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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00916
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: January 3, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
sobekcm - UF00084249_00916
System ID: UF00084249:00916

Full Text





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The


Tribune


BAHAMAS EDITION


A~eTIJRSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2008 PRICE 750


Claim that some named

on election court petition

of Pleasant Bridgewater

may take action
By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
THERE is a possibility that
some of the persons named on
the election court petition of
defeated PLP MP Pleasant
Bridgewater may sue the sena-
tor for defamation of character,
attorney Fred Smith said yes-
S terday.
Mr Smith, counsel for Mar-
co City MP Zhirvargo Laing,
told The Tribune he had been in
contact with the majority of per-
sons listed on Ms Bridgewater's "I know that- three of them
petition, a number of whom have obtained their own inde-
were "very upset" and "very pendent counsel and seven of
angry" about Ms Bridgewater's them have asked me directly to
assertions regarding their right
to vote in the Marco City con- SEE page nine
stituency.

Further delay to the

PLP's senate challenge
0 By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
THERE has been a further
delay in the PLP's legal challenge
over the senate appointments as
Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall is
expected to hear arguments next
week for and against striking out
an application filed by lawyers
for the prime minister.
Although the matter was ini-
tially adjourned to December 20,
2007 attorneys for both sides told
The Tribune yesterday that due
to normal court procedures; it was
SEE page nineS


Man, 27, is charged with
conspiracy to commit murder


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT A 27-year-old
Freeport man was charged on
Tuesday in Freeport Magistrate's
Court with conspiracy to commit
murder in connection with the
shooting death of Ryan Wood.
Marvin Fredrick, a resident of
South Bahamia, was arraigned in
Court One before Magistrate
Debbye Ferguson.
Attorney K Brian Hanna rep-


resented Fredrick, who was not
required to enter a plea to the
charge.
Ryan Wood was gunned down
in the Red Lane area on Decem-
ber 5. His death was the 13th
homicide for 2007 on Grand
Bahama.
Fredrick was denied bail and
remanded to Fox Hill Prison until
April 7, 2008 for a preliminary
inquiry into the matter.
Police are still searching for
another man in connection with
Wood's murder.


Man shot and robbed
on new year's day
IT WAS not a happy new year's day for one man who, with his
wife had been robbed, and then shot by an armed gunman, who
made his getaway in the couple's car.
According to police press liaison officer ASP Walter Evans,
around 12.30 pm on Tuesday, a couple who live in the Sandilands
Village Road area had just returned home when they were held up
by two masked gunmen.
According to police, the gunmen robbed the couple of a small
quantity of cash as well as a black 2006 Honda Accord. Before flee-
ing the scene in the couple's vehicle, one of the gunmen shot the 34-
year-old man in his left arm. The man was taken to hospital where
he is listed in stable condition.
According to ASP Evans, police found the couple's vehicle in the
Soldier Road area around 9 pm Tuesday. Police say that they are
actively investigating this incident.


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter'
kherig@tribunemedia.net
THE country's economy
could see an annual finan-
cial injection of over three
million dollars with the
arrival of the new Norwe-
gian Gem cruise ship, which
has chosen the Bahamas as
its home base.
The 965-foot long cruise
ship, which arrived in port
yesterday morning as a part
of its inaugural voyage, will
bring some 3000 passengers
and crew to three Bahamian
islands on a once-weekly
basis.
With cruise passengers
spending an average of $70
per person, this means that
there will be a sizable injec-
tion into the economy,
Tourism Minister Neko
Grant said yesterday.
Speaking a special press
conference on board the
Norwegian Gem, Minister
Grant said the cruise ship
will stop at the Norwegian
Cruise Line's (NCL) private
island in the Berry Islands,
Great Stirrup Cay, as well
as in Nassau and in Grand
Bahama.
Mr Grant said he is espe-
cially pleased that the Nor-
SEE page nine


Woman,

64, tied up

and robbed
POLICE say that a 64-year-
old woman was tied up and
robbed on Monday by armed
gunmen who fled in her vehi-
cle.
Police press liaison officer
Walter Evans told The Tribune
that the woman who was stay-
ing in the western area of New
Providence, had just returned
home at around 8.45 pm when
she was approached by two
masked gunmen who forced
her inside her home, demand-
ed cash and then tied her up.
According to police the gun-
men made their getaway in the
woman's 2007 Toyota Yaris
which was discovered some
two hours later near the RND
Plaza on John F Kennedy Dri-
ve. Police say they are actively
investigating this incident.
E A shotgun with three live
rounds of ammunition and an
imitation pistol was discovered
by an off duty police officer on
Tuesday.
SEE page nine

Weather postpones
Grand Bahama
junkanoo parade
* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT Grand
Bahama junkanoo fans did
not celebrate the New Year
as traditionally expected due
to inclement weather which
resulted in the postponement
of the New Year's Day
Junkanoo Parade.
Wellington Moultrie, chair-
man of the Grand Bahama
Junkanoo Committee, said
that bad weather reports had
forced the committee to post-
pone Freeport's parade. He
said it has been rescheduled
for 6pm on Saturday, January
5.
As forecast, Freeport did
experience heavy rains and
strong winds on Monday
evening due to a weather sys-
tem that passed over Grand
Bahama.
SEE page nine


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STHE TRIBUNE
j LOCAL.


Minister: PM will


speak soon on



airports next step


.'Neko Grant says

redevelopment

plans are well

underway


Of B'KARIN HERIG
STribune Staff Reporter "
k1e'rig@tribunemedia.net
.,.TE nation can expect to
lir from Prime Minister
.Ilbert Ingraham in "short
:Jrder" regarding plans for
'the next step in the redevel-


at of
|I-nte
urism
rant said
;-Speakin
eidia at a

Lt said
e airport
'"way i


,"'tgo of
Irt Deve
14jt moni
dter, have
itbacks i
plan


-td&iessed


f the Lynden Pin- in: tourism arrivals.to.the
national Airport, Bahamas, saying that he
Minister Neko expects visitor numbers to
I yesterday. improve in 2008.
ig with the local He conceded thai the
k special press con- country's tourism industry
i board the Norwe- took some hard hits last year
m cruise ship, Mr due to a soft US economy
plans to transform .and the introduction of the
rt into a first-class new passport regulations as
re well underiway, part Western Hemisphere
I that he could not Travel Initiative (WHTI).
further or give any This initiative, he said, cost
the' Bahamas to lose the
impulsive traveller segment
, gt of the tourism pie.
SHowever, there are already
signs that visitor numbers will
the Nassau Ar- increase in this year.
lopment Company s I its latest report, the Cen-
tig Richmond said tral Bank of the Bahamas
th that although saidthat totaltourist arrivals
been some minor to the Bahamas increased
n individual pro- by 1.7 per cent to one nil-
s for the redevel- lio in the third quarter of
the airport are on 2nn jj
nt yesterday also rand '" B ..ia saw an
last year's decline increase in air atrivals of 2.6


per cent and 15.1 per cent
respectively for that period.
This increase, the Central
Bank said, could indicate that
the effects of the WHTI are
easing...

Agency
As it 'concerns the
Baliamas' new advertising
agency, Mr Orant said yes-
terday tiha; it is working
"extremely well" with the
Ministry of Tourism.",
The Ministry pf Tourism
announced in November that
it had selected the ad agency
Arnold Worldwide to handle
the country's advertising
business. j" .
The decision to choose the
company was based primari-
ly on the agency's potential in
terms of online marketing
and iis'wide-ranging travel
experience, the Ministry of
Tourism said.








E T E TY J 3EWS IB T


0 In brief

Man il court
on marljuafa


charge
A 22-YEAR-OLD man
was arraigned in Magis-
trate's Court yesterday on
a marijuana possession
charge.
It was alleged that on
Monday, December 24,
2007 Javaughn Clifford
Deveaux of Colony Vil-
lage was found in posses-
sion of a quantity of mari-
juana which authorities
believed he intended to
supply to another.
According to the prose-
cution, Deveaux was
found in possession of 50
foil wrapped packets con-
taining a total of seven
and a half ounces of mari-
juana.
He appeared before
Magistrate Carolita
Bethel at court one in
Bank Lane.
Although Deveaux
pleaded not guilty to the
charge, he was remanded
to Her Majesty's Prison
due to the fact that he is
already on bail in connec-
tion with another matter
of similar nature.
The case has been
adjourned to April 15.

Elderly man
dies after
leaping from
Florida
condo tower
* DAi'TONA BEACH, Fla.
A: 92-YEAR-OLD man
died Wednesday after jump-
ing from the ninth floor of
an oceanside condominium
t'-rer, officials said, accord-
ing to associated Press.
Floyd Snyder leaped from
a balcony of the Towers
Condominium around 8
a.m., police and fire officials
said.
According. to a police
report, Snyder called the
building's front desk and told
them he was going to jump.
Employees were trying to
reach Snyder but could not
get into his apartment until
after he jumped. No suicide
note was found, according to
the report.
Condominium association
Vice President Charles Blake
told the Daytona Beach
News-Journal that Snyder
was distraught after recently
visiting his wife in a nursing
home.

12-year-old
catches 551
pound bull shark
in Florida waters
u WEST PALM BEACH,
Fla.
A 12-YEAR-OLD Con-
necticut boy may be the new
Florida state record holder
for catching the heaviest bull
shark, according to Associat-
ed Press.'
Aidan Murray Medley had
a spent a half day at sea
Tuesday when he reeled in
the 551-pound bull shark just
north of the Palm Beach
Inlet.
The seventh-grader was in
Palm Beach County on vaca-
tion with his family. They
plan to submit his catch for a
new state record.
Florida wildlife officials say
the current record set in 1981
was a 517-pound catch at
Panama City Beach.


Two (2) storey, shops, office
and three (3) two (2) bedroom
(2/1) apartments.




Pes Con6Itrol
TS.clEtemntp

322-215


Girl seriously injured after


ceremonial cannon explodes


Traditional New Year's Eve event ends tragically


A CEREMONIAL cannon The girl, Britney Edge- pieces and nred out to sea to
firing which traditionally combe, was rushed to a local mark the arrival of the New
marks the New Year for an clinic for treatment, then air- Year.
Abaco settlement ended trag- lifted to Nassau, where she "This time, however, things
ically when the ancient was yesterday undergoing went terribly wrong. The gun
weapon exploded, seriously surgery in hospital. exploded and scattered met-
injuring a young onlooker. Abaco sources said she suf- al all over the place. Several
The cast-iron cannon, lcat- fered a broken rib and internal people had minor injuries.
ed on the seafront at Chero- bleeding in the accident, which "The girl who was badly
kee Sound, is fired every New also caused minor injuries to injured had trouble breathing
Year's Eve while local and vis- several other bystanders. after the explosion and had to
iting revellers look on. One source said: "This was be flown out on an air ambu-
This year, however, the can- devastating for everyone pre- lance. We understand she had
non blew up, scattering frag- sent. The firing of the cannon surgery today (Tuesday)."
ments of metal into the crowd, has been a Cherokee Sound Last night, another source
seriously injuring a 19-year- tradition for years. said: "Doctors have said there
old Bahamian girl from Sandy "The old cannon is loaded are some problems with her
Point. with rags and other bits and lungs."



Churchmen plan



police meeting in



bid to tackle crime


CHURCHMEN in the Bahamas are plan-
ning to meet senior police officers next week in
a bid to come up with a new crime-beating
formula.
All ministers of religion are being urged to
meet at the police force conference room next
Tuesday as part of a new Bahamas Against
Crime initiative.
The campaign is in response to 2007's record
high murder rate of 79 and the shocking
shooting death of Constable Ramos Williams
outside The Tribune's office on December 29.
Chairman Dr William Thompson issued a
statement yesterday calling on the religious
community to "pray earnestly and work dili-
gently to reduce the scourge of crime and vio-
lence in the Bahamas."
Dr Thompson said 2007 brought crime and
violence of '"epic proportions" to the Bahamas
"with crimes of every description threatening
the very quality of our lives."

Killing
The "cold-blooded, cowardly" killing of Con-
stable Williams underscored the tragic state
of Bahamian society "and must be condemned
by all decent, right-thinking citizens."
He added: "There is no doubt the rising tide
of criminality in the Bahamas must be
stemmed.
"Bahamas Against Crime has put forward
a clearly defined, workable plan of action
which, if supported, will positively affect the
state of crime and violence.
"We call upon the government and corporate
Bahamas and all other sectors to 'step up to the
plate' and put their tremendous resources
behind this campaign.
"As the problem is fundamentally a spiritu-
al one and as the Bahamas Christian Council is
one of the sponsors of Bahamas Against
Crime, it is only fitting that the religious com-
munity lead the way in supporting this bold
campaign."
On Sunday, January 27, the campaign will


The girl's stepfather is
Ricardo Burrows of Sandy
Point, Abaco.
The cannon is believed to


have been found on the
seabed by divers and is
thought to have been of 18th
or 19th century origin.


JACK VICTOR

.MOLEY



Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
'Te shone: (242) 362-6656
.Bayparil building, Parliament Street
"Telephone: (42) 323-8240 Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com


also hold a "day of confession, repentance and
reconciliation" throughout the Bahamas.
"Each resident will be encouraged to confess
to God any contribution they may have made
to the state of affairs," said Dr Thompson.
On the same day, at the Church of God of
Prophecy on East Street, leaders of various
denominations will lead the nation in confes-
sion and repentance.
Anti-crime messages by national religious
leaders will also be promoted during the month.
And churches are being urged to encourage
parishioners to support Bahamas Against
Crime in every possible way.


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2008, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


'-'


-1-- -- 3 C- A -.. -- *









PAGE 4, HURSDAYJANUARYt3,2008X3S STHEETEDITB


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEENDUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama


Keeping Kenya Democratic


MAYBE, JUST maybe, Mwai Kibaki legiti-
mately won reelection to the presidency of
Kenya last week. Enough doubts have arisen,
however, to require a thorough re-examination
by the Kenyan parliament and courts, with assis-
tance from dispassionate outsiders.
The African Union, the United States, and
the European Union need to pressure Kibaki
and his supporters to allow this recount to pro-
ceed without the corruption and tribalism that
have marked Kenyan politics since indepen-
dence in 1963.
The alternative to an honest reassessment is
evident in the horrors that have engulfed Kenya
in areas where members of the Kikuyu group,
the largest in Kenya, rub shoulders with the
Luo and Kalenjin peoples. Kibaki is a Kikuyu.
Raila Odinga, the candidate opposing him, is a
Luo, and some of his strongest supporters are
Kalenjin. They think Odinga won, and many
of his followers are determined to reverse the
Kibaki victory, decreed by the Electoral Com-
mission, in the streets.
While ethnic groups have clashed sporadi-
cally before, Kenya has never known the inter-
nal conflicts that have devastated other African
nations. Even though the country is an amalgam
of 20 or more peoples forced together by the
British in the 19th century, Kenyans have
learned to coexist even when jammed into shan-
ty towns. They should not be set against one


another by one man's determination to remain
in power.
Kibaki has presided over five years of peace-
ful economic growth, stabilized government
finances, and helped the United States in the
war on terrorism. But he is only the third pres-
ident of Kenya since independence and, like
his predecessors, he has been unable or unwill-
ing to rid the government of deeply embedded
corruption.
Democracy can function well only if there
are frequent and assured rotations in the high-
est offices.
There is no doubt that the election result is at
least tainted. Samuel Kivuitu, chairman of the
Electoral Commission, said Tuesday that he
was pressured by both sides to announce a win-
ner prematurely. Observers from the European
Union reported many irregularities, chiefly in
Kikuyu districts. Kibaki's re-election should
not stand without a recount, or if that is impos-
sible, a new election.
Kenya, the economic hub of East Africa, has
been regarded in recent years as an exemplar of
stability. Democracy is fragile in Africa, and
for the sake of their own future development,
the continent's other freely elected govern-
ments need to intervene to help Kibaki devise a
solution. They ought to be seconded by nations
in the developed world, including the United
States.


IN THE AFTERMATH of Benazir Bhut-
to's murder, domestic power struggles are shap-
ing, or distorting, debates about how she was
killed, what becomes of her Pakistan People's
Party, and when to hold pending elections.Giv-
en Pakistan's geopolitical importance, and the
likelihood that any overt American meddling in
those power struggles will exacerbate resent-
ment of the United States, .the Bush adminis-
tration must avoid any temptation to play the
puppeteer in Pakistan.
Americans cannot be indifferent to what is
going on in Pakistan, or about control of its
nuclear weapons. In the past, the father of Pak-
istan's nuclear weapons programme, A. Q.
Khan, peddled nuclear technology and hard-
ware to Iran, North Korea, and Libya. Pak-
istan's military establishment had to know about
Khan's proliferation activities. Today, Pakistan
is the likeliest source of nuclear weapons falling
into the hands of undeterrable extremists.
Precisely because so much is at stake, how-
ever, President Bush must suppress the impulse
to strike a hectoring pose. Bush's past backing
for President Pervez Musharraf only made
Musharraf more unpopular, and America more
resented.
Because of the turmoil ensuing from Bhutto's
murder, European election monitors had been
saying they could not do their job properly if the
elections were held on the original date of Jan.
8.


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I,KEVIN A. BUTLER
of Forbes Close, Golden Gates #1 of the Island of New
Providence, Bahamas intend to change my name to KEVIN
A. HUNTER. If there are any objections to this change of
name by deed poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, PO. Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas
no later than thirty (30) days after the date of the publication
of this notice.




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The less Bush says now about the delayed
parliamentary elections, the better, As long as
those elections are held when the government
has said they will be held, and as long as they
are free and fair, there should be no quibbling
or criticism from Washington. ...,
Pakistan is not a protectorate of the United
States.
As with the election date, the dynastic trans-
fer of leadership in Bhutto's party to her hus-
band and son is a domestic issue for which Pak-
istanis do not need American advice.
But calls for an independent investigation of
Bhutto's assassination do involve the interna-
tional community. Musharrafs government was
foolish to put out implausible denials that Bhut-
to was shot. It did so out of fear it would be
accused of failing to provide proper security.
But it was Bhutto's husband, the notoriously
corrupt Asif Ali Zardari, who refused an autop-
sy.
America could win points for goodwill if it
supported an international investigation, show-
ing it is more attached to the rule of law than to
Musharraf. But the investigation will not bring
Bhutto back, nor resolve Pakistan's domestic
conflicts, nor eliminate the threat from reli-
gious extremists. Pakistanis will have to do
those things themselves.
(* These articles are from
The Boston Globe 2008)


EDITOR, The Tribune.
YEAR 2008 is less than 24
hours away. January is always
a good month for making
changes. More people start
changing for the better in ear-
ly January than at any other
time of the year. Many even
put off giving up a bad habit
until New Year's Day! Mak-
ing a positive step or two in
the right direction is a won-
derful way to ring in the New
Year. How great if you could
just pick a day, and give up a
habit which you may have
struggled with for months, or
even years.
Some of us are fortunate
enough to have our resolu-
tions develop into lasting
change. Action precedes moti-
vation, not the other way
around. People often think
that they should wait until
they are motivated to start
doing something good for
themselves. They'll say, "I'll
start that diet or fitness pro-
gramme when I'm really well
rested and have a lot of ener-
gy." But it doesn't work that
way. Instead of waiting for
inspiration, you need to take
action first. Your initial action
doesn't have to be anything
big. Just by putting on your
sneakers and walking for 10
minutes, you will make that
energy you are "waiting" for
to materialize. Once you initi-
ate an action the smallest of
actions you pick up
momentum and it will be a lot
easier to keep moving for-
ward.
"Shareyour gdMs. by telling
someone who ydi trust about
your resolutions and ask for
their support. It helps to share
your goals with friends who
can gently steer you in the
right direction. Your goal
should be something you real-
ly desire to change or achieve,
not something that society or
your family says is good for
you. If you don't have a strong
personal desire, you are less
likely to be successful. Set
realistic goals that are attain-
able, and then take small steps
that are likely to succeed.
Here are some beneficial
New Year's Resolution for
2008
1) Quit smoking: Make this
the year that you decide to
stamp out your smoking habit.
It is the leading preventable
cause of premature death.


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A ID OA


Even if you've tried to quit
before and failed, don't let it
get you down. On average,
smokers try about four times
before they quit for good.
2) Stop drinking alcohol:
While many people use the
New Year as an incentive to
finally stop drinking, most are
not equipped to make such a
drastic lifestyle change all at
once. Many heavy drinkers
fail to quit drinking alcohol,
but do much better when they
have group support. If you
have decided that you want to
stop drinking, there is a world
of help and support available.
3) Find financial freedom -
get out debt: Was money a big
source of stress in your life
last year? Try to have a bud-
get on spending your money
4) Help others: You can
choose to spend time mentor-
ing a child, or visiting a home
for the elderly. For things to
change, for the Bahamas to
change, you and I have to
change. "Let's make some


changes for 20081
5) Get fit: The medical
proof for fitness is every-
where. Regular exercise is
now associated with more
health benefits than any time
in history. Studies show that it
reduces the risk of some can-
cers, increases longevity, helps
achieve and maintain weight
loss, enhances mood, lowers
blood pressure, and even
improves arthritis. In short,
exercise keeps you healthy
and makes you look and feel
better.
6) Spend more time with
family and friends: Many
Bahamians have not spent
enough time with family mem-
bers to build up stronger rela-
tionships with one another in
2007. I1 believe that a renewed
commitment to the family and
the community could nip
crime in the bud.
Come tomorrow, write a
comprehensive plan. Let's
make some great resolutions
for 2008 and plan to make
them work.

SHAVADO GIBSON
Nassau,
December 31, 2007.


Thanking helpers


after being hit by car
EDITOR, The Tribune.
I WAS hit by a' light'eoloured car as;' crossed a street near
Shirley Street and Blue Hill Road on Monday, December 17,
2007 betweei'2-3pm. The person who hit me did riot stop.
My reason for writing this letter is to thank individuals whose
names I do not know. A young woman stopped her car in the
middle of Blue Hill Road in order to help me. The young
woman and a man I think there were two men, but I do not
remember clearly enough to be sure helped me up, expressed
concern over what had happened and offered to get medical
attention for me. One of the officers at Government House who
witnessed the incident also, offered to get medical assistance for
me, but I declined the offer. The young woman then drove me
to my destination.
I thank God for those persons who showed concern for my
welfare and went out of their way to assist me. I shall always be
grateful to them. I have asked God to bless them for their
kindness. I hope that God will use this incident for good in
the life of the person who hit me and left me perhaps for dead
as he or she had no way of knowing the extent of my injuries. I
know that God uses the good and (what we see as) the bad for
His own purpose to work in the lives of individuals. I hold no
anger or resentment toward the person who hit me. I thank God
that the injury to my leg did not result in broken bones and that
the blow to my head, as far as I can tell so far, did not result in
serious injury. God was good to me in so many ways that day
that I thank Him and the persons He sent my way.
CAROLYN KNOWLES
Nassau,
December 19,2007.

Why should Sea Hauler tragedy

victims continue to suffer?


EDITOR, The Tribune.
WHY the Ingraham govern-
ment seems unwilling to sit
down and settle the claims of
the victims of the Sea Hauler
tragedy is, in my opinion, total-
ly beyond any logical thinking
as they recently took $4 million
from the Treasury to compen-
sate ex-employees of Royal
Oasis where there was absolute-
ly no legal liability for govern-
ment to give this compensation?
As crazy as it might be I
wouldn't be surprised if gov-
ernment didn't step-in and com-
pensate the workers of Morton
Salt because their working week
will be shortened, but numbers


seem to mean something in the
political life of The Bahamas,
rather than fairness, ethics, and
moral judgment, and topping
everything good governance.
Trust has obviously been lost
in the corridors of government
as we continue to see so much
irrational and illogical decisions
or worse the lack of decisive-
ness from this government.
Prime Minister: Instruct
someone you trust and negoti-
ate a settlement now with these
victims. Why should they con-
tinue to suffer?
P STRACHAN
Nassau,
December, 2007.


Professional marine navigation doesn't happen
by accident. Study and learn theoretical and
practical aspects by enrolling in, the Terrestrial
Navigation Course offered by The Bahamas
School of Marine Navigation. Plan to attend
the free first class on Monday, January 7, 2008
at 7pm at BASRA Headquarters on East Bay
Street.

Telephone the school:
364-5987, 364-2861 or 535-6234
for details and fees.


Healthy




New Year's




resolutions


Speaking subtly to Pakistan


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2008


THE TRIBUNE














Anniversary of historic




election one week away


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net
THE Bahamas is a week a way
from the 41 anniversary of one of
the most important and heated
elections in its history.
While it is easy enough to dis-
cuss the 1967 general election,
which ushered in majority rule,
with those who were there, it is
difficult to get a sense of how heat-
ed and hard fought the election
was without looking back at the
news reports both national and
international of the day, which
carried with them the weighty and
sometimes impassioned views of
the writers of the time.
The opposition Progressive Lib-
eral Party launched a scathing
attack against the United Bahami-
an Party with charges that cabi-
net ministers had ties to the mafia
and were involved in corruption,
nepotism, conflicts of interest and
general mismanagement.
The UBP hit back at the PLP
saying that these "wild" allega-
tions were examples of why they
considered the PLP to be "irre-
sponsible and incapable of ruling
the colony".
The more sober points of both
party's campaign were more
noble, however.
The PLP's claim was that
Bahamian democracy would be a
"mockery" so long as the colony
was ruled by a "white governor
appointed by a white queen, with
a majority white assembly and sen-
ate and an all-white cabinet rep-
resenting a party that a majority of
Bahamians didn't vote for."
(While the UBP did win the
majority of the seats in the 1962
election they did not command
the popular vote).
The UBP ran on a "prosperity
platform" highlighting that the
country had seen unprecedented
economic growth and investments
since the UBP won the 1962 elec-
tion.
Per capital statistics of the time
showed that the Bahamas was per-
haps the richest black nation on
earth. In 1967 more Bahamians
owned more cars per capital than
did Britons.
a art of their ca the
tory. argued that a PPm ,ic-e
tory nuMet e A oie o thei,;money


41 years since end of

heated 1967 campaign


flooding in at the time.
It was these arguments that
made many UBPs believe that
they would be returned to power.
However, the PLP argued that
too little of the new wealth had
trickled down to the poor Bahami-
an.
There were 38 seats (17 in New
Providence and 21 in the Family
Islands) to be contested. Following
the January 10 general election,
the Bahamas would have had
what would have been, at that
time, the largest House of Assem-
bly in its history. k
The UBP had 36 candidates,
the PLP 29, the NDP 13, Labour
four and there were 12 indepen-
dents. The incumbent UBP had
come out of the 1962 election with
24 seats in the 33-member House.
The election was closely
watched by members of the inter-
national community in general and
the United States public in partic-
ular.
The UBP poured money into
its campaign, even buying time on
six Miami radio stations heard in
the Bahamas.
Robert Reno, brother of the
former, and the first, female Attor-
ney General of the United States
Janet Reno, wrote in an article
that appeared in the January 9,
1967 edition of The Miami Herald
that "the white man's 300 year
domination of the Bahamas is at
stake in what could be the most
fateful election in the colony's his-
tory."
He described the campaign as
one of "the most bitter" ever con-
ducted with charges of rampant
corruption and US gambling influ-
ence "adding new fuel to old polit-
ical fires".
He also highlighted the then 36-
year-old Sir Lynden's frustration
with the fact that assembly dis-
tricts were "being rigged against
his party whose main strength lies
on the island of New Providence".
Sir Lynden charged that the
UBP had laid plans to buy votes,
gerrymander districts, censor PLP
speeches and had resurrected long
neglected road pTojects to give


jobs to Bahamians in the few days
before the election.
While issues of race were rele-
vant in 1967 certainly more so
then than in any other subsequent
general election the PLP, accord-
ing to Mr Reno, insisted that "race
is not an issue in this nation with
its 85 per cent Negro population.
But they claim that Bahamian
democracy will be a mockery so
long as the colony is ruled by a
white governor appointed by a
white queen, a majority white
assembly and senate and an all-
white cabinet representing a party
that a majority of Bahamians did-
n't vote for."
While compelling, this was not
the only argument the PLP had
put forth as a reason for change.
The UBP at the time had to
answer numerous charges of cor-
ruption, nepotism, conflicts of
interest and mismanagement.
Mr Reno pointed out in his
writing that "the PLP had
unleashed a rash of bitter charges
against the white rulers which has
prompted the UBP to charge the
opposition with being irresponsi-
ble and incapable of ruling the
colony".
These allegations against the
UBP did not blanket the entire
party. In fact, the lion's share of
claims of UBP corruption were
laid at the feet of the late Sir
Stafford Sands who served as
Finance and Tourism Minister.
Sir Stafford was reportedly
"infuriated" at claims that he had
tied the Bahamian government to
the US mafia.
Both Sir Stafford and the pre-
mier, Sir Roland Symonette,
declared themselves off limits to
the foreign press after Sir Stafford
had threatened to sue several US
and British publications who
charged that he was in league with
US gangsters in the operation of
Bahamian casinos.'
Addressing these allegations at
the time, Sir Stafford took out a
full page advertisement in the Jan-
uary 7, 1967 edition of The Tri-
bune stating, that he had never
been directly or indirectly asscci-


ated with mobsters.
In addition, Sir Stafford was
accused of acting professionally
for Wallace Groves and the Grand
Bahama Development Company,
despite being a member of cabinet.
Sir Stafford was unapologetic
about this because at that time,
ministers were not paid for their
services and had to continue to
earn money privately.
He vehemently denied, howev-
er, that he had influenced Gover-
nor Sir Ralph Grey and the Exec-
utive Council in the granting of a
gambling licence to Bahamas
Amusements Ltd.
Despite these allegations, many
predicted that the UBP would
maintain control of the House of
Assembly.
In fact the Wall Street Journal
predicted that the UBP would win
the election.
"Unless there is an upset of
miraculous proportions," the Jour-
nal said, "elections will return to
power for another five years Sir
Roland Symonette, the premier,
Sir Stafford Sands, the minister of
finance and tourism and other Bay
Street Boys".
On the other hand, then PLP
chairman, Sir Cecil Wallace-Whit-
field predicted that Sir Lynden's
party would take 23 seats in the
House.
On January 10 1967, the PLP
won 18 seats in the general elec-
tion as did the UBP.
Sir Randol Fawkes, the lone
Labour MP, voted to sit with the
Progressive Liberal Party, enabling
them to form a government.
The other Independent, Sir
Alvin Braynen, accepted the posi-
tion of Speaker in order to main-
tain his neutrality.
The Bahamas boasts the sec-
ond oldest legislative body in the
British Commonwealth. It first
met in Nassau in a private home in
1729 and has continued uninter-
rupted since then.





Everybody is talking about
Calypso Man.
FB h


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2008 FORD ESCAPE XLT


"


THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2008, PAGE 5


,'






,'*
*, '


THE TRIBUNE









8.~~~~~~~~~~ ThRDY AUR?3, 218H RDN


THE COLLEGE JF .Or

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs 04
Thu c~r~ ., ..~


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CERTIFICATES
.


Continuing Education Units
Now Available


Classes begin 2"d February 2008
What is your career goal? "
PROMOTION
/ QUALITY SERVICE
/ INTERNATIONAL CERTIFICATION
/ SALARY INCREASE
V CAREER CHANGE/ ENHANCEMENT


Iidll *. W l The Professional Development Department can help
you achieve your career goal! A wide array of courses and
programmes leading to certificate, certification and licensure are offered. You can become a pioneer in setting
performance standards in your organization. We have secured partnerships with leading international
institutions to help you accomplish your career goals. You can attain your professional development credentials
at The College of The Bahamas. Success is at your finger tips. Call us today.

Choose the courses or programme to help you accomplish your career goals...
Certified Professional Manager
Certificate for The Office Assistant
A+ Computer Technician Certification
Certified Computer Operator (Microsoft Office Specialist- MOUS)
Certificate in Law
Certified Project Manager- 0 .r... ..n <
Becker Certified Public Accountants' Review (CPA)*
Certificate in Human Resource Management rom 6 Monthse uraMo rangeths.
Certificate in Supervisory Management' *
Journeyman Plumbing License Course External Registration is required
Master Plumbing License for UK and US Institutions.
Single Phase Electrical Course Affordable Tuition To Be Paid
Three Phase Electrical Course Per Term
Managerial Accounting For Non-Financial Managers P
Ethics and Professional Responsibility or Master Degrees may ng apply for
Writing and Research Skills exemption from prerequisite courses.
Introduction to Computers, Windows & The Internet .- ...-- .

Enroll in our International Certification Programmes.
No entrance exams required. Tuition Payment is due per term.
Visit COB's Centre For Continuing Education & Extension Services on Moss Road,
or Telephone us at (242) 325-5714 or (242) 328-0093


jj fir.!'


-i


I


February 21-23,2008


Naesau, The Bahamae


Art Exhibition
February 15-235, 2008

Guidelines for Artists
The Conference on the Abolition of the Trans Atlantic SlaveTrade: Telling The
Story, invites all artists to submit up to three (3) artworks executed in any medium
for showing at the conference February 21-23, 2008.
The exhibition will open on Friday, 15 February, 2008 at 6.30 in the evening at
the Performing Arts Centre at The College of the Bahamas Oakes Field Campus.
All artwork should be sent or brought to the Pro Gallery which is located in the
S Block at The College of the Bahamas Oakes Field Campus one (1) week prior
to the opening of the exhibition. Please address all artworks to Mrs. Joann Behagg
or Mr. John Cox.
All artists should give an indication of how they would wish their 3D pieces to
be displayed. Photographic images would assist us in determining your display
needs.
Foreign artists are welcome. However, all related costs will be the responsibility
of the artists (packing, shipping, and customs duty, etc.) to and from The Bahamas.
The Conference Committee will select the works to be exhibited and all decisions
are final.


Contacts:
Joann Behagg
email: jbehagg@cob.edu.bs
Telephone: 302 4560


John Cox
jcox@cob.edu.bs
Telephone: 302-4485


The College of The Bahamas
Presents an
International Conference

Abolition of the Trane-Atlantic Slave Trade:

Telling the Story
February 21-23, 2008
Nassau, The Bahamas








Come learn about and celebrate a part of Bahamian and world history
that has profoundly influenced Africa, Europe and the Americas. Register
today.

Plenary Speakers

Dr. Joseph E. Harris, Howard University Distinguished Professor
of History Emeritus, an expert on Africa and Director of the South
African Research and.' ,chival Project. At the conference his topic
center around: "GIc al slave trade and the emergence of
communities of African descent around the world".

Dr. Rosanne Adderley, Professor of History at Tulane University
and author. Her presentation will focus on "Freed Africans in The
Bahamas".

Mr. William Godfrey Davis Esq., Attorney at Law and
Transformative Mediator, his topic will be "Reparations for the
peoples of the Maafa".

Mr. Kojo Yankah, President of the Africa Institute of Journalism
& Communications, educator and author, he will speak on the
topic: "Reconciliation for the Peoples of the Maafa".

For additional information contact the School of Social
Sciences, Telephone 397-2606/7
Jessica Minnis, Assoc. Professor,
School of Social Sciences
The College of The Bahamas
PO Box N4912
E-mail: abolitionconf@cob.edu.bs
Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 397-2608
k


THE TRIBUNE


t.


L


I-


PAGa & THURSDAY. JANUARY 3. 2008


I


CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND
EXTENSION SERVICES
Spring 012008

BUSINESS
COURSES BEGINS
ACCOUNTING FOR BEGINNERS I, II & III 11 February
CREDIT & COLLECTIONS PROCEDURES I 19 February
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE WORKSHOP 21 February
INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS I 7 February
HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT I & II 4 February

HEALTH, FITNESS AND COSMETOLOGY
COURSE BEGINS

MASSAGE THERAPY I & II 11 February
GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR I 13 February
MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 6 February
MAKE-UP APPLICATION 18 February
MANICURE & PEDICURE 19 February
NAIL ART TECHNICIAN 18 February


SEWING AND DECORATING
COURSE BEGINS
BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING I & II 18 February
BEDROOM DECORATING 16 February
DRAPERY MAKING I 19 February
UPHOLSTERY 13 February

COMPUTERS

COURSE BEGINS
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I & II 4 February
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY I 6 February
QUICKBOOKS 5 February
MICROSOFT EXCEL 9 February
MICROSOFT WORD 5 February
PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR 5 February
MICROSOFT POWERPOINT W/S 6 March
WEB PAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP W/S 13 March
CALL: 325-5714 / 328-00931 328-1936 / 302-4300

International Conference
and Art Exhibition

Abolition of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade:
Telling the Story


I














Rnnm C residents


GRAND Bahama Power Com-
pany has announced that Excell
Osborne Ferrell III has been
appointed to the position of pres-
ident and CEO, replacing former
CEO Tim Browkowski.
Mr Ferrell is a 36-year veteran
of the power industry and an elec-
trical engineer.
Born, raised and educated in
North Carolina, EO, as he is com-
monly known, is a North Carolina
State University engineer who for-
merly worked for Duke Energy, a
US energy supplier with a cus-
tomer base of more than 2.2 mil-
lion.
After 36 years with the compa-
ny, and 22 of those spent as an
officer, Mr Ferrell retired in 2006
from the position of regional vice
president of power delivery. Dur-
ing the past year he served as a
consultant for Mirant Corpora-
tion.
During his work with Mirant,
Mr Ferrell became very familiar
with Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany and visited the island numer-
ous times, working with the engi-
neers on various projects.


"His recruitment to come here
was quite natural as he showed a
great affinity to the island and to
the work being done here," said
the company in a statement.
"I have two resolute plans to
start my new year," Mr Ferrell
said. "One, to improve service to
the community by an improved
and reliable electric service." He
noted that as a former leader of a
large electrical distribution sys-
tem, he has experience improving
electrical systems and feels this
will be a goal he can accomplish.
"Secondly, I want to ensure that
Grand Bahama Power is able to
meet the needs of the growing
community. We will especially
look to provide needed service for
the expansion plans of our existing
customers, the new developments
in the east, and the large demand
that Ginn will bring for the west."
The work he was referring to
has already begun with the exten-
sion of the 69 KV transmission
line to east end, which is nearing
completion, and Mr Ferrell not-
ed that the company will also need
to invest in additional electrical


generation. "These needs will
become more prevalent as we plan
for the just announced Freeport
Container Port expansion and the
resources they will need."
Mr Ferrell has now met with
the entire staff at Grand Bahama
Power Company. "I have found
our staff to be very dedicated and
very proud employees, they take
great pride in their work" he said,
"ip fact everyone on the island has
been very welcoming and so very
friendly.
"I am very pleased to be here, I
have been working with Grand
Bahama Power Company for over
a year now and my decision to
join the team came very easily."
Mr Ferrell and his wife, an inte-
rior designer, arrived on island
two weeks before the holidays and
they said they are both very excit-
ed about this new phase in their
lives.
"We feel we have the opportu-
nity to contribute to the power
company and to the island. My
wife and I think Grand Bahama is
beautiful and we are excited to be
here."


U. *AA '~ ~ J U''L % U W WW K L



want government



to intervene in the



island's land disputes


DESPERATE residents
of Rum Cay want the gov-
ernment to intervene in land
disputes on the island,
claiming that growing bad
feeling is driving away
tourists and ruining the local.
economy.
Trouble flared again yes-
terday when an alleged pub-


ToHE Ci
Vuksft our welit. k


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE


INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT


PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSES SPRING SEMESTER 012008 (SESSION 02)

SESSION A


COURSE TUITION LAB
SEC CODE BEGINS DURATION DAYS TIME & FEES FEE RM
Bahamlan COOK 6:00 -
Cuisine 1 806 Feb. 07 6 weeks Thursday 9:00pm $225.00 $150.00 MK

Gourmet COOK 6:00-
Cooking I 1 823 Feb. 4 6 weeks Monday 9:00pm $200.00 $180.00 MK
Gourmet COOK 6:00 -
Cooking II 1 824 Feb. 4 6 weeks Monday 9:00pm $225.00 $240.00 MK

Cake & Pastry COOK 6:00 -
Making I 1 813 Feb. 5 5 weeks Tues/Thurs. 9:00pm $225.00 $75.00 LK
Cake & Pastry COOK 6:00 -
Making II j814 Feb. 5 5 weeks Tues/Thurs. :00pm $250.00 $75.00 PK

COOK 6:00 -
Bread Making 1 810 Feb. 7 6 weeks Thursday 9:00pm $200.00 $90.00 LK

Cake COOK 6:00-
Decorating I 1 817 Feb. 4 5 weeks MonAMed. 9:00pm $225.00 $100.00 LK
Cake COOK 6:00-
Decorating II 1 818 Feb. 4 5 weeks MonM/ed. 9:00pm $225.00 $150.00 PK
Deadline for applications, January 25,2008 at 4:00 p.m.


SESSION B
TUITION
COURSE SEC CODE BEGINS DURATION DAYS TIME & FEES LAB FEE RM
Bahamian COOK 6:00-
Culsine 1 806 Mar. 27 6 weeks Thursday 9:00pm $225.00 $150.00 MK

Gourmet COOK 6:00 -
Cooking I 1 823 Mar. 24 6 weeks Monday 9:00pm $200.00 $180.00 MK
Gourmet COOK 6:00 -
Cooking II 1 824 Mar. 24 6 weeks Monday 9:00pm $225.00 $240.00 MK

Cake & Pastry COOK 6:00 -
Making I 1 813 Mar. 25 5 weeks Tues/Thurs. 9:00pm $225.00 $75.00 LK
Cake & Pastry COOK 6:00-
Making II 1 814 Mar. 25 5 weeks Tues/Thurs. 9:00pm $250.00 $75.00 PK

COOK 6:00-
Bread Making 1 810 Mar. 27 6 weeks Thursday 9:00pm $200.00 $90.00 LK

Cake COOK 6:00 -
Decorating I 1 817 Mar. 24 5 weeks MonM/ed. 9:00pm $225.00 $100.00 LK
Cake COOK 6:00 -
Decorating II 1 818 Mar. 24 5 weeks Mon/Ned. 9:00pm $225.00 $150.00 PK
Deadline for applications, February 28,2008 at 4:00 p.m.

For further Information or to pick up an application please contact the Industry Training department of the Culinary &
Hospitality Management Institute, 323-5804,323-6804 or fax 325-8175.

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time).

CHMI reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.


THE INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGES AND CULTURES INSTITUTE THE COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY OF THE BAHAMAS
EVENTS CALENDER 2007-2008 BY I. MOSS
DATE EVENT LECTURERS / PARTICIPANTS VENUE
January 9 Wed CHINESE EVENING Lecture by Professor Xu Xianwen Munnings Room 2, 7PM ,
January 19 DRUMFEST A dnum summit regrouping Video of Montreal TAM TAM JAM by I. Moss Band shell
Saturday members from A11 the Junkanoo teams Junkanoo practioneers are cordially invited 2 PM
January 30' JUNKANOO ART designing and pasting Presentation and demonstration by Henry Moss Jr.; Munnings Room 2
Wednesday costumes WORKSHOP slide show by I. Moss 6-8
February 7 PANEL DISCUSSION: Tourism and Panel members from Tourism, Immigration, COB Munnings Room 2 or BTC
Thursday Languages and private tourism businesses Lecture Hall? 7 PM
February 19 FRENCH FILM ASTERIX Presentation on Roman history background by Munnings Room 2
Tuesday Professor Stephen B. Aranha 7 Pmi
March 14 FRENCH FOLK SONG EVENING Slide show by I. Moss, F. Leger on guitar, J. Munnings Room 2
Friday Mereus on vocals and other musical friends 7 PM
March 21 Fri VICTOR HUGO Beyond LES MIZ Lecture and slide show by I. Moss Munnings Room 2
April 10 HAITIAN FILM Slide presentation: Leger, SCCA Munnings Room 2
April 16 AN EVENING OF BAHAMIAN MUSIC Slide show on Bahamian Musicians and New Performance Center?
Friday Guests: The DICEY-DO SINGERS Entertainers by I. Moss
May 6 MAIFEST Slide Show by I.Moss; participation of German- Munnings Room 2
Tuesday speakers in Nassau & ILCI students
May 23 CLASSICAL MUSIC EVENING Piano solos by I.Moss; Cello / piano duets by H. Munnings Room 2
Friday Peloquin & I.Moss; guests < Bah.Concert Orch.? ________

NOTE: Other evenings of foreign films are planned in addition to the above events. The dates will be added as they become fixed.

Datesar we subject to change.


I


lic road was blocked off by a
foreign businessman, pre-
venting an American
investor from getting to his
home.
The incident is the latest
in a string of flashpoints in
Rum Cay's recent history,
leading to open and bitter
conflict between several for-
eigners on the island.
Over Christmas and New
Year, Rum Cay locals suf-
fered a massive economic
setback when only two
yachts called in instead of
the usual 20 or more.
Residents claim news of
the island's many problems
has gone out over the Inter-
net, deterring the all-impor-
tant American yacht trade
from using island businesses.
Bar owner Mrs Delores
Wilson said yesterday that
she still has 26 left of the 40
cases of liquor she ordered
for the festive season a
clear indicator that Rum
Cay's ongoing strife is
killing its appeal for tourists.
She said during a normal
Christmas and New Year,
her order would have
exceeded 40 cases. Now she
is left with the surplus and
the knowledge that many of
the yachts that would usu-
ally call at Rum Cay went
to George Town, Exuma,
instead.

Peace

A local source told The
Tribune that direct inter-
vention is now required
from Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham and Police Com-
missioner Reginald Fergu-
son to ensure that peace is
restored to the embattled
island.
"This used to be a won-
derful, peaceful place," the
islander said, "Now we have
nothing but trouble, with
people threatening to kill
each other and endless dis-
putes over land and access
issues."
At the centre of yester-
day's dispute were Ameri-
cans Bobby Little Jr., whose
family has lived in Rum Cay
for many years, and Rhode
Island building contractor
Buz Gardiner, who claims
that Mr Little dropped boul-
ders on a public road, block-
ing access to his home. Mr
Little, in turn, claims the
land is his and that the road
is a private driveway.
The incident follows the
demolition of The Green
Flash restaurant at Sumner
Point late last year, when
another American Dave
Cummings alleged his
property was bulldozed
while he was away.
Tension is now so high on
Rum Cay that locals gen-
uinely fear the island econ-
omy will collapse because of
the greed and ruthlessness
of certain people.
They believe that central
government's intervention
is vital if the island's way of
life is to be preserved.
Mr Gardiner told The Tri-
bune yesterday: "I have
been here for abouf eight
years and have invested
close to half a million dol-
lars on the island.
"I have tried to be a good
neighbour .to islanders and
have tried to give them work
when I can. I was attracted
here by the peace and quiet
and the lovely people.
"But the place has become
a horror show. My wife
Cindy doesn't want to come
here anymore because of the
bad feeling. This latest inci-
dent means I can't get to my
home. It's crazy."
He said a rear entrance to
his property had also been
blocked by a back-hoe
belonging to Mr Little.
A Bahamian islander said:
"The natives are not at war.
We are right here in the
middle trying to keep the
peace. We would like to see
if the prime minister can


A LOCAL source said' *!,t direct
intervention is -iow required
from Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham (top) and Police
Commissioner Reginald
Ferguson (above).

help. The local police are
hopeless in this kind of situ-
ation we need officers hornom
Nassau to come in and sort
this out.
"We have been told by the
authorities that a public
road cannot be blocked in
any circumstances, and the
road in question here has
been a public road for as
long as anyone can remem-
ber."
Mr Gardiner said: "The
situation is just horrible.
When I first came here we
landed on a little grass
airstrip and I slept with my
windows open. Now I have
all my doors locked with a
knife next to my bed.

Frustrated
"It's bad for the locals
because they have nowhere
to go. I feel frustrated
because if I react to things
that are being done to me, I
will be the one to pay the
piper."
Meanwhile. Mr Little is
ad;.nant that he has done
noting wrong and that Mr
Garner and Mr Cummings
arc t,. blame for many of the
island's woes.
"I'l s road is my private
driveway, which they were
using for access to their
home. I told them they were
trespassing. These people
are creating havoc for my
family."
Mr Little also alleged he
had been the victim of a
murder attempt and that
Rum Cay had fallen foul of
criminal elements who had
infiltrated the island over
the last few years.
Referring to other Amer-
ican investors not Mr Gar-
diner and Mr Cummings -
he said: "Over 400 proper-
ties have been sold on Rum
Cay and only 25 of them
have proper documented
title."
He said he and his family
had begun developing Rum
Cay in 1991 "and everyone
on the island was like family
to me." But he said there
was now a need for govern-
ment to step in and conduct
"a 100 per cent investiga-
tion" into corruption on the
island.
Several legal actions are
now before the courts relat-
ing to various aspects of
Rum Cay's continuing trou-
bles, most of them centred
on land disputes and per-
sonal animosity.


THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2008, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE









RBC
Royal Bank
of Canada



PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE
Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each property.

H. SAPAHT 8 Tl AL BUIINGS


(401) Lots#17  CrownAllot-
ments, Love Hill Settlement,
Andros. Containing a two sto-
rey residence. Appraised value
$100,000.
(806) Lots#1 & #2, Block 3 with a
parcel situated between Lot #1,
Block 3, containing a 4 bedroom
condominium Sunset View Villas,
West Bay Street. Appraised value
$750,000.
(806) Lot#13, Block#4 of Coral
Waterways, Section One, Coral
Harbour, N.E with two houses
and a swimming pool, #312 New
Providence bounded northwardly
by a canal or waterway of the said
Subdivision known as Flamingo
waterway and running 102.004 ft
eastwardly by lot #14 and 146.145
ft southwardly by a reservation for
a private road. Appraised value
$530,000.
(433) Lot#27 ofVillage Allotment
#14 in the Eastern District, con-
taining residence situated on
Denver Street off Parkgate Road
in the Ann's Town Constituency,
New Providence. Property size
-2,500 sqft Building size 990 sq ft
Appraised value $50,000.
(304) Lot#2, Block#8, Steward
Rd, Coral Heights East Sub-
division situated in Western
District of New Providence -approx
size 8,800 sq ft with a split level
containing 2 bed, 2 bath, living,
dining & family rooms, kitchen
and utility room. Approx size of
building 2,658 sq ft. Appraised
value: $322,752.
(902) Lot#14, Block#23 (125ft
x 80ft) situated Rainbow Bay,
Eleuthera containing a one
storey house with 2 bed,
1 bath, kitchen, living room and
2 linen closets. Appraised value
$89,998.
(902) Lot of land 94 x 94 x 150 x
150 on Queens Highway just south
of Palmetto Point with a two sto-
rey stone building containing two
apartments. Each unit has 3 bed,
2 1/2 bath, kitchen, living room
and 3 linen closets. Appraised
value $287,209.
(100) Developed property
Pinder's, Long Island containing
a split level Mediterranean style
home with kitchen, living room,
dining room, master bed and
bath, two guest rooms, full and
half guest bathroom on lower


level. Also garage and breezeway
- a gross area 4,212 sqft. Kitchen-
ette, master bedroom and bath
and front entry porch features the
upper level, gross area of 780 sqft.
Porches all around the concrete
structure which is 90% complete.
Appraised value $650,000.
(400) Property situated in Cala-
bash Bay on the Island ofAndros.
75 ft x 150 ft and containing ther-
eon a small grocery store 480 sqft
and an incomplete 3 bed 2 bath
house 900 sqft. Appraised value
$65,000.
(702) Lot#20 with residential prop-
erty located Skyline Heights, N.P.
Appraised value $280,000.
(400) Lot #14 situated in the set-
tlement of Love Hill on the Island
of Andros totaling 20,000 sqft.
Property contains a two storey
5 bed, 3 bath residence. Appraised
value $185,000.
(902) Lot containing 3 bed, 2
bath residence situated in the
settlement of Governor's Har-
bour bounded northwardly by a
19ft road and running thereon
50ft eastwardly and running
thereon 100ft southwardly and
50 ft westwardly. Appraised value
$90,000.
(902) Lot (8,000 sqft) situated
Sand's Alley, North Palmetto
Point with incomplete triplex (con-
crete structure- belt course 2,529.6
sqft). Appraised value $49,414.
(105) Lot containing two storey
building. with 3 bed, 2 1/2 bath
residence, and 30 ft x 86 ft situated
Bailey Town, North Bimini.
Appraised value $235,000.
(203) Lot B situated on the
north side of Shell Fish Road,
being the third lot west of Fire
Trail Road and east of Hamster
Road with a one half duplex
residential premises. Appraised
value TBA.
(701) Lot#16 in Block #16
in Section 3 of the Subdivi-
sion called and known as Sea
Breeze Estates situated in
the Eastern District of New
Providence. Property con-
tains a 3 bed, 2 bath residence.
Apprasetf"valuerTjB3t- "
(701) Lot of lari4tbeing #11
in Bloc-k#10 on a plan of
allotments laid out by Village
Estates Limited and filed in


the Dept of Land & Surveys
as #142 N.E and situated in the
Eastern District of New Provi-
dence. Property contains 3 bed,
2 bath residence. Appraised
value TBA.
(565) Lot#1018 in Golden Gates
Estates #2 Sub situated in the
Southwestern District of the island
of New Providence containing a
single storey private residence
3 bed, 2 bath. Property approx
size 6,000 sq ft. Building approx
size 2,400 sq ft. Appraised value
$173,176.
(902) Lot of land containing res-
idence in North Palmetto Point
Eleuthera. Appraised value: TBA
(902) Lot of land containing a 2
storey 7 bed/2 bath single fam-
ily residence (2,234squarefeet)
located of Queens Highway in
Tarpum Bay Eleuthera. Appraised
value $77,000.
(902) Lot#31 situated at the
intersection of Albert & Victoria
Streets in Hatchet Bay contain-
ing a 2 storey concrete building
with an incomplete 2bed 1 bath
apt and store downstairs. Prop-
erty approx 2250 sqft. Appraised
value $65,000.
(902) Lot containing commer-
cial building housing a sports
bar, restaurant and a 2 storey
commercial building on Queens
Highway Tarpum Bay Eleuthera.
Value $180,000.
(808) Lot # 3 Block 24 in the
Centreville Subdivision Build-
ing #109/Eastern side of Collins
Avenue. Comprising commercial
2,800 sq'feet commercial building.
Appraised value $582,000
(108) Single Family Lot #5 Block
#5 Unit #1 Devonshire. Appraised
value TBA
(902) Lot #17 Block 7 in section"A"
of Eleuthera Island Shores Subdi-
vision Northwest of Hatchet Bay
containing a 3 bed/2 bath house.
Appraised value $99,000.00
(601) Lot #17 located Village
Allotment with fourplex value
- $500,000
(901) Lot #32 containing bedroom
2bath concrete structure located
Triana Shores Harbour, Island,
Eleuthera. Property size 80' x 120'
x80' 120 feet. Appraised valued at
$332,735.


VACANTPROPERT IES


(565) Vacant lot #5 located Eleu-
thera Island Shores, Seaside Drive
Section B, Block #15, Eleuthera,
Bahamas. 9,691 sqft. Appraised
value $27,619.92.
(902) 0.281 acre of vacant land off
Queen's Highway in the settlement
of Governor's Harbour, Eleuthera.
Appraised value $31,320.
(800) Vacant property located
Bahamia South. Block 16 lot 9A,
Freeport, Grand Bahama consist-
ing of 24,829.20sqft. Appraised value
$52,000
(565) Vacant Lot #9 (11,406.65 sq.
ft.) situated in Mango Lane Sec-
tion "B" Block#15, Eleuthera Island
Shores on the Island of Eleuthera.
Appraised value $50,189.
(701) Undeveloped lot #149. Sea-
fan Lane, Lucayan Beach Subdivi-
sion. Grand Bahama, 18750 sqft.
Appraised value: TBA


(402) Lot 89, Block 7 Aberdeen Drive,
BahamiaWest Replat Subdivision,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, consist-
ing of 12,100 sqft. Appraised value
$51,000.
(902) Lot #46, Block #32, Baha-
mia. Section IX Freeport, Grand
Bahama 90 ft wide along Stratford
Way and 150 ft along Stratford Court.
Appraised value $26,000.
(723) Vacant lot #20 comprising a
portion of the Murphy Town Crown
Allotment # 72 situated in Murphy
Town, Abaco Bahamas.
Appraised value $18,000.00,
(724) Vacant lot # 67A of Section 2
of the said Subdivision known as
"Whale Point Estates" in the vicinity
of Bottom Harbour and extending
from Whale Point to Cotton Hole in
the Northern section of the Island
of Eleuthera. Appraised value
$36,000
(108) Single Family Lot #57 Blck7


# Chesapeake Subdivision (no util-
ities), Freeport, Grand Bahama.
Appraised value$18,000.
(108) Single Family Lot #5 Block
#21 Leicester County (no utilities),
Freeport, Grand Bahama. Appraised
value $6,000.
(101) Tourist Commercial Canal
Lot #71 Silver Cove Subdivision,
Freeport Grand Bahama. Appraised
value $175,000
(902) VacantLots #'s 5 &6 inBlock3
of Club Estates Subdivision located
North of Rock Sound Eleuthera com-
prising of 1.48 acres. Appraised value
$55,000.00
(902) Vacant lot of land situated
in South Palmetto Point Eleuthera
measuring 97x127x82x121.
Appraised value $38,000.00
(601) Lot located Fort Fincastle -
value $25,000


"OFFI C


COMMERCIAL
BANKING CENTRE
Tel: 242-356-8568
(800) Mrs. Monique Crawford
(802) Mr. Brian Knowles
(805) Mr. Jerome Pinder
(806) Mrs Lois Hollis
(807) Mr. Lester Cox
(808) Mrs. DaShann Clare-Paul
PALMDALE SHOPPING
CENTRE BRANCH
Tel: 242-322-4426/9
or 242-302-3800
(201) Ms. Nicola Walker
(202) Mr. Frank Dean
(203) Mrs. Cedricka Clarke
NASSAU INT'L AIRPORT
Tel: 242-377-7179
(433) Mrs. Suzette Hall-Moss
GOVERNOR'S HARBOUR,
ELEUTHERA
Tel: 242-332-2856/8
(902) Mr. Brian Hanna
HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH
Tel: 242-333-2230
(901) Ms. Velderine Laroda


ANDROS TOWN
Tel: 242-368-2071
(400) Mrs. Rose Bethel
NASSAU MAIN BRANCH
Tel: 242-322-8700
(701) Mrs. Stephanie Saunders
(702) Ms. Cherelle
Martinborough
JFK DRIVE BRANCH
Tel: 242-325-4711
(401) Mr. James Strachan
(402) Mrs. Chandra Gilbert
PRINCE CHARLES
SHOPPING CENTRE
Tel: 242-393-7505/8
(501) Mr. Keith Lloyd
(505) Ms. Patricia Russell
CABLE BEACH
Tel: 242-327-6077
(466) Mris. Winnifred Roberts
MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO
Tel: 242-367-2420
(908) Mr. Antonio Eyma
(909) Mrs. Sylvia Poitier
(910) Mrs. Vanessa Scott
BIMINI BRANCH
Tel: 242-347-3031
(105) Mr. Kermit Curry


GRAY'S, LONG ISLAND
Tel: 242-337-0101
(100) Mrs Lucy Wells
LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE
Tel: 242-394-3560
(716) Mrs. Ingrid Simon
(717) Mrs. Nancy Swaby
(723) Ms. Deidre King
(724) Mrs. Faye Higgs
(725) Ms. Marguerite Johnson
(565) Mrs. Catherine Davis
MACKEY STREET
Tel: 242-393-3097
(601) Mrs. Anastacia Knowles
BAY & VICTORIA BRANCH
Tel: 242-322-2451/3
(301) Ms. Thyra Johnson
(303) Mr, Desmond McIntosh
(304) Mrs. Alicia Thompson
FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH
Tel: 242-352-6631/2
(101) Ms. Garnell Frith
(103) Mrs. Damita Newbold-
Cartwright
(104) Ms. Jackie Knowles
(108) Ms. Sylvie Carey


Australian Chief Justice visits Governor General


ANTHONY M GLEESON, AC, Chief Justice of Australia paid a courtesy call on Governor General Arthur
Hanna at Government House yesterday. Standing from left are: Indira Francis-Demeritte, registrar of the
Court of Appeal; Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall; Governor General Arthur Hanna; Anthony M Gleeson;
Robyn Gleeson, wife of Chief Justice Gleeson.









1.



















GOVERNOR GENERAL Arthur Hanna, left, greets Anthony M Gleeson, AC, Chief Justice of Australia at a
coittesy call at G government House yesterday.
,. -. .










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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, THURSDAY JANUARY 3, 2008


remises








THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2008, PAGE 9


LOCANW


Further delay to

the PLP's senate

challenge

FROM page one

delayed to January 15 and 16.
"That (hearing) did not
happen. Any objections
which they (the FNM) may
raise will be raised on the 15
and 16 (of January)," Paul
Adderley, who represents the
opposition, said during a tele-
phone interview on Wednes-
day.
Issues stemming from the
preliminary application will
be heard from both sides
along with the substantive
arguments of the case, said
attorney Loren Klein, who
represents Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham.
According to previous
reports, the preliminary appli-
cation calls for the removal
of certain paragraphs of the
affidavits filed and the
attached exhibits, including
parts of the written corre-
spondence between opposi-
tion leader Perry Christie and
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham in relation to last year's
senate appointments.
Subsequently, these refer-
ences would not be permissi-
ble as evidence in the case.
In November 2007, Mr
Adderley argued in court that
the correspondence between
the two party leaders was the
crux of the PLP's case saying,
"The whole case is dependent
on them."
He further argued that the
letters made it evident that
the prime minister had made
up his mind "a long time ago"
as it related to the senate
appointments without first
consulting with the opposi-
tion leader.
The PLP maintains that the
appointment of Tanya Wright
to the senate was unlawful.
In accordance with Article 40
of The Bahamas' constitution
the senate seat held by Ms
Wright should have lawfully
been appointed to a member
of the opposition, the PLP has
argued.
However the FNM con-
tends that under the consti-
tution, the prime minister has
the authority to make three
senate appointments with or
without the consent of the
opposition leader.

Wom robbed
FROM page one

According to ASP Wal-
ter Evans, the officer was
in the area of West Bay
Street, just west of Arawak
Cay, around 11 pm Tues-
day when he saw two men
walking from under a
coconut tree towards a car.
The officer became suspi-
cious as the two persons
sped off. The officer
searched the area where
the two men had been and
discovered the shot gun
along with three live
rounds of ammunition as
well as an imitation hand-
gun.


FROM page one


represent them in bringing
action against Ms Bridgewater,"
he said from his Grand Bahama
office during a telephone inter-
view with The Tribune on
Wednesday.
Many of the persons cited on
Ms Bridgewater's petition took
offence to allegations that "they
have behaved fraudulently and
dishonestly" by voting in Marco
City, Mr Smith added.
The election court case for
the Grand Bahama constituen-
cy is slated to begin January 21,
however, on January-8 the
Supreme Court in Nassau will
hear Mr Zhirvargo Laing's
strike-out application after
which justices will decide the
fate of the hearing.
The strike-out motion was
filed on November 14, 2007.
The motion also requests that
Ms Bridgewater pay Minister
Laing's court fees.
Mr Smith said both he and
his client are secure inthebelief
that Ms Bridgewater's petition
will not succeed.
"We are very confident that
Ms Bridgewater will not suc-
ceed in her petition (and) we
have filed an application to
strike out (that) petition," he
said.
According to Mr Smith, the
former MP's petition argues
that 100 people allegedly vot-
ed illegally in Marco City during
the May 2 general election. Of
that number, the opposition
contends 20 were not citizens
of Grand Bahama while 80
were not "ordinarily resident"
* in the Marco City constituen-
cy.
"On top of that (Pleasant
Bridgewater) said she knew
they were not citizens or resi-
dents before the election. The
question is why didn't she chal-
lenge them on the day of the
election?" he questioned.
"We dispute such allegations
made by her and if there is a
trial she will be put to strict
proof of her allegations."


Senator

'could be sued'

Several attempts were made
to contact Philip "Brave" Davis
counsel for Pleasant Bridgewa-
ter for comment, but The Tri-
bune's calls were not returned
up to press time yesterday.
The strike-out motion argues
for the petition to be dismissed
on the grounds that an election
court does not have jurisdiction
to engage in the adjudication of
the matters raised by the peti-
tioner (Ms Bridgewater) and
that the constitutional rights of
the 100 persons to a fair hearing
in respect of their criminal and
civil rights will be breached.
If Zhirvargo Laing's strike-
out application is unsuccessful
and the matter proceeds to trial
his legal team believes there is
still a possibility the proceed-
ings will be held in Grand
Bahama. Attorneys for both
sides have voiced the desire in
the past to have the case heard
on that island.
"There is such a possibility
(of the case being heard in
Freeport) and we wish to
encourage that possibility," Mr
Smith said yesterday. With
more than 100 witnesses expect-
ed to be called to the stand if
the matter proceeds, the attor-
ney said it would be a logistical
and "expensive nightmare"
arranging for travel to Nassau
and living accommodations of
the witnesses.
In May Mr Laing, who is also
Minister of State for Finance,
ousted the former MP by 47
votes. The Marco City con-
stituency is one of three being
challenged through the election
court process.
The first of the three,
Pinewood, commenced in Octo-
ber 2007 and concluded late last
month. A decision has yet to be
given on the matter.
The case for the Blue Hills
constituency begins in April.


New cruise ship

FROM page one

wegian Cruise Line has chosen to make economically struggling
Grand Bahama part of its newest ship's itinerary.
The Norwegian Gem's captain Mikael Hilden explained %iat
his ship sails on seven-day cruises from New York to the Bahamas
for 15.weeks in.tjp Wiptfrjaod Spring seasons. In the summer, the
Norwegian Gem will make Barcelona, Spain, its home base and
travel throughout the Mediterranean.
Captain Hilden said that the Bahamas is very attractive to the
NCL because of its climate. Nassau, he added, is of particular
interest because of the proximity of Prince George Dock to down-
town's shopping opportunities.
He noted that despite yesterday's inclement weather, numerous
passengers and crew members still made their way onto Bay Street
to shop and sightsee.
Officially welcoming the Norwegian Gem to the Bahamas, Min-
ister Grant yesterday assured Captain Hilden that the Bahamian
people will do all that is necessary to ensure that the ship's pas-
sengers enjoy their days in port, especially in New Providence and
Grand Bahama.
The Norwegian Gem is the newest in the NCL's fleet of cruise lin-
ers.
Like its sister ship, Norwegian Pearl, Gem offers so-called
"freestyle cruising."
Captain Hilden explained that this means that passengers can
dine whenever they want at whichever of the 12 restaurants they
want, and can enjoy numerous activities such as bowling and rock
climbing.
In addition to the numerous restaurants, the Norwegian Gem can
also boast of some 11 bars and lounges, a movie theatre and exclu-
sive courtyard villas and garden villas.


FROM page one
In response to comments regarding the post-
ponement, Mr Moultrie denied that the parade
was postponed because the groups were not
ready to compete.
"I saw comments in the Freeport News
today (Tuesday) by some persons who were
interviewed as to what they thought about the
postponement of the parade. I want to inform
the public that the parade was not postponed
because certain groups were not ready," he
said.
Mr Moultrie explained that the parade can
only be postponed or cancelled for three rea-
sons: bad weather with rain and winds sus-
tained at over 20mph, civil disobedience, and
power failure in the vicinity of the parade
route.
"Those are the three conditions in which a
parade is postponed or cancelled. The groups
have months to prepare and they know the
deadline and if they are not ready the parade
will go on without them," he said.
Of the nine groups on Grand Bahama, eight
will be participating in this year's parade. They
are: the defending champions, Classic Dancers,
Swingers, Harbour Boys, Superstar Rockers,
Victory Boys, Arawak Invaders, Rotary Club,
and the Bushwackers.
The Majestic Crusaders will not be compet-
ing this year because of lack of funding as a
result of insufficient sponsorship.
Mr Moultrie said that several group leaders
supported the Committee's decision to post-
pone the parade.
"I spoke with four of the major group lead-
ers and they were very happy that we did in
fact cancel the parade because the rain started
after 7pm and we would not have completed
the first lap within that time period.
And it would have made it extremely diffi-
cult to make a decision because some groups
would have got their costumes wet and ruined
and it would not be fair to make a determina-
tion," he said.
Mr Moultrie felt it was important to call an
early postponement so that persons travelling
and food vendors would have sufficient notice.
"In Grand Bahama, we normally consult
with weather officials five days in advance.
We again on yesterday (Monday) consulted
with both the Freeport Weather Department
and the Bahamas Met Office in Nassau, and
both offices were saying the same thing, that
we were going to get rained on around 7pm
and that it would be in our best interest to
postpone.
"And the decision was made on the best
information available and we did not want
people, including the Minister (of Culture)
and his party, and other fans from Nassau who
were coming on the 7pm flight, to come here
and spend all that money, knowing that we
probably would have to postpone, so we had to
make an early call.
"The public may be second guessing us as to
why we called an early postponement, but
there are a number of factors that have to be
taken under consideration.
"There are economic factors for our food
vendors, and we could not afford for them to
cook their food and at the last minute cancel,


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which would have resulted in significant loss
es to them," he said.
Mr Moultrie ?aid that forecasters are report-
ing good weather conditions for SaturdaY',
parade.
"Right now, they are telling us that there
will be no weather systems in our general area
on Saturday. We expect it to be cool, but the
wind will drop off," he said.
Mr Moultrie said this is not the first time
that the New Year's Junkanoo parade was
postponed on Grand Bahama.
"When I was chairman between 1992 and
2002, we had four postponements in that 10-
year period and that is how we ended up w'th
the evening junkanoo because of the post
ponements of the early morning eadly
parades," he said.



Cruise ship crew

member found dead

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
BERRY Island Police are investigating th-.
sudden death of a crew member found dead
onboard the Norwegian cruise ship, Gem, it
Stirrup Cay on New Year's Day.
Supt Mackey said that at about 3.25pm on
January 1, police visited Sturrup Cay and went
on board the Norwegian Gem, where they
spoke to the Chief Security Officer.
She said police were informed that Napoleoa
Fernandez,~-34, of India, was found dead in his
cabin.
Supt Mackey said he was pronounced dead at
1.55pm by the physician on board who respu;od-
ed to a medical call.
She said foul play is not suspected in the
man's death. Investigations are still contain ,-
ing.
ARMED ROBBERY ON GB.
Grand Bahama Police are investigating ani
armed robbery that occurred at the Road Way
Foodstore in Lucaya on December 31.
According to reports, a female cashier told
police that at about 9.30pm she was held up
and robbed of cash by an armed gunman at the
store on Midshipman Road.
The police visited the foodstore, located at
Cooper's Service Station. The woman said the
gunman was a tall, slim dark man dressed in
blue jeans, grey hooded jacket and a i-'d :lni
mask, and armed with a black handgun.
Supt Mackey said persons with inform i Io
that could assist police with their investigations
should call 350-3107/8 or 911.
She also reminded business operators to
secure cash periodically from the cashier rcgis-
ter until their deposits can be made at the bank.


<:*a.r "






PAGE 10, THURDAY JA


PHOTO
i


A JEWEL OF A CRUISE SHIP! NORWEGIAN


Taking you where you want to go.
A dynamically styled notchback sedan with a generous amount of space
for passengers and luggage.


THE new 965-foot Norwegian Gem cruise
ship has chosen the Bahamas as its home
base. The country's economy could benefit
from an annual financial injection of over
three million dollars. In addition to the
numerous restaurants, the Norwegian Gem
can also boast of some 11 bars and lounges,
a movie theatre and exclusive courtyard vil-


las


and garden villas.


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TOURISM MINISTER Neko Grant being interviewed by the Press on
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Invites you to
^. --- "tHOLY SPIRIT ENCOUNTER CONFERENCE 2008
Monday, January 7th -Friday January 11th, 2008
7:30 p.m. nightly 5 nights of:
SEEKING, SOAKING, SANCTIFICATION, IMPARTATION
AND MANIFESTATION!
Speakers include:
Minister Kim L. Sweeting- Family of Faith Ministries Int'l
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Dr Kennedy Williams- Vision for Life Ministries Intl
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Sunday @ 7:00 a.m. Prayer Sundays @ 8:00 a.m. Prophetic Praise and Holy
Spirit Encounter- 1st Sundays @ 6:00 p.m. Prophetic Service


PHOTOS:
Derek Smith/BIS


I


LOCAL NEWS


I HE IHRIBUNE .


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2008


i









SPECIAL A N


GEM CELEBRATES INAUGURAL VOYAGE


THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2008, PAGE 11


THE GRAND PACIFIC dining room on board the Norwegian Gem. It is one of the 12 restaurants on
the new ship.


10 D
QUALITY
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today can be used for a lifetime.
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limited only by your imagination.


TOURISM MINISTER Neko Grant gets a special tour of the Nor-
wegian Gem by the ship's staff.


Unless ewe
photos j I ar by0rks iw


we are moving
on January 7 our BahamaHealth office
will be relocating to new offices
on Church and East Bay Streets
On January 7, 2008our BahamaHealth Office at Harbour Bay Shopping Centre will move
to new offices on Church and East Bay Streets.
Visit or call BahamaHealth at our convenient new location.
Please not6, parking can be accessed from East Bay Street onto Alice Street. .
S., Telephone 396-1300
S. ," Fax 396-1301 or 396-1302


m W FAMILY GUARDIAN
INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED
CHURCH AND EAST BAY STREETS, NASSAU, BAHAMAS RP.O. BOX SS 19079
o


THE TRIBUNE


+












Conservationists condemn F

plans for Alaskan Arctic Fwer crashes mark 2007 as


Ocean petroleum leases
ANCHORAGE, Alaska

The U.S. government will open up nearly 46,000 square miles
(119,140 sq. kilometers) off Alaska's northwest coast to petroleum
leases next month, a decision condemned by environmental groups
that say the industrial activity will harm marine mammals.
The Minerals Management Service said Wednesday it would
hold a lease sale Feb. 6 for bidding on the outer continental shelf
lands in the Chukchi Sea, the part of the Arctic Ocean that begins
north of the Bering Strait and stretches between northwest Alaska
and the northern coast of the Russian Far East.
It would be the first federal oil and gas lease sale in the Chukchi
Sea since 1991. Minerals Management Service Alaska spokes-
woman Robin Cacy said the area contains an estimated 15 billion
barrels of conventionally recoverable oil and 77 trillion cubic feet
(2.18 trillion cubic metres) of conventionally recoverable natural
gas.
The Chukchi Sea is home to one of two U.S. polar bear popula-
tions. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is days away from decid-
ing whether polar bears should be declared threatened because of
globalwarming and its effect on the animal's primary habitat, sea ice.
"The polar bear's existence is increasingly threatened by the
impact of climate change-induced loss of sea ice," said Margaret
Williams, managing director of World Wildlife Fund's :aincaatka
and Bering Sea Program. "The chances for the continued survival
of this icon of the Arctic will be greatly diminished if its last
remaining critical habitat is turned into a vast oil and gas field."
Polar bears spend most of their lives on sea ice. They use sea ice
for to hunt their primary prey, ringed seals. In Alaska, females use
sea ice to den or to reach denning areas on land.
Arctic sea ice this summer plummeted to the lowest levels since
satellite measurements began in 1979, according to the National
Snow and Ice Data Center at the University of Colorado.
Brendan Cummings of the Center for Biological Diversity, one
of the organizations that filed the petition seeking polar bear pro-
tections, said protections for marine mammals are insufficient.
"The polar bear is in need of intensive care, but with this lease
sale the Bush Administration is proposing to burn down the hos-
pital," Cummings said.
Drilling could take place no closer than 50 miles (80 kilometres)
off shore.
The sale area will not include nearshore waters ranging from
about 25 to 50 miles (40 to 80 kilometres) from the coast, Mineral
Management Service director Randall Luthi said. That buffer
includes a nearshore "polynya" through which bowhead and bel-
uga whales, other marine mammals, and marine birds migrate
north in the spring, and in which local communities subsistence
hunt.
Two sales have been held in the Chukchi Sea Planning Area pre-
viously in 1988 and 1991. All of those leases have expired.
A lack of sea ice last summer forced much of the Chukchi Sea's
walrus population to take to shore. Unlike seals, walruses cannot
swim indefinitely and must "haul out" on ice or land to rest. The
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has not analyzed aerial photographs
to do an official count but estimate that as many as 6,000 walruses
hauled out on the coast that parallels the lease area because they did
not have the sea ice to use as a platform for foraging on clams,
snails, crabs, shrimps and worms on the ocean bottom.
On the Russian side of the Chukchi Sea, biologists recorded
huge herds gathering on shore instead of the pack ice, including one
group of up to 40,000 animals at Point Shmidt, a spot that had not
been used by walruses as a haul out for a century. Russian biologists
estimate that 3,000 to 4,000 animals were crushed in stampedes
when polar bears and hunters low-flying aircraft startled walruses
and sent them rushing to the safety of the sea.


good year for aviation safety

* GENEVA


Aviation is becoming safer
every year and 2007 saw the low-
est number of crashes in 44 years,
an independent watchdog group
said yesterday, according to the
Associated Press.
But the Geneva-based Aircraft
Crashes Record Office said some
countries, including the Democ-
ratic Republic of Congo, Indone-
sia, and Colombia, were slower
to improve airline safety.
There were 136 serious acci-
dents in 2007, the fewest since
1963; ACRO said. It said 965
people died in crashes last year
a 25 percent drop from the
previous year.
Most crashes involved small,
propeller-powered planes,
ACRO said. Larger jets account-
ed for only a quarter of accidents,
but carried the highest fatality
figures because of the greater
number of passengers.
Preliminary estimates by the
International Air Transport
Association showed air travel
increased by more than 3 per-
cent in 2007 to about 2.2 billion
passengers.
While industry experts differ
on just how safe last year was -
it depends on what is classified as
a serious accident they agree
that the overall trend in airline
safety is good.
"We're operating at such a
high level of safety that even one
or two accidents can skew the
numbers tremendously," IATA
spokesman Anthony Concil told
The Associated Press.
The July 17 crash in Brazil of a
Tam Linhas Aereas SA jetliner,
which slammed into a building
in Sao Paulo and killed 199 peo-
ple was the worst single accident
of 2007.
Europe, which had no major
accidents in 2007, and North
America, where the figure of 34
accidents is relatively low com-
pared to the large number of
flights, are leading the way on
safety, said Concil.
According to a tally of inci-
dents listed on the Aircraft
Crashes Record Office Web site,
the number of people killed in
airline accidents in the United


FIREFIGHTERS, left, carry remains from the crash of a TAM airlines commercial jet in Sao Paulo, in this
July 18, 2007, file photo.


States dropped from 75 in 2006
to 66 last year.
If systems on the ground in the
U.S. were brought to the same
level as those in modem planes,
then it would even be possible
to have more takeoffs and land-
ings from the same airports with-
out endangering safety, Concil
said.
The added benefit would be
fewer delays at notorious
hotspots such as New York's
John F. Kennedy and New Jer-
sey's Newark airport, he said.
Council said other parts of the
world still have a long way to go
on safety, noting the loss of over
120 lives last year in two sepa-
rate accidents in Indonesia as
well as Africa's continuing poor
safety record, exemplified by the
crash of a Kenya Airways plane
in May with 114 fatalities.
According to Jim Burin, direc-
tor of technical programs at the
Washington-based Flight Safety
' Foundation, air traffic officials
in developing countries are strug-
gling with limited numbers of
trained staff and poor imple-


mentation of existing rules. "The
oversight, particularly in Africa,
is not as strong as it could be"
and many of the planes are old
and poorly maintained, said
Burin. By contrast he said, the
airline'industry in Indonesia has
become a victim of its own suc-
cess -"growing so rapidly that
sometimes they get ahead of
themselves."
China, where the number of
flights isalso increasing ata phe-
nomenal rate each year, is much
stricter wheirit comes to airline
regulation and has a more suc-
cessful safety record to show for
it, Burin said
Other countries, such as Rus-
sia, manaedto turn theirindus-
try around last year after two
very serious accidents in 2006.
"Russia went from the worst in
the league to the best" by imple-
menting a series- of safety mea-
sures based'on IATA standards,
said Concil.
The industry group recently
agreed to exclude any carrier that
does not undergo an audit every
two years, and customers will


soon be able to see on the IATA
Web site which companies have
done so and which have not, he
said.
For Burin the fear of accidents
will always be present among
some passengers, whatever the
safety figures show.
"If you told someone your
chances are one in five million
of something happening, I don't
think people would be too con-
cerned. Yet we have a crash or
two and everyone gets worried
about flying" he said.
The aim, said Burin, should be
to bring global accident levels
down to those in the U.S. and
Europe, where incidents happen
in only one in 1.5 million depar-
tures. Only about a third of those
result in casualties.
One of the ways of doing this
is to raise the retirement age of
pilots in order to keep the most
experienced crew in the cockpit,
said Burin. According to IATA
the industry is currently some
4,000 pilots a year short of what it
needs to keep up with rising air
traffic demand.


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2008


THE TRIBUNE










T HE T R I B U N E


0


THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2008


SECTION B uneTcdiaoet


Bahamas First eyes Ql-end



for Turks expansion plans


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
Bahamas First Holdings, the par-
ent of Bahamian general insur-
er Bahamas First, closed the
deal to sell a 20 per cent stake
to a major Canadian insurer on Decem-
ber 18, with the Bahamian carrier looking
to complete its expansion to Turks &
Caicos by the end of the 2008 first quarter.
Patrick Ward, Bahamas First's president
and chief executive, said yesterday that
the company obtained all the necessary


Sale of 20% stake to Economical Insurance Group closed

December 18, with all regulatory approvals in place


government approvals for its equity
alliance with The Economical Insurance
Group by mid-December 2007.
"We signed the deal with them on Octo-
ber 18 with all the regulatory approvals in
hand," Mr Ward confirmed, Bahamas First
having obtained all the necessary permis-
sions from the Registrar of Insurance, Cen-


tral Bank of the Bahamas, National Eco-
nomic Council (NEC) really the Cabinet
- and the Securities Commission.
One advantage from the deal with the
Canadian general insurance carrier, Mr
Ward said, was that it would "assist us in
how we chart our course in the future with
regard to expansion", as Bahamas First


looks beyond the Bahamian borders at
other Caribbean territories.
The Bahamas First president said the
necessary regulatory approvals for it to
begin selling insurance policies in the Turks

See EXPANSION, 10B


BISX stocks forecast


to appreciate 12-15%


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
STOCKS listed
on the Bahamas
International
Exchange (BISX)
should appreciate
in value by a col-
lective 12-15 per
cent during
2008,m a leading
investment ana-
lyst told The Tri-
bune yesterday,
with much depending on the
overall performance of the
Bahamian and US economies.
Kenwood Kerr, chief executive
of Providence Advisors, said the
BISX All-Share Index, which
closed 2007 up by 22-23 per cent
for the year, would appreciate at
a lesser rate for 2008-given the
uncertainty surrounding the US
economy's performance and the
likely knock-on effect for the
Bahamas.
"I feel comfortable that 12-15
per cent is a fair prediction," Mr
Kerr said, "which is less than the
23 per cent it did for this year."
He acknowledged, though, that
the slower growth rate for the
Bahamian economy had already


been factored in, with the Gov-
ernment, International Monetary
Fund (IMF) and analysts trim-
ming GDP growth forecasts to 3-
3.5 per cent, down from 4-4.5 per
cent.
It was also unclear what would
happen to the US, some believing
it would slip into recession during
the 2008 first half, while others
felt that while it would slowdown,
such a scenario would be avoided.
Mr Kerr, though, said BISX's
performance would largely be dic-
tated how financial services and
. banking stocks chiefly First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas), but also FINCO,
Bank of the Bahamas Interna-
tional, Fidelity Bank (Bahamas)
and Commonwealth Bank -
would perform. Any economic
slow down, he warned, would
have a knock-on effect on those
stocks.
However, Mr Kerr said
Bahamian stocks did not trade
on "pure fundamentals".
He added: "Smart money,
which is supposed to be the
sophisticated institutional
investor, does not come in when
prices are overvalued to sell, or

See BISX, 2B


70% of contractors

'had no major work'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
SOME 70 per cent of con-
struction companies who regis-
tered at the $1.4 billion Albany
project's job fair had no major
work going on, the Bahamian.
Contractors Association's (BCA)
president revealed yesterday,.
indicating just how tough the 2007
second half became for the indus-
try.
Stephen Wrinkle, who is also
president of Wrinkle Develop-
ment Company, told The Tribune
that "seven out of 10 companies
did not have anything going on"
when they registered with the
Albany developers at the job fair
late last year, which was organ-
ised in conjunction with the BCA
and Department of Labour.
"It's been a very tough year for
the, construction industry. Here
we are on January 2, and none of
these projects have got the green
light," Mr Wrinkle said, refer-
ring to the likes of Albany, Baha
Mar's $2.4 billion Cable Beach
redevelopment, and the Rose
Island Ritz-Carlton project.
After construction work on
Kerzner International's Phase III
expansion of its Atlantis and One
& Only Ocean Club Resorts on
Paradise Island concluded in
April-May 2007, Mr Wrinkle indi-
cated that there was a dearth of
major projects for Bahamian con-


tractors to get their teeth into, as
they waited for developers to
finalise their agreements and
approvals with the Government.
' The May 2 general election,
and subsequent change in gov-
ernment, also delayed matters, as
the FNM administration reviewed
all the Heads of Agreements and
public works contracts entered
into by its predecessor Christie
government.
While many would not expect a
new government to give an auto-
matic green light to the projects
left behind by the PLP govern-
ment, and agree that it should
review them, there is now a feel-
ing that this review process is tak-
ing too long.
The Christie government had
planned that when construction
work on Atlantis was concluded,
those contractors and construc-
tion industry employees would
be able to switch to Cable Beach,
where Baha Mar was ready to get
going.
That never happened, though,
partly because the PLP adminis-
tration delayed on signing a sup-
plemental Heads of Agreement
to allow Baha Mar to proceed
prior to the general election.
Mr Wrinkle yesterday
expressed concerns that the
Bahamian workforce, and espe-

See ALBANY, 2B


Insurer hopes property rates are 'less volatile'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
COMMERCIAL and residen-
tial property insurance premiums
for 2008.are likely to mirror those
charged last year, Bahamian gen-
eral insurers told The Tribune
yesterday, with one company
expressing hope that the rates
would become "less volatile" and
ease inflationary pressures.
Steve Watson, RoyalStar
Assurance's managing director,
said of property premiums: "We
just see it as being a flat renewal -
no increase, but no reduction. We
don't see much change from our
perspective. We see the same
thing in 2008 as in 2007."
He was supported by Timothy
Ingraham, Summit Insurance
Company's general manager and
director, who said there were
unlikely to be "any significant
changes" in property insurance
premiums for 2008.
He pointed out that many


* General insurers say commercial and residential property
premiums likely 'flat' in 2008 compared to 2007
* Many carriers selling property 'at or a little below cost', suffering squeeze
after reinsurers raised rates in 2005 with them unable to follow suit
* More stable rates would lower inflationary pressures, with home, contents
and auto premiums accounting for six week's salary or $9,000


Bahamian general insurers had
been selling commercial and res-
idential property insurance "at a
little below cost" over the past
two years, meaning that some
were either not making a profit or
generating a loss on their proper-
ty portfolios.
Mr Ingraham explained that
this situation occurred after prop-
erty premium rates increased in
2005, in the aftermath of the 2004
hurricane season, which includ-
ed Frances and Jeanne.
Then, while the Bahamas was
not impacted, the 2005 storm sea-


son proved to be one of the most
active ever, with hurricanes such
as Katrina and Rita wreaking
havoc elsewhere and generating
billions of dollars in insurance
claims.
Reinsurers increased their rates
to compensate for such losses, but
Mr Ingraham said that having
already raised their rates,
Bahamian general insurers could
not increase premium prices fur-
ther.
As a result, they were squeezed
when reinsurance rates went up;
while premiums charged to


Bahamian commercial and resi-
dential property owners remained
flat.
"We couldn't push through a
whole lot more, because we put
rates up in 2p005 after the 2004
losses," Mr Ingraham said.
On prospects for 2008, he
added: "It's still a bit early to say
for sure, but I don't see any sig-
nificant changes.... The major
reinsurers haven't given any huge
reduction in general insurance

See RATES, 8B


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CAREER OPPORTUNITY


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Minimum of eight (8) years experience must possess a degree from
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Resumes can be forwarded to email:
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FROM page 1

cially the construction industry,
would be overstretched and sim-
ply unable to meet developers'
demands in 2008 with work on
Albany, Baha Mar, the Rose
Island Ritz-Carlton and the rede-
velopment of Lynden Pindling
International Airport all set to
start at around the same time.
He added yesterday that there
was "no co-ordination between
the Government, industry and
developers" in terms of the
sequencing for these projects,
something the Bahamas desper-
ately needed.
Mr Wrinkle had previously told
The Tribune: "They've bottled it
up and are about to unleash this
genie. I see over $5 billion worth
of work that they have committed
to starting between Nassau and
Rose Island in the next 120 days.
"I just don't know how it's
going to happen. I don't know
anywhere else in the world where
this level of development is going


WONDIG PAY



Entry level Marketing role
Excellent communication and administrative skills
Highly motivated self-starter
Flexible schedule (weekdays/weekends/holidays as
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Ability to follow standard (and detailed) office/
administrative procedures.
Professional appearances and demeanor.
Computer literacy
Exceptional skills in long range guest relationship
ifaintenance.-
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Please send resumes to

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P.O. BoxAB20571
Marsh Harbour Abaco
humanresources@theabacoclub.com
Or

Fax: 242-367-0392







Three(3) fully equipped operatories
located in large multispecialty
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Available for immediate occupancy for
full-time or sessional dental practice.

Contact:

Ms. Kaijanna Lockhart

Phone: 242-373-7400


Do you have to spend more than just a few days in
Nassau or Freeport and need somewhere to live? Do
you want to save money and not pay tourist
charges for a small cramped up hotel room?
Then check out Stop-n-shop home away from home program.
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Must have a reliable

vehicle and be able to

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Applications are avail-

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Tribune's front desk. No

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on, so the whole Bahamian work-
force is going to be challenged in
stepping up to the plate to meet
this."
Given the well-documented
education problems in the
Bahamas, the supply of skills as
well as the sheer number of work-
ers is likely to be inadequate to
meet developer needs, forcing
them to import increasing quan-
tities of expatriate labour.
Meanwhile, Mr Wrinkle said
the draft Contractors Bill had
been disseminated to all BCA
members, and the organisation
was now awaiting feedback from
them before trying to schedule a
meeting with the Ministry of
Works and Attorney General's
Office to discuss this.
"We're just waiting on the final
comments from the stakeholders.
As soon as we've got all of them,
we will sit down and meet with
Mr Deveaux [the minister of
works] and the Attorney Gener-
al's Office to go through all the
comments," Mr Wrinkle said.
"For our part, we'll definitely
be meeting with him in January."
The proposed Bill will call for a
classification of skills based on
educational qualifications and
experience, such as unskilled,
semi-skilled and fully skilled.
All contractors will be licensed
according to their areas of exper-
tise and the contracts and work
they can perform, enabling the
Bahamian construction industry
to have set standards and
recourse against unscrupulous
contractors.
A Contractors Board would be
formed to not only hear cases
involving contractors who per-
formed bad work, but also cases
where a contractor may not have
been paid by a client.
In some cases, the Bill will
'grandfather' in persons who may
not have met the educational
requirements, but who have more
than five years of field experi-
ence.



.BISX

stocks

forecast to

appreciate

12-15%


FROM page 1

undervalued to buy, and bring
the market to equilibrium."
Mr Kerr suggested this was
because there were too few alter-
native investment options for
institutional investors when they
sold a stock.
He added that it was also diffi-
cult to "justify" the price increase
in stocks such as Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) based on fundamen-
tals, as this institution had yet to
produce any major net income
increase or provide a reason for
its shares to appreciate in value
from $1.22 to its current $2.65 per
share.





Te TM'-.h


nllmmlunnmnlml


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2008







BUINS


Cruise s


S


multi-million



spending boost


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter
THE Nassau and Freeport
economies could each receive
a $3.15 million tourism spending
injection with the Norwegian
Gem cruise ship set to call on
three Bahamian islands per
week, it was revealed yesterday.
The ship's captain, Mikael
Hilden, met with Bahamian
tourism minister Neko Grant
and senior Ministry of Tourism
officials for a special plaque
exchange onboard the new lux-
ury liner, which will bring more
than 3,000 passengers and 1,000
crew members to Nassau, Great
Stirrup Cay and Freeport each
week during the winter and
spring months.
Mr Grant said the new cruise
intinerary would boost tourism
figures following a less than stel-
lar 2007.
"We expect the numbers to
improve.'You will be aware that
we were hampered by a number
of factors last year, including
the passport challenge," Mr
Grant said.
"The soft economy in the US,
with the passport issue, was per-
haps the most damaging of the
lot for the impulse travel."
Of the Norwegian Gem, he
added: "It means an increase in
visitor arrivals. Some 70 per
cent of our arrivals are by cruise
ship, and if we are going to
bring in an additional 3,000 vis-
itors on each of the voyages, it
means that those numbers will
be increased substantially.
"We are aware that the
schedule calls for 15 [sailings],
and so if we multiple 15 by
3,000, you can do the math, and
the average visitor spend is $70
per passenger, a sizable injec-
tion into the industry. It is


important that we ensure that
once these visitors arrive, they
are treated properly and are
shown the hospitality that we
are capable of providing.
"The Government of the
Bahamas and all tourism indus-
try partners are fully commit-
ted to ensure the success of the
Gem's calls in Nassau and
Grand Bahama. We will
endeavour to do everything in
our power to make Norwegian
Cruise Lines' decision to focus
more strongly on the Bahamas
one that is justified by the expe-
rience we provide their cus-
tomers at each destination."
Captian Hilden explained
that the ship will sail out of New
York to stop in Cape Canaver-
al, and then travel onto Great
Stirrup Cay in the Berry Island


The American Embassy is
applications for the following:


before calling into Freeport and
Nassau on a seven-day cruise
in the winter and spring. In the
summer, the ship sails around
the Mediterranean.
"The climate is extremely
nice. Downtown Nassau is just a
few steps away from the ship,
so it is nice," Captian Hilden
said of Norwe~igien Cruise
Line's decision to make the
Bahamas the home base for the
Gem.
The ship, entered service on
October 1, 2007. Its full capaci-
ty is 3,100 passengers and 1,100
crew members. Onboard
ammenties include a rock
climbing wall, bowling alley,
casino and 12 restaurants, which
feature freestyle dining",
allowing passengers to chose
their dining times.


presently considering


Realty Assistant

Serves as the senior member of the GSO
Housing Office working interdependently in
administering and managing the complex
legalities and details of an interagency housing pool
that spans from New Providence to Grand Bahama

This position is open to candidates with the
following qualifications;

An Associate Degree in the area of Business
Administration, real estate or a related field.
Two years of experience in real estate
leasing/ contracting, property management
or related field required.
Must have a good working knowledge of
general office procedures, Microsoft Office
Suite and data base management.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

Must have ability to meet deadlines in a
timely manner and work independently with
minimum supervision


BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:
The successful candidate will be offered an excellent
compensation package including performance-based
incentives, medical and dental insurance, life insurance,
pension and opportunities for training development.
Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens
who are eligible for employment under Bahamian laws
and regulations.
Application forms are available from 8:00a.m. to
5:00p.m. Monday through Friday at the security area
of the American Embassy, Queen Street. Completed
applications should be returned to the Embassy ad-
dressed to the Human Resources Office no later than
Friday, January 11, 2008.


Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch,
Private Banking
is presently considering applications for a


TREASURY ADMINISTRATOR


The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

Minimum qualifications:
Three Five years International Banking experience in the Money Market/
Forex and Securities Trading and Execution Department of an offshore bank
or Asset Management Company.
PC Literacy (MS Word, Access, Excel).
General banking knowledge and keen knowledge of (trading and settling)
capital market instruments.
A Bachelor's or Associates degree with concentration in Finance/Economics.
Series 7 Certification or Canadian Securities Course qualification would be an
asset.

Personal Qualities:
Excellent organizational and communication skills.
A commitment to service excellence.
Ability to work with minimum supervision.
Goal oriented.

Benefits provided Include:
Competitive salary and performance bonus
Pension Plan
Health and Life Insurance


APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. Persons not meeting
the minimum requirements need not apply.

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas
or via fax 356-8148

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS
JANUARY 11 2008.




CREDITSUISSE


Legal Notice


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACIT
(No.45 of 2000)

SANBACH COMPANY LIMITED
In Voluntary liquidation
"Notice is hereby given thatin accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
SANBACH COMPANY LIMITED is in Dissolution."
The date of commencement of dissolution is the 28th day of
November, 2007

LUIS PINEYRUA PITTALUGA
Juncal 1305, Office 2201
Montevideo, Urguay
Liquidator
i


SNotice

A vacancy exists in the Aviation industry for the position of

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

RESPONSIBILITIES: To provide Financial Accouting and Cost
Management of the Company.

DUTIES:

* Design and establish effective financial controls and procedures that will
produce accurate and timely financial reports to the Board and
Management for financial decision making purposes.

* Implement and maintain an effective Cash Flow Management, Account
Receivables and Payables system.

* Prepare and monitor Operational and Capital budgets.

* Ensure that the accouning process and reporting are consistent with
International Financial Reporting Standards for quality and efficiency.

* Advise management on Cost Control Issues.

* Manage Expenditure.

* Participate in Management and Board Meetings.

* Direct and coordinate the day to day leadership and management of the
Accounts Department.

* Perform other management functions as required by the General Manager
and the Board of Directors.

Education & Qualifications:

* Minimum of seven (7) years experience at a senior management level
and hold the designation of a Charted Accountant with membership in good
standing with the Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants.

Interested persons should apply no later than 18th January, 2008 to:

The Tribune
C/O P.O. Box DA 8368
Nassau, Bahamas


--


THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2008, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE




PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2008
IrYour Bahamian Supermarkets'1 EU i I E i


SUPER
VALUE
NOW ACCEPTING
4ASV UNCA RD
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or
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L DOUBLE STAMPS EVERY SUNDAY


1

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PASTA RONI
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4.6 oz.
2/0200


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wa
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THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2008, PAGE 5B


STONE, 8 oz.
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MEN'S SANDWICH'MATE
ED, 8 oz.
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# '


AR MAYER
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1 lb.


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FROSTY ACRES, 4 Ears
SCORN-ON-COB........................$2.79
ISLAND QUEEN FROZEN, 2 Ibs.
SPLANTAINS............................... $3.49
PEPPERIDGE FARM Asst'd. Layer, 19 oz
SCAKES ...........................................$2@99
I-'- -


HYunDlO


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Hyundai Tucson GL
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with Cc%'- a.it 1k
Price includes rustproofing, licensing and inspection to U;.-thday, full tank of fuel,
24,000 miles/24 months warranty and emergency roadside tance.


#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET 322-3775 325-3079
Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals, Queens Hwy, 352-6122
or Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916



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THE TRIBUNE





\









INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY





NWPOIECFAMIYSANDS


SANDYPORT Appraisal: $300,000.00
All that lot of land having an area of 9,626 square feet, being lot number 40,
of the subdivision known as SandyPort, situate in the Western District of
New Providence. The property Is Irregular In shape, Is on a level grade and
zoned as single family residential. An electrical connection outlet Is located
near the property. The property is located on Sandy Port Drive just on the
bend before Governor's Cay on the Southern Side of the road.


No. 17 WESTRIDGE ESTATES


Appraisal: $930,000.00


All that lot of land having an
area of 30000 square feet,
being lot Number 17 of the
subdivision known as
Westridge Estates Addition.
.., Situate in the Western District
Providence.
.H Located on the subject
property is a newly
: constructed single story
structure comprising 6,000
feet of living space with a
three Car Garage.
The building is 75% completed and comprises five bedrooms, four and a
half baths study, living/dining, family room, kitchen, laundry and
generator room.
Location: From SuperValue West Bay, take the road heading west into
Westridge, take the first comer on the Right, Westridge Drive. Subject
property will be about the seventh on the right hand side of the road.





FAIRWAY MANOR CONDOMINIUM Appraisal: $73,000.00


Apartment 402, 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms.
Lot 4, Block GN, Edward Birch Curt, Bahamian North

GREENING GLADE SUBDIVISION Appraisal: $75,000.00
All that piece parcel and lot of land described as lot 7 block 21,
Albacore Drive, Victoria Place and Mid Chipman Road, Unit 2,
Greening Glade Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama. The lot
contains 20,580 sq. ft. and zoned as multi-family residential.

LOT No. 20, BLOCK 1, UNIT 3
FORTUNE POINT SUBDIVISION Appraisal: $38,000.00
All that lot of vacant land having an area of 12,650 sq. ft. being lot No.
20, Block 1 Unit 3 of the Subdivision known and designated as Fortune
Point Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama. Duplex property zoning with
a rectangle shape.

LINCOLN GREEN, CANEBY CLOSE Appraisal: $38,500.00
Unit 5, Block 17, Lot #48 Single family residence, Clearwater Close.
Located on fresh water canal. Approximately 17,404 sq. ft.

LOT No. 37 BLOCK 33
CHURCHILL COURT, BAHAMIA MARINA
& BAHAMIA 4 SUBDIVISION, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA Appraisal: $337,000.00


g. .,.-- -,.._
All that lot of land having an area of 16,533 sq. ft. being lot No. 37
of the subdivision known and designated as Bahamia Marina and
Bahamia Section 4 Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama. Located
on this property is a structure comprising a 3 year old duplex
structure which covers approximately (3,058) square feet.
Apartment consisting of two 2-bedrooms, 2-bathroom with private
Jacuzzi in master bath, spacious living and dining room, full service
kitchen, a laundry and utility room, foyer/hallway with linen and
storage closet. The property is fully secured by six foot plastic
coated chain-link fence runs along the side and rear and adjoins the
painted 4 foot wall, with 5 foot pillars at front with electronic gate.


ABACO


Appraisal: $108,000.00


PORTION OF MURPHY TOWN CROWN
ALLOTMENT, MURPHY TOWN, ABACO.


The property is 89 x 100 ft
and rectangular in shape.
The land is elevated
approximately 15 ft above
road level and
approximately 25 ft above
sea level. Located on this


-" property is
Sold three
bathroom,
kitchen and laundry room house. The structure
attention.


EXUMA


a twenty-year-
bedroom, two
living, dining,
requires much


Appraisal: $170,000.00


DUPLEX IN LOT 6625
BAHAMA SOUND No. 8, EAST, EXUMA
Trapezium shaped lot 35
Sft. above sea level
comprising 10,000 sq. ft.
Situated thereon is a 10-
year-old single storey
duplex, 2 bed, I bath,
kitchen, living/dining
area and porch.
(Building is in need of
repairs).


EXUMA


Appraisal: $673,075.00


CASTELRAG ESTATES, LOTS 129 & 130
EXUMA HARBOUR SUBDIVISION


SThe subject property is located
on Kingway Road and is
developed with an area of
20,000 square feet. Situated


F

Jin~


thereon is a residence
comprised of 3,645 square feet
of living accommodations,
inclusive of 4 bedrooms, 2
baths, with laundry and utility
spaces and a two bedroom one
bath guest cottage of 600
square feet. The property is


fenced with white picket fencing and has a Gazebo at the highest portion
of the property.


BAHAMA SOUND 10,
EXUMA


Appraisal: $20,000.00


All that piece, parcel or lots 12571 and 12572, Bahama Sound of Exuma
10, total area of 20,000 square feet. Bahama Sound is a sudivision
situate at the southwestern portion of the Forest Estate between the
settlements of Southside and Richmond Hill, Great Exuma, Bahamas.



PARCEL OF LAND, PALMETTO POINT
ELEUTHERA Appraisal: $112,105.00
All that piece, parcel or lot of land 2,743 feet East of the junction of the
Palmetto Point road and main Eleuthera Highway containing 2.45 acres.
This site encompasses a 28-year-old single storey concrete structure of
approximately 832 square feet of enclosed floor space inclusive of shop
space and rest room facilities.



TO VIEW PROPERTIES

, ,,. ." 0 0., T O

www stopnshopbahamas.com

C" on "Real Estate Mall"

CM on Doorway

S "Enter Online Store"


FOR CONDITIONS OF SALE AND ANY OTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
HARRY COLLIE Ca 502-3034 E-mail harry.collie@scotiabank.com
or
PHILIP WHITE @ 502-3077 E-mail philipwhite@scotiabank.com
Fax: 356-3851 send bids to P. 0. Box N-751 8 Rosetta Street, Nassau, Bahamas


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2008


THE TRIBUNE









SJanuary 3rd,2008,




M TLL heTriun

MICLLNOS RPETE


(Lot No 62, Lower Bogue)
f L EUTHERA


Air that pie.* paitel ') lot of land and
ir nproemenirii-:. i1i the settlement of Lower
Bogue Niurt i Eleuthera. being No. 62,
cornprisiny u about 34 .210 sq. ft.. this site
----"':C erlco passes a 12 year old single storney home
Scornprising of 1 bedcoonms. 3 bathrooms, front
__ __._-_-_ _.. ~room, dining breakfast room, kitchen and
laundry rou.', with a :otai living area of
approximately 2.342. i6 'opert, ,ilo include d double car garage. and front entrance
with a totai sq ft- of appioxima'ery 6 65b /5 ihis home is. -pproxilnateiy 85% completed.
The property is well landscaped with uab grass :ascos and some fruit trees.
Appraisal: $235,638.00


KENNEDY SUBDIVISION
(NASSAU)

Lot no. 21 all utilities available 10 year old single
story house, 3 bedroom 2 bathroom, living
room. dining area, family room, kitchen, study,
laundry and an entry porch.

Appraisal: $188,406.00


Heading west along Soldier Road take main entrance to Kennedy Subdivision on the
left, then take the 1st corner on the left then 1st right, house is second on your right
with garage.


This property is situated n. the western side ot Eleuthera Highway in the settlement of
Lower Bogue


S Investment Opportunity Must
Sell Lot No. 217 Pinewood
Gardens Subdivision

All that lot of land having an area of 5,000 sq ft,
being Lot No. 217 of the Subdivision known as
Pinewood Gardens the said subdivision situated
in the Southern I.)istrict of New Providence
Bahamias. Located on this property is a structure
comprising of a" approximately 20 yr old single
family residence consisting of 992 sq. ft of
enclosed living space with 3-bedroorn ,ii bathroom, liviry/dining rooms, kitchen, drive way and
walk way [he land is on a grade i ,evel and appears to be sufficietitl elevated to disallow
the possibility of flooding. The grounds ai>- fairly kept adi 10 yard is open

Appraisal: $127,988.00

Traveling south on East Street to the junction of Soldier Road. make a left at the light then turn
right into Kennedy Subdivision, go all the way to T-junction, turn rigni then first left then right
again toward Mount Tabor Church building, O ter passing Mount labor take first left sapodillaa blvd),
the subject house is about 400 yards on the right painted yellow trimmed green, with green and
white door.


LOT NO. 1490
GOLDEN
GATES
SECTION 2

All that lot of land having
an area of 6,000 sq. ft.
being lot no. 1490 of the
subdivision known and
designated as Golden Gates, the said subdivision situated in the southwestern district of New
Providence, bahamas. This property is comprised of a 25 yer old single family residence consisting
of approximately 2,480 sq. ft. of enclosed living space with three bedrooms, three bathrooms, living,
dining rooms and kitchen: The land is on a grade and level, however the site appears to be sufficiently
elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year. The
grounds'are fairly kept, ith improvements including driveway, walkway and low shrubs. Yard is
enclosed on one side wth a 5 foot chain linked fencing and a low cement block wall to the front.
Appraisal: $162,400.00
Traveling west on Carmichael Road tum left then right onto the service road opposite Bahamas Faith
Ministries Complex, then first left again after passing clico and pre-school. The subject house is the
6th house left painted green trimmed white.


LOT NO. #7, BOILING
HOLE SUBDIVISION


S- I All that piece parcel or lot of land and
', I improvements situated on the Island of
Eleuthera. North of Governor's Harbour,
4'coipiJrisiig oi Loii o 7 in the Boiling
Hole .-ubdiv sior and comprising of
appiuoximateiv 0.)U0 sq. ft. this site
S Aenc)iiipases.e a' yeasis id duplex with
reach Und .Iui isisting of 2 bedroom ; 1
bathrooTn, frbntroom, diningroom and kitchen with a gioss. tlolt area ot approximately 1,474;20
sq ft and covered porch area of approxir,,telv Ib4 /0 :q ft this duplex was built in
accordance with the plan and specific.atior, as appij,:,vdj ad ai a standard that was acceptable
to the Ministry Of Public Works ins structure is ir goojud ..;unditio, dEah apartment could
oe rented at $800.00 per month fhe land is laiiascaped and pianiecd with ficus trees. but
needs some manicuring.
APPRAISAL. $153.5, ,00


Lot No. 130, St. Andrews
Beach Estates

All that lot of land having an area of 8,100
sq ft, being lot no. 130, of the subdivision
known and designated as st. andrews beach
estates, the said subdivision situated in the
on. eastern district of New Providence,
Bahamas. located on the subject property
is a structure comprising of anapproximately
"" 12yr :duplex. ..
Appraisal: $245,237.00
Traveling east on yamacraw hill road take the third corner right, with sign for st andrews
beach estates, then take first left, then first right, the subject property is the 2nd property
on the left side painted beige trimmed orange.


Lot No. 3 Yamacraw
Beach Estates
All that lot of land having an area of 10,000 sq
ft, being lot no. 3 in Yamacraw Beach Estates,
in the said subdivision situated in the eastern
district of New Providence Bahamas. Located
on the subject property is a single-storey triplex
building comprising of 3 units with two 2-
bedrooms 1 -bathroom living, dining, kitchen
apartments unit and one unit being used as a
barber and beauty salon the land is on a grade
and level; however the site appears to be sufficiently elevated tc disallow the possibility of
flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year

Appraisal: $313.016.00
Traveling south on Fox Hill Road, go pass "amacraw Hilii Road and Joe Farrington
Road. The subject property is located or, tiu fii nand side of Fox Hill road painted white
trimmed brown.


Lot No. 1056 Pinewood
SrdGardens Subdivision
All that lot of land having an area of 5,000
sq ft, being lot no. 1056 of the subdivision
known as Pinewood Gardens, the said
subdivision situated in the southern district
of New providence Bahamas. Located on
this property is a structure comprising of
an approximately 10 yr old single family
residence consisting of approximately 1.205
sq ft of enclosed living space with 3-
bedrooms with closets, 2-bathroom, linen closet, living, dining rooms, kitchen and
covered front porch. the land is slightly elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding.
the grounds are fairly kept.

Appraisal: $144,977.00
Traveling south on East Street to Sapodilla Boulevard, turn right at thatch Palm Street,
turn left onto Rosewood Street, the subject property is the second on the right hand
side painted blue trimmed white.


Lot B, Marigold Farm Road Allotment 67
All that lot of vacant land having an area of 1 173 cises and being referred to as the plot. the property is lot No. B and is situated on Marigold Farm Road in the area known as
Allotment 67, a subdivision situated in the south eastern n district of New Providence Bahamas. This property is zoned multi family.
Appraisal: $146,000.00
Traveling from Joe Farrington Road onto Marigoco Far-: Road heading south. The subject is th.2nd to last property on the left hand side of the road near the pond.

Rainbow Subdivision Lot No. 3, Block 27
Ail that vacant lot of land having an area of appri.Axiiatiy i4.052 6 sq. ft being iot no, 3, block 27, section b, of Rainbow Subdivision with residential zoning. This property is bounded about
103.44 ft north by Queens Highway. and 137 i2 fti iist and about 99 94. ft south of Rainbow Hill Circle. 139.91 ft West. All utilities and services available.

Appraisal: $37, 440.00
BLACKWOOD, ABACO
All that lot of iand having an area of approximately v68,0r,4 sq ft. !this property is yei to reach its highest and best use. It is ideally suited to single or multi-family development as is the nature of
surrounding properties within the community 'n si:e nay albo serve well as a commercial site as the area remains un-zoned the property remains largely in its original state. It is covered with low
brush and broad ieaf coppice vegetation intersrper.:e with oruad strands of mature Yellow Pine indigenous to the area. The property is well drained and represents no immediate flooding danger under
normal conditions
APPRAISAL: $219,354.40
!he.' suoject property is vacant.and is situated ai the uj'Atrieasieriii entrance of the Community of Blackwood, Abaco. The property is undivided and comprises approximately 6 acres of a larger tract

NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA)
..l, approximately 11.200 sq ft., and bounded on Noit,' by Early Settler Drive and South by Deal Investment Ltd., this is a single family zoning and 50 ft., above sea level. This site encompasses
S..udatior. with plumbing and roughing inpiace and well ,uinua, ked quarry fill. 'he concrete floor has not been poured as yet. The foundation is 2.511 sq ft. Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly
he Bluff Settlement The said lot is vacaintl and a hill ojv: o,)v; .he .A otic Ocean.
Appraisal: $41,275.00


THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2008, PAGE 7B


rJ


THE TRIBUNE









PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


RATES, from 1


rates, and most of us are selling
at or a little below cost."
Bahamian homeowners insur-


ance premium rates are around
1.45 per cent of the total rebuild-
ing value for mixed-construction


Deloitte.





Administrative/Marketing Assistant


Responsibility:
* Preparation of correspondence to clients such as management and engagement
letters, proposals, reports etc.
* Administrative and clerical duties include but are not limited to taking calls,
filling, scheduling and copying documents.
* Coordinate brochures, presentations and other marketing material
* Maintain up-to-date contact mailing list
* Assist with meeting and seminar preparation


Requirements:
* Administrative and/or Marketing Background (at least 2 years preferred)
* An Associate degree in Business Administration or Marketing would be
preferred but not required.
* Proficient in MS Word, Excel and Power Point
* Ability to handle confidential information, excellent verbal & written
communication skills, problem solving skills, ability to prioritize, ability to
work well independently & in a team
* Salary or equivalent to commensurate with experience

Applicants should send their resume and cover letter via email
No later than Monday January 14, 2008
Att: Human Resources Manager
careers@deloitte.com.bs.


properties, built from concrete
and shingle, and slightly less for
more robust constructions.
Yet Bahamian general insur-
ers were "totally dependent" on
the global reinsurance market to
determine property premiums in
this nation, Mr Watson added.
In comparison with insurance
carriers in many other nations,
Bahamian general insurers are
relatively thinly capitalized, forc-
ing them to cede large amounts of
risk to reinsurers, who provide
the additional underwriting
capacity.
With more capital, Bahamian
carriers would be able to write
additional business and take on
extra risk, enabling them to take
on a greater percentage of pre-
mium income. Yet because they
cede so much, reinsurers largely
determine the premiums charged
to Bahamian commercial and res-
idential property owners.
Given that the Bahamas sits
squarely in the hurricane belt, the
extra perceived risk, coupled with
catastrophe losses elsewhere in
the world, helps keep property
premiums in this nation high
because reinsurers demand more
to cover the risk.
Yet Mr Watson told The Tri-
bune he hoped that property
insurance premiums would
become more consistent and less
volatile, remaining flat from year-
to-year, thus allowing households
and businesses to budget better
and escape inflationary pressures.
"We don't believe that the
Bahamas enjoying two relatively
hurricane-free years should result
in rates coming down,.just as we
believe that one hurricane event
should not result in rates rising,"
Mr Watson explained.
"Hopefully, if there's a hurri-


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I If you fulfill the position requirements, please send your resume by email to recruitmentbahamas@yahoo.com
before January 4,2008 I







Pricing Information As Of: F A L
Wednesday, 2 January 2008
BISX.ALL SHARE INDEX: LI0,, Nr.XF = .__IMP,
,52w.- -H. 52k.Low :-ecurn Prevaius Close Today s Close Cnange Daily Vol EPS $ Div I PiE Yield
1 66 0 4I At.aco M.larkets 166 1 66 000 0 157 0000 10 6 000':..
11.80 11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.80 11.80 0.00 1.502 0.400 7.9 3.39%
9.61 8.03 Bank of Bahamas 9.61 9.61 0.00 5,000 0.733 0.260 13.1 2.71%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 0.188 0.030 4.5 3.53%
3.74 1.75 Bahamas Waste 3.66 3.66 0.00 0.289 0.090 12.7 2.46%
2.70 1.22 Fidelity Bank 2.65 2.65 0.00 0.058 0.040 45.7 1.51%
12.05 10.00 Cable Bahamas 12.05 12.05 0.00 1.030 0.240 11.7 1.99%
3.15 1.90 Colina Holdings 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.031 0.040 101.6 1.27%
8.43 4.17 Commonwealth Bank (Sl) 8.43 8.43 0.00 200 0.426 0.260 19.8 3.08%
7.22 4.74 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.03 4.95 -0.08 0.129 0.050 39.0 0.99%
2.60 2.20 Doctor's Hospital 2.35 2.35 0.00 0.316 0.020 7.4 0.85%
7.20 5.70 Famguard 7.20 7.20 0.00 0.713 0.280 10.1 3.89%
12.95 12.02 Finco 12.95 12.95 0.00 0.829 0.570 15.6 4.40%
14.75 14.15 FirstCaribbean 14.60 14.60 0.00 0.914 0.470 16.0 3.22%
6.10 5.18 Focol (S) 5.18 5.18 0.00 0.359 0.140 14.4 2.70%
1.00 0.54 Freeport Concrete 0.77 0.77 0.00 0.017 0.000 45.3 0.00%
8.00 7.10 ICD Utilities 7.25 7.25 0.00 0.411 0.300 17.6 4.14%
11.00 8.60 J. S. Johnson 11.00 11.00 --- 0.00 1.059 0.590 10.4 5.36%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.167 0.600 8.6 6.00%
FlaeUtyOver-Th."r a en ,tO u",^'..i;4,; .-. .. . '
52AK.-o,. siK-.Lco.'. SL,rr.,,i, BI.J I sk $ Lasi Pr--e Weekly .'Gi EPS $ D. $ P E V.eld
14.60 14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 16.00 1.160 1.185 13.4 8.12%
8.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 6.00 0.000 0.480 NM 7.80%
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.20 -0.023 0.000 N/M 0.00%
Colina Ovar-The ..f.. .... ....,
41 i0 0 Ir O- CiFAB 4 1 .1 1-13 J00 .1 00 44150 2 "'' 0 6 ',.
14.60 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 14.00 1.160 1.125 13.4 7.71%
0.55 0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.45 -0.030 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52 K..-H, 52 .K-L,.. -.Fur.i NJ.-Te, qNA YVTD- Lasi 12 Montins Di Yie .
1.3686 1.2647 Colina Money Market Fund 1.368558*
3.5388 3.0569 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.5388***
2.9902 2.4723 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.990218"'
1.2827 1.2037 Colina Bond Fund 1.282687*
11.8192 11.3545 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 11.8192"*
'FINDEX: CLOSE. 934K7 R ,=00"4- f ..,'l" ',' .' .
"L ,- -. .. ,. i.. ,:,., . = i ,:,:, .. , ,.. F T TrF..r 'i LL' Iet .' -, ,;,-,r., 1 .. s,' ,e3B ,l.i'ca ,':l:. l'i- Ltti/ ;.
52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 wooks Bid $ Buying price of Collna and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Collna and fidelity 21 December 2007
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price 30 Juno 2007
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week *"-31 October 2007
Change Change In closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported eaminge per share for the last 12 mths *" 31 July 2007
Daily Vol, Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1. 1994 100
S) 4-for-1 Stock Spilt Effucive Date 0/8/2007
S1i) 3-for-1 Stock Spilt Effeclive nDto 7/11/2007
2.., .[ ..


Skills


cane, the rates will remain flat
afterwards. Hopefully, there will
be less volatility.
"We believe rates should be
more consistent and not be as
volatile. That's not good for busi-
nesses as they can't budget and
plan properly, and not good for
homeowners."
When asked whether the
Bahamian market could with-
stand any further property pre-
mium rises, Mr Watson replied:
"That's a tough question."

Banks

He explained that because
Bahamian commercial banks and
other mortgage lenders required
borrowers to have and maintain
homeowners insurance coverage
in order to obtain their loans, they
had little choice but to pay the
premium regardless of what the
rate was.
"If prices go up, it adds to infla-
tion, but people don't have a
choice [with property insurance]
and it has to be passed on," Mr
Watson said, "because home-
owners in the Cayman Islands
and the Bahamas are mortgaged.
You have to pay.
"People end up paying more
in insurance, and want a salary
rise. It's very much ap inflation
driver because it's a big number."
RoyalStar also operates in the
Cayman Islands, and in the after-
math of the devastating blow


inflicted upon those islands by
Hurricane Ivan in 2004. Mr Wat-
son said a study carried out by
the company revealed that a fam-
ily of four, with two working par-
ents, two children and two cars,
would end up spending six weeks'
salary to insure their home and
cars.
"It's a big chunk of change,"
he added. A home valued at
$250,000 in the Caymans would
cost $5,000-$6,000 to insure with-
out contents included, the Royal-
Star study showed. Adding con-
tents insurance took insurance
premium costs up to $7,000, and
with two cars thrown in, total
insurance costs for that family
were close to $9,000.
Most of that $9,000 sum went
to reinsurance companies, Mr
Watson added.
Reinsurance pricing and risk
models were becoming more con-
sistent, the RoyalStar managing
director added, not changing as
frequently as they did in the past.
Then, reinsurers frequently low-
ered the premiums they charged
primary insurance carriers to
attract more business and gener-
ate demand, increasing prices
only in the aftermath of a major
catastrophic event.
For 20o8, reinsurers had to fac-
tor in hurricane activity elsewhere
in the Caribbean, plus catastro-
phes that included wildfires in
California and earthquakes in
Peru and Chile.


Bimini Sands Resorts & Marina
is seeking an
EXECUTIVE CHEF to Live and Work on
The Island of Bimini

This high profile, contemporary resort is seeking
an Executive Chef with food art experience and a
portfolio to back it up. The right individual will be self
motivated and ready to express all of the creative
requirements expected in a tropical island paradise.

The best candidate will have high volume experience;
comprehensive profit & loss knowledge, training
experience and know how to motivate and get
the best out of associates and will have a current,
modern an contemporary portfolio and able to submit
Photos if asked. ,. .

Salary will reflect experience and skill set, plus a
structured bonus program. Relocation to the island
will be provided along with living assistance.

If you meet the above qualifications, please forward a
formal resume to frankir()biminisands.com

Only the most qualified candidates will be contacted.

Key Words:
Executive Chef, Bahamian, Contemporary, Food Art







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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2008, PAGE 98


JUDGE PARKER __ __________ TIT'S HAR TO RBEIEE TNEWS EENA WNGM.

14 6r. v __ *.^ ^ ^ ( -"s,! ^ f-N YU 1
(-- ws 0n TrO


APARTMENT 3-G


AY LIFE IN DALLAS 6
WASN'T GOING 50 WELL.
I NEEDPEDA CHANGE
,,OF SCENE. -


*P5NNI5 IS LIKEJZMPrg4CA ,ES. WECAN
ALWAYS GETGEORGE'5 ENGINE RUNNING"


BLOND-E


SOME PEOPLE NUNER
GET EHOUG A TO EAT.


There's Only One Hope


South dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
*AJ984
VQ6
*K 102
+K85
WEST
4*752
T 10 9 5 4
*J4
410964
SOUTH
4103
VAK 7
*8763
*AQ72


EAST
*KQ6
VJ832
*AQ95
+J3


The bidding:
South West North East
1 Pass 1 4 Pass
1 NT Pass 3 NT
Opening lead four of hearts.
Assume you're defending against
three notrump with the East hand
after the bidding shown. Partner
leads the four of hearts, and South
takes your jack with the king.
Declarer leads the ten of spades and
finesses, losing to your queen. What
would you do now?
When the deal occurred, East
returned a heart at trick three, and
South was home free. He won with


dummy's queen, crossed to the ace of
clubs and tried another spade finesse.
This lost to the king, but declarer
now had three spades, three clubs
and three hearts for nine tricks.
In failing to find the winning
defense, East fell victim to the
"return your partner's lead" syn-
drome. While this is normally a good
practice, East should have relegated
it to the scrapheap in this case.
In view of South's opening bid, it
was impossible for West to hold the
ace of hearts. East could see a total of
26 high-card points between his own
hand and dummy, leaving only 14 for
his partner Mid dectax N"
thus hold at most one otw t,'
East's best chance to defeat the
contract, therefore, was to try to
establish three tricks in his own best
suit, diamonds, before South could
score nine tricks. All this required
was that West hold the jack of dia-
monds, which was certainly po ible
on the bidding.
If East had shifted to the five of
diamonds at trick three, declarer
would have been a dead duck. After
taking West's jack with dummy's
king, South would not have been
able to come to nine tricks before the
defense scored five, and he would
have finished down one.
AC I !


L_ T~AR E


ACROSS
1 Cat country (6)
7 Yoursis just what's
wanted (3,2,3)
8 The "drive' one can get from
courgettes (4)
10 Cuts right Into deep dark places (6)
11 Hovers around on Tuesday, perhaps
(6)
14 Jack's river? (3)
16 Given the slip easily? (5)
17 An old fiddle easily heard around
mid-January (4)
19 Apt to succeed at the
sunwat (5
21 Highly displeased with the us a
Roman numerals (5)
22 Be left, that is, to contradict
something (5)
23 Soa wildly when upset
by the chief (4)
26 Margo's other name? (5)
28 Managed to give an artist a new start
(3)
29 Ruined condition, certainly
not new (6)
30 Considered alt round,
there's no end to it (6)
31 Garment for the ruling
head to order (4)
32 Venomous opposition? (8)
33 London street full of rabbits? (6)


Yesterday's cryptksolutions
*ACROSS: 1, T-ouch 6, Bee-Ch. 9, H-aunt-e'd 10, Steam 11,
A-gent 12, Stage 13, Sa-velo-y 15, Get 17, Twit 18, BL-side
19, Peers 20, Nailed 22, Meat 24, Ted 25, Staunch 26,
Dutch 27, S-l-AS 28, Bites 29, W-E-stern 30, B-L-and 31,
Agate
DOWN 2, Outt-a-W 3, Cha-le-t 4, Ham 5, Unity 6, B-eagles
7, Edge 8, Can-Ted 12, So-we-d 13, Sti-NT 14, Vi-VI-d. 15,
GrV-en 16, Tenth 18, Broth 19, Per-us-Ed. 21, Aerial 22,
(a-)Musing 23, AC-cent 25, Scats 26, Dawn 28, Bra


OD

E


CL


0


R


C


The
um


Cbmbem
21st
Dkomry
sim.,


Sw HOW many words of four
letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here? In
S, 'making a word, each letter may
I be used once only. Each must
contain the centre letter and
there must be at least one
nine-letter word. No plurals.
Good 18; very good 27;
excellent 36 (or more).
nSolution tomorrow.


DOWN
1 One delivered right In the wrong
place l (6)
2 Passed a figure hidden In reeds,
perhaps (6)
3 Experts who can crack a case (4)
4 That of a young American ruffian? (7)
5 Lots are arranged out of love, as for
the piano (5)
6 Beaten on board (5)
8 Talk of paying our dues (4)
9 Gosh, a half share In a horse (3)
12 Is he a tearaway? (3)
13 She's heavenly (5)
15 Smith's property in an East Angllan
village (SW
18 Mythical figure with a o tfor
wrought Iron (5)
19 Olive's part In the panto I love (3)
20 In a gameof patience, there'snowin
or loss (3)
21 Fabulous stories of feet? (7)
22 An exclusive drinking place? (3)
23 In his shop, one of a quartet? (6)
24 Only about a hundred,
formerly (4)
25 Land on the way to paradise? (6)
26 Many may be said to become king (5)
27 Being so out of touch is rotten (5)
28 That little old capital In S. America (3)
30 With credit, we return to
the team (4)


Yesterday's easy solutions
ACROSS: 1, Appal 6, Fence 9, Foremen 10, Graft 11, Avoid 12,
Party 13, Starter 15, Tea 17, Lend 18, Result 19, Caber 20,
Cretan 22, Beta 24, Ear 25, Devises 26, Ubel 27,
Shoot 28, Rebut 29, Satanic 30, Creel
31, Otter
DOWN: 2, Pirate 3, Afford 4, Lot 5, Cedar 6, Feather 7, Envy
8, Chisel 12, Pecan 13, Slice 14,/Anger 15, Tunes 16, Atlas 18,
Repel 19, Capital 21, Rather p, Bisect 23, Tenure 25, Delay
26, Lose 28, Rio


1 Follow (6)
7 Iterated (8)
8 Beers (4)
10 Make an effort (6)
11 Easy (6)
14 Frozen water (3)
16 Narrow (5)
17 Drove (4)
19 Inferior (5)
21 Furious (5)
22 Military student (S)
23 Stair (4)
26 Warehouse (5)
28 Hill (3)
29 Pressed (6)
30 Salty (6)
31 Snare (4)
32 Flexible organ (8)
33 From where (6)


DOWN
1 Accounts officer (6)
2 Join (6)
3 Gaelic (4)
4 Discussed (7)
6 Viper (5)
8 Dry (4)
9 Previous day (3)
12 Vehicle (3)
13 Sll (5)
15 Slum (5)
18 Proprietor (5)
19 Cover(3)
20 Humour (3)
21 Of the side (7)
22 Deceive (3)
23 Comfort (6)
24 Journey (4)
) 25 Promise (6)
26 The same (5)
27 Indicate (5)
' 28 Pitch (3)
30 Casserole (4)
i


IIU


i I
vosnaseno
t S S S. -S
S b *


THURSDAY,
JAN 3
ARIES March 21/April 20
Someone makes a proposal, Aries
and it's a difficult decision for you
to consider. Health concerns are the
topic at hand for midweek. Plenty of
bed-rest will recharge you.
TAURUS April 21/May 21
Your sibling is looking for an emo-
tional handout, Taurus. Though
you've had arguments before, now
is not the time to be petty. Watch

d scare recently,
Gemini, but you're a trooper and
have pulled through. Do not expect a
relapse, yet be careful what you
include in your diet.
CANCER June 22/July 22
Exhaustion has been your main
nemesis lately, Cancer. You have
to give in and take a break from
your busy schedule. A new rela-
tionship seems promising. Just be
patient for a little while longer.
LEO July 23/August 23
You've been spending most of your
time taking care of a loved one, Leo.
Your efforts have not gone unnoticed.
By week's end someone pampers you
unexpectedly, yet deservinaly.
VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
Have you been playing games
with your significant other, Virgo?
It's not like you to be deceptive.
You might want to reconsider and
change your ways.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
You might want to reconsider the rela-
tionship you're in, Libra. This is not
the person for you, and you've been
taking advantage of his or her generos-
ity. Work is rough on Monday.
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
If anyone can appreciate dedication
and drive it's you, Scorpio.
However, an overzealous coworker
is driving you batty. Take some time
off to distance yourself from stress.
SAGnITARIUS-Nov23/Dec21
You've been acting reckless,
Sagittarius. Don't let trouble blind-
sight your positive goals. Buckle
down and straighten up. You'll have
plenty of time for fra once the
weekend arrives.
CAPRICORN Dec '2/Jan 20
Have you been getting the runarouma
from your boss, Capricom? Nothing| can
be more frustrating than not gettzg a
clear sign from authority. Go with your
instinc- there hnn rnhnhL
AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
Putting in a lot of overtime does have
its financial benefits, but it can take a
toll on your health and well-being,
Aquarius. Be a go-getter, but don't go
overboard. Save fun for Friday.
PISCES Feb 19/March 20
It seems you've been sneaky, Pisces.
Have you been keeping an eye on a
lost love. Don't spend too much time
reminiscing you're missed your
chance in that arena.


OC -eSS L o .re


Joseph Quinn v Valentina Bayer,
European Union U12 championship,
Mureck, Austria 2007. Gravesend
grandmaster Neil McDonald is one
of the best chess coaches in the UK,
and he planned today's instructive
episode two years in advance.
Black's c6 knight has just captured
White's d4 pawn, and it seems
White has blundered. The usual
trick for such positions is Nxd4
Nxd4 Nxd4 Qxd4 B check and Qxd4-
but here the white bishop has no
checking square, which
undoubtedly persuaded Black that
there was a safe central pawn to be
taken. However, way back in 2005
GM McDonald had shown his pupil
Quinn, the trap which the boy now
remembered and sprung. How did
White (to play) gain significant
material?


8508

-
.-.t






a b c d c f g h


LEONARD BARDEN


Chess 8508:1 Nfxd4 Nxd4 2 Be3 Bc53 b41 wins a
piece after Bxb4 4 Bxd4.


MARVIN,,


I CRYPTIC PUZZLE


m


BCN i WM W
IwHA Tl/OTE












. Tourism arrivals up by 15% for October


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter
VISITOR arrivals to the
Bahamas for October 2007
increased by 15 per cent, the lat-
est statistics released by the Min-
istry of Tourism confirmed.
According to the numbers, air
arrivals to all the islands increased
by 29 per cent, with Nassau/ Par-
adise Island and Freeport seeing
increases of 38 per cent and 1 per
cent respectively.
Abaco saw an increase of 9 per
cent in air arrivals, while Long
Island and Inagua were up slight-
ly and San Salvador saw a "con-
siderable increase".
Several islands saw decreases
in air arrivals, with Cat Island and


the Berry Islands experiencing
the most significant downturns -
55 per cent and 33 per cent
respectively. Exuma saw air
arrivals decrease by 21 per cent,
followed by Eleuthera with a 19
per cent fall, Bimini at 16 per
cent, Cat Cay a 15 per cent drop,
and Andros 8 per cent.
Despite the overall increase in
air arrivals for October, the 2007
year-to-date figures for air and
sea arrivals were down overall 4
per cent, and for Nassau/ Paradise
Island 2 per cent. Grand Bahama
was down 6 per cent, and the
Family Islands were down 7 per
cent.
Notable 2007 year-to-date
increases were experienced by
Inagua with 91 per cent and Long
Island, 147 per cent. Cat Island


saw the greatest year-to-date
decrease in air arrivals of 18 per
cent. ,
Turning to cruise arrivals as a
first port of entry for the month of
October, Nassau/ Paradise Island
saw a slight increase, but the rest
of the Bahamas saw a decrease.
Overall, cruise arrivals
decreased by 10 per cent, with
Grand Bahama down 20 per cent
and the rest of the Family Islands
off 19 per cent.
The 2007 year-to-date figures
revealed that overall .cruise
arrivals were down by 4 per cent,
with Nassau/Paradise Island expe-
riencing a 1 per cent decrease,
Grand Bahama a four per cent
decrease, and the remaining Fam-
ily Islands a nine per cent
decrease.


Bahamas First eyes Ql-end for Turks expansion plans


- '4I


FROM page 1

& Caicos Islands were already
"en route".
"I can't give you any firm dates,
but our objective is to get that
finalised by the end of the first
quarter," Mr Ward said. "At this
stage, we will operate through a
single, or perhaps two, agencies.'
He described the move to pen-
etrate the Turks & Caicos gener-
al insurance market as "a natural
progression" for Bahamas First,
given that nation's proximity to
this country and its growing econ-
omy, which in turn would lead to
a growing demand for insurance
coverage.
Mr Ward said Bahamas First
also had "spare capital that we
can deploy that, on the face of it,
will enjoy an attractive return".
Another attraction of Turks &
Caicos, which has recently attract-
ed the likes of Colinalmperial
Insurance Company and Royal
Bank of Canada to set-up shop, is
that its currency is US$ denomi-
nated.
The deal with The Economi-
cal Insurance Group is designed
to give Bahamas First the extra
capital and resources to enable it
to expand outside the Bahamas
into the Caribbean.
The Canadian insurer has
acquired about seven million
ordinary shares in Bahamas First
Holdings in a deal worth $10.75
million, the Canadian company
paying a price between $1.49-
$.50 per share to be a passive
shareholder a position it is said
to be happy with.


The price being paid by The
Economical Insurance Group is
much higher than recent trades
in Bahamas First's shares, which
had been closer to a $1 per share
price. As a result, the purchase
represents an increase in value
for Bahamas First shareholders.
Outlining the objectives behind
the alliance with The Economical
Insurance Group, Mr Ward said:
"The primary one for us in the
short-term is to have a capital
partner or shareholder who will
participate in a meaningful way in
the management of the compa-
ny."
In addition to using the Cana-
dian company's experience and
vision, Mr Ward said Bahamas
First "intends to tap into" its
training programmes and facili-
ties for the benefit of its own
employees in early 2008.
Bahamian insurance compa-
nies have increasingly established
alliances with overseas carriers in
recent years as a way of accessing
greater capital resources, exper-
tise, technology and products. A
prime example is a similar deal
to Bahamas First's, namely the
taking of a 20 per cent stake in
FamGuard Corporation, Family
Guardian's parent, by Barbados
financial services conglomerate,
Sagicor.
"I think it's a recognition that
our business is a global business,".
Mr Ward said of these alliances,
"and if you want to compete
effectively in the short and long-
term, you've got to have a num-
ber of things lined up. One of
them is to have a relatively strong
partner to assist in managing your


business on a number of fronts.....
"It's another way of getting
some additional leverage without
having to effectively cede control
of the business to a foreign enti-
ty."
RoyalStar Assurance is 25 per
cent owned by Trinidad's
Nemwil; Security & General is
majority-owned by the Bermu-
da-based Colonial Group; and
Insurance Company of the
Bahamas (ICB), the carrier
through which J. S. Johnson
places its general insurance busi-
ness, also has substantial foreign
ownership through its parent.
Describing the attractions that
the Bahamian insurance market
held for overseas partners, Mr
Ward said: "Number one, it has a
very high insurance penetration
rate. In dollar per capital spend, it
is not far off' what you see in
developed insurance markets
such as the UK and Germany.
The Bahamian economy is also
considered strong with a very
favourable outlook."
In addition, Mr Ward said the
Bahamas' fixed exchange rate
regime, with the one:one peg with
the US dollar, meant investors
faced no currency risk.
Mr Ward had previously told
The Tribune that Bahamas First
had enjoyed the "best year we've
ever had from a bottom line per-
spective", net income for the first
nine months of 2007 standing at
"just a shade under $8 million".
Bahamas First Holdings was
likely to pay $0.07 in total divi-
dends per share to shareholders
for 2007, compared to $0.04 per
share in 2006.


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PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2008


THE TRIBUNE