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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00915
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: January 2, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
sobekcm - UF00084249_00915
System ID: UF00084249:00915

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HIGH 70F
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OR TWO


The


BAHAMAS EDITION
BAHAMAS EDITION


Tribune


r


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2008


PRICE 750


ALOKAHEAD TO 90


Pinewood 'crucial lor ChPisie0'


Claim that former PM

could face convention

challenge if election court

case goes against pary


By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net
FORMER Prime Minister
Perry Christie will face a lead-
- ership challenge at the PLP's
February convention if the
election court case involving
Senator Allyson Maynard-
Gibson goes against the party,
insiders claim.
Senior Justice Anita
Allen and Justice Jon Isaacs
are to rule within the next
three weeks on the PLP's
challenge of the May 2 gen-
eral election result in
Pinewood.
The PLP and FNM have
already acknowledged, based
on the evidence, that 85 votes
should be thrown out, 56
should remain, with another
42 still in dispute.
If the court accepts that 85
or more votes should be dis-
counted, scrutiny, or a
recount, would be necessary
before the lawful winner of
the seat is declared.
If the PLP were to win the
petition, Mr Christie, sources
agree, would be given a "new
life" as leader and retain the
support of the party at next
month's convention.
However, it is understood
that Mrs Maynard-Gibson has
"a lot" of ground to cover to
regain the seat and that her
political future, as well as Mr


Christie's, hangs in the bal-
ance.
If Mrs Maynard-Gibson
were to lose the court chal-
lenge, it is expected that PLP
MP for West End and Bimini
Obie Wilchcombe will chal-
lenge Mr Christie for the PLP
leadership.
Dr Bernard Nottage, MP
for Bain and Grants Town,
who has expressed a desire to
lead the party, is also expected
to make a push for the top
post.
However, it is understood
that Dr Nottage, while
desirous of leading the party,
is apprehensive about vying
for the post again and will
only do so if he is nominated
and assured of an outright vic-
tory.
SEE page 10


Two stabbed, four
others arrested
during Junkanoo
By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net
TWO men were stabbed
and four others were arrest-
ed during the New Year's Day
Anthony "Tony" Carroll
Junkanoo Parade.
Two unidentified men were
yesterday treated at Princess
Margaret Hospital for knife
wounds they suffered in two
separate altercations on Bay
Street.
One man had facial injuries,
the other was cut on his left
hand. Both injuries were con-
sidered to be "non-life-threat-
ening." Investigations into
SEE page 10

| Woman is

charged with

S78th murder


Four men charged

with killing officer


* By NATARIO McKENZIE
FOUR men, accused of the
brutal slaying of police Con-
stable Ramos Williams, were
arraigned in Magistrate's
Court on Monday.
Mario Flowers, 26, of
Sapodilla Boulevard, Shawn
Feaster, 35, of Buttonwood
Avenue, Ramond Thompson,
25, also known as Ramond
Jones, of Wulf Road, and
Sylvester Aritis, 23, of Fritz
Lane, were arraigned before
Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez at Court One, Bank
Lane, on Monday morning.
All four men have been
charged with killing police
Constable 2827 Ramos
Williams on Saturday, Decem-
ber 29.
Williams, 26, who was
attached to the Wulff Road


police station, was on mobile
patrol in a marked police vehi-
cle with two other officers
around 3 am on Saturday
when several persons were
observed in a Nissan Sentra
driving from Collins Avenue
onto Shirley Street.
The officers reportedly
became suspicious and fol-
lowed the car, which stopped
on Deveaux Street just in
front of The Tribune.
Officer Williams was
reportedly shot several times
as he got out of the patrol car.
Williams staggered across the
street and took cover behind a
yellow storage container in the
parking lot next to The Tri-
bune as the gunfire continued.
He was taken to hospital
where he died of his injuries.
SEE page 10


THE Valley Boys, with
their presentation of the
theme "Earth, Wind, Fire
and Water", were crowned
victors of the New Year's
Day Anthony 'Tony' Car-
roll Junkanoo Parade by
the National Junkanoo
Committee.
Before the parade, the
group announced that it
hoped its theme would
help raise environmental
awareness.
Last week's winners of
the Boxing Day parade,
the One Family group with
its theme "What time is
it?" placed second, fol-
lowed by the Saxons Super
Stars with the theme of
"The Vikings are Coming"
in third place.
Roots, depicting the
"NFL football live" phe-
nomena placed fourth, and
the Prodigal Sons, who
were disqualified last week
at the Boxing Day parade,
placed fifth with the theme
SEE page 10


A 48-YEAR-OLD woman
was arraigned in Magistrate's
.Courton Monday, charged
with the country's 78th mur-
der.
Donna Fisher of Bacardi
Road was arraigned before
Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez a rt One, Bank
Lane, on Monday, charged
with the murder of Anthony
Colebrooke.
Colebrooke,19, of Sunset
Park, was reportedly found
near Bacardi Road sometime
around 6 pm on Boxing Day
with multiple stab wounds.
Fisher, who is represented
by lawyer Shaka Serville, was
not required to plead to the
charge and was remanded to
Her Majesty's Prison. The
case was adjourned to Janu-
ary 25.
* CORRECTION
IN an article on page 6 of
Monday's Tribune on the death
of Ralph Seligman, QC, attor-
ney Carey Leonard was incor-
rectly referred to as the former
counsel of the Grand Bahama
Port Authority.
Mr Leonard in fact continues
to represent the Port Authority
as lead counsel.
The Tribune apologises for
any inconvenience this error
may have caused.


NA ;.


. ,.- ,,., A! w" l-. .."VI -


ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE'RE #1


Posponi


liailtyove S ha


MON






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2. WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2008


Oscar-winning actor aims to




bring musical to Bahamas


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net
THE Academy Award-win-
ning American actor Louis Gos-
sett Jr, who can boast of Cat
Island roots, has vowed to help
Bahamians find their African
origins through a world-famous
musical.
The 71-year-old thespian,
best known for roles in movies
such as "An Officer and a Gen-
tleman" and "Enemy Mine",

FO0 N AN EVC

U ."'.'e-,Fngcie


Star with Cat Island roots

in talks with govt officials


visited Nassau over Christmas
for a short vacation and to meet
Bahamian government officials.
Mr Gossett met with some
government members to discuss
bringing the musical "African
Footprint" executive pro-
duced by him to the Bahamas.
The stage show, ,written and
produced by Richard Loring,
tells the diverse history of South
Africa with a mix of Afro- and
Euro-centric music and dance.
To date the show has been
seen by over 250 million peo-
ple in South Africa, Europe,


China, Australia, Israel, India
and the US.
Mr Gossett, whose father
hailed from Bennet's Harbour
in Cat Island, said he wants to
be responsible for bringing the
stage show to the Bahamas "for
the reason of our history."
"My foundation ERACISM
is dedicated to educating young
black children about their roots.
If you don't know where you


come from, you won't know
where you are going," the actor
said in a press release.
After 57 years on stage and in
front of the television and
movie cameras, Mr Gossett said
that "dealing with young people
through my foundation, I feel
like I'm just getting started, act-
ing is one of the careers you
don't retire from."
The actor was a guest at the
official Christmas Eve opening
of Cedric Munnings' Nirvana
Beach Pavilion Restaurant, Bar
and Lounge on Love Beach.
Mr Gossett was born in
Brooklyn, New York, where he
grew up with other famous peo-


ple such as Ella Fitzgerald, Lena
Home and Duke Ellington.
He went to New York Uni-
versity on a basketball and dra-
ma scholarship.
In 1982 he won an Oscar in
the best supporting actor cate-
gory for his performance
in "An Officer and a Gentle-
man."
Mr Gossett also won a Gold-
en Globe for his role in HBO's
"The Josephine Baker Story"
and starred in the critically
acclaimed mini-series
"Roots."
He last starred in "Tyler Per-
ry's Daddy's Little Girls", which
was released in 2007.


LUUI SUSSII I JR. nolas hIS
Oscar in Los Angeles Monday
night, April 11. 1983 after win-
ning in the best supporting actor
category at the 55th Annual
Academy Awards. Gossett won
for his performance in "An Offi-
cer and a Gentleman."
(AP Photo)


* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
THE last few residents of a government-
provided trailer home community in Grand
Bahama, who have had their bills personally
footed by MP Obie Wilchcombe since the
beginning of October, are due to move out
this week, the MP said yesterday.
The vacating of the land in West End on
which the trailers sit, which is in fact owned
by the Ginn Development Company, will
allow that company to go ahead with imple-
menting their plans for the area, he said.
Yesterday, Mr Wilchcombe said that all
but three mothers and their children have
been re-housed, and those remaining will
likely move into rental accommodation in
Eight Mile Rock in the next week.
Forty-one people 18 adults and 23 chil-
dren had been housed in the trailer homes,
which were set up under the PLP govern-
ment to accommodate some victims of Hur-
ricanes Jeanne and Wilma in 2003. In Sep-
tember, the Ministry of Housing under the
new FNM government issued a notice calling
for all of the individuals to leave the property
by the 28th of that month, claiming that many
who were now living there were never orig-
inally victims of the storms, the trailers were
in a poor condition, and the monthly utilities
bill being footed by the government was sub-
stantial.
However, Mr Wilchcombe protested,
claiming that not enough notice was given,


and that the hurricane season was an inap-
propriate time to carry out such an
eviction.
Shortly afterwards the government
announced that Mr Wilchcombe had taken
over financial responsibility for the commu-
-nity, which is in his constituency.
Minister of Housing Kenneth Russell had
said that the water and electricity bills for the
community were in the region of $5,000 and
$2,000 a month respectively.
In November, the MP had said he antici-
pated having all of the individuals out by
mid-December.

Shortage
These persons were unable to leave by
the mid-December deadline either because of
a shortage of available accommodation or
financial issues, Mr Wilchcombe said yes-
terday, noting that his office was unable to
locate vacant homes in West End.
Asked whether he feels the individuals
will now be in a position to support them-
selves financially, Mr Wilchcombe said he
"thinks so" but added that some may have
difficulties, particularly due to employment
shortages.
"Even if they get housing and they pay
the first and second month, there's still the
months that follow," he said.
However, he added that by making way
for the Ginn Development Company to con-
tinue to carry out their development of the,.


land, benefits ensue that will improve the
lot of Grand Bahamians.
"We want to ensure that we give (Ginn)
the opportunity (to go ahead) because once
they are able to embrace the opportunity
then we can embrace the opportunities that
will be provided by what Ginn is doing in
Grand Bahama."
The MP mentioned that, having spoken to
a Ginn representative recently about his
office's progress in having the people re-
housed, Ginn was "pleased", but he asserted
that the development company had not put
any "rush" on the operation.
"They worked with us," he said.
The company signed a heads of agreement
with the former government to create a lux-
ury resort in West End, consisting of con-
dominium hotel units, residential sites, two
golf courses, a private airport and a casino,
among other amenities.
Mr Wilchcombe said that he believes the
extra time provided by his having taken over
the costs of keeping the trailer community up
and running after the initial September dead-
line gave the people the opportunity to "reor-
ganise...and better position themselves"
ahead of moving out of the accommodation.
Previously, asked why the individuals
would not have yet been re-housed under
the former PLP government, Mr Wilch-
combe admitted that the question was a
"valid" one.
However, he said that the government had
been "overwhelmed" by the size of the dis-
aster wrought by the tw?,hurricanes.


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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2008, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


LOCAL NEWS


* In brief Bahamas' handling of Daniel Smith
Struggling

tribe asks

for financial inquest criticised on US TV station

boost


* ROSEAU, Dominica
THE last remaining pre-
Columbian tribe in the
eastern Caribbean asked
Tuesday for public and pri-
vate funds to ensure its
survival, according to
Associated Press.
About 70 percent of the
Kalinagos living in a 3,800-
acre (1,538-hectare) terri-
tory in Dominica's north-
east are impoverished, said
Carib Indian chief Charles
Williams. They live in
greater poverty than the
rest of the country, relying
mostly on banana and cit-
rus farming for income.
He spoke at a New
Year's celebration orga-
nized by government offi-
cials to encourage
islanders abroad to return
home or send remittances
to help ease poverty in
Dominica, where roughly
23 percent of 72,000 inhab-
itants are unemployed.
Culture Minister Lor-
raine Bannis-Roberts
urged people to "recommit
themselves to their coun-
try."
An estimated 3,000
Carib Indians live in the
former British and French
colony.

Barbados

prepares for

large voter

turnout

* BRIDGETOWN,
Barbados
VOTER turnout is
expected to be high for
general elections that pit
Barbados's prime miti'ster
against his cousin later
this month, government
officials said as the dead-
line to register to vote
passed Monday, according
to Associated Press.
The ruling Barbados
Labor Party expects to
retain its majority in the
island's 30-seat parlia-
ment in the Jan. 15 vote.
Prime Minister Owen
Arthur, who is seeking a
fourth term, is running
against his cousin in the
St. Peter constituency,
traditionally a BLP
stronghold. If he loses
that seat, the BLP will
choose another candidate
to run for prime minister
against David Thompson,
head of the main opposi-
tion Democratic Labor
Party.
Barbados's elections
office said it plans to
open at least 24 new
polling stations to accom-
modate the anticipated
surge in voters.


I i I A
IVESTMEI OPPORTMIMTY
Two (2) storey, shops, office
and three (3) two (2) bedroom
(2/1) apartments.
IR'lIIFVANVEN


THE Bahamas' handling of
the Daniel Smith inquest has
been sharply criticised by lead-
ing names on one of Ameri-
ca's top cable television sta-
tions.
And the government has
been warned that, no matter
how many times the inquest is
adjourned, Fox TV will "never
let this story go."
The long-delayed inquest,
which has already been
adjourned three times, aims to
establish whether a crime was
committed when Daniel, 20,
died at Doctors Hospital on
September 10, 2006.
Two separate autopsy
reports have established that
the son of cover girl Anna
Nicole Smith had a cocktail of
drugs including methdone -
in his body when he died in
his mother's hospital room
while visiting Nassau to see
his newly-born sister, Dan-
nielynn.
Both top Fox TV anchor
Geraldo Rivera and noted
American pathologist Dr
Michael Barden made it clear
on screen over the weekend
that they have little faith in
Bahamian authorities or the
inquest process.


Man escapes death after


car crashes into tree


* By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net
A 28-YEAR-OLD man narrowly escaped
death on New Year's Eve when his car crashed
into a tree just a few feet from the shore of Lake
Cunningham.
Traffic was backed up Monday morning along
the stretch commonly referred to as "Airport
Road", as passers-by stopped to view the 1997
White Honda Accord driven by Theodore Sey-
mour Larrimore, which was wrapped around a
palm tree off John F Kennedy Drive.
, According to a witness, just after 10am Mr
Larrimore, a Foxdale resident, was driving alone
west on John F Kennedy Dr, when he attempted
to overtake a vehicle.
As he did so another vehicle in front of him did
the same, leading Mr Larrimore to swerve off
the road to the right, where he hit the tree in
front of the lake.


Police and paramedics tried to free Mr Larri-
more whose legs were trapped under the col-
lapsed steering wheel.
Twelve firefighters from two fire units, and
two sets of Jaws of Life extraction equipment
were needed to free the victim, whose right leg
was severely injured in the crash.
The left car door, where Mr Larrimore was
eventually hauled out of the wreck before being
taken to Princess Margaret Hospital for treat-
ment, was left covered in blood.
The accident ironically took place in front of a
public safety billboard that read 'Accident Pre-
vention is My Intention'.
Mr Larrimore, employed by Delta Airlines, is
married with a seven-month-old child. Relatives
of the victim were on the scene, including his
uncle, who was seen collecting belongings scat-
tered along the lake foreshore.
Mr Larrimore was described by authorities as
"fortunate" as his injuries are not life-threatening,
even though his car was destroyed.


Bahamas basketball team


'robbed on Florida trip'


A HIGH school basketball
team from the Bahamas was
robbed of its uniforms, tro-
phies and money during a trip
to Central Florida, US media
reported yesterday.
Investigators told CBS
Florida affiliate Local 6 that
the team of 13 players are
underprivileged and raised
money for the trip to play in
several tournaments in Flori-
da.
The team's trip to Oak
Ridge was their first time in
Florida.
According to police reports,
the team were visiting the
West Oaks Mall in Ocoee
when someone stole their


rental van from the shopping
centre's parking lot. In the van
were the team's luggage, mon-
ey, uniforms and several tro-
phies.
As investigations into this
incident continue and the
police follow several leads, the
team is heading back to the
Bahamas without their
belongings.
Oakridge High School ath-
letic director Red Johnston
said that this incident shows
that "people don't care about
other people anymore."
"There's no conscience in
young people today. You
know, (they) just go out there
and steal from other people,"


he said.
Bahamian shoppers visiting
Florida have in the past been
warned by travel agents not
to leave luggage or other valu-
able items in vans, as potential
robbers can easily see through
the vehicle's windows into the
van's interior.
The Tribune last night was
unable to determine which
Bahamian high school the
team is from.


Rivera, who aired his suspi-
cions that certain people were
probably being protected by
high-level Bahamas connec-
tions, said the inquest had
already been subject to three
long adjournments.
But he warned Bahamian
authorities that, no matter
how many times the inquest
was adjourned, Fox would stay
with the story until the very
end.
"We will never let this story
go," he told viewers, warning
the Bahamas not to make the


mistake of thinking the mat-
ter would go away.
"They are putting it off hop-
ing everyone will lose inter-
est," said Rivera, "but you can
adjourn it 30 times or more,
we will never let this story go."
Dr Barden, a top forensic
pathologist, noted that a
Bahamian coroner who had
wanted the case to go ahead
(attorney Linda Virgill) had
been "bumped off the case"
in the early stages.
He claimed there was
enough evidence to have
Daniel's death classified as a
homicide, but added: "I
have no confidence in the
process."
Immediately after Daniel's
demise, then coroner Linda
Virgill announced an inquest
date, only to be pushed aside
in a reorganisationn" of coro-
ner duties. Chief magistrate
Roger Gomez was also taken
off the case after allegedly dis-
cussing the issue on American
television.
The inquest is now being
conducted by magistrate
William Campbell. It has been
adjourned until January 28,
with at least 10 witnesses still
to be heard.


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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2008


THE TRIBUNE


EDIORAULETES T HEEITOR


The Tribune Limited
NI /1.1 ./1S. 1I ))I(CT'S ,IURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
I'cingl,' ml l, .'Swc'iar to 'lhe Dogmas of No Master

I I '()! 1 l ill l'l/C 1, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

S/R I,/' N, /)/ 'I'I('CH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
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Iowa Caucus' final poll


DES MOINES, owa The results of the
Des Moines Register's final poll of low;l caucus-
goers, showing Sen. Barack Ohainma leading the
Democrats and Mike lHuckahee leading the
Republicans, continued to reverberate across
the campaign trail on iT uesda\ as the clock
ticked toward the caucuses on Imlursdav night.
Obama seemed to haic fresIh bounce in his
step as he set oil on his first fli around tour of
Iowa. At the first of four events on the day, he
addressed an audience of moCe than 1,0)00I peo-
ple in Des Moines, saving: "1 think 2008 is going
to be a good yeai. Thal's what I think. I think
some big things might happen in 2008."
While Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton. former
President Bill Clinton and their campaign advis-
ers publicly projected confidence and optilmsm,
hitting the campaign trail with hl to on Tuesda\
morning, there was substantial surprise and con-
sternation behind the scenes. I ter first event, in
Ames, drew about 750t people.
Her advisers said that no one had predicted
that the poll would show Obama as the prefer-
ence of 32 per cent of caucus-goers compared
with 25 per cent for lionnn and 24 per cent for
John Edwards.
On the Republican side, a day after facing
guffaws from a room full of repol ters for screen-
ing a commercial criticizing his rival Mitt Rom.
ney after cancelling the ad. Mike Huckabee
sought to fuse his rejection of the attack adver-
tisement with his pitch to voters' economic anx-
ieties, asking lowans to reject the power of mon-
ey in politics by helping him beat an onslaught of
negative commercials that his shoestring cam-
paign could never affoi d to match.
"I need your vote beItuse I can't do it. I can't
spend enough none hleie'" to liht back with his
own ads. he told a cio\\ d ,it ahout .'0) people ill
Sergeant Bluff. sa\ Iine ls i ,,nr(\ woi uld' be a
historic statement iit. Ii L n l the influence of
money and the tone of presidentIal ptiliics."
Mitt Romnev was in cenitial lowa. where he
went after Huckahee l:o making critical com-
ments about President Bush l[ eaIcign police\ on
Monday.
"I think we should come together and recog-
nize the great work our piesidcnt is doing and
not take our rhetoric or our plays from the
Democratic playbook," Romne\ said. "This is
the kind of stuff you expect of lhe )Democrats,
but it's certainly not something \ou expect of a
presidential contend on ithe Republican side."
Soon after the Register poll was published
Monday night, the C'liton camp sent out a
memo questioning the methodology\ and the
sampling, including the fact that 40 per cent of"
likely Democratic caucus -1e cis described them-
selves as independents.
"A lot of people read about this poll and were
totally taken aback, said one prominent Clinton
donor in Manhattan, who spoke on condition of
anonymity because he did not want to he seen
criticizing Clinton's operation.
Obama did not dwell onil the results of the


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poll. Privately, his aides questioned the num-
bers themselves, but said the trajectory matched
the momentum that they were seeing in data
they are collecting hourly through telephone
calls and door-to-door canvassing.
"The polls look good, but understand this,"
Obama told supporters jammed inside the gym-
nasium at Roosevelt High School. "The polls
are not enough. The only thing that counts is
whether or not you show up to caucus. The only
thing that counts is whether over the next 72
hours you are willing to work for this."
A fresh batch of Obama volunteers descend-
ed on neighborhoods, passing out literature
about the caucuses to remind voters of their
specific precinct locations for Thursday evening.
As the campaign hurtles to a close here, aides
believe the momentum from the poll could be a
booster rocket in pushing supporters to their
caucuses.
In a brief interview with reporters before his
plane flew from Des Moines to Sioux City, Oba-
ma said he put more stock in what he was seeing
on the ground, rather than the findings of a par-
ticular poll.
"I think it's very hard to read what's going on
except for the fact that we've got these great
crowds with unbelievable energy," he said.
"And now, I think it's going to come down to
who gets their supporters out. I'm putting my
money on my organization. It's as good and as
dedicated and as intense as I've ever seen."
Edwards began a 36-hour marathon campaign
swing on Tuesday, starting with an event with
500 people in Ames.
"I don't need a poll to tell me that we're mov-
ing." Edwards said. "We're moving every single
day."
Joe Trippi, an adviser to the campaign, who
"'was Howard Dean's campaign manager in 2004,
invoked his experience in that year's Iowa cau-
""cus, when the Dean campaign predicted
unprecedented turnouts, which never material-
ized.
The three Democrats leading in the polls fol-
lowed one another across the state, all stopping
in Council Bluffs. The Clinton campaign sought
to match the bad news from the poll with some
good news from the donors, announcing Monday
night that Clinton had raised more than $100 mil-
lion in 2007.
Still, some Clinton donors in New York who
spoke on condition of anonymity said Tuesday
morning that they were unnerved by the Regis-
ter poll. They said that they had always been told
by the Clinton high command that Iowa would
be a challenge but they said they had been led to
assume that Edwards would most likely come in
first; they never expected an Obama blowout.
Some Clinton advisers said that if Obama has
actually managed to attract a whole new crop of
independent voters to the caucus process, he
would be very tough to beat at the caucuses.
(* This article is from
The New York Times 2008)


Sir Jack Hayward



should be commended



and not condemned


EDITOR, The Tribune.
NO ONE in their right
"state of mind" who lives in
Freeport and/or other parts of
Grand Bahama, for that mat-
ter, would disagree with the
position taken by Sir Jack
Hayward, on the question of
whether to disburse dividends,
declared, recently, by the
Grand Bahama Port Authori-
ty group of companies, to its
shareholders of record; or to
reinvest those sums into the
economy of Freeport, in an
effort to bulkhead, what
seems to be a swift ebbing tide
of economic activity from this
city. The economy of Freeport
has been on the decline for
sometime, now, and the only
cure for this kind of disease is
- you guessed it Money,
Money, Money.
Freeport's Infrastructure; its
inner city neighborhoods and
its general physical appear-
ance are in a state of rapid
deterioration. This situation
will continue to worsen unless
measures are taken, posthaste,
to bring it to a halt. Our once
enviable city is in danger of
being no more and concerned
stakeholders cannot, any
longer, just sit idly by and do
nothing.
Sir Jack, notwithstanding
what his detractors may think
of him and his opinion on the
matter of "dividend pay-outs"
at this time, I submit, is show-
ing a sense of fiscal prudence,
discipline and responsibility
and therefore he ought to be
commended and supported
for putting Freeport at the top
of his list as a priority rather
than a "back burner" item.
When it comes right down to
it, you know, Sir Jack really
doesn't have to care. Most of
you, I am sure, would agree
with me that if Sir Jack wants,
he can walk away from
Freeport, economically,
tomorrow and wouldn't even
shed a tear; would that be the
right thing for him to do?
Absolutely not. Sir Jack and
the other Port Authority own-
ers have a fiduciary responsi-
bility to Freeport and it's
Licensees and it is obvious
that Sir Jack is very cognisant
of that fact and is taking his
obligations very seriously.
Mr Fred Smith, on the oth-
er hand, does not seem to
share Sir Jack's concern for
Freeport's survival; but why
should he? Mr Smith's only
role in Port Authority mat-
ters, in recent months, as far as
I can perceive, is as a paid
legal advocate, where his only


interest and consideration
would be the representation
of his clients and the collec-
tion of his legal fees, and right-
fully so. Mr Smith has no fidu-
ciary responsibility to Freeport
or its Licensees, unlike that of
Sir Jack and others. In the
local media recently it was
reported that Fred Smith
accused Sir Jack of having an
ulterior motive for wanting
the proposed payment of div-
idends deferred; well who
should we believe has the ulte-
rior motive; Sir Jack, who
wants to inject all the $20 mil-
lion of dividends back into the
Freeport economy or should
we believe Mr Smith, an


employee, who is certainly not
working for "free" but is look-
ing to get paid at the end of it
all? You be the judge. My
advice to all is do not consider
the message without consid-
ering who the messenger is.
2008 is here and it is time
that we move forward, in
Freeport. Sir Jack Hayward
should be commended and
not condemned for refusing
to accept millions of dollars
in dividends, while the city of
Freeport and its economy are
dying an accelerated death.
He wants to put it all back into
Freeport and I say "Hats off
to you, sir". Those are my
views.
FORRESTER
J CARROLL JP
Freeport,
Grand Bahama,
December 28,2007.


Biofuel business

EDITOR, The Tribune.
IN YOUR edition of December 24th, Business section, there was
a lead article in which it was proposed that we appoint an energy
czar and a Mr Joudi, unknown what interests this good gentle-
man has, proposing that we should get into the Biofuel business by
growing grain.
Firstly, as things have evolved many can today in hindsight say
that possibly Minister Leslie Miller might have been correct and we
should have signed onto the Petro-Caribe Initiative although that
will annoy many who even suggest that higher prices of gasoline will
not injure the economy of The Bahamas.
The facts of life in our service driven economy is that a cent any-
where is added to the bill and the bill is paid for by the consumer,
not government or the businessman.
The public needs to know the long standing practice of BEC,
BTC and Water & Sewerage is that the government bill is never
paid for, but bartered against taxes or services rendered due from
those parastatal entities so whatever price the energy or product
increases to it never affects government budgeting so why should
the budgeting people worry what the cost of essential services
goes to?
The most ironic thing Biofuel fanfare-by many environmentalists
is that this approach has simply added to our individual grocery-
food bills and when coupled with other harvest problems many basic
foodstuffs as well as livestock will increase considerably or have
already and will continue.
BEC in Nassau uses Bunker C as there is a much lower customs
duty due on that, 10 per cent plus 7 per cent stamp tax against diesel
- the reason that electricity is more expensive in Grand Bahama
is that they use diesel, which, without any duty, is more expensive
than Bunker C.
The initial step of any alternative energy policy has to be that the
public may actually use an alternative source other than BEC the
current law disallows this. The economics of alternatives? To what
extent can alternative energy sources lower the cost of energy?
Don't fool yourself today the cost of as simple an item as a solar
water heater takes a good number of years to recoup the cost
whilst a simple $20 installed, on-off switch, would suffice or a
timer switch.
If we can find a fuel source which costs nothing then we will effec-
tively and immediately eradicate the consequence of ever rising
prices of fossil fuels.
N RUSSELL
Nassau,
December, 2007.


To All My Young people need to

Val ed ents silence the violence
Valued Clients EDITORTheTribune.

MY FELLOW young people, I am writing to say that crime
I Am No Longer Employed does not pay. Young people, we need to put down the guns and
knives and silence the violence.
With Lampkin & Company I believe that many of our young people have potential if they just
try to stay out of trouble. Many of our youth today believe that the
.I *only way to solve a problem is to act in violence.
Cindy John I have witnessed young people who have fought over stepping on
o meone's shoes takin someone's irlfriend or bo vfriendan or ev n


,iCU0 g g by5Ju>b ,V[UWVU 0 5u U r UUy even
simpler matters such as saying something to someone.
These are things that we should be concerned about because it
shows that too many young people do not understand real conflict
resolution.
Adults, please do not give up on our youth. I believe that all hope
is not lost, and everyone can achieve success if they just try. As a
young person, I am speaking to all youth, we can do anything in life
if we work towards it. Dreams are for real all you have to do is just
believe.
Faith Temple Christian Academy, 10th grader.
KAIRA TAYLOR
Nassau,
November 27, 2007.






Professional marine navigation doesn't happen
by accident. Study and learn theoretical and
practical aspects by enrolling in the Terrestrial
Navigation Course offered by The Bahamas
School of Marine Navigation. Plan to attend
the free first class on Monday, January 7, 2008
at 7pm at BASRA Headquarters on East Bay
Street.

Telephone the school:
364-5987, 364-281., or 535-6234
for details and fees.


Three(3) fully equipped operatories
located in large multispecialty
ambulatory clinic in,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.



Available for immediate occupancy for
full-time or sessional dental practice.

Contact:

Ms. Kaijanna Lockhart

Phone: 242-373-7400


1 1


___






TH~ TIBUNEWEDNEDAYJANUAYL2,C008,NAGES


0 In brief





people for
'50 years of

resistance'

HAVANA
AILING leader Fidel Cas-
trp saluted the Cuban peo-
ple for their "50 years of
resistance" against the Unit-
ed States in a written mes-
sage read on state television
shortly before the first min-
utes of the new year, accord-
ing to Associated Press.
"During the course of the
morning, the 49th year of the
Revolution will have been
left behind and we will have
fully entered the 50th year,
which will symbolize a half
century of heroic resis-
tance," said the message
read by a television presen-
ter shortly before midnight.
The broadcast showed old
photographs of the Cuban
leader.
"We proclaim to the world
with pride this record which
makes us believe in the most
just of our demands: that
there be respect for the life
and the wholesome joy of
our nation."
Cuba will mark the 50th
anniversary of the Jan. 1,
1959, triumph of the revolu-
tion that brought Castro to
power a year from now, but
is already characterizing all
of 2008 leading up to that
date as the "50th year of the
revolution."
The 81-year-old Castro
has not been seen in public
in the 17 months since he
announced he had under-
gone emergency intestinal
surgery and was provisional-
ly ceding his powers to a
caretaker government led by
his younger brother Raul,
the 76-year-old defense min-
ister.
Fidel's exact ailment and
condition are carefully
guarded state secrets, but
.. Raul,qpstro recentlYd ,.,
..,voters itie,eastern cityo..<
. Sant.go thatjis brpthexis
doing well enough that
Communist Party leaders
support his candidacy to be
re-elected as a deputy to
Cuba's National Assembly,
or parliament, on Jan. 20.
When the new parliament
meets on a still unspecified
day in early March for the
first time after the national
elections, deputies will elect
a new ruling Council of State
Cuba's governing body.
At that time, they will also
have to decide whether to
retain the elder Castro as the
council's longtime president.
Fidel has not said directly
whether he would seek to.
retain the post, but recently
indicated he could be think-
ing about retirement.


Roselyn

Sanchez to wed
fellow actor

Eric Winter
*SAN JUAN,
Puerto Rico
ROSELYN Sanchez
and fellow actor Eric
Winter got engaged dur-
ing a holiday vacation on
the island of Vieques, just
east of mainland Puerto
Rico, according to a state-
ment released Tuesday,
according to Associated
Press.
The couple, who have
been dating for two years,
will talk about a date and
location for their nuptials
once they return to Los
Angeles, according to
Brenda Rodriguez,
Sanchez's publicist in


Puerto Rico.
Sanchez appears in the /
CBS series "Without a
Trace" and produced the
2007 movie "Yellow."
Winter has appeared in a
variety of TV shows,
including "Days of Our
Lives."


I.


Fourteen homicides on


Grand Bahama in 2007


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net


aged 31, in April, 2007
6 Lambert Bowe, aged 38,
in May, 2007
7 Roselyn Louis, aged 20, in
June, 2007
8 Alex Davis, aged 48, in
August, 2007
9 Corporal Edison Bain,
aged 28, in October, 2007
10 Kenneth Lightbourne,
aged 46, in November, 2007
11 Gifford Martin Jr, aged
32, in November, 2007
12 Vincent Pedican, aged 64,
in November, 2007
13 Ryan Wood, aged 35, in
December, 2007
14 Julian Nicholls, aged 22,
in December, 2007
Grand Bahama lost three
young businessmen: Konstan-
tino Vardoulis, 31, owner and
operator of G B Foods and the
Chicken Farm; Lambert


Bowe, owner of Lebco Tyre
Shop, and Gifford Martin Jr,
owner of Xtreme Auto Sup-
plies.
All three men were gunned
down and killed one at his
residence, and two at their
business establishments.
According to reports, Var-
doulis was shot to death on
April 12. He had just pulled
up at the entrance of his
Bahama Reef residence
around 1.20am when an
unknown assailant shot him.
Police have charged two per-
sons in connection with his
murder. They are still search-
ing for a third suspect. In May,
Lambert Bowe was discovered
dead at his business off Yel-
low Pine Street. Two men
have been charged with his
murder.
Gifford Martin Jr was found


dead at his auto shop on
November 16 with a gunshot
wound to the head. Two men
have also been charged in con-
nection with his murder.
Police are still searching for
suspects in three unsolved
murders on Grand Bahama.
School security officer Vin-
cent Pedican, 64, was working
the midnight to 8am shift at
Eight Mile Rock High School
when he was discovered miss-
ing on November 22 following
an apparent break-in at the
school.
The vehicle driven by Mr
Pedican was found abandoned
in the Hawksbill area on
November 22. His body was
later found on November 23
on a service road off East Sun-
rise Highway.
Mr Pedican was employed
as a security officer in the
school system for 15 years and
was scheduled for mandatory
retirement in January, 2008.
His death has highlighted
the need for additional man-
power, perimeter fencing and
video surveillance at public
schools on Grand Bahama.
No-one has been arrested


for his murder. Desmond But-
ler, alias Butler Druma
Alexander Carey, was found
dead inside a Burgundy 1999
Buick Regal parked at the
roadside near Barbary Beach
in March. Butler had a wound
to his torso.
Ryan Wood, 35, was gunned
down shortly before 2pm on
December 5 in the Redwood
Lane area.
Marvin Fredericks was
taken into police custody
on December 29 for question-
ing in relation to Wood's mur-
der.
Asst Supt Mackey said
police are grateful to the pub-
lic and media for their assis-
tance over the year.
"We would like to take time
to say thank you to the public
and the media who supported
us throughout the year and
would like to please renew our
appeal to the public with
respect to cases No 2 and 12."
Supt Mackey said persons
do not have to identify them-
selves and can call police at
350-3107/8 or 911 with any
information that would assist
them with their investigations.


. i i.....n ',
* flI
By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
THE country's premier
beauty pageant franchise, the
Miss Bahamas Universe
Organisation, has started its
nation-wide search for the
2008 Miss Bahamas beauty
queen.
Executive producer and
franchise owner Gaynell
Stubbs told The Tribune that
the registration process for the
upcoming pageant is under-
way.
Prospective contestants
must be Bahamian women
aged 18-26, single, have never
given birth, of good moral
character and have the desire
to be crowned Miss Universe
2008.
Women fitting the above
specified criteria can register
online at www.missba-
hamas.org or call the organi-
sation at 364-3472. All those
interested have until January
10, 2008, to register.
Under the theme "Seven
years of gratitude and splen-
dour", commemorating the
organisation's seven years of
producing the pageant, the
upcoming event promises to
be the best to date, organis-
ers said.
"We're pretty much going
to be more of a gala event
(next year)," executive pro-
ducer Gaynell Stubbs told The
Tribune yesterday. "There
are also going to be a lot more
prizes and awards given to the
Queen and her court (the
semi-finalists). We're finalis-
ing (the details) with our cor-
porate sponsors now."
/ Contestants will take part
in a rigorous eight-week train-
ing programme to include
media training etiquette, stage
, grooming and modelling.
The Miss Bahamas Uni-
verse pageant will take place
on March 16, 2008, at the Rain
Forest Theatre.
The lucky lady crowned
Miss Bahamas 2008 will com-
pete in the prestigious Miss
Universe 2008 pageant to be
held in Vietnam in May, 2008.
A gathering of 90 beauty
queens spanning the world
will vie for the coveted crown.
The reigning Miss Bahamas,
Trinere Lynes, represented


a


the country at last year's
pageant in Mexico City. She
was one of 77 candidates in
the grand finale on May 28,


2007, the Miss Bahamas web-
site says.
Miss Japan, Riyo Mori, was
crowned Miss Universe 2007.


is arrested in Freeport
By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT Marvin Fredricks, the man wanted for
questioning in connection with murder, was arrested by
police at 11.25am on Friday, December 28, on Pioneers
Way near the downtown area of Freeport.
Assistant Supt Loretta Mackey said investigations are
continuing into the matter.
Police are also investigating an armed robbery that
occurred early Saturday morning involving a tourist.
According to police reports, Dusko Joketic, a 52-year-old
visitor from Plaganti, Montenegro, and a guest at the Royal
Islander Hotel, called police around 5.30am from the Island
Palm Resort to report that he had just been robbed.
Mr Joketic told police that after leaving the La Tropic
Club in the International Bazaar around 3.30am he met a
Caucasian man driving a sports car. The two spoke for a
while and he left with the man.
The man drove to an unknown area, where he pulled out
an 8" blade knife and robbed Mr Joketic of cash.
Supt Mackey said the suspect is described as 5'8" tall and
wearing a white tee-shirt and a pair of black jeans.
She is urging anyone who was in the area of the La Trop-
ic Club during that time and has information that might
assist the police with their investigation to call 350-3107/8 or
911.
Police are also investigating the theft of a large quantity
of copper wiring, valued at over $17,000, from Bahamas
Telecommunication Company 6n Settler's Way.
Supt Mackey said on Friday, December 28, that Edney
Sherman, the Logistics Manager at BTC, reported that
sometime between noon on December 27 and 1pm on
December 28, some persons) cut a hole in the eastern
chain link fence to gain access to BTC's property on Set-
tlers Way and stole 2,138 ft of copper wire, valued at
$17,486.62.
Police are continuing their investigation into this incident.


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


I ib^^^^^d ^^^:,1Ij ^^^^^


Blair & East Bay Street
Light brown female
Potcake. Very Friendly.

Tel. 393-8630


SMan wanted for questioning

Search begins for in connection with murder


Miss Bahamas




Universe 2008


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2008, PAGE 5


Arrests still pending


in three cases


FREEPORT The homi-
cide count on Grand Bahama
for 2007 has ended with a total
of 14 killings with arrests still
pending in three cases.
Asst Supt Loretta Mackey
said no-one has been charged
in connection with the mur-
ders of 31-year-old Desmond
Butler in March, 64-year-old
Vincent Pedican in November
and 35-year-old Ryan Wood
in December.
A report issued to The Tri-
bune indicated that March and
November had the highest
number of murders during
2007.
The list of homicides in
Grand Bahama is as follows:
1 Felix Mitchell, aged 19, in
January, 2007
2 Desmond Butler, aged 31,
in March, 2007
3 Ellie Jean, age 24, in
March, 2007
4 Maxo Monome, aged 40,
in March, 2007
5 Konstantino Vardoulis,


[

i


TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS
FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 3:22-L:2157]


THE TRIBUNE




PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2008


NEW YEAR'S DAY IN PICTURES


JUNKANOO PARADE GETS 2008


Fireworks display


sets the mood


0 .


... and then the fun really began
PRODIGAL SONS ONE FAMILY


......................PHOTOS: Patrick Hanna/BIS...........


-_I I 11 I I> 1 J1 1 ir


THE TRIBUNE







NEW YEAR'S DAY IN PICTURES



OFF TO SPECTACULAR START

SAXONS


ROOTS


VALLEY BOYS


RAY SMITH
Everybody is talking about
Calypso Man.
MY,4 fmM- IIM. M


V Ass& esbhfcvd ik (5&a 64
c caul8A% mar

Warwick St (Behind Sun Tee)
Ph 393-3453


C&r 6Pommmoni
Our QcKuoin
ca? 7-Qcarch 13

Mon 7:00 p.m Historical Books II

7:00 p.m. Homiletics I

Tues 7:00 p.m. Epistles II

7:00 p.m. Minor Prophets

Thurs 7:00 p.m. Daniel & Revelation

Fri 7:00 p.m. Computers II

MA and (ST Class:
To be announced. US Instructors from Global University


Registration Jan 3-4 or before first class


PHOTOS: Patrick Hanna/BIS


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2008, PAGE 7





THE TRIBUNE


LOALEW


BOOK SAYS CIA'S HISTORY HAS BEEN MARKED BY INCOMPETENCE




Debunking the myth of a monster with




tentacles reaching around the world


"We went all over the world
and we did what we wanted.
God, we had fun." -Al
Ulmer, chief of the CIA's Far
East division in the 1950s.

T. here was just
one book on my
holiday reading
list this year -
the 700-page Legacy of Ashes
published recently by Pulitzer
prize-winning New York
Times investigative reporter,
Tim Weiner.
It is an utterly absorbing
history of the United States
Central Intelligence Agency
- from its foundation after
World War Two to its recent
humiliation after asserting
that Iraq bristled with
weapons of mass destruction.
Weiner presents on-the-
record accounts taken from
recently declassified docu-
ments as well as the personal
recollections of those
involved.
And its bottom line is that
"the most powerful country
in the history of Western civ-
ilization has failed to create a
first-rate spy service (and)
that failure constitutes a dan-
ger to the national security of
the United States."
Wow! When Tough Call
was a leftist college student
in the early 1970s, the CIA
was considered omnipotent
- a mythical monster whose
tentacles reached out to con-
trol the world.
We believed it was capable
of the most extraordinary
things, and we detested its
power and influence.
But now we learn (from
the horse's mouth it appears)
that over the past 60 years
CIA operations have been
marked by incompetence and
recklessness, and in many cas-
es were counter-productive
to US interests.
Weiner documents this
appalling record using the
actual words of the major
protagonists.
For example, a secret
report to President Dwight
D. Eisenhower at the end of
his second term determined
that "all of the covert action
programmes undertaken by
CIA up to this time" had not
been worth "the risk of the
great expenditure of man-
power, money and other
resources."
In those early postwar
years, thousands of agency
recruits were sent to their
deaths on futile missions
behind the Iron Curtain in
Europe and Asia.
Millions of dollars were
wasted on worthless opera-
tions.
The political and social fab-
ric of many third world coun-
tries was subverted at will,


1
jw
A ,' *-V .. ,
., A,
a''' S


- I ~iM FAiULT YI NT EIGENCE


"... we learn (from the horse's
mouth it appears) that over the
past 60 years CIA operations
have been marked by incom-
petence and recklessness, and
in many cases were counter-
productive to US interests."


and often without good pur-
pose.
And many covert actions
were undertaken without the
full knowledge of the political
directorate.
And although Weiner says
one of the chief motivations
for creating the agency was
to prevent another Pearl Har-
bour, the CIA failed to warn
the White House of the first
Soviet atomic bomb (1949),
the Chinese invasion of
Korea (1950), anti-Soviet
uprisings in East Germany
(1953) and Hungary (1956),
the dispatch of Soviet missiles
to Cuba (1962), and the
Arab-Israeli war of 1973, not
to mention Saddam Hussein's
invasion of Kuwait in 1990.
In fact, Weiner's title for
his book comes straight from
the mouth of President Eisen-
hower, who complained bit-
terly about the failures of US
intelligence as he was leaving
office.



Disbanding
The old general told a
meeting of the National Secu-
rity Council in 1961 that, in
this regard, he would "leave a
legacy of ashes" to his suc-
cessor.
Weiner begins his story at
the very beginning with the
disbanding of the wartime
Office of Strategic Services
by President Harry Truman
a month after the Japanese
surrender.
There was little interest in a
permanent espionage service
at the time, but as the US
began to fear the Soviet
Union, the CIA was created
in 1947 with the twin tasks of
collecting global intelligence
and conducting secret oper-
ations for the president over-
seas.
In the 1950s the agency ran
"swashbuckling" operations
all over the place toppling


governments, fixing elections,
buying political leaders or
plotting to kill them, and
sponsoring guerilla warfare.
According to Weiner, its ear-
ly leaders disdained intelli-
gence analysis, supposedly a
core mission, and CIA offi-
cers were often clueless about
the countries they worked in.
The best example is prob-
ably Iran also considered
one of the agency's top suc-
cesses.

n 1953, an operation
was launched to over-
throw the elected prime min-
ister and reinstall the exiled
Shah on the pretext that the
country's oil reserves might
come under Soviet control.
The CIA fomented Islamic
sentiments and hired mobs to
assemble in Tehran for a
"spontaneous revolution".
Weiner quotes a US embassy
official who witnessed the
opening round:
"It began with a public
demonstration...They began
shouting anti-Mossadeq, pro-
Shah slogans and proceeded
to march through the streets...
Many others joined
them...Two of the men in the
crowd were religious leaders.
One was the Ayatollah
Ahmed Kashani. Alongside
him was his 51-year-old devo-
tee, [Ayatollah Khomei-
ni]...the future leader of
Iran."
Now this seems like
exquisite irony to me.


But the agency's reaction
is that Weiner views CIA
actions "solely through the
prism of events decades later,
as though you can draw a
simple, straight, decisive line
of causation through years of
complicated history....Legacy
of Ashes paints far too dark a
picture of the agency's past."
Well, it is certainly clear
to me that there is a direct
link with the past.
The virulently anti-Amer-
ican theocratic regime created
by Khomeini in 1979, which is
now seeking to join the
nuclear club, is a direct result
of the treatment of Iran by
the British and Americans
during the Cold War.
Legacy of Ashes points out
that most of the agency's
covert actions were mandated
by the White House, and
many were illegal.
After the failed invasion of
Cuba in 1962, President
Kennedy called for Fidel Cas-
tio's head.
And JFK's successor, Lyn-
den Johnsofi, ordered the
CIA to illegally spy on Amer-
icans in the anti-war and civ-
il rights movements. Richard
Nixon's national security
adviser, Henry Kissinger, also
told the agency to spy on
Americans who opposed the
war in Vietnam.
It wasn't until after 9/11
that Congress and the Bush
administration gave the
agency thc legal right to spy
inside the borders of the
United States.


"Legacy of Ashes points out
that most of the agency's
covert actions were mandated
by the White House, and many
were illegal."


World leaders on the CIA of the chaos of the early days
payroll over the years includ- of CIA espionage and covert
ed King Hussein of Jordan, action...His recounting of
President Joseph Mobuto of events in the 1990s-the
the Congo, Prime Minister change in CIA's relationship
Nobosuke Kishi of Japan, with the military as a result
Prime Minister Forbes Burn- of the Gulf War, the effect of
ham of Guyana and the Shah the "peace dividend" on
of Iran. And like the Soviets, agency resources, and the
the CIA set up a network of debacle of the Clinton admin-
false fronts from the istration's attitudes toward
National Student Association intelligence-seem accurate
to the Congress for Cultural and useful summaries."
Freedom and Radio Free Dujmovic doesn't mention
Europe. the CIA's ultimate failure -
But Legacy of Ashes is not the 2002 intelligence estimate
a comprehensive history on Iraq's weapons of mass
despite its length. destruction that justified the
It is more in the line of war and led to the agency's
investigative reporting, and downgrading.
therefore a thoroughly good CIA Director George
read. Tenet insisted that he had
"slam dunk evidence" against
Saddam, leading the respect-
ed General Colin Powell to
Faillres make a fool of himself argu-
ing the case at the United
For those unfamiliar with Nations.
For those unfamiliar with "We think intelligence is
events over the past 60 years, e thk intelligence is
the book pr0 littlee con-,,ay -!' said
textso we rarelfy-kifpw whaT -y ecys cIraq.ef
the other ltde was-doing at -'o4. ilnor in Iraq.
the time such as crushing "What inteigence really
rebellions, causing famines, does when it is working well
torturing and killing dis- is help avoid wars."
centers, and setting up puppet In 2005 a government
sentimes report said the agency's over-
As CIA historian Nicholas riding flaw was "poor human
Dujmovic put it, "a fair treat- intelligence" an inability to
ment of intelligence and a conduct espionage.
realistic assessment of its his- As Weiner put it, "The fic-
tory...would at least least attempt tional CIA, the one that lives
to understand the very in novels and movies, is
human context of what must ompotent...for60years tens
be a record that will include of thousands of clandestine
failures service officers have gathered
This context is especially only the barest threads of tru-
necessary in appraising the ly important intelligence -
early years of CIA, when and that is the CIA's deep-
early years of CIA, when st secret."
enormous challenges were estcrd in case you are
faced by a new generation for Oh, and ering case you are
whom intelligence was some- wondeng. ..there was noth-
thing learned through often- ing ins the book about the
bitter experience. Bahama...............


B uteven the CIA
agrees that Weiner
"accurately chronicles much


What do you think? Send
comments to larry@tribune-
media.net
Or visit www.bahamapun-
dit.com


..' ~4.I


^^^^^^w^iIIIJ ^^I ^ i m'BFU If^hHB


N PAST columns I
have complained that
the regime that requires spe-
cific business licences has
held back the entrepreneurial
energy of young Bahamians.
I am still convinced that
this is still the case.
This system limits compe-
tition and creates red tape
which makes the setting up
of new businesses more diffi-
cult.
It also allows those of
influence with established


VIEW FROM AFAR


J O H N


businesses to try to limit com-
petition and preserve the sta-
tus quo.
Another consequence of
the system is higher prices
and a higher cost of living.
This column maintains that
citizens of The Bahamas


S S A


should not have to submit to
any discretionary decision as
to whether they can operate
any particular business or
practice any trade or profes-
sion.
The circumstances
described above have led to a


number of self employed or
small businesses in The
Bahamas. The opposite is
the case when it comes to
criminal enterprises and
activities, including murder.
There has been an unfor-
tunate blossoming of such
activities in recent years.
I know that there are a
number of reasons for this.
These range from social
ones such as illegal immigra-
tion, the quality of our
schools, the international
criminal activities that are


undertaken on our territory
to external cultural influ-
ences.
I would, however, like to
suggest that if young persons
were facilitated to more eas-
ily start their own legitimate
enterprises without all the red
tape presently entangling
their path, we may see a
reduction in criminal activi-
ty since these activities
require no licensees.
Anti monopoly and
restraint of trade laws would
also be helpful.


.. -, -.. .tI....L1m^, uI U nU I I l c.UUO


. .. l .

it .y'-
l "jt <-

a





WEQNEiSDAY, JANUARY 2, 2008, PAGE 9


200I


Sreraton Cable


Baoch Resort


17th Annual
Baharmas:

Business

outlook

Under the theme
"Improving
Competitiveness For
Regional Leadership"


... . r
:distinguished local and international
will answer these key questions:


authorities


Are we sufficiently competitive to be
considered regional leaders?


SPONSORS


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VI N A. N CI


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How do we maintain and improve our
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And, what will we have to do to achieve our
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SPEAKERS
Hon Zhivargo Laing, Minister of State for Finance
Hon Cad Bethel, Minister of Education, Youth, Sports & Culture
Vernice Walkine, Director-General, Ministry of Tourism
Vincent Vanderpool-Wailace. Secretary General Caribbean Tourism
Organization
Simon Townend, Partner, KPMG
Duane Sands, M.D.. Chairman, Bahamas Medical Council
Chdstopher Anand, Managing Partner. Albany
Charles Klonaris, Chairman, Nassau Tourism & Development Board
Craig Richmond, CEO, Nassau Airport Development Company
Deslree Cox, M.D., Ph.D. Rhodes Scholar
Dionisio D'Aguilar, President, Bahamas Chamber of Commerce





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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAYJANUARY2,2008TOCAL EWSHIBUNE


Pinewood

'crucial for

Christie'
FROM page one
It was also suggested
yesterday that Dr Nottage
may, in fact, play more of
a vital role in actually
"protecting" Mr Christie's
leadership than challeng-
ing it.
A PLP insider said yes-
terday that a strategy may,
in fact, be afoot to present
Dr Nottage as the only
viable leadership alterna-
tive. As Dr Nottage has a
tumultuous history with
the party, the source
claims that Mr Christie
views him as a "weaker"
challenge and wants him
as his main contender.
The hope of this
scheme, the.source said, is
to make the other possi-
ble candidates, such as
Senator Allyson Maynard-
Gibson, MPs Fred
Mitchell, Vincent Peet: and
Mr Wilchcombe, irrele-
vant figures thus weak-
ening their positions and
possible effect on Mr
Christie at the convention.
A prime example of this,
the source added, were the
recent riots in Bimini.
"Obie was the first one
on the ground when that
riot broke out. But did you
see the PLP say anything
about that? They had a lot
to say about the event,
mind you, but did not
mention a word about
their own MP intervening
in the matter. If that's not
cannibalistic, I don't know
what is," the source added.
Hinged on the PLP
leadership are the political
futures of a number of cur-
rent and former PLP MPs
who fear that under either
Dr Nottage or Mr Wilch-
combe they will not be run
again as candidates.
These are said to
include, but are not limited
to, Shane Gibson, Fred
Mitchell, Kenyatta Gib-
son, Keod Smith and Vin-
cent Peet.


New


FROM page one

"A Journey to Freedom."
The Music Makers were
disqualified at the New Year's
parade, but no explanation
was given by the National
Junkanoo Committee.
New Year's Day began with
a bout of rain and a few gusts
of wind, but the 2008 New
Year's Day Junkanoo parade
was still held and well-attend-
ed despite a more than two-
hour delay of the parade's
start.
Present were Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham, Nation-
al Security Minister Tommy
Turnquest and Speaker of the
House Alvin Smith.
And, despite inclement
weather, Bahamians arrived
in droves to watch the parade.
Both Bay and Shirley Streets
were crowded with eager fans
- all waiting for their favourite
group to come out.
"Roots", the A-class group
placed third in the Boxing
Day 2007 parade, was first to
perform. Its theme was based
on the NFL (National Foot-
ball League) and its costumes


Year's


depicted various well-known
teams in the NFL.
They were well-received by
most fans, but some expressed
disappointment in what they
called the Roots' lacklustree
dancers'.
Others said Roots could
have done a better job in
choosing a theme and execut-
ing it well. A Bahamian
woman said: "I think they
should have chosen a theme
that more Bahamians could
relate to rather than a theme
that has more ties with Amer-
ican culture."
Roots' appearance was fur-
ther marred by the apparent
breakdown of its leading float,
which held up the parade for
20 minutes.
The Shell Saxons Superstars
showed determination in pre-
senting their theme: "The
Vikings are coming". Specta-
tors responded well to what
one described as "great cos-
tumes that conveyed the his-
torical message that they were
trying to represent."
Another interesting theme
was "Journey to Freedom",
depicted by The Prodigal


Sons. Their lead piece, as well
as off-the-shoulder pieces,
depicted various ways blacks
had suffered torture. This
theme was effective because
it tied into the black history
of the Bahamas, from which
Junkanoo rose.
When One Family
appeared, the crowd went wild
with delight. One Family's
music was, as usual, of high
standard. Their theme 'A
time to' was highly original,
with costumes depicting 'A
time to Read' and 'A Time to
Sleep'.
Their most detailed and
intricate piece was called "A
Time to Scare the Living Day-
lights Out of You" and fea-
tured images of ghosts, witch-
es, goblins and Halloween
pumpkins.
One Family was called the
most diverse group on Bay
Street and also the most inno-
vative and artistic. While oth-
er groups consistently stick to
materials that they are com-
fortable with, One Family has
been one of the few groups to
experiment with new styles
and medium in the Junkanoo


Two stabbed, four others arrested during Junkanoo


FROM page one

both incidents are continuing at this time.
Four men were also arrested during the
night and early morning of the Junkanoo
parade.
"One of the men had an outstanding arrest
warrant, one was arrested for disorderly con-
duct, one was found in possession of a small
amount of marijuana and one was arrested for
robbery," Asst Supt Walter Evans told The
Tribune yesterday.
Mr Evans could not say what the nature of
the outstanding arrest warrant in this case was.
The press liaison officer explained that
although police deployed similar security strat-
:1


egy as at the Boxing Day parade, there was
more criminal activity at yesterday's Junkanoo
celebrations.
Officers employing a "search and stop" strat-
egy and those stationed at the security check-
points confiscated numerous items ranging
from knives, to bottles, to lighters. '
Nevertheless, Mr Evans said that the major-
ity of Junkanoo-goers were "very well-
behaved" and showed respect for the security
regulations and the police officers.
The infractions that did occur, Mr Evans
noted, were minor.
He added that although this year's Junkanoo
strategies worked very well, police will con-
tinue to improve thfe security measures with
every parade.


parade


craft.
While most groups were
fairly well-received, they could
not match the fervour dis-
played when The Valley Boys
arrived.
After suffering a disap-
pointing fourth place finish in
the Boxing Day parade, The
Valley Boys seemed to
regroup and reform to come
forward on New Year's Day
with a spectacular show.
The Valley Boys were the
last group out of the gate.
They did their first lap around
9am. The crowd had thinned
but swelled massively again
when word was out that they
were due to appear.
Their theme was 'Earth,
Wind, Fire, and Water' and
their costumes depicted these
elements. In addition to hav-
ing good costumes, the music
was excellent and the intensi-
ty and passion in the group
were evident. They trans-
ferred their energy to the
crowd.
A number of small groups
and independent pieces were


displayed on the Junkanoo
route along with the big A
class groups and the smaller
B and C class groups.
Many of these scrap groups
and independents seek to
keep the original styles of
Junkanoo alive.
Mario 'Marly' Stubbs, a 40-
year veteran of Junkanoo,
says he feels that Junkanoo
has become too commer-
cialised.
Junkanoo has taken a
change for the worse and it's
just a business now, says
Stubbs.
"I think the Bahamas is at a
crossroads in Junkanoo and it
is as yet to be seen the direc-
tion which it will take."
Stubbs was on the parade
route with his son, displaying a
large independent piece pay-
ing homage to the victims of
the tragedy at sea in HMBS
Flamingo.
When asked why he decid-
ed on a dedication to those
victims, he said he felt that it
was an important piece of his-
tory that must be kept alive.


Hugo Chavez:


Colombian rebels say


hostage handover impossible for now


* VILLAVICENCIO, Colombia
A VENEZUELAN-LED mission
to rescue three hostages, including a
3-year old boy, from leftist rebels in
Colombia's jungles fell apart Mon-
day as the guerrillas accused Colom-
bia's military of sabotaging the
promised handoff, according to
Associated Press.
Colombian President Alvaro
Uribe dismissed the claim as a lie
by the Revolutionary Armed Forces
of Colombia, or FARC, instead sug-


gesting the guerrillas could be back-
ing out of the deal brokered by Pres-
ident Hugo Chavez because they
don't have the boy hostage.
"The FARC terrorist group does-
n't have any excuse. They've fooled
Colombia and now they want to fool
the international community," Uribe
said from the central Colombian city
where Venezuela helicopters have
been waiting since Friday for word
from the guerrillas on where the
hostages could be picked up.
Uribe made the shocking sugges-


I I4
irmhlTribunWIe)

eal^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Esta^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^te


tion that the guerrillas "don't dare to
keep their promises because they
don't have the boy, Emmanuel" -
who the FARC announced two
weeks ago they would free along
with his mother, Clara Rojas, and
former congresswoman Consuelo
Gonzalez. Rojas had the child with
one of her rebel captors.
Uribe said his government had giv-
en Venezuela and the international
Red Cross coordinating the mission
every guarantee that its military
would not obstruct the handover,
even promising to create a cease-
fire corridor to allow the rebels to
escort their hostages through the
France-sized jungles to the pickup
point.
Former Argentine President
Nestor Kirchner and observers from
France, Switzerland and four leftist
Latin American governments aban-
doned Villavicencio on Monday, say-
ing only in a terse statement they
would "continue their mission" once
all conditions for the hostages'
release were met.
"Shame on Colombia, shame on
Uribe," Oliver Stone, the American
filmmaker, told The Associated
Press shortly before boarding one
of three Venezuelan jets carrying
the observers back to Caracas.
Stone, who was invited by Chavez to
document the handover, added "the
FARC have no motive not to release
these hostages."
Uribe said a 3-year old child
named Juan David Gomez, match-
ing the description of Emmanuel
provided by escaped hostages and
suffering from malnutrition, malaria
and jungle-born leishmaniasis, may
have been living for the past two
and a half years with at a foster
home in Bogota.
The child was turned over in the
eastern city of San Jose del
Guaviare, a FARC stronghold, in
2005 by a man who said he was the
boy's great uncle and who now
claims to be his father. The boy's
mother was reported as disappeared,
according to the child welfare agency
case file read to journalists by peace
commissioner Luis Carlos Restre-
po.


The Colombian leader said only
DNA tests were required to prove or
disprove "this hypothesis" which
he said could be done as soon as the
boy's grandmother returns from
Caracas, where she was awaiting the
handover of her daughter and grand-
son.
The international Red Cross con-
firmed Uribe's claim that his gov-
ernment informed the humanitari-
an organization of the child's exis-
tence two days ago.
"We were asked to keep this con-
fidential and for the protection of
the child, we respected the govern-
ment's request," said Red Cross
spokesman Yves Heller.
Chavez welcomed the hostages'
relatives to the presidential palace on
New Year's Eve.
"Nothing has finished," he told
reporters. "We always said it was a
process with many risks ... The oper-
ation hasn't been stopped."
Chavez said he hasn't eliminated
the possibility the guerrillas will still
give the coordinates to pick up the
hostages. "We have a channel open
with the FARC," he said.


If Uribe happens to be right about
the boy, "the FARC will have to
explain to the world," Chavez said.
Chavez said Uribe's offer of a
demilitarized "corridor" doesn't
make sense because it's unclear
exactly where it was stretch between.
"Uribe is lying," Chavez said,
accusing him of "going today to
Villavicencio to place a bomb" on
the operation.
Speaking earlier, Chavez said the
rebels wrote in a letter that "the mil-
itary operational attempts in the
zone impede us for now from turn-
ing over" the three hostages.
The FARC letter said "insisting
on (a handover) in these conditions
would be putting at risk" the lives of
hostages and guerrillas.
The FARC are holding 44 high-
profile hostages including three
American defense contractors and
former Colombian presidential can-
didate Ingrid Betancourt. The U.S.-
allied Uribe has used some $600 mil-
lion in annual military and intelli-
gence aid from Washington to push
the insurgencts deeper into the jun-
gle.


Valley Boys top in


Four men charged

FROM page one

Williams was the 79th murder victim in a year.
The four men charged with Williams' murder were not
required to plead.
Lawyer Romona Farquharson, who represents murder
accused Mario Flowers, told the court that her client had indi-
cated that he was physically abused while at the Central
Detective Unit.
Ms Farquharson said that when she attempted to have the
matter entered into the detention record, ASP Leon Bethel
became verbally abusive to her.
Ms Farquharson told the court that Sergeant Anton Rah-
ming was verbally abusive to her on Sunday.
Chief Magistrate Gomez noted Ms Farquharson's com-
plaints. The four accused were remanded to Her Majesty's
Prison and the case has been adjourned to January,25,


PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2008


THE TRIBUNE















A true Bahamian welcome


for the Grande Mariner


Complimentary punch, conch


fritters and music from rake 'n'


scrape band greet visitors


WELCOME TO
LONG ISLAND:
The American
Canadian
Caribbean
Line's cruise
ship Grande
Mariner comes
to Clarence
Town where
passengers got
a warm recep-
tion.


By Fay Knowles
P ASSENGERS aboard a small
American cruise ship received a
true Bahamian welcome when
they called into Long Island.
They were offered complimentary punch
and conch fritters and were then enter-
tained by a local rake 'n' scrape band.
The American Canadian Caribbean
Line's Grande Mariner stopped over in
Clarence Town, Long Island.
Some years ago ACCL chose the'
Bahamas as its first cruising destination
beyond the bounds of the United States.
The Grande Mariner is part of the compa-
ny known as "The Small Ship Cruise Line",
based in Warren, Rhode Island.
Long Island commissioner Rodrick
.-.---- Bowe and local residents wel-
comed passengers as they disem-
barked from the shallow-draft
vessel.
After a meal, the island's pop-
ular rake'n'scrape band The Orig-
inals entertained the group.
Grande Mariner passengers also
toured the island the next day.
The cruise line, whose slogan is
that they "Go Where The Big
Ships Cannot", was founded in
the 1960s by the late Captain
Luther Blount and continues to
run successfully as a "casual cruis-
ing experience" under the super-
vision of Blount's daughters Nan-
cy, Julie and Marcia.
Their fleet of expedition-style
ships explores some of America's
"most historically rich regions", as
well as transporting passengers
on 11 night voyages through the
Bahamas and Caribbean.
Clarence Town is one of the
stopovers on the cruise line's
"Beach Lover's Bahamas"
cruise.
The cruise begins in Nassau
and then stops in the Exuma Cays
and George Town before docking
in Clarence Town. From Long
Island the ship continues on to
Acklins and Mayaguana before the cruise
ends in Providenciales.
Several of those on board the Grande
Mariner were repeat passengers of The
American Canadian Caribbean Line.
The Grande Mariner has 50 cabins with
a passenger capacity of 100.
The ACCL fleet's special features
include smoke-free cabins, individually-
controlled air-conditioning systems that
continuously feed in fresh air and remove
"used" air, a one-seating dining room and
an open seating practice, "Bring Your Own
Bottle" liquor policy, bow ramps (giving
easy access to beaches), and stairlifts
between main, sun and top decks.


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2008, PAGE 11


c


THE TRIBUNE





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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2008
' 4 S E T ONb si es,..n e e~ l ~


HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010


Port's potential 65





liability over Babak


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Grand Bahama Port
Authority (GBPA) and Port
Group Ltd, or their immedi-
ate holding company, "may
have a significant liability to pay" to oust-
ed chairman Hannes Babak, as terminat-
ing his contract would allegedly cost $65
million.
The claim was contained in an affidavit


* GBPA and Port Group holding vehicle says 'rights significantly affected'
by $12.1m dividend payment, as corporate structure being ignored


sworn by Ian Boxall, a director of Cay-
man-domiciled Intercontinental Diversi-
fied Corporation (IDC), the GBPA's
immediate holding company, in support of
its application to block a $12,1 million
dividend payment by the Port Authority
and Port Group Ltd receivers.


The Hayward family trusts, which a
Supreme Court trial determined own 50
per cent of the GBPA and Port Group
Ltd through IDC, and IDC itself, are
opposed to the dividend payment because
they believe the two companies need to
conserve capital and cash to meet poten-


tial liabilities.
Among those liabilities is a multi-mil-
lion dollar demand that has been made by
Hutchison Whampoa against Port Group

See PORT, page 5B


Tourism arrivals up Bahamas '80% compliant' with FATF's stipulations


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
TOTAL tourist arrivals to the
Bahamas increased by 1.7 per
cent to one million in the 2007
third quarter, a welcome reversal
of the downward trend encoun-
tered earlier in the year. with the
4.8 per cent rise in air or stopover
visitors especially on New
Providence and Grand Bahama
indicating that the worst effects
of the US passport initiative
might be over.
The Central Bank of the
Bahamas report on monthly eco-
nomic developments for Novem-
ber 2007 revealed that the
) increase in tourist arrivals was
driven by a 4.8 per cent gain in
higher-spending air visitors for
the three months to September
30, 2007, while sea arrivals rose
by only 2 per cent.


* Air arrivals growth
indicates WHTI effects
possibly easing
* Excess liquidity far
better than in 2006, as
consumer and mortgage
credit growth both slow
13.3 per cent
* Bahamian economic
outlook linked to United
States as always

New Providence and Grand
Bahama, the two islands where
the bulk of this nation's hotel

See TOURISM, 2B


No 'major' spending

adjustments likely

at Budget mid-term


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Government is unlikely
to request Parliamentary
approval for "any major adjust-
ments" to its 2007-2008 Budget
when it presents its mid-term fis-
cal report in February, the min-
ister of state for finance told The
Tribune.
With the Government now
half-way through its fiscal year,
Zhivargo Laing said Prime Min-
ister and Minister of Finance,
Hubert Ingraham, was "more
likely" to present the mid-term
Budget report to Parliament in
February than this month.
The Government sees the
mid-term report, the first of its


kind for the Bahamas, although
it is done in the UK, as increas-
ing transparency and account-
ability on how Bahamian tax-
payer and public monies are
spent.
In addition, the mid-term
report will allow the Ingraham
administration to deal with any
supplementary appropriations
that may become necessary to
meet unexpected fiscal costs ear-
ly, rather than allow the parlia-
mentary approvals required to
build-up and be left until the new
Budget is presented.
Mr Laing told The Tribune:
"The idea is to do a bit of

See BUDGET, 2B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas' financial services regula-
tory regime is "80 per cent compliant" with
the Financial Action Task Force's (FATF)
anti-money laundering and anti-terror financ-
ing requirements, the minister of state for
finance telling The Tribune that the Gov-
ernment had already moved to address many
of the concerns identified in a report by that
body's regional affiliate.
Zhivargo Laing said the Caribbean Finan-
cial Action Task Force (CFATF) report,
details of which have only been revealed by
The Tribune, said most of the concerns raised
by the document related to non-traditional
financial institutions, as opposed to banks
and trust companies and insurance firms.
He added that many issues identified by
the CFATF related to clarifications that were
required from the Bahamas to'confirm that
certain areas were properly regulated to com-
bat money laundering and terrorism financ-
ing.
"The report clearly indicated that the
Bahamas, in so far as its bank and trust com-
pany regulations [are concerned], is for the
most part compliant with the FATF's rec-
ommendations," Mr Laing said. !
"If you were to ask about a percentage
figure, you're looking at 80 per cent compli-
ance in terms of our financial services sector.
It is basically the non-bank, non-trust com-
pany and non-insurance company area where
the concerns were raised."
He added: "The concerns that were raised
were matters, in many respects, of clarifica-
tion the extent to which the CFATF was
looking for certain kinds of ways to regulate
these things, and we regulate them in a dif-
ferent kind of way. That being the case, we
moved to make these clarifications."
The CFATF report was only releasedlast


month, but Mr Laing
pointed out that it
was "somewhat dat-
ed", the organisa-
tion's inspection
team having con-
ducted its review of
the Bahamas' anti-
money laundering
defences in late 2005.
The minister told
The Tribune: "We
have had a very com-
prehensive look at
the report. Obvious-
ly, from the time it
was initially drafted, the Attorney General's
Office, the Ministry of Finance and the
Deputy Prime Minister's Office, as Minister
of Foreign Affairs, came together with the
officers in these ministries reviewing the
report."
Prior to its publication, the Attorney Gen-
eral'sOffice had led a Bahamian delegation
to the last CFATF plenary session "to essen-
tially speak to the report. It was essentially an
effort to address any number of concerns
the report highlighted.
'"A number of legislative initiatives as well
as policy initiatives have been done to speak
to some of the observations in the report,'"
Mr Laing added.
The Central Bank of the Bahamas and the
Securities Commission were both moving to
amend existing legislation and regulations
to address concerns identified by the CFATF,
such as wire transfers and correspondent
banking. Mr Laing added that these pro-.
posed change would "nimore than adequately
address the issues that were raised".
He said: "I expect these areas will be fully
addressed. I am fully confident today that
our review and adjustments to our regulato-
ry regime will adequately respond to the con-


cerns raised in'the CFATF report.
"We are a developing country being asked
to make these adjustments in the regulation
of our financial services sector. It takes time
to do that. There is perhaps no one single ter-
ritory that is fully compliant with all the rec-
ommendations of the FATF, including the
world's most developed countries. -
"We are trying to do what we can to assure
the world we are a responsible member of the
global financial community. I am very satis-
fied we are making good progress in doing
just that."
The CFATF itself noted that the Bahamas
had moved immediately to address some of
its concerns, with the Compliance Commis-
sion publishing updated Codes of Conduct on
Know Your Customer (KYC) provisions for
the industries it regulated on July 24. 2006.
The Central Bank had also published draft
amendments and regulations for standalone
money transfer businesses, while the Securi-
ties Commission had confirmed to TOSCO.
the global security regulators body. that the -4
Central Bank would continue to help it meet
international requests for assistance.
The CFATF added that this was -part of
the wider dialogue between the Bahamas.
IOSCO and the Financial Stability Forum
(FSF) about future international co-opera-
tion".
Legislative changes in 2007 had also given
the Securities Commission the same power as
the Central Bank to'compel its registrants
to produce information, and enhanced "the
co-operation and exchange of information"
between Bahamian regulators.
The Proceeds of Crime Act was also
amended, the CFATF said, to close a poten-
tial loophole that could have allowed per-
sons who knowingly acquired assets, property

See FATF, page 33


Tariff liberalisation

offer on EPA 'early

in the New Year'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas will submit its
tariff liberalization offer to the
European Union (EU) over the
Economic Partnership Agree-
ment (EPA) "very early in the
New Year", the minister of state
for finance told The Tribune.
While the Bahamas has pre-
served duty-free market access
to the EU for its major exporters,
the fisheries industry and Poly-
mers International, by signing on
to the region-wide CARIFO-
RUM offer for the EPA, it has
yet to submit its own offer -
detailing the rate at which it will
liberalism import tariffs imposed
on EU imports to the EU.
The Bahanmas has the option
of excluding up to 15 per cent of
its tariffT lines firomi the FPA,
phasing in the liberalizaition of
others over periods lasting up to
25 years, and removing import
duties in other products imme-


diately.
Zhivargo Laing, the minister
of state for finance, said: "The
base offer of CARIFORUM was
on offer all of us bought into. It's
the schedule of tariff liberaliza-
tion that would matter to our
goods suppliers.
"When we submit out detailed
offer, it would be in respect of
our liberalization schedule. But
for us, it's not a major challenge
whatsoever. It will be submitted
very early in the New Year."
The Bahamas now has six
months to submit a services and
investments offer over the EPA
if it is to access the CARIFO-
RUM offer, but Mr Laing said:
"We certainly expect to meet
that deadline much earlier than
the six months set. Beginning in
January, we will have the neces-
sary consultation with the pri-
vate sector to build a services
offer." Discussions, he added,
would he held through the Trade
Commission.


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Tourism arrivals up





per cent in 2007'si


1.7


FROM page 1


and tourism infrastructures are concen-
trated, saw air arrival gains for the peri-
od of 2.6 per cent and 15.1 per cent
respectively.
This more than offset the 5.8 per cent
decline in total visitor arrivals to the
Family Islands, and give a tentative first
hint that the major fallout from the
Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative
(WHTI), which requires US air visitors
to the Bahamas to possess a passport
so they can return home.
Increase
However, the increase came during
what is traditionally the slowest quarter
for the Bahamian tourism industry, and
more time will be needed to see if it
develops into a trend. The Bahamas will
also have to contend in 2008 with the US
sub-prime mortgage fallout, credit
crunch and housing market slowdown,
factors that may slow the US economy
down and leave consumers with less dis-
posable income something that will
impact travel plans and may reduce
demand for Bahamian vacations.
Still, for the first nine months of 2007,


total tourist arrivals to the Bahamas
were down 4.19 per cent compared to
the same period in 2006, standing at
3.485 million compared to 3.632 million.
Air arrivals for the year to September
. 30,2007, stood at 1.15 million, off 3.7 per
cent on the previous year's 1.194 mil-
lion. Yet for the third quarter, while air
arrivals started off slowly in July, down
13.7 per cent at 130,400, the pace picked
up in August and September with 10.2
per cent and 36.2 per cent increases
respectively, taking monthly arrivals to
124,800 and 94,700 respectively.
In its analysis of the main economic
indicators, the Central Bank said the
short-term outlook for the Bahamian
economy was "relatively positive", giv-
en the modest signs of tourism recovery
and "a healthy level of consumer
demand" in the run-up to the Christ-
mas season.
"The seasonal build-up in domestic
demand, combined with increased aver-
age fuel prices, are expected to place
additional pressures on the external
reserves" until the end of 2007, the Cen-
tral Bank said.
"Partial indications suggest a moder-
ate rate of economic expansion during
the month of November, amid signs of
aan improving tourism outturn and stable
construction activity.
"In the monetary sector, liquidity lev-


els were comparatively more buoyant,
whereas external reserves contracted,
reflecting the seasonal firming in con-
sumer demand and persistently higher
paymentsfor fuel imports."
Prognosis

Looking further out, though, the Cen-
tral Bank said the prognosis for the
Bahamian economy depended on how
quickly various tourism-related invest-
ment projects, such as Baha Mar and
Albany, came to fruition, plus the state
of the US economy and global;
credit/liquidity crunch.
Preparations for Christmas began in
November for Bahamian consumers,
Central Bank data showing that con-
sumer credit expansion in November
increased by $9.9 million compared to
the previous year, growing to $28.5 mil-
lion. This contrasted with a $15.1 million
slowing in rMortgage loan growth to
$18.3 million.
Overall, for November 2007 growth in
Bahamian dollar credit fell by $18.2 mil-
lion to $63.6 million, as the expansion of
private sector and public sector credit
slackened by 23 per cent and 22.1 per
cent respectively to $46.9 million and
$16.7 million.
Meanwhile, growth in the build-up of
Bahamian dollar deposits slowed by 27


per cent to $2:
rose by $28.'
deposits decli
As the dem
seas shopping
Bank saw the
currency rese
lion to $9.7 m
Still, comp
uidity surplus
banking system
lending purp
reserves loo
November anc
2007.
Excess liqu
million during
a $60.2 million
November 20(
just under $1
$52.22 million
that month al
grown by $11
$3 million con
However,
external reser
by the drawd
assets, and th
rency, to fin
Bahamas-base
concerns.
These inclu
chase of Baha
Holdings, and


No 'major' spending adjustments likely:


FROM page 1
accounting on how funds have
been spent to date in relation to
Budget allocations,, how rev-


enues are performing, and speak
to any new supplementary fund-
ing requirements the Govern-
ment feels are necessary, so they
do not pile up at the end of the


The time has come to lake the field once again.
To emerge from the shadows and makecountries proud.
Who will summon the strength? Tuin fear into motivation? Recognize their destiny?

The time has come to take the field once again.
To defy the laws of physics. To put on an incredible show.


Budget year. We will make
adjustments to Budgetary pro-
visions earlier rather than later."
When asked whether the Gov-
ernment would make any major


adjustments to its Budget fore-
casts, Mr Laing said: "Overall,
we're not mindful to make any
major adjustments. We're com-
mitted to the fiscal targets we


The time has come to take the field once again.
To welcome new teams, new countries, new fans.
Who wilt hear the call of victory?
The cries of defeat? The salutes of respect?

The time has come to take the field once again.


3.7 million. Fixed deposits chase of Shell (Bahamas) by FOCOL
4 million, while savings Hdldings.
ned by $0.3 million. Meanwhile, the rate of decline in the
and for imports and over- external reserves fell to just $4.5millioi
g trips grew, the Central foi the first 11 months in 2007, corn-
contraction in its foreign paIed to $134.4 million in 2006. The
rves increase by $3.6 mil- exernal reserves stood at $447.44 mil-
illion. lio at end-November 2007, remarkably
ared to 2006, excess liq- similar to $448.57 million for the same
is assets in the commercial peod in 2006.
Dm that are available for The Central Bank acknowledged that
)oses and the external in 006, "a combination of stronger con-
ked much healthier in suier demand, heightened payments
d for the first 11 months of foihfuel imports, and several extraordi-
nafy real sector transactions exerted
iid assets grew by $170.2 pr assure on reserves".
that period, compared to
n fall in 2006. As at end- I Year
O7, excess liquidity stood at
80 million, compared to lor the year to November 2007, the
n the previous year. For Cebtral Bank said growth in Bahamian
lone, excess liquidity had doflar credit fell by 14.8 per cent to
.6 million, compared to a $591.7 million, largely reflecting a 13.3
traction in 2006. per cent fall in both mortgage and con-
excess liquidity and the suler lending growth to $267.5 million
ves were impacted in 2006 anl $184.1 million respectively.
own on Bahamian dollar Inflation in the 12 months to Novem-
e demand for foreign cur- bet 2007 rose to 2.45 per cent from 1.74
ance the acquisition of pe cent in the same period the previous
cd assets owned by foreign year, the greatest price increases coming
in urniture and household operations;
ided the $54 million pur- ford and beverages; recreation and
mas Supermarkets by BSL entertainment; and transport and com-
i the $50-million plus pur- minnications.




at Budget mid-term

have set. We have no reason at recurrent surplus, the amount by
the moment to make any adjust which revenues are projected to
merits in those targets." exceed the Government's recur-
Among those targets is th( rent spending on its fixed costs,
achievement of a $25 million such as civil service salaries and
rents.


Who will be the one?
Who will conquer all?
WHO WILL RISE?


The minister added that the
Government was carefully
watching a number of factors
that could impact the public sec-
tor's fiscal performance either
way, especially the US and glob-
al economies, which are dealing
with the fallout from the US sub-
prime mortgage blow-up, cred-
it/liquidity crunich, and housing
market downturn.
Government spending was
"tracking to plan", Mr Laing
said, while compared to the 2006-
2007 performance, revenues
were either slightly ahead of
slightly behind depending on
which day was looked at.
However, revenues were
behind 2007-2008 Budget fore-
casts, Mr Laing acknowledged.
"Revenue is behind, and we're
watching that and analyzing it to
see which elements of revenue
are tracking behind forecast," he
added,
The Central Bank of the
Bahamas, in its monthly analysis
of economic developments for
November 2007, said that for the
2007-2008 Budget's first quarter,
the Government had run a $50.7
million fiscal deficit compared
to a $3.6 million surplus in the
2006-2007 comparative period.
However, that latter period had
enjoyed "an extraordinary boost
in tax revenue".
For the three months to Sep-
tember 30, 2007, the Govern-
ment's total spending rose by 6.5
per cent to $344.4 million, while
total revenues fell by 10.2 per
cent to $293.6 million.
Revenues gained from import
duties during the period had
risen by 3.15 per cent to $122.2
million, from $118.5 million, yet
recurrent spending on fixed costs
had grown by 7.05 per cent to
$303.4 million, compared to
$283.4 million.
The total national debt, mean-
while, stood at $2.611 billion at
end-November 2007. Most of
that, some $2.34 billion, is held in
Bahamian dollar currency, with
only $270.5 million denominated
in foreign currency.


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BUSINESS


AP GE 28 WEDNESDAYJANU 08


W-rAl-&-.


THE TRIBUNE










THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2008, PAGE 3B


Bahamians urged to




pool resources for




hotel ownership


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter
BAHAMIANS should follow
the example set by the National
Association of Black Hotel Own-
ers, Operators & Developers
(NABHOOD) and pool their
resources to realise the dream of
hotel ownership, the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce's presi-
dent suggested.
NABHOOD members met
with hotel operators in the
Bahamas over the weekend to
discuss funding and planning for
resort development.
Chamber of Commerce presi-
dent Dionisio D'Aguilar, who
attended the networking session,
explained to Tribune Business
that the organisation's primary
focus was to increase the number
of and percentage of African-
Americans who own hotels,
which currently stands at less
than 1 per cent of the industry.
Mr D'Aguilar said this was
similar to the Bahamas, given
that very few Bahamians owned
resorts. This was unlike Jamaica,
where the hotel industry did
have a fair amount of local own-
ership.
Bahamians, he added, could
benefit by adopting NAB-
HOOD's basic aims, which are
to pool resources and contacts
to assist African-Americans in


1 -C:Jtn i ; r"<-J :. [[ *;.* ;.-*.
a, U!d, rn.. . -. mi .
JOHN Christie, of Bahamian
realtor HG Christie Ltd, has
been named among the top lux-
ury specialists in the Bahamas
by Unique Homes, the real
estate magazine, and is featured
in the December/January 2008
issue.
Mr Christie was recognized for
his proven reputation for excel-
lence in the marketing and listing
of premier properties. Lisa Mas-
ters, a spokeswoman for the


realizing their desire to own and
develop hotels.
Mr D'Aguilar said that at the
event, he had met a developer
who, through the association
with NABHOOD, was able to
shave five years off of the devel-
opment process.
The issue of funding was a


major topic of discussion, he
added.
Jerry Butler, the Bahamian
representative to the Inter-
American Development Bank
(IADB), was there to discuss
funding options for persons who
are looking to develop a resort,
Mr D'Auguilar said.
He added that one of the
speakers at the session explained
that before an interested person
goes to the bank, they need to
ensure they have the proper
planning in place.
"The speaker said something
like: 'Your business plan needs
to be so well done that funding
comes to you.' That is something
that I agree with. Sometimes
people go to the bank for fund-
ing, but have not done the
research, and then they fail and
that is why banks are hesitant to
give out funding," Mr D'Aguilar
said.
A number of Bahamian hote-
liers attended the session, includ-
ing a representative of the Cot-
ton Bay resort. Also in atten-
dance was John Issa, the owner
of SuperClubs Breezes,
Norman Jenkins, the senior
vice-president of North America
for Marriot International, and
Michael Roberts, the owner of
Roberts' Castle and Roberts Cay
at Sandyport, where
he is intending to build a mul-
ti-million dollar timeshare facili-


magazine said.
"The luxury property special-
ist" section spotlights some of
'the best in the business', and
:gives these professionals the
opportunity to present informa-
tion on themselves as well as
their properties.
Unique Homes magazine
believes the specialist section will
prove extremely beneficial to
prospective high-end buyers and
sellers, she added.


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FATF, from page 1

and cash that were derived from
criminal conduct to escape con-
viction if they could show they
had paid 'fair value' for these
assets.
Meanwhile, iMr Laing
promised that plans to consoli-
date the Bahamian financial ser-
vices regulatory regime into just
one 'super regulator' or two.
using the 'twin peaks' model.


would also deal with any per-
sonnel, resource and informa-
tion technology constraints that
the existing supervisory bodies
faced.
He added- "The last thing we
want to do is achieve a consoli-
dation that does not have the
necessary financing and
resources to effect the efficiency
we want in the first place."
Responding to industry con-
cerns about the Securities Com-
mission taking on the Inspector


of Corporate and Financial Ser-
vices Providers responsibilities,
when it lacked the resources to
properly fulfill its existing man-
date, Mr Laing said the Com-
mission was already carrying out
on-site inspections on its behalf.
"'They were essentially carry-
ing out the inspections, and that
was the bulk of the work," the
minister said. "The Registrar
General's Department is enor-
mously challenged in terms of
what it has to deal with."


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of competitive sales tactics, efficient operating practices, adequate customer service,
provide advise and assist customers in making business decisions to improve
profitability.


NECESSARY SKILLS/COMPETENCIES:
Bachelor degree in Marketing, Business Administration, or Related Fields
4-5 Years of experience in sales
Analytical Capability
Great Interpersonal Effectiveness & Communication Skills
Strong Decision Making, Problem Solving, Computer & Analytical Skills
Has Commitment to High Standards
With Drive, Perseverance & Initiating Action




If you fulfill the position requirements, please send your resume by email to recruitmentbahamas@yahoo.com
before January 4, 2008


BUSINESS


I


-,MOIR
nw, O


]











THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4C, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2008


COIC PG


JUDGE PARKER











A C '


APARTMENT 3-G


BLONDIE


TIGER


I _CRYPTIC PUZZLE I


ACROSS
1 Buking wherein er sher lers a
stray dog (0)
7 Silver seaman with singular
undies (4,4)
8 Face a dim* couple (4)
10 Uke a dog cdumpect about a
horse(6)
11 A French te of seaman, possibly
indisposed (i)
14 Rest after finishing toll, that is (3)
16 It's augmlMiveIly Ilustratve (5)
17 Start with Ie fan twopence (4)
19 Anticipated getting a boy at the
dance (5)
21 Had he a golden touch with the
maids? (6)
22 Withdiyhedgot a newidea,
which helped (6)
23 A bar acrasthe window (4)
26 There's something engaging aut
good listeners (5)
28 She who slimmed down father? (3)


29
30


They're taken to be holy (6)
It's what you do where you H for
years (6)


31 The last word in retrograde
dnema (4)
32 Like pineapples, they're handy for
throwing (8)
33 Junior player (6)


DOWN
I Rapid poster production (6)
2 Possibly Iro-w ad soldier,
fora start (6)
3 Aolly oyess 4th of Jly, matel (4)
4 Suerngs n Saigon, perhaps, out
East(7)
. 5 Blunders by blockheads (5)
6 Stil to be leased because not
allowed? (5)
8 A name for lead, possibly? (4!
The stage manager's double for a
*lme(3)
12 Also a bit of a L (3)
13 A smooth back, too (5)
15 Fashions some product out of a
piecof wood (5)
18 A problem in prose (5)
19 Covered in aphids (3)
20 Inte home, dad seems tohave
gone soft In the head (3)
21 In wid dreams, one may see things
wrong (7)
22 ULve in the parental home (3)
23 Opionally elects to take one's
choice (6)
24 It'shardto get one right ahead (4)
25 Joe's In town with the unit (6)
26 Eat too much cheddar? (5)
27 Creature you may dread
to distub (5)
28 Border of Hashemte Kingdom (3)
30 Letter to obtain permiselon to
sunbathe (4)


I I
Yesterday's cryptic solutions Yesterday's easy solutions
ACROSS: 1, Blush 6, Dance 9, Hearten 10, Tur-l-n 11, ACROSS: 1, Organ 6, Sense 9, Bumpler 10, Sport 11,
Co-as-t 12, Swain 13, Rest-f-ul 15, Cot 17, Ally 18, Cobra 12, Scots 13, Stealth 15, Led 17, Herd 18,
Sahara 19, An 20, G rany 22 de 24, Een25 Comedy 19, Ccon 20, Ordeal, 22, Here 24, Tee 25,
De-MOT-ed 26, Never 27, Came- 28, Other 29, Risble Desires 26, Minor 27, Depot 28, Adore 29, Rapture 30,
30, Medoc 31, Er-ode
OW 2,Laurel, Sh-lf-y 4, Hen5, Grow-L 6, Dedmal DOWN:2, Repute 3, Abroad 4, Nut 5, Epoth 6, Secton7,
7, An-on 8, Castor 12, Sun-NY 13, (the) Range 14, DWt2 Rpu ,Aro ,, 6 c
Sloan(-e)15 Can it 16, Ta-X-ed 18, Sver 1, Angelic21, Eros 8, Sorted 12, Stool 13, Shoot 14, Erode 15, Lever
Reg-ale 22, R-otter 23, Def-end 25, D-evl 26, Nero 28, 16, Dykes 18, Cower 19, Capital 21, Relent 22, Hinder
Ole 23, Reared 25, Dolts 26, More 28, Art


NEEP'T1AINING WHSELS FOR
S3Ar4IN, ENNIS MITCHELL!"









Bidding Quiz


You are the dealer, both sides vul-
nerable, and have opened One Heart.
Partner has responded One Notrump.
What would you bid now with each
of the following hands?
1. KQ5 V AQ763 AJ 4 Q74
2. + KJ6 V AKQ7652 KJ 44
3. 4 YVAK8653 AK82 4 K7
4. 4 K6 V KQ7643 AK64 4 9
* *

1. Two notrump. Partner's one-
notrump response indicates six to at
most 10 high-card points. Whether or
not a game is feasible therefore
depends upon the strength of his
response. The best way to find out is
to bid two notrump, inviting partner
to continue on to game (most likely
in notrump) if he is in the upper half
of the range for his previous bid.
In general, a two-notrump rebid by
the opener in this sequence shows 16
to 18 points. Responder carries on to
game if he has eight to 10 points, and
passes if he has only six or seven.
2. Four hearts. You should not
want to risk playing at less than
game. A jump to three hearts would
merely invite partner to bid again,
and would be passed close to half the
time. So little is needed for 10 tricks
to-be made for example, just the
een of spades and queen of dia-
monds that partner should not be
given the option of passing.
3. Three hearts. Here, with a heart
uit that is much less self-sufficient,


partner has to be consulted about the
advisability of undertaking a game
contract You should be willing to.
give him the opportunity to pass if he
lacks heart support or his notrump
response was, sketchy. Accordingly,
you make an invitational jump to
three hearts (16 to 18 points).
The alternative to three hearts is
two diamonds (nonforcing), which
understates your heart strength. A
jump-shift to three diamonds com-
mits the partnership to game, and
your hand simply isn't good enough
for that.
4. Two diamonds. This hand is
essentially the same as the previous
one, except that the queen of hearts
has been substituted for the ace.
Obviously, the hand is much weaker,
so game prospects are not nearly as
good.
Nevertheless, game is not out of
the question, and the problem now is
to reach it if it's there. A two-
diamond bid serves that purpose
best. If partner passes, it is highly
unlikely that a sound game contract
will be missed. The pass would indi-
cate not only a minimum hand but
also better support for diamonds than
hearts. .
If paitner, over two diamonds, bids
two hearts, vhli- is just what you
would want to hear, game prospects
pick up, and a continuation to three
hearts (invitational) would be in
order.


U GT Rse







or more can you make from the.
letters shown here? Inmaking a
word, each letter may be used E
once only. Each must contain i
the centre letter and there must
be at least one nine-letter word.
IS p a
Good 17; very good 26; excellent.
33 (or more). Solution tomorrow.


I CHESS byLeon


Ketevan Arakhamia-Grant v Pia
Cramling, MonRoi women's Grand
Prix, Montreal 2007. Edinburgh
housewife Arakhamia-Grant, a
former Georgian now married to a
Scot, is the UK's top active female
player, winner of the national*
women's crown four times in a row.
She faced one of the games of her
life in today's puzzle. It was the
final round, and both A-G and
western Europe's number one
woman Cramling could take first
prize by winning. The Briton is a
pawn up, but Whitea fl king is
exposed to attack and Black (to
play) took advantage by a winning
tactic. How did the game end?


I


WEDNESDAY,
JAN 2
ARIES March 21/April 20
There's no time for beating around 1
the bush answering an important i
question just be direct, Aries. A n
special friend comes into your life )
again. Make the most of the moment .
TAURUS April 21/May 21
Don't let the cold weather get you )
down, Taurus. Find ways to enjoy ,
the snowy season. Organize a trip ,
with friends it could provide the .
excitement you need this week.
GEMINI May 22/June 21 6
Stop playing that Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde n
routine, Gemini. You're bound to 2
lose friends when you act two-faced. )
Expect conflict by Thursday. You'll 3
have things sorted out by week's end. a
CANCER June 22/July 22
Is a new neighbor trying your o
patience, Cancer? Well, you may I
want to keep your cool for a bit d
longer. A work project leads to
adventure for Wednesday -3
something you didn't expect. b
LEO -dJuly 23/Au 23
YoU e'v en a bitg yliy;'y.
Yod~iiight be tak int6t intd ii'tny
responsibilitiesatwokdRestup,so tat
you'll bring fresh ideas to the able. A s
loved one reaches out on Tuesday ..
VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
It could be the right time to take
your relationship to the next step.
The stars indicate that this one is
really meant to be. Look to family
members for some good advice.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
If your work has been mediocre,
Libra, it could be because you're ot .
putting your "all" into it Seek out a
hobby to free up the creative side of
your brain. Aquarius is key this week
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
Your sarcasm has gotten you into.
trouble again, Scorpio. Not everyone
appreciates your own brand of
humor. Tread lightly at work on
Friday the boss is in rare form.
SAG1ITARIUS -Nov 23Dec 21
Now's not the time to be level-
headed, Sagittarius. Explore that new
romance and run with it. Expect a
friend to need your help on the week-
end with a serious matter you're
the one with the right answers.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
Why do seem to be seeking the war path
lately, Capricorn? Set your sights on
peace and quiet rather than confronta-
tion. A stranger provides the answer to a
Question that's been a bother.
AQUARIUS -Jan 21/Feb 18
So, you've made a resolution to get in
shape for the new year, Aquarius.
Because you're not known for stick-
ing to your guns, recruit the help of a
friend who can motivate you.
PISCES Feb 19/March 20
Does it feel like you've been swim-
ruing up stream lately, Pisces. It could
be because you're chasing the wrong
goal. That special someone you've
had your eye on is up to no good.

nard Barden


LEONARD BARDEN


Chess: 8511:1...Rxd5 2 Qxd5 (2 RxdSQel mate)
Qe2+ 3 Kql Ba7+ 4 Khl Qel+ 5 Rxel Rxel mate.


k U


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j
R

I
B
U
N
E


T
W

0


I
N


0


I.










THE TIBUN WEDESDA, JAUARY2,208SIPGES5


Port's


PORT, from page 1

Ltd for the repayment of a loan
related to Grand Bahama Inter-
national Airport, understood to
be in the form of a debenture
debt, plus Mr Babak's cofitract.
Mr Boxall alleged that Mr
Babak's Cayman-based attor-
neys, Maples & Calder, had
already written to IDC's attor-
neys, Bodden & Bodden, on
December 12, 2007, in relation
to their client's contract to act"
as GBPA chairman.
While IDC was preparing to
respond to that letter, Mr Boxall
alleged: "IDC considers that it
may have a significant liability
to pay Mr Hannes Babak his
remuneration for 2006-2007, and
will require funds to secure pay-
ment of that contingency......."
He then added: "Furthermore,
IDC has now had Mr Babak's
contractual entitlement assessed.
Subject to caveats by the valuers,
it appears that if it were to be
terminated, the payout value
would be in excess of some $65
million, which IDC and/or the
GBPA and/or Port Group Ltd
would be liable to pay."
Mr Babak was removed as
GBPA and Port Group Ltd
chairman in November 2006,
after then-Supreme Court jus-
tice Jeannie Thompson approved
an ex-parte application by attor-
neys acting for the late Edward
St George's estate to appoint
Clifford and Myles Culmer, the
BDO Mann Judd accountants,
as receivers.
This was amid the ongoing
ownership dispute related to Sir
Jack Hayward and his family
trusts, who had claimed 75 per
cent of the GBPA and Port
Group Ltd. The St George estate
disputg4 that, though, arguipg
thatthe a d always.benai
50175Rdwa uprem2Court
verdict that has since been
appealed.


Together with what some
sources have alleged is a $29-$0
million demand by Hutchison
Whampoa, which has also made
a $125 million offer to acquire
the Hayward trusts' stake, Mr
Babak's contract would appear
to present a significant potential
liability.
Yet in December 20, 2007,
note, the receivers disagreed.
Writing to Sir Jack, the Culmers
said: "We have considered, as
per the court order, the potential
contingent liabilities with Mr Ian
Barry [the GBPA chief financial
officer]. We are holding back suf-
ficient funds for the moment to
cover a number of contingencies,
including repayment of the Air-
port loan by Port Group Ltd.
"We are taking legal advice
on the airport loan, and will
make a determination in the
New Year on what position to
take in respect of this particular
claim."
The Culmers added that Mr
Barry believed that the GBPA
and Port Group Ltd had "suffi-
cient unencumbered cash in
hand" to pay the $12.1 million
dividend.
And the December 19 court
order approving the dividend
payment said the issue of
whether a proportion of the
available funds be retained to
meet the Hutchison Whampoa
demand was adjourned until this
month.
The Tribune understands that
collectively, the Port Group of
Companies saw their net income
more than double increase by
more than 100 per cent to $12
million in 2007, compared to $5
million the previous year.
The GBPA as a standalone
entity, though, remained unprof-
itable, generating a $1.5 million
loss compared to a $4 million
loss the year before.
Meanwhile, in his affidavit, My
Boxall, described as i*ependent
IDC director, reiterate-the com-
pany's opposition to any divi-


potential


over


dend payment.
He alleged that as the GBPA
and Port Group Ltd's immedi-
ate holding entity, any dividend
be paid to IDC, rather than
directly to Lady Henrietta St
George and attorney Chris Caf-
ferata, as the St George estate's
executors, and Seashells Invest-
ments. The latter is the company
through which the Hayward fam-
ily trusts hold their interest.
"Importantly and .particular-
ly, the right to any dividend is
IDC's," Mr Boxall alleged.
"IDC's rights are affected signif-
icantly by this order (likely some
$12.1 million of its assets being
dissipated without regard to it
or its liabilities). It would wish
to be heard in relation to the
matter before its rights are affect-
ed......
"I do not understand there to
be any urgency or need for a div-
idend to be paid, particularly
over the strenuous objections of
the [GBPA and Port Group]
shareholders, and indeed, pur-
ported beneficiaries........
"IDC is the primary proper
rights holder in relation to these
assets and any distribution. It is
impossible to attempt to pierce
any corporate veil without a
proper hearing on the matter by
all parties. These matters affect
millions of dollars of IDC's
assets."
The $12.1 million dividend is
due to be paid today, but all par-
ties are back before Justice Ani-
ta Allen tomorrow to hear appli-
cations by IDC's and Seashells'
attorneys to stay the payment or,
in the alternative, for it to be
paid directly to IDC.
IDC has also appealed the $6
million dividend paid by the
GBPA and Port Group Ltd ear-
lier this year, again on the
grounds that it went directly to
the shareholders and..bypassed
itself, ignoring the corporate
structure.
The St George estate, though,
will be keen to both receive a


dividend payment and bypass
IDC, as it is alleging that IDC is
effectively now under the Hay-
ward side's control. IDC's direc-
tors include Sir Jack and Lady
Henrietta, plus Mr Boxall and
another independent, Clive Har-
ris, with Sir Jack's son, Rick, act-
ing as secretary.
The St George estate is likely
to be keen to receive a dividend
payment, as this represents its
sole source of income, necessary
to fund the family and the many
legal battles being waged against
the Haywards.
They are likely to view the
Hayward family trusts' opposi-
tion to any dividend payment as
an attempt to starve the estate
of dividend income, and force it
to the negotiating table, rather
than a prudent move to conserve
the GBPA's capital to meet lia-
bilities and Freeport's economic
development, as Sir Jack has
alleged.
The application to the
Supreme Court by the liquida-
tors for approval of the dividend
payment was filed on December
18, 2007, and the Judge's order
approving it was made on
December 19, 2007.
IDC had held a Board meeting
on December 19, 2007, The Tri-
bune was told, yet the first it and
the Hayward side heard of the
approved $12.1 million dividend
payment was when it received
the court order via the fax
machine.




[INSIGHT

Fo-hesore
behndth n ws


$65m


liability


Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch,

Private Banking
ispresently considering applications for a


TREASURY ADMINISTRATOR


The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

Minimum qualifications:
Three Five years International Banking experience in the Money Market/
Forex and Securities Trading and Execution Department of an offshore bank
or Asset Management Company.
PC Literacy (MS Word, Access, Excel).
General banking knowledge and keen knowledge of (trading and settling)
capital market instruments.
A Bachelor's or Associates degree with concentration in Finance/Economics.
Series 7 Certification or Canadian Securities Course qualification would be an
asset.

Personal Qualities:
Excellent organizational and communication skills.
A commitment to service excellence.
Ability to work with minimum supervision.
Goal oriented.

Benefits provided Include:
Competitive salary and performance bonus
Pension Plan
Health and Life Insurance


APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. Persons not meeting
the minimum requirements need not apply.

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas
or via fax 356-8148

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS
JANUARY 11M, 2008.




CREDIT SUISSE


UQ-p 1


Classes begin Monday, January7,2008


Kegistranon


Thursday, January 3- 4,

9:00am 6:00pm


Date 11Time Programme

Thursday-Friday 9:00am-6:00pm Tile Laying
January 3-4, 2008 Painting & Decorating
Plumbing
Welding
Masonry
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Facial Technology

CISCO NETWORKING

Thursday-Friday 9:00am-6:00pm Cisco Certified Network Associates
January 3-4, 2008 (CCNA)




Are you looking for a way to jump start your career
in high tech? The Cisco Networking Academy
Program prepares you for industry-recognized
certification and exciting careers in Information



Professional Development ft Home Improvement
Courses Registration. November 26- February 1, 2008
Call 502-6300 for more information


Spring Semester Orientation
MB CAMPUS
Date: January 3, 2008
Mo 9:O.m oo-10:.0om


Babak



Shape your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.




NOTICE
IN THE ESTATE OF
MICHAEL K9ENNETH
FAIRHURST, late of The Herons,
Heronswood Road, Kidderminster
Worcestershire, deceased
NOTICE is hereby given that all
persons having any claim or demand
against the above Estate are required
to send the same duly certified in
writing to the undersigned on or before
the 5th day of March 2008 after which
date the Executor will proceed to
distribute the assets having regard only
to the claims of which he shall then
have had notice.
AND NOTICE is hereby given that
all persons indebted to the said Estate
are requested to make full settlement
on or before the date hereinbefore
mentioned.
ALEXIOU, KNOWLES & CO.
P.O. Box N-4805
St. Andrew's Court, Frederick St.
Steps
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Executors -
DavidLAirhur4 and Peter Fairhurst


I


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2008, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE











JANUARY 2, 2008


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

Wild Florida Pioneers of Television Sitcoms' Andrew Jackson: Good, Evil and the Presidency Martin Sheen nar-
WPBT 'Florida's Ani- Joyce Randolph; Mario Thomas; rates a biography of Andrew Jackson, America's seventh president. (N)
males" A (CC) Andy Griffith; Mary Tyler Moore. A\ (CC)
The Insider (N) Power of 10 (Season Premiere) Criminal Minds The BAU team CSI: NY 'Oedipus Hex" A teen who
B WFOR n (CC) Contestants compete to win cash. must delve into Morgan's past when dreams of becoming a SulcideGirl is
(N) A (CC) he is arrested for murder. murdered. A (CC)
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U WTVJ wood (N) (CC) World Trade Center attack survivor Lupo deals with trouble at home. (N) A (CC)
Will Jimeno. (N) A (CC)
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8 WSVN P m(Live)
Jeo rdyl (N) Wife Swap The mother of a pag- Supemanny Drake FamilyThe Supemanny"Chapman Family"
SWPLG(CCeant queen swaps places with a parents of three lively children get Teens deal with unhelpful parents.
home-schooling feminist (N) (CC) advice. (N) (CC) (N) A (CC)

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SPEED Pinks Unique Whips Pinks Pinks Street Tuner Street Tuner
SPEED Challenge (N) Challenge
:00) Blly Gra Behind the GrantJeffrey AncientSecrets Jack Vanm h AnotherPerfect Stranger Nikks
T N Classic Scenes (CC) of the Bible Presents (C) daughter Sara, befriends an unlikely
Crusades travel companion.
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TLC I Woke Up n the Smallest Kids (N) sponses to attraction and mating;
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(:00 Law & Or- Law & Order Fontana and Green * THE GENERAL'S DAUGHTER (1999, Suspense) John Travolta,
TNT der Ill-Con- zero in on the young wife of a mur- Madeleine Stowe, James Cromwell. Army investigators probe an officer's
ceived" dered venture capitalist .1 brutal slaying. (CC)
N Home for Imagi- ome for Imagi- Chowder Out of Jimmy's Grim Adven- Ed, Edd n Eddy Naruto
ITO N nary Friends nary Frends Head tures Ed's pen pal.
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(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order: Special Vctims Unit NCIS Agents board Air Force One to NCIS A Marine dies when his para-
USA der: Criminal In- Rape suspected in mentally chal- probe what appears to be a death chute fails to open during a training
tent A (CC) lenged woman's pregnancy. by natural causes. (CC) exercise. A (CC)
VH:00) America's What Perez Sez About 2007 A America's Next Top Model A America's Next Top Model "The
VH1 Next Top Model (CC) Girl Who Needs a Miracle" (CC)
VS:00) NHL Hockey Atlanta Thrashers at Carolina Hunicanes. From the Hockey Central WEC WrekCage (CC)
VS. RBC Center in Raleigh, N.C. (Live) nA (Live)
(:00) America's Comer Gas "I, Corner Gas The BeckerBecker is Becker Becker WGN News at Nine (N) A (CC)
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Videos A (CC) er. A Reggle. A ng stalked.
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W PIX "No byNorth Pageants An emotional trust exer- fun almost turns tragic. (N) A (CC) Tong, JIm Watklns (N) (CC)
Quahog" (CC) cise leads to tension. (N) A (CC)_
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STARWARSV: ** UNACCOMPANIED MINORS (2006, Comedy) SweneyTodd: Inside the NFL (N) A (CC)
HBO-E THE EMPIRE Dyllan Christopher. A snowstorm strands youths in an Demon Barber
STRIKES BACK airport during te holidays. n 'PG' (CC) First Look
(:00)Costas i** AMERICAN DREAMZ (2006, Comedy-Drama) Hugh Grant, Dennis *** MY COUSIN VINNY (1992,
HBO-P NOW (CC) Quaid, Mandy Moore. A White House official books the president to judge Comedy) Joe Pesci, Marisa Tomei,
a TV talent show. 'PG-13' (CC) Ralph Macchio. n 'R' (CC)
S(:00) ACCEPTED (2006) (:45) *t** STAR WARS V: THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK (1980, Science Fiction)
HBO-W Justin Long. A college reject and his Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher. Luke Skywalker, Han Solo and Princess Leia face
friends create a fake university. Darth Vader's wrath. A 'PG' (CC)


(6:45) ***s SERPICO (1973, Crime Drama) Al Pa- *** CAPE FEAR (1991, Suspense) Robert De Niro, Nick Nolte, Jessi-
HBO-S cino, John Randolph. Undercover cop Frank Serpico ca Lange. Premiere. An ex-convict takes revenge on the lawyer who be-
exposes police corruption. A 'R' (CC) trayed him. A 'R' (CC)
(:45) * BATMAN RETURNS (1992, Action) Michael Keaton, Danny DeVito, Michelle THE HITCHER (2007) Sean
MAX-E Pfaeffer. The Catwoman and the Penguin join forces against Batman. A 'PG-13' (CC) Bean. A cunning serial killer victim-
izes two traveling students. 'R'
(:15) *** THE PRINCESS BRIDE (1987, Adven- ** LEATHERFACE: TEXAS CHAINSAW MAS- (:20) Best Sex
MOMAX ture) Cary Elwes, Robin Wright. A stableboy in disguise SACRE III (1990) Kate Hodge. Premiere. A cannibalis- Ever Fantasy
sets out to rescue his beloved. 'PG' (CC) tic family preys on highway travelers. A 'R' (CC) about a fireman.
(:25) ** THE PINK PANTHER (2006, Comedy) The L Word "Luck Be a Lady" (iV) The L Word "Lesson Number One"
SHOW Steve Martin. iTV. A bumbling Frenchman probes the Bette enjoys a new romance. A (iTV) Jenny's short story sparks in-
theft of a priceless gem.1A 'PG' (CC) (CC) terest. A (CC)
S (5:45") ** ** ART SCHOOL CONFIDENTIAL 2006, Comedy-Drama) Max i* NATIONAL LAMPOON'S
TMC HAPPY END- Minghella, John Malkovich, Sophia es. Premiere. An art student is BARELY LEGAL(2005, Comedy)
INGS (2005) 'R' jealous of a clueless jock. A 'f' (CC) Erik von Detten. A 'R' (CC)


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THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY EVENING


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2008, PAGE6C
M E W ____ ___________'




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THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2008, PAGE 7B


i THE ARTS-


Explosive '07 farewell


TRIBUNE ARTS captures ih brilliance of the annual fireworks display seen from the top of the western Paradise Island bridge, where an increasing number of jotfrists gat4eeach year, pullingover on the bridge-
side to get a bett glirp e pf the explosive action... --


q A FirstCaribbean Credit Card

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1 3 swipes. 3 prizes. 3 reasons to smile.

So what are you waiting for?
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Use your FirstCaribbean Credit Card this Holiday Season and it could be you.


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Corporate and Business cardholders; FirstCaribbean employees, their immediate
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GET THERE. TOGETHER.


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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2,


2007


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FIREWORKS burst the night sky across New Providence, Bahamas, to mark the end of the year 2007, ushering in the New Year, 2008. To the delight of our dedicated readers, Tribune Arts captures the brilliance of
the annual fireworks display seen from the top of the western Paradise Island bridge, where an increasing number of motorists gathereach year, pulling over on the roadside to get a better glimpse of the explosive
a.tion,.Spo 4 oaq 78 .


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