Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00506
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: August 19, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00506
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text





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Volume: 102 No.223


Ping


The


Tribune


SATURDAY, AUGUST 19, 2006


TI ICE -


guI


Unanimous


verdict over


murder of


Jamal Robins


By NATARIO McKENZIE
AFTER a month of star-
tling and at times emotional
testimony a iury of eight men
and four women found
Cordell Farrington guilty of
-.the murder of 22-year-old
Jamal Robins.
The decision was unani-
mous, 12-0. When the verdict
was read family members of
the deceased were elated.
-Some burst into tears, strug-
gling to maintain their com-
.',posure as the judge continued
-the proceedings.

Emotional
,Outside the courtroom,
Jamal Robins' parents, who
had been emotional through-
out the trial, expressed their
relief that it was over and
praised the prosecution for its
work. Jamal's parents said
they were happy with the ver-
dict and that when their son's
remains are turned over to
them, they will take them back
to Freeport for a proper bur-
ial.
i."I am very happy with the
.verdict, justice has been
-served and now my son can
test. I can now give him a
proper Christian burial and
.-.have my mind at ease,"
----tEdward Robins, Jamal's
father said yesterday. "That's
my only son, he and I were
very close until somehow he
-drifted off and I lost control
Sof him," he said. Mr Robins
called for Farrington to face
the gallows.
"I want to see him hang
because he showed no mer-
cy," he said.
An emotional Christine
*-, Scott accused Farrington of
S intentionally "playing crazy."
Mrs Scott said that she would
probably be attending the tri-
Sal or trials into the deaths of
the four Grand Bahama boys.
"It's because through me
that they found those boys,"
she said. "I was searching, I
contacted him (Cordell) and
he came and said that he was
going to help me find my child
S'because I know he was the last
Person I saw with my Jamal.
-So he was the one that I was
supposed to look. for to find
Jamal," she said.
Prosecutors will not say if
they plan to have Farrington
face separate trials into the
murders of each of the, four


Grand Bahama boys. Deputy
director of public prosecutions
Cheryl Grant-Bethel said that
within the next three months.
the prosecution .plais.tostart
those proceedings. A sentenc-
ing hearing for Farrington's
conviction for the murder of
Robins has been scheduled for
September 11 at 2.30 pm.
Following the verdict, Far-
rington had been asked if he
had anything to say. He told
the court, "I turned myself in
to police because I knew I
committed a crime," (the rest
was incoherent). Farrington
was whisked away from Bank
Lane in an unmarked police
vehicle after he was escorted
out of court yesterday.
Throughout the month-long
trial, jurors heard testimony
from thirty-two witnesses,
including those who knew the
accused, police investigators,
forensic experts, psychiatrists
as well as the accused man
who earlier this week gave an'
unworn statement from the
prisoner's dock. Farrington
was charged in Grand
Bahama in October 2003 with
Robins' murder. He was also
charged with the murders of
four Grand Bahama boys.
The case went tothe jury
around 12.30pm yesterday. It
was after 3.30pm when they
returned to the courtroom
with a guilty verdict.

Jury
In her summation of the
case, Justice Anita Allen
reminded the jurors of the
oath that they had taken when
they were impanelled, which
was to return a true verdict
based on the facts. She told
the jury that they were the
judges of the facts and could
choose to accept or refuse any
evidence or testimony that
had been presented to them.
In Farrington's defence, Ms
Farquharson had argued that
the accused man suffered from
an "abnormality of mind" at
the time he murdered Robins.
She leaned heavily on the tes-
- timony of psychiatrist Dr.
Michael Neville. She had
pointed to the accused man's
claims of a tumultuous child-
hood consisting of physical
and sexual abuse as a means
to justify his later personality

SEE page 11


ELA-IN i e d r t e r ae
* CORDELL FARRINGTON is led from court yesterday after the verdict.
(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)


Thousands yet to be paid

despite promise by Wisdom


to c or n r in a g

By NATARIO
McKENZIE
TRANSCRIPTS of the
coroner's inquest into the
January 17 prison break are
nearly complete, according
to coroner Linda Virgill.
The coroner told The Tri-
bune that limited personnel
and outdated machinery has
contributed to the delay in
releasing the documents and
has, in general, affected the
functioning of her court.
On Thursday The Tribune
published a story that out-
lined the issue, which, since
the conclusion of the coro-
ner's inquest into the Janu-
ary 17 prison break and the
subsequent filing of a con-
stitutional motion on behalf
of prison officer Sandy
.Mackey, his lawyers have
been waiting for. So far they
have not been able to get a
copy of the transcript of the
SEE page 11


a By REUBEN SHEARER
THOUSANDS of students
and adult employees have yet
to be paid despite what Youth
and Housing Minister Neville
Wisdom promised.
The buzz about the mass
employment programme;
launched to revolutionise the
job market for aspiring young


Bahamians has now turned into
anger for some waiting for their
pay.
An inside source at the Sum-
mer Youth Experience Pro-
gramme told The Tribune that
Youth Minister Neville Wisdom
announced twice that $1.8 mil-
lion was allocated by govern-
ment to defray the cost of youth
programmes.


According to Judith Hep-
burn, an adult counsellor for
the camp at CR Walker High
School, it has been four days
since she and others were
promised their pay at the end of
the programme. However, she
said, some workers were paid
SEE page 11


Polluted water distribution 'has to be addressed'


* By CRYSTAL JOHNSON-COLLIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
ANGRY Nassau residents claim they con-
tinue to suffer at the hands of persons who
distribute polluted water to consumers.
Several persons have told The Tribune that
this is a common practice and has to be
addressed because of the health problems
involved.
Angela King said she purchased a five-gallon
bottle of water that had paint and debris inside.
She said that when she opened the bottle a
foul smell was released.
She called on health officials to stop persons
who pretend to sell purified water, but instead
fill bottles with well water.
"Suppose I was a blind person and could not


have seen what was at the bottom of that bot-
tle, I would have drank that water and given it
to my small children. I am aware of so many
elderly people who have gotten use to this
because they have no other means of getting
purified water," Mrs King said.
The problem is a repetition of a situation
that arose in 2003 when government had to
crack down on persons who sold untreated
water to consumers.
At the time, the issue was said to be of seri-
ous concern to the Department of Health and
Environmental Services, which implemented
new rules to address the issue.
Efforts were made to speak to officials from
the Department of Environmental Health yes-
terday, but no one was available to comment
on the issue.


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#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION



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BAHAMAS EDITION


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Tdel 9 6 6 3
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46 Madeira Street


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PAGE 2, SATURDAY, AUGUST 19, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


Govt to 'update'





cultural policies


* By CRYSTAL
JOHNSON-COLLIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
/
THE government is in the
process of making plans to
"update" the country's cul-
tural policies according to
director of cultural affairs Dr
Nicolette Bethel.
Dr Bethel explained that
her department is in the
process of developing an
administrative structure for
junkanoo, "which would serve
as a government-based entity
that is expected to have its
own corporate infrastructure."

Festival

She said this at a press con-
ference to announce that the'
Bahamas has been chosen to
host Carifesta, a roving multi-
disciplinary arts festival that
began in 1972 in Guyana.
It is to be held in the
Bahamas for the first time
ever in 2008," she said.
Dr Bethel also announced
the relocation of the Cultural
Affairs Office, which was for-
merly located on Thompson
Boulevard, to building D on
the grounds of the former
Ministry of Education head-


quarters on Shirley Street.
According to Dr Bethel, the
Bahamas Carifesta Commit-
tee aims to attract 5,000 for-
eigners to the event.
Senior cultural affairs officer
Dr Patricia Bazard explained
that Carifesta aims to create
opportunities for talented
Bahamians celebrate the arts.
"The Bahamas has so much
to offer. But many times
Bahamians would look at
another country and consider
that country better than ours,"
said Dr Bazard.
She said Bahamians must
realise that there is a great
deal of talent in the country
and that what is needed is a
greater level of involvement
in the arts.
The overall objective, of
Carifesta is to deepen aware-
ness and knowledge of the
diverse aspirations of
Caribbean people and to fos-
ter a vision of Caribbean uni-
ty.
Dr Bethel said the only dif-
ficulty facing the department
in hosting the event will be
accommodation;
She also stated that when
choosing venues for the event,
they are likely to consider the
most popular Bahamian
islands.


I..I j ..'L ijd~flJ~l asl A l~.


The committee estimated
that Carifesta will cost about
$1 million to host, pointing out
that junkanoo costs the
Bahamas around $2 million
annually.
Dr Bethel encouraged busi-
ness owners and vendors to
take part in the event, which
has the potential to generate a
great deal of revenue.

Performances

Carifesta will involve per-
formances by numerous local
and Caribbean artists and will
be profit-oriented and sub-
contracted to the promoter of
the event.
Dr Bethel added that Car-
ifesta is an excellent opportu-
nity for the Bahamas to build
relationships with neighbor-
ing countries.
Dr Anne Peterson-Higgins,
special events coordinator,
said: "I want to encourage our
Bahamians to get involved in
this event, because our little
Bahamas has so much talent
and we have so much to offer
if we just try."
Persons interested in par-
ticipating in the event are
asked to contact Dr Peterson-
Higgins at 326-0152.


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT More than 20 private avia-
tion representatives from the United States
and Canada were hosted by tourism officials,
to a familiarisation trip to Grand Bahama.*
Earl Miller of the Bahamas Tourist Office
said that private and corporate jt operators
play a vital role in the country's economy.
About 26 fixed base operators (FBOs)
were hosted to a luncheon at theOur Lucaya
Resort, where they met with tourism and
immigration and customs officials.
Mr Miller said the group will travel next to
Exuma and Long Island.
"What we are trying to do here is to col-
lectively get all of the FBO's in Florida, which
is our number one market, coupled with
FBO's around the US and Canada, to bring
them down to show them what we have to
offer in the islands of the Bahamas.
"Today, the group met with customs and
immigration officials to see first-hand how
easy it is clear customs and immigration and


Prioing Information As Of


12.08
7.49
0.85
1.80
1.49
9.60
2.20
11.00
8.26
2.88
6.21
11.61
13.50
11.17
1.15
10.20
9.10
8.06
10.00


9.25
6.60
0,70
1.26
1.10
8.73
1.39
8.60
4.12
2.10
4.02
10.49
9.30
8.91
1.00
8.86
8.27
6.30
10.00


Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Pamguard
Pinoo
PiratCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S.Johnson
Keraner International BDRS
Premier Real Estate


FREEPORT The Royal
Bahamas Police Force of
Grand Bahama has height-
ened their anti-terrorist ini-
tiatives at the Lucayan Har-
bour and other Grand
Bahama based marinas.
The Police Department
now has a team of divers
whose responsibilities
include ensuing the safety
of marine facilities. This was
evident as police divers did a
safety check at Lucayan
Harbour on Wednesday pri-
or to the arrival of the US
Navy vessel Curts, whose
225 ship personnel are in
town for shore leave.
Superintendent of Police
Mr. Basil Rahming who was
on hand to watch the police
divers carry out an under-
water search at the Lucayan ,


Harbour said: "we are so
proud of the members of the
Royal Bahamas Police Force
with what has transpired
here at the Lucayan Har-
bour this morning.
"A United States Frigate
Class Naval vessel, the USS
Curts, is visiting our island
for the next three days and
from our Police, operations,
and using this new capabili-
ty that we recently acquired.
was able to put a four man
dive team into the water to
properly scan, search
for underwater explosive
devices or anything
that could endanger the
security of this vessel, and
secure this berthing," he
explained.
According to Mr. Rah-
ming this new capability is
something that is unique to
the Caribbean and is not
found in many other
Caribbean countries,


to ask any questions they may have or myths
they have about procedures in the Bahamas."
Mr Miller explained that corporate clients
prefer to go to FBOs which are much like a
concierge service.
He said that instead of going to govern-
ment airports, the FBOs offer private jets'
and special services such as limousines and-
special hotel rooms..
"That is very important for clients flying on
corporate jets because they don't want to be
in the crowd, and they want to be served
first-hand that you wouldn't be able to get
at the regular airport," he said.
Billy Floreal, a representative of Embry
Riddle Aeronautical University, said his insti-
tution also works with companies, govern-
ments and aviation organizations.
S"There is an interest in trying to get avia-
tion people coming to the Bahamas, and this
is a fact-finding trip for me to see what the
islands have to offer and possibly later on as
we work with tourism officials, to see what we
do to bring aviation people in to the
Bahamas," he said.


RCnolAvinar t
Finenolal Advisore Ltd.


12.06
7.49
0.80
1.50
1.48
9.10
1.98
11.00
6.48
2.60
6,21
11.61
13.60 .
11.17
1,00
8,86
9.10
8.06
10.00


12.06
7.49.
0.80
1.60
1,48
9.10
1.98
11.00
6.64
2.46
6.21
11.61
13.50
11.17
1.00
8.66
9.10
8.05
10,00


S


In brief

Virgin Islands
refinery seeks to
halt payments to
active duty troops

CHARLOTTE AMALIE,
U.S. Virgin Islands

A NEW law requiring com-
panies in the U.S. Virgin
Islands to pay active-duty
National Guard and reserve
troops the difference between
their military pay and private-
sector salaries is already being
contested by one of the
world's biggest oil refineries,
according to Associated Press.
The Hovensa oil refinery,
owned by the state oil compa-
ny of Venezuela and New
SYork-based Amerada Hess
Corporation, is suing to strike
down the law, passed by the
island's legislature in Decem-
Sber, saying it's unfair and
Sopen-ended.
"There is no reason why a
private employer should have
to bear that burden with no
limitation," Henry Fuerzeig,
an attorney with Hovensa, the
Western Hemisphere's sec-
ond-largest oil refinery, said
Thursday.
But critics of the lawsuit
argue the measure is necessary
to sustain families of soldiers
deployed to Iraq, Afghanistan
and elsewhere.
"We don't want our people
losing their homes or having
quality-of-life issues while
away serving their country,"
said Emmett Hansen, U.S.
Virgin Islands director of the
Employer Support of the
Guard and Reserve.
Hovensa, the U.S. territo-
ry's largest private employer,
sued on July 28 seeking to
stop making up the salary dif-
ference for at least eight
employees serving in the
National Guard.
Many U.S. states offer to
pay public employees the dif-
ference between their federal
military pay and state pay, and
many large U.S. employers
voluntarily pay the difference,
seeing it as a matter of patrio-
tism or good business.
The new law requires large
private employers in the U.S.
Caribbean territory to do the
same.
Refinery operators say
that's unfair, since the money
comes out of a corporation's
bottom line, while government
agencies rely on taxpayer dol-
lars.
"If you want to compensate,
make it fair," said Fuerzeig.


I IW, I ,


1.612
0.738
0.292
0.143
0.188
'0.618
0,009
0.943
0.130
2,000 0.283
0.639
0.746
2,000 0.886
0.886
-0.170
0.632
0.627
0.160
2.0386


0.380
0.330
0.020
0.000
0.0W0"
0.240
0.000
0.600
0.045
0.000
0.240
0.640
0.860
0,800
0.000
0.270
0.860
0.000
0.196


7.8
10.1
2.7
10.6
7.9
14.7
220.0
11.7
41.9
8.7
11.6
16.1
16.3
12.6
N/M
18.3
17.3
60.4
4.9


0.00%
3.15%
4.41%
2.60%
0.00%
3.68%
2.64%
0.00%
5.66%
0.82%
0.00%
3.88%
4.78%
4.07%
4.48%
0.00%
3.12%
6.16%
0.00%
1.95%


52wk-Hi 82wkLow S P/E Yield
14.00 12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.00 15.00 1 O.8 80 1.923 0.B80 7.8 6.40%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 8.00 8.26 1000 0.000 0.640 NM 7.86%
0.84 0.20 RND Holdings 0.29 0.64 0.00 -0,0 4 0.000 NM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41,00 43.00 41,00 2220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.00 15.00 12.60. 1.780 0.30 8.0 2.67%
0.60 0.36 RND Holdings 0.29 0,4 .0.38 -0.070 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52wk-HI 62wk-Low F und Name 'NA V ,YT% Last i _Mnthe Iv .i Yield%
1.3009 1.2442 Collna ManeyMarket Pund 1.30082
2.9038 2.4169 iPdelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.9038"*
2.4416 2.2528 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.441484"
1.1820 1.1246 Colina Bond Fund 1.182038"***
BsX ALL SHARE INDEX -1 Dec 02- = 0000.00 MARKET TlM. YIBLD last 12 month dividends divides by losing p41pe V" KIY
52wk-HI Highest closihg pride In last 52 weeks Bid S Buylln( pr #lef Oli dll i a dl llty
d2wk-Low Lowest along prne in last 82 weeks Ask I = alllne priM of tolin en fid liy 2 July 2000
Previous Close Previous day'B weighted price t o daily Volume Last Prie = Last traded sVfthaB-ounltf prie
Today's Close Current days weighted pHie for dally volume Weely Vl. Trading vewne o to the pdt week 30 June2004
Change Change In dosing price rom day to day EP I A eariptn'reported eaming rper hw e ter sIM t i th
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net AMat Valu r30 June 200
DIV $ Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningtul
P/ Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings INDE( T'The Pidkaly ha _ees leAnttM u 1 Ja106 ... . "". 30 June 2008


Private aviation representatives


enjoy tour of Grand Bahama


* 4. -


Notice
NOTICE is hereby given that NAHOMIE PHILIPPE, OF HAY,
ST. OFF BLUE HILL RD., HOUSE #13, P. O. BOX GT 2557,
NASSUA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible'
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 19th day of AUGUST 2006 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Exuma, Bahamas.


NOTICE
NOTICE Is hereby glvon that MYRTHA ST ANG:-E OF
Ir 1l,'.r IE( -. El,.IE, 1TAPLETON, 'I-SSAU, BAHAMAS,
Is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 12TH day of AUGUST, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.


LOCL EW


I -A


- -- -- - -


OPOTUIIE O







THE TRIBUNE


SATURDAY, AUGUST 19, 2006, PAGE 3


0 In brief

FNM 'united

firmly behind

Edison Key'
THE FNM has united
firmly behind South Aba-
co candidate Edison Key
and expects to sweep to
victory throughout the
island in the general elec-
tion, say party officials.
Though Mr Key was
seen by some as a contro-
versial choice, he now has
the full support of FNMs
on the island, they added.
"Mr Key is totally com-
mitted to defeating the
PLP and, whether there
are two or three seats on
Abaco for the election,
we'll win them all," said
Jack Albury, chairman of
the FNM's South Abaco
constituency branch.
His prediction came as
FNM workers on Abaco
geared up for a possible
early election.
At one time, former
administrator Everette
Hart was being touted as
a possible FNM candi-
date.
But Mr Albury said Mr
Hart, a personal friend of
his, had never really
wanted to get involved in
politics.
"Edison Key will be
our candidate and MP for
South Abaco. If there are
two seats on the island,
we'll win them both. If
there are three, then we'll
win all three."
Mr Albury predicted
that Mr Key would beat
.. the PLP by at least 500
votes, whoever was cho-
sen to run against him.
"Edison has brought a
huge following to the
FNM," he said. "We have
a united front behind
him.-By the time the elec-
tion is called, a very high
percentage of Abaconi-
ans will vote for him.
S "What he will bring to
,-the table will far out-
weigh the few who might
stay away from the polls."
Mr Key, a former PLP
stalwart, quit as a senator
to throw his weight
behind the opposition
party.


ter ship for us. It makes up
for about 15 to 20 per cent of
our business," one store
owner told The Tribune yes-
terday. ,

Business
With the Celebration
expected not to able to con-
tinue regular operations until
August 26, Nassau will lose
out on two days of business
from cruise ship passengers.
"We will lose a Saturday
and a Thursday. Two days of
business, that is very signifi-
cant," said one shop owner.
After the Celebration's
propeller hit the ground dur-
ing the docking procedure
earlier this week, the. ship's
scheduled call into Nassau
was immediately cancelled,
and passengers onboard dur-
ing the incident were offered
a $100 shipboard credit and a
25 per cent discount on
future three- to seven-day
cruises through December
13, 2007.
A Carnival spokesman
said the company expects to
have the Celebration back ini
the water in time for its
August 26 to 31 cruise.
The Ministry of Transport
said that in the preliminary
reports conducted by the
Royal Bahamas Defence
Force, it was revealed that
the spill was "minimal" and


LO N


* KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
BAY Street merchants
estimate that they could lose
up to 20 per cent of their, rev-
enue for two business days-
as the Carnival cruise ship -
which spilled oil into
Bahamian waters on Tues-
day was forced to enter dry
dock in Freeport.
Carnival announced yes-
terday that it has cancelled
the Celebration's August 21
to 26 cruise so the ship can
be repaired.

Oil

The Celebration which
docks in Nassau twice week-
ly spilled 53 gallons of
lubricating oil after damag-
ing two engines during a
failed attempt to berth at
Prince George Dock.
Although Carnival Cruise
Lines first announced that
the ship would be able to
immediately resume opera-
tions, it now said that the
extent of damage to the ves-
sel was greater than antici-
pated.
Following this announce-
ment, Bay Street merchants
are now concerned
that it will mean a significant
hit to their revenue in-
take.
"That is a bread-and-but-


CONTRACTOR Herman McLean speaks to Minister of
Education Alfred Sears yesterday.
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)


* By KAHMILE REID
SURPRISE revelations at
Adelaide Primary School sug-
gest the school may open late
this academic year due to a
lack of funds.
The Tribune learned this
while on a tour of the school,
when 'contractor fHerman
McLean complained to Minis-
ter of Education Alfred Sears
that he had been forced to use
personal funds to finance some
of the construction.
"I have done all I can do out
of my own pocket," Mr
McLean said.
He also revealed the win-
dows and doors of the class-
rooms are not on the con-
struction site, but said he
understands they are on the
island.
He told Mr Sears that he


expected them to arrive yes-
terday, however this did not
happen.
The Adelaide Primary
school has three existing class
rooms and is being extended
to six classrooms, the princi-
pal of the school, David Dean
told The Tribune.

Capacity
Mr Sears said he anticipates
that the school will be ready
for September 4, but added
that this will be dependent on
the capacity of the contractor.
Permanent secretary in the
Ministry of Education
Creswell Sturrup confirmed
that the school is being
repaired at a cost of $300,000.
The school expects 128 stu-
dents for the next academic


year. However the school is
being extended to accommo-
date more students.
Over 50 schools in New
Providence are being refur-
bished; 30 of those according
to Mr Sturrup are getting
"major repairs".
These projects will cost $17
million collectively.
T G Glover High is among
the schools that are being
repaired, an will be complete-
ly reconstructed at a cost of
$10 million. This institution,
Mr Sturrup said, will accom-
modate 800 students.
The tour was one in a series
of exercises that the Ministry
of Education has been under-
taking to look at the progress
of all the schools being refur-
bished, repaired or built in
New Providence and the Fam-
ily Islands.


TheOMall-at-Marathon I _
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BARNYARD B 1:10 34 N/A 6:15 8:20 10:30
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THE DESCENT C 1:15 3:45 N/A 6:10 8:20 10:55
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USE YOUR E-CARD TO RESERVE TICI ETS AT 80-3649 R V GALLERIACINE AS.COI
SNAKES ON A PLANE NEW 1:00 3:45 N/A 6:00 8:20 10:30
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BARNYARD B 1:15 3:30 N/A 6:15 8:30 10:20
MIAMI VICE C 1:00 N/A 4:00 N/A 7:00 10:00


THE ANT BULLY


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T N/A NIA IN/A 17:10 I N/A 10:10
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that all.traces of the oil have
already disappeared.
The spill posed no threat
to the environment, accord-
ing to the report.


Family Eye Care Centre
... ... . . . . . . . .. ...


Dr. Charlene C. Wallace, O.D.
#65 Collins Ave.
Tel: 322-3EYE (322- 3393)
P.O.Box SS-6511


Nassau, Bahamas
Back to school special for the months of August and SePfeirber


(i)e (ilg/qioe gou a free frme

and 50% off the cost of your
lenses when you receive a comprehensive eye examination ad
buy a complete pair of Prescription Glasses. ,

Additionally, there is a 20% Discount on all other compli
Glasses and 15% Discount on all Contact Lens Packages and
Designer Sunglasses.


Street merchants


'could lose 20% of



revenue' due to cruise



ship entering dry dock


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


PRICEWATEPHOUSE4OPERS o
invites applications from qualified
Bahamians for the position of:
Administrative Assistant, Internal Accounting
Role

As a key member of the Finn's internal accounting department, the administrative assistant provides primary operational
and support services for the preparation of the Finn's financial information. The individual performing this role should be
proactive, possess strong analytical skills and leaning towards attention to detail, have a strong commitment for
professional growth and possess the ability to adapt to a constantly changing environment.
Job Requirements
* An associates degree (or equivalent) with a major in accounting
* A working knowledge of bookkeeping/accounting procedures
* Proficiency in excel spreadsheet and word processing
* Strong interpersonal skills
* Good written and communication skills
Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.
Applicants should send their resumes via fax to
(242) 302-5350 or deliver them to
Firm Administrator
PricewaterhouseCoopers
P.O.Box N-3910
Providence House
East Hill Street
Nassau, The Bahamas
PHONE CALL INQUIRIES WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED


I


Adelaide Primary



School may



open late 'due to



a lack of funds'


------- -- -- --- -------






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4. SATURDAY. AUGUST 19, 2006


EDIT IAE STOTHEIT


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchbpard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Surprise test for explosives liquids


SCIENTISTS and engineers at the Pacific
Northwest National Laboratory in Richland
have created a device that they say could be
used to rapidly and accurately identify any
suspicious liquids carried on board by air-
plane passengers.
The device, which uses ultrasound, can
even tell the difference between Coke and
Diet Coke. Despite the fact that the research
was done at a national lab, the device's exis-
tence appears to have come as news to many
officials at the Department of Homeland
Security and Transportation Security Admin-
istration.
Ever since British authorities announced
they had thwarted a terrorist plot to use dis-
guised liquid explosives on airplanes, spokes-
people for'the federal agencies have repeat-
edly said there is no "operationally viable" or
"feasible" technological way today to rapid-
ly and routinely screen for liquid explosives at
airports.,
Aaron Diaz, a physicist at the Richland
lab, respectfully disagrees.
"We're making these measurements in
about three to four seconds, but I think we
could get it down to one or two," said Diaz,
who led the lab's effort to develop its patent
pending HAZAID (Hazardous Material
Acoustic Inspection Device).
"We've been getting barraged with calls
about this for the last week," he said. Some of
those calls have been with Homeland Security
officials anxious to learn more, Diaz said.
"It's'very coincidental that this (terror plot)
would come just as we were wrapping the
project up," he said. TSA officials had been
aware of an earlier, similar prototype the lab
developed years ago, Diaz said, but there
hadn't been any urgent official interest in
their new-and-improved liquid explosive
detector until last week.
"The earlier unit was designed for large
volume containers, based on U.S. Customs
work at the borders," said Diaz. "We realized
years ago there was going to be a need for
looking at very small containers."
The device uses sound waves to precisely
identify liquids. An earlier, larger version of
this acoustic inspection device was created
in the early 1990s at the Richland lab for
chemical weapons inspections after the 1991
Gulf War. The national lab today trains bor-
der guards from many countries in the use of
this technology as part of an international
treaty prohibiting chemical weapons traf-
ficking.
Diaz, working with his team of PNNL sci-
Sentists, engineers and software programmers,
years ago set out to modify this technology so
it could be used on smaller containers. For
use in airports, he knew the device had to
provide rapid and accurate identification of


liquids contained in almost any kind of mate-
rial.
"We completely redesigned the thing," he
said. His team had to modify the electronics,
alter the nature of the sound waves and re-
programme the software to increase its sen-
sitivity.
Unlike the older units, Diaz said, the HAZ-
AID measures both the speed of sound waves
travelling through liquid and the attenuation
- how the waves are altered as they travel.
"This really increases our measurement
sensitivity," Diaz said.
But one of the complaints transportation
officials have had with earlier detection meth-
ods is a lack of specificity too many false
alarms.
Amy Kudwa, a spokeswoman for TSA,
said in response to media inquiries last week
that it is the high error rate of many of these
new detection technologies that has pre-
vented the agency from putting them into
wide use.
Critics noted, however, that the highly
dubious effectiveness of an airport screen-
ing technique known as "behaviour obser-
vation" didn't prevent TSA from putting it
into use at a dozen airports. The agency now
has "behaviour detection officers" who look
for facial features or mannerisms some psy-
chologists believe involuntarily reveal people
up to no good.
Not everyone is convinced the approach '
will ever be viable as a tool for airport screen-
ing. Some members of Congress have said
they are concerned TSA has emphasized
funding personnel increases while cutting
back on technological developments.
A 2004 Government Accountability Office
report noted that the agency, in 2003, trans-
ferred more than half of its $110 million
research budget to cover personnel costs.
This directly undermined research projects,
the GAO reported, that were dedicated to
developing new technologies that could,
"detect weapons, liquid explosives and flam-
mables in carry-on luggage or passengers'
effects ."
Diaz and his team at PNNL, fortunately,
were not dependent on TSA funding for
development of HAZAID. They won't reveal
yet who the client is for the device, but the lab
routinely works on contract for commercial
interests to develop new products. The patent
that was filed for HAZAID is held by the pri-
vate Battelle Memorial Institute.
Diaz said he believes the new device is
nearly ready for prime time, though it may
need to go through more testing to convince
officials that it is highly unlikely to produce
many false alarms.
(This article was written by Tom Paulson of
Seattle Post-Intelligencer c.2006).


Freedom of





expression


EDITOR, The Tribune.
THIS past August Monday
weekend, Bahamians cele-
brated that special and histor-
ical day of Emancipation
throughout the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas. After
more than three hundred
years of suffering under the
shackles of slavery, by a Roy-
al proclamation, Queen Vic-
toria ended one of the most
evil chapters in the history of
colonialism. Millions of
Africans had been stolen
from Africa for the purpose
of being sold into slavery in
the colonies. Their basic
human rights and dignity were
taken away. Their lives were
physically controlled with oth-
ers dictating their behaviour.
Emancipation was supposed
to mark the beginning of a
new dawn of liberation in
what is referred to as a
civilised world. The former
African slave was "free" and
thus responsible for the
moulding of his own destiny.
The sky was the limit and the
only limit was his imagination.
However, physical slavery was
replaced by an even greater
and more sinister menace, one
that had no regards for race,
creed, colour or religion. This
was the concept of mental
slavery. By controlling your
mind and thoughts, an oppres-
sor could abuse and degrade
you without any physical
infliction. Psychological scars
are slow to heal and can be
just as painful many years lat-
er as the day they were inflict-
ed. The great reggae legend
Bob Marley sang, "Emanci-
pate yourselves from mental
slavery...none but ourselves
can free our minds!" Amaz-
ingly, after 172 years since the
original day of Emancipation,
far too many of us are still vic-
tims of mental slavery.
,. Mental slavery has empow-
ered corrupt and misdirected
leaders over the years. By
brainwashing a nation, a "wut-
less" government can get
away with the most barbaric
and demented acts. By skil-
fully controlling the people
with only providing them with
a selective amount of infor-
mation always results in social
disaster and disorder for that
nation. Oftentimes, the nation
pays a terrible price for such
ignorance, with those exploit-
ing-the masses, abusing both
their privileges and public
trust. Supported by persons.
who would believe without
question what is said and done
by those in power who take
advantage of such an unjust
system has been directly
responsible for some of the
worst atrocities in modern
times. Just look at the Red
Tide that swept through China
under Mao Tse-tung when
millions were killed when pro-
moting an ideology that could-
n't be questioned.
Efforts to eliminate, if not
control men, came out of the
ashes of the holocaust after
World War II. With a com-


mitment of "Never Again",
the new body called the Unit-
ed Nations,' formed in the
postwar era to unite the
nations of the world, con-
ceived a document to prevent
such world disorders and dis-
asters in an effort to save
mankind from itself. That doc-
ument was named "The Uni-
versal Declaration of Human
Rights!" One of the most fun-
damental provisions of the
Declaration to promote world
peace and understanding is
the one of freedom of expres-
sion. Anyone has the right to
express their opinion against
any institution or government
without fear or favour.
Whether or not you like what
was being said, doesn't give
you the right to prevent what
was being said. You cannot
punish someone for what is
going on in their head!
So important was this pro-
vision of the Declaration, that
many countries, including the
Bahamas, has adopted it as a
part of their Constitution or
the supreme authority of that
country. With Freedom of
Expression enshrined in the
Constitution, democracy will
flourish in that country. Any
effort by any authority or
institution to limit or curtail
such protection must be met
with a determined vigilance.
This is something that under
any circumstances must never
be compromised. Journalists,
members of the Opposition
and the average citizen must
be afforded the right to criti-
cise the government of the
day or any institution in his'
country.
- Regrettably, too many lead-
ers have blatantly and per-
versely disregarded this criti-
cal provision of the Declara-
tion by penalising and crimi-
nalising those who try to crit-
icise or promote an opinion
contrary to the status quo.
Journalists and persons who
dared to speak out against the
government soon discovered
that there was a high price
and in some cases the ultimate
price to pay for exercising this
basic human right.
The classic case in the
Bahamas is that of Lionel
Dorsett who was dragged
before the courts and charged
with the offence of "criminal
libel." For having made a
statement questioning the
integrity of Prime Minister
Lynden Pindling, he was
threatened with seven years
imprisonment without the
possibility of parole.
The 1991 Election Petition
Act forbidding the Bahamas
to discuss or broadcast
Bahamian political opinion
from abroad was another
gross and blatant violation of
the Bahamian Constitution by
the government of the day in


its evil attempt to prevent per-
sons from freely expressing
themselves.
Recently, in Cuba, a neigh-
bour of the Bahamas, some
journalists were given as many
as 30 years in prison for pub-
lications contrary to the estab-
lishment. This is so wrong and
it only serves as a tool of
intimidation and oppression..
How any country, including '
the Bahamas, could support a
country such as Cuba to serve
on the United Nations Human
Rights Council is beyond any .
reasonable comprehension.
In the Bahamas in recent
times, the Press has.been
under fire, especially the dai-
ly Tribune.
When you support the views
of government, you are a good
citizen. However, when you
provide an objective opinion,
you. become public enemy
number one. When in opposi-
tion, Foreign Minister Fred
Mitchell had nothing but
praises for The Tribune. He
indicated that The Tribune
was a true friend of the PLP.
Now, along with Senator
Philip Galanis, PLP Chairman
Raynard Rigby and others,
The Tribune is under attack
to the extent that freedom of
expression in the Bahamas is
now being questioned. To
make matters worse, they are
demanding not only the revo-
cation of the Work Permit of
the Managing Editor, John -
Marquis, but his expulsion
from the Bahamas as well. It
will be a dark day for the
Bahamas should this despica-
ble act come to pass and the
Bahamas will join the ranks
of those totalitarian dictator-
ships and Banana Republics.
For those of us concerned
about human rights, this is a
stupid and unacceptable sug-
gestion.
On the other hand, Tourism
Minister Obie Wilchcombe
must be congratulated for
being a true statesman and a
professional when it comes to,
journalism. Clearly, he under-, .
stands what is being suggested.
will come back to haunt the
Bahamas. Based on his own
personal experience, he
understands that Freedom of
Expression is an essential
ingredient for a positive social
development of the Batn-mas.
In his interview with Thi -?ri-.
bune on July 17, 2006, \v
standing up even against his
own party, Minister Wilch-
combe stood out as a true
leader for all Bahamins and'.
democracy. We cannot just,
attack the messenger, but we-
should listen to the message.
By his own example, Minister.
Wilchcombe must be regarded
as a true freedom fighter and
protector of our liberty. Well
done Obie!

DR LEATENDORE
PERCENTIE
Boston,
Massachusetts,
August 13, 2006.


Iu

rA al it


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10% CASH DISCOUNT


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5% Discount on
Credft Cards


TAYLOR INDUSTRIES
SHIRLEY STREET TEL: 322-8941
OPEN: MON FRI 7:30 am 4:30 pm
SAT 8:00 am 12 noon
^____________________-


5 Scotiabank

VACANCY
Assistant Manager, Training and Learning
Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd. is seeking the services of an
Assistant Manager, Training and Learning. The successful
candidate should possess the following qualifications:
Bachelor's Degree in Human Resources, Training and
Development (or a related field).
At least 3 5 years experience as a training facilitator
and or instructional designer.'
In-depth business knowledge of banking operations and
business environment including retail, commercial and
branch banking operations, procedures, products and
policies.
Excellent facilitation skills and knowledge of adult learning
principles.
Exceptional written communication skills and interpersonal
skills.
Excellent time management and organizational skills.
Comfortable with autonomy and self motivated.
The ability to organize and execute multiple projects and
apply project management methodology with minimal
supervision
The ability to work well under pressure and meet deadlines.
The ability to work flexible hours and travel.
Microsoft Office skills (Word, Excel, Power Point)
Interested persons should submit applications in writing marked
Private and Confidential to:

Manager, Human Resources
P. 0. Box N-7518
Nassau, Bahamas
Applications should be received no later than Thursday, August
31, 2006.


A Market Leading, Highly Succesful
Restaurant Seeks Applications From
Qualified Individuals For Positions Of
Servers, Bussers, Host, Hostess And Line
Cooks.


Applicants Must Have Some Experience
In Hospitality, Food And Beverage
Knowledge, Along With Strong Customer
Service.


Interested Persons Should Come In To
The Restaurant And Fill Out An

Application At Our Location Charlotte St.
North, Bay St.


Hard Rock Cafe
Charlotte Street North
Downtown Nassau.


1-%AL T


1.






SATURDAY, AUGUST 19, 2006, PAGE 5


o In brief

Maximum
penalty for
knowlingly
transmitting
HIV/AIDS 'is
five years'
By CRYSTAL
JOHNSON-COLLIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE ma\imum pena3li for
kno\ ingal irnjn ting
HIV,AIDS to another per-
son is tif.e .\L rs in prison.
according to a local attorney.
Lisa Botqick. of the la"
firm Bostv. ick and Bostick.
-said this is stipulated in sec-
tion eight. ,buhsection tmo of
the Se\ual Offences and
Domestic Violence Act of
the Bahamas. 1901.
This se::ion makes it an
' offer nce for a person % ho
. kno\"s the\ hate HIV'AIDS
to hac consensual inter-
course lith another person
without disclosing the fact
that they have HIV/AIDS to
that person. If found guilty
the person can be detained
for a maximum of five
years," she said.
She was responding to an
S'August 16 Tribune article
That quoted members of the
Public urging government to
Create laws to deal with this
problem.


Urgent
Junkanoo
meeting

THE Junkanoo Corporation
of New Providence will hold
* an urgent meeting on Wednes-
Sday, August 23.
The meeting will begin at
7pm and will be held at the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and
SHousing, said a statement
issued by the JCNP.
SThe topic of discussion will
be the 2006/2007 junkanoo
Seed money and prize distrib-
ution.,
All A, B, C and D division
official representatives are
Invited to be present, and an
official from the ministry will
also attend. .


SATURDAY,
AUGUST 19TH
12:00 411
12:30 Aqua Kids
1:00 2006 CARIFTA Games
Track & Field
2:00 2006 CARIFTA Games
Swimming
3:00 Boxing Outside The Ring:
Evander Holyfield ,
4:00 The Jackie Robinson Story
5:00 Cricket World
5:30 Gillette World Sports
6:00 Ballroom Boxing
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
7:30 Da Native Stew
8:00 Feel The Rush Junkanoo
Parade
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 The Lounge
1:30am Community Page 1540AM

SUNDAY,
AUGUST 20
6:30am Community Pg. 1540AM
8:30 The Covenant Hour
9:00 IMPACT'
9:30 The Voice That Makes
The Difference
10:00 Effective Living
10:30 Morning Joy
11:00 Zion Baptist Church
1:00 Gilette Wbrld Sports
1:30 Sports Desk
2:00 A Rhema Moment
3:00 Showcase of Miracles:
Ann Grant Ministries
3:30 Ernest Angley Ministries
4:30 Temple Fellowship
Ministries International
5:00 Walking In Victory
6:00 The Apostolic Hour
6:30 The Bahamas Tonight
7:00 BTC XI Caribbean Volleyball
Championships Opening
Ceremony
8:30 BTC XI Caribbean Volleyball
Championships: The
Bahamas vs Guadeloupe -
Men
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 New Dimension
12m/n Community Pg. 1540AM

NOTE: ZST5 13 reserves t he
rih Somk atmnt
progamm. chages


'\' ~


Xd:' 4

4"~x
rf'A...


* PHOTO shows from left AUTEC Commander Lovell, Alexander Roberts and'


Fair


give transparel




view of AUTE(


* By KAHMILE REID

ATLANTIC Undersea Test-
ing and Evaluation Centre offi-
cials hosted their third infor-
mation fair in an effort to
inform and educate the resi-
dents of Andros about their
"sensitive environmental pro-
grammes".
AUTEC officials said in a
statement that the fair "is
"designed to give residents and


activists a transparent view of
AUTEC and an opportunity to
learn more about the facility's
role in community as well as
various environmental and
marine programmes."
The fair, which was held on
August 10, featured posters
bearing information on various
topics, including the facilities'
command missions, economic
impact, community service,
environmental programme,


* RESIDENTS viewing the poster information boards.



Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE
PERFECT FOR ATTORNEY:

Rent includes the following:


* Electricity
* Water
* Generator
* Receptionist
* Kitchen and


* Cleaning
* Security
* Parking
* Use of two
conference rooms


coral reef prote
gramme and marii
programme.
Experts at the f,
AUTEC envirdnm
tor Marc Ciminello
who specialises in


lurnquest urges

students living

abroad to register

for next election
* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter


a i' IN A-N etfort to boost toter registration. FNM Senator
Tomm\ Turnquest is urging students who libe abroad to
\ register in time for the netl general election.
?Slogans like Rock the \'ote" ma\ soon be heard in the
streets, as Senator Turnquest hopes to approach the coun-
tr\ young g others in a ne%\ and aggressive way.
The number of persons who ha\e registered for the next
a, election is still lo\ at last count onlk 71.000 had signed up
S- and Senator Turnquest said he hopes to encourage more
'Bahamians to exercise their right to1 \oe. especially uni-
S \ersii\ and college students.
He pointed out. hoe\ er. that the reluctance on the part
ol youngg people ito inol\he themselves in the political
process b. \olnng is not unique to the Bahamas.
"' e\\ recall the push b\ celebrities, such as Sean -Didd\
Combs and Jessica Simpson in the 2004 LUS presidential
election to get as man\ youngg people out to \ote as posi-
ble Their slogans. such as -Rock the Vote' and -Vote or
Die~, \ eie the clarion calls b. these activists and capture
an apparent worldd \ ide path\ for politics among young
people. Perhaps a similar ettort by influential young per-
Tim Legal. sons in our communities is needed in the Bahamas," he
said.
Mr Turnquest said that the large number of Bahamians
studying in the Caribbean, the US, Canada and the United
Kingdom, as well as Latin America and China, must be
encouraged to participate in the upcoming general elec-
tion.
"Young people must be reminded that this is the primary
way in which they can impact tht direction of our country.
"I am encouraging young Bahamians at home and those
t living and studying abroad to register to vote. They will
inherit this great nation, and it is their duty and right as a
citizen of this country to vote to assure that the best party
S1will be in place to make the best decisions on their behalf,"
he said.
Senator Turnquest is also urging the government to
make the registration process easier for students studying
abroad.
While not advocating absentee.voting at this time, Sena-
tor Turnquest said he is calling on the government to
explore the possibility of using embassies and consular
offices overseas to register qualified voters abroad.
"We hope that they exercise their right to vote and
choose the FNM as the next government. We are aware
action pro- that when many of our students return home, they bemoan
ne mammal the lack of suitable jobs and opportunities a situation
that we in the FNM will address once elected.
air included "Bahamians who are returning home with international
mental direc- exposure, new skills and expertise need opportunities that
STom Szlyz, can only be created by a forward thinking government
coral reefs; which can provide creative solutions," he said.


David Mortetti, a marine mam-
mal scientist, and Tim Legel,
vice president of the CSC
Applied Technologies Division.
The event' was' reportedly
attended by 30 to 40 Andios
residents, including island
administrator Alexander
Roberts, who is also a senior
police officer in central Andros.
The fair marked the third in a
series of outreach meetings
designed to increase trans-
parency about the AUTEC
operations.
In April of this year Dr
Brent Hardt, deputy chief of
mission at the US Embassy in
Nassau, headed a fact-finding
team to the base that included
Minister of Energy and the
Environment Dr Marcus
Bethel and Minister of Agri-
culture, Fisheries and Marine
Resources Leslie Miller.
In June, AUTEC also held a
follow-up meeting at -the
base, which was open to all
media.


Women's Full Figured Fashions


FABULOUS


NEW


ARRIVALS
SPECIAL 50% SALE RACK


Maderia Shopping Plaza
P.O. Box SS-5166
Nassau, Bahamas


Tel: (242) 326-1879
Fax: (242) 324-5706
E-mail: sizes@coralwave.com


Open: Mon. Sat.: 10 am 6pm


THE I HIIbUIUNl


LOA NW


-N r1


m ~T Hr t L.


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. is pleased to invite qualified
companies to apply for tender for New Vehicle and Equipment.

Interested companies can pick up a specification document from BTC's
Administration Building, John F Kennedy Drive and The Mall Drive Freeport,
Grand Bahama August 9 to August 23, 2006 between the hours of 9:00am
to 5:00pm Monday to Friday.

Tender should be sealed in an envelope marked "'VEHICLE & EQUIPMENT
TENDER" and delivered to the attention of:-

Mr. Leon Williams
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.
P.O. Box N-3048
Nassau, Bahamas

Bids should reach the company's administration office on John F. Kennedy
Drive by 4:00pm Wednesday August 23rd, 2006.

Companies submitting bids are invited to attend the bid opening on Thursday,
August 24th, 2006 at 10:00am at BTC's Perpall Tract location.

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.
^~ -


Bathroom Supplies Use of Law Library


To arrange viewing please call: 394-5145


I


I


-


L


i

i


II'-"- P
.a

B
I,







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6. SATURDAY. AUGUST 19, 2006


LOCAL'NEWS


Military jail director investigated

in Venezuelan prison escape


* CARACAS, Venezuela

THE director of a Venezue-
lan military jail was under
investigation Friday in con-
nection with the high-profile
escape of four convicts,
including a key foe of Presi-
dent Hugo Chavez, according
to Associated Press.
Col. Gustavo Busnego,
director of the Ramo Verde
military prison, has been tem-
porarily removed from his
position and summoned to
testify to a military court, said
Gen. Carlos Acosta Perez,
chief of the armed forces gen-
eral staff.
Prominent labor union
leader Carlos Ortega and
three convicted ex-military
officers escaped from the jail
last weekend. Officials say the
four fugitives may have fled
to the Caribbean islands of


Aruba and Curacao.
A low-ranking National
Guard member working as a
prison guard at the time has
been detained as a primary
suspect, and 14 other mem-
bers of the military are also
being investigated.
Ortega, 60, led a crippling
national strike in 2002-2003
aimed at ousting Chavez's
government and was serving a
16-year sentence for civil
rebellion.
Two of the three ex-mili-
tary officers were serving
nine-year terms for military
rebellion in connection with
an alleged plot by Colombian
paramilitaries to assassinate
Chavez.
The third was arrested for
theft in 2005 after a military
assault rifle was found hidden
in his car's fender. All three
maintained their innocence.


CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL
CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, AUGUST 20TH, 2006



BRETHREN PRAYER, PRAISE &
FELLOWSHIP DAY
at The Christian Life Center, J.F.K. Drive
(next to The Red Cross)
10:00am 3:00pm
LUNCH WILL BE SERVED!
Bible Class 9:45 a.m. Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
*Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
SSisters' Prayer Meetng: 1000 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)


LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future


Worship time: 11am & 7pm

Sunday School: 9:45am

Prayer time: 6:30pm

Place:

The Madeira Shopping

Center
Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND
Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles
P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL lynnk@batelnet.bs


THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH
Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
inm" R P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
>11l11 Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135

CHURCH SERVICES
SU SUNDAY, AUGUST 20,2006
ELEVENTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST

ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH, Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart

COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH, Bernard Road
11:00AM Pastor Sharon Loyley

CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH, Zion Boulevard
10:00AM Evangelist Colamae Collymore

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH, East Shirley Street
11:00AM Pastor Martin Loyley
7:00PM Mr. Earl Pinder

GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH, Queen's College Campus
9:30AM Rev. James Neilly

ST. MICHAEL'S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue
8:00AM Connections Rev. Phillip Stubbs
9:30AM Rev. Philip Stubbs
TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
11:00AM Mr. George Knowles
7:00PM No Service


RADIO PROGRAMMES
'RENEWAL' on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Your Hosts: Mr. Henry Knowles
.....................................................
METHODIST MOMENTS' on each weekday at 6:55a.m.
Your Host: Mr. Henry Knowles
.................. ..............................
OPENING OF THE NEW CHURCH YEAR
The FOCUS TRAINING EVENT will be held on Saturday, September 2,
2006, 9:00am 2:00pm at Epworth Hall, East Shirley Street. This Conference
event is for all Staff, Congregational Board Chairpersons, Treasurers, Lay
Preachers and leaders of all organizations.
Lay Preahers wishing to participate in the PULPIT EXCHANGE on Sunday
morning, September 3, 2006, are asked to call Ms. Debra Gibson at the
Conference Office 393-3726/2355 to register their names.
SThe Official Opening of the New Church Year Service will be held on
Sunday, September 3, 2006, 7:00pm at Ebenezer. Rev. Dr. Eddie Fox from
the World Methodist Council will be the guest preacher. A reception will
follow the Service at Epworth Hall.


@rant' fobirWePp 1pi l)0Rtobist Chiurrt
lelia'tUW.S& ChapeW traeel P.O.Box C B1304i
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)
SUNDAY AUGUST 20, 2006
11th after Pentecost
7:00a.m. J. Neilly/R. Williams
11:00a.m. Youth Sunday
7:00p.m. Lay Preachers
0' 3-.. IMigAtM fvtintoJsusUns. St. .nb


Horror movie unlikely to





send your Pulse racing


MOVIE

REVIEW



* By JASON DONALD

PULSE
Starring: Kristen Bell,
Ian Somerhalder,
Christina Milian

I'M TIRED of movie
ghosts. I'm tired of watching
them clawing at frosted glass,
appearing as grainy images
on computer screens, and
doing that once-was-creepy
stop-motion walking thing.
And, after suffering
through Pulse, I'm even tired
of them crawling out of
washing machines.
You'd think it would be
impossible for a film that
starts out as teen horror,
morphs into a hit-tech
"thriller" and ends as an
apocalyptic drama, to be
dull. But, somehow, Pulse
manages it.
The story centres on a
group of teens investigating
the mysterious suicide of one
of their friends. We know
something spooky happened
to him beforehand thanks
to an opening sequence
which is strangely reminis-
cent of Ghostbusters but
they don't, and their investi-
gations soon lead them to a
supernatural website.
Before you can stifle a
yawn, the plot then takes a
huge leap into incomprehen-


v -ilable fromCommercial News Providers
Available from-Commercial News Providers


d* o S 0M ft ft


sible territory, involving a
mysterious virus, the end of
the civilisation and ghosts all
over the place. Rubbish
ghosts that is this bunch
couldn't be more cliched if
they were wearing sheets
with eyeholes. In fact, the
"creepy" bits are like a
greatest hits reel from all the


BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL
Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL .
Preachering 11am & 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour: Pastor. Mils
Pastor:H. Mills
Sunday 6pm ZNS 2
Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

"Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are"
Pastor: H. Mills Phone: 393-0563 Box N-3622



GRACE AND PEACE WESLEYAN CHURCH
A SOCIETY OF THE FREE METHODIST CHURCH OF NORTH AMERICA

SII HERE GOD IS.ADORELD. W0D El ER YO'E IS AFFIRA\EDI

Im Worship time: 11am & 7pm

Prayer Time: 10:15am to 10:45am

Church School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

PO. Box SS-5631

STelephone number:324-2538 Telefax number:324-2587


COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE





EVANGELISTIC


TEMPLE
A Life Changing Experience

Collins Avenue at 4th Terrace Centreville
Telephone: 322-8304 or 325-1689 P.O. Box N-1566
Fax No. 322-4793


SUNDAY 8:30am ZNS-1
8:30am
9:45am
ll:00am
7:00pm

WEDNESDAY 7:30PM


Temple Time Broadcast
Early Morning Worship
Sunday School For All Ages
Worship Service
Evening Celebration

Selective Bible Teaching Royal
Rangers (Boys Club) Ages 4-17 Years
Missionettes (Girls Club) Ages 4-17.


VISIT OUR PREMISE BOOKSTORE, TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY


recent remakes of Japanese
horror films.
To be fair, there is a good
idea in here trying to get out.
The suggestion that the
undead may take advantage
of our reliance on technology
is an intriguing one and per-
haps the original Japanese
version of the movie (enti-
tled 'Kairo') made more
sense.
But Pulse is just too mud-
dled, murky and boring -
and that's evep with a zom-
bie in a washing machine.
* OUT THIS WEEK:
SNAKES ON A PLANE:
No, the title is not a clever


metaphor, it refers to exact-
ly what you can expect to see
in this one.
But these CGI snakes
aren't being safely
strapped in and ordering
drinks.
SInstead they're jumping in
people's faces and causing
general mayhem, judging by
the previews.
This looks like it could be
the cheesefest to end all'
cheesefests, but with Samuel
L Jackson onboard and some
lukewarm early reviews,
maybe it will turn out to be a
guilty pleasure,
At least you'll get what
you pay for.


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4:'- THE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS ,,
OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE
CARIBBEAN AND THE AMERICAS
L'EGLISE METHODISTE DANS LA CARAIBE
E.-T LES AMERIQUES
NASSAU CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES
108 Montrose Avenue
P.O. Box EE-16379, Nassau, Bahamas; Telephole: 325-6432; Fax:
328-2784; rhodesmethod@batelnetbs
METHODISM: RAISED UP IN THE PROVIDENCE OF GOD,
TO REFORM THE NATION, BUT ESPECIALLY THE
CHURCH AND TO SPREAD SCRIPTURAL HOLINESS
THROUGHOUT THE LAND (Father John Wesley)
"Celebrating 223 years of continuous Methodist witness
for Christ in The Bahamas"
THE ELEVENTH LORD'S DAY AFTER PENTECOST,
AUGUST 20, 2006
INTROIT AND COLLECT:
My flesh and my heart may fail, but God is the strength of my
heart and my portion for ever.
Whom have I in heaven but you? And there is none other on the
earth whom I desire beside you.
FATHER OF HUMANKIND, who gave your only begotten Son
to take upon himself the form of a servant, and to become obedient
even to death on the cross: give us the same mind that was in him
that, sharing his humility, we may also reflect his glory here and
enjoy eternal blessedness with him in the world to come; who is
alive and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and
forever.
WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd East)
7:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes (Holy Communion)
11:00 a.m. Sis. Annette Poitier (Local Preacher)

RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108 Montrose
Ave. near Wulff Rd)
7:00 a.m. Sis. Isadora Bethell & Sis. Constance Gibson
10:00 a.m. Rev. Colin C.L. Newton
11:00 a.m. Rev. Colin C.L. Newton
6:30 p.m. Rhodes Young Adults
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (Rose Street, Fox
Hill)
11:00 a.m. Sis. Katie Carter (Local Preacher)

PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza)
11:00 a.m. Sis. Cecilia Gardiner (Local Preacher)
HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST CHURCH
(28 Crawford St, Oakes Field)
7:00 a.m. Sis. Katie Carter (Local Preacher)
10:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes (Holy Communion)
GOOD SHEPHERD METHODIST CHURCH (20 Cedar Terrace,
Tall Pines)
8:00 a.m. Congregational Steward
CROIX-DES-MISSIONS-ALDERSGATE (Quackoo Street)
9 a.m. Aldersgate Fellowship
Friday (September 17)Children's Club at 5 p.m.
METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -Thrift Shop and
other Ministries
JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford St.,
Oakes Field) Reception to Primary
RADIO PROGRAMS.
"Vision" On the Lord's Day, ZNS 1 at 9 p.m.; "Great Hymns of
Inspiration" On the Lord's Day, Radio 810 at 5:30 p.m.; "Family
Vibes" ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.; "To God be the Glory" ZNS 1,
Tuesday, 7:45 p.m.
PRAYERS
Our brothers and sisters in the Middle East, those affected by hurricanes
and other natural disasters, and the Privy Council Appeal.


"'C


.,5









THE TBUNESATURDAIY, AUGT 9I, 0I06 PAI


High school

contract will

go to tender

in 10 days'
* By KAHMILE REID
THE CONTRACT for
the Lowe Sound High
School in North Andros will
go to tender in 10 days
according to Copeland
Moxey, senior architect at
the Ministry of Works.
He told The Tribune on
Tuesday that the construc-
tion of this new high school
is in accordance with the
directions given to the Min-
istry of Education Science
and Technology by the
Cabinet: "to undertake a
systematic overhaul of the
educational infrastructure
-in Andros."
'."Mr Moxey, who is also
the co-ordinator of the pro-
ject which is geared
toward the modernisation
of all the schools in Andros
- said the school will be
built on 12 acres of land.
Aside from the actual
school buildings, he said,
there will be several physi-
cal education facilities,
including a softball field,
volleyball and netball
courts, and track and field
facilities.
The institution, according
to Mr Moxey ,will have the
capacity to accommodate
1,400 students.
The construction period
for this school is thought to
be 18 months, he added.
Mr Moxey said he was
Unable to confirm the price
tag for the project.
Lowe Sound High is one
of i0 schools that are being
refurbished in Andros at a ,
collective cost of $6 million.
A team.from the Ministry
of Education toured
Andros on Tuesday, then
travelled to Bimini on
Wednesday to evaluate the
progress of school repairs
on that island.
They are set to visit
Eleuthera and Abaco, on
Monday and Wednesday
respectively, to look at
the progress of repairs
there.


Rudolph Hanna is first blind




ordained minister in Bahamas


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport.
Reporter
FREEPORT Disability
has not deterred Rudolph
Hanna from achieving his
ultimate goal to preach the
Gospel as the first blind
ordained minister in the
Bahamas.
Mr Hanna, 65, was
ordained as a reverend, on
July 30 at the First Holiness


Church of God on Young
Husband Avenue in
Freeport.
"I feel great to be the first
blind minister in the church
preaching, teaching and
exalting the word of God,"
he said.
Mr Hanna, who has been
blind since he was 17, said
that blind persons can
achieve their goals through
proper education, determi-
nation and perseverance.


'A., it,
"1.
A *t'4


He noted that the develop-
ment of modern equipment
in the 21st century has made
it possible for visually
impaired persons to get a col-
lege education.
"There are great possibili-
ties for the blind and I am a
great example of that, said
Mr Hanna, who has complet-
ed business courses in Eng-
land and Canada.
"I always believed in fight-
ing for my rights, and I was
praying that one day I would
become a minister of the
Gospel," he said.
Mr Hanna is well-known
for his work for the blind in
New Providence and Grand
Bahama, where he served as
president of the Northern
Council For the Disabled and
president of the Blind
and Visually Impaired in
Freeport.
He believes that more
needs to be done for the
blind in the Bahamas.
"We need the facilities
here to upgrade the standard
of education for the blind to
further their vocational train-
ing," he said.
Despite his disability, Han-
na worked as a switchboard
operator at the Rand Memo-
rial Hospital. He is now
retired.
Rev Hanna, who held the
position of Elder at First
Holiness Church of God, was
one of two persons that were
ordained at the church's con-
vention by church overseer
Bishop Edward Missick of
Nassau.
'With his ordination to such
a high office in the church,
Hanna has set a precedent
for the blind and continues
to be pacesetter.
"I am grateful to the Gen-
eral Superintendent Bishop
Edward Missick and local
pastor Lucile Woodside,"
LR..v Hanna said.
e nitfc tW-


* RUDOLPH HANNA


For the

Tennis Center


Ph: 323-1817
East Steet
Nassau, Bahamas


IMPROVE IENTS al Mable % walker Primar3 School
on Tucker Road are almost complete with workers going
full steam ahead before the start of the new school year.
_$Photo: F~lipd Major/Tribune Staff)


PICTET
1805

PICTET BANK & TRUST LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-


GLOBAL CUSTODY ASSISTANT

REQUIRED SKILLS:-

-Strong supervisory and organisational skills.
-Excellent administration skills.
-Commitment to excellent customer service.
-Excellent oral and written communication skills.
-Ability to work under pressure and to meet strict deadlines.


EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-

-Bachelors degree in Business/Finance
-Series 7 (international) or equivalent qualification.
-Knowledge of another language would be an asset.
-Working knowledge of investment instruments.
-Ability to manage money market, forex and trading desks.
-Excellent knowledge of corporate actions and settlements.
-At least seven (7) years Private Banking experience.
-Proficiency in a variety of software applications including
Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED. Please
send Resume and two (2) references to:


The Human'Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park
P O. Box 4837
Nassau, Bahamas


Offices in
Lausanne, Geneva, Zurich, Luxembourg, London, Montreal, Nassau,
Singapore, Tokyo, Hong Kong


School finprovements
1 .1


SATrURDAY, AUGUST 19, 2006, PAGE 7


ITHE TRIBUNE


. ,; *


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8. SATURDAY, AUGUST 19, 2006


L


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CAMP I


ie)S(ooe0
:-:!^ =: icebergsC


I smATRT Fun in THE summERTime
iS 55 . -


The Birth of an Iceberg
Icebergs start out as snow. Snow that falls
in places where it stays cold all year long
doesn't melt.
t p[i Year after year. snow piles
up. As more and more
snow accumulates. it turns
to ice.
Now the snow has become
a glacier. Gravity and the immense weight
of a glacier causes it to flow outward and
downward like a river of snow and ice.
When a glacier comes to a large body of
water, pieces of it will calve, or break off.
These glacier pieces are called icebergs.
Standards Link: Reading Comprehension. Sequencing.


Even as you read this, special teams of scientists are tracking
large masses of ice that are floating around the frigid waters
near the icy poles of our planet. The scientists alert ship captains
as to where the large chunks of ice called -I-MPKI-Sei- P 1
icebergs are located. Icebergs have sunk I CP ID C
ships, the most famous being the Titanic I
in 1912, killing more than 1,500 people.


Is an iceberg just
frozen seawaterP
DYES DINO
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S! 43!L')L ','OuS U3|llEl q peUwJo| SEM
ai.OE'|6 ai jaijeleD e ;Io uelolai Ss-L
|B11Wi|-1 JBD 10 luntl P sl l JalieAE9es
lou si BJeqaj! LV :t3MSNV





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Can you identify the different kinds of icebergs?
Icebergs have been divided into six groups based upon their shape: blocky. wedge, tabular.
dome, pinnacle and drydock. Do the math to discover which is which.


152



20


132


Look at each drawing of an iceberg on this page. Then use the pictures abo\ e
identify each one.


How can icebergs
float?
An iceberg
is nothing
more than k. j_ j
a large ice
cube. If you
put an ice
cube into ..--
a glass of
water, what
happens?
It floats!
Why?
Ice is actually lighter than
water. Try to make an ice
cube sink sometime!

Frigid Facts
* Only about 10 percent
of an iceberg can be
seen above water.
$ The largest iceberg on
record was about the
size of the state of
Rhode Island.
* That iceberg could have
supplied everyone in
the world with about
1,058,220 glasses of
pure drinking water.


If one person drinks 8
glasses of water a day,
how many days of
drinking water would
the Rhode Island-sized
iceberg provide each
person?
sAep S9LLZ'Z~ L :UI3MSNV



Ice Size
Look through
today's newspaper
to find pictures of
things that are
About the same
size as:
a small iceberg
a growler
a bergy bit
slob ice
Standards Link: Reaaing
Comprehension: Follow
wrinen directions.


Find the words in the puzzle,
then in this week's Kid Scoop
stories and activities.
I C EN E E R G C I
E B E LGRR I CD
RGWD CANEU I
A S EAVABABG
LWH I T EN S E I
U C T I R EMNO R
B Y T GOL RO I F
A B S LOB E W D P
T R E-R E I C A L G
Standards Link: Letter sequencing. Recognized identical
words. Skim and scarr reading. Recall spelling patterns.


to help you


Standards Link: Earth Science: Students know some changes in the zann are due i slow process, su:r as ero5iC.n


Icebergs are mostly Find where each
because they are full of tiny air missing word
The surface of these belongs.
bubbles reflects white light making
it look white. Ice that has no
bubbles looks a bit blue.
Icebergs do come in different
colors (but not different ). I
Some icebergs look green. This is EXPOSING
from growing in the ice 11 t
and is only seen when icebergs F
roll over the previously
underwater sections to __
Standards ULink: Reading Comprehenslon: Follow simple written dtrecsdons.


More summer fun!
Now your kids can enjoy even more Kid Scoop in our new,
64-page book from Scholastic. Great for teachers!
To order, visit: www.kidscoop.com


Measure It
Measure and calculate the area of two
pictures on the front page of today's
newspaper. What is the TOTAL area of
the two pictures?
Standards Link: Math/Measurement: Calculate area.


I .


ICEBERG
CUBE
TITANIC
GLACIER
PINNACLE
WHITE
WEDGE
FRIGID
GRAVITY
GREEN
SNOW
DOME
WATER
SLOB
TABULAR


0


Thrifty is ...







... saving your change,
allowance and money you
receive as a gift to use later
on, rather than wasting it.





This week's word:
accumulate
The word accumulate
means to pile up, gather
or collect.
On windy days, a lot of
leaves from our neighbor 's
tree accumulate in or- yard.
Use the word accumulate
in a sentence today when
talking with your friends,
parents or teachers.



You're S0 Cool!
Make a list ofAtipoand
ideas: for keping,.&ool
this siunner wi.ut
electcity


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324-172 = blocky
98 + 63 29 = tabular
19 + 6 +11+ 2 = pinnacle
24 +9-12 = drydock
39+14 + 6-3 = wedge


0


Proof It!
Are you an eagle-eyed reader?
Read the story below and circle
the six errors you find. Then
rewrite the story correctly.

Icebergs in the Desert?
, Some people think icebergs
could be a source of fresh
water. How would people in
desserts get fresh water from
an iceberg? By towing it.
Towing icebergs is not knew.
Icebergs are towed away from
drilling rigs in the North Sea
as a safety measure. However,
harvesting icebergs for water
raises many questions. One is
how two tow an iceberg into
warmer waturs without it
melting what effect might
hauling large numbers of
icebergs from the Arctic have
on the Artic region? Would the .;:
temperature of the Arctic
change?


'tinL ;n~lll~


..... . . . .


I


- -


56



21






ST1


LCLNW


In


Days


Gone


By


WEDNESDAY,
April 24, 1984 saw
Demonstrations in favour of
bringing in the option of cor-
poral punishment as a penalty
for rape. Now attorney gener-
al, but then co-chair of the
Citizens for a Better Bahamas
Committee Allyson Maynard-
Gibson, brought together
hundreds of Bahamians who
felt strongly that not enough
was being done to deter
rapists, or give women incen-
I lives to report them in light
of steadily increasing rape
rates over previous years. Mrs
Maynard-Gibson and co-chair
Mrs Janet Bostwick
"favoured the cat" that is,
the cat-o-nine tails, as punish-
ment for rape. Currently, the
situation remains that "the
cat" is on the books in the
Bahamas, but is not applied
as a sentence.


M ABOVE: TO THE POINT:
Mrs Janet Bostwick, co-chairman of
CBB emphatically urged Bahami-
ans to inform their political repre-
sentatives that they want judges to
be able to punish.

LEFT: UNITED Against
Rape: As co-chairman of the Con-
cerned Citizens for a Better
Bahamas (CBB), Allyson Maynard-
Gibson (holding placard) headed
the historic march on Wednesday
April 4,1984 demanding heavier
penalties for rapists.


'-.

*


A GROUNDSWELL of support: Despite the pleas by Mrs Janet Boswick MP (pictured front,
centre) that others did not join her due to the risk of arrest, the number of people marching with her
along East Street in the early part of the morning towards parliament grew. The popular support for
the amendment to the law was substantial.


A MASS MOVEMENT: later that day the anti-rape protesters congregated at the South-
ern recreation ground, waving placards. The issue brought Bahamians from all sectors of society
together in the biggest demonstration to take place in Nassau in years.


5 New Reftaurants,

21 New Shop,



All in the keart

paradise.





A whole new experience has been unveiled on Paradise Island. Marina
Village at Atlantis offers the finest in world-class ksh ing and dining.
Youll find brand names from around the world offering everythingfrom
ex.uisitejewelry and timefiecef to resort wear and accessories. After you
visit the 21 boutiques, dine at one ef the new restaurants, with dishes to
satisfy even the most refined plate. The village is situated at the eastern
end of The Marina at Atlantis, just over the Paradise Island Bridge.








VILLAGE
-For mr i AT ii lat


For more information, visit Atlantis.com


SAT URDAY, AUGUST 19, 2006, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE









PAGE 10, SATURDAY, AUGUST 19, 2006



-I


W H A T S ON IN A N D AROUND NA


E-MAIL:


THE TRIBUNE :






,SSAU






S S A U ,,"
...................... -... ..........
.,


YDELEVEAUX@TRIBUNEMEDIA.NET -


PLEASE P UT "OUT THERE"


IN THE SUBJECT LINE


1-- MONDAY a
HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: New
Providence Community Centre: Mondays -
.6pm to 7pm. The Kirk: Mondays 7:30pm to
8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a.FREE diabetic sup-
port group meets the first Monday of each
month at 6:30pm at New Providence Com-
munity Centre, Blake Road. Dinner is pro-
i vided and free blood sugar, blood pressure
and cholesterol testing is available. For more
info call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the
third Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors
Hospital conference room.

CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British
Colonial Hilton Monday's at 7pm Club
612315 meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham
Nassau Resort, Cable Beach Club 3596
meets
at the British Colonial Hilton Mondays at
7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the
month in the Board Room of the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.


--r TUESDAY


Kappa Alpha Psi
Fraternity meets
every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ Atlantic
House, IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first
Tuesday, 6:30pm at the British Colonial
Hilton. Please call 502.4842/377.4589 for
more info.


_e WEDNESDAY J

* PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS


* PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS & RESTAU- ,. Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters
RANTS Sports Bar every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free
appetizers and numerous drink specials.


10.10.2.20. @ Club Nirvana: Tuesday nights
at Club Nirvana, Elizabeth Avenue; have
been dubbed 10.10.2.20. Every tenth female
patron is allowed into the club absolutely
free and is given a Complimentary glass of
Carlo Rossi. Tuesday nights also include the
Carlo Rossi's Hot Body Competition. Host-
ed by Daddi Renzi and music provided by
DJ Ai from 100 Jamz. Master Chef Devito
Bodie provides scrumptious appetizers.

* HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Tuesday -
6pm to 7pm/8:30pm to 9:30pm.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at
5:30pm on the second Tuesday of each
month at their Headquarters at East Ter-
race, Centreville. Call 323.4482 for more
info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being
held 6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics
Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles Dr). ,
Doctor approval is required. Call 364.8423 to
register for more info.

* CIVIC CLUBS

The Kiwanis Club of New Providence meets
every Tuesday at 7:30pm at the Holy Cross
Community Centre, Highbury Park.

The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets
every third Tuesday at SuperClubs Breezes,
Cable Beach at 12:30pm. We invite all com-
munity minded persons to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday,
7:30pm @ C C Sweeting Senior School's Din-
ing Room, College Avenue off Moss Road *
Club Cousteau 7343 meets Tuesdays at
7:30pm in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh
Creek, Central Andros Club 7178 meets
each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer Society
of the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi
Omega chapter meets every second Tuesday,
6.30pm @ the Eleuthera Room in the Wynd-
ham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach.


* HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: New
Providence Community Centre: Wednesday
- 7pm to 8pm. The Nassau Group: Rosetta
Street, Wednesday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm.

* CIVIC CLUBS

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated
meets 6:30pm every third Wednesday it the
Bahamas National Pride Building.

TM Club 753494 meets every Wednesday,
6pm-8pm in the Solomon's Building, East-
West Highway. TM Club 2437 meets the
2nd and 4th Wednesday of each month at C
C Sweeting Senior High School, Oakes
Field.

International Training in Communication,
Essence Club #3173 holds its bi-monthly
meetings on the 1st and 3rd Wednesday of
each month at Doctor's Hospital Conference
Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus
meets the second and fourth Wednesday of
the month, 8pm @ St Augustine's Mones-
tary.

KHB1 THURSDAY "'


* HEALTH

Free public health lectures featuring distin-
guished physicians are held at Doctors Hos-
pital every third Thursday of the month at
6pm in the Doctors Hospital Conference
Room. Free screenings between 5pm &
6pm. For more information call 302-4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Thursday
6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The Kirk:
Thursday 7:30pm to 8:30pm
Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being
held 6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNas-


tics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles
Dr). Doctor approval is required. Call
364.8423 to register or for more info.

REACH Resources & Education for
Autism and related Challenges meets from
7pm 9pm the second Thursday of each
month in the
cafeteria of the BEC building, Blue Hill
Road.

CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a
breakfast meeting every Thursday morning
at 7am at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel.
(Fellowship begins at 6:45am)
Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first,
second and third Thursday at the Ministry of
Health & Environment building on Meeting
Street commencing at 7:30pm. Everyone is
welcome to attend.

TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8.30pm @
SuperClubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative
Professionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the
third Thursday of every month @ Superclubs
Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance
Baord Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets
every fourth Thursday in the month, in the
National Insurance Board's (NIB) training
room, Wulf Road office complex, at 6pm.
All retirees are welcome.


8pm.

* CIVIC CLUBS

TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @
Bahamas Baptist Community College Rm
A19, Jean St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every sec-
ond Friday of each month, 7.30pm at
Emmaus Centre at St Augustine's Mones-
tary. For more info call 325.1947 after 4pm.

SATURDAY

* HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday
mornings 10am to 11am.

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and
December) @ the Nursing School,
Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street.
Doctors Hospital CPR and First Aid classes
are offered every third Saturday of the
month from 9am-lpm. Contact a Doctors
Hospital Community Training Representa-
tive at 302.4732 for more information and
learn to save a life today.

* CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR
Cycling are pleased to offer a cycling clinic
for juniors between 10 and 17. The free clinic
will be held every Saturday in an effort to
encourage kids to cycle. Parents interested in
registering their children should contact
organizers at jarcycling@gmail.com

AGLOW International Northern Caribbean
'Area Bahamas, Nassau West Aglow
Anniversary Thanksgiving Meeting
When: Saturday August 26,2006 9am to 12
noon
Where: Superclubs Breezes Hotel, Cable
Beach
Speaker: Minister Jacquelyn Dean of Evan-
gelistic Temple, Anointed women of God,
president of Aglow International, Northern
Caribbean area board New Providence
Bahamas.



SUNDAY


* THEATRE
PARTIES,
For this weekend only, Thursday, August 17 & RESTAUI
to Saturday, August 19, Track Road Theatre
will present 'Da Market Fire', written by Traveller's Re
Emille Hunt and directed by Deon Simms, at Street, feature
the Dundas Centre at 8pm. Gernie, Tabit
every Sunday

FRIDAY
HEALTH

* PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS Alcoholics A
& RESTAURANTS public of its n
Nassau Grou]
Cafe Europa on Charlotte Street North, I'
kicks off every Friday night with Happy
Hour... special drinks, live music/DJ from
6pm to 9pm and Nassau's first European
Night Restaurant- Open Friday night till 0 EVENT
Saturday morning 5am, serving hot food/and
take out music, drinks and an English
breakfast. Cafe Europa...the perfect place to. 3rd Annua
spend your night out till the morning. "Vision of U
jxauin ~qn


* HEALTH


Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Fridays 6pm
to 7pm & 8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred Heart
Church Fridays @ 6pm to 7pm New Provi-
dence Community Centre: Fridays @ 7pm to


ality, Best Ra
Mix Show, Be
many more
* The public
www.dafutui


NIGHTCLUBS
GIANTS

est Restaurant, West Bay
es special entertainment -
ha and the Caribbean Express -
from 6:30pm to 9:30pm.



anonymous, wishes to inform the
meeting times and places: The
p, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm
pm to 9:30pm.
UPCOMING



Il DJ Awards under the theme
nity". Categories: Best Female
ality, Best Male Radio Person-
.dio Talk Show, Best Bahamian
st Radio DJ, DJ of the Year and

Sis allowed to vote online @
re.net or at selected outdoor


events.

Send all your civic and social events to
The Tribune via fax: 328.2398
or e-mail: ydeleveaux@


t- "A


ANNIVERSARYY


"The brewery of The Bahamas"


ir
~r*
~ '
':. .-
-r'

`i

:


Please


.........;..................................................... .........................................................................


..... .....


Yr~""~~^ - I


J











: i


I






ITHF RIRLS D A T 6 G


'o tidoRaul Castro says Cuba is open
to normalised relations with US


* HAVANA
ACTING President Raul Cas-
tro said Cuba remains open to
normalised relations with the
United States, but warned the
Bush administration in his first
comments since assuming power
that it will get nowhere with
threats or pressure, according to
Associated Press.
Raul Castro also said in Friday
editions of the island's Commu-
nist Party newspaper that he had
mobilised tens of thousands of


troops in response to what he
called aggressive U.S. acts, includ-
ing stepped-up radio and televi-
sion broadcasts to the island, and
an $80 million plan to hasten the
end of the Castros' rule.
"Some of the empire's war
hawks thought that the moment
had come to destroy the Revolu-
tion this past July 31," the day
his brother Fidel Castro's illness
was announced, Raul Castro said.
"We could not rule out the risk of
somebody going crazy, or
even crazier, within the U.S.


government."
State Department spokesman
Tom Casey declined on Friday to
respond specifically to Raul Cas-
tro's comment but said "I don't
think we're particularly enam-
ored of the first words we heard
from 'Fidel Light."'
For more than four decades,
U.S. policy toward Cuba has been
to undermine Cuba's one-party
authoritarian rule through a trade
embargo and restrictions on
American travel to the Caribbean
country.


FROM page one
disorders and paraphernalia,
specifically his attraction to
young boys.
From the beginning, Ms
Farquharson tried to have
the trial into the murders
of Robins and the four
Grand Bahama boys
joined as one.
It was her argument
that these murders were
all a part of a series of
events that attested to the
accused man's psychosis.
Justice Anita Alien, how-
ever, ruled that Farring-
ton had to stand separate
trials.
Ms Farquharson then
took her argument to the
-Court of Appeal, but was
unsuccessful in having
Justice'A llen ruling'
overturned.! '
The prosecution has
maintained that Farring-
ton was not crazy and
knew right from wrong
when he murdered 22-
year-old Robins.
Its case was that he had
murdered Ro ins in cold
blood...


Transcripts of prison


break inquest 'are

nearly complete'

FROM page one
proceedings.
Coroner Virgill said the transcripts of that inquest are almost
complete. However her secretary, who is compiling, copying and
stapling several copies of the transcript of some eight weeks of,
witness testimony, was on vacation. The coroner also noted that
some 10 different court reporters were attached to the court at
various stages in the inquest and that all of their reports had to
be submitted. Most of these reports, she said, had been sub-
mitted. However, two are still outstanding.
The root of the problem inadequate manpow,er,.tle. QAq-l0
n, *r said._ ..
- The coroner also blaml-d l M.k'L k la.\ers foi essentially
"jumping the gun" by going before a judge before they had a
copy of the court's transcript. While noting that every citizen has
a right to petition the court, she argued that Mackey's lawyers
knew that the transcripts would take a considerable amount of
time to complete.
S"Equip me with the people and machines tHiat work," Mrs
Virgill bluntly stated. "I can't compile these things; they know
that."
The coroner said that once her secretary returns, the tran-
scripts willbe completed and forwai ded to the registrar.


Thousands yet to



be paid despite



promise by



Neville Wisdom


SFROM page one
last Friday.
The programme, which
comes under the Urban
Renewal project, started on
July 20. It was held daily at
Claridge Primary, CR Walker
High, Sandilands, Queen Eliz-
abeth Sports Centre, and
Kendal G L Isaacs Gym.
Mrs Hepburn said that about
2,000 students were hired, in
addition to teachers who were
taken on to supervise the teen
students.
"This is their first year doing
it, and they don't want the trith
to be known so that they can
bring it off on their own for
everyone to give them credit,"
she said.
"But this is not important


right now because high-school-
ers who participated need their
monies for school, and college
students need to be paid to
take care of their tuition," she
said..
Mrs Hepburn suggested that
government could not have
allocated $1.8 million for the
programme as announced by
Minister Wisdom or else there
would have been no difficulty
in paying the workers.,
She said the programme is in
its third year. For the two pre-
vious years it was spearheaded
by the Ministry of Youth and
Culture.
"Now it is under the Ministry
of Youth and Housing, but
Housing takes a majority of the
load since the Prime Minister
switched up the Ministries in
cabinet.


"Some of the student work-
ers went down to the Ministry
yesterday to get their monies,
but Oral LaFleur, the director
of the programme, was not
there."
Mrs Hepburn said she called
Mr LaFleur once on the matter,
but "he didn't really give an
answer, and kept passing me
on to other people.
; She explained that other
workers who participated in the
programme have made numer-
ous unsuccessful attempts to,
contact Mr LaFleur.
"When I called, I didn't get
through, and when I tried again
they said no one was in the
office to speak with me. I was
told that.most of the other
workers had already made
plans to go away before the
programme ended."


THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANY LIMITED
P.O. BOX N-3048, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
TEL. (242) 302-7000


VACANCY NOTICE

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites applications
from suitably qualified individuals for the position of Senior
Associate/Network Operations IT in its Audit Department.

JOB SUMMARY

To perform audits and other engagement or duties for the Internal Audit
Department, thereby assisting the Company to achieve its objectives.
To plan, organize, conduct, and formally report on a scheduled
engagement in accordance with Internal Audit's methodology as well
as the Standardsfor the Professional Practice of Internal Auditing and
the general standards for Information Systems Auditing. Provide
independent' and objective appraisal of activities to ascertain the adequacy
of systems and controls.

Confidentiality under any and 'all circumstances is mandatory.

ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

1. Direct and perform independent reviews and evaluations of the
Company's operations and activities .


2.


Contribute to a number of internal audit reports of varying
complex\it annuiallS.: "RpcIrfg average 84 -1i2p.heWifietingtk`n
.usually support nunierous recommendations. Recommendations
are thoroughly researched and discussed with responsible
managers. Recommendations are not necessarily bound by
existing policy, and should affect controls, efficiencies and savings
on all operational areas.


3. Exercise discretion in the review of records to ensure
confidentiality of all matters that comes to the auditor's attention.
4. Facilitate Internal Audit's administration function including
presenting bi-weekly timesheets, weekly status reports, responding
to and issuing correspondence to external parties through Internal
Audit Department's Management, presenting reports and
promoting the Internal Audit Function, etc.
5. For all audit engagements.
SPerform or assist in the performance of preliminary research
for assigned audits in accordance with the Internal Auditing
methodology, including conduction interviews with
operational managers, supervisors, and staff member; flow
charting audit operational procedures and conducting risk
assessments.
Determine or assist in the determination of appropriate audit
approaches, scope and tools for assigned audits.
Perform test of controls using appropriate audit tools and
techniques
Compile findings in a clear and concise manner in accordance
with the internal audit guidelines and format;
Confer with management, consult reference materials and
other sources, and use knowledge and experience to devise
practical remedies for deficiencies noted and make
recommendations for corrective actions;
Document and compile audit evidence and working papers
in accordance with Internal Audit methodology and standards,
and present the same for review;
Other duties and tasks as required by Unit Manager or Senior
Manager.

EDUCATION AND/OR EXPERIENCE

1. Bachelor's degree and four years related experience in a
telecommunications industry is desirable;
2. Ability to communicate effectively, both verbally and in writing
with all levels of staff;
3. Must be able to manage time effectively.
CERTIFICATES, LICENSES, REGISTRATIONS
Must have at least one of the following certifications: CCNA, CISSP,
CIA
All applications are to be received at BTC's Head Office, 21 John F.
Kennedy Drive, no later than AUGUST 24, 2006 and addressed as
follows:
VICE PRESIDENT
HUMAN RESOURCES, TRAINING & SAFETY
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD.
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS

RE: SENIOR ASSOCIATE, NETWORK OPERATIONS
IT/AUDIT DEPARTMENT


MOTHER of Jamal Robins Christine Scott and father Edward Robins outside of court.
(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)



Farrington found guilty


Sin mondday's




world

RONALD SANDERS ON THE COST OF TERRORISM


m


SATURDAY, AUGUST 19, 2006, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE


AP GE 12 SATURDAY AUGUST 19, 2006


S9 By Franklyn G Ferguson


NASSAU EVENTS CAPTU R E D ON C CAMERA


Turks & Caicos' first premier


N By FRANKLIN G FERGUSON
ONCE there was a greater Bahamas and per-
haps, in our own lifetime, the Bahamas will be
greater again. Up to 1838, the Turks and Caicos
Islands were a part of the Bahamas.
They were represented by Horatio N. Chipman
and John McIntosh, who in 1836 petitioned the
House of Assembly in Nassau claiming the
nation, with salt as one of its major industries, was
being treated poorly by the then government
here.
The Turks and Caicos were annexed to
Jamaica in 1847, then, after that country's inde-
pendence in 1962, the Turks and Caicos had an
association with the Bahamas for over a decade
until it became a British Crown Colony.
And, on August 9th, 2006, Turks and Caicos
swore in its first Premier, Dr Michael E Misick.
Special guests at the occasion included Dr Den-
zil L Douglas, Prime Minister of St Kitts & Nevis
and Chairman of CARICOM.
U PICTURED from left: Cynthia Pratt,
Deputy Prime Minister of the Bahamas; Guest
speaker Patrick Manning, Prime Minister of
Trinidad and Tobago; Dr Michael E. Misick,
Premier of Turks and Caicos.,


* MISS Mahala Wynns was, sworn in as
deputy governor. The oath was adminis-
tered by Governor Mr Richard Tauwhare.


* THE principals of Bartlett-McWeeney Communications Ltd,.
through its subsidiary GEMS Television. spent some time with
Turks & Caicos Premier Dr. Michael Misick and First Lady Lisa
Raye McCoy-Misick after the historical swearing in ceremony on
August 9, 2006 in Providenciales, Turks and Caicos. Bartlett-
McWeeney Communications and GEMS Television consulted with
the Turks & Caicos New Media Network for the live production of
the swearing in ceremony. Pictured from left: GEMS Radio-& TV
Chief Operations Officer Darold Miller, First Lady Lisa Raye
McCoy-Misick, Premier Dr. Michael Misick, GEMS Radio & TV
CEO Deborah Bratlett and GEMS Publishing and Public Relations
CEO Cyprianna McWeeney. ,


SPKREl[IEK [li~ici. along Ainh the Conunssioner o roucf licenpects in
guamrl oI Iioniiir conpri~ing Ro~al Yurk-s and Caicos Islands police and
cadets.


* BAHAMIANS AT THE SWEARING:
From left: Captain Brandon Gardiner, Hillary Higgs, Kendall Jones,
John Rex Messam, Jan Messam and Crayton Higgs


* HOLLYWOOD actress Lisa Ra3e Misick (centre) with fami-
ly members and husband, Premier Dr Michael Misick (far right)


0 CABINET Ministers: McAllister Eugene Hanchell, Minister for Natural Resources, Land Registry and Conservation; Galmo
Williams, Minister of Immigration, Social Services, Natural Disaster, Labour; Deputy Premier Floyd Basil Hall; Premier Dr Michael
Eugene Misick; Governor Mr Richaid Tauwhare; Jeffrey Christoval Hall; Lillian Been, Education, Gender Affairs, Youth, Sports
and Culture; Kurt de Freites, Attorney General


"

* FROM left: Premier Dr Michael Misick; Hollywood actress
Lisa Raye Misick, Lisa Jones; Taylor L Jones-Gardiner


Jtrran~dln (1i~. ~~Fergue iu


17~ae


Pec4


(242) 357-8472


P.O. Box N-4659,
Nassau, Bahamas i


a lgoinewce


hi


--
~p~=_ II -~b~CM -I ~ z


n~S,


i


_"B7:







.a ......


SATURDAY, AUGUST 19, 2006


SECTION



B
Fax: (242) 328-2398
.E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


i -I I ., I;
I i I~


'.4 a

'III-

.t I?


Jeremy

Knowles

finishes

seventh

in final

* SWIMMING
JEREMY KNOWLES,
making his first final at
the 2006 Pan Pacific
Swimming Champi-
onships in Victoria, Cana-
da, posted a time of one
minute and 58.96 seconds
for seventh place in the
men's 200 butterfly final
on Thursday night.
Knowles had lowered
his national record to
1:58.25 for fourth in his
heat earlier in the day for
a ninth place overall. But
he was moved out of the
B final to the A Final
after one of the top com-
petitors pulled out.
American Michael
Phelps lowered his world
record of 1:53.93 that he
set in Barcelona in 2003
by winning the gold in
1:53.80. Japan got the sil-
ver and bronze from
Ryulchi (1A55.82) and
Takeshi Matsuda
(1:56.20).
Yesterday in the 400
individual medley,
Knowles came in 11th in
a time of 4:26.17 to make
-it to the B final, which
was scheduled last night.
Phelps went in as the top
qualifier in the men'sA
final.
Today, Knowles will
compete in the men's 100
fly and on Sunday, he will
wrap up competition in
the 200 IM.
He's the lone Bahami-
an competing at the
championships.


I


* TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
OLYMPIC and world char pion
quarter-miler Tonique Williams-Dar-
ling had her first brush of head-to-
head competition for the year with her
American rival Sanya Richards yes-
terday at the Weltklasse Zurich 2006.
And, while Richards kept her bid
alive for a share of the Golden
League's $1 million jackpot by staying
unbeaten, Williams-Darling had to set-
tle for fourth place in the new Letzi-
ground Stadium.
The meet also saw two other
Bahamians, national sprint champions
Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie and Der-
rick Atkins post fourth place finishes
as well in the women and men's 100.
For the Bahamas, the focus was on
the women's 400 as Richards contin-
ued where she left off when she closed.
out the year with a victory at the
IAAF Grand Prix Final by winning in
a time of 50.18 seconds.
Williams-Darling ran 50.93, well off
her season's best of 50.13, for fourth.
Vanya Stambolova of Bulgaria was
second in 50.42 and Jamaican Nov-
lene Williams was third in 50.58.
Bahamian Christine Amertil also
competed.in the race, but she was at
the end of the line in eighth place in
51.58, running out of lane eight. She
has a season's best of 50.62.
As for the shorter sprints, Atkins
made his debut on the big European
stage in the men's B race. The nation-
al record holder produced a time of
10.25 for fourth. His national record
stands at 10.14.
Trinidad & Tobago's Marc Burns
won the race in 10.19 with Jamaican
Dwight Thomas second in 10.23 and
American Jason Smoots third in 10.24.
Kim Collins of St. Kitts was seventh in
10.45.
Jamaican Asafa Powell once again
tied his world record of 9.77 to erase
the meet record of 9.90 that American
Tim Montgomery set in 2001. Powell
also stayed in contention for a share of
the jackpot.
In the women's century, Ferguson-
Williams came in fourth in 11.32 as


I


A Copyrighted Material



i Syndicated Coent



PAvailable from Commercial News Providers
frmo mercn -m


SANYA RICHARDS from the U.S., left. runs to \\in the wom-
en's 400 meter race at the \1ellklasse Golden League athletics meel-
ing in Zurich. Switzerland, Friday. Aug. 18. 2006.
(A P Photo/Keystone. II alter Bieri


BOA gives $5,000 to CVC hosting


MARK KNOWLES


Quarter

final exit for

Knowles

and Nestor

* TENNIS
MARK Knowles and
Daniel Nestor were
eliminated in the quar-
ter final round of the
Western & Southern
Financial Group Mas-
ters Tournament in
Cincinnati yesterday.
Knowles and Nestor,
the number three seed-
ed team, lost to the No.7
seed team of Martin
Damm and Leander
Paes 3-6, 7-5, 10-4
(Match Tie breaker).


* BAHAMAS Olympic Association president Arlington Butler (left) presents Bahamas Volleyball Federationpres-
ident Don Cornish with a cheque for $5,000 for their sponsorship of the Caribbean Volleyball Championships that start
on Sunday night at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.


* VOLLEYBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
THE Bahamas Olympic Association
put an extra $5,000 into the kitty for the
Bahamas Volleyball Federation's host-
ing of the Caribbean Volleyball Cham-
pionships.
The presentation was made on Friday
in the office of BOA president Arlington
Butler as the championship's opening on
Sunday draws closer and the federation
aims for its projected target of $200,000.
"We are pleased to be able to assist
the volleyball federation in bringing
about this tournament, which we are
'pleased they brought here because this
will not only provide an opportunity for
our players to improve their skills, but it
will be a worthwhile tournament for the
Bahamian people to watch," Butler
charged.
"For that reason, we have made a pre-
'sentation to the volleyball federation,
which we normally do for these various
functions. We are indeed happy that you
will be able to put this on."
Federation president Don Cornish said
every step they make in putting a dent in
their projected expenditure is progress.
"Obviously starting very late didn't
help us, so we are a little ways off from
meeting our financial obligations," Cor-
nish revealed. "But we are very pleased
that the Olympic Association is providing
us with some of that support."
Cornish said they are still appealing to
corporate Bahamas to come forth and
make their financial contribution and for
the Bahamian people to come out and
view the championships that start on Sun-
day night at the Kendal Isaacs Gym so
they can meet their obligations when they
are concluded on Sunday, August 26.


-----------


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PAGE 2B, SATURD AUGU 9, 2006 TRIBUNE SPORTS

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SATURDAY, AUGUST 19, 2006, PAGE 3B


TRIBUNE 61-'UK I1-


SPORT


Shenique

Ferguson

reflects on

200m final

TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
-Reporter
SHENIQUE'Q' Fer-
guson said she was disap-
pointed that she finished
eighth in the final of the
women's 200 metres at
Sthe 11th IAAF World
Junior Championships in
Beijing, China.
But she's comforted by
the fact that, at age 15,
she still has a bright
future ahead of her in
track and field.
"When I finished the
race, I was kind of disap-
pointed that I was eighth,
but the coaches told me
that I am still young, so I
shouldn't feel that bad,"
said Ferguson in an inter-
view with The Tribune
from Beijing yesterday.
Coming off her semifi-
nal appearance in the 100
on the first day of compe-
tition, Ferguson became
the second Bahamian to
make it to a final at the
championships.
She ran 24.03 seconds
last night for eighth.
The gold went to
Tezdzhan Naimova of
Bulgaria in a personal
best of 22.99 with Vanda
Gomes of Brazil taking
the silver in a season's
best of 23.59 and Ewelina
Klocek of Poland captur-
ing the bronze in 23.63.
"I got off the curve and
I just went for it," said
Ferguson, who admitted
that she was right in the
race for the first 100.
"Coming to the end, I
think in the last 50, I felt
I didn't have any more to
give."
Ferguson said she will
chalk this up as a learn-
ing experience.
"I'm very proud. I'm
happy. I'm only 15," she
reflected. "To make it to
the semifinal and the
final is a great achieve-
ment forme." '
As for the competition,
Ferguson said it was
extremely tough.
"I didn't know that it
Swas going to be as tough
as it was," she stressed.
"But now I know what I
have to do when I come
home. I have to work
harder to get my times
faster."
Before she comes
home, Ferguson will run
on the women's 4 x 100
relay team. During the
interview, neither Fergu-
Sson or team manager
Rosie Carey could say
how the team will beset
S up.
But Ferguson said she's
confident that they
Should go out and make
the final on Sunday. The
Bahamas ran out of lane
five in the second of
three heats. The United
States is in lane four and
Great Britain in six.
The first two finishers
plus the next two fastest
times will advance to the
final.
T'Shonda Webb, who
ran in the preliminaries
of the women's 100, was
also expected to compete
on the team. She went a
little further than Fergu-
son in her predictions.
"This is an awesome
group of girls," she stat-
ed. "We are going for the
gold. I'm looking forward
to running on the team.
We feel we can win a
medal."
The men's 4 x 400 team
also ran in the prelimi-
naries yesterday. They
were in lane one in the


first of three heats with
France in two and the
United States in three.
The first two in each
heat plus the next two
fastest times will advance
to Sunday's final.
Carey said with all of
the individual perfor-
mances complete, they
are now focussing on the
two relays.
She indicated that all of
the athletes are eager to
compete.


* CARIBBEAN VOLLEYBALL CHAMPIONSHIP


Renee makes


sure eve


one


is a part of




the process


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
ONE of the most difficult tasks of
hosting an event like the Caribbean Vol-
leyball Championships is to make sure
that everybody is properly accredited.
Renee 'Sunshine' Curry has been giv-
en that responsibility by the Bahamas
Volleyball Federation and she noted
that it's a job that has kept.her standing
on her feet.
"Basically, we've been having people
coming out in droves to be accredited,"
said Curry, who took a break from pho-
tographing a few people for the inter-
view this week at the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium. .
While Curry has had to photograph
the Bahamian teams, dignitaries and
volunteers as they show up, the visit-
ing teams have been mailing their pho-
tos, which will alleviate the long lines
when they arrive in town this weekend.
Curry said that has made it even eas-
ier for her to have everybodyprocessed
in time for the start of the champi-
onships on Sunday night.
"Even though we will be at the hotel
when they reach, we want to make sure


that we have everything set up for
them," said Curry, about the processing
of the visiting teams.
As for the local personnel to be
processed, Curry said she's at the gym
almost all day and even through the
evening taking their photographs as
they show up.
Up to the time of the interview, Cur-
ry said she had already processed 250
people. She couldn't give a final count
of just how many she will have to
accredit.'
But she noted that as fast as they walk
into the press centre in the secretariat at
the gym, she will snap their photos and
they will be on their way out.
"It's not a long process once they get
in," she said. "The longest they will
probably have to wait is on the lihe out-
side and that's just because we can only
accommodate one at'a time in the
room," she summed up.
Curry, a member of the defending
national ladies softball champions Elec-
tro Telecom Wildcats, has taken the
entire month off from her job at the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture
to assist the federation in the accredi-
tation process.


t'~;


ii.
.4


.


M RENEE CURRY


Crystal shines in her


tough


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
SHE'S working as the
brain behind the scenes for
the Caribbean Volleyball
Federation. But her tough
job is something that Crys-
tal Forbes accepted when she
became the secretary of the
Bahamas Volleyball Feder-
ation.
As manager of the games
secretariat, Forbes can be
seen on a daily basis sitting
behind her desk in her office
at the Kendal Isaacs Gym-
nasium ensuring that all of
the letters are typed and sent
out and the necessary data
are put into the computer.
It's a job that has Forbes
working around the clock
since the federation agreed
to host the championships,
which kick off on Sunday.
"My job entails coordinat-
ing all aspects of these
games, from the tournament
set up, to volunteers, to help-
ing in the gym, helping in the
concession, helping in the
festival that will be held out-
side to even telling people
where to park," she stated.
"It's just been crazy."
Despite the workload that
has been placed in her lap,
Forbes said her main objec-
tive is to remain cool, calm
and collected, advice she has
been taught all her life, even
in tough situations.
"When I go home at night,
I dream about this place and
when I wake up at 6am, I
wake up with the intent of
getting here at 7:30, but I get
here between 8-9 to do the
little things I can do before
the people start coming in
and the phone ringing," she
stated.
"Somehow, through the
grace of God, I get through.
Thank God. I get things
done. Unbelievably."
However, with the days
winding down to the start of
the tournament on Sunday,
Forbes said she doesn't
expect her workload to get
any easier.
"I expect my job to get


job at the CVC


~K e-
L ".


I j


* HARD AT WORK:
Crystal Forbes


harder because I'm in charge
of the statisticians and I'm
in charge of the scorers," she
further pointed out. "So I
will have to leave this job
and moving towards helping
them.
"Right now, Kirk Far-
quharson is helping them.
He's our head official. He's
training the statisticians and
scorers. Once his job is done,
I have to take over and coor-
dinate them when the tour-
nament start."
From day one, Forbes said
she's been under a lot of
pressure, but people have
been popping in from time
to time assisting her, so it has
made her job a little easier.
Forbes, however, said she's
excited about the tourna-
ment because, as a volleyball
player, she will enjoy watch-
ing the high level of compe-
tition during the week long
session.


. THE Caribbean Volleyball Championships
will get started on Sunday, August 20 at the
Kendal-Isaacs Gymnasium and run through
Sunday, August 27.

* Here's a look at the schedule of games:
Sunday, August 20
5:30 pm US Virgin Islands vs Bahamas (Ladies)
7:30 pm Bahamas vs Guadeloupe (Men)
Monday, August 21
9:30 am Trinidad vs Dominca (Ladies)
11:30 am Guadeloupe vs Haiti (Men)
1:30 pm Barbados vs US Virgin Islands (Men)
5:30 pm Jamaica vs US Virgin Islands (Men)
7:30 pm Bahamas vs Haiti (Ladies)
Tuesday, August 22
9:30 am Barbados vs Dominica (Ladies)
11:30am Barbados vs Haiti (Men)
1:30 pm Trinidad vs US Virgin Islands (Men)
5:30 pm Jamaica vs Netherlands Antilles (Men)
7:30 pm Bahamas vs Trinidad (Ladies)
Wednesday, August 23
9:30 am US Virgin Islands vs Haiti (Ladies)
11:30 am Trinidad vs Netherlands Antilles
(Men)
1:30 pm Guadeloupe vs Barbados (Men)-
5:30 pm Barbados vs Trinidad (Ladies)
7:30 pm Bahamas vs Haiti (Men)


IS,\


schedule
Thursday, August 24
9:30 am Trinidad vs Haiti (Ladies)
11:30 am Dominica vs US Virgin Islands
(Ladies)
1:30 pm Netherlands Antilles vs US Virgin
Islands (Men)
5:30 pm Trinidad vs Jamaica (Men)
7:30 pm Bahamas vs Barbados (Men)
Friday, August 25
9:30 am Men's Quarter-final
11:30 am Men's Quarter-final
1:30 pm Trinidad vs US Virgin Islands (Ladies)
5:30 pm Barbados vs Haiti (Ladies)
7:30 pm Bahamas vs Dominica (Ladies)
Saturday, August 26
9:30 am Haiti vs Dominica (Ladies)
11:30 am 7th vs 8th (Men)
1:30 pm Semi-final (Men)
5:30 pm Semi-final (Men)
7:30 pm Bahamas vs Barbados (Ladies)
Sunday, August 27
9:30 am 5th vs 6th (Men)
11:30 am 3rd vs 4th (Men)
1:30 pm 3rd vs 4th (Ladies)
5:30 pm Final Ladies
7:30 pm Final Men


. 1:


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I CRYPTIC PUZZLE
ACROSS DOWN


3 Keep an eye on Albert (5)
8 Measure me for some trews (5)
10 Consume doggedly? (3,2)
11. Nominally less than all out (3)
12 Something hard for a butcher to
use? (5)
13 Novel character sound in
foresight'(7)
15 Acceptable figure on a fancy dial (5)
18 Scots have to be different (3)
19 Tell tales about being unpunctual (6)
21 Simon? He's a saintly character (7)
22 Did Heloise give her a hiding? (4)
23 Since metrication, are they no longer
handy? (4)
24 Mice, lad, can be used for healing
purposes (7)
26 How we send abroad (6)
29 The gid in the word wide web? (3)
31 It turns red when you're sleepy (5)
32 Fattening fish? (7)
34 A mixture bringing everyone
some joy (5)
35 A fortune out of second-hand
clothes? (3) '
36 A little beast like Teddy (5)
37 This native gives the option to
change (5)
31 The body In the box (5)


1 Hotel managed by a humble
fellow (5)
2 A bighead chases up the
cleaners (7)
4 Suitable room for poker? (4)
5 Figure always to be witty (6)
6 Meat men?'(5)
7 Ring for a fling (5)
9 To a raw beginner, it's a high
place (3)
12 He had a feast on Boxing Day (7)
14 Plant that may come up (3)
16 Tag left on a fratricide victim (5)
17 Not an air letter, though it may be on
the wing (5)
19 Strike casually but quickly (7)
20 Be started at the back, darn itl (5)
21 Once mounted, it's permanent (5)
23 Can one be so attracted to a podgy
pal? (7)
24 Medium large portion of fruit (6)
25 Gosh a little house for love (3)
27 For her, I'd be seen in a great
success (5)


28 Gave a hand in s
30 Run out, he could
32 Given a start (4)
33 Find the sum, jus


Friday apt solutions
A S: 9, Get about 10, Coo 11, No-ti(ck)-on 12, Addled
13, Pn-ance 14,Tote(mpole) 15, At th-e re-ady 17,
Outhone 18, R-e nds 19, A-re-a 21, Better 24, The
g of the amp 27, Sees to (seietoo) 29, Dash 30,
A-undsr 33, Cus-OM-er 35, De-liberate 3, Fawn 37,
Uni-orm 36, (ch d)Re-now-n 40, Be-fell 41, Eve(r) 42,
Suitable
DOWN 1, Ready to eat 2, Hal (hale) 3, Po-nde-red 4,
Stop 5, Down to earth 6, Un-beatable 7, Stitch 8,
Cowinie 10, Can-(ma)n 16, He-ires-'s 20, Rooks 22,
Trainer 23, Bird-brained 25, Enormoisly 26, Prety we l 28,
Em-late- 31, Suburb-a32, Flemish der ,
Droge 39, Neat


uhool, perhaps (5)
I be blue (5)

t a little one (3)


Friday's easy solutions
ACROSS: 9,Test tube 10, Axe 11, Raisin 12, Tribal 13,
Pronoun 14, Trot 15, Scattering 17, Depletes 18,
Stopper 19, Boil 21, Arrest 24, Abominable
snowman 27, Bedsit 29,, Also 30, Strange 33, Pedigree 35,
Represents 36, Thus 37, Unarmed 38, Pillar 40, Infect 41,
Ova 42, Resolves.
DOWN: 1, Terracotta 2, Stub 3, Bull's-eye 4, Despair
5, Second-class 6, Grand piano 7, Little 8, Widowers
10, Among 16, Tiptoes 20, Ogles 22, Rummage
23, Paracetamol 25, Interrupts 26, Nightmares 28,
Elephant 31, Trespass 32, Spiders 34,
Instep 35, Rumba 39, Lull.


ACROSS
3 Garment (5)
8 Amusing (5)
10 Type of duck (5)
11 Section (3)
12 Upset (5)
13 Fish (7)
15 Water plants (5)
18 Young animal (3)
19 Takes unlawfully (6)
21 Pause (7)
22 Cupid (4)
23 Former empire (4)
24 Pleased (7)
26 Tie (6)
29 Rubbish (3)
31 Radio (5)
32 Blasphemer (7)
34 Trail (5)
35 Firearm (3)
36 Relent (5)
37 Started (5)
38 Make amends (5)


Contract Bridge

By Steve Becker

The Theory of Probabilities


South dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
+862
V1085
+K83
+9764
WEST
J 1097
VA7
+J42
+Q832


EAST
*Q3
V96432
SQ 1075
+105


SOUTH
*AK54
VKQ J
*A96
+AKJ
The bidding:
South West North East
3 NT Pass Pass Pass
Opening lead jack of spades.
Bridge is a game of probabilities.
You make a certain bid because you
think it has a better chance to suc-
ceed than any other bid. You make a
certain play because you think it is
more likely to work than any other
play.
But a probability, by definition,
is not a certainty. All you can do in
bridge is rely on the percentages and
hope for the best. You may be wrong
in a particular case if you follow the
percentages, but in the long run
you'll be right more often than
wrong.
All of which leads us to this deal,
v.hich is strictly a matter of percent-


ages. Let's say you win the spade
lead with the king and play the king
of hearts. West takes the ace and
returns a spade, which you win with
the ace.
You have eight certain tricks and
two ways to try for a ninth. You can
enter dummy with a diamond and
take a club finesse. If the jack wins,
you are home free. You have about a
50-50 chance of making the contract
this way, but in the actual deal this
approach would fail.
The alternate line of play is to
cash the A-K of clubs and continue
with the jack. This method will suc-
ceed if the clubs are divided 3-3 or if
either the queen or ten falls as the A-
K are led. The diamond king pro-
vides the entry to dummy if the nine
of clubs becomes a trick.
Some knowledge of percentages
is required to know which of the two
lines of play has the greater chance.
of success.
The second approach is much
better. The clubs will break 3-3 about
36 percent of the time, while a
singleton or doubleton queen or ten
will occur in approximately one deal
out of three.
The combined chance of finding
the clubs 3-3 or otherwise favorably
divided comes to about 70 percent -
20 percent better than the finesse.
Playing the A-K-J of clubs is there-
fore the superior -line of play, and
succeeds in the actual deal.


The
Target
uses
words in
the main
body of a
Chambers
21st 0 o-'
Century a I "
.I I Dictionary "" .'
E (1999 (199
edition) a ,-
HOW many words of four r ,"' .
letters or more can you make .5 0
from the letters shown here? d0t o
In making a word, each letter m
may be used once only. Each g o
must contain the centre letter o
and there must be at least one
nine-letter word. No plurals
TODAY'S TARGET
Good 18; very good 27;
excellent 35 (or more). Solution
tomorrow.


DOWN
1 Caribbean (5)
2 Lures (7)
4 Retained (4)
5 Tell (6)
6 Heading (5)
7 Honour (5)
9 Zero (3)
12 Secondary story (7)
14 Coach (3)
16 Haggard (5)
17 Treatise (5)
19 Stammer (7)
20 Respond(5)
21 Mountain ash (5)
23 Number (7)
24 Floor covering (6)
25 Listening organ (3)
27 Sport (5)
28 Match (5)
30 Without (5)
32 Brass Instrument (4)
33 Pull (3)


Two American amateurs
reached this tricky position
during a game in Ohio in 1993.
Black (to play) is a pawn down,
but has plenty of compensation
with all his pieces poised to
invade the white defences. He
has to be careful, though, since
White's own rook and knight
are entrenched deep in black
territory. Black narrowed down
his selection to Qd2 and Nd2,
not realising that one move
wins while the other loses.
Unable to decide between
them, he mentally tossed a
coin, and made the wrong
choice. Can you do better, and
demonstrate which move
scores the point and which is a
blunder?


SATURDAY,
AUGUST 19

ARIES Mar 21/Apr 20
Overindulging in all areas of your life
is not a healthy way to live, Aries.
Rethink your personal goals and
streamline so you're not being pulled
into too many directions.
TAURUS Apr 21/May 21
You want to support a friend,
Taurus, but you just don't agree
with this person's motives. Don't
get involved in the situation; you'll
regret it later.
GEMINI May 22/Jun 21
Someone in the family has stepped
on your toes,'Gemini. Rather than
lash out, keep your feelings to
yourself and be the bigger persoh
in this situation.
CANCER Jun 22/Jul'22
You've put all your eggs in one bas-
ket, Cancer, and now that things
haven't worked out, you're left won-
dering what to do. Family members
won't let you down.
LEO Jul 23/Aug 23,
Watch how much you spend this
week, Leo. You could go overboard
if you're not paying attention.
Better leave the credit at home and
use cash instead.
VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
If you don't make a move soon in your
love life, you're going to miss the
opportunity, Virgo. Stop looking for
the perfect Mr. or Ms. Right. Rather,
look outside your comfort zone.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
Now is not the time to make rash
career decisions, Libra. You have too
many responsibilities and kills com-
ing in. Even though yourjob may not
appeal to you anymore, stick with it.'
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22,- '
Normally a go-getter, Scorpio, you're
ready to throw in the towel in regards
to a project that isn't working out.
Don't give up, however;, you'll find
relief soon.
SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 2l
Stop being so generous to others, atd'
start concentrating on your immedi-
ate family, Sagittarius. They're in
need of your love and attention.
,Quality family time is key.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 210
Your loye life is a mess, Capricori."
You can't seem to get along with ydur
partner no matter what you do. Instead
of butting heads, sit down and talk
camly and rationally.
AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
Stbp being argumentative, Aquarius:
Those around you will grow tired pf
hearing how you're always, right:
Accept that someone else's opinion
might be valid.
PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20
Recuperation from an injury or illness
will take time, Pisces. Don't try to do
it all now. You'll have plenty of time
to catch up in the weeks to come.


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TRIBUNE SPORTS SAI UHDAY, AUGUSI 19, 2006, PAGE 78
________________________________ I


AUGUST 19, 2006

9:30 10:00 10:30


mI


American
Soundtrack:
Doo Wop


[00) Andre Reu: The Homecoming Violinit Andre Pink Floyd Live Pulse The group peorms "Moneyr
Roeu returnsto his hometown of astricht, Nether its in this 1994 onereComfortably Numb and other
"nds. for a performance in Vriithof Sauare. (CC) hits in this 1994 concert. (CC)


NFL Preseason Football Miami Dolphins at Tampa Bay Buccaneers. (Live) Dolphins
B WFOR Postgame Show
:00) Access Gymnastics 2006 Visa Women's Cirque du Solell Crossing Jordan Jordan awakens
S WTVJ ollywood (N) Championships. From St. Paul, the moving after a arty with a gun
(CC) Minn. (aped) A (CC)in her hand A (CC)
DecoDrive Cops Officers Cos Altercation America's Most Wanted: America News (CC)
B WSVN Weekend find a cocked gun with a male sus- Fights Back Search for a missing
and bullets. pect. (CC) family. (N) A (CC)
Wheel of For- * CAST AWAY (2000, Drama) Tom Hanks, Helen Hunt, Nick Searcy. A courier company executive is ma-
S WPLG of Lux-rooned on a remote island. ,

:00)Cy Confi- * FLIGHT 93 (2006, Docudrama) Jeffrey Nordling, Ty Olsson, Colin The Anatomy of September 11th
A&E denlal(CC) Glazer. Passengers revolt against terrorist hijackers on Sept. 11. (CC) (CC)
This Week Cor- (15) Extreme Lives The Great BBC News The World Un- BBC News The Reporters
BBCI respondents. Dog Race" (Latenight). covered War on (Latenight).
cocaine.
BET Access Granted The Wayans The Wayans Girlfriends A Girlfriends A Girlfriends A Girlfriends n'
BET (c) Bros. (CC) Bros. A )(CC) (CC) (CC)
S :0) WTA Tennis U.S. Open Series Rogers Cup -- Semifinal. From CFL Pregame CFL Football Hamilton Tiger-Cats
CBC ontreal (Live) (CC) (Live) (C) at Saskatchewan Roughd ers.
:C 00) Tim The Suze Orman Show "Smart The Suze Orman Show Home, (N) Tim Russert
uC ssert Debt" Handling debt. (CC) (CC)
C N (:00 On the Sto- CNN Presents Larry King Live CNN Saturday Night
CNN ry (DC)
It** SHE'S ALL NOT ANOTHER TEEN MOVIE (2001, Comedy) Chyler Leigh, Chris South Park South Park A tri
COM THAT (1999) Evans, Jaime Pressly. A football player bets he can turn a nerdinto a "Kenny Dies" to Arkansas. (CC)
(CC) prom queen. (CC) (CC)
COURT Forensic Files Forensic Files Forensic Files BodyofEvi. Body of Evi- Body of Evi- Body of Evi-
COU Just Desserts" "Bed of Deceit" dence dence dence dence
That's So Raven Phil of the Fu- The Suite Life of American Drag- The Emperor's Phil of the Fu- Life With Derek
DISN Too Much Pres- ture(N) Zack& Cody on: Jake Long New School (N) ture Babe Raider"
sure' School project, (N) (CC) A (CC)
DIY Inside: The DIY to the Res- DIY to the Res- Freeform Furni- Wood Works Handmade Mu- Woodturning
DY Builder Show cue cue ture sic Techniques
W Euromaxx The Journal In Focus (Ger- Journal: Gute Reise TV Journal: with Euromaxx
DW man). Wlrtschaftsbi- Business
:00) El News ** DAZED AND CONFUSED (1993, Drama) Jason London, Wiley Saturday Night Live Sketches fea-
E! weekend Wiggins. Richard Linklater's portrait of aimless '70s-era teens. during E die murphy, A (CC)
Little League Little League Baseball World Series --Columbia (Mo.) vs. Portsmouth Baseball Tonight (Live)
ESPN Baseball (NH.). From Williamsport, Pa: (Live) (CC) _
S :00 ATP Tennis US Open Series -- Western & South- Little League Baseball Teams to Be Announced. (Same-day Tape) (CC)
ESPNI em financial Group Masters Semifinal, (CC)
EW- N Dally Mass: Our Maximilian: Saint of Auschwitz The Holy Rosary Fr, John Corapi
EWTN Lady
Blalne's Low All Star Workouts Fat burning Total Body Sculpt With Gilad Caribbean Work- Namaste Yoga
FIT TV Carb Kitchen dance party. (CC) Warm-up.out (CC) ,Lungs,
(F N :00) Fox Report Heartland With John Kasich In The Line-Up (Live) Big Story Primetime (Live)
FOX-NC columbus, Ohio. (Live)
S:00) MLB Baseball Cleveland Indians at Tampa Bay Devil Rays, From Tropicana Field in In Focus on FSN The FSN Final
FSNFL t. Petersburg, Fla. (Live) Score (Live)
GOLF (:00) Live From the PGA Championship (Live) LPGA Golf afeway Classic -- Sec-
G 'ond Round. (Same-day Tape)
GSN (:00) Greed (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire A Chain Reaction Starface (CC) The Amazing Race 7 n (CC)
GSN__ __(CC) (CC) ____ __ahw'IC______ 2
ie h cons Seth Star Trek: The Next Generation Star Trek: The Next Generation The Man Show"Compilation 2"
G4Tech Green. The Booby Trap" A (CC) Geordi is stranded on a planet. Highlights. (CC)
(:00) Diagnosis Diagnosis Murder Dr. Sloan poses MYSTERY WOMAN: OH BABY (2006, Mystery) Kellie MYSTERY
HALL Murder n (Part as a medical police consultant to in- Martin, Premiere. A sleuth investigates murder after WOMAN: OH
1 of 2) (CC) vestigate a case. (CC) someone abandons a baby. (CC) BABY (2006)
Kitchen My First Place Space For Liv- Hometo Stay Rooms That Home on Their My Parents'
HGTV Equipped Eclec-Odd-shaped liv- ing Charming "Waverley'n" Rock"Punk Pop" Own The Sels- House Living/din-
tic Kitchen" ing room. (CC) family cottage. (CC) A (CC) bys" A (CC) ing room. n
(:0) Old Time Gaither Homecoming Hour Specials Christian Artist I Gospel "Martha
INSP. Gospel Hour Talent Search Munizzi"
NEW PORT SOUTH (2001, Drama) Will Estes, Blind Date A My Wife and Friends Monica Everybody
KTLA Kevin Christy, Todd Field. Students begin to rebel at a (CC) Kids A (CC) considers a Loves Raymond
high school, A (CC) dream job. (CC) Marital woes.
*LIFE ** LUCKY 7 (2OO3, Romance-Comedy) Kimberly THE FANTASIA BARRINO STORY: LIFE IS NOT A FAIRY TALE (2006,
LIFE Williams-Pasley,Patrick Dempsey. A lawyer believes Biography) Fantasia Barrino, Loretta Devine, Viola Davis. Premiere.
that her true love has arrived too soon. (CC) Singer Barrino wins the third season of "American Idol." (CC)
MSNBC Inv.: City in Fear: Night Stalker MSNBC Investigates "Lockup: MSNBC Reports Police pose as hit
MSNBC Vanished Louisiana" Louisiana. men to lure criminals.
CK Jimmy Neutron: The Adventures of Jimmy Neu- TheAdventures of JImmyNeu- Roseanne A (:34) Roseanne
Boy Genius tron: Boy Genius A (CC) tron: Boy Genius n( (CC (CC) Radio Days'
NTV 00)ReGenesis Andromeda Doyle lears her real W-FIVE Presents: Chairman News A (CC) NTV Entertain-
Backour identity. A (CC) George __ment News
S Baseball Cal Ripken Jr. World Se- Bull Riding PBR Built Ford Tough Invitational. From Detroit. Championship
OLN ries U.S. Championship. Bullfights
SPEED NASCARPerfor- Pinks! Pinks! Mercedes Test Drive SPEED Test Drive
SPEED mance
(:00) The Coral In Touch (CC) Hour of Power (CC) Billy Graham Classic Crusades
TBN Ridge Hour (CC)
* SWORD- GONE IN SIXTY SECONDS (2000, Action) (PA) Nicolas Cage, Angelina Jolie, Giovanni *x THE
TBS FISH (2001) (PA) Ribisi. A retired thief must steal 50 cars to save his brother. (CC) WHOLE NINE
(CC) YARDS (2000)
1-!_VL_ U -. IT .A..L ....MA- Cl t-.


Property Ladder Young newlyweds IFlip That House FlpThtHos rang Spaces ~Austin: Smokey
remdei ) oria N the theme in Tex~as. .


* THE PA- * RUNAWAY JURY (2003, Suspense) John Cusack, Gene Hackman, Dustin Hoffman, * RUN-
TNT TRIOT (2000) A man tries to manipulate an explosive trial. (CC) AWAY JURY
Mel Gibson. (2003) (CC)
Pokemon Teen Titans For Naruto Naruto (N) ZatchBell Bobobo-bo Bo- One Piece A
TOON Chronicles Real" _____Bobo(N) (CC)
T(:00) DeS racines et des alles (:45) Histoires (:05) Qual No 1 Journal TVS
TV5 "de chateaux ________________
6:00 Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
TWI PIC M Edition CC) (CC) "Arizona Heat"
:00) Casos de Sabado Gigante Claudia, Jorge Ramos y Lily Estefan hablan de su primera vez,
UNIV Familla:Edici6n
Especial
:00) Psych Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
USA Who Ya Gonna Two police officers in separate A religious educator's daughter-in- Benson and Stabler investigate a
C all?"(CC) precincts attack their wives. law is found murdered. (CC) woman's deadly plunge.
S :00) I Love the I Love the '70s Volume 2 "1976" 1 Love the 70s Volume 2 "1977" I Love the '70s Volume 2 "1978"
VH1 170s Volume 2 Bicentennial; Captain and Tennile. Billy Beer; The Deep." A Billy Joel; Devo; 'Dr. Who." A\
:00) MLB Baseball Chicago White Sox at Minnesota Twins. From the Hubert H. Humphrey WGN News at Nine A (CC)
WGN Metrodome in Minneapolis, (Live) A (CC)
Everybody *x BIG DADDY (1999, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Joey Lauren Adams, WB11 News at Ten Weekend
WPIX Loves Raymond Jon Stewart. A goofy ne'er-do-well adopts an impressionable youngster. Edition With Peter Thorne and
marital secret. Mary Murphy (CC)
Jeopardy! (CC) * BLADE (1998, Horror) Wesley Snipes, Stephen Dorff, Kris Kristof- Veronica Mars "Plan B" Weevil en-
WSBKferson. A vampire hunter does battle wit a vicious bloodsucker, lists Veronica's help to find Felix's
killer. A (CC)
-)-PIcinMatthewMe-
6:00)** THE TWOFOR THEMONEY (2005,Drama) AlPacin, MatthewMc (:05) Boxing Sharmba Mitchell vs.
HBO-E ING TWO Conaughe Rene Russo Premiere. Two men handicap football games Paul Williams. (Live) n
(2005) 'PG-13' for high-roling gamblers. n 'R' (CC)
* SHARK TALE (2004, Comedy) Voices of Will Rome Triumph" Caesar is anointed The Wire "Reformation" Brother
HBO-P Smith, Robert De Niro. Animated. A bottom feeder pre- emperor. A (CC) Mouzone returns to Baltimore. A
tends to be a shark slayer. A 'PG' (CC) (CC)
(:00) ** MR. & MRS. SMITH (2005, Action) Brad ** THE RING TWO (2005, Horror) Naomi Watts, Simon Baker, David
HBO-W Pitt, Angelina Jolie. A husband and wife are assassins Dorfman. A journalist must protect her son from evil Samara. A 'PG-13'
for rival organizations. A 'PG-13' (CC) (CC)
(6:45) COME SEE THE PARADISE (1990, * THE WEDDING DATE (2005) Debra Messing, The Making Of:
HBO-S Drama) Dennis Quaid. A Irish-American loves a Japan- Dermot Mulroney. A woman brings a male escort to her Collateral omn
ese-American in World War II. A 'R' (CC) sisters wedding: A 'PG-13' (CC) Cruise stars: A
(6:30) * ROLL BOUNCE THE MAN (2005, Comedy) Samuel L. Jackson, ** BATMAN BEGINS (2005,
MAX-E 2005) Bow Wow. A roller-skater Eugene Levy. Premiere. An ATF agent squabbles with Action) Christian Bale, Michael
prepares for a big showdown. A a salesman in his custody. A 'PG-13' (CC) Caine. Premiere. A 'PG-13' (CC)
(:00) *** WEDDING CRASHERS (2005, Comedy) * FEVER PITCH (2005, Romance-Comedy) Drew (:45)PASSION
MOMAX Owen Wilson, Vince Vaughn. Partygoers spend a wild Barymore, Jimmy Fallon. A woman falls in love with a OVE5: SEXU-
weekend with a politician's family. 'R' (CC) die-hard baseball fan. A 'PG-13' (CC) AL INFERNO
(6):30) ** THE Brotherhood Mark-8:36" (iTV) Brotherhood "Genesis 27:29" (iTV) Brotherhood Matthew 13:57 (iTV)
SHOW BATER(2005) TommyCaffee's brother retums Michael clashes with Freddie. n Tommy draws closer to Judd.
iV.'PG-13' from being on the lam. A (CC) (CC) (CC)
ASSASSINA- * ALFIE (2004, Comedy-Drama) Jude Law, Marisa Tomei, Omar * THE BIG LEBOWSKI (1998,
TMC TION OF NIXON Epp. A London womanizer works as a chauffeur in New York. A 'R' Comedy-Drama) Jeff Bridges, John
(CC) Goodman. A 'R'(CC)


SUNDAY EVENING


UGUST 20, 2006


SATURDAY EVENING


(:00) After 911:
Rebuilding
Lives


Camp 9/11: Children of Hope Meeting six children who lostpareis on1
Sept. 11, 2001, at a special camp that's helping them deal wih theirgrief
and heal. (N)


Fim75: 7hgF AS the Wodd Watched
(NJ


*** SIGNS ** PAYCHECK (2003, Science Fiction) Ben Affleck Aaron Echart, UmaThurman. Pre- **PAYCHECK
TNT (2002) Mel Gib- miere. A technical wizard learns his memory has been erased. (CC) 2:003) Ben Af-
son. (CC) _____r___
T O CampLazlo BenlO "Framed" d,EddnEd dy GrimAdven- Squirel By Futurama'Xmas TeVenture
TOON tures story Brothers (N)
TV5 Gerard Klein autour du monde Tryo fite ses 10 ans (:45 Hist res Vingt uatre Joumal TV5
TVde chteux Id6eseconde_____
6:00) Weather: Storm Stories KatrinaAnniversary Full Force Na- It Could Happen Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
TWC PM Edition (CC) Special" Hurricane Katrina. ture Huicanes. Tomorrow
U:00)La Hora Cantando Por un Sueno "La Gran Final Slete concursantes compiten
UNIV Oco
* ALONG CAME POLLY (2004, Romance-Come- The 4400 Terrible Swift Swordf (N) TheDead Zone Heart of
USA dy) Ben Stiller, Jennifer Aniston. A jilted newlywed finds(CC) Daness (N)(CC)
solace with another woman. (CC)
HoganKnows HoganKnows HoganKnows CelebrtyFit Club Firefightingit The Flavor of Love 'She Works
VH1 Bestn B BestA Bt A camp competition. A Hard for Her Money" A
(00) Maximum 24 "Day 4: 3:00AM-4:OOAM" Forein 24 Day 4:4:00AM-5:OODA The WGN News at (:40) Instant Re-
WG N Exposure (CC) nationals become involved. A (CC)U.S government braces for another Nine n (CC) play (CC)
00) Just Legal Charmed Phoebe and Piper plot to Just Legal A (CC) WB11 NewsatTen-Weekend
WPIX The Heater" A get Leo back; Paige saves her new EditionWith Peter Thome and
(CC) charge. A (CC) May murphy (CC)
That '70s Show CSI: Crime Scene Investigation CSI: Crime Scene Investigation RedSoxThis RedSox Stories
WSBK The annual Grissom and Sidel race to save a Local fishermen discover a wmans Week
school concert. multimillionaire's wife. A (CC) leg in lake. A (CC).

The Wire: The TheWire 'Middle Ground" Stringer Deadwood The Catbird Seat" Bu "to What Luc Lode im
HBO-E Game(N) and Avon reminisce. A (CC) lckdelivers ampaigpitchesin About (N) a
(CC) CC) is. (N) raise. (N) (CC)
Boxing: Mitchell ** MR. & MRS. SMITH (2005, Action) Brad Pitt,Angeina Jolie,Vince, GLORIA (1999, Drama) Sharon
HBO-P vs, Wiliams Vaughn, A husband and wife are assassins for rival organizations. Stone, Jean-Luke Figueroa. A 'T
S'PG-13'Y(CC) (C)
O- 6:30 ** RAC- (15) Trust the *A SUPERCROSS: THE MOVIE (2005, Action) Steve The Wire Con- The Wire: The
H BO-W NG STRIPES Man: HBO First Howey, Mike Vogel. Motocross racers are sibling rvas, nected (N) C Game (N) A
(2005) 'PG' (CC) Look A (CC) A 'PG-13' (CC) (CC)
(:15) *% SURVIVING CHRISTMAS (2004, Comedy) ** SOMETHING THE LORD MADE (2004, Docudrama) Alan Rick-
H BO-S Ben Affleck. A lonely man celebrates the holiday with man, Mos Def, Mary Stuart Mastetson. A lab technician helps a doctor
strangers. A'PG-3'(CC) with surgical techniques. A(CC).
(6:30)* i ** MISS CONGENIALITY 2: ARMED AND FABULOUS (2005) Sandra ** SHAUNOFTHEDEAD
MAX-E RED EYE (2005) Bullock. FBI agent Gracie Hart clashes with her superiors he (2004, Comed) Simon Pegg, Kate
'PG-13' jumps in to save two kidnapped friends in Las Vegas.'PG13 ,: Ashfied. A 1'(CC)
(6:30)*** BATMAN BEGINS (2005, Action) Christ- ** PAPARAZZI (2004, Suspese) Cole Hauser, Sex Games Can-
MOMAX ian Bale. Premiere. Bruce Wayne becomes Gotham Robin Tunney Dennis Farna, An actortakes revenge cun 'Phone Tag'
Citys Dark Knight, n'PG-13 (CC) on intrusive photographers. \ PG-13 (CC) A (CC)
(:0) DIARYOF A MAD BLACK WOMAN (2005) WeedCorn WedCofm Brothertood' Genesis 27:39" (iV)
SHOW Kimbery Eise.iTV.A woman starts over after herhu-SnakeNan Snake'Nancy osetakesanewb(N) (CC)
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0 WSVN Red Carpet'06 na, Kevin Federline, Nelly Furtado and Timbaland perform; hosts Jessica
(Live) A (CC) Simpson and Dane Cook. (Live) A (CC) __________'.I
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S WPLG nniest Home Kubena Family" (CC) Thi Now' (CC) th hospital bring out the doctors'
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A&E use CC) long" Texas ranch. (N) (CC) gaton(CC) an alcohol and crack addict.
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Extra Time BBC News Dateline London BBC News Srit of EquW BBCNews Have Your Say
BBCI (Latenight). (Latenight). rn ,Latenight).
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BET ShownA(CC) Show A (CC) Show A(CC) TheWay t Is Man(CC) asks Bird to come on tour.
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CBC arth (N) (CC) teen hides her soccer-playing from her strict parents. (CC)
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NOT ANOTH- SCARY MOVIE 2 (2001, Comedy) Shawn Wayans, Marion Wayans,Comedy Central Roast William
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(2001) house. (CC) .___
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ESPNI Baseball Tonight MLB Baseball Ne*w or, Yaniees at Boston Red So. From Fenway Park in Boston. (Subject to Blackout)
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FIT TV younger (CC Marathon wimrmer Diana Nyad Volleybal. (CC) ard Nancy. A (CC)
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FO -NC Warren Change the World? (N)
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FSNFL ory (CC) Tournament From Las Vegas. (Le) Track
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GOLF Round. From Portland, Ore.
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G4Tec Ryde or Die" The Price" A (CC) "The Vengeance Factorf (CC), travelto Jamaica. (CC)
(:00) Diagnosis Murder "The House on Sycamore Diagnosis Murder Twist of the Knife' Dr. Sloan's old classmate is ac-
HALL Street A physician suspects foul play in a reported sui-cused of murder. A (CCql
cide). A
Designed to Sell Junk Brothers Take It Outside Buy Me (CC) Hous Huntes Holmes on Homes Olivia decides
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