Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00556
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: October 17, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00556
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text














#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION





BAHAMAS EDITION


HIGH 86F

LO SiH7E3F


L~c(~A D CLOUDS


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2006


PRICE 750


Volume: 102 No.271


h MSS SLOVAK REPCBLIC Katrina Mlanova is crowned Mfiss Intercontinental 2006 at the Rainforest Theatre in the
Wy;ndham Nassau Resort on Sunday. lAliss RAlanova came out on top from a field of -18 contestants.
(Photo: FelipP Mlajor/Tribune staff)


a By NATARIO IVcKENZIE
MORE than five weeks after Daniel Smith's mysterious death, no
decision has been made on whether an inquest should be held, it was
revealed yesterday.
Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez said police and pathology reports
were still awaited on cover girl Anna Nicole Smith's 20-year-old son.
"We are still waiting for the police and pathology,reports to come in,"
Mr Gomine said. "After getting all of the reports, a decisioil will be made
as to whether or not an inquest willb~e held."
Mr Gomez said he believed the reports would be in some time this
v: eek. October 23 had originally been set as the date for an inquest into
~SEE page 10

SKeod. -Snth set to break

Silence at press conference


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I-1


United Nations Security Council. "
The BBC report claimed that the
document stated that the US gov-
ernment believed that Venezuela
has shown that it is. more con-
cerned with disrupting interna-
tional events than in working con -
structively to achieve common
goals, The document- claimed
that Venezuela would use its
-admission on the Security Council
for "ideological grandstanding."
On Sunday the Free National
Movement, issued a piess state-
ment calling on government~to
'vote for Guateemala; ThfiGoffiEhit~l"
Opposition believed that a vote
for Guat~emala would be in the
best interest of the Bahamas and
the region. The FNM also called
on government to make its vote
public.
Govertiment's decision may
cmea sa su prss to o~sbeo
mi Heraldt reported that the 15-
member Caribbean Community
had made it clear it wpuld not
support Guatemala's US-backed

SEE page 10


THE government is to vote for
Guatemala when votes 4re cast
to fill one of the rotating vacancies
on the United Nations Sectirity
Council. .
This confirmation came from a
top government spokesman, who
told The Tribune that government
had instructed its delegates at the ~
United Nations to vote for
.Guatemala to be admitted as a
non-permanent member on the
Security Council.
Government's decision comes
in the wake of both international
and national, concernS that
Venezuela might be supported for
admission to the council. ~
The Bush administration has
already made it known that it
would prefer. Guatemala to be
voted onto the council, rather
than Venezuela. However, 1he US
deoi d'h at ai hs tboen nprms u
position.
In June of this year, the BBC
reported that it had obtained a
IJ S. diplomatic communique
called "Defeating Venezuela in the
-2006 non-permlanent seat on the


M By 'ALISON LOWE
ACCORDING to reports the
badly decomposed bodies of two
men have beeri found in bushes in
South Andros.
An eyewitness reported that the
bodies wyere discovered somewhere
between the Bluff and Smith's Hill.
Yesterday, Chief Supt Marvin
Dames confirmed that officers
From the criminal defence unit had
been dispatched to the island at
around 1pm to investigate.
Unable to provide any more spe-
cific details at this stage, Mr Dames
said CDU was "await qg a prelim-
inary report on the st tus of the
mat"e" from its officers on the


Stabbing victim is

reported to have died
By KRYSTEL ROLL
ONE oftwo'men stabbed dur-
ing Harbour Island's weekend
regatta has reportedly died in hos-
pital after being airlifted to Nas-
sau.
The Tribune was unable to con-
firm what condition the other man
was in after reports came into the
newsroom late last might, but
according to eye witnesses on the
island there were several discrep-
SEE page 10


BAHAMIAN baseball star Anthony "Tony" Cui~ry died yesterday
morning after a five-year battle with ill-health.
On earring of his death Prime Minister Pyrry Christie expressedi his
"profound sympathy" for,the fanuly, friends and associates,
"Tony Curry, aged 68, was one of the truly great Bahamian sports
legends and was one of the early pioneers in the integration of Major
League Baseball.
,"He followed the late Andre Rodgers, as the first of Bahamians to
play major league baseball in the- Unite~d Stides of America at a time
when there were considerable barriers for black meln of talent and abil.
ity to enter into the sport," Mr C~hristie~ said
Tony Curry played for the Philadelphia Phillies for two seasoh~s in
- 1960 and 1961, and in 1966 he returned to baseball where he played
with the Cleveland Indians for one season.
SEE ae 10


7 -ALISON LOWE
A 51 MIlLLION donation ha
beecn made by; the Kerzner family
to a memorial fund set up in the
name of their late son to further
the "cmaso tha hir' K ez
ezre eado a irte Bah mas. and i
partic lr, its a lren.
The Butch Kerzner Alemonal
Fund will be a repository for fundj
to be used primarily to "recon-
Ituc ack on ti~m I~d an!
Bahamas", according to a itate-
me~nt ona he fanl Hyr sterdayof
Butch Keizner, Kerzner Interna-
tinaloha e adt $ mlendon don -
ital Fund in the name of all Kerzn-
er International employeess" said
;te tatmel .say they intend to
wok 'ith Prime Mini te Perr
C rsti mits ehsrn thatsth fund
go toward te ineddprio iies'
uhic ne lcthMrdKze o enown
the Bah amas.
de I pers dsah er Crsiad
that the country can draw "com_
fort (from) the certain knowledge
w av ta Buhsu swor u r

SEE page 10


sador and gt ing b ard chair
.known if Prime Mimister Perry
Christie has accepted their resig-
nations.
Shortly after the altercation
between the two men, Mr Gib-
son publicly~acknowledged that
there was in fact a fight and apol-
ogised for the part he played in it.
However, no such apology came
from the Mt Moriah MP. .
Weighing in on the issue, for-
mer Attorney General Carl
Bethel said there was no ques-
tion whether a public apology
should have been offered. As a
government official, it was an
SEE page 10


SBy KRYSTEL ROLL
KEOD SMITH, one of the two
MPs caught tip in the Cabinet
Room brawl scandal, will break
his silence on the issue at a press
conference toinorrow.
But he refused to give a hint
last night on what he might say.
"That would take the fun out of
it," he told The Tribune.
Unlike his fellow "fighter",
Kenyatta Gibson, Mr Smith has
yet to apologise for the slugfest in
which it is claimed a glass-topped
table and window panes were
broken.
However, he and Mr Gibson
have reportedly offered their res-
igriations as environment ambas-


n ~PS['~' 5?~:
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i rif:'*l
:i

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nrbune


The


Go


Bahamas makes decision on

UN Security Council vacancy


No decision on inquest Bodies found

into Daniel Sinith death in Andros


Kerzner family

;~--mae 1$s km


Bahamian baseball star


,Anthony Curry dies at 68 nation to fund















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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2006


DESPITE spending only $2
million on advertising and pro-
motions; Ministry of Tourism
'officials expect to increase the
number of visitors from Canada
by 20 to 25 per cent by June of
20)7.
After hiring Punch Commu-
nications, a public relations firm
headquartered in Toronto, the
Ministry's Canadian team lead
.by national director Mr Paul


Strachan is already seeing
marked improvements that
exceed initial target returns.
The Bahamas is continuing
to be pushed as a multi-purpose,
multi-island destination, under
the public relation firm's new
aggressive campaign.
Using local Bahamian talent
such as Gregory Lampkin and
Claudette "Cookie Allens for
promotional radio spots, the


team is seeking to infuse as
much Bahamian culture as pos-
sible into its advertisements.
Four Toronto transit com-
mission trains have also been
plastered with images from the
Bahamas ranging from beach
scenes to the Royal Bahamas
Police Force band to pictures
of couples snorkeling along
Andros' barrier reef aill high-
lighting a different island and a
different experience.
These trains travel along King
Street and Queen Street in the
financial district of downtown:
Toronto, where Punch bhair-
man Stewart MacPhee said they
are focusing on the target mar-
ket of adults between 25 and 54
years old~ with an hiolishold
income of $100,000 or more.
The radio and transportation
ads are expected to make over
77.5 million "impressions" on
the Toronto public before the
campaign's completion in Tune
2007. j
Noting that the Baha~pas is
not a "cheap destination": com-
pared to the Dominican R~eptib-
lic and Cuba, tourism director
General Ellison Thompson said
the country will have to focus
on "value for money'' instead
of price.
However, with the increase
in value of the Canadian dol-
far, the notion of travel to the
Bahamas is being seen as an
affordable idea.
Speaking at a lunch for the
Bahamian/Canadian tourism
team, Minister of Tourisui Obie
Wilchcombe reminded the audi-
ence that while they promote
many of the -Bahamas' attr~ibut-
es, its most important one by
far is the people.
"'We would like to have ntore
of your visitors to come to our
country, to have more of your
citizens to come and visit us and
spend time in our nation -
spend time with our peoplik. Yes
we promote the suit, saindl, and
sea; the greatest aspect of the
Bahantas is of course the
Bahamian people.
"I don't think that therp are a
people in the world maybe
except the Canadians who are
as friendly, persoilable, and3 who
go out of their way to eusure


SONE of the advertising initiatives being launched in Toronto
(Photos.* BIS/Derek Smith)


I OBIE Wilchombe'
addresses the lunch~:
that you appreciate that we are
very proud of who we are, and
we want to share that with~ you,"
he said.
Mr Wilchcombe said this lat-
est tourism push in Canadai
arose- after a review of the
Caniadian market arid its con-
tinuing surge and development.
"I also believe it had to do
with the fact that we were trying
to rebuild the industry at home
when we focused~ very heavily
on the US, where more than 80
per cent of our business comes
from. So when you look at the
size of Canada compared to one
of the states of America -
whether its Florida or New
York then you Avonder how
you're gomng to get more bang
for your buck. So I think some
decisions weie made along
those lines.
"I know you're aware that we
have reached out to Asia and
Latin America, and we are hop-
in8 that this combined would
assist us in our efforts to
become sustainable. Because if
one economy falls apart; you
don't want to be overdependtent
on that one economy and have
no where else to turn. Because
that is the difficulty with
tourism, tourism is perhaps the
most resilient industry but it
has its problems as well."
The airline West Jet is expect-
ed to start direct services: from
Canada to the Bahamas in
November. It will compliment
the existing service of Air Cana-
da which offers four flights a
week.


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THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2006, PAGE 3


* In brief

Tourist dies


tri: of dn iand
Bahamna

A~N American tourist died
whie on a diving expedition in
Grand Bahaina over the week-

enCid B c, 57, of Palatra,
Flonida was pronounced dead
on arrival at the trauma section
of the Rand Memorial Hospital
at around 10.30am on Sunday
after becoming unconscious
While on a diving expedition
with a group of other visitors m
waters off East Grand Bahama.
At 8.45am Sunday, the group
of 17 persons who wer~e visit-
ing Grand Bahama island on a
Sseven-day dive cruise aboard
the 65-foot sailing sloop "Morn-
ing Star' began their dive at
Blair House Reef, where their
vessel was anchored.
According to police, after
being in the water for 30 min-
utes, David surfaced and began
swimming towards the vessel.
"When he got about 25 feet
away, he ejected his respirator's
mouthpiece, threw his hands
into the air, rolled over and
began to sink," said air official
police statement.
"He was quickly pulled
aboard the vessel in an uncon
scious state, then rushed by a
Basra vessel to the Sir Jack
Hayward Yacht Club where he,
was transferred to an ambu-
lance," it said.
CPR and other emergency
medical procedures reportedly
failed to produce a response, ~
Police said an autopsy will be
performed in order to deter
mine the exact cause of death.

WNoman is
rele oa sed fro m

hospital- after
accident
A WOMi~AN was treated and
released from the Rand Memo-
rial Hospital after being
involved a traffic accident in
Br'ahd 'Bahania`lk Frjiday.
The crash occurred at the
intersection of Settlers Way
East and Balao Road when a
green 1996 Mazda Prot~g6 dri-
ven by Delma Kemp, 61, of
Arden Forest Subdivision, col-
lided with a Dodge Neon dri-
ven by Evan Kemp, 34, of Lan-
caster Street. .
Both vehicles were badly
damaged,
'r s Kemp sustained bodily
i'lr, ries~ and was rushed to the
;:spital where she was treated
and later discharged.
Police urged motorists ~to be
attentive and alert when using '
the public roadways.


THE Baham~as stands on
the verge of a severe challenge
to its economic well-being due
to the US Western Hemi-
sphere Passport Initiative, it
was claimed yesterday.
FNM Senlator Carl Bethel
said government ministers
dropped the ball on the issue
because they were busy
attending events in Cuba.
The initiative will require,
with some exceptions, that cit-
izens of the US, Canada, Mex-
ico,'and Bermuda present a
passport to enter the US when
arriving by air or sea from any
part of the Western Hemni-
sphere, including the
Bahamas.
Mr Bethel's pointed to
statements made by. Mr Vmn-
cent Vanderpool-Wallace,
Secretary-General of the
Caribbean Tourism Organisa-
tion (CTO), who claimed that
the initiative would haire the
impact on the region's tourism
industry of a "category six hur-
rican~e".
Mr Bethel said that if Mr
Vanderpool-Wallace is right,
the damage to the Bahamas
would be umimagmnable.
In August of this year the
US Department of Homeland
Security extended the first
phase of the `initiative by one
week from January 1 2007
to January 8, 2007.
The FNM senator suggested
that the US Congress, which
has just voted iii favour of
implementing thje initiative,
caught the Bahamas by sur-
prise.
He said that for the 'entire
two months before Congress
acted, the Rlvinister of Foreign
Affairs Fred Mitchell and sev-
eral PLP cabinet ministers
were busy opening a Bahami-
an Embassy in Havana, Cuba
and attending the Non-
Aligned Movement's summit
meeting in Havana.
"When Fred Mitchell
should have been in Washing-
ton protecting the engine of
Our economy, he and his col-
leagues were in Havana," he
said.
Mr Bethel added that he
believes the "impending seri-
ous economic challenge"
reflects a huge failure of the
government's foreign policy -
which has been characterized
by a "slavish" adoption~ of


SCARL Bethel


CARICOM positions.
The former MP for Holy
Cross said that instead of tak-
ing immediate, firm and deci-
sive steps in the face of an
impending threat, Prime Min-
ister Perry.Christie seems to
be "following his time-worn
and failed practice of trying to
talk away every problem and
every crisis".
Mr Bethel stated that if Mr
Christie and his ministers fail
to act, "and to act forthrightly
and speedily" then they will
have no one to blame if the
country suffers as a result of
th~e implementation of the ini-
tiative,
Last week, USAmbassador
John -Rood said that the eco-
nomic impact of the new law
will not be "as catastrophic"
as Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
had indicated and as Jeremy
McVe an, pr I side Ii dri ot t h e
Caribbean Hortel A \~iation
and other hloteil indli~itoffi-
cials fear.
It was recently revealed in a
studyby the World.Traveland
Tourism Council (11TI'C) that
30 per cent of U1S alsitors to
the Baliamas d'o not have a
passportt` S~ome commentators.
say this is an indication of the
percentage of tourism that will
be lost in C2007. :
A-ccording to the WITT'C'
report, the region could lose
$2.6 billion in vlisitor exports
and more than 188-,300
tourism jobs as a result of the
Western Hemisphere Passport
Initiative.
The same study folind that


80 per cent of US visitors to
Jamaica do not use a passport,
while in St Vincent and
Antigua, the figures are 50 per
cent and 25 per cent respec-
tively.
Onliy around ~27 per cent of
Americans have current, valid
passports.


Carl Bethel claims



1111115ters dropped



the ball' on issue of



pas port 11litiative





The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MA GISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas ofNro Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K. CS. G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt .


Cnhrbtn Ed ito 117 -1 91

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2006


cannot play ganies with Hubert
Ingraham but may be easier to
"pussyfoot" with Perry Christie.
Everyone knows that the PLP
will use the FNM's damaged
goods to do all of their dirty
stuff.
The PLP must be cognizant
that if these so-called FNM left
their home, what would prevent
them from returning? Their loy-
alty is now in question. Would
they be honestly loyal to the
PLP? If anyone thinks so they
are fools. None of these men is a
team player. In my view they are
selfish and only looking out for
themselves.
The political kindergarten
game played recently by the
press is so obvious. The story
released of the FNM rejects
Whom very few now respect, was
carefully timed to help deflate
the bad press the PLP was and is
still receiving from the infamous
"PLP cabinet fight", and the mis-
handling of the Anna Nicole per-
manent residency. The fallout
from these two recent missteps is
tremendous. The PLP know that
the results of the fight may have
already dealt a death blow to the
chances of the PLP winning.
The propaganda machine of
the PLP is now resorting to des-
perate tactics. But all must
remember that Hubert Ingra-
ham was smarter than all of
them put together that is why he
was Prime Mimister and not any
of those men, who were all mn
their own way trying every trick
in the book to outsmart Mr
Ingraham. For that reason alone,
I will work my fingers to the
bone to elect a real~man~as Prime
Minister and that is the Rt Hon-
ourable Hubert Alexander
~Ingrahiam.~
WHITNEY L. ROLL' :
Nassau
October 2006


EDITOR, The Tribune
RECENTLY in the Bahamas,
politicians have already can-
cluded that ALL Bahamians are
stupid. Politicians who have been
walking the line of either being
condemned or otherwise have
been flexing their muscles. They,
because of looking out for them-
selves will stop at nothing while
satisfying their insatiable greed
for more. I must set the record
straight, especially because when
some of these rejects speak,
some people not many -
believe them.
Hubert Ingraham and I have
had many disagreements. He has
a strong personality and so do I.
He made some decisions that
personally affected me and
caused me to become resentful.
But before I go too far with this,
let me state up front, I am an
FNM, I am a husband and father
and I am definitely BAHAMI-
AN.
My wife and I disagree on
many issues and because of her
very strong personality, we "lock
horns". Sometimes I yield to
keep the peace, and other times
I give in because she made more
sense. In the event I totally dis-
Sagree, T do not move next door,
neither do I bad mouth her with
the neighbour. This is a coward-
Sly act, and proves that I would be
less than a man if I did some-
thing so disgraceful, .and still
expected to a part of the fanuly.
By the same token, I do not
expect the neighbor to have
respect foi~ me if I shared our
family's innermost secrets with
them. It only stands to reason
that if I was disloyal to my ~own
family what in the world would I
do with outsiders. PLPs beware!
FNM~ who are crawling to the
PLPuetre looking for-slackness, ~
because.they could -not have
their way with In graham as


leader. They know that they can-
not get their wish, which is "all
for them and no one else". They
also realise that it is easy to fool
Perry Christie because everyone
knows that he has a "soft"
nature, and is easy to get over,
One only need to recall the alle-
gations of Bradley Roberts, the
shocking behaviour of Leslie
Miller, the questionable circum-
stances surrounding Sidney
Stubbs and the Korean boats
and more to conclude that Mr
Christie is frightened to death
to make any serious decision.
There are allegations that
'heavy demands have already
been placed on Perry Christie.
The tricky question: Is Perry
Christie using the FNM rejects
or are the FNM rejects using
Perry Christie? Some are brag-
ging that they made Mr Christie
give them everything they wa~nt-
ed. Some say they want more. If
Mr Christie expects them to
work, then he must appease
them. Other PLP are watching to
see if they are going to be treat-
ed better than them. All hell will
break out soon, mark my word.
The men mentioned recently
in the Bahama Journal are a case
of solir grapes. They were all in
the FNM government and sat
around the table with Hubert
Ingraham and for ten years or
more they did not "crack their
teeth". They were not men
enough to challenge Hubert
Ingraham, but crawled under the
table and bad.mouthed him
behind his back. In my opinion
they are all cowards. But they
isee another avenuerto exploit
someone, this time it is Perry
Christie. They all know that they


Not pushing h~im hard enough would
rnake the dimensions of the war on terror
far more immense. .-
Over the course of five years, this bal-
ancing act has continued. In the United
States, no one in~ the Bush administration
mentions Musharraf's dictatorship in rela-
tion to the democracy agenda in the Middle
East-
Meanwhile in Pakistan, Musharraf par-
doned A.Q. Khan, the mastermind behind
the world's most dangerous nuclear prolif-
eration network, and hailed him as a per-
sonal and national hero. And Saudi-funded
madrassas are still indoctrinating children
with an intolerant creed of hatred that's
churning out a new generation of terror-
ists.
Musharraf 's reliability as an ally has
always been in question. But the pretence of
keeping the United States and the jihadis
equally at arms length evaporated last
month when he announced a peace pact
with Taliban-allied tribes along the border
with Afghanistan in a region long sus-
pected of harbouring the fugitive bin Laden.
While the full terms of the agreement
aren't know n. at the very least the Pakistani
mibrtary has ceased operations in the region
in return for a pledge not to- destabilize
Alusharraf's regime. At worst, Musharraf
has formally recognized the "Islamic Emi-
rate of Waziristan" and created a safe-haven
for al-Qaida and the Taliban to wage, war
against coalition forces in Afghanistan and
the Karzai government,
Just how serious a setback Miusharraf's
.retreat or desertion might be for the
regional and global conflicts can't be under-
estimated. Which goes a, long way toward
explaining his recent charm offensive in the
United States and Europe in connection
with ~the publication of his memoirs.
To the extent that he was ever truly on the
right side, Musharraf is backsliding in the
war on terror. Someone needs to remind
him~ that his accommodation of extremists
has consequences not only for Afghanistan
arid the United States, but also for Pak-
istan.

(Thiis article was written by
Jomi'than Gurwitz of the San Antonio
Express-News ---c.2006).


UNLIKE North Korea or Iran, Pakistan
has more than mere nuclear ambitions it
has a demonstrable nuclear arsenal.
Before the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq,
Pakistan became the first battlefield in the
U.S.-led war on terror. And what's hap-
pening there, largely unnoticed, may ulti-
inately be of greater significance than any
Other front against Islamic extremism.
Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf got
a lot of mileage on, the publicity tour for
his new book by recounting former Deptlty
Secretary of State Richard Armitage's threat
to "bomb Pakistan back into the Stone
Age" if it failed to ally itself 1yith the U.S.
effort against the Taliban and al-Qaida in
neighboring Afghanistan.
JTournalists with a short sense of history
haven't bothered to explain, however, why
that bit of diplomatic tough love was nec-
Sessar in the fall of 2001. Before he became
President Musharraf, he was Gen. Mushar-
raf, who staged a military coup in 1999.
Democracy and civilian rule have an uneven
record in Pakistan, which Musha'rraf's ille-
gitimate power grab: did nothing to smooth.
And Musharraf's government wias one of
only three na tons to rec`ognize the Taliban
as the official government of Algharunsa~n -
along with those other slaunchb Li.S. allies:
Saudi'~rabiar and the Uinlted Arab Eml-
rates. .-
In the case of the Pakistani government
- pai-ticularly its intelligence agency the
ties to the Taliban and al-Qaida were com-
plex and sinister. Beyond Cold Wtr history
and sympathy with the religious extremists
next door, the agency the ISI relied on
Osama bin Laden's camps in Afghianistan to
train terrorists for operations in.Kashmir,
which Pakistan contests with India.
War in Afghanistan presented the United
States with one of twio policy options: Either
Pakistan would cut its ties with the Taliban
and al-Qaida and nominally join the Amer-
ican effort or the war would have to be
broadened to inchide P~akistan.
Which path U.S. policy~ ultimately fol-
lowed hinged on a delicate balancing act, the
Stone Age notwithstanding. Pushing
Musharraf too hard might provoke a coup
From Taliban and al-Qaida sympathizers in
the ISI, placing Pakistan's nuclear arsenal' at
.the disposal of radical Islamists or, at least,
their allies.


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EDITOR, The Tribune
I JUST read The Tribune for
Monday, October 9th, and I see
the "shroud of secrecy" is alive
and well with the preserit gov-
,'eriment, two examples: ~
inomin gthh p lc of th preee
sent offer that is on the table, they
"blew" the offer for 130 million
back in 2003. Why? They did not
want: to lose control of the com- ,
pany and especially its employ-
ees. After all just look at the won-
derful~ service Bahamians are get-
ting frbm BTC since 2003. It
should be known that the offer


currently on the table will not get
close to that figure of 130M. The
present government has grossly
caused the diminished value of
BTC. That is simply why they do
not want to mnform the public of
the current opening offer.
taEC: I s th fuell surcharge
increased again for Septem-
ber/October at a time when
world fuel prices have draynati-
cally dropped. I just hope that
the geniuses over there did not .
lock into long term contracts for
fuel. Nonetheless the surcharge
should have dropped by some 23
.per cent; to about $9 instead of


almost $12 per KWH.~ Customers
shouk) not be chaiged for-ail the
mistakes created by BEC.
As to the mysterious "fixed
formula for the surcharge' knd-
ly disclose that so the conl uer
can have some idea of a ...t
caorg are being channelleq
Let us have some candor and
transparency here; after all these
promises were made back in
2002 as a platform for the cur-
rent governing p~arty.
JOHN SMESTAD
NPIFla
October 9 2006


PLP: beware





the dam aged.





gOod s of F NM


TA. shou ofscr









I_ IIIV

I I r r I ,


MBy ALISON LOWE
BY ~the end of the week, the
government will be in a position
to "chart a` way forward" in
addressing allegations that an
industrial facility in Long Island
has caused health problems,
according to Minister of Energy
and the Environment Dr Marcus
Bethel.
As part of the investigative pro-
cedure, said Dr Bethel, a report
by officers from the 6nvironmen-
tal management and risk assess-
nient department of his ministry -
compiled during a trip to the
islandd last week is currently
.under review by health officials.
Once a review has been com-
pleted and input from that min-
istry added, a public release of the
information within the report will
be made, and appropriate action
taken, said Dr Bethel.
"The process on the wray for-
ward will depend in part on the
(input) from Ministry of Health
which will then give us a compre-
hensive report," he said.


*Idn brief



acoctodrentc
results in


A MAN was pronounced
dead on arrival at the Princess
SMargaret Hospital over the
weekend after suffering injuries
inamt rcle accdent

motorcycle on Bay Street nd
cra ddr i co a choo re nty the
police did not confirm, was 30-
yeeaws-old aendefrom western

Man heIp ing
police in
connection
with fi rearm

A MAN wanted for ques-
tioning in connection with a
unlicensed firearm allegation
surrendered to police on Sun-
day morning
Glen Rolle Jr, aka Billy Rolle
and Barefoot, turned himself in
at the Central Police Station in
Freeport, Grand Bahama at

Th 3-ero f Epo!
Road, Mayfield Park, is present-
lyassin fcrso h Cenrl
ammunition possession matter.

Haitian denies
indecently
assaulting a
minOf
A HAITIAN man who
appeared mn Magistrate's court
yesterday was remanded to Her
Majesty's Prison after pleading
nqt arguilty to the ch re of inde-
ceneleu aiul la3, n eared
before Magistrate Susan
SSylvester at Court 11 pmNJas-
sau Street vesterday.
It is alle ed that sometime
between August and Septem-
ber he mndecently assaulted an
11-year-old girl.
The prosecutor objected to
granting Miguel bail on the
grounds that he has no status
in the country. He will retum
to court on January 26.

Ex- cai m pa i g n
director to



M PUERTO RICO

STHE governor's ex-campaign
director has been summoned by
a federal grand jury to~ testify
about ~allegations that illegal
donations were made to the top
official's campaign for Puerto
Rico's nonvoting representative
to US Congress, a newspaper
reported Sunday, according to
Associated Press.
Carlos Dalmau, an attorney
who ran Governor Anibal
Acevedo Vila's successful cam-
paign for US Congress in 2000,
will appear Thursday before an
grand jury to be questioned
about tens of thousands of dol-
lars donated to the politician's
war cest six y ars agEl Ne-
Acevedo's 2000 campaign
daleg dl rece eddotnhusans so
Philadelphia businessmen who
wanted to win a US$7.2 miillion
contract for reform of a dental
hema Ttold the newspaper
that FBI agents interviewed him
for roughly two hours in his law
office. He said he answered ques-
tions regarding field operations
and campaign strategies in the
2000 campaign, but that he has no
information regarding finances.


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of the kitchen including pastry, butchery and
vacuum cooking techniques. International
European exposure is a must and Caribbean
experience a necessity. This position also
demands great knowledge in culinary
management with Chef Tech training and
achieved cost control skills. The suitable
applicant must have competent management
skills to supervise seventy (70) staff from
various backgrounds and origins.

Applicants should apply to the attention of:

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Fax # 362-6245


Nassau, Bahamas


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Freeport?

We'have up to 65,000 sq. ft. available at the corner of
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Storage units are also available from 25 sq. ft. to 1,500
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NASU OORC


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2006, PAGE 5


me meet


Man aeonets


fired at him

and family

POLICE are investigating
the claims of a man who
iceported that he and his fam-
ily were shot at as they
arrived at their home on Fri-
day last week at around
11Cmbstopher Chambers, 41,
'of Acklins Place, Hawksbill,
contacted the Central Detec-
tive Unit and reported that
he and his family had just
arrived at their home in a
gold 2001 Dodge Grand Car-
avan when they saw a young.
man whom he knew standing
in the road.
Mr Chambers told police
that the man fired several
shots from a handgun at the
vehicle.
The complainant said that
he managed to get his family
to safety; however, the rear
door of his vehicle was dam-
aged by the gunfire.
The culprit fled the scene
on foot.
Uniformed and plain-
clothes officers responded
immediately after bemng con-
tacted and found one spent
S9mm bullet casing.


other spent casings from the
::, 4'repoic aried


and we will need to secure
someone to go before the court
to give evidence.
S"But we will have identified
them because the police as a
part of their investigations -
has already gone to see them,
and gotten statements from
nhmnsdocwe know what they
"And so those decisions can
be made with regards to who
will be able to assist the
inquiries at that level if it aris-
es at that point.
Mr Ferguson was not able to
say whether an inquest would
in fact be held. Several things
need to happen before that can
be determined, he said.
"I am unable to say that
definitively because the process
will go from us and end up at
the Attorney General's Office,
the attorney general has the
authority based on what she
sees tin that file to decide
whether that is so and that will
be determined then.
"When that is, determined,
that file will be sent to the chief
magistrate who will decide
which judge will do what," he
explained. '


SBy KRYSTEL ROLLE
THE four Bahamian police
officers who travelled to Cali-
fornia about two weeks ago
were attempting to ascertain
exactly what Daniel Smith was
doing in the days before his
arial a and death in the
Assistant Commissioner
Reginald Ferguson, who was
in charge of the operation, said
the officers returned with infor-
mation that could be used if
te file ends up in the coro.
rier's court.
However, Mr Ferguson said
that ife could not reveal what
the officers had learned
through their investigations.
Daniel, the son of former
Playboy playmate Anna Nicole
Smith, died while visiting his
mother in the hospital, due to a
lethal mixture of drugs.
Pathologist Dr Cyril Wecht
told The Tribune that the
deceased had at lest three
drugs in his system including
the heroine substitute '
methadone.
According to Mr Ferguson,
the team of investigators that


M


POLICE are still investi-
gating allegations that a plain
clothes policeman showed
his firearm during an argn-
ment with a bank employee '
last week Monday.
The incident reportedly
took place a branch of First
Caribbean International
bank in the Marathon area.
It was reported thatL the
officer became angry over a
"missing" application for an
account and that the employ-
ee felt intimidated as a result
of his gesture.
Having been told the
application had been mislaid,
the officer allegedly became
Although the officer didn't
draw the weapon,shhe
"opened his shit to sow
off his gun, one witness said.
According to sources, the
teller involved was left shocked


MREGINALD Ferguson

travelled to California included
Superintendent Marvin Dames
and Forensic Lab Director
Quin McCartney.
"They went to make neces-
sary inquires to try to deter-
mine some background infor-
mation and to see people like
the deceased's doctor and any
care persons," the assistant
commissioner said.


SDANIELSmith


"Any information that came
to light, they had to check it
out so they went up there and
had it done. They talked to a
number of persons," he added,
"including doctors and others -
that's a part of the inquiries
that we were doing up there.
"If the file ends up in the
coroner's court then these are
questions that will be asked


The initial investigation into the
allegations came mn the wake of
letters sent by a well-respected
pulmonologist to director of envi-
ronmental health Ron Finder.
Th'e doctor ~requested that
action be taken on the island after
he had come into professional
contact with residents living in the
vicinity of a local industrial facili-
ty who were reportedly exhibiit-
ing symptoms of a severe respi-
ratory condition.
The doctor identified breathing
difficulties that patients were suf-
fering as symptomatic of "severe
bronchospasm ''- .1 condition
involving a narrowinng of the air-
ways linto the lun~gsc caused by a
contraction of the muscles mn the
lung walls or inflammation of the
lung lining, oi a combination of
both.
In his notes, the doctor stated
that in his opinion these symp-
toms were "reactive" andd "sec-
ondary to chemical exposure".
Minister of Health Dr Nottage
was unavailable for comment yes-
terday.


TUESDAY,
OCTrOBER- 1I7TH
6:00 Community page
11:00 Immediate Response (Live)
noon ZNS News Update
12:05 Immediate Response (Conf~d)
1:00 Island Life Destinations
1:30 Ethnic Health America
2:00 One Thousand Dollar Bee
2:30 Aua Kids
3:00 D rone Hepbumn
3:30 Emest Leonard
4:00 Little Robots.
4:30 Carmen San Diego.
5:00 ZNS News Update
5:05 Welcome Home
5:30 The Envy Life
6:00 Tourism Today
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
8:00 The Envy Life
8:30 Island Lifestyles
9:00 Da' Down Home Show
10:00 Caribbean Newsline
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
1:' Comuit age 1: 0AM


SDR Miarcus Bethel


When contacted about the
incident last week, police.said
they had received no reports of
the incident


and shaken by the incident.
Inspector Walter Evans said
that the police was still gather-
ing information on the incident,


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SBy Arthia Nixon-Stack
'TREASURE Cay, Abaco -
During a heart-wrenching but
inspiring memorial service for
13-year-old car crash victim
Wensil Laroda on Saturday,
church and community leaders
unveiled plans to set up an award .
anld scholarship in his name.
The gifted Treasure Cay
youngster was on his way home
from band practice when the


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--(VACANCY NOTICE ~

The Bahamas Telecommunicatpon Company Limited invites applications from
suitably qualified individuals for the position of MIAdAGER, Interconnection
Specialist/Legal &C Regulatory Affairs Department.
OBJECTIVE

To develop, manage and oversee inter-carrier arrangements with other operators
primarily from a business perspective but also for regulatory purposes in order
to proactively manage BTC's reference interconnection offer interconnection
agreements and inter-carrier arrangements and develop potential markets for
BTC wholesale carrier services.

REiPORTING RELATIONSHIP

This position will report,directly to the Vice President, Legal &.Regulatory Affairs
and Interconnection and will handle the following specific duties.


SPECIFIC DUTIES AND ACCOUNTABILITI~ES

1. To address all matters related to inter-carrier interconnection provisioning'
including co-location and infrastructure sharing;

2. To assist in the development and implementation of a RIO (Reference
Interconnection Offer);

3. To assist in the development of strategy outline for inter-connection wholesale
carrier services;

4. To co-ordinate review and resolve interconnection agreement related
complaints against BTC at the preliminary stage;

5. To negotiate terms and conditions and amendmentslfor interconnection
agreements;
6. To assist with the PUC on matters related to interconnection compliance '
and regulation under the PUC licence issued to BTC;

7. To liaise with other licensed telecommunications providers on matters of
interconnection from a business perspective.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS

1. Bachelor of Science Degree in Telecommunications or Electronics Engineering
or related qualification with a minimum of ten (10) yearS work experience.
Possession of a Master's degree in Business Administration would be an
asset.

2. Experience in the telecommunications- industry would also be an asset.

3. Strong leadership and organizational skills.

4. Strong~ written and verbal communications skills.

All applications are to be received at BTC's Head Office, 21 John F. Kennedy
Drive, no later than Thursday October 20, 2006 and addressed as follows:

VICE PRESIDENT'
HU MAN RESOU RCES, TRAINING & SAFETY .
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANY LIMITED
NASSAU,BAHAMAS

RE: MANAGER INTERCONNECTION SPECIALIST/LEGAL & REGULATORY AFFAIRS DEPARTMENT


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r r r II I I _,_ I ~b~ sc~tC JI -r 3


THE TRIBUNE


AP GE 6 TUESDAYOCTOBER 006


: 1 = = = * I us


I 2 1 U


ily, friends, schoolmates and
local government officials gath-
ered to say a final goodbye to
Wensil -who many thought had
the leadership skills to become
a member of parliament or pas-
tor of his own congregation.
Tributes of song, dance and
poetry filled the Full Gospel
Assembly Church. Church lead-
ers said it was the largest gath-
ering ever in the sanctuary.
Rev Charles Carey, principal


of the Wesley College, whei~e
Wensil attended, led the school
in three touching tributes.
"Every person who knew
Wensil was touched by his
untimely demise," said Rev
Carey. "It's amazing to note that
Wensillived a life we all ought to
live. He was the product of a
'wonderful home and the attrib-
utes he took out of the home left
nothing but great respect for his
parents. Rarely you find young


men who are ahead of their time
and Wensil accomplished more
in his 13 years than most
Bahamian men would in 36."
At the time of his death, the
popillar 10th grade student was
the recipient of his school's
principal award for three con-
secutive years, band captain at
both school and church and
member of countless groups
and organizations including the
Boys Brigade and 4H Club.


car he was a passenger in was
involved in a crash and he eject-
ed fromt the vehicle.
The September 29 accident
sent shockwaves throughout the
island community of Abaco.
SWensil's didult bandmate who
was driving the vehicle remains
in hospital and police have not
released details about the driver
of the other vehicle.
Describing him as an out-
standing young Christian, fam-


Rev Stafford Symonette out-
lined the plans to officially
establish the Wensil Laroda
Youth Award arid Scholarship.
"The scholarship will be a six
month music scholarship and
we will keep Wensil alive mn our
hearts and actions," he said.


day, they attended freshman
level courses in math, chenustry,
computer programmmng, eco-
nomics, physics and business
management.
The courses were taught by
Kettering faculty and home-
work assignments and exami-
nations were required.
Since~ the Programme's incep-
ironm arsshtahne US, Pet
Rico and the Caribbean have
participated, each sponsored by
a company, foundation or ser-
vice organisation.
This year, the Rotary Club of
N~assau Sunrise was one of 17
such entities, and Dr Robinson
presented'the Club with a
plaque in recognition of the
Club's ongoing participation it\
the AIM programme.
"For every investment you
make inta student, the return
in terms of additional scholar-
ships and job opportunities that
student receives is: multiplied
tremendously and we are grate-
ful for your continued support,"
he said.
Dr Robinson also pointed out
that Nassau Sunrise Rotarian
Omar Martin, a Grand Bahama
native and now Mechanical
Engineer,.was the very first~
Bahamian to have participated
in the programme back in 1997.
Among t-he students in the
?006 fl u.'LI' just sifi~iere fidin:
the (.lllbbtcanl including four
from the Bahamas and two
from Jamaica.


FOR the third year in a row
the Rotary Club of Nassau Sun-
rise has granted a scholarship
to a Bahamian high school stu-
dent to participate in Kettering
University's Academically
Interested Minorities pro-
gramme.
The Michigan-based univer-
sity is ranked 12th in the US
aomonbgn n-dno oral i stitutions
grammess, and every summer
since 1984 has put on the pro-
~gramme, known as AIM.
It is a five-week summer
course for students about to
~enter their 12th year of high
;school, and specifically targets
:students serious about poten-
tial careers in science, technol-
~ogy, engineering and math.
The students live on campus,
.attend~ classes given by some of
the university's professors and
lecturers; and also meet with to
some of Kettering's corporate
~partners in the programme,1like
Toyota, General Motors, and
Harley Davidson.
This year's scholarship recip-
ient was Janiel Pinder of Gov-


ernment High School.
Janiel, along with Dr Milton
Robinson, consultant to the
president of Kettering Jniver-
sity, visited with Nassau Sunris-
ers last week.
She said that while at times a
bit challenging, the course left
her "determined to excel even
more in mathematics, especial-
ly calculus and science sub-
jects".
Nearly 100 per cent of AIM
grad~nuates go on to college and
unl\rsr--a1 and Dr Robinson
c 1;pl..ac-~ J~tht based on Janiel's
performance in the programnie,
that she is already on track to
receive up to $10,000 in schol-


arship money.
The programme offers just 40
spots each year, and students
from across the US and the
Caribbean compete for the
chance to fill one of those
places.
To be eligible, applicants
must have at least a 3.0 grade
point average in mathematics,
chemistry and English; and no
less than two years of study in
algebra, one year mn geometry,
one year in chemistry (including
lab work) and two years inEng-
'Students in tihe programmed
wer~e given a real college expe-
rience. Monday t-hrough Thurs-


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Plans announced for award




in memory of car crash victim


Rotary grants scholarship to 19ichigan university


2006 FORD RANGER 4DR


SmartChoice


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SmartChoice


2006 FORD EVERES
















The Nassau Institute is on the





wr ong side of global war ming


fiercely pro-American and
believe that the present admin-
istration is taking the country in
the wrong direction.
It is laughable that the Insti-
tute's spokespersons should try

HnCe Rain it
SCCelS that

COpo~rate
interests thiS
title Oil and gaS -
are willing 10
Spend millions tO
CORVincC 000 10
that Whaat iS
appeing is
not happening.

to pin the label of ideology on
those with whom it disagrees.
A nodding familiarity with its
history would indicate that the
Nassau Tnstitute is bound hand
and foot, body and soul, by ide-
ology. .-.
They should be the last ones
to talk about "article of faith"
and "fascist left", the latter being
a particularly absurd concoction
and perhaps deserving of a lep-
ture about -fascism which will
have to wait for another day.
It is interesting to examine
the persons and groups that the
Institute's managers rely on in
their effort to debunk the con-


MObTORS UlMITED



























Tel: 394-0323/5 OR 394-1377


tific community has acknowl-
edged the evidence that the
planet is indeed warming and
that humans are contributing
significantly to the process by
the reckless consumption of fos
sil fuels.
But as the polar ice caps melt
and threaten much of the world
- including these vulnerable
islands of The Bahamas with
rising sea levels, there are still


Smaoking Is a
multi--bllion
dollarp ndustry
anad the OWCe~S


wP9ere determined ed
that Othiling
W~ulde getin
the Way Of their



those who are in denial over-
drive, and some of them are
right here at home.

The Nassau Institute
describes itself as an
independent, apolitical, non-prof-
it institute with a mission to pro-
mote economic growth, a free
market economy with limited
government, and-a society that
embraces the rule of law and the
right to private property.
About two weeks ago the
Institute published in the press
and on its website another one
ofe it a icles attempting to dis-


AME13L~N


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2006, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


sensus over global warming.
They quote US Senator
James Inhofe whose views have
been rejected by his more cred-
ible Republican colleagues such
as Senator John McCain who
says that the science. linking
human activity to global warm-
ing is overwhelming.
CNN's Miles O'Brien, in a
recent commentary on Senator
Inhofe's position on global
warming, pointed out that the
Senator has received, over a
five-year period, $850,000 in
campaign contributions from the
oil and gas industry.
Once again it seems that pow-
erful corporate interests this
time oil and gas -- are willing to
spend millions to convinde peo-
ple that what is happening is not
happening, thal; what is not good
for them is good for them, all
in the overriding interest of prof-


n anL~article in the.British
nwpprThe Guardian,
George Monbiot points out that
most of the organizations that
are busy trying to discredit the
global warming consensus are
financially supported ~by the oil
and gas industry.
Some of then were also
involved ini the tobacco cam-
paign. Mr Monibiot refers readers
to a bIrt of 124 such organizations
that receivedmioneyfrom Exxon
Mobil (see website http://envi-.
ronment.gnardian.co.uk).
SNow these are some of the
groups the Nassau Institute
relies on,in its campaign to dis-


credit global warming: the Cato
Institute, the Heartland Insti-
tute and the Fraser Institute; it
also lists on its website the fol-
lowing additional resource
organizations: Atlas Economic
Research Foundation, the
Hoover Institution, the Inde-
pendent Institute and the James
Madisor Institute.
Each one of' these groups
appears on the list of those who
have received contributions
from Exxon Miobil!
'By contrast the US National
SAcademy of Sciences, hardly an
orgamisation of anti-Americali
zealots, says:
"In the judgment of most cli-
mate scientists, Earth's warm-
ing in recent decades has been
caused primarily by human
activities that have increased the~
amount of greenhouse gases in?
the atmosphere."
The oil and gas industry and
their collaborators. will fail in
the: end, just like the tobacco
.industry.
Already, the dean of the reli-
gious right in the US, Pat
Robertson, has jumped off the
naysayers bandwagon with the
announcement that he hias
become a convert to the cause.
"IWe really need to address th~e
'burning of fossil fuels,"' says M I
Robertson,
*Perhaps others will waker uptl
too if it is not already tooi i W;


Ssirarthurfou~lkes~~hotmaitil
comn www.bahamaiPpndi~t type
pad.com


CORPORATE
Agreed, callousness
and dishonesty have
brought untold suffering,
disease and death to mil-
lions of humans all over the
world. Perhaps the most
egregious example of cor-
porate abuse so far has
been that of the tobacco
industry.
Cigarettes have for years
brought death and disease
to millions-who smoke and
to millions more who suffer
from passive smoking. The
victims include innocent
children and the unborn in
their mothers' wombs.
When it started to dawn
on people that smoking was
responsible for all kinds of
afflictions, including cancer
and heart dise ase, the
tobacco .companies went
into denial overdrive with a
torrent of lies. They cov-
ered up damning evidence -
and intensified advertising
himed at young people.
They spent hundreds of
millions recruiting scien-
tists, research organizations
and policy institutions in an g
effort tdi convince the pub-
lic that smoking was not
bad, or not that bad, thiat
in any event adults had a
right to choose to smoke and
that the government had no
right to interfere.
Smoking is amulti-billion dol-
lar industry and the owners and
managers were determined that
nothing would get in the way of
their profits. The ideology of
profit above every other con-
sideration had to prevail even
if it cost millions of lives.

hen they were final-
Wly forced to admit
their culpability, the tobacco
merchanty launched-a public
relations campaign to conymnce
people that they were really
good guys interested in the
health of their victimss` In the
meantime they loaded up sup-
posedly better (light!) brands of
cigarettes with more addictive
nicotine to trap new smokers
and keep old victuns hooked.
As, governments in the devel-
oped countries started-to clamp
down on cigarette advertising,
the vultures turned on the devel-
oping countries with the same
seductive advertising that had
captured millions of customers
and netted billions in profits in :
developed countries.
Today the inhabitants of plan-
et Earth are facing a threat of
apocalyptic proportions, a threat
-which affects every single
human being, but as it pro-
gresses it will claim its first vic-
tims among the poor and most
vulnerable.
SThat thr-eat is, of course, envi-
ronmental degradation includ-
ing: .the pollution of oceans,
*rivers, soil and~ the very air we
breathe; and the unsustainable
ep oia on o re lur sshuch


running out of resources".
The Institute is opposed to
the Kyoto Accord, which is
designed to commit the
nations of the world to the
reduction of the greenhouse
gases responsible for global
warming. It describes coun~
tries supporting the Accord
as "zealots driven by anti-
Americanism". Further, says
the Institute, "it is not a posi-
tion that the majority of
Baha~mians could or would
supportt"
The people who run the
Institute are deluding them-
selves if they believe they can
speak for the majority of the
Bahamian people on any
issue, much less the burning
issue of environmental degra-
datlon.
Filrthermore, it is quite
foolish of them and others
who are similarly inclined, to
sling the charge of "anti-
Americanism" against
Bahamians who dare to criti-
cise the policies of the US
Government.
Those who criticise the
administration of President
George Bush on the issue of
global warming may in the
end be more pro-American -
and pro-humanity than the
people who run the Institute.

nany event, it is unlikely
that our American friends
are taken in by this shameless
pander-ing. Many Americans are
criticising their own1 government
preciselyr because they are


SOn gr~ua tulas t n


ania


.1




.4





Al~~~ ~ 0lr. :Meonei d n in




11st ~~I isIin dFed


To THE


POINT


ARTHUR

I I I C-1










PAGE 8, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


ESAl-AMAS




qroessona In:::y association Working G~roup


The "Minister's Award" will be presented again this year by the Hon. Vincent Peet, M.Pi, Minister of Financial
Services and Investments. The award was introduced in 2002 as part of the Financial Services Industry
Excellence Awards programme. The Minister's Award recognizes stellar performance' within the industry.


'"iD

1..


DIANE 80WE-P1NDLING
Chief Financial Officer
Oceanic Bank & Trust Ltd.


TYiRONELE. FITGERALD
..Senlor Counsel & .
Head of Chambers
Fitzgerald & Fitzgerald


IAN A. JENNIINGS
Director, Sernlor Vice President &
Chlie Financial Officer
Commonwealth Bank Limited


ANDREW D. LAW
CEO3 & President
international Protector Group


ROBERT' V. LOTIMORE
President, Ml~anaging Director &
Head Of The Bahamas Divislon
B~utterfield Bank: (Bahamnas) Ltd.


ROSS A. MCDONALD
Senior Vice Presidenlt,
Bahamass &Y Caribbean
RDy3l Bank. of Canrada


J~ I"
ri
I

`, a


PAUL 3.1 M~cWEENEY
Managing Director
Bankc of the Bahamas
International


CASSANDRA NOTITAGE -
Mranager, Bank Supervision
Department
Central Bank of The Bahamas


ANTOINETTE RUSSELL
Vice Presiden &
Hiead of Trust Services
Credit Suisse Trust Ltd.


FELIX N. STUBBS
General Manager
IBM (Biahamas) Limited l


PATRICK G.W. WARD
Grou~p President & CEO
Bahlarnas First Holdings Ltd.


RAYMBOND L. WINDER
Managing Partner
Deloltte & TOU~ihe


CORDELIA A.
BARNWELL-FERNANDER
Head Corporate Adminlistration
UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd.


KAREN V. ROLL
Assistant~ Manager,
Policy Unit, Bank
Supervision Department
Central Bank of
The Bahamas


EMYILY A. DEMERITTE
Senior Manager, Human
R~esources/Training
Bank of the Bahamas
International


SHEENA DEVEAUX
Vice President &
Manager, Service Centre
Credit Sulissse
(Bahamas) Ltd.


LISA DENISE GIBSON
Compliance Manager,
MLRO
Ansbacher (Bahamas)
Limited


MAXWELL R. JO)NES
Senior Manager, C'redlt Risk
Comminonwealth Bank Limnited


BONNIE L. NGUYEN
Diretor, HR, & Training &
Assistant Vice President
Fidelity Group


JAMIELL R. BODIE
Senior Assistant, Porlicy Unit
Bank Supervisioin Dep~artment
Central Barnk of the Bahamas


PATRICIA E. FERGUSON
Business Se~rylces
Representative
Royal Bank of Canada


LATOYA L. GIBSON
Securities E*.ecuto~r, .
Service Gentre
Credit Sulisse (Bahamas)j Ltdl.


ROBERTHA G. MURRAY
Quality Servi~e C~oordilnator
Commonwealth Bank Limited


GERIYAINE E. SIMIMONS-DEAN
Seniorr Assistant, Desk Euro~pe
UBS (Bahamnas) Limited


AISHA MELVINA JOHNISON
BBA Banking &r Finance


JODY CHRISTINA WELLS
AA Law & Criminal Justice


CANDACE P. ROLLE
BBA Accounting


The Excellence Awards Programme is designed to recognize achievers in the Bahamian financial services

industry for outstanding performance and contribution to the growth and development of the sector.


2006 FINANCIAL SERVICES INDUSTRY


EX CE LLE N CE AWA RD


MIINISTER'S AWARD


EXECUTIVE OF THE YEAR FINALISTS


'I
i


PROFESSIONAL OF THE YEAR FINALISTS


ACHIEVER OF THE YEAR FINALISTS


FINANCIAL SERVICES DEVELOPMENTS & PROMOTION AWARD








FINANCIAL SERVICES; STUDENT OF THE YEAR FINALISTS














Women's leader ur ges 'proper




balance' in battle of the sexes


II


2. Handyman Nassaui


Bahamians only need apply.


~Please call 242-394-3313 (Nassau)
242-336-2780 (Exuma) to arrange an
appointment.


MERCHANDISER L MiEAT, DELI &r BAKERY


.Bahamas Supermarkets Linditetes a,1eading supermarket chain in The Bahame
leader, the Company prides itse~lf on delivering premier service through i
having a strong commitment to ~it's customers, associates and community.

An opportunity~kchandiser Meat, Deli &t~akjeig this market leader has a

Reporting to the Merchandise Director, the successful applicant will have
buying and an intricate knowledge of the three operations areas (meat, de
environment. Key selection criteria include:

0 Sound technical ~and' practical experience in meat, deli & bakery oper
0- Strong~ business cicumen with the ability to creatively solve problems
0 Ability to manage all .aspects of a high-volume retail environment wh
meaningful merchandising and buying information
0 Manage relationships within the business encompassing budgeting, for

Oz obilt vo lead and motivate a retail team
0 Ability to identify system, control and process improvements
O Have good communication and interpersonal skills with the ability to
0 Solid functional computer skills with working knowledge of Microsoft
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If` you have what it takes to succeed in~ this challenging role, forward yo



Human Resources
Bahamas Supermarkets Limited
East-West Highway
P. 0. Box N 3738
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No telephone inquiries please


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2006, PAGE 9


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quish or share their roles
"behind the kitchen stove and
changing diapers" in order, to
pursue "sociological prowess"
in areas that traditionally
belonged to men.
She noted that all these
changes "bring together in a sin-
gle instrument, with legal force,
provisions requiring the elimi-
nation of discrimination on the
basis of sex in the enjoyment of
civil, political, economic, social,
,and cultural rights, and specific
rights of particular concern to
women and girls."
Senator Wilson advised that
as women seek to make a name
for themselves in a "testos-
terone-filled territory", Ithey
must be careful that they do not
lose their own identity.
She said that women can hold
their various professions, with-
out trying to become a man.
In what has been described
as a "timely article" for women
of all ages, race, creed denomi-
nation or political affiliations,
Senator Wilson said fl~at even
though much progress has been
made in the removal of barriers
for women, changes in the law
are lagging behind.
S"Leaders must not only be
aware of the dynamics of social
change as they evolve but must
be instiruments of that change,"
she stated.
"Good governance can be
enhanced by the inclusion of a
balanced representation of both
genders in policy making issues,


which translates into the need
for more female representatives
in parliament" she added.
The senator also warned that
professional women "must not
lose the thing that makes them


stand out, treasured and
respected which is their femi-
ninity. In the pursuit of their
goals, they must still hold on to
'a softer side while showing that
inner strength."


As more women begin to
take on leadership roles in all
:sectors of society, and as the
~Bahamas prepares to celebrate
women's suffrage in November,
one female leader is advising
her counterparts to "find the
proper balance".
Appearing as the lead story
: for the new edition of The Jour-
nal of the Parliaments of the
Commonwealth, Senate presi-
dent Sharon Wilson's article,
'The Way Forward for Female
Parliamentarians' questions a
new sociological phenomenon
which she refers to as "the
women come, the men leave".
The article is based on a pre-
sentation by Senator Wilson, a
former magistrate and teacher,
to the inaugural meeting of the
Caribbean Commonwealth
.Women Parliamentarians, held
in Nassau in April 2006.
It provides a "to do" list for
today's modern women; women
who are not satisfied with just
being a housewife and mother,
but are challenged to hold down
the home front while in the pur-
suit of any career, including pol-
itics.
Wilson shared the history of
the women's suffrage moment
in parts of the Caribbean, as
well as the route to the estab-
hlisment of the United blation's
.Universal Declaration of
Human Rights in 1948, when
the world began to slowly open
doors for women.
This, she notes, was followed


Wt SHARON Wilson


by the 1967 Declaration on the
Elimination of Discrimination
against Women and the 1979
Convention on the Eliminaation


of All Forms of Discrimination
against Women.
Senator Wilson noted hdw
recently women began to relin-


PROFESSIONAL women
have been challenged not to
neglect their families and chil-
dren while in pursuit of their
cami~ers. ~
Having breen a ma~glstrate in
the Family Court for some
years, Senate President Sharon
Wilson said that she witnessed
"many women whose downfall
was that by giving so much of
themselves to community and
public service, they questioned
whether they had spent enough
time with their children".
In a new article published in it


leading international magazine
for parliamentarians, Senaltor
.Wilson noted that single par-
enthood is a dominant reality
in:)ii Car Ibbea~n region.
"E\en L1fit were.not," she not-
ed, "children must get their fair
share of parents' time:
"'Traditionally, mother has seen
to this. As more and more women
are called to leadership, it cannot
involve a choice that pits family
on -the one hand against public
service on the other. The family
must remain secure," she said.
Senator Wilson also


expressed her displeasure for
the disrespectful actions of male '
parliamentarians towards their
female counterpal I
i She- said that ~as wocmen con-
;t~iiue to ~fight for equalityTheyi-
must set a high standard for
themselves.
"I do not believe that
Caribbean women have to be
disrespectful or rude to be effec-
tive or to make our points,
instead, we have a duty to raise
the bar and not sink to the -low-
est comnion denominator.
"We have to bring more and


.more credibility and integrity
to politics through the medium
of our personal lives. This tooc
must be a part of our mission."
;she said.


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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2006


ancies in the reports during the
holiday weekend.
There were unconfirmed
reports alleging that one of the
men was stabbed 16 times. It is
unknown whether this is the man
who died of his injuries.
According to a bystander, who
saw one of the victims bemng car-
ried to the boat, assisted by a doc-
tor and several police officials,
said he appeared to be naked
underneath the body bag that he
was in,


The bag, zipped up to his neck
showed a man who appeared to
be in his mid-twenties.
The victim was taken to North
Eleuthera then air lifted to Nas-
sau, to be treated'
The Tribune tried to get more
information from the Harbour
Island police, but was asked to
call Press Liaison Officer Walter
Evans. Inspector Evans promised
to call back, but did not return
the call up to press time.


Speaking to students and teach-
ers in the school's auditorium that
month, Mr Kerzner said he had
lived in many places, but had final-
ly "found a new home" in the
Bahamas.
"My wife, two kids and I love
this country. What we have going
in this country is just astounding. I
believe that in 10, 20 or 30~ years,
we, together with everybody, are
going to build some amazing
'things in the Bahamas..
"The story is just getting start-
ed," he said when announcing to a
"jubilant" audience the swimming
pool donation.
The Kerzner family has invited
anyone wishing to -make~ a dona-
tion to the fund to do so by
cheque, sending it to The Butch
Kerzner Memorial.Fund, c/o
K~erzner International, Executive
Of~fi~cs. Coral Towers, Paradise
Islaind, Trhe; Bahamas, or c/o
Kerzner International, 730 .Fifth
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NY 10019.


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THE TRIBUNE


Basebal~l star dies ; .Government vote
FROM page one FROM page one
Mr Curry retired after the 1966 season and cniay o h euiycuclsabt nta
returned to the Bahamas. cniayfrtescrt oni et uised
"He was an athletic and skilful sportsman and his teCrbenbo ol upr eeul.
abilities on and off the field inspired a whole gen- ."The very strong view in CARICOM is that the
er ation of young Bahamians who themselves clnthtGaelaotmstoakonBieis
aspired to make it to the major leagues," Mr unacceptable," said CARICOM Chairman and St.
Christie continued. Kitts and Nevis Prime Minister Denzil Douglas.
"Mr Curry was always a gentleman and his atti- Vnzea rsdn ug hvz h ald
tudeanddemenou wee suh tat oungr bse- US President Bush the "devil" during a speech last
ball players and athletes of other sports sought to mnha h eea sebyhsbe pny
emulate his style of sportsmanship. Mr Curry did challenging the US-backed Guatemala for a seat on
much in helping to engender a strong local interest the council. President Chavez told reporters that
in baseball, and he was supportive of the growth and Venezuela "accepts this challenge against the
success of the Bahamas Baseball Association when empire a reference to the United States. The
it was at its strongest in our nation." South American president said that Venezuela will
*See sports section for more use its position to support peace in the world and wil
on the death of Tony Curry refuse all kinds of attacks on peaceful countries.


Daniel Smith


FROM page one
Victim


FROM ae' one
Daniel Smith's death. That
date has been cancelled, h~e
said.
Mr Gomez said it would be~
his decision ori whether to hold
an inquest.
"When we get all of the
reports, a decision and an
announcement will be maiie as
to who will be hearing the~ -
inquest and the time, if one i~s'
to be held," the magistrate'
said.
Daniel Smith was found
dead on September 10 at his
mother's bedside in her room
at Doctors Hospital. He had.
nnto nohe eaunash ngrn
his newly born sister, Dannie
Lynn Hope.
Daniel's body reportedly
remains embalmed in a Iocal
morgue. As yet there has been
no word as to~ when a funeral
will take place.
Last month the Coroner's
Court was disbanded by Chief
Justice Sir Burton Hall, who
announced that the system wkill
be reverting to the old justice
system where cdses can be'
shared aniong the othe 1l3~
magistrates who, by law, :can
also serve as coroners.
SThe court n as re~poraccly
dissolved amid numer'qus com-
plaints that the case hhd been
given an unmdiatejcc dale. while
others has waited years It is
now expected-that the backlog
in inquest hearings can be alle-
viated with 13 th~agistriites
rather than one 'coroner.
However, pritatell-balred
US pathologist Dr Cyril
Wecht, who carried out a Sec- ,
ond autopsy on Ifaniel's body,:
revealed that the; young mjan
had methadone and at least
two anti-depressants in his syis-
tem.
SA's speculation continues to
rage on American television
over Dan~iel's death, Bahamnian
police stressed they were not
involved mn the delay of his
funeral.
Anna Nicole's mother Vir-
gie Arthur told CNN's Naincy
Grace last week that she is
very upset that her 'precloui
grandson was "still flying in a
cold room somewhere." ,a
Brit Bahamas CDU bbiss,
Chief Supt Marvin Dames,4aid
as far as police were~ con
cerne~d, Daniel's bod! baa
been released for burall.'He
said the delay in holding j
funeral had nothing to do \knh
them.


' L !


Keod Smith
after the fight, Mr Gibson offered ~an "unreserved
apology", saying he was deeply saddened that on the
evening of the fight his "human frailty" led to behav-
iour that he deeply regretted.
"I realise that these events declined t'o an unac-
ceptable and undignified level. I therefore sincere-
ly and unreservedly apologise for my conduct and L
hope that the.Bahamian people, my constituents,
and my colleagues can forgive me."
On September 25, an argument between the inen
turned physical as they got into a fist-fight that last-
ed several minutes in the Cabinet Room after a
meeting of PLP parliamentarians.
During the' fight it was reported that damage was
caused to two windows and a table. According to
sources, the fight had nothing to do with government
business.
In the statement, Mr Gibson added: "Indeed I
am sorry. I sincerely hope that I can put this unfor-
tunate incident behind me and request your sup-
port in this regard. To err is human, perfection is
divine."


FROM page one .

obligation.
"Persons in public life have a duty to set stan-
dards and to conduct themselves appropriately and
always appear to conduct themselves appropriately.
And where there is a fault in that, an apology, at the
very least, should always be offered. No questions
asked," Mr Bethel said.
Hesitant to judge Mr Smith or to comment fur-
ther, Mr Bethel said only the Bahamian public could
decide his fate. .
"That is for the Bahamian people to decide," he
said. "It's a matter for the Bahamian people to eval-
uate and make their own decisions on. Particularly
the~ people in Mount Moriah,": he added.
One woman calling into The Tribune agreed that
Mr Smith should offer an apology even though it's
bt~en three weeks smece the fight occurred.
"It's never too late to do the night thmng?" she
said, identifying herself only as a concerned citizen.
"Even if he didn't stait the fight and I don t
know if he did, or didn't -he should still apologise.
In a statement issued from his office four days


FROM pae one

apace. "
Paul O'Neil, appointed as acting
CEO at Kerzner Internationalm i
the hours immediately following
Mr Kerzner's death, said on behalf
of the Board of Directors that the
company "rembrace(d) dearly" the
Kerzner family's wish to honour
their son's memory through the
philanthropic gesture. ~
Before his death on Wedines-
day, in a helicopter crash in the
Dominican Republic, Mr Kerzner,
C3EO of Kerzuer International atul
3 man described as a visionary "
br\ man\ of those whot knew\h him,
hadl alread) played a pe-rsonal role
io a number of community build-
tng proj~cls in the country wbere
his f~ather tirst seti up the "revolu-
rionarv" Atllantis brand.
In Junec. lir Kcrzner announced
a sigmncant home rebuld~mg part-
nership in the St Cecihae con-
statueni!. moll Eng the refuirbijh-


Kerzners
ment of homes, repair of damaged
roofs, toilets, plumbing and elec-
trical facilities, among other needs
in the area.
"I would go so fa'r as to say that
not only does the Bahamas suc-
ceed when we succeed, but that
we succeed when the Bahamas
succeeds,!' Mr Kerzner was' quot.
ed as saying at the time,
According to Mr Kerzner, his
experience of "inner city" areas
of the Bahamas had "solidifie(d)
(the company's) commitment to
assist in the development of the
Bahamas and our people when-
ever and wherever (they) can.' "
Other projects sponsored by the
companymirclude the construction
of a state-of-the-art baseball park
in the Einewood Gardens area.
opened in July. wrhile io April a
525g0,00 donation was made to St
Anne's school to fund the con-
struction of a new swimming pool.


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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2006, PAGE 11


A man who made Hife better in Th aatis
a country he came to love, a people who
came to honour hhn for the vision he shared,-.-
and the gentle Idndnesls he showed.

SOn behalf of the Board of Directors, Maagimplme~me
& Staff of Cononwat Bank, we exressi:,~ sincerett
condolences to his fathesf Sol Kenner,' his wiffe
and the entire family including Manaates
and StaRf of Atlantle Reso~rts. ;.1.
We aplau hi forhis ontibuton t th
growth~~~~~ ~ ~ i of. tormi heahmnan eeo
displayed to the commonly.

C lB~~5"" ''~
COMOWELI BA


In remembrance of
Howard 'But~ch' Kerner
19641 -iOj 200










































































Ille


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2000


b caber 17,2006 Vol 2 Issue V :j(

Business Systems Department Honours

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:: TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2006


ENSIB ESSS


I IIIP I -11 3'


Several majorr utilities interested

in Mirant's 55 per cent stake


MTBr b~u e BAsiness E~ditor

HANE kjak.t~:efad BahaaP
intention wrhatsoevecr" of resigning, his position,
although pressure on him to do so is increasing.
The Trrlnbun has been told that the Grand
Bahama Contraictors A~ssociation was considering
staging a protest outside the Port Authority's
beadquart~ers yesterday' o\r t he cont ract aw~ard-
ed to hir Babalk's construction compFany-. H and F
Bab~ak Construction, to construct the Associated
Grocers warehouse in the Sea/Air Business Cen-
Stre.
SThe Trib'une cpuld not confirm at press time
whether the demonstration had been held, with
some sources suggesting that contractors were
having second thoughts.
Meanwhile, Mr Babak told The Tribune yes-
terday he w~as st ill in place at the Port Authority
and had no intention of resigfting, proceeding
with his daily schedule and meetings.
Yet criticism of Mr Babak and his appoint-
,ment is continuing, both from inside the Port
Authority's shareholders and outside among its
licensees, and especially from parties~ with a vest-
Sed interesting the organisation's fate.

SSEE page 3B


SIRlyfordcay.comi t 242.362.421 1 f 242.362.6098


'YIJ~T~YYSl.s~i~~B


HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764
FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010


FrnkC' o hes an mjoo sha s-
such as Systems Resource Group
(SRAG and Abac Ma b t.ith
process could be the Government
through the Bahsimas Electricity
Corporation (BEC), although it isj
unlikely whether it;would have the
financial muscle to acquire the 55
per cent stake.
It would also represent a return
to nationalisation and reversal of
pr satisation. and the Go\ ernment
would also probably be reluctant
to beome~ inv~ol\ed in utility oper-
ations in Freeport, preferring to
leave that to ~the Port Authority
and its partners.l
While` a nunibe2. of Bahamian
groups hiave expressed interest in
acquiring Alirant's Grand Bahama
Power Compan) stake. several
sources have suggested that they
would likely lack the capital to pull
off a major multi-million dollar
deal. .

SEE~ page 3B


T r b~u e Bu~sne~s~s Editor

acMAJNORtehlec~trictal utihitiese frty
America are eyeing the potential
purchase of Mirant's 55 per cent
stake in Grand Bahama Power
Company, with informed sources
telling The Tribunze that the dis-
pute over the late Edward St
George's estate will not impact the
sale.
Lady Henrietta St George, Mr
St George's wife, owns and con-
trols a 50.37 per cent stake in ICD
Utilities, the BISX-listed holdiqgg
vehicle that in turn owns a 50 per
cent stake in Grand Bahama Pow-
er Company.
By extension, this makes her the
owner of a 25 per ~cent stake in the
electricity company, and the major
partner for whoever purchases
Mirapt's majority stake.
Several business sources had
expressed concern to The Tribune
that the dispute over Mr St
George's estate, which has spawned


of Mr St George and Lady Henri-
etta, and passed over to her upon
his death.
"It was one of the few assets
owned jointly in the name of Ladiy
Henrietta and Edward St George,"
the source said. -
Meanwhile, among the compa-
nies thought to be interested in
Grand- Bahaina Power Company is
the Canadian utility, Fortis, which
already has strong Caribbean con-
nections.
It owns power generation opera-
tions in Belize, Turks & Caicos and
the Cayman Islands, where it has a
37.4 per cent stake in Caribbean
Utilities.
The Caribbean Utilities connec-
tion gives it a strong Bahamas link,
as a major player in that company is


litigation by both his former sec-
ond wife, Mary, and daughter, Car-
oline St George, could impact or
tie-up Lady Henrietta's take in
ICD Utilities.
Such a development could easily
discourage potential purchlasers of
Mirant's stake, given the uncer-
tainty over who there major partner
would be once the dust settled, but
The Tribime has been told there is
no cause for alarm.
Sources who have investigated
the matter told this newspaper that
Lady Henrietta's ICD Utilities
stake is one of the few assets left
behind by Mr St George that does
not fall under his estate.
It is understood that the just over
five million lCD Utilities shares
were jointly registered in the names


- RBC becomes partner liss



-.-in Cotton Bayr resort: ~(~


II By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business Reporter
THE Royal Bank of Canada
has pal~rtneredL with JT Cjiopen I of
the Cortton Ba y r eiot in
Eleuthera to became a $2 mil-
lion equity shareholder in the
Bahamian owned tourism ven-
ture in an unprecedented and his-
toric partnership involving a lead-
ing financial institution and a
local investor.
Making the announcement
yesterday, RBC senior vice-pres-
ident Ross McDonald said that
the time was simply right for his
company to lend its support and
confidence to a Bahamian-led
investment. ,
He noted that RBC was
attracted to this particular deal
because of the bank's commit-
ment to the Bahadmas, its faith in


could not have happened with-
out a; chanipion msbide the bank
and noted that Mr McDonald
was that champion.
SFinanciail Sc a ices andi Invest-
me~nt Mlinister l incent Peet said
that th e oveinme~nt Is e~xtreme-
by pleased by the holisticic" ven-
ture between tjhe government's
bank and a Bahamian develop-
ment group.
He said that this should put to
rest any doubts that Bahamian
investments are not encouraged
and supported in this country.
He said that this ~was something
that five or ten years ago would
riot have been possible.
"We want to welcome aid
invite other commercial banks to
jomn this initiative in furthering
others in empowerment." he Faid

:;EE page 4B,


the success of Cotton Bay ~and
the bank's confidence in devel-
oper Franklyn Wilson andi his
management team,
"We know his vision andR we
share his vision to develop the
country," said Mr McI~Don:l.1
RBC and Mr Wilson hate Iiad
a relationship for almost 30 years
with the bank playing a m~aor
role in the financing of Freeport
'Oil (FOCOL) Holdings Comopa-
ny, of which Mr Wilson is the
director,
Mr Wilson also announced that
Mr -McDonald is to sit on the
board of directors for Cotton
Bay. He said that the bank's
investment partnered with Mr
McDonald's accession to the
board lends the development a
worldwide credibility that Cot-
ton Bay simply cannot pay for.
He added that the partnership


SBy CARA BRENNEN ~
Tribune Bus~iness Reporter
COMMODITIES; imp orted
` to the Bahamas last year
totalled $2.5 billion, a 30 per
cent increase over the $1.9 bil-
lion of 2004, while the Bahamas
exported $293 million worth of
goods to other countries
The Department of Statistics
.I,has announced its 2005 foreign
trade figures, which indicated
that machinery and transport


equipment continue to be the
largest contributor-to the coun-
Stry's imports, totalling $567 mhl-
lion or 22 per cent of all imports.
This was followed by mineral
fuels, which accounted for near-
ly 20 per cent or $508 million.
However, the department point-
ed out that this increase relect-
ed the significant rise in oil prices
and not so much an increase in
quantity of fuel purchases,
SEE page 4B


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SECTION


business~tribunemedia.net Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Gr and Bahama Power sale



Snot hurt by St George estate


Pont lhaeirnann-



of resigning'


Commodities imported

rise 30% to $2.5bn


t


Sotheby's
IflTEIMIATION~ iEALTY


4J Ly~c"e


















Striking the correct a financial





boar d~room balance I .""


Legal NTotice
NOTICIE


GOOD DAY HOLDINGS INC.


(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company isin dissolution, which commenced on
the 12th day of September 2006. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc. P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



~NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that THEOPHILE LEONVILE OF
P. O. BOX 48, SPANISH WELL, ELEUTHERA, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 17th day of October, 2006 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Eleuthera, Bahamas.








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Pricing Information As Of: -
Monday 16 October 2006
BISM5~ LISTED) & TRADED SECURITIES VIBIT WWW~b.BISXBAtfH~A~fulk$.COM 9701 Molite 6ATA & INF RMATION
..~,, ~i~~~, .: qsx.eb.L SHARE LINDEX: CLOSE .1,64 1.11 / CHG 00.00 /% ~~ ft 910./ YTD 290.40 /'YTD3% 2150 .
52nk-HI 52nk-LowSejra pr, ,ous, 2Clos Too~ s Closea Change Daily 'rol. EPS 5 D1 P PE Y eld
1 85 0 59 Anasce. Mark.= I 1 57 1 57 O 0j0 -0 109 O 000 NI 0 00
12.05 .10.10 Bahamas Property Fund 11.25 11.25 i 0.00 400 1.627 0.380 ' 6.9 3.38%
7.56 6.90 Bank of Bahamas 7.56 7.56 .0.00 '0.802 0.330 9.7 4.37%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark '0.80 0.80 .;0.00 .0.208 0.020 3.8 2.50%
1.80 1 .26 Bahamas Waste 1.60 1.60 10.00 0.168 0.060 9.5 3.75%
1.49 1.10 Fidelity Bank 1.44 1.44 '~0.00 0 .188 0.050 '7.7 .3.47%
9.60 9.05 Cable Bahamas 9.55 9.55 0 .00 5,000 0.659 0.240. 14.5 2.51%
2.20 1.39 Colina Holdings 1.80 1.80 : 0.00 0.046 0.000 23.1 0.00%
11.91 9.00 Commonwealth Bank 11.91 11.91 0.00 0.943 0.660 12.6~- 5.54%
6.26 4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.27. 5.06 -0.21 0.130 0.045 40.3 0.86%
2.88 2.10 Doctor's Hospital 2.70 2.70 '0.00 0.348 0.000 7.8 0.00%
1521 14600 Famguard 615 615 a~o042 .40 14 3.0
14.00 9 .50 FirstCaribbean 14.00 14.00 0.00 0.927 0.550 .15.1 3.93%
1.2 F ortcnce .11.2 11.2 0. 08 .50 12M7 4.
10.20 8.49 ICD Utilities 8.49 8.49 0.00 0.532 0.270 16.0 3.18%
8.0 5.0 e~r erhIn rational BDits 8. 90 80 o sus/DEL 01 .0 56 0%
10 00 10 00 Premier Real Es~tate 10.~00 10 00 0 00 1 291 0 195 7.7 1 95%
F~tiidty Ove~r-The-Counrter Scy~ -:
52wk-H1 52wk-Low djmool Bla $ ASk J Last Price V~eaki,.01 EP B Div 5 PiE viela
14.30 1~2.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 14.00 1.923 1.320 7.9 9.04%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 8.00 8.25 10.00 0.000 0.640 NM 7.85%
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.00 -0.002 0.000 NM 0.00%
43.00 28 OO ABDAB 4 1 00l 43- 00 1 00 2' "20 0 000i 19 4 O 00' .
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.00 15.00 12.50 1.750 0.360 8.0 2.570/o
0.60 0 35 RND Holmlr~gs Oi 45 O 55 0 45 o-0 o' 0o 000N 0 00.
1941BF~~ii:~; .,. siesx LIsted Matua~l.Purna ':-:1 .5~,
52wrk-HI 52@ -cLow Furj Nar. NA' TD'.. Last 12 Mlonthj DI.S 5 <=***
1.3092 1.2574 Colina Money Market Fund 1.309234* *
2.9515 2.4766 Fidelity Bahamas G &I Fund 2.9515***
12.4687 2.2671 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.468721**
11970 1.1395 Colina Bond Fund 1.196970'*** ..
FINDEX. CLOSE 720 93 I1 YTD 30.64%~ 1 SkODB. 26.OBL%
52wk-HI Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bld S Buying price of Colina and Fidellty
52wk-Low Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks Ask S Selling price of Colina and fidelity 6 October 2006
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week ** 30 September 2006
Change Change In closing price from day to day EPS 5 A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Dally Vol. Number of total shares traded today .NAIV Net Asset Value ***- 30 September 2006 ,
DIV S Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
? DE Ce ALL: COLINA 242-602-701 /r FIDELITY242-358-7764; 1 FOR MIORE ~ATA & 'INFORMUATION .CALL (247) 394-25~~~i)Y 194279


Life. Money. Balance both


PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2006


The obvious question to ask:
"Is this new level of scrutiny in
the best interest of the compa-
ny?" I am of the firm view that
increased vigilance by directors
and, more specifically, inde-
pendent non-executive direc-
tors (INEDs), is essential to the
advancement of the good cor-
porate governance that mod-
ern 'best practices' demand.

Role of INVEDs
The Central Bank of the
Bahamas published a consulta-


tion paper on August 3, 2003,
entitled Guidelines for Inde-
pendent Non-Executive Direc-
tors. In this document, it
described the role of INEDs as
follows:
"A key principle of corporate
governance is that there should
be a sufficient number of
INEDs on the Board of Direc-
tors to create a suitable balance
of power, and prevent the dom-
inance of the board by one mndi-
vidual or by a small number of
individuals, .


"This is very important, as
INEDs should be able to brmng ~
independent andsobjective
views, experience and a range of
skills to the deliberations of the
board. A key role of INEDs is
also to brmng an external 'real
world' focus to the board's dis-
cussions and act as a counter-
balance, where appropriate, to
the influence of the chairman
or chief executive over board
decision-miaking.
"The Bank recognizes the
importance of INEDs and the


The October 2, 2006, edition
of the Wall Street Journal (WSJ)
carried a story entitled Drana
in the Boardroom, which
addressed the change in board-
room behaviour in the post-
Enron environment. According
to the article: "Corporate direc-
tors, pressed to become more
vocal following the scandals of
the Enron era, are throwing
their weight around more, rub-
ber-stamping management less
- and roiling many once clubby
boardrooms." .


tions on boards and meet more
often without management.
Adding to the mix are several
other forces, including mergers
(apd acquisitions) that have left
a legacy of distrust, and director
fears of personal liability for
corporate misdeeds."

How to avoid a dysfunctional
board?
Companies are organising
'team-building' activities for
board members and providing
coaching on handling disagree-
111ent the same as they do for
members of executive manage-
ment.
Also,' more companies aire
instituting a system of peer
reviews that allow fellow direc-
tors to focus on common prob-
lems directors experience with
their peers, such as: inadequate
preparation for meetings, asking
too few questions, frequently
side tracking the meeting, or
leaking sensitive information.
Finally, many boardroom vet-
erans believe diplomacy can
overcome many disputes. *
Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Char-
tered Financial Analyst, ifs vice-
president pensions, Colonial
Pensions Services (Bahamas),
a wholly-owned subsidiary of
Colonial Group International,
which owns Atlantic Medical
Insurance and is a major share-.
holder of Security & General
Insurance Company in the
Bahamas.
The views expressed are
thbse of the author and do not
necessarily represent those of
Colonial Group International
or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson~atlantic-~
house~com~bs


role they play in good corpo-
rate governance. The 'role of
INEDs' section of the proposed
guidelines highlights the respon-
sibilities of licensees' INEDs
and their involvement in board
committees. The Bank recom-
mends that the nominations
audit and compensation com-
mittees be composed entirely
or predominantly of INEDs.
"The Bank seeks to encour-
age the boards of its licensees to
carry out continuous evaluation
of the combination of skills they
need to be effective, and make
necessary adjustments to the
composition of the same.
INEDs would be expected to
maintain an ongoing dialogue
with the bank and make con-
tact where necessary to discuss
matters of mutual concern."
Clearly, the Central Bank is
taking the lead in directing its
licensees towards adopting
appropriate levels of corporate
governance in their operations.
However, there can be an 'unin-
tended effect' arising from
greater levels of Boardroom
vigilance...which is: "At what
.point does greater boardroom
debate lead to a dysfunctional
board?"
Just recently, boardroom dis-
agreement at Hewlett-Packard
(HP) led to the dismissal of the
exhief executive after, discord
among members. While HP's
situation might be regarded as
being extreme, I do believe we
haven't seen the last of such
incidents. -

Why are INEDs becoming
more vocal?
According to the WSJ: "Pro-
pelled by changes in stock
exchange rules and the Sar-
banes-Oxley corporate reform
law, more independent direc-
toi-s have more leadership posi-


1
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I
I


THE TRIBUNE


SCOTI~IA PiLAi LOA.N





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARIE THERESE LOUIS
NORVIL OF P. O. BOX 48, SPANISH WELL, ELEUTHERA,

=Ac a Ciie fTeBhms a n ath at any ero
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 17th day of
October, 2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P O.Box N- 7147, Eleuthera, Bahamas.


Legal Notice
NOTICE


AV~ENTUTRA CORPORATION

(In VLoluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 12th day of September 2006. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc.' P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Legal Notice
NOTICE


FORM~OSITAS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby iven that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 12th day of September 2006. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc. P.~O. Box N-77~57
Nassau, Bahamas.





SARGOSA CORP. INC.
(L~iquidator)


I


BSi



BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established international
private bank in The Bahamas, with its head office BSI AG in Lugano, Switzerland
since 1873, is presently accepting applications for :-


B ASSISTANT TO THE EXE CUT I ON DESK


The' successful candidate for the position of Assistant to the Execution Desk must have
good knowledge of financial instruments to ensure efficient execution of transactions
concerning securities, Forex, investment funds, money markets,' derivatives,
commodities and any other financial instruments on the major markets with approved
counterparts and in accordance with established risk limitS and applicable local &
international regulations. Knowledge of Italian language would be a plus.

Personal qualities :-

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Flexible, goal-oriented, positive attitude and outlook, self-motivated
Commitment to quality and service excellence
Possess analytical qualities and research orientated
Work under minimum supervision
Available to flexible working hours

Responsibilities :

Executions of Forex transactions, deposits and placements
Executions of securities, options, futures and investment funds, etc.
Input transactions onto Bank's system
.Troubleshooting
Overlook -& 'coordinate with various departments for proper settlements of
transactions
Liaise internally as well as externally with third parties
Morning briefings on market situations and trends -

This position will report directly to the Head of Financial Services Department.

Resumes should be faxed to #702 1253 or mailed or delivered to the offices of BSI,
addressed to :-
Personnel Officer
BSI Oversears (Bahamas) Limited
S- Bayside Executive Park, W. Bay St. & Blake Road
P. O. Box N-7130
Nassau, Bahamas
(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted.


I I r III I IIC III I Il


RESPONSIBILITIES


~In providing -technology support across several global locations, the
candidates will specifically be responsible for:
Managing the software change control process, including
version control for software releases to ensure compliance
with all relevant policies and procedures.
Change control records management.
Administration of internal technology change management
system.
Responsible for all business nisk and colitrol requirements
for technology change management and any associated
reporting.
-Management of" the department's information security
monitoring tools including SEMS, EMS, and AppDetective.

KNOWLEDiGE/SKILLS REQUIRED

The ideal candidate will have the following competencies:
Experience in technology change management systems,
software management systems.
--Experience information security processes and ptandards.
Knowledge of WIN2000 Administration, MS Office Suite,
LAN/WAN systems.
Ability to multi-task in a time sensitive work environment
supporting various applications and infrastructure changes.
-Bachelor's degree in Computer Science or equivalent
experience.
-Minimum 3 years related work experience.

Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to:
Technology Unit Head
GWS/Bahamas Technology
Cititrust(Bahamas)Limited
`P.O.Box N-1576,
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: (242) 302-8732 or
Email: gieselle.campbell@citigroup.com


Deadline for application is October 20, 2006.


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2006, PAGE 3B'


.THE TRIBUNE


again suffered "a continued
increase in expenses to restore
the electricity system" after
Hurricane Wilma in 2005,
upgrading and restoring the
power hines.to western Grand
Bahama.
Some 50 per. cent of' Grand
Bahama Power Company's
almost 19,000 customers were
back on line four days after
Hurricane Wilma passed, with
90 per cent of customers
receiving power some six days
later.
In 2004, Grand Bahama
Power Company suffered $12
million in losses from the dam-
age inflicted by Hurricanes
Frances and Jeanne $7.9 mil-
lion in repairs, and $4 million
in revenues.
The decision to dispose of
its majority stake in Grand
Bahama Power Company is
part of a wider strategy by
Mirant to sell-off all its mnter-
national operations and focus
solely on its home market of
the US.


auction process for Grand
Bahama Power Company and
the other Caribbean assets.
Apart from three generating
facilities in the Philippines, all '
Mirant's international opera-
tions are in the Caribbean.
They include an 80 per cent
stake in Jamaica Public Ser.
vice Company, a 39 per cent
interest in Power Generation
Company of Trinidad & Toba-
go,-and a 25.5 per cent stake in
Curacao Utilities Company.
All are up for sale via auction.
A collective sale of these
assets would make it more dif-
ficult for Bahamians to partic-
ipate in the process other than
as minority partners.
Writing mn ICD Utilities 2005
annual report, David Dunbar,
chief executive of Grand
Bahama Power Company, said
its net earnings in fiscal 2005
increased by 28.6 per cent
upon hurricane-ravaged 2004,
rising from $4.9 million to $6.3;
million.
Mr Dunbar attributed the


SDAVE DUNBAR


increase to a 4.2 per cent rise in
sales to 370 gigawatt hours.
Yet sales were up against low
2004 comparatives as a result
of the hurricanes, and contin-
ued to be affected by the Roy-
al Oasis closure.
He added that Gran~d
~Bahama Power Company


in conversations with The Tri-
bune. Fle~ said he has recused
himself from all involvement
with H and F Babak Con~-
struction Company,' and is no
longer involved with Freeport
Concrete's day-to-day opera-
tions.
On the Associated Grocers
contract, it is understood that
the US grocery wholesaler and
distributor spoke to H and F
Babak Construction Company
before Mr Babak was appoint-
ed to his current Port Authoni-
ty role.
..Several sources have sug-
gested that the criticism of Mr
Babak is really designed to
increase pressure on the Port
Authority's shareholders'
chiefly Sir Jack and the St
George estate; through attacks
on its chairman.


Some St George family mem-
bers, including Caroline, are
understood to have been
unhappy that they were not
consulted on Mr~ Babak's
appointment.
Caroline's views have been
echoed by PLP Senator Philip
Galanis, who together with
attorney Harvey Tynes and con-
tractor Floyd Farquharson,
mounted a $400 million bid to
acquire the Port Authority, Port
Group Ltd and its related assets
earlier this year.
That offer was rebuffed by
Sir Jack Hayward, Mr St
George's business partner and
50 per cent shareholder in the
Por~t Authority, although Mr
Galanis said he left the door
open to further talks.
Mr Galanis previously told
The Tribune that Mr Babak


should be removed because of
perceived conflicts of interest
between his Port Authority role
and private interests, namely
his construction company and
Freeport Concrete, the BISX-
listed entity in which he holds a
43 per cent stake. Freeport
Concrete owns building mate-
rials supplier, the Home Cen-
tre.
"He doesn't have any stellar
record of achievement in any
of his existing businesses. I don't
understand what great strengths
and special skills he brings to
the job," Mr Galanis said,
"I have spoken to several
investors who claim they have
been directed to the Home
Centre to purchase tresses and
Other building materials.'j> ~
Mr Babak has described
such claims as "total nonsense"


Grand Bahama Power sale



not hurt by St George estate


FROM pae one
The best Bahamian groups
could hope for, they added,
would be to act as minority
Partners in a bid group or as
corporate advisers, in both cas-
Ses providing much-needed local
:knowledge to international
.players.
One source said the most
likely purchasers of Mirant's
shareholding would be "large
players, able to make the capital
investment required and fly in
people to fix things" in the
aftermath of a hurricane. .
Major electrical utilities
would have the "deep pockets'
and eco ois afs al equn e

Company, and the human
resources for hurricane repairs.
date isw ether ia l osne
to sell off its international oper-
ations, including Grand
Bahama Power Company, indi-
vdually o ollectively
viJP Mogan Chase is handling
what has been described as an


Port chairman: 'no intention of resigning'


FROM pae one
His appointment earlier this
year, to replace former Central
Bank governor Julian Francis,
appears to have unwittingly
-ignited the dispute over the
~estate of the late Edward St
George.
Mr St George's daughter,
Caroline, has made clear her
hostility towards Mr Babak,
saying she will ensure his
removal should her claims to
the estate succeed.
The Tribune has been
informed that Mr Babak's
appointment was chiefly dri-
ven by Lady Henrietta: St
George's brother, the Earl of
Euston, and Port insider Derek
:Harrington, rather than Lady
Henrietta anld Sir Jack Hay-
ward.









,I U ,) v~-


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sectionl38
(8) of the Intemnational Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of
2000), MANCIN ENTERPRISES LTD., is in dissolution.
CONTINENTAL LIQUIDATORS INC. is the
Liquidator and can be contracted at 60 Market Square,
P.O.Box 1906, Belize City, Belize. All persons having
claims against the above-named company are required to
send their names and addresses and particulars of their debts
or claims to the Liquidator before November 12, 200i.



2ti ColloaltLiquidators, Inc.
Liquidator


I ~R~m*J~- =-


giat teleom


make it ea ier to facilitate this.~
Cottdn` Bay Estates and Vil-e
las, currently in development:
by Eleuthera Properties Ltd.,:
is a residential resort commu-
nity.
The l41 lots will offer ocean
views on 196 acres of vegeta-
tion and private beaches~
stretching over l.3 miles. Cot-
ton B~ay Villas, opening in
2007, will be a 73-room Star-
wood Luxury Collection bou-
tique hotel featuring a restau-
rant, pool, private marina and:.
concierge services.
Mr Wilson is chairman of
Eleuthera Properties Ltd.














The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making newsmintheir
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigmng
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If SO, Call US On 322-1986
and share your story.


Managing Director
MBA degree or equivalent. 15 years experience in banking and trust business. Fluent in
Spanish, read and written, mandatory. Portuguese and French would be a plus.
Extensive knowledge of IBM I series (AS400), PC and networking. Complete
knowledge of Argentine Financial and Tax systems, as well as detailed knowledge of
banking w r~s and regulations in the Bahamas. Experience of reporting to the Central
Bank, and ability in the areas of compliance and AML are prerequisites.

Manager
Must possess a banking qualification. 10 years minimum experience in banking and
trust business. Fluent in Spanish, read and written, mandatory. Portuguese. Knowledge
of IBM I series (AS400), PC and networking. Knowledge of Argentine Financial
System. Knowledge of banking laws and regulations, as well as trust matters.
Experience preparing informatic for Central Bank, and AML requirements.

Applications should be mailed to
,Ofslure Bank90
NaSSaH, NP


Friday, October 20, 2000 Saturday,
Moderator Mloderator
Dr Earia Carey-Baines, Dean Dr Thad
Faculty of Liberal and Fine Arts
The College of The Bahamas (COB) 9:30-10:00 r
9:30 am Dr Gail ~
Opening
Invocation 1:01:
Persona
National Anthem Honour;
Welcome and lir o-11.1 1 ll. Former
Janyne M. Hodder, President, COB The Nat
Remarks
His Excellency, Sir Arthur Hfanna 10:30-11:00
Governor General of The Pol,
The Commonwealth of the Bahamas Honour
10:00-10:20 a.m. Fr n~e
The Life and Times, of The Nal
Mother Frances Butler and h~er Irnpact
enSriosLife and Work 11:00-1 :1
Contribe
10:30-1:00 a~m. John I
Sir Milo and Lady Caroline: Profess
Perspectives from the Grandchildren Lafayet~
Loretta Butler-Turner & Claudette Butler
Break
11:15-12:00 noon
The Religious and Criur':h~~ Ll, f*= 01 r M.1I.
Churchmen estZSr) ind Stres likas1'r

i e,, ,--,, ,,,, ,,,, ,,, ~ :--".0 r.C ~ ; .:: 10 1~~.. :


i FTHE -8 4R4 M AS 9


TH--E TRIBUNE


AP GE 4 TUESDAY OCTOBER 6


deal












r~ r










.C r
,


* er








*



-


P
t
d
i


market being purchased by the

AS. significant amount of:
trade was also done with the
European Union (the UK,
Germany, France among oth-
ers). There was also trade to::
lesser extents with Curaco (7.1
per cent the majority of which
is mineral oils), Puerto Rico
(two per cent) Japan (one per ,
cent) and the European coun- *
tries.(one per cent).
The statistics department
noted that the major imports'
from the Uniited States were
various food products ($285.1
million); nuclear reactors, boil-
ers, machinery and mechani-
cal appliances ($140l.3 million),
mineral fuels, mineral oils and
by-products ($256.4 million),.
art works and antiques ($97.9*1
inillion ), electricity machin-
e~ry equipment and parts
($160.6 million) and vehicles
($117.2 million).
As for exports, polystyrene
represents $94.8 million, craw-
fish $38.2 million, some $52 mil- .
lion worth exported to France;
sea salt $14.6 million and rum;
$1.1 million were among the,
main items exported to the US,
the figures suggested.


. .


~~ Z


a ---


,


1

r

i

r
J
I-

rl


.. .


.


r


' FRO p~age o~ne ;
Mr wilson noted that
Ele'uthera is being transformed
by the development.
"You have to understand
that until Cotton Bay there
was no significant construction
on Eleuthera for 35 years,
There was literally a genera-
tion of young people not see-
ing their parefits go to work.
Think of the implications. The
human benefit is difficult to
articulate it is huge."
He added that work on the
resort is going very well and
said the bank's investment will


. ,


Til-IIlnpsonr Bourlevard~l, NaJ~ss u, Thie BahamnaS
October 20-21, 2006i at 9:30 a.m.


October 21, 2006
Ideus' McDonald


.Op.,,.Act~ivities ofSir Milo .
Saunders, Director, Heritage
,a.m-
li Reflections of Sir Milo
able Loftus Roker
member of Parliament and
:ional Cabinet
la.m.
tlical Life of Sir Milo
able Paul Adderley
M mb r c Frf all, orl...- II and.
tional Cabinet

ysi o Sir Milo s Political
ultions to Th7e Bahamas
McCartney
;or, Head of Government and Law
te College, Easton, PA, USA


THE eCO)b r / C
Elsit our w~ebsite at www.co.b.eiday bs


Commodities


I


imp orte d


rise son



to $2.5bn


FROM page one
Manufactured goods
accounted for 15 per cent
($400O million), food and live
animals, including both fresh
meats, fruits and vegetables
and processed foods accounted
for almost $330 million or 13
per cent of foreign trade.
The statistics revealed that
imports of automobiles, their
parts and accessories
increased by 9.5 per cent from
$140 million in 2004 to $153
million in 2005.
A comparison of the imports
from Japan and the US indi-
cates that the majority of these
imports come from Ameried.
According to the depart-
.ment, the Bahamas' export
market consisted mainly of
chemicals (polystyrene and
other plastic materials) !or 53
per cent of exported goods,
with food and live animals,
particularly crawfish, rum and
salt, contributing 33 per cent.
The United States continues
to be this country's major trad-
ing partner with 80 per cent of
all items entering the Bahamas
coming from there and 66 per
cent of the Bahamian export


S- Copyrighted Material



Synd icate d Con ton t


Available from Commercial Newi


RBC becomes




partner mn


Cotton Bay


The College of The Baihamas
CGIl .lid~lll in~Vites you to attend itcs
Sir IMillO Butler Centennrial Slym >osium
honou~cring the life and~ work of
the first Baharnian Governor Generall anc
r]ational Hero of The Baham-aS







- - I-- ~srrsarri~tpiff I


NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be, made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
in the Probate Division by KEVIN MARTIN RUSSELL
of #14 Doubloon Drive in the City of Freeport, on
the Island of Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for
obtaining the Resealed Grant of Letters of
Testamentary in the above estate granted to
ROBERT G. SElPEL AND WILLIAM G. SElPEL,
Co-Executors, by the Orleans County Surrogate's
Court, in the State of New York, on the 12th day of
April, 2000.
Signed
K. Mackey
(for) Registrar

.THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
Oct. 19, 2006

2006/PRO/npr/OO499
In the Estate of JOSEPH RUSSELL GODDARD,
late of Harmony Hall in the Parish of Christ Church
in the Island of Bar~bados,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
on its Probate Division by BRADLEY W.
CALLA;NDER of the City of Freeport, on the Island
of' Grand Bahama, one of the Islands osf.the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law,
the Authorized Attorneyi in Trhe Bahamas for obtaining
the Resealed Grant of Letters of Testamentary .in
the above estate granted to ELAINE GODDARD
'and JOSEPH NATHANIEL GODDARD', the
Executors, by the Chief Jus~tice of the ~Supreme
Court of Judicature, High Court, Barbados, onl the
25th day of November, 1974.

Signed .
K. Mackey
(for)' Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
i THE SUPREME COURT:
PROiBATE DIVISION
Oct. 19, 2006
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00500
W\~hereas BPNAST J LATATSIA THOMPSON, of :
Ann's Drive, Winton- Meadows, .New Providence,
one of the Island of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supremi
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
of~ the Real and Personal Estate of ARLINGTON
WILLARD THOMPSON late of Hanna Hill, Eight
Mile Rock, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the
.Commonw-ealth of the Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that s~uc~h applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.
K. Mackey :
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURiT
PROBATE DIVISION
Oct. 19, 2006
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00501
Whereas GERALD WILDGOOSE, of~ West Palm
Beach, in the State of Florida, one of the States of
.the United States of America, has made ~application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters
of Administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of RODERICK WIjLDGOOSE late of Hanna Hill,
Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama, one ~of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date' hereof.
.K. Mackey
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
Oct.19, 2006
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00502
Whereas RICHARD HERBERT ROGER
LIGHTBOURN, of Mareva House, George Street,


New Providence, one of the Island of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for Letters of Administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of JOSE ALVIO GONZALES late of Graham
Acres, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the~date hereof.
Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
Oct. 1.9, 2006
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00507
Whereas LOUISE STURRUP, of Wilson Tract, New
Providence, one of the Island of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the Real and~ Personal Estate of
MARITA. STURRUP late of Wilson Tract, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 1~4
days from the date hereof.
Nicoya Neilly
(for)} Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAM~AS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
SOct. 19, 2006
No. ,2006/PRO/npr/00508
Whereas JOSEPH EMMANUEL WHYMS, of New
Providence, one of the Island of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamnas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahiamas, for Letters of
Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of
SHARON TERESA WHYMS late of Wilson Tract,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of~ their Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby give that such applications will
be heard by the; said Court at the expiration of 14
dayS from the date hereof.
: Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar



THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REG~IST`RYS
RO. BOX, N-167
lNassau, The~ Bahamas
Oct. 19, 2006

S2006/PRO/npr/O00051
In the Estate of KENNETH W. SUMNER, late of
Brunswickiin `the County of Cumberland in the~ Statte
eMV.o~1a3ilve;?oe-oneo the United States of Amneric~ar
deceased. '

:NOTICE is: hereby given ~that after the expiration
of fourteen' days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
oh its Probate Division by LOUREY G. SMITH of 4
I-George Street in the City of Nassau in the Island of
New Providence, one of the Islands~of the
Commonwealth of The Bah'amas, Attorneyat-l~aw,
the Authorized Attorniey in The Bahamas for obtaining
the Resealedl Grant of Letters of Appointment in the
above estate granted to KAREN CHANCE,
VRIGINIA AX and GEORGE SPARLING, Personal
Representatives, by the Ikobate Court in the County
of Cumberland and State of Maine one of the States
of the United States of Am~erica, on the 27th day of
December, 2005.

Signed
K. Mackey
(for) Registrar


GN-415














SUPREME COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
Oct. 19, 2006
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00295
Whereas IRIS JOHNSON-MOXEY, of New
Providence, one of the Island of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration with the Will Annexed of the Real
and Personal Estate of CLEO PATSY JOHNSON
late of Stapledon Gardens, New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.
K. Mackey
(for) Registrar


i'tHE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.~O. BOX N-167
SNassau, The Bahamas
Oct. 19, 2006

2006/PRO/npr/OO494
In the Estate of ROBERiT BRADFORD ARNOLD,
late of Christie Terrace, Lyford Cay in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands -of the Commonwe'alth of The Bahamas,
-deceased.

NOTICE is he~reby.given that after-the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to.the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
on its Probate Division byl.EARL A. CASH of Marli'n
Drive in the' Wnestern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, the Authorized
~Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining~the Re~sealled
Grant of Amended Letters of Admiinistration, Nunc
Pro Tunc in the above estate granted to GEORGE
L. FIELDS, JR., Personal Representative, by the
Probate Division of the Circuit Court for Marion
County, i~n the State of Florida, on the 12th day of
May, .2006.
Signed
K. Mackey
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
RO. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
Oct. 19, 2006

2006/PRO/npr/OO495
In the Estate of ROAL GEORGE MITCHELL, late
of "The Valley"' Stilwell Road, Stony Hill, Kingston
8 in the Parish of Saint And~rew Jamaica,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
on its Probate ~Division by KARA GEORGETTE
TURNQUEST of the Western District of the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law,
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining
the Resealed Grant of Probate in the above estate
granted to NATIONAL COMMERCIAL BANK
JAMAICA LIMITED, Personal Representative, by
the Supreme Court of Judicature of Jamaica, on the
9th day of June, 2004.

Signed
K. Mack~ey
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
Oct. 19, 2006
2006/PRO/npr/OO498

In the Estate of ARLINE ELSA SEIPEL, late of No.
3626, 57th Avenue Drive West, on the City of
Bradenton in the County of Manatee, in the State
of Florida, one of the United States of America,
deceased.


_


1,)R~il)~; (j~J~~)(rdeSt~9 BP, ZWlkeDI~~$P~We ;;)8;11


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
R.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The B3ahamas
Oct. 19, 2006

2006/PRO/n pr/O0005 14
SIn the Esta'te of LEONARD S. KIM, late of 49 Frontier
Road, Cois Cob in the State of Connecticut, United
States of Amedca,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
on its Probate Division by HARRY BRACTON
SANDS of Skyline Drive in the Western District of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law,
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining
the Resealed Grant of Letters of Testamentary in
the above estate granted to CHRISTINE H. KIM,
the Executrix, by the Probate Court of the District
of Greenwich in the County of Fairfield in the said
State of Connecticut, on the 15th day of September,
2005.

Signed
K. Mackey
(for) Registrar









, = -Ll-dh~ -r


Sh r


yOMP

PlSWRO

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TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 6B TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2006


RBI and run scored and Julian
Collie was 1-for-4 with a run
scored to lead Del Sol to
advance to the final on Sun-
day.
Gilbert also picked up the
win on the mound as he fired
a three-hitter,
Ryan Major suffered the
loss on three hits as well for
the Stingrays.
Crestwell 'the Bomber'
Pratt was 1-for-1 with a run
scored; Luthan Delancy 1-for-
2 and Maitland Demeritte 1-
for-3 to lead the Stingrays
offensively.
STruckers 19, New Breed
1: TBS erupted for 14 hits as
they blasted their way past the
New Breed to even their play-
off series at 1-1 on Sunday.


Adrian Hutchinson had a
perfect 3-for-3 day with a
home run. He had a total of
six RBIs and scored twice to
lead the parade.
Winston Seymour was 2-for-
4 with four RBIs and a run
scored; Terrance Culmer was
2-for-4 with three RBIs and a
run scored; Jamal Johnson
was 1-for-3 with two RBls and
two runs scored and Marvin
'Tougie' Wood was 3-for-4
with three runs scored.
Leroy, Thompson tossed' a
four-hitter for the win.
Sherman F'erguson vi~as 2-
for-2 and Garfield Bethel 1-
for-2 with a run in a losing
effort.
Dezron Curry was tagged
with the loss on the
mound.


SSOFTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
WHILE the Del Sol
Arawaks secured their berth
into the New Providence Soft-
ball Association men's cham
pionship, the TBS Truckers
came close to ensuring that a
much anticipated matchup
becomes a reality.
Over the weekend at the
Baillou Hills Sporting Com-
plex after the Electro Tele-
com Wildcats wrapped up
their sixth straight ladies'
crown, Del Sol completed
their two-game sweep over the
Stingrays Sporting Club and
TBS pulled even with New
Breed.
In game two on Sunday, the


advance to the best-of-five
finals to face the Arawaks will
be played on Saturday at 2pm.
Game one of the men's final
will be held on Sunday at 1pm
with game two to follow
immediately afterwards at
3pm.
S*Here's a summary of the
games played! in the men's
series.
II Arawaks 5, Stingrayls 2:
Nelson Farrington went 1-for-
3 with a run scored; Cardinal
Gilbert was 1-for-3 with an


Truckers rolled all over New
Breed 19-1 after they lost by
forfeiture in the first game of
the best-of-three series three
weeks ago.
The Arawaks, on the other
hand, pulled off a close 5-2
'victory in the other game
played on Sunday. They had
taken the initial lead in game
one on Saturday with a 13-11
slugfest.
The third and deciding
game between TBS and New
Breed to determine who will


d, -I
hlB
.~o*
.Q~ r
rr
ci

i''


Jtl
c
,,


i
4
Ct).
-F

B~amian baseball star


e


the foyer of the arrival section of
the Lynden Pindling International
Airport.
Since returning home, Curry has
agitated for a resolve in the bitter
dispute that has forced the form-a-
tion of the New Providence Base-
ball League and the Bahamas Base-
ball Federation from the Bahamas
Baseball Federation, the governing
body for the sport in~ the country.

WrOrked

Curry has also worked with the
Bahamas Professional Association
of Past and Present Baseball Play-
ers, a body which is headed by
Ve srevredu aste initial vice pres-
ident.
thate win osne da f eacahsothmre
the Bahamas has lost its first two
major leaguers, taking a wealth of
knowledge and experience to their
grave without it being fully utilised
for the benefit of the young players
Tinb un rp rts extends its con-
dolences to' his family.


by the Phillies in the National
League. In his first year, he hit .261
and .194 in the second year.
On March 20, 1962, Curry was
traded by Philadelphia with Ken
Lehman to Cleveland for Mel
Roach. ]During .his brief stint with
the Indians, Curry hit just .125 with
only two hits in 16 at-bats.
On July 19, 1966, Curry was again
traded by Cleveland to the Houston
Astros for Jim Gentile. But that
didn't last too long as he was dealt
by Houston to the California
Angels on October 9, 1966, signal-
ing the end of his career.
As his career came to an end, the *
late Wenty Fhord followed in his
footsip a ajeor ithir theamA nto
Braves.

pltnd inhe B dam arnm qure
enthe Majors with the Cincinnati
Curr jo d Rodges Ford and
Armbrister with their photos being
placed on thebwalltat the A dr
itwas semalsehedhin Ju m ot
enshr nd on he Wall of F pme i


MBy BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
GEORGE Anthony Curry, one
of four Bahamians to play in the
Major League, died on Monday
morning~ at his home.
Affectionately known as 'Tony,'
the former professional baseball
player who suited up for three
Major League teams during a
career that spanned just over a
decade, was diagnosed with renal
failure for the past five years.
Curry, who agitated for the reso-
lution in the long standing dispute
that has rocked the local baseball
community, was 68. He was due to
c~e e re 2 .s 69th birthday on
Contheted at the family home off
tHhi h~wa ns odls m aD 1 enf
Antona, said that their father will
be missed.
"We are holding up," she stated.
"The good thing was that he made
peace with God. He said good-bye
ho usu.nHde waisagoxl. He wdas a good

sa Rdersrfirry f su ehildortma


Antona Curry, Donree Bain, Tina
Butler and Antoine Curry and four
grandchildren.
Funeral service is set for Saturday
at 11 a.m. St. Matthew's Anglican
Church on Shirley Street.
Curry followed in the footsteps
,of the late Andre Rodgers as the
second Bahamian to play in the
Major League.- He played with
Philadelphia Phillies and the Cleve-
land Indians prior to an extensive
stint in the minor league.

]Batted

As an outfielder, Curry first
played for Tampa in the Florida
S ate3Leau in li9571wher the bt
550 at-bats
heK wn for hisdeatensive prw s2
put outs and just 26 errors.
From 1958-59, Curry played with
HP Thoa (C 1o Le ge in '58
and Eaom Leaguae '59) b tuing .293
and .313 respectively with fielding
avoer sn m~bersa ab91 d Curry to
be called up to the Major League


1.


TBS Truckers even


The


Dockendal.


chonch BCA


20etr titl*


CRICKET
DOCKENDALE won
by two wickets over Sco-
tia Bank Paradise to
clinch the Bahamas
Cricket Association's
20/20 title on Sunday at
Haynes Oval.
Batting first, Dock-
endale scored 188 runs.
Narendra Ekanayake
was the top scorer with
84 runs and Kevin Suru-
jlal scored 27.
The best bowler for
the bank's team was
Gary Armstrong, who
took four wickets.
Batting second, Scotia
Bank Paradise were
unable to reach 124 runs
with Llewelyn Arm-
strong and Ryan Tap-
ping scoring 29 and 22
runs respectively.
Narendra Ekanayake
took four wickets and
Shanaka Perera and
Dwight Weakley took
two wickets each for
Dockendale.
Ekanayake won the
prize for the Player of
the Tournament.
Earlier in the day, the
T-Bird Flyers lost to
Scotia Bank in a very
close semifinal game.
Scotia Bank, batting
first, scored 185 with
Llewelyn Armstrong
and Ryan Tappin scor-
ing 38 and -34 runs
respectively.
Patrick Cole took
three wickets and iRal-
ston Myles and Andrew
Nash had two wickets
each for T-Bird.
At bat, T-Bird could
ol realhas or eof 181
Wicket.


tMar IrterT and ary
Armstrong took three
wickets each for Scotia
B ank.
Action in the tourna-
ment got started on Fri-
day with Dockendale
beating-the Police by
five wickets.
In the other game
played, Scotia Bank
defeated St Agnes by
125 runs.
The action continued
on Saturday with T-Bird
knocking off the Rising
Star by seven wickets.
And in the other game
played, Dockendale
defeated Castrol Com-
monwealth by just one
wicket in what turned
out to be a very exciting
match.
By virtue of winning
the match, Dockendale
advanced to the final on
Sunday.

"E. EewdBC hAs-

on Saturday and Sunday
at Haynes Oval.


series with New Breed.


.1.a I ame dect es

WHO W111 IRCE AlraWRKS


Syniae Cnent



~Availa lesfrom Commercial NewsFProvi ers


dies ag e 68


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I I~IIYVI~L VI VI I IV


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, ~2006, PAGE 7B


TRIBUNE SPORTS


* ~Eagles stage comeback to beat the Tigers
SLEFT: Tigers try to c ose out thte second set by keeping things in play, but fall short as the
i. BELOWI: Randolph Cooper is all form in yesterday's game against the AF Adderley Tigers.
i r T I* SEE STORY ON SPORTS FRONT
S(Phtotos: Tim Clarke)


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---- -- U- r -"


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2006

SECTION


Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


iBC~;f:.
f'~
~....


to be a determining factor irj
the championships.
"Like I said earlier this is
an excellent team, they proved
to .mC today that they
are fighters and that is a posi-
tive.
"Any coach will be pleased
with this team's performanc5h
I am_ very pleased, but it
will back to practice for the
teani."
Play in the junior boy's
league will continue on
Wednesday at the RM Bailey
,Courts. All senior games will
be played at the DW DaviS
gym.


Eagles' energy level went to
the roof. They opened up the
second set with a 5-11lead and
as the set progressed they
were able to set their big men
up for the kill.
Cdnf~idence
Bain added: "All we needed
was to gain confidence, they
did that and it paid off for
them. This is just the first
game~ sc I can't really judge
them by this performance, but
there are some things we will
have to clean up on if we want


who pulled off a come-fi~om-
behind victory over the AF
Adderley Tigers, 15-17, 17-15
and 15-13.
Thunderous
The Eagles got off to a slow
start, but once they got the
ball rolling, they delivered
thunderous spikes and several
service aces to pull off game
two. .
Their coach, Penial Bain,
blamed the sluggish start on
the boy's lack of experience,
but said the team will be one


to be, reckoned with as they
continue playing.
The Tigers were able to
jump to a 10-11ead in the first
set and were looking to close
things out when the Eagles'
Rashad Sturrup drilled two
spikes down the center of the
Tigers' court. The spikes
quickly changed the momen-
tum in favour of the Eagles,
who were able to pull them-
.selves within two before the
Tigers could close.
Bain said: "If you look at
this team this is an excellent
team. I really can't tell you
why we allowed AF Adder-


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


p.


I VOLLEYBALL '
By KELSIE JOHNSON :
Junior Sports Reporter
GOVERNMENT affiliated
schools got their chance yes-
terday to hit the courts after
weeks of waiting for the Gov-
ernment Secondary Schools
Sporting Association (GSSA)
executive members and coach-
es to decide whether or not
they will take part in after
school activities,
Although many complained
about the late start, it didn't
seem to bother the LW Young
Golden Eagles junior boys,


0


b8
i.





e8


ley to open stich a big gap on
us in the first set. The guy who
was to the line yes he was
serving tough but nothing my
guys weren't jble to pick up.
"After the~ picked up the
first two services by him, they
realized that ~hey could play
against him, when they did
this it was a little' too late
because we h~ad already dug
ourselves in a whole. I was
very happy t see them pull
themselves out, this means this
is a fighting 4eam and I like
ta.After closi g out the first
set with a bi~ comeback, the


8


I0


P




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