Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00617
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: December 27, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00617
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text










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Volume: 103 No.30


L~rr~ir ~91~ ~o~arn -


Police plea for public
10 find alternative ways
to ftSOlVC COHilictS
8 By MARK HUMES
WITH the 60th murder for the year tak-
ing place over the holiday weekend, offi-
cials of the Royal Bahamas Police Depart-
ment make aziother plea for the general
public, and young men in particular, to
find more effective ways to resolve per-
sonal conflicts.
According to police press liaison officer,
Inspector Walter Evans, previous pleas
for the public's assistance in fighting crime
has not fallen on deaf ears. He acknowl-
edged that the public has been of great
ass stance to the police on a number of
However, Inspector Evans said that he
would like to see the public become more
involved in preventing the growing num-
ber of violent criminal matters that, in
every way, affect them as a community.
"The community is helping the police,
SEE page 10


~~-~11111


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2006


M By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune News Editor
THE death-of 22-year-old
local reactor Jamieson Dami-
anos is now being treated as
"highly suspicious" by senior
police officials.
Chief Superintendent Hulan
Hanna confirmed that police
have stepped up their inves-
tigation after taking a closer
look at the circumstances sur-
rounding the incident.
"We are reasonably satis-
fied, based on our experience
of such incidents, that the mat-
4 ter is very, ery suspicious,"
he said.
A member of the Dami-
anos family confirmed that
"'there is evidence, both phys-
ical and circumstantial, t11at
indicatesfoulplay."
The Tribune has learned
that a number of individuals
have been questioned by the
police over the past few days
and that interviews and the
examination of evidence con-
tinues.
On the morning of Sunday,
December 17, the body of
o t iad Dn aa m s
complex on Paradise Island.
Jamieson and his friends had
been exijoying an evening of
d cdnghat tlheb la tibhotel
the group decided to leave
Atlantis and reconnect at the
Bambu nightclub downtown,


8 JAllllESON DAMIANOS
however Jamieson never
showed up. He was last seen
b\ friends shortly before
1.30am walking to his car.
which was parked in a Par-
adise Island parking lot
The official cause of death.
as listed on the Death Certifi-
cate, is asphyxiation, however
all other evidence and details
of the investigation have not
yet been released.
Jamieson Damianos was
eost
just jomed the family busmess
after graduatmg from Rollins
College in May of2006. 'Jay

worked 1 rus he
SEE page 10


JUNKANOO officials are
being asked to respond to alle-
gations that the real reason for
the cancellation of the much
nat c ptar bd eoodx no t3 05e
ready.
With the pilssing of a Bqxing
Day night that many are describ-
ing as a "perfect night" for
Junkanoo, Junkanoo officials are
being accused of unnecessarily
inconveniencing the public in
order to accommodate the two
groups, blaming the cancellation
on the threat of rain.
Early yesterday afternoon,
word began circulatmg through-
out the island that the annual
be do t n roa
ne t eath re ow ee, O
member of the Saxons Junkanoo
Group, although not speaking on
behalf of the group, said that his
group knew of the parade's post-
ponement since last Friday,
SEE page 10


nrbune


The


Pa


Damianos de


Police step up


Mi By MARK HUMES


TWO murders

bring total for
year Up tO 60
WITH'only four days left to close 2006,
the Bahamas yesterday morning recorded
its 60th murder with the shooting death of
34-year-old Monty Thompson.
According to police reports, shortly
before 9 am yesterday, Mr Thompson was
gunned down in front of the Culmersville
Laundromat on Royal Palm Street in the
Grove.
Police officials say that Mr Thompson
was leaving the laundromat when he was
approached by a man who produced a
handgun and shot him multiple times in
p ermbody.sMr Thompson later died
A few hours before Mr Thompson's
shootmg, hotmcide number 59 occurred
when, shortly before 5 pm on Monday,
police m the Taylor Street area responded
to reports of gunshots being fired in the
area. When they arrived on Taylor and
SEE page 10












GreatC4R4ER Junkanoo returns to West



End des ite rain showers





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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2006


8 By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT The inclement
weather may have ruined this
year's Boxing Day Junkanoo
Parade at West End, but it did
not dampen the spirits of the peo-
ple who stood out in the rain for
two hours to see the return of the
parade after an eight-year hiatus.
Tourism Minister Obie
Wilchcombe, the MP for West
Eild, did that residents of the
West End settlement celebrated
Christmas for the first time in
two years,


"I feel very good that we
were able to have Christmas
this year because in 2004 and
2005 we really didn't after (hur-
ricanes) Frances, Jeanne, and
Wilma. And to have Christmas
and to celebrate it with the
return of Junkanoo is tremen-
dous," he said.
"Unfortunately, the weather
conditions were not what we
would have liked. But despite
the circumstances, the spirit of
the people really impressed me
because not only did many
West Enders want to stay and
be a part of what is gomg on,
many Freeporters came down
and had a good time too." "
The junkanoo parade, which
was scheduled to start at 2am,
began around 5.30am with four
groups taking part in the street
festival.
The bleachers erected along
the main parade route remained
empty as residents and tourists
scampered under the eaves of
buildings and tents lining the
bayfront road in downtown
West End.
Despite the delay and rain
showers, junkanooers marched
to the beat of drums and the
sounds of cowbells, horns, and
trumpets.
When it was over, the unoffi-
cial results of the parade put
The Swingers in first place with
899 points. The
Arawak Invaders was second
with 813 points, The West End
Concerns was third with 799
points, and Funtime Geiko was
fourth with 566 points.
Mr Wilchcombe commended
the junkanoo groups for their
participation in the parade.
"It just tells us that we can
do so much more in these com-
munities, and generate com-
merce as one of the tour com-
panies bought 100 tickets so a
lot of tourists came down and
most of the hotels in these areas
were filled with people who
came up for the junkanoo.
Mr Wilchcombe also thanked
the Ginn Group for its spon-
sorship of the parade and its
continued commitment to the
West End community.


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EXXON Mobil Oil has
entered into agreements with
several independent artists and
entertainment companies
including Sandcastle Studios of
Bahamas based in Miami.
Sandcastle Studios is under the
direction of Gena Gibbs, who
represents many musicians of
Bahamian origin, including Ron-
nie Butler and Eddie Minnis.
The company is also aggres-
sively seeking joint ventures/
revenue sharing partnerships in
China.
The company will soon
release the Chinese language
website for the local market and
overseas Chinese speaking audi-
ence/subscribers.
Exxon Mobil has completed
all the mobile connections to
the international network of
gateways for commercialization.
Exxon Mobil intends to raise
up to $5 million in the coming 12
months or earlier either through
equity or debt financing, sub-
ject to terms and conditions
acceptable to the company.

Puerto Rico
may ban
.
trans fats in
reStaurantS
8 PUERTO RICO
San Juan
. .
PUERTO Rico may join
those communities seeking to
restrict artificial trans haes
health authorities in t
island territory look for ways to
promote better nutrition in a
place where fried food is a key
part of the local diet, according
to Associated Press.
The island's Health Depart-
ment is drafting a proposed law
that would require.restaurants

i.i'"'st's.E
baked and fried foods, accord-
ing to Waldert Rivera, assistant
tothnedlwalA rp a Puerto
Rico would unpose fines rang-
ing from $200 to $1,000 on
restaurants that violate the ban,
which Rivera said would help
reduce heart disease.
"The (restaurant) industry
should take corporate respon-
sibility and make decisions that
are good for them and for the
clients they serve," he said.
Rivera said the agency would
likely recommend a gradual
approach to enforcement. .
The measure would require
approval by the legislature.
Besides clogging arteries,
trans fats are also associated
with obesity. Some 64 percent
of Puerto Ricans are classified
as overweight or obese, accord-
ing to the latest figures fiom the
Caribbean island's Health
Department.

Aluminium
smelter site
is overruled
.
0 Ill Hidad

8 TRINIDAD
Port-of-Spain .
TRINIDAD has- asked US-
based Alcoa to consider alter-
native sites for an aluminum
smelter after the government
scuttled the project in a south-
west farming village, the com-
pany said Tuesday, according
to Associated Press.
Alcoa spokesman Kevin Low-
ery said the government sug-
gested several alternative sites
but he declined to give details,
saying the company is still in talks
with Trinidadian authorities.
"We will be sitting down with
them to learn more about these
sites and we will go from there,"
Lowery said.
Trinidadian Prime Minister
Patrick Manning announced
Sunday that the government
had decided against the pro-
posed site in Cap-de-Ville,
where farmers and fishermen,
citing environmental concerns,
had set up a protest camp.
Alcoa had begun a feasibility
study to determine whether to
build at Capde-Ville and planned
to begm construction next year.
Lowery said consideration of
other sites could delay the pro-
ae o o so idn T tr
gas to produce 375,000 tons of
aluminum per year.


"Isla~anrmawo~qew~a~arau~pla~-~a~~n. ~~~F~-~i''-~ ~LLL n-d


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


confession should have been
excluded and we must accept
the correctness of that conclu-
sion. There was, however, a
compelling body of evidence
against this petitioner, quite
apart from his confession,
Lord Bingham noted.
The evidence that the peti-
tioner threw away a firearm
upon the arrival of the police,
the finding of that firearm along
with two spent rounds match-
ing those at the body of the
deceased, the findmg of the
petitioner's fingerprmt on the
car driven by the deceased, the
finding of blood on his shoes
and the evidence that he was
seen driving a car like that of
the deceased were all points
that were disputed but were
thoroughly.explored before the
jury durmg a lengthy trial, Lord
Bmgham noted. "The Court of
Appeal was .satisfied that the
possibility of wholesale fabrica-
tron could be safely rejected.
We find no reason to question
the Court of Appeal's deci-
sion," Lord Bmgham said.
"In the petition of Anthony
Evans we consider that the
Court of Appeal reached the
correct decision for the reasons
the court gave. We find no fault
with the approach of the Court
of Appeal and have no reason
to doubt the safety of the con-
viction," Lord Bingham said.


W By NATARIO McKENZIE
ON its final day of sittings
in Nassau, members of the
judicial committee of the.Lon-
don-based Privy Council grant-
ed "special leave" to one con-
victed murderer to appeal his
conviction while rejecting a
similar petition of two others.
The Privy Council, which is
the highest court of appeal for
the Bahamas, sat in the couth-
try for the first time on Mon-
day, marking a historic
moment for the nation's judi-
clary.
The occasion also marked a
first for Her Majesty's Privy
Council which had never sat
outside the United Kingdom.
The Judicial Committee of the
Privy Council is the highest
court of appeal for some inde-
pendent C6mmonwealth coun-
tries, the UK overseas territo-
ries, and the British Crown ter-
ritories.
Lord Bingham of Cornhill,
accompanied by Lord Carswell
and Lord Brown, acceded to
the petition of convicted mur-
derer Quincy Todd, conclud-
ing that special leave to appeal
his conviction be given despite
the "gross delay."
On February 23 1998 Todd
was convicted and sentenced
to death for the murder of
Venette Bellizaire 28, a young
Haitian woman. Bellizaire was
a waitress at a restaurant at
Port Lucaya in Freeport,
Grand Bahama, at the time of
the murder. According to a
pathologist, the victim died of
fractures of the skull resulting
from more than one blow.
According to court records, a
great deal of time was occu-
pied by a trial within-a-trial to


determine the admissibility of
oral and written confessions of
the appellant. These confes-
sions were ultimately excluded
from evidence. Todd appealed
his conviction to the Court of
Appeal, however, the appel-
late court dismissed his appeal
and affirmed his conviction
which gave rise to his petition
for special leave to have his
appeal heard before the Privy
Council.
James Guthrie presented
submissions before the three
Law Lords on behalf of the
appellant and James Dinge.
mans argued for the Crown.
The second petition the
Law Lords heard on Friday
was that of convicted murder
ers, Ellison Smith and Antho-
ny Evans, who were convict-
ed of the murder of Charles
Virgill who was a Cabinet Min-
ister at the time of his death
in February 1997. Virgill's
body was found in a well field
at the back of the Bahamas
Electricity Cotporation. His
wife, Magistrate Linda Virgill
was in court while arguments
were being submitted. Virgill's
death resulted in a public out-
cry. Within twenty-four hours
the appellants Smith and
Evans, along with Charles
Rahming Jr., who was tried,
convicted and later acquitted
by the Court of Appeal were
arrested. The men appeared
in a magistrate's court on Feb-
ruary 17 1997 on charges of
armed robbery, murder and
kidnapping. Their Supreme
Court trial lasted some seven
months.
Virgill at the time of his
death lived with his wife and
children at an apartment con-
do at Silver Cay Club. Accord-


Inc -m sill s me 1 1 1
5 THE law lords sitting in session


(BISPhoto: Tim Aylen)


"In each case we grant spe-
cial leave to appeal against the
sentences imposed for murder.
We allow the appeals, quash the
sentences imposed and remit
the cases to the Supreme Court
for the consideration of sen-
tencing," Lord Bingham said
Friday.
He noted that in the petition
of Ellison Smith the Law Lords
were not persuaded that the
Court of Appeal was or may
have been wrong to apply the
proviso. .
"The Court of Appeal held
that this petitioner's alleged


ing to court records, the
deceased arrived at the park-
ing lot after 11 pm on Febru-
ary 1997. He was leaving his
car when three men pounced
on him, forced him back into
his vehicle and drove off in his
wife's white Hyundai Accent,
which he was driving. When
Mr Virgill did not show up for
an appointment the next day
the police were notified.

Re'ections

The Privy Council Friday
rejected the petitions of Smith
and Evans for special leave to
appeal conviction however
granted special leave f or
appeal against their sentences.
In March the Privy Council
ruled that the mandatory death
penalty in the Bahamas was
unconstitutional and that sen-
tencing should be left to the
discretion of the trial judge.


- .--


FOLLOWING liumerous
protests and public appeals,
government has finally agreed
to meet with the victims of the
Sea Hauler incident.
After weeks of press con-
ferences and appeals to gov-
ernment for assistance -
which culminated in several
of the victims of the two-boat
collision at sea and their sup-
porters chaining themselves
to the gate at Prime Minister
Perry Christie's home -
Transport Minister Glenys
Hanna-Martin has announced
she will meet with represen-
tatives of the victims some-
time today.
Today's meeting, the gov-
ernment said, is part of an
ongoing effort to sustain and
maintain communications and
a "full understanding" of the
issues relative to the matter
of the. collision between the
vessels Sea Hauler and the
United Star in 2003, and the
"recent demands for compen-
sation" hy the victims and
theirfamilies.
The government also
emphasized that there can be
no comparison between cas-
es of the crash of the Chalks
Airways in Bimini last year -
in which the families of the
victims last month received a


$50 million settlement and
the collision of the two ves-
sels.
"The government wishes
to make it clear that the Sea
Hauler incident and the
Chalks incident in Bimini are
materially different. Family
members of the victims of the
Chalks air disaster sued the
entity responsible for the
crash and received compen-
sation from that entity and/or
itsinsurersnotfromthegov-
ernment of the Bahamas. In
the case of the Sea Hauler
incident between 2004 and
2006, some nine civil actions
were filed in the Supreme
Court against the government
between 2004 and 2006 by
affected parties, the govern-
ment said in its statement to
the press.
The government, it saidin
the statement, is "deeply con-
cerned about the misinforma-
tion in relation to the tragic
Sed Hauler incident."
On August 2, 2003, the
United Star and the Sea
Hauler, both travelling to Cat
Island collided at sea.
Four people were killed and
25 people were injured, some
severely.
In its press statement, the
government said that it and


the Minister of Transport expe-
diently appointed a Wreck
Commission to look into this
accident at sea.
The Commission was initial-
ly appointed for a period of two
months, with effect from Sep-
tember 8, 2003. The report of
the Wreck Commission was
presented to Minister Hanna-
Martin on the January 4, 2005.
The Commission was not
empowered to make any legal-
ly binding findings as to.civil
liability.
"The Ministry of Social Ser-
vices has been and continues to
be active in rendering assistance
to the victims of the Sea Hauler
tragedy. The Commonwealth
of the Bahamas is governed by
the rule of law. The government
will continue to take all legal
avenues to resolve this matter.
All parties are encouraged to
join with the government in
seeking a resolution to this mat
ter in a manner consistent with
the law of the land," the gov-
ernment's statement said.


'
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---** **: ** *- ""** *

IF SECTION 24 AGES

GUIDE24 PAGES


PriVy Council committee gives man


Government agrees to meet





The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogrnas of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editorl919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARBON, CM.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editorl972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirle Street, EO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama:1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


Did ovt mislead us on ILO report?


IIII
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COmplimentS of the Season
from
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December 25 26, aoos

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to non-Bahannans

EDITOR The Tribune
TO ALL Bahamians: where will our children and grandchil-
dren live?
The following is my opinion based on feeling, fear, fact and con-
cerns. It seems that our land is being sold to non-Bahamians hand
over fist as fast as you can say, yes that fast. Our government must
pass laws (to protect us from ourselves) which linuts and only
allows non-Bahamians to own only X per cent m total and only Z
per cent of that on the coast on all/any island to be owned by non-
Balyamians. This would not apply to small cays under X acres.
Today non-Bahamians own more land on the coast on most
islands than B@amians. Yes we sold it to them (greed), hence
"protect us from ourselves".
There are some places where Bahamians do not own any land. I
am not saying, nor do I mean to imply, that we should take any land
now owned by non-Bahamians but if say X = 35 per cent total with
no more than Z = 20 per cent coastal (or what ever percentage is
decided and non-Bahamians now own 70 per cent, no more land can
be sold to a non-Bahamian. Should a non-Bahamian wish to sell
their land it must be sold to a Bahamian until there is only 35 per
cent owned by non-Bahamians.
What does a nation have if its land is owned by others? What will
be our birthright?
If something is not done we will not see the sea and will not tena
a beach to go to, or land to live on, other than maybe in the swkwp
or maybe a non-Bahamian will sell you-a lot if you are lucky!
The UBP did as they wanted (they all do) the Ist PLP had the
Immovable Properties Act, maybe too hard (right now I do not
think so) the FNM would sell anythmg to anyone, the new PLP is
sellmg and giving the land away, will the next government pay
them to take it?
JAMES A
ROBERTS
I would like to add a little story entitled:
That's not my job
This is a story about four people named Everybody, Somebody,
Anybody and Nobody. There was an important job to be done and
Everybody was sure that Somebody would do it. Anybody could
have done it, but Nobody did it. Somebody got angry about that,
because it was Everybody's job. Everybody thought Anybody
could do it, but Nobody realized that Everybody wouldn't do it. It
ended up that Everybody blamed Somebody when Nobody could
have.
Author Unknown
it was somebody
Nassau,
December 20, 2006.



QUALITY INSIDE


AND 0 UT
_ _ _. .
m.


"THE T'IRIBUNE


PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2006


.
hotels.com to review our
Annual Report which pro-
vides an overview of our work.
Keep in mind, all that we do is
made possible by the count-
less hours of volunteer time
and financial commitment of
our members over 200
hotels, tourism-related Igusi-
nesses and countless other
businesses who realize the
tremendous impact which
tourism has on all of our lives
and want. to be part of solu-
.
tions and problem solymg.
I have thoroughly enjoyed
these past two years of service
to our industry and our nation
as President of The Bahamas
Hotel Association. We are on
the right track and must not


EDITOR, The Tribune.
FOR many years The
Bahamas has been a model
for others in our region
who've looked to us to under-
stand why we have excelled
in tourism. They have looked
and they have learned.
Today, several of.our com-
petitors are matchmg or sur-
passing us. Those who have
excelled best took a page from
our highly touted approach to
partnership. Indeed, histori-
cally this has been one of our
great strengths working
together -the Bahamas
Hotel Association (BHA), our
Promotion Boards and other
sister or animations with the
8
Mimstry of Tourism, the Min-
istry of Education, the Mm-
-istry of Transport and Avia-
tion, the Royal Bahamas
Police Force and others
toward common goals.
Together, we have achieved
great things for our industry
and our nation in marketing,
product development,
research and advocacy.
But times have changed-
and so too must we.
This year we laid a new
foundation updon whi hpBHA
tradition as a change agent for
our industry and our nation.
.
Our five year strategic plan -
titled Profitability, Quality and
Sustainability provides a new
level of focus, direction and
commitment. It takes us into
new uncharted realms of activ-
ity like advancing sustain-
able development and educa-
tion improvement. It chal
lengeshis to broader our base
of engagement, involvement
and influence. It calls for a
new level of partnership. We
thank our many members and
partners for their input in
develop the plan
ping t b
h we aretho once aga thete envy e region, an e
world, we must contmue to
challenge ourselves. We must
plan together as government,
community, business and
labour partners. Equally
important, we must manage.
together. We must focus on
common ground, rather than
let differences or indifference
keep us from achieving ottr
potential.
This has been an exception-
al year for the Bahamas Hotel
Association. I invite you to
visit our website at www.bha-


lose sight of the challenges
which he ahead. I am grate-
ful to our staff at BHA, my
company and colleagues at
Cable Beach Resorts, the
BHA Executive Committee
and other dedicated volun-
teers for helping us to make a
difference.
As the new year approach-
es...let us all as a nation
resolve to work together and
to focus on our common
ground rather than oursdiffer-
ences to help make tourism
work better for each of us and
for our nation. I truly believe
that greatness is within our
grasp.
EARLE R
BETHEL
2006 Bahamas
Hotel Association
President
Nassau,
December 20, 2006.


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Right from day one the prime minister led
his colleagues in promising the Bahalitian
people far more than any government could
ever deliver, particularly with the present
standard of service at government's main
hospital. When these promises are not kept,
Bahamians with long memories will be look-
ing to Mr Christie to live up to his pie-in-the-
sky dreams. If the aggressive attitude of the
Sea Hauler victims is any indication of the
new mood of the Bahamian people, we can
foresee many more chaining themselves to
politicians' gates demanding an accounting
of unfulfilled promises.
"It appears that comments have been
offered to reassure the public as to the 'com-
prehensive' nature of the health care to be
of red under the scheme," the ILO report
"'Comprehensive' care is not intended to
mean, as might be assumed by the pubhc'
that every conceivable medical procedure
will be supported by NHI. The potential for
misunderstanding and unfortunate infla-
tion of public expectations is clear, and it
may be helpful to prepare a briefing note on.
this and other items of technical terminolo-
gy for the use of officials likely to be engaged
in presenting or explaining the scheme in
public."
The ILO also warned that the scheme
would cost far more than government had .
projected. It was only after the Bill was safe-
uly through the House that Dr Bernard Not-
tage let the cost-cat out of the bag during a
radio talk show. The plan, he admitted,
could be more than government's projected
figure of $235 million. Also that drug costs
and salaries could force up the NHI bill.
The ILO also warned government about
pensioners' $1-a-day "contribution".
"In particular," said the ILO, "care should
be taken that no individual is likely to find
the dollar amount of his/her contributions to
be higher after retirement than before."
Government has already ignored that
caveat. Pensioners' $1-a-day "contribution"
is already more than that paid by a working
person earning $800 a month, and a dollar
short of a person earning $1,200 a month.
Obviously this is a rushed, ill-thought-
out scheme for an election that has the
potential of backfiring on its promoters.
For more details of the ILO report turn
to Tribune Business Editor Neil Hartnell's
reports in the Business section of this issue-


PRIME MINISTER Christie and his gpy-
ernment, during their campaign to ram their
National Health Insurance scheme through
parliament, relied heavily on the "thumbs
up" given the scheme by the ILO at least
that is what they told the Bahamian people
- "thumbs up, my people, all the way!"
It now turns out that the ILO, although it
did not give the scheme the thumbs down, it
certainly did not give it the "thumbs up." .
Were Bahamians misled by government?
That is a question that Bahamians will now
have to answer for themselves by reading the
ILO report that is if they can get a copy of
it.
What is of interest is that the ILO in giv-
ing an opinion on figures presented to it by
fig moerjttsdfnotd caonn21stedstitse
representatives in the Bahamas the
National Congress of Trade Unions (NCTU)
and Bahamas Employers Confederation
(BECon), representing both employer and
employees. BECon and NCTU, not satis-
fied by government's presentation, demand-
ed more information. Together they raised
many issues, which the ILO itself had
warned government to handle with the
greatest of care certainly not to promise
more than it could deliver. However, this
feature ofthelLO report has only just come
to light- after legislation has beert passed
for its implementation.
Meanwhile, employers and employees'
pleas for more information having been
ignored by government, Mr Brian Nutt of
BECon asked Dr Cleopatra Doumbia-Hen-
ry of ILO during her visit to Nassau last
Thursday on what grounds could Health
Minister Dr Bernard Nottage say with such
confidence that the ILO. had given the
"thumbs up" for the proposal.
She told him that only the committee of
experts at the ILO had the authority to do
so
"As far as she was aware, the committee
of experts had not given an opinion on this
plan," said Mr Nutt.
As a matter of fact there weie many
warnings to government in the ILO's report.
Care needed to be taken, said the ILO, on
how the NHI scheme was presented to the
public by politicians and government offi-
cials, as the two major reports produced on
NHI showed that the scheme's package of
benefits would be unlimited.


REFRIGERATOR


BHA President's


6 5 as
,.,@ lies
a ...





PLP 'held together by fear of losing power'


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


oln brief

Chinese
company to

bbauyx tackminnes
A GUYANA
Georgetown
CANADA'S IAMGold
Corporation has agreed to
sell its stake in Guyanese
bauxite mines to a Chinese
company for US$46 million,
according to Associated Press.
Under ,the agreement,
Bosai Minerals Group Co.
will assume US$18 million in
third-party debt.
"The transaction is consis-
tent with our strategy to
focus on our core assets,"
said Joseph Conway, prest-
dent and chief executive offi-
cer of Toronto-based
IAMGold.
The two companies said
they expect mdustry regula-
tors to approve the deal by
December 31.
Guyana, located on the
north-east coast of South
America, is among a few
countries that produce high-
grade bauxite, the ra\v mate-
rial for aluminum which is
also used in aircraft and
industrial construction.
Bauxite was Guyana's
leading foreign exchange
earner in the 1970s. It now
ranks number four after sug-
ar, gold and rice.

St Lucia
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WEDNESDAY,
DECEMBER 27TH
6:30am Community Page 1540AM
8:00 Bahamas @ Sunrise
lee mp a Christmas
10:00 The Fun Farm
11:00 AVery Retail Christmas
11:39 Frosty's Winter Wonderland
noon ZNS News Update
12:05 Mat.: Babes in Toyland
2:30 Christmas In America: Love
Story
3:30 Ecclesia Gospel
4:00 Christmas In The Islands
With Frank Perry
5:00 ZNS News Update
5:05 76th Annual Spellman


Morehouse Christmas
Concert
6:00 ASpecial Report
m oln ght
8:00 A Evening of Christmas Music
College of The Bahamas
9:00 Labour Speaks
9:30 Family Matters Christmas
nMNie3wsline
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Movie:AChristmasTo
Remember
1:30am Community Page 1540AM


8 By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT The govern-
ment has installed new water
mains in seven communities in
Exuma, where residents will
now have access to quality
potable water just in time for
Christmas.
Works Minister Bradley
Roberts signed a $2.4 million
contract in June for the instal-
lation of new water mains to
replace old and-corroded mains
in numerous sections of great
Exuma, and to install a reverse
osmosis plant in Williams Town.
He said the extension and
replacement of water mains will
ensure that the overwhelming
majority of those living on Exu-
ma will finally have quality
potable water. .
Local contractors Cyril Rolle
and Martin Rolle were granted
a contract for the first phase,
which involved the replacement
of water mains in the commu-
nities of Rollesville, Harts, Old
Place, The Forest, Mount
Thompson, Ramsey, and
Farmer's Hill.
Mr Roberts said this means
that residents will no longer
have to worry about rusty-
coloured water, or having water
too salty to drink.
"We are today celebrating
the completion of phase 1,
which brings long overdue relief
to Rolleville and those other


communities mentioned. The-
delivery of this basic and pre-
cious commodity is now a real-
ity and represents the fulfilment
of the PLP Government's com-
mitment made," he said.
The second phase of the pro-
ject will include the extension
and replacement of water mains
to communities of Stuart
Manor, Curtis, Williams Town,
and Alien Town.
Minister Roberts said that
government also intends to
deliver potable water to Bar-
reterre.
"I need to remind you that
this Government is not just
installing pipes in Exuma, but
We are also making arrange-
ments to increase the volume
of water available. The reverse
osmosis plant in George Town
will soon increase its daily pro-
duction from 195,000 imperial
gallons per day to 360,000 gal-
lons, and for this expansion I
wish to thank and acknowledge
the role of General Electric.
There is also an agreement in
place with Emerald Bay Resort
to take as much as 150,000 gal-
lons per day.
"Exumians, combined these
volumes are more than suffi-
cient to meet your present
needs. However, we will not
stop there, as we finalist our
plans for the next 10 20 years,
we are looking at establishing
additional RO plants, and/or
increase capacity to stay well


ahead of the game, Mr Roberts
said.
He commended the Water
and Sewerage Corporation for *
the work well done. He noted
that WSC has major water sup-
ply contracts in place for expan-
sion and rehabilitation work in
San Salvador for the extension
and replacement of the mains
to United Estates, which will be
commissioned soon,
There are also plans for
works in Eleuthera for the
replacement of mains in Lower
Bogue, James Cistern, North
and South Palmetto Point,
Savannah Sound, and Banner-
man Town, and the construc-
tion of a new storage tank at
the Bogue wellfield.
In Abaco, new mains and a
distribution system to serve
Cherokee Sound; the extension
of mains in Coopers Town, and
a new storage tank in Sandy
Point and in a reverse osmosis
contract for Green Turtle Cay.
In Central Andros, govern-
merit plans to carry out replace-
ment and extension of mains in
Stafford Creek alid Behring
Point; and South Andros and
Mangrove Cay, new storage
tanks at the Bluff, South
Andros and Mangrove Cay
Wellfield.
Mr Roberts said government
will soon signicontracts for Ack-
lins (new water systems and
reverse osmosis plants at Salina
Point, and Snug Corner), and


SBRADLEY$B Robrt


for Long Cay (a new water sys-


Cay, Grand Bahama, plans are


THE PLP has is a coalition
held together by a "desperate
fear of losing both power and
money making opportunities",
the FNM charged yesterday.
"With only a few more days
to go until the new year is ush-
ered in, the FNM in its weekly
column on the party's web site
reviewed the actions of PLP
administration in 2006 and in
the years since the last general
election, reaching the conclu-
sion that the PLP has lost its
mandate and the trust of the
Bahamian people and has failed
to adhere to its own code of
ethics.
Prime Minister Christie "pre-
sides over a coalition of the
compromised, the self-seeking
and prime-ministers-m-waiting,"
a "shaky coalition held together
by a desperate fear of losing
both power and money-making
opportunities after only five
short, unproductive and con-
fused years in office," the FNM
said.
The opposition party claimed
that within months of winning
the government, the PLP fell
back into "old PLP bad habits."
It said that some in the 'new'
PLP government "furiously
abandoned pledges of honesty,
integrity and transparency.
The FNM said the Christie
government "went into full time
crisis mode in a half-hearted
effort to contain a gathering tide
of corruption, ethical lapses,
incompetence and indiscipline
in an untested and over-


whelmed government. By the
end of their first year, the 'chief
executive' lost control of his
own government. He has never
gotten it back, the FNM
claimed,
The FNM alleged that after
the PLP promised "an uncom-
promising code of complete
honesty," it "manipulated
employment statistics and still
tries to fool the public; nto
believing that money promised
in various heads of agreement
are actual dollars."
"History will judge individual
Cabinet ministers for their mis-
deeds; it will also lay blame
squarely at the feet of the
'Prime' Minister who looked
the other way; who foolishly
believed tall tales concocted by
compromised ministers; who
refused to act when confront-
ed with facts, or who simply did
not have the courage to stop
the stench which quickly over-
powered the 'fresh wind'," the
opposition claimed in its week-
ly commentary.
, Not only has the personal
integrity of too many members
of the PLP Cabinet come into
question, the FNM said, but the
nation is also witnessing a
decline in the integrity of gov-
ernment institutions.
"Some of the same ministers
happily engaged in ethical laps-
es also abused and ignored the
integrity of Cabinet government
itself. Their combined private
and public misdeeds long ago
warranted, their dismissal.


net colleagues, the domestic and
international media and even
the Prime Minister himself, can
act with impunity in a Christie
administration. There are rarely
any consequences for the most
outrageous behaviour in this
Government: even a made for
TV side-show.which harms The
Bahamas' good name.<.
"If the PLP were genuinely
concerned about alleged FNM
errors in immigration, why did
they wait until one of their Cab-
inet colleagues was in career-
ending meltdown before act-
ing," the opposition asked.

CriSCS

The FNM were further criti-
cal that routine matters such as
the timely review of judicial
salaries and conditions of ser-
vice have evolved to crises
which distract from other cru-
cial issues under the PLP gov-
ernment.
"The PLP no longer has the
energy and focus to govern.
They have lost their mandate,
our confidence and our trust,"
the FNM said.
The opposition party pointed
out that the PLP in not appoint-
ing a promised Public Integrity
Commission has failed to carry
out one of its anchor projects
designed to cultivate enhanced
standards in government.
On page five of the PLP's
manifesto "Our Plan", the FNM
said, the following can be read:


"We will make freedom real
by ... restoring faith in govern-
ment by appointing an inde-
pendent Public Integrity Com-
mission to ensure that the gov-
ernment is responsive to the
people and that a standard of
conduct is maintained that is
worthy of the people's trust."
The FNM said that "five
exhausted years later the PLP is
unable or unwilling to sustain
its proinise to appoint this com-
mission. After an explosion of
scandals it realizes that such a
commission would prove even
more embarrassing. Better to
renege on a promise than to
appoint a group which would
expose even further decay.
"The transparency Mr
Christie promised is now trans-
parently untrue. His Govern-
ment refused to table various
secret agreements which gave
away untold amounts of our
national and natural heritage.
Under his government, critical
stakeholders and the public are
fighting to get copies of actuar-
ial and financial studies related
to National Health Insurance
scheme.
"Mr Christie was right -
the example set at the top does
filter down to the bottom;
unfortunately his was the wrong
example.By repeatedly refusing
to act when confronted by the
PLP's 'all for me baby' culture
Mr Christie sent out a clear
message: 'As long as you leave
me as Prime Minister, I'll leave
you alone'," the FNM claimed.


5 SHANE Gibson: under fire
.
for his role m the Anna Nicole
Smith affair

Instead some of them were
rewarded with additional
. responsibilities," according to
the FNM.
As examples of "ethical laps-
es", the opposition cited the
Cabinet brawl between Mount
Moriah MP Keod Smith and
Kennedy MP Kenyatta Gibson,
and Immigration Minister
Shane Gibson's fast-tracking
and involvement in the perma-
nent residency of US celebrity
Anna Nicole Smith
"We have learned that a
Minister who misled the House
of Assembly, the public, Cabi-


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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


WITH the prices of gaso-
line reaching almost $5 per
gallon in 2006, many of the
local retailers will "barely
break even this year," said
Byran Woodside, Chairman
of the Bahamas Petroleum
Retailers Association.
"The recent gasoline crisis
has affected retailers in more
ways than one. They were
faced with their businesses
cash flows being seriously
impaired because thby were
paying substantially more for
gasoline supplies from whole-
salers. The end result was that
their net profits remained the
same, or in some instances
declined, while the cosyt of
gasoline. increased signifi-
cantly," Mr Woodside said.
wi said tha tus:::e
statements made by Minister
Leslie Miller about the petro-
leumindustr hasthenet
Bahamas Petroleum Retail-
ers Association (BPRA) call-
ing the statements "unfair
attacks," on small business-
men.
"It appears that the Mr
Miller is living in the past
where it was normal for some
to attack monied segments of
our populace. He has not
noticed that the so-called
monied persons have got out
of the petroleum retail busi-
ness and that-the current
retailers are your average
hardworking small business-
men trying to provide jobs
and reap a profit at the end of
the da ," BPRA said.
The Association also
cleared up what it terms are
other "inaccuracies" of Mr
Miller regarding retail mar-
gins and Bahamas retailer
margin, as compared to other
Caribbean countries.
According to the BPRA,
the actual history of margin
increases since 1973 have
totalled 26 cents, broken
down as follows: .


PUMP SELLING PRICE
$3.83 100%
,
"Margins are fixed and so
unless our volumes increase
then our net profit does not
increase," Mr Woodside
said.


The BPRA is the official
voice of the Petroleum
Retailers of The Bahamas.
During elections in Novem-
ber, '2006, the following offi-
cers were elected Byran
Woodside, Chairman,
Charles Johnson, Vice Chair-


man, Nikita Curtiss, Secre-
tary, Oswald Moore, Trea-
surer.
Thene w ly elected
officialspledged to
continue etoeducate
the public on petroleum
issues.


The Association also point-
ed out that gasoline margins
in The Bahamas are compa-
rable to other Caribbean
countries.
COUNTRY
POPULATION GAS
PER GALLON
RETAILER MARGIN
Bahamas 303,770
$3.83 44 cents
Bermuda 65,773
$5.81 95 cents
Cayman 45,436
$3.76 57cents
Jamaica 2,758,124
deregulated 16 cents
Turks&Caicos 21,152
$4.19 56 cents
Barbados 279,912 .
$3.97 28 cents
The BPRA says that
although mgny retailers oper-
ate on huge bank overdrafts,


the Association has not
requested a margin increase
since 2002because the retail-
ers elected to wait until the
high prices of gasoline
dropped, thus putting the
needs of the public
first.
The-BPRA said that it is
continuing to lobby for gaso-
line to be treated similarly to
bread basket items with built
in margins to provide for
increased staff increments, to
help erase losses and to pro-
Vide a profit for service sta
tions.
The BPRA also stressed
that its members do not ben-
efit from high gasoline
prices, but in most instances
face losses due to
cash flow challenges, and
increased operational expens-
es.
Using April, 2005 gasoline
prices to make the point, the
BPRA explamed the break-
down of gasoline pump
pnces.
Gasoline base cost of prod-
uct $1.87 48.8%
Government stamp tax, &
dut
$1.19 31.09%
Wholesaler's margin
$0.33 8.62% .
Retailer's margin
$0.44 11.49%


WASHINGTON New crash test results
released by the insurance industry recently show
the downside to fuel-saving economy cars.
The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety
gave its lowest rating of poor in side-impact
protection to four vehicles: a version of the
2007 Tojrota Yaris without side air bags, the
2006 Scion xB, and2007 models of the Hyundai
Accent and the Kia Rio, which share similar
underpinnings.
The institute evaluated several minicars for
their abiliti toprotectpeople in ase The '0117 Nissan Versa.11bieb offers standard
e t Nis on ie
sold in Nassau as the Nissan Tiida by Sanpin
Motors.)
The 2007 Toyota Yaris with optional side air
bags and the 2007 Honda Fit which has stan-
dard side air bags also got top marks in
frontal and side-impact tests. (The Yaris is sold
in Nassau by Executive Motors and the Honda
by Nassau Motors)
insThet30ntom h lesbwe ete ed by the
prices have made the small cars more popular.
The vehicles, which typically weigh about 2,500
pounds or less, raise some safety concerns
because of how they would interact with larger
vehicles in a crash.
"People travelling in small, light cars are at a
disadvantage, especially when they collide with
bigger, heavier vehicles. The laws of physics
dictate this," said institute president Adrian
Lund. .
During testing of the Scion xB, part of Toy-
ota's youth-oriented brand, the institute said
the test barrier struck the driver dummy's head,
which would have likely caused bram and neck


injuries. Side air bags are unavailable on the
xB and are a $650 option on the Yaris.
Bill Kwong, a Toyota spokesman, said, "We
feel our.vehicles perform really well in the real-
world situation."
The institute also cited the Hyundai Accent,
which has standard curtain-style air bags in the
front and rear seats. While the air bags "pro-
vided good head protection," they said the dri-
ver dummy withstood impacts that would have
led to internal organ injuries, broken ribs and a
fracturedpelvis.
MilesJohnsonaHyundaispokesmannoted
that the vehicle has performed welling the gov-
The institute said it conducted two frontal
tests for the Fit.
The air bag deployed too early in the first
test, allowing high forces on the dummy's head.
Honda spokesman Sage Marie said they would
contact customers about a voluntary safety cam-
paign in early 2007 to modify the air bag's soft-
ware. In a second test, the, Fit's air bag
d ed properly after Honda made the
Among other vehicles, the 2007 Chevrolet
Aveo with standard side airbags received the
second-highest score of acceptable fdr frontal
crash protection and the second-lowest mark of
marginal for side-impact evaluation.
GM spokesman Alan Adler said the Aveo
"meets or exceeds safety standards in more
than 120 countries in whichit is sold.
The 2006 Mini Cooper was rated good on
frontal evaluation and acceptable on the side.
The newly redesigned 2007 version is expected
in showrooms inkhe end of February, BMW of
North America spokesman Thomas Plucinsky
said.


1973
1979
1983
1990
1994
2002


2 cents
1 cent
4 cents
4 cents
5 cents
10 cents


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


9 eopn











'''- I I r I


I


Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa


Invites Application for the following positions:


One Executie Sous Chef

* Applicant must have at least five years experience as a Sous Chef
.
* Must be pleasant and have the ability to work with a tem of
highly profendonal cooks.

HOUSEHOLD MANAGER

*Applicants MUSTBE KNOWLEDGABLEINFood&
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* Must be able to develop menu and prepare meals for special
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* Should be fully experienced in domestic household chores.
Husband and Wife team preferred. Three years in a similar
position would-be an asset.

Send resume to cmajor@srb.sandals.com
Or Hand Deliver to Sandals Resort
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Super Clubs Breezes Bahamas hosts client appreciation party

M IN APPRECIATION of
the patronage throughout
2006. SuperClubs Breezes
Babamas held its annual cock-
rail party for their valued
clients. A --Super-Inclusive
event enjoyed bi all \\as sump- ,,.
ruous cuisine areal drinks and
great entertainment. Parry-
goers danced to the music of
the Soca Di Funks D and DJ Killa B.
"He are espenally grateful
to all of our lear and particularl\ apprecia-
ut e that the\ hale selected us
at Breezes to host heir
momentous events." said Air
Derek Smith. Food and Beler-

ro working with each one of .
them in 2007."
Pictured are performing
artists. Terez Hcpburn and
Funki D.


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


ness was his lack of appreci- .
ation of the responsibility of
public office:
"Sir Ralph said that in
British Guiana politicians
are forever looking for
excuses why they cannot do
.something; it is the only
country he knew in which a
a u leoh s t

' Department memo said.
Of course, that was
before Sir Ralph had been
appointed governor of the
Bahamas, where he proba-
bly gained a better appreci-
ation of "inaction."
canneng da rh s
k1 rbta cod ohn o
tonal representation, which
led to decades of racial con-
dtr gp s ci nm roa n
Guyana is now the poorest
of the former British West
Indian territories. Burnham
remain d in9p8 erhuentP9h '

electionswerewonbyJagan
(who died in office), and the
PPP has been in power ever
since. What a monumental


waste of time.
When Tough Call was a
yoot-man, the intelhgentsta
regarded Burnham's so-
called Co-operative Repub-
lic of Guyana as the most
politically advanced society
in the region. But eventual-
ly, this facade crumbled to
dhes cawm teh ofisc

As you can imagine, all
of this produced hundreds
of thousands of well-edu-
cated and mixed-up
Guyanese refugees who fled
to better lives in Canada,
Britain, the US and the
Braohc sal f tha s y

wn raking garlicatpork
house.
Isn't it wonderful how the
unnca n s asonal in
memories
All the best for the Chi-
nese new year.
What do you think? Send
commentstolarry@tribune-
media.net
Or visit www.bahamapun-
dit.com


increasingly important arena
of Cold War competition.
Burnham went on to form
the PNC in 1955, but Jagan
was re-elected in 1957 and
1961. By this time the
British were ready to grant
the colony independence
under Jagan's leadership,
utter a tmh p ec

region since Fidel had
recently taken over in Cuba
and become a Soviet client
- that they gave Guyana a
lot more attention than it
deserved.

MelllO

According to a declassi-
fied memo from then Secre
tary of State Dean Rusk:
pW nt nchne Hos
benefit of the doubt which
was given wo or three years
The British, in their haste
to decolonise, took a more
sanguine view. In a 1961
meeting with a US State
Department representative,
the governor of British
Guiana discounted the view
that Jagan was a Soviet pup-
pet. According to Sir Ralph
Grey, Jagan's greatest weak-


MY HOUSE reeks
of garlic and vine-
gar.
It always does at this time
of year. That's because the
wife has an almost religious
compulsion to make Carne

is ah rteug hs Cahti -
Not that she's Por-
tuguese, I hasten to add.
Actually she's from Guyana
- and mostly Amerindian,
with admixtures of African,
Dutch and Welsh.
In Guyana, Carne de
Vinagreae Alh is bett

idn 1 fepricpkMdso %eo
in vinegar spiced with salt,
hot peppers, garlic and
sma'"irlst" "o"ti'nh
Servedwithpinkgmit'sbet-
than bacon, I ave to
The Guyanese think and
talk about food even more
than Bahamians do. But
they have infxmtely more
variety to choose from. In
fact, the country likes to
refer to itself as the land of
six people, meaning East
Indians, Africans, Amerindi-
ans, Chinese, Portuguese


y'Ja n'spPPP(thepcaoun)
with Burnham as a top lieu-
tenant. But within a feiv
months the British decided
to suspend the constitution
to prevent extremists from
setting up a one-party state
allied to the Soviet bloc. An
emergency wasndeclared and

t snh t atus backed by
The context of the time
is instructive.
St oi o sef
after sponsoring a bloody
K
tR ieo sw inEMoread
Europe were crushed by
Soviet tanks, and the Amer-
,ican spies who had given
nuclear secrets to the Rus-
sians were executed. The
two opposing blocs faced
each other with atomic
weapons in an armed truce.
And throughout the 1950s,
the Third World was an


andGa iTpE n(apop-
ular dish amongst Guyanese,
although there are not many
Portuguese left in the coun-
try,

MOderation

the sTndMof Mndle ,fro
came suucessliuklemtehr-

Greeks did here). They were
a voice of moderation dur-
6 seund t
P. 8 -
His middle class United
Force hung precariously for
a time between the East
I n1PeobpleCs Prdo ressdve
and the AfricanPeople's
National Congress led by
Forbes Burnham -
In 1953 the first free elec-
tions in British Guiana (as
Guyana was then known)
produced a convincing win


Fe~'escht~ivecookig nnetioun





Pope Benedict XVI pays tribute to Catholics


~C~eic~Leet.





- L- I------ ~~ -- I~.


friendship and
TOYOTA n
support in 2007
and wish everyone
a safe and

happy holiday.






Be B B ^ -


AUTO MALL
Shirley Street opposite St. Matthew's Church

Tel: 397-1700
Quality Auto Sales Showroom:
East Shiriey Street 322-3775 325-3079


THE TRIBUHr E


PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2006


Christmas and snowball fights.
Soldiers wearing red Santa hats
and even a couple dressed as
elves walked around Camp
Eggers, the main US base in
Kabul, the capital,
Shoppers packed malls awash
with tinsel, plastic pine trees
and special promotions in most-
ly Buddhist Japan and predom-
inantly Hindu India, reflecting
the spread of the season's com-
mercial appeal.
For many of those celebrating
the holidays in Sri Lanka there
was no cake this year. The price
of eggs and butter has risen six-
fold following the resumption
of a civil war that has led to spi-
ralling inflation on the island
state just off India's southern
tip.
In China, where the govern-
ment allows worship only in
churches, mosques and temples
run by state-monitored religious
groups, the English-language
China Daily ran a front-page
photo of a Mass m Shanghat
and published several com-
ments urging tolerance in
response to-recent calls for Chi-
nese to resist imported holidays.
"Ournationalculturewillnot
fade only because people are


M LONDON
FROM soldiers who donned
red Santa hats in Afghanistan
to devoted worshippers visiting
Bethlehem, Christians around
the world celebrated Christmas
Day with the sobering thoughts
of peace and tolerance even as
recording to Associated Press.
. In his Christmas Day address
4t the Vatican, Pope Benedict
XVI called for an end to con-
fliicts across the globe and
greater concern for the poor,
the exploited and all who suffer.
Speaking from a balcony
overlooking St Peter's Square,
the pontiff called for peace in
the Middle East, noting in par-
ticular the long war between
Israel and the Palestinians.
"I place in the hands of the
divine Child of Bethlehem the
indications of a resumption of
dialogue between the Israelis
and the Palestinians, which we
have witnessed in recent days,
and the hope of further encour-
aging developments," Benedict
said in his annual address.
Two dozen US peacekeeping
troops celebrated the holiday
among elementary schoolchild-


ren in Partis, a Serb village in
the snow-covered hills of east-
ern Kosovo with-a school, a yel-
low-bricked Serb Orthodox
church and modest houses.
They dug into a box full of
toys and handed out dolls, cars,
water colors, chess and bowl-
ing sets as they marked Christ-
mas morning in the troubled
province, far from family and
friends in Puerto Rico and
Massachusetts.
"It's a beautiful thing," said
Blagoje Stojkovic, an elemen-
tary school teacher, as children
began unwrapping and com-
paring toys.
At the Church of the Nativity
in Bethlehem, the traditional
birthplace of Jesus, pews were
packed with hundreds of wor-
shippers, but foreign visitors
critical to the town's economy
were largely absent, deterred
by recent Palestinian infighting
and the conflict with Israel.
Spirits were high, however,
among the few foreign pilgruns
who made their way to Manger
Square to celebrate Christmas
in the West Bank town.
"The experience was incredi-
ble," said Nick Parker, 24, of
Woodland, Kan. "I could feel


the true spirit of Christmas here
in Bethlehem."
The theme of Middle East
peace resonated with others.
Britain's Archbishop of Can-
terbury Rowan Williams, fresh
from a visit to the Holy Land,
said in his annual address as
spiritual leader of the world's
Anglican Communion that the
world must not turn its back on
Israelis or Palestinians,
Queen Elizabeth II, in her
annual Christmas broadcast,
called for religious tolerance
and mutual respect between the
young and old in a fast-changing
world.
"It is very easy to concentrate
on the differences between the
religious faiths and to forget
what they have in common -
people of different faiths are
bound together by the need to
help the younger generation to
become considerate and active
citizens," the monarch said.
In south-east Asia, Christians
m the world's most populous
Muslim nation, Indoi1esia,
ignored terror warnings and
flocked to heavily guarded
churches.
Foreign troops in
Afghanistan woke up to a white


,,
celebrating foreign holidays,
one said.
People in Australia's drought-
affected south-east danced in
the streets as summer rains


drenched.wildfires that had
burned out of control for three
weeks, enabling around 800 vol-
unteer firefighters to go home
to their families for Christmas.


to the plight of Catholics loyal
to him in China. The faithful in
China are only allowed to wor-
ship in a state-sanctioned
church, and Beijing views papal
appointments of bishops there
as an interference in its-inter-
nalaffairs. e
Chinese bishops and priests
loyal to the Vatican have been
detained and sometunes unpris-
oned. Millions follow the pontiff
and worship in secret, but mem-
bers of congregations are fre-
quently harassed.
Relations between Vietnam


and the Vatican have also been
strained at times.
The Vatican has also taken
up the cause of Catholics in oth-
er places where open worship
puts them at risk,,including Sau-
di Arabia.
Tuesday was.a holiday in
Italy, and many pilgrims,
tourists and Romans turned out
in the square to listen to the
pope at noon, and admire the
towering Christmas tree and the
life-sized Nativity scene in the
square.


5 VATICAN CITY
POPE Benedict XVI on
tuesday paid tribute to Chris-
tians who are persecuted for
fAith, including Cadiolics w ha
suffer because oi their loyalty
to the ptintiff, in an apparent
reference to the undergrouqd


church in China, according to
Associated Press.
To the Virgin Mary, "we
entrust all those who are per-
secuted and suffer, in various
mass. for paying witness to, and
being-in sen ice to, the Gospel,"
Benedict told pilgrims as the
TC|prog marked the feast day of


St. Stephen, a Jewish convert
who became the first Christian
martyr.
"With special spiritual close-
ness, I am thinking as well of
those Catholics who kmep their
own loyalty toPeter's Seat with4
out yielding to compromise,
sometimes at the price of grave


suffering," the pope said. The
mention of St Peter represents
papal authority in Rome.
"All the Church admires their
example and prays so that they
wilLhave the.strength to perse-
vere, knowing that their tribu-
latfoB69rethesourcephictpryp
even if at the moment they can
appear to be a failure," the pon-
tiff said, speaking from his stu-
dio window overlooking St
Peter's square.
Benedict has been leading a
Vatican campaign for religious
liberty, with particular attention


"'


**
-ee -
me.
..
ee *
some***
**mme
**


Executive Motors and Quality Auto
Sales will close at 1pm on Friday,
December 22 and re-open on
Wednesday, December 27, 2006.
MATSLJ

We will also close at 1pm
on Friday, December 29
.A and re-open on Tuesday,

S SUZUKI January 2, 2007.

We acknowledge and
thank all our valued
customers for their

patronage during the
fit year. We look forward
to your continued


Religious leaders call for


.1..~ .7. -


gagg ag a
ag .
ga em a em
ad e emme he @@**


or enuman aime em







I I


VIE


Cuba9h land
When Fidel Castro b
ill, he transferred power
brother and a small gr
individuals who reprise
bureaucracy and institute
Cuba's totalitarian state
have prepared for this m
for years by improving
internal policing, increase
worship, blocking foreign
to Cuba's democratic civ
ety, and further closi
independent spaces exis
Cuba.
At this uncertain m
Cuba sits between ho
fear. Hope for a political
ing that would lead to
and.democratic Cuba re
regain its place amo
democratic .nations
Americas.Feat that the


SGOLDEN GATES BRANCH COM HBN



~.


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2'7, 2006, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


s


mendations demand caution,"
he said, adding that one of the
problems the Cuban medical
team had was limiting the pres-
ident's activities,
"He is a patient of 80 years
and he will have the limitations
of recovery of a person of his
age," said Garcia Sabrido.
"His intellectual activity is
intact, I'd say fantastic," the sur-
geon said. "I was amazed at his
capacity to relate personal and
historical anecdotes."
On Monday, Spanish author-
ities confirmed that Garcia
Sabrido had traveled to Cuba's
capital with advanced medical
equipment for Castro and to
study a possible surgery. The
Madrid's health department has
been sending medicines to Cuba
since June.
Garcia Sabrido said Spain
and other European and Amer-
ican countries have long been
collaborating with Cuba in med-
ical matters.
He stressed, however, that
while he had had to seek per-
mission from Spanish health
authorities to leave his hospi-
tal, his visit to Cuba had been
strictly a personal one. .
A doctor at the Gregorio
Maranon hospital for the past
35 years, Garcia Sabrido, 61,
said that although it was the first
time he had treated Castro, he
had visited Cuba many times
on a professional basis and
knew the.Castrofamily;
"I was required to. give my
opinion on the state and treat-
ment of President Castro," he
said."Icanassureyouthatthe


less stopped insisting Castro will
return to power.
Asked whether he thought
Castro would be physically
capable of once agam govermng
Cuba, Garcia Sabrido said:
"If his recovery is absolute,
then naturally, yes," said the
doctor.
"I think that in these
moments his decision to dele-
gate power implies that he must
now be dedicated to his recov-
ery. What happens in the future
will be an absolutely personal
matter."
There was no mention of
Garcia Sabrido's visit in Cuba's
state media.
Some doctors.believe Castro
may suffer from diverticular dis-
ease, which can cause bleeding
in the lower intestine, especial-
ly in people over 60. In severe
cases, emergency surgery may
be required.
Garcia Sabrido wrote in the
medical journal Archives of
Surgery in 1988 about a tempo-
rary stomach "zipper" that
Spanish surgeons had used on
patients to provide repeated
easy access for draining and
treating abdominal infections.
On Tuesday, he ruled out
another operation for Castro
for the moment.
"It is not planned that he will
undergo another operation for
the moment," he said. "His con-
dition is stable. He is recovering
from a very serious operation."
He said he was impressed by
Castro's good spirits.
"He wants to return to work
everyday but medical recom-


a SPAIN
Madrid
A SPANISH surgeon who
flew to Cuba last week to help
treat Fidel Castro on Tuesday
denied reports that the Cuban
leader was suffering from can-
cer and insisted that he was
recovering slowly but progres-
sively from a serious operation,
according to Associated Press.
"He hasn't got cancer" said
Jose Luis Garcia Sabrido, chief
surgeon at Madrid's Gregorio
Maranon Hospital. Garcia
Sabrido flew to Havana last
Thursday to see Castro and con-
sult with the Cuban leader's
medical team on how his treat-
ment was progressmg.
"While respecting confiden-
tiality, I cari tell you that Presi-
dent Castro is not suffering
from any malignant sickness,"
the Spanish doctor said, adding
that he could not give precise
details on the nature of his con-
dition.
"It is a benign process in
which there have been a series
of complications," he added.
Castro, 80, has not appeared
in public since undergoing
emergency intestinal surgery in
July, but has since released little
information on his condition.
Castro placed his younger
brother, Raul, in charge of the
government,
His medical condition is a
state secret, but Cuban author-
ities have denied he suffers from
terminal cancer, as US intelli-
gence officials have claimed.
Cuban officials have nonethe-


I


ege a 4
a go 4
go
*
a or **

health of President Castro is m
excellent professional hands."
Born in Madrid, Garcia
Sabrido said his specialty was
in.the digestive system and m
transplants. He has studied in
several countries melding the
United States, Canada and the
Netherlands.


We wish our valized customers
a Merry ChristBlas
and a Happy New Year -
*
NRSsau Tile
.
Will be

CLOSED


R R OA
TO
8:00 am TUESDAY
- JANUARY 2nd, 2007
n


Looking to the future of Cuba


will attenipt to perpetuate itself,
W and the privileges of its elites,
through increased repression
aa o tg dCbpen e tphle so-
nat oonwl i rt ee e
ecama Cuban people that it stands m ,
to his solidarity with their democratic
oup of aspirations, and will provide the
nt the political and economic support
ions of necessary to make those aspi-
. They rat atl.ste is for the inter-
oment P
g their national community td call on
ng cen. the regime to free its political .
access prisoners, stop the persecution,
ilsoci- restore individual political and
ng any econonuc rights and start down
ting in a path that leads to free elec-
trons. The dialogue that needs
oment, to take place is one between the
pe and Cuban authorities and the
l open- Cuban people about the demo-
a free critic future of the island. We
ady to look forward to the day when
ng the the people of Cuba will enjoy
of the the same freedoms as citizens
regime of democracies everywhere.


M By Thomas Shannon
Assistant Secretary of
State for Western
Hemisphere Affairs

liv at i aa e ut
be banned from using its most
beautiful beaches; live blocks
away from fine restaurants, but
not be allowed to eat in them?
To be required to get govern-
ment permission to buy a car, to
rent an apartment, or leave the
province in which you live? To
be spied on by your neighbours
and made to participate in
group "acts of repudiation"
against neighbours who flout-
ed the government's restric-
tions? Welcome to Cuba.
Vaclav Havel, former politi-
cal prisoner, leader of Czecho-
slovakia's Velvet Revolution,
and eventual president of an
independent republic, once
argued that totalitarian regimes
fear and imprison dissidents
because they represent the
potential of human freedom.
Regimes that govern through
lies, fear, and intimidation can-
not abide individuals who
remain true to themselves and
their aspirations. Individuals
who dare to question such
regimes find themselves in
prison. In Cuba today, over 300
political prisoners languish in
its jails.
In March 2003, the Cuban
regime arrested and imprisoned
75 members of Cuba's democ-
ratic civil society for such
"crimes" as organizing seminars
on the Universal Declaration
of Human Rights, running a
library, and writing uncensored
articles, essays and poems about
life in Cuba. In June 2005, oth-
ers were arrested for organiz-
ing a protest outside the French
embassy.

b re all
dent on their behaviour. While
out of prison, many, such as
Marta Beatriz Roque, have
been subject to harassment,
intimidation, and violent attack.
In recent weeks, the regime has
released some well-known dis-
sidents, while other activists
have been beaten and arrested.
The message is clear: The
regime will not tolerate inde-
pendent political activity that
undermines its ability to con-
trol Cuba's future.
The systematic repression of
dissent should be unacceptable
in a hemisphere that, through
the Inter-American Democrat-
. ic Charter, declared, "The peo-
ples of the Americas have a
right to democracy and their
governments have an obligation
to promote and defend it." It
should be unacceptable in a
larger community of democrat-


s h a fr
and political liberty. The Cubari
people deserve to elect their
leaders just like everybody else
in the hemisphere.
The U.S. does not seek to
unpose its modelon Cuba. To
paraphrase Secretary of State
Condoleezza Rice, you cannot
impose democracy, but you can
impose tyramly. As she said
recently, "If you ask people,
'Do you want to live in a society
in which you have some say in
who will govern you, in which
you can educate your children,
both boys and girls, in which
you can speak your conscience,
in which you can worship freely,
in which you can associate to
promote your interests, the sort
of basics of democracy,' most
people will say yes." Asking


Spanish doctor sa s


Castro does not have cancer


.~ 11 IIIUVyIVI g ug yyg ygg


PI/1IY


SN





Claims that Junkanoo cancelled


O OH ER HMETH & E

Independence Drive Phone: 341-4055


TS. RIBRO 8 YOWHS Ell H 11 B 52
formerly of Wemyss r
Bight Eleuthera and a
resident of Bel Air
Estates, will be held on
Thursday December
28th, 10:00 a.m. at
Church Of God Of
Prophecy, Seven Hills .
Baillou Hill Road ,,
South.PastorValentino ..
Williams assisted by ..
Pastor Andrew Brown 9
and Bishop Daniel -- .
Nixon will officiate and
interment will follow in Lakeview Memorial Gardens
.
John F. Kennedy Drive'

Precious memory ate held by her faithful husband,'
Charles Brown; 5 sons, Renardo, Kenyan, Kendrick,
Deon, and Charles Brown; 4 daughters, Katherma
Williams, Ramona Taylor, Mehnda Brown 1md
Miranda Storr; 4 grand-children, Jasmim, Janae and
Jadahia Williams and Anthon Taylor; 3 brothers, Israel
Hall, Patrick Brown andRollison Culmer; 4 sisters,
Dr. Mavis Thompson-Maycock, Evangelist Cametta
Ferouson. Minister Valeri rharlow and Patricia
11;
0 nieces, Ismae, Eulease, Cecilia, Cleopatra, Kishner,
Irene, Nichola, Sharon, Andrea, Monica, Magarita,
Terecita, Wenneka, Keisha, Vera, Gabrielle, Lauren,

o 1;B w ne d ,o h eRa k J fd
Israel, Vincent, Desmond, Samuel, Sheldon, Luke,
Nicholas, Hank, Leonardo, Johnlee, Myriam, Patrick'
Travez. Donell. Edmund, Ezra, Deivin,^Witham,
Anthony, Seth, John, Wendall, Wenrick, Melie, Andie,
Denton, Bruno and Nardo; 79 grand-meces and
nephews; 3 sons-in-law, Rondon Williams, Anthon
Taylor and Kenneth Storr; 2 daughters-in-law, Monette
leetingta1n aK BroM sis in-laVw Emi
Ferguson, Netlean Ruffm and Helen McQueen; 20
brothers-in-lawPatrickMaycockJohnleyFerguson,
Howard Charlow, Calvin Jolly, Arthur, Wendall,
Nelson, Tyrone, Morland, Roland, Ezra, Emith
Eleazor, Berlm, Jerome, Gary, Alhe and Douglas
Brown, Dialysis Unit of Princess Margaret Hospital,
Deliverance Faith Center family, Wulff Road COGOP
family, the Community of Wemyss Bight Eleuthera
including, Mt. Olive Tabernacle Assembilies ofGod,
Wings of Deliverance, Bi holi Daniel Nixon and
family, Pastor Carl Nixon and family, Agatha Brown
and family, George and Lee Sweeting and family,
Margaret Thompson, Eulamae Brown and family,
Aunt Evelyn and the Thompson family, the Young,
Hall, McKinney and Brown families, Iris, Whylly,
Bishop Clarence Williams, Pastor Andrew Brown,
PastorValexitinoWilliamsandotherstoonumerous
to mention
.
Relatives and friends may view the remains at THE.
CHAPEL OF MEMORIES INDEPENDENCE
DRIVE on Wednesday-from 11:00-7:00 p.m. and at
the church on Thursday from 9:00 a.m. to service
time.


position
available

Accountant Financial Controls
Responsibilities:
Accounting and management of financial controls
surrounding, the Company's investment assets
and cash transactions
Management of bank accounts and bank reconciliations
Assistance with the Company's compliance in FTRA
requirements
Preparation of management reports
Requirements:
Minimum of Bachelors degree in Accounting
Professional accounting designation or eligibility
for admission to BICA preferred
Minimum of two years accounting experience
Working knowledge of International Financial Reporting
Standards
Proficient in Microsoft Excel and Word
Excellent communications skills oral and written
Excellent interpersonal skills
Self-motivated and able to work independently
and meet deadlines *


SALES OFFICES: NASSAU, FREEPORT, ABACO & ELEUTHERA


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2006


"The reality is that last night
(Monday night) would have
been the perfect night for
Junkanoo. The weatherman
came on and said it would not
rain until 8 am this (Tuesday)
morning, however, you had
groups who said that they would
need 24 hours to mobilize."
The official said that an inves-
tigation needs to be undertaken
to determine how much of the
postponement was, in fact,
related to weather and how
much was related to costumes
not being ready.
He said that if the groups
were prepared for the Boxmg
Day parade, they could have
easily mobilized and been ready
to make it to Bay Street in time
to start and complete the
parade before the anticipated
rain came.
"You have to hold them
accountable because of the
inconvenience caused to tourists
who came here specifically for
this event," the official com-
plained. "These groups can't be
regulators of Junkanoo and par-
ticipants. They need to be
called into question."
He is concerned about the
precedent being set by the pos-
sibility of allowing Junkanoo


groups to dictate when the
parade should be held and the
impending fall-out from the
parade's postponement.
"This hostage-holding thing
and the implications are many,
as the latest postponement will
impact many in New Provi-
dence. You have the Bay Street
merchants who are going to be
impacted, you have the police,
and the judiciary. It impacts a
number of people and that is
the reality," the official said.
He noted that the mconve
niece of the postponement
"throws the country, partiou-
larly New Providence, into a
chaotic situation."
Late yesterday evening, as a
result of the parade being
moved to 8 pm Wednesday
evening, the Junkanoo Corpo-
ration sent out an important
notice that roads in the down-
town area, including Bay Street,
will begin closing down by 4 pm.
The report goes on to say:
"The Royal Bahamas Police
will make every effort to facili-
tate normal working activities,
including traffic traveling&
through the downtown area, as
of normal business hours
on Thursday, December 28,
2006."


public until yesterday (Mon-


news of the change "because
they are not complete."
Saying that had the parade
been threatened by rain, he
would not have wanted to take
his costumes out on Bay Street
for them to be destroyed, the
Saxon member added: "But
after seeing how the. weather
went last night, I think we could
have gone. We would have
been finished with our two
laps."
He feels that this parade
delay will have a tremendous
impact on public participation
and says that the government
stands a great chance of losing
large sums of money as a result.
"A lot of people have to go to
work," he said. "And besides it
being a work day, a lot of peo-
ple who came in for the parade
have to leave the country, and
people who came in from the
family islands have to go back."
The Saxon member is joined
by another Junkanoo official
. who, too, says that this year's
festival may have been "held
hostage" by two major
Junkanoo groups.
Saying that he knows for a
fact that two of the groups did
not have all of their costumes
.completed, the official said:


FROM page one


M SEARCH
AND SEIZURE
Also on Saturday morn-
Ing, police executed a
search warrant oil a resi-
dence in Summerhaven
Estates, and there, they
recovered a .44 magnum
handgun, 79 live rounds of
=.::==d
a .3 handgun, an e
su rse taothma r ,
two persons, a male and a
female, both in their 30s,
were taken into police cus-
tody.

POlice step up
inVCStigation;
family ChillS
that evidence
indicates foul play

FROM page one

Nick, "eventhoughhe was
new in the business, he was
a natural. His charm and
charisma made him a
favourite among clients.
He was gregarious and
humble and was loved and
respectedbyallwhoknew
him. My family and I are
devastated that he was tak-
en away from us so soon."
Jamieson is survived by
his parents George and jill
Damianos, his brother
Nick and a number of lov-
ingfamilyandfriends.


[wiend tatphoens of aSrdult airsep ng
Evans continued. "A person's life is taken
away, and then the perpetrator can find
him, or herself, in it posmon where he or
she can be placed behinds bars. We would
hope to see people resolve their issues in a
. better way, as opposed to just using vio-
lence."
Inspector Evans said that persons who
have information that may prevent a vio-
lent crime from happening can call
Crime stoppers at 328-8477.
With Crimestoppers,- confidentiality is
assured and there are sometimes mone-
tary rewards attached to tips as well, said
InspT t E np ople who see and hear
things at the begilining stages of these
fights ar uments, and other disagree-
= 8 ,, .
ments, and they do not call police, said
Inspector Evans. They have a deaf ear
or turn a bhnd eye towards what is hap-
pening, so these are the people that we
need to reach. We want these people to
contact us so that 14te can help to prevent
further incidents where violence is
involved and people are being injured.


FROM page one

and ive a reciate all the hel that they
PP ..
e doing ut TV a ashking,iagaC h
there are people who see knd h dr these
things at the beginning stages, and they
do not call Inspector Evans pointed out.
"We are continuing to do all that we can
as an organization, however, we are asking
the public, at large, to partner with us a lit-
t1e more in order for us to keep crime at a
minimum," he said.
Pointing out that as a result of many of
these violent;acts quite a few young men
continue to be cut down in the "midstream
of life," Inspector Evans continued his call
for the public's assistance saying that "the
message thatthe pohce force has been
sending out over the past few monthsand
years remain the same."
"In regards to persons resolving con-
flicts, persons involving themselves in
domestic violence and unresolved issues,
and other injurious activities, we need
these people to seek a better way out," he
said.
"Getting a knife or a gun, two of the


CV's should be sent


Two murders


ex::'re
FROM page one

Leeward Streets, police
fa dying
The body of the victim
was found near the bas-
ketball courts opposite
Salem Baptist Church. He
too had been shot multi-
ple times about thq body.
The victim was later iden-
tified as 29-year-old Cecil
Coakley of Pinewood Gar-
dens.
Police say that circum-
stances in the Coakley inci-
dent are sketchy. They
have launched an investi-
gation into the shooting.
There was another
shooting-incident in the
Taylor Street area around
5 am yesterday when a 45-
ear-old man was
approached and shot in the
hip by a young man. The
shootmg victun was taken
to the hospital. According
to pohce his condition is
not life threatening. Police
continue their investiga-
tions into this matter as
well.
A ROBBERY
On Saturday morning,
The Hang-On Bar was
robbed by a gunman who
made off with about $1,500
in cash. According to
police, the gunthan
oab he an bm ee
of the cash. He made his
get-a-way on foot.


'because gron s


Police plea f


Ir~FAMIY








































































13UY ON E
.
4
SU PE RIORIGOLD
40oz for 10.70 & RECEIVE
ONE & 2 LIT RE BT L


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_ I- i' I I ,I _-I-


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


~-


AH Bristol Wines & Spirits Loca#ons
Village LIquor Store (Village Road)
M(Inmar Liquor Store (Prince Charles DK)
west steve equor store twearriage 0=>
Lightbourne & Son (Dunmore Ave.)
outom;acuor store caugusta st.>
Darvilles Wholesale LIquor (Wulff Rd.)
ad usuor store conto canon>
EJ's LiquOr StoreIPalmdale)
Lutra Sunshine (Wulff Rd.)
Hudson Llouar Store (VII/age Rd.)
GNK LIquor Store, kuma
Tt/PP& LIquar Store (Ahara)
































'"-rWa~s~aF~~ ~


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2006


MM


fle


It is like We Are Giving the Store Away!





WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2006


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Srtreet


HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel:(242)351-3010


i )


"r~r~EiYlrsrrrr~


r\smi8~l~e~sl~~"~2~n~~~lg~B~i~i~(~w


business@tribunemedia~net


8 TibNu e BHAs s Editor
he International
Labour Organi-
sation's report on
the proposed
National Health
Insurance (NHI) plan "does
not" give the scheme an
unqualified 'thumbs up'as the
Government has claimed, the
Bahamas Employers Confed-
eration's (BECon) president
told The Tribune.
The report, which the ILO
itself acknowledges was of
"fairly limited scope" at the
Government's request, reiter-
ated a number of concerns pre-
viously expressed by Bahamian
private sector. and medical
groups over NHI's financmg,
costs and administration (see
other story on Page lB).
In addition, while the report
supported a number of
assumptions made by the Gov-
ernment in its NHI financial
design, it expressed concerns
and doubts over other data
relating to the plan's costing
and administration.
An e-mail circulated to
members of the National .
Coalition for Healthcare
Reform, the body featuring
trade unions, the private sector
and various medical bodies,
which is attempting to assist
the Government in creating a


a se n
Insurance Board's (NIB) abil-
ity to administer the plan, and
states that the scheme's suc-
cess depends on strong man-
agement --something all public
corporations have lacked to
date.
The ILO report takes issue
with the Government's
assumption that the annual
costs for administering NHI,
and the scheme's reserves,
should not exceed 5 per cent of
the benefit costs.
Revealing far more about
the data used to formulate
NHL than the Government
ever has, the ILO report set
out the first-year claims expe-
rience projected for the
scheme:
Primary care consultations
- 812,000 visits
Specialist consultations -
209,000
*.Accident and emergency
--9(),000visits
*Tfolilecare--105,000visits
In patient long term (men-
tal bealth) 1.000 admissions
In-patient short-term -
25,000 admissions
Catastrophic events -
1,000-1,500 cases

SEE 7B
PRI


scented and misled the (3ahami-
an people over the true level of
the ILO's support. -
The ILO report was pro-
duced some two days after Mr
Nutt queried the level of ILO
support for NHI in an inter-
view with Tribune Business.
The report's content backed
up his instincts, asd the tuning
of its release indicates that it
was done partly in response to
The Tribune article.
The ILO itself said the Gov-
ernment was likely to imple-
ment the NHI scheme in either
2007 or 2008. Yet the National
Coalition for Healthcare
Reform has yet to receive any
of the data it has requested
from the Government to
enable it to properly assess and
understand what the Govern-
mentis proposing.
This includes the critical
report on.the NHFi compo-
nents. costs and financing, for
which only an eight-page sum-
mary has been released. The
report was completed Jn Sep-
tember 2005, and presented to
the Cabinetin January 2006 to

SEE 5B
page


lively provided to it by the
administration. The organisa-
tion, which includes BECon
among its recognized Bahamas
affiliates, said further work was
needed, and it stood ready to
assist in areas such as assessing
NHI's macroeconomic impact
and legislation for the scheme.
The Government has fre-
quently used the ILO report
to back its case for the NHI
scheme. And the report does
acknowledge that based on the
assumptions, it is possible to
operate NHI "for the foresee-
able future on a basis which is
financially sound", with no
changes to its major estimates,
especially the 5.3 per cent con-
tribution rate.
However, the ILO said that
duetochangesinfinancialcon-
ditions, it was not possible to
give an accurate forecast for
the NHI scheme beyond two
to three years.
And the various other
queriesandconcernsraisedby
the ILO report are likely to
cause some to charge that the
Government, by selectively
taking or 'cherry picking' the
sections from the report that
bolster its case, has misrepre-


financially sustainable NHI
plan to the benefit of all
Bahamians, said: "This.....
shows that the ILQ did not
give a thumbs up to NHI, did
not analyse and .OK the
scheme, and did not give the
scheme its firm support."
Brian Nutt, BECon's presi-
dent, said: "This report indi-
cates that my assumption was
correct, that only a limited
amount of analysis was done
by the ILO regarding the pro-
posed National Health Insur-
ance plan."
When asked by The Tribune
whether the ILO report
amounted to unqualified sup-
port fbr the Government's
NHI plan, Mr Nutt replied: "I
would have to say it does not,
because of the limited nature
of this report and the fact it
only dealt with a proposed
aspect;ofthisplant
"This report refers to a pro-
posed plan. It doesn't refer to
An implementation plan, it
refers to a propo d plan."
The ILO report has only
analysed the assumptions
made by the Government in
forecasting the scheme's costs,
assessihg financial data exclu-


Capital to match
net premium
'dollar-for-dollar'

capitalisationg
This has since been brought
back into line by an infusion
of $10 million in extra capital
from Bahamas First's parent,
Bahpmas First Holdings, which
A. 10. Best said had been in
the form of commonn shares".
This, A. 11 Best said, had
returned Balthmas First "to a
riskibased capital level com-
mensurate with its rating and

SE pa e 4B


ILO report 'does not' 110 wrns o


l anoitaN H ealth

data forecasts


give NHI: thumbs up


TibNu e BHAs n Ns Editor
THE 5.3 per cent contribu-
tion rate for the proposed
National Health Insurance
(NHI) plan will in future have
to "significantly" increase to
cope with the extra medical
demands of an aging poptila-
tion, the International Labour
Organisation (ILO) has
warned in a report that raises
concerns about several of the
Governnient's financial esti-
mates for the scheme.
Although the Government
has insisted that the ILO
assessment of its proposed
NHI scheme gave the plan a
'thumbs up', the report echoes
a variety of concerns already
expressed by members of the
Bahamian medical profession,
the National Coalition for
Healthcare Reform, and the
private sector.
The ILO report, although
supportive of a number of
assumptions underpinning the
Golernment's bnancial pro-
jections for NHI. n arns that .
the scheme as presented -
could.raise false expectations
among the Bahamian people
regarding how comprehensive
the scheme's package of bene-
fits is.
It also warns that contribu-
tion rates forNHI wimbases:


Bahamas First capital


5 By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BAHAMAS First's 2006
year-end capital base will be
"very close to, if not in excess
of"$30 million, the company's
president and chief executive
told The Tribune, following a
$10 million injection from its
parent that ensured it was
removed from 'review' by the
leading international insurance
rating agency.
Bahamas First had seen its a-
(Excellent) financial strength
rating placed under review by
A. M. Best on October 10,
2006, after unexpected growth
in its premium revenues out-
paced the company's capital
base, impactmg its risk-based


Hilton to refit over 50 rooms

THE British Colonial Hilton is to under extensive renova-
tions to improve some of its rooms as part of the hotel chain's $85
million investment in the Caribbean.
According to the MI6 news website, Hilton Hotels is to reno-
vate and expand five of its nine Caribbean properties.
The British Colonial Hilton on Bay Sheet will renovate 21
suites and 35 executive floor rooms with )Suite Dreams' beds,
linens, flat screen TVs, blackout curtains work areas and new
colour schemes, the website said.
According to the website, a 007 suite illspired by the hotel's
connection to two James Bond movies filmed on location in the
Bahamas and at the Hilton Thunderball and Never Say Never
Again will be outfitted with new furnitul-e and amenities befit-
ting James Bond himself, such as a martini bar and personalized
stationary.
Hilton spokeswoman Opal Gibsoli tok1 The Tribune the resort
would issue a statement regarding they renovations sometime
this week. The repairs are expected tq be completed by next
summer.





8 By CARA BRENNEN- THEL
Tribune Business Reporter
MERCHANTS are expecting another
Aveek of strong sales following a boom
experienced during the lead- up to Christ-
K ly's spokeswoman and company buy-
er, Srisan Glintori, said the store was
pleased by its performance thus far, and
expected it to continue untif the New Year.
"Peoplebought a variety:0f items, espe-
cially toys of course, but household items
such as linens and paints continue to be
very big sellers, because a lot of people use
this time of year to fix and decorate their
homest.In addition, people bought Christ-
mas decorations," Ms Glinton said.
She added that the week after Christmas
WRS traditionally a busy time as well.
011, JOu know you have people who
maybe did not have a chance to get here
before Christmas or who have a gift that


QUEEN'S COLLEGE


ISL PAYROLId


HEALTH INSURANO


NOTICE


Sandyport Private Mailboxes

The Postmaster General of the
Bahamas would like to announce that the
Sandyport postal mailbox facility
will open effective
Tuesday 2nd January 2007


All persons who have appHed for
, mailboxes at this facility can make
inquiries at the Cable Beach Post Of5ce
between the hours of
9:00a.m. 5:00pan. Monday to Friday.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2006


as first thought, and although
it was possible ground could be
broken for its construction this
year, 2008 was a more likely
date.
"It'll be interesting to see
three years from now where we
are, if in fact we've achieved
movement of the port by then,"
he added.
The masterplan for down-
town Nassau's redevelopment,
crafted by more than. 200
Bahamian stakeholders work-
ing with urban planning con-
sultancy, EDAW, projected
that up to 4,000 new jobs could
be created, with an extra $264
million spent in the area per
annum and a rise in "tourism
stays" of 98,000 annually.
The overall economic impact
from transforming downtown
Bay Street and the area
between Montagu and Arawak
Cay would include raising prop-
erty values by $48 million.
The Master Plan said: "Nas-
sau cannot afford to delay mov-
ing forward given the estimated
billions of dollars that could be
generated in the economy and
the improved quality of.1ife that
will come as a result of imple-
menting this plan.
"The renaissance of Nassau is
imperative and cannot be left
to decline.......... It is time to
manage, enforce codes, clean
up and revitalize as a world
class destination and liveable
tropical urban model."
Apart from generating
increased employment, the pro-
ject will also benefit existing
and new businesses most of
which will be owned by
Bahamian entrepreneurs.
Therefore, their profits will
remain more within the com-
munity than is the case with the
large hotel chains.
Among the leading goals set
out by the blueprint is to
reclaim the waterfront, with the
master plan saying that about
55 per cent is currently inacces-
sible to the public due to the
proliferation of commercial
shipping facilities, including
warehouses. Other buildings
are underused or abandoned.
To implement the project, the
Master Plan has been divided
into seven segments: Govern-
ment Green, Downtown Water-
front, Arawak Cay and Beach,
the Living WaterfrontPotter's
Crossing, Fort Montagu, and
Streetscapes.
Government Green will
involve creating a network of
civic buildings and green spaces
in the heart of Nassau, giving
most visitors theil first taste of


the city. It will stretch from the
cruise ship dock through Raw-
son Square to south of Shirley
Street.
This project proposed three
new government buildings,
including a new Office of the
Prime Minister, Senate and Par-
liament. One existing govern-
ment building would be demol-
ished to expand Rawson
Square.
The master plan said the
Government Green project
would increase cruise ship visi-
tor spending by $24 million per
annum if completed, "resulting
in a significant number of new
jobs for Bahamian entrepre-
neurs". Property values would
rise by $2 million, with 275 jobs
created and 734,000 more hours
per year spent in the area by
cruise visitors.
The Dos ntown Waterfront
project, involving a waterfront
promenade, expanded Straw
Market and Pompey Museum,
would "increase tourist spend-
ing on retail goods".
Property values would rise by
$950,000 in the area, with $32
million extra spent by visitors
annually through an additional
396,000 hours of cruise passen-
ger visits.
The Arawak Cay and Beach
project would involve the cre-
ation of 750,000 square feet of
new retail, space, 195,000
square feet of hotel space, and
130,000 square feet of office
space.
The master plan said: "The
Arawak Cay and Beach project
will have a wide range of posi-
tive economic impacts. New
lodgingoptionswillincreasethe
number of overnight visitors to
the Nassau area.
"New shopping and recre-
ational offerings should signifi-
cantly increase the spending of
cruise visitors.
"Property values will be
increased by new, more intense
development of well-located
properties. The total employ-
ment impact is estimated at
approximately 1,500 new jobs
for Bahamians." An additional
$77 Alilliba per annum is esti-
mated to be spent in the area.
The Living Waterfront area,
between Elizabeth Street in the
west and the parade grounds to
the east, has been forecast to
increase visitor spending by
$17.4 million per annum, gen-
erating 1,800 new jobs. And
Potter'sCrossingwouldinclude
180,000 square feet of retail
space, with an extra $34 million
spent in the area annually, cre-
ating 300 new jobs.


CRITERIA FOR EMPLOYMENT
* A nunmen of a Bachelor's Degree
from a recogmud adversity confrased
by a cardGed copy wherdikage
* A past graduate ceredisare in educanon
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certaied copy of eartafacate
* Willingness so support the edsod's
Accelerated Progr amate, includang
teaching advanced courses such as Ad-
vanced Placement and Adveared
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Coalorence of nor Medeedies Clarch of


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where caring for others is intrinsic
* 08rre a competitive benefitapacle
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cinIdren's knition
* Queen's College was established in


they need to buy, so they come in. Also
this is when we have our sale, so people
come in for that," Ms Glinton said.
A spokesman for Radio Shack added
that their stores have been doing excep-
ti i although th y could t make
A spokesman for Solomon's Mines said
the chain's stores were also expecting to
have a strong week.
Sales at Solomon's Mines had picked up
since last year, with perfume and jewellery
continuing to be hot sellers and expected to
continue into this week.
"Yes, definitely the week after Christ-
mas is always very busy for us," the
Solomon's Mines spokesman said.
Earlier this month, merchants reported
strong holiday sales, particularly in the final
days of the month, as it appeared that
Bahamians waited for the last minute and
government payments to complete their
shopping.


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Waterfront Authority


A By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Taskforce created to
develop a structure for over-
seeing the city of Nassau's rede.
velopment is looking at estabi
fishing a Waterfront Develop-
ment Authority, the Prime Mini
sister's chief planning adviser
told The Tribrink
Malcolm Martini, who works
in the Ministry of Energy and
the Environment, said the gov
ernment and private sector joint
taskforce, co-chaired by Paul
Major and Charles Klonaris,
had been working on the cret
ation of this Authority in addia
tion to the Business Improves
ment District (BID).
Brad Segal, the consultant
hired by the Government and
Nassau Tourism axid Develope
ment Board (NTDB) to advise
on the BID's structure and
functions, is due to deliver hill
report on this by February, Mr
Martini said, a
"The big things they've beeti
working on are this BID and
what I think they're calling a
Waterfront Developmen
Authority," Mr Martini said.
He added that the BID wa
one of several organizations
likely to be set up to oversee
the implementation of the overs
all masterplan for Nassau's revi
talization, as the whole project
was too big for any one bod
to handle.
An organization such as th
BID, Mr Martini said, would
focus on activities such as build
mg parking facilities, cleaning
the streets, setting up area byes
laws, and levying charges o(
user groups and people once it
was established.
A key element in downtowli
Nassau's revival is the relocal
tion of all major commercial
shiplilig facilities to a planned
new port in southwestern New
Providence, situated between
BEC's Clifton Pier power plant
and Commonwealth BreWery.
Mr Martini said the environ-
mental feasibility for that loca-
tion had been determined, and
the Government would sign in
the New Year the official con-
tract with the company that had
won the bid to design the busi-
ness plan foi the port. *
The bitsiness plan would deaf
with issueslitteYr as the next
port'sownership.management
and financing for its construc-
tion. An environmental man,
agement plan (EMP) will also
be drawn up. 4
Mr Martini said the port
would not cover as much land


Retadlers e acting another good week











I I I II


pg g jg g g y jg

.~Thursday Closure of

New Providence I..ocal Offices~

The National Insurance Board wishes to advise the general
public that the Board's Fox Hill, Jurnbey Village, and Wulff Road
Local Offices, will be closed to the public at 3:00prn on Thursday,
December 28, 2006.


The Offices will re-open on Friday at the usual time.


The Board apologizes for any inconveniences caused.


CRITERIA FOR EMPLOYMENT
* A minimum of a Bachelor s Degree from a
recognize usuversity confumed by a
certified copy of certificate
* A post graduate certificate in education 01
a reaching certificate. a degree in educa-
tional admunstratzon or curnculum man-
agement is preferred and should be con-
(irmqddy accrr@(cqpy qf rjjg.,grt a-
(atq.; -ggy I
* W115n 4.9 Apr kiipyrs e schoofs
Accelerated P agrammes 1. A <.-J
- -----
* The successful apphcant wd be expected to
nake a carrunitment to workm harmonY

.: .:d to po the
The Methodist Church of which the school
is a pa


QUEEN'SCOLLEGE...

* Is the oldest rivate school in The
I'
Baharnas
* Ensures a .seamless continuity of education
and strong sense of community
* Offers a rich currkulum
* Is staffed by a talented and dedicated
teactung staff
* Is a place where excellence is respected
and pursued, where teaching and learning
are innovatxve and where taring for oth
.. .is intrinsic
OE a spaw M
includmg gratuity, pension health
insurance, discount on chidren's tuition

* u 9s a hTILTed me an a
inember of The International Association
of Methodist Schools, Colleges and
Universines (IAMSCU)


Application forms are available from the Human Resources Office at the school or may b frain
out award winning website vtov., qc.Ilancelorth.corn. The completed application, together willr a covering let-
ter' a statement of educational philosophy and a ece ho h must be sent ta:
Queen's college
P.O. Box N7127
Nassau, Bahamas .
Or faxed to: 242-393-3248, or mailed to drynch@qchanceforth.i:am dand a nolaterlifan
January 5, 2007. Only candidates short-listed will be contacted by telephone fax iir email fair an rview.
QUEEN'S COLLEGE
r o:aox N-vi27, Nassau, sanamas
Tel: (242) 393-1666/393-2153/393-2646 Fax: (242) 393-3248
Website: www.qchenceforth.com* Email: queens@qchenceforth.com


on
legs 7 PM ... Omans FumN.
* *
NOw accepting applications for a

Deputy Head of Curriculum High School
=# -
[

Responsibilities will include-
Sharing in the leadership and administration aspects of the High School
Supervising curricular matters
Supervising intemal and extemel examinations
: Sharing responsibility for sustaining a culture of excellence throughout the school
*. Sharing responsibility for providing a climate that fully develops the camcept of teamwork


TRAINEE PRO RAM

ROLE STA TEMENT:
Responsible for the execution of special projects or assignments in different Business areas in order
to obtain Training and exposure to our company's processes and values for a period of 12 months,
having the possibility at the end of the program of becoming part of the organization.


POSSIBLE RESPONSIBILITIES: .
Monitor andT perform business data analysis '
Short term assignments in Operations, Staff Functions, Sales or Convenience Retail
Develop projects, business plans, results and strategies
Assist with logistics and implementation of category programs

SSARY SKILLS*
Bachelor degree in Business Administration, Engineering, Marketing or Related Fields
3-4 Years of experience in areas of study
Great Inter sonal Effectiveness & Communication Skills
Strong Decision Making, Problem Solving Computer & Analytical Skills
Has Comrnitknent to High Standards
With Drive, Perseverance & Initiitting At"tion


If you are interested in participating In tMs program, please send your resume by email to:
recruitmentbaharnas@yahoo.com


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


bNu sR s ditor
BAHAMIANS "are in no
position" to absorb any more
property insurance premium
increases, two carriers have told
The Tribune, the good news
being that consumers are likely
to experience minimal rate
increases if any at worst
when their policies are renewed
in 2007.
Patrick Ward, Bahamas
First's president and chief exec-
utive, told The Tribune: "I can
tell you from my point of.view
that we have no intention of
increasing our rates. Most com-
panies are facing fairly static
renewals. There are exceptions
to that, but that's what my
sources are telling me.
"The market is facing fairly
static renewals. If other compa-
nies follow our lead on this, that
will definitely be the case.''
When it came to the ability
of Bahamian commercial and
residential property owners to
absorb further rate increases,
Mr Ward said: "In my personal
opinion, the market can't.
absorb further increases at this
time...... I don't think con-
sumers here are in a position to
pay any more."
In the Bahamas, general
msurers purchase huge amounts
ofreinstirance from the global
reinsurance industry, which suf-
fered massive losses in 2004 and
2005 as a result of Hurricanes
Katrina, Rita and Wilma in the
US.
As a result property insur-
ance premiums in the Bahamas
hadtorisetocompensaterein-
surers for their losses and keep


them interested in still cover-
mg risks in this nation, given
the increased hurricane risk
faced. Reinsurers largely dic-
tate the property premium rates
charged in the Bahamas, and
the ability of Bahamians to con-
tinue to absorb reinsurance
mereases that are passed on by
local carriers is limited.
Steve Watson, RoyalStar
Assurance's managing director,
said Bahamian carriers were
still negotiating next year's
treaties with the reinsurance
carriers. He added: "I don't see
there being much difference
one way or the other [in the
rates]. If there's any increase or
decrease it'll be very minor. On
the whole, it's fairly static."
188
Mr Watson said 2006 had
been a good year for reinsur-
ers, as the absence of any major
hurricanes or natural catastro-
phes had enabled reinsurers to
maky significant profits.
He added that it was difficult
to imagine what would have
happenedtopropertyinsurance
rates in the Bahamas had there
been another year like 2005,
agreeing with Mr Ward that the
ability of Bahamians to absorb
continued premium rises was
limited.
"It's probably not much at all,
and we've made that point to
reinsurers. It's getting to the


point where people will not buy
your product," Mr Watson said.
He added that if property
premiumratesremainedasthey
were, and proved sustainable,
then Bahamian carriers would
be able to "the losses back" to
the reinsurers fairly quickly,
ensuring capacity for the
Bahamas.
The Bahamas has to compete
on price with Florida for rein-
surance, and Florida's property
rates have soared as a result of
hurricane damage in that state
over the last two years. The
Bahamas, though, has tougher
building codes and construction
standards.
In RoyalStar's 2005 annual
report, Mr Watson said the
company was starting to prune
its property portfolio due to
"incorrect pricing" of property
insurance in the Bahamas. He
added that even without Hurri-
cane Wilma, the company
would not have recorded an
underwriting profit on its prop-
erty insurance portfolio.
Given that most damage
inflicted in the Bahamas and
Florida by hurricanes in 2004
and 2005 resulted from storm
surges, rather than wind, Mr
Watson said properties on the
shore, in low-lying areas or
areas prone to storm surges,
would be viewed as greater
risks, with either insurance rates
increasing or these properties
being dropped by insurers.


-


FIRSTCaribbean Interna-
tional Bank, the parent com-
pany that holds a 96 per cent
stake in FirstCaribbean Inter-
national Bank (Bahamas), said
CIBC on of its two largest
shareholders has made an
offer to acquire all minority
shareholders' interests in the
barik.
The move comes pfter CIBC
acquired 43.7 per cent of First;
Caribbean, a deal involving the
purchase of just over 599 mil-
lion shares, from Barclays for
$988.652 million in cash.






ary 30, 2007, and Barclays has
the option to tender its remain-
ing 66.6 million shares in First-
Caribbean as part of that.
43T7heepurcha rpclahyss
completes the UK bank's strat-
egy to exit the Caribbean,
which began in 2002 when it
merged its regional operations
- including those in the
Bahamas with CIBC's.
It is unclear what impact this
will have on the Bahamas, but
Sharon Brown, FirstCaribbean
International Bank (Bahamas)
managing director, told The
IT innPelf ta htej
nation as the transaction was at
the holding company level.
Both CIBC and First-
Caribbean said in a statement
that they were committed to
maintaining "strong minority
ownership" in the bank despite
the buyout offer, which has to
be made as part of securities
market takeover iodes in Bar-
bados, Jamaica and Trinidad.
FirstCaribbean has total
assets in the Caribbean of
$12.4billion, and a market cap-
italisation of more than $2.8
billion. CIBC, as a result of the
Barclays heal, now owns 87.4
per cent of the FirstCaribbean
parent.
CIBC's president and chief
executive, Gerry McCaughey,
said in a statement: "We are
pleased to have concluded this
part of the transaction suc-


cessfully.
"We look forward to partic-
ipating in the future growth of
FirstCaribbean in this dynam-
ic region," said Mr McCaugh-
ey.
FirstCaribbean has more
than 3,400 staff, 100 branches
and banking centres, and
offices in 17 countries com-
prising: Anguilla, Antigua, the
Bahamas, Barbados, Belize,
the British Virgin Islands, the
Cayman Islands, Cur acao,


D.ominica, Grenada, Jamaica,
St Kitts & Nevis, St Lucia, St
Maarten, St Vincent and the
Grenadines, Trinidad & Toba-
go aird The Turks & Caicos
Islands.
The bank has-about 780,000
active accounts. It has main-
tained an 'A-Stable' rating by
Standard & Poor's from First-
Caribbean's inception in 2002,
thy highest rating of any com-
mercial bank in the Caribbeai1
Community.


Bahamians 'in no


Property premiums set to remain


n emneE,
ag
* ago. .
FESERT1bbean in buyout offer to


minority after Barclays purchase





CO
T O


Act Now 'Ib void Suspension Of

Benefit/Assistance


Persons ivho are in receipt of monthly Long-Term Benefit or Assistance
from the National Insurance Board, who fail to be verified in their assigned
.
months, or anytime after; are advised that no further pension cheques will be
issued to them-either though banic accounts or through pay stations-until they
have submitted themselves to the verification process.


Pensioners in New Providence are urged to present themselves to the Fox
Hill Local Office, the Wulff Road Local Office, or the Jumbey Village Local
Office, immediately for verification. Pensioners in Grand Bahama and the
.
Fanuly Islands are urged to present themselves to the nearest Local Office.


Cheque(sifor pensioners who are not verified on or before January 29, 2007.
will be held and will only be released to pensioners 11hen they have been
verified. a


Pensioners are required to produce their National Insurance ID card, along
with a driver's license, a passport or current voter s card.


For more information you may contact the Verifications Department at your
nearestLocalOffice. -


JR. TRADER

REQUIREMENTS Applicants must be articulate and have good
COmmRUicatiOH Skills. Working knowledge of Spanish would be
.
88 RSset. Mimmum preferred qualifications: Associate's Degree in
related field; Series 7 qualification; at least (2) years' experience
in the trading area and in the financial services area as, well.

DUTIES Providing institutional andsor retail securities trading
services to all customers audior internal departments; receiving
buy/sell orders, assembling individual or block trade buyisell
and processing the order through the proper exchange or agent;
monitoring order status.

THVO1VCS considerable attention to market listings, trends, etc.
and considerable telephone contact with customers and other
illstitutions

Compensation will be commensurate with experience. Interested
applicants must submit applications by January 12, 2007 to:


Human Resources Manager
EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited
(Re: Jr. Trader Position)
P.O.BoxSS-6289
Nassau, Bahamas


FVISFT VWWW.BISXBAHAMASG COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMdATION


_ ____


s~s~1~98BiBBI~ I ~C-~ I"""""$ilP~s~l~',kl*~mT*LgVI~;


.anwn-n. umwn-s.uw Symbol Bid 5 Ask fi Last P..ce Eveekly Los EPS & D.. & E .ela
14 30 12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 1-2 60 15 60 1.1 00 1 923 1 080 8 1 40 .
.oocadbbea Crossings(Pref) 8O 1001: its *** 11 Nf.
T:onna over-Tne-counter securines
43.00 28.00 ABDAB .si 00 43 00 .si co 2 :20 0 000 is a 0 00
14.50 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 1-2 60 15 to 1.1 00 1 580 1 320 6 9 9 -II
O 60 0,")S RND Holdings 0 as a as 0 .25 0 070 0 000 N ?.1 0 00 .
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Fund Name NA EBISX Listed Mutual F ,, 12 isl0r.le.s on. 5 sea ,
1.3193 1.2678 Colina Money Market Fund 1 3 iner
3.0017 2.5864 Fidehty Bapames G & I Fund *-, 1 ""
2 4723 2.2982 Colina MSSPreferred Fund 2 4 11""
LOS 735,20..I Yi0 33.22% / 2006 26.09% .- i.. 0;<
BISX AR SHARE INDEX -19DadO2*1.000.00 41ARrtET TEar.15 IEi.C. ...ss: 12 rr. ..Ir.0.. 3 nas ableS E. :::-17.4 c is NA. **.EV
saws-us men......an, us........sa w e. a e- a e--= c. -: s e.-'
52ak-Low LoutestClosingpriaggInlastS2Weeks an I Zeni..g c..:e :.v. is .. .2 over,. if Dece.nt.e. 2006
Prealous Close Premday"a weighted pdom for daIly volurrie Lan Pace Lati traces :.e..sr. .::. -.se. p.a,=>
Today'sCIOBe CurrentdeffusightedpriceMDrdailywolurrie ."..va, .:1 Treaur.g .:.,.net. rre c..u:. Amer ** :s.:.rd:.e.r.cer 'C. 6
ce.....ce..na.........ws....ma.,sea., a :-s.-:.:r car.see we ...,cs. es.,a ,we...n ve.,
Daily Vol Number of total shares traded togay re.,.. rder Assel e mus *** :4.:. rd.:..err.t.e. 24 .*6
DIV 5 Dividends per share paid in the test 12 mardrts re P.1 N.-a P.aears. go,
PE Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX Tr.e Fueler, Bar.arnes arc.ca s...se. Jar...ar, I i.....a = ir..) ---- :so rac.nernor 2 sor3


Ilm krr


market average of 30 per cent to
around 10 per cent.
Mr Anderson said the liquidi-
ty tightening in the banking sec-
tor, with excess liquid assets
available for lending standing at
just $55 million at the end of
October 2006, was likely to
dampen consumer spending and
business expansion financing
because the banks had less mon-
ey available for lending.
He anticipated that this situa-
tion would last for at least the
2007 first half, through the gen-
eral election, and the Bahamian
economy's prospects while still
good would become more
dependent on various investment
projects coming through. It's
basically a catch-your-breath
period for the next six months,
and hopefully some of these pro-
jects will come through arid will
re-kickstart the economy after
the election." .
Mr Anderson said: "The local
market is struggling a bit because
of the liquidity situation,
The liquidity situation will
have a direct impact on the bank
stocks listed on BISX, namely


Commonwealth Bank, First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas), Bank of the
Bahamas International and
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas).
In addition, it could reduce
demand for the products of oth-
er BISX-listed stocks and limit
any major growth or expansion
plans they have.
Mr Anderson described 2006
as having been "a great year" for
equities, with Fidelity's FIND-
EX Index standing at 735.4 on
December 22, 2006, up year-to-
date 33.22 per cent.
FINDEX is heavily weighted
towards FirstCaribbean, given
the stock's heavy market capi-
talisation compared to other
equities, meaning that its per-
formance is dictated to a large
extent by that particular bank.
Mr Anderson said First-
Caribbean's stock had generated
30.06 per cent returns to
investors for the 2006 year-to-
date based on capital apprecia-
tion alone, never mind dividends.
Other stocks delivermg excel-
lent returns to investors based
on just capital appreciation for


the year to December 22, 2006,
were Bahamas Waste at 38.9 per
cent; FOCOL at 24.88 per cent;
Commonwealth Bank at 37.65
per cent; Bank of the Bahamas at
14.71 per cent; 14.51 per cent for
Bahamas Supermarkets; 15.21
per cent for Doctors Hospital
Health Systems; Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) at 13.64 per cent; and
FINCO at 10.28 per cent.
"All the bank stocks are up at
the moment, reflecting the
improving economy," Mr Ander-
son said. "Earnings have under-
pinned the gains in price.
Pricelearnings ratios are largely
where there were three to four
years ago. The prices have gone
up accordingly with the compa-
nies' earnings. The equity mar-
kets have been good for the
Bahamas over the last few
years."
Since the Bahamian eqixities
market began its recovery in
September 2003, having bot-
tomed out from the September
11, 2001, terror attacks in August
2002, Fidelity's FINDEX has
increased from 348 to 735.4, a
gain of more than 100 per cent.


M By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE liquidity crunch in the
Bahamian commercial banking
sector is likely to slow down the
returns delivered by equities list-
ed on the Bahamas Internation-
. al Securities Exchange (BISX)
in 2007, a leading broker told
The Tribune, due to its damp-
ening effects on consumer spend-
ing and business expansion.
Michael Anderson, Fidelity's
chief financial officer and head of
its capital markets division, said
that while the equity markets
had "been good for the Bahamas
over the last few years", the price
appreciation most BISX-listed
stocks had enjoyed was likely to
slow in 2007 from the current


First is likely to retain $2 mil-
lion in profits on its balance
sheet following a ye4r that
should have been good for
most Bahamian general insur-
ers, given the absence of hur-

ric1 eeard said Bahamas First
was "very close to matching,
dollar for dollar, net premium"
by having a $30 million capital
base. "With the additional
income, the capital base of the
company is in the range of $30
million," he added.
Mr Ward said thedemoval
of A M. Best's ra ring rel ieu.
and atfirmation of Bahamas
Firsl's financial strength had

"6 en t r cta-
tions were that we would
always get it done, as we were
always in discussions with A.
M. Best regarding a solution,
Ourreinsurersandagentsare
delighted we have achieved it.
"We can now put that issue
behind us and move forward
with opportunities we see in
the market. We think we can
grow otir business organically,
and exploit advantages we
have because of our product
offerings and infrastructure."
Bahamas First's capital base
became "skewed" in relation
to the insurance business it was
writing as a result of increases
in homeowner's premium rates

oevseurltt h rsrticta an g ia
the Bahamas and elsewhere.
The company had also
expanded its book of business
rapidly as a result of acquiring
Commonwealth General's and
COlina General's portfolio, and
the recent construction boom


in the Bahamas.
To write more business and
take.on more risk, insurance
companies need more capital.
Without it, they have to cede
more of the anticipated

e r sp n Amt tmF
chance to capture that extra
income from the premium
growth.
M. Best said of Bahamas
First's performance: "Histori-
cally, Bahamas First has pro-
duced favourable earnings and
operating returns. This perfor-
mance is derived from its pos-
itive underwriting results and
consistent flow of investment

incoOm r the last several years,
the company has enhanced its
reinsurance programs to sig-
nificantly reduce its net reten-
tion and promote consistent
operatingresults.Furthermore,
BFG maintains a strong mar-
ket presence and regional
brand name.
But A. M. Best added"Par-
tially offsetting these godtive
rating factors is Bau to.as
First's limited geographic ons
centration, which exposes it to
catastrophic losses.from hur-
ricanes. However, this concern
is mitigated by Bahamas First's
strong catastrophe reinsurance
programme, which has proven
effective m protectmg the com-

pad2 gcapt itnclu It sns
a manageable level.
"In addition, the Caribbean
insurance market continues to
be increasingly competitive as
regional insurers challenge
established local companies for
market share."


risk profile, as measured by
Best's Capital Adequacy
(BACR) model".
Patrick Ward, Bahamas
First d th d ch

million was raised: "We had
some assets that were part of
the group in the non-risk tak-
ing entities. Some of that
involved re-allocating those
assets, and some of that was
done through other means,
14' kh I can't disclose at this
ume
dded, though, that the
$10 million capital injection.

comtiin d with li I etai d
..bring us very close, if not in
excess of. $30 million" in capi-
ga
This compares to 518 mil-
lion in capital at the end of
2005 indicating that Bahamas


OF R



EN TR


1,774 4,866 sq.ft, office suites-
Features a full standby generator.
State-of-the-art telecommunications facilities.
Excellent parking facilifles.
Breathtaking sea/harbour views.


Centreville House
Collins Avenue
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel. 242-393-8618
www.bahamasrealty.bs
www.cbrichardellis.com



BAHAMAS REALTY LTD
COMMERCIAL



CB RICHARD ELLIS
m..<:anu<:- newavoRLC'


,,. ,,

..
IIL
as
All


BA gg


us

,ata
1... d !w


Previojus CI ez Today j CI 05


C~hange


Dl \l EP5 D.


P E ed


o oo
O 400
Cl 260
, ,
0 050
0.240
0.040
0.680
0.045
0.000
0.240
0.570
0.550
0 500
0 000
on
0 5.50
O 255


N M
6 5
iO i

" 4
14.0
24.4
12.6
36.3
8.5
10.5
15.4
15.3
a 5
N r.,
on
1-s 6
7 9
P


e, oo
3 6-2
3 24

4 00 .
2.40%
2.11%
5.42%
0.92%
0.00%
4.15%
4.74%
3.89%
3 98
c. oc.
is
6 5i
2 as


1
11 00
8 03

1 25
9.99
1.90
12.51
4.87
2.50
5.79
12.02
14.15
12 55
0 SE.
7 15
8 60
10 00


11 OO
8 03

1 25,
9.99
1.90
12.54
4.93
2.50
5.79
12.02
14.15
12 se,
O 55
7 15
8 60
10 00


- 293
1 689
O '9E

0 170
0.715
0.078
0.943
0.134
0.295
0.552
0.779
0.927
i an-
-0 1-0
case
0 588
1 269


- Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
ap.maT were
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina )*Ioldings,
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRS
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Anco
FiratCaripbean
Focol
Freeport.Concrete
sco uuline.
J. S. Johnson
Premier Real Pstate


lu MD
6.90
o.
1 10
9.06
1.64,
9.00
4.12
2.10
6.54
10.70
10.50
10.00
0.50
r is
8.52
10 00


2 000


isve~rTh-count er securtu


Y


L____


___


I) I


PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


Ll qui 1t cr un c to hit


Bahamas First capital base to reach $30m


FROM page 1B


BIS
Pricing Information As Of-
Thearatinas 91 flar-arnhan St


C








~


_ (


-

NASSap Plastics Company
Sign Post and 'A*ophy Case
HOLIDAY HOURS
Please note that our offices
will be closed from
5pro on Friday, December 22, 2006
Reopening for business at
8:30 am on Tuesday, January 2, 2007
We would like to take this opportu y
to thank our customers for th
past patronage and to wish.everyo e
a very Merry Christmas
and Happy New Year .


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT 2006/CLE/QUI
EQUITY SIDE No. 00662
IN THE MATTER of alithose pieces parcels or lots
of land being Lot Numbers 584 and 585 situate in
Golden Gates Estates Section II Subdivision in the
Western District of the Island of New Providence,
The Bahamas.


IN THE MATTER of'1'he Qitiefing Titles Act, 1959
(Chapter 393 statute law of the Bahamas revised
edition 2001)

AND

IN THE MATTER of The Petition of
RICHARDSON HARVEY THURSTON

NOTICE -

RICHARDS HARVEY THURSTON, The Petitioner
claims to be the owner in fee simple in possession of
the pieces parcels or lots of larid hereinbefore described
and have made application th the Supreme Court of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3
of the Quieting Titles Act to have the title to the said
pieces parcels or lots of land investigated and the
nature and extent thereof determined and declared in
a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the Act.

Copies of a diagram or plan showing the position
boundaries shape marks and dimensions of the said
pieces parcels or lots of land may be inspected during
normal working hours at the following places:

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court Bitco
Build East Street in the City of Nassau
New Providence, The Bahamas.

(b) The Chambers of Messrs. Davis & Co.,
British Colomal Hilton, Centre of Commerce,
4th Floor Suite 400, #1 Bay Street, Nassau,
New Providence, The Bahamas, Attorneys
for the Petitioner

NOTICE is hereby given that any person or persons
having a right of Dower or an adverse claim or any
claim not recognized in the Petition shall within thirty
(30) days after the appearance of the Notice herein
file in the Registry of the Supreme Court in the City
of Nassau aforesaid and serve on the Petitioner or the
undersigned a statement of his claim in the prescribed
form, verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith,

Failure of any such person to file and serve a statement
of claim within thirty (30) days of the date herein will
operate as a bar to such claim.
Dated this 16th day of November A.D. 2006


DAC & CO.
British Colonial Hilton
Centre of Commerce
4th Floor Suite 400
#1 Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioners


L


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2000
IN THE SUPREME COURT No. 270

Common Law Side

BETWEEN .
GEORGE BAKER
(As Trustee of the BAKER ESTATE)
Plaintiff


ROOFING BAHAMAS LIMITED
Defendant

NOTICE on Order for Substituted
Service by Advertisement

TO: Roofing Bahamas whose last known address for
service was East Bay Plaza, East Bay Street,
Nassau, Bahamas.

TAKE NOTICE that an action has been commenced
against you in the Supreme Court by George Baker,
Trustee of the Baker Estate, of the City of Nassau, in the
Island of New Providence one of the Island of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas for Summary Judgment
in Default of Defence and that by an Order dated the 30th
day of August, A.D., 2006 it was Ordered that service of
the Notice for Summary Judgment filed on the 5th day
of May, A.D. 2006 by the publication of an advertisement
in this form twice in the Nassau Guardian and The Tribune
newspapers to be deemed good and sufficient service of
the proceedings upon you.
AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that you must within
fourteen (14) days from the publication of this
advertisement inclusive of the day of such publication
acknowledge service of the Affidavit and Order for
Substituted Service by completing a prescribed form of
Acknowledgment of Service which may be obtained from
the Attorneys whose name and address appear e ow,
otherwise judgment may be entered against you.

Dated the 7th day of December, A.D., 2006.

DUPUCH & TURNQUEST & CO. .
Chambers
308 East Bay Street,
Nassau, Bahamas

Attorneys for the Plaintiff


I
HeeR S et

has a vacancy for a temporary



M
.
A short term teaching post will become available on
January 3, 2007 for a high school Mathematics
teacher. In addition to relevant qualifications, the
preferred applicant will be an experienced teacher,
familiar with the BGCSE examinations, and a desire
to work within an environment promoting an
accelerated programme.

A certified copy of the relevant degree and teacher
certificate must accompany the apphcation. The
names and current contact information of at least two
professional references should also be listed.
Applications from unqualified persons and or
incomplete applications will not be processed.

The successful applicant is expected to commit to
working m harmony with Christian principles and to
support the emphases of the Bahamas Conference of
The Methodist Church of which the school is a part.

The completed application, which can be downloaded
.
from our award winning website,
www.qchenceforth.com together with a covering
letter, must be sent to:
The Principal
Queen's College
P.O. Box N 7127
Nassau, Bahamas

Or faxed to 242 393 3248 or mailed to:
dlynch@qchenceforth.com


-


ILO report 'does not'





give NHI thumbs up


---- - ~F ~


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2006, PA(.it- 5tJ


be covered (insured) by their
parents' NHI membership or
government contributions.
In addition, the estimates
regarding the participation of
'indigent' persons in NHI were
"somewhat uncertain",
although unlikely to affect the
scheme's calculations.
To aid cost and demand con-
trol under NHI, the ILO said
doctors working in the scheme
would have key roles in man-
aging and using resources.
"This mean that, for example,
referral procedures and phar-
maceutical prescription prac-
tices must be efficient and
carefully worked out before
the scheme is inaugurated,"
the ILO said.
"Fears are expressed that the
provision of benefits to new-
ly-insured persons is likely to
be followed by over-claiming,
perhaps massively, under NHI.
Although it will be natural for
individuals at the outset to


explore their rights under NHI
and the degree to which it
meets their needs, it seems
likely that with appropriate
guidance from, in particular
the medical professionals as to
the disbenefits, rather than
benefits, of over-medication
and over-treatment this
should be a problem limited
to the very short-term."
In addition, the ILO said
that doctors continuing to hold
the interests of patients as
"paramount" could cause dif-
ficulties under NHI, such as
when patients were referred to
a private, as opposed to a pub-
lic sector, physician, or when
branded as opposed to generic
medicines were prescribed.
The ILO urged the Govern-
ment to discuss in advance
with doctors the, "degree of
balance" needed between their
responsibilities to patients and
those to members of NHI col-
lectively.


inflation of public expectations
-is clear, and it may be helpful
to prepare a briefing note on
this and other items of techni-
cal terminology for the use of
officials likely to be engaged
in presenting or explaining the
scheme in public."
The ILO report also urged
the Government to reconsider
its proposal that pensioners
pay $1 per day to the NHI
scheme. The report agreed that
pensioners should make a con-
tribution, based on a percent-
age of pension income, and
that their expected total con-
tribution to NHI some $8
million out of $124 million paid
by workers, employers and
pensioners was not signifi-
cant as far as the scheme's
financial viability was con-
cerned in the early years.
Yet the ILO said: "In par-
ticular, care should be taken
that no individual is likely to
find the dollar amount of
his/her contributions to be
higher after retirement than
before. "
Other areas that the ILO
asked the Government to
review were "a more detailed
assessment" of emergency
transport costs by ambulance,
and whether children were to


THE TRIBUNE


FROM page 1B


be adopted in principle.
Winston Rolle, a former
Chamber of Commerce presi-
dent and Coalition consultant,
told The Tribune that the
group had received "nothing
as vet" from the Government
before Christmas.
He added: "We're going to
make some decisions in Janu-
ary as to the way forward."
The ILO report urged that
"care needs to be taken" on
how the NHI scheme is pre-
sented to the public by politi-
cians and government officials,
as the two major reports pro-
duced on NHI showed that the
scheme's package of benefits
would be unlimited,
"It appears that comments
have been offered to reassure
the public as to the 'compre-
hensive' nature of the health
care to be offered under the
scheme," the ILO report said.
"'Comprehensive' care is not
intended to mean, as might be
assumed by the public, that
every conceivable medical pro-
cedure will be supported by
NHI. The potential for misun-
derstanding and unfortunate





PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT

The following Personal Development courses have been approved
by the Academic Board for COB credit courses equivalencies.

ACCA900 Accounting for Beginners I
ACCA901 Accounting for Beginners II
MGMT 900 -Human Resource Management I
MGMT901- Human Resource Management II
.
Students may continue to utilize the courses as a means of professional
development in both private and public s ec tor s with the added
.
recognition that these courses have been equated to courses taken
toward a degree programme.


~I I


III I I


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


PAGE 6B,WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2006


Visit our website at www.cob.edut.bs


EDUCAI1NG & IkANI~NG BAc~i~~rAML4N


. .


COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT
""""littit'o'"'"ti""i'disknam S onsAn Sdesigned to provide
understand how it works. This course participants with an overview of the
covers the major computer concepts with fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint, It
extensive hands-on practice using various focuses on developing effective and dynamic
softwareincluding: PowerPointpresentations,
II M.....&011IIIrr...e tr;ore Race -:<.ig .


, (ill) Microsoft Access Database
Management.
Pre-requisite: None
Begins: Monday, 5th February, 2007
6:00pm 9:00pm
Section 01 (CEES)
Saturday, 3rd February, 2007
10:00am -1:00pm
Section 02 (CEES)
Duration: 12 weeks
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Tuition: $450.00
COMPUTER APPLICAHONS II
This course covers the advanced concepts
with extensive hands-on practice using
various software, including:
(1) Microsoft Office Word Processing
(ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet
(iii) Microsoft Access Database
Management.
Pre-requisite: Computer Applications I
Begins: Thursday, 8th February, 2007
Time: 6:00pm 9;00pm
Duration: 12 weeks
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $550.00
.
*


QUICKBOOKS
1 courseNtreains new a sling small
employees) in organizing and managing their
accounting using QuickBooks Pro software,
Students will leam how to set up their
companyfileschartofaccountsbudgetand
customervendorandemployeefiles,
Pre-requisite: None
Begins: Tuesday, 27th February 2007
Time: 6:00pm 9:00pm
Duration: 6 weeks
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $330,00
WESPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP
Targeting persons who would like to create
their personal web pages,.this cotuse
will cover Web page creation, Web site
management and HTML Specific topics will
include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia,
Forms aed Tables and hosting of web pages.
Pre-requisfie: Participants must be
computer literate and have
a basic knowledge of
word processing
Dates: 1st & 2nd March. 2007


ever.....a. No.
Date: Thursday, 8th March 2007
Time: 9:30am 4:30pm
Duration: 1 day
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $160.00
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY I
This course covers basic concepts of
information Technology. The course provides
training in these areas: Basic Hardware
Proficiency, Application Features Proficiency,
Operating System Proficiency, Internet and
Email Proficiency.
Pre-requisite: None
BeDins: Wednesday, 7th February
2007
Time: 6:00pm- 9:00pm
Duration: 12 weeks
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $450.00
PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR
This course is a hands-on introductionto
technology systems for use in information
environments. The course will cover the
following topics: Basic Hardware, Operating
Systems, Troubleshooting and Repairs.
Pre-requisite: None
Begimi: Monday 12th February 2007
Time: 6:00pm-7:80pm -
Monday & Wednesday -
Duration: 12 weeks
Venue: 8HTC Computer Lab
Fees: $500.00


Time:


9:30am 4:30prb


All fees are included with thre exception offhe application fee of $40.00 (one time). Whren submttiffng application,


DAY TARTDUR FE


COURSE SECT
NO. NO.

ACCOUNTING
ACCA900 01
ACCA901 01
ACCA902 01


COURSE


TIME


6:00-8:00pm
6:00-8:00pm
6:00-8:00pm


6:00-9:00pm
9:30am,4:30pm
6:00-9:00pm


6:00-9-00pm
10:00am-1:00pm
6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm
6:00-7:30pm
9:30am-4:30pm
9:30am-4:30pm


6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm


6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm


*
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ACCA FOR BEGINNERS I
ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II
ACCA FOR BEGINNERS Ill


CREDIT 8: COLLECTIONS I
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE W/S
INTRODI_1rTi0N TO BUSINESS I


COMPUTER APPLICA110NSI
COMPUTER APPUCATIONS I
COMPUTER APPLICA110NS II
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 1
QUICKBOOKS
PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR
EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT W/S
WEB PAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP

Y
MAKE-UP APPLICATION
MANICURE & PEDICURE
NAIL ART TECHNICIAN


INTERioR DECORATING I
INTERIOR DECORATING II
FLORAL DESIGN I
FLORAL DESIGN II
FLORAL DESIGN Ill


EFFECTIVE WRIT100 SKILLS
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE


Mon/Wed
Tue/Thurs
Tue/Thurs


Tue
Thurs
Thurs


Mon
Sat
Thurs
Wed
Tue
Mon/Wed
Thurs
Thurs/Fri


Mon
Tue
Mor/Thurs


Wed
Tue
Tue
Mon
Thurs


12-Feb


10 wks $250


blUSINESS
BUSl900 0
Cu51000 0
BUSl904 0


27-Feb 8 wks


$225


22-Fb 1day$170


COMPUTERS
COMP901 01
COMP901 02
COMP902 01
COMP903 01
COMP 941 01
COMP953 01
COMP960 01
COMP930 01

COSMETOLOGY
COSM802 01
COSM804 01
COSM807 01

DECORATING
DECO800 01 .
DECO801 01
FLOR800 01 .
FLOR801 01 .
FLOR802 01


5-Feb
3-Feb
8-Feb
7-Feb
27-Feb
12-Feb
8-Mar
1-Mar


26-Feb
27-Feb
26-Feb


28-Feb
27-Feb
27-Feb
26-Feb
1-Mar


12 wks
12 wks
12 wks
12 wks
6 wks
12 wks
1 day
2 days

8 wks
8 wks
6 wks


8 wks
8 wks
10 wks
10 wks
10 wks


$450
$450
$550
$450
$330
$500
$160
$550


$225
$225
$500


$225
$250
$225
$250
$300


ENGLISH
ENG 900
ESL 900

HEALTH
MASG900
MASG901
HLTH900


6:009:00m Tu 27-eb 8wks $225


& FITNESS


*


22-Feb


10 wks


$465


6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm


6:00-9:30pm
6:00-9:30pm


Thurs


' MANAGEMIENT


Thurs 8Fb 12ws$5


MEDICAl.
MEDT900

SEWING
SEW 800
SEW 802
SEW 805
SEW 806
SEW811
SEW 804


01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY


6:00-:00pm Thurs 2-e 0ws$2


BASICS OF FREEHAND CUTTING I
BASICS OF FREEHAND CUTTING II
DRAPERY MAKING I
DRAPERY MAKING II
UPHOLSTERY MAKING I
BEDROOM DECORATING I


6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm
1:00-10:00pm


Mon
Thurs
Tues
Wed
Wed
Sat


26-Feb
22-Feb
27-Feb
28-Feb
28-Feb
24-Feb


10 wks
10 wks
10 wks
10 wks
10 wks
10 wks


$225
$250
$225
$250
$225
$225


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS


Personal Development SPRING. SEMES;TER JANUARY 2007













THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
Yasit our website at www.cob.edu.bs ggg 4

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES
Personal Development Workshops Spring Semester 2007


ILO warns on



NatiOnal Health



data forecasts


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES
Health and Fitness Course Offerings Spring Semester 2007


Credit Suisse (Bahamas) Limited

is presently considering applications for a

SENIOR SECURITIES ADMINISTRATOR


The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

Qualificaffons:
A minimum of four (4) years experience in a Securities Administration
Department of an offshore bank
PC Literacy (MS Word, Access, Excel)
Knowledge of capital and money markets and instruments (bonds,
equities, options, fiduciaries)
Knowledge of payment wire transfer
Experience with mutual funds administration
. A Bachelor's degree with concentration in Finance, Economics,
Accounting or Business Administration

Personal Qualities:
Excellent leadership, organizational and communication skills
A commitment to service excellence
Ability to meet deadlines with minimum supervision
,
Benefits proVIded include:
Competitive salary and performance bonus

ti@n fe Insurance
Other fringe benefits

ONLY PERSONS WITH SECURITIES TRADING AND ADMINISTRATION
EXPERIENCE NEED APPLY.

Applications should be submitted:

Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas
or via fax 356-8148

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS JANUARY 12ns, 2007


I I I I


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE


financial viability.
To make all employed
Bahamians and residents com-
ply, the ILO warned: "Ensur-
mg compliance in this respect
will require strong manage-
ment and effective sanctions.
Consideration should be giv-
en to the means by which each
of these may be put in place."
us.*
JlugOUf
A similar "level of rigour"
would be required of NHI
management on non-compli-
ant persons. Again, the ILO
warned: "It will be important
that proper annual auditing of
NHI is commissioned and the
results publicize. In particular,
it is critical that 'bad debts' are
not allowed to accumulate, and
that appropriate sanctions are
available to ensure a high lev-
el of repayment of such debts."
As for NHI's long-term
financing, the aging of the
Bahamian population "will
result in a pattern of costs of
health care such that the cost
of the beliefit 'package' must
eventually be expected to
equate to a significantly higher
contribution rate than the Im-
tial rate selected of5.3 per cent
of earnings..........
"Animportantaspectofthe
NHI design is the affordability
of contributions paid by, and
on behalf of the members, and
does not require that such con-
tributions should cover in full
the cost of the package of ben-
efits provided to them. The
proposed initial rate of 5.3 per
cent of earnings does not in
fact do so, although the 'gap' is
relatively small. '""
"However.comparison with
schemes in coy es in gill
the aging process is more fid-
ly advanced indicates that the
cost of a comprehensive bene-
fits package will eventually rise
to a level which equates to a
contribution rate significantly
higThher an thisniniltita figpurd."
the likely aging of the
Bahamian population, m 15-
20 years time it would have to
consider "the degree to which
a greater proportion of nation-
al resources need be devoted
to the health needs of an
increasingly elderly population.
"Since the NHI does not
incorporate a mechanism for


automatic increase of contri-
. buttons, there is no inherent
'signal' to enable government,
potentially, to respond to such
changing demands and prefer-
ences for health care in rela-
tion to other expenditure
opportunities or needs."
Given that the 5.3 per cent
contribution rate for salaried
workers is to be split 50/50
between employer and
employee, both paymg 2.65 per
cent of a worker's earnings, the
ILO's assertion that rate rises
are "inescapable" will again
raise fears m the private sector
that NHI will act as an
income/payroll tax. As such,
mereases in this tax rate could
depress business and econom-
ic activity.
The ILO bluntly stated: "In
other words, the continued via-
bility of the proposed NHI
scheme after being inaugurat-
ed will depend on management
which while dealing sympa-
thetically with the needs of
members at times of illness -
must be rigorous as regards
matters such as compliance
with membership obligations
and insistence on payment for
medical services m NHI facili-
ties by those who fail to join
and contribute."

Wage
The ILO noted that the
$5,000 insurable wage ceiling
for NHI will be "adjusted
annually" in proportion to
earningsmaintainingtheceil-
ing's value in
'real terms'.
The report said the Govern-
tridnt had assumed this adfust-
ment would ,be.made.auto-
spatically aq4s.yrit out,44y
delay at the end of each year,
and could not wait for the pas-
sage of legislation to effect this
in Parliament.
"It is understood that no sat-
isfactory basis for indexation,
ahgaimtdw es r Atdres rather
which case mechanisms must
be in place from the outset for
NHI's own statistical to main-
tain records of members' gross
earnings, in addition to the
assessable, 'capped figure' so
as to generate the average
'gross' earnings figure from
NHI's own resources each
year," the ILO said.


SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior
customer service. It focuses on customer value, retention and relationship building and employee
motivation'
Date: Thursday, 22nd February, 2007
/n pem
Tunion- $170.00
EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft
PowerPoint, it focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.
Date: Thursday, 8th March, 2007
Time: 9:30am 4:30pm
Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
Tuition: $160.00
WEB PAGE DESIGN
This course will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML Persons who enjoy
working with computers and would like to create their own web pages are encouraged to attend.
Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web
pages.
Date: Thursday & Friday, 1st & 2nd March, 2007
Time: 9:30am 4:30pm
Venue: CEES Computer Lab, IVloss Road
Tuition: $550,00

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40,00 (one time). When submitting
application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to
change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials


Contact the COOrdinMOf f)CYdCV Cob.ed14}S


" ;


MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I
This is an introductory course for learning basic techniques of massage therapy and its thaby
benefits. Major topic areas will include Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniques, Weliness
Education (Psychological and Physiological Benefits), Indications and Contraindications, Serving
Special Populations and Complementary Bodywork Systems, to include Aromatherapy Essentials.
Starting: Thursday, 22nd February 2007
Time: 6:00-9:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee: $465.00
Venue: Munnings Building, The Collegeof The Bahamas
MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS 11
This is an advanced course for learning techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major
topics include introduction to Hydrotherapy; Spa and Body treatments; Basic Facial; Aromatherapy-
Fundamentals or Essential Oils; Relaxation and Meditative Methods; and Hot Stone Therapy.
Starting: Monday, 26th February 2007
Time: 6:00-9:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee: $620.00
Venue: Munnings Building, The College of The Bahamas
GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR
This is an-introductory course for teaming how to teach group fitness and exercise classes. Major
topics of discussion will include: Basic Anatomy and Physiology; Choreography and Cueing; the five
components of fitness, nutrition, basic exercise testing and how to teach group exercise.
Starting: Wednesday, 28th February, 2007
Time: 6:00-9:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee: $400.00
Venue: Munnings Building, The College of the Bahamas

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40,00 (one time). When submitting
application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to
change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials

CO17tart FC COOrdinatOf f)CYdCV CO ,Cd14}S


FROM page 1B



Diagnostic facilities and
pharmaceuticals are included
but the ILO said, they would
be included with the majority
of cases listed here. As a result,
the Government is estimating
that there will be 1.25 milliori
claims on the NHI system per
year.
Yet the ILO warned that the
NHI proposed administration
budget did not provide for
enough claims administrators
to administer the scheme. It
said that it was possible to
employ about 50 such work-
ers, given the financial con-
straints, with salaries and over-
head costs per capital between
$60-$100,000.
Given the 1.25 million claims
expected per year, the ILO
said of the administrators:
"Each must therefore handle
an average of 25,000 claims per
year, which would equate to
about 100 per day or 15 to 20
per hour."
Despite the much-vaunted
technology system that the
Government has touted for
administering NHI, the ILO
warned: "It must also be
expected that a proportion of
claims will be complex or dif-
f icult to resolve. The conclu-
sion is that, while not totally
unrealistic, the provision of
ad equate claims handling
capacity within the proposed
administration cost envelope
is a demanding assumption."
Administrative capacity is a
recurrent concern in the ILO
report. 11warned: "Care may
be needed to.epsure that....
the capacity of NIB to admin-
ister the scheme can be
matched to the needs of the
scheme, which will include a
very much greater emphasis
on claims administration than
hitherto."
Backing
While backing the Govern-
ment's notion that all working
persons contribute to the NHI
scheme, and that the plan not
coverthemedicalcostsofnon-
compliance, the ILO warned
that tough, competent man-
agement was key to long-term





,


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JOCELYNE STRACHAN-
REGIS OF #10 GIBBS CORNER, P.O. BOX N-3331,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 20th day of
December, 2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that PATRICIA L. ROLLE OF
P. O. BOX EE-17331, 12 CHESAPEAKE ROAD, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to 'the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and sighed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days fiom the 19th day of
December, 2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that CINDY JOSEPH OF
CARMICHEAL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 20th day of
December, 2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


Legal Notice
NOTICE

OJOS CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation) .

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 21st day of December 2006. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc. P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE

LUSAMBO FIBER S.A.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 21st day of December 2006. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc. P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas.


Notice
NOTICE is hereby given that CHRISTIANIE THEOPHILE
KEY WEST STREET, NASSAUBAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minisfer responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts.within twenty-eight days
from the 18TH day of DECEMEBER, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE .'
NOTICEis Fleteby given that GUMMYSON AUGUSTIN OF
MOUNT ROYAL AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that ally person who knows any reason why registration/
haturalitatiori should not be granted, should send a written
and sighbd statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 19th day of December, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice
NOTICE
GANY LIMITED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) GANY LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 22nd December, 2006 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Credit
Suisse Trust Ltd Geneva, of Rue de Lausanne
17 bis, Geneva, Switzerland.
Dated this 27 day of December, A.D. 2006

Cardit Suisse Trust Ltd, Geneva
Liquidator


Legal Notice
NOTICE

FORDSON RIVER CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

otice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 21st day of December 2006. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc. EO. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas.



ARGOSA CORP. INCa
(IAquidator)


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that WILSON JEAN OF #39
WEST STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registrationinaturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 19th day of December, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Ndtionality and Citizenship, PO Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that HOWARD ANDERSON OF
WINDSOR PLACE, P.O. BOX SB-51353, -NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 20th day of
December, 2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P O.Box N- 7144, Nassau, Bahamas.




INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

In Voluntary Liquidation
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sectionl38 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
MIDTOWN PROPERTIES LIMITED, is in dissolution,
Mrs Geraldine Marie' Guest is the Liquidator and can be
contacted at ASDIP, Old Towne, Montserrat, British West
lixdies. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names, addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before
January 22, 2006.


1,iqui


Legal Notice
NOTICE

ARBRE VENTURES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 21st day of December 2006. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc. P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8BWEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2006


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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 9B


THE TRIBUNE





a By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

AFTER much agitating, the Bahamas Golf
Federation has finally received a plot of land
to develop a mini golf course.
According to l\iinister of Youth, Sports and
Housing Neville Wisdom, the Bahamas Gov-
ernment has allocated 15-18 acres of land at
the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre for the
construction of a driving and putting range, in
addition to a clubhouse thatwill house the
administration office.
"The work in that regard has already start-
ed, which will alleviate some of the problems
that we have been experiencing." said Wis-
dom. .
"We would not have experienced the degree
of problems that we have, if the South Ocean
Golf Course had been completed on time.
But they experienced some delays in the grass-
es they have been using."
But Wisdom said they have been in con-
sultation with the BGF and the Prime Miliis-
ter for the construction of a public golf course,
BGF president Agatha Delancy said the
talks are on going with the government
because the home for the BGF is long overdue
and they feel that the timing is right.
"I am ecstatic about it because I know that
was one of the things that I would have want-
ed to see during my tenure," she admitted.
"So we have been able to forge a relation-
ship with the Bahamas Government and oth-
er golf properties, so we will move this project
forward."
While the public facility will take a little
longer to become a reality, Delancy said work
has already began with the clearing down of
the land to be used for the driving and putting
range and the clubhouse.
"It makes it accessible to the Bahamian
public at large," she stated.
By the end of March, Delancy said they
intend to have the driving range and the office
completely constructed so that they can have
theithome established.
Three months later, she said they intend to
.have their mini golf course constructed so
y can at least have their activities set
up on their own facility.


ag agg
RWeam


The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods.Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigmag
for improvements m the
area or have won an
award.
Ifso, callus on 322-1986
and share your story.
g


TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2006


be," he insisted.
The view is that if the
Bahamas is going to subvert<
an athlete, that athlete has an
obligation to represent the
country when called upon."
During next year, Wisdom
said the committee response
ble for the subvention of ath-
letes will also be looking at
how they can subvert those
developmental athletes who
become elite athletes through
their Aderations.
And he also noted that
they will be looking at ways
of subverting professional
athletes tike boxers Sherman
'the Tank' Williams, Meacher
'Pain' Major and Jermaine .
'Choo Choo' Mackey, as they
are doing now for bodye
.builder JoetStubbs and fit-,
ness athlete Natasha Brown.

CERTIFIED
OFFICIATING
With the implementation
of a new official body headed
by Arthur 'Old Art' Thomp
son at the ministry, Wisdom
said the Bahamas Govern-
ment is in a position to lend
assistance to all sporting bod-
ies,
"He has prepared a fulL
report to the government and,
we are trying to address the
needs and assist wherever.
possible because we know
that more people officiating
are requesting a fee," Wis-
dom stressed.
"It's a mammoth task, but
it's a problem when we have
unqualified officiating at the
various events. So we're try-
ing to get as many persons
certified and at the sameo
time, establish an association
through a department in the
ministry to deal with that."

ACCOUNTABILITY
AND TRANSPARENCY
Wisdom said the compli-
ance department of his min-
istry wants to ensure that an
association or federation does
what they say they will do
with the funds entrusted to
them.
"We have a chartered
accountant on our staff, ready-
and able to assist them and
our.permanent secretary is a
lawyer, who can review con-
structions," he stated.
"The month of January is
the time for all federations
and associations to provide,
their financial statements and
budgets to the ministry so
that we can properly plan to
submit our budget to the
national committee in April."
CHANGING ,
OF THE GUARD
Within the new year, Wis-
dom noted that there will be
changes in his ministry as
they seek to replace some of
the officers who have left,
such as Eldece Clarke-Lewis
now at the Ministry of
Tourism, and the late Philip
'Cabbage' Poitier.
"You will see the injection
of some new blood into the
ministry very shortly," he
proclaimed.
SEASON'S GREETINGS
While we are still in the fes-
tive mood of the Christmas
celebrations, Wisdom wished
the entire sporting body "a
Happy New Year."


Sports for Canada, who I
would have had talks with
here, indicating that they will
be wilhng to assist us with
that programme.
"We're not sure the degree
of that assistance, but he has
written to us indicating to us
his assistance."

SPORTS TOURISM
BREAKTHROUGH
While the new facilities,
when constructed will pro-
vide an enormous amount of
opportunities for athletes and
coaches to visit the Bahamas,
Wisdom said their relation-
ship with Canada should also
provide some additional
avenues for Sports Tourism.
"After the discussions that
I've had with the Canadian
Sports Minister, he has writ
ten indicating that he has dis-
seminated information to the
sports organizations through-
out Canada, advising them of
our kind offer to facilitate
sporting opportunities in New
Providence and Family
Islands where facilities are
available," he charged.
"The reality is that in these
cold countries, particularly
during their off-season, they
need to train and the
Bahamas has the ideal cli-
mate for them 1;q come and
train. The facilities that we
have, in some cases, will suf-
fice."
Wisdom was referring to
the.Betty Kelly Kenning
Swim Complex that is cur-
rently being used by a num-
ber of colleges and universi-
ties from the United States
during the Christmas holiday.
"If we had four more Betty
Kelly Kenning facilities, we
could have filled them this
winter," he pointed out.

FAMILY ISLAND
DEVELOPMENT
North Aridros will be the
recipient of an all-weather
track and field surface and an
infield facility that will accom-
modate track, American foot-
ball and soccer teams.
"What that will do is help
the economy of North
Andros because accommo-
dations, food and transporta-
tion will all have to kick in,"
Wisdom disclosed.
"From experience, I know
that codcheswill want to have
that type of atmosphere of
tranquility, to have, a beach
and sand to train, good ocean
water and peaceful atmos-
phere. So if we can have the
facility, we can attract large
number of international
teams." .
Once completed, Wisdom
said they intend to do the
same in North Eleuthera.

SIXTH BAHAMAS
GAMES
Although the event was
postponed again this year,
Wisdom said the need was
necessary to ensure that the
Family Islanders.are better
prepared when they come to
New Providence to compete.
"We thought it wrong to
have the BahamatGames
once again dominated by
people who are based in New
Providence," he stated. "We
thought that if we provided
upgraded facilities in the
Family Islands, the teams
conung m will be better rep-
resented by residents m those
Family Islands."
The Bahamas Games, he
said, is expected to be held
next year, but he declined to
give the exact date at this
time.

SPORTS POLICY
The Bahamas Govern-
ment, along with the
Bahamas Olympic Associa-
tion, has saw it fit to imple-
ment a subvention for elite
athletes in the country.
But Wisdom said they will
be monitoring .that policy
even further next year, ensur-
ing that those athletes who
are subverted, give back by
making sure they are avail-
able whenever called upon to
represent the country.
"We've had too many
instances where subverted


athletes have opted out of


M By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

IN LESS than one week,
we will be in 2007.
With the new year comes
new resolutions.
Minister of Youth, Sports
and Housing Neville Wisdom
said this year has been a year
of planning and next year the.
Bahamas will see the fruition
of those plans.
In his projections, Wisdom
outlined some immediate
goals of his ministry as it per-
tains to the growth and devel-
opment of sports in the coun-
t ry.

CONSTRUCTION OF
NATIONAL STADIUM
With.the demolition of the
Andre Rodgers Baseball Sta-
dium and the Churchill Ten-
er Knowles National Softball
Stadium in July, Wisdom said
Bahamians can look forward
to the start of the construc-
tion of the new national sta-
diumby the middle of Janu-
ary.
"We have a detailed
timetable now and starting
from the second week in Jan-
uary, the Chinese Govern-
ment have informed us that
the intend to et the work
star ed," he stat d
"I am also pleased that we
have had discussion with
housing for the workers who
will be coming to build the
stadium with the view that
an 1:, nade perma_
nent so that when we have
the Babamas Games and
training and seminars, we will
have the dormitories avail-
able '

- CONSTRUCTION ON
NATIONAL BASEBALL
AND SOFTBALL ,


.

.
5 MINISTER of Youth, Sports and Housing Neville Wisdom


FACILITIES
While those two national
stadiums were demolished in
July, Wisdom said the Chi-
nese have assured the
Bahamas Government that
construction towards replac-
ing them will begin simulta-
neously with the national sta-
dium.
"I'm so pleased that we've
had the cooperation of the
respective federations m help-
ing us to ensure that those
facilities meet their long-time
requirements," he pointed
out.
"As you are aware, the new
soccer facility is already
under construction and the


land has already been cleared
for the construction of a mini
golf facility.
CONSTRUCTION OF
NATIONAL INDOOR
FACILITY
While it is expected to be a
part of phase two of the con-
struction at the Queen Eliza-
beth Sports Centre, Wisdom
said they are already talking
about the new national
indoor facility. .
What is proposed is a
10,000 seat multi-purpose
indoor facility," he stated. "I
can tell you that we have
rd ived an until correspon-
dence from the Mimster of


tion of Athletic Associa-
tions' awards banquet will
ntiagsed on Frid an ht at
Hotel, starting at 7pm.
American sprinter Laurysi
Williams, a training partner
of Bahamian sprinter Deb-
bie Ferguson-McKenzie,
will be the special guest.
Williams and her party will
be arriving in town today.
During the evening, the
BAAA will award the most
outstanding athlete, the
most outstanding male and
female, the junior male and
female athletes, the coach
and official of the year.
Additionally, all athletes
who represented the
Bahamas on the national
teams will be honoured.
M REGATTA
BOAT OF THE YEAR
WINNERS
THE Bahamas Boat Own-
ers and Sailors Association
have announced the win-
ners of the three classes of
sailing for 2006.
In the A Class, the Red
Hot Thunderbird secured
the most points in the fleet,
the Eudeva captured top
honours in the B Class and.
the Bulla Reg accumulated
the most points in the C
Class.
W REGATTA
NEW YEAR'S DAY
REGATTA
V. Alfred Gra the Min-
ister of Local G ernment
anel Consurn- Affairs. with
will hold a press conbf rence
on Thursday to reveal plans
for the New Year's Day
Regatta.
According to the Rev. Dr.
Philip McPhee, the chief
spokesman for regattas, thi
year's event will be held
during the weekend of Jan-
i uary 26-28 in Montagu Bay
when Prime Minister Perry
Christie will make an offi-
cial address.
McPhee indicated that the
event will take the form of a
national regatta with all of
the boats m New.Provi-
dence participating. He said
they are also anticipating
that a number of boats will.
come in from the Family
Islands.
.Additionally, McPhee
said they are looking at
revamping those regattas
that didn't come off like
Bimini and Abaco and to
strengthen the weaker
regattas with an infusion
from the ministry.
a BIKE/CAR RACING
HOLIDAY SAFETY
Minister of Youth, Sports
and Housing Neville Wis-
dom is appeahng to all
those persons who have
acquired new motor cars
and bicycles to akoid using
them on the public streets
unless they are properly
advised how to ride them.
Wisdom has informed the
public that both the
Bahamas Hot Rod Associa-
tion and the Bahamas
Cycling Federation have
agreed to assist those
youngsters with these new
equipment at their respec-
tive sites at the Queen Ehz-
abeth Sports Cen tre.
He said it's imperatil e
that those youngsters follow
allp7Cirn thd ,ste e-
season, to avoid any acci-
dents that may occur on the
streets of New Providence.
W GOLF
JR GOLF .
PROGRAMME
Through the corporation
of the golf courses in New
Providence, the Bahamas
Junior Golf Association has
resumed its national junior


golf training programme,
according to Mimster of
Youth, Sports and Housing
Neville Wisdom.
As you may or may not
be aware, the Jr Golf Pro-
gramme was suspended at
the end of November and I
madaenalno peta tsoothte own-
golf courses that the junior
programme and the nation-
al programmes had to con-
tinue," he charged.
"I'm getting the coopera-
tion from them in this ,
regard "


Minis ter Ne ville Wis dom lo oks:


BGF~~~ ln po


"The problem for us is that we need to go
out and scout talent and make this game avail-
able to all and sundry," she stressed. "My
burning desire is to look at this talent in the
shortest possible time through the urban
development programme because I know the
talent is there.
"Thed we will take it into the academic
phase whether it be in the primary, junior,
senior and then onto our college level. The
short ternt thing is the urban development
because we have a mixture of age classification
and we presented it to the Minister of Sports
arid he bought into it."
Delancy said that while many of her prede-
. cessois have tried to get the facility off the
ground, she's just delighted to be the person in
charge at a time when it will become a reality.
With the construction currently underway,
Delancy said the BGF will continue to lobby
with the local private golf clubs in a view to get
the best rates for their members so that they
carr continue to play.
She further noted that they are in consulta-
tion with the Lyford Cay, Ocean Club and
Cable Beach facilities in respect to keeping
their jumor programme alive. .
At the same time, she said she continues,
along with Wisdom, to negotiate for better
rates for their local golfers to participate on
their properties.
In the meantime, she said the BGF will be
looking at sanctioning more local tourna
-
ments, starting with a tournament hosted by
the Nocturne Group, headed by Shawn
Thomas, on New Year's Day at South Ocean.
But she emphasized that the BGF will not
host its first tournament until Saturday, Jan
-
uary 20 when they travel to the Four Seasons
Golf Club in Georgetown, Exuma to host the
second annual Exuma Open.
"Next year we will be conducting in New
Providence, Grand Bahama, Exuma and Aba-
co a golf job career fair because the
industry now focuses, not just on playing
golf, but opportunities available," she
said.
"So we now realize that we have to edu-
cate Bahamians to the jobs and careers that
are available to them in the golf industry. So
Our job is a big one."














Warne surpasses 7(%) test wickets



with another Hye-wicket haul


9 W 41P W
Offer Good At ALI'Bristol Wines Spirits in
New Providence: Gladstone Rd, BI e Rd, Coral Harbo$rf.ast Bay St & Solomons
Abaco: Marsh Harbour & Treasure Cay
Harbour island: a Island Booze
Freeport: a Cedar Stmet
Exuma: a Bristol & Emerald Bay


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 11B


TRIBUNE SPORTS


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M By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
THIS year, Bahamian athletes
were able to put some of the
international focus on sports oth-
er than track and field.
The Bahamas received atten-
tion from the international media,
fans, coaches when professional
athletes such as Jeremy Knowles,
Mark Knowles, Jermain 'Choo
Choo' Mackey, Alex Smith and
Godfrey Ellis turned the heat up
with this season's performances.
Every year, my colleague Brent
Stubbs and I reflect on the top
performances by some of our elite
athletes when selecting the Tri-
bune's male and female athletes
of the year.
And this year's crown in the
men's division was placed on the
head of Jeremy Knowles. The
Bahamas' own swimming torpedo
is currently world-ranked in three
events, the 200 Fly, 22nd; the 200
IM, 36th and the 400 IM, 49th.
1) Jeremy Knowles: Set eight
new national records, five short
courses and three long courses,
The Bahamas' swimming torpedo
established new Bahamian
records in the 200 Fly (1:58.25), 50
Fly (24.83) and the 200 IM
(2:02.85). The records a the short
course came m the 50 Fly (24.54),
100 Fly (53.40), 200 Fly (1:55.23),
200 IM (2:00.52) and the 400 IM
(4:15.92). .
MHishinternat o year star m
Games in Melbourne, Australia.
Competing in several events, the
young swimmer missed out on
medaling 200 Fly, finishing fourth.
This ivas the closest Knowles
would come to medal, however,
he did appear in the finals in the
200 and 400 IM's, closing out in
the seventh and eighth places
respectively. .
The journey continued for
Knowles at the Short Course
World Swimming Championships
in Shanghai, China in April. At
thismeetKnowlesfinishedfifthin
the finals of the 200 Fly in a time
of 1:55.23, and 10th in the 400 IM
wit 4:15.92.


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2006


Llli


played with Daniel Nestor.
His final appearances were list-
ed at the ATP Masters Hamburg
Series, ATP Masters Series
Madrid, Dubai, Marseme and the
Tennis Masters Cup Doubles.
Knowles played in the semifinal
rounds of the ATP Masters Series
in Canada, London and Wimble-
don. He finished this season with
a doubles win-loss record of 48-20
and a career record of 560-270.
Since turning professional in
1992, Knowles has peaked the
charts witli a lumber one rank-
ing, but finished off this year in
the number three spot.
-4) Jermaine *Choo Choo'
Mackey: The fighting sensation
promised to revive boxing in the
Bahamas and established his
name in the international arena.
The tall, lean, fighting niachine
started out the year with a liang
asid in midseason was holding
onto two title belts, the Bahamas
and Caribbean Boxing Federa-
tion's Super Middleweight. Cur-
rently ranked 38th on the World
Boxing Council charts, Mackey
has scheduled several fights that
should really mark him as a force
to be reckoned with on the box-
ing scene.
5) Dan Woodside: This young
man is the first Bahamian to be
selected to play in a well estab-
lished amateur Rugby league, in
hopes of moving onto the profes-
sio Itonians Rugby club is
one of the leading rugby clubs in
the English West Midlands,
founded in 1948.
Since Woodside joined the
Luctonians Rugby team in
August of this year, he was
named to the team's first seven-a-
sides team. This is a major accom-
plishment for a Bahamian espe-
cially since the sport of rugby isn't
as popular in the Bahamas.
With several weeks of training
under his belt, Woodside was
called upon to lead the Bahamas'
team at a seven-a-side tourna-
ment, his spectacular perfor-
mance at the tournament gave
him the opportunity to play on


team, the versatile footbaliplayor
is the centre for the Stampeders
who finished off second in the(r
division this year.
8) Edney 'the Heat' Betheir
Bethel proved this year that he
still has what it takes to stop bat-
ters that step to the mound. The
veteran player led the Bahama)'
men's softball team at the Central
American and Caribbean Games
in Cartagena, Columbia.
On the local scene, Bethel
turned in a spectacular perfor-
mance at the BSF softball nation-
.als.


He then led a team of swini-
mers this summer into the Central
American and Caribbean (CAC)
Games in Cartegena, Colombia.
The Bahamas brought back 10
medals from this meet including
four for Knowles.
The highlight of his year came
at the Pan Pacific Championships
in Victoria, Canada, where he was
able to set a new national record
in the 200 Fly competing against
American Michael Phelps, who
established a new world record
in the event in a time of 1:53.80.
2) Derrick Atkins: No one
expected a recent college gradu-
ate to burst on the scene the way
Derrick Atkins did this year. He
may not have won an Olympic or
WorldChampionshiftmedalbut
the young sprinter did break a
25-year-old national record in the
100m dash held by Rudy Levar-
ity.
Atkins broke the record when
he ran a time of 10.14 seconds at
the North American, Central
American And Caribbean
Under-23 Championships in San-
to Domingo, the Dominican
Republic in July. But he wasn't
finished yet.
In an earlier race Atkins had
clocked a wind-aided 10.03 sec-
onds and was denied the
Bahamas national record. So at
the Central American and
Caribbean Games in Cartagena,
Columbia, he lowered the record
to ds en ckn h sseH r
in the final in 10.13 seconds.
Atkins is currently ranked 34th
in the world in the 100 meter
dash.
3) Mark Knowles: This was an
'up and down' year for the tennis
professional, having to play in
several tournaments without ten-
nis partner Daniel Nestor. But
when the duo did linkup on the
court they did hit form.
Knowles closed the year with
five title wins, the ATP Masters
Series Indian Wells and ATP
Masters Series in Rome,
Barcelona, Basel, and Delray
Beach. A of the wins were


the West Indies seven-a-side team
in mid-November.
Woodside is currently back in
England, at the Luctonians train-
ing camp.
6) Sherman 'the Tank'
Williams: WBC CABOFE
(Caribbean Boxing Federation),
the NBA world champion,
Caribbean Heavyweight champi-
on and WBA Fede Caribe cham-
pion has taken the world by
storm. Williams, who is fighting
under new management, is hop-
ing to expand his title collection
this upcoming season when he


steps into the ring. .
The Grand Bahama native has
a win-loss record of 31 wins, 17
knock-outs, 10 losses and two
decisions.
This year he has faced-off with
top names, but his biggest chal-
lenge will come in 2007. Current-
ly Williams is ranked 34th in thb
world on the World Boxing
Championships chart.
7) Godfrey Ellis: The first
Bahamian to play in the Canadi-
an Football League is with the
Calgary Stampeders.
Now a starting memberof the,


Here's a look at the CI Gibsoin's Fourth
Annual Christmas Invitational Basketball Tour-
nament that wiB be played at the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium next week:
Pool l CI Gibson, King's College; Church of
God and RM Bailey.
Pool II Kingsway Academy, Telios Acade-
my, Eight Mile Rock and Prince William.
Pool IH CV Bethel, South Andros, Mt.
Carmel and Government High.
Pool IV Doris Johnson, St. John's College,
CC Sweeping and Team Jamaica.
WEDNESDAY
Session One
9am CI Gibson vs Church of God (Pl).
1015am King's CoHege vs RM Bailey (Pl).
11.30am St. John's College vs Doras Jolmson
(PIV)
Session Two
2pm CC Sweeting vs Team Jamaica (PIV).
3.15pm Mt. Carmel vs Government High
(PIII).
4.30pm Kingsway Academy vs Telios Acade-
my (PII).
Session Three
7pm Eight Mile Rock vs Prince William High
(PH).
8.15pm South Andros vs CV Bethel (PIII).
9.30pm CI Gibson vs King's CoHege (Pl).
THURSDAY
Session Four
9am Team Jamaica vs St. John's College


(PIV).
10.15am CV Bethel vs Mt. Carmel (PIII).
11.30am Prince William vs Telios Academy
(PH).
Session Five
2pm Kingsway Academy vs Eight Mile Rock
(PH).
3.15pm RM Bailey vs CI Gobson (Pl).
4.30pm Government High vs South Andros
(PIII).
Session Six
7pm Doris Johnson vs CC Sweeting (PIV).
8.15pm Prince William vs Kingsway Academy
(PH).
9.30pm King's College vs Church of God (Pl)
FRIDAY
Session Seven
9am CV Bethel vs Government High (PM).
10.15am Mt. Carmel vs South Andros (Pm).
11.30am Church of God-vs RM Bailey (Pl).
Session Eight
2pm Doris Johnson vs Team Jamaica (PIV).
3.15pm Eight Mile Rock vs Telios Academy
(PH).
4.30pm CC Sweeting vs St John's College.
Session Nine
Pool Championships.

SATURDAY
Session Ten
Cross-overplayoffs.
Session Eleven
Consolation and Champkmship gaines.


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


JOPO~y K HO


10s 8 18r 0 8


8 1 0


tlth lf 010Oth 0


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