Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00549
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: October 9, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00549
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text








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The


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S MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2006


Volume: 102 No.266


ON RES I N 1100 O MA I 'IP


nI


Brother of slain

Deron Bethel injured

after alleged attack


By MARK HUMES'
. THE family of slain
Pinewobd resident Deron
S Bethel cried out for justice last
night after another son himself
a policeman was allegedly
beaten up by plainclothes offi-
cers.
Corporal Dw aN ne Bethel w as
left nursing a gaping gash in his
head after allegedly being gun-
butted outside his own police
station by force colleagues from
another unit.
Yesterday, talking wilh The
Tribune, Corporal Bethel, who
is attached to the Carmichael
branch of the CDU, relived the
Saturday night attack which left
him with a visible bruise to his
forehead and a four-inch gash
on top of his head which need-
ed 30 stitches.
"I pulled :up in the
Carmichael Station yard around
a quarter to twelve," said Cor-
poral Bethel. "I didn't see the
unmarked police car that I nor-
mally use, but I knew two offi-
cers were working. So I thought
one mightbhe.outand the other
would have been in. I knocked
on the window of the office,
which is in the back of the build-
ing." t
The officer said that hen no-
one came to open the door, he
returned to his van, and sat in
the vehicle listening to music.
About five minutes later, he


said three men armed with Uzis
and sub-machine guns
approached him in the van.
One of the men, he added.,
shone a light in his face, and it
was at that point that he recog-
nised one of the officers.
According to Corporal
Bethel. at no time did any of
the officers identify themselves
and; because he recogniSt.tre'"
one officer who was shining the
flashlight, he did not think mucl
of the matter and thought it wag
all a joke.
'I thought he was just clown-
ing around," said Corporal
Bethel. "The other two walked
around to the front of the van,
and one of them came and said
something to me."
Corporal Bethel, wearing a
tamnon his head at the tmeto
get over the flu, said that he did
not really hear what the officer
said to him, but realized the
men were seriously accosting
him when one of them "forced"
his hand inside the vehicle,
"grabbed my keys. openedlmy
door. and grabbed me out."
At that point Corporal
Bethel, whose \an has large air-
brushed pictures of his deceased
brother on both sides, said he
and one assailant began fight-
ing.'
He said that everything was
happening so quickly that he
was not able to identify himself
to the officers. I
"Right after he pulled me out
and we started hassling, he took
the sub-machine gun and he hit
SEE page 15


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'I, IIN A L C N L


SKeod Smith
Sand Kenyatta
Gibson both
Reported to
have quit their
govt posts
TWO MPs whose Cabinet
Room fist-fight caused a
Major embarrassment for the
PLP were reported to have
EL'S van pays quit their government posts
er Deron. over the weekend.
Keod Smith and Kenyatta
Gibson were said by sources
close to the PLP to have:
offered their resignations only
if guaranteed nominations for
the next general election.
And, it was claimed, they
threatened to quit as MPs if
not granted their wish, thus
possibly triggering two by-
elections at a 'time when the
Government is under fire on
several fronts.
The reported "deal" was
offered to Prime Minister Per-
rv Christie as a means of
Breaking an embarassiing
deadlock which somepoliti-
Mirt which j cal observers feel could
s wearing are undermine the government's
lood. election hopes. it was claimed.


* DWAYNE BETHEL shows his head injury.
(Photos: Felipe lajor/Tribune staff)


Ingraham hits
out at the PM's
'attitude to
the people's
business'
PRIME Minister Perry
Christie's "go-along, get along"
attitude toward the manage-
ment and co-ordination of the
people's business had failed to
produce beneficial results for
Bahamians, opposition leader
Hubert Ingraham said yester-
day.
Mr Ingraham made the
statement at a testimonial ban-
quet for Dion Foulkes hosted
by Mr Foulkes' former con-
stituency of Blue Hills to.
express their appreciation for
NMr Foulkes' service.
Mr Foulkes is now pursuing
a seat in the.MICAL con-
stituency. Former FNM deputy
leader Sidney Collie has taken
Mr Foulkes' spot in Blue Hills.-
In addressing Mr Christie's
leadership sty le, Mr Ingraham
said that it provided nothing
SSEE page 14


More convictions
handed down
in first period
of 'Swift Justice'

* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
SChief Reporter
THE courts handed down
more convictions this quarter
than the period April-June,
2006, the first period of the
pilot project of the Swift Jus-
tice programme, Deputy
Director of Public Prosecu-
tions Cheryl Grant-Bethell
said at a press conference yes-
terday.
"I would hope that this is
due to the increased effective-
ness of the agencies of govern-
ment working together. The
statistics remained the same
for Justice Allen's court when
compared to the last period,"
she said.
The Swift Justice Initiative
is a scheme designed for the
speedy and efficient disposal
of criminal matters.
SEE page 15


iI By RUPERT
MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
DESPITE assertions
made by prosecutors trying
the case of alleged drug
kingpin Samuel "Ninety"
Knowles, the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs said in a
release yesterday that from
its viewpoint no further clar-
ification is required on
Knowles' extradition.
The ministry was respond-
ing to comments made by
Knowles' prosecutor,
George Karavetzos, at
Knowles' October 3 court
appearance where he faced
arraignment in federal court
for criminal cases 1091 and
0425, conspiracy to import
cocaine and conspiracy to
SEE page 14


SEE page 15


El Paso pulls

the plug on

Bahamas LNG
* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor. .
EL PASO CORPORA-
TION, one of the three US
companies proposing to con-
struct a multi-million dollar
liquefied natural gas (LNG)
terminal and pipeline from
the Bahamas to Florida, has
pulled the plug on its plans.
The company had been
seeking to develop the Sea-
farer-project, which would
have involved the transporta-
tion of LNG by ship to a ter-
minal on Grand Bahama.
There, the LNG would have
been regasified and taken by
pipeline to Florida, where it
would have generated pow-
er.
In a letter to the Federal
Energy Regulatory Commis-
sion (FERC), El Paso's senior
attorney said the "uncertain-
ty" surrounding whether the'
Bahamas would allow the
SEE page 14


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LOCALNW


Party time at the Delaporte Fair





MAIN SECTION
Local News ..................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,12
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REAL ESTATE GUIDE 24 PAGES
N PRIME MINISTER Perry Christie dances with the Saxohs
CLASSIFIED SECTION 28 PAGES Supert'ars on Salurd~3 night at the Delaporle Fair.
(Photo: Felipd .lajor/Tribune staff)

MIAMI HERALD SECTIONS
Main ........................ ................12 Pages ..
Sports/Business ....... .........,.;. 2 Pag.es











THE Valley Boys hit the right note at Saturday fair.
(Pho/o: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)

SHOP CHINA DIRECT
Silent Diev el (cnerainr $ P M fkagir
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(Photo: Felipo Major/
Tribune staff)


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, OlTOBER 9, 2006, PAGE 3


0 In brief

Man in

court faces

charge of

sex with girl

A MAN was arraigned at
magistrate's court on Friday for
allegedly attempting to have
unlawful intercourse with a 10-
year-old girl.
It is alleged that 26-year-old
Lamont Collie attempted to
have unlawful intercourse with
the minor during December,
2005, and June, 2006. The
accused was not required to
enter a plead. He was granted
$5,000 bail because he had no
previous convictions of a similar
nature. He is to appear before
the court on January 26, 2007,
for the preliminary inquiry.

Arraigned

on unlawful

intercourse

charge

A 29-YEAR-OLD man
charged with having unlawful
intercourse with a 13-year-old
girl was arraigned in court on
Friday..
Kendrick Dean, alias "Ken-
ny", allegedly committed the
offence in July, 2006. He was
granted $5,000 bail. The accused
is to return to court on January
19, 2007, for the preliminary
inquiry.

Man accused
of robbing
another at
gunpoint

A 22-YEAR-OLD man
charged with armed .robbery
was arraigned in magistrate's
court on Friday.
John Hutchensori is accused
of robbing Sean Stubbs of $300
while armed with a handgun.
The accused was not required to
enter a plea.
Because magistrates do not
have the power to grant bail for
armed robbery charges, the
accused was remanded to Her
Majesty's Prison until January.
26, 2007, for the preliminary
inquiry.,;

16-year-old
recovers
from grenade
blast

R TRINIDAD
Port-of-Spain
A 16-YEAR-OLD boy
injured in a grenade blast in a
gang-ridden area just outside of
Trinidad's capital was recover-
ing Saturday from shrapnel
wounds, officials said, accord-
ing to Associated Press.'
Kayode Oliver wasin stable
condition at Port-of-Spain Gen-
eral Hospital after having
surgery to remove shrapnel
from various paris of his body,
hospital officials said.
Oliver :was, walking through
a grassy area Thursday evening
when a grenade buried in the
field exploded, police Cpl. Fran-
cis Vidale said. Police believe a
nearby garbage fire set. off the
grenade.
Vidale said at least one other
grenade was found and the
weapon could be linked to an
illegal arms smuggling opera-
tion run by gangs in the area.
No arrests have been made
and police were investigating.

Trinidad
players'
threat to quit
over dispute

* ThINIDAD
Port-of-Spain
TRINIDAD and Tobago
players have threatened to quit
the national team over a pay-
meni dispute w ith the country's


soccer federation. according to
Associated Press.
Trinidad captain Dwight
Yorke said Friday that the fed-
eration had pledged to give the
players additional compensa-
tion if the team played at a cer-
tain level, which Yorke said
the) had.
The federation gave the play-
ers a Saturday deadline to take
back theif'threat to quit.
"We are mortified by these
developments," general secre-
tary Richard Groden said.


Bahamas 'runs risk of not getting




special treatment on passports'


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

THE Bahamas' new policy
of "cosying up" to Cuba,
Venezuela and facilitating Chi-
na's penetration of the region
puts it at risk of being excluded
from any special treatment
from the US as it relates to
new passport regulations it has.
placed on its citizens, it was
claimed yesterday.
Dr Dexter Johnson, leader
of the Bahamian National Par-
ty, said in a press release:
"How can we expect that we
will get an extension of time
as regards the passport issue?
Why would we qualify for any
special treatment?"
After January 8, 2007, all US
citizens returning to the US by
air from a Caribbean destina-
tion are required to carry a
valid passport.
This does not include cruise
ships and the destinations of
Puerto Rico, the United States
Virgin Islands, Mexico and
Canada, which are exempted
until June 1, 2009.
Many in tourism fear this
deadline, coupled with the
apparent preferential treat-


* DR Dexter Johnson

ment given to the aforemen-
tioned destinations and the
slow response of the US in
educating its own citizens
about the deadline, could have
devastating consequences for
travel to the Bahamas, where
Americans have become accus-
tomed to entering or leaving
the country bearing only a dri-
ver's licence.
Dr Johnson said the
Bahamas needs to ensure that


it maintains its trade with trad-
ing partners who have provid-
ed the means for "our achiev-
ing the high standard of living
we enjoy today, and which we
will not enjoy for long."

Path

He added: "Bahamians need
to wake up.to the difficulties
we face in the real world, and
need to see just who clearly
understands the complexities
of our position, prepared to
address our needs in a step-
wise manner which will put us
on a path to greater dignity
and greater democracy.
"The PLP, through its rash
regional and foreign policy, has
'exhausted all our credit, so
now we have lost our previous
position, which ensured that
we would not be treated in this
manner as regards the time-
line for the passports," the
BNP leader said.
Dr Johnson said that 33
years of the Bahamas' failure
to diversify its economy had
created a "one crop economy"
almost totally reliant on busi-
ness from the US.


Man accused of stealing car


A MAN granted bail last
month appeared in court on
Friday facing charges of a sim-
ilar offence.
It is alleged that Mandel
Miller, 21, on Tuesday, Octo-
ber 3, in New Providence, stole
a black 1996 Honda Accord
valued at $5,000, the property
of Rico Thompson. The.
accused was arraigned in mag-
istrate's court number 1, Bank
Lane.
Miller was previously
charged with a similar offence
last month. On September 15,
he was arraigned in court,


4, CQW^S


along with four other' men,
where he was accused of steal-
ing several jeeps valued at
more than $20,000 each from
Friendly Ford M6tors. The
four men pleaded not guilty to
four counts of stealing and two
counts of receiving. They elect-
ed to have a summary trial in a
magistrate's court.
Court dockets stated that
the four men, being concerned
together between Tuesday,
August 1, and Friday, Sep-
tember 1, stole a gold 2006
Ford Explorer valued at
$31,193, a blue 2007 Ford


Escape valued at $25,115 and a
silver 2006 Ford Explorer val-
ued at $29,664 which, accord-
ing to the prosecutor, had not
yet been recovered.
Magistrate Carolyn Evans
granted each of the men
$20,000 bail with two sureties.
The matter was adjourned to
December 4 for trial.
Yesterday, Mandel Miller
was arraigned before magis-
trate Gomez and this time he
was remanded to Her
Majesty's Prison, pending trials
for both the September 15 and
October 6 matters.


w -w rw4u T.


hions


This "hard fact", he said,
ought to have tempered the
"rashness of the government in
taking hard-line stances against
the USA in particular and the
West in general.
"It is no good showing soli-
darity with Castro while
Bahamians starve," he said.
However, the government
has maintained that its rela-
tionships with these countries
has not put a dent in its rela-
tions with the US, which it still
considers its closest ally.
The US has, on an equally
consistent level, affirmed its inti-
mate relationship with the
Bahamas, maintaining that
countries can remain friends
while not seeing eye-to-eye on


some issues.
Dr Johnson maintains, how-
ever, that virtually all requests
for support on major foreign
policy initiatives by the UK and
the USA have been ignored by
the Bahamas and increasingly
the country has sided with Chi-
na, Venezuela and Cuba in sit-
uations which have placed the
Bahamas on the opposite side
of the USA/UK vote.
Most recently the Bahamas
voted to allow Cuba to sit on
the UN's Human Rights Coun-
cil despite encouragement from
the US that countries like the
Bahamas should not elect coun-
tries who, in their estimation,
have a history of human rights
abuses.


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- LOCAL NEWS








PAGF 4 MONDAY OCTOBER 9. 2006


I *A *TE TO THE EDITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352


Immigration's 'special' Haitian treatment


SPEAKING IN Freeport in August Immi-
gration Minister Shane Gibson told of the spe-
cial treatment given to Haitian immigrants.
He said, unlike all other nationalities that
have to pay $10,000 for permanent residency,
Haitians pay between $500 and $1,000. Those
here for less than 20 years pay $1,000 and
those here for more than 20 years.pay $500.
He, however, did not say how many Haitians
were granted permanent residence, presum-
ably with the right to work.
He said that cabinet usually meets once a
month "to give status to those who qualify,"
and he was the one "responsible for signing off
on briefs that go to cabinet, where we actual-
ly approve permanent residence and citizen-
ship." He said that 95 per cent of foreigners
sworn in every Monday in New Providence
are Haitian.
"Haitians," he told his Freeport audience,
"are treated special and when persons say we
don't treat Haitians right that is absolutely
not true."
We shall now tell the real life story of a
Haitian who has been in the Bahamas 26 years,
has a passport, an expired work permit and,
through his employer, pays National Insur-
ance, We shall then leave it to our readers to
judge for themselves the truth of Mr Gibson's
words and decide just how special is "special."
We always hear so much about.what a bur-
den Haitians are on the social services, but
what Bahamians fail to realise is that when
Haitians want to see a doctor at Princess Mar-
garet Hospital or one of the government clin-
ics they pay $30. Bahamians pay $10.
Now to get back to our Haitian. He applied
to us for a gardener's job in 1993 13 years
ago. On examination of his documents we dis-
covered that he arrived in the Bahamas in
1980 26 years ago -had a valid passport
and a work permit that had just expired. We
had the permit renewed in our name. He has a
Haitian wife, two daughters born in Haiti, but
raised in the Bahamas, and a son born in the
Bahamas. His wife and his two daughters have
residence permits to live with him in the
Bahamas at least they had until February
this year when we submitted a renewal of res-
idence for them, as well as a renewal of work
permit for him. We have heard nothing from
these applications, although we have called
Immigration and in April sent a reminder note
.to the department. And so this familyis still
here, hoping one day to experience that much
vaunted "special" treatment, and the depart-
ment's new "level of efficiency.",
We have been trying to get legal status for
the family so that they no longer have to live
like hunted animals, dodging the law. They
want to live like other human beings, free to


make a contribution to society. Because we
knew that asking consideration for them as a
family was a policy decision, we wrote to the
Minister of Immigration bringing their.case
to his attention.
Now that the gardener's eldest daughter is of
age we tried to get residence for her so that she
could work to contribute to a household of
five, living off a gardener's salary. She is an
extraordinarily bright young lady, who speaks
and writes English better than many Bahami-
ans. She was in the first graduating class at
Doris Johnson High School, a favourite of her
teachers, and among the top six in her class.
But one day she was picked up on Bay
Street in an Immigration raid. In desperation
she had got a job to help support herself and
her siblings. She was arrested. Immigration
planned to deport her to Haiti, where she has
no family and knows no one. Coming from
an overly protective home in Nassau, she
would have been abandoned in a foreign land
to the ruthless mercy of human predators. We
intervened. She was released, and sent home
where she was left to vegetate, because she had
not been given permission to work.
But, being the ambitious young woman
that she is, she was not one to sit at home
looking at four dull walls. She signed up for a
six months training programme at Doctors
Hospital to qualify as a doctor's assistant. The
hospital promised that it would hire the top
three performers from the class of 20. Of
course, she was one of the top three. She was
elated. However, when it came time to fill out
the job application form she was told that she
could not complete the form until she could get
a work permit.
A work permit? From where? How? Where
is one to find thatgovernment that claims to be
so generous?
Here is an exceptionally talented young
woman, desperately trying to make a life for
herself in a country that she has come to regard
as home. But every time she raises a head
filled with thoughts of achievement, the heavy
hand of the system grinds her back down into
the dust.
As the saying goes, "God don't like ugly."
The day of reckoning is only around the corner
for her tormentors.
Imagine since February eight months ago.
in a system boasting a new level of effi-
ciency, to have heard nothing from renewal of
permit applications. And after many persis-
tent calls over the years for a decision on the
gardener's permanent residence status, and
having been told.on February 15, 2005 last
year- that we would have an.answer the next
day, we are still waiting. Exactl\ one year and
eight months ago, the next day is yet to come.


What demons



are roaming



around here?


EDITOR, The Tribune
I AM as mad as hell right
now and the 'caveman' mental-
ity, which we all tend to develop
sometimes, is struggling, vio-
lently, to come out. The recent
reports about a young girl being
abducted; sexually molested and
left for dead have done some-
thing to me which I am afraid IP
will never be able to erase from
my mental psyche. There are, I
contend, demons on the loose
right here in The Bahamas.
Seven years ago, while
attending a regular Sunday wor-
ship service at my church home,
Evangelistic Temple, I asked
the Yahweh to grant me the
privilege of fathering an addi-
tional child. I specifically asked
Him for a female child. Lo, and
behold, less than a'month later
my dear wife informed me that
she was with child. Of course,
when the child was born it was a
female, just as I had requested
and she looks just like how the
order was placed. Glory be to
God.
She is now six going on seven
and is developing into a fine
young child. Only a parent who
is able to feel for his/her
child/children is capable of
understanding the love and con-
cern which other parents may
have for their children.
I do not know the parents of
the child who was allegedly


assaulted but I am able to
empathise with the man who
was pictured being subdued by
police officers. As a trained
lawyer and a person who con-
siders myself a Christian, let me
say right now, up front, that if
anyone were to do to my six-
year-old daughter what was
allegedly done in the instant
case, without commenting on
the available evidence, I would
haveabsolutely no hesitation in
committing what may be a
"criminal" act on the perpetra-
tor.
Having said this, it is now
mandatory for the learned
Attorney General to show her
determination to bring "swift
justice" to matters of this
heinous and totally sickening
nature. The 'laws must be
amended and given iron teeth
to deal with paedophiles and
other deviants who would seek
to endanger the social and
moral fabric of our underage
and possibly gullible children.
Life imprisonment and sev-
eral strokes of the cat-o-nine
tails, going in and coming out
of prison should become the law
of the land in cases of sexual
assault and other molestation


on under aged children. In fact, 1
I would even go so far as to '
demand that actual castration,:.
whether by chemical or the sur-
geon's knife, be a part of this
"swift justice" scenario. v
This is not a knee jerk reac- a
tion but one which is reflective i
of the collective repugnance ofi
right thinking Bahamians. With
all of the of age nubile females i
in this country, just begging for q
a half way good man, it escapes a
me when I see and hear abput
big rusty men (and some!t
women too) molesting or1
assaulting children. The Devil 1
is still a liar and I invite the"
slumbering Bahamas Christian',
Council to issue one of its salu- '
brious press statements on this a
disgusting issue.
As a father, my prayers andl
thoughts go out to the victim, her:
parents and other close relatives.
I wish to assure them that "weep-
ing may endure for a night.....but:
that joy, unspeakable joy will
come in the morning...." God3
will not allow what appears to
be an injustice to just go away. I
Indeed, He plainly told us:
"Vergeance is mine ...." God '
cannot lie and He will never
allow a single one of His words
to fail. To God then, in all of 1
these trying things, be the glory.,
ORTLAND H BODIES JR
Nassau
September 2006


Surprise at treatment by media,


EDITOR, The Tribune
I WAS honestly surprised
that today you carry a story
where you criticise Pierre
Dupuch for his comments on
theoJeff Lloyd Show, More 9.4
and suggest there were a num-
ber if "irate" callers to the show.
Those who are annoyed with
Mr Pierre Dupuch can't take
his criticism and opinion then I
suggest Bahamian democracy
is being weakened as sure as
the sun this morning rose in the
east there were many FNM


operatives calling in to counter
what Mr Dupuch said.
True or untrue that in today's
Bahamian politics seems not to
matter but I will argue strongly
that Mr Dupuch is an hon-
ourable, man and-would.:nr-oi
have stated what he stated with-
out there being substance and
truth.
It was certainly interesting in
what we all heard so loud when
a certain caller was slow in read-
'ing off a question to Mr Dupuch
that someone in the background
told the man...Hurry up read


what we gave you.
It seems sentationalism is thea
way of life for the Bahamiant
newspapers and the record,
shows that no newspaper has
ever made so much money as,
they are today. Just look at the,
column inches of advertising all
thanks to the strong economy
and business that the Govern-
ment of Perry Christie has cre-
ated.
J MURPHY
Nassau,
October 5th, 2006,


We need to hold more referenda


EDITOR, The Tribune
WHY doesn't the PLP have a
referendum on some of the very
important decisions they are
making on behalf of Bahamians?
It seems no one I speak to
wants the gas pipeline. Florida
does not want it, and neither do
most of us.
Let us put the political con-
troversy aside and consider the
people who actually live here.
Please let US decide if we want
to live next to a potential ter-


rorist target/health hazard/pos-
sibe environmental disaster.
To make the referendum
worthwhile there needs to be
some disclosure. What did the
environmental impact study
show? Do we have the resources
to.deal with a disaster? We
couldn't save the Straw Market
from a little fire so can we save
oceans and islands and how
much will it cost? Will the USA
help us physically and financial-
ly if there is a leak? Do we have
their support in writing?


How come mi monneN pa\v
for studies and documents I
cannot have reasonable access
to?
I want to continue to live in
democracy. I demand informed
consent. I want politicians to!
realise.they are the servants o
the people, not the "boss" oft
the people. My next vote will
not be for the PLP.
SARA APPLETON
Nassau
October 6 2006'
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-







MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2006, PAGE 5


Responsibility for managing growth



does not come from the outside


It is obvious enough that
The Bahamas is now
embarking on one of those
transformational periods of eco-
nomic growth (possibly the
biggest yet) that have left their
marks on the country every cen-
tury or so.
And just as in all of the rest,
the primary factors that will dri-
ve the impending boom have
next to nothing to do with the
internal politics of The
Bahamas.
If you ask the principals of
the various pending or
planned investment projects
around the country, many of
them will tell you frankly that
the reason for their choice of
The Bahamas is that Florida,
the obvious first choice in
many instances, is "running
out of space". This is so espe-
cially in the case of develop-
ments centered around mari-
nas, or whose central compo-
nent is residential, rather than
traditionally touristic.
The Ginn project in Grand
Bahama, slated to comprise the
largest single investment in the
entire region, is a good example
of a largely geographic incen-
tive luring an investor to The
Bahamas.
South Florida, only 40 miles
away, now has a coastline of vir-
tually uninterrupted high-rise
developments of the kind
planned for West End. By
choosing the latter as their latest
locale, the Ginn people could
offer all of the conveniences of
being in Florida (including iden-,
tical proximity to other parts of
the US and the world), but with
an intriguing twist.
And like much of what is
happening elsewhere in The
Bahamas, the effects of a pro-
ject of the magnitude of Ginn
are likely to be of significant
benefit to the standard of liv-
ing of Bahamians. On the other
hand, policymakers will need to
closely monitor transformations
in the nature of the tourist
industry and adjust incentives


and related policies to maximise
benefit to Bahamians.
Whatever balance successive
administrations negotiate
between the interests of com-
munity and investor, any of
them (including the present
one) will have a hard time con-
vincing thinking Bahamians to
credit them with the basic buoy-
ancy of the Bahamian econo-
my in the present era.
All of this is not to fault suc-
cessive governments unduly, or
to deny them due credit for
ensuring the basic stability and
business environment that are a
pre-requisite for investors (no-
one is likely to be seen running *


We have
already, in many
ways, become an
extension of the
United States
economy, though
of course not in
the sinister sense
that alarmists
would have us
believe.


to Haiti to invest should The
Bahamas "run out of space"
anytime soon).
But it is nonetheless an unde-
niable reality that we have
already, in many ways, become
an extension of the United
States economy, though of
course not in the sinister sense
that alarmists would have us
believe. As a unitary market,
we compete not against, but in
many ways within the economy
.of our northern neighbour.
Visitors to Florida will note
advertisements of the Resi-
dences at Atlantis around Mia-
mi International Airport. These


PERSPECTIVES


AND R EW
advertisements (which will no
doubt soon be joined by ones
featuring Ginn and Bah Mar)
differ from ads of competing
properties in Florida only in zip
code (or lack of one).

T he realities of this inte-
gration (and the obvi-
ous fact that it will mean con-
tinued, and at times dramatic,
economic growth for the small-
er economy) mean that our gov-
ernment, while it invites con-
gratulation for it, is left with a
somewhat limited role in its
own economy.
But it is a role, nonetheless,
and one that has all too often
been neglected. Firstly, while
all the fanfare is underway, very
little is. being said or done to
prepare the ground for all of
the investment about to be
unleashed throughout the coun-
try.
Unless local regulatory and
physical infrastructure (not to
mention deeply ingrained local
attitudes) are addressed, the
impending boom will leave us
with unwanted legacies for gen-
erations.
On a trip last week to one of
the smallest and least developed
communities in the country, I
was surprised and amused to
hear locals express concern that
planned developments near
their community will bring the
risk of 'brilandisation'.
As a son of Harbour Island
(at least if we allow for the 'gen-
erational skip' theory) I instant-
ly empathised with their, senti-
ment.
For while it is touted in inter-
national publications and appar-
ently still loved by the kind of
foreigners whose love is an eco-
nomic blessing, Harbour Island,
is to many of us the essencerof


A L LE


development gone Wrong on a
little island. Its infrastructure is
appallingly out of step with its
level of development, it is dirty,
run down, and increasingly
ghettoised.
The rules that should be
enforced to keep order and
beauty on such a little cay are
routinely ignored on Briland
and the simplest matters of self-
organisation seem beyond the
capacity of the community. The
tiny streets now bustle with cars,
where once only golf-carts were
seen.
The risk that similar plights



MONDAY,
OCTOBER 9TH


6:30am
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4:00
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6:00
6:25
6:30
7:00
8:00
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
1:30am


Bahamas @ Sunrise Live
Immediate Response
ZNS News Update (Live)
Immediate Response cont'd
Caribbean Passport
Ethnic Health America
One Thousand Dollar Bee
Aqua Kids
David Pitts
Bishop Neil Ellis
Little Robots
Carmen San Diego
ZNS News Update
The Envy Life ,
Andiamo
Gospel Grooves
Life Line
News Night 13 Freeport
Bahamas Tonight
Bahamas @ Sunrise Prime
Time Special
Legends
Island Life Destinations
Fight For Life: India
News Night 13
Bahamas Tonight
Immediate Response
Community Page 1540AM


await other parts of the
Bahamas when they become

The realities of
this integration
mean that our
government,
while it invites
congratulation
for it, is left with
a somewhat lim-
ited role in its
own economy.
I
host to large developments is;
under the present circum-


stances, more a certainty than a
risk.
Communities with no tradi-
tion of self-regulation and
whose infrastructural needs
have been treated as an after-
thought by central government
will now become appendages
to billion dollar Meccas. The
results are obvious.
The answer to all this is far
from simple. It may even sound
like a trite observation to say
that it should ideally have been
dealt with back in the 1960s at
latest. But what is clearly
required today, however late,
is a government commitment
to promote robust communi-
ties, strengthen (and depoliti-
cise) local government and
undertake massive infrastruc-
tural and public education exer-
cises throughout the. country.


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Task force focus on domestic violence
,


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT Domestic-related
homicides have accounted for between
40 and 60 per cent of murders in the
country since 2000, according to Dr
Sandra Dean-Patterson.
Dr Patterson, chairperson of Domes-
tic Violence Task Force, said that
domestic violence/intimate partner vio-
lence has been recognized interna-
tionally as a problem of epidemic pro-
portions.
"Research has shown that
unchecked domestic violence becomes
an incubator for social violence," she
said.
Dr Patterson was speaking at a town
meeting in Freeport on the newly-pro-
posed Domestic Violence (Protection
Orders) Act.
She explained that existing domestic
violence legislation, which was tacked


on to the Sexual Offences Act 1991,
does not acknowledge relationships
where people live together or share an
intimate partner relationship outside
of marriage.
This, she said, leaves a large group of
persons in society without the ability to
access a protective order.
She also pointed out that "binding
over" orders as a form of protection for
victims of violent and abusive partners
have not worked and resulted in
increased incidents of domestic vio-
lence.
According to a survey-taken in 2004,
the police station in southern district of
New Providence received 668 com-
plaints of domestic violence. She also
reported that 40.3 per cent of women in
an emergency room survey in 2000
reported physical violence.
Dr Patterson believes that domestic
violence should be viewed as a crime.
"It is a misuse of power over the vic-


tim. It is about the abuser's desire to
exert power and control that can result
in injury, physical or psychological, or
even worse, death," she said.
She stated that new legislation is
expected to address shortcomings of
the Sexual Offences Act of 1991.

Definition

The new act defines domestic vio-
lence as physical, psychological/emo-
tional, sexual and financial. It defines
harassment as persistent verbal abuse,
threats of physical violence, persis-
tent following, damage to property,
unwanted physical, verbal sexual
advances, and a pattern of behaviour
that undermines emotional well-
being.
The Act further defines partners as
"a party to a common law relationship
between a man and woman who either


live with or lived with each other as if
husband and wife; and a person who is
having or had a common law relation-
ship but not living in the same house-
hold."
Dr Patterson said that stalking,
which includes persistent following,
watching home or job etc., persistent
telephoning, is also covered in the Act.
An application for a protection order
can be made by spouse, partner, mem-
ber of household, commissioner of
police or social worker.
Under the new act, a magistrate is
empowered to refer for psycho social
intervention, counselling, parenting
education, provide interim protec-
tion order and attach a power of
arrest.
The penalties under the Act include
compensation not to exceed $10,000. A
breach of order is punishable by a fine
of $5,000 or imprisonment for 12
months or both. The protection order


remains in place for no more than
three years.
Dr Patterson said the Act gives
police the power to enter the premises
to give assistance if they suspect a pro-
tection order is being violated, or if
they suspect that an occupant has suf-
fered physical injury or is in danger of
it.
The police will be able to assist vic-
tims by obtaining medical treatment, or
getting them to a place of safety. They
will also be able to accompany them to
get belongings and inform them of ser-
vices and their rights.
She also stressed that protection
orders are confidential. She warned
that information cannot be published
or broadcast or disseminated to the
public on the identity of persons as it
relates to a protection order.
Dr Patterson said that persons found
guilty of this are subjected to a $5,000
fine.


Why you vex?


* By KRYSTEL ROLLE
"I am vex because the garbage
collectors in my area are late and
I've had numerous bags of
garbage in my home for quite
some time now, which is creating
a very unbearable odour in my
living room. It has been a week
and three days since their last
collection. On top of that the


garbage is already full outside
and if I put the other bags along-
side the trash can the dogs will
get to them and when the
garbage collectors come they
won't pick up the errant trash.
Something needs to be done in
the VERY NEAR FUTURE
before persons start dumping
trash in the road."
Unhappy Camper


"I vex because after leaving
my house, to go to a game, I
noticed that my tyre was flat on
the left side and I had to hobble
all the way back home for a
spare. Upon inspection I found
two holes in my tyre. And seeing
that my car was parked at home
the whole time that day, and
there were no sharp objects in
my yard, obviously this was a
case of sabotage. If you have a
problem with me, tell me my
tyres didn't do anything wrong."
TIRED out
"I am vex at these people who
always taking their slow time to
cross the road. If I take the time
out to let you across the street
the least you could do is hurry
and get over. This message is not
for elderly or disabled people.
But all the girls who trying to be
cute and the guys who are trying
to act hard."
Road Hog
WHY YOU HAPPY?
"I am happy because despite
my monthly struggle to live and
pay bills with the salary from my
regular job I am a young gifted


person who is able to make extra
money from my other talents.
Thereby I have recently ini-
tialised two projects with two
leading business establishments
and I remain very confident that
my endeavours will not go unre-
warded."
Penny pincher
"I am happy because I will
finally get to see Avvy perform.
I have been waiting to watch his
performance since I heard the
song 'Roach on my Bread' for
the first time. I can't wait till the
concert tonight. I'm also happy
to see Bahamian artists doing so
weIlJ."
: Av y fan .*; p. ;** o /


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2006


, *' ^






MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2006, PAGE 7


SIn brief

Memorial

for Daniel

Smith held

in Texas

FAMILY and friends gath-
ered in a Texan town to
mourn the death of Anna
Nicole Smith's 20-year-old son
Daniel, who died last month
while visiting his mother in
the Bahamas after she gave
birth to a daughter.
According to the Associat-
ed Press, about 50 people
attended the hour-long
memorial service on Saturday
at First Baptist Church of
Mexia for the son of Anna
Nicole, a former Playboy,
Playmate and reality televi-
sion star, and her former hus-
band, Billy Smith, who still
lives in Mexia.
Billy Smith looked grief-
stricken during and after the
service, the Waco Tribune-
Herald reported in its Sun-
day.online editions.
Relatives remembered that,
before moving away with his
mother, Daniel Smith liked
to wear cowboy apparel and
ride horses in this town of
about 6,000, located about 85
miles south of Dallas.
He died September 10 in
his mother's room at Doc-
tors Hospital, Nassau.
According to a private
autopsy, he died of an acci-
dental lethal combination of
methadone and two anti-
depressants.
His cousins recalled catch-
ing frogs and playing Teenage
Mutant Ninja Turtles with
him as a boy. Full-size cutouts
of the turtles Leonardo was
Daniel's favourite lined the
front of the church.
As a relative sang a song
she wrote upon learning of
his death, other relatives -
most of whom haven't seen
Daniel since he left town -
wiped tears.
SDaniel's great-grandfather,
Gus Moser, eulogised Daniel,
Though he said he didn't,
know Daniel, he spoke to the
crowd about salvation.
Billy Smith and Anna
Nicole, then known as Vickie
Lynn Hogan, met while work-
ing at Jim's Krispy Chicken
in Mexia. When they got mar-
ried in 1985, Anna Nicole was
17 and Billy Smith was 16.
They divorced about a year
after Daniel's 1986 birth.
In 1994, she married Texas
oil tycoon J. Howard Mar-
shall II, when she was 26 and
he was 89. He died the fol-
lowing year and she's since
been embroiled in a legal dis-
pute over his multi-million
dollar estate.


TROPICA

EXTERMINATORSI I


* SIR Clement Maynard


FORMER Deputy Prime
Minister Sir Clement Maynard
reflected on 33 years of inde-
pendence during an address to
Bahamian exiles in Miami.
"The vision for independence
by the founding fathers of The
Commonwealth of The
Bahamas was not something
that we were so smart to think
of by ourselves, I can assure
you," he told an audience at
Goldie's Conch House Restau-
rant and Lounge for the
Bahamian-American Heritage
Forum series sponsored by the
Bahamas Consulate General in
Miami.
"We were being led by the
Spirit and, in that context, some
providential hand was there
showing us the way, as we felt
that we wanted to establish the
finest and the freest country in
the western hemisphere."
Sir Clement said: "I do feel,
and strongly so, this is the.right
audience to be speaking,to
because, you here assembled
and others like you, have con-
tributed much to what has hap-
pened over the last 33 years."
Consul General Mrs Alma
Adams said Sir Clement fol-
lowed several distinguished
Bahamians living in Florida
who had addressed the lun-
cheon series, such as attorney
Jacob Rose and Commissioner
Dennis Moss.
Also at the forum were sev-
eral Bahamians noted for their
involvement in the political are-
na in Florida, including Vice-
Mayor Thomas Dorsett, who
was born in Exuma, James
Moss, leader in the Bahamian-
American community, Mr Brian
Williams of Exuma parentage,
who works in the international
jaljils )office of Florida's Go\-
ernor Jeh'Buh., and Mr Joe
Delaney' fonner nmaarigr of tlle
Ministry of Tourism's Grand
Bahama office and now a lead-
ing Republican in South Florida.
Additionally; Florida Sena-
tor and former Secretary'of
State, Senator George Fire-
stone, made a presentation to
Sii Clement and brought greet-
ings from Governor Jeb Bush.
In recounting those years
before independence, Sir
Clement spoke of the founding
fathers' knowledge, noting that
"We knew that next door was a
very powerful country, strong
for democracy and freedom.
"We decided to look at what
they had written and what they
were doing and to also look at
what was happening elsewhere,
to find a way of doing some-
thing which would make us look
back and feel that we had con-
tributed something to the world.
"I often tell youngsters when
I see them getting out of hand
or not understanding what was
done, or what is being done,
that they are able to behave that
way because they are free and
because their parents, who were


unable to enjoy even a little bit
of what they are enjoying, gave
them the opportunities to have
options."
He said he knows of some
youngsters who are not yet 40
years old and have already
moved on to their second suc-
cessful career.

Independence

Sir Clement said when Major-
ity Rule came about in 1967, it
was expected that the internal
self-government practised at the
time would bring about inde-
pendence as a natural step.
"Naturally, I say, because in
1963, when the constitution for
internal self-government came
about, the British government
was already willing for The
Bahamas and nearly every oth-
er colony to gain their indepen-
dence and those who went
before us, the founders, had dis-
cussed independence, but they
were not yet ready for it.
"But we thought that some-
thing ought to happen, and
therefore we consulted Bahami-
ans, and all sorts of things hap-
pened by way of consultation."
He said rallies, concerts and


meetings were held so people
had a chance to know what,
why and how things were going
to be done.
Sir Clement said mistakes
were made along the way, but
there was good leadership and
he believed that among that
leadership would have been the
Lord himself. "But there was not
one man in the government who
had any previous experience of
governing a country," he added.
Sir Clement then spoke about
Bahamianisation and noted that
The Bahamas is for Bahamians
and anyone who lived in The
Bahamas.
This led to the decision, he
said, to have the country's own
Commissioner of Police,
National Insurance, Defence
Force, Central Bank and other
institutions.
He noted that the College of
The Bahamas, soon to become
the University of The Bahamas,
was important, as the institu-
tion which would help to free
the people.
In closing, Sir Clement
thanked officials in Florida who
helped Bahamians to obtain an
education in Lindsay-Hopkins
Institute and other institutions
throughout Florida.


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I Iit- I rIIDUINE


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PAGE 8, MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2006 THE TRIBUNE


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Bahamian elected



chairman of



awards council


BAHAMIAN Dr Davidson
Hepburn has been elected
chairman of the Caribbean
Award Scheme Council.
This body, known as the
CASC, comprises 14 countries
and was formed 18 years ago.
In his role as chairman, Dr
Hepburn will be responsible for
ensuring the CASC meets the
objective of giving support to
and helping develop the award
programme among countries in
the Caribbean in accordance
with the declaration, principles
and code of practice adopted
by the International Award
Association on May, 1988.
Dr Hepburn, chairman of the
Governor General's Youth
Award in the Bahamas,
expressed his delight at being
elected to the chairmanship of
the regional body and said he
looks forward to working with
all the other chairpersons.
CASC member countries are
Bermuda, Cayman Islands,
Jamaica, Antigua and Barbu-
da, Dominica, St Lucia, St Vin-


* DR Davidson Hepburn is pictured here (standing) at the
recent Caribbean meeting.


cent and the Grenadines, Bar-
bados, Trinidad and Tobago,
Guyana, Grenada, British Vir-
gin Islands, Montserrat and the
Bahamas.
One requirement to be con-


sidered for the CASC leader-
ship post, or any executive post,
is that one must be the chair-
person of his/her country's
National Award Authority
National Council.
Dr Hepburn has been chair-
man of the GGYA National
Council for five years. The
national executive director of
the GGYA, Ms Denise Mor-
timer, reports directly to Dr
Hepburn on the day-to-day
operation of the programme.
The GGYA is a programme of
voluntary activities for young
people between 14 and 25.,
It is an exciting self-develop-
ment progamme available.to all
young people worldwide, equip-
ping them with life skills to
make a difference to them-
selves, their communities and
the world.
The GGYA is operating in
35 units in the Bahamas, includ-
ing the Family Islands.


Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Call us
on 322-1986 and share
your story.


OFFICE SPACE


AVAILABLE
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Vacancy
Manager III (Human Resources Department)
Princess Margaret Hospital
Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post of Manager III,
Human Resources Princess Margaret Hospital, Public Hospitals Authority,
Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-
Bachelors Degree in Busness Administration, Management or equivalent or related field and
three (3) years relevant experience in Human Resources Management with excellent computer
skills.
The Manager II as a part of the Human Resources team at Princess Margaret Hospital will
report to the Senior Manager Human Resources Department and will be responsible for all
Human Resources matters for area (s) assigned.
Responsibilities and Duties
1. Processes recommendations for:
Probationary appointments
Confirmations in substantive posts
Promotions and reclassification
Benefits under the Authority's policies
Benefits under the law, e.g Employment Act, Pensions Act and National Insurance
Act
Employee transfers and.secondment
Employee grievances
Disciplinary actions and penalties
Involuntary and voluntary terminations
2. Liaises with and assists Administrative Officers and Area Supervisors to ensure
all personnel/human resources matters are handled in keeping with the rules and
regulations of the organization, ensuring that matters are processed as expeditiously
as possible
3. Liaises with the Payrolls Unit on issues relating to staff salary and financial
clearance to ensure that they are processed in a timely manner.
4. Assist with the coordination of Human Resources routine and special projects.
5. Managers the Performance Appraisal process for staff within assigned areas of
responsibility, ensuring that they are prepared, distributed reviewed and corrected
as needed.
6. Keeps an up to date detailed records, of all applicant for positions within assigned
area and ensures that all applications are acknowledge in a timely manner.
7. Participates in the interview process, completes background check and processing of
appointments.
8. Completes staff orientation process.
9. Participates as a member of Human Resources Department Internal
Executive Committee and Human Resources Management Committee.
Letters of application, resume, documentary evidence of qualifications and three
(3) references should be submitted, no later than 20th October, 2006 to the Director
Human Resources, Public Hospitals P.O. Box N-8200, or 1st Floor Corporate Office,
Dockendale House, West Bay Street.(Empoyees of the Public Hospitals Authority must
apply through their Head of Department).


YOUR CONCN ECri i IHE A 9OR1D


Self Insurance Tender


The Bahamas Telecommunications
Company Limited (BTC)


BTC is intending to transfer its Property/Business Interruption
risk from a traditional "All Risk" program to a 100% self
insured plan.

BTC is hereby inviting qualified Companies/Firms to present
a creative cost effective conceptual tender including a scope
of work detailing how your Company/Firm proposes to design,
develop and implement the Self Insurance Plan.

Tender Packages can be collected from the Security's Desk
of B 2 John F. Drive Nassau, Bahamas between the hours
of 9:0.. m and 5:00pm.

The deadline for submission of proposals is on or before
5:00pm Monday, November 17t', 2006.

Only Companies/Firms who have experience in creating and
implementing self ir surance and alternative risks transfer
plans need apply.

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2006













US Bill on internet



gambling: is it



morality or is it




protectionism?


* By Sir Ronald Sanders
(The writer is a business exec-
utive and former Caribbean
Ambassador at the World Trade
Organisation).

THE value of publicly-
traded Internet gaming
companies in Britain and their
subsidiaries in the Caribbean has
been savaged by a Bill adopted
in late September by the US
Congress making it illegal for
banks and credit card compa-
nies to make payment to foreign
online gambling sites. Over
US$7 billion was wiped off the
market value of companies that
were worth US$12 billion.
Revenues to the UK govern-
ment and more significantly
to governments of Caribbean
countries such as Antigua and
Barbuda, Belize and Costa Rica
- will be reduced immediately
and employment will be
adversely affected.
If the United States was not
the main centre of the world for
gambling, the Bill; ostensibly
adopted on the basis of morali-
ty; may have been acceptable.
But, the fact is that the US is
the major centre in the world
for gambling. Five years ago,
spending in US land-based casi-
nos alone reached almost
US$26 billion. It is much more
today. And, there is no effort
in Congress to close down US
casinos on any moral basis.
To the contrary, Nevada Con-
gressman Jon Porter introduced
a Bill last May to study whether
Sn-line' gambling-sites- run by
IiS companies, could be regu-
lated effectlivelh. Mr Porter'
Bill is backed Kb casinos whos-
lobby, the American Gaming
Association, is on record as say-
ing that US based casinos would
like to open on line.
Further, the Bill, passed by
Congress in September,
expressly makes legal bets
through the Internet on US
horse racing, US Internet lot-
teries, US fantasy sports and,
more critically, allows states and
Native American tribes to
authorise Internet-gaming of
almost any kind that occurs
wholly within the borders of the
state in which they are located.
So, even though the moral
argument is being touted, and the
religious right in the US has wel-
comed the Bill, it has little to do
with morals and more to do with
stopping Internet gaming com-
panies from outside the US pro-
viding services to US customers.
Bob Goodlatte, the Con-
gressman from Virginia,
summed up this protectionist
position when he declared that
the Bill would stop "US $6 bil-
lion from being sucked out of
the economy" annually.
It is this very protectionist
position that caused successive
governments of the small
SCaribbean Island, Antigua and
Barbuda, to bring a case against
the US to the World Trade

It has little to do
with morals and
more to do with
stopping internet
gaming companies
from outside the
US providing
services to US c
customers.

Organization (WTO), com-
plaining that iri its commitments
under the General Agreement
on Trade in Services (GATS),
the US bound itself to provide
market access and national
treatment to the cross-border
supply of foreign services that
come within the category of
"other recreational services"
which includes gambling and
betting services.

A ntigua and Barbuda
pointed out to a
WTO Panel back in 2003 that
while many US operators are
allowed to offer gambling ser-
vices in the US, US authorities


THE E-CLASS SALOONS


.?


WOD ht

WORLD VIEW-


M SIR Ronald Sanders


take the view that all gaming
services offered on a cross-bor-
der basis from abroad are
unlawful. Up to then, the US
'had enforced its claims admin-
istratively by blocking credit
card transactions and penalis-
ing credit card companies and
banks that facilitate them, and
by punishing US persons who
own gaming entities that pro-
vide services to US residents.
Since then, US authorities
have arrested officials of UK-
based on line gaming compa-
nies, and now Congress has

The WTO should
take a very dim
view of this very
protectionist
development once
Antigua and
Barbuda draws it
to their attention.

adopted the Unlawful Internet
Gambling Enforcement Act
which effectively turns into law
the administrative action they
have been taking.
But, the law just like the
administrative actions adds
up to a violation by the US of its
GATS commitment.
A WTO Panel has already
ruled that the US has to bring
its laws into conformity with its
international obligations. This
new Bill, which specifically per-
mits a whole host of domestic
Internet betting opportunities, is
even more blatantly discrimi-
natory against the supply of
gaming services to the US from
other countries than US law was
before Antigua and Barbuda
won its ruling from the WTO.
Therefore, the WTO should
take a very dim view of this very
protectionist development once
Antigua and Barbuda draws, it
to their attention.

It does appear that some
Congressmen, especially
Representative Jim Leach of
Iowa and Senator Bill Frist who
piloted the Bill in the House
and Senate, had their eyes on
the upcoming mid-term elec-
tions in the US where they
hoped to drum up votes from
the religious right.
Significantly, the very people
.that the US Congress suppos-
edly voted to protect from
Internet gambling have
expressed outrage at the
Bill. Michael Bolcerek, the Pres-
ident of the US Poker Players
Association, is reported as stat-
ing that "allowing the Bill to
become law would run contrary
to public opinion" and "the mil-
lions of Americans who enjoy
playing this great game will
have the last voice in the debate
comes Election day".'
The context of the Bill's pas-
sage also raises serious ques-
tions of just how much study
Senators gave to it, and the
extent to which they really
understood that it was also a
trade issue with implications for
the US in the WTO.


Mercedes-Benz


The Senate adopted the Bill in
a late night pre-recess session of
Congress. It was tagged on at
the last minute to the Safe Port
Act that was designed to stop
companies from other countries
(such as almost happened with a
Dubai company earlier this year)
having security rights at a US
port. Many of those who voted
for the Bill to cramp Internet
gambling were really concerned
about the security of US ports.
Sharp teeth will be given to
the Bill after the President signs
it into law. Then, the US Trea-
sury Department, the Federal
Reserve and the Department
of Justice will write the regula-
tioris to enforce the law.
It looks, therefore, as if the
battlefield for this issue is where
Antigua and Barbuda took it in
the first place the WTO. If
not, a sad precedent will be
accepted by which the il
advised domestic legislation oa
countries, even if it is passed by
legislators without full under
standing of its implications, will
prevail over international trade
rules to the detriment of busi
ness and employment.
Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com


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THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 10, MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2006 THE TRIBUNE


I


* SOME New Providence residents say the problem with "blood-
like" water (shown) has got so bad, and continued for so long, that
they are considering leaving the Bahamas.
(FILE photo)


* By ALISON LOWE
COMPLAINTS continue to mount over
the quality of water in certain parts of
New Providence, with some residents say-
ing the problem with "blood-like" and
"unusable" water has got so bad, and con-
tinued for so long, that they are consider-
ing leaving the Bahamas.
"We don't know what to do," said one
Person who called The Tribune yesterday,
days after complaints made by other resi-
dents had featured on the front page of the
paper, "My husband and I are ready to
leave the country.
"They are charging us $300-$400 a


month for water we can't use."
According to the woman, the water is
not fit to drink, bathe in, or wash clothes
with. It has also cost her a washing
machine and a dishwasher as both have
malfunctioned as a result of the "rusty"
water.
"I have to take my better linens to
Superwash," said the woman, who added
that the problem has been going on "for
months".
"I wouldn't even give it to a cat or a
dog," she said and even suggested that
the water would be dangerous to pour out
in the yard, considering the amount of
metals and other contaminates it appeared


to contain.
Furthermore, the woman said the
Water and Sewerage Corporation had had
"the gall" to inform her that the problem
lies in her own system despite the fact,
the woman claims, that her entire neigh-
bourhood is affected.
"I'm afraid of what's coming out of
there God knows what's in it," she said.
She recalled how months prior the
Water and Sewerage Corporation had
promised residents new water filters. "But,
guess what?" she said, "We haven't seen
one yet!"
The Water and Sewerage Corporation
failed to respond to Tribune calls.


* Road Town, Tortola, British Virgin Islands: Nine senior Customs officers received international-
ly-recognised certificates on Thursday after successfully completing a Train the Trainers workshop
organised by the British Virgin Islands Tourist Board. The training comes as part of the customer ser-
vice component of the Tourism Industry Service Standards (TISS) programme, initiated by Chief Min-
ister and Minister of Tourism Dr D Orlando Smith just over two years ago. TISS is aimed at improv-
ing the quality of service delivered to 1isilors to Ihe lerrilor) and to customers in general.


Toastmasters' officers installed


YOUR CONNtCr iOd TO THE n 'ORLD


VACANCY NOTICE

The Bahamas Telecommunication Company Limited invites applications from
suitably qualified. individuals for the position of MANAGER, Interconnection
Specialist/Legal & Regulatory Affairs Department.
OBJECTIVE
To develop, manage and oversee inter-carrier arrangements with other operators
primarily from a business perspective but also for regulatory purposes in order
to proactively manage BTC's reference interconnection offer interconnection
agreements and inter-carrier arrangements and develop potential markets for
BTC wholesale carrier services.
REPORTING RELATIONSHIP
This position will report directly to the Vice President, Legal & Regulatory Affairs
and Interconnection and will handle the following specific duties.

SPECIFIC DUTIES AND ACCOUNTABILITIES
1. To address all matters related to inter-carrier interconnection provisioning
including co-location and infrastructure sharing;
-2. To assist in the development and implementation of a RIO (Reference
Interconnection Offer);
3. To assist in the development of strategy outline for inter-connection Wholesale
carrier services;
4. To co-ordinate review and resolve interconnection agreement related
complaints against BTC at the preliminary stage;
5. To negotiate terms and conditions and amendments for interconnection
agreements;
6. To assist with the PUC on matters related to interconnection compliance
and regulation under the PUC licence issued to BTC;
7. To liaise with other licensed telecommunications providers on matters of
interconnection from a business perspective.
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS
1. Bachelor of Science Degree in Telecommunications or Electronics Engineering
or related qualification with a minimum of ten (10) years work experience.
Possession of a Master's degree in Business Administration would be an
asset.
2. Experience in the telecommunications industry would also be an asset.
3. Strong leadership and organizational skills.
4. Strong written and verbal communications skills.
All applications are to be received at BTC's Head Office, 21 John F. Kennedy
Drive, no later than Thursday October 20, 2006 and addressed as follows:
VICE PRESIDENT
HUMAN RESOURCES, TRAINING & SAFETY
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANY LIMITED
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

RE: MANAGER, INTERCONNECTION SPECIALIST/LEGAL & REGULATORY AFFAIRS DEPARTMENT


Chickcharnie Hotel in Fresh
Creek.
Oaths of office were offici-
ated by area 44 governor of
Bahamas division of Toast-
masters Pamela D Rolle.
During her talk, Toastmaster
Rolle admonished officers to


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make Club Cousteau a house-
hold name so that it and the
Toastmasters programme will
not remain "the best kept
secret" in the communities of
Central Andros.
She advised them to build
the kind of club that future
clubs formed in Andros would
want to emulate.
It was revealed at the recent
Area 44 speech contest in Nas-
sau that another club for Cen-
tral Andros and one for North
Andros are on the drawing
board and expected to come
on stream in the near future.
The weekend of festivities
included an officer training
seminar covering all aspects of
club management. Presenters
assisting Area Governor Rolle
were from the Healing Com-
municators Toastmasters Club
7178: Toastmasters Wence
Martin, Kingman Ingraham,
Stanley Wilson and Distin-
guished Toastmaster Anthony
Longley, assistant division
governor.
The events concluded on
Saturday evening with a social
at the home of Club
Cousteau's president, Toast-
master Vanessa Scott. Other
Officers inducted were TM
Christopher Hinsey, vice-pres-
ident education; TM Newton
Hamiltofi, vice-president mem-
bership, and immediate past
president; TM Roscoe Thomp-
son, vice-president public rela-
tions; TM Delilah Barr, secre-
tary; TM William Adderley,
treasurer, and TM Nahdjla
Thompson, sergeant-at-arms.
Club Cousteau meets every
Tuesday at 7pm at the
Chickcharnie Hotel in Fresh
Creek, Andros. The public is
welcome to attend.






IN-IGHT
For he sorie


TOASTMASTERS Club
Cousteau 7343 has held its offi-
cial officers installation cere-
monies.
The event, which officially
marked the beginning of the
club's 2006-2007 administra-
tive term, was held at the


Nassau water quality





complaints mounting


Ninecustoms. officrs.

recivetranig, ertficte


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2006


~-~s;~. ' ~ -:
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-






MONDAY, OCTOBER 9,


THE TRIBUNE


2006, PAGE 11


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BREITLING
1884
INSTRUMENTS POR PROPESSIONALS-


Oh



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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2006


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* FEBRUARY 8, 1984 Minister of Youth Kendal Nottage is called names by protester Rodney
Moncur (wearing straw hat) upon leaving the House of Assembly. Mr Nottage remained calm as the
demonstrators shouted abuse at him.


dive aLHoleuve %%itse Ifdsica n l.
-. &AQ.

'~,A ;-.
C,, AFl!j t
.t~rlIiuricane Hole Plaza, Pa-'a'al se Island


* April 17. 1984 -
"CHANGE OUR
NKTION from rape -
change la'" reads Ihis
placard carried hb Ihik
babi girl. who %as pushed
in her stroller bI her molh-
er to the anti-rape rall)
Saturday morning. A small
boy kneels by her side with
his placard. Bahamians had
been vocal in demonstrat-
ing to parliamentarians
that they wanted rape laws
changed immediately.


* Julh 28. 1980 LO
PLUS AD EQUALS
LOAD Thirts-
four-sear old Aulre.
Locell Bullard. a sci-
ence lecturer at the
College of the
Bahamas, stages a
one-man demonstra-


I~'ll 1 I, I


lion on Bay Street
against the leadership
of Prime Minister
Lnden Pindling and
Depul Prime Minis-
ter Arthur Hanna.
Mr Bullard carried
placards listing Ihe
salaries of the nation's
two lop executives.
He said that both the
Prime Minister and
his Deputy made over
$200 per day each
year. He wore a habit
of white sackcloth.


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St John's students'


green lesson


* GRADE Four students from St John's College visited The Retreat, headquarters of the
Bahamas National Trust, to learn about plants and become acquainted with Bahamian native
trees and shrubs. Students viewed a video on plants and then took part in the "Wanted" activity
where they found specimens of horseflesh, saffron, silver buttonwood and sea grape. The students
then drew the plants as aid to identifying them. This one of several educational presentations
co-ordinated by the BNT's education office.
New Justices of the Peace sworn in


* EIGHT new Justices of the Peace were sworn in by Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez lastweek.
Pictured with Magistrate Gomez are Evans Clifford Moss, Matthew Sweeting, Rev David Bastian,
Anthony Williams, Rev Dr Enid Louise Ellis, Athama Bowe, Rev Benjamin Gibson, and Bislop
(Photo: BSce Betheiannl.
(Photo: BIS/Patrick Hanna
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THE TRIBUNE


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2006


LOALN


FROM page one

but excuses for incompetence
and deflects attention from mis-
takes.
"The PLP would be well
.rtvised to come to terms with
their fate. They have earned
t::. right, nay the reward/pun-
, iment, of being voted out of
c.fice for what they have done
- a good job at not doing the
job for which they were
hired." he said.


Distributed b-y Lowe's V .l


Ingraham hits out at the PM's 'attitude to the people's business'


The opposition leader said
the PLP's record in office
speaks not only of their fail-
ure to govern, their refusal to
do the right thing, their addic-
tion to power and to protect-
ing their power regardless of
the consequences, but it also
speaks to what results emanate
from a group unprepared and
"unready" to govern.


"They did what they
believed they had to do and
they took all of the goods for
themselves and their friends
without exception. They for-
got to plan a charted course,
and so they missed many a
step along the byway, but they
did it their way," he said.
Mr Ingraham said there was
a constant failure by the PLP


to understand that the spoils
and the rewards of office
belong to the people, not to
parliamentarians.
"They fail to understand
that the duty of parliamentar-
ians is to be of service to the
people and not to gather up
benefits for themselves," he
said.
The current government,
the FNM leader said, is busy
telling the public that it does
not see what it sees and does
not hear what it hears -
"chaos, incompetence, inef-
fectiveness, greed, and cor-
ruption".
"In New Providence they
tell us that we do not feel frus-
tration sitting in traffic. In
New Providence they tell us
that we do not feel fear as
crime escalates and spreads.
They tell us that our public
health system is in. good order
as shortages of essential med-
ication for the sick, aged and
infirm proliferate.


"They tell us that our chil-
dren are safe in overcrowded
schools, unmanageably over-
sized classes, with teacher
shortages and on school
premises that remain con-
struction sites weeks after the
end of the summer break.
They tell us that they have a
good hold on immigration
matters as the department is
scandalised and immigration
is out of control. As they say,
'people are able to pay to
play'.
"They tell us that there is a
job waiting for anyone who
wants one when unemploy-
ment rates remain stubbornly
high. They tell us that we do
not hear what we hear that
they have out-stretched palms
all over the place taking and
grabbing from whomever,
whenever and whatever they
can. But we see and hear dif-
ferently and our eyes and ears
are not playing games on us,"
Mr Ingraham said.


Ministry on Ninety

FROM page one

possess with intent to distribute.
Mr Karavetzos said they were seeking official clarification to
avoid discrediting the provision of the (extradition) treaty.
However, in its statement over the weekend, the ministry said
that, from its point of view, no further clarification was required.
"The government of the United States was notified on Septem-
ber 4, 2006, that the warrant of surrender related only to those
charges in the request of the United States on December 16,2003.
"Under the terms of the extradition treaty between The Bahamas
and the United States, the person extradited can only be charged
on those offences for which he has been extradited," the ministry
said.
Once again, at last week's court appearance, no formal charges
against Knowles were read and he did not enter a plea in case
number 0425. Instead Knowles' new public defender, Kenneth
White, said that his client "stood mute" to the indictments.
Though arraignment was scheduled for case number 1091 as
well, the prosecutor suggested deferral again, due to what he
described as the ambiguity of Knowles' extradition by the Bahamas
with regard to this case.
Nevertheless, Mr White has informed the court that Knowles
would be challenging jurisdiction of both cases 1091 and 0425.
SOctober 3 was Knowles' third arraignment and pre-trial deten-
tion hearing since his extradition to the US.,
The judge ruled during the first pre-trial detention hearing that
Knowles be required to pay a $10 million court maturity bond
which would be honoured once the money was found to have
come from legitimate sources. However, the still disputed case
1091 would not allow Knowles to be released under any circum-
stancs.


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FROM page one
establishment of an LNG
facility and pipeline within its
territory was among the rea-
sons for it withdrawing the
Seafarer application.
James Johnson wrote:
"Because supplies of liquefied
natural gas have not been com-
mitted, and. conditions for
developing LNG infrastructure
in the Bahamas remain uncer-
tain, Seafarer cannot now
make the substantial commit-
ment to perform the site-spe-
cific geotechnical surveys
required by letter dated Sep-
tember 21, 2006.
"Withdrawal of the applica-
tion will relieve Commission
staff, the inter-agency team
and participants of further reg-
ulatory burden."
El Paso Corporation had
previously linked up with Suez
and FPL Resources, a Florida
Power and Light affiliate, to
form the Blue Marlin consor-
tium that was exploring the
possibility of locating an LNG
terminal at South Riding Point
in Grand Bahama.
However, the group "dis-
banded" last year, after that
site was rejected by the
Bahamas Environment, Sci-
ence and Technology Com-
mission (BEST), and Suez has
returned to Freeport Harbour.
The government also
expressed reservations about
that site, due to its proximity to
populated areas.
SSuez is still hoping it will be
able to re-engage the govern-
ment on siting an LNG termi-
nal in Freeport Harbour.
Meanwhile,'AES Corpora-
tion, the most advanced of the
three LNG proponents with
its site on Ocean Cay, a man-
made island near Bimini, is still
enduring an almost three-year
wait to hear whether the gov-
ernment has said 'yes' or 'no'
to its project.
A draft Heads of Agree-
ment is understood to have
been-drawn up for almost a
year. The government's last
statement on the issue was that
it was waiting for a regulatory
regime and Environmental
Management Plan (EMP) to
be put in place for the Ocean
Cay facility.


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STAPLEDON GARDENS
LOT NO. 544
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence
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LOCATION: On Gladiator Road, 2nd
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APPRAISED VALUE: $224,000

SANDILANDS ALLOTMENT
LOT NO. 2
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence
(6,440 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Quarry Road approx. 100 ft. N
of Robert Sandilands Road
APPRAISED VALUE: $189,000


PINEWOOD GARDENS
LOT NO. 971
PROPERTY SIZE: 3 Bed / 2 Bath, Single
Storey Residence (5,000 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Rosewood Street
APPRAISED VALUE: $125,000

CULMERSVILLE SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 25
PROPERTY SIZE: Triplex Apartment
(4,800 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Orchid Lane
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LOCATION: West of Blue Hill Heights
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PROPERTY SIZE: Multi Family
(4,800 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Curtis Road, Gambler Village
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GAMBIER
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PROPERTY SIZE: Multi Family
(6,500 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Curtis Road, Gambier Village
Appraised Value: $72,000


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T I EA U U bt
*iI


FROM page one

The Attorney General and
Minister of Justice Allyson
Maynard-Gibson announced
this during her contribution to
the 2006/07 Budget debate on
June 14.
Overall, the loss of judicial
days in all courts in this quarter
was the same as that of the last
quarter.
Mrs Grant-Bethell said that
the reasons for the lost days
were different as, this time
around, delay was mostly
caused by defence counsel.
Nevertheless, she said the
effectiveness of the results in
the period July-September
improved overall, although the
courts completed fewer matters
than in the last sitting.
The DDPP's assessment that
the effectiveness of the court
has increased is based on the
fact there were more convic-
tions for this period.
She said the reason the court
completed fewer matters in this
quarter was that traditionally
most judges take their leave inr
the summer period.
"We are all recommitted and
renewed.in energy this Michael-
mas sitting. We hope to contin-
ue to increase the effectiveness
of olur contribution to the crim-
inal justice system. We are
pleased with the overall results
and the improvements in this
period, benchmarking and com-
paringit to the last sitting of the
court," Mrs Grant- Bethell said.
The following is the statistical
breakdown from each court:
Senior Justice Anita Allen
In April-June there were 15
judicial days lost and the court
sat for a total of 60 days. In
July-September, 2006, the judi-
cial days lost were exactly the
same.
There was an increase in the
number of matters completed.
In this period two long mur-
der trials were completed in that
court that of Cordell Farring-
ton and the second of Roger
Watson (which involved the
indiscriminate shooting-up of a
residence in Fox Hill, when bul-
lets entered the house, fatally
wounding a young boy).
Justice Jon Isaacs
In that court, 10 judicial days
were lost and those days were
mainly due to the non-appear-
ance of defence attorneys.
This, in fact, resulted in two
instances where bench warrants
were issued for defence coun-
sel's arrest..

MPs both
reported to
have quit

govt posts

FROM page one

Last night, The Tribune was
unable to get independent con-
firmation of the "offer", but
sources insisted the story was
true. Another source said: "It
seems that at least the resigna-
tion part is true. I'm not sure
about the reported deal."
Mr Smith and Mr Gibson
have been under heavy pres-
sure to resign as environment
ambassador and gaming board
chief respectively over the last
few days in the wake of their
much-publicised Cabinet Room
brawl.
The pair are said to have
come to blows following a meet-
ing of parliamentarians when
they began arguing over a prop-
erty deal they were involved in
as attorneys.
Fierce public reaction to the
bust-up has left government
leaders especially Mr Christie
- wondering about the possible
fall-out among voters.
A source told The Tribune
last night: "It seems Mr Christie
doesn't want to announce their
resignations until he can also
announce their replacements."
The- Tribune..was. unable to
contact any of the parties
reportedly involved in the dis-
cussions. A government source
said he had heard nothing about
the resignations.


However, the overall per-
centage in the court showed an
increase in the number of mat-
ters completed.
This shows an improvement
in and the proper use of judicial
time.
Justice Faizool Mohammed
This judge sat for fewer days
this sitting as opposed to last
session, 25 days as opposed to


40. Seven judicial days were lost
in this court, which was the
same as the period lost during
the last sitting. Based on the
number of completed matters,
there was a decrease.
Justice Stephen Isaacs
(Freeport)
There was an overall increase
of completed matters from 33
per cent to 71 per cent.


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More convictions




handed down




in first period




of 'Swift Justice'


FROM page one

me once in my head. I heard the other officer
behind me shout something, but I wasn't paying
attention," said Corporal Bethel.
"It wasn't until I heard what sounded like a
weapon being cocked behind me that I took
my eyes off him. When I took my eyes off the
one officer to see what was being cocked in the
back of me, he hit me two more times."
Corporal Bethel said that officers from inside
the station came running out and shouted to
the three plainclothes officers that the person
they were beating was a corporal who worked at
the station.
It was only after the men stopped beating
him and he was able to take off his tam that offi-
cers said anything to him, he added.
"They started saying, 'Man cop, that's you.
We didn't know that's you. You ain't saying
nothing. You ain't saying nothing,'" said Cor-
poral Bethel.
Saturday night's brutal beating took place
one day after the Bethel family appeared in
court to testify in proceedings looking into the
April shooting death of Dwayne's brother
Deron.
Nathaniel Charlow, a former officer who was
said to be attached to the Oakes Field CDU, has
been charged with the killing.
A spokesman for the Bethel family, Mr Felix
Bethel, claimed there was nothing coincidental


'''~ ''1 r~-----:~-- -. -tt~~i:;*

--


'Qwznos~Suu

+EATUP-


MUNUAUY, UL; I Ubth V, ZUUOv, VAclt 10


THE TRIBUNE


Alleged attack
about this weekend's beating of Corporal
Bethel.
"It is passing strange and it borders on the
incredible that he would be sitting in a van that
is well-marked, and they know is well-marked,
with the image of Deron.'Sharky' BetheL It is no
coincidence, and it could not be a coincidence,"
Mr Bethel said.
"He (Corporal Bethel) was authorised to be
there and he was not breaking any laws. He
was assaulted by three men, and the fact that
these men happen to. be police officers only
raises an extreme concern about the ordinary
citizen going about his business," added Mr
Bethel.
"The fact that Dwayne Bethel happens to be
a police officer does one thing: it illuminates the
fact of police brutality in the Bahamas. A police
officer is brutalised in front of the police station
by police officers, and we are calling on the
Commissioner of Police to rein in police officers
who are obviously so poorly trained and so ill-
disciplined that they can harass the Bahamian
citizen as he goes about his ordinary business,"
said Mr Bethel.
The head injury that Corporal Bethel
received required t1\o layers of switches. with ten
used to close the top layer of the wound.
The Tribune was unable to reach senior police
officers for comment.





THE TRIBUNE:


2006


TRAD
Managing


I


EXPO I


ESHOnp
and Impacting


the Future of Technology
Expo and Tradeshow Oct. 9- 11

r-_2006 EXPO & TRADESHOW
i , ,o r. w, i Managing and Impacting the Future of Technology


Name: ................. .... ............................... .... ........................... ...... ................................
Position:................. ............................ Com pany Name: ......................................................
Business Address: ..............................................................................................
Phone: .....................................................E-mail: .....................................................................
Date: Opening Ceremony Oct. 8 Expo and Tradeshow Oct. 9 11 Venue: Wyndham Nassau Beach Resort & Crystal Palace Casino
If you areregistering more than one person from your company, please fill in the information below:
N A M E (LA ST, FIRST, M l) .................................................... ..........................................................................:.................
TITLE ............................. ................................................................. ...........................................................................
E-M A IL ..................................... .......................................... ............................ .............................. ...........................
NAME (LAST, FIRST, MI) ................................
TITLE .......................................
E-MAIL ........................................................ ...................... ................
NAME (LAST, FIRST, MI) .... ............................
TITLE ............................................................................................................................................................................
S E-MAIL ......................................
COST FOR DELEGATES REGISTRATION FREE!
LUNCH WILL BE PROVIDED FREE!!!
Please fax, e-mail, or deliver registration form by October 5th, 2006.
For additional information, please contact our office.
4 WAYS TO REGISTER
PHONE: 242-302-7827 FAX: 242-394-4329 / 242-393-0685
www.btcbahamas.com/expo2006/index.html
E-MAIL: dsbraithwaite@btcbahamas.com


I 0m-O
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.PAGE 16, MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2006


I
I
i,


I
I
I

I







THF TRIRINCLE MO9 P


SJohn Bull helps with



breast cancer drive

IN commemoration. of Breast PICTURED from left
Cancer Awareness Month, Nas- are Tarek Vanderpool,
sau luxury retailer John Bull jewellery buyer, John
Ltd has teamed up with Miki- Bull Group of
motor to launch the "Everything Companies; Suzanne'
is Possible With Hope" cam- Smith, member, Sister
paign, offering a special collec- Sister (Breast Cancer)
tion of cultured pearl jewellery Support Group; Andrea
to benefit local breast cancer Sweeting, President,
awareness charity, The Surgi- Sister Sister (Breast
cal Suite Sister Sister (Breast Cancer)Support Group;
Cancer) Support Group. Mitzi Thompson,
Originally launched in the US jewellery supervisor,
market in October, 2005, to John Bull and Sandra
coincide with Breast Cancer Rolle-Ferguson, member,.
Awareness Month, Mikimoto Sister Sister (Breast
has introduced new "Hope" Cancer) Support Group.'
pieces in an ongoing effort to ,
draw attention to this important
cause and raise funds to benefit FUEL SURCHARGE2005
women all over the world. 12
"We are very thankful to 11.1341c
John Bull for this wonderful
opportunity they have extended 11
to our organisation. TAeir kind
act will enable us to continue
our steadfast efforts in the fight 10 10.8948
against breast cancer," says 9. 6 10.3676
Andrea Sweeting, president,
The Surgical Suite Sister Sister 9 9.70731
(Breast Cancer) Support 9.2901e
Group.
Inspired by the pink ribbon,
the symbol for breast cancer
awareness, the 2006 collection
highlight is an Akoya cultured 6.823
pearl bracelet strung with pale 7
pink silk thread. A luxurious 6.5357n
twist on the rubber "'cause"'
bracelet, it features a ribbon 6----
charm in 18K rose gold. The .
collection also features other g
pieces, including necklaces, ear- 5
rings and brooches offered at L.
the 284 Bay Street and Marina 4.62370
Village at Atlantis stores.
"We are thrilled to,:partner
with a company that has a long
history of supportfig charities 3
that promote women's causes,"
said Tarek Vanderpool, jew-
ellery buyer, John Bull Group
of Companies. "Likewise; John 2
Bull recognizes the tremendous
need for local support in this
area."
The collection will be on sale
throughout October. A portion
of the proceeds from sales will 0
be donated to fund the fight JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL
against breast cancer.



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* GIRL Guide "Brownie" Chelsi Seymour, 11, and Girl Guide "Sunflower"
Judith Strachan, seven, present cookies to the Deputy to the Governor General,
Lady Pindling, at Government House on Thursday. Looking on is Girl Guides
Association leader Indyanna Moss, right.


ed
d *:


.. ...,- .: -,*,: -


MONDAY, OCTOBER ,9, 2006, PAGE 17


THE TRIBUNE




4 a


PAGE 18, MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2006 THE TRIBUNE


LOCAL NEWS
Doaio o ace sscato


Aly forBone Health.

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* The 'Residents of Eight Mile Rock to Elect Vernae Grant' group made a cheque donation to the
Grand Bahama Cancer Association. Mrs Grant said the funds are to show their undying commit-


ment to the community, especially to those battling against cancer and surviving the disease.
(Photo: Vandyke Hepburn)







ra-.- itratet


ixern l m







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] Festival is

announced

PLANS for the 14th annual
Wine and Food Festival were
officially unveiled during a
press conference at the
Minisr) of Tourism'shead.
-'office in Nassau .
i Elements for this year's
-"-*--* ~festival include a trip to a local
:'>90 .0 organic vineyardistyle farm, a
wine-tasting iand dine-around
with top restaurants at Forts
Charlotte and Staney and a
Sunday morninsggospel
brunch. 1, 1-7
Presentedl by the r of
Tourism iWconjunCtion with
Sthe Ministiy of Agiculture
and Marine Resounces, the
Culinary and Hosp tCiity
Management Institte at the
College of The B ahmas,
and the iBahamas H~tel
Association, the festival is
designed to strength ,
" tourism Ikages through the
incorporation of native
produce in restaurant inenus
and the nurturing and promo-
: tion of the culinary inautry's
finest ambassadors.
RO '- .-Pictured are Julia Burnside

-%y! 'Culinary Classic Wine knd
o* anFood Fe tival, and Jan t
nJohnson i(right) executive
show chdir, Culinary Festival.


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THF TRIBUNE


o In brief

Bones of

giant

camel are

discovered

* SYRIA
Damascus


THE bones of a giant camel
dating back 100,000 years have
been unearthed in the Syrian
desert, a government newspa-
per has reported, according to
Associated Press.
The bones were discovered
by a joint Syrian-Swiss archae-
ological team at the site of al-
Hemel in the Palmyra region
about 150 miles north-east of
Damascus, the state-run Tishrin
daily reported Saturday.
The discovery revealed that
the Syrian desert "is the first
origin of the camel," Bassam
Jammous, director general of
the Antiquities and Museum
Department in Syria, told the
newspaper.
He said the camel would have
been some four metres tall -
double the size of the modern-
day camel and "poses a revo-
lution in the world of archaeo-
logical discoveries".
Officials with the Swiss
archaeology team could not
immediately be reached for
comment Sunday.
The bones' discovery was first
reported if 2005.

Oil reserves
discovered in
Uganda, says
president
UGANDA
Kampala
OIL has been discovered in
western Uganda after years of
exploration, the president
announced Sunday, saying he
expected production to begin
in 2009, according to Associated
Press.
President Yoweri Museveni
Said the country plans to build
an oil refinery, with Uganda ini-
tially producing between 6,000
to 10,000 barrels a day.,
He did not give details of how
the oilwillbe produced.saying .
only that Uganda has studied
various oil production contracts
S around the world. The govern-
ment.will use some of the oil to
produce electricity, Museveni
said.
Some opposition politicians
have said that the oil could turn
into a curse and lead to wars,
as it has done in other coun-
tries, but the president dis-
missed those concerns.
Thomas Male, a Ministry of
Energy official, said that the
three fields in western Uganda
where the oil has been discov-
ered have 100 million barrels to
300 million barrels of oil in
reserve with 30 million barrels
ready for extraction.
Nigeria, Africa's biggest oil
producer, is currently produc-
ing more than 2.3 million bar-
rels a day.


INERATIOALESayee t


MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2006, PAGE 19


4i
d^f"


Diplomats say Sudan rejects




an offer for peacekeepers


New proposal expected

from Arab League


* EGYPT
Cairo
ARAB countries. have
launched a new effort to push
Sudan toward a compromise
over UN peacekeepers for
Darfur, offering to dispatch a
force of Arab and Muslim
troops to the troubled region,
diplomats said Sunday,
according to Associated Press.
The Arab League diplomats
said Sudan's president reject-
ed the initial proposal as he
has all suggestions of a: UN-
affiliated contingent, regard-
less of the makeup but
promised to suggest an alter-
native soon, in a sign that the
Arab effort might show more
promise than Western
attempts to stop the humani-
tarian crisis.
"The situation is deterio-
rating and needs interven-
,tion," said Hesham Youssef, a
top aide to the league's sec-
retary-general, Amr Moussa.
But Youssef said the Arab
negotiators believed the world
community and the United
SStates should also be flexible.
"The Americans should
realise that there should be a
compromise," he said..
The new push could be a
significant step in the stalled
effort to reach a compromise
over Sudan's rejection of an
August Security Council res-
olution that would let the
United Nations to take con-
trol of and significantly
expand a peacekeeping force
in the western Darfur region,
run so far by the African
Union.
The two sides are still far
apart, however. And it was
unclear how much leverage
'the Arab countries close
Neighbors and supporters of
Sudan's Arab-dominated
regime have or how strong-
ly they intended to press.
SAt least 200.000 people
have died and some 2 ralioan
have been displaced sindithe
startof ia 2003 revolt by rebels
from Darfur's ethnic African
population. The Sudanese
government is alleged to have
responded by unleashing mili-
tias known as the janjaweed
against villagers.
Fears'the tensions could
spread were highlighted this
weekend when Sudanese sol-
diers crossed the.border into
eastern Chad to fight a group
of Darfur rebels, leaving more
than 300 people injured, an
aid, worker said Sunday,
speaking on condition of-
anonymity because he was not
allowed to divulge informa-


tion to the media.
Chadian government
spokesman Hourmadji Mous-
sa Doumgor said he had no
information about the battle.
Moussa carried the propos-
al for Arab peacekeepers to
Sudanese President Omar al-
Bashir in Khartoum in recent
days, said diplomats who
accompanied the Arab
League chief.
The United States has
asked its moderate Arab allies
like Egypt to take a greater
role on Darfur, with Secretary
of State Condoleezza Rice
making it a key mission of her
Mideast trip last week.
Moussa proposed that
Sudan accept thousands of
troops from Arab and Mus-
lim countries, at first to join
the current African Union
peacekeepers, with the possi-
bility that they could later shift
under a UN mandate, the
diplomats said.
Samir Hosny, who heads
the African section of the
Cairo-based Arab League,
said al-Bashir was still
opposed to UN peacekeepers
- even Arab ones but
promised to come back with a
counterproposal.
"He (al-Bashir) said he will
make an initiative soon," Hos-
ny said.
Youssef told The Associat-
ed Press he expected the
counterproposal "within
days."
"We expect that the ideas
will be closer to what is being
circulated," Youssef said.
Some analysts have said
they believe Arab countries
will be loathe to press too
hard unless the United States
makes progress on other
issue, important to theM ch
a.s Israeli-Arab peace eilor ts.
Another possible negotia-
tor, China, is believed to have
strong leverage with Sudan
because it is Sudan'smain oil
partner. But China so far has
indicated it believes Sudan has
the right to keep the peace-
keepers out.
Sudan's government had no
immediate comment. In the
past, it has accused "cru-
saders" from the West of try-
ing to take over the country,
and al-Bashir has repeatedly
said the force would be neo-
colonialists and violators of
Sudanese sovereignty.
However, he also has said
in recent days that he would
accept UN advisers to the cur-
rent AU force as a possible
compromise.
The latest Arab efforts
, came after Rice, on a trip last


* CHILDREN play in the
North Darfur refugee camp of
El Sallam on Wednesday.
Some 80,000 refugees survive
in El Sallam and the nearby
camp of Abu Shouk, with
humanitarian workers
struggling to provide aid amid
growing violence and security
problems
(Photo: AP/Alfred
de Montesquiou)


week to the Mideast, emerged
from a meeting with eight Arab
foreign ministers in Cairo and
pleaded for the world to per-
suade Sudan to accept UN
peacekeepers.
Arab states which had ear-
lier expressed reservations
about pressuring Sudan imme-
diately made a more public
push on their neighbor.
On Saturday, for example,
Egyptian Foreign Minister
Ahemd Aboul Gheit signaled
to Sudan that it was time to
show flexibility.
"The international commu-
nity has concerns that thousands
more of the Sudanese people
in Djrfui %ill f:,ll ictim'." he
told Eg[ pl in in Lie tel rc .Mi on.
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PAGE 20, MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2006 THE TRIBUNE


INERATINLNW


Rebels: Army preparing major n brief
France to


offensive in north Sri Lanka


* SRI LANKA
Colombo

SRI Lanka's military on Sun-
day denied a Tamil rebel claim
that the army is preparing an
imminent attack on Tiger posi-
tions and civilian settlements
in the north under a scorched-
earth policy, accordingto Asso-
ciated Press.
The head of the rebels' polit-
ical wing, Suppiah Thamilsel-
van, said that reliable intelli-
gence "suggests the Sri Lanka
military is in full preparation
to launch offensive operations
into our territory," according
to the pro-rebel TamilNet Web
site.
Military spokesman Brig
Prasad Samarasinghe denied
that a major offensive was
being planned.
"We will retaliate only when
we are attacked," Samaras-
inghe said.
Dozens of army personnel
and rebels have been killed in
recent days in fighting in north-
eastern Sri Lanka, with each
side accusing the other of initi-
ating the attacks. The continu-
ing violence comes despite the
government's promise Thurs-
day that it is ready to resume
peace talks, slated to take place
in Switzerland at the end of the
month.
About 1,500 people have
died in increasingly heavy fight-
ing since the last round of talks
in February.
TamilNet, quoting unnamed
rebel officials, said the army
was building up its arsenal on
its front lines, indicating a "war
plan based on a scorched-earth
policy that will flatten civilian


settlements" around the Tamil
areas of Elephant Pass,
Muhamalai and Pooneryn on
the Jaffna Peninsula.
The rebel report said that
"heavy deployment of troops
in the northern defence lines
indicates that an offensive
could be launched at any time."
The military controls almost
all of the Jaffna Peninsula, but
small pockets are under rebel
control, and fighting since
August 12 has cut off a major
highway linking it to the main-
land.
On Saturday, Thamilselvan
wrote a private letter to a top
peace envoy from Norway,
rebel spokesman Daya Master
said. He did not reveal any
details.
The rebels have warned that
while they are also ready to
resume peace talks, they will
withdraw from a 2002 Norway-
brokered cease-fire if the gov-
ernment continues to attack
rebel positions.
A spokesman for the Nordic
cease-fire monitoring mission,
Thorfinnur Omarsson, said the
escalating violence is damag-
ing the truce agreement, but
hoped "it will not destroy the
possibility of having talks."
He said the monitors are also
awaiting permission frpm the
security forces to visit the
northern defense front in
Muhamalai in Jaffna, where
artillery and mortar fire occurs
almost daily.
Meanwhile, the rebels' mili-
tary spokesman, Irasiah Ilan-
thirayan, accused police com-
mandos of firing artillery on
Sunday into Tiger areas in east-
ern Amparai district, forcing


civilians to flee, following a sim-
ilar assault Saturday night,
according to TamilNet. He did
not say whether the rebels suf-
fered any casualties.
Military spokesman Brig.
Prasad Samarasinghe said the
commandos had fired mortars,
not artillery, in response to an
attack by the guerrillas.
Separately, the army
increased its control of Mani-
rasakulam and Raikuli areas in
eastern Trincomalee district
after the rebels intensified their
activities there in recent days,
posing a threat to the strategic
naval base and civilians in the
area, Samarasinghe said. He
did not elaborate on the rebel
activities.
Samarasinghe did not say
whether troops had captured
more rebel-held land.
Rebel officials were not
available for comment.
Also Sunday, suspected
rebels attacked a police check-
point near Eravur town in,Sri
Lanka's east, triggering a gun-
battle that left one officer dead
and a civilian wounded, police
and Defense Ministry officials
said.
The attackers fled after
police started firing.
On the Jaffna Peninsula, the
rebels said they killed five sol-
diers, and wounded four oth-
ers, during a battle along the
military defense line in
Muhamalai, according to
TamilNet.
The Media Center. for
National Security said four sol-
diers died in the fight and four
were wounded.
It said troops retaliated, caus-
ing heavy damage to the rebels.


S.

* AN ethnic Tamil family sit on top of their belongings as they
reach the government controlled town of Valachchani, 138
miles north-east of Colombo, Sri Lanka on Saturday.
Thousands of people have been displaced as a result of recent
fighting between the government and the Tamil rebels in the
north and east.
(AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe)


Somalia repatriates more than 1,000



illegal immigrants from Ethiopia
Aig, .e *


* SOMALIA
Baidoa

AUTHORITIES in north-
east Somalia on Sunday repa-
triated more than 1,000
Ethiopians whom smugglers
S ci e pl-pl i r, iL to take across
thle Gull at Aden to the
promise of jobs and a better
life in the Middle East, accord-
ing to Associated Press.
The 1,370 migrants were
sent home in the first wave of a
government crackdown on the
channel of illegal immigration
running through Somalia's
autonomous iL gion of Punt-
land,.said the region's interior
minister, Mohamned Abdi Hab-
sade.
The immigrants were taken
to villages in the Ethiopian
area of Galadi on the border
with Somalia, a resident, Sahal
Abdi, told Associated Press by
telephone.
Over the past 24 hours,
police have rounded up
another 236 Ethiopian immi-
grants and sent 72 Somalis
back to their homes in other
parts of the country after
they were caught trying to
board boats to Yemen, said


P jl, l.nd' D.DpuLI 'Poi'ce.
( Ih Col. A.Jbdi'j:. S.i'id
Ga'amey.
A September 25 govern-
ment order banned human
smuggling.
Ga'amey, who heads a spe-
cial unit investigating illegal
immigration, said authorities
are going after traffickers and
the owners of the boats used to
ferry the migrants across the
Gulf.

Smuggling

On Friday, the UN refugee
agency said that north-east
Somalia has become a major
hub for smugglers taking illegal
immigrants to Yemen: Most of'
the immigrants are from Soma-
lia, Ethiopia and Sudan, escap-
ing drought, insecurity and
economic hardship in their
countries.
Yemen is very hospitable to
refugees, being one of the few
countries in the region that
have signed an international
refugee convention, the agency
said. Yemen hosts more than
88,000 registered refugees, of
whom 84,000 are Somalis.


SIn ,,Siptembei, the UN.
refugee agency found that as
many as 85 per cent of 'the
refugees arriving in Yemen
expected to go on to richer
Gulf states.
The agency said, that-
Bossaso, the region's main port
city, has been at the center of
the smuggling, but there are
other departure points along
Puntland's 435-mile coastline.
Bossaso is about 700 miles
north-east of Somalia's capi-
tal, Mogadishu.
Smuggling of illegal'immi-
grants usually begins in Sep-
tember when the sailing sea-
son starts in the Gulf of Aden
and ends in March, the agency
said.
At least 54 people have died
trying to get across to Yemen
from Somalia and another 60
have gone missing since the
sailing season began in Sep-
tember. Over the same .peri-
od, more than 3,500 people
were smuggled across the Gulf
of Aden in several dozen
boats, the agency said.
In recent days, the smug-
gling fee has gone up to
US$70, from US$50, the
agency said.


launch ban
on smoking
in public

* PARIS


PRIME Minister Dominique
de Villepin said Sunday that
France will begin putting in
place a ban on smoking in pub-
lic places in February though
restaurants, bars and dance
'clubs will be allowed to wait to
apply it until 2008, according to
Associated Press.
"We have decided to ban
(smoking) tobacco in public
places" Villepin told LCI tele-
vision, adding that buildings like
schools and offices would be
affected in February, but some
types of businesses would be
allowed to postpone the new
rules until January 1, 2008.,
If the ban takes effect, France
would become the latest Euro-
pean country to join the anti-
smoking bandwagon Ireland,
Spain, Italy and Britain have
adopted similar measures.
Villepin said the ban will be
announced by decree "in the
next few days" allowing the
government to avert a poten-
tially explosive parliamentary
debate ahead of presidential
and legislative elections next
year.
On Tuesday, a parliamentary
panel called for a ban on smok-
ing in enclosed public areas
within a year and floated an
idea of "hermetically sealed"
smoking rooms for those who
want to light up which
Villepin said he favors. How-
ever, no service would be
allowed in such rooms in order
to protect the health of waiters.

Fashion
editors show
a touch of
magic

* PARIS

FRENCH designer Jean-Paul
Gaultier made a fashion editor
levity te niot fiwom the thrill of
his latest caimrlk display but on
the stage of a theater where he
celebrated 30 years in business,
according to Associated Press.
Singer Janet Jackson and
actress Demi Moore looked on as
top fashion industry figures per-
formed elaborate magic tricks. '
"It's because they are magic,
and fashion is magic!" a beam-
ing Gaultier told hundreds of
guests at the Olympia theatre:
The designer, known for his
irreverent wit, performed his
levitation trick with Virginie
Mouzat, the glamorous fashion
correspondent of French news-.
paper Le Figaro.
Grace Coddington, the flame-
haired creative director of US
SVogue, was locked into a cage
by colleague Hamish Bowles and
covered with a velvet drape. She
reappeared on the edge of the
stage, replaced inside the cage
by British model Lily Cole, who
was holding a large, grey cat.
But it was International Her- .
aid Tribune critic Suzy Menkes,
whose reviews have the power
to make or break a designer's
collection, who brought the
house down. Camping it up in a
geisha outfit, she locked a
British fashion editor inside a
box and gleefully twisted the
editor's head around.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 20, MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2006


4s
F


mwv7







THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY EVENING


7:30


8:00 8:30


E -I-


B WPBT


Florida Roadtrip


Antiques Roadshow Letter of apol-
ogy from plaintiffs in shooting at
Kent State University. (CC)


MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2006, PAGE 21


OCTOBER 9, 2006

9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30


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'PG' (CC) rope. 'PG-13' (CC)
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ter, returns. f 'PG-13' (CC) ( CC) Bruce. (CC) (CO
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HBO-W Joaquin Phoenix. The story of music legends Johnny Campbell Scott. Premiere. A boy returns his cheetah to its South African
and June Carter Cash. n 'PG-13' (CC) habitat. .'PG'-(CC) r P_
(15) * FOREVER YOUNG (1992, Romance) Mel *** THE SISTERHOOD OF THE TRAVELING PANTS (2005, Come-
HBO S G on, Jamie Lee Curtis. Two 1990s boys thaw a y-Drama) Amber Tamblyn, Alexis Bledel, America Ferrera. Four teens
frozen 1930s test pilot. 'PG' (CC) keep in touch by passing along a pair of jeans. 'PG' (CC)
(615) ,A *** JARHEAD (2005, War) Jake Gyllenhaal, Peter Sarsgaard, Jamie OUT FOR JUSTICE (1991,
MAX-E SOUND OF Foxx. Marines band together during the Gulf War. n 'R' (CC) Action) Steven Seagal, William
THUNDER (CC) Forsythe. A 'R' (CC)


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Jerusalem from invaders. n 'R' (CC) (CC)
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TMC FE (2004) Jude Bello. A betrayed thief launches a single-minded quest for revenge. A Rock. A sheriff and a deputy y to
__ Law. '' 'R'(CC)I rid their town of thugs. 'PG-13'


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PAGE 22, MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2006


COMICS PAGE


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MONDAY,
OCTOBER 9

ARIES Mar 21/Apr 20
With birthday wishes soon heading
your way, you may be planning a
major bash. Don't be so extravagant
with your spending, however.
Finances are tight.
TAURUS Apr 21/May 21
You've had, a short temper, Taurus,
and close friends and family are start-
ing to feel the brunt of your tongue
lashes. Calm down and start mending
fences before it's too late.
GEMINI May 22/Jun 21
An important decision due at the end
of the week has you pulled in two
directions. You must make decision
soon, or else the opportunity might
pass you by.
CANCER Jun 22/Jul 22
You've been waiting to hear big
news, Cancer, and it's finally headed
your way. Expect a complete turn-
around with a situation that has been
plaguing you lately.
LEO Jul 23/Aug 23
A business trip, a vacation or some-
thing that involves your going out ol
town is on the horizon, Leo. Pack
your bags now because you'll be in
store for an adventure.
VIRGO Ay24/Sept 22
Someone from your past has made
an appearance lately;Virgo.-You're
not happy to run into thus individual.
Graciously smile and be on your
way in the opposite direction.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
A large responsibility has been put
into your hands, Libra. Don't worry,
you have the. means to :get it done.
You can always enlist the help of a
friend if you feel overwhelmed.
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
Your life is in an upheaval, Scorpio,
but it is a happy change to. your
normal orderly schedule. Friends and
family love to be near you in the days
to come. Enjoy the company.
-SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
If you've been feeling down in the
dumps, Sagittarius, all of that is
going to change. A stranger brings
good news, and you're the first in
line to accept his offering.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
You've been juggling too many
responsibilities, Capricorn. Pretty
soon one of the balls is going to drop.
Realize that you need to scale back
your projects.
AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
Someone will rely on your help
heavily in the days to come,
Aquarius. You don't mind because
you love to feel needed and a central
part of the action.
PISCES Feb 19/Mar20
Advice is offered to you, but you're
not inclined to take it. Reconsider,
because this person really speaks
words of wisdom.


Test Your Play
1. You are declarer with the West mond finesse until the second round
hand at Three Notrump. North leads of the suit.
the four of spades, and you win After winning the spade return at
South's ten with the king. How trick three, you cash the A-K-Q of
would you play the hand? hearts and then take a diamond
West East finesse. If South started with two or
+ AK 96 three diamonds including the king -
V8 VAKQ5 which is essentially your only chance
*AQ754 *863 you are home.
+QJ852 410 9 74 2. It is impossible to go down
2. You are declarer with the West unless you lose a spade trick
hand at Six Hearts. North leads the (because South has the king) and a
ace of diamonds. How would you trump trick (because one opponent
play the band? has all three missing trumps). The
West East problem is to make the slam even if
SQ5 *AJ84 both of these conditions exist.
V KJ 10 9 2 VA7653 Ruffthe diamond and lead the five
SK 3 of hearts to the king. If both defend-
A Q 7 4 +K J 9 2 ers follow suit, your troubles are
* over. At worst, you lose a spade trick.
1. The first problem is whether to Now let's assume one defender
tackle clubs or diamonds, but it shows out on the first trump lead. If
shouldn't take long to recognize the it's South, you have no problem,
futility of trying to establish the since you can pick up North's queen
clubs. If, say, you led a club at trick with a finesse. If instead North
two, a spade would come back, and shows out, you will lose a trump
when you then led another club, the trick, all right, but you will still make
defenders would cash enough spades the contract by cashing the king of
to set you at least one trick. diamonds and ace of hearts followed
You therefore turn your attention to by four rounds of clubs.
diamonds, where you have to decide If South ruffs a club at any point,
the best way to tackle the suit.Oddly he will be forced to make a losing
enough, the correct approach is not return, while if he does not ruff, you
to lead a heart to dummy first, which next throw him on lead with a trump
would force you to cash the remain- to accomplish the same result.
ing top hearts prematurely before Note that if you make the mistake
tOr~y ara diamond 1essje4nstead, .ofplaying.the heart ace at trick two,
you 10eaU low diamond:from your the contract fails if South has the
and at two, postponing t .e di- king of spades and no hearts.








S I words In a
NJ 1999 Iz(1999
edition) a
HOW many words of four
letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here? 3
SIn making a word, each letter
may be used once only. Each -
must contain the centre letter z: 3
and there must be at least one 4
nine-letter word. No plurals
TODAY'S TARGET
Good 16; very good 24;
excellent 31 (or more). Solution
-tomorrow.


CRYPTIC PUZZLE 12


DOWN


ACROSS 1 B
1 Cannabis cigarettes, maybe, but we 2 E4
allhavethem (6) 3 S
7 The acting game (8) na
8 Information given in 4 It
Latin? (4) 5 A
10 By holding out, one gets ou
thebirdl(6) 6 In
11 Dictate grandiose piece about a 8 Re
politician (6) do
14 Awholesale brew(3) 9 Ma
16 Problemwith pores, 12 As
possibly(5) 13 De
off
17 Depend on gettingthe of5
right place (4) s
19 Disliked half the team getting caught 18 Bib
out (5) 19 YOL
21 Struggle to find the 20 Ari
right rhyme(5) fah
22 She may be sore about 21 Lov
faint-hearledness (5) inca
23 FoodItemfor which asailorneedsa 22 Not
tin-opener (4) 23 Prel
26 Means of locating a source exp
of arson? (5) 24 Cen
28 Father's silent yst
partner (3) 25 It's
29 Toy withone'sfood? (6) extn
30 A foreign paper? (6) 26 Bee
31 Cold dice,27 Sea
possibly (4) 28 e
32 Reveals some uncommon shortage ts
wet
of verse (8) 30 wet
33 Something to'eat befon men
breakfast (6)


ACROSS: 1, M-lda-S 6, Buggy 9, Fall-out 10, Cr.-aft 11,T-
aste 12, Pinch 13, C-alib-an 15, Set 17, O-der 18, Senora
19, Adder 20, Strata 22, Side 24, Tun 25, Must-a-Rd. 26,
Bloom 27, SN-are 28, Gid-dy 29, Attuned 30, Opi-E 31,
Me-wed
DOWN: 2, Inroad 3, Affair 4, Sat 5, P-lain 6, But-cher 7,
Utah 8, Gather 12, Panda 13, Coast 14, Lear-n 15, Sofia
16,T-aped 18, Serum 19, Athlete 21,Turn-l-p22, St-ride
23, Dr-edge 25, M-0-gul 26, Bran 28, Gem


3y's name for silly japers (6)
expertly edits a tale in NewYork (6)
)rt of tissue used in mending,
naturally (4)
can be played voluntarily (7)
farewell brokenly said
t of love(5)
grandpa's terms, a bloomer (5)
duced gradually, but at the
ubl? (4)
ly get knocked out by the driver (3)
small case of vegetables (3)
spite somi perseverance, break
(5)
e wonderful game's almost up, I
e(5)
lical witch's place orden, maybe (5)
I won't find hers in Chislehurst (3)
cle possessed by mothers and
ers (3)
er of fiddling, requiring no cash
entive (3,4)
all air traffic is in service (3)
pare to make music more
ensive (4,2)
itrally placed in a pyramidal
em (4)
hardto solve with ease in
emes of terror (6)
rforthe beefy? (5)
side resort out East, relatively
akng (5)
won by man on account of the
(3)
upset when hissed by a
e gir (4)


ACROSS: 1, Beast 6, Frank 9, Compare 10, Scrap 11,
Essay 12, Come! 13, Special 15, Rep 17, Mere 18, Reside
19, Refer20, Rector 22, Bean 24, Tat 25, Plainly 26,
Tally 27, Slain 28, Widow 29, Echelon 30, Store 31,
Egged
DOWN: 2, Escape 3, Scarce 4, Top 5, Spool 6, Freezer 7,
Rest 8, Neared 12, Caber 13, Smart 14, Erect 15,
Ripen 16, Penny 18, Reply 19, Romance 21, Eaglet 22,
Biting 23, Alcove 25, Plied 26, Tier 28, Woe


ACROSS
1 Amrru(6)
7 Friendly (8)
8 Asian language (4)
10 Twisted(6)
11 Gambler(6)
14 Inormalion (3)
16 Tables (5)
17 Casserole (4)
19 Rege (5)
21 Sovereign (5)
22 Caribbean (5)
23 Undergarment (4)
26 Cutlery item(5)
28 Receptacle (3)
29 Plaid (6)
30 Walked
effeminately (6)
31 Border (4)
32 Miming game (8)
33 Abandon (6)


DOWN
1 Fower (6)
2 Wading bird (6)
3 Praise (4)
4 Awkward (7)
5 Adoins (5)
6 Dreads (5)
8 Desire (4)
9 Lair(3)
12 Zero(3)
13 Moral (5)
15 Tooth(5)
18 Florda resort (5)
19 Chae (3)
20 Cunw cyunt(3)
21 Fbe (3,4)
22 Bed (3)
23 Vocalst (6)
24 Formery (4)
25 Fooled (6)
26 Ordsryp(5)
27 Bodypart(5)
2 Offer (3)
30 Untidy state (4)


ICHESby eonard arden


Sergei Tiakov v Friso Nijboer,
Dutch Open 2006. The bizarre
conclusion to this game
between the two top seeds
provides a useful tip in chess
rules. After Black's last move
Qa4 Tiviakov triumphantly
banged out 1 Qf4+?7? expecting
exchange of queens and a
simply won pawn ending for
White. But it's illegal, Black's
Qa4 checks White's d7 king In
the ensuing hubbub the arbiter
got confused and tried to
penalise Tiviakov two minutes
on the dock. So the Dutch
champion replaced 1 Qf4+ by 1
Kd8, but Nijboer stood his
ground: "Tiviakov touched his
king and must move it!" The
only legal queen move is 1 Qb5,
which gives away the queen for
nothing. Tiviakov now called for
the rule book, and when this


a b c a e f' n
supported Nijboer he left the hall
without signing the score sheets.
Result 1-0 forfeit for Nijboer. The
moral? Touch and move is a bask
chess rule and can only be waived
in the case of an obvious physical
acddent or when a player says
J'adoube" (I adjust) before
centering chessmen on their
squares.
LEONARD IARDEN


Chess solution 8219t no solution for plcation for
8219.
Mensa qui Six of each of 2p, 5p,l0p and 50p.
One possible woa ladder solution i HALT, hot,
hoot soot sot shop, STOP.


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MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2006, PAGE 23


THE TRIBUNE


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PAGE 24, MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2006


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MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2006


SECTION -- m


SI,.,


business@tribunemedia.net


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Developers warn Bahamas




on investment procedures


By-CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business Reporter
.T he Government needs to
speed up the approval
process for foreign devel-
opers wishing to build
resorts and timeshare
properties in the Bahamas, potential
investors have told The Tribune, or risk
Sthe possibility they will take their busi-
-'' ness to-other Caribbean destinations
with friendlier environments.
This was the overwhelming senti-
ment expressed by a number of
, investors, potential developers and
i- industryy experts at the Vacation Own-
ership Investment Conference, held at
the Peabody Hotelin Orlando, Florida.
Many of the persons The Tribune
spoke with said the Bahamian govern-
ment's inability to respond to invest-
ment applications promptly was a
major source of frustration to their
'development plans.


Howard Nusbaum, president and
chief executive of the American Resort
Development Association (ARDA),
told The Tribune his organsiation was
working with the Bahamian govern-
ment to determine the best way to
amend timeshare legislation to facilitate
investment in the Bahamas.
"We have a Bill right now that we are
working on in the Bahamas. Our
ARDA Caribbean group is working
with the Minister of Tourism and with
the developers there. Its been stalled,
but it is finally moving again," Mr Nus-
baum said.
"I think that is something that will
ease up the problem. And the Bahami-
an government knows that and they
want to fix it."
Mr Nusbaum added that on the oth-
er side of the issue: "They [the Bahami-
an government] want to make sure that
it is a good law and it is safe for every-
one,
"Time is money, and if the develop-


Timeshare Bill 'stalled, but finally moving again'


er has to buy the land then it is going to
take him a lot longer to get all of the
rights to be able to develop it. That,
makes it expensive, so if he has a choice
of developing here or, maybe, if it's
faster in Mexico, he's going to opt to go
to Mexico."
Mr Nusbaum noted that the appeal
of the Caribbean and the Bahamas was
still strong.
He said: "Down the road, eventually
you are going to have to compete with
world destinations [such as the emerg-
ing markets of Asia and Dubai], but
the good news is I think you have a
time to build your infrastructure to
develop more support systems and to
continue to grow."
Mr Nusbaum said the infrastructure
of an island was, very important to a


developer because there was a cost he
had to bear.
"The other thing is that the traveller,
unless it's an all inclusive resort, is con-
cerned about the support services
around the resort, such as shopping,
restaurants, the more of a destination it
makes," Mr Nusbaum said.
The Caribbean Tourism Organisa-
tion's secretary-general, Vincent Van-
derpool Wallace, said governments all
over the Caribbean. not just in the
Bahamas, needed to answer potential
investors quickly.
Even if the answer is 'no', give peo-
ple a quick answer," he explained.
"One of the problems I find, generally
speaking, is that governments almost
everywhere have a great difficulty say-
ing 'no'.


"Even when they are leaning to say
'no', they drag .the thing on and the
investors keep pressing and pressing.
So, many times what you see is a dance
going on where the government is hop-
ing to try and figure out some way to
make something happen when they
should say 'no', and it looks like it's
dragging the thing out unnecessarily
long.,
"But there is no doubt that speed is
very important to these things, and the
whole idea of eliminating the red tape
and rolling out the red carpet."
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace added that
governments need to be much better at
saying 'no' to some investors and
explaining %h} it is 'no', so that
investors can fix what needs to be fixed
and expedite the process.


Cool heads must prevailing Freeport Government replies
.* ; 1 "* . \ ** : ' * 1 .' * '.. ^ *' : ; - .* ^ -^ 4 .* ** *r~'


IT'S" hot, and last week
seemed to be getting hotter.
With emotions in some quarters
alreadv fraying, they seemed to
be stoked to new levels by the
two writs filed by Caroline St
Gorge against -parts o' her late
father's estate, which also hap-
pen to be part of the Grand
Bahama Port Authority network.


TRIBUNE BUSINESS OPINION


While Ms St George has every:
right to protect her interests.as.
she sees them, the recourse to
potential litigation could not
have come at a worse time for
Freeport, its economy, residents


and licensees,:and potential
.investors. And the\ ma\ be in
for further shocks, gien that Tri-
bune Business has been told that
Ms St George and her attorney.
Damien Gomez. hase more rnits


in the pipeline, and may al
have filed one at the end
week against Fiduciary Ma
ment Services Ltd. ,
Tribune Businems has no
ment to make on the valic
Mi St George's claims,


SEE page 6B


Iready
of last
anage-
com-
dit ,ofI


to BTC bidders offer


* By NEIL HARTNELL .
Tribune Business Editor


s this - THE Government-appoint-.
ed negotiating committee has
delivered a formal.response to
the offer made for the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company (BTC) by Bluewa-
ter Communications Holdings.
the minister of state for finance
told The Tribune.
James Smith said the Gov-
ernment remained committed


E SNUiTH


to concluding
its latest
attempt to
p.riv atis e
BTC, aa
process that
has been
ongoing for
eight years
and cost the
Bahamian


SEE page 5B


Port licensees concerned

over unlicensed vendors


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Grand Bahama Port
Authority (GBPA) has been
criticised by several licensees
for failing to protect their inter-
ests by cracking down on unli-
censed street vendors or stores
who do not have permission to
sell particular goods, arguing
that it was harming their busi-
nesses and undermining
Freeport's licensee economy.
All licensees who spoke to.


The Tribune did so on condi-
tion of anonymity. They felt
the Port Authority was focus-
ing too heavily on its private,
for-profit interests and ignoring
its regulatory responsibilities
and obligations under the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement.
One licensee said he was
awaiting a response from the
Port Authority to a letter sub-
mitted by his attorney, seeking

SEE page 7B


Bahamian dollar credit 'doubles'

* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BAHAMIAN dollar-denominated credit almost doubled to
$491.9 million in the eight months to August 31, 2006, the Cen-
tral Bank of the Bahamas reported, but the $146.4 million rise in
consumer borrowing is again likely to fuel fears that too many
'Bahamians are not planning their financial affairs wisely.
In its report on monthly economic developments for August,
the Central Bank said the increase in Bahamian dollar-denomi-
nated credit was underpinned by a $459.9 million increase in
private sector credit. This compared to a $281.8 million rise in the
same period in 2005.
In the first eight months in 2006, mortgage lending rose by
$222.3 million, with consumer credit rising $146.4 million.
For August alone, the Central Bank reported that Bahamian
dollar credit grew by $47.6 million, almost double the growth in
August 2005.
Mortgage lending expanded by $19.1 million, with consumer
credit up by $26.9 million, a sta-
tistic that might cause concerns
over a potential consumer lend- SEE page 7B


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PuCtWATERHOLSE(OJPERSU



Change In Leadership At

Pricewaterhousecoopers






'.
.~ ." :-; .-












Clifford A. Johnson Thomas F. Hackett


Today the partners of PricewaterhouseCoopers, Chartered Accountants, announced a change in its
leadership. Tom Hackett retired as Senior Partner on 30 June 2006 and CliffordA. Johnson succeeded
him as Senior Partner on 1 July 2006. Tom's retirement concludes an outstanding career at the Firm
that included 10 years as Senior Partner, 1990 to 1998 and 2004 to 2006.: Tom stated that he will take
some time to travel and improve his golf game before considering how to continue being of service to
the Bahamian business community generally and the financial services industry in particular.

Clifford A. Johnson. CA now takes over the position of Senfior Partner, PricewaterhouseCoopeis,
Bahamas with principal responsibility for managing the Firm's business. Mr. Johnson is now in his
twenty-fifth year of being a partner of PricewaterhouseCoopers,'Bahamas having been admitted to the
partnership on 1 July 1982 at the Firm of legacy Coopers & Lybrand; Coopers & Lybrand and Price
Waterhouse merged on I July 1998 to form PricewaterhouseCoopers. Mr. Johnson is an advisory and
assurance specialist with over thirty years experience in serving the Firm's clients in the financial
services industry and public sector. In recent years he has leveraged his knowledge of the investment
management industry to serve as a Court appointed Joint Liquidator ofGlobe-X Canadiana Limited and
Globe-X Management Limited. Mr. Johnson stated that as Senior Partner his task is to lead the Firm
with the following-priorities: (i) improving and maintaining client service and work quality, (ii)'
. strengthening its assurance business, (iii) developing advisory and.regulatory compliance lines of
services, (iv) strengthening its human capital and skill sets, and (v) leveraging its experience nationally
and drawing on the expertise of PricewaterhouseCoopers-regioAally and internationally to demonstrate
thought leadership in wealth management, business recovery services, telecommunications, insurance,
leisure and energy sectors. Mr. Johnson stated that these priorities will be addressed with the able
assistance of his fellow partners: Wayne J. Aranha. Dawn A. Jones, L. Edgar Moxey, John R. Ranson,
Kevin D. Seymour and C. Ednol Smith. The Firm has a well established program of assisting with the
development of Bahamian human capital to become qualified accountants and all of'ts partners are
products of that program.

PricewaterhouseCoopers, Bahamas, which has offices in Nassau and Freeport, is a member firm of the
PricewaterhouseCoopers organization. PricewaterhouseCoopers provides industry-focused assurance,
tax and advisory services to build public trust and enhance value for its clients and their stakeholders.
More than 130,000 people in 148 countries work collaboratively using Connected Thinking to develop
fresh perspectives and practical advice.

"PricewaterhouseCoopers" refers to the network of member firms of PricewaterhouseCoopers International
Limited, each of which is a separate and independent legal entity.

Mr. Johnson stated that while his new role will necessarily require increased attention to managing the
business of PricewaterhouseCoopers, Bahamas, he will continue to have direct client engagement
responsibilities and presently serves as engagement leader on clients in the wealth management, insurance
and investment management industries. In addition to his passion for golf and running, he will continue
with his charitable works which includes serving as a director of St. Augustine's College and as a trustee
of The Royal Bahamas Police Force Dependants' Trust.

Clifford is married to the former Marjorie Nairn, a past President of The Bahamas Institute of Chartered
Accountants. and next-week the couple will celebrate their silver wedding anniversary. Clifford and
Marjorie worship at St. Barnabas Anglican Church, on Wulff and Baillou Roads


The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 716.45 YTD 29.81%


BISX CLOSING CHANGE
SYMBOL PRICE


AML
BAB
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
CWCB
DHS
FAM
FCC
FCL
FIN
ICD
JSJ
PRE


$1.74
$1.44
$0.80
$7.51
$11.25
$14.60
$1.55
$9.55
$11.91'
$1.80
$13.82
$5.37
$2.70
$6.15
$1.00
$11.21
$11.51
$9.94
$8.70
$10.00


$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$0.57
$0.10
$-
$-
$-
$-
$0.04
$-0.05
$-


VOLUME YTD PRICE
CHANGE


0
0
0
0
400
0
0
2200
0
7560
0
0
12700
0
0
200
750
4800
10000
0


138.36%'
30.91%
14.29%
7.29%
8.17%
14.51%,
23.02%
0.00%
30.74%
9.76%
27.02%
11.88%
24.42%
1.65%
-13.04%
11.54%
5.60%
-14.67%
-3.87%
0.00%


DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:
Bahamas Supermarkets (BSL) has declared dividends of i
$0.24 per share, payable on October 10, 2006, to all sharehold-
ers of record date September 29, 2006.
Bahamas Supermarkets (BSL) has declared a special divi-
dend of $0.36 per share, payable on October 10, 2006, to all
shareholders of record date September 29, 2006.
Bahamas Waste (BWL) has declared dividends of $0.06 per
share, payable on October 20, 2006, to all shareholders of
record date October 11, 2006.
Consolidated Water Company (CWCO) has declared div-
idends of $0.012 per share, payable on November 7, 2006, to all
shareholders of record date September 30, 2006.



FIDLIT

MARKETWRAP-


* By Fidelity Capital
Markets

A MODERATE level
of trading activity took place
in the Bahamian market this
past week, as over 33,000
shares changed hands. The
market saw seven out of its 19
listed stocks trade, of which
one advanced, one declined
and five remained unchanged.
Volume leader for the week
was Doctors Hospital Health
Systems (DHS) with 12,700
shares changing hands,
accounting for 37.76 per cent
of the total shares traded.
The big advancer for the
week was also DHS, gaining
$0.10 or 3.85 per cent to end
the week at $2.70. On the
down side, J S Johnson Com-
pany (JSJ) lost $0.05 or -5.71
per cent to close at $8.70.
For the week, the FINDEX
rose by 0.46 points to end the
week at 716.45.

COMPANY NEWS

The Bahamas Property Fund
(BPF) -
FOR the six months ending
June 30, 2006, BPF posted net
income of $1.3 million, repre-
senting an increase of $142,000
or 12.31 per cent.
Total income increased by
$8,500 or 0.41 per cent to total
$2.1 million, while operating
expenses declined by $57,000
or 6.67 per cent to total
$797,000.
For the period, funds from
operations stood at $1.3 mil-
lion or $0.54 per share versus
$1.2 million or $0.51 per share
for the same period last year.
As at June 30, 2006, NetAsset
Value (NAV) of the fund was


$11.49, compared to $10.25 for
the equivalent period in 2005.
At its present share price of
$11.25, BPF is trading at a dis-
count of $0.24 or 2.13 per cent
to its NAV.

Doctors Hospital Health
Systems (DHS) -
SThe positive upward trek of
DHS's financial performance
continues. For the 2006 second
quarter, net income stood at
$1.1 million, an increase of
$650,000 or 134.6 per cent over
the 2005 second quarter net
income of $483,000.
Total revenues grew by
$947,000 or 11.52 per cent to
total $9.2 million, while
expenses rose by $596,000 or
8.30 per cent to total $7.8 mil-
lion.
Income from continuing
operations stood at $1.4 mil-
lion versus $1 million year-
over-year, while the loss from
discontinued operations
improved:by $283,000 to stand
at -$167,000 versus -$450,000
for the comparable period in
2005. Earnings per share grew
by $0.06 to $0.11 as at July 31,
2006.
In related news, DHS's an-
agement announced the cm-
pany has entered into a sales
agreement to sell the Western,
Medical Plaza (WMP).
WMP's operational losses
have had a negative effect on
DHS's bottom line in recent
times. As at July 31, 2006,
WMP had an estimated book
value of $5.5 million, and it is
anticipated that the transac-
tion should be completed by
the end of the third quarter. If
the sell'of WMP goes as plan,
the proceeds will in all likeli-
hood be used to pay down
DHS's bank debt.


International Markets

FOREX Rates -A
Weekly %Change

CAD$ 1.1261 0.73
GBP 1.8708 -0.06
EUR 1.2597 -0.60-

Commodities
Weekly %Change

Crude Oil $59.88 -4.80
Gold $578.00 -3.38

International Stock Market Indexes:
Weekly %Change

DJIA 11,850.21 1.47
S&P500 1,349.58 1.03
NASDAQ 2,299.99 1.84
Nikkei 16,436.06 1.91
.......... ~L


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2006


THE TRIBUNE







ilIL IIiiDUI'J1 MONDAY, OCTOBER 9,2006, PAGE 3B


I ME ":. .4


Tourism supply




plans for Haiti


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business Reporter
CARICOM is in talks with
Haiti's government to trans-
form that country into a major
supplier of tourism products
for the Caribbean.
The idea is one of several
being worked on in an effort
to improve Haiti's impover-
ished economy, and is some-
thing the Caribbean Tourism
Organistion (CTO) is excited
about, its secretary- general,
Vincent Vanderpool Wallace,
said at the Vacation Owner-
ship Investment Conference in
Orlando, Florida.
"We have discovered that a
lot of people coming to the
Caribbean do not have to nec-
essarily have to have a prod-
uct from a specific destination,
so we are creating something
which is made in the Caribbean
brand," Mr Vanderpool-Wal-
lace said.
* "Haiti, if you do not know,
because of the artist art and
sculpture and souvenirs is enor-
mous, so we are very much get-
ting them involved as we begin
to build the business with them
in terms of getting some of the
other stuff done."
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said
the CTO has found that any-
one who has land or an invest-
ment in a Caribbean destina-
tion is among the biggest cheer-
leader for the destination.
"When you go and invest
your money in a destination,


VINCENT VANDERPOOL-WALLACE
* VINCENT VANDERPOOL-WALLACE


(FILE photo)


what you suddenly become is
the person who walks around
telling everybody about what
a wonderful place it is ,and so
there are certain kinds of
investment, including this ,that
we believe are extremely
important in terms of getting
the.word of mouth out," Mr.
Vanderpool-Wallace said.
He added that this venture
could provide Haiti with an
immediate benefit while long
term solutions are being put in
place.


"The reality of the situation
is that it will take some time
for Haiti to build its stocks to
get into business, and get itself
to the place where people are
going to go back to Haiti in
very large numbers," Mr Van-
:derpool-Wallace said..:
! He added that this did not
stop the rest of the region from
working with Haiti in a number
of areas. There were a number
of joint ventures being imple-
mented between Haiti and the
Dominican Republic, he said.


Located next to Atlantis,
with 228
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appointed Junior Suites
and meeting facilities
to accommodate
up to 70 people.

Our guests have
full use of the
exclusive facilities of
the fabulous Atlantis
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Ask about our local
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Contact our
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PARADISEISLAND
BAHAMAS


1 Paradise Island Drive
Paradise Island, Bahamas


CARIBBEAN GROUP OF SECURITIES REGULATORS
.,s 3rd ANNUAL CONFERENCE
^ BRITISH COLONIAL HILTON OCTOBER 26 27,2006

HOSTED BY THE SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS

Day I Day 2
Keynote Address Presentation:
OPENING CEREMONY THE REGULATION OF HEDGE FUNDS
Senator Hon. James Smith Minister of State Mr. Dermot Butler Deputy Chairman, Alternative
for Finance Investment Management Association

Presentation: Panel Discussion:
IOSCO INITIATIVES INFORMATION CORPORATE GOVERNANCE IN THE
SHARING CARIBBEAN
Mr. Phillippe Richard Secretary General, Mr. Trevor Blake, General Manager,
International Organization of Securities Eastern Caribbean Securities Exchange
Commissions [IOSCO] Mr. George Roper, Senior Director of Securities,
Financial Services Commission, Jamaica
Panel Discussion: Panel Discussion:
CROSS BORDER COOPERATION REGIONAL INTEGRATION (CSME) & THE
Ms. Virginia Mapp, General Manager, REGULATION OF CAPITAL MARKETS
Barbados Securities Commission Mr. Roy Johnson, Executive Chairman,
Mr. Munro Sutherland, Superintendent of Jamaica Stock Exchange
Banking Trust and Investigations Bermuda Mr. Marion Yarde, General Manager, Barbados
Monetary Authority Stock Exchange

Panel Discussion: Panel Discussion:
ACCOUNTANTS AS GATEKEEPERS COMBATING MARKET ABUSE: THE
Mr. Kevin Seymour, CPA, Price Waterhouse DISCIPLINARY PROCESS
Coopers Ms. Darell Taylor, Legal Officer, Securities
Mr. Kendrick Christie, President, Bahamas Commission of The Bahamas
Institute of Chartered Accountants [BICA] Mr. Michael Scott, Senior Partner, Callendars &
Ms. Ana Fiorella Carvajal, Technical Co Attorneys-at-Law, Nassau, Bahamas
Assistance Advisor, Monetary and Capital
Markets Departments of the IMF

Lunch Presentation Lunch Presentation
RELAXATION OF EXCHANGE FINANCIAL SERVICES SECTOR: PRODUCTS
CONTROLS & TRENDS
Mrs. Wendy Craigg Governor, Central Bank Ms. Wendy Warren, CEO, BFSB

Panel Discussion: Presentation:
SUPERVISION OF CONGLOMERATES ENFORCEMENT
Mr. Kevin Solomon, Chief Investments Mr. Ethiopis Tafara, Director- International Affairs
Cayman Islands Monetary Authority United States Securities and Exchange Commission
Mr. Warwick Ward, Senior Economist,
Central Bank Barbados
Panel Discussion:
MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS &
MINORITY SHAREHOLDERS' Cost: Entire Conference $400
Mr. Keith Davies, CEO, BISX Individual Days $250
Ms. Sandra Osbourne, Executive Vice
President, General Counsel, Sagicor Financial (Lunch and parking included)
Corporation
Mr. L. Everette Martin, Deputy Director,, Contact: Securities Commission of The
Eastern Caribbean Securities Regulatory Bahamas
Commission Tel.: (242) 356-6291
Presentation: Email:
INVESTOR EDUCATION CSRC2006@scb.gov.bs
Ms. Lori Schock, Acting Director, ...
United States, Securities and Exchange Website: www.scb.gov.bs
Commission


.. BAHAMAS FIRST
1Ien&e6a/W9n\uiance m6/sany inaied.



Career opportunityfor an ambitious career oriented individual as a:

NETWORK SUPERVISOR

The Role:
Maintain Servers
Maintain Cisco Routers and Switches
Maintain and support PC workstation hardware
Maintain printers
Maintain the following software:
Microsoft Office Suite
Microsoft Exchange
.*IBM Client Access
Perform Network System Backups
Hardware installation, maintenance and upgrades
Communications Support
General User support
The ideal candidate will have the following:
At least three years experience managing a Windows 2000
based network
At least two years experience working with Cisco Routers
Knowledge of Wireless communications
Experience with server upgrades and maintenance
Extensive knowledge of VPNs
Knowledge of Telecommunications
Comprehensive knowledge of routing
Must be able to work unsupervised
Excellent trouble-shooting skills
Must be able to train others
MCSE and CCNA Certification are not required but an asset.
The Bahamas First Group is the largest property and casualty
insurance company in the Bahamas and has an A- (Excellent)
Rating from A. M. Best, reflecting the company's financial stability
and sound risk management practices.
Please send resume to:
Group IT Manager
SBahamas First Centre
32 Collins Avenue
P.O. Box SS-6268
Nassau, Bahamas
Or email to: deborahm@bahamasfirst.com
Deadline for submission is October 11, 2006

R"y" O" 'MMIMM1


MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2006, PAGE 3B


I Mt I -1tDUll-e









PAGE 4B, MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2006 THE TRIBUNE





Minister launches



latest Clipper ship


f


41 UBS
UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd., a leading international trust
company has an opening in our

Data Management & Projects Team

This position is open to candidates with the following minimum
requirements:
Qualifications/Experience:

* Operations experience from any bank in client reporting;
* IT project experience;
* VBA, MS Access and/or SQL Knowledge;
* Basic accounting knowledge;
* Administration experience in Online Banking Systems.

University Degree in either:

* Business Administration with IT knowledge or
* Computer Information Systems / Computer Science with
strong business exposure.

Main Responsibilities:

* Setting up and creating new efficiencies for sourcing PDF
Portfolio Statements from other booking center locations;

* Source end-of-month account valuations from other booking
center locations;

* Assume responsibility for any existing sourcing project
(transaction record information used.for financial statement
preparation) for Asia, London and Jersey booking centers;

A successful track recording project management and strong
analytical skills are key requirements to succeed in this position.

Interested persons should reply on or.before October 16, 2006
to:

hrbahamas@ubs.com
or
UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas


* PICTURED from L to R: Lowell Mortimer, attorney; Lynne
Hanna, Clipper Group, Nassau; Captain Anthony Allens, head
of the Port Department; Fred Mitchell; Kemal Yardimci,
Bahamas Honorary Consul in Turkey; Erma Mackey, assistant
director at the Bahamas Maritime Authority; Calvin Brown;
Ministry of Foreign Affair; Gurli Moyell; John Moyell, Clipper
Group; Teddy Folmer, Clipper Denmark; K. Christie, Ministry of
Foreign Affairs; Jan Meinertz, Clipper Wonsild Tankers, Copen.
hagen; Marianne Meinertz


FRED Mitchell, minister of
foreign affairs, has named the
10th vessel in a series of chem-
ical tankers that will be man-
aged by the Nassau-based Clip-
per Group.
The Clipper Loyalty was
launched at the Yardimci Ship-
yard in Tulza, close to Istan-
bul, Turkey, as the latest in a
series of 10,000 ton deadweight
capacity chemical tankers.
When delivered to the Clip-
per Group early next year, the
vessel will be flying the
Bahamian flag and registered
under the Bahamas Maritime
Registry. It will be managed
by Clipper Wonsild Tankers.
With the acquisition last year
of the Danish shipowner, Won-
sild Tankers, the Clipper
Group's tanker activities and
investment has expanded con-


siderably.
The company's tanker fleet
features 64 vessels, with an
additional 25 vessels ranging
in size from 3,500 to over
300,000 tons deadweight capac4
ity under construction at ship
yards in Turkey, Bulgaria, the
Netherlands, China, Japan and
South Korea.
The Clipper Group is head-
quartered in Nassau, and cur-
rently operates a fleet of 250
vessels.
More than 105 vessels are
owned, out of which 76 vessels.
fly the Bahamian flag and are
registered with the Bahamas
Maritime Authority.
The Clipper Group has
another 72 newbuildings under
construction. The majority of
these vessels will also be regis-
tered in the Bahamas.


Bahamas Agricultural &
industrial Corporation (BAIC)


Company Name:
Contact Persori Name:
Telephone No.


Fax: No.


Soon.


-Baha, A rts Festival 2006
A trade show promoting Bahamian made Arts & Crafts


October 27 29, 2006
Arawak Cay, Nassau, Bahamas


"; --7" " - ,
Ministry of Financial
Services & Investments


n Form


S__Cell No:


P.O. Box


E-Mail Address
Cost of Craft Booth: $150.00


Workshops: $20.00


Don't wait! 'Register Now!!!!
Please fill out the form,and drop off to BAIC


The Levy Building
East Bay Street,
P.O. Box N-4940
Nassau, Bahamas






-C- F A L"
Pricing Information As Of:.
Friday. 6 October 2006
S ..XMAHAMAS.COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
67-HG 00.001 /%CHO 00.00 / YTD 279.75/ YTD % 20.71
'S. .*. -H. 5. k-L c Secunl y Previous Close Toda.'s Close C-r.,rg.- Di, .:-.i EPS i. C, P E ld
1.6 0 59 A a3co Markets 1 74 1 4 .' '"' .1: 109 0 000 N.'M 1i0 00.
12.05 9.50 Bahamas Property Fund 11.25 11.25 0.00 1.627 0.380 6.9 3.38%
7.51 6.90 Bank of Bahamas 7.51 7.51 0.00 0.777 0.330 9.7 4.39%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.208 0.020 3.8 2.50%
1.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.55 1.55 0.00 0.168 0.000 9.2 0.00%
1.49 1.10 Fidelity Bank 1.44 1.44 0.00 0.188 0.050 7.7 3.47%
9.60 9.05 Cable Bahamas 9.55 9.55 0.00 1,600 0.659 0.240 14.5 2.51%
2.20 1.39 Colina Holdings 1.80 1.80 0.00 0.009 0.000 200.0 0.00%
11.91 9.00 Commonwealth Bank 11.91 11.91 0.00 0.943 0.660.. 12.6 5.54%
6.26 4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.36 5.18 -0.18 0.130 0.045 41.2 0.84%
2.88 2.10 Doctor's Hospital 2.70 2.70 0.00 1,500 0.348 0.000 7.8 0.00%
6.21 4.20 Famguard 6.115 6.15 0.00 0.428 0.240 14.4 3.90%
11.51 10.60 Finco 11.51 11.51 0.00 ,750 0.763 0.560 15.1 4.87%
14.00 9.50 FirstCaribbean 13.82 13.82 0.00 0.927 0.550 14.9 3.98%
11.21 9.25 Focol 11.21 11.21 0.00 0.885 0.500 12.7 4.46%
1.15 0.95 Freeport Concrete 1.00 1.00 0.00 -0.170 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.20 8.49 ICD Utilities 8.49 8.49 0.00 0.532 0.270 16,0 3.18%
9.10 8.65 J. S. Johnson 8.70 8.70 0.00 0.527 0.560 16.5 6.44%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.291 0.195 7.7 1.95%
*.~ .r\ ,* ....... .;.-,:i-The-Counter, Scur,ltes
52vk-HH 52wk-LOW Symool Bid $ Ask '. LAai Pr..:.z. I.eekl. :Il EPS 0.. i PE 'I lld
14 30 1225 Bahamas Supermarkets 14 60 15 6i 1i 01.: 1 923 1 '20 9 9 0-
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 8.00 8.25 10.00 0.000 0.640 M 7.85%
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.00 -0.002 0.000 .,M 0.00%
4 ; .'"-. : -.. ,~~ato -Counter Securities
13 00 28 00 ABDAB 41 00 j1.3 0, .-1 1 22.0' 1:1 000 194
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.00 15.00 12.50 1.750 0.360 8.0 2.57%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.45 -0.070 0.000 N/M 0.00%
....... " ,:~%.':U. -" '.',atedIuluua; FLnos
..- 52 k-Lo., Fund Name NA I'TDO L _.i 1. r.1.:.r.lh .. F Yieldh ;
1.3087 1.2552 Colina Money Market Fund 1.308718"
2.9513 2.4766 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.9513"*"
2.4606 2.2560 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.460616"
1 1923 1.1348 Colina Bond Fund 1.192331.""
-... ~gI YTDro 29 al % 2005o 28.09% .-..'..:, ;-:..'*:2 .:
Bie X ALL SHARE INDEX 19 De 0' = 1.000 0 MARi ET TERMS VYILO Iast1 'I; ..:..i.r. 1.1.CJ. I..S ai..I r J ::, .: ii .-.,N ., KEY
52wk-Hi Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity 29 September 2006
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for dally volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week 31 August 2006
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value ** 31 August 2006
DIV $ Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 "* 31 August 2006


NOTICE


Pursuant to the provisions of Section 228 of The Companies
Act, 1992 notice is hereby given that at an Extraordinary General
Meeting of the Members of DICK'S POINT 23 LIMITED
held on the 5th, day of October, A.D. 2006 the following
Resolution was unanimously passed:-

RESOLVED that the Company take all such steps as may be
necessary to effect its liquidation and fdrthwith cause it s name
to be struck off the Register of Companies in accordance with
The Companies Act, 1992 AND that John E. J. King of #6
Poinciana Dr., Skyline Heights, Western District, New Providence,
The Bahamas be and is hereby appointed Liquidator of the
Company for the purpose of such liquidation.

Dated the 5th day of October, A.D. 2006.


John E. J. King, Liquidator


Customer Service Representative

We are in search of qualified individuals to join our team
as Customer Service Representative (CSR)
The successful candidate will be responsible for and should
display the following:
Greet Clients
Create invoices and bills for departing Clients
Answering and directing telephone calls
Perform data entry and use software programs
Excellent communication skills are essential.
Work independently and be a team player
Exhibit exceptional organizational skills
-Work in a fast pace environment and prioritize
work assignments
-Proficient in Microsoft Office
Occasional travel may be required
3 years in customer services and data entry experience
Hand deliver resumes with a passportlphoto, for directions
call 377-3355.
Or mail to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-8174
Nassau Bahamas


Comic


Register


NOTICE
Pursuant to the provisions of Section 236 of The Companies Act, 1992
notice is hereby given that at an Extraordinary General Meeting of the
Members of DICK'S POINT 23 LIMITED will be held at the Office
of Worldwide Corporate Service Prbviders Ltd. on the Second Floor,
Olde Towne Marina, Sandyport, West Bay Street in the City of Nassau
on the day 31st day of January, 2007 at 11 o'clock in the morning.
The purpose of the said Meeting is to have laid before the Members of
the Company the Final Statements of the liquidator showing the manner
in which the winding up of the company has been conducted, the
property of the company disposed of, the debts and obligations of the
company discharged and also to hear any explanations that may be given
by the Liquidator.
All claims by creditors of the Company must be received by the Liquidator
at P.O. Box N-4825, Olde Towne Marina, Sandyport, West Bay Street
in the City of Nassau (Address of Liquidator) before the 5th day of
November, 2006.
Dated the 5th day of October, A.D. 2006.

John E. J. King
Liquidator of the above-named Company


F


)








THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2006, PAGE 5B


Government replies to BTC bidder's offer


FROM page 1B


taxpayer more than $150 mil-
lion, with a successful conclu-
sion seemingly elusive.
"It's continuing in the sense
that our group has been meet-
ing regularly over the past cou-
ple weeks, and formally
responding to their offer," Mr
Smith said.
"So it's very much in the
middle of the pipeline."
He declined to comment on
the details of Bluewater's offer,
or those contained in the Gov-
ernment's counter-proposal.
The process is now likely to
see a series of exchanges
between the Government com-
mittee and Bluewater, with
each. side submitting various
proposals and counter-pro-
posals, and seeking clarifica-
tion on each other's submis-
sions.
This is likely to last for some
time, and there is no guarantee
that the Government and
Bluewater will be able to reach
an agreement on BTC's pri-
vatisation, with a 49 per cent
stake in the telecoms incum-
bent initially on the table.
S The Government would
,retain the remaining 51 per
cent, with Bluewater gaining
management control if it were
* successful. However, the size
of the stake being sold to Blue-
Swater is likely to be open to
negotiation,
If talks with Bluewater break
down, then the Government is
likely to invite other interested
parties to begin due diligence


on BTC. Among other poten-
tial suitors is known to be
Cable & Wireless (C&W),
which sees BTC as a good fit
with its other Caribbean tele-
coms operations.
The Government commit-
tee's membership has been
appointed by the Cabinet, and
chosen from a combination of
the public sector, quasi-public
sector and the private sector.
Agencies

Among the agencies likely
to be represented on the Com-
mittee are the Ministry of
Finance, Attorney General's
Office, Ministry of Public
Works, and the directors and
management of BTC itself.
Leading figures on the com-
mittee are likely to include
Ruth Millar, financial secre-
tary to the Treasury, and
Rowena Bethel, the Ministry
of Finance's legal adviser.
The Government has vest-
ed the current privatization
process with heavy secrecy,
due in part to the failed 'open
beauty contest' method that
was tried in 20,03, when it
decided none of the three
offers made for a 49 per cent
stake in BTC matched its own
valuation.
The secrecy, and lack of
transparency when compared
to the previous process, has
caused some frustrations, not
only among other potential
bidders such as C&W but
members. of the Bahamian
financial community and some
BTC staff.
Bluewater seem to have


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause., campaigning
for improvmt iIn Ihc
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



-V.WWW -lVlAS. S TERi -

Call 434"-3-055












Sfor Clarks and

Shoe Village Shoe Stores.

Please fax your applications to

326-0570
or mail to
P.O. Box N 3009
Nassau, Bahamas




Young's Beverage Depot


Caribbean Springs

Eraram'


Tel: 322-6200
Super Wash Plaz
Robinson Roa

1 Litre water $7.50
4/ gal water $3.50
12oz water $8.50
20oz water $11.50


ICE
Large $6.50
Medium $4.50
Small $2.50


We Deliver to the Family Island


been a bid vehicle created
specifically for the purpose ol
trying to buy into and priva
tise BTC. It is likely to be
backed by private equity
financing.
Among Bluewater's principals
are Roger Ames, former chair-
man and chief executive of
Warner Music Group, and pres-
ident of Warner Music Interna-
tional from August 1999 to
August 2004.
Also involved is the former
chief financial officer of a UK-
based cable operator called
NTL, John Gregg. He was for-


merly managing director of
two European broadband
cable operators. Cablecom
GmbH and iesy Hessen
GmbH.
Mr Gregg was also manag-
ing director of the Cellular
Communications Inc group of
companies, which operated cell
phone networks in the US,
Puerto Rico, the US Virgin
Islands and Italy.
Among the key issues likely
to dominate negotiations with
the Government are the price
Bluewater is willing to pay for
its BTC stake; conditions of


any agreement; the extent of
the monopoly BTC holds in
fixed-line and cellular services
and how long they will be
maintained; capital expcndi
ture and how much Bluewater
is willing to put into its busi-
ness plan; how much the
group will invest in training
Bahamians; and the composi-


tion of the Board and man-
agement agreements.
The impending general elec-
tion may also act as an obstacle
to the Government conclud-
ing BTC's privatization during
its current term in office, given
the numerous votes bound-up
with the company's staff and
their relatives.


Staff Openings


Esso On The Run located at Wulff Road and Mackey
Street is seeking to attract suitable candidates for deli,
convenience store and pump attendant positions.

Candidates must be pleasant and courteous.

Interested persons should contact Tel 356-7870 or
email kendrathompson@coralwave.com or
fax 325-3962 to make an appointment to be interviewed,


We're drivers too.


-9A

Wit4o0NG MAY
TwoPoitonAMAv


Construction Manager-Building


* Minimum 5 yrs experience in construction or related
field such as Architecture or Engineering
* Working knowledge of timber and masonry construction
methods
* Proficient in reading and understanding construction plans'
* Proficient in performing material take-offs and placing
material orders
SWorking knowledge of construction materials
* Proficient with Mficrosoft Word and Microsoft Excel
* Good communication skills

Construction Manager-Utilities

* Minimum,5yrs experience in construction or'relatcd field
such as Engineering
* Working knowledge of methods of installation of water,
sewer, communication and electrical infrastructure
* Proficient in reading and understanding construction plans
* Proficient in performing materials take-offs placing material
orders
* working knowledge of construction materials
* Proficient with Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel
* Good communication skills

Resume' ;h ifild be mailed to NicklSims, Development"'
Department. The Abaco Club on Winding Bay,
P.O.Box AB20571, Marsh Harbour, Abaco,
or Faxed to 242-367-2930.


DEAN OF STUDENTS FOR,
KINGSWAY ACADEMY
Kingsway Academy High School invites applicants
for the position of Dean of Students who will assist
with planning, overseeing the discipline system, and
counseling.

The successful candidate MUST:

be a practicing, committed born-again Christian
have minimum qualifications of a Bachelor's
Degree from a recognized college or university
have a valid teacher's certificate or diploma
where appropriate
be willing to participate in extra curricular
activities, etc.
be expected to teach in his specialized subject
area for 12 to 15 periods weekly
be familiar with Microsoft Office, including
Access
be willing to learn the Student Information
System Data Base

Applications must be made in writing together with
a full curriculum vitae, recent color photograph and
names of at least three references, one being that of
your Church Pastor to:

Ms. Kelcine Hamilton
Academy Affairs Manager
P.O. Box N-4378
Nassau, Bahamas

For further information, please contact the
I.tusimvs Oflice,.al 'Telephone numbers 324-6369
or' 324-6887.

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2006


- ~"'- --


~--~I--I I







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B. MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2006


Cool heads must prevail in Freeport


A single storey incomplete Triplex Apartment Building (gross floor area 2,016 sq.ft.),
consists of T o two bedrooms and One- one Bedroom units each with one bathroom,
living-dining room and kitchen and situate about 166 feet south of Bellot Road and
1/2 mile east of Gladstone Road and comprising 87,120 sq.ft. or 2 acres
Appraised value: $377,000
Utilities: Electricity, Water and Telephone





:7-4





For conditions of the sale and any other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
at: 356-1685 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Comxmercal Credit Collection Unit, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
to reach us before November 3. 2006
SaeioAs enquiri only





A multi-national oil company has an opening for a





The candidate must meet the following criteria:


Must have a minimum of 5 years experience in field:Thorough
knowledge of all financial reporting, Inventory control,
Auditing.
Must be highly proficient in computer software applications
and accounting systems (specially Microsoft Excel)


Please send your enquiries to: Texas Gas & Oil Ltd.
1 st Floor Charlotte House
Email: Jalmaraz@tgoltd.com
Ph: (242) 328-4380/1
Fax: (242) 323-4871












BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION VACANCY
NOTICE


INTERNAL AUDITORS INTERNAL AUDIT.
DEPARTMENT

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for Internal Auditors in the Internal Audit
Department.

The job executes various audit and investigation assignnients as stipulated in the
Schedule of Activities formulated by the AGM-Chief Internal Auditor; supervises and
directs the activities of the Audit Clerks, and offers technical assistance to the
Assistant Internal Auditors. The internal auditor trains subordinate staff; assists the
External Auditors with joint audit efforts for the year-end audit; produces audit
programs; produces audit and investigation reports as well as monthly and quarterly
reports; assists the AGM-Chief Internal Auditor with annual plans and corporate
research.

The duties and responsibilities for this job is as follows, but not limited to:

Produce audit programs and submit for approval of the chief Internal
Auditor
Conducts complete risk assessment for area being audited
Conducts financial, operational and ITS audit assignments in
accordance with established audit programs.
Produces complete file of audit working papers
Produces audit reports on audit concerns and recommendations in
accordance with the IIA Standards
Conducts some confidential audit investigations, evaluate finding
& produce reports; exercising the IIA's ethical standards
Conducts reviews of budgetary systems (including variances
analysis), policies, manpower efficiency and new computer applications
Discusses audit concerns with the relevant Department/Section
head and seek agreement to implement recommendations.
Supervises work of Audit Clerks and conduct review of work done

The successful candidate should also possess:


could ultimately be for a court to
decide. Yet this publication
remains deeply concerned about
the wider ramifications the dis-
pute over the late Mr St
George's estate could have, with
Freeport's economy and
licensees caught up in any 'col-
lateral' damage.
If the dispute was one involv-
ing shareholders in an ordinary
private company, it would be
largely contained within the
walls of that firm. Yet the Port
Authority is not you average
run-of-the-mill private compa-
ny, the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment having vested it with qua-
si-governmental powers to gov-
ern Freeport and the entire Port
area, including licensing and reg-
ulatory functions.
So while the day-to-day func-
tions at the Port Authority may
not be impacted, the estate dis-
pute has the potential to impact
the wider business and invest-
ment climate in the Bahamas'
second city. Already, Morgan
Stanley, the Port's partner in the
potential Barbary Beach devel-
opment, is understood to have
become nervous about the secu-
rity of its potential investment,
given the prevailing climate and
public statements made by some
with a vested interest in the out-
come.


Of course, the Port Authori-
ty's existing major private sec-
tor partner, Hutchison Wham-
poa, has already been dragged
unwillingly into events, given
that one of Ms St George's writs
is against the Grand Bahama
Development Company (Dev-
co), Hutchison owns a 50 per
cent stake in Devco, the other
50 per cent held by Port Group
Ltd the other entity to receive
the writ.
Indeed, the writ against Port
Group indirectly drags all the
Port's major assets, such as the
Freeport Harbour Company and
Grand Bahama Airport Com-
pany, into the affair, although
business will continue as usual.
The fallout is obvious. Sever-
al sources told Tribune Business
last week they feared that the
flurry of writs was "starting to
paralyse the Port", distracting
its attention and that if its senior
executives from more important
matters, such as Freeport's eco-
nomic and social development
and well-being.
Given the potential impact on
business and investment confi-
dence in Freeport, now would
seem like as good a time as any
to revisit the amendments to the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement
that provide for the creation of a
'Local Authority' that the Port


BUSINESS WORKSHOPS


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Notice
NOTICE is hereby given that NICOLE DORELUS, OF 3961
NORTH WEST 36TH AVENUE,. LAUDERDALE LAKES,
FLORIDA, 33309, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 2ND day of OCTOBER, 2006
to thd Ministdr'fteponsible for Natiohality and Cilizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas. '


Authority can devolve all its reg-
ulatory and quasi-governmental
powers to.
Who knows, the Port Author-
ity could well end up being that
'Local Authority' if its current
owners agreed to split it off from
their private, for-profit assets
and interests. In the process, it
could also reduce much of the
tension surrounding Mr St
George's estate.
Obviously, such a move could
not happen without the consent
of at least 80 per cent of
licensees, and could not be done
overnight. The transition to a
'Local Authority', with licens-
ing and regulation done via a
heavy dose of licensee self-reg-
ulation, needs to be planned and
will take time, but will remove
the obvious 'conflict of interest'
between the Port Authority's
profit-making roles and respon-
sibilities, and its governance
obligations.
It is not hard to envision Port
Group Ltd being left with the
asset ownership, investment
attraction and deal-making
responsibilities underthe guid-
ance of someone like present
chairman Hannes Babak.
And, equally, an entirely sep-
arate or 'Chinese-walled' Port
Authority could be seen as
Freeport's governing and regu-
latory authority, headed up by a
man such as former co-chair and
chief executive, Julian Francis.
Such a move could take some
of the heat out of the simmering
St George estate furnace, which
appears to have unwittingly been
ignited by Mr Babak's appoint-
ment earlier this year, judging
by comments made by Ms St
George and her rival claimant,
Edward's former second wife,
Mary.
Whatever happens in the
long-term with the Port Author-
ity, the wheels can be set in chain
now to set that future course.
And hopefully, it could begin
the cooling-off process so badly
needed.
The dispute over Mr St
George's estate needs to be
resolved without recourse to lit-
igation, which could depress the
Port's value and standing fur-
ther. And it requires all vested
interests in the outcome to back
awayand give those directly
involved some much-needed
breathing space. That would,
indeed, be the best outcome for
Jll concerned. Especially
Freeport residents: '.


Conversational Haitian Creole I
Mon/Wed: 6:00 -7:30 p.m.


Conversational French I
Tues/Thurs: 6:00- 7:30 p.m.


Conversational German I
Mon/Wed: 6:00 7:30 p.m.


Conversational Spanish I
Tues/Thurs: 6:00 7:30 p.m.


A Bachelors degree in Accounting or other closely related discipline
and a professional accounting qualification e.g. CPA, CA or ACCA
Obtaining the CIA would be highly desirable.
Five years post certification experience in auditing and general
accounting with experience in interviewing, producing reports and
making verbal presentations.

Interested persons may apply by completing an returning Application form to:
The-Manager-Human Resources & Training, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads, P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau, Bahamas
on or before October 13th 2006.


-BUSINESS








THESTIN M


Port licensees concerned over unlicensed vendors


action from its technical and
licensing departments against
other licensees selling com-
peting products to his without
possessing a licence to do so.
"People are selling products
without having a licence to sell
them," the licensee source.
"This has been going on a long
time, and they're [the Port
Authority] not doing anything
about it at all. They really
don't seem to care.
"This is the fourth letter I've
sent to them. I've called them
on many occasions, and
they've said they'll call back,
but they never do. So it's obvi-
ous they're not interested in
licensee people like us."
The licensee said the latest
letter had been sent to Albert
Gray, the Port Authority's
president. Mr Gray did not
return The Tribune's detailed
phone message seeking com-
ment.
Several licensees said they
A were considering refusing to
pay their licence fees to the
Port Authority until it moved
to crack down on unlicensed
street vendors and fellow


licensees selling products they
were unlicensed for.
Another licensee said:
"There are people in my par-
ticular business working from
their trucks and going to peo-
ple's houses, selling their ware.
"There are many people
who are doing this, and why
should I pay a business licence
. In order to have a business
licence, you have to have an
address, so right there I have
two expenses and overheads
that people selling out of their
cars don't have. It's like that in
many businesses."
Arguing that this practice
should have been "clamped"
by the Port Authority many
years ago, the licensee said
signs advertising services were
posted at many homes, even
though Freeport's byelaws are
supposed to prevent business-
es being conducted from resi-
dences.
The situation shows the dif-
ficulty the Port Authority has
in balancing its private, profit-
making duties to its share-
holders, Sir Jack Hayward and
the St George family, with the


regulatory, licensing and qua-
si-governmental powers hand-
ed to it by the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement.
The licensees spoken to by
The Tribune all felt the Port
Authority was pursuing its pri-
vate, for-profit functions at the
expense of its regulatory role
and responsibilities to the
licensees.
One said: "I do understand
they're in business to make
money themselves, but they
do seem to be concentrating
on that area more than oth-
ers."
While acknowledging that
business licences and other fee
income was essential for
enabling the Port Authdfity to
maintain Freeport's infra-
structure and upkeep, one
licensee questioned whether
they would still receive a dis-
count on their business licence
fee.
In-the past, some Port
Authority licensees received
as much as a 50 per cent dis-
count on their fees if'these
were paid up by a certain date,
but great uncertainty exists


over whether this practice will
continue.
Another licensee source said
that the Port Authority once
used to be "very strict" in its
application of the regulations,
with licensees only able to hire
other licensees to perform
work on their business such as
decorating, painting.and car-
pentry.
However, the source said
this no longer seemed to be
the case. "I have a business
licence, and you really don't
get any protection. Anyone
can come in and do what they
want," he added.
'.It.justcosts me more to do
. business.:Ihave an office;-,te-l
phone, pay a business licence
fee, pay rent, pay money to
the Port's utilities, and they"
just drive around in a truck."
Another licensee source told
The Tribune that the Port
Authority was now starting to
grant street vendors business
licences 'provided they
..received' permniifii'f to 'oper-
'ate from the property owners
where they had based them-
selves.


Bahamian dollar credit 'doubles'


ing boom.
Consumer loans tend to be
for luxuries, such as cars and
other consumables, rather than
on houses or other more pro-
ductive activities. They attract
higher interest rates, and have
often been blamed for plung-
ing Bahamians into unsustain-
able debt.
Meanwhile, the Central
Bank said its exchange control
data for the first eight months
of 2006 showed that foreign
currency payments on oil
imports had risen by 60.7 per
cent to $347.2 million, com-
pared to 2005.
Foreign currency payments
for oil rose by 48.3 per cent to
$56.8 million during August
2006, providing further evi-
dence of the impact global oil
prices have had on the nation's
current account.
The Central Bank again
warned that the "potential for
Soil price increases remains a
critical factor" for the. Bahami-
an economy i s performance
during the remainder of 2006;
notwithstanding that this is
being cancelled at least part-
ly by the tourism industry,
continued robustness of the US
economy, and capital inflows
from foreign direct investment
projects.
On the tourism front, hotel
room revenues rose by 12.7 per
cent to $33.2 million in May,
ahead of the previous year's:
$29.5 million intake.
Most of this improvement,
came from Grand Bahama,
which saw a 24.5 per cent
increase in room revenues to
$4.6 million. The increase was
generated by a 17.9 per cent
rise in average daily room rate
(ADR), and 5.6 per cent
increase in occupied room
nights.
In New Providence, room


revenues were up by 11.2 per
cent, with the ADR and occu-
pied room nights ahead by 2.1
per cent and 8.8 per cent
respectively.
Room revenues for Family
SIsland hotels increased by 9.8
per cent, with firmer ADRs
offsetting a reduction in occu-


pied room nights.
Total visitor arrivals for June
were up 3.4 per -cent ori'2005,
with air and sea arrivals up 1.7
per cent and 4.5 per cent
respectively. New Piovidence
generated 56.3 per cent of
arrivals, which were up by
around 0.9 per cent.


Notice
NOTICE is hereby given that ALINE PIERRE OF FAITH
AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 9TH day-of
OCTOBER, 2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES.ACTil,.
S(No. 45or 2000) .\ o .f ,..:

CLOVERGOLD INCORPORATED
LIQUIDATOR'S NOTICE"


PURSUANT TO SECTION 137 (6) OF THE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
I, Paul Francis, Liquidator of CLOVERGOLD .
INCOPORATED hereby certify that the winding up and
dissolution of CLOVERGOLD INCORPORATED, has bieen
completed in accordance with the Articles of Dissolution.

Dated the 29th day of September, 2006.


Ai i,

1 . ,


The Family Islands saw an
.84 percent- rise-in air visitors
and 17.9 per cent increase in
sea travellers for'an overall
increase of 15.4 per cent, with:
Grand Bahama, saw a total
decline of 7.4 per cent. Air and
sea visitors fell by 3.5 per cent
and 9.3 per cent respectively.


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The successful candidate will be a recent graduate from a Bachelors of Science or Arts program in
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The qualified candidate will be able to work in a challenging team driven environment, possess the
ability to meet tight deadlines, perform with minimal supervision, have excellent oral and written
skills, and possess a good working knowledge of Microsoft Office applications.

"~idiviilials\ wih ihe'above\meniioiiead qualiBiuion's sIhoi6ffidaf~i6f' il'lfei'iCo6rTielersalong i
,resume's to-the-following:

Recruitment Manager
BDO MannJudd
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 242-325-6592
info@bdomannjudd.com

SDeadline for applications-is October 3t-2006
ELU..


Financial Controller Needed

Responsibilities:
SFull responsibilities for all accounting activities including G/
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* Cash flo management, financial reporting, forecasting and
budgets ,
* Manage relationship with current lender and fulfill monthly
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* Manage year end audit and act as liaison to external CPAs
.* Manage annual budget process; work with senior manage-
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* Directly supervising accounting staff of 10

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Switch increasing responsibilities for multi-faceted direction
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Fax: 328-4211
Email: humanresourcesnassau@dutyfree.com


MONDAY, OCTOBER: 9, 2006, PAGE 7B


'THE TRIBUNE






PAGF RR MONDAY. OCTOBER 9, 2006


Swingers change their


pitch to defeat


0 SOFTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter.
THE Bommer George
Swingers made a key pitch-
ing change down the stretch
to hold off the perennial
champions Electro Telecom
Wildcats in game three of
the.New Providence Soft-
ball Association ladies'
championship series.
Trailing 2-0 in the series,
but leading 6-2 going into
the bottom of the seventh
on Sunday afternoon at the
Baillou Hills Sporting
Complex, manager Gary
'Super' Johnson brought in
reliever Bernie Farrington
for ace and starter Desiree
Taylor.
Farrington struggled at
the start, walking the bases
loaded, giving up four runs
before she finally got the
save for the Swingers as
they stayed alive for game
four on Saturday at 1.30pm
in between the men's play-
offs,
"We played a double
header yesterday and both
pitchers pitched and
Desiree pitched a full game
and she came back in relief
in the other game," John-
son reflected.
"If Desiree didn't give us
as much as she did, we
probably wouldn't have had
to pull her. But we needed
three outs in the sevenu~l
and after she got a little
tired, we just hoped that
Bernie would have pulled
us through."
Farrington walked two
and gave up just one hit
with a strike out to go
alone with Taylor's impres-
sive 3-hitter with three
strike outs over the first six
innings.
Taylor said it was a must
win situation.
"I just gave it my all after


Wildcats


* DOROTHY MARSHALL in action for the Bommer George Swingers
(Photo: Tim Clarke)


-itching two: s'es yester-
day and to have to come
back out in the hot sun
today," Taylor reflected. "I
wasn't prepared to go home
and the rest of the girls
were not prepared to go
home. So we had to come
out and give it our best."
Wildcats' player/manag-
er Vernie Curry said it was_
: .-.ime they still could have
S i, devl'l j ge liling ,.If to 'a
slow start.
-"We didn't hit the ball,"
Curry noted. "Desire got us


out 1-2-3 the first five
innings. Afterwards,- we
still ended up with six runs
and left two runners on
base. We still had a chance
to tie the game 'and go
extra innings."
Curry said they just had a
rough weekend, having to
play two gruelling games
back-to-back qn Saturday
before they ended up play-
ing aaini yesterday, all in
the sun.
hlcctro Telecom had tak-
en game one in, a come-


from-behind fashion, 4-3,
on Saturday. They moved
one step closer to clinching
another title with a 13-6
rout in game.two that fol-
lowed.
. But Bommer George
made sure:that they were
not swept yesterday..
Here's a summary of
the three games played: '
Swingers 8, Wildcats 6:
Dorothy Marshall came
through with a .three-run


in-the-park home run in a
four-run fourth that
extended their lead to 8-0
after the Swingers pro-
duced three runs in the first
and one more in the sec-
ond.
While Taylor and Far-
rington combined for the.
win, Mary 'Cruise' Edge-
combe was tagged with the
loss.
Melinda Bastian had the
big blow for the Wildcats
with a two-run single in the
seventh.
Wildcats 13, Swingers
6: Wandelee Harris went 2-
for-5 with three runs;
Vernie Curry was 2-for-3
with a run; Hyacinth Far-
rington was 3-for-3 with
two RBIs and three runs;
Chryshan Percentie was 2-
for-4 with two RBIs and
two runs; Linda Knowles 1-
for-3 with. two RBIs;
Donette Edwards 2-for-3
with two RBIs and a, run
and Melinda Bastian was 2-
for-4 with an RBI and run
scored.
Mary Edgecombe; who


scored two runs, gave up 12
hits for thewin.
Christine Hanna went 2-
for-4 with two runs; Ncrissa
Seyinour was 3-for-4 with
an RBI and three runs and
Dorothy Marshall and
Theresa Miller were both
1-for-3 with an RBI. Mar-
shall also scored a run.
Bernie Farrington got the
loss.
E Wildcats 4, Swingers 3:
Mary Edgecomnbe led of)
the bottom of the sixth on
an error and scored on
Donette Edward's two-run
RBI double for the winning
run.:
Edgecombe ended up
scoring two runs'and .gave
up eight hits with four
strike outs and twd walks
for'the win. Hyacinth Far-
rington was 3-for-3.,
Denise Sears went 2-for-4
with an RBI and run;
Theresa Miller was 2-for -4
With a run and Christine
Hanna was 1-for-4 with an
RBI and run.
Desiree Taylor suffered.
the loss.


U RENEE SWEETING confronts the plate umpire Harry Dean (Photo: Tim Clarke)


DESIREETAYLOR in action
for Bommer George Swingers (Photo: Tim Clarke)


r-%%.4 L- VL-01 IV I


SPORTS


A i Lo U 1 4 L:: j i

















Wallace sets the pace





for birthday victory


* REV. DR. PHILIP
MCPHEE


New post


for Rev


Dr Philip


McPhee

* SAILING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
BAHAMAS Boat Owners
and Sailors Association com-
modore Rev. Dr. Philip
McPhee now has another
prestigious post.
He will serve as the official
chief public relations officer
for all regattas in the Ministry
of Local Government and
Transport.
The announcement came
on Saturday night in the San-
dals Royal Bahamian Hotel
ballroom as the Mt. Calvary
S Baptist Cathedral hosted its
gala 60th Anniversary Ban-'
quet.
Minister V. Alfred Gray,
under whose ministry regattas
now fall, said he was delight-
ed to announce for the first
time that McPhee will not
,only serve as chief public rela-
tions officer, but he will also
be a consultant in his office.
"Obviously we can't pay
him what he deserves, but we
will pay him what we can,"
Gray told the audience that
showed their appreciation to
their pastor, who has been at
the helm of the sport for
more than a decade.
Gray didn't go into any
details on the role that
McPhee will play, but he
commended him for his con-
tribution to the sport at regat-
tas throughout the country
and he said he's looking for-
ward to working with him in
the future.
Prime Minister Perry
Christie was also on hand at
the:ball and he too com-
mended McPhee for his
achievement.
McPhee, pastor of the Mt.
Calvary Baptist Church, was
humbled by the honour.
"I think it's a tremendous'
plus for me to find that the
government has seen fit that
I'm capable of handling the
affairs of Local Government
and Community Affairs in
terms of regattas," he stated.
"I take that as a tremen-
dous honour and I'm grate-
ful to serve and will be willing
to bring ga tremendous
amount of energy to the.
office."
The honour;- according to
McPhee, could rot have come
at a more fitting time.
"I think the Prime Minis-
ter has saw fit to that and I
want to thank him personally
in the confidence that he has
shown in me and I promise
to serve the Bahamian peo-
ple in the manner that I know
how.
"I also want to thank Min-
ister Gray for also entrusting
me with the role and I look
forward to making a contri-
bution to the further devel-
opment of our country and
serving the government of the
Bahamas in such a special
way."
This weekend, McPhee will
step out in his new role at the
North Eleuthera Regatta in
Briland, Harbour Island.


* BOXING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

IT WAS a birthday cele-
bration for David 'the Pace-
setter' Wallace to remember
as he punished Anthony
'Psycho' Woods into a fifth
round submission on Satur-
day night at The Patio
Restaurant and Bar.
Woods' corner threw in
the towel two minutes and
15 seconds into the fifth of
their scheduled six round
affair on the First Class Pro-
motions' professional show,
signaling the end of the flur-
ry from Wallace;
Celebrating his 22th birth-
day, Wallace moved up to
the main event bout too take
on Woods after Duran
'Hands of Stone' Miller
failed to show up. Wallace's
opponent on the undercard,
Derrick 'Castro' Sawyer, was
present, but unable to fight.
"First of all, let me thank
God for getting me here
because he's the one who is
the help of my life. He gave
me the strength and has told
me that I can do anything
through him," Wallace pro-
claimed.
"Tonight, I know Psycho
was going to at me with his
hook shots and his jab, but
he doesn't prepare his head
and his body. He came out
focused to fight Duran


Miller, another bum, who I fight from him." loss to him and celebrate his
will fight and defeat. My Wallace said he.was glad birthday by reversing the
opponent, Castro Sawyer, is he got the opportunity to TKO he suffered..
not a worthy opponent, but I fight Woods instead because "The is i-
don't know if I can take a he got to avenge a previous more and I.T,.," he charged.


* BOXING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
ALPACHINO Allen was a little too much
for Drexel 'Hard Mouth' McIntosh to handle
Saturday night.
In their co-main event on the First Class
Promotions professional boxing show at "The
Patio" Restaurant and Bar, Allen forced McIn-
tosh into submission two minutes and 10 sec-
onds into the fourth and final round. ,
"I think I went out there and I had one of
two notches against," McIntosh admitted. "First
of all, I went out there and my confidence was-
n't at its best and I know I did one or things in
training that went wrong. I got in an incident
and got hit in my face.
"Mr. Allen hit me in the same place, so it
was a strike against me. So I have to say hands
off to Mr. Allen and his crew.
"But it was me who gave up. I got up and
went back down. I didn't think that I would
ever do something like that. Next time I think
I will step in there and show the Bahamian
public my best."
Entering with an entourage of fans, led by his
father and manager as they danced to a
Junkanoo beat, Allen seemed to be all busi-
ness as he stepped into the ring to make his
pro debut after a short sabbatical from the
sport.
"To tell you the truth, I trained for this
fight. I won't say that I was in top condition, but
I didn't underestimate Mr. McIntosh.
"I'm just a veteran undisputed champion in
the junior welterweight ranks and now I come
in the professional ranks to become a champi-
on."
AJlen said he wanted to shut up McIntosh's
claim that he was going to knock him out.
. He said he could have put him away early in
the fight, but.he just wanted to "stick and
move". and go round for round with him.
"I'm a stronger fighter than him, so when he
went'down, he knew it was best for him to stay
down," Allen stated. "That's why he didn't


DAVID 'Pacesetter' Wal-
lace (left) unleashes a flurry of
punches on Anthony 'Psycho'
Woods (right) on the ropes in
their welterweight main event
on Saturday night at the Patio.
Wallace stopped Woods in the
fifth round.
(Photo: Tim Clarke)

Wallace caught Woods
with a vicious right that cut a
hole over his left eye in the
third round. In the absence
of a ring doctor, he was
checked by promoter
Michelle Minus and match-
maker Ray Minus and
allowed to continue to
fight.
Realising that he had his
opponent in trouble, Wallace
continued to pursue Woods.
He managed to cut him
down and slowly worked
towards putting off the vic-.
tory.
He was sort of surprised
that his corner threw in the
towel.
"I know that Psycho could-
n't handle. I know after the
first round that he couldn't
keep up with the pace and I
just tried to do the things
that I had to do to win,"
Wallace said. "He's my boy,
but he ain't ready.
Wallace said his goal now
is to win the Bahamas' title
and he interti- z r!- ,l1,.
ever it tlki:s.


want to finish in the fourth when he went
Downn"
Both fighters exchanged blows, tangling up
at times to give the fans the most exciting fight
of the night.
But in the fourth, after both fighters were
warned by referee Gregory Storr for holding
each other too much from apparent fatigue,
Allen heldhis right fist in the air, indicating
that he had enough.
Wallace charged into McIntosh's corner and
delivered a left hook to his head. McIntosh
dropped on the canvas with Allen leaning on
top of him. He knelt down to take a mandato-
ry eight count. But instead of coming up and
fighting again, McIntosh knelt again as the fight
was called off.
"He hit me where I was hit during training.
That was a shot that was already venerable, so
he took advantage of it," McIntosh said.
On the undercard, Anthony 'the Kid'Drum-
mit tried to go head-too-head with the taller
Ryan 'Big Youth' McKenzie. But in the end,
McKenzie would get the better of the two, stop-
ping Drummit 2:50 in the second of their four
round bout.
"I was expecting him to come out wild,
burning up all of his energy," McKenzie stated.
S"I'm in shape and he didn't hurt me, so I just
kept my guard up and stayed in control. I
expected him to try and take me out like he
did his last opponent. But I stayed in gym and
worked hard since imylast fight."
McKenzie improved.to 2-0, while Drummit
dropped to 1-1.
And in the other fight of the night, Hensley
'Bruiser' Strachan had too much power for
'Dangerous' Deon Sweeting to handle. Sweet-
ing had to be warned constantly in the fight
for holding before referee Storr eventually
stopped it 2:18 in the third.
"He vas holding too much; He is supposed
to be dangerous, but ain't nothing dangerous
about him," Strachan noted.
"He fought like a girl. He was holding too
much. I was getting angry, but there wasn't
anything that I could do."


The Tribune b Al rinzi t ralb

Fill out coupon and drop off at The Tribune


Isirphrims, vs.CaIsr7
Name:

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CONGRATULATIONS to Denis Johnny, WINNER of the Dolphins and Titans drawing

t -I


Allen forces McIntosh into




fourth round submission


I '


TRIBUNE SPORTS


IVIUIJLJMT U%.,, IVrr-F-A C-uuu Fl-rAL VL










MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2006

SECTION


B
Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


ri






rP


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


-_ -. -I -.. ---.-


iaz


PS


N SAILING
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
AUGIE DIAZ and Pam
Keily were crowned king and
queen of the waters on Sat-'
urday evening, claiming
another championship title.
Diaz and Keily, two time
champions of the Snipe
World Masters Sailing Cham-
pionships, were in full con-
trol of the Regatta, which
was held at the Montagu
Beach.
The team also won their
division, the Apprentice Mas-
ters, with a score of 6.25. Fin-
ishing in second in the overall
division were Bibi Juetz and
Dante Bianchi with 28, Terry
Timm and Mardi were third
with 31 points, while Robert
Dunkley and Michelle Hope
were fourth with 33 points.
He said: "We are very sat-
isfied, it was more difficult
that it really.looks. If you
look at the scores we had
S tough competition from
Peter Commette and Barb
Evans.
"Keep in mind these aren't
the only persons that we had
a tough time from, but all the
other teams as well.
"That is something about
the Snipes, it is very interest-
ing and rewarding. At every
regatta you are going to get
great competition,'so I am
very pleased to know that we
were able to prevail and we
cheer every time we can win
a championship like this, it
is a great thing for us.
"This was a great regatta
and winning is everything.
But we worked hard and
Pam has a young family but
her husband is really good,
taking care of the children
while we go out and prac-
tise."
Winning
For Keily, winning the
overall title was an accom-
plishment she had set for her
and her partner when regis-
tering for the regatta.
She also felt as though this.
year's competition was
tougher, but with hard work
the team was able to pull off
a big win.
After two days of rain
delays it was smooth sailing
in the annual event and skip-
pers were more than anxious
to take their boats to the
open water.
The clear skies and calm
waters were used as a perfect
opportunity for skipper Jim-
mie Lowe and Lori Lowe to
test their new boat.
Although the team didn't
finish in the top three as they
would have liked, a sixth
place finish was good enough


9.S





I
~.. -


LEFT: Americans
Augie Diaz and Pam Keil
claimed the title. The team
also won their division, the
Apprentice Masters, with a
score of 6.25.
Augie Diaz said after-
wards: "We are very satisfied,
it was more difficult that it
really looks. f you look at
the scores we had tough
competition from Peter
Commette and Barb Evans.
*Keep in mind these aren't
the only persons that we had
a tough time from, but all
the other teams as well.'


* BAHAMIANS Robert Dunkley and Michelle Hope finished as the top Bahamian team.


Winners are announced on Cool96 FM between 10-I lam
r every Friday. One winner will be selected from every Subway
Restaurant in Nassau.
To be eligible to win. put your name, daytime phone number
and address on the back of your receipt every time you make


a purchase at Subway and drop
it into the box for a chance
- to win a free lunch.


-y-
-.:i
"` -

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i.,
,,
-..-


eR'~\


ti


I


em'f t'~lo'ces aild Fan'-11V MEMbers of employees are not eligible. (0240 DAI


iF~Z~
,,


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