Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00512
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: August 26, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00512
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text









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HIGH 90F
LOW. 77F

SUN WITH
.. SHOWERS


The


Tribune


Volume: 102 No.229 SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 2006 PRICE -750


...... ..
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I


Two teenage


Bahamians


are arrested


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT Two yOung
women in their teens were
arrested at Grand Bahama
International Airp',i i aftersecu-
S rity ottIlcrs ftou nd cocaine
allegedly hidden inside a birth-
day cake.
The women, both 19, were
taken into custody by DEU offi-
cers sometime around 3.50pm
on Thursday.
According to Supt Basil Rah-
ming, two women presented
themselves to the security
checkpoint inside Pre-Clearance
Lounge for travel to Miami,
Florida, on board American
Airlines flight 4947.
Mr Rahming said while


screening the birthday cake, a
security officer noticed a solid
object inside the cake on the
monitor.
The officer immediately
requested police assistance. On
cutting the cake with a knife,
police discovered a'kilo of
cocaine hidden inside.
As a result, a female resident
of Windsor Park, and a female
'resident of Hanna Hill, Eight
Mile Rock, were arrested and
flown to New Providence.
Both are expected to be
arraigned in the Drug Court on
Monday to face charges of pos-
sessing dangerous drugs with
intent to supply and taking
preparatory steps to export dan-
gerous drugs from the
Bahamas.


Cuban envoy:


Bahamas must


beware US plan


By Alison Lowe
The US is trying to promote
an "international crusade"
against Cuba and wants the
Bahamas and the rest of the
Caribbean to join, according to
Cuban Ambassador to the
Bahamas Felix Wilson.
However, Mr Wilson said he
has faith that the Bahamas gov-
ernment will "do what the
Bahamian people want them to
do," and is mature enough to
know where it stands on the
issue.
His emphatic statements
came in response to requests by
the US Assistant Secretary of
Western Hemisphere Affairs
Thomas A Shannon at a press
conference with Caribbean and
South American journalists in
Washington on August 23.
Shannon called on the inter-
national community to show
"solidarity" with the Cuban
people and "provide resources
that could help develop a polit-
ical space inside Cuba".
Referring to the recent poor
health of the Cuban president,
Mr Shannon said it was a "very
propitious moment" for the US
and the international commu-
nity to "talk aloud" about the
future of Cuba.
"What we're looking for is a
political opening in Cuba that
begins to create conditions that
would allow a democratic tran-
sition to take place," said Mr
Shannon.
"We kind of sketched out
some of the basic components


of that, such as releasing politi-
cal prisoners, respecting human
rights, allowing the creation of
independent organizations and
creating mechanisms and path-
ways towards free and fair elec-
tions.
"It is about sending clear
messages to the Cuban people
about the willingness to help
Cuba move through this tran-
sition period," he said.
Responding to the comments,
veteranjournalist and politician
and one-time Bahamian
Ambassador to Cuba Sir
Arthur Foulkes said: "I don't
believe that the Bahamas
should interfere in the internal
affairs of the Cuban people, and
I don't believe that the US
should either.
"There is no good reason why
the US shouldn't engage Cuba
just as it treats other authori-
tarian regimes such as Chi-
na."
Sir Arthur said the best way
to encourage political and eco-
nomic liberalisation is for the
US to abandon the embargo
against Cuba.
Ambassador Wilson
described Shannon's statements
and others like it as "very
opportunistic at this time,"
adding that the US is "taking
advantage of the illness of the
president to make public what
everybody knows and that they
have been making public for
such a long time that the
intention of the US government
SEE page 11


This was the scene on Friday at the Lynden Pindling International Airport, where passengers coming into the capital described the
wait for the their luggage as both "frustrating and upsetting". Passengers arriving on yesterday's 11am US Airways flight from Char-
lotte said they had to wait about 30 minutes before they even saw their baggage the result of only one operational carousel.
(Photo: Onan Bridgewater/ Tribune Staff)

ACN r


DISGRUNTLED travellers at Lynden
Pindling International Airport yesterday
complained of massive delays in the
arrivals section due to three of the four
baggage carousels being out of commis-
sion.
Airport officials said the delays were
attributed to both a broken baggage
carousel and the massive amounts of bag-
gage LPIA receives at this time of year.


A porter told The Tribune that there
is normally a problem with the carousels.
"Only one is working today and last
week for a few hours none were working.
There are two or three planes at a time
that have to wait to unload the bags
because only one belt works.
"Sometimes passengers have to wait up
to 45 minutes one hour to get their bags.
11 makes it hard on us, too, when we have


to push the bags through the hole," he
said.
Deputy general manager of the Airport
Authority, Joseph Reckley, said that while
the arrivals section is suffering from the
loss of one bag belt, repairs on that were
expected. to be completed last night.
SEE page 11


By NATARIO McKENZIE
THE MINISTRY of Youth,
Sports and Housing has apolo-
gised to those inconvenienced
by the Summer Youth Pro-
gramme's payment methods.
Persons employed on the
programme are receiving pay-
ment, ministry officials stated
yesterday.
"The need to ensure that stu-
dents' payments matched giv-
en qualifications and attendance
records resulted in inevitable


delays in forwarding payment
vouchers to the treasury and the
preparation of cheques," a
statement said.
It was issued in response to
an article in The Tribune on
Saturday, August 19.
Sources quoted in the article
claimed that thousands of stu-
dents and adult employees had
not been paid, despite a promise
from Minister of Youth, Sports
SEE page 11


TWO people were killed
when a twin-engine aircraft
crashed near Ormond Beach,
Florida, on its way to the
Bahamas, officials said last
night.
The Federal Aviation
Administration said two peo-
ple were on board the plane,
registered to Drug and Labo-
ratory Disposal Incorporated of
Plainwell, Michigan..
The plane was last seen on
radar east of St Augustine
about 1.30pm yesterday. It went


down about five miles north-
west of Ormond Beach.
The plane, a Mitsubishi MU-
2, was flying from Indiana to
the Bahamas, the FAA said.
Weather could have been a
factor since heavy rain was
reported over most of Volusia
County, officials said.
The MU-2 is small twin-
engine turbo-prop that normal-
ly carries eight or nine passen-
gers but can be configured to
carry up to 12. Some MU-2s
-also carry freight.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 2006


OAL


Government cannot



'dictate' to investors


Minister concerned

about signals sent by

Port Authority, debate


BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT Responding
to comments made at a town
meeting on the Grand Bahama
Port Authority, Tourism Minis-
ter Obie Wilchcombe said he
does not think it is wise for the
government to dictate to
investors about who they
appoint to lead their companies.
He warned that Bahamians
must be very careful about the
message they are sending to
investors on Grand Bahama
and in the rest of the country
Mr Wilchcombe was in
Grand Bahama on Thursday.
He said some of the views
expressed on the Grand
Bahama Port Authority can
have very damaging effects.
During a live radio broadcast
town meeting, Dr Doswell
Coakley called on government
to immediately institute a com-


mission of inquiry into the
affairs of the Grand Bahama
Port Authority.
PLP Senator Philip Galanis
also called for government to
look more closely at the Port
Authority and with greater
scrutiny on any and all appoint-
ments to executive management
positions.
The government, members of
the opposition, and Port
Authority executives were crit-
icised by attorney Fred Smith
for their absence at the town
.meeting, which sought to ques-
tion the various recent changes
at the Port Authority.
Mr Wilchcombe said: "When
I listened to some of what I've
been hearing, I wondered, is
that the message you want to
send to a community of
investors, that you want the
government to dictate the
course of their leadership?
"Do I tell Sol Kerzner tomor-


row who should be his general
manager?
"Should I tell others who
should be leading their organi-
sations, or should I prepare
Bahamians to be ready for
when the opportunity presents
itself, and then to be able to
present an authoritative argu-
ment that Bahamians are pre-
pared?" he asked.
Mr Galanis has questioned
whether it was appropriate for
Hannes Babak to head the Port
Authority given his business
interest on the island.
Mr Babak, who was appoint-
ed Port Authority chairman on
June 1, has stepped down as
CEO at his businesses in
Freeport.
Mr Wilchcombe said the Port
plays a great role throughout
Grand Bahama. He-believes
that Bahamians must very care-
ful in the message they are
sending to investors.
"I remember where I had a
conversation with Edward St
George and I. said 'why don't
we have any Grand Bahamians
on the board in the Port
Authority, why can't Grand
Bahamians play a role there?'
He asked me to name one and
it created a problem for me, tell
you the truth.


Obie Wilchcombe, minister of tourism, addresses Rotarians earlier this week


"I wondered about that. And
that is why when you hear the
cry today about even investors
who bring in their managers,
whether it Sol Kerzner or Bob-
by Ginn, the reality is are we
ready? Have we prepared?"
Mr Wilchcombe recalled a
quote from the bust of Winston


Churchill that sat in the square
of downtown Freeport, which
reads: "If we quarrel about the
past and the present we have
lost the future."
"I think that the time has
come to plan for our young peo-
ple to be a part of what the
country is doing. We must


ensure that the educational sys-
tem meets the reality.
"We must prepare young
people today. We now have
opportunity today, because two
or three year from now we are
going to need more and more
qualified Bahamians and more
young Bahamians," he said.


The Ministry of Education
has announced a new strategy
to encourage private school
tactics in the public school sys-
tem.
Education Minister Alfred
Sears explained that the strat-
egy includes the establishment.
of a National Training Insti-
tute to train administrators,
the expansion of the Extend-
ed Learning Programme to
assist student comprehension,
a focus on adult education
and the implementation of a
National High School Equiv-
alency Certificate.
Mr Sears made this
announcement while he and
Bradley Roberts, the minis-
ter of Works and Utilities,
toured Abaco schools on
Thursday.
While there, Mr Sears
signed funding contracts for
what he called a "period of
transformation in the educa-
tional system".
The tours were part of a
series of visits to various
islands in response to calls for
repairs and expansions to
schools around the Bahamas.
In total the government has
spent more than $6 million on
school repairs, expansion, and
hurricane relief in Abaco
alone.
The tour began in Sandy
Point at J A Pinder Primary
school where contracts were
signed and construction was
already underway for expan-
sion.
The other schools visited
included Central Abaco Pri-
mary, Abaco Central High,
and Crossing Rock School.


Along with public schools,
Mr Sears visited private,
schools including the Every
Child Counts (ECC) learning.
center.
The school, like others vis-
ited by the minister, was
undergoing extensive expan-
sion -but appeared to be well
ahead of public schools in
construction and is ready to
receive students into the new
building in September.
Under the umbrella of the
Catholic council, the school
has free land, but the rest of
the funds for building and
running the special needs
school come from the com-
munity and enthusiastic
fundraising.
The school raises $230,000
per year to keep running and
relies heavily on donations
from the public.
As a result of the public's
investment in the school, the
facilities are painted, the new
building is fireproof, the walls
are varnished to prevent light
damage, new ramps are
installed and a.wide range of
other advancements 'hve
been made.
Sears said of the school,
"ECC does not get a penny
from the government, yet they
are a flourishing school
because they have the atten-
tion of the community and
people see the need for their
children to be properly edu-
cated."
He went on to say that pub-
lic schools need public atten-
tion if they are to become the
state-of-the-arts schools that
Bahamian students deserve.


Grand Bahama gets




tourism re-branding


BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT Tourism Min-
ister Obie Wilchcombe revealed
that plans are underway for the
total re-branding of the Grand
Bahama in an effort to make
it a destination that is unrivalled
in the Caribbean.
Mr Wilchcombe said that at
the moment, the lack of brands
on Grand Bahama is signifi-
cantly impacting the island's
tourism industry.
"We have one of the leading
marketing gurus from the US
who has been working with us
in developing a plan for the re-
branding of Grand Bahama,"
Mr Wilchcombe told members
of the Rotary Club on Thurs-
day,
"We must do that and money
must be spent in doing that so
that Grand Bahama will have
its tourism industry,' Mr Wilch-
combe said.
The minister said he believes
that once"complete..Bobby Gin-
n's project in West End will pro-
pel tourism on Grand Bahama
the way that Atlantis has done
for Paradise Island, New Prov-
idence, and the Bahamas.
"Sol Kerzner whether we
like it or not, you can criticise
him all you want, but the truth
of the matter is that Kerzner
has helped us revitalise the
tourism industry.
"When I became minister of
tourism no one really knew
about Grand Bahama. I can tell
you today that we have many
people at present interested in
being in Grand Bahama, and
that was not the case many
years ago,
That's the case now because
we have a big fish Bobby
Ginn is a big fish," the minis-
ter said.
Last December, the govern-
ment signed a heads of agree-


ment with the Ginn Group for
the development of a $3.7 bil-
lion mixed-use resort invest-
ment in west Grand Bahama.
Ginn has cleared a large por-
Stion of the 2,000 acres of land in
West End in preparation for
first phase of construction.
Mgrilchcombe said thji
Bobby Ginn will be able to
attract large numbers of people
to Grand Bahama.
"The boom-bust year of
Grand Bahama tourismis near
an end in my view. I say that
with a high level of confidence
because Grand Bahama will
have a brand and a destination,
perhaps unequalled to anything
in the Caribbean," he said.
"I think we've had a boom-
bust period in Grand Bahama
because we didn't get brands -
you need brands. You are not
going to build a tourism indus-
try just by putting aname on a
property it has to niea some-
thing and you have to be able to
tapinto the databases that exists
with these major companies,
like Bobby Ginn.
"Bobby Ginn comes in with a
database with thousands of
clients and when the come they
will create the tourism we
want."
Mr Wilchcombe' also men-
.tioned that several other pro-
jects are already in the
advanced stages in west Grand
Bahama, such as the Blue Mar-
lin Condominium project in
Bootle Bay, Seaward in Dead-
man's Reef, the Bootle Bay
Beach project, and the multi-
million dollar expansion df Old
Bahama Bay.
.He also assured that both
parties in the'Royal Oasis
Resort sale are working toward


closure within the next 40 days
- after which full details relating
to the operations of the hotel
and the casino will be disclosed.
The investors, said Mr Wilch-
combe, have promised the cre-
ation of a new experience
encompassing the International
Ba-izar and G'ombay Park.
-: llddonall), he pointed out
that a groundbreaking is set to
take place by investor Preben
Olsen for construction of a con-
do-hotel near Port Lucaya.
Marina.
And, approval has also been
given to the construction of
another 250-condo unit for
Lucaya, Mr Wilchcombe said.
He stressed that Grand
Bahama, which has just about
3,000 hotel rooms, needs 7,000


to 10,000 rooms in the next
decade to be competitive.
"When Grand Bahama is
able to welcome three million
tourists a year, then we are on
our way. But, right now we are
still under one million.
"We got up to a one million
in 1992, but we haven't been
back there. But, you can't talk
about a sustainable industry
without the inventory that has a
brand and the marketing."
"So what is happening now
is we are looking to ensure that
the players over here are strong.
That is why it (Royal Oasis) has
taken longer than we wanted to
take because we have.had three
or four real good players at the
table and we are still talking to
everybody," he said.


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MAIN SECTION
Local News .............P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12
Editorial/Letters. ......................................... P4
SPORTS SECTION
Sports ........................................... P1,2,3,4,5
Comics..................................................P6
Advt ...................................................... P7
W eather......................................................P8

CLASSIFIED SECTION 24 PAGES

MIAMI HERALD SECTIONS
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Schools to adopt

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-- - ----






SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 2006, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


SOCALNEWS


Vendor claims


'no


over bike


loss


NEWSPAPER vendor
Michael Johnson says he has
had no help from police in his
two-month fight to bring the
driver of a bus that struck him
to justice.
He says that he has been try-
ing to get justice since early
June but claims that instead,
he has been harassed for unre-
lated matters. Mr Johnson was
walking his bike up Marlbor-
ough Street when, he says, he
was hit by a speeding bus com-
ing down Baillou Hill Road.
His bicycle was totalled.
Uninjured but shaken, he
addressed a policeman who he
claims watched the entire inci-
dent from the corner.
"The officer told me that I
should not have been walking in


the street, even though I was
on the furthest edge of the road,
and the only space there was
for my bike and I," he said.
As a paper vendor, Mr John-
son requires his bicycle to earn
a living and raise his two chil-
dren. He filed a complaint to
the police and gave them a bus
number, and the station asked
him to get an estimate of the
cost of his bicycle.
While finding an estimate, Mr
Johnson said he had to borrow
another bike to continue sell-
ing his papers although with
much more difficulty as the bike
was not suited to his work.
Mr Johnson said he returned
to the station with an estimate
and was asked to go to another
branch, and once there, he was


sent back to the first.
Frustrated, Mr Johnson went
to the Police Headquarters and
was told by officers there that
he needed to provide a bicycle
license for his borrowed bike,
he said.
Having no choice but to fol-
low directions, Mr Johnson said
he went to get the information
from his friend, who said he
could not supply it right away.
Mr Johnson claims that when
he arrived again at the station to
continue filing his complaint,
he was threatened with jail for
possessing a bicycle without a
licence.
"I was hit by a bus and all
they want to do is make me run
around. I'm a busy man and I
have to spend all this time look-


ing for attention from the
police," he said.
Mr Johnson's biggest griev-
ance is that he thought Police
Headquarters would help him
in his dealings with thelocal sta-
tion he visited but instead, he
was turned away with a threat
of imprisonment.
Upon hearing of the matter
last night, police press liaison
officer Inspector Walter Evans
immediately invited Mr John-
son to come see him at Police
Headquarters first thing Mon-
day morning.
"I am not aware of the mat-
ter, but he can come and see
me and we will do everything
possible to see if the matter can
be resolved we have to serve
our customers," Mr Evans said.


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TE :580FLIX 5959404:--11-11: '' ",


Theodore Capron from the Road Traffic Department was named the Ministry of Transport and Avi-
ation annual public officer of the year at a luncheon on Friday at Super Club Breezes.
Mr Capron (left) is seen with Minister of Transport Glenys Hanna-Martin, Transport Permanent
Secretary Archie Nairn (far right) and enthusiastic supporters.
(BIS photos Patrick Hanna)


Man';


not guilty plea over


'marriage of convenience'


A MAN was arraigned in a Magistrate's Court
on Thursday in connection with a "marriage of
convenience" scheme.
Philip Adderley, 45 was arraigned before Mag-
istrate Roger Gomez on the charge of conspiracy
to make a false declaration.
It is alleged that on Tuesday May 9, while at
Long Island and being concerned with another,
Adderley conspired to make a false declaration of


o In brief PRI
............................................................... B )
B
Chavez in
second call
on Castro
CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) The I
- Venezuelan President Hugo
Chavez said he made a second wish 1
visit to his ailing ally, Cuban
leader Fidel Castro, before will
arriving in China this week.
"Fidel is recuperating. I saw Avenu
him again three days ago. We
spoke a bit, a couple hours, and AU
from there (Havana) we came
to China," Chavez said during a
news conference Friday in Bei- A diver
jing broadcast by Venezuela's
state TV channel. Palm
Chavez has kept close tabs
on Castro's health since the 80-
year-old Cuban leader under-
went intestinal surgery and tem-
porarily handed over presiden-
tial power to his younger broth- We
er Raul on July 31.
Chavez earlier was in Havana altern
helping Castro celebrate his
birthday on Aug. 13.
The specifics of Castro's ail-
ment and the nature of his
surgery have been treated as a We a1
state secret.
The U.S. government sug-
gested after Castro stepped
down last month that Chavez
help push for democratic
changes in Cuba.


marriage.
He pleaded not guilty to the charge and was
granted bail in the sum of $1,500.
A date for trial, which is expected to take place
on Long Island before a circuit magistrate, has
been set for September 4.
A 29-year-old Cuban woman is also expected to
be charged in connection with the same allegva-
tions.


ESS RELEASE
AILLOU HILL ROAD
REHABILITATION
PROJECT


vlinistry of Works and Utilities
to serve notice that Baillou Hill
be closed between Palm Tree
e and Robinson Road from 28th
igust to September 1st 2006.


rsion route will be in place using
Tree Avenue and First Street for
both directions.


requesting the Public to find
ative routes and avoid this area,
if possible.


apologize for any inconvenience
this may cause.


e


NA i A :3n


Credit Suisse Nassau Branch
is presently considering applications for a

Head of Operations

Credit Suisse Nassau Branch is part of the global Credit Suisse-Investment Bank
based in Zurich. Nassau Branch plays a pivotal role in the funding of the Credit
Suisse US based entities and is the main Structured Note issuer in the Credit Suisse
group. Nassau also plays a pivotal role in raising capital for the group via issuance of
Subordinated Debt.

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

Responsibilities:
Responsible for maintaining control over all aspects of the Operations department including:
Daily booking and settlement of all products processed by the Branch
Dealing with all new business queries,
Management, training and development of the Operations department staff
Ensuring adherence to all internal and regulatory controls

Qualifications:
Minimum of 7 years investment banking experience at a major financial institution.
Successful applicant will need to. have reached the level of Vice President or equivalent
in their current investment banking role.
Strong track record of management experience, is required, including project
management
A degree level education is required, with a second investment banking qualification
preferred.
Excellent working knowledge of all the products traded by CS Nassau Branch is required,
including money markets, Credit Linked Notes, Equity Linked notes, Warrants, SWAPs
and Subordinated Debt. .
Should be able to illustrate an understanding of Euroclear and cash settlements.
Should be able to demonstrate a full understanding of appropriate investment banking
controls.
Will have experience in managing and developing a team.
Excellent ability to communicate with all levels of management, and with other groups
based in London, Asia and USA
Working knowledge of the Globus application.


Personal Qualities:
Excellent organizational, interpersonal and communication skills
Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision
Enthusiasm, a positive attitude and a willingness to work flexible hours

Benefits provided include:
Competitive salary and performance bonus
Health and Life Insurance .
Ongoing career development/training program

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. Persons not meeting the minimum
requirements need not apply.
Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE: AUGUST 30 2006


0


1_16


R ETNECE DARTD LROW






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4. SATURDAY. AUGUST 26. 2006


EIOI AULTTRSTOTH EITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
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Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
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Freeportfax: (242) 352-9348



Lessons on today's terrorism


ELEVEN SUSPECTS. were taken to court in
London this week, charged with involvement in
the plot to blow up several airliners over the
Atlantic. The foiling of their alleged conspiracy
will inevitably be scrutinized for what it reveals
about the changing character of the terrorist
threat five years after September 11.
Even though there is some uncertainty about
the scope of the plot and possible links to Al
Qaeda, there are important general lessons to be
gleaned.
It should be reassuring that the plotters were
not as well organized or as successful at keeping
their plans secret as the September 11 master-
minds and the suicidal terrorists who did their
bidding. If British and Pakistani officials are
correct, knowledge of the airline plot was dis-
seminated among scores of people. The con-
spirators failed to prevent a mole from infil-
trating their network. And they were careless
enough to permit US agencies to intercept their
communications and pass the intercepts on to
authorities in London.
If the scheme to use liquid explosives to blow
up the airliners was conceived or directed by top
Al Qaeda figures, as Pakistani intelligence has
claimed, then it seems obvious that Osama bin
Laden's lieutenants are less capable of carrying


out a complex terrorist spectacular than they
were before they lost their sanctuary and train-
ing camps in Afghanistan. Part of the explana-
tion for this reduced capability'may be the dif-
ficulty for Al Qaeda fugitives of coordinating
with self-starting volunteers, such as the 22
British Muslims who have either been charged
or are in police custody now in London.
Also, the isolation and atomization of Al
Qaeda leaders since the toppling of the Tal-
iban in Afganistan may have seriously com-
promised their ability to organize successful
operations like the 1998 bombings of US
embassies in East Africa, the 2000 attack on
the USS Cole, or the 2001 crashing of airliners
into the World Trade Centre and the Penta-
gon.
If Al Qaeda was not orchestrating the air-
line scheme, or if Al Qaeda figures were
involved only tangentially, the thwarting of the
plot suggests that local terrorists and jihadists
are best fought with sound intelligence and old-
fashioned police work.
They may be capable of mass killing, as the
London train bombings last summer showed,
but the threat they represent is very different
from that of Stalin's Soviet Union or Hitler's
Germany.


EVERYONE knows Elmo: He's the furry, red'
"Sesame Street" monster with the high voice and
the relentlessly upbeat personality. He's the star
of "Elmo's World," a continuing "Sesame Street"
feature. His friends include Dorothy (a silent
goldfish), and a frequently befuddled fellow
named Mr. Noodle.
Then it turns out that Elmo and his falsetto
are the work of a,6-foot-tall black man, Kevin
Clash, a New Yorker in his 40s. Suddenly, com-
mon knowledge about who does what in the
world gets swept aside. And, at least momentar-
ily, life's great choices and possibilities can be
felt.
Interviewed by The New York Times this
week, Clash recalled children teasing him for his
love of puppets. Adults suggested that he go out-
side and play.
His parents deserve a yet-to-be-established
award for supporting him. His mother taught
him to sew. His father helped him build puppet
stages.
The theme here is much more than "African-
American makes good." It's "Childhood hobby
becomes blockbuster career," or perhaps "Man
resists the lure of law school and other safe, con-


ventional choices endorsed by nosy relatives with
limited imaginations."
In an upcoming book, Clash writes that Elmo
was born when a "Sesame Street" colleague
tossed him a "shapeless, soft bundle of red," and
challenged him to make something. Well, look out
for flying red stuff; it might herald the creative
break of a lifetime.
Elmo seems an unlikely catalyst for public pol-
icy, but it pays to ask how other children could
have Clash's creative experiences.
Children often persist at what they love. And
even if they're weak on quadratic equations,
they'll have learned what hard work is and how to
do it. Similarly, the relentless drumbeat is true:
America needs more science, technology, math,
and engineering majors who will go on to careers
that help keep the country competitive. It's a les-
son that's so heavily flogged, one imagines drea-
ry education camps where children memorize
the periodic table of elements.
A better message: Children should fall in love
with microscopes, experiments, and unanswered
questions. And while love can't be forced, more
sparks might fly if more boys and girls were to
meet more science projects.


History may





be ready to





repeat itself


EDITOR, The Tribune.
LET me take you on a brief
stroll through history. First his-
tory is very important because if
one is armed with stories of the
past, if one is equipped with the
recollection of information from
the past, then they could speak
intelligently to a particular point
and maybe, just/maybe they
would not repeat the mistakes
of the past. At least they would
not have exposed their posteri-
or so ashamedly for all to see.
History should record that
the late Sir Lynden Oscar Pin-
dling in his quest to control all
around him and to secure him-
self, his family and his friends,
he, whether he realized it or not,
presided over almost the
destruction of the Bahamas.
Many of us who are willing to
be honest with ourselves would
admit that the Bahamas dete-
riorated in many major areas,
especially internationally. I also
remember that Sir Lynden said
that he did not know the people
were suffering the way they
were.
In an interview after the 1992
election he told Fred Sturrup:
"We knew people were hurt-
ing, we knew that homes were
being sold, we knew that par-
ents were taking kids out of
school. We didn't think that
this would have affected them
so dramatically in determining
what they would do during the
election."
Some of us who dare to speak


should remind the people with a
selective dose of amnesia that
Lynden Pindling himself finally
admitted that if he had put the
reins on the people around him,
maybe he would not have end-
ed, politically, the way he did.
The raw facts are that the min-
isters in the PLP government
under his reign and the close
friends did whatever they
wished and they did it knowing
that their leader would not do
anything about it. The rest is
history.
Fast-forward, today Perry
Gladstone Christie, who is obvi-
ously not a good student of his-
tory, finds himself in the same
predicament. Everywhere you
turn,' someone is alleging that
certain persons are getting kick-
backs, left right and centre.
Because some of the men, espe-
cially contractors, who have not
been accustomed to having big
money, cannot wait to brag
everywhere they go about their
new found fortune.
We can assume that Perry
Christie is innocent of any
wrong doing, but the number
of allegations about some of the
people around him are growing
by leaps and bounds. No one
seems to care because, if
rumour is to be believed, the
practice is so rampant. The per-


ception is that while the PLP is
in power some are going to get
whatever they can get their
greasy palms on, regardless of
who finds out. These are the
rumours that are flying around,
fast and furiously.
A student of history would,
therefore, recognize that what
went around is fast approach-
ing again. The same predica-
ment Sir Lynden found himself
in when his "house of cards"
was crumbling all around him,
his prot6g6 Perry Gladstone
Christie now finds himself in a
similar predicament. His laid
back, consultative approach is
interpreted to be a weak posi-
tion and everyone seems to be
doing whatever they wish.
It seems that Mr Christie did
not learn one earthly thing, he is
doing the exact thing Sir Lyn-
den did and he will get the same
results. If you plant corn, you
cannot get apples at the day of
harvest.
SAs usual, I must clear my
conscience. I will not let the
actions of others determine if I
be true to myself. Michael Jack-
son said if you want to make
this world a better place, change
the man in the mirror. I am
strengthened by the fear I still
have in Almighty God, and no
one else.

IVOINE W
INGRAHAM
Nassau,
August 23, 2006.


EDITOR, The Tribune.
I USUALLY do not get
involved, but this is the time
for me to make an exception.
The Bahamas is deteriorating,
right before our very eyes.
Those of us who love the
Bahamas and who love God
cannot sit idly by and say noth-
ing.
The uncompromising truth is
much needed in the Bahamas,
especially because, if rumours
now in circulation are to be
believed I can only conclude
that not only do we have a gov-
ernment that is slack, but in my
opinion a government that is
corrupt and a government that
is immoral. There are two past


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events that have played them-
selves out in the newspaper that
sickens me, but time will handle
all things.
It is alleged that is if the
rumour now in circulation is to
be believed that the PLP is
planning, if they are returned
as the government, to introduce
"same sex marriages". It is
claimed that the PLP is lobby-
ing heavily, so much so that
there is a meeting and survey
planned by Harvard University
to determine how many peo-
ple will support "same sex mar-
riage". Is this a local plan that is
part of an international plan to
literally "ram down the throats"
of Bahamians that people of
same sex should enjoy the same
legal pleasure as a normal man
and wife situation?
In a Bahamas where we
loosely say that we are a Chris-
tian nation, the PLP, which dur-
ing the last election presented
itself as a Christian party,
seems to be pandering to the
constituency that is trying to
advance its agenda and trying
to impose its lifestyle on the
majority.
The Deputy Prime Minister
Cynthia Mother Pratt, Fred
Mitchell, Minister of Foreign
Affairs, and MP for Fox Hill,
Ron Pinder, MP for Marathon,
Alfred Sears, Minister of Edu-
cation, Vincent Peet and, of
course, Perry Christie, must
state their position on same sex
marriage. I know that the peo-
ple of Fox Hill would be anx-
ious to hear what their MP's
position is, especially knowing
that Fox Hill is heavy on build-
ing the family.
Bahamians are talking. They
collectively are saying that
there seems to be a hidden
agenda with the PLP. It is obvi-
ous that certain criteria must
be in place to gain employment
with certain ministries. It is no
secret, but Bahamians gossip a
lot and nothing is out of
bounds. A minister's preference
should not be a yardstick by
which everyone else is mea-
sured.
In an effort to thwart the
"same sex marriage" train, Rev
Rex Major has planned an
event and I trust that Rev
Major leaves no stones
unturned at his service on
August 27 in Rawson's Square.
His attempt to bring attention


to this agenda that is being pur-
sued by a "hired group" to help
lobby the Bahamian people
toward "same sex marriages", is
very necessary and timely.
Everyone knows that Rex
Major is not a puppet, like
many other ministers of the
gospel. So we anticipate that
he will be shooting straight as
usual.
On another note, it is claimed
that the PLP is planning to set
themselves up to remain in
power forever. Seeing how Per-
ry Christie "gets off" about
being Prime Minister, the
rumour mongers claim he is
planning to make himself
"President for life". This is
being discussed among a spe-
cial group of cronies who usu-
ally cannot speak intelligently
about anything. This idea has
seemed to gather legs, because
it has surfaced more often than
not.
Bahamians must not be
fooled by the naming of these
projects. PLP think people are
fools. That is why there is a
junkanoo rush out everywhere.
Is that why there is a "block
party" closing down streets in
almost every constituency,
under the disguise of Urban
Renewal? The powerful United
States would not, even though
they are the richest country in
the world, throw a party in Lib-
erty City, Harlem, Watts and
other ghetto areas of the Unit-
ed States funded by the state.
But the PLP uses our money
out of the treasury and throws a
party in the densely populated
areas. Could it possibly be, as
some are now claiming, to buy
votes?
Bahamians are fools if they
succumb to the same kind of
party atmosphere that tricked
them to vote PLP the last time.
They are fools if they get drunk
from free rum tonight and can-
not pay their children's school
tomorrow. Will the PLP use
the treasury to win this elec-
tion?
Can the money, which in my
opinion was wasted under the
disguise of the Ministry of
Tourism in Fred Mitchell's Fox
Hill constituency be explained?

SANDRA DAVIS
Nassau,
August, 2006.


Elmo's off-screen world


'Don't be fooled



by PLP gameplan


St. Augustine's College



Is accepting applications for the following position
2006 2007Academic Year


Spanish Teacher
One person to teach Spanish to grades seven
through twelve.


Mathematics
One person to teach Mathematics to all Grades seven through
eleven. Experience in preparing students for external
examinations (BJC, BGCSE & SAT) is a requirement

All applicants must hold a degree from an accredited Univer-
sity and a Teacher's Certificate or must have some teaching
experience. Two letters of reference, copies of all degrees and
certificates, proof of teaching experience and two passport size
photos should be submitted.
A commitment to the values of Catholic, Benedictine educa-
tion is expected of our teachers. Only those persons who have
no difficulty with Roman Catholic beliefs and teaching need
apply.
Please submit applications and required
documents to:
THE PRINCIPAL
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE
P.O.BOX N-3940
NASSAU, BAHAMAS


I






SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 2006, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


L


Government


moves on New


Providence


water supply


Minister of Works and Utili-
ties Bradley Roberts said the
government is taking steps to
increase the water supply to
New Providence and Paradise
Island.
Minister Roberts said the
government recognizes that the
supply of water to a fast devel-
oping city and major tourist des-
tination like New Providence
and Paradise Island cannot
depend on the barging of water
and mining of depleted well
fields.
"The Christie government,
true to form, sought to address
this perplexing state of affairs,"
Mr Roberts said. "Consistent
with our PLP philosophy, we
have awarded a contract to the
Consolidated Water Company


Bradley Roberts
(Tribune file photo)
Limited for a five-million impe-
rial gallons per day desalination
plant at Baillou.Hills."
He said the plant was partial-
ly commissioned last May and
has already begun to supply 1.6
million imperial gallons perday
of potable water. Full co6ibus-











SATURDAY,
AUGUST 26TH
12:00 411
12:30 Aqua Kids
1:00 Sports Lifestyle
1:30 BTC Caribbean Volleyball
Championships
3:30 Gillette World Sports
4:00 Ballroom Boxing
5:00 Cricket World
5:30 BTC Caribbean Volleyball
Championships
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
7:30 Island James
8:00 BTC Caribbean Volleyball
Championships
10:00 Tropical Beat
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Neo Soul Cafe
12:30am Community Page 1540AM


SUNDAY,
AUGUST 27TH
6:30am Community Pg. 1540AM
8:30 Spiritual Impact
9:00 E,M.P.A.C.T.
9:30 The Voice That Makes
The Difference
10:00 Effective Living
10:30 Morning Joy
11:00 E. Clement Bethel National
Arts Festival Gospel Concert
2006
12:05 Video Gospel Countdown
1:00 Gilette World Sports
1:30 Sports Desk
2:00 A Rhema Moment
3:00 Video Gospel
3:30 Ernest Angley Ministries
4:30 Temple Fellowship
Ministries International
5:00 This Week In The Bahamas
5:30 BTC XI Caribbean Volleyball
Championships: GId Medal
Women
7:30 The Bahamas Tonight
8:00 BTC XI Caribbean Volleyball
Championships: Gold Medal
Men
8:30 BTCXI Caribbean Volleyball
Championships: Prize
Giving Ceremony
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11-30 New Dimension
12m/n Community Pg. 1540AM
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sioning is expected by the end
of this month.
Mr Roberts was addressing
the Rotary Club of West Nas-
sau at their luncheon meeting B B.
on the topic: "The importance
of clean water in the provision '.
of piped water in the Bahamas."
He said that the government
recognizes that the barging of
water from Andros, which was
intended to be a temporary i:
solution, was allowed to "drag
on" becoming increasingly
expensive and unreliable, due
to adverse weather conditions
and mechanical failures.
"The reality is that the price
of reverse osmosis water is
cheaper than the cost of barging
and is not subject to weather
conditions," he said. "In addi-
tion, special purpose water
barges are becoming increas- '
ingly scarce."
He said the Water and Sew- -
erage Corporation's strategic
plans for eradicating the water
problems in New Providence
extend beyond the Baillou Hills -
Reverse Osmosis (RO) plant .
and that the government is
finalising negotiations for
another plant for northern New Bahamians and residents i
Providence. Minister Perry Christ
In addition, Mr Roberts said
directives have already been
issued to initiate plans for yet
another plant in the Winton
area of eastern New Provi-
dence.
"The PLP government
believes that the Blue Hills RO B a
plant represents an historic step
in our vision to guarantee the
supply of high quality, reliable
potable water to each and every
resident of and visitor to New
Providence and Paradise rs
Island," he said.
"The giant steps made by
Perry Christie's government in While investigating a com-
the provision of potable water plaint from a Bahamasair cus-
in four short years in our tomer, The Tribune learned
Bahamaland clearly acknowl- that it has become very difficult
edges the importance the gov- to contact or make a reserva-
ernment has placed on this vitaltion with the national flag car-
commodity and our declared rier.
strong and deep commitment The customer said heiwas
to providing.this basic necessity outraged to find that on Thurs-
throughout the Commonwealth day, Bahamasair's reservation
of the Bahamas," Mr Roberts section was closed by 4.30pm.
added. "Our ongoing plans will, "This is unbelievable. What
in the next few years, secure our kind of airline closes its reser-
potable water needs in New vations section at 4.30?" he
Providence and the Family asked.
Islands for the next decade." "What if I wanted to make a


at all levels of society are sharing in the post-rain woes. The garbage has even built up behind Prime
ie's home after heavy rains earlier in the week, which put garbage collectors one day behind.
(Photo: Onan Bridgewater / Tribune Staff)





imasair suffers




rvation 'defect'


reservation for the 6.30 am
flight tomorrow?"
When The Tribune called the
reservations number listed in
the phonebook, the message
said that they were closed for
the day and that customers
should call back at 8.30am the
next day.
"We appreciate your busi-
ness," it said.
Attempting to contact the
Bahamasair customer service
about the problem today, The
Tribune found all three avail-
able phone numbers listed for


SNS iwas



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Available from Commercial News Providers


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the customer service depart-
ment the number in the
phonebook and the two other
numbers on the Bahamasair
website to be currently out of
service.
Managing' director -of
Bahamasair Henry Woods said
the problem was due to a
"defect" with the telephone sys-
tem.
Qn the question of the
4.30pm closure of the reserva-
tion section, Mr Woods
explained that this section:clos-
es at 5pm every day, but said


that "in a matter of days" the
operating hours will be extend-
ed to 7.30pm.
This is not a moment too
soon, according to the angry
customer.
- -It is ridiculous"to'close;
before the last flight and open
after the first flight because if
you want to get on one of those
flights, you have no way to find
out if that is possible.
"Surely a shift system would
work. I don't know of any inter-
national airline that operates by
Bahamasair's system."


SUNDAY SERVICES


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BACARDI & COMPANY LIMITED

Bacardi & Company Limited is seeking
Candidates to fill two vacancies for the position of



The Company has been based in Nassau for over 40 years
with significant manufacturing operations in the areas of
bulk rum production and bottling of various spirits beverages,
primarily for export markets.

The Trailer Head Drivers will be primarily responsible for
the transport of raw materials and products between the
Plant and Clifton Pier. Successful candidates will be self-
motivated, diligent, and available to work shift hours as
required.

Candidates must be in possession of a valid driver's licence
and must have obtained at least a high school diploma.

Interested candidates should submit a completed application
form directly to Bacardi & Company Limited
P. 0. Box N-4880
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Attention: The Human Resources Manager

Information may also be forwarded via e-mail to
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Application Deadline: September 29, 2006
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Raw'ija







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6. SATURDAY. AUGUST 26. 2006


LOCALN


Vandalism shocks




education officials


Education officials on a rou-
tine tour in Abaco were
shocked to discover the exis-
tence of a widespread vandal-
ism problem affecting several
schools on the island.
Mr Sears toured Abaco
schools on Thursday to visually
assess the progress of ongoing
construction, expansion, and
maintenance projects.
At a conference in Sandy
Point alongside Minister of
Works Bradley Roberts, Mr
Sears asserted that Bahamians
deserved "the best, state-of-the-
art schools that this government
can afford."
Upon physical inspection of
the schools, including J A Pin-
der Primary School, Crossing
Rocks School, Central Abaco
Primary, and Abaco Central
High School, Sears found build-
ings in mid-construction and not
maintained despite the funds
allocated in past years for those
purposes and for post-hurricane
relief.


The word of the day was
"vandalism" as students were
blamed for not taking personal
interest in the upkeep of their
facilities.
A contractor blamed bad
behaviour for the frequency of
repair work needed in the
schools. The facilities director
said that administrators are to
blame for not disciplining stu-
dents enough.
Most observers said the fre-
quent need for maintenance
was a direct result of parents
failing to discipline there chil-
dren. More discipline, they said,
would stop vandalism and
decrease the high upkeep costs
at the schools.
But some of those who spoke
to The Tribune linked the
severity of the vandalism to the
lack of facilities and upkeep at
some schools. Vandalism was
more severe in schools that do
not provide a full range of facil-
ities, they said. One school for
more than 700 students lacked


playing fields, for example.
Overgrown lawns and unentic-
ing eating and social spaces also
add to the problem, it was
claimed.
One school mentioned was
Central Abaco High School -
the public school with the
largest enrollment in Abaco.
The students there have been
blamed for restlessness and lack
of discipline. But the grass is
knee high in some places and
the lunch tables are weathered
and uninviting.
Abaco Central Primary
school boasts defaced walls and
crude drawings. And the school
has no playing fields.
There are no courts, race
tracks, or soccer goals and PE
class is held in the parking lot.
There is no place to sit and eat
and a drainage problem puts
the grassy courtyard off limits to
students. Without somewhere
to expend energy during the
day, some Abaconians said the
students turn to anti-social


behaviour, like writing graffiti
and defacing school property.
Mr Sears suggested that the
problem is bad leadership on
the part of the administration,
the district and the parents.
"The community has to take
ownership of the school," he
said.
Dave Ralph, editor of the
newspaper The Abaconian,
explained that the campus is not
treated as an integral part of
the community.
He explained that it is diffi-
cult to yield enthusiasm for its
upkeep.
Minister Sears went on to say
that new leadership roles in
schools all over the Bahamas
would be announced. "Athletics
is part of the curriculum not
just an activity. I am interested
n solutions," he said.
In the last three years, Cen-
tral Abaco Primary School has
received $700,000 from the gov-
ernment for general mainte-
nance.


GRACE AND PEACE WESLEYAN CHURCH
A SOCIETY OF THE FREE METOST CHURCH OF NORTH AMERICA
(WHERE GOD IS ADORED AND EVERYONE IS AFFIRMED)

Worship time: 11am & 7pm

Prayer Time: 10:15am to 10:45am

Church School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

Po.BoxSS-5631

Telephone number:324-2538 Telefax number:324-2587


COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE


TE BAHAMASCONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH
Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
m -R P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
'100 Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135

CHURCH SERVICES
SUNDAY, AUGUST 27,2006
TWELFTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST


II


ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH, Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH, Bernard Road
11:00AM Pastor Sharon Loyley
CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH, Zion Boulevard
10:00AM Rev.Carlos Thompson
EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH, East Shirley Street
11:00AM Pastor Martin Loyley
7:00PM Mr. Allison Underwood
GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH, Queeno College Campus
9:30AM Rev. James Neilly
ST. MICHAEL'S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue
8:00AM Connections Rev. Philllp Stubbs
9:30AM Rev. Philip Stubbs
TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
11:00AM Rev. William Higgs
7:00PM Ms. Jocelyn Demeritte

RADIO PROGRAMMES
'RENEWAL' on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Your Host: Rev. Charles A. Sweeting
.....................................................
METHODIST MOMENTS' on each weekday at 6:55a.m.
Your Host: Rev. Charles A. Sweeting
OPENING OF THE NEW CHURCH YEAR
The FOCUS TRAINING EVENT will be held on Saturday, September 2,
2006,9:00am 2:00pm at Epworth Hall, East Shirley Street. This Conference
event is for all Staff, Congregational Board Chairpersons, Treasurers, Lay
Preachers and leaders of all organizations.
Lay Preahers wishing to participate in the PULPIT EXCHANGE on Sunday
morning, September 3, 2006, are asked to call Ms. Debra Gibson at the
Conference Office 393-3726/2355 to register their names.
The Official Opening of the New Church Year Service will be held on
Sunday, September 3, 2006, 7:00pm at Ebenezer. Rev. Dr. Eddie Fox from
the World Methodist Council will be the guest preacher. A reception will
follow the Service at Epworth Hall.


The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)
SUNDAY AUGUST 27, 2006
7:00a.m. Pastor Sharon Loyley/Bro. Sherwin Brown
11:00a.m. Rev. James Neilly/Bro Ernest Miller
7:00p.m. Board of Evangelism

Castingocso mo cs


0'.


- ____


* 0


'CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL
CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS Tel: 325-2921
SUNDAY, AUGUST 27TH, 2006
11:30am Speaker: Pastor Errol Jackson
6:30pm
Save The Family Rally at Rawson Square
with Dr. Rex Major
S Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. Evening Service: 7-00 p.m.
Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
Sisters' Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)


LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future


Worship time: Ilam & 7pm

Sunday School: 9:45am

Prayer time: 6:30pm

Place:

The Madeira Shopping

Center
Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND
Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles
P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL lynnk@batelnet.bs




EVANGELISTIC


TEMPLE
A Life Changing Experience

Collins Avenue at 4th Terrace Centreville
Telephone: 322-8304 or 325-1689 P.O. Box N-1566
Fax No. 322-4793


8:30am ZNS-1
8:30am
9:45am
ll:00am
7:00pm


Temple Time Broadcast
Early Morning Worship
Sunday School For All Ages
Worship Service
Evening Celebration

Sekltive Bible Teaching Royal
Rangers (Boys Club) Ages 4-17 Years
Missionettes (Girls Club) Ages 4-17.


SUNDAY


WEDNESDAY 7:30PM


VISIT OUR PREMISE BOOKSTORE, TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY


Alfred Sears
(FILE photo)

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL


Sunday School: 10am
Preacheing 11am & 7:30pm
Radio Bible Hour:
Sunday 6pm ZNS 2
Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm


FUNDAMENTAL
EVANGELISTIC ,.

Pastor:H. Mills -. '-


"Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are"
Pastor: H. Mills Phone: 393-0563 Box N-3622


S THE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS
CONFERENCE
OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE
CARIBBEAN AND THE AMERICAS
L'EGLISE METHODISTE DANS LA CARAIBE
ET LES AMERIQUES
NASSAU CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES z' .
108 Montrose Avenue
P.O. Box EE-16379, Nassau, Bahamas; Telephone: 32.56432; Fax:
328-2784; rlhodlesnetliold@balelnet.bs
METHODISM: RAISED UP IN THE PROVIDENCE OF GOD,
TO REFORM THE NATION, BUT ESPECIALLY THE
CHURCH AND TO SPREAD SCRIPTURAL HOLINESS
THROUGHOUT THE LAND (Father John Wesley)
"Celebrating 223 years of continuous Methodist witness for
Christ in The Bahamas"
THE TWELFTH LORD'S DAY AFTER PENTECOST,
AUGUST 27, 2006
INTROIT AND COLLECT:
O Lord, indeed I am your servant, I am your servant and the
child of your handmaid, you have loosed my bonds.
I will raise the cup of salvation and I will invoke the name of the
Lord.
ALMIGTHY FATHER, whose Son Jesus Christ has taught us
that what we do for the least of his brethren we do for him: give
us the will to be servants of others as he was servant of all; who
gave up his life and died for us, and is alive and reigns with you
and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.
WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd East)
7:00 a.m. Rev. Mark S. Christmas (Holy Communion)
11:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J Sykes
RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108 M6ntrose
Ave. near Wulff Rd)
7:00 a.m. Bro. Jerry Rolle
10:00 a.m. Rhodes Prayer Band
11:00 a.m. Bro. Arthur Chase (Local Preacher)
6:30 p.m. Rhodes Prayer Band
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH
(Rose Street, Fox Hill)
11:00 a.m. Rev. Leonard G. Roberts Jr./ Women
PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza)
11:00 a.m. Rev. Stacia Williams- Christmas
6:30 p.m. Class One
HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST CHURCH
(28 Crawford St, Oakes Field)
7:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes
10:00 a.m. Rev. Mark S. Christmas
6:30 p.m. Rev: Edward J. Sykes
GOOD SHEPHERD METHODIST CHURCH (20 Cedar
Terrace, Tall Pines)
8:00 a.m. Sis. Gillian Bethel
CROIX-DES-MISSIONS-ALDERSGATE (Quackoo Street)
9 a.m. Circuit Men
Friday (September 17)Children's Club at 5 p.m.
METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -Thrift Shop
and other Ministries
JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford St.,
Oakes Field) Reception to Primary
RADIO PROGRAMS
"Vision" On the Lord's Day, ZNS 1 at 9 p.m.; "Great Hymns of
Inspiration" On the Lord's Day, Radio 810 at 5:30 p.m.; "Family
Vibes" ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.; "To God be the Glory" ZNS 1,
Tuesday, 7:45 p.m.
PRAYERS
Our brothers and sisters in the Middle East, those affected by
hurricanes and other natural disasters, and the Privy Council Appeal.


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In this photo provided by New Line Pictures, on board a flight over the Pacific Ocean, Nelville Flynn (Samuel L. Jackson ) must fight a plane load of
loose deadly snakes in "Snakes On A Plane." (AP Photo/New Line Pictures)


Eusar


WHEN a South American
volcano began blowing its top
last week, people living on its
slopes were not the only ones
to get excited. There were
tremors of anticipation in Nas-
sau, too.
They say it's an ill-wind that
blows no-one any good. Well,
the same goes for volcanoes.
While those living under the
crater are unlikely to be too
pleased, writers of volcano
books glow brighter than a
magma chamber when the
ground starts rumbling.
Nassau-based author James
Frew, whose novel Volcano
Santorini harks back to one
of the greatest volcanic cata-
strophes of all time, is not
alone in welcoming the spec-
tacle of flying sparks, flowing
lava and subterranean con-
vulsions...so long as no-one
gets hurt, of course.
Stephen Lay, a Nassau-
based magazine editor who is
also director of US-based Epi-
center Press, said: "One real-
ly big volcanic explosion could
lead us to order 10,000 more
copies of,our book on Mount
St Helen's. There's nothing
like a major eruption to stim-
ulate interest and therefore
book sales."
Epicenter's book, Echoes of


Fury by Frank Parchman, is a
riveting account of the 1980
eruption of Mount St Helen's
and the lives it changed for-
ever.
Described by an online
reviewer as "scary, jolting and
gripping", the book is the true
story of the eruption and its
aftermath with specific
emphasis on the human toll.
Mr Lay said: "The book has
been a good seller since it
appeared in 2004, but it really
needs another eruption of the
volcano to liven things up."
Although there is a solid
core of volcano buffs who will
always buy books like Echoes
of Fury and Volcano Santori-
ni, it takes a major news event
from a glowing peak to really
set the bookshop tills ringing.
Mr Frew, 86, a former
senior US officer who was also
a commercial airline pilot,
published his book two years
ago. It's a thriller in which
Volcano Santorini and the
eruption that wiped out
Mayan civilisation feature
prominently.
Mr Frew, who is also an
architect, has written several
thrillers at his South Ocean
Beach home. But this was the
first to feature a volcano at its
core.


Iraqis bdl hrinw

Srk r '


By JASON DONALD
SNAKES ON A
PLANE
Starring: Samuel L Jackson
THE weird and wonderful
tale of Snakes on a Plane's cre-
ation is sure to find its way into
cinematic legend.
After shooting it as a straight-
faced B-movie (actually, make
that a "C"),'then seeing it sub-
jected to humiliation in movie


chatrooms across the globe for .
its title and premise (even
before the preview was shown),
the team behind Snakes on a
Plane decided to take advan-
tage of its premature notoriety
by adding some new scenes, .., *
keeping the title and blitzing us
with an ironic marketing cam- plain bad? Maybe it's a work
paign. of comedy genius. I'm not quite
With such a rollercoaster ride sure, but there's one thing I can
behind the movie's production, say with certainty: It's the best
its now almost impossible tc Lufiln involving snakes and places.
judge the film on its own merits. -- that I've sL n thi- year.
Is it so bad, its good? Or just The story goes a little sonie-


thing like this: An FBI agent
(Jackson) is escorting a prose-
cution witness on aiflight to Los
Angeles but the crime lord
who could be sent down as a
result has hatched a plan to stop
them. He's going to unleash
"snakes" on the "plane". Loads
and loads of them.
The slippery fellows come in
wide range of sizes and colours
- one of them even growls but
they're all deadly. And, before
you know it, they're dangling
from people's faces and jump-
ing out of sick bags (I'm not
kidding).
SIt's all ridiculous, of course,
but there is the definite sugges-
tion of a wink to the audience.
Apart from the hilarity of all
the mayhem, there's some great
one-liners which I won't spoil
here.
I suppose it all depends on
your frame of mind when you
enter the theatre, because, while
Snakes on a Plane is cheap, sil-
ly and the special effects are
rubbish (maybe they should
have called it Fakes on a Plane),
I haven't laughed so much at a
movie in ages.


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i" "i" Under The Patronage of '

SHon. Cynthia A. Pratt M.P

)epti Primt'e .\fiiist'r La .\ in .iser o0f l\aio/nal Secu'ity


The Royal Bahamas Police Force
Is hosting an



INTERNATIONAL

(RIME SUMMIT
I Iemw.

Enforcing the Fight Against Crime, Violence &

Social Ills through Global Collaboration"
Topics\ to he ,is usSed.'L.
-Human Trafficking
Homicide
The Effect of (rime oin ouri.nm
Gun \'iolence'/Crime Pre ention-A C'oncern fior Business Ow0 ners
.Adtult Violence: Anoer .ai~aiement/Contlict Resolution

Date:
A.-\ulgustL 2Sth-31 st. 2006
e- I 3p111

Wyndham Nassau Resort & CrI stal Palace
\.'Wet Bay Street.
Na'S;1au. Bahamias


Registration $100

Group rate: $95 (5 persons or more)

Day Pass: S30 per person


For further information, contact the Reserve Office
(242) 302-8050/8048


The American Embassy is presently considering applications for the following
position:

CASHIER

Serves a Collection Clerk with responsibility for collecting Consular fees in accor-
dance with specific guidelines.

The position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

A high school diploma
One year of experience in performing basic cashiering and clerical functions.
S Must have a good working knowledge of an electronic cash register.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

Must have the ability to identify fake monetary instruments, meet deadlines in
a timely manner and work independently with minimum supervision.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation package includ-
ing performance-based incentives, medical and dental insurance, life insurance,
pension and opportunities for training and development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are eligible for
employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application forms are available from 8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday
at the security area of the American Embassy, Queen Street. Completed applica-
tions should be returned to the Embassy; addressed to the Human Resources Office
no late than Thursday, August 31, 2006.


- ~~~~~~~~~""~"~~"b~"~"~


SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 2006, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE


S. S. S S1 11
'I IM


iw
A t lI P




Schools of Fish
smAIRT FUn in THE SUmmeIRTIm


Underwater schools are different from
the school you go to. A school in the
, causf1P ocean is actually a
i ^10p1 !group of fish that ,
i 0 swim together.
I # SCHOOSIj About 4,000 kinds
of fish swim in groups called schools.

Schools of fish are always made up of one kind of fish
swimming together. Sardines swim with sardines, and
minnows swim with minnows.

In a school, the fish are able to swim together.
moving in the same direction or even
changing directions in an instant without
bumping into each other. This can make a school
of thousands of fish look like one big fish.
Standards Lnk: Ule Science. ULrvng organisms depend an one another
for survival.


Some fish travel in schools
to confuse enemies that
want to eat them. Traveling
together also helps in the
search for food. Having
thouarids of eyes and noses
: .onthe lookout for food
..,l~.e ich6t: a bner:':.
. lnarf 0 a findig inner.


Not all fish school. For the most part, predator fish
do not school. One exception is this fish. These fish
are born into and live in large schools.


Standards Link: Life Science A.:iapltains
nr beh-a.or improve an organism'S
chan fe for BuriO'al.


Some groups of underwater animals are not called schools. Use the code to
find out what each group of animals below is called.

C-U-

TROUT B- BASS
shE y HERRING 0- )
13 A "V=


SHARKS
r D H ADEHIL IO P R S V Y


Standards Link: Lila Serncna. tucSw raLz l.nnror ,Examples ol i derte lla icrrn, C, irE e oc-an

ad 0


How do fish swim so close without
colliding? Fish use a combination
of their senses to create the smooth
schooling movements.


Eyes: Each fish can
look for" ard with one
eye while the other is
looking backward.


Lateral Line: Along each side of a fish's body there is a
line of tiny holes or pores. Tiny hairs inside the pores feel
the slightest ripple or movement in the water. This lets fish
know \\ hen another fish is nearby. If one fish moves in a
different direction. all the others sense it and move
accordingly.
Standards Link: L.le Scence Ar.rn-als na.e liruclures irsa j1se difleren lurnchcons in sur.iival



My School
Look through the newspaper for five or more
adjectives that describe your school. Then look
for words that describe what you want to learn
this year. Use these words to write a paragraph
with your plans for the coming school year.


Standards Link: Grammar: Identify and use adjectives; Writing
Applications: Write brief expository sentences.


i~~flUYIiI Ii 14Ji1 I'~


UNDERWATER
SCHOOLS
MINNOWS
RIPPLE
SWIM
LATERAL
SARDINES
PREDATOR
HAIRS
CLOSE
NAME
BACKWARD
PORES
CHART
WHY


Find the words in the puzzle,
then in this week's Kid Scoop
stories and activities.
RETA W R E D N U
DSR IAH E S L R
RE M A N L S S A O
A N C H P E L W T T
W I O PROYOEA
KD I O O S HN RD
C R P H O L W N A E
AA C L O S E I L R
B S T RAHCMMP

Standards Link: Letter sequencing. Recognized identical
words. Skim and scan reading. Recall spelling patterns.


Are you an eagle-eyed reader?
Read the story below and circle
the six errors you find. Then
rewrite the story correctly.
That Sounds Fishy
How do fish hear?

Fish do not have ears on the
outside of their bodies, yet
they can still here sonds.

In fact in murky water, hearing
can be more important than
sight.

Fish ears are in their skulls,
one on either side of the head.
Sound waves pass through
there bodies and are picked up
by this iner ear.


Perseverance is ...









... not giving up the first
time you don't succeed at
something new.





This week's word:
lateral
The word lateral
means being on or directed
towards the side.
I made a lateral move
from one side of the
classroom to the other.
Use the word lateral
in a sentence today when
talking with your friends,
parents or teachers.



If fish went to
school...
What would a school FOR fish
be like? What would the fish -
study? Write a story about a day
in a school for fish.


More A's


E- -------


Pretzel
I FREE Pretzel
II


More Plays.

Bring your report card &

get 3 tokens for each "A"


Complete the Double
Word Search Puzzle &
bring it with this coupon
to Mr. Pretzels & get 1
pretzel & 1 small soda..
Only 1 coupon per customer per visit


Great-tasting pretzels &

wholesome family entertainment!


Mal atMartho4 net4 t te Fod4our. P: 34-0 92/3B


LOCAL NEWS


6


-A


.11, ........... ...


PAG E 8, SATU RDAY, AU G UST 26, 2066


*


I







THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, AUGUST 26,2006, PAGE 9





*"47n C)s1aps C9o ne
































Tough questions




for government

THIS week, in Days Gone By looks back at the sion of the resort, told the Commission of Inquiry .
1983 Royal Commission of Inquiry into the trans- he was expressly prohibited from making any
shipment of dangerous drugs through the application to the Central Bant for exchange
Bahamas. control approval because it was the view of
Clockwise from Above: Robert Deutsch and also of the vendor the that
the exchange control approval would be blocked
Then deputy prime minister Arthur Hanna, by Mr Nottage.
auditor general Richard Demeritte (second from
left), PLP chairman Brenville Hanna (third from Former Cabinet Minister CA Smith, Mr Ingra-
left), and then Housing and National Insurance ham, Mr Christie and Mrs Christie stand outside
Minister Hubert Ingraham (right) chat outside the commission building.
the Commission of Inquiry after the DPM had
completed his evidence. BELOW:
The setting for the Royal Commission of I
Cecil Wallace-Whitfield, lawyer for a group of Inquiry. Speaking is secretary to the Commis-
foreign investors who bought the Islander Hotel sion Mr Patrick Erskine-Lindop. Behind him
in Grand Bahama in 1979 while a rival group of from left to right are Bishop Drexel Gomez,
would-be local purchasers, including Cabinet Commission Chairman Sir James Smith and Mr
Minister Kendal Nottage, had physical posses- Edward Willis.
Minister Kenda! Nottage, had physical posses- Edward Willis. .


Notice

NOTICE is hereby given that MCKENZY JOSEPH, EAST
ST., is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 26th day of August, 2006 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




Notice
NOTICE is hereby given that NAHOMIE PHILIPPE, OF HAY
ST. OFF BLUE HILL RD., HOUSE #13, P. O. BOX GT 2557,
NASSUA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 19th day of AUGUST, 2006 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Exuma, Bahamas.



Notice

NOTICE is hereby given that YVONNE PAUL, MARKET
STREET SOUTH, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26th day of
August, 2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


IS Colinria
Financial Advisors Ltd.

Pricing Information As Of:
Frid-', 25 Auqu-t 200 6
BISX LIST ED & TRADED SECURITIES VISIT VVWW BISXBAHAMAS COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
E' B1 AULHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1.586.88 / CHG 00.54 / %CHG 00.03 YTD 236.17 YTQD 7;-4 :
*"..I.H, .kLOW S mb,:i Pro .,.,-_ Ci.:... T.:,a'. 5 C.i e Cran cr.. C.a, ...:.1 EFS : Div $ P/E Y.o:la
1..o5 0.59 ADaco Markats 1.74 1.74 -0109 0000 NAM r ,.17 _
12.05 9.35 Bahamas Property Fund 11.46 11.46 0.00 1.612 0.380 7.1 3.32%
7.50 6.55 Bank of Bahamas 7.50 7.50 0.00 0.738 0.330 10.2 4.40%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.292 0.020 2.7 2.50%
1.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.50 1.50 0.00 0.143 0.000 10.5 0.00%
1.49 1.10 Fidelity Bank 1.44 1.44 0.00 0.188 0.050 7.7 3.47%
9.60 8.80 Cable Bahamas 9.43 9.43 0.00 0.618 0.240 15.3 2.55%
2.20 1.39 Collna Holdings 1.90 1.90 0.00 2,000 0.009 0.000 211.1 0.00%
11.10 9.00 Commonwealth Bank 11.05 11..10 0.05 2,000 0.943 0.600 11.8 5.41%
6.26 4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.45 5.61 0.16 0.130 0.045 41.7 0.83%
2.88 2.10 Doctor's Hospital 2.45 2.45 0.00 0.283 0.000 8.7 0.00%
6.21 4.02 Famguard 6.21 6.15 -0.06 1,000 0.539 0.240 11.5 3.86%
11.51 10.60 Finco 11.51 11.51 0.00 0.745 0.540 15.1 4.78%
13.50 9.50 FirstCaribbean 13.50 13.50 0.00 600 0.885 0.550 15.3 4.07%
11.21 9.00 Focol 11.21 11.21. 0.00 0.885 0.500 12.7 4.46%
1.15 1.00 Freeport Concrete 1.00 1.00 0.00 -0.170 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.20 8.65 ICD Utilities 8.65 8.65 0.00 0.532 0.270 16.3 3.12%
8.50 8.27 J.S.Johnson 8.74 8.74 0.00 100 0.527 0.560 16.6 6.41%
8.08 5.30 Kerzner International BDRs 8.07 8.08 0.01 0.160 0.000 50.5 0.00%
n0 nn 10 00 Premier Real Estate 1 00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.195 4.9 1.95%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Se-urdtles
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price W/eeKly vol. EPS Div $ PE Yield
14.13 12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.25 15.25 13.50 7,094 1.923 0.960 7.9 6.74%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 8.00 8.25 10.00 0.000 0.640 NM 7.85%
S54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.084 0.000 NM 0.00%
Collna Over-The-Counter Sacuritles
S,,8 00 ABDAB 1 1 ,,Z -0 :. .' 0 000 19 0 00,
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.00 15.00 12.50 1.750 0.360 8.0 2.57%
n O6 0 35 RND Holdinas 0 45 0.55 0.45 -0.070 0.000 N/M 0.00%
S' ';;;. BISX Listed Mutual Funds
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NA V YTD% Last 12 Monins Div $ Yield
1.3031 1.2454 Collna Money Market Fund 1.303064*
2.9038 2.4169 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.9038**
2.4500 2.2636 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.450018**
1 1820 11246 Colina Bond Fund 1.182038****
,-' '.. ,' FINDER CLOSE 697.67 i YTD 26.42% / 2005 26 09:
,- t- -,E x 1c ., -,: 2 1 ,.)00,, 0i0. T T rIq I r i 1 NAV KEY.... .
52wk-Hi Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colhna and Fidulily
52wk-Low Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colino and fidelity 11 August 2006
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week 31 July 2006
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value 30 June 2006
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
S*. .... ; j ... 4-' c, Ir.e .-.sI ..-.r. I .- ; Fitl .E" T Fji;i. ..r.i 1::1 I i I. ., i, 1 )j = nn 2 0 .. -M:-l
TO TRADECALU' OUNA 242-502-7010 1 FIDELITY 2-12-356-7764 / FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION CALL 4L 334-S


Mrs. Phyllis Mclean of Camperdown Heights
died at her residence on Thursday, 24th August
2006


She is survived by her daughter, Fiona and was
predeceased by her husband, Duncan in 2000.


Instead of flowers her daughter requests
donations in her mother's memory to:
Animals Require Kindness (ARK),
P.O. Box N291 or the Bahamas Heart
Association, P.O. Box N.8189, Nassau,
in memory of Mrs. Phyllis McLean.


A memorial service will be announced at a
later date.







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 2006


SIK


W H A T'S ON IN AND AROUND NASSAU
.. .. .. . .. .. .. . .. .. . .. .. .. . .. .. .. . .. .. . .. .. .. . .. .. .. . .. . . .. .. .. . .. .. .. . .. .. . .. .. .. . .. .. .. . .. .. .


E-MAIL:


YDELEVEAUX@TRIBUNEMEDIA.NET -


PLEASE PUT "OUT THERE" IN THE SUBJECT LINE
............................................................................................................................... ........................................................................................................


W- MONDAY

* HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform
the public of its meeting times and places:
New Providence Community Centre:
Monday -
6pm to 7pm. The Kirk: Mondays 7:30pm
to 8:30pm
Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic sup-
port group meets the first Monday of each
month at 6:30pm at New Providence Com-
munity Centre, Blake Road. Dinner is
provided and free blood sugar, blood
pressure and cholesterol testing is avail-
able. For more info call 702.4646 or
327.2878
MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets
the third Monday every month, 6pm @
Doctors Hospital conference room.
* CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the
British Colonial Hilton Monday's at 7pm
* Club 612315 meets Monday 6pm @
Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach *
Club 3596 meets
at the British Colonial Hilton Mondays at
7pm.
The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Coun-
cil (NPHC) meets every third Monday of
the month in the Board Room of the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.


*-- I TUESDAY

* PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS &
RESTAURANTS
10.10.2.20. @ Club Nirvana: Tuesday
nights at Club Nirvana, Elizabeth
Avenue, have been dubbed 10.10.2.20.
Every tenth female patron is allowed into
the club absolutely free and is given a
complimentary glass of Carlo Rossi. Tues-
day nights also include the Carlo Rossi's
Hot Body Competition. Hosted by Daddi
Renzi and music provided by DJ Ai from
100 Jamz. Master Chef Delito Bodie pro-
vides scrumptious appetizers.
* HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform
the public of its meeting times and places:
The Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Tues-
day 6pm to 7pm/8:30pm to 9:30pm.
The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets
at 5:30pm on the second Tuesday of each
month at their Headquarters at East Ter-
race, Centreville. Call 323.4482 for more
info.
Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being
held 6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNas-
tics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles
Dr). Doctor approval is required. Call
364.8423 to register for more info.
* CIVIC CLUBS

The Kiwanis Club of New Providence
meets every Tuesday at 7:30pm at the
Holy Cross Community Centre, Highbury
Park.
The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets
every third Tuesday at SuperClubs
Breezes, Cable Beach at 12:30pm. We
invite all community minded persons to
attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday,
7:30pm @ C C Sweeting Senior School's
Dining Room, College Avenue off Moss
Road Club Cousteau 7343 meets Tues-
days at 7:30pm in the Chickcharney Hotel,
Fresh Creek, Central Andros Club 7178
meets each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer


',.



Society of the
Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.


Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi
Omega chapter meets every second Tues-
day, 6.30pm @ the Eleuthera Room in the
Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach.
Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every
second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ Atlantic
House, IBM Office, 4th floor meeting
room.
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every
first Tuesday, 6:30pm at the British Colo-
nial Hilton. Please call 502.4842/377.4589
for more info.

;I f: WEDNESDAY fl

PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters
Sports Bar every Wednesday 5pm-8pm.
Free appetizers and numerous drink spe-
cials.
HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform
the public of its meeting times and places:
New Providence Community.Centre:
Wednesday 7pm to 8pm. The Nassau
Group: Rosetta Street, Wednesday 6pm
to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.
CIVIC CLUBS

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated
meets 6:30pm every third Wednesday at
the Bahamas National Pride Building.
TM Club 753494 meets every Wednesday,
6pm-8pm in the Solomon's Building, East-
West Highway. TM Club 2437 meets the
2nd and 4th Wednesday of each month at
C C Sweeting Senior High School, Oakes
Field.
International Training in Communication,
Essence Club #3173 holds its bi-monthly
meetings on the 1st and 3rd Wednesday of
Each month at Doctor's Hospital Confer-
ence
Room.
Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Colum-
bus meets the second and fourth Wednes-
day of the month, 8pm @ St Augustine's
Monestary.

S THURSDAY

HEALTH

Free public health lectures featuring dis-
tinguished physicians are held at Doctors
Hospital every third Thursday of the
month at 6pm in the Doctors Hospital
Conference Room. Free screenings
between 5pm & 6pm. For more informa-
tion call 302-4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform
the public of its meeting times and places:
The Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Thurs-
day 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The
Kirk: Thursdays 7:30pm to 8:30pm
Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being


T:; Awn. r Li.L i B41K OR IPiLU E ('II9ci)I
0,V A 4L r! Oi:q' I G1 I C,
Marrel t .nui quniersei1rndl I io slory based oil ie ipr el eiysh oO
Olrpritui afid Eueialyc i5 5t1 i jairflll Th ii sdw6drop of riii, of In R'0
du Jarnero Black Orpheus coordiriaps bejulilul colorsand mowEri-Mu
'4 h hv&y music nd dr eiheredl emaq I he borv i one full Of iinlbol-
in i It keeps Lhe ali ud.rLc bobilni tmrauined and ,ivolvrd in a consuJfll
dijoguee *onh m IWm I a u-icosar soral iruois ore being loin Wvinuer of
Lht Gljr-ri Pwzeaii Cannes ds cell a sn Oscajr Ir Be.i hFrglja Film.


held 6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau Gym-
Nastics Seagrapes location (off Prince
Charles Dr). Doctor approval is required.
Call 364.8423 to register or for more info.
REACH Resources & Education for
Autism and related Challenges meets
from 7pm 9pm the second Thursday of
each month in the
cafeteria of the BEC building, Blue Hill
Road.

* CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a
breakfast meeting every Thursday morn-
ing at 7am at the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel. (Fellowship begins at 6:45am)
Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first,
second and third Thursday at the Ministry
of Health & Environment building on
Meeting Street commencing at 7:30pm.
Everyone is welcome to attend.

TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8.30pm @
SuperClubs Breezes.
International Association of Administra-
tive Professionals, Bahamas Chapter
meets the third Thursday of every month
@ Superclubs Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.
The recently established National Insur-
ance Baord Retiree Association
(NIBRA), meets every fourth Thursday in
the month, in the National Insurance
Board's (NIB) training room, Wulf Road
office complex, at 6pm. All retirees are
welcome.
* THEATRE

For this weekend only, Thursday, August
17 to Saturday, August 19, Track Road
Theatre will present 'Da Market Fire',
written by Emille Hunt and directed by
Deon Simms, at the Dundas Centre at
8pm.

,- W FRIDAY

PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS
Cafe Europa on Charlotte Street North,
kicks off every Friday night with Happy
Hour... special drinks, live music/DJ from
6pm to 9pm and Nassau's first European
Night Restaurant Open Friday night till
Saturday morning 5am, serving hot
food/and take out music, drinks and an
English breakfast. Cafe Europa...the per-
fect place to spend your night out till the
morning.

HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform
the public of its meeting times and places:
The Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Fri-
days 6pm to 7pm & 8:30pm to 9:30pm.
Sacred Heart Church Fridays @ 6pm to
7pm New Providence Community Centre:
Friday @ 7pm to 8pm.

CIVIC CLUBS

TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @


I'I


"The r o hI


I 9 I I


llenj


Bahamas Baptist Community College Rm
A19, Jean St.
Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every
second Friday of each month, 7.30pm at
Emmaus Centre at St Augustine's Mones-
tary. For more info call 325.1947 after
4pm.

SATURDAY f

* HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform
the public of its meeting times and places:
The Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Satur-
day mornings 10am to 11am.
Bahamas Diabetic Association meets
every third Saturday, 2:30pm (except
August and December) @ the Nursing
School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street.
Doctors Hospital CPR and First Aid
classes are offered every third Saturday of
the month from 9am-lpm. Contact a Doc-
tors Hospital Community Training Repre-
sentative at 302.4732 for more informa-
tion and learn to save a life today.

* CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR
Cycling are pleased to offer a cycling clin-
ic for juniors between 10 and 17. The-free
clinic will be held every Saturday in an.
effort to encourage kids to cycle. Parents
interested in registering their children
should contact organizers at
jarcycling@gmail.cQm
AGLOW International Northern
Caribbean Area Bahamas, Nassau West
Aglow
Anniversary Thanksgiving Meeting
When: Saturday August 26, 2006 9am to
12 noon
Where: Superclubs Breezes Hotel, Cable
Beach
Speaker: Minister Jacquelyn Dean of
Evangelistic Temple, Anointed Women of
God, president of Aglow International,
Northern Caribbean area board New
Providence Bahamas.

-- SUNDAY i

* PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Traveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay
Street, features special entertainment -
Gernie, Tabitha and the Caribbean
Express every Sunday from 6:30pm to
9:30pm.

* HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform
the public of its meeting times and places:
The Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Sun-
day 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.
-- UPCOMING Ui-
EVENT

3rd Annual DJ Awards under the theme
"Vision of Unity". Categories: Best Female
Radio Personality, Best Male Radio Per-
sonality, Best Radio Talk Show, Best
Bahamian Mix Show, Best Radio DJ, DJ
of the Year and many more
The public is allowed to vote online @
www.dafuture.net or at selected outdoor
events.


Send all your civic and social events to
The Tribune via fax: 328.2398
or e-mail: ydeleveaux@
tribunemedia. net/


"The brewrery of Thie Bahamnas"


KALI] Ku

Please Drink~ Responsibly









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BINIINI The streets are their island, the) also ind
.- ... quiet. but the atmosphere is that the3 %anted a first
A-.- . ..* AN A A -.


. ACu-ba4n4 4;c 5. a *.*"rati.: ....
0' O' 0-' ;


0 rnargeu diin anticipation oi
1 the first-ever Feel the Rush
. junkanoo parade Io be held in
Bimini.
Taking part in the celebra-
tlion %ill be contingents from
Nas lan junkanoo groups, as
lell as performnners from Grand
Bahama,
Although Biminites were
thrilled to have had this year's
Feel the Rush competition in
Grand Bahama dedicated to


icated
-hand


feel, according to organizers.
The celebration will take the
form of a weekend of eents
beginning on Frida3 with a
junkanoo skills competition
open to performer- through-
out the island.
On Saturday the leaders of
the Valley Boys, winners of
the Grand Bahamas parade
this year, will put on a
junkanoo workshop for the
local students who are inter-


ested. The rush parade will
begin at 9pm on Saturday
night. The weekend will end
on a religious note with a spe-
cial church senrice on Sunday
morning.
The 200--srong \ allek BoB
are expected to carrt the samni
theme as these did in Grar
Bahama last w eek hoi evit;
they will be adding some tra-
ditionalfeatures.
Hundreds of patrons are
expected from New Provi-
dence and the Family Islands.


US 'crusade' against Cuba


MIAMI ( \Pi A unLr ,i- i
ty professor .. kn> ,.\ kIdgc'i fri-
day that he was a "collabora-
tor" with Cuba's intelligence
service but insisted he had dis-
tanced himself from the com-
munist government by the time
he confessed details of his work
to the FBI in the summer of
2005.
"I was collaborating, basical-
ly, sharing insights and infor-
mation with the Cuban govern-
- 11ent for some years," Carlos


Alvarez testified in a federal
court hearing.
But Alvarez, who is charged
with failing to register with the'
U.S. as a Cuban agent, said he
quit providing information to
Cuba by 1998, well before he
was approached by two FBI
agents in June 2005 at a Miami
supermarket about his involve-
ment. Alvarez also insisted he
was never a covert Cuban agent.
Alvarez's surprise admission
came on the third day of a hear-


ing on a motion. filed by.As
lawyer contending that the FBI
promised him immunity from
prosecution if he fully confessed
his involvement with Cuba.
Alvarez, 61, and his 56-year-
old wife, Elsa, have both plead-
ed not guilty to charges of being
unregistered Cuban intelligence
operatives for more than two
decades, reporting mainly on
activities of Cuban-American
exile groups .n Miami and on
U.S: political developments.


FROM page one

is to destabilise the country and to create insta-
bility in the region."
Commenting on the US hopes that Cuba will
release political prisoners, and improve its human
rights situation, Mr Wilson said the US was in no
"moral position" to make such requests in light of
"Guantanamo Bay, Iraq and its support of Israel."
The conference at which Mr Shannon spoke
was held at a time when the Bahamas government
has been criticized by US Ambassador to the
Bahamas John Rood for the extent to which its
"approaches to major international challenges"


differ from those of the US. .
Yesterday, permanent secretary at the Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs, Patricia Rodgers, con-
firmed that the Bahamas is "very likely" to par-
ticipate in the Non-Aligned Movement Summit
2006 in Havana a meeting of states that consider
themselves not formally aligned to or against any
superpower.
The stated purpose of the summit is promoting
"the national independence, sovereignty, terri-
torial integrity and security of non-aligned coun-
tries."
Despite its stance on Cuba, officials at the US
Embassy in Nassau said it is "appropriate" for the
Bahamas to attend.


Ministry says Youth



Programme delays



were 'inevitable'


FROM page one

and Housing Neville Wisdom.
The statement said, however,
that only 123 employees were
still awaiting payment.
The ministry's summer pro-
gramme ran from July 3 to
August 25. A total of 1,578 peo-
ple were employed by the pro-
gramme.
The ministry said yesterday
that it is confident that more
than 98 per cent of those who
stopped working on August 11
would receive payment by Fri-
day, August 25.


According to the statement,
payments to summer employ-
ees began on Friday, August 18
- and since then, 826 salary
cheques have been prepared
and were collected. The
cheques totalled $495,879.
An additional series of
cheques totalling $72,697.were
collected from the Treasury for
disbursement to 429 persons on
August 24, the ministry said.
According to the statement,
the 123 persons who are still to
be paid are owed $121,257 in
total.
In response to an issue raised
in the article, the ministry also


confirmed that the government
did approve $1.6 million for the
employment of trained teach-
ers, teachers' aides, college and
high school students.
The release stated that $5,000
for training, $150,000 for grants
to private camps, $60,000 for
supplies, food and water and
$34,000 for sporting equipment
was also approved.
The Summer Youth Pro-
gramme sponsored by the Min-
istry of Youth, Sports and
Housing for 2006 provided and
supported camps at over 85 cen-
tres in New Providence and the
Family Islands.


-- --m m m-
mw m mm ,mw
- ------ m


MINI SPLIT UNITS


COOL & EFFICIENT.


NEW SHIPMENT

JUST ARRIVED!
$50.00 FREE
Gift Certificate with prchhase


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Energy Efficient Features:
Miller Mini Split Units have METAL &
PLASTIC CASINGS WITH COATED COILS!
Compact Design


Quiet uperation
S -.-. ....-- Easy Maintenance
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METAL CASING UNITS
MDX4 Series 1 Ton Condenser and
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.- MnSre Cnr; 1 C Tnn rCnennarr


Carousel problems



cause airport delays


FROM page one
"If you arrive on a flight and it's only one flight
and you come on a 19-seater you are going to get
your luggage in less than 10 minutes," said Mr
Reckley.
But delays occurred if there were a lot of flights
and a lot of luggage. "We do have a lot of luggage
this time of year because people are shopping
overseas and we are seeing an extraordinary
amount of that kind of travel," he added.
"On Monday of this week you could hot stick a
pin in that place because there were so many
people. Literally, it was difficult to walk, so in a
situation like that it will take some time to get
your luggage.
"Even after some people got their luggage they


found it difficult to get to the customs belt because
of the large number of people in there," he said.
That fact, Mr Reckley said, was attributed to
rain. Airlines didn't want to get people's bag-
gage wet.
"So there was a delay because they waited until
they could get luggage covered and transported
over to the airport.
"All of our carousels are usually operating but
if you walk in there and you don't see all of them
operating it does not mean it is not operating.
"Some people feel that if they don't see a
carousel operating, it's down. We allow a certain
amount of choice to airlines. We spent thousands
of dollars in trying to ensure that when they go
down we have the necessary parts in place," he
said.


"'I1


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SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 2006, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


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PAGE 12, SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 2006 IHE TRIBUNE


By Franklyn G Ferguson


I,.


NASSAU


EVENTS


CAPTURED O N CAMERA


DR VALRON (nee Grimes) on the arms of her husband, Dr.
Olu Tinubu. Following the wedding, the bride and groom flew off
to honeymoon in Paris.


'This is what heaven has in mind'


DR. VALRON GRIMES, the youngest
daughter of Valentine and Thelma Grimes,
recently married Dr. Olu Tinbu, the eldest
child of nurse Edna Mae Tinbu.
The ceremony was at St. Agnes Church
and the reception was at the Crown Ballroom
of Atlantis Hotel. Surveying the diverse back-
grounds of the guests, the beauty of the dec-


orations and the feel of the atmosphere, one
speaker summed it up with: "This must.be
what heaven has in mind".
They feasted on the following: Saffron fish
bouillon with shrimp satay, key lime hearts of
palm, pink ,I I. ,i u;i gourmet greens, roast-
ed vinaigrette, and champagne sorbet.
For entrees, Nassau style grouper, Exuma


lobster tail, Long Island petit crab cake, and
crushed red bliss potatoes and seasonal veg-
etables.
Desert consisted of mine chocolate tarte,
white chocolate flan, milk chocolate mousse.
and marinated tropical fruits.
Entertainment was provided by
Visage.


0 HEIRE. Sh~kjrj LLdaiJId.a .-I th.mirim.im'irtiL~ititL'l'I.iIliii,',.I
ci I, %ho hi" griciol ik c ct-i rot 'Sp-rLI 1.1,ibiI11 Ld V.. m"I'L II Ed I
n~on ind -.aricd [Or %'ICL~ri~ Lrctm. t.ik, it ill in %. iii1)i
% Aoit ine Grinic-;. bAI MLir tt11Lhc i 'd i .i'd id, i. [,11ii I
1-111CIL.'t mhL bride hid p.ist j~I'll,. i lc'l TIM B~ .hliii." -a-r I


DOCTORS
galore...classmates of
the bride from the
class of 2004 at the
School of Medicine of
the University of the
West Indies, came
from Jamaica and
Barbados to celebrate
with Dr. Valron.
These included Dr.
Bert Rodney, Dr.
Jason Payne, Dr. Dia-
ga Robinson, Dr. Toni
and Ann Fulford, and
Dr. Jared Ramdial


THE Acklins connection:
Trevor McKay, vice principal
at Doris Johnson High School;
Kim Hanna, administrator at
PMH; Senate President
Sharon Wilson (whose mother
hails from Acklins); and Don-
na Johnstn, executive at the
Water and Sewage Corpora-
tion, join the celebrations.
Donna, Terry and Kim are the
daughters of the late former
Senior Deputy Commissioner
of Police Dudley Hanna, who
was considered as the most
honest officer of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force.


I--x -,- .... .- ._..' .. .- -
MAID of Honour Dr. Valya Grimes and
her date, Dr. Gregor Pinlo. dance at the recep-
tion with music being performed by Visage.


THE Grimes-Tinubu union brings togeth-
er two families with six children three on each
side. Five out of the six are physicians and the
only non-physician is a banker. Nurse Tinubu
justifiably shows pride on the wedding day of
her oldest child.


*FOR-
MER Attor-
ney General
Sean
McWeeney
and his wife
Cyprianna,
join Banker-
Attorney
Cleopatra
Christie and
Gary
Christie,
entrepreneur
and brother
of the Prime
SMinister.


CON-
GRESSWOMAN
Maxine Water'
and her husband,
former US
Ambassador to
the Bahamas, Sid-
ney Williams, fle-
in for the wed-
ding, as did Mr.
and Mrs. Tom
Morazza. Mr.
Morazza recently
acquired the
Islander Hotel in
Elcuthera and is
planning a sub-
stantial redevel-
opment.


.. *)L.- ~ ~

. .' j
~1


S0 // 6/


(242) 357-8472


P.O. Box N-4659,
Nassau, Bahamas


~:~j~---Ler~p"BI~~;~


N~e~i~ce


~-qrnkl05AW frrgus Ott









a a


SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 2006


SECTION



B
Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


* VOLLEYBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
AT LEAST the Bahamas men's
national team can say at the end of
the XI Caribbean Volleyball
Championships that they have
matured as a team.
When the team got started last
Sunday night, they were just trying
to find themselves. By Thursday
when they played Barbados, they
showed.that they have arrived.
Down two sets in the marquee
men's game of day five, the
Bahamas rode the momentum of
the cheering fans inside the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium as they forced a
fifthianddecidingset.
But in the end, it was Barbados'
experience that prevailed and they
proved why they are indeed the
defending champions ofthe tour-
nament, remaining undefeated at'
3-0 in Pool A.
The Bahamas dropped to 0-3
and will now have to prepare to
play for the seventh or eight spot
today at 11:30 am against the US
Virgin Islands, who finished win-
less as well in Pool B.
"We gave it our all. In the lock-
er room, it was said that we should
give it our all," said Renaldo
Knowles, who led the team's offen-
sive attack. "Everyone had heart.
Everyone played with heart.
Everyone did what they had to
do."
Knowles -.md n %~ a, atough-loss,
but they should not hold their
heads down in shame because they
played as well as expected having
not had the opportunity to get any
exposure before the tournament.
Head coach Joey Demeritte said
the players went out and put it all
on the line as they gave Barbados
the fits like they have done so
many times before.
"Our lack of inexperience this
time really did us in," Demeritte
reflected. "I'm reallyjproud of the
way the guys played. They went
out and left it all out on the court."
Demeritte is of the opinion that,
based on the way they played, if
the team can stay together, he's
confident that, in two to,three
years, they should emerge as
champions.
For now, Barbados is the
defending champions and they
played that way.
Renier Grace powered down 18
kills and Fabian Cox added 16.
Dale Addison finished with four
block shots and Elwin Oxley
chipped in with two.
For the Bahamas, Renaldo
Knowles had a tournament high
22 kills and Prince Wilson finished
with 13 to post the best 1-2 combo
so far in the tournament. Wilson
also had four blocks and Romel
Lightbourn added three.
After losing two close encoun-
ters in the first two sets, the
Bahamas would trade the lead
with the Bajans throughout the
third before they took a 25-24 lead
on a Knowles' spike.
After a side out, the Bahamas
got the ball back on a Wilson cross
court spike and on his serve, Bar-
bados hit-the ball long to force a
fourth set.
The Bahamas would carry their
momentum over to the fourth set
by snatching a 8-4 lead that they
extended to 12-7 as Knowles
fuelled the-attack up front.
But Barbados refused to die as
Renier Grace landed a series of
spikes to cut their deficit to 13-12.
However, with Knowles spiking
and Romel Lightbourne blocking,
the Bahamas would take a 16-14
lead. Before they knew it, they
were leading 22-18 with Wayne
Johnson at the service line.
The Bahamas eventually won
the set as Wilson put the icing on
the cake with his spike.
While Knowles and Wilson
came through offensively, the
Bahamas got some big defensive
plays from Byron Ferguson II,
Romel Lightbourn and Arison
Wilson, along with John Rolle and
Muller Petit off the bench.
Climbing_ out of their slump,
Barbados took advantage of the
errors that the Bahamas started to
make at the service line and at the
net to take an early 6-4 lead and
they never trailed the rest of the


jway. I


Debble fourth in 400









second i in the 2Om


* TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
ALTHOUGH the conditions were
extremely cold yesterday, sprinter Deb-
bie Ferguson-McKenzie was heated up
enough to go out and run two consecu-
tive races at the Memorial Van Damme
meet yesterday in Brussels.
Ferguson-Williams, the lone Bahami-
an competing at the meet, ran 11.24 sec-
onds, the same time as American
Stephanie Durst, but she had to settle
for fourth place,
Her time was well off her season's
best of 11.06 and her personal best of
10.91.
Jamaican Sherone Simpson won the
race in 10.95 with American Me'Lisa
Barber second in 11.10 and Durst third.
About a hour later, Ferguson-
Williams was back on the track where
she posted a second place finish in the
200 in 22.93. Kim Gevaert of Bulgaria
won the race in 22.68 and.Russian
Yuliya Gushchina was third in 23.24.
Ferguson-McKenzie's time was shy
of her season's best of 22.40 and her
personal best of 22.19.
While Ferguson-McKenzie compet-
ed in the double, noticeably missing
were quarter-milers Tonique Williams-
Darling, Christine Amertil and Chris
'Bay' Brown.
American Sanya Richards stayed
undefeated, wininng the women's 400
in 50.02 as she stayed in contention for a
share of the $1 million jackpot being
offered at the end of the Grand Prix
series.
Jamaican Novlerie Williams was sec-
ond in 51.02 and Bulgarian Vanya Stam-
bolova came in third in 51.13.
Williams-Darling and Amertil were
not entered in the race.
Brown, who hasn't competed since
June 3 when he ran in his only meet,
said lie's disappointed that he's not
entered in the Golden League because
he would have liked to earn some of the
cash being offered.
"With the meets going on and I'm not
involved, I feel kind of disappointed," he
stressed. "But it ain't much I can do. I
just have to take it as it comes.
"I just have to hope that I have a bet-
ter year next year."
After being told by his manager that
he couldn't get into any of the meets
that have been taking place, Brown said
he finally got a call inviting him back
to Europe next weekend to compete in
Berlin at the Golden League.
"It ain't much that I can do (if they
don't want me in their meets). I just
have to wait until I can get in another
meet," he insisted. "I've still been train-
ing, so I should be ready to run next
weekend."


lbl frSm icdie-itad Conten"t




Available from Commercial News Providers


When he comes back, Brown should
expect to see American Jeremy Wariner
and the rest of the quarter-milers waiting


U'r *-- - ~ I

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41. oft


for him.
Wariner, who is also still eligible for a
share of the $1 million jackpot, won yes-


The Bahamas women





suffer three set defeat


* VOLLEYBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
DEFENDING champions
Barbados continued their
impressive run through the XI
Caribbean Volleyball Champi-
onships by sweeping the
Bahamas in three straight sets
on Thursday night.
The Bajans held off the
Bahamians 25-19,25-22,25-22
in the marquee women's game
at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um to remain undefeated on
top of the standings at 4-0 -
and they have not lost ai set yet.
"When the Bahamian girls
played Trinidad, they were
very confident and said they
were ready for us," said Bar-
bados' head coach Paul Payne.
"But we were ready for them
too."
Coming off their sweep over
Trinidad & Tobago the night


before, Barbados rode the 1-2
hitting attack of Janelle Chase
and Aviara'Brown as they
came up with the big plays at
the right to seal the deal.
Chase had ten kills and
Brown added eight. Brown and
Juan Bovell also produced
three block shots apiece.
The Bahamas got 10 kills
from Katrina Johnson and
another five from Kelsie John-
son, who boosted her lead for
the best spiker award.
Johnson, who is also.on top
of the leaderboard for the best
blocker, posted six in that cat-
egory in the game, while
Anastacia Moultrie, who came
off the bench at the end of the
first set and started the second,
added two.
Coach JoeIMo Smith used
an assorted line-up, using just
about all of the players at his
disposal, but they still didn't
find a way to dismantle


the Bajans.
Although Moultrie, along
with setter Shatia Seymour and
Kissie Gray, made her pres-
ence felt as she tried to pro-
vide the Bahamas with the
spark they were lacking from
their starters.
But the Bahamas never led
in any of the three sets against
a resilient Barbados team that
wasn't fazed at all.
Gray, who came into the
game primarily to play the
backcourt, ended up playing
up front as well, as she helped
to provide a different offensive
look for Barbados to counter-
attack.
She noted that despite the
loss, the team doesn't have to
hang their head in shame.
"At least we went down
fighting," she stressed. "We
went out there and did what
we had to do, but in the end
Barbados came out on top. At


least we gave them a run for
their money."
Barbados has already
clinched a berth in the gold
medal game, while the
Bahamas will be playing for a
shot at the bronze.
"We still have some more
volleyball to play, so hopefully
we can stay tough as we move
on," Gray noted. "We won't
get the gold or silver, but we
don't want to let the bronze
slip away too."
The Bahamas will play its
final game in the round robin
segment of the tournament
tonight at 7pm against the US
Virgin Islands.
"At least we got a chance to
see them play," said Gray, not-
ing that it should give them the
incentive to keep their hopes
alive for a medal.
The women's bronze medal
game is scheduled for 11.30am
on Sunday.


terday's quarter-mile in 44.29 with Gary
Kikaya second in 44.62 and American
Lashawn Merritt third in 44.74.


IN BRIEF

THE Rotary Club of East
Nassau has joined forces with
the Bahamas Lawn Tennis
Association, not just to put on
a junior tennis tournament, but
also provide a financial grant
to assist with their further
development.
This week at the NTC, plans
were revealed for the tourna-
ment that will be staged from
Saturday at 9am at the centre.
More than 30 entries have
already been submitted from
players from New Providence,
Grand Bahama and Eleuthera.
Paula Whitfield, the first
vice president of the BLTA,
said they expect a large num-
ber of players to participate,
especially because of the rants
that the rotary Club is offering.
She listed 17-year-old
Jamaal Adderley, the number
206 ranked under-19 player in
the world; Grand Bahamian
Rodney Carey, the No.1 player
in the COTEC and Kerrie
Cartwright, the 13 1/2-year-old
who is back from her
European tour, as some of the
players to watch in the tourna-
ment.
"We expect a whole lot
from the players," Whitfield
stressed. "With the assistance
of clubs like your's, we can do
a whole lot more in developing
the players."


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TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 2B, SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 2006


Caribbean Volleyball Champion ips



IAB4AQ AWASMEN v G deI lo A-; RAHAMAS WOMEN v Haiti ;-I


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v Haiti 0-3
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v Trinidad & Tobago 0-3
v Barbados 0-3


* THE Bahamas \uomen's team
go up lor the block against Haiti.
(Photo: Felipe; taior/
Tribune sta.fj


* BAHAMAS' Women's team's Davia Moss and Krystel Rolle try to put up a wall of defence over
Trinidad's spiker Rheeza Grant on Tuesday in their XI CVC game at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.
(Photo: Felipe Major)


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* BAHAMAS' Women's team's Katrina Johnson spikes the ball over the defence of Haiti's
Sainvilla Aubert in their 11th CVC game on Monday night at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. The
Bahamas won the game in four sets.
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)


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contract urioge


By Steve Becker


The Possible Vs.
North dealer
North-South vulnerable.
NORTH
*AJ952
VA98
*J63
*AQ
WEST EAST
43 *Q7
10 74 3 2 2 VQJ6
*108752 *Q4
*J 5 +K 109843
SOUTH
*K10864
YK5
*AK9
+762
The bidding:
North East South West'
1 NT Pass 3 Pass
44 Pass 5 Pass
6+
Opening lead jack of clubs.
Suppose, just as an academic
proposition and independent of the
deal shown, you had to make three
tricks in a suit where dummy held J-
x-x and you, as declarer, held A-K-9.
There would be only two practical
ways to handle this combination.
One would be to cash the A-K. If
either opponent had the singleton or
doubleton queen, you would fulfill
your mission.
The other way would be to lead, ,
low from dummy and, if the. next
player followed low, finesse the nine.
This method of play would succeed
if your right-hand opponent had both


I


C[


0




U
H


L

R

Q


the Impossible
the ien and the queen.
The mathematics of the situation
dictate that it is better to try the dou-
ble finesse than to cash the A-K.
Playing the A-K will drop the queen
in only one deal out of 10, while the
double finesse will succeed in one
deal out of four.
Jean Besse, Swiss star, played this
hand in a match against Italy in the
European Championship some years
ago. He finessed the club lead, losing
to East's king, and got a club return.
After drawing two rounds of trumps,
he cashed the king and ace of hearts
and trumped a heart.
Next he ruffed a club, West show-
ing out, and he was then faced with
the proposition of making all three
diamond tricks with the combination
discussed above.
He led a low diamond from
dummy, and East played the four.
Besse thereupon played the ace, con-
tinued with the king, caught the
queen and so made the slam.
Why did Besse abandon the per-
centage play? The answer is that he
knew the double finesse could not
succeed in this deal and that the only
chance he had was to drop the dou-
bleton queen.
During the play, Besse had
learned that East started with two
spades, three hearts and six clubs.
IHnce, East could not possibly have
the Q-10-4 of diamonds (which
would give him 14 cards). The only
hope, therefore, was that East had
started with the Q-4 doubleton.


TARET


The
Target
uses
words in
the main
body of
Chambers
21st
Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition)


HOW many words of four
letters or more can youmake
from the letters shown here? In
making a word, each.letter may
bemused once only. Each must
contain the centre letter and
there must be at least one nine-
letter word. No plurals.
TODAY'S TARGET
Good 12; very good 18; excellent
24 (or more). Solution
tomorrow.


S1CRYPTIC PUZZLE1 2 5 7 7
nal


ACROSS
3 Former article made from wheat (5)
8 Gained entry so as to leave
acan (3,2)
10 Work for longtime instage
production (5)
11 A cricket side (3)
12 Must be squashed soft,
this remnant (5)
13 Suitable gir for a French
white male (7)
15 Like a lion, yet maybe owlish (5)
18 At school, the kids wouldn't
miss him (3)
19 Fishout a bit of baccyfofocomfort(6)
21 More than merely a
suspicion (7)
22 In the best wine bars,
a double(4)
23 The beast to be warm-hearted and
give a hug (4)
24 Races Lee's pop, possibly (7)
26 To give a gir rotten furis niggardly (6)
29 A lding cover? (3)
31 But theycan1blow the
candles out! (5)
32 To get promoted in sport you need
backing (7)
34 Titanicholdup man, albeit
bookish? (5)
35 Less than fourteenin court (3)
36 How Moira goes native (5)
37 Bloomingrates-
unreasonablel (5)
38 Multiplication stables (5)


DOWN
1 Is such a bird an easy catch? (5)
2 Gesture to a boy as one puts one's
name down (5,2)-
4 The money in the middle starts a
cash collection (4)
5 Chap twice beaten (3-3)
6 Shock a very quiet fellow (5)
7 Former general robbed of nothing but
money (5)
9 Some like it hot and strong (3)
12 Shrink and be silent as
you chop liver (7)
14 Historic hero in plain clothes (3)
16 Points out something refreshing in
the country (5)
17 Long for the last of the money to be
paid (5)
19 Almost certain to get cross because
of the extra (7)
20 To get tiffs sorted can be difficult (5)
21 it's not positive that I'm getting up
before sunrise (5)
23 A corner in furniture (7)
24 It's apt, maybe, but too old (4,2)
25 It can assume a bit of a curl, I
presume (3)
27 Can it be truly hard to say? (5)
28 Good listeners can be engaged, of
course (5)
30 Hesitation, looking embarrassed,
having slipped up (5)
32 Stated to be apologetic
about Indie (4)
33 Sailing from Southend (3)


1~


Friday's a otic rlutions
ACROSS: 9, Thir-al-el 10, Extenson 12, A-hy 13, Stals
14, Bar-rage 15, Gain-fuly 17, A-memnd-nrt 1,T-EE-
nage 19, Batman 20,Late 23,Sk-iig 4 25, Pre-
ambles 26, Toys 27, St-len 29, Br-a-ed 32, Ga-heri-
ng 34, Es-cargo-ts 35, Iron-ng 36,Thrown 37,C-leo 38,
Silver fir 39, Canies on DOWN: 1,Straigt 2, Highfidleily
3, Past-ill-e 4, (he)Re-ally 5, Re.D-start 6, Slable-mate
7,1-ntrude 8, Ancestress 11,l-rate 16, F-E-ass 19, But
(rev) 21, All is not lost 22, I'm-pair 23, Set against 24,
Getting off 25, Pin (rev) 28, Ughters 29, Back-ward 30,
Dismount 31, Deliver 33,T-R-oll 34, Enrich


Friday's easy solutions
ACROSS:9,Toothache 10,Terminate 12, Nags 13, Orator
14, Nudists 15, Amphibian 17, Esperanto 18, Destroy
19, Mishap 20, Swat 23, Dramatist 25, Patrol car 26,
Tees 27, Reggae 29, Suggest 32, Carhation 34,
Caretaker 35, Militia 36, Stacks 37, Reel 38, Nashville
39, Arliners. DOWN: 1, Standard 2, Rough passage 3,
Scarcity 4, Beaten 5, Starkers 6, Transplant 7, Hinders
8, Peashooler 11, Arson 16, Inroad 19, Mat 21,
Wicketkeeper 22, Forget 23, Detachment 24, Inevitable
25, Pie 28, Gangster 29, Strikers 30, Tireless 31,
Captive 33, Rules 34, Cravat.


ACROSS
3 View (5)
8 Premature (5)
10 Glowing coal (5)
11 Bind (3)
12 Vice (5)
13 Rout (7)
15 Location(5)
18 Old coin (3)
19 Wobble (6)
21 Colonist (7)
22 Walk heavily (4)
23 Group (4)
24 Denies (7)
26 Tenant (6)
29 Manage (3)
31 Mountain range (5)
32 Feels remorse (7)
34 Yearns (5)
35 Distant (3)
36 Plait (5)
37 Stiff (5)
38 Handled (5)


DOWN
1 Colourless liquid (5)
2 Content (7)
4 Inactive (4)
5 Mood (6)
6 Abundant (5)
7 Tennis score (5)
9 Chest bone (3)
12 Mess (7)
14 Bed (3)
16 Book of maps (5)
17 Wear away (5)
19 Terms of office (7)
20 Musical drama (5)
21 Noise (5)
23 Sake (7)
24 Dwell (6)
25 Dine (3)
27 Access (5)
28 Lukewarm (5)
30 Undress (5)
32 Film (4)
33 Go on at (3)


SCalvin & Hobbes )












'1e





Providers



ijfegI


Tribune

Horoscope

By LINDA BLACK. :

SATURDAY,
AUGUST 26
ARIES Mar 21/Apr 20
Don't worry .about bad news you'll
receive this week, Aries. It's more of a
misunderstanding than anything else.
Ignore the dire warnings and proceed
with your plans.
TAURUS Apr 21/May 21,
Advice you'll receive from a friefid
can't be trusted, Taurus. This person
is not qualified to speak about cer-,
tain topics, and' especially not the.
one you have concerns about.
GEMINI May 22/Jun 21
A surprise. guest knocks on your
door in the days to come, Gemini.
Be warm and accommodating even
though it's an imposition. The visit
will be a short one.
CANCER Jun 22/Jul 22
A positive attitude' will help you
tackle a project more easily than a
negative one will, Cancer. Cast your
doubts aside that you'll never get the
job done and get to it.
LEO Jul 23/Aug 23
Putting your trustin a family mem-
ber's hands will end with surprising
results, Leo. You can't avoid the sit-
uation, so there's no point worrying
about it in advance.
VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
This is a critical time at work, so be
on your best behavior, Virgo, or you
may be passed up for a promotion.,
Don't sabotage what you've worked.
.so hard to attain.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
A move that you made a few months
ago is not panning out. Admit defeat
and cut your losses. Don't worry,
friends and family will support you
until you're back on your feet.
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
A promotion at work has resulted in
more assignments on your plate.,
While you enjoy the status, you
didn't expect so many extta responsi-
bilities. Speak up if you need help.
SAGMITARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
Several financial blunders left you in
the red at the end of last year. Make
a resolution this time around to be
more frugal with your purchases, or
the same results will ensue.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
A proposition has been made to you,
and you've accepted. Big changes are
in store in the weeks to come,
Capricorn, so hang on tight and enjoy
the bumpy ride.
AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
Now that things are stable on the
homefront, Aquarius, concentrate
on what you're going to do at
work. It just,may be time to seek
out a promotion.
PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20
After a year of hard work, consider
taking some time off for a much-
needed vacation, Pisces. You'll be'
glad you got a break.


i

S lenty

game pla


CHE SS by Le o adarden


LEONARD GARDEN


PUZZLE SOLUTIONS
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ii


Viorel Bologan v Sergey
Karjakin, Aerosvit grandmasters,
Yalta 2006. Moscow's Aeroflot
Open is one of the premier
events in Europe, so the Ukraine
national airline dedied to
follow suit ata Crimean tourist
resort. The organizers hoped
that Karjakin, 16, who at 12
became the youngest GM in
history, would add to his
reputation. The teenager
reached this diagram where
experts thought he stood
slightly worse-White's a4 pawn
looks more dangerous than
Black's at c4. Then, to
everybody's surprise, Karjakin
advanced c4-c3. What was
Black's idea?


)I


LV


PAG E 06


THE TRIBUNE


IL


4gj I


. 0 V.. 0; -








I IR O qDnTc


i SATURDAY EVENING


AUGUST 26, 2006


SUNDAY EVENING


AUGUST 27, 2006


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 1 9:30 10:00 10:30

The Thin Blue Keeping Up Ap- As Time Goes a** THE GLASS BOTTOM BOAT (1966, Comedy-Drama) Doris Day,
S WPBT Line arances By Lionel won't Rod Taylor, Arthur Godfrey. A physicist gets involved with a woman posing
(CC) go to premiere, as a mermaid.
The Insider Cel- NFL Preseason Football Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Jacksonville Jaguars. From ALLTEL Stadium in Jack-
3 WFOR ebrty news. (N) sonville, Fla. (Lve) (CC)
n (CC)
(:00) Access Profiles In Courage: A Kennedy Law & Order: Criminal Intent A Law & Order: Criminal Intent Two
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(CC) death at the opera house. (CC) cocoons and asphyxiated.
Deco Drive Cops "Coast to Cops Crimes in America's Most Wanted: America News (CC)
S WSVN Weekend Coast" n (PA) Pittsburgh and Fights Back (N) [ (CC)
(CC) Spokane. (CC)
Wheel of For- * APOLLO 13 (1995, Historical Drama) Tom Hanks, Bill Paxton, Kevin Bacon. Based on the true story
WPLG tune "Cash & of the ill-fated 1970 moon mission.
Splash" (CC)

(:00) City Confi- Cold Case Files (CC) Cold Case Files A bloody dagger The Jonesboro Schoolyard Am-
A&E dental CC) and a phone tap help detectives bush (CC)
solve a 20-year-old murder. (CC)
This Week Cor- (15) Extreme Lives Two Men in a BBC News The World Un- BBCNews The Reporters
BBCI respondents. Boar (Latenight). covered Stem (Latenight).
cell transplants.
Access Granted The Wayans The Wayans Grf irlfriends Gi Gir frien d Girlfiends Girlfrends"Se-
BET (CC) Bros. 0 () ro (CC) (CC) (CC) (CC) crets and Eyes"
00CFLFootballSaskatchewan Roughriders at Hamilton Tiger-Cats. From Ivor Wynne * KILL BILL: VOL. 1 (2003)
CBC itac ium in Hamilton. (Live) (CC) Uma Thurman, Lucy Liu. (CC)
C 00) Tim The Suze Orman Show Dealing The Suze Orman Show Spending Tim Russert
NBC assertt with a money-controlling spouse. habits. (N) (CC)
CNN (:00) In the Footsteps of Bin Laden Larry King Live In the Footsteps of Bin Laden
*i FRIDAY (1995, Comedy) Ice Cube, Chris Tuck- *a BILLY MADISON (1995, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Darren McGavin,
COM er, Nia Long. Buddies in South Central LA. ponder re- Bridgette Wilson. A hotel magnate's adult son goes back to grade school,
paying a dealer. (CC) (CC)
COURT Forensic Files Forensic Files Forensic Files Bodyof Evi- Body ofEVi- Body ofEvi- BodyofEvi-
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DISN Fashion intern- Bailon, Kiel Williams. A teenage vocal group attends a music festival in Raven skips The Poxfather
ship.(CC) Spain. C 'R'(CC) school.
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T Blaine's Low All Star Workouts "Cardio Sport Total Body Sculpt With Gilad Kick- Caribbean Work- Namaste Yoga
FIT TV Carb Kitchen With Petra Kolber" (CC) boxing. A (CC) out Sugar Hill. Legs.
FOX-NC (:00) Fox Report Heartland With John Kasich In The Line-Up (Live) Big Story Primetlme (Live)
FOX-NC __ Columbus, Ohio. (Live)
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(:00) Columbo "The Conspirators" An arms smuggler MCBRIDE: MURDER PAST MIDNIGHT (2005) John :42) M*A'S*H
HALL uses his Irish wit and charm against Columbo. Larroquette, Marta Dubols. A lawyer defends a woman Chares revives a
accused of murdering her husband. (CC) dying patient.
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OBITUARY (2006, Suspense) Josie Bissett. An obitu- * TO LOVE, HONOR AND BETRAY (1999, Mystery) James Brolin,
LIFE ary writer investigates a murder. (CC) Crystal Bernard, David Cubitt. A daughter believes her father murdered
her mother. (CC)
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H BO- hETHE CHOCO lette, Shirley MacLaine. Premiere. A sexy partner clashes with her seri- he guys travel Eric finds a proj-
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track rogue Soviet captain and sub. 'PG' (CC)


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0 WFOR (N) (CC) nominations for eviction. (N) ,n in1994 begs him to re-examine the appears fromthe shelter where he
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0 WTVJ Red Carpet Spe- Edie Falco, James Gandolfini, Dennis Haysbert, Heidi Klum, Evangeline Lilly and Kiefer Sutherland. (Live) -A
cial (CC)
** STAR WARS: EPISODE II ATTACK OF THE CLONES (2002, Science Fiction) News (CC)
i WSVN Ewan McGregor, Natalie Portman, Hayden Christensen. Obi-Wan Kenobi and his apprentice
protect the former queen. n (CC)
* PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: THE CURSE OF THE BLACK PEARL (2003, Ad- Grey's Anatomy Meredith and
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(00) Flip This Flip This House The Movie Star The First 48 An elderly man is Intervention Cristy" Alcohol and
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dered outside a liquor store. (CC)
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BBCI (Latenight), (Latenight). the Ryder Cup (Latenight).
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BC Johnny Depp. A blacksmith and a pirate must rescue a kidnapped damsel. (CC)
Wall Street Jour- High Net Worth Chris Matthews The eBay Effect: Inside a World- CNBC Prime
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*, BILLY MADI- *x 10 THINGS I HATE ABOUT YOU (1999, Comedy) Heath Ledger, Ju- Mind of Mencia Reno 9111
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new boy in town. (CC) (N) (CC) the sheriff's mur-
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DISN (CC) Bailon, Kiely Williams. A teenage vocal group attends a music festival in tana Oliver's love "Male Code Blue
Spain. 'NR' (CC) life. (CC)
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the Red Carpet Door Wiggins. Richard Linklater's portrait of aimless '70s-era teens.
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iH BO-W TRUE UNDERDOG STORY (2004) sltion With Mr. Johnny Depp, Freddie Highmore, David Kelly Five children tour the won-
Vince Vaughn. n 'PG-13' (CC) Wuhl 0 (CC) drous factory of an odd candy-maker. 'PG' (CC)
S(:15) *' PICTURE PERFECT (1997, Romance-Com- **t INDECENT PROPOSAL (1993, Drama) Robert Redford, Demi
HBO-S edy) Jennifer Aniston. A single galpretends to be en- Moore, Woody Harrelson. A man offers a couple $1 million for a night with
gaged to further her career. n'PG-13' (CC) the wife. 0 'R' (CC)
(6:30) **s THE (:15) ** MONSTER-IN-LAW (2005, Romance-Comedy) Jennifer Lopez, * THE TRANSPORTER 2
MAX-E SKELETON KEY Jane Fonda, Michael Vartan. A shrewish woman clashes with her son's'li- (2005, Action) Jason Statham. Pre-
(2005) (CC) ancee. 0 'PG-13' (CC) miere. 0 'PG-13' (CC)
(:00) * MATCHSTICK MEN (2003, Comedy) SPIDER-MAN 2 (2004, Action) Tobey Maguire, Kirsten Dunst,
MOMAX Nicolas Cage, Sam Rockwell. Acon man bonds with James Franco, Peter Parker fights a man who has mechanical tentacles.
his daughter and plans a swindle. n 'PG-13' (CC) 0 'PG-13' (CC)
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