Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00559
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: October 20, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00559
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text










.''FEBST8 O R


oFB


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION




~he~BAHAMAS ~iEDITIO


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2006


i


Vo ume: 102 No.274


PRICE 750


~


pi By PAUL TURNGUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
DANIEL Wayne Smith, the
20-year-old son of former Play-
mate Anna Nicole Smith, was
buried yesterday at Lakeview
Cemetery, at what reports
reveal was quite a tumultuous
ceremony. .
Amiia Nicole and her lawjrer,
Howard K Stern, who claims to
be the father of her newborn
daughter, Dannie Lynn Hope,
arrived at the cemetery shortly
before 2pm in two private v hite
limousines, with their own pho-
tographers.
A' small crowd of onlookers
watched from is distance as the
gold-coloured coffin arrived.
However, they were Inot
allowed any closer as a horde
of police officers, plainclothed
and uniformed, guarded the ser-
vice. Bishop Neil Ellis conduct-
ed the funeral, attended ljy no
more than 20 people.
From inside the green tent
that blocked the service from
onlookers, a woman, believed
to be Anna Nicole, screained:
"I'm sorry, I'm sorry.: I don't
want rny, husband, I want my
sork lack. Leave me alone! ,
Leave: me alone, don't touch
me!"
During .the service, a jocal
photographer saul Anna Nicole
clear the f-unerail te~nt. take'baby
Dannie Lynn out of the limou-
smne, and carry her to the jran ice
inrside: the tent f ora afew
moments before retrrnirig her
to the vehicle.
According t~o the funeral
boklet's bt ary,A'ian Id had .


Itlan osu ..w


H


i


through most of his education,
but had still to determine a
career path. However, said the
booklet, ".his opportunities were
limitlesss"
."He passed up a lucrative
opportunity to act and to mod-
el," according to the booklet,
"because he understood the
intense scrutiny experienced by
his mother. Instead he ;thought
recently that he might want to
be a rocket scientist.
"Daniel was a friend to all
who met him. They loved bvery-
thing about him. He was smart,
humble, and had a great sense
of humour. and all of his friends
knew that he could always be
trusted."
The obituary said that Daniel
w\~as the driving force: that sus-
tained his mother through all
of her trials an'd tribulations.
"He was the glue that held
his mother together during her
rnost difficult times. He would
playfully call her 'woman', and
then proceed to put any prob-
lem in its proper perspective.
His -mother's nickname for him
was 'pumpkin hea~dl' But in
truth he was her pride and joy,
and he was her reason for
:being."
This notion was further
expanded in a very emotional
tribute written by Anna Nicole
herself to her sojn entitled "A
Mother's Reme~mbrance.'
"My dearest son. Daniel, you
are my rock,. you are the only
'one who could keep me: solid."
the letter started;"why God
took you away from me ~Ido
not know, understand; perhaps
SEE page three


3 CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: The setting for Daniel Sinith's burial; Anna NYicole Smith's baby, Daninie Lynn, is taken to the service;
the limousmne carrying Anna Nicole Smith ~arriv~es for the funeral.


(Photos: FelipE Major/Titibune sta~ff)

Redevelopment 'will rid

Bay Street of unsightly blights'


eI
cc
C
a
tr
In
"j
se
te
m


MBy KRYSTEL. ROLL
.WHEN you put togerber
:busvecrow ded streets worh tnsuf-
Slicient parking. dilapidated
buildings. and peddlers harasi-
Ing tounsis. )ou end up writh the
every~Tday scene of downtown
SNaSSau. Howev~r, all that wrill
.change \\then the business plan
;for the redevelopment of the
area is started.
.In its entirel i'he drear!, pic-
.ture described above is not
entire) accurate, as there are
some bea;utif~ing~ factors such
.as the; well placed pamtmngj that
.co\ er the wa~lls where r he straw


market used to be and the rich
contrasts of the evening sky
meeting the calm seas at the
port But even writh these,
dowrntown Nassau Is far from
perfect. The private sector. mn
conjunciton wvith Government,
has beecn planning~ for the past
three yea3r5 ways to3 redevelop
and re tialize Ba\ Stree~t.
Though still In the detelop-
ment stages. the plan witll seek
to nd Bay Street of all ''unslght-
11 blights." This information
came from Mliniste~r of Ene~rgy
and Environment Dr Masrius
SEE page 12


de~n Prindhng Internanonal Ailr-
port ILPIA) writh Y\A'.RS. a


I sraNr HURRICANE PRKrECHNI~ NO SHUTIERS OR1 PLYWOOD NECESSRYII


:c. ~I .I ..; II.


nrbune


The


Reports of a


tumultuous



ceremony


$200m. contract to

tranIrfl 8 Ort
IBy' KARIN HERIG Canadian firm, a subsidiary of
Tribune Staff Reporter 1'ane~oute-r Airport Serv'ic~s
(Y\'RI
GOV\E RNMlENT ves~teldl AddreJ,-ssing the mnedia nt the
ntered into a managemencnt rigning ofi the contract In the
ontract with a well k~nown Cjbinet room \ejterday, Pr-ime
anadian airport c~ompan! at Mlinister Pe~rn Christie hailed
cost of about t'"OOl million to the agreement as an --hlstorical
ansformi Linden Plndling step" In the miascile shift In rthe
terrnational Alirport into~ the Bahama~s' approach to alrport
ewel ofthe Caritbbean."" operations
After a three-year selection Follow\ing yesterday's rign-
nd negotiation process and ing, there is now\ a h0-day hand-
~veraldelays, government ~es- ole-r pe~riod before Y\'RAS
rday finally signed a 10-ye~ar asjumes operations at the air-
anagement contract for Lin- port.


SEE page 11


SPGT WINGUlARD IS I : I :u & PROVEN!





uwrist angry



with author itie s'




handling of death Coripted Merial



of Daniel Smith Sviin me antpn


MAIN SECTION ~ fi?
Local News.......Pls;23,5;6,7,$ 8b;f
Editorial/Letters. ....:. .... 9
Out There ..............:,... :,.-kir.........
TV G uid e.................... .... -.....$
Weather............ .........;. :-7r
BUSINESS/SPORT'S "
Business .........e.. .. .9

Comics........~

Sports......4.,,(t


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2006


MBy ALISON LOWE
ON the day of 20-year-
old Daniel Smith's funeral
- six weeks after his drug-
induced death during a visit
to his mother and new baby
sister a Bahamian jurist
expressed anger at the
"injustice" that has so far
been done: to the Bahamian
public by authorities since


his death.
The jurist's anger and dis-
appointment with authori-
ties centred on the fact that
they have thus far not con-
ducted. or set a date for an
inquest into Daniel's death.
despite it being a "matter of
policy and procedure" in all
cases of "sudden death."
such as his, in which no-one
is criminally charged.


The result of this lapse: is
that dererminations that "no
foul play" was involved in
Daniel Smith's deatb remain
merely speculai\tive accord-
ing to the sources who
denounced such claims as
"irresponsible" and ''scar "
In Monday's INSIGHT.
Tribun~e managing editor
John Mlarquis described simn-
ilar concerns:
''Pathologist Cyrll W'echt
told us Daniel had at least
three drugs in his body...and
that the acute toxicity' of
this powerful cocktail prob-
ably caused his death. With
that established it is clear
that Daniel's death is not
natural. .
"An inquest now needs
to decide whether it was an
accident, a suicide, a homi-
cide or a case of misadven-
ture."
Yesterday, however, the
lawyer ultimately expressed
confidence in the likelihood
that an inquest would lve~n-
tually take place.
"It' certainly has not fin-
ished,'" said the source. +
.:It was claiined that
because of the high profile
o~f the cate, authorities w\ill
nor be able to~ ",just push
something like that under
the rug.
"If you are not going to
.charge anyone.with homi-
cide, you must hod1 an
inquest, there's rio ifs and

MA PAGE from yesterday's
orderef service paymngtribute
to Daniel Smith.


11- ; *..L 11il 11


buts about that," said the
source'.
~According to the source,
however, the pertinent ques-
tion with regard to the
inquest is: "When? "
Without an inquest at this
stage "you know you're los-
,,ing your trail," and as more
time elapses since Daniel's
death, it becomes increas-
Singly likely that evidence
can disappear. "
Last week, Chief Magis-
trate Roger Gomez told Thie
Tribune that before a date
could be set police and
pathology reports had to be
completed.
However, the lawyer
implied the possibility that a
decision as to whether an
inquest is to be held could
be delayed indefinitely by
Sthe police.
"How long is it going to
take the police officers to
Scomplete their report -
how long? asked the jurist.
Pointing out that the
coroner's court closes ort
December 15, the jurist indi-
cated that time was "run-
ning out.
According to assistant

Re "'a'd oegsno hol fur
Baha'mian police officers
who went to California to
conduct investigations
returned almost two weeks
ago, reportedly bringing
with them information gath-
ered from interviews with
doctors and "other persons.",
However, at that time Mr
Ferg sons he oould not

Both the source, and
Monday's INSIGHT, stated
that a key question vet to be .
answered is how\ the 20-
year-old got possession of
the methadone, which was
later found in his system.


The October 16 edition
of People magazine quoted
somneone, who had seen the
results of the pathology
report, as claiming that "he
had seven times the thiera-
peutic dose for methadone
aind seven times the thera-
peutic dose for Zoloft" in
his system.
In time meantilie, the
source expressed fears that
authorities would set a dan-
gerous precedent if they
fail to set a date for an
iniquest.
:"There'llbe someone else
add then you'll be in trou-
ble," the source said.

Siter

Daniel Smith died ~in
10~trsH 1 stl n dse
mother. Anna~icole Smirb,
and his baby sister,. Dannie
Lynm Hope~, born three days
earlier.
After being -found dead
in the early hours of the
morning, an American
pathologist hired by Mi/iss
Smith, Dr Cyril Wecht, sub-
sequebt~ly determined that
Dsaab ~ ded aci tntsal
"coclt~ait" of drugs in his
system.
The combination of drugs
-two anti-depressants and
methadone -- would. have
reportedly affected the
brain: !ungs, and ultimately
Danie~ls heart, with devas-
tating: results.


that she believes her grand-
son w'si~ murdered.
"Daidel did not take
drugs. Noioixe could con-
vmece me of that," she told
tie show.'s host."


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Fea atan wriginartbl, go to Weady's.
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Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
frorn people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


yesterday, Dr Wecht said that
he does not know where Ms
Arthur is getting her infor-
mation from.
He said that at this time
pathologists' and ~other tech-
nicians are still calculating the
amount of anti-depressants in
Daniel's body and the role
the drugs played in his death.

Report
":; With the completion of the
toxicology report still pend.
ing some five weeks after the
you'" man"s d a hpDr Wech
this time to exclude the pos-

large amount of drugs in
Daniel's system.
He explained that there are
multiple factors to consider -
such as exact dosage taken,
the time the drugs were taken
in relation to -tinie of death
and the body's tolerance lev-
el before making any more
precise determinations.
However, in his opinion, he
said, the possibility of mur-
der in this case is very unlike
ly.


FRIDAY,
OCTOBER' 20TH
6:30am Bahamas @ Sunrise
11:00 Immediate Response
Noon ZNS News Update
12:05 Immediate Response
(Cont'd)
1:00 A Special Report
1:30 Ethnic Health America
2:00 One Thousand Dollar Bee
2:30 Aqua Kids
3:00 International Fellowship of
Christian & Jews
3:30 Paul Morton
4:00 Little Robots.
4:30 Carmen San Diego
5:00 ZNS News Update
5:05 Andiamo
5:30 The Envy Life
6:00 Caribbean Passport
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 The Bahainas Tonight
8:00 55 Degrees North
9:30 Da' Down Home Show
10:00 Caribbean Newsline
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
1:0. 10 eiae ReP g 0 a


0 CSTABUERR 2ST
6:30am Community Page 1540AM
9:00 Bahamas @Sunrise
10'00 U dro
10:30 Dennis The MenaCO
11:30 Little Robots
n000 411


CsQ~ fg 4 4
Established in 19516 by an old Bahamian farnily
Parliament Street (near Bay St.) Tel: 322-8393 or 328-7157
Fx: 326-9953
Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island Tel: 363-4161/2
SLyford Cay (next to Lyford Cay Real Estate in
........Harbour Green House) Tel: 362-5235


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2006, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


Copyrighted Matenial



Syndicated Contentj


Wi By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
PROMINENT forensic,
pathologist Dr Cyril Wecht
yesterday challenged claims
by Daniel Smith's grand-
mother that the yoting man's
death was the result of a
homicide.
Speaking with The Tribunze
yesterday, Dr Wecht called
in by Anna-Nicole Smith to


perform a second autopsy on
her 20-year-old son's body -
said that he considers the pos-
sibility that Daniel was mur-
dered "very implausible."
The 'internationally
renowned pathologist was
responding to claims by Vir-
gie Arthur, Daniel's maters
nal grandmother, that thlere
was no way that her grand-
son ~took the drugs found in
his system on his own accord.


Ms Arthur, who spent 28
years working in US law
enforcement told CNN's
Nancy Grace that there was
seven times the accepted
amount of anti-depressants in
Daniel's body at the time; of
his death,
During her interview oil.
CNN, Ms Arthur also hinted
that her grandson may -have
been murdered.
Speaking from Pittsburgh


Fuea UHfCC T0m10 y fO T

son of Anna Nicole Smith


for such a short time. I give God thanks for
letting you see her. For that I give him
thanks. But for taking you away, my heart is
empty. I will come home to you. Your moth-
er always and forever."
Daniel was pronounced dead on Septem-
ber~ 10, 39 days ago, at Doctors Hospital.
Since then, both private and public autopsies
have been conducted. Court, officials have
stated that they are still awaiting the con-
clusion of police investigations before they
can announce iyhether or not a coroner's
in uest will be held into his death.


FROM~ page, one

.one day I will. flf.I h
"You were so young, so full of ie wis
he would have taken me instead. You were
always afraid of dying, and I' never believed
you. And now you're gone, and I don't
know how mommy's going to make it with~
out you.
"It's so hard to think of you', but I do
every second. Please help me go on with
your baby sister, who youl loved so much





~ ~--~-
C) C
1 c~


Available from Commercial News Plroviders


1


F or ensic pathologist



challenge es homicide



claims by Daniel



Smith's grandmother





The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MA GISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K. CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising: Manager (242) 502-`2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387



Rights groups in Russia suspended


Attorey's emova









EDITOR, The Tribune.
I W~AS not surprised to see that attorney Michael Scott has
removed his services frorn Anna Nicole Smith. My sympathy
goes out to him. I recall that Mr. Scott not so long ago suffered
the tragic and untimely death of his young soil the result of
a traffic accident.
It could not have been easy for him to deal with Ms. Smith as
she planned to celebrate a non-legal commitment ceremony with
her lawyer-boyfriend Howard K. Stern on a boat off Paradise
Island while the body of her young son Danny remained in a
Nassau morgue four weeks after his death,
I suppose grief is expressed in many ways. In my opinion Ms.
Smith's self-indulgence does not speak well for her method of
dealing with grief.
CONCERNED
Oassau, 20
Oct ber, 20

8haro yo"r newvs

.The Trib~une wants to hear
from people who are
making, news mn their B
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a jk
good cause, campaigning
for improvements mn the.
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



289 Market St. South P.O. Box N-7984 Nassau, Bahamas

.~ "With God behind you, you can
face inhatever is ahead of you."
SUNDAY SERVICES
PASTOR EL FRNCS J.P.,D.D.
SMarriage Officer, Counsellor, Intercessor
Phone: 323-6452 393-5798
Fax: 326-4488/394-4819




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hemdaccountda heeforthisngov-
inactions of his government,
including his MPs, in fact,
most especially his MPs.
If Prime Minister Christie
cannot ensure accountability
and responsibility in his gov-
ernment, and it seems he
can't, then he needs to resign!
The government cam~iot sim-
ply run itself. That happens in
no' organisation, 'certainly not
in any successful one. And, at
the end of the day, as in every
orgamisation, accountability


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2006


.cassor

$67d 00


ends at the top. Yesj where
the tough and difficult deci-
sions are made, that is why
Perry Christie is Prime Minis-
ter.
If Perry Christie is not up to
the tak and it appears he is

The young people, my peers,
are tired of this indecisive, do
nothing, plenty talking Prime
Minister and this dishon-
ourable, untruthful and most
ineffective PLP government.
They all need to go!

SAM DEAN
A Frus'trated
Youth
Nassau,
October 10, 2006.


EDITOR, The Tribune.
AS A yourig person and
first time voter I am very
shocked and outraged by the
initial behaviour of our PLP
lelected re rese~n aies name-
Kenyatta Gibson. Having dis-
played their total lack of
maturity they proceeded to
demonstrate that they are also
devoid of truthfulness and
forthrightness by not telling
what really happened between
them in the Cabinet Room on
the Jones &r Co Sunday Radio
Show two weeks ago.
We all know that Prime
Minister Christie is aware that
there was a fist-fight, as we
say "a bust-up" and there is
no responsibility, no account-
ability, and the PLP govern-
ment intends to just "move
on", what they really mean is
"(cover-up".
Well, the PLP government
.and party needs, to know that
the Bahamian people are not
Just "moving on" or "cover-
ing-up". This was unaccept-
able behaviour then and it is
worse now because based on
all accounts, these men have
not told the truth to the
Bahamian pe le as our rep-
resentatives aond Prime Min-
ister Christie has done nothing
about it. It is things like this
that cause people to call us a
"Banana Republic", its seems,
"anything buck-up goes" but
that is n~ot so! We will not
have it! Bhn o
Young Baamians wan t
be PSpud of their country,
their political leaders and our'
political processes. They must
be above-aboard and be seen
'to be above-board, otherwise
how can the average person
be expected to have ~confi-
dence in the system, its fair-
ness and feel, much less
believe or know that they
have a stake in it all?
Both MPs have had more
than ample opportunity to
resign, but they have not
(although there have been a
lot of reports) and, if they did,
there has been no official
announcement of nL. Hence,
in my opinion they have fur-
ther failed to be honourable
men.
Prime Minister~ Christie,- sin-
gularly, is now to blame for
where' we are today. iHe
should have undoubtedly fired
both of the MPs long before
now. Mr Christie needs to be


Frontieres, or Doctors Without Borders, said it
had to halt some: of its humanitarian work in
Chechnya and a programme in Moscow involv-
ing homeless children because two of its Ihree
offices -- toe bdaed' in Belgium and France -
Thelasw obliged foreign-based groups to com-
plete the procedure by the deadline or suspend
their activities.
The European Union said it had "repeatedly
expressed concern'" about the NGO law since its
adoption in April.
"We attach paramount importance to~ the
principle of freedom of association and we hope
the NGO law will have a positive rather than
negative impactt" European Commission
spokesman Pieltro Petrt16ci said. .
An official from the Council of Europe,
Europe's leading human rights body, urged the
Russian government to issue the necessary per-
mits. "'We deeply hope that the authorities will
very quickly give registration to organizations
such as Amnesty," Annelise Oeschger said.
The National Democratic Institute for Inter-
.national Affairs and the International Repub-
lican Institute, both U.S.-based organizations
that promote' democracy, were also affected by
the suspension order which lets NGOs keep
paying staff and remain in their offices.
Officials have accused NGOs of filing their
applications too late, saying many only began
ehe poe in July, although the law came mnto
But the NGOs complained of shifting guide-
lines and onerous red tape; one requirement
,, stipulated that organizations had to submit per-
sozi'al details on their founders, even if they
were dead. Some devoted lengthy time, to
Searching for death certificates or affidavits
from widows.
A Western NGO ~activist, who spoke n con-
dition of anonymity to avoid jeopardizing the
registration process, accused authorities of delib-
erately seeking ways to obstruct the applica-
tions.
Panchenko said 107 groups completed the.
procedure in time.
The Justice Ministry had earlier estimated
the number of foreign groups in Russia at
between 200-500, but Panchenko said only
.about 250 were probably working in the coun-
try.
Russian NGOs face even more onerous con-
trols under the law, which allows authorities to
b they aeanu dodto th naenthG cutys tojnea
al security or "morals."
SThe law has already been! used by prosecutors
who successfully petitioned a court to order the
closure.1ast week of a Russian rights group crit-
ical ofgovernrment's conduct in Chechnya. .
(r This article is from The Associated Press -
@ 2006


MOSCOW Russia brushed aside U.S.
objections Thursday and forced nearly 100 for-
eign non-governmental organizations, includ-
ing leading human rights groups, to suspend
to trationsdfor missing a d~eadhine for re-regis-
Those wh~o had to stop work included
Amnesty International and Human Rights
Watch, which have been persistent critics of
President Vladimir Putin, and some accused
the authorities of deliberately keeping them in
legal limbo.
Kim Reed, an NGO lawyer who is advising
several foreign groups, told The Associated
Press that the Federal Registration Service was
creating constant delays by insisting on minor
changes to documents that the head offices had
to prepare from scratch.
"It appears that if you are an organization
involved in human rights or democracy activi-
ties, then your application gets much harsher
scrutiny. Even if you are not sending police and
court bailiffs to shut down their office, by not
registering them, you are effectively doing that,"
she said
Alexander Petrov, deputy head of the
Moscow office of U.S.-based Human Rights
Watch, said the group had to stop its research
work Thursday, including interviewing rights
victims, as well as participation in public events. .
He said the organization hoped to resume
bueurti dede of th fb Octo to
submit plans for 2007.
Putin, who has warned against foreign-
financed groups interfering in domestic poli-
tics, has been accused of backsliding on democ-
racy and freedom of the press since~ he took
office in 2000.
Western governments have expressed strong
concern about the law, which imposed~ strict
limits on all NGOs, but especially Russian ones,
as likely to curtail civil freedoms. The State
Department on Wednesday urged Russia to
speed up the re-registration process and to allow
all NGOs to continue operating.
But Justice Ministry official. Anatoly
Panchenko said, authorities were unable to
process the registrations of 96 NGOs by the
midnight Wednesday deadline, although he
promised they would do so as soon as possi-
ble.
"We will do our best, to process them as
quickly as possible so they can resume their
wo k," he told the AP.bthITRasnes
agency as saying that the number of spending
applications had fallen to 93. The Danish
Refugee Colincil, an aid group active in Chech-
nya that has had uneasy relations with the Russ-
ian government, said it was told that its permit
would be issued Friday.
However, medical aid group Medecins Sans


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WHEIREAS, Physiotherapy is the science that utilizes physical agents su~ch as
'heat, cold, water and electricity as well as therapeutic exercises and inessage to
treat patients suffering from injuries, diseases or movement clsftinction and to
rehabilitate' them to their previous level of function;

AND WH1EREAS, th'e Barhamas Assoiation of Phisiothera pisis 713AFF)
seeks to make the public aware of the organization, the physiotherapy
services available locally and to bring ~together physiotherapists: nationwide;

SANIi WH-EREAS, the Bahamas Association of Physiotherapists has set
aside a week to promote these goals under the theme" Achieving Optim;al
Phiysi'cal Potential";

NOW, ITHEREFORE, I, Perry G. Christie, Prime Minister of the
SCommonwealth of The Bahamas, do hereby proclaim the period beginning
SSunday, 15 October and ending Saturday 21 October 2006 "Physiotherapy
Weekt

IN WITNESS WHEREOF
I have hereto set my Hand
and Seal this 17th day of
October 2006.
Signed
Perry G. Christie
PRIME MIINISTER


XI


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2006, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


* In brief

Re-entry to


fo srthotse born
in Bahamas


Ba~hEma~s w l agai ne en tibhl:
to enter the visa lottery known
as the 2008 Diversity Immigra-
tion Programme, the US
Embassy announced.
The programme makes avail-
able each year by random selec-
tion 50,000 permanent residence
visas to persons from countries
that have low rates of immigra-
tion to the United States.
Last year 12 Bahamians were
selected.
Visas are apportioned among
six geographic regions based on
immigration rates over the last
five years, with a greater num-
ber of visas going to regions
with lower rates of unnugation.
Eligibility to apply for this
pgamm un d t rnunedtbia
zenship or residence, the
embassy explained in a state-
ment.
SIt said that persons born in
any one of the following 19
excluded countries cannot par-
ticipate in the programme for
the year 2008:
The United Kingdom (except
Northern Ireland) and its
dependent territories, Brazil,
Canada, China (mainland
born), Colombia, Dominican
Republic, El Salvador, Haiti'
India, Jamaica, Mexico, Pak-
istan, Peru, Philippines, Poland,
Russia, South Korea, and Viet-
nam.
The statement continued:
"'If a person Avas born in an inel-
igible country, but your spouse
was not, you can claim your
spouse's country of birth instead
of your own, provided you and
your spouse will immigrate to
the United States together.
"Both you and your spouse
can submit individual entries.
If you were born in a country
where neither parent was born
or residing at the time, you may
be able to claim one of their
countries of birth.
"If selected, the princ~ipal
entrant must also provide prp~of
of a high school education or
its equivalent, or show two
years of work experience in an
occupation that requires at least
two years of training or experi-
ence within the past five years."

Christie to
conrsult with
Cabinet OVO'

replacements
THE decision to replace
Keod Smith as Ambassador of
the Enivironment and Kenyatta
Gibson as chairman of the
Gaming Board will be made
after Prime Minister Perry.
C~hristie consults with his Cabi-
net.
SAt a press conference at the
Office of the Piime Minister on
Cable Beach on Tuesday, Mr
C~hristie said he 'accepted the
resignations of both men Mr
Smith' on Octob.er 3 and Mr
Gibson on October 5, effective
on ave the power to appoint
the ambassad'orsbut it is a
practice that you advise your
Cabinet colleagues' of the pro-
poised appointments with a view
to having their concurrence,"
'he said.
He added that the appoint-
ment of chairman of the Gam-
ing Board is done in consulta-
tion with the minister respon-
sible for gaming, according to
the law.
The two MPs were involved
in an altercation on Mlonday,
September 25 following a par-
liamentary meeting at Cabinet
Office in the Churchill Build-

inT is re lewd n Na 1age to
pubic property and public out-
cry for their dismissal.
The prime minister added
that while he accepted their res-
ignations, he has never been
one to condemn any of his col-
leagues or opponents to a life of
banishment from the body
: oliic because they made a mis-


tke
"I certainly did not adopt that
position when leading FNM
personalities were caught in
serious improprieties and grave
ethical lapses," he said.


SMINISTER of Health and National Insurance (right) Bernard
Nottage greets Tourism Minister Obie Wilchcombe (centre)- as
THE government has able, quality health care for all Dr Nottage focused on how he arrived for the NHI presentation. At left is NHI Blue Ribbon
announced that it is one step Bahamians." National Health Insurance Commission chairman Dr Ferry Gomez. National Insurance
closer to implementing the pro- Dr Ber-nard Nottage, Miniister would be funded, who will Board director Lennox McCartney is also pictured.
posed $235 million National of Health and Njational Insur- make contributions, and what (Phroto: BIS/Tim Aylen)
Health Insurance plan. ance, said the plan is aimed at benefits ivill attach to such a
In a statement released yes- revolutioilising the availability scheme.
terday, health officials saki tl'at and delivery of health care, with "Firstly, government will ees, percentage sharing may be ance, the government is propos-
a seminar for parliamentarians over $10 litilion aimed at health contribute on behalf of the equal so what each party con- ing that private insurers have
was an important milestone in care promotions.. poor,~ wards of the state, and tributes 2.65 per cent. an option of charging co-pay-
the process - and came as "the Only government MPs anld its share of contribution by its "'Thirdly, pensioners will con- ments for services provided.
finishing touches'' were being senators reportedly attended, workers," Dr Nottage said. tribute. Altogether, the pro- "What that means is that the
put on the plan. along with independent MP "Secondly, employers, posal anticipates contribution government will pay for the ser-
The initiative was described Tennyson Wells, who hours lat- employees and self-employed revenue covering the total cost vice at the cost it is provided at
as the fulfilment of the gov- er criticised the opposition Free workers will contribute about .of the NHI of $235 million." in the public service and the
ernment's promise "of provid- National Movement for not 5.3 per cent of earnings. in the And for those Bahamian~s patient will have to pay theba~l-
ing universal access to afford- being present. case of employers and employ- who already have private insur- ance," he said.

Alcohol consumption 'linked to rise in domestic violence'


about 20-30 per cent oi
esophageal cancer, liver cancer,
cirrhosis of'the! liver, homicide,
epileptic seizures, and motor
vehicle accidents worldwide.
According to a survey con-
ducted by Bahamas Livmng Con-
ditions, households spend an
average of $103.80 on beer, wine
and other alcoholic beverages.


MBy KRYSTEL ROLL
THE steady rise of alcohol
consiumltion in the Bahamas is
not only an indication of the
increased number of persons
drinking but also one of the
reasons instances of domestic
violence and murder are esca-
lating, according to psychia-
trist Dr David Allen.
The World Health Organi-
sation's (WHO) latest report
on alcohol identifies the
Bahamas as having the 33rd
highest adult per capital~ con-
sumption of alcohol in the
world. Additionally, according
to statistics the Bahamas is in
the top 20 spirits consumers,
placing seventh behind coun-
tries like Saint Lucia, Dominica
and Thailand.
Dr Allen explained that


The problem with alcohol
consumption, Dr Allen said, is
that it causes one to lose his or
her inhibitions.
When someone becomes very
angry their palse rate increases,
and blood pressure rises, he said.
"When our pulse rises 10 per
cent above normal when we're
angry our IQ drops about 30


points so it really means when -
we're angry we're stupid."
Which can lead to a whole
variety of problems including
domestic abase, child abuse.
"When. your IQ drops, and
you take a drink if there's a
knife or gun in the house, then
that could lead to a problem."
Alcohol is estimated to cause


Bahamian~s turn to alcohol as a
source for relaxation, or as a
way to lose inhibitions.
"In some, sense we have; a
high, grandiose self -- when
your expected level of life~ far
exceeds the actual level of life.
And so from age 21 each
Bahamian carries a heavy
grandiose self which is relieved
on a Friday or Saturday night
with alcohol," he explained.
The Bahamas like most
resort communities has a very
high rate of alcohol consump-
tion, Dr Allen added.
"In the Bahamas we don't
make tonics and gin, we make
gin and tonics. Sometimes you
get, twice as much gin in your
drink than you would get any-
where else in the world. But
this is a part of our atmosphere
of play and relaxation and fun.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAG;E 6, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2006


ies and Gaming Act, with a
view to establishing a national
lottery and permitting Bahami-
ans to not only own casinos, but
also to gamble locally.
In today's Bahamas, barring
citizens and permanent resi-
dents from legally gambling is
appearing more and more as an
attempt to govern morality.
~A national referendumn must
be held to truly gauge the pub-
lic's pulse about legalising gam-
'bling by locals and whether they
would support national lottery!
In the September 14, 2006,
edition of The Tribune it was
reported that customs officials
were confiscating gaming
machines that are being used
illegally in local establishments
throughout New Providence
and the Family Islands.
'Reportedly, Controller of
Customs John Rolle also stated
that the operation was a con-
tinuing effort, though he could
not say how many machines
were seized.
It is obvious that: in today's
sil a toshpheretocustonsdman
and seize gaming machines as
operators will continue to take
risks to import them becatise par-
taking at gambling and numbers
houses has increasingly become a
most popular Bahamian pastime
- and a lucrative venture.
In a newspaper report last
year, BDM leader Cassius Stu-
art referred to the Lotteries and
Gaming Act, which excludes
BahamiaIjs from gambling at
local casinos, as discriminating
and unconstitutional.
Mr Stuart added: "A .iaw
cannot exist in' a country which
permits one group of people
from doing something, while it
allows another group to do the
same. The Lotteries and Gam-
ing Act chapter 387 is an invalid
act because it allows for a form
of discrimiination against the cit-
izens of the Bahamas." Indeed,
Mr Stuart is right!
The .Lotteri~es and Gaming
Acr~t~b ineqiui;lable and sets an
into~l'l shli c double standard.
A.llnunc JI) I do not support
the idea of Bahamians gambling
at hotel casinos with tourists.


GI B S ON


ADR I AN


amusement games are legal,
they have discovered that sev-
eral business proprietors are
purchasing them and convert-
ing' them into gaming machines.
Actions such as this are bla-
tant indications of the popular-
ity and appeal of gambling.
throughout Bahamian society
- regardless of any illegality.
Amending chapter 387 of the
Lotteries and Gaming Act would
undoubtedly lead to protests
from the usual suspects that
is, the 'vocal when convenient'
Bahamas Christian Council and
other churchmen even the~
nunibei~s house operators who
can make much more money by
operating illegally.
Churchmen must realise that
every church raffle is form of
gambling. What is the differ-
ence between paying a dollar
that he ga e ersty u'c sh
and spending a dollar for a raf-
fle ticket, taking the gamble
with hopes to win a new car,
free trips or some accessories?
Is this some form of "soft-core"
gambling?
In an effort to curtail illegal
gambling and develop a lawful
format that would benefit
B:ahamians, the government
must overlook electoral threats
and/or the propensity to please
campaigning churchmen to lock
up their church members' votes.
.We must realise that while
many protesters will reject any
governmental effort to pernnt
Bahamians to gamble, many of
them are keenly aware that a
gargantuan percentage of
monies/tithes collected in their
church coffers each Sunday/Sat-
urday stems illegal gambling,
Politicians must begin to con-
sider the bigger picture~ when it
comes to lotteries and gaming,?
and discard the religious and
politically based narrow-mind-
edness known to classicallyl afflict
legislators around election time!
ajbahama@hotmail~com


However, allowing for local
ownership of casinos and .for
Bahamians to gamble at these
,establishments may be a worth-
while compromise,
It would be in the govern-
ment's interest to lift the ban
on locals gambling, and instead
launch a national lottery that
could generate supplementary
funds for infrastructural and
human development.
The establishment of a
national lottery would lessen the
burden on taxpayers and assuage
governmental budgetary con-
straints as it relates to road
repairs, reparations to schools
and government buildings, con-
structing and upgrading of parks,
and increasing the pay of gov-
ernment workers and soon.
Continuing to disallow
Bahamians by law from gam-
bi is merely a la rnyt
enforced as many Bahtimians
daily (some hourly) buy num-
bers, sometimes more than they
buy bread!
Some Bahamians are so fix-
ated with numbers that some
spend one or more dollars per
day some spend much riore
- with hopes of winning their
dream payout. Unfortunately,
as local gambling is forbidden,
these monies cannot be rein-
vested into the country's infra-
structure or some other nation-
al cause via taxes earned or gov-
erilment involvement.
In the Bahamas, particularly
in Nassau, there are numbers
houses on every street corner'
masquerading as web sh~ps.
However, I was recently told
that several of these so-called
"web shops".do not even have
computers, with some "web
shop" operators not having the
slightest clue how to use a com-
puter or the Internet. .
Recently, former police com-
missioner and Gaming Board
Secretary Bernard Bonamy
pointed out that, although


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I


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2006, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


British American Breast Cancer Tip


C)IN


At By ALISON LOWE
SOME disgruntled residents
o Long Island may be using an
ongoing investigation into the
aleged release of toxic fumes
t vent "animosity" towards a
siesthere, said director of
vrnetal Health Ron Pin-

SMr Pinder was expanding on
his earlier claims that "mischief
is afoot" on the island, where
investigations are underway into
a company after allegations of
toxic poisoning.
In response to the headline
o-" a story in yesterday's Tri-
bane, which implied that Mr
P nder had stated that all the
allegations were unsubstantiat-,
ed, yesterday he clarified that
a'number of the complaints
wpere certainly serious enough
tcl warrant further investigation.
INonetheless, Mr Pinder said
tdat based on his officers' inves-
tikations so far, it appeared that
"g significant amount of the
mpans(were) rooted in ani-
itstemming from some of
fornier business associates
ad friends of this company,
towards the owners of this com-
p ~ny. "
LEvidence had come to the
a tention of investigators that
a ." long standing feud "
between the company and for-
m er associates may have
resulted in some of the report-
e41 information being exag-


: : _ :
'i
'
I~i~i
"
;,..:;
;i', .:I `x
..,..,. ;. il..,...I


.


.John Bull Ltd. Is looking for people who:

* Know what it means to give outstanding
customer service
* Are mature candidates (25 years and over)
* Have experience in sales, skincare and
makeup application
* Strong communication -skills
* Desire to bring fun and enthusiasm to our family
* Truly believe the customer always comes first

We offer:

* A great group of people to work with
* A competitive benefits package
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please complete an application form (available at
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and a copy of a police certificate and submit to:

The Human Resource Dept., #284. Bayl St.
P.O. Box N-3737, Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: (242) 328-4365 Email: info~johnbull.bs


A RON Pinder


gerated, said Pinder.
Last month, it was reported
that several residents on the
island have been diagnosed with
respiratory problems, which a
local pulmonologist has identi-
fied as potentially resulting from
exposure to toxic fumes emitted
from a boat-building operation.
On Wednesday in the House
of Assembly, MP for Long
Island and Ragged Island Larry
Cartwright asked that the


results of the investigation into
the complaints be made public.
Mr Pinder explained that the
report had not yet been tabled
in parliament because investi-
gations were continuing, with
the initial findings currently
under review by the Mimistry of
Health,
The results of the depart-
ment's investigation are expect-
ed to be made public in the next
week.


:JYOU'RE never too old to
fytlfil your writing ambitions,
a4Nassau resident James Frew
his proved over and over
a an.
Mr Frew, 86, has just cele-
b ated the seventh printing of
his novel Bahamas Passage,
which is on sale at bookshops
a~d gift shops throughout the
Biahamas.
(And his next book also on a
Bhamas theme is expected
tobe published early next year.
[Mr Frew, who lives at South
Qcean Beach, began writing as
a hobby when he was 70. He
nbw has half a dozen books to ~
his name and still pecks out his


fast-paced prose on an old type-
writer,
"It's just something I like to
do," he told The Tribune,
An internationally-known
architect and former wartime
pilot, Mr Frew uses his spe-
cialised knowledge to good~
effect in his books.
As a lifelong aviator, he
makes frequent references to
aircraft in his novels and all
with the unerring authority of a
flying veteran.
His last book, Volcano San-
torini, uses as a theme the
largest explosion known to
'mankind the destruction of a
Mediterranean island and the


eradication of the Minoan civil-
isation.
Bahamas Passage, which is
now published in a mass paper-
back edition, has proved a pop-
ular buy with tourists.


Earlly detectionz is the key...

.'t.~~l :" f


-.- ;.j r:1 :; : :i I
. ..r 0




umpit~bl.r his entry form before November 1st, 2006 arid mail to Doctors Hospital ~
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The Tribune







, .


Bahamnas-fla~gge ship in collision
THE Bahamas-flagged cargo ship Roko is seen in Rio de Janeiro's Guanabara bay on Wednes-
day, October 18. Shortly before midnight Tuesday, Roko ran into a smaller Brazilian boat, the
Costa Azul, which quickly sank, according to Sonia Cristina, a spokeswoman for the Rio de Janeiro
fire department.

ill~ .


1..
s
-- ~L --.





We wish to inform our Credit Card customers
that we will be upgrading our Credit Card
SAccount Management system this weekend,
from Friday, October 20th to Sunday, October
22nd, 2006.

Once this upgrade is complete, we will be able
Sto offer you enha-nced Credit Card services.

We take this opportunity to assure you that this
system upgrade will not affect your ability to
use your Credit Card for transactions during this
w~eekend.

This upgrade does not apply to, our customers
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.*I ~ 11--1- "~ ~U


~~a


THE TRIBUNE`


PAGE 8 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2006


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j rt
r
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r~LI~


s Providers


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e


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' 'I11
Ipl;~
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~iR~a~mian Rcc;ourct~s--


IMNIPO R TA NT

NOTICE





URGENT NOTICE

SThe following are vehicles stored at Betty K. Agencies
USA, 3711 N.W.SO. River DR. M~iami, FL. 33142 and
will be sold to cover expenses if notf removed on or
before NJovember 30th 2006. All interested persons
please call (242) 322-2142 or (305) 635-4650


Il II I I ~TYf~~~FII~ ~F~~ i -r I ~-


I I-


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2006, PAGE 9


tHE TRIBUNE


~ 5~ 5



New Large Sh spment


Of Japanese Vehicles


fl CO S afting From



1995 Nissan Sunny $ 4,371.00

1996 Nissan Skyhine $ 4,642.00

1996 Nissan Mar ch $ 4,191.00


Fo 0 Easy Financing Ban kAnd

Insurance On Premises


Chaeck Our Prices

BOf Ore buy ing



Ba ha mas Bus &h 'uc k


bcon-gathering th ourn ofOPBT
opereat oinsBthata theUSis stil ;
aconfien that OPBAT will .1F ba
mta ite A s i tno i m p ro e t ur r tf i
teDepartme n T ofa Defennceill "a 4*m
saontuinue to vsupot to he pro W RN yoeteuylae f h reNtoa
SMr O'Connell oversee the Cosme faishoa OCnelU As istn Sertary
adtravyellerd to ather Bahamas
~-atthern reques of US Ambs
He a ido John Rood the opios bu eae of- neddiohrteaeso
OPDlu tng ah athhe omton bu vO BsTwet r ann riep cobm rh
travielldto thet OPBAT baeo fetiees nerayse thrast ha a ana
Greaita o Exumar tian obsrvedt Tefctwlle rmetuf thc ctyft mssnte
lee At a rectioene at d theAm as- pr h rgam, r vst mecuae htw
OPBAT OPBATmen cotiu tofnc evauat "The potental for OPA is
JohHnu tospoth te p hi n RI Smo ontch, dept oB e tch te pre r ioa en
ivl be bad nnews fordrug eal hakhe licopte Afars, hc T ho ave support.ll This lok ik t S couldr
rs e art e still eevautng all wartim e; capabiliti es curre tly biise r a f re al i-i e so iaid.

RBDF officersd tol toe act
itterqeth 'fairness and ne integhritety's o


SDEFENCE Force officers
w~~ere reminded this week to
execute their duties with fair-
tiess and integrity.
o~Acting Captain Raymond
~arquharson, who currently
;serves as Captain of the Coral
rrIarbour Base, ivas speaking on
"ch haif of Commodore Davy
%olle at the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force Toastmasters
cClub 753727's historic first-ever
!n~stallation ceremony for offi-
T~I~he ev~ent, which officially
iparks the beginning afftfhe -
~club's 3~10!7 adm~imitrstile term,


was held at the Defence Force's
Coral Harbour Base.
Captain Farquharson con-
gratulated the clubs of Toa~st-
masters International and
extended a warm apprecia-
tion and congratulations to
the incoming executive offi-
cers.
' Ie encouraged them to
uphold the vision and mission of
Toastmasters International,
while executing their duties in
fairness, integrity anld commit-
ment.
ed~by area governor 44, Pamela


Rolle, who itssured the mem-
bers and guests present that
Toastmaster Club 753727 will
be a very strong club in due
time.
She admonished the officers
to be steadfast in their endeav-
ors.
"I am here to help to prepare
them for the challenges that lie
ahead"', said Ms Rolle. "Their~
collective challenge is to ni~ake
this club strong and to help peo-
ple from17 all walks of life kto
sp 'I\ ii;lln efC~tli\C maln r.
Us~ten with sensitl\It) antithmlk
Ccrealitel\ t


Dodge Caravan
Dodge Ram 1500PK
Mitsubishi Larncer
Ford Taurus
Chevy Cavalier
Ford Ranger PK
Ford Tauras
GMC Saf~ari Van
Buick Century
Ponitac Sunfire
Ford F-350
BMW-3251CR
Ford F-1;50 PK


Red
2Dr White
4Dr Wihite
41Dr Blue
4Dr Black
Red
4Dr Red
4Dr Gray
4Dr Burgudy
2Dr Black
White
White
Blue
4Dr White
41Dr Gold
4Dr Green
White/Green
4Dr Bl~ue
41Dr White
4CDr Blue
4Dr Green
4Dr Beige
4Dr Silver
2Dr Green
2Dr Red
2Dr Silver
2Dr Gold
4Dr IGold
4Dr White


1994
1995 -
2002
1997
2004
2004
1998
1997
1997
2004


Bain Elton
Bethel~ Cars
Bethel Cars
Big Mac's .
Big Mac's
Deon Bullard
David Legiste
Direo Minus
Direo Minus
Dune Auto


Dellareese Williams 1989


1990
1997


Jay &Jay
J & A Auto
] & A Auto
Kendra Ingraham
Kir-Jak & Co.
Leslie Mitchell
Moss Auto
Moss Auto
]Porcia's Imports


1999 Chevy Tahoe
1991 Infiniti Q-45
1998 Dodge Intrepid
1994 Ford Explorer
1999 Ford Van E-150l


Honda Accord
Buick Regal
GMC Safari Van
Chevy Astro Van
Honda Akccord
Mercury Sable
Cutlass Olds
Nissan-300 ZX
Mercury Cougar
Toyota Solara
Dodge Stratus
Chevy Lumina


1994
1995


Pre. Eminence Autol~997


1997
1997
2000
1996
1992
1999
2000
1998
1998


Reo Cooper
RL & Son .
Robert Munroe
Robert Dieudonne
Steven Hanna
Shines
Tevon REolle
T.C. Security
Wayne Johnson


OPBAT changes 'bad for drug dealers'


Learn about pine
forests and blue holes
at the second BNT
Nature walk just south
Of the airport on the
COral Harbour Road'l












I el I I rl -e~rl i, I- I r s~


I ~% rqL~B II


M h SILK COTTON SOUL a POETRY READ- 1
ING: The Track Road Theatre Foundation, in con-
junction with Cerasee Books, will be launching lan
Strachan's first book of poetry,. Silk Cotton Soul, a
very stirring collection of poetry that vividly captures
the writer's passion for his people and their culture. Dr
Strachan will read from the new took during a special
"meet with the author" session.on Friday, October 27
at 7pm at the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas, and
also sign copies. RfrbedhmentsesL) he uer\ed.

an e-mail to bruno.pletscher@gottardo.com or kathyvsmith@hotmail .com.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incorpo-
rated meets 6:30pm every third Wednesday at the Bahamas National Pride
Building.

International Training in ~Communication, Essence Club #3173 holds its bi-
monthly meetings on the 1st and 3rd Wednesday of each month at Doctor's
Hospital Conference Room.
Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets the second and fourtl1
Wednesday of the month, 8pm @ St Augustine's Monestary.

NEW n The Kwnis of Cb Bec invie th ubl t s reuar ky

Child, One Community at a time."

NEW School and Commuziity Nature Walk and Petting Zoo Free Every
Wednesdays from 10am 2:30pm at Earth Village Ranch, St Albans Drive and
Columbus Avenue (Chippinghamn). Call (242) 356-2274 now to make Reservations.
Odpdnt al c i asndngrop Mo ys unday from 9am 6pm. Inquire about


M LSSill:lilttW+ THURSDAY M ~E s~


eets the third Thursday of every month @ Superclubs Breezes, Cable Beach,

The recently established National Insurance Baord Retiree Association
(NJBRA), meets every fourth Thursday in the month, in the National Insurance
Board's (NIB) trammig room, Wulf Road office complex, at 6pm. All retirees
are welcome.

The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its weekly meeting every Thursday at
Choices restaurant on the campus of the College of the Bahamas. Fellowship
starts at 12:30pm, with the meeting held from 1pm to 2pm.

s 4~~885 ;..~ FRIDAY ,J M~11
A PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

SCafe Europa on Charlotte Street North, kicks off every Friday night with Hap-
py Hour... special drinks, live music/DJ from 6pm to 9pm and Nassau's first
European Night Restaurant Open Friday night till Saturday morning Sam,
serving hot foodland take out music, drinks and an English breakfast. Cafe
Europa...the perfect place to spend your night out till the morning.
5 HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of its meeting times and
Places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Fridays 6pm to7pm & 8:30pm to
9:30pm. Sacred Heart Church Fridays @ 6pm to 7pm New Providence Com-
munity Centre: Fridays @ 7pm to 8pm.

CIVIC CLUBS

TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas Baptist Community College Rm
A19, Jean St.
SNassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Friday of each month, 7.30pm at
Ernmaus Centre at St Augustine's Monestary. For more info call325.1947 after
4pm.
AMISTAD is a club which promotes the Spanish language and culture in the
community. Residents of the Bahamas who speak Spanish or are learning Span-
ish are invited to attend meetings on the third Friday of the month durizig the
academic year at 7pm mn room 13 of COB's Tourism Training Centre.


.: SATURDAY .GMg
W EN ERTAINMENT

ABSOLUT Vodka presents "Finid your Flavor" Saturday, November 4 from
8pm to lam hosted at the Nassau Botanical Gardens. This is a presentation of
Apah). Five flvu E~fve d s sf rp fe arde evinens afiv djs, five
entertainers, creating five unique moods. Absolut is the most attractive brand in
the Bahamas, come and experience Absolut like never before and find your
flavour.
5 HEALTH

Alchlc Anh usou wshe ifr h ul o t aen time an

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third Saturday, 2:30p~m (except
August and December) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street.
Doctors Hospital -CPR and First Aid classes are offered every third Saturday
of the month from 9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Community Training
Representative at 302.4732 for more information aird learn to save a life tdday.
NEW School and Community Nature Walk and Petting Zoo Free Every
Wednesday from 10am ?:30pm at Earth Village Ranch, St Albans Drive and
Columbus Avenue (Chippmngham). Call (242) 356-2274 now to make Reserva-
tions. Open to all ages and groups Monday-Sunday from 9am 6pm. Inquire
abotit additional activities and programmes.
CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR Cycling are pleased to offer a cycling clin-
ic for juniors between 10 apd 17. The free clinic will be held every Saturday in
an effort to encourage kids to cyce. Parentbm itr ted in registering their chil-

New The Rotary Club of West Nassau will hold a Fun, Run, Walk beginning at
6am on Arawak Cay. Funds raised will benefit our efforts to continue to assist
naius conunit cr dects co bute ifratinn oand deal about ha Fun,

mhepburns242.com

~a~e~s~-SUNDAY P
PRTIES, NI HTCLUBS


ST atel' bRes ReturanC, bes nBa Sret ,eftureS spca o nt anuteont -
9:30pm.
5 HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of its meeting times and
places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm.

Send all your civic and social events (attach pictures ifpossible) to
The Tribune via fac 328.2398 or e-maik ydeleveaux@
tribunemnedia~net Out there in subject line


I I C I ~ L I III(L........C 'I ~........ ~ J% ~~ PLI--- II~L IL~1111161 II --_______~__.~r______ll___._~_... .-~--.-~-~--------~-r________


--- I -- '' '


PAGE 10, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2006


L


O N I N A ND ARHO U ND N AS SA U


WH A T 'S


L~ 1 rli

2
r


EMAl L. YDELEVEAUX@TRIBUNEM EDIA. NE'f
PLEASE .PUT LLOUT T H E R E IN .THE SU BJ E CT LINE
PHOTOGRAPHS ARE WELCOME


l~a88g; MONDAY IIII
M HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the pilblic of its meeting times and
places: New Providence Community Centre: Mondays -
6pm to 7pm. The Kirk: Mondays 7:30pm to 8:30pm
Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support group meets the first Monday of
each month at 6:30pm at New Providence Community Centre, Blake Road,
Dinner is provided and free blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol testing
is available. For more info call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third Monday every month, 6pm @
Doctors Hospital conference room.
CIVIC CLUBS ,

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial Hilton Monday's at 7pm *
Club 612315 meets 19onday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach *
Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial Hilton Mondays at 7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) meets every third Monday
of the month in the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.

TUESDAY 's(g

PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS & RESTAURANTS

10.10.2.20..@ Club Nirvana: Tuesday nights at Club Nirvana, Elizabeth Avenue,
have been dubbed 10.10.2.20. Every tenth female patron is allowed into the club
absolutely free and is given a complimentary glass of Carlo Rossi. Tuesday
nights also include the Carlo Rossi's Hot Body Competition. Hosted by Daddi
Renzi and music provided by DJ Ai from 100 Jamz. Master Chef Devitco Bodie
provides scrumptious appetizers.
II HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of its meeting times and
places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Tuesday 6pm to 7pm/8:30pm to

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at 5:30pm on the second Tuesday of
each month at their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville. Call 3231.4482 for
more info.

Pre &r Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held 6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau
G-ymNastics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is
required. Call 364.8423 to register for more mnfo.
CIVC CLUBS

The Kiwanis Club of New Providence meets every Tuesday at 7:30pm at the
Holy Cross Community Centre, Highbury Park.
The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets every third Tuesday at SuperCluis
Breezes, Cable Beach at 12:30pm. We invite all community minded persons. to
attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm @ C C Sweeting Senior

Scho?' Din Rom Clee Avne s f Mos RaR Cu ose 74
Bahamais, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega chapter meets every second Tues-
da~c.3pm @ the Eleuthiera Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ Atlantic
House, IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday, 6:30pin at the British
Colonial Hilton. Please call 502.4842/377.4589 for more info.


~aa~-.WEDNIESDAY
MIP RTIE ,IGTCLUBS


Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar every Wednesday 5pm-8pm.
Free appetizers and numerous dririk specials.
5 HEALTH

,Al oholc A on mous wih infr nah pbi of t medng lms an
Nassau Group: Rosetta Street, Wednesday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

.FREE He~alth and Wellnesrs lectures ae held the first W dnsda ofee r mr
information call 327.1660 or 327.2878. FREE Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar and
Cholesterol Screening.
TheCace Scityofthe B hamas bup ort trou ome ts evr Wdeda r

Phone 323.4482

TM~ Club 2437 meets each.Wednesday on the 4th floor of the Ministry of
Health, Meeting Street at 6 pm.

5 CIVC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets every Wednesday fro~m 1pm -
2pm at East Villa Restaurant, East Bay Street. Always an mnterestmng speak-
er and great fellowship. If you would like to attend our meetings please send


I HEALTH


Free public health lectures featuring distinguished physicians are held at Doc
tors Hospital every third Thursday of the month at 6pm in the Doctors Hospital
Conference Room. Free screenings between 5pm & 6pm. For more informa-
tion call 302-4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of its meeting times and
places: The Nassaiu Group, Rosetta Street:.Thursday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays 7:30pm to 8:30pm
Pre 1 otNta in Cr sse ore ein h 6 30p ?'ursy sat Na sau


REACH- Resources &( Education for Autism and related Challenges meets
from 7m 9pm tube e ondaTI ursday of each month in the cafeteria of the

i CIVC CLUBS

Th otr 7Cu tof Na s sa unnise has brena as mein g cvr hurda


The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill meets every Thursday at 8pm at the Holy
Cross Activity Centre, Soldier Road. Guests are welcome.
Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first, second and third Thursday at the
Ministry of Health &r Environment building on Meeting Street commencing at
7:30pm. Everyone is welcome to attend.
TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8.30pm @ Super Clubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative Professionals, '3ahamas Chapter .


"The brewery of The Baxhamars"


THE TRIBUNE,


Csla
I! ;iy

,: I
I
4
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II
:
i :-i.
F.!
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Plealse Drink~ Responsibly
















'200m contract to oositin..l


-:( I:..~, : The College of Thea Bahamas
cordially invites you to attend its


OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER AND
MINISTRY OF NATIONAL SECURITY
POLICE -DEPARTMENT


Re: Traffic Press Release Notice
Full Military Funeral Service for
The late Police Sergeaint 1217 Craig Sands
Friday, 20 October 2006 at 10:00 a.m.
New Destiny Baptist Church


INFORMATION:

Full Military Funeral Service for the Late Police Sergeant 1217 Crig
Sands will be held on Friday, 20 October 2006 at New Destiny Church at
10:00 a.m.

ROUTE:

~~The Funeral Procession 147ill leave the Church after the Service in a motorcade
and travel the following route:

From New Destinyi Baptist Church, Blue Hill Road north along Blue
Hill Road to1 Poinciana Drive; west along Poiticiana .Drive to Thompson
Boulevard; .west along Thompson Boulevard to John E Kennedy Drive
continuiing west along Johti E Kennedy Drive to Prospect Ridge Road
and Tonique Darling. Highway where the motorcade and mourning Fparty
will form into a Procession and march west along John E Kennedy Drive
to Lake View Cemetery, .Gladstone Road and John E~ Kennedy Drive.

ROAD CLOSURE:

From 12:00 noon until after the Procession, the following Streets will be closed
to vehicular traffic:

(a) John K. Kennedy Drive between Tonique Darling ~Highway and Gladstone Road.

(b) Tonique Darling Highway between John E Kennedy Drive and Theodor Lane;

(c) Theordore Lane between John E Kennedy Drive and Tonique Darling Highway:

S(d) Prospect Ridge Road between John E Kennedy Drive and Skyline Drive.

TRAFFIC DIVERSION:

At the commencement of the Funeral Procession, vehicular traffic not connected
therewith will be divert-ed through side streets.

NO PARKING:

From 12:00 noon until after the Funeral Procession, no vehicles will be permitted to
park on the` Streets


Is~lsl~BE~BB~~:r.'* ;rj~


IIB~s~PB~


-- I


From 9:00 a.m. until after the Funeral Service, no vehicle will be permitted to park
on the following Street:

(a) Blue Hill Road between Newbold Street and Wulff Road.

Limited Parking is permitted in the Church Parking lot at the rear of the Church.


Paul H. .Farquharson, Q.P.M.,
Commissioner of Police.


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2006, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


::::.::. :rtgage Credit & Collections

Supervise day-to-day activities within the Mortgage
Credit & Collections area
Promote the company's mortgage product
Analyze, recommend and approve mortgage applications
IVaximize recoveries from remedial loans
Prepare various reports related to credit & collections
Requirements:
Minirnum of Bachelors Degree in Finance/Business
Administration
FiV6 yeafs eXperience in a supervisory role in mortgage
credit & collections
Ability to work with limited supervision
Excellent communications skills oral and written
Working knowledge of Microsoft Excel, Word,
POWefPoint & Publisher

CV's should be sent via e-mail to


Locals will also have that MP~iE1HITR
same preference regarding the Perr, Christie
ownership and operation of
retail businesses and conces-
sions at the airport, he
said.
Up to opening of the new ter-
minal facilities, the objective
will be to improve the financial
performance of the airport,
thereafter to turn an operating
.profit, Mr Christie said.
transof %apti of emsA te
prime minister reiterated that
anpdassacuer tfail ty fe of $ 5
introduced shortly. ...f id !
Prime Minister Christie point-
ed out that yesterday's signing is ii
'probably one of the boldest, s
and most defining eperinces
for our country.'" s
He, explained that it repre- n I1
sents a change in the country's
aprah t ar ot oceans,
duction of modern airport man- i
agement to the entire Bahamas a
tndwi cmloen e theenun nechee
resort industry in New Provi-
dence. ~~I


Technological confer ence


hr@fa
by dc


lmilyguardian.com
:tober 3:1, 2006.


SALES OFFICES: NASSAU, FREEPORT, ABACO & ELEUTHERA
CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.O. BOX SS 6232


that can be employed in develop-
ment planning, map making and
resource management.
Local organizers say the confer-
ence will have "significant impact"
on local, regional and global GIs
usThe conference will be held
under the auspices of the Office of
the Prime Minister and the Bahamas
Natioital Creographic Information
Systems (BNGIS) Centre.
"The Office of the Prime Minister
views this conference as most timely
- particularly as the nation is expe-
riencing unprecedented economic
development throughout our chain
of islands," said Carolan~n Albury,
director of the BNGIS Centre.


MORE than 250 urban planners
from around the globe have regis-
tered for an important technological
conference to be held this month in
the Bahamas.
The third Urban and Regional

will b~e a specialty -event that focuses
on the effective application of Geo-
graphic Information Systems (GIS)
and other information technologies
among agencies in the Caribbean.
It is designed to inform regional
and international users about GIS
technology and its many applications
and developments' in the region.
GIS is a system used for creating,
analysing and managing spatial data


Thomnpson Boullevard,, Nassau, The BahamaS
October 20-21, 2006 at 9:30 a.m.


Saturday, October 21, 2000
Moderator
Dr Thaddeus IMcDcinald


Friday, October 20, 2006
Moderator .
Dr Earia Carey-Baines, Dean
Faculty of Liberal and Fine Arts
The College of The Bahamas (COB)
9:30 am
Opening
Invocation
National Anthem
Welcome and In~troduction
Janyne M. Hodder, President. COB

Ii xelency, Sir Arthur Hanna
Govemnor-General of
The Commonwealth of the Bah~amas

10:00-10:20 a.m.
The Life and Tirnes of
Mother Frances Butler and, her Impact
on Sir Milo's Life and Work
Kendal Butler

10:30-11:00 a.m.
Srr Milo and Lady Caroline:
Perspectives from the Grandchildren
Loretta Butler-Turner & Clauldette Butler
Break

11:15-12-00 noon
The Religious and Church Llfe of Sir r.111l.:.
Churchman Vestry~ and Synoa Fiember i~
Sir Orvllle Turnquest GCMG 00 JF jnd~:
Cajnon Dr Klrkley San~ds


9:30-10:00 a.m.
Phinlanhropic Activities of Sir Milo
Dr G~ail Saunders, Director, Heritage

loqu-ir la Rflections of sir Milo
Honourable Loftus Roker
Former member of Parliament and
The National Cabinet

10:30-11:00 a.m.
The Political Life of Sir Milo
Honourable Paull Adderley
Attorney at Lawv
Former Member of Parliament and
The National Cabinet

11:00-12:00 noon:
An Analysis of Sir M~ilo's Political
Contributions to The Bahamas
John I: McCartney
Professor, Head of G~overnment and Law
Lafayette College, Easton, PA, USA



PR"


i1 T' d


(a) John E Kennedy Drive between Tonique Darling Highway
and Gladstone Road

(b) Gladstone Road South of John E Kennedy Drive


- Both Sides

- Both Sides


usei o., were,.,.. wna.....->


Exx~~u~~- P cae 4, amawE4sounaw,


trallSform airport


FROM page one
Under the partnership of the
Nassau Airport Development
Company (NAD) a new sub-
sidiary of the Airport Authori-
xty -eandd bVAR nts airepdo tis
a "premier world class facility"
within the next four years.
After the ten-ya ner 2
board of directors comprised of
stakeholders in the tourism

r s osble Ior ca rp otpoebae
tions. .
The prime minister explained
that during phaseoone of the
scheduled to be completed
within 24 months the physi -
cal and sanitary conditions of
the facility will be improved'
the cngc st on aswoae t wit
viated, adequate check-in
spaces for additional air traffic
will be created, and mereased
group travel and the streamlin-
ing of security checks will be
facilitated.
In phase two anticipated to
take some 48 months design
and construction of new and/or
upgraded terminal facilities and
related airport infrastructure
will take place.
During this time technical
expertise will be steadily passed
on to Bahamian staff.
Mr Christie said it is planned

mddl man ger 11 e simn f
icantly increased at the airport
within three years, and that
within six years the majority of
all five top level managers
will be replaced with Bahami-
ans
The prime minister empha-
sised that Bahamian firins will
haefirt prferec a c
h ers cos rats inr tea de'e
ment of the airport.


INSUR ANCE~

CcOMPANY


GN 419


Sir Milo Butler Centennial Symposium
honouring the life and work of
th-e first Bahami17an Governor Genieral and
National Hero of The Bahamas


"


THEF~j COLLEGE Of; TT-i BIA.HIAMAS





P~uveig


L w


25TH ANNSV ERSAR I 'BA~LL


COM'E ALONG AND MEET FRIENDS,
OLD AND NEW
A4T T-HIS CELEBRATION BALL
TO BE HELD AT

SANDALS. CABLE BEACH .
BALMORA~L BALLROOMM
FRIDAY 27rTH OCTOBER 28006
COCKTAILS AT 7PM

SOULFIl, GROOVERS/DJ
SPECL4~L GUES~T PERJFORMANQ~FCE B Y


TICKETS $150.00 E1ACH
ON SALE NOW

~~CALL B~ASRA
T EL: 325-8864
Email co@basra~org
DOOR PRIZE
2, BUSINESS CLASS TICKETS
NASSAU-MI~AMIn-LONDON DONATE~If~BJl~~ :,;
ArnicanAirline" ...-
America :~dt'


I I .


THE TRIBUNE ~


PAGE 12, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2006


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of the committee responsible i
for the redevelopment of the':.
city, is the first item on the.
committee's agenda. Everyl.-
one has identified parking as.
the most critical issue." he said:.
Minister Bethel suggested~.
the building of a "multi-story *,-
parking facility." ;
"The parking issue," Mr .p:-~
Klonaris said, "has been one
that is of very high importance;
The whole area of transporta-
tion, with jitneys i
the movement of large a
trucks, carrying bulk. contam~/,
ers or demolition waste moiN e:
"Wg'h eouhd hea do n ~ornd
the ambiance and the quahtyl!"
of life experienced in the
downtown area."
"LThe government ought not. "
to be expected to do all these
things," Dr Bethel said. "TheLII
private sector has the money,
metahnes,blaand anl the b rckn
projects that can pay for them- '
selves and there is no question
thet aamudhi- tay earl ng scil-
aoe can and wil [nala nanteh
pla e from the private sector?"
It. was also recommended :
that improvements be made to
law and order.
"There is the.recommenda,
tion that there is a greater j
police presence and enforce-
ment of existing laws relating
to traffic, petty crime, health,
and nuisance violation," D~r
Bethel said. "Because the nui
sances that tourist.and locals,
face in the downtown area are'
great. "
"It isn't' that there aren'f
laws on the boiok," he said,
"it's a matter of having th;t
requisite law enforcers to bring~:
rity; : ?
The plan to reyitalise Baj "
Street and eventually the Nasti~
sau harbour is' a joint effort~~'
between the private and publioL
sector: Several other consider
actions were. disps~ussed, includ;
ing sanitationjgand the restorari
tion of dilapidated buildings,
and the creation of a new portb




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ate


The most pressing of all
issues is the lack of sufficient
parking. The creation of a
parking facility, according to
Charles Klonaris, co-chairnian


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Visit ourr w~ebsite at ,wwwl.cob.edur.bs 3 -T -IIG




Have you done anything special


Try a Personal De~velopme'nt WIorkshrop' at
The College of The Bahamas
Centre for Continuing, Education and Extension Services...
With one of our courses, you can gain
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Personal Development Fall Sichedule of Courses


TIME


DAY


Tue/Thurs
Mon/lWed
Tue*: Thurs


START DUR FEE


COURSE SECT COURSE
NO. NO. DESCRIPTION


ACCOUNTING
~4:C;A9010 01
~ICCA901 I1
riCCA90 01


6 00-800Opm
6 00-8 00pm
6 00-800lpm l


10-Ocl
23-Oct
24-Oct


10 w~ks
10 wks
10 wks


$250
$275
$300


ACCA F'OR BEGIIINERS I
ACCSA FOR B~EibINNERS 11
ACC~A FOR BEGIONlERS 1Ill


BUSINESS
BUJS1900 01 CREDIT & COLLECTION]S I 6,00-900~pm Tue 24-Oct 8wks $225
il.USTS003 01 SUPIERIOR'J CU~STOMER3 SERVICE W.'S 9 30am-41 30pml Thulrs 26-Oct 1 clay $170j
COMPUTERS
COiMP901 02 COMPU TE R APPFLICATIONS 1 10 0)0am-1 00pani Sai 4-rlov 12 wks u:450
a% COMP902~ 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 1 6 00-900~pmn Inurs 19-Oct 12wks $550
COMP9 4J1 011 OUICri iUOMP960 01 MICR\OSO7FT POWERPOINTl W!S 9 30alm--30pm Inluls 26-Oct 1 day $160
i.lMP9 30 01l WEB PAG;E DE 5IGH WORKSHOP 9 30amn-4 0pm Thurs/Ful 9-Nov 2 days $5501
COSMETOLOGY
CO(SM802(3 01 MAKE-UPAPkFPLATION\ 6 00-9003(pm Mon 23-Oct1 8wks $225
COSM801 01 MANICIURE&EcPEDICURE 6 00-900~pm Tue 241-Oct 8wks $225
COSM807 01 NAIL ARFT TECHNICIAN~ 6 00-900~pm Mon.'Thurs 30-Oct 6 wks $500
DECORATING
DEUl.0800 0)1 INTERliOR DECORATINIG I 6 00-9 00pm Tue 24-Oct 8 wks $225
DIECO0801 01 IN~TERIlR DECORATINlG i 6 00-900~pm Wed 25-Oct 8wrks $250
Fl080 OfRn : FLO)RAl D3ESIGNr~ I 600-900~pm Mon 23-Oc t 10wks $225
p-LORF8U 1 01 FLO)RAL DESIGNrII 6 00-900~pm Thulrs 26-Oct 10wks $250
FLO)R802 01 FLORAL. LIESIGN\ III 6 00-9.00pmn Tue 24COct 10 wks $300
ENGLISH
ENG 900O 01 EFFEC TI.1 \JRITINGr 51 :ILLS 6 00-900Wpm Tue 24Oct 8~C Mr 25
E'L JO00 01t EI.GLIS.Hl AS A EC ONd~ LANIGUAGE 6 00-7 30pm Mon/Frl 23-Oct 10 wks $250I
HEALTH AND FITNESS
14~ASG900C 01 MJASSAG;E THERAPY' ESSENTIALS I 6 00-900~pm Thurs 19-Oct 10wks e=165
MAS(;901 031 MAS1SAG;E TH1ERAY ES.SENUTIALS II 6 00-900~pm Mon 9-Oct 10 wls $620l
MEDICAL
MEDT900 01 MEDICAL TERMINUOLOGY 600-9:00pm Thurs 19-Oct 10wks, $25
SEWING
S;EW 8300 01 BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING I 6 00-900pm Thurs 19-Oct 10 wks $225
SEW 802 01 BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING II 6 00-9.00pm Mon 23-Oct 10 wks $250
SEW 805 0)1 DRAPERY MAKING I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 24-Ot 10 wks $225
SEW 806 0)1 DRAPERY MAKING II 6: 00-9:00~pm Wed 25-Oct 10 wks $250
SEW 811 01 UPHOLSTERY MAKING I 6-00-9:00pm Wed 25-Oct 10 wks $225


..
;- -;-~;.~ '~'''-'


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ENQUIRIES
Ernall nlacroix~cob.edu.bs






Conrtrrt th F nor santer


S.i~iduation



.crsTo atsedn ?(:(


IP~~ r-~


Yill rid


Redevelopment '\


Bay Street of unsight


FROM page one
Bethel at a meeting with the
private sector yesterday.


AHA


Ofo yoursOl fl


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Karate -Jujutsu- Judo
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For more information you can call us at:
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Or email us at: g~newry~igmail.com


3 ~a


-I I I I I I IeglYIIL


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2006, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


latest audit techniques that are
available to us in the 21st cen-
tury," Mr Bastian said.
"We want to be able to ade-
quately and appropriately deal


with current issues challenging
the Public Service at this tune,
issues that challenge the public
sector, issues that challenge us
as public auditors."


Institution (CAROSAI) Con-
gress, on Monday at the Wynd-
ham Nassau Resort and Crystal
Palace Casino. It was held
under the theme, 'Towards
greater accountability'.
Around 36 auditors general
from the region, representatives
from the United Kingdom and
the United States met to dis-
cuss operations of the Public
Accounts Committee and the
auditor general's role in the effi-
cient management of public
funds, amongst other things.
Prime Minister Christie noted
that the niajor challenge for the
Bahamas is that there is no real
economy on the Family Islands.
He called on auditors to be part
of that development.
Terrance Bastian, auditor
general of the Bahamas, said
that the country was honoured
to have received the confidence
of CAROSAI to host the con-
greSS.
"As auditor general, I believe


that steward of public funds and
resources should be held to the
highest standards of account-
ability. I am sure that my col-
leagues feel the same way," he
said.
"As auditors general, we are
dedicated to serving the needs
of the citizens and providing
assurance of accountability
while enhancing good gover-
nance," Mt Bastian added.
"Increasingly, the populace in
various countries is demanding
that their elected parliamentar-
ians give the best possible: value
of the use of public funds. In
addition, and rightly so, they
are demanding more from us as
auditors general."
At the end of the congress,
he said, it is hoped that audi-
tors be enlightened and in a bet-
ter position to deliver better ser-
vice to parliamentarians, the
public and audit entities
"We want to be able to
-enhance our skills by using the


PRIME Minister Perry
Christie challenged.auditors to
ensure government is account-
able for public funds -as pend-
ing major developments for the
Family Islands are expected to
boost the economy.
He made the call as he offi-
cially opened the Caribbean
Organisation of Supreme Audit

F ERRY Christie

Mye ure Inte naT Lnnal fr-*

MMI ~ ~ ";fB * .l .


L 0 I cI

MBER ~519th ,. .
Wyndham Nassau Resot **
Rediscoveringa The Power Of ,
S:ERV~/ANIT EIADER~S'HI'P '
E PORING LEADERSHIP PdINCIPLES FOR THE 215T CENTURY WORLD


* Prior k~npwviledge of fundraising principles, methods, techniques and practices
is a definite asset.
The following ~staterrientsrare intended to describe the general nature and level
of work being performed. They are not intended to be construed as an exhaustive
list of all responsibilities, duties and skills required of the Development Officer.
MINIMUM JOB REQUIREMENTS:
Mastei-'s degree preferred: bachelor's degree acceptable with relevant
experience
*~ Prior development experience would be highly valued
*Demonstrated ability to plan and strong communication skills
* Basic computer skills`
Compensation is commensurate with qualifications and experience:
To ensure full consideration, interested candidates should submit a College
of The Bahamas Application Form, a comprehensive ~resume and a cover
letter of interest. To expedite the appointment procedure, applicants should
request that three referees send references under confidential cover directly
to the address listed below:
Human, Resoures Department .
The College; of The ~Bahama's~
Ground Floor, Adminiilsti~ation Building
Thompsoni Blvds arid"Poincian'a' Dr~ive
PO Box N 4912
Nassaur, Bahanias
Email: hrap~ply~cob.edu.bs
Please visit our website at www.cob.edur.bs for more information about the
College and to access the College's Employment Application Form.



Prospect ve Ap phcants


the Graduate Programmes Office
Michael Hartley Eldon Complex
Thompson Blvd








in collaboration
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Visit ourr website at www.cob.edu.bs


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SSTAFF VA CAN CY

The College of the Bahamas invites~ applications for the following post:

Executive Director, Alumni Relations and Development
DIVIISION: Office of the President
UNIT: Alumni Relations and Development

START DATE: December 1, 2006

J.OB DESCRIPTION
SUMMARY:
Reporting to the President, th~e Executive Director, Alumni Relations and
Development is responsible for overall leadership and' direction of the Alurrini
Relations and Development Unit that will include fundraising and building alumni
participation and chgagement for The College of The Bahamas. The incumbent
will be responsible for building the foundation for major gifts, annual fund and
alumni relations programs which wvill,serve the College now and into the future.
With a focus on identifying str-ategies and implementation plans for maximizing
gift revenue for the College, the incumbent will help to cultivate, solicit and steward
potential donors-~in su~pporting key areas of fundraising priority for the College
ah~d for advancing the College's transition to university-status: Through the
development of targeted alumni programming and service to graduates, the
i cumbent will help to. reconnect ~graduates and strengthen their support oif the
i stitution.
DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:
. Provides strategic direction for the President's involvement in key fundraising
Sand alumni engagement activities including those involving alumni and special
Events, and prospect and donor meetings.

Participates in the development of short and long range strategic planning
activities to realize fundraising and alumni engagement goals and objjectives.

Develops and oversees the implementation of Iprograms and projects to
promote alumni relations including providing strategic guidance and counsel
to the COB Alumni Association on the development and delivery of its


dPlns aansd delivers high quality and strategic special events which serve to
~~strengthen alumni engagement and fundraising efforts.
Oversees the successful execution of key alumni events, receptions,
homedoming and reunion class programers which builds loyalty- and promotes
the College~ in the lives of its graduates.

.Directs, coordinates and ensures delivery on all, COB3 fundraising activities .
and provides guidance to the College community to ensure that individual
fundraising efforts are integrated, consistent with, and serve to advance the
1;College's overall mission, goals, and objectives.

.Oversees the process of identifying, cultivating, .soliciting, and stewarding
Major donors and prospects including individuals, corporations, and
foundations, through strategy based visits and other forrns of direct personal
contact

Engages senior management in furthering the advancement of alumni relations
and fundraising goals and assists in education] faculty. and staff in respect of
the roles they can play supporting alumni andl development ,generally.

Recruits and manages volunteers and provides them Wiith leadership and
direction in support of the cultivation and solicitation of major donors and
prospects; coordinates volunteers' .activities to ensure their integration into
the College's vision and goals,

0O. Provides leadership and supervision to the Director of Alumni Relations and
the Development Officer and other staff in the Unit in ensuring that institutional
alumni relations and development goals and targets are met.

1i. Represents COB at various community and business meetings including
externallyy to funding agencies.

52. Develops and manages related unit budgets.

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:
SKnowledge of program development; ability to plan, organize and direct
Multiple programs and activities; ability to provide guidance and leadership

A bi~altyto plan and implement promotional programs; ability to design, write
and edit promotional material is an asset.
SAbility to plan and execute a range of events.
Exceptional interpersonal skills and the ability to interact effectively with
Academic leadership, faculty, prospects, donors, and volunteers in a wide
range of roles
CCommunity relations skills and the ability to communicate and work effectively
within a diverse community
Willingness and availability to travel extensively and to work extended hours
as necessary


Early Childhood andn i Eleapntary


Special Educador: .~;r


Applications for the two programmes
are now available in


Auditor s ur ged to monitor g over nment


p.l~ir~~q~
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A (CC)


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ny. (N) (CC)


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CSl: Miami "Crime Wave" Caruso
and the team must stop a gang of
bank robbers. A\ (CC)


CSl: Miami "11nder Box" Afire at a
popular night club dlaims 16 lives.
A (CC)


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22 Minutes (CC) Air Farce (CC) port (CC) erate on the same patient. (N)


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Relocation, Relocation Tom and
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Openn Soon
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dating dilemma.


iW Wfe and According to
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Wagner, George Stults. Premiere. A man copes as four
of his loved ones battle breast cancer (CC)


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I


FIRST Catibbean Interna- 'A; couiltry that does n~ot pre- entry into the school environ- ()(5~lp ou
tionial Bank has adopted the pare its youth, is a country mnent and/or job market, said O It YO($~ iOS OR~f l fTTjS~~~~~
PACE education programme' preparing to fail'." the statement.
for the 2006-2007 school year PACE, which stands for "Not only will the physical (15Lur g)
under the bank's Adopt-a- Providing Access to Contin- environment for the students
Cause 2006 initiative. ued Education, is a pro- be enhanced, it is the inten- We a
In an effort to nurture gramme that provides assis- Ition of First Caribbean to also
Caribbean communities tance to female students who enhance the educational envi- 1- 4-t
through sponsorship and con- leave the regular school set- ronment throughout the
triidutions, First Caribbean ting as a result of pregnancy. course of the school year," it -
intr~oduced Adopt-A-Cause in It serves as a conduit for said. rc
Apiil2005 young mothers who seekr to1
"Trhe programme is not sim- return to an academic institu- Plans for PACE during the.
ply; about sponsorship, it is tion. "A~lhough its name sum- present academic year include: ,
designed to create an envi- marises what It is all about, it ~nn~, qp-
renmnent of volunteerism atnd does not limit the institution's Compilation of a PACE
teamwork amongst the First ability to educate students information. booklet
Caribbean stiff," said the about the physical, psycho-- *~ Assistance with computer
bank in a statement. "As a logical and emotional needs ~skills
pacesetting, goal- oriented and of babies, adolescents and Motivational guest speak-
community minded institu- young adults; build coping ers -including someobf
tionl, First Caribbean's Adopt- skills to enhance the further First Caribbean's employ-
a-Cdause programme allows development of a positive self- ees who have participated ,
thesopportunityjto utilise our image; equip the teen mothers in the PACE programme
assets in order to emancipate with parenting and life skills; Business/ entreprelneurship
our society .froristhe maxim: and prepare students for- re'- skills seminars -:


THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2006, PAGE 15


pt PACE has been adopted by the Adopt-a-Cause 2006 initiative


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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2006


BU S


SWe must 'examine the need for a





lobbyist to represent our interests'


Insurancer & Investments
t. ""1.d a =trLf


onetihe tbl nbetion a dte for

rul ia i io, Mr Wilchcombe
said that iwenz t >ur mm minks

week, they will be asked to con-
sider going forward with a strate-
gic plat of action that safeguards
and carries a voice for the pro-
tection of the Caribbean tourism
industry.
"This is fundamental. We
compete more with ourselves
than with other countries. The
Bahamas is a brand no "com-
peting" country can offer the
multiple destinations, the mul-
tiple experiences, offered by the
Bahamas.
le added that while thie min-
istry is hopeful that the US gov-
ernment does grant the exten-
sion, they must be prepared if it
is not. To ensure,this, the min-
istry has embarked on an aggres-
sive campaign to encourage US
visitors to get their passports to
travel to the Bahamas.


WT CARABBRENNEN
Reporter


-for a lobbyist to
represent its inter
ests in the United
States, says Tourism Minister
~':Obie Wilchcombe. /
Speaking at the first ever Exu-
ma Business Outlook, Mr Wilch-
combe discussed the possible
ramifications to the country
should the US government not
grant an extension for its citi-
zens to return to the country
without a passport. *
Presently, Americans have
until the first month of next year
to travel to the Caribbean with-
out a passport. After that they
will require one for re-entry.
However, this requirement does
not extend to those travelling by
sea.
The possible effects of this
might have been likened to a


category six hurricane for the
Caribbean.
However, Mr Wilchcombe
said that hurricanes should be
tracked and added that the
country must be prepared for
any eventuality which might
affect its most important indus-
try.
"We in the Bahamas and the
Caribbean must appreciate that
government is big business. We
must respond to the noise in the '
market, the movement of the
world economies, and the deci-
sion that affect both,
"The decision which must now
be answered with aggressive lob-
bying anda educational initiatives
speak to the need to protect our
business. In going forward, the


Bahamas has to examine the
`need, for a lobbyist to represent
our interests in the Beltway.
That is the way business is done
iii Washington."
Mr Wilchcombe: also applaud-
ed the work of Earle Bethel and
the Bahamas Hotel Association
who documented to the -senate
commiittee the impact that the
senate decision on US passports
could have on the economy of
the Bahamas and the Caribbean.
The minister acknowrledged
that the issue is a delicate matter ~
which demands adherence to the
tenets of diplomacy. .
"The prime minister is hiim-
self involved and has taken
strategic initiatives that we
believe will get the issue back


STOURISM Minister Obie W~ilchcombe speaks during l
the first ever Exuma Business Outlook,

S(Ph~oto: Collin Galanos) .


SBy CARA BRENNEN l
Tribune Business Reporter
12XU1911ANS were warned not to
become too complacent over the island's
increasing prosperity, n\hich has -been
boosted by~ the~ success of the Four Seasonis
at Emerald Bay.
.The island's chamber of commerce pres-
ident Re~ginaldl Smith told residents at the
first annual E suma 13isiness Ocltlook Cori-
ference that although they may already
have an anchor property in place, they
need to do everything in their power to
ensure they cari sustain it.
Already, he noted, the island has a
shortage of goods, labour and infrastruc-
ture to support the five-star resort.
"We: have the anchor property and we


.have to embrace the development," he
added.
Mr Smith said that his vision is to see
E~iuma become a planned community~ with
Exumians playing~a major role.
"You hate a responsibility to set the
direction.'" he said.
He said that the island had undergone a
depression in earlier years but noted that
better times wvere now on the horizon.
How everT he said that he would like to
see the various communities on the island
become more self-sustaining.
He added that he would like to see
et ery community on the island have its
own anchor property on a Imaller scale,
such as a small guest house.
Mr Smith added that he would like to
: see local go\ ernment play a: more signifi-


cant' role- in Exuma's developmeixt.
Mr Smith said the island is fortunate
that; so much property on Exuma is gen
rational land.
If this were not the case, he said the
land would would have been sold an<
developed a long tirne ago.
However, he said they have to be ver
careful about the types o~f additional deve!
opments on the ishind.
JHe said that, while the island had a cor
struction boom, more attention needed
to be paid to building thetii with quality, 4
he noted.that some properties had bee
built "a bit helter-skelter".
The Business Outlook was a one da
event hosted by The Counsellors Ltd an
~attended by make than 100 Exuma buis
ness people.


AN Insurance- comqpani has
been accused ofj "51sgnin a
death warrant''by a client afer
it Mdancelled hiis medical cover-
age `and left him without the
necessary funds to pay for a life-
savitig liver transplant.
Pachardl Paciluth, a US citizen
who is married to a Bahamian,
said British American Insurance
Company had cancelled his
major medical policy on the
grounds of alleged fraud.
Yet he -alleged that the
grounds cited by the insurance
company were either incorrect
or had restilted from errors
made in reports by doctors who -
had treated him.`
Mr Pa'citxlli described the
position taken by British Amer-
ican Insurance Company as "a
bunch of b~aloriey", and accused
the company of allegedly doing
everything it could to avoid
meeting its payment obligations
under the terms of the policy.
Mr Paciulli was approved by
SBritish American Insurance
SCompany for his major medical
insurance policy in March, 2003,
but a year later it was discov-
Sered that he had contracted the
hepatitis C virus. The virus had
destroyed part of his liver, caus-
ing cirrhosis of the liver,
After two years of treat-
ments, and undergoing a gall
bladder operation, Mr Paciulli
told The Tribune he now needs
a life-saving $440,000 liver trans-
plant in the US. Yet he cannot
afford to pay for it without
insurance.
'Mr Paciulli said of his deal-
ings with the insurance compa-
ny: "The whole thing's just been
unbelievable. These people
must think I want to be sick.
"They've signed a death war-
rant. I can't get insurance any
place else, and if I can't pay for
the liver transplant, I'm going to
die.
"They're doing everything
they can not to pay. I can't
believe they can get away with
it."
Mr Paciulli accused British
American Insurance of drag-
Sging out negotiations rover his
policy to avoid a payout proba-
bly in the hope that he would
either tire of the fight, run out
of money to pay any legal fees
or, mna worst case scenario, die.
He added that his cousin had
pledged to sell his house to
finance Mr Paciulli's liver trans-
plant "if it comes down to it".
Mr Pactulli'said of the impact
on himself and his family:
"They're devastated. I'm dev-
astated. I can't think about it
or else I'll get too tipset."
Mr Paciulli married his wife
in 199)8, and was included on


the group ~medical plan for
Rest aurant (Bahamans, the
holder of the Ke~ntuck\ Fried
Chicken franchise, when she
worked for the company. ibO
SMrs Paciulli retired in 20,
but in 20602 Restaurant
(Baha-mas) said it would no
longer keep~ retirees and their
dependants in the~ group health
insurance plans
Mr Paciulli made lio claims
during the time he was on the
Restaurant (Bahamas) group
plan, and in early 2003,he and
his wife applied for the najor
medical coverage with British
American Insurance- thr~ugh
their broker. Insurance Mann-
ageme~nt.
The policy would cover up to
a maximum of $1 million in
medical expenses incurred dur-
ing the rest of their lives.
In February, 2003, the cou-
ple received ta letter saying a
rider had been attached to the
policy because Mr Paciulli was
then a smoker, meaning that
any smoking-related medical
bills, would not be covered. Yet
in March, 20031 British 'Ameri-
can Insurance issued the poli-'
cy.
Mr Paciulli's troubles began
in November, 2003, when the
couple looked to take out a
mortgage. They applied for life
insurance with the Travellers
insurance company to go with
the mortgage, and a nurse took
blood and other samples ~from
them.
In December, 2003, Tray-
ellers wrote to the couple saying
theyr would not provide Mr
Paciulli with life insurance due
to his test results. He went to
the US for a complete physical
in February/March, 2004, when
the hepatitis C was discovered.
Mr Paciulli's treatment
involved a 48-week series of
Pegasus injections, with assess-
ments performed every two
months to see if the virus was
still aCtive.
After notifying British Amer-
ican Insurance of the treatment,
Mr Paciulli said it took three to
four months of talks with the
company before they agreed to
cover the injection costs under
his policy.
Mrs Paciulli said: "From
March to August, 2004, he went
back and forth getting letters
from the doctors, and finally
they said: 'OK, we will cover
you'."
Mr Paciulli added that he
"tried to do everything he
could" to reduce his medication
costs. Rather than import Pega-


I-


SEE page 2B


SECTION


business~tribunemedia.net Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Minister discusses possible ramifications~ to
SBahamas should US government not grant
RD eXtenSi0H ~f() itS .CitiZ811S 10 retuTH to

the country without a passport


t6hamber president warns Examians not to' become too


complacent over increasing prosperity on the island


MORTGAGEE APPROVED!"
The words you want to hear.


The terms you expect toget.


[ N $ R .ANC
COlM P AN Y


Down~~O pamntaw as 5%
'kS Up to 30years
Nassau 242 393 4040
Freeport 242 352 7233





Rt. Hon. Prime Minister PROCLAMATION
Perry G. Christie
WHEREAS, Sunday, 1 October 2006 is observed as the International Day of Ageing:

AND WHEREAS, over the past several years, the Ministry of Social Services and Community
Development in conjunction with the National Council for Older Persons has made use of this
observance as the springboard for a month of activities on behalf of older persons;

AND WHEREAS, the Ministry and Council are committed to ensuring that focused attention is '
given and appropriate action taken to addressing the needs of older persons so as to permit them
to age with dignity;

AND WHEREAS, the Ministry and Council are resolute in recognizing and celebrating those
older persons who have distinguished themselves as major contributors to the development of
The Bahamas;

AND WHEREAS, the Ministry and the Council have again organized a month of activities for
Older Persons under the theme "Improving the Quality of Lif~e for Older Persons ;

NOW THEREFORE, I, Perry G. Christie, Prime Minister of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas,. do hereby proclaim the period Sunday, 1 October 2006 to Tuesday, 31 October,
2006 as "OLDER PERSONS MONTH".


IN WITNESS WHEREOF,
I have hereunto set my Hand
and Seal this 30th day of
September 2006.

ge -- R ~


S Sctiaa ban




VACANCY





Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd. is seeking. the services of a Fiinancial:
Comptroller.

The Comptroller, Finance Department is responsible for coordinating
the development of anm~ial profit plans and variance reports; the timely
. prparation of accurate and comprehensive financial analysis and evaluation
'df~ Scotiabank's performance for reporting and decision JnakE~1iqg,pur~poses;
conducting the annual review of Scotiabank's Schedule of Rates; aw
afid completion of special pricing requests; monitoring/contriollinig. se
anid revenue management; maintaining the Bank's Fixed Asset L~~; .
directing the timely and accurate preparation of internal and ef8al
financial reporting.

In order to perform this function the following competencies are required:

*In depth accounting and financial analysis.skills gained through
formal training in Finance,(CPA designation or M.B.A.) and ''
relevant experience of at least 3 5 years;
*Thorough understanding of the business conducted by financial
Institution's; ,
*Solid understanding of local economic and competitive trends;
Solid understanding of banking and branch operations related
accounting procedures; and regulatory requirements;
Proven organizational skills to prioritize tasks and elicit a high
Level of productivity.from Bank staff to meet objectives, often
within tight deadlines;
Strong interpersonal skills, professional judgement and tact in!
dealing' with contacts inside and outside the financial areas dfthe
Bank;
Ability to maintisin effective working relationships with senior
field management, Managing.Director's Office personnel anid
management personnel within Iriternational Banking itnd: other
Execultive Office Departments;
Working knowledge of personal computers and spreadsheet
programs is a~must in order to conduct analysis and to understand
~potental applications to work performed by the unit.

Interested, persons should submit applications in writing marked Private
and Confidential to:
Senior Manager, Finanice &Treasury
P. O. Box N-7518
Nassau, Bahamas

Applications should be received no,1ater than Monday, November 06,
2006.


* Tradema~omarsofTeBank of Nova ctia T rademarkusdudratnzto dcoroofTeBkofNaSoia


I ~~lmy I


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2006


cation form.
Mr Pacuilli and his wife are
now accusing British American
Insurance of negotiating "in bad
faith", as they are asking him
to "prove there was no fraud"
before any move to remnstate
his medical coverage.
The company has asked Mr
Pacudlli to provide it with a
whole medical history and doc-
tors' reports, something he says
he has done and shows when
the hepatitis C started.
In the meantime, tests in Jan-
uary, 2006, showed that the
hepatitis C was still in Mr Paci-
ulli's body. As a result, he has
hadtogobak n te etoasu
first 48 weeks of treatment.
Yet to save costs, because the
injections are not covered by
insurance, Mr Paciulli said he
had himself cut the current
dosages in half placing them at
one-quarter of their initial
strength.
His wife has since had to go
back to work to help support
his medical treatment, and she
, said: "Financially, we're getting
to the bottom"."
Mr Cooper told The Tribune:
"We do not comment to the
press on matters related to any
matter dealing with our clients.
They are treated with confi-
dentiality."


Mr Paciulli said he also spoke
to Chester Cooper, British
American's president and chief
executive, who asked him to
send all details on his case to
him the next day, and that the
issue would be sorted out.
Yet he alleged that when he
next contacted Mr Cooper, the
British American president said
it was "out of my hands".
Eventually, British American
Insurance wrote to the couple
confirming that they were can-
celling the policy because it was
breached by fraud.
Apart from the 40-mnonth
issue, the company said Mr
Pacil ms bha thoaod ohd
the policy with them. .
In addition, British Ameri-
can Insurance said Mr Pacuilli
failed to disclose that he was
talking two other drugs -
Prilosec and Lipotor when
he applied for thie major med-
ical policy.
Yet ~Mr Pacuilli countered
that the policy application forms
only required details of pre-
scription drugs he was taking,
but.Prilosec was an over-the-
counter drug, to aid an upset
stomach when he had an
inflamed gall bladder.
And he added that it was his
wife, not him, who was taking
,Lipotor, as noted on their appli-


Ir* I m~~~
sus from the US at a cost of
$2,400 per month, he estab-
lished 4 relationship with
Lowe's Wholesale, who bought
the drug straight from Switzer-
land at a cost of $1,650 per
month.
Then, in July, 2005, Mr Paci-
ulli needed a gall bladder. oper-
ation in the US. He added that
British American Insurance
agreed to cover the costs of his
operation under the policy.
Yet the aftermath of that
operation was when Mr Paciul-
li's problems began in earnest,
bcutse in SA ust Sewp mb r
ed him wrote a report to British
American Insurance that incor-
rectly stated he was on a 40-
month course of drugs to kill
the hepatitis C, not 40 weeks.
As a result, the company
wrote to the Paciullis in Octo-
ber, 2005, announcing it was
cancelling their policy oil the
grounds of fraud.
Mr Paciulli said he contact-
ed the US doctors, who re-sent
a correct report to British
American Insurance. He added
that in telephone calls to the
insurance company, he was
repeatedly told not to worry,
and that the whole matter
would be dealt with.


Life. IVdney. Balance both:


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1


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aBy SAMORA ST ROSE
A SAINT Lucia-based finan-
cial holding company has
promised to expand ATM and
Point of Sale services in an effort
to cater to the anticipated
increase in demands for these
services, arising from the host-
ing of the 2007 Cricket World
Cup "and beyond."
East Caribbean Financial
Holding Group of Companies
(ECFH), in its 2006 half-year
performance report, Robert
Nhe ooup smi i ddion wi h
the soon to be launched Inter-
national Debit Card, customers
will be able to withdraw funds
from their accounts anywhere in
the world.
alThe report said ECF sd over
sections during the first half of
the current financial year.
"Economic growth in St Lucia
has averaged about four per cent
over the last two years, driven
Primarily by the tourism and
construction sectors. Corre-


NOTIC

MOSS POINT INC.

6-


Notice is hereby given that in accordance
with Section 138 (8) of the international
BUSilleSS Companies Act 2000. the
dissolution of MIOSS POINT INC. has
been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the
COm~a ny has there fore been struck off
the regiSter.


. AROOSA CORP. INC.





NOTICE
DRACO MOUNTAIN INC.




NOtiCe is hereb' given that in accordance
with Sectio~n 138 (8) of the international
BUSineSs Co~mpanies Act 2000. the
dissoluion of DRACO MOUNTAIN
INC. has been completely; a C'ertif~icate of
Dissolution has b~een issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off
the re ISter.


AIRGOSACORRINCJX~lt,. .





NOTICE
TU AH INVESTME NTS LTD.




Notice is herebyv given that in accordance
with Section 138 (8) of the international
Business Companies Act 2000. the
dissolution of TUAH INVESTMENTS
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off
the register.


ARGOTSA CORP. INC.


NOTICE~ :

NOTICE is hereby yivenn tha~t THEOPHILE LIeONV LE:
IOReVIL OF R 0.BOX 45, 8PANISHW WELL,FLRUTen4 A
BAAHM1AS, is appllnyin to Ire folinite resp~asiblle fa
N1atialality andr Ciizensh~i p, for resist a~ ~iadaalralizatial
as a dizenl of Thle Bahamnas;r, and (lt anly pwson wuho
knowu any! reso~n whly regista~on? n~atralizatial shrourld
noct bagyrantarl, whold~l send~ a written andr sinedl stalans~it
of thle facts wrillin twlenty-aighlt dayLs t~an the 201h dlay of
Ocakhes 200 910~ ilellin ister reqssai ble fox N a aal ityasnd
CitizelllshipP.O.Bo:


N~1OT ICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BENNY LORFILS OF
MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship., for.
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should n~ot be granted, should send a written
and signed stattement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 20th .daywgf October, 26006 to the Minister
responsible for. Nationality-and Citizen-ship, P O. Box N- 7147,
Abaco, .Bahamas. ~
O I


NOTICE
LAKSMEI VENTURES INC.




Notice is hereby, given that in accordance
with Se~ction '138 (8) of the international
Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of LAKSM'E VENTURES
INC. has bee~n completed: a Certificate~ of
SDissolution has been issued and the
~Companyi has therefore been struck off
the register.


ARGOSA COQRP. INC -
(Liquidatory :


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that SAMANTHA OLIVIA SMITH OF
SANTA MARIA DR., SOUTH BAHAMIA, P.O.BOX F-42123
FREEPORT,. GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship. for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should~ send a written,
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 20th day of October, 2006 to the Minister responsible
'for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Freeport,
Bahamas.



NOTICE
M ATSUYkA MA INC.




Notice iS he~reby given that in accordance
w~ith Se~ction 138 r8) of the international
Business ~Companie~s Act 2000li. the~
dlissjolution olf MAlTSUY' AMAIr INC. has
been comp~leted; a Certificate of
Dissolution has b~een issued andl the
CIompi~any has there~fore~ been struck: off



ARG~OSA CORP. INC- -
(Liquidator)



Legal.Notice

NOtiCE

BLANCHARD SHIPPING COMPANY LIMITED

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 138 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice
is hereby given that the above-named Company has
been dissolved and struck off the Register Pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by thie Registrar
General on the 5th day of October, 2006,


M.J. Jor an
Liquidator

BLANCHARD SHIPPING COMPANY LIMITED



NOTICE OF FINAL MEETING
OF
Banco del Pichinchts Limited

(II Voluntary Liquidation)

Pursuant to section 249 of The Companies ACT 1992
notice is hereby given, that a general meeting of the
IRCenbers of the above-named Company. will be held at the
:offices of Deloitte &~ Touche, 2nd Terrace West, Centerville,
~NassRB, Balalnas on November 20, 2006 at 10:30 a.m. The
purpose of this meeting is to present to the members, the
Liquidator's fmnal report, which shows how the winding-up
was conducted, and the Company's Properties disposed of.

A member entitled to attend this meeting may
appoint a proxy to attend and vote instead of him or her.
.A proxyj holder need not be a member of the Company.


Pricing Information As Of:
Thursday. 19 October 200 6
BISX LISTED & irRADED SECURITIES -VISIT VWWW.thlSXBAHAM~lt.COr POR W(CIRI M iP? 'jp
s alX ALL SHARE. INDEX: CLOSE 1,6413 OB / CHG 00.00 / 96dHG 00.00f j 9' ,, a15
2..-- E2.vil-LcGA eiScUFE r F're.loUS CIOle TC Glal 5 OcIsjd Change Daily Vol EPS 5 Dlu 5 PIE Yield
16 1:1 0 9 ~tai,ac r.larses 1 57 i 57 i, 00 -o lo9 o ooo NM o oo~
12.05 10.23: Bahamas Property Fund .11.25 11.25 0.00 1.627 0.380 6.9 3.38r
7.56 6.90 Bank of Baharnas 7.56 7.56 0.00 0.802 0.3:30 9.7 4.37'
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.208 0.020 3.8 2.50c
1.80 1.26' Bahamas Waste 1.60 1.60 0.00 0.168 0.060 9.5 3.7Sc
1.49 1.10 Fidelity~ Bank 1.44 1.44 0.00 O.188 0.050 7.7 3.47'
9.60 9.05 Cable Bahamas 9.60 9.60 0.00 4.170 0.659 0.240 14.6 2.50'
2.20 1.39 qFolina Holdings 1.83 1.83 0.00 0.046 0.000 39.8 0.00'
11.91 9.00 Commonwealth Bank 11.91 .11.91 0.00 0.943 0.660 12.6 5.54'
6.26 4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.29 5.27 -0.02 0.130 0.045 40.6 0.85'
2.138 2.10 Doctor's Hospital 2.76 2.76 0.00 0.348 0.000 7.9 0.00'
6.21 4.20 Famguard 6.15 6.15 0.00 0.428 0.240 14.4 3.90'
11.51 10.60 Finco 11.51 11.51 0.00 870 0.763: 0.560 15.1 4.87
14.00 9.90 FirstCaribbean 14.00 14.00 0.00 645 0.927 0.550 '15.1 3.93
11.21 9.25 Focol 11.21 11.21 0.00 900 0.885 0.500 12.7 4.46
1.15 0.95 Freeport Concrete 1.00 1.00 0.00 -0.170 0.000 N/M 0.00
10.20 8.419 ICD Utilities 8.49 8.49 0.00 610 0.532 0.270 16.0 3.18
9.10 8.70 J. S. Johnson 8.70 8.70 0.00 1,150 0.527 0.560 16.5. 6.44
8.09 5.30 Kerzner International BDRs 8.09 8.09 0.00 SUS/DEL 0.160 0.000 50.6 0.00
1( O 0 ee Premier R(eda Erlale 10 00 10 OO O 00 1 291 O 195 77 1 95
bsnkngle 52,w-1..c Sy~mool Bid $ Ask5 $ L..St Prece WeekBly V/ol EPS 5 DIV 5 P/E Yield
1430 2.5BahanasSurpe madats 140600 15 650 NM.0 8.2 .20 799
o sa 6.20 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.00 -0.002 0.000 NM 0.00
-13.0 2.00ABDA.BColina Over-The-Counter Setourluae
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.00 15.00 12.50 1.750 0.360 8.0 2.57
O? 60 0 35 ORND H(oldings 0.45 0.55 0.45 -0.070 0.000 N/M 0.0(
.. :4 m yi g
52wk.h. 52.i-Lov. Fund Name NA4 V YTD ,, Lasi 12 FLionths DI. 5 Y eld %
1.3092 1.2574 Colina Money Market Fund 1.309234*
2.9515 2.4766 Fidelity Bahamas G & Fund 2.9515***
2.4687 2.2671 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.468721**
1.1970 1.1395 Colina Bond Fund 1.196970"***
BISX ALL. SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 MARKET TERMS YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price A E
52wk-HI Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid $ Buyingl price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity - 6 cltobr 2006
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price -Last traded over-the-counter pi~ce
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for dally volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week '- 30 September 2006
Change Change In closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reportec| earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Dailly Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value * 30 September 2001
DIV S Dlvidends per share paid In the last 12 rnonths N/M Not Meaningful
P / E ~N ~ l a n r c i i e d b h a t 1 o t t a n n sF N E FLd ejl t y ~ ~OBis a a o kI n d x J n a r 9 4 = 0 3 0 S p t m


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2006, PAGE SB


THE TRIBUNE


2.7 per cent and 26.7 per cent
respectively for the current half
year
*Bank of Saint Lucia Linuted,
which remitins the largest sub-
sidiary within the Group, both
in terms of assets and contribu-
tion to total profits, increased its
profit by 19.4 per cent over last
year
*Deposits of the Group
moved from $861.7 million to
$1.160 billion
*The loan portfolio which
totalled $728 million, reflected
an sm trsar not7.8 per cn
cent, bringing the total to $522
milliork
The Board of Directors
announced an interim dividend
sf3h0arcehs sper o rd arrd asth -
tember.10, 2006.
"This is an mecrease of 50 per
cent over last year, when $2.7
million was paid. The interim
dividend payout of $4.4 million
will be paid on October 10,
2006."


spondingly, growth in ECFH
assets, deposits and loans have
surpassed previous years," said
the report.
The report said with contin-
ued growth in St Lucia's econo-
my expected for the rest of 2006,
"barring any unforeseen devel-
opments," the Group should
record improved results for: the
year.
,"Improved customer relations
and high quality convenience
banking continue to be the pri-
mary objectives of the Group.
To en oneutre soir rof sr
Group has introduced such prod-
ucts and services as TeleBank,
Complete Online Banking, a
Complaints Management Sys-
tem, as well as automated cheque
pmecessing and imaging," said the
While improving the Group's
financial position is critically
important, said the report,
ECFH continues to focus on
improving the socio-economic
environment "through our cor-
porate social responsibility poli-


cities and programmes."
"Resources allocated this year
will boost skills development
among the youth and in adult lit-
eracy programmes."
The report said all five sub-
sidiary companies of the Group -
Bank of Saint Lucia Limited, EC
Global Insurance Company Lim-
ited, Bank of Saint Lucia Inter-
national Limited, Mortgage
Finance Company of Saint Lucia
Limited and Property Holdinlg
and Development Company of
Saint Lucia Limited showed
improvements ovei last year.
The report (expressed in East-
ern Caribbean dollars) highlights
the following:
*Total assets reached $1.5 bil-
lImn, an increase of $311.4 mil-
*Net profit after tax of $18
million, surpassed that of last
year by 43 per cent or $5.3 mil-
lion
*Return on assets and equity
moved from 2.3 per cent and 21
Piper cent in the previous year, to


4


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;-r


~Ithony S. Kikivarakis
Lqui ator


ECFH promises to expand ATM, Point of




Sale services for 2007 Cricket World. Cup





~b I


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE
MANAGER SECURITY
ADMINISTRATION DIVISION


T~hevMannacyer Seseusrit ini responsible for thoencooirdisnationfoarndmaannageem~etourith
day-to-day security and related functions for the Corporation in New Providence and
the Family Islands.
Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:
* Provides a secure work environment
* Supervises in-house investigations and assists with serving legal documents
: Monit to e pr visn of Narices byv upher to ehneme r quadn standards are met
* Advise management on security concerns
* Arrange emergency drills in collaboration with the Safety Department -
* Develops emergency policies and procedures for the Corporation
* Inspects all security monitoring and alarm systems and liaise with the service
providers to ensure optimal performance
* Maintain a comprehensive list of the Corporation's security equipment, machinery
and vehicles
* Make physical checks on the Corporation's buildings inclusive of Big Pond, the
Power Stations and Family Islands Operations
* Prepare and manage the Security Department budget
* Maintain the building and ground maintenance of the Administration Building
* Prepare monthly, quarterly and annual reports
* Coordinates and prepares tenders for external security contractors and related services
* Maintains a log book of all employees who access the Corporation's premises outside
normal working hours.
Job requirements include:
* A minimum of a Bachelors Degree in Criminal Justice or equivalent
* A minimum of 13 years experience in law enforcement, including a minimum of 3
years at a senior level
* Strong investigative skills
* Strong managerial and supervisory skills
* Good report writing skills
* Ability to communicate effectively ~both orally and in writing
* Strong analytical skills and ability
* Knowledge of the Criminal Code of thC Rahamas
* Knowledge of technological advances in the security business
Interested persons may apply by completing and returning Application form to:
The Manager-H~uman Resources & Training, Bahamas Electricity Corporation,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads,
P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau, Bahamas
on or before October 31, 20)06.


_


RESPONSIBILITIES


In providing technology support across several global locations, the
candidates will specifically be responsible for:
Managing the software change control process, including
version control for software releases to ensure comnplian~e
With all relevant policies and procedures.
Change control records management.
Administration of internal technology change management
system. .
Responsible for all business risk and control requirements
for technology change management and any associated
reporting. .
~Management of the department's information security .
monitoring tools including SEMS, EMS, and AppDetective.

KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS REQUIRED

The ideal candidate will have the following competencies:
Experience in technology change management systems'
software management systems.
Experience information security processes and standards.
Knowledge of WIN2000 Administration, MS Office Suite'
LAN/WAN systems.
Ability to multi-task in a time sensitive work environment
supporting various applications and infrastructure changes.
Bachelor's degree in Computer Science or equivalent
experience.
Mimimum 3 years related work experience.

Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:
Technology Unit Head
GWS/Bahamas Technology
Cititrust(B ahamas)Limited
P.O.Box N-1576,
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: (242) 302-8732 or
Email: gieselle.campbell @citigroup.com


Index up 0.1'










C0pyrig hted Material


. Syndicated Content .


Available from Commer c al News Pr ov d ers


Facilitators: David Heslett, Mlanaging Director, ECV & Brian "Totterdill, Consu tant, ECV

The Progr~amme will consist of an introduce t
documents and address the follo'wingss

The Management of Claims, Claims ProceCdgres 0
Contractor's Claims, Principles governing the AB
Procedure for the Engineer's Decision, Po~st DA
Decision and Case Studies of Dispute R s~igt

Thr~oughout the programme there will be opportunities for questions,
and \\here appropriate. case studies will be introduced.

Who should attend-'
Professionals f~rom Goviernment ~Ministries and Agencies,
Pri\ ate bcrLtor Emnployers, C'onsulting Engineers, Contractors,
Qulantit! Survey~ors, Architects, Legal Advisors
anld all iniocl\ed wtith the next generation of International Projects.
It is palrticurlarly important where FLDIC and DAB p lrocdxures
shall be implemented.

For further information/reservations please contact
JCC, Tel: 868-623-9396
Fax: 868-623-2949, Email: jcc@jectt.org or ttca~wow.net


THE TRIBUNE~T


PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2006


115-11111i1


*-













- -C * *


*


* -


r


:'""j~ a


1.


Invites you to a two day International contracts training course entitled:


t:lrm c. nk


"The,PIac ti cal NIanagem nt of .o
Re ii/into isDi j


Under thte 1999 FIDIC Contracts and multi-lateral
Banks Harmonised Construction Copntrac@.~,,


November 6th &: 7th 2006 `31;f~l
Ililton. Kiingston. Jantaica
8:45 ami toi 4:30 pm
US'I1.150) per participant or US$1'-Mi;~~
or more participants fr-om the same or a
A4 further 1I0% wvill apply for regisFrit::
received onl or berrfore October 9t'h 2(10~'i~~-.
(with proof of purchase).-:a:


Date:
Venue:
Time:
Fee:


Deadline for application is October 20, 2006.


JCC


Federationof intemationial tl
Consulting Engineers






THeI\IV


i


Freeport Tug and Towing Services, Ltd(FTTS).
Freeport, Grand Bahama I~sland, Bahamas


'9~ PICTET
X1805

PICTET BANK & TRUST LIMITED
Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

ASSISTANT HEAD OF CORPORAL TE SER VICES

DUTIES WILL INCLUDE:-

-Assist with day-to-day supervision of Corporate Department.
-Preparation of Annual Reviews and Corporate Synopses.
-Fee biilling and collection.
-Preparation of Corporate Minutes.
-Maintaining corporations in good standing.
-Management of proprietary database (CPS).
-Liaising with industry professionals on matters relating to Corporate
Administration.
-Liaising with Registrar General's Department and foreign regulatory
authonhtes on all matters pertaining to corporate administration.

PRE-REQUISITIES:-

-Bachelors Degr'ee in Law, Finance or related area.
-In-depth knowledge of Bahamian company law and practice.
-Workmng knowledge of regulations and corporate practices in other
jurisdictions (Panama, BVI, Cayman Islands, Turks & Caicos, et
eetera).
-In-depth knowledge of all aspects of Corporate Administration.
-Computer literate with proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel.
-At least seven (7) years related experience mna private bank, law firm

orkin kn wege of foundations.

PERSONAL QUALITIES:-
The successful candidate will be self-motivated and able to work with
minimum supervision in a busy, multi-cultural environment. He or she
must be willing to work mn order to meet to strict deadlines. Persons who
fail to meet these minimum requirements need not app y.1

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED.
Please send Resume and two (2) references to:

The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park
P. O. Box N-4837
Nassau, Bahamas
Offices in
Florence, Frankfurt, Geneva, Hong Kong, Lausanne, London,
Luxembourg, Madrid, Milan, Montreal, Nassau, Paris, Rome, Singapore,
Tokyo, Turin, Zurich


PERSONAL CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
The position ofer on exitng ndeattra tv~ ar o nousn
professional and personal development both within SvitzerWijsmaller
Group or World Point Terminals Inc.
CONTACT INFORMATION
Application with resume/CV to be sent by October 31 to:
Freeport Tug and Towing Services Ltd. att. Chester Tumqcuest,
#4Milton Street,
P.O.Box F-43550
Freeport, Gratid Bahama, Bahamas,
Tel.+1 242 352 3060
Mob.+ 1 242 727 0288.
Fax + 1 242 352 4114
Email: chesterturquiest@svitzerwijsmuller.com
With copy to: Mario Garcia, Regional Finance Manager,
SvitzerWijsmuller (Caribbean)Ltd, Lennar Corporate
Centre, 790 NWV 107thAve, Suit 400, Miami FL33172
USA Tel + 1 305 485 2123, Fax + 1 305 221 4797
Mail usmhia.info~'svitzerwijsmuller.com.


& Svit zer
-~i WiSmuller


SA single storey incomplete Tripler Apartment Building grosss floor area 2,016 sq~ft.),
consistss of Two two bedrooms and One- one Bedroom units each with one bathroom,
Sliving-dining room and kitchen and situate about 166 feet south of Bellot Road and
1'/2 mile east of Gladstone Road and comprising 87,120 sq.ft. or 2 acres .
Appraised value: $377,000
Utilities: Electricity, Water ad dTelephone
..~c







For conditions of tihe sale and any other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
at: 356--1685 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas

.Interested persons ~should submit offers in writing addressed to:
T 0 CO1Bmaercial Credit Collection Unit, P.O. Box N-7518, Nagssau, Bahamas
10 reach us before November 3, 2006 .
Saimts e~quirig a@ T






~3PICTTET


i iPICTET BANK & TRUST LIMkITED

jiInvites qualified applicants for the following position:-

.t.TRUST OFFICER

REQUIRED SKIILLS:-

-Strong' supervisory and organisational skills.
-Ability to function independently but work as part of a team.
-Ability to function in a high volume, high pressur-e environment.


:EDUCATION A4ND EXPERIENCE:-

-Minimum of a Law Degree and/or STEP Certification.
-Sound knowledge of trust drafting, reporting and accounting.
-Ability to read and assimilate complex trust documents.
-Familiarity with the relevant local legislation, particularly the
Trustee Act, 1998 -and the Fmnancial Transactions Reporting
SAct, 2000.
-Working knowledge of legislation in competing jurisdictions .
-Proficiency in Microsoft- Word and Excel.
-At least seven (7) years experience in a Private Bank or Trust
Company, at least two (2) years of which must be at the Trust
Officer: level.
-Knowledge of French or Spanish would be an asset.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE
ACCEPTED. Please send Resume -and two (2) references to:

The Human Resources M1/anager
Bayside Executive Park
P. O. Box N-4837
Nassau, Baharnas

Offices in .
Florence, Frankfurt, Geneva, Hong Kong, Lausanne, London,
Lucxembourg, Mad~rid, Milan, Montreal, Nassau, Paris, Rome,
Smngapore, Tokyo, Turin, Zurich


r~u~isrmm~ ~r~

:r~~L:


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2006, PAGE 5B


E TRIBUNE


`e ~
r


r


r -


r


A verl respe bl fo te FITS finance and accounts
- Handling of supplies invoices and invoicing to customer
SCleto n al gonroe ssnents and lookkeeping of
banks movements
-Preparation of monthly, semi and annual reports to parents
companies, preparation of audlit fdes and reporting to
Governmental institutions and authorities
- Reconciliation of intercompany balances, preparation
and reporting of budget and forecast
- Cash management (liquidity forecast, exchange rates etc.)
and payroll
-Minimizing financial exposuires, optimizing worlang
capital and maintaining fixed assets register.
- Corporate secretary frictions.
-Other ad hoc tasks
SKILLS REQUIRED .
The right candidate should have either an MSc in Busmness
Administration and Auditing or a bachelor's degree .
in Finance or be a chattered accountant with 3+ years' related
experience as well as have experience in preparation of consolidated
accounts. In addition s/he should have knowledge of existing
legslation on finance sa emensn oand internatioai ac o s>.

sme should also have the abiiy t> meet dot lne and d eca h~om
analytical;. good at keeping focus on complex issues and thrives on
taking ownership and responsibility. Finally, s/ he is capable of
taking initiative for proper and timely action and has the personal
drive to take on challenging tasks.


WXall Stret ho ld s




on t~o~pyr g'htd Materiajac


S indicated Content.


Available from Commercial News Providers





PROJECT MANAGERS & PROJECT EXECUTIVES REQUIRED
In the SALES and BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT offices of
MONTANA HOLDINGS LTD, Nassau
Montana Holdings Limited is undertaking a multimillion dollar development of Rum
Cay. We are seeking Project Managers and Executives with general commercial
business skills to take responsibility for the following activities:
Preparation of work schedules, matrices and charts
Monitoring an~d maintaining the scheduled progress of contractors.
Establishing well defined processes for the control of inter-department work
programmes - . -. i. ci.. ~. li .. ;u. .ii ~. .
Efficien~l~y resolving logistical events and supporting areas of delays
Liaising \iithegoii~nment Agencies
Applicants rfust be PC literate, excellent communicators and highly productive.
Knowledge of Excel and resort development and operations will be an advantage.
Experience in7 property sales and marketing or construction will also be advantageous'
The successful candidates will be working in a very busy high-pressure environment
wvher-e they will be expected to meet exacting time scales and be rec~ognised as
efficient completer-finishers. The task contents will vary through the range of business
functions related to the Rum Cay development and offer variety and experience. It
will also test the adaptability of the selected staff.
Salary in the range of $22,0)00-$40,000 per annum, plus health care benefits

FINANCIAL ANALYST REQUIRED
To report directly to the Chief IFinancial Officer of
MONTANA HOLDINGS LITD., Nassau
Montana Holdings Ltd. is undertaking a multi-million dollar real estate development
on the island of Rum Cay. The Finance Department is seeking a Financial Analyst
with experience in real estate fihance andi/or investment banking to undertake the
following activities:
Preparation of detailed financial analyses for shareholders, investors and lenders;
Communication of such reports both verbally and through written reports;
*Imp'lementation of financial controls on operations;
Interpretation of legal documents to ensure compliance; and
* Other tasks as required by the Chief Financial Officer.
This position represents a unique opportunity for an eager, University-educated (BI.S-
degree a must) individual to gain invaluable, hands-on experience working closely
with the CFO related to the development of a large-scale real estate project with many
challenges. If successful, the candidate will play an integral role irl the continued
conceptualization, financing and development of the project. This position could
potentially lead to more senior positions in real estate development, finance or
commercial and investment banking, both -domestically and internationally.
Candidates must possess a strong knowledge of Microsoft Excel and spreadsheet
modelling, as well as a strong command of the English language; both oral and written.
A writing sample should be submitted with all .resurnis/applications. Montana
Holdings is a busy, high-pressure working environment where you will be required to
meet exacting time~ scales with a strong attention to detail. .
Salary in the range of $40,000-$50,000 per annum (commensurate with experience),
plus health care benefits.

RECEPTIONIST OFFICE CLERK
Montana Holdings Ltd is undertaking a major land development programme
in Rum Cay. We are seeking a Receptionist/Office Clerk to join our rapidly
expanding office.
The successful ctand date will be organize, personable, ambitious and very productive

3 years office experience
*Excellent communication skill both written and oral
Capable of working independently and/or as a team rnember
Excellent typing skills with a minimum of 50wpm.
Must be computer literate with excellent knowledge of Microsoft office application
General office duties
'The Montana Holdings office environment is challenging, energetic and very,
demran~ding. It calls for staff to accept responsibility for ally types of work activities,
whI~ICh shall be undertaken to high professional standards.
Interested personsl should send cover letter and resume to:
The Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box N-9322, Nasa, The Bahamas
E-mail: laland development ~yahoo.com


Wal-Manv mills out low-cost Iperic




dnru p otine to I 4 mone stne


* 38' Chris Craft, Sports Fishing Vessel (1982) MV Farm Road
* 122' Single Screw Steel Hull (1960) MV Lisa lll, vessel has a new engine requmrng
Installation. And can be view at Bratdford Marine, Grand Bahama
COOKING rrTENSELS POTS. PANS & PLATES
DRs CIF.ANING EQUIPMENT
Serious inquires only. Sealed bids marked "Tender" should be submitted to Bahamas Development
Bank, P.O. Box N-3034, Nassau, Bahamas or telephone 327-5780 for additional information.
Please note that all bids on the aforementioned properties and assets should be received* by
October 30, 2006. The Bahamas Development Bank reserves the right to reject any o: all
offers. All assets are sold as is.


I
'i
i




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4


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F


PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2006


- C


Copyrighte'd Mlraterial



. Syndicated Content


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L3
r .
r-


PROPIFERTIES
7.1 i t #11 li;.2', 5004si:ft ~)1
with a single story comrplex
(3,440sq. ft.) Sir Henry
MorgatdDr Andros Beach
Colony Subdivision Nichzoll's
Town Andros
(Appraise~d Value .
$147,700.00) :
8. Vacant property 100O'xl 50'
mn the settlement of Pinders,
Mangrve Cay~ South Andros
(Appraised Value
$22,500.00)

SVacufZ 1 2 it
~E3(11, S~q. 8)- Hny Av
Derby Subdivision Freeport ~
Grand Bahama
( r ~is~e Value

Eleu~thera
10. Property 31'xll1' with '
house Lord Street in the
settlement of Taptum Bay
Eleathera.
(Appraised Value
$45,000.00)
11. Vacant Lot #6 (14,555sq.
ft.) -a half mile Southward of
the Settlement ofrarpum Bay
Eleuthera
(Appraised Value
$18,050.00)
ASSETS


New Provridence
1.. Lot #3 &z #Y4, Block #47
(5,000fsci. ft.) with duplex
apartment coinplex Forbes
Street Nassaua 1'illage
(Appraised Value
$11.9,000,00) .
2. Vacant lot #1038 (6,000sq.
ft.) Garden Hills #3.
(Appraised Valre
$35,000,00)
3. Lot#171 (100'x100') w/two
story building East St
opposite De~veaux St.
(A$ r~ie d0Wue
4. L ot # 7 4 (55'x90')
w/incomplete split level hse-
Boatswain Hill or Bosun HEill
(Appiraised Value
$139,580,00)
5. Lot #39, Blk #35 (2,500~sq.
ft.) w/wooden Hse #64 -
Lincoln Blvd EnglXerstone Sub>.
(Appraised Value
$52,000.00)
.A..ndrea s
6. Property (4f,344 sql. ft.) with
duplex ~(1i,74 sq. ft) in the
settlement: of Fresh Creek,
Central Andros. .
(Appraised Value
$73,258.00)


Cat Island
12. Property with twelve (12)
room motel 1.39 acres -In the
settlemxient of Arthur's Town
Cat Island
(Appraised Vahire
$1.3 M~illion Dollars)
13. vacant lo~t 6.498 acres-
South of Lorrimiore Estate,
near Arthiur's Town Cat Island
(Alppraised Value
$130,000.00)


wi h tw t~o4 suln .4,160
sq, ft., apartment upstairs and
shop downstairs, George Town
Exuma.
(Appraised Value
$468,000.00)
15. Vacant lots #47747R &
#~7747S 160'x125f'-Florrence
Dr Bahama Sound No.2
Exuma.
(Appraise~d Value
$60,000.00)
Inagna.
16. Lot #43 (9,000sq. ft.) with
house -"lMatthew Town Inagua
Russell Street.
(Appraised Value
$120,000.00)


1) Wood Table (Round)
1) Marble Table (Rectangle)

:ofer/Fee~sers
1) Two Door Chest Freezer
1) One Door Chest Freezer
1) Blue Coleman Cooler
2) Double Door Coolers
1) Three Door Cooler
1) Double Db~or Refrigerator



1) 03 Yumbo 125cc Motorcycle
1>9 F rdd Expo
1) 2001 Hyundai H-100 Bus
1.) 1998 Chevy S-10 Truck
1) 2002 Kitchen Trailer
1) kitchen Cherokee Trailer


Electrpnig Equippient
* (1) Compaq Presario Computer Monitor & Tower
* (1) Whirl Microwave.
* Tec Cash Register
Machinery
* (1) Food Mixer
S(1) Wall TV Stand
* (1) Chrome J'ujce Filler
* (1) Multi Fruit Juicer
* (1.) Chrome Mixer
. (2hFuo B rae Soves
* (1) SPSL5000 6watt Silent Generator, Electric Starter

* 29' Phoenix w/enrgines (Jannette2)
t 1 Deeder Vssl 181 c( quality)
* 48' Ni. h Carolina Hull (1989)
* 52' Hai ; Fiber Glass (1979) MV Buddy
* 47' Fiber < iass (1.980) Vessel (Miss Quality)
* 43' Defender fiber Glass Vessel (1990)
(Lady Raine Too)


THE TRIBUNE


Ava ilable~ fro m Com m ercalNelwsv Providers








_ I


THE WINTERBOTHAM TRUST COMPANY LIMITED

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
AS OF JUNE 30, 2006
(Expressed in United States dollars)


1. GENERAL

The Winterbotham Trust Company Limited (the "Company") was incorporated and licensed in
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas in 1994 under the Bank &t Trust Companies' Regulation
Act of 1965, and is a 75% subsidiary of Winterbotham Holdings Limited. In D~ecember~ 1996
the Company wras- granted a. license to carry on unrestricted banking and trust business
activities which, today, are subject to the terms and conditions of the Bank' & Trust companies
Regulation Act, 2000. The Company is regulated by the Central Bank of The Bahamas. The
Company is also a licensed fund adrb~inistrator and securities broker/dcaler, activities that are
regulated by The Bahamas Securities Exchange Commission.

The registered- office of the Company is Winterbothem Place, Marlborough and Queen Streets,
Nassau, Bahomnas.

Asof Jun~e 30, 20016, the Company's holdings in subsidiaries are as follows:


a I ~------- -- -


1 March 2006


IFalc interpretations

IFRIC 7 Applying IAS 29 for the first time


The directors do not anticipate that the adoption of these standards and interpretations will
have a material impact on the consolidated balance sheet in the period of initial application.
Upon adoption of IFRS 7, the group will disclose .additional information about its financial
instruments, their significance and the nature and extent of risks to which they give rise. More
specifically, the group will be required to disclose the fair value of its financial instruments and
its risk exposure in greater detail. There will be no effect on reported income or net assets.
3. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

a. Basis of preparation The consolidated balance sheet has been prepared in accordance
with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) and their interpretations
.adopted by the International Accounting Standard Board (IASB) and mecludes the
Company and its subsidiaries in which it directly or indirectly, has a controlling interest
through ownership interests or agreements. The consolidated balance sheet has been
prepared under the historical cost convention, and modified by any revaluation of assets
and liabilities at fair value through the statement of changes in equity according to the
policies for the relevant areas.

The preparation of the balance sheet in conformity with IFRS requires the use of certain
critical accounting estimates. It also requires management to exercise its judgment in
the process of applying the Group's accounting policies. The areas involving a higher
degree of judgment or complexity, or areas where assumptions and estimates are
significant to the consolidated ballance sheet are disclosed separately.

The accounting policies set out below have been applied consistently by Group entities.

b. Basis of consolidation

i. Subsidiaries subsidiaries are entities controlled by the Company. Control exists
When the Company has the power, directly or indirectly,~ to govern financial and
operating policies of an entity so as to obtain benefits from its. activities. In
assessing control, the potential voting rights that presently are exercisable or
convertible are taken into account. The balance sheets of the subsidiaries are
included in the Balance sheet from the date that control commences until the date
that control ceases.

ii. Transactions eliminated on.consolidation 'intra-group balances and any
unrealized gains or losses or income and expenses arising from intra-group
transactions, are eliminated in preparing the consolidated balance shoot,

ii. ~Fiduciary assets assets held. in trust and in c~ustd ocn behalf of customers, and,
assets and liabilities under fiduciary~ agreements 'are not included in the
consolidated balance sheet.,

.c. Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equlivalents comprise cash on hand, short
term deposits and shares in investment funds. All investment funds are short-term and
offer daily liquidity. Investments in precious metals are considered cash equivalents.

d.Accounts receivable Accounts receivable are stated sit cost less impairment losses (see
note 3h).

e. Loans receivable Loans origi~nted by the Group include loans where money, is
provided directly to the borrower and are recognized when cash is' advanced to the
borrower. They are initially recorded at cost, which' is fair value of i~sh originated by
the Group, including any transaction costs, and are subsequently measured ~at amortized
cost using the effective interest: rate method.

f. Investments Investments are recognized on a trade date basis and are classified as
available for sale investments. Investments are initially measured at cost an~d are
subsequently remeasured at fair vahte based on quocted prices. `Fair values for unlisted
securities are estimated using market values of the underlying securities or appropriate
valuation methods. Where fair value of unlisted investment cannot be estimated, they
are carried at cost.

g. Fixed assets -Fixed assets, are stated at cost less accumulated :depreciation and
impairment losses. Depreciation is being provided by the straight-line method a~at the
Following rates:


2005


S 4,605,000
168,791
425,823
600,000
272,282
6,971,896


2,672,740
20,792
2,693,532


2006


$ 5,248,368
201,146
450,684
1,294,000
6601527
7,854,725

163,518
3,689,170
39,532
3,892,220


ASSETS
CURRENT ASSETS:
Cash and cash equivalents (Note 5)
Accounts receivable net (Note 6)
Prepaid expenses and other assets (Note 7 and 17)
Secured loans (Note 8)
Investments, available for sale (Note 9)
Trital current assets
NON-CURRENT ASSETS.
Security deposits
Fixed assets (Note 11)
Deferred tax assets (2005 restated Note 19)
Total non-current assets
TOTAL
LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
CURRENT LIABILITIES:
Call accounts (Note 12) ,
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities (Notes 13 and 17)
Dividends' payable
Advances from clients (Note 14)
Fees received in advance (Niote 14)
Total current liabilities
EQUITY:
Share capital:
2,500,000 shares of $1 each
Retained earnings (2005 restated -Notel19)
Total equity
TOTAL


$11,746,945 $,642


S 3,078,286
.1,060,275
225,b000
622,426
335,763
5,321;750


,500,o000
3,925,195
6,425,195


S 1,467,296
S750,760
500,000
25,252
257,382
3,000,690


2,500,000.
3,264,738
5,764,738


See notes to consolidated balance sheet.

Thecos idted balance sheet was approved by the Board of Directors on September 9, 2006 and is
sindo behalf by:


DirecLTor~ Y

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
JUNE 30, 2006
(Ex rssd in United States prsedollars)


Director


2%/.
6.67% to 25%


20% and 50%
10%


Housing property
Office building improvements
Vehicles
Software
SOffice equipment
Office furniture and fittings


Place of .
incorporation
and operation

'Uruguay


Name of subsidiary


The Winterbotham
Trust Company
(Uruguay) S.A.







Shiffel Corp. S.A













Winterbotham
Properties Limited

Haplar Holdings
Limited
Delacroix Limited




Delaroche Limited



Banco del Pichincha
Limited (in voluntary
liquidation)


100% Provides administrative services
to parent company on intomnal
matters (suc~uih as certain
accounting' functions) and also
with respect to client servricing
(with particular focus on clients
in Latin America due~ to
geographical "plximity~ ind
language)


h. Imnpairment Fixed assets ~and accounts receivable are reviewed at each balance sheet
date to determine whether there is~ objective evidence of impfairment. If any such
indication exists, the asset's recoverable amount is estimated.

Fixed assets

An impairment loss is recognized whenever the carrying, amount of the asset or its cash-
gene'rating unit exceeds its recoverable amount.

The readverable amount of assets is the greater of their net selling price and value in use.
In assessing value in use, the estimated future cash flows are discounted to their present
value using a discount rate that reflects current market assessment of the time value of
money and the risks ~specific to the asset. For an asset thaf'does niot generate cash flows
largely independent of those fr~om other assets, the recoverable amount is determined for
the cash generating unit to which th~e asset belongs.

An impairment loss is only reviersed to the extent that the' assets carrying amount does
not exceed the carrying amount that would have been determined if no impairment loss
had been recognized.

Accounts receivable

The Group's policy is to fully provide for all~ balances outstanding for more than 120
days. In addition to the, specific provisions for impaired receivables, an additional
general provision is created for potential losses not specifically identified but which
experience indicates may be present in receivables. Therefore, additionally a generic
provision equal to 5% of the remaining receivable balance is created:
Loans receivable

An impaired, loan refers to a loan where there is no longer reasonable assurance of timely
collection of the full amount of principal and interest due to deterioration in the credit
quality of the counterpart. A loan is impaired if the estimated recoverable amount of an
asset is less than its carrying amount 'shown in the books of the Gjroup. Impairment is
measured and a provision for credit losses is established for the difference between the
carrying amount and its estimated recoverable value.

i. Foreign currency translation The Group's functional~ currency is United States
.Dollars. In .preparing the consolidated balance sheet of the Group, transactions in
currencies other than United States Dollars are recorded at the rates of exchange
prevailing on the date of ~the transaction. At each balanCe sheet date, monetary items
denominated in foreign currencies are translated at the rates prevailing on the balance
sheet date. Non-monetary items carried at fair value that are denominated in foreign
currencies are, translated at the rates prevailing on the date when the fair value was
determined. Non-monetary items that are measured in terms of historical cost in a
foreign currency are not re-franslated.

j. Provisions A provision is recognized in the balance sheet when the Group has a
present and legal obligation as a result of a past event and it is probable that an outflow
of economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation.

k. Classification Assets are classified as current when intended for sale in the normal
operating cycle, or held primarily for the. purpose of being traded, or expected to be
realized within twelve months, or classified as cash or equivalents. All other assets are
classified as non-current. Liabilities are classified as current when expected to be settled
in the normal operating cycle, or held primarily for the purpose of being traded, or due to
be settled within twelve months, or there are no unconditional rights to defer settlement
for at least twelve months. All other liabilities shall be classified as non-current.
4. CRITICAL ACCOUNTING JUDGMENTS AND KEY SOURCES OF ESTIMATION
UNCERTAINTY

Certain amounts included in or affecting the Group's balance sheet and related disclosure must
be estimated, requiring the Group to make assumptions with respect to values or conditions
which cannot be known with certainty at the time the balance sheet is prepared. A "critical
accounting estimate" is one which is both important to the portrayal of the Group's financial
condition and results and requires management's most difficult, subjective or complex
judgments, often as a result of the need to make estimates about the effect of matters that are
inherently uncertain. The Group evaluates such estimates on an ongoing basis, based upon
historical results and experience, consultation with experts, trends and other method
considered reasonable in the particular circumstances, as well as the forecasts as to how the>
might change in the future.


Uruguay 100%/ iAdministrative services to the
parent company on in ena
matters (such as certam ;
accounting' functions) and also
with respect to client servicinS
(with pag~ticuilar focus on clients
in Latin America ,due to
geographical' proximity and
language). This company
operates from a free trade zone
which has certain tax
.advantages -for the
adiministration .of companies
domiciled outside of Urguay'

Bahamas 100%/ H~olds real-estate in Nassau.


100% Hoolds real-estate in ruguay.


Bahamas


Bahamas 100%/ Acts as~ nominee 'of The
Winterbothaa Trust Company
Limited in its capacity as trustco
and/oroustodian


Bahamas


100% Acts as nominee ~of The
WVinterbotham Trust Company
Limited in its capacity as trustee
and/or custodian.


Bahamas 100% This Company wras purchased
on November 25, 2005 and is
under voluntary liquidation
(Note 10).


Delaroche Limited and Delacroix Limited are duly licensed and regulated by the Contral Bank
of The Bahamas as Nominee Trust Companics. These companies, acting individually or
together, are nominees for The Winterbotham Trust Company Limited in its capacity as trustco
and/or custodian. Winterbotham Fiduciaria S.A. 4dministradora de Fondos de Inversi6n is
duly licensed and regulated by the Central Bank of Uruguuay as a professional Trust Company
and is a wholly-owned subsidiary of The Winterbotham Trust Company (Usuguay) S.A.

The average number of employees for the year is 50 (2005: 3 8)*
2. ADOPTION OF NE)N INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL REPORTING STANDARDS
(IFRSs) AND INTERNATIONAL ACCOUNTING STANDARDS (ASs)
During the year, the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) and tbo International
Financial Reporting Interpretations Committee (IRIC) have issued the following standards
and interpretations with an effective date after the date ofthe balance shet:
International Accountinr StandardslAS/I~IFRI~s) Efircthe date


IFRS 7 Finadcial Instruments: Disclosures

IAS I Amendment Presentation of Financial Statements-
Capital Disclosures

IAS 21 Amendment Not Investment in Foreign Operation

IAS 39 Fair Value Option

IAS 39 Amendment to IAS 39 and IFRS 4 Financial
Guarantee Contracts


1 January 2007


1 January 2007

1 January 2006

1 January 2006


1 January 2006


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2006, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


$11,746,945 $ 8,765,428


Ownership
iguereg






UL- VII I) ~~ ~I---I -~~~


Beginning Edn
Balance Additions Disposals B lnce


S 386,127 $ 646,839 S. $1,032,966
1,017,001 276,98'1 -1293,982
1,313,651 72,795 278,518 .1,107,928
252,436 81,658 45,600 288,494
205,575; 66,444, -~c 272,019
653,609 129,400 783,009
S442 654 37,231 21 477,785
$4,271,053': $1311,3498 .$362 5,618

2000
Beginning Ending
Balance; 'Additions: Disposals Balance


- I I I __ I -


T'HE T HIBU~I-t BUSiNESS~


I
C
e,


AP GE 8B FRIDAY OCTOBER 6


It was also agreed that for a period of one year from the effective date, the Vendor would
continue to be liable to Winterbotham for liabilities and contingencies that may not have been
registered in BDP's balance sheet as at the effective date, if Winterbotham suffers any losses
due to the existence of such liabilities and contingencies, previously and totally justified. In
light of this, BDP undertook to advise the Vendor mn writing of its dissolution.
Notwithstanding, the liability of the Vendor terminates on the first to occur of the dissolution
of BDP or the expiration of the said one year from November 25, 2005.

On November 24, 2005 the Directors of BDP decided to place BDrP into liquidation by netting
off the liabilities against the equity. Anthony Kikivarakis (partner at'Deloitte in Nassau) was
appointed liquidator. At the time of performing this audit the liquidation was mn process,


~11 FIXED ASSETS NET

Fixed assets consist of the following:


a.' Impairment The Group has made significant investments in fixed assets, loans
receivable and investments. These assets and investments are tested for impairment
when~ circumstances indicate there may be a potential impairment. Factors considered
important which could trigger an impairnent review include the following: significant
fall in market values; significant underperformance relative to historical or projected
future operating results; significant changes in the use of the assets or the strategy for the
overall business, including assets that are decided to be phased out or replaced and assets
that are damaged or taken out of use, significant negative industry or economic trends;
and significant cost overruns in the development of assets.

Estimating recoverable amounts of assets and companies must in part be based on
management evaluations, including estimates of future performance, revenue generating
capacity of the assets, assumptions of the, future market conditions and the success in
marketing of new products and services. Changes in circumstances and in
management's evaluations and assumptions may give rise to impairment losses mn the
relevant periods.

b. Depreciation and amortization Depreciation and amortization is based on management
estimates of the future useful life of fixed assets. Estimates may change due to
technological developments, competition, changes in market conditions and other factors
and may result in changes in the estiinated useful life and in the amortization or
depreciation charges. The Group reviews the future useful life of fixed assets
periodically taking into consideration the factors mentioned above and all other
important factors. Estimated useful life for similar type of assets may vary between
different entities in the Group due to local factors as growth rate, maturity of the market,
history and expectations for replacements or transfer of assets, climate etc. In case of
significant changes in the estimated useful lives, depreciation and amortization charges
are adjusted prospectively.

c. Legal proceedings, claims and regulatory discussions The Group is subject to various
legal proceedings, claims and regulatory discussions, the outcomes of which are subject
to significant uncertainty. The Group evaluates, among other factors, the degree of
probability of an unfavorable outcome and the ability to make a reasonable estimate of
the amount of loss. Unanticipated events or changes in these factors may require the
Group to increase or decrease the amount the Group has accrued for any matter or accrue
for a matter that has not been previously accrued because it was not considered probable
or a reasonable estimate could not be made.

5. CASH AND CALL ACCOUNTS

Cash and short-term deposits comprise the following:


t


if

:t. E

~::'
r
o!
ri
d
a




rd
ti
s
Ic



t. -
;?i



5
x





3 i
s
.; t

:

P
F
*.
.9:

d
P
$
h



Y
E
(ij



,f
b


COST:
Land
Housing property
Office building improvements
Vehicles
Software -
'Office equipment
Office furniture and fittings


ACCUMULATED
DEPRECIATION:
Housing property
Office building improvements
Vehicles
Software
Office equipment
Office furniture and fittings


2006 Net Movement .
2005 Net Movement


S ~50,2$59 $ 21,375~ $ .
439,475 85,849 278,518
149,791. 48,912 .'45,600
201,186 10,377 -
534,143 85,616 -
2 23,463 41.512 .2


$2,672,7140 '$1,017,707 :$127
S1,924,141 S _751,384~ S2,7]85


$ 71;630
246,806
153,103
211,563
619,759
264,152
$1,567,013
$3,689,170
$2,672,740


2006


2005


Cash on hand
Overnight placements
Call accounts
Shares in investment funds:
AIM s/t Invest. Co. Global US (Inst'l)
Bank of America Global Liquidity
Citi Institutional Liquid Reserves, Inc.


S 15,916
3,770,329
1'46,934

100,000
100,000
42,582
$ 4,175,761


$ 17,818.
2.30% 770,000
.1,126,901


0.70%


1.90%
2.00%
2.10%/


4.00% 0
4.20%
4.10% o


250,000
250,000
632,178
$ 3,046,897


12. CALL ACCOUNTS

Call accounts represent the total on-balan~ce sheet amounts held byr clients in the Company's
Call Accounts. Funds in excess of $ 10,000 in such' accounts are placed out opn a S~duciary
basis for the account and risk of the account holderss. ~ The balance on the balance sheet
represents the first $ 10,000 held in each account phris thie total balance held in the ~accounts
that secure the loans indicated in Note 8.


13. ACCOUNTS PAYABLE AND ACCRUED LIABILITIES


2005


2006


S 299,580 $ 268,626


Accounts receivable
Allowance for doubtfurl accounts:
Balance, beginning of period
Provision'for the period .
Write back of provision
Balance, end of period
Accounts receivable, net

7. PREPAID EXPENSES AND OTHER ASSETS

Prepaid expenses and other assets are comprised of the following:


S (99,835)
S(497,1 54)
498,555
(98,434)


$ (95,455)
(316,650)
312,270
(99,835)


208io5 ~

$ 180,208
410,733.
59,139.
94,243
210

6 227


.'2008

$'~ 194,710
449,084 ~
i145,900
90,939
(10~j,219)
S180,712
-9,149


SAccounts payable
Provision for staff benefits and training expenses
Provisions other
Commissions payable .:
Taxes payable (advance)
Winterbotham Group accounts
Social security


$ 201,146 $ 168,791


$ 51,060,275. $' 750,760


2006


2005


$ 10,357 $ 9,145
22,825 18,819
S- 112,357
32,153 39,541
,154 064 1'13,198
164,321 105,794
1,000
66,964~ 11,969
$ 450,684 $ 425,823


Shelf companies available for sale
Advances to suppliers
Winterbotham Group accounts
Third party accounts
Deferred expenses>
Loans to staff
Loans granted
Others


8. SECURED LOANS


These are specific loans fully guaranteed by cash collateral held on account.. It is not part of
the Company's regular activity to grant loans, but it may do so ozi a carefully selected case by
case basis, requiring full cash collateral in every case. As of June 30, 2006 there were two
loans outstanding: -


2006 2005


2006


2005


Capital Rate
$ 600,000 $600,000' 3.60% .3.60%
S694,000 -Libor 90d + 3%


Loan # 1
Loan # 2


Prepaid expenses and other assets
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities
Loans to key management personnel
Off balance sheet item bank accounts


$1,294,000 $600,000


9. INVESTMENTS

Available for sale, at fair value are as follows:



Other investments
SSecurities and shares
The Bahamas International Securities Exchange (BISX)
Bonds


2006


2005


16. TAXATION

The Winterbotham Trust Company. (Uruguay) ~S.A.: and its Wholly owned subsidiary
Winterbotham Fiduciaria .S.A. Administradora .de Fqndos do Inversibn are domiciled in
Uruguay and subject to Uruguay;an tai laws.

Uruguayan tax law is applied on a territorial basis as opliosed to a universal taxation system
which detennines that where the company is doing business, receiving-income. and/or holding
its assets (i.e. has Uruguayan source income and assets) within rugxriayan territory is subject
to tax at the following rates:

a. Income Tax (Commerce & Industry Income Tax ("IRIC") ..30%
b. Tax on net worth of corporations 1'.5%
c. Sales or Value Added Tax (VAT) 14% Cor 23%~

Where a company has Uruguayan source income, it will have to pay a minimum monthly tax
to IRIC at a rate of 30% of its taxable net income as an advance (plt eaesfer to point (a)
above) the amount of which will depend on the level of its prior year's taxable at operating
income.


Withholding tax on loans granted by foreign lenders, which do not operate locally mr Usuguay,
shall apply in the range of 0.02% to 2.36% per annum on tbo balance (principal plus interest)
of such loans.

Payment of dividends: Up to 30% withholding tax depending on the fiscal treatment of the
country where the dividends are received. If the foreign country does not impose any tax on
the dividends received, the company is not subject to any withholding tax in Uruguay. If the
foreign country does impose taxes on dividends received but albwowe tax asedit in respect of
Uruguayan withholding tax, then no tax will be withhold in Ustagay. If the country reC
the dividends levies taxes on the dividends received and where there is a tax credit for any
taxes levied in Uruguay, then a withholding tax of 30% is apple4 in Uttagey."

Double taxation treaties: Uruguay has old (and effecdively obsLet besticswith Get ny and
Hungary. More recently it has entrmlx into specific ata treties with Chil4 .Isrel and
Paraguay.


$ 371,300 $ -
283,670 78,060
5,557 .1
-194,221


$ 660,527 $ 272,282

10. INVESTMENT IN SUBSIDIARY DURING THE YEAR

Banco del Pichincha C.A (the "P~arent") and Delacroix Limited (jointly the "Vendor"),
registered and beneficial~ owners of Banco del Pichincha Limited ("BDP"), through a Share
Purchase and Novation Agreement (the "Ag~eement") dated November 25, 2005, the effective
date, transferred, sold, and assigned all of their rights, title, and interest in its 14,705,000
participating and voting ordinary shares in BDP's capital to Winterbotham. The aggregate
purchase price for the purchased shares was USS37,998,393, which represented the value of
the Vendor's equity in BDP in the balance sheet as at the November 24, 2005 (un-audited).

The purchase price was in the form of a nova~tion, in accordance with which the Vendor owed
BDP the sum of US$37,998,393 and Winterbotham owed the Vendor the sum of
US$37,998,393 as the purchase price. The Vendor therefore, with the consent of BDP, agreed
to assign the said debt it owed to. BDP (the "Debt") to Winterbotham and accepted ,the
assignment as full consideration in settlement of the ~purchase price for the purchased shares.
Winterbotham, in turn, covenanted with BDP and the Vendor to perform and to be bound by
the terms of the Debt in every way as if Winterbotham was, with effect from and including the
November 25, 2005, a party to the Debt in the place of the Vendor. BDP covenanted with
Winterbotham to honour the Debt and to be bound by itsl terms in every way, acknowledging
that Winterbotham would be entitled to exercise all the rights and entitlements of the Vendor,
as if Winterbotham was a party to the debt in place of the Vendor from the effective date.

In consideration of the undertaking by Winterbotham and in consideration of the release by the
Vendor, BDP released and discharged the Vendor from all of its obligations and liabilities due
to be performed or satisf ied on or after the effective date, in respect of the Debt and all claims
and demands whatsoever in respect of those obligations and liabilities, and accepted that
Winterbotham would be liable for the same. In return the Vendor released and discharged
BDP from all obligations and liabilities of the Company due to be performed or satisfied on or
after the effective date, in respect of the Debt and all claims and demands whatsoever a
respect of those obligations and liabilities.


Average Average
Balance Rate B~ajance Rate


6. ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE NET


ADVANCES FROM~ CLIENTS AND FEES RECEIVED IN ADVANCE

Advances from clients include credit balances corresponding .to clients who have made
advance payments on account. Fees received in advance includes the portion of annual client
.fees which have been collected in the year ended June 30,. 2006, .and relate to periods
subsequent to the balance sheet date.


15. BALANCES` AND TRANSACTIONS WITH RELATED PARTIES

Related parties include all entities which are relatdd through common directors and
shareholders. Where the o~ffcers, directors and shareholders of such related entities have the
authority and responsibility for directing~ and controlling the auth~orties of other? companies
(established to participate in the Company's business activities) those entities are also regarded
as related parties in the consolidated balance s~heet. Entities administered by the Company on
behalf of customers where the Company also provides directors are not considered related
parties.


Balances and transactions with related parties:


.2008 2 005

$ $ 106,150
$ 180,712 :$ 25,000
$ 30.756 S 37,857

9 -172,661 S ;565,624






L I r I II


1 ::3 : ~ II . ~- . __ I


-Freeport T~ug and Towiviig Services, Ltd(FTTS).
Freeport, Grand Bahama Island, Bahamas ~


A single storey incomplete Triplex Apartment Building grosss floor area 2,016 sq.ft.),
CODSISES of Two two bedrobms and One- one Ikdtroothi units each with one bathroom,
liVing-dining room and kitchen and situate about 166 feed south 'of Bellot Road and
i/i mile eaSt of Gladstone Road and comprising 87,120 sq.ft. or .2 acres.
Appraised value: $377,0;00
Uti itieS: Electricity, Water aind Telephone













For conditions of the sale and any other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
at: 356-1685 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
Thle COlmaecal Credit Collection Unit, P.O. Box N- 7518, Nassau, Balann:
tO reach us before November 3_ 2006
SSaiots enqudicis odly


- ; I I I


I I )






1~


17. INCOME TAX

Companies subject to Corporate Income Tax are The WCinterbotham Trust Company (Uruguay)
S.A and its subsidiary Winterbotham Fiduciaria S.A. Administradora de Fondos de Inversion.


a. Interest rate risk The Group is exposed to interest rate risk on deposits and call
accounts.


b. Credit risk The Company is exposed to credit risk in respect of losses that would have
to be recognized if counterparties fail to perform as contracted.

The Company's exposure to credit risk is primarily in respect of accounts receivable,
bank balances, deposits, secured loans and prepaid expenses and other assets. As at the
balance sheet date, the Company's maximum exposure to credit risk is equal to the
carrying amount of the above assets disclosed in the balance sheet.

c. Foreign exchange risk is the risk of loss resultin'g frm foreign currency translation.
Currency risk is managed by matching liabilities with assets within the same currency
whenever possible.



d. Fair value of financial assets and liabilities The fair value is the amount for which an
asset could be exchanged, or a liability settled, between knowledgeable, willing parties
,in an arm's length transaction. Underlying the definition of fair value is the
presumption that the Company is a going concern without any intention or need to
liquidate, curtail materially the scale of its operations or undertake a transaction on
adverse terms.

In the opinion of management, the estimated fair value of financial assets and financial
liabilities (accourits receivable, investments available for sale, bank balances, secured
loans, prepaid expenses and other assets, accounts payable and accrued liabilities and
call accounts) at the balance sheet date were not materially different.from their carrying
value due to their short term nature.


20. COMPARATIVE FIGURES

Certain prior year's figures have been reclassified to conform with the current year's
presentation. In the current year, investment in precious metals has been included in cash and
cash equivalents.




SDeloitte.

nortre Ac erants
an PaMgein T vIsltants
P.o.- Box N-712o
Nassau, Bahamnas
Tel)- + (4)a3o24
trtp://www.deoitte.com.bs




INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT


To the Shareholders and Directors of
The Winterbotham Trust Company Limited:

We have audited the above consolidated balance sheet of The Winterbotham Trust Company Limhited
(the "Company") as of June 30, 2006. The consolidated balance sheet is the responsibility of the
SCompany's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the consolidated balance
sheet based on our audit.

Wje conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those Standards
require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assuirance about whether the
consolidated balance sheet is free of material misstatement. An audit mecludes examining, on a test
basis, evidence supportng the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated balance shoot. An audit
also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant~ estimates made by
management, as well1 as evaluating the overall consolidated balance sheet presentation. We believe
that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the consolidated balance sheet presents fairly, in all material respects, the financial
position of the Company as of June 30, 2006, in accordance with International Financial Reporting
Standards.


2006


2005


Profit (loss) before tax $ (86,357) $ 3,175
Fiscal adjustment for inflation 9,636 4,473
Non-deductible expense 59,828 46,936
Taxable profit (loss) $ (16,893) $ 54,584
Income tax using corporate tax rate (30%/) $ $ 16375

Tax loss to be used in future periods (expires in 3 years) $ (5,068) '$


Deferred tax assets and liabilities

The deferred tax stated cor-respond to differences between book and tax values of fixed assets
originated mainly by differences of valuation and depreciation criteria.

The deferred tax is the tax expected to be paid or recovered based on the differences existing
between the book value of an asset or liability, and their tax value.

Assets for deferred tax as at June 30, 2006, rise from applying the tax rate in force at that
moment (30%) on the temporary taxable differences of US% 131,493, which correspond
mainly to the different valuation criteria and fixed assets depreciation criteria.

Assets for deferred tax, are recognized as long as the Company will probably have fiscal
earnings against which to use the deductible temporary differences. Liabilities for deferred tax
are normally recognized for all the taxable temporary difference.

Assets and liabilities for deferred tax are offset when related to income taxes levied by the
same tax authority and the Companly seeks to hiquidate its assets and liabilities current tax on a
net basis. '

As to June 30, 2006 deferred tax assets and liabilities are attributable to the following:

Assets Liabilities
2006 2005 (*) 2006 2005 (*)
Temporary differences arising from. differences in
fixed assets valuation and depreciation criteria $ 12,715 $ 14,463 $ $ .
Temporary differences associated with


21,749 6,329
5,068 ___g
$39,532 $20,792 $ $ -


investments in subsidiaries
Temporary differences for unused tax losses.


Deferred tax recognized in the net profit for the period:


2006 2005 (*)
$18,740 $20,792


Income for deferred tax recognition ,


(*) Figures as to June 30, 2005 are re-stating the balance sheet presented as to that date to
incorporate the recognition of the ef feet of the deferred tax as established in IAS 12.

18. FIDUCIARY OPERATIONS

At June 30, 2006, The Winterbotham Merchant Bank, a division of The Winterbotham Trust
4TOmp,2L9 ite :ha entered into fde les baere mns &o ran ag rea ebamout of
carried out by the Company on their behalf under these contracts. The depositors agee to
indeminify and hold harmless .the Winterbotham Trust Co pnyLimited, its daP trs
employees, agents and representatives against all liability, lossempor damages arising out ofo
mn connection with the fiduciary agreement. The major portion of the fiduciary transaction
comprise funds received by The Winterbotham Trust Company Limited from corporate or
individual depositors which are subsequently lent on to corporate or individual borrowers or
Deposited with banks in time deposit accounts. Fiduciary services yield fees equivalent to the
Difference between the lending and deposit rates and are: recognized as income upon collection
Sat the time oflibaurity, or flat commissions paid on implementation of the transaction s.


19. Fly'I~AN5; IA INSTRUMENTS

The Group in the normal course of business, uses various types of financial instruments.
Information on financial risks and fair value of these financial instruments is set out below.


September 9', 2006


SAreas ofResponsibility i ~
- Overall responsible for the FITS finance and accounts
function
-Handling of supplies invorces and invoicing to customers
- Cole t ,Ndal lo lin co yments and lookkteepmng of
banks movements.
- Preparation of monthly, semi and annual reports to parents
companies, preparation of audit files and reporting to
Governmental institutions and authorities
-Reconciliation of intercompany balances, preparation
and reporting of budget and forecast.
- Cash management (liquidity forecast, exchange r tes etc.)
SMinimizing financial exposures, optimizing working
capital and maintaining fixed assets register.
-` Corporate'secretary functions.
- Other ad hoc tasks.
SKILLS REQUIRED
The right candidate should have either an MSc in Business
Administration and Auditing or a bachelor's degree in Finance
o ela vhtee acutn wt p3a yars l eaeoa f~ expedience
accounts. In addition s/he should have knowledge of existing
legislation on financial statements and international accounting
standards as well as HI flair (MS Office and consolidation tools).
S/he should also have the ability: to meet deadlines ahd expectations
omlyicl cedg a kepn fus on o I exi sue san tr vs on -
taking ownership and responsibility. Finally, s/ he is capable of '
taig initiative fr poe and timely action and has the personal


PERSONAL CAREER OPPORTUNITIE'S
The position offers an exciting and attractive career in an .
international envitonmentd with the possibility of ontinuous
.SvitzerWijsmuller Group or ~World Point Terminals Inc.
CONTACT INFORMATION
Application with resume/CV to be sent by October 31 to:
Freeport Tug arid Towing Services Ltd. att. Chester Turnquest,
#4Milton Street,
P.O.Box F-43550
Freeport Grand ahama, Bahamas,

Mab. 112242 7274028:8.
Email: chesterturnquest@svitzerwijsmuller.com
Writh copy to: Mario Gaycia, Regional Finance Manager,
SvitzerWijsmuller (Caribbean)Ltd, Lennar Corporate
Centre, 790 NW 107th Ave. Suit 400, Miami FL 33172
USA Tel + 1 305 485 2123, Fax + 1 305 221 4797
Email usmia~info@svitzerwijsmuller com.



3 SVit Ze f

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THE TRIBUNE BUISINE $.8


FRIDAY, OC-TOBER-20, 2006, :PAGESB~





_ -~.-^11111_1__1_--11l~m~~~.l- ~. s. I


IM~ '
HOW many words of four letters or more can you
make tf~om the letters shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used once only. Each
must contain the centre letter and there must be
at least one nine-letter word. No plurals or verb
forms ending in "s", no words with initial capitals
and no words with a hyphen or apostrophe
permitted. The first word of a phrase is permitted
(e.g. inkrjet in inkrjet printer).
TODAY'S targetT,, :
G ood 19; very good 29; excellent 37 (or more).
Solution Monday.

YaES RlSagre ageddgger drag dreg eager
edge egest egged egret gadget gage gate
gated gear~geared grade grate grated grease
ges g eeat g eed greets restr gd ra ded
stager stagger STAGGERED tagged


Cop:




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Trburdoie


Hiuoroscope


FRI DAY,
OCTOBER 20
ARIES March 21/April 20'
This week good friends make goodr
business partners, so jump' on thye
opportunity to start a new venture.
Gemini and Pisces are key players in.
this new opportunity.
TAURUS April 21/May 21 .
You're' the one with the bigger brain
than your opponent this week,
Taurus. Use it to you best advantagde'l
to avoid a conflict, which is th8
smart way out.
GEMINI May 22/June 21 :
A radical proposal can change yo~'r' ''
life this week, Gemini. Wednesday is,
the day when things are bound to
change. Your instincts say "stop," bul
the right~course is to push forward. ,
CANCER June 22/July 22~h
You're as special at you thirik, tut keep
in mind that others are special, too. You'
may want to pay attention to close~;`'
friends this week, they have more:~
insight than you'd mignht imagine;
Expect good news on Thursday. -
LEO July 23/August 23
Walking through a wall is not possibly,
unless you're it magician, Leo. So stop,.
being so stubbom and accept that theii
may be another wagy tg solve your prob-
lem. Loved ones have the answer.
VIR.GO F Aug 24/Sept 22'
Things are not what they' seem this


ready for the. next. step. T
LIBRA~ Sept 23/Oct 23
People are your weakness, Libra, but:
they're also your source of streligthi.
You're outgoing and not afraid to
dive- into new adventures. Bult keep
both feet on the ground this week.
SCORPIO Oct 24/N~ov 22 .
Trivial matters escalate into biggei
issues this week, Scorpio. Put the
welfare of others before your needt -
and you'll be, able to See the bigget
picture. Virgo is a good friend.
SAGIITA~RIUS Nov 23/Dec 21~
So uhhn ean~ nd sta nep-
New friends come into your heart
and set up shop there. You feei'l
st raet aout neiy changes, but the)'
CAPRICORN Dec 22/'Jan 20
Work your hardest to keep the mood
light at work this week, Capricom. A~
manager has bitten off more than he can ,
chew and is taking it out on your fellow.
work mates making life miserable.
AQUA1RIUS Jan 21Feb18
You're feeling at the top of your form -
this week, Aquarius, and nothing can r.
bring you down. Petty problems' at
work fall from your shoulders and .

o{SsCrEad- theb otarch 20 .
Stop living life in a fantasy woldd`
Pisces, let friends bring you back
down to earth. A soul mate makes an
appearance on Wednesday. Don't let~l
this one get away again.


Famous Hand


*
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*

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I


cRYPTIC PUZZLE I6


I


I ` -- *I I '


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


PAGE 10B, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2006


.*
* 4-
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yrighted Material(




ndic~ated Contentr




Commercial News


*
.
....
.;
h..r~stlLxz~.~.~BCP~LL~t~;~~t;lBDLil -t~i-~xls~-~L~~ Ir~;~..-: ~


played, East (Charles Coon) returned
the six of clubs! As a result, declarer
went down one when he later lost a
spade finesse.
Now let's suppose Coon had
returned a spade instead of a: club. In
that case, declarer would make the
contract with proper play.
After placing West, the opening
bidder, with the king .of spades,
South would rise with the ace and
play three more trumps, ending in his
hand, to produce `this position:
SNorth
+A KT 9
West East
4 K Immaterial
4 Q 10 8 4
South
SQ8 2
S7
47
The seveni-of-hearts lead would
now destroy West. Whether he dis-
carded a spade or a club, South
would win the rest of the tricks w~ith
the aid of a club finesse;
Most declarers find it difficult to
recognize and execute a squeeze, but
it's usually even more difficult for a
defender to spot an impjending
.squeeze and take whatever steps are
necessary to break it up. Certainly
Coon's club return at trick five mer-
its an accolade of some sort. .


South dealer,
Neither side vulnerable.
NORTH
+ 6 5
49 Q96 3
S9 74
+AK J 9


r J


EAST
S10 9 7 4
10 6 2
i52


WEST
+ K3


+ AK QS +1
+q Q 1 8 4 3 + 6
SOUTH
4 A Q 8 2
lK 10 8 74 2
4 J 5
+7


The bidding:
South West North East
Pass 1 + Pass 1 4
2 V 3 + 3 V Pass
4 V
Opening~ lead king of diamonds.
Good' defense is .generally
regarded as the most difficult part of
the game, but in case you don't think
so, here's a hand to test your ingenu-
i Msume you're East and partner
leads the K-A-Q of diamonds, South
ruffing the third round. Ieclaret
plays a low trui~np to dummy's
queen, and you win with the ace.
What would yobu retum?
You'd~ probably lead the, jack of
spades; but when the deal was


1 Possilybe lu d en ough lootwat6)
7 Beingsor may
anger Iv (8)
8 Many psa rperso eche~atid(4)
10 Arie u ed by an ailatol(6)
11 Fnally we get a bookwIth a perfect
ending (2.4) .
14 Allow people to useonet
property (3)


other wray? (4)
9 inexperienced k~Bai negotai
re-entry (5)
21 Mal of stone? (5)
22 Polentally oceani-goinji
craft? (5)
23 That ofthe catat thas e attenhe
dudc? (4)
26 Maybe backward
performances (5)
28 Offer of a job, Idealyly(3) ~
29 Went in tohelp make a core (6)
30 LOOkin danger (6)
31 Greek god ofwar and land
measures (4)
32 Tricks out ofgettng finshed and
pretends Ifs OK (8)
33 He has the skills to
make a suiI (6)


DowN
.1 - ngine that conks out, needing a bit
of help (6)
2 Resenrved ty he referee? (6)
3 Always fundin tranellive verbs (4)
4- The iller upset tester at te
weekend (7)
5 Standard AngloSaxon soldiers (5)
8 Mr Earp's funnyway with a
teetotaller (5)


importance (3)
12 Hlenic name? {3)
13 He raced back from St. Anne's (5)
15 O)neofthose all ina rjulver? (5)
18 A litte Iat s shinng(5)
19 Info for the top brass? (3)
20 Regardin humle yeaning (3)
21 The brken batons a
strong things (7) .
22 Deceive witin seconds (3)
23 The screen that hides nothng (6)
24 The chances of being eccentric? (4)
25 Maybe f'd star i Dr Who (6)
26 Continue with corporal
punishment (5)
27 Shows abias towards
twisting lanes (5)
28 Legal level for the high jump?(3)
30 Nasty Injury at Goodwood? (4)


Martin Becker v Simon Ansell,
Amsterdam Open 2006.
England's young masters scored
well in the 86-player open, and a
Anselloutwit g drng
White is under pressure, so has
to exchange his central e5 horse,
allow Black to make the ktnight
swap, retreat 1 Nd3 allowing
Black to support his own knight
by f7-f5, or challenge e4 by 1
Bd3. After a long think White 2
settled for the last choice, noting
that 1 Bd3 f57 fails to 2 Nxg6.
Ansell spotted a major flaw in
White' logic and his reply yo 1
which Black soon converted into
a won endgame. What
happened?


DOYN
.1 Thicker (6)
2 Last (6)
3 Tiled lady (4)
4 Hand over (7)
5 Tempre~ss(5)
a Dry (4)
9 Expert (3)
13Fol(5)

19 Can (3)
20 Misery (3)
21 Skin



25 Giggle (6)
26 Break (5)
21 Foe (5)
28 Was victedous (3)
30 River tossing ()


ACROSS
1 Rely (6)
7 Front (8)
8I First man (4)
10 Tree (6)
11 Two-legged
creatures (6)
14 Anger (3)
16 Planet (5)
I rv(4

22d (gs rit(5)
23 Bard (4)
26 Fish basket ()
28 Mary (3)
29 Hire charge (6)
30 Wooded area (6)
31 Burden (4)
33 M r
profound (6)


I

V
~
r
r
c
f
r
e
o
r


r
r

d
P
c
r
c
I
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_


Yesterday's cryptic solurtionS
ACROS: 1, Cheep 6, Darby 9, Disa-vo 10, Stdip il, Walst
12, Belay 18, Hobo-Ken 15, Pet 17, O-X-en
10, De-pul-y 19, Drler 2, Exited 22, F-use 24, Ran 25,
Sleeper 26, Sigh- 27, Pig 1128, Fil-h29, G-elatl-in 30,
Grand 31, Berry
DOWN: 2, Hatbox 3, Edisor~ 4, Pip 5,Ta~ken 6, DEMvager
7 A-wa 8, Basket 12, Bear-d l3, Hover 14, B-gin lS,
Put-up 16, T-yler 18, D-eall 19, De-bi-ed 21, Xavier
22. Felie 23, Setter 25, She-ar 26, Sign 28, Fib


Ycsterdacdysesysolution s
ACROSS:1, Users 6, Afler9, Opem-air 10, Jetty 11, Rogue
12, Sprig 13, Te state 15, Pea 17, Role 18, Assist 19,
Buill 20, Carpet 22, Soda 24, Eve 25, Debates
26, Cedar 27, Proof 28, Limit 29, Disdain 30, Beret 31,
Tenel
DOWN: 2, Stereo 3, Rotate 4, Spy5, Snipe 6, Aldiest 7.
Frog 8, Eludes 12, Stout l3, Tucel4, Store 15, Pilot 16,
Atlas 18, Alter 19, Benefit 21, Averse 22, Saline 23, Desire
25, Dandy 26, Code 28, Lit


Chess solution 8~ldnl62091d7Nxcps+2dc ~53
Kh2 Qxc24 Btczcx2Nadaskanhd Blsackcaleihie
M q~cuin )alrb) Dap~ingly b)aptsd c)Apee
Oneposside wood ldder~bnr s(oluenis MMnk
mil ma g~eml agMggIg


Available from


c; ;ier 9

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII11111111111111111111 ~~C~ ~C


Providers~


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Contract Bridge


By Stare Beck~er


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The Mystic Sharks enjoy two-set victory
Markis to host .LEFT: Vallance Ferguson of' SC McsPherson Sharks seris for rthe match against the DW
Davis Pitbulls The Sharks \
Pre-SeaSOn '.)~jBF ~ ~ k A16~~b~i~ilI BELOW': Kethner Joseph of SC M~cherson Sharks defends a shot against DW Davis'


IIllrl~l :~

LT~ll~fl~~~


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2006, PAGE 11B


TRIBUNE SPORTS


"Our vision is to take thiis
.enterprise to full professional
Status at lest by our third sea-
son," declared Smith, who
Added that they intend to run a
"Development Division" for
those younger players' who
have the talent and the ability
to play college ball, but' do not
Swish to lose eligibility by play-
'ing in the semi-pro enterprise.

PriZCS

Although he declined to
reveal who the sponsors are,
Smith stated that they will be
offering. a total of $10,000, in
cash prizes with $8,000 going
to the winning team and $2,000
to the runners-up.
SAnd even though they have
four teams confirmed to par~
ticipate so far -' Real Deal
Shockers, Wizards, Rockets
and Virgo. Car Rental Smith
said they intend to add an addi-


tional two -before the season
starts.
However, ;he made' it
emphatically clear that they are
not seeking sanctions from
either the NPB A or the
Bahamas Basketball Fedeya-
tion, nor are they seeking to
replace any of these bodies.
"Thislis strictly professional
aind they' are strictly amateur.
They have their role to play
and we have our's," he insisted.
"We, wish to state' for the
record that all over the world
these bodies co-exist."
'Public relations director
Gary 'Super' Johnson said
.eventually it is their desire to
branch out where and bring in
Spro teams to play in the
Bahamas and have Bahamian
.teams travel abroad to play
against pro sides.
Smith said there is nothing
new to this as the NPBA co-
existed at the same time as the


breakaway Bahamas Athletes
in Action before they united.
James Price, the' coach and
sponsor of the Shockers, said
he decided to rejoin forces with
Sinith because of what he
claims~ was a decline in' the
NPBA last year. .
"If you've noticed last year,
basketball had taken the worse
fall since P've been around bas-
ketball in the last six years. It
was to the point where in the
championship game, you only
had the players inside the
gym," he stated.

PrOgreSS
S"If you're going to go in a
league and there isn't gonna
be any progress, you need to
seek other ways to get
progress. Ijust decided that I'm
gonna take my team and five
Ricardo Smrith a chance with
hnis Pro Show."


Assistant commissioner Noe
Sutherland advised the critic
that, "This is going to be a Pr~
Show. That's why it's going t
succeed. The show must g-
on."
SButler, representing Virg
Car Rental, assured the far
that they will be pleased "wit
the product that we put on th
floor." He. said Virgo Cs
Rental is excited about what
b-eing anticipated.
-Smith made it clear that tl
fans can look forward to somn
thing exciting to watch.
"The glory days are back aI
I want to.rally the troops,
whip them into shape, to g
them ready," he stated. "Con
go with us. It's pro time."
Treasurer Mark Cox sa
they have put together a col
petent group of Directors
the Board, who will ensure tl
the product they offer will
second to none.


BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
WHILE the New Providence
Basketball Association will be
launching its new season with
just the men's division one
play, a breakaway Bahama Pro
Show will be making its debut
this year. .
Plans were announced on
Tuesday for the semi-profes-
sional league that will take the
forni of the National Basket-
ball Association with a Board
of Directors, headed by a com
missioner and chairman.
Foi-merNPBA and Bahamas
Government Departmental
Basketball Association presi-
dent Ricardo Smith will fill
those two roles when the
Bahama Pro Show hits the
floor at the K'endal Isaacs
Gymnasium. on Thursday,
November 9.


tournament

BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
ALTHOUGH the Gov-
'ernment Secondary Schools
Sports Association's basket-
ball season won't get under-
way until next month, the
Dame Doris Johnson Mystic
Margins will host a pre-sea-
son tournament this week-
end.
Mystic Marlins' coach
Harcourt McCoy said they
have invited 16 teams from
both the GSSSA and the
Bahamas Association of
Independent Secondary
Schools to participate in the
tournament that starts today
and runs through Sunday at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um.
"W~e want to have some
extra games, some quality
games because most coach-
es want to try and get in
some scrimmages at this
point before the season get
started," McCoy stressed.
"So instead of the schools
. o rganising the scrimmages
in a controlled environment,
we, have decided to put on
the tournament, which will
also allow the government
and private schools to play
together."
McCoy feels that his Mys-
`tib-Marlins will be a
favourite to win the tourna-
rMent, but he's not counting
oiit the reigning Hugh ,
Campbell Basketball Tour-
nament champions, CI Gib-
son Rattlers, who will be
Springing two teams.
Trhey will be joined by
twob teams froni the RM
Bailey Pacers as well, along:
With the CV Bethel
Stip~grays, Kingsway Acade-
my Saints, Queen's College
SComets, Jordan Prince
W~illiam Falcons, Galilee,
Temple Christian Suns, CC
Sweeting Cobras and the
Government High Magic-
men.
McCoy; said the tourna-



Jeetball Classic is staged in
~Felfruary, compared to the
Grand Bahama teams who


'"It's always the downfall
of the Nassau teams to find
more games and more p~lay-
my situations instead of
gomg off the island or trying
tosarrange it themselves,"?
said McCoy, who noted that
the tournament provides -
that opportunity. .
There is expected to be
four pools set up each with
t o teams each. All four
teifms will meet each other
before they cross over to
play in the playoffs.
SGames will.get started at
3;45pm today and continue
at 10am on Saturday. The
final day of competition will
~ get underway at 2pm on
Sunday-
The New Providence
Association of Basketball
Officials is expected to offi-
ciate the games. '
Trophies will be awarded
to the winning teams and
outstanding players at the
end of the championship on
Sunday night.


Bahama Pro Shorltomake




debut basketball season



















~I II -


TENNIS
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
AFTER dropping the first set for
Sthe second straight match, Mark
Knowles and Daniel Nestor rallied
for another comeback victory in a
tight super tie-br'eaker.
At the Mutua Madrilena Masters
in Madrid, Spain, Knowles and
Nestor pulled~ off a 4-6, 7-6 (3), 11-9
decision over the team of Jonathan
Erlich and Andy Ram from Israel
in the quiarter-final.
They are now into the semifinal
of the indoor tournament that~ they
won for the past two years and three
out of the past four years.
Contacted in his hotel room in
Madrid, Knowles said it was good
to still be in the tournament
<'It was tough. We lost a tough first
set -$md we were ahead 5-1 in the
second set and actually lost the
lead," he reflected. "But we played a
good tie breaker and won.
"It was a good hard fotaght match,
which is what we expected. We
weldddha Hhlied to cos towut b
to give credit to the other team.
They stood around and played well."
Knowles and Nestor posted five
aces, two more than Erlich and Ram,
but they also had a total of seven
double faults, three more than their
opponents.
They were 33 for 49 for a 67 p~er
cent in the first serve' win, while
Elrich and Ram were 37-for-54 and
69 yier cent. The Israel team con-
verted 9-of-23 for 39 per cent, less
than Knowles and Nestor's 10-for-
24 for 42 per cent.
But in the break points won,
Elrich and Ram had the advantage
after going 6-for-8 for 75 per cent.
Knowles and ~Nestor only managed a
57 per cent after they were 4-for-7.
The two teams combined for 11
service games played.
"We hope to' keep going. We won
this tournament for the last two
years, so it feels good when we play
here,'' Knowles reflected.
I~owevrer,. it won't get any easier
today -when they take on the No.2
.seeded team of Jonas Bjokrman of
Sweden and Max Mirnyi of Bulgaria
in the semifinal.
''We played them many times,"
said Knowles, who along with
Nestor, hold a 2-1 advantage mn their
head-to-head confrontation with
Bjorkman and Mirnyi.
"They're' a great team, but we will
be better by beating them tomor-
row ")
Knowles feel that a victory over
Bjorkman and Mirnyi will. help to
boost their confidence gomng into the
season ending Tenmis MR~asters Cup
Doubles in Shanghai, China, starting
on November 13.


I -- ' I ''I -- --


Win two (2) tickets palus travel

to see the Nllo ember 62: 8:ame


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___ _11~_ _I_ I


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2006


SECTION




Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


.l NO PAOF


?h N Poiec ltms
Softball Association will start its
playoffs on Saturday at the
Archdeacon William Thompson
Softball Park at thd Southern Recre-
ation Grounds.
Games on tap are as follows:
10 a.m. Kiwi Knights vs Bahamas


staertmgarts noon. ; oo os

Tnihev B rahams Asownciuation

POffcas are mourning with the fam-
iy. of thelaer Dinn Lycnn Thomp-
12 at te hm o e duhtr
Claire anaiella cninu Bethsuda.
nosedin with lng cnce ea g

She w aaas recivngchmiotherap
andlti rad siation u otetm of ther
delcath a munn i t f-
vice is tentate ivel y shdue fhorSa-
tirda, Otober 28d at ay venu to be
deatthermined Interestd pgersos cn
conactre n Dniferlyroa Bt328-2231
TorVlKmpsn ath 362-1797 sert
'fthe Tribuane SpCort Deartment
aloetnds riats ond oltencies to her


Tnher Bahmoas Assoiatio of
Aice istnAHie 1s hneu e 0 f St
mournmingd Ithrelssotoiederges ant
SnacJndswa aforer Pyrmiddl dis- 2
tane riunner for thMais Deand he
clompetend inthe BAAAmenets dur- r



fuhlliltaysrice Asoiats held atNew G
Dnestnyat isthurchBl agillounill
The rnibn te Sports DfP eprtieant
extnds its c ondoene todl hisfm-


Shannod n RusellA colleted agame
aces to ead heScti Bnk
Defendl ers a to atreeset swepovr i

the Chrlotte Hpornts. Dprm
Te Deend eri s won olnc t hes New




Nicola3 Maornt wha 11g spikes and
Snipe iF bst died fiepikes an w
Ine the mens feture contest the
Sabarontrders t altreso pulled off a
thehreeset vicory,2522 2-2 ad
2519oer Diamondes Ion ternatonl
Shrwaidnce Arthurs had 1 Aspoikes,
two blocks and anae for Dav game
high 2-13 points and Leonardo ean
chippd n wt i pkeoebok
and lan e f or the d Int s e~sos ette
came apwtha Fbsevden i spikes adto
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ot wit sevn siks and two aces f gm
ind alsng aeffor t.e Itue


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