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The Tribune
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00943
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: February 4, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:00943

Full Text







2 SURPRISE
TOYSIEVERY j J .
HAPPY MEAL o kinw.I
HIGH 83F
LOW 70F

&PARTLY
SUNNY


The


Tribune


Volume: 104 No.62 MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008 PRICE 750


Heal thimp ovements pPioPri


PM blames Opposition

for failing to prepare

for a National Health

Insurance programme


* By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
BEFORE a comprehensive
National Health Insurance pro-
gramme can be effectively intro-
duced in The Bahamas govern-
ment must first improve the
existing public health facilities,
notably the deteriorating
Princess Margaret Hospital,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said Sunday.
Mr Ingraham made this state-
ment while highlighting the fact
that the previous government
failed to make adequate prepa-
rationfor the introduction of
such a scheme before it was vot-
ed out of office in May, 2007.
He also accused the former
administration of politicizing
the scheme during its election
campaign in 2002.
"One day (NHI) will happen


in The Bahamas, unfortunately
for The Bahamas, my prede-
cessors in office marketed a pro-
gramme to the public and used
the words 'National Health'
(touting) 'everybody's going to
be covered' without doing ade-
quate work to cause that to hap-
pen."
Speaking from what he
promised to be a quarterly
forum with the press at the
British Colonial Hilton yester-
day, the nation's chief said gov-
ernment would reform health
care by first "substantially
improving" Princess Margaret
Hospital.
"We need to expand upon
and improve what we have -
we need more money we need
better facilities and the rest of it
- and the money can only
SEE page 12


'Growth rate of up to .

4 per cent possible' Ingraham keeps date with the media
* RUPERT MISSICK Jr Keeping the pledge made before his re- more open and forthcoming in dealing with forthcoming with what is essentially public
Chief Reporter election to office, Prime Minister Hubert the press. Journalists in New Providence business."
rmissick@tribunemedia.net Ingraham held the first for 2008 of what is took full advantage of the press event, ask- His comments came in response to
expected to be quarterly Meet the Press ing questions of the Prime Minister on top- question on when the government plans to
DESPITE a possible recession in the US and the current feeling conferences. ics ranging from crime to the economy to' enact a Freedom of Information Act.
of the analysts from Standard and Poor's, Prim Minister Hubert The Meet the Press event was held in the contemporary social events. The Prime Minister pointed out that th
ngham said tat hs government b elieves it is possible for the Victoria Room of the British Colonial Mr Ingraham expressed his expectation former Free National Movement adminis
Ingraham said that his government believes it is possible for th Hilton on Sunday. that during this term in office, his govern- tration drafted a Freedom of Informatio
Bahamas to experience a growth rate of between 3.5 to 4 per cent. Prime Minister Ingraham said he imple- ment would have helped to create a "cul- Bill. He affirmed that the government wi
With increasing job losses, a credit crunch and a slowing of wage mented the quarterly sessions to help to tural shift and change in the mindset of the deliver on its pledge to enact this piece c
cres,; ma ny er e ,on which the Bahamas e onoy encourage others in the public sector to be public sector of The Bahamas, to be more legislation during its current term in office
haivaeh relies- will o n nto a recesinn


y IavUt F Alie, wt n1 go X11oV an s recOOVIn.
For the first time in four years US employers terminated jobs en
masse which, for many analysts in North America, was a signal that
the US economy was teetering on the brink of an economic slump.
SEE page 13


c
a
o
e
s-
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II
of
t.


Concern over marina-condo
scheme 'grounded in fear'


* By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
CONCERNS by residents of
Hope Town, Abaco that Amer-
ican buyer Mark Mason is plan-
ning to develop a large-scale
marina and condominiums
without the town's approval are
grounded in "fear as opposed
to facts," Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said yester-
day.
The prime minister noted
that Mr Mason has not put for-
ward an official development
application to the government.
When, and if, such a proposal is
made, the matter will be heard
before the town's council, Mr


Ingraham said Sunday during a
media forum at the Hilton on
Bay Street.
As reported in The Tribune
previously, many in Hope Town
are incensed that Mr Mason, a
South Carolina lawyer, has
acquired such a significant piece
of land and are opposed to
reported plans to construct con-
dominiums and a marina.
When The Tribune ques-
tioned Mr Ingraham on these
fears, the prime minister sought
to clear up the matter.
"I'm really sorry that some
of the people of Hope Town
have reacted in the way they
have reacted, because I think
SEE page 13


Realize yur dreas with our help!
Realize your dreams with our help


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ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE'RE #1


BAHAMAS EDITION


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._._________


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008


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* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT The $4.9 billion
Gin sur Mer project at West End
is gaining "momentum" and has
recorded its highest ever sales in
January despite the downturn in
the US and UK real estate mar-
kets, according to investor Bobby
Ginn.
"We took about 28 contracts
on lots and that is the highest
month in sales since we started
the project (here), and February
looks equally as good," he said
on Thursday at West End.
Mr Ginn is very optimistic
about the project and is moving
forward with plans for the con-
struction of close to 400 units in
early summer.
"I would say we're on schedule
- I think we are probably a little
ahead of schedule and we decided
it was not large enough and we
added two more phases," he told
the media during a press confer-
ence following an extensive tour
of the site.
Putting all doubt to rest, Mr
Ginn has assured the public that
the company is very committed
to completing its project in West
End, and has put $160 million in
an escrow account for construc-
tion work which is currently
underway.
"We escrowed all the cash it
takes for the amount of work we
currently have under construc-
tion roads, golf courses, and
marina. We put $160 million cash
in an account to take any question
out of the minds of people of how
committed we are to the commu-
nity," he said.
So far, the Ginn Company has
invested $150 million on exten-
sive foundation and ground work,
preparing the site over the last
two years getting it to the
required elevation height of 10.5
feet.


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The next phase will involve
infrastructural development such
as roads, water and sewer sys-
tems, as well as installation of
'power and utility supply.
According to John Davies,
senior vice president overseeing
the project, 200 Bahamians are
already employed with the com-
pany. He said plans are to hire
an additional 200 persons during
the first phase of construction.
Mr Ginn is not too worried
about the real estate crunch in
the US. "We knew it was going to
happen and we forecasted it. It
happens every 10 years or so and
we went through one downturn,
but our attitude is, now is the time
to build."
He revealed that within the
next few days Ginn will announce
its first vertical product, which is
about 375 units, and will start pre-
sale of those units and construc-
tion in the summer.
The drop in the US and UK
markets has not driven Ginn,to
reduce its prices either, said Mr
Ginn.
"We sold several hundred
pieces of property out here for
several hundred millions dollars
worth of volume.
We really have not reacted to
the market; we have not reduced
prices as we felt that we were
below market and reasonably
priced already," he said.
Mr Ginn explained that there is
still a huge demand for the
Bahamas in terms ocean-front liv-
ing, golf, marina, dock, and beach
communities that almost does not
exist in the United States.
The Ginn Company has signed
a heads of agreement with gov-


ernment to construct on 2000
acres of land, a mega mixed used
resort and residential community
at West End, which will consist
of 4,400 condominium and hotel
units, centred around a 20-story
tower; 1,800 single family resi-
dential home sites; two signature
golf courses; two grand club hous-
es; mega-yacht marina with 380
slips; a 500 slip private boat dock;
a private airport and a Monte-
Carlo casino.
In addition to Gin sur Mer, the
company also acquired the Old
Bahama Bay Resort in West End
last December and is using it as a
hospitality centre.
"It gave us a big step forward
and we are in operation now...so
things are good for us we are
moving forward we feel the
momentum is rolling and will con-
tinue to roll."
"One of the things we are talk-
ing about is dropping one of the
names and come up with one
name so that everybody will
know it is one community and
one project, and that will be done
over the next few months," he
said.
Ginn said the company is work-
ing closely with the new FNM
government the prime minister
and his cabinet.
"We got a great working rela-
tionship with the government and
it has been one year and a half
of actually working in the
Bahamas and it has worked out
well," he said.
Mr Ginn expects the project to
be operational within the next
five years.


S '.
unw r -ranDAN r















Cable Beach
4 bed, 3 bath, central air,
security screens & bars,
furnished, alarm, swimming
pool, large yard,
$650,000.00
Phone 423-9866 / 327-7860






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$4.9 billion Gin




sur Mer project





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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


L AN


Honouring a Scottish 1


Here is Robert Burns'
poem "Address to a haggis':
Fair is your honest happy
face
Great chieftain of the
pudding .race
Above them all you take
your place
Stomach, tripe or guts
Well are you worthy of a
grace
As long as my arm
The groaning platter
there you fill
Your buttocks like a dis-
tant hill
Your skewer would help
to repair a mill
In time of need
While through your pores
the juices emerge
Like amber beads
His knife having seen
hard labour wipes
And cuts you up with
great skill
Digging into your gush-
ing insides bright
Like any ditch
And then oh what a glori-
ous sight
Warm steaming, rich
Then spoon for spoon
They stretch and strive
Devil take the last man,
on they drive .
Until all their well swollen
bellies
Are bent like drums
Then, the old gent most
likely to rift (burp)
be thanked, mumbles
Is there that over his
,French Ragout
Or olio that would sicken
a pig
Or fricassee would make
*her vomit
With perfect disgust
Looks down with a sneer-
ing scornful opinion
On such a dinner
Poor devil, see him over
his trash
As week as a withered
rush (reed)
His spindle-shank a good
Swhiplash
SHis clenched fist.the size
of'a nut.
Through a bloody flood
and battle field to dash
Oh how unfit
But take note of the
strong haggis fed Scot
The trembling earth
resounds his tread
Clasped in his large fist a
blade
He'll make it whistle
And legs and arms and
heads he will cut off
Like the tops of thistles
You powers who make
mankind your care
IAnd dish them out their
meals
Old Scotland wants no
watery food
That splashes in,dishes
But if you wish her grate-
ful prayer
Give her a haggis!


Police report

quiet weekend

POLICEI had no major mat-
leis to epot i this weekend.
*'W, believe," said Asst. Supt
W,;,Jlti Evans, press liaison offi-
cer. "ihat this was due to the
w.ay in which people behaved
aii'i ;1a pi;ctivic crime fighting
i;ti~.egv implemented to

It w s reported that some-
iic I,:core 9 o'clock Friday
ni. r.ing, officers from Central
P',ic ;,tatin,( acting on a tip
went to the area of Market
Sree't and Andros Avenue
wlicre a shotgun had been
found. They recovered the
weapon. No arrests were made.
A1n1unition Arrest
A Tropical Gardens resident
was arrested when, on a search
being made of the 28-year-old
man's bag on his arrival at Lyn-
. den Pindling International Air-
port, seven live rounds of
ammunition for a .40 handgun
was found. Also one live round
of .40 ammunition was found in
his shoe. The discovery was
made at the airport shortly
hclore 1pm on Saturday.


* BY XAN-XI BETHEL

THE Bahamas is a diverse
"country with influences from
almost all of the world's major
cultures.
This country is home to peo-
ple with origins far removed
from these small islands in the
Americas. The British, Africans,
Indians; and Scots are just a few
who are represented here and
they bring their customs, and
beliefs to the intricate pot pour-
ri that we call home.
The Scottish Bahamian Soci-
ety celebrated "Burns Night"
last weekend at St. Andrews
Presbyterian Kirk, Princess
Street.
"Burns Night" or "Burns
Supper" is celebrated by mil-
lions of Scots worldwide in hon-
our of one of Scotland's most
outstanding son poet Robert
(Rabbie) Burns. Burns' Suppers
have been held by Scots for the
past 200 years. The tradition
was started by friends of Burns
in celebration of his life and
work. Characteristic of these
suppers was the playing of tra-
ditional Scottish music, the eat-
ing of Scottish food, most
notably Haggis, the drinking of
strong Scotch whiskey and the
sharing of Burns' most recog-
nized poetry. Burns Night is
now effectively a second nation-
al day, and is celebrated on or
about January 25. It is more
widely observed than the offi-
cial national day, Saint
Andrew's Day.
Robert Burns is also known
as Rabble Burns, Scotland's
favourite son, the Ploughman
Poet, the Bard of Ayrshire and
in Scotland as simply The Bard.
He was born Robert Burness
on January 25, 1759 and died
July 21, 1796 at the age of 37.
He was the eldest of seven chil-
dren and received little formal
education being primarily
educated at home by his father,
William Burness. Farming was
the family business and Robert
Burns lived a difficult life in his
early years.
Burns was also known for his
colourful love life. In many
instances, his poetry was
inspired by his female compan-


Scots, Bahamians and Britons dress up in

traditional kilts to celebrate 'Burns Night'

.... *


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ions and a number of his poems
are named for them as well.
Nelly Kilpatrick was working
with Burns at Mount Oliphant,
the farm on which his family
had taken tenancy. She inspired
his first attempt at poetry which
he wrote at the age of 15. 0,
Once I Lov'd A Bonnie Lass
was the poetic result of his
admiration. In the summer of
1775 he was sent to finish his
education with a tutor, where
he met Peggy Thomson, to
whom he wrote two songs, Now
Westlin' Winds and I Dream 'd I
Lay. Over the course of his life.
he had a number of other rela-
tionships and produced a large
body of work stemming from
his romantic associations.
Both a poet and a lyricist, his
work is recognized and cele-
brated by Scots and non-Scots.
Poems and songs of Burns that
remain well-known across the
world today include A Red, Red
Rose. A Man's A Man for A'
That, To a Louse, To a Mouse,
The Battle of Sherramnir, and
Ae Fond Kiss.
The startling universality of
Burns' poetry is due to the raw
beauty and stark truth that is


characteristic of his work. He
is perhaps the most studied poet
in Europe after William Shake-
speare. He is also regarded as a
pioneer of the Romantic move-
ment, helping to usher in one
of the most important eras in
literary history. Apart from
being a writer of love poems,
Robert Burns was a satirist and
his poems express harsh com-
mentary on many of the issues
of his times. Because of this he
became an important source of
inspiration to the founders of
both liberalism and socialism.
The most interesting thing
about Burns is that through his
work, he was able to influence
people on both ends of the
spectrum. He is highly respect-
ed by radicals and conservatives
alike. Democrats and socialists,
high society and the common
man were all enamored of
Burns' work. His themes includ-
ed republicanism, radicalism,
Scottish patriotism, class
inequalities, gender roles, com-
mentary on the Scottish Kirk of
his time, Scottish cultural iden-
tity, poverty, sexuality, and even
the beneficial aspects of popular
socialising such as carousing,


a S 55lll~~llllll


"As long as

Robert Burns'

work and

memory lives

on, so will the

celebration of

his life

continue."


drinking Scotch whisky, and
folk songs. "It was this unique
ability to appeal to all strands of
political opinion in the country
that led him to be widely
acclaimed as the national poet."
The international significance
of Robert Burs, his life and his
poetry, is evident in the num-
ber of things that have been
done in his honour. There are
many organizations around the
world named after Burns, as
well as a large number of stat-
ues and memorials in places far
removed from his native Scot-
land. The British Royal Mail
even issued two stamps in hon-
our of Robert Burns. All of
these stand as a testament to
his literary genius.
The Scottish Bahamian Soci-
ety is a group of Scottish
natives, descendants, and inter-
ested non Scots who live in the
Bahamas.
Every year, following the tra-
dition of 200 yehrs, this society
plans a Burns Supper. The
Burns Supper of 2008 was, as
usual, a highly anticipated affair.
Scots, Bahamians, the British,
and a host of others dressed in
traditional kilts, gathered in the
hall of St. Andrew's Presbyter-
ian Kirk to drink whiskey, eat
haggis, laugh, and share Bums'
work.
The welcome was given by
Tom Duff, High Chieftan of the
Scottish Bahamian Society, fol-
lowed by the Selkirk Grace.
The Selkirk Grace, is a grace
(prayer said before a meal)


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legend

attributed to Robert Burns.
This grace is traditionally
said on the special occasion of a
Burns Supper. Following the
grace was the Parade of the
Haggis. Haggis is a traditional
Scottish dish. There are many
recipes, most of which have in
common the following ingredi-
ents: a sheep's heart, liver and
lungs, minced with onion, oat-
meal, suet, spices, and salt,
mixed with stock, and tradi-
tionally boiled in the sheep's
stomach for approximately
three hours. Most modern hag-
gis outside of Scotland is pre-
pared in a casing rather than in
an actual stomach. The haggis
was brought in and paraded to
the music of a piper (Rob
Latimer) as is traditional at
Burns suppers. After the
address, The Immortal Memory
was read. This is a tribute to the
life and work of Robert Burns
and was followed by a toast to
him.
Following that immortal
memory were the hilarious
poems, "The Toast to the
Lassies", read by Brian Moodie
and "Response of Behalf o' the
Lassies" read by Fiona Moodie.
Both of these were read in light
Scottish dialect. The night was
rounded out with the singing of
Aud Lang Syne a poem and
song by Burns.
The meal was traditional
Scottish and included an appe-
tizer: 'Cock a Leekie Soup', the
main course, Haggis, served
with 'Champit Tatties' (mashed
potatoes), and 'Bashit Neeps
(turnips) and dessert, 'Typsy
Laird Trifle' which was a kind
of fruit cocktail topped with
whipped cream. The last to be
served was the 'Bannocks an'
Cheese,' a fruit, dish served with
different kinds of cheeses and
oat crackers.
Burns Supper will continue -
to be a fixture in the lives of
Scots worldwide. "As long as
Robert Burns' work and mem-
ory lives on, so will the celebra-
tion of his life continue," said
a Burns Supper guest. "This is
a major cultural event and is
important to the history and cul-
ture of Scotland." This is an
event that also serves to unite
Scots in the Bahamas and
expose other Bahamians to 'for-
eign' cultures.
To learn more about Robert
Burns, you can access the web
site; www.robertburns.org. To
become involved in the Scot-
tish Bahamian Society, you can
e-mail them at scottishbahanmi-
ansociety@yahoo.com.


IDe oration









PAGE 4, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


EDITORI *AULE -RS TO THE EDITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
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Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


Tribune backs no tolerance programme


IN THIS column on January 30 we discussed
the root cause of most of our problems in this
society an indisciplined people. The conse-
quences of this indiscipline starts in the home,
continues in the school and often ends in a
prison cell.
We applauded all schools that have now
drawn a line in the sand and announced that
they have introduced a "no tolerance" pro-
gramme with regard to school rules- no matter
how simple those rules, even down to a girl's
hemline and a boy's haircut.
One would have thought that parents would
have applauded the move. But, no, many par-
ents are the problem. The only thing that will
bring them to their senses is if they are made
responsible for their underage children's mis-
behaviour. Any parent who threatens a teacher
should be brought before the courts. Not only
do schools have to have zero tolerance for the
students, but they will also have to have zero tol-
erance for the parents. Parents who do not
accept school rules should take their children
elsewhere. In other words the rules should not
be bent to accommodate them, no matter who
they are.
In Friday's Tribune an RM Bailey English
teacher described the complaints of some par-
ents as "pathetic' ..
She defended the school's zero tolerance
decision as necessary if students want to learn
and become.productive members of society.
It takes discipline and determination to stick
to the books. And unless they stay with their
books during these years and get their minds off
the fashion conscience short hemline and weird
hairstyles, today's students will end up among
the 80 per cent graduating illiterates who
showed up on a survey done last year by the
Coalition for Education Reform.
We believe strongly in separating the sexes in
the primary and secondary grades. These are the
years when boys and girls are more interested in
making themselves attractive to each other than
preparing themselves to live productive lives
in their community.
There is plenty of time for physical preening,
after they have achieved respectable BGCSE
scores. Surveys have shown that students do
better when one sex is not trying to impress
the other in the classroom. Boys, in particular,
do better and have less complexes if they do not
have to go up against a student of the opposite
sex who often outshines them.
This is something that should be given seri-
ous consideration. Reasons for many of the
campus fights might also be removed if we have
one school for boys, the other for girls.
The teacher said that despite the negative


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remarks of some parents, RM Bailey's 80-mem-
ber staff have no thoughts of backing down.
"We are calling on all heads of churches, par-
ents and the entire community to assist in the
correct discipline of our young people," she
said. "We are not going to allow anyone to
cause us to bend or lower our standards."
The Tribune is 100 per cent behind the RM
Bailey headmaster and staff.
"We were of the opinion," said the teacher,
"that it is a known fact that our youth is out of
hand and desperately needs to be taught to
respect authority and walk the line. Instead of
being greeted by praises, regrettably there are
factions of this society who do not support this
initiative. And then we wonder why the crime
rate is escalating daily!"
Parents who undermine the teacher's author-
ity in front of their children do great harm.
They have no reason to complain when these
same young people end up in the hands of the
law. The defiant attitude to authority of some
parents can be considered as having assisted in
their child's destruction.
Also serious consideration should be given to
not allowing any student to graduate or attend
a prom unless they have made decent grades
and qualified for graduation.
What goes on at these ridiculous and tasteless
proms makes a mockery of education. We
understand that because of the behaviour of
the students and their followers, some hotels are
turning down prom-night business.
Here again parents are at fault. They will
put themselves in the poor house to borrow
money to cater to their child's desire to be the
best dressed at the prom. And, of course, their
flamboyant arrival one even by helicopter -
is obscene.
Imagine getting a certificate for failure. No
wonder employers can't understand these young
people who join their staff and expect hefty
salaries for non-production.
And, because the new employee, who as a
student was accustomed to his parent indulging
his every failure now feels justified in yammer-
ing to his union because he can't understand
why he can't continue to coast through life with
minimum effort.
If we are to turn this society around and
produce young people with ambition and a
decent work ethic, then parents and unions also
will have to join the zero tolerance programme.
If they don't, then the police will certainly
enforce it for those unfortunate ones who fall
through the cracks and transgress the law.


Changes to




the Bahamas




bring tears




to my eyes


EDITOR, The Tribune.
I AM of the time that remem-
bers July 10th, 1973 when the
Union Jack was taken down for
the final time and the resilient
gold, aqua marine and black
Independent Bahamas flag flut-
tered over Clifford Park.
I recall the silence when the
union flag was taken down -
amongst those 15,000 odd you
could hear a needle drop but
what a roar from those proud
Bahamians when the soft
breeze caught and finally
opened that new proud flag of
The Bahamas.
I remember wondering
whether and how we would
fare? May I test all my fellow
Bahamian's conscience as to
whether we uphold those
mighty words scribed that form
our national anthem.
Lift up your head to the rising
sun, Bahamaland....
Do we or can we lift our
heads up high? 80 murders in
2007. Everywhere is filthy.
March on to glory, your bright
banners waving high....
We are so fragmented we no
longer can march unless in
opposite directions and we
seem hell-bent to continue this
all to say we support political
Party 'A' or 'B'.


See how the world marks the
manner of your bearing;
Yes, we have the highest
murder rate per capital and No.
2 per capital in HIV/AIDS cases
and probably the highest single
mother birthing rate. Crimes
seems to pay here nowadays as
long as you are never caught.
We no longer respect life.
Pledge to excel thro' love and
unity......
We no longer excel, no longer
love and even unity that's also
gone.
Pressing onward, march
together, to a common loftier
goal;
We are going backwards,
totally disjointed and the goal is
more like the jail!
Steady sunward tho' the
weather hide the wide and4
treacherous shoal....
Everywhere is treacherous
today, everywhere' is unsafe
even Bay Street and children
and 80-year-old ladies are being
raped!
.Lift up your head to the rising
sun, Bahamaland....


We had better bow our heads
in shame as we make a mockery
of this anthem.
'Til the road you've trod lead
unto your God, march on
Bahamaland.
Yes we have trodden on
everything good, family, envi-
ronment, beaches, coral reefs,
law and order and we honestly
don't any longer care of
Bahamaland, and I suspect also
many, God.
Editor: When will we see our
mistakes? Just how much more?
My prayer every morning and
night is for this land and our
people to finally realise that pol-
itics, money will never give us
spiritual redemption God
does not redeem points for
owning a Mercedes or a
$1,000,000 home and boat or
for being one big-shot politi-
cian! I honestly believe today
we are worse off as a people
than we were on that proud day
for us all when we were one,
we had things to be proud of
on July 10th, 1973, yes we have
a lot of material things, mind
you very quickly depreciating
to nothing.....this all brings tears
to my eyes.
P MURPHY
Nassau,
January 25th, 2008.


God bless the Spanish--Wells cornmuniy


EDITOR, The Tribune.
Please publish this letter sent
to me for the community of
Spanish Wells from Customs
Officer Nathan Butler.
Abner Pinder, Chief Council-
lor.
Spanish Wells.
I TRUST that you and the
residents of Spanish Wells have
experienced a joyous and Christ
filled Christmas. Please accept
and extend my personal well
wishes to the Spanish Wells
community. It is also my hope
that the community will experi-
ence a God blessed, purpose-
driven and dream- fulfilling
New Year.
Spanish Wells you have made
my two and a half years deploy-
ment in your community a won-
derful and delightful experience.
Admittedly, the work as a cus-
toms officer was occasionally
challenging and exhausting, but
I often found comfort and
encouragement in your kind


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seeks qualified persons for the following position:

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in The Bahamas.

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business management

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/ Proficiency in time management, planning and
organizing

/ Computer literate

/ Self-motivated team player

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Candidates should possess a reliable motor vehicle, be
willing to travel to the family islands, to the U.S., and other
foreign countries.

Please send application letter and resume
by February 6th, 2008 to:
MEDICAL REP
P.O. Box N-7504
Nassau, Bahamas
or Fax: 393-0440
We thank all applicants for their interest, however;
only short-listed candidates will be contacted.


words and warm smiles. Thank
you, for your full'cooperation,
opened arms and acts of kind-
ness; they have truly impacted
and enriched my life in many
ways. I am definitely grateful
and shall forever owe a debt of
gratitude to the entire commu-
nity for refining character and
leadership within me.
Additionally, I will always
have warmhearted and fond
memories of Spanish Wells for
the quality of life you lead. This
quality is measured by your
industrious spirit that propels a
vibrant and robust economy,
while preserving strong family
values, and an exquisite and
lovely environment. I frequent-
ly refer to Spanish Wells as a
model community whose blue-
print should be emulated by
the wider Bahamian society.
I also take this opportunity
to extend my admiration and
commendation to the distin-
guish church, business and civic
leaders for the tremendous


unsdf1h'service and leadership
you give to the Spanish Wells'
community. You have also con-
tributed greatly to my pleasur-
able experience. To the wider
Spanish Wells Community,
thank you for receiving and
respecting me as a government
professional as well as your son,
brother and friend. There will
always be a place in my heart
for you. Finally, I cannot for-
get or thank you sufficiently for
hosting and supporting a com-
munity farewell celebration in
my honour, it was indeed a
delightful and enjoyable
evening. My family was blown
away by your hospitality and
joins me in extending thanks to
you for all you have done.
May God continue to bounti-
fully bless the Spanish Wells
Community.
NATHAN BUTLER
Customs Officer
Nassau,
December 27, 2007.
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THEAL TNU0


o In brief


Colombian

rebels say

they will free

three ailing

hostages


M BOGOTA, Colombia
Leftist rebels have
announced that they will free
three politicians suffering
health problems after being
held hostage since 2001, a
Colombian radio network
reported yesterday, according
to Associated Press.
Caracol Radio said that it
had received an e-mail from
the Revolutionary Armed
Forces of Colombia, or
FARC, announcing the rebels
will release political leader
Gloria Polanco, former Sen.
Luis Eladio Perez and ex-con-
gressman Orlando Beltran.
The e-mail did not say when
they would be released.
The authenticity e-mail
could not immediately be con-
firmed,' but. the 'FARC,'have-
maue previous announce-
m6nts about hostages through
the media.
The FARC said that it
would like to free the hostages
in Colombian territory to
Venezuelan President Hugo
Chavez or a delegate chosen
by him. The e-mail said it
would release the three "given
their state of health," but did
not provide details on their
conditions.
In the statement, dated Jan.
31, the rebels said that they
would free the hostages
because of Chavez's work last
year in trying to mediate a
deal between the FARC and
the Colombian government
that would swap dozens of
hostages for hundreds of
imprisoned rebels.
"These liberations are a
direct consequence of the real-
istic, complete and transpar-
ent effort by President Chavez
and other friendly govern-
ments in the search for a polit-
ical solution to this humani-
tarian crisis." the statement
said.
However, the Colombian
government has rescinded
Chavez's role as a mediator,
accusing him of going behind
President Alvaro Uribe's back
and directly contacting
Colombia's top generals.
The FARC is in its fifth
decade of trying to overthrow
Colombia's central govern-
ment. The rebels, Latin Amer-
ica's largest guerrilla army, use
kidnapping to raise funds and
pressure the state.


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Helping young Grand Bahama




drivers find the road to safety


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT In an effort
to reduce road accidents and
fatalities on Grand Bahama,
the Grand Bahama Road
Safety Committee and the
Road Traffic Department
announced plans for a road
safety youth symposium for
young drivers.
According to the commit-
tee, this is the first time that
such a symposium is being
held on the island for high
school students at the Foster B
Pestaina Hall on February 7.
J R Frazier, chairman of the
GBRSC, said that a number
of road safety initiatives are
also in the pipeline, including
the establishment of a driver's
range; driver's education high
school; aggressive campaign
against drunk driving, and a
World Day of Remembrance
for traffic accident victims.
He said the committee will
also continue its billboard
erection, distribution of
dumper stickers, public ser-
vice announcements, defen-
sive driving programme, and
the naming of a courtesy dri-
ver of the month.
Mr Frazier explained that
the purpose of the symposium
is to educate young drivers of
the importance of road safety.


* By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedla.net
THE NUMBER of contes-
tants for the chairmanship of
the PLP has increased to four,
as Elcott Coleby, 45, has
entered the race which is set for
later this month at the party's
national convention.
In his platform released yes-
terday, Mr Coleby officially
declared his intention to com-
pete for the PLP chairmanship.
In making the decision to enter
the race, Mr Coleby, a busi-
nessman who is a 23-year vet-
eran.in the petroleum industry,
will run against Glenys Hanna-
Martin, PLP newcomer Omar
Archer and Keod Smith, who
has all but declared his inten-
tion to run for the post.
"In a free modern democrat-
ic society, it is the responsibility
of every citizen to assist in the
development and maintenance
of democracy," said Mr Cole-
by in his statement. "Therefore,
I offer myself for service to this
great Progressive Liberal Par-
ty, in the capacity of chairman,
as a demonstration of this com-
mitment.".
Mr Coleby, a member of the
PLP's rapid response commit-
tee, has recently increased his
public profile by addressing
issues on behalf of his party
through media appearances, on
talk radio programmes, and as a
regular letter writer to the daily
newspapers.
In addressing the issue of par-
ty unity, Mr Coleby argues that
a party chairman must be a
"facilitator" between the vari-
ous factions within the organi-
zation to advance the interests
of the body as a whole.
"The offices of the leader,
chairman, parliamentary cau-
cus, national general council
and the political committee
must always speak with one
voice," said Mr Coleby. "The
chairman must.function as facil-
itator of this vital process. Dis-
unity, real or imagined, provides
an opportunity for our detrac-
tors to divide and conquer us
by weakening the resolve of our
supporters. Visible leadership
must be the principle driver of
the party's business at the con-
stituency level."
In outlining some of his poli-
,cy objectives, Mr Coleby said
the PLP should enshrine the
post of national training officer
in its constitution, while vice
chairs should be both function-
ally and geographically aligned
with the objectives of the
national leadership council and
the party's political committee.
He further, suggested that
vice chairs of the party and the
National Progressive Institute
.(NPI) a party think-tank of
young professionals should


Plans for symposium in bid to


cut accidents and fatalities


The theme is, "Embracing
today's Opportunities for a
Safer Tomorrow."
"This symposium seeks to
target the next generation of
drivers by engaging them in
productive discussions regard-
ing road safety. And we also
expect that participants will
exchange ideas regarding road
safety strategies that appeal
to young people," he said.
Stephanie Rahming, assis-
tant comptroller for Road
Traffic, said that two students
from the 11th and 12th grades
at the various high schools are
invited to participate in the
symposium.
Some of the topics that will
be discussed are the types of
insurance policies available to
teenage drivers, factors that
contribute to accidents, as well
as a one-on-one discussion
with a crash victim survivor,
among other things.
Ms Rahming said: "We look
forward to full participation
from high schools and we
hope the information shared
will contribute to better road
safety practices by road users
who are about to turn 17 or
are 17 years old.


both form a body called the
"Centre of Focus" that would
be charged with the responsi-
bilities of rolling out and imple-
menting all party policies,
processes and initiatives.
"It is understood that the NPI
represents the future leadership
of the PLP, therefore the skills,
knowledge, and abilities of its
members must be maximized in
offering operational support at
every level within the organi-
zation," he said. "When cou-
pled with their present role of
policy advice, I can think of no
better way to prepare the NPI
for future leadership in this
great party. As chairman, I will
take ownership of and personal
responsibility for designing this
system that will prepare the
future leadership of the PLP.
These future leaders will be the
face of the PLP and I make this
commitment with the convic-
tion that if the development of
these future leaders is imped-
ed, the party does so at its own
peril."
Thus far, sources within the
party inform The Tribune that
Mrs Hanna-Martin, who is fully
backed by Obie Wilchcombe,
is the frontrunner for the PLP
chairmanship. It is also under-
stood among party insiders that
she is not the choice of the
Christie faction of the party for
the post.
Thus far, party leader Perry
Christie has not publicly
endorsed any of the contestants
for the chairmanship. If he does,
however, it is expected that that
person will be a formidable
opponent to Mrs Hanna-Mar-
tin.
The race for the PLP chair-
manship and the deputy lead-



II L S IC


"We want to give them
information and we expect
they would share it with their
peers," she said.
Ms Rahming reported that
11 persons between the ages
of six and 65 died on the
streets last year on Grand
Bahama.
"Accidents on a whole are a
concern for RSC and the RT
department. But, of the 11
fatalities last year a number
of persons were very young
male drivers ages 20 and 21
years old.
"I remember, in 2005, we
had 23 and I believe that traf-
fic accidents and fatalities are
preventable. So we are hop-
ing that the information we
impart to young road users
will eliminate and reduce
those numbers.
"We need to get the mes-
sage out to young persons and
we believe the youth sympo-
sium will do just that," said
Ms Rahming
Ms Rahming said the
Comptroller for Road Traffic
is expected to give insight on
legislation that the department
hopes to implement to make
roads safe.


win both posts, one source said
that "it would just be a matter
of time before Mr Christie is
compelled to step down as
leader."


She said that it is hoped that
the Minister of Transport and
Aviation will attend the sym-
posium. Registration will start
at 9am and opening will be
held at 10am.
The members of the
GBRSC are J R Frazier,
Stephanie Rahming, Dave
Parker of GB Power Compa-
ny, Bertram Pinder, Valentine
Knowles, and Mr Sam Rigby
and ASP Reckley.


"We need to
get the
message out to
young persons
and we believe
the youth
symposium
will do just
that."

Stepanie Rahming


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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


Number of contestant for PL

0~C~S Ys I~~Y [1(











CAT ISLAND




Broaden our base, check out the boot


* By Sylvia Laramore-
Crawford

W hat is Cat Island
doing to broaden
its base and its boots! It is said
that it is the cultural bedrock
of the Bahamas. It is mystical.
Some will tell you that it is
unique and its people are
extremely friendly. It is no
question that it can boast of
having some of the most beau-
tiful beaches in The Bahamas.
It is the island with that spe-
cial appeal that keeps tourists
returning year after year.
Apparently all the resorts
are doing a good job in mak-
ing sure people enjoy their
stay.
At New Bight Airport, a
tourist about to board Cat


"Our young people need help
and they need it now."


Island Air, talking about the
super vacation he had and
how much he and his wife
enjoyed his stay in Cat Island,
was overheard saying that he
hated to leave.
He added that Cat Island
was the best place he and his


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wife had ever visited. Cat
Island has so much more to
offer. It has a base which has
to be broadened and a boot
that is time to change.
How do we broaden that
base? What could we do to fill
the boot? Tell the world about
Cat Island as it really is.
Tell them about its serenity,
tell them it is the island for
family gatherings, beach pic-
nics.
Tell them it is where people
fall in love and get married.
Tell them that it is a safe place
to visit and where one could
find the highest hill in the
Bahamas.
Tell them they could run or
walk on the highway like Pam
Armbrister who takes part in
United States marathons.
Tell them it's the island of
story telling, poetry readings, a
rich heritage, held in the
month of October, the Rake
and Scrape in June, a home-
coming, and in August the
Sailing Regatta.
Breathe the fresh air explor-
ing places of interest. Eat
coco plums when in season.
Perhaps you would like to
try your hand at bonefishing.
Of course, you and your group
may sit under a casuarina tree
to watch the sunset.
How about scuba diving?
That could be fun. There are
:boat rentals, canoes and
kayaks, ride bikes, or play
paddle tennis, and you cannot


TRADITION: A traditional straw bag made from locally-sourced Cat Island palm. Venturing into the bush to find
their materials, women cut down, cure and strip the palm fronds before plaiting begins.


I -m s1- .- .. I
THE GOOD LIFE: Bahamian owner of Sammy T's resort and restaurant,
Sammy, pours some wine for his guests. The bar and dining room is taste-
fully adorned with original Bahamian artwork.


come to Cat Island and not
visit one of our beautiful
churches.
Cat Island consists of thirty-
one settlements. Each has its
own uniqueness. Knock on


any door, and you will be wel-
comed.
Both my late husband,
Richard Crawford, and I often
talked about what a difference
it would make if Cat Island


could only have a technical
and vocational school with
dormitories, where its students
could attend along with others
from nearby islands to live and
learn a trade of their liking.
Cat Islanders would no longer
have to travel to Nassau to
live with relatives who cannot.
afford to board them properly.
It is past time the people of
Cat Island wake up to reality,
and realise that their voices
must be heard.
Our young people need
help and they need it now.
They have no one to speak for
them. It is past time they wake
up, or they will grow up being
poor and miserable.
Most of our builders have
not been trained for house
building, and houses are nev-
er properly completed; and
because of lack of fresh sand,
beach sand is used causing
early cracks in a building.
Our young people must be
trained to work properly or
they will be left behind.
They will find outsiders
coming in to do work that
should be done by them. If
they don't educate themselves,
investors will be forced to
bring outsiders in. Cat Island
needs real workmen, not
hackers.
Let's be smart and broaden
our base,.and check out the
boot.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008


11


I Ili








THE T R I B U N E M ~ ~~ON DY ,FERURY4,00,WAGS


0 In brief

Seminar to

include

lectures on

economy, law

and banking
A well qualified line-up of
professionals is set for Bahamas
Agricultural and Industrial Cor-
poration's Grand Bahama busi-
ness seminar scheduled for Feb-
ruary 26 at 6pm at the new
Teachers and Salaried Workers
Building, West Atlantic Drive,
Freeport.
Held over three consecutive
evenings, the seminar will
include lectures on the econo-
my, law, and banking as they
relate to the promotion of small
and medium size businesses.
BAIC is the government
agency mandated to promote
and encourage entrepreneur-
ship among Bahamians.
"Through this seminar we
hope to provide participants
with a forum for attaining
knowledge on starting, running
and improving a business," said
BAIC's northern region assis-
tant general manager H. Rudy
Sawyer'
"A goal of the seminar is that
participants will successfully
start new, or improve existing
businesses with the information
attained.
"Through this course, BAIC
is fulfilling its mandate to build
better business people and busi-
nesses in the Bahamian econo-
my, thus improving employ-
ment.
"We want to encourage that
entrepreneurial spirit among
Bahamians."
The seminar will take note of
Grand Bahama's declining
tourism'figures; its faltering
economy; and a need to boost
entrepreneurship on the island,
Mr Sawyer said.
Topics to be discussed include
development of business plans;
funding; record keeping; legal
protection; insurance; e-com-
merce and customer value.
There also will be presenta-
tions from active businessper-
sons 6on eir real business expe-
riences.
"A well qualified line-up of
professionals in their fields has
been confirmed to present on
the seminar topics each night,"
said Mr Sawyer.
Participants may register at
BAIC's office in the National
Insurance Building, downtown
Freeport.

Cat Island

restaurant

robbery
A robbery took place in Old
Bight, Cat Island at the Pilot
Harbour Restaurant and Bar
owned by Capt Albert Rolle of
Cat Island Air. Entry was made
through a window. Up to a few
days ago, the culprits have not
yet been found. Police are
investigating the matter.
Anglicans held their annual
general meeting at St Peter's
in Knowles yesterday when
events were planned for the rest
of the year.
Wednesday, February 6, is
Ash Wednesday.
For bus transportation to the
various services, Fr Chester
Burton or Fr Edward Seymour
is to be contacted.
Residents of Old Bight, Cat
Island are mourning the death
of senior citizen Atril Rolle.
And yesterday, Senior
Administrator Mr Charles King
paid a visit to his wife, Mrs
Winifred Rolle, and family. He
was accompanied by Sylvia
Laramore-Crawford.


Minister highlights cultural role of



community parks in the Bahamas


Community parks have
always played a role in
Bahamian social and cultural
development, especially when
one considers the role it
played in the establishment of
Junkanoo and musical groups,
Minister of State for Culture
Charles Maynard said in a
recent address.
"Community bands could
be developed as a result of the
park acting as a centre of
activity," Minister Maynard
noted. "Cultural expressions,
such as Junkanoo groups, usu-
ally sprung out of this kind of
socialisation; so the prospects
are good for the further
growth and development of
culture in new communities."
In its manifesto, the gov-
ernment pledged to imple-
ment a programme of expan-
sion and upgrade of neigh-
bourhood parks.
Minister Maynard pointed
out that when people usually
think of community parks,
they think of larger events and
festivals aimed towards revel-
ry. However, he said, when
you have growing areas and
new subdivisions, the whole
concept of the community
park is important to those res-
idents for different reasons.
"It gives them a chance to
get to know each other and
learn how to work together,"
he said.
The Culture Minister used
as examples the parks being
developed in Bricknock, Misty
Gardens and Carol Manor
and Carol Cove Subdivisions.
He said that such parks are in
relatively new subdivisions
with "sizeable" populations.
Once those parks are devel-
oped, it is hoped that various
community programmes are
developed as a way to bring
them together and create tra-
ditions.
"Just because they are not
in the city does not mean that
we cannot have that same
spirit of togetherness, unity
and cultural uniqueness that
some of the inner-city com-
munities enjoy," Minister
Maynard said.
Minister Maynard noted
that with all the social prob-
lems currently facing the
country, it is important for cit-
izens to "learn how to be each


"Community
bands could
be developed
as a result of
the park
acting as a
centre of
activity."

Charles Maynard

other's neighbour" and appre-
ciate each other's traditions
and enjoy being Bahamian.
"We hope to be the pilot
programme for what can hap-
pen throughout the nation,"
he said referring the parks in
the area. Minister Maynard
added that even though most
community parks are usually
funded by the $100,000
allowance given to each con-
stituency, private sector spon-
sorship should be encouraged
in order to ensure their devel-
opment and maintenance"in
as many communities as pos-
sible.
"We are hoping that further
development can be aided by
various corporate partners,
both in the communities and
nationally, because a more
peaceful, united community is
a safer community," he said.


MINISTER OF STATE FOR CULTURE Charles,Maynard recently checked
on equipment that will go into the community park being developed in Bric-
knock Subdivision. He said that community parks have always played a role
in Bahamian social and cultural development, especially when one con-
siders the role it played in the establishment of Junkanoo and musical
groups.


MINISTER OF STATE FOR CUL-
TURE Charles Maynard speaking
recently about the importance of
community parks at the site of the
Bricknock Subdivision in Golden
Isles. It is one of three parks being
developed in three subdivisions in
that area of New Providence.










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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008, PAGE 7


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PAGE 8, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008













Earnestine Moxyz




among women to




be honoured by




Trumpet Awards




Foundation


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008, PAGE 9


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Awards celebrations held in
Atlanta, Georgia, January 10-
13, marked a special one for the
Bahamas as one of its own,
Earnestine D Moxyz was hon-
oured during its second annual
"High Heels In High Places"
award ceremony.
Moxyz was one of 30 women
from the Caribbean and North
America honoured during the
special ceremony held on Janu-
ary 12 at the Hyatt Regency
Ballroom and was co-sponsored
by the Bahamas Ministry of
Tourism.
One of numerous events cul-
minating with the Trumpet
Awards, "High Heels In High
Places" honours women who
have not only excelled in their
field in the corporate world or
their respected professions but
have maintained a conscious
role within the community in
which they live.
A veteran in the hospitality
industry, Moxyz serves as the
Communications Manager for
the Westin and Sheraton Grand
Bahama Island Our Lucaya
Resort and a Property Service
Culture Trainer for Sheraton
and Westin brands for Star-
wood Hotels and Resorts
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lic relations unit inclusive of
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and television broadcasts, pho-
to and film shoots and serves
as its spokesperson.
Rising from humble begin-
nings, she was the first person in
her family to attend college and
worked tirelessly and diligently
on her academic pursuits, where
she achieved four degrees all
with honours, while working full
time. Among them are an Asso-
ciates of Arts degree in Com-
puter Business Administration
and Management from Prospect
Hall College, Bachelors of Arts
Degree in Broadcasting and
Television'Production from the
University of the District of
Columbia, a Master's of Busi-
ness Administration from Nova
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Human Resources Specialised
degree also from Nova.
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excellence and passionate
toward the cause, this young
Bahamian professional and for-
mer director of the Chamber of
Commerce is making her mark
and presence felt in the Grand
Bahama community in which
she lives. Working closely with
other industry professionals, she
has been instrumental in height-
ening the awareness of the des-
tination nationally, and the eco-
nomic importance of tourism,
the Bahamas' number one


industry has to the investor and
inhabitants.
Prior to her current position,
she spent eleven years as a mar-
keter and senior public relations
executive with the Bahamas
Ministry of Tourism in New
York, Washington, DC, and
Nassau and an instructor with
the Bahamas Baptist College.
The former television host, who
has interviewed countless
celebrities and government and
civic leaders, including Sir Sid-
ney Poitier, Rosa Parks, Lou
Rawls, Tramaine Hopkins,
among many others also
worked with CNN in Washing-
ton, DC and the Broadcasting
Corporation of the Bahamas in
Nassau.
Well travelled, the former
Miss Bahamas Wonderland
served as a goodwill ambas-
sador for the Bahamas and has
represented her country in Chi-
na, the Caribbean and through-
out the United States of Amer-
ica.
In her upward mobility, she is
the principal owner of several
other entrepreneurial pursuits,
including EDAM Enterprises
Limited and Corporate Casual
Boutique.
The avid boater is passionate
about gardening, real estate and
being a mother to her three-
year-old daughter, Hezrona
Ashleigh-Elizabeth.
Originally presented by Turn-
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pet Awards were created to her-
ald the accomplishment of
Black Americans who have suc-
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and was designed to inspire,
educate, stimulate and enlight-
en human minds to the reality
that success, achievement and
respect are void of colour and
gender. Those honoured, who
symbolise the many who have
overcome the ills of racism and
poverty and achieved special
greatness, are persons who are
viewed not only for what they
have individually achieved but
also for the achievement they
inspire in others.
Among those honoured at
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Berry, Danny Glover, Chris
"Ludacris" Bridges, Shareef
Abdur-Rahim, Dr Vance and
Dr Vincent Moss, Paul L Brady,
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dan, Shelia C Johnson, Dr T B
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Christie, Dr Myles E Munroe,
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bie Bartlette and King.


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LON


Lessons of the 'Lusignan massacre'


* By SIR RONALD
SANDERS
AS 1 write this
commentary,
the people of
Guyana are
gripped in
uncertainty and apprehension
about the days to come as a
result of what the Guyanese
media have described as 'the
Lusignan massacre" the brutal
murder of eleven innocent peo-
ple, including five children by
a band of heavily armed killers
on the morning of Saturday,
January 26th.
Lusignan is a tiny village on
Guyana's East coast with the
Atlantic Ocean. It houses a pre-
dominantly East Indian com-
munity in a country almost
equally divided between
descendants of East Indians and
Africans.
The scale of public reaction
has not reached a height that
would justify the use of the
word "terror" to describe it, but
there is an evident and perva-
sive feeling of fear.
Georgetown, the country's
capital, usually a place of
bristling crowds and heavy traf-
fic, has seen little such activity in


2- r-
r

^'9
|| I I T | 1 >. -,


WORLD VIEW


the week following that ill-fated
Saturday morning. People have
opted to stay at home as much
as they can during the day. The
nights are given over to the
brave.
The perpetrators of this
vicious and heinous act are, at
the moment, officially
unknown, although the Police
have fingered a wanted man,
Rondell 'Fineman' Rawlins, as
the organiser.
Rawlins has been wanted for
several years in connection with
a number of robberies and mur-
ders, but he has managed suc-
cessfully to elude the police.
Quite how he has achieved it is
a question that looms large in
private discussions throughout
Guyana.
One newspaper, the popular
Kaieteur News, has given sup-
port to the Police's identifica-
tion of Rawlins as the organiser
of the Lusignan incident. The
newspaper's Editor, Adam Har-
ris, said that he received a tele-
phone call from Rawlins not
only taking responsibility for
the massacre of the eleven, but
promising an even worse inci-
dent.
What motivated this act of
lawlessness has not been fully
established. But, one theory is
that it arose from Rawlins'
belief that his 18-year-old girl-
friend, Tenisha Morgan, was
being held by the Police.


The police charge that prior
to the Lusignan murders, they
received a telephone call from
Rawlins accusing them of hold-
ing Morgan who disappeared
two weeks ago in a heavily
pregnant state. According to the
police, Rawlins threatened
"mayhem" unless Morgan was
released. The law enforcement
agencies have since publicly
stated that they are not hold-
ing Morgan.


Merciless

n Friday, January
25th, just hours before
the Lusignan massacre, and in
an act of total contempt for
authority, shots were fired at
the main Headquarters of the
police.
Then came the brutal killings
at Lusignan cold-blooded and
merciless; perpetrated against
innocent people who had no
reason to expect so violent a
fate.
When early reports of the
Lusignan massacre were made
in the Caribbean and the wider
world community, the first reac-
tion was that it was another
manifestation of racial violence
which has plagued this nation
at different periods since 1962.
There was speculation that
the incident may even have


COUNCIL OF LEGAL EDUCATION
HUGH WOODING LAW SCHOOL
P.O. Box 323, Tunapuna
Trinidad. WI

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE POST OF
TUTOR HUGH WOODING LAW SCHOOL


The Council of Legal Education invaits.; applications. from attorneys-at-law for the post of Tutor at the
Hugh Wooding Law Shool,':Trinidad & Tobago. Applicants should demonstrate competence in at least
,two (2 t ,or more of the 'ollowing areas:


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THE PERSON:
Applicants must be attorneys-at-law with at least five (5) years practical, professional experience.
Applicants should indicate their professional interest and areas) of expertise.

Knowledge of the laws of the Commonwealth Caribbean is essential. Applicants are expected to have
experience in information and communications technology. Qualifications and/or experience in various
aspects of educational pedagogy including quality assurance, teaching and learning methodologies and
assessment and evaluation techniques would be an asset.

THE POSITION:
The duties and responsibilities of the post include:
Teaching and conducting tutorials in such courses as may be assigned by the Principal
Functioning as part of a team in the delivery of an integrated teaching programme
Participating in a regular assessment of relevant areas of the established curriculum with a view to
the continued development of content and advancement in teaching methodology.
Participating in activities to facilitate the training programmes of the Law Schools of the Council
of Legal Education.
Enhancing the reaching profile of the institution through research and publication on aspects of
Caribbean Law and practice
Assisting in the Legal Aid Clinic
Such other duties as may be assigned

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been politically motivated to
serve the purposes of one or
other of the two major politi-
cal parties the ruling People's
Progressive Party (PPP) whose
support resides largely in the
East Indian community, or the
People's National Congress
(PNC) whose supporters are
mostly people of African
descent.
Both parties have played the
race card over the years, and in
many ways, the economic con-
dition of Guyana (it is the sec-
ond poorest country in the
Caribbean after Haiti), and its
social division, can be traced to
the political manipulation of its
people on racial lines.
At independence in 1966,
Guyana became a nation, but
with two societies. Over the
years, little has been done to
meld the two societies into one.
Hence, the nation has remained
weak, as has respect for the
State controlled, as it has been,
by one racial group or the other


"The inadequate response of
the large countries, as
President Jagdeo saw it, is even
more reason why CARICOM
countries should create the
machinery to fight crime
through a pan-CARICOM rapid
response, law enforcement
unit."
TCS 11SCIRWC11liCCI1C i


but not by a representative
group of both. Even though the
divided society and a weak
State is the context in which the
Lusignan incident has to be
seen, the fact is that it was an
act of absolute and brazen law-
lessness which, in the words of
the Guyana Private Sector
Commission, was "an open
challenge by organized crimi-
nals to the authority of the State
to maintain the rule of law".
Certainly; the people of
Lusignan and neigh-
bouring villages have shown no
confidence in the government
and the security forces to give
them the protection that every
citizen is entitled to expect from
the State. In what appeared to
be voluntary and spontaneous
protests, the residents of the
area spat at government minis-
ters, slapped one, and assaulted
others when they visited the
scene at Lusignan. There were
also confrontations with the
security forces and loud procla-
mations of no faith in their
capacity to provide for the safe-
ty of the community.
No government or law
enforcement agency accepts


readily that a situation could
reach proportions where they
require wider dialogue and con-
sultation to deal with it effec-
tively. Neither the government,
not the law enforcement agency
wants to convey the impression
of weakness.


Innocent
But, the lawless acts that
occurred in Lusignan (and
which have happened before in
Guyana in other areas of the
country) in which innocent peo-
ple are killed and the perpetra-
tors disappear, demands the
widest possible national partic-
ipation in ending it.
There should be the deepest
and most meaningful consulta-
tion between the government,
the opposition political parties
and civic groups along with the
law enforcement agencies on
effective measures to ensure
that lawlessness does not esca-
late to terror. As for the rest of
the Caribbean Community
(CARICOM) of which Guyana
is an integral part, perhaps the
time has come for all govern-
ments to recognize that the per-
vasive rise of crime throughout
their countries demands the cre-
ation of a pan-CARICOM law
enforcement unit, well trained,
well-equipped and imbued with
the legal right to operate within
each CARICOM country in
times of need.
At Lusignan, the affected
residents called on Guyana's
President Bharrat Jagdeo, to
ask the US and UK for help in
fighting crime. His response as
much a show of his frustration
with donors as anything else -
was: "They said they would
help. But what is their assis-
tance? US$15,000 and an advis-
er."
The inadequate response of
the large countries, as President
Jagdeo saw it; is even more rea-
son why CARICOM countries
should create the machinery to
fight crime through a pan-
CARICOM rapid response, law
enforcement unit.
****
Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.co
m


(The writer is a business exec-
utive and former Caribbean
diplomat)


i/ Sanpin Motors Ltd.


to manage multiple stores.
Applicant must have retail
management experience.
If interested, please submit
your application to
P.O. Box N 3009
Nassau Bahamas
or fax to 326-0570
or application may also be
hand delivered to
GR Sweeting's Head Office.


/ THE TRIBUNE


AP GE 10 MONDAY FEBRUARY 4, 2008


RetaiI ~ l Ma ~i % IW X
Nd


,~a;J~~


r yry -,I 1. 1 f ac c. ,5 no








TETIUENDF A 2


C I GIBSON receives new computers Mr Brian Gibson of Sigma Man-
agement promotional company (left) is seen presenting Mrs Elaine
Williams (centre) Principal of C I Gibson High School with that school's
share of new dell desktop. computers. Also pictured is the school's Com-
puter Department's head.


MRS ANGELA ROLLE, Principal of C C Sweeting High (centre) receives new
Dell desktop computers from Sigma Management's Brian Gibson. Also pic-
tured is student Sonovia Hepburn.


BRIAN GIBSON of Sigma Management makes a presentation of new delta
desktop computers to Vice Principal of A F Adderley High, Mrs Patricia
Strachan and Ms Daphne Roberts, computer department head. Sigma Man-;
agement presented 40 computers to four new Providence High SchoolE
to follow up on a commitment made to the schools last November.
--r


Four NP high schools



receive 40 computers


FOUR New Providence high
schools have received a total of 40
new computers, compliments of
Sigma Management and Down-
sound Records, the promotional
group responsible for the Millen-
nium Countdown Concert held
in the Bahamas last November.
The donation to the Ministry
of Education high schools was a
follow through on a commitment
made by promoters to foster the
growth and development of
Bahamian youth through educa-
tion.
"Sigma Management and
Downsound Records felt com-
pelled to do something substan-
tive to promote higher learning
among high school students, espe-
cially among some of our public
schools," explained Brian Gib-
son, spokesman for the promo-
tional group.
"Many of our young people
have been written off as bad
apples leaving them.vulnerable
to bad behaviour in many cases.
We wanted to do something,
about that and decided to give
the wonderful learn tool of com-
puters."
Schools that received the dell
desktop computers included C I
Gibson High, R M Bailey High,
AF Adderley High and C C
Sweeting High.
Mrs Elaine Williams, Principal
of C I Gibson, said she was elated
to receive such a valuable dona-
tion from Sigma Management
and praised them as an exemplary
corporate giant that follows
through on commitments made.
"I would like to encourage


ILL


R M BAILEY gets computers- Mr. Brian Gibson (left) of Sigma
Management presents R M Bailey High Principal, Mr Julian Ander-
son with brand new Dell desktop computers. R M Bailey was one
of four high schools on New Providence that received 40 comput-
ers from the local promotional company.


more corporate citizens to do
likewise and help the many
Bahamian students who are real-
ly great kids.
"Let us all invest in them and
their talents," she said. "These
computers are definitely a bless-
ing to C I Gibson and will go a
long way in assisting hundreds of
our students."
Principal of R M Bailey High,
Julian Anderson also expressed
his gratitude to Sigma manage-
ment for making good on its
promise to donate computers to
the various schools.
"I have personally been trying
my best to get as many corporate
sponsors to pay attention to
grants and donations as such
because our youngsters need as
much education in all aspects of


their development to be equipped
for the real world when they fin-
ish high school. This donation by
Sigma Management is indeed
very timely and very much appre-
ciated," Mr Anderson said.
Principal of C C Sweeting
High. Mrs Angela Rolle accepted
on behalf the students and facul-
ty and Mrs Patricia Strachan, Vice
Principal of A F Adderley
received the computers on behalf
of that school's student body.
Downsound records is an inter-
nationally recognized record label
and Sigma Management is a
Bahamian owned and operated
production and entertainment
company that has produced the
Millennium Countdown Concert.
Series over the past seven years :
here in the Bahamas.


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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008, PAGE


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


PArF 12 MONDAY. FEBRUARY 4. 2008


L


Health improvements



are a priority, says PM


Ingraham blames PLP for failing to prepare

for National Health Insurance programme


FROM page one

come from us in a paying in
kind of fashion. It is easy for
me to say I'm gonna give you
national health (insurance) and
don't produce.
"Where is the national health
(insurance) going to come
from?
"The same PMH is going to
be there, the same clinics are
going to be there, so I pay my
money in this scheme and what
are you going to give me? The
same thing I had last week?"
In the coming weeks govern-
ment will allow the Public Hos-
pital Authority to borrow
another $15-20 million to
upgrade its facilities until it is
feasible to construct a new hos-
pital, the prime minister said.
He restated that his govern-
ment was moving forward with
a "phased" plan for national
health care commencing with


"We are going
to seek to/move
in a phased
manner
beginning with
(a) drug
medication plan
available to all
in the society ."


the introduction of a national
drug plan that is anticipated to
begin by the end of the year:
"We are going to seek to
move in a phased manner
beginning with (a) drug med-
ication (plan) available to all in
the society.
"We hope to be able to pro-


duce that within the course of
the year. We will then move to
another phase which will then
include (coverage for) cata-
strophic illnesses and some
additional things (that) will be
determined as a result of stud-
ies.
"Eventually you arrive at that
point (National Health Insur-
ance)".
The prime minister was also
quick to point out that many
persons overlook the fact that
The Bahamas has a "substan-
tial" health coverage scheme
that was set in place during the
1950's by the now defunct UBP.
"One of the things that we
dismiss in The Bahamas is we
have national health coverage
to a substantial extent today:
There are few countries in the
world that guarantees free hos-
pital and out patient care to all
school age children, all civil ser-
vants, all indigent persons, all
pensioners."


Last senate appointment



to be announced today


COUNCIL OF LEGAL EDUCAT
EUGENE DUPUCH LAW SCHOOL
P.O. Box SS 6394 Nassau
The Bahamas

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE POST OF
TUTOR, LEGAL AID CLINIC
.* ....'. EUGENE DUPUCH LAW SCHOOL


I' '


ION


The C0ouncil of I legal Education invites-irpplications from attb' neys-at-law for the post of Tutor at the
legall Aid C(~e Dupuc Law, The Bahamas.

he successful applicant will be expected to assume duties on Monday, August 4, 2008. The position is
a flll-time one and ng outside employment may be undertaken without the prior approval of the
Council of Legal Education. The appointment will be on contract for three (3) years in the first instance
and is renewable.

THE PERSON:
Applicants must be attorneys-at-law with at least five (5) years practical, professional experience in both
criminal law practice and civil law practice particularly in litigious work, personal injury cases, family
law, law of conveyancing and real property applications and applications in respect of the estates of
deceased persons. Applicants are expected to have experience in information and communications tech-
nolugy.

Qualifications and/or experience in various aspects of educational pedagogy including quality assurance,
teaching and learning methodologies and assessment and evaluation techniques would be an asset.

THE POSITION:
The duties and responsibilities of the post include:
Performing the duties of full-time attorney-at-law in the Legal Aid Clinic. This includes repiesent-
ing clients in Court
Supervising, instructing and teaching students in the practical aspects of
heir training
Participating in a regular assessment of relevant areas of the established curriculum with a view to
the continued development of content and advancement in teaching methodology
Participating in activities to facilitate the training programmes of the Law Schools of the Council
of Legal Education
Assisting the Director of the Legal Aid Clinic and performing any other duties as
assigned by the Principal.

BENEFITS INCLUDE:
* A Housing Allowance
* A Duty Allowance
* A Studv and 'ravel Grant
* A Book Grant
* Membership in a Contributory Pension Scheme
* Membership in a Group Health Plan

Where appropriate up to five (5) full economy class passages and baggage allowances will be paid on
appoininenr and on normal termination of appointment.

Six (6) copies of a letter of application and letters of recommendation accompanied by curriculum vitae
and supporting documents, and the names and addresses of three (3) referees should be sent not later
tian FebtruarV 15 0208 to;
No TPTC Header found

THE PRINCIPAL
EUGENE DUPUCH LAW SCHOOL
P.O. BOX SS 6394
NASSAU
THE BAHAMAS


Unsuitable applications will not be acknowledged.


For a copy of the advertisement and/or further particulars, please refer to www.clecaribbean.com
*

Information relating to salary and allowances may be directed to the
Registrar, Eugene Dupuch Law School at 1-242-328-1370

I I I


FROM page one
ate has been delayed with no
new date set for its continua-
tion. Lawyer for the Progres-
Pi-^i rI


-T
l .*-, .',c I,


sive Liberal Party, Paul Adder-
ley, who represents the party in
the Senate challenge, confirmed
that the matter, which was to
have opened before Chief Jus-
tice Sir Burton Hall, has been
cancelled yet again.
Mr Adderley told The Tri-
bune in a previous interview
that a date for the start of the
matter had not been fixed.,
When asked if there was a rea-
son for the adjournment, Mr
Adderley simply replied: "Not
really."
The PLP is challenging the
appointment of former Cham-
ber of Commerce president
Tanya Wright to the Senate and


The Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD)
is looking for a visionary executive to join our group
of aviation and customer service experts as we
embark on a $400 million redevelopment of the
Gateway to the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
Reporting directly to the President and Chief
Executive Officer, the duties and responsibilities of
the successful candidate will include:
* Operating as an integral part of the Senior
Management Team.
* Supporting NAD's goal of transforming the
Lynden Pindling International Airport into a
worldclass facility.
* Planning, procurement, engineering,
construction and commissioning of the
Phase I capital plan.
* Managing capital expenditures to maximize
rate of return and ensuring all capital
projects meet approved Board and
.__..u1. . ---. _ -IL r--egu --si..u
amu reguaturty stauuarus.


* Supporting the Phase II terminal
redevelopment project.


* Ensuring a high level of environmental health
and safety for all Authority employees,
contractors, tenants, passengers and
the public, through a number of ongoing
initiatives, such as inspection and testing
programmes, risk assessment and facilities
upgrading programmes.
* Coordinating with partner agencies and
government departments on their capital
and maintenance plans at the airport.
* Providing effective, efficient facility
maintenance with a focus on preventative
maintenance, multi-skilled trades people and
enhanced skill development.


seeks a declaration that the
appointment of Mrs Wright was
unconstitutional on several
grounds.
The PLP maintains that the
appointment of Tanya Wright
to the Senate was unlawful as in
accordance with Article 40 of
the Bahamas' constitution, an
opposition member should have
been appointed to the vacant
seat.
The FNM contends, however,
that under the constitution, the
prime minister has authority to
make three appointments with
or without the consent of the
opposition leader.
.," ,l,1 tI; ,. ;-.


* Ensuring that airport facilities meet
regulatory and code standards through full
documentation of maintenance activities and
a facility permit system.
* Optimizing capital solutions that provide
for appropriate levels of customer service,
airline efficiency, reliability/redundancy and
commercial revenue opportunities while
meeting safety, environmental and security
standards.
* Maintaining and developing a strong,
flexible and capable team of professionals.
Promoting employee training, cross training
and development opportunities to encourage
job satisfaction, promote innovation and
improve job-related skills and knowledge.
Potential candidates will be fully accredited and
experienced senior engineers with 15 to 20
years of experience in a variety of management,
maintenance and construction roles.
S--- .-.- ---- --... '---- -.. ckage will be
uerllaeU t tMe suCcessiu calluluade.




If you are qualified and Interested,
please send your resume by
8 February 2008 to:

The President and CEO,
Nassau Airport Development Company,
Lynden Pindlng International Airport,
P.O.Box AP 59229,
Nassau, Bahamas

or Fax 377-0294


.'~' 2


' 5-.lhC.
~:;..~ S1~t~~-r~* ~
.:. ...,.

i~r.-~~

~Il~~;:~rF::
'r


. ."


N4AD
Nassau Airport
Development Company

CAREER



OPPORTUNITY

Senior Director or Vice President
of Engineering & Maintenance.


U' -I


II


~- I


,. :;'L';sPJi~' ~-~
: I R

,
,


C
ia
~t~'
..
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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008, PAGE 13


LSyCALN


Concern over marina-condo 'Growth rate of up to


scheme 'grounded in fear'


4 per cent possible'


FROM page one

have reacted, because 1 think
that they are acting based on
fear as opposed to facts."
"We always, as a standard
policy, refer to the district coun-
cil any development proposal
that comes forward for devel-
opment in their area.
"So when, or if, Mr Mason
makes an application for devel-
opment it will (be) referred to
the district council in Hope
Town (and) they will have their
say. If it's a matter that we think
(calls for) a public meeting we
will cause a public meeting to be
had."
In reference to complaints
that the town was not notified
before the transaction, Mr
Ingraham explained that gov-
ernment had different guide-
lines for the sale of land
between a foreign owner and
foreign buyers.
"We do have a different view
when we are dealing with an
application (for the sale of) land
by a foreigner; if it's already
owned by a foreigner we have
one view.
"If its owned by a Bahamian
who's selling to a foreigner we
have a different view and we


give different considerations to
both."
Mr Ingraham highlighted that
before Mr Mason's purchase of
the parcel of land, it was owned
by another foreigner a Mr
Maltrop whose first name he
did not give -- who had default-
ed on his real property tax pay-
ments for a number of years.
"Taxes hadn't been paid in
respect to the property for
many, many years. A gentle-
man by the name of Mr Mason
came along to buy the land. It
was being bought by one for-
eigner to another foreigner. No
Bahamian owned any part of it.
"We agreed for the (Mr
Mason) to buy it subject to pay-
ing us all the outstanding taxes
that were due and committing
to pay taxes for the. future. He
put forward a development pro-
posal for the property (but) we
did not agree to (it). We said
we will only allow you to buy
the land and you can make an
application for the development
proposal in the future if you
want to take that risk, please
do so.
"Hope Town is quite frankly
better off today than they were
before the sale took place,
because in any case the land is
still in foreign hands, (and) no


Bahamian had offered to buy
it as far as I'm aware."
Last week, residents of Hope
Town held a town meeting
where they posed questions to
Mr Mason about his future
plans for the site. Concerns by
residents are that a large-scale
development will threaten the
idyllic setting of the island while
increasing traffic, congestion
and trash.
"You could feel the tension
pretty strongly between the
majority of residents in the
meeting and the developer. For
the most part even though the
tension was high (the meeting)
was still pretty much under con-
trol," Jeremy Sweeting a mem-
ber of the town council told The
Tribune. He noted that some
residents worry that because Mr
Mason has bought so much land
he has intentions for a large
development.
"As for now the council just
views this as a land sale trans-
action between two non-
Bahamians of which we have
no control. Up until such time
when the purchaser seeks to
develop the property, then the
land council expects to be
apprised by government before
any large scale development is
committed to."


FROM page one

According to the US Labour
Department, employers were
nervous at the beginning of
2008 and eliminated 17,000 jobs.
This was compounded by the
fact that wage growth in the US
has also slowed, making ana-
lysts believe that these smaller
wage gains could make people
who still have jobs reluctant to
spend; certainly reluctant to
spend a lot of money on vaca-
tions.
However, Mr Ingraham said
that hotel occupancy is current-
ly better than some people had
expected.
Hoteliers, he said, generally
are optimistic about this winter
season and the Ministry of
Tourism has proposed some
additional strategies and
requested additional money to
promote the country.
The prime minister said that
when the government presents
its midterm budget it will make
an additional $12 million avail-
able to the Ministry of Tourism
for additional expenditure in
Europe, North America and
elsewhere.
All is not lost for the US


economy, however, and many
feel that it is more resilient than
most analysts believe.
Krishna Guha of the Finan-
cial Times explained that the
US will "skate along the brink
of recession in early 2008, but
should avoid tipping over the
brink, in part owing to contin-
ued strong exports to the rest
of the world. Nonetheless, the
economy will not bounce back
quickly and will instead endure
a protracted period of weak
growth, during which time it will
be vulnerable to any further
economic shocks.
"House prices will continue
to fall nationwide, with big
declines in California and Flori-
da. However, the negative
wealth effect on consumers will
be partly offset by adequate
earnings growth in a resilient
jobs market. Unemployment
will edge up, but not by much.
The Federal Reserve may end
up cutting interest rates by more
than it thought it would, but its
ability to do so will be con-
strained by inflation risk, espe-
cially if oil and food prices
remain high or move higher."
The Bahamas maintained its
"A" rating with Standard and
Poor's but it disagreed with


government that the Bahamian
economy would experience a
growth of between 3.5 to 4 per
cent and thought it would be
more in the order of 3 per cent.
The prime minister said that
only time will tell who is right.
"We are of the view that our
projected growth rate of 3.5 to 4
per cent is achievable and we
are working toward that," Mr
Ingraham said.
While he said that govern-
ment tends to agree with Stan-
dard and Poor's with respect to
what they feel the housing crisis
in the US will have on the
tourism economy, government
believes that the construction
sector will be far more robust
than S&P thinks.
In all of this, Mr Ingraham
said that Freeport's economy
still presents a challenge to his
government.
"Generally speaking we have
reasonable prospects for this
year. That is why I am reason-
ably confident that we are going
to have a growth of 3.5 to 4 per
cent notwithstanding the Stan-
dard and Poor's revised fore-
cast," Mr Ingraham said.


INTERNATIONAL NEWS


Hidden camera images show Dutch student


* THE HAGUE, Netherlands

Hidden camera footage
broadcast in the Netherlands
on Sunday showed Dutch stu-
dent Joran Van der Sloot saying
he was with Natalee Holloway
when she collapsed on a beach
in Aruba. He said he believed
she was dead and asked a friend
to dump her body in the sea,.
according to Associated Press.
"She'll never be found," he
said.
A series of conversations
between Van der Sloot and a
man he believed to be his friend
were recorded in a Range
Rover that had been rigged with
three hidden cameras by Peter
R. de. Vries, aDutch television
crime reporter. They were
shown on Dutch television.


Last week, Van der Sloot said
he was lying in those conversa-
tions and denied that he had
anything to do with the Alaba-
ma teenager's disappearance.
Holloway, 18, vanished in
May 2005 just before she was
due to fly home to Alabama, at
the end of her high school grad-
uation trip to the Caribbean
island. No trace of her has been
found. The mystery of her dis-
appearance has frustrated
authorities and garnered wide
attention on television and in
tabloid newspapers in Europe
and the United States.
In the recordings, Van der
Sloot said Holloway was drunk
and that she began shaking and
slumped down on the beach as
the pair were making out.
"Suddenly she started shak-


ing and then she didn't say any-
thing," Van der Sloot said,
adding that he did not kill her.
"I would never murder a
girl," he said.
He said he panicked and tried
but failed to revive her. He said
that Holloway looked dead but
that he could not be sure she
was not still alive when the
friend took her away.
He used a pay phone next to
a hotel's swimming pool to call
the friend and asked for help in
disposing the body. When the
friend arrived at the beach, the
two put Holloway's body into
a boat. The friend then took it
out to sea and pushed. it into
the water, Van der Sloot said.
"The ocean is big," he added.
He said he and his friend
agreed that Van der Sloot"


*%MISCELLANEOUS


L 1 I F. umlH


saying Holloway's body was dumped at sea
would go to school the next day referring to the Dutch student Everybody will see it Sunday,"
to avoid arousing any suspicion. by his initials. The statement Van der Sloot said, referring to
Van der Sloot said his friend did not say when the judge De Vries' planned television
assured him he had taken care made the ruling. show.
of Holloway's body and that the The prosecutors said they "That is what he wanted to
police were not going to locate would appeal the judge's ruling hear, so I told him what he
it. "They will know nothing," and seek to have the Dutch stu- wanted to hear," Van der Sloot
Van der Sloot quoted the friend dent re-arrested. They also cau- said, adding that he had built
as telling him. tioned that the Holloway mys- up a relationship with the man
"I've not lost any sleep over tery was far from resolved, he spoke to, but had never fully
this," he added at one point. "While video tape may pre- trusted him.


Aruban prosecutors said last
week they were reopening their
investigation into Holloway's
disappearance after seeing De
Vries' material. But on Sunday,
they said a judge on the island
had ruled that while the infor-
mation merited an investigation
against Van der Sloot, it did not
meet the threshold for an arrest
warrant.
"This means that the. office is
legally not able to have J.v.d.S.
arrested in the Netherlands,"
prosecutors said in a statement,


sent a strong case in a TV news
show, it may be insufficient for
a finding of guilt by a judge. It is
up to the court to evaluate the
materials and the statements,
and to find out their signifi-
cance," prosecutors said.
Van der Sloot was inter-
viewed last week by the,respect-
ed Dutch television show
"Pauw & Witteman" following
reports that De Vries had cap-
tured him making statements
about the case.
"It is true I told someone.


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PAGE 14, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


Is our tourism product value for money?


OR many years
the tourism prod-
LICt of The
S Bahamas com-
in;anded ; price premium rel-
:ative to Jamnaica, the Domini-
can Republic, the Mexican
t. iibban, Cuba and a num-
lxri of other competitive resort
;"reas in the region.
This was a good thing
because almost all cost inputs
in the hotel sector are much
highierthan those in the com-
petitive destinations.
Costs in the ground trans-
port sector are also generally


VIEW FROM AFAR


J O H N


higher in The Bahamas. This
situation between prices and
costs resulted in some sort of
balance although it continued
to eliminate any prospects for
the needed growth in stopover
tourism arrivals.
The constant decline in the
market share of regional
tourism enjoyed by The


S S A



Bahamas attests to this fact.


Another result of the
price/cost equation
is the extreme level of diffi-
culty encountered when try-
ing to earn an adequate return
or even a profit in the hotel
business.


NASSAU LISTINGS


RESIDEN IA & CO M ER I


E-14


I'!


1. CORAL HARBOUR SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 13
DESCRIPTION: Single Family
Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 12,113 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Hopkins Drive
APPRAISED VALUE: $121,000

2. CHARLOTTEVILLE SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 82
DESCRIPTION: Single Family
Residential Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 8,667 sq. ft.
I LOCATION: Northern side of the south-west
section of the area perimeter road the fifth lot
west of the area main access road from John
F. Kennedy Drive
APPRAISED VALUE: $104,000

A


7. ENGLERSTON ADDITION
LOT NO. 22 Block 84
DESCRIPTION: 3 Small Single Storey
Houses
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,925 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling south on East Street
from Wulff Road turn onto Palmetto Avenue,
the houses are located on the corner of
Palmetto Avenue and East Street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $348,000

8. KEMP ROAD
DESCRIPTION: Split Level Residential
Building
PROPERTY SIZE: 19,960 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Western Side of John Evans
Road south of Shirley Street
APPRAISED VALUE: $155,000

9. FAITH AVENUE
LOT NO. Portion of Crown Grant A6
DESCRIPTION: Duplex Apartment
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,500 sq. ft.
LOCATION: From Charmichael Rd. onto
Faith Ave., take the 5th comer on the right
then 1 st corner on the left; property is 2nd
duplex on the left painted dark pink
APPRAISED VALUE: $240,000

10. BEL-AIR ESTATES
LOT NO. 374
DESCRIPTION: Single Storey Residence
PROPERTY SIZE: 4,603 sq. ft.
LOCATION: East on Charmichael Rd. from
Faith Ave., take the 4th comer on the right
(Turtle Drive) then 5th corner on the left (River
Circle) property is 9th house on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $185,000

11. BEL-AIR ESTATES
LOT NO. 259
DESCRIPTION: Single Storey Residence
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: East on Charmichael Rd. from
Faith Ave., take the 4th comer on the right
(Turtle Drive) property is 4th lot on the right
APPRAISED VALUE: $186,000

12. CHIPPINGHAM
LOT NO. 17
DESCRIPTION: Single Storey Residence,
2 bed/1 bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,832 sq. ft.
LOCATION: North side of Quarry Mission
Rd. 700ft. West of Nassau St.
APPRAISED VALUE: $125,000


VACANT LOT


..HIGHLAND ESTATES.SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 6
DESCRIPTION: Single Family Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 9,761 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west along West Bay
Street turn on to Grove Avenue. Head south
on Grove Avenue turn right to Sanford Drive,
head west on Sanford Drive take first right
to second T-junction, turn left take first
right; property is fourth lot on left
APPRAISED VALUE: $117,000
4. EAST SHIRLEY STREET
LOT NO. Parcel of Land
DESCRIPTION: Commercial Land
PROPERTY SIZE: 4,650 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Southern side of Shirley
street and West of Margaret Street
APPRAISED VALUE: $79,000


INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS (INCLUDE TELEPHONE CONTACT AND
POSTAL ADDRESS) TO CHERRY MISSICK, P. O. BOX SS-6263, TEL. 394-6465;
FAX: 393-2883, OR VIA EMAIL: CHERRY.MISSICK@COMBANKLTD.COM OR
CHRISTOPHER KNOWLES (FREEPORT), PO. BOX F-40876, TEL: 352-8307; FAX: 352-8221
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS


This fact is confirmed by the
accounts of The Hotel Corpo-
ration of The Bahamas.
It is also confirmed by the
situation on Grand Bahama
and the older downtown
hotels and the history of the
South Ocean resort.

Tacky

All that being said, we now
find ourselves in the most
unfortunate situation of the
destination not being able to
command the higher prices
needed to support our higher
costs.
This is a consequence of a
number of factors.
The tacky image of down-
town Nassau is one of them.
Another is the long over-
due redevelopment of the air-
port.
A third is the deal squeezed
out of the nation which allows
cruise ships to operate casi-


"There are always increased

needs for funding education

and other social services so it

is necessary for us all to accept

that the taxpayers' funds must

be carefully spent even if the
efficiency adversely affects

one's self or one's relatives."


nos in port and to operate
them tax free. Another is the
changing image of Nassau
with respect to crime.
An investment in the hotel
business hotel, however has
the same sort of permanence
as those spelled out in mar-
riage vows and is not like a
cruise ship's call which more
resembles a one night stand.
This latter fact was clearly
demonstrated by the exodus
from the Mediterranean to the
Caribbean after 9/11 and the
reverse flow taking place now.
Therefore those of us in the
stopover tourism industry
need to work hard to take the
actions necessary to make us
more secure.
This can be done by finding
ways to lower our costs.


t can be partly accom-
plished by operating a
little more efficiently and


keeping our product fresh and
up to date but there is a need
for some structural adjustment
of our economy in order to
reduce those costs created by
lack of competition and inef-
ficient monopolies.

Prosperous

There are always increased
needs for funding education
and other social services so it
in necessary for us all to
accept that the taxpayers'
funds must be carefully spent
even if the efficiency adverse-
ly affects one's self or one's
relatives.
This will allow for taxes to
be kept to the minimum.
It is only by keeping our
product tip top and keeping
costs down that we will guar-
antee a prosperous life for
future generations.


1. CARMICHAEL ROAD
DESCRIPTION: Single Family Residence
3 bed/2 bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 11,988 sq. ft.
FLOOR AREA: 1,710 sq. ft.
LOCATION: East on Carmichael Road from
Bacardi Road take the 1st asphalt paved
easement on the right. Property is 150 ft.
south of Carmichael Road
APPRAISED VALUE: $232,000
2. GAMBLE HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION
DESCRIPTION: Split Level Triplex
(incomplete)
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,141 sq. ft.
FLOOR AREA: 2,444 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Heading South on Blue Hill
Road from Faith United Way, take 1st corner
on left (Sunrise Road) Heading south on
Sunrise Road take the 5th corner on left then
first corner on right. Property is 7th lot on
the right
APPRAISED VALUE: $200,000
3. STAR ESTATES EASTERN DISTRICT
LOT NO. 54
DESCRIPTION: Multi-Family Duplex
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling East along Prince
Charles Drive take the'1st comer on the right
past Sea Grape Shopping Plaza. Heading
SSbth n Jupiter \Way take the 1st right then
Wif2indlCafft-tVerfiu~s-vehue. The property is
the 2nd building on the left
APPRAISED VALUE: $348,000

4. SOUTH BEACH & MARSHALL ROAD
LOT NO. 17D
DESCRIPTION: Multi-Family Triplex
Apartment
PROPERTY SIZE: 10,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling West on Marshall Road
from South Beach Road, take the first corner
on the right (Tiao End) the subject property
is the 4th building on left painted green with
white trim
APPRAISED VALUE: $288,000
5. GLENISTON GARDENS SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 0 Block 7
DESCRIPTION: Single Storey Residence
PROPERTY SIZE: 10,875 sq. ft.
LOCATION: East Side of Jean Street off
Prince Charles Drive .
APPRAISED VALUE: $210,000

6. SOLDIER ROAD
DESCRIPTION: Two Storey Commercial
Building
PROPERTY SIZE: 4,750 sq. ft.
FLOOR AREA: 3,960 Sq. Ft.
LOCATION: Corner East of Strachan's
Auto Repairs
APPRAISED VALUE: $312,000


COUNCIL OF LEGAL EDUCATION
SECRETARIAT
IPr P.O. Box 323, Tunapuna
Trinidad. WI

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE POST OF
SENIOR TUTOR HUGH WOODING LAW SCHOOL
I T ....T .

The Council of Legal Education invites applications from attorneys-at-law for the post of Seniqr T r
at the'Hugh Wo~pg Law School, Trinidad & Tobago.
,V ^
The successful applicant will be expected to assume duties on Monday, August 4 2008. The position is
a full-time one and no outside employment may be undertaken without the prior approval of the
Council of Legal Education. The appointment will be on contract for three (3) years in the first instance
and is renewable.

THE PERSON:
Applicants must be attorneys-at-law with at least seven (7) years practical, professional experience.
Applicants should indicate their professional interest and areas) of expertise.

Knowledge of the laws of the Commonwealth Caribbean is essential. Applicants are expected to have
experience in information and communications technology. Qualifications and/or experience in various
aspects of educational pedagogy including quality assurance, teaching and learning methodologies and
assessment and evaluation techniques would be an asset.


THE POSITION:
The duties and responsibilities of'the post include:
Deputising for the Principal in his/her absence
Teaching and conducting tutorials in such courses as may be assigned by the Principal
Co-ordinating the Tutorial programme
Co-ordinating the Transitional programme
Monitoring the performance and attendance of students
Organising and monitoring the In-service Training programme for students in Year I and in the
Transitional Programme
Administering the programme of court attendance for year I students
Collaborating with Bar Associations to organize a programme of continuing legal education
Functioning as part of a team in the delivery of an integrated teaching programme
Such other duties as may be assigned

BENEFITS INCLUDE:
Competitive Salary
A Housing Allowance
A Transportation Allowance
An Institutional Visit Allowance
An Entertainment Allowance
A Study and Travel Grant
A Book Grant
Vacation Leave
Membership in a Contribuiory Pension Scheme
Membership in a Group Health Plan

Where appropriate up to five (5) full economy class passages and baggage allowances will be paid on
appointment and on normal termination of appointment.

'Six (6) copies ofa letter of application and letters of recommendation, accompanied by curriculum vitae
and supporting documents, and the names and addresses of three (3) referees should be sent not laier
than February 1S 2008 to:

THE PRINCIPAL
HUGH WOODING LAW SCHOOL
P.O. BOX 323
TUNAPUNA
TRINIDAD & TOBAGO
Wl

Unsuitable applications will not be acknowledged.
For a copy of the advertisement and/or further particulars, please refer to www.clecaribbean.coni

Information relating to salary and allowances may be directed to the
Principal, Hugh Wooding law School at 1-868-662-5860/583'.-


r


--^H^|^^|^^HH^^LOCAL NEWS I^H^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^








THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008, PAGE 15

iIiL C AL!EW


STUDENTS MEET VIP


PROCLAMATION


WHEREAS, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority,
Incorporated, was founded 100 years ago, on 15th
January, 1908 on the campus of Howard
University in Washington, D.C, as the first Greek
lettered sorority for predominantly black college
trained women;
AND WHEREAS, since that.time Alpha Kappa
Alpha women continue the legacy of fostering
sisterhood and friendship amongst college
women, alleviating the problems concerning
young women and girls, promoting high ethical
standards and maintaining a progressive interest
in college life;
AND WHEREAS, Alpha Kappa Alpha can boast of over 200,000
women as members of their elite organization with chapters in many
countries;
AND WHEREAS, the members. of Alpha Kappa Alpha Incorporated,
Eta Psi Omega chapter established in Nassau, New Providence 24th
September, 1963, have been fulfilling their purpose of serving
mankind in The Bahamas through their various programmes, along
with much contribution in hours as well as monetary assistance to
the Elizabeth Estates Home and Unity House;
AND WHEREAS, Alpha Kappa Alpha has impacted our high schools,
by touching the lives of many young girls through its mentorship
programme and its Honors Day programme which encourages young
girls to attain excellence;
AND WHEREAS, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Incorporated, Eta Psi
Omega chapter is celebrating its centennial anniversary under the
theme "Exploring our Sisterhood Past";
NOW THEREFORE, I Hubert A. Ingraham, Prime Minister of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas do hereby, proclaim the month of
February 2008 as "ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA SORORITY,
INCORPORATED MONTH".

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have
hereunto set my Hand and Seal
this 31st day of January, 2008.


REACHING OUT


-.. IUG ,.i !i:; ,, -. r '*..A -,.<
PRIMARY School students in New Providence eagerly greet Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham at the
National Tourism Week Conference on Thursday January 31.


WEALTH MANAGEMENT: EXPANDING OUR COMPETITIVE EDGE REGISTER TODAY


FEBRUARY 26rH 2008 I ATLANTIS, PARADISE ISLAND

Trust Legislation: How does it compare elsewhere?

The Pros and Cons of Trust Administration in Switzerland

The Changing Landscape: Competition Among Trust Jurisdictions, and the
Drivers for the Selection of Jurisdictions Panel Discussion

International Initiatives: Status and Strategies

Business Opportunities in the New EU

The Effect of Exchange Controls on Capital Markets Panel Discussion


To register, please visit www.nassauconference.com. Or complete and forward
the registration form to:

Anastacia Johnson
The Nassau Conference
Association of International Banks & Trust Companies in The Bahamas (AIBT)
P. O. Box N-7880
Nassau, The Bahamas


FIRST NAME
LAST NAME


TITLE
FIRM


BUSINESS ADDRESS
CITY/TOWN

PROVINCE/STATE/COUNTRY


POSTAL/ZIP CODE

BUSINESS PHONE


FAX

EMAIL ADDRESS


PLATINUM SPONSOR

SPICTET
1805


SILVER SPONSOR
GHoMI M
GT&Co.
Art, ONi)f YS
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BRONZE SPONSORS


NSBAC
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CLEARING BANKS COMMITTEE


Butterfield Bank 9 .

LENNOX PATON
Comuswl and Atlltm ys-attl.aw, Nol*- IIIblic


CA i P.,I va B Ai:MAS

Private Banking


MEDIA SPONSORS

EUREKAHEDGE Xalt
EUREKAHEDGE Xait.tv


GOVERNOR GENERAL Arthur D. Hanna poses for a photograph with students of the St. Thomas More Pri-
mary School in Parliament Square on Friday, February 1, 2008.


~~-~~`-------------`-


















Are Bahamians a people of
p p!


* By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmall.com

B AHAMIAN culture is
quickly becoming a
hybrid culture that is being cor-
roded almost daily.
The food Bahamians con-
sume, the music we often listen
to and our dress code are heav-
ily influenced by our exposure
to the American way of life,
whether by television, interact-
ing with tourists or by travel-
ling. Bahamians seem to have a
voracious yearning to keep up
with the Joneses foreign
countries emulating their
fashion, entertainment and var-
ious other cultural influences.
In short, are Bahamians imita-
tors or originators?
Our culture barely seems to
be an expression of our African

B~yT"7 7",-," "


YOUNG MAN'S VIEW


DR IAN


and European ancestry, but
instead appears to be a diluted
commodity that is rapidly being
beleaguered by an invasion of
foreign ideas and attitudes and
prostituted in marketing
schemes.
Although culture is what
makes us Bahamian, our cre-
ativity is buried by our knack
to copy everything that's for-
eign, as we have little to no
appreciation or recognition for
what we have already created
(our architecture, our relation
to the sea, our music, our
dances, the original form of
junkanoo, etc). Since indepen-
dence, we have grossly neglect-
ed our culture!
According to Director of
Culture Nicolette Bethel "our
history has trained us to disre-
gard and disrespect everything
home-grown, and our govern-
ments have institutionalized the
disrespect."
Since the docking of the first
slave ship in the Bahamas,
African culture has been a ubiq-
uitous and dominant social fea-


I BSO N


ture. The same can also be said
of Eur9pean cultural influences
which have merged with
African customs over several
centuries to form very distinct
attributes that we all relate to
being Bahamian.

Glorification

These days, even within
the Bahamas, Bahami-
an culture seems to have
become dwarfed by Jamaican
Haitian and more prevalent
American culture. Frankly, the
Bahamas can almost be seen as
the 51st state or perhaps at
extension of the Florida Cays
With the passage of time
Bahamian culture is becoming
even more suppressed and is
being speedily replaced by an
apparent fixation and glorifica-
tion of all things American (or
foreign). When it comes to
food, American fast food chains
are widespread as many
Bahamians seem to have
acquired a taste for foreign


"The dress code of the
Bahamas screams of external
manipulation. The Androsia,
which is made in the Bahamas,
Sis considered to be a fashion
Sno-no by some Bahamians,
unless it is worn as a work
uniform or during cultural


expositions."


dishes that competes for their
taste in native dishes. Even
Bahamian cuisine is taking a
back seat to the hodgepodge of
international gastronomy that
has now found a home in The
Bahamas.
Junkanoo, an extremely pop-
ular expression of our'heritage,
has itself been politically
exploited and viewed as a high-
priced, money-making scheme
that is losing its cultural flare
and has, first and foremost,
been marketed as a tourist
attraction and then seen as a
cultural expression. Junkanoo,
which was born during the pre-
emancipation era, was a grand
dance that was organised by the
slaves during special holidays
at Christmas that gave them an
opportunity to reunite with rel-
atives, reconnect with their
African heritage and tem-
porarily enjoy themselves while
away from the laborious plan-
tation lifestyles. Junkanoo
began as a form of passive resis-
tance to slavery. Today,
junkanoo has become an exces-
sively commercialised entity,
whose original intent has been
forgotten.
In speaking of junkanoo and
music heard locally, historian
Arlene Nash Ferguson said:
"What disturbs me is that
Bahamians glorify American
and Jamaican music. Jamaican
music seems to be the default


music among young Bahami-
ans. We must do a better job
in helping these youngsters to
understand the richness of our
musical heritage, as we have the
same talent pool and abilities
as Jamaicans."
Mrs Ferguson contends that
junkanoo is much more than
competition, claiming that it
represents a Bahamian spirit
that "will not be quenched."
voine Ingraham, a social
activist who holds a con-
trasting view, said:
"We ain't gat no culture no
more! Everything about us has
been devoured by the US.
Bahamians are followers.
Junkanoo, an original idea, has
been assassinated by greed as
artists and artisans now mimic
other places rather than build
on what we have. We have
imported the carnival from
Trinidad and Tobago and
mixed it with our own thing.
We have sacrificed our heritage
on the altar of greed for a dif-
ferent kind of product that
would be more palatable.
"Junkanoo, as a whole, was
steeped, in African origin. Ya
see, junkanoo was not as glitzy
and glamorous as what is seen
today. One time ago, costumes
did not have so many mirrors.
What's the point in fringing our
costume when it's covered with
mirrors, rhinestones and so


forth? How can a judge see if a
costume is out of fringe paper
with so much decoration on it?
Every year the Bahamas' gov-
ernment wastes hundreds of
thousands to send junkanoo
experts to Trinidad to learn
what they do and then return
to alter junkanoo," he said.
He added: "The indigenous
Bahamian music is rake and
scrape. When tourists come off
the ships, a rake and scrape
band should greet them. While
Bahamian music may not have
funds to market their product
internationally, the level and
style of music reflects our cul-
ture."

Junkanoo
Nicolette Bethel said:
"Junkanoo is 'respected' only
because the junkanoo commu-
nity can make or break a politi-
cian something that was nev-
er understood until 1987 when
Perry Christie's affiliation with
the Valley Boys (who had hith-
erto been pretty fundamentally .
PLP) led to the defeat of Pedro
Roberts and the PLP there.
Christie's success against the
PLP was a huge upset and led
to politicians taking junkanoo a
whole lot more seriously."
The sounds of rake and
scrape are known forms musical
expressions of Bahamian cul-
ture, developing increasingly on
the heels of such great artists
as Joseph Spence, Eddie Minnis
and The Ancient Man. I recall
sitting on a plane to Holland
during the summer beside a
very inquiring guy from Ten-
nessee whose musical icon was
the late Joseph Spence. This
shows that genuine aspects of
our culture are revered even
outside of the Bahamas.
The dress code of the
Bahamas screams of external
manipulation. The Androsia,
which is made in the Bahamas,
is considered to be a fashion
no-no by some Bahamians,
unless it is worn as a work uni-
form or during cultural exposi-
tions. These days, Bahamians


COUNCIL OF LEGAL EDUCATION
NORMAN MANLEY LAW SCHOOL
P.O. Box 231, Mona Campus, Kingston 7
Jamaica W.I.

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE POST OF
TUTOR NORMAN MANLEY LAW SCHOOL
ib-. A' -t =,i---

The Council of Legal Education invites applications from attorneys-at-law for the post of Tutor at the
Norman Manley Law School, Jamaica. Applicants would be expected to demonstrate competence in at
least two (2) of the following areas:

Civil Practice and Procedure
Adviicacyi' i
Legal Drafting and Interpretation

The successful applicant will be expected to assume duties on Monday, August 4 2008. The position is
a full-time one and no outside employment may be undertaken without the prior approval of the
Council of Legal Education. The appointment will be on contract for three (3) years in the first instance
and is renewable.

THE PERSON:
Applicants must be attorneys-at-law with at least five (5) years practical, professional experience.
Applicants should indicate their professional interest and areas) of expertise.

Knowledge of the laws of the Commonwealth Caribbean is essential. Applicants are expected to have
experience in information and communications technology Qualifications and/or experience in various
aspects of educational pedagogy including quality assurance, teaching and learning methodologies and
assessment and evaluation techniques would be an asset.

THE POSITION:
The duties-and responsibilities of the post include:
Teaching and conducting tutorials in such courses as may be assigned by the Principal
Functioning as part of a team in the delivery of an integrated teaching programme
Participating in a regular assessment of relevant areas of the established curriculum with a view to
the continued development of content and advancement in teaching methodology
Participating in activities to facilitate the training programmes of the Law Schools of the Council
of Legal. Education
Enhancing the teaching profile of the institution through research and publication on aspects of
Caribbean Law and practice
Assisting in the Legal Aid Clinic
Such other duties as may be assigned

BENEFITS INCLUDE:
* Competitive Salary
* A Housing Allowance
* A Transportation Allowance
* A Study and Travel Grant
* A Book Grant
* Membership in a Contributory Pension Scheme
* Membership in a Group Health Plan

Where appropriate up to five (5) full economy class passages and baggage allowances will be paid on
appointment and on normal termination of appointment.

Six (6) copies of a letter of application and letters of recommendation, accompanied by curriculum vitae
and supporting documents, and the names and addresses of three (3) referees should be sent not later
than February 15 2008 to:

THE PRINCIPAL
NORMAN MANLEY LAW SCHOOL
P.O. Box 231,
Mona Campus
Kingston 7,
Jamaica W.I.

Unsuitable applications will not be acknowledged.

For a copy of the advertisement and/or further particulars, please refer to www.clecaribbean.com

Information relating to salary and allowances may be directed to the
Registrar, Norman Manley Law School at 1-876-927-1235.


Emerald Coast is New Providence's newest, gated community of
single family and town homes designed around traditional British
Colonial architecture. Nestled in the West, adjacent to South
West Ridge Emerald Coast will offer and preserve a lifestyle that
revolves around love of tranquility and the natural wonders and
timelessness reminiscent of the old Bahamian living that embraces
the true values of a community.


RECONSTRUCTION PRICING

Home & Lot Packages Starting at $335,000.00

Townhouse Unit Starting at $250,000.00

Single Family Lots Starting at $98,000.00


PAGE 16, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008


1





1

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I



r

I


THE TRIBUNE




















imitators or originators?


are used as human billboards,
modelling and promoting
trendy outfits by foreign design-
ers on a daily basis. It is.not
uncommon to see Bahamians
clad from head to toe in fash-
ionable brands! While many
Bahamians would pay exorbi-
tant amounts for foreign design-
er wear, they would further
bury expressions of our culture
by contemptuously snarling at
the efforts of upcoming local
fashion designers.
A according to Arlene
Nash Ferguson:
"The way we dress today, the
way youngsters dress, has to do
with what we see on TV and in
music videos. They have no ref-
erence to the Bahamian way!
Our youth picks up on the stu-
pid trends from the US, for
example, wearing the pants
below the waist."
Being Bahamian has much
to do with our social and cus-
tomary beliefs. One original
aspect of Bahamian culture is
the 'asue', which is a custom
that has survived the test of
time and allows many Bahami-
ans to form co-operatives to
contribute and accumulate cash.
Since slaves were banned from
using banks, they fQrmed asues
- with trustworthy persons
organising everything to save
and borrow money. Today,
Bahamians participating in this
continue to anxiously await
their "draw."
The arts and craft (eg, straw
work) was once a major aspect
of our cultural expression,
which eventually became a
prominent feature of our
tourism offerings. Today, local
works of art/craft are scarce, as
fake designer items and cheap
products from Asia form the
core of what's sold at the
derelict, rodent-infested
straw/flea market.
One uniquely Bahamian fea-
ture is a penchant for credit or
trust'. 'Crediting, or "truss-
ing'; occurs when someone gets
goods or money without ifime-
diate payment, promising


The Nassau Airport Development Company
(NAD) has the mandate to operate,
manage and develop the Lynden Pindling
International Airport. A project definition
report (PDR) defining the scope, schedule
and budget for the project was presented
to the Government, the NAD Board and the
media on September 17, 2007.

Stantec Consulting International Ltd. is
currently negotiating with the Nassau Airport
Development Company to act as the Prime
Consultant. If Stantec is successful, we will
need a professional team for the detailed
design of the Lynden Pindling International
Airport Expansion Project. Suitably qualified
Bahamian engineering consultants/firms
are invited to submit their expressions of
interest and credentials to Stantec, at the
e-mail address below, for the following
disciplines:

* Structural Engineering
* Mechanical Engineering
* Electrical Engineering
* Civil Engineering


"'.


A


SEAEF",Te~ -prd eisole oflleh igtsllllothel l' llliyan eahm fs.


instead to pay at a later date.
This is usually done on the
Family Islands.

Dialect
Indeed, there are several tra-
ditional aspects of our culture
that have weathered the test of
time. For example, the forma-
tion of lodges or friendly soci-
eties, customs relating to burial
or death, our religious practices
and our development of phar-
macology from bushes that are
known to heal wounds.
During our interview, Mrs
Ferguson also expressed a fear
that even our most original cul-
tural aspect our dialect is
in jeopardy of being replaced
by American lingo, such as 'off
the chains' and 'you guys' with-
out us even thinking about it."
Bahamian dialect originated
from a marriage between
African languages and Euro-
pean elements (British). It


began as a communicative tool
between the slaves and their
masters, having an inconsisten-
cy of pronunciation (of English
words) that developed over
time and today serves as a dis-
tinguishing characteristic of
Bahamians.
Could one of the rea-
sons for the spate of
violent crime our nation now
faces particularly in Nassau
- be because many youngsters
are not getting to truly experi-
ence our culture and therefore
carry around pent-up
anger/aggression because they
feel trapped, even landlocked
on a small and crammed island
such as New Providence?
Both Nicolette Bethel and
Arlene Ferguson responded
affirmatively.
Rick Lowe, a social activist,
said one reason for the spate of
violent crime was the knack of
Bahamians to mimic everything


emanating from North America
or Jamaica.
Bahamian youngsters are
unable to experience their cul-
ture/nature,. and instead are
bombarded in homes with
unimpeded access to American
video games and television pro-
grammes that pipe values into
them that are contrary to tradi-
tional Bahamian values. Via


MI-.i


Co


P

-F


foreign influences, today's
youth is taught to view women
as "pieces of meat", to tote guns
and engage in violence because
it's "cool". Further adding to
this sad reality is the notion that
youngsters are confined to a
small island, with hardly any
accessible beaches or cultural
happenings, which makes them
incapable of interacting with


Credentials are to be submitted in the following
format:

1. Ownership
* Firm name and list of Principals/
Shareholders
* Location(s) of firm

2. Stability and size
* How long in Bahamas; Size changes over
the years
* Insurance limits

3. Current Staff
* Number of qualified engineers
* Number of technicians and support staff
* CAD capacity

4. Provide the following information on 3
significant completed projects:
* Project name and type
* Project value
* Role performed (note if project was in
association with other engineers)
* Project start and completion date
* Provide at least one reference for each
project

5. List procedures for:
* Quality control; CAD coordination
* Adherence to budget and Adherence to
schedule/timelines


Please limit submissions to a maximum of 5 pages. Credentials are to be
submitted electronically to the following email address:
stanis.smith@stantec.com no later than February 8,2008.

All costs involved with the preparation and submission of information are to be
borne by frms submitting their credentials, and any or all submissions may be
rejected without providing reasons.


"Bahamian
dialect origi-
nated from a
marriage
between
African lan-
guages and
European ele-
ments."

nature or experiencing their cul-
ture beyond a watered-down
junkanoo rush-out.
Although there are certain
original aspects of our culture,
most persons interviewed cate-
gorically referred to Bahami-
ans as "imitators" or "copy-
cats."
Our culture arose out of our
past and should be seen as an
interaction between our ances-
try, not carelessly discarded by
the wayside.
Given our unique circum-
stances with immigration and
also with tourism being our
main industry we must make
deliberate efforts to preserve
the aspects of our heritage that
make us inimitably Bahamian
and pass them on to future gen-
erations.


COUNCIL OF LEGAL EDUCATION
HUGH WOODING LAW SCHOOL
P.O. Box 323 Tunapuna
Trinidad. WI

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE POST OF
TUTOR, LEGAL AID CLINIC
HUGH WOODING LAW SCHOOL


.' .ub c' '1 ^ . .. ........ ._ ...
The Council of Legal Education invites applications from attorneys-at-law for the post ofTuto a t
Legal Aid Clinic, Hugh Wooding Law School in Trinidad & Tobago.

The successful applicant will be expected to assume duties on Monday, August 4, 2008. The position is
a full-time one and no outside employment may be undertaken without the prior approval of the
Council of Legal Education. The appointment will be on contract for three (3) years in the first instance
and is renewable.

THE PERSON:
Applicants must be attorneys-at-law with at least five (5) years practical, professional experience in both
criminal law practice and civil law practice particularly in litigious work, personal injury cases, family
law, law of conveyancing and real property applications and applications in respect of the estates of
deceased persons. Applicants are expected to have experience in information and communications tech-
nology.

Qualifications and/or experience in various aspects of educational pedagogy including quality assurance,
teaching and learning methodologies and assessment and evaluation techniques would be an asset.

THE POSITION:
The duties and responsibilities of the post include:
Performing the duties of full-time attorney-at-law in the Legal Aid Clinic. This includes represent-
ing clients in Court
Supervising, instructing and teaching students in the practical aspects of their training
Participating in a regular assessment of relevant areas of the established curriculum with a view ro
the continued development of content and advancement in teaching methodology
Participating in activities to facilitate the training programmes of the Law Schools of the Council
of Legal Education
Assisting the Director of the Legal Aid Clinic and performing any other duties as assigned by the
Principal


BENEFITS INCLUDE:
* A Housing Allowance
* A Transportation Allowance
* An Institutional Visit Allowance
* A Study and Travel Grant
* A Book Grant
* Membership in a Contributory Pension Scheme
* Membership in a Group Health Plan

Where appropriate up to five (5) full economy class passages and baggage allowances will be paid on
appointment and on normal termination of appointment.

Six (6) copies of a letter of application and letters of recommendation accompanied by curriculum vitae
and supporting documents, and the names and addresses of three (3) referees should be sent not later
than February 15 2008 to:

THE CHAIRMAN
COUNCIL OF LEGAL EDUCATION
C/o THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR SECRETARIAT
C/o HUGH WOODING LAW SCHOOL
P.O. BOX 323
TUNAPUNA
TRINIDAD & TOBAGO

Unsuitable applications will not be acknowledged.


For a copy of the advertisement and/or further particulars, please refer to www.decaribbean.com


Information relating to salary and allowances may be directed to the
Registrar; Hugh Wooding Law School at 1-868-662-5860/5835.
,. ,____________


NIAD
Nassau Airport
Development Company





REQUEST

FOR ENGINEERING QUALIFICATIONS


r uasa-r r ~~u i~uc-. ;-


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008, PAGE 17


. di


THE TRIBUNE














Golf course near


IMMIGRATION


NOTICE
The following persons are asked to contact the Department of
Immigration at telephone numbers 502-0563 or 502-0537 in
connection with their application for citizenship and permanent
residence.


Alder, Riffin
Alouidor, Kaye
Ambroise, Anise
Ambroise,, Franky
Augustma, Francois
Anderson, Paula
Anestor, Anselot
Antoine, Emmanuella
Aris, Claude
Apply, Karen
Appolon, Amos
Augustin, Sauveur
Bachmann, Thomas
Belony, Gervais
Belot, James
Bienaime, Fritzner
Blanc, Lavira
Brecher, Mark
Brinkley, Sonya
Brutus, Roniald
Beauchamp, Nadege
Campbell, Jacqueline
Cadet, Elda
Camille, Maxo
Capre, Jackson
Cato, Ian
Caty, Linda
Charles, Jimmy
Charles, Raymond
Chariot, Clerkson
Charly, Charles
Chery, Johnson
Cherenfant, Yves
Claivtl- Fridson
Craig, Guy De Laprade
Darling, Lena
Davis, Tito
Decembre, Marie C.
Decius, Marguerite
Decius, Wisner
Diejuste, Erline
Duncombe, Samuel
Dolce, Paul
Dorestin, Sylvia
Dorilien, Nady
Dorgelus, Bertin
Edgecombe, Cheryl
Elie-Innocent, Sands
Edwards, Karlton A.
Eliodor, Anoria
Erne-Clecidor, Andrea
Etienne, Kevin
Eugene, Leekey
Eugene, Odanis
Fenelus, Cherline
Fertil, Fernand
Frais, Jacques
Francois, Lucien
Francois, Willy
Fritz, Kyesha
Gardiner, Glenford
Gomez, Pablo-Felix
Gordon, Alecia
Gordon, Racquel
Guillaume, David L.
Guillaume, Linda
Guerrier, Alma
Guerrier, Faustin
Hall, Schivon N.
Hanna, Maria Dawn
Haughton, Ronica
Higgs, Marie Angela
Holland, Jeremy H.
Jacobs, Alfreda A.
Jean, Nadilia
Jeune, Ileus
Johnson, Deltora
Johnson, Howard
Joseph, Alfred


Joseph, Nasson (c/o Bettie Dorcely)
Joseph, Jhondeka
Joseph, Leslie
Joseph, James
Joseph, Reynold
Jules, Kedly
Kelly, Linos
Kemp, Sherry
Kerr, Therame Leonie
Knowles, Marie Vernicia
Lacroix, Angeline 0.
Lamour, Amos
Leslie, Clement
Lindsay, Leona Madgaretta
Livadas, Christos
Leonce, Jeanine
Louis, Joselaine
Louis, Shantnel
Louis, Reviere 0.
Louissaint, Rosnie
Luc, Marc A.
Madu.abuchukwu, Chima
Masena, Francis
Mareus, Fedner
McIntyre, Juanita
Messam, Marvin Ray
Mertil, Wilner
Mitial, Constantin
Mocombe, Dieupha
Mocombe, Merline
Narcisse, Antoine
Nelson, Karline
Newchurch, Coralie Patrone
Octavien, Orelus
Osias, Denie
Okyere, Frank
Onege, Kenson
Orange, Jacques
Paul, Kevin
Payoute-Rolle, Claudette
Petit, Almori
Petit-Frere, Wilner Lamba
Petit-Homme, William
Pitter, Latoya
Pierre, Atilus
Pierre, Berry
Pierre, Guerry
Pierre, Natanael
Pierre-Louis, Claude
Philippe, Merlande
Pena, Andres Alberto Merino
Reynolds, Lauren
Riviere-Clecidor, Shirley
Robinson, Selina
Rolle, Claudette
Rollins, Manishka
Saintilhomme, Jeancius
St.Michael-Hylton, Byron
Samuels, Lennise
Saunders, Cristina
Seamy, Pierre
Severe, Yanick
Shaw, Lloyd
Simon, Allen
Small,Thomas
Stern, Kim
Sylvain, Herode
Sylverain-Joseph, Ella
Theophile, Ernage
Thurene, Dieuseul
Tilme, Adie John
Tysoe, Clive
Valson, Kelvis
Valbrun, Curry
Valbrun, Daniel
Valbrun, Odonel
Veus, Luckson
Wilson, David
Youte, Orius


* NAIROBI, Kenya

hen Steve
Maina finishes
a round of golf
at Kenya's
exclusive Windsor club, a waist-
coated waiter hurries over with
a tall iced drink while armed
guards watch discreetly from
the shrubbery, a few minutes'
drive from one of Nairobi's old-
est slums, according to the Asso-
ciated Press.
That's Mathare, the shanty-
town where Cliff Owino's tin
shack leans over a river of
sewage and almost every morn-
ing a corpse with machete
wounds turns up in an alley.
Most of the time, these two
faces of Kenya, so close geo-
graphically, exist on different
planes. But clashes triggered by
Kenya's disputed elections on
Dec. 27 set them on a collision
course. Some 800 people have
died and more than 300,000
been displaced after opposition
leader Raila Odinga accused
President Mwai Kibaki of rig-
ging the slim margin that
secured him another five-year
term.
Many factors contributed to
the violence frustration over
poverty and corruption, ethnic
rivalries exploited by politi-
cians, criminal gangs and com-
petition over land but most
of all the feeling of Kenya's
poor that Kibaki's much-touted
economic boom is passing them
by.
"We are the weak," com-
plains 25-year-old Owino in the
gloom of his tiny shack where
Odinga stares down from a


A -TALE'OFTWOIAS


-;-





CLIFF OWINO walk past a sewage filled stream, Saturday, Jan. 19, 2008
in the Mathare slum in Nairobi, Kenya. When Steve Maina finishes a
round of golf on the immaculate lawns of Kenya's exclusive Windsor club,
a waistcoated waiter will hurry to offer him a tall drink while armed
guards keep watch discreetly from the shrubbery. But a few minutes
drive away, Cliff Owino's tin shack leans over a river of sewage in Nairo-
bi's Mathare slum, where he says police hunt people like animals and
almost every morning a corpse with fresh machete wounds turns up in a
muddy alley.


poster on the wall. Owino has
dog-eared dictionaries and
books on philosophy to read by
the light of a gas lantern. He
dreams of going to college but
knows he can never afford the
fees.
"We work harder than a don-
key but we can never be rich,"
he says.
Owino is a Luo, the same
ethnic group as his hero Odin-
ga. But he says that tribe, often
used as a shorthand to explain
the country's strife, didn't come
into it. Sitting in his dark, leaky
shack, Owino explains he voted
for Odinga because he
promised to change the cor-
ruption of the current regime


and spread the country's
wealth.
In 2002, the candidate of
change was Kibaki, of the
Kikuyu tribe, Kenya's largest.
The man he was seeking to
unseat was the notoriously cor-
rupt President Daniel arap Moi,
who had driven the country's
economy into the ground.
Odinga campaigned vigorously
for Kibaki then, winning him
votes from the slums.
Kibaki, an economist, won
the 2002 election. and since
then tourism and agriculture
have led economic growth aver-
aging 5 percent a year. But the
gap between rich and poor has
widened substantially.


COUNCIL OF LEGAL EDUCATION
SECRETARIAT
P.O. Box 323, Tunapuna
Trinidad. WI

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE POST OF-
PRINCIPAL HUGH WOODING LAW SCHOOL


The Council of Legal Education is a regional institution, which has oversight of legal education and rthl
qualifications for legal practice in the West Indies. It administers three professional Law School.,
Norman Manley Law School in Jamaica, Hugh Wooding Law School in Trinidad & Tobago and E'~gene
Dupuch Law School in The Bahamas.

The Council is inviting applications for the position of Principal of the Hugh Wooding Law School. The
successful applicant will be expected to assume duties on, Monday, August 4 2008.

THE PERSON:
Applicants must be attorneys-at-law with not less than ten (10) years standing at the Bar and /or in the
Judiciary of any Commonwealth Caribbean territory. Qualifications and/or experience in administra-
tion, academia or finance would be an asset. The successful applicant should have or be willing to devel-
op the following core competencies:


Human Relations Skills
Leadership Skills
Management Skills
Strategic Planning Skills


THE POSITION:
The Principal of dte Law School shall be responsible to the Council of Legal Education for the organic
nation and administration of the Law School and of the courses of study and practical instruct ion and
shall exercise such other functions of the Council as the Council may from time to lime ellru[L 10o
him/her.

BENEFITS INCLUDE:
* Competitive Salary
* A Housing Allowance
* Free use of a Motor Vehicle
* An Entertainment Allowance
* Five (5) weeks annual vacation leave
* A Study and Travel Grant
* A Book Grant
* An Institutional Visit Allowance
* Membership in a Contributory Pension Scheme
* Membership in a Group Health Plan
* Removal Expenses and Passages

Where appropriate, removal expenses and up to five (5) Full economy class p.iss.agcs aniJ b1,1,:.,;
allowance will be paid on appointment and on normal termination.

Six (6) copies of a letter of application and letters of recommendation, accompanied by ur.!i, ,i \ 1 '.!,,
and supporting documents and the names and addresses of three (3) referees, should b .I 1 .,:, ,.,-
fidential cover no later than February 15 2008, to:

THE CHAIRMAN
COUNCIL OF LEGAL EDUCATION
C/o THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR SECRETARIAT
C/o HUGH WOODING LAW SCHOOL
P.O. BOX 323
TUNAPUNA
TRINIDAD & TOBAGO

Unsuitable applications will not be acknowledged.

For a copy of the advertisement and/or further particulars, please refer to www.elccaribhean.eomi


Information relating to salary and allowances may be directed to
Mrs. Margaret Adams-Stowe, Registrar (Secnrtariat)
Council of Legal Education at 1-868-662-5860/5835 or migiestoivwc'@iormil. corn.
I I


IA


--.---


THE TRIBUNE)
.'.*'


PAGE 18, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008


- o"







MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008, PAGE 19


RATOAL


slum signals divisions


"If this matter (of elections)
is not resolved, we don't have a
better future," Owino said,
explaining why he braves police
bullets to hit the streets every
time Odinga calls a demonstra-
tion. "If we don't have a future,
I don't see the point of living."
But those surfing the wave
of Kenya's prosperity blame
politicians as well as poverty
for the violence.
"The election campaigns
implied it would be like a light
switch: You move out of the
slums overnight, you'll be dri-'
ving a car," says Maina, 38, his
gold wedding ring flashing as
his golf ball sails through the
air.
SMaina and many of his
friends are Kikuyu. In the after-
math of the elections, Kikuyus
have been murdered and their
businesses burned.
By the sculpted lake at the
Windsor, which costs nearly
$5,000 to join, Maina's friends
swap tales of previously friend-
ly neighbors who forced
Kikuyus out of homes and tried
to take over businesses.
In the west of the country,
which has seen the worst vio-
lence, his golfing partner's hair-
dresser had her salon taken
over by neighbor from another
tribe and another friend forced
from her home because she was
Kikuyu.
"People were expecting to
take over property," said
Maina, who employs five peo-
ple to look after his own home.
"Instead of saying why don't
we create more of that wealth,
they want to grab it and dis-
tribute it.
"I was worried this could turn
into a class war."
But the police have largely
kept protesters penned in the
slums with tear gas and live bul-
lets, and politicians capitalized
on long-held land grievances to
channel the violence on ethnic,
rather than economic, lines.
"The Kikuyus have been
demonized," says Maina.
"Politicians on both sides are
to blame, but those of Odinga's
party "have been preaching a
campaign of hate."
Owino also fears ethnicity is
looming too large.
"We are not fighting


"We work
harder than a
donkeybut we
can never get
rich."


Cliff Owino

Kikuyus, we are fighting the
government," he insists, as rain
turns the mud and sewage to
sludge outside his door.
"They were not for change,
they were for the status quo."
If there is ethnic violence, he
says, it is because Kikuyus are
not sharing their power.
Kenya's first president after
independence from Britain,
Jomo Kenyatta, was a Kikuyu.
Moi, of the Kalenjin tribe, came
next, then Kibaki, a Kikuyu.
Now the Luo feel it is their
turn.
Kikuyus "want to dominate
us .... We are not being ruled
by people representing all
Kenyans," Owino said.
Maina, an executive with a
private medical firm, insists that
he has never been helped by
his tribe or government con-
nections.
No one is stopping anyone
else frc --making money,
Maina p,.its out.
He says he takes his own chil-
dren into the slums to help on a
church project supporting a
school.
"We work our butts off.
Many hours, over the weekend,
at night you are on that lap-
top," he says to nods of agree-
ment from friends.
Yet Maina, who voted for the
ruling party, knows that his
country is sitting on an eco-
nomic time bomb.
"The violence will subside,
but the injustice will remain,
and if those injustices are not
addressed, we will be back here


again," he says sadly. "The elec-
tion gave them (the poor) a
sense of hope and it was taken
away."


Owino occasionally makes $6
a day as a construction worker,
and lives in a slum so violent
it's nicknamed Baghdad.
"Kibaki gave us promises but
they ended up in dust," Owino
said. "Now they want calm.
What about justice?"


we have moved


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2008 at the Windsor club near the Mathare slum in Nairobi, Kenya.


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at Corporate Centre have moved to new offices on Church and East Bay Streets.


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PAGE 20, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008 THE TRIBUNE



Samba paraders dance


until dawn as Brazil's


carnival hits high gear


* RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil
Brazilian beauties wearing
only sequins led carnival
parades lasting until dawn Sun-
day as second-division samba
groups used a kaleidoscope of
colorful dancers and floats to
launch the biggest part of Rio's
five-day bash, according to
Associated Press.
Led by a two-story golden
lion, the samba group Estacio
de Sa kicked off the party in a
hail of fireworks and roars from
crowds waving the flags of their
favorite samba groups at the
85,000-seat Sambadrome stadi-
um. Backlit with a purple neon
glow, the towering float was sur-
rounded by scores of dancers
in skintight lion costumes and
followed by an army of women
spinning in gold and red hoop
skirts and elaborate headdress-
es fashioned from crystal globes
and feathers.
Argentine tourist Edgardo
Levita, dressed up as pirate,
marveled at the scene as he
swilled beer and tried to hit on
scantily dressed young Brazil-
ian women swarming into the


stands. "This is great, the best in
the world," said Levita, 23.
"Alcohol, women, the floats:
Everything is perfect."
The parading that didn't end
until daylight was only a warm
up for bigger competition
among the city's top 12 samba
schools, which mount 80-minute
parades on Sunday and Mon-
day nights to impress a panel
of judges and be declared the
year's champion.
Among the biggest carnival
mysteries was the plan for the
group Viradouro, forced by a
judge last week to redo its car-
nival theme after Jewish group
successfully sued and forced
Viradouro to remove a float
depicting naked holocaust vic-
tims with a dancing Adolf
Hitler. The group has said it
would rework the float to cele-
brate freedom of expression,
but hid the new float from pub-
lic view, suspense surrounding
how Viradouro will pull of its
carnival theme: "It Give You
Goosebumps."
Crowds topping the million
mark turned out in the north-
eastern city of Recife for the


traditional Galo de Madrug,
da, or Midnight Rooster part,
on Saturday. And in the city c
Salvador, revelers dance
behind bands playing Axb
music atop huge sound truck,
and followed hundreds of exot-
ically costumed drummers
Blocos Afros down the streets.
Two girls ages 16 and 7 -
were killed early Sunday and
12 people were injured in the
small southeastern city of
Sabara when a tractor-trailer
with a band playing atop hit
them during the '"Mamm
Africa" street carnival part;
the city reported on its We
site. The Web site of the Fol
de S. Paulo newspaper said th
truck's brakes failed, but th
city did not cite a cause.
After two straight days of ht
and sunny weather in Ri,
rained poured down Sundar
and threatened to swamp th
parade at night making it dif-
ficult for the samba groups tb
pull off their elaborately script
ed routines with hundreds
dancers and multiple floats
keen-eyed judges rate them on
a point system.


We offer Flexible Annuitles
starting with an initial
contribution of $500
minimum and contributions


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i THE TRIBUNE



DUS I ess
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008






Baha Mar 'on


of


$110m-


plus


Colinalmperial


cusp'





Work


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

B aha Mar is "on the cusp
of execution" for the
three main projects that
will kick-start its $2.6
billion Cable Beach
redevelopment, with infrastructure
costs estimated to be between $95-
$100 million, and total direct con-
struction costs for the Commercial
Village pegged at $15 million.
Robert Sands, Baha Mar's senior


vice-president for
administration -'
and external -P.
affairs, told The
Tribune that the
three initial pro- i,'
jects all infra-
structure-related
- will be to con-
struct the re-rout-
ed West Bay
Street, the Commercial Village, and
relocate the Cable Beach strip's east-
ern Straw Market to where the west-


* Tenders out for three major preliminary projects, with 'execution' expected shortly
* Infrastructure and roads to cost $95-100m, with Commercial Village to add
another $15m, as Cable Beach developer prepares for three lead projects
* Straw Market relocation also kickstarted by new agreement's signing,
with project to be completed by 2011


ern one now is.
"The aggreg.ilc direct costs of con-
struction in the Commercial Village
will be around $15 million, and the


infrastructure work, which includes
the roads etc, the cost will be between
$95-$100 million," Mr Sands said.
"These are very advanced in terms


of the development stages, and having

SSee PROJECT, 13B


'Some softening' on opposition to worker fingerprints


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THERE has been "some
softening" of opposition to
using biometric fingerprints as
a means of recognizing
Bahamian employees when
they 'clock in and out' of work,
the Bahamas Employers' Coh-
federation's (BECon) presi-
dent told The Tribune,
although sceptics want to
obtain more information to
satisfy their remaining con-
cerns.
Brian Nutt said the use of
biometric fingerprint recogni-
tion, coupled with the ongoing


Employers and union camps on TRIFOR split over child labour


debate over whether to rein-
state the Employment Act's
First Schedule on employing
child labour, were the two key
issues dominating discussions
at TRIFOR the grouping of
employers, trade unions and
the Government.
On the biometric fingerprint
issue, Mr Nutt said: "There's
been some softening of views,
but it's a case of getting the
information.
"We're trying to ensure bio-
metric data can't be used to
incriminate people by trans-


ferring that biometric data
from one machine to another,
or recreating the fingerprint."
Bahamian cimpiloi have
long been calling for the Gov-
ernment to amend the
Employment Act to provide
for biometric fingerprint recog-
nition of employees, believing
that "thousands of dollars" per
week were being added on to
comnpan\ payrolls due to time
card and 'clocking in' scams,
which caused productivity loss-
es.
Currently, the Employment


Act 2001 outlaws the use of
fingerprints by all Bahamian
employers, apart from those in
the casino industry.
It stipulates: "No employer
shall, as a requirement for
employment or continued
employment, require any per-
son to furnish a set of his fin-
gerprints or take a lie detector
test."
The issue was raised again
in the Vexing Business Issues
pape rpre1 ntcd.lo PrimM0tyP,-
ister Hubert Ingraham and
other Cabinet ministers by the


Chamber of Commerce last
month.
That report said: "Labour
laws are outdated since they
prevent the use of certain tech-
nology in tracking employees'
time.
"Clearly, it is common
knowledge that many employ-
ees come to work late, leave
early, or generally leave their
job for many hours during the
day.
"The systems that employ-
ers are presently allowed to
use to track when an employee

SEE page 8B


BECon chief disagrees

with Chamber report

on termination pay


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas Employers
Confederation's (BECon)
president has disagreed with
concerns expressed in a report
sent to the Prime Minister that
Bahamian businesses face
"great uncertainty" over
employee redundancy costs,


Lost company
filings are 'too
commonplace'
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor
LOST company records,
filings and resolutions are
"too commonplace" at the
Registrar of Companies'
office, a private sector
report warning Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham that
this can be "potentially dis-
astrous" to professional ser-
vices firms.
The Chamber of Com-
merce's report on Vexing
Business Issues, delivered
to Mr Ingraham and his
Cabinet ministers,
described the nature and


pointing out that the Employ-
ment Act does set limits on
this.
Brian Nutt told The Tribune
that Section 29 of the Act
"provides for the amount of
payment in the event of redun-
dancy", and effectively

SEE page 8B


Act's regulations
will not forget
its omissions

* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
REGULATIONS to accom-
pany the proposed Securities
Industry Act 2008 will not
leave out provisions omitted
from the previous Act, such as
trading from a broker's own
account and the short selling
prohibition, the sector regula-
tor told The Tribune.
Hillary Deveaux, the Secu-
rities Commission's executive
director, responding to indus-
try concerns that they had not
seen the regulations, with the
new Act omitting a number of
areas covered by its predeces-
sor, said the regulations would


SEE page 10B


., Nassau Exuma


*Abaco *Freeport *


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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4,2008 THE TRIBUNE


UOYAL IIT MARKETa!R AP I


* By Fidelity Capital
Markets
IT was an active week of
trading in the Bahamian









-I


stock market, with 197,690
shares changing hands. Ten
of the 19 listed companies
saw trading activity during
the week, with five advanc-
ing, four declining and one
remaining unchanged.

Bank
Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) led the volume for the
week, with 140,099 shares
changing hands, accounting
for 71 per cent of total shares
traded. CBL lost $0.10 on its
share value during the week,
to close at $7.82.
JS Johnson & Company
(JSJ) led the rally for a sec-
ond consecutive week, climb-


ing by $0.50 or 4 per cent on
volume of 2,000 shares to
close the week at a new 52-
week high of $12.50.
Also experiencing new 52-
week highs during the week
were Abaco Markets (AML),
Cable Bahamas (CAB), and
FamGuard Corporation
(FAM), closing at $1.71,
$12.64, and $7.45, respective-
ly.
The FINDEX declined by
0.61 points or 0.61 per cent,
week-over-week, to close at
945.61.

COMPANY NEWS
Earnings Releases:
There were no earnings
releases from any of the list-
ed companies during the
week.
INVESTMENT TIP
One investment vehicle
gaining popularity is a mutual


(


fund. A mutual fund is a pro-
fessionally-managed invest-
ment fund that pools the
funds from many different
investors and invests in a
wide array of securities,
which are selected in accor-
dance with the fund's invest-
ment objective.
Mutual

The value of a mutual fund
share is called the net asset
value (NAV) per share, and
could be calculated on a dai-
ly, weekly or monthly basis.
The NAV per share is the
net assets of the mutual fund
less any liabilities, divided by
the total outstanding shares.
Investment gains for most
mutual funds are not distrib-
uted, but are rather reinvest-
ed into the fund until an indi-
vidual redeems their hold-
ings.


BAHAMAS
R E A I,. T Y
lt*c.', 19t~


I DIC. 6 TW


EXCLUSIVE! 2bed/2.5bth: Price: $550,000
1,720 SF oceanfront townhouse with private dock to
accommodate yachts up to 55 feet. Residence located in
an exclusive gated community with 24 hour security,
tennis courts, a swimming pool and more. Features
include superb views of Montague Bay, 10 ft. ceilings,
spacious rooms, large master suite, walk-in closets,
recessed lighting, 2-zone central a/c, washer/dryer, large
balcony, two parking spaces, standby generator and
outdoor lighting. Offered fully fumished.

ww .bahamasrealtybsi/s3197
Stuart Halbert I Tel: 242.396.0034 J Cel: 242.477.7908.
Eml: stuart@bahamasrealty.bs


The Bahamian Stock Market
FINDEX 945.61 YTD 0.67%


BISX CLOSING
SYMBOL PRICE


AML
BAB
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
CWCB
DHS
FAM
FCC
FCL
FIN
ICD
JSJ
PRE


$1.71
$2.65
$0.85
$9.61
$11.80
$14.60
$3.66
$12.64
$7.82
$3.14
$14.60
$4.71
$2.45
$7.45
$0.77
$5.12
$13.00
$7.25
$12.50
$10.00


CHANGE VOLUME


$ 0.01
$-
$-
$-0.07
$-
$-
$-
$0.14
$-0.10
$-
$-
$-0.45
$0.15
$0.05
$-
$-0.02
$-0.01
$-
$0.50
$-


4,000
0
0
5,500
0
0
0
10,040
140,099
306
0
0
18,500
3,000
0
5,295
8,950
0
2,000
0


YTD PRICE
CHANGE


3.01%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
.4.90%
-7.24%
-0.32%
0.00%
-6.55%
4.26%
3.47%
0.00%
-1.16%
0.39%
0.00%
13.64%
0.00%


DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:
BBL has declared a special dividend of $0.02 per share,
with $0.01 having been paid on December 31, 2007, and $0.01
being payable on March 31st, 2008, to all shareholders of
record date December 21, 2007.
CBL has declared a special dividend of $0.06 per share,
payable on April 30, 2008, to all shareholders of record date
April 15, 2008.
CWCB has declared dividends of $0.013 per share,
payable on February 7,2008, to all shareholders of record date
January 15, 2008.


International Markets

FOREX Rates
Weekly %Change
CAD$ 1.0075 1.41
GBP 1.9653 -0.86
EUR 1.4796 0.86

Commodities
Weekly %Change
Crude Oil $88.92 -1.96
Gold $909.10 -0.45

International Stock Market Indexes:

Weekly %Change
DJIA 12,743.19 4.39
S & P 500 1,395.42 4.87
NASDAQ 2,4..36 3.75
e '^... ..... "" 13,497.16 -0.97


I


I BUSINESS -7 71


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


Th tribute







MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


Talks over Family




Island cruise tours


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter
THE Ministry of Tourism
is in talks with small cruise
lines over the possibility of
creating a unique inter-island
Bahamian cruise, which
would allow small numbers
of cruise passengers to expe-
rience several island destina-
tions.
The ministry's director-
general, Vernice Walkine,
said they had approached a
number of "smaller quality
cruise lines" that accommo-
date between 200-250 peo-
ple.
She explained that the
cruises, similar to Hawaii and
Greek island cruises, would
allow small pockets of
tourists to travel to the differ-
ent Family Islands, with the
added benefit and conve-
nience of cruise travel.
Challenge
The challenge and task of
her ministry, Ms Walkine
added, will be to convince
Family Island communities
that the idea can be a major
boost to their economies.
"A lot of the smaller
islands are hesitant about let-
ting what they think will be
massive amounts of persons
,~vm; i iu port, because when
they think of the Bahamian
cruise exp :rience, they think
Nassau or Freeport," she
said.
Ms W Ikine said that is
why the ministry has been
careful in selecting the cruise
lines they are talking to,
focusing on small ships who
cater to quality passengers.
i Her-comments came dur-
Ing me question and answer


period of her speech at the
National Tourism Week Con-
ference.
One participant suggested
that such a service would be a
vital boost to the Bahamas.
His suggestion was that
there could be two itiner-
aries- one a northern
Bahamas tour, and then a
southern island one- some-


thing he said would be partic-
ularly beneficial to the more
remote islands.
Passengers
He said that 200 passengers
calling into an island on a
regularly scheduled, weekly
basis would be a tremendous
boost, and would inspire a lot


Mon.-FrI 6 in -Fri.u I I'7aII IIIp
S Pit 1. iS i t1.. I Il
~ ser in~oimearm icoalaveco
Sherwin Williams Paint Store


of the residents to create
activities and spin-off busi-
nesses that would address the
uniqueness of each island.


Eventages


Your future INVESTMENT MANAGER
in a major international Venture Fund in Nassau


You have
* A sound degree in.a life science related field, such as pharmacology, biology,
nutritional sciences or medicine and/or sound business background
in nutrition or food and beverage products, preferably in the US market
* Post graduate qualifications and/or an MBA or equivalent
* Hands-on analytical and research experience, preferably in a Venture
Capital or Private Equity environment
* Passion for a healthy lifestyle and the right food
* Excellent oral and written communications skills in English, Spanish a plus
* Bahamian Citizenship, you want to live and work in an international
environment right here in Nassau, with frequent travels

We are
The world's foremost Venture Fund in Health, Wellness and Nutrition. The Partnership
invests in the life sciences field and is particularly interested in identifying nutritional
products, dietary supplements, medical foods and innovative approaches to prevent chronic
diseases.

We offer
a job which will involve search and analysis of companies in the area of health, wellness and
nutrition and preparation of investment decisions by investment committee. A competitive
salary package commensurate with the experience and qualifications will be offered.

If you are attracted by this unique opportunity, or have questions, please contact IVC
Americas S.A., P.O. Box N-7532, Nassau or FAX: 225-1307 or EMAIL:
hr.nassau@inventages.com for the attention of HUMAN RESOURCES -Ref: IM.

The deadline for applications is 11-February-2008.
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AN INDEPENDENT CANADIAN CO-EDUCATIONAL BOARDING SCHOOL FOR GRADES 7-12

PICKERING COLLEGE

CANADIAN BOARDING SCIH IOOX


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II ;L' 1-cIs'i[ l I 0[IIll:i inn l)P1 lt o I c m imv I0111 by(Eol k m ltl nillI
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Core responsibilities:


* Oversees fully the operation of the branch on the island which
includes providing instructions for all staff.
* Conducts monthly and weekly audits by reviewing the work of
team members against bank procedures.
* Ensures the balancing of half-yearly, quarterly, monthly, bi-monthly
and weekly listings.
* Carries out account management such as: processing inquires,
account updates, holds, and the auditing and filing dormant account
files.
* Performs duties of Treasury Custodian by distributing and receiving
cash shipments.
* Performs a variety of other related duties such as: conducting cash
counts, holding treasury combination, preparing branch reports,
taking loan applications, performing lock-up duties, and preparing
safety deposit box correspondence.


Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:


* Associates degree, or Institute of Financial Services Certificate,
and five (5) years of banking experience
* In-depth knowledge of general bank policies, procedures and bank
services to appropriately direct and service customers.
* Knowledge of specific governmental and banking laws, regarding
improper practices such as money laundering.
* Knowledge of credit policies to process loan applications.
* In-depth knowledge of customer services and the ability to
demonstrate duties to other persons in the branch.
* Basic supervisory and management skills to counsel and direct
associates in performance and other matters.
* Strong oral and written communication skills to interact with
customers and associates.

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience
and qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and life
insurance; pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later than February 15th, 2008 to:


c/o The Tribune
DA#04604
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas


BUSINESS-i I


0









PAGES M


V


Awo


BFSB's chairman and chief executive are shown with some of the Government and regulatory representatives present at the weekend Retreat. (L tO R: Craig Gomez, BFSB chairman; Rowena Bethel, legal advisor in the
Ministry of Finance; Brent Symonette, deputy prime minister and minister of foreign affairs; Senator Elma Campbell, minister of state for immigration; Desmond Bannister, minister of state for legal affairs; Senator Claire
Hepburn, attorney general and minister of legal affairs; Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance; and Wendy C. Warren, BFSB chief executive


BFSB directors set to




assess Retreat reports


THE Bahamas Financial
Services Board's (BFSB)
Board of Directors is set to
examine the reports produced
by the plenary and small group
breakout sessions at its 2008
Marsh Harbour Retreat, aim-
ing to use them to refine the
organisation's strategy going
forward.
"BFSB will examine the rec-
ommendations made by indus-
try participants and respond to
the specific requests from the
Government," said Wendy
Warren, the BFSB's chief
executive and executive direc-
tor.
Some 133 persons attended


this year's Retreat working
sessions, with 21 per cent rep-
resenting the Government and
regulators; 5 per cent Profes-
sional Industry Associations;
and 74 per cent member firm
representatives across all
industry sectors. The Govern-
ment delegation was led by
Prime Minister Hubert A.
Ingraham.
Sessions were structured to
provide information on finan-
cial services developments in
international financial centres,
private banking and insurance,
trade matters and regulation.
Retreat participants received
reports and 2008 action plans


I- I-
iII~


MI. r. ..-.r _

Lin- -44-11.1h_
,-,-3-.-.


-i i T. '
r:~i. ::I Im'v ;~~.n-
-; -rr ti:m: I
-i 'I


from the Ministers with day-
to-day responsibility for finan-
cial services the Office of the
Attorney General and Legal
Affairs (including Registrar
General's Department) and
Immigration, as well as the
Central Bank.
Participants heard reports
on the progress that has been
made on regulatory and immi-
gration matters.
Rowena Bethel, legal advi-
sor in the Ministry of Finance,
reminded participants that
reform was a process that
requires a phased approach.
"It requires coordination at
administrative levels, common
leadership, physical and legal
consolidation and complete
integration," said Ms Bethel.
She said the Bahamas was
well down the road to reform,
citing the consolidation that


has already occurred in the
reduced number of govern-
ment entities responsible for
regulatory affairs, approval
form the private sector to com-
plete insurance regulations,
and greater meaningful inter-
action with industry.
Craig Tony Gomez, the
BFSB's chairman, said: "The
feedback was tremendous
from both the perspective of
the presenters as well as audi-
ence. I think going forward we
understand what the issues are
to keep the Bahamas compet-
itive and to grow the sector.
"I am optimistic that, should
the matters discussed be
addressed in the way that all
stakeholders wish, the
Bah~in'as will rerimhin'a very
competitive jurisdiction in
which to do financial services
business."


HARBORSIDE RESORT AT ATLANTIS IS RECRUITING FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS:
Human Resources Director Sales Executives Bus Drivers


* Marketing Training Operations Manager
* Al Marketing Manager


- Marketing Executives


* Special Operation Coordinators


Harborside at Atlantis will be hosting an Open House for people interested in learning more about Starwood
Vacation Ownership, Inc. Join us on Thursday, February 7, 2008 from 6:00pm to 8:30pm in the
Harborside Sales Gallery, Beach Towers Lobby.
Spread your wings and soar to new heights with a prosperous career at Harborside Resort at Atlantis, where we hire for Attitude,
Train for skills and the Benefits are Stella!
Please respond to the Recruiter, Harborside Resort at Atlantis on or before February 6, 2008 by:
Fax: 363-6822
Email: H RArecruitment@starwoodvo.com
Or deliver the resume to:
Human Resources Department
Marine One Building, Marina One Drive
Paradise Island



HARBORSIDE


RESORT
AT
ATLANTIS
THE ATLANTIS VACATION CLUB


"Hoime declncrv of The
ITribune gi\Lv .1' ,a he.ad
start. iThe Tribune is
my newspaper.
HAROLD ANTOR
INSURArNCE EXECUTIVE
For delivery of the leading
Bah,--nmian ewspapei, a:all Tho
Tribune's Circilation D'lm.ii n1,1nt
at 502-2383 or visit our uolic's i
Shirley Streect to signi ni today'


The Tribune
/ //y l ; ,c /qt7" / "/


-Quote

of the

Betty Taylor weekI
Journalist / Entrepreneur

"A man who

fais once and

tries twice, is

more tikey to

succeedthian a

man who

never tries."


Hiy otnilIncm Poucn


* Sf~il 0'1 *Im II~~~ 1o:
on bth ides of ,the[Oonl ly road'll
hedig it egtS l rc f-


Frepor (o th bo:ndry. S50.0


Equal Opportunity Employer/Drug-free Workplace


NOTICE


Southern Community General Clinic is please to
announce Extension of Services as Dr. Richard
Bridgewater joins Dr. Locksley Munroe in practice.

Dr. Bridgewater is an obstetrician/Gynecologist with
a special interest in stress Incontinence. He is a
fellow of The American College of Obstetrician and
Gynecologist with over fifteen years of experience.

Consultations by appointments-328-6360


_____j


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


. .


'"

r








1


Director-general



calls for tourism



training school


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter
THE Bahamas needs a Hos-
pitality Training Institute that
will provide high school gradu-
ates with tourism-related train-
ing prior to them entering the
workforce, the Ministry of
Tourism's director-general said.
Vernice Walkine told the
National Tourism Week Con-
ference that such a facility
would go a long way in address-
ing concerns surrounding an
unqualified workforce in the
Bahamas' main industry.
The programme, she said,
could be an alternative for per-
sons preparing for entry-level
positions who would otherwise
not be planning a tertiary edu-
cation.
Ms Walkine said too many
Bahamians were without basic
educational skills, and the coun-
try needed to catch up.
The director-general added
that if established, a Tourism
Development Centre would be
able to focus on the develop-
ment of special experience and
incentives in the industry as
well.
Highlighting the theme of the
week, Tourism: a New Begin-
ning, Ms Walkine said the
tourism industry of today was
not the one of old, and young
and old Bahamians must accept
that and change their mindset
accordingly. Otherwise the
Bahamas will be left behind.
Ms Walkine pointed out that
while there has been the talk of
anchor projects in the Family
Islafids. the country's oldest and
perhaps most essential anchor
property Bay Street was suf-


fearing and had to be improved if
Nassau was to improve its cruise
passenger spend, which is at the
lowest end in the Caribbean.
She said the area needs to be
properly zoned, and store mer-
chants who are allowed a busi-
ness there should feel it is an
honour and privilege and main-
tain their property, whether
they are owners or not. Own-
ers of buildings that are not
maintained need to face puni-
tive damages.
Jonnajah Boodle, the junior
tourism minister finalist, cap-
tured the director-general and
audience's attention with her
suggestions for the Ministry of
Tourism. She explained her


plan using the acronym TAR-
GET. The fourth grade Abaco
student explained that the let-
ters stood for Training of young
persons, Advertising, Reward-
ing stellar tourism performance,
Guides creating Bahamas
experiences throughout the
islands from regular residents,
Exposure, and Treat guests to
unique experiences.
Among her ideas was the
development of a culture centre
on every island, ensuring that
guests leave with contact infor-
mation for at least one Bahami-
an resident, and giving guests
goodbye presents. Her sugges-
tion for the latter category? An
Androsia fabric rose.


FREEPORT CONTAINER PORT LIMITED
Is pleased to offer a CAREER OPPORTUNITY to a qualified candidate
In the position of:
CIVIL ENGINEER

Candidate must possess the following minimum qualifications and experience
and perform the essential functions of the job-including but not limited to:

A Bachelor of Science Degree in Civil Engineering with a minimum of Five
(5) years' experience in civil and marine engineering.

RESPONSIBILITIES:
Freeport Container Port Limited
* Supervision of All Civil Engineering projects including: Phase V
development, Phase 1 repairs, establishment of additional Stacking Area,
construction of an Amenities Building, preparation for additional Reefer
Capacity and all property maintenance an repairs for Freeport Container
Port.

Freeport Harbour Company Limited
* Supervision of repairs to quay walls; entrance and breakwaters,
consultation on new Cruise Facility, Bahama Rock Mining Program and
all property maintenance and repairs for Freeport Harbour Company.

Grand Bahama Airport Company include:
* Construction of a new Fuel Farm, construction of an extension to the
Domestic terminal and all property maintenance and repairs for Grand
Bahama Airport Company

Eighteen months on the job training will be provided before assuming full
responsibility for the position.

Candidates are required to forward Resume to:

The Human Resource Director
Freeport Container Port Limited
P.O.Box F-42465
Freeport, Grand Bahama
Bahamas
or send email to: Ads@fcp.com.bs


U


JEWELLERY SALES

PROFESSIONALS

Top Retailer of Fine Jewellery in the Bahamas
wants to hire experienced and successful sales
associates to work in established stores located
on Paradise Island and Bay Street.


$


S


Best BASE PAY in the country!
SBest COMMISSIONS in the country!


$


$


$


$


S


MUST HAVE AT LEAST ONE YEAR OF
JEWELLERY EXPERIENCE AND A PROVEN
HISTORY OF SALES EXCELLENCE!


lw


'9
~1WA~t


Fax Resume to 393-5102 Re: Sales Professionals


Legal Notice

NOTICE

BLUE MANAGEMENT LTD.
IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 of BLUE
MANAGEMENT LTD. is in dissolution.
The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 30th January
2008. David Thain of Arer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd., Build-
ing 2 Caves Village, PO. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of BLUE
MANAGEMENT LTD. All persons having claims against the
above-named company are required to send their address and par-
ticulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the 2nd March 2008.
-
7...
/ l oI


CREDIT SUISSE
Credit Suisse (Bahamas) Limited
is presently considering applications for a
I.T. SPECIALIST (Senior Globus System
Developer)
Credit Suisse Private Banking is one of the world's premier private banks.
it is setting new standards that go beyond traditional banking services.
Our dedicated and highly qualified staff provides our clientele with
comprehensive solutions in individual investment counseling and professional.
portfolio management. Our total commitment is always to our clients and we
focus without compromise on their financial well-being and their personal values.
The position is open to candidates with the following minimum
requirements:
Qualifications:
At least Five (5) years experience in installation, configuration
and troubleshooting in a baking environment
Superior knowledge of GLOBUS/T24 Banking Application in
both support and development roles
Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science or equivalent
Knowledge of AIX 5.1 5.3, UNIVERSE/JBASE, PL/SQL
Experience in working with Globus/T24 related migration or
implementation projects.
Personal Qualities:
Excellent organizational, interpersonal and communication skills
Good technical and problem solving skills and experience
Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision
Enthusiasm, a positive attitude and willingness to work flexible hours as
overtime
Previous experience of working in a production support role in maintaining
Globus/T24 system is a plus.
Other Duties:
Answer Helpdesk requests (provide support & troubleshoot)
Provide UNIVERSE & GLOBUS training to IT Staff
Ensure compliance to IT guidelines / directives
Ensure that "Business Contingency Planning" requirements are followed
Other duties & projects assigned by the Manager of Department
Benefits provided include:
Competitive salary and performance bonus
Pension Plan
Health and Life Insurance
Ongoing internal and external career development/training
program
APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. Persons not meeting the
minimum requirements need not apply.
Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas
DEADLINE: 15h FEBRUARY, 2008


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE










PAGE 6B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


Visit our website at itwww..cob.edu.bs


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BUSI900 01 CREDIT & COLLECTIONS I 6 00pm-9 00pm Tues 19-Feb 8 wks $225
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COMP901 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 6 00pm-9.00pm Mon 4-Feb 12 wks $450
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COMP902 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II : ') 6 00pm-9 00pm Thur 7-Feb 12 wks S550
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SCOMP953 01 PC UPGRADE AND RSIfAIR u it- 6.00pm-7 30pro n jes/Thur 5-Feb 12 wks S500
COMP960 01 MICROSOFT POWERPOINT W/S 9:30am-4 30pm Thur 6-Mar 1 day $170
COMP930 01 WEB PAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP 9:30am-4.30pm Tues/Thur 13-Mar 2 days $550
COSMETOLOGY
COSM802 01 MAKE-UP APPLICATION 6:00pm-9.00pm Mon 18-Feb 8 wks $225
COSM804 01 MANICURE & PEDICURE 6'00pm-9 00pm Tues 19-Feb 8 wks $225
COSM807 01 NAIL ART TECHNICIAN 600pm-9:00pm Mon/Thur 18-Feb 6 wks $500
DECORATING
DECO800 01 INTERIOR DECORATING I 600pm-9:00pm Tues 19-Feb 8 wks $225
DECO801 01 INTERIOR DECORATING II 600pm-9 00pm Wed 20-Feb 8 wks $250
FLOR800 01 FLORAL DESIGN I 6 00pm-9 00pm Mon 18-Feb 10wks $225
FLOR801 01 FLORAL DESIGN II 6:00pm-900pm Thur 21-Feb 10wks $250
FLOR802 01 FLORAL DESIGN III 6:00pm-9.00pm Tues 19-Feb 10wks $300

ENGLISH
ENG 900 01 EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS 600pm-900pm Tues 19-Feb 8 wks $225

HEALTH AND FITNESS
MASG900 01 MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I 6:00pm-900pm Thur 14-Feb 10 wks $465
MASG901 01 MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS II 6 00pm-900pm Mon 11-Feb 10wks $620
HLTH900 01 GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR 6 00pm-900pm Wed 13-Feb 10wks $400

MANAGEMENT ,
MGMT900 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT I 6:00pm-900pm Thur 7-Feb 12wks $250
MGMT901 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT II 600pm-9:00pm Mon 4-Feb 12wks $300
SEWING
SEW800 01 BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING I 6.00pm-9 00pm Thur 21-Feb 10wks $225
SEW 802 01 BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING II 6:00pm-900pm Mon 18-Feb 10 wks $250
SEW 805 01 DRAPERY MAKING I 6 00pm-9.00pm Tues 19-Feb 10wks $225
SEW804 01 BEDROOM DECORATING 6 00pm-9:00pm Sat 23-Feb 10wks $225
SEW 811 01 UPHOLSTERY I 6:00pm-9:00pm Wed 27-Feb 10wks $225
MEDICAL
MEDT900 01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 6.00pm-9:00pm Wed 20-Feb 10wks $225
ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0098 / 328-1936 / 302-4300 ext 5201
or e-mail acurry(d),cob.edu. bs
All fees are included with the exception of the application fee ol $40.I00 (one time).
CEES reserve the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content. Course Scedlle andl Conurse A materials.

THE INTERNATIONAl, LANGIAG( ES ANT)D C I TURES INSlI TITLE TI IE ()OI;E("I/I INI VIV:l.SITY OF TIl IE BAl4AMAS
EVENTS (AI.ENDI)ER SEnMIESTER: 01 2008
DATE EVENT LYE( TI RERS / PIARTI IM PANTS VENkt E
February 8 Chinese Spring Festival IFireworks, lion )ance, ctc at i PM Biand Shell 6-10 P'm
Friday ____________________
February 15 Spanish Movie: ]rief IPresentation bl1unni2ngs Building
Friday (Tille to be announced) M G T 6,_o_ Room 2 at 6:30
FebnWary 22 German Movie: l resenatlion bI Prl'olcssor Steplhen ., Arallha M innlings Bluilding
Friday ,WIR KINDER l'M A IMNIIAN ZOO /..)Room 2 at 6: ~10 PNI
February 29 Movie: PAPER ('IP'S Presclntaion by Ir. \Walter Asil Munnlings 1luilditng
Friday A Holocaust Project Roonm 2 at 6:30(
March 7"' Brazilian Film riefl ntroduclion by 1. Moss Munnings B1uilding
Friday 3 FItI .IIS D1) FIRANCIS(CO(_______ ___ Room 2 at 6:30
March 14 FIRENCI H FOLK L SONG IEVENING Slide show by I. Moss, F. L.eger on guitar, J. lMunnings Building
Friday Mhlercus on vocals and otlher musical Iiicnds Routom 2 at 6:30 PMFE
March 28 VIC'O 11 I G( lgcyond ItS NIa Z I .cctur and slide show hy I. Mloss Nluatnings lluilditng
Friday Room 2 at 6:30
April 4tht PANEI. D)IS(CUSS(ION: Tourism and Pancl miciembrs liom Tourism, Imnigration, COll \Ventc to he announced
Friday lI_,anguaics an pialc lotu isntl bsic ss ss __ __
April 11 HAITI AN I ,M Slic prcsenlalion: I.ceger, S('CC.\ Ihtutings (Iuidding
Friday (title to be announced) oom 2 at (:31)
April 16 AN I'EVENINO ()F BHAIMIA IAN MUSIC. Slide show on Bahamianl Musicians atid Venue to he anomunced
Wednesday Guests: Thie 1DICE-DO SINGERS lnlcrlainers by I. Moss
May 2 MAIFFST Slide Show by LMoss: particilIaion ol Get man- M ntnings building
Friday speakers it Nassau & i May 9 French Movie: Brief l'trodtuclion b\ I. Moss MNutings Iluilding
Friday IES CHOI( RISTES RRoom 2 al 0:30 PM1


May 17"'
Saturday
May 23
I day
NOTE:


HAITIAN FL AG DAY


CI.ASSICAI, MI SIC EVENING G


Par'adec and cclclbrliotn otl I litiai citllute


Piano solos by 1. Moss:
Cello pttino duties lb 11 Ploqiin & I. Nlss
PLEASE CALL US PRIOR TO ANY
EVENT TO CONFIRM


Hand Shell al 9 .\A[
ltuntnings I nillilng
Roin 2 al 7 PMl1
302-4584
302-4587


F THE BAHAMAS


EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS



CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND
EXTENSION SERVICES
Spring 012008

BUSINESS

COURSES BEGINS

ACCOUNTING FOR BEGINNERS I, II & III 11 February

CREDIT & COLLECTIONS PROCEDURES I 19 February

SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE WORKSHOP 21 February

INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS I 7 February

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT I & II 4 February


HEALTH, FITNESS AND COSMETOLOGY

COURSE BEGINS

MASSAGE THERAPY I & II 11 February

GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR I 13 February

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 6 February

MAKE-UP APPLICATION 18 February

MANICURE & PEDICURE 19 February

NAIL ART TECHNICIAN 18 February


SEWING AND DECORATING
COURSE BEGINS

BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING.I & II 18 February

BEDROOM DECORATING 16 February

DRAPERY MAKING I 19 February

UPHOLSTERY 13 February


COMPUTERS

COURSE BEGINS
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I & II 4 February
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY I 6 February
QUICKBOOKS 5 February
MICROSOFT EXCEL 9 February
MICROSOFT WORD 5 February
PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR 5 February
MICROSOFT POWERPOINT W/S 6 March
WEB PAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP W/S 13 March

CALL: 325-5714 / 328-0093 328-1936 / 302-4300


INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGES AND
CULTURES INSTITUTE
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS



COURSE OFFERING: SPRING 2008

Beginning February 4th

CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I and II
CONVERSATIONAL HAITIAN CREOLE I and II
CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I
CONVERSATIONAL GERMAN I
CONVERSATIONAL MANDARIN I

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE I

LOCATION: Munnings Building (next to KFC at COB
Roundabout): Room 16

DURATION: 3 hours per week for 10 weeks, total course hours:
30 hours

PRICE: $ 250.00 per course except for Tai Chi Courses

TELEPHONE: 302-4584 or 302-4587 e-mail:
ilci @cob.edu.bs

SPECIAL OFFER!


ALL EVENTS ARE SUBJECT
TO CHANGE


Visiting Associate Professor Xu Xianwen from Nanjing, China,
who is an expert on the traditional Chinese discipline of TAI
CHI, will be offering two classes of Tai Chi: I hour/week for
10 weeks:


Monday from 3 to 4 PM
Wednesday from 5 to 6 PM


COURSE FEE: $100 PER STUDENT

PLEASE CALL US FOR ALL OTHER DATES AND FORMS


I___ __


I i


Dates iar l 'r e jcl to cIhoI( g c









..G..E OF THE BAHAMAS


,1 LtC.TN(2l'G4IM


la,


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CERTIFICATES


Continuing Education Units
Now Available


Classes begin 2nd February 2008
What is your career goal?
PROMOTION
v QUALITY SERVICE


S"." INTERNATIONAL CERTIFICATION
..SALARY INCREASE
CAREER CHANGE/ ENHANCEMENT

The Professional Development Department can help
you achieve your career goal! A wide array of courses and
programmes leading to certificate, certification and licensure are offered. You can become a pioneer in setting
performance standards in your organization. We have secured partnerships with leading international
institutions to help you accomplish your career goals. You can attain your professional development credentials
at The College of The Bahamas. Success is atyourfinger tips. Call us today.

Choose the courses or programme to help you accomplish your career goals...
Certified Professional Manager
Certificate for The Office Assistant
A+ Computer Technician Certification
Certified Computer Operator (Microsoft Office Specialist- MOUS)
Certificate in Law
Certified Project Manager -..,, .,,
Becker Certified Public Accountants' Review (CPA)
Certificate in Human Resource Management Programme Duration may range
Certificate in Supervisory Management from 6 Months -9 Months
SJourneyman Plumbing License Course External Registration is required
Master Plumbing License for UK and US Institutions.
Single Phase Electrical Course Affordable Tuition To Be Paid
Three Phase Electrical Course Per Term
Managerial Accounting For Non-Financial Managers *
Ethics and Professional Responsibility Professionals holding the Bachelor
or Master Degrees may apply for
Writing and Research Skills exemption from prerequisite courses.
Introduction to Computers, Windows & The Internet .. .


THE Bimini Bay Resort
and Marina is planning to
double its staff numbers this
year, and provide training in
culinary classes, customer
service and self development
courses.
Resort
Bimini Bay Resort current-
ly employs nearly 200
Bahamians, most coming
from Nassau and Freeport,
and has plans to hire at least
another 100 over the next
year.
"I was looking for work for
a long time before I found
Bimini Bay Resort, and I


have never learned so much
in my life," said current wed-
ding coordinator, Nathalie
Rutherford.
"It's a tough economy out
there right now, but Bimini is
seeing better days. We have a
lot of tourists and I have a
large workload. I couldn't be
happier with my current posi-
tion."
Averaging about 10 new
hires a month, the resort
plans to fill positions ranging
from front desk managers to
security officers.
University
Johnson & Wales Universi-


ty has been commissioned by
the resort to hold a two-week
training session in early 2008,
with future courses to be
implemented into a regular
training curriculum for
employees.
Tourism
Published tourism numbers
in 2007 for the Family Islands
indicate that air arrivals to
the island of Bimini are up by
32 per cent compared to air
arrivals in Abaco, Andros,
Cat Cay, Cat Island and Exu-
ma all of which are down
when compared to 2006 num-
bers.


Enroll in our International Certification Programmes.
No entrance exams required. Tuition Payment is due per term.
Visit COB's Centre For Continuing Education & Extension Services on Moss Road,
or Telephone us at (242) 325-5714 or (242) 328-0093


UWI LLB PROGRAMME (FULL-TIME)
AT
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
kflt .-
ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
The normal entry requirements for the UWI LL.B degree are based on the following
basic UWI Matriculation standards:
(a) Five subjects, at least two of which must be at Advanced (A) Level and the remainder
at CXC (Caribbean Examinations Council) general or BGCSE (Bahamas General Certificate
of Secondary Education) or the equivalent; OR

(b) Associate or Bachelor degree with a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher. Note:
Space in the programme is limited and competition is high. Therefore, above average 'A'
Level grades and high averages ((at least 3.0) in undergraduate degrees are required for
an applicant to stand a reasonable chance of gaining admission.
The College of The Bahamas will consider a limited number of applications from
persons who do not satisfy Matriculation standards as identified above but who have
equivalent academic qualifications. In particular, mature applicants over 30 who
provide evidence of academic and professional achievement can be considered. This
is an opportunity for persons who have already been associated with the practice of law
in some way to read for a law degree. A resume must be submitted with the COB and
UWI applications.

All applicants are required to sit a Proficiency Exam, at a date to be announced
(probably during the month of April 2008).

Interested persons must complete a College of The Bahamas and University of the West
Indies Application for Admission Form available from the Office of Admissions, 2nd
Floor, Portia Smith Building, Poinciana Drive, The College of The Bahamas. Both
applications are also available on their respective websites www.cob.edu.bs and
http://ww.cavehill.uwi.edu.

Completed applications, original certificates (which will be returned to the applicant),
copies of original certificates, transcripts sent directly from universities or colleges
previously attended to the Director of Admissions at COB, and proof of payment of the
fifty-dollar ($50.00) late application fee (paid at the Business Office at COB), must
be submitted by Friday, February 8, 2008.

BACHELOR OF PHARMACY
The College of The Bahamas is now accepting applications for the Bachelr of Pharmacy
Programme 2008/09 academic year. The deadline for applications is 14 February,
2008.

Admissions Requirements
V 5 BGCSE with C or higher, including mathematics and English
V Two semesters of college chemistry and two semesters of college physics,
biology or mathematics
V Successful selection interview

For more information please contact Dianne Pratt, School of Nursing and Allied Health
Professions at 328-4309 or 325-5551.


j THE COLLEGE OF i. ...
Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs f ''


Associate Vice-President,
External Affairs
POSITION PROFILE
The Associate Vice-President, External Affairs, develops and fosters positive relations with The College
of The Bahamas' internal and external partners; enhancing the College's image and profile in the broader
community; and increasing die financial and material resources of The College of The Bahamas through
an integrated program of communications, fundraising and service to alumni and friends of The Collge
of The Bahamas. The Associate Vice-President provides recommendations on policy and action in the
management of issues and crises affecting the College, including media relations. The Associate Vice-
President provides oversight to The College/University's efforts to raise funds from private sources and
to engage its alumni in the life of the institution. He/she provides oversight and management for the
two offices within the area of External Affairs: Alumni Relations & Development and Public Affairs,
Marketing and Communications. Working collaboratively with all members of The College's community,
The Associate Vice-President, External Affairs will:
Serve as the College/University spokesperson on College/University-wide concerns at the request of
the President and provide counsel and advice on major public relations issues;
Oversee the operations of the offices of Alumni Relations & Development and of Public Affairs,
Marketing and Communications;
Develop a public relations and marketing programme which supports and advances the strategic plans
of College/University's internal constituencies among its various external constituents.
Provide direction and counsel for the administration of The College/University's graphics and
communications programme, and oversee an external communication programme to ensure that standards
of high quality are maintained;
Develop and implement the campus's media relations for print and broadcast media at the local.
national and international levels;
Working with Deans, Chairs and other departmental heads, administration, assess departmental, school
and faculty public relations needs in support of institutional goals and develop and implement programs
accordingly to meet those needs;
Develop and implement a strategic marketing programme for The College including areas such as
academic programmes, recruitment, research, internationalization, campaign, alumni relations;
Coordinate communication and media strategy in support of The College/University's development
efforts;
Counsel The College/ University on issues management and media relations;
Develop and oversee the actions of the institution's crisis management plan; Develop and implement
a program of internal communication for The College/University focused on building support for the
University transition agenda;
Oversee the major gift and campaign efforts for the External Affairs of The College's private fmuding
needs including the identification, cultivation and solicitation of'major gift donors, and the management
of the staff of the Alumni Relations and Development Office, Council, senior team, administration,
volunteers and others who work with those donors.
The successful candidate will possess:
A master's degree in a relevant field and a minimum of five years of successful management and
leadership experience working and communicating with multiple publics. (While experience in an
institution of higher education is preferred, candidates from other fields who demonstrate successful
work experience will be considered).
Excellent oral and written communication skills;
Experience in dealing with broadcast and print media;
Ability to serve as an institutional spokesperson on a variety of issues;
Demonstrated ability to work successfully with multiple constituencies, both internal and external to
an organization;
A thorough knowledge of principles and methods of planning and conducting a comprehensive public
relations programme, including the development and implementation of a strategic marketing plan;
Previous supervisory experience, preferably in the area of public relations, public information,
communications or publications.
Broad knowledge of the principles and practices of annual giving, special events, major gifts, major
gift fundraising (preferably in higher education).
Experience in engaging and motivating volunteers.
Ability to direct the design of strategies for cultivation and solicitation of donor prospects.
Ability to work effectively with Deans, Chairs, Directors and faculty as well as with volunteers to
achieve fundraising goals.
Skill in devising, analyzing, implementing and evaluating overall College/University External Affairs
strategies
In addition, progressive fundraising experience with supervisory duties preferably in higher education
will be an asset
To ensure consideration, application materials must be received by February 15, 2008. A complete
application packed consists of:
S An application letter
S College of The Bahamas Application Form
S A detailed curriculum vitae
S Copies of transcripts (original transcripts required upon employment)
S The names and contact information for three references
Please send information to:
The Director
Human Resources Department
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus
P. O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas
Please visit The College's website at www.cob.edu.bs for more information about The College and
to access The College's Employment Application Form.


Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs


Bimini Bay





plans to double





staff numbers





this year


. I p
.


_II


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008, PAGE 7B









PAG 8, ONAYBFBRARY4,00STESRIUN


BECon


chief


disagrees


with


Chamber report


.on


termination


pay


FROM page 1B


"capped" this amount as the maxi-
mum due under the Act.
While some businessmen had com-
plained to him that they felt the
Employment Act's provisions for
compensating terminated employees
were too expensive, Mr Nutt said the
system was just given that the Gov-
ernment did not provide unemploy-
ment benefit financed from taxes paid
by employers.
Courts
The courts had also ruled that the
Employment Act did not codify com-
mon law, or act as a barrier to
employees pursuing a claim for fur-
ther compensation and wrongful dis-
missal actions. They found that the
Employment Act was "to establish a
formula" to compensate terminated
employees, and enable these work-
ers to avoid incurring costs associated
with pursuing legal redress for their


benefits.
Yet the Chamber of Commerce's
Vexing Business Issues paper, which
was submitted to Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham and his fellow Cab-
inet ministers last month, said: "Cer-
tain Chamber members who repre-
sented large organizations were
adamant that there is a need for
amendments to the law to address
the issue of redundancy costs.
Presently, there is great uncertainty as
to the meaning of the law, and as a
result there is an equal degree of
uncertainty as to what a business's
costs could be if it chooses the path of
termination."
The report added: "The decision
to terminate staff is rarely the path
of first choice for Chamber members.
However, when selected or being
considered it is critically important
to be able to consider all aspects of
the business decision. This means that
the scope of potential costs should be
quantifiable.
"Under the current laws, there is
no clarity as to whether there is a
maximum number of weeks or


months for which the employer is
liable. This is grossly unfair to the
business. In general, Chamber mem-
bers want to pay terminated employ-
ees their just due, but they do not
want to have an open-ended or unde-
terminable financial obligation."
Situation
To deal with this situation, the
Chamber report said: "Timely amend-
ments to the laws are the best solu-
tion, outlining in detail what the max-
imum requirements an employer must
pay a terminated employee. Caps,
based upon years of service and
salary, should be also laid down to
avoid excessive and potentially bank-
ruptcy causing awards, and to limit
the total amount of severance, given
the many interpretations that typi-
cally happen over a single piece of
legislation."
Yet Mr Nutt told The Tribune that
the Employment Act provided that
for line staff employed for more than
a year, upon termination they were
due two weeks' pay or two weeks'


basic pay in lieu of notice, and two
weeks' basic pay for each year worked
up to 24 weeks.
As for supervisors and managers,
they are due one month's notice or
pay in lieu of notice upon termina-
tion, and one month's basic pay for
each year worked up to 48 weeks
(effectively 11-12 months).
As a result, Mr Nutt said the
Employment Act had allowed for line
staff to receive a maximum of six
months' pay upon termination, with
the maximum amount for managerial
staff 12 months.
"What's provided for in the
Employment Act is the minimum,
although additional payments are
based on company practices and poli-
cies. In regard to redundancy and ter-
mination payments, it is very clear
what is in the Employment Act. It is
capped," the BECon president said.
"As a general rule, redundancy and
termination is based on what is pro-
vided for in the Act. I have had peo-
ple complain to me that they feel the
redundancy provision is very expen-
sive, and feel it should be a lower


amount..........
"If all businesses were paying a pay-
roll tax that was utilised for paying
unemployment benefit, you would
expect redundancy and payments to
employees to be greatly reduced in
law, as the employee would be enti-
tled to go to the Government and col-
lect it. But we don't have that."
Mr Nutt said Bahamian trade
unions had "made a lot of noise"
about the cap on termination/redun-
dancy payments being too low in com-
parison to other Caribbean nations,
but a number of those countries had
their minimum requirements down-
ward, too.
Expensive
"Although it might seem to be very
expensive, because it's laid out in the
law, you know what it is to apply
these payments and make these pay-
ments," Mr Nutt said.
"Businesses don't have to go to
court and make huge legal fee pay-
ments on top of a damages award
they don't know the amount of."


'Some softening' on opposition to worker fingerprints


FROM page 1B

comes to work and leaves
work are easily thwarted by
employees. They typically get


their colleagues to 'punch'
them in and out and receive
payment for work they did not
do.
"Complaints that the collec-


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tion of biometric data by
employers will compromise the
privacy of employees is con-
sidered groundless since, on
the one hand, all citizens glad-
ly give up this same informa-
tion to the US government to
obtain a US visa and will now
have to give up that same
information to obtain a new
Bahamian passport, while on
the other hand, technology
exists that allows employers to
obtain the biometric data that
they need without compromis-
ing the privacy of employees."
Use of biometric fingerprint
recognition, the Chamber
paper said, would make
Bahamian employees "more


accountable" and allow for
more accurate time and atten-
dance records.
The effect of the current sit-
uation, the report said, was
that "employers suffer sub-
stantial losses due to their
inability to implement a track-
ing system that ensures that
employees come to work on
time and do a day's work for a
day's pay. The effects on
employee productivity, there-
fore, are considered to be sig-
nificant".
Yet biometric fingerprint
recognition was being heavily
opposed by the trade unions.
Obie Ferguson, attorney and
Trades Union Congress


(TUC) president, previously
told The Tribune: "We are
diametrically opposed to fin-
gerprinting because we are
not certain that the finger-
print is for the purpose they
say it is for.
"With technology being
what it is today, that infor-
mation can be transmitted all
over the world in a matter of
seconds.
"Technology can be made
to say what you want it to
say, and achieve what you
want it to achieve. We are
not sure it is going to do what
they say it is."
Mr Nutt, though, said there
was no danger of stored
records of employee finger-
prints falling into the wrong
hands.
Biometric machines did not
store images of worker fin-
gerprints, instead matching
the shape of their hands, fin-






,-
IN SIGH
Fo hesore


gers, eye vessels and retinas
to a mathematical algorithm,
rather than storing them.
Meanwhile, Mr Nutt told
The Tribune that opinion at
TRIFOR was divided on the
issue of the Employment
Act's first schedule as it relat-
ed to child labour, and
whether it should be
renewed.
"These camps do have
pretty good support," Mr
Nutt said. "There are feel-
ings by some that the sched-
ule should stay void and that
we have no child labour, and
the other camp feels it should
be allowed to continue."
The First Schedule to the
Employment Act, which came
into effect on January 1, 2002,
sets out the employment of
children in businesses, stating
that they can be hired by food
stores as packing boys and
girls, as gift wrappers, peanut
vendors and newspaper ven-
dors.
Yet the schedule began with
the words "for a period of five
years from the coming into
effect of this Act". Given that
five years have now passed,
BECon had expressed concern
that since the First Schedule
has neither been amended to
remove the time limit, nor
extended, this meant it was
void and now technically illegal
for any Bahamian business to
employ child workers in any
category.


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Have you been working with high net worth clients over the last 5 years of your career?
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Small Business Consultants


PAGE 8B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008


THE TRIBUNE









T T ND F U 4 PG


THE BAHAMAS Real Estate Association (BREA) has signed a contract with Realty Server to provide a Multiple Listing Service (MLS) to licensed
BREA realtors. Mike Fowles, Realty Server's managing director, is pictured with BREA President Larry Roberts (right) and BREA director and MLS
committee chairman, George Damianos (left) following a two-day seminar held recently to familiarise BREA members with the service.




Realtors to launch Multiple



Listings Service 'in 4 weeks'


THE Bahamas Real Estate
Association's (BREA) presi-
dent said it is hoping to launch
its Multiple Listing Service
(MLS) within the next four
weeks, in a bid to boost effi-
ciency and client service by giv-
ing members access to exclu-
sive property listings through-
out the Bahamas.
The Association has held
training sessions for its licensed
realtors recently in prepara-
tion for the MLS's launch.
George Damianos, a BREA
executive member, who has
headed the committee investi-
gating several international
companies who provide MLS
services, said: "After many
years of searching and consid-
eration, our association has
decided to offer the MLS to
its members, bringing us in line
with leading real estate associ-
ations worldwide.


"The service will allow us to
provide improved service to
our clients, and bring much-
improved productivity to our
members and our profession,
since each licensed broker or
salesperson who signs up for
the programme will have
instant access to exclusive
property listings throughout
the Bahamas. After much
research, we selected Realty
Server as our MLS provider".
Realty Server's managing
director, Mike Fowles,
described the MLS service and
offered training to more than
150 BREA members who
attended a two-day seminar at
the Sheraton Hotel, Cable
Beach.
BREA's president. Larry
Roberts, said: "The service has
been customised to suit our
local requirements, but as we
use the service no doubt fur-


t~ I,.


MIKE FOWLES, Realty Server's managing director, is seen far right, as
he addresses more than 150 licensed Bahamian realtors during the
recent two-day MLS Seminar, held at the Sheraton Hotel, Cable Beach.


their modifications will be
required.
"The cost of the MLS for
participating members will be a


modest $35 per month; We are
anticipating that the service
will be activated within the
next four weeks."
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is presently considering applications for a

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The position is open to candidates with the following minimum
requirements:

Qualifications:
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an offshore banking environment
Strong management and leadership skills
Well versed in Bahamian building codes
In-depth knowledge of contingency planning and project management
PC Literacy.(MS Word, Access, Excel)
Proven track record

Duties
The candidate will be expected to:
Manage on-site Engineering and Security Functions
Manage on-site Reception and Mailroom functions
Manage all maintenance contracts
Facilitate building maintenance
Facilities Management and services activities

Personal Qualities:
Excellent organizational and communication skills
A commitment to service excellence
Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision

Benefits provided include:
Competitive salary
Pension Plan
Health and Life Insurance


APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING.


Persons not meeting the minimum requirements need not apply.

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE: 15rH FEBRUARY, 2008


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008, PAGE 9B


THE TRIBUNE


" ~i4


T a














Act's regulations will not forget its omissions


FROM page 1B

,bL drafted 'in parallel' to the
' onsuIltaltiol process ol tlie leg-
,islilion.
'" "W\hile doing'lthe consulta-
.t1ion. \\c will be pursuing assis-
"lianlcc roll same Canadian
,consIllliit who drafted the Act
lto help \with tlihe regulations,"
N'r D)e\',tux said.
"\We know what the regula-
lions will be to some extent,
Ibui with further insight from
0the industry, we will be in a
much better position to fine-
ltun the regulations as we fine
tune lhe Act itself."
While an Act sets out the
legal parameters and frame-
,work, it is the accompanying
regulations that give it enforce-
ment teeth. Mr Deveaux said


the Act would not be passed
before the regulations were
ready, because then its provi-
sions could not be enforced.
With the revised Securities
Industry Act, the Securities
Commission has opted to put
the main requirements and real
detail into the regulations and
rules that it can make, leaving
the legislation to set.out the
general legal obligations.
Mr Deveaux explained that
this was done to enable the
Securities Commission, and the
Bahamian capital markets
industry in general, to better
keep pace with international
best practices and global stan-
dards in the securities indus-
try, as these were constantly
evolving.
Putting the main details in
the regulation is intended to


enable the Securities Commis-
sion to avoid having to seek
Parliamentary approval every
time any change however
minor is needed to the Act,
thus avoiding time-consuming
delays.
"This new legislation will be
the bare bones of the regula-
tory regime," Mr Deveaux
said. "It will provide all the
legal obligations, and the pro-
cedures will be fine-tuned in
the regulations and whatever
rules are established by the
Securities Commission, so we
don't have to go to Parliament
for changes of a certain matter
in such a dynamic industry.
"We can have a situation
where immediately after bring-
ing the legislation into force,
the dynamics cause us to
amend the legislation in some


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way."
Among the areas where reg-
ulations have to be drawn up
are a Takeover Code dealing
with the purchase of majority
ownership in Bahamian-listed
companies.
Such takeovers have hap-
pened several times, and
include CIBC's effective buy-
out of Barclays' stake in First-
Caribbean International Bank;
Winn-Dixie's $54 million dis-
posal of its 78 per cent holding
in Bahamas Supermarkets to
BSL Holdings; and Marubeni's
acquisition of Mirant's 55.4 per
cent Grand Bahama Power
Company stake, the remain-
der being held by Bahamian
investors through ICD Utili-
ties.
The Securities Commission's
explanatory notes on the pro-
posed Act said: "One of the
acknowledged gaps in the reg-
ulatory regime in the Bahamas
is the lack of a regime to gov-
ern takeover bids that ensure
all security holders are treated
in a fair and equitable manner
on a change of control or sim-
ilar transaction involving a
public issuer."
"We need to establish the
Takeover Code," Mr Deveaux
told The Tribune.


Another area where the
Securities Commission had
encountered "enforcement
issues" under the previous Act
was over the issuance of public
offering prospectuses.
The former legislation had
stipulated that prospectuses
could not be issued, and
investors solicited to buy in,
until the Securities Commis-
sion had approved the offer-
ing document.
Acknowledging that this was
"not followed in practice", the
regulator said it had been left
with "no control over what sort
of information is being used to
sell the securities".
As a result, the new legisla-
tion requires that issuers of
public securities deliver a 'pre-
liminary prospectus' to
investors that have been solic-
itied prior to the Securities
Commission giving its
approval. The 'preliminary
prospectus' would be the same
as the draft prospectus sub-
mitted to the regulator.
Adding that he hoped the
new Act would "go to Cabi-
net as quickly as possible" once
consultation was finished, Mr
Deveaux said it ensured that
the Securities Commission was
in compliance with the princi-


pies and objectives of IOSCO,
the global securities regulators'
body, and its Memorandum of
Understanding on cross-bor-
der co-operation and itiforma-
tion exchange.
Meanwhile, Mr Deveaux
said reports on the fact that
only 127 or 29 per cent,of 438
registered and licensed com-
panies had paid their annual
licence fees two days before
the January 31, 2008, deadline,
referred to Financial and Cor-
porate Services Providers, not
Sthe Commission's broker/deal-
er and fund administrator reg-
istrants.
The Securities Commission
has just taken on the Inspector'
of Financial and Corporate
Services Providers' responsi-
bilities, and Mr Deveaux said
the deadline was imposed to
ensure all paid their annual
licence fees.
"We are preparedto renew
the licences of all licensees, but
once they don't pay the fee by
January 31, your licence
becomes void, and not only do
you have to apply for a renew-
al, you have to apply for a new
licence. In addition to a renew-
al fee, you will have to pay an
application fee and submit it,"
Mr Deveaux said.


Lost company filings


'too common


FROM page 1B


maintenance of corporate
records at the Registrar of
Companies, part of the Regis-
trar General's Department, as
"generally unacceptable".
Further complaints from the
Chamber's members and other
private sector representatives
were that the "quality and time-
liness of service is substandard"'
at the Registrar of Companies.
The report found: "Lost or
misplaced records could be
potentially disastrous to pro-
fessional services firms and their
clients. In addition to loss of
reputation, there is the potential
for financial losses as a result


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of missing information.
"Additionally, the lack of
quality service, particularly with
respect to timeliness, has con-
sistently proven to be a prob-
lem for financial service
providers. Customers general-
ly view the service providers
and the country as less compe-
tent, and certainly less compet-
itive."
The report added: "The man-
ner in which the Registrar of
Companies operates needs to
be changed. Best practices
should be pursued in terms of
delivery times and service
quality needs to be radically
improved. Online payment
opportunities should be adopt-
ed.
"The practice of paying assis-
tant registrars to perform such
minor functions as renunciation
of dowers should be eliminat-
ed. It seems so unprofessional
to personally pay employees of
the Government to perform
tasks that they perform as a
result of their position with the
Government."
Other concerns were
expressed over cross-regulation
in the financial services industry,
and whether the regulators had
the ability to enforce the numer-


ous rules and regulations being
considered.
"Significant uncertainty with
respect to enforcement of regu-
lations poses a major problem
for businesses. In an environ-
ment such as the Bahamas
where cross-regulation is
increasing, the risks are multi-
plied. There is also the finan-
cial impact to businesses that
needs -to'be considered," the
Chaniber document warned.
It'also said that financial ser-
vices regulators needed to be
more proactive in recommend-
ing 'obvious' changes that were
necessary to financial laws.
The report said: "The most
obvious impact of this problem
is the inability to address client
needs due to gaps in the legal
framework. This, again, puts
both the firms and the country
at a competitive disadvantage
by making it less attractive as a
place to do business.
"One noted example of this is
the issue of dormant accounts
and the return of funds to
account holders after a Bahami-
an licensed bank has closed.
The jurisdiction loses credibili-
ty when such significant mat-
ters are not addressed on a
timely basis."


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SPricing Information As Of: C A
Friday. 1 February 2008
8 1'5 i LISTED & TFRAu ED SECURITIES VISIT WWW BISXBAHAMAS COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
I-. BISX ALL SHARE INDEX CLOSE 2.049 40 / CHG 0.22 / %CHG 0 01 / YTD -17.35 /YTD % -0.84
1 52 I -Hn, ..- L. .-. .ar.I F,~,.-....,- :j:.: T.-O3a, Close Cr.ang- Daill \'C' EPS .$ Di. PE YEole
1.71 0.75 Abaco Markets 1.71 1./1 0.00 0.157 0.000 10.8 0.00%
t 11.80 11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.80 11.80 0.00 1.502 0.400 7.9 3.39%
S9.68 8.03 Bank of Bahamas 9.61 9.61 0.00 0.612 0.260 15.7 2.71%
0.85 0.80 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 0.188 0.030 4.5 3.53%
P 3.74 1.85 Bahamas Waste 3.66 3.66 0.00 0.289 0.090 12.7 2.46%
2.70 1.25 Fidelity Bank 2.65 2.65 0.00 0.058 0.040 45.7 1.51%
12.64 10.00 Cable Bahamas 12.61 12.64 0.03 2.500 1.030 0.240 12.3 1.90%
3.15 2.00 Colina Holdings 3.14 3.14 0.00 0.031 0.040 101.3 1.27%
S8.50 4.40 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 7.82 7.82 0.00 0.428 0.260 18.3 3.32%
7.22 4.70 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.70 4.71 0.01 0.129 0.052 36.4 1.11%
a 2.60 2.20 Doctor's Hospital 2.40 2.45 0.05 5,000 0.316 0.020 7.8 0.82%
S7.45 5.70 Famguard 7.45 7.45 0.00 0.713 0.280 10.4 3.76%
13.01 12.30 Finco 13.00 13.00 0.00 0.829 0.570 15.7 4.38%
a 14 75 14.25 FirstCaribbean 14.60 14.60 0.00 0.914 0.470 16.0 3.22%
S6.10 5.18 Focol (S) 5.14 5.12 -0.02 5,295 0.363 0.140 14.1 2.73%
1 00 0.54 Freeport Concrete 0.77 0.77 0.00 0.017 0.000 45.3 0.00%
S 18 00 7.10 ICD Utilities 7.25 7.25 0.00 0.411 0.300 17.6 4.14%
S12.50 8.60 J. S. Johnson 12.50 12.50 0.00 1.059 0.610 11.8 4.88%
10 00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.167 0.600 8.6 6.00%
SFiaellv O.vrr-The-Crounter Securii"es
52wk-l-li 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Dlv $ P/E Yield
n 14 60 14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 16.00 1.160 1.185 13.4 8.12%
S 8.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6 25 6.00 0.000 0.480 NM 7.80%
0 54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.35 -0.023 0.000 N/M 0.00%
Colina O. r- rr,e-Counor Sacuirmies
41.00 41.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 .i .:4 i' 7I: '0 :
14.60 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 14.00 1.160 1.125 13.4 7.71%
0 '55 0 40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.45 -0.030 0.000 N/M 0.00%
BISX Lsls5d Mulual Funds
a 52wk-Fli 52wk Low Fund Name NA V YTD% Last 12 Months DIv $ Yield %
1.2920 1.2037 Colina Bond Fund 1.291985**
S3 0008 2.4723 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 3.00076"
1.3773 1 2647 Colina Money Market Fund 1.376507*
3.7969 3.0569 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.7969" 27.72% 27.72%
11.9333 11.3545 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 11.9333" 5.53% 5.53%
FINDEX: CLOSE 945.57 / YTD -0.68% / 2007 341 47%
P 131i y AI ';ll Atl( Ii) LX 10 D0 ; 02 = 1.000 00 MARKE ( I [ MS YIEID lI.I 12r month llvilnds divided by clo rlg prcoNAV K
2wk II, III I h,,l clh,,in pr- Ir i, 52 w ok, .iOd $ nuyinI priiorr of Colhi lt lnI Fidelity
'52wv I row iLown. I In ',i pri, r in lI r:.r '2 wooks Ask $ Sulling prico of Cuollrn rnId fidelity 18l1 Januly 200S1
Pn)~, r,. i l i-ruvltlSon s dJy. Walllted n yri.o for dllly VOIUII01 Las Price Liast Ird(-d over tho-ounltor prico I Docerlbr 2007
S I I yrl. ',, ,I ,, a r n -';,,Ipl lda wi. hllc:d p[ric( for (d ily volumno Wookly Vol Trnllint volume of the prior wook
(II ( in, Ii .Io.1( price frorm lnday to tay EPS $ A conipany's riportod ornlngs per share for the IRst 12 mths
fril.I VII 4,.. r 1 otdi .harr," trdid oidry NAV Not Asset Vailu
I 11V ,, I Ir 'l. ,l p. r hll;are pr.; l ll in l i,,l 1l2 monthss N/M Nol Monningful
SI'i I'.r, n. ri "' ivild"' d by Ihe lasl 12 moinh ornlnor s FINDEX The Fideliy Bahami s Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
(';) I t, 1 r l' r.k Gpl it Effi ctliv DalIo 818/2007
U 1,I) 1 f-l I ,0 .< Spit) Effective Dntio 7/11/2007
rC, TRADE CALL CFAL 242-502-7010 FIDELITY 242-356-7764 / FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION CALL (242) 394-2503


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008


THE TRIBUNE









THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008, PAGE 11B


Education and






health face US






budget squeeze


* By ANDREW TAYLOR
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) -
The spiraling growth of
Medicare and the high cost of
renewing President Bush's tax
cuts are squeezing popular
education, health, housing and
anti-poverty programs in the
budget blueprint that he hands
lawmakers Monday.
Even with difficult-to-digest
proposals to curb Medicare
costs and kill programs to
repair dilapidated public hous-
ing, fund community action
agencies and provide food to
the elderly poor, Bush's $3 tril-
lion budget will project deficits
around $400 billion this year
and next.
Bush's submission is already
absorbing brickbats from
Democrats castigating him for
inheriting a government in sur-
plus and leaving Washington
withfia budget deficit that is
likely to break the $413 billion
record set four years ago, once
war bills and the cost of giv-
ing the economy a fiscal jolt
with tax rebate checks are fac-
tored in.
"The next president is going
to inherit a colossal mess
because of the fiscal irrespon-
sibility of this president," Sen.
Kent Conrad, D-N.D., chair-
man of the Budget Committee
said Saturday.
Bush's budget will demon-
strate a way to produce bal-
ance in four years and still
renew tax cuts on income,
investments and people inher-
iting large estates cuts now
scheduled.to expire at the end
of 2010. The cost of reniew'ing
those tax ctifs exceeds $300 bil-
lion by'2013, according to con-
gressional scorekeepers.
But he'll only be able to pre-
dict that balance by cutting
spending in ways that Congress
- whether controlled by
Republicans or Democrats -
has rejected many times
before. After his proposal to
kill or significantly cut 141 pro-
grams to save $12 billion was
rejected by Congress last year,
Bush is upping the ante by 50
percent with an even more
controversial plan. And his bid
to squeeze $178 billion from
Medicare over five years has
no chance on Capitol Hill,
even though the program
would still grow by 5 percent a
year under his proposal.
Despite a worsening deficit
picture, caused in large part by
slumping tax revenues as the
economy sours, Congress is
likely to take no action this
year td reverse the tide. No
one likes to take painful steps
to reduce federal spending in a


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presidential election year, and
lawmakers typically don't defer
to unpopular, lame duck pres-
idents.
"This will be a placeholder
year," Conrad said. "That's the
reality."
While the Bush budget will
receive a dead-on-arrival
reception from lawmakers and
be overshadowed by Tuesday's
presidential primaries, admin-
istration officials have been
promoting its more appealing
elements in recent days.
Funding for the State Chil-
dren's Health Insurance Pro-
gram, the subject of an intense
battle with Democrats last
year, would increase by almost
$20 billion over the next five
years. An additional $6 billion
is requested to finish a mas-
sive project to protect New
Orleans from flooding. And
the Food and Drug Adminis-
tration would get a larger-than-
average budget increase to
send FDA staff overseas to
inspect food and drugs import-
ed into the United States.
Bush also backs $2 billion
over three, years to help get
cleaner and more efficient
energy technology to big pol-
luters like India and China.
Other details the adminis-
tration might not be as eager to
promote have been leaking out
from a variety of sources with *
particular knowledge about
specific areas of the budget and
from some budget planning
documents seen in advance.
When the full document is
out Monday, the full wrath of
interest groups will be felt.
Hospitals and other health care
providers are already protest-
ing cuts to Medicare and the
Medicaid health care program
for the poor and disabled,
while advocates for the poor
vow to again reverse huge cuts
to social services block grants
to states and funding for non-
profit groups.that help the
poor..
Affected industries can be
counted on to protest user fees,


even those as small as a 50-
cents-per-flight ticket tax to
finance screening machines for
the Transportation Security
Administration that are intend-
ed to detect explosives being
smuggled aboard airplanes.
The Bush forecast for a bal-
anced budget by 2012 also is
likely to strike many as unre-
alistic, depending as it does on
the assumption that there will
be no additional no war costs
for Afghanistan or Iraq after a
$70 billion infusion for next
year.
The White House budget
also does not account for the
huge cost of preventing the
alternative minimum tax from
hitting millions and millions of
upper middle-class taxpayers
after 2009. The White House
and congressional Republicans
blasted House Democrats as
raising taxes for trying to offset
AMT relief by closing a loop-
hole on offshore tax havens;
Bush's budget effectively
assumes AMT relief after a
one-year "patch" for next year
is financed by tax increases
elsewhere.
Elsewhere, cuts in the Bush
budget would eliminate a $302
million program that gives
grants to children's hospitals
to subsidize medical education.
A $300 million program for
public health improvement
projects would be eliminated,
while grants to improve health
care in rural areas would be
cut by 87 percent.
The Centers for Disease
Control's budget would face a
7 percent reduction of $433
million. The budget for a pro-
gram to treat and monitor the
health of first' responders and
others exposed to toxins at the
World Trade Center after the
Sept. 11 attacks would be cut
by 77 percent, from $108 mil-
lion this year to $25 million in
2009.
The National Institutes of
Health, which funds health
research grants, would see its
budget frozen at $29.5 billion.


New Providenc-
I. \ Vc.i.'ulL lot o103
(6.OOOsq. 1. ) (;r(Ird.n
IHills t43.
(Appraised Value
$35,000.00)
2. Ptrope-rt\
40('x36'xQO'"
(3.,)33sq. 11.) with
building (l1.429sq. 11.)
Sutton Street & S 1.
ltcdes I.tne oof Kinlp
Road (Appraised
Value S85.0(10.00)
3. L.ot 39. BIk / 35
(2 5'xl 0)"*) w/\Ahse
I.I .4.s1i. ,-I incoln
Ilv0d. house 064
4. I.otl t338 (O'xs97.24')
w/lsc ( 1.735sq .it.)
Arnaak Ave l'stir'on's
Addition
5. l.o i#41. IIk /'1
(50's 100') \N/two
NtorN) 4 nxitS build ing
West 01, oF .lili St oil'
Soldier Rd
6. I.ot /301 (60,' 100')
w/'duplcx (1.686sq.O.)
(iolden (ilmes t.sitate #
(Appraised
$231,136.00)
7. Lo s 4& oo4
(50sxIoo"). 1Ilk #47
wI'dtiplx.k & shop
(1.532.sq. It.), Iorl's St
Nassaui Village
(Appraised Value
S120.000.00)
8. I ot 021, BIk P1
(17.1 5 sq. 1t.) w/split
l\e el house -.('p.0)t iln
Rd. ('oral I ciglhts
(Appraised Value
$480,000.00)
9. Lot #52
(40'x 00') w/hse
(845s4. ft.)-Water
St Big Pond
10. A portion of lot
#35 (50x 100')
w/hse (l,635sr .
ft.) Sandilands
Village Rd
II. Vacant lot #147
(10,557sq. ft.)-
Munnings Dr e Roy
West Ln Southern
Heights Subdivision
(Appraised Value
$90,000.00)
12. Lot #14, BIk #14
(43,1 50sq. ft.)
w/incomplete three
storey building
(5,000sq. ft.)-
Lookout Hill
Winton Heights
Subdivision
13. Vacain lot #302-
Winton Metadows
Subdivision #2
14. .Lot ,#161 (8,400sq. ft.)
w/hse (2.137sq. ft.)
Lancaster Rd Staloledon
(jardeni
15. Iots #5 & '#6
(I150'xo100')i w/hsc-
Silver Pillm 1, l
Imperial Panrk
(Appraised Value
S31 3.650.00)
Antdrus
16. I.ol #41 1 (22. (00sq.
11.) w\isingle story
complex (3.440sq. ft.)
Sir I enly Morgan lDr
Andros Racli Colony
Subdivision Nicholls's
Town Andros
(Appraised Value
$322.900.00)
17. Vacant pIroperty
1OO'x150' in the
Nli l rs. Milantgrove
(a\ Soitllh Aln i,


PROPERTIES
Grand Bahama
18. Vacant Lot li8 lBlk t#12
Unit il3 (I 1.250sq,
t.) I enn y Ave Derby
Subdivision Grand
tlhahma (Appraised
Value S131,700.00)
19. Vucuat 11.250sq. 1l.
lot #19, Ilk #22, Unit
5 --incoln Cireen
Subdivision Grand
Buhamat (Appraised
Vnalue 30,000.00)
20. l.ot / IS., BIk 415 .nit
#3 (90'xl25 ') l)rby
Subdivision; Grand
I;hatma (Appraised
Value S23.000.00)
21. Vacuitt lot 013. [tlk
159. rUnit #3
(22.752sq. It.) with
45' canal ronllt
Dlaglllnham Circle &
lngrave l)r I mIcrald
is)u Subdivision
(irand tBnhama
(Appraised Value
site.eo0.00o) -.-
22. l.l o /162- (I O.ooosq.
tl.) Section frI
'N/foundation lfor
duplcx- Saltish &
Tresco Rd l'reporl
Ridge Subdivision
Fr-eport (inrnd
Bahama (Appraised
Value $12.000.00)
23. Vacnn l ot f25. BIIk
#15 (17.866sq, It.)-
C'utwater l.n Shlnnon
Cointry ('lub
Subdivision ( rand
tBahana (Appraised
Value S38.000.00)
24. Vacanu lot tlI10
Section #1 (12.500sq.
ti.)- tonefish St &
Polaris Dr, C(arv\l
Beach (iraild lnhaama
(Appraised Value
S40,000.00)
25. LtOt fiS5 (17.276sq. ft.)
Section AI with an
incomplete flturplex ..
AmnIriack St &
Polaris Dr Carvel
Beach Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value
S74,970.00)
26>. Lot #2 (20,)00sq., f.)
building complex &
coin I.aundromiat
QucIns HIigh llay
t lines Rock
iiCommonage t irand
lBahluat (Appraised
Value $S78.600.00)
27. Vacant lotl t5. BIk
931. Section I3 Royal
[1ahmian il'slcta
Subdivision Grand
Itahama (Appraised
Value $3 1,000.00)
28. Vacant lot #21. "Hlk #3
Seahorse Village
Subdivision (Grand
Blahlania


ASSETS
Vessels
* 53' Vessel (1977) sih.ilAk
S 29' (1983) Vessel (lady Rece)
4 -'( '"'' I l)cli.dcer Vessel (l.iminos)
* 48' North Carolina I lull (1989)
* 52' tlallers Fiber (,I.,, Vessel (1979) MV Buddy
a 47" Fiber Glass (1980) Vessel (Miss Quality)
a 43' l)fender Fiber Glass Vessel (1990) (Lady Raine Too)
* 58' Steel I lull Vessel (1997) Bayouside Child
S 120' T'win Screw Steel Hlull Vessel (1978) with
(2) l)Detroit Diesel V 16-92 cngilne, lilly loaded
* 5 1' )efnder Vessel (1981 ) quilily
* 122' Single Screw Steel 11ull (1960) MV l.isa III.
vessel has a new engine requiring installation. And
can be vic\v at Bradlbrd Marine, Grand Bahama


29. Lot #54 ) (6.500sq.
It.) w/triplex
ibundution Murphy
Town Abaco
(Appraised Value
$27,034.00)
30. Lot 16 Vacant 2 acres-
Fox 1'own Abaco
(Appraised Value
$40,000.00)
31. Portion of vacant lot
#69 (15.000sq, ft.)-
Front St Murphy
Town Abaco
32. Lot 151 (15.000sq. ft.)
w/building-Murphy
Town Abaco
33. Lot #55 (6.900sq. ft.)
v!building-Murphy
'own Abaco
34. Lot #45 (60'xl60')-
Sandy Point Abaco
35. .ot #25 (17.755sq. ft.)
wihsc (800sq. t1.)-#47
Queen Elizabeth Drive
Marsh Harbour Abaco
Long Island
36. Vacant Lot
100 x20'-Bonacorde
area west of Clarence
Town Long Island
(Appraised Value
S30.000.00)
37. I.ot (150,x300.57')
w/house-CarMTright" s
Long Island
Eleuthera
38. Property 31'xl I1'
\v/house-Lord Street in
the settlement of
Tapnim Bay
Eleuthera.
(Appraised
Value
$40,000.00)
39. Portion of lot #90
w/building
(2,61 sq. ft.)-
Parliament St,
Cupids Cay
Governors Harbour
Eleuthera
(Appraised
Value
$55,000.00)
40. Vacant lot #6
(14,555sq. ft.)-
Tarpum Bay
Eleuthera
(Appraised
Value
$38,000.00)
Cat Island
41. Property with twelve
(12) room motel 1,39
tacrs In he settlement
of Arthur's 'Toyvn Cat
Island
42. One acre of land
w/building-Devl''s
Point Cat Island
Exims
43.Vacaiil lot 1281
(6.600sq, ft.)-Oceanic
Rd IBahalma Sound
Section #3 tI'ulima




Vehicles
(1)03 DIOdgc Caravan
(1) 96 Ford Explorer
(1)97 I)odge Stratus
(1) 01 lyundai Hl1-00 Bus
(1) 01 Kia Bus 12 Sealer
(I) 02 Kitchen Van Trailer
(1)00 Ford Ranger Truck
(1) ()5 Toota Coaster Bus


The public is invited to submit Sealed bids marked "Tender" to Bahamas Development Bank, P.O. Box
N-3034. Nassau. BWham;as attention Financial Controller, faxed bids will not be accepted or telephone
327-5780 tbr additional information. Please note that all bids on the .il;llcm'nilliocd propcrtics and assets
should be received by or on lebtruar' 15, 'inI? Ihe' 1' t H Ihams Development Bank reserves the right to
reject any or all olters. All assets are sold as is.


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2006
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/00941
Common Law & Equity Division
IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF LEROY CAPRON
AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT, 1959
AND
IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land together
comprising of 5,000 square feet of property more or less in the
Nassau Village Subdivision on the Island of New Providence
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas being
Lots 9 and 10 of Block 14 situate on the Western side of Lewis
Street and about 100 Feet North of Northern Alexander Boulevard
and having such positions shapes marks and boundaries as
are shown on the plan filed herein and thereon coloured Pink.

NOTICE

The Petition of LEROY CAPRON of Nassau Village in the Southern
District of the island of New Providence, one of the islands of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas of

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land together comprising of
5,000 square feet of property more or less in the Nassau Village
Subdivision on the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas being Lots 9 and 10 of Block 14.

The Petitioner LEROY CAPRON claims to be the owner of the fee
simple estate in possession of the tract of land hereinbefore described free from
encumbrances.

And the Petitioner has made application to the Supreme Court of the
aforementioned Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the
Quieting Titles Act, 1959, in the above action, to have his title to the said tract of
land investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

Notice is hereby given that any person having a Dower or a right to Dower
or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or before
the expiration of Thirty (30) days after the final publication of these presents
file in the said Registry of the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or
the undersigned a Statement of his claim in the prescribed form verified by an
Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file and serve a
Statement of his Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days after
the final publication of these presents shall operate as a bar to such claims,

Copies of the said plan may be inspected during normal working
hours at the Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street North, Nassau,
N.P Bahamas and the Chambers of Messrs. Evans & Co., Samuel
H. Evans House, Christie and Shirley Streets, Nassau, Bahamas
DATED the 11th day of January A.D., 2008.
EVANS & CO.
Chambers
Samuel H. Evans House
Shirley & Christie Streets
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner


i BSIES


SBAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK
/ Cable Beach, West Bay Street,

P.O.Box N-3034
SNassau, Bahamas
Tel:(242) 327-5780/327-5793-6
S Fax:(242) 327-5047, 327-1258
T'h cwww.bahamasdevelopmentbank.com







PAGE 12B. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4,2008 THE TRIBUNE


GN-641















SUPREME


COURT



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
7TH FEBRUARY, 2008

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00678

In the Estate of ALLEN C. SHERMAN, JR. late of 730
N.E. 20th Lane in the City of Boynton Beach in the County
of Palm Beach in the State of Florida one of States of the
United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by EARL A. CASH, of the Western District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney
in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Grant of
Successor Letter of Administration in the above estate
granted to BRIAN M. O'CONNELL the Personal
Representative of the Estate, by the Probate Division in the
Circuit Court for Palm Beach County Florida, on the 25th
day of January, 2007.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
7TH FEBRUARY. 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00027

Whereas PERRY ARBACES PINDER of Spanish Wells
on St. George's Cay, one of the Cays of the Eleuthera Island
range of Cays in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration withAthe-will annexaedof the
Real and Personal Estate of ARBACES PINDER late of
Spanish Wells on St George's Cay, one of the(ta5s of the
Eleuthera Island range of Cays in the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the date
hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
7TH FEBRUARY, 2008


No. 2008/PRO/npr/00028

Whereas PERRY ARBACES PINDER of Spanish Wells
on St George's Cay, one of the Cays of the Eleuthera Island
range of Cays in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of LILAH GERALDINE PINDER late of Spanish Wells
on St George's Cay, one of the Cays of the Eleuthera Island
range of Cays in the Commonwealth of The Bahama,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the date
hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
7TH FEBRUARY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00029

IN THE ESTATE OF FRANK GEORGE ALSTER, late
of 262 Wearimus Road,, Ho-Ho-Kus in the State of New
Jersey, one of the States of the United States of America,
deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by MELISSA L. SELVER of Western District of the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney
in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Letters
Testamentary in the above estate granted to MARY WAIT
and BARBARA WENDT, the Executrixes of the Estate,
by the State of New Jersey, Bergen County Surrogate's
Court, on the 27th day of September, 2004.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
7TH FEBRUARY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00032

Whereas CLEVELAND LEROY HANNA of Peach Street
in the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application to
the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration of the Real and Personal Estate of JAMES
RANDOLF HANNA (a.k.a.) JAMES R. HANNA late of
Spring Point on the Island of Acklins, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the date
hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
7TH FEBRUARY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00033

Whereas DEBORAH SANDS of Vesey Street in the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the Real
and Personal Estate of ALLAN SANDS late of Vesey
Street in the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date
hereof.


Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
7TH FEBRUARY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00034

Whereas EARLA ROSNEL RUSSELL of Arawak Avenue
in the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application to
the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration of the Real and Personal Estate of GEORGE
ELONE HIGGS (a.k.a.) SAMUEL GEORGE ELONE
HIGGS late of Eight Mile Rock in the Island of Grand
Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.
... .. . . I .';
Notice is.hereby.given that such applications will be heard
byth iid Court at the ep'iration of 21 days from the date
hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
7TH FEBRUARY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00038

Whereas E. TERRY NORTH of Winton Highway in the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application to
the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration of the Real and Personal Estate of EDWARD
JOSEPH BENSON (a.k.a.) EDWARD J. BENSON late
of 9449 Abbott Avenue, Surfside, Dade County in the State
of Florida, one of the States of the United States of America,
deceased

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date
hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
7TH FEBRUARY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00039

Whereas JENNIFER STUBBS of the Western District of
the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application to
the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration of the Real and Personal Estate of VERNAL
E RUTHERFORD late of Hawthorne Road in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date
hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
7TH FEBRUARY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00040

IN THE ESTATE OF WILLIAM LESLIE JONES, late
of 2005 Lawrence Avenue West in the Town of Oakville
in the Regional Municipality of Halton in the Province of


Ontario in the Dominion of Canada, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by EARL A. CASH of Marlin Drive, Western District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attoiney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney
in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Grant of
Certificate of Appointing of Estate Trustee With a Will in
the above estate granted to THE CANADA TRUST
COMPANY and !BRIAN WILLIAMS JONES, the
Executors and Trustees of the Estate, by the Superior Court
of Justice at 491 Steeles Avenue West, Milton in Ontario,
L9T 1YZ on the 8th day of June, 2005.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
7TH FEBRUARY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00043

Whereas LORI ELIZABETH LOWE, of the Eastern
District, New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas Attorney by Dee4 of
Power of Attorney for Lazelle A. Grothe, The Personal
Representative, has made application to the Supreme Coprt
of The Bahamas, for letters of administration with the will
annexed of the Real and Personal Estate of HOWARD L.
GROTHE, late of 4932 Silverthorne Court, Oldsmar,
Pinellas County in the state of Florida one of the States of,
the United States of America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date
hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
7TH FEBRUARY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00044

IN THE ESTATE OF JON RICHARD BROCKETT, late
of 1017 Port of Call Villas in the City of Freeport in the
Island of Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the-
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.'.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by W. CHRISTOPHER GOUTHRO of Freeport, one of :
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-
At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for
obtaining the Resealed Grant of Probate in the above estate
granted to DAVID HENRY NEVILLE the Executor of
the Estate, by the District Probate Registry at Winchester,
Birmingham on the 6th day of December 2004.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
7TH FEBRUARY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00046

IN THE ESTATE OF JACQUELINE J.M. DAUCHY,
late the County of New York in the state of New York, one
of the states of the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by DR. DEBRA ROSE MUNNINGS of the Eastern
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the
Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealed Certificate of Letters of Administration in the
above estate granted to WILLIAM A. SIMON the
Administrator of the Estate, by the Surrogate's Court of
the County of New York, on the 27th day of March, 2007

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
7TH FEBRUARY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00047

IN THE ESTATE OF JERRY A. DORMINY, late of 4053
Indian Trail in the City of Destin in the County of Okaloosa
in the State of Florida one of the States of the United States
of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by STEPHEN J. MELVIN of the Western District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney
in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Grant of Letters
of Administration in the above estate granted to SHERRY
W. DORMINY the Personal Representative of the Estate,
by the Probate Division in the Circuit Court for Okaloosa
County, Florida of the 9th day of October, 2006.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


PAGE 12B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008


..... o


THE TRIBUNE









THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008, PAGE 13B


PROJECT, from 1B


SUPREME


COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
7TH FEBRUARY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00048

IN THE ESTATE OF ELIZABETH STOKES DOYLE, late of 2800 North Ocean
Drive, Apartment Number 23 in the City of Singer Island in the County of Palm Beach
in tie State of Florida, one of the States of the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that the expiration of fourteen days from the date hereof,
application will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by EARL A. CASH of the Western District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed of Letters of Administration in the above estate
granted to ANNE C. DOYLE the Personal Representative of the Estate, by the Probate
Division in the Circuit Court for Palm Beach County, Florida, on the 17th day of
December, 2006.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
7TH FEBRUARY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00049

IN THE ESTATE OF IRIS ELIZABETH WIDINCAMP (a.k.a IRIS ELIABETH
GAYLORD), late of 18218 Foxtrace Court, Lutz in the County of Hillsborough in the
State of Florida, one of the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of Fourteen days from the date hereof,
application will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by MICHELLE Y. CAMPBELL of the Eastern District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized
Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Order of Summary Administration
in the above estate granted to SHARON W. ROYAL the Administratrix of the Estate,
by the Probate Division in the Circuit Court of the 13 Judicial Circuit in and for
*Hiallsorough I~d~Gt~~A the Flotidfi, 6n'the 22nd day of March, 2007.
: .. i' Desiree Robinson ''
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
7TH FEBRUARY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00050

IN THE ESTATE OF MARGARET V.L. HISCANO (a.k.a MARGARET VON
LENGERKE HISCANO, MARGARET VON L. HISCANO) late of the Township
of Millburn in the County of Essex in the State of New Jersey one of the United States
of Ameica, deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days from the date
hereof, application will be made to Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate
Division by LORI E. LOWE of the Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in
The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealing of Certified Letters Testamentary in the above
estate granted to MARGARET H. McDERMOTT the Executrix of the Estate, by the
Chancery Division in Probate Part, Surrogate's Court of Essex County, Newark, New
Jersey on the 4th day of December, 2006.

Desire Robinson
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
7TH FEBRUARY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00051

Whereas ALLAN DELENORE GIBSON of No. 14 Aloe Road, Winton Meadows,
Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, the lawful widower has made application to the Supreme Court of the
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of LORRAINE
GIBSON late of No. 14 Aloe Road, Winton Meadows, Eastern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
7TH FEBRUARY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00053

Whereas JUDY MAE RODGERS of No. 4, Robert Maynard Drive, Freeport, Grand
Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas the Lawful Widow
has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
of the Real and Personal Estate of SAMUEL GREGORY RODGERS a.k.a.
GREGORY RODGERS late of No. 4, Robert Maynard Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 21 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson


(for) Registrar


signed yesterday we are on the
cusp of execution. These are
the first projects we will
embark on."
He added: "We're finalising
the costs on the Straw Market
at the moment. The intention
is to relocate the eastern Straw
Market to an area where the
western Straw Market is, and
create an area we hope to call
Pompey Village."
Pompey Village, Mr Sands
explained, would feature a
number of amenities and
attractions besides the Straw
Market, and "will include
authentic Bahamian-made
items. It will attract visitors to
things that are indigenous and
authentically Bahamian".
Among the items and
amenities set for inclusion in
Pompey Village, Mr Sands
said, were Bahamian arts and
crafts, plus 'down home'
authentic Bahamian eating and
dining experiences, such as
daiquiri shacks and conch sal-
ad.
The Baha Mar executive
said the tender for the West
Bay Street roadworks contract
was "at a very advanced
stage", with the developer also
having received permission to
"go out to tender" for the
Commercial Village construc-
tion works as it awaits the
finalising of some permits.
On the West Bay Street re-
routing, Mr Sands said a total
of three bids had been submit-
ted. All these bidders had
received prior approval to bid
from the Ministry of Works,
and the developers and the
Government were "finalising
and reviewing the bids as we
speak".
One of these bids is under-
stood to be from a South Car-
olina-based company, working,
in partnership with a Bahami-
an firm. The same group has
also bid on the New Provi-
dence Road Improvement pro-
gramme.
The $15 million construction
costs for the Commercial Vil-
lage include the cost for replac-
ing the existing police and fire
station along the Cable Beach
strip, plus new offices for the
Scotiabank, Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) and Common-
wealth Bank branches that cur-
rently line the Cable-Beach


strip.
The figure does not include
the cost of replacing the Cecil
Wallace-Whitfield Centre, or
the Bahamas Development
Bank and Gaming Board
Offices.
Last week's signing of the
supplemental Heads of Agree-
ment for the Baha Mar pro-
ject has opened the door for
the developers to start their
construction activity.
Yet Mr Sands said Baha Mar
had not been idle while waiting
to reach its new agreement
with the Ingraham administra-
tion, having done "preliminary
work" on realigning the Cable
Beach golf course to accom-
modate the West Bay Street
re-routing, and rebuilding the
hotels' maintenance shed.
"We've done a lot of reme-
dial work in anticipation of
[the Heads of Agreement sign-
ing], so that we can jump start
a number of preliminary
works," Mr Sands said.
Steps

He added that the "next
steps" were for Baha Mar Joint
Venture Company Ltd to
finalise its joint venture agree-
ment with Harrah's Entertain-
ment, which is taking a 43 per
cent equity stake in the pro-
ject.
It is understood that Har-
rah's may be pumping as much
as $250 million of its own cap-
ital into the project as equity,
to go alongside the $400 mil-
lion committed by Baha Mar's
principals, Lyford Cay-based
father-and-son duo, Dikran
and Sarkis Izmirlian.
"We are ready to go. We are
working on this very urgent-
ly," Mr Sands said.
When asked whether the
global credit/liquidity crunch
had impacted Baha Mar's debt
financing lines, Mr Sands
replied: "Not at all. Everything
that has been committed will
be there. "The important thing
is that this project is not a one-
year project. It is spread over
time. What we are going
through economically is just a
situation today, and certainly
by the time this project finish-
es in late:2011, the world eco-
nomic cycle" will have changed
for the better. ,,>


Mr Sands added that Baha
Mar's two partners, Harrah's
and Starwood, through their
affinity and marketing schemes
gave the redeveloped Cable
Beach access to more than 100
million potential customers.
Describing this as an "imme-
diate marketing opportunity",
Mr Sands said the strength of
its partners "is a very positive
situation for Baha Mar Joint
Venture Company".
The West Bay Street re-
routing roadworks were likely
to take "slightly over a year",
with work on the vertical con-
struction of Harrah's 1,000-
room Caesar's Entertainment
hotel and 100,000 square foot
casino, plus Starwood's 'W'
and St Regis hotels, to start
"immediately after that".
"The timelines are to finalise
the [joint venture] documents,
get the Parliamentary
approval, do the roads, do the
Straw Market, do the Com-
mercial Village, and then build
the main superstructure," Mr
Sands said.
On the Government side, it
will have to table Parliamen-
tary resolutions to approve the
$5.962 million sale of Treasury
lahd to Baha Mar, and also the
$37,550 sale of the Crown's:
remaining interest in the land
upon which the now-closed
Nassau Beach Hotel sits.
Baha Mar had been seeking
to negotiate a supplemental
Heads of Agreement with the
Government to account for the
fact that the cost of its pro-
posed project has increased
from $1 billion to $2.6 billion.
The April 6, 2005, Heads of
Agreement signed between
Baha Mar and the Christie
government was for a $1 bil-
lion project.
A forecast on Baha Mar's
likely economic impact, pre-
pared by Global Insight, pre-
dicted that the project would
create more than 7,000 "direct
and indirect" jobs after becom-
ing fully operational.
It was projected to attract
500,000 guests to its resorts in
the first year after fully open-
ing, and pump $560 million
annually into the Bahamas'
gross domestic product (GDP).
Several thousand construc-
tion jobs are also expected to
be created.


Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited




Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited. the developers of the Royal Island Resort
and Residential Project, just off North Eleuthera wish to fill the following
positions:

Project Superintendent of Site Infrastructure

This position will oversee the construction efforts of the underground
infrastructure systems for Royal Island. These systems include: electrical,
mechanical, plumbing, communications, gas distribution, water, and
sanitary utilities.

Responsibilities & duties include the following:

* Effective coordination for installation of underground utilities within the
various components of the development.
* Coordinate activities with other contractors and suppliers.
* Monitor schedule with General Superintendent and Project Scheduler.
* Coordinate inspections.
Supervise contractors and their performance.
Participate in weekly construction meetings.
SPrepare daily construction reports.
SMaintain jobsite safety.

Qualifications and Experience:

The individual must have a minimum of fifteen (15) years of trade
experience in the underground infrastructure occupations. Candidate
must have experience in working with design consultants, architects, and
engineers in the industry. Applicant must demonstrate strong leadership
and excellent communication skills.

Project Manager Residential Development

This position will oversee the design. development and construction
efforts related to the Residential Build-out of Royal Island. The successful
candidate will manage both the schedule and budget associated with
this project and coordinate the design and construction consulting and
contracting firms.

Qualifications and Experience:
The individual must have a minimum of fifteen years of senior
management experience In the design. construction and development
on long term residential construction projects. This candidate must have
experience in working with design consultants, architects, and engineers
in the industry.

Applicant must demonstrate strong leadership skills and possess a
Masters Degree in Construction Engineering or similar.

The successful candidates will be required to reside at Eleuthera.

Interested persons should submit their resumes with cover letter to:

Fax to: (954) 745-4399
or
Email to:aileen.miller@royalislandbahamas.com

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for their interest.
however only those candidates under consideration will be contacted.


GN-641







PAGE 14B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


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- CRYPTIC PUZZLE


ACROSS
4 Using a tool with a swing (6)
7 A warning not to transfer
colour (3,5)
8 Sailor posted missing (6)
10 In these bars,one finds trouble in
extremes of rudeness (5)
13 A bit of a dance (4)
14 Sort of skirt for the south of
France? (4)
15 Form of food developed in the West
(4)
16 A bit rusty, this pen?.(3)
17 Bank of Scotlandl (4)
19 Gone off? Emphatically! (4)
.21 Being injured, Fred's out of turn for
half an hour (9)
23 They're green and pleasant
in parts (4)
24 Vehicle apt to skid? (4)
26 Consuela's pet name? (3)
27 A rude epithet for Charlie and the
bunch (4)
29 Turns andleaves (4)
32 Dads certain notout
tohurt (4)
33 He has a name for courage (5)
34 Pampered pilots, possibly (6)
35 Where, in Herts, the bowler has to
retrieve the ball? (8)
36 RAF set, i.e., prepared, to attack (6)


Yesterday's cryptic solutions
ACROSS: 1, Way out 7, Hand-some 8, Semi 10, Dr.-agon(-
y) 11, Demand 14, Row 16, Dukes 17, Rain 19, Fre-U-d 21,
S-I-eep 22, Skoat 23, S-OAP 26, Ma-fia 28, Sin 29, Erects
30, Oil-can 31, Cr.-ee 32, Tigerish 33, Ex-tort
DOWN: 1, Wand-er 2, O-Reg-on 3, Thin 4, Added up 5,
Kojak 6, See-D-s 8, Sari 9, M-ow 12, M-UD 13, Nesta 15,
0-ream 18, At war 19, F-L-O 20, Eel 21, Skaters 22, Sic 23,
Silent 24, On-ce 25, Pun-ne4 26, Meaty 27, Feign 28, Sir
30, Oche


DOWN
1 Gather round the southwestern
extension (5)
2 As mentioned, stayed sober (5)
3 Plenty of luggage (4)
4 Speak for the people (5)
5 Was quiet in flight, perhaps (4)
6 Tiny upset about a piece of news that
could mean a lot (6)
9 Live somewhere in Herts- with
caution! (6)
11 Am Iwrong in my intention? (3)
12 The sign of a liberal artist (5)
13 Surprising tests on a cowboy hall (7)
15 Bag at the bottom of a
blind alley (3)
16 Sorry to have left the previous
address? (3)
18 Th, cad Carla's upset (6)
20 lam at the West Side (5)
21 Of coffee or toffee, the price is the
same (3)
22 In consultation last month (3)
23 A high position in the Church (6)
25 Washerwoman? Not she! (3)
28 Many an article is flexible (5)
30 So wrong about a stormy sea being
in the desert (5)
31 Learn about composition (5)
32 City of towering fame? (4)
33 A fit of ill humour at draughts? (4)


ACROSS
4 Whole
7 Upset 8
8 Gysy 6
10 RUbP,,iS)
t"a
13 Extra (4)
14 Stringed
instrument (4)
15 Post(4(
16 MOist (3)
17 M East country (4)
19 Walk (4)
21 Convey (9,
23 Manner(4)
24 Sound quit (4)
26 Policeman (3)
27 Stair (41
29 Observe (4)
32 Needy (4
33 Afterwards (5)
34 Type of hat 6)
35 Headlong rush (8)
36 Road (6)


Yesterday's easy solutions
ACROSS: 1, Slight 7, Reverses 8, Vile 10, Teepee I1,
Morose 14, Red 16, Voted 17, Ebbs 19, Hoped 21, Liver 22,
Ripen 23, Dips 26, Rotas 28, Bad 29, Agents 30, Famous
31, Opal 32, Decanter 33, Meeker
DOWN: 1, Settle 2, Gripes 3, Tree 4, Recover 5, Ascot 6,
Asked 8, Verb 9, Led 12, Rod 13, St up 15, Hovel 18,
Befog 19, Hip 20, Pen 21, Listens 22, Ran 23, Damage
24, Idol 25, Sister 26, Raids 27, Teach 28, Bap 30,


.Case of the Missing Damsel


East dealer.
North-South vulnerable.
NORTH
+AQJ
V873
474

S10 7 6 3
VAQJ92 2
4J95 4
+6 4


EAST
*9852
'64
Q 1082
-Q 7 4


SOUTH
4K4
YK105
*AK63
#A 10 8 2
The bidding:
East South West North
Pass INT Pass 3NT
Opening lead-- qren ofI hus.

Assume you're deldarer at aee
notrump and West leads te queenof
he. is. How would you play the
hand?
Looking at all S c ard it is obvi-
ous you can score 11 tricks if you
win the heart with the king, cross to
the king of clubs and take a club
fiesse against Bat.
The trouble is that very few
declares get to see their opponents'
cards during the play. So, with the
location of the queen of clubs
unmkown, declare might try the per-
centage play of cashing the A-K of
clubs in hopes of dropping the queen.


In the actual deal, this would result in
down one.
Yet there is a way of assuring the
contract regardless of how the clubs
lie. The problem can be resolved
very simply if you allow West's
queen of heart to hold the first trick!
No mattRexwat he does nex you are
guaranteed to soore at least nine
tricks before your opponents can
score five.
Suppose West decides to continue
with the jack of hearts. In that case,
you win with the king, cash the ace
of clubs and lead another club. If
West follows suit, you finesse, while
if West shows out, you concede the
queen to East
This method of-play ensures that
only East can gain the lad with a
club. If he has a heart remaining, it
means the hearts were originally
divided 4-3, so you finish with ine
tricks. If East doesn't have a heart,
you score 10 tricks.
Now lt' s ay West does not con-
tinue hearts at trick two, but shifts to
another suit In that event, you win
his return, cash the dub king and
finesse East for the queen. If Wet
wins e trick, he cannot nm his
hearts, and again you make the am-
tract
Thus, there is nothing that can stop
you from getting home safely-pro-
vided you refuse to take the king of
hearts at trick one. That's all there is
to it


I.. T RGET'


body of
21st
C LCotur



ena word, each letterman
once only. Each must

there must be at least one
nine-lette word. No plurals.
TODAY'S TARGET
Good 18; very good 27;
excellent 36 (mor e).
Solution tomorrow.


,DOWN
1 Facial feature (5)
2 Tree (5)
3 Irritafion4)
4 Sign up (5)
5 Domesticated (4)
6 Setting agt (6
9 US state 16.
11 Uncooked (3)
12 Steeple (5)
13 Oqre(7)
15 Dislh J)
16 Comedian (3)
18 Kidnapper's
demand (6)
20 Amphitheatre (5)
21 Gratuity (3)
22 Lemonade (3)
23 Austrian
composer (6)
25 Devoured (3)
28 Charred bread (5)
30 Freshwater
mammal (5)
31 Strayed (S)
32 Sheet of qass(4)
33 Swelling (4)


n



technology
inutimrs


MONDAY,
FEB 4

AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
Don't make a hasty decision when it
comes to your personal finances this
week. An old friend whom you
haven't seen in a while calls you.
* Find out what he or she really wants.
PISCES Feb 19/March 20
You have several things -to do this
week, Pisces, and a lot of people
are counting on you. Avoid dis-
tractions whenever you can.
"ARIES March 21/April 20
While you don't want to have a dis-
cussion with a family member, you
have to early in the week. Listen to
what be or she says to you.
TAURUS April 21/May 21
Don't give up too easily when it
comes to something that you really
want, Taurus, A loved one gets you
involved in a family argument. Try to
help everyone come to an agreement
SGEMINI May 22/June 21
You have to be patient this week
while waiting for a close friend to
answer an important question. Don't
force the issue or you may not get
the response that you're hoping for.
CANCER June 22/July 22
Try not to get upset when a business
associate is in the spotlight instead
of you this week. He or she really
does deserve the praise. A close
friend needs help with a family
: matter. Don't get involved.
LEO July 23/August 23
Keep your eyes and ears open at
work. There is something strange
going on. Colleagues are counting
on you to find out what it is. Don't
worry it isn't anything serious.
SVIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
You struggle with your perfectionist
nature early in the week, Virgo. Do
the best that you can. Scorpio plays
an important role.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
An acquaintance tries to pull 'the
wool over your eyes early in the
week; don't let it happen. If you
really listen to what is being sai'
you'll see that it can't be true. i
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
A close friend confides in you this
week, Scorpio. Even though he or
she reveals some important informa-
tion, don't betray this person's trust
He or she wouldn't do that to you.
SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
A coworker gets into trouble, and
asks you tb lie for him or her. Don't
do it; it's not worth it. Besides, no
one will believe you anyway. You
can't lie. Blow off some steam this
weekend, you deserve it.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
Don't try to take control of a situa-
tion that you can't handle early in
the week, Capricorn. You know
your limitations; don't ignore them.
Let someone else take the lead.


CHESS by Leonard Barden


Russian chess coaches show
their students today's diagram
as an example of
resourcefulness in an
apparently reignable position.
Whit (to play) Is threatened
with instant checkmate by Qh7,
Qh6 or Rh6, but a remarkable
defence saves the game. How
can White escape defeat?
If you are looking for a chess
set, board, dock, book or
computer, London's two
specialists are likely to have the
answer. The BCM chess shop in
Baker Street (020 7486 8222,
web bcachessco.uk) and the
London chess center in Euston
Road (020 7388 2404, web
chess.co.uk) are within walking
distance of each other, so you
can visit both in an afternoon
to compare stocks and prices.


They offer a friendly and expert
serve and a large collection of
equipment


PUZZLE SOLU1TONS


BOnspoe9qsuoolsaipaL1q ppb(lpo q oias
mOupinwgq9pfljgtpis5l 58tuonnloussas


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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4,2008, PAGE 15B


*I ILI wl~r


II -s L~dl~kr ~I.,


"I get a bettcir sense of wlat
is happening in The Baihanmis
from rcadilg the Tribune.
Where other daily
newspapers fall short, the
Tribune delivers. I'm
confident knowing The
Tribune looks out for my
interests. The Tribune is


my newspaper.


The


NELSON JOHNSON
TAXI DRIVER


Tribune


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PAGE 16B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2008


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