Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00500
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: August 12, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00500
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text









"A
FOR,


HIGH 91F
LOW 79F

SSULTRY AN
V ^ PARTCLOUOY
- - - - - -


Volume: 102 No.217


The


Tribune


SATURDAY, AUGUST 12, 2006


I, *: I:iBI B
A
D ]BdI~r"katr


brk


or be


punished


Government


takes BEC union


dispute to


Supreme Court
7 /


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
BEC union offices lnd direc-
tors could face imprisonment
and fines if they do not heed a
Supreme Court injunction and
return to work, government
officials said yesterday.
Government has referred the
BEC union dispute to the
Supreme Court .after, 00 work-
ers refused to return to work
despite the matter being passed
on to the Industrial Tribunal.
Meanwhile, New Providence
will have to suffer rotating load-
shedding until all generators are
repaired, a complication which
BEC management believe was
instigated by union members.
Failure to comply with the
Supreme Court injunction,
Attorney General Allyson May-
nard-Gibson:told a press con-
ference i-,iLers .could result
in imprisonment andifines of all
union officers and directors and
attachment of union funds to
compensate the public and BEC
for expenses incurred because
of their refusal to woilk.
"1 am not anticipating that
they would disobey a court
order," she said.
Two days ago more than 200
irate BEC workers gathered at
the Clifton Cay Power'Plant to
protest what they described as
failed contract negotiations.'
BEC management has
claimed that power outages
experienced across New Provi-
dence Thursday were the result
of sabotage iby ,corporation
workers.
Because of:the seriousness of
the situation, :minister Shane
Gibson said he thought'it would
be important to refer ithe issue
to the Industrial Tribunal.
The dispute arose after the
government reduced working
hours from 44- per week to 40.
The union felt they were


owed money as a result of not
having their hours of work
reduced at the same time as
other corporations.
However, at that time,
according to Mr Gibson, gov-
ernment corporations were
working at 40 hours or below
so by law BEC workers were
owed nothing.
Despite the issue being,
referred to the Industrial Tri-
bunal, which would require all
BEC employees to return to
work, Mr Gibson said as many
as 200 workers did not show up
for work and instead appeared
at the Blue Hills Power Plant
to protest.
He pleaded for BEC mem-
bers to stop what he called an
illegal stoppage and return to
work.
"Each individual worker has
a responsibility, once they have
knowledge that the dispute was
taken to the Industrial Tribunal,
to return to work. The union
has always stated that they were
law-abiding and so I encourage
them to do so," Mr Gibson said.
Meanwhile, some parts of
New Providence experienced
power outages.
Dr Marcus Bethel,. who is
responsible for BEC, said those
employees who did show up are
working diligently to restore full
power to New Providence.
."I am advised that this morn-
ing there were some 200-300
employees at Blue Hills not
working like they ought to be.
In so far as the power and
restoration of power is con-
cerned, three of the four gen-
erators'are operating and they
are working diligently to get the
fourth operational, which will
provide for near complete
restoration of power in New
Providence.
'"There will be rotating load-,
shedding until all major engines
are operational," he said.


BEC customers condemn

union members' actions


* By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
ELECTRICITY workers
came in for mounting criticism
yesterday after repeated pow-
er cuts made life a misery for
thousands of people.
Both the government and the
public lashed union members
for disrupting supplies to homes
throughout New Providence.
The Bahamas Electrical
Workers Union, (BEWU) was
the target as infuriated resi-
dents phoned The Tribune


venting their anger for being
forced to sit in darkness as elec-
tricity around the island was
affected by "illegal industrial
action" taken by some union
members.
Businesses throughout the
island were forced to revert to
alternative power sources, and
frustrated home-owners in some
areas even contemplated
checking into hotels.
"With all the high costs we're
paying for electricity, at least
SEE page nine


-f- '. .' .ia


-q~.: m~
I; -'I ~


s

Et~ ~s~. .~d~g~l~ ~.s.L'bl: lr Iii ~. i~
r . ---- ~a ---- "~,,~s4a~a;i~i~4ss~~tj~,sk~J~j~.~C~~:`~ ~~EI4'~'~~~:~?~g~L~:;;- ~Cr"7"L"i~V-~
k~ i,- ~~i t~F~i
-
-a
-1 -~ -~7
~i n ~1
~jKtik~rnrr
;e;;-.-- I------,,,,,, ~~ r. g r ~~h
-`------~;i~-;;l~g~g~~5~i~
r
aI~ i.
~BL~P~
nn. IDC ~a~ r~ rrs~ une se p~py.l*
;3.-.19~is~8~B~i~!~~p
., , .
, ?I~~ . ? - ~-m~- 'i. r~.-~
r,
~c~~~~n;~n~slrsarlaaE;i-r~uc*u*wi~jru


I.,.'"G


....-- .. : :. 2': -.. ": :--

* CRUISE ships docked at Nassau's harbour eslerday "ere under "special security} sur eillance procedures". The 7 ribune
was unable to obtain a full comment from Defence Force Officers or personnel stationed at the port facility.
(Photo: Onan Bridgewater/Tribune staff)


Terror threat 'will not affect tourism'


* By KRYSTEL ROLLE
THIS week's terror threat in London
should not affect the Bahamas' tourism,
it was claimed yesterday.
Tourism Minister Obie Wilchcombe
said today's travellers understood extra
security precautions needed in such cir-
cumstances.
Yesterday, passengers leaving Lynden
Pindling International Airport had to
stop at additional security checkpoints
following Thursday's alarming develop-
ments in London.
Mr Wilchcombe said travellers to the
Bahamas understood that extra measures
had to be taken. "They recognize that in


$100,000 reward

offer from father

of murdered girl

* By ROYANNE F. DARVILLE
Tribune Staff Writer.
THE father of a -girl brutally murdered
four years ago in Collier County, Florida, is
in the Bahamas offering a $100,000 reward
for information on her possible killer.
Gary Karp's search began immediately
after his daughter Marissa Karp's body was
found floating in a canal in the Everglades
between Fort Lauderdale and Naples on
August 19, 2002.
Seventeen-year-old Marissa had been shot
and stuffed in a plastic trash bag, then
dumped in a watery grave.
Mr Karp yesterday told The Tribune that
he is haunted by thoughts of his daughter's
final moments.
"My life has been a living hell since her
murder. I want closure. I want answers. I
have spent every hour of every day thinking
about what she would be like today," Mr
SEE page nine


the world in which we live today, pre-
vention is better than cure.
"We have to take extra precautions in
order to protect ourselves and they
recognize that. The bottom line is.we
cannot not do it."
Following the UK's arrest of 21 sus-
pects believed to be involved in a plot to
bomb aircraft in flight, security at air-
ports around the world was tightened.
The suspects were arrested in England
for allegedly plotting to blow up at least
six aircraft in mid-flight destined for the
US.
London's Heathrow airport, Europe's
busiest terminal, was shut down imme-
diately and all hand luggage was banned


Police- return

escaped inmate

to Fox Hill

* By KRISTINA McNEIL
THE seventh prisoner to escape prison
custody this year has been returned to Her
Majesty's Prison after police captured him
yesterday afternoon.
According to a statement released by the
prison, inmate Tameco Ferguson was on a
police bus returning to the prison when he
broke through one of the vehicle's windows.
An eyewitness described what she saw as
she stood in traffic at the intersection.
"The prison bus was on Prince Charles
Drive preparing to turn on to Fox Hill Road
in the direction of the prison when I saw
the window from the bus fly out," she said.
"Then the young man who jumped out
started running. I don't even know how he
got out of the bus...it was just so quick," she
added.
The prisoner, who was wearing jeans, a
white T-shirt and white tennis shoes, ran
SEE page nine


j' I CO:- jiL i I


on flights leaving the UK.
This extra precaution was taken
because, according to some reports, the
plan was to detonate explosives smug-
gled on board in hand luggage.
According to Mr Wilchcombe, the
Bahamas should not be affected by
increased security measures. In fact, he
said the Bahamas was doing well in
tourism statistics.
Security measures in place now are
merely an added precaution and will not
last forever. However, officials could not
determine when the ban would be lifted.
Meanwhile, US authorities had raised
Sthe red flag, warning that the threat may
not have been fully eliminated.


Pre-clearance

lounge at

airport is

shut down

temporarily

THE Ministry of Foreign
Affairs has announced that the
US pre-clearance lounge a;
Lynden Pindling International
Airport in Nassau has closed
temporarily.
US officials said the closure :
is due to problems with corn
puter systems on which the
facility depends.
Passengers travelling to the
United States from New Provi-
dence will have to clear US
Immigration and Customs in
the United States until the mat -
ter is resolved.
The ministry did not indic;,te
when the facility will be open
again. No further information
was available up to press time.-

-


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION



hBAHAMAS EDi TION
BAHAMAS EDITION


WOOD-YOU





Certified Member
Tel 9 6 6 3
346 M5 a WOOD
46 Madeira Street


I a I
Polce ay, accusednl aB I


A d!ll alPs~lrl lll11216t


i


1:
j t







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2. SATURDAY. AUGUST 12, 2006


LOA6 NW


AES boss claims negotiations



with government 'going fine'


* By KRISTINA McNEIL
NEGOTIATIONS between the
Bahamas government and the AES
Corporation are "going fine" accord-
ing AES managing director Aaron Sam-
son.
Mr Samson said his company is still
working alongside Minister of Agricul-
ture and Fisheries Leslie Miller and the
Attorney General's office to come to
an agreement on the construction of a
liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminal
at Ocean Cay.
Despite the vocal opposition to the
deal from local environmentalists, Mr
Samson said the agreement is "99 per
cent complete"
He also said that he is was not aware
of anything that could hold up the nego-
tiations.
However, since last week, there has
been no progress update from the gov-
ernment.
When contacted by The Tribune yes-
terday, Mr Miller, who is the cabinet
minister with responsibility for LNG,
said he was still not in a position to issue
a report.
LNG terminals receive natural gas in
liquefied form from ocean-going
tankers, then convert it back to gas and
pump it through underwater pipelines.
Several proposals for the Bahamas
aim to service the South Florida market
through such pipelines.
Environmentalists opposing the LNG


n AARON Samson


project said they were surprised when
the debate sparked up again.with a
statement made by Attorney General
Allyson Maynard-Gibson late last
month.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said that there
is "every reason to believe" that LNG
will be approt ed by the end of the gov.-
ernment's present term before May of
next year.
In response to the revival of the
debate and possible approval of the pro-


Halt ordered



on Eight Mile



rock blasting


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
FREEPORT The Bahama
Rock Company has been
ordered to halt all underground
blasting activities.
The company's rock blasting
projects have been an ongoing
cause of concern for the nearby
Eight Mile Rock communities.
The rock mining company,
which manufactures and exports
aggregates, was issued a Cease
and Desist Order on Wednes-
day.
Minister of Energy and the
Environment Dr Marcus Bethel
said that as a consequence of
the disturbance and annoyance
arising from the blasting, the
government through the Grand
Bahama Port Authority had
issued the order.
The ministry, he said, has also

TR PC AL
EXTERM~INATOR S] ~
IET ONRO


launched an official investi-
gation into the processes
used during the blasting and
the impact on public and
private properties in adja-
cent communities in Grand
Bahama.
Walter Reid, manager of
Bahama Rock Company,
was unavailable for com-
ment when contacted by
The Tribune yesterday.
The vibrations generated
during the blasting have
been blamed for causing
structural damage to nearby
homes at Eight Mile Rock,
although this has not been
proved.
Residents also com-
plained that the blasting is
too loud and disruptive.
Bahama Rock exports
most of 2.5 million tons of
product, which is used as
construction aggregate for
ready mix concrete, asphalt
and road construction.
'Because of increased
demand, the company is
investing $40 million in a
new processing facility
which will allow it to expand
into new markets.


* LESLIE Miller


ject in the near future, reEarth president
Sam Duncombe encouraged govern-
ment and opposition leaders to take a
stronger stand on the LNG issue before
general elections are held.
Mrs Duncombe, who claims to have
an anti-LNG petition signed by 3,000
Bahamians, said the view of the public
is something that neither political party
has learned to truly listen to.-
In the wake of the attorney general's
comments, it*was revealed that the


Bahamas could see not only one, but
two LNG terminals built in the country
in the near future.
Another company, Suez Energy
North America, is still pushing for an
LNG facility in Grand Bahama and it
is possible that both could be approved,
Mr Miller was quoted as saying last
week.
"There really is no reason why the
Bahamas should not have two LNG ter-
minals. It all just depends on Florida's
demand for liquefied gas," he said.
The minister said that with the need
for energy in Florida expected to double
within the next 15 to 20 years, "it could
very well be that government would
approve more facilities in the
Bahamas,"
Florida currently only has one source
of natural gas, which is transported
through a pipeline from New Orleans.
The sunshine state is in desperate
need of a second source of natural gas.
Mr Miller pointed out that should
Florida's demand increase, it would
make more sense for AES to add anoth-
er pipeline to its facility, as opposed to
building an entirely new LNG termi-
nal,
He added, he ver, that should Suez
- formerly Tractabel North America -
meet all the necessary requirements in
the future, there is still the possibility
that they may be allowed to build a ter-
minal at the proposed Freeport Har-
bour location.


Repairing damaged



traffic lights 'will



cost thousands'


* By ROYANNE DARVILLE
Tribune Staff Writer
IT will cost the government
thousands of dollars to repair
traffic lights damaged by the
constant power outages over
the past few days, it has been
claimed.
Owner and project manager
of High Power International
Matthew Williams told The
Tribune that his work crew has
been "running around like
crazy" trying to fix the scores
of traffic signals that are still
down,
"I live here, was born here
and all the men who work for
me are Bahamians and the
constant power surge is affect-
ing all of us on a personal lev-
el," Mr Williams said.
"For the last two days every
time power goes off and comes
on it blows some of the relays
inside of the lights. We
replaced relays over the last
two days up to three times in
one day," he said.
Relays are computer cells


inside traffic lights that open
and close on signal regulating
the flow of electricity to the
signal bulbs.
Based on initial assessments,
Mr Williams said two traffic
lights were completely
destroyed during the slew of
power outages on Thursday.
He said the light at the foot
of the Paradise Island Bridge is
out of commission, and con-
tributed to major traffic con-
gestion in that area.
"We have been making
repairs, and every time we get
a system up and running -
boom, it goes out again," Mr
Williams said.
He said the majority of the
69 traffic lights in the capital
have been malfunctioning over
the past days,
BEC management has
claimed the power cuts were
the result of sabotage at the
hands of some corporation
workers.
On Thursday, more than
200 BEC workers gathered at
the Clifton Cay Power Plant


to protest what they described
as failed contract negotiations.
Management blamed the
outages on some members of
the Bahamas Electrical Work-
ers Union. The union's secre-
tary general Stephano Greene
denied this but said that BEC
workers would not hurry to
correct the situation while
they are in the process of
demonstrating against an
"insulting" pay offer from
management.
On Thursday night, Minis-
ter of Labour Shane Gibson
declared power an essential
service and referred the matter
to the Industrial Tribunal. He
said that any BEC workers
who goes on strike will face a
fine or imprisonment.
"All of this is going to cost
the government, so when BEC
gets sorted out with whatever
is going on internally once
we have the power we can
project when all of the lights
will be working properly," Mr
Williams said. "Without that,
we can't do anything."


Call for more support


for young actors


the Performing Arts is current-
ly the only available environ-
ment for young actors to devel-
op their craft.
Appearing on the More94
radio show Real Talk with host
Michael Pintard on Thursday,
Ms Davis explained how impor-
tant it is for the government cre-
ate more arenas for young per-
formers to showcase their tal-
ents.
"If we do not have environ-
ments where young persons like
myself and upcoming people can
develop themselves and their
craft, then what do we expect
them to do?" Ms Davis asked.


This lack, she said, is unfor-
tunately why many performers
feel they cannot come home
and choose to remain in the
United States.
As the National Centre for
the Performing Arts is under
renovation, the Dundas is cur-
rently the sole stage available
to performers.
The lack of adequate venues
is leading actors and performers
to look elsewhere for the cre-
ative space that they need.
"We staged our last produc-
tion at Bahamas Faith Min-
istries, which is not a theatre,
but we had to do what we had


to do to create it," Ms Davis
said, speaking about her last
performance as "Dynamite
Daisy".
As for the National Cen-
tre for the Performing Arts,
Ms Davis said she hopes to
see it continue to develop
after the renovations are
complete.
"From talks that I've
heard, they are realising
more and more that they
didn't have everything in
place to develop the centre
as they ought to," she said.
The structure was built in
1966 as the Shirley Street
Theatre.
It was acquired by the
government in 2000 to serve
as a national theatre to pro-
mote Bahamian culture and
art.


o In brief

Dominican

economy
grows by
11.7 pe cent

* DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
Santo Domingo
THE Dominican Republic's
economy grew 1..7 percent in
the first half of this year as the
Caribbean nation continues its
recovery from a punishing eco-
nomic recession the country '
central bank has announced.
according to As-ocit:aed Press.
Real gross dpmestic:pjoduct
has grown at more.than-,11 per-
cent for four straight periods.
powered by particulhrly strong
growth in the construction and
telecommunications sectors, the
bank said.
"This is stronger than expect-
ed," said Pabkl Morra, a Gold-
man Sachs economist specializ-
ing in Latin America, who cred-
ited sound government policies
and improved domestic senti-
ment with powe ingthe-nation's
economy forward.
Inflation is hovering around
10 percent, several percentage
points above the government's
target, Morra said. He was opti-
mistic that the government
could bring it uider control, but
warned that further increases
in oil prices could derail those
efforts.
Gasoline currently sells at
more than US$4.37 a:gallon in
the Caribbean country, accord-
ing to the departmentof indus-
try and commerce
Exports grew,23;percent over
the same period from.last year.
but the courilr's trade deficit
grew 27.8 per cent to US$4655,
million, the central bank said.
The bank said it expected
growth to slow down. for the
rest of the year, ultimately
matching 20Q54's. estimated.
growth of about 9 per cent.


Senators

suspended

from safety

panel,


* PUERTO RICO
San Juan:-
TWO lawmakers suspected'
of having ties to an :aileged'diug
dealer who \\as killed la-,1
month will he.:susgpenditdiftom aa
public safety. panelL.SenatePres-
ident KennethMNltClinutck said
Thursday, according- to Associ-
ated Press.
Sen. Lomanai Soto, one of
three legislators& being investi-
gated by federaliagentmandithe
island's Justioe-DtEaatment'for
links to accused' diug' dealer
Jose "Coquito" Lopez, and Sen.
Norma Btrgos, who; was pho-
tographedl with' the: slain man
at a concertwillbe replaced on
the Public. Safety Committee,
the Senate, chief said,
McClintoek saidihe made the
decision "merely asi a precau-
tionary measure."
Federal authorities and Pter-
to Rico's Justice Department
are investigatiing'allegations that
Soto, Rep, Epifanio) Jimenez
and Sen. KI2etor. Mantinez had
close ties tm in.ezg which
they have dhniidl.
The legislators,.alliof the pro-
statehood New, Pogressive Par-
ty, have said'they knew Lopez
or his family because he hailed
from their' home district of Car-
olina, a city just east of San
Juan.
Martinez steppedidown from
his role as teadiof the Senate's
public safety panelipending the
investigationi'souteome.
U.S. agents are also investi-
gating allegations that rogue
police officers acted as body-
guards and: informants for
Lopez, who'allegedly controlled
the drug trade in: northeastern
Puerto Rico;.


Jiliane JzTmrIiav



'Be/oled "Wife. (otber and
qrandmotber Of Cyjbrd Cay jaun ,
7"be 3abaamas, passed aay peacefully
atbe residence on 7tesday 8Stb ,August.
2006.


A rl sem ice Wi / e Awi be ltd tt
'Paulds Roia Catholic C11b, cM ord

Cay, on 3(onday n 4 tb ,August, 2006 at

5.45 p.m. sharp:.


r7// //fi offolwu s donations be may sent to
t. 'PRu/s ,oman Catholic Ch urch.
JY/brd Cay, ,N ssau, P(9. Box X.,

80f, ,assau in memory of
: : ian i5 fZirnian.


,MAIN SECTION -
.'Logq I News........ ,.........P1 ,2;3,6,7,8,9,10;11
l/L er .......... ...P4
There ..... .... ....... ...,.;.' .. ,. ............ 0
sCa p Kid Scoop ..........P1.,, ..1........P
HIg 'Society ..... .... ..... ... .... .......... P12
$TS SECTION
,-.................................. ....3,44
S ................................... ................ 1 -
....................... ..... ......................P1l1
!, .. p .i-< ... ........ .
, """ ..:
.. .. : ,, t:; -


SILENT DIESEL GENERATORS
50% BELOW U.S. PRICES
6 KW- 1000 KW ORDER
YOURS NOW AT
www-carib-cable-descrambniers-.com
Bank Financing Available
Contact Us For Detaii


_I _


......................................................................... ................... .......... ................. ......................... .............................................. .......................................................................................................








THE TRIBUNE


SATURDAY, AUGUST 12, 2006, PAGE 3


L CALNEWS


0 In brief

Fishermen
to go back to
Dominican
Republic

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
Santo Domingo
SIXTY-FIVE Dominican
fishermen arrested after being
caught fishing illegally in
Bahamian waters will be
returned to their home coun-
try, the Dominican foreign min-
istry said Thursday, according
to Associated Press.
The fishermen and ship's cap-
tain were arrested in July for
fishing near the capital of Nas-
sau, some 559 miles north of the
Dominican Republic, said for-
eign ministry spokeswoman
Veri Candelario.
The captain, whose name was
not disclosed, was sentenced to
a year in prison and a
US$30,000 fine in the Bahamas,
the foreign ministry said.
The rest of the fishermen will
be returned by plane in the next
few days, the foreign ministry
said,
Separately, a crew of 66
Dominican fishermen detained
in Jamaican waters are also
expected to be returned soon,
the newspaper Listin Diario
reported Thursday.

Annan calls

for revival

of talks on

trade
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
Santo Domingo

UN Secretary-General Kofi
Annan has called for reviving
global trade liberalisation talks
so that developing countries can
use trade to lift millions out of
poverty, according to Associat-
ed Press.
Annan, making his first trip
to the Dominican Republic, said
the World Trade Organization's
long-struggling Doha round of
trade talks were in "crisis."
S "I used the word crisis Idid-
n't say it's dead," Annan said
in a speech at the presidential
palace in the capital of Santo
Domingo. "I hope it can be
revived, because most of the
countries would want to trade
Themselves out of poverty
rather than live on handouts."
The global trade liberalisa-
tion deal, which emphasises
lowering commercial barriers
for developing countries such
as ihe Dominican Republic, col-
1t psed during last month's
WTO meeting in Geneva after
five years of negotiations
between rich and poor nations.
The European Union accused
the United States of derailing
the talks named for the Qatari
capital where negotiations were
launched in 2001 by failing to
offer deeper cuts in subsidies
paid to farmers. The US blamed
Brussels' failure to ease access
to its agricultural market for
foreign goods.
Standing next to Dominican
President Leonel Fernandez,
Annan praised the country's
efforts to reduce poverty by
stressing community involve-
ment and technology.


* Electricity
* Water
* Generator
* Receptionist
* Kitchen and


Farrington 'said he was sorry




the way Robbins had to die'


* By NATARIO McKENZIE

MURDER accused Cordell
Farrington said he was sorry
that Jamaal Robbins had to die
in the manner he did, according
to a statement police say he
gave in 2003.
As the trial continued yes-
terday, Detective Sergeant
Presley Rolle was recalled to
the witness stand to read a
statement he testified to tak-
ing from the accused on Mon-
day, October 27, 2003..
According to the statement,
Farrington said he hoped the
victim's family would find it in
their hearts to forgive him.
While officer Rolle read the
statement, Christine Scott, the
victim's mother began to cry,
but remained in the court-
room.
The trial is expected to con-
clude by mid-week next week.
It was adjourned earlier than
usual again yesterday because
the accused was not taken to
hospital on Thursday, as had
been expected.
Officer Rolle said Farring-
ton gave the statement volun-


Police claim murder accused


admitted crime when questioned


tarily and was cautioned
beforehand. He said the
accused appeared emotionless.
Sergeant Rolle said the state-
ment began at 6.25pm and end-
ed at 7.32pm.
The following remarks were
made by Farrington, according
to the statement:
Farrington, who was 35 and
a warehouse worker at the
time, told police that he met
Jamaal at the Sandilands Reha-
bilitation Centre in Nassau,
befriended him, and that they
began a sexual relationship
which continued when they
returned to Grand Bahama.
The accused said things start-
ed to get out of control and he
became angry when Robbins
began abusing drugs and steal-
ing.
Farrington said in August of


2002 Robbins was arrested.
At this point, Farrington
said, he was low on cash and
had no means of keeping Rob-
bins, so he decided to kill him
as a means of dealing with the
possibility of ultimately losing
him.
Farrington went on to
explain that while Jamaal was
asleep in his bed at Mallory
Lane, he hit him in the head
then about the body with a
metal plank until he thought
the victim was dead.
There was a lot of blood,
Farrington told police, claim-
ing that he began to wipe up
the blood, then wrapped the
body in a blanket and placed it
in the closet.
He said he then called to
Oterrio Floyd, told Floyd that
he had killed Jamaal and


showed him the body wrapped
in the blanket.
The accused told police that
he drove his car to the back
door of the Mallory Lane
apartment and he and Floyd
lifted the body into the car.
From there, they drove to an
area off the Grand Bahama
highway and disposed of the
body, Farrington said.
Also according to the state-
ment, Farrington told police
that when he returned to the
.apartment he continued to
clean up the blood.
He said he then folded the
blood-soaked mattress, took
the bloody sheets and towels
and placed them in the trunk of
his car.
Farrington said he then
drove to Queens Cove and
dumped the items in different


areas.
The accused told police he
threw the metal plank in the
canal.
Officer Rolle noted however
that the weapon was never
recovered.
According to the statement,
Farrington said that sometime
in March 2003, he began
returning to the site to collect
the victim's bones. He said he
knew the date was correct
because he was living at King
Neptune Drive and had a place
to store the bones.
Officer Rolle testified that
according to the accused, he
would revisit the site where he
dumped Robbins' body and
pick the meat off he bones
because he wanted to take the
bones with him, although he
did not say what he did with
the meat.
He also said that the accused
described the murder weapon
as "a straight iron bar".
On Monday jurors will watch
a recorded interview with the
accused, which took place at
CDIJ headquarters in
Freeport.


* CHARLES Frazier (right)
talks about the report as
Glenys Hanna-Martin' (left
loos on)


nificantly reduce traffic con-
gestion.
Making the point that the
issue of congestion in New
providence is fueledby logis-
tics and the number of vehi-
cles, Mrs Hanna-Martin also
pointed out that traffic con-
gestion is a world-wide phe-'
nomenon.
She expressed her delight
in the fact that this study has
been completed, however was
unable to speak to the details
of the report, as the depart-
ments concerned have not
reviewed or discussed the rec-
ommendations.


* By KAHMILE REID

THE MINISTRY of Trans-
port and Aviation has been
presented with a.comprehen-
sive report on strategies that
will be used to address traffic
congestion in New Provi-
dence.
Charles Frazier, who spear-
headed the Congestion
Reduction Study, presented
the report to the Minister of
Transport and Aviation
Glenys Hanna-Martin on
behalf of the Advance Logis-
tics Group (ALG), at a press
conference held at the Min-
istry.
"This project is a shift in
the way traffic congestion is
approached," Mr Frazier said.
HE said the project has
been structured in such a way
that it represents a bold step
in how congestion is dealt
with and has laid commend-
able ground work for how
government should proceed
in dealing with the problem.
The unique factors of New
Providence were identified,
along with the leading caus-
es of congestion and a
detailed diagnosis was formu-
lated, he said.


* Cleaning
* Security
* Parking
* Use of two
conference rooms


Data was collected in the
form of documentation and
information gathered from
meetings held with various
transportation officials who
deal with congestion issues on
a daily basis.
A preliminary analysis was
done which determined the
main problems and allowed
for theoretical modifications.
Mr Frazier said ALG also
met with major stakeholders
from the' public and private
sector in an attempt to
address their concerns.

Model

He said the group was able
to develop a Travel Demand
Simulation Model with the aid
of a Geographic Information
System (GIS).
This, he said, allowed them
to build a mathematical mod-
el in GIS format which.rep-
resents the entire island and
outlines traffic patterns.
With this additional infor-
mation, Mr Frazier said ALG
was able to build a model of
the current situation which
aided in developing strategies
that he is confident will sig-


S Financial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information As Of:
Thursday, 10 August 200 6
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES VISIT WWW.BISXBAHAMAS COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1.561.11 1 CHG 03.61 / %CHG 00.23 / YTD 210.40 / YTD % 16.58
z .%k --Fl." 57 ..r.:-L*1:r..... 3. P.,:,lr *.*.I C :,. I:.; _. ..C 1, .*~'l E F .. i. Ii. ,i P E i .
l 8a ia, .SI ti 3a : .:, r. .ail i1 i 74 1 4 ,, ~. , ,' : N :
12.05 9.25 Bahamas Property Fund 12.04 12.04 0.00 1.612 0.380 7.5 3.16%
7.49 6.50 Bank of Bahamas 7.49 7.49 0.00 0.738 0.330 10.1 4.41%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.292 0.020 2.7 2.50%
1.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.48 1.48 0.00 0.143 0.000 10.3 0.00%
1.49 1.10 Fidelity Bank 1.48 1.48 0.00 0.188 0.050 7.9 3.68%
9.60 8.73 Cable Bahamas 9.10 9.10 0.00 0.618 0.240 14.7 2.64%
2.20 1.39 Colina Holdings 1.96 1.99 0.03 1,439 0.009 0.000 221.1 0.00%
11.00 8.50 Commonwealth Bank 11.00 11.00 0.00 0.943 0.600 11.7 5.66%
6.26 4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.60 4.95 0.35 0.130 0.045 35.3 0.98%
2.88 2.10 Doctor's Hospital 2.50 2.50 0.00 0.283 0.000 8.8 0.00%
6.21 4.02 Famguard 6.21 6.21 0.00 0.539 0.240 11.5 3.86%
11.51 10.49 Finco 11.51 11.51 0.00 500 0.745 0.540 15.1 4.78%
13.10 9.30 FirstCaribbean 13.05 13.10 0.05 1,050 0.885 0.550 14.8 4.20%
11.17 8.91 Focol 11.17 11.17 0.00 0.885 0.500 12.6 4.48%
1.15 1.00 Freeport Concrete 1.00 1.00 0.00 -0.170 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.20 8.65 ICD Utilities 8.65 8.65 0.00 0.532 0.270 16.3 3.12%
9.10 8.27 J. S. Johnson 9.10 9.10 0.00 0.527 0.560 17.3 6.15%
8.02 5.30 Kerzner International BDRs 8.00 8.01 0.01 0.160 0.000 50.1 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10 00 1000 0.00 2.036 0.195 4.9 1.95%
Fldelliy Over-Tha-Counter Securities
2u..'. M- i ... L.:...'_. ,,, t:...,i bit .. LJ-I ir,: '',.4 .1 t.Pi '. D,. .Ij,! P.E Yield
14 0n 1- -. B,: r,.-rn'd uFfr,;r.;. 1. 14.'' l,'.". 1' -t ^ ', 1 _:a c *' o io 7 8 6 40,^
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 8.00 8.25 10.00 0.000 0.640 NM 7.85%
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0 29 0.54 0.00 -0.084 0.000 NM 0.00%
Collna Ovpr-The-Counter Securities
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 .13'.':-. 41 i:.i .2 220 0 000 19.4 0.00.
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.00 15.00 12.50 1.750 0.360 8.0 2.57%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.070 0.000 NIM 0.00%
BISX Listed Mutual Funds .: '.
52wk-Hi 51.'.L,.. 1Funr dr.,rr..- r.l TO L I 1' l. [. i 1610 .
1.3009 I 2.JJ. C-:.:.r.n r 1:.r.- r.1 r F .-.: 1 -0i:I .:i "
2.9038 2.4169 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.9038***
2.4415 2.2528 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.441484**
1.1820 1.1246 Colina Bond Fund 1.182038"***
-': ... .- FIENDEX: CLOSE B83.60 / YTD 23.87% / 2005 26.09% '
Bi Z !LL E;i P "luE .:': -In- C:- i.-.. [.lfr.E r TEiR1z.l -l.:. I E
52wk-Hi Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid 5 Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Collna and fidelity 28 July 2006
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week 30 June 2006
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value 30 June 2006
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months NIM Not Meaningful
O TRADE CALL: COLINA242-502-7010 I FIDELITY 242-366-7764 FOR M E DATA & INFORMATION CALL (242)
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 / FIDELITY 242-366-7764 f FOR MOkE DATA & INFORMATION CALL (242) 394-2M03


Strategies are



considered to



tackle traffic



congestion


-4
-- ,- --- - -'.



';' . A '
.." '- in, a

R as
~ ~ - ~. l' it. f iL ii
T.V .=, ,- -", =-_-_ ,-- -|- T _,s. i
a 1.
,"- ',.:11 1 s A A P r1 -* f

i ., .. .. ;_ ... sa , t .
B "" ':.1- 4: alf 1 A 6 I iB

L ^R il 1i 1 i 1
~ ~ ~ ~ 3 1 q4 a ag a


OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE
PERFECT FOR ATTORNEY:

Rent includes the following:


Bathroom Supplies Use of Law Library


To arrange viewing please call: 394-5145



FENDI BOUTIQUE


Is looking for a Sales Associate
at least 25 years old
honest, mature, responsible and flexible
cashing and computer experience an asset
outgoing personality
Send resume to
P.O. Box N-1688 or fax
322-1361 or hand deliver.


NO CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED.







PAE ,SAURALUGSE1, 06 HETIBN


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeportfax: (242) 352-9348



US military understands limits of force


ATLANTA The most important les-
son we should have learned in the five years
since Sept. 11 is that, as a tool for winning
hearts and minds, force has its limits.
In Iraq, force succeeded in removing Sad-
dam Hussein from power. In Afghanistan,
military force brought down the Taliban and
stripped al-Qaida of its sanctuary.
But in Iraq, force has proved unable to
transform a dictatorship into a functioning
democracy. Force has failed to transform
most Iraqis, and most Arabs, into supporters
of American policy. Force has failed to intim-
idate the Arab world into meekly accepting
American leadership in the region, as the
neo-conservative architects of this war
believed it would.
We have also learned once again -
that in a struggle against insurgents and ter-
rorists, relying too heavily on firepower cre-
ates more enemies than it kills, particularly if
that firepower is levelled too often at inno-
cent civilians.
That was the message back in May from
Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, who
complained that U.S. killings of innocent
Iraqis had become a "daily phenomenon"
by troops who "do not respect the Iraqi peo-
ple. They crush them with their vehicles and
kill them just on suspicion. This is completely
unacceptable," ,
It was the message from Brig. Nigel Ayl-
win-Foster, a respected British officer who
served with U.S. forces in Iraq and who last
year published a scathing analysis of the
American over reliance on force. Aylwin-
Foster concluded that in honing itself to
become "the ultimate war-fighting machine"
with "a marked and uncompromising focus
on conventional war-fighting," the U.S.
Army had lost sight of the fact that such a
struggle must be won politically, not mili-
tarily.
After three years in Iraq, many American
officers have come to that same conclusion.
"We arrested people in front of their fam-
ilies, dragging them away in handcuffs with
bags over their heads, and then provided no
information to the families of those we incar-
cerated," observed Army Lt. Col. Douglas
McGregor, now retired. "In the end, our sol-
diers killed, maimed and incarcerated thou-
sands of Arabs, 90 per cent' of whom were
not the enemy. But they are now."
Ahmed Hashim, a professor at the Naval
War College and who served for almost two


Looking for

Japanese used cars?


New Arrivals Weekly

Mitsubishi

Suzuki

Toyota

Nissan

Honda

We have various makes


Check our prices

Before Buying

at

Bahamas Bus & Truck

call:


years with U.S. forces in Iraq, reaches that
same conclusion in his book "Insurgency
and Counter-insurgency in Iraq."
"The U.S. military's response to the insur-
gency has been uniformly muscular, its:
weapon of choice the blunt military instru-
ment," writes Hashim, who warns that a civil-
ian population alienated by such tactics is
providing support for insurgents "as well as
a steady supply of recruits."
Even our top brass is coming to that con-
clusion. Gen. Peter Schoomaker, Army chief
of staff, has made Aylwin-Foster's report
required reading for his generals, and has
also commissioned a new military field man-
ual that attempts to downplay force.
"Lose moral legitimacy, lose the war,"
warns the manual, which was written under
the direction of Lt. Gen. David Petraeus,
who commanded the 101st Airborne in Iraq.
"Efforts to build a legitimate government
through illegitimate action including unjus-
tified or excessive use of force, unlawful
detention, torture or punishment without
trial are self-defeating, even against insur-
gents who conceal themselves amid non-
combatants."
As Hashim points out, the U.S. military's
over reliance on force is in many ways an
echo of the over reliance on force of the
Sneoconservatives who pushed. us' into the'
warin Iraq. But there is a critical difference.
In war, mistakes are inevitable, and victo-0
ry often depends on whether you recognize
and correct your mistakes more quickly than
your opponent corrects his own. Our best
and brightest in the military, to their credit,
are trying hard to adapt, with new ideas
about the proper use of force spreading
through their ranks like a virus.
However, that virus hasn't made the leap
into our nation's civilian leadership.
Watching the White House allow and even
encourage Israel to pursue much the same
course in Lebanon that we have taken in
Iraq and listening to the neoconservatives
press for military actions against Iran and
Syria dashes any hope that the Bush admin-
istration and its backers have learned much
the last few years.


(* This article is by Jay Bookman, deputy
editorial page editor of the Atlanta Journal-
Constitution 2006).


Attention!





The Bahamas





is for sale


EDITOR, The Tribune
I'M a born Bahamian and a
member of an old Bahamian
family and have become extra-
ordinarily frustrated when I
realise that the Bahamas is 'sell-
ing out' all our desirable real
estate. This process is hurting
all Bahamians and in particu-
lar those in the lower and mid-
dle class. We have become a
playground for the rich who
have the ability to roam the
world and purchase property in
destinations and locations most
pleasing to them. This volume
of foreign buyers is "squeezing"
out Bahamian property buyers
and having a trickle down effect
on prices even at the lower-end
as Bahamians must go "down
the line" to find properties they
can afford.
Commercial vs Residential
Investors:
In this letter, an important
distinction is to be made
between the foreign commer-
cial (hotel) investor and the for-
eign second home (residential)
buyer. The commercial investor
provides benefits to the econo-
my, individual Bahamian work-
ers and the entire society. My
frustrations are directed at the
number of foreign second home
(residential) buyers. The liber-
alisation of the foreign second
home buyer's market has gone
too far and as the saying goes:
"Too much of a good thing..."
We can accommodate second
home buyers, but only in mod-
eration.
Family Island & Waterfront
Property:
My personal travels have tak-
en me to numerous family
islands within the last several
years. Even as a Bahamian; the
beauty of the islands is Il". -_.
striking. This beauty is obvi-
ously not lost on foreigners as
they are gradually purchasing
every oceanfront property avail-
able on the market. The effects
of this process are evident.
These property prices are now
out of reach of 95 per cent or
more of Bahamians. Future
Bahamians may not know what
it is like to reside on the water-
front. The economic effect of
second home homeowners is as
nothing when compared to
commercial foreign investors.
Also, when it is time to sell a
property, certain foreigners do
not "list" the property for sale
in The Bahamas but instead
network abroad to other for-
eign property buyers, so not
considering the extraordinary
price increases over the past 10
years the property may not even


MULTI-DISCOUNT FURNITURE &

The First Stop on your Shopping List!


BEAT THE HEAT

Air Conditioners


I
a


6000 BTL Remote ....................234.00
8000 BTU ................................ $285.00
8000 BTU Remote
High Energy Efficient Model ..$350.00
10000 BTU Remote .............. $377.00
12000 BTU Remote.................$389.00
12000 BTU Remote
High Energy Efficient Model..$409.00
14000 BTU Remote .................$495.00
18000 BTU Remote .................$575.00
24000 BTU Remote
High Energy Efficient Model ..$755.00


I I
II






Ea


become available on the local
market for the few Bahamians
who will be able to afford it.
Critics of my thoughts will
say, "Well, we live in a free mar-
ket economy and those are the
effects of the system". My
response is that the world is
NOT a 100 per cent free market
system and countries like the
United States, Canada and
members of the European
Union have numerous standing
tariffs and restrictions to pro-
tect their local industries and
citizens. A few examples of the
restrictions include lumber,
media ownership, ethanol fuel,
steel, agricultural products and
the list goes. on. Major
economies like Europe and the
United States care nothing for
free trade when it is not in their
interest, as they give away bil-
lions in subsidies to their cor-
porate farmers while they
restrict imports from starving
third world countries who rely
heavily on the sale of agricul-
tural products. For people to
suggest we should have a free
real estate market, which bene-
fits the richest 5 per cent of their
citizenry is ridiculous and we
should not bow to it.
I highlight these examples not
to attack these countries but to
say if they, as the largest and
richest in the world, can have
reasonable restrictions why does
a tiny country like the Bahamas
need to completely open our
property markets to the world
at large?
According to Forbes Maga-
zine-, there aie approximately
800 billionaires and untold num-
bers of multi-millionaires world-
wide. How few of these indi-
viduals would it take to go to
places like Great Exuma,
Crooked Island, Eleuthera or
Long Island and purchase every
beachfront property available
and lock Bahamians out of the
market once and for all? I don't
make reference to Abaco,
Grand Bahama or Nassau as I
fear the game may be almost
up.
Recently a Bahamian friend


relayed a story to me of a New
Year's party that he attended
on Long Island with about 25
other people. At the party he
realized that there were only
three Bahamians in attendance,
with the rest naturally being for-
eigners. His conversations with
them gravitated toward their
property purchases, the rela-
tively low prices paid (for them
at least) and even more sur-
prising the little or no property
taxes foreigners are playing on
their properties. I recently read
an article in The Tribune enti-
tied "Crooked Island's Proper-
ty Boom". This article did noth-
ing but cheerlead the fact that
foreigners were purchasing the
desirable properties and the
prices were increasing at a fan-
tastic rate (naturally it omits
that these price increases have
priced out probably 95 per cent
ormore of the Crooked Island
residents and Bahamians in
general). After reading the
dizzying real estate prices, I did
not understand any economic
benefit to justify the potential
"loss" of a place truly uniquely
Bahamian as Crooked Island.
Solutions:
As for general solutions, we
may need a combination of the
following: Tougher restrictions
on the number of foreign prop-,.
erty buyers. Much higher stamp
duty (transfer tax) on the sale of
property to foreigners. Much
higher property tax rates on for-
eign property owners (perhaps -
five times the tax rate for'.
Bahamians). Whatever the solu-
tions, we cannot continue on
the same course, as the
Bahamas.may be lost forever.
As a positive note, I applaud
the current administration for
the preservation of Clifton Cay.
Many Bahamians, who will not'-
take the effort to make them
known, share these views
expressed. I wish both political
parties luck in the next election'
and I hope the issues below are.
considered in your manifesto,-
for your benefit and those of'
the Bahamian people.
ANONYMOUS
BAHAMIAN
"Looking for a
piece of the rock"
Nassau
June 2006


Thanks for efforts


EDITOR, The Tribune
WITH regards to the pub-
lication of our letter Friday;
we would like to thank all
those people who phoned
with compliments and the
senior officials in Immigra-
tion who graciously took
time out from their busy


schedules to help me. Within
hours of the letter's publica-
tion the matter was resolved.
Thank you for making this
possible.
IAN GOODFELLOW
Team Goodfellow
Nassau
August 5 2006


PART-TIME
ACCOUNTING OFFICER

Tasks and responsibilities include but are not limited to:

Reviewing monthly accounting entries before posting
Reconciliation of all bank accounts, including
investment brokerage account
Reconciliation of all re-insurer accounts, quarterly
Recording all investments entries
Monitoring maturity of investments in portfolio in
order to advise financial controller
Assisting accounting officer and financial controller
with completion of monthly management accounts as
well year end audit

Successful candidate should meet the following criteria:

Bachelors degree in accounting or professional
accounting designation with 1 or 2 years experience
Team player, able to operate in a very small office
environment and handle individual repsonsibilities
Affinity with figures and attention to details

Respond to:
Financial Controller
P.O. Box N 8320
or
Fax: 326-3132


PAGE 4, SATURDAY, AUGUST 12, 2006


~r i~rrra~aPIIIPr ~041~~8111
arrrr
:~c*r~rc *III~ I~rra -~
~~a~lrma~r;l~(l**aaf~,
~i~lbFi~i~*trq d*r*l~i~slr~l .~a~PI1~WIS(pff


THE TRIBUNE






SA I UHDAY, AUGUSI -12, 2UUbl, I-'AUt


I lH I iibUIl


0 In brief

Cuba

lambastes

US court

decision


Veteran diplomat condemns




Israeli attacks on Lebanon


CUBA
Havana
COMMUNIST officials on
Thursday lambasted a US appel-
late court decision denying a
new trial to five men convicted
in Miami of being unregistered
Cuban agents, implying it was
tied to Fidel Castro's current ill-
ness and absence from power,
according to Associated Press.
On Wednesday the full 11th
US Circuit Court of Appeals in
Atlanta, with two judges dis-
senting, rejectedthe men's argu-
ment that pervasive community
prejudice against the Cuban
government and pretrial pub-
licity prevented them from
receiving a fair trial.
In Havana, the Communist
Party daily Granma noted the
ruling coincides with recent
events in Cuba, where Fidel
Castro temporarily ceded pow-
er to his brother Raul on July 31
after announcing he had under-
gone intestinal surgery.
"All of this occurs in an
unusual way and at a time when
Miami is calling for an end to a
sovereign nation, calling for ter-
rorism with the greatest inso-
lence, urging bloodbaths, pro-
claiming to the news media in a
loud voice its calls for political
assassination and genocide," the
official newspaper said.
"This has been a political case
from the beginning," Granma
said, adding it demonstrates
"hate and vengeance against the
Cuban nation."

Former
Jamaica PM
launches
consultancy

JAMAICA
Kingston
- FORMER Jamaica Prime
Minister PJPatlteirsin his start-
ed a firm to advise local busi-
nesses on how to expand
regionally, his assistant said
Wednesday, according to Asso-
Sciated Press.
SHeisConsults will focus on
companies trying to benefit
from the Caribbean Single Mar-
ket Economy, a deal designed
to allow goods, services and
skilled workers to move more
easily throughout the region,
said Debbie Hamilton, Patter-
son's assistant.
Patterson, 72, opened the firm
on Aug. 2 in New Kingston, the
capital's business district.
The Caribbean island's for-
mer premier, who stepped
down in March after 14 years
as Jamaica's leader, has said the
firm will not accept government
jobs.
Patterson led the ruling Peo-
ple's National Party to three
consecutive election victories.
But his administration was
dogged by scandals and allega-
tions of corruption while the
Jamaican economy lagged and
the crime rate soared.


* By KAHMILE REID
THE attacks by Israeli forces
on the civilian population in
Lebanon are "uncivilised"
according to former journalist,
MP and cabinet minister Sir
Arthur Foulkes.
These civilians, Sir Arthur
said, are not military targets,
and should not be treated as
such.
He was echoing sentiments
expressed earlier this week by
Amnesty International, which
condemned the Israeli armed
forces for "deliberate and indis-
criminate attacks on women
children."
Sir Arthur said he is in com-
plete support of AI, and their
request that the United Nations
Security Council call for an
"immediate, full and effective
ceasefire to protect civilians in
Lebanon and Israel from what
they dub unlawful attacks".
"Civilised people for a long
time have come to the recogni-


tion that even in war, there are
rules," Sir Arthur pointed out.
He said that one of these rules
is that "people and property
that do not contribute to the
war effort be protected against
unnecessary destruction and
hardship."
Sir Arthur noted that the
present Middle East crisis is
not only a danger to the civil-
ians being directly affected, but
a danger to the whole world.
The Bahamas he said, is no
exception.
Although he totally disap-
proves of the actions of the
Israeli forces, Sir Arthur said
he does not advise the
Bahamas government to offi-
cially condemn anyone at this
point.
He asserted that the best way
for government officials
approach the crisis is to get
together and offer solutions as
soon as possible.
According to Amnesty Inter-
national, the kinds of attacks


* SIR Arthur Foulkes


being carried out by both sides
have become part of an
"increasingly entrenched pat-
tern which includes war
crimes."
The statement referred to the
repeated Israeli strikes against


Lebanese infrastructure, the
forcible displacement of hun-
dreds of thousands of civilians
and the intentional destruction
of roads and bridges.
"Such attacks make it urgent
and imperative that Israel and
Lebanon consent to an investi-
gation of the pattern of
attacks by both Israel and
Hezbollah by an independent
and impartial body like the
International Humanitarian
Fact-Finding Commission
(IHFFC)", the statement said.
The director of AI's Middle
East Programme Malcom
Smart condemned the actions
of both parties and the silence
of world leaders, saying: "the
past few days has been a hor-
rendous escalation in attacks
against civilians and civilian
infrastructure ... yet G8 lead-
ers have failed conspicuously
to uphold their moral and legal
obligation to address such bla-
tant breaches of international
law, which in some cases have


amounted to war crimes."
These allegations were
reportedly made following eye-
witness interviews conducted
by AI in Lebanon.
According to pne eye wit-
ness, Israeli forces launched
two air strikes against a farm
in al-Qaa on Friday of last
week.
The victims of this attack
included workers, most of
whom were Syrian Kurds. Five
of them were women whose
job it was to pack and process
fruits for export from the farm.
The witness said that once
the smoke had cleared, he saw
22 bodies being pulled out of
the rubble.
An Israeli spokesperson said
the attack was directed at a sus-
pected transfer of Hezbollah
weapons from Syria.
AI claims the Israeli
spokesperson's report was
inconsistent with eyewitness
reports and footage from the
scene.


Insurance company to hold


free financial seminars


BRITISH American
Insurance has announced
that it will host an evening
of free seminars designed to
educate the public on finan-
cial planning, investment and
healthy lifestyles.
The event entitled, Mid-
summer Night School will be
staged from 6pm to 8.30pm
on Wednesday, August 16 at
the company's headquarters:
on Independence Drive.
"As a pioneer in Financial
Services in the Bahamas and
the oldest insurance compa-
ny locally, we have created
the annual Midsummer
Night School as one of a
series of free public educa-
tion events in appreciation
of the public's support over
the past 86 years of opera-
tions in the Bahamas," said
the company's president and
CEO Chester Cooper.
With free sessions for both
adults and children, the
event is open to the public
and intended to provide
attendees with expert advice
and information to help
them to improve their mon-
ey management skills and
long term financial and
health protection while
achieving their financial
goals.
"We are not only offering
creative products and ser-
vices to help you amass and
protect wealth, but we recog-
nise that financial literacy is



FR1]11ILA IIVICE
F e ti i z r, F n gi c d e
P~est Control
TPOPI ,ldEtmint


POSITION AVAILABLE

A TECHNICIAN WITH ELECTRONIC MACHINE
NEEDED. MUST HAVE EXPERIENCE A GOOD
SALARY IS BEING OFFERED.

PLEASE CALL
394-3457
TO SET UP AN APPOINTMENT.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MYRTHA ST ANGE OF
McKINNEY AVENUE, STAPLETON, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 12TH day of AUGUST, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.



Notice

NOTICE is hereby given that ZAMRUD SULTANA SHERIFF,
P.O.BOX F 44317, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 5th day of AUGUST, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Freeport,
Bahamas.


an important first step; so we
are meeting this need as well,"
said Mr Cooper.

Topics

Seminar topics include: finan-
cial planning and investments;
from the cradle to the grave -
managing your risk with insur-
ance; mortgages how to get
more for less; food for thought -
a healthy mind and body; get
your house in order wills and
estate planning made simple.
There will also be a session
on "what every man and
woman should know" by the
local representatives of Pfizer
Pharmaceuticals (the manufac-
turers of Viagra).
These 30-minute seminars
will be repeated several times
throughout the evening so that
students can attend at least
three sessions.
There will also be a "BA
headstart" session, an extension
of the BA headstart programme
launched in primary schools in
2004 to teach children the




SATURDAY,
AUGUST 12TH
12:00 411
12:30 Aqua Kids
1:00 1994 Caribbean Volleyball
Championship Women's
Gold Medal Game:
Bahamas vs Barbados
3:00 1994 Caribbean Volleyball
Championship Men's
Gold Medal Game:
Bahamas vs Barbados
5:00 Cricket World
5:30 Gillette World Sports
6:00 Ballroom Boxing
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
7:30 Da Native Stew
8:00 The Envy Life
8:30 N-Contrast
9:00 Tropical Beat
10:00 American Chart Show
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 The Lounge
1:30am Community Page 1540AM

SUNDAY,
AUGUST 13
6:30am Community Pg. 1540AM
8:30 Spiritual Impact
9:00 EMPACT
9:30 The Voice That Makes
The Difference
10:00 Effective Living
10:30 Morning Joy
11:00 St. Barnabas Anglican Ch.
1:00 .Gilette World Sports
1:30 Sports Desk
2:00 A Rhema Moment
3:00 Video Gospel
3:30 Ernest Angley Ministries
4:30 Temple Fellowship
Ministries International
5:00 Walking In Victory
6:00 The Apostolic Hour
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
7:30 Kemp Road Ministries
8:00 This Week In The Bahamas
8:30 Paul Morton In Concert
9:00 Ecclesia Gospel
10:00 Turning Point
10:30 Bobby Jones
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 New Dimension
12m/n Community Pg. 1540AM
NOE0 N-V13rsre h
rih o aelstmnt
program hanes


importance of saving and invest-
ing.
Attendees may be able to
qualify for a mortgage with spe-
cial incentives at the event as
well as have free private finan-
cial consultations.
There will be blood pressure
screenings and glucose testing
and the opportunity to donate
blood to the Princess Margaret
Hospital's blood bank.
Midsummer Night School
Seminars will be led by finan-
cial, insurance and law experts
from British American Insur-
ance Company and McKinney
Bancroft and Hughes law firm.
Established in 1920 in the
Bahamas, British American
Insurance has offices in Lon-
don, Malta, Mauritius and
Kenya.


* CHESTER Cooper, president and CEO of British American
Insurance


ire


po t t e r y s t u d i


Boot Camp for the Bored Artist


We're doing it again! Before the summer furn n'' .the
kids up for a creative, fun and educational prbrX~t'th~e
Earth & Fire Pottery Studio! We will teach kidageS 6 16 ,
about pottery, glazes, and creating their own matpece~: s:
using various painting designs and techniques;


Camp Week Includes:

9\pieces of pottery, valued from $16 $30 each
Daily Atlantis encounters, snacks and drinks
Customized sessions on pottery, painting techniques
and glazes F
Painting supplies, studio time and kiln firing .

Plus, a fun afternoon at Club Rush!


SIGN UP NOW AS SPACE IS LIMITED


L OCALNEWS


I







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, SATURDAY, AUGUST 12, 2006


LOCALSNEWS


Q:N7n c~afV 9one v


FRIDAY marked the 100th anniversary of the

birth of Sir Milo Butler, the first Bahamian Gov-

ernor general of the Bahamas. This week, In

Days Gone By looks back at a few moments in

the distinguished career of a national hero.


* ON the afternoon
of January 22, 1986,
hundreds of
Bahamians gathered
to witness the
unveiling of the
statue of Sir Milo
in Rawson Square
on the seventh
anniversary of his
death.
(Photo: Charles
Davis)


* PRESIDENT of the Senate Dame Doris Johnson presents the Speech
from the Throne to the Governor-General Sir Milo Butler on January 28,
1976


Orant's U1owln W eevlep tfobisit CIburcr
(Ballou Hll Rd & Ch'ape StreU PO Pot CB- 18l 6
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)
SUNDAY AUGUST 13, 2006

7:00a.m. W. Higgs/A. Woodside
11:00a.m. E. Miller/K. Rose
7:00p.m. Board of Music Ministry





GRACE AND PEACE WESLEYAN CHURCH
A SOCIETY OF THE FREE METHODIST CHURCH OF NORTH AMERICA

i IIHERE GOD IS .DORED .AD El ER)'ONE IS .FFIR IEDL


Church School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.. Box SS-5631

Telephone number:324-2538 Telefax number:324-2587



COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE


THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH
Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
ll Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135

CHURCH SERVICES
SE SUNDAY, AUGUST 13, 2006
TENTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST

ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH, Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart

COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH, Bernard Road
11:00AM Pastor Sharon Loyley
CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH, Zion Boulevard
10:00AM Mrs. Minerva Knowles
EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH, East Shirley Street
11:00AM Pastor Martin Loyley
7:00PM Pastor Martin Loyley
GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH, Queen's College Campus
9:30AM Rev. James Neilly
ST. MICHAEL'S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue
8:00AM Connections Rev. Phillip Stubbs
9:30AM Rev, Philip Stubbs
TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
11:00AM Rev. William Higgs
7:00PM Rev. William Higgs
* ****** .****** **.****"**** ***. *********************************.. **.. *************


RADIO PROGRAMMES
'RENEWAL' on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Your Hosts: Mrs. Kenris L. Carey
METHODIST MOMENTS' on each weekday at 6:55a.m.
Your Host: Mrs. Kenris L. Carey
.....................................................
OPENING OF THE NEW CHURCH YEAR
The FOCUS TRAINING EVENT will be held on Saturday, September 2,
2006, 9:00am 2:00pm at Epworth Hall, East Shirley Street. This Conference
event is for all Staff, Congregational Board Chairpersons, Treasurers, Lay
Preachers and leaders of all organizations.
Lay Preahers wishing to participate in the PULPIT EXCHANGE on Sunday
morning, September 3, 2006, are asked to call Ms. Debra Gibson at the
Conference Office 393-3726/2355 to register their names.
The Official Opening of the New Church Year Service will be held on
Sunday, September 3, 2006, 7:00pm at Ebenezer. Rev. Dr. Eddie Fox from
the World Methodist Council will be the guest preacher. A reception will
follow the Service at Epworth Hall.


BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL


'Sunday School: 10am
Preachering 11am & 7:30pm
Radio Bible Hour:
Sunday 6pm ZNS 2
Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm


FUNDAMENTAL
EVANGELISTIC

Pastor:H. Mills


"Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are"
Pastor: H. Mills Phone: 393-0563 Box N-3622


CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL
CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS Tel: 325-2921
SUNDAY, AUGUST 13TH, 2006
11:30am & 7:00pm
Speaker: Pastor Dexter Duvalier
Topic: Walking In Victory
Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
S* Sisters' Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)


LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future


ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND
Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles
P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL lynnk@batelnet.bs




EVANGELISTIC


TEMPLE
A Life Changing Experience

Collins Avenue at 4th Terrace Centreville
Telephone: 322-8304 or 325-1689 P.O. Box N-1566
Fax No. 322-4793


SUNDAY 8:30am ZNS-1
8:30am
9:45am
ll:00am
7:00pm

WEDNESDAY 7:30PM


Temple Time Broadcast
Early Morning Worship
Sunday School For All Ages
Worship Service
Evening Celebration

Selective Bible Teaching Royal
Rangers (Boys Club) Ages 4-17 Years
Missionettes (Girls Club) Ages 4-17.


VISIT OUR PREMISE BOOKSTORE, TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY


* GOVERNOR-DESIGNATE Sir Milo and Lady Butler pose
outside Buckingham Palace following his knighting by Queen
Elizabeth and subsequent luncheon with Her Majesty on June
27,1973

S THE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS
CONFERENCE
SOF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE
CARIBBEAN AND THE AMERICAS
L'EGLISE METHODISTE DANS LA CARAIBE
ET LES AMERIQUES
NASSAU CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES -- -
108 Montrose Avenue
P.O. BoxEE-16379, Nassau, Bahamas; Telephone: 325-6432; Fax:
328-2784; rhodesmethod@batelnetbs
METHODISM: RAISED UP IN THE PROVIDENCE OF- OD,
TO REFORM THE NATION, BUT ESPECIALLY THE
CHURCH AND TO SPREAD SCRIPTURAL HOLINESS
THROUGHOUT THE LAND (Father John Wesley)
"Celebrating 223 years of continuous Methodist
witness for Christ in The Bahamas"
THE TENTH LORD'S DAY AFTER PENTECOST, AUGUST
13, 2006
INTROIT AND COLLECT:
They prevented me in the day of my calamity, but the Lord was
my stay. I will love you, Lord, my strength.
The Lord is my rock, and my fortress and my deliverer, my God,
my rock in whom I take refuge, my shield, and the horn of my
salvation and my stronghold.
ALMIGHTY GOD, who see that we are unable of ourselves to
defend ourselves: preserve us both outwardly in our bodies and
inwardly in bodies and from all evil thoughts which may attack
and hurt our souls; through Jesus Christ our Lord.

WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd East)
9:00 a.m. Bro. Arthur Chase
11:00 a.m. Bro. Andrew Hunter

RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH
(108 Montrose Ave. near Wulff Rd)
7:00 a.m. Sis. Natasha Rolle & Sis. Betty Clarke
10:00 a.m. Prayer Band
11:00 a.m. Bro. Arthur Chase
6:30 p.m. Women Alive/ Men of Action
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH
(Rose Street, Fox Hill)
11:00 a.m. Sis. Patrice Strachan (Local Preacher)
PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza)
11:00 a.m. Sis. Annette Poitier (Local Preacher)
HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST CHURCH
(28 Crawford St, Oakes Field)
9:00 a.m. Sis. Cecilia Gardiner (Local Preacher)
GOOD SHEPHERD METHODIST CHURCH
(20 Cedar Terrace, Tall Pines)
5:15 p.m. Good Shepherd Youth
CROIX-DES-MISSIONS-ALDERSGATE (Quackoo Street)
9 a.m. Youth Enuentro Group
Friday (September 17)Children's Club at 5 p.m.
METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -
Thrift Shop and other Ministries
JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford St.,
Oakes Field) Reception to Primary
RADIO PROGRAMS
"Vision" On the Lord's Day, ZNS 1 at 9 p.m.; "Great Hymns of
Inspiration" On the Lord's Day, Radio 810 at 5:30 p.m.; "Family
Vibes" ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.; "To God be the Glory" ZNS 1,
Tuesday, 7:45 p.m.

PRAYERS
Our brothers and sisters in the Middle East, those affected by hurricanes
and other natural disasters, and the Privy Council Appeal.


Worship time: 11am & 7pm

Prayer Time: 10:15am to 10:45am


Worship time: llam & 7pm

Sunday School: 9:45am

Prayer time: 6:30pm

Place:

The Madeira Shopping

Center


Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles


__j


.I ..,


r

















;


ci~.
t.
...; .;
;`"'""~














Feel the Rush 'a huge success'


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
FREEPORT The second-
annual Feel the Rush junkanoo
parade was a huge cultural and
economic success according to
an event organiser who
reported that ticket sales
exceeded last year's figures.
Peter Adderley said the event
also drew significant support
from Nassau and the interna-
tional market, particularly
South Florida.
"We think we are creating a
signature annual event for
Grand Bahama," he said. "We
are truly delighted with the suc-
cess of the parade, and like last
year, we are very pleased about
the fact that we have been able
to impact Grand Bahama's cul-
tural and economic life."
Mr Adderley commended the
four competing groups for going
"beyond the call of duty" and
surpassing the 200-participant
requirement.
He said the groups lined up
400 to 500 members and put on
a very competitive show for the
fans.
The Valley Boys out of New
Providence finished first with a
total of 3,806 points.
The defending champion Sax-
on's Superstars of New Provi-
dence finished second with a


Numbers of performers

and audiences both up

for Freeport festival


total score of 3,775 points.
One Family, which is also out
of New Providence, was third
with 3,601 points, and the
Grand Bahama All-Stars came
in fourth with 3,365 points.
"They all went beyond the
call duty in putting the numbers
on the streets and the way they
carried out the Bimini theme -
it was a great and wonderful
tribute to the island of Bimini,"
Mr Adderley said.
In addition to Sunday's
parade, he stated that event
organizers had also extended
the weekend of activities to
West End and to the Interna-
tional Bazaar.
Mr Adderley thanked Prime
Minister Perry Christie for
attending the parade in
Freeport.
"I am extremely grateful to
the prime minister for accepting
our invitation and officially
opening the parade. But, he too
went beyond the call of duty
with his participation in all of


the groups during their rush,"
he said.
Mr Adderley said the event
was well supported out of Nas-
sau, but that unfortunately a
group out of South Florida,
which purchased an entire sec-
tion, was not able to find suffi-
cient rooms on the island for
everybody to come and attend
the parade.
"Grand Bahama just did not
have sufficient rooms to accom-
modate the international mar-
ket, as the domestic tourism
took all the rooms, and so we
are hoping that next year we
would have more rooms on the
island," he said.
Mr Adderley thanked spon-
sors of the event, including the
Grand Bahama Port Authori-
ty, the Ministry of Tourism, the
Ginn Corporation, Grand
Bahama Power, Burns House,
Old Bahama Bay and Tourism
Minister Obie Wilchcombe,
who came up with the idea for
Feel the Rush.


Valley Boys taking to



the streets of Bimini


asko Wind Tower Fan
2" with remote control $90o0
WVHITE
$s58o00
tk d BLACK
Lasko Pedestal Fan- .. $56
18" in Black & White stationary or oscillating :
ii ''""":"::l i;llm.'


* By KAHMILE REID
THE Valley Boys are set to
bring their Feel the Rush win-
ning performance to the streets
of Bimini on 26 August.
Bahamians and visitors who
have become addicted to
Bimini's charm will have anoth-
er excuse to venture its shores -
-the Bimini Rush Celebration.
Peter Adderley, co-ordinator
for the Feel the Rush parade in
Grand Bahama for the past two
years, said although Biminites
were thrilled to have had this
year's rush-out dedicated to
their island, they also indicated
that they wanted a "first-hand
feel of rush".
Mr Adderley told The Tri-
bune that he intends to give it to
them.
The celebration will take the
form of a weekend of events
beginning on Friday with a
junkanoo skills competition; this
competition will be open to
junkanoo performers through-


out the island.
On Saturday the leaders of
the Valley Boys will put on a
junkanoo workshop for the local
students who are interested.
The rush parade will begin at
9pm on Saturday night.
The weekend will end on a
religious note with a special
church service on Sunday morn-
ing.
Mr Adderley said the 200-
strong Valley Boys are expected
to carry the same theme as they
did in Grand Bahama last week
- however they will be adding
some traditional features.
Support for the event has
reportedly been secured from
Norma Wilkinson, head of the
Tourism office in Bimini.
Chairman from the local gov-
ernment of Bimini Tasha
Bullard-Rolle said she is excited
about the event and is certain
that it has the full support of
Biminites.
Mr Adderley. said plans are
in their final stages and that


Valley Boys leader Gus Cooper
and chairman Brian Adderley
embraced the idea with great
enthusiasm.
"The core factor of their
acceptance is the impact that it
will have on Bimini's cultural
and economic life, coupled with
the degree of exposure it has
the potential .to give to
junkanoo in general." he said.
Mr Adderley is also the pres-
ident of Creative Works, a pub-
lic relations, marketing and
advertising firm based in Grand
Bahama and public relations
director for the C-Cube seating
company.
He has been an integral part
of the promotion of junkanoo in
the Bahamas and says he hopes
to continue to take "Feel the
Rush" and similar events to
higher heights.
Mr Adderley said he expects
hundreds of patrons from New
Providence and the Family
Islands to attend the Bimini
event.


Lasko 12" & 16"
Oscillating Wall Mount Fans -----
3 whisper-quiet speeds -
S$74


Lasko 12" Desk Fan
3 whisper-quiet speeds --,..

$3800

Lasko Platinum"


1:.


Desktop Wind Tower -
Space-saving desktop size-slim 6" diameter : : '*

. ... iT~~i~fit


sNATUREi 0



WITH 84 TRACE


o


POSITIONS AVAILABLE


Bottled water company invites applicants for;
Truck Drivers, Sales People, and Receptionist

The potential candidates must meet the following criteria;
* A minimum but not limited to a High School Diploma,
along with working experience in a similar position
Excellent communication skills

Must be a team player, motivated & well groomed

Successful applicants can look forward to
competitive re-numeration and benefits,

Willing to work flexible hours

Applicants must be 25 yrs or older and possess
a clean police record & a valid drivers license.


Please note that we are located in
the western district near the airport.

All interested persons are asked to call
377-0444 thru 0446 or submit resumes to
jobs@NlautillsHl20.co prior to August 11, 2006.

Only successful applicants will be contacted.


L(FN S & r LYPEC17ON FURLL SET FLOOR MATS
%lIl( IS & SE14% IC .F SL RE I


16 OC
S8600


GRAB LIFE BY THE HORNS


200.6 DODGE DURANGO


7 PASSENGER.


RUGGEDYE SO REFINED

Bahas B

MOTRS A NT HNEa2 -12IM 2 -75


FULL TANK OF GAS


PRICE INC(LLIDLF": FLIR SETS1MCE FREE


-~~~~~~~~~-- -- -- -" 1- ~~'--"1~1~~-- I---~---


I - --


SATURDAY, AUGUST 12, 2006, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


")


$;,






I t-lt I MiOUNIt


PAGE 8, SATURDAY, AUGUST 12, 2006


Credit Suisse (Bahamas) Limited

is presently considering applications for a

I.T. SPECIALIST (Junior Globus System Developer)

Credit Suisse Private Banking is one of the world's premier private banks. It is
setting new standards that go beyond traditional banking services. Our dedicated
and highly qualified staff provides our clientele with comprehensive solutions in
individual investment counseling and professional portfolio management. Our
total commitment is always to our clients and we focus without compromise on
their financial well-being and their personal values.

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum
requirements:

Qualifications:
At least Two (2) years experience in installation, configuration and
troubleshooting in a banking environment
Intermediate knowledge of GLOBUS Banking Application
(programming and administration)
Experience to run and support Close of Business programs in
Globus
Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science. o equivalent
Knowledge of AIX 5.1 5.3, UNIVERS/JBASE, LAN & WAN
Experience with offshore banking applications

Personal Qualities:
Excellent organizational, interpersonal and communication skills
Good technical and problem solving skills and experience
Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision
Enthusiasm, a positive attitude and a willingness to work flexible
hours as overtime
is required
Good technical and trouble-shooting skills and experience

Other Duties:
Answer Helpdesk requests (provide support & troubleshoot)
Ensure compliance to IT guidelines / directives
Ensure that "Business Contingency Planning" requirements are followed
Other duties & projects assigned by the Manager of Department

Benefits provided include:
Competitive salary and performance bonus
Pension Plan
Health and Life Insurance
Ongoing internal and external career development/training program

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING.
Persons not meeting the minimum requirements need not aoply.
Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas




Credit Suisse (Bahamas) Limited

is presently considering applications for a

I.T. SPECIALIST (Senior Globus System Developer)

Credit Suisse Private Banking is one of the world's premier private banks. It is
setting new standards that go beyond traditional banking services. Our dedicated,
and highly qualified staff provides our clientele with comprehensive solutions in
individual investment counseling and professional portfolio management. Our
total commitment is always to our clients and we focus without compromise on
their financial well-being and their personal values.

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum
requirements:

Qualifications:
At least Five (5) years experience in installation, configuration and
troubleshooting in a banking environment
Superior knowledge of GLOBUS BankingApplication
(programming and administration)
RS/6000: Installation, maintenance and operation experience
Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science or equivalent
Knowledge of AIX 5.1 5.3, UNIVERS/JBASE, LAN & WAN
Experience with offshore banking applications

Personal Qualities:
Excellent organizational, interpersonal and communication skills
Good technical and problem solving skills and experience
Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision
Enthusiasm, a positive attitude and a willingness to work flexible
hours as overtime is required
Good technical and trouble-shooting skills and experience

Other Duties:
Answer Helpdesk requests (provide support & troubleshoot)
Provide UNIVERSE & GLOBUS training to IT Staff
Ensure compliance to IT guidelines / directives
Ensure that "Business Contingency Planning" requirements are followed
Other duties & projects assigned by the Manager of Department

Benefits provided include:


A refreshing turn



for Robin Williams


IT^ .




THE NIGHT LISTENER
Starring: Robin Williams, Toni
Collette
WATCHING Robin
Williams is very much a hit and
miss affair. He can, as we all
know, be a comic genius (except
for the laughter void that was
Popeye), and recently he's also
shown his acting chops with
some offbeat choices. But, even
on his best days, the spectre of
sentimentality is never far away.
Williams has a habit of spoiling
a good performance by digging
out his smiling misty-eyed face
to overdo key emotional scenes.
Thankfully in The Night Lis-
tener, an effectively-eerie little
thriller, he keeps the puppy dog
expressions to a minimum and
everyone is better off for it.
Williams stars as Gabriel, a
writer and radio host in New
York. When a colleague hands
him a manuscript by a young
writer detailing a horrific expe-
rience, Gabriel considers fea-
turing the book on his show.
But a close friend expresses
doubt over the authenticity of
the manuscript and the exis-
tence of the writer, despite the
fact that Gabriel believes he has
spoken to the teenager and
his new guardian by tele-
phone.
An intriguing premise like
this will almost always hold your
attention, even if the film isn't
so great. But The Night Listen-
er manages to be very watch-
able, thanks to a couple of good
performances and a tight run-
ning time.
Gabriel might be a sympa-
thetic character, but Williams
plays him with a edge that bor-
ders on the unlikeable. It's pret-
ty refreshing to watch a mys-


AvailablifroiCommercial News Providers







,m

ot= o
a


tery in which the investigating
protagonist is aging, lonely and
slightly bitter.
Then there's Toni Collette as
the young writer's guardian.
With her uneasy mannerisms
and strange appearance she
delivers a very creepy perfor-
mance and her scenes with
Williams are intense and
extremely uncomfortable.
On the downside, Sandra Oh
is wasted in a clumsily-written
role that serves as little more
than a plot server and the story
runs out of steam towards the
end even at the slight running
time.
For the most part, however,
The Night Listener works and


serves as one of the better
examples of Williams "darker"
career choices.
OUT THIS WEEK:
PULSE
Starring: Kristen Bell, Ian
Somerhalder
Japanese horror remake! Sin-
ister website! The supernatural!
With these elements, Pulse
sounds like it's literally crawled
off the chart for its target demo-
graphic. Remakes of Japanese
horrors can be sensationally
scary (The Ring) or sensation-
ally dull (The Ring 2), but the
preview was certainly effective
and this might well be worth a
look.


Credit Suisse Nassau Branch
is presently considering applications for a

ASSISTANT FIN CIAL. CONTROL? .


Credit Suisse is one of the world's premier private banks. It is setting new standards that go
beyond traditional banking services. Our dedicated and highly qualified staff provides our
clientele with comprehensive solutions in individual investment counseling and professional
portfolio management. Our total commitment is always to our clients and we focus without
compromise on their financial well-being and their personal values.

TEMPORARY POSITION UNTIL a.Rl 2 00,.

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

Main tasks:
Assisting in ensuring that the Branch's books and records are accurately recorded on a timely
basis
Preparing all Branch, Group and Regulatory reporting to specific reporting deadlines
Assisting in the preparing of reports for Senior management in London and New York
Assisting in ensuring that all Balance Sheet accounts are substantiated
Involvement in various investment banking and Group accounting issues and projects

Requirements:
CPA or equivalent qualification
A minimum of 1-2 years' post qualification experience, investment banking experience
preferred (maybe gained through audit profession)
Knowledge of US GAAP would be an asset

Personal Qualites:
A commitment to service excellence
Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision
Good organizational and interpersonal skills
Ability to work independently
Good IT skills

Benefits provided include:
Competitive salary and benefits

APPUCATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. Persons not meeting the minimum requirements need
not apply.

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas


DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS AUGUST 15, 2006



CREDITSUISSE
I~i -I


r 1 ___


Competitive salary and performance bonus
Pension Plan
Health and Life Insurance
Ongoing internal and external career development/training program

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. Persons not meeting the minimum
requirements need not aDlvy.

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas








THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, AUGUST 12, 2006, PAGE 9


Pirate of the Car-ibbean

THIS is the vehicle
. ; ,which one lucky win-
1 ,,0 0 :. ner walked away with
on Thursday
The worldwide race
to uncover a buried
Volvo XC90 V8 SUV
.. valued at $82,000
ended in Abaco with
the victory of David
Hutz, a 30 year-old
computer program-
mer from Herndon,
Virginia.
Mr Hutz discovered
the luxury vehicle in
Little Harbour after
completing a challeng-
ing two-month global
multimedia treasure
hunt.
Volvo secretly hid
the vehicle as part of
its sponsorship of Dis-
ney's blockbuster
Pirates of the
Caribbean: Dead
Man's Chest.




BEC customers express anger



at actions of union members


FROM page one
we should have a reliable ser-
vice," one caller exclaimed.
A large retail generator store
manager said that he found it
ridiculous that, even though he
was running his own generator
due to blackouts last night, BEC
would still be profiting from
electricity generated by the fuel
and generator that he bought.
"As a consumer feeling the
need to purchase a generator, I
don't think I should have to pay
BEC to run it. And if there
weren't as many blackouts as
there were there would be no
need to have one.
"It is not as if we are not pay-
ing them enough money,
because my electricity has
tripled in the past year. The
money obviously is going some-
7where, but if we are paying top
dollar we have to expect top
service," he said.
Independent negotiator
between the government and
the union Bishop Neil Ellis said
he was very disappointed at the
state at which the negotiations
have arrived.
He explained that, after much


$100,000

reward is

offered by

murdered

girl's father

FROM page one
Karpsaid.
He often wondered "What
was going through her mind the
last minute of her life?" and the
person she had reached out for.
"The last person to have been
with her is that person over
there," Mr Karp said, pointing
to an enlarged photograph of a
black male believed to be
Marissa's last known acquain-
tance before her murder.
"If this man is, in fact, the
person who killed my daughter
and was involved in other crim-
inal acts, is that the type of per-
son you want walking down
your streets?" he asked.
Over the next few weeks the
cold case will be profiled and
aired on Nancy Grace and
America's Most Wanted, Mr
Karp told The Tribune.
Marissa, according to her
father, aspired to be a teacher
and was a typical "I know it all
kid with a good heart."
Mr Karp said he is in contact
with Chief Supt Marvin Dames
of thd Criminal Detective Unit,
who seemed sincere and had
sent his regards.
"I have been in touch with a
lot of officials, but I haven't
seen much result since I have
been here," Mr Karp said. "I
would like some sort of closure
for myself and for my family.
Nothing will ever bring back my
daughter, but I can't live my life
wondering."
Gary Karp can be reached at
(561) 910-0311. Anyone with
information about the murder
of Marissa Karp is asked to call
America's Most Wanted at 1-
800-CRIME-TV or
WWW.AMW.COM. For addi-
tional information persons can
also visit WWW.MISSINGOR-
MURDERED.ORG.


review, he had come to the
same conclusion as BEC's man-
agement that the union was
not legally entitled to anything.
However, he said he recom-
mended.to government and
management that something
could be considered from a
"moral perspective" as workers
at the corporation's "sister com-
panies" (BTC and Water and
Sewage) had received some-
thing.
Bishop Ellis revealed that the
union initially was seeking as
much as $9 million before they
lowered their figure to $4.9 mil-
lion.
Consequently, a proposal of
$1,234,000 was presented to.the
union executives, with 16 meet-
ings being held to settle 30 of
the 33 outstanding issues the
union raised.
"I am really taken aback at
where we have come to in the
last two days. I really do hope


and pray that the union would
give great consideration to
returning to the bargaining
table and bringing some relief to
the hurting public," he said.
"We had 16 meetings, and I
was the only one around that
table that wasn't being paid for
those meetings. Sixteen meet-
ings, and I'm talking about the
shortest meeting lasting three
hours.
"So I have given almost 50
hours to these issues. So to
come so close to resolve 30 out
of 33 issues, and to find our-
selves at this point over one, is
really disappointing for me," he
said.
The bishop said he will be
using the coming weekend to
reflect on whether he should
still be involved in the negotia-
tions, as there appeared to be
no appreciation for the amount
of time put in thus far.
He said he could not confirm


the union was involved in the
blackouts but said that, during
their negotiations, they were
unwilling to accept any offer,
be it vacation time or anything.
else only money.
"That was unequivocal. They
wanted money. My initial reac-
tion was, of course, that they
were not really entitled. Man-
agement was firm on not offer-
ing anything, and the $1.2 mil-
lion was agreed by management
after the firm case that I put
before the management and the
government. Initially, they were
both firm on not giving any-
thing.
"So I had really thought that
they would have taken this and
ran with it. Or at best come
back saying 'Bishop, see if you
can make it $2 million'. In the
back of my mind that is what I
expected them to come back
with, but they never came
back," he said.
*~ ? fv-w--iiEM-xf -w' www eim^^^


Escaped prisoner recaptured


FROM page one
towards the new Esso service
station being constructed at the
intersection of Prince Charles
Drive and Fox Hill Road when
the eyewitness lost sight of him.
According to the prison
statement "several prison offi-
cers who were not connected in
any way to the return of the
inmate, were at the intersection
and saw when the inmate
jumped off the police bus.
"The prison officers fired
several warning shots and ran
behind the inmate, apprehend-
ing him virtually at the scene of
the incident," the statement


continued. "The inmate was
immediately transferred to a
prison bus and returned to Her
Majesty's Prison."
Ferguson is the second pris-
oner to escape prison custody
within the last month as Adlet
Cilice, 21, is still evading police
after walking off a work detail
last month.
At a graduation ceremony
held on Thursday, Prison
Superintendent Dr Elliston
Rahming commented on Cil-
ice's escape, saying that in the
case of a walkaway the search
is handled by prison officers
within the first two hours of
an escape, after which it is


handed over to police.
The prison has struggled with
prisoners escaping custody this
year. This is the fourth incident
of 2006.
An April Tribune article
revealed that prison officers
were not adequately prepared
for the event of an escape.
An officer involved in the
largest and most deadly prison
break in Bahamian history in
January said he had never in his
11 years as a prison officer
received training for a break-
out.
The search for Adlet Cilice
in New Providence and Grand
Bahama continues.


No.000673


2006


COMMONWEALTH OF

THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT



Equity Side


IN THE MATTER of ALL THAT piece parcel or
tract of land containing One Hundred and Sixty-six
(166) Acres more or less and being the
Southeastern portion of the property known as
"Townhead Tract" SITUATE partly on the north
and partly on the south side of Queens Highway,
approximately 315 ft. North of the Old Airport
Road and approximately 1.5 miles Southwest of the
Settlement of George Town
on the island of Great Exuma one of the islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles
Act, 1959.

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of George
Leroy Cumberbatch



NOTICE OF PETITION

The Petition of George Leroy Cumberbatch, of the
City of Freeport in the island of Grand Bahama, in
respect of:-

ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land containing
by Admeasurements One Hundred and Sixty Six
(166) Acres, more or less being the Southeastern
portion of that larger tract of land said to contain by
admeasurements Two Hundred and Seventy-eight
(278) Acres and known as "Townhead Tract" and
situate approximately about One and a half (1.5)
Miles to the Southeast of the Settlement of George
Town in the Island of Great Exuma
aforesaid through which there runs to the North-
eastern boundary The Queen's Highway formerly
The Great Exuma Main Highway being (30) Feet
wide separating the said tract of land from the other
portion of the said tract of land which is bounded
by a mangrove pond creek or lake which pond
creek or lake finally empties itself into Elizabeth
Harbour on the Northeastern coast of the
Settlement of George Town aforesaid and bounded
".".Tie-'TSoutheast b) land fiow"or Tormertly thep6fi6p.-
erty of the Estate of Ernest Smith on the Southwest
by land now or formerly the property of Flamingo
Bay (1975) Limited and on the Northwest by land
now or formerly the property of the said Flamingo
Bay (1975) Limited which said piece parcel or tract
of land has such position shape boundaries marks
and
dimensions as are shown on the diagram or plan
hereto filed herein and being the land which is the
subject of the Petition filed herein.

George Leroy Cumberbatch claims to be equitable
and beneficial and owner in fee simple possession
of the parcel of land hereinbefore described and
such ownership as aforesaid arises by virtue of a
possessory and documentary title to the said land.
The Petitioner has made application to the Supreme
Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under
Section Three (3) of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959
to have his title to the said land investigated.

Copies of the filed plan may be inspected during
normal office hours at:-

1) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher
House, East Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

2) The Chambers of Harry B. Sands, Lobosky &
Company, Shirley House, Fifty Shirley Street,
Nassau, Bahamas.

3) The Office of the Island Administrator, George
Town, Great Exuma, Bahamas.


Notice is given that any person having dower
or right of dower or an adverse claim or a claim
not recognized in the petition shall on or before
the 21st day of September A.D., 2006 file in the
Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or
the undersigned a statement of such claim in the
prescribed form, verified by an affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure by any such person to file and
serve a statement of such claim on or before the
21st day of September, A.D., 2006 will operate as a
bar to such claiin.


HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY & COMPANY
CHAMBERS
SHIRLEY HOUSE
FIFTY SHIRLEY STREET
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
ATTORNEYS FOR THE PETITIONER


I I


YOUR CONIEC rON TO TEo I ,'iPI c
S. *






The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. is pleased to invite qualified
companies to apply for tender for New Vehicle and Equipment.

Interested companies can pick up a specification document from BTC's
Administration Building, John F. Kennedy Drive and The Mall Drive Freeport,
Grand Bahama August 9 to August 23, 2006 between the hours of 9:00am
to 5:00pm Monday to Friday.

Tender should be sealed in an envelope marked "VEHICLE & EQUIPMENT
TENDER" and delivered to the attention of:-

Mr. Leon Williams
Acting President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.
P.O. Box N-3048
Nassau, Bahamas

Bids should reach the company's administration office on John F. Kennedy
Drive by 4:00pm Wednesday August 23rd, 2006.

Companies submitting bids are invited to attend the bid opening on Thursday,
August 24th, 2006 at 10:00am at BTC's Perpall Tract location.

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.
1t


SATURDAY, AUGUST 12, 2006, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE









THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10 SATURDAY, AUGUST 12, 2006


' ."-


~----~----~--I


WHAT 'S ON IN AND AROUND N A S S A U
.. .. .. . .. .. .. . .. .. .. . .. .. . .. .. .. . .. .. .. . .. .. ..-. .. .. . .. .. .I . .. .. .. . .. .. .. . .. .. . .. .. .. . .. .. .. . .. .. .


a,


E-MAIL :


YDELEVEAUX @TRI BU N.EMED.IA. N ET


PLEASE PUT "OUT THERE" IN THE SUBJECT LINE


M-- MONDAY :,-

I HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: New Providence
Community Centre: Mondays -
6pm to 7pm. The Kirk: Mondays 7:30pm to
8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support
group meets the first Monday of each month at
6:30pm at New Providence Community Centre,
Blake Road. Dinner is provided and free blood
sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol testing is
available. For more info call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third
Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors Hospital
conference room.

* CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colo-
nial Hilton Monday's at 7pm Club 612315 meets
Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable
Beach Club 3596 meets
at the British Colonial Hilton Mondays at
7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the month
in the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel, Bay St.


TUESDAY .w


* PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS & RESTAURANTS

10.10.2.20. @ Club Nirvana: Tuesday nights at Club
Nirvana, Elizabeth Avenue, have been dubbed
10.10.2.20. Every tenth female patron is allowed
into the club absolutely free and is given a compli-
mentary glass of Carlo Rossi. Tuesday nights also
include the Carlo Rossi's Hot Body Competition.
Hosted by Daddi Renzi and music provided by DJ
Ai from 100 Jamz. Master Chef Devito Bodie pro-
vides scrumptious appetizers.

* HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau
Group, Rosetta Street: Tuesday 6pm to
7pm/8:30pm to 9:30pm.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at
5:30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at
their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville.
Call 323.4482 for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes
location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval
is required. Call 364.8423 to register for more info.

0 CIVIC CLUBS

The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets every
third Tuesday at SuperClubs Breezes, Cable Beach
at 12:30pm. We invite all community minded per-
sons to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm @
C C Sweeting Senior School's Dining Room, Col-
lege Avenue off Moss Road Club Cousteau 7343
meets Tuesdays at 7:30pm in the Chickcharney
Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central Andros Club 7178
meets each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer Society
of the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega chap-
ter meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ the
Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second
Tuesday, 6:30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office,
4th floor meeting room.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tues-
day, 6:30pm at the British Colonial Hilton. Please
call 502.4842/377.4589 for more info.

WEDNESDAY -,


PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar


fliiwalo~ry kil tillv "hTP.AIWnrHH & CHOCOLATE" (19Q
A: '4t I, V.'iddir'r I Ii,,Jrlf, *r -h f rl. ,. IP7;m fto f' zPull h c
CVIFL.11 11I Tom- I AhSIVI F7411,14, c Cu(lrl't's law" subl illai111
A brvis IrCi n i uoij In 'IIICti so CI',s, IIUam LnoUImar wi',or Icu Crewm
lJQ' Iltjvvcun uv ilddll utfId rd m iNd in iyung "a 1wort bolovtr Ii in ofltump.
oror-, r lGlvn or' ilm srui b r fro ge for u I ,nr'0 bult 'rlovs filmiib ubL11
'JI M 'Arti sli j11d aL clllirwicu Thi's liln ImII it 4o% g ficlii riiilidanco
r LOcdb in Cu ia,, ad rt i.nd .'mOri...urj ~CCioili A cnritho onroanl
ryn'nn P'oID.'Wir fio rL'r (i namar n 'i vIDavid SStrttop. Virletyl.

flurriliY At M 'II "CLACV I MlPHEII. 119i)
*q /t~iad,', tnIIIII r:' 'inr n'!1.' 1 ,n t '5: 'aI rnl 'n: i. ll

Mairfji Fjiiip 5nrnhn.SiIiIIwI Isov blur,, t.,nsad loi Ith Gro'a* nith Pof
Cliph.11% Ofid Eur'dnJo:e v ,.or a pninl, I l.1 id baicdrop of 1jinivol in R'iC
al: Janou- 11B.ich OiptIOUS rC,,jrjjin~jjm bb viIitil U1012 .,Ad M-3-rTaer d
-i , r, d i'l j" a I Tr. .1 Th.l 3n ln w i. I: in full cf if mbol.
jI n ]I, LuD-r 1 -wi, bollr ,?rin-.i n u nii nd innl ] r If i ncnr
jIiijirjq~ lh hTIIIT iE jrp tf\hd III irigi ~lnlrld WV1.1c'er of
-- - -- -


every Wednesday
5pm-8pm..Free appe-
tizers and numerous drink specials.

* ENTERTAINMENT

The 56th Annual Bimini Native Fishing Tournament,
sponsored by the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism begins
August,6 and runs through August 11. On Wednesday,
August 9, come enjoy fishing, dominoes, volleyball,
the Softly Basketball Camp, Miss and Little Miss Bimi-
ni Native pageant and a special cocktail party at Bimi-
ni Big Game. Call 242.347.3529 for more information

* HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: New Providence
Community Centre: Wednesday 7pm to 8pm. The
Nassau Group: Rosetta Street, Wednesday 6pm
to 7pm / 8-30pm 1t 9:.30pom.

N CIVIC CLUBS

I he Nassau Bahmnas Alumnae chapter of Delta
Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30pm
every third Wednesday at the Bahamas National
Pride Building.

TM Club 753494 meets every Wednesday, 6pm-
8pm in the Solomon's Building, East-West High-
way. TM Club 2437 meets the 2nd and 4th
Wednesday of each month at C C Sweeting Senior
High School. Oakes Field.

International Training in Communication, Essence
Club #3173 holds its bi-monthly meetings on the
1st and 3rd Wednesday of each month at Doctor's
Hospital Conference
Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets
the second and fourth Wednesday of the month,
8pm @ St Augustine's Monestary.


* ENTERTAINMI


8:30pm to 9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays 7:30pm
to 8:30pm
Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics Sea-
grapes location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor
approval is required. Call 364.8423 to register or
for more info.

REACH Resources & Education for Autism and
related Challenges meets from 7pm 9pm the sec-
ond Thursday of each month in the
cafeteria of the BEC building, Blue Hill
Road.

* CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3956'meets every first, second
and third Thursday at the Ministry of Health &
Environment building on Meeting Street com-
mencing at 7:30pm. Everyone is welcome to
attend.

TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8.30pm @ Super-
Clubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative Pro-
fessionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third
Thursday of every month @ Superclubs Breezes,
Cable Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance Baord
Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets every fourth
Thursday in the month, in the National Insurance
Board's (NIB) training room, Wulf Road office
complex, at 6pm. All retirees are welcome.


:, FRIDAY


* PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS
Cae urpaon-- arote- ret_ 0 t._- ics t


Cafe Europa on Charlotte Street North, KICKS off
every Friday night with Happy Hour... special
THURSDAY ..j drinks, live music/DJ from 6pm to 9pm and Nas-
sau's first European Night Restaurant Open Fri-
day night till Saturday morning 5am, serving hot
ENT food/and take out music, drinks and an English
breakfast. Cafe Europa...the perfect place to spend


The 56th Annual Birnini Native Fishing Tournament
continues, Thursday, August 10. Activities include
39th Annual Glenda's Road Race, Julian Brown
Fun/Run/Walk, fishing and Softly Basketball Camp.
Call 242.347.3529 for more information.

* THEATRE

The Sweetheart's Club a new Bahamian play: Writ-
ten and directed by Nickeva Eve, The Sweetheart's
Club will be performed at Worker's House, August
10-12 @ 8pm. Tickets are available from the
Kennedy Medical Center (by Galleria Cinemas, JFK
Plaza) and Woodside Photoshop and Gallery (Sol-
dier Road, East of Abundant Life Road).

* HEALTH

Free public health lectures featuring distinguished
physicians are held at Doctors Hospital every third
Thursday of the month at 6pm in the Doctors Hos-
pital Conference Room. Free screenings between
5pm & 6pm. For more information call 302-4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to infomi the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau
Group, Rosetta Street: Thursday 6pm to 7pm /


your night out till the morning.


* ENTERTAINMENT

The 56th Annual Bimini Native Fishing Tourna-
ment, FINAL DAY Friday, August; 11. Activities
include fishing, Softly Basketball Camp, Gala Ball at
the Bimini Breeze, under the patronage of Minister of
Tourism Obie Wilchcombe. Call 242.347.3529 for more
information. '

M THEATRE

The Sweetheart's Club a new Bahamian play: Writ-
ten and directedby Nickeva Eve, The Sweetheart's
Club will be performed at Worker's House, August
10-12 @ 8pm. Tickets are available from the
Kennedy Medical Center (by Galleria Cinemas, JFK
Plaza) and Woodside Photoshop and Gallery (Sol-
dier Road, East of Abundant Life Road).


* HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,


Rosetta Street: Fridays 6pm to 7pm & 8:30pm to
9:30pm. Sacred Heart Church Fridays @ 6pm to
7pm New Providence Community Centre: Fridays @
7pm to 8pm.


* CIVIC CLUBS

TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas Bap-
tist Community College Rm A19, Jean St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Fri-
day of each month, 7.30pm at Emmaus Centre at
St Augustine's Monestary. For more info call
325.1947 after 4pm.


*I ~SATURDAY


* THEATRE

The Sweetheart's Club a new Bahamian play: Writ-
ten and directed by Nickeva Eve, The Sweetheart's
Club will be performed at Worker's House, August
10-12 @ 8pm. Tickets are available from the
Kennedy Medical Center (by Galleria Cinemas, JFK
Plaza) and Woodside Photoshop and Gallery (Sol-
dier Road, East of Abundant Life Road).


* HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau
Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday mornings 10am
to 11am.

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third
Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and December)
@ the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley
Street.
Doctors Hospital CPR and First Aid classes are
offered every third Saturday of the month from
9am-lpm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Community
Training Representative at 302.4732 for more
information and learn to save a life today.


* CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR Cycling are
pleased to offer a cycling clinic for juniors between
10 and 17. The free clinic will be held every Satur-
day in an effort to encourage kids to cycle. Parents
interested in registering their children should con-
tact organizers at jarcycling@gmail.com



SUNDAY



PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Traveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street, fea-
tures special entertainment Gernie, Tabitha and
the Caribbean Express every Sunday from
6:30pm to 9:30pm.


HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau
Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pm /
8:30pm to 9:30pm.

N W UPCOMING

EVENT

3rd Annual DJ Awards under the theme "Vision of
Unity". Categories: Best Female Radio Personali-
ty, Best Male Radio Personality, Best Radio Talk
Show, Best Bahamian Mix Show, Best Radio DJ,
DJ of the Year and many more
SThe public is allowed to vote online @ www.dafu-
ture.net or at selected outdoor events.


Send all your civic and social events to
The Tribune via fax: 328.2398
or e-mail: ydeleveaux@
tribunemedia.net/Out there in subject line


,... ~ N
ThI
I.'-.
-J ~~



NNIVERSARY


'The breweiq of Thea-L. InLus" Pleas Responsibly ~-Rg


.'fl~


1IL~r~lr I 'I


'---


I 19C sl~'- isI -I I I II '


^


... ...


''' `'

i*lt"


Responsibly


T'7he breivei tj Bahamas"clrimci


Please


Q
lo~Si
.~,~Uc :1~

a~i~Y
mcra~nuro~i~sers~r


~
~p




it
~~








SATURDAY, AUGUST 12, 2006, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALN


I ANewpapr ctiviy Pae fo IYoug Peple-


What is a sea Star and what is it not?
A starfish is not a fish at all.Many .
m: marine biologists want to change its
narrm to a sea star. because most of
Them look like stars. Sea stars are
Sechinoderms (eh-keen-oh-durmz) -
animals that lack a back bone.




Sea stars have arms but no legs.
Their arms are called "rays." Some
sea stars have five rays. some have
Ssix. ten or twenty.


Sea stars have no eyes, no ears,
no nose. They do have a
on their underside. To eat, a sea
star_____ on top of, and
slowly wraps its to around
its food.


One thing sea stars like to eat is
clams. Once one has wrapped its raNys
around a clam its hundreds of
tentacles to the shell and hang
onto it as it pulls and pulls until the
shell opens. As soon as it opens just
a little, the sea star its stomach
out of its body and into the shell and
_the clam. This can
take an hour or two.


SStar Match
Do the math to match each
sea star to its name.


Sea stars don't have
skeletons. Their spiny.
tough skin gives them
Their shape and q4
mtperts them C


25 = chocolate chip star
22 = sun star
48- = cand\ cane star
18 = basket star


Standards Link: Life Siet e: Studentst know, examples of diverse life forms In different environments; physical


There are more than
3,600 different kinds
of sea stars. They come
in lots of different colors
and shapes. Some sea
stars are colored to
match the surfaces on
which they live. This
camouflage helps
them hide from predators,

How many sea
stars are hidden,here?
Visit www.kidscoop.com
for the answer.


Standards Link: Life Science: Animals have structures that serve different functions.
More summer fun!
Now your kids can enjoy even more Kid Scoop in our new,
64-page book ftro Scholastic. Great for teachers!
To order, visit: www.kidscoop.com



Little-Known Facts
Look through today's newspaper and find
three to five facts that you think not too
many people know, Create a question for
each fact. See how many people v .
know these facts.


Standards Link: Reading Comprehension: Ask questions to demonstrate
comprehension.


Great-tasting pretzels &

wholesome family entertainment!


al


She ocean is full of amazing creatures.
and one that is unique is the sea star or
starfish.It is a sea creature.but it li es close
to the shore. Sometimes they are
w\ ashed up on
the beach or '
stranded in a
tide pool.
gi\ ing people
a chance to see
this mysterious --,
creature up close. < ..


Sea stars have feet but
no toes. If you look on
the bottom of a sea star's
y ray, you will see rows <
of soft tentacles called
tube feet. The sea star
slowly creeps along Sea Star Search
on these feet. How many sea stars
can you find on this
page in 30 seconds?
These sea stars s%\ iped Now have a friend try.
some of the words from Who found the most?
paragraphs at left. Write Slan.Jrd Lnr.k Rea.in:j
in each word where CoComprelenisor Foillo, simple
it belongs.

.7 ";42 ? 2 "
Creature Cut-Ups
S"' You can create a new
) n 'creature from the
parts of creatures
pictured in today's
newspaper. Cut out
29-7 ra different parts of
29-7 !


27 = cushion star
12 = fat star
32 = comb sea star
16 = sLunflo\\er sen star


differeut people ana
animals found in
today's newspaper.
Use these to create
a new creature.
Give your creature
a name. Make up
things about it, such
as what it eats and
, where it lives.
Standards Link: Reading
Corprie Is ilr''nFollow simple
vFllTr: i directions


structure or behavior may Improve an organism's chance for survival.


TTY I
M.7ru c =i1


SEA Find the words in the puzzle,
then in this week's Kid Scoop
STARS stories and activities.
SKELETONS
SKELET T C S H ORE S P
TENTACLES
H I E S Y A R N N R
CREATURE
PREDATORS S S E N E UORME
CRAWLS L S T D T T U B E D
RAYS W P I A E A S E A A
SHORE A T E L R T C A S T
TUBE RR EAR S F L HO
CREEPS C KC R E E P S E R
TIDE
TIDES A RM I P O L S
POOL __ I .
ARM Standards Link: Letter sequencing. Recognized identical
Ru,.. ,l,; Skm ,.an r ,,cnn Rolna call li nn atrnc.


- ^*..; .- ,' ., "-

SWhere is the.
best place to see a
5MAN EATING FISH?


*lueBnelseJ poojees e. I :aI3MSNV


More A's



More Plays!


Bring your report card &

get 3 tokens for each "A"


..i


Proo"!!-40
Are you an eagle-eyed reader?
Read the story below an~d circler
thze nine errors youfind. 7-henl
rewite thze story correctlyt

Amazing Sea SisaT
Sea stars do something nearly
no other animal. Can do. If a
a sea star loses a ray, it will
grow another ray. Not only
that the ray that broke off
can become an entirely knew
sea star. In fact, if a sea star
is broken into pieces, each
peace can become a whole
new sea star.

While sea spars love eating
clams, they will also eat a ded
fish or dead krab, if it is lucky
enough to crawl over one.


Healthy is .









..eating lots of fruits'
and vegetables all
summer long.





This week's word:
,BIOLOGIST
TThe word biologistmen
a specialist who studies
the- science of living things.
The biologist discoi.,etred a
new species of sea starr.

Use the word biologist in a
sentence today when talking
with your friends, parents or
teachers.




7 Summer Joke Book
!!Te !!ollection of your
faoiejokes. Dra
illustrations on each page
and staple the pages together
to create a joke book to
share with friends.


-- ----------


Words, bnllm anascan reaaing. riecaii speittrigIII patturri5 I


,


r


--


I


F-


Z-J r -N /I


I I


PL~ULVL- L--A


Mail atMaratho next t the Fod Court Ph: 39-2092/


11


SFRIEEPretzet

Complete the Double
SWord Search Puzzle &
Spring it with this coupon
to Mr. Pretzels & get 1
Pretzel & 1 small soda.
SOnly 1 coupon per customer per visit






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, SATURDAY,MAY 13, 2006


m -- By Franklyn G Ferguson


- ~ -


NASSAU


EVENTS


CAPTURED


ON CAMERA


Bahamas says thanks to China


Senator Sharon Wilson,
President of the Senate
recently hosted His
Excellence Yuanming
Li Ambassador
Extraordinary and
Plenipotentiary
People's Republic of
China and Madame
Gansheng Zheng to an
elegant dinner at "Point
of View," the Eastern
Road Estate of her and
her husband,
businessman Franklyn
Wilson, CMG.


N FRED Mitchell Minister of 'Foreign Affairs and Public Service shared a moment with his predecessor, Janet Bostwick as well as well as Hisi
Excellency Ambassador Yuanming Li and Madame Li.


MS Lilia Green, Permanent Secretary at the Ministry of Youth Sports and Hous-
ing, Ms Colleen Nolltnge. Permanent Secretary at the Ministry of Agriculture and
S Fisheries engaged in exchange with Mr Jingshen Chen, First Assistant Secretary at
the Embassy of the People's Republic of China.


m IN her reinarks of Welcome, senator
* THE dinner provided an ideal opportunity for the President President Sharon Wilson thanked her
of the College of The Bahamas and His Excellency to not only predecessor in Office, Henry Bostwick,
compliment Ms Chavallar Walker who helped to provide the QC for the assistance he providedher
entertainment and is enrolled at the College of The Bahamas upon her coming to the office, here Mr
but to also engage in a substantive dialogue about the Bostwick and his wife Janet enjoy. the
strengthening of bonds between the planned University of The ocean front views fom the upper p4tio of
Bahamas and leading Universities in China, the Wilson Residence. '


* MINISTER of Youth, Sports and Housing and
entrepreneur Tracy Godet, chief executive officer
of Donald's furniture, were among the guests.


E'SENATE President Sharon Wilson specifically thanked the ambassador and
his wife for their varied and general acts of kindness to the people of the
Bahamas and left it to Minister of Youth Sports and Housing Neville Wisdom
to make specified to the gift of a National Stadium from the Government of the
People's Republic of China. In his remarks Minister Wisdom spoke about the
literal explosion in trade which is taking place between China and the Bahamas.
He expressed particular pleasure that many Bahamian entrepreneurs are
contributing to this process.


* JANYNE Hodder, new president of the College of the
Bahamas, and Franklyn Wilson, chairman of the College board


-j


Q? /e4


(242) 357-8472


P.O. Box N-4659,
Nassau, Bahamas


I


e~e


- -----------gn I I I


In


' ^ 5?^,


~rankl~lr C~, ~tj ergu~an









ah~~BB '.' 18 t s~


SATURDAY, AUGUST 12, 2006


SECTION



B
Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


Knowles and Nestor



through to semis


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
MARK Knowles and Daniel
Nestor moved two away from
winning their first mren's dou-
bles title yesterday at the
Rogers Cup Tournament in
Toronto, Canada.
But it won't get any easier in
the semi-final when the num-
ber four seeds play the tourna-
ment's top seeds, American
twin brothers Bob and Mike
Bryan.
Knowles and Nestor pulled
off a stunning 2-6, 643, 10-2
(match tie breaker) victory in
the quarter-finals over the
unseeded team of Simon
Aspelin from Sweden and Todd
Perry from Australia.
The Bryan brothers'won 3-6,


. By BRENT STUBBS
- Senior Sports Reporter
MORE than 60 youngsters
took advantage of the 'Learn
to Read' basketball camp that
was held on Friday at St Cecili-
a's Park.
The camp was conducted by
Wesley Frater of the WEST
Sports Management and Wali
Jones of the Miami Heat. It was
held in honor of Deputy Prime
Minister Cynthia 'Mother'
Pratt, the MP for St Cecilia's.
Local co-ordinator Godfrey
McQuay said they had antici-
pated having around 100.par-
ticipants, but the smaller num-
bers enabled the instructors to
work more one-on-one with
those present.
S"We did all of the basic fun-
damentals dribbling, passing,
shooting," McQuay said. "But I
think it was just great to hear
Wali describewhat basketball
was from then to now.
"I think it was just good for
all of us to just listen to him.
Once you sit down, listen and
understand what he's saying,
you win big time."
Jones, a former guard of the
NBA's 1967 Philadelphia 76ers
champions, talked about to the


6-4, 10-7 (Match TB) over the
number five seeded team of
Fabrice Santoro and Nenad
Zimonjic in their quarter-final
match yesterday.
Last year, playing as the num-
ber three seeds, Knowles and
Nestor reached the quarter-final
before they were ousted by the
team of Jonathan Erlich and
Andy Ram.
Knowles and Nestor are play-
ing together in their first tour-
nament since losing to the
Bryan brothers in the semis of.
Wimbledon in June.
The Bryan brothers hold the
advantage over Knowles I
Nestor this year.
The winner will advance to
the final to play either the team
of No.3 seeds Paul Hanley and
Kevin Ullyett or No.7 seeds


Martin Damm and Leander
Paes.
Damm and Peas upset No.2
seeds Jonas Bjorkman and Max
Mirnyi in their quarter's yester-
day.
Ullyett teamed up with
Wayne Black last year to win
the title over Erlich and Ram.
Going into the tournament,
Knowles and Nestor are ranked
as the No.4 team on the ATP
computer list with 564 points.
The list is headed by the Bryans
with 925, followed by Bjorkman
and Mirnyi with 704 and Hanley
and Ullyett with 573.
On the individual rankings,
Nestor is sixth with 4185 points,
compared to Knowles, who is
seventh with 4175. The Bryan
brothers are tied for first with
6135.


be in their endeavors.
Patricia 'Patti' Johnson,
another local coach who assist-
ed the visitors, said they are
appreciative for the presence of
Jones and Frater, because "they
have a true passion for the inner
city, just as we all do.
"They really want to see
those kids' success. I guess if
you use them as examples; as
well as myself, McQuay and
even Mother Pratt, you will suc-
cess because we are all from the
inner city."
One of the, campers, Chiav
LaFleur, a 14-year-old ninth
grader at HO Nash Junior High
School, said he learnt a lot of
the basics of the game.
"It was good. I liked every-
thing shooting, passing and
playing defense," said LaFleur,
who hope to use the experience
gained when he play for the
Lions' junior boys basketball
team this year.
SuperClubs Breezes served
as the official sponsor for the
camp. Their public relations
officer, Renee Hanna, was com-
mended for the role she played
in making it a success.
The Ministry of Tourism
were also thanked for their con-
tribution.


youngsters of the role of being
a member of the inner city
emerging to the top in their
profession in this case, bas-
ketball.
SJones, a native from Philadel-
phia, and Frater, a Jamaican
who has founded the WEST
SSports Management group in
Miami, also told the youngsters
about the importance of being
appreciative of what they have
and most importantly, the need
to be discipline.

Gifts

Before leaving, Jones and
Frater also gave T-shirts to all of
the participants. Some of the
participants also were awarded
basketballs for their perfor-
mances.
It was considered one of the
best disciplined group that
Jones and Frater have enter-
tained since they have been
coming here. They both
expressed their delight and indi-
cated that they will definitely
be coming back next year.
Also present was Mother
Pratt, who encouraged the par-
ticipants between the ages of 5-
17 years, to be.all that they can


* MARK Knowles and Daniel Nestor in action


^ -hK.


* WALI Jones (in cap) and Wesley Frater preparing the kids for basketball drills


* WALI Jones (in cap) talking to the kids (in t-shirts given by Jones and rater) about the
importance of education and reading
I.. "


Sorrow for basketball team


* By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
THE woes continued for our
women's junior national team
at the FIBA Americas under
20 Championship.
Team Bahamas lost their
third consecutive game in as
many days, an 87-38 loss to
Canada.
The 54-point blowout win
was the first for Canada in the
tournament thus far as they
improved to a 1-2 record.
The Bahamas fell to a record
of 0-3, and remains the only
winless team in the tournament.
Being the smallest team in
the tournament, the Bahamas
has had trouble with the more
physical play of the other coun-
tries.
Canada dominated from the
outset of the game, outscoring
the Bahamas 21-5 in the game's


opening quarter.
The deficit would grow each
quarter as Canada continued
to pummel the struggling
Bahamian squad, outscoring
them 21-9 in the second, 22-14
in the third, and 23-10 in the
fourth.
Sasha Ferguson led tlhe
Bahamas in scoring with 11
points, and also pulled down
two boards.
Taronya Wildgoose had 10
points and two rebounds, while
Philicia Kelly, back from sus-
pension, chipped in with 6
points.
The Bahamas shot an
abysmal 27 per cent from the
field, connecting on just 13 of
47 shot attempts.
Krysten Boogaard led Cana-
da with 16 points and 6
rebounds.
The Bahamas has conti-
nously struggled on the offen-


sive end and has yet to shoot
above a respectable 40 per cent
from the field.
In three games, the team has
lost by a combined total of 152
points.
Wildgoose raks 5th in the
tournament in free throws
made averaging three per
game, while Siobhan Williams
raks 10th in steals with 1.7 per
game.
The road gets even more dif-
ficult for the Bahamas as they
face the United States today at
2pm.
The US defeated Mexico
124-38, and Canada 90-39, both
teams defeated the Bahamas
by 25 and 54 points respective-
ly.
The United States features
six top tier NCAA division one
players including Oklahoma's
acclaimed All-American,
Courtney Paris.


* GODFREY McQuay; Wall Jones (in cap); Cynthia "Mother" Pratt (in sunglasses); Renee HaL-
na, PR Coordinator SuperClubs Breezes Bahamas (blue shirt) and Wesley Frater (red shirt) wit
the kids


Youngsters pic







up the skills







for basketball


+i'


:


-----; -1- -,
~jttgr.
t-i '--
ii s~i~ I~~


I


.~-u~ne~ur








TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 2B, SATURDAY, AUGUST 12, 2006


fAailafromC commercial News Providers


-0m -


..0 -o am,-.-


Officials discuss strategies




for helping student athletes


* By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
FOR Bahamian student athletes, compliance
with National Collegiate Athletics Association
admission standards has become a complicated
process.
However the Ministries of Youth, Sports and
Housing and Education, in conjunction with the
NCAA are seeking to provide clarity to the situ-
ation.
Dr Bernard Franklin, NCAA vice-president
of governance and membership, visited the cap-
ital last month to meet.with ministers, delegates,
coaches and interested persons for a series of
discussions to form a dialogue between the
SBahamas and the NCAA.
Dr Franklin, Ministry of Education and Youth,
Sports, and Housing officials, technical directors
and coaches engaged in a dialogue session regard-
ing issues affecting Bahamian student athletes.
Discussion points at the meetings included:
entry requirements for Bahamians to attend Divi-
sion One colleges in the United States; the
Bahamas Government's subvention of local stu-
dent athletes attending NCAA schools; scholar-
ship opportunities for Bahamian student athletes
at Division One colleges; facilitation of relation-
ships between the NCAA and the College of the
Bahamas and the possible hosting of NCAA con-
ventions in the Bahamas.
Minister of Youth, Sports and Housing Neville
S Wisdom said these issues had become paramount


because of the numerous amounts of Bahamian
student athletes studying and competing in the
United States.
He said Bahamian students, coaches and par-
ents must better educate themselves with the
requirements and regulations surrounding all
aspects of participating in the NCAA sporting
process.
Athletes must initially be admitted to the school
and must also qualify through the NCAA Clear-
inghouse.
Since 1993, the NCAA has accepted scores
from the Bahamas General Certificate of Sec-
ondary Education exams as the standard for
Bahamian athletes to qualify for play in NCAA
sports.
Local coaches and athletes have felt as if these
standards place athletes at a disadvantage due
to the timing of the release of the BGCSE scores
and the fact that students competing for academic
scholarships face no such restrictions.
Academic scholarship applicants are evaluated
solely on SAT scores and high school transcripts,
however, an athlete's body of academic work is
not evaluated.
The panel suggested a compromise of results
that would benefit the student while simultane-
ously giving the NCAA an accurate depiction of
the student's academic performance.
"The question is, should we ask these students
to wait a whole year or attend an institution that
was maybe not their first or second choice? The
reality is that the BGCSE exam results are not


produced until late July and by then most schol-
arships and admissions would have been rati-
fied," he said, "Or de we adapt our system and try
to make arrangements that benefit the athletes
and at the same time satisfy the qualifications of
the NCAA."


Dr. Franklin said the sooner people involved on
both sides of the situation become more educat-
ed on the basics a dialogue can be started parties.
"The first issue is that we must establish a clear
distinction between academic admission and
becoming eligible for competition. The academ-
ic adflission is cTomplctil} subjective based on
each individual school; however the NCAA does
mandate if a student athlete is eligible in terms of
athletic competition," he said, "We have a given
set of criteria Which varies on divisional varia-
tion. One of the things I would strongly encourage
everybody to do is to read the; publication we
annually produce on the eligibility standards of
international athletes, which is posted on our
website. The key is to acquire this information as
early as possible to be prepared for those final few
years of high school."
Dr. Franklin said keeping abreast of the infor-
mation is vitalito making the process a successful
one.
"The rules are changing radically and are
changing often as the issue of academic perfor-
mance becomes more important to student ath-
letes," he said, "But you have got to start early
and you have got to have a balance."
The Government's subvention to development
athletes was also discussed and the issue has been
cleared as a legal action by the NCAA.
Rules and regulations regarding amateur status
regarding compliance, eligibility and amateur sta-
tus can be found on the official website of the
NCAA, www.ncaa.org.


bonour


- S


in defends American heal)weight




Copyrighted Material



SSyndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


a ---


S ~ - -
- a - *
-~


-4b- -


SPORTSr


4n


- ft 4b.-










Belgium's Gevaert completes



sprint double at Europeans


*


Copyrighted Material
ft.- -- 't


SSyndicated Content


vailable6from!Commercial New


-,PAIYI


*Co. w.m a 0 f t *- 04bo .0 o4 tk waw4oo moo 0.0owe.b -m 4 b
b ____ __o M M No- -
4wVdf a4mdpan


-


a a


b


- a-~ ~- -

- -a


5 a S


- .
- w- -
*~ a *~
C


-r a


-a


-~ -S U
Taeiro-B-.PIC3
0 a -O b dw4 NW o4 00 -lft4 o omo4bf*w aoal


'4


4b 40 0 -0-ap-4b- 0 4 .- -


A


SATURDAY, AUGUST 12, 2006, PAGE 3B


TRIBUNE SPORTS


-.-,qp


o


- ..Iw


o





TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGF 4R SATURDAY. AUGUST 12. 2006


- _


lighted Material


icatedtent
ft -m -40- -Itm 4 WI 0 ml m


,. "m --
Available from Commercial. News Providers

An Olympic mgnmuaret


od)


\thlns stru klsg with

its 2(MN inheritance



-


S -


- S

- S
-* 0 -5-


- -


SPORTS


I


48- -





SATURDAY. AUGUST 12. 2006, PAGE 5B,


I BliUNE SPTH IS


David Beckham


SEdropped from


;.. England squad


- o


* ~ -


* -
- ~- S
~ _


a _


S S
I


- S


v -


& Copyrighted Material


- Syndicated Content.


0 =


* i


p -


al" mmrc'--"~--"
Available from Commercial News* Providersm
*~~~ gob.- ~
~ ~ ~ s a Sm- .a -w -am- 4D
__________-_-__-_-_- -OW5
.,1
eb.O b,., J .. .


S


Williams advances to quarterfinals


lb- -amml
-~~ 0
-r*- = -


40o


4:


,,,,,,


rrr


r


r,


0


- ik. m -m d b


40100pol






TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 6B, SATURDAY, AUGUST 12, 2006


AUGUST 12, 2006


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

The Kingston Trio: Wherever We May Go Interviews, Great Performances "Liza With a 7" A 1972 concert Roy Orbison &
WPBT vintage footage and music clips tell the story of The features Liza Minnelli at New York's Lyceum Theater. Friends: Black &
Kingston Trios rise to fame. 1 (CC) n (CC) White Night
NFL Preseason Football Jacksonville Jaguars at Miami Dolphins. From Dolphin Stadium in Miami. (Live) Dolphins
0 WFOR Postgame Show
(:00) Access Dateline NBC Former aerospace executive found dead in Florida. (N) n Crossing Jordan A young girl in-
SWTVJ Hollywood (N) (CC) sists she found her father dead but
(CC) Jordan is skeptical. t (CC)
Deco Drive Cops An officer Cops Juvenile fe- America's Most Wanted: America News (CC)
B WSVN Weekend responds to a male traded for Fights Back Suspected serial killer
vandalism call. drugs. (CC) inTexas. (N) f (CC)
Wheel of For- ABC's 50th Anniversary Blooper COYOTE UGLY (2000, Romance-Comedy) Piper Perabo, Adam Gar-
SWPLG tune"Life's a Celebration f (Part 2 of 2) (CC) cia, Maria Bello. A struggling songwriter cuts loose in a rowdy New York
Beach" (CC) bar. t (CC)

(:00) City Confi- Cold Case Files A young gir is Cold Case Files The 1990 murder American Justice "The Monster In-
A&E dential(CC) found dead in her home; a woman of a Fort Worth, Texas woman is in- side" n (CC)
is raped and murdered. vestigated. (N) (CC)
This Week Cor- (:15) Extreme Lives "Mr. Sunset" (:10) The World Uncovered "Bolly- BBC News The Reporters
BBCI respondentswood" Bollywood. (Latenight).
S Access Granted The Wayans The Wayans Girlfriends "Sis- Girlfriends f Girlfriendsn t Girlfriends f
BET (cc) Bros. (CC) Bros.n (CC) ter, Sistah" n (CC) (CC) (CC)
:00) ATP Tennis U.S. Open Series -- Rogers Cup -- Semifinal. From CFL Pregame CFL Football Montreal Alouettes at
oronto. (Live) (CC) (Live) (CC) Calgary Stampeders. (CC)
N:00) Tim The Suze Orman Show (CC) The Suze Orman Show "Men & Tim Russert
CNBC assert Money" Help for men. (CC)
CNN (:00)On the Sto- CNN Presents Larry King Live CNN Saturday Night
CNN ry(cC)
(6:30) Larry the ** X BLUE COLLAR COMEDY TOUR RIDES AGAIN (2004, Documentary) Comics Bill BLUE COLLAR
COM Cable Guy: Git- Engvall, Jeff Foxworthy and others perform. (CC) COMEDY TOUR
R-Done (CC)
OURT Forensic Files Forensic Files Forensic Files Body of Evi- Body of Evi- Body of Evi- Body of Evi-
COURT "Pillow Talk" "Plastic Puzzle" dence dence dence dence
That's So Raven Hannah Mon- That's So Raven American Drag- The Emperor's Phil of the Fu- Life With Derek
DISN (CC) tana Billboard "Mad Hot Cotil- on: Jake Long New SchoolA ture Keely plays The kids organize
pimple. (N) (CC) lion" (N)(CC) bride is chosen, matchmaker, a reception.
(:00) M Ulti- DIY to the Res- DIY to the Res- Freeform Furni- Wood Works Handmade Mu- Woodturning
DIY mate Workshop cue cue ture Hand planes. sic Techniques
DW Euromaxx The Journal In Focus (Ger- Journal: Popxport Journal: with Euromaxx
DW man). Wirtschaftsbilanz Business
S(:00) El News Hugh Hefner: Girlfriends, Wives and Centerfolds: The El True HollySaturda Night Live Halle Berry;
E Weekend wood Story Playboy. (CC) Britneypears. (CC)
C D (:00) Little League Baseball Midwest Regional Final Little League Baseball West Regional Final -- Teams TBA. From San
ESPN Teams TBA. From Indianapolis. (Live) (CC) Bernardino, Calif. (Live) (CC)
I (:00) ATP Tennis U.S. Open Series-- Rogers Cup -- 2005 U.S. Poker Championships 2005 U.S. Poker Championships
i ESPNI Semifinal. From Toronto. (Live) (CC) (CC) (CC)
:T00) EWTN 25th Anniversary Family Celebration Bookmark Fr. John Corapi
EWTN "Special Family Live Show"
FIT TV Blaine's Low All Star Workouts Stability ball Total Body Sculpt With Gilad Caribbean Work- Namaste Yoga
FIT V Carb Kitchen workout. (CC) Warm-up. n (CC) out f (CC) Grace.
FOX-NC (:00) Fox Report Heartland With John Kasich In The Line-Up (Live) Big Story Primetime (Live)
FOXA-NC Columbus, Ohio. (Live).
FSNFL Inside the Devil Inside the Devil Rays on Deck MLB Baseball Tampa Bay Devil Rays at Oakland Athletics. From McAfee
Rays Rays (Live) Coliseum in Oakland, Calif. (Subject to Blackout) (Live)
:GO F 00) Golf U.S. Women's Amateur Championship -- Golf Central Champions Tour Mid-Season Road to the
GOLF Fourth Round. From North Plains, Ore. (Taped) (Live) Show (N) IPGA Champ.
GSN (:00) Greed (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire f Chain Reaction Starface (CC) The Amazing Race 7 "Courteous?
GSN (CC) (CC) Thiss a Race!" n (CC)
G4Tech cons Artist Star Trek: The Next Generation Star Trek: The Next Generation The Man Show The Man Show
G4TeCh Shepard Fairey. Tin Man" f (CC) "Hollow Pursuits" f (CC) (CC) (CC)
S* PERRY MASON: THE CASE OF THE GLASS MCBRIDE: TUNE IN FOR MURDER (2005, Mystery) John Larroquette,
HALL COFFIN (1991) Raymond Burr. A flamboyant show- Marta Dubois, Matt Lutz. An attorney investigates the death of a radio
man's assistant dies during an illusion, host. (CC)
Kitchen My First Place Space For Liv- Home to Stay Rooms That Home on Their My Parents'
HGTV Equipped African and Asian ing Young boys' Best choices both Rock "Karaoke Own The House "A Moonlit
(CC) elements. bedroom. (CC) for resale. Pop Star" (CC) Smiths" (CC) Bistro"
IS:00) Old Time Gaither Homecoming Hour Gospel Music Community of Christian Artist I Gospel "John P.
INSP Gospel Hour Southern Style Friends Talent Search Kee"
!* ON THE LINE.(2001, Romance-Comedy) Lance Blind Date My Wife and Friends Ross Everybody
KTLA Bass, Joey Fatone. A young ad man launches a cam- (CC) Kids Parents tar- races to get the Loves Raymond
paign to find his true love. n (CC) get bickering. gang ready.n n (CC)
*s CONVICTED (2004, Drama) Connie Nielsen, LAST EXIT (2006, Suspense) Kathleen Robertson, Andrea Roth, Ben
LIFE Aidan Quinn, Kelly Preston. A Texas defense attorney Bass. Road rage leads two mothers on an extended car chase. (CC)
investigates a death-row inmate. (CC)
SNBC MSNBC Inv.: MSNBC Investigates: Little Boy MSNBC Investigates "Lockup: Re- MSNBC Reports "Mercy or Murder"
MSNBC Use of Force Lost tur to Riker's IsTand" Dawn Fratangelo reports.
S SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob Thugaboo: Sneaker Madnessn Roseanne ( (:34 Roseanne
NICK SquarePants SquarePants SquarePants (CC)n )
NTV (:00) ReGenesis Andromeda A geneticist plans to W-FIVE f (CC) (DVS) News f (CC) NTV Entertain-
create a new Vedran Age. (CC) ment News
Billiards: King of Bull Riding PBR The Nile Invitational. From Billings, Mont. Darts Premier League. (Taped)
OLN the Hill
SPEED NASCAR Perfor- Tradin' Paint (N) Payback"Brooke Champ Car-Rac- Lucas Oil on the Auto Racin Knoxville Nationals -
SPEED mance Burke" ing Edge Highlights. (Live)
(:00) The Coral In Touch (CC) Hour of Power (CC) Billy Graham Classic Crusades
TBN Ridge Hour (CC)
(:00) MLB Baseball Milwaukee Brewers at Atlanta Braves. From Turner Field in Atlanta. *A BAD BOYS (1995, Action)
TBS (Subject to Blackout) (Live) (CC) PA) Martin Lawrence, Will Smith,
Tea Leoni. (CC)
:00) Property Property Ladder Two couples pool Trading Spaces Drawing inspiration TradingSpaces "Austin: Emerald
TLC Ladder (CC) their resources to flip a high-end from Anzona's red rocks; modern Forest Circle" Traditional designers
home. (N) oasis. (N) (CC) tackle funky hipster homes.
S** DRUM- *** REMEMBER THE TITANS (2000, Drama) Denzel Washington, Will Patton, Donald *I HARDBALL
TNT LINE (2002) Nick Adeosun Faison. A black man coaches high-school football after integration. (CC) (2001) Keanu
Cannon. Reeves.
TPokemon Teen Titans Naruto Naruto (N) watch Bell Bobobo-bo Bo- One Piece .
TOON Chronicles ___ _Bobo (N) (CC)
(:00) Des racines et des ailes (:45) Histoires Quai No1 Journal TV5
TV5 de chteaux
6:00 Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
TW'M Edition (CC) (CC) Missing child.
(:00) Casos de Sabado Gigante El final del concurso de baile; Junior Ranks; Tormenta de Durango.
UNIV Familia: Edici6n
Especial
(:00) Psych Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
USA "Weekend War- A mother who reported statutory Detectives link an assault to illegal The dismembered body of a woman
riors" (CC) rape is found murdered, trafficking in painkillers, is found in a junkyard. ft
VH1 Io00) The Drug The Drug Years "Just Say No" The *** TUPAC: RESURRECTION (2003, Documentary) Premiere. The
V Years crack epidemic of the '80s. life and music of rapper Tupac Shakur. n
Health: Treating MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at Colorado Rockies. From Coors Field in Denver. (Live) f (CC)
WGN Prostate Cancer
Everybody * GEORGE OF THE JUNGLE 2 (2003, Comedy) Christopher Shower- WB11 News at Ten Weekend
WPIX Loves Raymond man, Julie Benz, Thomas Haden Church. George must cope with a Edition With Peter Thorne and
ft (CC) scheming mother-in-law. Mary Murphy (CC)
Jeopardy! (CC) ** GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS (1992, Drama) Al Pacino, Jack Veronica Mars The Rapes of
WSB K Lemmon, Alec Baldwin. Real-estate salesmen fight to survive; David Graff" Veronica's ex-boyfriend is ac-
Mamet's play. caused of date rape. f (CC) *

HARRY POT- *** CHARLIE AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY (2005, Fantasy) Entourage The **x MAN ON
HBO-E TER-PRISONER Johnny Depp, Freddie Highmore, David Kelly. Premiere. Five children guys travel to Las FIRE (2004) n
OF AZKABAN tour the wondrous factory of an odd candy-maker. n 'PG' (CC) Vegas. (CC) 'R'(CC) .
:15) *x TAXI (2004, Comedy) Queen Latifah, Jimmy Rome "Utica" Vorenus and Pullo The Wire "Slapstick" McNulty and
HBO-P Falton. A bumbling policeman and a cabby chase bank have a showdown with a local thug. Prez turn up in the wrong alley. n
robbers. n 'PG-13'(CC) n (CC) (CC)


6:45) SURVIVING CHRIST- *** HARRY POTTER AND THE PRISONER OF AZKABAN (2004, Fantasy) Daniel
HBO-W MAS2004, Comedy) Ben Affleck. Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson. The young wizard confronts the fugitive Sirius Black.
A 'PG-13' (CC) A 'PG' (CC)I
(6:30) ***x CINDERELLA MAN (2005) Russell I***' SIDEWAYS (2004, Comedy-Drama) Paul Giamatti, Thomas
H BO-S rowe. Down-and-out boxer Jim Braddock makes a Haden Church, Virginia Madsen. Two friends ponder their lives during a
dramatic comeback. f 'PG-13' (CC) road trip. n 'R' (CC)
(E6:00)*** * RANSOM (1996, Suspense) Mel Gibson, Rene Russo, Gary *t RED EYE (2005, Suspense)
MAX-E SERENITY Sinise. A wealthy executive turns the tables on his son's abductor. n 'R' Rachel McAdams, Cillian Murphy.
(2005) 'PG-13' (CC) Premiere. 'PG-13'
(:15) * ANACONDAS: THE HUNT FOR THE ** THE INTERPRETER (2005, Suspense) Nicole Kidman, Sean
MOMAX BLOOD ORCHID (2004) Johnny Messner. Explorers Penn, Catherine Keener. A U.N. translator overhears an assassination
encounter monstrous snakes in Boreo. 'PG-13' plot. f 'PG-13' (CC)
THE COOKOUT (2004, Comedy) Ja Rule, Tim * DIARY OF A MAD BLACK WOMAN (2005, Comedy-Drama) Kim-
SHOW Meadows. iTV. An athlete's mother has a wild barbe- bery Elise, Steve Harris, Shemar Moore iTV. A woman starts over after
cue at his mansion. n 'PG-13' (CC) herhusband leaves her. n 'PG-13' (CC)
S(6:30)** ** NOTTING HILL (1999, Romance-Comedy) Julia Roberts, Hugh (:05) * DISCLOSURE (1994,
TMC SLEEPOVER Grant, Hugh Bonneville. A bookseller and a movie star have an unlikely Suspense) Michael Douglas, Demi
(2004)'PG' (CC) romance. f 'PG-13' (CC) Moore. Premiere. 'R' (CC)


SATURDAY EVENING


(6:45) * CITY OF ANGELS :45) * U.S. MARSHALS (1998, Crime Drama) Tommy Lee Jones, Wesley Snipes,
HBO-W 1998, Romance) Nicolas Cage, Robert Downey Jr. Sam Gerard gets caught up in another fugitive case. f 'PG-13' (CC)
eg Ryan. 'PG-13' (CC)
(:00) ** K INDECENT PROPOSAL (1993, Drama) ,, MRS. HARRIS (2005, Biography) Annette Ben- ( :45)S*
HBO-S Robert Redford, Demi Moore. A man offers a couple $1 ing, Ben Kingsley. Socialite Jean Hams kills her lover, RIPTEASE
million for a night with the wife. n 'R' (CC) Dr. Herman Tarnower. f 'NR' (CC) (1996) 'R' (CC)
(6:30) * (:15) * KICKING & SCREAMING (2005, Comedy) Will Ferrell, SCREAM (1996, Horror)
MAX-E BEVERLY HILLS Robert Duvall, Mike Ditka. A father and son go head-to-head as soccer Neve Campbell, David Arquette,
COP 'R" coaches. t 'PG' (CC) Courteney Cox. 'R'(CC)
* RED EYE (2005, Suspense) Rachel McAdams. SON OF THE MASK (2005, Comedy) Jamie Ken- (:40) Intimate
MOMAX Premiere. A plane passenger involves his seatmate in nedy, Alan Cumming. A cartoonist's infant son has ex- sessions "Tama-
a deadly plot. 'PG-13' (CC) traordinary powers. t 'PG' (CC) ra" f (CC)
(6:05) JOHN(7:50) ** THE PASSION OF THE CHRIST (2004, Drama) Jim Brotherhood "Samyutta 11:10" A
SHOW NY MNEMONIC Caviezel, Monica Bellucci, Claudia Gerini. iTV. Jesus endures the agony shooting involves Declan; Mary
(1995) of his final 12 hours. (Subtitled-English) f 'R' Rose gets caught. (N) (CC)
(6:35) DONNIE DARKO * SOUL PLANE (2004, Comedy) Kevin Hart, Tom * CARLITO'S WAY: RISE TO
TMC (200, Fantasy) Jake Gyllenhaal, Amold, Method Man. Passengers and crew party POWER (2005, Crime Drama) Jay
Jena Malone. f 'R' (CC) aboard an airliner. f 'R' (CC) Hemandez. f 'R' (CC)


SUNDAY EVENING AUGUST 13, 2006

S7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 930 0:00 10:30

Leyendas: The WillyChirinoi A Concert for History The event celebrates a variety of The Best of Que Pasa, USA Televi-
* WPBT Legends of music styles. From the James L Knight Center, November 2005. sion's first and only bilingual situa-
Cuban Music tion comedy.
(:00) 60 Minutes Big Brother: All-Stars Two are Cold Case "Superstar" Lilly gets Without a Trace The team search-
E WFOR (N) fl (CC) nominated for eviction. (N) t (CC) new evidence in the 1973 murder of es for a missing 15-year-old bicycle
a young female tennis player. messenger. A (CC)
(:00) Dateline NFL Preseason Football Washington Redskins at Cincinnati Bengals. From Paul Brown Stadium in Cincinnati.
m WTVJ NBC (N) n (CC) (Live) (CC) -
Kingof the Hill TheSimpsons American Dad Family Guy / TheWarat News (CC)
H WSVN Hank has some- Bart destroys "Stan of Arabia" (PA)(CC) Home The Run-
thing to prove. Willie's shack. (CC) always"
(:00) America's Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Desperate Housewives "It Wasn't Grey's Anatomy "Straight to the
S WPLG Funniest Home The Nutsch family lost its house in Meant to Happen" Bree finds anoth- Heart" New doctors face personal
Videos (CC) an explosion, n (CC) er fault in Peter. (CC) and professional pressures.

(:00) Flip This Flip This House "History Lesson" Keepers: A Job Behind Bars Cam Intervention "Betsy" A family gives
A&E House Restau- Historic Atlanta house. (N) (CC) eras record the life of a prison an ultimatum to a woman who
rant renovation, guard. (CC) drinks. (N) (CC)
Extra Time BBC News Dateline London BBC News Countdown to BBC News Have Your Say
BBCI (Latenight). (Latenight). the Ryder Cup (Latenight).
T Keyshia Cole: Keyshia Cole: Keyshia Cole: Keyshia Cole: Keyshia Cole: Trini-Rhythms Trini-Rhythms
BET TheWay It Is The Way It Is The Way It Is The Way It Is The Way It Is
(:00 The Nature * HAPPY GILMORE (1996, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Christopher Mc- CBC News: Sunday Night (CC)
CB of Tings (N) Donald, Julie Bowen. A hockey player joins the PGAtour. (CC)
S Wall Street Jour- High Net Worth Chris Matthews Town Hall CNBC Prime
CNBC nal Report1
N4: 00 CNN Live CNN Presents Larry King Live CNN Sunday Night
CNN Sunday (CC) ,
BLUE COLLAR COMEDY TOUR: ONE FOR THE ROAD (2006, Comedy) Comics Jeff Fox- Mind of Mencia Reno 911! The
COM worthy, Larry the Cable Guy, Bill Engvall. (CC) Wrestling tourna- deputies seek
ment, (N) vengeance. (N)
C T Scariest Police Cops "Coast to Cops ( (CC) Cops Prostitution Cops "Coast to Party Police: Wild on the Water
COURT hases2 Coast" f (CC) sting. (CC) Coast" n (CC)
That's So Raven Viewers'Choice Phil of the Fu- Life With Derek
DISN To See or Not to ture First day of "He Shoots, She
See" school. Scores"
DIY Inside: The DIYto the Res- DIY to the Res- Rock Solid Grounds for Im- From Junky to Fresh Coat
DIY Builders'Show cue cue provement Funky.
DW Euromaxx Journal: The In Focus (Ger- Journal: mit Re- Wer glaubt, ist Journal: with Euromaxx
DW Week man). porter nie alein Reporters
SThe Simple Life: The Simple Life: The Simple Life: The Girls Next The Girls Next The Simple Life: The Simple Life:
E 'Til Death 'Til Death 'Til Death Door (N) Door 'Til Death 'Til Deat
N :00) Baseball MLB Baseball San Francisco Giants at Los Angeles Dodgers. From Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles. (Live)
ESPN Tonght (Live) (CC)
ES I Baseball Tonight MLB Baseball San Francisco Giants at Los Angeles Dodgers. From Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles. (Live)
ESPNI (Live) (CC) (CC)
EWT Father Father Corapi and the Catechism G.K, Chesterton The Holy Rosary A Dedicated Father Pat
EWTN Groeschel of the Catholic Church Man
:IT-V 00) Body Art of the Athlete Olympic gold Insider Training "Basketball" Bas- The Gym 'Thrown Into the Spot-
IT V builders (CC) medalist Dan Jansen. A (CC) ketball players. (CC) light" Amber has her first client.
FOX-NC (:00) Fox Report War Stories With Oliver North The Line-Up (Live) Big Story Primetime (Live)
F L PRIDE Fighting Poker Superstars Invitational In Focus on FSN The FSN Final The Sports List Around the
FSNFL championships Tournament From Las Vegas. Score (Live) Track
G F (:00 Golf U.S. Women's Amateur Championship -- Fi- Golf Central Post Game Show (Live) PGA Champi-
GOLF al Round. From North Plains, Ore. (Live) onship High-
GSN (:00) Greed (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire 1 Lingo (CC) Lingo (CC) World Series of Blackjack 2006
GSN (cc) (cc)
:00) Formula Star Trek: The Next Generation Star Trek: The Next Generation The Man Show The Man Show
G4Tech Drif "Chicago" 'The Most Toys" n (CC) Sarek's visit sparks violence. / (CC) (CC)
(:00) Diagnosis Murder "Gangland" A mobster be- Diagnosis Murder "Out of the Past" Alex and Mark clash over Alex's rela-
HALL lives he can turn his physical resemblance to Mark to tionship with a murder suspect. n (CC)
his advantage. f' (CC)
Designed to Sell Junk Brothers Take It Outside Buy Me n (CC) House Hunters Holmes on Homes Two Steps
HGTV Selling a condo, Side table into Adaptable play A couple wants Back" Building a cement staircase.
1 (CC) hallway clock, space. ( more room. f1 f (CC)
It's a New Day In Touch Growth through adversity. The King Is Calvary Revival Jack Van Impe Manna-Fest (CC)
INSP (CC) Coming (CC) Church Presents (CC
A ix LIFE Pepper Dennis Charlie advises What I Like : Twins Lee takes Just Legal "The Body in the Trunk"
KTLA WITH MIKEY Pepper how to connect with view- About You The Mitchee to the Body in a trunk. (N) r (CC)
(1993) n (CC) ers. n (CC) Other Woman" salon. n (CC)
THE ACCIDEN- BREAK-IN (2006, Suspense) Kelly Carlson. Premiere. Intruders hold a Angela's Eyes "Undercover Eyes"
LIFE TAL WITNESS couple hostage within an island mansion. (CC) Angela goes under cover as a sub-
(2006) (CC) stitute teacher. (N) (CC)
S (:00) MSNBC MSNBC Investigates "Deceased City in Fear: Beltway Snipers Meet the Press (CC)
MSNBC Special Unknown" Coroners' offices.
NICK Unfabulous'The Zoey 101 "Jet X" Just for Kicks A Different Fresh Prince of Hi-Jinks "Corbin Fresh Prince of
NICK Word" n(CC) (N) (CC) World t (CC) Bel-Air Bernsen" Bel-Air
The Simpsons Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Blue Murder "Family Reunion" f News t (CC) News
NTV n(C(DVS) "() Nutsch Family" n (CC) (CC)
N Billiards: King of Bull Riding PBR The Nile Invitational. From Billings, Mont. Billiards IPT King of the Hill 8-Ball
OLN the Hill IIShootout, Round 3.
SPEED 0)NASCAR SPEED Report (N) Wind Tunnel With Dave Despain NASCAR Victory Lane (N) (CC)
SPEED Victory Lane (N)______ _____
Jack Hayford Joel Osteen Taking Authority Believer's Voice ChangingYour Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN (CC) (CC) (CC) of Victory (CC) World(CC)
*** BAD Seinfeld Elaine's Seinfeld George Seinfeld Elaine Seinfeld George Seinfeld Elaine Seinfeld "The
TBS BOYS (1995) ex has bizarre acts like arebel. creates an alter- hunts for a lost takes on a new Summer of
(PA) (CC) buddies. n (CC) nate persona. key ring. (CC) business. (CC) George" (CC)
(:00) Miami Ink Miami Ink "Woman in a Man's Miami Ink The guys play a prank on The Messengers "Hope" Patients at
TLC CYoi's Initiation" World" Nufiez tattoos Dalia with a their latest applicant for the shop the Children's Hospital of Orange
(C memorial piece for her father, manager job. (CC) County. (N)
*** REMEM- * THE RON CLARK STORY (2006, Biography) Matthew Perry, Ernie ** THE RON CLARK STORY
TNT BER THE TI- Hudson, Melissa De Sousa, Premiere. A New York teacher has a lasting (2006, Biography) Matthew Perry,
TANS (2000) impact on his students. (CC) Erne Hudson. (C)
TOON Camp Lazlo Ben 10 The Big Ed, Edd n Eddy Grim Adven- Squirrel Boy Futurama/ The Venture
ON Tick" tures Leon's tree. (CC) Brothers (N)
S Grard Klein autour du monde Festival International de Jazz de Ombres et lu- Vingt quatre Journal TV5
TVMontral (SC) mitres idees/seconde
6:00) Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Full Force Na- It Could Happen Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
TWC PM Edition (CC) Gloucester. (CC) (CC) ture (CC) Tomorrow
(:00) La Hora Cantando Por un Suenio Siete concursantes compiten.
UNIV ,ico
(:00) Monk "Mr. Monk "Mr. Monk and the Actor" An The 4400 "The Gospel According to (:01) The Dead Zone "Revelations"
USA Monk and the actor gets in the way. (CC) Collier" The detectives go on a man- (N) (CC)
Garbage Strike" hunt: (N) (CC)
VH 1 GHOST (1990) Patrick Swayze. A murder vic- Celebrity Fit Club The teams com- The Flavor of Love "Flav Is Blind"
V H1 tim retums to save his beloved fiancee. t pete in a bicycle race. ft /t
(:00) Maximum 24 Jack's interrogation techniques 24 "Day 4: 2:00AM-3:00AM" Agent WGN News at (:40) Instant Re-
WGN Exposure (CC) are questioned; CTU operatives Bauer sets his sights on a new lead. Nine f (CC) play n (CC)
close in on Marwan. (CC) f (CC)
(:00) Just Legal Charmed The Torn Identity" Coop Charmed The Charmed Ones try to WB11 News at Ten Weekend
W PIX Body in a trunk, realizes that he has fallen for help a mermaid avoid losing her im- Edition With Peter Thorne and
(N) f (CC) Phoebe. ft (CC) mortality to the Sea Hag. Mary Murphy (CC)
That '70s Show CSI: Crime Scene Investigation CSI: Crime Scene Investigation Red Sox This Red Sox Stories
WSBK Leo falls in love "Pilot" Grissom and the team track Gdrissom calls in a former colleague Week
with Kitty. (CC) down a serial killer. f (CC) to help on a case. A (CC)

(5:45)** U.S. The Wire "Reformation" Brother Deadwood "A Constant Throb" Entourage Eric Lucky Louie
HBO-E MARSHALS Mouzone retums to Baltimore. f Hearst's henchmen target Alma. (N) finds a project for "Confession" (N)
(1998) 'PG-13' (CC) f (CC) Vince. (N) (CC)
(6:15) * KINGDOM OF HEAVEN (2005, Historical Drama) Orlando Bloom, Eva Green, Jere- * FINAL
HBO-P WHITE NOISE my Irons. A young knight protects Jerusalem from invaders. f 'R' (CC) ANALYSIS
(2005) 'PG-13' (1992) 'R' (CC)


>


I









TRIBUNE SPORTS


SATURDAY, AUGUST 12, 2006, PAGE 7B


COISPG


Dehi"


, Copyrighted Material .




YSyndicatead Conte nt !v
:s Aft


L ,4 A r .Ii 1mI-- V- .-w -


-Available from Commercial News Providers

^ ^ .Ai.=."^'.' ^m ^ ^ s^ _*



^^^^'^'a44


t
e
~ *
.sr


V.~I


ACROSS
3 Caughtthepairut in a
bed job(5)
I Made to payfr a good number (5)
10 They can be hard to lose, perhaps,
al golf(5)
11 Potydrnk? (3)
12 Differentnameforesal? (5)
13 Curly nd without delay (7)
15 Abitofhope, pet, caninvigorate (3,2)
18 Spareyre material(3)
19 Though hideous, she was somehow
amused (6)
21 Fun lute composition,
very melodious (7)
22 He nobly giesatention
to a novice (4)
23 For the present, a soldier on foot (4)
24 Notice of exclusion (4,3)
26 In the shed, apieceof hardware in
communal use (6)
29 Woman of unique value (3)
31 Now'sthe time to play around
with keys (5)
32 One who plays with
rattles? (7)
34 Spots how thedirecton mustbe
changed(S)
35 Students own little
room? (3)
36 Adrink witt thechar? (5)
37 Bady aimed in the
press, etc. (5)
38 Be unconsciously
noisy (5)


Friday's cryptic soiudons
ACT S: 8, Pull ou 9, Freeanc-e 13, Wrong 14, Stamp
15 Takes up 16 Scratch 17, Pulls 18, Force 20, St-a-r 22,
(DOwning 23, B-ten 25, Passage 2, Like-ned 30,
ra-(l)n-ce 31, Cove-Rt 32, Ma-(Eas pes 35, Tan
(tighten) 36, Harps 37, La-sagne 39, Further 41, Ea-R-th
42, Lined 43, S-nd-s out 44, Spoiled
DOWN: 1, Humour 2, B-ghter 3, Puts trouh 4, Drop a
line Den-tis-t 6, Walk of life 7, Aces 10,Twists 11,
Ra-pant 12, S-p(O)een 19, Retreat 21, Ada-man-t 24,
Pistol-whips 26, Second-hand 28, Co-urteo-us 29,
C-ensure 30, Pu-t o-ff 32 Musce in 33, Sp-eeD-y 34,
Cher-ish 38, Gander 40, Ro-a


a


o .4 do m


UUWN
1 t's ashame about thehotelbeing
short (5)
2 Afraid to be atrocious? (7)
4 Can a slippery customer be as
smooth? (4)
5 Where to praythat a fellow gets
a bit of help (6)
6 Washed down with water (5)
7 Couldshebringus abit of
heaven? (5)
9 Modern as a Nazi would need to be,
nowadays (3)
12 Related differently (7)
14 Instant bronzed appearance? (3)
16 Turning up with a flier to express
one's point (3,2)
17 Such politics call for skill in extremes
of perfidy! (5)
19 -Not exactly puppets, but they are
manipulated (7)
20 Maybe steal no more
than you need (5)
21 Walk a little round about (5)
23 Being cautious, was protected (7)
24 Ken accepts Any, perhaps, as an
important person (6)
25 Eggs, not quite oval (3)
27 Nonsense, though good in sound (5)
28 Utters, roughly speaking (5)
30 Spirit of a general, that Is (5)
32 As an gitator, keep things
moving (4)
33 By a length, perhaps- or by the
nose? (3)


Friday's easy solutions.
ACROSS: 8, aynet 9, Navigates 13, Atlas 14, Raise 15,
Gosling 16, Impedes 17, Eerie 18, Oive 20, Oscar 22,
Hearse 23 Ladies 25, Kitchen 27, Detests 30, Eskimo 31,
Fnale 32, Incur 35, Synod36, Exams 37, Rafters 39,
Loafers 41, Pivot 42, hotel 43, Wednesday
44, Genine.
DOWN: 1, Galo 2, Consider 3, Ferris wheel 4,
Gate-crash 5, ggls 6, Passionate 7, Yeti 10, Casino 11,
Vinear 12, Are 19, diotic21 Chicken 24,
Celebrities 26, Coedienne 28, Diappear 29, Massive
30, Easily 32, Infamous 33, Rustle 34 Persist 38, Extent
40, Ayes


ACROSS
3 Handle (5)
8 Wonderful (5)
10 Saftpetre (5)
11 Males (3)
12 Middle (5)
13 Endanger(7)
15 Biscuit (5)
18 Lard (3)
19 Designate (6)
21 Pugilst(7)
22 Stop (4)
23 Percussion
Instrument (4)
24 Coach(7)
26 Steeples (6)
29 Staff (3)
31 Temptress (5)
32 Discovers
(7)
34 Raged (5)
35 Barrel
(3)
36 Turret(5)
37 Tendon (5)
38 Kingdom (5)


c


Contract Bridge

By StevW eekr


You Don't Need a Slide R


South dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
*KJ 1094
Q 109
+62
+643


WEST
472
VK8653
*J74
+Q 105


EAST
A 8 53
VY72
SQ 1095
+J98


SOUTH
4Q6
VAJ4
*AK83
+AK72
The bidding:
South West North East
2 NT Pass 3 Pass
3 NT
Opening lead five of hearts.
The importance of planning the
play can never be overemphasized.
To play first and think later.is to put
the cart before the horse, and all too
often a hasty declarer will have rea-
son to regret a mechanical reaction
on an earlier play.
For example, consider this deal
where West led a heart against three
notrump. Dummy's nine won the
first trick, and declarer led a spade to
the queen, which also won. The next
spade went to East's ace, and he
returned a heart.
South played the jack, won by


Tribune

SHroscope.

ule
By LINDA BLACK


West with the king, and the heart
continuation was taken by South's
ace. At this point, declare found
himself staring forlornly at dummy's
three good spades, and with no way
to reach them, he eventually finished
down one.
Declarer's undoing can be traced
to his play at trick one. He should
have assumed the opponents would
not cooperate by winning the first
round of spades, and then sought a
solution before proceeding.
Had he done that, he.would have
found a simple way to make the con-
tract. All he had to do was to win the
opening lead with the ace of hearts
and force out the ace of spades.
Dummy's Q-10 of hearts would have
constituted an absolutely certain
entry to dummy to cash the estab-
lished spades, and declarer would
have finished with an overtrick.
Superficially, it seems absurd to
win the first trick with the ace of
hearts when you can win it with the
nine. But when you stop and look at
the hand as a whole, it becomes clear
that winning with the ace is right and
winning with the nine is wrong.
Although most of the time you win a
trick as cheaply as possible, that
doesn't mean you always do so.
Occasionally you get a chance to
prove that reasoning is more reliable
than woodenly following the line of
least resistance.


I T~ARE


O

I

D


T


I

U


S

N

E


The
Target
uses
words in
the main
body of
Chambers
21st
Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition)'


HOW many words of four
letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here? In
making a word, each letter may
be used once only. Each must
contain the centre letter and
there must be at least one nine-
letter word. No plurals
TODAY'S TARGET
Good 16; very good 25;
excellent 33 (or more).
Solution tomorrow.
SI


DOWN
1 Card game(5)
2 Sake7)
4 Genue (4)
5 Reply(6)
6 Giant (S)
7 Salute (5)
9 Energy (3)
12 Wits (7)
14 Tatter (3)
16 Entrance hall (5)
17 Staggers()
19 Wished
20 Board game (5)
21 Talent (5)
23 Plague (7)
24 Term of office (6)
25 Negative (3)
27 Aviator (5)
28 Allude (5)
30 Freshwater
mammal (5)
32 Transaction (4)
33 TIn (3)


SATURDAY,
AUGUST 12,

ARIES March 21/April 20
While you don't lack ambition this
week, you're short on people who
share your enthusiasm. Look for
romance in an unexpected place.
TAURUS April 21/May 21
Prickly colleagues complain that
you're egotistical and uncompromis-
ing, but in your mind, you're simply
confident and exacting. Whatever.
You prefer to wprk alone anyway.
GEMINI May 22/June 21
Hold on, Gemini, this week
promises some surprises ,t '4rm?
and at work. Keep your c,
others willbe impressed wirn your
management skill. A lost love finds
his way back to you on FridE.
CANCER June 22/Jui .y
It's about time you stepped out of
your shell for a bit, Cancer. In fact,
you're feeling downright adventur-
ous this week. Great! Get out there
and show 'em what you've got.
LEO July 23/August 23
A windfall relieves some of your
money woes, but that doesn't mean
that-you're rich. Spend this cash
wisely now, and the real rewards
will follow.
VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
This is a time to go it alone, Virgo.
People are too unpredictable this
week. Have faith in yourself -
everyone else does.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
Nothing will work out as planned
this week, Libra. It's just one of
those weeks. While certainly frustrat-
ing, it will teach you to adapt. Take
time for yourself on Tuesday.
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
You're on fire, Scorpio -- at your
creative peak. Others will be look-
ing for a chance to share in your
spotlight. Friends look to you for
romantic advice. Stay out of it!
SAGFTTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
People are free to do what they want,
Sagittarius, a fact that you'll find
most annoying this week. Instead of
getting angry, use your energy to
find a way to accomplish your goal.
A special someone has a gift for you.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
Aren't you tired of going to the
same place all the time? Go
someplace new, where you can
be yourself without worrying
what others will say.
AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
Things are shifting into a higher or a
lower gear this week, Aquarius. This
could be a promising change, a gate-
way into the next phase of your life.
PISCES Feb 19/March 20
You'll be surprised how quickly
things happen this week, Pisces.
Don't fight the tide it's taking
you to better places, new experi-
ehces and acquaintances.


CHESby-eonardBarde.-


Hikaru Nakamura (US) v Alex
Grischuk (Russia), Turin
Olympiad 2006. This Is
yesterday's puzzle one move on
from where Grischuk missed a
forced win. He has just played
f7xg6, a pawn capture, and the
American teenager promptly
replied Bg3xf4, taking a bishop.
Grischuk again has to make a
fast dedsion among three
plausible choices: (a) Rxf6 (b)
exf4 and (c) Rxf4. Two of these
lead to a forced draw, the third
loses. Grischuk went for the
move which lost not only the
game but also the Russia v US
match an error which in
Soviet times could well have led
to a prolonged holiday in the
gulag. Can you do better, and
selPct a route to half a point?


rlII I I~~1

8181a

aa:~~J i1


LEONARD ARDEN


PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

pOUSf8umsml petams atp pup uo S LJIN +S-b t
La)l +59bE JXA +Ri Z j ljttJ asoip pelg) M mW
+SPb~S~pNBJYoJ LOX4 EI~Y~~jXBIIrtl
Pup s 'ppviledtdqms +"eSgON +L00VL'0I
+9"0 C M +" Z9PQI '1Eo f :i uoqnps ssMau


m -


.*


'9'
TI. bh


quow

IQ


'V.


- -.~


CRYPTIC PUZZLE


T
R
I
B
U
N
E


T


0
O


I
N





E


C
R
0
S
S
W
0
R
D


II I


-- ...-ul .-I S.~~


I I


-'


II I


I I


; r


-T lp or


-e
ri?
c jl i'. -. ~';h
-r -- -:;1 IC


I


I N%


Jew


r w


4=


Ar






I IJ
III


I II I
ittt


' .I


I 3 o I


I.,


I;' 1,1w!,,


'gig,
I I 1.3 1


B..'.
5 V...
*1.


0 *


I~~ 3softies$

0 0lbl


S


Copyr
Syrid
from Cc

'0


1ighited
icated


it

Material
Content .,


"I D .l CS
)mmercial News Providers
. ft "/^
*1l' .4 IS

1..-*.all


nn
4N
i|
eeI


I'll

I


JiI


I
* I


lot g.0,a:9ge:3M94UgW"O44""-11 t41+1iiOIt
Oa. 0 0

*1" 1111 4 I~sGof ol1996
", I rl 3*


OPM


S4o 1


I ,""
$489


I
Se
SB
I


4


.

6


em


p


rl(lWn~III(IY9C111]1




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - Version 2.9.9 - mvs