Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00585
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: November 20, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00585
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text









CHILDREN'S P it
DAYND~V2O~evn-

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ci ouny


Volume: 102 No.301


The


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006


Tribune


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Wisdom hits back ah cont racor


Minister speaks

out after clannims of

'corrupt practices'


SBy MARK HUMES
AS OPPOSED to his
department being a vehicle for
"negligent" contractors to
make unsubstantiated claims,
Housing Minister Neville Wis-
dom, urged the news media
to join his ministry and insist
- -that these same contractors
simply "do their job."
The Minister's comments
came in reaction to several
Tribune articles in which con-
tractors have come forward to
criticise what they consider
"corrupt" practices at the
Housing ministry.
Identifying, without calling
any name, who he believed to
be one of the disgruntled con-
tractors, Minister Wisdom
said: "If we think we are cor-
rect, a contractor did come
and speak with the Permanent
Secretary and requested pay-
ment."
Mr Wisdom said that his
Permanent Secretary told the
contractor that she would try
to find out what his situation
was, and upon checking,
found out that the contractor
had several building infrac-
tions-that-needed to be
addressed before he could be
paid.
"We found out that in one
house, there were 10 infrac-
Stions," said the Minister. "In a
second house, there were four,
and in a third house, there
were seven infractions."
SAs a result of the infrac-
tions, it was believe that the


builder's retention was with-
held, prompting his "stories"
to the press.
"He needed to simply go
and repair the infraction, some
of them simple, and at the end
of that point, demonstrate to
the inspector, who would in
turn advise his supervisor, who
would-in turn advise the.direc,-
tor, and then, the necessary
sign offs would be done," said
the Minister.
But in a meeting at the Min-
istry last week, one Ministry
official said that a contractor
can begiven his or her reten-
tion despite the fact that they
may not have completed a
particular job.
At the time, the official was
questioned about the handling
of retention payments in the
event a contractor did not fin-
ish a project for which he was
contracted. The question was
related to information seen in
a ministry file that showed
that a home started by one
contractor had to be complet-
ed by another.
When asked who would get
the remaining retention, the
official said that that money
would eventually go back to
the original builder the one
who had not completed the
work.
But asked what incentive it
would be for a builder to com-
plete a job if he or she could
get paid for work that they
did. plus a retention "bonus"
SEE page 13


SA MOTORCYCLIST was killed on Shirley Street last night in the Harbour Bay area
after a collision with a car, bringing the number of traffic fatalities for the year to 43. Pic-
tured above is the remains of the motorcycle with the man's body covered in the back-
ground. -
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)


AG: no ball dropped on
Judge's Remun-eration

and Pension's act


* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
ATTORNEY General
Allyson Maynard-Gibson has
hit back at accusations that the
government 'dropped the ball"
on the Judge's Remuneration
and Pension's act, and has
emphasized that the government
does not agree with Justice John
Lyon's ruling that the indepen-
dence of the judiciary has been
compromised.
Wendell Jones, host of the


Jones and Co. show on Love97,
suggested yesterday that the fact
that Mrs Maynard-Gibson only
announced a new commission
last week headed by Joseph
Strachan, a retired justice of the
Supreme Court-after Justice
John Lyons had "laid (a)
scathing attack on your govern-
ment", evidenced a mishandling
of the act and a belated attempt
to rectify the situation.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson
SEE page 13


Weekend shootings
prompt police call
for public assistance
* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
AFTER a weekend of shoot-
ing, police have renewed their
calls for the public lo assist in
removing guns from the streets
of New Pros idence.
Speaking with The Tribune yes-
terday, press liaison officer
Inspector Walter Evans said he
was saddened by yet more crimes
involving the use of illegal
firearms.
Police were called to tlhe scenes
of wo shootings in the early
hours of Sunday, both within an
hour of each other.
The first incident occurred at
around lam in the Montell
Heights area. -
According to reports, a 23-
year-old man was walking in the
area, when a burgundy coloured
Nissan pulled up beside him.
"A weapon was suddenly pro-
duced by the occupants of the
vehicle and shots were fired," Mr
Evans said.
The 23-year-old man was shot
SEE page 13

Man stabbed
in the face
A MAN is in serious condi-
tion in hospital after being
stabbed in the face.
According to police reports, a
42-year-old man got into an
argument with "a man known
to him" while they were on Pal-
metto Avenue.
The dispute escalated and the
42-year-old suffered "serious
lacerations" to his face as a con-
sequence.


AG tight-lipped on possible

consequences for deputy

of public prosecutions


* By KARIN HERiG
Tribune Staff Reporter
ATTORNEY General
Allyson Maynard-Gibson yes-
terday refused to comment
directly on possible conse-
quences for her deputy of pub-
lic prosecutions Cheryl Grant-
Bethell for speaking out against
her superiors.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson, speak-
ing yesterday on Love97's radio
talk showJones and Co, would
not comment directly on how


she will "deal"with Mrs Grant-
Bethell in future, or if in fact
any disciplinary action will fol-
low for the deputy director of
prosecutions.
When pressed for a direct
answer, the Attorney General
said:
"I do not intend to be dis-
tracted, I'm working for the
Bahamian people to improve
the administration of justice for
the Bahamian people and I will
SEE page 13


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PAGELOCA 2, M ,


Ranfurly Homes celebrate birthday


* By ANASTACIA MORE
Tribune Feature Reporter
Thirty-four children at the
Ranfurly Homes were all smiles
and laughter when Lady Caro-
line Simmonds held a surprise
anniversary pafty at the home
on Tuesday to celebrate both
her mother's birthday and the
opening of the Ranfurly Homes
fifty years ago. As a little girl


of four, Lady Caroline unfurled
the flag for the opening in
November, 1956.
Lady Caroline, who visits the
Bahamas every year and con-
tinues to support the home by
collecting donations from
around the world, added a little
spark to the youngsters' day
during the fun-filled event. Lady
Caroline was accompanied by
her daughters, Zara and Rose.


.P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12
"..-P13,14,17,18,19,21,22,23
.P25,26,27,29
2 ....................................P4
.....P15,16,20,24,28,30,32
............................... P 1. P
s SECTION
^ .0P12,3.4,5,6,7,10,11,12,13
........................P8,9
.......................P14,15,16


..............P1,2,3,4,5,6,8
........................... .. P7

TION 28 PAGES

,TG:UIDE 28 PAGES

SECTIONS
........ n12 Pages
........ ...............12.Pages


The occasion was an oppor-
tunity to meet some of the
newest residents at the home.
It was also a chance for many
of the children to meet the
daughter of the founder of their
home, Lady Hermione Ran-
furly, wife of the then Gover-
nor, the Earl of Ranfurly.
'Lady Ranfurly, who died in
February, 2001 at the age of 87,
founded the home following a
fire in downtown Nassau in
1954.
While helping to clean up
after the blaze, she discovered a
group of children sleeping in
cardboard boxes in buildings
and alleys near the burnt build-
ings. They were homeless.
Lady Ranfurly then used her
local and international contacts
and, together with the Queen
Mary's sewing guild, began gal-
vanising worldwide support for
the creation of the home.
Just six months after secur-
ing a spacious property on
Mackey Street, with room for
the children to play under the
shade of poinciana and sapodil-
la trees, the patrons and care-
givers welcomed the first resi-
dents into their full-time care.
In 1997 the home, which
came into being as a result of a
fire, was nearly destroyed by
fire. Patrons and board mem-
bers had to once again turn to
the community for support in
rebuilding the boys' dormitory.
The home, which has been a
safe haven for thousands of
Bahamian children since 1956,
now has the capacity to acconm-
modate more than 45 children,
whose ages range from five to
20 and is equipped with three
dormitories, a study room, liv-
ing room, a computer centre
and a kitchen and dining facili-
ty. .
According to Mrs Lillian
Edwards, administrator of the


* LADY Caroline Simmonds, right, with one of the Ranfurly
. Homes children


home, all 34 of the children
had a great day and were very
appreciative of Lady Caro-
line's \isit.
"It was a thrill for the chil-
dren, they all enjoyed them-
selves and had a wonderful
time. They were very happy to
see her," said Mrs Edwards.
Showing their appreciation
to Lady Caroline, some of the
children played the piano.
danced and read a few poems
for her.
According to Mrs Edwards.,
the Ranfurly Homes is a learn-
ing ground, a place where lov-
ing memories take shape.
"Every child is shown love
and respect at the home. This


is where most of them receive
their first feeling of apprecia-
tion," said Mrs Edwards.
The home, which is headed
by an administrator, works'
with a team of social workers
and psychologists to meet the
emotional and physical needs
of the children in their care.
Mrs Edwards said that Lady
Caroline was very happy to
spend the day with the chil-
dren, and was impressed with
their performances.
The home, which also pro-
vides a safe structured envi-
ronment for children who have
been orphaned, abused,
neglected and abandoned, has
future plans for expansion.


In brief

Bahamas

lizard backs

up Darwin's

theory


and share your story.


'f
A NEW study conducted in I
the Bahamas has proven Dar-
win's theory and shown that
evolution moves more quickly ,
than scientists thought.
Scientists, who have been
observing the brown arole
(Anolis sagrie) lizard through-
out the Balhama lands and
cays, have determined that
twice within a year the. small
reptile evolved, charging in its ,
body and behaviour to outwit
a predator confirming Charles Z
Darwin's theory on natural
selection.
Researchers told the journal
Science that the findings of this '
study counters the "widespread
view of evolution as a process
played out over thF course of
eons".
Changes in limb length in the
brown arole lizard were
observed by biologists after they
introduced a predator, the I
northern curly-iailed lizard
(Leiocephilus caiiatus). to
islands xlhere the brown arole is
found.
In the first six months the
brown arole developed longer
legs so that it could outrun its
predator.
Over the second six-month
period the arole changed its
behaviour so that it spent far
less time on the ground and
longer on branches and plant
stems.
After a year the surviving
aroles had much shorter,
stumpier legs that were more
suited to clinging on to thin
branches.
"We showed that selection
dramatically changed direction
over a short time, within a single',
generation," the researchers
told Science.

Accident

leaves one ,
d^ foa 4.at t''^wf

one injured

FREEPORT -A traffic acci-
dent in Freeport over the week-
end has left a young man dead
and another hospitalized with-e
serious injuries in New Provi-.
dence.
Kevin Sears of Freeport was
fatally injured at around 8.45pm.
when the vehicle he was driving
crashed into a concrete utility. ,
pole on East Sunrise Highway.''
His passenger, Jeahreal King,4
21, was seriously injured and
airlifted to Nassau on Friday'.t
evening. He is listed in critical
condition.
According to Inspector
Loretta Mackey, the man's-"
death has pushed to nine the'
number of traffic fatalities on
Grand Bahama for the year.
Insp Mackey reported that'
the victim was driving a black
Mercury Sable car license 37040"
west on East Sunrise Highway'
when he lost control of the vehi-
cle, about 300 feet east of the'
Sunrise Medical Centre.
The vehicle crashed into a
concrete utility pole in the'4
median.
According to one witness at
the scene, the vehicle so was
badly wrecked, it was unrecog-,
nizable.
The witness said it took a few
hours for emergency rescue,'
crew to extricate the victims
from the wreckage.
Both men were taken by
ambulance to Rand Memorial-
Hospital, where twenty-two,-
year old Sears a resident of-
No 438 Manderville Road,'
Hudson Estate was officially
pronounced dead by doctors
around 11.45pm Friday.
Insp Mackey said investiga-"
tions are continuing into the'
crash. She is appealing to''
motorists to drive on the streets
with caution and care.


Share:

your

news

The Tribune wants to hear '
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps z
yo~are raising funds for a 1
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
aref or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986


PAGE 2, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006


THE TRIBUNE












0 In brief

Thousands

at funeral

of slain

officer

THOUSANDS attended the
memorial service for slain Flori-
da Deputy Sheriff Brain Teph-
ford, who was gunned down
when a Bahamian allegedly
opened fire on a police vehicle.
Mr Tephford's superior offi-
cer Sheriff Ken Jenne read a
copy of a letter penned by the
deceased's four-year-old daugh-
ter to more than 3,500 of the
deputy's family, friends and col-
leagues on Friday afternoon
during a memorial service at the
Broward Centre for the Per-
forming Arts.
"Mommy told me a very bad
man hurt my daddy, and my
daddy's dead," four-year-old
Alyssa wrote. "I was very sad
and I cried and cried."
Deputy Corey Carbocci, of
Royal Palm Beach, who was
injured in last week's attack, lis-
tened from his wheelchair.
Three Bahamian men were
charged last week in connection
with opening fire on the two
deputies killing one and seri-
ously injuring the other.
Eloyn Devon Ingraham, 28,
was charged with first degree
murder of Deputy Tephford,
34, and the attempted murder
of Deputy Carbocci, 37, accord-
ing to the Broward County
Sheriff's office.
Two other men, both
Bahamians, who were seen on
surveillance video with Ingra-
ham, were also arrested.
Arron Bernard Forbes, 22,
and Andre M Delancy, 19, were
charged with accessory after the
fact.
Tephford, 34, was working
an off-duty detail last Saturday
night at an apartment complex
when he made a traffic stop
with Deputy Carbocci.
It is alleged that without
warning, Ingraham jumped out
of the car and fired 19 shots,
striking both deputies several
times, according to US author-
ities.
S Deputy Tephford, who was
Snot wearing a protective vest at
/Kthe time of the shooting, was
'shot twice. The six-year veteran
of the department was pro-
nounced dead at a hospital ear-
ly Sunday.
Deputy Carbocci, who was
wearing a protective vest, was
shot four times. He was hospi-
talised and was expected to
make a full recovery.

Young man in
custody after
firearm and
ammo found

A 23-YEAR-OLD man was
detained for questioning Friday
following the seizure of a .357
revolver and 21 rounds of live
ammunition from a Colony Vil-
lage home.
The firearm was found after
officers from the Drug Enforce-
ment Unit executed a search
warrant on the house, according
to police press liaison officer
Inspector Walter Evans.


Man to face

murder and

robbery

charges

FREEPORT A man is
expected to be arraigned in the
Eight Mile Rock Magistrate's
Court on Monday morning
charged with the murder of
Troy Anthony Seymour of
Pinedale, Eight Mile Rock.
According to police, the sus-
pect is also expected to be
charged with conspiracy to com-
mit armed robbery in relation to
the matter.
According to police reports,
Seymour, 37, died of gunshot
and.stab wounds received on
November 13 while at Hanna


Hill, Eight Mile Rock.
Seymour, a father of three,
was a delivery driver for KFC
restaurants on Grand Bahama.
He was also an associate minis-
ter at Mt Zion Baptist Church.
His death is the ninth homicide
for the year on Grand Bahama.



TROICAL


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006, PAGE 3


LOCAL NEWS


BUT head: more work to be done


* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
A $26 million industrial agree-
ment recognizing the "primacy" of
the teaching profession will go some
way towards encouraging more peo-
ple to join the teaching profession,
but there is still a lot of work to
do", according to president of the
Bahamas Union of Teachers (BUT),
Ida Poitier-Turnquest.
Three thousand five hundred
teachers now in the sector can look
forward to pay increases and other
benefits as part of the five-year
agreement, signed on Friday, after
months of negotiation.
Mrs Poitier Turnquest said yes-
terday that she is pleased with the
framework that resulted, adding that
the BUT ultimately did not have to
compromise a significant amount of
their demands. "There was some give
and take but not too many," she said.


She said she is confident that the
agreement will be carried out as
planned.
However, with regard to whether
the deal will make teaching appear a
more "viable" option for young
Bahamians choosing their career
path, Mrs Poitier-Turnquest said
there is still "a lot of work to do".
"We realise that teaching is not
as glamorous or as financially
rewarding as some professions," she
said, noting that currently many
teachers have to be recruited from
abroad. However, this industrial
agreement will bring some "justice"
to those in the profession, she
added.
This justice xill pairtl come in
the form of salary increases over a
period of five years. Hundreds of
extra dollars each year will be
received, including a $1,800 payment
in the first year, and an $800 pay-
ment in the final year..


The maximum pay scale would
also be increased from $31,200 to
$33,600 retroactive to September
2006 and raised to $34,000 as of Sep-
tember 2007.
Paternity or adoption leave once
every three years and sabbaticals for
teachers who have given at least 12
months of excellent service will all
now be options, while allowances
also have been increased in the case
of itinerant teachers, housing assis-
tance, and transportation, as well as
for multi-grade, special school and
pre-school teachers.
In the Bahama Journal on Sat-
urday Education Minister Alfred
Sears said that the deal provides an
"enhanced, orderly and relevant
grievance procedure."
Both Mr Sears, and Mrs Ida Poiti-
er-Turnquest said they thought the
new agreement would strengthen
the partnership between government
and the BUT.


* IDA Poitier-Turnquest


ZNS under fire for not representing

all sectors of Bahamian society


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

ZNS was slammed yesterday
for being a political mouth-
piece that does not allow equal
representation or express the
"needs, concerns and issues" of
all sectors of Bahamian society.
Speaking on Parliament
Street, hosted by Craig Butler
and attorney Fayne Thomp-
son, Erin Greene of the
Caribbean Association for
Feminist Research and Action
(CAFRA) said that program-
ming on the station has to
begin to be opened up to non-
christians, in particular, if the
station is to truly represent the,
, Bahamas as a whole.
"When we look at the pro-
gramming on ZNS, I ask and I
want Bahamians to ask them-
selves: do women, do non-tra-
ditional Christians and non-
Christian Bahamians have
equal access to .ZNS?" asked
Ms Greene.


"I don't think there should
be anything stopping anyone
from saying anything they want
to say just as long as every-
body has access to put forward
their view," she said.
Ms Greene said that the sta-
tion was neglecting children in
particular, by not having more
educational programming.
"Children love TV but ZNS
is mainly, majority Christian
programming. Where is the
educational programming?"
she asked. "Why aren't you
helping me to find a mecha-
nism that will work with my
child?"
"Don't presume that all the
Christians in this country want
to watch Christian program-
ming," she said, adding that
"there is still positive social pro-
gramming" other than Christ-
ian programming, that could
be aired as an alternative.
Such areas which are under,
or not featured at all are
health, public awareness rais-


ing programming, art, Bahami-
an films, and the interests of
the youth, said Ms Greene.
Mr Butler said that the
question that needs to be
asked of the channel is what
"aim and direction" they have
in society, in light of the "open-
ing up of the airwaves."
According to Ms Greene,
ZNS needs new "fresh" voices
to help it determine a new
agenda. With an increase in.
the numbers of Bahamian
going abroad to study, and
returning with "fresh ideas" in
the field of communication, Ms
Greene said these should not
be hard to find.
Ms Greene said that ZNS
has no right or reason to "deny
a voice" to certain sectors of
society based on what makes
better commercial sense.
Both the host, Mr Thomp-
son, and Ms Greene agreed
that political candidates need
to start talking about the future
of the station.


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THE TRIBUNE


.'


";


-l

fIW ,i^' I VqiD.P !:if










PAGE 4, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 200


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K. C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
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Questions raised on Health Scheme


IN PUSHING through his government's
plans to legislate into being The National Insur-
ance Act, Prime Minister Perry Christie has
promised much. The question is, with the pre-
sent state of government's health care infra-
structure, carn he deliver?
Mr Christie said that his government will not
shirk its responsibility to "guide and take the
leadership role in protecting the health of our
people."
However, he said, "while it is a responsibili-
ty of government to take the lead it is also an
obligation of all parties to rise to the challenge
of sustaining those health gains.
"Public-private partnerships have served us
well and brought progress in many areas of
national action. A similar partnership can also
enhance our progress in health."
That is true, but that is only true if all part-
ners are in agreement. It does not work if, as in
the case of the provision of national health, one
party appears to be coercing the other into
falling in line.
The only premise on which all parties in the
public-private partnership, envisioned by Mr
Christie, seem to agree is that health care should
be available to all. However, the public partners
stress the "need for health care reform and
restructuring" before a sensible health care plan
can be launched. But how to achieve it is where
the potential partners disagree and their dis-
agreement goes to the veryheart of the matter.
Government says there has to be dialogue.
The private sector agrees. Ho vei iit com-ii
plains that there has been no minininoful di.-
logue as one understands that term. In other
words one side is doing all the talking, while a
deaf ear is turned when the other side asks
questions. Unless those questions are answered
the services the Prime Minister has promised
Bahamians will not be forthcoming espe-
cially if those who are to provide the services are
not allowed input as to how best to. deliver
them.
We all kqow that the National Health
scheme is this government's election trump
card. But what folly to sell the people a bill of
goods that won't work in fact they will be
worse off if the Bill goes through in its present
form.
The Coalition for National Health Care
Reform has advised government that upgrading
the present health care infrastructure should
be its first priority.
Says the Coalitton: "All Bahamian residents
should have access to health care. Reform must
improve and ensure access to primer%, sec-
ondary and critical care for all Bahamian resi-
dents." '
The first priority to achieve this, says the


Coalition, is the upgrading of the present health
care infrastructure. "The Bahamian health care
system requires significant and sustained restruc-
turing and reform which includes an upgrade to
the physical, human and administrative infra-
structure."
The Prime Minister says more clinics will
be built in the Family Islands. Fine sounds
good. But remember, many of the -patients
attending those clinics will be transferred to an
already overburdened Princess Margaret Hos-
pital in Nassau.
And what can be done to improve the PMH
before it cracks under its present weight?
It was only in August three months ago -
that Princess Margaret Hospital staff were urg-
ing government to investigate allegations of
"poor management, bad organisation skills and
mistreatment of patients."
The radiology department in particular was
an area of concern. "Many times," it was
claimed, "the files are so disorganised, they
hold off a patient from being seen by a doctor
and this causes a back-up in the process of
patients."
S "Radiology needs the most work when it
comes to fixing the problems that contribute
to the hospital's unsuccessful results," said a
staff member. "Some patients have to wait as
long as six months to be examined or receive an
ultra-sound."
When The Ti'bune contacted radiology to
confirm the reports it was getting from other
departments in, the hospital, our reporter was
told- "I agree with what. was said and I do
encourage both patients and employees to speak
up and fight for what is right. 'IThat is the only
way we are going to get change."
And until government faces the challenges
and remedies the basics, this government will
not be able to deliver; health care services "on a
timely basis or in a dignified manner" as claimed
by Mr Christie.
The Coalition, composed of doctors, unions
and business persons those on whom gov-
erniment has to count to ensure the success of its
plan urges that Bahamians be given the facts.
S And in the words of Dr Robin Roberts,
chairman of the National Coalition for Health
Care Reform, and chairman of the Bahamas
Medical Association, those facts, based on
examples of. "all the other nations who have
embarked along this road, what we can expect
to achieve high unbridled health costs, long
lines, and eventually deteriorating quality of
care in the health system -the exact opposite
as to what was expected to be achieved."
.Anid what will Bahamians really be getting?
he asked. And answered his own question:
"Everything is free, but nothing is available."


A contribution





to budget through





a residency tax


EDITOR, The Tribune.
WHETHER you support
the Christie administration
or not even a blind and deaf
person will acknowledge on
the face of a direct compar-
ison between the first term
of the FNM, 1992-1997 and
the PLP from 2002-2006 the
PLP have without any
doubt excelled with attract-
ing prospective new
employment projected by
leaps and bounds. I would
say there is no rational com-
parison.
I have no doubt in saying
that the fiscal business per-
formance of Kerzner Inter-
national had a lot to do with
causing this and therefore
the signing of the initial
Heads of Agreement with
Kerzner after the dropping
of the South Africa
apartheid exemption to
doing business with South
Africa, under the FNM has
to be registered as "a most
positive catalyst."
The election of the;
Republicans, President
George Bush, for two terms
and the growth of wealth
under their leadership is the
catalyst as to why such a
high caliber of investor is
interested in The Bahamas
- I wait to see with the
occurrences of last week
where the Democrats have.
come to control both the US
Senate and Congress as to
whether their legislative
agendathrough to 2008, the
next ,TS election, will injure
and disrupt these circum-
stande's?
On the face of it the fear
that the Dems will tax the
wealthy will auger well for
the sales of the Real Estate
elements at Atlantis Ginn
- Rum Cay .- Abaco -
Albany and the other pro-
jects.
May I make some
remarks as to the long term
benefits of these projects or
what should be the long
term benefits?
Although the FNM were
proud of what they promot-
ed as a 'Balanced Budget'
in late 2000 it was never
such a thing but that rev-
enues met and. matched
expenses they still
brought to the budget
process deficits and I sug-
gest it will be most prudent


for our economic planners
to effectively address this
boom and how can the
boom reconcile and assist in
increasing annual revenues
where future generations of
Bahamians will not have to
face horrific tax increases
whether through direct or
indirect approaches.
It would seem that the
majority of the sales of
these real estate lots will be
to US citizens who enjoy, if
resident outside of the US,
considerable annual tax
allowances and cost of living
benefits I suggest that
firstly US$70,000.00+ direct
income is exempt from US
tax and after that a living
allowance of over $7,000.00
a year.
Propose that serious
evaluation and considera-
tion must be made for these
new participants in these
developments to make an
indirect contribution to our
national budget through a
residency tax.
There will I suggest not
be for sometime applica-
tions for permanent resi-
dency as a lot of these peo-
ple are in their mid to late
40's and far from retire-
ment.
The Bahamas should levy
a residency tax of say
US$5,000.00 a year % which in
say six-eight years' could
neutralise the current recur-
ring. Deficits which have
been in the region of $100-
125 million annually.
Some will argue why tax
these people?
Editor there is n'o alter-
native way to increase trea-
sury revenue without rais-
ing taxes on Bahamians
without this approach.
The bottom line will be
that we will kill our per-
ceived competitiveness
dead.
Yes there will be addi-
tional revenues from acqui-
sition contracts but those
are only a one-time matter
and by 2011 of the thou-
sands of potential new real
.estate owners who will be
attracted from the 2006 pro-
jects will have expired. If


we have 10,000 new resi-
dents at a fee of $5,000.00
a year that will cause some
$50 million in new recurring
treasury revenue (50 per
cent of the current deficit).
Will this impact real
estate sales? I doubt it as
the $5000.00 a year could be
included by the US resident
as part of either their salary
exemption or cost of living
tax exemption to the US.
Yes it will deter some at the
low-end of the spectrum.
There is no doubt that we
simply do not nor have we
ever evaluated the actual
level of Bahamian taxes and
whether the current regime
is working, fairly and equi-
tably?
I would support as a thor-
ough study of the fiscal tax
regime of The Bahamas
whose mandate would be to
examine the current all
alternatives and create a 10-
year Economic Revenue
Plan.
This is long overdue and
government will be well
advised to take this all-
important step.
Credit has to be give to
the fiscal improvements of
the Central Bank Foreign
currency Reserves in
2002 at the last election they
were US$373 million the
latest reserves in Septem-
ber, 2006 show that they
stand at US$547.7 million a
whopping increase of over
US$174 million, in less than
ff.ye. years even with, the
negativeimpa.ciof, the .cost
of oil over the past 18-
months. This augers well
that within three-four years
we could have Foreign
Reserves which would
exceed US$1 billion com-
pare that to in October,
1992 the reserves stood at
US$156.7 million.
The conclusion is that it
is essential that The
Bahamas takes this current
economic development peri-
od not just to have billions
of dollars invested in the
country but to re-engineer
the future tax burden of all
Bahamians, present and
future. I suggest it can be
done but we need effective
and pro-active leadership.

J MOORE
Nassau,
November 12, 2006.


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PAGE 4, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006


L(I~I~


.1 : .


THE TRIBUNE








MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006, PAGE 5


THF TRIBUNE


The statistical plunge in the




Bahamas standard of living


I BEGAN following the
United Nations Develop-
ment Programme's annual
country rating publication while
pursuing my Masters Degree
in London in 1997. In that year,
The Bahamas was rated in the
top 30 countries (number 28, I1
believe), having recently (and
curiously) been replaced by
Barbados as the highest rated
country in Latin America and
the Caribbean..
In the years that followed, I
noted a steady decline in the
Bahamas' position relative to
other countries. Typically, the
country would slip from 2 to 4
places down the index each
year. It is now supposedly far
outpaced by Barbados, lags
Uruguay, Chile and St. Kitts
and has just been passed by
Cuba (a deeply impoverished
country) in terms of living stan-
dards, according to this year's
report.
Strangely, this supposed sus-
tained and dramatic decline in
living standards took place
during an era of undoubted
social and economic progress
in The Bahamas. In fact, the
1990s and 2000s have been the
only two post-independence,
decades in which unemploy-
ment (a crucial indicator of
social conditions in The
Bahamas) has consistently
remained below 15 per cent.
In 2000, as confirmation of
the anecdotally evident social
progress, the IMF (which com-
piles its own statistics) reported
that six successive years of
strong economic growth had
further confirmed the
Bahamas' position as having
the best social indicators in
Latin America and the
Caribbean. The Fund's state-
ment reflected a mantra repeat-
ed in the literature of the Min-
istries of Foreign Affairs and
Toirism, The Central Bank of
The Bahamas and the Bahamas
Financial Services Board.


Yet, if the people at the
Bahamas' Department of Sta-
tistics (the ones who supply the
statistics upon which the
UNDP index is compiled) are
to be believed, they are all flat
wrong.
Who is right? The answer to
that question becomes obvious
if you either contact the United
Nations Development pro-
gramme directly or have a look
at the detailed statistics pub-
lished in their index. Through-



There are
several very
obvious flaws
in the way
in which sta-
tistics are
calculated by
the Bahamas
Department of
Statistics, as
well as a
pattern of
tardiness.


out the 1990s and presumably
still today, more entries appear
for The Bahamas than for prac-
tically any other country in the
region. Staff of the UNDP must
feel like they are pulling teeth
trying to extract basic indica-
tors like internet coinectivity
for The Bahamas.

S econdly, and maybe
more seriously, there


PERSPECTIVE


ANDRE W

are several very obvious flaws
in the way in which statistics
are calculated by the Bahamas
Department of Statistics, as
well as a pattern of tardiness.
When you look closely at the
figures for Per Capita Income,
for instance, you note that the
Bahamas' figure is not shown at
purchasing power parity (PPP)
while all others are.
This means that, while Bar-
bados, for instance, measures
its economy in current (2006)
dollars, the Bahamian statistic is
presented in constant (unin-
flated) dollars from some past
year.
In the years 1996 to 1998, this
factor alone was responsible for
much of the slippage relative
to Barbados, since in those
years we continued to measure
our economy in 1993 dollars
right up to the end of the
decade. With each successive
year (due mostly to inflation),
Barbados showed growth of a
thousand or so dollars to its per
capital income, while we stayed
the same or barely budged. All
of this occurred while our rate
of economic growth has
remained about twice that of
Barbados.
Additionally, figures reflect-
ing things like calorie intake
(where we rate as among the
lowest in the region!!!) simply
were not properly updated
between the 1960s and at least
the 1990s, skewing our overall
human development picture
.badly.
. At a time when, in reality,
the Bahamas has probably
climbed up quite a few places in
terms of living standards (to
perhaps the top 20),'thU PNDP
continues to report a precipi-
tous plummet to the apparent


A L L E r

indifference of success
ernments. For a county


hrlTU II-


W iMe
Barbados, for
instance,
measures its
economy in
current (2006)
dollars, the
Bahamian
statistic is
presented in
constant
uninflatedd)
dollars from
some past
year.


so obvious an obsession with
its international image and per-
ception this is truly remarkable,
and can only be explained by
ignorance.

T he wake up call is only
a few years away, how-
ever. There are only 63 coun-
tries rated as having high
Human Development. When I
began following the UNDP
report, less than ten years ago,
The Bahamas was comfortably
within the first half of the


grouping. Now it is (at 52) close
to the bottom and dropping
every year.
S Ministers and public servants
S who enjoy telling the world that
Swe have the highest living stan-
dards in Latin America and
The Caribbean may soon have
ve gov- difficulty explaining themselves
ry with to people who keep up with the
published UN development
programme's annual country
ratings.


Filiz F c
PetCoto

HUpialE"'.mnao
3225,


MONDAY,
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11:00 Immediate Response
12:00 ZNS News Update (Live)
12:05 Immediate Response cont'd
1:00 Caribbean News In Review
1:30 Ethnic Health America
2:00 Thousand Dollar Bee
2:30 Aqua Kids
3:00 David Pitts
3:30 Bishop Neil Ellis
4:00 Little Robots
4:30 Carmen San Diego
5:00 ZNS News Update
5:05 Andiamo
5:30 The Envy Life
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6:25 Life Line
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THE TRIBUNE


Manager Operations Risk

Caribbean Banking

The successful candidate should possess the following qualifications:
University degree in banking (or a related field) is preferred but
not mandatory
Operational leadership experience within a retail branch network
required; as well as leadership experience in at least one back-
office support environment
Experience as internal auditor or Risk Advisor preferred
Must have broad operational administration knowledge and
experience; basic understanding of credit administration is an
asset
Ability to build relationships with regional stakeholders (cross
functional)
Strategic business sense
Analytical thinking
Verbal communication skills (delivers finding to service partners)
Change leadership skills
Proficiency in Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, Power Point)
Ongoing travel throughout Caribbean is required
Responsibilities include:
Leading a team of Risk Advisors in effective Management
Internal Control Reviews (MICR) ensuring operational risk are
identified and risk ratings properly evaluated (retail operations
in eight Bahamas & Caribbean countries (including 14 background
functional groups, 31 foreground units, as well as Finance
Corporation of The Bahamas); consistent with RBFG global
operational risk standards and regulatory standards of the
individual Caribbean countries
Partnering with key stakeholders to raise operational soundness
across the region, and identify areas of opportunity to enhance
operational effectiveness
Leading, monitoring, analysis and reporting of regional risk
events, in partnership with functional managers managing
risk rating analysis and review for all units; overall MICR
scheduling on risk based approach
Maintaining integrity of Team-mate (software standard used)
review process by partnering with RBC global functional teams
and monitoring policy and regulatory policy changes to adhere
to established governance process
Providing quarterly risk review/trending report to Regional
Operating Committee Primary liaison with Operational Risk
Assessment teams
Monitoring outstanding items from previous internal audits;
support functional managers in resolution activities
Championing operational risk aspects of Global Risk Management
policy documents Business planning for Operations Risk team.
Championing risk analysis of new/changed products
Co-ordinating business resumption planning for Caribbean
region.
A competitive compensation package (base salary & bonus) will.
be commensurate with relevant experience and qualifications.
Please apply before November 22, 2006 to:
The Manager Human Resources
Bahamas & Caribbean
Royal Bank of Canada
Bahamas Regional Office
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, N.P, Bahamas


A


US-Caribbean


free trade area?


1 By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a business
executive and former
Caribbean diplomat).

SHOULD Caribbean Com-
munity (CARICOM) coun-
tries enter a Free Trade
Agreement (FTA) with the
United States? A few readers
interpreted an observation
that I made in my commen-
tary (US mid-term elections
and the Caribbean) to mean
that I was advocating such an
agreement.
In fact, I was not.
All that I did was to point
out that "the Caribbean is yet
to negotiate a Free Trade
Agreement with the US";
CARICOM "has not seriously
focused" on such an agree-
ment; and "time may be run-
ning out to get negotiations
for such an agreement firmly
underway" with the present
US administration since the
authority that Congress. gave
President George W Bush to
sign such agreements ends in
July 2007.
The matter of whether
CARICOM countries should
enter an FTA with the US is
complex.
What are the arguments for
CARICOM countries enter-
ing an FTA with the US?
The main argument is that
the US has entered FTA's
with other countries whose
goods and services compete
with CARICOM's-in the US
market. Among these FTA's
is the agreement between the
US, a number of Central
American 'countries and the
Dominican Republic.
When these FTA's are up
and running, the exports of
these'countries will displace
CARICOM products in the
US market because they will
'enter the market on more
advantageous terms.
CARICOM saw this hap-


Ins"
.B" -i :* .. .;?^ *'-* | ;

WORLD VIE

pen when the North Ameri-
can Free Trade Agreement
(NAFTA) was signed in 1994
by the US, Canada and Mexi-
co.
Prior to NAFTA, certain
goods from CARICOM coun-
tries enjoyed duty-free treat-
ment in the US market under
the Caribbean Basin Initiative
introduced by the Reagan
administration. Once NAFTA
came into force, those goods

"The main
argument is
that the US has
entered FTA's
with other
countries
whose goods
and services
compete with
CARICOM's in
the US market."

could not compete with similar
products from Mexico.
But, the fact that the US is
concluding FTA's with other
countries and regions is not,
by itself, sufficient reason for
CARICOM countries to enter
an agreement with the US.
The experience of Mexico
with NAFTA clearly demon-
strates that while there were
bendfirs'to Mexico in terms of
lower tariffs on Mexican goods
entering the US market, there
was also a huge downside to
the agreement.
For example, the US used
non-tariff barriers to block
Mexican products that began
to give serious competition to
US produced goods. At the
same time, heavily subsidized
US agricultural products, par-
ticularly corn, entered the
Mexican market cheaper than
Mexican farmers could pro-
duce them. This led to a dis-
placement of Mexican farm-
ers in their own domestic mar-
ket.
Further, because Mexico
had to drop its tariffs on goods
imported from the US, the
government's tax revenues
,declined adversely affecting its


Sht




public expenditure programme
on education, housing and oth-
er social welfare programmes.
CARICOM countries
would face similar problems
unless the FTA was carefully
negotiated.
In the cases of Antigua and
Barbuda, the Bahamas whose
economies are almost entirely
reliant on services, particular-
ly tourism and financial ser-
vices, they would hardly ben-
efit from duty free entry to the
US market for goods. Con-
versely, their governments
would suffer a significant loss
of revenue from lowering tar-
iffs on imports from the US.
But, other CARLCOM
countries such as Belize,
Jamaica, Guyana and Trinidad
and Tobago, could find advan-
tage in securing duty-free
entry to the US market for
certain commodities.
Having said that, the point
should also be made that
already, without an FTA,
many small farmers in CARI-
COM countries have lost mar-
kets within their own coun-
tries because subsidized US
farm products are delivered to
Caribbean supermarkets and
hotels at prices that make it
very difficult for local farmers
to compete. An FTA which
requires CARICOM countries
to lower tariffs on imports of
US agricultural products
would wipe out Caribbean
small farmers altogether.
In adi cases, CARICOM
countries would want to set
certain basic criteria for nego-
tiations, with the US. These
would include: a meais; of
imposing duties on products
which the US subsidiess. clear,
language to stop the US from
using non-tariff barriers to
prohibit exports into its mar-
ket; non-reciprocity for the
reduction of tariffs on certain
goods for a defined period to
allow Caribbean producers to
develop the capacity to com-
pete; the removal of restric-
tions on US imports of certain
commodities such as sugar;
and access to US capital as
grants or as loans on soft
terms to compensate for ppen-
ing up Caribbean markets (aid
for trade).
None of these criteria
would be easy to achieve
unless the US was genuinely
concerned with helping CARI-
COM countries to develop


r' -d ~ e
* SIR Ronald Sanders
and grow. If US negotiators
view an FTA with CARICOM
in the same way that they
would regard an agreement
with, say, the European Union
or South East Asian nations,
then CARICOM would, do
well to scrap the idea before it
starts.
What has to be established
firmly in advance of negotia-
tions on a CARICOM-US free
trade agreement is that it
would be development orient-
ed.
Of course, this is ilso the
problem that the Caribbean
faces in its current negotia-
tions with the European
Union (EU) for Economic
Partnership Agreements
(EPA's).
Caribbean countries, like
their counterparts in Africa
and the Pacific, feel that the
EU is not taking sufficient
account of the development
dimension of the EPA's.
And, at the even wider
international level, the global
negotiations on trade rules
have stalled precisely because
although developed countries
promised at Doha in 2001 that
these negotiations would focus
on.;deyelopment, they have
done nothing of the sort., ,
,This is not to say that the
US could not adopt a more,'
enlightened and ambitious
approach to the CARICOM
countries. For, the Caribbean
is a very close neighbour, and
what happens in the
Caribbean should matter to
the US.
A genuine FTA with a
strong development orienta-
tion would help the smai; and
vulnerable countries of CARI-
COM enormously. Givtiithe
relatively small size bou 'g
the economies of CARICOM
countries and their exports,
the US would lose nothing by
being generous and would
gain much in terms of show-
ing concern for its neighbours.
Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com


PROPERTIES FOR SALE






NASSAU



U SEA BREEZE ESTATES
LOT NO. 132
PROPERTY SIZE: Two-storey
E Residence (10,400 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Golf Course Boulevard (Past Seafan
Drive)
APPRAISED VALUE: $397,256


PINEWOOD GARDENS
LOT NO..971
PROPERTY SIZE: 3 Bed / 2 Bath, Single
Storey Residence (5,000 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Rosewood Street
APPRAISED VALUE: $117,000

ENGLESTON SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 9 Block 47
PROPERTY SIZE: Multi-Family
(10,000 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: 1000 ft. South of Homestead
Avenue
APPRAISED VALUE: $80,000


ENGLESTON SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 10 Block 47
PROPERTY SIZE: Multi-Family
(10,062 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: 1,050 ft. South of Homestead
Avenue
APPRAISED VALUE: $105,000

SUNSET MEADOWS SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 1
PROPERTY SIZE: Multi-Family Triplex
Apartment Building (10,149 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: 187 Ft. West of Golden Isles
Road North of Cowpen Road
APPRAISED VALUE: $461,000


INEESE ARISSHUDSI UBMITOFFE S T UCALVVTSFEHN


I








THE TIBUNEMONDY, NOEMBER20,C006,NAGES


Tobacco smoking



a human rights


issue


By Bahamas
Information Services
SECOND hand tobacco
smoke violates the human rights
of innocent persons, Health
Minister Senator Dr Bernard
Nottage said.
"You have to wonder how we
could legally allow people to
release potentially toxic and car-
cinogenic substances into the
atmosphere, where others must
breathe it," Minister Nottage
said.
"When secondhand smoke
enters the private space of per-
sons, it interferes with their
,right to enjoy a smoke-free
environment."
Dr.Nottage was addressing
the opening ceremony of the
"Human Rights and Second-
hand Smoke: Actions Towards
a Smoke-Free Bahamas" semi-
nar.
His ministry held the event,
with Pan-American Health
Organisation/World Health
Organisation (PAHO/WHO).
Evidence shows that smok-
ing tobacco harms almost every
organ in the body and is the
major cause of lung cancer, with
links to other forms of the dis-
ease, said Dr Nottage.
. Health risks associated with
tobacco smoking include heart
attacks, strokes, bronchitis, asth-
ma and other respiratory ill-
nesses, even infertility, he said.
As an obstetrician he said he
knows that the babies of smok-
ers are small and do not do as
well as they should when they
are born.
The Ministry of Health has
been engaged in promoting a
nationwide healthy lifestyles
programme to help Bahamians
take responsibility for their
health-and-to lead 'quality and-
produciike lifeu)les.
-thka ilhbt 'la'n R asy tasklo
accomplish.t'D 0 Nottage said;J
-, li !) ? i Te rr. -.j ; i n:o irq


- minister


Y*A rJ'' *,:


I .~


V- NW M=I I=!wwflsfflq
* MINISTER of Health and National Insurance Dr Bernard Nottage speaks at the Ministry of
Health and National Insurance and the PAHO and WHO Human Rights and Secondhand Smoke
seminar opening ceremony on Monday at the British Colonial Hilton
(BIS Photo:. Tim Aylen)


Lightb


ounme


Marine


ENGINE SPECIAL


* PAN American Health Organisation (PAHO) and World
Health Organisation (WHO) Human Rights specialist Javier
Vasquez speaking at the seminar
(BIS Photo: Tim Aylen)


"The truth of the matter is that
if we are able to provide people
with information and education
about what is good for their
health...that in itself ought to
be sufficient for them to be their
own primary healthcare
prbvidefs; ': '
"Ifpeople take responsibility
for their heIalth and eliminate
mfsf ;


from their lifestyle the things
they know are harmful, then
their life expectancy will
increase, along with their qual-
ity of life and their ability to
look after their families.
"These are, I believe, signifi-
cant incentives to adopt healthy
Lifestyles, but we are still chal-
lenged," Dr Nottage saidqw'


Former Nassauvian dies


after battle with cancer


ERIC Proctor Albury, 82,
died in Vancouver, Canada on
September 3, after a long battle
with cancer.
A special memorial service
was held for him in Vancouver
on September 14, the anniver-
sary of the day on which he was
married 62 years earlier. Mr
Albury had made his home in
Canada.
Born in Nassau on March 20,
1924, the youngest child of.
S.V.S. and Minnie B. Albury,
he is survived by his wife, Thel-
ma, his daughter Heather
(Meikle), his son Warren, six
grandchildren, one nephew and
three nieces.
Mr Albury went to Canada
to join the Armed Forces in
1942, and was the youngest lab-
oratory technician in the
RCAF.
He returned to the Bahamas
after the war and worked in his
family's Import Business for
two years before returning to
Canada.
Mr Albury worked for Pan
American World Airways after
his senior matriculation, and
then joined Air Canada (TCA)
where he spent the next 16 years
in Vancouver, leaving the com-
pany as a sales representative.
In 1963, his family in Nassau
coaxed him back to the family
firm "S.V.S. Albury and Son" for
what would be seven more years
in the Bahamas. During this time,
he was asked to run in the elec-
tion against Prime Minister Sir
Lynden Pindling, and received
an astonishing number of votes.
On his return to Canada, he
joined Japan Airlines as Resi-
dent Sales Manager, Alberta,
covering Alberta, Saskatchewan,
NW Territories and the Koote-
nays.
He saw an opportunity with
the Alberta Government Min-
istry of Tourism and worked
with Travel Alberta for the next
15 years. He was the Chief Rep-
resentative for Expo '86 at the
Alberta Pavilion. While with
Travel Alberta, he was posted
to London, England as Di;ector
of European Operations, #here
he covered the U.KJ and
Europe. He retired in 19S7.
Mr Albury belonged to any
organizations over the 'ears.
Among them he was a ason;
he sat on the Board of th Unit-

\ !I


ed Church in Calgary and Delta;
he was a member of SKAL (a
travel trade club), President,
Canadian Men's Club, Nassau;
and member in England; Cham-
ber of Commerce in Nassaru and
Calgary, Honorary ex-officio
Director, Calgary Tourist and
Convention Bureau, Chairman,
Red Cross Publicity Commit-
tee, Calgary, The Rotary Club
of Calgary and the first Hon-
orary member of the Probus
Club of South Delta.
He was also made an Hon-
orary Citizen of the Isle of Man.


* ERIC Albury


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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8. MONDAY. NOVEMBER 20, 2006


,OCLNW


DUTY

FREE

LIST
GET YOUR COPY OF
WHAT'S YOUR DUTYo
AT
BAA Bookstore (Bay Street)
Bellevue (Abaco)
Bellevue Business Depot
(Freeport)
Bethel Booksellers
(Freeport, 352-2665)
Eyes of Love (Bar 20 Corner)
Island Bookstore (Bay Street)
Logos (Harbour Bay)
Megabyte (Robinson Rd)
Nassau Stationers (Rosetta St)
One-Rib (322-5281)
Zipx (Village Rd)


THE FAMILY AND FRIENDS OF MR. JACKSON MILLER,
ELECTRICIAN, ROTARIAN, HUMANITARIAN, COMEDIAN
WILL BE CELEBRATING HIS LIFE AT AN A^.P'-CIATION BANQUET,
SCHEDULED FOR FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1 ST, 2006 AT, 7:00PM
AT THE CHURCH OF GOD AIlFT.OQTf 1, JOE F.-H lO.-I0ON ROAD.
TICKETS ARE PRICED AT $50.00 PER PERSON, AND THE DRESS IS
EVENING CASUAL.
THE EVENT PROMISES TO BE A LOT OF FUN.
PURCHASE YOUR TICKETS NOW BY CALLiI TELEPHONE #393-7281 OR
394-4387.
WE'LL SEE YOU THEP-E'


* PICTURED from leftto right are Ms Jan Mortimore, Health Inspector-DEHS; Mr Peter Brown,
Executive Coordinator-BNPA; Dr Bridgette Rolle, Board Member-BNPA; Mr Olvin Rees, Chairman-
BNPA; Ms Judy Williams, Board Member-BNPA; Inspector Simmons, Urban Renewal; and Ms
Joanne Johnson, Community Coordinator-BNPA.

Taking to the


streets in St Cecilia


ON NOVEMBER 16, The Bahamas Nation-
al Pride Association and Urban Renewal
organised a walk-about in the area of St Cecil-
ia where their aim was to bring the communi-
ty leaders together and point out the chal-
lenges of the area and its environmental issues.
As part of the walk, those persons admitted
into the Urban Renewal programme assisted by


picking up litter along.the street.
The walk began at the Urban Renewal Cen-
tre and ended at the Church of God of
Prophecy, Wuiff Road, where Pastor Andrew
Brown and members of the BNPA enjoyed
refreshments as they discussed ways of
improving the area through community
involvement.


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,IN
M E D *I C A L C L i N I

In keein wih urcomiten
toar comuntysevie ndhelt


Fm













Ministry's significant'



education programme


THE Ministry of Education,
Science and Technology has
embarked on a wide-ranging
programme designed to
address the educational needs
of Bahamian children in an
expanding economy.
And according to Prime
Minister Perry Christie, this is
probably the "most signifi-
cant" work that the country is
undertaking at this time.
He made this statement at
the official launching of the
Support Programme for
Transforming Education and
Training (SPTET) on Mon-
day, November 13, at the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel.
The programme, a joint
venture between the Ministry
of Education, Science and
Technology and the Inter-
American Development
Bank, came about through a
$22.5 million loan agreement
signed in July. The IDB is pro-
viding $18 million, and $4.5
million frmn counterpart fund-
ing.
The Prime Minister told
those involved in the pro-
gramme that they are
"involved in probably what is,
without exception, the most
significant work that our coun-
try can now be undertaking.
"The future of our country,
the future of our children are
entirely dependent on the
extent to which we are able
to accept the responsibility of
giving them opportunities and
ensuring that the opportuni-
ties we give them include the
constant application of our
own efforts to make them stay
at the wheel."
"At the end of this
process," he added, "we must
have tangible results and be
able to measure the progress
we have made."
Purpose of SPTET is to
.effectively implement targeted
.innovations that address the
educational needs of Bahami-
an youih, including a relevant
technical education and voca-
tional training system, articu-
lated at the secondary and
post-secondary levels.;


.1


I .2:;.,.


PAA




... ..
**^ ^ ^ ,,,; *'-:


S I I


PRIME MINISTER Perry Christie spoke at the official
launch of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology
and the Inter-American Development Bank's Support Pro-
gramme for Transforming Education and Training (SPTET) on
Monday, November 13 at the British Colonial Hilton.
(BIS Photo: Tim Aylen)


improved quality and access
to early education; a strength-
ened capacity in schools to
accommodate children
with special needs; and
enhancement of the Manage-
ment Information System's
capacity of the Ministry of
Education, Science and Tech-
nology.
It is expected that these
innovations will, on an annual
basis, benefit approximately
38,000 secondary and post-sec-
ondary students, 12,000 pre-
school children, as well as stu-
dents with special needs.
The programme is also
designed to help transform the
national curriculum, restruc-
ture the Bahamas Technical
and Vocational Institute
(BTVI) to improve the deliv-
er\ of education in high
school. increase the capacity
in pre-sdhool and special edu-
cation and better integrate
information technology in
education.
"The progamme is further


EDUCATION, Science and Technology Minister Alfred
Sears (second right) enjoys a light moment at the official launch of
the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology and the Inter-
American Development Bank's Support Programme for Trans-
forming Education and Training (SPTET) on Monday, November
13 at the British Colonial Hilton.
(BIS Photo: Tim Aylen)


HUtE


#5 ace Stretbsd F


designed to facilitate long-
term economic competitive-
ness through the development
of a dynamic and training sys-
tem that is aligned with the
demands of the economy for
skilled human resources, and
will greatly aid in our contin-
ued quest for success," the
Prime Minister said.
Minister of Education, Sci-
ence and Technology Alfred
Sears, Parliamentary Secre-
tary in the Ministry of Immi-
gration, Labour and Training
Agatha Marcelle, and Iwan
Sewberath Misser, acting
country head, IDB, also
addressed the launching. Uri-
ah McPhee Primary School
steel band provided enter-
tainment.


- -I .


your car.



our trust.


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006, PAGE 9






THE TRIBUNE


AP GE 10 MONDAY NOVEMBER 2006


LOCAL NEWS


Crowds flock to

There was a very healthy turnout at the Annual
Christmas Jollification at The Retreat on Village
Road this weekend. The event, in aid of the
Bahamas National Trust, had plenty of arts, crafts,
food and drink for all who attended. The major
sponsor was Bristol Wines and Spirits.
(Photos: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)


Annual


YOUR CONNECTION A 0 THE \ l R D


* THE annual event at The Retreat proved very popular on Saturday and Sunday.


BTC HELLO CARD WINNER

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd (BTC)
wishes to inform its valued customers and the general
public that the winning Hello Scratch & Win Card for the
Ford Escape has been purchased.

The holder/user of the card has not come forward to claim
his/her prize. The winning serial number is
000442363246 and the holder of'the winning card is
asked to bring it to BTC's Public Relations Department
located in the Mall at Marathon, between 9am and 5pm.

The deadline to bring in the winning Hello Scratch & Win
card is November 24, 2006 at 5pm. For further information
please contact ,02-7827.


* PLANTS catch the eye of those at the Annual Christmas Jollification.


use* Bahamas *Na


i i 4


J V


Sabers Dyna's Escapes
Inspires Vans Explorers
Accords Caravans Sport Track
Crown Victorias Largos Escudo's
Focus Serenas
Optimas








Prices Include: Licensing and

Inspection, Plates, Mats, Full tank of
gas, Band Expander, Pre-Delivery
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Service and Warranty

Note: The Above Mentioned is Excluded from"Specials of the Week"


V


rn -A I I %. ,L-0- 1 I,,I V


.**' *
**^.-*'*: '"'. '
y ^ ,,


***^^ ^>*'; w i^:i '' ly^-
.. r: .- ** . ^ T
:* ^fi'" ;
^ :.. "
^ ^ y.:'\^&
*i.-a 'AS^iiA':^ fcilA'?







LOCALNEWSI


Christmas"


9.,. ,6~. ~s.
,,~*1

I -.~ -
.~ r
A. ~. ~i:~


Jollification


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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


1









THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12 MONDAYNOVEMBE 6


* By MARK HUMES

IT STARTED out several
months ago with The Tribune
asking senior housing officials at
The Ministry of Housing for an
explanation of how it awarded
housing contracts. To date it has
ended with the Minister of Hous-
ing calling on the police to inves-
tigate allegations of corruption in
his ministry.
The initial request to Housing
came when claims linked a small
group of building contractors to
an "unfair" practice by the min-
istry of awarding them contracts
to the exclusion of others.
The public vetting of informa-
tion that has followed since May,
when The Tribune first made the
request of the ministry, has the
Minister accusing the media of
unfairly casting a "cloud of suspi-
cion" over his agency and its staff,
leading to his call for the police
investigation.
The call to police, however, did
not come before he tabled some
of the much sought after infor-
mation in the House of Assembly,
only to'have that information
come under fire, publicly, for
what seemed to be obvious dis-
crepancies.
Since these discrepancies were
reported, senior officials at Hous-
ing have denied that there is any-
thing unscrupulous taking place at
the agency and, on several occa-
sions in the last few weeks, have
sat down with The Tribune hop-
ing to bring some closure to the
over, helming negative press that
has the agency shrouded in "sus-
picion."l
i '- with senior
-. cy took
on Friday, November 3. At the
time, among other things, discus-
sions were primarily. centred on
the $5000 difference in contract
amounts listed on the "Procedure
for Awarding Contracts and Con-
struction Cost" document that
Minister Wisdom had tabled in
the House of Assembly and the
amounts listed on, what seemed
to be, housing documents that
S The Tribune had in its possession.
Neither of the two officials pre-
sent at the time, one being Mr
Anthony Farrington, an engineer
with the ministry, was aware of
any other document that could
have shown a contradiction in the
contract amounts as presented by
the minister in the House. They
claimed that they had actual
signed contracts awarded to con-
tractors to support their claims.
However, because they did not
have anything available for the


....... .. .. ... ... l. QTA88 lGNMENTg
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-- I-. .."rf^ ~?^a(:?*:" ; '".*-* $'R^f^}'''" '. 23F'0 YES' 74r-b 'W ^ f' 4*-Atpr-08: 4-Apr-06'* B o B'.Binh


* ABOVE: Housing documents obtained by The Tribune.
M RIGHT: Ministry of Housing documents prepared by Anthony Farrington in 2005.


November 3 meeting, they agreed
to produce these documents at
another meeting to take place the
following Monday.
Before the meeting was con-
cluded, however, officials were,
once again, told of information'
that the newspaper had in its pos-
session which showed a $5000 dif-
ference in contract amounts from
those in the document prepared
by Mr Gordon Major and pre-
sented to the House by Minister
Wisdom.
And once again, the officials
denied that there could be such a
document which showed a dis-
crepancy and, in turn, asked The
Tribune to present whatever
information it had. It was agreed,
and that presentation, too, was
to take place at the next meet-
ing.
But, the meeting never took
place on Monday, and when we
contacted the Ministry the fol-
lowing day to reschedule, we
w!.re informed that !ie Minister,
t ouid be 1' hiding i._.cs confer-'
ence on the matter and we would
be made aware of the details.
On Wednesday, November 8,
the Ministry held a press confer-
ence at Workers House with
employees and officials from
Housing and the Mortgage Cor-
poration, along with some of its
builders. '
It was at that public forum that
the minister announced that he
had called for a police invesntiga-
tion into corruption at his agency ,
that The Tribune was asked to
present its evidence of contradic-
tions for the perusal of housing
officials present for the minister's
press conference.
When the officials, in particu-
lar, Mr Major and Mr Farring-
ton, were shown The Tribune's
acquired "housing" spreadsheets,
they said that they did not recog-
nize the documents as housing
documents, and therefore they


were unable to account for the
sizable difference in contract
amounts in Mr Wisdom's "origi-
nal" documents and ours.
They suggested that the docu-
ments might have belonged to the
Bahamas Mortgage Corporation,
and when Mr Farrington brought
Rory Higgs, Managing Director
of the Mortgage Corporation, to
look, the documents over,
Mr Higgs verified that they did
appear to be Corporation docu-
ments.
However, after some 20 min-
utes of scrutiny as to why the con-
tract amounts on the various
sheets differed and how, if any,
did it affect the mortgage rate
being charged to housing cus-
tomers, Mr Higgs then recognized
that the documents were in fact
not Mortgage Corporation doc-
uments.
Attention then turned back to
the Ministry of Housing as the
source of the documents, and
once again, those officials held
that the documents were not ones
that they recognized as having
been generated by their agency.
Shortly after the close of the
press conference, however, Mr
Major was seen going through a
folder which contained docu-
ments very similar in format to
those The Tribune had shown him
Earlier in the evening.
But the N14mstrN's denial of the
documents was maintained until
the next day, wben officials, faced
\%ith the question again, said: "I
did not recognize it initially as a
housing document," and anoth-
er said: "It resembles the kind of
layouts that we do."
It was at the same time, oh the
invitation of ministry officials,
that officials showed The Tribune
signed builders contracts that sup-
ported the contract amounts
appearing in the documents pre-
pared by Mr Major and presented
by Mr Wisdom. In addition to


that information, officials also
presented a document that
showed revised costs for new
home construction.
In the documents, the actual
construction costs of the various
models of homes, built at $60 per
square foot, were listed. Those
prices directly reflected the
amounts in the documents pre-
sented to the House and the con-
tract amounts as per Ministry
files.
However, next to the construc-
tion cost, in another column,
there was a $5000 per house con-
tingency fee added to the con-
struction cost, bringing that total
construction value to the exact
figures reflected in the amounts
on the documents in The Tri-
bune's possession, the same doc-
uments shown to officials the
night before.
The $5000 contingency fee,
added to the original construc-
tion costs in the new document,
according to the officials present,
reflected a "what if" factor added
by the ministry, as it is sometimes
called on to cover "unforeseen
costs" during the building process.
"That happens for instance, if
we have to do additional block
work, like we had to do .in
Carmichael," said one official,
and another added that any of
the contingency fund nut u;ed
goes back into the Hou-ing bud-
get.
iit despite the claims, the new
document, prepared over a year
earlier by Mr Anthony Farring-
ton, shows that the proposed sell-
ing cost of homes in the subdivi-
sions on the documentation in
question had the contingency fees
factored into them.
What this "what if" document
revealed, upon analysis, is that in
many instances, many home own-
ers may be paying substantially
more for their homes than they
should be paying, and in essence,


MO1LS UVING AnIO PORCH TOTAL COT @ 55000.00 PER H8E.
NO.____ ARMA AREAft-2 60/f^2 CONTINGENCYY_
7i5 1 009 63 43 1115 $66,900.00 571,900.00
.732 796 42 43 882 $52,92ar W57,92.00
73B 888 72 960 07,600.M 562,600.00
S5- 1027 76 72 1175 $70,500.00 S75,500.00
0i-0 1199 i 74 1331 $79,860.00 84,8000
-9- 3 1085 68 56 1209 S72,54000 S77,540.00
996 1034 83 190 1307 S78,420.0 5f83,00.00
S1066 1229 1 39 96 134 81,40.00 86,840M.00

TABLE #2, SHOWING OVERALL COST FOR Dlii.21RENT RANGES


MUI~~tl. 1NV.TUEC L.JN,L1L


,_ L:sj vsuwj~~ vay NL u.u
7ns $71,900.00o 1,40.00
732 $57,920.00 67,920.00$
738 $62,600.00 $72fM.
$SS $75,500.00 85,5000
05 $84,800.00 594,90m $j
993 M77,540.00 S87.S54a.e
996 $83,420.00 S93,42.
1066 $86,840.00 90-8 W.00


are additionally paying more in
mortgage charges as well.
If, according to the Ministry
estimates, the actual contract
amount for building a home mod-
el 805 in Excellence Gardens
costs $79,860, with a $20,000 infra-
structure cost added, for exam-
ple, the homeowner should be
paying in the area of $99,860.
However, homeowners in that
subdivision are being charged
$103,788 for the 805
model.
From the documentation, it
would appear that the actual sell-
ing costs of all the homes in
Excellence Gardens have the
$5000 per house contingency
added, despite officials saying that
-'those amounts are aryVmfactored
in for unforeseen circumstances.
In light on this,-The Tribune
wanted to find out if the mort-
gage of these unsuspecting home-
owners were in fact being calcu-.
lated on the basis that this addi-
tional $5000 was added onto the
selling price, based on the infor-
mation that the Ministry would
have provided to them, for as one
official said: "At the end of the
day ... the pricing document...
ties in, eventually, that mortgage
price."
To find out, we contacted Mr
Higgs at the Corporation early
-last week hoping to schedule a
meeting to discuss the matter. At
the time, Mr Higgs said that he
had two meeting scheduled for
that particular date, however,
because of the nature of the meet-
ing, he said he would attempt to


$19i,42a00


adjust his schedule for that day
as opposed to putting the meeting
off for another day.
When contacted several hours
later, Mr Higgs said that upon
speaking with officials at the Min-
istry, he would have to refer the
matter to them as he did not want
to become involved. After sever-
al questions about his change of
heart, Mr Higgs said that The Tri-
bune's questioning him on the
matter was "bordering on harass-
ment."
And despite briefly "mislead-
ing" the newspaper into believ-
ing that the information in ques-
tion, which included the selling
Cost of the homes, came from his
department. 'Mr Higgse ended the
call b. once again. saying that he
did not want to ge t invoked.
S In a meetingwithofficials from
Housing on Friday, they did agree
that the selling costs appearing
on the documents in The Tri-
bune's possession were indeed the
selling cost of the homes in the
respective subdivisions.
However, at the time, they
were not able to provide docu-
mentation with a breakdown of
how the contingency fees had
been spent.
Yesterday, when contacted
about the information contained
in this article, a senior official with
the agency said that The Tri-
bune's calculations were incor-
rect, and that the agency would
provide the newspaper with prop-
er documentation so that the cor-
rect information could be given to
public.


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006, PAGE 13


L NW


Neville

Wisdom
FROM page one

for uncompleted work, the
official said that, unfortu-
nately, the Housing
department sometimes los-
es money like that.
In a meeting with Minis-
ter Wisdom later that day,
Mr Wisdom's version of
how retention monies
were awarded differed
from that of his official,
who had spoken earlier
with The Tribune. Mr Wis-
dom insisted that contrac-
tors were not paid the
retention fee for work left
uncompleted in any of the
five building phases.
Now as he seeks to rid
his agency of "corruption"
claims, Minister Wisdom
said that these contractors
cannot have their "cake
and eat it too."
"On the one hand we
have to insist on the per-
formance of the contrac-
tors, and then we have to
also, on the other hand,
insist that the inspectors
do their job so that the
beneficiary, at the end of
the exercise, is the home-
owner who is spending all
this money for the house,"
Minister Wisdom said.
In his efforts to clear the
name of the Housing min-
istry and its employees,
Minister Wisdom, last
week, called on police to
investigate allegations of
"corruption" and
announced that housing
inspectors are now under
scrutiny as a part of the
inquiry.
Additionally, the Minis-
ter and his officials have
been meeting with The
Tribune, hoping to bring
some clarity to discrepan-
cies in which documents in
the newspaper's possession
appear to contradict infor-
mation he reported to the
House of Assembly at the
beginning of the month.
In a follow-up article
today, The Tribune reports
i it findings.


Weekend shootings

FROM page one
in his left leg and is now recovering in hospital.
Just an hour later, a second shooting incident left a man seriously
injured.
At around 2am, a 44-year-old man was shot in his chest when gun-
shots were fired in the area of Cordeaux Avenue. The man was
rushed to Princess Margaret Hospital where he is fighting for his life.
Inspector Evans yesterday appealed to Bahamians to provide the
police with any information pertaining to persons in possession of
illegal firearms.
"Especially as we are now approaching the Christmas season, we are
trying to stop this kind of thing from happening," he said.
Acknowledging that guns are still a big part of the crime problem in
the Bahamas, Mr Evans emphasised that police are doing all they can
to rid the country of illegal firearms, but need the assistance of the pub-
lic in fulfilling this goal.
He said that the branch-wide initiative headed by the Central
Detective Unit under Chief Supt Marvin Dames to rid the country.of
all illegal firearms is still going strong.
In March of this year, Chief Supt Dames declared war on guns,
announcing a new initiative aimed at reducing the number of firearms
used in crimes.
With firearm statistics showing an alarming increase in the use of
firearms, Mr Dames said that guns are becoming the weapon of choice
for criminals.
The initiative, he said, is intended to increase public awareness
across communities and at the same time assure the public that officers
will continue an aggressive pursuit of all illegal firearms.


AG: no ball dropped


FROM page one

responded that "there was no
ball dropped and that the gov-
ernment acted properly at every
step along the way."
"Justice Lyons said that this
thing (Judge's salaries) was sup-
posed to have been reviewed in
2003 and 2006. It was after his
judgment that you went to the
parliament of the Bahamas and
announced anew commission..."
said Mr Jones.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson
responded that the matter is
before the courts, as the gov-
ernment has appealed Justice
John Lyon's ruling.
"There's a judgment on
which we don't agree," she said.
"There's reason we don't
agree, we take it to the courts,
we don't fight about these mat-
ters in the media."
On Wednesday Mrs May-
nard-Gibson sought in parlia-
ment to assert that no "consti-
tutional crisis" has arisen from
the Supreme Court judge's rul-
ing that the independence of the
judiciary has been compro-
mised. She called Justice John
Lyon's ruling "misleading" and
said that the government is cur-


* ATTORNEY-GENERAL
Allyson Maynard-Gibson

rently seeking legal advice from
international experts and mem-
bers of the Bahamas Bar.
She pointed out that the gov-
Semment has in fact followed cer-
tain recommendations by the
judicial review committee and
subsequently reviewed and
increased salaries of a number
of judicial officers, registrars and
magistrates.
"This government unre-
servedly respects the integrity
and independence of the mem-
bers of the judiciary and their
right and indeed constitutional
duty to give expression to views
pertinent to matters before
them," she said.


FROM page one

not be distracted by anybody inside or outside of
my organisation in enabling the quest that the
Bahamian people wish me to achieve on their
behalf."
Defending herself vehemently against the
harsh criticism levelled against her by Supreme
SCourt Justice John Lyons regarding the circula-
tioh of a report on the "Swift Justice" programme,
Mrs Grant-Bethell last week publicly declared
That she was being made a "scapegoat" for mis-
takes made by the Attorney General.
In his now controversial ruling, Justice Lyons
referred to a press release on the government's
Swift Justice initiative which he said originated
with Mrs Grant-Bethell as a "chilling picture" of
the contempt for judicial independence that cur-
rently exists in the Bahamas.
In seeking to defend herself, Mrs Grant-Bethell
emphasised that the report in question was not
Issued by her, but in fact was an internal docu-
ment disseminated by Mrs Maynard-Gibson.
The deputy director of prosecutions said she
hoped not to be politically victimised for being so
outspoken.



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The Attorney General yesterday pointed out
that whenever any internal memorandum is pre-
pared for the minister, "the boss decides what is
confidential in the ministry."
"Information that is fully available, is freely
available to the public, that is not confidential
and which reports on the efficiency, on the results
of initiatives put in place, this Attorney General
will continue to give it to the public," she. said.
Responding to the question of the nature of the
future working relationship between herself and
Mrs Grant-Bethell and if the "hatchet is buried",
the Attorney General said:
"I am not going to be distracted by anybody, I
can work with anybody in accomplishing a mis-
sion for and on behalf of the Bahamian people.
"I am serving the Bahamian people with great
focus."
Emphasising that it is her mission to administer
justice, Mrs Maynard-Gibson said that she does
not intend to "step on any toes", but apologised
if she has done so.
"I feel privileged working for the Bahamian
people and I measure my successes to the extent
that I am able to improve the lives of Bahamian
people," she said.


FNM questions origins

of money in reported


theft from minister


FOLLOWING concerns
addressed in parliament and
reports in the media concerning
the theft of a large sum of money
from a Cabinet minister, the Free
National Movement yesterday
questioned the origin of those
funds.
In its weekly commentary on
the party's web site the opposi-
tion wanted to know what the
money was "doing in Mr Peet's
bedroom."
The Tribune last week report-
ed that the 49-year-old
former driver of Minister of
Financial Services and Invest-
ments Vincent Feet admitted
stealing $10,000 from a black
travel-size bag in Mr Feet's
bedroom closet in November,
2003.
He claimed he entered into a
private agreement with the police
to repay the money.
In an exclusive interview, the
former driver also claimed that
the bag from which he stole the


money was half full of US $100
bills.
The driver, who was subse-
quently fired, told The Tribune
that he believed the cash must
have been Mr Peet's.
"I assume it's his because it
was in his house, in his room, in
his closet in his home," he
said. ,
The FNM yesterday agreed
with this assessment by the driver.
"It looks like the money
belonged to Mr Peet for several
reasons. First, it would be
unthinkable for a Minister of the
Government, or anybody else for
that matter, to have $10,000 -
maybe $50,000 in a bag in his
bedroom," the opposition said in
its commentary.
The FNM went on to say that
Minister Peet showed compas-
sion in not demanding the prose-
cution of the thief.
"Either that or he was more
interested in getting his money
back and that would not be like-


ly if prosecution had ensued," the
FNM said.
However, if the money
belonged to the public and was
not part of the minister's person-
al funds, the FNM said, "perhaps
Mr Peet would have let the mat-
ter go to the courts and laid the
whole thing open to the Bahami-
an people rather than covering
up the theft of public funds.
"But," said the party, "that
still leaves some interesting ques-
tions. Why would a minister keep
such a large sum of money in
cash in his house? More impor-
tantly, where did it come from?"
the FNM asked.
The opposition pointed out
that while there is nothing ille-
gal about keeping "a lot of Amer-
ican money in a bag in a bed-
room, (a) prudent person with
that amount of cash from any
source would have deposited it
in a bank as soon as possible.
Unless, of course, he has a good
reason not to do so."


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PAGE 4, MODAY, OVEMER 20 2006THE TIBUN


MEMORIAL SERVICE


^S a'-


S- : -:; a 4

FUNERAL DIRECTORS
"Rendering the finest in caring and compassionate service
regardless offinancial condition."
7th Terrace, Collins Avenue (242) 356-2187 *
P.O. Box GT-2679 Nassau, Bahamas
FUNEALERICEFO


Two wounded


as shots fired at


anti-UN street


protest in Haiti


MONTAGU ROSCOE HIGGS

was born on January 27, 1939, and passed away
on November 14, 2006. He was the eldest son
of the late The Hon. Godfrey W.*Higgs, C.B.E.
and Suzanne H. Stoll.

He is survived by his said mother and stepfather
Wayne Stoll of Ocala, Florida; his devoted wife
of 43 years, Judith Ann Higgs, of Nassau; and
his brothers Peter and Geoffrey Higgs and sister-
in-law Joyce Higgs of Nassau. He is also
survived by his sons and daughters-in-law
Andrew and Jennifer Higgs and Christopher and
Pleasants Higgs, his nephews Grouper and
Spencer Higgs, all of Nassau; and five adoring
grandchildren, Travis and Savannah Higgs of
Louisville, Kentucky, and Albury, Lilly and Stella
Higgs of Nassau.

/Amemorial service to celebrate his life will be
lild at Christ Church Cathedral, George Street,
Nassau on Wednesday, November 22, 2006, at
2:30 in the afternoon.

The family requests that in lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to The Cancer Society
of the Bahamas, P.O. Box SS 6539, Nassau In
Memory of Montagu R. Higgs.

HR04VGEMENTSBY KEMP'S FUNERAL.
HOME .


)


TERRANCE
ROBERT "SQUID"
STORR, 38
of Atlanta, Georgia and
formerly of Yellow Elder
SMGardens, will be held on
e NTuesday, November 21, 2006
at 10:30 a.m. at St. Joseph's
Catholic Church, Boyd Road.
Officiating will be Monsignor
Simeom Roberts and
interment will follow in the
Southern Cemetery, Cowpen
and Spiknard Roads.
He is survived by his parents, Mrs. Sylvia Colebrooke-
Whylly-Phidd of Detroit and Mr Philip Storr; stepmother,
Mrs. Florinda Mackey-Storr; brothers, Todd and Craig
Whylly, Marcus, Bernard, Timothy, Kennon and Nino Storr;
sisters, Nursing Officer Jania Pennerman, Bernadette, Tanya
and Felicha Storr; step-brothers, Marcus, Lynden and Donahue
Mackey, step-sisters, Sheryl Mackey and Nata sha
Cummingham; aunts, Shirley and Eleanor Bain, Mrs.Rodnell-
James, Lisa and Wendy Colebrooke, Miriam and Majorie
Storr, Bernice Whynder and Antoinette Pintard; uncles, Dr.
P. Samuel Bain, Nathaniel and Willis "Kool-Aid" Bain,
Gerald, Jeffrey, Raymond, Deron, David and Dilleth
Colebrooke; grand aunts, Edith Kemp, Merrell Thompson
and Zerlene Williams; grand uncles, Willis, Donald and
Hasting Charlow and Norman Brown; cousins, Tamika,
Tammerell, Gwendolyn, Taria, T'Shura, Theleshea, Carla,
Destri, Candice and Crystal; numerous nieces and nephews
including Ashley, Mercades, Samuel Jr., Nathaniel Jr., Tamiko,
Tereco, Tarall, Rashad, Terez, Tanaz, Gordan, Gerald Jr.,
Joshua, Deangelo, David, Ian, Diamond, Adrian, Christopher
and Christophe; and a host of other relatives and friends
including Emma Richardson, Latoya Storr, Pericka, Strachan,
Marcel Major, Genica Forbes of Atlanta and Monique Evans,
Frederick Whylly and family, Christopher Pennerman,
Melvern Huyler-Lewis, Barbara Darrell, Symba Jones, Adam
Martin and the graduates of St. Augustine's College class of
1996.
The bodN .i ill repoie at the Blessed Redeemer Chapel at
Ferguson's Funeral Directors, 7th TerracerCollins Avenue,
n,4-rida y-an .Inda' from 10:00 a.m. to 5: p mn..and on
)kbgchurch from 9:30 a.mpr, I ervmce time.
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* HAITI
Port-au-Prince
GUNFIRE rang out Satur-
day during a i street prole by
university students' demanding
the withdrawal of United
Nations peacekeepers from
Haiti, and witnesses said two
demonstrators were wounded,
according to Associated Press.
About 100 protesters were
marching through Port-au-
Prince's downtown when gun-
fire erupted. scattering demon-
sitritois. \% witnesses said a secu-
rirty guard at a nearby bank fuired
the shots and was later arrested
by pokce after protesters threal-
ened to Ilynch him. It was not
clear \hat prompted the shoot-
ing.
Two students were wounded
Bullets, one in the leg and
the other in the back, \ tnesses
said.
Shortly after the shooting,
protesters regrouped and came
upon three UN civilian police
officers. Associated Press jour-
, nalists saw protesters chase after
the Filipino officers and throw
rocks. UN police spokesman
Fred Blaze said one Filipino
police officer was slightly
injured but could not give
details.


Earlier in the day, the stu-
dents from the Human Sciences
Facultyvof the state-run Univer-
MiiN of Raiti marched on a main
road. chanting -UN get out'"
and "Haiti is not your home!"
Demonstrators, some with
their faces covered, smashed the
windshield of a passing-UN-
vehicle and ihrew rocks at oth-
er cars, witnessessaid. They lat-
er cornered a white SUV and
spray painted the words "Down
with the UN" on the side. No
injuries were reported.
It followed a series of other
demonstrations calling for the
exit of UN troops, who arrived
in June 2004 to quell unrest
after rebels forced out former;
president Jean-Bertrand Aris-
tide.
Protesters accuse the blue-
helmeted troops of failing to
curb violence and of firing indis-
criminately during slum raids,
wounding and killing civilians.
,The UN says it only fires when
attacked.
The 8,800-strong UN mission
has beefed up patrols in the cap-
ital since two Jordanian peace-
keepers were shot to death on
November 10. The soldiers
were returning to base when
they were surprised by
unknown gunmen.


APPROACHES TO OVERCOMING
& PREVENTING C R

Thursday. Nov. 23, 2006 Wyndham Resort, Cable Beach, Nassau, The Bahamas


,v-~ ~ri'~\
~
9 4


An Information, Business & Personal Security Seminar


SESSION 1
8:30 a.m.



9:30 a.m.

10:30 a.m.
SESSION 2
10:45 a.m.







SESSION 3
Noon
12:30 p.m.


Opening Ceremony & Welcome Remarks
'Mr. Branville McCartney, Chair, Grime Prevention Committee
* Mrs. Tanya Wright, President, Bahamas Chamber of Commerce
* Mr. Paul Farquharson, Commissioner of Police
* Hon. Cynthia Pratt, Deputy Prime Minister, Minister of National Security
Crime & Its Impact [Root causes & analysis of crime]]
* Dr. David Allen, Dr. Graham Gates, Dr. Evaneth McPhee
COFFEE BREAK

Police Panel Discussion Rights and Solutions in The Bahamas
Moderator, Chief Superintendent Hulan Hanna
* Robbery Prevention, Employee Screening, and Embezzlement:
Asst. Superintendent Drexel Cartwright
* Crime Trends from an Intelligence Prospective:
Superintendent Keith Belle
* The Role of the Divisional Commander: Superintendent John Ferguson
* Prevention of Intimate Partner Violence in the work Place
Asst. Superintendent Elaine Sands

LUNCH .
Crimestoppers [The Power of the Tip]
* Alex MacDonald,BSc, MBA


SESSION 4
2:00 p.m. Trade Show/ Exhibition
Presentations by Exhibitors and The RBPF:

4:00 p.m. CLOSING


IOUPh VL

Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial New!


i, I


PAGE 14, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


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,MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006, PAGE 17


Tir TRIBUNE


SVenezuelan army



reserve to 2uard Copyrighted Material


VENEZUELA
Caracas
THOUSANDS of Venezue-
lan army reserve troops under-
went training Saturday to guard
Spelling stations and ballots dur-
ing next month's presidential
election, according to Associat-
ed Press.
The group was joined by
members of the country's Ter-
ritorial Guard, a special mili-
tary division established by
President Hugo Chavez com-
prised of neighborhood-based
militias.
Opposition leaders have
expressed concerns over the


role of the army reserve and
Territorial Guard in the
December 3 vote, arguing most
members -.are pro-Chavez and
should not be trusted.
Military officers deny
reservists' political leanings will
compromise security efforts.
"We are charged with watch-
ing over the safeguarding of
election materials and the secu-
rity of the installations and peo
ple," said Army Col. Francisco
Salcedo, who supervised train-
ing for roughly 1,000 reservists
in Caracas.
Troops say they simply want
to prevent possible attempts to
disrupt the vote.


"There are people that want
to sabotage (the election)," said
Isidora Acosta, a 33-year-old
reservist. "I have faith and I
pray everyday for things to
come out well."
It remains unclear if mem-
bers of the 100,000-strong army
reserve will carry firearms dur-
ing the election.
Chavez, who is running for
re-election, has accused oppo-
sition groups of working with
the US government to try to
disrupt the vote. On Friday, he
said that certain media organi-
sations and business interests
were also involved, but did not
provide any names or evidence.


il indicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


- 0 -". 4m


Chavez says Cuba-inspired

light bulb giveaway scheme

will mean energy savings


... .'i h-
.. ... .


0 VENEZUELA
Caracas
PRESIDENT Hugo Chavez
said Friday that his Cuba-
inspired light bulb giveaway pro-
gramme, which aims to improve
energy efficiency, will mean big
energy savings for his oil-rich
nation, according to Associated
Press.
"They'll say Chavez has gone
crazy that he's going around
giving out light bulbs," Chavez
said in a televised speech.
But Chavez claimed that
Venezuela consumes more elec-
" tricity per person than any other
South American nation and that
the new bulbs would allow the


country to save 2.000 rnegan\ art i
of electricitN, roughly equal to
about 12.7 percent of domestic
energy demand.
Chavez has said that the gov-
ernment plans to distribute 52
million energy-saving light bulbs
to Venezuelans unJer its "Mis-
sion Energy Re'olution" p.ult
of a new energy conservation
policy under "ay in one of the
world's top oil producers.
Cuban leader Fidel Castro, a
close friend and mentor of
Chavez, earlier began distributing
energy-saving light bulbs in order
to reduce electricity consumrnp-
tion on the communist island.
Cuba's electncit grid has taced
problems in recent years and


blackouts have been common.
Chavez regularly warns
Venezuelans that even though
their country sits atop some of
the world's biggest crude
deposits, oil will one day run out
and the country must turn to
cleaner, renewable energy
sources.
He has said the second phase -.
of his "energy revolution" will," .
involve the construction of
micro-electricity plants to help
supply energy to hospitals, food
storage facilities and small towns
,during emergencies.
Venezuela is the world's fifth-
largest oil exporter and has the'
largest proven oil reserves in the
western hemisphere.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 18, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006


INENTONLNW


Kiss me Kate? At



least one retailer



is banking on



royal nuptials


Available


5

,Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content



from Commercial News
v v --A


* LONDON
AS far as the world knows,
no question has been popped
and no ring has been produced,
but that hasn't stopped one of
Britain's biggest retailers from
gearing up for a royal wedding,
according to Associated Press.
Prince William and his long-
time girlfriend, Kate Middleton,
have not announced an engage-
ment, but in Britain there has
been speculation tinged, per-
haps, with hope that they soon
could. To that end, Woolworths
has designed a range of Kate-
and-Wills engagement memo-
rabilia which ranges from the
traditional mugs, plates, and
thimbles to the unusual, such
as mobile telephones and
prince-shaped candy.
"This is an exercise in being
ready," company spokesman
Daniel Himsworth said,


"because we felt we weren't
ready when Charles and Camil-
la got married.
"It's no secret they could get
married. It's been in the press,
on the radio. This is about the
mood of the country."
Britain loves a royal wedding,
it's true. The marriage of Prince
Charles to his longtime love
Camilla Parker-Bowles was a
relatively low-key affair; cer-
tainly, it was a far cry from the
1981 marriage of Charles to
Lady Diana Spencer, when peo-
ple slept in the streets to catch a
glimpse of the bride and about
700 million people around the
world watched it on television.
Souvenirs for the prince's sec-
ond wedding did a brisk busi-
ness, and those which bear the
incorrect date their nuptials
were rescheduled so Charles
could attend Pope John Paul
II's funeral are considered


more valuable.
Hiinsworth said Woolworths
estimates the market for mem-
orabilia from a possible union
. between William and Middle-
ton could top 10 million. By
contrast, they estimated the
market for Charles-and-Camil-
la souvenirs at 3 million.
William, who is second in line
to the throne after his father,
has been dating Middleton since
they met at St Andrew's Uni-
versity, in Scotland, in 2001. The
pair, who are both 24, were first
seen together publicly three
years later on a skiing holiday.
Now, paparazzi often snap
the pair on evenings out, and a
recent picture of the couple
smiling broadly at each other
as they left one club for home
made the front page of Lon-
don's Evening Standard, with
the headline, "Look of Love."
The accompanying article


- 404


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Go- -


qft 4m do


opined, "Kate smiles at William,
and it is a smile of the tenderest
affection, a look that says she
loves him, admires him and yes,
still fancies him something rot-
ten. They are going home
together at ithe end of the
evening, and the girl could not
be happier."
In March, when the prince
and Middleton left London for
a Caribbean vacation, some in


Britain's media speculated that
William was about to propose;
then, as now, the palace had no
comment.-Oin Friday morning,
bookmaker William Hill put the
odds of the couple becoming
engaged this year at 5-1; it is
even money, though, that they
will eventually be married.,
: Himsworth said that Wool-
worths hasn't actually manu-
factured any of the.merchan-


dise; the chain has instead stock-
piled all the materials they need,
commissioned the designs, and
when an announcement is
made, production would begin.
SDespite all the planning,
though, the candy part is still
up in the air. The idea to have
candy as part of the range is a
new one, he said, and the shop
isn't, certain exactly what form
they would take.


Police investigating suspected poisoning of former Russian spy


* LONDON
BRITISH police are investi-
gating the near-fatal poisoning
of a former Russian spy who
has been an outspoken critic of
the Kremlin and of his former
colleagues in Russia's security
agency, authorities said Sunday,
according to Associated Press.
Col Alexander Litvinenko, a
former KGB and Federal Secu-
rity Service (FSB) -agent, was
under armed guard in Univer-
sity College Hospital, London.
He was in a "serious but sta-
ble" condition, the-hospital.said.


Police said a specialist crime
unit began an investigation on
Friday into how he may have
been poisoned. No arrests had
been made so far, said a
spokesman for Scotland Yard.
Litvinenko, who had been
looking into the killing of Russ-
ian investigative journalist Anna
Politkovskaya, told reporters
earlier this week that he fell ill
on November 1 following a meal
with a contact who claimed to
have details about the murder.
Politkovskaya, who had writ-
ten critically about abuses by
,Ru.ssia .and pro-Moscow


Chechen forces fighting sepa-
ratists in Chechnya, was gunned
down October 7 inside her
Moscow apartment building.
Her attackers have not been
found. Rights groups have said
the killing underscores the risks
faced by Russians who question
or criticise the government.
A doctor treating Litvinenko
told the BBC that he had been
poisoned by thallium a toxic
metal found in rat poison..
"He's got a prospect of recov-
ering, he has a prospect of
dying," said Dr John Henry, a
clinical toxicologist who treated


Ukrainian President Viktor
Yushcheriko when he was poi-
soned by dioxin during his 2004
presidential election campaign.
Henry told the BBC the drug
can cause damage to the nervous
system and organ failure, and
that just one gram can be lethal.
Friends visiting Litvinenko in
hospital said they were shocked
by his appearance.
"He looks like a ghost," said
friend Alexander Goldfarb,
speaking outside the hospital
entrance. "'He's a very fit man,
he-neyr. smoked,, he neyer
drank, he ivould run five miles a


day, but now he has lost all his
hair, he has inflammation in the
throat, so he cannot swallow."
Litvinenko quit Russia for
Britain six years ago and has
been an outspoken critic of the
Kremlin ever since.
In 2003 he wrote a book,
"The FSB Blows Up Russia,"
accusing his country's secret ser-
vice agency of staging apart-
ment-house bombings in 1999
that killed more than 300 peo-
ple in Russia and sparked the
second war in Chechnya.
,, His friend- have.said4.h1,y
believe Russian authorities


could be behind the poisoning.
Moscow did not comment on
the allegations.
Russian dissident and tycoon
Boris Berezovsky, who was at
Litvinenko's bedside on Friday,
told The Associated Press he
suspected Russia's intelligence
services were behind the alleged
assassination attempt
"It's not complicated to say
who fights against him," Bere-
zovsky said in a telephone inter-
view. "He's (Russian President
Vladimir) Putin's enemy, he
,tjrcd to cTiticise hium nd had
lots of fears."


C hi


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The Ministry of Tourism in Cooperation with -
The Bahamas Hotel Association Presents


12TH ANNUAL









CHRISTMAS CRAFT & SOUVENIR SHOW

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Authentic Fashion Show, Junkanoo Rushout, Culinary Comner with Chefs
cooking tasty Christmas recipes


Win lots of prizes and enjoy complimentary eggnog with us!

Bahamas Hotel Association Holiday
Silent Auction (Friday and Saturday Only)
Special Addition:
Kids' Corner, Story-telling, Ophie and the Websites Rake N'
Scrape Band, Sunday Desserts with Chef Tracey,
Urlah McPhee Violin Ensemble

Friday, December 8, 2000 s: Sam to Gpm
Saturday, Deoember 9, 2000 :: 11am to 6pm
Sunday, Deoember o10, 200 s: 12pm to 6pm

WYNDHAM NASSAU RESORT & CRYSTAL PALACE
CASINO BALLROOM FOYER, CABLE BEACH

Sponsors: FirstCaribbean Bank; Royal Bank of Cimanada; J.S. Johnson;
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THE I HIBUNf *.I ._-I
INERATIOALNW


v


N BANGLADESH
Dhaka
A POLITICAL alliance said
it would resume a crippling
blockade of Bangladesh's trans-
portation network on Monday,
unless its demands for electoral
S reforms and the sacking of key
election officials are met,
according to Associated Press.
The 14-party alliance, led by
opposition leader Sheikh Hasi-
na during former Prime Minis-
ter Khaleda Zia's five-year rule,
had given an interim govern-
ment a Sunday evening dead-
line to meet the demands.
As the deadline expired and a
last-minute meeting between
Hasina and President lajuddin
Ahmed failed, the alliance
vowed to go on with the strike,
alliance spokesman Abdul Jalil
told reporters at a news briefing.
Hasina and key aides met
Ahmed at his palace Sunday
evening and repeated the
demands, but "he (Ahmed) did-
n't respond," Jalil said. "Now
there's no alternative but to
stick to our plans of street
protests."
The alliance says the com-
missioners, including chief Elec-


Available from Commercial News Provider


S gue f -0
4 O N& *


tion Commissioner MA Aziz,
are biased toward Zia's coali-
tion. It maintains that Zia is try-
ing to rig the election.;
Zia stepped down on Octo- f
ber 29 to make way for a care-
taker government to steer the
.country through January elec-
tions.
A council of advisers to the
caretaker administration had
met twice on Saturday at the
presidential palace in the capi-
tal, Dhaka, to discuss the


alliance's demands.
President Ahmed, leading the
interim government, was
expected to make a public state-
ment "soon" to break the
impasse, said Mahbubul Alam,
a spokesman for the caretaker
administration. But a statement
was yet to materialise late Sun-
day.
"Now there's no need of his
statement," Jalil said. "Every-
thing is clear now."
At the emergency meeting


with the council members of the
interim government, Ahmed
decided to send a delegation to
Aziz on Monday, Alam said.
He did not give details of
what message the delegation
might carry, or of the meet-
ing.
Violent protests paralysed the
country's roads, rails and main
port and left two dead from last
Sunday until Wednesday..
Meanwhile, several thousands
of alliance activists rallied in
downtown Dhaka to drum up
support for their planned
protests starting Monday.
A police statement Sunday
said they would ban political
gatherings in Dhaka starting
Monday morning. People would
be barred from carrying sticks,
explosives and other potential
weapons, it said.
On Sunday, tens of thousands
of supporters of Zia's four-par-
ty alliance marched through the
capital toward a downtown'
meeting place, where they ral-
lied against the strike call by
Hasina's alliance.
Business community figures
expressed concern about the
strike and demanded the presi-
dent act within 12 hours to


resolve the disputes.
"We ask the President to
resolve the crisis. Otherwise
we'll be bound to stage a sit-in
in front of the Presidential
palace with millions of work-
ers," S.M. Fazlul Haque, Presi-
dent of the Bangladesh Gar-
ment Manufacturers and
Exporters Association, told
reporters at a news briefing.
Textiles, impoverished
Bangladesh's main export item,


earn about US$7 billion a year -
roughly 75 per cent of the coun-
try's total annual export earn-
ings. The industry employs
about 1.8 million workers, most-
ly women.
Bangladesh has a history of
political violence.' Two of its
presidents were slain in military
coups, and the country has been
through 19 other failed coup
attempts since its independence
from Pakistan in 1971.


Former leader of Chechen



force killed in Moscow


ROSTOV-ON-DON
S A POLICE official and two
other people were killed in a
drive-by shooting by suspected
rebels in Russia's war-shattered
province of Chechnya, police
officials said Sunday, according
/ to Associated Press.
The incident took place in the
* Kurchaloi district in eastern
Chechnya, when the assailants
opened fire on a car that the
member of Chechnya's elite
police unit and two passengers,
a man and a woman, were rid-
ing, the regional Interior Min-
istry said.
The attackers escaped and
were being searched for, the
ministry said.
Major fighting has died down
in Chechnya since the Second
war started in 1999 and the sep-
aratists were driven from pow-
er, but the mostly Muslim
region is plagued by rebel
attacks as well as violence
blamed on federal troops and
forces of the Moscow-backed
Chechen government..
Russian prosecutors, mean-
while, said they will look at the.
legality of the police operation
in which the former head of one
of Chechnya's shadowy security


forces was killed in Moscow on
Saturday.
Movladi Baisarov was shot
while resisting officers on a
main avenue in the capital,
Moscow prosecutor's office
spokeswoman Svetlana
Petrenko said. A prosecutor at
the scene, Irina Bobinova, said
he had pulled out a grenade
when police tried to arrest him
after he got out of a car.,
Petrenko said on Russian
television that the investigation
into the incident will also look
into the legality of the police
operation.
Authorities said they were


Share your
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning /
for improvements in the L
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


trying to detain him on suspi-
cion of abductions and killings
in Chechnya, officials said.
A Moscow police spokesman
told Associated Press on Sun-
day that the operation was con-
ducted by Chechen police who
had been dispatched to the cap-
ital to detain Baisarov.
Baisarov headed a force that
reportedly provided security for
the separatist Chechen leader-
ship in the late 1990s and later
for the region's first pro-
Moscow president, Akhmad
Kadyrov, who was assassinated
in 2004, but had been on
increasingly bad terms with


news


Kadyrov's son Ramzan, Chech- *
nya's powerful prime minister. .
Kadyrov's office on Sunday
denied that Baisarov had served
in his father's security service.
Baisarov's history reflects the
volatile web of shifting alle-
giances and rivalries that con-
tribute to. persistent violence
and tension in Chechnya.



BLUE LAGOON


RESTAURANT


THANKSGIVING DINNER

MENU




Appetizers
Old Fashion Pumpkin Soup 1
Waldorf Salad
Or
Green Salad


Entree
Roast Tom Turkey
Walnut Dressing & Cranberry Sauce
or
Baked Sugar Cured Ham
Sweet Potatoes/Garden Vegetables


Desert
Freshly Baked Apple Pie
Home-Made Pumkin Pie
Ice Cream
Coffe or Tea


Glass of Wine / Apple Cider


$47.00 per person plus 15% gratuity.
Advance purchase price: $42.50 per peraon plus gratuity.


Thursday, november 23rd 2006, @5pm
Featured soothing Music b Andrew Miller

(We will also be serving from our a la carte menu)


.1, f


Bangladesh alliance threatens




to resume paralysing strike


I 4fg


Styl+OMFI Z


y011 jluyucc gtaogwihu t


r I




PAGE 20, MONDAY. NOVEMBER 20, 2006
"Your Bahania Supemwlets"




VALUE
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PEPPERIDGE FARMS 80Z. OCEAN SPRAY 16 OZ.
STUFFINGS CRANBERRY SAUCE.....$1.99
H ERBICORN...................$2.99 s
SHURFJNE 10OZ LIBBY'S 15-OZ.
RED CHERRIES.........$2.69 PMIVIPKIN PIE MIX....$1.89
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ISLAMIC fighters ambushed
an Ethiopian military convoy
on Sunday, killing six Ethiopian
soldiers and wounding 20 oth-
ers, eyewitnesses said, in the
first known skirmish between
the rival forces maneuvering for
control in Somalia, according
to Associated Press.
Two Ethiopian trucks were
destroyed by land mines before
Islamic fighters opened fire on
the convoy, which eyewitnesses
told The Associated Press was
made up of more than 80 vehi-
cles and headed for the Somali
government town of Baidoa,
150 miles west of the capital,
Mogadishu.
Six Ethiopian soldiers were
killed and 20 wounded, a Soma-
li fighter traveling in the con-
voy said. He asked not to be
identified for fear of being pun-
ished for talking to the media.
Government officials con-
firmed a skirmish had taken
place but said they had no
details.
Islamic and Ethiopian offi-
cials were not immediately
available for comment.,
The attack occurred near the
town of Bardaleh, 50 miles
south-west of Baidoa.
"There were two explosions
and then a large exchange of
gunfire," said one eyewitness
on condition of anonymity for
fear of reprisals. Around 50
Islamic fighters were involved,
the eyewitness added. "We saw
Ethiopian soldiers in defensive
positions and two trucks over-
turned."
Several hours after the skir-
mish, the Ethiopian convoy
arrived in Baidoa, eyewitnesses
said. Large numbers of Ethiopi-
an infantry were aboard buses
as the convoy pulled into town,
witnesses said.
There has been heightened
tensions in Somalia and fears


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that an all-out war could engulf
the region. Ethiopia backs the
transitional government, whose
authority has been severely
challenged by an Islamic move-
ment that has taken over the
capital and much of southern
Somalia since June.
Somalia has not had an effec-
tive government since 1991,
when warlords overthrew dic-
tator Mohamed Siad Barre and
then turned on one another.
The interim government was
formed with the help of the
United Nations two years ago,
but it controls just one town.
Experts have warned that the
-country has become a proxy
battleground for Somalia's
neighbours, Eritrea and
Ethiopia.
A confidential UN report
obtained last month by the AP
said 6,000-8,000 Ethiopian
troops are in or near Somalia's
border with Ethiopia, backing
the interim government. The
report also said 2,000 troops
from Eritrea are inside Somalia
-supporting; the Islamic move-
. ment.
On November 2; the US


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warning saying Somali extrem-
ists were threatening suicide
attacks in Kenya and Ethiopia.
Somalia's Islamic militia denied
they planned any such attacks.
A UN panel charged with
monitoring the 1992 arms
embargo on Somalia said in a
report obtained Wednesday by
the AP that 10 countries, includ-
ing Ethiopia and Eritrea, had
provided weapons, money and
training to armed groups in
Somalia.
The four-member panel based
their report on their own inves-
tigations, interviews and mater-
ial supplied by embassies in
Nairobi. Several of the countries
have denied the allegations.
Somalia's Islamic movement,
meanwhile, lifted a curfew Sun-
day imposed after demonstra-
tions against a ban on the pop-
ular stimulant khatt", a leaf
chewed across the Horn of
Africa and the Middle East.
The 9pm to 4am curfew was
the first in Mogadishu since the
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MONDAY,^NOVEMBER 20, 2006, PAGE 23


INT-ERNATIONALNEWS


Cruise ship stricken with virus


docks in Florida for extra cleaning


FORT LAUDERDALE,
Fla.
A THOROUGH scrubbing
of the Carnival Liberty began
as the ship docked Sunday
after a virus sickened nearly
700 passengers on a trans-
Atlantic cruise, according to
Associated Press.
SFourteen guests and five
crew remained ill and in isola-
tion when the ship arrived at
Port Everglades, according to a
statement released by Carni-
val Cruise Lines.
More than 530 guests and
140 crew had reported to the
ship's infirmary with similar
symptoms during the 16-day
voyage. Some passengers were
escorted off the ship in wheel-
chairs by crew wearing blue
gloves to prevent infection.
Preliminary tests identified
the source of the outbreak as
the highly contagious
iorovirus, which had struck
'several guestsjust before they
boarded the cruise Nov. 3 in
-Rome, Carnival officials said.
Passengers who fell ill dur-
ing the cruise said they
S 'received over-the-counter anti-
S 'diarrheal medication and pills
or an injection to ward off nau-
'sea in the ship's infirmary, and
'had been quarantined in their
cabins while showing symp-
"toms.
"They brought us 7-Up, bot-
tied water, ice and a diet of
rice, though you didn't feel like
-.eating," said Jim Lankes, 48,
'of Phoenix. Lankes and his 45-
year-old brother both got sick
when the ship was docked in
Barcelona, Spain.
"There were 10 people at
our dinner table, and seven of
'the 10 got sick during the
course of the cruise," he said.
SCrews scrubbed the ship's
.handrails and utensils, offered
-'disinfecting hand gel and halt-
ed the self-serve buffets after
'the outbreak started. Even
*.-plastic menus were wiped
clean, said Pedro Carreras, 51,






:; KSIq


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of McDonough, Ga.
"They served everybody so
nobody 'touched the same
spoons," said Carreras, who
escaped the illness.
Most cruise activities and
excursions continued as sched-
uled, passengers said, though
the crew's illness disrupted
some personal services.
"Our cabin steward was


struck, and we didn't have any-
body to clean our cabin for five
days," said Pamela Stupnik of
Pueblo, Colo. She said she and
her husband spent two days
vomiting in their cabin.
A team from the U.S. Cen-
ters for Disease Control board-
ed the cruise when it docked
in St. Maarten to oversee the
cleaning operation andatry-to


determine what caused the out- touching contaminated surfaces departure until Tuesday so
break, Carnival said. or objects and then placing that crews could have extra time to
Norovirus is a group of virus- hand in one's mouth, or disinfect the ship. Its new four-
es that cause stomach flu symp- through direct contact with day itinerary includes stops in
toms such as diarrhea, vomiting someone who is infected and Key West and Cozumel, Mexi-
and stomach cramps, accord- showing symptoms. co.
ing to the CDC. The illness The Liberty had been sched- The Liberty, which made its
usually lasts one to two days uled to set sail again Sunday maiden voyage in July 2005, is
without any long-term health afternoon on a six-day one of the world's largest cruise
effects. It spreads through con- Caribbean voyage, but Miami- ships, with 13 passenger decks
laminated food or liquids, by ,based Carnival delayed its next androoip for2,?,974 travelers.


34- 70/
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THE TRIBUNE


rr







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 26. MONDAY. NOVEMBER 20, 2006


INATERNATIONALNEWS


Russia signs a




key trade deal




with the US


E HANOI, Vietnam
RUSSIA and the United
States signed a key trade
agreement Sunday, removing
the last major obstacle in
Moscow's 13-year journey to
join the World Trade Organi-
zation, according to Associat-
ed Press.
The deal, inked on the side-
lines of a gathering of Pacific
Rim economies, is a powerful
vote of confidence in Russia
- the largest economy still
outside the 149-member WTO
- and signals its integration
into the global trading system.
It also marks a bright spot in
the two countries' relations
that have been marred by dis-
agreements over Iran's con-
troversial nuclear program
and Washington's fears of a
roll back of democratic free-
doms under Russian President
Vladimir Putin.
"I am very pleased to be
here today to have the oppor-
tunity to celebrate this very
important milestone as Rus-
sia moves one important step
closer to becoming a member
of the WTO," said U.S. Trade
Representative Susan Schwab.
"Russia belongs as a full-
fledged member of the
WTO," she said. "We look
forward to continuing these
efforts to improve the eco-
nomic and commercial ties
between our two nations."
Russia's Trade and Eco-
nomic Development Minister
German Gref called the deal a
"historic step the last step
- that signifies the return of
Russia to the market princi-
pies of the world economy."
As part of the deal. Gref
said that Russia had pledged


Last major obstacle in


journey to join WTO


to cut import tariffs on a range
of goods including aircraft,
computer technology, agricul-
ture and machinery.
Speaking after the signing
ceremony Gref defended
those concessions. "I think we
found the necessary balance.
On all positions that were sen-
sitive for us we found a com-
promise."
SThe two countries also man-
aged to overcome the high-
profile question of Russia's
shaky record on protecting
intellectual property rights.
Pirated films, music and soft-
ware in Russia cost U.S. com-
panies nearly $1.8 billion in
2005.

Satisfaction
Schwab said that while talks
with Russia on the piracy
question would continue at
the stage of multilateral nego-
tiations, she expressed satis-
faction with Russia's progress:
"We believe that the bilateral
agreement is very good."
Before it can join the WTO,.
Russia must consolidate the
bilateral agreements it has
forged with 57 countries. Gref
said he expected that process
to be completed by the middle
of next year.
After that, the WTO needs
to vote to approve its mem-
bership.


Buit some questions remain.
Georgia and Moldova have
threatened to block Russia's
bid because MNloscow has
blocked key exports from
those nations. Gref said Sat-
urday that he hopes that those
problems would also be
resolved by mid-2007.
Membership in the WTO
would mean Russia, a big oil
and gas exporter. would
receive the same favorable
tariff rates for its products as
other members. Also. Russia
and other member countries
would have to follow WTO
rules in trade disputes.
Freer trade would give
Russian companies more
opportunities to sell their
goods on world markets. Join-
ing the WTO also might make
its sizable market of potential
customers even more attrac-
tive to companies in the U.S.
and elsewhere.
"With the integration of
Russia into the global trading
system and Russia undertak-
ing the obligations and bene-
fiting from ... the WTO, we
do anticipate significant
increases in Russia's global
trade," Schwab said.
The deal was widely antici-
pated. On Nov. 10. both sides
announced that all the main
questions had been settled and
all that remained was for a few
technical questions to be
nailed down.


Available from Commercial News Providers


** dHm- *-*ao -NO i*i4ibinf


Before the U.S. can trade
with Russia under a WTO
agreement, Washineton must
establish normal trade rela-
tions with MNloscow.
For thai. Congre-ss would
still ha'e to pass legislation
remo ine Russia from the
1974 Jackson-\anik amend-


Colina Ge.ieral

Insurance Ag00-
,~~~~ i'^ *i? .^lt


ment, which ties Russia's trade
status to whether the country
is allowing Jews to freely leave
the country.
Though the amendment is
widely considered an anachro-
nism, the newly elected Con-
gress, which convenes in Jan-
uary, will be controlled by
Democrats, who are less
receptive to free-trade agree-
ments than Republicans.
About four months ago,
U.S. and Russia had appeared
on the verge of an agreement.


But in a major embarrassment
for Moscow, it failed to mate-
rialize right before the sum-
mit of leaders of the world's
wealthiest countries that
Putin was hosting in St. Peters-
burg.
Observers have suggested
that the deal with the U.S.
may have been used as a polit-
ical incentive to encourage
Moscow to back a U.S. pro-
posed sanctions package, pun-
ishing Iran for its controversial
nuclear program.


M U.S. TRADE REPRESENTATIVE Susan Schwab speaks to
reporters after signing trade agreement with Russia in Hanoi, Sun-
day, Nov. 19, 2006. Russia and the United States signed a key
trade agreement on the sidelines of a meeting f Pacific Rim lead-
ers Sunday a major economic milestone that paves the way for
Russia's entry into the World Trade Organizaton.
(AP PhotojOmitri Lovetsky)


I _






MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006, PAGE 27


THE TRIBUNE


INTERATION A NW


A


N TOKYO
THE Airbus A380 landed
in Japan on Sunday, as part
of a final series of test flights
intended to lead to the super-
jumbo's air-worthiness certi-
fication by the end of the year,
According to Associated Press.
The plane, which is on an
Asian tour and flew from
Hong Kong, arrived safely in
Narita International Airport
near Tokyo, airport
spokesman Masaharu Watan-
abe said.
The final four flights in the
test schedule, ending Nov. 30,
are designed to put the 555-
seater A380 through 150.
hours of flights under the kind
of operating conditions it will
experience with airlines. Sun-
day's arrival is part of the sec-
ond of the four trips.
During its Narita stopover,
aviation officials will make
sure if the huge aircraft can
fit the facility and equipment
at the airport, while going
through a series of routine
work such as maintenance,
fueling, and attaching a board-
ing bridge, Watanabe said.
"It's the first time for Nari-
ta to accommodate such a big
plane," Watanabe said. "We
have to make sure if the plane
fits the facility."
The airport's observation
Balcony was crowded with
many Japanese aviation
enthusiasts who were taking
pictures of the A380, he said.
"I'm hoping to go down to the
spot later and take a look."
The superjumbo will return
to France on Monday, before
taking off again for mainland
Chinese airports in Beijing,
Shanghai and Guangdong
next week, Airbus said in a
statement. It will then fly to
South Africa, Australia and
Canada in the coming weeks.
The company has said the
superjumbo is on track for cer-
tification by mid-December.
Airbus has received orders
for 166 superjumbo jets. Sin-
gapore Airlines will ,be the
first carrier to fly the super-
* .. jumbo after it receives its first


Airbus


Superj'umb.o




L380 arrives i


*Availableifrom Commercial News Providers


* . *- a ;
0o a -*o* W*4 b*
ii


plane in October next year a
year later than originally
planned. Subsequent deliver-
ies have suffered longer
delays, averaging two years.
Airbus and its parent com-
pany European Aeronautic
Defence and Space Co. have


blamed wiring problems for
the holdups, which are set to
wipe US$6.2 billion off profit
over the next four years and
are complicating plans for an
unlaunched mid-size jet to
compete with Boeing Co.'s
787.


moving forward l
74 on"


A MAN in uniform
stands outside Airbus A380
on the tarmac at Narita Inter-
national airport as part of its
"round the world" tour flight
in Narita, east of Tokyo, Sun-
day, Nov. 19,2006. The world
first "True" double-deck pas-
senger airliner arrived in
Japan as one of ten airports
in the world to stop over for
global route proving flight.
(AP Photo/
Junji Kurokawa)

Share
your
news
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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006, PAGE 29


,,NEW ZEALAND
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Y Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers
~0


S emd 0- a-
w0 b qmm m ab*


Report: Orthodox



leader warns against



unpleasant incidents'


during papal trip


REC ;PASTA RONim
MUSTARD ALL FLAVOURS
m m S A R7 4 -.C-O3


I


* ANKARA, Turkey
THE spiritual leader of the
world's Orthodox Christians
cautioned Turks in an interview
published Sunday against cre-
ating potential "unpleasant inci-
dents" during Pope Benedict
XVI's upcoming trip to Turkey,
according to Associated Press.
Ecumenical Patriarch
Bartholomew I said in an inter-
view in the Sabah newspaper
that the pope's Nov. 28-Dec. 1
trip was a great opportunity for
Turkey, and he would tell the
pontiff that the country
belonged in the European
Union, which Ankara has long
sought to join.
The pope's visit to Turkey
was born out of Benedict's
desire to meet Bartholomew,
who has his headquarters in
Istanbul, once ancient Con-
stantinople. The pontiff has
been trying to foster better rela-
tions between the Orthodox
and Catiiholic. and will meet pri-
vately with Bartholomew on
Nov.29.
Turkish authorities have said
they expect protests against the
pope, who angered Muslims by
a speech he made in Septenm-
ber in which he quoted a Byzan-
tine emperor s remarks about
Iaftm antdviotiewe.
On Sunday, mao'e d Aie'l
Whittttottatts Wnrortedi *'-.i~i j-i..-:
batnmets 'dn'rnrg a tervi








Vya.
il*r iteAl. .....e 114 WIN te
-, IN i '.'i'.' .: 'ii'i :.. .. I i h. *.rPa..* *


Pope's visit 'a great

opportunity for Turkey'


Bartholomew cautioned that
if protests turn violent, they
could cause problems for
Turkey ahead of a critical EU
summit in mid-December,
where the EU leaders will judge
Ankara's progress for member-
ship.
"The pope has a say in all
Ca tholic co un trie s. "
Bartholomew told Sabah. 'If
there are psychologically
unpleasant incidents, then this
would be an issue in Brussels
in December.
"Even if not at the office il
level, they would talk aboir it
between themselves."
Bartholomew, however, said
he would tell the pontiff that
"it is not wrong for Turkey to
become a member of ti' Fhel
as a Muslim country because it
would bring mutual richness."
"The EU should not remain
as a Christian club,"' .1 il' Sabah
quoted Bartholomew as saving.
'...ii i s.ni '1. Tu kish citi-
ent. said the p *p 's irip '' a
great o1tthwfitv for 1. '
l it r'frtsed v *' n it wouitd be
b !, Sah id i s0ai0dl' [i 'A "
'1 to 'hO at c,:. \ ,i Ith
% \ \, 5 1ltA1'14 tlld l l c i WCh ,Mn


1i~jt~to-a' .* '4. i,-t' i~trtth~fflo Ih1e-
i.*' .*, : *,l hip ..., I, ., *, . , *,o ,, *.^.I

V'T.j ..' ]hW,~ lb,(c
Wi(! 4t~e'slhelliiwtautnell'~Iarn41a'i ca'


new students in 1971 under a
law that put religious and mili-
tary training under state con-
trol.
"As Turkish citizens, we pay
tax, we serve in the military, we
vote and we want the same
rights. But it does not happen,"
Bartholomew said
"It' Muslims want to study
theology, there aii 24 theolo-
gy faculties. h\\ '. I are we going
to stuidv?"
The seminar v trained gener-
ations of( iitek Onhdolcad-
i- incildiiL P lb'dib m w.
'Turikey does not i1co'len'/ his
international lole and ictects
his use otthe title "eciUMInCi-
cal." or ni" ers;rl. It argues
iin.stcad that the pai nichl is
nmu''Cly the piiiu'il leader of
itmanhul'< dwinidling Orthodox
Cihoniinuritv.
"We've have this title since
the 01h Lcilnury. The word of
ecumenical has no political con-
itent. This title is the only thing
thal I insiSt on. I will never
renounce this title,"
Baiiholomnew said.
IThe ( I bodidx sho' IIl issue is
I ,-l lo :il y'lc !r r
thc i pjAa i"rp.
[' oiroia'lir" 1n1 I t oi hul
dacis fiw Ih, 1 i00 a-aIold
. i 'G k k .7antine
*II ..* v-.'when
1u1.11'1ii1 O lonqur'ian TurIs 0Con-
1- . I r. .
S-- i so .' ii
?'(iB'lle ".'s 1: "n aomdi dht
,N f 1 'I I :* 'ci .1 ,


,*~a. - ---- -. .",~-------~, - - - --


THE TRIBUNE








THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 30, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006


MONDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 20, 2006

1 7:30 1 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 1 10:00 10:30

Florida Roadtrip Antlques Roadshow Painting of Kennedy Center Presents "The Mark Twain Prize for Funny Ladies of
B WPBT Northem Pacific Railroad train; Civil Amencan Humor Celebrating Neil Simon"(N) A (CC) British Comedy
War photo collection. (CC) n(CC)
SThe Insider (N) How I Met Your The Class Holly Two and a Half (:31) The New CSI: Miami A young woman is killed
0 WFOR n (CC) Mother "Slap and Perry host a Men (N) n (CC) Adventures of after being auctioned off at a charity
Betf (N) (CC) dinner. (N) 1 Old Christine event. (N) ) (CC)
Access Holly- Deal or No Deal (iTV) Contestants Heroes Claire's homecoming cele- (:01 Studio 60 on the Sunset
0 WTVJ wood (N) (CC) geta chance to win money (N) n ration becomes a frightening night Strip Ricky and Ron plan to leave
(CC) for many. (N) n (CC) and take the writing staff. (N) n
Deco Drive Prison Break "Disconnect" A family House "Forever" A mother and her News (CC)
B WSVN reunion brings up painful childhood son are in grave danger. ft (CC)
memories for Michael.
Jeopardy! "Cel- A Charlie Brown He's a Bully, The Bachelor: Rome Ten jilted What About Brian Needing money,
G WPLG ebrity Week in Thanksgiving Charlie Brown bachelorettes return to confront one Brian takes a ob at his father's real
New York" (N) (CC) (N) (CC) another one last time. (N) 1) estate firm. (N) (CC)

S:00)CSI: Miami CSI: Miami Tinder Box"A fire at a CSI: Miami The team delves into Gene Simmons Gene Simmons
A&E Speng Break' popular night club claims 16 lives.. methamphetamine "tweaker" culture Family Jewels Family Jewels
n (CC) f (CC) after a brutal murder. (CC) "Fantastic" Facelih (CC)
Hardtalk BBC News World Business BBC News Click Online Es- BBC News World Business
BBCI (Latenight). Report (Latenight). sentialguideto (Latenight). Report
computers.
BET Hotwyred (CC) * PAID IN FULL (2002, Crime Drama) Wood Harris, Mekhi Phifer. A Soul Food ( (CC)
BET young man becomes a drug dealer in Harlem. (CC)
C13BC Royal Canadian Doctor Who "The Age of Steel" 72 Hours: True Rumours (N) CBC News: The National (CC)
Air Farce (CC) (Part 2 of 2) (CC) Crime Frenzy (CC) (DVS)
00)0nthe Warren Buffett: The Billionaire Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CN BC oney Next Door (N)
N (:00)RThe Situa- Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)
CNNV lion Room
Scrubs Turk's in- The Daily Show The Colbert Re- Chappelle's South Park "You Scrubs "My Scrubs Turk and
COM definite silent With Jon Stew- port (CC) Show Snoop Got..." (CC) American Girl" Carla set a wed-
treatment. (CC) art (CC) Dogg. (CC) n (CC) ding date.
C RT Cops "Coast to Inside "Supormax" The debate over Forensic Files Forensic Files Murder by the Book "Michael Con-
OU Coasr i ICCI superman peniteniianries. "Over and Out' nelly 'Ni
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DISN Parents may sep- delinquents are forced to10 dig at deternlioin camp n PG (CC) ture i" ICC)
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This Old House DIY to the Res- DIY to the Res- Kitchen Renova- KdIchen Renova- Freeform Furni- Barkitecture
DIY "I (CCI cue INi) cue tions tions ture
DV In Focus (Ger- Journal: Projekt Zukunft Journal: In Euromaxx Journal: Im Focus lia-
DW miani Tagestema Depth Tagesiema haufnahme'
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E Door Door Carters |Ni Carters looking breasts IN
S (:00) Monday Night Countdown NFL Football New fork Giants at Jacksonville Jaguars From ALLTEL Stadium in Jack-
E(SN Live) (CC) sonville, Fia (Livel (CCi
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E PNI Primera Plana (Live) sonville, Fla (Live) (CC)
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CW I N Lady cyI
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FS F (:00) NHL Hocke Florida Panthers at Bos'rin Bruins From iTD Ban- Besi Damn Sports Show Period The FSN Final
FSNFL knort Garden in oston (Subject to Blackout) (Live) Live) (CC) Score (Livel
GOLF Playing Lessons 13 Wendy's Tour Challenge (8:58) Golf Channel Academy Live 1:13) Grand Slam Champions Clin-
GO Fflm ivel ic 2005
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(:00) Walker, Walker, Texas Ranger Walker * DOC HOLLYWOOD (1991 Romance-Comedyl Michael J Fo..
HALL exas Ranger breaks up a deadly arms racket us- Julie Warner. Barnard Hughes An arrogant phriysi:iari is delainied in a
r iCC) ing diamonds to buy weaponry Soutn Carolina town
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room. (CC) ,, quete..n (CC) .
Morris Cerullo Breakthrough Touch the Fire Inspiration To- Life Today (CC I This Is Your Day The Gospel
INSP (CC) day iCCi Truth
Reba Core Foc- My Wife and According to According to Friends Ross Everybody Everybody
KTLA cus '' |CCI Kids Lessionis in Jim Jims. real fa- Jim Pairiball wanis Rachel as Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
paying anerilon other 1 | CCI \ (CCI a neighbor Thanksgiving n (CCI
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LIFE Time Out ol Dead(N I(CC) Peel Sarah Paulson Premiere. A dying man tails in love with a woman
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S CMNB (CC) mann Louisiana' Louisiana.
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NICK Boy Genius SquarePants An n (CC) (CC) (CC) Show (CC) Bel-Air
NITV New Adv.-Old Deal or No Deal Contestants get a Heroes "Home:omiring" (N) I' (CC) News i (CC) News
N *Christine chance to10 win money. IN) (CC)
SP E 7 Days (NI Inside Nextel Cup (NI Barrett-Jackson: Life on the MAXIMUM OVERDRIVE I1986i
SPEED Block Emilio Eiieve: Pal Hingrl
Bishop T.D. Behind the Mark Chironna Jentezen Jesse Duplantis Praise the Lord (CCI
TEN Jakes (CCi ScenesiCC| Franklin (CC) ICC)
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TLC Moms (N) Thaniksgiving Remodeling night- mon gei a anoc 10 Io ymq')l::ili hiS
mare ICCI st iugle Wilh diabetes CC|I
(:00) Without a Law & Order Marathon' A liustrai- Law & Order Detectives discover a Law & Order Deiectives search lotr
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Goddess rweern Bricoe and Green of a gambling operation ii lasi customerr iCC) IDDVS)
T N Home for Imagi- Grim Adven- Grim Adven- Camp Lazlo Ed, Edd n Eddy Ben 10 Trutrih" Futurama (i
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TV5 Des racines et des ailes LE GRAND CHARLES i2ii:6, iogriph.iel (Panie 2 de
TV 2) Bernard Farcy, Danrele Lebrunr
TWC Storm Stories Abrams & Bettes Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
TWC (CC)
(:00) Heridas de La Fea Mas Bella Lety es una nifia Mundo de Fieras (N) Cristina Ana Barbara.
UNIV Amor ItN'i dulce, romantica e inteligente, pero
apena'; atraciva |NI
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order: Special Victims Unit WWE Monday Night Raw Ladder MAtih for the riniter':nineiniiai Title
USA der: Criminal In- f iCCi Hardy vs ru:ro (Live ft |CCI
tent Baggage
VH 1 40 Bad Breakup Celeb Breakups and Scandals ft The World's Most Insane Mega Fabulous Life Breaking Bona-
VS1 Songs Yachts f Real Estate duce ft
Holy ...d NHL Hocke Colorado Avalanche at Dallas Stars From American Ailines Center in Dallas NHL Postgame
VS. iSubjec to lackcul ILivel Show (Live)
N :00) America's America's Funniest Home Videos America's Funniest Home Videos WGN News at Nine f it C
WGN Funniest Home n (CC) ft (CC)
Videos f (CC)
Everybody Everybody All of Us "My Girlfriends Lynn The Game "The CW11 News at Ten With Kaity
W PIX Loves Raymond Hates Chris (N) Two Dads" (N) is singing for Trey Wigs Tong, Jim Watkins (CC)
f (CC) f (CC) f (CC) money. (N) (CC) Episode (N) (CC)
WSJeKopadey! "- Dr. Phil r (CC) .Jeopardy! (CC) News aiber Faier's Fra~s rT~he First
New Yrk'(N)______________ (CC) Daphne" n

(6:15) *** Real Time Richard Dreyfuss; Nor- **** MILLION DOLLAR BABY (2004, Drama) Clint Eastwood, Hi-
H BO-E MEUIDA AND man Learn n (CC) lary Swank, Mor an Freeman. A cantankerous trainer bonds with a fe-
MELINDA (CC) male boxer. At PG-13' (CC)
ANGEL RODRIGUEZ (2005, Drama) Rachel Griffiths, The Wire "Misgivings" Burrell sends Def Comedy * JUNGLE
HBO-P Jonan Everett. A New York social worker tries to help a out a mandate. f (CC) Jam Rodney Per- FEVER (1991)
troubled teenager. f 'NR' (CC) y. ft (CC) Wesley Snipes.


%* JUST FRIENDS (2005, Romance-Comedy) (:15) ** MELINDA AND MELINDA (2004, Comedy-Drama) Radha
HBO-W Ryan Reynolds, Amy Smart. A music executive tries to Mitchell, Chlob Sevigny, Jonny Lee Miller. Parallel stories reflect a
woo his high-school crush, f 'PG-13' (CC) woman's attempt to ix her life. 'PG-13' (CC).
6:45)*** THE CONSTANT GARDENER (2005, ** KINSEY (2004, Biography) Liam Neeson, Laura Linney, Chris 0'-
H BO-S ram Ralph Rennes. An English diplomat investi- Donnell. Zoologist Alfred Kinsey studies human sexuality. A fR' (CC)
gates the death of his wife. f 'R' (CC)
*(6:00) * CHARLIE AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY (2005, Fantasy) *** TWISTER (1996) Helen
MAX-E THE WITCHES Johnny Depp, Freddie Highmore, David Kelly. Five children tour the won- Hunt. Storm chasers race to test a
OF EASTWICK drous actory of an odd candy-maker. f 'PG'(CC) new tornado-monitoring device.
(:00) **DOMINION: A PREQUEL TO THE EXOR- * PHENOMENON (1996, Drama) John Travolta, Kyra Sedgwick,
MOMAX CIST (2005) Stellan Skarsgard. A former priest fights Forest Whitaker. A small-town mechanic is gifted with amazing mental
demonic possession in Egypt. f 'R' (CC) powers. f 'PG' (CC)
(:20) * WITHOUT A PADDLE (2004, Comedy) Seth ** THE BIG LEBOWSKI (1998, Comedy-Drama) Jeff Bridges, John
SHOW Green, Matthew ULillard. iTV. Three friends embark on a Goodman, Julianne Moore. iTV. An L.A. slacker gets caught up in a
calamitous canoe trip. f 'PG-13' (CC) wacky kidnapping plot. f 'R' (CC)
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TMC 99V.Drama) Tim Robbins. Innocent man goes to a Moore, Donald Sutherland. An executive faces unwanted sexual ad-
Maine prison for life in 1947. A 'R' (CC) vances from his boss. 'R' (CC)


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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006, PAGE 31


THE TRIBUNE


C Calvin & Hobbes )

-p
I ^ ^ \ 1 *.


*W k C*oiyrighited Material



___ Syndicated Content


j J'Wm, "W I IW


'Available from Commercial News Providers





d V i B4 TIm i>
> A. -^B i i~i1 ^m ^ T ^ T^B /^ *.*^ 05-11-116 *^**. .ri T*\ r Tiklinnis


1 In prison perhaps, but they may be
driven home (6)
7 Jack's traditional dance (8)
8 SomethIng appeisng on the
computer screen? (4)
10 Quietly fix the hedge (6)
11 Read of an eccentric peer touring
the States (6)
14 Cry because there are many
contradictory directions? (3)
16 Chances of gettingthe wrong skis at
the tourist centre (5)
17 Bad weather for the man In the
movie (4)
19 The couple had a meal (5)
21 He'll pop round at six (5)
22 A soldier might be lamed
winning one (5)
23 No pennermission to act at the National
Theatre (4)
26 Be precise as to how to get the
amount of money Increased (3,2)
28 Looking sick can be a
bit of a wangle (3)
28 LH,a last, the bad cigar-
how sadl (6)
30 Where we possibly came In during
the show (6)
31 Hil dwellers? (4)
32 For a time, there's still water
movement (8)
33 FRnish the party with one dvnk too
many-at speed) (6)


y Steve Becker


Hidden Asset


South dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
4KJ98532
V864
*10
JJ7


WEST
47
TKJ2
*Q853
4KQ962


EAST
4- .
V109
S*K7642
*A 10 8 54 3


SOUTH
*AQ 1064
VAQ753
*AJ9
A 9
S-
The bidding:
South West North East
1 + Pass 44 Pass
64
Opening lead king of clubs.
You're not expected to play every
hand as though you know the loca-
tion of each outstanding card,, but
you are expected to play most hands
as if you did.
For example, consider today's
deal. It appears at first glance that to
make six spades, you will have to
win a heart finesse. If East has the
king, you'll make six; if West has the
king, you'll go down one.
However, closer observation
reveals that the contract cannot be
defeated regardless of where the king
of hearts is located, provided you


play correctly. You don't have to
depend on luck you've got a sure
thing going for you.
You begin by ruffing the king of
clubs, enter dummy with a trump
and ruff another club. You then lead
a spade to dummy and return the ten
of diamonds'.
If East plays low, you do also.You
thus lose a diamond tnck to West that
you didn't have to lose, but there is a
tremendous upside to this in that the
slam is now assured.
Whatever West returns, you have
the rest of the tricks. If he leads a
heart or a diamond, it is into one of
your teniaces, and your heart loser
disappears. If he leads a club instead,
the effect is the same. You discard a
heart from dummy as you. ruff in
your hand, and dispose of another
heart from dummy on the ace of dia-
monds.
If East covers the ten of diamonds
with an honor, the outcome is the
same whether he has both the king
and queen or only one of them. You
take the honor with the ace and
return the jack of diamonds.
If West covers the jack, you ruff
in dummy and later discard a heart
from dummy on the nine. In that
case, you lose only a heart to the
king. If West plays low on the jack,,
you discard one, of dummy's hearts,
after which you're hom whether the,.
jack wins or loses.


nVI



*

erudition

-a
,inI
vst[nwedge


I O P uses
A the main
:H Chambers
21st
I Century
T I 1 C DIctionary
S S 1999
edition).
HOW many words of four
letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here?
In making a word, each letter
may be used once only. Each
must contain the centre letter
and there must be at least one
nine-letter word. No plurals.
TODAY'S TARGET
Good 13 very good 19;
excellent 25 (or more).
Solution tomorrow.


DOWN
1 Something to eat before
breakfast (6)-
2 A leggy team (6)
3 Close up suitable huts (4)
4 Annoyed by a gender confusion (7)
5 Figure a suit suitable for a saint (5)
6 Keeps mad dogsl (5)
8 In opera, she's on the road again (4)
9 Novel in three ways
out of the four (3)
12 Get free of Fay-kick her
out Fridayl[(3)
13 A/gaggle to look up to (5)
15 It's comfortable for a police inspector
on a truck (5)
18 Tell in advance that half a month is
over half an hour (5)
19 Pop up again (3)
20 The penniless have nothing (3)
21 Shows of French old people (7)
22 Vessel coming In from Uganda (3)
23 He was guillotined and
not reformed (6)
24 Persons employed in bonesettIng (4)
25 Very poor attempt to get out of the
wood (6)
26 Distribute right In the West,
perhaps (5)
27 One using many an acre for sound
reproduction (5)
28 Get the gi (3)
30 in Normandy, can
Include the east (4)


IfIMUIla

Horoscope


By LINDA BLACK


MONDAY,
NOVEMBER 20

ARIES March 21/April 20
The more important it seems to get
something done quickly, the more
time you actually have to complete the
task. Take your time this.week, Aries.
TAURUS April 21/May 21
All of the energy and enthusiasm in
the world won't make your dreams
come true any faster, Taurus. You
must ha'e patience: good fortune
ill come to you in its own time.
GEMINI May 22/June 21
Be understanding when dealing with
family) this week, Gemini. Remember,
not everyone thinks and feels like
you. As a matter of fact, go out and
have fun with loved ones over the
weekend. It will bring you closer.
CANCER June 22/July 22
Take extra care when on the move
this week, Cancer. There's no need
to panic, just be sure to watch where
you put your feet. On Thursday, take
time to pamper yourself.
LEO July 23/August 23
.ot everyone shares your noble
nature, Le-U It's *'especially good
idea to watch your back this week. A
Irlt, o ; tries ,topppnnpct on
Saturday give him or her a chance.
VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
This is a pivotal week for you, Virgo.
It may mean the end of something or
an important opportunity just over the
horizon. Keep your eyes open!
LIBRA- Sept 2i/Oct 23
Don't push yourself harder than you
have to this week, Libra. There will
be time enough to accomplish your
goals in the weeks and months
ahead. For now, concentrate on you.
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
Don't be so cocky this week, Scorpio.
There are some things, you cannot'do
on your own. Others are glad to help
you no strings attached. In the end,
you'll be happy you asked. A chance
meeting leads to romance on Friday.
SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
You've fooled around enough. It's time
for you to take life seriously at home
and at work. There's a lot to be won or
lost this week.. The final outcome
depends on the choices you make.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
Life is an adventure, Capricorn, so
get out there and start living. If you
let your anxieties get the best of you
this week, you wop't accomplish
much at all.
AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
Someone you think of as a friend
will try to persuade you to make a
shady investment this week. Don't
feel guilty about being skeptical.
PISCES Feb 19/March 20
This is a great time to reflect on how
far you've come over the past year,
Pisces. Don't worry if it isn't as far
as you might have hoped; there's
still time to make up for it.


CHSSb Loar are


ACROSS
1 Lecturer (6)
7 Neighbouring (8)
8 English river (4)
10 Wilderness (6)
11 Exile (6)
14 Anger (3)
16 Mountainous (5)
17 Defence feature (4)
19 Deadly (5)
21 Disgusting (5)
22 Magic spirit (5)
23 Worry (4)
26 Fish basket (5)
28 Fish eggs (3)
29 Truly (6)
30 Straight (6)
31 Gemstone (4)
32 Permitting (8)
33 Cricket team (6)


Yesterday's cryptic solutions Yesterday's easy solutions
ACM S-&1, Globe6, Oakum 9, Uniform 10, H-0-ard 11, ACROSS:1,Trash 6, Curry9, Pelican 10, Acorn 11, Rigid
Co-L-n 12, Baths 13,T-un-eful 15, Boa 17, 0-pen 18, 12, Carat 13, Topical 15, Wet 17, Anon 18, Beside 19,
Friend 19, Blood 20, G-rebe-s 22, Some 24, 8iR 25, Feral 20, Editor 22, Hero 24, Rut 25, Melanin 26, Fever
Sto 26, 27,-Paris 28, Dan-ce 29, Centaur 27, Scrum 28, Lamps 29, Manager 30, Ashen 31, Adder
011 3,Essay cu Lms2,Iaae30Ahn31Adr
DOWIt 2, Look upt3, Burden 4, End 5, Of-f-al 6, Or-chard DOWN: 2, Reckon 3, Sprain 4, Hen 5, Vital 6, Caramel 7,
7, Amos 8, Un-I-son 12, Bulls 13, Tongs 14, Never 15, Unit 8, Raised 12, Caper 13, Taper 14, Posit 15, Widen
Be-bop 16, Adder 18, Forty 19, Be-mused 21, RIb-ald 22, 16, Tenon 18, Baker 19, Foreman 21, Dunces 22, Hazard
Spears 23, Mercia 25, S-M-lh 26, DIce 28, Due 23, Ripple 25, Medal 26, Fume 28, Lea


DOWN
1 AImless (6)
2 Turn aside (6)
3 Rage (4)
4 Arthurian knight (7)
5 Danger (5)
6 Initating(5)
8 Continent (4)
9 Mineral (3)
12 Zero (3)
13 Inclination (5)
15 Paved area (5)
18 Earthy
colour (5)
19 Swampland (3)
20 Bind (3)
21 Chaps (7)
22 Set (3)
23 Hunt (6)
24 Stagger (4)
25 Italian
painter (6)
26 Dairy
product (5)
27 Bird of prey (5)
28 Tear (3)
30 Venetian prince (4)


Masha Kllnova v David Spence,
Gibraltar Telecom 2006. White
(to move) has a dream position.
She is two pawns up, has
trapped the black king in the
corner, and has the white
queen poised to deliver the
decisive Qe8+. Just one small
problem: White's own king is in
check. There are four plausible
ways to escape: 1 Qf3 offering
a queen exchange, 1 f3
interposing the pawn, 1 Be3
retreating the bishop, and 1
Kh4 runnIng with the king. You
might think they all win, but
the position is deceptive. One
of the choices actually loses,
another draws due to a hidden
resource, while the other pair
really do score the point. In the
actual game neither expert


a b c d e f g h
realized the significance of the
decision. White made one of the
wrong selections, whereupon
Black tamely resigned. Can you do
better?
LEONARD BARDEN


PUZZLE SOLUTIONS
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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 32, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006


SS Sa




..Wa c inR- h ... ..


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We're drivers too.









MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006


SECTION


gsIi ubkugugIr


BUSINESS


business@ a.nt Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Businesses slam


Engineer sues developer sinesses sam

o uid $8k unconstitutional

over unpaid $80k study NHI interference


SBy NEIL But Studios chief alleges EIAnever
Tribune Business Editor But Bahamas Film Studios chief alleges EIA never


A Bahamian
engineer has
filed a legal
action against
the Bahamas
Film Studios, the location
where the two Pirates of the
Caribbean films were shot,
alleging he has not been paid
the $80,000 balance for an
environmental impact study he
conducted for the project.
Keith Bishop, of Islands by
Design, has filed a writ with
the courts alleging that the
Bahamas Film Studios
breached the final stage of a


delivered to company, and threatens counter-suit


three-part agreement with him
over the environmental impact
assessment (EIA) he prepared
for the studios.
Mr Bishop is alleging that
through a promissory note, the
Bahamas Film Studios agreed
to pay him a deposit, he would
deliver the completed EIA to
the Bahamas Environment,
Science and Technology
(BEST) Commission, and then
he would be paid the remain-


ing-balance.
However, he alleges that
while the deposit was paid and
the EIA submitted to BEST,
the Bahamas Film Studios has
yet to pay him the balance.
When contacted by The Tri-
bune, Mr Bishop confirmed
that his attorneys, Alexiou,
Knowles. & Co, had served a
writ and the matter was before
the courts, but declined to
comment further.
Yet Ross Fuller, the
Bahamas Film Studios' chair-
man, anda director, countered
that the balance had not been
paid because Islands by Design
had not provided the company
with the EIA.
He alleged in an e-mailed
statement: "Mir Bishop has not
yet delivered a copy of the
report to-us, and this is in vio-
lation of our contract. Islands
by Design has been paid all
but a mere $80,000, which NMr
Bishop \will receive once he
delivers the report."
He threatened to counter-
sue Mr ishop.
The 7Tribune understands
that Mr Fuller has actively
been looking to either sell the
Bahamas Film Studios and exit
his investment in the project,


or alternatively attract new
investors and capital with the,
ability to take the development
forward.
He declined comment on
this when questioned by The.
Tribune, but this newspaper
previously revealed that one
of the groups who approached
Mr Fuller was a mixture of
new investors and existing
ones, brought togetherby
Bahamian banker Owen
Bethel, president of the Nas-
sau-based Montaque Group.
Sources close to the situa-
tion told The Tribune that Mr
Bethel and his group had made
an offer to Mir Fuller that was
still "active and on the table".
However, the two sides have
not reached an agreement, and
there is understood to have
been no meeting of minds
between them.
Mr Bethel and his group are
understood to be keen to
invest money directly into the
Bahamas Film Studios, which
was the first project to receive
a signed Heads of Agreement
from the current PLP admin-
istration back in 2002.

SEE page 12B


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business
Reporter
BAHA MAR is conduct-
ing drilling tests at five dif-
ferent areas in the Cable
Beach strip, as it moves for-
ward slowly but surely to
revitalise the area with its $2
billion redevelopment.
Baha Mar's executive vice-
president of administration
and public affairs. Robert

SEE page 13B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BUSINESS leaders have
slammed as "crazy" and.
"ridiculous" the clause in the
Government's proposed
National Health Insurance Bill
that mandates employers to
seek government permission
to amend their private health
insurance schemes for employ-
ees, questioning whether this
amounts to "unconstitutional"
interference in how they run
their businesses.
Clause 14 (1) of the Bill says
that despite any agreement a
Bahamian employer may have
in place regarding the provi-
sion of group health insurance
for his workers with a trade
union representing them. or in
their contracts of employment.
"every employer is entitled to
modify..... the rate of contri-
butions payable" under this
scheme, to eliminate an' dupli-
cation and "overlap" of bene-
fits with the proposed NHI
scheme.
Apatt from the fact that this
seems to allow employers to
arbitrarily tear up any con-
tracts and agreements made
over the provision of private
health insurance for their staff,
the following clause. 14 (2), of
the Bill stipulates that "no
employer shall make any mod-,
ification [to their private group
coverage] without obtaining
the prior written approval of
the Minister". To obtain this


approval, all relevant informa-
tion and materials, including a
copy of the group health plan.
has to be sent to the Minister.
This has left business execu-
tit e; fearing that the Bahamas
is heading down the route of a
'nannN state'. where the Go%-
ernment always determines
whatever is best for people and
seeks to regulate everything.
stifling the private sector.
Winston Rolle, the former
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce president and now a
consultant to the National
Coalition for Healthcare
Reform. told The Tribune that
both parts of Clause 14 were
being reviewed on the Coali-
tion's behalf to see w whether
they interfered with employ-
ers' constitutional rights.
He said: "That is one major
area of concern for us, that
we're now in a position where
the Gov.ernment is able to dic-
tate to businesses how we run
our business, and that's uncon-
stitutional.
"We're taking a detailed
look at the Bill to see if there's
challenges to constitutional
rights. We'll have a better idea
of where we're heading with
that in the next day or so."
Employers also believe the
need for all plan modifications
to be approved by the Minister
responsible, at the moment Dr
Bernard Nottage, minister of

SEE page l1B


* ROBERT SANDS


Royal Oasis buyer:

Settling $4m-plus

pension judgement

not oUr problem

* By CARA BRENNEN between the seller and gov-
Tribune Business ernment.
Reporter Jethro Miller, the attorney
for potential buyer World
THE Royal Oasis sale will Investment Holdings. said the
not be delayed by the judge- purchase of the Royal Oasis
ments against the resort over from Lehman Brothers' pri-
unpaid contributions to the vate equity arm, which holds
two hotel pension funds, the a mortgage on the property,
purchasers' attorney told The was not contingent on the
Tribune, adding that the out-
standing $4 million-plus some pg
would be dealt with in talks SEE Pge 7B


'Multiple firms'


eye


Western Medical Plaza


DOCTORS Hospital Health
Systems has told The Tribune
that "multiple companies" are
conducting due diligence on its
Western Medical Plaza facility,
which has been held for sale
since 2002-2003, with talks cur-
rently underway on its dispos-
al.
DHHS said in a statement:
"Multiple companies are in the
process of conducting due dili-
gence procedures, and a series
of negotiations are underway.


There is optimism that an
arrangement can be finalised
in the near term for the West-
ern Medical Plaza."
. In Tribune Business, on Fri-
day, November 17, this news-
paper reported that DHIHS
was just awaiting government
approvals for the sale of West-
ern Medical Plaza. This was
incorrect.

SEE page 6B


She has yet to learn her ABC's but that doesn't matter. When it's time for her to go to college, she
won't have to worry about whether we can afford it or not. With a plan from Colinalmperial, we
know that we can give her the education she needs to succeed. Harvard, Oxford, University of
The Bahamas? The choice will be hers...but a college education is definitely in her future!


U


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BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY
# S6 Madeira Street, Palmdale
P.O.BoxSS-6270 Nassau, Bahamas
242.328.3040 Fax:242.328.3043
www.micronet.bs


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Baha Mar drills,

into $2bn project










International Markets
FOREX Rates
Weekly %Change

CAD$ 1.1485 1.49
GBP 1.8939 -0.85
EUR 1.2825 -0.09

Commodities
Weekly %Change

Crude Oil $55.81 -6.39
Gold $622.00 -1.27

International Stock Market Indexes:
Weekly %Change

DJIA 12,342.56 1.93
S&P500 1,401.20 1.47
NASDAQ 2,445.86 2.35
Nikkei 16,091.73 -0.13





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P B O N E 22T R


* By Fidelity Capital
Markets

A MODERATE level of
trading activity took place in
the Bahamian market this past
week, as 39,642 shares changed
hands. The market saw 12 out
of its 19 listed stocks trade, of
which four advanced, four
declined and four remained
unchanged.
Volume leader for the week
was Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) with 10,850 shares
changing hands and account-
ing for 27 per cent of the total
shares traded.
The big advancer for the
week was also CBL, up.$0.15
or 1.24 per cent to end the
week at its new 52-week high
of $12.25. On the dow side for
a third straight week was Aba-
co Markets (AML), dropping
another $0.19 or -17.92 per
cent to close the week at $0.87.
Week-over-week, the FIND-
EX gained 0.30 points, to close
at 726.05.

COMPANY NEWS
Benchmark (Bahamas)
(BBL) -

FOR the 2006 third quarter,
BBL's pet income stood at
$423,000, representing an
increase of $282,000 or 200 per
cent over the $141,000 earned
for the same period in 2005.
Total revenues, declined by
$143,000 or 29 per cent to total
$350,000, but this decline in
revenues was offset by a reduc-
tion in operating expenses by
$188,000 to total $209,000.
Operating income was
$277,000 for the quarter, versus
$93K fbr the same period last
year.
Earnings per share increased
by $0.06 to total $0.09, com-
pared to $0.03 for the equiva-,
lent period in 2005.
As at September 30, 2006,
BBL's. net assets stood at $6.3
million, with a book value of
$1.27 per share. BIL shares
are presently trading at $0.80
on BISX.


RND Holdings (RND) -

FOR the six months ending
August 31, 2006, its net loss
stood at -$103,000, which is an
improvement over the net loss
of -$302,000 for the same peri-
od last year.
Total revenues increased by
$31,000 or 5.23 per cent to total
$614,000, while operating
expenses declined by $38,000
or 6.62 per cent to total
$541,000. Income from contin-
ued operations increased by
$69,000 to total $73,000, com-
pared to $4,000 earned in the
equivalent period in 2005.
Total assets grew by
$109,000 to total $12 million,
while total liabilities declined
by $182,000 to total $4.8 mil-
lion as at August 31, 2006.

Doctors Hospital Health
Systems (DHS) -

FOR the quarter ending
October 31,2006, DHS record-
ed net income of $429,000,
which represents a decline of
$528,000 or 55 per cent com-
pared to $957,000 in 2005.
Earnings per share totalled
$0.04 versus $0.10 for the same
period in 2005. Total revenues
declined by $174,QOO to total
$11 million, while operating
expenses increased by$399,000
or 4 per cent to total $10 mil-
lion.
DHS management has said
the decline in revenues was
due to low, patient volumes in
the Intensive Care Uniit, which
is the company's top income
earner.
The increase in operating
expenses was due primarily to
hikes in rent and insurance.
Income from continuing oper-
ations was $603,000 fdr the
quarter versus $1.2 million for
the same period in 2005.
In related news, DHS man-
agement has restructured its
long term debt arrangements
at Royal Bank of Canada and,
as a r!siiu, its monthly debt
servicing costs, which stood
around $265,000 per month,


The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 726.05 YTD 31.570o


BISX CLOSING
SYMBOL PRICE


AML $0.87
BAB $1.21
BBL $0.80
BOB $7.88
BPF $11.00
BSL S14.60
BWL S1.65
CAB S9.92
CBL S12:25
CHL S1.85
CIB 814.00
CWCB S5.22
DHS S2.65
FAM S5.54
FCC 51.00
FCL S11.65
FIN S12.00
ICD $8.09
JSJ $8.70
PRE $10.00


CHANGE VOLUME


S-0.19
s-
s-
SO.02'
s-
s-
S- ~-,
'S-0.15
S0.02
S-
SO.04
S-0.05
S-0.49
S-
SO.1-14
s-
S-
S-
S- .'s


200U
500
(j
3648
0 I
00
0
4600
10550
5512
2300'
0
7182

lOU
1500
250
0
300
0(


YTD PRICE
CHANGE
19.180
9.090o
14.29%o
12.570o
5.770o
14.51%o
30.950o
3.87"o
34.470'o
12.800S
28.6S'u
0.77%r
22.12%
-8.43%
-13.04oo
15.q2oo
10.090o
-18.690o
-3.870a
0.00o


DIVIDENDIAGIM NOTES:

FOCOL Holdings (FCL) has declared dividends of $0.11
per share payable on November 15. 2006. to all shareholders
of record date October 31. 2006.

J. S. Johnson Company (JSJ) has declared dividends of
$0.14 per share payable on No'ember 15. 2006, to all share-
holders of record date November 9. 2006.

FamGuard Compant (FAM) has declared dividends of
30.06 per share payable on November 17. 2006, to all share-
holders of record date November 10, 2006.

Commonwealth Bank (CBL) has declared a special div-
idend of $0.08 per share payable on November 30. 2006. to all
shareholders of record date November 15. 2006.

CWCO has declared dividends of $0.012 per BDR.
payable on January 31.2007. to all shareholders of record date
December 31. 2006.


will fall to about $130,000 per
month.
This equates to an estimated
$135,000 being added back to
the company's bottom line
every month going forward.
DHS has also disclosed the


sale of 5 acres of investment
property located on Blake
Road for $1 million.
The deal is expected to close
'in December 21006. alter all relt
evant government approvals
have been granted.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006







MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006, PAGE 3B


National Health Insurance to





'devastate' private insurers


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Government's decision
to fast-track its National Health
Insurance (NHI) scheme will
"have a devastating effect" on
the Bahamas and its private
health insurance industry, the
Bahamas Insurance Brokers
Association's (BIBA) president
told The Tribune, fearing its
inability to cope with rising
healthcare costs and demand
could "bankrupt this country".
Jeanine Lampkin said the
NHI scheme as envisaged by the
Government would result in a
major reduction in premium tax
earned by the Government, as a
result of the drop in private
health insurance policies writ-
ten by Bahamian life and health
carriers. The Government has
predicted that it will eari
$15.785 million this year from
the premium tax, levied at 3 per
cent on gross premiums.
She pointed out that the com-
prehensive benefits package the
Government is planning to offer
through NHI meant it was like-
ly that many Bahamians and
employers would, respectively,
drop their individual and group
health insurance policies due to
* the high costs they would incur
as a result of financing these as
well as NHI contributions.
This, Ms Lampkin said, would
result in a reduction in commis-
sion income for Bahamian
agents and brokers who sold
health insurance policies, and
for life and health insurance car-
riers who underwrote them.
As a result, NHI's introduc-
tion and shift in the burden for
healthcare financing from the
private to the public sector was
likely to make many Bahamians
employed in the private health
insurance sector redundant, Ms
Lampkin said.
"I don't think they've looked
Sat it in .terms of loss of premi-
4-um tax.. The impact that alone


will have on our Budget, it's
going to be huge, and then
there's the loss of jobs," Ms
Lampkin said.
"Any agent or broker selling
health insurance will see the
impact on their income. It's def-
initely going to impact the life
and health insurance sector.
Even though they've [the Gov-
ernment] been saying you can
go ahead and still sell private
health plans, not many people
will be able to afford it with the
matching 2.65 per cent contri-
bution required from employers
and employees."
The Government is propos-
ing that NHI contributions be
set at 5.3 per cent of a salaried
worker's monthly income, to be
split 50/50 between employer
and employee, leaving both to
make a matching 2.65 per cent
contribution. The ceiling has
been set at $5,000 per month,
where both employer and
employee will pay $133 per
month.
Self-employed persons will
have to pay the full 5.3 per cent
contribution themselves, and Ms
Lampkin said these people will
"definitely not be able to afford
private health insurance" too,
given that they have to fund the
whole amount. "It will definite-
ly have a major impact on those
persons who have private health
insurance," Ms Lampkin said of
NHI. "Some may decide not to
do it, as their income will be dra-
matically reduced.
"There will be persons laid off
in the life and health insurance
sector, and there may be more
mergers and acquisitions. There
will be a major impact in the life
and health area that none of us
can really predict at this point."
The BIBA president said one
question to be answered was
"whether health insurance is still
going to be offered privately".
She added: "I don't see the pro-
posed National Health Insur-
ance plan as being the solution


Brokers pedtasc' Baham

if it pro Sve sS' u 0u 0tialeadcosts0not controlled


for what ails our provision of
healthcare. It's an income tax,
and people understand that, but
to say you're basically replacing
private insurance, I don't under-
stand that kind of logic in this
day and age when government
should be taking a back seat to
private enterprise. Private enter-
prise should be allowed to run
and do what it does best, com-
pete......... "The private enter-
prise part of providing health
insurance has been working well
for what the Government admits
is 51 per cent of the population."
Position
In a previous position paper
on NHI, BIBA found common
ground with the Coalition for
National Healthcare Reform, of
which it is part, in backing the
Government's notion that all
Bahamians and residents should
have access to quality healthcare
regardless of inability to pay.
Apart from the impact on pri-
vate health insurance jobs and
the premium tax received by the
Government, BIBA also warned
that NHI would generate a
reduction in business licence
fees, private insurers "pulling
out of the market or ceasing
writing private health insurance
altogether", and reinsurers
pulling out of the Bahamian
market because the reduction in
premium volume has lessened
the risk spread.
Bahamian life and health car-
riers would also be charged
greater reinsurance premiums,
BIBA warned, eroding their bot-
tom line further. However, Mon-
ty Braithwaite, Colinalmperial
Insurance Company's president,
previously admitte"''thliat


Bahamian life and health carri-
ers would not be unhappy at
shedding some of their health
risks to NHI. Few carriers make
profits from their health insur-
ance business, which involves
frequent and substantial claims
payments.
BIBA said that if the average
private health health plan costs
131 per month, as the Govern-
ment's Blue Ribbon Commis-
sion report on NHI stated in
.2004, the most private health
insurers would be able to charge
when the scheme was imple-
mented was $60 per month, a
reduction in premium income of
50 per cent.
Ms Lampkin told The Tri-
bune, following the National
Insurance Bill's first reading last
week: "They are going ahead
with what they want to do. The
tragedy of it all is that it will
bankrupt this little country of
ours. They are very short-sight-
ed, thinking everything is busi-
ness as usual, and the tragedy of
it all is that we will not see it
until it is too late, and then we
will be left with an even greater
problem, which is what to do
now."
The BIBA president said she
was hoping NHI "falls by the
wayside", and if it did not then at
least the Government took its
time implementing it and lis-
tened to the advice of experi-
enced professionals. "The coun-
try is not ready for it. The
National Insurance Board (NIB)
does not have the training to
administer it," Ms Lampkin said.
"If they do go ahead with it, I'm
hoping and praying they take
their time and not go full speed
ahead like they've done with this
Act." ..


Located next to Atlantis,
with 228
beautifully
appointed Junior Suites
and meeting facilities
to accommodate
up to 70 people.

Our guests have
full use of the
exclusive facilities of
the fabulous Atlantis
just steps away.

In-room amenities
include: king size or
double double beds.,
sitting area
with sofa bed,
cable tv, refrigerator,
in-room safe,
coffee maker, hair dryer,
complimentary deluxe
continental breakfast
served daily,
Pool with swim-up bar,
Crusoe's garden
restaurant serving
breakfast and lunch.
Bamboo cocktail bar.

Ask about our local
corporate, group and
wedding rates.

Contact our
management team
for a site inspection.


PARADISE ISLAND
BAHAMAS


1 Paradise Island Drive
Paradise Island, Bahamas


THF TRIBUNE


CAREER OPPORTUNITY

A leading jewelry company is expanding its
Nassau Operations and has openings, at
various levels, in the following areas:

ComputeovOWjerations
Administrationw/Acounts
Marketing
Inventory Control and Management


BASIC REQUIREMENTS

1. Persons of integrity
2. Self-starters with drive and determination
3. Previous experience an asset

If you mee the above requirements and have
skills in the above disciplines, we will be
pleased to welcome you to our winning team.
The positions offer career opportunities with
excellent salary and benefits package.

Please submit your resume in confidence to:

CAREER OPPORTUNITY
P. 0. BOX N-623
NASSAU, BAHAMAS.
OR
Fax 328-4211
Email hunanresourcesaassau@dutyfree.com


Bank of The Bahamas
INTER N A T 10 N A L



VACANCY FOR THE POSITION OF:

SENIOR ASSISTANT MANAGER, BRANCH CREDIT

Core responsibilities:

* Prepare and recommend credit proposals.
Perform maintenance and records management on existing
portfolios by liaising with relevant parties.
* Initiate action on past dues accounts.
Design marketing initiatives to attract new business.
* Conduct annual credit reviews.
* Recommend and monitor adherence to credit policies and
procedures.
* Counsel and provide guidance to branch Credit Officers.
* Review credit reports to determine trends and effectiveness
of procedures, policies and make recommendations for
improvement.
* Recommend debt compromises, forgiveness of debt and
restructuring.

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:

* BA/BSc in Finance, Accounting, Economics or Business
Administration.
* 5-7 years experience in Consumer and Commercial Lending
* Strong analytical skills, particularly in the areas of accounting
and credit assessment.
In depth knowledge of computers to use Bank's network and
its core banking applications to create presentations, reports
and correspondence.
Strong oral and written communication skills, in particular to
impart financial and credit information.

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with
experience and qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and
vision) and life insurance; pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later that November 30, 2006
to:
The Manager, Human Resources & Training
Bank of The Bahamas International
P. O. Box N-7118
Nassau, Bahamas














Petition urges government:





Slow down on health scheme


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE National Coalition for
Healthcare Reform, the group


of employer and trade union
bodies that aims to supply
alternatives to the Govern-
ment on how to achieve its
healthcare objectives, will meet,


with Dr Bernard Nottage, the
minister responsible for the
proposed National Health
Insurance (NHI) scheme, this
Wednesday.
The meeting comes as a peti-
tion circulates among Bahamas
residents and the business
community seeking signatures
for a petition, connected to the


Coalition, that is asking the
Government to "to slow down
the process, release all the
information and implement a
sustainable and effective health
care plan" in relation to the
NHI initiative.
The petition said: "The Gov-
ernment is rushing through leg-
islation for a National Healthl


Te Tibn


TI
, ili IiSo ljfl B~101


T]EHI


CARIBBEAN
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
INSTITUTE (CEHI)

Employment Opportunity


The Caribbean Enviromental Health Institute (CEHI),
an institution of the Caribbean Community, Based in St.
Lucia, is seeking to recruit a suitable candidate for the
post of Executive Director.

The Main Responsibility of this position is overall
management and administration, of the Institute as a
core facility undertaking, in all areas of environmental
management, the implementation of regional projects
and the provision of direct technical and scientific
advisory services to participating states.

Further details of the post and all other
requirements can be obtained for our website at
www.cehi.org.lc.

Deadline for application is November 30, 2006.


Insurance plan without pro-
viding the Bahamian public
with the information and
analysis that would show that
their plan will be able to deliv-
er better, more timely health-
care.
"Indeed, many are con-
vinced that Without proper
planning and.management, the
Bahamian public health care
system will get worse, as we all
get forced into an inefficient
public bureaucracy.
"In fact, if you are now
insured in a company health
insurance plan, your private
coverage will likely be watered
down or eliminated if the leg-
islation goes through as
planned."
The petition arose after the
Government tabled the
National Health Insurance Bill
in the House of Assembly on
Wednesday, a move many
have interpreted as a sign of
its determination for force the
legislation through without
allowing for proper debate or
consultation.
Winston Rolle, the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce's former president who
is now a consultant to the
Coalition, acknowledged that
the business community was
feeling "a certain degree of
deja vu" over the Govern-
ment's handling of the NHI
Bill.
This was because the busi-
ness community had also felt
there was a lack of consulta-
tion over the Labour Bills
passed by the former FNM
administration, and now the
Consumer Bills and NHI Bill
under the current administra-
tion.
Mr Rolle said that despite
this, the Coalition would not
be deterred in its efforts to pro-
vide advice and feedback to


the Government.
He pointed out that the
National Congress of Trade
Unions (NCTU) was involved
with the Coalition because it
was concerned ho healthcare
for its members might be
affected by the NHI plan.
Mr Rolle said there were "a
lot of unanswered questions
out there", citing the fact that
the hotel industry did not
know whether its employees'
NHI contributions would be
calculated on just basic salaries,
or whether gratuities or tips
would be taken into the equa-
tion.
The former Chamber presi-
dent said the timeline the Gov-
ernment had set for passing
and debating the Bill showed
there was "no intent to have
any dialogue" on the issue.
Mr Rolle added that he was
troubled because, as far as he
was aware, no one in the med-
ical profession had the oppor-
tunity to review the Bill before
it went to Parliament.
The Coalition's work would
continue with "more focus and
diligence", as it believed there
were. "a lot of things that had
to happen" before NHI could
be implemented.
Mr Rolle said: "It was very
disappointing that the Bill was
introduced prior to what was
thought to be a proper consul-
tative process. There's a lot of
devil in the detail, such as the
benefits package.
"It was very disappointing,
especially when you consider
the fact that we are speaking to
a government that prides itself
on being a consultative gov-
ernment.
"They've had a number of
meetings and presentations of
What they planned to do, but
that does not constitute true
consultation." -


Bank of The Bahamas
IN TERNATIONAL


VACANCY FOR THE POSITION OF:
ASSISTANT MANAGER, HUMAN RESOURCES


Core responsibilities:

* Coordinate recruitment activities for new employees and
follow up to ensure new employees receive appropriate
job orientation.
* Make recommendations for Human Resources staffing,
policy, compensation, and benefits changes.
* Oversee the Bank's payroll system.
* Review and upgrade job descriptions.
* Conduct routine visits to branches to liaise with employees.
* Assist with investigations into performance issues.

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:

* Bachelor's degree in Human Resources Management or a
related field.
* Thorough knowledge of Human Resources Management
theories and principles.
* Strong grasp of labour laws.
* General knowledge of systems organization and design.
* Strong oral and written communication skills.
* Five (5) or more years experience in a related environment.
* In-depth knowledge of computers (e.g: MS Excel and Word)

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with
experience and qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental
and vision) and life insurance; pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later than 30th November
2006 to:

The Senior Manager, Human Resources & Training
Bank of The Bahamas International
P. 0. Box N-7118
Nassau, Bahamas


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006


THE TRIBUNE








THuC TIRI IUNF


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006, PAGE 5B


Aquapure denies Tribunal claims


AQUAPURE, the bottled
water supplier, has denied that
the Industrial Tribunal found it
had wrongfully dismissed nine
former workers and awarded
them a total of $65,000 in dam-
ages, saying it had instead
negotiated a good faith settle-
ment.
The company, in a state-
ment, said its new owners,
KLG Investments, had inher-
ited the dispute between
Aquapure and the nine former
workers after it had been par-
tially heard by the Industrial
Tribunal.
Aquapure described the
claim by Heudley Moss, the
chief negotiator for the union
representing the Aquapure
workers, that the Industrial
Tribunal ruled against the
company and awarded the for-


mer staff damages as incorrect
and misleading.
Aquapure said: After
Aquapure's assets and busi-
ness was purchased by KLG
Investments Ltd, the new man-
agement of Aquapure decid-
ed for various good and prop-
er reasons, including a desire to
avoid them being distracted in
carrying on Aquapure's busi-
ness and to foster good indus-
trial relations, that it would be
preferable tb settle the former
employees' claims by negotia-
tion rather than litigation.
"The decision by Aqua-
pure's new management was
not based on the merits of the
former employees' case or the
lack of merit in.Aquapure's
case."
And the company added:
"KLG's attorneys reviewed the


evidence and were firmly of
the view that there was a good
defence to the claims made
and that the Tribunal would
likely find that the employees
were dismissed for cause.
"KLG's attorneys met with
the former employees' attor-
ney, Obie Ferguson, and in
good faith negotiated a settle-
ment. "There was no determi-
nation by the Tribunal. A Con-
sent Order was entered con-
firming that the matter had
been settled."
Aquapure alleged that it had


asked Mr Moss and Mr Fergu-
son to correct previous com-


ments they had allegedly made
on the situation to other media


outlets, but this had not hap-
pened.


ID olphim (mwl m((NO h(h Ii


t-: Copyrighted Material -


-~
I *
~- S


-- Syndicated Content -


Available from Commercial News Providers

m-


- -
S -
a- -~


- -~. S
* a S
- -
-


a -


Exclusive property requires a General Manager to coordinate and
oversee the day to day functioning of the homeowners'
association including:


Management of staff and sub-contractors
Property maintenance, including building
and landscaping Administration

Successful candidate must possess proven managerial skills and
knowledge of construction industry practices.


Excellent salary and benefits package commensurate
with experience.


Please fax resumes to (242) 362414-7








invites applications for the position of
MANAGER, CARD OPERATIONS

PROFILE:
S 7+ years in the financial services industry with 5+ years in the bank card
and/or electronic banking services and card operations management
A Bachelors degree with concentration in Business or Process Engineering.
MBA is a plus

S RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:
Establish operating policies, procedures & controls
Responsible for daily management of card product operations and electronic
banking delivery systems
S* Work with internal departments, external vendors and card
associations to assure cardholder services and compliance
Output and delivery of statements, plastics, letters and supporting
IT infrastructure
Support the development of new card and electronic banking
products and services
Team with Marketing to execute product and sales plans,
marketing strategies, customer loyalty programme
Oversee payments and application processing, maintenance of
databases, cards support training, account posting and reconciliation
Resolve cardholder disputes and process chargebacks
Administer fraud and loss prevention programmes
S Participate in budgeting process
Monitor service levels and report on performance

CRITICAL COMPETENCIES:
S.* Operations /financial focus with technical background
Demonstrated project management experience
Strong communication (verbal and written), organizational, and
supervisory skills
Strong demonstrated knowledge in banking regulation and operational risk
management
Excellent interpersonal skills. Ability to effectively interact with all levels
of management and employees
The person will report directly to the Executive Vice President and CFO
Competitive compensation package will include salary, benefits and bonuses.
Send resume no later than November 24th, 2006 to:
The Director Human Resources

51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
Fax 326.3000
e-mail: careers@fldelitybahamas.com


ACREAGE FOR SALE


The Property is located off Fox Hill Road in the vicinity of Prince Charles Drive.
The parcel is a parallelogram in shape, is on a level grade and contains 15.32
acres.

All that piece, parcel, or lot of land being lots #81 & 82 being bounded on the
north by Springfield Road running thereon One Thousand One Hundred and
Eighteen and Sixteen Hundredths (1,118.16) feet, on the east by lot number 83
running thereon five hundred and eighty-seven and eighty hundredths (587.80)
feet, on the south by land running thereon nine hundred and seventy-seven
and ten hundredths (977.10) feet, and one the west by lot number 52 running
thereon five hundred and eighty-seven and eighty hundredths (587.80) feet.






T^^^S^ss^- - -

O FatON a a



A O R Y 4
T10AV4 k Y C




RPA



PLOT PLAN


The property is for sale by owner. No agents. Asking price is One Million Five
Hundred Thousand (B$1,500,000.00) dollars net The right is reserved to
reject any and or all offers. All offers to be submitted in writing by December 31 ,
2006 to:-

Acreage for sale
cdo P.O. Box N-8097
Nassau, Bahamas


0- N--

Excellent Property


Management Career


Opportunity


^Comay as nowrogfu dsmi^ssalulin

againt it, assettemen wasnegoiate








PAGE6BMONDY, OVEMER 01206 TE TRBUN


FOR


RENT-


* 5,000 sq.ft. (Ground Floor).
* 1,564 sq.ft. (storage).
* 24 on-site parking.
* Immediate occupancy.
* Rental rate $25.00 per sq.ft. plus service chg.


I .1
To avepisein The Tpfihune ~ithe 1 nwBppe

in----------jut-al-32-186-ody'


THE Inter-American Devel-
opment Bank (IDB) has
approved a $3.84 million loan,
to the Bahamian government
that aims to help coastal areas
in this nation achieve sustain-
able development.
The loan will help the Gov-
ernment establish, co-ordina-
tion and planning processes for
an Integrated Coastal Zone'
Management Master Plan for
the Bahamas, an IDB state-
ment said.
ICZM aims to improve the


"quality of life" in Bahamian
communities that depend on
coastal resources, such as fish.
The Bahamas, as nation with
more than 700 islands, is
almost a country based entire-
ly on the coast. It is highly
dependent on the sea and
coastal areas for its major
industry, tourism, and other
sectors such as fishing and
marine transportation. The
IDB said the initiative would
involve the participation of
communities and Bahamians


living in coastal areas, and use
various planning techniques
"to achieve a balance between
different coastal uses aimed at
improving living conditions,
safeguarding property and pro-
tecting coastal ecosystems".
The 20-year IDB loan will
be executed by the Ministry of
Energy and the Environment,
and fits in with Prime Minis-
ter Perry Christie's emphasis
on planning and creating a
structured approach to the
Bahamas'development.


Grand Bahama Power Company
Keeping Grand Bahama's Future Bright


VACANCY NOTICE

The Grand Bahama Power Company, Limited invites qualified
applicants to apply for the position of ASSISTANT FINANCIAL
COMPTROLLER.

In collaboration with the Financial Comptroller, this position
manages all activities related to Finance and Accounting.

The ideal candidate should possess the academic skills and
experience to:

Maintain the general ledger
Oversee the timely reconciliation of balance sheet items
Ensure timely preparation and submission of monthly financial
statements.

The applicant must be a Certified Public Accountant with
membership in PICA, The incumbent should also be computer
literate and experienced in a Windows environment with a
working knowledge of Microsoft Excel and Word and have
proven leadership skills.

Applications with supporting documentation including a clean
Police Certificate and proof of Bahamian citizenship should be
sent to:

THE DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES
GRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY, LIMITED
P.O BOX F-40888 ..
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS
Email: brdept@gb-power.com


DEADLINE FOR RECEPIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS:
NOVEMBER 30, 2006


FROM page 1B


The property for which gov-
ernment approvals are awaited
is DHHS' other investment
propertyto@n Blake Roadf,
which is bIi'rg sold for a 'price
understood.to be about $1 mil-
lion. The sale of this property
is much further advanced, and
it is not Western Medical
Plaza. It is situated across the
road from Western Medical
Plaza.
Western Medical Plaza,
located on Blake Road, has
been a drag on DHHS e'arn-


Sandringham House
Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel. 242-393-8618
www.bahamasrealty.bs
www.cbrichardellis.com


BAHAMAS REALTY LTD
COMMERCIAL
In oocil...cf w3''

CBRE
CB RICHARD ELLIS
NAVIGATING A NEW WORLD


Cs A L"
Pricing Information As Of:
Friday. 17 November 200 6 -
YTD % 22.93
'..\kH. 52wk-LoA Securil y Previous Close Today's Close Change Da Vol EPS Dii $ PE Y.ela
1.V5 0.59 Abaco Markets 0.87 0.87 000 -0 109 0 000' NM C'QC'.
12.05 10.25 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.00 1.627 0.380 6.8 3.45%
7.88 6.90 Bank of Bahamas 7.86 7.86 0.00 0.802 0.330 9.8 4.19%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.265 0.020 3.0 2.50%
1.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.65 1.65 0.00 0.168 0.060 9.8 3.64%
1.49 1.10 Fidelity Bank 1.21 1.21 0.00 500 0.188 0.050 6.4 4.13%
9.95 9.05 Cable Bahamas 9.92 9.92 0.00 0.659 0.240 15.1 2.42%
2.20 1.40 Colina Holdings 1.85 1.85 0.00 0.046 0.000 40.2 0.00%
12.25 9.00 Commonwealth Bank 12.20 12.25 0.05 5,000 0.943 0.660 12.3 5.39%
6.26 4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.07 5.00 -0.07 0.134 0.045 37.9 0.89%
2.88 2.10 Doctor's Hospital 2.65 2.65 0.00 0.295 0.000 9.0 0.00%
6.21 4.35 Famguard 5.54 5.54 0.00 0.428 0.240 12.9 4.33%
12.00 10.60 Finco 12.00 12.00 0.00 0.763 0.560 15.7 4.67%
14.10 10.00 FirstCaribbean 14.00, 14.00 0.00 0.927 0.550 15.1 3.93%
11.65 9.25 Focol 11.65 11.65 0.00 0.885 0.500 13.2 4.29%
1.15 0.95 Freeport Concrete 1.00 1.00 0.00 -0.170 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.20 8.05 ICD Utilities 8.05 8.05 0.00 0.532 0.270 15.1 3.35%
9.10 8.65 J.S.Johnson 8.70 8.70 0.00 300 0.527 0.560 16.5 6.44%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.291 0.195 7.7 1.95%
.A-H. 52.sVk-LoA Symbol Bid S Ask $ Last Price Weekly \ ol EPS S. D. I PE Yield
1 :'C. 12 25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 14 0r 1.923 1 320 6 1 9 0-1F
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 8.00 8.25 10.00 0.000 0.640 NM 7.85%
u -1 020 RND Holdings 0.45 055 000 0021 LI 00 2r. 2 6 C" .0
.4 U'' 28 00 ABDAB 4100 4300 4100 2220 0 OOC 19.1 UC'U'
14.50 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.50 14.00 1.580 0.720 8.9 5.14%
0 60 0 35 RND Holdings 045 055 045 .0070 0000 N'.1 000",
5Ak.vk-Hi 52wk-LG Fund Name NA V YTD'O Last 12 Mor.lhs Div Y'i-la .
1 3139 1 2615 Colir.a Money Market Fund 1.313862'
3.0017 2.5197 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.0017"*
2.4829 2.2754 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.482888"
1.2037 1.1406 Colina Bond Fund 1.203719
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX -19 Dec 02 = 1.000.00 MARKET TERMS YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing priceNAV KEY
52wk-HI Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity 10 November 2006
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price,for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week **-31 October 2006
Change Change in closing price from day to dpy EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value 31 October 2006
DIV $ -Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1. 1994 = 100 *-31 October 2006


ings statements for several with the maturity date for the
years. previous two facilities extend-
During the third quarter to ed to 10 years.
October 31, Western Medical DHHS said in a statement:
Plaza produced $174,000 in "The effect of the change in
losses for DHHS, a period in terms and rates will be an
which the company's total net immediate reduction in the
income fell by more than half amount of monthly debt ser-
to $429,000, compared to vdicing'a.nd-an immediate ..,
$957,000 a year earlier. -, opportunity 'to commence mai-j
For the nine-month period, accumulating internally-gen-
DHHS saw its net income erated cash flows for manage-
decline by 33 per cent or one- ment and board-designated
third to $2.4 million, compared purposes.
to $3.6 million in the same "Previously, blended month-
period a year earlier. Earnings ly debt servicing was $265,000.
per share were $0.24. The amount for principal and
Total revenues for the year- interest will average $130,000
to-date increased slightly from going forward."
$28.5 million to $28.9 million..
DHHS monthly debt servic-
ing payments will more than
halve as a result of restructur-
ing its long-term debt with
Royal Bank of Canada.
DHHS said Royal Bank had
agreed to reduce the interest
rates attached to the debt asso- Fo
cited with both the hospital
and Western Medical Plaza to'bint' s
Prime plus 1.5 per cent.
In addition, Royal Bank also
agreed to reduce the rate on Mo
attached to its overdraft facili-
ty to Prime plus 1.25 per cent,



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$3.84m loan to




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Western Medical Plaza


rI:i4


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006







MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006, PAGE 7B


Roval Oasis buver: Settfing tm-lu


.A-. Il %IF WW i W W. L ~fwo -IF ..O MFP j 1- w- a.- -. - --


-i-


pension judgement not our problem


FROM page 1B announced, and that the pur- butions, plus interest and costs,
chaser does not appear to have be paid to them. After Royal
a strong hotel operating/own- Oasis failed to pay the sums'
judgements being settled first. ership track record. Whether ordered, the pension funds
Mr Miller said payment of the purchaser has the right served writs on the five com-
these funds was not part of plan to revitalise the Royal panies via the Provost Mar-
any sales agreement, and was Oasis, and the wherewithal to shall of Freeport's Supreme
more a matter to be dealt with execute this, has also been Court, authorising the seizure
between the Government and questioned, of their goods and property to
Lehman Brothers. The Prime Minister on make good the debts.
As far as he knew, Mr Miller Wednesday basically implied Effectively, the two pension
said provisions for certain that whether World Invest- funds have attached liens to
amounts has been made ments Holdings obtained the Royal Oasis and its five
between the Government and financing for the deal was con- companies, meaning the judg-'
Lehman Brothers, He said that tingent on it securing world- ments have to be satisfied
in addition to the pension con- class hotel and casino opera- before the deal to purchase the
tributions, also under discus- tors. resort from Lehman Brothers'
sion were sums owed by the Mr Miller admitted there. private equity arm moves for-
Royal oasis to the National was some concern over who ward. Yet they currently
Insurance Board (NIB) on the hotel and casino operators remain "unsatisfied".
behalf of its former employ- would be, but added that they Mr Wilchcombe claimed
ees. would be selected from an that matter was for discussions
Mr Miller added that he did approved list of vendors, between the vendor and pur-
not know what the exact World Investments Holdings chaser. "They are looking at
amounts involved were. He had previously been talking to those matters, which were cer-
added that his clients only have New York, New York, the tainly brought to our attention
one obligation, which is to pay Las-Vegas-based hotel and by the attorneys" for the pen-
Lehman Brothers $40 million casino operator that is an sion funds."
to acquire the property. MGM Mirage subsidiary, but it He added: "All of these
The Prime Minister looks as though those discus- issues have been put into a pot,
announced in the House of sions have not achieved a deal and brought to the attention
Assembly on Wednesday that yet. of the purchasers. They have to
World Investments Holdings Earlier this month, tourism be dealt with before any agree-
and Lehman Brothers had minister Obie Wilchombe said ment goes forward. Part of the
negotiated a second extension the Government would not deal moving forward is contin-
to talks over the Royal Oasis approve the Royal Oasis sale gent on these issues being set-
acquisition, a move that is like- until the property's outstand- tied."
ly to take discussions into ing debts to the two hotel pen- Mr Wilchcombe said the
December. sion funds, the hotel union and Government would "make
Grand Bahama residents small Bahamian businesses are sure" the situation was "fully
and others have frequently settled. dealt with", and it would not
expressed scepticism over He had also said the sale was issue the necessary approvals
whether a deal will be sealed, "contingent" on the debts left for the resort's sale without the
and the more than two-year behind by its previous owner, judgments being satisfied.
closure of the Royal Oasis end- Driftwood (Freeport), being Sources close to the two pen-
ed. The resort's shut-down saw settled. sion funds confirmed to The
more than 1200 workers laid The two hotel pension funds, Tribune that all the judgments
off, and the resulting impact the Bahamas Hotel and Allied remain "unsatisfied", and there
saw other Freeport businesses Industries Pension Fund and has been no contact from
close, too, particularly in the the Bahamas Hotel Industry either World Investment Hold-
International Bazaar, with Management Pension Fund, ings or Lehman Brothers as to
more job losses. secured judgments last year how the debts will be settled.
The scepticism is based on against the five companies that The Bahamas Hotel Indus-
the fact that World Invest- comprise the Royal Oasis try Management Pension Fund
L mentsHoldinrgsTwasincoipo-. resort. ,. secured judgments tqtalnpg.
rated just-weeks, before .the-,,The judgments. require that $1.826 million against the. Roy-._
Royal. Oasis, deal was all outstanding pension contri- al Oasis companies -






.11NhTB R N A T _1 0 N
1 Bank of The Bahamas
INTERNATIONAL

VACANCY FOR THE POSITION OF:
ASSISTANT MANAGER, TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT
Core responsibilities:

Build an effective training and development program.
Design and select relevant training programs for all levels
within the Bank.
*Evaluate effectiveness of training programs.
Manage the Bank's Training Centre and related resources.
Coordinate leadership development and mentoring programs.
Oversee training conducted by the Training Officer.

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:

Sound knowledge of Human Resources Management and
Organizational Development.
Detail oriented, excellent facilitation and problem solving
skills.
S* Superior organizational, time management, interpersonal and
written communication skills.
Creative, self-motivated and able to work independently.
Knowledge of adult learning principles.
Knowledge of Microsoft Office Programs particularly Word
and PowerPoint.
Ability to use audio/visual equipment such as LCD projectors,
video cassette players, and video recorders.
Bachelor's Degree in Human Resources Management, Training
& Development or related field.
3-5 years experience in a training and learning capacity.
Experience in a banking environment.

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with
:experience and qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental
and vision) and life insurance; pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later than 30th November
2006 to:

The Senior Manager, Human Resources & Training
Bank of The Rphqmqs International
P.O. Box N-7118
| Nassau, Bahamas


I' I I


Caribbean Utility Company;
Sunrise Property Ltd, which
traded as Crowne Plaza at
Royal Oasis; DVI Country
Club trading as Vacation Club
at Bahamia; DVI Country
Club trading as Holiday Inn
Sunspree at Bahamia; and
Bahamia Casino Ltd.
Attorneys for the Bahamas
Hotel Industry Management
Pension Fund alerted govern-
ment officials to the judgments
earlier this year, saying they
would "be grateful if you
would ensure that any sale of
the captioned properties be
made subject to the judgments
being satisfied".
Both the hotel union and
Bahamas Hotel and Allied
Industries Pension Fund have
obtained similar judgments
against the Royal Oasis in sep-
arate actions that also have yet
to be settled.
When the Royal Oasis
closed in September 2004,
Driftwood (Freeport) had left
liabilities of at least $22 mil-
lion. Much of that money,
some $16 million, was owed in


casino taxes.
However, the resort also
owed the hotel pension funds a
combined $4.1 million as at
January 2005, and other credi-
tors included the Grand
Bahama Port Authority Group
of Companies, Grand Bahama
Power, the National Insurance
Board (NIB), and private com-
panies on Grand Bahama.
Mr Wilchcombe said the
Government would also apply
pressure to ensure the debts
to small and large Bahamian
businesses were satisfied
before the necessary approvals
were issued for the sale.
World Investment Holdings
signed in August a deal in prin-
ciple to acquire the Royal
Oasis, and had hoped to com-
plete the purchase last month.
Seyed Moghani, an investor
in the group, told The Tribune
in August that World Invest-
ment Holdings planned to
invest at least $170 million to
upgrade the resort to five-star
status.
He added that the group was
waiting on Lehman Brothers


to produce evidence of clear
title to the Grand Bahama
resort before the deal closed.
Apart from Mr Moghani and
Mr St Clair, who is chief exec-
utive of Coral Gables-based
Internet travel agency, Travel.
Leaders, World Investment
Holdings initially included a
father-and-son duo who are
both called Fernando Alvarez,
and Idalberto Rodriguez.
The two Cuban-Americans
are said by sources to be close
to Gerardo Capo, the devel-
oper behind the Bimini Bay
resort project. Mr Capo is
understood to have vouched
for their credentials to the
Government, and his attorney,
Valentine Grimes, is also the
attorney for Driftwood.
World Investment Holdings'
Bahamian partner is Lawrence
Chisholm & Associates, an
architectural and planning firm
based on Elizabeth Avenue in
Nassau. The company will be
the lead architect and planner
in the investors' bid to revive
the Royal Oasis, once the deal
is closed.


p. UI ~


MINISTRY OF EDUCATION



NOTICE


COMMONWEALTH SCHOLARSHIP AND
SFJ.LQWSHIP PiAR4Mq ,

UNITED KINGDOM AWARDS 2007

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for scholarships tenable in the
United Kingdom under the Commonwealth Scholarship and Fellowship Plan commencing,
October 2007.
The scholarships are intended for post-graduate study at the Master's and Doctoral levels;
i.e. a one (1) year Master's or equivalent degree or six (6) months clinical training in
Medicine or Dentistry, or a three (3) year doctoral or equivalent degree.
Men and Women of intellectual and academic excellence who have a degree or equivalent
qualification with at least upper second class honours are encouraged to apply.
Applicants in Medicine and Dentistry whose programme requires them to practise clinically
can be considered only if they are eligible for registration with the general Medical Council
or the general Dental Council.
Candidates who wish to undertake post-graduate study in Business and/or Management
should have taken, before applying for the scholarship, the Graduate Management Admission
Test. Those who wish to study Economics or related subjects should note that a number
of university departments will require candidates, before entry, to take the Princeton Graduate
record Examination (GRE).

VALUE OF AWARD
The scholarships are intended to cover the expenses of travel, living and study and include:
(a) approved aii fare to the United Kingdom by the most direct and economical route
and return on expiry of the scholarship (a scholar's dependents are not eligible);
(b) a personal maintenance allowance of 703 per month; (872 per month for those
studying at institutions in the London Metropolitan area)
(c) approved tuition and examination fees;
(d) a grant towards the expenses of preparing a thesis or dissertation where applicable;
(e) an initial arrival allowance, incorporating an initial clothing grant for scholars
from tropical countries;
(f) a grant for expenses for approved study travel within the UK or overseas;
(g) a grant towards fieldwork costs for those scholars for whom a case has been made
for fieldwork outside the United Kingdom.This shall not normally exceed one
economy class return airfare to the fieldwork location.
(h) a paid mid-term fare to their home country for scholars on three year awards.
Scholars for whom fieldwork fares are provided to their home country shall not
be entitled to a mid term fare home.
(i) for married scholars selected for awards exceeding one academic year, a marriage
allowance of 204 per month is payable provided that the husband and wife are
residing together at the same address in the United Kingdom. It is not paid when
a husband or wife of the scholar is also a recipient of an award. For such married
couples accompanied by their children, a child allowance is payable at the rate
of 118 per month for the first child and 94 for the second and third child under
the age of 16, provided they are residing with their parents;
Irrespective of the length of the award, a scholar who is widowed, divorced or a single
parent, will receive an allowance in respect of the first accompanying child and child
allowances for the second and third accompanying children.
Further details, application forms and Prospectus may be obtained from the Scholarship
and Educational Loan Division of the Ministry of Education or Commonwealth Scholarship
and Fellowship Plan international website www.csfp-online.org. Applications should be
returned to reach the Scholarship ad Educational Loan Division, Ministry of Education,
P.O. Box N-3913, no later than 1 December 2006. Application forms received after
this date will not be considered.
Scholarship and Educational Loan Division
13 September, 2006


THE TRIBUNE









L~ -u


GN-435

Office Of The Prime Minister








COMMUNICATION TO PARLIAMENT
BY

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE PERRY G. CHRISTIE MP
PRIME MINISTER AND MINISTER OF FINANCE COMMONWEALTH OF THE
BAHAMAS


ON THE


TABLING OF
THE NATIONAL HEALTH INSURANCE ACT 906

ON


WEDNESDAY, 15" NOVEMBER, 2006

HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY

Mr. Speaker,
It is with mixed feelings that I place before Honourable Members of the House this Bill
to Establish a National Health Insurance Scheme.

I say mixed feelings because it is with some measure of regret that, as a country, it has
taken us so long to put in place a system of health financing that can secure lifetime.
access to health services for our people.


It is also with feelings of genuine gladness and optimism that the privilege is now mine
to be the leader of a team bringing before the House this historic Bill that sets out to
transform our approach to health and the welfare of our people.

Mr. Speaker,
Before I get into the objects and contents of the Bill, I want us to reflect on three
aspects of this historic path, which we are carving for our country: -

Firstly, the close relation between good health and the well-being of our people;.

Secondly, good health and the wealth of the nation; and

Thirdly, good health and our collective sense of responsibility arid compassion.


(HEALTH AND WELL-BEING)
Mr. Speaker,
It is an unqualified truth that not one of us gathered here can casually assume that
ai6_W&Tfltlt 'wibe apegna ptfture of our lives.

It is a fact that our progress in health n6w means that the average life expectancy of a
Bahainiarn is about 73 years. However, this is only an average some may be lower,
some higher.

Without good health and the means to sustain that good health, the quality of our daily
life is weakened and the freedom to enjoy the fruits of our long years of toil is
diminished.

I know... in fact we all know that way too many people simply do not have the means
to pay for their health care.

Some people are faced with huge bills at one time.

Many more people are faced with regular and increasingly burdensome bills to treat and
manage a chronic health condition that requires continuing visits to doctors, tests and
more tests; more drugs and sometimes a stay In hospital.


There are some people in our country who die because they are unable to afford the
health care they need. In the fact of that fact, what rationale can be put that in moving
for National Health Insurance we are not doing the best thing for our country?

Without some form of health insurance, many people have to dip deep into their savings
or borrow or depend on help and the charity of others.

Cookouts, church welfare activities; or donation sheets: all to find the cash to pay
people's health care bills.

Many who cannot get help or who don't have the savings to draw on have to live with
their pain and sickness and the shackles imposed by that sickness on their daily lives.

Many persons also, without adequate cash, live with the fear of getting sick and worry
about how they will manage.

What hard choices will they have to make? What things will they have to do without so
that health care bills can be paid?

I am saying that in the 21s century Bahamas, we cannot allow so many of our people to
be excluded, to lack access to care, to suffer; when we know that by pooling our
resources we can do better.

We cannot leave the health of the population to individual luck or to charity.

As a caring society, as a caring government, as a country with the highest GDP per
capital in the Caribbean, we can do better than to allow so many to suffer in the midst of
plenty.

This is what National Health Insurance is all about a mechanism to share the cost of
care and access to the benefits of health care based on one's need.


(HEALTH AND WEALTH)
Mr. Speaker,
Every well-developed and progressive society recognizes that good health in the
population is the bedrock a vital resource; a facilitating precondition for the creation
and enjoyment of wealth and for individual advancement; business advancement; and
indeed national advancement.

However, the growing burden of chronic diseases, the persistent threat of HIV-AIDS and
the unacceptably high incidence of violence and accidents have led to major concerns
over the impact on the young and our working population.

This concern is justified, because:
o Good health Is essential for productivity;
o Productivity is essential for sustained production;
0 Sustained production is essential for economic viability; and


0 Economic viability is essential for national development.

When viewed in the context of all the major developments and the plans for future
developments irn The Bahamas, we need a healthy population to take advantage of the :
opportunities being created.

We need to find and indeed we are finding the resources to make the investment in .
health facilities and services to sustain the health of the population.

For, if I may paraphrase from another well-known source, what would it profit a
business or community if it has all the gains from commercial development but the
availability and quality of its health services cannot match this level of progress?


(HEALTH, RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPASSION)
Mr. Speaker,
Our approach to health reflects our cultural values in terms of individual and social
responsibility as well as our sense of compassion.

We know that we have made significant progress in improving the health of the
population.

Many of you may remember the days when polio and smallpox ravaged our children,
when leprosy and typhoid fever and polio made our lives miserable from being bed-
ridden and unable to carry out our daily duties; and when TB meant isolation from
families and friends and almost certainly it meant an early death.

Today, many of these health scourges have been conquered. We can now expect to live
longer, our children can survive those difficult early years and the majority of our
mothers do not have to face childbirth with uncertainty.

But while we have made progress in reducing or eliminating most of these health
scourges, we are now faced with new health challenges.

High blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes, high blood cholesterol, cancer, depression.

These bring heart attacks, strokes, kidney failure and amputations; among a host of dire
consequences.

And on top of these, we must face the spectre of HIV-AIDS and the growing burden of
injury and trauma caused by accidents and inter-personal violence.

Each day, the Ministry of Health and all private health care providers have to confront
thousands of cases of chronic disease; of trauma, of HIV-AIDS.

Data for 2003 reveal that about 26% of the population (1 person in 4), has high blood
pressure; 17% (1 person in 6), has diabetes; 66% of the adult population (2 out of

every 3 adults), are overweight or obese with all the attendant co-morbidities, and the
incidence of cancer and mental illness remain at unacceptably high levels.

In addition to the human suffering, the disability and premature deaths caused by these
conditions, we have to confront the cost of care.

Confronting the cost of care means:

> Having to find the funds to keep improving our facilities;
> Having to find the funds to keep up to date with securing the most effective
health technologies;
> Having to find the funds to keep abreast with advances in the pharmaceutical
industry and to purchase the most reliable and cost effective drugs; and finally
> Having to find the funds to train, recruit and adequately tompensate 7ur health'
professionals. o ,.
For all of us: individuals, business firms, health care providers; and the health
authorities, there is the clear recognition that we can do better with
managing our health concerns...

We can do better with how we care for our health.

More fundamentally, it takes cash to care. Finding the cash means
developing a collective solution.

The answer does not lie in a solution for only the public or private health
sectors or business or private health insurance only.

A collective solution means that we must build on dear principles, on
partnerships, on the shared values of Bahamian society, on blending personal
and social responsibility and on good stewardship by government.

National Health Insurance offers that collective solution.

National Health Insurance is a financing mechanism that pools the resources
and health risks of the community persons contribute on the basis of their
ability to pay and access care on the basis of their needs.


(GOAL OF NHI)
Mr. Speaker,
National Health Insurance is a plan to help all residents have ready access to health care
services:
> On a timely basis;
> In a dignified manner;
> Throughout their lifetime; and
> Without having to face the financial worry and burden of having to find large
amounts of money to pay for the care they need.

All residents, means:

> All ages no one will be excluded because they are too young or too old;
> All workers, persons who are not working and pensioners;
> All income groups the poor, the not so poor and those who have plenty.
> All health conditions whether you are healthy or sick or disabled or have any
kind of pre-existing condition.
> All those who already have private insurance and those who do not.
> All 320,000 Bahamians living in all our islands and cays.


(HEALTH BENEFITS PACKAGE)
As members of NHI, citizens and legal residents will have ready access to all of the
following health benefits:

--Access to General Practitioner and Specialists when you need to visit a doctor;

--Prescription drugs when your doctor says you need medication;

--Laboratory tests and X-rays and other diagnostic services;


--Medical care, surgery and room and board when you need hospital care;

--Emergency transport to health facilities when needed this is especially for persons
who live in the Family Islands and who need to get q ickly to the major health facilities
in Freeport and Nassau;

-Access to overseas care for tho<- services that we cannot provide in The Bahamas.

In addition, we recognize that a health plan mst not only focus on 'sidmne'
but also on 'wellness'.

We know that 'prevention is better than cure'. So we want to put aside some
money to promote healthy living.


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006, PAGE 88B









TH TRBN BUIESMNAY OEBR2020,PG


(COST OF NHI PROGRAM)
To pay for all the health services we want to provide, to undertake all the necessary
tasks and activities in our health promotion programmes and in managing such a
national plan, it is estimated that about $235 million per year will be needed.

To help us to meet this cost of $235 .million, we will be looking at that partnership I
spoke about the joint contributions by government, workers, employers and the
retired population.

To find this money, we have worked out that we will need contributions from workers
and employers, the self-employed, pensioners and the government

Workers will be asked to pay about 2.65% of their income. This will be matched by
another 2.65% from their employers for a total of 5.3% of their Income.

The self-employed will pay a flat rate based on a broad estimate of their earnings per
year.

On average, this will work out to about 5.3% of their earnings.

Pensioners, who have a substantial income, may also be asked to make a small
contribution of 2.65% of their pension.

And the government will be required to make contributions on Ihalf of the poor, the
disabled and'on their share on behalf of public sector workers.

To give you an idea of what the expected contributions are:
> Someone like a pensioner getting $500 per month will be asked to contribute
$13 per month;
> A worker earning $1,500 per month will contribute $40 anrid his employer $40;
S> Persons earning $5000 and more per month will contribute $133 and their
employers will contribute $133.

When we compared these contributions with what someone would pay for a private
health plan, we think that most persons will find that NHI is very affordable.

This is much less than they would pay for the same package of benefits to a private <
insure- Indeed there is no private plan that can match the benefits package.



(aMPROVEMENTS IN PUBLIC HEALTH SYSTEM)
Many people have also expressed concerns that the quality and availability of services In
the public health system will change to accommodate the new demands made by
National Health Insurance.

Let me say that there is already a plan being implemented to bring about major
improvements in public health services. This includes:

4*: A new hospital for Grand Bahama to replace the Rand Memorial;

Mini-hospitals to be built in Exuma, Abaco, Eleuthera, Inagua

+.: New Polyclinics and health centres in Freeport, Cat Island, Grand Cay, Abaco;
Rum Cay and more.

4* Upgrading of other polyclinics and public health centres throughout the Family
Islands and New Providence;

Training and recruitment of more staff,
*.--Upgraded equipment; .., ..

Improvements in the supply of drugs;

A major Healthy Lifestyle Initiative so that we try to get people to think
'prevention rather than cure'

All these changes and improvements will not happen in a year, but it is an Indication of
the kind of transformation in health we are looking at, to ensure that NHI brings real
change.




(OBJECTS AND REASONS IN RELATION TO THE PROVISIONS IN THE BILL)
Mr. Speaker,
The Bill is formally entitled 'An Act to Establish a National Health Insurance Scheme
Whereunder Persons Would be Provided With A Defined Package of Health Care
Services; And To Provide For Ancillary Matters'.

It contains 16 Clauses describing the purpose, objects, management, financing and
governance of the Plan.

The detailed provisions relating to the administration and operations of the Plan will be
presented in companion Regulations, which will be placed before the House at a later
date.

> Clause 1 indicates the short title of the Bill which will now be refeed to as the
National Health Insurance Act. Clause 1 also stipulates that the effective dates for
implementation of various provisions of the Act will be established by the Minister
assigned with responsibilities for national health Insurance.

> Clause 2 provides definitions of the various terms in the Act so that there is overall
consistency with provisions in the National Insurance Act as well as other relevant Acts
that pertain to health matters.

> The prime objective of the Scheme is specified in Clause 3 that is to establish a
financing and purchasing mechanism to promote the health of the population and
enhance their access to health services defined in the benefit package.

> The fourth Clause indicates the establishment of a new statutory body to be called the
National Health Insurance Commission which will be charged with administering the
Scheme. Matters related to the composition of the Commission and guidelines for its
governance are spelt out in the Schedule to the Act.

> Clause 5 describes the various functions of the Commission in its role as administrator
of the Scheme and its inter-relationship with the Minister in regard to overall
responsibilities for ensuring that these functions secure the interest of the public.


> The specific tasks and activities in relation to management of the inflows, outflows
and investment of monies by the Commission are set out in Clause 6 dealing with the
establishment of a National Health Insurance Fund. This Clause (6) also draws on
relevant provisions of the National Insurance Act in relation to the generation and use of
monies by the Commission.


> Clause 7 specifies the role and periodicity (or timing) of actuarial reviews to report on
the financial status of the Fund as well as the requirement that such reviews be laid
before both Houses for their consideration.

> The target members and beneficaes of the Scheme are identified in Clause 8.
This group of members and beneficiaries includes all contributors and their dependents,
that is, their spouse and children. The group of members and beneficiaries also includes
other persons such as the indigent and other prescribed persons whose membership
and benefits will be secured through coubibulions by the gwovemmrnent

> Clause 9 outlines the contribution obligations of members and government on behalf
of prescribed categories of persons. The specific contribution rates based on the
principles of reasonableness, equity and progressiveness as well as manner of
payment (as is the case for contributions to the National Insurance Fund) will be defined
in the companion Regulations.


> Clauses 10 and 11 define the role and scope of contractual agreements with public
and private providers for the delivery of health services to members of the Scheme. The
specific terms indicating the obligations of the Commission and the health service
providers willte defined rin the particular contract. In addition, Clause 11 outlines
provisions for dealing with appeals by aggrieved.providers.


> In Clause 12, the payment obligations of contributors as well as the treatment of'
those who are non-compliapt are defined. This is done so that there is congruence with
similar obligations and treatment as for National Insurance contributors.


> Matters relating to the day to day administration of the Plan by a duly appointed Chief
Executive Officer and other officers are dealt with in Clause 13. The broad terms of
employment and duties of these officers are also discussed in this Clause (13).


> Clause 14 defines the options and obligations of employers who already have or are
contemplating private health insurance benefits for their employees.



> Clause 15 indicates the various matters which require detailed specification in the
Regulations. Matters which require detailed specification include such as criteria for
registration of providers, likely co-payments, issue of identification cards, offences,
procedures for appeals) and the role of the Minister in making these Regulations as well
as for placing them before both Houses for consideration.


> Clause 16 provides for amendments in the National Insurance Act to include
responsibilities for the discharge of specified tasks under contract to the National Health
Insurance Commission.




(NHI. PUBLIC-PRJIVATE PARTNERSHIP AND NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT)
Mr. Speaker,
National Health Insurance is not just about getting more money. It is about money as
an instrument for sustained investment in the health of our people.

I say investment because too many treat the cost of providing health services as an
expenditure item, as a burden.

We can all agree that investment in health, like investment in education, strengthens
our human potential and brings benefits to individuals, to businesses and to the nation.

As with any other business investment where one weighs in the balance the costs and
benefits or returns, National Heath Insurance forces us to think not just about the cost
of providing health care to all, but also the benefits of good health.

In this sense, making that investment in the health of our people must be a conscious
act of policy rather than leaving people's health to luck or chance or to acts of charity.

National Health Insurance is not new and has had to contend with many detractors as
well as cynics.

However, I am reminded of our experience with the National Insurance Board and our
bitter struggle in the 1970's against many other detractors.

Then, the purveyors of doom and gloom predicted ffe wortas we sought to secure this
crucial safety net for all workers pnd their families..

Today, there are very few who doubt the national and social valueof the National
Insurance Board and even fewer who have not been beneficiaries of one of its various
provisions.

I sincerely hope that we have learnt from that experience and can approach National
Health Insurance with better understanding of its costs and benefits.

The progress that we have made as a country in almost all areas of national endeavour,
with all the challenges of size, geography and resources, has been based on the
uniqueness of our public and private partnerships.

Ultimately my government has responsibility for the health of the nation.

We will not shirk our responsibilities to guide and to take the leadership role in
protecting the health of our people.

But while it is a responsibility of government to take the lead it is also an obligation of all
parties to rise to the challenge of sustaining those health gains.

Public-private partnerships have served us well and brought progress in many areas of*
national action.
* \ I *',! .;




A similar partnership can also enhance our progress in health.

Through National Health Insurance we can build a system that is good for all, fair to all
and which we can hold high as a symbol of a caring and progressive Bahamas.

> We can improve access to public & private health care;
> We can improve access to high-cost overseas care when needed;
> We can generate more money to improve the quality & timeliness of health
services;
> We can share the cost among all persons so that the burden is lighter on each.





(CONCLUSION)
Let me conclude, as I began, with an open and sincere invitation to you to join hands
and minds as we collectively chart the course for realization of this goal, this vision, this
commitment of National Health Insurance as we continuously strive to enhance the
health of all Bahamians.

Indeed, with National Health Insurance, we can all put into practice the maxim that
health for all is good for individual welfare... is good for business progress... and it is
good for national development


Mr. Speaker,
It is the government's intention to begin debate of this Bill on Wednesday 29m
November and pass it through all of its stages in this place by Wednesday December 6.

It is anticipated that it will be read for the first time in the Senate on Monday December
11th and debate will begin in that Chamber on Wednesday December 13.

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS



























Attorney Michael Miller,
STI's president, said:
"The CSC provides a very
comprehensive coverage of
investment products and mar-
kets, and can provide a gate-
way to a rewarding career in
financial services."


Notice
NOTICE is hereby given that LENNIES SAMUELS OF 37
DAVIS STREET OFF OAKESFIELD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 10TH day of NOVEMBER, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice
NOTICE

KALENDAS HOLDINGS LTD.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Sectionl38 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
KALENDAS HOLDINGS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

HENITROPE CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 3rd day of November 2006. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc. P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)









Harbourside Marine is looking for marine
helpers. Must have mechanical knowledge and
strong work ethics.

Please fax resumes to: 394-7659

Harbourside Marine is looking for sales
person with knowledge of generators, golf
cars and the marine industry.
Must be self driven.

Please fax resume to: 394-7659


* MR ZELANO (right) is pictured with Michael Del
Bianco, Pearl's chief executive.


A FASTGR IGi~*6*4 JU.PMillN. lUStil~7


RESTAURANT MANAGERS
The successful applicants most meet at least the fh gA4
requirements:
* Experience In the fast food or fastserice reavtio
-setting. '*
. Knowledge of computers bhd windows oft" r
ticularly word & excel
" Motivated to achieve success o
S Sound communication and "people frindIly*"f
41-
S A solid team player
* Ability to manage and dirtctgagro fjanitora
. A secondary education
Flexibility to work weekends and holidays .4
Possess auto transporatation
Salary Is based on experience and eo i6t, I
available anddi based oa performandfy

Send resumes to ycpike@emagine.bs or axx 5630.


Legal Notice
NOTICE

AVONDALE ALPS CORP.
_....

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Sectionl38 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
AVONDALE ALPS CORP. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

GOOD MANNERS LTD.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Sectionl38 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
GOOD MANNERS LTD. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006


Investment



officer finishes



securities



course


THE TRIBUNE


A SENIOR investment offi-
cer at Pearl Investment Man-
agement, Daniel Zelano, has
completed the Canadian Secu-
rities Course (CSC) after
studying with the Nassau-
based Securities Training Insti-
tute (STI).


4:













A
V








'OZ-

- A;










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a il


#4


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V
I















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4
4
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A
4


SENIOR

ACCOUNTANTS

WANTED


National accountancy Firm immediately
requires two senior accountants.

The ideal candidate should have completed the
examination requirements for the CPA, CA, ACCA
or CGA with at least one years post-qualifying
experience. Alternatively, the applicant should have
completed at least two parts of the final
examinations of their qualifying body.
The remuneration package will be commensurate
with the successful candidate's experience.

Applicants could visit our website at
www.galanisco.com and apply on-line to
info @ galanisco.com:


The Human Resource Partner
GALANIS & CO.
Chartered Accountants
Shirlaw House
P.O. Box N-3205
Nassau, Bahamas

"Local insight, global reach"


BUSINESS


I i -e II I II--









T HES TRIBUN M NEM




Businesses slam




'unconstitutional'




NHI interference


UNCOLLECTED SHORT-TERM BENEFIT


FROM page 1B


health and national insurance,
is simply unworkable.
And failure to gain the min-
ister's approval could leave
businesses liable to a fine of
$10,000 or less, or imprison-
ment for no more than five
years.
Chris Lowe, an executive
with Kelly's (Freeport) and
candidate for the Grand
Bahama Chamber of Com-
merce presidency, told The Tri-
bune he and his employees
were unhappy that NHI, due
to its mandatory nature, was
going to impact their freedom
of choice regarding healthcare
provision.
The National Coalition for
Healthcare Reform has
already identified one of the
major drawbacks of NHI as
being its mandatory nature, as
choice and competition are
generally regarded as the main
wa#to keep healthcare provi-
sion in line, both in terms of
price and quality.
Mr Lowe said: "As an
employer of 107 people, my
employees are very disturbed
by the way this NHI scheme is
going to affect their level of
healthcare. They're all very
concerned, as they all like their
private medical insurance.
"They're all insured, and its
mandatory under their
employment guidelines. Now,
how do I change my guide-
lines?"
SAnd tMr Lowe added: "As
for an, employer like me,
there's going to be an enor-
mous line at the Minister's


office, looking to alter the
structure of their healthcare
plans for employees. How the
hell is one minister going to go
through that and discern who
is screwing their employees, or
who is going too far?
"No one wants to give up
private health insurance and
rely on government services.
They're really bum-rushing
[this Bill]. It's incredible; it's
absolutely incredible."
Mr Lowe said that private
health insurance premiums
were likely to increase as a
result of NHI, "but I'm going-
to do everything I can to retain
a decent level of private
healthcare for my staff. But
I'm going to have to make
adjustments.
"It'sjust another example of
the Government taking a big-
ger slice of the pie, this time
out of my employees' hands.
This one really has serious eco-
nomic ramifications."
This echoes repeated warn-
ings from Bahamian health--
care professionals, who believe
that the Government's plan for
NHI contributions-, with
salaried workers paying 5.3 per
cent of their monthly income
up to a ceiling of $5,000 to the
plan (split 50/50 between
employer and employee, leav-
ing each to contribute 2.65 per
cent) is nothing more than. an
income tax.
It is also being seen by some
as a tax on labour, which will
reduce take home pay and dis-
posable income for workers.
Among the likely outcomes of
NHI. employers have said, )s a.
..reducLion in real %%ages,.
increases in the costs of goods
and services, and business cost
cuts, including job losses. All


would further raise the costs
of doing business in the
Bahamas, and reduce the econ-
omy's competitiveness.
There are also concerns that
the $235 million cost placed on
NHI by the Government's pro-
ject implementation team are
far too low, and combined with
the likely problems in admin-
istering the plan through the
National Insurance Board
(NIB), this will mean the
scheme is not financially viable
or sustainable in tle long-term.
It is likely that contribution
rates will have to be increased,
acting as a further burden on
disposable income, the busi-
ness community and the
Bahamian economy.
Meanwhile, Rick Lowe, a
member of the Bahamas
Motor Dealers Association
(BMDA, which is part of the
National Coalition for Health-
care Reform, a business and
trade union grouping, said the
National Insurance B-ill's-
Clause T14and was "typical of
the legislation in recent yeats".
"Government is taking over
absolute control of our lives.
Eventually, they'll be coming
to the bathroom with us," Mr
Lowe said.
He added that, in similar
fashion to the consumer pro-
tection Bills recently passed by
Parliament, the National
Health Insurance Bill seemed
to make the minister responsi-
ble 'all-powerful'.
"The other concern is that
there's more and more bureau-
cracy, and the minister does
not. have to take professional
advice on anything. Like the
consumer bills, they can make
decisions because they're the
minister."


^KTo dvptseinTh Tffun


the#1ne sppe, n ipultin,
jus all32-186toay









BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY-CORPORATION- -
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

TENDER FOR PROVIDING ENGINE & SURROUNDING AREAS
CLEANING SERVICES-BLUE HILLS POWER STATION

TENDER No.607/06

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders to
undertake the provision of Engine & Surrounding Areas Cleaning Services at its
Blue Hills Power Station.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting: -

Miss Winifred Tumrnquest
Administrative Assistant
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1170
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 24 November 2006 by 3:30 p.m
and addressed as follows:

The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity .Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Marked: Tender No. 607/06

"ENGINE CLEANING SERVICES-BLUE HILLS POWER STATION"

L The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.


* Tel: 356-2070
* P.O.BOX N7508
* Nassau, Bahamas


NAME


CHEQUES NEW PROVIDENCE LOCAL OFFICE
171 Short-Term Benefit Cheques Await Collection By Eligible
Claimants. All Claims Were Processed In New Providence.
The names of persons with outstanding cheques are listed below.
These persons are requested to collect their cheque(s) from the
Cashier's Department, located on the ground Floor of the National
Insurance Board's Building in Jumbey Village, Baillou Hill Road,
between 9:15a.m. 4:45 p.m. on weekdays.
Claimants are asked to collect heir cheque(s) in person and to produce
photo identification.
PLEASE NOTE: Claimants are asked to collect their cheque(s) in person
and to produce photo identification.

Lennox MoCartney(Mr.)
Director
N. I. Number


ALCIAJOR Orbus
AMERTHIL Anna
AND PERSON, Patrice
3ACKFORD, Errol
3AIN, Chaniquie
3AIN\, Karen
3AII\,N Kenyon
3AR JETT, Stephen
3ASTIAN, Naomi
3ELLE Rudolph
3 YDE'I, Alma
3 ROW\ Karen
3ROW\ Lorraine
3 ROW\, Mark
3 ROW\, Marva
3ROW\, Oswald
3ROW\ Pornell
3JLLARb, Elvis
3URNS Quincy
3URRO\S, Ethel
3URROWS,--Mark
3UTLER Demetrius
CAMPBELL, John
CARGILL John
CHARLTON, Pedro
CIUS Presendieu
C -CLA--KE, LaToya
CLEAR Shan
COOPER D'Antoin
CORNISH- Geleta
CURTIS-Pamela-- -
DAV S Annamae
DAV S, Marjorie
DAV S Sha-Ann
DEIVERITTE Patricia
DEVEAUX, Dwayne
DOLGLAS Tess
EDGECOMBE, Dencil
EVANS Gleiroy
ERGUSO\, Doris
E RGUSO Evelyn
SERGUSO \ Judith
:RGUSO\, Kipplin
=E RGUSO\ Veronica
:7ERNANDEk, Marie
=ORBES, Donnell
:ORBES Tamika .
GARDINER Gina
GIBSON Ellen
GIBSON Shanelle
GOULD Yvonne
GRAY, Quintin
HEPBURN, Ethel
HUMES Alvaree
I JGRAHlIAM Glenda
.ARRETT, Marao
.OHNSON, Kishlyne
.OHNSON, Verneta
ONES Ricardo
KNOWLES, Jermaine
KNOWLES, Portia
EARY, Maxine
EWIS Monique
.OCKHART, Michael
VAJOR, Kenya
MARSHALL Louise
VASON, Latoya
VclNTOSH, Christopher
VcKENZIE, Iris
--\LONCtJR Patricia
VORRISON, Sophia
VOSS Dianne
VUNNlNGS Arline
VUNNINGS Dabrielle
VUNROE Alicia
VURAT, Mona
\IEELY, Florine
\IEILLY Ricardo
EWTVVTN, Gertrude
_\ORDELUS, Elvita
'HILLIPS Ivy
'INDER banvis
'OlTIE Blian
:RATT, Jan ce
RAHMING, Diane .
RAHMING, Dortia
REID, Chris opher
RILEyLaTova
R03ERTS,Audika
RO31NSON-Angela
RO-LE, Cyril
RO-LE Sidney
RUSSELL, Maxwell
RUSSELL, Raquel
SANDS Boston
SHERMAN, Rochelle
SIV ITH, Austina
SIV ITH Celrene
SIV ITH Lavarison
STRACHAN, Erica
STRACHAN, Hartman
START, Tony
STUBBS, Ian
SUAREZ, Dionne
SWEEi1NG, Asaneth
SWEE7lNG, Caroline
SWEE~ING, Catherine
~AYLOR, rVelanie
AYLO RVncent
--OVIP OJ MAndrew
--OVIPSO \J Cordell
--OVIPSO11 Elizabeth
--OVIPSO1, Robin
--URSTON Lakisca
R1QUESt Milan
URMJQUEST Wayne
WHI7FIELD .armiletha
WHYMMS, immanuel
W LIAV1S, Sharon
W JLIAVIS, Theresa
W -LIAVISON, Barbara
W..SO\JAvan
W SO: Joanne
W-SO 'I Penelope
WOODS DE, Carnetta
YOUNG, Sheryl


'5374521
0577726
S0226664
4673770
S3757849
'3415727
2274690
0652450
'2117463
S3502859
2406562
10107703
'2975591
'5583570
'1217553
-2352497
'3021745
78011639
30034728
22095624
14544768
29851750
14431688
54062756
3061798
'0573836
'2185825
3386832
5094855
50066595-
4168723
5445577
1468556
3927744
2286621
6471679
6198859
4383802
0144609
21118639
4398656
3086731
3754777
5758826
1305797
4497689
0166831
1517700
56007795
3447777
3426591
6221605
3445723
S2946737
3005642
5938697
1426802
5678709
5723682
23338636
2124826
3738720
2246638
3228692
2724629
70015694
'3388606
'2575798
'1764635
'1787473
o6245687
'1358718
'3065602
'3315579
'0305475
62085778
14628813
54015472
10652655
10456538
14736721
11075694
50236822
11164778
70016607
'2748587
'0257799
-1894792
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-_ ..-- 2185795-
54035708
'5651665
'2024554
-3101625
'3625845
'5091643
'3505718
'4148803
66126789
'2073814
2846783
'0114629
'3373811
4923661
-0415734
'3375571
21228639
2377651
'1557745
5424529
'2151645
'3058606
'3427504
52267636
'2127833
'1421568
4963655
'0715649
4334569
2227757
3597663
'0435611
'1272791
'1696621
50207687
16067754
10747524


A.
A.
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A



















AS


9-


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006, PAGE 11 B


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


PAG:L 12B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006


exclusivee Boutique

Resort & Spa

Recruiting

Passionate, Personable and Honest
I idividuafs have a least 3 years experience in the
o)spi(tality Industry to fill the following
positions:

Executive Chef
Food and Beverage Manager
Boutique Manager
Room Division Manager
Spa Manager
Spa Therapist
Entertainment Coordinator
Concierge
Receptionist
Maitre D
Bartenders
Waiters
Housekeeping
Bellman

APd applications are appreciated but only qualified
Idivid(luals will be considered. Applications must
IL (.ccived before December 4,2006. Our email
'ddfress is stephmresort@yahoo.com or you can
Ih i f to AP-59223 Slot 440, Nassau, Bahamas.


q fL;aflt


('i nui oniwealth of The Bahamas
IN THE SUPREME COURT


2006
CLE/Qui/00247


IN THE MATTER of
The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND
IN THE MATTER of the
SPetition of Edison Tyrone Neely

AND

IN THE MATTER of Lot 19 Block 16
Westward Villas, New Providence, Bahamas.

NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that Edison Tyrone.Neely
is applying to the Supreme Court to have his Title
0o the following land.investigated under Section 3
&J he Quieting Titles Act, anid the nature and extent
. hero'f .determined and declared in a Certificate of
Ti1eC to be.granted by the said Court in accordance
wviIh the provisions of the said Act:

" A JL THAT lot of land being lot number 19, Block
6, Westward Villas Subdivision, New Providence
aild bounded as follows. On the NORTH by Lot
iumiber 14 of the said block said to be the property
ol.Michael Oakes on the EAST by Lot Number 18
o( said block the property of the Petitioner on the
S I 'l *H by Devonshire Street and on the WEST by
L1t number 20 of the said block to be property of
I .ic e Albury and which said lot has such
dJimnsions as are shown on survey plan 3873NP."

C 4pics of the plan may be inspected during normal
o(lfc hours at the following places:-

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court,
Ansbacher House, East Steet North,
Nassau, Bahamas
2. The chambers of James M.Thompson,
Terrace House, First Terrace and
Collins Avenue, Nassau, Bahamas

A ny Cperson who objects to the granting of said
c(itlicate of Title is required to file in the Supreme
< u mil and serve on the Petitioner or his Attorney a
Statement of his, her or its claim in the prescribed
(o In verified by an affidavit and other related
docuticnts to be filed and served therewith by the
30(i day of November, A.D., 2006. Failure of any
SCh person to file and serve a Statement of his, her
or i; Claim by the 30th day of November,A.D.,2006,
V fi u',e rate as a bar to such Claim.

ANDREW THOMPSON
Attorney for the Petitioner


Engineer sues





developer





over 'unpaid'





$80k study


FROM page 1B


One factor that disrupted the
plans of Mr Bethel's group was
another lawsuit filed against
the Bahamas Film Studios in


the Miami courts, this time by
another alleged investor in the
project, Bjorn Monteine, and
his company the Bahamas Film
Studios Inc.
Firm
That firm is not connected
to the Bahamas Film Studios


Accounting Degree or solid
accounting background
required


Must be a mature, reliable
and honest team player

w"-Must be computer literate


Must have excellent
people skills



Please fax resume & cover letter.


Fax# 325-3260.


or its holding company, Gold
Rock Creek Enterprises.
Mr Fuller had previously
described Mr Monteine's alle-
gations as "lacking merit", and
he was confident they would
be thrown out. Mr Monteine
had alleged that the Bahamas
Film Studios had been failing
to make lease payments on the
3,500 acre site it is leasing from
government, something Mr
Fuller had denied, adding that
all payments were up to date.
Mr Monteine had also
alleged that the Bahamas Film
Studios was in financial trou-
ble, projects were undercapi-
talised and that it owed signif-
icant debts.
Several sources told The Tri-
bune that the Miami-Dade
County Circuit courts had
ruled that Mr Fuller had to
ensure Mr Monteine's claim
was satisfied if he sold the
Bahamas Film Studios or his
interest in the project..
Yet Mr Fuller described this
information as "totally bogus",
saying the Florida court action
would vindicate him and the
Bahamas Film Studios when
ultimately heard. _-; 'niisk..
The film studios, which are
seen as having tremendous
potential for Grand Bahama's
economy and the wider
Bahamas, due to the tourism-
related spin-offs and econom-
ic diversification they provide,
have undergone a number of
recent changes.
President
Their president, Paul
Quigley, the last of the three
founding partners who nego-
tiated the Heads of Agreement
for the $76 million project with
the Government,was "relieved
of all duties" and his Board


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

TENDER FOR PROVIDING ENGINE & SURROUNDING AREAS
CLEANING SERVICES-CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

TENDER No.608/06

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders to
undertake the provision of Engine & Surrounding Areas Cleaning Services at its
Clifton Pier Power Station

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting: -

Miss Winifred Turmquest
Administrative Assistant
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1170
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 24 November 2006 by 3:30 p.m
and addressed as follows:

The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Marked: Tender No. 608/06

"ENGINE CLEANING SERVICES-CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION"

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.


seat in September/October
2006.
His two fellow founders,
Hans Schutte and Michael Col-
lyer, had both tragically passed
away, and Mr Quigley had
come under increasing pres-
sure from the project's finan-
cial backers to produce profits
and a return on their invest-
ment.
It was thought that the
investors were not as 'emo-
tionally attached' to the pro-
ject as the three founders, and
were keener on seeing a return
on their money. The Bahamas
Film Studios had previously
obtained a $10 million loarr
from FirstCaribbean Interna-
tional Bank to excavate the
water tank where Pirates of the
Caribbean was filmed.
Working
Mr Quigley is now working
on an independent project, an
action adventure television
show that will be an all-
Bahamian production, based
on the exploits of BASRA.
Meanwhile, the Bahamas
Film Studios is.not.r.esting on,
its Piates of dhe Guibbean lau-
. rels either. ,
Diana McGonigal, the
Bahamas Film Studios' acting
director of operations, told The
Tribune that the development
was working with a number of
potential clients on projects
that were in the "pre-produc-
tion phase".
She added that the Bahamas
Film Studios could not reveal
any names yet, but said: "We
are working with nearly a
dozen potential clients, rang-
ing from a major commercial
shoot to a television series and
-several well-budgeted feature
films."


Share
your,

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.
I


I


BUSINESS









THE TRIBUNE


FROM page 1B


Sands, told The Tribune that the company was
preparing for redevelopment and the construc-
tion of new properties by conducting testing,
which will provide vital information when it
comes to building the foundations.
The drilling at sites such as the former Rock
and Roll Cafe and the golf course started last
week.
Mr Sands said that the company was pro-
gressing in its redevelopment of the Cable Beach
strip. "We are close to an agreement with the
Ministry of Works for the rerouting of West
Bay Street, and bids for that project should go
out to tender, if not by the end of the year, then
by the first month of 2007," said Mr Sands.
On July 21,2006, Baha Mar signed an agree-
ment with the Government to that will allow it
to import $18.379 million worth of construction
and other equipment, needed to redevelop the
Radisson, Wyndham and Nassau Beach resorts,
free from customs duties.
The agreement also exempts the three resorts,
and the Radisson Golf Course, from the pay-
ment of real property taxes for a five-year peri-
od, which began on May 4, 2005.
In common with other developers, Baha Mar
has created separate companies to own each of
its properties. Baha Mar Properties owns the
- Radisson- BMP Three is the company that owns
the 99-year lease on the Wyndham; NBH Hold-,
ings performs a similar job at the Nassau.Beach,


I


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006, PAGE 13B


and BMP Golf Ltd owns the golf course.
Meanwhile, Mr Sands said the $80 million
renovations at the Radisson, which have tem-
porarily decreased the resort's room inventory
by more than 300, were progressing very well.
The 300 rooms renovated in the first phase are
due to be completed by March 2007. Work on
the public spaces and additional rooms will take,
another six months, lasting until
September/October 2007.
The Radisson, which is due to eventually be
rebranded as a Sheraton, is being renovated
under an $80 million contract that was awarded
to Bahamian company, Osprey Developers.
Bids are also about to be made for a new
Culture Centre, which Baha Mar is to build to
house the Cable Beach straw market.
According to Mr Sands, plans and drawings
for the new centre are 95 per cent completed,
and the bid process should be completed by the
end of the year.
Bids are also about to go out before the end of
the month for a new staff parking lot, as the
current one will have to be replaced to accom-
modate the developnient.
So a tremendous amount of work is being
done," said Mr Sands.
Apart from the West Bay Street re-routing,
Baha Mar's next task will be to relocate all gov-
ernment office buildings and the commercial
banks on West Bay Street to the new Commer-
cial Village.
From start to finish, work on the Commercial
.Village construction is likely to take between 12-
18 months.


3Bank of The Bahamas
INTERNATIONAL

FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE FOR THE THREE-MONTH PERIOD ENDED
SEPTEMBER 30, 2006 WITH YEAR OVER YEAR COMPARISON


BUINS














B A~ha Ma








dr-Il


R K OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
CONSOLUIATEDDBALANCE SHEET
AS OFP SEPTEMBER 30,2008
(Epemad iSn Iabmen dollare)


SEPTEMBER
A 2DO


Cash and due hom banks
Invetnte. Loan and Advances to Customma, net
OUtwAssls
TOTAL



AMUnmes
Depoelmt fom cutomer and banks
TotayIb"te
Total Uabtttm


SEPTEMBER J'ns
Aoifi 0


$ 45,514,125 $ 47.518,801 S
498,012,640 428.469.311
20739043 2 2,845148


Bank of The Bahamas International (Bank), capitalizing on the momentum created from a record-
breaking fiscal year 2006, maintained its steady and consistent growth during the period. Such
experience is evident in Net Income of $2.9 million recorded for the review period which represents
an Impressive increase of 19.52% over the corresponding period.

Total Assets at period end stood at $564.3 million representing an increase of 13.57% over the
previous period, growing ever closer to the $600 million threshold. The Bank's share price
continues to show significant upward trending increasing by 10.56% or $0.74 to end at $7.75 for
the period compared to $7.01 at the same time in 2005.

Return on Assets stood at 2.21% for the period compared to 2.06% in 2005. Earnings per Share
of 19 cents and Retum-on Equity of 17.4% settled at levels lower than the corresponding period of
20 cents and 21.97% respectively reflecting the impact of the Bank's increase In capital through
the successful issuance of 3.6 million additional shares via a fully subscribed rights offering plus
the issuance of $14.7 million in preference shares. As a result the Bank's Shareholders' Equity
stood at $90.0 million an increase of 101% year-over-year. Further, its capital, ratio which defines
its ability to absorb general business risks has significantly improved from 9% in 2005 to 16% in
the current period.

Although generally sound economic conditions prevail a weakening in system liquidity may
challenge core asset growth prospects for the sector. However, it is the Bank's expectation that
new business opportunities will emerge from its introduction of handsomely crafted new products
designed to improve the convenience and efficiency of the customer experience.

During the period, the Bank made a landmark announcement with the launch of its Private Banking
Department geared at providing enhanced customer service and full scale banking products and
services to Bahamian and. International customers. Private Banking is an integral element of the
Bank's strategic thrust to becoming a full service financial enterprise. The Bank continued to enjoy
recognition for its commitment and contribution to the Financial Services Industry (FSI). During the
period the Bank received the prestigious Development and Promotion Award from the Bahamas
Financial Services Board and its Managing Director, received the Executive of the Year award. We
are also pleased to note that our Manager, Human Resources & Training was a 2006 nominee for
"Professional of The Year." The Bank acknowledges these awards as being external recognition by
its peers of its continuous and prudent efforts in enhancing both the FSIand shareholder value.

We acknowledge and thank our loyal staff for their dedicated efforts in securing the continued
success of the Bank. We thank our directors for their disciplined and responsible stewardship,
Importantly we remain grateful for the confidence and support expressed by our growing customer
and shareholders base.


F











44,198.930
484.881,282
37f230


$ S6458 8 $ $ 502,M.=
. .



438,307,283 416,741,901 441,816,912
17,000.000 17,000,000 17,000,000
19,023,289 18m.23o,011 11,.794,99
474,330,572 451,979,912 470,411,611 k


SHNHOLDERS EQUIM Y


ShamCapal
Authoized--25.000.000 preferred shares of SB 1,000 mec
-2,000,000 common shares mof S aoch
IaWsd and Fuly Paid 1500,000 common shares (20D05:12.0
leaued PMereIT S4awM edeemoabte By Issuer)
Share m Piurksm
TreswyShaerm

Retaked Eam-ng
Total Shareholders Eqity

TOTmAL


15T600,000.
14.764,990
28.587,866
(237,239)
\


12.000.000

7.88,084
(264,270)
1,400,000
2^4.128.594t


C

'F.

15.600,000 '
'F
28,587.866
(245.739)
1,400o.00oo
294 Af 75684


31.21619i 2,125,54 294 ,
$- 89,935,236 S 44.853,348 S 74,817,811

$ 564,265,800 $ 46833.260 $ 45, 2,422


BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME
3 MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30,2006 '
(Expressed in Bahaiulan dollars)


NET ITERESTAND OTHER INCOME:


Interest Income
Interest Expense
Net Interest Income
Less Net Provision for Loaon Losses,
Net Interest Income after Provision for Loan Losses
Non-Interest Revenue
Income from Investments
NetRevenue
NON-4NTERET EXPENSES
NET INCOME


EARNINGS PER SHARE


$ 10,132,194
4,200.482
5,931,712
342,030
5,589,682
1,817,164
435,808
7,842,652
4,915,296
$ 2,927,356

$ 0.19


$ 8,025,025
3.097,446
4,927,579
628,545.
4,299,034.
1 63.,482.
384.764,f
6,497,2804
4,047,969,-
5 2.449,311l

$ 0.20P
rf
'F
'C'
F,


BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS
3 MONTHS ENDING SEPTEMBER 30,2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)


CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
Net income
Adjuntments for non-cash items

Net change in operating assets
Net cus used In operating activities

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
Acquisition offixed assets
t Purchase of investments
Proceeds from maturity of investments
Net cash used In investing activities

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:
Issuance of Preference Shares
Dividends paid
Net cash provided by (used In) financing activities

NET INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
DURING THE PERIOD

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS BEGINNING OF PERIOD


END OFPERIOD

BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED


2006


t 2,927,356
332,128
3,259,484
(14,065,373)
(10,805,889)


(154,235)


(154,235)


14,764,990
(2,489,671)
12,275,319


1,315,195

44,198,930

$ 45,514,125


NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED INTERIM CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENT
3 MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2006


I V
2005
Ft
0

$ 2,449,311
372,575
2,8291,886q
(8,419,3931
5,597,5071
I'
-
(3,462,000t
100,000s,
(3,362,000



*:
(l,912,896
(1,912,896




4
(10,872,40i

58,391,204

S 47,518,801


S4
Ft
W 4


1. ACCOUNTING POLICIES

These consolidated interim condensed financial statements are prepared in
accordance with IAS 34 Interim Financial Reporting. The accounting polices used in
the preparation of these consolidated interim condensed financial statements are
consistent with those used in the annual financial statements for the year ended June
30,2006.

The consolidated interim condensed financial statements include the accounts of
Bank of the Bahamas Limited and its wholly owned subsidiaries, BOB Financial
Services Ltd and Bank of the Bahamas Trust Limited.
a
2. COMPARATIVES t

Certain comparative figures have been restated to comply with the current year's
presentation.


41.






Citco Fund Services is a division of the Cilco Group of Companies and is the largest independent
administrator of Hedge Funds in the world with offices in Curacao, Amsterdam, Dublin. London.
Luxembouirg. Miami. New York, Toronto, Cayman Islands, the British Virgin Islands, the Bahamas,
Bermuda, San FranLisco and Sydney The di% ision pro% ides fill sen ice administration to over 2,000 Hedge
Funds fo.r multinational banks and international Investment Managers. totaling over $300 billion in net
assets.








As part of'.ur continued expansion. In Our office in Baihanus we are looking for a number of motivated
and pro-active


(Senior) Fund Accountants


v.ho iare LUapble orfprprig fing ancial reports. in an international and d\ nunic environment. for our clients
who onsist of international inmesmenri manaccrs and institutional inv'iturs N within those [ledge Funds.
The Fund Awc'uniatnt is the main contact for the inm stncnt mn.icers. adSors'. shareholders and third
pJriics. as appropriate.


Your most important tasks and responsibilities are:
preparing periodical linancial reporting for thel Hedge Funds. includulg tlic detennination ol'"Net
Asset Valuc" and preparing the Statement of Asscts and Liabilities. and Prolli and Loss Statement
maintaining contact \ith ln estlnt Managers. Investors. Banks and Brokers
monitoring of irregularities, and de% elopiments through ad-hoc reports
handling pa iment transactions
liaising with international clients and other CithLI Oflie5 iorlduide, to ensure that client needs
are.met


The successful candidates should meet the following criteria:
aCPA orCA designation,a CFA candidate or another Lquialcentprofessional qualification
affinity with investment instruments and figures
a leam pla er. able to cope with individual responsibilities
highly accurate and excellent communication skills
working experience in the financial area or at an accounting firm is an advantage


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If you are interested in this opportunity, please send your curriculum vitae and covering letter via e-mail
to: Citco Fund Services (Bahamas) Ltd., att. Managing Director (hrbahamas@citco.com).

You can find more information about our organization, on our website: www.citco.com.


F

F








PAGE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 206 T E S


Karate kids have all the rtkoves


Notice
i**

NOTICE is hereby given that LINDA NOREUS, RP.O. BOX
1-6049, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
ho knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
Mt be granted, should send a written and signed statement
$f the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13TH day of
%OVEMBER, 2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
tid Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



I Notice
NOTICE is hereby given that KATHIA FELIMA OF EAST
BROUGHAM STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
I the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
r registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
Ad signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
om the 20TH day of NOVEMBER, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
ssau, Bahamas.


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, MARGARET NOEL
of Pinewood Gardens, #1713 Avacado St. Nassau,
Bahamas, intend to change my name to MARGARET
MISCALIN. If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections
to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau,
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of
publication of this notice.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ANDRE DANY OF SPANISH
WELLS, ELEUTHERA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 10th day of November, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Eleuthera, Bahamas.


* AGETHA CURRY in action on Saturday.
I (Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)


I












































-Ar.
Il
1'


TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 14B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006







MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006, PAGE 15B


TRIBUNE SPORTS


Angels put the




on title-holding


brakes




Truckers


* BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
AFTER losing their first title in
the New Providence Women's
Basketball Association last year,
the Cleaning Center Lady Angels
returned with vengeance in their
eyes.
With Anthony Swaby returning
to the sidelines to coach and guard
Keisha Smith joining their line-up,
the Lady Angels knocked off the
defending champions Johnson's
Lady Truckers 93-71 in the season
opener under a new administra-
tion.
"It's good to be back," said Swa-
by, who is coaching the Lady
Angels for the first time since the
league was formed, taking over
from Charlene 'Swish' Smith, now
an assistant to Linda Davis with
the College of the Bahamas
Caribs.
Swaby, who devoted his time to
the executive board when the


league was formed four years ago,
said he liked what he saw from his
Lady Angels, but admitted that
there's still some things they have
to work on.
"We need to be more consis-
tent," he said. "But that have to
start with getting everybody out
to practise. Once we can do that,
we will be okay."

Line-up
The Lady Angels, with basically
the same line-up, won the title for
the first three years before 'they
lost it to the Lady Truckers last
year..
SOn Saturday, with Keisha Smith,
a player who played in the United
States and represented the country
on the national team, in their line-
up, along with Nadja Armbrister,
the Lady Angels added the youth
that they needed to help out the
veterans.
Still, it was the 1-2-3 punch of
Suzette McKenzie, Keisha


Richardson and Sharelle Cash,
who carried the load as they
served notice that they are out to
regain their crown.
McKenzie, the MVP of the Lady
Angels' winning seasons, had 33
points with 11 rebounds and five
assists. Richardson had 21 points
with 10 rebounds and Cash poured
in 19 points with seven rebounds,
three assists and three steals.
Smith, who was limited to foul
trouble early, scored just seven
with three rebounds and two
assists. However, she delighted the
crowd with her ball handling skills.
Armbrister was also a big addition
with six points, nine rebounds and
a block shot.
"I had two fouls in the first half,
but the next game I will definitely
be ready," Smith charged. "I'm
playing with a lot of veterans. I've
never played with them before, so
it's good.
"The chemistry is there and we
all can play great ball. Plus I'm
familiar playing with Swaby. I love


playing with him. He's been
around for a long time. So I think
this is our year. We're going all
the way."
Despite the loss, the Lady
Truckers, who only played with six
players, have vowed that they will
be back.

League
"It was a good effort. We just
came out and worked with what
we had," Shantelle Rolle pointed
out "That was just our first game.
The league just started.
S"All we have to do is bring our
girls out and I think we can take
the championship again."
In her defence for their big to
repeat as champions, last year's
MVP Rolle lid up the nets for a
game high 37 points. She also had
six rebounds and four assists.
She got help from her back court
tandem Glenda Gilcud, who came
up with 20 points, four rebounds
and two assists.


Their next best scorer was Ran-
dell Cooper with five. Newly elect-
ed president Antoinette Knowles
made her contribution with three
points and 10 rebounds.
The game started off close until
the Lady Angels broke an 11-11
tie to go up 19-11. But Shantelle
Rolle hit the last of her two free
throws at the buzzer for a 19-12
deficit.
Then in the second quarter, the
Lady Angels went on a 9-4 spurt to*
open the second quarter.
Although the Lady Truckers'
managed to cut it to 28-21, the'
Lady Angels surged back out front
45-30 at the half.
In the third quarter, the Lady.
Truckers came under the 10-point
margin a couple of times and they
stayed that way to the break, trail-"
ing 59-53.
But mid-way in the fourth quar-
ter, when the Lady Angels made
their run, the Lady Truckers just
didn't have the legs to stay with
them.


'hoo Choo'




suffers his first




professional loss


* BOXING
By BRENT
STUBBS
-Senior Sports
Reporter


JERMAINE 'Choo
Choo' Mackey suffered
the first loss of his pro-
fessional career on Sat-
urday night in Montreal,
Canada.
It came at the hands
of Jean Pascal in a bout
that went the distance
for the North American
,Boxing Organisation's
super-middleweight
title.
The three judges
awarded Pascal the
unanimous victory after
they all scored the bout
120-106 as he improved
his record to 15-0 with
12 knockouts.
Mackey dropped- to
11-1 with eight knock-
outs and he avoided get-
ting stopped in the sec-
ond round. EEMIE
Pascal had knocked
down Mackey twice in the round and on the
third one, the bell sounded as the referee did-
n't have to issue the mandatory eight-count.
Mackey traveled to Canada with First Class
Promotion's promoter Michelle Minus. Her
husband and trainer Ray Minus Jr. joined
them from New York where he worked the
corner.
Attempts to contact the camp in Canada
failed today as they were enroute back to the
Bahamas.
Minus Jr. was in New York City to work
the corner of Meacher 'Pain' Major, who
fought on Wednesday night. He was stopped in
the third round by Edgar Santana.


-ho


On his return holhe,'
Major complained' of
getting hit in hisFyesd
with a* liquid substance
from the gloves of
Sahata in the second
round. He said he
informed Minus Jr. that
he couldn't see clearly,
but his eyes were not
rinsed.out.
Major admitted that
he couldn't see clearly
in the third round as
,Santana went to work.
The referee eventually
stepped in after San-
tana delivered a flurry
to stop the bout two
minutes and 53 seconds
in the round.'
The Bahamas and
World Boxing Associ-
ation's FedeCaribe
champion was-fighting
out his weight-class.
The fight was set at the
welterweight division.
Mackey, the
Bahamas and World
oo Choo' Mackey BoxinglCouncil's Con-
tinental Boxing Fed~era-
tion's super-mniddleweight champion, is sched-
uled to be back in action on Friday, November
24 at the Wyndham Nassau Resort.
He is expected to:be in the co-main event
against Jamaican Anthony Osbourne in an
eight-rounder. Major was scheduled to fight in
the main 10 round event against Ian 'Killer'
Smith.
After getting stopped in New York City by
Santana, he said he won't be able to fight.
He's under medication, trying to get his eyes
cleared up.
There's no word from First Class Promo-
tions as to whether or not the show will still go
on.


Cod l N mom
W. IhS-O

r^Wt~li~jby


IW OW iAW- I-


COOL 943 NASSAU
BIE Tu On lICATIFAR
vwEEK 1 wUCE


,The Tribune ,i i =r


cokuBm and drobp off at Th e Thibume
-U -


Ad*i3~~ir


4


tfK -


./'- UIP~AVr.


1 IDI JSVPR I S


--


.V. -.A VAr-, -, 4*hA Mnu. A


T~ff^^f^canr^ip'





nA$Wt040H?(BumllrAB!fO
o USriTMrBHl'M


2








a S *' rt


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2006


SECTION



B
Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Iiail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


LulHi I
S SOFIB1ALL
HFLRRIC.vNES0GO
LINDEFEATED
\\HILE hE inc fIu>l iinion
-* .-1Ii Ilk 'i l A u0uiine >C.11-
k mj BiL. Rcd MNia.chjne' inning
Ih. .l the ili iour Bah.imas A.ss0-
ti. .-iii cit indeip.:ndJrni SccondarN
SLh. I cii s th illl tidk the Si
.-ildJr. .o.' H.IUrTicjnci' daIo
ri]. : d. naujor :ichicLemrienit
Tlicir juiior r hi- -%; v.epi ihe
<.)Lii...'n (C"'I:kiLe Coniheii, in rMo
Iir.iLhi -'mic I".-iAdd ihe champi-
(n lhip i.1'v n i- iheir pifnlnf ni s
thi .%enr ijnde-laicJ
ba.k.-ibail pl.1icr Herman
llJN L-ik Ir ka: thii i ace puich r.
l:tding ihL Hurricincs aijack on
thl mound N.,\cL'ck Jr. had Indi-
cdiid i he mhct.asn' surprised that
thi\ aere unbeaten and ;aid the
pl s~d Aell .ill \caii
Nla'.cock and ihc Humianes
mrc h, _pttois do' [hih c ime thing
v.1h.n iI h : ,kc ih I ;e.i-on roll
iiround
-\nd %hlule the\ %-.-'n the junior
hs'v timll. Si Adrsdiews also
pl.i\icdJ and loti o SAC in boih
ihc unisir girl' and senior girls
di'. r 'i'n-
U \ OLLEI BALL
NPV ACTION
THE Ne% Pro\idence \olk\-
ball A;-\-s'ciation played a double
hc.idcr on Frindai niwht at ihe D\V
Dai tsG\ mi 'iih ihie folloai mg
rc sulii'
Team Tech Iniernational Lady
7I.Lch defeated the Scoitusdalc
C'ougars in lour sets '125-14. 30-28.
23-2 ind 2S19.
RichcU He nHfield had 19 spikes
and four ici; for a game high 23
poiunis ind Nicoleuc Camphbell
haid I.i 'pike, and NiX aces
In thec Is.- Lanishka Clarke
had 10 spikes, two blocks and an
ace, while Joneen Saunders had
t11 spikes and two aces.' .
Also, the Scotia Bank Defend-
* ers defeated the Police
Crimestoppers in li;e ilugh s'.
25-17,25-22,13-14., 25-27 and 15-
11. ,. .:' .
Ian 'Wire' Pinder had 22
spikes, two blocks and an ace for
a game high 25 points. Muller
Petit had 12 spikes and six aces.
In the loss, Jolhn Rolle had 17
spikes, a block and an ace and
Fisk Burrows had 11 spikes and,
eight aces.
The NPVA played a triple
header on Sunday. No results
were available at presstime. They
will be back in action tonight % ith
a double header on tap starting at
7pm.
SEASON POSTPONED
GSSSA MEETING
The Government Secondary
Schools Sports Association has
put itsN olli ,ball season oin hold
until thz hat, i ni mculing r [od.i\a ai
4pm at the Bahamas Union of
Teacher's Hall to discuss their '
constitution.
A number of coaches have
c.nmppihnebd :iboui the amend-
n i:ri ic ili i1;'tltbiis claim-
imr oih.t nilii dn It \otie onlt he
points inserted, particularly those
that have to do with the eligibility
of players.
All schools are urged to have a.,
representative present for the
meeting.
M BASKETBALL
CATHOLIC PLAYOFFS
The Catholic Diocesan Primary
School will play its final regular
season game today at 3:15 p.m. at
St. Francis/Joseph as theShockers
host Our Lady's Blue Flames to
determine who will get the fifth
and sixth spots. Both teams go
into the game winless at 0-4.
The playoffs will get underway
on Wednesday with pennantwin-
ning Xavier's (4-1) takirigon
fourth place St. Thomas More (3-
2), while second place St. Cecilia's
(4-1) will host third place St.
Bede's(3-2).
The best-of-three champi-
onship will start on Monday,
November 27 at Loynla Hall.


opyright edMaterial



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AVailable from Commercial News.Rroviders


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9 itt Mt ism ..P .. --
A. .:


nbic


Nd


for


estor


lose in final


sters Cup


add the prestigious crown
to the five titles .hey won
this year.
For IKniowles and Nestor.
who could not bI reached
for comments, this was
their eighth appearance in
the year- .ndin, tourna-
ment arid their third trip to
the final.
While they won four
titles this year at Delray
Beach, AMS Indian Wells,
AMS Romie and Basel, they
were hoping that they could
finally raise the crystals
that Bjiorkman and Mirnyi
held .it the c nd of the
match.
But the Sweden-Belarus


combo played like they
wanted it more as they'
jumped out to a 4-0 lead in
the first set and took a 5-3
lead in the second set
when they broke Knowles
serve in ihe seventh'
game. .
Then serving for thO
match, Mirnvi watched as
Knowles and Nestor pulled
even at 30-30.
However, the Bahamian-
Canadian duo dropped the
final two points wilh a ser.-
\ice return that sailed wide.
Knowles will now turrt his
attention on the hosting of
his sixth Celebrity Thurna-
Sment that is scheduled for
December 8-9 at Atlantls
on Paradise Island. I I
Nestor and a host (if
stars, including Fred Stolle,
Jim Courier, Nicole Vaidij-
ova, Jamea Jackson, Scont
Davis, Rich Leach, Mark
Merklein and Ryan Sweet-
ing, are expected to partic-
ipate.


* TENNIS
By BRENT STUBB!
'Senior Sports
Reporter
FOR the third ti
Mark Knowles and Da
Nestor have fallen sho:
winning the Tennis Mas
Cup year-ending tou
merit, dubbed "The F
Show down" in Shang
China.
Knowles and Nestor
number three seeded ti
pla ed in the final as
did in 2004 and 2005,
this time they fell s]
after defeat by the I
seeds of Jonas. Bjork
and Max Mirnyi, 6-2 an
4 yesterday.
After finishing sec
behind Bjorkman and
in their, Gold Group q
flying segment of the t
nament, Knowles
Nestor took out the I
team of Paul Hanlev I
Australia and Kevin L I


owes a



SDoubles pair


oie f Tennis Ma


aniel
rt of
sters
rna-
inal
;hai,
, the
eam,
they,
but
hort
No.2
man
id 6-
ond
Max
uali-
our-
and
No.4
rroni
frlyoit
Myent


of Z'imbabwe 4-6, 6-1, 6-3
in their semifinal match on
Saturday.
Bu-t .against Bjorkman
and Nlirnvmi. to whom they
lost 4-6. 6-4, 7-6 (2) in their
round robin play, Knowles
and Nestor couldn't find a
way to turn the tables on
the pair, who reached the
final with a hard fought 6-
714), 7-6(4). 7-6(5) win over
No.6 MNlartin Damm of the
Czech Republic and Lean-
der Paes of India.
It was a remarkable per-
formance by Bjorkmnan and
Mirnyi, who were winless
in last )Car" year-ending
tournament, to go unde-


feated in every match they
played this y~ar.
"I think m\e :iN ed the
best until last, and we
couldn't hav finished the
year better t an this," said
Bjorkman, in an interview
on the tournament's web-
site. "We just played prob-
ably the best match of the
year."

Crcwn
With the win, Bjorkman
and Mirnyi topk their head-
to-head match-ups for the
year against Knowles and
Nestor to 5-4. They also


** ^ - > 4. ^
/4. *








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