Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00522
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: September 7, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00522
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text









DOUBUEQUAR I
POUWD WasE" i/btal

HIGH 90F
LOW 77F

T-SRUN AND
^ T-STORM


The


Tribune


Volume: 102 No.239 'THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2006 PRICE 750


U 7 -v> ~ ri, -- -


sections inside


Schools op enin delay aaan


Unfinished construction


at Yellow Elder and

Adelaide Primaries


* By KRYSTEL ROLE
THE opening of Yellow
Elder Primary and Adelaide
Primary Schools was delayed
again yesterday as a result of
unfinished construction, the
Acting Dirc -i'r 'of Educa.tion.
Cecil Thompson announced.
These schools in addition to
CR Walker Senior High \ ill
not open until Monday. Sep-
tember 11, according to a
release from the Ministry of
Education, Science aridTech-
nology.
This announcement comes
just days after officials
promised that school would
resume yesterday after a two-
lay delay.

Work
CR Walker opened on
Monday, but was closed yes-
terday because extra work
needed to be done.
Contractors -were-working
continuously for the past sev-
eral weeks to ready these
schools for the start of the
term on Monday, but not
enough work was done to
allow students onto the cam-
puses.
Education Minister Alfred
Sears said that in the course of
work at Adelaide Primary,
contractors discovered a num-


ber of cavities that prevented
them from finishing work in
time.
"We reinforced the work
crew by sending in additional
masons," the minister said.
The contract at Yellow
Elder Primary was extended,
creating a challenge for con-
tractors, the ministry had to
send in additional workers at
that school also.

Site.
"Both contractors promised
to have the schools completed
by Tuesday, however when we
visited the site is was clear that
conditions were such that stu-
dents could not come in. So
we made the decision to delay
school until Monday," Mr
Sears explained.
In all instances, the minis-
ter said, contractors were chal-,
lenged by the scope of the
work. This is the "most mas-
sive programme" during Mr
Sear's tenure. The Ministry
did more than $20 million
worth of repairs to 154
schools.
\\ ule construction goes on
teachers are asked to continue
preparing their classrooms and
their lessons for the opening
of school on Monday. Schools
will be open to teachers today
and tomorrow.


CABLE BEACH
Hoffer Shopping Plaza

Hours Of Operation:
Sun-Thu 6:30 11pmr Fri Sat 6:30 12am

OTHER LOCATIONS:
Village RdL Roundabout Harold Road
Prince Charles Plaza Frederick Street North


' .

Boy given 1% chance

to live is on the mend


* By ROYANNE
FORBES-DARVILLE
Tribune Staff Reporter
IT WAS a fainily affair yes-
terday, as the boy given a one
per cent chance to live follow-
ing a violent car crash two
months ago sat ip eating and
talking with loved ones, in his
small cubical on a male surgical
ward at Princess Margaret Hos-
pital.
He is not 100 per cent hunself,
but he is getting there, mother
Joan Bethel told The Tribune:
yesterday, during visiting hours.
"Depending on his response to
therapy, he could be home pos-
sibly by Monday."
Two weeks ago Kenneth
Bethel regained consciousness
from a coma doctors had given
him a slim chance to overcome.
In an exclusive interview with
The Tribune, yesterday "Lil
Ken", who spoke almost in a


\\ hisper said "I was knocked
down" when asked if he remem-
bered what caused him to be
hospitalized,
Family and friends looked lov-
ingly on, as he attempted to
answer each question directed
to him.
Second guessing himself at
SEE page 14


Tribune phone

lines go down,
THE Tribune's phone lines
were down from early afternoon
until after 5pm yesterday appar-
ently as a result of work being car-
ried out by BTC staff in the area.
Although the workmen ini-
tially said they knew nothing
about the.problem, the lines came
back up when BTC senior man-
agement was contacted after 5pm.
The Tribune would like to apol-
ogise to anyone attempting to
reach its offices after 1pm yester-
day.


eat frtesh


BREAKFAST DEL
SANDWICHES
A DELICIOUS WAY
TO START YOUR DA


'Ninety'

is due in

court today
ALLEGED drug kingpin
,Samuel "-Wl Kno:w% les is due to
appear in court today for his
pre-trial hearing where he is
expected to be denied bail.
Today the magistrate judge
will conduct a pre-trial bail
hearing, resulting in four possi-
ble results:
Ineligible for Bail The
defendant is denied a release
pending court appearance.,
Many believe that this will
be the outcome of the hearing
today. Because of his high pro-
file status and flight risk
Knowles may not be given bail.
The bail decision may be
appealed to a judge who will
re-examine the evidence. A vio-
lation of any agreement of
release pending court appear-
ance can result in the issuance
of an 'Order to Show Cause"
why the release should not be
revoked.
Recognizance This is the
defendant's written promise to
SEE page 14


Gunfire

in Black

Village
A MOTHER of three dived
for cover under her bed when
gunfire broke out in Black Vil-
'lage at lunchtime yesterday.'
It was the third shooting inci-
dent in five days in a community
living in fear since the killing of
Hosc a Lighthoure, 23, last week-
end.
A single shot rang out just
before 1pm a- a car .spd past the
woman's house in what residents
believe is a "war of vengeance"
between youths in Black Village
and Bain Town.
Lightbourne, said to be'a
founder of the Gundogs gang in
Bain Town, was gunned down last
Saturday a few yards from his
home in Rupert Dean Lane.
His killing % as reportedly in
retaliation for the wounding of
Tavare Dorsett at a Stapledon
Gardens birthday party some
time bctfore Another youth was
hurt at the party as a result of
what a source.described.as "col-
lateral damage".
On Saturday evening, a few
SEE page 12

Commonwealth
Electrical Workers
Union expected to
start work to rule
P By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT The Common-
wealth Electrical Workers Union is
expected to start working to rule
today because of the failure of the
Grand Bahama Power Company
to conclude negotiations for a new
industrial agreement.
Keith Knowles, CEW Union
president, said that the 135 union
members employed with the Pow-
er Company will only work the 40
hours that are required by law.
The decision, he said, was made
at a special call meeting on Tues-
day after the GBPC declared a
bargaining impasse despite every
effort made by the union to meet
the company half way' on the
remaining articles to be agreed.
"There will be no overtime
worked by the employees in the
bargaining unit, whether it is
through their lunch or after normal
working hours," Mr Knowles said
on Wednesday.
The Grand Bahama Power
Company and the CEW Union
have been negotiating a new indus-
SEE page 14


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in-; ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ *~~2 .4.-,~ 4i;vifi J'**:~~' __~L.li*ii ~~~9!~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ i


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Bhe AMiami ED ral
BAHAMAS EDITION


St.


* THE Ambassador of the Republic of Italy Giovanni Castellaneta presents a book about
Italy to Go ernor General Arthur Hanna at Government House yesterday.
SEE PAGE FIVE
(Photo: Felip6 Major/Tribune staff)


Breakf at a Subwav...
i lodfllow Mmi* tMW


''. L ,'







THE TRIBUNE


PAGF 9 THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 7. 2006


LOA NW


Mother of Archbishop



Gomez is laid to rest


Come watch


a movie
at New Providence Community Centre

Leap of Faith
will be showing on
Friday 8 Sept at 6:30pm

Admission is FREE.
Refreshments will be On s~ae.
BRing the ktd for their owkt rfliel

Call 32"-1 i for more information.
Located at Blake.Road & JFK Drive
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O HIwr 7 wi ol- fwHM f wp
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bgi n g with ,422 -a 3, 3 s. a2 32, 3S, aS & 37.



PRIZES & GIVEAWAYS

c ^s & a s' -w^/W^? w


WEALTHY Jane Gomez,
mother of Archbishop Drexel
Gomez, Magistrate Roger
Gomez and Dr Perry Gomez,
was laid to rest yesterday in the
graveyard of St Agnes Church.
Originally from Bullocks
Harbour in the Berry Islands,
Mrs Gomez, nee Francis, was a
devout Anglican and a mother
of eight.
, Born on November 5, 1917,
Mrs Gomez was the first of
four children of Elisha and
Nathalie Francis.
On April 11, 1934 she mar-
ried Rueben Nathaniel Gomez,
who had been the headmaster
of Bullocks Harbour School,


homemaker, Mrs Gomez is
said to have been an industri-
ous woman, who used her tal-
ents to create more wealth and
a better standard of living for
her family.
For many years she ran a
profitable food service from
her kitchen, and prepared
lunches for several schools in
Nassau.
An excerpt from the funeral
programme read:
"If a person named 'Gomez'
meets a person who attended
CC Sweeting during the 1970s
and 1980s, the subject of Mrs
Gomez and her 'juicy maca-
roni' is bound to come up. Her
tasty offerings of coconut or
Pineapple tart, pineapple cake,
potato bread along with the
staples of fried chicken and
macaroni were eagerly antici-
pated by children at CC Sweet-
ing, TG Glover, and CR Walk-
er schools."
Wealthy Jane Gomez will be
missed by her children, Thel-
ma Ford, Archbishop Drexel
Gomez, Myrtle, Anthony and
Dr Perry Gomez, Roger
Gomez, Anita Roberts, Veron-
ica Gomez, and Leonie
McCartney.


'Bahamian Friends of

the Cuban Five' online
a By ALISON LOWE
A BAHAMIAN committee formed to express solidarity with
five Cuban prisoners held in the US now has an online presence.
Bahamian Friends of the Cuban Five, which was formed last
Week, made this announcement at their second meeting yesterday.
Secretary of the committee Tamiko Gilbert explained that the
group has created a blog which will serve as a portal for the pub-
lishing of all articles, essays, photos and other information relate,'
to the campaign to raise national awareness about the "Cubai.
Five" and issues surrounding their imprisonment.
During the meeting, committee chairman Errington Watkins
spoke about the situation of the five men imprisoned in Miami
since 2001 who are the focus of the committee's efforts.
According to Mr Watkins, at the time of their arrest the men were
"working for their country to uncover terrorist plots by Ameri-
can-based and trained terrorists in Miami."
He said that upon uncovering this information, and passing it on
to their_,wn and the US government,,the men ended up being the
ones arrested- rather ihan the suspected terrorists.
They, ere ,- nltenccd tLo total of four life sentences and seven- .
ty five years.
Mr Watkins asserted his belief that the US consutution has lost Lus
"identity and meaning" in the hands of the current administration,
with the effect that human rights abuses and injustices are being per-
petrated across the world including within the United States
itself.
Watkins claimed that by releasing the Cuban five the US can
move towards reclaiming the "true meaning and intention of the con-
stitution as laid down by the Founding Fathers" which, he stated,
has become distorted.
Since the men's imprisonment, they have become the focus of
numerous" campaign groups worldwide.
This.week, the Bahamian committee was invited to form one of
the many contingents which are anticipated to take part in a march
in Washington DC on September 23. .
The march has been organised by the National Committee to Free
the Cuban Five, in support of the release of men.



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o In brief

Schedule
for free

legal clinic

is released

HALSBURY Chamber rs
has released the schedule for
its upcoming free legal clinic.
The clinic, "Information '
You Need For the Life You
Want", will be held on Satur-
day, September 9, at Super-
Clubs Breezes on West Bay
Street.
9.15am
Mr Craig Delancy, build-
ing control officer in' the
Ministry of Works,will
speak on building permits
and what to look for in a
contractor.
9.45am
Mr Glenn Ferguson, a
financial and retirement con-
sultant, will speak on bud-
geting and recovering, under
the title: "How to manage
when you haven't".
S10.15am
Mr Larry Roberts, presi-
dent of the Bahamas Real
Estate Association, will
speak on the residential real
estate market, and give tips
on buying and selling prop-
erty.
10.15am
Approved Lending Ser-
vices will begin a session on
financing a home purchase.
COFFEE BREAK
1am
Dr David Allen, a psychia-
"d author, will speak
Q lict resolution and
ang-.i management.
11.40am
Mr Bradley Ferguson, a
manager at the health and
property insurance
agency CLICO, will speak
on the-topic: "Getting a grip
on life, health and property
insurance".
S12.10pm
Philip Simon, executive
director of the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce, Will
speak on entrepreneurship,
and the benefits and pitfalls
of owning a business.
S12.40pm
Paula Wikle, consular
diplomat and economic offi-
cer at the American
Embassy, will speak on new
US travel requirements.
1 pm
Wendy Warren, CEO and
executive director of the
Bahamas Financial Services
Board, will speak on devel-
opments in financial services
in the Bahamas.
The firm's lawyers will be
available until 5pm for free
consultation and complimen-
tary childcare will be provid-
ed for participants by staff of
the Meridian School.


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
Good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Y V -Mo0 4 1y r e 1.Ili l [ ] J K
Frtiizr, uniite


where she had been a former
student.
Moving to New Providence
in 1944 with her husband and
four children, Thelma, Drexel,
Myrtle and Anthony, Mrs
Gomez and her family set up
house in McCollough Corner
West.
Being staunch Anglicans, the
Gomez family worshipped at
the nearby St Agnes Church.
After moving to Nassau, the
family was increased by four
more children, Perry, Roger,
Anita, and Veronica.
Despite her decision to be a


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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2006, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALNEWS


0 In brief

Criticism

on lack of

firefighting

capability

By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE government and the
Grand Bahama Port Authority
have been criticised by a human
rights group for the lack of fire-
fighting facilities on the island.
According to Grand Bahama
Human Rights Association
president Fred Smith, there are
currently no functional fire sta-
tions in Freeport. He said that
there are only three operational
fire trucks which are "located
dangerously in the heart of a
residential neighbourhood."
"How can the government
and the Port Authority be invit-
ing investors to spend billions
of dollars in Grand Bahama
when even the most basic city
services for health and safety,
like fire stations are .absent?"
Mr Smith said in a statement
yesterday.
"The facilities are cramped
and inappropriate. In addition,
it is dangerous to have fire
trucks zooming through resi-
dential neighborhoodss" he
said.
The GBHRA president once
again criticised government for
. not pumping the tax money
they collect from Grand
Bahamians back into that
island's economy.
"Again, we ask the govern-
ment, where does the $150 mil-
lion per year extracted from the
Grand Bahama tax payer go?
SOur association also asks the
Port Authority, where do all
licence fees, service charges and
utility rates go?"
Mr Smith pointed out that
Freeport's old fire station was
destroyed in Hurricane Jeanne
almost two years ago, and that
despite promises from the gov-
ernment, neither the Port
Authority nor the government
has moved to build a new sta-
tion.
The GBHRA further criti-
cised the government and the
Port Authority for keepingthe.
island's fire branch :'grossly
understaffed."
"It has only 30 people, includ-
ing administrative staff, for the
entire island. Indeed, one officer
of the fire branch is on rotation
to Bimini, yet, the government
is permitting Capo to develop
hundreds and hundreds of con-
dominiums for the Bimini Bay
development.
"Neither the government nor
the Port Authority seem to
appreciate the importance or
significance of bona fide fire
fighting departments in a com-
munity yet, they and the pub-
lic expect the usual services a
fire department provides," Mr
Smith said.
He noted that when investors
conduct feasibility studies for
their developments, they look
at what kind of medical, fire
fighting and teaching facilities
can be found close' to the site.
"Lyford Cay and Kerzner
have put police and fire depart-
ments at the doorsteps of their
communities to minimise risk
and harm to their guests. But
what about the people of Grand
Bahama?" Mr Smith asked.


Eleuthera outcry over schools


* By KRYSTEL ROLLE
PARENTS and teachers in
Eleuthera have joined the cry
against the Ministry of Educa-
tion as they feel that their
schools have been overlooked,
it was claimed yesterday.
Parents of children attend-
ing North Eleuthera's Central
Primary School were very upset
on Monday after school was.
cancelled due to unfinished
repairs, according to MP for
North Eleuthera Alvin Smith.
The minor repairs that were
supposed to be done before the
start of the term on Monday.
The fact that they were not, Mr
Smith said, caused officials to
cancel classes.
"Painters didn't arrive to
paint the school until Monday
afternoon and school didn't
begin until Tuesday," the MP
said.
Mr Smith, who was visiting


M ALVIN Smith


the island on Tuesday, added
that overcrowding was another
problem at the school which
took in an added 46 students
from a school in Spanish Wells.
The new national policy that
does not allow primary school


students to travel over water
to get to school has taken
North Eleuthera Central Pri-
mary over its quota, he said.
Minister of Education, Sci-
ence and Technology Alfred
Sears said this policy was imple-
mented to protect the students
as several unfortunate instances
have already taken place.
Now, students who used to
travel to Spanish Wells All-Age
School have to attend North
Eleuthera's school causing
further overcrowding. "I say
'further' because they have
been overcrowded for a little
while," Mr Smith explained.
The MP said he told Mr
Sears in August after he saw
no indication that repairs would
be done to the schools in his
constituency that work need-
ed to commence and that in
some instances, expansions
were needed particularly
because of the new policy.


But it was not until Septem-
ber 4, he said, that repairs even
started on the government
school. This was the same day it
was expected to open.
Repair efforts will continued
for the rest of the week and stu-
dents of North Eleuthera Cen-
tral Primary will be released at
noon every day, so that con-
tractors can finish the work.
Another concern for the par-
ents, Mr Smith said, is that their
children are constantly being
exposed to the paint fumes,
which are trapped in the class-
rooms when they are closed at


night.
"The students are going to
school only hours after painting
is finished and to further com-
pound this, once they complete
the painting the classrooms are
closed," Mr Smith explained.
To accommodate the extra
students, two trailers were sent
to North Eleuthera as a tem-
porary solution.
However, Mr Smith pointed
out that the trailers have not
yet been prepared for students.
The minister has said the
trailers should be ready by
Monday.


Interest growing in the


devolution of powers


* By ALISON LOWE

PUBLIC interest in the
idea of surrendering central
government powers to local
authorities in New'Provi-
dence is growing though it
may not be popular with
some politicians.
Former PLP cabinet min-
ister George Smith spoke to
The Tribune on the back of
a series of town meetings
held to facilitate discussion
on the idea of devolution in
the capital.
Judging by attendance at
the meetings which have
been taking place at regular
intervals since June Mr
Smith said the popularity of
the concept is growing.
While the first meeting was
poorly attended, last Mon-
Sday's meeting played host to
around 75 persons, including
current and former members
of the government and acad-
emics.
Mr Smith expressed his
, h6pe that citizens in New
Providence will educate
themselves about the work-
ings and advantages of local
government and claims
that, as they do so, the move-
ment for its creation can only
become more attractive.
"People need to use the
Internet and look up how it
works in Jamaica; become
aware .of how it is, how it
functions," he said.
Currently, a system of local
government is in place in the
Family Islands. However,
according to Smith, "it is not
as it should be you can't say
you have local government
but have no control over
money."
Before initiating a system
of local governance, New
Providence would need to be
divided into a number of
areas, which would each
obtain its own "distinct legal
personality".
According to a statement
issued by Mr Smith on Mon-
day, such a system would


involve.the public administra-
tion of "a broad range of ser-
vices" at the community level
by locally elected authorities
which are subordinate to cen-
tral government, but also
empoweredd by law to act inde-
pendently with matters of com-
plete local concern."
Local authorities would gov-
ern regional divisions with
financing both by grants from
central government and with
revenue raised on their own ini-
tiative for example by the
granting of shop and music
licenses and building permits.
Such a system of local gover-
nance will by definition involve
some surrendering of authori-
ty, and diminishment of influ-
ence on the part of central gov-
ernment and the ministers:who
represent it, said Smith.
Instead, those in local regions
of New Providence will have an
enlarged role in matters affect-
ing their own communities -
and will have the opportunity
to benefit from revenue not
directly granted from central


government.
According to Smith, it is
hoped that such a system would
be more responsive to and
reflect the needs of individual
communities allowing for the
local administration of matters
to do with streets, parks, hous-
ing, the running of schools, pub-
lic health services, "and scores
of other things that touch their
own and their neighbour's per-
sonal interest and purses."
Speaking on the subject in
March, Minister of Local Gov-
ernment Alfred Gray said that
if a consensus emerged from the
town meetings and New Provi-
dence residents were in favour
of local governance, the gov-
ernment would "certainly begin
the process of making it part of
the system in the near future".
Yesterday, Mr Smith said that
the project to raise awareness
of the possibility and potential
of such an arrangement is a
"work in progress" and,
expressed his hope that more
people will attend subsequent
meetings.


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Congratulations goes
out to

Azarria Wallaeo


!



4


A r


mV omp-


rSID tilt


I


Azarria isa 7th grader who.took andiyassed her
mathematics B.J.C at .W.Young junior -ligh,
Congratulations are coming from her 'Dadand
M'om.; Bertram and'Keva; 'rom grandparents
Levingston and Victoria 'rown and Clement and
Ruth Wallace. Teachers and staff especially
Miss gibson
A special thanks to Iqomeroom teacher
Mr.Mullings for providing her the opportunity to
take the exam.


E.s.I ihe: UmIn





Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family
Parliament Street (near Bay St.) Tel: 322-8393 or 328-7157
S* Fax: 326-9953
Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island Tel: 363-4161/2
S Lyford Cay (next to Lyford Cay Real Estate in
." H Ilm'iam Gr.en H,-u'. Btei ?62-2. 35
e-mail,; 10-4 ii.clesof nassauL om,* P.O. Box N-121


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I







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4. THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2006


EIOIAULETTRS T HEEITOR


MR I G STUBBS, who appeared on the
August 15 "Issues of the Day" radio talk show
with farmer Paul Cumberbatch, told the radio
audience how the attitude of Bahamians to
farm labour was "impacting the whole indus-
try." Like Mr Cumberbatch, he explained why
Haitian labour was essential if farmers were
to succeed.
Mr Stubbs said that in terms of agriculture a
farmer needs people to do what he called "the
grunt work." Bahamians, he said, considered
the work menial, and, therefore, refused to do
it.
"You hire a Bahamian today to work on a
farm," said Mr Stubbs, "and he works until 12
or 1pm and he's gone home, you don't see him
no more. Or he works a day and a half or two
days, he won't even come back for his money,
because he's not historically, in the recent past,
he's not been geared for that kind of work'and
its impacting on the whole industry."
A caller to the show agreed that farmers
"should get preferential treatment":for foreign
labour. Bahamians, he said, "don't want to
work, they'd prefer to grow marijuana trees
than a little tomatoes and okras, so we need
some of the Haitians to help this country." He
pointed out that should there be another 9/11
"who knows, we might have no tomatoes, no
cucumbers, no carrots, no nothing." Mr Stubbs
agreed that should the Bahamas be cut off
from its US food supply, within a few.weeks
Bahamians would starve. Therefore, it is essen-
tial, he said, that Bahamians are able to feed
themselves,
A woman caller agreed that farmers were
being treated unfairly. According to her they are
being hindered on many fronts. Not only can't
they get the needed labour, but they don't have
the proper outlets for the delivery of their pro-
duce, nor can they get sufficient land to farm.
"They.say the Bahamian people don't want
to help themselves, but how can you help your-
self when somebody who is in charge doesn't
want to help you?" she asked. ,-
She said she had applied for farm land in
Nassau, Exuma and Andros. "That has been
almost 10 years," she said, "and I haven't got a
response to my application form yet, and I
went to see the Minister for Agriculture and I
haven't seen him as yet."
Asked if she believed government was seri-
ous about revitalising agriculture, she replied:
"To be honest, no sir, because if that were the
case, the people who seriously want to do it and
they have farms and they have things there to
show that they are farming and they show they
need people to,till their lands and to.pick their
vegetables and their fruits and they allow them
not 'to get the workers by denying them their
permits and by allowing the fruit to spoil on the
trees and allowing the vegetables to spoil, then


they are not serious."
An annoyed caller from Eleuthera recalled
how farming at Eleuthera had been destroyed.
He reminded government how the successful
Hatchet Bay farm was shut down by the pre-
vious PLP government.
Another caller felt Prime Minister Christie
should get involved. "This is no joke," he said,
"we should be able to feed ourselves."
Mr Stubbs believed that an agricultural
development policy should be a part of the
national development policy. He wanted to
see the day when farmers would get support
from" government, the hotels, the importers
and any other group or institution that required
their services.
He said Bahamian farmers cannot compete
with the large subsidies given by Europe and
the US to their own farmers. He said although
there are some tax concessions in the Bahamas
for local farmers, in many instances they "mit-
igate against the industry."
: According to Mr Stubbs, government's poli-
cies "are not clear enough so that we can inter-
face" with other enterprises.
Although on the show Mr Cumberbatch was
described as a "small farmer", he revealed that
he had more than 200 acres of farm land at his
disposal. He was reluctant to say how many
Haitians he employed, but eventually admitted
to 55. However, he estimated that he needed
two persons to work an acre of farm land. Alto-
gether, he said, to work the acreage he had he
needed 500 workers, But in the past 15 years,
he complained, government had not given him
a single permit.
He admitted that he has to subsidise his
farming with landscaping and other related
business ventures to make ends meet. Because,
he said, there is little left when he has to pay for
work permits, National Insurance and all the
other requirements to keep his farm opera-
tional. .. .
If the Bahamian domestic who we quoted in
this column oiiMonday is correct that the only
way Bahamians will work the land "in the hot
sun" would be to pay them $400 a week, then
no farm could afford the burden. For example,
if.Mr Cumberbatch's present 55 Haitians were
replaced by Bahamians, his weekly salary
cheque for labour would be $22,000. But, if he
could get 500 Bahamians to work his farm-
which he says is the number' he needs to be
successful and each is paid $400, his weekly
outlay for salaries would be a prohibitive
$200,000.
Therefore, if farming is to succeed in this
country, Haitian labour is necessary. If it is
denied, and there is another 9/11 and all contact
with the US is cut off for any length of time,
then maybe starvation will force Bahamians
back to the soil.


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., KM., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON; C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352


Farmers have many complaints


EDITOR, The Tribune
PLEASE allow me space in
your paper to remind parents
of their obligation to whole-
heartedly support their chil-
dren's school.
First. of all, parents are
accountable to God for the care,
supervision and education of
their children. The Hebrew
'Shema' is not only for the
Israelites, but also for all
nations. It says: "Hear, O Israel:
The Lord our God is one Lord:
and thou shalt love the Lord thy
God with all thine heart, and
with all thy soul, and with all
thy might. And these words,
which I command thee this day,
shall be in thine heart: And thou
shalt teach them diligently unto
thy children." (Deuteronomy
6:4-7).
Secondly, they must also com-
ply with all legal requirements
concerning their parental duties.
One such obligation is that they,
must ensure that their children
receive full time and suitable
education. In law, compulsory
school age is between five and
sixteen (Education Act 1996,
Subsection 23).
Surely, the first school is the
home, the place where parents
instil in their children a set of
core beliefs and values that
would produce proper attitudes
and behaviours: reverence for
God, respect for others, and.
respect for self. Further, chil-
dren will do their best if parents
provide nutritious meals, a
home environment conducive
for learning, an authority struc-
ture that encourages children to
respond immediately, correctly
and completely to instructions.
Although the government is
responsible for providing suit-
able education for school age
children, parents must still do
all that is required of them, the
schools to deliver quality' edu-
cation. For instance, only par-
ents can ensure that their chil-
dren are registered on time, pre-
sent and early to school every
day as well as wear full and
proper uniforms throughout the
year.
Yes, only parents can make
sure that their children bring all.
their supplies for each day
together with lunch or money
to buy lunch at school. Only par-
ents can really check that their
children are engaged in daily
study and that homework
assignments are completed and
turned in on time.
Clearly, parents are,ultimate-
ly responsible for their children's
behaviour. Hence, they must
assist the schools in reprimand-
ing, and correcting their chil-
dren for committing school


infractions. In fact, students who
refuse to adhere to rules and
regulations should not be
allowed to enjoy the privilege
of being in regular public edu-
cation until they and their par-
ents have complied fully with
the school's policies. gy the way,
there are just too many delin-
quent and absentee parents in
the system.
Moreover, they should give
their children positive encour-
agement for work well done and
whenever necessary, find addi-
tional and immediate help for
their children's poor perfor-
mance and conduct. Even with
advanced students parents' con-
tinual motivation and commen-
dation make a big difference.
Children should see their
fathers and mothers whether
single, married, separated or
divorced working together
with school personnel in helping
them become responsible and
productive citizens. It is imper-
ative that parents, readily
respond to and cooperate with
teachers and administrators
whenever they are asked to
attend conferences, collect
report cards and external exam-
ination information. Parents
must stay abreast of what's hap-
pening in their child's school
and classroom by reading all
correspondence and periodical-
ly checking the school's calendar
of events.
In addition, parents are
required to supply the school
with written notes or letters, giv-
ing reasons) for their children
inability to meet any school
requirement. They should also
make the school aware of any
concerns or problems be it
physical, mental, medical or oth-
erwise that might adversely
affect their children's academic
performance or conduct.
Sure, the success of students
in school hinges on parental
involvement, that is, school and
home must connect, if children
are to receive the best educa-
tion possible. The disciplinary
challenges of today call for par-
ents to act as role models,
appreciate the school's code,
teach their children the nega-
tive effects of drug abuse, deter-
mine their children's company
of friends and oversee their
social.interactions, control the
use of the internet, the televi-
sion and, of course, examine
their music as well as show them
,how to resolve conflicts posi-
tively.


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The time is now for fathers to
play a more critical and leading
role in eradicating violent, !'i
aggressive and criminal activi-
ties' that are mainly perpetrat-
ed by male students.
For schools to run well-struc- q"
tured, disciplined and effective .
systems, parents must support
the school's Counselling and -.
Guidance Department, the
teachers and administrators in .,
helping students appreciate
remedial, accelerated, and refor-
mative programmes.
School structures break down
whenever a significant number
of parents either refuse to coop-
erate with teachers or comply
with stated policies and proce-
dures. For example, in the case
of violent student behaviour,
sometimes a great part of a day
is wasted because certain par-
ents had failed to cooperate with
the school authorities. -
Since human nature is essen-
tially depraved, schools expect '"'
parents to assist them in build-
ing student character, to help
them in reinforcing the moral
and spiritual value's that par-
ents ought to have modeled -.
and ought to maintain in the ''
home.
These words, written in 1868 :
by JP Wichkersham, describe b
for both home and school edu-
cators that awesome task of
character training: "The human '
body in infancy is weak, it needs
to be invigorated and tough-
ened; the human intellect is fee-
ble, it needs to be developed
and strengthened; the human
passions are wild and rash, they
need to be restrained and guid- 'j
ed; the human will is fitful and :'
perverse, it needs to be trained '.
to docility aid educated to 'hus-' .
band and direct'its power. This ".
Sinvigoratingand toughening of
the body, developing and
strengthening of the intellect,
restraining and guiding the pas-
sions, training and educating the
will, is discipline; and it is one of
the highest aims of study to :
secure it." "N .-
We see that the challenges of N
education today is so great that
if parents do not give their full,
faithful and loyal support,
schools will not achieve excel-
lent results, regardless of their
having a complete complement
of competent educators, fine
facilities, and relevant and out-
standing curricular programmes.
In the absence of effective
parental involvement, the chil-
dren will be heard to say: "We ,
jokin'!"

PERRY R CUNNINGHAM
Nassau
August 9 2006


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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2006, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


LOA N


In brief Italy planning to deepen
Minors are
accused of
armed
robberies dialogue with Bahamas
rob be ries |


FREEPORT Three male
minors were arraigned
before a juvenile panel in
Freeport Magistrate's Court
in connection with a spree of
armed robberies and bur-
glaries in the Sea Horse Vil-
lage area.
The minors, aged 13 and
14, were charged with 23
counts which included bur-
glary, armed robbery, house-
breaking, stealing from a
house, attempted armed rob-
bery and attempted burglary.
Several thousand dollars
worth of property and cash
was allegedly stolen from for-
eign expatriates employed at
the Grand Bahama Shipyard.
The three boys pleaded
not guilty to the summary
charges. They were not
required to enter pleas to the
indictable offences such as
armed robbery and attempt-
ed armed.robbery.
The matters were
adjourned to December 14.
The three juveniles were
remanded into custody.

Bimini man
found dead
at his Bailey
Town home

A 43-YEAR-OLD Bimini
man was found dead at his
home in Bailey Town early
.this week.
According to police
reports,,Rodney Knowles
discovered his brother, Kevin
Levarity, lying across a bed.
There were reportedly no
signs of violence or injury to
the body. He was pro-
nounced dead at the scene
and police say they do not
suspect foul play.


TROPICAL
EXERIATR


THE Italian government
aims to deepen political dia-
logue and co-operation with
the Bahamas on shared inter-
ests including agriculture
development, environmental
security and the protection
of artistic heritage.
It was with this goal in
mind that the newly-appoint-
ed Italian Ambassador Gio-
vanni Castellaneta yesterday
presented his credentials to
Bahamas Governor General
Arthur Hanna.
"Both our nations are
bounded by seas and tran-
quil waters and enjoy land-
.scapes known throughout
the world for their beauty.
Our peoples are hailed for
their cordiality and generos-
ity, placing us in a unique
position of hosts to millions
of tourists and visitors," said
Ambassador Castellaneta.
The new Italian ambas-
sador took the opportunity
to point out that the Memo-
randum of Understanding


signed in July, 2005 between
Italy and CARICOM, under-
scores his country's commit-
ment to enhance and
strengthen ties with the
Caribbean region.
He said that the Bahamas
and Italy share "many expe-
riences."
Addressing the new
ambassador, the governor
general emphasised that the
two countries have shared
almost 30 years of friendly
relations, "which stem from a
historic link beginning with
the landfall of Christopher
Columbus and remain today
based on our shared belief in
respect for basic human
rights and fundamental free-
doms."
"Italy's commitment to
the Caribbean region, par-
ticularly in the area of the
sustainable development of
small island states is exem-
plary and we look forward
to continued co-operation in
this regard," Mr Hanna said.


* ITALIAN Ambassador
Giovanni Castellaneta walks out
of Government House along with
Governor General Arthur Hanna
yesterday
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune
staff)


Volunteers in Coastal Clean-up


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT Volunteers
will join Ministry of Tourism
personnel on beaches through-
out Grand Bahama to collect
marine debris in observance of
International Coastal Clean-up
Day.
The clean-up campaign will
be held on Saturday between
8am and 2pm at eight designat-
ed sites: Deadman's Reef
Beach, Lovers Beach, William
Town Beach, Xanadu Beach,
Gold Rock Beach, the East End
shoreline (Sweeting's
Cay/McClean's Town/High
Rock/Freetown) and the West
End shoreline.
SRenamae Symonette, the
. ministry's Sustainable Tourism
manager, reported,that 6,265
pounds of debris were collected


by 700 volunteers last year.
Ms Symonette explained that
the ICC is the largest single-day
volunteer event in the world,
and is held on coasts along
every major.body of water.
In studies conducted since
1985 by the Environmental Pro-
tection Agency's office of toxic
substances and centre for envi-
ronmental education, plastics
were identified as the number-
one marine debris hazard.
Mrs Symonette said that all
items collected are reported to
ICC for data compilation pur-
poses.
She explained that an insti-
tute known as the Ocean Con-
servatory compiles, analyses
and tracks the data year-by-year
and site-by-site to identify
trends of debris distribution by
region, state or country.
Last year in Grand Bahama,.
*' ; 1 l !


she said, 729 volunteers walked
58 miles and collected 467 bags
of debris.
Beach-combing efforts yield-
ed 28 shotgun shells or wadding,
1,756 beverage bottles and 1,383
cans.
Also collected were articles
of clothing, cups, plates, forks,
knives, spoons, food wrappers
or containers, straws, toys and
six-pack holders.
Ocean and waterway initia-
tives yielded plastic sheeting
and tarps; 36 fishing nets; 77
fishing lines; 57 buoys or floats;
bait containers or packaging;
crab, lobster and fish traps; 38
crates; and 37 light bulbs or
tubes.
The volunteers also collect-
ed 93 cigar tips, several ciga-
rette lighters, 129 cigarettes or
cigarette filters, and 35 tobacco
wrappers.


THURSDAY,
SEPTEMBER 7
6:30am Community Page 1540AM
11:00 Immediate Response
noon ZNS News Update
12:05 Immediate Response (cont'd)
1:00 Legends: Willis Lindberg
Harding
1:30 N-Contrast
2:00 Bullwinkle & and His Friends
2:30 The Fun Farm
3:00 ,Bishop Leroy Emmanuel
3:30 Tiangello Hill
4:00 Dennis The Menace
4:30 Carmen San Diego
5:00 ZNS News Update
5:05 Back To School Message
5:10 TreasureAttic
5:30 CMJ Club Zone
6:00 This Week In The Bahamas
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
8:00 Da' Native Show
8:30 The Envy Life
9:00 Bahamian Spirit- J. Burnside
10:00 Caribbean Newsline
10:30 News Night13
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30am Community Page 1540AM


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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2006 THE TRIBUNE,


YOUR CONNECT TION TO IHE WORLD


lIPUBIC NOTICE[I


TRANSPORTATION

FOR TOWN MEETING


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company
Limited (BTC) wishes to inform our valued
customers and the general public that
transportation for the September 7th, BTC Voice
of the Customer Town Meeting at the BPCOU
Hall will be available. Persons interested in
attending should be present at the following
locations: Church of God of Prophecy East
Street, E P Robert Primary School, BTC
Poinciana and Yellow Elder Primary School


Blue Hill Road.


Transportation will leave all


of these locations at 6:15pm and 6:45pm.


Please contact 302-7545 to confirm your use
of our busing service.


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NHI income education

'reneges on tax pledge'


* By KRYSTEL ROLLE
IF the government imple-
ments a compulsory income
deduction to fund the National
Health Insurance scheme, it will
be.reneging on a pledge to cre-
ate no new taxes, it was claimed
yesterday.
Dr Dexter Johnson, leader of
the Bahamian National Party
(BNP), said his party condemns
the apparent "flip flop" of the
Christie administration on the
issue of new taxes.
During the budget debate a
few months ago, he explained,
Prime Minister Perr.y Christie
vowed not to establish any new
taxes on the public.
But comments by Minister of
Health Dr Bernard Nottage on
the NHI plan revealed that
deductions are to be taken out
of salaries to fund the scheme,
he noted.
"This compulsory deduction is
nothing but a poorly-disguised
tax on income, and as such
would be a gross betrayal of his
promise," Dr Johnson said.
"A tax by any name is still a
tax, and a promise not to
impose any new tax ought to be


* DEXTER Johnson


binding when it is stated in the
halls of parliament," he added.


The BNP leader said it seems
as if both the PLP and the FNM
cannot be relied on to keep the
promises they make to the
Bahamian public.
He added that Bahamians
cannot afford to be forced to
pay any new taxes, as the cost of
living is steadily rising.
Dr Johnson pointed out that
the effects of inflation can be
felt every day- not only in
terms of gas prices, but also in-
groceries, school fees and even
airline prices.
Wages, he said, "are not
keeping pace with this infla-
tionary trend."
He said the BNP is calling on
Mr Christie to "honour his
word" and not put another bur-
den on the public.
The process of the compul-
sory deduction would be similar
to that used to collect National
Insurance, Dr Johnson
explained.
He said that if implemented,
Bahamians can expect that this
health tax would be adminis-
tered just as poorly as National
Insurance as the same bureau-
cracy would be supervising both
under the plan.







Share
your
News
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or haVe won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.
.,


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THE TRIBUNE,


PAGE 6, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2006


I BRIDGE
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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2006, PAGE 7


THF TRIBUNE


LAN



S poosall o


fiacia qick-a


* By The Nassau Institute
ON January 31, 2004 the Blue Ribbon Com-
mission on National Health Insurance (the
"BRC") delivered its proposed plan to the Prime
Minister; and in September 2005 the NHI Steer-
ing Committee (the "Committee") reported on
the Components, Costs and Financing of the plan.
An analysis of the financial data contained in
these reports strongly suggests that the new tax-
es required for the NHI plan, i.e. the new funding,
are greatly understated.
Background
To date two reports have been prepared by the
private sector and delivered to the Government.
1. The Nassau Institute commissioned Mr.
Nadeem Esmail, Director of Health System Per-
formance Studies, Fraser Institute of Canada, to
. analyze the BRC plan. Canada has had a uni-
versal access, publicly funded healthcare system
for 45 years; and the Fraser Institute is a leading
authority on the effectiveness of such systems.
The report, dated July 2006, was delivered to
Government and has received extensive coverage
in the media..
2. The Bahamas Dental Association (the
"BDA") prepared a position paper dated August
28, 2006 that is being circulated now.
The.BRC & Steering Committee plan.


The BRC report showed Government and
Private Health expenditures for the fiscal year
1984/1985 and 2001.
According to the BRC total expenditures were
$147 million in 1984/1985 and $343 million in
2001; while Government Health expenditures
were $56.3 and $163.8 million respectively..
Between those dates total Health Expenditures:
grew at an annual rate of 5.1 per cent per annum
and Government Health Expenditures at 6.5 per
cent per annum.
The BRC report recognized that -
1. Public healthcare costs were higher than
they should be because of inefficiencies.
S2. The National Insurance Board was to admin-
ister the health care insurance operations and it
was presently overstaffed by 25 per cent and the
overhead costs were perhaps as much as 100 per
cent above where they should be.
The Steering Committee was formed after the
submission of the BRC report with the specific
task of preparing "estimates of the cost and
financing requirements of a Comprehensive Pack-
age of Benefits."
Its Executive Summary shows a "Projected
Cost" for Government Health Expenditures
of $235 million stating it was based on "pro-
jected 2005 data" and five other critical
assumptions.
But to the reader not privy to the full report,
this forecast is useless. The Steering Commit-
tee's Executive Summary does not associate its
$235 million forecast with a specific year...neither
2006 nor 2026.
Thus one cannot
relate future
growth to past Total Health Expenditures
growth, the sim- Gross Domestic Product
plest test for rea- Expenditures as % of GD:
sonableness. Unadjusted
The decision Age-Adjusted
to date not to
make the full *In Millions
report of the
Steering Committee available to non-govern-
mental organizations is not consistent with the
alleged, often stated government objective to
build an informed policy consensus.
The BDA Position Paper
The BDA paper makes a number of points.
1. It questioned the projected cost of $235 mil-
lion by relating that estimate not to 2001 expen-
ditures but to the $205 million governmental allo-
cation toward health care in the 2006 budget. It
concluded that "on the surface the present pro-


[11 I




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* PERRY Christie received the Blue Ribbon
Commission's report


jected cost estimate provides little or no recogni-
tion of the likely cost increases."
2. It asserted that the record keeping in public
healthcare institutions is indeed
poor and referred to the BRC
01* Cost report itself that notes that sta-
tistical and financial data is diffi-
64 $235 cult to acquire and this has
79 "forced management in the pub-
43 lic health system to employ guess
work, when making critical deci-
sions."
3. The BDA asks: "Without
reliable data about the country's
utilization of the health care system....how can
'we accept the estimated costs of NHI with any
reliability?"
4. It stated that a "substantial investment in
information technology and health care manage-
ment software are crucial to the initiation of this
plan."
5. As a specific instance, the BDA notes that
there is a complete lack of financial transparen-
cy within the Hospital and Health Care Facilities
Licensing Board. The Board has not presented
the required audited statements on its opera-
tions since its inception in 1997. This is a small
component of the Ministry of Health; but it rais-
es concern whether the far more complex oper-
ations of a NHI programme will get good
accounting, management and operational effi-
ciency. .
The overstaffing, poor record keeping,, the
inadequate accounting, management and man-
agerial systems and the absence of financial trans-
parency all contribute to high operating costs.
The Nadeem Esmail Report
Nadeem Esmail puts Bahamian healthcare
costs into perspective by comparing healthcare
costs in the Bahamas with OECD and Latin
American countries. If one looks at 2001 total
health expenditures as a percent of GDP one
notes that such expenditures are 6.9 per cent of
GDP versus 13.8 per cent, 9.4 per cent and 7.5 per
cent for the U.S., Canada and the U.K. respec-
tively.


However, the years in a person's life beyond
65 years "are the most costly in terms of health
expenditures"; and the Bahamas is a relatively
young country with a smaller proportion of its
population, 5.2 per cent, over 65 years of age. In
contrast, the U.S. has 12.4 per cent over age
65. Therefore in order to compare healthcare
expenditures between them, one has to put
them on the same "age-adjusted" basis.
On an "age-adjusted" basis the expenditures of
both the Bahamas and the U.S. are 14.9 per cent
of GDP, the costliest in the
world; and Bahamian spending
is 32 per cent greater than
Canada and 54 per cent greater
I than the U.K. Both have uni-
I m versal access, publicly funded
national healthcare, systems and
significantly both have
funding and "patient access to
care" problems.
SNadeem Esmail discusses
in detail the BRC proposal,
provides six examples of the
more successful national
healthcare systems and makes
eight specific recommenda-
athtubs tions to improve the BRC
ile and Marble proposal:
bases He concludes with the fol-
lowing statement -
The BRC's proposals, if
implemented verbatim, would
create a substantial health care
programme whose cost far
exceeded what was necessary...
The funding of that pro-
Agramme is not likely to be sus-
tainable in the long run.
M|I The economic costs associ-
)Om ated with the introduction of
NHI in general and the BRC's
:OOpm expensive proposal in particular
i -would be significant.
If Bahamians insist on forg-
^aler" ing ahead with NHI, the policy
Package implemented must not
East Bay Street be that proposed by the BRC.


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Projected
Healthcare Expenditures


Government $56 $1
Private $91 $1
Total $147 $3
* In Millions


Bahamas US Canada UK
s $343*
$4,950*
P:
6.9% 13.9% 9.4% 7.5%
14.9% 14.9% 10.1% 6.8%


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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2006, PAGE 9


Bahamians take top positions


SinmTv purchase any 3


featured items on special,

Shave cashier verify product

by signing the back of

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2006 at 1:30pm on Love 97.


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u Quaker Bag Cereals 2/5.00

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Lyons Cream Cookies 99c

Nestle Butterfinger/Crunch Baby Ruth/Kit Kat 2/1.29

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Gain 23oz 15 use 3.59

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No City Market Employee
or Participating Vendor can enter promotion.


a By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT Two Bahami-
ans have been promoted to top-
level positions at Freeport Con-
tainer Port, Freeport Harbour
Company and the Grand
Bahama Airport Company.
Raymond Jones and Julian
Russell were appointed as chief
operating officer and financial
controller of the three compa-
nies, respectively.
Mr Jones, who recently
returned from abroad, previ-
ously held the post of commer-
cial director for the three busi-
ness units until 2004, when he


transferred to Mexico as a pro-
ject manager.
He will continue to head the
Commercial Department with
the additional responsibility of
assisting CEO Chris Gray.
In 2003, Mr Jones was select-
ed to participate in a global
leadership development pro-
gramme sponsored by Hutchi-
son Port Holdings and held by
the Richard Levy School of
Business.
Mr Jones has been employed
with the group for the past 10
years.
He joined after working with
the Grand Bahama Port
Authority Group of Companies


as assistant group financial con-
troller for one year.
Mr Jones holds a bachelors
of science degree in account-
ing and computer science from
Elizabeth City State Universi-
ty, a component Institution of
the University of North Car-
olina.
Julian Russell, who joined
FCP, FHC and GBAC in 2001,
will be responsible for all finan-
cial matters for the three busi-
nesses.
Prior to joining the group, Mr
Russell was employed at Hon-
eywell (Bahamas) Ltd for 14
years, and served as financial
controller there for five years.


VYOUR COCFVNEICi rv T O r E tI'ti i


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) is pleased to invite
Tenders to provide the Company with Motor Insurance coverage.

Interested companies/firms may collect a Tender Specification from the
Security's Desk located in the Administrative Building on John F. Kennedy
Drive, between the hours of 9:00am to 5:00pm Monday through Friday.

Packages could also be collected from the security's desk BTC Settlers Way,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

The deadline for submission of tenders is Friday, September 15th, 2006.
Tenders should be sealed and marked "TENDER FOR MOTOR
INSURANCE" and should be delivered to the attention of the "Acting
President and CEO, Mr. Leon, Williams."

In Grand Bahama, packages could also be dropped off at the security located
at Settler's Way, Freeport, Grand Bahama.

BTC reserves the right to reject any, or all Tenders.
<________________________________


I '" ''---


THE TRIBUNE


I


I






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2006


LOA6 NW


PUBLIC NOTICE


Closure Notice


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited (BTC)
wishes to inform our valued customers and the general public
that due to the death of an employee the following departments
located at th Mall at Marathon will be closed on Saturday
September 9 2006, Cyber World, BaTelNet and the Wireless
Department.

All departments will reopen on Monday September 11 at
their regular schedules times.

BTC wishes to thank the public for their patience during this
time of bereavement.






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1995 B-14 Model...........$4,400.00
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1997 B-14 Model............:$4,600.00

1998 B-14 Model..........."$4,700.00
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COB's 'cream of



the crop! ready to



begin new term


THE first College of the
Bahamas President's Scholars
are eager to begin their acade-
mic careers this semester.
The five young women and
one young man were identified
as among the country's brightest
and most talented high school
graduates before being select-
ed for the ground-breaking pro-
Sgramme.
"Those selected came into a
windfall of a full academic
scholarship and a package of
benefits, including leadership
training, internships and the
opportunity to interact with
leaders in various spheres," said
the college in a statement.
The six students are: Neu-
casha Greene, an honour roll
graduate of ,Kingsway Acade-
my who has chosen culinary arts
as her field of study; Delia Fer-
guson, also an honour roll grad-
uate of Kingsway Academy
who is a history major; Christa
Lowe, the 2006 salutatorian of
Bahamas Academy who main-
tained a 4.0 GPA from grade 7
to grade 12 and who aspires to
be a corporate lawyer; Amina
Sarr, an outstanding graduate
of CR' Walker Senior High.
School who speaks Spanish and
French fluently and who wants
to study oncology; Dominic
Stubbs, valedictorian and head
boy of Jordan Prince William
High School who is an eco-
nomics major; and Acqueela
Thompson, a graduate of Cen-
tral Eleuthera High School who
is a tourism major.
Only students with a GPA of
3.50 and above, and exhibiting
outstanding leadership qualities
and the promise of continuing
this level of performance in col-
lege and beyond weie invited
to compete for membership.
All six of the pioneer scholars
have, d.m n1tt- a 11- lrbutid
skills .i ithcir ic boolI Iand in,
their 'nc'imnunitie's. the college
said.
Neucasha led a mentoring


.. .


'-r. :.,
'- ";*. .










* COLLEGE of the Bahamas President's Scholars Amina Sarr,
Delia Ferguson, Acqueela Thompson, Neucasha Greene,
Dominic Stubbs andChrista Lowe.


programme and leads her
church's youth group; Delia was
a prefect, member of the school
soccer team and treasurer of the
Student Council; Christa was
assistant treasurer of her senior
class and president of the
school's Social Science Club;
Amina gained 10 BGCSEs and
recently won a debate on stem
cell research in Trinidad and
Tobago; Dominic was on the
basketball team and in the pres-
tigious Gentleman's Club;
Acqueela was president of the
Student Christian Movement
and the Senior Class Commit-
tee, an active participant in the
Future Teachers of the
Bahamas programme and a
member of her school's
junkanoo group.
"Membership in the PSP will
allow the students to develop
close associations with col-
lege/university administrators
and meet scholars and digni-
Staries who frequently visit the,-'
campus. Students also have the
oppoitinnit\ lo'tike aJ.anntige
of some of the most: talented
faculty members at the College


of the Bahamas who teach spe-
cial sections of selected required
courses," the COB statement
said.
While demanding high acad-
emic standards, the scholarship
programme also requires that
the students receive leadership
training and demonstrate their
qualities of leadership for 50
hours per semester.
"The students are eagerly
beginning their college careers
and looking forward to con-
tributing to the vibrant life of
COB while the college itself
confidently expects its first Pres-
ident's Scholars to raise both
the academic and civic stan-
dards in a noticeable way here
at Oakes Field," the statement
said. "The College of the
Bahamas believes that these
students have the potential for
high levels of success in their
chosen professions. They will
be the country's future leaders.
The mission of-the College/Uni-
versitj dftChe Bahamas is to give
them li ducatibhal experience
comimiefinfirate with their excep-
tional, abilities."


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.0







THE RIBNE TURSAYSEPTMBE 7,2006 PAE 1


Economic transformation



has not taken place


PRIME Minister Perry
Christie believes that his
government has transformed the
Bahamian economy.
Never mind that precious little
has changed about the structure,
size or model of our economy in
50 years, the PM insists that he
has transformed it.
Never mind that under his
watch the economy has basically
experienced jobless growth, the
PM boasts that it has been trans-
formed.
Never mind that so-called
"anchor projects" existed long
before Mr Christie became
prime minister, he is convinced
that he invented the policy and
has transformed the economy.
Never mind that the govern-
ment's finances are still in terri-
ble shape with unbridled deficit
spending crowding out domes-
tic credit, the PM beams with
pride that he has transformed
our economy.
Never mind that many invest-
ments have been announced in
the last four years but few
realized; PM Christie says he has
transformed our economy.
Never mind that investments
made in the ten years prior to
him coming to office have pri-
marily fuelled any economic
growth enjoyed over the last four
Years, PM Christie postulates
that he is transforming the econ-
omy.
Go to Exuma and see what
has happened there in the last
five or six years. There you see
something that looks like eco-
nomic transformation.
', The Four Seasons' Emerald
Bay Resort, which predates Mr
Christie coming to office, has
done wonders for that island's
economy. That's transformation!
People are working; businesses
are flourishing; construction is
booming; and the people are
beaming.
Even the atmosphere in Exu-
ma beams of hope and optimism.
That's transformation!

P M Christie and his
administration had noth-
ing to do with that; they met that
happening, when they came to
office1Moving about our econo-
my generally, what you see in
Exuma is not what you see in
the rest of the country.
This is one of the principal
reasons that the PM and his
administration must spend so
much time using the public
broadcast network trying to con-
vince Bahamians of that which
they cannot see, feel or experi-
ence.
Perhaps what PM Christie
means by economic transforma-
tion is what has happened for
those few political insiders and
some new allies who now have a
precious perch at the mouth of


P aLa 19 h-33


20%


STRAIGHT UP TALK

ZH IVA R GO LAI NG


the government's spending spig-
ot where an unending stream of
cash flows to them.
I have no doubt that they
would gladly support the PM's
claim of transformation, as they
chew on the mutton paid for by
loose government contracts, con-
sulting jobs and directed favours.
WHEN DID GINN DO
THAT?

A young man called into
ond of the talk shows
recently to complain that the
government said that there were
jobs available but that he was
unable to find one.
Minister Alfred Gray quickly
answered him by saying that
Ginn in Grand Bahama had just
hired some 300 people and was
getting ready next week to hire
1,500 others. Some effort was
made to verify this claim by the
minister with no success.
Surely if hundreds of people
were being hired by any project
in Grand Bahama where resi-
dents are hurting from the lack
of robust economy, the news
would be on the ground like
wildfire and in the air like the
sweet aroma of guava. Yet, one
hears or sees nothing.
Surely if this was so, the gov-
ernment would have seen fit to
herald the news day in and day
out using its chief mouthpiece
and propaganda machine ZNS.
But nothing!
Either Minister Gray was
ignorant of what was happening
on the ground here in Grand
Bahama, which was not unlikely,
or he was misleading the public
out of political panic.
Whichever was the case, this
much is certain: he should sub-
stantiate his claim because right
now lots of needy people in
Grand Bahama are angry that
what they were told is not what
exists.
THE SCHOOL OPENING
DEBACLE

clearly embarrassed by
.the school opening
debacle, the September 5, 2006,
edition of the Freeport News
reported that Minister Sears
expressed "disappointment"
over how some of the local con-
tractors performed.
He was quoted as saying "we
had to give our local workers a
chance. We thought that it would
have been good to give these
guys a chance to work on pro-
jects of this scale. But after what


we have seen this year, we will
be putting together a list of local
contractors that we will not be
working with in the future to
avoid these kinds of things from
happening."
This quote begs so many ques-
tions. If the minister was not
going to use "local workers" who
was he going to use?. Was he
going to use workers out of Nas-


If the Ministry of
Education or Min-
istry of Public
Works was vigilant
in monitoring the
work being done
by contractors,
why would they
find out so late
that contractors
were doing
nothing?


sau, Abaco or Florida? Besides,
who has been doing work on
schools in Grand Bahama over
the years? Were not "local work-
ers" doing the work? What has
changed, are not these same
workers doing all of the con-
struction and repairs for the pri-
vate sector here in Grand
Bahama? Or, did Minister Sears
and his government take the
opportunity to award contracts
based on political favour rather
than competence and used con-
tractors who were not tried and
tested for the level of work
required?
If this is so, why would one do
something so silly, given the crit-
ical time of the year. fr students,
parents and teachers What
about the claim that some c o-'
tractors were given money alte
and could not therefore carry
out the work in a timely fash-
ion? There are just too many
questions here.

A dding insult to injury,
permanent secretary
Creswell Sturrup is reported as
saying: "We toured a lot of the
schools in the country and we
are finding that, only weeks
before school is set to open, they
have done little or nothing on
these schools."
Two things here: first, if the


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Ministry of Education or Min-
istry of Public Works was vigilant
in monitoring the work being
done by contractors, why would
they find out so late that con-
tractors were doing nothing?
Surely someone should have
checked the progress of works a
week or two after the contract
was signed. Of course this may
not have been helpful if the con-
tract was issued or money
released only a week or two
before school opened,.as the
Bahamas Union of Teacher
president suggested.
But we have been led to
believe that contractors were on
their way as soon as the school
year ended in June.
The second thing is that Min-
ister Sears was jet-setting up and
down the country checking
schools. On almost every occa-
sion he gave the impression that
things were dandy. It was only
lately that we are now being told
that little or nothing was done
on these schools. Something is
amiss; Someone was misleading
the public. It seems that the Min-
istry of Education's position is
that the contractors are to blame.
Unless contractors say otherwise,
this may be what holds.
OFFICIAL SILENCE ON
NINETY KNOWLES

O official silence! It is
deafening on the issue
of Ninety Knowles' extradition.
It is as if something went wrong,
terribly wrong, in the matter and
the government is in utter shock.
But something did go terribly
wrong because this extradition
was not handled by a govern-
ment but by personalities and
personalities in conflict.
Now the rumours and specu-
lations abound about what has
happened. Worse yet, we remain
in the dark, as our government
seems afraid or unwilling to
account for its'actions. What
next?
THOUGHT FOR THE
WEEK

ome seasons are not
merely silly: the can be ,
downright stupid.


KENNEI'IH Sco lit

Head iboy, Valedieflrri-n 2006
graduate Oe NGiM Major HIih School
Long island, for oblaiinng 9 .4 in his
B('Si 'iE exams from, your fmnily and
friends in Long island, ELunma. Halfirnoon
Cay and Nassau.



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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2006, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


I










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Police expect charge


over drive-by shooting
By NATARIO McKENZIE believed that this killing was an act of retaliation
for a previous shooting in Stapledon Gardens
POLICE say that they expect to charge some- when another man in his twenties was shot in his
>e before the end of the week in connection mouth at a party. Lightbourne became the coun-
th Saturday's drive-by shooting death of a 23- try's 37th homicide for the year.
ar-old man. "We have not fully determined what the motive
Speaking with The Tribune yesterday Chief was, but we are certainly on the right track," Mr
superintendent of Police Marvin Dames said that Dames said yesterday.
Ilice are confident that they will soon complete Meanwhile police are also investigating an
eir investigation into the shooting death of a early morning shooting involving a 37-year-old
osea Lightbourne. man.
According to Chief Superintendent Dames, According to police, the shooting incident took
)lice investigators now have someone assisting place in the Wilson Tract area shortly before 6 am
em in their probe and expect to bring formal yesterday. The victim, who has been identified as
arges against "someone" before the end of the Allie Joseph, reportedly received gunshot wounds
eek. to his back and hip. Up to press time yesterday
"We have someone assisting us in our investi- police officials could not confirm all of the cir-
tion and should be bringing the matter to con- cumstances surrounding the incident or the vic-
ision soon. Before the end of the week someone tim's condition.
11 be charged," Mr Dames said yesterday. However, The Tribune was told by Commis-
According to initial reports Lightbourne was sioner of Police Reginald Ferguson, who is
nned down shortly after 3 pm Saturday while responsible for crime, that the wounds apparent-
alking in the Rupert Dean Lane area. It is ly were not life threatening.


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Or e-mail resume to kjoos@grandislevillas.com
Bahamian citizens or residents only, please


FROM page one

hours after Lightbourne was
killed, shots were fired from a car
into a group of men at Black Vil-
lage. No-one was hurt,,but a res-
ident said later: "Had the bullets
been on target, the entire lead-
ership of the community would
have been wiped out."
Then, at 5am on Monday, more
gunfire rang out from a car as it
sped through the community.
Following yesterday's incident,
Black Village residents called for
Space and an increase in police
foot patrols. One said senior offi-
cers had later promised more
policing in the area.


Gunfire in Black Village


Mothers fear their teenage
sons, in particular, are at risk as
Lightbourne's friends lust for
revenge before his funeral next
Saturday.
Last night, community activist
Rodney Moncur called for calm
in the area, saying that "violence
begets violence" and that the
community was at a loss to know
why the tit-for-tat shootings had
begun.
"Mothers are afraid their sons
will be targeted by these people,
even though they had no part in
the death of Hosea Lightbourne,"


he said.
"I am demanding a visible
police foot patrol in the area. This
cannot be allowed to go on. The
rule of law must prevail if we are
to achieve the kind of Bahamas
that we all want."
Mr Moncur said the govern-
ment's urban renewal programme
had collapsed, adding: "The PLP
has not funded it properly and
too many young men are idle and
can find time for lawless activi-
ties and behaviour.
"We have to stop canonising
lawless people. I call on Bain
Town and Black Village to
restore peace. Those who live by
violence die by it. You can't have
a whole community being ter-
rorised like this."
Earlier this week, men were
said to be wandering round Black
Village asking children to iden-
tify relatives of Dorsett, who was
hit in the mouth by gunfire during
the party shooting.
Residents believe they were
trying to select a target for a
revenge shooting. One source
said: "They are determined to kill
someone before Hosea's funer-
al."

A press conference due to
have been held yesterday by
Lightbourne's grieving mother
was cancelled. A friend said she
was unell.


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Saturday, September 9
SuperClubs Breezes, West Bay Street


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Mr. Craig Delancy
Building Control Officer, MOW
Mr. Glenn Ferguson
Financial/Retirement Consultant

Mr. Larry Roberts, President
Bahamas Real Estate Association
&
Approved Lending Services
Dr. David Allen
Psychiatrist, Author
Mr. Bradley Ferguson
Agency Manager, CLICO
Mr. Philip Simon, Exec Dir.
Bahamas Chamber of Commerce
Paula Wikle
Consular Diplomat & Economic
Officer, American Embassy
Ms. Wendy Warren
CEO & Executive Director, BFSB


Time
9:15 am


Topic
Building Permits & What to
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9:30 am Budgeting & Recovering:
How to Manage When You
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10:00 am Tips for Buying or Selling a Home

10:00 am Financing Your Home Purchase
10:45 am Conflict Resolution &
Anger Management
11:30 am Getting a Grip on Life, Health
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12:00 pm Entrepreneurship: Pros & Pitfalls
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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2006


THE TRIBUNE






THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2006, PAGE 13


|


---" Appraisal: $142,742.00

S.. .- ... Traveling south along Blue.Hill Rodd,: turn right at the Farmers Market just after passing the Golden Gates Shopping Center, take 1st corner
L, -' ....______ left, Windward Isles Way, then take,3rd corner right, St Thomas Road, then first left, grenada Crest, drive around the bend then 1st left again
the subject property is the 2nd property left house #4 painted peach trimmed black.





NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA), Lot #20 approximately 11,20Q sq. ft., and bounded on Nprth by Early Settler Drive and South by Deal
Investment Ltd., this is a single family zoning and 510 ft., above sea level. This site encompasses a foundation with plumbing and roughing inplace and well compacked quarry
fill. The concrete floor has not been poured as yet. The foundation is 2,511 .sq. ft. Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is vacant and a hill
over looking the Atlantic Ocean. Appraisal: $41,275.00


T BE TRIBUNE


I Il I I UIIL.ICL








MSE AE S II





DUNDAS TOWN CROWN ALLOTMENT,
S- DUNDAS TOWN ABACO

Ll iI All that parcel of land having an area of 14,400 sq. ft. being a portion of the Dundas Town Crown allotment this land is rectangular in.
I li Ii shape with dimensions of 80 ft by .180. Located on the above mentioned lot is a concrete block structure with dimensions of 27 x40.
This house is an approximate 30 year old single family, residence comprising of 3-bedrooms, 1-bathroom, living/dining area and kitchen.
..-.. .- This house is in fairly good condition for itsage with a projected future life of about 25 to 30 more years. The land rises above road level,
to a height in excess of approximately 15ft above sea level, with no likelihood of flooding in an hurricane. The grounds are sparsely
landscaped.
S'' : Appraisal: $90,000.00
This house is located in Dundas Town Abaco which is adjacent to Marsh Harbour and is painted white trimmed teal green.



LOT #7 EARLY SETTLERS DRIVE
(EleUthera)


S. All that lot of land and improvements having an area of 11,200 sq. ft. being #7 Early Settlers Drive, North Eleuthera Heights, El6uthera
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. This property is comprised an incomplete two storey single family structure
: consisting of approximately 2,255.92 sq. ft. of enclosed living space with 3 bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms, living room, dining, kitchen and
tv room.

SAppraisal: $132,968.00



LOT 29 GOVERNMENT SUBDIVISION
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

SAllI that lot of land having an area of 15,950 sq. ft. being lot No. 29 of the subdivision known and designated as the Government
i iSubdivision, the said subdivision situated in the southern side of the town of Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Bahamas. Located on the subject
S| Hproperty is a block structure 32x34 plus an addition of wood partially completed being 29x5 the house is an approximate 25 yrs old
single family residence comprising of two bedrooms, one bathroom, living and dining rooms, and kitchen. The house is structurally sound
with the exception of the woodwork. The land rises above road level, to a height of approximately 15 ft and is 30 plus ft above sea level.
Appraisal: $130,000.00

This property is located in the Government Subdivision in Marsh Harbour, Abaco and is painted blue trimmed white.




(Lot No. 42, Lower Bogue)
... ---: -- -- ELEUTHERA

.'- AIll that piece parcel or lot of land and improvements, in the settlement of Lower Bogue,' North Eleuthera, being No. 42, comprising of
about 11,570 sq. ft., this site encompasses a 25 year old single story home comprising of 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms (one incomplete),
Front room, dining, kitchen and basement area. Total living area is approximately 1,703.66 sq. ft. and basement area about 144 sq. ft.
This homeiis in good condition.:The land is flat and on a hill, and is clear of all debis. Area is complete with all goods, utilities and services
available.
S. , Ta.to t h d o Appraisal: $108,934.00
S This property is situated on the northern side of.the road leading to the public cemetery and approximately 66 ft westerly from the main Eleuthera
Highway in the settlement of Lower Bogue.,




S. (Lot No. 62, Lower Bogue)
iT :ELEUTHERA

SAll that piece parcel or lot of land and improvements, in the settlement of Lower Bogue, North Eleuthera, being No. 62, comprising of
about 34,210 sq. ft., this site encompasses a 12 year old single storney home comprising of 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, front room,
--. - dining, breakfast room, kitchen and laundry room, with a total living area of approximately 2,342.06. Property also includes a double
car garage, and.front entrance with a total sq. ft. of approximately 655.75..This home is approximately 85% completed. The property
is. well landscaped with crab grass, fiascos and some fruit trees.

Appraisal: $235,638.00
This property is situated on the western side of Eleuthera Highway in the settlement of Lower Bogue.



SInvestment Opportunity Must Sell
S', JOHNSON'S HARBOUR VIEW ESTATES SUBDIVISION

St All those piece, parcel or lot of land and improvements having an area of approximately 4,500 sq. ft. Being Lots 12E and 13W situated in the Johnson's
Harbour View Estates Subdivision on Harbour Island, North Eleuthera, Bahamas. This site encompasses a single storey apartment block that is
_* approximately 4 years old and consist of a living area of approximately 1,555.36 sq. ft. Each apartment contains 2-bedrooms, 1-full bathroom, front
1 .: room/dining in one, and kitchen. These apartments are fully furnished. The kitchen and bathrooms are complete with cabinets. There is a wooden
storage to the rear wood landing, and a wood decking to the back door entrance. This building is in good condition. The property is partially landscaped
with crab grass, and fiascos trees. All Utilities and services available:
Appraisal: $196,348.00
This said pieces, parcels or lot of land and improvements is situated in Johnson's Harbour View Estates subdivision, on Harbour Island, Eleuthera one
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. .



LOT NO. 370 GRENADA CLOSE GOLDEN GATES #2
(Nassau)
1 All that lot of land having an area of 5,500 sq. ft., being lot 370 Grenada Close of the subdivision known and designated as Golden Gates No.
-,.';- 2, situated in the Southwestern district of New Providence Bahamas. This property is comprised of 25 years old single family residence consisting
-.- -? -of approximately 1,234 sq. ft., of enclosed living space with 3 bedrooms, two bathrooms, living/dining room, and kitchen. The Land is on a
grade and level and appear to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods. The grounds are
fairly kept, with improvements including driveway, walkway and low shrubs. Yard is enclosed with chain linked fencing to the sides and rear.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2006


OAL


FROM page one
trial agreement for the past year.
The company employs 180 work-
ers.
CEO Dave Dunbar accused the
union of being "unreasonable"
when it rejected the company's
$1.5 million offer on June 24, and
submitted a counter proposal of
$2.5 million on July 27.
At a press conference held at
the union's office on Yellow Pine
Street, Mr Knowles accused man-
agement of misleading the public


Union
by "painting a picture of decep-
tion and not presenting all the facts
to the public."
"I don't think the $2.5 million
figure was correct," he said.
"And, in spite of what was said
to the media, the union went back
to the negotiation table on August
15 and 16 with a view to conclud-
ing the negotiations," he said.
Mr Knowles said that the union
has since changed its position,


proposing a lesser amount than its
initial offer to the company.
While he did not want to go into
details of what the union was ask-
ing for, he pointed out that the
;amount of money spent by the
company on foreign linesmen dur-
ing the storm over an eight to 10
month period, is more than what
the union is asking for in its four-
year agreement.
Mr Knowles also noted that for-
eign linesmen were paid $45 to $50
per hour compared to the $8 to
$18 paid to Bahamian linesmen.


FROM page one
appear in court on the date set, and to abide by the
terms set by the judge. No monetary pledge, cash
deposit, or security by property or professional
bondsman is required.
Unsecured Bond This release, pending court
appearance, is based on the defendant's written agree-
ment to appear in court on the date set and to abide by
the conditions set by the magistrate judge. It is backed
by an agreement by the defendant to forfeit money to
the court if he does not appear in court on the date set.
Secured Bond This is secured by either a cash
deposit, a pledge of real or personal property, or a
pledge by a third party that the defendant will, appear
in court 'on the date set and will abide by the conditions
of the release. The magistrate judge may forfeit any
type of security in the event the defendant does not
appear in court on the date set.
During the arraignment the accused appears before
a judge who will read the offences with which the
accused is officially being charged.
In this case Knowles is charged with conspiring
with other suspects to distribute cocaine and marijuana.
in two separate indictments in 2000 one in Miami
and the other in Fort Lauderdale.
Stewart Abrams, an assistant federal public defend-


YOUR COi CIrEC I ON lTO 3 iHt 11O ?t



PUBLIC NOTICE


New Billing System



The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited (BTC)
wishes to inform our valued customers and the general public
that BTC has implemented a new billing system. Therefore,
the public is advised that all accounts in arrears thirty-one days
or more will be liable for disconnection effective September
30th, 2006.


BTC encourages customers to,keep their accounts current,
payments on all accounts can be made at any BTC CTO location,
via BTC's website www.btcbahamas.com and at all of the
following bank branches: Bank of The Bahamas, Royal Bank,
Scotia Bank, Commonwealth Bank, Finco, Fidelity Bank and
First Caribbean. Customers who have financial difficulties in
settling their accounts, can visit our Credit Administration
Department at our John F. Kennedy Drive location to arrange
payment plans to secure their services.,


We thank you for your cooperation and look forward to serving
you our valued customers.
^ '. 00


'Ninety' Knowles
er, will be Knowles' lawyer.
Prosecuting the case from the State Attorney's
office is Karen Gilbert.
If charged with a misdemeanor, a suspect pleads
guilty or not guilty at the arraignment. Or, if the court
approves, a suspect can plead nolo coezgndere, mean-
ing he will not contest the charges. Legally, this is the
same as a guilty plea, but it cannot be used against the
suspect in a non-criminal case.
If misdemeanor charges are nQt dropped, a trial is
held later in a court of law. If, however, the defendant
is charged with a felony, and the charges.are not dis-
missed, the next step is a preliminary hearing.
Knowles, whose registered number is 76902-004, is
being held at the Federal Detention Centre in Miami,
which is an administrative facility housing male and
female inmates.
Administrative facilities are institutions with special
missions, such as the detention of pre-trial offenders;
the treatment of inmates with serious or chronic med-
ical problems; or the containment of extremely dan-
gerous, violent, or escape-prone inmates.
Administrative facilities 'are capable of holding
inmates in all security categories.'


Boy makes recovery


i


KENNETH BETHEL in
hospital yesterday
him responding like this and I am
thankful to God for everything
that he has done."
In the meantime, Ken's moth-
er, said her faith in God has
grown stronger and she is certain
God will continue to intervene in
her son's healing.
"He is going to be 100 percent.
We stop believing the doctors'
report only because God don't


do things halfway," Mrs Bethel
said.
Kendra and Kyle Bethel
explained their brother's steady
recovery as a "miracle."
"I think it is a miracle because"
he is getting better day by day,"
Kendra, "Lil" Ken's older sister
said.
Of his older brother, Kyle sim-
ply said: "I feel relieved."
-But while many relatives
shared fond memories of the last
.encounter with Kenny, friend'
Greg Brown, a front seat passen-
ger in the car when the accident
occurred explained that contrary
to what many may believe, he
and his trend e'-rer not drinking
or speeding.
Recalline the accident he
e\plamied- \\e ere on Mackey
Street heading to thIe 'On The
Run' in Kemp Road and when
we were coming over the hill
from Mackey Street, a car
approaching us head on was
speeding and driving in the mid-
dle of the road without head-
lights. We s\,er\ed to zaoid the
car and ended uiphitting a wall
and a tree."
Greg said initially he was wor-
ried because, "Ken was not mov-
ing or talking. So I thought he
was dead. But now I feel excited
that he is happ\ and alive and
talking!" .
Despite minor scratches and a
small scar on hi, temple, the
young man whose injuries threat-
ened to claim his lie. appeared
to be enjoying the attention and
his family's loving care,


p

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a CARaIBBEAN LANDS CA 5






GARDEN CEN


FROM page one

times Ken would ask his mother
the answers to the questions
asked, as jf to confirm his own
answers.
The Tribune also asked "lil.
Ken", as he is affectionately
c. called, what he intends to do
when he leaves the hospital?
He replied: "I want to finish
school."
According to medical experts
many persons may in fact recov-
oer full physical and mental func-
tioning when they emerge from a
coma. Others, they say, may
require various forms of therapy
to recover as much functioning
as possible.
However, they say some
patients never recover anything
but very basic body functions.
Elizabeth Charlton, one of "Lil
Ken's" aunts, who sat quietly in a
nearly chair said: "I feel so proud
that he has come thus far from
where he was. By the help of God
;he will be the same Ken."
Another aunt, Aune Carey,
who smiled affectionately on her
nephew said: It's.great to see


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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2006, PAGE 15


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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 200U


tid i F 1) A


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H-110:I


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u INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS


II


THE TRIBUNE


* '"









THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2006


SECTION




siness@tribunemedia.net

business~tribunemedia.net -I V 10


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I N I N T ATI ONA

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mi Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Management buyout plan



mulled at insurance firm


. By NEILHARTNELL
Tribune:Business Editor
A MANAGEMENT buyout
of British American Insurance
Company, the Bahamian life and
health insurer, is under consid-
eration, The Tribune has learned.
Multiple sources have told
this newspaper that the buyout
is being led by Bahamian
Chester Cooper, British Amer-
ican's current president and
chief executive, although the
proposed deal has not yet been
concluded. The purchase price
is as yet unknown.
'However, Mr Cooper
declined to comment when con-
tacted by The Tribune yester-
da\


Bahamian leading proposed deal


for British American Insurance


If the buyout plan goes
ahead, The Tribune understands
that there will be no impact on
the jobs of existing British
American staff, with' the com-
pany's operations and structure
unchanged.
British American Insurance
Company, which was est;ab-
lished in the Bahamas in 1920, is
part of the British American
Group. Its ultimate parent.


understood to be British Amer-
ican Holdings, is controlled by
Mauritius-based Daw ood
Rawat, its chairman.
'Apart from life and health
insurance products, British
American Insurance Company
also offers annuities, pensions
and a variety of investment
products, extending its interests
nto the wider financial services
market.


The Bahamian life and health
insurance market has become
increasingly compettit e in the
past five years, largely due to
the consolidation forces that
have seen Colina Insurance
Company acquire Global
Bahamas, Canada Life and
Imperial Life within the space
of three years.
SEE page 5B


BTC earns more than $21m



in roaming revenues


M By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business Reporter
THE Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Company (BTC) earned more"
than $21 million in roaming re enues
from visitors to the Bahamas in the
first seven months of 2006, Bradley
Roberts, minister of public works.
S and utilities, said yesterday.
I -Mr-Robe-rt attended a- lncheorr
-B TC hosted tor members ot the busi-
ness community) to officially launch
. its latest product, the BlackBerry.
which was made available to the pub-
lic yesterday.
He sad cellularserices had gown
tremendous\ since GSM:.was
launched in the Bahamas in Febru-
ars 2004.
"In a country whose population is
estimated;at 307,000, there are over
20ti,0)00 cellular subscribers," said
Mr Roberts.
He added that this \\ as signifi-
cant increase from the 90,000 TDMA
S customers he met when he assumed
responsibility for BTC in 2002.
Mr Roberts said the unprecedent-
ed growth in cellular subscription


had required the replacement of the
80,000 subscriber GSNM switch that
was first installed in 2004. A few
months ago, that system was
replaced %with a sw itch with a capac-
ity of 250.000 subscribers.
I am told that even this capacity
is being resieswed, with the idea of
incieaMsin the capacity to 5010,0001."
said Mi Robhcrts.
""'Presently. Bahamians can use their-
cell phones in 55 countries around
the world, and BTC is collecting
roaming revenue from a number of
them through bilateral agreements.
"This fantastic growth did not
come without some pain of conges-
tion and dropped calls, but as minis-
ter responsible for BTC. I can assure
that this network will be a world class
network." he said.
Mr Roberts added that in recent
months. BTC had continued to
rebrand itself by dropping interna-
tional and domestic long distance
rates. introducing on-line EZPAY,
and introducing new services as the
BlackBerry,. ibe Voice Over Inter-
net sers ice, and rebranding its DSL
Internet service as 1- Connect.


* BRADLEY Roberts


Inagua tourism


plan an 'antidote'


to large resorts


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The transformation of
Inagua's "weak" tourism prod-
uct, which currently has only
20 rooms available, aims to
provide a model for sustain-
able Family Island develop-
ment, reduce economic depen-
dency on Morton Salt and
reverse the island's depopula-
tion.
The joint plan betwcei the
Government and the Inter-
American Development Bank
(TDB) to transform Inagul i
into a sustainable tourism des-
tination \warns that this objec-
tive could be compronused if
the Go\ernment permitted
large-scale resort projects sun-
ilar to what was happening on
other Family Islands. :
Acknowledging that this sce-
nario was unlikely\ on Inagua.
given the Government's desire
to establish the island as a sus-
tainable, eco-tourism destina-
lion, an IDB document on the
project implicitly criticized the:
size of some so-called 'anchor
proJects" on the Fanmily Islands.
While part of the Gooern-
ment's stiateg minolved di\er-
silving the Bahamian tourism
product "as ay trom mass
tourism", capitalising on the
sustainable assets in each Fam-
il% Island. the IDB said: "A
mjin risk to this slo\\ and
health% dcelelopnlent Lould
--cote-i>fm large -se-a le' dee-l -
opments in the form of hotel
resol ts or subdi Isions second
residences, as is the case in oth-
er Family Islands.'
Large-scale developments
would "bring considerably less
benefit' to Inagua's economN.
the IDB warned, and its ini-
Stiatise with the Gosernment
aimed to create job opportu-
nities and economic benefits
for the long-term.
It added: "Diversifying the
tourism industry on small
island states such as the
Bahamas currently provides a
vital tool to fight ott decreasing
economic benefits and mount-
ing social pressure through,;


large-scale resort development.
"The concentration of
tourism infrastructure on New
Providence and Grand
Bahama continues to exert
special pressure on its eco-
nomic, environmental and
social structures. while outer
islands are not participating in
the development."

Dependence
Great Inagua currently has a
population of about 1,000, but
its economywas dependent on
Morton Salt to prove ide about -
SO per cen I of its employment. -
"Job cuts by Morton Salt
and the absence of other sig-
nificant economic acti cities
have led to a continuing .
.depopulation of Inagua. with
\ oung people emigrating to :
seek job opportunities in the -
Bahamas or overseas," the
IDB said.
The IDB sdid this economic
emigration, which had also tak- -
en place from other Famil -.
Islands, and the concentration
of tourism infrastructure and
foreign direct investment in
New Pro\idence and Grand
Bahama. had left Family
Islands with "little economic
development over the past
decades and..... struggling to
maintain standards of living
.ind population levels".
While the poverty rate on "
New% Pro\ dence. and Grand -
Ba ihani 'as '.3 Treent, on
Fan!ul Islands such as Inagua,
it was 20 per cent.
And the IDB pointed out
that while the Bahamas
enjoyed more than five million
visitor arrivals in 2005, more.
than 7( percent of these were
to Nassau!Paradise Island and
Giand Bahama.
And while the Family
Islands received 1.44 million
\ visitors in 2005, more than 80
per cent of these were cruise
ship passengers, who tradi-
tionally spend.much less and
have a smaller economic
impact than stopover visitors.
SEE page 6B


National Health costs

'greatly understated

By NEIL HARTNELL cerns voiced in the Blue Rib-
Tribune Business Editor bon Commission's report over
S' existing inefficiencies and exces-
THE Government ard its sive costs in the public health-
Blue Ribbon Commission have care system, and the over-
"greatly understated" the staffing and overhead costs at
amount of new taxes required the National Insurance Board
to fund the proposed National (NIB).
Health Insurance (NHI) plan, While the Government-
with an economic-think tank appointed steering committee
. arguing that the $235 million had projected the "cost and
;cost estimate is "unreasonable". financing" requirements for
In its latest missive on the NHI's comprehensive package
proposed NHI plan, the Nas- of benefits at $235 million, say-
sau Institute said the report pro- ing this was based on 2005 fig-
duced for it by the Fraser Insti- ures and five key assumptions,
tute's Nadeem Esniail, and the the Nassau Institute described
Bahamas Dental Association's this forecast as "useless".
(BDA) position paper, had
added further weight to the con- SEE page 6B


Construction and


IT sectors first

for labour study


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE construction and infor-
mation technology (IT) indus-
tries will be among the first sec-
tors of the Bahamian economy
to undergo a labour study, as
part of the $22.5 million Inter-
American Development Bank
(IDB) funded initiative to over-
haul the Bahamian education
and training systems.
The Transforming Education
and Training initiative aims for
the "complete transformation
of the Technical Education and
Vocational Training (TVET)"


system in the Bahamas, with the
quality monitored by a National
Workforce Development Coun-
cil (NWDC) yet to be created.
In a paper on the initiative,
the IDB said the Bahamian
TVET system would be
reformed into a training system
that had "a permanent rela-
tionship with the productive
sectors, aligned with the
demands of the employment
sector, and adherent to stan-
dards that allow its graduates
to become successful partici-
pants in the labour market".
SEE page 4B


_ /j ~_~


- I ,I-









PAGE B, TURSDY, SETEMBR 7,2006UHEINESSN


Prepare your firms



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ICROSOFT'S first January 2007, and to business tinuing to evaluate Vista "mile- Yet Vista will get to t
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tem upgrade in five years, Win- licensing in November this year. ship the product "when it's begin showing up on new de
dows Vista, is expected to be Having said that, the company ready" rather than according to tops and laptops. And if.ther





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a major security attack aimed
at legacy Windows XP systems,
you may find yourself under
serious pressure to upgrade fast,
It is time now to get ready for
Vista so that you are not caught
short at a later date, with insuf-
ficient hardware or incompati-
ble software.
Key Benefits of Windows
Vista
1. Security
Chief among the benefits of
Vista are its numerous security
improvements. Vista has been
developed in the age of the
Internet, in contrast to Win-
dows XP, and it will therefore
be much more resistant to Inter-
net-based attacks. Windows
Vista will make your PCs safer,
with built-in protection against
spyware and other types of
malicious software.
The Network Access Protec-
tion feature will prevent laptops
from connecting to the network
unless they meet certain stan-
dards for patch management,
virus signature downloads and
so on.
Vista also offers authentica-
tion via smart cards, in addition
to user name and password
checking. Vista also will offer
strong, hardware-based encryp-
tion, which can protect docu-
ments when an employee's lap-
top is stolen.
2. Manageability
Vista will improve the process;
of deploying, supporting ;J
managing desktops. IT admin-
istrators will be able to control
desktop settings remotely via
command line, eliminating the
need for your IT staff to visit
every, desktop when, for
instance, it is time to upgrade
client virus-scanning software.
Vista also will have built-in
diagnostics that can help you
proactively address common
problems'before they occur.


3. A Dynamic Interface
Vista has a shiny new inter-
face, 'Aero', and advanced mul-
timedia features that will appeal
to all the technology lovers in
your team. Aero will make it
easier for you to find your way
through the operating system,
and from application to appli-
cation. For instance, Aero will
help you juggle multiple tasks at
once by providing a 3-D, real-
time, animated view of all your
open applications and docu-
ments.
4. Focus on Business
Windows Vista comes in a
number of different versions,
too many according to some
commentators. However, two
of the versions are specifically
focused on the business com-
munity. Microsoft Vista Busi-
ness is optimised for. small and
medium-sized businesses, and
Vista Enterprise is for larger
organizations.
One of the features of Vista
Business are the 'Small Busi-
ness Resources', or IT Man-
agement tools. These will be a
great benefit for those non-tech-
nical people who have the
responsibility for the day-to-day
support of their organisation's
PCs. .A built-in ho" -to guide
will lead you through everyday
tasks and troubleshooting in
non-technical language.
Time to Get Ready '

whether you see a
V V business reason to
upgrade now or pot, it is
inevitable that your company
will have to upgradeIto Vista at
some point. Given that Vista's
hardware requirements are
steeper than those for Windows
XP, and given that there may
be issues with your business
SEE'page 3B


cRBCRie Bank f Canadal



RBC RoyaL Bank of Canada today-apinte Mr. Nathaniel Beneby, Jr.,' Vice President and Country
Headfor n ThieBahamas-effectie Nomberi, 2006. In thisrole, Mr. Beneby will have
management responsibility for the'firmis entire retail branch network in The Bahamas, including
the branches of RBC FINCO (Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited). The combined branch
network serves more-than 100,000 consumer and small-business clients.
Mr. Benebyalso.serves onthe Operating Committee of RBC's Bahamas and Caribbean
region and will have regional oversight for the bank's marketing and communication programs
in his new role.
"This change positions us to take advantage of market opportunities and builds on our
success in The Bahamas by aligning all of our retail branch operations under one senior officer,"
said Mr. Ross McDonald, Senior Vice President, Caribbean Banking for Royal Bank. "Nat has
shown tremendous leadership of RBC FINCO over the past four years, with the bank experiencing
unprecedented growth and profitability during his tenure. His industry expertise and knowledge
of The Bahamas make him the ideal candidate for this senior management position." Mr.
Beneby is the most senior-level Bahamian in the nearly 100-year history of RBC Royal Bank of
Canada in the Caribbean region and the first Bahamian to be appointed to this position.
"I am very pleased at the opportunity to be able to lead Royal Bank's retail network in The
Bahamas and to position our businesses for further long-term sustainable growth," commented
Mr. Beneby. "We look forward to continuing to serve generations of Bahamians in our community
and to providing high quality products and services to meet their banking and financial needs."
Mr. Beneby, a 33-year career banker with-Royal Bank of Canada, is currently Managing
Director of RBC FINCO. Previously, he held positions as the Area Manager, Family Islands RBC,
and Assistarnt Manager of Risk Management RBC for The Bahamas and Cayman.
i; Mr. Benebyis a graduate of Prince Williams Baptist High School. He holds a Bachelor of
Sisice gree r iSiesSA-. injstration -from California Coast University, Santa Ana,
^^teig M o Uiversityisalso anAssociate of theBahamas
t roeMags.-Pei4ty Cbainrm^i
I ^,-oetei i.a . and FirstVice


About RBC Royal Bank of Canada
Royal Bank of Canada (NYSE, TSX: RY) is North America's leading diversified financial
services company. It provides personal and commercial banking, wealth
management, insurance, corporate and investment banking, and transaction
processing services.on a global basis. Thelcompany employs approximately 70,000
people who serve more than 14 million personal, business and public sector clients
through offices in North America and some 30 countries around the world.
RBC Royal Bank of Canada has a long-standing presence in The Bahamps, with I
operations first established on November 2, 1908. Today, it boasts a retail network of
23 branches throughout New Providence and the Family Islands, a Commercial
Banking business centre, and 37 automated banking machines. In addition, RBC ''"
FINCO, established in 1953, is a leading provider of single- and'multi-family bone '*":
mortgages to Bahamians and attractive interest rates for its depositors. It has'5 -
branches and 4 automated banking machines located in New Providence .an', ;
Freeport. RBC FINCO is owned 25 percent by the general Bahamian public .
representing approximately 4,000 shareholders and 75 percentby.its
shareholder Royal Bank-of Canada. .
Royal Bank.ofers:a:fi ll.rangeof consumerjei
facilities'foriesiltew tand s with- f
tNn-lendihg.servt n-clude a a:ri ,fnd osit
.-Banking, payirolllppcengmad nwa n "g'
The. naag~


Making

IT work


I -IS


4..
A
-I




,'I


THE TRIBUNE


I


PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBE;R 7, 2006


I


i












- '


i .

i-- ~







THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2006, PAGE 3B


THF TRIBUNE


BTC pledges Internet


searches via cellular


phones by year's end


By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business Reporter
BAHAMAS Telecommuni-
eations Company (BTC) cus-
tomers will be able to search
the Internet via their cellular
-', phones by year's end, it was
, announced yesterday.
SLeon Williams, BTC's acting
president and chief executive,
said yesterday that the company
was still beta testing the GPRS
technology that would allow
this. He said the technology
should be available before the
end of December.
That month is also the target
date for BTC to ensure that a
GSM network is available on
all the major Family Islands.
BTC is poised to launch GSM
in Bimini and Andros this
month at a cost of more than
$1 million and over $14 million
respectively. In Exuma, BTC
engineers are working with
Canadian firm Nortel to install
GSM for that island.
Mr Williams was speaking at
the official launch of BTC's lat-
est product, the BlackBerry,
and said the company is acute-
ly aware that Bahamians want
the convenience of being able to.

FROM page 2B
-applications working with Vista,
now is the time to assess these
issues and plan for the future.
It is important now to take
note of the hardware require-
ments of Vista when you make
new hardware purchases. Cor-
porate PCs have, on average, a
three-year cycle, and over the
next three years you will most
certainly have needed an
upgrade to Vista. You don't
want to get stuck with machines
that won't work with Vista.
SVista is no minor upgrade.
There'is virtually no part of the
operating system that hasn't been
altered in some way. Most-com-


have voice and data informa-
tion at their fingertips wherever
they are.
As a result, BTC was working
to bring in these features as
quickly as financing and tech-
nology allowed
Yesterday's 'Lunch and


BTC is poised
to launch GSM
in Bimini and
Andros this
month at a cost
of more than $1
million and
over $14 million
respectively.


Learn' event wasto introduce.
the BlackBerry as a valuable
tool to businesses, which could
help them increase their pro-
ductivity and bottom lines.
-The BlackBerry allows users

mon software will work under
Vista, However, it is not possible
to assume that all.software will
work, particularly customised
applications. It is important to
test your custom software now.
Although Microsoft will con-
tinue to support Windows XP
and will issue Service Pack 3
for XP in late 2007, Vista will
eventually replace XP. You
can either take a gradual
approach by letting Vista slow-
ly into your company as you
buy new PCs or laptops, or
plan a corporate-wide upgrade
when Vista has settled into the
market. Either way, the time
to get ready is now as you may
need to upgrade more than


to access their e-mail and Inter-
net while away from the office
or home and, if customers wish,
it can also be used as a cell
phone.
Mr Williams added that the
company was marketing the
BlackBerry s a business tool,
and said BTC hopes to expand
its revenue in that area.
However, he pointed out that
all technology, new capabilities
and features have the affects of
cannibalising pre-existing ones.
, For example, Mr Williams
said the revenue earned from
Batelnet customers using their
laptops may be minimised. but
the profits in many cases will
be transferred to BlackBerry
fees.
In particular, he noted that
BTC's revenues had been dra-
matically impacted by the use
of alternative (and in some cas-
es illegal) long distance Voice
over Internet Protocol (VoIP)
and callback suppliers.
The introduction of Vibe,
,BTC's Voice Over Internet sys-
tem, should regain a large por-
tion of BTC's customers, as well
as canabalise traditional long
distance methods, Mr Williams
predicted.

just the operating system.
About the Author:
Alvin Azeez is a technical
lead at Providence Technology
Group, one of the leading IT
service and solution provides in
the Bahamas. Providence Tech-
nology Group specialises in
Networking Solutions, Software
Solutions and Consulting &
Advisory Services.
Mr Azeez has a Bachelor of
Arts (Computer Sciences), and
is Microsoft Certified Systems
Administrator (MCSA). He
possesses over six years expe-
rience in network supgrt,
'administration and manage-
ment.


7,1'.


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I'l JL








PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


Construction and IT sectors first for




labour study as part of IDB initiative


FROM page one
To help enhance technical
and vocational training in the
Bahamas, the initiative will cre-


ate "a labour market informa-
tion system to inform the sector
and facilitate the flow of data
from the schools, the Bahamas


Technical and Vocational Insti-
tute (BTVI), government and
employers.
"Initial labour market stud-
ies will include the construction
and information technology
(IT) sectors."
The IDB and the Govern-
ment have taken the initial steps
to radically overhaul the
Bahamian educational system,
after employers expressed con-
cern over skill shortages among
the existing labour force and
what was coming out of the high
schools.
A previous IDB report said
the "acute skills shortages at
all levels of the Bahamian
economy raise serious ques-
tions" about how relevant tech-
nical and vocational education
was in preparing workers to
compete and enter the work-
force, with 75-80 per cent of
students in such programmes
reading below their grade level.
Drawing on statistics from
2003-2004 as an example, the
IDB said that although BTVI
had 1,500 students that year,
the "attrition rates ran as high
as 65 per cent". Only 25 per
cent of those students gradu-


ated within the prescribed time,
and only 250 found employ-
ment.
This means that only one
sixth of BTVI students in 2003-
2004 found employment. And
that year, just 5 per cent of high
school graduates chose BTVI
to further their education, even
though 60 per cent of sec-
ondary students are enrolled
in at least one technical or
vocational course.
The IDB noted the chal-
lenges this posed in maintain-'
ing the Bahamas' economic
competitiveness, adding that
while the upsurge in foreign
direct investment projects pro-
vided an opportunity "to
achieve sustained growth over
the medium term" and lower
the 10.2 per cent unemploy-
ment rate that existed in 2004,
the workforce would find it dif-
ficult to meet developers'
demands.
"Such economic dynamism
poses a serious challenge to the
education and training system
and its ability to supply the
skilled labour needed to main-
tain the Bahamas' competi-
tiveness as an investment des-


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MINISTRY OF THE PUBLIC SERVICE
P.0.ox*Msi
fK498^. INN5M$AMMAS
P$4t 042) "t42W
Pw.r(244) MAW w~57.55254


26 une, 200o6
Sncresi'l raniuig Cilleg ,
..Beranard Rncd
Nassau, Tihe Bahanmasq ;iM

Attettllontt rs. Troy N. Oiilre

Dear Madam, '

ACCRDJATION OF SV'UCCE COLLEGWM 'S COES
I wlrie with regards to. the captioned, 1 have been advised to inform you that approval
has been granted in 1995 to approve Accreditation of courses done at the Associate
Degi ee level at Success College.
Since that time, Cabinet has also given its approval to award Public Officers a 7(a)
Increment for having obtained additional quialiicalion, thus allowing oMncrs the benefit
of a Itrnnsfpr to an area of Iheir.discipline or for a plmniolltn
The areas considered are: Business Stuilies, Information Technology. Management,
Secretarial Studies, Technical and Vocational Studies etc.
Congratulations are extended to Surcesa Cullege in its venture of providing higher
education for counlless Bahamians, allowing Ihem to fulfill their career goals..
nfrtlhMr Information required, please contact the undersigned at the Ministry of
,hllc Snervice.


Co n rancis (Mr.)
(for) P anent Secretary
(Pi 5.i12-7303/72uO)


tions apply. New classes begin I-_
October 7th. Call Success for application and registration details.


Financial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information As Of:
Wednesday. 6 September 200 6
BISX LISTED & TRADED StCURrm ES. w-lSI ,. x8SX $ ..TAJ --ON .....
BISX ALL SHARE IND.EXj' CLO:.6SE: ,6 ( t ,C, -Q ^.r ^:7 o iA, %,-:,-:, .
52wk-Hi 52wk-L6w Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ -Div $ PIE Yield
1.85 0.59 Abaco Markets 1.74 1.74 0.00 -0.109 0.000 N/M 0.00%
12.05 9.50 Bahamas Property Fund 11.50 11.50 0.00 1.612 0.380 7.1 3.30%
7.50 6.55 Bank of Bahamas 7.50 7.50 0.00 500 0.738 0.170 10.2 2.27%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.292 0.020 2.7 2.50%
1.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.50 1.50 0.00 0.143 0.000 10.5 0.00%
1.49 1.10 Fidelity Bank 1.44 1.44 0.00 0.188 0.050 7.7 3.47%
9.60 8.81 Cable Bahamas 9.42 9.42 0.00 0.618 0.240 15.2 2.55%
2.20 1.39 Colina Holdings 1.90 1.88 -0.02 1,176 0.009 0.000 208.9 0.00%
11.25 9.00 Commonwealth Bank 11.25 11.25 0.00 0.943 0.600 11.9 5.33%
6.26. 4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.00 5.41 0.41 0.130 0.045 41.8 0.83%
2.88 2.10 Doctor's Hospital 2.50 2.50 0.00 0.283. 0.000 8.8 0.00%
6.21 4.12 Famguard 6.16 6.15 0.00 0.539 0.240 11.5 3.86%
11.51 10.60 Finco 11.51 11.51 0.00 0.763 0.550 15.1 4.78%
13.69 9.50 FirstCaribbean 13.69 13.69 0.00 0.885 0.550 15.5 4.02%
11.21 9.21 Focol 11.21 11.21 0.00 0.885 0.500 12.7 4.46%
1.15 0.95 Freeport Concrete 1.00 1.00 0.00 -0.170 .0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.20 8.65 ICD Utilities 8.65 8.65 0.00 0.532 0.270 16.3 3.12%
9.10 8.50 J. S. Johnson 8.75 8.75 0.00 0.527 0.560 16.6 6.40%
8.09 5.30 Kerzner International BDRs 8.09 8.09 0.00 SUSPENDED 0.160 0.000 50.6' 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.195 4.9 1.95%
... . . .... , .... ......... .. s. :. '.
52,'k--ni 52wk-Lo.w Symbol Bla $ Ask $ Last Pnce Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P'E Yiela
14.13 12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 14.00 1.923 0.960 7.9 6.74%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 8.00 8.25 10.00 0.000 0.640 NM 7.85%
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.002 0.000 NM 0.00%
1 '"": 28 00 ABDAB 41.00 -3.00 41 00 2220 0.000 194 O 000
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.00 15.00 12.50 1.750 0.360 8.0 2.57%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.45 -0.070 0.000 N/M 0.00%
5,fC k-Hi 52K-Low Fund Name NA V YTD% Last 12 Months Div S Yiel %
1 306-1 1 2508 Colina Mtoney .Market Fund 1 306371"
2.9038 2.4403 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.9038***
2.4606 2.2560 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.460616**
1.1886 1.1273 Colina Bond Fund 1.188633**
._= .LL .'. i .R-L IIjr. I : C : 1 .:... ET T-..- VYIELD i a- l 12 .r.,.-,nNr. ar.do.-,. dI ea o c/ ,:'c '.-. u i Na. .EV
52wk-Hi Highest closing pric in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity 01 September 2006
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter pricey
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week 31 August 2008
Change Change In closing price from day to day. EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value *" 30 June 2006
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 31 July 2006


tination," the IDB said.
Alongside the National
Workforce Development Coun-
cil (NWDC), a Ministry of Edu-
cation special projects unit will
be established to develop a
national technical and voca-
tional qualifications framework,
aligned with Caribbean and
international standards.
Under the IDB-fifianced pro-
gramme, BTVI will become
semi-autonomous from govern-
ment and establish "a' genuine
partnership with the private sec-
tor and labour".
The IDB said: "The Govern-
ment of the Bahamas is in the
,process of appointing a govern-
ing board with multi-sector rep-
resentation to oversee the
development of the business
plan for BTVI and the institu-
tion's transformation.
"To ensure articulation
between the secondary TVET
education and BTVI efforts,
curriculum committees will be
formed which'will include rep-.
resentatives from the Ministry
of Education and BTVI. These
curriculum committees will be
in charge of developing new
training programmes consistent
with the new standards.
"To facilitate execution,
whenever possible, the Ministry
of Education will purchase
existing packages of assessment
instruments-and curricula mate-
rials that meet required stan-
dards. The programmes can
then be adjusted to the Bahami-
an context."
To create "a well-educated
and productive workforce", the
IDB said the initiative would
see the Ministry of Educatiop
adopt a standards-driven model
for secondary, and technical and
vocational, education.
This effort will involve bring-
ing information technology (IT)
into all Bahamian schools,


teaching students to interna-
tional standards.
Technicaland vocational ini-
tiatives will focus initially on the
,tourism, construction and IT
sectors, while academic stan-
dards will be updated.
The existing skills shortages
were illustrated by a 2000 sur-
vey of 200 company managing
directors by the Nassau
Tourism and Development
Board (NTDB). That survey
found that 65 per cent of
employers were having diffi-
culty in finding and keeping
qualified employees, with the
same percentage believing
there was a serious skills gap.
Another 80 per cent of
employers surveyed felt the
skills shortage would have.an
impact on future economic
growth, and 44 per cent had to
reconsider "plans to expand
their business due to short-
ages".
"With 40 per cent of the job-
less under the age of 25, acute
skills shortages at all levels of
the Bahamian economy raise
serious questions about the rel-
evance of existing technical
education and vocational train-
ing (TVET) programmes to the
world of work," the IDB report
said.
This view, it added, was con-
firmed by a Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce focus group
in 2004, which found that
employers believed too many
technical and vocational cours-
es failed to meet industry stan-
dards.
Skill shortages and a lack of
trained workers in sufficient
numbers has made Bahamian
employers increasingly reliant
on expatriate workers, the IDB
report saying that in 2003 work
permits were even issued for
posts such as hotel maids and
waiters.


Is seeking qualified and experiencilf`ap1icas o i-iiits I
Title Search Department

Attractive salary and benefits to the successful applicant.
Please address resume and cover letter to:

The Managing Partner
P.O. Box N-272,
Nassau, Bahamas
Facsimile (242) 323-0012 or email
info@gtclaw.comn





GRAND CENTURION

INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)




Notice is hereby given that the above named
company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 4th day of September 2006. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas.








ARGOSA CORP. INC.




CABIN ATTENDANTS


OPEN HOUSE INTERVIEW


September 9th at 10 a.m.



Age 20 to 40.
Maximum height 5'9"
Pleasant Personality.
Excellent Communication Skills.


Bring resume.
Phone: 327-6032.
ssmith@skybahamas.net


S


HIBISCUS OPEN

CORPORATION
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above named
company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 5th day of September 2006. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas.








ARGOSA CORP. INC.


324-.77





I MUMhLJAY, ot i' lciviom/, 4uuo, rMUL U


- U~


Fidelity opens


the first of six



Financial Centres


FIDELITY Bank (Bahamas)
has reopened its former Fred-
erick Street branch after
extensive renovations as the
first of six one-stop Fidelity
Financial Centres, providing
both traditional banking prod-
ucts and wealth creation tools.
Products offered by the bank
include home mortgages, per-
sonal loans, mutula funds, trust,
financial planning and wealth
creation. Customers can meet
individually with Fidelity client
account managers for their
financial needs, and for freb
financial planning sessions to
help create a'customised plan
for building financial security.
Ursula Rolle, the Financial
Centre manager, said: "We buy


into the old adage that time is
money by combining regular
banking facilities and every-
one's need for today's, 'need to
have' financial products that
create wealth. This location has
been strategically modelled to
convey Fidelity's mission of
becoming a relationship bank
and not a transaction bank.
"We've found that more than
ever, people need help and
guidance and a good person-
alised financial plan, one that
alleviates the stress of debt
through built-in flexibility and
offers the comfort of a nest egg
at the end of the day.
"We like to explain and to
educate our customers so that
they understand that mortgages


and mutual funds, debt consol-
idation and retirement plans can
be used as tools to help them
get ahead and stay ahead."
Jennifer Jones, a client
account representative, (CAR)
added: "So far we have had a
very positive response from our
clients. Our visibility and acces-
sibility has started to change the
perception that banking is an
impersonal service.
"We are trained by Fidelity
to focus on the client, not the
transaction, and to offer our
clients services and products
that will help them create and
manage wealth. The layout of
this Financial Centre is espe-
cially conducive to getting that
message across."


Management buyout plan


mulled at insurance firm


FROM page one
Insurance sources suggested
that any buyout led by Bahami-
ans was likely to be a positive
development for British Amer-
ican Insurance Company, giv-
ing it sharper focus through its
new owners' on-ground pres-
ence and bolstering its compet-
Sitive position.
The firm is currently consid-
ered non-resident for exchange
control purposes as a result of
its international ownership, and
any Bahamian-led buyout
would reverse this situation by
making it resident.
The fact that Bahamians have
the central role in the proposed
British American Insurance
Company buyout also fits in
nicely with the Government's


stated aim of expanding and
deepening Bahamian ownership
of companies and assets within
the context of the wider econo-
my.
Management buyouts involve
members of a company's exist-
ing. management and executive
team raising the capital neces-
sary to purchase the business
from its then owners.
Such transactions have been
relatively commonplace in
developed economies for sev-
eral decades, and are not
unheard of in the Bahamas,
Cavalier Construction having
changed hands through a nian-
agement buyout in March 2005.
, A management buyout ear-
lier this year also created new
Bahamian-owned broker/dealer
Prc* idence Ad\ isors out of SG


Hambros Bank "& Trust
(Bahamas) investment services
division.
Mr Cooper joined British
American Insurance Company
in July 2001 from SG Hambros
Bank & Trust (Bahamas), hav-
ing been a senior manager there
with responsibility for corpa-
rate services and managing a
large Bahamian pension fund.
He had also worked for SG
Hambros in Dublin and Lux-
embourg.
Mr Cooper initially joined
British American in 2001 as
vice-president for financial ser-
vices and investments, being
promoted to senior vice-presi-
dent and chief operating offi-
cer in March 2005. This was pri-
er to him replacing Greg Sweet-
ing as president.


I ri1-" I IDLJU'1L


I BUSINESS


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

STAFF VACANCY

Assistant Director, Networking
The Management Information Services Department is seeking applicants who will be
responsible for the Networking/Technical Services area and will provide the highest
level of professionalism and performance possible in the execution of duties. This
individual must be goal oriented, organized, a team player and enthusiastic to meet
all goals set by the College. Specific responsibilities include but are not limited to:
* Managing medium to.large infrastructure and core technologies installed base
* Managing enterprise PBX installation, with AMC request, CDP and CDR plans
maintenance requirements and availability of system
* Working with a variety of hardware and software networking platforms
* Experience of working with networking technologies including TCP/IP, routing
protocols (RIP, RIPII, OSPF, etc.) addressing, DNS, DHCP, AD, Proxy, network
management tools, CLI, wireless, security, 802.1X, multi-homing to the internet
and configuring equipment.
* Networking "big picture" issues including security
* Troubleshooting specific detailed network problems toresolution

Qualifications & Experience
* A Bachelor's Degree preferably in Computer Technology or a related area along
with relevant or equivalent professional qualification is required.
* No less than 8 10 years experience with at least 4 years of supervisory
responsibility.
* Recent experience managing medium to large infrastructure and core technologies
installed base.
* Experience managing enterprise PBX installation, with AMC request, CDP and
CDR plans, maintenance requirements and availability of system.
* Experience with a variety of hardware and software networking platforms.
* Specific experience with networking technologies including TCP/IP, routing
protocols (RIP, RIPII, OSPF, etc.) addressing, DNS, DHCP, AD, Proxy, network
management tools, CLI, wireless, security, 802.1X, multi-honring to the internet
and configuring equipment.
* Specific experience with networking "big picture" issues including security.
* Ability to troubleshoot specific detailed network problems to resolution.
* Working knowledge of Ethernet and LAN/WAN technologies.
Additionally, the successful candidate should possess the following:
* Strong Supervisory skills
* Ability to work unsupervised
* Good organizational skills
* Excellent oral and written communication skills.
* Proficient knowledge of Ethernet and LAN/WAN technologies

Interested candidates should submit a COB Application Form, a detailed curriculum
vitae and a cover letter of interest, giving full particulars of qualifications and experience
along with three confidential work references no later than September 30, 2006 to:
The Director
Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
P. O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS.
lisit our webwme at www.cob.edu.bs ErCai NC & 2t!d.DICG RiaA.dS .


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY


CORPORATION


EXTERNAL VACANCY NOTICE

LINESMAN MATE TRAINEES

A vacancy exists in the Human Resources & Training
Department for Linesman Mate Trainees.

To qualify as a Linesman Mate Trainee the following criteria
should be met:

Must be 18-25 years old
Have a minimum of five (5) BJC's including Maths, English,
Language and General Science with grades of "C" or better
Any other equivalent technical certification or relevant
training diploma


As BEC supplies and maintains electricity through the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas candidates who successfully complete the
Linesman Mate Training Programme, may be posted in the New
Providence and or the Family Islands Operations, which will be
based on the Corporation's manpower needs.

Applications forms can be collected from BEC Head
Office located at Blue.Hill & Tucker Roads, Nassau Bahamas.
Family Island applicants can also collect these forms from their
local BEC office in their respective district. All applications forms
should be returned completed with supporting documents to:-


The Manager, Human Resources & Training
P.O. Box N-7509,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Applications must be received on or before September 8, 2006.


GN397
MINISTRY OF FINANCIAL SERVICES AND INVESTMENTS

NOTICE

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT
(CHAPTER 320)


It is hereby notified pursuant to Section Seven of the Industries Encouragement
Act that the Minister is about to consider whether the following products should
be declared "APPROVED PRODUCTS" for the purposes of that Act

PRODUCTS RAW MATERIALS TO BE USED IN
MANUFACTURE

Initially Crabs then venture into Natural Vegetation; Coconuts and
Shrimp, Crawfish and Fish Seaweed




It is hereby notified pursuant to Section Five of the Industries Encouragement
Act, Chapter 326, that the Minister is about to consider whether the manufacturer
specified in the first column of the table below should be declared an
"APPROVED MANUFACTURER" in relation to the products specified in the
third column,

MANUFACTURER LOCATIONOF PRODUCTS
__FACTORY PREMISES_


Andros Hatcheries Long Bay Initially Crabs then venture
South Andros into Shrimp, Crawfish and
The Bahamas Fish.



-mt

Any interested person having any objection to these declarations should
give notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the Office of
the Ministry of Financial Services and Investments, before, 15th day of
September, 2006, by letter addressed to:-


THE PERMANENT SECRETARY
THE MINISTRY OF FINANCIAL SERVICES & INVESTMENTS
P.O. Box N-7770
NASSAU, N. P.,
THE BAHAMAS


SHEILA CAREY
PERMANENT SECRETARY


-







PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


IT~ I I *l I.~L


INVITATION TO BID



The Airport Authority invites bids from interested firms
to provide services to clear the airfield and establish grassy
areas.


Interested firms may collect bid packages from the
Executive Office of the Airport Authority at the Lynden
Pindling International Airport during normal working
hours commencing Tuesday, September 5, 2006 through
Friday, September 8, 2006.


A site inspection has been arranged for 9 am on Friday,
September 8, 2006. Those persons interested in attending
should contact the Authority via telephone 377-1759 no
later than 5:00 pm on Wednesday, September 7, 2006.


Bids are to be returned by 4 pm on Friday, September
22, 2006 to the Executive Offices of the Airport Authority
in plain sealed envelopes marked "Bid for Landscaping
Services" and delivered to the attention of Mr. Bertram
Reckley, Acting General Manager, Airport Authority.


The Authority reserves the


right to reject any or all bids.


FROM page one
This was because only a sum-
mary, not the full steering com-
mittee report, had been
released.
The Nassau Institute said:
"The Steering Committee's
executive summary does not
associate its $235 million fore-
cast with a specific year...nei-
ther 2006 nor 2026. Thus one
cannot relate future growth to
past growth, the simplest test
for reasonableness."
It pointed out that the BDA
had questioned the $235 mil-
lion cost estimate itself, given
that the Government's 2006-
.2007 Budget allocated some
$205 million to healthcare..
As a result, the BDA con-
cluded that current projected
costs gave no insight into likely
cost increases associated with


the NHI plan. It also expressed
concern about the'Blue Ribbon
Commission's concern 'that
record keeping in the' public
healthcare system was poor,
forcing its management to
"employ guess work when mak-
ing critical decisions".
"Without reliable data about
the country's utilisation of the
'health care systemn.. how can
we accept the estimated costs
of NHI with any reliability?"
the BDA had asked.
And the Nassau Institute fol-
lowed up yesterday by saying:
"The, overstaffing, poo0 record
keeping, 'the inadequate
accounting, management and
managerial systems, and the
absence of financial trans-
parency, all contribute to high
operating costs.
It again drew attention to Mr
Esmail's report, which adjist-


Notice
NOTICE is hereby given that ROBERT PIERRE, OF' HANNA HIILL
Eight Mile Rock, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible' for Nationality and Citizernship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be' granted, should send a written alnd
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
7th day of SEPTEMBER, 2006 to the Minister responsible for:
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,Freeport, Bahamas.
o





WEMCO LTD.
"THE COMPANY YOU KEEP"
A Leading Security Firm is Seeking Full-Time


Eligibility Criteria:

* Mature individual with two or more years supervisory
experience.
* Persons witmilitary e peience-would be- in:asset
* GofConinR ca ohSkils
* Must be computer literate
* Must be in possession of driver's license ,
* Positive attitude, great people skills, and career-oriented.
* Ability to perform as a team player and act independently.
* Be able to pass a background investigation and drug
screening
* Must be willing to work nights, weekends, holidays and
overtime.

Interested persons can contact 325-6170/4 between the
hours of 9a.m-5p.m., Mon.-Fri.






LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 OF 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation
Notice is hereby given that hin accordance with Settion 138 (4)
of the Ilatemational BusineSs Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000), ,
SEEFORTH SECURITIES LIMITED
is hi dissolution. Mrs. Arena Moxey is'the Liquidator and can be contacted at
The Wihiterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets,
S Nassau, Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names addresses anid particulars of their
debts or claims to the Liquidator before November 6, 2006.



ALIENAMOXEY
IInIIDATOR


NOTICE
LONDAL LIMITED



NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) LONDAL LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 6th September, 2006 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by
the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Blue Seas
Administration Ltd., of 4th Floor, Bahamas
Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Dated this 7th day of September, A.D. 2006

Blue Seas Administration Ltd.
Liquidator


Inagua


tourism


p lan an


'antidote'
1 tn 1 ,O ",
t, l-n mrw*.


:resorts



FROM'page one
In addition, many of the Fam-
ily Island calls are likely to have
been at the cruise lines' private
islands where they control all
the attractions, excursions and
water sports activities, meaning
there is even less economic
impact.
"To this day, the potential of
Inagua is only sparsely realized
and the existing tourism product
is weak, with some 20 rooms
available and limited tourist ser-
vices and amenities," the IDB
said.
"Low demand is due to a lack
of outside awareness of Inagua
as a destination, and also to'
restrained accessibility. How-
ever, the preparedness of the
population to pursue tourism
development and the rich
potential product offering pro-
vide a good base for low-impact
tourism development.
"With the right mix of cre-
atively developed services and
facilities, and focused marketing
and promotion, Inagua has the
potential to develop a signifi-
cant tourism industry that is
financially and environmentally
sustainable."
The IDB said Inagua had
some natural resources that
made it an obvious eco-tourism
destination, with the world's
largest population of West Indi-
an flamingoes, hundreds of bird
species, flora and fauna, fishing
grounds; and its coasts and coral
reefs.
Historical and cultural attrac-
tions on the island included its
economic past, including salt
extraction.
The IDB said Inagua's popu-
lation was awaiting the initia-
tive's progress, and both the
island's Eco-Tourism Commit-
tee and the Inagua Develop-
ment Association were ready
to work on sustainable tourism
for the island.
The IDB has put out a tender
document seeking consultants
to help develop a plan for sus-
tainable tourism on Inagua.


[Vn.



'4


ed countries' total healti'care
spending as a percentage of
gross domestic product (GbP)
to account for the differences
in relative age between popu-
lations.
The Bahamas was a relative-
ly young country, with just 5.2
per cent of its population over
65 years-old, the time of life
when most healthcare spending
is incurred, while 12.4 per cent
of US citizens were aged over
65.
When age-adjusted, Mr
. Esmail found that healthcare
spending in the Bahamas as a
percentage of GDP was 14.9 per
cent, the same as the US, mak-
ing this nation's healthcare sys-
tem joint most expensive in the
western world.
"On an 'age-adjusted' basis,
the expenditures of both the
Bahamas and the US are 14.9
per cent of GDP, the costliest in
the world; and Bahamian
spending is 32 per cent greater
than Canada and 54 per cent
greater than the UK," the Nas-
sau Institute said.
"Both have universal access,
publicly funded national health-
i care systems and.. .significant-
ly...both have funding and
'patient access to care' prob-
lems.",
,As a result, Mr Esmail urged
that if the Bahamas proceeded
with the NHI plan, it should not
implement the comprehensive
benefit package proposed by
the Blue Ribbon Commission.
He described the economic
costs of the Commission's pro-
posals as "significant", with the
NHI likely to be unsustainable
long-term, creating "a substan-
tial health care programme
whose cost far exceeded what
was necessary".


4'
I, '


I I. ^**^ ^ *- .l



Thai Cooking Demonstration

at The College of The Bahamas




Calling all who love to cook and try new styles of

cooking. Come learn to cook the rich, tropical

cuisine of Thailand with renowned Thai Chef

Vatcharin Bhumichitr, owner of Thai restaurants

in London and Miami.



The Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute,

in conjunction with the Thai Trade Centre of Miami

and hospitality industry partners, is inviting

members of the public, on a first come, first served

basis, to attend a hands-on cooking demonstration

of one of the world's most popular cuisines.



Date: Tuesday, September 12, 2006

Time: 2:00-5:00 pm

Venue: COB Culinary & Hospitality

Management Institute, Bahamas Tourism

Training Centre, Thompson Boulevard.



Telephone: 323-6804

Fax: 325-8175



Deadline: Thursday, September 7, 2006. Spaces

are limited, so call today to reserve your place.



H COLLEGE OF THE.BAHAMAS
l i\it our webFite at www.cob.edu.bs ERyfrzM'a T hA4 W C RdtAM!'ANSg


.7

I,


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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2006, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE


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-*
.. _-._
Sniae CotFOR SALE

SWCRAr 0 CASTAL 001 $65,000
_" ..- _. _20



0M t. ,- 0.




11111 110111 A -,, .
_______~i ~_- 2


S- -L





rr* C
* o .


ENROLL IN BUSINESS WORKSHOPS
* Starting/ Managing a Business
-, N1 9 '.
* Marketing Products and Services,
Corporate. Small Business. Individual
L DO on: www.markturnquestconsulllng.com


seeking applicants for the following positions:

Office Administrative Assistant
The applicant must possess the following:
* Minimum of Two Years experience m Office Administration
* Good Communicator
* Team Player
* Excellent Organization Skills
* Experience with NMicrosoft Word program
* Good People Skills

Dental Assistant
The applicant must possess the following:
* NMinimum of Two years Experience as a Dental Assistant
* Good Communicator
* Team Play'er
* Good people Skills

Please fax resume to (242) 393 5802.



DIVIDEND NOTICE



C13
COMMONWEALTH BANK
TO ALL SHAREHOLDERS
The Board of Directors of Commonwealth Bank Limited has
declared a Quarterly Dividend for Ordinary, A", "B", "D", "E",
"F", "G" and "H" Preference Shares to all shareholders of
record at September 15, 2006, as follows:-


Ordinary
'" Preference
"B"Preference
"D"Preference
"E"Preference
"F" Preference
"G" Preference
"H"Preference


129 per share
7% per annum payable quarterly
7% per annum payable quarterly
7%perannum payable quarterly
7% per annumpayable quarterly
7% per annum payable quarterly
7% per annum payable quarterly
7% per annum payable quarterly


The payment will be made on September 29, 2006, through
Colina Financial Advisors Limited, the Registrar & Transfer
Agent, in the usual manner.
Charlene A. Pinder
Corporate Secretary


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, JENNY EVANS, of No. 1
Ling Lane Casavel Beach. P.O.Box F 43370 Grand Bahama,
intend to change my name to JENNIBIE EVANS. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll. you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box SS-19478, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.



GN 396 I


Office of The Prime Minister
; ITOUqn LuF b
Pursuant to Article 70(3) of the Constitution.
the Constituencies Commission appointed under
the provisions of Article 69 of the Constitution
intends to proceed the review of the number and
boundaries of the constituencies into which
The Bahamas is divided.


The first meeting of the Commission
on Friday, September 8. 2006


will be held


J. Oswald Ingraham
Speaker
House of Assembly


Puli Noic


Michelle Carter

Cartwright

is no longer employed at British American
Insurance and is not authorized to conduct
any business on behalf of the Company

For further information please
call our Rosetta Street Branch
at 322-1801/2


SaBRITISH
AMERICAN

Nmwsa 242-461-1100 Feeport 242-352-7209 Eba 242-336-3035
Sbfinancial@babinsurance.cm


wages


Year 2001 Hard Top & t Binini Top Microwave Oven
Twin Evinrud&s 225hp Gendralor i ...-'
Fuel Capacity 22 1 il VHF Radio I -,r., l
WaiterCpacily 4" G OPS & FishDepth Finder 1. I. ',h. r
Auito PIilot .-..l .
Contact:
Tim Fraser- Smith 302-4112 or
Terry Girling 302-4115


CLE/QII/01317 2005
COiMONWEALTHITOF THE BAHAMlAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Equity Side

NOTICE
STHE QUIETING TITLES ACT, 1959
The Petition of PHILIP ANDREW ALBURY SR., PHILIP
ANDREW JR..AND CELIA ALBURY of the
Settlement of Mai h IHa- bour, in the Island of Abaco, one of the
Island; of tde Conrnonwealthof the Bahamas.
ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising 7.739 acres
being a portion of Grant B-8S granted to John Sweeting and
situate in the To\un of Marsh Harbour in the Island of
Abaco one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas
\which said piece. parcel or lot of land is bounded on the EAST
by the Sea ot Abaco and running thereon One Hundred and
T\ enr\ Fi\ e and Si.xt -ivo Hundredths (125.62) feet and on the
EASTSOLITH EAST b\ the Sea of Abaco and running thereon
Seventry-mto and Nineteen Hundredths (72.19) feetandSOUTH-
WEST by land no\\ 1o former the property of the Estate of
the late Howard Sweeting arid running thereon One Thousand
Seven Hundred and Sixty-three and Forty Hundredths (1,763.40)
feet on ithe WEST by land now or formerly the property of the
Estate of Milton Kenneth Sweeting and running thereon One
Hundred and Seventy-eight and Sixty-eight Hundredths (178.68)
feet and on the NORTHWEST by land now or formerly of
Audrey Roberts and running thereon One thousand Seven
Hundred and Three and Forty-eight Hundredths (1,703.48) feet.
The Petitioners, PHILIP ANDREW ALBURY SR., PHILIP
ANDREW ALBURY JR. AND CELIA ALBURY, claim to
be the owners in a fee simple estate in possession of the pieces
parcels or lots of land hereinbefore described and the Petitioners
havernade application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas under S.3 of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959, to have
their title to the said land investigated and the nature and extent
thereof determined and declared, by a Certificate of Title to be
granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the
said Act.
Copies of the plan may be inspected during
normal office hours at:-
(a) The Registry of The Supreme Court, Second Floor,
Ansbacher Building, East Street, Nassau, Bahamas.
(b) The Chambers of HOPE STRACHAN & CO., Equity
House, Mount Royal Avenue North, (Hawkins Hill), Nassau,
Bahamas.
Notice is hereby given that any person having dower or right
of dower or an adverse claim or a claim not recognized in the
said Petition shall on or before the 23rd November, 2006 file in
the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or undersigned
a Statement of Claim in the prescribed form verified be an
Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such person
to file and serve a Statement of Claim on or before the 23rd
November, 2006 will operate as a bar to such claim.
HOPE STRACHAN & CO.
Chambers,
Equity House,
Mount Royal Avenue North (Hawkins Hill),
Nassau,Bahamas


BUSUNESS


1


incrme






PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, SEPTEMISt-H /, ZUuo


FIDELITY BANK (BAHAMAS) LTD.
Consolidated Balance Sheet (Unaudited)
As of June 30,2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)


30-Jun-06


ASSETS
Cash on hand and at banks
Investment in securities
Mortgages, consumer and other loans
Property, plant and equipment
Other assets


LIABILITIES
Customer deposits
Mortgage-backed bonds
Long-term loans
Other liabilities and accrued expenses


EQUITY
Capital and reserve attributable to the
Bank's equity holders:
Share capital ordinary shares
Shgtre capital preference shares
Revaluation surplus
Retained earnings

Minority interest


$ 11,448,414
21,170,265
103,755,951
6,834,891
1,359,847
$ 144,569,368


30-Jun-05


$ 21,847,098
16,840,800
97,949,819
6,948,350
1,927,5 1
$ 145,513,818


$ 115,411,045 $ 117,576,991
755,485
400,000 600,000
721,755 680,514
116,532,800 119,612,990


5,000,000
10,000,000
1,675,020
10,447,244
27,122,264
914,304
28,036,568
$ 144,569,368


5,000,001
10,000,000
1,688,568
8,350,616
25,039,185
861,643
25,900,828
$ 145,513,818


6 Months Ending


30-Jun-06


Income
Interest income
Interest expense
Net Interest Income

Non-Interest Income
Total Income

Expenses
Salary and staff benefits
General and administrative
Depreciation
Loss on Sale of Fixed Assets
Total Non-nterest expense
Provision for credit losses
Total Expenses
Net income before minority interest

Attributable to:
Equity holders of the bank
Minority interest
Net income

' Weighted averagenumber of
common shares outstanding

Earnings per share


$ 5,076,253
1,797,987
3,278,266

1,780,065
5,058,331


1,934,058
1,617,199
243,604

3,794,861
225,214
4,020,075
1,038,256


1,012,305
25,951
S 1.038 256

16,666,670


0.06


30-Jun-05


$ 4,992,713
1,942,578
3,050,135

1,506,287
4,556,422


1,636,872
1,511,419
233,114

3,381,405
141,006
3,522,411
__ 1,034,011


1,015,235
18,776
$ 1,034,011

16,666,670


$ 0.06


I nCE I nru1D Li[.. V1II.. ....-


FIDELITY BANK (BAHAMAS) LTD.
Consonidated Statement of Changes in Equity.(Unaudited)
For the Six Months Ended June 30, 2006' |
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)


Share Capital
Ordinary
Shares


At at 1 January 2005


Share Capital
Preference Revaluation
Shares Surnlus


Retained
Earnings


$ 5,000,001 $. 10,000,000 $ 1,735,925 $ 7,996,358 $ 24,712,284


Property, plant and equipment revaluation
Net Income
Dividends paid ordinary shares
Dividends paid/payable preference shares
As at 31 December2005


As at 1 January 2006


Property, plant and equipment revaluation
Net Income
Dividends paid ordinary shares
Dividends paid/payable preference shares
As at 30 June 2006


5,000,001 10,000,00


(40,605) 40,605
3,669,343 3,669,343
(666,667) (666,667)
_- (750,000) (750,000)
1,5320. 10,289,639 26,984,60


5,000,001 10,000,000 1,695,320 10,289,639 26,984,960

(20,300) 20,300
1,012,305 1,012,305
(500,000) (500,000)
$ 5000001 10 375,000)00 $ 1375 0)
1 $ 10.000000 $1675020 .10447.24 27122265


FIDELITY BANK (BAHAMAS) LTD.
Consolidated Statement of Cash Flow (Unaudited)
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)
-- rl ,


Cash flow from operating activities
Net income (before minority interest)
Adjustments for:
Net change in provision for credit losses
Depreciation
Net change in unrealized (appreciationr)in financial assets at fair
value through profit or loss
through profit or loss
Operating income before changes in operating
assets and liabilities

Increase in mortgages, consumer and other loans
S(Increase)/decrease in other assets
Increase in customer deposits
(Decrease)/increase in other liabilities and acrrued expenses
Net cash flows used in operating activities

Cash flows'from investing activities
Purchase of government securities
Purchase of financial assets at fair value through profit and loss
Sale of government securities
Sale of financial assets at fair value through profit and loss
Purchase of property, plant & equipment

Net cash flows provided by investing actitivies


Cash flows from financing activities
Maturity of mortgage-backed bonds
Ordinary dividends paid
Preference dividends paid
Repayment of long-term loans .
Net cash flows used in financing actiti% ies
Decrease in cash and cash equivalents .
Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the year,
Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the period


For the
six months ended
30-Jun-06

$ 1,038,256 $

4,075
243,604

(132,941)
(30,952)


1,122,042

(1,993,236)
(267,128)
5,636,619
(3,268,332)
1,229,966


(186,000)
; '(508,595)
758,800
1,057,860
(27,158)


For the
year ended
31-Dec-05


3,714,830

310,237
489,269


4,514,336

(9,361,477)
292,545
4,733,246
1,536,964
1,715,614


(2,491,500)
(2,828,639)
805,200

(461,229)


1,094,907. (4,976,168)


(755,543)
S(500,000) .(666,667)
(375,000) (707,992)
(100,000). (200,000)
(-.. 75 n) 1 (n 2,330,202)
1,349,873 (5,590,756)
10,098,542 15,689,298
$ 11,448,414 $ 10,098,542


r rn tt a a
leb o Int' n Day


Renowned Bahamian authors *Obediah Michael Smith


and *Michael Pintard will share their lifelong appreciation


of reading and the role it has played in shaping their lives.




Hear the featured authors:


*Reading a selection of their works and *Autographing books


Chapter One Bookstore,

The College of The Bahamas,

Thompson Boulevard

Friday 8th of September,

2006 at 6:30pm


rpThe Tribune



Partnership



for literacy.


-- College of The fahamas


FIDELITY BANK (BAHAMAS) LTD.
Consolidated Statement of Income (Unaudited)
For the Six Months Ended June 30, 2006
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)


*1



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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2006, PAGE 9B


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Killing Two Birds With One Stone


West dealer.
North-South vulnerable.
NORTH
*Q8
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*9762
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r EAST
SJ 1094
62 105
04 *J853
3 + Q62
SOUTH
AK7 6 5 32
VQ84
+A7
46A 7


The bidding:
West North East South
1 l Pass Pass 2*
Pass 3 4 Pass 4 *
Opening lead king of diamonds.
If you're a careful declarer, you
don't always take things for granted.
Instead, you assume the worst and
try to guard against it It would be
easy to go wrong on this deal; yet,
there is really no good reason for
falling down on the job.
West leads a diamond against
your four-spade contract. There
seems to be nothing to the play when
dummy appears you may lose a
club and two hearts but every-
thing else looks solid. However,


being extra-careful, you recognize
that it's possible to go down if the
trumps are divided 4-0. There's one
quick way to find out, so you cash
the ace of trumps at trick two, and, lo
and behold, your worst fears are real-'
ized.
You're now sure to lose a club
and a spade, which means that the
only way to salvage the contract is to
reduce your two heart losers to one.
The. $64,000 question, therefore, is:
How can the hearts be divided so that
you lose only one heart trick?
A little thought produces the
answer. It is true that West opened
the bidding with one heart, but that
doesn't necessarily mean he has the
K-J-10. East may have the jack or
ten, in which case the problem can be
solved.
Accordingly, at trick three you
lead a spade to the queen and return
a low heart. When East-follows low,
you play the eight. West takes his
jack and returns a diamond, which
you ruff.
You cash the king of spades, then
play the queen of hearts, hoping East
started with the doubleton ten.
Bull's-eye! It doesn't matter whether
West covers the queen or not, since
you've. managed to kill two birds
with one stone-and so make the con-
tract


TARE7-


C R


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The
Target
uses
words in
the main
body of
Chambers
21st ,
Century
Dictionary
11999
edition)


SHOW many words of four
letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here? In
making a word, each letter may-
be used once only. Each must
contain the centre letter and
there must be at least one
nine-letter word. No plurals
TODAY'S TARGET
4 Good 15; very good 22; excellent
30 tor morel Solution
tomorrow


CRYPTIC PUZZLE


ACROSS
1 Wasle, we hea, in a statistical
centre(S6)
6 Food for Ihe journey east (5)
9 Sne names a vessel (7)
10 The besI lerer takes a lot of paper
i51
11 Litle house Ait no fridge (5)
12 Gels hold of disorderly bars al
Galeshead (5)
13 Gains a lot, nomnaly (7)
15 Fay, said to be whimsical (3)
17 She's some comediennel (4)
18 Nol out o0 create the moa (2,4)
19 Are outl o serve, love (5)
.1 In Afica. Ihe fist letter to upset
Sarah 16)
22 One bom in Hollywood? (4)
24 Sinke haid at it (3)
1S Somelhmg horsy afoot (7)
26 Twin uncle (5)
77 Not originally a simmer's setback
(5)
28 Chap to idy up ne stable? (5)
2. Her gifl s lo make arcraft(7)
S Ethe's less tan humanitarian (5)
'31 Adl first origir~a Chrislmas grill (5)


DOWN
Fearful affray said to come to a sad
end (6)
Thin wooden beam, part of a seat (6)
Young Scot inThe Quiet American
(3)
Decorate sailors with much
ceremony (5)
Praise or people holdng out, losig
nohg (7)
Wel they aren't rkies (4)
Mel up wilh a rel expert, ust for
now (3,3)
Cheese, intaly from an urban
dsrict inpat o India (5)
Lanwgge e state leamng on me
quieB (5)
Tng rebin line (5)
Playing sreng? (5)
Log lime geing to me point(5)
Place in some embarrassment (5)
Land of men n song (7)
Weapon ilale for a "29 Aoss?
(6)
Niceso of nigh to stay out of the
car (6)
Wamnn-earted, uncomp isng
devotion (6)
Too keen to lum up and have a
&ng? (5)
A crack rom some driller (4)
Is Margarets unm to be a Ireaswe
(3)


L PTr T i- ,,)LUTIC'ti,

ACFiC'S 4 So4eC-lo 7 Oiel cas.l B ES-says 10. Sname 13. Reap 14 Tale 15,
Car.t i. iDoE 17 T-R ot 19 Errni 21 Shon head 23. Ru-s-t 24, Lernd 26. Pen
- Tre,, '9 LI.- 32 Z-.uS 33. Sylpn 34 Sup-ero 35, B-ignler 36. Sentry
i ir' i Mc, i-si ,s Med Al 3. Acre 4 St e'er 5. Wasp b. Taylor 9 Saleen 11,
Hag i: l ir.iTe 13 Ranies 15. Cor 16. Did (rev) 18. R owner 20. Ma DL-y 21. Su-N
2-" n.. "3 RAluse 25 A-p 28. uoDDy 30. Elie 31 Snre 32 Zest 33. Sage

E.i' 3LUTIONS
4CR;o, 4. Sar.oal 7 Tomorrow 8. Oracle 10. Lasso 13, Door 14 L1sl 15 Tent
it ,Ar. I1-. Amc.m 9 Tine 21 Prominent 23 Pier 24. Gone 26. Hol 27 Plod 29,
F-., 3i: Roaa 33 Stone 34 Report 35, Electric 36 Stupor
C.jh i 1 Al.1ji 2 Amas5 3 Trio 4 Swoon 5, Near 6 Allure 9. Rotten 11. Aid 12,
Sla.i 13 Dem.g.,5, 1I Tom 16 Ant 18 Torpor 20 Inept 21 P.I 22 Noo 23,
PO.jiE'l -'5 W on 28 Latde 30. LOrry 31. Tencn 32. Romp 33. Sick


ACROSS
1 Leered (5)
S6 Bring about (5)
9 Extraterrestrial
.(7)
10 Pastime (5)
11 Bend (5)
12 Tables (5)
13 Tuned aside
(7)
15 Body of water
(3)
17 Writing table
(4)
18 Remember (6)
19 Large shrubs
(5)
20 Ground (6)
22 Formerly(4)
24 Cathedral city
(3)
25 Church (7)
26 Fool (5)
27 Horrify (5)
28 Closes (5)
29 Milder (7)
30 Interior style(5)
31 Russian rulers
(5) --


DOWN
2 Furrow(6)
3 Setoff(6)
4 Period of time
(3)
5 Sedate (5)
6 Forts(7)
7 Insects (4)
8 Spade (6)
12 Gain
knowledge(5)
13 Love (5)
14 Treatise(5)
15 Holy person (5)
16 Change (5)
18 Send (5)
19 Child (7)
21 Pass (6)
22 Willows (6)
23 Underground
room (6)
25 Facial feature
(5)
28 Shalespearean
villain (4)
. .. G_.roup (3)- -.


I


I CHES* S b LonrdBadem


White checkmates in three
moves, against any defence (by
Kurt Laue). Rook and bishop
ahead, but not so simple for
White. The black king's cornered
position means that if White
kicks off with any rook move his
opponent can immediately daim
a stalemate draw.


THURSDAY,
SEPTEMBER 7


ARIES Mar 21/Apr 20
This week you'll face the truth of who
you are, and stop acting like you're try-
ing to be someone else, Aries. It'll be
rewarding discovering and acting
upon your own values.
TAURUS --Apr 21/May 21
A relationship is entering a new
phase, which means that there are
exciting times ahead with your mate.
Embrace and enjoy the moments you
share together, Taurus.
GEMINI May 22/Jun 21
The stars want you to slow down
and enter an introspective phase,
Gemini. Whether you stop to smell
the roses or just ease up on,your
pace at work, you'll make progress.
CANCER Jun 22/Jul 22
Make a solid effort to complete a
project this week;,Cancer. Even
if it doesn't pan out, you'll still
have the feeling of accomplish-
ment that hard work brings.
LEO Jul 23/Aug 23
Don't throw up your hands in frus-
tration, Leo. It will only make your
current situation worse. Rather than
opt for a quick fix, study the problem
and get to the.heart of the matter.
VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
Your stubbornness may cause you
to overlook the obvious, Virgo.
Giving up something that you
worked hard to gain might actually
be a benefit to you in the long run.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
Who said you can't have it all,
Libra? This week you're lucky in
love and money and will receive
some good news at work. Live up
every minute of this good fortune.
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
Take a serious look at your financial
future, Scorpio. Are you putting
your money to the best use or just
buying things you want instead of
need? Focus' on important things.
SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
It'll take a little more than a few
strokes of bad luck to keep you
down, Sagittarius. Get back on your
feet and dust yourself off. It's time to
get back in the game.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan20
Stop holding on to a situation that you
cannot win, Capricorn. Focus your
energy on something that will actually
have merit and a result you will enjoy.
Negative thoughts get you nowhere.
AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
A brainstorm will come into play
this week, Aquarius. However,
what seems like the perfect idea to
you is not so well received by oth-
ers that you know.
PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20
Expect a few bumps along the road
this week, Pisces. But it's not some-
thing that will put you out of com-
mission; it will just slow you down.


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PUZZLE SOLUTIONS
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I.;tHE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


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TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAr' F nR THIUlRSDAY SEPTEMBER 7. 2006


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Debbie and Christine





keep the year on track

FIGURATIVELY speak- TU B
ing, it's been an "off year" for ST
many of our senior track and
field athletes.
With the exception of those
who competed at the Com-.
monwealth Games in Mel-
bourne, Australia in March and
those who participated in the
Central American and
Caribbean Games in Cartage-
na, Colombia in August, our
athletes have not been too
active this year.
But it's good to see that we
will still end up with at least
two athletes making their pres-
ence felt sprinter Debbie F er- .
guson-McKenzie and quarter- 'B
miler Christine Amertil.
For Ferguson-McKenzie, this
low-key season has worked in A
her favour because it gave her A
the opportunity to redefine her o :
skills to get back on the circuit "
in both the 100 and 200.
For someone who took the
majority of last year off OPINION
because of surgery, Ferguson-
McKenzie has had a remark- smpi "um. "/1m *.--"
able comeback as she sizzled
to the top 10 once more in both
events, month.
It's a testament to the hard Ferguson-McKenzie has
work that has been the trade- always been an advocate for TA
mark of the 30-year-old in her not using performance enhanc- 'i CHRISTINE AMERT
long and illustrious career. She ing drugs. So it will be inter-
has been the Bahamas' most testing to hear her contribution
decorated female sprinter, hav- to the issue.
ing won at least one medal in Over the years, she has made
some cases two and three in an impact on the local and
just about every international international scene, not just on
meet that she's competed in. the track, but off it as -well. So
This weekend, Ferguson- she should fit right in at the
McKenzie will attempt to add. symposium.
another feather in her cap in Ferguson-McKenzie has cer-
the sprint double at the fourth tainly been a role model for
IAAF World Final in Athletics our youngsters to emulate.
in St uttgart, Germany. Amertil has also been per-
She will follow that with an forming a credible level.
appearance on the women's 4 x For the last two years, she's
100 relay team that will defend had to run behind the shadow I
its Americas team title at the of Olympic and World chaim-
IAAF World Cup in, Athens, pion Tonique Williams-Dar-
Greece next weekend. ling. But in this off year, Amer-
Fergh'a b iiil hg intained a level
to co lVe bik a- i remain:' stability on the international
healthy during the course of scene.
the season has really boosted Like Ferguson-McKenzie,
her ability to close outthe year she will get the opportunity to .
on a high. close out her season by run-
But I'm even more ning at both the IAAF World
impressed with the fact that Finals in Athletics and tle
Ferguson-McKenzie will get World Cup.
the opportunity to speak on So even thought it's an 'off
behalf of our colleagues at the year', it's still been one'for Fer-
IAAF Symposium on doping guson-McKenzie and Amertil
in Lausanne at the end of the to relish. .:.,...-..


Three Bahamian




boxers head for




Turks and Caicos


Copyrighted MatCeial



Syndicated Cont


Available frorfCo niiiiercial News Providers



0- -
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* BOXING
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
THREE boxers will carry
the load for the Bahamas at
the 1st Turks and Caicos Invi-
tational tournament this week-
end.
Representing the Bahamas
in the heavyweight division will
be James McKenzie, Tamiko
Dorsette in the middleweight,
and Shamaelye Lightbourne in
the junior welter division.
The three boxers will match-
up against some of the best
from the host country along
with the Dominican Republic,
Haiti and Jamaica.
According to head coach
Andre Seymour, attending the
1st annual Turks and Caicos
Invitational tournament is a big
step the Amateur Boxing Fed-
eration of the Bahamas
(ABFB) is taking to improve
the level of boxing in the coun-
try.
Seymour said: "The team is
ready, I don't want anyone to
think that since we've been
only training for six weeks that
the boxers aren't ready.
"They are more than ready.
All of the boxers realized what
needs to be done in order to
reach the next level. They must
go to tournaments, no matter
how small these tournaments
be, they must attend.
"Attending these tourna-
ments will only make them
stronger so when they are
faced with tougher tourna-


.'4,


4. -




4,-


merts and competition they
will be ready."
Despite only having six
weeks of training under their
belts, the team has gone
through a vigorous training
programme.
Seymour, who is also the
trainer of the team, revealed
that the three boxers' workouts
had doubled since the ABFB
took on the challenge.
On the last day of training
the boxers squared off with
each other, putting in the final
touches needed.
"The federation, along with
myself, we've made a promise
to expose the boxers, they real-
ly need it," said Seymour.
"The more exposure they.get
the better they can become..
Tournaments are important
and it not only plays an impor-
tant part on the boxers' physi-
cal conditioning but the mental
aspects as well.
"The more they fight against,
foreign blood the better they
become. They will learn how
to pace themselves and when
they get into a mental situation
they can box themselves out
with out any trouble.
"That is the most important
factor, one a coach cannot
teach."
McKenzie is expected to lead
the three boxers into battle.
This tournament will mark the
return of Lightbourne, who has
been on a two year break.
The three member team will
leave for Turks and Caicos
Island today.


SPORT


F-rUur I VY) I I I) -


I







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Sporting and business community



on course at Duke Semi Finals
cors u i,


PERFECT HITI Garland Evans swings a good shot which
makes it into a hole on the spectacular Ocean Club Golf Course
during the recent Dule or Edinburgh Semi Fnals,:.
PARADISE ISLAND -
Golf enthusiasts and hie
'Who's -Who' in the local
sports, and business commu-
nity converged at the cham- ':
pionship 18- hole Ocean pQi lng
Club Golf Course for the
sixth annual.Duke of Edin-
burgh Semi Finals on Sun-
day, September 3, 2006.
Organized by Kerzner
International and its cdrpo-
rate sponsors, the tburna- :
ment raised a total of :
$80,000. Kerzner Interza- R I''
tional presented $50.0001 to
the Governor General Youth :- -
Awards; the resort company -' .I'.VOP'
also donated $20.000 toithe : le
Duke of Edinburgh Charities ,. O ID
and $10.000 was used tor. r
prizes for the event. i cu tomer se
Prominent businessms*n I
:Billy Saunders,ow r of c, i sons to
- Majestic Tours, and Thomiaso
Beihel were the first plhce
winners. Nancy Mc'Donald NECSS$A R
,,.and Sandy Walker came in
' second place, Both first And L ch r
:second place winners I .,
received an all expense paid 3-5 Year:
trip to London, courtesy pf
British Airways and Kerzner. Analtica
International, to participate
in the Duke of Edinburghi Great Int
Cup Finals at Wentworth; :
Berkshire Golf Club,and Strong
Windsor Castle from Oct0-
ber 1 to october 6,2006.. r Imm n
Husband and wife tam,l l
James and Paula Cooper *iv P
placed third. The couple. i v re
received a two night stay at
One Only Ocean Club along
with $1500 for food and bev- -If
erages. Fourth place went:o
Eddie Carter; Rojon Chow ;
How; Andrew Burrows and
Mark Carter. i I
'' ~i *' '


! CFlo (nI F l r ttmpints to hit the
7t- li (-)Uc ian Q!iO: tt


fTalned Candidatwh seek exc phonaf
develop forte, following on


SAES TEIRR IfNA E A--


career


.


nsiltative relationship with customers and utie ik-dptlh
f competitive sales tactics, efficient operating practices, adequate
rvice, provide advice and assist customers in mandig business
improve profitability. -.

Y SKILLS: ..1'
Degree inMarlting, B uieAdministration, or Relatedi Fields
s of experience in'Sales
J Capability
terpersonal Effectiveness & Communication Skills
decision Making, Problem Solving Computer & Analytical Skilils
lent to High Standards
perseverance & Initiates Action

ful l tLw poflSon nmesdrquaWntsip, eosend S r msamwe byemall to:

ONLY 5n AwlCfUmATESWLL BEACNOWt!DGED
,~ *~'R~la~bY ~ov~dll,,l I -kB~P~ -~$g~~~~~1 .- P . :


c.TrbW);,.obLyl-ros~tt Ca.,cr Aar ,:S,


..,........ .:,- ..


E.15SO Standard Oil S.A. Ltd.


.1 - I


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 20'06, PAGE 11B


TRIBUINE SPORTS


:frt "








THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2006


SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


o ataa


fin

N FOOTBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
IF THE Commonwealth
American Football League
(CAFL) intends to make a
comeback, it will have to first
find a suitable home.
With its season opening date
set for October 14th, the field
(Windsor Park) which they
once called home is still being
S repaired.
The popular park is still
undergoing renovation. The
much needed facelift started in
early June.
But an optimistic Michael
Foster claims the Minister of
Youth, Sports and Housing
Neville Wisdom has promised
the.committee members that
he would do everything in his'
power to ensure that the sport
meets its opening date and this
would hopefully include the
usage of the AF Adderley
field.
But the Ministry of Educa-
tion has had to use the field for
classroom space.
More than four trailers are
set up on the field to accom-
modate the registered students.
Foster said: "We anticipate
to open up on October, 14th, I
suspect the opening game will
be between the Pro's and the
Jets.
"We are still awaiting confir-
mation as to where we will be
playing, either at the Windsor
Field or the AF Adderley field.
"As you are aware the
Windsor Field is currently fie
undergoing some renovations ro
right now and we are hoping
that the grass they have plant-,
ed is set by the time. But we
have a choice of either one of 0
those locations."
Despite fighting the taxing Io
issue of not having a field as l
yet, Foster revealed that, along by
with the six interested teams up
that have confirmed their par-
ticipation, the committee also
has other teams that have
expressed interest in playing.
He added that the teams
aren't too worried about the
playing venue as yet, but pro-
claimed that all parties
involved are excited about this
year's season.
This excitement has extend-
ed to the newer teams even
those not eligible to play.
Foster added: "Even though
we are steadily working fever-
ishly at getting all the teams
involved, we have some teams
that are making the necessary
improvements but are still npt
up to par.
"One of the teams is the
Kingdom Warriors. They've
been practising on a daily basis,
but the committee looked at
them, visited their camp, and
we recommended that they get
a little more training. We are
more than happy to welcome
them next season when they
make these necessary adjust-
ments.
"Even though they have the
numbers, we just didn't want a
team coming on to the field.
who isn't prepared fully."
But when the Tribune visited
the intended sites agreed for
the CAFL to host their games,
construction was still visible.
On the Windsor Field, the
playground equipment for the
neighboring children was set
up just steps away from the lin-
ing of the intended football
field.
As for the AF Adderley
field, a fence has been set in
place to protect the students
and teachers who will be using
the trailers.
The field is also in need of'
repair due to the heavy tractors
that brought the trailers to the
site.


- .? I1UT-M rL L 3 f L z7z~uU D 7Ir--vtTT) rT -*--m-~ -- wr


U


season
a sO


Knowles and Nestor

make third round exit


THE ball stopped in the third round ol the US Open yesterday lor
Mark Knowles and Canadian doubles partner Daniel NeIsor
The duo, who came off a two set sictorv o'er Mardv Fish and
Fernando Gonzalez, 7-6 and 6-3, took on Paul Goldsiein and Jim
Thomas from the LISA yesterday
After a con\ incing first set win, things went dow nhill for Knowle,
arid Nestor, and they dropped the second and third sets to finish o-4..
3-6 and 4-6.
Ranked number three in the tournament. Knowles and Nestor
took a commanding lead to win the first, and tried all the could to
hold off their opponents.
But it was the tough sen ices b\ Goldstein that helped the double,
team to force a third and decisive set.
Tied at 30-3), and a score of 3-4 in fa our of Goldstein and Thomas.
Goldstein served a 85 mph ball at Nestor. v ho's return .ent into the
net.
Knowles and Nestor were able to break ivine ihings up. but Gold-
stein and Thomas w.:re relentless. forcing the deuce to0 .\cniu.ill vin
the point There were three ties in the second set
It was Knowles and Nestor who got off to a banging suitl in itIk third
set. but as the match continued it was all Goldstein and Thomas
After going up 4-3, the duo never looked back. sealing their icto-
ry on a missed \olley by Nestor.
Goldstem and Thomas will take on Ashley Fisher and Tripp Phillips
in their bid to advance to the semi-final rounds
MARK KNOWLES (FILE Photos


r


Sea


0h


Fi




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