Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00463
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: July 3, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00463
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text









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MONDAY, JULY 3, 2006


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Country lays

claim to Pirates

of the Caribbean

film franchise


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE BAHAMAS has suc-
cessfully tied itself to the highly
profitable Pirates of the
Caribbean movie franchise, out-
doing its Caribbean rivals in this
multi-million dollar business.
Large parts of the upcoming
movie, Pirates of the Caribbean:
Dead Man's Chest, were filmed
in Grand Bahama and Exuma.
Additional scenes were also
shot on location in other
Caribbean islands, however
only the Bahamas is laying
claim to the blockbuster movie.
Speaking at a special press
conference held in New York
this week, Director General of
Tourism Vernice Walkine said
that ensuring that the two
sequels of the Pirates of the
Caribbean franchise are associ-
ated with the Bahamas will go a
long way in diversifying the
product the country offers to its
visitors.
Also addressing the Bahami-
an media in New York, Ren6
Mack, president of the travel
and lifestyle marketing practice
at the Bahamas' main public
relations agency Weber Shand-
wick, said that the Bahamas was
way ahead of its competitors in
the region in seeking to eco-
nomically benefit from the
movie and all its spin-off effects.
Mr Mack said that despite the


fact that scenes of the antici-
pated summer blockbuster were
also filmed in St Vincent and
the Dominican Republic, no
other destination other than the
Bahamas is laying claim to the
movie.
"No other destination moved
fast enough, or had the intu-
ition, the street smarts.
"The islands of the Bahamas
stole this movie away from the
rest of the Caribbean," he said.
The Bahamas' first step in.
achieving the goal of firmly
establishing a connection to the
movie in the minds of con-
sumers, started in 2005 with the
Disney National Partners Con-
ference in Grand Bahama, he
said.
Mr Mack explained that dur-
ing this meeting, the Bahamas
was able to negotiate special
promotion deals with the
attending Disney partners var-
ious A-list US brands including
breakfast cereals, soda compa-
nies and car manufacturers.
As a result of the conference,
multi-tiered programmes
between the partners and the
Ministry of Tourism and its
Film Commission were creat-
ed.
Mr Mack said that the
Bahamas was the only country
in the region where the govern-
ment and the private sector
SEE page 14


L. WORK takes place yesterday at Long Wharf near Arawak Cay. A new sea wall is being constructed in a bid to stop
sand reAching the street during the hurricane season which runs until the end of November.
(Photo: Felipg Major/Tribune staff)

Shots fired, ahamas'resnondin well' Man dies after
-ahamas-- res-on di we


stabbing

at wedding
reception
GRAND Bahama police are
investigating a shoot-out and a
stabbing which occurred when a
wedding reception got out of
hand at the Rock Island Bar
and Grill on Garnet Levarity
Highway.
Reports of a fight and gun-
shots fired at the bar were made
to police on Saturday at
10.45pm. Several units on patrol
responded to the call to investi-
gate.
At the scene it was reported
that a young man from Sea
Grape, Eight Mile Rock, who
had been attending a wedding
SEE page 13


to major tourism changes


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE nature of tourism is
drastically changing in the
Bahamas, as seven out of ten
rooms built in the Bahamas
today are part of second-
homes, David Johnson, deputy
director of tourism announced.
Attending a special media
briefing in New York this
week, Mr Johnson said that
persons are increasingly invest-
ing in private residences as
opposed to hotel rooms.
Director General of Tourism
Vernice Walkine told members
of the Bahamian media in New
York that the entire business
of tourism is changing and that
the Bahamas is responding


very well to this latest shift in
the industry.
She said that more and more
homes throughout the
Bahamas are being built by
wealthy people who want the
opportunity to have vacation
homes in a warm weather des-
tination.
Mrs Walkine emphasised
that "mixed-use" properties -
hotel rooms with resort ameni-
ties combined with second
homes are especially attrac-
tive at the moment.
"Mixed-use is important
because they (tourists) have
access to the amenities of a
resort. And it's not a fad, it's a
long-time trend," she said.
Mrs Walkine said that as
SEE page 13


accluent on
motorcycle
* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
A MOTORCYCLIST lost
his life yesterday after running
into a parked vehicle on Prince
Charles Drive.
Kent Reid, 35, of Nassau East
died from his injuries.
According to Marvin Dames,
officer-in- charge of CDU, the
incident occurred around 12.45
Sunday morning.
The victim, who was driving a
red and black 600cc Honda
motorcycle, was travelling with
a friend, who was on another
motorcycle.
Mr Dames said the motorcy-
clists were travelling east on
SEE page 13


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PAGE 2, MONDAY, JULY 3, 2006 THE TRIBUNE


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* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
WITH the current state of
the educational system, a vet-
eran educator gives a D grade
to the Ministry of Education's
performance at the end of this
academic year.
The high level educator who
wished to remain anonymous
has been working in the edu-
cational field for more than
30 years, and has moved up
the rank from teacher to
administrator in a local pri-
mary school.
In a candid interview with
The Tribune over the week-
end, the concerned educator
discussed the many issues fac-
ing educators, especially in
government primary schools.
One of the issues highlight-
ed was the class sizes at gov-
ernment schools.

Students
The educator pointed out
that there should be nomore
than 25 students in grades one
and two, and a maximum of
30 students from grades three
to six.
However, the source said
there are still many classes
with 35 to 40 children with one
teacher.
The educator believes that if
the Ministry of Education is
"serious" about improving the
D grade point average it is
imperative that something be
done with the class sizes.
There would then be more
teachers for each class, more
materials, and an environment
that is conducive to learning.
"We are in the technology
age, all classes by now should
have been equipped with at


least one computer with Inter-
net access."
The educator said it is
important that there be atten-
dance officers and guidance
counsellors in all primary
schools to help with the work
that principals have to deal
with on a daily bases.

Dialogue
In discussing ways to com-
bat the social ills that occur
within the primary schools, the
educator believes there should
be dialogue between admin-
istrators in the primary school
and persons in the various
departments in education.
"It is perceived that primary
students are innocent and all
of the behavioral problems
(that are currently) being
experienced begins in the
junior school. This statement
is far from the truth," the edu-
cator said.
Last December The Tribune
revealed that in 2004, the pub-
lic school national average for
graduation exams was F+.
The mean grade achieved
by students from all New
Providence high schools that
year was D+.
However, in an earlier inter-
view with The Tribune this
month, Education Minister
Alfred Sears said that over the
next five years a "qualitative
improvement" in education
can be expected.
He also added that his team
has moved to improve the
quality of instruction, increase
the involvement of parents
and to better socialise stu-
dents.
The educator is of the opin-
ion that the Ministry of Edu-
cation has its "head buried in


the sand, because of the chaos
that occurs every September."
This is indicated by school
buildings not being ready, the
lack of availability of teach-
ers, and students not being
sure which school they are to
attend.
Former Governor General


EARLIER this month,
Education Minister Alfred
Sears (above) said that over
the next five years a 'qualita-
tive improvement' in educa-
tion can be expected.


Dame Ivy Dumont said that
the ultimate responsibility for
the state of-education in the
country rests with the Prime
Minister, the Minister of Edu-
cation, the Permanent Secre-
tary and Director of Educa-
tion.


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Veteran educator



gives ministry's



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PA~GE 2, MONDAY, JULY 3, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


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MONDAY, JULY 3, 2006, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


L N


oIn brief

Police

investigate

armed

robberies

By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

POLICE were busy over
the weekend investigating a
number of armed robberies
and an attempted armed rob-
bery in the capital.
According to police, the
first incident took place at
Multiple Accessories store
on Wulff Road.
It was reported to police
that sometime around 11.15am
on, Friday, two unmasked
men, one armed, robbed the
store of $430 in cash.
Other items reportedly
taken were an Apple iPod
and a number of other acces-
sories, including an assort-
ment of cell cards.
Before fleeing the scene
on foot, the men duct taped
an employee and a woman.
The culprits wore black t-
shirts and green camouflage
trousers.
S On Friday night, accord-
ing to Marvin Dames officer-
in-charge of CDU, another
armed robbery was reported
by a 19-year-old resident of
Pine Yard Road, Seabreeze.
The teenager told police
that as he was about to enter
his' home, he was held up by
Stwo armed, unmasked men.
They robbed him of about
$50 in cash. The men also
fled the area on foot.
Mr Dames said that police
are also making inquiries into
an. alleged armed robbery.
He said that a 54-year-old
man reported that at
11.40pm on Saturday he was
in his vehicle outside the
Players Club when he was
approached by a man, who
was with a group of women.
The victim told police that
they pulled him from his
vehicle, beat him and robbed
him of some $800 in cash, a
cell phone and a gold chain.
An Esso woman employee
Swas the victim of an attempt-
ed armed robbery.
According to police reports,
sometime around 12.15am on
Saturday, the employee of the
East Street and Balfour
Avenue service station was
held up by two armed men,
one of whom was armed with
a chrome handgun.
They demanded cash from
her. She told them she had
no money. The culprits then
pushed her to the ground.
Before leaving they fired a
number of shots into the air.
One man was wearing a
blue pair of jeans and a white
shirt. The other wore blue
jeans and a grey sweat shirt.


* By MARK HUMES

XENOPHOBIA is a real
issue in the Bahamas, and
according to psychologist Dr
David Allen, "'if we are going
to build a country, we must give
up some of our old 'racist' ways
and our desire for retaliation."
As the immigrant population
continues to grow in the
Bahamas and Bahamians
become more vocal on the
issue, the unfathomable idea
that the Bahamas and black
Bahamians can be racist is
becoming more fathomable.
But, any attempts to label the
populous racist would more
than likely be met with outrage.
However, what one will
notice, as a local journalist
pointed out: "When things get
really tense in the Bahamas,
racial prejudice, which many
Bahamians pretend is a thing
of the past, emerges once more
in full plumage."
According to Dr Larry Craw-
ford, Associate Professor of
Sociology at Morehouse College,
"racism," as we know it, is con-
sidered a European creation, a
tool of white supremacy which
elevates Europeans and creates
oppression and antagonistic
infighting among the remaining
dispowered population.
Defined, Dr Crawford says:
"Racism [is] discrimination by a
group against another for the
purposes of subjugation or
maintaining subjugation. In oth-
er words, one cannot be racist
unless he has the power to sub-
jugate."
Since blacks do not have
"power," their "perceived"
racists acts are merely a response
to a situation in which they find
themselves the objects of white
racism. Simply put, black racism
exists because of white racism.
If one were to consider and
accept the premise that one can-
not be a racist unless he or she
has the power to subjugate,
then, one must also consider
and accept the notion that in
the Bahamas, as black Bahami-
ans do have the power to sub-
jugate, they too must then pos-


(Photo: Tribune archive)


sess the power to be racist.
Yesterday, in an interview
with The Tribune, noted psy-
chologist Dr David Allen said
that the Bahamas is a shame-
based society, and one of the
faces of shame is racism, whether *
it be black or white racism.
"The shame core among
whites and black Bahamians
prohibits people from accept-
ing each other for who they
are," said Dr Allen.
"What happens with shame,"
he continued, "is that people
retaliate."
In February of 1996, PLP Sen-
ator Obie Wilchcombe, oppos-
ing a resolution condemning
racism in the Bahamas, said:
"You see, sir, I am not fooled by
the smiles of any white man. I
am not fooled by his offer of gen-
erosity. I am not fooled by his
outstretched hand offering me a
gentleman's pension. Because
that same man was laying down
his wares upon my father's back."
When told that his remarks
sounded racist, Mr Wilchcombe
replied: "If being a racist means
putting a lie to the white man's
credit ... then I am content to
be considered a racist ... That's
my right. Ya'll (referring to
FNM senators) sell out for polit-
ical power. They (white men)
gat the power. Ya'll 'ain gat no
power. That's why they smile."
Flash forward 10 years and
think how destructive such com-
ments would be to our nation's
business if the white men whom
the now Minister of Tourism
courts for their dollars were to
find out that the smiling Mr
Wilchcombe is a "noted" racist
who harbours deep-seated hate
for their kind.
During the same period of
Mr Wilchcombe's "coming out,"
the then senator Franklyn Wil-
son maintained that racial divi-
sion is a part of Bahamian his-
tory, and a part of his resolve as
a senator was to "build bridges
within our community to help


Fetlzr Fniie

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A noted psychologist gives his view on why

the Bahamas must rid itself of 'racist ways'


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us come together as a people."
However, twenty years before
Mr Wilchcombe's and Mr
Wilson's comments, The Race
Relations Act of 1976 sought to
"make fresh provision with
respect to discrimination on racial
ground and relations between
people of different racial groups."
A person discriminates against
another in any circumstances,
the Act says, if "on racial
grounds he treats that other per-
son less favourably than he treats
or would treat other persons."
Just this year, 200 Haitian
immigrants from North
Eleuthera and Harbour Island
were rounded up in an immi-
gration raid. Of the 200, 140
were later found to be wrong-
fully detained. Their release was
orchestrated with the help of
Abner Pinder.
The way this group of peo-
ple was rounded up and herded
into New Providence was not
consistent with the treatment
of other groups of immigrants
who are now calling the
Bahamas home, namely those
from Latin American countries.
Based on what could be per-
ceived as a form of "racial pro-
filing," these people were
"snatched" from their island
homes and brought to New
Providence before if could be
determined whether they were
legal, and had it not been for
the goodness of Mr Pinder, a
white resident of Spanish Wells,
they might '11il li.i. e been here.
In America, where whites
continue to hold onto majority
rule, comments like Mr Wilch-
combe's and acts by the Immi-
gration Department against the
Eleuthera residents would have
brought out the protesters. And
many Bahamians would have
probably voiced their displea-
sure with America's continued
practice of racial discrimination.
However, these acts contin-
te to be justified in the
Bahamas because, one, it is
done in the name of national-
ism, and two, they are done in
reaction to the white man's past
evil against blacks here.
However, as Dr Allen point-
ed out: "Blacks got power, and
feeling the power, they devel-
oped a form of racism that is
just as bad as white racism."
He concluded by saying: "If
we are going to build a coun-
try, we have to make the tran-
sition to a truly interracial soci-
ety. The Bahamas is a country
of black, white, brown, and yel-
low people. We have to give up
some of the old ways and our
desire for retaliation to transi-
tion into building a new world."


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PAGE 4, MONDAY, JULY 3, 2006


3 *~ A


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-


Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352


BEC: you've got to be kidding!


A SHORT LETTER is published in the Let-
ters column on this page today recognizing the
efficient work being done by the Water and
Sewerage Corporation in trenching and laying of
new water pipes.
We would like to second those compliments,
particularly when the work ethic of the Water &
Sewerage Corporation is compared to the on-
again-off-again work still in progress at a
Camperdown site by BEC, whose staff are
among the highest paid civil servants in the
country.
Water and Sewerage have been laying new
water mains along the side streets off the East-
ern Road. We had a birds-eye view of their
work when the men and their equipment arrived
in the Camperdown area early one morning.
The side road officially named Wild
Tamarind Drive, but known to its original res-
idents as Camperdown was closed. A long
stretch of the road at the southern end had
been trenched, and large pipes were piled on the
roadside. Residents groaned as they took
detours to get to their homes, imagining weeks
of inconvenience ahead of them. But by 2pm on
the first day, the pipes were laid, the trench
was closed, and that area of the road, although
now rough, was open and at least passable. The
next day the work crew was back. Again, as
they worked their way north up and over the hill
and down to the main Eastern Road, the men
each day opened just as much of the road as
they estimated they could complete by 2pm.
And by 2pm each pipe was laid, the trench was
closed, the road was reopened and they were
gone. Before the end of the week Water &
Sewerage had completed their work. It is true
that the firm that had been contracted to patch
the road with tar took a little time following
up with their job. But that too has been com-
pleted leaving BEC still dawdling over a project
that it had undertaken at the top of Camper-
down Hill in March.
The main problem with BEC seems to be
lack of communication and misinformation
being given to head office from the men in the
field.
For example, when the contractor of the
building paid BEC the cheque in March for
work that had to be done to provide electricity
to the house he was constructing, he asked what
he could do to facilitate BEC's work. As'he
already had all of the equipment on site, he
even offered to do the trenching for them. He
was given specifications for a platform for a
transformer, which he completed immediate-
ly. It was decided that at least two poles one
was in such a rusted condition that it was just
waiting for the next high wind to blow it down
- had to be taken down and all lines on it had
to be run underground to another pole. BEC
did its own trenching.
Being assured that nothing else had to be
done once the platform was built, the contractor
proceeded with his work, building and painting


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a wall along the front of the property and just
behind the poles that had to come down. All of
this was nicely done when a BEC workman on
site, and in an offhand "oh-by-the-way" com-
ment, told the contractor that a well would have
to be drilled right next to the wall to reach the
water table for the transformer. Would this
undermine his beautifully painted wall was the
contractor's first thought, his second thought
we shan't record for fear of burning a hole in
this column.
We then received information from BEC's
head office that most of the cables and poles
were scheduled for laying for Wednesday, May
17, followed by additional work on Friday. "It is
anticipated that the work will be completed by
next week," said head office. Remember this
project was contracted in March. Weeks and
weeks went by with not even a shadow of a
BEC crewman appearing on site.
The contractor was also told that the poles
could not be taken down until BaTelCo and
Cable Bahamas had removed their equipment,
and that it was BEC's responsibility to notify
them of what they had to do.
By June 4 another complaint was directed to
BEC head office. This time to report that a
workman on site had informed the contractor
that he did not understand how head office
could have told him that BEC was responsible
for notifying BaTelCo that they had to remove
their equipment that was not the responsi-
bility of BEC, he announced with a flourish.
Although it was verified that BaTelCo had been
notified by BEC, BaTelCo's equipment is yet to
be removed from the pole. This is indicative of
why everything moves at a snail's pace in, this
country staff of two highly paid corpora-
tion's can't even cooperate with each other to
complete a project, which should have taken a
few weeks, now entering its fourth month!
In May a neighbour phoned to find out if
BEC's trench would soon be closed. A wed-
ding was planned for a Saturday. The contractor
was assured there was nothing to worry about,
the job would be finished and the trench closed
by Wednesday -three days before the wed-
ding. That was head office talking, but in the
field the men had decided to leave the trench
open, clear the road and put up barriers to let
cars pass. That was in May. The trench was
only closed a few weeks ago. And to add a bit of
poetic justice to a trench that BEC assured
everyone was safe, one of its own trucks backed
into it, and the much put-upon contractor had to
get one of his heavy duty vehicles to pull it out.
The poles are still up, thanks to the added inef-
ficiency of BaTelCo.
If this is indicative of the indifference to a
project, paid for four months in advance, sure-
ly BEC does not expect to get public sympathy
when its union, in its dispute with management,
threatens massive industrial action and major
power outages. If it does, then our only com-
ment is: Fellas you gotta be kidding!


;.


need a loan?


EDITOR, The Tribune
Venezuela borrowing mon-
ey? It just doesn't add up.
In the Business Briefing sec-
tion of The Nassau Guardian
today there was an intriguing
headline: Venezuela lines up
$850m loan.
Apparently Venezuela is
using $400m for low cost hous-
ing, $400m for subway expan-
sion and the remaining $50m
for future debt issues by the
local utility
Electricidad de Caracas.
Why on earth would
Venezuela a country that
should be "rolling in dough" as
a result of the increasing cost
of oil need to borrow money?
So does this put another lie
to the great "deal" that Chavez
is "giving" to his Caribbean'
neighbours?
Let's think about this a little
further.


If The Bahamas proceeds
with PetroCaribe based on the
information available today,
Venezuela will send oil to the
Bahamas government (and no
cash). The Bahamas govern-
ment will then sell this oil to
the local oil companies and
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion, etc, who will have to pay
in full for the fuel they
receive.
The Bahamas government
will then pay Venezuela for 60
per cent of the shipment of oil
they received and retain 40 per.
cent as a loan owing to
Venezuela.
So in other words, Venezuela
is sending oil and the Bahamian
government will get the cash for


the "loans" from the local econ-
omy.
The Bahamas government is
happy as they get more taxpay-
er dollars to waste in the near
term, and Venezuela is happy
because The Bahamas will
potentially owe them millions
of dollars.
If Chavez is such a great guy, 5 5
why doesn't he simply lend The
Bahamas the cash without try- )
ing to disrupt the market? ,AI
It would appear that frlf
Venezuela needs a little finan- ig"
cial guidance. Why borrow ago
$850m from The Andean: as
Development Bank Corpora- Ino
cion Andina de Fomento for rO.g
market interest rates and then `;od
"lend" money to their neigh- .\
bours at 1 per cent per annum? aoil
It just doesn't add up. b-


RICK LOWE
Nassau
June 30 2006


EDITOR, The Tribune
KINDLY allow me, on behalf
of the College of the Bahamas
Alumni Association, an oppor-
tunity to publicly thank and
honour a great Bahamian
woman, Dr Ronda Chipman-
Johnson.
On Wednesday, June 28,2006,
the new executive team of the
College of the Bahamas Alumni
Association made an official
courtesy call on the COB's Act-
ing-President, Dr Ronda Chip-
man-Johnson, in order to share
with her our goals for the future
and to thank her for her com-
mitment to the College over the
many years she has been here
(especially, this last year when
she so ably led this College). We
also took this same opportunity
to show our commitment to the
College by way of a financial
donation to the College in the
sum of $5,000. This donation of
$5,000 specifically comes from
of Alumni Endowment Fund (ie
fund raised via our annual Hall
of Fame luncheons).
We all know that the College
has been going through soiie
challenging times, especially over
the last twelve months, but Dr
Chipman-Johnson has nonethe-
less displayed her genuine com-
mitment to the College of the
Bahamas and has successfully


"captained" this ship to safe
port.
She has accomplished much
during her many years at COB,
but has truly shown her true
worth during her period as act-
ing-president.
SWe know that Dr Chipman-
Johnson will still be at the Col-
lege, still leading and still push-
ing the College forward
,(although in a different capaci-
ty), but we feel it fit, at this time,
to show our appreciation to her.


Without a doubt, she will be ,u
seen as one of the many
"Greats" of the College. 1
Dr Chipman-Johnson should ,~
know that we, the College com-
munity at large, thanks her! We j
love her! We wish her the best in
the future.


DON L SAUNDERS
President, COB
Alumni Association
Nassau
June 28 2006


Congratulations to Water & Sewerage
EDITOR, The Tribune.
THE Water & Sewerage Corporation recently laid a new
water line down Mt Pleasant Avenue. The work of digging the
trench and laying the pipe was down efficiently and fast.
causing minimal disruption to business on this road.
After two weeks the tar macadam topping the refilled
trench started to sag along a six feet stretch, perhaps because
of insufficient packing of the till. I telephoned the corporation
to report this and was impressed to find that the faulty area
had been refilled within a couple of days of my phone call to
report it.
Congratulations to the Water & Sewerage Corporation
not only for the efficiency of their work but also tor their
responsiveness.

ANTHONY W
WALLS
Nassau.
June 22. 2006.





North Andros Regatta

The tEnd Lhk

Vehlipas-g ger

Fteysheduub.
IArcondtbned pasrigercabih and

D Jon boald)

FrdayJLi7th,2006

DeptNasau -7 0 pm .

Ari/e M oigans'Blaff-9 20pm .

DayawayexcmDn

SatuidayJy8th ,2006

DeptNasa -9ui-30am .

DeptM oganBh1fE-11 00pm

M ondayJll10th,2006

DeptM otgansBlhff-9 00 am .

ArrieNasau 41120 am .


Thanks from alumni to



acting COB president


THE TRIBUNE







Why should





Venezuela


::










T ~LHEA TIWBUNEMONDAYJULY3206,PAGE
1 I~l~l~l~~i~0


Continuing our in-depth look into the

world of education, we examine what

Minister of Education Alfred Sears is

promising teachers


Minister's 'concessions'





would only apply to a few


* By MARK HUMES
CONCESSIONS and
allowances for teachers which
the Minister of Education called
"groundbreaking" might not
cost the government as much
as it purports, as they would
only be applicable to a minority
group of teachers across the
board.
As a part of its public rela-
tions campaign, the Ministry of
Education has disclosed a num-
ber of proposed allowances and
concessions to allow "not only
teachers, but the entire coun-
try" to evaluate what the gov-
ernment "has put on the table,"
said Minister Sears on Friday.
As a result of protracted
agreement between the gov-
ernment and the Bahamas
Union of Teachers, the bene-
fits and salaries given to teach-
ers have reached an impasse.
These allowances, along with
the salary proposal, said the
minister, is above any other
public servants.
He went on to say that "there
is not any other category within
the public that would receive a
package as good as what we
have on the table."
For the most part, when the
figures are thrown in, they
appear to take hefty chunks out
of the government's pocket.
However, broken ddwn, they
will only make'a substantial
dent, and ultimately, they will
not benefit all teachers, as the


* ALFRED Sears


Ministry would want its audi-
ence to assume.
One of the "exclusive" con-
cessions that the government is
proposing to extend to teach-
ing professionals is a sabbatical
leave of up to twelve month
with full pay.
This benefit would be applic-
able to teachers of "outstand-
ing service" who have complet-
ed 10 years of service, and it
would afford them the oppor-
tunity to carry out research,
write books, or do whatever
may be professionally enhanc-
ing.
Although the notion of a sab-
batical may be new to teaching
professionals in the Bahamas,
its concept may not be very


"exclusive" to the public ser-
vice, as General Orders 1601
makes a provision for public
servants to pursue a programme
of similar characteristics, study
leave.
According to the Orders:
"When an officer is required by
the Government to undertake a
course of training or study in
the interest of the Public Ser-
vice, he will be granted study
leave on full salary and this will
not count against his vacation
leave or leave of absence eligi-
bility. As a rule, such a course of
training or study might be
expected to last up to about six
months, but should it be a
longer course, the officer may
be granted additional leave on
full pay up to a maximum of
twelve months in all to enable
him to complete the course:
provided that, exceptionally,
and with the express permission
of the Deputy Prime Minister,
additional leave for such a
course may be granted with full
pay beyond the period of twelve
months."
So despite touting sabbatical
leave as "groundbreaking," the
opportunity for teachers in the
system to get a year of profes-
sional training in their fields, at
the government's expense, is
already in place. Duringthat
time, they may write books as
well, and they do not have to
wait for 10 years to qualify.
Another two "significant"
allowances that government


proposes is paternity and adop-
tive leave.
This first allowance, given to
male teachers, would afford
them one week with pay once
every three years. As male
teachers make up approxi-
mately 20 per cent of the teach-
ing population, it is unlikely that
the government will be pressed
for money to support large
numbers of male teachers tak-
ing paternity leave.
Even if they do spend money.
on these male teachers, that is
an allowance that the other 80
per cent teaching body would
not benefit.
The adoptive leave that the
government proposes is anoth-
er benefit that is almost redun-
dant, as not that many in the
teaching profession will be
going out in droves to adopt
children, unless they want two
to four weeks off from work
once every three years.
The government proposal to
give a coaching allowance of
1000 per sport to its coaches
many see like something to talk
about, in,a lump sum. But bro-
ken down, this amount comes
out to about $333 a month to
be given out to a small coaching
staff.
After decades of a mere $280
to $320 per month for housing
assistance to teachers trans-
ferred to Grand Bahama, the
government is not proposing to
increase those fees by an esti-
mated $200.


Whereas this increase is being
heralded as significant, some
teachers feel that this increase is
a favour, but was something
they are entitled to, as it makes
up for cost of living increases.


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*.- ,


MONDAY, JULY 3, 2006, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


Rosetta St.


Phone : 325 3336







iL,. ,I.IJNDAY, JULY 3, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


new political party, elections




:Id power-sharing in Guyana


[.i By .;ii i d Sanders
i'c j b siness exec-
i .. i ...,, ,:i: rI Caribbean
/. iI'. .1 ",li(hes widely
'ni, '. i the global

S ;. -,-,iAL elections
S'-i, *' v; na to elect the
ln and gov-
er l ti country will
i !,.,, ,' i 'c,:' held in early
; tic e time of writ-
i l, l ,".'; leclions Com-
.. ' '()M) appears
n'd" )( a voters' list
'i -:, ,.M; stage for Presi-
dlcil i: :;at Jagdeo to
2 actionn date.
...sd on the 2001
cl... ... sister with new
S teen October
?.O(n ;ii. i ,' c this year during
;I -.";intous regis-
it;, i ;! 1 ,.ii legitim acy has
be,! ,::, :1, J by opposition
p .:ii...: ; . and the private
c.', ; 'ir ., im that the list
ih:. i:;: !.. i ified and that it
Ilr iJ;: :; i o: .",f persons who
ia.. '.J ;~, emigrated and,
lh.T : ,; .:.-;! [ th, e opportu-
S:. ;. istions have


also been raised about whether
persons continue to reside in
the regions where their names


In the last few
months, the
country has
been rocked by
a rise in the
incidents of
killings linked
to drug
traffickers, and
the almost
causal abandon
with which
violent crimes
are committed.

appear on the list.
Despite their concerns about
the list, it is likely that the


numerous opposition parties will
contest the general elections,
recognizing that a boycott would
simply lead to a walk over for
the ruling People's Progressive
Party (PPP) which has now held
office for fourteen years.
But, both the opposition polit-
ical parties and the private sector
will want water tight assurances
from GECOM and the Guyana
government that the procedures
for voting at every polling sta-
tion is such that ballot boxes can-
not be stuffed with ballots from
non-existent voters.
The main opposition party,
the People's National Con-
gress/Reform (PNC/R) led by
Robert Corbin, has been par-
ticularly vocal about the need
to verify the accuracy of the
electoral register. If the PNC/R
decides to contest the election,
it will no doubt do so in the
expectation that scrutineers will
be permitted to follow the
process closely from the cast-
ing of the first ballot to the
counting of the last.

fortunately for Guyana
and the Guyanese peo-


fif Appointment

r F ,B. Sands, Jr., President & CEO of Commonwealth Bank is
pleased to announce the following appointment:


Gladys Fernander
Sr. Manager, Financial Planning & Reporting


We are pleased to announce the appointment of IMrs..
Glads Fernander as Senior Manager Financial
Plarimunn. nd Per uiO tiri.- eff,:.:t, June 1, -_i l. f.,i
Fer nari.ler has a strong bai.m touncl both domne:Atijcll),
ajnd iiteC national in financial accotuitin'l She ,i .a
mnerl.ber in good standing of the New Hamrnphire State
Board of Accountancy and the Bahamas Institute of
Chartered Accountants.


3inl :11:reas Cin Ijreadth of the Bantl's products and services necessitates the
ml it ti-iiracial and business planning and reporting systems. The establishment
in ..ill 1:.e anl integral part of enh-ancing the Bank 3 overall systems.

ncill ':,I tlie E.i-il i linanc;.i l and businies planning techniques and practices ~,ill
S.,I. t, ill'it:ic, "n: Ei tre.[icgthein it! corripetitn'e position and remain. in the forefront
S i. f nI: a :l t..usiiess, plnri inrig practices.


' I I I


CEE3
COMMONWEALTH BANK
Leder in Personal B.,nkin Serv\: i


pie, the PNC/R leader showed
great responsibility by not.
putting supporters on the streets
in mass protest demonstrations
despite his insistence that the
voters' list be verified.
Such demonstrations would
have unnerved further the
majority of the people who are
already living on tenterhooks,
desperately concerned about
safety and security.
In the last few months, the
country has been rocked by a
rise in the incidents of killings
linked to drug traffickers, and
the almost causal abandon with
which violent crimes are com-
mitted.
There is also a rising desire
by a growing number of the
population to see an end to the
politics of race which has para-
lyzed Guyana's social and eco-
nomic development over the
last 50 years and locked the
nation in poverty.


There is a
rising desire
by a growing
number of the
population to
see an end to
the politics of
race which has
paralyzed
Guyana's social
and economic
development.


This is a mood that has been
obviously sensed by the PNC/R
leader, Robert Corbin, who has
publicly declared that he sup-
ports a."One Guyana" govern-
ment, and the PNC would share
power with other parties even if
it wins an overall majority in
the elections.
Traditionally, the PNC/R has
counted its main support from
Guyanese of African descent.
But, it is a new political party,
the Alliance for Change (AFC)
that has made eschewing racial
politics the main plank of its
appeal to the Guyanese peo-
ple. Led by three persons -
each of whom broke away from
the one of the traditional three
main political parties in Guyana
- the AFC has galvanized sup-
port remarkably quickly, and
though it is unlikely to win the
election, it appears set to com-
mand enough of the parliamen-
tary seats to compel both the
PPP and the PNC/R to a bar-
gaining table.


i4


he AFC's three leaders
Raphael Trotman (for-
merly PNC/R), Khemraj Ram-
jattan (formerly PPP) and
Sheila Holder (formerly linked
to the Working People's
Alliance) have made it clear
that they want a government in
which power is shared by all the
parties that are elected to par-
liament.
President Jagdeo and the PPP
have not indicated that they
would be interested in power
sharing after the elections what-
ever the result. It is under-
standable that they haven't. If
a ruling party states ahead of
an election that it is willing to
share power, there would be
any number of critics who
would submit that such a state-
ment is an admission that it has
lost its capacity to win.
But, the PPP now has to look
beyond its core East Indian
support if it is to win the elec-
tion.
The 2002 population census,
which was only published
recently, shows that the East
Indian community, which used
to be about half the population,
has dropped to 43.4 per
cent. Given Guyana's electoral
system of proportional repre-
sentation, it has to be assumed
that, while they have not
expressly stated it, the PPP too
is contemplating some form of
power sharing after the elec-
tions if it is to participate in gov-
ernment.
The size of the African com-
munity has also declined. It is
now 30.2 per cent of the popu-
lation making it mandatory for
the PNC/R to pursue support
beyond its base in the African
community.
Significantly, increases in
population numbers were
reflected in the mixed 'races


community which was up to
16.7 per cent, and the
Amerindian community which
grew to 9.2 per cent of the total
population.


SM ore than likely the
AFC support has
come from the mixed races
who would instinctively shun
voting that is designed to keep
one racial group or another in
a position of political dicta-
tion.


In any event, this situation
provides a real opportunity for
Guyana which was one of the
most developed countries of the
Caribbean in the early 1970's,
and is now the second poorest
after Haiti despite all its abun-
dant natural resources.
More than any other factor,,
racial politics has been the bane,
and blight that has tormented
and retarded Guyana.
A government, after the elec-
tions, that is drawn from the'
major political parties could
give the country a chance to
tackle effectively both its eco-
nomic challenges and the
immense problems of crime and
security that now confront it.
Such a government would
attract the active financial sup-
port of both the public and pri-
vate sectors in the international
community. It would also make
the nation stronger and dis-
courage those external forces
who take advantage of its inter-
nal divisions to advance their
own agenda.
Should there be a power
sharing government, the vast
resources of Guyana in agricul-
ture and minerals could open
an era of prosperity not only
for Guyanese but also for the
people of the Caribbean Com-
munity (CARICOM) who
would benefit from the invest-
ment and employment oppor-
tunities a revitalised Guyana
would bring to the Caribbean



Racial politics
has been the
bane and blight
that has
tormented
and retarded
Guyana.


Single Market.
First though, there must be a
peaceful even if vigorous -
election campaign, and the elec-
toral process must be such that
it can stand the toughest scruti-
ny.

Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com


METHODIST SUMMER

CAMPS 2006

Held at cam Symonette in James' Cistern,
Eleuthera
July 1-7 for ages 13-17 and July 10-16 for
ages 6-12.This year's theme is:
Keys To The
Kingdom: Unlocking the Clues to Christ.
Registration $100. for more information
contact Debra Gibson at the BCMC office at
393-3726, visit our website at:
www.angelfire.com/rnb/campsymonette or
send an email to:
methodistsummercamps@hotmail.com



DC Technology

W~\ILL BE

CLOSED

July 1st & July 3rd 2006
for stock taking
Re-Open:July 4th
SORRY ANY FOR ANY
INCONVENIENCE CAUSED
- - - - -


insight

w ,oe, -,vD V.. "


' ,ading fast food company is recruiting




Assistant Managers


Qualified applicants should:

Have suitable experience

Have a great attitude toward customer service

Be willing to work weekends & flexible hours.




S tf:: ed persons should submit resume to PO. Box N-4351
Attention: Human Resources Manager
Deadline for application is July 15, 2006.


* I

I


It8sa~ ~, .. -


--la


7"'
~t~BLd;









TIB M Y JY 3 26


Volunteers complain




about disrepair of




counselling centre


By KRYSTEL ROLLE


VOLUNTEERS and persons
r attending therapy sessions at
( the Public Hospital Authority
Community Counselling and
Assessment Centre have com-
plained about the state of dis-
Srepair into which the building
'has fallen under government
management.
* James "Pat" Bain, a long-
'time volunteer at the centre,
r said the problem started as
soon as the centre was moved
'from its old facilities in the
Princess Margaret Hospital's
parking lot to its new building
on Market Street.
One of the most pressing
'problems in the building, he
'said, was the shortage of rest
Rooms. The Community Coun-
Sseling Assessment Centre
(CCAC) employs more than 10


people, including volunteers. In
addition the centre has a large
number of persons who come
in daily. Both male and female
are forced to use the same rest
room.
The problem is particularly
severe on Fridays when about
70-80 per cent of the persons
who go to the centre are there
for community meetings. The
majority of the them are drug
abusers and persons who are
violent or have violent tenden-
cies.
"It doesn't make sense for all
of these people to share one
bathroom," Mr Bain said. In
addition to counselling services
the centre has a urine testing
centre to ascertain whether
patients are still abusing drugs.
"One bathroom cannot facil-
itate all these people, especially
because most of these people


have to pass their urine," Mr
Bain said.
Mr Bain, himself a drug user
in the past, can relate to most
persons who seek help at the
CCAC. A little more than 20
years ago Mr Bain was in the
same position as most of the per-
sons going to the centre for urine
testing. In those days, he said,
he went to the old facility on the
hospital's property, and even
now, he claims, not much has
changed even though the centre
has moved into a newer facility.
Other problems at the centre
are the uncomfortable heat that
smothers the back section of the
building and the offensive
smells that sometimes perme-
ate the whole building because
of plumbing problems.
Employees of the centre
declined to comment on the
problems. However, Mr Bain


spoke for them saying, "You
have these people working in
these conditions, but they can't
complain like I can complain
because the government can't
fire me.
"In order to put a dent in drug
addiction in this country the
government must first develop
this programme, he said. "We
need more buildings and more
people working in this pro-
gramme for it to be effective."
"If you don't have the facili-
ties and the people to do it you
don't have anything."
"It is terribly wrong," he con-
tinued. "These people want to
help but the conditions are
ridiculous. They stay here only
to help these people who are
on drugs because if they protest
or turn them away, they are
afraid they will abuse drugs
again."


Officer completes US marine


Straining course in States


R SUB Lieutenant Eric Strachan


Forr





Everyhig ls
i~~s justmtrol


SUB Lieutenant Eric Stra-
chan of the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force returned home
recently after successfully com-
pleting the demanding United
States Marine Corps (USMC)
Basic Officers Course in the
United States. The course,
which lasted for almost seven
months, was sponsored through
the International Military Edu-
cation Training (IMET) scheme
that is facilitated by the Amer-
ican Embassy.
The training was designed to
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officers with a basic education
in the traditional leadership
standards which are synony-.
mous with the USMC, and to
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ethos of this storied military
organisation.
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pletion of the lessons, the young
infantry officer would assume
the duties and responsibilities of
company grade -administrators
in the field and or garrison.
Additionally, participants receive
a basic understanding of the
infantry skills necessary to sup-
port ground combat operations.
Strachan, a 17-year veteran


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of excellent. A member of the
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team, which served in Haiti dur-
ing United Nations efforts there
in the early 90's, Sub Lieutenant
Strachan currently serves in the
Commando Squadron, which is
the infantry arm of the Defence
Force.


.. -,.ia ..aa M. .. ,
Old Female Chow, spayed and with a shaved coat
She is brown with a bald tip to her tail and
shrivelled ears. She is wearing a tick and chain collar.
Last seen on the night of Sunday 25th June.
Lost in the Camperdown Sans Souci area.
Any information on her whereabouts appreciated.
Reward offered.
Phone 324'7392 or 324 0134










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MON DAY, J ULY 3, 2006, PAG E 7


THE TRIBUNE














Retiring nursing adviser honoured


* DEPUTY Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt u ANNETTE Okpuno


HAVING served the public
for more than 40 years, Annette
Okpuno, Nursing Adviser to
the Public Hospitals Authority
was honoured at her retirement
banquet on Thursday evening
by Deputy Prime Minister Cyn-
thia Pratt.
The event, which took place
at Sandals Royal Bahamian
Hotel, was a tribute to Mrs
Okpuno, who as the first nurs-
ing adviser to the Public Hospi-
tals Authority, set the pace for
many innovations in nursing


seen in the field today.
Addressing the guests at the
special banquet, Deputy Prime
Minister Pratt praised Mrs
Okpuno for being a role model
for women everywhere.
"Great leaders are those who
first begin by serving. You
served and you have impacted
the lives of thousands over the
years not realising it, but what
you did is what a lot of us as
women must learn to be
responsible on the job and in
the home," she said.


Mrs Okpuno in her long
career worked in various capac-
ities at the Princess Margaret
Hospital over the years. She
advanced from nursing officer
grade II to nursing officer grand
senior, and finally acting prin-
cipal nursing officer. Mrs
Okpuno further developed her
expertise in the field of nursing
by serving on many committees
at the Ministry of Health and
Environment, including the
committee to establish the
Bahamas National Drug


Agency and the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital.
Mrs Pratt commended Mrs
Okpuno for not only her dedi-
cated service, but also for being
a great leader in the profession.
"This Bahamas is blessed to
have a gem like Mrs Annett
Okpuno. There are times in our
lives when we set out going
about our business not realis-
ing that you are building lives,
you, are building a nation, and
you are building your own fam-
ily," Mrs Pratt said.


* THE audience applauds

Herbert Brown, the Public
Hospitals Authority's manag-
ing director, in his tribute to
Mrs Okpuno called her a
woman who set high standards
and raised the bar to explore
new avenues for quality nurs-
ing in the Bahamas.
"This exceptional nurse has
served the Bahamian people
with distinction for an uninter-
rupted 40 years of service. She
stands out as a definite inspira-
tion to the younger generation


4.


of nurses as a model of whaf
must be done to be successful ih
your chosen career," Mr Brown
said.
Several other people paid
tribute to Mrs Okpuno, includ-
ing Mrs Mary Johnson, dired-
tor of nursing at the Ministry
of Health; Gloria Gardiner,
principal nursing officer at thes
Department of Public Health,
and Ampusam Symonette, pres-
ident of the Nursing Associa,-
tion.


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Shape youP news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
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for improvements in the-----
area or have won an
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If so, call us on 322-1986
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THE TRIBUNE


M


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Churches, Schools and
charitable organizations
receive a discount.


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from the factory















Abaco business



Community attend



BTC 'power lunch'


STHE Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company hosted the
Abaco business community to
iis first Enterprise Power Lun-
cheon held at the Abaco Club
at Winding Bay.
Employing the theme "Hap-
py Together," BTC's Enterprise
Sales Team undertook to rein-
force its commitment to the
business community to intro-
duce customers to the dedicat-
ed Enterprise Sales Team.
The focus of the event was to
create an overall awareness of
the services offered by BTC to
illustrate its response to the
business community's demand
for efficient technological ser-
vices.
S In his welcome address, Hen-
-y Romer, acting vice president
"of Northern Bahamas said:
"Competition, cost, and cus-
tomers are driving major
changes in the telecommunica-
St-ions industry. This change is
evident in the transformation
of BTC; our network, services,
,applications, and the way we
Ivork are all in transition. The
4iew demands and requirements
Of you, our Enterprise Clients,
,have caused us to enhance our
service delivery. Not only are
'we forced to deliver more effi-
.cient service, but we also have
4"o find new and innovative ways
.t do so."
,' Mr Romer assured the busi-
ness community that as the
telecommunications industry
assumes its new shape, BTC will
'evolve into a dynamically struc-
,tured company.
SGregory Bethel, Executive
Chairman of BTC's Board of
,Directors, also addressed the
-audience. During his remarks
*he said that BTC is proud of
-the contributions it has made
to the development of technol-
ogy in the Bahamas and that it
is committed to the success of
the corporate sector.


,





....





HENRY Rmer BTC's acting VP of Northern Bahamas
M HENRY Romer BTC's acting VP of Northern Bahamas


Leon Williams, acting presi-
dent and CEO, and Mr Antonio
Stubbs, acting senior vice pres-
ident and CTIO, gave a presen-
tation on BTC and the compa-
ny's future as it relates to new
technology.
Mr Williams claimed that
BTC offers telecommunications
solutions geared precisely to the
.requirements of Bahamian busi-
nesses in addition to support for
communication processes.
"Our goal is to give you the
means to win new business and
to enhance and strengthen your
customer relationships," Mr
Williams said. "Our customers
will benefit from the expertise
we have gathered in a wide vari-
ety of projects in the telecom-
munications industry.
"We provide the flexibility in
service delivery that you need to
establish and manage success-
ful customer relationships and
we work hand-in-land with you
to ensure the best possible sup-
port for your entire system."'
Guests attending the lun-
cheon were entertained by Aba-


U THE audience at the BTC lunch






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A well established hospitality company is seeking to hire an
individual to supervise the maintenance and repair of all company
owned mechanical equipment.
RESPONSIBILITIES
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& Installation, repair and maintenance of diesel engines.
0 Maintenance of generators.
M Supervise maintenance and repairs of company owned
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EDUCATION
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S Evidence of having completed skilled crafts or trade school in the
mechanical field.


Apply in writing to
The Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box SS -6257,
Nassau,The Bahamas,
Or fax to 363-4437


co native Stone McEwan and
received new GSM phones acti-
vated with $20 of air time, a
copy of the book Rediscover-
ing the Kingdom by Dr Myles
Munroe, and other BTC brand-
ed items.
Gary Smith of Bahamas Cus-
toms, Abaco, won a Motorola
Razr, Silbert Mills of Radio
Abaco was the winner of
Motorola Slvr, and Rowena
Pinder was the winner of a day
spa package for two at the Aba-
co Club at Winding Bay.
In addition, guests were given
a tour of BTC's wireless demon-
stration room where they had
the opportunity to test Black-
berry one of the many new
wireless products BTC will be
featuring in the near future.
The luncheon, which was
considered a great success was
also seen by persons over the
internet through www.stream-
c,inedia.com\btc.htnim


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I ~I~Lr:;t~r.~nnomt-p~ I II


THE TRIBUNE''


MONDXYii jULY '3,2006, PAGE 9








PAGE~~~~~~~~_ 10 ODY UY3,20 H RBN


Career Opportunity


A leading Broadcasting Company has a
unique immediate opening for an
energetic, motivated, professional fe-
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Applicant must be a team-player and
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There will be No Consideration for
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DA1 1411 c/o The Tribune P.O.Box
N-3207, Nassau.




CELEBRATE THIS IND


President Bush must




use Supreme Court




ruling to push change


A AMNESTY Interna-
tional is urging Presi-
dent Bush to treat the Hamdan
ruling as a spur to a major
rethink of the full range of his
administration's "war on ter-
ror" detention policies and
practices, whether in effect in
GuantAnamo, Afghanistan, Iraq
or undisclosed locations.
"We welcome the fact that
the Supreme Court has blocked
military commissions as they



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violate international fair trial
standards, including the right of
a detainee to be present at his
trial and to know all the evi-
dence against him," said Rob
Freer, Amnesty International's
researcher on the US.
"President Bush must now
see the bigger picture and
ensure that his administration
adopts a progressive interpre-
tation of the ruling in the inter-
est of justice, respect for human
rights, and the reputation of his
country. He must not seek to
resurrect the military commis-
sions in other forms or by other
means," said Rob Freer.
"For too long too much def-
erence has been given to this
executive in the 'war on terror',
and the administration has
sought to apply the narrowest
interpretations to judicial rul-
ings that have gone against it,"
Rob Freer said. "Today's rul-
ing is a welcome assertion of
judicial oversight."
The court affirmed the applic-
ability of fundamental protec-
tions under Common Article 3
of the Geneva Conventions,
specifically trials under "regu-
larly constituted courts afford-
ing all the judicial guaran-
tees...recognised as indispens-
able by civilised peoples". In
early 2002, President Bush
determined that Common Arti-
cle 3, which also prohibits tor-
ture, cruel, humiliating or
degrading treatment, did not
apply to those detained by the
US in Afghanistan and the
wider "war on terror".
When asked recently about
closing Guantanamo, President
Bush has said that he was wait-
ing for the Supreme Court to
rule in the Hamdan case, as it
concerned the question of


whether detainees he has des-
ignated 'enemy combatants'
could be tried by military com-
mission.
"President Bush has always
had the power to close Guanti-
namo and.to cancel the military
commissions. Both are the
products of his administration.
Each violates international law
and each should be consigned to
the history books."
The military commissions -
bodies created by the executive,
not independent courts fall
far short of international stan-
dards for fair trial. Justice would
neither be done nor be seen to
be done in any trials conducted
before them. Moreover, the
commissions can hand down
death sentences.
Amnesty International has
been calling for the closure of
Guantinamo for over a year
and since late 2001, the cancel-
lation of President Bush's mili-
tary order setting up the com-
missions.
Amnesty International con-


tinues to stress that the closure
of the Guantinamo facility
must not be used to transfer the
human rights violations else-
where. All secret detentions
must be ended and all detainees
fully registered. All detainees
should be guaranteed their ful
rights under international law
and standards, including the
right not to be subjected to tor-
ture or other cruel, inhuman or
degrading treatment, the right
to judicial review of the lawful-
ness of their detention, and the
right of anyone charged wit-
recognisably criminal offenc6s
to be brought to full and fair
trial in an independent arid
impartial court of law, witho'dM
the threat of the death penalty.
Background Information '
Salim Ahmed Hamdan,,a
Yemeni national, was captured
in November 2001 during tlhe'
international armed conflict pa
Afghanistan. He has now beeh
in US custody for more tha~
four and a half years, most ofit
in the detention camp in Gua -
tAnamo Bay, some of it in pro-
longed solitary confinement. i
July 2003, he was named under
President Bush's Military Order
of November 23, 2001, making,
him eligible for trial by military.
commission. He was charged
with conspiracy to commit ats
triablee by military commft-
sion", for example "attacking
civilians" and "terrorism". -
In a 5-3 decision, the
Supreme Court ruled that Pre-
ident Bush had overstepped his
authority in ordering military
commission trials for foreign
nationals held at Guantanamo.
The ruling held that the prt-
posed commissions violated US
law and the Geneva Conven-
tions.


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,'AA









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AEMTC's participants who attended the Small Business Training Seminar. "Houw to
Start & Operate a Successful Business' pose with several of the facilitators.


Successful Business Seminar held-Alpha Entrepreneurial Management
Training & Consultancy Services (AEMTC) held its second successful Small
Business Training Seminar "How to Start & Operate a Successful Business" Phase I,
June 12, 13, 15,. 19-21,2006 at The College of the Bahamas, Michael Eldon Complex.
Phase I is designed for individuals who have a desire to start their own businesses or
for those persons already in business but have no formal business training. AEMTC
is committed to providing quality small business for budding and experience
entrepreneurs. Ten(lO) individuals through many long hours of hard work discipline
and determination, attended the seminar and gave it high marks as outstanding
facilitators/presenters led them in lively and informative sessions. Participants
engaged in a series of interactive discussions, skills training group, presentations and
networking activities. On Wednesdays June 21, 2006 the closing ceremony was held
and guest speaker Beth Stewart, an entrepreneur and owner of Beth's Candy Kitchen
urged participants to follow their dream of becoming entrepreneurs..Then participants
were awarded certificates of participation from AEMTC and The National Foundation
for Teaching Entrepreneurship (NFTE, New York). Successful individuals from
both training seminars (held in March & June 2006) will now have the opportunity
to complete Phases II and III of the program. Interested persons wishing to take
advantage of this ongoing special small business training opportunity can contact
AEMTC at (242) 393-5961, or e-mail them at: alphaenttraining@yhaoo.com


lm r IIl ___~- L---~-- -L I --


THE TRIBUNE


PAG E 10, MON DAY, J ULY 3, 2006







I MiUNUAY, JULY 3, 2006, PAGE 11
L.:i~in~iCt~NU~sl~API~BW~II


THE TRIBUNE
U=I pm q r" PR 0 Z-17MR,


---111---- -----


---


- -~-"~--^--~s~m~ra~m- -- -~-I =1 -9 ~-LI ~ ---L~L~L-~a~lr~-~arrYU(iAP~sAtXY~aslll













Bahamians urged to display their



patriotism on National Pride Day


FROM Grand Bahama in the
north to Inagua in the south,
Bahamians from throughout the
archipelago are urged to display
their patriotism during Nation-
al Pride Day on Friday, July 7.
Rawson Square will be the
nation's centre of activity filled
with a kaleidoscope of Bahami-


an culture as local performers
take to the stage and colourful
display booths reminiscent of
an old Family Island village
showcase thingss Bahamian".
"National Pride Day isn't a
Nassau thing," says Director of
Culture Nicolette Bethel-Bur-
rows. "It's something any


Bahamian anywhere in the
world can celebrate by wearing
something Bahamian, eating
something Bahamian, listening
to something Bahamian or just
being Bahamian."
"We want to encourage
everyone who can to wear
Androsia or the Bahamian


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Pride Day T-shirts, decorate
their home.or business with
Bahamian flags and share their
culture with someone," said Mrs
Bethel-Burrows. "As a nation,
we have a whole lot to be proud
of and this is something we
must instil in our youth so that
the generation that follows can
carry the torch of our legacy to
their children."
Corporate entities are urged
to contact Del Sol for the pur-
chase of the official t-shirt for


staff and customers.
In New Providence activities
will begin promptly at 10am
with live radio remotes from
Rawson Square. A highly antic-
ipated Cultural Explosion also
will start at that time bringing to
life indigenous Bahamian songs,
dances, storytelling, arts, crafts
and Junkanoo.
Various Bahamian musicians,
including John Doe, Jane Doe
and Papa Mama are scheduled
to perform some of their popu-


lar hit songs.
Free tastes of The Bahamas
will be offered with a number of '
uniquely Bahamian dishes, such
as pastries, conch, fish, peas 'n'
rice or grits and such drinks as
Kalik and switcherr", among
others.
Finalists of the National Arts
Festival will also perform.
Bahamian style craft, jams, jel-
lies, liquors and samples of
Bahamian chefs' creations will
be offered.


* BAHAMIANS have been urged to celebrate their heritage and culture


~ r I 0 6 0 0M


* WHEN Anglican Bishops, in Nassau for the consecration of Father Laish Boyd as Bishop of the
Bahamas, paid a courtesy call on Governor General Arthur Hanna, it brought together, from left,
former Governor General Sir Orville Turnquest, Governor General Hanna, and former Acting
Governor General the Hon Paul Adderley. Mrs Adderley is pictured right.
(Photo: BIS/Patrick Hanna)


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Telephone: 322-2100


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I


THE TRIBUNE


PAO E 12, MON DAY, J ULY 3, 2006







MONDAY, JULY 3, 2006, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


L N


Shots fired,

stabbing

at wedding

reception

FROM page one
reception at the establish-
ment got into an argument
with one of the bar's employ-
ees.
The situation escalated
and one of the guests
removed a handgun from
his waist band and started
firing shots into the air,
before fleeing the scene on
foot.
Investigations are also
underway into a stabbing
incident which resulted in a
man being severely injured.
According to reports, 22-
year-old Mario Frederique,
of Eight Mile Rock, Grand
Bahama, was attending a
party at the Rock Island
Bar and Grill on Garnet
Levarity Highway at the
same time that the shooting
occurred at the bar.
During an altercation,
Mr. Frederique was stabbed
in, the upper right side of
his back. The doctor
attending the victim
described the injury as
"very serious".
Mr Frederique has been
detained in hospital.
Investigations into both
matters continue.


Motorcycle accident


FROM page one
Prince Charles and had just crossed the intersec-
tion of Prince Charles and Fox Hill Road, still
travelling east.
He reported that not too long after passing
the Texaco service station, both individuals
lost control of their motorcycles.
As a result, Mr Reid ran into a burgundy
coloured 1999 Ford Contour, which was
parked on the northern side of Prince
Charles.
Mr Reid died of his injuries on the way to
the hospital.
"The number of traffic deaths every year on


the streets throughout the Bahamas is unac-
ceptable," said Mr Dames.
He said that road safety is a collective
responsibility.
Generally speaking, and not referring to
this particular incident, Mr Dames said: "It is
the authorities' responsibility to ensure that
people understand you have to adhere to the
rules.
"At the end of the day, it is up to the per-
son sitting behind the wheel to take heed and
to understand that this is an awesome respon-
sibility that I have, and if I don't take it seri-
ously enough I could endanger not only my
life, but the lives of others," he said.


Major tourism changes


FROM page one
more people around the world
are coming into money, "for
example the baby-boomer gen-
eration is inheriting their par-
ent's wealth", people are look-
ing to invest in homes away
from home.
Often these days, she said,
wealthy people prefer to trav-
el with their family members -
aging parents and young chil-
dren and want to enjoy the
benefits of a home even when
they are on vacation.
Mr Johnson explained that
the advantage of second home
owners is that the Bahamas
gains more investors.
"These are not transient vis-
itors who come once every


A little goes


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0 YOi mipgh be surprised to
learn that the simpler the home
renovation. the more likely vou
are to recoup your costs when
.ou sell. Basic reno\artons
should enhance your home's
"livability," while avoiding over-customisation.
While purchasers may pay top dollar for elaborate improve-
ments in high-end real estate markets, appropriate touch-ups in the
kitchen and bathroom prove effective in more moderate markets.
The kitchen and bath always draw the most attention from pur-
chasers, and remodelling those rooms will likely result in a quick-
er sale.
Without tearing up your kitchen and having to eat out for two
weeks, you can simply install new cabinet fronts and hardware
for a fresh look. Another easy and relatively inexpensive option for
the kitchen and the bath is to replace dull scratched sinks and
update the faucets.
In 2005, REALTOR Magazine partnered with Remodelling
Magazine to publish its Cost vs. Value Report. One unsurprising
result that was reported is that major kitchen renovations typical-
ly recoup more than 90 cents on the dollar. Sounds pretty good,
right? Then consider another result that reported minor jobs will
recoup almost 100 per cent of the cost:
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five years, it's someone who
spends more time.
"It creates the opportunity
to sell them more products.
They are now investors," he
said.
However, Mr Johnson said
that the country must be care-
ful to not shut the Bahamian


home owner out of the mar-
ket.
With second homes in the
Family Islands selling for mil-
lions of dollars in some cases,
it will be an ongoing challenge
for the country to ensure
affordable housing for the
locals, he said.


Two missing persons


POLICE are requesting the
help of the public in locating
two missing persons, one who is
said to be "mentally chal-
lenged".
Ida Curry reported to the
police on Friday, at about
2.30am, that she was looking for
her missing son.
Parron Levine Curry, 27, of
Cedar Way, Golden Gates, was
last seen on June 27, wearing a
white t-shirt and a long pair of
jeans. He is of slim built, 6ftlin
and of light brown complexion.
Police said that Mr Curry is
reported to be mentally chal-
lenged. His mother is appeal-
ing to the public for anyone
who might know of his where-
abouts to come forward.
Another mother has also
reported her 13-year-old daugh-
ter, Antania Fowler, missing.
According to information
received by police, Antania left
her Croton Street home some-
time around 11.30pm on Friday,
and has not been seen or heard
from since.


EPARRON
LEVINE CURRY


She was last seen wearing a
pair of jeans and a red blouse.
Her mother Katherine Ash
is appealing to the public for
any information on the where-
abouts of the teenage girl.
Persons with any information
on the whereabouts of both
individuals are asked to report
the matter to any police station,
CDU or dial 919.


A leading General Insurance Agency seeks
to employ a Commercial Lines Customer
Service Representative.

RESPONSIBILITIES
1. Providing customer service to
commercials clients.
2. Creating and maintaining appropriate
file records.
3. Preparing required correspondence
(i.e. letters, memos, policy registers,
quotation slips, cover/debit notes etc.).
4. Processing all premium payments.
5. Following up outstanding premiums.
6. Producing and mailing customer
statements and dunning letters.
-. Structuring payment plans.
8. Assisting with monthly renewals.

REQUIREMENTS '
The ideal candidate should hold a
minimum of 3 BGCSEs (including Math
& English), a High School Diploma and
be in pursuit of a Certificate of Insurance.
Associate/Bachelors Degree or equivalent.

SYSTEMS KNOWLEDGE
Must be computer literate with working
knowledge of Windows, Word and Excel.

CONTACT
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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, MONDAY, JULY 3, 2006


Tourism officials and media mix


Last week the Ministry of
Tourism held an event in New
York to celebrate the 10-year
partnership between Conde
Nast and the Bahamas. We
capture the images.


1 f ....;r'c i
* MINISTER of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe addresses the
crowd


* DIRECTOR General fo Tourism Vernice Walkine cuts loose
on the dance floor


ALL Vehicles
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U JOSEPH Garby entertains guests at the party


* FRED Ferguson of Ihe band Ting ;nid Deni. illich provided
the music for the evening


Bahamas claims


link with franchise


FROM page one
worked together to create spe-
cial pirate-themed vacation
packages to get the maximum


* VERNICE Walkine,
Minister of Tourism Obie
Wilclicombel and Lisa Hughes
of Conde Nast Publications


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benefit from the upcoming
movie.
He emphasised that it was not
necessary for the Bahamas to
spend any money on the Pirates
of the Caribbean campaign, as ..
the country has created its own
currency in the form of its',,
tourism product.
In exchange for the promo-
tion initiatives, hotels and
resorts in the Bahamas simply. .
offered their rooinm as grand'-'.
prizes for US travellers partici-"
pating in any promotional com-
petitions, he said.
The Weber Shandwick
agency announced that as the
movie opens world-wide in the-
atres this week, promotions
tying the Pirates of the
Caribbean sequel to the
Bahamas include multi-million '
dollar campaigns with Exxon
Mobil, Coca Cola and Kellog-
The agency explained thatr-'",
banners featuring the name.,,,
'Bahamas' have been set up at
Exxon Mobil service stations inr
the US and Canada and tlhat ,"
Bahamas logos have been% .
placed on all the Pirates of thd<.t
Caribbean-themed Kellogg's'-i,..'
cereal boxes reaching millions' *
of consumers and potentiac*`*L
tourists. "-
With the Bahamas competvK. ,
ing not only regionally, but witK", j
destinations worldwide, Mrs#*, 1"
Walkine emphasised that it iS*'
vital that the country keep seek-' -
ing out these kinds of opportu-
nities as presented by the
Pirates of the Caribbean movie.
"With so many competitors, m *
for us to stand out we have to, *,,
push the envelope very hard,"'i
she said.
Pirates of the Caribbean.:-'o*
Dead Man's Chest, starring.
Johnny Depp, Orlando Bloorrni*
and Keira Knightly, opens thi,
Friday.
It is expected to be the sumno
mer's number one hit. .~*'
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' .;i ', -, *v -., :.- : -, '.'*,', -' ,,- ,






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1 MINISTER of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe with 'pirate' Joseph Garby


i t o L`h, e, A, T


I )RE
tJ.:virm INNd.


FEED
- -- - - -- - -- -~


1. ,/PII. ~ ~?/~Z Cof le, lCIII I ',ICr1.-, e. nnnt"W Ci'Iirw


* VERNICE Walkine helps Basil Smith, director of communications in the Ministry of Tourism,
to cut his birthday cake
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Rou n dTableQu alifiers


Eddkn Be BerylNors


Adetle Hutchinson Sandradee Henfield


Jeffrey Randall'


Lynette Thompson


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Patricia Ferguson


Founded in 1927, MDRT is comprised of 32,981 qualifiers whq reside in 74 nations and terri-
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MONDAY, JULY 3,2006


SECTION- ,- -


business@trihunemedia.fet


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


PM awaiting airport




agreement proposals


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor
MORE than $3.6 mil-
lion flowed out of Coli-
naImperial Insurance
Company to related par-
ties and entities within the
Colina financial group
during fiscal 2005, even
though its BISX-listed
parent did not declare a
dividend payment to ordi-
nary shareholders.
The 2005 results for
Colina Holdings
(Bahamas) are likely to
raise further questions
about whether minority
shareholders, who hold a
37 per cent stake in the
company, are being dis-
advantaged by the outgo-
ing revenue flows to relat-
ed parties.
There is nothing,
though, to suggest that
Colina Holdings, its staff,
officers and directors, or
those at any other Colina
entity have done anything
wrong in relation to the
related party transactions.
The fiscal 2005 outflows
to related parties from
Colina Holdings are less

SEEpage-4B -..


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

said he was awaiting rec-
ommendations from a gov-
ernment-negotiating team
that would "hopefully" see
the administration enter a full manage-
ment agreement for Nassau Interna-
tional Airport (NIA), as he acknowl-,
edged the public sector's inability to
meet all development and infrastruc-
ture demands.
In an address to business executives
that formally launched the next phase
for transforming downtown Nassau, the
Prime Minister said the Government's
negotiating team had just left Washing-
ton ard would deliver to him recom-
mendations "to enter into a full man-
agement agreement with YVRAS for
Nassau International Airport".
The Government earlier this year
entered into a Memorandum of Under-
standing with YVRAS, the internation-
al subsidiary of Vancouver Airport Ser-
vices (YVR), over the management con-
tract for NIA. However, a final defini-
tive agreement between the two parties
has yet to be concluded.
Joseph Reckley, the Airport Author-
ity's general manager, told The Tribune
last month that the negotiations over a
final agreement had been unexpectedly
drawn out:
"We still have some 't's' to cross and
'i's' to dot. We would have thought that
negotiations would have been wrapped
up a lot sooner than this, but it didn't
Happenn" hi e said .
The Government had hoped YVRAS


Meeting private sector demands is


Legislation


on the way


for Nassau's


Bay Street


BID


'greatest challenge' for government, says

Christie, with three developers 'impatient TribNE Business Editor


for decisions they should have had'


SP M PERRY CHRISTIE
would take over management at NIA by
mid-April.
In his address, Mr Christie acknowl-
edged that the private sector's creativi-
ty, financing and ingenuity had a key"
role to play in the financing and devel-
opment of infrastructure projects in the
Bahamas.
- The Prime Minister said: "Govern-
ment will not have the resources to do


all the development in this country..........
"The greatest challenge for the Gov-
ernment is the difficulty of keeping up
with private sector demands, private
sector development, conforming with
private sector realities."
Mr Christie said that on 'Friday he
had held three meeting with "developers
impatient with government for decisions
they should have had".
Focusing on plans to revitalise down-
town Nassau and move all commercial
shipping and port facilities to south-
western New Providence, the Prime
Minister questioned whether Bahamian
capital could be wholly relied upon to
provide a solution.
He also queried how quickly the
Bahamas could take a decision on
whether outside capital and expertise
needed to be integrated with their
Bahamian counterparts.
To aid harbourfront Nassau's revital-
isation, Mr Christie said Kerzner Inter-
national had offered to restore the
beach at Montagu to the size it was at in
the 1950s and 1960s. The Atlantis own-

SEE page 6B


LEGISLATION to facilitate
the creation of the Business
Improvement District (BID), the
entity that would co-ordinate
downtown Nassau's revitalisation,
will be drafted in August and Sep-
tember this year, the Nassau
Tourism & Development Board-
's executive director said.
Frank Comito, who is also the
Bahamas Hotel Association's
(BHA) executive vice-president,
told business executives attend-
ing the formal launch of the next .
phase for transforming downtown
Nassau that there were plans to
create a BID committee in
August 2006 to oversee its cre-
ation.
An external consultant, Brad
Segal of Progressive Urban Man-
agement Associates, had already
been hired to work on the BID's
formation.
Mr Comito said the committee,
in addition to fundraising, would
"develop a business plan, incen-
tive scheme, and draft legislation
for the BID".
"We plan to do this in August

SEE page8B


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Marina Villages 'could

replace' city of Nassau


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Atlantis and Baha Mar
Marina Villages could replace
downtown Bay Street as New
Providence's central business
district if the area is not rapid-
ly transformed, Prime Minis-
ter Perry Christie has warned.
In an address, to business
executives that formally
launched the next phase for
transforming downtown Nas-
sau, based on the masterplan
developed. by more than 200
Bahamian stakeholders and
urban planning consultants,
EDAW, the Prime Minister
said efforts now had "to go
beyond talking" and "have our
city take on more value".
"We are compelled to look
at New Providence and know
that if we don't change our
city, we have Kerzner's Marina
Village, Baha Mar's Marina
Village and whatever else is
created in New Providence to
take the place of the business
district, Bay Street downtown,"
Mr Christie said.
The plan for revitalising har-
bourfront Nassau has project-
ed that up to 4,000 new jobs
could be created if its vision is
translated into reality, with an
extra $264 million spent in the
area per annum and a rise in
"tourism stays" of 98,000 annu-
ally. .
The overall economic impact
from transforming downtown
Bay Street and the area
between Montagu and Arawak
Cay would include raising
property values by $48 million.
The plan added that the


enhanced attractions,
improved retail experience and
variety of activities for tourists,
cruise visitors and Bahamians
would also boost cruise visita-
tions by two million hours per
year.
The Prime Minister said the
revitalisation of downtown
Nassau, and moving all ship-
ping facilities to a new pur-
pose-built port in southwest-
ern New Providence, was
important for not just this
island but elsewhere in the
Bahamas.
He added that, if done cor-
rectly, "governments of the
future will patent development
on what happens here".
"New Providence must pro-
vide the leadership, with
tremendous implications for
the future of our country," Mr
Christie said, indicating Bay
Street's transformation could
become the model for plan-
ning and development within
the Bahamas.
He pointed to Exuma, which
has enjoyed tremendous eco-
nomic and population growth,
and which requires a decision
"now" from the Government
on where to relocate the
island's container port and
shipping facilities.
Referring to his mantra of
"planning, planning, planning",
the Prime Minister said the
Government and wider com-
munity faced various chal-
lenges in providing orderly
development, particularly
when dealing with New Provi-

SEE page 7B


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THE TRIBUNE


.-PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JULY 3, 2006


IIRI wT S c


3 Bed/ 2 Bath Residence 2,854 sq ft situated on 1.85 acres
Located Queens Highway, Nicholls Town, North Andros.

For conditions of the sale and any other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
at: 502-0929 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas


Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
to reach us before July 21s 2006.








Position Available

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* By Fidelity Capital Markets
IT was another scorching hot week
in the Bahamian market, as over
136,000 shares changed hands. The
market saw 15 of its 20 listed stocks
trade, of which seven advanced, one
declined and seven remained
unchanged.
Investors continue to take a keen
interest in the stocks of Abaco Mar-
kets and Freeport Concrete, although
nothing has fundamentally changed
with these companies with respect to
future earnings or growth prospects.
The volume leader for the week
was Freeport Concrete Company
(FCC), with 61,095 shares changing
hands and accounting for 44.9 per
cent of the total shares traded. The
big advancer for a second straight
week was Abaco Markets (AML),
increasing by $0.26 or 16.35 per cent
to close at a new 52-week high of
$1.85. Also advancing by $0,05 or 5.26
per cent was Freeport Concrete Com-
pany to close at $1. On the down side,
Cable Bahamas (CAB) lost $0.05 to
end the week at $9.16. The FIND-
EX advanced by 9.60 points to close
the week at 668.41.
US ECONOMIC NEWS
Consumer spending rises, while
inflation remains constant
Consumer spending in the US rose
in May by the least in three months,
and a measure of inflation watched
by the Federal Reserve was
unchanged, a day after policymakers
hinted at a pause in their interest-
rate increases. Spending increased
0.4 per cent after a gain of 0.7 per
cent in April. The personal con-
sumption expenditure deflator,
excluding food and energy, rose 2.1
per cent from a year ago, the same
pace as the previous month.
The absence of a pick-up in infla-
tion pushed the dollar lower and
spurred a rebound in Treasury notes.
While the price gauge is still above
chairman Ben S. Bernanke's pre-
ferred range, the fact that it didn't
accelerate reassured investors that
inflation is not spinning out of con-
trol. Today's report also showed'
incomes rose 0.4 per cent, more than
expected, after a 0.7 per cent increase
that was larger than the government
reported last month. The May rise
reflected a jump in proprietors'
income, while wages were unchanged.
Americans were also more opti-
mistic in June as gasoline prices
declined, the University of Michigan
reported, the first increase in confi-
dence in three months. The universi-
ty's final index of consumer senti-
ment climbed to 84.9 from 79.1 in
May.


The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 668.41 YTD 20.95%


BISX CLOSING
SYMBOL PRICE


AML
BAB
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
CWCB
DHS
FAM
FCC
FCL
FIN
ICD
JSJ
KZLB
PRE


$1.85
$1.49
$0.80
$7.49
$12.00
$14.00
$1.45
$9.16
$10.80
$1.96
$12.43
$4.78
$2.50
$6.21
$1.00
$11.15
$11.50
$9.50
$9.10
$7.92
$10.00


CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
CHANGE


$0.26
$-
$-
$0.26
$0.25
$-
$0.02
$-0.05
$-.
$0.06
$-
$-0.61
$-
$-
$0.05
$0.08
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-


16350
1000
0
5000
1000
0
10618
12800
7350
5019
.200
0
13100
400
61095
1100
1000
0
100
0
0


153.42%
35.45%
14.29%
7.00%
15.38%
9.80%
15.08%
-4.08%
18.55%
19.51%
14.25%
-11.32%
15.21%
2.64%
-13.04%
10.95%
5.50%
-4.52%
0.55%
15.62%
0.00%


DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:
FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) has declared a
dividend of $0.25 payable on July 5, 2006, to all shareholders as at
record date June 27, 2006.
Benchmark (Bahamas) has declared a special dividend of
$0.01 payable on July 31, 2006, to all shareholders as at record date
June 30,2006.
Consolidated Water Company has declared a dividend of
$0.012 per BDR payable on August 8, 2006, to all BDR share-
holders as at record date June 30, 2006.
ICD Utilities will hold its Annual General Meeting on July 18,
2006, at 6pm at Westin Sheraton in the Manor House, Great
Harbour Cay Room, Our Lucaya, Royal Palm Way, Freeport
Grand Bahama.
Abaco Markets will hold its Anfiual General Meeting on
July 24, 2006, at 6pm at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay
Street, Nassau, Bahamas.


International Markets


FOREX Rates
CAD$
GBP
EUR
Commodities
Crude Oil
Gold
International Stock Market Indexes:
DJIA
S & P 500
NASDAQ
Nikkei


Weekly
1.1154
1.8487
1.2791

Weekly
$73.87
$617.20

Weekly
11,150.22
1,270.20
2,172.09
15,505.18


%Change
-0.71
1.71
2.28

%Change
4.26
5.86

%Change
1.47
2.07
2.39
S2.46


IHT
1;


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intcA;




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.


I Bank of The Bahamas
INTERNATIONAL
"A growing and dynamic Bahamian institution"


VACANCY FOR THE POSITION OF:
CREDIT OFFICER FREEPORT BRANCH



Core responsibilities:

* Prepare thorough credit proposals and maintain profitability of assigned
portfolio.
* Interview loan applicants and make considered decisions based on
investigations and assigned lending authority.
* Act as the "Relationship Manager" for assigned accounts by ensuring
that 11 of the customers needs are satisfied.
* Ensure all loans are granted in compliance with the Bank's lending
policies and guidelines.
* Monitior and control loan portfolios to avoid delinquency.
* Perform constant follow-up on delinquent loan accounts.
* Ensure loan and security files are completed and properly maintained.
* Constantly increase lending by marketing the Bank's products and
services.

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:

* Associates Degree in relevant area (e.g. Accounting/Business
Administration/Finance)
Three to five years banking and lending experience
Excellent interpersonal and communication skills
Strong negotiation, and analytical and organizational skills
Computer literate-Ability to use MS Word and Excel



Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience and
qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and life
insurance; pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later that July 21st 2006 to:


The Senior Manager, Human Resources & Training
Bank of The Bahamas International
P.O. Box N-7118
Nassau, Bahamas


.


1 BUSINESS


vv 's N olsao t if o d .393 ,1i 4Fa: 91 141


.^w u


morei~d rehaj,






MONDAY, JULY 3, 2006, PAGE 3B


THF TRIBUNE


Unified taxi





body plans





purchases


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A COMPANY that aims to
unify the Bahamian taxi cab
system would "make two
acquisitions in the transporta-
tion field" if its proposals were
approved by the Government,
its chief proponent told The
Tribune.
Richard Johnson, the Public
Service Drivers Union's pres-
ident (PSDU), said the Taxi
Union Partners had already
been incorporated as a body
that was separate from his
organisation and others, such
as the Bahamas Taxi Cab
Union and the Grand Bahama
Taxi Union.
All three organisation
would be invited to partici-
pate as shareholders in the
Taxi Union Partners, though.
Mr Johnson said: "What is
critical to this whole initiative
is the approval of the Gov-
ernment of the proposal. The
Prime Minister has assured us
that once we've brought it to
the.level where we've got
financing approved, he will
oause this to happen."
Industry

Ultimately, Mr Johnson said
that what the taxi industry was
seeking was a Heads. of
Agreement with the Govern-
ment.
- -On the financing side, Mr
Johnson said discussions had
been held with the Royal
Bank of Canada, and he was


now awaiting the institution's
response. He added that
financing was likely to hinge
on government approval of
the scheme.
Partners

The Taxi Union Partners
proposal is similar to the one
that has been worked on for
restructuring the jitney sys-
tem. It, too, calls for a unified
system, with franchise owners
and drivers holding shares in a
single company that would
apply a degree of self-regula-
tion to the industry, control-
ling the issuance of plates, for
instance.
In the case of the Taxi
Union. Partners, Mr Johnson
said franchise owners and
operators, and drivers, would
be given stakes in the compa-
ny based on the valuation of
their franchises.
He added: "We have the
support of the Road Traffic
Controller, Jack Thompson.
He has said that once we've
got the necessary approvals
and government permits, he
would help to make it happen
and get the involvement of the
taxi drivers.
"It is the position of the
PSDU that with the taxi busi-
ness in this country, we should
be the ones in control of our
business. Government should
always be the regulator, not
the operator."
SIf the Taxi Union Partners
initiative took off, Mr John-
son said that any franchise'


holder who participated would
not have to worry about pur-
chasing new vehicles.
This would now be the
responsibility of the Taxi
Union Partners, which would
purchase vehicles, finance,
them and maintain it.
Apart from helping to cre-
ate,and maintain a uniform
fleet, Mr Johnson said this pol-
icy would remove hefty start-
up and fixed costs from the
franchise holders, as they
would be able to lease the
vehicles from the Taxi Union
Partners eventually acquir-
ing them once the lease was
paid off.
Drivers

Taxi drivers would also be
invited to become sharehold-
ers in the Taxi Union Part-
ners, Mr Johnson said.
He added: "Should we get
this Heads of Agreement, gov-
ernment will not have to wor-
ry about negotiating with
management at the airport, as
we'd be prepared to step in
and do that. We would want
to actively become stakehold-
ers.
"We. want to be able to go
to a Baha Mar, sit down with
them and discuss the trans-
portation services they are
needing.
"What we are attempting to
do is position taxi drivers to
take full advantage of the
Government plans to put an
anchor property on each
major island."


SOUTHWEST PORT JOINT TASK FORCE

Expressions of Interest for Consulting Services for a New Container and Freight Port

The Government of the Bahamas has approved the formation of a joint Public and Private Sector Task Force-
The Southwest Port Joint Task Force (SPJTF) to relocate container and freight activities on New Providence
to an inland site on the southwest part of the island. The port relocation project is a consequence of an
initiative of the Government of the Bahamas to redevelop the downtown waterfront area of Nassau. The
Bahamas wishes to develop an efficient, safe, secure and environmentally friendly marine container port.

The purpose of the SPJTF is to oversee the development of a marine container port to accommodate the
anticipated container cargo, break bulk, aggregate and fuel volumes in the region. This includes the
preparation of feasible designs for the new port; consideration of the location of break-bulk facilities and tho
development of the associated infrastructure.
The SPJTF is requesting Expressions of Interest from consultants with extensive international experience and
qualifications in the design, cost estimation, management, and operation including preparation of financial
analyses, feasibility studies and business plans of ports. The immediate requirement is for the preparation of a


comprehensive business plan addressing:
1. the design of the port,
2. estimated capitalcosts,
3. estimated cargo volumes,
4. operating expenses forecasts,


5. revenue forecasts,
6. a phased port development program,
7. port ownership options, and
8. port management options


Following the completion and acceptance of the business plan, the selected consultant may be asked to
proceed with a design suitable for tender calls. Further involvement of the Consultants is neither promised
nor prohibited at this stage..
Interested parties capable of commencing work by August 14, 2006 should forward a statement of their
experience in comprehensive port development consulting, including similar work performed within the
Bahamas and the Caribbean along with their company profiles and the profiles of individuals who would be
assigned to the project. Firms should clarify whether they are affiliated or part of a construction/development
company. The Expression of Interest should not exceed 10 single spaced letter size pages and should be e-
mailed to arrive not later than 12:00, p.m., noon, EDT, Tuesday, July 11, 2006 to:
Southwest Port Joint Task Force
Ms. Camille Johnson, Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Energy and the Environment
Email: Camille Johnson" camilleiohnson()bahamas.gov.bs

Copies should also go to the task force co-chairs:
Mr. Paul Major (public sector co-chair) at paulmaior.,bahamas.gov.bs and
Mr. Michael Maura (private sector co-chair) at mmaura@.tropical.com.
The SPJTF will review the Expressions of Interest and will send out a more detailed terms of reference
(TOR) by e-mail to short listed firms by noon July 13, 2006. A response to this TOR will be due July
28, 2006. Firms submitting proposals will be interviewed on August 8 and 9, 2006. The successful
consultant will be notified at the end of that week.
Questions on this request should be addressed to either to Mr. Paul Major at 242-322-6005 or Mr.
Michael Maura at 242-322-1012.










Th ..Un it .of,"m.'


A Bahamian Tradition of Educational Excellence.
The only MBA program offered in the Bahamas that is fully accredited by AACSB International -the Association to Advance Collegiate
:.,:r:.l ; .l EU rr i, .:i 1 -. ii ..,' r, ,r. i ,i,, 1 ;. j. r n.; The MBA degree you earn is recognized
worldwide: ranked #1 in Florida by The Wall Street Journaland 45 by Hispanic Business Magazine.


New executive-style classroom, exclusive to Bahamian
EMBA students, at the College of the Bahamas.
The program is designed for those who work full-time and
have an undergraduate degree from an accredited university.
Curriculum integrates practical experience, comprehensive
business theory and aspects of international business
a Students attend a one week course on the Coral Gables
campus during one summer of the program all
expenses paid.
Fellowships of $15,360 will be awarded to all admitted
students who meet required criteria This fello,,s!io is only
available in the Bahamas

MEMBER OF THE BAHAMAS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.


F First offered in 1976, this program is modeled after our
J1 r, 1 ',, 1 P ., A ii ' .r:ir ,iiT rn '.,' i-' lri '. ng
its 33rd anniversary.
:, I I ujn ti i i.l,'i-_]i :l, .rln ,3ri] nd it.t q ludifid
faculty, many of whom serve as consultants to
international companies.
a Classes meet 40 Saturdays per year, spread over
8 semesters,



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS


Stra, Jl atJi**, aamsShabe f om ereN ssa


U I


I I JL







PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JULY 3, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


i Colina: Questions on related parties


110Balfla uf ,1 1 I0 I w $ Apd anit4 ffrllto


FROM page 1B


than the $4.472 million
recorded in 2004, the latter
year having seen the pay-
ment of $921,000 in "broker-
age fees" to CFG for services
in negotiating the Capada
Life and Imperial Life pur-
chases.
And the 2005 financial
results for Colina Holdings
received a clean bill of health
from external auditors Price-
waterhouseCoopers (PwC).
The 2004 accounts had
been qualified by the same
firm, after PwC "were not
able to satisfy" themselves
that all related party trans-
actions had been disclosed.
Indeed, the transparency
regarding Colina Holdings'
related party dealings is wel-
come, and could serve as a
model for other Bahamian
companies.
Some $1.075 million or just
under a third of the $3.6 mil-
lion went to the Colina


Are you looking for a new challenge?

We are currently seeking talented and highly motivated candidates to join our Information Technology ("IT") Services and
Information Risk Management ("IRM") practices.

IT Services and IRM Associate

Successful candidates for the dual role of IT Services and IRM Associate will have a minimum of a Bachelor's degree from
an accredited institution and one to two years of experience. Exceptional writing and documentation skills are required.
Experience with Active Directory, TCP/IP, network and application security skills, and backup software preferred. Duties will
include technical support for staff, management of backed IT infrastructure, IT audit compliance testing, change
management recording, and security documentation. MCP and/or CCNA certification and experience.preferred.

This is an excellent opportunity to broaden your professional experience in a varied practice that offers competitive
compensation and benefits packages.

Applicants should submit a cover letter, resume, copy of their transcripts and copies of any relevant certifications, to: KPMG, Human Resources Manager, P.O.
Box N123, Nassau, Bahamas or tavi.es.:A!k.m,, g.r ... /



AUDIT t TAX a ADVISORY


*2 06. XPMG, a Bihsmian pa neoship, he Bahamian r;cen berfirm of KPMG IenrRatin al, Swiss coop~rativf All rights reserved.





Coi Colina
SFinancial Advisors Ltd.

Pricing Information As Of:
Friday. 30 June 2006
*". f: rtX US.1T:D & TRADED SECURITIES VISIT WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
i.R;''..,' IBX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1.519.11 / CHG 02.40 %CHG 00.16 / YTD 168.40 / VTD % 12.47
52wk-1H 52wk-Low S.rrn.bol pr.-. .:..us Close T a,'5 C ,113. Cnanjg Daill 1,c. EPS : Oi. & PE E '..1-i
1.85 0.59 Abaco r.larketl 1 8i 1 85 0 00 1 50 -0 .i :u N 0 r r.1
12.00 8.70 Bahamas Property Fund 11.75 12.00 0.25 1,000 1.568 0.380 7.7 3.17%
7.49 6.35 Bank of Bahamas 7.23 7.49 0.26 5,000 0.738 0.330 10.1 4.41%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.292 0.020 2.7 2.50%
1.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste. 1.43 1.45 0.02 10,618 0.143 0.060 10.0 4.20%
1.49 1.05 Fidelity Bank 1.49 1.49 0.00 1,000 0.188 0.050 7.9 3.68%
9.60 8.00 Cable Bahamas 9.15 9.19 -0.04 2,800 0.618 0.240 14.9 2.61%
2.20 1.39 Colina Holdings 1.96 1.96 0.00 -0.067 0.000 NM 0.00%
10.80 8.50 Commonwealth Bank 10.80 10.80 0.00 0,931 0.600 11.6 5.56%
6.26 4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.69 4.91 0.22 0.115 0.045 40.7 0.96%
2.88 2.10 Doctor's Hospital 2.40 2.50 0.10 5,100 0.283 0.000 8.8 0.00%
6.21 4.02 Famguard 6.21 6.21 0.00 0.539 0.240 11.5 3.86%
11.50 10.49 Finco 11.50 11.50 0.00 0.745 0.540 15.1 -4.78%
12.43 8.75 FirstCaribbean 12.43 12.43 0.00 0.885 0.550 14.0 4.42%
11.15 8.46 Focol 11.15 11.15 0.00 0.885 0.500 12.6 4.48%
1.27 1.00 Freeport Concrete '1.05 1.00 -0.05 5,000 -0.162 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.50 9.50 .0.00 0.532 0.405 17.9 4.26%
9.10 8.27 J S. Johnson 9.10 9.10 0.00 0.565 0.560 16.1 6.15%
7.98 5.30 Kerzner International BDRs 7.93 7.92 -0.01 0.160 0.000 49.6 0.00%
1000 1000 Premier Real Estale 10 00 10 00:' 00 i u,00- i 8:,- 1. 5 4 5
-'' '. Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securies
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price weeklyy Vol trj.o 4 y Jv FE I '61
14.00 12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.00 15.00 11.00 1-923 0.720 7.8 4.80%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) '.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0 5-1 0 20 RND Holdings n 29 054 o n00 -0.084 0.000 NM 0.00%
:-'.' '- "Coilrna Over-The-Counler Securities
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 100 04 00 J 1 ,:,C .1 .. ,, ,'i i) ) , -
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.00 15.00 12.50 1.750 0.360 8.0 2.57%
060 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.070 0.000 N/M 0.00%
^AS0' OfBISX Usted Mutual Funds
52vk-H, 52wk-Low Fund Name N- TO T. Last 12 r.:.nlr. D.. i.~.' ,-
1.2945 1.2378 Colina Money Market Fund 1.294496*
2.8564 2.3657 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.78564 ***
2.3915 2.2487 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.391480*.
1 174- 1 1246 Colina Bond Fund 1 114411*
.'~ iNES2,~h; ._. '- FINDEX: CLOSE 667.20 / YTD 20.90% / 2005 26.09%
6-1 .-.. ARE !NDEX 19D 2= l.:,..0 -* '-. T T di- *' .L:.' : ,r. . -. . s..:a r ::
52wk-Hi Highest dosing pice in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest losing pricein last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity 23 June 2006
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol.- Trading volume of the prior week 31 May 2006
Change Change in dosing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value 30 April 2006
DIV $ -Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P .C,. ir.g r..ed..deaD, r.e. I I.2.-:' .. -; ... Flrli Tr. ,lil,. B-...-. i .l::R i.-.d J: ., I.1-,.F 1 199 10 .... A3,. 20016
'TO TRAPDECALL: COUNA 242-502-7010 / FIDELITY 242-356-7764 FOR MORE DATA 8 INFORMATION CALL r242) 394-2503


Financial Group (CFG), the
then parent for the Colina
group. Some $981,500 of that
was described as "manage-
ment fees", paid to CFG
under a July 2002 services
agreement, while another
$93,833 was for "reimburse-
ment of operating expenses".

Name

CFG's name was subse-
quently changed after the
end of fiscal 2005 to A.F.
Holdings. The name change
is likely to have resulted
from the bitter shareholder
dispute between remaining
principals, Emanuel Alexiou
and Anthony Ferguson, and
their former business part-
ner, James Campbell, which
led to the latter's ouster. The
'A' is likely to stand for
Alexiou, the 'F', Ferguson.
Other related party pay-
ments include $780,207 in
investment:management fees
likely to have gone to Colina
Financial Advisors (CFA), a


significant increase on 2004's
$548,220.
In addition, the adminis-
tration and registrar and
transfer agency fees paid by
Colina Holdings increased to
$173,406 year-on-year, com-
pared to $30,000 the year
before.
CFA is also likely to have
been the recipient of
$573,850 for handling Coli-
nalmperial's $20 million
preference share issue, which
ultimately financed the pur-
chase of Imperial Life.
Another $182,384 was paid
to a related party for prop-
erty and casualty insurance,
likely a reference to Colina
General, the group's insur-
ance agency.
In addition, the legal fees
and property management
fees noted in Colina Hold-
ings 2005 financial are like-
ly to have been paid to a law
firm and real estate firm in
which Mr Alexiou holds a
substantial stake.

Start

Altogether, since the start
of 2003, more than $15 mil-
lion has flowed out of Colina
Holdings via related party
transactions and dividend
payments to affiliates.
Aside from the related
party dealings, Colina Hold-
ings (Bahamas) did not turn
out a bad year, with net
income increasing to $1.749
million compared to the pre-
vious year's $313,867,
although gross premium rev-
enues had risen to more than
$136 million compared to
2004's $78.833 million. The
revenue rise was due to
Imperial Life's inclusion for


Legal Notice



NOTICE



EUROFAR CONSULTANTS LTD.
In Voluntary Liquidation

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act. 2000, EUROFAR
CONSULTANTS LTD. is in dissolution as of June
29th, 2006.

International Liquidator Services Limited situated
at 35A Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City,
Belize is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR


Legal Notice

NOTICE


BLANTON MARKETING
LTD.
NOTICE is hereby given that'in accordance
with Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act. No. 45 of 2000, BLANTON
MARKETING LTD., is in dissolution as of June
28th, 2006.
International Liquidator Services Limited situated at
35A Regent Street, P.O.Box 1777, Belize City, Belize
is the Liquidator.



LIQUIDATOR


FAB! FINDS GIFT SHOP

2 Week Long Pre-Summer Sale

June 26 through July 8, 2006









Located in the Ljford Cay Shopping Center
Sale hours: 10am-4pm
MIonday Saturday




INTERNATIONAL CULTURE LTD,7
Language Services
Translators-Interpreters
Spanish Immersion Courses

Immersion Summer Camp in Cuba
,A cultural experience for your kid
All inclusive with Group rates available
July 2nd August 20th, 2006


Week C ilidren'.$450.00 Teens**:$580.00
2 weeks Children*:$850.00 Teens**$980.00
3 weeks Children*:$1200.00 Teens* *$1300.00
Month Children*:$1400.00 Teens**$1500.00
Adults 6-10 nights $400.00 & 11-15 nights $450.00

For booking and registration call 356-3953 or Email:
myru@batelnet.bs









S11 on
WtNDING BAY
ABACOA. HAMAS
Has two (2) vacancies for
Membership Sales Executives:
-Exceptional written and verbal communication skills, organization
skills
-Exceptional Telephone skills
-Public speaking preferred
-Ability to demonstrate strong relationship sales capability
-Ability to interface professionally with all members of staff
-Generation and execution of an annual business plan
-Self generation of buisness through referrals and other personal
contacts
-Exceptional skills in long range guest relaional maintenance
-Use of tracking system for effective follow up andcustomer purchase
sequence
-College degree preferred

Please Send Resumes to:

Attn: HR Director
The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O. Box AB2057
Mash Harbour, Abaco
or
Fax: 242-367-0077


the first time.

Income

All in all, the income per-
formance was not bad given
that Colinalmperial is still
bedding down the Canada
Life and Imperial Life acqui-
sitions. In deals this size, it
often takes two years before
a reasonable judgment can
be made about whether the
purchases have worked.
Colina Holdings also sold
off the 60 per cent stake it
had acquired in Internation-
al Reinsurance Managers,
the US group health reinsur-
er, on October 1, 2005, for
$1.408 million, a slight gain
on what it had paid.
Meanwhile, Colina Hold-
ings said it had paid $642,810
for the review of the compa-
ny carried out by KPMG to
determine whether it was in
compliance with the 21 con-
ditions imposed by the Gov-
ernment in return for
approving the Imperial Life
deal.
Several sources have ques-
tioned why the review, which
was being conducted for
Bahamian financial services
regulators, particularly the
Securities Commission of the
Bahamas and Registrar of
Insurance, and its conclu-
sions will not be made pub-
lic, since the shareholders of
a public company are effec-
tively paying for it.
Colinalmperial also
incurred payments of
$708,000 in 2005 in relation'
to a programme encouraging
staff to take voluntary redun-
dancy, as its downsizes to
appropriate levels after the
acquisitions.


I I I BUSINESS;


THE TRIBUNE






MONDAY, JULY 3, 2006, PAGE 5B


Five new directors for Chamber


Butler & Tayler; and I Chester
Cooper, British American
Insurance.
Only eight out of the 12
nominated directors could be
elected.

Officers

On the officers side, incum-
bent president Tanya Wright, a
Bank of the Bahamas Interna-
tional executive, was returned
unopposed to office.
Also returned were first
vice-president Dionisio
D'Aguilar, Super Wash; and
second vice-president Khaalis
Rolle of Bahamas Ferries.


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, CRYSTAL ELIZABETH
STRACHAN of Nassau, Bahamas, C/O P.O. Box N-10095, Nassau,
Bahamas date of birth 27th September, 1972, intend to change my
name and date of birth to CRYSTAL ELIZABETH STRACHAN-
WILLIAMS date of birth 27th September 1971. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write
such.objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of
publication of this notice.


Serving as honorary treasur-
er is Bryan Knowles of
Bahamas Supermarkets, and
Gershan Major, Mail Boxes
Etc, will hold the post of Hon-
orary Secretary.
The AGM was also chosen
as the forum to host represen-
tatives of the Coral Gables
Chamber of Commerce. The
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce and the South Florida
Chamber have enjoyed a close
relationship over the years,
particularly during the presi-
dency and lifetime of busi-
nessman John Morley, who
died last year.
The Coral Gables Chamber
passed a resolution honouring
the accomplishments of Mr
Morley during his tenure as
Chamber president and as a
director, highlighting his role
in the international chamber
relations programme between
the two organizations.
Accepting the award was Mr
Morley's son David, who
offered a moving expression
of gratitude on behalf of his
father.


* SHOWN (from left to right): Branville McCartney, I Chester Cooper, Inga Bowleg, Michael
Rolle, Tanya Wright, Gershan Major, Caroline Moncur, Khaalis Rolle, Phillip Simon.






PUBLIC NOTICE ,

PAYMENT OF CONTRIBUTIONS -
The National Insurance Board wishes to advise all employers and
seld-employed persons that beginning July 1, 2006, contributions
paid after the due date, will be automatically assessed interest
charges.

Be reminded that contribution payments for the month of June
2006, must be paid by July 15th, 2006.

The National Insurance Board wishes also to remind employers that
students.hired to work between June 1 and August 31, who are
between the ages of sixteen (16) and twenty-four (24) years, and
earn $250.00 per week or less, are categorized for National Insurance
purposes as "summer students;" consequently, no contributions
are to be deducted from their wages. However, contribution payments
must be made in respect of their employment at the rate of 2% of
their insurable earnings.

Please contact your nearest National Insurance Local office for
further information.


Bahamas Hot Mix: Equipment For Sale
Telephone 242-377-6351 Ext 239 (Nassau) / 242-367-3956 (Abaco)


Local

Nassau












Abao








Nassau


Abaco


Nassau


:.Nassau


rDI


Nassau



Nassau


Abaco


Nassau


SNassau



SNassau


.ion Manufacturer

John Deere


iCaterpillar


Gal,-:,nl


15iilr .. i


Sear


1997 i410E


1973 12


i :;? T9 ,B


I r? G.ILl ,:,


P,'i 95.B


Model


iBarber Greene 1979 SB140


Roadtec


Oynapac


;Dynapac


Dynapac


Gehl


Sweepster


Mack


Mack


iKenworth


1986 455



1986 :CS12


1997 iBW212D


1995 :CA251D



1995 CA251D


2000 .6635 DXT Series II Turbo


N/A Model HB72P


1986 RD686SX


1986 RD686SX


1973 W925


Description


'Backhoe


Grader


Gr ,ds r


,jr daer


Paver


Paver


Roller 3-Wheel


Roller


Roller


Roller


Skid Steer


Sweeper Attachment


Dump Truck


Dump Truck


Tractor Head


BHM ID # Selling Price


EP1 537


EB8103


EB 108


EB15 ?"



EP506


EH401


EHS15


EB315


EB1534


EB311


EB316


EP6001


iEA2302


ET1586


ET1590


ET124


$20,000.00


$8,000.00


13.000 00


128.500.00


$8.000 00


$2,000.00


$2,000.00


$1,000.00


$40,000.00


$30,000.00


$30,000.00


$12,000.00


$1,000.00


$20,000.00


$20,000.00


$2,000.00


* SHOWN (from left to right): Tanya Wright, David Morley,
and Roy Gonas, Coral Cables Chamber of Commerce.


FIVE new directors have
been elected to the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce's
Board of Directors, with the
organisation's annual general
meeting (AGM) returning all
officers to their posts for
another year.
The five new directors are
Caroline Moncur, Providence
Technology Group; Michael
Rolle, Scotiabank; Ken Hut-
Ston, John S. George; Inga
SBowleg, John Bull; and Dar-
ron Cash, Doctor's Hospital.
The three directors return-
ing for a second term are
Branville McCartney, Hals-
bury Chambers; Lewis Butler,


WINDING BAY

Has two (1) vacancies for
Sales & Marketing Project Director:
-Responsible for onsite coordination of sales, sales administration and
marketing.
-Achievement of targeted sales volume and maintaining inventory.
-Develop fnture(MVCI experience preferred) managers and implement
self developed program
-Implementation of tour efficiency and building of strong team values
-Forecast and budget annual sales targets.
-Ensure communication, between personnel and others
-Strong leadership skills.
-Minimum 5 years marketing vacation ownership
-Minimum 5 years marketing in management of sales, marketing and /or
administration
-College degree preferred, but not required.
Please Send Resumes to:

Attn: HR Director
The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O. Box AB2057
Mash Harbour, Abaco
or
Fax: 242-367-0077





POSITION AVAILABLE


Leading and well established office

equipment and business solutions

company has opening for a
SUPPORT TECHNICIAN

2 years + experience in microsoft

Server 2000/2003 and other

microsoft programs

Computer hardware experience

desirable.

Please reply with resume to:

DA4277c/o

The Tribune

P.O.Box N3207

Nassau, Bahamas


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THE TRIBUNE





THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B. MONDAY, JULY 3, 2006


GN-367


MINISTRY OF FINANCIAL SERVICES AND INVESTMENTS
NOTICE

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT
(CHAPTER 326)


It is hereby notified pursuant to Section Seven of the Industries Encouragement
Act that the Minister is about to consider whether the following products should
be declared "APPROVED PRODUCTS" for the purposes of that Act.


PRODUCTS


Baked Bread, Buns & Cakes


RAW MATERIALS TO BE USED IN
MANUFACTURE

Flour, Soya Bean Oil, Cotton Seed Oil,
Vegetable Oil, Yeast, Additives, liquid
egg, cake and pudding mix


-- - ---

It is hereby notified pursuant to Section Five of the Industries Encouragement
Act, Chapter 326, that the Minister is about to consider whether the manufacturer
specified in the first column of the table below should be declared an
"APPROVED MANUFACTURER" in relation to the products specified in the
third column.

MANUFACTURER LOCATION OF PRODUCTS
FACTORY PREMISES


Bakery Services Ltd. Oakes Field Baked Breads, Buns &
New Providence Cakes
The Bahamas



Any interested person having any objection to these declarations should :
give notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the Office of
the Ministry' of Financial Services^arid Investments, before, 13th. day of July,
2006, by letter addressed to:-
THE PERMANENT SECRETARY
THE MINISTRY OF FINANCIAL SERVICES & INVESTMENTS
P.O. Box N-7770
NASSAU, N. P.,
THE BAHAMAS

SHEILA CAREY
PERMANENT SECRETARY


just call 322-1988 today!(


FROM page 1B

er had also offered to provide a
beach restoration consultant,
who had worked on such a
project at Lyford Cay.
Opposition FNM MP Brent
Symonette claimed in the
House of Assembly that the
delay in bringing YVRAS in
might have been caused by
"exclusive rights of certain ten-
ants controlled by supporters"
of the PLP. The exclusive
rights he is referring to are
likely to be the retail and
liquor concessions.
The Memorandum of
Understanding fell far short of
what was initially anticipated
for NIA, with the Government
retaining a large degree of con-
trol.
Release
A YVRAS press release,
issued on February 10, 2005,
when the company was named
the preferred bidder on the
contract, said in relation to
NIA: "The contract will be for
15 to 25 years depending on
the negotiation of financial and
commercial terms."
However, the Memorandum
of Understanding (MOU)
between the Government and
YVRAS was only for 10 years,
and is just related to manag-
ing, operating and helping to


develop NIA.
Lease
Rather than lease the airport
to /VRAS, the Airport
Authority will instead lease it
for 30 years to a new Bahami-
an company, called Newco,
which will assume NIA's oper-
ations.
Newco will "initially be
wholly-owned" by the Airport
Authority, which retains own-
ership of NIA. This effectively
means that the Airport
Authority is leasing NIA to
itself, as the 100 per cent own-
er of Newco.


And the financing for capital
works and improvements,
derived from the passenger
user facility fee charge, was
also under government control'
through itself, the Airport
Authority and Newco, with
YVRAS "collaborating" in this"
area.
Phase
Phase one of the expected
$200 million "facelift" for NIA.
is expected to be completed 24'
months after the date that'
YVRAS assumes responsibili-
ties for the management of the
airport.


/ \* )
f/

The Romora Bay Club & Resort has the
following exciting job opportunities available!

SOUS CHEF

Hotel/resort restaurant supervisory experience
required. Take charge individual to run busy outlets.
Great chance to grow with the company!

CHIEF MAINTENANCE
ENGINEER

Knowledge of heating, ventilation and air
conditioning/refrigeration, vehicle maintenance and
kitchen equipment essential. Experience in supervisory
maintenance position required. Exciting future projects
in store!

ASSISTANT MANAGER

Hotel management experience and a necessary
including training, guest service and front office.
Manager on duty background essential.. Outstanding
opportunity for advancement with the organization!

Please send your resume including salary details either
by fax: 242-333-2500 or by email:
info@romorabay.com. For more information on
Romora Bay Club & Resort, please review our website
at www.romorabay.com. No phone calls, please.






"Teach Mie 0 Lonrd Thy Way"...Ptalm 11933
Shirley Street Tel: (242) 39404481/394-4484
P.O. Box N-1566 Nassau Bahamas Fax:(242) 393-0058

TEMPLE CHRISTIAN
HIGH SCHOOL
ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

Temple Christian High School will
hold it's Entrance Examination on
Saturday, July 8th, 2006 at the school
on Shirley Street from 8:00 a.m. 12
noon for students wishing to enter
grades 7, 8, 9 and 10. Applications
are available at the High School Office
and should be completed and
returned to the school by Friday, July
7th, 2006.


For further information please call
telephone numbers:
394-4481 or 394-4484



Our dshwfi member vf the
Association ofChrstlan Schoos Intermtwian


BAHAMAS PROPERTY FUND LIMITED
CONSOLIDATED INCOME STATEMENT
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH, 2006
( UNALUDITED)


THREE MONTHS ENDED) THREE MONTHS ENDED
31.03.06 31.03.05
INCOME

RENTAL REVENUES 1,043,708 1,036,890
OTHER INCOME 27,274 8,301
1,070,9.82 1,045,191

OPERATING EXPENSES

BANK INTEREST 202,158 220,820
PREFERENCE SHARE DIVIDENDS 110,904 137,500
OTHER EXPENSES 81,470 114,845
394,533 473,165



FUNDS FROM OPERATIONS (FFO) 676,449 572,026

GAIN/ (LOSS ) ON REVALUATION
AMORTISATION OF DEFERRED EXPILSrS (2,126) (2,828)
BAD DEBT EXPENSE

NET INCOME 674,324 569,198


FFO PER SHARE $0.28 $0.24

EARNINGS PER SHARE $0.28 $0.24

NET ASSET VALUE PER SHARE $11.44 $10.18


_ q___


I


BUSINESS


Prime Minister




awaiting airport




agreement




proposals


~
~
i.


i






MONDAY, JULY 3, 2006, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE


Marina Villages 'could



replace' city of Nassau


FROM page 1B


dence's existing traffic conges-
tion.
Mr Christie indicated the
number of cars on this island
was likely to increase further as
a result of the job opportuni-
ties to be created by ongoing
development projects and
those yet to be formally
approved, as this would pro-
vide Bahamian employees with
more discretionary income.
Among the investments yet
to receive approval to which
he referred were the Stillman
Organisation's plans to invest
$500 million in transforming
the still-closed South Ocean
resort into a five-star, 1,000-
room hotel with a casino.
And there was also the $1.4
billion Albany residential com-
munity, whose major investors
are the Tavistock Group,
which is the holding company
for investments made by
Lyford Cay-based billionaire
Joe Lewis, and world-famous
golfers, Tiger Woods and
Ernie Els.
"When I look at New Provi-
dence in five to 10 years' time,
I see a fourth phase [by Kerzn-
er International] on this island,
a Ritz-Carlton, 3-5,000 jobs at
Baha Mar, $200 million invest-
td in a new terminal at Nas-
sau International Airport," Mr
Christie said.
"I see a new South Ocean,
and I see a new Albany. These
Share developments hiring more


Bahamians." This, he said,
would produce more traffic
congestion, and "is something
we have to deal with, and deal
with now".
To implement downtown
Nassau's revitalisation, the
Master Plan has been divided
into seven segments: Govern-
ment Green, Downtown
Waterfront, Arawak Cay and
Beach, the Living Waterfront,
Potter's Crossing, Fort Mon-
tagu, and Streetscapes.
The Master Plan said: "Nas-
sau cannot afford to delay
moving forward given the esti-
mated billions of dollars that
could be generated in the
economy and the improved
quality of life that will come
as a result of implementing this
plan.
"The renaissance of Nassau
is imperative and cannot be
left to decline.......... It is, time to
manage, enforce codes, clean
up and revitalise as a world
class destination and liveable
tropical urban model."
Mr Christie agreed with such
sentiments, saying: "We have
to have our city take on more
value..... We cannot afford to
fail. My government has the
will to continue. We lown an
obligation to future genera-
tions of Bahamians to suc-
ceed."
As a further encouragement
to the business community to
get involved, the Prime Min-
ister added: "This is going to
the bottom line.-This is going
to increase value.
"The magic of our port and


LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
OF
BRESSAY LIMITED
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No. 45 of 2000)
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),BRESSAY
LIMITED is in dissolution: Alrena H. Moxey is the Liquidator and can
be contacted at Winterbotham Place, Malborough & Queen Streets, P.O.
Box N 3026, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons having claims against the
above-named company are required to send their names, addresses and
Particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the 28th day
of July, 2006.


ARENA MOXEY
signed: LIQUIDATOR



LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


BENDERN LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act. 2000, the dissolution,
of BENDERN LTD. has been completed; a certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the register







ARGOSA CORP. INC.'


geophysical structure. The
magic brought about by the
Kerzner development, the
magic I know is in the plans of
Baha Mar. LyfordCay, and
the plans for further develop-
ment of that kind on the south-
west coast of New Providence,
the Ritz-Carlton plans.
"We have this extraordinary
opportunity to create some-
thing special, and if anything
must accelerate our efforts."
He added that the Govern-
ment was willing to pay for
consultants to help the down-


town Nassau transformation
effort, promising that the pro-
ject would not be held up.
To prevent the downtown
project from being impacted
by changes of government, the
Prime Minister said: "The suc-
cess of any plan that will go on
for a generation depends on
the will of the people, which
in turn must impress itself on
whoever is in the Government
of the country, so as to avoid
this being interfered with or
interrupted by people who
have a different point of view."


LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION.
OF
BURGATE LIMITED
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000), BURGATE,
LIMITED is in dissolution. Alrena H. Moxey is the Liquidator and can
be contacted at Winterbotham Place, Malborough & Queen Streets, P.O.
Box N 3026, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons having claims against the
above-named company are required to send their names, addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the 28th day
of July, 2006.


ALRENAMOXEY
signed: LIQUIDATOR



LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
OF
KIRKBURN LIMITED

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
.(No. 45 of 2000)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000), KIRKBURN
LIMITED is in dissolution. Alrena H. Moxey is the Liquidator and can
be contacted at Winterbotham Place, Malborough & Queen Streets, P.O.
Box N 3026, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons having claims against the
above-named company are required to send their names, addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the 28th day
of July, 2006.


ALRENAMOXEY
signed: LIQUIDATOR


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


CHRINO LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in
dissolution, which commenced on the 29th day of June, 2006.
The Liquidator is Argosa Corp, Inc., of P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.







ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


LACERTA CRITTA INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act. 2000, the dissolution,
of LACERTA CRITTA INC. has been completed; a certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the register






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the.
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


SSWIMMING LESSONS

FROM FOUR TIME
CARIFTA CHAMPION

Ms. KIMBERLY KNOWLES

LEARN TO SWIM TODAY


SSwihnt vesso fron m of
ithe ient accapisWhed swninmrs

SWIM FOR LIFEBam for A ts and
I children 4 years
h..tc i:l ;and up with 1mphe-na-
-Diving and drills ..
o1t On breatling
*Compaetrivt drills. water safety
techniques !|p Vep and t .
*Aqua Baby water nies. On oa ono lesnsm for
adjustment (for $35/half hur ailable for $35/
babies 7 months and half hour or $55/45 minute
older) group asss for a max. 8 chil-
sPool is provided or willdrn. Pool is available or will
9o to your pool ituach your kids in your.own pool.
- --- Dwt wait, let us
Tel: 393-1188 't wait, let us
Cell: 434-9237 yur s
Email, MSN Messenger: swim lda, it my
iblinkiefishehotmail.com l




LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


CAPS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the dbove-named Company is in
dissolution, which commenced on the 29th day of June, 2006.
The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc.. of P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.







ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


KHAI CORPORATION
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in
dissolution, which commenced on the 29th day of June, 2006.
The Liquidator is Argosa Corp, Inc., of P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.







ARGOSA COR6P NG.
(Liquidator)



LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


RUGGB .
(In Voluntary L .


LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
OF
KINLOCH LIMITED
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No. 45 of 2000)
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000), KINLOCH
LIMITED is in dissolution. Alrena H. Moxey is the Liquidator and can
be contacted at Winterbotham Place, Malborough & Queen Streets, P.O.
Box N 3026, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons having claims against the
above-named company are required to send their names, addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the 28th day
of July, 2006.


ALRENA MOXEY
signed: LIQUIDATOR


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act. 2000, the dissolution,
of RUGGELL CORP. has been completed; a certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the register ,






ARGOSA CORP. l 1e.
(Lquidator)


_ .


I


BUSINESS







PAGE 8B. MONDAY, JULY 3, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


LIST OF AUTHORIZED ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS
FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 2007


NAME LISENCE BUSINESS NAME ADDRESS CITY/ISLAND TELEPHONE
Adderley, Patrick Three Phase P.O. Box N-7487 Nassau, Bahamas 324-0641
Albury, Wycliffe Three Phase Nu-Way Electric Co. Ltd. P.O. Box N-1877 Nassau, Bahamas 393-3558
Anderson, Berkley Three Phase Lil Bert Electric P.O. Box GT-2021 Nassau, Bahamas 357-8883
Archer, Leonard Three Phase Taylor Industries Liniited P.O. Box N-4806 Nassau, Bahamas 322-8941
Archer, Leonard G. Three Phase Taylor Industries Limited P.O. Box N-4806 Nassau, Bahamas 322-8941
Bain, Alfred Three Phase P.O. Box CB-11808 Nassau, Bahamas 357-3339
Bain, James Three Phase Bain's Electric P.O. Box SS-5595 Nassau, Bahamas 325-8451
Bartlett, Clarence A. Three Phase Bartlett's Electrical P.O. Box F-41026 Nassau, Bahamas 348-3601
Basden, Trevor Three Phase The Electrical Institute P.O. Box GT-2460 Nassau, Bahamas 328-0910
Bethel, Marcus Three Phase Marco Air-Conditioning & Ref. P.O. Box AB-20192 Abaco, Bahamas 367-3186
Bodie, Meteor Three Phase Channel Electric Service & Repairs P.O. Box GT-2021 Nassau, Bahamas 323-5478
Bowe, Donald Three Phase P.O. Box F-41160 Freeport, Grand Bah. 352-1589
Bowleg, Nicholas Three Phase P.O. Box GT-2717 Nassau, Bahamas 477-6525
Bostwick, Kermit Three Phase Flameless Electrical P.O. Box EE-17102 Nassau, Bahamas 457-4155
Brennen, Samuel 0. Sr. Three Phase Brennen Electrical Services P.O. Box N-7935 Nassau, Bahamas 323-6706
Brown, Patrick Three Phase P.O. Box EX-29130 George Town, Exuma 336-2408
Bullard, William Three Phase Service Electric Ltd. P.O. Box N-8430 Nassau, Bahamas 361-4106
Campbell, Ishmael Three Phase Campbell's Electric Company Ltd. P.O. Box SS-5087 Nassau, Bahamas 393-6203
Campbell, Stanley Three Phase Campbell's Electric Company Ltd. P.O. Box SS-5087 Nassau, Bahamas 393-6203
Collie, Stephen Three Phase Colco Electric Company Limited P.O. Box CB-13684 Nassau, Bahamas 393-4323
Cox, Donovan Three Phase P.O. Box F-44294 Freeport,Grand Bah. 557-6212
Curling, Ricardo Three Phase Lil Carder Electric IP.O. Box EX-29259 George Town, Exuma 336-2816

THREE PHASE ELECTRICIANS
NAME USENCE BUSINESS NAME ADDRESS CITY/ISLAND TELEPHONE
Delancy, Sherwin Three Phase Delancy's Electric Company Ltd. P.O. Box EE-15075 Nassau, Bahamas 328-8868
Douglas, Rudolph Three Phase P.O. Box N-8719 Nassau, Bahamas 323-4612
Edgecombe, Felton Three Phase P.O. Box FH-14391 Nassau, Bahamas 324-2423
Edwards, Jonas Three Phase P.O. Box CB-12750 Nassau, Bahamas 362-0380
Fox, Livingston Three Phase Fox Electrical Enterprise P.O. Box N-4370 Nassau, Bahamas 328-1986
Gibson, Arthur Three Phase A G Electric Company P.O. Box N-8807 Nassau, Bahamas 393-8192
Greene, John Three Phase P.O. Box N-10683 Nassau, Bahamas 341-4937
Hanna, Clifton Three Phase P.O. Box CB-13972 Nassau, Bahamas 328-6532
Heastie, Eugene Three Phase Commonwealth Electrical Co. P.O. Box EE-15223 Nassau, Bahamas 477-0446
Hepbum, Paul Three Phase PG A Electric P.O. Box N-8012 Nassau, Bahamas 356-7239
Johnston, William Three Phase J & J Electric Limited P.O. Box AN-20413 Marsh Harbour, Abaco 367-5145
King, Garnet Three Phase P.O. Box N-1490 Nassau, Bahamas 324-1960
King, Kendal Three Phase P.O. Box CB-12585 Nassau, Bahamas 427-6122
Knowles, Alfred Three Phase P.O. Box F-40169 Freeport, G. Bahama 559-3008
Knowles, Kenuth Three Phase Kenuth's Electric P.O. Box CB-13929 Nassau, Bahamas 341-5522
Knowles, Quentin Three Phase Flameless Electrical P.O. Box SS-5945 Nassau, Bahamas 325-8666
Laing, Kenneth Three Phase The Brothers Electrical .P.O. Box F-44925 Freeport, G. Bahama 374-7710
Lockhart, Alva Three Phase P.O. Box EX-29036 George Town, Exuma 336-2433
Longley, Nicholas Three Phase P.O. Box N-10251 Nassau, Bahamas 557-4304
Mabon, lan Three Phase Taylor Industries Limited P.O. Box N-4806' Nassau, Bahamas 322-8941
Mabon, Thomas Three Phase Taylor Industries Limited P.O. Box N-4806 Nassau, Bahamas 322-8941
Martinborough, Timothy Three Phase P.O. Box EE-17105 Nassau, Bahamas 393-1079
Mclntosh, Elijah Three Phase P.O. Box EE-15850 Nassau, Bahamas 395-8179
Mclntosh, Lionel Three Phase P.O. Box F-44239 Freeport, Grand B. 352-9269
Mclntosh, Peter Three Phase P.O. Box N-8804 Nassau, Bahamas 357-4011
McPhee, Godfrey Three Phase McPhee Electrical Engineering P.O. Box N-4133 Nassau, Bahamas 345-0216
Miller, Lottason Three Phase P.O. Box EE-17221 Nassau, Bahamas 364-7435
O'Brien, Hugh Three Phase O'Brien Electric P.O. Box N-3705 Nassau, Bahamas 326-2852
Patton, Simeon Three Phase P.O. Box 26036 Rock Sound, Eleuthera 334-2176
Paul, Alvin Three Phase Sunrise Electric Company Limited P.O. Box N-1836 Nassau, Bahamas 477-0075
Pintard, John Three Phase P.O. Box SS-5761 Nassau, Bahamas 361-4036
THREE PHASE ELECTRICIANS
NAME USENCE BUSINESS NAME ADDRESS CITY/ISLAND TELEPHONE
Rahming, Drexel Three Phase P.O. Box N-7418 Nassau, Bahamas 361-6554
Reckley, John Three Phase Caribbean Electric P.O. Box SS-5594 Nassau, Bahamas 362-4404
Rolle, Anthony Three Phase P.O. Box F-44932 Freeport, Grand Bah. 477-9383
Russell, Jeremy Three Phase Russell's Electrical P.O. Box EE-17010 Nassau, Bahamas 364-5993
Sands, Gregory Three Phase New Millennium Electric P.O. Box N-8234 Nassau, Bahamas 361-3274
Sands, Thomas Three Phase P.O. Box SS-5594 Nassau, Bahamas 323-4516
Seymour, Raphath Three Phase Quick's Electrical P.O. Box SB-51544 Nassau, Bahamas 557-2905
Simms, Roderick Three Phase P.O. Box FH-14463 Nassau, Bahamas 427-8825
Storr, Henry Three Phase Henry F. Storr Electric P.O. Box N-945 Nassau, Bahamas 393-7777
Storr, Henry Three Phase Henry F. Storr Electric P.O. Box N-945 Nassau, Bahamas 393-7777
Stuart, Marvin Three Phase Eagle Solutions Limited P.O. Box CR-55440 Nassau, Bahamas 341-5085
Sullivan, Wilfred G. Three Phase Sullivan Electrical P.O. Box SS-5281 Nassau, Bahamas 393-7737
Symonette, Christopher Three Phase Innovative Waves Limited P.O. Box CB-12394 Nassau, Bahamas 392-8282
Taylor, George Three Phase Taylor's Electrical & Mechanical P.O. Box SN-51346 Nassau, Bahamas 328-3984
Thomas, Howard Three Phase P.O. Box N-9860 Nassau, Bahamas 323-4941
Thompson, Frank A. Three Phase CoJays Building & Maintenance P.O. Box N-1903 Nassau, Bahamas 323-4257
Thurston, Peter Three Phase Infinity Electrical Contracting .P.O. Box CR-54481 Nassau, Bahamas
Walker, Ralph Three Phase Walker's Industries Limited P.O. Box N-668 Nassau, Bahamas 325-7831/4
Williams, Ambrose Three Phase Williams Electric Company P.O. Box N-1151 Nassau, Bahamas 323-6644
Williamson, Roosevelt Three Phase P.O. Box CR-56352 Nassau, Bahamas 424-0549
SINGLE PHASE ELECTRICIANS
NAME LISENCE BUSINESS NAME ADDRESS CITY/ISLAND TELEPHONE
Adderley, Warren Single Phase Guarantee Electric P.O. Box N-345 Nassau, Bahamas 361-6677
Andrews, Anthony Single Phase General Delivery Pleasant Bay, Andros 557-5501
Bain, Dwight Single Phase P.O. Box N-9391 Nassau, Bahamas 502-1648
Bain, Ryan Single Phase P.O. Box SB-52145 Nassau, Bahamas 457-4442
Barrow, Neil Single Phase Gen-Tech Electric P.O. Box FH-14569 Nassau, Bahamas 357-8204
Bethel, Samuel Single Phase K & W Refrigeration & Electrical P.O. Box AB-20454 Nassau, Bahamas 367-4949
Bowe, Brackston Single Phase Electric City & Appliances P.O. Box CB-13076 Nassau, Bahamas 436-3226
Cargill, Ephraim_ Single Phase P.O. Box N-9277 Nassau, Bahamas 395-6540
Clarke, Jermaine Single Phase Sontech Electrical Services P.O. Box CR-54053 Nassau, Bahamas 557-8963
Cleare, Willard Single Phase Cleare's Electric P.O. Box N-5896 Nassau, Bahamas 323-6465
Colebrooke, Henry Single Phase P.O. Box SS-19485 Nassau, Bahamas 364-2022
Curry, Elvis Single Phase P.O. Box AB-20592 Marsh Harbour, Abaco 456-9247
Curry, Gregory Single Phase Four G's Electrical Contractor P.O. Box N-4426 Nassau, Bahamas 454-1796
Davis, Osborne Single Phase Sixteen Electrical Services P.O. Box CB-13096 Nassau; Bahamas 392-4062
DeCosta, Logan SinglePhase Sudden Electric P.O. Box SB-51384 Nassau, Bahamas 392-7998
Douglas, Rudolph Single Phase P.O. Box N-8719 Nassau, Bahamas 323-4612
Ferguson, Andrew Single Phase Ferguson Electric P.O. Box CR-55545 Nassau, Bahamas 393-7747
Ferguson, Otis B. Single Phase Megan's Global Unison General Delivery The Bluff, S. Andros
Forbes, Clinton Single Phase Progressive Electrical P.O. Box N-530 Nassau, Bahamas 394-2336
Fox, George Single Phase Fox Electrical Enterprise P.O. Box N-4370 Nassau, Bahamas
Greene, Arthur A. Single Phase P.O. Box N-3304 Nassau, Bahamas 324-2977
Hall, Dwight Single Phase D.L.H Electric P.O. Box SB-50449 Nassau, Bahamas 392-5937
Hewitt, Christopher Single Phase General Delivery Johnson Bay, Andros
Humes, Michael Single Phase P.O. Box N-4266 Nassau, Bahamas 557-1159
Johnson, Anderson Single Phase Precision Electric Services P.O. Box N-1169 Nassau, Bahamas 364-8567
Johnson, Garfield Single Phase P.O. Box SB-50087 Nassau, Bahamas 393-7238
Johnson, Jeffrey Single Phase Jay's Detail Electric General Delivery Little Creek, Andros 369-5105
Johnson, Wilton 0. Single Phase P.O. Box SS-6189 Nassau, Bahamas 302-8445
Jones, Robert Single Phase Geoffrey Jones & Co. Ltd. P.O. Box N-793 Nassau, Bahamas 322-2188
Key, Herbert Single Phase P.O. Box AB20458 Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Knowles, Edward Single Phase Flameless Electrical Cont. Ltd. P.O. Box SS-5945 Nassau, Bahamas 325-8666
Mabon, Allan Single Phase Taylor Industries Limited P.O. Box N-4806 Nassau, Bahamas 322-8941
Miller, Bryan Single Phase Illumination Electrical Services P.O. Box N-10805 Nassau, Bahamas 359-2207
SINGLE PHASE ELECTRICIANS
NAME LISENCE BUSINESS NAME ADDRESS CITY/ISLAND TELEPHONE
McQueen, Darvin Single Phase General Delivery Nicholls Town, Andros 329-4316
Moree, Bruce Single Phase B.A.M. Electrical Services P.O. Box SS-6536 Nassau, Bahamas 359-2973
Munroe, Derek Single Phase 3-D Electrical Services P.O. Box CB-11994 Nassau, Bahamas 361-0870
Rahming, Edmond Single Phase Hard Times Electrical P.O. Box N-3599 Nassau, Bahamas 356-0491
Roberts, Richard Single Phase Roberts Electrical P.O. Box AB-22990 Nassau, Bahanas 365-6016
Rolle, Wilfred J. R. Single Phase P.O. Box EE-16770 Nassau, Bahamas 361-8152
Russell, Nowell Single Phase TeJay's Electric P.O. Box EE-17239 Nassau, Bahamas 356-2685
Sands, Gary Single Phase P.O. Box EL-260066 Palmetto Pt. Eleuthera 334-2161
Sands, Gladstone Single Phase R G Sands Electric P.O. Box SB-52649 Nassau, Bahamas 357-3527
Scott, Samuel Single Phase General Delivery Eight Mile Rock, GB 348-2728
Simmons, Vincent Single Phase P.O. Box N-3444 Nassau, Bahamas 323-8976
Storr, Wellington Single Phase P.O. Box N-1830 Nassau, Bahamas 322-8187
Stuart, Carlington Single Phase P.O. Box AB-20053 Dundas Town, Abaco 375-8050
Stuart, Tyrone Single Phase P.O. Box CR-54233 Nassau, Bahamas 325-5786
Taylor, Peter Single Phase Electrical Wizard & Associates P.O. Box SS-19777 Nassau, Bahanas 394-8506
Walker, Hilliard Single Phase Excalibur Electrical & Building P.O. Box N-3117 Nassau, Bahamas 325-1592
Williams, Harry Single Phase P.O. Box N-229 Nassau, Bahamas 324-2041

RESTRICTED JOURNEYMEN
NAME ADDRESS CITY/ISLAND TELEPHONE
Albury, Morral P.O. Box MT-509 Matthew Town, Inagua 339-1300
Anderson, Charlie P.O. Box F-41231 Freeport, Grand Bahama 349-3097
Carey, Timothy P.O. Box EL-26045 Rock Sound, Eleuthera 334-2296
Cates, Metland P.O. Box EL-26034 Rock Sound, Eleuthera 334-2260
Deal, Joseph P.O. Box 23 Palmetto Point, Eleuthera 322-1421
Evans. Robert L. P.O. Box 23002 Nicholl's Town, Andros 329-2662
Femander, Clifford General Delivery Cockburn Town, San Salvador 331-2676
Femander, Spencer General Delivery Cat Cay Utilities Co. 347-3565
Johnson, Cedric S. General Delivery Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera 334-4178
Hanna, Ralph Alfred General Delivery Bailey Town, Bimini 464-5731
Lindsay, Oswald P.O. Box F-41017 Freeport, Grand Bahama
McDonald, Comelius General Delivery Current Island, North Eleuthera 335-3313
Pinder, Leonard P.O. Box F-3266 Freeport, Grand Bahama 373-1610


Roberts, Pedey P.O. Box AB-22990 JMan-O-War Cay, Abaco 365-6118
Rolle, Ken P.O. Box MT-509 Matthew Town, Inagua 339-1300
M- A n A AQO-QU'fL


P.O. Box AB-20546


I


I .' v. :: -. --


Rolle, Samuel R
Swain, Salathiel
SwI n I IIII II s


FROM page 1B


and September," he added.
The master-plan for revital-
ising harbourfront Nassau,
developed by some 200
Bahamian stakeholders in con-
junction with urban planning
firm EDAW, suggested that
the BID and overall project be
funded by a bond issue.
The plan suggested that the
bond could be collateralised
by the funds flowing from
property owners within the
BID area, as they would pay
an assessment amount based
on property values -each year
to the BID organisation.
The report said: "As the
major projects are implement-
ed and the new administrative
programmes are started, prop-
erty values in the BID begin
to rise.
"Therefore, property own-
ers are able to recover their
investment in the BID through
increased property values and
increased rents in the long run.
"In this way, BID is a kind
of investment. Property owners
work together for their mutual
interest the work of the BID
is financed by the property
owners, who in turn capture
the benefits of the project
through increases in their
property values."
Mr Comito suggested that
the BID's creation would
ensure that all downtown Nas-
sau stakeholders bought into -
and contributed financially to -
the city's revitalisation.
SHe hinted that in the past,
around only 50 per cent of
stakeholders had been pre-
pared to put money forward.
To help boost the project,
the master plan suggested sev-
eral incentives that the Gov-
ernment could provide to the
private sector, such as reducing
or removing taxes such as real
property tax; speeding up
licence and permit approvals;
small business loans at low
interest rates; and designating
products as duty free.
Mr Comito said there were
1500 BIDs in existence around
the world, and they had been
used by locations such as Mia-
mi Beach, Coral Gables and
West Palm Beach to revitalise
their respective locations, in
partnership with the private
sector.
Mr Comito said contacts had
been developed with the Inter-
national Downtown Associa-
tion, with a view to obtaining
assistance for revitalising
downtown Nassau.
He added: "The challenge
for all of us is how to take


something from vision to
action. The political will is
there; we need a collective
resolve and will to move it to
reality."
Apart from the BID and the
Government, Mr Comito said
other organizations were
required to help oversee the
project, including a Port
Authority to manage the new
commercial shipping facilities,
which would be relocated to
the proposed new port in
south-western New Provi-
dence.
He added that the Port
Relocation Task Force was
"well underway right now" in
terms of its work.
"None of this is possible
without government commit-
ment, which we believe we
have, and money, which we
believe we can find," Mr
Comito said. "We're moving
in the right direction, and
believe it's all for real."
He said the Government
had spent $750,000 on the mas-
terplan for downtown Nassau's
redevelopment, with the pri-
vate sector, through the Nassau
Tourism and Development
Board, contributing a further
$75,000.
To help the separate Down-'
town Improvement Initiative
(DII), staged by the Ministry
of Tourism, Mr Comito said
the private sector had raised
$250,000 through contributions'.
on top of their NTDB mem'.
bership dues.
The absence of any central,
management authority to over-
see downtown Bay Street and.'
the city of Nassau, combined
with the absence of long-term
planning and just plain neglect,
are at the root of many of the
problems.
"There was, and is, no cen-.
tral management of the city's
affairs. The blame game is
incredible," Mr Comito said,
apparently a reference to how
government agencies, depart-
ments and others 'pass the
buck' when it comes to taking
responsibility for problems.
While downtown was clean-
er than it had been, Mr Comi-
to acknowledged it could be
cleaner still.
"We are funding, through
the NTDB and support form
the business community, a new
police sub-station on the main
thoroughfare and placement
of traffic police," Mr Comito
said.
"It's an ongoing battle to
eliminate illegal signage and
postage, illegal vendors."
He added that six out of 12
derelict buildings had already
been restored.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that EARNEST PIERRE OF GUANA
CAY, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 3RD day of JULY, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.



JOB OPPORTUNITY(Family Island)
You are invited to apply for the position of

RESORT MANAGER

Duties & Responsibilities include but are not limited to:
Plans, organizes, directs and controls all aspects of property
management
Integrates and directs the strategic plan for the development
of the organization ensuring future growth
Develop and control budgets
Perform personnel management duties
Manage all aspects of advertising and marketing for the
property
Ensure the proper maintenance of the property
Other duties as assigned.

Qualifications

3-5 years experience in property management
Strong leadership skills
Strong decision-making, negotiating and problem-solving
skills
Excellent communication skills, written and oral.

Interested persons may apply in writing by sending an e-mail
to: familyislandhotel@hotmail.com


THREE PHASE ELECTRICIANS


Legislation on the



way for Nassau's



Bay Street BID


I


J348-9042L


POBox F-41253


Hepburn Town Gr a


367-2706UD


nHlla


Marsh Harbour. Abaco





MONDAY, JULY 3, 2006, PAGE no


Eagles


soar to


victor


Weekend softball action as

the Whirlpool Eagles, in ligh:

shirts, defeat the Bommer

George Swingers 10-3


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SPORTS


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PAGE 10B, MONDAY,,JULY 3, 2006


SPORT


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groups, we had some strong
-w-


















Swimmon the boys' side came in
a 0


















a record on day one of the


meet in route to capturing
gold inter the 50m butterfly thand a
ne star peof bronzes in the 100
group.





butterfly and 50m freestyle.
SwBahamas Swimming Feder-

ation President Algernonee
he bright spo for the teams
on the boys' side came in
Vereance Burrows who broke
a record on day one of the
meet in route to capturing-
gold in the 50m buer had and a
pair of bronzes in the c100m
butterfly and 50m freestyle.
Bahamas Swimming Feder-
ation President Algernon
Cargill said the team's "fan-









of three meets that many of
tastic" per formance outdid

When you look at the factor
that we have such a small
team, compared to the other
countries, I think we per-

aid, "This is the best CISC
team we have ever had and is
a continuation of the success
we achieved at Carifta."
uThe CISC meet s the first
of three meets that many of
the swimmers will see action
in over the coming four weeks.
The National Swimming
Championships take place
in Cartagena, Columbia July
17-22.


Mark Knowles teams up





with tennis legend Martina


U- :..


* AT THE DOUBLE: Mark Knowles and Martina Navratilova (FILE PHOTOS)






Winless end to





FIBA tournament


* BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THE Bahamas failed to
win a game at the FIBA
Americas Under-18 Tourna-
ment.
Federation's vice president
Larry Wilson admitted that
problems in shooting and
executing down the stretch
haunted the Bahamas
throughout the week-long
tournament in San Antonas,
Texas as they finished at the
bottom of the pile in seventh
place with a 0-5 win-loss
record.
After going 0-3 in pool
play, the Bahamas crossed
over and played Puerto Rico
and just barely missed win-
ning the game, 79-77, in what
could be described as its best
performance at St. Mary's
University.
The team came back on
Saturday and had another
letdown, losing 79-60 to
Uruguay in their fifth and
final game.
"In spite of not winning a
game, the BBF is extremely
proud of the teams and the
coaching staff for a job well
done," Wilson stated.
"Unfortunately in the
Bahamas, we always want to
measure progress in terms of
winning and losing.
"However, it was very evi-
dent here that the Bahamas
has made significant progress
in basketball and the rest of
the world has taken notice."
The Bahamas made its ini-
tial appearance in the Tour-
nament of Americas and was
hoping to qualify for the 2007
World Championships in
Malaysia.
But those hopes were


quickly dashed when the
team was blown away by 40
points in their opener against
Argentina. The Bahamas
bounced back and had a
chance to redeem themselves
against Canada.
But, after leading for most
of the game, the Bahamas
self-destructed down the
stretch and lost a chance to
stay in the hunt for one of
the four playoff spots and a
shot at qualifying for the
World Championships by six
points.

Consolation

If there was any consola-
tion, Wilson that "little
Bahamas, with a population
of 310,000 or so going up
against all of these much larg-
er countries with millions of
people and we were six min-
utes or 10 points away from
going to the 2007 World
Championships in Malaysia."
Wilson said it was evident
that the Bahamas' weakness
was a lack of shooting, as
opposed to taking the ball to
the basket and secondly, they
didn't execute when they had
to down the stretch.
While a number of the col-
lege and NBA scouts com-
mended the Bahamas team
on its quickness and athleti-
cism, they pointed out that
the team's obvious lack of
"execution and experience"
made the difference.
Wilson, however, said they
were pleased with the man-
ner in which head coach
Mario Bowleg prepared and
motivated the team and
Sharon 'the General' Storr,
who assisted in providing the
scouting reports on the teams
they had to face.


Looking back at the final
two games they played in the
tournament over the weekend,
here's some of the stats that
the players produced:
Uruguay 79, Bahamas 60:
Darshtyn Baker, playing 34
minutes, came up with a game
high 23 points, shooting 9-of-
23 from the field, 2-of-10 from
the three-point and 3-for-4
from the free throw line. He
also pulled down seven
rebounds.
The only other Bahamian
player in double figures was
Davaughn Jackson with 15
points. He connected on 6-of-
9 from the field and 3-for-5
from the foul line. Jackson
also had nine rebounds in 34
minutes of play.
Although he only had eight
points in 19 minutes, Scott
Farrington pulled down a
total of 10 boards.
Uraguay, by the way, had
five players in double figures
as they won their only game
of the tournament.
Puerto Rico 79, Bahamas
77: In another solid effort,
Baker finished with game
high honours with 18 points-
on 4-of-ll from the field and
5-of-10 from the charity stripe.
He also contributed five
assists and as many rebounds.
Marco Cooper came up
with 15 points and 13
rebounds in 26 minutes and
Kyle Grant ended up with 13
points with six rebounds in 23
minutes.
Puerto Rico, who trailed 74-
68 with four minutes and 40
seconds left to play, rallied to
hold the Bahamas scoreless
in a 10-0 run as they went on
to steal the game.
They eventually had five
players scoring in double dig-
its.


* TENNIS
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

MORE than two decades
ago when he was just getting
started in his career, Mark
Knowles could hardly wait to
watch the legendary Martina
Navratilova play in the pres-
tigious Wimbledon Tourna-
ment.
On Saturday, Knowles and
the veteran American teamed
up for the first time to play
mixed doubles. Seeded num-
ber eight, they pulled off a 6-
2, 7-6 (4) victory over Amer-
icans Justin Gimelstob and
Meghann Shaughnessy.
"It was exciting. It was a
thrill," said Knowles about
their appearance in the sec-
ond round after getting a bye
in the first round.
"She's arguably the greatest
female player of all time, so
it's really a thrill to play with
her. It was a thrill for both of
us and we played well, beating
a good opponent in the
process."
Although they played on
court 18, Knowles said they
were able to lure a large fol-
lowing of fans to the stands,
which put the added pressure
on them winning.
But Knowles admitted that
just to be on the same court
with Navratilova was a pres-
sure situation for him to be
in.
"She's a little bit older than
I am and I remember pop-
ping in front of the TV as a
kid, watching her play Wim-
bledon," said Knowles of his
team-mate, who turns 50 in
October.
"So it's really serene to not
only be playing with her, but
to be winning with her. It's
going to be exciting as we
continue to play on."
Knowles, 32, and Navratilo-


* -- a. -
- ~.- - a -


va, who has played in 28
Wimbledon Tournaments,
winning nine women's single
titles and seven in doubles,
won't play until Tuesday.
They are still awaiting their
* opponents, but Knowles
admitted that the expectations
are high for them to succeed.
"She's won so many Grand
Slam titles, I don't know how
many," Knowles reflected.
"She's in it for a lot of enjoy-
ment, but she still wants to
win as bad as I do.
"So we will try to win the
thing. We still have a couple
more matches to play, but the
way things went right away,
if we keep up the form, we
will be okay."

Nestor

Meanwhile, Knowles' dou-
bles partner Daniel Nestor
from Canada, is teaming up
with Elena Likhovtseva from
Russia. As the fifth seeded
team, they have yet to play
their first match.
They got a bye into the sec-
ond round where they are
scheduled to face the Aus-
tralian combo of Ashley Fish-
er and Nicole Pratt.
Today, however, Knowles
and Nestor will play their first
round match in the men's
doubles against the team of
James Auckland and Jamie
Delgado from Great Britain.
"Things are looking good,
but the British team has been
plying well lately, so we have
to be ready," Knowles stat-
ed. "They are the local team
and they will have the crowd
support, so we have to play
well from the break and set
the tone and let them know
that we mean business."
Knowles and Nestor are the
No.3 seeded team inthe tour-
nament.


a ~ -


-- Copyrighted Malerial
.


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MONDAY, JULY 3, 2006


SECTION


Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


i kIr
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"~ cy, .,


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


* SWIMMING
By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
THE Bahamas' small but dynamic
24 member team returned home Sat-
urday afternoon after an impressive
showing at the XVI Caribbean Islands
Swimming Championships in Puerto
Rico.
The team finished in third with a
Total of 681.5 points, behind host team
Puerto Rico who finished first with
1498.5 points, and Trinidad and Toba-
go in second with 884.
The Bahamas boasted a haul of 46
medals, including 23 gold, 11 silver
and 12 bronze.
While Puerto Rico swept all divi-
sions, other than the boys' 13-14 won
by Trinidad and Tobago, the
Bahamas posted strong showings in
each age bracket.
The team, placed second in the
boys' 11-12 division with 112 points,
third in the girls' 11-12 with 78.5
points, second in the girls 13-14 with
133 points, 9th in the boys 13-14 with
17 points, second in the girls 15-17
with 193.5 points, 7th in the boys' 15-
17 with 36.5 points, second in girls 18
and over with 101 points and 9th in
the boys 18 and over with 10 points.
The females heavily dominated the
squad and turned in a myriad of per-
sonal bests and record breaking per-
formances.
The team was led by Nikia
Deveaux and Alana Dillette in the
girls 18 and over division alongside
Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace and
Ariel Weech who also turned in dom-
inating performances in the girls' 15-
17 and 13-14 divisions respectively.

Gold
Weech, one of the relative new-
comers to the swimming scene, won
gold in the 50m freestyle, 50m back-
stroke, 200m backstroke, 100m
freestyle, 100m backstroke and 400m
IM, along with a silver in the 400m
freestyle relay.
Vanderpool-Wallace was equally
as impressive winning gold ini the
100m freestyle, 200m freestyle, 400m
IM, 200m IM, 400n freestyle relay
and 800m freestyle relay.
She also captured silver in the 50m
butterfly, 50m backstroke and bronze
in the 100m butterfly and 50m
freestyle.
Dillette and Deveaux, the teams'
only competitors in the girls' 18 and
over division achieved a second place
finish in the division and set the pace
for much of the younger athletes.
Dillette wor a number of golds
including the 400m IM, 200m
freestyle, 100m backstroke, 100m but-
terfly, 50m backstroke and'200 IM.
She also gained a pair of silvers in
the 100m and 400m freestyles.
Deveaux captured bronze in the
100m butterfly, with gold in the 100m
freestyle, 50m butterfly, and her sig-
nature race, the 50m freestyle.
She said the team performed well
and was one of the larger teams she
had competed with internationally in
quite some time.
"I was very pleased, I'haven't trav-
elled with a team as large as that one
in about three years," she said, "I was
pleasantly surprised at how well
everyone swam, I think that swim-
ming in the Bahamas is going to see
some amazing things in the future."
Deveaux said the third place finish
was a result of a true team effort from
a considerably balanced squad.
"The fact that we finished third was
proof of how strong the team really

SEE page 10B


Eagles ha


e the


SwingePs in a fla


* SOFTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
THE youthful Whirlpool.Eagles
have not been as consistent as they
could have been, but whenever
they're on their game, manager Ali
Culmer feels they can pose a lot of
trouble for their opponents.
The Bommer George Swingers
found that out the hard way on Sat-
urday night as the Eagles flew past
them 10-3, stopping the lone New
Providence Softball Association
game played in five innings via the
new seven-run rule.
"I was quite pleased with our girls'
performance," noted Culmer, who is
assisted by Ricardo Treco. "Our
defence, which was lacking for the
last two games, was tremendous and
tonight we hit the ball very well.
"So I was quite happy with the
way they played. They were much
more relaxed and they got some
good pitching and the big bats came
through, which was the key to the
game. Once we cut down on the
mental and physical mistakes, we
will be right where we need to be."
The win improved the Eagles'
fourth place record tp 5-6, while the
loss dropped the Swingers to 6-3 as
they remain in second place.
Whirlpool got a big performance
from Theila Johnson on the mound
as the national team player spun a
five-hitter with six strike outs and
four walks. She said it was the
team's effort behind her that
enabled her to get the job done.
"We did a whole lot better than
our last game. They stayed down
on the ball and they fielded it well,"
said Johnson, who was inspired to
go out and pitch as well as she did.
On her effort, Johnson noted: "I
think I pitched a very good game
tonight. I know I always pitch good.
I never put myself down.
"As long as I throw strikes con-
sistently, I know my defence will do
their job."
While the Eagles came up with
the big defensive stoppers to seal
the deal, their offence was clicking
with Lindsay Treco leading the
attack with a 2-for-3 night with a
pair of runs batted in (RBI) and
three more scored.
Cassie Smith, one of the veterans
on the team, held her own with a
2-for-3 night and a run scored. Kim-
mie Neymour went 3-for-4 with an
RBI and run scored; Lisa Culmer
was 1-for-4 with a run scored and
Rondell Bethel added a 1-for-2 out-
ting with a run scored.
Whirlpool managed to burst the
game open in the second inning
when they came up with six big runs
on four hits to produce enough for
the stoppage. They had scored two
runs on a hit in the first. "
Desiree Taylor suffered the loss,
giving up 11 hits with four strike
outs and four walks. She also hit a
couple of batters with her pitch and
said afterwards that her team was
just out of sync all night long.
"We came out flat and once you
come out flat, you end up flat," she


':p _,.-"', -: . *^ ^... "- ... ,,-v ,. : .,, "

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* THE Eagles have a swinging time on Saturday night.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


explained. "We didn't pick up the
pace or anything. We just have to
practise. When we call practice, the
girls don't come out and if you don't
practise as a team, you won't play as
a team."
In the Swingers' limited offensive
attack, Rebecca Moss was 2-for-2
with a run scored and Neressa Sey-
mour also had a perfect 2-for-2 night
at the plate.
In the men's feature contest, the
hapless Dorcy Park Boyz failed to
show up to play against the TBS
Truckers. They ended up dropping


their ninth straight game, while the
Truckers improved to 7-2, a half
game behind front-running Del Sol
Arawaks.
The Truckers and the Dorcy Park
Boyz are scheduled to meet again in
Tuesday's feature contest. But
there's been some rumors that the
Dorcy Park Boyz may not be back
as their player/manager Mario Ford
and his brother Andy Ford are still
suspended.
During their suspensions, the
Ford brothers are preparing to trav-
el with the Bahamas Cricket Asso-


ciation's national team to the Stan-
ford 20/20 Cricket Tournament lat-
er this month.
In the ladies' opener, the Swingers
will try to rebound from their dis-
appointing loss, but it won't be easy
as they take on the front-running
defending champions Electro Tele-
com Wildcats.
Tonight, however, the leaguevill
play a make-up game between the
New Breed (3-6) and the Stingrays
Sporting Club (5-4) at 8pm. It will
be the lone game on the scheduleiat
the park.


Breakfast at Subway...

A Dekiiou Morning ritual




BREAKFAST DELI
SANDWICHES@
t es A DEUOUS WAY
e TO START YOUR DAY!
BattrJ


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