Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00465
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: July 5, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00465
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text







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The


Volume: 102 No.185


Tribune


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION



Bhe Miami DItral
BAHAMAS EDITION


WEDNESDAY, JULY 5, 2006


Do a Frosty
S ? I' o Cleamy. Chocolaty..


Catch the
CHILL.




DON


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Cub


detainees caum


Investigations indicate

Bahamian smuggler

assisted Detention

Centre escapees


By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE five Cuban detainees
who escaped the Carmichael
Detention Centre last week
were picked up on American
soil.
US authorities captured the
group of Cuban men in Jupiter,
Florida on Monday. Initial
investigations indicate that a
Bahamian smuggler assisted the
Cubans in their escape from the
country.
The Tribune first received
information on the capture of
the detainees late Monday
night. Yesterday, Director of
Immigration Vernon Burrows
confirmed those reports.
Mr Burrows said that US offi-
cials were able to apprehend
the five men around midday on
Monday in the city of Jupiter.
The group was then transferred
to the Krome Detention Centre
in Miami where they are cur-
rently being held.
"We are now in talks with the
authorities in the US to deter-
mine the fate of the detainees,"
" he said.
Mr Burrows explained that
there is a possibility of the
Cubans being returned to the
Bahamas.
"However, the US have their
own policies. Maybe they will
send them back to us, maybe
they will keep them at their
detention centre, maybe they
will set them free, give them
some sort of status.


S"They have their wet foot,
dry foot policy. It may be that
the US decides to apply their
dry foot policy in this case," he
said.
Under the wet foot, dry foot
policy, Cubans who have man-
aged to gain entry into the US
are given the opportunity to
pursue residency a year after
their arrival in the country.
Although investigations into
Thursday's escape are continu-
ing,i the immigration director
said that a Bahamian is sus-
pected to have transported the
men out of the country.
'"It looks like a Bahamian
smuggler got them out of that
country for a fee, which we
.believe was paid by some of
their relatives in the US," he
said.
According to officials, the
group of Cuban men, who fled
the Carmichael Road centre by
cutting through a fence, were
thought to be part be an even
larger escape attempt.
Officials at the centre
observed that there were
numerous gaps cut into the
perimeter fencing.
It is thought the Cubans were
able to escape because visibility
in the area in which they were
being held, was obstructed by
two large yellow buses parked
next to the fences on the north-
east side of the compound.
Thursday's incident consti-
tutes the third escape from the
SEE page 11


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Under-age
drinking 'a
social norm
in Bahamas'

The Tribune
SPECIAL
REPORT
By CHESTER ROBARDS
UNDER-AGE drinking has
become an unspoken social
norm throughout the Bahamas,
one frequently indulged in by
vacationing tourists who are
under legal drinking age in their
own countries.
A popular anecdote through-
out the Bahamas explains the
common perception towards
underage drinking in the coun-
try: "As long as you can see
over the counter you can buy a
drink".
SEE page 11


BEC management

hits out at report


MANAGEMENT at the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion yesterday criticised a local
daily for reporting that mem-
bers of the Bahamas Electrical
Workers Union planned to
carry out massive industrial
action after a failed meeting
with corporation executives.
Because of the "inappropri-
ate behaviour of these jour-
nalists", BEC said the public
never got to hear that these
threats and allegations on the
part of the Bahamas Electri-
cal Workers Union were total-
ly without foundation.
The corporation said that
contrary to what was report-
ed, BEC is always ready to
meet with the BEWU and
government to resolve what-
ever disputes may actually
exist and in fact, BEC, the
BEWU and government have
been meeting regularly, with
its most recent meetings cen-
tred around trying to draft an
agreement for binding private


arbitration to solve disputes.
"Once again, The Nassau
Guardian in its July 4 edition
has demonstrated an inability
to live up to its obligations as
professional journalists and
members of the Fourth
Estate," BEC management
claimed.
The Guardian had reported
that union boss Dennis
Williams had tried to set up a
meeting on Friday with union
principals and BEC manage-
ment, but BEC general man-
ager Kevin Basden refused to
show up.
However, the corporation
said that a duly authorized and
empowered BEC representa-
tive is always present whenev-
er there are meetings sched-
uled.
"In fact, whenever the Gen-
eral Manager is unable to
attend because of the demands
of running a corporation like
SEE page 11


The need for
witness protection
programme 'not
influenced by degree
of criminality'
ASSISTANT Superintendent-
of Police Reginald Ferguson
said yesterday that the need for
a witness protection programme
in the Bahamas is not influ-
enced by the degree of crimi-
nality in the country.
After the violent death last
week of a person, who it is
believed was to have testified
in a murder case, many are once
again concerned that an "out of
control" crime culture has dri-
ven Attorney General Allyson
Maynard Gibson to call for the
establishment of a witness pro-
tection programme.
In response to these concerns,
ASP Ferguson replied: "I do
not want anyone to get that
kind of impression, that crime is'
out of control in the Bahamas.
SEE page 11


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2. WEDNESDAY, JULY 5, 2006


LOCALNW


Event to boost




economy on




Grand Bahama


* By KAHMILE REID
GRAND Bahama is about to
feel a rush of excitement as the
C-Cube Seating Company pre-
pares to bring Junkanoo to
downtown Freeport on Sunday,
August 6.
The second annual "Feel the
Rush" junkanoo parade, which
is set for 7pm, promises to be


even bigger than before with the
top three finishers from the New
Year's Day Parade from New
Providence slated to perform.
Each group is required to
bring a minimum of 200 mem-.
bers to qualify for the prize
competition.
The Saxons, the Valley Boys,
and One Family will be com-
peting with an all-star team


from Grand Bahama for over
$90,000 in cash and prizes.
The theme for "Feel the
Rush" this year is Bimini.
"Other than the fact that
Bimini has physical charms, it
has a colourful history," said;
Peter Adderley, president of.
Creative Works and.
spokesman for !C-Cube.
According to Mr Adderley,
one of the reasons for choosing
Bimini as the theme was the'
Chalks flight 101 crash, which
killed all 20 passengers 19 of
which were Bahamians and 11
Biminites.
However, he also added: "We
thought people should focus on
Bimini for more han that trag-
ic reason; they will get a chance
to see Bimini its poetic, full, live,
characteristic colour."
In an effort to further estab-
lish the "Biminii' theme, Mr
Adderley said C-Cube took
representatives from the par-:
ticipating groups to Bimini,,to
learn about the history of that,:
Family Island. ,
Mr Adderley expects great
things for the Grand Bahama
economy through his event.
"Initially it was ap event that
C-Cube put on because of the.
devastating effects that the
three hurricanes had on their
economy, we wa ted to do .


w ..; . -1
* A GREAT Bahamian boxer of his time, Yamma Bahama
tells of his history and love for Bimini
(Photos: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


something that impact that
economy.
"Even though the C-Cube
group is for business," Mr
Adderley said, "this event was
not born out of the concept of
profit-making. It is an event to
uplift the spirits of the people
of Grand Bahama, to impact
the economy, and to do some-
thing as corporate citizens that
is great for the island and by
extension the country."
The event, he went on to
say, was inspired by Minister of
Tourism Obie Wilchcombe.
The magnitude of the event,
he said, "compares to nothing"
ever hosted by Grand Bahama.
In its first year the event
attracted around 20,000
patrons. This year Mr Adder-
ley says he expects an even
greater number.
"It is perhaps the biggest
event ever held in Grand
Bahama," he said.
The marketing of this event
went beyond the borders of the
Bahamas.
Mr Adderley told The Tri-
bune that he, along with his
team, have initiated marketing
abroad particularly in the


* CAPTAIN Ansal Saunders
bonefish world record holder
and legendary boat builder
invited leaders of Junkanoo
groups to see a boat he was
building and spoke about
of his relationship with
Dr Martin Luther King

South Florida area.
The Ministry of Tourism is
currently in talks with the Mia-
mi Heat basketball organisa-
tion to recruit celebrity judges.
"We are hoping to have
Shaquille O'Neal as one of the
celebrity judges," Mr Adder-
Sley said.


0 In brief

Flag-raising

ceremony
to be held
on July 7

THE Carmichael Consulta-
tive Committee (CCC) in con-
junction with the Carmichael
Road Police Division will host
its first flag raising ceremony.
The ceremony will be held to
commemorate independence,
to memorialise a fallen officer,
and to recognize outstanding
citizens and businesses.
Chairman of CCC Athema
Bowe said the pre-indepen-
dence flag-raising ceremony will
be the first of many activities.
"This act on July 7 is meant
to be the first of bigger things to
come because hopefully we
expect that this flag raising exer-
cise will be apart of an annual
festival that will be held in that
community.
"Within two years or so," he
continued, "we will be having
the Carmichael Police Division
festival which will incorporate
activities and the six communi-
ty constituencies which are
included in those boundaries."
During this historic ceremony
the CCC will recognize three
dead consultative members;
Chief Inspector William Moss,
director of the'Carmichael Box-
ing Club; four businesses that
contribute to the CCC; and
Bishop Donnie Storr.
The ceremony will take place
on the grounds of the
Carmichael Road Police Sta-
tion on Friday night at 6.30pm.
Cabinet ministers Leslie
Miller and Shane Gibson will
take part in the ceremony.


Public Utilities Commissiron


PUBLIC CONSULTATION

Proposed Interconnection Guidelines


The Bahamas


The Public UVIRles Commrsshon (PUC erweoy Invites comments from licensees and other Interested 1
parties on its public c.cnsuflarion con PrcpO?,ad Inltaconnec.tion rGdeflnes ForThe Bahamas.
This goals o i Mis conrsuftation aire to,
iAj inform tmicnqmu of the PUCq expemhtions in ielajn to Interconw'tection negotiation, principles to
teftetso iI' enterK nnD on oIWars labe dt developed by the Barhamas Teleoommunioations Company Ltd.
iBTC) arnd ag eamonts negotiated between BTC and Other Licensed Operators of voice networks and
systomr
(b) deSCribe the PUC's approach to reiotnng nterconnection disputes, and

(c) inite comments from tbcen sees and other inl8eTested parties on the proposed guidelines.
The e'legl and pdVCy tramf jork fo rn eiconrrection comprises
(0 The-reteco mmunctroonts Ac, 199%
(r) The T ~-ammuniCiu Tronn Setntor Polcy (TSP), as Amarl(We October 2002 and
(inl LUMMrOSc rjitOly heMd by the BTC And Systoms Remoirce Group fSAG), trading as IndIGO Netwokks,
CVuies & othis. PuFbli C sullasron mDowmM mv be obtained firm the PU office coated in the Agaosi
aru~e xi1 Fourth TOf'ace. Ent. toians Avenue Nmau, The ahamas otr downloaded fromn the PUC's
website & &I WW pLit~bahamas ov be Witien omff t w ould be submitted by July 31. 2008 to:
?~r. 8errt Rumii, UErcutlvt Olztlior
Pta$bI, lJ##liIieommkwon
a" *4M, Se F45 ft Torrawt bpto COMlM AVusMs
Wep 2424224437
ftx 2424237?3S
mib~O ~.9Ic~~)PE&Y~uunuIo'(r)bs


Winners selected for Bahamas


first online sweepstakes in US


THE Ministry of Tourlnm's
first online sweepstakes
throughout the, United Stites
hai gi' n n, Carnegie Pcenns\ I-
vania couple the opportumnII t
escape a busy US ci\ tor the
ultimate island-hopping e\pe-
rience.
Mr and Mrs Robert Murano
were the winners of the Escape
from Everyday Life Sweep-
stakes that delivered 9.5 million
impressions to internet users
through the campaign's four top
websites weather.corn.
espn.com, about.com and Eon-
line.com.
During the campaign, which
spanned April 15 to May 15 last
year, all four websites received
a total of 48,482 clicks, and
drove web users to
Bahamas.com and its sweep-
stakes entry page.
Stephanie Toote, general
manager for Advertising in
Ministry of Tourism, said the
sweepstakes had impressive
results.
"In addition to securing
entries for the sweepstakes, we
found that thousands of the
online browsers also thorough-
ly explored the content of
bahamas.com as a result of the
hyperlinks posted on websites
such as weather.com and
espn.com.
"Due to this campaign,
bahamas.com recorded more


* THE Muranos received a warm Bahamian welcome at
Nassau International Airport. Pictured (from left) are:
Stephanie Toote, general manager of advertising in Ministry of
Tourism; Mr and Mrs Murano, Basil Smith, director of
communications in Ministry of Tourism, and Randy Junkanoo.
(Photo: Derek Smith/BIS)


than 2,400 clicks exploring Nas-
sau/Paradise Island, more than
1,050 clicks exploring Grand
Bahama and almost 700 clicks
for information on our Out
Islands.
"Furthermore, we recorded
124 clicks on the icon for online
booking of trips."
Email blasts enhanced the
results of the campaign. Blasts
were sent to the databases of
My Bahamas, Bahamas.com
purchasers and Ministry of
Tourism/Immigration.


As a result, more than 4,200
users clicked on the sweep-
stakes link, more than 1,200 reg-
istered for the sweepstakes and
269 consumers forwarded the
email to other email addresses.
To enter the sweepstakes,
consumers submitted stories
about why they wanted to
escape their "everyday" life to
visit the Bahamas. Some of the
stories of 50 or fewer words
were posted on bahamas.com
on a daily basis.
The winners, Mr and Mrs
Murano, were chosen random-
ly from all entrants. They
received a six-day tour of the
Bahamas, which consisted of
two-day stays in Nassau, Grand
Bahama and Exuma.
Ms Toote said the Muranos
were "absolutely thrilled" with
their island hopping experience,
which they completed at the
end of June this year.
"Mr Murano has had noth-
ing but the highest compliments
for us," she said. "He has been
raving about the islands, our
people, and all the wonderful
experiences he and his wife
have had in our destination."



IIll
F I I] 1 1 i


T Celebrate with SAVINGS


for holiday weekend fun




Mon-Thurs: 8armfl-ig &.-7Wam-onpmt* i I


METHODIST SUMMER

CAMPS 2006

Held at cam Symonette in James' Cistern,
Eleuthera
July 1-7 for ages 13-17 and July 10-16 for
ages 6-12.This year's theme is:
Keys To The
Kingdom: Unlocking the Clues to Christ.
Registration $100.for more information
contact Debra Gibson at the BCMC office at
393-3726, visit our website at:
www.angelfire.com/rnb/campsymonette or
send an email to:
methodistsummercamps@hotmail.com
II O SI ImI


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it








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1'

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TODAY

AVOID REPOSSESSION


SuOAHAMAS ORTGAGE CORPOMRAtON


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WEDNESDAY, JULY 5, 2006, PAGE 3


o In brief

Security

still not

upgraded

at centre

By CHESTER ROBARDS
NEARLY a week has passed
since the escape of five Cuban
detainees and surveillance cam-
eras have still not been installed
at the Carmichael Road Deten-
tion Center, Minister of Immi-
gration and Labour Shane Gib-
son revealed.
This is despite information
received by Deputy Prime Min-
ister Cynthia Pratt indicating
that the cameras would be in
place by the end of last week.
Mrs Pratt told The Tribune
on Friday that she was promised
that video camera equipment
would be installed at the cen-
ter between Thursday and Fri-
day of last week, but Mr Gibson
confirmed that the equipment
has not even arrived on the
island yet.
He said the cameras are still
on order.
Mr Gibson said he would be
releasing the details for the re-
fortification of the detention
center in parliament today.


Prison

:'abuses'

in court

this week

: CLAIMS of human rights
infringements at Her Majesty's
prison are expected to be
addressed in Supreme Court
later this week.
Last week, the allegations
arose when death row inmate
Forrester Bowe appeared in
Supreme Court to have a date
set for the review of his death
sentence which was overturned
in a landmark decision by the
Privy council earlier this year.
GiniMorle. whoiss the
Y lawyer for Forresier Bowe, told-
Justice Anita Allen that she
received a report from her client
that forth past six months, his
cell has been like "a dungeon"
and has no ventilation.
Bowe was brought to court
from Her Majesty's Prison yes-
terday, however according to
-prosecutor Francis Cumber-
batch who is looking into the
allegations,. a judge was avail-
able to preside over the matter.
Bowe will return to court on
Friday' And will appear before
Justice Jon Isaacs, at which time
the allegations will be heard.

Man is hit

in face

with a

machete
A MAN is in serious condi-
tion after being hit with a
machete during an altercation
on Monday evening.
According to police reports,
Earnest Barr of Palmetto
.Avenue was struck with a cut-
lass on the left side of his face
after being involved in a domes-
tic dispute by another man.
The incident took place near
the corner of Market Street and
Palm Tree Street around 7pm.
The attacker, whose identity
.has not been revealed, is still at
"-large.
-' According to Assistant Com-
missioner Reginald Ferguson,
Mr Barr was taken to the
Princess Margaret Hospital.


:Man faces

charge of

sex with

11-year-old

A CAT Island man was


arraigned in Magistrate's Court
Yesterday and was charged with
unlawful sexual intercourse.
S Sean O'Neal Armbrister was
S charged with having sex with
an 11-year-old girl sometime
during May of this year.
Armbrister was arraigned
before Magistrate Marilyn
Meers at Court Five on Bank
Lane.
He was not required to enter
a plea to the charge and was
granted $10,000 bail with two
sureties.
The case was adjourned to
October 2 when a preliminary
inquiry will begin.


Government under fire for


failing to rebuild Straw Market


* By ROYANNE
FORBES-DARVILLE
THE FNM is critising the
government for failing to
revatilise Bay Street and
rebuild the straw market dur-
ing its first term in office.
In a statement released yes-
terday, the opposition party said
the government is incapable of
laying a foundation for a better
organised capital city during its
remaining months in office.
"The governing party need
only have continued the plan
left in place for the re-beauti-
fication of Nassau from Mon-
tagu in the east to Arawak
Cay and beyond in the west, a
plan that was home-grown and
designed in a co-ordinated
fashion with input by Bahami-
ans in the public and private
sectors," the statement said.
"FNM plans for the rede-
velopment of Nassau were not
limited to Bay and Shirley
streets but extended into tra-
ditional over-the-hill neigh-
bourhoods where we believe
tremendous opportunities for
Bahamian entrepreneurs exist


in restaurants, entertainment
and cultural endeavors.
The opposition also said that
"neither the prime minister,
nor anyone in his government,
can explain how they purpose
to pay for the redevelopment
of the City of Nassau, including
the transfer of all commercial
shipping to a new port to be
constructed at Clifton Bay."
Yesterday in an interview
with The Tribune, Minister of
Energy and Environment,
Marcus Bethel said the FNM's
claims baseless and pointed
out that $500,000 was ear-
marked in the 2006/2007 bud-
get to assist in the effort.
The government has never
proposed to transform Bay
Street in four years, as trans-
formation is expected to hap-
pen gradually over a 20-year
period, Dr Bethel said. He
explained that major changes
are determined by the pace at
which downtown merchants
"buy" into the vision.
In the interim, legislation is
being drafted, to facilitate the
creation of a Business Improve-
ment District (BID) an entity


that would co-ordinate down-
town Nassau's revitalisation.
The draft is slated to be
completed within the next two
months, Dr Bethel said.
An external consultant, Brad
Segal of Progress Urban Man-
agement Associates, was hired
to work on BID's formation.
The government has also
placed the Straw Market in the
portfolio of the Deputy Prime
Minister Cynthia Pratt.
Earlier this year, the gov-
ernment begun excavation on
the site where the new mar-
ket is to be built, but con-
struction has yet to begin.
The FNM release claimed
the "serious redevelopment"
of Nassau was a focus intro-
duced by the former govern-
ment, and that in an attempt
to "gain political mileage" the.
present government has
sought to reinvent the scheme.
The release continued: "We
do not believe that this gov-
ernment understands that a
revitalised Nassau does not
mean transforming Nassau
into a version of some colo-
nial American city, regardless


* A YOUNGSTER takes part in the fun as Atlantis guests celebrate the Fourth of July





NOTICE

Date Stolen: between 11:00 p.m. on May 18, 2006 and 6:00
am. on May 19, 2006

Location of Theft: The Cove, Gregory Town, Eleuthera

Description: 1998 32 ft. White & Blue Intrepid with two
250 hp Yamaha Outboard Engine

Registration#: n/a

Name of Vessel: n/a

A reward of $5,000 is being offered for any information
leading to the recovery of the vessel or the arrest and
prosecution of the culprits.


Please call 919, 326-1449 or


328-4962


of how beautiful those foreign
cities might be. Nassau is
Bahamian and its Bahamian
ethos must be preserved."
The government through the
Hotel Corporation contracted
EDAW, a land-based planning,
design and, landscape architec-
tural firm to collaborate with
Bahamian professionals in the


Bay Street regeneration efforts.
EDAW is proposing to trans-
form Bay Street through a plan
that will address beach access,
the movement of commercial
shipping companies, road
improvement, public transit sys-
tem, including a water transit
system and parking facilities in
the downtown area.


NIA contract signing is

months behind schedule


THE government is
months behind schedule in
signing the contract with the
Canadian firm selected to
transform the airport into the
"Jewel of the Caribbean."
The announcement that
NIA would be transformed
into an first-class airport of
the 21st century was first
made early last year.
In April, 2005, the govern-
ment announced that NIA
would be under new man-
agement within a few months.
However, more than a year
later, government and YVARS
- a subsidiary of Vancouver
Airport Services (YVR) have
yet to sign the management
contract which transfers opera-
tions to the Canadian company.
In a recent interview with
The Tribune, deputy general
manager of the Airport
Authority (AA) Joseph
Reckley said that although


both parties entered into a
Memorandum of Under-
standing in January of this
year, final negotiations were
taking longer than expected.
In the interim period, while
talks are being wrapped up,
YVARS has sent two mem-
bers of the Vancouver's air-
port authority to be tem-
porarily installed at the AA
offices at NIA.
YVARS was awarded a 10-
year contract to manage NIA
earlier this year despite gov-
ernment having initially
advertised the contract for
the airport's management as
a 30-year lease.
Conditions at NIA were
slammed by virtually every
representative of the this
year's National Tourism Con-
ference, and blamed for neg-
atively affecting the tourism
industry and the economy on
the whole.


II


M EN

Harbour Green Centre, Lyford Cay
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 362-6656, Fax: (242) 326-9953
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com


I.,


0:-
'.




.4


THF TRIRIUNF


LO


COMPUTERS LIMITED

Kindly note that we will be CLOSED on
Friday, July 7th for our
Staff Fun Day

We hope this will not inconvenience
our valued customers.

The Know How Store will RE-OPEN
on Saturday July 8th,
ready to serve you.

HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY BAHAMA

The Custom Computers "Know How Team"
Giving you the answers you need to succeed.

Tel: 242-322-2115


Celebrations at AtlantisII~


I


I







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4. WEDNESDAY, JULY 5, 2006


EIOIAULETTES T HEEITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

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Titans pass their torches of wealth


THE Big good-news story last week was of
selflessness in a selfish world: America's sec-
ond-richest man, Warren Buffet, deciding to
merge his fortune with that of the first-richest,
Bill Gates, to form the largest charitable
organization the world has ever seen. Rather
than build his own foundation, Buffet said: "I
came to realize that there was a terrific foun-
dation that was already scaled up."
It made one think of what would have hap-
pened 100 years ago if Andrew Carnegie and
John D. Rockefeller, then the two richest
men in America and perhaps the world -
had merged their fortunes for the public
good. They never did, but the two giants of
that earlier philanthropic era did cooperate.
"We found Mr. Rockefeller's splendid edu-
cational fund, The General Educational
Board, and ourselves were working in this
fruitful field without consultation, with some-
times undesirable results," Carnegie wrote
in his autobiography. "Mr. Rockefeller
wished me to join his board and this I did.
Cooperation was soon found to be much to
our mutual advantage, and we now work in
unison." And, in turn, Buffet will now go on
the Gates's board.
There is an old saying that behind every
fortune there is a great crime, and in their
time Rockefeller and Carnegie were bitterly
criticized for business practices that would
be illegal today. Theodore Roosevelt was
wont to call the rapacious capitalists of his day
"malefactors of great wealth." Some of the
ongoing efforts to break up Microsoft remind
one of the breaking up of Rockefeller's Stan-
dard Oil. Ironically, today some of the pieces,
such as Mobil and Exxon, have been allowed
to join together again.
But if there is any truth to the Buddhist
concept of gaining merit by good deeds, sure-
ly Rockefeller and Carnegie have been rein-
carnated into better beings. For their philan-
thropies have immeasurably contributed to
the arts, science, medicine, culture, and edu-
cation in this country as well as abroad. Espe-
cially in Rockefeller's case, one can add
nature conservation, which has helped protect
vanishing open spaces for the public's bene-
fit.
What unites Buffet, Gates, Rockefeller,
and Carnegie is the conviction that, as
Carnegie put it in his 1889 essay, "The Gospel
of Wealth," that the super-rich should be
"trustees" of great wealth, and administer it
for the public good.


Now the torches of the titans have been
passed. "The Gates Foundation has decided
to take on some of the largest challenges to
mankind," said Trevor Neilson, a former
staffer. "Will some of their strategies fail?
Of course, but if one or two of them work
they will change the course of history." Neil-
son went on to say that "the reason they are
so powerful is not the size of their bank
account. It is because they aren't afraid to
fail."
When Carnegie stopped accumulating
wealth and began "the infinitely more serious
and difficult task of wise distribution," as he
called it, his passion was education and inter-
national peace. He hated colonialism, and
even offered to buy the Philippines in order
to give Filipinos their freedom from their
new American masters. He founded a foun-
dation for international peace, and he paid for
a court house for international arbitration in
Holland. He lobbied world leaders, and in
1912 he thought the German Kaiser might be
"a man of destiny" who could further
Carnegie's dream of bringing all international
disputes to arbitration. He went to Berlin
and personally congratulated the Kaiser on 25
years upon the throne in a peaceful Ger-
many, "his hand unstained by human blood."
But two years later, all Carnegie's hopes. for
peace fell apart. Carnegie was not afraid to
fail, but the outbreak of World War I -
"men slaying each other like wild beasts" -
broke his heart.
The passion of the Bill and Melinda Gates
Foundation appears to be education and com-
bating disease in the Third World. The latter
will create confrontations with government
and kings who don't like to be told what to do
any more than they did in Carnegie's time. As
the Financial Times put it: "The hands-on
approach of venture capitalists can threaten
the independence of grant recipients."
But the enormous wealth of the Gates
foundation being applied abroad has already
made the foundation an important interna-
tional player. Hopefully a hands-on approach
will constantly remind reluctant governments
that progress in eradicating diseases will fol-
low only if they live up to their responsibili-
ties. For not even the combined wealth of
the Gateses and Warren Buffet can change
the world alone.
(This column was written by H.D.S. Green-
way of the Boston Globe c. 2006)


Immigration,




Haitians and




our country


EDITOR, The Tribune

IT is with great amazement
that I have listened to the var-
ious opinions on the illegal
immigration issue in the
Bahamas.
I must reluctantly admit that
I am somewhat taken aback by
the ignorance and basic lack of
knowledge of Bahamian law
and the Constitution of the
Bahamas demonstrated by
those who have taken a strong
position on this issue. Even of
more concern is the fact that a
number of these individuals are
the ones responsible for enforc-
ing the Laws or protecting the
Constitutional rights of the
public.
Far too many Bahamiahs are
motivated by xenophobia and
a prejudice against immigrants,
especially Haitians. This is so
ironic as the Bahamas, a coun-
try with a black majority has
historically prized itself as pro-
moting racial equality around
the world. However, it is such a
contradiction that Haitians are
treated as second class people
in the Bahamas and are open-
ly discriminated against just
like the Negroes in the deep
South during the Civil Rights
movement.
There are Haitians who have
been living in the Bahamas for
decades and have acquired
proper legal status. Others by
virtue of being born in the
Bahamas since July 10, 1973
are entitled to citizenship
under the provisions of The
Bahamas Constitution.
Through marriage and other
social arrangements such as
work, etc, many Haitians are
legally residing in the
Bahamas.
The Minister of Foreign
Affairs, the Hon. Fred
Mitchell, while in opposition
pointed out that there were
some 4,000 Haitian applica-
tions for citizenship that were
being processed by the gov-
ernment of the day. Despite
the unquestionable status of
many Haitians in the Bahamas,
and no matter how long they
have been in the Bahamas, the
incorrect perception by most
Bahamians is that they are
residing in the Bahamas ille-
gally.
Surprisingly, the vast major-
ity of Haitians in the Bahamas
have some sort of legal status
to be here. An educated esti-
mate some time ago is that
only twenty percent of Haitians
in the Bahamas are there ille-
gally. This fact was definitely


proven when Immigration
along with the Police conduct-
ed a pre-dawn raid in
Eleuthera last April. Approxi-
mately 200 persons "suspect-
ed" of residing in the Bahamas
"illegally" were rounded up
and taken to the Detention
Centre in Nassau for process-
ing. Less than ten percent were
found to be in the Bahamas
illegally. Certainly, this disas-
trous approach to dealing with
the illegal immigration prob-
lem in the Bahamas is the
wrong approach.
Opposition Leader, the Hon.
Hubert Ingraham issued a
statement condemning the gov-
ernment for such inhumane,
Gestapo and unconstitutional
behaviour towards the Haitian
community. Of even more con-
cern is the psychological scars
that will remain from the trau-
matic experience these indi-
viduals had experienced from
the abuse of their constitution-
al rights by Bahamian Immi-
gration and Police Officers.
This will be especially exag-
gerated in the young who are
taught to respect these author-
ities.
Can you imagine a situation
where the Bahamas govern-
ment would refuse to accept
your documents as genuine?
They still ignore your docu-
ments and proceed to arrest
you even though your docu-
ments would have exonerated
you. The explanation that
some of the documents might
be fake is absolutely unaccept-
able as it is truly amazing that
an Immigration Officer cannot
determine if a document issued
by Bahamas Immigration is.
genuine.
This ignorance puts every
Bahamian with a passport,
travel document, etc, at risk
because it is obvious that
Immigration cannot determine'
the credibility of any document
as was demonstrated during
That raid.
The million dollar question is
why are the Haitians being the
ones picked on? Is it because
they are poor, black or born in
another country and the
Bahamas government has a
racist and bigot attitude
towards Haitians? Why wasn't
a white English female who
came to the Bahamas at 10
months of age and acquired
Bahamian status harassed in
the same manner by Immigra-
tion?
The claim that there was
"reasonable suspicion" that
these individuals were illegally
residing in the Bahamas is pure
hogwash as most of them had
proper documents. So certain
was Immigration of their sus-
picion that no provisions were
made to return them back to
Eleuthera. Obviously it was
expected that these persons
would be deported to Haiti.
Hubert Ingraham has taken
the condemnation of this poli-
cy of terror to another level by
advising persons to hold the
government of the Bahamas
legally accountable for this bla-
tant breach of their Constitu-
tional rights.
For his call for justice and
fair play, Hubert Ingraham was
viciously rebutted by persons
who are clearly ignorant of the
laws of the Bahamas and the
supreme authority of the Con-
stitution. Any action or law
passed by Parliament if incon-
sistent with the Constitution,
to the extent of that inconsis-
tency shall be rendered inef-
fective. Carmichael MP John
Carey felt that the Leader of
the Opposition was "hell bent
on encouraging the illegal
immigration problem to esca-
late to a state of anarchy".
In addition, John Carey felt
that Hubert Ingraham's actions
were "tantamount to treason"
and that "it was insulting to the
intelligence of the Bahamian
people by advising non-nation-
als to take legal action against
the government of the
Bahamas."
Regrettably, John Carey


himself should have taken
legal advice before making
such an inaccurate statement.
He doesn't understand the
Constitution of the Bahamas,
in particular section 3.15 that
protects the rights of all per-.
sons in the Bahamas. He just -
had to check with one of his
parliamentary colleagues,
Pleasant Bridgewater who is,.
an attorney by profession. Ms
Bridgewater and Fred Smith
just last October successfully.
completed a Privy Council-.
case against the Bahamas gov-
ernment on behalf of a for- .
eign plaintiff whose constitu-
tional rights had been violated
by the government of the
Bahamas. Reportedly, along
with accumulated interest, that
plaintiff was awarded a mil-'.'
lion dollar plus settlement. For
advising a foreigner of their
constitutional rights, accord-
ing to John Carey's logic, Ms
Bridgewater is now guilty of -
treason.
For his part, the newly
appointed Immigration Minis-
ter, the Hon. Shane Gibson
feels that he is acting in the .
best interest of the Bahamian
people. Minister Gibson has a
reputation of grabbing the bull-
by the horns and enthusiasti-
cally doing what he has to do to
get the job done.
Subtly he may be suggesting
that the end will justify the
means. He claims that this
aggressive approach has the.
support of the majority of
Bahamians. Just a few detrac-
tors or "naysayers" oppose it.
Majority support does not
mean that you are doing the
right thing.
Just look at how much legal
work needs to be done before
anyone can be hanged in the
Bahamas even though the vast
majority of Bahamians sup-
port hanging. Just one voice
of reason in the wilderness is
sufficient for any authority to
re-examine the rightfulness of.
their position. Minister Gib-'
son is vicariously responsible
for all immigration policies in
the Bahamas and s., it is
essential that he lead by ..yanm-
ple.
What Minister Gibsoi-
should have done was to host a
conference dealing with all
aspects of the illegal immigra-
tion issue. Institutions from the
church to service and relief
agencies should have been.
invited to participate.,A prop-
er census of all immigrants con-.
ducted and various categories
of priorities established.
It is almost pointless deport-
ing illegal immigrants as long
as the borders are still open.
How on earth can a slow sail-
boat sail all the way from Haiti
to Nassau Harbour undetect-
ed? In the United States, I was
amused by a story in an Ari-'.
zona border story where anr-
illegal immigrant was deported.
four times in a single day. As
there wasn't a fifth time, there
was speculation that he had got
through.
Undoubtedly, with this same
mentality, there are some ille- .
gal immigrants who may have.'
been deported from the'
Bahamas more than once.
Therefore, what is needed in
the Bahamas is a well thought.
out plan to deal with illegal'
immigration and not just a
knee-jerk response! However,."
even more disturbing is the
reported abuses that immi-
grants have suffered while in
Bahamian custody. Beatings
such as the one protested by
the Haitian Ambassador not.
only violates the Bahamian'-
Constitution, but the United
Nations Universal Declaration
of Human Rights as well.
Just last week the family of a.
Jamaican national complained'
to me that while handcuffed
he was beaten by Immigration
Officers in Grand Bahama. In
a country where the Constitu-
tion refers to the Bahamas as
"a nation with Christian val-
ues", the Bahamas seem to
have got its immigration poli-
cies all wrong!
DR LEATENDORE
PERCENTIE
Boston, Massachusetts
June 26 2006


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T T BW N A J 5 2 G


0 In brief

Man faces

charge of

making
death threats


Concern for marine resources




after sonar ban by US judge


FREEPORT Julian
Knowles, 45, was arraigned in
Freeport Magistrate's Court on
Monday to be charged with
firearm possession.
Knowles, a resident of Easter
Avenue, appeared in Court
One before Magistrate
Franklyn Williams.
He was charged with posses-
sion of an unlicensed firearm
and ammunition, and with mak-
ing death threats.
Lawyer Brian Hanna repre-
sented Knowles, who pleaded
not guilty to the charges.
He was granted $6,000 bail
with one surety.
The matter was adjourned to
December 11.


Plan to

expand

parking at

airport

4 DUE to the increased
Demand for public parking at
the Nassau International Air-
Sport especially on holiday
weekends the Airport
Authority announced a new
plan to expand customer park-
ing when necessary.
The new arrangements will
Sbe in place for the upcoming
Independence holiday weekend
I (July 6 through July 10).
The public is advised that
attendants will be on hand to
, help customers find a parking
' spot.
Once the airport's main park-
ing lots are full, they will be
closed and the attendants will
direct customers to an overflow
lot, located just northwest of
the US departure parking lot.
The Airport Authority said
There will be a flat rate of $10
for parking over the Indepen-
dence holiday weekend and that
the overflow parking lot will be
open from 7am until 10pm from
Friday to Monday.
The public is therefore
advised that any car found
parked on the grass, at a curb or
in a no-parking zone will be
towed at the owner's expense.


Executive

body to be

resurrected

in Cuba

CUBA
Havana

CUBA'S Communist Party
announced Tuesday the resur-
rection of a powerful executive
body known as the secretariat in
San attempt to shore up its
Authority and reassert ideologi-
cal influence as President Fidel
SCastro nears his 80th birthday,
according to Associated Press.
The Cuban party secretariat
Swas dissolved 15 years ago as a
necessary cost-saving move
amid an economic crisis caused
by the collapse of the Soviet
Union.
Its members include Fidel
.Castro, the party's first secre-
.tary, and his younger brother
and constitutionally designed
successor Defense Minister
Raul Castro, the party's second
secretary.


WED. JULY 5
2:00am Community Pg.1540AM
8:00 Bahamas@Sunrise
9:00 Island Hopping: Highlights of
52nd Ann. Family Is. Regatta
10:00 Da' Down Home Show:
Entertainers & Musician Hall
11:00 Immediate Response
12:00n ZNS News Update
12:05 Immediate Response Cont'd
1:00 Island Lifestyles
1:30 The Bahamas National
Performing Arts Academy
2:00 The Fun Farm
3:00 Morning Joy
3:30 Ecclesia Gospel
4:00 Nassau Bahamas: See It Like
A Native
4:58 ZNS News Update
5:00 Legends: Whence We Came
Rev. Lavania Stewart
6:00 A Special Report
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
8:00 In His Own Words: A Political
Walk With the Hon. A.D. Hanna
8:30 A Woman of Substance: Hon.
Cynthia A. Pratt
9:00 ETC
9:30 Native Son: The Journey of Sir.
Lynden Pindling
10:30 News Night l3
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30 Comm.P .1540AM
NOE ZST 1 esre


* By REUBEN SHEARER

The government must take
responsibility for the nation's
marine resources according to
environmentalists as a ruling
in the US may not affect Navy
testing in Bahamian waters.
This week, a federal judge
ruled to temporarily bar the
US Navy's use of the mid-fre-
quency active sonar which
some allege is killing marine
life during a military exercise
in the Pacific.
This sonar is used to transmit
and reflect underwater sound
waves to detect submerged
objects and measure the dis-
tances.
The Navy's Atlantic Under-
sea Testing and Evaluation
Center (AUTEC) in Andros
has been criticised by local
environmentalists for carrying
out this kind of operation.
ReEarth president Sam
Duncombe claims that there
are many other ways of detect-
ing submarines, for example
by satellite, that are not harm-
ful.
Andros environmentalist Dr
Margo Blackwell's view is that
the Bahamas should ban all
sonar programmes operated by
outside agencies until further
notice.
She feels that this ban by the
US is still not going to protect


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* ENVIRONMENTALISTS have called on the government to have more concern for the
Bahamas' marine resources, such as these orcas


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is very important to the project.
Mr Davies said the company
would hire probably around
2,000 employees at the, peak of
construction.
He said permanent jobs will
start off slow, but eventually
increase to 4,000 or 5,000.
"Once we get over the hump
with the construction jobs then
the operations position would
come into place and it would
create -more and more employ-
ment as time goes on," he said.



FO N AN EVC


i. ,
i











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; ,


WEDNESDAY, JULY 5, 2006, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


available to them.
"The second whale did not
have a necropsy, but the third
whale's head is going to be
analysed this summer by a sci-
entists from Spain who will be
training Bahamian scientist on
how to do it," Dr Blackwell
said.
According to Dr Michael
Brennen, who took part in the
necropsies, no information
available on the results is avail-
able yet.
The Tribune contacted Dr
Brent Hardt of the American
Embassy, who said he feels it is
unlikely that this temporary
ban will stand for very long,
since there is not enough evi-
dence to keep it in place.
DrBlackwell disputes this
point, pointing out that a fed-
eral judge in the US says there
is evidence significant enough
for them to atop and investi-
gate sonar operations.
Dr Hardt later qualified his
statement, -saying the only
species that may be affected by
the range of sonar that the
Navy uses is the beaked whale.
He said this was proven in
2000 when a sonar test was
conducted that resulted in the
death of some beaked-whales.
Dr Hardt claimed- that this
is the only case where AUTEC
ran a test that resulted in
marine life being harmed.


the whales, since it is only tem-
porary.
Mrs Duncombe said envi-
ronmentalists hope that all
Navy bases will comply with
the ruling regardless of where
they are in the world.
She explained that the USS
ban is not surprising to her, as


there are other countries such
as Spain that have started to
ban sonar operations.
"Spain said that there will be
no sonar exercises, and the
Canary Islands promised not
to test for 50-square mile
radius," she said. "It is not
unusual for countries to stand


up and determine how valu-
able their resources are valued
and decide to stop."
Three whales died in Grand
Bahama and Abaco earlier this
year, and according to both Dr
Blackwell and Mrs Sam Dun-
combe, results from the
necropsies have not been made


some of that money, then that is
maybe something that could
happen, but that would have to
go before the conunittqe before
it is decided."
Mr Davies stressed that it is
very important for locals to
have proper technical skills and
training to take advantage of
the many job opportunities that
will be available.
"We want to employ people
with the proper skills and obvi-
ously if we can employ people
who are local to the project, and
to benefit contractors who will
be doing work for us, we won't
have to import labour or crafts
or skills.
"It is very important to have
local people, whether it is in
West End or Eight Nfile Rock,
and as long as it is local people it


0 By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
FREEPORT The Ginn
Company has cleared 1,400
acres of land in West End
and is awaiting final
approvals and permits from
the government to move
ahead with the next phase of
their development.
John Davies, senior vice
president of development,
said Ginn is expected to
employ 2,000 workers dur-
ing the, course of construc-
tion.
"We are in a hold mode
right now, but we have
cleared enough land for the
project to get started and we
are just awaiting on final
approvals from the, govern-
ment to proceed with t'he
work," said Mr Davies.
"We have some permits in
hand, but we still need a cou-
ple more to move ahead and I
am hoping we can get those in


the next two weeks."
The company, which
signed a heads of agreement
with. the ... government in
December, is proposing a
$3.7 billion resort and real
estate development in West
Grand Bahama. The compa-
ny has purchased 2,000 acres
of land in West End.
The project calls for the
construction of a "mixed-use"
resort d(velopment, compris-
ing of 4,400 condo-hotel
units, 870 single-family home
sites, two championship golf
courses and club houses, two
marinas, a casino and a pri-
vate airport.
The Ginn project is expect-
ed to transform West Grand
Bahama into another "Key
West" according to the de'vel-
opers.
According to Mr Davies,
the project will continue
developing over the next 12
to 14 years.
The government is hoping
that locals in West Grand


Ba'hama will benefit from job
opportunities created by Ginn.
In an effort to help residents
obtain the necessary skills and
training, the government is
seeking to establish a BTVI
institute at West End. BTVI
officials met with residents on
Monday.
Mr Davies said Ginn is will-
ing to assist with the establish-
ment of a technical school
through a foundation.
"We have a foundation that is
going to be part of the project
and between some members of
the Ginn Company and some
members of the community, we
will determine how these funds
are spent.
"If the community decides
assisting BTVI to set up here
in the community is best use of


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Ginn preparing for next phase,




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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JULY 5, 2006 THE TRIBUNE






Social services and the next election i


F our new Health Minister
is anything to go by, it's
clear the government has decided
to take advantage of an upbeat
economy to bet the next election
on a massive expansion of social
services.
"National health insurance is
so important that it shouldn't be
delayed any longer," Dr Bernard
Nottage told the Chamber of
Commerce last week, trying to
appear large and in charge.
Acknowledging that this
would require legislation, he said
that would be accomplished with-
in three months: "The final con-
sultation process is going to be
intense because we're on a short
timeframe."
The aim is to set up a system
of mandatory social insurance as
proposed by the government's
Blue Ribbon Commission on
healthcare. This calls for a new
payroll tax, and will add enor-
mously to our inefficient public
sector.
There may be a genuine con-
cern driving this debate, but the
obvious political motives should
not be allowed 'to defeat good
advice. The goal should be to
ensure that whatever system is put
in place makes sense, and is not
wasteful, foolish or impractical.
A draft research report com-
missioned by the Nassau Institute
earlier this year goes a long way
towards meeting this goal. While
not opposing the scheme in prin-
cipal, the report says many of the
government's proposals are "ill-
advised" and would create a sub-
standard system that would be
unsustainable.
This report was produced by
Nadeem Esmail, an expert on
health systems performance stud-
ies at the Fraser Institute in Cana-
da. Esmail has published exten-
sively on this subject, and his arti-
cles have appeared in newspapers
across Canada. Tough Call was
able to obtain a pre-release copy
of his 60-page analysis. The final
report will be published later this
month.
After an extensive review of
comparative studies on health sys-
tems and insurance markets
around the world, Esmail con-
cluded that the economic costs of
the government's proposals
would be significant. He urged
policymakers to consider the evi-
dence on how best to structure a
national health programme.
"The Bahamas is not the first


nation to consider a national health
insurance programme," he said,
"so it should not needlessly suffer
the ills endured by so many flawed
attempts that came before it. Also,
an evidence-based approach to
healthcare policy is vital if The
Bahamas wishes to ensure that the
final set of policies introduced is
the best option available."

M ost developed nations
have policies in place
that seek to ensure full access to
healthcare services as needed,
regardless of the ability of citi-
zens to pay. However, some coun-
tries manage to deliver on this
promise much more efficiently
than others.
And Esmail makes the inter-
esting point that studies by the
World Health Organisation and
others show little or no correla-


There may
be a genuine
concern driving
this debate, but the
obvious political
motives should
not be allowed to
defeat good advice.


tion between spending and pop-
ulation health. There is, however,
evidence that better sanitation,
safe water supplies, immunisation
and screening services and other
preventive care do have an
impact on public health.
"Government should focus on
simply ensuring universal access
and the availability of health-
care," the draft report said.
"Beyond this, government should
be concerned only with ensuring
that those who cannot afford to
pay for medical services have
access to them when they require
care and, perhaps, requiring their
citizens to purchase (public or pri-
vate) health insurance. There is
no obvious reason to suppose that
a government monopoly will be
the most efficient provider of
health insurance or producer of
health services for the poor."
The Bahamas already commits
a relatively large share of nation-
al income to healthcare. This
year's Ministry of Health budget


-

TOUGH CAu
kit. iq K!1 Sl ^i S M IJT


alone is $205 million, providing
public healthcare that is virtually
free. But the quality of treatment
is below what might reasonably
be expected, Esmail said.
"The important question to
ask then is: Will the Blue Ribbon
Commission's proposal for health
reform and the introduction of
NHI improve the quality of
health services without increas-
ing cost or adversely affecting
income growth?"
Reviewing the Commission's
recommendations, Esmail cau-
tioned against a government
monopoly of health insurance and
argued that there was no eco-
nomic rationale for the badly run
National Insurance Board to
administer NHI over a competi-
tive private contractor:
"Private provision of health
insurance and services within an
NHI structure is the model
employed in Switzerland...(and)
other functions within the health-
care programme in the Bahamas
could well benefit from privatiza-
tion, or at least private contracting
within a publicly defined structure."

The Commission pro-
posed a system of com-
prehensive benefits for all resi-
dents complete medical and
dental care, drugs and supplies,
rehabilitation, eye exams and
emergency transportation in both
public and private settings. This is
at least as generous as health pro-
grammes in developed nations
and likely to result in excessive
demand for "free" services.
To reduce this demand,
increase efficiency and contain
costs, Esmail advocated the use of
co-insurance, co-payments and
deductibles: "If required to bear a
portion of costs, individuals will
curb their consumption of med-
ical care, and medical services of
lesser value will eventually be
eliminated. A second advantage is
that these payments can reduce
the financing burden of NHI
because they reJiri.ci h .li.hc.irc
financing from ..-i- r? .: use I ,
He said a cost sharing scheme


I


was "far superior to centrally
planned restrictions on service
use (read rationing) because they
leave the decision over which ser-
vice is best to those best placed to
make the decision the doctor
and the patient being treated."
The Commission proposed an
income-rated premium for
salaried workers, and a flat rate
contribution that would vary by
occupational class for the non-
salaried sector. The contribution
for salaried workers, but not their
dependents, would be shared
50/50 with employers.
"The real concern here,"
Esmail said, "is the impact the
NHI premium might have on the
economy as a whole...These costs
will ultimately lead to larger costs
for workers finding themselves
without work as the government
takes a larger share of the econo-
my to finance the NHI pro-
gramme. The main source for
NHI premium funding by firms
is likely to be lower wages for
employees.
"A premium levied on the
employer will ultimately be paid
by the employees through lower
take-home wages. Thus, it makes
most sense to simply require that
individuals fund the entire premi-
um themselves. This will also have
the added benefit of greater cost
recognition by the insured popu-
lation...Unless the value of an
employee rises post NHI imple-
mentation, the NHI premium
must ultimately be factored in to
total income through a reduction
in other forms of income."


The question of the future
affordability of NHI
(especially as the Bahamian pop-
ulation ages) was considered vital
by Esmail since health spending
in developed nations is growing
-faster than their overall
economies. For example, the
average inflation-adjusted growth
rate of total health expenditures
pel capiti in OECD nations
Ic i\ lLtdtn.f I l kLc Tb l l 'eC *TY"'5
CIn 2 i.(._7. I C -1 p C r 1 ni1
And the introduction of public
insurance in other countries has
been shown to increase the use
of healthcare services: "This sug-
gests that the impact of NHI can-.
not be assessed using current cost
and intensity figures because
(they) will expand significantly.
The future cost of NHI is likely to
far exceed estimates compiled by
the Commission, thus elevating
concerns about its impact on the
Bahamian economy."


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Arguing against the Commis-
sion's proposal to fund NHI ser-
vices through capitation payments
to doctors and providers, Esmail
pointed to large differences in
economic incentives and the effi-
ciency of provision that result
from different payment schemes.
Salaries allow direct control
of costs but promote under-pro-
duction as doctors have no incen-
tive to produce beyond a mini-
mal standard. Capitation pay-
ments based on the number of
patients registered to a given
practice can lead to over-regis-
tering and under-servicing, as well
as adverse selection of better risks
to reduce expenses. Fee-for-ser-
vice payments are linked solely
to output and, according a recent
OECD study, produces fewer
waiting lines for services.
The Commission's proposal
that the NHI contract with
providers creates a block grant'
system for hospitals based on a
per capital allocation: "Block
grants disconnect funding from
the provision of services to
patients. Incentives to provide a
higher or superior quality of care
to patients are virtually absent.


Independent
certification would
provide the quality
signal desired by
healthcare
consumers, while
constraining the
possibility of
harmful political
intervention.


There is also no incentive to func-
tion efficiently," Esmail said.
"Opting for a payment scheme
based on the number and type of
patients actually treated would
create poweiful,incentives to deliv-
er a greater.quantity and quality of
services without leading to dra-
matic cost increases. This method
of funding, best considered a
prospective fee-for-service, is most
commonly known as the diagnos-
tic-related group payment system,
I'hiich ppa\ sl a fec for ejch iridi-
..-V l tr-a ci-_l l"> n + >.J c.-,a ..,t tr .i-i-^ 1.1 ._ d !i,-l! >..'- a
the time of admission."
Concluding that the Commis-
sion's proposals were unlikely to
be sustainable in the long run and
that the economic costs associat-
ed with the introduction of NHI
would be significant, Esmail
offered recommendations to ame-
liorate the impact. Topping the
list was the privatization of hos-
pitals and services; together with
,the outsourcing of other govern-,
ment health sector activities via a


competitive bidding process.
"The ultimate goals of any
reform should include a system
in which the population's health is
improved, people have access to
medical services when they need
them, consumers control their
own healthcare decisions, and
there is accountability (by both
providers and consumers) for the
use of healthcare services.
"The literature generally indi-
cates that there are distinct effi-
ciency advantages in relying on
private providers/hospitals vis-A-
vis publicly owned providers/hos-
pitals. Further, private healthcare
providers, because of their incen-
tives to increase efficiency- and
provide a higher level of care in
order to attract more patients,
will end up enhancing care for all'
patients, including the very poor."

making the accreditation
of facilities and care-
givers away from the Ministry of
Health would be a vital step to
avoid serious conflicts of inter-
est, Esmail said. Independent cer-
tification would provide the qual-
ity signal desired by healthcare
consumers,.while constraining the
possibility of harmful political
intervention.
"It is far wiser to simply
require that practitioners and/or
facilities maintain certification
with any of several licensing bod-
ies in Canada, the United States,
or Europe; or independent qual-
ity-certification organizations that
also practise in these regions."
And he said that national
health insurance be provided by .':
both public and private insurance
companies within a competitive '
marketplace. The purchase of,
insurance should be mandatory, -
and those unable to afford it ,'
should be given vouchers. Ideally, ,
NHI providers should be able to
offer a multitude of insurance
options and not be regulated to
the extent that consumer choice is
needlessly restricted.
"A system of competIitie
social insurers has a number of a
benefits over a single go\ernmient
insurer model where premiums i
are levied in a manner which mir-'
rors an income tax," he'said It
"Principally, this system is less 1
likely to suffer from politically-
motivated intervention and is
m11"l c Oii. LIIIIjhl- 1. i1 o!!izi ns than *
-te Ji r.Cir l\ l1.ilna-.d I- %g6 irn-
ment." '
Of course, if you believe that
government-operated enterpris-,
es are more efficient, more effec- ,
tive, more affordable and more
accountable, you can ignore these
recommendations and we will all
end up with yet another ball and .
chain around our necks run by* '
bureaucrats who' don't give a
damn. .
What do you think? Send com-
ments to larry@tribunemedia.net.
Or visit www.bahamapundiLcomi


i i




THE U WEDNESDAY JUL 5, 2006,


ENTERPRISES LIMITED





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WEDNESDAY, JULY 5, 2006, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNF~~







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JULY 5, 2006


W H A T S ON IN A N D AROUND NASSAU














E M A I L : YDELEVEAUX@TRIBUNEMEDIA.NET -
PLEASE PUT "OUT THERE" IN THE SUBJECT LINE


MONDAY .Hr
* HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: New
Providence Community Centre: Mondays -
6pm to 7pm. The Kirk: Mondays 7:30pm to
8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support
group meets the first Monday of each month
at 6:30pm at New Providence Community
Centre, Blake Road. Dinner is provided and
free blood sugar, blood pressure and choles-
terol testing is available. For more info call
702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the
third Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors
Hospital conference room.

* CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British
Colonial Hilton Monday's at 7pm Club
612315 meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort, Cable Beach Club 3596 meets at
the British Colonial Hilton Mondays at 7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the
month in the Board Room of the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.

-- TUESDAY '

* PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

10.10.2.20. @ Club Nirvana: Tuesday nights at
Club Nirvana, Elizabeth Avenue, have been
dubbed 10.10.2.20. Every tenth female patron
is allowed into th'e club absolutely free and is
given a complimentary glass of Carlo Rossi.
Tuesday nights also include the Carlo Rossi's
Hot Body Competition. Hosted by Daddi
Renzi and music provided by DJ Ai from 100
Jamz. Master Chef Devito Bodie provides
scrumptious appetizers.

* HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Tuesday 6pm
to 7pm/8:30pm to 9:30pm.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at
5:30pm on the second Tuesday of each month
at their Headquarters at East Terrace, Cen-
treville. Call 323.4482 for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes' are being
held 6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics
Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles Dr).
Doctor approval is required. Call 364.8423 to
register for more info.

* CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 1095 meetsTuesday,
7:30pm @ C C Sweeting Senior School's Din-
ing Room, College Avenue off Moss Road
Club Cousteau 7343 meets Tuesdays at
7:30pm in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh
Creek, Central Andros Club 7178 meets
each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer Society of
the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm
@ the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort, Cable Beach.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every sec-
ond Tuesday, 6:30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM
Office, 4th floor meeting room.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first
Tuesday, 6:30pm at the British Colonial
Hilton. Please call 502.4842/377.4589 for more
info.

WEDNESDAY

PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS
LIVE MUSIC @ The Butr., Nassau's Weekly


Jam Session & Musicians Hook-up. Located
East Bay Street two doors East of Esso On
The Run.
Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters
Sports Bar every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free
appetizers and numerous drink specials.

* HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: New
Providence Community Centre: Wednesday -
7pm to 8pm. The Nassau Group: Rosetta
Street, Wednesday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm.

* CIVIC CLUBS

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated
meets 6:30pm every third Wednesday at the
Bahamas National Pride Building.

TM Club 753494 meets every Wednesday,
6pm-8pm in the Solomon's Building, East-
West Highway. TM Club 2437 meets the 2nd
and 4th Wednesday of each month at C C
Sweeting Senior High School, Oakes Field.

International Training in Communication,
Essence Club #3173 holds its bi-monthly
meetings on the 1st and 3rd Wednesday of
each month at Doctor's Hospital Conference
Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus
meets the second and fourth Wednesday of
the month, 8pm @ St Augustine's Monestary.


THURSDAY "N

HEALTH

Free public health lectures featuring distin-
guished physicians are held at Doctors Hospi-
tal every third Thursday of the month at 6pm
in the Doctors Hospital Conference Room.
Free screenings between 5pm & 6pm. For
more information call 302-4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times arid places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Thursday 6pm
to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The Kirk: Thurs-
days 7:30pm to 8:30pm

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being
held 6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics
Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles Dr).
Doctor approval is required. Call 364.8423 to
register or for more info.

REACH Resources & Education for
Autism and related Challenges meets from
7pm 9pm the second Thursday of each
month in the cafeteria of the BEC building,
Blue Hill Road.

CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3956 "Destined for Suc-
cess" will present the theme "Forward,
Upward, Onward, Together". Thursday, July
6 at the Ministry of Health & Environment
building on Meeting Street commencing at
7:30pm. Everyone is welcome to attend.

TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8.30pm @
SuperClubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative
Professionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the


--u a IL I
third Thursday of
every month @ Superclubs Breezes, Cable
Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance
Baord Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets
every fourth Thursday in the month, in the
National Insurance Boaid's (NIB) training
room, Wulf Road office complex, at 6pm. All
retirees are welcome.


-r^**11 FRIDAY .---

PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

New THE BUZZ Come on out and let
loose with the High Tide band! Let Shelley
and Ericka's vocals take you to another level,
while Snucky's pumping bass, Gavin's guitar
licks and Monk's drumming antics keep you
moving and grooving. Show starts Friday at 9-
ish. The Buzz has the coldest beers on the
island and great specialty drinks to keep you
cool.

Cafe Europa onC-Gharlotte Street North, kicks
off every Friday night with Happy Hour...
special drinks, live music/DJ from 6pm to
9pm and Nassau's first European Night
Restaurant Open Friday night till Saturday
morning 5am, serving hot food/and take out -
music,'drinks and an English breakfast. Cafe
Europa...the perfect place to spend your night
out till the morning.

THE ARTS

Junkanoo Summer Festival, Street Party, will
be held on Woodes Rodgers Wharf every Fri-
day between June 9 and July 29, from 1.to
10pm.

HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Fridays 6pm to
7pm & 8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred Heart
Church Fridays @ 6pm to 7pm
New Providence Community Centre: Fridays
@ 7pm to 8pm.

CIVIC CLUBS

TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas
Baptist Community College Rm A19, Jean St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every sec-
ond Friday of each month, 7.30pm at Emmaus
Centre at St Augustine's Monestary. For
more info call 325.1947 after 4pm.

SATURDAY .


PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Sun City Entertainment presents Saturday &
Sunday night functions for the alternative
lifestyle crowd (Gay) at Kendal's Auto
Garage on Gladstone road from 11:30pm to
4am. Music provided by DJ X. Heading south
on Gladstone Road, Kendal's is located
immediately past Moss Gas station.

THE ARTS

Junkanoo Summer Festival Heritage and
Cultural Extravaganza will be held at


Arawak Cay every Saturday between June 9
and July 29 from 2 to llpm.

Junkanoo Summer Festival Box Cart Derby
- will be held on Marcus Bethel Way every
Saturday between June 9 and July 29, from 2
to 6pm.

* HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday
mornings 10am to 11am.

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and
December) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor
Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital CPR and First Aid classes
are offered every third Saturday of the month
from 9am-lpm. Contact a Doctors Hospital
Community Training Representative at
302.4732 for more information and learn to
save a life today.

* CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR Cycling
are pleased to offer a cycling clinic for juniors
between 10 and 17. The free clinic will be held
every Saturday in an effort to encourage kids
to cycle. Parents interested in registering their
children should contact organizers at jarcy-
cling@gmail.com

New Free NFL Football Camp hosted by
Alex Smith #81 Tampa Bay Bucaneers, Satur-
day, July 8 at St Augustines College 9am-
3pm. Sign-up must be in advance! Contact
(242)327-3920.


S SUNDAY


PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Traveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street,
features special entertainment Gernie,
Tabitha and the Caribbean Express every
Sunday from 6:30pm to 9:30pm.

Mr Caribbean Bahamas competition will be
held July 15 to 23. Under the theme, "Seduc-
tion Surrender'', the final night of competi-
tion will be held on Sunday, July 23 at 8pm in
the Rain Forest Theatre. The show will be
hosted by Olympic medalist, Ato Boldon,
America's Next Top Model (Season Three),
Eva Pigford, and Bahamian radio personality,
Krissy Luv. There will also be an after, party
immediately following the Mr Caribbean
Bahamas Competition to meet the winner of
the competition, delegates, the international
judges, and celebrity hosts.

THE ARTS

Junkanoo Summer Festival Royal Poinciana
Tea Party will be held in Government House
Gardens, every Sunday between June 9 and
July 29, from 3 to 6pm.

Junkanoo Summer Festival Old Town Jazz
at Sandyport will be held at the Olde Town
Sandyport every Sunday between June 9 -
July 29 from 4 8pm.

HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm to
7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.


Send all your civic and social events to
The Tribune
via fax: 328.2398 or e-mail: ydeleveaux@
tribunemedia.net/Out there in subject line


ANNIVERSARY


"The brewery of The Bahamas"


Please Drink Responsibly


.... .... ..


t_


~ INEER:


;

,I

-
I~







WEDNESDAY, JULY 5, 2006, PAGE 9


THF TRIBUNE


Government's priorities questioned


i as airport prepares for renaming


* By CHESTER ROBARDS
1 THE Nassau International Airport is sched-
Hlied to get its new name this week before it
Srceives a much anticipated and long over-
due facelift.
, The airport will officially be renamed Lyn-
den Pindling International Airport during a
ceremony scheduled for Thursday.
- Critics of the renaming have expressed their
concerns about branding the airport with the
name of the country's most celebrated, but
also most criticised prime minister.
SPersons who commented on the renaming
ig the press last week called the former prime
minister a "tainted" politician and said the
taxpayers' money should not go toward bur-
dening the airport with a name that many
Bahamians reject.
* However, many see this as a much-deserved
posthumous accolade for a man often referred
t1 as the "Father of the nation".
' "I believe that Sir Lynden should be suit-
ably honoured and memorialised for the con-
tibutions he made to the development of this
country," said veteran journalist and former
cabinet minister Sir Arthur Foulkes. "How-
ever, I believe that it is a mistake to name
tlhis particular facility after him.
S"I believe it will be too much of a tempta-
Ston to visiting journalists and others to recall
the disastrous drug era over which Sir Lynden
presided. That would be bad for the country
and for the family of Sir Lynden," he said.
SHowever is not only the choice of new


* THE wall and surrounding area which have been prepared for the renaming of
Nassau International Airport to Sir Lynden Pindling Airport. The name of the former
prime minister of the Bahamas will adorn the wall from tomorrow.
(Photo: Felipg Major/Tribune staff)


name, but also the timing of the move that has
some Bahamians concerned.
They said it seems strange to make the renam-
ing exercise a priority ahead of much-needed
refurbishment projects and before the deal is


concluded for a new operator for the airport.
According to Joseph Reckley, deputy gen-
eral manager of the Airport Authority, the
government is still in negotiations for a new
operator.


.Pharmacists demand




action on legislation


:~By ROYANNE
FORBES-DARVILLE
THE government's delay in
ratifying draft legislation to gov-
eyn the local pharmaceutical
industry could be a major set-
back for the country, president
of the Bahamas Pharmaceuti-
cal Association Philip Gray said
yesterday.
Mr Gray explained that it is
not only a national priority, but
also a regional one as CARI-
COM officials are waiting to
adopt the draft written by
Bahamian pharmacists.
S"CARICOM has sought to
use our draft as the template
f6r harmonised legalisation for
tile region. It is incumbent then
that we have this legislation
passed at home before the
-ARICOM nations (approve)
fer its own intent and purpos-
es," he said.


The draft, written under the
advice of government's attor-
neys, seeks among other things
to create a pharmacy council.
The Bahamas is among only a
few countries in the world that
does not have a council to rep-
resent pharmaceutical profes-
sionals.
Local pharmacists are
presently represented by the
Health Professionals Council.
"The current legislation cur-
rently sits at the Attorney Gen-
eral's Office awaiting debate
and approval by parliament,"
Mr Gray said. "The repeal of
the current legislation is neces-
sary, as what is law at present is
antiquated at best and does not
meet the demands of pharmacy
practice today."
Mr Gray added that a phar-
macy council is necessary,
"based on the pharmacy indus-
try's contribution to the gross


national product, the role (phar-
macists) play in health care, the
impact on all patients, the risk
issues that are related to phar-
macy services worldwide and
medication errors."
The significance of the legis-
lation is one of several key
issues the association intends to
address during a summit sched-
uled to be held at the Radisson
Cable Beach Hotel, July 25
through 29.
---- The purpose :of the summit
according to association offi-
cials is to bring unity, clarity and
purpose to the future of the
pharmacy industry in the
Bahamas. Officials are also
expected to unveil the indus-
try's strategic plan for the next
10 years.
The Bahamas Pharmaceuti-
cal Association is also seeking
to foster opportunities for ter-
tiary education for Bahamians


interested in the field.
Remuneration of pharmacists
- particularly in government
institutions is also a main con-
cern.
Said Mr Gray: "We are of the
opinion that we can assist the
government with retention and
recruitment providing that the
necessary analysis is done.
"We also wish to address how
we might assist the government
from a pharmacy perspective in
its initiative to implement
National Health Insurance."



KIA MOTORS


STAR

General


A leading General Insurance Agency seeks
to employ a Commercial Lines Customer
Service Representative.

RESPONSIBILITIES
1. Providing customer service to
commercials clients.
2. Creating and maintaining appropriate
file records.
3. Preparing required correspondence
i'.e letters, memos, policy registers.
quotation slips. cover, debit notes etc.).
4. Processing all premium pay ments.
5. Following up outstanding premiums.
6. Producing and mailing customer
statements and dunning letters.
-. Structuring payment plans.
8. Assisting with monthly renewals.

REQUIREMENTS
The ideal candidate should hold a
minimum of 3 BGCSEs (including Math
& English). a High School Diploma and
be in pursuit of a Certificate of Insurance,
Associate/ Bachelors Degree or equivalent.

SYSTEMS KNOWLEDGE
Must be computer literate with working
knowledge of Windows, \Vord and Excel.

CONTACT
Please send cover letter and resuim b\ hand
or fax to the following:

The Office Manager,
Star General Insurance
Agents & Brokers Ltd.,
Marathon Road

Fax: 393-8722 .


Independence Extravaganza Sale!


NOTICE











'd --
*'.. ',*' ', : 't-. '. j ^,
. _,. -


At


*. '..
.. .,-. .;:
:? -.. ., .


Date Stolen: between 7:00 p.m. on Thursday,
2006 and 6:50 a.m. on Friday, May 19, 2006


Location of Theft: San Marino Marina, Paradise Island

Description: 1991 17 ft. White Boston Whaler with 115
hp Yamaha Outboard Engine


Registration#: N 08607

Name of Vessel: "Sea Bee"


A reward of $5,000 is being offered for any information
leading to the recovery of the vessel or the arrest and
prosecution of the culprits.


Please call 919, 326-1449 or 328-4962


18 May,


A mid-size SUV with all
the qualities you want.



2006 KIA SORENTO
Let the Good Times Roll


ON THE SPOT FINANCING WIT H
Thompson Blvd. Oaks Field COMMONWEALTH BANK
SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED t.242.326.6377-f.242.326.6315 INSURANCE AVAILABLE WITH
e. sanpin@coralwave.com ADVANTAGE INSURANCE
I BROKERS & AGENTS LTD.


I I ti


I


s I I L- I








PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JULY 5, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


OAL


NOTICE

Date Stolen: night of June 12, 2006 and early hours of June
13, 2006

Location of Theft: San Marino Marina, Paradise Island

Description: 2002 19 ft. White Boston Whaler with 2002
150 hp Yamaha Outboard Engine

Registration#: N 09181


Name of Vessel: "Tender To Trixsea"


A reward of $5,000 is being offered for any information
leading to the recovery of the vessel or the arrest and
prosecution of the culprits.


Please call 919, 326-1449 or 328-4962




OFFICE SPA CE FOR RENT

Global United House

Freeport Harbour Entrance


For More Inf rmation Contact:
Betty or W-rre4 242-352-2328. 931 '- *
Betty or Warren.. 242-352-2328 / 93al -


Concern over deaths



due to the 'bends'


BAHAMAS INFORMATION
SERVICES
THE Ministry of Agriculture
and Marine Resources is con-
cerned about the death of three
Family Island fishermen due to
the "bends" or decompression ill-
ness.
All three fishermen died last
month, according to the ministry.
Officials at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital say Bahamian fish-
ermen make up about 40 per cent
of patients admitted to the Acci-
dent and Emergency section suf-
fering from decompression illness.
The bends is a sometimes fatal
disorder marked by neuralgic
pains and paralysis, breathing
trouble, or collapse.
It is caused by the release of
gas bubbles into tissue because
of too rapid decrease in air pres-
sure after a stay in a compressed
atmosphere.
"We've had patients who have
been paralysed," said consultant
Dr Carolyn Burnett-Garraway,
clinical director at Accident and
Emergency.
"You may get away with it a
couple times joint pains. But
you have silent bubbles and it's
also affecting your body, so when
you get older the effects will
come..
"It has been proven that it does
have effects on the liver, the
bones, the joints and the lungs
especially," Dr Burnett-Garraway
said.
Last month Mayaguana's Chief
Councillor Clinton Collie, diver
Nathaniel Emmanuel, and an 18-
year-old Acklins Islander died
after suffering suspected decom-
pression illness.
These cases arise mainly out of
persons misusing air compressors
for fishing, noted Michael Bren-
nen, Marine Resources Director
in the Ministry of Agriculture and
Marine Resources.
The use of air compressors in
the Bahamas is legal provided the
necessary permit is obtained and
they are used during the time and
within the depth established by
the regulations, Mr Brennen said.
Though it is difficult to prove if
a diver is breaking the rules, Mr
. Brc r.nr n said violators face a fine
So up ... $3,000.
"Persons applying for permits
must present evidence of train-


ing from a dive professional or
dive master that would indicate to
us that they have thought about *
the various hazards and how to
use the device properly," said Mr
Brennen.
Decompression illness, he said,
occurs when a diver surfaces too
quickly.
The body is under pressure
when diving and nitrogen which is
in the breathed air gets dissolved
in the blood and the liquid parts
of the body, he said.
"When you release the pres-
sure by returning to the surface or
just changing from a deep depth
to a lower depth," said Mr Bren-
nen, "the nitrogen that is dis-
solved in the tissues and the tissue
fluids comes out of solution and
turns back into a gas.
"It can form these little bub-
bles just like you have bubbles of
steam forming in boiling water.
These bubbles can be transported
around the body in the blood
stream or they could occur in cer-
tain parts of the body like in the
joints. That can cause pressure
on the nerves or disrupt the flow
of blood vessels which can, as a
result, have serious medical con-
sequences."
The amount of this nitrogen
that dissolves in the blood
depends upon the depth to which
a person dives and also the time a
person stays at that depth, Mr
Brennen said.
"So it's possible to get into
trouble by going very deep for a
short time, or you could be at a
relatively shallow depth, but if
you stay there for a very long
time you could put yourself in a
very dangerous situation if you
are not observing the rules exact-
ly.
Dr Burnett-Garraway
explained that Type I or mild
decompression illness results in
skin rashes and itching.
Type II, she said, is dangerous
and can end in "neurological
bends" depending on where the
nitrogen bubbles form, or if they
get bigger and coalesce espe-
Scially if they occur in the spinal
cord.
The only treatment for decom-
pression illness, she said, is recom-
pression therapy in a hyperbaric
or decompression chamber.
"Basically you dive them again
but in a controlled setting," she


said. "You dive them to try and' ,
treat the bubble. We are trying.
to push in oxygen under pressure,
which helps to shrink the bubbles
mechanically and also heals the
damaged tissues."
There is a decompression
chamber at Lyford Cay hospital.
However, a patient suffering
negative reactions after diving'
should be taken to the hospital
first so that any other ailments
can be ruled out, said Dr Bur-'"
nett-Garraway.

.. . . . .. . . .I. .. . . . .. . . . .


DIVERS descend during
an attempt to set a new world
record for greatest number of
scuba divers simultaneously
diving on a single site, near
Male, Maldives, Saturday,
Feb. 25, 2006. Divers that sur-
face too quickly are in danger
of suffering decompression ill-
ness.
(AP Photo/Gemunu
Amarasinghe)


Entries will be judged anonymously by a panel of four architects from the Caribbean
and one Bahamian engineer.Judges'identities will not be released.

SInformation packages and entry forms available at Village Road & Tonique Williams-
Darling Highway (Harrold Road) branches of Bank of The Bahamas
S$250 entry fee for established architects or firms (Fee waived for students)
SEntries limited to three per firm







Excel- lencan* $ 0II
Excellence and $5000.""'

Entris mus be sbmittd to HP soiate, anyptbySeteber 7200


Bank of The Bahamas is pleased to invite
Bahamian architects and students to enter
an ideas competition to produce a winning
design concept that clearly captures
Bahamian architectural style & spirit while
maximizing views and elevation of the nearly
6-acre site located across from Nassau
harbour.The site is bordered on the west
by Nassau Street.


Because of its location and views afforded
pedestrians, passengers & cruise visitors,
this project holds the promise of becoming
a national landmark.


* .,





I.


"



I
-



r
~


~I


'
''








WEDNESDAY, JULY 5, 2006, PAGE 11


THF TRIRINFE


* O AI


BEC

FROM page one

BEC, he is diligent about
selecting and instructing
someone to act on his behalf
so that the meetings will nev-
er be delayed by his unavoid-
able absence," the corpora-
tion said.
The management of BEC
assured the public that its
many dedicated, diligent and
'hardworking employees will
do everything they can to
keep the power supply avail-
able to their customers and to
keep any supply interruptions
to a minimum.
"The public would also
have learned that BEC
regards its responsibilities to
the consumer very, very seri-
ously and would never know-
ingly jeopardize the national
welLbeing by ignoring any
meetings with the Govern-
ment or the union.
S"But, because of the irre-
sponsibility of these journal-
ists, the public never got to
hear that side of the story.
Because of this biased and
unbalanced reporting, the
public-is now left, once again
just before a holiday, with a
sense' of anxiety about the
power supply over the upcom-
ing long weekend," BEC said.
The corporation pledged to
continue its vigilance, to con-
tinue-to meet with Govern-
'.ment and the union until res-
.-.lutions on any legitimate
'issues raised are forthcoming
and to continue to keep the
public informed regarding the
whole story at all times.
The corporation's man-
agement said that the
Guardian has chosen to print
an unsubstantiated, one-sided
and misleading attack on the
management of the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation,
specifically the general man-
ager.
"This particular story pre-
sented some very erroneous
information and at no time
did the reporter ever try to
contact BEC for the other
side, so that the public could
truly get the full story, instead
of the narrow, misinformed
perspective that was offered,"
the corporation said.
The paper, according to
BEC, failed to avoid "biased
and one-sided stories" that
sought to sway public opinion
without sharing all the facts
of a situation.
"The management of BEC
is very disappointed in the
unprofessional behaviour of
the journalists at this particu-
lar daily as, yet again, irre-
sponsible headline writers are
attempting to unnecessarily
provoke public apprehension
about threatened power sup-
ply interruptions," corpora-
tion management said.
BEC said that it was sad-
dened to see that these par-
-ficular journalists do not take
this very important role more
seriously.
"They are, instead, more
focused on putting forth their
own agendas rather than
telling the whole story. What
is alarming is that Bahamian
people are depending upon
the Fourth Estate to deliver
that full story and some of the
Fourth Estate .are not living.
up to their obligation and are
letting' the Bahamian people
down repeatedly and deliber-
ately," BEC claimed.


Need for witness protection programme




'not influenced by degree of criminality'


FROM page one the Justice Protection Bill of
which it is a part, comes at a
critical period in our country's
That is riot the reason why the history when society is being
witness protection programme threatened by criminal elements
has been contemplated." and others who threaten the
"The degree of criminality in country's peace and prosperity.
this society does not necessarily Last week, Marcian Scott, a
influence the need for witness former police officer, was mur-
protection," the police spoke- dered when a white car pulled
man said. "It does not have to up near his home and opened
mean that crime has gone wild fire on him as he sat in his vehi-
in the Bahamas." cle, and 2004 saw the death of a
ASP Ferguson said that wit- young mother whose daughter
ness interference can be influ- was said to have been a witness
enced by a number of different in another criminal matter.
things, however, he pointed out Although only speculation at
that the programme has been the time of Mr Scott's death, a
instituted to prevent interfer- source told The Tribune that he
ence and protect potential wit- may have been a witness in a
nesses from criminal harm. murder case that was soon to
During an address to the go before the courts. Police offi-
House of Assembly in March, cials said that as a policeman
Attorney General Allyson May- "he may have been a witness in
nard-Gibson proposed the several murder cases."
establishment of a witness pro- Mrs Gibson-Maynard pointed
tection programme, out that this threat is not a
The Attorney General point- national threat endemic to the
ed out that this programme, and Bahamas, however, "but one



Detainees caught in US

FROM page one

Detention Centre since April this year.
Immigration and Labour Minister Shane Gibson in past inter-
views said that his ministry was aggressively looking at new ways to
enhance the security at the detention centre.
New security initiatives slated to be implemented in the near
future will include the installation of guard dogs, additional razor
wire fencing, and video surveillance cameras.
However, this latest escape occurred on the same day the secu-
rity cameras were to have been installed.


FROM page one

Many foreigners use the pop-
ular website bahamsb2b.com to
inquire about the legal drink-
ing age in the Bahamas and
whether it is strictly enforced.
Commonly the webmaster
ensures visitors to the website
that the legal age is 18 but
that the law is not rigorously
enforced in this regard.
According to Chief Superin-
tendent of Police Hulan Han-
na many of the minors who
break the under age drinking
law facilitate the sale of alco-
hol by presenting falsified iden-
tification. However, Mr Hanna
said that this is not a huge prob-
lem for the police.
"Underage drinking of such is
not something that the police
see routinely I guess' at pri-
vate parties you have adults
who do not have any scruples
when it comes to involving
young people in the consump-
tion of alcohol, but in public
places police have not been see-
ing a proliferation of under age
persons, that's not to say it's not
happening, but we have not
seen an inordinate amount of
under aged people consuming
alcoholic beverages," said Mr
Hanna.
He said the police run "Oper-
ation Quiet Storm" on a regular
basis when police officers patrol


Drinking
bars in search of operators who
are in violation of the Liquor
Licence Act, which includes the
sale of alcohol to minors.
"With your established busi-
ness it is not significant that the
police are aware of for the
simple reason that people know
that the police are up and about
checking out these places. And
so they are not going to risk
their licences and certainly not
going to risk.being exposed
publicly, but from time to time
we come across these people
and if that's the case we take
them before the courts," he
said.
)Vacation planning companies
such as Grad City, the high
school division of Student city,
highlight partyspots such as
Senor Frogs as a part of their
vacation packages.
While a number of minors,
both local and foreign visit the
establishment, management at
Senor Frogs assured The Tri-
bune yesterday that they "card"
all persons who eiiter the club
to verify that they are of legal
drinking age.
,Mr Hanna said he believes
that the biggest facilitators
of underage drinking are
those people who are not
in possession of a liquor
licence.


that is waged both regionally
and internationally."
ASP Ferguson said that other
Caribbean countries, such as
Jamaica and Trinidad and
Tobago, have witness protec-
tion programmes. And whereas
the Bahamas is nowhere in the
same class, as Jamaica or
Trinidad when it comes to
crime, Mr Ferguson said: "We
are trying to take action before
crime'becomes a run away situ-
ation in th. Bahamas."


"Going into a witness protec-
tion programme," said ASP
Ferguson, "is not determined
by a particular crime. Whether
or not the witness is being tam-
pered with, threatened, intimi-
dated, or interfered with in gen-
eral is the determinant, regard-
less of the crime."
With the establishment of the
witness protection programme,
ASP Ferguson said he does not
want the criminal element to
get the wrong message that


their tactics of intimidation are
working.
"The purpose of the pro-
gramme is to ensure that wit-
nesses are kept safe and out of
harms way so that they can be
available to provide the neces-
sary testimony to put criminals
away."
As it is proposed, the pro-
gramme would allow for the
relocation of Bahamian wit-
nesses to other countries out-
side of the Bahamas.


The Tribune
4e


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PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JULY 5, 2006


BRI STOL

WINES & SPIRITS


Jj
' 1 B ^'~


--7'


itt


cI
-i--a,


ii''-


s .. &


j ; j


i.d


JULY STH JULY ilTh
PROUD AGENTS OF BACARDI RUM'THE RUM OF THE BAHAMAS.


:.: -1.- .:...r








WEDNESDAY,.JULY 5, 2006


SECTION ,- -l


buisiness@tribtuiiemelia.nlet


1U ill~rl~ne


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Hotel room revenues


9.6%o


to


$159.1m


0 By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

enues increased
by 9.6 per cent
to $159.1 mil-
lion during the
first four months of 2006, the
Central Bank of the Bahamas
reported yesterday, as the
strengthening stopover visitor
market compensated for the
reduction in cruise passenger
arrivals.
The Central Bank's report on
monthly and economic devel-
opments for May said hotel
room revenues in the period to


the end of April 2006 were bol-
stered by "appreciated pricing
and boosted occupancy levels"
in the industry.
Grand Bahama showed the
highest increase, with room rev-
enues rising 30.2 per cent in the
first four months of 2006, with
average room rates and occu-
pied room nights up by 18.9 per
cent and 9.7 per cent respec-
tively.
It is likely that the still-closed
Royal Oasis resort was excluded
from this analysis, its closure
and the subsequent cut in Grand
Bahama's room inventory by
one third resulting in greater
pricing power for those hotels


lii)stopoveS'JrI[O~( IiiiILIiUEJ viitrscopesaefr ueiinup iacrl e wsel lrnsiu


that are still open.
On New Providence, hotel
room revenues increased by 6.3
per cent in the period to April
2006, with average daily room
rates up by 3 per cent and occu-
pied.room nights rising,by 3.2
per cent.
Elsewhere, room revenues on
the Family Islands were up by
11.7 per cent, due to a 13.7 per
cent rise in average daily room
rates. The Central Bank indi-
cated that occupied room nights


were either flat or below 2005's
comparatives.
The improved financial per-
formance by the Bahamian
hotel industry, the sector that is
the largest private employer in
the Bahamas, compensated for
the 3.3 per cent decline in total
visitor arrivals during the first
four months of 2006 to 1.783
million.

SEE page 6B


Board still assessing


$500m Aman resort


By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business
Reporter
THE proposed $500 million
Aman Resort project for Nor-
man's Cay is still before the
Investments Board for
approval, Financial Services and
Investments Minister, Vincent
Peet, told The Tribune yester-
S day.
Mr Peet said the Board was
still engaged in its due dilli-
S gence, and he hoped to be able
S to give a further update on the
project, which has been in limbo
for the past several years, soon.
The proposed ultra-luxury
Aman Resort would feature a
residential community and
S marina to be built over a seven-
S year period. However, the
developers have had a four-year
wait for the Government to
revise the Heads of Agreement


that was originally put in place
by the former Hubert Ingra-
ham-led administration in 2002.
Adrian Zecha, chairman of
Aman Resorts, had recently
told The Tribune that he hoped
to complete negotiations with
the Government
"As withall Aman.Resorts,
we succeed in creating a very
exclusive high-end resort," Mr
Zecha said.
"Our resorts create enor-
mous pleasure for our visitors,
who are tourists to your coun-
try, as well as create a sense of
pride among Bahamians."
Other sources had told The
Tribune that the Aman Resort
project has been held up
because Prime Minister Perry
Christie's government wanted
to amend the Heads of Agree-

SEE page 2B


Florida investors plan

Cat Island development


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business
Reporter
SEVERAL Florida devel-
opers are in negotiations to
redevelop the former Cutlass
Bay Club resort on..Cat
Island through a project cov-
ering 252 acres.
According to the Palm
Beach Post, Delray Beach
developer James Knight, cat-
tleman Billy Bowman, a well-
known Republican party sup-
porter and fundraiser, and
Palm 'Beach County Com-
missioner, Tony Masilotti,
were three of nine partners
with plans to turn the long-
abandoned former 'clothing
optional' or nudist resort into
a luxury getaway.
Speaking with The Tribune


yesterday, Financial Services
and Investment Minister,
Vincent Peet, said he
believed an application had
been made to the Govern-
ment for the development.
However, he said he would
.have to look into the issue to
see how far it had progressed
before he could make a fur-
ther comment.
The Cutlass Bay resort has
both a colourful-and dark
past, having closed its doors
in 1999.
That year, James and
Sandy Robertson, the then
owners of the Cutlass Bay
Club, alleged they were beat-
en in their bedroom by a
group of intruders. The resort

SEE page 6B


NIA airport operator

waits on government


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Canadian company
seeking to finalise a full man-
agement agreement for Nassau
International Airport (NIA)
yesterday told The Tribune it
was "waiting for the response
of the Bahamian government"
to its latest proposals, as talks
continue to drag on.
Coleen Rogers, vice-president
of operations for YVRAS, the
international subsidiary of Van-
couver Airport Services (YVR),
said she could not comment on
the reasons why negotiations for
the final management contract
were taking so long.
She added: "We've negotiat-
ed contracts around the world
and the negotiations always
seem to take longer than you
hope they will."
Ms Rogers said YVRAS was
unable to give a timeframe for




TRIBUNE Business on
Tuesday, July 4, ran an article
with the headline Abaco Mar-
kets planning to sell Cost
Right. While the article was
correct, the headline was not.
Abaco Markets is only selling
its Cost Right store in the
Turks & Caicos, with the
remainder of the chain staying
within the group and no
change in their ownership.
The headline should have
read Abaco Markets planning
Turks divestment. The Tri-
bune apologises for the error.


when negotiations were likely
to be concluded.
The Government had hoped
YVRAS would take over man-
agement at NIA by mid-April,
but it is now early July, although
the two-sides do seem to be
irphing closer to an agreement.'.-.
Prime Minister Perry Christie.
said on Friday that he w-as
awaiting recommendations from
a government-negotiating team
that would "hopefully" see the
administration enter a full man-
agement agreement for Nassau
International Airport (NIA).
It would thus seem that both
sides the Government and
YVRAS are waiting to see
how the other will react to the
proposals and recommendations
made at the meeting in Wash-
ington.
It is understood that Baltron
Bethel, the Hotel Corporation's
managing director and lead
negotiator for the Government
on the airport management
deal, was at the meeting.
In an address to business
executives that formally'
launched the next phase for
transforming downtown Nassau,
the. Prime Minister said the
Government's negotiating team
had just left Washington and
would deliver to him recom-
mendations "to enter into a full
management agreement with
YVRAS for Nassau IDterna-
tional Airport".
Opposition FNM MP Brent:
Symonette claimed in the House
of Assembly that the delay in
bringing YVRAS in might have.
been caused by "exclusive rights'-


SEE page 5B


HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010


Sure you'll retire early!


Now what's Plan B?


II


C


rise.














Oil spending up 65%.


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Central Bank of the
Bahamas has repeated previ-
ous warnings that rising global
oil prices, and the increased
value of other commodities,
"remain a cause for concern"
for the Bahamian economy
because they could cause a
build-up of inflationary prod-
ucts inside and outside this
nation.
The Central Bank's report
on monthly economic devel-
opments for May 2006 found
that average consumer prices
in the Bahamas rose by 2 per
cent in the 12 months to end-
April 2006, compared to a 1.2
per cent increase the previous
year.
It said this reflected "higher


energy costs", with a 2.7 per
cent hike in housing costs
attributed entirely to the fuel
surcharge on energy consump-
tion. Food and beverage and
goods and services costs rose
by 4 per cent and 3 per cent
respectively during that 12-
month period.
In a separate report on eco-
nomic developments during
the 2006 first quarter, the Cen-
tral Bank said rising oil prices
were continuing "to exert
upward pressure on domestic
inflation".
Exchange control figures
showed that for the first five
months this year, oil imports
into the Bahamas increased by
$73.5 million to $186.9 million,
a 64.8 per cent increase. This
will have widened the current
account deficit


The cost of non-oil imports
rose by $44.4 million to $615.3
million.
The Central Bank reported
that the growth in the Bahami-
an external reserves fell by
$45.1 million to $80.7 million,
although last year's figures
were boosted by inflows relat-
ing to Baha Mar's $2 billion
cable Beach redevelopment
project.
Excess reserves in the
Bahamian banking system
advanced by $42.9 million in
the first five months of 2006, a
more than three-fold rise over
the $11.2 million expansion the
previous year.
The Central Bank added:
"Underpinned by continued
robust private sector demand,
Bahamian dollar credit growth
firmed by $52.9 million to


PUBLIC NOTICE U

PAYMENT OF CONTRIBUTIONS-
The National Insurance Board wishes to advise all employers and
seld-employed persons that beginning July 1, 2006, contributions
paid after the due date, will be automatically assessed interest
charges.

Be reminded that contribution payments for the month of June
2006, must be paid by July 15th, 2006.

The National Insurance Board wishes also to remind employers that
students hired to work between June 1 and August 31, who are
between the ages of sixteen (16) and twenty-four (24) years, and
earn $250.00 per week or less, are categorized for National Insurance
purposes as "summer students;" consequently, no contributions
are to be deducted from their wages. However, contribution payments
must be made in respect of their employment at the rate of 2% of
their insurable earnings.

Please contact your nearest National Insurance Local office for
further information. ... .:






10 Bank of The Bahamas
INTERNATIONAL
"A growing and dynamic Bahamian institution"

VACANCY FOR THE POSITION OF:
CREDIT OFFICER FREEPORT BRANCH



Core responsibilities:

* Prepare thorough credit proposals and maintain profitability of assigned
portfolio.
* Interview loan applicants and make considered decisions based on
investigations and assigned lending authority.
* Act as the "Relationship Manager" for assigned accounts by ensuring
that 11 of the' customers needs are satisfied.
* Ensure all loans are granted in compliance with the Bank's lending
policies and guidelines.
* Monitior and control loan portfolios to avoid delinquency.
* Perform constant follow-up on delinquent loan accounts.
* Ensure loan and security files are completed and properly maintained.
* Constantly increase lending by marketing the Bank's products and
services.

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:

* Associates Degree in relevant area (e.g. Accounting/Business
Administration/Finance)
Three to five years banking and lending experience
Excellent interpersonal and communication skills
Strong negotiation, and analytical and organizational skills
Computer literate-Ability to use MS Word and Excel


Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience and
qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and life
insurance; pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later that July 21st 2006 to:

The Senior Manager, Human Resources & Training
Bank of The Bahamas International
P.O. Box N-7118
Nassau, Bahamas


$237.2 million. Private sector
credit expansion more than
doubled to $257.4 million, led
by strongly accelerated increas-
es of $72.5 million in consumer
credit and $131.3 million in
mortgages."
The Bahamian dollar
deposit base saw its growth fall
by 6.4 per cent to just $247.4
million, with demand deposits
up by $107.8 million, fixed
deposits by $98.4 million and
savings increasing by $41.2 mil-
lion.
On the fiscal side, the Cen-
tral Bank report found that for


the first 10 months of fiscal
2005-2006 to end-April, the
Government deficit fell by 30
per cent to $88.5 million.
Revenues and grants rose by
$147.5 million or 18 per cent
to $965.3 million, although
public spending which the
Government fails to control -
rose by $110 million or 12 per
cent to $1.053 billion.
Aided by increased imports,
tax receipts grew by $108.6 mil-
lion or 14 per cent to $873.5
million, while "the early
receipt of rental payments"
boosted non-tax revenues by


$36 million to $88.6 million.
Recurrent spending, though,
rose by 13 per cent or $103.7
million to $925.2 million, due
to "higher wages and salaries
as well as goods and services
payments". Capital spending
almost doubled to $88.6 mil-
lion, reflecting higher infra-
structure outlays.


Board still assessing


$500m Aman resort


FROM page 1B

ment drafted under the Ingra-
ham administration, in the
belief that the developers and
a Bahamian group associated
with them were getting "too
sweet a deal".
The resort's centrepiece is
planned for the former land
and properties once owned by
infamous Colombian-German
drug trafficker Carlos Lehder,
which were vested in the Pub-
lic Treasury after being seized
by the Bahamian authorities.
Sources said the developers
were also seeking to acquire
surrounding land from a group
of Bahamian businessmen and
attorneys that had been instru-
mental in attracting Aman to
the Bahamas.
Government
However, the Government
is understood to want to
amend the Heads of Agree-
ment to obtain a greater per-
centage from real estate sales
associated with this surround-


ing land.
Group
This was because it felt the
Bahamian group was getting
too good a deal, having
brought Aman to Norman's
Cay and increased the value
of its landholdings.
Mr Zecha said previously:
""In 1998, I was invited to
come to the Bahamas by the
former director-general of
tourism, Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace, and Greg Cleare
when they were on a tourism
visit to Asia.
"I arrived in the Bahamas
eight years ago to look at the
island."
"Norman's Cay was love at
first sight," Mr Zecha smiled.
"The island has such a unique
shape, gorgeous beaches, con-
tours and, most important, is
that it is undeveloped.
"My partner, Jonathan
Breene, and I signed a Heads
of Agreement in 2002 with the
former government under
Hubert Ingraham with the
plais that are here on paper,"


said Mr Zecha.
"Mr Breene the developer
of the Setai hotel and residen-
tial project in South Beach
(Miami) and I got together to
do this project. That project
took the South Beach market
to new heights in terms of lux-
ury, price and location. It was
a very successful and happy
venture for us both.
"Since that time, some four
years later, we have been wait-
ing to finalise outstanding
issues (in the Bahamas) so that
we can begin construction."
Resorts
Aman Resorts would be an
ideal addition to the Bahami-
an hotel product mix. The size
of its developments are in
keeping with retaining the
character of Family Island des-
tinations,.
And its high-end, luxury
boutique nature will enable
Aman to charge and justify
room rates that will cover the
relatively high operating costs
encountered in the Bahamas,
ensuring it is profitable.


PAGE 2B. WEDNESDAY. JULY 5, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


IMPORTANT NOTICE


MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY/
SBRITISH CONSULATE OFFICE (NEW YORK)

INVITE

ALL STUDENTS ATTENDING OR PLANNING TO ATTEND
COLLEGE / UNIVERSITY IN THE UNITED KINGDOM

TO A

STUDENT WORKSHOP

BRITISH COLONIAL HILTON
THURSDAY JULY 6th, 2006
8:30 AM 12:30 PM
TOPICS:
GETTING YOUR VISA, THE APPLICATION PROCESS, PROCESSING TIME,
CONDITIONS OF ENTRY INTO THE UK, WHAT TO EXPECT IN THE UK,
PERSONS TO CONTACT INCASE OF EMERGENCY, ETC.

OPENING REMARKS BY: Minister of Education, Science & Technology
Hon. Alfred M. Sears, MP

REPRESENTATIVES FROM:
THE BRITISH CONSULATE OFFICE (NY)
THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, & OTHERS
WILL BE IN ATTENDANCE

IF YOU ARE ATTENDING OR PLANNING TO ATTEND A COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY IN THE
UNITED KINGDOM, THEN YOU SHOULD NOT MISS THIS IMPORTANT WORKSHOP

SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATION LOAN DIVISION
THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY


I


I -


BUSINESS







WEDNESDAY, JULY 5, 2006, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


UK's 1bn deficit



warns Bahamas



over health plan


- By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE British National Health
Service (BHS), one of the sys-
tems upon which the Govern-
ment has based its National
Health Insurance (NHI) pro-
posal, incurred a gross deficit of
almost 1 billion in its 2005-
2006 financial year, providing a
stark indication of the prob-
lems this nation could
encounter if it implemented,
such a scheme.
Despite receiving more than
75 billion in funding, Patricia
Hewitt, the British health sec-
retary, said providers of med-
ical services under the NHS
plan would generate a gross 1
billion deficit.
Medical services providers
-who made a profit were expect-
ed to reduce the NHS net
deficit to 620 million, but poor
financial management by loss-
making providers is being
blamed for the scale of the
problems.
The 2004 Blue Ribbon Com-
mission report acknowledged
that the Bahamian public
health sector faced similar
issues, even without the intro-
duction of an NHI scheme.
SIt concluded: "The cost of
services in the public health
sector is higher than it should
be, and is related to inefficien-
cies in the health care institu-
tions.
"For an NHI system to be
sustainable, a management
strengthening process is neces-
sary to foster efficiency and
cost containment in the public
sector institutions."
Taken with the evidence
-from the UK, this suggests that
-the proposed Bahamian NHI
scheme is likely to encounter


similar problems on containing
costs and budget deficits.
Not to mention the increas-
ing hospital waiting lists and
lack of available beds. In the
UK, the number of people
waiting for operations under
the NHS and the duration
they are waiting for is contin-
uing to increase, with some
people dying before they reach
the operating room.
In his address on the NHI
scheme to the Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce last week, Dr
Bernard Nottage said: "We are
aware of the absolute need for
good management to the
integrity of the [NHI] plan."
However, he did not explain
how this would be achieved.
Dr Nottage also acknowledged
other existing problems in the
Bahamian public healthcare
system, including staff who
went to work for two hours per
day.
On the private sector side,
Dr Nottage admitted that ser-
vices provided by private med-
ical careers under the NHI
would have to be audited to
prevent provider fraud, which
could result from overpre-
scribing treatments and drugs,
plus prescribing expensive
treatments that are not neces-
sary.
Another impediment to
implementing NHI in the
Bahamas is the relatively high
administrative costs at the
National Insurance Board
(NIB), which has been chosen
to administer the scheme and
collect contributions.
In fact, NIB's rising adminis-
trative costs are making the
proposed National Health
Insurance plan increasingly
"not feasible".
The full 150-page report by


the Blue Ribbon Commission
records that the NIB was in
2004 operating with "approxi-
mately 17 per cent administra-
tive overheads".
The Commission said: "NHI
will not be feasible with that
high an administrative burden.
The cost of administering the
NHI system should be less than
10 per cent of the income to
the system."
But its administrative costs
as a proportion of contributions
continues to grow, far exceed-
ing the 17 per cent referred to
in the report.
The NIB's own annual
report for fiscal 2004, the last
year for which accounts have
been published, showed that
while contributions were $125.5
million, administrative costs
that year rose by $5.5 million to
$29 million.
This means that the NIB's
administrative costs for that
year were 23.1 per cent of rev-
enues earned, more than dou-
ble the acceptable limit iden-
tified by the Blue Ribbon
Commission for the NHI
scheme to work.
Some $2.2 million of the
NIB's $5.5 million increase in
administrative costs came from
payments made under a volun-
tary early retirement package,
but even stripping this out-
leaves costs of $26.8 million.
This is still 21.4 per cent of total
contributions.
Dr Nottage last week tood
the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce: "National Health
Insurance is not just about get-
ting more money. It's about
using money for sustainable
investment in the health of our

SEE page 6B


SOUTHWEST PORT JOINT TASK FORCE

Expressions of Interest for Consulting Services for a New Container and Freight Port

The Government of the Bahamas has approved the formation of a joint Public and Private Sector Task Force -
The Southwest Port Joint Task Force (SPJTF) to relocate container and freight activities on New Providence
to an inland site on the southwest part of the island. The port relocation project is a consequence of an
initiative of the Government of the Bahamas to redevelop the downtown waterfront area of Nassau. The
Bahamas wishes to develop an efficient, safe, secure and environmentally friendly marine container port.

The purpose of the SPJTF is to oversee the development of a marine container port to accommodate the
anticipated container cargo, break bulk, aggregate and fuel volumes in the region. This includes the
preparation of feasible designs for the new port; consideration of the location of break-bulk facilities and the
development of the associated infrastructure.
The SPJTF is requesting Expressions of Interest from consultants with extensive international experience and
qualifications in the design, cost estimation, management, and operation including preparation of financial
analyses, feasibility studies and business plans of ports. The immediate requirement is for the preparation of a
comprehensive business plan addressing:


1. the design of the port,
2. estimated capital costs,
3. estimated cargo volumes,
4. operating expenses forecasts,


5. revenue forecasts,
6. a phased port development program,
7. port ownership options, and
8. port management options


Following the completion and acceptance of the business plan, the selected consultant may be asked to
proceed with a design suitable for tender calls. Further involvement of the Consultants is neither promised
nor prohibited at this stage.
Interested parties capable of commencing work by August 14, 2006 should forward a statement of their
experience in comprehensive port development consulting, including similar work performed within the
Bahamas and the Caribbean along with their company profiles and the profiles of individuals who would be
assigned to the project. Firms should clarify whether they are affiliated or part of a construction/development
company. The Expression of Interest should not exceed 10 single spaced letter size pages and should be e-
mailed to arrive not later than 12:00, p.m., noon, EDT, Tuesday, July 11, 2006 to:
Southwest Port Joint Task Force
Ms. Camille Johnson, Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Energy and the Environment
Email: Camille Johnson" camilleiohnson~ibahamas.qov.bs
Copies should also go to the task force co-chairs:
Mr. Paul Major (public sector co-chair) at paulmajortbahamas.qov.bs and
Mr. Michael Maura (private sector co-chair) at mmaura@itropical.com.
The SPJTF will review the Expressions of Interest and will send out a more detailed terms of reference
(TOR) by e-mail to short listed firms by noon July 13, 2006. A response to this TOR will be due July
28, 2006. Firms submitting proposals will be interviewed on August 8 aid 9, 2006. The successful
consultant will be notified at the end of that week.
Questions on this request should be addressed to either to Mr. Paul Major at 242-322-6005 or Mr.
Michael Maura at 242-322-1012.


_ I_ I


I I I~IBUSINESS


NOTICE
B.P.S.




TO ALL MEMBERS
EOF

THE BAHAMAS PUBLIC SERVICES
UNION


PleaseDbeladvisedlthatlasOalresultloflSPECIAL
CALIGENERAIOMEETINGIheldDon
Thursday,022ndlJuneD7:300p.m.DatltheB ahamas
PublicDServiceslUnionf(BPSU)DmeetingDhall
situatedDonlEastlStreet0South,Din[NewOProvidence.
alResolutionlwasDpassedland[resolvedlforDthe
d'IncreaseloflUnionlMembershiprDuesE.DThe
clearOcallaoflthelresoulutionDsays:-


d'RESOLVEIqrthatnthelvotingrmembersDoflthe
SpeciallCalllMeetinglinstructslandlmandates
President,IJohnlPinder andlExecutivelOfficers
oflthelBPSUDtolincreaseDitslUnionlgeneral
membershipDduesFfromlFifteenfDollarsl($15.00)
perfmonth0tolTwenty-fivelDollarsD($25.00)
effectively 1 stlJulyE.


AlllmembersloflthelBPSU,Darelherebyminfonrme
thatleffectivel stlJuly,020060theOincreaseDwilllDb
realizedlandDthelnewrreductionlrateslwilllbe
honoured.


ALPHA ENTREPRENEURIAL MANAGEMENT TRAINING &
CONSULTANCY
"Offering Quality Small Business Training & Consultancy Services"
P. O Box GT-2452
Nassau, N. P., Bahamas









4 h" '












AEMTC's participants who attended the Small Business Training
Seminar, 'How to Start & Operate a Successful Business' pose with
several of the facilitators.


Successful Business Seminar held-Alpha Entrepreneurial Management Training
& Consultancy Services (AEMTC) held its second successful Small Business Training
Seminar, "How to Start & Operate a Successful Business"- Phase I June 12, 13, 15, 19-21,
2006 at The College of The Bahamas, Michael Eldon Complex Phase I is designed for
individuals who have a desire to start their own businesses or for those persons already ,in
business but have no formal business training. AEMTC is committed to providing quality
small business training for budding and experienced entrepreneurs. Ten (10) individuals,
through many long hours of hard work, discipline and determination, attended the seminar
and gave it high marks as outstanding facilitators/presenters led them in lively and
informative sessions. Participants engaged in a series of interactive discussions, skills
training, group presentations and networking activities. On Wednesday June 21, 2006, the
closing ceremony was held and guest speaker, Beth Stewart, an entrepreneur and owner of
Beth's Candy Kitchen, urged participants to follow their dream of becoming entrepreneurs.
Then participants were awarded certificates of participation from AEMTC and The National
Foundation for Teaching Entrepreneurship (NFTE, New York). Successful individuals
from both training seminars (held in March & June 2006) will now have the opportunity to
complete Phases II and III of the program. Interested persons wishing to take advantage of
this ongoing special small business training opportunity can contact AEMTC at
.(242) 393-5961, or e-mail them at: Sph.licniirihIii Ii oo.cdiii.










PAGE 4B. WEDNESDAY. JULY 5. 2006


THE TRIBUNE


Stock Oo py righteaM eria ndal






could (Si ydicated'Contenes tof


Available from Commercial News Providers
Available from Commercial News* Providers


- - e -


SALE OF VEHICLE (by tender)
Bids are being invited in writing for the sale of
ONE 2000 DODGE DURANGO
by original owner
Mileage 50, 554 miles
Bids less than $9,000 will not be considered
Sealed offers clearly; BID FOR SALE VEHICLE
Should be delivered to the following address between
the hours of 9:30a.m 4:30p.m Monday to Friday


The PAHO/WHO Representative
Pan American Health Organization
World Health Organization
SUnion Court Building
Elizabeth Avenue and Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas :.,:


Call 242-326-7299/7390 to arrange viewing
Offer closes 4:30p.m. on Julyl4, 2006



Legal Notice



NOTICE


FILIGRAVE ASSETS LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) FILIGRAVE ASSETS LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on.29TH June,
2006 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Diodata Holdings Ltd.,
Wickhams Cay, P.O. Box 146, Road Town, Tortola, BVI.


Dated this 5th day of July, A.D. 2006



Diodata Holding Ltd.
Liquidator


,'
-


-~ ~ ~ ~ -- --


S- -


5w


- -


a- 6 *a db w


- -* -

p -* -


- -.


U -


- ~- ~- .-
-


- .*


- -


FAB! FINDS GIFT SHOP

2 Week Long Pre-Summer Sale

June 26 through July 8, 2006








I


Located i-h the Ljford Cay Shopping Center
Sale hours: 10am-4pm
Monday Saturday




Legal Notice



NOTICE


PASTELS LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) PASTELS LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on 15TH June,
2006 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Mark Edward Jackman, c/o
1 Raffles Link #05-02, Singapore 039393.


Dated this 5th day of July, A.D. 2006



Mark Edward Jackman
Liquidator


-, Financial Advisors Ltd.


l) ai.DEL


Pricing Information As O:
Viufl-d'I 0 .iiy CUUF;


Monday. 3 July 2U0 0
SBISX LISTED & iYkADED SECJITlI1ES VISIT WWW.BISXBAHAMAS COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1.519.11 / CHG 00.00 / %CHG 00.00 / YTD 168.40 / YTD % 12.47
:.2,K-H. 52.K-.Lovw SymDo l Prev.ouz Close Toja, CI C I- C nnal _- a.i, ..1 EPS DI PE v/s10d
I. . ..1.


1.85 0.59 Abaco Marketa
12.00 8.70 Bahamas Property Fund
7.49 6.35 Bank of Bahamas
3.85 0.70 Benchmark
1.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste
1.49 1.05 Fidelity Bank
9.60 8.00 Cable Bahamas
2.20 1.39 Colina Holdings
10.80 8.50 Commonwealth Bank
6.26 4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs
2.88 2.10 Doctor's Hospital
B.21 4.02 Famguard
11.50 10.49 Finco
12.43 8.75 FirstCaribbean
11.15 8.46 Focol
1.27 1.00 Freeport Concrete
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities
9.10 8.27 J.S. Johnson
7.98 5.30 Kerzner International BDRs
10 00 10.00 Premier Real Estate

52k.Hi 52wk-Low Symbol


. 00o
16.00
060

52Ml-HI
1 2945
2.8564
2.3915
1 1744


12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0 20 RND Holdings


28.00 ABDAB
13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0 35 RND Holdings


52wk-Low


Fund Name


1 2378 Colna Money Market Fund
2.3657 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
2.2487 Collna MSI Preferred Fund
1 1246 Colina Bond Fund


1 .8 5 1 ,5 ,
12.00 12.00 0
7.49 7.49 0
0.80 0.80 0
1.45 1.45 0
1.49 1.49 0.
9.19 9.19 0
1.96 1.96 0
10.80 10.80 0
4.91 4.85 -0
2.50 2.50 0
6.21 6.21 0
11.50 11.50 0
12.43 12:43 0
11.15 11.15 0
1.00 1.00 0
9.50 9.50 0
9.10 9.10 0
7.92 7.91 -0
1000 1000 0
Fidelty OVer-The-Counter Secunries
Bid SI A. S Lat' Pri.:


14.00 15.00 11 0')
8.00 8.25 10.00
C 29 0 54 0.00
Coflni OOr-Thw Counltr Securities
.-1 00 .13 J 0 .1i -
14.00 15.00 12.50
029 0 54 0.35
: V '" L*" l.t d IMu tual Funds
NA V YTD:: L3Ml t.l,:,rIr, .. ,


1 29449


1 293496'
2.78564 ***
2.391480**
1 174411"*


1.612
0.738
0.292
0.143
0.188
0.618
0.009
0.931
0.115
0.283
0.539
0.745
0.885
0.885
-0.162
0.532
0.565
107 0.160
2.036


0.380
0.330
0.020
0.060
0.050
0.240
0.000
0.600
0.045
0.000
0.240
0.540
0.550
0.500
0.000
0.405
0.560
0.000
0.585


7.4
10.1
2.7
10.0
7.9
14.9
217.8
11.6
40.7
8.8
11.5
15.1
14.0
12.6
N/M
17.9
16.1
49.6
4.9

PE


19..J 177211 7E1 4 dU


1 9.3 0 720 8
0.000 0.640 NM
-0.084 0.000 NM

2 220 u 000Ir 19 -1
1.750 0.360 8.0
-0.070 0.000 N/M


3.17%
4.41%
2.50%
4.20%
3.68%
2.61%
0.00%
5.56%
0.96%
0.00%
3.86%
4.78%
4.42%
4.48%
0.00%
4.26%
6.15%
0.00%
5.85%

/lelIJ


4 du"1
7.85%
0.00%

,: ':'0 ,
2.57%
0.00%


ield


SF' NDEXI CLO6li.4t I YTD 21.12% / 2005 26.09%
i -.LL SrARE INDEX 19 Dec02 = 1.00000 rD-iI.ET TE"M. Y LcD las, I r..:.rr. 1.1.3 .3. -... c.. : r.- "-E
52wk-HI Highest closing price in elst 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest dosing price i last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Collna and fidelity 23 June 2006
Previous Close Previous days weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week 31 May 2006
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value 30 April 2006
DIV $ Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
;= ra ...l.lde by the let ;2 r.or.thea.-.. rNuE Tr.- Fije.i' BO. .. .-,. J-. I 1 1 C. 0 .15, P00e
TO 1iTR_- ..... 2 011 i FIDELITY 242-3B56-774, I FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION CALL (242) 39 4-2 3'. '


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Legal Notice



NOTICE


STANDPOINT LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) STANDPOINT LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on 15TH June,
2006 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Mark Edward Jackman, c/o
1 Raffles Link #05-02, Singapore 039393.


Dated this 5th day of July, A.D. 2006



Mark Edward Jackman
Liquidator




Legal Notice



NOTICE


GREEN TEA LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) GREEN TEA LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on 15TH June,
2006 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Mark Edward Jackman, c/o
1 Raffles Link #05-02, Singapore 039393.


Dated this 5th day of July, A.D. 2006



Mark Edward Jackman
Liquidator



Legal Notice



NOTICE


NEW ASTER LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) NEW ASTER LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on 15TH June,
2006 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.

S(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Mark Edward Jackman, c/o
1 Raffles Link #05-02, Singapore 039393.


Dated this 5th day of July, A.D. 2006



Mark Edward Jackman
Liquidator


1I Bank of The Bahamas
L I M T E D
NOTICE

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 64 of the Securities
Industry Act, 1999 tha Mr. Lester Smith is no longer a Director with Bank
of the Bahamas International effective May 29, 2006


i Laura AWlliams
Secretary


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THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, JULY 5, 2006, PAGE 5B


NIA operator





waits on the





government


FROM page 1B


of certain tenants [at Nassau
International Airport] con-
trolled by supporters" of the
PLP. The exclusive rights he is
referring to are likely to be the
retail and liquor concessions.
Ms Rogers yesterday told The
Tribune that she was unable to
speak about YVRAS's plans for
taking NIA forward once the
agreement was finalised,
because "that's part of the con-
tract terms".
She added: "I really can't
speak about that because I
haven't seen the contract
terms."
"Hopefully, the response of
the Bahamas government
means we can move on to the
next stage," Ms Rogers said,
adding that both parties needed
to be satisfied with the agree-
ment.
"We wouldvprefer the way to
set up the structure of these
negotiations gives the Bahamas
government all the time they
need to consider the recom-
mendations."
YVRAS currently has a con-
sulting agreement with the Air-
port Authority, as a result of
the Memorandum of Under-
standing it signed with the Gov-
ernment in January this year.
"In place with the Airport
Authority we do have two exec-
utives," Ms Rogers said. "These
executives are providing opera-
tions advice, and focusing on
Skey areas such as security. That
is in anticipation of the conclu-
sion of the management con-
tract."


The transformation of Nas-
sau International Airport, due
to be named Sir Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport
tomorrow, into a world-class
facility is viewed as vital to giv-
ing the Bahamas transport
infrastructure to match the
world-class resort developments
in this nation.
Yet the Memorandum of
Understanding fell far short of
what was initially anticipated
for NIA, with the Government
retaining a large degree of con-
trol.
A YVRAS press release,
issued on February 10, 2005,
when the company was named
the preferred bidder on the con-
tract, said in relation to NIA:
"The contract will be for 15 to
25 years depending on the nego-
tiation of financial and com-
mercial terms."
However, the Memorandum
of Understanding (MOU)
between the Government and
YVRAS was only for 10 years,
and is just related to managing,.
operating and helping to devel-
op NIA.


Rather than lease the airport
to YVRAS, the Airport
Authority will instead lease it
for 30 years to a new Bahamian
company, called Newco, which
will assume NIA's operations.
Newco will "initially be whol-
ly-owned" by the Airport
Authority, which retains own-
ership of NIA. This effectively
means that the Airport Author-
ity is leasing NIA to itself, as
the 100 per cent owner of New-
co.
And the financing for capital
works and improvements,
derived from the passenger user
facility fee charge, was also
under government control
through itself, the Airport
Authority and Newco, with
YVRAS "collaborating" in this
area..
Phase one of the expected
$200 million "facelift" for NIA
is expected to be completed 24
months after the date that
YVRAS assumes responsibili-
ties for the management of the
airport. Included in the plans
for phase two is construction of
a new airport terminal.


Application Deadline:


.. TWENTY THIRD ANNUAL
i-, ART COMPETITION AND EXHIBITION 2006
APPUCATION FORM

The Central Bank of The Bahamas is proud to announce its Twenty Third Annual Art Competition
and.Exhibition to be held'from Monday, November 6 to December 1, 2006. The Grand opening
and Awards Presentation will take place on Wednepday. November 8, 2006 at S:30pm.
The objectives of the competition are to Identify, recognize and encourage young Bahamians
who demonstrate talent in the visual arts.
R OlirtMENTS FORa PARITY ATION
To qualify, participants must be citizens of The Bahamas age 26 and under, who are not
Involved in commercial sales of artwork.

There are no restrictions as to the theme of works to be entered in the competition, however.
works reflecting aspects of Bahamian culture and of an experimental nature are encouraged.

Each artist must.submit only three (3) works In any of the following media:
o Drawing
o Painting
o Print
o Collage
o Other pictorial presentation
Failure to present the required number of wors may result in disqualification from the
competition and exhibition.
GUIDlNES
The entries must meet the following requirements:-
1. Each entry must be te authentic work of(te.participating artist.
2. Repeat entries will not be accepted and artists are encouraged to submit original works

3. Artists must demonstrate imagination in concept and in skillful use of materials.
... .. .. .. .-- ... ......---.. .... ---... --.. --- --............ . .
4. Paintings and drawings must be properly presented and should be framed unless artistt
chooses to omit it as part of creative-process. All works must have screw eyes and
hanging wire attached to rear.
5. Two-dimensional art works should be no larger than 30" by 40".
SONmONS
*1. All art works selected for exhibition shall remain In the custody of the Bank for the entire
period of the exhibition.
,2. Artists are requested to indicate whether they wish to sell their work and to submit a
reasonable suggested price for each piece. All sales by the Bank, on behalf of artists, will
be considered binding.

A panel of judges will select the award winning entries which will be eligible to receive cash
prizes.
$fholarhlps will be awarded to deserving artists based on their overall presentation and the
assessment by the Judges. The scholarships will be tenable at the College of The Bahamas or
Saccredited Collegeoutside The Bahaafor the study of art.

Governors Choice Award
Thi. will be presented :o the artist selected by the Governor as having the most
outstanding display of artwork in the Competition and Exhibition.
SBeParticipating School
Th recipient of this award will be the school with the best overall participation in
S terms of the quality of work.
SSpeal Schorsp Award
This award will be given, .In addition to the usual scholarship awards, to the
deserving Individual for completion.of a two year Associate's Degree In Art at The
College of The Bahamas.
:Qalties such as originality of essio creative use of materials and presentation are among
ome l'of tuf citrtia rfsalieri The judges reserve the right to dsqiual iy eWityWhere there
Is doubt as to authenticity.
'ihe Central Bank stipulates that award winning entries will become iteproperty of the Bank;
participantss therefore enter this competition In agreement that the Central Bank be allowed to
displayy winning pieces in any forum Including but not limited to the Central Bank's webslte. All
other entries will be offered for sale during.the exhibition.

Entry Forms may be obtained from the CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS, or from webslte or
*,fm local news papers and in the Family islands at the ADMINISTRATOR'S OFFICE or the
DISTRICT EDUCATION OFFICES of the MINISTRY OF EDUCATION. One 5" by7" photograph of one
of the entries must be submitted with the Entry Form by FRIDAY, 8 September, 2006.
'`Al entries must be delivered io the Central Bank of the Bahamas no later than FRIDAY, 20*
*"-ODcWer, 2006. "' .--*- --....... -.
No: AMl uitres submitted aWfjubdged, howve. pnly works of the highest quality
ndpmtsanted In accordance ath the guidelines will be exhblited. Wors not
exhbllad w he strd only for 60 days after opening ofexhlbitlon. The
Central ank of The Bhamas will not be responsible for works left beyond this
period.
ENTRY FORM

Nam e of Artist ... ....................................... ................................ ....... ...........
Age of Artist:............. .................................Date of Birth.......................... ......................
A of Birth :...................................... ....................................................................................



S .: . ............... ........................ .
. ARE YOU PRESENTLY STUDYING ART?........................................................................................
IF YES. WHERE?.......... .....I................ .................. ........................ ....:........ ...........
MARK !- APPROPRIATE CATEGORY:
OPEN CATEGORY:......................................... HIGH SCHOOL............................ ......
Name of Art Teacher-- .............. ... ............................. .... ... ...... ........... ..........
TITLE AND PRICE OF WORKS TO BE ENTERED:
S............ ..................... ... .. .... ........ .......... .................. .............


S 2.


...... ..,..... .... ..,.................
INDICATE MEDIAOF WORK: .....................................................................................
Should any of my entries be'chosen for either of the awards available, I agree to allow the Central
Bank of the Bahamas to display that entry (those entries) in any forum including but not limited
,to the Central Bank's webslte.


Signature:......................... ...............................Date........................... ........
ENTRY TAG

(TO BE SUBMITTED WITH EACH ART WORK)

Kindly type or print please

Name of Artst (Mr./Ms./Mrs.)
First Name: ........................................ initial ............... Last Name: ......................................... .........
Title of Work: ........................................................................................ ........................................
Telephone Contact: ............................................ (H)................................................... (WORK/SCHOOL
Suggested Price: ............................ .......---*....

Signature: ................................................................ ... ........... DATE .............................. .............
Email Address: ......................................... ..
Name bf Art Teacher: ..................................... ......... .................
Nam e and Location of School: ...................................................... ................................................

Emergency Contact::
Nam e: ................. ........... :. .................. ................................ Hom e Phone .............................
W ork ............................................................. O their ............................................... ..................


THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS


RECEIVED: .......................................... ................... DATE: ...........................................


The aft g* d Bea~T.u
TWTee* AI MtCmysaw a iEt. 20=0


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising finds for a '
good cause, campaigning '
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


CUSTOMER SERVICES OFFICER




Duties: Candidate must be able to provide exceptional
customer services including but not limited to:
meeting and communicating \\ ith customers;
accurate and timely processing of customer
transactions; monitoring of transactions for
potential money laundering and deputizing for
Department Head whilst the latter is absent on
leave.


Requirements:


BA degree in Business or Finance
A minimum of five years Customers Services
experience within the Financial Services industry
Commercial Orientation
Excellent Communication Skills (Written and verbal)
Excellent Organizational Skills
Excellent Interpersonal Skills
Computer Literate (MS Office)
Working knowledge of Money Laundering and
Financial Transaction laws and regulations
A Team .Paye-r, .


Fringe Benefits include:


Life and Health coverage
Pension


Interested persons should submit their Resume along with a
police Certificate and two (2) Character References to:


Manager Human Resources
HSBC
P.O.Box N-4917
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 502-2566/2577


..................................... ............................................


-- --m


Friday, 07 July 2006







PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 5, 2006


UK's 1bn deficit warns


Hotel room revenues


Bahamas over health plan rise 9.6% to $1


FROM page 3B
people. Too many treat the
cost of providing health care
as a burden."
Yet critics of the scheme
have argued that the Govern-
ment and its Blue Ribbon
Commission zeroed in on NHI
as the solution to the Bahamas'
healthcare financing, equality
and accessibility issues to the
exclusion of all other options.
While few would argue that
something needs to be done to
provide accessible healthcare
for poor Bahamians, they
believe that NHI is not the way
to go, given the problems
developed nations such as the
UK and Canada have encoun-
tered with their own similar
.systems.
The Nassau Institute, the
economic think-tank, said a
consultant it had engaged had
produced a 60-page report that
analysed the Blue Ribbon


Commission report and exam-
ined alternative options. The
report will be fully available
by mid-July.
The Nassau Institute report
said: "The report makes rec-
ommendations that will avoid
negative consequences of esca-
lating costs and the shortfall
of funding, inevitable if the
Blue Ribbon plan is adopted.
"We hope for a serious dis-
cussion on a subject critical to
individual healthcare needs
and the health of the Bahami-
an economy in the years
ahead.
"Currently, the Bahamas has
an opportunity to avoid the
socialist-communist systems
typical of most other countries.
Bahamians have a right to be
free to choose their physicians,
and their incomes left alone so
they can pay for the services
they require."
To encourage business sup-


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ERNST JEROME OF CHARLES
VINCENT ST, ENGLESTON, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 5TH day of JULY, 2006 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


The Kidney Foundation of the
Bahamas cordially invites the
general public to
attend a lecture
On THURSDAY July 6th 2006 at
7:30 p.m. at The College of the
Bahamas, U.W.I Restaurant

Topic: "ADVANCES IN KIDNEY
TRANPLANTATION and the
PROSPECTS FOR KIDNEY
TRANSPLANTATION IN THE BAHAMAS"

Lecture: Dr. Phillip BELITSKY
Professor Emeritus
Faculty of Medicine
Dalhousie University,
Nova Scotia, Canada.

EVERY dialysis patient, their families and
friends, as well as doctors, nurses, social
workers, counselors, health care providers,
MOH officials and the general public should
make a special effort to attend this important
event.

This is a groundbreaking milestone in
Medicine for the Bahamas, SO PLAN NOT
TO MISS THIS ONE!!!

Introductory remarks by Dr. Ada Thompson,
president of the KFB and Dr. Robin Roberts,
Consultant Urologist and Transplant Surgeon
in the MOH.


port for the NHI plan, Dr Not-
tage said last week: Good
health is an essential pillar on
which to build a country, build
its economy and ensure the
productivity of its people.......
"In reality, health is all of
our business. Good health is a
bedrock, a vital resource, a
pre-condition for national
development and advances."
Dr Nottage dangled a fur-
ther carrot under business
community noses, pledging
that NHI would provide
affordable and universal access
to healthcare for all Bahamians
and legal residents.
He added that good health
enabled workers to be more
productive and take less time
off work, while NHI would
enable them to spend more
money on purchasing goods
and services by reducing
healthcare costs, providing
another boost for the econo-
my.
Yet he did not mention the
2.65 per cent contribution rate
that will be levied on workers
and deducted from payrolls as
NHI contributions, plus the
matching 2.65 per cent per
employee to be contributed by
employers. This will effective-
ly act as another tax on the
economy in all but name.


FROM page 1B

The Central Bank said the
decline "reflected continued
weakness in cruise tourism",
with arrivals down by 6.8 per
cent. This outpaced the 5.4 per
cent rise in air arrivals. Howev-
er, air arrivals have a much
higher per capital spend that
cruise passengers, standing at
around $1,050 compared to $68,
and their spending often has a
greater trickle down effect.
The Central Bank said total
visitor arrivals to New Provi-
dence and.the Family Islands
fell by 4.6 per cent and 8 per
cent respectively, while Grand
Bahama saw arrivals figures


expand by 15.3 per.cent.
Sea arrivals to that island rose
by 24.6 per cent, although its
performance was made to look
better by the 2005 compara-
tives, when Grand Bahama was
still recovering from the 2004
hurricane season.
The Central Bank conclud-
ed: "Economic activity contin-
ued to be stimulated by robust
tourism sector investment,
domestic construction activity
and firming in.consumer
demand. In addition, improve-
ments in stopover visitors, com-
bined with higher expenditures,
supported a further modest
expansion in tourism output
during the year."
This was backed up by the


FROM page 1B
was allegedly during that inci-
dent in August 1999.
The Robertsons grew disen-


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that SHERLA THURENE OF FIRST
ST., COCONUT GROVE AVE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 28TH day of JUNE, 2006to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MAYBELL MOREAU OF MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 28th day of June
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JONAS JEAN OF GARDEN
HILLS #1, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 5TH day of JULY, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that PEDRO ERMILIS OF MUTTON
FISH DRIVE CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 5TH day of JULY, 2006 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


W 2M0. 2PMG.40a Bahamlin partnernhip. wh Bahabmian member firm of KPG InI rmmional. a Swiss coopaeratvi All rights reserved.


chanted with Cat Island, alleg-
ing they had been targeted by
those who resented their anti-
drup opinions and opposition
to the fact that an airstrip near
the club was allegedly being
used during the night hours by
planes from the south usingCat
Island as a transshipment point
for cocaine and marijuana.
At the time, Mr Robertson
wrote to then Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham urging him to


take all the "necessary steps" to
ensure that justice was done in
relation to the attack on him
and his wife.
The couple launched a web-
site that outraged Cat Islanders,
who claimed it was designed to
destroy their island by smear-,
ing their reputations. They
wrote a book, Sand Money, to
inform the public about their,
alleged experience and closed,
the resort.


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, PHILLIP JOE
JR., intendto change my name to PHILLIP JEROME
PINDER. If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections
-4othe-Chief Passport Officer. P.O.Box N-742,-Nassau;
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date.
of publication of this notice.


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, MICHELLE CLARKE, ofl
Farrington Road, Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas, Legal
Guardians of the infant ANGEL ANASTICA MUNROE intend
to change her name to ANGEL ANASTICA CLARKE. If there -,
are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you.
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.

Legal Notice

NOTICE


HORMUD INVESTMENT TRADING LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hearby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
the 27th day of March 2006. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA, CORP. INC.,
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE


M'LORD LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hearby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
the 9th day of June 2006. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.




ARGOSA, CORP. INC.,
(Liquidator)


p.
~> ,


59.1m


Central Bank's review of, ,
domestic economic develop-, .
ments during the 2006 first '.
quarter, which found that hotel i
room night sales at the major
resort properties rose by 4.9 per
cent in the period to March 31,.'.
compared to a 6.7 per cent,
decline in 2005.
"As this outpaced a 3.7 per
cent boost in available invento-
ry, average room occupancy
rates firmed to 76.2 per cent
from 75.3 per cent in the same
period last year," the Central.
Bank said.
"In the context of room gains ,
of 7.94 per cent, the average <
nightly room rate at major
properties also appreciated fur-
ther by 2.9 per cent to $183."


Flrd inetrspa


CatIslnddevlopen


Are you looking for a new challenge?

We are currently seeking talented and highly motivated candidates to join our Information Technology ("IT") Services and
information Risk Management ("IRM") practices.
IT Services and IRM Asoclate
Successful candidates for the dual role of IT Services and IRM Associate will have a minimum of a Bachelor's degree from
an accredited institution and one to two years of experience. Exceptional writing and documentation skills are required.
Experience with Active Directory, TCP/IP, network and application security skills, and backup software preferred. Duties will
include technical support for staff, management of backed IT infrastructure, IT audit compliance testing, change
management recording, and security documentation. MCP and/or CCNA certification and experience preferred.
This is an excellent opportunity to broaden your professional experience in a varied practice that offers competitive
compensation and benefits packages.
Applicants should submit a cover letter, resume, copy of their transcripts and copies of any relevant.certifications, to: KPMG, Human Resources Manager, P.O.
Box N123, Nassau, Bahamas or tdavies@koma.com.bs.


AUDIT a TAX a ADVISORY


PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 5, 2006
i


'BUSINES


-I -I--


I


THE TRIBUNE


SI





WEDNESDAY, JULY 5, 2006, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


JULY 5, 2006


1 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

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Ii_______________________________


One Piece One Price

MULTI. PURPOSE


Tel: 9 6 6 3

FURNITURE
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WEDNESDAY EVENING





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on show


* SOCCER
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

THE expansion of the
National Soccer Academy
summer programme has
Bahamas Football Association
(BFA) members looking for-
ward to the upcoming season.
The programme which is in
it's fourth year, is used as a
feeder programme for the var-
ious national teams, and also
an introductory programme
to peak the interest level in
the country.
More than 200 campers
have signed on for the pro-
gramme, which started on
Monday past and scheduled
to end July 21st. Daily sessions
are from 9am-3pm with lunch
and refreshments being pro-
vided by the association.
Instructions at the camp will
be given by national coaching
staff who are FIBA qualified.

Maturity

According to executive
member Lionel Haven the
summer programme will assist
in the development of all
interested soccer athletes and
help bring maturity to soccer's
national programmes.
Haven said: "This pro-
gramme is something that we
developed for individual play-
er's development to produce
teams, but it is designed to
produce players that can play
on a team.
"These players can fit into
any tea', not just one team..
The ski s learned here can
assist with their development.
That has always been our mis-
sion to make sure that our
players are well rounded.
Teaching discipline, determi-
nation and implementing skills
they can use throughout their
careers."
The National Soccer Acad-
emy has opened their doors
to several Primary School
teams, who are also involved


* BOYS U-9
Aaron Levarity
Andre Levarity
Asher Johnson
Christian Cargill
Christopher Nottage
Denzel Bazard
Devaughn Williamson
Donovan Williamson
Eltin Hart
George Charite
Ivan Rolle
Jeremy Weech
Marcellus Wilkinson
Michael Robinson
Rory McCarroll
Stuart Hanna
Tre Rolle
Tyler Eldon

* BOYS U-11
Alex DfAguiliar
Dikembe Williams
Dylan Christie
George Rolle
Harold Antor
Jahlil Johnson
Joseph Lockhart
Justin Higgs
Juwon Forbes
Kayle Darrell
Kemsey Sylvestre
Malik Williams
Marco Borsetto
Nesley Olibrice
Ondre Cargill
Raymond Souder
Romane Hinds
Timothy Munnings
Wilner Desir

* BOYS U-13
Alex Inferenta
Andre Tunrquest
Ansenio Gibson
Daniel Lockhart
Duane Beneby
Dwayne Miller
James Carey
Matthew Coistantakis.
Michael Butler
Nathan Taylor
Preston Rolle
Quayde Smith.
Shaquille Williais
Stefan Nembhard
Terry Delancy
Timothy Smith
Weston Saunders

BOYS U-17
Adam Miller
Ambry Moss
Andrew Pratt
Bristol Hanna
Chris Larson
Craig Smith
Duran Mitchell
Ehren Hanna


in the BFA's Primary School
programme.
The camp caters to children
from the ages of five-years-
old to 17.
Haven revealed that the
growth in the National Soccer
Academy will inspire the asso-
ciation to break the national
programmes into two divi-
sions, even though a national
roster can only hold 12 play-
ers.
Haven added: "It is some-
thing that has4been anticipated
by all the kids involved in the
programme. Each year it
grows in it's prestige and that
is mainly because there are
more and more kids vying for
the few positions that we do
have available.
"This year we have
increased in numbers where
we have 18 slots available in
each national team's age
group. When you only have
these slots available and you
have a big number coming out
from New Providence, Grand
Bahama and starting in Sep-
tember the programmes in
Abaco and Eleuthera, grow-
ing in its prestige is a more of
an understatement.
"The kids look forward to
it especially with the sponsor-
ship set up. Based on the
arrangements the association
signed on with the kids are
being fully outfitted these
they get to keep as a memen-
to for their participation in the
camp. So it now has a profes-
sional side of it even though
this is not a professional camp.
Every year we try to improve
it just a little bit more."
At the conclusion of the
programmes, participants will
receive awards and prizes.
There will be several match-
ups in each division scheduled
for the closing day.


(ALL PHOTOS BY
FELIPE MAJOR/
TRIBUNE STAFF)


Frantz Duna
Franz Taylor
Jared Higgs
Junior Veuis
Justin Sealey
Laquardo Newbold
Michael Bethel
Nicholas Vonham
Nolan Cancino
Ramon Strachan
Raymius Johnson
Shem Moss
Sidney Watkins
Tereko Lewis
Terrell Sandiford

* GIRLS U-11
Acacia Simms
Burdecia Sands
Dawn Dean
Deantrinique Whymns
Dena Butler
Destinee Mitchell
Eden Taylor
Jackie Lewis
Jolanda Carey
Kalie Ferguson
Keisha McCartney
Kennadi Carbin
Lauren Haven
SLyric Culmer
Sapphire Porras
Sarah McClure
Shelby Carbin
Vanaillan Walker

* GIRLS U-15
Ainba Moss
Ashlee Smith
Brittany Allen
Caroline Kiriaze
Darelle Ferguson
Jasmine McDonald
Temple Christian
Jessica Albury
Jonquel Jones
Karen Wert
Keenan Brownrigg
Kelly Johnson
Keshante Roker
Kimberly Johnson
Lauren Brown
Makeria Gibson
Myra Moncur
Sarah Rolle
Shannon Hutton
Vashti Simmons
Whitney Turnquest

* GOALKEEPERS
Courtney Treco
DfNae Capron
Dominique Bannister
Keith Miller
Michael Bellot
Raynaldo Sturrup
Sauve Rolle
Shari Clarke
Sherma McDonald


Silky skiHNl


I


I Natinal Acdemy apticiants.


TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 5, 2006


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WEDNESDAY, JULY 5, 2006


SECTION




Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


ASSAILING
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports
Reporter .
PRESIDENT of the
Bahamas Boat Owners
and Sailors Association
Phillip McPhee is predict-
ing the biggest turnout for
any regatta, this weekend.
Using the picturesque
setting of the Olympic
Racing Park's Harbour in
Morgan's Bluff, Andros,
McPhee said that the inter-
est level for the 14th annu-
al North Andros Regatta
has doubled along with the
sailors' participation.
The historic regatta,
which is being held in con-
junction with the Indepen-
dence Celebrations, will
get underway today, with
more than 24 sloops get-
ting set to hit the water..
The sloops will partici-
pate in three classes, A-C.
There will be six boats
competing for the crown in
the A class, eight in the B
class and 10 in the C class.
Heading the list in the C
class will be defending
champion Bulla Reg;,rep-
resenting the island of-
Exuma. But boats like the
WG Thunderbird and
Lady Eunice, Fugitive and
Barbarian will be looking
to dethrone the champion
for the crown.
In the A class the new
boat the Red Hot Thun-
derbird, Red Stripe,
Lucayan Lady, Who Dat,
Good News and Pieces of
Eight.
Boats in the B class will
have to ward off the charge
by the Sailing Barber Elea-
zor Johnson and the Cam-
pari Lady Nathalie for the
title. The Campari Lady
Nathalie is the defending
champion. Also competing
in this class will be the
Ants Nest, Ansbacher
Queen, Cobra, Barbarian,
Williams Auto, Passion
and the Eudeva.
McPhee said: "This is
the 33rd celebrations for
Independence, it is really
the Independence Regatta
so we usually join hands
with the Independence
Regatta.
"What a lot of people
don't know is Regatta is
the national sport so we
will be expecting some
exciting races because you
have all the top boats in
the various classes compet-
ing.
"This regatta is going to
be a special one, thousands
of people have scheduled
their holiday weekend cel-
ebrations around this.
There is no accommoda-
tion left in Andros, all the
hotels have reported to us
that they have been
booked out solid.
"This is from.Morgan's
Bluff all the way to Fresh
Creek."
The 14th annual Regatta
is being held in the honour
of Algernon Allen, the
minister who created the
Regatta Village. Frank
Hanna will also be
honoured during the festiv-
ities.
Hanna was the first
chairman of the All
Andros Regatta.
Boats competing in the
Regatta will leave for the
Olympic Racing Park
every two hours.
The Regatta will official-
ly start on Thursday after-
noon with Minister Vin-
cent Peet's Ocean Race for
all C class boats and will
continue on through the
long holiday weekend.
The awards presentation
will be held on Sunday
night.


Know es anil Nestor a








sqr Uae re laraton Opatcp


* TENNIS
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
IT WILL probably go down as the
longest match that Mark Knowles and
Daniel Nestor have played together.
In the quarter-finals of the men's
doubles at Wimbledon, England,
Knowles and Nestor played for five
hours before their match against
Simon Aspelin of Sweden and Todd
Perry of Australia was suspended in
the fifth inning because of darkness.
The two teams will be back today to
break an 11-11 tie to decide the win-
ners, who will have to win by two
points, in order to advance to the
semifinal.
Before the match was called, the
two teams split the four sets they
played. Aspelin and Perry won the
first set 7-5, but Knowles and Nestor
bounced back for a 6-3 win.
Aspelin and Perry took a 2-1 lead
with a 7-6 (5) victory, but once again,
Knowles and Nestor staved off elimi-
nation with a 6-3 decision to even the
tie.
Knowles was unavailable for com-
ments, but his mother, Vickie, who
watched from the sidelines, said it was
unbelievable tennis played by both
teams.
An exhausted Vickie Knowles
claimed that "It was just a dog fight.
They both were playing very, very
well. It was just a great match to
watch.


"Who knows, hopefully we can pull
it out (today), but these guys are play-
ing very well. It was about 93 degrees
on. the court and about 100 degrees
inside.
"I don't know how either of tho'e'
teams survived out there."
Vickie Knowles admitted that :h''s
read about some of the marathon.
matches, but she's never seen one like
what she witnessed yesterday live on,
the court.
Unlike the other sets, players don't.
have the luxury of playing in a tie.
breaker in the fifth set at Wimbledot.
They just need to win by two points.,

Suspending
However, having played such a lon'~
and grueling match, neither team Wa,
able to pull off the final two poiin
margin before darkness fell, suspeind-
ing the remainder of the match until-
today.
Waiting in the wings are the top.
seeded team of American twin broth-
ers Bob and Mike Bryan. They earned
their berth with a 7-6 (4), 7-6 (5), 6-1.
triumph over the Czech Republic'
team of Lukas Dlouhy and Pavel
Vizner.
Also today, Knowles and Amert-
can legend Martina Navratilova, seed-
ed No.8, will play their third round
match in the mixed doubles against
the team of Amdy Ram and Vera.
Zvonareva of Israel.


* MARK KNOWLES will team up will Daniel Nestor today to decide the match '
(FILE Photo: Felip6 Major/Tribune staff)


......................................... .... . . .............. .....



Youngsters on the ball for summerii


., ._ ... ?.. . ...: -" " ,.- -- i 7 o -- ' A


THE expansion of the National Soccer Academy summer programme has Bahamas Football Association (BFA) members looking forward to the upcoming
season. Yesterday youngsters practised their skills at the Baillou Hill Sporting Complex. SEE PAGES 8 & 9B
(Photo: Felipd Major/Tribune staff


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PAGE 3F


THE TRIBUNE


INDEENENC.SPPEMET 00


The challenges the Bahamas


fac(


* By TRIBUNE
STAFF WRITER
THIRTY-THREE years
after independence, the
Bahamas continues to flourish
as one of the most impressive
post-colonial success stories in
the Caribbean region.
But it would.be extremely
foolish to imagine that high liv-
ing standards and economic
buoyancy are the ultimate hall-
marks of a thriving society.
The truth is that this country
has many social challenges to
meet and a lot of maturing to do
before it can rest easy. And it
finds itself in a position where,
in some areas, inaction could
lead to major trouble.
Take, for instance, law and
order. Over-the-hill pastor Rev
C B Moss believes the Bahamas
is only ten to 15 years behind
Jamaica and Trinidad in becom-
ing one of the crime hotspots
of the region.

Tourism
If he's right, this could have a
massive impact on the country's
economy. For while Jamaica
and Trinidad have other indus-
tries to fall back on, the
Bahamas has only tourism,
which is notoriously fragile in
the face of any kind of disor-
der.
Put simply, if the Bahamas
wants to continue to benefit
from tourist dollars in the com-
ing decades, it will have to con-
front its crime explosion with
true resolve. At the moment,
the signs are not encouraging.
Bahamians are growing
increasingly restive over law
.and order generally, especially
in regard to enforcement and
the integrity of the courts.
There is serious disquiet
among many that the police and
SD.. i nie Force are at least part-
Sly, ..nd probably largely, cor.-
rupt. At times, it seems certain


s on its 33rd birthday



Emphasis should be placed on the nation's future


areas of law enforcement are a
greater hazard to society at
large than the criminals


bthe ar~ t.


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too, is under fire. Concern is
growing that the judicial process
is not always serving the public


ing to coin- eood.
Social. the Bahamainis is seln
The court b\ man\ as iundamcntall d.\s-
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'' include ing

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SA


r .


incest and child molestation -
have run rampant.
Single-parent families are
nov. more the norm ithn the
exception. and the 24-\eiar-olJ
grrl ndnotlhei the product oI
children giving birth io children
- i a disturbing re.alt\
Mlejn\Mhile. the i.iles % ho
are supposed to gi\e a lead are
not here to be seen. i while man\
bov.s 2oS\\ into aimless i1u -
biliies.


From these fetid spawning
grounds, more criminals will
emerge in the coming years,
urged along b\ a growing dis-
pia iy in healthh and continued
suppiession and margnalisation
ot the poor.
The Bahamas is subject not
onlN to home-gro%%n troubles.
but trials imposed from outside
its borders, too.
There is no doubt that mass
immigration \\ill ha\e a high\
significant impact on Bahami-
an society o\er the next
Shalf-centur\.


st
'''i i ~ L ''::jl '


-'--'a t
"The .... +
:I truth. is tfat
This country has many
social challenges to meet and a lot of maturing to do
before it can rest easy. And it finds itself in a position where,
in some areas, inaction could lead to major trouble."


Already, a sizeable Haitian-
Bahamian community is in
place and with sloops arriving
from Haiti every week "cre-
olisation" will continue apace
until the influx is harnessed and
the repatriation process is
speeded up.
Most observers feel, however,
that Haitian influence is now a
reality of modern Bahamian life
and will continue to be so for
eternity. Whatever action is tak-
en now, it will be too little too
late with limited likelihood of
reversing a process in place for
the best part of 50 years.

Desperation
An unpalatable off-shoot of
this situation is an angry collec-
tion of stateless youhg males
who feel the system is against
them. Their desperation
could mean big trouble for
the Bahamas a decade or
two down the line.
Tied into all these diffi-
culties are educational stan-
dards deemed certain to
exacerbate rather than
enhance whatever goes on
now.
The disclosure that "F" for
failure is now the mean aver-
age exam performance in our
public secondary schools does
not bode well for society's
recovery.
During a 30-year period when
the nation was supposed to be
making its way in the world as
an independent entity, govern-
ment mismanagement ensured
that children were denied their
educational rights.
As a result, schools are turn-
ing out thousands of young peo-
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PAGE 4F


THE TRIBUNE


Work to be done before



Bahamas can rest easy

FROM page three
ple every year who are, quite
simply, unemployable because
they can't read, write or do sim- .
ple maths properly. "
Add to all this the :
Bahamas' appalling rating in
Amnesty International's
human rights appraisals and x 'i
it's easy to see that the %.,1 ,
Bahamas is far from perfect.
Fox Hill Prison and i
Carmichael Road detention
centre remain searing indict-
ments not only of society as
it stands, but the kind of
people we want to be.
If there is a bright side to
the gloom, then it's this:
there is still time to retrieve
what many outsiders see as a
potentially catastrophic situ-
ation.
Society
A crime-ridden, poorly-
educated society in which
children grow up without
fathers is not what.politicians
of the 1960s foresaw when
the first steps were taken
towards nationhood. Yet this
is the scenario taking shape
greed, corruption and a wor-
rying loss of trust between
the people and those agen- --
cies that are supposed to
protect them. ,
As the Bahamas marks its
33rd birthday, the emphasis -,-
needs to be not on what has
been achieved to date, but
what needs to be achieved in A .
future. V
In truth, there is still a
long, long way to go before i SCENES ol jubilation in Ba3 Street as decorated floats make their ,sa3 slhrough tlie crol ds at the height of the 1973 Independence Celebrations.
we reach the point where Bunting and trimmings festooned the don nto%% n area as Nassau got into the swing of the occasion, the biggest single event in the country's history. "It
self-congratulation is in was a fun :time," said one Bahamian %iho recalls the occasion well. "Everyone was in carnival mood."
order.


Happy 33rd





Anniversary


From the
Management & Staff
of
Central Bank of The Bahamas


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PAGE 5F


THE TRIBUNE


INDEENENE UPPEMNT206.


COMMENTATOR George Mackey
* COMMENTATOR George Mackey


* THE AUTEC base at Andros


The death of a




unique voice in


Bahamian politics


THE death of George Mack-
ey early in 2006 silenced a
unique voice in Bahamian pol-
itics.
Apart from his long career
as PLP stalwart and Fox Hill
MP, Mr Mackey was known as
a wise commentator on nation-
al affairs.
His Saturday column in The
Tribune was eagerly awaited
by his many readers, who liked
his quiet and engaging style.
Mr Mackey's collection of
columns, published in book
form, won many admirers and
he was in the process of com-
piling another book at the time
of his death.
"Honest George", as he
became known to friends and
colleagues, began his working
life as a Tribune linotype oper-
ator.
One of his earliest jobs \ as
to set the editorials of the late
publisher-editor Sir Etienne
Dupuch, from whom he
learnt much about the art of
composition.
Another prominent poli -
ical name to die during the
year was Livingston Coak-
ley, former Minister of
Education.
Mr Coakley, described
as one of the most hon-
ourable of the old PLPs,
suffered a stroke before
passing away aged 80..
A former student of
his said: "He was a
great educator and,
even more important-
ly, a man of great
integrity."
The death of
Bahamian songbird 4
Kayla Lockhart Edwards was


a major blow to the nation's
cultural life.
This multi-talented woman
was an inspiration to all cre-
ative people in the country.
But, as Sir Arthur Foulkes not-
ed in his Tribune column, she
was "inadequately recognized",
even though she received a Sil-
ver Jubillee Award in 1977.
4t
THE ever-interesting Sir
Harry Oakes murder mystery
sprang to the fore again dur-
ing the year, with no fewer than
three books appearing on the
subject.


. -


Blood and Fire, by Tribune
managing editor John Marquis,
enjoyed a highly successful
launch in Nassau just before
Christmas, with more than
2,000 hardback copies being
sold in the first two weeks. It
has since done well on Ama-
zon and is now in Nassau shops
as a trade paperback.
Who Killed Sir Harry? by
Eric Minns was a fictionalised
version of events and also
enjoyed good exposure local-
ly.
A Serpent in Eden by James
Owen was published in Lon-
don last summer.
So far about
eight
books
Shave been
published
about the
murder,
Which made
headlines all
over the
world in the
summer of
19'43.'

E AN amaz-
ing sculpture
Near Clifton by
Bahamian artist
A ntonius
Roberts has
attracted much
.. attenuon this year.
Sacred Space
consists of several
car\ ed casuarina
stumps depicting
African women
looking eastwards
towards the dark
continent.


Near this spot, African slaves
were herded ashore by traders
in the 17th century.
Mr Roberts was in Germany
earlier this year replicating his
idea there. He was invited over
after European tourists
expressed an interest in his
work.
THE famous Caf6 Mar-
tinique on Paradise island was
revived with the opening of the
impressive Marina Village,
which has become a favourite
meeting place for locals and
tourists. It's one of several
restaurants in the colourful new
development adjoining
Atlantis.
AUTEC at Andros was in
the news again over the last
year, with locals suggesting it
is the centre of a cancer scare in
the area. Environmentalists
remain concerned about the
base's sonar-testing activities
and their affects on whales, sev-
eral of which washed up on
Bahamian beaches, having
apparently become disorien-
tated.
THE government's
National Health Insurance plan
caused concern among private
insurers, but is expected to be
implemented in the coming
months.
IN June, several malaria
'cases were confirmed in Exuma
with seven more suspected dur-
ing the following week. Min-
istry of Health experts moni-
tored the situation and patients
were flown to Nassau for blood
tests.


LENNOX PATON

Counsel and Attorneys-at-Law, Notaries Public

Nassau London


YnY~eza~uzee


Nassau
P. O. Box N-4875
Fort Nassau Centre
Malborough Street
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tel. (242) 502.5000


London
No. 1 Cornhill
London EC3V 3ND
England
United Kingdom
Tel. (44) 207.743.6490


info@lennoxpaton.com
www.lennoxpaton.com


jJd


(W4


Adafir-
4prwl








THE TRIBUNE'I


PAGE 6F


INDPEDECESP PLEMNT00


What choices face an independent




Bahamas seeking a government?


.f
t-



'I
*1


* PERRY Christie: How long can he remain as Prime Minister?


* HUBERT Ingraham: Can he revitalise the FNM to recapture
power in the next election?


* OBIE Wilchcombe: The frontrunner on the list.of who could
replace Perry Christie as the next leader of the PLP


* By TRIBUNE STAFF
WRITER

LESS than a year away from
the next general election, the
Bahamas finds itself in a
quandary. Does it stick with a
government noted primarily for
doing nothing, or go with an
opposition whose performance
is less than stellar?
Only since it dawned on the
PLP that polling day was loom-
ing has there been much sign
of animation. Before then, crit-
ics were calling it "the good for
nothing government" an
administration seemingly paral-
ysed by the enormity of its sup-
porters' expectations.
That there is widespread dis-
enchantment among the PLP's


fan-base is beyond doubt. The
overall impression is that Prime
Minister Perry Christie and his
ministers have been disturbing-
ly passive, with no long-term
vision and few ideas. And
instead of delivering on its
promises of openness and trans-
parency, the government has
been furtive and secretive in the
extreme always a sign that it
has much to hide.
The electorate's problem is
not so much that the PLP needs
ditching that seems obvious -
but whether the hastily reassem-
bled FNM has what it takes to
dislodge them.
Whatever its weaknesses, the
PLP has always enjoyed a solid
core of support which identifies
totally with its underlying phi-


losophy a crude "Bahamas for
Bahamians" credo underpinned
by an anti-foreign mindset.
The FNM, on the other hand,
is a hybrid party formed from
what were originally opposing
political beliefs. Nonetheless, it
gave the Bahamas the best
decade of its post-colonial life,
saving the country from the
depradations of the Pindling era
and restoring its reputation
among international observers.
The question now is whether
Hubert Ingraham a former
prime minister restored to lead-
ership under duress can revi-
talise his forces for what could
be an extremely dirty political
skirmish.
Anti-PLP interests hope sin-
cerely that he can, but they are


not exactly full of optimism.
One leading professional told
The Tribune: "My fear is that
too much stress is being laid on
Mr Ingraham. After all, here is
a man who has suffered one
heart attack and whose health
cannot be taken for granted.
"The truth is that, outside of
Mr Ingraham, the FNM doesn't
appear to have a great deal to
offer. It doesn't even have a
line-up of potential leaders if
he should falter. That's not very
encouraging."
The PLP, too, has its health
worries. Mr Christie's stroke
last year shook the party and
slowed up the prime minister.
And it lent emphasis to the sug-
gestion that, in both major par-
ties, it's the next generation who


will probably have to step up
to the plate before the end of
the next governmental term in
2012.
In the PLP's case, there is no
shortage of contenders. Tourism
Minister Obie Wilchcombe is
fast emerging as the most plau-
sible option, though Cynthia
Pratt as official deputy can't be
discounted.
Behind these two come
Attorney General Allyson May-
nard-Gibson, Health Minister
Dr Bernard Nottage and For-
eign Affairs Minister Fred
Mitchell.
Though Mr Mitchell can safe-
ly be discounted "Even the
PLP isn't that daft," said one
media commentator the party
still has choices, whereas the


FNM seems to have only Brent".
Symonette (seen as potentially
divisive), Tommy Turnquest
(voter-unfriendly, according toa
his critics) and Dion Foulkes.
("Far too lightweight," said one,
observer).
"What it boils down to," said,
one analyst, "is that Ingraham is,
an all-or-nothing leader. With-,
out him, the FNM is in big trou7
ble. Brent Symonette, whatever
his qualities, is white and we4
still don't know whether the^
Bahamas is sufficiently matured
to accept a white man as prinm
minister."
Also lacking, according toq
some sources, is a single issue,
on which electoral fortunes,
could turn. The FNM needs a
baton with which it can beat the


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PAGE 7F


THE TRIBUNE


Do either the PLP or the FNM have what it takes to run the country effectively?


* ALLYSON Maynard-Gibson: Still a contender for the PLP
leadership


* SHANE Gibson: Taking new role as Minister of Immigration
seriously


* FRED Mitchell: The Minister of Foreign Affairs is not
thought of as in the running for the top spot in the PLP


government over the head. If it
hss one, it has yet to make an
appearance and no-one is
holding their breath.
"As the election draws near,
someone needs to capture the
electorate's imagination. While
there are plenty of issues out
there law and order, social
problems, immigration no-one
has grasped the nettle in a way
that will set the country alight in
tihne for the campaign."
'It's probably because immi-
giation and law and order are
seen as potentially the domi-
nant themes of any future
debate that two reshuffled min-
isters have suddenly sprung to
life.
'Allyson Maynard-Gibson, in
her new role as attorney gen-
eral, is now trying to breathe
life into the courts and speed
up the judicial process. With
some prisoners waiting on
r6mand for four or five years
just to get into court, it's clear
that'fctidn is needed.
"Shane Gibson, former hous-


ing minister, is taking his new
immigration duties seriously,
organising police swoops on
communities where "illegals"
are thought to live.
There is no doubt that law
and order and immigration are
highly emotive issues, and grass-
roots Bahamians will be looking
for results in both areas when
they come to decide how to
vote.
But will the actions of the
two Gibsons be sufficient to
outweigh the prevailing impres-
sion of the PLP, which is that it
is basically a clueless "caretak-
er" government handed power
on a platter by an FNM blinded
by arrogance and complacen-
cy.
For Mr Christie, the election
will prove a powerful test, not
only of his own health, but also
the virtues or otherwise of his
consensus style of government.
After two maximum leaders -
Pindling and Ingraham the
Bahamas in 2002 gained a pre-
mier with a vastly different


style. This could have been
interpreted as part of the matur-
ing process. But has Mr Christie
been effective?
In his quiet way, he seems to



For Mr Christie,
the election will
prove a powerful
test, not only of
his own health,
but also the virtues
or otherwise of his
consensus style of
government,


have prevailed over the rowdier
voices all around and instilled a
modicum of moderation into a
Cabinet which might otherwise
have run riot. For that, he must


be given credit.
Alongside that, though, is
the old charge of indecision
and lack of resolve. Does he
have what it takes to define
the era in which he ruled?
Maybe not, but some
observers believe he might
well have provided that cru-
cial intermediate step between
the bad old days of quasi-dic-
tatorship and a future when
the Bahamian people will be
bold enough to ensure they
control the politicians rather
than the other way round.
A media source said: "The
way he stamped on Raynard
Rigby in the press freedom
uproar was probably his single
most impressive act in four
years as prime minister.
"It showed that, at base, he
was the mature man of the
world and Rigby the schoolboy
jumpjack who needed to be
neutralised. It happened swiftly
and most impressively.
Christie's stock rose a lot as a
result of that."


Even so, there are PLP ele-
ments who share Rigby's anti-
press stance. There is no doubt
they would favour a return to
the "be seen and not heard" era
of Pindling, when intimidation
and victimisation were still the
much-feared weapons of gov-
ernment.
But it was the FNM, remem-
ber, who brought freedom to
the airwaves and created the
climate for more open discourse
which prevails today.
Perhaps it's that freedom, and
the realisation that it could so
easily be snatched away, that
will drive voters into Mr Ingra-
ham's camp this time around.
The PLP has not yet been
able to detach itself from its past
sufficiently to convince the peo-
ple that it would not once more
revert to its old intimidatory
methods if returned to power
for a second term.
It's interesting that, in a
recent letter to the press, PLP
Senator Philip Galanis referred
to freedom of the press as a


privilege. That underlines his
party's mindset that freedom is
a privilege granted by politi-
cians to those who obey their
rules.
The implication is that priv-
ileges can be withdrawn if
those enjoying them fail to
adhere to standards laid down
by those in power. Even after
Mr Rigby was justifiably
ridiculed and humiliated by
The Tribune following his own
immature gaffe, Mr Galanis
apparently lacked the judg-
ment to take the hint.
The question now is just how
fragile the freedom of Bahami-
ans would become if the PLP
were allowed a second term.
% One source said: "Personally,
that's what frightens me most -
that the PLP will be so embold-
ened by a second victory that it
will start to revert to the tactics
of old. That would be a serious
backward step for the Bahamas
- and an enormous blow to our
chances of economic success in
the future."


Independence Bahamas




from the management and staff of


C.-'w


West Hill Street, P.O. Box N10246
Tel: 322-2796, 322-2797 Fax 326-6110
Email: graycliff@coralwave.com


DI
r1


,J


sb t










As Independence celebrations start,


THE tiny isle of Bimini suffered two major
blows over the past year the Chalk's plane
tragedy in Miami and the destruction by fire of
the famous Hemingway bar and museum.
Twenty died when a Chalk's seaplane
crashed after take-off from its Florida base,
killing all 20 people aboard, mostly Biminites.
It was the first major disaster for a company
which had served Nassau and Bimini since the
early 1930s.
Hardly a family on the island was untouched by


the crash, which led to a suspension of service by
an airline whose flights were very much part of
Bimini life.
The blaze at The Compleat Angler Ernest
Hemingway's haunt during the 1930s took the
life of a Bimini stalwart and destroyed priceless
memorabilia of the writer's life.
Continued tension over the controversial Bimi-
ni Bay resort development and the two disasters
has made the last year probably the worst in
Bimini's history.


rl
21,
4--
A-v. .-
I'l


* THIS picture from 1978 shows a Chalk's plane surrounded by scores of people at Bimini during
a 'Welcome to Tourists' day. The celebration was organised by Chalk's and a local hotelier to show
the island's appreciation of the economic benefits of tourism.


C H A L K '


OCEAN
>~


A I


R wAYm


P((( /rf


(V


Every proud Bahamian has a Unique
way of celebrating this very
special occasion.

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staff


of


* A PORTION of a wing jutting out from the water all that could be scene of the Chalk's
seaplane which crashed on December 19 last year by Miami Beach
(Photo: Miami Herald)


* SANTA arriving on a Chalk's seaplane


(Photos: Tribune archive)


CONGRATULATIONS



Bahamas







On Celebrating your




33rd finniuersary


from management &



BAHAMAS

WAST


Commersdal ~Residential Properties
Phone: 361-6841 Fax 361-6842
Email: info@bahamaswaste.com P.o.Box N-4827


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8F



:ur.I ~r-c~fi
;;


rAO






PAGE 9F


THE TRIBUNE


INDEPNDECE SPP.PENT200


Bimini looks back on a tragic year


":': :" "'14.



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* TH nrnewyt h omla igeafvuie an fEns eig
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* INSIDE the Compleat Angler


4.
44'C'


*ji I liul Iieg blep
cmai n i a'fieii i e I: imi he d
I 4?ll 'I %ed i e.Iiiii
a .1.1Ici otu hiuc-


* ERNEST HEMINGWAY.in Alice Town, Bilnini, where he used a Thompson
sub-machine gun to drive away the sharks that threatened catches of giant tuna and blue
marlin


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r -- ,- ... -. .


_ _1 __ YU~__ I __ I


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- ~s~--l~Plr-aoan*.~c~llr~* Im I I


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(Pholos. Paccrco Nufie,-)


~":~/







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10F


INDEPNDE EM. N 200


thur Hanna's appointment


:vas a big surprise for many




TI-1 E appointment of former
, ,puty prime minister Arthur
::na as Governor General
l; carly 2006 surprised many
political commentators.
''his was primarily because
vilr -lanna was spen as an old-
style radical with no interest.. .. ..
in the remnants of the British ...
colonial system.
Along with fellow PLP stal-
wart Paul Adderley, he was
seen as a fervent opponent of
th, old order and probably the
least likely choice for the Gov-
ernment House tenure.
Some commentators, though
surprised, thought Mr Hanna a ;
viewed as one of the few die- A W' "
hbards of the Pindling era who
came through with his integri- -L :
ty intact.
Sceptics, however, felt accep- S ."
tance of a job he would have
been expected to refuse in ear- . .
lier days was more to do with ; .
his wife Beryl's illness, and the
prospect of a handsome pen-
sion, than any great desire to A.'
take it on. ,MP. . ..,.
However, having become W.
installed at Mount Fitzwilliam,
MI r Hanna has tackled the job
with gusto, though refusing to
fall in with tradition by accept-
ing the knighthood that has
been one of the traditional
perks. -
It's all a long way from the
early 1960s when he and his
fellow opposition MPs were
the bane of the old UBP gov-
ernment.
Right up until the general
election of 1967, Mr Hanna,
his leader Lynden Pindling, ...
Milo Butler and Clarence Bain
c ,re extremely vocal in call- ....-
inu down damnation upon the E NEWLY-appointed Governor General Arthur Dion Hanna
reads his speech at Government House. U NEWLY-appointed Governor General A D Hanna with Lady Marguerite Pindling, wife of the
SEE page F (Photo: Felp MaorTribune Staff) late Sir Lynden Oscar Pindling.
SEE page-11F (Photo: Felip6 Major/Tribune Staff (Photo: Fr anklyn G Ferguson)


PAGE 10F







PAGE 11F


THlF TRII INIF


B I ** I.


as the Governor General





political commentators


A


M ABOVE AND RIGHT Newly-appointed Governor
General A D Hanna with his wife, Beryl.


FROM page 10F

British colonial system.
Interesting, therefore, that
Mr Pindling and Mr Butler
were later to be knighted, with
Mr Butler becoming the first
Bahamian Governor General


after independence in 1973. Mr
Hanna's decision to accept the
job rounds off an ennobling
process begun 33 years ago
when Mr Butler became Sir
Milo. It means all the key rad-
icals of the old PLP hierarchy
ended up as solid establish-
ment figures.


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WHEN Prince Charles
(khown helow) handed over
.,'ntr ol o th B.ih mira.i, from
II,,. Jld Britih c,.)I niial admin-
isi ratjion to Prime Mliniter
L ,ndcn Pindling go\crnment
in i'473. it w\ .s ine\itable that
r,\al Iink, wouldd loosen .ilth
IIine
\\ell. no' the Bihamas
Constitutional Commss-ion has
recommended that the coun-
irs become a republic, \ith its
,.'v.n Bhanmian head of state
in-iead of a London-based
monarch % hose rele'ance
,,ems to get \weaker b\ the


year.
As the Bahamas' future now
seem, much more closcl.
bound up with the United
Statle- than Britain. it's proba-
bl\ onl\ to be expected thai it
should o- dosn the samne go\ -
ernmenial route. The LIS has
no% bKen a republic. \ith its
own president, since 177o.
Ho\w long tll it be before the
Bahamas follows suit
EBen in Britain itself. some
suree', h\ae show n thlt up to
a third of the population
f3\ours abolition of the monar-
ch\.


1.(,



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* PRINCE CHARLES addresses the crowd in Parliament Square during the 1973 celebration%. B% ilh him oulide 'Senate
building are Governor Sir John Paul and LadN Paul. and Primne Minister L-nden Pindling and Mr, Pindliiie.
(FILE phoiro


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12F


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IIIIMIiII



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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 13F


Bahamas becomes a republic?


































(FILE photo) (FILE photo)
.4
4. ."S* / *, i.
S. i-4'riVIwuL-
*: : .'...... .















lii Bahamas Oldest M mortuary .







SFealyDemeritte Gertrude Demeritte










S#162 Market Street
SP.O. Box GT-2097, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas Rock Sound
Tel/Fax: (242) 323-5782, 359-2874, 457-3011, 457-4476, 323-4425

tu tions & old's ssins 3rd


1, 1
to the people of The Bahamas on the occasion of our Annvry
- Can it be that long? We can't deny that months, years, decades have flashed by and now we are looking forward with mixed emotions to :--
our 30th Anniversary. The Bahamas became great through the efforts of self-reliant people who knew how to take care of themselves. ---: '
Today everyone seems to know what's wrong with leaders, institutions, other people in our society. The more immature they are, the '-''
' quicker they shout "get rid of them". Throughout this lengthy period we have tried to provide our community with the finest service while ,' ,/
S'. ,adhering to the highest ethical standards. Your response gives us hope that we have in large measure succeeded. We believe that the best. \ \ : / '
..*.. ,, ,:/...ay.to demonstrate our appreciation is to endeavor to keep your respect through continued efforts to improve our standards of service ., \ ':. *.

----- I.radition & "acred 'rust "--"-
""- ::...."1 "
I -I \ \ I /ll / \ ii / 1\ / \*1: '








PAGE 14F_ TH TIBN


INEPNENE1 PLEE T.20


Meeting the Queen and Prince


APLSRTME
TO/ SrRoan ymnet


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rii j1


: ..-.*'.
)I


4'.-~~


I-":


-1
job
Y,4,


6* f-\Ir--IP Puince Chatlej
,ieel' Ilr ialer Suir) Clenient
Mlaynard (luring hi ollicijl
farre%%eLl after handing omer Ile
Bahamas o0 iI; i oin peopli.
AMio seen is Goernor Sir mlnfi
Paid. ilio i. Ialoii1g ili NItP-jui
Adderle.. and Mlr Simeoni
Bo%% e.


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Taking the oath


* A YOUTHFUL Lynden Pindling takes the oath of office
as Premier of the Bahamas after the 1967 general election,
which brought the PLP to power for the first time with the
help of Labour member Randol Fawkes and Independent
Alvin Braynen.
(FILE photo)


~PlituaL


THE TRIBUNE


I PAGE 14F


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PROUD


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BAHAMIAN


Happy Independence Bahamas


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14%







THE TRIBUNE
PAGE 16F
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