Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00579
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: November 13, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00579
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

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(Photos: Felipe Major/
Tribune staff)

9, up,
Tribune Staff
anorter
FORMER Playboy
playmate Anna Nicole
b hand
"Horizons", the Eastern
Rotadrluxkurhy home used to
residency in the Bahamas.
Her ex-lover Ben
Thompson, a South Car-
olina reactor, was at the
gate of the mansion on
Saturday to try to assert
ownership of the proper-
ty.
Mr Thompson, along
with son-in-law Ford Shel-
ley and family friend Mark
Sichitano, arrived m Nas-
sau at 10am through Exec-
utive Flight Services.
However, by the time
they reached Horizons, Ms
Smith's attorney Wayne
Mun e was already th

SEE page 12


Volume: 102 N;o.294


MONDArY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006


M.By PAUL G
TURNOUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
HAITIAN police are to
undergo training with the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force in a
move to make their homeland
safer and more secure.
Deputy Prime Minister Cyn-
a thia Pratt, who recently
returned from an official visit
to HaitI. sued oilicers would
attend the Police College in
Nassau from January, 2007.
Accompanying Mrs Pratt on
her visit was Commissioner
Paul Farquharson, other offi-
cers and government officials.
Ms Pratt said Haiti's police
commissioner would visit the
Bahama next month following
a police chiefs meeting in Bar-
bados. .
She said it had always been
their view that a more stable
Haiti would result in a more sta-
ble Bahamas.
"We established relationships
with the government of Haiti,
and also we were able.to dis-
cuss the opportunity of us start-
ing as sgon as possible. Thereby,
we agreed that we would begin
in January of 2007.
"Like I said earlier, there will
be four police officers coming to
egbndGh. Theb will chnar60bl at
opportunity to work with Urban
Renewal as well, so they can
oversee the community polic-
ing," she said.
Mrs Pratt said Haiti had a lot
o bT C e r
ing Haiti to the stable country
that it once was
"We believe that if there is a


safe Haiti there will be a safe
Bahamas. We believe that if we
are able to assist them in train-
ing they will be better able to
police their country, giving us
an opportunity to curtail some
of the problems that we are
faced with,
"This is something that has
bothered us, aild really the
police are concerned about the
criminal element emanating out
of Main cloning la. the
Bahamas. *
"We agreed that this would
~ be the way forward, that we
could reach out to assist Haiti in
training their officers so they
can be able to police them in
Haiti. The Bahamas then Would
be a safe Bahamas," she said.
Mr Farquharson said that the
< trip was an "historic one" as it
was the first time that any
Bahamian police commission-
er had gone to meet his coun-
terpart in Haiti to discuss
national security issues.
, "We are very excited by the
training. Our DPM ensured that
we came back with commit-
ments on both side. And, as she
said on the last night when the
Prime Minister hosted a recep-
tion in her honour, it is a win-
win situation. If Haiti can ben-
efit from this activity, then the
Bahamas will benefit as well,"
. Echoing this sentiment, Mrs
Pratt said the Haitian govern-
mentwasveryexcitedaboutthe
Idea and extremely grateful to
the Bahamas.for its assistance.
thel also nt totpubl2 t nk
their hospitality and the way
SEE page eight


LAWYERS and loved
ones visitmg mates at Her
Majesty's Prison were out-
raged yesterday after they
found that the visitmg hours
were changed without suffi-
cient notice.
Lawyer and human rights
activist Paul Moss said this
mistake, which he said was
indicative of the "ad hoc man-
ner" in which the prison was
run, resulted in inmates not
being able to see their loved
ones or receive food from out-
side.
Mr Moss said that regular
visiting hours at the prison are
f omc2hTg 4pm.oBut they
"They changed things up so


much so that prisoners who
were expecting food from
loved ones were not permit-
ted because they did not
know they could not visit
because of the change.
"I think (prison superin-
tendent) Elliston Rahming
has done an excellent job but
it seems to.me that it's the
same old ad hoc system that
has plagued the prison for
decades," he said.
Mr Moss said he was told
by a prison guard that the vis-
iting time was changed
because of a staff shortage.
The officer also told Mr
Moss that the prison.had
SEE page 13


n iune


The


8 818 ASS 0 IP IR


p ill


Training to start E


Shooting
* *
71011111 lS
4 h
JORT S St
0111101 'd
bPAUL GdT QUEST
THE 45th homicide in the
Bahamas for 2006 was recorded
on Friday night when a young
man, believed to be in his mid
twenties, was shot in the head.
Police press liaison officer
Walter Evans said the victim
was standing with a group of
men on Lyon Road, off Shirley
Street in the Kemp Road area,
when the shooting occurred.
"These men were standing in
the area when gunshots were
heard. As a result, one young
man was hit by gunfire. He was
struck in the head area, and sue
combed atntshe enes Usai

SEE page 13


POSOH V1S1ting
1-
IIOUTS change


Sp arks outrage







THE TRIBUNE


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a ,
good cause, campaigning a
for improvements in 11 vgy a
area or have won pn
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


HA WEARY Haitian immi-
'e't-Def re-
hended off South Andros on
Friday by the Defence Force
patrol craft HMBS Yellow
Elder, and brought to Nassari
early Saturday morning.


PAGE 2, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006


DEFFa As
assisting
immigrants
at the Coral

.s
the 90-strong
group appre-
hended off
South
Andros.


A total of 147 Haitian immi-
grants have been detained by
the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force within the past three
days.
The latest apprehension was
made on Friday afternoon,
when 90 Haitian migrants were
picked up by the Defence Force
patrol craft HMBS Yellow
Elder.
After receiving reports of a


Haitian vessel in the central
Bahamas area on Friday
evening, the patrol craft was dis-
patched to investigate,
A Haitian sloop with a large
number of illegal immigrants
was discovered about 10 miles
off South Andros.
The immigrants 79 males,
10 females and a child = were
brought into the capital early
Saturday morning and turned


over to immigration authorities
for processing.
Earlier this week, 157 Haitian
immigrants were rescued by the
Defence Force after their sloop
ran aground off Little Ragged
Island.
This means a total of over
1,400 Haitian immigrants were
apprehended in Bahamian
waters by the Defence Force
this year.


Haitian immigr ants










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I es;s~E~,~s~~m-'l~a~~ --~marp~


i


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


missed the statutory
deadhne m 2006, lead-
ing Justice Lyons to
suspect that the omis-
sion was deliberate.
ys the Juda I h

rattulala ,nbp sli Indt
conclude that this was
aln hing other than
The FNM concurred,

n igl t.h
prime minister himself
is a lawyer and so are
his former attorney
general, Alfred Sears,
an inCTnAl
Maynard Gibsoli.
As the judge says:"If
this was a deliberate act
ire for by the Cabinet, then
(and there is no dull
edge to this), this must
be considered a delib-

indepe ae tth uTci ye
And that, m turn, is an attack
on the fundamental constitu-
tional rights elijoyed by all per-
sons of this country."
The FNM said that this is a
very serious piece of negli-
gence on the part of a govern-
ment that is stumbhng from
crisis to crisis and scandal to
scandal while the people are
crying out for relief.
"We used to think that Mr
Sears was not paying attention
to his duties as Minister of
Education because he was
busy with the Attorney Gen-
eral's Office, but now it turns
out he was not paying atten-
tion to that either.
"As for Mrs Gibson, we
know that she was anxious to
announce that her office was
busy preparing heads of agree-
ment for the LNG deal," the
FNM said.
The opposition said it was a
shame that both of them, and
their colleagues. were not car-
sying otit the constitutional.abd
Ic'Mrfi'Itiffff"ffiff i\ftfi'nfre"
directly on the administration
of justice and the protection'
of the rights of the Bahamian
people,
"The best thing Mr Christie
can do now is to urge Bahami-
ans who have not yet done so
to register to vote so we can
have an early election and end
this national nightmare," the
party said.


The FNM said over
the weekend that
Prime Minister Perry
Christie and his minis-
ters have remarkable
m I etob deludn
es dk ewotu
high level of anxiety in
the Bahamas today,
and
mounting with every
pa nl t fei has to do
with the level of crime
and insecurity felt
every day by citizens,
exacerbated by the
tjr t rai t t
his colleagues are inca-
pable of doing any- as g
thing about it except to 15115"'"
indulge in their old M ALl
smoke and mirrors her ha
game," the FNM said.
The party described
g me as semoC nd mir-
rors exercise which has now
been embarrassingly exposed
and has contributed to an
"unprecedented dressing down
of the Government by a Jus-
tice ofthe Supreme Court".
"Justice John Lyons stunned
the nation last week as he laid
down a chilling indictment of
negligence and dereliction of
duty against the PLP govern-
ment," the FNM said.
The judge accused the PLP
Cabinet of breaking the law
and undermining the very
foundation of the system the
Bahamian people must rely on
for the administration of jus-
tice and for the protection of
their constitutional rights and
freedoms
Justice Lyons contends that
there may be a constitutional
crisis as a result of the govern-
ment's failure to obey the law
and this view is supported by a
number of qualified persons,
including former PLP Senator
Dynian Gomez, who has only
recently beezi designated a Jus-
tice of the Supreme Court in
waiting.
"The extent of the crisis and
the effects of it are to be deter-
milled by the courts, but what
is clear beyond any doubt is
that the PLP government
- neglected to carry out a clear
mandate under the law, and
that they did it not once but
twice, the second time being


ndling of the judiciary


after the first offence and a
possible remedy was pointed
out to them," the party said.
The party said that it was in
2000, on the watch of the FNM
government, that the Judges
Remuneration and Pensions
Act was amended to more
effectively protect the inde-
pendence of the Judiciary.
The amended Act requires
the Governor General every
three years to appoint a Com-
mission to review the salaries,
allowances and pensions of
judgesandtomakeappropri-
ate recommendations.
Appointments to the Com-
mission are to be made by the
Governor General on the
advice of the Cabinet.
As Justice Lyons pointed
out in his ruling, this is not a
matter of discretion but some-
thing that must be done. The
FNM government did it in
2000, but in 2003 when the
next review was mandated, the
PLP government did nothing.
"Having missed th$ dbad-
line to appoint the stattitory"*
commission, the prime minis-
ter in 2005 appointed alitther
commission headed by former
Attorney General Sean
McWeeney in an apparelit
effort to make up for its dere-
liction. That ad hoc commis-
sion did its work but nothing
came of it," the party said.
The opposition said aston-
ishingly, the government again


r y
gWWIFL .
t E.


M By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
COMMISSIONER of Police
Paul Farquharson has finally
received a formal request from
the Ministry of Housing to
begin an investigation into an
alleged "ring of corruption" in
the government's low-cost
housing programme.
Speaking at*a press confer-
ence with the Deputy Prime
Minister Cynthia Pratt yester-
day, Mr Farquharson said that
the Corruption and Com-
plaints Department will be in
charge of the investigation.
Last week, Minister of Hous-
ing Neville Wisdom told


reporters that he had asked the
Commissioner to launch an
investigation to determine if
there was any validity to claims
of corrupt practices m his nun-
istry.
Toshowhisunwaveringsup-
port for his staff, Mr Wisdom
pledged that if it is proven that
he had knowledge or been a
part of any "ring of corrup-
tion", he would resign.
However, when The Tribune
checked with police, it discov-
ered they had not received any
wntten request.
Pointing out that The Tri-
bune had been running articles
for nearly two weeks reveal-
ing damning allegations of cor-


eruption at the Ministry of
Housing, Mr Wisdom said that
the negative publicity had cast
a "cloud of suspicion" over the
entire staff.
With this in mind, he chal-
lenged anyone with informa-
tion to step forward and make
that information public.
"No particular person has
been identified as being cor-
rupt," Mr Wisdom said, "and
since the allegation has been
placed that there are some per-
sons in the mimstry who are
carrying out a 'ring of corrup-
tion', then I would like for
those persons to be identified,
and if so, they will be dealt
with accordmg to the law.


The Mall-at-Marathon


RG000 YEAR


EW1:00


FNM RCCUSCS government o


*In brief





...jo*,dan
sent home

The body of a Canadian
sailor who died while his ship
was visiting the Bahamas was
returned to Newfoundland on
Friday.
ofA casketS r gT eis7yde
wiswasabornrriaenddlraxhsied mo
sailors from a plane to a waiting
hearse during a ceremony at St
John's International Airport.
Pye, 22, died on November 3
after faRinghirito N1asasau har-

shi HMCS St John's, was in
the Bacheamian c italruled the
death was.an accident.
At Fsn sCsreren onybP te
ers each placed a single flower
on the coffin
Also at the service were the
commander of Canadian Forces
Station St John's and the head
of the ruivy school where Pye
attended.

todAy 1 uwt 1 anned for

US official Is

say Castro
.
beheved to
have cancer

5 WASHINGTON
THEUSgovernmentbelieves
FidelCastro'shealthisdeteno~
rating and that the Cuban dic-
tator is unlikely to live through
2007, US officials said, according
to Associated Press.
That dire view was reinforced
last week when Cuba's foreign
minister backed away from his
prediction that the ailing Castro
would return to power by early
December. "It's a subject on
which I don't want to specu-
late," Felipe Perez Roque told
Associated Press m Havana.
US government officials sa'
there is still some mystery.about
Castro's.diagnosis.his treatment
and ho\\ he is responding. But
these officials behave the 80-
year-old has terminal cancer of
the stomach, colon or pancreas.
Castro was seen weakened
and thinner in official state pho~
tos released late last month, and
it is considered unlikely that he
will return to power or survive
through the end of next year,
said the US government and
defence officials. They spoke
on condition of anonymity
biseau o eak uebnod aau';
the politically sensitive topic.
ta erbican oafficialshow l1tjt
glean clues to Castro's health.
But US spy agencies include
physicians who study pictures,
video, public statements and
Other information coming out
of Cuba.
.
BritlSh officers
to probe
Ogffigjgggy jg
police force
M ST LUCIA
Pastries
TEN British police officers
recruited to help fight rising
crime in St. Lucia will also work
to rid the island's police force of
updon nd i f ilency a
according to Associated Press.
Home Affairs Minister Cal-
ixte George said the British offi-
cers, who month, were needed to battle
"endemic diseases," such as cor-
ruption within the Caribbean
country's law-enforcement ranks.
"Some of those endemic dis-
eases relate not only to corrup-
tion, but also to lack of com-
mitmentlackof supervision,
lack of foresight, and no initia-
tive," George told reporters on
Saturday.
His comments come a week
after Labor Minister Velon


John attacked the island's police
force in speech before the
Hou e10f Assembly ae s
He did not elaborate.
Police Commissioner Ausbert
Regis could not be reached for
comment Sunday.
St. Lucia officials asked
Britain earlier this year to help
recruit police to counter violent
crime, rates of which have risen
steadily each year in this for-
mer British colony of 162,000
people. Police blame much of
the violence on drug traffick-


Stranger


C~mmlSSIOner reCelVES request


w~fac19~1









, ~n:~inrr19Zi~ I LI


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.


rs itlo 1 17 12991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARBON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation D artment (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Baharna:1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

.
Career lawyer hits ba.ck at minister


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Reporting to the District Sales Manager, this position will be
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Previous experience in Pharmaceutical
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Candidates should possess a reliable motor vehicle and be
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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4 MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006


laudable the desire for "swift jus-
tice", it cannot be at the expense
of the rights of an accused and
the duties of a prosecutor.
In addition, the short but
undeniable fact is that the Gov-
ernment has not complied with
the provisions of the Judges
Remuneration and Pensions Act
and the Government has known
for some time that it has not
tn ns mr Is in tw hu
liable fact, the Government by
inaction has caused the judges'
salaries to be stagnant for more
an t ed in thus effe
clearly against the spirit of Arti-
cle 135 of the Constitution of
The Bahamas which provides
that the salary of.a Justice of The
Supreme Court shall not be
altered to his disadvantage. All
this could have been avoided if
the Government simply com-
plied with the law.
The Government's non com-
pliance with the provisions of
the Judges Remuneration and
Pensions Act is inexcusable.
Having regard to its non com-
pliance with the Act, the Gov-
ernment's pious representations


EDITOR, The Tribune
IREAD with interest the press
releases by the Cabinet of The
Bahamas and the subsequent
release by the Attorney General
where she purports to come to
the defence of the Deputy Direc-
tor of Public Prosecutions.
The Deputy Director has
issued a press statement which
speaks for itself.
It is unacceptable that the
Attorney General did not
acknowledge her personal
responsibility for the publication
of the memorandum. More
importon sh w 0 c ns
in his judgments in Rv Willams
& Pratt et al and Moss v
Bahamas Reef Condominium
Associati10dne must be given s ri
ernment and people of The
Bahamas as they go to the very
heart of the administration of jus-
tice and the rule of law. It is in the
public interest to publish the
entirety of the two judgments and
the community should read them.
The criticism by the judge of
the cases presented by the Attor-
.ney General's office for trial can-
not be ignored. They go to the
core of a person's constitutional
right to a fair trial, guaranteed by
Article 20 of the Constitution of
The Bahamas. The point made
by the Judge is that however


that it values and respects the
independence of the judiciary
must be dismissed as political
cant.
The fact of the matter is that-
this Government treats the
administration of justice with the
importance that it is entitled to
receive from the Government.
A simple example is the fact
there has been a vacancy in the
Court of Appeal of The
Bahamas for almost one year.
The appointment of a Justice of
the Court of Appeal ls made by
the Prime Minister after consul-
tation with the Leader of the
a pnoo y tnsensitGo e m
appointment. The result is that
the work previously done by five
junsltices is now being one y
o Th k h Cqurt of
- Appeal has been hampered by
the failure to make the appoint
ment.
This is not a matter of scoring
political points. The administra-'
tion of justice is far too impot-
tant to our society. The appro=
private response would be for the
government to acknowledge its
fault and assure the country that
the matter will be corrected
immediately.
MICHAEL L. BARNETT.
Nassan
November 11 2006


BAHAMIANS were a frightened lot during
the Pindling administration. Anyone, be he a
disgruntled PLP politician or just ordinary lit-
tle Joe Blow, wag crushed underfoot and for
gotten if he dared get m the way of "the Chief
and his mimons.
Not so today thanks to the open air-
waves anyone can express his or her opinions,
sometimes in the most outlandish ways. Today
many Bahamians are standmg up to defend
their rights. They don't care how high or
mighty you might think you are they will
confront you with biting words.
Today's young Bahamians are a new breed.
They are not going to be crushed underfoot to
save the career of any politician.
Bahamians are tired of civil servants, who
cannot defend themselves, being made scape-
goats to cover the tracks of some politician
who has meandered from the straight and nar-
rowWe saw it happen in the Korean fishing
boats scandal when an unsuccessful attempt
was made to pin the misdeeds on a civil servant
with an impeccable record to divert attention
from the true culprits. It failed when The Tri-
bune got wind of their despicable attempts.
And now there is a head-on collision with
the judiciary. On November 6, Mr Justice John
Lyons, sitting on the Bench in Freeport on a.
case sent to him for adjudication, opened 3
Pandora'sboxfor emernmeni.
Not only 11ad government not followed the
law as set out in The Judges Remuneration
and Pensions Act which, if deliberate, was
an interference with the independence of the
judiciary -but the Deputy Director of Public
Prosecutions planned a tri-monthly review of
each justice's court. Mr Justice Lyon's likened
it to "a school master's report or human

":";?os many de od of wha dsinha
name of the Attorney GeneraPs "swift jus-
tice hper rea e ase, purportedly issued by
the deputy director of pubhc prosecutions
seemed to score each.court by the number of
cases that had swiftly crossed each judge's
desk. Justice Lyons likened the release to a
"self-promoting piece of headline hunting."
On Friday, in an unprecedented move by an
employee of government, Cheryl Grant-
Bethell defended her reputation. The deputy
.director was not going to have her career
ruined by any government minister even
though that minister is her immediate superi-


or. She made her point in no uncertain terms.
She claimed she was being made the scape-
goat for mistakes for which Attorney General
Allyson Maynard- Gibson failed to take
responsibility.
And then she said:
"In my efforts to defend my good name I
hope, trust, and pray that the powers that be di
not seek to administer and visit 'Swift Justice
upon me."
In view of what the Attorney General said
in public print Friday about Mrs Bethell it
would be more than Mrs Allyson Maynard-
Gibson or anyone else would dare do-that is,
if they value pubhe opmxon.
After all this won't be the same as the firing
of the former registrar general, who Mrs May-
nard-Gibson told the House she had hired
solely on the reputation of her mother a
staunch PLP.
as WME rd d M saB txhpeH
rienced and seasoned prosecutor. She is, said
the Attorney General, highly respected by her
peers and is a great asset to the Office of the
Attorney General. "We in the Attorney Gen-
eral's office are proud to have Mrs Grant
Bethell as one of our team leaders," said the
Attorney General.
Now to turr around and fire her, or make it
so difficult that she resigns, would be seen as a
despicalflgacyofspite.
Our country has too few attorneys who
have the qualifications described by Mrs May-
nard-Gibson, enabling them to be "embraced
anywhere in the world," to lose this one
because of an attempt to promote a political
career.
As for Justice Lyons' fear that "like most
messengers," he will "be surely shot" for his
u hl hnsn Th anhmst as addtuh
things, we don't think they are that dumb.th
disiOe ti jt ic rb to Ird. le
would be madness to add another nall to that
coffm.
There is yet another case that we want to
expose. An.attempt is now bemg made to sac-
rifice the promising career of a young lawyer to
save the skin of a politician who decided to
take political risks with so-called "high soci-
ety."
It is now a matter of his word against hers.
It depends upon which one the pubhe is pre-
pared to believe as to who will be sacrificed.


beautiful picture of a young girP
and boy entitled "Change out
Nation" at an anti-rape rally in
1984. Here we are 12 years tater
and magistrates:stilLdon't have
tl}ppover go ill to remand prey,
who are accused of having sex,
withl0-year-oldgirlsandcommit
unlawful intercourse with 13-
year-old girls. How are we gomg
to stop what is alleged to have
happened to these two girls and,
the one who was attacked, sexu-*
ally molested and left for dead
if we cannot firstly get the pezV
operators off the street? One
p i de c emso
iiTtisemee etnold. 11
e ac s sceuadct mh it
positions within the Church)
Until the government does somq
thing, our little girls and boys will
not be safe and I challenge the
members of the government td
take action and hopefully it does
not take another anti-rape rally
before they do so!
ROSALYN BROWN
Nassau
October 2006


EDITOR, The Tribune
THERE were som.e very
interesting items in your paper
on Monday, October 9th. The
.first was a very eloquent letter by
.Mr Ortland Bodie. In my opin-
ionithis could have been enti-
tied, "What demons are allowed
to roam around here", because
on the previous page we find two
brief articles about two men in
court facing charges of sex with
an underage girl and unlawful
intercourse respectively. What I
find incredible is that both of
e0s00 ma Inun I e (11 fdul
atrum2 haatttit ie e
aitf tttho pa e
are back on the streets for
over three months where they
are in a position to .commit
against another young girl exact-
ly the same atrocities that Mr
Bodie describes in his letter and
neither his young daughter, nor
mine or any for that matter, is
safe
Do the authorities not under-
stand that most rapists become
serial rapists until they are incar-


cerated and that the pedophiles
that prey on young girls do not
stop on their own, but continue
to endanger our underage chil-
dren as Mr Bodie statefi2 Fur-
ther down in the "In BrikG pol-m
umn we read about a man
accused of robbing.wlio was
remanded because magistrates
do not have the power to grant
bail for armed robbery charges,
Shouldn't this be the same for
persons accused of rape whether
statutory or not? It is my belief
that these deviants use a differ-
ent type of weapon but one that
is lesst a tel mo

It sB adnasm I tng a
or tw trli abr t cot
and we should remand the cul-
prits that attempt to take these
away from us but release the
ones that would jeopardize the
safety of our young children?
And again, I do not see the dif-
ference between a first time
offender and a repeat offender
where so heinous a crime is con-
cerned and the tendency to
repeat the offence is so high.
Lastly on page 12 we see a


Behavior by


Action needed on rapists


R=rFRPWA-CN











.:_ I I I


ALLEN
the justice of an individual case,
aided by a tribunal of fact the
jury. Subject to legislative guide-
lines, it is also the judge who
decides sentences.
This soliletimes tempts politi-
cians to create the impression


The perception
Of COntempt for
the independence
of the judiciary
has now been
made ublic in the
1HOSt Startling Way.



that they are policing or moni-
toring the conduct of judges, in
order to ensure that they are
being tough enough in convic-
tions and sentencing a dan-
gerous tactic, and one that is


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to allow them to take credit for
supposed visible "improve-
ments" in criminal justice (ie
more convictions, tougher sen-
tencing etc.).
In fact most, if not all, of the
important factors in the preva-
lence of crime are both invisible
and beyond the timescale of
electoral politics. These include
demographic shifts, improve-
ments in education and, some-
what controversially, increased
rates of abortion among young,
badly-educated women the
kind most violent criminals have
as mothers. (This latter factor
was recently argued convinc-
ingly by economist Steven
Levitt in the New York Times
Bestseller Freakonomics).
Of course, none of these
things creates quite the excite-
ment of a politician grimacing


The role of an
Attorney General
.
lS Strictly EXCCH-
tive/administra-
tiVC While an inde-
pendent judiciary
dispenses justice
Without regard to
political priorities
or timetables


on television as he (or she)
describes what fate awaits the
evil-doers. Hence, we get non-
senselike"SwiftJustice"parad-
ing itself as serious policy.
But again, the nagging prob-
lem foropoliticians is that, in
reality, their role is quite limit.
ed. It is the judge who decides


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independence of the judiciary
h mowt beenhmad public in
Moreover, the response of
the AG and of her defenders
(wliichhasbeentotrivialisethe
matter by in some cases sug-
gesting that the gripes of the
judge siniply relate to a desire
for better pay) illustrate a grave
incapacity to comprehend what
she has done wrong a prob-
lem in and of itself.


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 200'6, PAGE 5


TH-E


contemptuous of the judiciary
and of the constitution itself-

he leak by th6 Attor-
neyGeneralofan
internal report on the Swift Jus-
tice initiative, so aptly described
by Justice Lyons as a piece of
headline-grabbing political spin,
was an attempt to convey that
impression. She took the extra-
ordinary step of naming mdl-
vidual judges, as if they some-
how fell under her authority,
and purportedly evaluating
them according to their num-
ber of convictions.
As Justice Lyons pointed out,
we must also be mindful of the .
context of this whole affair. To
date, government has failed to
appoint an independent Com-
mission under the Judges Pen-
sion and Remuneration Act to
review the salaries of judges,
although the act mandated it to
do so by October past. One
interpretation for this failure on
government's part could be that
it enjoys perpetuating the per-
ception that it exercises finan-
cial power over judges.
Whatever the specific reason
(and pure negligence should by
no means be discounted), the
perception of contempt for the


I:p hFd c yote:
anything political. That is why
many members of the public
simplyascribethepositionsof
commentators to their own
political persuasions or agen-
das
Over the course of this gov-
ernment, there have been sev-
eral calls for the resignations of
ministers over a variety of sup-
posed infractions. Most of these
calls have been political in
nature and no-one (not even
the caller) has been surprised
by their ultimate lack of effect.
The case for the dismissal or
resignation of Allyson May-
nerd-Gibson as Attorney Gen-
eral is very different. In the last
week, we have had a Justice of
the Supreme Court react to the
actions of the Attorney Gener-
al by stating that he could no
longer dispense his duties inde-
p ndently.
Justice John Lyons cited gov-
ernment's failure to ensure the
independence of the judiciary
(through the appointment of an
independent body to adjust
judges' salaries) as a form of
constitutional contempt. And
hi specifically condemned the
"self-promoting" Swift Justice
report, issued by the AG, which
purports to subject judges to a
scorecard rating, system based
on their convictions.


The problem for Mrs
Maynard-Gibson is
that, for all her anxiety to be
seen as a dis ensei of "Swift
Justice" in our constitutional
system, the role of an Attorney
General is strictly executive/
administrative, while an inde-
pendent judiciary dispenses jus-
tice without regard to political
priorities or timetables.
But as we all know, the
importance of the crime issue
to'the voting public provides an
iritmittivefor politicians the
world direr to blur the distinc-
tion between these roles, so as


E W


TRIBUNE


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PAGE 6, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


THE Free National Move-
::n id n hsasw k stati
;"";dl ve lith t a artan
Bahama Port Authority.
This conflict, the party said,
comes at a time when resi-
dents of Freeport and Grand
Bahama face unacceptably
high levels of unemployment
and business failures resulting
in serious economic hardship.
"Grand Bahama is in des-
perate need of restoration and
stable, focused and productive
leadership," the opposition
said.
While the FNM would not
comment on any specific
issues before the courts at this
time, it said it was fully aware
that it is the responsibility of
the government to look after
the interests of the Bahamian
people in all matters and to
formulate policies in pursuit
of thtsednqt res (continue to
keep abreast of all develop-
ments in Freeport to the

"E.'.haotuurretpuor ttoonofpere
the FNM will give urgent
attention to su matters anect-
ing Freeport and the entire
island of Grand Bahama. We
wainns et et she:==


tylives up to all of its respon-
2 ei e unds the Fahwkshll
"haednwhile, the FNM is ask-
ing the Port Authority and the
Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany to exercise leniency and
forbearance with heensees,
small businesses and residents
of Freeport and Grand
Bahama while they continue
to experience hardship and
deprivation resulting from
Grand Bahama's stagnant
economy.
"The FNM assures all that it
will take all steps necessary to
move Grand Bahama's econ-
omy to positive growth as it
did in 1992 following its elec-
tion victory. Grand Bahama
knows that on this score the
FNM's record in office speaks
for itself and we pledge upon
return to office to do it again,"
the party said.


Bahama Port Authority," the
opposition said.
The FNM said that it will
act urgently, decisively and
sensibly to ensure that
Freeport and Grand Bahama
can realize their potential
through open and transparent
commerce, internationally-
accepted regulatory standards,
robust tourism and industrial
sectors and increased capital
inflows.
The FNM said it is consult-


ing widely with residents of
Grand Bahama, Freeport
licertsees (80 per cent of
whom are Bahamians) and
all Port Authority sharehold-
ers.
"TheFNMfullyappreciates
that the continued orderly
development of Freeport is
critical to the future develop-
ment of Grand Bahama and
The Bahamas. Therefore in
government the FNM will
ensure that the Port Authori-


A RE-SENTENCING hearing for prison
inmate Truno Davis has been set for January
15, 2007.
The appeal of Davis and inmate Forrester
Bowe, who also appeared in Supreme Court,
was the basis of a ruling


by the Privy Council earlier this year that the
mandatory death penalty in the Bahamas is
unconstitutional.
As a result of that historic ruling, Attorney
General Allyson Maynard-Gibson announced
that re-sentencing hearings be held for those
persons who were on death row.
Attorney Dorsey McPhee appeared before
Justice (on Isaacs yesterday to argue on a
constitutional motion on Davis behalf. Mr
McPhee argued that his client's constitutional
rights were being infringed upon as he was
still being detained on the "condemned block".
He akargued that.12is clie.ntlytd notheen
seritenced in a reasonable time in light of the
landmark Privy Council ruling m Alarch.
Yesterday Justice Isaacs ruled that Davis
no longer be considered a "condemned"
inmate.
Davis was convicted of the murder of Jerrad
Ferguson on December 13, 1999, and has been
on death row for nearly seven years. The mat-
ter will continue in January.


M ATTORNEY
General Allyson
Maynard-
Gibson announced
that re-sentencing
hearings be held
for those persons
who were on
death row.


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With FObbery


with an attempted robbery in
Exuma.
Early Thursday morning, a
break-in took place at a store
in Georgetown.
Police press liaison officer
Inspector Walter Evans report-
ed that, after preliminary inves-
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h n ne rta
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th uo nn ingfiehr
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One bag contained a .380
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84 rounds of ammunition. The
other bag contained a sawn-off
shotgun with two live rounds.
Both are in police custody.
One is a 20-year-old from Anne
Nottage estates, and the other a
27-year-old from Fort Fincas-
tle.
It is likely both will appear in
court today, Mr Evans said.






The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their .
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
:::-:,:-2 e
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
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~9~1


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


M FORMER
Minister of
rourismss,
Clement
Maynard
speaking
during "A
Reminis-
cenceand


honour at
Sandals.
BIS/MOT
photos:
Defek Smith


Event committee members presenting former Minister of Tourism Sir
Clement Maynard with framed artwork during "A Reminiscence and
Reunion Luncheon" held in his honour at Sandals. Pictured from left
are James Catalyn, Yvonne Woods, Sir Clement, Craig Woods, WWa.
mae Salkey and John Deleveaux. The event recognized Sir Clement
for his contributions to nation-building, particularly in tourism.


outside of school so that they
can make the 1110st of their time
in school," he proposed. "They
must arrive at school with a
readiness to learn, citrious,
excited and possessing the nec-
essary cognitive skills.
"This is another very impor-
tant mandate of every govern-
ment. It cannot ignore the social
pressures of the day that often
affect the state of mind with
which our students attend
school," Sen Turnquest said.


"What is the quality of the
neighbourhood from which our
students come?" he asked. "Are
their parents employed? What
is the quality of the parenting to
which the child is exposed?
What is the quality of their fain-
ily life? Is there adequate hous-
ing?"
Continuing, Senator Turn-
quest asked: "Is there adequate
food? Is their diet healthy? Are
they properly supervised at
home? Do they feel safe and


protected? Do they have ade-
quate nutrition? What about
the necessary tools and supplies
for school? Are they being
robbed of their childhood?"
He said government and soci-
ety cannot ignore that very basic
probleth of socially dysfunc-
tional children, citing the fact
that contented and well cared-
for children are ready learners.
"In short, we must galvanize
our social organizations to
improve the lives of children


Nevertheless, he told Senate
colleagues, many informed edu-
cators in.The Bahamas believe
that effective schools can, in
many, many instances, tran-
scend background and social
context.
"One school administrator
quotes research that states that
an effective school is six times
more important than back-
ground in terms of reading, and
ten times more important in
mathematics," he said.


SENATOR Tommy Turn-
quest told members of the
upper chamber that the gov-
ernment must continue to
address the social needs of
Bahamian children if they
are to increase their chances
of learning.
Making his contribution to
the debate on The National
Accreditation and Equiva-
lency Council of the
Bahamas Bill, the Opposi-
tion Senate leader said that
students are products of their
social environment, and the
quality of that environment
can affect their ability to per-
form in the classroom.
He said that students
arrive at school laden with
the joy or the heaviness of
the social context in which
they live, and that affects
their ability to learn to a
greater or lesser degree.
"If government wants to
positively impact the quality
.-::r : --=
many of the social problems
that rest heavily on the shoul-
ders of our nation's youth,"
Senator Turnquest said.


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THE TRIBUNE


III


al ItST Caril 1 11 ar:

gramme. -
The finalists, along with fmal-
sts fromol(boctliler comintrile will
Regional Unsung Hero.
First Caribbean's managing
director Sharon Brown congratu-
lated the finalists, Ean Maura,
Marvin Finlayson and Kenneth
Sweeping Sr.
She said they have made a tan-
gible difference in their respec-
tive communities and have
touched the lives of many peo-
plc.
Unsung Heroes highlights out-
standing humanitarians in local
communities.
"Whenever we look around
this great country of ours, we
must constantly remind ourselves
that freedom and the Bahamian
way of life that we take for grant-
ed is not free of cost," Ms Brown
said.
"It has been bought, main-
tained and must be forever guard-
ed by the vigilance of those who
unselfishly give of themselves.
"It is therefore refreshing to
have an opportunity to highlight
that which is good and hon-
ourable and to encourage indi-
viduals who give tirelessly of
themselves every day to continue
with their good works."
The "Unsung Heroes" pro-
gramme was first launched by
First Caribbean in 2003. The aim
was to be a strong corporate part-
ner that recognizes the impor-
tance of celebrating the best of
humanity.
Ms Brown said the 2006 pro-
gramme has had an unprece-
dented number of entries (250),
easily surpassing the number
recorded last year. She said for
the first time, all 17 countries in
which there is a First Caribbean


'""l~~l""lrsllL-~ls~i~a


operation have participated.
Local finalists, Maura, Sweeting
and Finlayson will stand against
representation from the other 16
countries vying to be the Region-
al Unsung Hero.
Local "Unsung Heroes" pro-
gramme cq-ordinators were Tere-
sa Williams and Thecla Grant.
And local external judges were:
Father Colin Saunders priest in
charge of St Ambrose Anglican
Church; Dr Ebbie Jackson, 2004
Unsung Heroes finalist; Gail Wis-
dom, educator, and Hubert Chip-
man, partner Ernst and Young.
"Words can't express how
4.hustibled I am right now," said
finalist Ean Maura. Mr Maura is a
volunteer/co-ordinator at an
after-school programme. He facil-
itates all aspects of the pro-
gramm"e, including homework
assistance, counselling and com-
munity relations and is also a trip
chaperone.
"What I do for the children is
done from my heart. Never did I
expect to be rewarded for it, but it
certainly feels good. I am really
thankful to First Caribbean and
to those who believe in what I
am doing."
Marvin Finlayson is a very spe-
cial firiallist. Although deaf from
the age of six due to meningitis,
he has excellent speech, lip-read-
ing and writing skills in addition
to fluent sign language.
The first deaf person to gradu-
ate from the College of the
Bahamas, Marvin realized at an
early age that he was able to func-


tioninboththedeafandhearing
worlds. He has used his ability to
straddle both worlds to work tire-
lessly and voluntarily to elevate
the status of hearing impaired
persons in the Bahamas.
"I am very happy to be here
today and I also want to congrat-
ulate my fellow finalists in being
recognized for their good work,"
said Mr Finlayson.
"I am very happy to be able to
help others, especially people who
are deaf. It's good to help them
achieve u.Itimate confidence in
being all that they can be."
Finlayson is past president of
the Talking Hands Society,
founding member of Bahamas
.Deaf Sports Federation and direc-
tor of the Deaf Ministry at Grace
Community Church and Visual
ICommunications mstructor.
Prison Officer Kenneth Sweet-
ing Sr was stabbed n the line of
duty but continues to counsel
young male mmates,
"I love working with the kids,"
he said. "I also love working with
the inmates; letting them know
for sure that there is life for them
after they are released."
For the past seven years he has
volunteered at Children's Emer-
gency Hostel and has donated
supplies to the children. Sweet-
ing also gives them regular hair-
cuts, paints the hostel building
and landscapes the yard. And, he
also hosts father/son forums.
"Theinmatesarespecialtome
and I love to counsel them. It
really makes me happy when I
can make someone else happy or
to their problems and helping
them through."
Ms Brown thanked the three
finalists for all their selfless efforts
.and on behalf of First Caribbean
told them how much of an hon-
,our it is to be able to tell the
world their.individual stories.


ar:.


"Tor High"


fax 326-4865 P. O. Box SS-6766t Natssau, Bahamas


"Midas is a business based ont service, iluality and reliability.


Unsung Heroes finalist 'hav


Bank's managing director praises


.

1 2 -


r ou rca r.


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US mid-term elections




and theCaribbean


Nicaraguan people and see
what policies the government
follows before making decisions
about future relations.
Mr Ortega would be hard
pressedtoinstitutepoliciesthat
would legitimately offend the
US. Since the 1990s, successive
Nicaraguan governments have


There are

f)OliCICS of the
Democratic
*

Should oive
8
fiSC 10 COR-
ggyg
the region.


sold more than 300 stafe-owned
enterprises, liberalized its mar-
kets and entered a free trade
arrangement with other Central
American nations andtheUS.
Not unlike Mr Bush's pre-
sent dilemma in which the US
Congress is dominated by the
opposition Democratic Party,
Mr Ortega's National Assem-
bly is divided between four par-
ties two of them conserve
tives with which lie must
make compromises.
This is till to the good. Both
the US and Nicaraguan admin
istrations will have to temper
their ambitions and work with-
intheconstraintstheyface..
On Cuba, the United
Nations General Assembly
ain votedUbyel83ato 4 for an
But for the US, Cuba is a dif-
ferent kettle of fish. US policy in
Cuba is still too closely tied to
the fortunes of both the Repub-
lican and Democratic parties in
domestic elections for any rad-
ical change to take place soon-
The votes of the anti-Castro,
Cuban-American community
and lobby remain influential.
Nonetheless, there can be no
doubt in the minds of policy
makers in the US that the glob-
al community and the
Caribbean countries especially
want to see the normalisa-
tion of relations between the
US and Cuba.
But, while Caribbean coun-
tries may quietly rejoice over
the legislative constraints that
have been placed on the Bush
administration's foreign policies
particularly in Iraq, there are


policies of the Democratic Par-
ty which should give rise to con-
cern within the region.
The Democrats will now
head many of the important
committees in the House and
Senate. Many Democratic rep-
resentatives are hostile to Free
Trade Agreements, regarding
them as threats to US
jobs. They are also opposed to
outsourcing of services like call
centres and back-room accoun-
tancy to countries thist could
provide such services much
cheaper than within the US.
Recently, Republican repre-
sentatives m the Senate inserted
language in this year's.State
Department spending bill that
would bar the Organisation for
Economic Cooperation and
development (OECD) from
using the U.S. taxpayer contri-
bution for "activities or projects
... designed to hinder the flowsof
capital and jobs from high-tax
jurisdictions to low-tax jurisd.ic-
tions or to infringe on the sov-
ereign right of jurisdictionasto
determine their own domestic
policies."
It will be recalled that the
OECD's "Harmful Tax compe-
tition Initiative" had the back-
ing of President Bill Clintqn's
Democratic Administrati4n,
and adversely affected the
finAncial services sectors of sev-
eral Caribbean countries.
Passage of this appropr;ia-
tions bill is pending Congres-
sional approval, and it is left to
be seen how a Congress,3in
which the Democratic Party has
themajoritywillvote.
Further, the Caribbean is yet
to negotiate a Free Trade
Agreement with the
us Caught in the failed nego-
tiations for a Free Trade of the
Americas Agreement (FTAA)
and pre-occupied with its cur-
rent negotiations with the Euro-
pean Union (EU) over Epo-
nomic Partnership Agreements
(EPA), the Caribbean has not
seriously focused op a f(ee tryle
arrangengn igifl}jhepS.
Now, time may be runnalg
out to get negotiations.kor suph
an agreement firmly underway
with a US administration
favourablydisposedtofreetrade.
So, while the time is propi-
tious for the US to begin to ye-
thinkitspoliciestowarditsclose
neighbours in Latin America
and the Caribbean to makeAts
relationship with them more
sympathetic and secure, it is also
in the interest of Caribbean
countries to intensify their Qb-
bying work in the US. 4
A meeting a few weeks ago
of senior trade officials from the
Caribbean Community (CAyl-
COM) and the Office of the


it IS in the
intereSt Of
Caribbean
COURidCS 10
111tellSify their

lObbying work
.
in the US.


United States Trade Represen-
tative to revive a dormant
CARICOM -United States
Trade and Investment Countil
was a good start. But, more is
needed now to push Caribbean
concerns.
Responses to: ronald-
sandersZ9@hotmail.com


I







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The Annual General Meeting of
St Andrew's School Limited
Will take place in the school's new
library on
Friday, 1 December, 2006
At 7:00 .m
P "

Financial statements and proxy forms
may be obtained from the Business Office '
at St Andrew's School


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006


A By Sir Ronald Sanders
(The writer is a business exec-
utive and former Caribbean
diplomat).

N mid-term elections for
I the US Congress, the
American electorate achieved
what several governments
around the world could
not. They registered their
intense unease with the US gov-
ernment's war in Iraq and
caused the resignation of
Defence Secretary, Donald
Rumsfeld, who symbolized his
government's Iraq pohcy.


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) 11

Caribbean governments are
among those who were unhap-
py with the US war in Iraq.
They regarded it as lackmg in
UN Security Council support,
and mdicative of a readiness by
the US government to behave
as a bully.
Like many others arotmd the
world, Caribbean.governments
would have quietly welcomed
the Republican Party's defeat
and Mr Rumsfeld's departure
in the hope that US foreign pol-
icy particularly the doctrine
of pre-emptive strikes and uni-
lateral action would be
curbed in favour of greater con-
sensus building in the UN Secu-
rity Council.
In the same week that the
George W Bush administration
received what the US President
himself described as a "thump-
ing" in the US mid-term elec-
tions, two other hemispheric
events occurred which would
underscore the importance of
the US re-thinking its relation-
ship with its Latin American
and Caribbean neighbours.
The first was the election of
Daniel Ortega, a former Marx-
ist revolutionary who fought
US-backed insurgents in the
1980s, as the President of
Nicaragua. The second was yet
another vote in the United
Nations General Assembly call-
ing for an end to the US embar-
go of Cuba.
Ortega won the Presidency
in Nicaragua in spite of inter-
ference by US officials to try to
.thwart his victory.
Paul Trivelli, the U.S. ambas-
sador to Nicaragua, U.S. Com-
merce Secretary Carlos Gutier-
rez and Republican Congress-
man Dan Burton warned the
Nicaraguan people not to vote
for Ortega. Burton went as far
as to say that foreign aid would
becutoffifOrtegawaselected.
It should be noted that
Venezuela's President Hugo
Chavez also intervened in the
Nicaraguanelectionsbyoffering
cheap oil and strongly advocat-
ing Ortega's election-

ince the results of the
S Nicaraguan election, US
Secretary of State Condoleez-
za Rice, is reported to have said
that the United States would
respect the decision of the

















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Nassau
Sandal s Royal Bahamian.
Balmoral B.xilroom
Thursday, November 16rh. 2000
6:30pm 10.00pm
Tickets al-. Harbour Bay. Shirley street, L1-ford
Cay and Cable Beach Stores.


Freeport
\h-scin at our la ava,
Grear st adc H.ubour ( av Rooms
Sunday. Nos ember l och. 200('
-i:Unprn : Opm
Tickets a\ailable at Queen's Highway
and RND Plaz 1 Stor es.


Proceed3 to arid the Bahamarrs Red Cross~ arnd the Gralnd BahamaIII Hearllt A.ssoc'iatfion,


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Over 150 professional cosmetologists
received valuable business, technique and
product knowledge at the 2006 Motions
Hair Show held Monday, October 30th at
the Wyndham Nassau Resort and Crystal
Palace Casino. .
Famous New York celebrity stylist
Johnny Gentry wowed the crowd with his
refined styling technique and client relations
tIps. Steps to complete hot trendy styles like
the Mohawk were explained to the crowd
and IIve models were styled on stage,
Certified Motions Technician Bahamas,
Donna Lee Minnis was also styling on stage.
Mr. Gentry said that styles should be
created to keep hair healthy and beautiful


for Ilfe. He also said the Motions product line
can be used for all hair types because people
have different ethnic backgrounds which will
affect the makeup of their hair. He urged the
cosmetologists to taller their product mlx to
suit their client's ethnic background.
Rohn Hamel, Vice President Global
Marketing of Motions gave a presentation
which covered the diffemnt product segments.
Mr. Hamel called upon cosmetologists to
invest thelr profits so they are able to retire at
a good age. He also encouraged them to
attend hair shows and seminars regularly to
keep their education fresh and learn about
new trends in the profession.
Lowe's Wholesale and Motions provided


decorative posters for the cosmetologists to
use in their salons as well as a free package.
They also gave two gift baskets that were
raffled to the audience and additional
product and styling tool giveaways.
A Student Semlnar was held on Tuesday,
October 31st at the Lowe's Wholesale head
office. Rohn Hamel, Johnny Gentry, Donna
Lee Minnis and Tiffany Rolle conducted the
student seminar. In-depth product
knowledge was reviewed and the students
were shown a relaxer and treatment
application video. After the video they had
the opportunity to have hands-on experience
with relaxers. Mr. Gentry also reviewed new
cutting techniques with the students,


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MONDAY, NOVEMBER. 13, 2006, PAGE 11


.


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I I I r I '~~r~i2~LT~I~~L~~ -~L-~J-l ~ppp~g(~)~k~8~.~a~s~B~a~~


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,THE TRIBUNE


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i More skilled


1 a a ~


M By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT Although 750
Bahamians are currently
employed at the Freeport Con-
-tainer Port, CEO Chris Grey
said thse lis still a mand t
transshipment terminal on
Grand Bahama.
"We cannot find enough peo-
ple to satisfy our needs," said
Mr Grey. "And it does not real-
ly matter whether they are casu-
al, temporary, or full time -
Sve cannot find sufficient peo-
ple to meet our requirements."
Mr Grey said that the con-
tainer port operates 24 hours a
day, 365 days of the year. He
reported that, in 2001, the port
handled 367,000 containers,
which has almost tripled in the
last five years.
The Freeport Container Port
has been in operation for the
'past 10 years. FCP executives
celebrated the milestone dur-
ilag a luncheon at the Westin at
Our .
Lucaya Resort on Friday.
The company also honoured 23
Bahamians, who were initially
employed at the facility over
the past 10 years since it opened
in 1995.
Labour and Immigration
Minister Shane Gibson, Direc-
tor of Immigration Vernon Bur-
rows, Director of Labour Har-
court Brown, and Albert Gray,
$resident of the Grand Bahama
Port Authority, were present.
"* Mr Grey reported that the
lhbour force has grown from
Initially 50 workers to about
750. He noted that the expan-
sion programme underway at
the port will require many more
skilled workers to meet the
'demand placed oil the facility
by its custoMers."
Mediterranean Shipping
Company (MSC), the second
largest container operator in
World, is a major customer and
joint venture partner at the FCP
since 2002.
"We are looking for more
employees as...MSC is making
greater demands on our service
ahd on our facility. ..
It is up to us to find a way of
matching that demand," said
Mr Grey.
"It is a far better problem...to
lie able to say how do we han
dle the volume, rather than say
how do we reduce cost and who
do we send home next because
we got a low volume."
According to Mr Grey
presently there is a demand foi'
some 25 engineers at the con-
tainer port.
"Where do we find them
from minister?" he asked
rhetorically. "It is something we
are not asleep on we are focus-
ing and working on this and we
want to make sure that all the
employees are Bahamian."
"We are now looking and



o In brief


LOckdown

.ends at

prison in
Trinidad

W TRINIDAD
Port-of-Spain
A LOCKDOWN at a
Trinidadian prison ended Sun-
day while officials continued
their investigation into the cause
of a recreation yard disturbance
which local newspapers said led
to one prisoner being shot by
another, according to Associat-
ed Press.
It wasn't immediately clear
how many prisoners were
mvolved in the disturbance at
, the Golden Grove Remand
Center in Arouca, about 12
miles north of the capital, or the
status of the m]ured prisoner,
said Michael Williams, chief of
the Prisons Officers Association.
The disturbance, which start-
ed late Saturday, was brought
under control by riot-equipped
emergency squads and the
prison was placed under a lock-
down to restore order and facil-
.1tate a weapons search.


SNEKO Grant, MP for Lucaya, presented trumpets to a representative of Harbour Boys


, .


.


---


--


- (

..e r
....A .
W SITWE Gbsonhas c ratlate the ontaner rtCO


talking with our partner MSC
(Mediterranean Shipping Com-
pany), and we will struggle to
find sufficient people to meet
the expansion programme we
have going forward," he said.
"We can't keep taking peo-
ple from a closed end casino
and a hotel. We have taked
many of those and converted
many of them. That is going to
run out," he explained.
Mr Grey said the FCP is now
looking to employ more young
people out of school to train as
engineers for the future.
"We will always go for the
best, and I am telling you it is
becoming more of a challenge
as we increase our demands on
the local labour force," he
added. .
Mr Grey said the container
port is 100 per cent Bahamian-
ized. He commended the 23
Bahamian workers and praised
them for their years of service at
the port.
The CEO also said that the
portisgratefultohaveMSCas
a partner, and attributed FCP's


success to the shipping compa-
ny.
- Labour Minister Shane Gib-
son congratulated Mr Grey in
his vision and confidence in hav-
ihg the container port 100 per
cent Bahamianised. Fle said that
that is very significant in the
Bahamas today.
"We deal with companies on
a daily basis where we have to
actually fight tooth and nail just
to get them to see the wisdom
of hiring Bahamians.
"The container port, and Mr
Grey have always talked about
the container port being
Bahamianized. And...when you
look at the quality and commit-
ment of the workers, and the
level of productivity of the
workers at the container port, 1
believe that you can consider
yourselves second to none.
Mr Gibson said the container
port should perhaps be used as
a model in the Bahamas to
show other employers of what
can happen "if you place real
confidence in the.Bahamian
workers."


An Information, Business & Pe~rsonal Security Seminar


= em. Opening Ceremony & Welcome Remarks
Mr. Branville McCartney, Chair, Crime Prevention Committee
Mrs. Tanya Wright, President, Bahamas Chamber of Commerce
Mr. Paul Farquharson, Commissioner of Police
Hon. Cynthia Pratt, Deputy Prime Minister, Minister of National Secunt
9:30 a.m. Crime & Its Impact (Root causes & analysis of crimes]
Dr. David Allen, Dr. Graham Cates, Dr. Evaneth McPhee
10:30 a.m. COFFEE BREAK
SESSION 2
10-45 a.m. Police Panel Discussion Rights and Solutions in The Bahamas
Moderator, Chief Superintendent Hulan Hanna
Robbery Prevention, Employee Screening, and Embezzlement:
Asst. Supenntendent Drexel Cartwright
Crime Trends from an Intelligence Prospective:
Superintendent Kelth Belle
The Role of the Divisional Commander: Superintendent John Ferguson
Prevention of Intimate Partner Violence in the work Place
Asst. Superintendent Elaine Sands
SESSION S
1]oon LUNCH
12:30 p.m. Crimestoppers [The Power of the Tip]
Alex MacDonaldBSc, MBA
SESSION 4

2:00 p.m. Trade Show/ Exhibition
Pf6Sentations by Exhibitors and The RBPF:


^-0am.CLOSING


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Writ served for



Anna Nicole to



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THE TRIBUNE


BAHAMAS INTERNATIONAL
FILM FESTIVAL 2006

BOX OFFICE OPENS


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PAGE 12, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006


. FROM page one
Thompson said.
According to Mr Sichitano, who served Ms
Smith the writ, Anna Nicole ran back into the
house upon hearing what the document was.
When The Tribune arrived at the scene, Mr
Thompson was speaking to Mr Munroe through
the lattice door along the western wall of the
home.
Here Mr Thompson discovered that the locks
to the doors had been changed, and was informed
by Mr Munroe that only if he had keys to the
home could he be allowed to enter.
Police officers inside the compound spoke with
Mr Munroe, Mr Shelley and Mr Sichitano, who
had earlier gained access to the grounds and
served the writ on Ms Smith.
Producing a remote to operate the front gate of
the home, Mr Thompson allowed The Tribune
access to the front lawn, where this reporter was
then met by three men. One told him he was
trespassing and in his "best interest" should leave.
In fact, one man said he was told not to allow
anyone to enter the gates, and had been instruct-
ed to park a F-150 truck, registered to Dorsette
Munroe, in the driveway to block it. Mr Shelley
and Mr Sichitano finally left the property, promis-
ing that they would not let the matter rest.
Mr Shelley said he found it very interesting
that the previous owner of the home (hotelier
Mr Ron Kelly) had informed various utility cor-
porations to discontinue services to the house
when Mr Thompson bought it.
However, the electricity and utilities were still
on, Mr Shelley said.
.Mr Thompson, who is battling in the courts
with Ms Smith over ownership of the home,
claims he advanced money for Ms Smith to buy
the property so long as she executed a mortgage
to repay it.
He alleged that she later reneged on the deal,
claiming the house was a gift. He told a press
conference in Nassau last week that she had
"double-crossed" him.
Mr Thompson said he will now apply for an
eviction order.
Mr Shelley said he was told a "high ranking"
tit ce ad tshk t eousu ,oa ns ITecon


HA SCENE from Vers Le Sudi showing at the festival


M ANNA NICOLE SMITH (AP FILE)

ly unpaid bills of thousands of dollars.
"We didn't do this to cause any pain. Your
own government has assisted them in commit-
ting this wrong," Mr Shelley said.
"We challenge her (Anna Nicole) tb show
receipt of a gift or funds for this'house: If she
s doleumenteto provedth w tdhis house


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gram, Reserve seating at Opening Night & Closing
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Individual Film Tickets
es.oo
Openitig Night Gala Film
$25.00
Closing Night Gala Film
$25.00
Panels Discussion
$10.00
Career Achievment Tribute to Nicolas Cage
$50.00
Students
$4.00 (over 30= $3.00)
Opening Night Chopard & Versace Reception
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Ansbacher Closing Night Party


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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


I





F


S.U.Vs
CRV
Ray 4s
Big Horns(Diesel)
Pajero's (Diesel)
Terranos (Diesel)
Shortages
Escapes


Sedans
Sunny
Corollas
Civics
Primeras
Avalons
Windows
Sabers
inspires
Accords
Crown Victorias


Trucks
F-150s
D-1500s
C-1500s
S-10s
Rangers
Atlas
Dyna's
Vans
Caravans
Largos
Serenas


Shooting


',1ROM one
the young man is in his mid.
twenties and a resident of the
Lyon Road area.
"At this pomt the police do
not know what the motive of
this latest incident is. Howev-
er, an investigation has been
launched. This is homicide num.
ber 45," he said.
Two people are he ng
police with inquiries.


through. There seems to be
no kind of constancy as to
what ought to have happened
and there is a need to be sys-
tematic and consistent. They
can't sof visiting hours on a
simple whim and a fancy," Mr
Moss said.


announced the time change
on ZNS but not everyone
heard it.
This was not the first time
this occurred, the lawyer said.
"Last Sunday they had
some'silvice arid they denied
access to lawyers coming


Black American Affairs.
The ATIB workshop will also feature Dr. Ron .1
(henail. Vice-President for Research, Planning and
Governmental Affairs of Nova Southeastern University.
Dr. (hennil oversees institutional research, accedita-
tion, strolegic planning, government and state relo-
tions at Nova. At present, he is
NSU's liaison to the SA(5
commissionn on Attreditation.
Prior to becoming Vice-
President, Dr. (henoil served as
the Assistani to the President for .
Academic Affairs at NSU, and on
before that, he was the Dean of on now a 1
1he School of Social and Re e- Id n d
Systemit Studies. Interim Dean ommamew.1Allow 0,
for file (enter for Psychological Novo southeastern
Studies and the Direflor of the
Institute for Systemic Therapy.
Friday's workshop is open to all operators, admin-
istrators and stakeholders involved in delivering post-
secondary education in The Bahamas. Officials from
the Ministry of Education are expected to give on
overview of the government's legislation package
Dr. Wheels will present a global views of the work
of accreditation bodies in the United States and Dr.
(henail will lead a discussion focusing on how institu-
tions worli their way through the accreditation process.
Workshop participants will have the opportunity to
gain a fuller appreciation of the implications of the
proposed oceeditation regime, to express their ideas
and concerns regarding the demands and responsibili-
ties which the legislation package is certain to impose
upon the tertiary educational sector.


Dr. Belle Wheelon, PresidenI
of the commissionn on Colleges .
of the Southern Association of
collegess and Schools will be the
featured presenter of a work 1
shop on accreditation to be held
by the Associalion of Terliary
InstiIulions of The Bohomas on DP SEtti welEELAll
Pretrded of SA{5
Friday, 17th November. 5A(5 is
one of six regional accredilation
organizations in the United
States.
Recently, a Bill for lhe eslablishment of a national
accredilation and equivalency council for The Bohamos
was introduced and possed in Parliament. The main
objective of the legislation is to ensure Ihat all educa.
lional inslitulions in The Balianius, especially of the ter-
liary level, are operating within recognized standards
of ocodemic excellence, professional and financial
integrity and with nolionally-opproved accreditation.
Dr. Wheelan, the first African American and the first
WOman 10 5000 05 100( Of 5A(5 has an academic
career which spons more that thirty years across the
tertiary education sector of the United Stales.5he holds
a Bachelor's degree from Trinity University in Texas, a
Master's from Louisiano State University and a
Doctorate from the University of Texas of Austin.
She has received numerous awards and recognition
in education and has held membership in many local
and state organizations including Rotory International,
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorarity, Inc the American College
Testing, Inc., board of directors- American Association
of Community Colleges' board of directors; and the
President's Round Table of the National Council on


day.* SEE pages14& 15 '
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7:00 p.m.-12 p.m Tickets are $10.00
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Moss-Sherman. Brenda Watkins, Stuart Kelly. Ester Woods.
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THE TRIBUNE .


PAGE 14 MONDAYNOVEMBER 13, 2006


On Sunday
current and
retired
servicemen, their
families and
local dignitaries
gathered to
remember the
war dead of the
Bahamas
(Photos: Felipd
Major/Tribune staff)


Ms


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THE TRIBUNE


on his appointment to the position of 3
00minandant
of the
legal Bahaulas Defence Forea
November 2006
I I' II .


r]~igE di~Wlt.O *N~rBFd~BrudhE~eMitfR S- hitMI~Es.1ail


SAN honour guard stands at the monument


s POLICE Commisioner Paul Farquarson


wringing opportunity to am community"


The President, Board of DirectorsAdministration & Far
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in extending


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 16, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006


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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006, PAGE 17


H TRIBUNE


V-~ ~LI~'


-~3C~-~~F


_ 1 i ~ _


--


5 LONDON
ON a crisp autumn mormng,
Queen Elizabeth II led a
somber ceremony of Remem-
brance Sunday for Britain's war
dead, including more than 120
British troops killed in Iraq,
according to Associated Press.
As Big Ben chimed 11am, the
queen joined thousands of gath
ered troops, veterans and civil-
ians in the traditional two-
minute silence, broken by a sin-
gle artillery blast and the sound
of Royal Marine buglers playing
the "Last Pos .essed in black,
laid a wreath of red poppies at
the Cenotaph memorial in
Whitehall, a central London
thoroughfare lined with gov-
ernment buildings.
Prince Philip, Prince Charles
and other members of the royal
family also placed wreaths at
the base of the simple stone
monument inscribed with the
words,"TheGloriousDead".
As a military band played
Beethoven's Funeral March,
politicians led by Prime Minis-


David Cameron also laid
wreaths, followed by represen-
tatives of the Commonwealth
of former British colonies and
the armed forces.
The Bishop of London, the
Right Rev Richard Chartres,
led a short firayer service before
, a march-past by thousands of
veterans and war widows.
Almost 10,000 lexerans -
some on w wheelchair. riding elec-
tric scooters or leaning on canes
filed past.rhe nwnument in
the liate sunshine.
Many n are medals audiegi-
mental berets, and some wore


EARi.I


.EFE er~ (III Illrme Mllil


the distinctive scarlet coats and
tricorn hats of Chelsea Pen-
sioners residents of the Royal
Hospital Chelsea, a home for
elderly eix-servicemen founded
in the 17th century.
The veterans were followed
by delegations from civilian
groups l it al to the wartime
--home front";including miners,
theavilbulanceservicethepolice
Write and the Royal Mail.
Also attending were relatives
of some ofthe 300 s61dieirs exe-


cuted for cowardice or deser-
tion during World War I, who
were pardoned by the govern-
mentearlierthisyear.
The remembrance service is
held every year on the nearest
Sunday to the anniversary of
theendofWorldWarlat11am
on November 11, 1918.
Millions of Britons also had
observed a two-minutesilerice
itrT1am. on Saturday'~the
anniversary of the World War I
armistice.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 18, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006


8 SOMALIA
Mogadishu
HEAVY fighting broke out
in central Somalia on Sunday, a
day after the transitional gov-
ernment rejected a peace ini-
tiative with the country's Islam-
ic movement, officials said,
according to Associated Press.
Islamic militia captured the
town of Bandiradley after
claiming they came under
attack from pro-government
militia backed by Ethiopian
troops near the border of the
semi-autonomous region of
Puntiand, one of the few areas
still outside their control.
"The fighting is continuing
and we are pursuingPuntland
troops," Mohamed Mahmud
Agaweyne, spokesman for the
Islamic group in central Soma-
lia, told The Associated Press
by telephone. Sa'id Abdirah-


man Dakaweyne, a colonel with
the Puntland militia, also con-
firmed the fighting,
Two Islamic fighters were
killed, Islamic officials said.
Government officials declined
to say if any of their militia were
killed. Unconfirmed reports
said three local residents were
also killed.
Neither side would comment
the sizes of forces involved,
Agaweyne said, however, that
the Islamic fighters had captured
two tanks and 11 pickup trucks
mounted with machine guns,
known locally as "technicals".
Islamic forces said the tanks
had Ethiopian markings, and
that militia loyal to secular war-
lord Abdi Awale Qaybdiid
were backing the Puntland
troops in fighting around the
small town of Bandiradley,
home mainly to around 2,0000
people and some 430 miles


north of the capital, Mogadishu.
Ethiopian officials were not
immediately available for com-
ment.
Puntland officials said they
had put their troops on full
alert.
Sporadic skirmishes have bro-
ken out in central Somalia since
May, when the Islamic move-
ment took Jowhar, a large town
and, began extending north
toward Puntland, which has
close ties to Ethiopia and
opposes the spread of the Islam-
ic forces.
Fears are mounting that a war
in Somalia could engulf the
region.
Several peace initiatives have
failed to take hold with both
the transitional government and
Islamic movement trading accu-
sations over who is to blame for
the deadlock.
A peace deal agreed on Fri-


day by a powerful but renegade
government lawmaker and the
country's Islamic movement
was rejected 24 hours later by
the interim administration,
which said it was done without
their approval,
Experts also warn Somalia
could become a proxy battle-
ground for neighboring
Ethiopia and Eritrea, which
broke away from Ethiopia in a
1961-91 civil war and fought
another 1998-2000 border war
with its rival. Eritrea supports
the Islamic militia, while
Ethiopia backs the interim gov-
ernment.
Somalia has not had an effee-
tive government since 1991,
whenwarlordsoverthrewadic-
tator and then turned on one
another. The government was
formed with the help of the UN
two years ago, brit it has failed
to assert any real control out-


side Baidoa. The Islamic courts,
meanwhile, have been rising
since June and now control
most of the country's south.
Late last week, the US
Embassy in Nairobi, Kenya,
warnedthatextremistsinSoma-
lia were planning suicide attacks
in Kenya and Ethiopia. As of
Monday, all flights to Somalia
from Kenya will be suspended
due to security reasons, gov-


ernment spokesman Alfred
Mutua said. The order affects
the six-days-a-week service
from Nairobi to Mogadishu and
three other towns in Somalia.
The Islamic group's strict and
often severe interpretation of
Islam raises memories of
Afghanistan's Taliban, which
was ousted by a US-led cam-
paign for harbouring Osama bin
Laden and his al-Qaida fighters.


SMEXICO


He has engaged in sporadic
talks with the federal govern-
ment and frequently speaks to
reporters and supporters just
blocks away from positions tak-
en by the federal police, who
apparently have not pursued
him.
Also Saturday, a convention
of the People's Assembly met to
plan the movement's strategy,
after striking teachers voted to
accept pay increases and many
agreed to return to work.
Francisco Martinez Neri, ree-
tor of Oaxaca's state university
which the protesters are using
as their headquarters, has
refused to allow police to enter
the campus.
But Martinez also said classes
should resume after having
beensuspended-forweeks,-and
suggested that th@YdHe if#
ence in the city "will prevent
acts of bloodshed.".


rant at the sarixe mall with gaso-
line bombs last week. .
Leaders of the movement,
known as the Oaxaca People's
Assembly, distanced themselves
from Sunday's attack, however.
McDonald's was at the centre
of controversy here in 2002,
when artists and community
groups forced the chain to aban-
don plans to open a franchise
in Oaxaca's picturesque colo-
nial main square; saying it
would hurt the city's cultural
identity.
The protesters have set up
camp on the university campus
after being ejected in late Octo-
ber from the arch-ringed main
plaza, which they occupied for
five months in sometimes-vio-
lent demonstrations to demand
the resignation of the state's
goveraak
The attack came a day after
the Roman Catholic bishop of


Oaxaca declined a request to
give asylum or sanctuary to
People's Assembly leaders who
fear arrest.
"We don't have the resources
or the infrastructure to guaran-
tee their physical integrity,
which involves a serious respon-
sibility," Bishop Jose Luis
Chavez Botello told reporters.
Chavez Botello said the
church is trying to facilitate
understanding and dialogue and
has not taken sides in the con-
flict, which began as a teachers'
strike in May.
"We have cared for average
citizens, policemen, teachers
and state government employ-
ees, without distinction," he
said.
The movement's most visible
leaderFlavioSosafacesarrest
warrants on riot and conspirage
charges and says he has not
slept at home.in months.


FOUR youths wearing ban-
danas over their faces tossed
petrol bombs at a McDonald's
restaurant in the conflict-torn
city of Oaxaca before dawn on
Sunday, damaging the store's
windows, seats and play area,
police said, according to Asso-
ciated Press.
Sectirity personnel at the
shopping centre where the
McDonald's is located were
able to extinguish the blaze and
there were'no injuries, said state
police director Manuel Moreno
Rivas, citing witness reports.
The restaurant, which was
closed at the time, is in a shop-
ping mall near a university
where a coalition of leftist
phtest groups have set up.their
headquarters: those activists
- attacked a Burger King restau-


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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006, PAGE 19


THE TRIBUNE


:


* g 5

GOLDEN RIPE

- PLANTAINS


M SPAIN
Madrid
ON a weekend of street ral-
lies in Spain Basques scream-
ing for independence, right-
wingers nostalgic for the late
Francisco Franco, pyramid-
scheme investors who lost bun-
dles on Sunday it was time for
sheep to come forward and

00-sotrrdoinng tbe ion
flock meandered through state-
ly downtown boulevards home
to McDonald's, Starbuck's and
such, a far cry from the very old
days of inns and straw in a
demonstration called by farm-
ers who say urban sprawl is
eroding ancient routes used to
transport the wooly critters from
one pasture to another.
The pungent-smelling protest,
also featuring donkeys, horses
and humans in old-fashioned
garb from rural areas of Spain,
was in its 14th year and called
on authorities to protect Spain's
125,000 kilometers of paths
used for seasonal movement of
livestock from cool, highland
pastures in summer to lower-
lying ones in winter.
Some of them are 800 years
old. Madrid lies along two of
the north-south routes.
One of these dates back to
1372, and at least on paper it
runs through the Puerta del Sol
- the bustling plaza that is
Madrid's equivalent of New
York City's Times Square.
The routes are protected
under Spanish law. But in prac-
tice, housing developments,
highways and railways the .
conveniences of modern life -
have nibbled away at the time-
honored paths, said Jesus Gar-
zon, a former farmer and rural
activist who launched an initia-
tive to preserve the practice
known asJranshumance, or the.
seasonalanovement of Evasteakw


emes me ease e * eme
***
me ** *
- *** *
a ---- - *


Madrid resident Conchi
Munoz fined her four-year-old
daughter Beatriz as the child
lifted one large specimen's tail
to see what was underneath.
"She is really enjoying this,"
Munoz said.
Daniel Pinillfi, eight, said: "I
want to take one home." His
father grinned with the certain-
ty that this would not happen.
A flock of around 1,000 sheep
has spent the last week grazing
ih a park on the city's western
outskirts, preparing for the pro-
cession. It was to have taken
place last weekend, but was
delayed by road work that
forced crews to build a
makeshift bridge so the animals
could cross.
More than 200 females
missed Sunday's procession
because they gave birth during
the week and had to.stay-with
their lambs, Garzon sa a


In Spain it involves a niillion
animals sheep, cattle and oth-
er creatures.
"Our mission is to recover
transhumance because it is a
1,000-year-old right," he said in
an interview.
Each route is supposed to
measure 100 yards wide. Multi-
ply that by the total length of
the routes, and the surface area
is equivalent to that of the
Netherlands or Sweden and
amounts to the world's largest
pasture area, Garzon said.
"It is a heritage that is unique
in the world, and one which we
must respect," he said.
Crowds lined Sunday's route
past such august buildings as
the Bank of Spain, and small
children squealed with delight
as they petted the thick, mat-
ted wool of the marchers, most-
lyayhite but also including the
odd black sheep.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 20, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006


foll rm ll and drop it inl the ~ou!


~3


,


5 NEW YORK
THE Navy is coming to
ighTes veet a ,e3 fning
the operation to free the
SdSWa rH r fmc;::,
Hudson River mud that has
blocked efforts to move the
ship to a dry dock for reno-
vatidn, officials announced
Saturday, according to
Associated Press.
A fleet of civilian tug
boats tried Monday to pull
the 27,000-ton ship out of
the berth where it has been
serving as the popular
Intrepid Sea Air & Space
Museum, but the carrier
moved only a few feet
before its 16-foot propellers
snagged in the 24-year accu-
mulation of sediment.
Under a new plan of
attack, the Navy will pro-
vide salvage support at a
cost of about $3 million.
That includes dredging mud
from underneath the ship's
stern to free the propellers.
The Army Corps of Engi~
neers also will be involved.
"On Veterans Day today
as we honor the service of
those who sacrificed for our
freeglyn}, Intrepid got the
a greatest news: She will be
savedil Intrepid Museum
Foundation President Bill
White said as he marched
alongside Mayor Michael
Bloomberg in a Veterans
Day parade Saturday.
Although the 900-foot
war ship still has its pro-
pellers, it no longer has
engines and will have to be


Command, said the Navy
was "pleased to be provid-
ing assistance."
The Intrepid was
deployed in 1943 and
became a mainstay of the
war against Japan in the
Pacific, surviving five
kamikaze attacks, seven
bombs and a torpedo hit. A
total of 270 crew members
were killed.
It also served in the Viet-
nam and Korean wars and
was a recovery ship for
NASA astronauts in the
early days of the space pro-
gram.
Intrepid was saved from
the scrap yard in the 1970s
by New York builder Zach
Fisher. Since then, with md-
itary aircraft displayed on
its flight deck and in the
hangar deck; it has been
serving as a memorial to the
armed services, drawing
more than 700,000 visitors a
year.
It is also equipped"to
serve as an emergency
operations center for city
and federal authorities, and
the FBI used it as a base of
operations after the 2001
terrorist attacks.
The carrier's refurbish-
ment is to include the open-
ing of more interior spaces
to the public and upgrading


towed from its berth on
Manhattan's West Side
down the Hudson River to
a shipyard at Bayonne, N.J.,
for the two-year, $60 mil-
lion renovation project.
The $3 ,million Navy
effort is in addition to the
$60 million refitting cost,
White said.
"The Navy is footing the
bill; however, Intrepid will
make its best effort to reim-
burse the Navy for the
cost," he said.
Officials had planned for
a combination of federal,
state, city and private funds
to cover the $60 million.

Operation
The operation to free the
ship will take place over the
next several weeks, but the
Navy and its contractors
ve n set a towing date,
"The expertise that ihe
military is offering to solve
. . .
this situation is crucial to
allowing Intrepid to get
under way and for us to
steayuwitihihn our sch ul
rebuild Pier 86 said
Arnold Fisher, chairman of
the museum.
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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006, PAGE 21


THE TRIBUNE


WI ~~d ~36~-~


5 DHAKA, Bangladesh
THOUSANDS of protesters
demanding electoral reforms in
Bangladesh targeted major
transport links on Sunday,
attacking trains and other vehi-
cles and leaving at least one per-
son dead, media reports and
witnesses said, according to
Associated Press.
About 15,000 security offi-
cials, including members of a
paramilitary force, deployed
around Dhaka. the capital,
which was largely cut off from
the rest of the country by the
blockades, ATN Bangla t evi-
sion reported,


Thousands of protesters
defied a ban on demonstrations
that came after a 14-party
alliance said Saturday it would
chokeroadsandraillinkstothe
capital with sit-ms to press for
the resignation of election offt-
cials accused of bias ahead of
January elections.
The bloc said it would con-
tinue with protests, blocking
transport for a second day Mon-
day.
"The transport blockade will
continue unless our demands
are met," alliance spokesman
Abdul Jalil told reporters.
Late last month, rioting left at
least 27 dead after clashes


between supporters of Awami
League chief Sheikh Hasina and
former Prime Minister Khale-
da ZIa, who was constitution-
ally mandated to cede power
on Oct. 27 to a caretaker gov-
ernment that will oversee the
next elections.
On Sunday, protesters
blockedrailtracksandlaterset
fire to a train in Tongi, just out-
side the capital. Firefighters
doused the fire immediately and
no one was injured,
Separately, a group of pro-
testers attacked a train in the
district of Brahmanbaria, 50
miles east of the capital, Dhaka'
ATN Bangla reported.


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PAGE 22, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


1


he*I


t


'i


5 VATICAN CITY
POPE Benedict XVI lament-
ed on Sunday that hundreds of
millions of people around the
globe do not have enough to
eat, saying it was a scandal
which must be combatted by
changes in consumption and
fairer distribution of resources,
according to Associated Press.
Speaking from his studio win-
dow overlooking St. Peter's
Square, Benedict noted that the
Rome-based U.N. Food and
Agriculture Organization had
recently reported that more than
800 million people are under-
nourished, and that many peo-
ple, especially children, die from
hunger.
Benedict called for efforts to
"eliminate the structural caus-
es tied to the system of govern-
ing the world's economy, which
earmarks most of the planet's
resources to a minority of the
(Earth's) population." The pon-
tiff described that situation as
an "injustice.
To make an impact on a
large scale, it is necessary to con-
vert the model of global devel-
opment," the pope said. "Not
just the scandal of hunger
demands it, but also the envi-
ronmental and energy crises."
"In any case, every person
and every family can and must
do something to alleviate hunger
in the world, adopting a style of
life and consumption compatible
with safeguarding creation and
with criteria of justice toward
whosewhocultivatethelandin
every country," Benedict said.
.. ,gU.N. agency, ma report
late last month, said that 10


'.
-0


..


sunnianna .


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years after global leaders had undernourishment.
pledged to halve the number of Benedict urged the faithful to
the world's hungry, almost no join him in "committing our-
progress has been made, with selves concretely to defeat the
some 854 million peopleavorld- scourge of hunger".and promoted
wide still sufferingdoom justiceandselidarityumn a


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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006, PAGE 23


I'm a winner with The Tribune!

Pm Maxwell Lightbourn, winner of
game tickets, a one day car and airfine
for two, to the Dolphins vs. Kansas
City Chiefs game. You can be a winner
too, fill out the Dolphins vs Vikings
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READ


SPORTS e.
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The IflDilDC


i t


~


THE TRIBUNE


. . ..-, .
.... .


.....*r~l I...


I


Q. WE ARE CELEBRATING WITH YOU TWENTY YEARS OF SERVICE;
WHAT MOTIVATED YOU TO COME AND JOIN THE CBL TEAM 2.0
YEARS AGO?
A. Being a recent graduate of the College of The Bahamas in the
engineering field, I was looking for a challenging career working
in the industrial environment. I must admit that the choices were
limited to B.E.C., the hotel industry or light manufacturing. Then
an opportunity presented itself toJearn something new; they were
building a brewery and looking for ted*nical persavine/. This was
what I was looking at as an avenue to break away from the status
quo, to step into new industry as far as The Bahamas was
concerned. And as the saying goes "the rest is history "

Q. WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR MOTIVATION YEAR AFTER YEAR?
A. The question for me can be answered very simply; it is the
constant change in technology which leads to the change and .
upgrade of equipment. I find the training, installing and repairing
these new equipment challenging and rewarding.

Q. COMMONWEALTH BREWERY HAS GROWN OVER THE YEARS, DO
YOU FEEL THAT YOU WERE AFFORDED THE OPPORTUNITY TO
GROW WITH THE COMPANY? IF YES, IN WHICH WAYS?
A. For me this answer has to be yes. I joined CBL as a fr.
Electrician and today I am the Engineeritig Manages This is quite
an opportunity to grow.

Q. COMMONWEALTH BREWERY HAS GONE THROUGH MANY
MANAGEMENT TEAM CHANGES OVER THE YEARS. WHAT HAS BEEN
YOUR EXPERIENCE IN DEALING WITH THE DIFFERENT CULTURES
AND PERSONALITIES THAT HAVE BEEN REPRESENTED OVER THE
PAST 2,O YEARs? Warr HAS BEEN YOUR MOST FAVORABLE EXPERT~
ENCEP
A. My expe lunce is you have to bc f lex:We u.a rulged. Open

lim:-es.=ct folloudi war is #1'.

Q. WillT HAs BEEN 10tiR C,1REER PATH \\HILE .1T CBL? DETAIL
YOUK MURNI-,1.
4. I started as a fr. Electrican recrusted directly from the
paduarag class of 'S6. The next step was Electracean, then
Ele:twal Foreman. The next step was Engineering Foreman,
1/ en on to :\ss:stant Cinef Engeneer: Innally, today I am the
Engenceting Manages.


gyg Yi ENJOYED MOST OVER THE YEARS?
A. What I have enjoyed was the opportunity to travel from
Atlanta, California, Holland, Indiana, St. Lucia and Vietnam. The
main purpose for these trips uras for training however, it gave me
the opportunity do experience different cultures which most
certainly was an enjoyable experience.

WOULD YOU RECOM 1EN D COMMONWEALTH BREWERY TO UP
AND COMING H1GH POTENTIALS FOR EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY?
HAT IS 081.1S STRONGEST SELLING POINT FROM YOUR PERSPEC-
TIVE?
A. Yes I wordd. CBL is the type of company that if you are willing,
dedicated and have a level of flexibility, you can experience great
OpportidnideS.

Q. WHERE DO YOU ENVISION THE COMPANY GOING IN THE YEARS
THAT LIE AHEAD?
A. I envision the company being rim entirely by Bahamians,
maintaining world class brewing standards. In addition to taking its
products not only to a few U.S. states, but to all and to all the
islands in the Caribbean.

Q. HAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO YOUR COLLEAGUES THAT
WOULD FURTHER ENHANCE THEIR CBL EXPERIENCE?
A. Like life, you get out what you put in; 15% in 15% out, 80% in
80% out, need I say more.

Q. HINDSIGHT BEING 30/2,0, WOULD YOU DO IT ALL OVER AGAIN?
A. Life is never perfect and ogourse if I had the opportunity to do
it again I would change a few things.. but dien aga perhaps not.
OK, it roas not all perfect but the imperfection is what has made my
experience unique, I wouldn't change anything, and I would do it'
all over again.

CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR PERSEVERANCE,
FORTITUDE, FORTTIRIGHTNESS AND A POSITIVE ATTETTJDF.
IN 2.0 YEARS AT 080. ,** / V
KEEP REACHING FOR THE STARS! JOB WELL DONE.
,9'' ..#4.'


Available from ~Commercial News Providers





M.Sc. (ECONOMICS) SCHOLARSHIPS

Advance your Career

The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) is offering attractive
scholarships to Bahamians who wish to study at an overseas
University for a M.Sc. (Economics) Degree and be trained in
utility regulation and competition for an interesting and exciting
career at the PUC. The PUC is responsible for the regulation of
utility service providers (only telecommunications at this time)
in The Bahamas.

Applicants are expected to possess a Bachelors Degree or
equivalent in Economics, Finance or Accounting or a combination
of at least two areas. The scholarships include tuition, fees, and
transportation costs. Upon successful completion ofthe degree,
scholarship recipients will be required to work with the PUC
for an acceptable period.

Further information and application forms can be obtained from
the Manager/Administration, PUC, 4th Terrace East, Collins
Avenue, Nassau, Bahamas, email: krigby@puchnhamns-gov.hs,
telephone: 322-4437, fax: 323-7288. Completed applications
must be submitted with copies of academic certificates and
transcripts no later than November 15, 2006 to:


"x:,:::"Du olrl
Public Utilities Commission
P. O. Box N-4860

9 Colhns Ave.
Msau, initiaitid -


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 24, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006


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..MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006'---


B US IN E SS ~gc~amegy.


BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY


I i I I -


"r =dito HRNL


M By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Inspector of Banks and
Trust Companies has admitted
the Central Bank "may have
sold external auditors short in
the past" on providing them
with restrictions and concerns
they had about bank and trust
company licensees' operations,
prior to performing an audit. -
Michael Foot told a
Bahamas Institute of Char-
,tered Accountants (BICA)
seminar that the guidelines on


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cCdidad ak

d planned "cha hbarm a
Coinmerce
au plant presidency has told The Tri-
bune that enacting clause 4 in
the 1960 amendments to the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement is
"the only way out" of the cur-
rent turmoil engulfing the
Grand Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) and enabling Freeport
to thrive
Christopher Lowe the
Chamber's first vice-president
and a Kelly's Freeport exec&
tive, who is standiitg for elec-
tion to the presidency, said the
Clause, which allows the Port
Authority through a written
agreement to transfer all its
"rights, powers and obliga-
tions" to a 'Local Authority'
Y PARKER, allowed the GBPA's current
ConsoHdated shareholders the feuding Hay-
ater ward and St George families -
"ati exit strategy"
(FILE photo) ''That's the only way out that
Tsee t Mr Lowe told The Tril
buke "For Freeport to totally
is plant, Wind- realize its potential, the only
ater production option is Cpatise 4. It s an exit
yman Islands. strategy, and if you've got the
Consolidated right people it as business man-
t expected, to agers, then no one will have
suance of a per- time to complain and the place
d for approxi- willbe booming "
on for the Blue De ite the l al battle now
etime during the initial d by the te Edward St
George's estate over the claim
10B by his former business partner,


lowing the resignations earlier
this year of Sean McWeeney
and Sharon Wilson.
The Clause 4 catch, though,
is that such an agreement
between the Port Authority
and a LLocal Authority' must
be approved by at least 80 per
cent of the former's IIcensees.
This effectively gives a major
say over the Port Authority
and Freeport's future to its
licensees, and there have been
sighs that they are stirring,
.almost 100 bceasees havmg
attended a total of three meet-
ings about forming an associa-
tion.
The Port Authority had
always had a tough balance to
strike between its functions as a
private company on the one
hand, seeking to create a prof-
it for its shareholders, the St
George and Hayward families.
and its responsibilities as a reg-
ulator, to the Government, its
licensees and the people of
Freeport.
By splitting off the owner-
ship of private assets, such as
the Graiid Bahama Develop-
inent Company, from the Port
Authority's regulatory and

SEE 78
PE


Sir Jack Hayward, that he owns
75 per cent of GBPA and its
affiliate, Port Group Ltd, Mr
Lowe argued that "as match, if
not more effort" needed to go
into determining the future of
Freeport and the Haivksbill
.Creek Agreement.
"Freeport has never realized
its true potential with regard
to investment- and diversifica-
tion, and again rational minds
must study and seek the rea-
sons why. so that the ensuing
48 years of this uniquely struc-
tured agreement do not simply
follow the first.52 years, with
the potential of producing even
more dismal results," Air Lowe
said. n
"Organisations like the
Grand Bahama Chamber of
Commerce, the manufacturers
association and the Licensees
Association must nature to the
point of becoming viable con-
tributors. They must be encour-
aged.and supported, welcomed
and looked upon as having
much to contribute for the bet-
terment of all who have made
this pitr home and base of
investment and operations.
"We can either spiral
upwards or downwards, and it
is each and every licensee's
responsiblht y to- becoine


involved in decisions being
made hat affect their own
future, and not withdraw and
complain to no avail when
events do not transpire as
wished."
The 1960 amendments to the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement
include Clause 4, which allows
for the creation by statute of a
'Local Authority' that can exer-
cise ''powers of local govern-
ment or administration" in the
Port Authority area.
It effectively paves the way
for the Port Authority to trans-
fer all its regulatory. licensing,
and quasi-governmental pow-
ers to another entity while
maintaining its private, profit-
making interests.
This is \iewed by many as a
route out of the- GBPA
impasse, ensuring that its regu-
latory, governance and devel-
opmental functions are not
paralysed while the legal dis-
pute between its two main
shareholder's plays out.
The Govertimeht owns the
remaining 7.5 per cent of
GBPA outside of the Hayward
and St George families, butit is
unclear how it will respond to
recent developments jtist yet,
especially as it appeals to have
no Board representathes fol-


CONSOLIDATED Water'
the BISX-listed water produc-
er, said it expects to arrange a
$4 million performance bond
this quarter to guarantee the
operation of its Blue Hills
reverse osmosis plant, the new-
ly-opened Bahamas facility
having helped boost the com-
pany's third quarter bulk water
sales by 79 percent.
The Blue Hills plant, which
was commissioned and started
full operations n the three
monniths to S ptember 30,
2006, generated $1.898 million
in sales to the Water & Sewer-
age Corporation.
This played the key role in
driving Consolidated Wate7
bulk water sales igher v
per cetit or 52.259 milhon dur-
ing the 2006 third qtiarter, to
$5.128. million compared to
$2.87 million in last year's com-
parative.
Gross profit margin, thoi gh,
stayed the same at 15 per cent
of sales, although the total
edged up to $78 248 comb
pared to $421,751 in the 2005
third quarter.
Consolidated Water added
that it took a $305,000 one-time
charge in the 2006 third quarter
o hf rea-


SJEFFRE!


reverse osmos
nor, moving W
imits to the Ca
Meanwhile,
. Water said i
-'arrange the is
formance bon
mately $4 milli
Hills plant som

1 $EE page


the relationship between the
Central Bank and external
auditors were designed to
improve two-way communica-
tions between both parties,
He haid: "We may have sold
external auditors short in the
past and not told them enough
about the restrictions imposed
on licensees, particularly pru-
dential standards. It's impor-
tant we keep external auditors
awareofthat."

SEE 7B
PE


THE Central Bank of the
Bahamas is expected today to
petition the Supreme Court to
wind up Suisse Security Bank
& Trust,- the former bank
owned by controversial tycoon
Mohammed Harajchi, some.
eight months after he lost his
final Privy Council appeal
against its licence being
revoked.
The move to wind the bank
up, and appoint Deloitte &
Touche's senior partner, Ray-
mond Winder, as full liquida-
tor, is due to be heard by Jus-
tice Stephen Isaacs.
The petition to wind the
bank up comes as Allegations
have been made that Mr Hara-
jchi has returned to the finan-


cial services business.
The Offshore Alert newsl8t-
ter alleged that Mr Harajdit
and his son, Michel, watt
involved with a business callf'd
CFM Offshore, operated by
another company, Internation-
al Clients Support Services.
The latter, Offshore Alert
alleged, was incorporated by
law firm Ryan & Co. Ryan &
Cd's senior partner, Derek
Ryan, was Mr Harajchi's attor-
ney in his fight to overturn
Suisse Security's licence revo-
.cation, and also the bank's cor-
porate secretary.
The newsletter alleged that

SEE pa e 10B


# 56 Madeira StreetPalmdale
P.O.Box SS-6270 Nassau,8ahames
242.328.3040 Fax:242.32
www.rnioronet.bs


8.04 ~


SECTION


$1.9gm Blue Hills


WRy O


O


Ls t


firm's resu

a By NEIL HARTNELL $4m bon
Tribune Business Editor
r of Nass


IVI


Chamber candidate says Clause 4 'an exit


Central Bank 'may


Suisse Security wind-up today





week, to close at $1.06'
Consolidated Water
Company (CWCO) -
For the 2006 third quarter,
CWCO posted net income of
$1.3 million, representing an
increase of $238,000 or 23.5 per
cent versus $1 nullion for the
same period in 2005.
Total revenue increased by
$3.8 million or 61 per cent to
total $10 million, while cost of
sales increased by $2.2 million
or 55 per cent to total $6.2 mil-
lion.
For the 2006 third quarter,
retail water sales increased by
38 per cent to total $4.1 mil-
lion compared to $3 million in
2005. Bulk water sales rose by
79 per cent to total $5.1 mil-
lion, compared to $2.9 million
in the 2005 third quarter.
Gross profit for the quarter
stood at $3.8 million, compared
to $2.2 million for the equiva-
lent period last year. Operat-
mg expenses grew by $844,000
to total $2.3 million, while
income from operations was
$1.5 million versus $723,000 for
the same period in 2005.
In related news, CWCO's
Board of Directors has
declared a quarterly cash divi-
dend of $0.06 or $0.012 per
BDR, payable January 31,
2007, to shareholders as at
record date December 31,
2006.


DIVIDIi'NDIAGM NOTES:
FOCOL Holdings (FCL) has declared dividends of $0.11per
share, payable on November 15, 2006, to all shareholders of
record date October 31, 2006.
.* J. S. Johnsozi Company (JSJ) has declared dividends of $0.14
per share, payable on November 15, 2006, to all shareholders of
record date November 9, 2006.
PamGuard Company (FAM) has declared dividends of $0.06
per share, payable on November 17, 2006, to all shareholders of
record date Noveinber 10, 2006.
Commonwealth Bank (CBL) has declared a special divi-
dend of 50.08 per share, payable dh November 30, 2006, to all
shareholdersofrecorddateNovernber15,2006.
CWCO has declared dividends of $0.012 pet BI)R, payable
on January 31, 2007, to all shareholders of record date December
31, 2006.

International Markets
FOREX Rates
Weekly %Change
CAD$ 1.1316 0.17
E'R

Commodities
Weekly %Change
Crade Oil $59.62 0.80
Gold $630.00 0.16

International Stock Market Indexesi
Weekly %Change
DJIA 12,108.43 1.02
S & P $Op 1,380.90 1.22
NASDAQ 2,389.72 2.53
Nikkei 16,112.43 -1.45


The Bahamian St~ock Market


Share
YOMP

The Tribune wants to hear
froiji people who are
making news in their
iteighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are ralsmg funds for a
good cause, campaignmg
for improvements m the
area or have won an
awitd. .
If so, call us on 322-1986
tind share your story.


~r


:1


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006


oa
7


CHAGEVOLUME


YTD PRICE
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-13.04%
15.52%
10.09%
-18.69%
-3.87%
0.00%


BIX CLOSING


accounting errors that caused
Accounts Payables to be
understated. AML's chairman
-and chief executive, Craig
Symonette, has reassured
shareholders that the compa-
ny is "...fully committed to pro-
viding a proper control envi-
ronment, full transparency and
accurate financial reporting",
and have taken the steps that
have".....strengthened the rele-
vant controls and procedures.."
in order to prevent any future
reoccurrence of this nature.
Due to the restatement of its
fiscal 2006 results, the release
and publication ofAML's sec-
ond quarter results has been
delayed. AML's share price fell
by $0.11 or -9.40 per cent this


side for a second straight week
was Abaco Markets (AML),
which lost $0.11 or -9.40 per
cent to erid thq week at $1:06..
. Week over week, the FIND-
* EX declined by 1.83 points, to
close the week at 725.94.
.
COMPANY NEWS
Abaco Markets (AML) -
The financial woes of AML
continue to persist, the latest
coming ixi the form of a press
release this week, where man-
agement disclosed the company
will most likely have to restate
its 2006 year-end net loss by $1
inillion to total -$1.3 million,
instead of a net loss of $302,00
'as was previously reported.
The restatement was due to


AML
BAB
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL .
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
CWCB
DHS
FAM
FCC
PCL
FIN
ICD
JSJ
PRE


S-0.11
SO.01
S.
SO.06
S-
S-
S-
S-
S-
S-
50:15
S-0.54
S-
S-
S-
S-0.09
80.25
3-0.07
SO.05
S-


22600
44860
O
13739
0
0
12500
0
25026
37900
4500
0
16000
0
2000
12000
5450
9574
4650
0


$1.06
51.21
50.80
57.86
$11.00
514.60
$1.65
59.94
512.10
51.83
$14.00
55.18
52.76
86.03
$1.00
$11.61
$12.00
S8.09
58.70
510.00


i


Best Ally for Bone Health.













Caltrate am
soo .
altrate .m.
600 PLUS




Wyeth




Chilstriner Healthcare

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Rinn.oyli m~lnmil~lfP; Qllhdl;~!llEi. 'It(~jt~~dlL ~,.lm, Ip~l~?hBB~ PIWT~I~~A~I~Jth r0~8~~ ~~ldl~p! ~iaamrrra~torr


THE TRIBUNE


8 By Fidelity Capital
Markets
*
IT was another active trad-
ing week in the Bahamian mar-
ket as more 210,000 shares
changed hands. The market
saw 13 out of its 19 listed stocks
trade, of which five advanced.
three declined and five
remained unchanged.
Volume leader for the week
was Fidelity Bank (Bahamas')
(BAB) with 44,860 shares
changing hands, accounting for
21 per cent of the total shares
traded.
The big advanced for the
week was FINCO (FIN), up
$0.25 of 2.13 per cent to end
the week at $12. On the down


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'II 1 IL II II~I I- 1,1 ttl IIII


4 pa p age g gag
(El 0 1 171 L LEAAA L

SENIOR FIDUCIARY MANAGERS AND FIDUCIARY OFFICERS

J.P. Morgan Private Bank is a leading wholesale global financial services firm
that has been operating in The Bahamas since 1960. We are currently seeking
.
applications for Semor Fiduciary.Managers and Fiduciary Officers.
.
The selected individuals will work with Trust business and function partners
to ensure that fidticiary services are delivered in a manner consistent with all
.
legal, regulatory, and internal requirements. The candidates will also serve as
a technical resource to wealth advisors, investors, and relationship managers.
Senior candidates are expected to develop direct relationships with clients and
have the flexibility to travel.

The qualified team players will possess 6+ years trust experience, with 3+
years mentoring others; a professional qualification, ideally in law or
accounting;.knowledge of investment product services, fiduciary and trust
regulatory requirements, and onshore and offshore jurisdictions; excellent
written/verbal communication and creative problem solving skills; and the
ability to assess risk in fiduciary and trust matters.

J.P. Morgan Private Bank offers competitive compensation and benefits
packages. Interested applicants should submit their resume/curriculum
vitae marked Private and Confidential" to the Human Resources
Manager, J.P. Morgan Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited, P.O. Box
N-4899, Nassau Bahamas.

JPMORGAN TRUST COMPANY
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED






QUEENS COLLEGE
Has a vacancy for a


CAFE TERIA MANAGER

Queen's College is seeking to employ a Cafeteria Manager to operate the Q Caf6
beginning early 2007.
The successful applicant should have experience working in the restaurant
industry and relevant supervisory experience. He/She should demonstrate
effective communication and interpersonal skills.

The major duties of the Cafeteria Manager will be to:

plan, organize and direct, control and evaluate, the operations of the school
cafeteria; including but not limited to:

Assisting with the recruiting process for prospective applicants.
Overseeing training for cafeteria staff.
Establishing staff work schedules and monitoring performance,
discipline and staff evaluations.
.
Advising and planmng menus for students and staff.

The successful candidate will also be familiar with local health and safety
regulations for the cafeteria and its workers.

The starting salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.
However, preference will be given to candidates with training received at The
Bahamas Hotel Training College or other recognized culinary institutes.
We offer a competitive benefits package, including gratuity, pension, health
insurance, discount on children's tuition.

Queen's College was established in Nassau in 1890 by The Methodist Church and
is a member of The International Association of Methodist Schools, Colleges and
Universities (IAMSCU).

Resumes, covering letters and application forms can be returned to:

The Office of The Principal
Queen's College
P.O. Box N 7127
Nassau, Bahamas
or mailed to: dlynch@qchenceforth.com
So as to reach the office by November 30, 2006
more information can be obtained at our
award winning website www.qchenceforth.com.

BAHAMIANS ONLY NEED APPLY


o


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006, PAGE 3B


TH E TRIBUNE


bNu e Bsns Editor
THE Public Hospitals Author-
ity (PHA) has not released an
audited financial report since
2002, with an executive with the
National Health Insurance
(NHI) project team questioning
why there had been "no public
outcry as to where this money is
gomg".
Etolie Pinder, in a presenta-
tion to the Bahamas Institute of
Chartered Accountants (BICA),
revealed that "the Public Hos-
pitals Authority has not released
an audited report since 2002",
the year Prime Minister Perry
Christie's government was voted
in to office.
This year's Budget allocated
some $142.48 million to the PHA .
tor fiscal 2006-2007, an increase
pon the previous year's almost
5128 million allocation by
$14.544 million. In fiscal years
O 04, a1n o I t a d
to have spent $114.095 million
and $129 million.
Ms Pinder's remarks are like-
ly to add to the concerns of those
a rea2 contc rned)abeo Nthe

plan, and believe that it should
first focus on strengthening the
existing public healthcare system
and eliminating management -
inefficiencies.
Ms Pinder acknowledged that
the current public healthcare sys-
tem needed improving, admit-
ting that "the odds are not nec-
essarily the way I would like to
see them" when it came to the
quality of experience and service
enjoyed by those who used the
system.
She added that 80-90 per cent
of public healthcare system users
reported enjoying a good expe-
rience, with 10-20 per cent hav-
ing a "not so good" experience.
Yet Ms Pinder argued that to
secure more financial account-
ability and management effi-
ciency in the Bahamian public


pi ed d oeb h gw
New and upgraded health clin-
ics and hospitals were required,
as were more health personnel
and pharmacists. The Govern-
ment had allocated an extra $10
million from the Consolidated
Fund, rising from $8 million to
$18 million, for capital spending
on the public health system.
Ms Pinder also admitted that
studies to lay the framework for
NHI had revealed "inefficient
management in a lot of areas of
the public health sector". How-
ever, she insisted NHI would
improve this generate more
accountability and transparency
in the sector, due to the fact that
it would be funded by taxpayer
contributions via the NHI.
The public healthcare sector
would "no longer get a blank
cheque" from the Government
via the Budget and Consolidated
Fund if NHI was introduced.
haMsaP iI er id the 19RI t
"across the board" increase in
use of the healthcare system
once the programme was intro-
duced, and the big turknown was
1 ther itawouldsr uh in a "ut 1-
the public and private sectors.
Currently, Ms Pinder said 48
per cent of outpatients used pri-
vate services, the remaining 52
per cent using the public sector.
NHI could potentially lead to
a swing from the private to the
public sector, and Ms Pinder
admitted questions remained
over how any "shortfall".
between the NHI cost estimates
and reality would be covered,
and whether the Consolidated
Fund could be used.
In response to questions over
whether NHI could result in an
increase in patient waiting times
for operations, as had happened
in nations with similar health-
care system, such as the UK and
Canada, Ms Pinder replied that
she would rather be on a waiting
list than not be able to have the


operation at all.
She admitted that the
Bahamas did not have "a ratio-
nal allocation of healthcare" cur-
rently, with people holding polit-
ical and family connections, plus
money, able to effectively jump
the queue.
Meanwhile, NHI will not nec-
essarily cover the full cost of care
for Bahamians who use private
doctors, Ms Pinder said.
This was because "the reim-
bursement rates for private
providers are based on the cost
of providing services in the pub-
lic sector". For instance, if a pub-
lic sector GP charges $50 for a
service, and his private sector
counterpart $60, the Bahamian
patient who uses a private doctor
will see NHI cover the first $50,
t enter ana deco-
The extra co-payment, Ms Pin-
der said, would have to be fund-
ed from either supplementary
insurance or a person's own
fin cial utrces.NHI would
reduce the number ofnon-payers
within the Bahamian healthcare
system, arguing that doctors did
not charge between 10-30 per
cent of patients who came to see
them because these people did
not have funds.to pay them.
To administer the NHI
scheme, Ms Pinder said all mem-
bers who paid their due contri-
butions would receive a smart
card to-enable the timely settle-
ment of their claims.
The project team had retom-
mended that.NHI not proceed
without a strong information
technology (IT) system being in
place.
Ms Pinder said some private
insurance carriers were good at
settling medical claims on a time-
ly basis, turning them around in
a week, while others took longer.


.


Located next to Atlantis,
with 228

appoinbeed Suites
and meeting facilities
to accommodate
up to 70 people.

Our guests have
full use of the
exclusive facilities of
the fabulous Atlantis
just steps away.
.
Ir.-room amenities
include: king size or
double double beds.
sitting area
with sofa bed'
cable ty, reingerator,
In-room safe.
cotee maker, hair dryer,
complimentary deluxe
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Pool with swim-up bar,
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breakfast and lunch,
Bamboo cocktail bar.

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Contact our
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PARADISE I5L4ND


1 Paradise Island Dnve


H os p it als uthor i





animals since 2002


fin














Government ma- exit






Venture fund in five ears


5 By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government eventual
ly wishes to exit its $1 million
per year financial contributions
and involvement in the venture
capital fund set up to assist
Bahamian entrepreneurs, its
administrator revealed, possi-
bly as soon as five years' time.
AccountantS

Jerome Gomez, of Gomez
Partners & Co, told a Bahamas
Institute of Chartered Accoun-
tants (BICA) seminar that the
Government eventually wanted
the private sector to take over
the financing and administra-
tion of the Bahamas Entrepre-
neurial Venture Fund.


,
N tO 100

.
Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, 2002, Notice is hereby
given that:-

1. MILTREX HOLDING S.A (In Voluntary Liquidation) is
in dissolution.
2. Proceedings to wind-up and dissolve the Company were
commenced on the 8th day of November A.D, 2006.

3. Dr. Wilder Gonzalez Penino whose address is Worki
Trade Centre, Montevideo, Av. Dr. Luis Alberto de
Herrera 1248/2301 (11300) Montevideo, Uruguay and
Mr. Mark Levine whose address is M. Safra & Co. Inc.,
590 Madison Avenue, 27th Hoor, New York, NY 10022,
U.S.A are the joint Liquidators of the Company for the
purposes of such dissolution.

war.nues Law emumns




*
NOtice

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 235 of the
Companies Act, 1992, as Amended, Notice is
hereby given that:-
1. STONEHENGE LIMITED (In Voluntary Liquidation) is
in dissolution.
2. Proceedings to wind-up and dissolve the Company were
commenced on the 8th day of November A.D, 2006.

3. Dr. Wilder Gonzalez Penino whose address is Woi 1
Trade Centre, Montevideo, Av. Dr. Luis Alberto de
Herrera 1248/2301 (11300) Montevideo, Uruguay and
Mr. Mark Levine whose address is M. Safra & Co.,Inc.,
590 Madison Avenue, 27th Floor, New York, NY 10022,
U.S.A are the joint Liquidators of the Company for the
purposes of such dissolution.

maranus Law cannus
Registered Agent


Legal Notice
NOTIA


ALPS SWISS INC.
......... ..............


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Sectionl38 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
ALPSSWISS INC. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the register.


M JEROME GOMEZ
(FILE photo)


DO YOU STUTTER? DO YOU KNOW SOMEONE WHO DOES? THERE
ARE OVER 3000 BAHAMAINS WHO STUTTER AND IF YOU ARE LIKE
THE AVERAGE STUTTERER YOU PROBABLY THINK OF STUTTERING
AS A MYSTERY.
IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT YOUR STUTTERING,
WHY YOU STUTTER AND WHAT YOU CAN DO ABOUT IT, THE
BAHAMAS ABSOCIATION FOR PEOPLE WHO STIOTTER WILL BE
HOLDING A SELF HELP MEETING ON WEDNESDAY, MOVBRIER SA
soosesm AT SBAMORESTAUMMT BAY STREET.
ASK FOR CHARLTON KNOWLES.




Legal Notice
NOTICE


AVONDALE ALPS CORPs

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 20th day of October 2006. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. nc .O. Box N-7757






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




Legal Notice
NOTICE


HETULA VALLEY LTD*




NOtice is hereby given that in accordance with
Sectionl38 (8) of the International Business
COmpanies Act 2000, the dissolution of
HETULA VALLEY LTD. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
COmpany has therefore been struck off the register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


ARGOSA CORP. INC.


Pricing Information As Of:
Thursday. 9 November 200 6
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES VISIT WWVV BISXBAHAA1AS COM FOR MORE DATA& INFO NATION
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX. CLOSE 1,640.90 / CHG 00 00 / %CHG 00 00 YTD 290 19 / YTD on 21 48

12.05 10.25 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.00 1.627 0.380 6.8 3.45%
7.88 6.90 Bank of Bahamas 7.88 7.88 0.00 0.802 0.330 9.8 4.19%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.208 0.020 3.8 2.50%
1.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.65 1.65 0.00 0.168 0.060 9.8 3.64%
1.49 1.10 Fidelity Bank 1.20 1.20 0.00 0.188 0.050 7.0 3.82%
9.95 9.05 Cable Bahamas 9.94 9.94 0.00 0.659 0.240 15.1 2.41%
2.20 1.40 Colina Holdings 1.83 1.83 0.00 0.046 0.000 39.8 0.00%
12.10 9.00 Commonwealth Bank 12.10 12.10 0.00 0.943 0.660 12.1 5.45%
6.26 4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.37 5.18 -0.19 0.130 0.045 40.1 0.86%
2.88 2.10 Doctor's Hospital 2.70 2.70 0.00 0.348 0.000 7.8 O OO""
6.21 4.35 Famguard < 03 6.03 0.00 0.428 0.240 14.1 3 9
12.00 10.60 Finco 0..1 12.00 0.00 0.763 0.560 15.7 4 *
14.10 10.00 FirstCaribbean 1185 13.85 0.00 0.927 0.550 14.9 3
11.70 9.25 Focol 11.61 11.61 0.00 0.885 0.500 13.1 4.31%
1.15 0.95 Freeport Concrete 1.00 1.00 0.00 -0.170 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.20 8.09 ICD Utilities 8.09 8.09 0.00 0.532 0.270 15.2 3.34%
9.10 8.65 J. S. Johnson 8.70 8.70 0.00 0.527 0.560 16.5 6.44%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.291 0.195 7.7 1.95%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Secunties
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E YIeld
14.30 12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 14.00 1.923 1.320 8.1 9.04%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 8.00 8.25 10.00 0.000 0.640 NM 7.85%
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.00 -0.002 0.000 NM 0.00%
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.00 15.00 12.50 1.750 0.360 8.0 2.57%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.45 -0.070 0.000 N/M 0.00%
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
,24. 52.e.K-LO.*, Fur.3 Nam.5 N.-- YTD Lan 12 F lor.Irs 0.. I r..-13 :
1


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 200ti


applicants; weak marketing
strategies; and the absence of
financial records.
The existence of a financial
system and cost controls within
the business "seems to be the
biggest challenge for small be
nesses", the fund adminish
tor said.

Capital
Mr Gomez said the Bahamas
Entrepreneurial Venture Fund
"tends to stay away from seed
capital and the Research and
Development stage".
He added: "In the Bahamas,
we find there is little need for
seed capital. Most entrepre-
neurs we find don't tend to cre-
ate, innovate anything."
The Bahamas Entrepreneur-
ial Venture Fund looked for
applicants whose businesses
and ideas had "good potential
growth" in profitability, sales,
revenues and share values,
especially those it took an equi-
ty position in.
Applicants had to show there
was a need for the profits and
services they offered, and
demonstrate their marketing
strategy and how they would
outperform the competition.


He said: "We wish the pri-
vate sector to become involved
in the fund.

? RO

"The plan long-te m is for
the private sector tocome in,
and the Gatern me E not to
have to fund it....
"The Government would
wish to be out of this project
in due course; five years is the
plan for the Government to be
out of the fund."
Some $3 million has been
allocated to the Bahamas
Entrepreneurial Venture Fund
to date, and Mr Gomez told
BICA members that it "can
really make a big impact" once
it reached a size of $10 million.
Currently, the fund is limited


to loaning a maximum of
$100,000 and an equity invest-
ment of $200,000 in any one
start-up applicant that it choos-
es to provide financial assis-
tance to.
Mr Gomez said this meant it
could not help businesses and
start-ups that required funding
over those limits, and whom
the banks were not prepared
to support.
He added that the Bahamas
Entrepreneurial Venture Fund
aimed to become "self-sustain-
ing over time", its main objec-
tives being to create a venture
capital culture in the Bahamas,
spur small business develop-
ment and "create a class of
well-educated Bahamian entre-
preneurs".
Fund

"The fund is the only oppor-
tunity to get into business and
make a profit" for many young
Bahamians, Mr Gomez said.
Among the main weaknesses
seen in the 200 applications for
assistance the fund had seen to
.
date were poor planning, with
little appreciation of how to
write a good business plan;
unprepared and impatient


.


2. i i B a a d


2. 55 *


2. 51


., FINDEX: CLOSE 721.72 .' YTD 30.78% / 2005 26.09%
S2wk-HI Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bld 5 Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fIdelity 27 October 2006
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week 31 October 2006
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value "' 30 September 2006
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
-10 TRADE CALL.: COUNA 242-502--'O1G = F;-,ELIT1' 242-356-770 / FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION CALL (2421 394-2503


THE TRIBUNE








I I 'I


Has a vacancy for a
Site Director of Finance (Operation)
To provide finance and accounting leadership and support for site marketing
and sales efforts, resort operations, and some new product to market initiatives.
To ensure accurate and timely onside financial management, reporting,
forecasting and budgeting of all on--site Ritz-Carlton Club business units(sales
& marketing and ancillary profit centers) and the Homeowner Associations
Safeguard company assets and maintain a strong environment of financial
control.
-Prepare budgets and forecasts for all business units.
-Monitor and control project budgets, commitments and final costs.
-Maintain accurate historical data to aid in the preparation of pro forma
economic performance models.
-Manage investments & banking for all Ritz-Carlton Club units and
Homeowner Associations.
-Oversee timely reconciliation of all bank accounts.
-Ensure communication between personnel and others
-Ensure all invoices are processed timely, accurately and ensure cost are
within budget.
-Perform all necessary journal entries andbnalysis to accurately close books
on period basis.
Please Sedd Resumes to:
Attn: HR Director
The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O. Box AB20571
Marsh Harbour, Ababo .








ANSBACHER

ANSBACHER (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
The Ansbacher Group, specialists in private banking,,fiduciary services
and wealth management, has an opening in The Bahamas for a

PRIVATE BANKING MANAGER

Reporting to: Head of Private Banking
Responsibilities:
* Client relationship management of high net worth banking
portfolios.
Ability to manage projects
Ensure execution and follow-up of bank reviews to minimize risk.
Analyzing of financial requirements of prospective and existing
clients.
Participate in continuous quality improvement initiatives in the
department
Leading a small tearri of relationship officers in the achievement
of department objectives
Developing and maintaining a good relationship with other
departments to ensure efficient and timely customer service.
Requirements:
* 5-7yrs proven experience in the Fiduciary/Banking field
* A Bachelor's or Master's Degree in Banking or Finance
* Strong problem solving and leadership skills.
* Customer service oriented
* Highly proficient in Microsoft Office
* Solid analytical skills with keen attention to detail
* Strong written communication and presentation skills
* Strong investigative skills
* Ability to multi-task
* Must be able to work under pressure in a fast-paced environment
* Must have the ability to establish and maintain a strong working
relationship.with key personnel and work effectively ih a team.
Please send C.V. to the attention of:
Human Resource Manager
Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-7768
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 325-0524
E-Mail: hrmanager@ansbacher.bs


ACREAGE FOR SALE

The Property is located offFox Hill Road in the vicinity of Prince Charles Drive.
The parcels a parallelogram in shape, is on a level grade and contains15.32
80tes.

All that piece, parcel, or lot of land being lots #81 & 82 being bounded on the
north by Springfield Road running thereon One Thousand One Hundred and
Eighteen arid Sixteen Hundredths (1,118.16) feet, on the east by lot number 83
running thereon five htindred and eighty-seven and eighty hundredths (587.80)
feet, on the south by land running thereon nine hundred and seventy-seven
and ten hundredths (977,10) feet, and one the west by lot number 52 running
theteen f ve hundred and eighty-seven and eighty hundredths (587.80)feet.



--
.. **---






ozo


on




PLOT PLAN

.
The property is for sale by owner. No agents. Asking price is One Million Five
Hundred Thousand (B$1,500,000.00) dollars net. The right is reserved to a
reject any and or all offers. AII offers to be subinitled in writing by December 31 ,
2006to:-

Acreage for sale
do P. O. Box N-8097
Nassau, Bahamas


'L~6


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE .


Bahamas policies hurt nation's


Mr Moss, who spoke on the topic,
Mergers and Acquisitions Valuation
Dynamics in the Bahamas and the
Caribbean, said that companies in the
region operate under many con-
straints, including political instabili-
ty, lack of infrastructure, and a small
skilled labour pool, all of which affect
a company's value when it is merged
or acquired.
While some of these obstacles were
present in the Bahamas, Mr Morris


said the country also contributed to its
own difficulties through some of the
policies put into effect.
LawyerS
For example, he said that both the
Cayman Islands and Bermuda allowed
businesses to use foreign lawyers,
which brought the advantage of their
companies having more contacts m
other countries, whereas the Bahamas


does not.
"Sometimes, we shoot ourselves in
the foot trying to protect ourselves,"
he said.
Another issue affecting the price
assigned to a Bahamian company is
government regulations, which often
slow down simple processes.
Mr Morris said this was also true in
transactions involving other Caribbean
countries, which have varying political
agendas and climates.


5 By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business Reporter
THE Bahamas must do more to
become competitive with other coun-
tries in the Caribbean, Bahamian
accountants have been told.
Fred Morris, a Bahamas-based
executive with KPMG Corporate
Finance Caribbean, told the Bahamas
Institute of Chartered Accountants
(BICA) that this country has been


lucky as a result of its geographical
location and proximity to the US east-
ern seaboard, which has le.d to strong
tourism revenues and financial ser-
vices opportunities.
Safety
However, Mr Morris said that in
some ways that safety net has hin-
dered the Bahamas' focus on its core-
petitiveness.


competitiveness







, rm~


LEGAL NOTICE


CO ET IN

KALAFIA LIMITED


Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 137(8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice is
hereby given that the above-named Company has been
dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant to a
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General
on the 1st day of November, 2006.

Lynden Maycock
Liquidator
KALAFIA LIMITED




40









Poss s dd i cation as QS or Accountant

Minimum 5 years experience in a responsible, senior
accountant or QS position

Working knowledge of the business of construction a
significant advantage
Proficient with Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel

Good communications skills

Resume should be sent to Mark Scott, Development
Department, The Abaco Club on Winding Bay,
P.O. Box AB-20571, Marsh Harbour, Abaco or
faxed to 242-367-2930




Assistant Manager
Position Available Immediately
At
Dairy Queen
Qualifications:

You should have a High School Diploma
Past managerial experience
Certificate in Management is a plus
Must be available for day and night shifts,
including weekends
You should demonstrate strong communication,
leadership, motivational and people
management skills
You should have a valid driver's license
You must have a GREAT attitude towards
customer service!

Basic responsibility to include:

Maintain product, service and image standard
To assist in supervision of all phases of
production.
To maintain a high level of efficiency &
productivity in all areas of store operation
Interested Person can email or send r6sum6
Attention: Human Resource Department
P.O. Box SS-6704
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax 356-7855
Email br@abacomarkets.com


- ,

.
- -




.



N Oil CO
NOTICE is hereby given that LINDA NOREUS, P.O. BOX
SS-6049, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13TH day of
NOVEMBER, 2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




Masters

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Bachelor Masler Ph.D. fields of study-
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To receive ro er information, NO COST Catalog and an Application Form:
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Student Communication Center
PO. Box 61707, ng of Prussia, PA. 19406 USA









Accounting Degree or solid
accounting backg round
FOquired

Must be a mature, reliable
and honest team player


Must be computer literate


MUSt have excellent .
people skills


Please fax resume & cover letter.

Fax# 325-3260.


S TA GSR US!!!

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PH. 436-8 80


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TECHNOLOOMS
E MP L OY ME NT

OPPORT UNITY
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skin set-
Computer Science College degree
Good hardware and software
troubleshooting skills
Knowledge of basic Windows
Networking
Knowledge and applied skills with
Windows XP and Windows server.
Exceptional time management and
customer service skills
Must be organized and a team player
SEND RESUME TO:
Lignan Technologies (Bahamas) Ltd.
The Harbour Bay Shopping Plean
Fax- 3044971
MaB: P.O. Box SS-895


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006


-


* *


* *
em


C,


C


- -


- *


maco rigitfd afefalheat


OVer O-s'yndicated*Cont'ent o


.Available from Commercial News Providers









I I I -


COUNSEL & AT TO RNE Y S- AT- LAW
303 SHIRLEY STREET jP O BOX N 492
NASSAU, NEW PROVIDENCE I THE BAHAMAS
t 242 328 35001f 242 328 8008 |www.gsolegal.com


GLINTON I SWEETING O'BRIEN is seeking two qualified
Attorneys-At-Law to join the firm as Associates specializing in Real
Estate Law and Litigistion respectively.

Applicants should have strong academic records, particularly in respect
of their legal studies, be organized and diligent workers.with sound
analytical and writing skilk, and should have the personal skills necessary
for direct professional interaction with the firm's most important clients.
.
Two or more years experience is preferred but is less important than
ability and the right attitude.

Successful applicants will receive a highly competitive salary, including
. .
full medical msurance and will participate in a generous profit-sharing
scheme. More importantly, the successful applicants will join a thriving
new practice in the early stages of its growth, and work in an enjoyable
and challenging environment while having the benefit of careful and
.
thorough trammg from experienced practitioners.

Interested*applicants should deliver their curriculum vitas to our offices
in the Destinations Building, 303 Shirley Street no later than the 1st of
.
December 2006, along with copies of all degrees and certificates earned
and at least two samples of written work prepared by the apphcants m
either an academic or professional context. All applications will be treated
as confidential.


4 unit apartment complex comprising 4,298 sq ft of living space
The building is located on Lot 6 Block 1, Maliboo Reef Court, Freeport'
Grand Bahama with a gross area of 36,743 sq ft.

For conditions of sale and any other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit -
at: 502-0929 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit,
P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
to h befo N mb 30 2006
reac us re ove er









Citigroup, a leading financial institution with a presence in over 100
countries and over 100 million customers worldwide, is seeking
candidates for the following position:


COg)Orate Secretary/Legal Vehicle Administrator

Reporting to the Senior Operations Offshore Coordinator, the selected
candidate will be responsible for the oversight arid management of all
formal corporate requirements to ensure that applicable legal vehicles
remain in good standing and available for the booking of offshore activity.


Key responsibilities include managing 1) all company non-financial
requirements; 2) the collection and assessment of Know Your Customer
(KYC) documentation requirements; 3) legal vehicle service agreements;
4) control reporting; and, 5) any associated projects related to local
regulatory requirements.

Requirements include excellent administration, interpersonal and
communications skills as well as the abilities to work independently and
lead projects. A Master's level degree in business administration, finance
or a related field or a legal degree, with a minimum of 2-5 years of related
experience, is needed. Additionally, an excellent.knowledge of the local
regulatory environment is required. Candidates must also be bilingual in
Spanish and English.

Interested candidates should fax OR forward a copy their resume to
Human Resources Department, P.O. Box N-1576, Nassau, Bahamas.
The Fax number is (242) 302-8732. The deadline for application is
November 24, 2006.


Commercial Building located Toote Shop Corner & East Street
The property comprises 1,876 sq ft.

For conditions of sale and any other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
at: 502-0929 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit,
P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
to reach us before November 30, 2006.


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE


but infrequent", happening once every four or
five years per licensee, Mr Foot said the Central
Bank had inspected 32 licensees last year, and
was on target to do 40 of about 250 this year.
The Inspector of Banks and Trust Compa.
nies said there was "nothing new" in the Central
Bank approving the external auditors of its
licensees, something it had been doing "for a
long time".
The Central Bank's guidelines had now set
out the factors involved when the regulator con-
sidered whether to approve an auditor, and Mr
Foot said one new requirement was that the
auditor would not be accepted if he provided
"certain other services to the client".
"There are now limits on the work an auditor
can do for a client outside the audit before they
are viewed as compromised," Mr Foot said.
He described the provision of bookkeeping
and internal audit services as "absolute no nos".
However, the Central Bank realized that for
commercial purposes it was impossible to seg-
regate audit services from others that accoun-
tants provided, so offering other things to
licensees was permitted provided certain con-
ditions were met.
These were that the audit committee
approved the provision of non-audit services
prior to their start, and that the total amount of
all non-audit revenues not exceed 5 per cent of
the revenues paid by the bank to the auditor in
a financial year.
In addition, Mr Foot said auditors could
approach the Central Bank with their licensee
client and "make a proposition to us that it does
not interfere with your independence".
"Y"ou will have to argue the case, and I can't
assure you we will accept," Mr Foot added.
No such cases had reached him yet, but Mr
Foot promised the Central Bank would "try
and turn it round pretty quickly. We will try
and work something out that does not inter-
fere with the business process".


Mr Foot said the Central Bank had, in par-
ticular, kept a keen eye on Bahamian banks
and trust companies that were either standalone
entities or acted as the 'home country' office
with offshore subsidiaries, imposing certain
higher limits and prudential standards on them.
The guidelines allow Mr Foot, at his discre-
tion, to notify external auditors about issues
that "could significantly affect the form" of the
audit and other reporting responsibilities.
He can also disclose information to help him
discharge his duties under the Banks and Trust
Companies Regulations Act, and if it is a "pru-
dential standard, a requirement under statute
and regulation, or a specific and general direc-
tive and any terms regarding a bank and trust
company's licence".
Mr Foot said that in the two years since he
took up the post of Inspector of Banks and
Trust Companies, "only on one occasion" had
he briefed an external auditor to look at certain
issues when the audit was performed.
Out of about 2501icensees, Mr Foot said this
was the only time he disclosed information to
then external auditor because he was "was not
happy with certain aspects of the licensee's oper-
ations".
The external auditor had checked out the
Central Bank's concerns, reported back to Mr
Foot and then a three-way dialogue between
the auditor, Central Bank and licensee had
ensued, the outcome being a programme of
action to correct the deficiencies noted. *
When asked why the Central Bank could not
carry out more frequent and in-depth inspec-
tions of its licensee, Mr Foot pointed out that no
regulator in the world had enofigh manpower
and resources to do this,
He said the Central Bank was "trying to
expand the number of examiners", and had
enough personnel to have three teams of exam-
iners in the field at any one time.
Adding that the inspections were "in-depth


against the Customs Depart-
ment to prevent it levying
$800,000 in duties on bonded
goods it has on retail display.
Business sources have
become concerned that the
lawsuit's existeAce would
impact any talks with Customs,
especially if Danny Lowe was
elected, if the Department
wanted to re-introduce its
planned changes to the over-
the. c unter.bonded go yu(-_
chase sisthm m Free
,Chidd-ibe,8xisting Ime.
w holesalersiuch a liv
Madison, Kelly's Frb port,
Bellevue and the Home Centre
are able to import goods duty
free under the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement.
Other Port Authority
licensees then present these
companies with an annual let-
ter indicating they will be buy-
ing goods from them for use
in their own trade or business
during the following year, enti-
tling them to buy those goods
duty exempt. Customs had
wanted to change this practice,
so that when a licensee pur-
chased these bonded goods
over-the-counter, they would
first have to go to Customs and
present them with a valid
invoice for those products.
- The Customs Department,
in its proposal, would then
approve the purchase and send
a stamped version of the
invoice back to the licensee,
who could then proceed with
the purchase. This was seen as
unworkable, tying the Freeport
business community up in red
tape and extra costs, but
although Customs shelved this
last year, had indicated they
would revisit the scheme by
theendof 2006.


quasi-governmental functions,
it could be left to concentrate'
on its economic development
and profit-making role with-
out being burdened by its often
conflicting responsibilities,
Mr Lowe and others have
called for dialogue between
licensees, the GBPA and gov-
ernment about how a 'Local
Authority' would work, how it
would be structured, who
m.ouldJ;ty represented on its
oai-d, bilitiesit would Again calling for dialogue
between the Licensees Asso-
ciation, Port Authority and the
Grand Bahama Chamber, Mr
Lowe said: "There are some
questions that must be
answered with reference to the
management structure, as
recent changes seem to be at
the core of the destabilization, .
but sane minds must prevail,
especially from the licensee's
perspective, with regard to
guiding the practices of
Freeport back into the realm
of the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment as intended under the
spirit of that document.
"Non-confrontational dia-
logue and discourse is essen-
tial, and should run parallel to
the legal wrangling currently
developing, but we must
remember that destruction will
serve the interest of no one,
least of all the licensees and
residents of this island from
east to west."
Mr Lowe told The Tribune
that legal troubles engulfing
the GBPA were the topic of
conversation throughout
Freeport, although few people
"understand the situation and
the ramifications for Freeport
of allthis .


He added that there was
"definitely a drawing back" on
investment and expansion
plans by Bahamian licensees
of the GBPA, who were get-
ting "cautious and hesitant" on
what the future held.
Apart from local licensees,
the battle over GBPA's and
Port Group's ownership, plus
Hannes Babak's embattled
chairmanship of both entities,
) 411 to hae.agimpact.pn
n int estors such as Mor-
ga tale). Mr Lowe said.
"I'm sure they're all looking
for a holding position. I've
heard a lot of them are looking
for a holding position, or say-
ing: 'Not yet. Let's wait and
see what the deal is'," he
added.
The Port Authonty situation
is also likely to impact the pol-
itics of the Chamber election,
The Tribune has learned.
Mr Lowe is standing for
president against Danny Lowe
(no relation), the current
incumbent who succeeded Dr
Doswell Coakley for the last
few months of the latter's
tenure, when he stepped down
to pursue his political interests.
Danny Lowe is an executive
with the Home Centre, a com-
pany owned by BISX-listed
Freeport Concrete, whose
largest shareholder is Mr
Babak, the Port's chairman,
Several business sources
have expressed concern to The
Tribune that if Danny Lowe is
elected, the Chamber could be
silenced as an effective voice
on the problems surrounding
the Port and Freeport's future,
given his employment rela-
tionship to Mr Babak.
In addition, the Home Cen-
tre has filed a legal action


Central Bank 'may have sold


I O'BR'IEN


GLINTON


I SWEETING


THE ONLY WAY OUT, from page 1B








.. L I


Centre For Continuing Education
& Extension Services

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND
RE CERTIFICATION SEMINAR
How to Work With
and/or, Mentor Difficult People
a ?
PRESENTER: Simone Bowe
Human Resource Consultant
DATE: 18th November, 2006
TIME: 9am 3:00pm
VENUE: Salon A, Wyndham Nassau .
Resort & Crystal Palace
COST: $100 (mcludes all lectures, seminar materials, lunch and refreshments)
Learn how to manage your communications with difficult people through an
understanding of alternative communication styles. Change a difficult situation
into a positive one by using techniques that control emotional reactions. Resolve
difficult encounters-more comfortably by identifying and practicing a variety
of strategies.
You will learn:
* Principles of conflict resolution
* The nature of difficult people
* The nature of conflict
* How to become stronger in the face of conflict
* More options in dealing with conflict and the difficult people who often
create it
* Practical applications of options for working with difficult people
* How to respond to different types of behaviors among difficult people;
* Sources of resistance and strategies to deal with the resistance.
DEADLINE TO REGISTER: 10th November, 2006
LATE REGISTRATION: $140
.
CERTIFICATION: Participants completmg all required hours will be awarded
.5 (point 5) Continuing Education Units (CEUs).
Secure Your Seat By Enrolling Today!
Call (242) 325-5714/328-0093/328-1936 or visit us on
Moss Road in Oakes Field.
Fees may be paid in cash ohfeM t card o ni c iffe c qWe
'ITre College of The E amas .
Kindly remit payment to the Business Office, Portia Smith Student Services
Centre, Poinciana Drive.
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course
Schedule and Course Materials.


THE INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGES AND CULTURES INSTITUTE
OF THE COLLEGE OF TH BAHAMAS

presents
A PANEL DISCUSSION ON
THE EUROPEAN UNION


I I


PAGE 8B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


B


Visit ou~r website at www.cob.edu.bs


gyg4pyg , }jAHtSHANc


STAFF VACANCIES
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
The Bahamas Marine and Environmental Studies Institute
The College/University of The Bahamas seeks a dynamic and creative individual to
provide leadership in The Bahamas Marine and Environmental Studies Institute.
The Institute is intended to facilitate the discovery of knowledge about the marine and
island environment of The Bahamas and build on the solid foundation of research and
monitoring programmes. The mandate of developing specialized laboratory and field
courses to compliment the current Bachelor of Science degree courses at The-
College/University will be a significant focus.
The Executive Director, reporting to the Vice President Research, Graduate Programmes
and International relations, has supervisory responsibility for the Institute, comprising
appointed faculty fellows. He/She will provide leadership in programme development'
and research initiatives so as to take full advantage of The College/University location
in a small island state and year round access to the unique sub-tropical ecosystems of
the coastal, coral reefs, mangrove and sea grass communities in The Bahamas. Toward
this end, the Executive Director will work closely with administrators at the existing
facilities at The College/University field stations in San Salvador (Gerace Research
Centre) and Andros (The Bahamas Environmental Research Centre). Such engagements
will include the traditional academic initiatives as well as certificate and general
environmental and resource management outreach courses/programmes. In this regard,
the Executive Director, through the resources of the Institute and in collaboration with
the School of Sciences and Technology, will assist with the development of a flagship.
multidisciplinary degree programme in Marine Science. Efforts will also entail attracting
researchers and scholars with marine and related interests as well as local, regional and
international students with exceptional academic credentials and future potential,
demonstrating a genuine interest m marme science. The Executive Director must have
exceptional skills in grantsmanship and the ability to develop collaborations to build
long-term research and monitoring initiatives that can help document and catalogue
the ecological systems that make up the Bahamian archipelago.
.The College/University of The Bahamas is the national higher education institution of
The Commonwealth of The Bahamas. The institution grants mostly bachelor degrees
and some joint masters degrees in conjunction with other institutions. It has a student
enrollment in excess of 4,000 students located throughout the Bahamian archipelago.
It has extensive links with tertiary institutions in the Caribbean and North America
and its credits are accepted by more than 200 colleges and universities in those regions
and in Great Britain. It has embarked aggressively upon a major expansion of its
programme offerings, research activities and physical facilities and is incorporating e-
learning methodologies into its repertoire of strategies for delivering instruction, all
.
with a view to attalmng a charter as a university by 2007.
The successful candidate must hold a doctorate in an appropriate field with a minimum
of eight to ten years experience at an accredited university, a proven research record
and have relevant work experience including appropriate supervisory level exposure.
Interested candidates should submit College/University of The Bahamas Employment
Application, a Comprehensive Resume and up-to-date transcripts, giving full particulars
o ua ao an r en e, alo with thr e work references no later than

Director, Human Resources, The College of The Bahamas
P. O. Box N-4912
Nassau, N. P., The Bahamas
Facsimile: (242) 302-4539
E-mail: hrapply@cob.edu.bs
Web Site: www.cob.edu.bs




















Tel ] Ol, 4] 6 6 / JO 2.4] 6 / O 2


The 25 member States of the European Union (EU25) are now: Austria,
Belgium, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France,
Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxemburg,
Malta, Netherlands Polandd t rtu 1, n, Slovakia, Slovenia'
462,371,237 is the 2006 estimated population for the EU
Free exchange of goods and services
One currency: the Euro.
European Anthem: Beethoven's Ode to Joy
PANEL:
Sir Arthur Foulkes, Former Bahamian Ambassador to the EU
His Excellency, A. Leonard Archer, High Commissioner for CARICOM
Mr. Ernst Rumer, Honorary Austrian Consul
Mr. Stephen Aranha, Lecturer, History Department, COB
MODERATOR:
Rev. Dr. James Moultrie, Associate Professor, School of Education, COB, and
Former Bahamian Ambassador to the United Nations
Come and hear this distinguished panel discuss the European Union, its global
influence as a powerful tool for change, and its potential impact on The Bahamas
in the ever-growing "global village".
LOCATION: The Munnings Building (next to KFC at COB roundabout),
Room 3, Ground Floor
DATE: Thursday, November 16, 2006, at 7 PM
LIGHT REFRESHMENTS WEL BE SERVED.
Call us at: 302-4587 or 302-4584.


Tickets avalable for a donation of $40


THE COLLEGE OFTE; l-il:


AHA.~~~1r~MA S











__ ___~__


*
Offke of Academic Affairs
Fa cult Advertisements 2007 2008

School of BusineSS
Associate/Assistant Professors Accounting (New Providence and Northern Bahamas Campuses)
Candidate must be able to teach FInancial and Intermediate Accountmg, Busmess Mathematics, Advanced Accounting,
Accounting Theory, Management, Cost, Fund and Tax Accounting up to the bachelor's degree level. Knowledge of
computerized accounting would be an asset. Professional certification or experience is desirable. The successful candidates
should have an advanced degree (Ph.D. preferred).
Associate/Assistant Professor Marketing (New Providence)
Candidate must be able to teach a full range of Marketmg courses from the introductory to the senior year in a bachelor's
degree programme. The successful candidate should have an advanced degree (Ph.D. preferred).
Associate/Assistant Professor Economics & Statistics (New Providence Campus)
The successful individual will provide mstruction for second, third and fourth year economics and second and third year
statistic courses. Candidate must be able to teach Macro and Microeconomic Principles, Price Theory, Macroeconomic
Analysis, Quantitative Methods in Economics, Managerial Economics, International Economics, Economic Development,
Comparative Economic Systems, Labour Economics, Business Statistics and Intermediate Statistics. They should also
be able to teach Techniques of Research and Quantitative Methods. Knowledge of computer applications is essential.
Additionally, the candidate should have sin advanced degree Doctorate level studies in Economics (is preferred) with
a sound background in Business Administration and Quantitative Methods from ;an accredited institution with five or
more years teaching and research. Industry-related experience would be an asset.
Other duties include advisement of Economic Majors and assisting with research-related courses and projects.
Associate/Assistant Professor Finance (New Providence Campus)
Candidates must be able to teach third and fourth year fmance courses included but not limited to: Financial Management,
Credit Analysis, Investment Analysis, Portfolio Management, International Finance, Investment Management and Security
Analysis. Additional duties include Advisement of Finance and Economics/Finance majors and preparation of students
for CFA Examinations.
The successtill candidate should have an advanced degree (Doctoral Level Studies preferred) in Finance with a sound,
background in Business Administration and Economics or Quantitative Methods from an accredited institution and at
least five years teaching experience. Investment Management experience ivould be an asset. Additionally, the candidate
should have completed at least part 1 of the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) Examinations, and have membership
in the CFA Institute.

School of Communication and Creative Arts
Associate/Assistant Professor in Journalism and Communication (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach courses in all or most of the followmg areas: reporting, photojournahsm, video production
and business writing and should have experience with curriculum and programme development. The ideal candidate
must have at least a Master's degree m the subject or a related area, a minimum of five years' teaching experience at
the tertiary level and some professional experience.
Associate/Assistant Professors in Foreign Languages (Spanish and/or French) (New Providence Campas)
Candidate must be able to teach Spamsh at the begmners, mtermediate and advanced levels. The ideal candidate must
have at least a Master's degree in the subject or a related area, native speaker competence and will be able to teach
language, literature and culture courses up to the bachelor degree level. A teachmg certificate or equivalent and experience
in teacher training are desirable.
Associate/Assistant Professors in Art (1Vew Providence Campus) .
Candidate must be able to teach 2-Dunensional Design, Commercial Art (illustration and graphic design) and Printmaking.
Experience in 3-Dimensional Design, mixed media, painting and drawing would be an asset. The ideal candidate will
have at least a Master's degree in the subject or related area. A teaching certificate or equivalent is desirable.
Associate/Assistant Professors in Music (New Providence Campus)
The successful candidate must be able to teach traditional; theory and harmony, piano skills, music history and analysis
yup to the bachelor level. Candidate must possess skills in choral work and have at least a Master's degree. The ideal
candidate must have at least three year's teaching experience at the tertiary level and some professional experience. A
teaching certificate or equivalent is desirable.
Part-time Lecturer in Foreign Lan uages (Sp sh) (Northern Bahamas Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach pamsh at mtroductory level. The ideal.candidate will have at least a Master's
degree in the subject or a related area and native speaker competence in Spanish. -A teaching certificate or equivalent
is desirable
Part-time Lecturer in Foreign Languages (Haitian Creole) (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach ITaitfan Creole at the begmners and mtermediate levels. The ideal candidate will have
at least a Master's degree in the subject or a related area and native speaker competence in Haitian Creole. A teaching
certificate or equivalent is desirable.
a , -
Part Mr.e 1e..rurers in Jotirnalis imitoriinRications(Newfro denceC Orpus) up 10
Candidates must be able to teach courses m any of the followmg areas: reporting, photbj'oursialisin, video protfdGlidiz
and advertising techniques. The ideal candidate must have at least a Master's degree in the subject or a related area and
some professional experience.

School of English Studies
Associate/Assistant Professors College Composition/Literature (New Providence Campus)
Candidates must have at least a Master's of Arts degree In Enghsh and must be able to teach College Composition and
Literature up to the bachelor degree level. The ideal candidates will have a background in Composition and Rhetoric
as well as in American and/or Post -Colonial Literature. A background in creative writing or experience in a writing
lab setting would be an asset. Teacher training is preferred.
Associate/Assistant Professor College Composition/Literature (Northern Bahamas Campus)
Candidate must have at least a Master of Arts degree m English and must be able to teach College Composition and
literature up to the bachelor degree level. The ideal candidate will have experience in the teaching of composition and
rhetoric and a variety of literature courses. Teacher training is preferred,

School of Social Sciences
Associate /Assistant Professors m Law LL.B. Pr amme (New Providence Cam us)
Candidates should have at a least a first egree mo w, wit no less than an Upper econd Class Honours or equivalent.
Possession of a postgraduate degree and some experience as a legal practitioner is desirable. The curriculum includes
all branches of Commoth Law and courses pay special attention to the place of Law in Commonwealth Caribbean
jurisdictions. The ideal candidates should be competent in at least three of the basic or core Common.Law subjects
including, but not limited to, Law and Legal Systems of the Commonwealth Caribbean; Criminal Law; Legal Writing.
and Research; Law of Torts; Commonwealth Caribbean Constitutional Law; and Law of Contract. Experience in teaching
in a semester system would be an asset. The successful candidates will be expected to pursue individual and departmental
research interests and to publish in reputable law journals.
Associate/Assistant Professor in Ref lon/Theology
Candidate to teach Theology and Re glous Studies courses up to the Bachelor degree level. A minor concentration in
Philosophy and/or Logic is desirable. -

School of Education
Associate/Assistant Professor Fatnil and Consumer Life/Honie Economics (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach Family and Consumer Life/Home Economics and Education Foundation courses to
prospective secondary teachers. The successful candidateemust have a Master's Degree, Teacher's Certificate, at least
ten years' teaching experience and the ability to supervise teaching practice-and research studies.
Associate/Assistant Professor Religious Educatiotl (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach Rehgious Education content and methods to prospective primary and secondary teachers,
as well as the general student population in other academic areas up to the senior year in a bachelor degree programme.
The successful candidate must have a Master's Degree, Teacher's Certificate at least ten years' teachmg experience
and the ability to supervise teaching practice and research studies.
Associate/Assistant Professor Science Education (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach Science Education courses to prospective prunary and secondary teachers. The;successful

p t i ra Master' Deearreceh her's Certificate, at least ten years' teaching experience and the ability to
Associate/Assistant Professor Art Education
Candidate must be able to teach Art Education courses to prospective primary and secondary school teacher trainees
up to the Bachelor degree level. The successful candidate must have a Master's Degree, Teacher's Certificate, at least
ten years' teaching experience and the ability to supervise teaching practice and research studies.
Associate/Assistant Professor Music Education
Candidate inust be able to teach Music Education courses to prospective primary and secondary school teacher trainees
up to the Bachelor degree level. The successful candidate must have a Master's Degree, Teacher's Certificate, at least
ten years' teaching experience and the ability to supervise teaching [practice and research studies,
Associate/Assistant Professor in Physical/Health Education K-12
Candidate must be able to teach Physical/Health Education to teachers in training up to theBachelor's degree level.
The successful cpndidate must have a Masterms Degree, Teacher's Certificate, at least ten years' teaching experience
and the ability to stipervise teaching practice and research studies,

School of Nursing and Allied Health Professions
Associate/Assistant Professors Nursmy (New Providence Campus)
The successful candidates will be required to teach m the bachelor degree programme. Responsibilities will include
classroom as well as clinical supervision of students. Applicants should have strong interpersonal skills and a commitment
to excellence in integrating teaching, clinical practice and research. Applicants should have a well-rounded clinical
nursing experience and should be able to teach at least three of the following areas: Fundamentals of Nursing, Medical-
Surgical Nursing, Psychiatric Nursing, Maternal and Child Health Nursing, Community Health Nursing'
Management/Leadership, Health Assessment, Nursing Theories, Transcultural Nursing and Nursing Research. The
successful candidates must be registered with the Nursing Council of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas; have college
level teaching experience and at least a Master's degree in Nursing.

School of Sciences and Technology
Associate/Assistant Professor Biology (New Providence Campus)
The successful candidate should have an advanced degree (PhD preferred) in the biological or agricultural sciences with
strong background in entomology, specifically agricultural entomology. The successful candidate will be expected to
teach biology up to the senior year in a bachelor's degree programme and develop a research programme related to the
needs and priorities of The College. Teaching experience at the college level is essential.
Associate/Assistant Professor Mathematics (New Providence and Northern Bahamas Campuses)
t he successful candidate should have an advanced degree (PhD preferred) m pure or apphed mathematics. Candidate
will be expected to both teach Pure and Applied Mathematics e.g. Statistics up to the semor year ma bachelor's degree
programme as well as develop a research programme in his or her area of specialty. Teaching experience at the college
level is essential.


Associate/Assistant Professors Physics (New Providence Campus)
The successful candidate should have an advanced degree m Physics, preferably a PhD., with experience teaching both
semice courses (physics for biology and health care professionals) as well as major courses. A broad background in
Physics is an asset; with a desire to teach and incorporate undergraduate students m research programmes both within
the college and in collaboration with other institutions. Successful applications should have research interest and foci
that can be pursued in at COB or in collaboration with partner institutions.
Associate/Assistant Professor Chemistry (New Providence Campus)
The successful candidate should have an advanced degree in Chemistry, preferably a PhD, with experience teaching up
to senior year in a bachelor's degree programme.- A broad background in chemistry would be an asset as teaching areas
span courses in Organic, Inorganic, Analytical and Environmental and Physical Chemistry. Research interests and foci
applicable to the use of current facilities and The College's research stations are desirable.
Culinary & Hospitality Mana ement Institute
Chef Providence Campus
The i eal candidate should possess a degree in Culinary Arts/Hospitality Management and be Certified as a Executive
Chef or higher, have a teaching certificate or equivalent with a minimum of five years teaching experience. Candidate
should be able to teach introductory through advanced cooking, baking, pastry, garde manger, sanitation, menu design
and food preparation.
All candidates must have at least an earned Master's degree from a recognized accredited institution in the relevant
area or its equivalent and five (5) years' post quahfication teaching experience at the College or University level.
The Associate Professor is a high academic rank. The successful candidates must have an earned Master's degree
from a recognized accredited institution in the relevant subject area, plus at least eight years ofteaching at the College
or University level OR an earned doctoral degree in the relevant area with at least five years teaching experience at
the College or University level;
In all cases, an above average record of teaching, research, and/or publication is.requirect Applicants must also
exhibit a commitment to excellence in teaching and scholarship.
Salary Scale:


To ensure consideration, application materials must be received by November 17, 2006. A complete application
packet consists of an application letter, a College of The Bahamas' Application Form, a detailed curriculum vita,
. copies of all transcripts (original transcripts required upon employment), and the names and contact information
for three references addressed to:
The Director
Human Resources
TheCollegeofTheBahamas
Oakes Field Campus
Thompson Boulevard & Poincianna Drive
P. O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas

Please visit the CoHege's website at for more information about the institution and to access the College's Employment
Application Form.

Non Instructional Faculty Advertisements 2007 2008

Counseling & Health Services Department
Counsellor
Candidate will be required to assist in developing and implementing counselling programmes for the campus community
including provision of individual and group therapy and counselling to students, assessment interviews, referrals and
consultations with faculty, staff and local professionals around issues related to the developmental-needs (academic,
career-vocational and psycho-social) of college students. Must be willmg to work flexible hours.
The successful candidate must have an earned Masters degree in Counselling, counselling/clinical psychology or
equivalent.
Salary Scale: $32,710 $47,710

School of Nursing and Allied Health Professions
ChmcalPreeppton
The successful candidate must be a Registered Nurse with post qualification training and good organizational skills.
Duties would include supervising studentWiri the laboratories to develop basic nursing skills; coordinating the clinical
.rotations and practicums for students; review practicum skills; compilation of student logs and reports for the course
instructor. The successful candidate should be self-directed and work well with people.
Salary Scale:1nstructor $27,110 $40,110

Library and Instructional Media Services
Librarian Techmcal Services

The position falls in the area of Technical Services. The incumbent should be dynamic, innovative individual with a
strong commitment to service within a diverse community. The Librarian will demonstrate successful administrative
experience in a library, sound understanding of emerging technologies and the ability to use them within the library
setting and commitment to developing a strong integrated library service within the academic environment.
The duties of the Librarian will include management of the Unit, leadership in short and long range planning to enhance
and expand library services, development and promotion oflibrary resources and services, personnel supervision, initiation
and management appropriate emerging technologies, and liaison with relevant internal and external groups.
The Librarian should possess a Masters Degree in Library and Information Science from an accredited institution, and
a minimum of two years, post Masters professional library experience. The mcumbent will demonstrate strong
communication and interpersonal skills that engender an excellent customer friendly environment. Evening and weekend
work on rotation, library research, service to the community and library mstruction will also be required.
Salary Scale: $32,710 $47,710
To ensure consideration, application materials must be received by November 17, 2006. A complete application
packet consists of an application letter, a College of The Bahamas' Application Form, a detailed curriculum vitae
copies of all transcripts (original transcripts required upon employment), and the names and contact information
for three references addressed to:
The Director
Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
.Oakes Field Campus
ThompsonBoulevard&PoinciannaDrive
P. O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas
Please visit the College's website at for more information about the institution and to access the College's Employment
Application Form.


ladustry Training Administrator
Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the Industry Training Administrator (ITA) post in the
Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute. The Industry Training Administrator reports to the Executive Director,
Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute. The successful candidate must possess at least a Bachelor's degree in
a relevant subject area plus five years related industry experience or a Master's degree in a relevant subject area plus
three years related industry experience. Excellent organizational, prTsentational and interpersonal commumcation skills
are required for this position.

The portfolio of the ITA includes the organization and oversight of all matters relative to Industry Training, including
the design, development and review of new and existing skills level training and education curricula; and the coordination
of the offering of such programmes and courses, both throughout the College Network and withm industry.
The Industry Training Administrator is responsible for working in concert with Industry Partners in the Hospitality and
Tourism Sectors to develop and implement training opportunities to meet special needs identified within the industry.
The successful candidate will coordinate the review and updating of existing education and training programmes offered
through the industry arm of the Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute; prepare training proposals, including
costing, for special needs as requested by various establishments; negotiate training consultants' contracts; and organize
and conduct training seminars and workshops. In addition to coordinating the preparation of Industry training manuals
and guides and maintaining reference copies of current standard operating procedures and job descriptions and specifications
for allmajor jobs within the hospitality and tourism sectors, the Industry Trammg Administrator must also coordinate
job placement for students and graduates and serve as Secretary to the Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute
Advisory Board.
Sala Scale: $27,110 $4 110
ry 0,
To ensure consideration, application materials must be received by November 17, 2006. A complete application
packet consists of an application letter, a College of The Bahamas' Application Form, a detailed curriculum vita,
copies of all transcripts (original transcripts required upon employment), and the names and contact information
for three references addressed to:
The Director
Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
OakesFieldCampus
Thompson Boulevard & Poincianna Drive
P. O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas

Please visit the College's website at for more information about the restitution and to access the College's Employment
Application Form.


- I i II


s: y


Assistant Professor:


Matr 39,460 $61,960


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006, PAGE 9B


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


OFy*E


~IECOLLEGE OF~ THliE BA.HAMAY


Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs


.:':eDU-C~aTING &'j lT~rAIWING6 -BAHAMIAN4~2S






PAGE 10OB, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006


n


oner. ended September 30, 2005.
Water Rick McTaggart, presided
ter rate and chief executive of Consol,
600,000 dated Water, said: "O
nd 2004 results for the third quarter
penalties 2006 reflect the initial sales
oration our new Blue Hills plant i)
g at the Nassau following its commas,
signing in July, along with colly
ieve we tinted strength in retail water
mbrane sales in the Cayman Islands.'B
Wind- Retail water sales increase
d Water 38 per cent to about $4.1 mi
mbrane lion in the third quarter
at the 2006, compared with about 5
we are million in the third quarter
auction 2005.
or other Bulk water sales rose 79 p
ould be cent to about in the quart
of the ended September 30, 200
act and Revenue from services mor
rse con- than doubled to $746,407 i
further the most recent quarter, co
or can- pared with $328,550 in t
t by the third quarter of 2005.
orpora- The gross margin on retail
sales improved to 65% in th)
r added quarter ended September 3(}
006, the 2006, compared with 56% j
pliance the third quarter of 2005.
tenants For the nine months ende
on cred- September 30, 2006, total re
al Bank enue increased 54 per cent t
n older $28.9 million, compared with
$18.8 million in the first nin
ed Sep- months of2005. e
compa- Net income increased 77 pe
creased cent to $6.847 million or $0.
$10 mil- per diluted share, versus $3.8
out $6.2 million or $0.32 per dilute
arter of share, in the nine months end
ased 24 ed September 30, 2005.
llion or Net income for the nin
, versus months ended September 3
.08 per 2006,approximated24perce
Aparter of total revenue ,: ,i


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fourth quarter of 2006".
The company, in a filing with
the US Securities & Exchange
Commission (SEC), due to its
Nasdaq primary listing, said it
had two contracts to supply
water to the Water & Sewer-
age Corporation, one for its
Blue Hills plant, the other for
Windsor.
Its contracts require it to
meet a minimum supply of
water to the Corporation per
week, and it must pay a penal-
ty for failing to meet this.
Consolidated Water said:
"The Blue Hills and Windsor
contracts expire in 2026 and
2013, respectively, and require
us to deliver 28 million imper-
ial gallons and 14 million impe-
rial gallons, respectively, of
water each week.
"We are required to provide
the Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration with performance and
operating guarantees, in the
form of bank-issued perfor-
mance bonds, to secure any
payments we may be required
to make under the minimum
delivery requirements of these
contracts.
"At September 30, 2006, a
$1.91 million performance
bond was outstanding for the
Windsor plant, and a $2.97 mil-
lion construction bond was
outstanding for the Blue Hills
plant."
The Windsor contract
expires on either March 2013
or Consolidated Water
(Bahamas) supply of 13.1 bil-
lion gallons to the Water &
Sewerage Corporation,,


whichever happens so
Yet Consolidated
(Bahamas) suffered wa
decreases, of about $
and $300,000 on 2005 a
respectively, due to p
it had to pay the Corp
over membrane fouling
Windsor plant.
"At present, we bel
have resolved the me
fouling problem at the
sor plant," Consolidate
said. "However, me
fouling may reoccur
Windsor plant, and if
unable to meet the pro
minimums due to this
operating issues, we c
in technical default
Windsor supply contr
subject to various adve
sequences, including
water rate decreases
collation of the contract
Water & Sewerage C
tion."
Consolidated Wate
that at September 30, 2
company was in com
with the financial co
under a new $5.6 milli
it facility with the Roy
of Canada, replacing a
$5.4 million facility.
For the quarter end
member 30, 2006, the
ny's total revenues in
61 per cent to about
lion, compared with ab
million in the third qu
2005. Net income incre
per cent to $1.247 mi
$0.10 per diluted share
$1.009 million or $0
diluted share, in the,


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UISSE SECURITY, from page

CFM Offshore was being operated from the
same Village Road address as Ryan & Co.
Yet CFM denied it was connected in any way
.to Suisse Security or Mr Harajchi. It said it had
contracted his son, Michel, to do IT work, but he
was not involved as a shareholder, director or .
manager. Michel Harajchi also denied the con-
nections.
In its March 2006 ruling, the Privy Council
described as "inconceivable" the notion that
Suisse Security be allowed to continue operating
as a financial institution.
The Privy Council described as "extraordi-
nary" the situation relating to Suisse Security's
missing cash and investment balances, which
were held by two affiliated International Busi-
ness Companies (IBCs) Suisse Security Hold-
ings and Suisse Security Investments- which
held accounts with the former Barclays Bank in


Nassau and UBS in Geneva.
Suisse Security clients had been instructed t
deposit funds with the two IBCs, rather than th
bank.
Mr Winder had reported to the Central Ba
that at March 2001, after the licence suspe
sion, he controlled only $5.485 million of Suiss
Security's cash and investment balances, co
pared to $27.14 million shown in the 2000 fourt
quarter report.
The missing position related to sums of $8.
million and $11 million supposed to be held i
the accounts of the two IBCs.
The Privy Council found that Suisse Security
"continuing non-cooperation and obstruction
relating to the funds missing from the two IB
accounts at Barclays and UBS had confirmed
the then governor, Julian Francis's, position
that the licence had to be revoked.


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GN42


Whereas OSBORNE JEROME SAWYER
(a.k.a) JEROME SAWYER, of 24 East
Brooke Street, New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the
SupremeCourtofTheBahamasfor Letters
of Administration with the Will Annexed of
the Real and Personal Estate of RUTH
SAVELETTA KNOWLES late of 24 East
Brooke, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas,
deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such
applications will be heard by the said Court
at the expiration of 14 days from the date
hereof.
Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
NOV. 16, 2006
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00555
Whereas REM ONA M ON ETTE
FERGUSON, of Nassau East North, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the Real and Personal
Est at e of JO H N ALEXAND FR
FERGUSON (a.k.a) JOHN FERGUSON
late of Nassau East North, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas, deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such
applications will be heard by the said Court
at the expiration of 14 days from the date
hereof.
Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
NOV. 16, 2006
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00548
Whereas DWIGHT CHRISTOPHER
BULLARD, of Cowpen Road, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Baharnas, has
made application to the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of RUTH BULLARD (a.k.a) RUTH
FLORENCE BULLARD late of Cowpen
Road, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such
applications will be heard by the said Court
at the expiration of 14 days from the date
hereof.
Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
NOV. 16, 2006
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00549
Whereas MINERVA FORBES, of Bacardi
Road, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
hasmadeapplicationsto4heSupremeGourt
of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the Real and Personal
EstateofEVEHi-IItCROXTONFORBES
late of Bacardi Road, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such
applications will be heard by the said Court
at the expiration of 14 days from the date
hereof.
Nicoya Neilly .
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTi-1 OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
NOV. 16,,2006
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00550
Whereas NICOLA NEELY, of Bouge,
Eleuthera, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas, for Letters 'of
Administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of DOUGLAS NEELY JR. Iate of
Bouge, Eleuthera, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas,
deceased,
Notice is hereby given that such
applications will be heard by the said Court
at the expiration of 21 days from the date
hereof.
Nicoya Neilly
(for)Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
NOV. 16, 2006
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00551


I I - I -- ----~1


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006, PAGE 11B


~HE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
NOV. 16, 2006
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00554
Whereas SHERRYLYN K. BASTION, of
Cable Beach, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters
of Administration with the Will Annexed of
the Real and Personal Estate of RUBY
IRENE MAGEE late of the City of Barrie
in the Province of Ontario,
Canadadecease6.
Notice is hereby given that such
applications will be heard by the said Court
at the expiration of 14 days from the date
hereof.
Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
RO. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
Novemberl6, 2006
Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00552
In the Estate of CONRAD PAYNE, late of
7138 Valeriana Ave., Citrus Heights in the
State of California, one of the States of
the United States of America,
deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that after the
expiration of fourteen days from the date
hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its
Probate Division by ARLEAN P. HORTON-
STRACHAN, of Robinson Road, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attornpy-
At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed
Letters of Administration in the above
estate granted to JUDITH M. PAYNE, the
Administrator, by the Superior Court of
California, County of Sacramento, Probate
Division, on the 4th day of October, 1999.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
RO. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
November 16, 2006
Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00557
In the Estate of GEORGE F. O'DONNELL,
late of the City of Regina, province of
Saskatchewan, Canada,
deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that after the
expiration of fourteen days from the date
hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its
Probate Division by MIRIAM J. CURLING,
of the Eastern District of the of the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney
inTheBahamasforobtainingtheResealed
Grant of Probate in the above estate
granted to ALASTAIR JAMES MUIR and
JAMES DOUGLAS COOPER, the
Executors, by the Surrogate Court at the
Judicial Centre of Moose Jaw, on the 26th
day of April, 1983.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
NOV. 16, 2006
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00553
Whereas ANGLADE COOPER, of No. 52
Palm Beach Street, New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, has made application to
the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
Letters of Administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of WAYNE LUTHER
COOPER late of No. 52 Palm Beach Street,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas,
deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such
applications will be heard by the said Court
at the expiration of 14 days from the date
hereof.
Nicoya Neilly .
(for) Registrar


SUPREME COURT








PAGE 12B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


SCalvina & Hobbes


. Tribune Comics


Dennis


~b~r"r ~t- -~L~L~ ~Ti~~7~y I


By Stevre Becker


CRYPTIC PUZZLE i


10 i


The bidding:
South West North East
1 V Pass 3 V Pass
4 V .
Opening lead jack of clubs.
Whenever you're playing a con-
tract that appears unbeatable, you
should stop and ask yourself: "What,
if anything, can defeat me?" If you
think along these 1mes, you can
occasionally avoid disaster.
Observe what happened to
declared on this deal. West led the
club jack, and the defense took three
club tricks before shifting to a dia-
mond,
South won with the ace and
played a trump to the queen, on
which East showed out. A spade to
the ace was then followed by another
trump, diimmy winning West's ten
with th king. South next ruffed a


L-~~l ----v-- -- ~IIC~BblllBsB


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South dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
4 Q 10 4
VAK Q 9
4 8 5 2 '
6 Q 8 4
WEST
4 K 9 6 5
VJ 10 4 3 *
+ J
+J 10 9 5
SOUTH
4 A
V 8 7 6 5 2
AK Q 4
4 6 3 2


spade and led another heart, finess-
ing the nine after West played low.
With only one trump left in each
hand, declare cashed the ace but
later had to lose a diamond trick to
go down one. However, he should
have made the contract.
When South wins the diamond
return at trick four, he should start
thinking in terms of "What can
defeat me?" The obvious answer is
that only four trumps in one hand can
jeopardize the contract.
Declarer is helpless if East has
four trumps, so all his thoughts
should be centered on the possibility
that West has them. As we've seen,
South fails if he tackles trumps at
once.
Instead, he should cash the ace of
spades before leading a trump. This
might not seem like an especially
meaningful play, but it represents the
difference between making the con-
tract and going down one. It protects
against West holding all four trumps.
After East shows out at trick six,
South ruffs the spade ten and leads
another trump. He wins West's ten
with the king and then ruffs the spade
queen.
This leaves South with one trump
while West and dummy each have
two. Declared now leads his last
trump, trapping West's J-4 in front of
dummy's A-9. South then discards
his four of diamonds as dummy's last
trump is cashed, and the contract is
home*


EAST
+ J 8 7 3 2
V- .
+ 10 9 7 6 3
+AK 7 .


'L


The
Target
uses

annours
21st
Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition)


HOW many words of four
letters or more can you make
ftom the letters shown here? In
making a word, each letter may
be used once only. Each must
contain the centre letter and
thete must be at least one
nine-letter word. No plurals.
ToD7'1 ;T ood 21;
excellent 28 (or more).
Solution tomorrow.


AG 055
1 Keep talking about,
pluckily? (4,2)
7 There's plenty of
spaceinit(8)
8 A measure of good and evil (4)
10 Like the column at the
.back (6)
11 Has he afishy line of
approach? (6)
14 Ruddy ripe? (3)
16 Chap hiding)50 in a

17 Thus figures no longer
on the market (4)
19 Get ready to eat, perhaps (5)
21 Fine new purse (5)
22 In Rome, Bert gets badly
out of line (5)
23 Permit dadto hiss (4)
26 Kind of chair fashioned
by Danes (5)
28 Officerin company with
a trainee (3)
29 Flinch from making a phone call
between notes (6)
30 Cledc'shistoric work
centre (6)
31 German gentleman
to turn to? (4)
32 The girl you need
when held up (8)
33 Digger a month on
test (6)


DOWN .
1 For accommodation, they have their
uses (6)
2 Hurt father and upset Enid (6)
3 Invalid'sddithyme(4)
4 Howto engrave so that one can get
satisfaction {7)
5 Search for oH on the parade ground? (5)
6 Happy, in my case, to make
a mistake (5)
8 She gives Joe confusing dedians (4)
9 Youngster making a Palladium

12 Weapon; a good French one (3)
13 Maybe he lives, it seems! (5)
15 Speaks highly of the organ parts (5)
18 What you will be tomorrow, I'll be next
week (5)
19 Cause friction (3)
20 By getting energy from pepper (3)
21 Perform for the French at
Wimbledon, say (7)
22 Instant sunburn? (3)
23 Sender of publicity? (6)
24 One who sings a lot; cleverly (4)
25 II can do without the tree in the
middle (6)
26 In certain ways, a policeman has
opportunity (5)
27 Such work can make a tidy mess
outright! (5)
28 Onespitefully spoiling the act? (3)
30 As written by Edgar Allan by the
thousand? (4)


Jonathan Parker v Nicholas Pert,
Smith & Williamson British
championship, Swansea 2006.
dm pd
opponent in style. In some
tournament situations a
comfortable early draw with the
black pieces is an excellent
upt IM Itennext
round. Here there are three
rounds to go in the 25,000
British title contest, and both
grandmasters are dreaming of
first place. Pert launched his
surprise early with the rare Albin
Counter Gambit 1 d4 d5 2 c4 eS,
and when City fund manager
Parker tried for a simple reply
with a queen exchange, a sIlf e
Initiative and the bishop pai


DOWN
1 Leave (6)
3 de an (4)
4 Lured (7)
5 Custom (5)
6 a to (5)
9 Previous day (3)
12 Spoil (3)
13 Even (5)
15 Desire (5)
18 Fossil resin (5)
TBe dous (3)
21 Condiment (7)
22 Colour (8)
23 Inn (6)
24 Setting agent (4)
25 Believe (6)
26 Cut (5)
27 Fashion (5)
28 Type of
element (3)
30 Impolite (4)


ACROPSr tect (6)
7 Ample (8)
80 y )
11 Figure of speech (6)
14 Raw material (3)
16 Provide (5)
17 Ribbon (4)
19 Oarsman (5)
21 Colourful (5)
22 Mature (5)
Soft I (4)
28 Joke (3)
29 Wore away (6)
30 Damage
extensively (6)
31 Consumer (4)
32 Leamed (8)
33 Man's name (6)


s
4 &
3
2
a
a b c d e f g h
didn't escape Pert's pre-game
homework. Black's next few turns
demonstrated a dear way to force
a draw. How did Pert secure his
desired half point?
LEONARD BURDEN


: Yesterday's cryptic solutions
ACROSS:1, Props 4, Us-ury 9, Leo-nine 10, Stost 11,
Da-RN-s 12, Bagel l3, Al-leg-ed l5, 11117, Le-er 18,
Agenda 19, Piano 20, Chop-in 22, Pear (-main) 24, Eon
25, Devoted 26, Ban-AI27, Valid 28, Hab-1-t 29, Topcoat
30, Never 31, Dolly
DOWN:2, Rattle 3, P-layer 4, Set 5, Knead 6, Und-E-1907,
Sea-I 8, R-onal-d.12, B-e.g.-in 13, Alice 14, Lemon 15,
In-let 18, Lalf-d 18, Angel le, Picador 21, Ho.-race 22,
no, Aerial 25, Dane 26, Bits 28, Had


Yesterday's easy solutions
ACROSS:1, Happy 6, Stash9, Recover 10, Siren 11,
Ranch 12, Tulip 13, Capital 15, Bra 17, Ales 18, Cutlet 19.
Minus 20, Enamel 22, Dean 24, Run 25, Flnesse 26,
Latin 27, Again 28, Eager 29, Ailment 30, Stern
31, Della
DOWN: , Animal S, Precis 4, YenS, Mogul 6, Serious ?,
Trap 8, Secure 12, Tamil 13, Caber 14, Pecan 15, Blues
16, Atone 18. Cumin 19, Melanin 21, Nugget 22, Debate
23, AssenI25, Films 26, Liar 28, End


a 2MNb33MNel4
Chess
RalNb3.h
forcing ad
serious ios50f
Mensa quir Y
One
telltealM trant, MA


Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Colitent *


I I . ..


Available from Commercial News Providers







'
C t t B id


Tribune
j*IOfOSCOpe


By LINDA BLACK

MONDAY
NOVEMBER 13
ARIES March 21/April 20
There will be some people you like,
others people you don't and still
more whom you'll nevei get along
with no matter how spuch you try.
rAsU OUrdnstiCc .il 21/May 21
Brace yourself, Taurus, you're going
to lock horns with someone power-
ful this week. Stubborn bull that you
are, you'd rather risk losing it all
before compromising your beliefs.
GEMINI- May 22/June 21
You've promised too much this time
around, Gemini, and when others
realize you can't deliver, your name
will be mud. Next time, don't make
bdgAoCEsRs just to an ess. 22
June /July
You'llCgd as od ngou etththis
who think you're too shy to fight for
what you believe in. Let 'em under-
estimate you it's bound to work
in your favor.
LEO July 23/August 23
Someone you simply can't seem to
get along with will rub you the
wrong way to such an extent that
you may lose all sense of reason and
go for the jugular. This is going to
be an explosive weak.
"h4/Sept 22'
It may seem like you're losing


LIBRA dept 23/Oct 23
Never mind the pressure, Libra, you
must take your time and get thmgs
right this week. The more you rush,
the greater the chance of making an
embarrassing mistake,
SCORPli Oct 24/Nov 22
A situation you've put up with in the
past is quickly reaching the point
where you can no longer bother with
it. Maybe you should've ended things
sooner, but at least you gave it ago.
SAGTITARIUS-Nov23/Dec21
You can be as dynamic and assertive
as you want to be this week. You'll
get away with almost anything, so
feel free to move ahead with the
things you've been held back in dur-
in these ast few months.
CAPR#ORN -Dec 22/Jan 20
You're capable of really big things,
so don't waste your time and
energy on trivial things, Capricorn.
Others may be ready for a fight, but
there's nothing that says you have

to adve uRa rR Jan 21/Feb 18
If you're going to blow your top this
week, make sure your anger is aimed
at the person who deserves to receive
it. If you're not careful, you may hurt
someone who's done you no harm.
PISCES Feb 197March 20
Let your actions speak for you,
ed su a sn e no
sure to ask yourself what effects your
deeds are likely to have on others.


no rac r ge


1?


;~t~


a e


V


U


f.*


I Z 31









NOVEMBER 13, 2006


Florida Roadtrip Antiques Roadshow Potte pieces American Experience "Victory in the Pacific" The battle of Okinawa. A
B WPBT from the University of North ako- (CC) (DVS)
ta's School of Mines.
The Insider (N) How I Met Your The Class The Two and a Half (:31) The New CSl: Miami "Darkroom" The CSI
O WFOR n (cc) Mother Marshall classmates at- Men "Release Adventures of team finds dozens of pictures of
and Uly elope. tend a party. (N) the Dogs" (N) Old Christine missing women in a safe. (N) A
Access Holl Deal or No Deal (iTV) Contestants Heroes "Seven Minutes to Midnight" Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip
0 WTVJ wood (N) (C ) et a chance to win money. (N) A Peter asks Nathan to help him find a Jack must get Tom out of jail to
CC) key to the future. (N) make it back for his show. (N)
Deco Drive Prison Break Lincoln says farewell Justice The firm represents the News (CC)
S WSVN to another loved one; Sarah and parking attendant for the building al-
Kellerman face off. (N) (CC) ter police arrest him. (N) (CC)
Jeo I "Cel- Wife Swap "Minkl0aks" (N) A The Bachelor: Rome1(N) A (CC) What About Brian Friends recall
B WPLG ebri k in (CC) fond memories of Angelo at his fu-
New rk' (N) neral. (N) A (CC)

:00) CSl: Miami CSl: Miami A lost, blood-soaked CS|: Miami "Kill Zone" The team Gene Simmons Gene Simmons
A& E Breathless" A toddler leads the team to a family tries to stop a deadly sniper taking Family Jewels Family Jewels
(CC) tale of horror A (CC) aim at downtown M ami. (CC) (CC) Anniversary.
Hardtalk BBC News World Business BBC News Click Online Es- BBC News World Business
BBC| (Latenight). Report (Latenight). tip guideto (Latenight). Report

Hotwyred (CC) Ats PAID IN FULL (2002, Crime Drama) Wood Harris, Mekhi Phifer. A Soul Food A (CC)
BET young man becomes a drug dealer in Harlem. (CC)
Royal Canadian Doctor Who "Rise of the Cyber- 72 Hours: True Rumours (N) CBC News: The National (CC)
CBC Air Farce (CC) men" (Part 1 of 2) (CC) Crime (N) (CC) (CC) (DVS)
:00) On the Conversations With Michael Eis- Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
oney ner (N)
0)RThemSitua- Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)
Scrubs J.D. talks The Daily Show eel Comedy Chappelle's South Park (CC) Scrubs "My Dra- crubs J.D. and
COM to pre-med stu- With Jon Stew- 'Deck the Halls." Show (CC) ma Queen' A urk re-evaluate
dents. (CC) art (CC) N) (CC) (CC) heir lives. (CC)
Co s "Busts" A Inside The Tennessee Prison for Forensic Files Forensic Files Murder by the Book "James Ellroy"
COURT (ci women. (N)
That's So Raven READ IT AND WEEP (2006, Comedy) Kay Panabaker, Danielle Life With Derek Phil of the Fu-
DISN "Drivin Miss Panabaker, Chad Broskey. A girl's pnvate joumal becomes a best-seller Parents lan a ture Personalities
Lazy" CC) by accident, weekend trip. switched.
This Old House DIY to the Res- DIY to the Res- Kitchen Renova- Kitchen Renova- Freeform Furni- Barkitecture
DIY n (cc) cue (N) cue tions tions ture
in Focus (Ger- Journal: Projekt Zukunit Journal: In Euromaxx Journal: Im Focus "Na-
DW man). Tagestema Depth Tagestema haufnahme"
The Daily 10 (N) The Girls Next The Girls Next House of House of Dr.90210 "Breasts,.Thighs and a
E! Door Door Carters (N) Carters Side of Wise" (N)
:00) Monday Night Countdown NFL Football Tampa Ba Buccaneers at Carolina Panthers. From Bank of America Stadium
ESPN Uve) (CC) in Charlotte, N.C. (Uve) CC)
Gol ESPN: NFL Esta Noche NFL Football Tampa Ba Buccaneers at Carolina Panthers. From Bank of America Stadium
ESPNI Fuera de Juego (Live). in Chariotte, N.C.(Live) CC)
Daily Mass: Our The Journey Home Lord Have Mer- The Holy Rosary Abundant Life
EWTN Lady cy
Stretch Max: The Craze Bakers team up to lose FitTV's Diet Doctor 'The Zone" Dr. FitNation Eastem traditions such as
FIT TV Cathe Friedrich weight. (CC) Barry Sears. (CC) chanting and Bikram yoga.
Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Uve) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
FOX-NC Shepard Smith Susteren (Live) (CC)
Destination Wild College Basketball Loyola Marymount at Mississippi State. (Uve) Best Damn Sports Show Period
FSNFL (uve)(cc)
GOLF ,Annihk Kings i cWendy's Tour Challenge )) Golf Channel Academy Uve 08 Playing Lessons From the
GSN Lingo (CC) High Stakes Poker (CC) High Stakes Poker (CC) High Stakes Poker (N) (CC)
(:00) Attack of X-Play PS3. X-Play Tokyo Star Trek: The Next Generation Star Trek: The Next Generation
G4Tech the Show! Game Show. "Shades of Gray" A (CC) 'The Ensigns of Command" (CC)
(:00) Walker, Walker, Texas Ranger "Faith" A LANDSLIDE (2004, Action) Vincent Spano, Alexandra Paul, Luke Eberl.
HALL Texas Ranger girl's life depends on Walker finding An avalanche of soil and rock buries a condominium complex. (CC)
"Child of Hope" a hijacked ambulance. (CC)
Takeover My Makeover Wish, My First Place Home to Stay reDesign Desi er Guys Takeover My
HG TV Makeover A girl has a brain Decorating a "Booth Avenue" "ColouN Therapy" Makeover
tumor. A man's bedroom. A (CC) A (CC)
Morris Cerullo Breakthrough Touch the Fire Inspiration To- Life Today (CC) This is Your Day The Gospel
INSP (CC) day (CC) Truth..
Reba Kyra ges. JV(y Wife andadccording to According to Friends The pos- Everybody Everybody.
KTLA on her first iate. Kids A (CC) Jim "Renewing Jim Jim cheats at sibility of preg- Loves:Raymond Loves Raymond
A (CC) Vows" A (CC) church bingo. nancy. (CC) Ray can't sleep. "Big Sh
:00) Medium Lisa Williams: Li e Among the LAST CHANCE CAFE (2006, Suspense) Kate Vemon, Kevin Sorbo.Pre-
LIFE 'Allison Wonder Dead (N) (CC) miere. A woman flees from her ex-husband and corrupt lawmen. (CC)
land"(CC)
(:00) Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- Scarborough Country MSNBC Investi ates "Lockup: Re-
MSNBC (CC) mann tum to Riker's is and"
Jimm Neutron: SpongeBob Unfabulous'The Full House Full House A The Cosby Fresh Prince of
NICK say genius SquarePants A Party" A "Baby Love" (CC) Show A (CC) Bel-Air
Old Christine Deal or No Deal Contestants et a Heroes Peter asks Nathan to help News A (CC) News
NTV chance to win money. (N) (CC him find a key to the future.
7 Days (N) Inside Nextel Clip (N) Barrett-Jackson: Life on the A STROKER AC E (1983) Burt
SPEED Block Reynolds, Loni Anderson.
Bishop T.D. Behind the Mark Chironna Jentezen Jessie Duplantis Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN Jakes (CC) Scenes (CC) Franklin (CC), (CC)

Everybody, Friends "He Friends 'The Friends The Riends Ross is Family Guy Bri- Family Guy Pe
TBS Loves Raymond One in Barbados" One in Barbados" gang parties with distraught over an is smitten with ter's given sensi-
"Pilot" A (CC) (CC) (CC) soap stars. the wedding. A Lois. (CC) tivity training.
Texas Cheer Little People, Big World Matt Incredibly Small: Kenadie's Story Miami Ink'The Jeep" Day of the
TLC Moms (N) makes a long-awaited purchase A girl, 2, weighs just 8 pounds and Dead skull tattoo. (CC)
while Amy is away. (CC) is only 2 feet tall. (CC)
(:00) Without a Law & Order "Blaze" A fire rips Law & Order "Shangri-La" Alove Law & Order "Sport of Kings" A
TNT Trace "Uttle Big through an audience at a rock con- triangle is uncovered| involving a stu- (CC) (DVS)
Man" (CC) cert, killing 23 fans. A dent and two teachers. A
Home for Imagi- At As THE IRON GIANT (1999) Voices of Jennifer Aniston, Eli Marien- Naruto IFuturama "The
TOON nary Friends thal. Animated. A boy befriends a gentle, 50-foot robot. Why of Fly" A
Vie privee, vie publique Des gens dont la vie privde et la vie publique LE GRAND CHARLES (2006, Biographie) (Partie 1 de
TV5 s'entremblent. 2} Bernard Farcy, Danible Lebrun.
TWC (",mo tF qs Abrams & Bettes Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
(:00) Heridas de La Fea Mds Bella Lety es una nitia Mundo de Fieras (N) ristina Guerra de bands.
UNIV Amor (N) duice, comintica e intelligent, pero
apenas atractiva. (N)
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order: Special Victims Unit WWE Monda Night Raw Survivor Series matches announced; DX,
USA der: Criminal in- A man's beating uncovers a danger- Edge, Orton, ohn Cena. (Uve) A (CC)
tent n (CC) ous male escort service.
:00) Hottest Cutest Bables A Fabulous Life Of..."Insane Celeb Fabulous Life Breaking Bona-
V H1 9ets A Entourages" A Real Estate duce A
NHL Hockey Philadelphia Flyers at Pittsburgh Penguins. From the Mellon Arena in Pitts- NHL Postgame Holy ...!
SV burgh. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) Show
(:00) America's America's Funniest Home Videos The three $100,000 prize winners WGN News at Nine A (CC)
WGN Funniest Home compete for the grand prize. A (CC)
Videos A (CC)
Everybody Everybody All of Us Track- Girlfriends Maya The Game "Mi CW11 News at Ten With Kaity .
WPIX Loves Raymond Hates Chris (N) down Roberfs challenges Joan, Casa Es Su Tong, Jim Watkins (CC)
"Big Shots A A (CC) ler (N) (N) Casa" (N) (CC)
Je I "('el- Dr. Phil A (CC) Jeopardy! "Col- News Frasier "Boo!" easier Frasier
WSBK ebri k in lege Toumament" Frasier dons a ults the wine
Ne rk" (N) (CC) clown costume. lub. A (CC)

6:30 At x eal Time Cand Crowley; Salman Roseanne Barr: Blonde and Hacking Democracy Com uters
HBO-E HA) K TALE ushdie. A (Cd) Bitchin' A (CC) that count votes in public e sections
(2004) 'PG' (CC) can be vulnerable. A (CC)
(6:45) At ELEKTRA (2005) Jen- Countdown to The Wire "Know Your Place" Bub- Def Comedy A++ RANSOM
HBO-P nifer Gamer An assassin tries to Pacquiao- bles identifies a witness for Herc. Jam Joe Clair. 6) Mel Gib-
protect a man and his daughter. Morales Ill (CC) A (CC) A (CC) A 'R' (CC)
(:00) Real Sport known Soldier: Searching for a Father A man HM SHARK TALE (2004, Comedy) Voices of Will
H BO-W (CC) ries to uncover details about his father's life. A (CC) Smith, Robert De Niro. Animated. A bottom feeder pre-
tends to be a shark slayer. A 'PG' (CC)


At THE CRUSH (1993, Suspense) C n; Elwes, Ali- +++ NORTH COUNTRY (2005, Drama) Charlize Theron, Frances Mc-
HBO-S gaffi$4ifer A 'Re to be- Dormannd, e B)ean. A miner charges her employer with sexual harass-

(6:00) At HA THE 40-YEAR-0LD VIRGIN (2005, Romance-Comedy) Steve AAt IN HER SHOES (2005,
MAX-E HARLEM arell, Catherine Keener, Paul Rudd. Three co-workers unite to help their omedy-Drama) Cameron Diaz,
NIGHTS (1989) ddy get a sex life. A 'R' (CC) ni Collette. A 'PG-13' (CC)
As SEED OF CHUCKY Horror) Jennifellllly, +++ WAR OF THE WORLDS (2005, Science Fiction) Tom Cruise,
MOMAX Voices of Brad Dourif, Bil Boyd. The doll and his Dakota Fanning, Miranda Otto. A man and his children try to survive an
bride try to raise a killer Id. A 'R' (CC) alien invasion. A 'PG-13' (CC)
(:00) AAA THE MASK OF 20RRO (1998, Adventure) Antonio Ban- At THE AMITYVILLE HORROR (2005, Horror) Ryan
SHOW deras, Anthony Hopkins, Catherine Zeta-Jones.iTV. Zorro's protege Reynolds, Melissa George. iTV. Strange events plague
crosses swords with a resuming tyrant. A 'PG-13' (CC) a family in a new house. A 'R' (CC)
(6:30) At is U-TURN (1997, Crime Drama) Sean Penn, Nick Nolte, Jennifer As NATIONAL LAMP00N'S
TMG COOL BLUE pez. A hood becomes involved with a woman he was hired to kill. A G THE DISTANCE (2004)
(1988) 'R' (CC) hristopher Jacot. 'R' (CC)


~..


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006, PAGE 13B


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


MONDAY EVENING


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TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 14B, MONDAY,


NOVEMBER 13, 2006


Both franchises will return
to the CBA as full "A" mem-
bers for the 2007-08 season.
As a result, the eight teams
participating are the Albany
Patrons; Butte Daredevils;
Great Falls Explorers, Indiana
Alleycats; Mmot Skyrockets;
Pittsburgh Xplosion; Utah
Eagles; and the Yakama Sunk-
ings.
The Patroons; Alleycats;
Skyrockets; and the Xplosion
will compete from the Ameri-
can Conference, while the
Dared evils; Explorers;
Eagles; and the Sunkings mak-
ing up the Nationhl Confer-
ence.
The two teams with the
most quarter points in each
conference will meet for the
conference championship with
each winner moving on to vie
for the CBA Championship.
Each CBA Playoff series will
be contested in a best of three
format, with the lowest seed
hosting the opening contest
and the higher seed hosting
the final two games,


The CBA is now in its 61st
season, having been founded
before the National Basket-
ball Association, but it has
served as the developmental
league for the NBA since its
inception.
"There's a lot of rich histo-
ry in the CBA with guys like
Phil Jackson, Flip Saunders,
Avery Johnson and Rick Car-
lyle, all coaches, who at one
time came through the CBA,"
Richardson noted.

Roster
Today, more than half of the
NBA roster has comprised of
players from the CBA, which
makes it much more stable
than the ABA.
The CBA was originally
scheduled to start its 2006-07
season ivith ten teams, but it
has been reduced to eight after
the Atlanta Krunk Wolvennes
and the Vancouver Dragons
turned down the league's pro-
motions to move from a "B
status to an "A .


SBy BRENT STUBBS


them, I jumped for the idea
because of obvious reasons."
Richardson said ultimately,
he wants to get players here
exposed to professional bas-
ketball and while the NBA
might be a long shot, he wants
to offer the alternative in the
CBA.

Opportunity
,,
This is an opportunity for
me to bring a professional
team here," said Richardson,
who had intended to pursue
the same idea with the ABA.
Because of the proximity to
the United States, I don't see
why we can't have a team here
as the CBA look to broaden
its horizons.
. Having spent a couple days
in town, Richardson said he
met with the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Housing
and others concerning the
development of basketball n'
the country to discuss the pos-
sibility of.forming a team in
the Bahamas.


The team, according to
Richardson, won't get to play
until the 2007-2008 season. It is
intended to feature local
Bahamian coaches and
Bahamian players, all of whom
will go through a training
camp to secure the ten spots
on the team.
"It's my hope that the team
will comprise of Bahamian
players," Richardson project-
ed. "Wheneyer you say you
are going outside of the
Bahamas, you can say it's a
team from the Bahamas and
whenever you win, you can it's
the Bahamas team that won.
"So if you win and you beat
a team from Chicago, or LA,
you can say the Bahamas won.
It's the sports side of the pro-
motion that we are looking at.
So it's something that I will be
working hard at establishing.,,
Eventually, Richardson
said he's looking at forming
the Pan American and
Caribbean region of the CBA,
which he hopes would have its
base here in the Bahamas.


BAHAMIAN businessman
Ricardo Richardson is now a
member of the Continental
Basketball Association
(CBA).
After departing the ABA,
. Richardson now serves as the
CEO with the CBA, based m
AlbanyNew York.
"It's really a step up for me
to leave the ABA to join the
CBA as the CEO," Richard-
son pointed out.
As it was when he joined
the ABA, Richardson aid his
love for basketball, having
played it competitively as a
member of the St. Augustine's
College Big Red Machines
and a college graduate,
Richardson said the CBA
turned out to be the ideal busi-
ness venture for him.
"I wanted to be tied to a
league that had some ties to
the NBA Richardson
stressed. So when they
approached me about joining


. .


- --


U


Bahamian businessman joins the


ATSCopyrighted Materialo third


20Syndicated.Content 3 UC


Available from s







TRIBNE SORTSMONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006, PAGE 15B


ISKF chairman gr ades Bahamas




Karate association members


MEMBERS of The
Bahamas Japan Karate
Association recently bene- .
filed from a three-day visit
b\ Teruvuki Okazaks.
Chairman and Chief
Instructor of the Interna-
lional Shotokan Karate
Federation (ISKF) during
his insit to the Bahamas.
During his visit. Okazaks,
\\ho is ranked as a 9th Dan,
spent most of his time grad-
ing members of the associa-
tion who demonstrated
their skills during intense
sessions at the YNICA on
J.F. Kennedy Drive and the .
Cafeteria at the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation
IBEC) on Balliou Hill and
Tucker Roads. Okazaki
also gate members of the
group helpful tips on areas
where the\ can improve.

Skills
Okazaki nored that he
has seen a notable improve-
ment in the members' skills,
since his last visit some
three years ago. "They are -
doing very good. I am very
pleased to visit...They have
realiv trained very hard,
and I am really pleased to
see that." said Okazaki.
Shair n Serrette. President
of The Bahamas Karate
Association, said that it \\as
an honour and prit ilege to 4:
have Okazaki in their pres- --- a
ence. "Mr. Okazaki is more
concerned about us train-
ing on a regular basis and
moving up through the
ranks, which is very impor- posed to develop character
tank and I think we see a need
Serrette emphasised that for a lot of that (character .
more important than train- development and persever-
ing is the need for character ance) igh&hese times in par-
Jerelopeneurail which. ticular'
he noted members of the "Aride-1 think that if we -
Bahamas Japan Karate can catch kids early with it.
Association continuaHy I think it \\ill go a long way
strive to achieve. to help and to build a good

1111pOrtant in concluding their ses-
sion the group stated the
"How you carry yourself, Japanese Dojokun. code of
boat you deport yourself is conduct. which encourages
tery important and this is participants to. "First seek 1
what we stand for, and this perfection of character, be
makes us different ..." faithful, endeavour. respect
Also pleased to be graced orbers and refrain from vio-
by the karate expert. \\as lent behavior.
Patrick Hanna. Chief
Instructor, whose ties
with Okazaki stem over-30
lears.
"AIr. Okazaki is a world
renowned master and be 5 THESE pictures show ,e
has been in karate f or members of the Bahamas
many, man\ vears and he is Japan Karate Associalion
one of the original students during a demonstration,
of Master Gichin which was graded by
Funakoshi. so it's ...a plea- Teruyuki Okazaki. Chair-
sure to have him here." said man and Chief Instructor
Hanna. of the International
H hen asked if he sees a Sholoken Karate Federa-
need for the karate to be tion (ISKF) during his
introduced in the school recent visit to the
systems. Hanna replied. Bahamas.
"There is a very important
facet to karate and it's the (Photos by
overall principle that is sup- Anastasia Stubbs)


t

















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Subway employee, at-d family members of employees are not eligble. @2006 DMI


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006


ment, said they were able to
establish an important point.
"I think we can say that
the best basketball players,
who are the future of the
sport, are playing in this
leagite," said Bowleg, one of
the coaches in the league. "We
have the best players in New
Providence playing in the
league."
The league, according to
Bowleg, is expected to be
comprised of a good mixture
of youth and experience play-
ers, as the NPBA moves frcim
having, two divisions to just
the men's division one play.
Bowleg's Ruff Ryders did-
n't fare as well as he had antic-
ipated, but he vowed that they
will definitely be ready for the
regular season.,
"We didn't put in sufficient
time in practice, so we lost
both of our gables," he
changed. "Right now, we are
fifth in the rankings, but we
have a team that should dbfi-
nitely put us on top."
Christopher 'Chicken' Turn-
quest, who played od the
men's national team, is expect-
ed to control the inside game,
while Kevin Smith and Nel-
son illandella' Joseph will
handle the ball on the outside.
Alphonso 'Chicken' Albury,
coach of the Crimestoppers,
admitted as well that they did-
n't get to.practise.
"But I think we did well,"
he stated. "As time goes on,
the Police Crimestoppers will
take it up a couple notches of
where we were last year. We
are excited about playing this
year."
The Crimestoppers got
some good performances from
Freddie Lighthourne, Vernon.
Stubbs and Aaron Sands.
"At this stage, it's not a mat-
ter of who you have. It's how
you play the game," Albury
pointed out. "We just tried to
play as a tearn and not indi-
vidually. We will be a very
good team when:the season
starts."
If there was any coach who
was concerned, it was Wade
Watson.
He had more players out
than any other team, yet his
team couldn't put their chem-
istry together to win any of
their two games played.
"I'm not too happy. All I
wanted the guys to do was
come out and play solid man-
to-man, but we couldn't get in
sync," lie reflected.
"Our offensive and defen-
sive rebounding was poor.
"We need to work on that
and ive didn't take the proper
shots.
"We had a full l2 players
out and so it was difficult to
run everybody when you're
playing running time. So
hopefully we will go back to
practice and work on our


M BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
THE Commonwealth Bank
Giants will go into the
revamped New Providence
Basketball Association's
2006/07 season as the top
ranked team.
The Giants secured the
ranking at the end of the
NPBA'spre-seasonbasketball
tournament that ivas held on
Saturday at the DW Davis
Gymnasium. The tournament
provided the eight teams with
an opportunity to see what
they have to work with before
the regular season starts in
two weeks.
The tournament was
designed for everybody to get
a look at each other ak we
combine the two divisions '
Thompson stressed. "I think
it was a good accomplishment
for us to look at what we have, .
so we will know what kind of
chemistry we will hale fling
into the season."
Thompson said they wel-
comed back Mark Hanna,
who had left the team toblay
with the Coca-Cola Explorers
for a couple of years. He
teamed up with Michael Bain
and Ray Ferguson, both of
whom played division II last
year,
"As we go along, we will try
to make some further adjust-
ments to get even better,"
Thompson stated: Minus
some things, some of the
teams were short-handed, but
I think the teams that are bet-
ter prepared will come out on
top."
The Jammers, who played
without coach Anthony 'Cops'
Rolle, were the talk of the
tournament as Gamilian Rose
rocked the gym with his high
flying act. He was assisted by
Eugene Bains While Horatio
'Yellow' Poitier directed the
show.
"This Avas our third game,
but everybody was tired," said
Rose, of the division II cham-
pions Police team. "This is just
a part of our team.-When we
have everybody out, we will
be tough to beat."
Rose said the teams look
good, but once they work on
their defence, they willbe able
to handle any team in the
league because they have the
offensive power.-
The Giants ended the tour-
nament with an unblemished
record to take the top spot in
the ranking. They are fol-
lowed by the Jammers, the Y-
Care Wreckers, the Police
Crimestoppers, the Sunshine
Auto Ruff Ryders, Electro-
com Cybots, Cable Bahamas
Entertainers and the Stars.
Mario Bowleg, the public
relations officer for the NPBA
who organized the tourna-


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