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The Tribune
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00936
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: January 26, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:00936

Full Text





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HAPPY MEAL ,'m-

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LOW 69F

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The


Tribune


ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE'RE #1


BAHAMAS EDITION


aM I


Official denies


mother's claim


over event in


Spanish Wells


* By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net
A SENIOR official in Span-
ish Wells has refuted claims that
a young girl was excluded from
the Little Miss Spanish Wells
pageant because of the colour
of her skin.
Yesterday, Mrs Yolanda Nel-
son told The Tribune that her
granddaughter had been denied
access to the pageant for being
"coloured".
"I went and talked to the lady
this morning and she said they
have rules in their pageant. The
last time they had a coloured
girl in the pageant the whole
island was upset," Mrs Nelson
said.
"I went to the people who are
having it and those are the
words that came out of her
mouth. I had to walk away from
her before I got into problems.
I could not believe that she said
that to me," she added.
Mrs-Nelson said she now has


the unwanted task of having to
break the news to her grand-
daughter that she will not be
able to enter the pageant.
However, the island's chief
councillor, Abner Pinder, said
the idea that the young girl
would be excluded due to race
is absurd.
Mr Pinder said the girl was
excluded from the pageant
because she is not a resident of
Spanish Wells.
Mrs Nelson confirmed in her
interview with The Tribune ear-
lier that her granddaughter was
born in Nassau but lives in
Spanish Wells and goes to the
island's All Age School.
"This woman is only trying
to make a racial thing out of
this, but the simple fact is the
girl is from Nassau..It's a Little
Miss Spanish Wells contest. We
can't let someone from Miami,
or Inagua, in the contest," he
said..
Mr Pindermaintains that this
SEE page eight


Former minister

calls for public vote

on national lottery

0 By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
A NATIONAL lottery
would provide "immeasurably
more" benefits than problems
for the Bahamas and the gov-
ernment should allow the pub-
lic to vote on whether one
should be introduced, former
FNM minister Algernon Allen
said yesterday.
Mr Allen elaborated on
comments he made as a caller
to a local radio talk show on
Thursday, in which he sug-
gested to the show's guest,
Minister of State for Finance
Zhivargo Laing, that a nation-
al lottery would be a "creative
revenue initiative" that would go some way towards aiding the
government in funding public goods and services.
As a long-term supporter of the lottery idea, Mr Allen said his
advocacy of such a scheme is buttressed by research he undertook
of various lottery schemes globally during his time in government as
a minister of youth, sports and culture, and before that as an oppo-
sition MP.
The attorney said that, in the late 1980s, "rough calculations"
done by interested parties had determined that a Bahamian nation-
al lottery, depending on how deeply the tourist market could be pen-
etrated, could make available an additional $30-$50million in fund-
ing which could be spent on charitable, sporting, cultural, youth and
special education initiatives, among others.
He noted that many Caribbean countries, including Barbados,


SEE page eight


E2

U-

THE COFFIN of Joseph Russell Ford, a former MP for Inagua and Mayaguana, is led from the House of Assembly yesterday. Mr Ford died
last weekend following a year-long struggle with prostate cancer.


'Skimming' a growing

problem at local banks


* By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
AN UNSUSPECTING bank
customer makes a routine trans-
action at an ATM machine
inside a popular gas station.
Two days later, while monitor-
ing his chequing account online,
he notices abnormal with-
drawals from Thailand totalling
$6,000.
Although it sounds like a
scene from a movie this kind of
identity theft, known as "skim-
ming", is gaining global popu-
larity and is now a growing
problem at local commercial


* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
MINISTER of State for Finance Zhivargo
Laing is proposing a Consumer Confidence
Index so that the government can get a bet-
ter handle on the public's perception of their
economic conditions.
A Consumer Confidence Index is a mea-
sure of consumer optimism, or pessimism,
towards current and future economic con-
ditions. The US's Consumer Confidence
Index, updated on a monthly basis based on
a survey of around 5,000 households, is
watched closely by many economists, who
consider consumer optimism to be a key
indicator of the future health of the econo-
my.
Speaking as a guest on GEMS 105.9FM,
Mr Laing said he "is seeking to have that


banks, The Tribune has learned.
According to about.com,
skimming is "a hi-tech method"
by which thieves capture per-
sonal or account information
from your credit card, driver's
licence, or even passport. An
electronic device used to cap-
ture this information is called a
"skimmer".
The card is swiped through
the "skimmer" and information
contained on the magnetic strip
of the card is read into and then
stored on the device or an
attached computer. Thieves can
then produce a duplicate of the
SEE page eight


Teenager is arrested in

connection with murder


* By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net
A 17-YEAR-OLD youth has
been arrested by Flying Squad
officers in connection with the
murder of Kendrick Rolle.
Police press liaison officer
Walter Evans said the officers
were acting on information
when they travelled to St James
Road around 10pm on Thurs-
day.
There they saw and arrested
the 17-year-old, who is now in
police custody.
Also, police report the death
of 50-year-old Elvis Strapp, a


member of the Valley Boys
Junkanoo Group.
Strapp was discovered around
8pm on Thursday at his home in
Millennium Gardens suffering
from severe burns to the body.
Mr Evans said officers found
Mr Strapp in the backyard lying
on his back. Emergency Med-
ical Services responded and pro-
nounced him dead at the scene.
It is believed this matter
stemmed from an earlier
domestic argument. However,
police are still only listing the
incident as "death by fire".
A second suspicious death
SEE page eight


done" in response to a query from host
Michael Pintard on whether he felt such an
index might benefit the Bahamas.
"It is another element of measuring the
expectations, the optimism, of the people
of this country in respect of the economy,"
noted Mr Laing.
He added: "There can be a disconnect
between what people think is happening
and what I or the IMF (International Mon-
etary Fund) believe is happening."
Mr Laing went on to explain that, despite
increasing levels of Gross Domestic Product
(GDP) per capital, a commonly accepted
indicator of escalating prosperity, "there has
been something inilcdi'll, happening" in
the Bahamas.
This, he explained, is that despite the econ-
omy and GDP per capital growing, when
SEE page eight


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2008


LOCALNEWS


PM: PLP owes ZNS $237,000





for election media coverage


By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

THE PLP still owes the
Broadcasting Corporation of
:he Bahamas $237,000 for
*nedia coverage leading up to
he 2007 election. Prime Min-
ster Hubert Ingraham said.
Speaking to a crowd of
thousands gathered at R M
3ailev Park on Thursday
night, the prime minister
announced that the FNM has
nio outstanding bills at ZNS
md has already paid for the
television and radio coverage
of this latest mass rally.
Following the outcome of
the Pinewood recount in
favour of the FNM, Mr Ingra-
ham said that it is now time to
,nove on.
"It's time to concentrate
our whole attention and the
whole attention of the parlia-
ment of the Bahamas on the
business of the people of the
Bahamas. They (the PLP)


have done their best to dis-
tract us and to obstruct our
progress. Th'lc conTlinuIe to
repeat the lies manuIfactured
while tIhey were in office in
attempts lo undlfermine us.
They will not succeed," he
said.
Mr Ingraham said that the
PLP suggested in the press
that the increase in the unem-
ployment numbers released
for 2007 are a result of FNM
policies.

Survey
However, he pointed out
that the PLP is aware of the
fact that the survey of the
country's unemployed in 2007
was taken in April one
month before the FN M came
to office.
He further said that the
PLP knows that the slow-
down in construction was the
result of the completion of the
Phase III development of
Kerzner International.


"And they know that the
much-heralded projects $20
billion worth which they
talked about were figments of
their imagination. They know
that few of these projects, and
no major project, was ready
to come on stream in May
2007 that's why they hid the
heads of agreements for so
many projects from you," he
charged.
Mr Ingraham promised that
the FNM government will
never sacrifice the people's
interests for political motive
or gain.
"Our commitment to cre-
ate jobs and new business
opportunity in our country
will not get in the way of our
greater commitment to pro-
tect the national interests. It is
in your interest that develop-
ment approved by us result in
the creation of a community
that we, the Bahamian peo-
ple, want," he said.
The FNM government, the
prime minister said, is striv-


ing to create a country where
Bahamians are able to afford
prime residential and com-
mercial land for development,
are able to access Crown
Land at preferential rates for
residential, agricultural and
commercial development, and
will continue to have access
to beaches, the shoreline and
open green spaces for recre-
ational purposes.

History
The administration, Mr
Ingraham said, envisions a
country where Bahamians are
assured that the environment
will be safeguarded, will know
that their history and their
heritage is valued and trea-
sured, will see education and
health receive the focused
attention of the government,
and will know that their
human, civil and social
rights are respected and
that their protection is guar-
anteed.


ABOVE: His Grace, the Most Reverend Drexel Gomez gives the commendation blessing
of the remains yesterday as Governor General Arthur D Hanna looks on (left). Thelma
Gomez Ford, wife of Joseph Ford is also pictured (centre).
LEFT: Andy Gomez, brother-in-law of Joseph Ford, Mr Ford's wife Thelma and sis-
ter-in-law former nursing officer Myrtle Gomez.


A $1,000 reward is


offered for missing dog

A $1,000 reward has been offered for the return of a missing
dog. Danny Boy pictured above was lost in the vicinity of East
Bay Street (Harbour Bay area).
Anyone who can help is advised to call 424-4621 or 557-9160.



INDEXI

MAIN SECTION
Local News.............P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12
Editorial/Letters. ....................................... P4
SPORTS SECTION
Sports ............................................. P1,2,3,4,5
Comics.......................................... ........ P6
Ad vt.. ......... ., ..l .... ...... . ..................... P7
Veather...... .................. ....................P8


Bank of the

Bahamas signs

Avvy to wrfle,

record, perform

commercials
THE Bank of the
Bahamas International
announced that it has
signed one of the coun-
try's leading musicians
to write, record and
perform its portfolio of
radio and TV commer-
cials for the coming
year.
In a statement issued
yesterday, the bank said
the signing of Avvy is
"another chapter in its
book of innovation"
and a continuation of
its commitment to
Bahamian culture.
"This is a very excit-
ing time for us," said
Tameka Forbes, BOB
senior manager for pub-
lic relations and busi-
ness development, dur-
ing a press conference
held at the bank's head
office downtown.

Voices
"What began in 2006,
linking Bank of the
Bahamas with Bahami-
an voices, is moving to
its next level in 2008 as
we introduce our
newest musical star,
Wendell Mortimer, bet-
ter known to his thou-
sands of fans as Avvy."
Avvy, Ms Forbes said,
has recorded seven
commercials, making
this the most ambitious
of the bank's pro-
grammes since it
began marrying culture
and commerce in
2006.
That is when it con-
tracted with Ancient
Man whose rendition of
'I een askin' fa much, I
just want the best, Bank
of the Bahamas...' put
BOB in the Bahamian
music spotlight.
That was also the first
year the bank produced
Junkanoo dollars, safe
currency for crowded
events.

Junkanoo
In 2007, the bank
joined forces with the
National Youth Choir
in print advertising for
its Vacation Club mem-
bership. And for the
past two years, it has
published Junkanoo
programmes prior to
Boxing Day and New
Year's Day parades,
providing what it said
was the first compre-
hensive overview
of the coming parades
in the country's
history.
"Today marks anoth-
er chapter in the Bank
of the Bahamas' book
of innovation as we
have again collaborated
with a Bahamian artist
to promote the bank's
products and services to
the Bahamian people
through sbng.
"We have a miaessage
to deliver and who bet-
ter to do that for us
than a second genera-
tion true Island star
from Inagua," Ms
Forbes said.
A year after bursting
on to the musical scene
with "Roach on My
Bread," Avvy was
crowned King of
Bahamian Music 2006
and Entertainer of the
Year 2006 by the listen-
ers of a popular radio
show.
He won the People's
Choice Music Award
for a secular
performer and writer at
the 2006 Cacique


Awards.
Currently on tour
promoting his latest
album, "Avvy, The Best
of the Best Kept Secret,
Volume 2," the per-
former returned to
Nassau for the press
conference and thanked
the bank for the con-
tract.
"It's an exciting pro-
ject and there is much
more to come," said
Avvy.


-- ---


The fun r'al of Joseph Russell Ford


I









THEA NE TA,
S ~~p


* In brief


Man in court

accused of

raping woman

A MAN accused of
forcibly detaining and raping
a 20-year-old woman was
arraigned in Magistrate's
Court on Friday.
According to court dock-
ets, it was alleged that on
January 19, Jamaal Bastian,
28, of Pine Yard Road
forcibly detained a woman
with the intent to have sex
with her.
It was further alleged that
on the same day, the accused
committed the offence of
rape.
Bastian, who appeared
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel at court eight in Bank
Lane on Friday, was not
required to enter a plea to
the rape charge.
He was granted bail in the
sum of $10,000 and will
return to court on January 28
before Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez.
SA 44-year-old man was
arraigned in Magistrate's
Court on Thursday on
charges connected to the
seizure of 31 and a half
pounds of cocaine.
According to court dock-
ets, it was alleged that on
January 23 in Freeport, Alex
Garcia of Cadney Place,
while concerned with others,
conspired to possess a quan-
tity of cocaine with the intent
to supply it.
Court dockets also alleged
that on the same day, Garcia
conspired to possess and
conspired to export the
drugs with the intent to sup-
ply.
The accused, who was
arraigned before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel at court
eight in Bank Lane, pleaded
not guilty to the charges and
was remanded to Her
Majesty's Prison until Janu-
ary 31 when he will return to
court for a bail hearing.


Errington

Rahming dies

at the age of 67

ERRINGTON Rahming,
president of the Retired
Police Officers Association
and a former superintendent,
passed away last week Fri-
day, The Tribune has
learned.
Rahming, 67, served on
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force for around 30 years.
He reportedly died shortly
after attending last week's
service commemorating for-
mer Police Commissioner
Paul Farquharson's han-
dover of duties to Acting
Commissioner Reginald Fer-
guson.
The funeral service will be
held 11am today at the
Hillview Seventh-Day
Adventist Church on
Tonique Williams Darling
Highway.

Airport Authority

signs industrial

agreement

THE Airport Authority
signed an industrial agree-
ment with the Bahamas Pub-
lic Services Union yesterday.
The signing took place at
the Airport Authority offices
at the Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport.
In attendance were John
Pinder, president of the
BPSU; Frank Watson, chair-
man of the Airport Authori-
ty and Jerry Hutchinson, act-
ing general'manager of the
Airport Authority.


IShare


New


president for


the Humane Societ.I


I KIMARAN and er rscud o*'hef' I


THE Bahamas Humane Society
announced yesterday that Kim Aran-
ha has been named its new president.
At the annual general meeting of
the Bahamas Humane Society at
their Chippingham shelter on Janu-
ary 22, Mrs Betty Kenning stood
down as the society's longest serving
president having dedicated 50 years
of continuous, service to animals
throughout the Bahamas.
Executive director of the society
Kevin Degenhlard said, "Mrs Ken-
ning's commitment to speaking up
for those who were, and are, unable
to speak for themselves has been
amusing.
"Mris Kenning is an incredibly phil-
anthropic Bahamian and her true
love of animals is outstanding. This
has been recognized in many ways,
not least of which was when the
Queen awarded her the Order of the
British Empire and the Royal Society
for the Prevention of Cruelty to Ani-
mals (RSPCA) in the UK awarded
her their rare Queen Victoria Silver
Medal for services to animal welfare.
"Having been influenced by her
parents, Mr and Mrs Trevor Kelly,
but particularly by her mother, Mary,
who helped establish our society, Mrs
Kenning's greatest contributions were
through her 'hands on' support of
the staff, volunteers and animals and


Appeal for return




of documents stolen




in daylight robbery


* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
AN EXPAT woman is
appealing for the return of
personal documents stolen
when she became the victim
of an aggressive daylight rob-
bery in downtown Nassau last
weekend.
The resident of Italy, who
also owns a condominium in
Nassau, was left so shaken by
the incident that she says she
has since suffered nightmares
and is now considering sell-
ing her Bahamian home,
which she has owned for two
years.
At the time of the robbery
- 1pm last Saturday the
woman had intended to visit
the Kura Kura shop, located
downtown.
She told The Tribune that
when she exited her car she
noticed a man, who appeared
to be talking on a cellphone,
standing in the street near the
store.
Leaving the man behind
her, she walked towards the
store and, when only a "step
away" from entering the
door, felt a sharp jerk as she
was pulled backwards by the
force of the man grabbing the
strap of her purse.
"He pulled me down so
violently," she said.
A brief struggle ensued, but
the man had broken her bag
away' from its strap and fled.
She gave chase barefoot -
after losing her sandals in the
struggle, as she was desper-
ate not to lose her documents,
which included her Italian
driver's licence and other
important identification
cards.
"I was screaming to him
that he could have the cell-
phone and the hundred dol-
lars, but just leave my docu-
ments," she said.
She was left with a blood-
ied and bruised elbow after
falling to the ground.
The expat said she was par-
ticularly surprised at the time
of day and location in which
she was robbed.
The woman reported the
incident to Fort Charlotte
police, but said she was dis-
appointed at the alleged lack
of interest from the officer


IR I Il K



322-215


who took her report.
However, she said she was
pleased to later receive a
phone call from an "'active
young officer" who said he
would be taking charge of the
case.


The woman is calling on
anyone who may have or
know the whereabouts of her
documents to contact Fort
Charlotte police station.
She is offering a reward for
their return.


wm ~i(IOX Oi'I' ClF. OPE'NS U. 1:00 ANII DAIXt


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6:05 18:25 110:40


her substantial contribution of our
current shelter, which was opened
by the Rt Hon Hubert Ingraham in
his previous term as prime minister.
Nobody could ask for more from
such a dedicated volunteer."
He added, "We must recognize the
faithful support which we have also
received from Mr John Kenning, and
we thank him most sincerely.
"The BHS Board is planning an
emeritus role for Mrs Kenning in
recognition of her service, and this
will be announced in due course."

Honoured
The new president, Mrs Aranha,
who was elected by the BHS board,
said "I was very honoured to be nom-
inated and I thought very seriously
about the responsibility which
goes with this role before I
accepted.
"There is a lot of hard work which
needs to be done and I am deter-
mined to continue improving stan-
dards of animal welfare in this coun-
try."
Stephen Tumquest, acting direc-
tor of operations, said "We are real-
ly very fortunate to have Mrs Aranha
leading the BHS into the 21st centu-
ry. The process of modernising the


society must continue and I i., Jw
Mrs Aranha has the commirn; nt,
energy and determination to i., t .
"Mrs Aranha, too, has a lon'm so-
ciation with our society and "' 'ne
who knows her knows she 'th
right. She will say what ncc !i be
said and do what needs to be d, i',e."
Dayne D'Aguilar will coiinli_,, as
vice president and Doreen Sc \ i iur-
March will continue as treu ;t:i
The resignation of outgoing: :ice
commissioner Paul Farquhaio iI v as
accepted at the AGM and b 1 .as
wished well in his new diph, tic
career.
Two new directors were voi n on
to the board-John 'Peanut' I lor
and Arch deaconKeith Cartwri.hlit.
The other directors are. Paul
Cleare, Cheryl Bastian. ( :.-ha
Sands, Police Inspectoi Alu.cw
Deveaux, Saskia D'Aguilar. Ciive
Toomer and ex-officio director KIcvin
Degenhard.
Mr Tumquest added "The mission
of the BHS continues to be to elimi-
nate unnecessary animal suLte:-ing
and to promote responsible animal
ownership through education,
encouragement and enforce ment.
We have a good team of st;,f; and
volunteers, and a strong. Ioc.ised
board of directors, so we are rc- ;vy to
face the challenges before us.


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January 29 30 February 1


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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
FOR
GENERAL MANAGER

An exciting and challenging opportunity exists for an
experienced Manager to manage the daily food and
beverage and other business operations of a private
membership club situated in Nassau.

The successful candidate duties will be to maintain
facilities and service levels to the level expected by
the club membership and include, but are not limited
to, the following:-

* Direction, training and scheduling of bar and
wait staff.
* Coordination with the executive chef in
food and beverage purchasing and menu
preparation.
* Management of the back office which deals
with bookkeeping/accounting and event
planning
* Supervision of the installation of a
QuickBooks compatible point-of-sale
accounting system.
* Maintenance of and improvements to
the club facilities and grounds including
management of security arrangements.

The ideal candidate will have several years of
hospitality management experience, and possess
strong communications skills (oral and written);
excellent people skills; and, demonstrate leadership
ability

Salary and incentive bonus commensurate with
experience and achievement.

Interested candidates are invited to submit their
resume to:-
"General Manager"
P.O. Box SS 19520
Fax. 364-8526
Email. manager4club@gmail.com


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ALVIN AND THE CHIPMUNKS B 1:00 3:30 N/A NA
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SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2008, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


M T8*


II






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2008


EIOIAULETTRS T HEEITOR


IT WAS inevitable that former president Bill
Clinton would play an active role in his wife's
campaign for the presidency. Not for him is the
aloofness of a Dwight Eisenhower. When asked
during his vice president Richard Nixon's cam-
paign for the White House in 1960 to cite a
major Nixon contribution, Eisenhower asked
for a week to think about it.
But Clinton has gone beyond being Senator
Hillary Clinton's No. 1 supporter to become
her No. 1 pitbull against her chief rival, Senator
Barack Obama. If he is not careful, he will for-
feit the elevated status he enjoys as an ex-pres-
ident and leader of philanthropic foundations.
And he runs the risk of dividing his own party,
which until now had been united in its deter-
mination to end the Republicans' grip on the
White House.
Neither Hillary Clinton nor Obama has dealt
with notably tough opponents in winning their
Senate seats, so there is a benefit for Democratic
voters in seeing how both respond to the give
and take of a hard-fought campaign. But the
Clintons' unique situation has steered them -
and the country into uncharted waters. Cer-
tainly it is Bill Clinton's right to malign Obama's
longstanding opposition to the Iraq war as a
"fairy tale." But in making these and other crit-
icisms of the Illinois senator, the former presi-
dent sounds less like an elder statesman than
like a political kidney-puncher.
The best contribution that Bill Clinton could
make to his wife's campaign is to attest to the


ON THE last day of this year, the United
Nations Security Council resolution authorizing
US troops in Iraq will expire. Before then, the
United States and Iraq will have to agree on
new terms for the US engagement there if it is to
continue legally. Under no circumstances should
the Bush administration make a commitment to
a continuing US role in Iraq's defense without
getting the two-thirds approval from the Senate
that a treaty requires.
Members of Congress are concerned that the
administration might make an open-ended
pledge of US military support for Iraq without
Senate approval, not least because of statements
the two governments made in November about
the accord that would govern their relations after
the UN mandate expires.
At that time, the administration promised to
support Iraq "against internal and external
threats."
But the administration's deputy national secu-
rity adviser for Iraq and Afghanistan, General
Douglas Lute, said he did not think the com-
pact between the United States and Iraq would
need congressional input.
Since November, US officials have been work-
ing on the US negotiating position. According to
recent leaked accounts, the proposal calls for
continuing the immunity from Iraqi laws that is
now afforded to civilian contractors, such as the
Blackwater security guards, who have been work-
ing with United States and other foreign forces.
This provision will face opposition in Iraq, where
there has been criticism of the guards for exces-


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, PATRICE LOVELLA
PAUL nee BETHELL of the Southern District of the Island
of Nassau, intend to change my name to LOVELLA
PATRICE PAUL nee BETHELL If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas, no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.


LEGAL NOTICE



NOTICE

AXIA INVESTMENTS, LTD
(In Voluntary Liquidation)
Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in
dissolution, commencing on the 23rd day of January 2008. Articles
of Dissolution have been duly registered by the Registrar. The
Liquidator is Barry W. Herman, P.O. Box N-10818, Nassau, The
Bahamas.
All persons having claims against the above-named Company are
required, on or before the 27th day of February, 2008 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the Company or, in default thereof, they may be
excluded from the benefit or any distribution made before such
debts are proved.
Dated this 24th day of January 2008.

BARRY W. HERMAN
LIQUIDATOR


achievements and advice she provided during
his presidency and to the work she has since
done as a senator. Hillary Clinton has made
much of what she sees as her advantage in expe-
rience over Obama, and no one was a closer wit-
ness of the White House years than her hus-
band.
But instead of restricting himself to positive
statements on behalf of Hillary Clinton, he has
taken it upon himself not just to disparage Oba-
ma but also to accuse the media of failing to
look critically enough at the Illinois senator.
These statements by the former president are
likely to remind voters of his griping about
Republican critics and the press during the
darker days of his own administration. The
intensity of his campaigning will also raise ques-
tions about how much of a role he would have
in the White House if Hillary Clinton does
become president.
Two so-far neutral Democratic members of
Congress, Senator Edward Kennedy and Rep-
resentative James Clyburn of South Carolina,
have told the former president, in Clyburn's
term, to "chill a little bit."
Kennedy, Clyburn, and other party leaders
know only too well that a bitterly divisive cam-
paign for the nomination fought over offhand
remarks about Martin Luther King Jr. and
Ronald Reagan will cheapen whoever emerges
as the nominee. Bill Clinton should take
Kennedy's and Clyburn's advice and get back on
the high road.


sive use of force.
What the proposal says about any US securi-
ty guarantee for Iraq is unclear. This week, Rep-
resentative William Delahunt held a hearing to
learn more about the direction of the negotia-
tions, but all four top administration officials he
had invited, including Lute, declined to attend. In
the past, the United States has concluded, with-
out Senate approval, numerous "status of force"
agreements with other countries agreements
that, as the name suggests, govern the legal sta-
tus of US forces serving in those countries. But
US security guarantees for countries ranging
from South Korea to the Philippines have gone
before the Senate for ratification.
The reason for getting that approval is clear: a
commitment with only the president's signature
will not have the weight of one endorsed by a
super-majority of the Senate.
Critics of an administration commitment to
Iraq without congressional approval fear that
such a compact, while lacking the force of a
treaty, would still limit the options of a future
president and Congress. Any attempt to with-
draw US forces and leave Iraqi security in that
country's hands could prompt accusations, both
in Baghdad and in Washington, that the United
States was abandoning an ally whose security it
had formally guaranteed. If the administration
wants its compact with Iraq to do anything more
than state the legal status of US forces there, it
should count on seeking Senate ratification.
(Both of these articles are
c. 2007 The Boston Globe)


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352


Statesman or hatchetman?


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that GUILBOT JEAN-PIERRE OF
REEVES STREET, FOX HILL, P.O. BOX N-1671, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 26TH day of JANUARY, 2008 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.


LEGAL NOTICE



NOTICE

FIRST ABUNDANCE LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in
dissolution, commencing on the 23rd day of January 2008. Articles
of Dissolution have been duly registered by the Registrar. The
Liquidator is Barry W. Herman, P.O. Box N-10818, Nassau, The
Bahamas.
All persons having claims against the above-named Company are
required, on or before the 27th day of February, 2008 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the Company or, in default thereof, they may be
excluded from the benefit or any distribution made before such
debts are proved.
Dated this 24th day of January 2008.

BARRY W. HERMAN
LIQUIDATOR


Training College without pass-
ing firearms training. It may
be advisable to give such indi-
viduals civilian positions
How could successive gov-
ernments not have adequately
addressed the very important
issue of protective gear for our
law enforcement officers?
If we were to assume that
the police force needs 1,000
vest and I imagine that I am
being quite generous here,
then based on Mr Hulan Han-
na's statement, this would cost
the government a mere
$600,000. That amount is quite
insignificant given the service
which our officers render to
our country, and the hundreds
of millions which our "intelli-
gent" prime ministers love to
give to foreign investors in con-
cessions. One thing we can be
certain of, our politicians can
be very generous. The Christie-
led government had no diffi-
culty finding half a million dol-
lars to pay the estate of the late
Sir Lynden Pindling. The first
order of business for the new
Ingraham administration was
to increase the salary of house
speaker Alvin Smith by
$12,(X)0. Isn't this interesting? I
humbly request that such gen-
erosity be extended to other
members of society, especially
our deserving police officers.
Govenunent Policy On Mil-
itary Funerals
I was shocked to learn that
the military funeral expenses
for officers slain in the line of
duty are deducted from the
compensation package that is
paid to their beneficiary. This


in my view is disgraceful.
Thank God for Father Davies
who exposed and decried this
practice at the service for Con-
stable Williams. The Rt Hon
Hubert Ingraham, Hon Brent
Symonette, Hon Tommy Turn-
quest and other cabinet mem-
bers now have an opportunity
to show the public just how
much you really care. You
spoke in glowing terms of offi-
cers making the supreme sac-
rifice for their country. The big
question now is, are you pre-
pared for the government to
underwrite the cost of a mili-
tary funeral service for such
officers? We are aware of the
extravagant Prime Ministers'
Pension Act as well as the
lucrative pension benefits for
Members Of Parliament. How
about the welfare of others?
John Maxwell, in his book,
The 21 Indispensable Quali-
ties Of A Leader, states:
"Nothing speaks to others
more loudly or serves them
better than generosity from a
leader". He continues, "Effec-
tive leaders, the kind that peo-
ple want to follow, don't gath-
er things just for themselves;
they do it in order to give to
others".
In conclusion, fellow
Bahamians, I implore us all to
wake up and demand that our
elected public officials do the
job for which they were elected
and are highly paid. We must
insist that they care and show
compassion especially for the
poor, downtrodden and, yes,
our police officers and other
members of the armed forces
whb daily put their lives on the
line for us.

G A WATKINS
Nassau,
January 14, 2008.


EDITOR, The Tribune.

IT WAS with horror and a
sense of deep regret that the
public learnt of the shooting
death of Constable 2827
Ramos Williams on December
29, 2007. Williams' death was
the nation's 79th and final mur-
der of 2007. Firstly, I convey
my condolences to his family
members and pray that God
will sustain them during this
difficult time. I also take this
opportunity to commend the
officers of The Royal Bahamas
Police Force, whom I feel are
doing a great job under very
difficult conditions. We must
however, take a closer look at
the circumstances surrounding
this tragedy in order to deter-
mine what corrective measures
can be implemented to prevent
or minimise future occur-
rences. There are three con-
cerns I wish to address:
Working conditions of
Police Officers
Superintendent of Police,
Hulan Hanna said in a press
statement that officer Williams
was not armed or wearing a
bullet proof vest at the time of
the shooting incident. His
explanation, a bullet proof vest
cost $600 and the force does
not have sufficient for each
officer to have one. As to the
officer not having a firearm,
Mr Hanna said some officers
graduate from the police acad-
emy but may not have suc-
cessfilly passed firearms train-
ing. He also stated that even
if they were successful in
firearms raining, the senior
officer in charge of their unit
will decide whether or not they
are permitted to carry firearms.
This situation needs to be
addressed immediately as the
excuse for lack of bullet proof
vests is absolutely unaccept-
able. The safety and lives of
our police officers must cer-
tainly be worth more than
$600.
Our politicians all boast of
our robust economy and that
our standard of living is among
the highest in the region. The
previous administration boast
of leaving reserves of
$600,000,000. How can we then
not afford bullet proof vest for
all officers?
I appreciate Mr Hanna's
assertion that in the past.
unarmed officers have dis-
armed criminals. However, I
think we will agree that this is
no legitimate reason to send
these young, dedicated officers
into the battlefield unarmed
and ill-equipped. The govern-
ment or commissioner of
police needs to explain how is
it possible for individuals to
graduate from the Police


Giving praise



when praise is due

EDITOR, The Tribune.

WE HUMANS find it. oh so difficult to give credit when
credit is due. and. for us, most difficult of all, is to give praise
to whom praise is due.
I shall, today, dispense with our age-old negative tradi-
tions, and give high praise to No. 22 Neil Johnson and his
Rapid Response Team from the emergency section of the
Royal Bahamas Police Force, here in Grand Bahama, for a
job well executed, when they responded to an alarm which
was tripped, at my residence, around 11am Wednesday Jan-
uary 16, 2008.
Within seconds of the alarm going off, Officer Johnson
telephoned to inform me while, simultaneously dispatching
his Rapid Response Team to my address.
I arrived at home within ten minutes and found an invasion
of police officers, who obviously had all matters under con-
trol.
The culprits, who must have left in a big hurry, had very lit-
tle time to achieve their objective: the evidence of their hur-
ried departure could be seen on the lawn and other areas
about the house.
The culprits, two 14-year-old students from St George's
High School. were apprehended within two hours, still wan-
dering in the neighbourhood.
We are told that they were recently suspended from school
and instead of being disciplined by their parents, they were
out patrolling our neighborhoods, staking out houses to
break into. Commendations go out to No. 2 Neil Johnson and
his Rapid Response Team and Big Charles Johnson and his
team for a super job well done.
I shall be grateful if you would permit me to thank publicly,
also, my security services carriers (Integrated Security &
Solutions Services Ltd) for their care and concern in coming
on the scene as quickly as they did to ensure that we were
"OK" and to make sure that our system was back in opera-
tion before the day was finished.
Thank you Neil Johnson: thank you Big Charles Johnson,
thank you Gwen and thanks to all the others, whose names
escape me at the moment and thank you Al Sanchez.

FORRESTER J CARROLL JP
Freeport.
Grand Bahama.
Bahamas.
January 17. 2008.


Shooting death




of Constable




Ramos Williams


No back-door promises in Iraq


I






SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2008, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


LOCHA LNEWS*aI


PEG criticises the FNM





for holding mass rally


WHY


YOU


VEX?

* By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net
"I vex and tired at all
the mud-slinging and
dirty ioli-tricking the
men and women who sup-
posed to be leading this
nation are involved in.
People elected to govern-
ment posts should set an
example for the masses to
follow and not incite
anger or ridicule those
with different opinions.
"It just makes me sick
to my stomach every time
I see politicians talking'
bad 'bout this one or the
next on the news and in
the paper. People need to
remember that old sayin'
ya' mother use to tell you,
'If you don't have any-
thing nice to say about
someone, don't say any-
thing at all."
Disappointed,
Marathon

"I vex at the slop peo-
ple pass off as food these
days. I went to one Chi-
nese take-away and spent
'bout $10 on chicken lo
mien. Not more than 15
minutes later I had a
migraine, cold sweats and
I was throwing up for the
whole day!
"I want to know how
people can pass health
inspection when they sell-
ing food that obviously
giving customers food
poisoning. I used to like
their food but I hope they
get shut down for almost
killing me with that nasty
chicken."
DeAndre,
Carmichael Road
"I am very, very vex
and appalled at the way
so many Bahamians are
raising their children. I
am tired of passing
through down-trodden
areas and seeing children
no older than four walk-
ing the streets barefoot,
barely clothed and not a
parent in sight!
"Why do people who
are not equipped to ade-
quately feed, clothe, love
and raise a child procre-
ate so much? It hurts my
heart to see little, inno-
cent ones in that state
while their no-good par-
ents roam the streets at
night looking for some-
one to make more babies
with. No wonder this
country is in the state it's
in today."
Moral in
Coral Harbour.

"Well today I happy
because the garbage col-
lection in Centreville is
finally on track! I guess
all these complaints The
Tribune been putting' in
the paper working,
because last week Satur-
day I saw them coming
through my corner pick-
ing up all that trash that
was sitting there stinking
up my yard for weeks! I
hope they keep the good
work up."
President of the
re-elect Ron Pinder club.


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net
THE non-partisan People of
Ethics in Government group is
accusing the FNM of creating
even more political polarisation
in a country that is already divid-
ed by holding a mass rally on
Thursday night.
"PEG believes that the prime
ininister has erred by employ-
ing divisive partisan tactics at a
time when the political climate is
unnecessarily volatile. All
Bahamians are led by our prime
minister, irrespective of politi-
cal persuasion," the group said in
a press release.
The newly formed PEG group
purports to consist of young
Bahamians whose aim it is to
hold government and public offi-
cials to high ethical standards.
In its statement yesterday, the


PEG said it believes that the cel-
ebratory rally following the elec-
tion court's affirmation of Byran
Woodside's Pinewood victory,
was completely superfluous.
"All Bahamians are led by our
prime minister, irrespective of
political persuasion. On January
13, the prime minister gave a
state of the nation address. Why
do FNM supporters need their
own special rally to hear what
the prime minister already com-
municated during his national
address?" the group asked.
Having a mass rally on R M
Bailey Park, the PEG said,
called for FNM supporters to
wear red and did more to incite
and provoke than it did to heal
and unify Bahamians.
"The FNM won the election,
notwithstanding the PLP's futile
attempts to change the outcome
through the election courts. It
must be noted, however, that


>u r!

lilic~-*


Linkages highlighted as the

Bahamas welcomes First

Ambassador of Ireland
* By LINDSAY THOMPSON
THE Bahamas and Ireland have a great deal in common, Gover-
nor General Arthur Hanna said as he welcomed the first ever Irish
ambassador on Thursday.
The governor general said the countries have similar immigration
issues, a similar geographical make-up and are bound by the ties of
Eleuthera's ancestral legacy.
He was accepting the credentials of Declan Kelly, Ambassador of
Ireland, during a ceremony at Government House.
"The Bahamas and Ireland share much in common. Geographically,
we are both islands, politically, ware both constitutional democra-
cies. Economically, we have overcome significant challenges, internally
and externally yet, through decisiveness and focus, achieved com-
parative, above-average economic growth," the governor-general
said.
Socially, he said, the two countries are very religious and have
been affected both positively and negatively by the forces of immi-
gration. And historically, the Bahamas can lay claim to a legacy of the
developmental impact resulting from the Irish diaspora.
"The name 'Kelly' is certainly a notable one, especially in business
in our Bahamas," the governor-general added.
He explained that Kelly's Lumber Yard, established in 1916, used
its success to grant mortgages to homebuilders, before the banks
began lending.
Charles Trevor Kelly was elected to serve as the member of par-
liament for Eleuthera in 1956; he also served as minister of mar-
itime affairs.
It was during his tenure that the first Paradise Island bridge was
built, the Nassau Harbour developed and Arawak Cay, formerly
known as "Kelly Island" was enhanced, the governor-general said.
"Both our countries are also active in international affairs, region-
ally and multilaterally," he said. "The Bahamas acknowledges and
applauds Ireland's generous contributions, to priorities of developing
countries in multilateral fora, such as the European Union (EU),
World Trade Organisation, and the United Nations where you have
indicated your government is committed to achieving the Official
Development Assistance Target."
According to the governor-general, this generosity extends to the
sub-region in the area of disaster mitigation.
He also congratulated Ireland on the restoration of devolved gov-
ernment in Northern Ireland, adding "it is our wish that continued dia-
logue between your government and that of the United Kingdom
result in a brighter future for the people of Northern Ireland."

Relations
Ambassador Kelly said he is honoured to be the first ambassador
of Ireland to the Bahamas, and that he looks forward to building
friendly relations between the two countries.
"We are both islands, but without a doubt the Bahamas wins the
prize when it comes to climate. Your beautiful island nation always
conjures up the warmest vistas for Irish people, especially during
our cold and damp winters," Ambassador Kelly said.
Ireland has a population of just over four million people. Until 15
years ago, emigration was a major factor in its economy. There are
large populations of Irish decedents in the United States, Canada, Aus-
tralia, New Zealand and the UK.
In the early 17th century, the Irish began to arrive in the Caribbean.
Some of the earliest references to Irish people in the Bahamas are in
Eleuthera in 1648; among the settlers was a family named "Kelly".
There is evidence of Irish settlements in St Kitts, Barbados, Nevis,
Antigua and Montserrat. In 1666, the white population of Barbados
was 20 per cent Irish.
"The era of non-voluntary emigration has ended in Ireland,"
Ambassador Kelly said. "The last two decades have witnessed an
extraordinary transformation in our economic fortunes."
Ireland boasts virtually full employment and a per capital GDP that
is 16 per cent above the EU average. Ireland is also a major location
for investment in IT, pharmaceuticals and financial services.
In 1973, Ireland began an aid programme which by next year will
account for 0.54 per cent of GDP. Its aim is to meet the UN target of
0.7 per cent by 2012.
In December 2007, Ireland pledged to contribute $2.5 million to the
Caribbean Risk Insurance Facility.
On Tuesday, January 15, Governor General Arthur Hanna also
welcomed the first Ambassador of the Czech Republic to the
Bahamas, Vit Korselt.


these legal challenges are con-
sistent with the democratic pro-
visions of our constitution, and
have the benefit of showing that
our system is susceptible to
abuse," the group said.
The PEG said that rather than
using the anticipated outcome
of the Pinewood challenge as an
opportunity to stoke the political


fire, it is time for the FNM gov-
ernment to work toward mak-
ing the Bahamas better on
behalf of all Bahamians black
and white, rich and poor; PLP
and FNM.
"Our politicians should not be
encouraging divisions within our
country along lines drawn by
party colour. Whatever the polit-


ical strategy at play, PEG asserts
that there are too many critical
issues that demand our atten-
tion at this time, and which can-
not be resolved by partisan polit-
ical rallies. It is incumbent upon
Prime Minister Ingraham to play
the role of unifying statesman
as opposed to divisive politi-
cian," the group.


Department of Immigration's

Employee of the Quarter named


* By LLONELLA GILBERT
FLORENE Gilbert, a data entry operator in the
naturalisation section of the Department of Immi-
gration, was named as Employee of the Quarter at
an awards ceremony this week.
Minister of State for Immigration Elma Campbell
presented Ms Gilbert with a plaque and gifts. She
beat out four other nominees to become the
Employee of the Quarter.
Director of immigration Vernon Burrows told
the nominees they should feel extremely proud for
being considered among the elite in their sections by
those who nominated them.
He said, "Continue to be good examples to those
who work with you. and for those of you who may
not win, do not lower your standards because of
course the opportunity is always there for the next
quarter."


Deputy permanent secretary of immigration Cora
Bain Colebrooke said, "Ms Gilbert is the epitome of
loyalty, excellence and commitment in the public ser-
vice.
"She demonstrates on a daily basis that there is no
challenge that she is not willing to accept, and this
attitude has greatly enhanced her effectiveness and
her working experience.
"She is a model for the younger employees to
follow as she communicates well with everyone with
whom she comes into contact, displays dedication.
professionalism and good work ethics."
The runners-up were Ingrid Clark. senior clerk in
human resources, Grand Bahama; Florene Gilbert.
data entry operator in the naturalisation section:
Natasha Gilbert, data entry operator. ADP: Tamika
Russell, trainee immigration officer and Fearlease
Wallace; senior immigration officer at Prince George
Wharf.


SCRATCHED DENTED DAMAGED


InAY NLY


MrMU.


W


I This Saturday January 26, 2008


I0Oam-3pm




vewrting Must GO,,,


These prices are unbelievable!

Choose from:

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1 E II


.II







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2008


L


Defence Force commissions


A'
pS
'*
$ a


THE NIB


'U-i


I'~~~----4 a i* IsSA AS I S 1 .ll


LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past &
-1., sGeared To The Future

Worship time: 11am & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm :
Place:
The Madeira Shopping
Center
(Next door to CIBC) Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL lynnk@batelnet.bs


THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OFTHE METODIff CHURCH
Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
PNO P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: 393-3726t393-2355/Fax:393-8135
Im CHURCH SERVICES
I SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2008
THIRD SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME
AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
l U:OOAM Mrs. Pamela Brice
ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Bernard Road
11:00AM Pastor Charles Moss
CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Zlon Boulevard
10:00AM Rev. William Higgs/Youth Service
7:00PM Rev. Charles Sweeting
EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,
East Shirley Street
11:00AM Rev. Charles New
7:00PM Rev. Charles New
GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen's College Campus
9:30AM Rev. James Neilly
ST. MICHAEL'S METHODIST CHURCH, Chuchl Avenue
8:00AM Connections Rev.Philip Stubbs
9:30AM Rev. Philip Stubbs
TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
11:00AM Rev. Charles Sweeting
l*************************************
RADIO PROGRAMMES
'RENEWAL' on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Your Host: Rev. Dr. Lavern R. Lockhart
'METHODIST MOMENTS' on esch weekday at 6:S am.
Your Host: Rev. Dr. Lavern R. Lockhart
*************************************************
LORD YOU ARE MORE PRECIOUS
Lord you are more precious than sliver
Lord you are more costly than gold
Lord you are more beautiful than diamonds
Nothing I desire compares with you




Arant' 0otoWn Weerlep Aetbotbit CElurcl
(Ballou HID Rd & Chapel Sirom) PO Box C0B-1304
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)
SUNDAY, JANUARY27TH, 2008.


Rev. Dr. Colin Archer/ Bro. Ernest Miller
Rev. Carla Culmer/Bro. Andre. Bethel
Rev. Carla Culmer/Bro. Franklyn Bethel


17C IsI.I.I.I .II-a I mI..I. He.i al! s forlus(PtrI


WBe Renewed In Thei
Gory OfGod's Presence
L6 A 8*


Come, join usi a ine me togetherandt j
:.* worship the d in Spintand:in Truth
D.Y .. R.




SUNDAY SERVICES


Morning Worship Service .......
Sunday School for all ages.,.
Adult Education ................
Worship Service ................
Spanish Service ..........
Evening '.,.: hl~ ,.....


8.30 a.m.
9,45 a.m.
9,45 a.m.
11,00 am.
8.00 a.m.
6.30 p.m.


WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.
.1ee ,cr. e Bible Teaching
Royal ',Li LS ;f,-,,.'. Club) 4-16 yrs.
|*.iii.jn,-.ic. (Girls Club) 4-16 yrs.

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Youth '.1ini,tl;, [. e lrln
RADIO MINISTRY
Sunday at 8:30 a.m. ZNS 1 TEMPLE Itr 1E
Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE
Assembly Of God

Tl32834Fa. : 22-79.P..BxN156


'CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL
CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS Tel: 325-2921
SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2008
11:30 am.Speaker:
PASTOR REX MAJOR

NO EVENING SERVICE
Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. Breaking of Bread Servie 10:415 e.m
SCommunity Outrach: 1130 a.m. Evn Seioe 7:00 p.m.
Midweek Serice 7:30 p.m.(Waednedays
SSsters' Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. nd Thursday of each month)





'Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL
Preaching 11am & 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:
Pastor:H. Mills
Sunday 6pm ZNS 2 Pastor:H
Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm


"Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are"
Pastor: H. Mills Phone: 393-0563 Box N-3622


A growing financial organization invites application
from suitable qualified persons for the above position
* Applicant must have five (5) BGCSE or GCE's
* Applicant must have typing and word processing
skills
* Applicant must be familiar with general office
practice
* Applicant must be computer literate with
knowledge of Microsoft Word & Excel
* 3-5 years work experience in this area will be an
asset
We have a strong commitment to training and
development and as the organization continues
to grow, we are looking for people who share
ouri commitment to their future careers.
IResumes with cover letters should be mailed or
faxed to:

The Huinan Resources Manager
P.O.Box AB-20187
Marsh Harbour, Abaco
FAx (242) 367-3612

Deadline for receipt of applications is
January 25th, 2008


7:00 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
7:00 p.m.


I


11







SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2008, PAGE 7


two new harbour patrol boats


All photos by Felip6 Major/Tribune staff


in..-

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Florida federal prison
guards charged in
contraband, bribery case
* OCALA, Fla.
ELEVEN people, including
nine who worked at Coleman
Federal Penitentiary, have been
accused of taking bribes to bring
contraband into prison and hav-
ing sex with an inmate, officials
said Friday, according to Associ-
ated Press.
Federal prosecutors announced
the case that began last year and
four workers had their cases
unsealed Thursday. All nine
prison workers were either fired,
suspended or resigned, Bureau
of Prisons spokeswoman Felicia
Ponce said.
Corrections officer Luiz Felix
Viera, 41, of 'avares, was accused
in an October indictment of
smuggling 12 cartons of cigarettes,
two packs of cigars and a knife
into the prison in exchange for a
$3,100 bribe. Defense attorney
Ronald E. Fox declined com-
ment.
Kendra Russell, also known as
Kendra Drain. 41, of l'avares, a
treatment specialist at the prison,
was accused in a November
indictment of smuggling m arijua-
na into the prison in exchange for
$948. She did not have an attor-
ney listed on federal records.
Former corrections officer
Calvin Williams was indicted in
November on charges that he
smuggled cell phones, cigarettes
and watches into the prison in
exchange for bribes of $5,700.
Former corrections officer
William Alan Blantoin of Ocala
was charged Tuesday with hav-
ing sex with a female inmate.


ABOVE: the two new
patrol boats

LEFT: The Royal Bahamas
Delence Force Band play at
the ceremony.

ABOVE RIGHT: On the
march during the ceremony
to mark the commissioning
of the new boats


I


ii* '


I I'




V.'






[ I


1 7


)


II


THE BH.\MA..S. TURKS AND CAICOS ISI \ND)' -
CONFERENCE
r OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE
C CRIBBE AND 1 HF LMERIC \s
UL'ELIiE METHODIST l\NS 14 C \1R IBE[ ,;
-. El LES hANERIQUES
N -SS TAU CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES
/Ii hfnrrtic 4It nu"
P.O. BRo EL It-l. Y. aV. ,a.u. Bahama%: Teldphtln,.. -2i-J. I.,
2.'-.." .l : rhi,. t'melrho, Ja bai,,I rnt'L
METHODISM: RAISED liP IN THE PRO\lIDENCE OF
GOD. TO REFORM THE NATION. BUT ESPE( I \l I \
THF CHURCH AND TO SPREAD SCRIP IIHR \1
rlOLINESS THROUGHOUT THE L LNI)
(Father John \ esle3)
"Celebrating 225 years of continuous Methodist
witness for Christ in The Bahamas"
EIGHTH LORD'S DAY BEFORE THE
RESURRECTION, JANUARY 27, 2008.
COLLECT: God of heaven, you send the gospel to the cniitd i'
the earth and your messengers to every nation: send you. II '\
Spirit to transform us by the good news of everlasting I, o i
Jesus Christ our Lord.
WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd EaslO
7:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes (Holy Connimoiilio
11:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes
6:30 p.m. Circuit Service
RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHlURC H
(108 Montrose Ave. near Wulff Rd)
7:00 a.m. Rev. Dr. Kenneth A. lluggins
(Holy Communion)
10:00 a.m. Bro. Colin Newton
11:00 a.m. Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly, Younri
Adults Fresh Expressions
6:30 p.m. Circuit Service
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH
(Rose Street, Fox Hill)
11:00 a.m. Rev. Leonard G. Roberts Jr./Sis. Ruth 1'i.i
PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Phi,,:
11:00 a.m. Rev. Emily A. Demeritte
HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODS I
CHURCH (28 Crawford St, Oakes Field)
7:00 a.m. Rev. Leonard G. Roberts Jr.(Holy Comniunr1111 n)
9:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes
6:30 p.m. Circuit Service
METHODIST CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPtHFRI)
8:00 a.m. Rev. Emily A. Demeritte
CROIX-DES-MISSIONS ALDERSGATE (Quackoo Strc l)
5:30 p.m. Friday Children's Club
9:00 a.m. Sunday Rhodes Praise Team
METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -I Ii
Shop and other Ministries
JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE
(28 Crawford St., Oakes Field) Reception to Primarn
PEACE AND JUSTICE CAMPAIGN: All Methodists of
the Conference are urged to pray and to fast for Justice to
prevail in the Methodist Cases and for an end to the ulpslurm
in violence. The fast begins weekly after the evening imncal
on Thursday and ends at noon on Friday. This we proclailnl
unswervingly: "My God and My Right."
RADIO PROGRAMS
"Vision" On the Lord's Day, ZNS 1 at 9 p.m.; ".Grcal I1'm Ins
of Inspiration" On the Lord's Day, Radio 810 at 5:30 p.m :
"Family Vibes" ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.; "To God beI lt11
Glory" ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:45 p.m.


$1000 REWARD
FOR INFORMATION LEADING TO THE RETURN
um'mw mwu D mu, C4 .mm


S.-a .,




He is a neutered fifteen year old white 'Westie'terrier
pointed ears, long haired, black nose and black eyes,
upright tail, 19 Ibs.
His eyesight is failing he is slightly deaf, he is an adored
family pet.
Disappeared from his home at Sunnyside, East Bay Street
Thursday January 24th, around 8 p.m.

Beloved Family Pet

Please call:
557-9160 first; 363-4000 second; 393-6252
on his tag, not working


THE TRIBUNE


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8. SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2008


LOCAL NEWS


Teen is

arrested

FROM page one

was reported around 9pm on
Thursday when a man's body
was found in a house in
Hampton Street, off Mount
Royal Avenue.
Mr Evans said the man
was discovered lying on his
back in a western room.
"Police are investigating
and are treating this as a sus-
picious death until an autop-
sy has been performed to
determine the exact cause of
death," he said.
In other police related
news, a 26-year-old woman
had to be freed from her
own car after her right hand
became stuck attempting to
retrieve an item that had fall-
en under the seat.
Firemen went to Wind-
ward Isles Road in Sunshine
Park to help free the trapped
hand. Medical staff took the
woman to the hospital,
where she is being treated
for her injuries. *


FROM page one


bank or credit card and use it to steal funds from
bank accounts.
Head of Fidelity Group of Companies Anwer
Sunderji said the issue was raised during a recent
Clearing Bank Association meeting prompting
local bankers to put together guidelines to educate
customers against this type of theft.
"We did discuss it at our monthly meeting and
one or two banks reported that there was increas-
ing frequency of skimming taking place.
"We wanted to make sure that our customers
were aware of it. This is not widespread in the
sense that not all our card holders have suffered
such a fraudulent event, but we are trying to
come up with some information that will edu-
cate card holders".
Mr Sunderji said he was not aware of any skim-
ming devices placed inside ATMs at bank loca-
tions, but he could not confirm-this at free-stand-
ing ATMs located at gas stations, etc.
Public service announcements and a national
campaign are expected within the coming weeks
to warn Bahamians, he said. Meanwhile, he said
customers should be vigilant when using ATMs,
cover the key pad when entering PIN numbers,
and should not disclose their codes to anyone.
Bank cards can be "skimmed" at ATM
machines, in restaurants by wait staff, store clerks,
or card payment terminals. Educated consumers
should be aware of any irregularities in bank
machines before inserting bank cards, and keep a
close eye on staff who swipe credit cards when
making purchases.


FROM page one


'Skimming' a growing

problem at local banks
The Tribune spoke with one victim, who wished
to have his identity withheld, about his experience
with identity theft: "Back in December, I used the
ATM at (a local gas station) and within two days
I saw several transactions on my account from
Bangkok (Thailand). At the time I was in Nassau.
They basically cleaned out my account of more
than $6,000."
Thankfully, the victim was able to get the stolen
funds reimbursed by his bank, who reportedly
told him that it was a common, growing prob-
lem.
According to statistics, identity theft is the
fastest growing crime in the United States, and is
growing globally as the Internet provides clever
criminals with emerging opportunities to outwit
others.

Pageant race row

FROM page one
is the only issue in contention, and that anyone of
any colour is allowed to enter the contest once
they are a resident of Spanish Wells.
"We have a coloured girl in the competition
now, but the only difference is she is from Span-
ish Wells. In fact, a coloured girl won in 2003," he
said.


inflation is taken into account
the "real" GDP per capital "has
been essentially stagnant and in
some areas it has actually
decreased," he said.
"That might explain the sense
of declining prosperity notwith-
standing the growing economy,"
said Mr Laing.
In November, the IMF agreed
with the Central Bank of the
Bahamas' decision to peg the
Bahamas' real growth rate at 3.1
per cent. This falls far behind
the six per cent real GDP growth
average projected for the
Caribbean region, with countries
such as the Dominican Republic
and Trinidad and Tobago pre-
dicted to achieve economic
growth of eight per cent and six
per cent respectively.
Earlier in the programme, Mr
Laing said he expects the
Bahamian economy to grow
faster in 2008 than it did in 2007.
"I believe this economy will
grow at between 3.5 per cent at
lowest end and four per cent at
highest end," he said.
His prediction which reflects
the government's position as a
whole is backed up by the IMF,
who pegged GDP growth for the


Former minister




calls for public vote




on national lottery


FROM page one

Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica
and Belize, have national lot-
teries, as does the United
States, the United Kingdom,
and many other countries.
He said that the British lot-
tery model would be a good
one to emulate. Under that
scheme, according to its web-
site, of every pound spent by
the public on the lottery 28 per
cent goes to good causes and
12 per cent goes to the govern-
ment in lottery duty, while the
rest is split between covering
operating costs and rewarding
lottery winners.


Since its inception the UK
lottery has created 20 billion
pounds for good causes -
including 2.2 billion pounds
towards funding the 2012
Olympic and Paralmpyic
Games in London.
The ex-minister noted that
the popularity of illegal "num-
bers" in the Bahamas, even
among "otherwise law-abiding
citizens", proves that a lottery
would be very successful in
terms of levels of participation.
"I find (it) so depressing (that
while) every single charity in
this country is in dire need of
funding every single good social
and humanitarian effort in this
country is in dire need of fund-


ing we have a population which
will play numbers," said Mr
Allen.
He said that as long as this
"enormous economic power"
is not harnessed for the "good
of the country" illegal numbers
will continue to make "fabu-
lous fortunes for a small hand-
ful of Bahamians whose contri-
bution to the overall social
good is highly questionable."
He noted that while a nation,
al lottery is still considered to
be a "controversial" suggestion,
in the main due to opposition
from the Christian Council
"and other people who lead
that charge", these people's
reasoning is, in Mr Allen's view
"not based on any universally
accepted moral basis".
While "both political parties
have been intimidated" by relil
gious leaders' opposition to a
national lottery, now is the times
for "political courage to bd
shown" as it relates to the issue;
Mr Allen asserted.
This would not necessarily
mean that the govenrment
should "champion" the cause
but simply be willing to provide
a forum for those representing
the various sides, of the argu-
ment to make the case known
and after this, to cause a refer!
endum to be held to gauge pubj
lic opinion on the issue.
Meanwhile, Mr Allen noted
that, as the need for "urgen
charitable and social efforts'
increases, funding is diminish
ing.
"My goodness how can wd
deny this small country; whicl
is in dire need, I mean cryin'
need of this assistance," said
the former minister.
On Thursday, Mr Laing sai
that he "would not have a prob4
lem" putting the issue to a vote
He believes that the govern
ment should "explore othet
avenues (of revenue creation'
first."


DELTEC BANK & TRUST LIMITED


Invites applications for the position of



CLIENT SERVICES MANAGER

Responsibilities will include (but are not limited to):

Maintaining regular contact with clients on their account
servicing/administration matters
Initiating and monitoring the execution of client instructions
Overseeing and reviewing client cash, currency hedging
and credit positions
General administration of client accounts, liaising with
other departments, managers and group offices
Reviewing and completing investment fund subscription
documentation and handling redemptions
Supervision of two staff members

The successful candidate should have:

Degree in Business Administration or Finance
Excellent relationship and communication skills
Strong interpersonal and motivational qualities
Minimum five (5) years experience in the offshore private
banking sector, preferably in a client relationship position

We offer an excellent benefit package and salary will be
commensurate with experience and qualifications.

Interested persons may submit resumes to the

Human Resources Manager either by email to
anh@deltecbank.com or by fax to 362-4623.
ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS!

All applications will be held in the strictest confidence and
only candidates under consideration will be contacted.


I a


r


I


a m k- w


Zhivargo Laing
proposes
a Consumer
Confidence Index
Bahamas this fiscal year at four
per cent (without inflation being
taken into account).
Mr Laing said that, despite the
Bahamian economy being "tied"
to the currently struggling US
economy, the Bahamian econo-
my can continue to see growth,
thanks to the stage of develop-
ment that many of the large
investment projects can be found
in throughout "this period of
sluggishness" for the US econo4
my.
Mentioning Kerzner's Hurri1
cane Hole Plaza development
and the Albany project, Mr
Laing said it is "fortuitous" for
the Bahamian economy that nei-
ther is yet atthe "selling stage")
and thereby likely to be impact
ed by the perception of eco-
nomic decline and ongoing cred-i
-it crunch in the US.
Instead, construction set tq
begin on numerous projects will
boost Bahamian employment
levels, he asserted.






bAI URL)AY, JANU.ARY 26, 2008, :1 '. -


Sandals CEO 'proud



of achievements



of team members'


t'DliAy' ,O

f li>i


,Iii ii '
ii 1 1.

y .':I ;


ip l : '


.11


I
I SANDALS CEO Adam
Stewart told team members at
Sandals Royal Bahamian that
he is very proud of their
achievements in 2007.
'Among all the hotels in the
Bahamas, you were voted the
country's leading resort for
the third year and the
Bahamas' leading spa resort
at the Annual World Travel
Awards," Mr Stewart said.
"This is an indication of the
tremendous work you have
performed this year and I per-
sonally would like to thank
each and every one of you."
Mr Stewart's brief remarks
at the resort's annual staff
awards and Christmas Party
brought cheers and applauds
to an evening of surprises and
excitement.
While most team members
walked away with door prizes,
the highlight of the evening
was the announcement of the
resort's top awards.
Guest Choice Award recip-
ient Marcian Cooper from the
beverage department received
a cash prize, a trophy and a
watch.
Marcian, who was consis-
tently acknowledged by guests
throughout the year for his
humour and warm personali-
ty, said he was delighted to
have been selected.
SThe Chairman's Award
went to Shawn Thompson
who was promoted to assis-
tant cost controller this year.
In 1996 he joined the resort
as a watersports attendant and
was promoted to concierge
and then receiving clerk.
SShawn received a cash prize
and a trophy.
i The Supervisor of the Year
Award went to Vanria Cul-


MR ADAM STEWART, CEO of
Sandals Resorts is pictured
speaking to team members at
Sandals Annual Award and
Christmas Party.
mer of the front office. Vanria
joined Sandals in 1996 and
over the years has received
numerous awards and recog-
nition from travel agents and
incentive groups.
Her prizes included a five
day cruise for two, a 28 inch
.colour television, a trophy and
a cash prize.
Team member of the month
for October Marion Ander-
son was the recipient of the
Team member of the Year
Award.
Described as the driving


force in the laundry depart-
ment, the management said
Marion has constantly proven
that she is able to go above
and beyond the call of duty
and demonstrate courtesy and
efficiency at all times.
Porsha Poitier, laundry
manager, said "Marion is our
gem. Every time a guest calls 1
know they are going to ask for
Marion because she has a
warm, engaging personality.
She leaves a lasting impres-
sion with everyone she comes
into contact with."
An elated Marion added, "I
am honoured to have been
selected from among all the
nominees and I will continue
to serve in a manner where I
give all that I could to our
guests and everyone I work
with."
Marion's prizes included a
seven day Caribbean cruise
for two, a stacked washer and
dryer, a 28 inch colour televi-
sion, a trophy and a cash
prize.
Also presented on the night
were shining star awards,
which were presented to: Dion
Smith, accounts: Tamar Bowe.
guest services'; Samuel Bast-
ian, watersports; Esau Far-
rington; kitchen: Lindburgh
Sutherland, housekeeping:
Carla McCartney, beverage:
Marion Anderson, laundry:
Norell Williams, spa; Maurice
Heintz. maintenance; Kihan
Moncur, photo shop: Patricia
Pinder, food and beverage:
Delino Moss, butler; Tarrel
Bain, gift shop: Cassandra
McKenzie, weddings:
Anissa Musgrove. human
resources: Cicclv Stubbs. hotel
and Kenja Rahming. enter-
taininent.


SANDALS
TEAM MEM-
BER OF THE
YEAR: Fred
Hansen, Hotel
Manager;
Marion Ander- i
son, Team
Member of
the Year and
Robert
Keesler, gen-
eral manager.


RETiiL-PCSAAILABLE FOR]: :R?]


Units from 875 sq.f'1. to 5,236 sq.ft. for rent. Shop-,
located in prime location at The Westin Grand Ba:b.
Island at Our Lucaya Resort in Freeport, Grand Bahama
units are suitable for retail businesses and available r,
Some restrictions apply.


We corporate with Real Estate Brokers.


For more information o- to view:


Please rortact Jon Markoulls
'Ile 242-373-4160



.311^ 47- _5 _______64


Ond Vew/an ined
NASSA


FREEPORT
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B Bai'aias
P.O. BoxF-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (2421 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 373-3005


NASSAU
Robmnsor .'; 1 soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
PO. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Page '12) 340 8043 Fax: (242) 340-8034


A Service of Praise & Thanksgiving
for th e late
ERRI N GTON
SRAHM1NG MBE, 67
../, fortme) Superintendent of Police &
'.^ ~the Royal Bd'iunm Police I ;'rce R 'lired Officers Associ( li.,;
of Fal Tei ac:. Ma'ilan .o will b eld on Slundal\ J.ai!l.l .
'. ,. 2008 at I l:!'0an at Fhilviei~ Sventh-Dai Adventist Church. I1o(,l t
SWilliams-L..rling highway. ()fficiating vill he Pastor Peter loser
assisted b' Dr. Leonv-d loluson. Pastor L:ic I). Clarke. Eldeli IMe'
Lewis. Dr. John Carey, Dr. Hugh '. Roach. ).D.. l':tor .lenicmii
Duncombe, Pastor Leo C. Rolle and Eldei Anthonx BurrowIs. Internme will ollow in IIe \\'t'o !oli-
Gardens, Soldier Road.
He is survived by his Wife: Eulhalic Rbhining, (6) Sisters: Lucine For'ls. Nlazella Ra:;ihim, I !11o,
Newry, Ovilda Forbes, Rosanna Straclihu an Min: ;va McKen 'ir, 3 tlrothers: Ntin\ \,. I :iui
and Ezra Rahnming, Mother-in-law: Iriai :: McPhei ,10) Sist*..rs-im-law 'Ilase and l!IniI RahNliiln
Minerva Forbes. Elizabeth Smitli Emi'-. M)orley, Lida Colebrooke Sandra NcPlhce. Nuilse l'!ln:
Deineritte, Nurse Berthamae Liz Andrews. Patricmi Cooper and Jacquhnie McPlce: (11) Brother-
in-law: Dw\ight Forbes Sr., Rueben McKenzie, Rudolph E. ',rachan Sr., Randollian Nc\\ r\, \ ill ,ci
Andrews. Shedrick. Kendrick McPhee of'M.;'nii, FIrida, Reginlld MlePhee. 'liontias Snilih. Soniii
Morley, ('pl.745 Patrick Colebrooke ant: Vaoi emeritte:(41) Nieces: ReIva. \oralee.. Patsy. ( .iol
Cynthia, Barbara. Delna. Cindv. Ella, Sliharon, Soni', Charmnaine. Patri Karen. Jlo\.el\n. .\ii iani
Shanna, Janette; Nikera, Lynn. Patric, Edlyn. Elis, : and Denise. Drlicia anti Dollan, I oi .'- t
Linda Moxey. Alisa Gibson, Cynara and Shenika Smith. ChlriseL S.weeting, I anika. ( haliaiumie :I
Cindy Morley, IlHdica Fawkes. Arhlranimetra Rollc, Shequel and Sonivia McPliee. m\ isn i l. i \ imiii '
Andrews and Jade Collie: (37) Nephews: Stedman & Lionel lF; 0 Antlheim\. Kl\ in. 1j I '1\,
Dave and Andy McKenzie. l)vighit Jr. & Keitli FoK'-t,. K.ci0i ..:-! i in. Joel. ( Irisih li
Martin, Clinton. Leonard. Kendal, lldlm i Jr.. O. ii :, Ii o ," i-l i ning. Rud lp i liI t 1! \.
Sidney Strachan. Steve Rodgt is and Ren',r'. New'" iniain sn' .1 s and Steplic I oill's. \:,,'
Alvin and Calvin Morley, (onstable l12)0-i ,iuek' in'd'' ;. I ,h. C('olcrlooke. ianc'lt MN .lc
Kendrick McPhele .IJr.. Shedrick McPhee .r. and .las' n Collie: ( : Aints: Eldna. Mai\ andNl l:isli I
Rolle and erltrude Rodg ers. ( I IUncle: Bursil PIiie. i ( Gd ar'lnts:i IL rice S\ eetip r I wi\
Mortillm r, 'Coii:istabl' 1 .1' hl ('!u'n k io ndri. \ v anid ''tniqii e ,.lnl sister : InuInierou. s olher Iniix .11mi
friends including: I a\isoni & Shinav'i.t Sw'eti. A, Sinmit',, Anm' 'i A\ndie\ s Sgl. lIi
Moxey, l.awrence andl I lainna Briic' :Ind lFamily. Mav s i \':is I l fI'miil. Prince Rahliii,;. S\ '11
Rahli ing and Family, Khylia anid Kial' libson, Charles l'.iidg'r.'s ,': l'amnil\, Illen I'oitbIh s .nd 1 ,:nnl\
Betty, Coralee. Pel, and'i "\onne Add,'iev and animilv. :hirIcv Airews. \ hitlmoie & (ciiic I :m
Lorena Rolle, Leo. Samuel and Stanley Rodgern, ai'aiinia l V.i c10e l)ax,<. I),>'ilb i lI.
and Iamily, Dr. Kevin Moss and family. Mr'. M :VI .\n.s Rilinii 'd I'hnily,' I il. I .l'.' ( .
Joel, Jefferson. (Gary and Jlenniler t 1i'l. N rs ,'lShl tri 'indei'. \c i ,ii \l.o.s. Chrii 1. Ic b I. "x
Marguerite Piindling and flh il, N rim! & Cri 'Fra' iel ul ( ''a !vy /ra & Shiel ( i'i.c I I.u 1,
Roland W illiams, Michael Elli-" & lamiiy I)in Id I oti' re Iani' ,n ', Llthl" ii Sauile, [ 1 an11 I.uiiim\
Nathalie Johnson and lfanily. Met'i .li lo l nd laul il Ci.erard [iu 'o\'s ald thaiiiilh ). I O M 1ni,
and ainily, Aston Mliller, Pat I'\. ins l!;,iva nt Sw cii,: I :ind ; .ily, HelenI i Jlohnson atml I 'lln\
Mitchell & Mrs. Thurston and lainilv, i tLina D\\l I, .lon, "lin I1ain. ric'a Dougli s Slx' \ai l
Brenda MePlhce, Peggy Johnson. NMr ad Mr; > al Mor'lv :it i family, I o Dunllcoimnl iid inl,
Former Commlissioner of Police P'i' Farqtuharson anid l';niil Mi :N ''.l Mrs (ii'Olin o \\ri ii '.
Taylor. Bro. Arthutr Chase ;tid lainilv. I Marii. Ii RoI l uid ini li Ne!lie I'ci i n Oi ,iin I ri
Lawrence Briee and lfan ily, Inlspc lV 1 1 ,,; ;:i.., \i I K .iin .il o and l l iinil\ I :ile I il, 111
hinilvy, Mr and Mrs Brian Carilt \ ri hi maiui ;ni v. Cflmis nid iiicitibci' l he i ltl)1 mI1d i( u iti .
oftlh Retired ()llicers Associaitin, ( a ii; ill I iteh(ias Aill. id\ ce Srachan. Iu:iiI.i Ilooltc ',,,l ,
Peter Joseplh and the I ill i\\ ':nA Ian ily, R NV M1 It 'Ihli I):ie tMur'ui O)llcci s and N11 inl ,
of St. Michael lodge 1//16i3 S. slalT IlT P'esP 'tion I'irloi PIl irmnac. Don Knoi\\ l and hC sAl.
of lially Total Fitness, DIr. lid on Il'm s andtl ;.': ',e g< Knowx les and lie stafl'of l' nil\ Islni '
Inn Restanralil. thle sta f lic' 'isl, orestlIl I Ih Nistl ofi i lu m ish li nd Maline Rcsonm .s,
M alcolm Rio:id Fl ailu y, : 1 otlier l ic .l, i\ aind I'11tlends too nu111 eroi ls t o i I !iiO o
Viewing will be held at ReslsIvi x Nv i 'i.il 1 o h,,ir> ad (ricil iatorinin ont Soldici & IollihlmOi IO.tn
on Saturday .lantlar y 251th. 2 )8 iron 1t' ii)aii to (Op m and again on Sililda\ !,jll 1'i I, iI
service time al (lie church.


St.-


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EXTRA, EXTRA, EXTRA,


Large Shipment of Used Cars


IN STOCK





1-\\
... .- -


cOMEBCHEC K UcS"OU
I n r .* i"t

rNNew -Shipments Arrivej


Hurry, HurryHIurr y

* 1
:G:etYdur First Choie



Igor Ea~y Finarnciin
or F.a k s .a I


Bak c
B l "
,, i~~~t/~~C


On Premises


Check Our Prices


Before buying


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__


*


___


THE TRIBUNE


m 1- - t~l


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__


i


'v'+ i









PAGE 10, SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


LOCA L EW


The class of 1987


gives


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MAISIE DELORES McKINNEY
MILLER of QUEEN COURT, YELLOW ELDER, P.O.BOX
CR 56777, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 19TH day of January,
2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE Is hereby given that SIDNEY NOEL of PEAR DALE
Rd., P.O. Box SS 6360 NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from
the 19TH day of January, 2008 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.


Pricing Information As Of: C F A L
Friday, 25 January 2008
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES VISIT WVVW [ISXBAHAMAS.COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 2 051 39 CHO -7 37 ,CHG -0 36 / YTD -15.36 / YTD %' -0.74
ci. r- 1.1 .H i 5 2.P -L.:. .o i'2u .Fr.: .1:... *. :._ r 1 .. : L.. I,.- s._I.-.,.J. C..--. -, EP_ i C-1. '. P E Yield,
1 ,', a0c-a;.:, r.1irK l6 I I ,11 ,, 'i .6 t :' f 157 0 000. 1C0 l.i 0 0:,
11.80 11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.80 11.80 0.00 1.50;2 O. 00 '9 3 ."j9
9.68 8.03 Bank of Bahamas 9.68 9.68 0.00 0.612; 1 6' 13 8 2 6
0.85 0.80 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 0.1'o8 030 .i *. 3 5-
3.74 1.85 Bahamas Waste 3.66 3.66 0.00 0.2.8 1t 2 I -
2.70 1.25 Fidelity Bank 2.65 2.65 0.00 0.058 u.04u 45.7 1.51
12.50 10.00 Cable Bahamas 12.50 12.50 0.00 600 1.030 0.240 12.1 1.92%
3.15 2.00 Collna Holdings 3.14 3.14 0.00 0.031 0.040 101.3 1.27%
8.50 4.33 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 8.05 792 -0.13 1,200 0.426 0.260 18.6 3.28%
7.22 4.74 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.27 5.16 -0.11 281 0.129 0.052 40.8 0.99%
2.60 2.20 Doctor's Hospital 2.30 2.30 0.00 0.316 0.020 7.3 0.87%
7.40 5.70 Famguard 7.40 7.40 0.00 0.713 0.280 10.4 3.78%
13.01 12.30 Finco 13.01 13.01 0.00 1,550 0.829 0.570 15.7 4.38%
14.75 14.25 FirstCaribbean 14.60 14.60 0.00 0.914 0.470 16.0 3.22%
6.10 5.18 Focol (S) 5.18 5.14 -0.04 21,100 0.363 0.140 14.2 2.72%
1.00 0.54 Freeport Concrete 0.77 0.77 0.00 0.017 0.000 45.3 0.00%
8.00 7.10 ICD Utilities 7.25 7.25 0.00 0.411 0.300 17.6 4.14%
12.00 8.60 J. S. Johnson 12.00 12.00 0.00 1.059 0.610 11.3 5.08%
10.00 10.00' Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.167 0.600 8.6 6.00%
F.dClity Ovr- The Cunler Securllles
5 Al- i 2v.n P -Lc- .r.,:.1 .I. i I1* -: 1 .-1 .... l ..I EP 1 Cf.. i __ E E. 3j
14.60 14.25 Bahamas ',E.uerr,rrl,. i i., 1 I 1 4 0,, 1 1.' -1 i
8.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 6.00 0.000 0.480 NM 7.80%
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.20 -0.023 0.000 N/M 0.00%
Colir,l Ovirf-T','l' C(.uunltTr : SLLurlfle
41.00 41.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 4.450 2.750 9.0 6.70%
14.60 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 14.00 1.160 1.125 13.4 7.71%
0.55 0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.45 -0.030 0.000 N/M 0.00%
BISX L.ll F.liuia!l Fundl
52A.H I 52 -L,.i. F 'r.l arn. I j I I Il r ... -i
1 3'"3 1 M.,J r'l ,llr.a f -.lr r.larret F.jr..J 1 '
3.7969 3.0569 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.7969"
3.0008 2.4723 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 3.00076"
1.2920 1.2037 Collna Bond Fund 1.291985"
11.8192 11.3545 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 11.8192'"
FINDEA CLOSE 949.45 / YTD -0,27% / 2007 4'1 479
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1.000 00 MARKE1 II- M.S i YIII 1 ) 1..t I. l VllFillvil'id, diveh l y h cIoillt |)ln NAV K1lY
52wk.Hi Highest closing price In last 52 weeks nit ,1.. Fillyill( I)11 ( i 1 :<)lllli ,111i I li llvy
52wk-Low Lowest closing price IIr last 52 weeks Aki .l t1 1( 11 f (. F ("illii .iI blaility III JaiuirV .'iiiti
Previous Close Previous day's weighted prico for daily volume L ,..l i-' t r d iv'f-t pr 31 Dr niclllt r 21011/
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume W lkly Vill li.nIIiI(i vIlu of the pilor w(ok "" :t OctolFr 200't
Change Change In closing price from day to day EPS $ A I< onp. lly.. iiy' l) tld oi llln.i pe1I hnro for tho Inti 12 in1th
Dally Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Not Asr-t Vl luh
DIV $ Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months N/M NIl Mti;nllqfilllI
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings I NIFHX I lo I 101lly LUn.i-haSlll Stock Index January 1, 1994 = 100
( 4-for-l Stock Split Effective Date 08/82007
S.T~gQTRADIt CLL CFi.AL 42-502-7010 / FIDELITY ZJ1 3.13 .- ,- Fr-I I'vI0r E DATIA & INFORMATION CAAL.L (242) 394.-2503









L AN


back to


RM Bailey


THE WORK Dy the class of 1987 is located at the front gate entrance
opposite the basketball court.


Russian police

arrest suspected

crime lord also

wanted by FBI
N MOSCOW
POLICE in Moscow have
arrested a suspected clime boss
with alleged links to Russia's
multibillion dollar gas business:
who has long been sought by
the FBI and Interpol. officials
said Friday, according to A s ,,
ciated Press.
Semyon Mogilevich, a
Ukrainian-born Russian citizen
whom the FBI has identified as
a major figure in international
crime, was detained in Moscow
late Wednesday, said Angela
Kostoyeva, spokeswoman for
the Russian Interior Ministry' ;
anti-organized crime unit.
Mogilevich was detained
under the alias of Sergei
Schneider, the spokeswoman
said, adding that he has used
17 other names and holds pass
ports from several countries. A
Moscow court approved his 1(i -
mal arrest Thursday.
The arrest was made in con
S nection with an investigation
into an alleged tax evasion
scheme by the owners of Ariat
Prestige, a successful chain .,)
Russian cosmetic stores.
Police grabbed Mogilevicl,
on the street near a supermnar-
ket, along with Vladimir
Nekrasov, the majority owner
of Arbat Prestige. The two
men, who were accompanied
by a large group of bodygual ds.
surrendered without resistance.
Russian state television on
Friday showed video of Mogile-
vich as police held him aird
some bodyguards up against a
car. They also broadcast video
of the seldom-photographed
figure in custody, wearing jcais.
a cap and leather jacket.
Police said Arbat Prestige
was suspected of evading aboul
$2 million in taxes.
A spokesman for the U.S.
Embassy in Moscow said that
neither the FBI nor any other
American law enforcement
agency was involved in Mogile
vich's arrest. The United States
has no extradition treaty ~sitl
Russia.
Interpol said it would not
comment on Mogilevich's
arrest because it has never put
him on publicly accessible w ant
ed lists. Interpol also has want-
ed lists that are accessible onh
to law enforcement authlwrities.
Mogilevich is wanted by lie
FBI on charges of racketeeri
ing, securities fraud, mail fraud
and monev laundering, accoi d
ing to the bureau's Web site.
He described himself as a com-
modities trader in a 1999 inter-
view with the British Bro:ld-
casting Corp.
The U.S. charges stem flo ni
2003 indictment in Philadelcphia.
in which Mogilevich and an
associate were accuteld of
manipulating the sl etk Lit ai
Pennsylvania-based company.
YBM Magnex Inc.
The billion-dollar corpora
tion collapsed in M.N
1998.


HARBORSIDE RESORT AT ATLANTIS IS SEEKING FOR A
DIRECTOR OF SALES
Harborside Resort at Adantis is currently seeking for seasoned talent with successful and
proven timeshare experience at high leadership level, demonstrated track record in the
Industry managing multimillion dollar projects and ready to take their career to new heights.
This person is responsible for assisting the Project Director in planning, directing, and
providing necessary leadership to deal with the short term and long term business objectives
of Harborside Resort at Adantis ResortVillas. In addition this position is responsible for
providing guidance, direction, and accountability in producing the expected performance at
Harborside Resort atAtlantis ResortVillas, while constantly striving to maintain a positive
work environment for all employees.
Our candidate should possess:
Proven successful track record of directing Sales and Marketing teams in timeshare
branded Organizations.
A minimum of proven 5 years recent vacation ownership experience at a Director level,
gained through increasingly responsible management positions within sales. Starwood
Vacation ownership experience is a plus.
SStrong leadership and excellent communication skills written and verbal. Must be able to
prepare comprehensive reports, presentations and represent ideas clearly and concisely
at different levels of the Organization.
Strong listening and organizational skills.
Superior interpersonal abilities to get along with diverse personalities in a multicultural
work environment; tactful, mature and flexible.
College degree preferred.
Key competencies indude: positive disposition, operational decision making, developing
organization talent/staff development, motivational fit (location, culture, job and company),
work standards, openness to differences, customer service orientation, building business
Partnerships, thriving on ambiguity, managing multiple priorities, patience, strategic thinking
and execution, organizational awareness, technical/professional knowledge.


For Immediate consideration please submit resumes online at
starwoodvo.comlcareers
or e-mail your updated resume to
Recruitment-Caribbean@Starwoodvo.com
(Reference: DOS position Harborside Bahamas)

EOE/Pre- employment drug screening and background required.


RESORT,
ATLANTIS


The Scotiabank Rate Booster Deposit
Combines the higher interest rates of a longer term
investment with the flexibility of a short term deposit.


Your ilntrest iate IIlcr;asc(s twice durin!q t oe he tri of yc ii ilnvcsltIc' Int,
so your moner y is gicitrialntcc d to( low ftlstorl I Plii vnl lvc(' ,i( ss ,to
your rmony at Iwo Se;t datsc' witlmin th l' torm ft youi. dpos);it, rivinil ,
you pe l 'llly ticf o i '((' ( '; to youl mi onriy. t


Visit your nearest Scotiabank branch today.


* t Io~,Irt iliI r P u ed .
r i,.tirb J' Ii ,< aii. r olI if L,' .,k It N v t ,


Life. Money. Balance botlh-


SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2008, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12. SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2008


* CALN


South Africa

mines shut as

power shortages

threaten nation's

economic engine
* CAPE TOWN,
South Africa
LEADING South African
gold, diamond and platinum
mines stopped production Fri-
day in the face of power out-
ages that threaten to choke
economic growth, according
to Associated Press.
The government said there
was no foreseeable end to the
electricity shortages that have
spilled over the nation's bor-
ders into Botswana and
Namibia, which rely heavily
on South African energy
exports.
"The unprecedented.
unplanned power outages
must now be treated as a
national electricity emergency
situation that has to be
addressed with urgent, vigor-
ous and coordinated actions,"
Public Enterprise Minister
Alec Erwin told journalists
after a Cabinet meeting.
"We are viewing the next
two years as being critical,"
he said, as government offi-
cials unveiled a package of
measures, including rationing,
price hikes and a renewed
push for alternative energy
sources.
The crisis reached new
heights Friday when mining
companies including Anglo-
Gold Ashanti Ltd., Harmony
Gold Mining Co. Ltd. and
Gold Fields Ltd. suspended
all but emergency operations
on some of the world's largest
gold mines out of fear that
power outages could trap
workers underground. The
stoppage may add up to hun-
dreds of millions in losses for
one of South Africa's most
important industries and frac-
ture investor confidence that is
already rattled.
Gold Fields whose South
African operations produce
7,000 ounces of gold per day
- said state utility Eskom had
warned the disruption could
last up to four weeks. Eskom
asked mines to cut electricity
consumption by 60 percent
per month.
Gold and platinum prices
soared to record highs Friday.
An ounce of gold for Feb-
ruary delivery spiked to
$924.30, a fresh record, on the
New York Mercantile
Exchange before easing back
to $912.30, up $6.50. April
platinum peaked at a new high
of $1,694.90 an ounce. Prices
later retreated to $1,674, up
$61.
Diamond giant De Beers
Consolidated Mines said it
had stopped procd"-lion in its
six South African mines.
The trade union Solidarity
said that BHP Billiton's man-
ganese mines were closed and
electricity supplies to three
aluminum smelters was dis-
continued. Samancor Chrome,
the worlds second largest fer-
rochrome producer, is plan-
ning to close its plants, it said.
Ferrochrome is used to pro-
duce stainless steel and most
of that is produced in South
Africa.
Rolling blackouts in South
Africa have begun to arrive
without warning.
Nearly forty people were
trapped in a cable car in high
winds for two hours this week
at Table Mountain, a tourist
destination that overlooks
Cape Town. Some climbed
through the roof to escape to a
loading dock more than 2,000
feet above ground. Hundreds
more were stranded at the top
of the mountain.
"The knock-on effect on
Cape Town is immeasurable,"
said Simon Grindfod, a Cape
Town city councilor. "A head-
line today is lost business
tomorrow."
The South African Tourism
Services Association said the
crisis is jeopardizing soccer's
World Cup games, to be held
in South Africa in 2010.
Erwin said measures taken
over the next two years would
help ease pressure on supply
ahead of the World Cup.
"There is no threat to the


successful holding of the
event," he said.
The government and
Eskom say South Africa's eco-
nomic growth has outstripped
energy supplies and the nation
must cut use by 10 percent to
15 percent. The government
has acknowledged for the first
time it shares some blame for
ignoring a 1998 Eskom report
warning of a serious energy
crisis within 10 years. The gov-
ernment approved a new pow-
er station building program in
2004.


PRESIDENT LUIZ Inacio Lula da Silva, left, listens to his Environment Minister Marina Silva during an emergency cabinet meeting at the Planalto presidential palace in Brasilia, Thurs-
day, Jan. 24, 2008. Lula called for the meeting to consider emergency measures to stop deforestation in Brazil's Amazon rain forest, which jumped dramatically in the final months of
2007.



Brazil to send extra police,




environmental agents to




reduce Amazon deforestation


,M BRASILIA, Brazil

BRAZIL will combat rising
deforestation in the Amazon
by sending extra federal police
and environmental agents to
areas where illegal clearing of
the rain forest jumped dra-
matically last year, officials
said Thursday, according to
Associated Press.


Authorities will monitor the
areas in an attempt to prevent
anyone from trying to plant
crops or raise cattle there.
Environment Minister Mari-
na Silva said.
The new measures were
announced after President
Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva
called an emergency meeting
of Cabinet ministers because


new data showed an apparent
reversal of a three-year slow-
down in the Amazon defor-
estation rate.
The clearing of Brazil's
Amazon rain forest jumped in
the final months of 2007,
spurred by high prices for
corn, soy and cattle.
Agriculture Minister Rein-
hold Stephanes said Latin


America's largest nation has
plenty of available land for
farming and cattle that has
already been deforested. Envi-
ronmentalists fear sugarcane,
used here to produce ethanol,
could spread through the rain
forest, but most ethanol oper-.
ations are in southern Brazil
far from the Amazon.
"It's not necessary to cut a


=.





POLICE OFFICERS stand guard next to the recovered stolen paintings "Portrait of Suzanne Bloch", by Pablo Picasso, left, and "0 Lavrador de Cafe",
by Candido Portinari, in Sao Paulo, in this Jan. 8, 2008 file photo. A suspect in last month's brazen theft of the paintings told Brazilian detectives that
they were meant to be delivered to a Saudi collector, authorities said Friday.


Suspect says Saudi collector wanted Picasso,


Portinari paintings that were stolen in Brazil


* SAO PAULO, Brazil

A SUSPECT in last month's brazen
theft of two paintings by Pablo Picasso
and Candido Portinari told detectives the
paintings were to be delivered to a S;iaI;
collector, ;aiilh ri tii iId ridnIv, l ','i
ing to Associated lc'tI ~ v.
Picasso's "Portrait of Suzanne Bloclh
and "O Lavrador de Cafe" by Portinari,
an influential Brazilian artist, were stolen
Dec. 20 from the Sao Paulo Museum of
Art by three men who used a crowbar
and car jack to force open one of the


museum's steel doors.
The framed paintings were found Jan
S., covered in plastic and leaning against
a wall in a house on the outskirts of Sao
Paulo, South America's largest city.

formation

The suspect, Moiscs Manoel de Lima
Sobrinho, who briefly hosted a cooking
show on a local TV channel, provided
the information after he turned himself in
Thursday, but a public safety department
spokeswoman said she did not know


whether Lima Sobrinho named the Sau-
di collector. She declined to be identi-
fied in keeping with department policy.
Police have also said that Lima Sobrin-
ho could provide information needed to
catch those who ordered the theft.
Two other suspects are in custody, one
of them an escaped convict. Still at large
are the owner of the house where the
paintings were found and the person or
persons who ordered the heist.
Art experts estimate the value of the
Picasso at about $50 million and the Porti-
nari at $5 million to $6 million.


single tree to produce soy or
raise cattle," Stephanes said.
"There's plenty of land out-
side of the Amazon to
increase the production of soy
and beef."
The government says its
new push to stop deforesta-
tion is different than previous
efforts because farmers will
now be targeted as well as log-
gers.
The government will target
36 areas that registered the
highest rates of deforestation,
environmental officials said.
Officials will try to fine people
or businesses who buy any-
thing produced on illegally
deforested land, the environ-
ment minister said.
The plan means a 25 per-
cent increase in the police
force assigned to the region,
though Justice Minister Tar-
so Genro did not say how
many officers will take part.
Farmers working deforested
land in the targeted area will
also be forced to reregister
holdings with government offi-
cials to prove their holdings
were not illegally cleared, and
there will be no new permits
for logging.
On Wednesday, the envi-
ronment ministry announced
that up to 2,700 square miles
of rain forest was cleared from
August through December.
That puts Brazil on course
to lose 5,791 square miles for
the year ending in August a
,34 percent increase from the
previous 12-month period.
Although preliminary cal-
culations can only prove that
1.287 square miles of rain for-
est were cleared from August
through December, ministry
executive secretary Joao Paulo
Capobianco said officials are
working under thd assumption
that the higher amount of jun-
gle was cleared as they con-
tinue analyzing satellite data.
Environmentalists sai an
immediate crackdown could
be well timed.
Paulo Adario, coordinator
of Greenpeace's Amazon
campaign, said it's important
for the government to act now
because slash-and-burn defor-
estation typically ramps up
this time of year at the start of
the rainy season.
Jungle is typically cleared in
the Amazon to provide pas-
ture for cattle, then soy farm-
ers move in later and cultivate
their crops. Brazil also has a
booming beef export indus-
try, and cattle ranchers have
been expanding operations in
the Amazon.


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