Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00567
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: October 30, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00567
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text







"FEAI ,OUR

POUNW tvm

HIGH 83F
LOW 72F

RAINT-STOM
T-STORM


Tribune


The


BAHAMAS EDITION


HASSLE FREE MOR GAGS, tt
"As a flight attendant,
Swas not home long
.enough to complete mn~
mortgage process.'





Do you have the time?
CALL US TODAY!
328-LOAN
www.approvedleaidingservices.com


IN TODAY'S INSIGHT


'in


FNM hits out


over handling


of Anna Nicole


Smith issue


IMMIGRATION Minister
Shane Gibson's handling of
the Anna Nicole Smith issue is
evidence fhat-the-PLP gov-
ernment has been in melt-
down for some time now and
Prime Minister Perry Christie
is helpless to stop it, the FNM
said yesterday.
The Anna Nicole cheque
incident is, said the opposi-
tion, evidence of Mr Gibson's
"indecent haste to provide his
good friend, the notorious
Anna Nicole Smith, with a
Bahamas permanent residen-
cy permit while trying to
deceive the Bahamian people
into believing that this was all
an example of efficiency".
The party pointed out that.,
in a "very strong and indig-
nant statement" on Septem-
ber 25, the minister had pub-
licly stated that no cheque for
the processing of Anna
Nicole's permanent residency
application was ever person-
ally collected by him or deliv-
ered to him and that any state-
ment to the contrary was a,
"vicious lie conceived in igno-
rance and spread in wicked-
ness by the FNM."
Prime Minister Perry
Christie, the party said, put
his own reputation, for the
second time, onil the line and
endorsed Mr Gibson's posi-


tion, making the "misplaced"
statement that newspapers
could not allege that "my min-
ister picked up a cheque when.-
it's a lie, an outrageous lie."
"But the prime minister -
already embarrassed and dis-
credited by his attempt to
deceive the public about the
fight in the Cabinet Room -
did not listen to us: either that
or he did ask his minister and
believed what Mr Gibson told
him.
"In any event the prime
minister made the same mis-
take he made with regard to
the Cabinet Room brawl.
Instead of getting,the truth
and passing it on to the
Bahamian people along with
an announcement that he had
taken appropriate action. Mr
Christie defended his minis-
ter," the FNM said.
The party said, just as in the
case of the Cabinet Room
fiasco. the "whole deception
has collapsed like a house of
cards".
"Mr Christie's defence of
his minister seems misplaced
in the light of further revela-
tions in the press. He should
have taken to heart what
FNM leader Hubert Ingraham
has tried to tell him about the
SEE page 13


At any one moment there are
a million ways to feel great.


Boxer Berbick from Ali's
Nassau finale Is found

murdered in Jamaica


* By JOHN MARQUIS
BOXER Trevor Berbick,
whose main claim to tame "as
to defeat Muhammad Ali in
the great champion's farewell
tight in Nassau. has been found
murdered in Jamaica.
The man whose points '%in
over a legend 25 years ago
earned him instant. worldwide
recognition. 'was discovered
lying in a churchyard near his
home with gaping head
wounds.
Local police say,.a man is
being held in connection with
the killing.
Berbick, who is thought to
have been 51,or 52, though his:
true age was never known, was
discovered dead at his native,
Norwich, 90 miles east of,
Kingston.
A church deacon at Norwich
Baptist Chapel, close to
Berbick's home, found the
boxer's body at about 5am Sat
urday.


iSenior Detective Sgt Ken-
nieth BaileN, ot Port Antonio
@riminal investigation branch;
said Berbick had left a local.
iightspot in the early hours
heading for home.
However. Sgt Bailey said he,
'appeared to have been
attacked from behind with a'
'machete.
"The body had four wounds
A the back ot the head, as he
was probably attacked trom
behind." said the officer.
"The impression and dam-
age done to the skull have indi-
cated that a machete may ha% e
been used by his attacker or'
attackers to murder him."
Police have discounted rob-
bery because Berbick was
found with. cash and no
attempt had been made to
enter his house a few feet from
where he was found.
Bertbick, who evaded ques-
tions about his age by saying
SEE page 10


Police reportedly take naked
woman from home and keep
her for hours in waiting room


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
A YOUNG woman and her
two daughters have been left
traumatised after police report-
edly threw her out of her home
naked and kept her in that state
for hours in the waiting room of
a police station before they
allowed her to go.
Ruth Lubin, 23, lives with her
two children, her boyfriend and
his 81-year-old grandmother,
who suffers from Alzheimer's
disease.
liS Lubin said that the elder-
ly woman, because of her con-
dition, has a history of behav-
ing irrationally.
"She calls the police for me
eerv day. The police came here
and they talked to me. When
they talk to her, she says; 'Why
are you here? I didn't call y'all',"
Ms Lubin said.
The greatest, indignity. she
said, occurred yesterday around
10am when a police officer,


responding to a call from the'
elderly woman, told her that she
needed to leave the house.
"I said 'Officer, I am not going
anywhere. Where do I have to
go?' I said 'Officer, you cannot
arrest me. If you have a concern
you cannot barge into my house
and tell me I need to get out
when you don't know what is
SEE page 13

*CORRECTION
IN AN article published in
Friday's Tribune, it was incor-
rectly stated that a 13-year-old
-boy who was allegedly the vic-
tim of an attack by older stu-
dents at St Andrew's School
was the son of MP Philip Davis.
The young man in question
is not the son of Mr Davis and
The Tribune wishes to apolo-
gise for any inconvenience the
statement may have caused.


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THE TRIBUNE


AP GE 2 MONDAYOCTOBER 3 6


^


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I


IM1 14TTill 11 'I iRFMl FRl =


l ir NL1im1 i HiIi i 1111








THE RIBNE MNDA, OTOBE 30 200, PGE


L CALNEW


* In brief

Man stable

after being

stabbed in

the chest

FREEPORT Grand
Bahama police are investigat-
ing a stabbing incident in the
Garden Villas (the Ghetto) area
that resulted in one man being
injured in the chest.
According to Supt Basil Rah-
ming, police received reports of
a stabbing around 10.20pm on
Thursday. When police arrived
at the scene, fhey discovered
the victim, Edward Prince
Reckley, 38, of Hudson Estates,
with a stab wound to the chest.
Mr Reckley told police that,
while at Weddell Avenue
around 7.30pm, he was socialis-
i ing with friends when he was
approached by a man, known
only by face, who stabbed with
an unknown object.
He was taken to Rand
Memorial Hospital, where he is
detained in stable condition.

Woman and
her son are
accused of
possession

A 68-YEAR-OLD woman
and her son were arraigned in
Magistrate's Court Three in
New Providence for alleged
drug possession.
Cecilia Delancey and her son,
Julian McKenzie, 23, of Mon-
trose Lane, South Bahamia,
appeared before Magistrate
Roger Gomez for possession of
dangerous drugs with intent to
supply.
Ms Delancey pleaded not
guilty to the charge. McKenzie
pleaded guilty to the charge. In
consequence to this, the prose-
cution offered no evidence
against NMs Dclancev and the
charge was dismissed against her.'
According to reports, police
seized 3,14 pounds of marijuana
and 2.5 pounds of cocaine and
$19,8ggsh in US currency at a
housi&o;iaontrose.Lane.
Magistrate pomeientenced
McKenzie to one year's impris-
onment and ordered that the
seized cash be confiscated to
the Public Treasury,.


|Shape
yours
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are mak-
ing news in their neighbour-
hoods. Call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

SYNTHETIC
GRASS
vf


NEARLY one year after a
seaplane crash killed 20 peo-
ple, Chalk's International
Airlines received US federal
approval to resume service to
the Bahamas using leased
planes that will land on run-
ways, ,according to a media
report.
The Associated Press said
Chalk's plans to begin flying
to the Bahamas on Novem-
ber 9 with planes leased from
Billings, the Montana-based
Big Sky Airlines.
Chalk's also announced
plans to lease additional
planes to fly from Fort Laud-
erdale and Palm Beach Coun-
ty to Tallahassee, Gainesville,
Orlando, Tampa and Key
West and Bahamas destina-
tions.

Crash

The airline, known previ-
ously as Chalk's Ocean Air-
ways, has been grounded
since one of its signature
Grumman G-73T Turbo Mal-
lard seaplanes crashed short-
ly after take-off near the Port
of Miami on December 19,
2005, killing 18 passengers

.~~k1IA(MMiLIIA4LWl


and both pilots.
The right wing broke off in
flight and investigators immedi-
ately focused on fatigue cracks
found in both wing structures.
Negotiations continue between
Chalk's lawyers and attorneys for


the families of the crash victims
over how to divide a proposed
$51 million settlement.
A filing in US District Court
said both sides have reached a
deal that would allow for all
claims to be settled.


MAIN SECTION
Local News................P1.3.5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12
Local News.....................................P13.14,16
Editorial/Letters. .......................................P4
A dvts.....................................................P2,15
BUSINESS/SPORTS SECTION
Business ............................................P1,2,3,5
A dvt ............................................................P4
S ports ...................................................P6,7,8
INSIGHT SECTION
Insight .............................................P 1,2,3,6 ,7
C om ics........................................................P4
TV G uide .....................................................P5
W eather.......................................................P8

CLASSIFIED SECTION 24 PAGES

MIAMI HERALD SECTIONS
M ain ................................................12 Pages
Sports/Business ............................12 Pages
I


Chalk's gains US




federal approval



to restart service




using runways


Sur 4iith Noue vebellr'MIT


Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family

BayParl. Bldg. Parliament St.
Telephone: 322-8393808 or 328-7157
email: info@colesofnassau.com


IDEALfor.
Business entrances
Srect Medians
Play Areas
Pootl S rrund's

Ph: 427-3300



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OCTOBER 30TH
6:30am Bahamas @ Sunrise Live
11:00 Immediate Response
12:00 ZNS News Update (Live)
12:05 Immediate Response cont'd
1:00 Caribbean Passport
1:30 Ethnic Health America
2:00 One Thousand Dollar Bee
2:30 Aqua Kids
3:00 David Pitts
3:30 Bishop Neil Ellis
4:00 Little Robots
4:30 Carmen San Diego
5:00 ZNS News Update
5:05 Andiamo
5:30 The Envy Life
6:00 Gospel Grooves
6:25 Life Line
6:30 News Night 13 Freeport
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
8:00 You & Your Money
8:30 Tourism Today
9:00 New Life Crusade 2006 -
Evangelist Frank Perry
10:00 Caribbean Newsline
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30am Community Page 1540AM
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I15 4,


-in-









(On Selected Items)
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ONL Y -!


MONDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2006, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


~c~C~







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, MONDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2006


EIOIA S E S TOTH6EDTO


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama-ir 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


Just who received $10,000 cheque?,


WHEN Anna Nicole Smith's fast-tracked
residence certificate made the headlines
someone familiar with the security checks
required for such applications told us it was
"absolutely impossible" to complete the
checks and issue the certificate in three
weeks.
However, as a result of what Prime Min-
ister Christie has referred to as "new records
of efficiency" being introduced in the Immi-
gration Department, Ms Smith's certificate
was issued exactly 21 working days after an
application was submitted to the department
on Friday, August 11.
On Monday, August 14, an Immigration
Department official called to set up an inter-
view for the next day at the Eastern Road
residence of Ms Smith who also goes under
the names of Mrs Vickie Lynn Marshall, Jane
Brown, Michelle Chase and Ann.,I M Smith
On September 11, the Dircio'r ot Immi-
gration wrote a letter to Ms Tracy Fergttson,
junior partner in Callenders and Co who
had been instructed to submit the applica-
tion on Mrs Vicki Lynn Marshall's behalf -
informing Ms Ferguson that Ms Marshall's
residence permit had been approved "without
the right to work."
However, although this letter was
addressed to the Callender law firm, it was
never sent to Callenders. It was only when Ms
Smith/Marshall called the firm on Septem-'
ber 20, giving instructions that a $10,000
cheque be delivered to her home by 7 o'clock
that evening for Immigration Minister Shane
Gibson that Callenders learned that the res-
idence certificate had been granted.
On September 20, Ms Ferguson herself
drove to Ms Smith/Marshall's home, where
she says she saw Mr Gibson in the living
room. Ms Ferguson was shown into the bed-
room where she gave the envelope to Ms
Smith. As Ms Smith opened the envelope
her lawyer-boyfriend ushered Mr Gibson into
the bedroom. Ms Smith handed Mr Gibson
the cheque. The young lawyer from Callen-
ders then left "Horizons."
The next day, September 21, the Perma-
nent Secretary called Ciallc nd r.. spoke with
a senior partner, anid asked.Callenders to
send Immigration the $10,000 cheque. There
was a surprised reaction when she was told
that the cheque had been deliL rld ihe night
before to Minister Gibson. It was then sug-
gested that she look in the Minister's office,
where it is understood the cheque was even-
tually discovered.
Mr Michael Scott, the law partner, then
told the Permanent Secretary that not only


did his firm no longer have the cheque, but
that it had never received Immigration's let-
ter, which informed the firm that residency
had been approved. She was asked to fax the
letter, dated September 11, which she did.
The original of the approval letter did not
arrive at Callenders until October 9.
The Tribune has in its possession a copy of
the $10,000 cheque dated September 20, a
copy of the permanent secretary's fax sending
Immigration's Sept. 11 letter of approval -
dated September 21 and the cancelled
cheque with the Bahamas Immigration
accounts stamp dated September 22.
When the unusual sequence of events
became public, Bahamians wanted to know
why a government minister would interfere
with the duties of the Immigration Depart-
ment, and why he would personally accept a
cheque on behalf of that department.
On September 25 an indignant Minister
Gibson "let it be known for public informa-
tion that no cheque was ever personally col-
lected by" him or delivered by him or to him
."in connection with Ms Anna Nicole Smith."
He said that "anything to the contrary is a
vicious lie conceived in ignorance and spread
in wickedness by the FNM."
Surprisingly, Prime Minister Christie, a
man noted for being slow to make a deci-
sion or commit himself to any position, once
again jumped to the defence of his minister.
It was obviously a repeat performance of the
Keod Smith-Kenyatta Gibson episode when,
acting on incomplete information, Mr
Chrigtie put himself in a politically embar-
rassing position.
. And so, at the opening of the first phases
of Excellence Estates on September 25, Mr
Christie declared: "You can't have it on the
front page of newspapers that my minister
pickedeup a cheque when it's a lie, outra-
geous lie."
However, later rumours are even more
disturbing. An unconfirmed report is now
making the rounds that the young lawyer is
being pressured to change her story about
the delivery of the cheque to Horizons. If
this report'is true,:it is very serious. If not
true, it should be denied immediately.
In the meantime, the public is entitled to
the truth. We urge the Opposition to ask for
the appointment of a select committee with
powers to send for persons and papers and
get to the bottom of this most irregular affair.
And when the truth is discovered we agree
with Minister Gibson that if there has been
any breach, the guilty should be "dealt with
to the fullest extent of the law."


A great and





much needed





programme


EDITOR, The Tribune.
A "CODE OF ETHICS"
has been introduced to Par-
liamentary officers. This is
a good thing. There have
been innumerable persons
who have broken the code
with no visible conse-
quences. This is a bad
thing. It gives a clear mes-
sage to our young people
that unacceptable behav-
iour has no consequences
for those who are in power.
Therefore, why should any-
one think integrity is a
good trait? The better thing
would be to make a public
apology, and resign his/her
public office.
A pastor holds a special
ceremony to celebrate his
birthday.
His congregation and
peers raise a large amount
of money to help him cele-
brate. Sharing in this way
is a good thing. The pastor
accepts the money for his
own personal purposes. We
are taught that avarice is a
bad thing.
A pastor has a special
calling. The better thing
would have been to accept
the money and publicly
redirect it to his favourite
charity.
SA person uses a small
part of the money from his
nefarious dealings to buy
schoolbooks and bicycles
for neighbourhoqd chil-
dren. This is a bad thing.
This act leaves young per-
sons in confusion. Dealing
drugs is illegal and to ben-
efit from it, even peripher-
ally,, is wrong. The better
thing would have been to
walk away from the gift.
A union wants more
money and better working
conditions for its dues-pay-
ing members. This is a good
thing. The union officers
have misunderstood their
employee's entitlement to
overtime pay. Legally, it
has been made clear no
overtime is due. Neverthe-
less they urge their mem-
bers to work on a "go-slow
basis". This is wrong. The
better thing would have
been to accept the legal
opinion and negotiate for
overtime pay in the next
contract.
Recently, one of the talk
shows had two guests from
the Ministry of Education


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who introduced, a new pro-
gramme, which they are
calling "Character Counts".
This sounds like a great
and much needed pro-
gramme. Let's hope the
public will buy into it and
all community partners will
promote it on a continuing
basis.
A theme song has been
written to compliment the
programme and it is hoped
that it will be played often.
My suggestion is that this
song be played each day as
the children enter the
building.
Additionally, each day,
teachers introduce one of
the positive character traits
and conduct a few minutes
discussion about that trait.
At the lower levels teach-
ers should provide a hand-
out for the children to take


home for family discussion.
Older children should write
a brief paragraph about
their trait .and give exam-
ples of conduct promoting
the positives of the trait.
The best of these could
be submitted to the radio
stations and one of them
read just after the song is
played.
All community partners
should be encouraged to
promote this programme to
their children, their staff
and themselves.
Let us all embrace this
programme as a way to
help our children and our-
selves grow into the won-
derful persons we are
meant to be. II we all do
our part we will see a rapid
reduction in crime.
Personal safety, peace
and happiness will become
a given.

MS C
Nassau,
October, 2006.


Nicki Kelly's column

EDITOR, The Tribune.
I READ with interest, and some amusement, Ms Nicki Kelly's col-
umn in The Punch in which she criticises local reporters for their
spelling and grammatical errors.
Most amusing of all is that she appears to make more mistakes
than those she seeks to ridicule.
In this week's Punch, Ms Kelly castigates "The Tribune's Krystal
Lowe" for allegedly misusing the word 'overthrown'. Unless there is
someone here I don I kniov. aboii Tie Tribune does riot empl6y any
suchperson..We hbe a Kr)sti RolLk, but one assumes that is not the
person the esteemed Punch columnist is writing about.
In her first paragraph, she declares: "Reading some of the non-
sense that makes its way into the local press, I have to wonder if these
newspapers still employ a news editor."
The answer is that we do. But even if the job was vacant, we would
not be inviting Ms Kelly to apply.
TRIBUNE STAFFER



Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news .in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps ,
you are raising funds for a
' good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the .
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


------- ---- - -1-






MONDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2006, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


o In brief

Police issue
warning over
counterfeit
currency
GRAND Bahama Police are
warning businesses to be on the
lookout for counterfeit curren-
cy, particularly US $100 cur-
rency notes.
The notes have been in cir-
culation on the island since
August.
Officers of the Commercial
Crime Section at the Central
Detective Unit have been
receiving reports of and seizing
counterfeit US 100 notes that
were being used in legitimate
business transactions.
Mr Rahming said while a sig-
nificant quantity of the notes
have been confiscated, police
suspect that there are still more
counterfeit notes in circulation.
The notes can be identified
with a currency note scanner
and by visually examining the
distinctive characters which
should replicate the imprinted
watermark images and the secu-
rity thread woven inside the
note, which should match the
figures printed on the note.

Man jailed
for three
years for drug
possession

TRISTAN Johnson, 22, of.
Angelfish Street, Freeport, was
found guilty and convicted of
possession of dangerous drugs
with intent to supply and taking
preparatory steps to export dan-
gerous drugs from the
Bahamas.
Johnson was arrested at
Lucayan Harbour on February
16, along with two other young
men, Ashford Ferguson, 23, and
Alonza Charlton, following a
high speed chase that began at
Lucayan Harbour and ended on
East Atlaiitic Drive opposite GB
Fitness Centre. A bag containing
10 pounds of cocaine was thrown
from the suspect's vehicle.
Johnson was sentenced to
three years at Fox Hill Prison.
Charlton and Ferguson were
acquitted of the charges.


t was heartening to
observe the depth and
width of revulsion that greeted
the (hopefully one-off) return
of the "cat" to The Bahamas a
fortnight ago.
From the Anglican Arch-
bishop to the Grand Bahama
Human Rights Association,
thinking Bahamians seem to
have rejected the return to
colonial barbarism mas-
querading as legitimate crimi-
nal justice.
In fact, the "cat" has very
little to do with criminal justice
as it is understood in the mod-
emrn world. Rather, it is a form
of crude public humiliation
once employed by British colo-
nialists to terrorise native pop-
ulations into maintaining the
peculiar "order" that makes
colonial domination possible.
Tellingly, it has no widespread
history of use in England itself,
nor in any of its predominant-
ly Caucasian colonies.
The underlying presump-
tion (apparently accepted by
many among us who reminisce
fondly about such "order") is
that, whereas in Britain the
population can be expected to
respond to the complex eco-
nomic, rehabilitative and puni-
tive notions that characterise
current ideas of criminal jus-
tice, we here just need a good
public whipping to keep us in
order.
If support for such an insult-
ing proposition came from a
foreigner, it would warrant a
slap. The fact that it has come
from born Bahamians being
paid at the public expense
(like ministers and judges)
should be greeted with sad-
ness and anger in thinking
people..
It is clear to policy-makers
the world over that the causes
of violent crime are deep and
complex. In our society, the
long-term solution is to inter-
rupt and transform the ugly
"ghetto" culture that persists

TROICA

EXTRMNAOR


PERSPECTIVES


AN D R EW

among a large segment of our
population. That is a very tall
task.
The short-term solutions (the
ones which concern the courts
and attorneys general) are
scarcely less complex. Reforming
a horrendous criminal-factory of
a prison, achieving an acceptably
balanced Bail Act, and ensuring
that those who are genuinely
beyond rehabilitation are
removed permanently from con-
tact with society are all parts of
the answer. Incidentally, none
of our leaders have gotten any of
them right yet.
Instead, it appears that we
have spent millions of dollars
paying supposedly educated min-
isters, civil servants and judges so
that they can come up so bril-
liant an answer to the crime sit-
uation as "the cat".
RADIO AND
ACCOUNTABILITY

The somewhat belated
conclusion to last mon-
th's Cabinet Office tussle is, if
anything, a testament to the
power of private radio stations to
keep politicians on their toes.
Though it is probably seldom
appreciated as such, the decision
of the 1992-2002 FNM govern-


A L LEN

ment to license private radio
broadcasters ranks among the
most significant developmental
"reforms" yet undertaken in an
independent Bahamas.
Why? Because no other
mechanism so effectively and
demonstrably creates or
enhances a culture of account-


It is doubtful
if even a solar
eclipse 'covers
up' certain
things with
as much
consistency as
ZNS

ability among public servants as
a free and critical media.
. In fact, the inverse correla-
tion between free media and cor-
ruption is dramatic. According
to the World Bank, some 70 per
cent of the least corrupt societies
have a free media,,while only 10
per cent of those deemed "most
corrupt" do.


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In our case, the improvement
in accountability is obvious, if
still a work in progress. We do
not have to think back very long
for confirmation.
Had something similarly
embarrassing to the government
taken place prior to 1992. (and
many of us recall hearing
rumoured accounts of incidents),
there is simply no credible pos-
sibility that it would have ended
with a resignation, a public
explanation by the participants
and a press conference by the
prime minister himself, whoever
he happened to be.
ZNS would have been totally
mute on the issue, much as it was
for the first week or so of the
recent controversy until its hand
was forced by the other media.
(While supposedly only the sun
'covers' The Bahamas better, it is
doubtful if even a solar eclipse
'covers up' certain things with
as much consistency as ZNS).
Of the printed media, the
Guardian as it was then would.
likely have similarly under-react-


ed, while scandal-mongering
tabloids could be plausibly
ignored by. all the participants.
Only The 'Tribune would likely
have given so embarrassing and
anomalous an incident its war-
ranted coverage and it would
just as likely have been accused
of mischief-making by members
of the governing party.
Also, unfortunately for all
The Tribune's efforts, even the
fullest coverage in the printed
media for some reason does not
excite the level of public interest
among Bahamians as radio,
especially its editorial comment.
However disproportionately
the hammer may have fallen on
the two young MPs in question
(and theirs was hardly the worst
sin in public life), their eager-
ness to explain the event on
radio, and the prime minister's
ultimate acceptance of their res-
ignations, is a powerful demon-
stration of a free media forcing
accountability where no other
institution could. Now for some
telei vision licences..


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6. MONDAY. OCTOBER 30, 2006


A Fynes

sunrise
S100 JAMZ disc jockey
Carvin Dorsette, also
known as DJ Fynes to his
loyal following, emerged
over the weekend as the
winner of the second
annual Heineken Green
Synergy Competition, an
international Caribbean
DJ competition. Here he
is at the Bahamas@Sunrise
set on Friday with show
hosts Romauld Ferreira at
left and Gabriella Fraser
at right
(Photo: Collin Galanos,
The Counsellors Ltd)


YOUR CONNECTION TO THE WORLD


Novelist to visit COB


The College of the Bahamas
has secured the visit to Nassau of
poet, novelist and playwright
Fred D'Aguiar, who has to his
credit five novels and as many
collections of poetry and has
won a number of the world's
most sought after literary prizes.
D'Aguiar is scheduled to
arrive in Nassau on Wednesday,
November 1, for a four-day stay.
The College of the Bahamas'
School of English Studies, which
has organised D'Aguiar's visit,
is making certain that COB stu-
dents, faculty and staff and the
wider community derive the
greatest benefit from the partic-
ipation of the distinguished visi-
tor.
D'Aguiar will give the first
Anatol Rodgers Memorial Lec-
ture on Thursday, November 2,
at 6.30pm at COB's Choices
Restaurant. His presentation is
entitled "The Caribbean Dias-
pora: What Survives of
Caribbean Identity in Our Minds
and Bodies when We Leave the
Caribbean?"
On Thursday, November 2,
radio listeners can tune in to
"Real Talk Live" with host Jeff


Lloyd at 10am to hear from
D'Aguiar.
He is scheduled to appear on
ZNS TV13 on Bahamas at Sun-
rise on Friday morning, Novem-
ber 3. Also on Friday, at 10am at
COB, members of the media will
be invited to meet and chat with
Mr D'Aguiar.
On Saturday, November 4, the
writer will conduct two creative
writing workshops, the first in
poetry. and the second in the
short story.
D'Aguiar's journey to prize-
winning writer is an unusual one.
He first trained as a psychiatric
nurse. He turned to African and
Caribbean Studies, graduating
with a degree in the subject from
the University of Kent., Canter-
bury, in 1985.
That year he brought out his
first collection of poetry, Mama
Dot (1985) to critical acclaim.
The. work established his repu-
tation as what the British Arts
Council terms "one of the finest
British poets of his generation".
Mama Dot, along with Airy
Hall (1989), was of sufficient
merit to capture the Guyana
Poetry Prize in 1989.


It was D'Aguiar's first novel,
The Longest Memory (1994),
which tells the story of
Whitechapel, a slave on an eigh-
teenth-century Virginia planta-
tion that indicated his early suc-
cesses in writing were not flash-
es in the pan.
The book won both the David
Higham Prize for Fiction and the
Whitbread First Novel Award
and firmly cemented the author's
literary reputation. It was adapt-
ed for television and televised
by Channel 4 in the UK. His
long narrative poem 'Sweet.
Thames' was broadcast as part of
the BBC 'Worlds on Film' series
in 1992. It also netted D'Aguiar
the Commission for Racial
Equality Race in the Media
Award.
Other D'Aguiar novels include
Dear Future (1996), set on a fic-
tional Caribbean island, and
Feeding the Ghosts (1997), based
on the true story of a slave who
survived being thrown overboard
with 132 other men, women and
children from a slave ship in the
Atlantic. Fred D'Aguiar's fourth
novel, Bethany Bettany, was
brought out in 2003.


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_ __._ _,


LOCAL NEWS







MONDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2006, PAGE 7


THF TRIBUNE


* By MARTELLA
MATTHEWS
FORT LAUDERDALE -
The key to the city of Fort
Lauderdale was presented to
Prime Minister Perry Christie
last week after he officially
opened the world's largest boat
show.
The country's chief and a del-
egation attended the Fort Laud-
erdale International Boat Show
as the honoured guests of Bob-
by Ginn, developer of the mul-
ti-billion Ginn sur Mer mixed-
use resort community currently
under construction in West
End, Grand Bahama.
For its 47th appearance, this
year's Boat Show featured over
$1.6 billion worth of boats,
yachts, super yachts and other
unique playthings that cater to
the world's elite. The event was
presented by Ginn sur Mer,
who signed on as title sponsors
of the annual Boat Show in
recognition of the fact that the
audience for the Boat Show and
the target market for its planned
$4.9 billion resort community
were one and the same.
"Ginn sur Mer will appeal to
boating enthusiasts from around
the globe with its world
class marina and oceanfront
location.
"It is a perfect partnership for
us," said Bobby Ginn, president
and CEO of Ginn Resorts.
The developer added that
choosing the Bahamas for his
latest project was the most
hassle free experience of his
career.
c"In all my years of business
and doing community develop-
ments, some 36 years, never
before have I been more
embraced," he said. "The gov-
ernment over there is a pro-
business government... I
encourage other people to
strongly look into waterfront
developments there."

Developments
In his official opening pie-
sentation on Thursday, Mr
Christie outlined the comple-
ments between the event and
the developments currently
ongoing throughout the islands
of the Bahamas.,
"The Bahamas is a yachts-
man's paradise," Mr Christie
said. "I have heard account
after account of the variety ot
experiences (boaters have had
in moving from island to
island...God created the
Bahamas to show how pretty\
waters can be."
Speaking to a room packed
to capacity with media from
across the United States and the
World, the prime minister went
on to outline the openness of
the country to Foreign Direct
Investments. He explained that
in selecting investors, much care
and attention is given to the
actual business plans presented
and their potential for making
an economic impact, not only
immediately, but for the fore-
seeable future.
According to Mr. Christie,


* PRIME Minister Perry Christie officially opened the
largest boat show in the world, the Fort Lauderdale
International Boat Show.




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the Ginn development passed
this litmus test. "We were very
interested that he had a sense of
the future and he was not just
selling and bailing out," he said.

Satisfied
"We are satisfied that Bob-
by Ginn has demonstrated to
our country connectivity, that
(this) is a positive development
to our country as an invest-
ment."
Carolina based Ginn Resorts
is touting its planned Grand
Bahama development as one
that will redefine the Caribbean
resort experience.


The gigantic marina is expect-
ed to provide slips for 380 mega
yachts (yachts 80 feet and over).
This will be in addition to the
Monte-Carlo style casino, a
water park, two signature
golf courses, a grand palace and
an inter-connected canal sys-
tem.
Prime Minister Christie con-
cluded his presentation to the
media and invited guests at the
official boat show opening by
impressing upon the group the
importance of adhering to envi-
ronmental best practices to
ensure that the beauty they are
currently privy to, remains
for ensuing generations to
enjoy.


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The Tribune


Teru o serv eBra C-crAwrnesM


The Nassau Music Society

presents

Crispian Steele-Perkins Trumpet

accompanied by

Leslie Pearson Piano



Friday
November 3"', 2006
8:00pm

GOVERNMENT
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BALLROOM

Saturday November,
4th, 2006
8:00Pm

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Tickets: Members: $25, Non-Members: $35, Students: $10
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DESPITE tension over a
powercut and noise from a
nearby 'homecoming', the
annual cultural show held by
Cat Island writers was pro-
claimed a great success.
The show, which included
skits and readings by a wide
range of Bahamian writing tal-
ent, attracted several "off-
island" as well as home-grown
writers.
Fernandez Bay resort own-
ers Anthony and Pamela Arm-
brister sponsored the event,
which was organised by Cat
Island Writers Society.
Mr and Mrs Armbrister pro-
vided incoming writers with
round-trip air transportation,
hotel accommodation, land


transportation and a tour of The
Hermitage, one of the island's
major landmarks.
Readings were given by Cat
Islanders such as Helen
Thurston, Evelyn Dean, Rev
Pandora Ingraham, Cyril Ingra-
ham, Deaconess Minerva Rolle,
Edith Williams, Paula Thurston,
Beverly Thacker, Anthony
Anderson, Garth King, Shantel
Culmer Deveaux, Alma John-
son Poitier, Pemmie Sutherland,
David Poitier, Ashley Lucy,
Veronica McKenzie ano others.
In addition, an exhibition of
published works and pho-
tographs of writers was mount-
ed on trees on the beach at New
Bight.
However, the writers com-


* THE cover for
Paul Aranha's new
book, The Island
Airman, which will
be released next
months .

plained that their
show a popular
attraction for several
years is now being
adversely affected by '
loud music from an
annual 'homecom-
ing' event.
Mrs Sylvia
Laramore-Crawford
said: "Because of the
homecoming and
very loud music
drowning out voices Paul
of performers, we
are now reduced to
a one-night event
performing for two hours only.
"Our event has been held on
the beach for years without dis-
turbance. Something has to be
done about this. uir young, the
elderly and visitors enjoy what
we do."
.To lessen the impact of the
noice, Police Inspector Ashton
Greenslade was called in super-
vise the placing of a barricade
between the two events. How-
ever, the writers claim this was
later moved.
Despite this, and a power cut,
the writers declared the show a
success and said it would be
held again next year.

FAMILY Islanders will be
interested in a new book to be
launched next month.
It is written by probably the
most familiar face in Bahami-
an flying circles Paul Aranha,
whose aviation career stretch-
es back over half a century.
The book, The Island Air-
man, includes tales of his air-
taxi service between the
Bahama islands, and anecdotes
about his dealings with royalty,
the rich and famous.
Mr Aranha was born and
raised in Nassau during the
1930s. His father, William Aran-
ha, was a senior official under
the governorship of the Duke


of Windsor during the Second
World War.
As a boarding school stu-
dent in England, Mr Aranha
began flying gliders at 16 and
gained his private pilot's
licence at 17.
Although he did some early
flying in Europe, much of his
experience was centred on his
island home, which provides
much of the material for this
book.
Mr Aranha said: "The book is
partly historical, partly
genealogical and largely to do
with flying, but very much-a
book about the.Bahamas."
The book launch will be held
at Million Air Jet Centre in
Nassau on November 22.

STILL with aviation, pilots
using Marsh Harbour airport in
Abaco remain seriously con-
cerned over runway conditions
there.
Apart from the $250,000
worth of damage done to a pri-
vate jet earlier this year when its
nosegear struck a pothole, sev-
eral other aircraft have suffered
damage, including a succession
of blown tyres.
Second-home owners who
use the airport regularly when
they fly in tromr the States are
calling for urgent action.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, MONDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2006















Venezuela and the US: oddly coupled


* By SIR RONALD
SANDERS
(The writer is a business
executive and former
Caribbean diplomat)

THE contest between
Venezuela and the
United States of America, as
the champion of Guatemala,
over a seat on the UN Secu-
rity Council was much blus-
ter. The oil relationship paints
a different picture.
In a spectacle that lasted
for days and several ballots
in the UN General Assem-
bly, Venezuela hotly fought
Guatemala and the diplo-
matic network of the US for a
non-permanent Security
Council seat.
Usually, the regional coun-
tries in this case Latin
America and the Caribbean
- would decide amongst
themselves on a candidate
and spare the General
Assembly the unpleasant task
of having to decide for them.
But, neither Guatemala
nor Venezuela would with-
draw in the Latin American
and Caribbean Group
(LACG).
They continued this pattern
in the General Assembly
after successive votes failed
to deliver the necessary two-
thirds majority to either of
them.
Guatemala should have
withdrawn from the running
when it did not secure the
endorsement of the LACG.
The Central American
country could not have want-
ed a clearer message from
member countries of the
Caribbean Community and
Common Market (CARI-
COM) who are the majority
in the LACG.
They said an emphatic
"no" to Guatemala on two
.grounds: Guatemala had
been vociferous at the World
Trade Organkisation in derail-
ing'the prterieniial access to
the European Union market
which Caribbean countries
had enjoyed for their.
bananas; and Guatemala con-
tinues to prosecute a claim to
all of the territory of Belize (a
CARICOM member state)
despite many international
efforts to end it.
Had Guatemala with-
drawn, the LACG would
have chosen a country the
majority could support -
possibly Chile or Uruguay -
and the matter would have
ended there. The selected
country, endorsed by Latin


WORLD V

American and the Caribbean,
would have taken the UN
Security Council seat auto-
matically.
Then, Venezuela entered
the arena.
Over the last few years,
diplomatic relations between
the governments of
Venezuela and the US have
deteriorated as Venezuela's
President Hugo Chavez
struck a leftist pose,, openly
fostered close personal rela-
tions with Cuba's Fidel Cas-
tro, and promoted left wing
political parties in a number
of Latin American countries.
He has vehemently
opposed the Free Trade Area
of the Americas pushed by
Washington and has attacked
both the foreign policies of
US President George W
Bush, and Mr Bush person-
ally.,
During a UN General
Assembly speech, Mr Chavez
called Mr Bush "the Devil".

T hereafter, the UN
Security Council seat
became the cause of an
unseemly diplomatic war
between Venezuela and the
US as the campaigner for
Guatemala.
. The US set out to ensure
that Venezuela would not win
the seat. Chips were called in,
and pressure applied. And, in
every count, except one
which tied, Guatemala beat
Venezuela but could not
attain the necessary two-
thirds majority to take the
seat. .
President Chavez claimed
his own defeat as a victory.
He is reported by the
A s->ci.ai|Ld PiL'- as saying
that V;ncz/ilL lIh d .IichiCi I'
its objective by preventing
Washington's preferred can-
didate from winning: the
seat. "We have taught the
Empire a lesson", he said.-
This is a sad statement, for
it suggests that in offering
Venezuela as the Latin
American and Caribbean rep-
resentative on the UN Secu-
rity Council, President
Chavez was less concerned
about the interests of the
group and more concerned
with giving the US a black
eye.


It has to be assumed that
he regarded the Security
Council seat as a forum from
which to continue attacks on
US foreign policy, particular-
ly over Iran and North
Korea.
And, if that was the objec-
tive, it would have changed
little since, as a non-perma-
nent member of the Security
Council, Venezuela would
have had no veto powers, and
in any event, on matters
which challenge international
peace and security, members ,
of the Council would have
been intolerant of rhetoric
and grandstanding.
Venezuela, in such a role,
would have found itself iso-
lated.
So, then, why was the US
so determined that Venezuela
should not get the Security
Council seat? It has to be
assumed that the powers in
Washington simply decided
to deny Mr Chavez another
stage on which to strut his
anti-Bush stuff. For,
Venezuela on the Security
Council poses no threat to the
US or to the world order.
It is clear that just as Mr
Chavez was eager tb give the
US a black eye, Mr Bush's
foreign policy advisers were
equally keen to bloody the
Venezuelan President's nose.
But, while in the first four
months of 2006, Venezuela is
reported to have sent 11.9
million barrels less of crude
and petroleum products to
the US than it did for the
same period in 2005 when it
shipped 190.1 million barrels,
it still exports 68 per cent of
its oil production to the US
whose refineries are geared
ro [i paeOssiing VerezA.iel-a-'s
h crude oil into usable
In this connection, not only
does the Venezuelan econo-
my need the US, but Mr
Chavez himself needs the US
market in order to pay for his
domestic political programme
and his regional and interna-
tional efforts to secure influ-
ence through loans for oil.
Now, it is true that Mr
Chavez has been busy open-
,ing markets in China and
India for Venezuelan
oil. Sales to China stood at
14,000 barrels a day in 2004;


i SIR Ronald Sanders


last year it rose to 80,000 bar-
rels a day. But, the higher
shipping costs to Asia are
expensive and reduce the
country's income by $3 a bar-
rel.
Not even the $10 billion
that China announced it will
pour into Venezuelan ener-
gy and infrastructure sectors
to feed its own escalating
demand for energy will break
Venezuelan reliance in the
medium term on the US mar-
ket.
The US also depends on
Venezuela which is one of its


top four suppliers of oil, somit
months surpassing Saudi Ani
bia. ,
. So, all that happened at
the UN using the candida
cy of Latin America and the
Caribbean for a seal on the
Security Council as a back-
drop is much bluster. The'
substance is in the oil rela
tionship between the US and
Venezuela and there they
remain coupled, however
oddly.
Responses to: ronald
sanders29@hotmail.com


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MONDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2006, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


<";


~sBI


I







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, MONDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2006


LOCAL NEWS


The end of the man who ended Ali


Boxer murdered in Jamaica


FROM page one
"Legally I am a spirit, I have no
age", was a journeyman heavy-
weight whose meeting with Ali
gave him an international profile.
For Ali, the basically mean-
ingless contest at Queen Eliza-
beth Sports Centre on Decem-
ber 11, 1981, was a last-gasp
attempt to accumulate money
at the end of the greatest career
in boxing history. He had
already lost his world title -
which he had held on three sep-
arate occasions to Larry
Holmes in Las Vegas in 1980.
By the time he met Berbick,
Ali was a shadow of his former
self a once-great champion who.
fought on too long. Against
Holmes and Berbick, Ali had
clearly run out of steam an old
man in boxing terms at nearly 40.
Berbick, who was originally
billed as a Canadian, though he
wasn't, held a portion of the
world title for a short time.
But his higher-than-deserved
profile rested on his perfor-
mances against two outstanding
champions his victory over Ali,
and his defeat by Mike Tyson
early in the iron man's career.
Yesterday, the Toronto Sun's


Steve Simmons said no-one who
knew Berbick was surprised by
his death."Berbick lived a con-
fusing, confounding, lawbreak-
ing life," wrote Simmons, who
said the fighter never possessed
the Canadian status he claimed.
After his retirement from the
ring, Berbick was beset by legal
woes. He served jail time and
was twice deported from the US.
The Ali-Berbick match gave
Nassau a permanent place in
boxing history. Though the
match was only a postscript to
Ali's amazing 20-year profes-
sional career, it ensured that the
Bahamas is likely to feature in
sports quizzes for eternity.
After beating Ali in 1981,
Berbick went on to win the
WBC heavyweight title four
years later with a points deci-
sion over Pinklon Thomas.
However, his reign was short,
with the 20-year-old Mike
Tyson stopping him in the sec-
ond round of their 1986
encounter to become the
youngest champion in history.
Berbick fought from 1976 to
2000, with eleven defeats and
one draw on a 50-bout record.
He also fought for Jamaica in
the 1976 Montreal Olympics.


THE murder of boxer Trevor
Berbick in Jamaica over the
weekend stirred memories of a
contest in Nassau 25 years ago,
when the greatest champion of
all bowed to the ravages of
time...
* By JOHN MARQUIS
IT was called the "Drama in
Bahama" or "The Last Hur-
rah." In truth, there was not
much drama and precious, little
to cheer about.
Muhammad Ali's last profes-
sional fight, staged at the Queen
Elizabeth Sports Centre in Nas-
sau on December 11, 1981, was
the final flourish from the great-
est boxer of all time.
After the so-so Jamaican
Trevor Berbick beat him on
points, Ali said resignedly; "I
came out all right for an old
man. We all lose sometimes.
We all grow old."
In truth, Ali's career had
effectively finished a year
before when I watched him
being used as a heavy bag by
Larry Holmes in Las Vegas.
A sagging, exhausted replica
of his old self, Ali was hauled
from the ring like a sack of
cement a.once dazzling ath-
lete whose halcyon days had


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long since passed.
It could be argued that he
was, by most people's reckon-
ing, finished three years before
that when a heavy hitter called
Earnie Shavers blitzed his brain
cells at Madison Square Gar-
den in New York.


Before that fight, Ali's for-
mer ringside doctor Ferdie
Pacheco told me: "I couldn't
stay with him anymore. I
can't see someone I love so
much destroy himself in the
ring."
The man who once would


"float like a butterfly, sting like
a bee" was no longer floating
and barely stinging by the time
. Shavers had finished with him.
Although Ali won the fight,
he should have called it a day
after taking Shavers' bomb-
blasts, retreated to his Pennsyl-
vania ranch and counted his
money.
The trouble was there wasn't
much money left. With a string
of divorces behind him, massive
amounts of alimony and child
maintenance to pay, and the
bruising financial demands of
his Black Muslim handlers, Ali
was still struggling financially
after a decade and a half at the
top.
Hence, he was tempted into
the ill-advised Holmes match
and, finally, the farcical
Berbick encounter, which
proved nothing except that Ali
was washed-up and so far gone
that he barely resembled the
champ of old.
Not long before, I was among
a group from the London Box-
ing Writers Club who met Ali at
his Dorchester Hotel suite with
the express purpose of dissuad-
ing him from fighting on.
Having travelled the world in
his wake, recording the wit and
wonder of this extraordinary
man, the last thing we wanted to
witness was his destruction or
even death- in the ring.
Despite our entreaties,
though, Ali fought on, primari-
ly because he needed the mon-
ey and the enormous adrenalin
rush he got from being centre-
stage.
Ali was more than a fighter.
He was a showman, an enter-
tainer. Too bad for him that,
unlike old troupers of the stage,
who could sing on into their
eighties, his discipline was the
potentially lethal trade of
pugilism.

Advice

"Get out now," we urged,
"while you've still got your
mind." He ignored the well-
intentioned advice of his friends
and paid the price.
Before entering the ring
. against Berbick, he said: "I
thought I should go out of box-
ing with a win or, if not a win,
at least throwing punches."
Berbick, though, was still in
his twenties. Ali was nearing
40, which is ancient by boxing
standards. Whatever his tech-
nical qualities, he was always
going to struggle against a
strong heavyweight in the first
flush of youth.
Behind the scenes, promoter
Don King was battling with the
Nation of Islam for a slice of
Berbick's purse. The Muslims,
meanwhile, were hangling in
there for a final slice off the cash
cow called Ali.
Berbick, following his brief
period as champion, finally
bowed out of boxing in 2000
when a bloodclot was found on
his brain. His licence was with-
drawn and he left the ring to
face the rest of what was to
prove a tempestuous life.
Almost up to his death,
Berbick had trouble with the
law. In 1992, he served five
years in a Florida jail for sexu-
ally assaulting the family baby-
sitter. In 1997, he violated
parole and was deported from
the United States. Five years
later, he was deported again
after his troubles escalated.
His death over the weekend
ended a turbulent life of strife
and trouble. But, to the end, he
was proud to be "the man who
ended the career of Muham-
mad Ali."
Meaningless as it was, he
wore that achievement like a
badge of honour.


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THF TRIBUNE M Y O


0OANW


New attorneys called to Bahamas Bar


TWENTY-SEVEN new attor-
neys were officially called to the
Bahamas Bar on Friday at the
National Centre for the Perform-
ing Arts.
Pictured in the front row after
the ceremony, from left to right
are: Clara R Taylor Bell, Daniel-
la Deborah Knowles, Tracy Anne
Wlls, Fern Lynette Bowleg,
Michelle Lagloria Ryan, Joan
Natasha Fritz, Cordell Falincia
Frazier, Claudia Louise King,
Joseph Jermore D-Arceuil, Terry
Goldwind Archer, Sandena Olivia
Mortimer, Erica Incia Kemp,
George Tevaughn Carey, Simone
Morgan-Gomez, Mr Justice Faizo-
ol Mohammed, Chief.Justice Sir
Burton Hall, Ch6-Toussaint
Chase, Pavia Catherine Crossgill,
Kenria Lynette Smith, Kirkland
Danford Mackey, Lakeisha Nicole
Strachan, Sophia P Thompson-
Williams, Chaunece Monette Fer-
guson, Carlene Denise Farquhar-
son, Peter James P Maillis, Casti-
no D Akeem Sands, Damara
Letisha Dillett, Leon Eddison
Bethel, Allen Ezekiel Emmanuel.
(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)


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Monday, November 6th


Tuesday, November 7th


Wednesday, November 8th


Thursday, November 9th


9:00 9:15 Prayer & Opening Ceremony
Opening of Accountants' Week -
9:15-10:10 Overview of Bahamian Economy
IFRS Technical Update Proposed National Health Insurance Plan The
Government Initiatives to Minimize Business Failures Accounting Standards Pitfalls of Business Management Facts
Hon. Vincent A. Pcet, MlP- ithihr ofFinii h hid SLrvices & Mr. Franklin Wilson, CA- Principal, FR Wilson Mr SianleyvLalta- Project .ti;agir, ThiAo /l
Investments Ernst & Young Co. Ltd, Health Insurance Implementation Scheme. NIB
10:10 10:20 Church Service Break Break Break
Christ Church IFRS Technical Update- Dynamic Changes Affecting The Financial Budgets, Projections & Forecasts Steps &
10:20 -11:15 Cathedral BAIC- Steps Involved in Obtaining a Grant Accounting Standards Services Sector Procedures
11:00AM- 1:00 Mr. Sean Bain, CA- Pri ipa1 lSR. Bain &
PM Mr. Michael Halkitis, MP Chairman BAIC Ernst & Young Ms. Wendy Warren, CA -CEO BFSB Associates
11:15 11:20 Break Break Break
The Impact of The Central Bank Guidelines for Role of The Bahamas Entrepreneurial Venture
11:20 -12:15 Creating a Professional Business Plan External Auditors Capital Fund
Mr. Michael Foot Inspector ofBanks & Trusts
Companies, The Central Bank
IFRS Technical Update Mr. Claude Haylock Head of Policy, The Central Mr Jerome Gominez Managing Director, Gomes
Mr. Lmawrence Lewis, CA Partner, Deloitte & Touche Accounting Standards Bank Corporate Management Inc
12:15-12:30 Induction of New Members into BICA Ernst & Young Issuance of New Licenses BICA Council Reports to Members

12:30- 1:45 Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch
IFRS Technical Update Going Public In The Bahamas Steps &
1:45- 2:35 What Makes an Accounting System Effective? Accounting Standards Procedures Liquidations The Accountant's Role
Mr. David Slatter, CFA Manager, Investments &
Mr. Peter Rutherford, CA. CIA -Principal, inip/lirud '4unLini Corporate Finance, Fidelity M.4h hant Bank &
Solutions Ernsti-e&4oung--- Trust Ms. Maria Ferere, CA Partner, FT Consultants
2:35 2:40 Break Break
IFRS Technical Update Mergers and Acquisitions Valuation Dynamics
2:40 3:30 The Public Accountant's Act 1991 and Proposed Changes Accounting Standards in The Bahamas & Caribbean Leading through Failure toward Opportunity
Mr. Simon Townend, CA, FCA, CF- Partner, Dr. David Allen, MD. MPD Psychiatrist,
Mr. Lambert Longley, CA Partner, KPMG Bahamas Ernst & Young KPMG Renascence Institute Int'l
3:30 3:35 Break Break
Ireased Trading With China & Panama- Pros & Cons for Financial IFRS Technical Update -
3:35 4:25 Services Sector Accounting Standards Mergers and Acquisitions An Overview
Sen. Hon. Philip Galanis, CA, JP Managing
Mrs. Tanya Wright President, Bahamas Chamber of Commerce Ernst & Young Partner, Galanis & Co.
4:25-4:30 Closing Remarks Closing Remarks Closing Remarks


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MONDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2006, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


I 1





THIE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12. MONDAY. OCTOBER 30, 2006


SAL


The Royal Bahamas


Defence Force assists


one of its own


THE Royal Bahamas
Defence Force has come to
:he assistance to one of its
own.
With the help of officers
and marines, Sub Lieu-
tenant Judy McDonald was
presented with a cheque to
a elp defray medical costs
and personal expenses.
The 15-year veteran
Defence Force officer, who
has been ill for several
months, is receiving med-


ical attention in the United
States.
Accepting the cheque on
behalf of Sub Lieutenant
McDonald was her hus-
band Mr Neil Benjamin,
who expressed his grati-
tude to the entire Defence
Force for their prayers and
contributions.
Pictured are Acting Cap-
tain Raymond Farquhar-
son, Captain Coral Har-
bour presenting a cheque


to Mr Neil Benjamin at the
Defence Force Coral Har-
bour Base.
Mr Benjamin is accept-
ing the donation on behalf
of his wife, Sub Lieutenant
Judy McDonald, who is
receiving medical attention
abroad.

(RBDF photo:
Leading Seaman
Jonathan Rolle)


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T IRLiMO31


FROM page one
kind of people he has around
him.
"Instead of leading them, he
has been hopelessly and will-
ingly misled by them," the
FNM said.
According to those direct-
ly involved, Bahamian
lawyer Tracy Ferguson did
indeed take the cheque to
Ms Smith's house at her
request and Mr Gibson was
there waiting for it. Ms
Smith looked at the cheque
when it was delivered and
then passed it on to the min-
ister. The minister put it in
his pocket.
Most of this happened in
Ms Smith's home in the
evening several hours after
government offices had
closed for the day.
"Both the prime minister


and the minister have yet to
explain how they could
come to the conclusion that
this woman was a fit and
proper person to be given
such a privileged status in
The Bahamas in the first
place.
"By no stretch of the
imagination does she quali-
fy to be- categorised as an
investor and the description
of her as a celebrity does
grave injury to that word,"
the FNM said.
Recent public revelations
show that the house which
figured in the approval of
her application is not owned
by her, that she never put
down money to buy it, that
she wanted the house as a
gift, that she refused to sign
a mortgage so she could get
the conveyance, and that the
conveyance, though signed


and sealed, was not deliv-
ered.
A copy of a conveyance
was found in the files of the
Immigration Department,
even though the lawyers say
they didn't send it to the
department, the FNM
alleged.
"So in the light of all this
we ask the question thou-
sands of Bahamians are also
asking: Why is Shane Gib-
son still a Cabinet minister
in the government of The
Bahamas? And the same
could be asked about sever-
al other PLP ministers," the
FNM said.


E ANNA NICOLE
SMITH (AP FILE Photo)
and Minister of Immigra-
tion Shane Gibson


Available


Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


from Commercial ews Providers


Police reportedly take


naked woman from


home and keep her for


hours in waiting room


FROM page one
going on.
"That officer grabbed me
by my arm and threw me out-
side bald-naked. I had no
clothes, no bra and no panties.
The whole of Englerston
watched the police drag me
into the police car with just a
piece of towel. When the tow-
ekdropped I was exposed. The
whole of Englerston was
watching me," she said.
Ms Lubin was taken to The
Grove Police Station where
she was later charged with
resisting arrest. But before
that happened she said she
spent. hours naked in the sta-
tion, most of the time in the
waiting room.
"My hands were cuffed and
I had a towel wrapped round
me I could not even hold.
They did not let me sit in a
cell. Anyone who walked into
that station took a good look
at me," she said.
While she said she believed
police only charged her with
resisting arrest because they
had no other reason to hold
her at the station, she did
admit trying to get back into
the house after the officer,
threw her out because she was
naked and terrified.
"When he took me and
threw me out of the house
with just a piece of towel on,
where could I go? When I
went to walk back in the
house he pushed me back out.
If you had seen the condition
I was in in that station...if they
wanted to arrest me they
could have given me the
chance to get some clothes,"
she said.
After some time waiting at
the station, she said a con-
cerned citizen asked police
why they did not give her
clothes to put on. It was at that
moment, Ms Lubin said, when
police offered to take her
home to get some clothing.
"I told them 'np sir, I am
not going anywhere. You will
take me to court just like
this'," she said.
Ms Lubin said she took the
position out of principle
because of what the incident
did to her children.
"When they barged into the
house I went into living room
where my two children were
and I said that it was OK,
because they are afraid of the
police, but when they saw the
officer grab me they started
screaming," she said.
Ms Lubin maintains that she
has never harmed her
boyfriend's grandmother in
any way. "This is an 81-year-
old lady how can I disrespect
her?" she said.
Police told The Tribune yes-
terday that they will be inves-
tigating the claims.


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The 'dI.I -ItImCiIr n.11ul staff of UBS iBh:i noI T.rd., congritlti-s
Mrs. Geri-maine Simimons-Dean on receiving the.Achiever of the Year
honor at the Bahamnas Financial Services Industry .L -ell-nce AWaIrds
Ceremony.
















Pictured from left: Daniel Brandenberger, Human Resources
Director, Germaine Simmons-Dean, Richard Voswinckel CEO,
Sandro Steiner, European Desk Head



Mrs. Simmons-Dean has been working with the E u.1 pe.in Desk in the
Bahamas for five years. Sihe- has proven to be an excellent ream player, is
always happy to share know-how and knowledge with others and has
therefore become the first point of contact for new team members. Her
sound understanding of client needs, the client focus in her daily work
and outstanding service levels have made her a key employee on the
Desk and a key contact for clients.

We thank Germaine for her commitment and loyalty and congratulate
her on receiving this prestigious award.


FNM hits out over handling




of Anna Nicole Smith issue


MONDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2006,'PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


IEBNr


---$Ei~e~isL--- (












Haiti making small


steps toward stability,


but challenges remain


INTRODUCING





THE ALL



NEW





NISSAN TIIDA


* PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti
YOUNG men with pistols
roam the fetid slums of Haiti's.
capital but now many are
looking for jobs instead of vic-
tims. Children in checkered uni-
forms walk to school on dusty
streets where stray bullets used
to whiz past, according toAsso-
ciated Press.
Five months into Haiti's latest
attempt at democracy, small but
important improvements.have
pulled the Caribbean nation
from the brink of collapse. Per-
haps most notably, an unprece-
dented wave of kidnapping
that terrorized Haitians rich and
poor finally seems to be leveling
off.
Only a year ago, Haiti was
engulfed in violence that began
with the February 2004 rebel
uprising that toppled President
Jean-Bertrand Aristide. Hun-
dreds, possibly thousands, died
in almost daily clashes among
well-armed gangs, former
rebels, rogue police and U.N.
peacekeepers.
Today, a new government led
by elected President Rene
Preval has passed a budget,
begun to collect taxes, raised
$750 million in foreign aid and
launched a campaign to disarm
hundreds of gangsters.
The economy is starting to
show small but encouraging
signs of life. Double-digit infla-
tion that soared after the revolt
is starting to fall, while vital cash
sent home by Haitians working
abroad has increased and over-
all growth is expected to reach
2.5 percent this year.
"It's a very different place
today," U.S. Ambassador Janet
A. Sanderson told The Associ-
ated Press. "There are some
real accomplishments and some
real things that, when looked at
over a year, are encouraging.
Peace and stability are far
from assured. Huge challenges
remain, from employing hun-
gry slum dwellers and rebuild-
ing shvaxtied infrastructure to
equiping, Haicis outgunned
police,.,


Kidnappings appear

to be levelling off


"This is a country where
almost everything is broken,"
Sanderson said.
A drive across the capital,
along streets known for giant
potholes, underscores her point.
Street children with swollen
bellies beg for money, crying
"I'm hungry" in Creole as they
cluster around stopped cars.
Few Haitians have electricity or
running water. Jobs are scarce.
Acrid black smoke rises day and
night from burning tires thrown
on trash heaps.
Haiti ranked 153rd out of 177
countries in the U.N.'s most
recent report on global quality
of life, behind Sudan and Zim-
babwe and ahead of .countries
including Nigeria, Congo and
Sierra Leone. A recent World
Bank report lists Haiti as one
of 26 states at risk of collapse.
But buoyed by its modest
progress, the government is
wooing foreign investors, even
touting Haiti as a Caribbean
vacation spot.
"There is some kind of win-
dow of opportunity. and the
sense of stability that the coun-
try: has some future," said
Edmond Mulet, the U.N. spe-
cial envoy to Haiti. "It's still a
fragile situation. I wouldn't say
we've turned a corner yet, but I
think in the next months we'll
be able to assume that, hope-
fully."
The key will be security.
After the revolt, gangs loyal
to Aristide launched a wave of
killings and kidnapping aimed
at destabilizing a U.S.-backed
interim government, which was
accused of persecuting Aristide
supporters. Everyone was a
potential victim from foreign
missionaries to security guards
to former first lady Lucienne
Heurtelou Estime, an elderly
widow shot to death at a jewel-
ry store in Nlay.
The number of reported kid-


nappings fell from about 80 in
August to half that last month,
Mulet said. Officials attribute
the decrease to government-led
negotiations with gangs and
increased police and U.N.
patrols.
Last month the government
unveiled a U.N.-administered
program to disarm up to 1,000
low-level gangsters in exchange
for food grants, civics courses
and training for such jobs as
mechanics and electricians.
So far, 109 Haitians have
been enrolled, Mulet said, and
dozens of weapons recovered.
"We must disarm to have
peace," said Alix Fils-Aime,
who leads the national disar-
mament commission. "It's a
make-or-break situation. If we
don't do it, the whole country
will drown in criminality."
But gang leaders wanted for
murder and oth,-r serious
crimes aren't eligible for the
program, and Haitians fear gang
members will return to kidnap-
ping if they don't get jobs, which
are scarce.
On, a recent day in the
sprawling Cite Soleil slum, three
young gang members sat out-
side a squat cinderblock house
complaining.
"A lot of people here are
hungry," Richard Jean-Baptiste
said, adding that he'd like to
work as a trucker. The other
men nodded in agreement.
"We need jobs. The new gov-
ernment promised us help, but
we're still waiting,"' said Joseph
Jean, 27, who claimed to be
broke even though he wore
expensive sneakers and a cell
phone clipped to his designer
jeans.
He said he surrendered a pis-
tol but has yet to hear if he will
be accepted into the U.N. pro-
gram.
". We're giving over the guns,"
he said. "Now we want peace."


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NOTICE OF VACANCY

For

Information Technology Manager

A vacancy exists at the Port Group Limnited for a qualified and experienced Infcrriation
Technology Manager The position reports to the Group Financial Controller.

The IT Manager manages the information technology department in accordance with
organizational policies and goals and keeps the computer equipment, hardware and software
Jpdated to meet organizational needs, Also, position oversees the Sage ACCPAC for windows
Accounting system, the Sage ACCPAC HR system, Local and Wide Area Communication
Systems, Microsoft Acive Directory Services, Printer Services, Microsoft Exchange/Outlook E-
Mail Services, Cisco Firewall Security Systems. Cisco Routing Services, Anti-Virus and SPAM
Filtering Services, Tape Backup System, and Microsoft-Ctiiix Remote Terminal Serices

The successful candidate must have the following:

* Proven experience in IT infrastructure planning and development.
* Demonstrated ability to apply IT in solving business problems.
* Ability to conduct and direct research into IT issues and products.
* Extensive experience working in a team-oriented, collaborative environment.
* Application support experience with Sage ACCPAC for windows.
* Extensive experience working with Windows 2003 Server with Active Directory network.
* Extensive experience working with Microsoft Exchange 2003.
* Strong technical knowledge of Microsoft SQL Server 2000.
* Strong technical knowledge of MS Office 2003 (Word, Excel, PowerPoint; Access).
Extensive experience working with CISCO routers; CISCO switches, CISCO firewalls, virus
protection and backup applications.
* Excellent customer relation skills,

Desirable qualifications:

* Bachelor's degree from four year college or university in the field of computer science or at
least 8 years related work experience.
* Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE) Certification.
* Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) Certification.
* Nortel phone switch administration skills.
* Citrix Certified Administrator (CCA) Certification.

Very competitive salary plus benefits package.

Resumes with supporting documentation should be submitted to:

The Personnel Department
The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited
P.O. Box F-42666
Freeport, Grand Bahama, or
..personnel@gbpa.com
on or before November 3.2006


I I


PAGE 14, MONDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2006.


THE TRIBUNE


* ^f-771:"


~usaam ~





THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, OC1 IOBLA 30, 2006, PAGE 15









Bahasna'sS






*^^^ Novmbe 2nI :0a hitteKn o
own Diana
Sw anni






F LO
EAL

VO(JUR OPINION
COUNTS!
W e want' to"






November 2nd 6:30 at Christ the King for
subscribers with phone numbers
beginning with 351, 352, 353, 373and 374w
November 3rd 6:30pm at Eight Mile Rock High for
subscribers with 346 and 348 phone numbers
o SIX Hear from the Chairman and Executives of BTC
Switch your host for the evening, Diana Swann.

tf/wnei


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THE TRIBUNE


AP GE 16 MONDAY OCTOBER 3 2006


John Rood

thanks

volunteers

in reading

initiative
AMBASSADOR Rood and Milton Lewis,
IN January, 2004, principal at E P Roberts Primary School
soon after his arrival
in The Bahamas as
United States
ambassador, John
Rood embarked on
a reading
programme for
Bahamian
schoolchildren.
In an expression
of thanks and
appreciation to
those who have
contributed to the
.,i",\ e iB M f "'"""nl*""1"1 1>1 *
success of the AMBASSADOR Rood and Yvonne Foulk
programmenpals vice-principal, Queen's College Primary Scho
including principals
and administrators,'
teachers, celebrity
readers and embassy
volunteers, Mr Rood
hosted a reception in
their honour at his
Sasidford Drive
residence on
October 25.
School principals
were presented with
the Laura Bush
letter and
photograph at this E AMBASSADOR Rood and Lillian Culmer
event. nrncintal at Sadie Curtis Primary School


a..Ha


'rdware
irdware,.^ -: ^-


* AMBASSADOR Rood and William Schlei,
humanities teacher at Lyford Cay School


es,
ol


*


Whee can I


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value on


home products?


AM ; F. I 4


SANYO ee


SAMIBASSADOR Rood and Deborah Stewart.
principal at Ridgeland Primary School


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16 kw silet diesel goewtors $6,580.00
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p AMBASSADOR Rood and Ellen Daniels.
principal at St Thomas More Primary School
U WI N


Buyer Beware


A counterfeit batik product is now being marketed
as Androsla.This copycat product is not Androsla,

and not a Bahamian product. Androsia is the

original Bahamian batik, proviqng jibs for


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p,--%-Ial L OX -- -


1


3





THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2006, PAGE 17
.", r~


a:fi fleu


~.- ,,~,--


Ai


It's time your money worked harder for you, and we
have EXACTLY what you're looking for. A
FirstCaribbean Income Escalator fixed deposit account
offers you competitive rates of return on your money,
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Start an Income Escalator account with a minimum deposit
of $10,000 and get:

* Example
You Invest Our Income Escalator
$10,000 Year 1 $10,391.25
Year 2 $10,850.84
Year 3 $11,361.26
Year 4 511,918.97
Year 5 $12,519.31

*Based on six months compounding and investment for
the duration of the period, rates from 3.75% to 5%.

EXTRA BENEFITS FOR A LIMITED TIME:
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Come in and find out more about FirstCaribbean
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Bay Street 326-0327
FirstCo 326-5044
Harbour Bay 393-2334
Hurricane Hole 363-3588
JFK Drive 323-2422
Marathon Mall 393-4386
Palmdale 322-8824
SandyPort 327-8361
Shirley Street 322-8455
Thompson Blvd 323-6062


Abaco
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367-2167


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PAGE 18 MONDA, OCTOBRT30,A006OTHETRIBUN


FREE Health

Seminar
at New Providence Community Centre


Available from Commercial Newsi Providers


Cmw Pfl






MaM



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i 'U


Q. WE ARE CELEBRATING WITH YOU TWENTY YEARS OF SERVICE; WHAT MOTIVATED YOU TO
COME AND JOIN THE CBL TEAM 20 YEARS AGO?
A. My dear departed father put me in his place here and I try my best to walk in his
-footsteps and learn different things from CBL everyday.

Q. WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR MOTIVATION YEAR AFTER YEAR?
A. MA motn'atiul year after year was interacting with new team members and managers.
'It was a ioy meeting different people and learning different things.

Q. COMMONWEALTH BREWERY HAS GROWN OVER THE YEARS, DO YOU FEEL THAT YOU WERE ,
AFFORDED THE OPPORTUNITY TO GROW WITH THE COMPANY? IF YES,IN WHICH WAYS?
A. Yes, my time uias well spent with the company. I learned and grew .ery strong within
my department.


.am 1be eam and advantage of everything
you can eaad ahe at


U-


CO Q. COMMONWEALTH BREWERY HAS GONE THROUGH Q.
| MANY MANAGEMENT TEAM CHANGES OVER THE YEARS. TH
WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR EXPERIENCE IN DEALING WITH 1 HL A.
DIFFERENT CULTURES AND PERSONALITIES THAT HAVE BEEN yet
| REPRESENTED OVER THE PAST 10 YEARS? WHAT HAS BEEN'
YOUR MOST FAVORABLE EXPERIENCE' Q.
A. My most f-orable experience was learning we are all CO
C different people aud ice came to learn and respect each EXP
Others cultures and personalities. A.
eve
Q.. WHAT H BEEN YOLuRCAREER PATH WHILE AT CBL? 1o
S DETAIL YOUR JOURNEY.
A. I have always wanted ic become an Engineer and I Q.
hope to become Cluef Engineer one day at CBL. I am ov
presently and hare been ai line technician. A.
it ..
> Q. WHAT HAVE YOU ENJOYED MOST OVER THE YEARS?
A. Over the years I enjoyed the seminars, the events and Co
the hard work. I 'enjoy meeting new members ofstaff and I FO.
enjoy working here at CBL for 20 years. IN
c: KEE
Q. WOULD YOU RECOMMEND COMMONWEALTH BREWERY
TO UP AND COMING HIGH POTENTIALS FOR EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY? WHAT IS CBL'S STRONGEST SELLING POINT
FROM YOUR PERSPECTIVE? -. .
A Yes 1 would recommend C &L potentials for
p em ynent lpporpunity:; CRI's hgest selling point to
ane is- JHeneke?' -'m -


~uw w-


.WHERE DO YOU ENVISION THE COMPANY GOING IN
E YEARS THAT LIE AHEAD?
I [Ala/lai /Reckley] e'nvision this unompany in the
rs that lie ahead with even more success.

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO YOUR
LEAGUES THAT WOULD FURTHER ENHANCE THEIR CBL
PERIENCE?
My advice would be to learn and take advantage of
erything that you can learn and achieve at CBL. Hard
rk here pays off in the end for you and your family.


HINDSIGHT BEING 20/20, WOULD YOU DO IT ALL
ER AGAIN?
Yes I would and I wouldn't change anything beca
ivas a blessing being here.

NGRATULATIONS ON YOUR PERSEVERANCE,
RTITUDE. FORTHRIGHTNESS AND A POSITIVE ATTITI
zo20 YEARS AT CBL.


Copyrighted Material


SyndicatedContent


Diabetes
Wednesday 1 November
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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 18, MONDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2006







MONDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2006, PAGE 19


THE TRIBUNE


I 'TFRNATIO[AL NEWS I


ii hI&O li h tdutru h Ihi iihi4 ht'1 Honwith little ?otai MhitriuluiTt tgtt(M



Copyrighted Material a ifi jo j o I


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VACANCY FOR FINANCIAL OFFICER

EDUCATION LOAN AUTHORITY
The Education Loan Authority is a quasi government corporation established under the Education Loan
Authority Act 2002, charged with the responsibilities of raising monies for the Education Loan Guarantee
scheme established under the Education Guarantee Fund Act 2001
Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals to fill the position of Financial Officer
in the Education Loan Authority on a three (3) years contractual basis.
QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE:-
Bachelor's Degree in Business, (with a major in accounting);
At least five (5) years job experience in accounting;
Knowledge and ability to apply accounting;
A formal accounting designation will be an asset;
ESSENTIAL DUTIES, RESPONSIBILITIES AND SKILL INCLUDES:-
Review and analyze financial reports provided by our agent and affiliated committee;
Provide overall direction for accounting, budget and cash forecast;
S Prepare and post journal entries;
Reconcile accounts;
Coordinate the annual external audit;
Any other job that may be assigned from time to time by the Board or the Chief
Administrative Officer;
The position reports to: The Chief Administrative Officer
The Salary range for the post is $30,900 x 700 $37,600 per annum.
Interested persons are invited to submit a cover letter, resume and documentary evidence of
qualifications and three (3) references to the Education Loan Authority, P.O. Box SS-19039
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline: November 10, 2006
No telephone calls will be accepted







Conservation Finance Specialist Job Opportunity


Bahamas Nation.il rumst seeks b fill 1 a 0o-% ear contract position of a Conservation Finance Specialist.

Primary Responsibility: To develop and implement the National SN stem of Protected Areas Sustainable
Finance Plan for the Bahamas which:
Includes a cost inm;ile .f the protected Aeas creation. consolidation and management needs over
10 year time horizon;
Idenillle e\istini Iundinu sources and financial gap of the protected area system;
Identilies and priuriti/es sustainable conservation linance mechanisms for tilling the financial gap.
Identifies fiscal and policy reforms necessary to implement the sustainable finance mechanisms
Includes a miulti- ear actiotil pljn for implementation.


Position location: BNT Headquarters. Nassau


Reports to: E\ecutive Director


Primary Tasks:
Work closely ilt stalY from the Bahamas National Trust, the Bahamas Environment Science and .
Technology (BEST) Commission, the Ministr) of Agriculture and Marine Resources, and the Nature
Conservincy (and other overruniLnial and non-governmental agencies as needed) to develop and
implement the National System of Protected Area Sustainable Finance Plan for the Bahamas.
WithI 6 iimoiiItis coinplete first draft of National System ofProtected Areas Sustainable Finance Plan
Within 9 months complete final draft of Plan
Within 24 months develop and implement, at a minimum, the three highest leverage (highest return on
investment and lowest implementation barriers) sustainable finance mechanisms as identified within the
Plan

Primary Skills Required:
Excellent written and verbal skills.
Finance or related bachelor's degree, Master's degree preferred.
Demonstrated knowledge of public policy development and sustainable finance mechanisms.
Experience in researching and securing grants, particularly from public sector donors, a major plus.
Minimum five years related work experience.
Demonstrated ability to organize time, manage diverse activities, meet deadlines and attention to details.
Proven administrative skills.
Excellent knowledge of MS Office, Word, Excel, Power Point and the Internet.
Willingness to work long hours to meet tight deadlines.

To apply: Email or send: 1) cover letter, 2) resume, 3) telephone numbers and email addresses for three
professional references, and 4) two writing samples to bnt@bahamasnationaltrust.org or Bahamas National
Trust Human Resources Manager, P.O. B x N4105, Nassau by November 10,2006.


Prophetic Breakthrough Revival/Conference 2006




Prophetic Deliverance Sessions
Mid-day Services Thurs. & Fri. 12:30 pm
Saturday morning at 8:00 am
Believers Faith Outreach Ministries Int'I Carmichael Rd. (west)
Nassau, Bahamas


Speakers Include:


Prophetess Mattie Nottage
Nassau, Bahamas
g Host/Speaker


III II I.
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PAGE 20, MONDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


INTERNATIONAL


Reports: South


Korea monitoring


movements at the


North's suspected


nuclear site


* SEOUL, South Korea
SOUTH KOREAN and
U.S. officials are monitoring
the construction of a new build-
ing and other activities at a sus-
pected North Korean nuclear
site, trying to determine if the
communist country is planning
a second test detonation, news
reports said Saturday, accord-
ing, to Associated Press.
South Korea is keeping a
close watch on the movement
of trucks and soldiers at the
Punggye-ri site in the North
Korea's remote northeast,
Yonhap news agency report-
ed, citing several unidentified
military officials.
One official, however, said a
second test was "not believed
to be imminent."
"We are closely monitoring
to see if these are preparations
for a second nuclear test,"
another official was quoted as
saying.
Site
South Korea has also detect-
ed a new building being erect-
ed at the site, the JoongAng
Ilbo newspaper reported, cit-
ing unidentified government
officials.
Separate U.S. and South
Korean studies have detected
abnormal radiation in air sam-
ples, confirming the North has
conducted a nuclear test. The
South Korean government has
pointed to Punggye-ri as a
place where the North most
likely have conducted the
underground blast.
"Intelligence agencies from
South Korea and the United


States are trying to confirm
whether this new building is
connected to another nuclear
test," an official was quoted as
saying.
It was not immediately clear
how military officials first spot-
ted the activities at the site.
However, the United States
and South Korea generally
share intelligence information
from satellite images.
South Korea's Defense Min-
istry said it could not confirm
the reports.
The U.S. State Department
refused to comment. Pentagon
spokesman Air Force Maj.
David Smith said, "We don't
discuss intelligence issues as a
matter of policy."
There have been several
reports of suspicious activity at
Punggye-ri since North Korea's
Oct. 9 underground nuclear
test.
But South Korean officials
have said they have received
no intelligence reports sug-
gesting another test is immi-
nent.
South Korean Foreign Min-
ister Ban Ki-moon the
incoming U.N. secretary-gen-
eral met with Chinese lead-
ers Friday to discuss sanctions
against the North over the test.
South Korea's Foreign Min-
istry said it had no information
about the outcome of the talks.
Seoul and Beijing have been
reluctant to enforce a U.N.
Security Council resolution
that calls for sanctions on the
North, fearing they might
aggravate their volatile neigh-
bor and destabilize the. region,',
China and South Korea are
the North's main aid providers
and trade partners, and their


participation is considered cru-
cial for the success of the U.N.
resolution, which bans the sale
of major arms to the North and
calls for the inspection of cargo
entering and leaving the coun-
try.
In a report Friday, the World
Food Program warned that the
U.N. resolution may deter
countries from making food
donations to North Korea,
where millions are believed to
have died of hunger in the past
decade.
Missiles
South Korea suspended its
regular humanitarian aid of
rice and fertilizer to its impov-
erished neighbor after the
North test-fired a barrage of
missiles in July. Supplies from
China have also shrunk to one- -
third of last year's levels, the
WFP has said.
The United States, mean-
while, reiterated its position
that it will not negotiate with
the North until the reclusive
state returns to six-nation talks
on its nuclear ambitions.
North Korea has refused to
return to negotiations unless
Washington lifts financial
restrictions imposed on
Pyongyang. It has also been
pushing for bilateral talks with
Washington.
State Department
spokesman Sean McCormack
said Friday that Washington
would be willing to hold one-
on-oRne talks with North Korea
only if it returns to the'six-par1'
ty negotiations, which' also
involve South Korea, China,
Russia and Japan.


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MONDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2006, PAGE 21


THE TRIBUNE


Researchers: damage



to coral reefs threatens



tourism dependent -



national economies


* CHARLOTTE AMALIE,
U.S. Virgin Islands
A RAPID decline in the
world's coral reefs could
damage economies that rely
on underwater sea life for
tourism revenue, researchers
said Friday, according to
Associated Press.
Tourists spend billions of
dollars each year on hotels
and tours to experience the
marine habitats in areas
including the Caribbean,
Australia and the Pacific
islands.
SBut that money could dry
up, as record amounts of
coral have died off in the
Caribbean and Pacific from
pollution, overfishing and ris-
,ing sea temperatures since
the late 1990s, according to
scientists at the biannual
meeting of the multination-
al Coral Reef Task Force.
"You cannot separate the
environment and the econo-
my. They are one," said Billy
Causey, a regional director
of the U.S. National Oceanic
and Atmospheric Adminis-
tration's marine sanctuaries.
Studies show greenhouse
gases from the burning of
fossil fuels are increasing the
ocean's acidity, making it
harder for coral to grow and
reproduce.
Nearly 500 million people
depend on coral reefs for
tourism income and coastal
protection, and about 30 mil-,
liopn of those rely on coral-
reefs 'for their food, according
to a 2004 report on the status
of coral reefs worldwide com-
missioned by the Australian
government.
"The people who wash the
bed linens in the hotels are
starting to realize their life
depends on the health of the
coral reefs," said Andrew
Skeat, executive director of


the Great Barrier Reef
Marine Park Authority.
Tourism is the fastest grow-
ing major industry in the
world, and ecotourism
accounts for 20 percent of the
worldwide market, according
to the Australian report.
In the Florida Keys, mil-
lions of tourists spend $1.2
billion annually to see or
catch fish and other under-
sea life, Causey said at the
meeting in St. Thomas, where
nearly 200 researchers from
the Caribbean, Florida and
U.S. Pacific islands gathered.
"Some of our reefs receive
more dives than anywhere in
the world," he said. "In
South Florida, the environ-


ment and the economy are
inextricably linked.
"You cannot separate the
two."
Causey encouraged offi-
cials in Florida to ban fish-
ing in broad swaths of water;
a move he said would help
coral grow.
Australia's government has
banned fishing along a third
of the Great Barrier Reef,
which generates $3.9 billion
in annual tourism revenue.
The measure has helped the
world's largest reef bounce
back from abnormally warm
seas in 1998 and 2002, when
more then half the reef was
damaged and 5 percent died,
Skeat said.


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PAGE 22, MONDAY, OCTOBE 30,206THOTRBW


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Sri Lankan peace



talks end in



deadlock over



road blockade


* GENEVA
THE Sri Lankan government
and Tamil Tiger rebels failed to
reach a breakthrough in a new
round of peace talks that ended
Sunday in an atmosphere cloud-
ed by new tensions in the Indi-
an Ocean island nation, accord-
ing to Associated Press.
Weekend talks concluded
without the two sides even
agreeing on a date for a new
meeting, said Erik Solheim,
Norway's minister for interna-
tional development who was
leading the negotiations.
Hopes were slim from the out-
set that a 2002 cease-fire could
be revived, with both sides refus-
ing to give way on key issues,
including the route by which aid
supplies could travel to the
northern Jaffna Peninsula.
"No agreement was reached
by the parties on how to address
the humanitarian crisis," Sol-
heim told reporters.
Sri Lanka's Health Minister
Nimal Siripala de Silva, who led
the government delegation, said
the government offer of a sea
route was cheaper and more
efficient, but that the rebels
refused.
"The ball is in the LTTE's
court," he said referring to the
rebels by their formal name, Lib-
eration Tigers of Tamil Eelam.
The LTTE said in a state-
ment that allowing humanitari-
an supplies to pass along the
closed highway was a precon-
dition for future tajks, adding


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that sea access would not pro-
vide sufficient relief to the
Jaffna region which has been
cut off by fierce fighting, leaving
thousands without food and
other essential supplies.
"Closure of the A9 highway
has resulted in an open prison
for more than 600,000 people,"
the LTTE said.
The government indicated
earlier during the' talks that it
was worried the LTTE, which is
banned in Canada, the United
States, the European Union and
India, would use the highway
to raise funds for their cause.

Aid

Rohitha Bogollagama, Sri
Lanka's development minister
and delegate at the talks, told
Associated Press that the rebels
would profit from aid trucks
going through their territory.
"One of the factors that has
to be taken into account is the
practice of the LTTE of levy-
ing extortionate fees on trans-
port through the areas that they
control," Bogollagama said.
In an attempt to present at
least one successful outcome of
the talks, Solheim praised both
sides for assuring Norwegian
mediators 'that they would
refrain from launching any new
offensives. But he warned that
"the proof of that pudding is in
the eating."'
Earlier Sunday a Tamil Tiger
delegate had warned of "seri-
ous consequences" if the island
nation's military advances while
negotiations are 'under %%aN.
Our troops along the North-
ern Prouince deferivLAirre
noticed a heaLn military prcs--
ence, and informants tell us they
have imposed a curfew along
the defense line," the rebels'
military spokesman, Rasiah
Ilanthirayan,:told AP. "This is
usually done in.preparation for
military operations. We are very
disappointed by the actions of
- the government. Exploitation...


for military advancement can
cause serious consequences."
Ilanthirayan did not spell out
what the consequences of mili-
tary action might be.
He said shelling took place
overnight in Muhamalai, Kilali
and Nagarkovil villages along a
line that divides government
and rebel territories in the
northern Jaffna peninsula.
In Sri Lanka the military said
one Tamil Tiger rebel and five
civilians were killed Sunday
when a bomb allegedly carried
by the guerrilla exploded pre- ..
maturely in Udupiddy village, .
on the northern Jaffna penin-
sula, 185 miles north of the cap-
ital, Colombo.
The military said on its Web
site that suspected Tamil Tigers
attacked a Special Task Force
camp late Saturday in the eastern
district of Ampara and that the
elite forces retaliated, killing two
insurgents. Earlier in the day, the
military had said militants shot
and killed a soldier and wounded
six police officers in bomb attacks
in the north and east. .
More than 2,000 soldiers,
rebels and civilians have been
killed since the cease-fire col- '
lapsed last year, and the inter-
national community has been
urging government and rebel
leaders to step up efforts to end
the 23-year civil war.
Overall more than 65,000
people have been killed since
the Tigers began fighting for an
independent homeland in
northern and eastern Sri Lanka
in 1983.
At the opening of the talks.,
Nor%%ay'- Solheirn s'_aiV'fhe9r]P47
Lankan people and ihe1eire I
national communitire'gr
ing impatient for peace.
But neither side appears'will-
irig to make concessions, at this
stage, with the government say-
ing the Tigers i.ust lay down
their arms and engage in a polit-
ical process, and the LTTE
accusing the government of
waging an "undeclared war"
against Tamils.


Bethel Brothers Morticians
Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026



MARY
LORRAINE
CUNNINGHAM-
MOTT, 44

of Anderson Street will be
held on Wednesd4y at
10:00 a.m. at St. Francis
Xavier Cathedral, West
Hill Street. Monsignor F
Simeon Roberts will
officiate. Interment will be
made in the Catholic Cemetery, Infantview Road.

Her memory will forever linger in the hearts of her
husband of 14 years, Kirkwood Mott; one son,
Rolland Rodgers Robinson; one adopted daughter,
Stacey Mott Hanna; three adopted sons, Jamaal,
Gerard and Kirkwood Mott Jr.; mother-in-law,
Marietta Wilmore; two aunts, Vera Monroe and
Rosalee Darling; four uncles-in-law, Baldwin,
Benjamin, William and Thaddeus Darling; seven
sisters-in-law, Margaret Cummingham, Sharon
Stubbs, Celestine Poitier, Denise, Melissa and Alsada
Wilmore, Sheila Mott; six brothers-in-law, John
Wildgoose II, Joseph Mott, Alexander Williams,
Cedric, Craig and Steven Wilmore; 11 nieces,
Michelle Gordon, Celeste Bascombe, Chante
Ferguson, Sharnicka Cox, Heather Wildgoose, Andrea
Miller, Tiffany Darling, Anastasia Davis, Alethea
"'Poitier, Lisa Smith, Marsha Wildgoose and Linda
Pinder of Miami, Florida; eight nephews, Carl and
Diego Cunningham, Mark Smith, John Wildgoose
III and Oneil Wildgoose, Joseph Gordon, Conrad
Bascombe and Officer 2162 Philip Cox and a host
Of other relatives and friends including Wilhelmenia
Shearer and Antionette Lightbourne.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers
Morticians, #44 Nassau Street on Tuesday from 10:00
a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Wednesday at the church
from 9:00 a.m. until service time.


4'
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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 22, MONDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2006





MONDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2006, PAGE 23


INERATIOALNW


Referendum on new Serbian constitution


meets 50 per cent turnout requirement


jergens


* SERBIA
Belgrade
SERBIAN voters met a 50
per cent turnout requirement
an hour on Sunday in a refer-
endum on a new constitution
reasserting Serbia's claim over
Kosovo, independent observers
said, according to Associated
Press.
Zorah Lucic, an official of the
Belgrade-based CeSID moni-
tors, said an estimated 50.05


voters had cast ballots by 7pm,
predicting the final turnout in
the two-day vote could reach
about 55 per cent.
Lucic gave no immediate
assessment whether a majority
of Serbia's 6.6 million electorate
had cast a 'yes'vote for the new
charter whose key point
declares Kosovo an "integral
part of Serbia" despite ongoing
UN-brokered talks on the
province's future status.
As polls began closing, oppo-


sition Liberal Party claimed
"massive fraud" was taking
place at polling stations in the
final hours of voting, with indi-
viduals 'oting several times and
without identification papers.
Prime Minister \'ojisla% Kos-
tunica issued earlier Sunday a
final appeal on all voters "who
hold Serbia in their hearts" to
head to the polUs and back the
new constitution, warning of
"unforeseeable consequences"
if it is not voted in,. the premier's
spokesman Srdian Djuric said.
"Citizens, go out and vote
'yes,' for a better life for every-
one," Serbian President Boris
Tadic said later in his own
eleventh-hour plea.


A massi'c government cam-
paign in Serbia to sa 'yes' to
the document had continued
into Sunday. with ads flashing at
the top of teles vision screens on
the state-run broadcaster call-
ing on people to )ote mi faor of
the draft constitution.
The draft is a 206-article doc-
ument offered as consolidating
democracy and the rule of law%
in the Balkan country.
But the focus and the
expected lure for Serb otherss -
has been the preamble seeking
to prevent a possible secession
of the disputed southern
province.
Independence-seeking ethnic
Albanians form 90 per cent of


the population in Koso'o,
which has been under UN
administration since 1999, when
US-led NATO air strikes halted
a Serb crackdown on lthe sepa-
ratists.
The referendum has been
strongly condemned by the eth-
nic Albanians, who ha'e long
boycotted any ballot under Serb
auspices. The government in
Belgrade did not e'en invite
then to take part.
Western diplomats ha'e
warned that only the interna-
tional negotiations can decide
on Kosolo's future, but the Bel-
grade politicians believe that
adopting the new constitution
would bolster their position in


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PAGE 24, MONDAY OCTOBER 30, 2006 THE TRIBUNE


leader and ex-rebel .


hif inn Available from Commercial News Providers
chief in t-ense


presidential runoff


CONGO
Kinshasa
A RUN-OFF election
between a president and a pow-
erful rebel warlord climaxed a
four-year postwar transition for
Congo Sunday, with voters
holding onto hope they will
soon see the end of a decades-
old cycle of war and despotism
that has shadowed the heart of
Africa, according to Associated
Press.
The voting was largely peace-
ful, but there was no guarantee
the violence was over. .Forces
loyal to 35-year-old President
Joseph Kabila and 44-year-old
Jean-Pierre Bemba a former
rebel leader who is now a vice
president in a power-sharing
government battled with tanks
and heavy weapons in the run-
up, and at least two deaths were
reported Sunday. Kabila and
Bemba have pledged to accept
the results of the vote, which
were not expected for weeks.
"Our people are still suffering
because of insecurity. We live in
fear. We hope this vote will
make our lives better," said
Santos Kambale, a 42-year-old
civil servant in the eastern town
of Goma.
In the northern town of Bum-
ba, more than 200 Bemba sup-
porters looted polling stations
and burned ballots in reaction
to rumors that officials were
stuffing ballot boxes with votes
for Kabila. A police commis-
' sioner said a 15-year-old boy
died and another person was
wounded by stray bullets when


troops guarding a station there
fired into the air.
Elsewhere in the same
province, a UN-supported radio
station reported one person was
killed and three injured when
naval forces shot at pro-Bem-
ba demonstrators who were
protesting alleged ballot-stuffing
in Lisala.

Hopes

Congolese are eager to see
their tumultuous country take
its place among the continent's
modern democracies. Until a
constitutional referendum last
year, most people here had nev-
er voted.
"If there's peace and stability
here, you could have peace and.
stability in the whole Great
Lakes region," said Mluleki
George, South Africa's deputy
defence minister and head of
that country's observer mission
for the vote.
Congo has been a vortex of
conflict. A 1998-2002 war pulled
in armies from half a dozen
African nations. Aid groups
estimate 4 million died during
the conflict, most from hunger
and disease that accompanied
the fighting.
The postwar transition has
been secured by the largest UN
mission in the world, a 17,600-
strong force backed up for the
vote by 2,500 European Union
troops.
"We've only had a change of
government through coups d'e-
tat of force," said Pius Bukasa,


a 40-year-old clothing store
owner in Kinshasa. "The prob-
lem of unemployment comes
from war. The wars have
destroyed our factories."
In the capital, many people
refer to themselves by the
career they used to have or wish
to have, before explaining that
they are out of work.
SKabila is favored to win a
five-year term. He captured 45
per cent of the first round vote,
compared with Bemba's 20 per
cent. As partial results of that
poll, contested by more than 30
candidates, were announced in
August, fighting between the
two men's forces erupted in
Kinshasa, lasting three days and
killing at least 23 people.
Kabila and Bemba voted in
neighboring Kinshasa schools,
and both refused to talk to
reporters continuing a reclu-
siveness displayed during the
campaign apparently due to
security concerns.
The EU hailed the peaceful
vote, saying it presents "a real-
istic opportunity to relaunch
development, to re-establish
democratic governance, and to
restore peace" in Congo. "By
returning to the ballot boxes,
the Congolese people have writ-
ten the democratic history of
their nation," EU Development
Commissioner Louis Michel
said.
. Rich in cobalt, diamonds,
copper and gold, Congo gained
independence from Belgium in
1960 and was ruled for 32 years
by Mobutu Sese Seko, a dicta-
tor who plundered the couh-


., III ,-.* **
S 0- --m -O





,. -
try's mineral xyealth, pocketing
billions and doing little to devel-
op the giant nation.
Rwandan-b cked rebels led
by Laurent Kabila, Joseph
Kabila's fatheii, ousted Mobutu
in 1997. But Kabila fell out with
Rwanda and faced a new rebel-
lion a year later that divided his
country into rival rebel-con-
trolled fiefdoms.
Laurent Kabila was assassi-
nated by a bodyguard in 2001.
His son inherited power and
helped negotiate the war's end
in 2002.
The government in Kinshasa
is now struggling to establish a
unified army apd regain control
over lawless b rderlands thou-
sands of miles o the east, where
rebels and miitiamen accused
of raping and pillaging residents
collect their own taxes.
prganising the ote has been
a colossal endeavor in a vast,
forested nation the size of West-
ern Europe with few paved
roads. Most people live in
remote villages without running
.water or electricity. About 25
million of Congo's 58 million
people were registered to vote
at 50.000 polling stations.


- -~ -


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Typhoon makes landfall in Philippines

as officials brace for possible disaster


* PHILIPPINES
Manila
TYPHOON Cimaron blasted
roofs off homes as it made land-
fall late Sunday in the northern
Philippines, with officials saying
it may be one of the most pow-
erful storms to ever hit the coun-
try. The president called for
prayers, and hospitals and troops
prepared for the worst, accord-
ing to Associated Press.
With winds gusting up to 143
mph, Cimaron named after a
Philippine wild ox roared across
an impoverished mountainous area
home to some 1.7 million people.


"This is probably one of the
strongest typhoons ever to hit
the country," Health Secretary
Francisco Duqueso said at a
news conference aired on Mani-
la radio stations. -We need to
be very careful and we need to
instruct our people to make
sure that all necessary precau-
tions are being taken."
President Gloria Macapagal
Arroyo ordered schools and
government offices closedin the
affected area and suspended
bus ser' ices in the region.
Although the storm did not
appear to be drenching the
mudslide-prone area as badly as


feared, rising rivers made some
bridges impassable. Officials
said water would be released
from two major dams to pre-
vent them from overflowing,
Hours before Cimaron made
landfall, Isabela province was
placed under the highest of a
four-step warning system to
advise residents to abandon vul-
nerable coasts and mountains.
The last time a typhoon this
strong struck the Philippines
was in December 2004.
although in that case, the storm
was deflected by a mountain
range and casualties were min-
imal.


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) invites suitably
qualified companies to submit bids to provide the company with Uniforms.

Tender specifications may be obtained from BTC's Security Desk, located
in the Administration Building on John F. Kennedy Drive, between the
hours of 9:00 am to 5:00 pm, Monday through Friday.

Tenders must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked "TENDER FOR
UNIFORMS", and delivered on or before 4:00 pm on Tuesday, October
31st, 2006, to the attention of:

Mr. Leon R. Williams
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Co. Ltd.
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive
P.O. Box N-3048
Nassau, The Bahamas

Companies submitting bids are invited to attend the bid opening at 3:00
pm on Friday, November 3rd, 2006 at BTC's Poinciana Drive location.


ChrIstmasSockNowI n!!I


BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.


MALLA
MARATHO

TELEHONE
3945..i


A'A


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393-830 FAX


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 24, MONDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2006


-s,


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MONDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2006


SECTION -


I


business@tribunemedia.net


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Financial services industry dealing




with a more sophisticated clientele


N By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business Reporter
The Bahamas Financial
Services industry is deal-
ing with a more sophis-
ticated clientele who
want to have greater
control over their financial resources.
Chief executive officer and execu-
tive director Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board Wendy Warren told del-
egates attending the third annual con-


ference of Securities Regulators that
wealth management practices are
changing because sources of wealth
are changing.
Mrs Warren noted that more peo-
ple are becoming wealthy through
their own work rather than through
inheritance.
These clients, she said, are becom-
ing more sophisticated and are inter-
ested in the best products and ser-
vices available through the industry.
In addition, globalisation is also giv-


* WENDY WARREN


ing clients more options.
Mrs Warren said that banks there-
fore have to tailor their services to
satisfy these clients, particularly in
the areas of asset management and
estate planning.
In addition, Mrs Warren noted that
the Bahamas is continuing its efforts
to attract the ultra high net worth
client the individual with $30 million
or more in assets.
Mrs Warren's comments came on
the final day of the two-day confer-


ence held at the British Colonial
Hilton as she spoke on the topic
'Financial Services Sector : Product
and Trends'.
The conference addressed some of
the challenges facing regulators in the
Carribean, particular in the areas of
co-operation, enforcement, gover-
nance and standard setting.
*The event was sponsored by the
Securities Commission of the
Bahamas.


SBFSB announces winners of


2006 Excellence awards


* STUDENT OF THE YEAR Shown (from left to right) are Renee Barrow, of SG Hambros
Bank & Trust (co-sponsor of student award), Foreign Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell, Aisha John-
Sson, Wendy Warren, chief executive officer of the BFSB, Michael Allen, chairman of the BFSB,
and Joe Delancy, of Pearl Investment Management (co-sponsor of student award)
,(Photo courtesy)


STHE Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board (BFSB) announced
the winners of its 2006 FSI Indus-
try Excellence Awards at its annu-
al banquet.
Executive of the Year: Paul
McWeeney, managing director of
the Bank of the Bahamas Interna-
tional
Professional of the Year: Lisa
Gibson, Ansbacher (Bahamas)
Limited
Achiever of the Year: Ger-
maine Simmons-Dean, UBS
(Bahamas) Limited
FSI Student of the Year: Aisha
Johnson. Credit Suisse Bahamas
BANK of the Bahamas Inter-


national received a special devel-
opment and promotion award in'
recognition of having "advanced
financial services for individuals
and for institutions" and "having
brought prestigious honour to The
Bahamas financial services sector."
The annual awards programme,
now in its sixth year, serves to pro-
file outstanding performers role
models within the financial ser-
vices industry.
M Paul McWeeney -
EXECUTIVE OF
THE YEAR
A 25-year veteran of the bank-


ing industry with experience in
international markets and in his
native Bahamas, Mr McWeeney
became the youngest managing
director of a clearing bank in The
Bahamas when he was named to
that post at Bank of The Bahamas
in 2000 at the age of 39.
In the nearly six years since, he
has guided the bank to a dramatic
increase in profitability and made
it a leader in the provision of finan-
cial services for Bahamians.
His financial services career
began in 1981 with Chase Man-

SEE page 3B


Mitigating the bad


Simage associated


with hedge funds


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business
Reporter
STHE Alternative Investment
Management Association has
de eloped two initiatives this
year in an effort to mitigate the
bad image that is so often asso-
ciated with hedge funds.
Speaking at the third annual
Conference of Caribbean
Group of Securities Regulators,
deputy chairman of AIMA
Dermot S L Butler said that two
initiatives have been designed
to strengthen regulatory and tax
resources and create a new
proactive media and press
department.
Mr Butler, chairman of the
Custom House Administration
and Corporate Services Limit-
ed, spoke to Caribbean regula-
tors on the global challenges
facing regulation of hedge
funds.
Mr Butler explained that bad
media influences politicians
who, in turn, have inevitable
knee-jerk reactions. "It is the
politicians the legislators who
drive the regulator," he said.
In addition, Mr Butler said
that in the past few years there
have been numerous pieces of
legislation and regulations
which are either targeting the
hedge fund industry or affect
hedge funds and their man-
agers, because the legislation is
so wide that it takes in a broad
spectrum of the financial indus-
try.
Mr Butler said that good leg-


islation is essential. "Personally,
I thrik that hedge fund man-
agers should be regulated, as
indeed they are in Europe and
in most offshore jurisdictions.
It is almost only in the United
States that they are noty egu-
lated."
He said that he thinks it is
inevitable that the SEC (Secu-
rities Exchange Commission)
will call for legislation that will
through due process become
law.
However, he said he hopes
that, when formulating this leg-
islation, it is done ith an eye
towards the practicality and use-
fulness of the regulation and in
the. actual interest of the
investor and not as a practical
reaction to bad news.
In addition, he said he would
like to see a push for regulators
to recognize each other and,
where it exists, accept the con-,
cept of equivalence.
Mr Butler said that he was
encouraged by a report in the
Financial Times, by Christopher
Cox, the SEC chairman, that
regulators in the US and
Europe had "established impor-
tant ground rules" that will
ensure that no market is
exposed to "undue extra-terri-
torial reach" by regulators on
either side of the Atlantic.
While the comment was
made in the context of the cross
border Stock Exchange merg-
ers, Mr Butler said that it was a
positive statement, particularly
if it is accepted as a basic prin-
ciple.


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BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY
# 56 Madeira Street, Palmdale
P.O. Box SS-6270 Nassau, Bahamas
242.328.3040 Fax:242.328.3043
www.micronet.bs


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2006


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2001/COM/bnk/436
IN THE SUPREME COURT

IN THE MATTER OF
SUISSE SECURITY BANK & TRUST LTD.
AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE BANKS AND TRUST
COMPANIES
REGULATION ACT, 2000
AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT, 1992

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Petition was on the 5th day
of April, A.D. 2001 presented by the Petitioner, Mi. Julian W;
Francis, in his then capacity as Governor of the Central Bank of
The Bahamas, of Frederick Street, P. 0. Box N-4868, Nassau,
Bahamas, to the Supreme Court for the winding up of the above-
named Company pursuant to section 14(5) (now section 18(5)) of
the Banks and Trust Companies Regulation Act, 2000.
AND NOTICE IS FURTHER. GIVEN that the said Petition is
directed to be heard before Mr. Justice Stephen Isaacs, Supreme
Court, Nassau, Bahamas on the 13th day of November, A.D., 2006
at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon or so soon thereafter as the Petition
can be heard.
Any creditor, or contributory of the said Company desiring to
support or oppose the making of an Order on the said Petition may
appear at the time of the hearing in person or by counsel for that
purpose. A copy of the said Petition will be furnished to any such
person requiring the same by the under-mentioned attorney on
payment of the prescribed charge for the same.
DATED this 12th day of October, A.D., 2006.
Rochelle A. Deleveaux
Central Bank of The Bahamas
Frederick & Shirley Streets
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorney for the Petitioner
NOTE: Any person who intends to appear on the hearing of the
said Petition must serve on or send by post to the above-named,
Notice in writing of his intention so to do. The Notice must state
the name and address of the person, or if a firm, the name and
address of the firm and must be signed by the person or firm or .
his or their attorney (if any) and must be served, or if posted, must
be sent by post in sufficient time to reach the above-named not
later than 4 o'clock in the afternoon of the 7th da','y pf No enmber.
2006. '


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IndiGO
N E I W 0 R K S

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A A


IndiGO Networks is a growing telecommunications company based
in Nassau, Bahamas. IndiGO Networks is the registered business
name of Systems Resource Group Limited (SRG), a Bahamian company
with a 16-year history in offering innovative technology and
telecommunications solutions to businesses and residential consumers.

Job Description

IndiGO Networks has an exciting opportunity for an experienced
LAN/Windows technician in its Network Services department.

Applications are invited from motivated individuals who possess a
current Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer qualification and have
a minimum of 5 years in a technical support role with experience in
the following:

Installation, configuration and troubleshooting of Wintel based
networked PC server & client hardware
Installation and configuration of Microsoft Windows products
including Windows NT server, 2000, 2003, Active Directory,
Exchange server and MS Office suite
Installation and troubleshooting of local area networks to include
layer 2/3 switches and Cisco routers
Experience with Cisco networking equipment; CCNA desired
VoIP knowledge desired
Good oral and written skills

IndiGO Networks offers a comprehensive benefits package. Salary is
commensurate with experience and qualifications.

Interested candidates should submit their resumes in writing by
November 1,2006 to:

Attn.: Network Services Manager
IndiGO Networks
P.O. Box N-3920
Nassau, Bahamas


Vacancy


Registry Clerk

Suitable candidates can apply for the position of Registry Clerk. The
successful candidate will be responsible for the day-to-day operations
of the registry and is required to implement proper file management
system, monitor and maintain accurate record keeping of all files
and correspondence. Must have strong organizational and clerical
skills, command of the English language, computer literate, attention
to details and minimum of 3 years working experience in relevant
field. Attractive employment package, salary commensurate with
experience.

Persons may apply to:
DA# 2791
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas

before November 8, 2006







A single storey incomplete Triplex Apartment Building (gross floor area 2,016 sq.ft.),
consists of Two two bedrooms and One one Bedroom units each with one bathroom,
living-dining room and kitchen and situate about 166 feet south of Bellot Road and
1/2 mile east of Gladstone Road and comprising 87,120 sq.ft. or 2 acres .
Appraised value: $377,000
Utilities: Electricity, Water and Telephone









For conditions of the sale and any other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit '
at: 356-1685 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit, P.O. BoxN-7518, Nassau, Rahamnas
to reach us before November 3. 2006
Serious enquirif only


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BUSINESS I


^ --
*
^


- -










BFSB announces winners of 2006 Excellence awards


BFSB announces winners of 2006 Excellence awards


FROM page 1B

hattan Bank N.A., where he rose
to the post of second vice-presi-
dent following postings in several
international branches. He joined
Bank of The Bahamas, still in its
infancy, as senior credit manager in
1993, and was promoted to deputy
managing director in 1996. Four
years later, he became managing
director.
Under his direction, the BOBI
has enjoyed phenomenal growth,
setting records and establishing a
number of firsts. Assets have
climbed steadily from $279 million
to nearly $600 million.
In two share offerings, one pre-
ferred, one common, he broad-
ened ownership and helped raise
capital to sustain growth.
Mr McWeeney serves as chair-
man of the Clearing Banks Asso-
ciation and president of the
Bahamas Institute of Financial Ser-
vices. He is also chairman of the
National Payments Council, a
member of the government's
Financial Services Consultative
Forum, the Blue Ribbon Commis-
sion on National Health Insurance,
the steering committee on govern-
ment's online initiative, and the
Business Improvement District
Committee.
Civic positions include chair-
manship of St Augustine's College
and membership of the Young
President's Organisation. He also
serves as honorary consul of the
Dominican Republic.
Hris vision has won internation-
al recognition for the bank and
for The Bahamas. In 2005, Bank of
The Bahamas became the first
bank in this country's history to
win the prestigious Bracken
Award, presented by The Banker,
a member of the Financial Times
Group.
In 2006, Bank of The Bahamas
became the first Bahamian bank
to win a similar country bank of
the year award presented by
Euromoney magazine. Also this
year, Paul McWeeney was named
Banker of the Year by Jones Com-
munication and the Toastmasters
Club 1600.

Lisa Gibson PROFES-
SIONAL OF THE YEAR
Currently serving as compliance
manager for Ansbacher
(Bahamas) Limited, Lisa Gibson
has responsibility for ensuring that
procedures are in place to enable
business units to comply with cur-
rent legislation and regulations.
She monitors compliance with
such procedures and produces reg-
ular reports to head office in Lon-
don and to the board of directors.
Also serving as Ansbacher's
money laundering and reporting
officer (MLRO), she has oversight
for all anti-money laundering activ-
ities and is the key person in the
bank for the implementation of
related strategies and policies.
Previous employment has
included accounting and consul-
tancy services for family-owned
businesses as well as senior audit
manager with PricewaterhouseC-
oopers.
Lisa Gibson joined Ansbacher
(Bahamas) Limited in 2001 as
client accounting manager, in
charge of client financial state-
ments.
When the position of compli-
ance manager became available in
2005, she jumped at the opportu-
nity to experience a more chal-
lenging area in the bank.
For a few months, she per-
formed duties in both capacities,
until Ansbacher finalised its choice
for her replacement in the client


accounting manager position. This
was a challenge to learn her new
role and to continue with her pre-
vious responsibilities, but she
demonstrated complete profes-
sionalism, increasing her work
hours to accomplish assigned tasks.
Her employers describe her as a
diligent, industrious employee who
takes on any challenge given to
her, and performs at the highest
level, even if tasks are outside of
her assigned responsibilities.
This has been demonstrated on
numerous occasions when she has
been required to take on multiple
roles, covering for staff out on
study leave as an example. She is
an outstanding professional who
is credited with assuming a lead-
ership role in any circumstance;
although particularly demonstrat-
ed in her field of compliance, Ms
Gibson's colleagues say that her
knowledge, confidence, research
capabilities and analytical skills all
provide a level of trust in her
strong judgment on non-compli-
ance issues as well.
Ms Gibson recently completed
the International Anti-Money
Laundering and Compliance
Diploma (with merit) and is one
exam away from completing her
Bachelor of Law degree (LLB).
She has been a certified public
accountant since 1989.
This year, she obtained her trust
and estate practitioners designa-
tion from the Society of Trust and
Estate Practitioners by way of the
experienced practitioner's route.
In addition to STEP, she also is a
member of the Bahamas Institute
of Chartered Accountants and the
Bahamas Association of Compli-
ance Officers.

Germaine Simmons-Dean -
ACHIEVER OF THE YEAR
Ms Simmons-Dean is a senior
assistant client adviser at UBS
(Bahamas) Limited, and has been
working with the European Desk
for the past five years. As a senior
assistant, she co-manages client
portfolios; processes payment and
security orders and confirmations
and client statements; and main-
tains the client database.
Additionally, her responsibili-
ties include preparation for client
visits and meetings; proposals (eg
bonds); account openings; order
dealings (eg foreign exchange,
money markets, deliveries/receipts,
FTD and buy/sell orders); and
KYC updating. As part of the IT
project team, she participates in
conducting testing on behalf of the
wealth management department.
Described as p dedicated, hard-
working employee who delivers
even when under extreme pres-
sure, she is always focused and
keen on professional development.
Her employers say she is an excel-
lent team player who is happy to
share know-how and knowledge
with others; in this connection she
has become the first point of con-
tact for new team members.
Since joining UBS, she has
demonstrated great loyalty towards
the company and was a critical
employee for her department dur-
ing a period when it lost key staff
to competitors.
She is credited with a capacity
for learning from setbacks and
turning these into positive action.
Exhibiting top professional behav-
iour, Ms Simmons-Dean is
extremely client focused with a
sound understanding of the client
needs. Very knowledgeable on reg-
ulations, she strives to understand
complex issues to the last detail,
and has provided cross-functional
support to other areas when need-
ed, as well as to the CEO and
senior management.


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She is an active member of the
firm's high potential pool, and has
displayed interest in other cultures
and working practices, with par-
ticular high interest in employment
diversity. UBS has advised that she
will become an international
assignee on a two-year secondment
in Switzerland in early 2007.
She has a BA in information sys-
tems administration and has com-
pleted various sector-relevant
training programmes, including the
Series 7, and the Introduction to
Mutual Funds and Quality Cus-
tomer Service courses. She is a
member of the International Asso-
ciation for Administrative Profes-
sionals (IAAP).

AISHA JOHNSON FSI
STUDENT OF THE YEAR
A graduate of C R Walker
Senior High, where she continu-
ously attained the principal's list
distinction, Aisha was recognized
during her secondary level school
years for helping students who
were considered under-achievers.
She served as a study hall tutor
for four years. While at C R Walk-
er, she also was on the Student
Council, a 1998 debutante, 1998
class valedictorian and 1998 head
girl.
Her academic achievements also
included honorable mention for
outstanding BGCSE results and
received nine out of 12 class
awards at graduation. During these
years, Aisha also participated in
numerous activities, including the
College of the Bahamas Confer-
ence of Youth Leaders and the
Alpha Kappa Alpha conference
for young women.
Aisha earned early acceptance
into the College of the Bahamas,
and also received the Apprentice-
ship Scholarship of Credit Suisse
(Bahamas), which allowed her to
attain her Associates of Arts
degree in banking with credit -
while working part-time to gain
experience.
At the completion of the
apprenticeship programme, Aisha
worked full-time with Credit Suisse
for a year before enrolling in the
Bachelor of Arts programme in
banking and finance at COB.
While continuing to work full-time,
she completed this degree, and
graduated in spring, 2006. Between
April-June, 2006, she worked with
Credit Suisse-Zurich, obtaining
exposure to back office functions
and account management. Aisha
has completed the Series 7 course
and plans to take the Series 7
exams abroad to become interna-
tionally certified. She also plans to
study towards the CFA designa-
tion.
She is a senior securities 'e&ecu-
tor at Credit Suisse (Bahamas)
Ltd. Her employers describe her as
"having sharp organisational skills
and the ability to multi-task very
well," and as "demonstrating an
ambition for excellence".

FSI DEVELOPMENT AND
PROMOTION AWARD:
BANK OF THE BAHMAS
This young and progressive insti-
tution, born in 1988, has advanced
financial services for individuals
and for institutions, and has
brought prestigious honour to The
Bahamas financial services sector
through back-to-back awards for
Country Bank of the Year from
The Banker, 2005-2006, and
Euromoney, 2006. No Bahamian
bank had ever won either of those
coveted awards before.
No Bahamian commercial bank
had ever offered trust services for
Bahamians before Bank of The
Bahamas recognized the need and
launched its trust subsidiary in the
year 2000.
No bank had issued VISA pre-
paid and gift cards, nor offered
three-day clearance of US dollar
deposits, nor cheque imaging as
part of its online banking product,
nor dreamed of opening a. branch


in South Florida to serve the needs
of Bahamians who do business
there every day of the year.
This last move alone, nearly
five years from initial approval in
principle to what is expected to be
the opening date in early 2007,
caused a re-write of regulatory
laws, paving the way for other
financial institutions to follow its
lead and making conducting busi-
ness abroad easier for all.
The explanation of the bank's
success can be summed up in the
one-word title of its 2006 Annual
Report: Innovate. From "out of
the box" thinking to "over the top"
training, from a multi-million dol-
lar investment in sophisticated soft-
ware that is allowing it to re-train
and re-position staff for more
meaningful careers, Bank of The
Bahamas has demonstrated the
benefits of innovation in financial
services.


Highlights that reflect sector
development include:
Conducting the first major
mortgage fair, involving partners in
real estate, insurance, furniture
and other homeowner needs and
generating thousands of mortgage
application requests, 2004;
Writing more mortgages lead-
ing to more broad-based home
ownership than any other bank in
The Bahamas, 2005;
IPO and two rights offerings,
one -preferred shares, one com-
mon, to broaden shareholder base;
Steadily increasing sharehold-
er value with equity increasing
from $19 million in 2000 to $95
million in 2006;
Creating Business Develop-
ment Department rather than tra-
ditional marketing division;
Recognising that partnerships
empower (BTC, Mt Tabor, Mail-
Boxes, Etc.);


Introduction.of private bank-
ing services scheduled for late
2006.
Despite its youth and relatively
small size, Bank of The Bahamas
reached out in the aftermath of
Hurricanes Frances and Jeanne in
The Bahamas and Katrina in the
US, leading a telethon fund-raising
drive, and donating over $100,000
to hurricane relief efforts in one
year.
From a two per cent market
share only a few years ago to eight
per cent today, from $279 million
in assets to nearly $600 million six
years later, Bank of The Bahamas
has demonstrated that caring about
community, nurturing staff, grow-
ing through teamwork and meeting
customer needs even before they
are recognized by customers them-
selves help not just the business
of one institution, but the growth
of the sector itself.


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Pricing Information As Of:
Thursday. 26 Oclob-Dir 200 6
Th a X'L2lORTEL&3J.TkEO URIETIe VIAIT WWW.BISXBAHAMAS COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
*. SSXALL'SHAftE INDEX: CLOSE 1.648.19 /CHG 06.39 / %CHG 00.39 / YTD 297.48 / YTD % 22.02
52*k-Hi 52wvk-LO.v Securil Pric.us Clo.se To.aa,'s C.oE.e 'na..ge DI-.., ..1 EPS 0 Di. 1 FE .la
1.85 0.59 ADa.o Markets 1.42 1 42 0.').' *C ..9 u '-:..0 N !. uL Oc .
12.05 10.23 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.00 1.627 0.380 6.8 3.45%
7.68 6.90 Bank of Bahamas 7.65 7.68 0.03 2,000 0.802 0.330 9.6 4.30%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.208 0.020 3.8 2.50%
1.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.60 1.65 0.05 1,000 0.168 0.060 9.8 3.64%
1.49 1.10 Fidelity Bank 1.31 1.31 0.00 0.188 0.050 7.0 3.82%
9.78 9.05 Cable Bahamas 9.70 9.78 0.08 2,400 0.659 0.240 14.8 2.45%
2.20 1.40 Colina Holdings 1.83 1.83 0.00 0.046 0.000 39.8 0.00%
11.91 9.00 Commonwealth Bank 11.91 11.91 0.00 0.943 0.660 12.6 5.54%
6.26 4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.16 5.20 0.04 0.130 0.045 39.6 0.87%
2.88 2.10 Doctor's Hospital 2.76 2.76 0.00 0.348 0.000 7.9 0.00%
6.21 4.35 Famguard 6.15 6.15 0.00 0.428 0.240 14.4 3.90%
11.75 10.60 Finco 11.51 11.75 0.24 1,770 0.763 0.560 15.4 4.77%
14.00 9.90 FirstCaribbean 14.00 14.00 0.00 0.927 0.550 15.1 3.93%
11.61 9.25 Focol 11.21 11.61 0.40 2,600 0.885 0.500 13.1 4.31%
1.15 0.95 Freeport Concrete 1.00 1.00 0.00 -0.170 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.20 8.49 ICD Utilities 8.49 8.49 0.00 0.532 0.270 16.0 3.18%
9.10 8.70 J. S. Johnson 8.70 8.70 0.00 0.527 0.560 16.5 6.44%
8.09 5.30 Kerzner International BDRs 8.09 8.09 0.00 SUS/DEL 0.160 0.000 50.6 0.00%
1000 1000 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.291 0.195 7.7 1.95%
52'... .e.. FIdty Over-The-Counter Secur.ties
52,k-1Hi 52hk-Lov Symbol Bid 5 isk I Lasl Pr..; L eeki, .. C EPS 5 D.. $ PE Y.ela
14.30 12.25 Bahamas Supermaikels 1460 156.) 1 2 1 9q23 1 320 6 1 j /4..
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 8.00 8.25 10.00 0.000 0.640 NM 7.85%
0 54 -0.20 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.00 -0.002 0.000 NM 0.00%
'' .: .. .- .. colalna Over-The-Counter Securities
43.00 28.00 ABDAB i1 CO .30':0 1 O 2 22'2 '.C". i) 1 4 0 0C.
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.00 15.00 12.50 1.750 0.360 8.0 2.57%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.45 -0.070 0.000 N/M 0.00%
C : lsx L6elad Mutual Fuftds
52 K-Hil 52wk-Low Funa Name NA YTL).: Last 12 1c.Ir.lr,s .. Y.ela :
1.3119 1.1892 Colina Money Market Fund 1.311922*
2.9515 2.4766 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.9515***
2.4687 2.2671 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.468721**
1.1970 1.1395 Colina Bond Fund 1.196970""
S:1 .;.., m 9INDEX; CLOSE 721.77 IYTD30.79% 1 200526.09%
BISx ALL SmARE INDEX 19 De: '02 I -) "0 M.-rET TEFl EiOL '.....1. 3.'.',c.-. .,.'^ei ., r 1- ...t
52wk-HI Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity 20 October 2006
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for dally volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for dally volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week 30 September 2006
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value 30 September 2006
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
PIE -Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 =100 30 September 2006
ga|.saFMa"e .TYZ242-3151-7764 / FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION CALL (242) 394-2503













THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


, %.- r, w~ .. -S ~ ________________________


THE COLLE GE OF THE BMAS


Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs


EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS


Associate/Assistant Professors Physics (New Providence Campus)
The successful candidate should have an advanced degree in Physics, preferably a PhD., with experience teaching both service


OFFICE OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
Faculty Advertisements 2007 2008

School of Business
Associate/Assistant Professors Accounting (New Providence and Northern Bahamas Campuses)
Candidate must be able to teach Financial and Intermediate Accounting, Business Mathematics, Advanced Accounting, Accounting
Theory, Management, Cost, Fund and Tax Accounting up to the bachelor's degree level. Knowledge of computerised accounting
would be an asset. Professional certification or experience is desirable. The successful candidates should have an advanced degree
(Ph.D. preferred).
Associate/Assistant Professor Marketing (New Providence)
Candidate must be able to teach a full range of Marketing courses from the introductory to the senior year in a bachelor's degree
programme. The successful candidate should have an advanced degree (Ph.D. preferred).
Associate/Assistant Professor Economics & Statistics (New Providence Campus)
The successful individual will provide instruction for second, third and fourth year economics and second and third year statistic
courses. Candidate must be able to teach Macro and Microeconomic Principles, Price Theory, Macroeconomic Analysis,
Quantitative Methods in Economics, Managerial Economics, International Economics, Economic Development, Comparative
Economic Systems, Labour Economics, Business Statistics and Intermediate Statistics. They should also be able to teach Techniques
of Research and Quantitative Methods. Knowledge of computer applications is essential. Additionally, the candidate should have
an advanced degree Doctorate level studies in Economics (is preferred) with a sound background in Business Administration
and Quantitative Methods from an accredited institution with five or more years teaching and research. Industry-related experience
would be an asset.
Other duties include advisement of Economic Majors and assisting with research-related courses and projects.
Associate/Assistant Professor Finance (New Providence Campus)
Candidates must be able to teach third and fourth year finance courses included but not limited to: Financial Management, Credit
Analysis, Investment Analysis, Portfolio Management, International Finance, Investment Management and Security Analysis.
Additional duties include Advisement of Finance and Economics/Finance majors and preparation of students for CFA Examinations.
The successful candidate should have an advanced degree (Doctoral Level Studies preferred) in Finance with a sound background
in Business Administration and Economics or Quantitative Methods from an accredited institution and at least five years teaching
experience. Investment Management experience would be an asset. Additionally, the candidate should have completed at least
part I of the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) Examinations, and have membership in the CFA Institute.


School of Communication and Creative Arts
Associate/Assistant Professor in Journalism and Communication (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach courses in all or most of the following areas: reporting, photojournalism, video production and
business writing and should have experience with curriculum and programme development. The ideal candidate must have at
least a Master's degree in the subject or a related area, a minimum of five years' teaching experience at the tertiary level and some
professional experience.
Associate/Assistant Professors in Foreign Languages (Spanish and/or French) (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach Spanish at the beginners, intermediate and advanced levels. The ideal candidate must have at
least a Master's degree in the subject or a related area, native speaker competence and will be able to teach language, literature
and culture courses up to the bachelor degree level. A teaching certificate or equivalent and experience in teacher training are
desirable.
Associate/Assistant Professors in Art (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach 2-Dimensional Design, Commercial Art (illustration and graphic design) and Printmaking.
Experience in 3-Dimensional Design, mixed media, painting and drawing would be an asset. The ideal candidate will have at
least a Master's degree in the subject or related area. A teaching certificate or equivalent is desirable.
Associate/Assistant Professors in Music (New Providence Campus)
The successful candidate must be able to teach traditional; theory and harmony, piano skills, music history and analysis yup to
the bachelor level. Candidate must possess skills in choral work and have at least a Master's degree. The ideal candidate must
have at least three year's teaching experience at the tertiary level and some professional experience. A teaching certificate or
equivalent is desirable.
Part-time Lecturer in Foreign Languages (Spanish) (Northern Bahamas Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach Spanish at the introductory level. The ideal candidate will have at least a Master's degree in the
subject or a related area and native speaker competence in Spanish. A teaching certificate or equivalent is desirable.
Part-time Lecturer in Foreign Languages (Haitian Creole) (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must be'able to teach Haitian' Creole at the beginners and intermediate levels. The ideal candidate will have at least a
-Master's .deric in ihe subjectt or a ielated.area and naliie speaker comrnpeience in Haitian Creole. A teaching certificate or
equivalent is desirable .-
Pailrt-time Lecturers in Journalism and Communications (New Providence Campus)
Candidates must be able to teach courses in any of the following areas: reporting, photojournalism, video production and advertising
techniques. The ideal candidate must have at least a Master's degree in the subject or a related area and some professional
experience.

School of English Studies
Associate/Assistant Professors College Composition/Literature (New Providence Campus)
Candidates must have at least a Master's of Arts degree In English and must be able to teach College Composition and Literature
up to the bachelor degree level. The ideal candidates will have a background in Composition and Rhetoric as well as in American
and/or Post -Colonial Literature. A background in creative writing or experience in a writing lab setting would be an asset.
Teacher training is preferred.
Associate/Assistant Professor College Composition/Literature (Northern Bahamas Campus)
Candidate must have at least a Master of Arts degree in English and must be able to teach College Composition and literature
up to the bachelor degree level. The ideal candidate will have experience in the teaching of composition and rhetoric and a variety
of literature courses. Teacher training is preferred.

School of Social Sciences
Associate /Assistant Professors in Law (LL.B. Programme) (New Providence Campus)
Candidates should have at a least a first degree in Law, with no less than an Upper Second Class Honours or equivalent. Possession
of a postgraduate degree and some experience as a legal practitioner is desirable. The curriculum includes all branches of Common
Law and courses pay special attention to the place of Law in Commonwealth Caribbean jurisdictions. The ideal candidates should
be competent in at least three of the basic or core Common Law subjects including, but not limited to, Law and Legal Systems
of the Commonwealth Caribbean; Criminal Law; Legal Writing and Research; Law of Torts; Commonwealth Caribbean
Constitutional Law; and Law of Contract. Experience in teaching in a semester system would be an asset. The successful
candidates will be expected to pursue individual and departmental research interests and to publish in reputable law journals.
Associate/Assistant Professor in Religion/Theology
Candidate to teach Theology and Religious Studies courses up to the Bachelor degree level. A minor concentration in Philosophy
and/or Logic is desirable.

School of Education
Associate/Assistant Professor Family and Consumer Life/Home Economics (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach Family and Consumer Life/Home Economics and Education Foundation courses to prospective
secondary teachers. The successful candidate must have a Master's Degree, Teacher's Certificate, at least ten years' teaching
experience and the ability to supervise teaching practice and research studies.
Associate/Assistant Professor Religious Education (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach Religious Education content and methods to prospective primary and secondary teachers, as well
as the general student population in other academic areas up to the senior year in a bachelor degree programme. The successful
candidate must have a Master's Degree, Teacher's Certificate at least ten years' teaching experience and the ability to supervise
teaching practice and research studies.
Associate/Assistant Professor Science Education (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must be.able to teach Science Education courses to prospective primary and secondary teachers. The successful
candidate must have a Master's Degree, Teacher's Certificate, at least ten years' teaching experience anrid the ability to supervise
teaching practice and research studies.
Associate/Assistant Professor Art Education
Candidate must be able to teach Art Education courses to prospective primary and secondary school teacher trainees up to the
Bachelor degree level. The successful candidate must have a Master's Degree, Teacher's Certificate, at least ten years' teaching
experience and the ability to supervise teaching practice and research studies.
Associate/Assistant Professor Music Education
Candidate must be able to teach Music Education courses to prospective primary and secondary school teacher trainees up to the
Bachelor degree level. The successful candidate must have a Master's Degree, Teacher's Certificate, at least ten years' teaching
experience and the ability to supervise teaching practice and research studies.
Associate/Assistant Professor in Physical/Health Education K-12
Candidate must be able to teach Physical/Health Education to teachers in training up to the Bachelor's degree level. The successful
candidate must have a Master's Degree, Teacher's Certificate, at least ten years' teaching experience and the ability to supervise
teaching practice and research studies.

School of Nursing and Allied Health Professions
Associate/Assistant Professors Nursing (New Providence Campus)
The successful candidates will be required to teach in the bachelor degree programme. Responsibilities will include classroom
as well as clinical supervision of students. Applicants should have strong interpersonal skills and a commitment to excellence
in integrating teaching, clinical practice and research. Applicants should have a well-rounded clinical nursing experience and
should be able to teach at least three of the following areas: Fundamentals of Nursing, Medical-Surgical Nursing, Psychiatric
Nursing, Maternal and Child Health Nursing, Community Health Nursing, Management/Leadership, Health Assessment, Nursing
Theories, Transcultural Nursing and Nursing Research. The successful candidates must be registered with the Nursing Council
of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas; have college level teaching experience and at least a Master's degree in Nursing.

School of Sciences and Technology
Associate/Assistant Professor Biology (New Providence Campus)
The successful candidate should have an advanced degree (PhD preferred) in the biological or agricultural sciences with strong
background in entomology, specifically agricultural entomology. The successful candidate will be expected to teach biology up
to the senior year in a bachelor's degree programme and develop a research programme related to the needs and priorities of The
College. Teaching experience at the college level is essential.
Associate/Assistant Professor Mathematics (New Providence and Northern Bahamas Campuses)
The successful candidate should have an advanced degree (PhD preferred) in pure or applied mathematics. Candidate will be
expected to both teach Pure and Applied Mathematics e.g. Statistics up to the senior year in a bachelor's degree programme as
well as develop a research programme in his or her area of specialty. Teaching experience at the college level is essential.


Please visit the College's website at www.cob.edu.bs for more information about the InsleAon ado waessm he CoUege's
Employment Application Form.


PAGF AR MONflAV Y T'TORFR 1A 9006


I'


courses (physics for biology and health care professionals) as well as major courses. A broad background in Physics is an asset;
with a desire to teach and incorporate undergraduate students in research programmes both within the college and in collaboration
with other institutions. Successful applications should have research interest and foci that can be pursued in at COB or in
collaboration with partner institutions.
Associate/Assistant Professor Chemistry (New Providence Campus)
The successful candidate should have an advanced degree in Chemistry, preferably a PhD, with experience teaching up to senior
year in a bachelor's degree programme. Abroad background in chemistry would be an asset as teaching areas span courses in
Organic, Inorganic, Analytical and Environmental and Physical Chemistry. Research interests and foci applicable to the use of
current facilities and The College's research stations are desirable.

Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute
Chef (New Providence Campus)
The ideal candidate should possess a degree in Culinary Arts/Hospitality Management and be Certified as a Executive Chef or
higher, have a teaching certificate or equivalent with a minimum of five years teaching experience. Candidate should be able to
teach introductory through advanced cooking, baking, pastry, garde manger, sanitation, menu design and food preparation.
All candidates must have at least an earned Master's degree from a recognized accredited institution in the relevant area or
its equivalent and five (5) years'post qualification teaching experience at the College or University level The Associate
Professor is a high academic rank. The successful candidates must have an earned Master's degree from a recognized
accredited institution in the relevant subject area, plus at least eight years of teaching at the College or University level OR
an earned doctoral degree in the relevant area with at least five years teaching experience at the College or University level;
In all cases, an above average record of teaching, research, and/or publication is required Applicants must also exhibit a
commitment to excellence in teaching and scholarship.
Salary Scale:
Assistant Professor:
Masters $39,460 $61,960
Doctorate $42,160 $69,160
Associate Professor:
Masters $45,760- $69,960
Doctorate $50,260 $77,760

To ensure consideration, application materials must be received by November 17,2006. A complete application packet
consists of an application letter, a College of The Bahamas' Application Form, a detailed curriculum vita, copies of all
transcripts (original transcripts required upon employment), and the names and contact information for three references
addressed to:
The Director
Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus
Thompson Boulevard & Poincianna Drive
P.O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas

Please visit the College's website at www.cob.edl.bs for more information about the institution and to access the College's
Employment Application Form.



Office of Academic Affairs
Non Instructional Faculty Advertisements 2007 2008

Counselling & Health Services Department
Counsellor
Candidate will be required to assistin developing and implementing counselling programmes for the campus community including
provision of individual and group therapy and counselling to students, assessment interviews, referrals and consultations with
faculty, staff and local professionals around issues related to the developmental needs (academic, career-vocational and psycho-
social) of college students. Must be willing to work flexible hours.
The successful candidate must have an earned Masters degree in Counselling, counselling/clinical psychology or equivalent.
Salary Scale: 532,710 S47,710

School of Nursing and Allied Health Professions
Clinical Preceptor
The successful candidate must be a Registered Nurse with post qualification training and good organizational skills. Duties would
include supervising students in the laboratories to develop basic nursing skills; coordinating the clinical rotations and practicums
for students; review practicum skills; compilation of student logs and reports for the course instructor. The successful candidate
should be self-directed and work well with people.
Salary Scale: Instructor $27,110 $40,110

Library and Instructional Media Services
Librarian- Technical Services
The position falls in the area of Technical Services. The incumbent should be dynamic, innovative individual with a strong
commitment to service within a diverse community. The Librarian will demonstrate successful administrative experience in a
library, sound understanding of emerging technologies and the ability to use them within the library setting and commitment to
developing a strong integrated library service within the academic environment.
The duties of the Librarian will include management of the Unit, leadership in short and long range planning to enhance and
expand library services, development and promotion of library resources and services, personnel supervision, initiation and
management of appropriate emerging technologies, and liaison with relevant internal and external groups.
The Librarian should possess a Masters Degree in Library and Information Science from an accredited institution, and a minimum
of two years, post Masters professional library experience. The incumbent will demonstrate strong communication and interpersonal
skills that engender an excellent customer friendly environment. Evening and weekend work on rotation, library research, service
to the community and library instruction will also be required.
Salary Scale: $32,710 $47,710
To ensure consideration, application materials must be received by November 17, 2006. A complete application packet
consists of an application letter, a College of The Bahamas' Application Form, a detailed curriculum vita, copies of all
transcripts (original transcripts required upon employment), and the names and contact information for three references
addressed to:
SThe Director,
Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus
Thompson Boulevard & Poincianna Drive-
P.O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas

Please visit the College's website at www.cob.edu.bs for more information about the institution andto access the College's
Employment Application Form.

..................... ...... .....-----------------

Industry Training Administrator
Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the Industry Training Administrator (ITA) post in the Culinary
and Hospitality Management Institute. The Industry Training Administrator reports to the Executive Director, Culinary and
Hospitality Management Institute. The successful candidate must possess at least a Bachelor's degree in a relevant subject area
plus five years related industry experience or a Master's degree in a relevant subject area plus three years related industry experience.
Excellent organizational, presentational and interpersonal communication skills are required for this position.
The portfolio of the ITA includes the organization and oversight of all matters relative to Industry Training, including the design,
development and review of new and existing skills level training and education curricula; and the coordination of the offering of
such programmes and courses, both throughout the College Network and within industry.
The Industry Training Administrator is responsible for working in concert with Industry Partners in the Hospitality and Tourism
Sectors to develop and implement training opportunities to meet special needs identified within the industry. The successful
candidate will coordinate the review and updating of existing education and training programmes offered through the industry
arm of the Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute; prepare training proposals, including costing, for special needs as
requested by various establishments; negotiate training consultants' contracts; and organize and conduct training seminars and
workshops. In addition to coordinating the preparation of Industry training manuals and guides and maintaining reference copies
of current standard operating procedures and job descriptions and specifications for all major jobs within the hospitality and
tourism sectors, the Industry Training Administrator must also coordinate job placement for students and graduates and serve as
Secretary to the Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute Advisory Board.

Salary Scale: $27,ilt) $40,110
To ensure consideration, application materials must be received by November 17,2006. A complete application packet
consists of an application letter, a College of The Bahamas' Application Form, a detailed curriculum vita, copies of all
transcripts (original transcripts required upon employment), and the names and contact information for three references
addressed to:
The Director
Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas \
Oakes Field Campus
Thompson Boulevard & Poincianna Drive
P. O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas


I











Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs


0i^


OffL7 C 'f H 11 YII101


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Fred D'Aguiar is the author of five critically acclaimed
novels, including The Longest Memory (1994), which
won the David Higham Prize for Fiction and the Whitbread
First Novel Award. Winner of the TS.. Eliot poetry prize.
Thrdy0.1.6Strdy0.10 --------


Real Talk Live radio show with Host Jeff Lloyd
10:00 a.m.
The Anatol Rodgers Memorial Lecture-
Inaugural Event (Reading and public lecture)
at 6:30 p.m. in Choices Restaurant, Bahamas
Tourism Training Centre, Thompson Blvd
Title of lecture: "The Caribbean Diaspora:
What Survives of Caribbean Identity in
our Minds and Bodies when We Leave the
Caribbean?"
To reserve your place


Room 2C, Second Floor
Michael Eldon Building
Thompson Blvd


Writing Workshop: Poetry
10:00 a.m.-12:00 noon
$50 per person
Writing Workshop: The Short Story
2:00-4:00 p.m,
$50 per person

in the workshops
enntait


-- ~
- -
~ - -
~
-
--

* ~


giggiggaaggaagggFedeialion of International
VwNIUImIUm n Consulting Engineer,
Invites you to a two day international contracts training course entitled:'

"The. Practical Management ContractClaims and the


Under the 1999 FIDIC Contracts and multi-lateral Development
Banks Harmonised Construction Contract
Date: Nox ember 6th & 7th 2006
Venue: Hilton, Kingston, Jamaica
Time: 8:45 amni to 4:30 pm
Fee: USS 1 150 per participant or USS 1,000 for two (2)
or more participants from the same organization.
A further 10% will apply for registration and payment
received on or before October 9th 2006
(with proof of purchase).
Facilitators: David Heslett, Managing Director, ECV & Brian Totterdill, Consultant, ECV

The Programme will consist of an introduction to new FIDIC
documents and address the following issues:

The Management of Claims, Claims Procedures, Clause 20.1
Contractor's Claims, Principles governing the DAB, Alternative
Procedure for the Engineer's Decision, Post DAB/ Engineer's
Decision and Case Studies of Dispute Resolution by DAB

Throughout the programme there will be opportunities for questions,
aind \here appropriate, case studies will be introduced.

Who should attend;
Professionals from Government Ministries and Agencies.
Private Sector Employers, Consulting Engineers, Contractors,
Quantity Surveyors, Architects, Legal Advisors
and all involved with the next generation of International Projects.
It is particularly important where FIDIC and DAB procedures
shall be implemented.

For further information/reservations please contact
JCC, Tel: 868-623-9396
Fax: 868-623-2949, Email: jcc@jcctt.org or ttca@wow.net


I


MONDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2006, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE


THETRIBUNEBUMINAOCBERS0S20,PAE5



Grouper may be



on the menu, but



not on the plate





Copyrighted Material"



Syndicated Content ?


Available from Commercial NewsProviders







TRIBUNE SPORTS


AP GE 6B MONDAYOCTOBER 6


Federer beats Gonza .


to win Copyrighted Matenal
to w n .. O a. 40.ft. u


-5 -


Syndicated Content


* -*


Available from Commercial NewslRroviders


Commonwealth of The Bahamas
IN THE SUPREME COURT


2006
CLE/Qui/00247


IN THE MATTER of
The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND
IN THE MATTER of the
Petition of Edison Tyrone Neely

AND

IN THE MATTER of Lot 19 Block 16
Westward Villas, New Providence, Bahamas.

NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that Edison Tyrone Neely
is applying to the Supreme Court to have his Title
to the following land investigated under Section 3
of the Quieting Titles Act, and the nature and extent
thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of
Title to be granted by the said Court in accordance
with the provisions of the said Act:-

"ALL THAT lot of land being lot number 19, Block
16, Westward Villas Subdivision, New Providence
and bounded as, follows. On the NORTH by Lot
number 14 of the said block said to be the property
of Michael Oakes on the EAST by Lot Number 18
of said block the property of the Petitioner-on the
SOUTH by Devonshire Street and-on.-the WEST b\
Lot number 20 of the said block to be property) of
Leslie Albury and which said lot has such
dimensions as are shown on survey plan 3873NP."

Copies of the plan may be inspected during normal
office hours at the following places:-

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court,
Ansbacher House, East Steet North,
Nassau, Bahamas
2. The chambers of James M.Thompson,
Terrace House, First Terrace and
Collins Avenue, Nassau, Bahamas

Any person who objects to the granting of said
Certificate of Title is required to file in the Supreme
Court and serve on the Petitioner or his Attorney a
Statement of his, her or its claim in the prescribed
form verified by an affidavit and other related
documents to be filed and served therewith by the
30th day of November, A.D., 2006. Failure of any ,
such person to file and serve a Statement of his, her
or its Claim by the 30th day of November, A.D.,2006,
will operate as a bar to such Claim.

ANDREW THOMPSON
Attorney for the Petitioner


Eligible Candidate must posses:

* Bachelors of Business Administrative Degree
with main concentration in Accounting.

* 4 to 5 years experience in the related field.

* Excellent oral, written and organizational skills.

* Must be a team player.

* Experience with supervising 10 or more people.

* Excellent benefits and remuneration package.


Apply in writing to:-
DA-18533
c/o The Tribfiife
P.O.Box N-3207








'Abacc 6lutb
WlNO(IN0 AV
AAC*, tAAMAS ,
Has a vacancy for a
Membership Sales Executives:
-Exceptional written and verbal communication skills, organization
skills
-Exceptional Telephone skills
-Public speaking preferred
-Ability to demonstrate strong relationship sales capability
-Ability to interface professionally with all members of staff
-Generation and execution of an annual business plan
-Self generation of buisness through referrals and other personal
contacts
-Exceptional skills in long range guest relaional maintenance
-Use of tracking system for effective follow up andcustomer purchase
sequence
-College degree preferred
Please Send Resumes to:
Attn: HR Director
The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O. Box AB2057
Mash Harbour, Abaco
or
Fax: 242-367-0077


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Notice
NOTICE is hereby given that MELONIA ENELUS OF EAST
STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 28TH day of
OCTOBER, 2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.






on-
^^cis no Uus
WVt0Noi BAY
AOACO, *AH^AMAS
Has a vacancy for a
Sales & Marketing Project Director:
-Responsible for onsite coordination of sales, sales administration and
marketing.
-Achievement of targeted sales volume and maintaining inventory.
-Develop future(MVCI experience preferred) managers and implement
self developed program
-Implementation of tour efficiency and building of strong'team values
-Forecast and budget annual sales targets.
-Ensure communication, between personnel and others
-Excellent communication, listening and organizational skills
-Strong leadership skills
-Minimum 5 years marketing vacation ownership
-Minimum 5 years marketing in management of sales, marketing and /or
administration
-College degree preferred, but not required.
Please Send Resumes to:
Attn: HR Director
The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O. Box AB2057
Mash Harbour, Abaco
or
Fax: 242-367-0077


UL~INVSTEN OPPORTUN 0]I I TY]~IIJ~


Commercial Building located Toote Shop Corner & East Street
The property comprises 1,876 sq ft.

For conditions of sale and any other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
at: 502-0929 or 356-1608 Nassau. Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit.,
P.O. Box N-7518,. Nassau. Bahamas
to reach us before Noiember 30. 2006.


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4 unit apartment complex comprising 4.298 sq ft of living space
The building is located on Lot 6 Block 1. Nlaliboo Reef Court. Ficepoii.
Grand Bahama \. ith a gross area of 36.743 sq ft.

For conditions of sale and any other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
at: 502-0929 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit.
P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau. Bahamas
to reach us before November 30. 2006.







TRIBNE SORTSMONDY, CTOBR ~0 200, PAE 7


Cougars on top in legends clash
ACTION from the Phil Smith Legends Basketball Classic between the Becks Cougars and the
Kentucky Colonels which took place on Saturday night.
The Cougars won the match 33-11 SEE STORY ON SPORTS FRONT.
(Photos: Felipi Major/Tribune staff)


'1


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Im Anthony Strachan, winner of game
tickets, a one day car and airfare for
two, to the Dolphin vs. Green Bay
Packers game. You can be a winner
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MONDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2006, PAGE 7B


TRIBUNE SPORTS









MONDAY, OCTOBER 30,2006


SECTION



B
Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


Tigers fall

short despite

Williams' win

CROSS COUNTRY
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
O'NEIL Williams' domi-
nance over the weekend
wasn't enough to give his
school, Benedict College
Tigers, the edge they will
need to claim the Southern
Intercollegiate Athletic Con-
ference (SIAC) Cross Coun-
try Championships.
Williams, the conference's
most valuable athlete in the
SIAC, won the men's 8k run
in a time of 26:59.50 seconds,
averaging 5:25.8 seconds per
mile. He was followed close-
ly by teammate Titus Rotich
in 27:42.38 seconds and Ross
McMillan of Morehouse
College in 28:11.65 seconds.
Other Bahamians in the
hike were Antonio Williams,
who finished 33:56.87 sec-
onds and Carl Rolle who
had a finishing time of
37:05.88 seconds. Both
Williams and Rolle attend
Benedict College.
Overall Benedict College
finished second behind
Morehouse College, who
averaged a total time of
2:22:35.15 seconds, Benedict
College's time was record-
ed at 2:34:19,45 seconds.
On the women's end
Bahamian Julie Nixon
trailed teammate and new
SIAC champion Irine Chep-
koech with a best time of
23:19.56 seconds.
Nixon averaged 7:30.5 sec-
onds per mile for her 10th
- spot finishing, also compet-
ing was Antius Robinson,
finishing 26th in 25:30.33 sec-
onds.
Benedict women finished
third overall with an aver-
age time of 1:57:11.65 sec-
onds.

McKinney

reaches

semifinals
I TENNIS
ALBERT MCKINNEY
secured a spot in the semifi-
nal rounds of the men's sin-
gle's match up yesterday in
the first annual Ocean Spray
Adult tennis tournament.
McKinney beat Tim
Dames 10-3 early Sunday
morning, the win giving
McKinney his first semi final
appearance to face off with
Leroy Johnson.
Major secured his spot in
the semi final round by
defeating Trevor Burgzorg
10-8.
In other results, Ryan
Knowles defeated Eugune
Gibson 10-3 to advance to
the semifinal round, he will
await the winner of games
played between Brent John-
son and Wayne Thompson
or Patrick Whitfield and
Wenzel Cooper.
In the men's doubles, the
team of McKinney and
Jason Watson defeated
Knowles and Carlton Sey-
mour 10-7 in the quarter
finals, while Dames and
partner Brett McDonald
trounced Jay Lockhart and
Bud Cambridge 10-8.
All semi final games will
be played today starting at
6pm at the National Tennis
Center.


The Cougars win as old









rivals serve u a classic


* BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
IT TOOK a little while for them to
get started, but once they got going it
looked as though someone had reversed
the hands of time.
The fierce, but friendly, rivalry
between the Becks Cougars and the
Kentucky Colonels brought Sir Kendal
Isaacs v mnasium to life on Saturday
evening. as hundreds ofeager fans gath-
ered to x\atch the legends pla) in honour
of teammate and close friend Phil Smith,
a sporting icon.
The first annual Phil Smith Legends
Basketball Classic was claimed by the
Cougars after a nail biting close out, 33-
31.
Even though both teams were out in
full force, many viewed it as a bitter
sweet moment, paying respect to those
former members of the clubs who
passed a\\ay.
For Reggie Forbes, the game high
scorer \\i h 10) points, playing in the clas-
sic brought back memories thathe was
, onIl\ able to share %\ith his friends and
family members.
He said: "It feels great to return and
play in honour of ai man who deserves it,
even though I had played a few times
after that. I had my time as youngster, so
I was very happy to know that my sons,
who are now 10 and 11 years old can
come out and witness this grea event.
"This event gives us as players an
opportunity to showcase to the younger
basketball players and our fans that
both clubs are still vibrant. The goal is to
try and re-energise basketball in the
country. When I sit down and tell some
of the younger players about some of
my teammates and persons playing for
the Colonels and how wellthey played
and the passion we had for the game,
some of them laugh it off, but I hope
they can see how dedicated we were in
the past and that same dedication has
brought us out here in full."
The Colonels won the tip for the
opening possession in the game, but it
was the Cougars who struck first.
After five minutes of play the Cougars
scored a basket from the free throw
line. Colonels tried to get back into the
swing of things, feeding Sterling Quant *
in the high post, but Fred 'Papa' Smith
and Joe Delancey double quickly, forc-
ing him to throw the ball up quickly.
Colonels made five trips down court
before Charles 'Softly' Robins con-
nected with a 'sky hook' that rattled
around the rim for a few seconds before
dropping.
Although the first quarter of the game
was a low scoring one, 10-5 in favour of
the Cougars, fans remained seated, anx-
ious to witness what would happen next
in the second quarter..
Both teams had brushed off the cob-
webs by this time, turning up the heat.
The Colonels had brought on some of
their younger players, to play alongside
Sharon 'the General' Storr.
Storr, who was well known for his
fast hands on defence, had helped to
turn the tables on defence for their
team. The Colonels held the Cougars to
just five points in the second quarter, as
they blazed to 16 points to take a six
point lead.


* ACTION from the thrilling legends dash on Saturday night.
(Photo: Feli i Major/Tribune staff)


There was no looking back for the
Colonels after taking the lead, the team
of Quant, Billy Anderson, Craig
Watkins, Robins and Storr were back in
motion.
Quant's presence in the middle made
it difficult for the Cougars to go inside.
At one point Quant had swatted four
back-to-back attempts by the Cougars.
But the Cougars weren't about to roll
over and play dead helping the team
to fight their way back into the game
were Delancey, Forbes, Ricky Fergu-
son and Andrew Colebrooke.


In fact the Cougars' game winning
shot was placed in the hands of
Delancey after missing a free throw.
But, according to Robins, the
Colonels will forever have the Cougars'
number.
Robins said: "I really enjoyed this, I
think the beautiful part of this whole
thing is renewing old friendships. Some
of the guys you haven't seen them in a
long time. We always have the Cougars
number, we knew it was only a matter of
time we would have won the game, but
the whole thing was basically about


friendship in honour of a very dear
friend. /
"Tonight brought tears to my/6yes
because you don't know the effect you
have on people because you played a
basketball ganie.
"But when I walked in here this after-
noon and the amount of people that
hugged you and were so happy to see
you return to the court one more did my
heart very well But my mind did go on
Cabbage Poitier and Anthony Bost-
wick, they were very close friends of
mine."


I


Winners are announced on Cool96 FM between 10-1 lam
every Friday One winner will be selected from every Subway
Restaurant in Nassau.
To be eligible to win, put your name, daytime phone number
and address on the back of your receipt every time you make
f a purchase at Subway and drop
it into the box for a chance f /I 77\


to win a free lunch.


~iz~1f
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Subway employees and family members of employee are not llble. 02006 DA


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