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Volume: 102 No.179


The


Tribune


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006


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Sears seeks bishop to


help in negotiations


* By PAUL G TURNOUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
NEGOTIATIONS between
the Bahamas Union of Teachers
and the government have dimin-
ished to the point that a religious
mediator has been called in to
ease tensions.
Speaking at his ministry's head
office late yesterday, Minister of
SF.-,,. ,i ,-, Alfred Sears revealed.
that after executives from the
BUT walked out of their latest
negotiations on Friday night (ear-
ly Saturday morning) he opted to
phone Bishop Neil Ellis to ask
him for his help.
"When they walked out of the
meeting at 1.45am I took it upon
myself to call one of our minis-
ters, I called him because I felt
that it was that urgent. I called
. ,Bishop Neil Ellis. I apologized
for waking him at that time in the
morning and I asked him for his
intervention, because I know that
he was helpful with respect to the
BEC and the Electrical Workers
Union.
"We spoke with him at about
2am and we asked him if he could
meet us at 8am on Saturday
morning. So this is 2am Saturday
and we asked him to come and
meet us here. We met with Bish-
op Ellis, briefed him, and asked
for his intervention as a mediator,
to see if he could speak to the
other side. I understand that there
have been some talks, and I am
hopeful that we will be able to sit
down once again very soon and
conclude this agreement," he said.
However the president of the
Bahamas Union of Teachers Ida
Poitier-Turnquest said that they
have not seen or spoken with
Bishop Ellis. In fact, Mrs Poiti-
er-Turnquest said that she had
"no idea" what Mr Sears was


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WAO) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS


talking about.
"There has been no talks. Not
one call - not anything that I
know of. No contact whatsoever.
As of this hour, which is 7pm on
June the 27th, I have not heard
from Bishop Ellis," she said.
During the press conference
Mr Sears said that the negotia-
tions are still in the hands of the
government and the BUT, and
that they only asked for a "small
intervention" from Bishop Ellis
for this particular stage.
"We asked for the intervention.
for a particular stage to help low-
er the temperature, to see if we
can reach some appreciation of
what the issues are. We will be
speaking with the union to see if
we can get back around the
table," he said.
Admitting that they did walk
out of their negotiations, Mrs
Poitier-Turnquest said she did
not believe government was pre-
pared to negotiate.
She said the union was on "red
alert" but would not expand on
what exactly the heightened alert
precaution could entail.
However, she did say that they
have encouraged their teachers
not to complete any final term
report cards, or participate in the
distribution of them on National
Report Card Day (tomorrow).
She also explained that the union
is discouraging its teachers from
attending any of the Ministry of
Education's workshops, summer
school programmes or teacher
development courses.
"The BUT has made their
offer. It is now time for the gov-
ernment to make a counter
offer," she said. "We are not mov-
ing from our stance. Do you real-
SEE page seven


I THE former -Sea Gardens',. a site
which has been the focus of the Bahamas
Environmental Science and Technology
Commission (BEST).
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/
Tribune staff)


S- ...


t, -f ..'


* By KAHMILE REID
KERZNER International s pending
development of the proposed goll course
on Athol Island \%tll increase the land mass
b% 35 acres and erase a part of Bahamian
hliisoiN in the process, according to enMi-
lonmental acLt ii and Re-Earth director
Sam Duncoimbc
* They are erasing a part of our history'
and there are sponges, coral and fish in
this area that they want to fill in, that is
really the biggest issue," said Ms Dun-
combe.
Declared j protected marine reef in


'Social discomfort
between Bahamians
of differing races'


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
A HISTORY of resentment,
class divisions and insecurity has
for years contributed to the
social discomfort between
Bahamians of differing races.
Many Bahamians rely on
stereotypes, assumptions and
stories told by their parents to
determine how they relate .to
persons of another race. This
coupled with the fact that most
debate on race issues in the
country occurs, in the last place
it should, on the stage of parti-
san politics, widening whatever
divide between black and white
there may be.
Whatever the reason for the
existence of this divide, educa-
SEE page two


1S92. Athol Island created histiorN in being
the first marine sancituar in the \\orld.
ho%\e\er the continuation of Phase III of
Atlantis' original design \ill erase this piece
of Bahranuan histor-, she -said Howecer. if
Kerzner Inteinmatonha ha, its ,a t he Athol
Island National MNarine Park %ill be no
more she saidL
Tihe d L-lopnicnti, _-chedled to begin bh
the end ot the year, has already been
approved by government and will be built
on the former "Sea Gardens", a site which
has been the focus of the Bahamas Envi-
ronmental Science and Technology Com-
mission (BEST).


Ecologist and research associate from
the Cambridge Coastal Research Unit,
Mark Spalding told the Tribune earlier this
month that the Sea Gardens %%ere protect-
ed in 1S92 from which time it %as illegal to
"dredge for or remote b\ any means coral.
sea fans, or other manne thereupon grow-
ing. lying or being m the area". This act
"as, however. rescinded in 1986 in an
amendment to the Fishenes Act.
The proposed golf course will be creat-
ed by filling 35 acres on the south side of
SEE page seven


Team to list
'all outstanding
criminal matters'
* By ROYANNE
FORBES-DARVILLE
WHILE the backlog of court
cases persists, Attorney General
Allyson Maynard-Gibson yester-
day announced the appointment
of a team to produce a compre-
hensive list detailing "all out-
standing criminal matters."
S"This list is critical to the effec-
tive administration of Justice,"
Minister Maynard-Gibson said
during a press briefing on swift
justice, held at her office.
"It will enable a true assess-
ment to be made as to the state of
affairs in the criminal courts and
an accurate assessment to be
made as to the resources neces-
sary to deal with the matters."
The list will contain matters set
for preliminary inquiry, matters
where the preliminary inquiry is
in progress; matters where the
preliminary inquiry is complete,
the transcript on file and matter
ready for trial, matters where the
preliminary inquiry is complete
and the transcripts are not yet on
SEE page seven


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
FREEPORT - Two new
major investments for Freeport
could be announced in the next
two weeks, Grand Bahama
Port Authority executives
Hannes Babak and Sir Albert
Miller announced Tuesday.


Since the appointments of
Mr Babak and Sir Albert as
chairman and CEO, respec-
tively, two major investments
totalling $23 million in
Freeport were recently
announced over the last sever-
al days.
Nassau businessman James
SEE page seven


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are seen speaking to the media following the meeting.
(Photo: Denise Maycock)

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ENa=turalizer







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006


LOA NW


Public speaks on racial issues


THE Bahamas as a whole is
made up of a number of mul-
tiracial and multicultural soci-
eties.
According to the Depart-
ment of Statistics' Living Con-
ditions survey done in 2001,
89 per cent of the country's
population is made up of
Bahamians, leaving the other
11 per cent to be of foreign
descent.
With this in mind The Tri-
bune took to the streets yes-


terday, to ask the Public their
views on "Racial Issues in the
Bahamas."


Most persons interviewed
believed strongly that there
are some racial issues in the
country, mainly in office envi-
ronments.
Others didn't think the
racial issues are as prominent
as some make them out to be
and some went so far as to say
"it doesn't impact society sig-
nificantly."

History

Vicar of Christ Church
Cathedral Michael Gittens
said: "There are some race
issues here, but I don't think
it's as bad as we make it out to
be. It's there, it's even in our
history. Although you do have
some persons that make more
of it to cover for their own
inadequacies."
"I think there is always an
issue between Bahamians
and most foreigners," com-
mented one Bahamian. "We
are always afraid of the
unknown. There are also

FROM page one

tor, social commentator and
Bahamian author Patricia Glin-
ton-Meicholas, said that there is a


* MICHAEL Gittens said:
"There are some race issues
here, but I don't think its as
bad as we make it to be."


racial barriers in the business
world, mainly in corporate
sectors."
Jason Evans said: "Yes, I
think that there are race
issues in the country, but it's
more of a class issue as well."
Some races, he said, can
migrate to the Bahamas and
find better jobs than others
because of small factors like
skin colour. "It's still ulti-
mately a class issue, it's how
we perceive foreigners in
some cases. The lighter your
skin is the more money you
have, it's just the way some
of us think."
, "There has always been a
growing issue between

need for persons to always
"beware of a simple explanation
for anything".
"I always feel that you should
look at several possible expla-
nations because there are many
things contributing to that sepa-
ration but there is still some of
the separation based on notions
of skin colour," she said. "It has
always been in modern times
very quiet in the Bahamas.
There are no signs saying that
you cannot come into a club or
that sort, but there are a lot of
issues."
This level of discomfort
between the races, Mrs Glinton-
Meicholas, said is quite natural
because of history even if a per-
son hadn't hIi d it.
"There are echoes of it all
around you. Now and again
someone in the papers would
bring up history, especially dur-
ing election time so that there
is always this discomfort and the
rest of the world comes in on
you, so there is always this .sense
of discomfort, especially for
whites who are a real minority in
numbers.
"I heard my parents talking
about active discrimination, but
even they had no kind of anti-
white thing going on but had a
great sense of self-possession
and a sense that they had just as
much right as anyone else to be
here although some may'have
been stupid enough to try and
keep them away from what is
owed to them as Bahamians,"
Mrs Glinton-Meicholas said.
Mrs Glinton-Meicholas point-
ed out that in the Americas
there had been imposed a sepa-
ration of races from early -on
because the whole economy in
these areas after the "discovery"
of the New World involved the
introduction of a variety of racial
groups, obviously the most
salient of which was that of
Africans brought here to work
the plantations.
"When you look at that eco-
nomic base you already suppose
superiority/inferiority because
,at the least lethal level you have
a supervisor and those who are
supervised but we know that it
went deeper than that. We had
owner and people owned and so
there is that great separation
that is imposed and made legal
and has all kinds of control
incorporated in society to have it
stay that way," she said.
On August 1, 1834, all slaves
in the British Empire were
emancipated, but still indentured
to their former owners in an
apprenticeship system which was
finally abolished in 1838.
Only then did this end a sys-
tem which had for centuries
imposed notions of inferiority
and superiority connected to
skin colour.
Mrs Glinton-Meicholas
explained that the baggage that
came with this system of slavery
and ownership obviously did not
provide blacks and whites the


* KENVA Sands said: "In 0 JASON Evans said: "Yes, I
some cases we have race issues think that there are race issues
on jobs and sometimes it's just in the country, but its more of
our perception." a class issue as well."


Bahamians and Haitians," said
M. Dawkins. "Even more so
now after the malaria scare. I
feel it's mostly because some
Bahamians feel like they are
trying to take over."
Kenva Sands said: "In
some cases we have race
issues on jobs and sometimes
it's just our perception.
You'd sometimes find per-
sons of different persuasions
other than Bahamians, being
promoted to executive posi-
tions and Bahamians are not
being promoted," she con-
tinued. "Otherwise we don't
have any racial issues, unless
some people perceive it that
way."


Thbe


opportunity to
relate to one another or share
wi[h one another.
If the race problems of the
1800s seem too far removed
*from the present date to explain
why there is still that divide, one
cannot forget that legs than 40
years ago the Bahamas still
wrested with the issue of insti-
tutionalised segregation and the
growing pains leading up to
majority rule.
"Majority rule is a very recent
date and until that time you had
the same notions of inferiority
and superiority connected to
skin colour carried forward into
modern times because of minor-
ity rule and that minority hap-
pened to be white and the
majority happened to be black.
"So because of that you are
not in the habit of socializing
together. Added on top of that
the vast majority of the black
people would fall into a certain
socio-economic category and I
would think that the majority of
whites fall into another," Mrs
Glinton-Meicholas said.
However, . many have
remarked that with the ugliness
of the system pre-majority rule
in the Bahamas is still within liv-
ing memory, it is remarkable
that the Bahamas is as integrat-
ed as it is.
This, she said, is due to the
insouciance that Bahamians had
to develop in order to survive in
the "bad old days".
There is a temptation for
some Bahamians to identify
with the struggle of black Amer-
icans of that era, but Mrs Glin-
ton-Meicholas said that while
some things may be valuable for
black Bahamians to take some-
thing from the experience of
black America, both groups do
not share the same pathology.
"How can they? The whole
development of it was quite dif-
ferent and you will notice, for
me personally, with some black
Americans you always feel a
sense of guilt that I am not feel-
ing this great burden they feel
and don't have the same com-
plaints.
"The dissolution of the plan-
tation system came far earlier
(in the Bahamas) than happened
in the States and was less well
organised. That along with the
isolation of the islands made
people less able to keep a social


E M Dawkins said: "There
has always been a growing
issue between Bahamians and
Haitians."


,une_


hierarchy based
on race.
"If you read the account of
the plantation on San Salvador
you will see that they-tried very
hard to keep that separation, but
when you are very poor and the
plantation is not in the best
shape it is difficult to keep the
kind of strict hierarchy that you
would have seen in the great
plantations in the Southern
United States," Mrs Glinton-
Meicholas said.
However, despite all this, she .
said, Bahamians are still afraid .
to speak about race for fear of "
being labelled racist.
There are many who feel that
the Bahamas has never had the
benefit of a sincere dialogue on
race or racism which afforded
blacks the opportunity to ask
questions and heal the hurt, par-
ticularly of those who lived dur-
ing the tumultuous period lead-
ing up to majority rule. Nor did
whites receive the opportunity
to address the hurt they may
have experienced during the
fiery political climate of the day.
Nevertheless, Mrs Glinton-
Meicholas said that with every
new generation this divide is *
lessening.
"I think because of the school
system and people going to
school more and more together
at a certain level, I think this
certainly is likely to improve
race relations," she said.
However, there may be anoth-
er divisive sociological phenom-
enon creeping quickly into
Bahamian society which will ere-
ate another divide - social class
and economics.
"That will have black Bahami-
ans on both sides of the divide.
In New Providence you have
enclaves of local whites, the
majority of black people still live
over the hill, but you have had
the development of new subdi-
visions, the expensive ones for
the nouveau riche, and you see '!,'
that separation of class arising .Jl
and now you have to look and 5*
decide is this only a matter of
race or skin colour or is this a
thing of class coming in here?
"There is a huge element of
class that you see exhibited
among those who seem better
off, even by the schools children
attend, there is that separation,
you tend to go where your
friends are, this is where you
socialize," Mrs Glinton-Mei-
cholas said.


AVOID REPOSSESSION


THE TRIBUNE


---7


-Da



SAL
lOn-Wed ONL








WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


O In brief

Kozeny

lawyers to

mount final

defence

LAWYERS for Viktor
Kozeny are expected to mount
one last defence for the Czech-
born investor in late July before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel gives
a final ruling in his extradition
case.
Kozeny's lawyers are expect-
ed to return to court on July 25
with a final defence to avoid his
extradi on to the United States.
Last >veek Magistrate Bethel
dismissed charges of money
laundering against Czech-born
investor Viktor Kozeny, stating
that she was not satisfied that
those acts for which the US had
indicted him constituted the
offence under Bahamian law.
Kozeny's lawyers will now
have to argue against the more
S. than 20 bribery charges still
- against the investor.
Kozeny, 43, was arrested at
his Lyford Cay home on Octo-
ber 5, 2005, just a few hours
before being indicted on a long
S- list of bribery and money laun-
dering charges in the US Dis-
trict Court in Manhattan. He
has been on remand at Fox Hill
prison since October 7 last year
having been denied bail. His
lawyer Philip "Brave" Davis
again brought up the issue of
bail yesterday. However, bail is
still being withheld.
Kozeny is accused of being
the driving force behind a mul-
ti-million dollar bribery scheme
which sought to corrupt Azer-
baijan officials so as to gain a
controlling interest in that coun-
try's state owned oil company
SOCAR during its privatization
process in the early 1990's. The
Czech investor is charged with
conspiracy to violate the US
Foreign Corrupt Practices Act
(FCPA) which makes it an
offence to offer to pay, or to
pay, foreign government offi-
cials in order to gain or retain
business.

VName of

hit-and-run

' victim is

released

POLICE have released the
identity of the elderly woman
who was struck down and killed
ii a hit and run accident over
the weekend.
According to reports, around
10.30 Friday night a Honda
vehicle travelling north on
Montrose Avenue hit 60-year-
old Emily Pierre, a resident of
the ar, '.
Pierre was taken to hospital
where she later died of her
injuries.
Pierre is the country's twenty-
second traffic fatality this year.
The incident is still being inves-
- tigated, according to police
--press liaison officer Walter
Evans.

Hanged

detainees

'passed

exam'

* CUBA
Guantanamo
-;- : -THREE Guantanamo Bay
; ; detainees who hung themselves
in their cells received psycho-
logical exams only days prior to
their suicides and showed no
signs of being depressed, a mil-
itary doctor said Tuesday,
according to Associated Press.
The doctor suggested the
exams, performed one to two
weeks before the June 10 sui-
cides, supported assertions by
military officials that the pris-
oners killed themselves as a
political act.
"None had showed any signs
of being depressed or having a
mental condition," said the doc-


tor, who is the medical officer in
change of the remote US.prison
on Cuba's southeastern tip.
The three detainees _ two
Saudis and a Yemeni _ were
given psychological exams as a
formality because they had
recently participated in a
hunger strike, including one
who refused meals for 180 days.


TROICA

EXERINTR


. ........ uFabulous Shoppin


* A VIEW of the lightning storm which broke off the coast of Nassau on Monday night



Decrease in drug



arrests may be due



to route alteration


* By KAHMILE REID
THE decreasing number of
drug-related arrests are not
necessarily a cause of celebra-
tion, according to
Assistant Commission-
er of Police Reginald
Ferguson. "
In an interview with
The Tribune yesterday,
he said the reduction
may not be due to the
efforts of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force,
but to drug traffickers
altering their routes. 1 .
"There is a fall off in ..
drug activity in that
they change route.
When they find that
law enforcement is
effective in an a-rea,
they switch to other
routes" Mr Ferguson
explained.
Since the start of the
year until May 31, the
number of drug- relat-
ed arrests have
amounted to 626, in the N RE
same period last year
it was 718.
"You may find that we have
less arrests and seize more
drugs".
Over the years the Family
Islands have been a target
alternative location for drug


traffickers. This is mainly due
to their isolation.
"The isolation of Family
Islands sometimes contribute
to trafficking - in that they find


GINALD Ferguson


these isolated cays, coves et
cetera. In order to do their
operation, however, eventual-
ly they come to the more pop-
ulated areas," Mr Ferguson
said.


Earlier this year, it was esti-
mated that 150 million worth
of marijuana was being culti-
vated and that some Family
Islands were host to more
than 14,000 marijuana
plants.
In February, 12,000
marijuana plants were in
found in Eleuthera, and
in January, 2,000 plants
were found in Andros.
According to police,
S' Marijuana in the
Bahamas has a street val-
' ue of $1,500 to $2,000 per
pound, and since the
country is a transit point,
upon reaching the US
these figures usually
increase.
Despite the fact- that
police efforts may not be
the reason for the arrests
decreasing, officers still
work very hard, using all
possible -tactics - includ-
ing undercover agents -
to combat drug traffick-
ing.
According to Mr Fer-
guson, "when your are
fighting crime, you utilise
whatever tactic is legally per-
mitted in this territory, going
undercover is one of these tac-
tics. If the scenario requires it,
then our intelligence will advise
us accordingly."


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PARLIAMENT STREET
Tel: 323-6145 Fax: 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121
email:pritcharddesigngroup@coralwave.com


June 30th



East Shirley Street


If It Looks Good It's Got To Be SunTee.


* By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
TO raise awareness and the
focus on a number of issues
relating to men, mainly vio-
lence, conflict resolution, and
health, the Catholic Archdio-
cese of Nassau will hold a
"Men and Boys Symposium"
tomorrow at Loyola Hall on
Gladstone Road.
Starting at 6.30pm the event,
which was initiated by the men
of St Francis Men's Associa-
tion, is open to the public.
Archbishop Patrick Pinder
said that it is far too easy to
find examples of under-
achievement in men.
"When we look around us
we see so many themes that
speak of the underachieve-
ment of men, so we know
there is a need for us to place
some emphasis on this matter.
It is not just the question of
the academic achievement. We


look around and we. so often
see those who are achieving in
academics are the girls and the
women, and we realise that
there is definitely some imbal-
ance here.
"On the other side we look
and we see that so much of the
violent crimes in our commu-
nity are being perpetrated by
the men, and even in some cas-
es the boys. So we certainly
need to address this question
of men and boys in our com-
munity. It is a very significant
issue, a very importance issue
to the life of our community
as a whole," he said.
The archbishop continued:
"We have to think carefully
about our self understanding
of the church. We don't simply
exist for our own existence.
The church really has a Gospel
to proclaim, and an important
aspect of that Gospel has to
do with the living of the faith.
"The living of the faith real-


ly has to connect with growing
the common good. And the
common good really has to do
with the quality of life in our
community. And if the quality
of life in our community is
being impacted by the under-
achievement of men, certainly it
is a matter we have to look to
with great seriousness, and
something we have been look-
ing to with great seriousness,"
he said.


Symposium to focus on


raising male achievement


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(next door to Sure Alarm)

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(linens, kitchen things), books, CD's,
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Website: www.sun-tee.com







''15:UNL~5EDITOURL 25, 2U(Jb ITOITHE EDITOR,~


IN THIS1 column yesterday we said that if,
as ;kjimied, caor option is endemic to our soci-
ety,and that this is the society from which our
police force is being recruited, then a strong
outside inIfluece,' is needed to point these
recruits in a new direction.
The trend in the (Caribbean, which is
plagued w. ilh the same local problems as the
Bahamas, is now looking to London's Met-
ropolitan Police for help.
Commissioner of Police Paul Farquhar-
son, a fine role model and strong commis-
sioner, who is presently investigating com-
plaints frolni 0he public, is determined to root
out the bad apples in his force.
We do not know his feelings on the matter
of foreign recruitment, but, as do many
Bahamrians. wc think he needs help -outside
help from well disciplined, experienced police
officers.
No longer can we turn to the Caribbean for
recruitment.
This is the' areca from which many of our
policemen were dravn, particularly from Bar-
bados. However, even Barbados is in trouble
and has now turned to Britain for help,
because crime lhas also overwhelmed its local
force.
It is through such recruitment that the
Pindling name took root in the Bahamas. Sir
Lynden's father was a police recruit from
Jamaica.
What. is needed in the Bahamas at this
time are policemen with no ties to the conm-
munity - no ma, pa, brothers, sisters, cousins
or friends to lean on them for favors and
protection.
In other words hio one to quietly "fix
things" when they cross the law.
We recall with amusement years ago when
a young staff member would remind her fel-
low workers whenever they annoyed her of
how many uncles she could call in from the
force to take cal e of them.
Needless to say she is no longer with The
Tribune.
Foreign officers. who have no axe to grind,
no favouis tu offer and nothing to fear, are
needed in such ai eas as CID and the records
office to make certain that no complaints fall
between the cracks and nocase files disap-
pear.
The Commissioner will have to reinforce
the Force's ride book.
The foreii.n officers would serve their time
and return to England, having set an example


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of discipline and integrity, leaving no trail of
having been in anyone's pocket. ,
We recall the days when members of the
public were afraid to give so much as a Christ-
mas gift to a serving officer. Today, gifts are
not only given, but letters from members of
the force soliciting donations for certain pro-
jects are written. All of this is proper if done
with the approval of the Commissioner, but
today how much of this slips under the radar
of propriety?
'raking an officer to lunch or dinner was
also, against the rules as it was open to mis-
interpretation.
It would be helpful to both sides if the
Commissioner would take out the rule book
and let both public and serving officer know
what is allowed and what is frowned on. And
how each side should treat the other.
We recall when The Tribune and Radio
Station 100 JAMZ, supported by the public,
donated bullet proof vests for the police force.
We wanted to find the best vests on the mar-
ket for our men.
However, we ran into a few snags behind
the scenes when some persons within the
force were representing certain companies
and, of course, were pushing their products.
In what Bahamians disparagingly refer to as
"those nasty old colonial days" such prac-
tices were unheard of. Bahamian officers
would not dare entertain such ideas. Ask Sir
Albert Miller and Mr Conrad Knowles and
others of that era who can tell you what was
expected of an officer.
The Tribune has reported case files that
have disappeared in the past, persons who
have complaints that they cannot, no matter
how hard they try, get before the courts; per-
sons who cannot get legal representation
because of public figures involved. And the
list can go on and on.
And now we are faced with a future of
under-educated Bahamians; Bahamians who
can't make their school grades, yet are being
socially promoted up and out of the schools
without qualifications.
Young people, both girls and boys, who
are dabbling in drugs as 10 year olds, who by
the time they hit their teens will have a police
record.
Is this the level of citizens from which our
future police force is to be drawn?
The situation is serious. Now is the time to
come to grips with the problem and try to find
solutions.


The Tribune Limited
*, LIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Peing I Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

S!'.:(N 1F. II. D UPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

S! l':7 T'INNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hion.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EJ'I.EEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
S;,'. Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Sii ichboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


Situation in Police Force serious


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For The Editor's informa-
tion, if Mr Ward's sign was
exempted from Customs
duties, under Seaward's
"Heads of Agreement" with
the government, then it was
for him to provide the Let-
ter of Approval to the Cus-
toms officer, who would have
kept the sign until Mr Ward,
or his Customs broker, sub-
mitted the proper entries to
Customs for processing.
The Editor should know
that it is not enough for any-


ment project and automati-
cally get a waiver of all the
statue laws in place, govern-
ing work permits for foreign
workers and customs duties
on imports. It just doesn't
happen that way; notwith-
standing whose friend is who.
Your editorial, was an
unfair attack, in these
instances, on both Bahamas
Immigration. and Customs
and I condemn you for doing
so.


FORRESTER
CARROLL
Freeport,
Grand Bahama,
June 22, 2006.


EDITOR, The Tribune.
I CONDEMN The Editor
of The Freeport News, for
the unfair, sneak attack on
Bahamas Customs and Immi-
gration, in the paper's edito-
rial published on June 21,
2006.
Anyone reading this edito-
rial, would readily conclude
that this, somewhat, subtle
attack on Bahamas Customs
and Immigration, was moti-
vated, not by any particular
concern for the welfare of the
general public, but by some
other factors, more personal
in nature.
While it might be true that
Mr Ward's Seaward project
pales in comparison with the
Ginn Corporation's mega-
project at West End, Grand
Bahama, it is not true, I sub-
mit, that this is the reason for
Bahamas Immigration
Department requiring the
two men accompanying Mr
Ward, to be issued tempo-
rary work permits before
being allowed to work in the
country; neither was it the
reason for Bahamas Customs
Department collecting Cus-
toms duties.on the sign that
Mr Ward admitted bringing
with him.
If the Editor did not know
the facts, I am of the view
that as a journalist, he/she
ought to have availed, them-
selves of the right informa-
tion before "pen lashing"
those officers.
With respect to the Immi-
gration Department and the
two men in question applica-
tions should have been sub-
mitted to Bahamas Immigra-
*tion, prior to their arrival in
the country, requesting tem-
porary work permits. The
permits would have been
granted for a nominal fee. I
do this all the time, in con-
nection with my ship agency
business, for persons coming
into the country to perform
ship inspections, etc,
The Customs Department,
on the other hand, has no
authority, under law, to
waive Customs duties - only
the Minister of Finance is so
empowered: hence the rea-
son for Mr Ward having to
pay the applicable Customs
duties on the sign he brought
with him. Customs officers
were not targeting Mr Ward,
I submit, as the editorial
comments seem to imply.


Fruition of dream at


graduation ceremony


EDITOR, The Tribune.
I EXTEND congratulation to Mr Fred Delancy, Mr Joseph
Fox, BTVI staff and graduating Class 2006, Freeport Grand
Bahama.
Sometime ago, I watched a TV programme on Cable 12. The
host was Dr Keith Wisdom and the former Governor General
Sir Clifford Darling was his guest. One of the pertinent things Sir
Clifford Darling noted was his desire to see more young Bahami-
an men equip themselves with at least two trade skills.
On Thursday, June 15, 2006, I witnessed the fruition to Mr
Darling's dream at BTVI (Freeport) graduation ceremony.
The keynote speaker was Parliamentary Secretary "Agatha
Marcelle".
She was dynamic in her speech and encouraged the graduation
class to strive on until they met their goals.
Those students were not the smartest in their academics at
their high school, but their determination to excel were unprece-
dented. Mr Fred Delancy and Mr Joseph Fox took up the chal-
lenge to work with them and to make them respectable citizens
of our country.
Those young men in particular obtained their qualifications in
automobile mechanics, air-conditioning, carpentry, II and III
phase electrician, masons and welders; the list goes on.
I am therefore challenging the Ministry of Education, tha :if
these same classes are extended to our family islands. we can
have qualified workers in our islands.
This experience for us as parents was filled with joy a.id hap-
piness. One mother expressed herself as feeling as p,':d as a
peacock.
Again, special thanks to Mr Fred Delancy, Mr Joseph F)x,
staff and students of BTVI the Northern District.
May God continue to bless them as they strive in helping
our children fulfill their dreams.

MANASSEH C
HEPBURN Sr
Freeport,
Grand Bahama,
June 19, 2006.









Wendy's is now recruiting


Crew Members,


Cashiers &


Maintenance Staff


for all locations.


Interested persons should apply in person

at Any Wendy's Locations from

Wednesday, June 28 to Friday, June 30

Between 9:00 a.m. to 12 noon

Must be able to work shifts & weekends.
No phone calls please.


Do what tastes right:


Criticism of





newspaper's




edito.rial


I i"HE 'I HbONE'


�; " -� I! -- -6UAY, JUNL 26,2UUb
: t : i, I.UNL






WEDNESDAY, JUNI- 28, 2006, PAU I b


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALN


* In brief

18-year-old

in serious

condition

after fight

FREEPORT - An 18-year-
old resident of Pinder's Point
remains hospitalized in serious
condition after being struck in
the head with a cutlass during
an altercation over the week-
end in Freeport.
Kemeron Pinder was at Pizza
Hut Restaurant on the Mall
Road sometime around 9.30pm
when he was involved in a heat-
ed argument with another man,
who hit him several times in the
head with a cutlass.
Inspector Loretta Mackey,
assistant press liaison officer,
said Pinder was taken to Rand
Memorial Hospital, where he
was admitted.to the male surgi-
cal ward.
Inspector Mackey said inves-
tigations are continuing into the
matter and police are searching
for the perpetrator who has
been identified in connection
with the matter.

Three-car

collision

puts woman

in hospital

FREEPORT - A 49-year-old
woman is listed as "ill" in the
Intensive Care Unit following
a three-car collision on Satur-
day.
According to reports, the traf-
fic accident occurred sometime
around 3.20pm at the intersec-
tion of Pioneers Way and
Columbus Drive involving three
cars - a silver 2002 Chevrolet
Cavalier licence 38849, driven
by George Duncombe, 33, of
Adventurer's Way; a 2001
Hyundai Accent licence 24338
driven by Ella Guarro of Sea-
horse Village; and a silver 1991
Isuzu Rodeo licence 6246 dri-
ven by Amy Watson, 29, of Sea-
, horse Village.
All three vehicles were exten-
sively damaged.
Ms Guarro and Ms Watson
. were taken to Rand Memorial
Hospital, where Guarro was
treated and detained with seri-
S . ous head injuries, and Watson
was treated and discharged.
Inspector Loretta Mackey
said that as of Sunday after-
noon, Guarro was listed as "ill"
, n the Intensive Care Unit.
Investigations are continuing
'into accident.


Share.

your

news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Call us
on 322-1986 and share
your story.










3 I22 S


WED. JUNE 28
2:00am Community Pg. 1540AM
8:00 Bahamas@Sunrise
9:00 Underdog Fun
9:30 Tennessee Tuxedo & His Tales
10:00 Da' Down Home Show
11:00 Immediate Response
12:00n ZNS News Update
12:05 Immediate Respbnse Cont'd
1:00 Island Lifestyles
1:30 Inside Hollywood
2:00 The Fun Farm
3:00 Morning Joy
3:30 Ecclesia Gospel
4:00 Dennis The Menace
4:30 Carmen San Diego
4:58 ZNS News Update
5:00 Fun Farm
5:30 Treasure Attic
6:00 A Special Report
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
8:00 Eye On Health
9:00 Labour Speaks
9:30 BTC Connection
10:00 Caribbean Newsline
10:30 News Night 13
11:00. The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30 Comm. Pg. 1540 AM


Transit union says supplement



on traffic system was 'flawed'


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
PUBLIC Transit Association
Bahamas (PTAB) president Reuben
Rahming is claiming that the govern-
ment's recent supplement on a pre-
ferred model for the unification of the
bus system for New Providence, is
"exceedingly flawed".
At a press conference yesterday, Mr
Rahming said the government claimed
the supplement - published in the Nas-
sau Guardian on June 21,- was a "full
copy" of the preferred module.
However, he claimed, the supplement
was not a "true representation" of the


final report issued to the industry.
,Mr Rahming pointed out two major
issues with the contents of the supple-
ment.
In the final draft of the model, he
said, it was stated that: "It'is important
for government to hold minority shares
in the new company." It added that the
government should obtain 20 to 30 per
cent of the equity at no cost.
He claimed that after he made this
point publicly two weeks ago, four days
later the supplement was issued.
However, this point was omitted in
the supplement and replaced with:
"That government does not take up any
equity in the new bus company."


"Although we would accept that posi-
tion, if it is true, it can not officially be
accepted as true so long as it has not
been reflected or amended in docu-
ments presented to the industry to
date."
Mr Rahming also expressed concern
about a foreign consultant who is
preparing a business plan for the indus-
try. He claimed that industry personnel
have not been introduced to this con-
sultant, or provided any information.
"There is no way someone can create
a business plan for a company owner,
without consulting the owner; that is
something flawed," he said. "The
process that is being conducted here is


one in which it seems that the govern-
ment would go ahead and built a house,
then come to us and ask us what colour
to paint it - and then say we had an
input into it.
"Yet we. who have built this indus-
try through blood, sweat and tears, we
who are now second and third genera-
tion of transportation franchise hold-
ers are saying that we want to be a part
of the building and the renovation of
our industry, from the ground up, and
we want it to be done very transpar-
ently," said Mr Rahming.
I Road Traffic Controller Jack Thomp-
son was not available for comment up
to press time.


Almost five years on, still no new Straw Market


* A WOODEN barrier being erected around the site in May last year. Today 0 THE temporary Straw Market in use today
little has changed behind the barrier.


* By KRYSTEL ROLLE
IT was almost five years ago
when the old straw market
burned to the ground and
straw vendors are still with-
out a permanent market.
In his 2006-2007 budget
contribution Bradley Roberts,
Minister of Works and Utili-
ties, made no significant
remarks about the straw mar-
ket. He said only: "The gov-
ernment has already com-
menced or will be carrying out
a number of other dredging
and construction projects,
including the Bay Street Straw
Market."
Although, in last year's bud-
get debate, he did state that


the government had allocat-
ed $2.7 million for the recon-
struction of the Bay Street
Straw Market.
A number of straw vendors
are concerned about how much
longer they will have to remain
in the temporary quarters pro-
vided for them by government
after September 2001 fire.
Some vendors say that not
enough "serious" improve-
ments have been made to the
old straw market site to give
them any indication that the
straw market will be rebuilt
anytime soon.
"I haven't seen any serious
changes to the site which
makes me believe that not
much is being done to build


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She is brown with a bald tip to her tail and
shrivelled ears. She is wearing a tick and chain collar.
Last seen on the night of Sunday 25th June.
Lost in the Camperdown - Sans Souci area.
Any information on her whereabouts appreciated.
Reward offered.
Phone 324 7392 or 324 0134



CONGRATULATIONS



.' : .







PHOENIX WILSUON
for a successful school year for making the Principal's
Award List and for skipping K5 and moving
on to grade one in September keep uip the good work.
We Love You Honey,
from your Parents Marvin and MaryAnn, Brother
Marvin Jr.., Teacher Ms. Johnson
and Bread of Life Christian Academy.


the new straw market," one
vendor said.
Over the years vendors have
complained about the heat that
continues to smother the mar-
ket, especially during the hot
summer months. They also
complain about the cramped
conditions and the lack of suffi-
cient rest rooms. The govern-
ment, and private sponsors,
have tried to improve condi-


tions for the vendors and
tourists by installing fans and
performing massive clean-ups,.
but still provisions in the market
are not of the standard that ven-
dors want.
"I don't think anyone will be
totally happy with this market
because there is not much you
can do to improve it," another
vendor added. "The govern-
ment has done the best they can


do. We just need to relocate to
an environment that can afford
better conditions and I don't
think that will be possible until
the new straw market is built."
The new straw market, once
completed will be three stories
high with two mezzanines -
extended decks or patios. Con-
struction began last year with
work on the foundations.


I


NOTE: ZNS -TV 13 reserves
the right to make last minute
programme changes! I


-1


,













'Inadequate funding' of Defence Force



is blamed for immigration failures


INADEQUATE funding of
the Defence Force has been
blamed by the FNM as one of
many reasons that the PLP's
immigration policies are failing
the country.
In a statement released yes-
terday, the Opposition cited "a
gross inadequate budget for the
Defence Force" was responsi-


ble for its inability to discharge
its duties.
The party added that the
Defence Force could not rely
on the PLP government for
funding for a seaworthy fleet.
and that the aircraft that is
meant for the enhancement ot
patrol and detection capabili-
ties remains parked and unused


The 1 Ni s Statement comes
in the \\wak of a highly public
citsed ciraLikJoxwn by inimigra-
tion Minister Shane Gibson in
Ilati l n coimi ulities.
l ivric in the document
S'lci thit under the PLYP,
'p;iili it< ol illegal im mi-
inilats tha:, decreased. In 20,02,
the year whlien FNM left office,
0.357 illeguis were repatriated.
I na ,iiidher tell to 4 642 in
,'ti.) it 1iS a ,14.i. So thi up to
May this year, it was 3,015.
"'I he go\ cirnent seeks to
hide its failure in immigration
behind a smoke screen of lies
and distortions," the statement
said
The FNM said that it left in
place plans for construction of a
new docking and holding facili-,
ties that would enable immi-
gration authorities to hold
iumiirants detained at sea,


f'O1"


"_p


N GUARDS pn cc
* *' . '

I~~~~~~~~~ T.* "?'"V" a '*
1 ^ �* ^ Mf. **.^ "
S-. ' " _ _ _







* GUARDS patrol the detention c


rather than having to take them
to Nassau. However, according
to the statement, the PLP has
"failed to continue and to build
oh the immigration policies left
in place by the FNM and now


attempting to mislead the pet,
ple."
The statement added that the
overcrowded detention centre
has frustrated security guard,
and other security personnel


into somelinmes responding
inaippropt lately to emergencies.
A. a Ijsult. there have been
fouin breakouts from the centre
in iccentl months.
'I le first breach was not con-
firmed by the government until
it ',as ri vealed exclusively by
'I h.' 'I rihune
I he statement added that
since May 2002 there has been
an obvious breakdown in the
fit m i me',-ient otf u inigic tio l;I\\
i ,i ' .r . ,,.. .-,:> : l'; t I I ,lt]. l . c i
iitllueiice- I' ..i.li I the pioLess
of immigration applications-
*.. aCe ]iIlt\, il work o p i)tjlt .
Considering all these facto s,.
no initiatives have been
launched to determine the need
in the local economy for illegals
whose presence is permitted to
continue.
The FNM maintained: "The
government has utterly failed-,
lhe Bahamian people in the''
protection for our borders."


Bahamians are urged to take



precautions against the heat


5M-4 Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa


Invites Application for the following positions.

One Household Manager
Applicant must have knowledge in Food & Beverage, Good
communication and supervisory skills, must be fully cognizant
of high domestic standards and the ability prepare gourmet
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Applicant must have a Bachelor Degree minimum of three
years experience in Hotel Accounting. Proven knowledge of
financial and operational management, strong communication
and supervisory skills

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Resume' to cmajortsrb.sandals.com hand deliver or
faxed to 327-6961

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Auditing preferably at a supervisory level. Sound knowledge
of Hotel Accounting & Cost Control an asset. Working
knowledge of ACL a plus. Excellent oral and written
communication skills. Send salary history with resume to:
mharding@srb.sandals.com


stroke dehydration and sun-
burns.
, She said that heat exhaustion
is the most prevalent heat-relat-
ed illness in her practice. This
occurs when the body has not
had enough fluids and has diffi-
iultl '.)oieg down and can
cause naseea tiind dizziness,
On the othti hand, the hot
weather can tause involuntary
muscle spasms as a result of not
taking in enough fluid and the
body's inability to control its
temperature.
Dr Hanna said that these
spasms should not last longer
than an hour, and would be alle-
viated by resting and light mas-
sages.
However, a heat stroke is a
form of illness that can be "life-


threatening!'.
"This is actually when the
body is basically having a lot of
difficulty dealing with the heat
stress itself. The body's tem-
perature becomes very high,
usually higher than 104 degrees
- and the normal b i. i.
ature is 98.4 degicc , ,sl
explained.
Veatrice Johhison, a nurse at
the Geriatric Hospital, said that
the number of fans have been
increased on both the wards and
the porch. They have also
increased the seniors' fluid
intake.
The American Red Cross
advises persons to follow sev
en simple guidelines to prev cent
becoming a victim of a heat
related illness:


- Wcmai lightweight, light
coloured clothing and wear hats
or use an umbrella.
* Carry water or juice and
drink continuously, even if you
do not feel lhi .-i'. Avoid alco-
hol id i 1 .1... which dehy-
*L, lL >ilitll iiiiclb .010lk i- lil 1 1
olC n. Avoid lughi pioLteti uoods
which increase imetabolic heat
* Avoid strenuous activities:
It you niIl't do strenuous activ-
ity, do it during the coolest part
of the day, usually between 4am
and 7am.
* Stay indoors when possible.
* Take rcgulai breaks when
engaged in physical activity.
* A\,)id using salt tablets
unlcesS diiiected to do so by a
physician.


Y 0u P CC. 'lj rv ie


S . : 0


REDUCED RATES

FOR INTERNATIONAL CALLS.



The Bahamas Telecommunications Company

Limited (BTC) is pleased to announce to the general

public and our valued customers that effective July
1st, 2006 all international calls will be reduced as

follows:


DESTINATION


United States of America


Canada


$ pei minute or part thereof

0.47

0.50


Caribbean (Except Cuba) 0.66

Cuba 0.85

All Other Countries 0.85


BTC thanks the public for their continued support

and we look forward to Connecting You To The

World.


I By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
BAHAMIANS have been
warned to take precautions
against the scorching heat.this
sununer.
So , 1 I, ; li; Ihi, il l1th 4 j1uneC,
he hi.'ghsi recorded tempera-
tlre has ioee a scorching 91
degrees Fahrcenheit - a mark
whi Ia iis been recorded three
limes this month.
And as the temperature rises,
tilhe probability of one being
plagued by heat-related illness
becomes greater if one does not
take the necessary precautions.
Dr Cher ilyn Hanna, a paedi-
atrician, told The Tribune that
persons can sutfler from heat
cxhatluslion, heat erailips, heat


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TFIE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006


.7".,.' � ,






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8 WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006


The fever of the earth and looking




to the future of the environment


Everybody talks about the
weather, but nobody does any-
thing about it."
- Mark Twain

AT THE height of the
Cold War, a huge
underground bunker deep in
the Rocky Mountains was
crammed with sophisticated
instruments to detect and deter
military threats from the Soviet
bloc.
-The North American Aero-
space Defence Command (or
NORAD) was a "doomsday"
machine designed to fight a
nuclear war that no-one could
survive. The Cold War is over
now, but life on Earth is still
under threat - although from a
very different quarter.
Recently, newspapers report-
ed the building of another kind
of 'NORAD' in the heart of a
mountain on a frozen island in
the Norwegian Arctic. And
some say the future of humani-
ty could; rest within this multi-
million-dollar concrete vault.
But instead of radars and
computers, it will contain a col-
lection of two million plant
seeds, representing all known
varieties of the crops that
mankind developed in the
10,000 years since agriculture
was invented.
I The UN-approved vault will
be built to last forever, protect-
ed by airlocks and high-security
blast-proof doors. It is designed
to safeguard crop diversity in
the event of a global environ-
mental catastrophe. This
doomsday seed bank is one


more sign of rising concern over
the impact of climate change on
human civilisation and life in
general.
As if to underline the threat,
the US National Academies of
Science reported just last week
on surface temperature recon-
structions over the last few
thousand years. The report was
commissioned by Congress last


Arctic sea ice
is melting
faster every
year, and
satellites have
determined
that Antarctica
is losing about
36 cubic miles
of ice a year.


year and it supports a key find-
ing of previous research - that
there has been unprecedented
global warming during this peri-
od, and particularly in the last
century or so.
Reliable records go back only
about 150 years, so scientists
estimate this information from
tree rings, corals, marine sedi-
ments, cave deposits, ice cores,,
boreholes, glaciers and docu-


Resorts International
.Invites applications for the position of
PHOTO SHOP SITE MANAGER
The successful applicant should satisfy the following minimum requirements:-
> Have a diploma or degree in Management/Marketing or a related field
> Have a minimum of 3 years experience in the .ii.-:1 I. i.; .i. industry in
a management position
> Have a minimum of 3 years experience in sales/retail
> Have a strong command of MS Excel, MS Word, MS PowerPoint
> Experience in Photo Shop Editing Suite (Adobe PhotoShop) is a definite
asset
> Have a basic knowledge of digital photography,
> Be bright, energetic and must be a self-starter
> Must demonstrate flexibility and assertiveness in generating sales proposals
and concepts for increasing Photo Shop revenue
> Be a team player with the ability to manage staff and daily Photo Shop
operations
Other duties will include:
> Daily supervision of work area ensuring maximum overall performance
through effective crew/staff management
> Maintenance of employee records, as well as establishing and maintaining
fair and consistent crew/staff practices
> Liaising with resort Sales Manager and assisting the resort General Manager
and Photo Shop Group Manager with all internal communications, site
reporting, evaluations and meeting coordination within designated site.
Applications should be emailed or faxed to:
GROUP MANAGER, PHOTOGRAPHY OPERATIONS
Sandals Resorts International
P. O.Box 100
Montego Bay
Fax: 518-0995
Email: ehanna@sri.sandals.com and hrd@sri.sandals.com
Applications close on Friday March 31, 2006










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ments: "There is sufficient evi-
dence," the report concluded;
"to say with a high level of con-
fidence that the last few decades
of the 20th century, were
warmer than any comparable
period in the last 400 years."
Ever since the 1970s scien-
tists have been warning that ris-
ing levels of greenhouse gases
(such as carbon dioxide) in the
atmosphere could cause signifi-
cant changes in climate that
could be disastrous. But there
was resistance by some to the
idea that human activity was the
cause of global warming, and
even greater scepticism that it
would lead to global catastro-
phe.
In 1988 the UN.set up the
Intergovernmental Panel on
Climate Change (IPCC) to
analyse and report on scientific
findings. And four years later
180 nations signed the Climate
Change Convention in Brazil,
agreeing to prevent "danger-
ous" warming from greenhouse
gases and setting an initial target
of cutting emissions from indus-
trialised countries to 1990 levels
by the year 2000.

The Kyoto Protocol in.
1997 agreed on emis-
sions cuts for industrialized
nations of less than 6 per cent,
to be met by 2010. But the US
under George Bush refused to
ratify the agreement, citing the
lack of controls over emissions
from big developing countries
like China and India. So far, the
best plan offered by American
politicians - the Climate Stew-
ardship act - aims to cut emis-
sions in the US merely to 2000
levels by 2010. And the Senate


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What do you think? Send
comments to larry@tribuneme-
dia.net
Or visit www.bahamapun-
dit.com


has rejected it twice.
But scientists say that if cur-
rent trends continue, green-
house gas concentrations will
rise to double pre-industrial lev-
els during this century: "That
will probably be enough to raise
global temperatures by around
2 to 50C," according to New Sci-
entist Magazine. "Some warm-
ing is certain, but the degree
will be determined by feedbacks
involving melting ice, the
oceans, water vapour, clouds
and changes to vegetation."
The visible evidence of glob-


The Bahamas
is more

vulnerable
than most to
the effects of
climate
change since
80 per cent of
our land is
within five
feet of mean
sea level.


al warming is all around us.
Glaciers are receding. Arctic
sea ice is melting faster every
year, and satellites have deter-
mined that Antarctica is losing
about 36 cubic miles of ice a
year. Experts say human activ-


ity could trigger an irreversible
melting of the ice sheets in this
century that would raise sea lev-
els more than 15 feet - enough
to flood land occupied by bil-
lions of people, including the
low-lyinig Bahamas._
Besides a rise in sea level, the
BEST Commission identifies
many other potential dangers
from global warming that could
affect us - including more and
stronger hurricanes, droughts,
spreading tropical diseases, loss
of farm land, and extinction of
many species of animals and
plants - with dire and unpre-
dictable consequences for
humanity.

The Bahamas is more
vulnerable than most
to the effects of climate change
since 80 per cent of our land is
within five feet of mean sea lev-
el. Coastal facilities are likely
to suffer heavy damage from
storm surges. Fresh water reser-
voirs will be contaminated and
we can expect increased flood-
ing from heavier rains, as well as
more malaria, dengue and oth-
er tropical diseases. Tourism
will decline as our major mar-
kets become warmer.
As former BEST Commis-
sion advisor John Hammerton
said recently, "Given that most
of the Bahamas is a low-lying
coastal zone subject to storm
surge and sea level rise, we
should be anticipating the pos-
sible impacts of climate change
and developing strategies to
protect our habitats and land-
scapes based on the best pre-
dictions."
The question is: Should we
bother to do anything about the
possible effects of climate
change? And if the answer is
'yes', what should we do, and
how should we go about it?'
According to Gordon Brown,
the British finance 'minister, the
challenges of global warming
point principally towards less
burning of fossil fuels and


ilia


--- ---- - --
y


greater energy efficiency: "We
must make climate stability,
energy investment and energy
security central to economic
policy," he said in a recent
speech. "All governments must
work together to tackle it."
Brown said the economic
costs associated with an increase
in average global temperature
"could lead to instability in
some countries. An'd as eco-
nomic instability increases risk
and undermines investment, so
climate change will come to
threaten our economic devel-
opment and growth."
And the New Scientist said:
"The bottom line is that we will
need to cut carbon dioxide
emissions by 70 to 80 per cent
simply to stabilise temperatures.
The quicker we do that, the less
unbearably hot our future world -
will be."
Of course, the sceptic's view
is of a planet where global
warming isn't happening - or,
if it is, it isn't happening because. , -
of anything we are doing wrong., .
Or, if it is happening because
of what we are doing, it isn't
going to be a big problem. And,
even if it is a big problem, we
can't realistically do anything
about it other than try to adapt.
But sceptics are becoming few-
er on the ground these days..
There is a related scientific
theory which sees the Earth is a
single giant organism - and the
balanced interrelationship
between animals, plants, the
Island, the sea and the atmos-
phere as critical to the survival
of the whole. This is called the
Gaia hypothesis, and it was first
proposed in the 1960s by a
British scientist named James
Lovelock.

I G aia was the ancient
Greek name for
Mother Earth. As the primor-
- dial element from which all the
gods originated, Gaia was wor-
shipped throughout Greece,
and in Roman mythology was
known as Terra.
Lovelock, one of the world's
most distinguished ecologists,
has written a new book called
the "Revenge of Gaia", which
talks about global catastrophe
on a biblical scale. According
to Lovelock, the Earth is about
to pass into a morbid fever that
may last a hundred thousand
years: "I have to tell you, as
members of the Earth's family
and an intimate part of it, that
you and especially civilisation
are in grave danger."
Before this century is over,
he predicts, billions will die and
the few who survive will be in
the Arctic where the climate
remains tolerable.
"Our planet has kept itself
healthy and. fit for life, just like
an animal does, for most of the
more than three billion years of
its existence. It was ill luck that
we started polluting at a time
when the sun is too hot for com-
fort. We have given Gaia a
fever and soon her condition
will worsen to a state like a
coma. She has been there
before and recovered, but it
took more than 100,000 years.
We are responsible and will suf-
fer the consequences."

And what can we do
about it? "First, we
have to keep in mind the awe-
some pace of change and realise
how little time is left to act; and
then each community and
nation must find the best use of
the resources they have to sus-
tain civilisation for as long as
they can. The big threat to the
planet, Lovelock says, is peo-
ple: "There are too many of us,
doing too well economically,
and burning too much oil."
According to the latest edi-
tion of the Pew Global Atti-
tudes Survey, the two countries
least concerned about global
warming are the two greatest
producers of greenhouse gases
- the US and China, where
only 19 and 20 per cent respec-
tively say they "worry a great
deal" about the problem.
But clearly, energy security
has become the key issue of our
age. Not only will it affect the
prospects for global war or
peace, it could determine the
future of the entire planetary
ecosystem. And remember, it's
not nice to fool with Mother
Nature.






WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006, PAOE 9


THE TRIBUNE


LOALNW


'Growing need'




for residential




care for elderly


* By Bahamas Information
Services
PRIME Minister Perry
Christie said that there is an
"escalating need" to provide
residential care and accom-
modation for the country's
senior citizens.
Mr Christie's remarks were
made at the official opening
of the Residential Care
Establishments Licensing
Authority office on Eighth
Terrace, East Centreville on
Tuesday.
He said the opening of the
office marked a "defining
day" for the Ministry of
Social Services and Commu-
nity Development,
Also in attendance were
. Minister of Social Services
. ad Community Develop-
ihent Melanie Griffin and St
Thomas Moore MP Frank
Smith:
The functions of the Resi-
dential Care Licensing Author-
ity include the registration of
buildings as residential care
establishments;, registration of
operators and administrators of
residential care establishments;
regulation of residential care
establishments; regulation of
the conducts of operators and
employees of residential care
establishments; the establish-
. - - . ment of standards of qualifica-
tion for operators and employ-
ees of residential care; issuance
of licenses to operators of resi-
dential care establishments.
Prime Minister Christie noted


WHEN E Clement Bethel
wrote the Cat Island-based folk
opera Sammie Swain he had no
idea he conceived a classic.
He also had no idea that his
.title, character would one day
S- be played by a talented 11 year-
SAd during the most. patriotic
veck on the Bahamian calen-
dar.
Pint-sized performers from
the National Children's Choir
will prove that there are indeed
no small parts in theatre when
they take on the pulsating musi-
cal during this year's 33rd Inde-
pender -e Celebrations under
the theme, "Past, Present and
Future: A Bahamian Cultura-
ma."
More than 50 youngsters
between ages six and 16 will be
taking part in the production,
which is set to take the stage on


that the government has spon-
sored entire homes and
increased subsidies to some
$150,000 over the years to resi-
dential care establishments such


L. ___ . a-
* PERRY Christie (fourth from
left) and Mrs Vylma Curling,
chairman of Residential Care
Establishment Licensing
Authority (second from left), cut
the ribbon at the official opening
of the Residential Care
Establishments Licensing
Authority office on Eight Terrace,
Centreville, on Tuesday, June 20.

as the Children's Emergency
Hostel.
I He urged'the new authority
to ensure that as the islands of
the Bahamas develop, residen-
tial care facilities are in place
for senior citizens.
"There is an escalating need
in our country to provide resi-
dential accommodation to
senior citizens," Mr Christie
said.
In recognition of this, he
added, the College of the
Bahamas, through its Continu-
ing Education Programme, will
introduce training initiatives for


July 8 and 9 at the National
Center for Performing Arts on
Shirley Street.
Choir director Patricia
Bazard said: "Sammie Swain is
a rich part of our cultural and
musical heritage. The young-
sters are all thrilled to be a part
of the play. While the choir is
vocally able to meet the chal-
lenges of the musical aspect, a
lot of them have discovered new
talents through acting and
dance."
Playing Sammie Swain will
be Osano Neely, a choir mem-
ber for three years. Lauren Rus-
sell, 13, will take the role of the
energetic Belinda.
Veteran dancer and choreog-
rapher Robert Bain is working
closely with the choir to pro-
vide his expertise in dance.
"The kids are doing all.of the


residential care providers to
ensure the delivery of proper
care.
Mrs Griffin said the Residen-
tial Care Establishments Act,
enacted on December 3,
2004, was a milestone in the
country's history and the cul-
mination of years of discus-
sion.
She said the authority has
been functional since July 1,
2005, and serves as the regu-
lator of residential care
throughout the Bahamas.
In addition, the authority
has produced a booklet of the
various residential care facil-
ities throughout the country
and has organised a five-day
training programme which
will cover of first aid and car-
diac pulmonary resuscitation
(CPR).
Mrs Griffin encouraged
persons to register their facil-
ities in an effort to comply
with the law.
She commended the various
civic and religious organizations
that have established residen-
tial care facilities for persons in
need.
The chairman of the authori-
ty is Mrs Vylma Thompson-
Curling. Mr Bertram Knowles
serves as deputy chairman. Oth-
er members include: Mrs
Andrea Archer, Ministry of
Health; Mr Basil Cleare, Min-
istry of Works and Utilities; Mr
Leslie Bowleg, Civil Society; Mr
Ivan Evans, Civil Society; Ms
Mellany Zonicle, Director of
Social Services.


work," said Mrs Bazard. "My
main challenge each rehearsal is
to contain them from bursting
with excitement. The musical
hasn't been performed here for
years and now it meets a whole
new generation for the first
time. From what I see, the kids
are experiencing something
they will not soon forget."
Mrs- Bazard feels that this
.double performance of Sammie
Swain by her choir members
will allow the audience to see
the play in a completely differ-
ent light.
"You'll get to see the play
through children's eyes," she
said. "More importantly, this
classic folk opera lives on with
the performers who will
undoubtedly reintroduce it to
their peers when they are
adults."


The Tribune....

TPartnership

for literacy.
SThe College of The Bahamas


The Secret of



Smith's Hill













Tuesday, and Thursdays

\ /hen the Claver family moves to a rural town to escape the dangers of their
big-city neighbourhood, 10-year-old twins Kelly and James look for-
ward to exploring their 18th-century house. But, th, family's first night's sleep is dis-
turbed by loud crashing sounds. As more odd events take place, the twins realise that
someone or something is trying to communicate with them-and when their
mother finds part of an old war diary, they suspect a connection between an 18th-
century occupant of the house and the present-day disturbances. Could a ghost be
haunting the Clavers-and if so, why? Read The Tribune every Tuesday and Thurs-
day from July 4 through August 31, to find out if the twins finally restore peace to
the old house on Smith's Hill.


sponsored by


O


)u-l CIsi
M o . rl


mi- WV. coutr


Out-


Island



Doctor



Wednesday
and Fridays


cc - e doctuh done reach! De doctuh done reach!" Share in the adventures
lJ# of Evans Cottman, the man who left behind his life in America, and
lived and worked in the Bahamas as "unqualified practitioner." Read about "De doc-
tuh's" life while attending to the medical needs of Bahamian residents in the Fam-
ily Islands in excerpts from the beloved book, Out-Island Doctor. Read Out-Island
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sponsored by


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Children's Choir to perform,


classic Bahamian opera


Y, . c o t r i? , N I V i- T L'-'; D



TENDER - APPRAISAL OF
BUILDINGS AND LAND

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) is
pleased to invite Tenders to provide appraisal of its Buildings and
Land.

Interested companies/firms in Nassau may collect a Tender
Specification from the Security's Desk located in the Administrative
building on John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau, Bahamas between
the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Packages can also be collect in Freeport, from the Security's desk,
BTC, Mall Drive.

The deadline for submission of tenders is 5:00 pm July 17th,
2006. Tenders should be sealed and marked "TENDER -
APPRISAL OF BUILDINGS AND LAND" and should be
delivered to the attention of the Acting President and CEO, Mr.
Leon Williams by the above date and time.

BTC reserves the right to reject any, or all Tenders.


I I


I I


RIGHT
I fl


50LOMON'S


-i







THE TRIBUNE:-


PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006


JUNE 28, 2006


7:30 8:00 8:30 [ 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

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TBS Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond "Evolution" A "La Douleur Ex-
"Be Nice" (CC) f (CC) "Who Am I?" f (CC) "The Sigh (CC) (CC) quisel"
(:00) A Face for Conjoined Twins: Erin and Jade Untold Stories of the E.R. "Moun- Mystery Diagnosis A baby is irrita-
TLC Yulce (CC) (CC) tain Lion Attack" Big-cat attack sur- ble, has trouble nursing and stops
vivor. (N) - gaining weight.
(:00) Without a Without a Trace Jack endures a Without a Trace "Party Girlt" The Without a Trace "The Bogie Man"
TNT Trace "Shadows" brutal deposition in his divorce pro- team must find a kidnapped heiress. ft (CC)
ft (CC) ceedings. n (CC) ,f (CC)
Home for Imagi- Grim Adven- Ed, Edd n Eddy Naruto Xiaolin Show- Ben 10 Futurama "God-
TOON nary Friends tures down ft (CC) fellas" f
TV5 Complment d'enqubte Acoustic Avocats et associ s TV5 Le Journal
'6:00) Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
T _WC PM Edition (CC) "Wild Wind" (N) (N)(CC)
(:00) Peregrina La Fea Mas Bella (N) Barrera de Amor (N) Don Francisco Presenta Entrevis-
UNIV (N) tasconcelebridadesdeldeporte y
..el entretenimiento.
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Criminal Intent De-
USA der: Criminal In- Two men claim they robbed a Benson and Stabler investigate a tectives stumble upon a terrorist plot
tent "Con-Text" woman but didn't kill her. (CC) woman's deadly plunge. . involving explosives. f (CC)
VH Hogan Knows Hogan Knows Hollywood Se- *** THE BREAKFAST CLUB (1985) Emilio Estevez, Molly Ringwald.
VH1 Best Best ft crets Five teenagers make strides toward mutual understanding. ft
(:00) MLB Baseball Chicago White Sox at Pittsburgh Pirates. From PNC Park in Pittsburgh. WGN News at Nine f (CC)
WGN (Live) (cc)
Everybody Blue Collar TV Blue Collar TV One Tree Hill The whole town gears WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
W PIX Loves Raymond "The O.C.: Ozark White-trash soap up for the Ravens' first basketball Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
______ "Ping Pong' f County." opera. f game. ft (CC) & Mr.G (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) One on One All of Us Robert Eve Shelly and Cuts "Mack Dad- Dr. Phil Family members who cre-
WS B K (CC) "Who's the meets a great Janie argue over dies" f (CC) ate conflict, f (CC)
Boss?" f (CC) woman. ft (CC) money. f

** * MADAGASCAR (2005, Comedy) Voices of Deadwood "True Colors" Bullock Lucky Louie Entourage
H BO-E Ben Stiller, Chris Rock. Animated. Zoo animals must discovers the truth about the Gem Louie must be a "Dominated" f
leam to survive in the wild. f 'PG' (CC) killings. f (CC) night watchman. (CC)
(5:00) ** * * * CRIMINAL (2004, Crime Drama) John C. Reil- * * * CLOSER (2004, Drama) Julia Roberts, Jude
HBO-P ALEXANDER ly, Diego Luna. A con man and his protege try a corn- Law, Natalie Portman. Four people grapple with love
(2004) 'R' (CC) plicated scam. f 'R' (CC) and betrayal. f 'R' (CC)
(6:30) ** (:15) * * * * MILLION DOLLAR BABY (2004, Drama) Clint Eastwood, Hilary Swank, * * * MADA-
HBO-W WEEKEND AT Morgan Freeman. A cantankerous trainer bonds with a female boxer. f 'PG-13' (CC) GASCAR (2005)


_ - BERNIE'S II ft [ Pt ()CC)
(:15) *** THE MAMBO KINGS (1992, Drama) Ar- *** THE INTERPRETER (2005, Suspense) Nicole Kidman, Sean
H BO-S mand Assante. Based on Oscar Hijuelos' novel about Penn, Catherine Keener. A U.N. translator overhears an assassination
two Cuban musicians. A 'R' (CC) plot. f 'PG-13' (CC)
(6:30) *** THE UPSIDE OF ** THE WEDDING DATE (2005) Debra Messing, ** THE RING TWO (2005) Naomi
MAX-E ANGER (2005, Comedy-Drama) Dermot Mulroney. A woman brings a male escort to her Watts. A journalist must protect her
Joan Allen. ft 'R' (CC) sister's wedding. f 'PG-13' (C ) son from evil Samara. A
(:00) * DOMINION: A PREQUEL TO THE EXOR- *')* WAR OF THE WORLDS (2005, Science Fiction) Tom Cruise,
MOMAX CIST (2005) Stellan Skarsgard. Former priest fights . Dakota Fanning, Miranda Otto. A man and his children try to survive an
demonic possession in Egypt. f 'R' (CC) alien invasion. f 'PG-13'(CC)
(6:15) * * THE (7:55) ** THE PUNISHER (2004, Action) Thomas Jane, John Travolta, HUFF "Which Up Is the Cervical
SHOW CURVE (1998) Will Patton. [TV. An FBI agent seeks revenge for his family's murder. ft Up?" 'TVi Huff answers Russell's
'R'(CC) 'R'(CC) call. A (C)
6:15) ** THE ** WICKER PARK (2004, Suspense) Josh Hartnett, Rose Byme, ** *Ax TRAINSPOTTING (1996,
TMC ROSARY MUR- Matthew Lillard. A man searches obsessively for his former lover. f 'PG- Comedy-Drama) Ewan McGregor,
DERS (1987) 'R' 13' (CC) Ewen Bremner.ft 'R' (CC)


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WEDNESDAY EVENING


p.. ~
a>-


I


I






WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE;


Fire 'could take out -. .




over 100 houses


THIS aerial shot of the Pigeon Pea shanty
settlement in Marsh Harbour shows what some
fear could be a fire hazard.
There are concernstthat with shacks packed
so closely together it Would be impossible for
firefighters to get access to the site.
A local resident sai;l: "This has many of us
nervous as a fire in the middle of this could eas-
ily take out 100 or more houses and there is not
much anyone could d6 to put it out."
The large, three-roofibuilding is Abaco Hard-
ware's lumber yard with houses backed up to
their fence.


The two joined roofs beyond the lumber
sheds are Abaco Hardware's retail and dis-
play store.
Parts of Don MacKay Boulevard can be seen
in front of the hardware store and extending
into Marsh Harbour to the left.
Left of the lumber sheds where trailers are
parked is the area of Pigeon Pea where 70
houses burned down some years ago.
The hardware store quickly bought the land
from the man claiming it and fenced it for stor-
age.
The picture was taken by Colyn Reese.


CONGRATULATIONS


*lCOLDWELL Banker Island Affiliates visited Lightbourn
Realty during a recent tour of properties on Nassau and Par-
adise Island. Pictured (front, fourth from left) are: JC Cal-
houn, president of Coldwell Banker Lsland Affiliates master
franchise; Mike Lightboukn, president, Coldwell Banker Light-
bourn Realty; Jim Gillesopie, president, Coldwell Banker Cor-
porition and Beth Makatura, vice president, international ser-
vicep and operations.
(Photo: Vision Photography)


Coldwell banker Island

Affiliates hold conference

on Paradise Island

THE 14-member group of 'The entire group was
Coldwell Banker Islqnd impressed with what they
Affiliates recently held its saw,' said Mike Lightbourn,
2006 Business Management president of Coldwell
Conference at Atlantis, Ear- Banker Lightbourn Realty.
adise Island, which coincided "They are looking forward
' witfi the parent company's to returning and were very
100th anniversary celebra- jealous that we lived in such
tioris. a wonderful place. Our high-
The conference was host- end properties got rave
ed ;by Coldwell BanX er reviews and fantastic expo-
Lightbourn Realty with head sure."
offices in Nassau.
DIuring his keynote Dinner
address, Jim Gillespie, pres-
idehit of Coldwell Banker Delegates were hosted t
Corporation, likened Delegates were hosted to
thel Island Affiliates td a a dinner at Luciano's of
beacon. Chicago, and Mr Gillespie
He said they know whatlto and his wife, Jenny, got a
do,7get on with the job and real taste of the Bahamas
1do It correctly. with a trip to Rose Island.
"I applaud what you gdys Gifts from The Plait Lady,
' aeldoing,' he added. Bahama Handprints and the
Mr Gillespie said Coldwell Bacardi Rum Cake factory
Banker's largest growth is'in were distributed.
thedinternational market. CI oldwell Banker is a real
tiring the conference, estate network comprising
broirs and managers frdem approximately 3,800 offices
the Bahamas, Bermuda and and 126,000 sales agents
the Caribbean blitzed Ndw worldwide.
Providence and Paradise Its global reach places
Island, touring select high- offices on six continents, 29
end properties.. countries and territories.
end properties.-


.ColinaImperial









Keith Major, LLIF

on being awarded an
Honorary Doctorat of Humane L~ters
from Sojourner Douglass College
on Sunday, June 4, 2006


Colinalmperlal expresses warm regards and congratulations to Keith Major. Senior Vice Peaident. Makeftlng. who rcety receseI OA
Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from Sojourner Douglass College.
Theresa Moxey-lngraham, President of the local campus of Sojoumrner Douglass, said the school thought It only belttlng th" Mr. M*lko re-
celve the honor as he Is well respected both professionally and personally for his conhtibutlon to the Baharman w society. Mr Major w~s
selected because of his role In making a positive Impact on the country and on recommendation trom the college' gltaduting cla s
and local Advisory Boaid.
Apart from his Innate desire to make a difference In the lives of his clients and community. Mr. Major has also dlautshed hinmel po-
fesslonally by achieving the LIMRA Leadership Institute Fellow designation. This dynamic. graduat%4el pogaraewt ecuses fitket-
Ing. financial, personal effectiveness, and leadership strategies to provide a comprehen e,. devellaopmJ ~et gsm aneori~rieetl st-
vices executives. To date some 500 executives from around the world have earned this dMsnaMton
Commending Mr. Majoi on the receipt of his Honorary Doctorate, Mr. Montgomey Braithwaite. prealdett of Conatrnpeal said "the
Collndimperial family could not be happier for Mr. Major. Keith's success has been a direct autt of his uvviwtave en 4edlatl to cn ei-
lence and client service and true skill for assessing the marketplace. I can think of nobody who deserve this honor r
As a 1999 recipient of Rotary Internationals highest honor - The Paul Harris Fellow - It Is no surprise that Mt. Majr e odes the tret of
service above self In every facet of his life. He has played an active role in charitable cause within ur commuwlwy. mat ecelly &r-s
Ing as a member of the Action Bahamas Committee which raised almost $50000 for Huntew *e Wma victims thaughtoal the Nsattet. I"
also has a strong sense of civic duty as evident by his willingness to sere as Chairman of the Bahamas Etecitctty Cotpalmton. a ot e
has held since 2005.
Mr. Major is married to the former Linda Lewis. The couple has three children - Keith Jr,. eory and tandat,


"The Woman & Health
Section of The Tribune is
a great resource to me and
my family. We love its
timely articles on food,
health, fashion and beauty.
The Tribune is y
newspaper."
DESEREA WALKINE
"My Gourmet Lunch &
Picnic Baskets"


READ
woman


EVERY TUESDAY



The Tribune
/owv y4. w







PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006 THE TRIBUNE


LOCAL'NEWS


Names announced for awards banquet


* MARGARET McDonald Policy Management Administration Centre (MNPMAC). announced
the names of those receiving awards at their annual awards banquet on Monday at the Cultural-,
Commission Office, Royal Victoria Gardens. From left, Alberta Byer, CEO, and Beverly Wallace
Withfield, assistant director.


* MINISTER of Foreign Affairs Fred Mitchell, and Murray Forde, assistant district gover-
nor, Rotary Clubs of the Bahamas present winners of the United Nation Model competition
last Friday at the Department of Public Service. From left are Charles Stuart, Christopher
Russell, Forde, Amielle Major, Rachel Fielding, Jade Pratt, Fred Mitchell, Frank Coyle,
Rhoda Jackson and Rev Samuel Boodle.
tPh/DA rB fIS/R M d Bthl,,,l


SIU. ,o ,y, ......... (Photo: BIS/Raymond Bethel)
........................................................................................................... ........................ .. ............. .................................. ... ... ... .. ,," ; ; .:


EU offers millions in aid to Haiti



if stabilizing reforms continue


* BELGIUM
Brussels
THE . European Union
offered millions in extra aid to
Haiti's President Rene Preval
Tuesday if he continues reforms
,to stabilize and anchor democ-
racy in his troubled Caribbean
nation, according to Associated
Press.
European Commission Pres-
ident Jose Manuel Barroso said
the EU's 'executive office was
readying to send /233 million
(US$293 million) in new aid and
possibly more if progress con-
tinues.
"We think the developments
are in the right direction," Bar-
roso told reporters after meet-
ing Preval at EU headquarters.
"There was a real effort after
the election to build a national
consensus. President Preval


came here with an important
delegation with former oppo-
nents."
Preval said he aimed to foster
new co-operation between
political factions to address the
needs of the population, notably
on fighting poverty and improv-
ing basic needs like education,
proper shelter and job creation.
"A big effort has been under-
taken since the elections... to
establish political stability,"
Preval said. He said his govern-
ment's aim was to boost foreign
investment in Haiti.
EU Development Commis-
sioner Louis Michel said
"depending on progress" fur-
ther aid on top of the 233 mil-
lion was also being planned. He
said a majority of the
announced aid package would
go toward education and build-
ing infrastructure like roads, as


well as filling the current gov-
ernment budget shortfall in
Haiti.,
The EU last October
unblocked 72 million (US$90
million) in aid to Haiti, ending a
freeze imposed almost five
years ago in protest over elec-
toral irregularities.
Preval has appealed to inter-
national donors to help funVd
road construction. The presi-
dent has said he hopes invest-
ment will make Haiti attractive
to tourists and bring the island
nation out of its deep economic
rut, which has made it the west-
ern hemisphere's poorest coun-
try..
Haiti had been relatively calm
since Preval was elected Feb-
ruary'7, but recent kidnapping
and attacks on police and UN
peacekeepers have raised fears
of a flare-up of violence.


. presented by the

MInt.,y ---


EVERY SATURDAY!

June 10 to July 29, 2006, 2-6pm
Marcus Bethel Way


Awards fo rzI~rU N model miwinners


THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS
COMPANY LIMITED

P. 0. BOX N-3048, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
TELE. (242) 302-7000

SENIOR MANAGER
CREDIT & COLLECTIONS DEPARTMENT
(FINANCIAL DIVISION)

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites applications from
suitably qualified individuals for the position of SENIOR MANAGER in its
Credit & Collections Department.

ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
- Determine collection strategies including, but not limited to:
- Setting credit limits for customers.
- Setting collection targets for staff.
- Reviewing collection activities of staff.
- Determine contact procedures to inform customers of amounts owing.
- Identification of customers who exceed their credit terms.
- Determine procedures to collect amounts owing by customers who exceed
their credit terms.
- Determine the timing of collection activities,to maximize collections.
- Ensure that customer's accounts are ceased in accordance with Company
Policy.
- Determine a strategy to engage the Company's major customers to address
issues and collections.
- Engage external agencies as required to supplement collection activities.
- Ensure that all transactions relating to the receivables are completely and
accurately recorded in the books of the Company.
- Regularly review documentation of Policies and Procedures for the
department to ensure the documentation is current.
- Ensure security deposits held on behalf of customers are accurately
recorded in the books of the Company.
- Ensure Coin Collection Policies & Procedures are correctly defined and
properly controlled.
- Ensure Executive Management is regularly updated as to the status of the
receivables and collection activities using key performance indicators.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS
* Bachelor's Degree in Fianance
* Minimum of five (5) years managerial experience preferably in a Credit &
Collections environment
* Proven experience in managing a Credit & Collections Department
* The ability to make sound business decisions
* Excellent leadership, oral and written communications skills

All applications are to be received at BTC's Head Office, 21 John F. Kennedy
Drive, no later than June 30th, 2006 and addressed as follows:

DIRECTOR
HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD.
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS

RE: SENIOR MANAGER/CREDIT COLLECTIONS DEPARTMENT


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28,2006









WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006


SECTI ONm


business@tribunemedia.net


a a


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Bahamas eco-tourism




ratings under threat


M By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business
Reporter
at the Caribbean Hotel
Industry Conference


MIAMI, Florida - Inap- fured in a destination suIrvey,
propriate development may which could be in 2008,, their
cause the Bahamas' standing ratings will go down. Ie told
as an eco-friendly'tourism des- The Tribune that this was
tination to fall, the director of because of what has been per-
the Centre for Sustainable ceived as inappropriate
Destinations at National Geo- tourism development in the
graphic warned yesterday at Family Islands, particularly on
the Caribbean Hotel Industry Bimini.
Conference. Mr Tourtellot added that
During his presentation on recent criticism also suggested
Sustainable Tourism, Jonathan that Abaco has turned into
Tourtellot said that in the last what he described as ',a sub-
destination scorecard organ- urb of Florida", and hepointed
ised by his company in 2003, to concerns that real estate on .
,the Bahamian Family Islands the more popular Family
placed 63rd out of 115 popular Islands was increasingly being
-destinatiois, based on their priced out of reach for many
environmental stewardship and Bahamians.
ability to remain "unspoilt" in The mention of Biinini is a
the face of mass tourism devel- thinly-veiled reference to the
opment. controversial Bimini Bay resort
Mr Tourtellot described the project, being developed by
Family Islands rating as aver- RAV Bahamas and its princi-
age, and said he suspected that pal, Cuban-AmeriLjan real
the next time they were fea- estate and property ntrepre-



PUC guidelines to aid


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Public Utilities Commission
(PUC) has published proposed guidelines
to govern interconnection agreements
between different Bahamian telecoms
operators, saying these rules are designed
to ensure "dominant operators" such as
the Bahamas Telecommunications Com-
pany (BTC) "do not seek to impede com-
petition".
Describing interconnection as "essen-
tial" for competition to thrive in the
Bahamian telecommunications market,
the PUC, which regulates the sector, said
the guidelines were designed to prevent
operators such as BTC from delaying
(.


neur, Gerardo Capo.
Mr Capo's Bimini Bay pro-
ject has frequently had to con-
tend with heavy criticism from
Biminites and environmental-
ists, who have claimed that the
project is totally out of pro-
portion to Bimini's size, popu-
lation and scale.
In addition, environmental-
ists have claimed that dredg-
ing, excavating and other activ-
ities carried out during Bimini
Bay's development have dam-
aged the environment and eco-
system, particularly mangrove
swamps and fish breeding
grounds.
Mr Capo has consistently
refuted criticism of his project,
saying environmental reports
and assessments have been
submitted to the Government,
and that none of the critics
have ever visited the develop-
ment to see what is going on


interconnection between its network and
other carriers.
It added that the guidelines were
designed to prevent carriers such as BTC
from chlarging rival carriers "in excess of
costs" for interconnection between its net-
work and theirs.
Interconnection agreements between
different carriers enable calls originating
on one operator's network to be routed to
the receiver who may be on a different
operator's network.


first hand.
He said in October 2005 that
Bimini Bay would make the
island "a real jewel".
Meanwhile, Mr Tourtellot
agreed yesterday with the com-
ments made by former
Bahamian tourism director-
general, Vincent Vanderpool
Wallace, earlier in the confer-
ence that there was a place for
large scale developments, such
as Kerzner International. How-
ever, he warned about the sus-
tainability of current Family
Island developments.
"New Providence and Grand
Bahama have already cast their
lots," Mr Tourtellot said, "but
my concern is that that kind of
development be contained so it
stays on Paradise Island and it
stays on Cable Beach, but does
not start popping up in places
like Bimini and Cat Island."
Mr Tourtellot said he also


had some reservations about
the Family Island 'anchor
property' model, which has
been highly touted by the Gov-
ernment as a means of eco-
nomic development.
"I question that approach,"
he said. "It is based on an
assumption that you have to
have an anchor in order to
improve infrastructure, and
that is not necessarily true.
You can look at other places.
"It is kind of like treating an
island like a shopping mall,
where you've got to have a big,
department store to anchor the
shopping mall. But an island
is not a shopping mall; it is a
place, and I think rather than a
big development, a series of
smaller boutique-style hotels
with the maximum amount of

SEE page 2B


The PUC said: "Without interconnec-
tion, new operators would be obliged to
duplicate expensive infrastructure, and
consumers would have to subscribe to dif-
ferent operators' networks to be able to
call each other. .Such complexities will
increase costs to consumers.
"Therefore, interconnection goes
beyond competition issues and bears on

SEE page 5B


Performance Counts


IFidelit




22.440/


B ahamias (rowt111& IncoewiiiJund


/o


60.81%

I iL"lI ..-", 'ii "" I


8.39%


M By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor,
THE Government's pro-
posed National Health Insur-
ance (NHI) plan may be nei-
ther affordable not sustainable,
the Bahamas Employers Con-
federation (BECon) has
warned, arguing that.its med-
ical benefits would far surpass
those provided by any private
group health insurance plan.'
Articulating its concerns on
the proposed NHI scheme, the
employers body pointed out
that it planned to offer a com-
prehensive package of health-
care benefits - ranging from
primary care visits and spe-
cialist visits to laboratory and
diagnostic services, emergency
airlift and overseas cata-
strophic care.
BECon also questioned
whether the level of contribu-
tions to the NHI plan from
both employers and employ-


* VERNICE WALKING



Ministry


in talks


on 'star


ratings'


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business
Reporter
at the Caribbean
Hotel Industry
Conference
MIAMI, Florida - The
Ministry of Tourism is in
talks with FreemanGroup
Destinations and its part-

SEE page 6B


ees - currently shared at 2.65
per cent of an employee's
earnings - would have to
increase, when and by how
much in future years.
It pointed out that increased
NHI contributions were likely
to be required due to increas-
ing medical costs, which rose
faster than inflation. Costs
rose, BECon said, due to tech-
nology advances and innova-
tions, while at the same time
people were living longer with
a higher quality of life.
Rising costs would make it
difficult for Bahamian pen-
sioners, living' o.n fixed
incomes, to afford NHI
expenses.
On the comprehensive ben-
efits package, BECon pointed
out: "There is no private group
health insurance plan that
offers these types of benefits.

SEE page 4B


Government's 'free'

20-30% jitney stake

* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Government should take a 20-30 per cent equity stake -
"at no cost" - in the company that would be established to unify
New Providence's jitney and public transportation, a report com-
piled for the Government has recommended.
A 46-page report on developing a model to unify New Provi-
dence's public transport system suggested that while the Gov-
ernment effectively be given a free stake in the company, it
should hold a different class of shares from franchise holders and
jitney operators.
This, the report, said was to ensure the Government did not
take a dividend from the'company and thus dilute the earnings
accruing to franchise holders who owned and operated their
own jitneys.
The report recommended that the Government's stake should
be held in trust, and used to "fund future development of public
transport facilities, such as bus terminals". In addition, the Gov-
ernment would have no voting rights, in theory allowing the
company to operate at arm's length from political interference.
The report eventually recommended that the Government
stake in the unified bus company be sold to the Bahamian pub-
lic once it was profitable and well-established.
It suggested that franchise holders who owned and operated
their own jitneys be given 100 shares in the new company for each
-franchise plate held and the option to buy more; franchise hold-
ers who were not owners or operators also be given 100 shares per
plate held; and owner-operators who did not have their own
franchise be given the option of buying shares.
The document also recommended that the Government should
lease land that it owns to the unified bus company "on favourable
terms', so that it could develop
jitney depots and passenger ter- SEE pa-g-e
minals. SEE page 4B


HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010


Sustainable tourism chief criticises 'inappropriate development' in Bimini
and other Family Islands; questions government's anchor property strategy


telecoms competition Employers warn on

.......... .National Health plan


. . ..... . .........


^...^WA-/.^: ^^w.^^^w^.w,^^TO^WA^^*^^^^*











IT~ 0 EASY TO Bahamas eco-

IVE & FORGET'


l tourism ratings


I under threat


FROM page 1B

involvement from local peo-
ple, which may mean training,
is quite possibly a safer way to
go because once you have an
anchor, how do you com-
plain?"
Mr Tourtellot said he was
concerned that once a proper-
ty had such a large interest on


a Family Island, there may not
be enough stewardship on that
island by the residents and gov-
ernment.
Comments
His comments are likely to
reignite debate on the Gov-
ernment's chosen method for
creating sustainable economic
development on the Family


Islands.
Critics have argued that
some of the projects are too
large for the island communi-
ties being asked to sustain
them, and their implementa-
tion - as seen with the Emerald
Bay resort on Exuma - is
changing the character, envi-
ronment and feel that attracted
tourists to such locations in the
first place.


,; -k', forgive & Forget' Mortgage Campaign

To celebrate our 50th year in The Bahamas, Scotiabank is giving
away ' 1. " 'i in prizes.
Down-payment as low as 5% (with Mortgage Indemnity insurance)
Campaign runs until July 14 2006
Cal or visit us today and let Scotlabank help you to lForgive & Forget


Lde ' t laj'' b.Ia! ,


,,in ,.,*S*,,4 W.4t.mA.$,~,K'4flbr# #4454414


PUBLIC NOTICE '
- FRIDAY CLOSURE OF S
ALL NATIONAL INSURANCE OFFICES -

The National Insurance Board wishes to advise


the general


public that all of its


departments/offices throughout The Bahamas,
including the Pay Windows at the Post Offices,
will- be closed on Friday, June 30, 2006.





The Board's New Providence offices will re-open
on Monday at the usual time.







has a vacancy for the position of

GROUP AUDIT MANAGER

PROFILE:
* . Relevant graduate or postgraduate degree and/or professional
qualifications e.g. ACCA, CPA, CGA, CFA,
RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:
* Management of the Internal Audit function within all Fidelity Group
operations (Bahamas, Cayman, Turks & Caicos Islands)
* Liaison with Price WaterhouseCoopers to oversee their internal audit
functions
* Formalization of the risk management process
* Updating and maintaining the policy and procedural manuals
* Overseeing the implementation of the disaster recovery plans
* Preparation of business-focused recommendations/reports that
provide clear actions to address control weakness.

CRITICAL SKILLS & KNOWLEDGE:
* Good level of business awareness and an understanding of
Fidelity's strategic and tactical goals.
* Specialist expertise in capital markets, asset management, financial
management, audit and risk management
* An awareness of general financial services issues including regula-
Story requirements.
* Reasonable knowledge of core banking processes and banking
functions
* Strong communication & PC skills
The person will report directly to the Audit, Risk and Compliance Committee.
H The successful candidate will be offered a competitive
compensation package including benefits and bonuses
commensurate with his/her experience and performance.
Send resume no later than Friday June 30th, 2006 to:
The Human Resource Director
Fidelity
51 Frederick Steet
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
f: 326.3000
e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com


- I.,,
* .3




J,.
- I)


I A


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28,2006


I i








THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006, PAGE 3B


Bahamas a model




for public-private




tourism partnership


H By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business
Reporter
at the Caribbean Hotel
Industry Conference
* - MIAMI, Florida - The Bahamas can
be looked at as a model for effective pub-
lic-private partnership in the developing
the tourism industry, two prominent
Bahamians told delegates attending the
Carribean Hotel Industry Conference yes-
terday.
Frank Comito, executive vice-president
of the Bahamas Hotel Association, and
Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, the Car-
ribean Tourism Organisation's secretary-
general, said the Bahamian government
and the private sector have developed an
effective way of ensuring that both sides
work together.
Agreements
Mr Comito said that while there were
not always agreements on every issue,
both sides have expressed a willingness


to at least listen to each other.
Critical
Mr Comito said it was critical that there
be a well-structured leadership in the pri-
vate sector, which in this nation's case was
the Bahamas Hotel Association (BHA),
the promotion boards and the Nassau
Tourism and Development Board. They
needed to speaking from one voice.
"That voice has to be well supported
and well funded," he added. "There has to
be a huge commitment to providing the
resources, staffing and the training, the
support to develop on infrastructure side
of the private sector, otherwise you lose
out.
According to Mr Vanderpool Wallace,
one of the challenges that face public-pri-
vate.partnerships is the political divide
between what each sector wants and what
the current minister of tourism sees as a
politically advantageous agenda.
"The political is always thinking I have
to do the right thing and the popular
thing," he said. "What is clever" is the


private sector coming to us and suggesting
how we can accomplish both these goals.
Mr Comito agreed, but noted there has
to be a commitment to the partnership
that transcends politics.
He said one example of partnership has
been co-operation in marketing, promo-
tions and public relations.
"The most significant thing we have
done in that regard is agreed to share in
the marketing cost of creating a volun-
tary room levy arrangement," Mr Comito
said.,"
Funds
"To generate the funds to do that, the
Government from that time to today
recognizes that business people are in a
much better position to market them-
selves."
Mr Comitio added that there has also
been a partnership in research and edu-
cation and culinary arts through pro-
grammes such as BahamaHost, which is
lead by the Ministry of Tourism and sup-
ported by the private sector industry.


* VINCENT VANDERPOOL-WALLACE


FAB! FINDS GIFT SHOP
2 Week Long Pre-Summer Sale
June 26 through July 8, 2006







Located in the Lybnrd Cay Shopping Center
Sale hours: 10am-4pm
Monday - Saturday



PROGRESSIVE SERVICE ORIENTED
COMPANY LOOKING FOR A FEW
GOOD PEOPLE

DIESEL MECHANICS

Prior experience on repairs to heavy
trucks advantageous. Top wages and
incentive program. Uniforms furnished
after probationary period.

Please come by and fill out an application,
or give us a call at:


328-2463

Bahamas Mack Truck Sales Ltd.


&


P.O.Bdx N-44 �
Nassau, Bahamas


2 Way Radio Sales Representative

2 Way Radio Radio
Repair Technician and
Mobile Radio Install

- Excellent oral and written
communication skills are essential as
position requires frequent interaction
with clients;
- Strong analytical skills;
- Knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel
applications and Quickbooks
- Ability to work in team concept.

Interested persons should send resume
with a cover letter to:


Personnel Department
P.O.Box CB 12385
Nassau, Bahamas


-co -/6
WINNING BAY
AOACQ, AAMA,
Has two (2) vacancies for
Membership Sales Executives:
-Exceptional written and verbal communication skills, organization
skills
-Exceptional Telephone skills
-Public speaking preferred
-Ability to demonstrate strong relationship sales capability
-Ability to interface professionally with all members of staff
-Generation and execution of an annual business plan
-Self generation of buisness through referrals and other personal
contacts
-Exceptional skills in long range guest relaional maintenance
-Use of tracking system for effective follow up andcustomer purchase
sequence
-College degree preferred
Please Send Resumes to:
Attn: HR Director
The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O.13 4,l AB2ti5
Mash Harbour, Abaco
or
Fax: 242-367-0077


FirstCaribbean
Career Opportunity


REAT - P AAGR
(Baed n* I)L


FirstCaribbean International Bank is the combination of CIBC and Barclays Bank in the Caribbean, Bahamas and
Belize. We are the region's largest publicly traded bank with over 3,500 staff serving over 5.3 million people in 17
countries. We manage over 700,000 activelaccounts via 100 retail branches and corporate/international banking
centres.
RESPONSIBILITIES:
* Source new clients and new business opportunities with existing clients
* Conduct thorough-needs assessment and identify business opportunities, client issues and risks
* Provide consultancy-based approach to customers, involving specialists and credit manager as needed
* Actively collaborate with credit manager, product specialists (e.g. credit cards, leasing) and corporate finance
managers to develop solutions which meet and create business opportunities with existing and prospective clients
* Review, agree and sign off on mortgages and credit applications or recommendations
* Take active role in delivery of risk management and ensure compliance with the Bank's internal control and
assurance framework
PREREQUISITES:
* At least 5 years' experience in the corporate and financial services business with proven experience in developing
successful relationships and in closing quality deals
* Graduate status with ACIB qualification or related work and business experience
* Highly numerate with related IT skills in applicable Bank systems
We offer an attractively structured compensation and reward package as well as performance bonuses.
Applications with detailed resumes should be submitted no later than July 7, 2006 to:
Michael Spencer
Head of Corporate Banking and Country Manager
FirstCaribbean International Bank ,'
P.O. Box 70
Road Town, Tortola
British Virgin Islands
Tel: (284) 494-2171
Email: Michael.Spencer@firstcaribbeanbank.com

i Only applicants who are short-listed will be contacted.


FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK
GET THERE. TOGETHER.


WINOINO BAY
AHACO. PAH#AMA*
Has two (1) vacancies for
Sales & Marketing Project Director:
-Responsible for onsite coordination of sales, sales administration and
marketing.
-Achievement of targeted sales volume and maintaining inventory.
-Develop fnture(MVCI experience preferred) managers and implement
self developed program
-Implementation of tour efficiency and building of strong team values
-Forecast and budget annual sales targets.
-Ensure communication, between personnel and others
-Strong leadership skills
-Minimum 5 years marketing vacation ownership
-Minimum 5 years marketing in management of sales, marketing and/or
administration
-College degree preferred, but not required.
Please Send Resumes to:
Attn: HR Director
The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O. Box AB2057
Mash Harbour, Abaco
or
Fax: 242-367-0077


BUSINESS


I


'AL
4499 w--


(;o











A WD A N 2T R


National Health plan, from Page 1B


Even the most comprehensive group
health plan requires the patient to
pay a deductible before any benefit is
given by the insurance company, then
an out-of-pocket amount has to be
paid as a percentage of costs (usually
20 per cent), after which the insur-
ance company pays 100 per cent for
major medical, provided the facility
and physicians are in the insurance
company's network."
It added that in cases where the
cost of medical and surgical proce-
dures was more than the 'customary'
cost determined by a health insurer,
the carrier would only cover the 'cus-
tomary' amount.
Private health insurers also capped
the total amount they paid for ser-
vices such as air ambulances, and lim-
ited the amount of payments made
per individual during their lifetime.


BECon said: "The truth of the mat-
ter is that even those with "good"
group health insurance policies find
themselves in so much medical debt
for items not covered that they resort
to fund raising activities such as cook
outs to service their debt."
It questioned whether the NHI
would, like private health insurance,
require deductibles, out-of-pocket
expenses and "lifetime limitation".
BECon added: "NHI's policy will
be to invite all private sector providers
to join the NHI network of services
and will reimburse the private
providers at the same rate as the pub-
lic sector.
"Private providers will have the
option of charging a co-payment to
the patient, to be paid for through
out-of-pocket payments or supple!
mental private health insurance.


"Will NHI produce a two-tiered
health system in the Bahamas, one
being the public sector and the other
being the private sector, similar to
the Bahamian education system?"
BECon said it was vital for the
Government and private sector to
conduct studies on the economic
impact that NHI would have.
Under the proposed plan, NHI
would be funded by employees, who
would contribute 2.65 per cent of their
monthly earnings through payroll
deductions. Employers would con-
tribute an equal amount, making pay-
ments equivalent to 5.3 per cent of a
worker's wages. Self-employed work-
ers would be required to pay the full
5.3 per cent.
NHI would be capped at $5,000 per
month, compared to the National
Insurance Board (NIB), which is


capped at $400 per week.
BECon said the $234 million esti-
mated cost for NHI was likely to be
too low, as it did not account for
Bahamians who had health insurance
outside the Bahamas, persons who
were unable to pay for treatments,
and those who were unable to afford
the costs of recommended proce-
dures.
BECon added: "Government sub-
sidises ]a lot of health care costs in the
Bahamas, but even the huge amount
they spend is insufficient in many cas-
es. Therefore, even public sector costs
may be under quoted in the NHI
report. "One example of this is gov-
ernment dialysis patients. For those
whose kidneys have failed, dialysis is
required to keep them alive and this
treatment is very expensive. The nor-
mal dialysis patient usually requires


dialysis three times a week, with each
session lasting between three to four
hours.
"There are times when government
dialysis patients are scheduled only
twice a week with sessions that last
only-one-and-a-half to two hours. This
is due to the fact that dialysis equip-
ment is very expensive and there are
a limited number of dialysis machines
available for government patients."
BECon also questioned how NIAI
was feasible when the National Insutr-
ance Board's (NIB) administration
costs were currently equivalent to
more than 20 per cent of contribu-
tions. The NHI Blue Ribbon Com-
mission's own report said that for it to
be feasible, NIB's administration costs
needed to be at least 10 per cent of
contributions, given that NIB would
administer its scheme.


Jitney stake, from Page 1B


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that VILLIAN CIVIL OF MIAMI
STREET, P.O. BOX-C.R. 54802 NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
.a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 21ST day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.


Legal Notice


NOTICE


TBN ONE LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation



NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act.No. 45 of 2000,
TBN ONE LIMTED., is in dissolution as of June 23rd, 2006.

International Liquidator Services Limited situated at 35A Regent
Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the Liquidator.



LIQUIDATOR



Legal Notice

NOTICE

GUN POINT INVESTMENTS LIMITED


This is to inform the General Public that all that private thoroughfare
or roadway known as Gun Point situate northeastwards of the
Settlement of Spanish Wells at the northwestern end of the Island
of North Eleuthera will be closed to the public from 6:00 a.m. on
Saturday, 8th July, 2006 to 6:00 a.m. to Sunday, 9th July, 2006 to
protect the right of ownership.




Everette Sands
President


The report said: "Govern-
ment's investment in the
ground transport sector has
been targeted towards road
infrastructure, whereas there
has been minimal investment
in public transportation and
supporting infrastructure.
"To reduce traffic conges-
tion in New Providence, and
improve future use of public
transport, much greater pub-
lic investment is needed, pri-


marily towards the provision
of bus bays and passenger ter-
minals. The economic benefit
in terms of road safety and
vehicle operating cost savings
would far outweigh the capi-
tal investment needed."
ToAunify New Providence's
jitney system, the report said
the new company would have
to buy all jitneys currently in
service.
It pegged the cost of doing


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ERICK ALCIME OF WULFF
ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 21ST day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that SAMUEL FENELUS OF MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, P.O. BOX: AB-20681, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 21ST day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.



PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, PATRICIA JOSEPH, of
Bellots Rd., Nassau, Bahamas, P.O. Box SS-6156 intend to
change my name to PATRICIA DIROSIA. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-792, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice.


this at $12.3 million, based on
the value of all jitneys current-
ly in service. The report did
not appear to account for cash
flow, revenues and future prof-
it forecasts in reaching this val-
uation, let alone goodwill.
The $12.3 million was based
on there being about 336 jit-
neys in the public transport
system, some 280 on the roads
and 56 - some 20 per cent -
being off the roads for repairs.


Using Department of Cus-
toms' Cost of Imported Freight
(CIF) figures, and adding on
45 per cent import duty, 7 per
cent stamp duty, and dealers'
margins and costs, the report
pegged the average jitney's
market value at $36,644.
But the report warned: "The
legal owner of many jitneys is
not known, nor is the informa-
tion currently available on
vehicle particulars reliable."


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MAYBELL MOREAU OF MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization:
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 28th day of June
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that DENNEISHA PRYCE OF #279
JACKFISH ST, P.O. BOX F-43218, CARAVELL BEACH, GRAND
BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that ariy person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 21ST day of JUNE,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that DANIEL COICOUS, MALCOLM
ROAD WEST, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 21ST day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.
I
Legal Notice .


NOTICE


TBN THREE LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation



NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act.No. 45 of 2000,
TBN THREE LIMTED., is in dissolution as of June 23rd,
2006.

International Liquidator Services Limited situated at 35A Regent
Street, P.O. Box 1.777, Belize City, Belize is the Liquidator.


LIQUIDATOR



Legal Notice


NOTICE


TBN TWO LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation



NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act.No. 45 of 2000,
TBN TWO LIMTED., is in dissolution as of June 23rd, 2006.

International. Liquidator Services Limited situated at 35A Regent
Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the Liquidator.


LIQUIDATOR


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that SHERLA THURENE OF FIRST
ST., COCONUT GROVE AVE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 28TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, BAhamas,


Financial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information As Of:
Tuesday, 27 June 200 6
..g' I" &.TRADPeM SECURITIES - VISIT WWWV .BISABAHAMP.AS COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
INElSHARE INDEX- CLOSE 1.515.62 / CHG 01 01 / %-CHG 00.07 ' YTD 164.91 YTD % 12.21
52w k-HI 52w k-Low S ym bol P . ..:. u _: ,_II-:-.e T : . : . :- ,r ,:,.:. ;i .:- C. F. E _ ,_ 1
1 .8 5 0 .5 9 A b a c o M a rk e ls 1 ' . , 1 .. . 1 . ,,- . '" , 1 * , ,:' P 1
11.75 8.70 Bahamas Property Fund 11.75 11.75 0.00 1.568 0.380 7.5 3.23%
7.24 6.35 Bank of Bahamas 7.23 7.23 0.00 0.738 0.330 9.8" 4.56%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.292 0.020 2.7 2.50%
1.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.43 1.43 0.00 0.143 0.060 10.0 4.20%
1.49 1.05 Fidelity Bank 1.49 1.49 0.00 0.188 0.050 7.9 3.68%
9.60 8.00 Cable Bahamas 9.21 9.21 . 0.00 0.618 0.240 14.9 2.61%
2.20 1.39 Colina Holdings 1.90 1.90 0.00 750 -0.067 0.000 NM 0.00%
10.80 8.50 'Commonwealth Bank 101.80 10.80 0.00 0.931 0.600 11.6 5.56%
6.26 4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.98 5.06 0.08 0.115 0.045 43.3 0.90%
2.88 2.10 Doctor's Hospital 2.50 2.50 0.00 0.283 0.000 8.8 0.00%
6.21 4.02 Famguard 6.21 6.21 0.00 0.539 0.240 11.5 3.86%
11.50 10.45 Finco 11.50 11.50 0.00 0.745 0.540 15.1 4.78%
12.43 8.60 FirstCaribbean 12.43 12.43 0.00 0.885 0.550 14.0 4.42%
11.15 8.42 Focol 11.15 11.15 0.00 0.885 0.500 12.6 4.48%
1.27 0.95 Freeport Concrete 0.95 1.03 0.08 51,095 -0.162 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.50 9.50 0.00 0.526 0.405 18.1 4.26%
9.10 8.27 J. S. Johnson 9.10 9.10 0.00 0.565 0.560 16.1 6.15%
7.98 5.30 Kerzner International BDRs 7.91 7.90 -0.01 0.160 0.000 49.5 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.585 4.9 5.85%
. nFidelity Over-The-CouLnter Sec:urmnes
52 wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol i63- -1.D F'-E=1 i ... .*0. .1 EF i ,. i - ' .E v-'l
14 00 12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.C -0 i ; ii. 1 _ . - ., - .- . :
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.084 0.000 NM 0.00%
,". � 'i"'- COil -La Over-The-Counmar Securities
J3 00 28.00 ABDAB 1 .) . .:. ,:,. 1 1 ...... . 1.:, ,:, ,:,,:,., ,i i ,:1.1 I' 0
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.00 15.00 12.50 1.750 0.360 8.0 2.57%
060 0.35 RND Holdings 0 2C ,2, 5.,a ,'., ~- .0,.--,0 0---3E Nr1, 000,"
: o, -- 28SX IUsted Mutual Funds
52",k-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NA V 1N TL L-,- 1i r I....n- c,. i
1.2933 1.2367 Coina Money Market Fund 1.293348*
2.8564 2.3657 FIdelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.78564 ."
2.3915 2.2487 Coina MSI Preferred Fund 2.391480"-
1.1744 1.1246 Colina Bond Fund 1.174411-"
-5A --MA re 8O6.291 / YTD 19.65%, / 2005 26.09%
BlSX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 - 1.0000 0 MARKET TEPPMA- NIELC .3=, 1 , --, :- r. 3. .--,- ,3 .. 3 , -. :l::l,.:.i-.:- J 'e
52wk-HI - H IV0he on-g price in st 52 weeks Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low - LoweMt do.itn pro In l st 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity " 16 June 2006
PrevWou Co.. - Prev.ou d.ys wtld price for dly voluTme Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Today' Close - Currnt days weighted price for dally volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week * - 31 May 2006
Change - Chang in doing price from day to day EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value -30 April 2006
DIV $ - Dividends per sham paid In the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningfrul
P/E - Clolng price divided by the last 12 month eamings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1. 1994 = 100 - 31 May 2006
- - ii t242-356-7764 / FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION CALL (242) 394-2503


____j


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28,2006









WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006, PAGE :;B


-THE TRIBUNE


PUC guidelines to aid telecoms competition


FROM page 1B

questions of consumer protec-
jion and economic efficiency.
. - , i "Interconnection enables
- consumers to contract with the
supplier of their choice, and
still be able to receive all
incoming calls regardless of
where they originate."
The PLUC said the guidelines
would help BTC prepare its
standard or Reference Inter-
connection Offer (RIO), mak-
ing it easier for other licensed
operators to enter intercon-
nection agreements with the
state-owned carrier.
It is unclear if the PUC's
publication of the guidelines is
in any way linked to the cur-
S rent dispute between BTC and
,its only legal competitor in
-, fixed-line, long and short-dis-
"tance telecommunications.
" IndiGo Networks, over inter-
; connection between the two
companies in Abaco.
S, Paul Hutton-Ashkenny,
president of IndiGo Networks,
wrote in a previous letter to
.:the PUC that interconnection


between its network and
BTC's had not happened since
IndiGo first requested this 17
months ago in December 2004.
He alleged that BTC had
"refused all efforts" to deal
with this, despite being man-
dated by its licence to provide
interconnection with other
operators at any technically
feasible point.
Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said
the issue was brought to the
PUC's attention on March 22,
2005, and IndiGo subsequent-
ly filed a formal dispute on the
issue on June 20 last year.
He added that IndiGo's two
suggestions for interconnection
locations had been rejected by
BTC, and the PUC had taken
no action to address the situa-
tion.
Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said:
"BTC has been permitted to
disregard the terms of its
licence with impunity, while
IndiGo's legitimate business
interests and legal rights have
been frustrated.
"Furthermore, Abaco resi-
dents have been denied the
opportunity to share in the
benefits of the competitive


telephone service and lower
rates that other Bahamiian res-
idents have been able 1t enjoy
since Septembhe 'i "H- "
IndiGO held a meeting with
the PUC on September 22.
2005, to address' ins and other
issues, and subsequLiently wrote
to the regulatoi seeking fur-
ther guidance, which it alleged
was not forthcoming.
In response, Barrett Russell,
the PUC's executive director,
said the PUC had held discus-
sions with BTC over its refusal
to interconnect with SRG's
network on Abaco in an
attempt to move that situation
forward.
Mr Hutton-Ashkenny had
added in his let ter: "BTC
appears to have been iicreas-
ingly adopting a policy of noi-.
cooperation with respect to
cross-carrier relationships,
even though such relationships
are a normal part of a profes-
sional, competitive telecom-
munications sector.
"The PUC, of course, as the
regulator of the telecommuni-
cations sector, must ensure that
no service provider within the
sector, and particularly the


t Summer Leadership Series!
the heat with courses that will
At your team on fire!







U N I \'-. RS I I-Y


OMERSER\ICE EXCELLENCE t
0 WIN AND KEEP CLISTOMM\ERIS
lay July 11th or September 2U. 2006 :
8 30 am - 4.00 pm
SHIP AN ART OF POSS BI LIY
19th, 2006 oi Salurday Jul\ 22nd 2006
8 30 am - 4 00 pm
IAT I N G IN L IV 11.) ULIL PI'Oi N I I NiL
Wednesday July 26th, 2006
8 30 am - 4 00 pm
ERING TEAM PERFORMANI
Vednesdav August 2nd, 2006


dominant incumbent is pei
mitted to frustirite the devel-
opment of competition, which
is against the interests of the
consumer atid contrary to the
PUC's statutory mandate.
-Notwithi.anding the salu-
taLy effect of.conmpetition
between BT''C and IndiGo on
rates within the sector, the gen-
eral public is, in our view,
being deprived of the wider
benefits of such competition


by a number of open issues
between the two companies,
which to date have not been
resolved."
The PUC said the proposed
guidelines would ensure inter-
connection agreements were.
not used by two providers to
the detriment of competition,
or be against the public inter-
est.
It said its role would be to
review RIOs, particularly those


involving "dominant opera-
tors", to ensure they met the
requirements of the Telecom-
munications Act and sector
policy.
The telecoms sectorregula-
tor said the guideline . applied
to telecoms services where
there existed competition, such
as fixed-line, and others that
were still subject to a BTC
monopoly, particularly cellu
lar services.


Position Available

Network Engineer
Profile:
- MCSE or MCP with N+
- CCNA or higher a distinct advantage

Key Responsibilities:

- Day to day operations of a datacentre
- " Providing support to clients
- Network and System troubleshooting

Knowledge and Skills:

- Good Organisational Skills
S - Polite And Well Presented

- Experience with PCs and IP Networking
7 Must be willing to travel
Salary & Benefits Negotiable

Send resume no later than Friday July 7th, 2006 to:
The Human Resource Director
Fidelity
51 Frederick Steet
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
f: 326.3000
e mail: careers@fidelitybaharnas.com









PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUI I1HO-)RII

VACANCY NOTICE
RISK MANAGER II
Princess Margaret Hospital

Applicants are invited from suitably qualified person for the post of Risk Manager II, Princess
I.Tirj,l.._ Hospital. Public Hospitals ,i .rir. .

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:..

Bachelors degree in Healthcare or Business Administration with a minimum of two years relevant experience.
Proficient use of Personal computer Software including presentation graphics and
statistical reports. Experience in health care environment preferred.

The Risk Manager 11 must be able to plan effectively. organize and direct various activities relating to risk and
insurance functions, and demonstrate effective communication skills with individuals ai all levels of the
organization, including clinician pati-ents and families.

Job Stunmal'y:
The Risk I ,-.. i. coordinates the liospitals risk management program. i.e., risk detection,
assessisent, prevention and appraisal.

Duties;
1. ciintralizes tIhe risk program, mainaiin aind coordiiialcs tlihe admiinisUative activities and
relrXrts relating to lo inthiernal and cilernal risks
2. Investigates and follok-up of lpolenlially compenscable e'ms identilied Iotighi lhec
incideni/ot currcnceL i'epormni"' syl stem.
3. 1: tortliilie hospital- i id method, to avoid, relduci or iinimin e risks includiiisi re\ieCs'
of (isk mnanagemnient dat d i] iiradepartincnial policies and pr.'cdures withli deparltmin heads
4. R vi( ws tit.' laingua.iic o I ' icient hospitals policies inid p)rocedtlis to issil their
defensibiliti
5 Mlainiin; cose liaisons and onliixriation ilth ( orporlir : Ril, Mana; ' and l.cgal
advisorr fi tifihe put pose IO repiortinii inim',tigating, anaki/iing, sett l ing and defending claiit ns.
6. Co(iers with all department of the instit ilon including Ithe medical staff as the need
arise-, I, in\estigatl a ctinltial ri, situailon
7. Develops and implements ind evaluates i. "". , I , cii. complaint
8. Inlic rates risk ilimanav .eniiiat li\ic - il ;i ,th iuralice.
9 (oodidniicates risk maniaagnement activities with mieilici allf. iinfectionI control. employee
hIealih. I.egal Ad\ior ('oiliorale Risk ,Maiiagri cngineehrina, nrll si�.ni , peveniti\e
mainltenance. patient riCepresenlalive, etc.
S |0 Proiidcs ongoing educational sessions and assistance, fir releiani risk management issues. to all levels ot

II C e(,',. .' lwriodic appiaisals ot hospital ina' g mioilni ;cti iti s to detenIine program effectiveness
i , "5i5aiimins current kno pledge I risk mnan ;mgc i; hai n iiM h l I ellndani'te at local, regional and national meeting
and through riel iv of current literature.
I etier, oli a)plp.ation. -.dunme and three (3) retcrences should be subhitlied., no lalei than 14th .ml). 2006 to tie lHuman
rVcSouies ciiitcior, Public Hosp)itai. Authority, P.OBox N-8200 or 1st Floor Corporate Office, Docken-
dale House, West Bay Street.


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call-us on 2- - -'
and share your story.


NOTICE


Hope Town residents and

decedents of Hope Town. There

are foreigners who are surveying

land between the Nigh Creek and

Back Creek. If you have or know

of anybody that has property there

please notify them to go and check

on it or you might have it taken

away from you by Quieting Title.


i!THE TRIBUNE
z-,


BUSIN 1.







1P HE IHIIHUNl


Ministry in talks on


'star ratings'


FROM page 1B

icr, Mobile Travel Guide, to
q)pply star ratings to this coun-
Iv's resorts.
Fhe company held a press
u,'nference, during the first day


of the Caribbean Hotel Indus-
try Conference to officially
launch its partnership, and dis-
cuss plans to talk to individual
Caribbean governments about
implementing its rating system.
Kendrick Malone, a manag-


ing partner at the Freeman-
Group, said he had broached
the ratings idea to Bahamian
tourism director-general, Ver-
nice Walkine, and other Min-
istry of Tourism officials while
in New York for Caribbean


Bank Automation Specialist


Profile:
f - Bachelors Degree

Ua Key Responsibilities:

f - Assist in implementing the bank's automation project
S - Liaise with Service Centres to set up scanning process
** - Scan days work and documentation from Service Centres
and accounting and operation areas

Knowledge and Skills

Attentive to detail
- PC Skills
- Some knowledge of bank processes and functions
- Ability to process high volumes of work accurately and
efficiently

Send resume no later than Friday June 30th, 2006 to:

The Human Resource Director
Fidelity
51 Frederick Steet
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
f: 326.3000
e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com


466 GN-366 I


THE PRICE CONTROL (GASOLINE & DIESEL OIL)
(AMENDMENT) REGULATIONS, 2002


The public is advised that prices as shown in the Schedule for LEAD FREE
gasoline and DIESEL OIL sold by ESSO will become effective on Wednesday, 28th June,
2006.

SCHEDULE


PLACE


ARTICLE


MAXIMUM WHOLESALE SELLING
PRICE PER U.S. GALLON


MAXIMUM
SUPPLIERS'
PRICE
$


MAXIMUM
DISTRIBUTORS'
PRICE
s


MAXIIMUM
RETAIL
SELLING PRICE
PERU.S.
GALLON


Tourism week.
He said the response was
very favourable, and the Min-
istry of Tourism showed par-
ticular interest in training
tourism vendors as well.
According to Mr, Malone,
Mobile is the only group which
can apply the star rating to
hotels. The group sends rep-
resentatives to each property
to analyse the resort on a wide
criteria, usually arriving unan-
nounced. At the end, Mobile
then applies a star rating of
between one to five, five being
the highest. This rating allows
potential visitors to have an
understanding of what they can
expect a resort or hotel to be
like.
Any other star ratings used
in the Caribbean are often, Mr
Malone said, ratings applied
based on the amenities the
hotel offers, and by persons
who have not actually visited
the resort.


According to Bill Freeman,
the company will be approach-
ing countries on an individual
basis.
Press
During the press conference,
FreemanGroup officially
launched FreemanGroup Des-
tinations (FG Destinations),
an initiative designed to offer
tourism destinations a fully
integrated and comprehensive
approach to establishing,
implementing and maintaining
international service standards
through measurable training
processes.
Service workers, especially
those with direct visitor con-
tact, hospitality workers, gov-
ernment employees and public
services workers can benefit
from the service.
Mr Malone, who is a former
Director of Tourism for the
British Virgin Islands,


explained that the services
being offered are essential to '-
the continued global competi-
tive position of the Caribbean.
Mr Freeman added: "We
saw a clear need to provide
destinations with an all-encom-
passing approach to quality -
issues directly affecting their,-
.visitor's intent to return and"
recommend."
, FG Destinations, he added,
has partnered with Mobile
Travel Guide, which is begin-
ning to identify countries inter-
ested in adopting the rating, It
has also linked up with AIG,
the insurance company and
underwriter of voluntary
employee benefits, a move
designed to alleviate the high
cost of health care services for
businesses and employees, and
eCornell, a subsidiary of Cor-
nell University and a provider
of a vast library of training
modules accessible via the
Internet in electronic format.


PUBLIC NOTICE

TO RECIPIENTS OF LONG-TERM BENEFITS

AND ASSISTANCE IN NEW PROVIDENCE

Pensioners are reminded that effective July 2006,
the National Insurance Board will require all recipients
of Long-Term Benefits and Assistance in New
Providence to have their monthly cheques deposited
directly to their banks accounts.


If you have not already made' arrangements to have
your cheques deposited to your bank accounts,
you are advised to immediately visit your nearest
NIB Local Office to avoid any delay or suspension
of payments.





Clearing Banks Association



NOTICE


The Central Bank of The Bahamas issued Guidelines on the
Prevention & Detection of Money Laundering for Licensees
(Guidelines) in October 2005. The Guidelines direct licensees
to complete, verification of existing clients by June 30th 2006
in accordance with section 6(6) of the Financial Transactions
Reporting Act, 2000.

Failure to verify your facility may negatively impact the normal
operation of your account/facility. Customers are encouraged
to visit their respective Bank (s) to update unverified
accounts/facilities on or before June 30th 2006.

The following documents, in addition to your respective bank's
verification documentation, are required for updating personal
accounts.

Official Current Photo for example:

Current Valid Passport;
Driver's License;
or Voter's Card

Verification of Address for example:

Voter's card;
Utility bill;
National Insurance Card ;or
Bank or credit card statement.

In the case of Corporate/Business accounts/facilities please
contact your nearest Bank for verification requirements.


Bank of The Bahamas Limited
Citibank N.A.
Commonwealth Bank Limited
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited
FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited
Royal Bank of Canada


-I


PARI A
NEW INCLUDING SEA FREI G H T
PROVIDENCE

ESSO STANDARD LEAD FREE 4.02 4 02 4.46
OIL
DIESEL OIL 3.33 3 33 3 52

PART Q
GRANI) BAHAMA INCLUDING S EA FRE I G H T
(NOT FREEPORT)

ESSO STANDARD LEAD FREE 3.92 410 4 52
OIL
DIESEL OIL 321 3.37 3 56

PART D
ABACO,ANDROS NOT INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
ELEUTHERA

ESSO STANDARD LEAD FREE 4.02 4.25 4.64
OIL
DIESEL OIL 3.34 3.50 3.69

ALLOTHER NOT INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
FAMILY ISLANDS

ESSO STANDARD LEAD FREE 4.03 4.27 4.67
OIL
DIESEL OIL 3.35 3.50 3.70


Signed:
HARRISON THOMPSON
PERMANENT SECRETARY


PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006


BUOINESS









TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGF RR WFFONESDAY. JUNE 28. 2006


Swimmers

make a splash

in Puerto Rico
* SWIMMING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

WHILE Vereance Bur-
rows turned in a surprise
record breaking perfor-
mance, Ariana Vanderpool-
Wallace, Alana Dillette and
Nikia Deveaux all lived up
to the Bahamas Swimming
Federation's expectations.
Burrows, 16, led the way
for the Bahamas on the first
day of competition at the
XVI Caribbean Island
Swimming Championships
in Salinas, Puerto Rico by
inking his name in the
record books.
Improving on his prelimi-
nary time of 25.92 seconds,
Burrows came back and
won the gold in the boys 15-
17 butterfly final in 25.39 to
secure the first CISC record
at the championships.
He erased the previous
mark set by Shawn Clarke
of Barbados in 25.87 in
2004. Juan Serrano of Puer-
to Rico also went under the
old mark in 25.72 for the sil-
ver and Brad Hamilton of
Jamaica did 26.28 for the
bronze.
Burrows' feat was one of
the six gold produced in the
Bahamas' 10-medal haul.
Deveaux came up with a
pair of gold, while Vander-
pool-Wallace and Dillette
had one each to go along
with their silver each.
Their performances,
along with a silver from Ali-
cia Lightbourne and a
bronze from John Bradley,
had the Bahamas sitting in
third place in the standings
with 144 points behind
Trinidad & Tobago (201).
Puerto Rico is on top of
the leaderboard with 309.
Federation president
Algernon Cargill, when
contacted in Puerto Rico
after the completion of
Tuesday's morning prelimi-
nary round, said they are
still beaming with excite-
ment over the performance
from Burrows.
"It was the first CISC
record as well. It has to be
the most outstanding swim
for us and at the meet so
far," Cargill stated.

Performing

Even though the
Bahamas only has a 24-
member team at the cham-
pionships, Cargill said they
are performing exceptional-
ly well, considering the fact
that all of the other teams
are much larger.
As the championships
continue, Cargill said their
primary objective is for all
of the swimmers to improve
on their personal best per-
formances.
If they can do that,
Cargill said he's convinced
that the Bahamas will be a
contender for the title at
the end of the week-long
competition.
"Our team is not as large
as the other countries, so all
we are asking for them to
do is to perform their best,"
Cargill noted. "So far, they
have been doing just that."
While Burrows had the
single most impressive per-
formance so far, Deveaux
struck for her pair of golds
in the girls' 18 and over 100
free in 59.93 and the 50
butterfly in 30.67.
Dillette, also competing
in the girls 18 and over,
picked up the silver in the
100 free behind Deveaux in
59.93 and posted a gold in
the 400 individual medley in
5:13.78.
Vanderpool-Wallace
came through with her pair
of medals with a gold in the
girls 15-17 100 free in 59.68
and a silver in the girls 15-
17 50 fly in 29.92.
The gold went to
Wilmarie Velez of Puerto
Rico in 29.72.
Lightbourne's lone silver
medal came in the girls' 15-
17 400 IM in 5:31.09 behind
Puerto Rico's Keshia


Vazquez winning time of
5:12.86.
Bradley's bronze was in
the boys 13-14 200 free in
2:03.05. The gold went to
Victor Munoz of the
Dominican Republic in
2:02.43 with Trinidad &
Tobago's Walter Romany
getting the silver in 2:03.05.
The Bahamas' team of
sisters Alicia and Teisha
Lightbourne, Jenna Chaplin
and Vanderpool-Wallace
won the gold in the girls 15-
17 400 free relay in 4:08.84.


NBA stars hold court with





Bahamian youngsters


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* BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

YESTERDAY, more than 100
Bahamian children got a first
hand opportunity to learn from
their National Basketball Asso-
ciation (NBA) idols.
Thanks to the thriving Sport-
ing Tourism programme, the
Ministry of Youth Sports and
Housing, the Bahamas Basket-
ball Federation and NBA play-
ers, the first annual basketball
camp was hosted at the Sir
Kendal Isaacs gymnasium.
With more than 30 profession-
al NBA players in town, the
excitement level at the national
gym was at an all time high.
After a light warm-up, the
campers went through several
fundamental drills which includ-
ed dribbling, shooting and box-
ing out.
On the dribbling exercise, the
campers were instructed to drib-
ble the ball with their finger tips
instead of using their palms,
which they were accustomed to.
According to the players, drib-
bling with the finger tips gives
you more control instead of slap-
ping the ball.
The players also tried to cor-
rect the shooting form of the
campers, who were throwing the
ball at the rim.
Representative from the
Tourism Office Cecile Rose said
that, through the Sporting
Tourism programme, more
camps will be introduced to the
Bahamas where aspiring athletes
can have this opportunity with
professional players.
He said: "The turnout to this
camp is overwhelming, the
response was huge. We have two
more camps like these planned
and I know that if the response
for the first one is this big that
the other two will be crowded.
"What we try to do is work
closely with the federations
when we host camps such as
these. We allow the executive
members of the federation to
invite the campers out, noting
S that they are more hands on
with them.,
"Camps like these are an
excellent opportunity for both
the Bahamas and the federa-
tions."
Although the campers were
eager to get started, the Sir
Kendal Isaacs gymnasium is only
.equipped with six baskets.
Rose explained that if they
had a bigger facility they would
be able to invite more campers
out.


* DIKEMBO MUTOMBO of the Houston Rockets instructs one of the youngsters yesterday.
(Photo: Felipg Major/Tribune staff)


Sprinters get ready


to go


* TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
SPRINTERS Derrick Atkins
and Adrian Griffith are ready to
take the professional circuit by
storm. The duo have recently
wrapped up their college careers
and are ready to compete for the
'big bucks.'
Both Atkins and Griffith are
recent graduates of Dickinson
State University (BlueHawk), in
North Dakota, and have assisted
the BlueHawks with three nation-
al championships, 2004-2006.
Winning the title of the fastest
male in the Bahamas in the 100m
at the recent senior national
championships hosted by the
Bahamas Association of Athletic
Associations, Atkins is hoping to
take over in the event, saying it is
just a matter of timc, especially if
the nagging injury, which he has
been nursing, doesn't flare again.
Atkins posted a winning time
of 10.03 seconds in the 100m at
the meet. The time had a power-
ful wind reading of +3.7, which
will not stand' for the national
record.
The sprinter said the time was
something in the 'woodworks' for
a long time, but the nagging ham-
string injury has forced him to
change his plans.
He said: "I am just hoping and
praying that I can remain healthy
and produce more fast'times, that


professional


Derrick Atkins and Adrian Griffith


wrap up their college careers


is my main focus right now. I have
some other goals in mind, like
breaking the national record at
the first meet, if I can't do it at
this meet, I will be looking for-
ward to doing it at the CAC
games.

Time

"I know a lot has been said
about me especially now since
I've ran that time. But I want,
everyone to know that I as long as
I am healthy they can expect
times like these or faster from
me, I will show up to big meets. I
was injured and I gave it an hon-
est effort last year. It just didn't
work out to my advantage and
people just tend to base their facts
on that.
"I am still nursing that injury
from last year that is why I start-
ed this season very late. This year
I was just trying to stay focused
on staying healthy so I won't fall
too far off the wagon. I am still
nursing and trying to stay posi-
tive in the process."


Atkins has officially been
placed in the government's elite
programme - in the past he was
on the developmental subvention
programme list.
The North America, Central
America and Caribbean Athletic
Association (NACAC) under 23
meet and the Central American
and Caribbean Championships
(CAC) championships might be
Atkins' final meets for the year,
but the sprinter, who is gunning
after the national record of 10.18
seconds held by. Rudy Lavarity
and Renward Wells, said he will
be open to compete at any meet
scheduled after July.
At the recent National Asso-
ciation of Intercollegiate Athlet-
ics (NAIA) championships. Grif-
fith accumulated 22 points to
assist the Hawks in their victory.
He competed in the 100m,
200m, long jump and the 4xl00m.
Atkins, who completed his eli-
gibility in 2005, holds the school
records in both the 100m and the
200m, and has helped the team
to establish a new record in the
4x100m.


The success in track and field
on the collegiate level has
inspired both Atkins and Griffith
to move forward.
According to Griffith, who has
clocked 10.29 seconds in the 100m
at the NAIA championships, tak-
ing it to the next level was always
a dream of his which will come
from hard work and dedication.
Griffith has had surgery on his
knee and is coming off a two sea-
son vacation.

Absence

Griffith said: "I just want to
thank God for the year and the
performances, especially since I
am coming off a two year absence
from the sport and a knee injury.
When you add up all those factors
I have really worked hard and I
must say that this year has been a
great year.
"I had a long season which
started with indoor and went into
the outdoors. I didn't have a
break, but it's something I will
do again. My first meet from


indoor I came out rocky, but as
time went on I got stronger and it
propelled me for the outdoor sea-
son.
"It was basically the same thing
for the outdoor, I had a rough
time adjusting but once I did it
was like know stopping me. So I
must say that the season has gone
pretty good for me on the colle-
giate level, the big test Will come
in the two meets I have coming
up.
"I am quite certain that my last
year in college will help me with
my transition process, I am not
afraid to make adjustments, so if
I get a chance to go on the circuit
I will be ready."
Griffith's season's best time in
the 200m is recorded at 21.43 sec-
onds and a best jump of 25-4 in
the long jump event. Both
recordings were done at the
NAIA championships held in late
May.
In 2004, Griffith was named to
the NAIA All-American team,
and again in 2006 in both
the indoor and the outdoor sea-
son.
His stellar performances for the
school landed him with the most
valuable player award for the
Dakota Athletic Conference
(DAC).
Griffith revealed that he will
focus on the 100m and the long
jump on the professional level
instead of trying to compete in
three events.


I'.


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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006

SECTION


Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS
ao


Fount ain


thrPough


in


first Pound







nail-iterP


* TENNIS
By ANDRE DAVIS
DAY two of the Security
and General International
Junior Tennis Open produced
success for Bahamian athletes
as they continued to advance
beyond the opening round.
Jacob Fountain of the
Bahamas defeated Haris
Radzematovic of the US in an
intense first round match, 6-2,
3-6, 6-4.
Early in the match, Radze-
matovic made it apparent he
was determined to use his
power to out muscle his oppo-,
nent, however Fountain's
finesse game was the perfect
counter.
Radzematovic showed phe-
nomenal strength throughout
the match, which he incorpo-
rated with his backhand and


Junior Tennis Open


forehand shots.
Despite his power he was
no match for the quick Foun-
tain in the beginning stages of
the match.
Fountain, ranked 26th in the
tournament, used a brain over
brawn strategy throughout the
match and it worked quite
well for him, as he took a 6-2
lead at the end of the first set.
The second set, however,
belonged to the 30th ranked
Radzematovic as he powered
his way through.
The momentum shifted in
his direction, as many of his
forehand shots proved to be
too quick for Fountain.
The second set was disap-


pointing for Fountain as he
only managed to win three
games.
Then, with Radzematovic
seemingly in control of the
match, Fountain mounted an
inspired comeback in the third
set.
He forced Radzematovic to
lose his focus in the latter
stages, and frustrated him with
timely drop shots throughout
the third set.
This lead to a high intensity
tie breaker and it seemed as if
both athletes were going to
bring their 'A game'.
It was Fountain, however,
who rose to the occasion to
win in a great match.


* JACOB FOUNTAIN in action yesterday.
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune st4ff)


'Well-rounded team' selected




for CAC Junior Championships


* TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
EXECUTIVE members of the
Bahamas Association of Athletic
Association (BAAA) are confi-
dent that they have put together
the strongest junior team to com-
pete in this year's Central Ameri-
can and Caribbean (CAC) Junior
Championships.
The event, which will be held in
Trinidad and Tobago in July 14th-
17th, will be led by Carifta Games
standouts Nivea Smith and Sheni-
qua Ferguson along with six other
medallists from the recently held
Carifta Games. The 48-member
team was named yesterday by the
BAAA.

Strength
According to public relations
officer Ralph McKinney, the
strength of this year's team doesn't
lie solely on the Carifta medallists,
but the presence of college ath-
letes who weren't able to compete
at the Carifta Games.
Those persons include Lanece
Clarke, Tamara Rigby, who's par-
ticipation is pending on a physical
test, Ramon Miller and Bianca
Stuart.
Although the team is pending
fitness test results from four ath-
- - 1 -. -':11 L1_ ;_ _,,o f t


Forty-eight athletes

named by the BAAA


the team will do exceedingly well.'
McKinney said: "This is truly a
well rounded team. There are
some veterans from Carifta Games
along with the college athletes who
weren't given that opportunity to
compete at the Carifta Games due
to school commitments.
"If we break down the athletes
who have qualified in each divi-
sion-you can see that all the divi-
sions are strong. Like in the under
17 girls we have Nivea and Warren
in the under 17 boys.
"When we look at the under 20
boys and girls there is Ryan Penn
and Sheniqua Ferguson on the
track and Tracy Morrison and
Jamal Wilson on the field. So we
can truly say that the team is bal-
anced on the field and on the
track."
Smith and Ferguson will have
their work cut out for them, as
they brandish four medals from
the Carifta Games along with
World and Youth rankings.
Taking charge of the under 17
division, Smith will compete in the
1 00m 200m, and both relays. She
t/


secured her spot on the team by
winning the 100m and 200m, at the
junior nationals, in times of 11.92
seconds and 24.64 seconds respec-
tively.
Smith is currently ranked on the
World Youth top performance list
in the 200m with a season's best
of 23.66 seconds, she is ranked
fifth.

Charge
On the field, defending champi-
on in the men's high jump Jamal
Wilson will led the men's charge
along with Johnathon Davis and
Rudon Bastian in the long jump.
Tracey Morrison is coming off a
college and Carifta Games high
and is hoping to better her perfor-
mance from two years ago in the
javelin.
The Bahamas will also stand a
great chance on snagging four
medals in each divisional relay.
The only medal secured at the
games in 2004 was in the under 17
boys and girls division.


CAC JUN~IO[TEAM,


* Under 17 Girls
1. Krystal Bodie
2. Jennie Jacques
3. Carlene Johnson
4. Tess Mullings
5. V'Alonee Robinson
6. Shellyka Rolle
7. Nivea Smith
8. Skyller Wallen
9. lesha White


* Under 17 Boys
1. Raymond Armaly
,2. Nathan Arnett
3. Tradecio Davis
4. Darion Duncombe
5. Warren Fraser
6. Raymond Higgs
7. Shawn Lockhart
8. Brandon Miller III
9. Rashad Moxey
10. Pedro Oliver
11. Kristian Hepburn-Taylor
12. Kenneth Wallace-Whitfield
13. Fenton Williams
Pending Fitness Test:
14. Karlton Rolle
Pending Verification of Time:
15. Laquardo Newbold
* Under 20 Girls
1. Lanece Clarke
2. Michelle Cumberbatch
3. Sheniqua Ferguson
4. Ashlee Hanna
5. Tracey Morrison
6. Ramona Nicholls
7. Leneice Rolle


8. Tia Rolle :
9. Bianca Stuart '
10. T' Shonda Webb
11. Shannice Wright
12. Cach6 Armbrister
13. Tamara Rigby
E Under 20 Boys
1. Anwick Alexis
2. Rudon Bastian -
3. Livingstone Brown
4. Kayuse Burrows
5. Jamaal Butler
6. Johnathan Davis
7. Lamar Delaney
8. Dwayne Ferguson
9. Juan Lewis
10. Ramon Miller
11. Ryan Penn
12. Jameson Strachan
13. Carl Stuart
14. Charles Williams
15. Jamaal Wilson
Pending Fitness Test:
Carlyle Thompson
Also pending the results of the pole
vault and decathlon.
* The team will be headed by:
Team Manager: Foster Dorsette
Asst. Manager: Laura Pratt-
Charlton
Chaperones: Ann Thompson &
Angie Rolle
Head Coach: Dianne Woodside
Asst. Coaches: Stephen Murray,-
Peter Pratt, Claudel McNabb, Pa all
Hanna








1 THE I F141".~11 1'i


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006, PAGE 7


AN IN TIRVIEW WIfT BASIL, DEAN.

I 0 i R MORE ABOUT THE MAN BEHIND WEATHER BROADCASTING IN:


PI R( C AS E T HE T r 1 B U NE ON F RI DAY


Frecpo t















aseili t ohe Sea/A viu ,o,
� ceri ',f F'lt ida pl.a. . ' : , c1 .
' t an \Sf toi, .h t ,'i , ,: ,

Centre.
Mr Babak, 45. ,,iid Sir
Albert, 80. are determined to,
turnaround the sluggish
Freeport economy.
')i in effort ( r ;'P' ''
!'e, aS lo i 1 i u . L . ti';. it 1. i
' ev'.jnomlv L I( o l 'tpOi't "f.!iItII
le , , t i h `, o i : t, ,!
A. ''t 'rily. Sir r ,lc. at t' \!
Babl'f met with b' ,kriI"
a;tc'� ntal ts t dK la ,'yt.is'("
, .,. their new vi:ioIn for ;

i nde'r llt',, r' h' ,
they hope to itp, i 'c ;,,
establish , ino . i';nsi, ' .
and opt'n l :il.ii:iinsiip ,LthI
stake lbuohis.) ;.'u. ,.oiniiii
* '* li:.!it' t

vith i'. :'in .

* .ore ,Ira p + ,, : .

w' l) ihe' l i;ift , i', '
.equcs:.,. IN Ilu.,.d attJi.

,t',u dict l'ilt l' id 1 '\ll t:-.tCI
Pllerry Christie last 'iThursday
1, i, share their vision about
. irning th ecoilnomy u!(Irond
I Freeport.
S Sir Albert.sI' ! n ,.
I;'ig today tha. .1'. :.. . ' ; ' "
. ni rate is s' ' '(n;
Around 11 pei t ' ,
*ith the mini;' ' ... .
servicess yestcr it i .I
'-ft with him
applicationss ' .
' hat we will g, ... , ..
* 'iswe'!s. T'ogiI t''. I
vo anoinounc
e expect th ai
vo week" we li' I
.)sition to niiI .'
'nore new atm'
'r invest ,;' tr
'eepoit.'
"we all g ,
; of nothing i' I' " I '
'" ,:ire d(I ing ll
' e have ' ' n .... ' n
, and va c 0'!"
f i at.
Sit Albeit s
! )rt A 'llio! ' ,,W 1,)
!,eed up tIe
oces; . ,o .' 1
in -ltalianiiiat' ! "i
He stat', d t i
g wi'llh v;'ii
* ve been ve .
"WVee ale ,'' n
',ore of t ;e i
, :C; e S'! L \.C at! I .
* ly we di't li "
S .I nlt to i i . 'Ii
S;id opci. '
'* 'oW1 \ 'il' 1:
e Por t III :.


' d we w i' II'' ,
;e il),1 !;!i ,
Sit i\llHl> iI ' it i. ' f 'l
" i- tet .'(. I n i

' 'as ;' n I ; |)

i t ,.t* .e,> ! I ' ; ' i

". it \V'i i t, ffi 'i .i

I, vye assto're l i, , ., I';,i


T'r':eport jS . I'i' lf
i,' hir ' I t(, . !|;cflir'f ' ,'
i Iw ;,.o ! If;iiy(i i 'l!'.Il' it ,



*'/ )t1 '11;;!!I ';' ! i', ' * : 1i


FROM page one I IT talks


i/c that thec noiy level ti .1
lt.clt'hei is oiCe oI tlhe IovC.;i lc I
els in thl public setiicc?.' An
enI.iiCe comes in and theiri) .
s;aln bi'g'ins al $35 )1I0? i \
.wi;, ^"tOnll}' $ll 1 1 0 khiH I wl.'l , M~ll "

Now ll of' those person I hlnvc
spoken about ehlt.'r with 1h
Simit hvel - or a iaichchlor' '
dli'e diand a p)rotessiona il ce'
tlficate. ' she said.
I-Ho0wever, Mr Sears said that
the icom:,csions. offcrud ( fl
itaclicils', i glioutd bicaking
and that a umber of (thin exclusive to teachers in thl pub
lic school-s) stem.
"Hlad the union accepted the
gsv ci nli lent s salaiy .pI oposal.


' itaclieiNs \\ utld hi ivit - rcC
$1.,200 in' back pay add
hc fnr Ithe 2 OOS/2006
venr al.ni l with a $100O
sutlin 'lis would mencan 1th
thie end ol . uliinc this year. t
Cis \\iould have benefited
ln Lxtra $1.'l00 added to
pii ipacket.
As ol July 2006, teach
monilhil salaries would
increased by $200. Furthe
0o\ ci intIent ihas undertake
- increase the minimum sala
a teacher with a Bache
degree and a training certi
from $22,800 to.$25,000 by
?007,' he said.


eivcd
ed to
fiscal
lump
iat by
each-
from
their

:her's
have
r, the
e(n to
ry for
elor's
ficate
y July


Claims over development

FROM page one
the island killing miol if l tm l ill It it,h ic ite li that ,irea. it was

A\,;Ide fi'm th-e clii t' , `_ on l iii iliilnii the .ducvlopment also
I illi 0 putting out 01 .1 buisifI's' a itnui iii oi lifidttiilin tour operators
Whose income is gcine aited b\ likine-iiis lo-Athol Island for recre-
al iunal diving and suoukceiig.
Re-Larth. according lo Mis D )ui tInnbhe has already sought inter-
national aid in an effort to save Athol island and is prepared to do
everything in jts power to stop the ventliure.
Re Faith is a 1non pimtl'f ti'l\ii \\iifi'iilt l \ ,iitch f lioup established
il I'- ;' a; i I t..le'ij, illn . ,i; iii a' '' ii s -id nd ctnd r-'

1 i.. ' .t ' ,L .. . ii. i. 1 .. . 1. lit uoi ti .it protests it
.ti, IN' lfouI'ht lon hle I'ihine iii d l ot ' li'a dolphin was caught in
., a , I. iill i lobbied to o t\ i. . .. ; ai.ii i . i .op) ie i rom
Latching any more oir allowing thell to h imo i rated iniq tihe country.
'lhal l ii)\\ :i . ' c !. 11 ' I ,i ] /.|lit.I .'i i ' '
MN I )uniombc fnialnainlis tiai (In e is ssonietlhiing lundarnental
i'. ., I \ ul t 1 t i iL I . .Ih . Ii i>i , . i i;il /.e th1ti lhe aire all
. ltiiciitleid S-l il tie e iitlh a ti liiai lhoit ! t1 e\ coild not exist. She
.aid lRBihall ni.,izn cennt'inuieIf lh . .'ith, i hF inlt ,iltiic' of nailtre and
iriaftn th fIlii c l i" i i l , June iliL i l, N ll , tii t ( live



Career Opportuniity


A leading Broadcasting Company has a
unique immediate opening for nll

energetic, moti vaed. plrolesslio ail fe-
male on--air personalty


Applicant must be a Iaclii tpk i Cl and
posses excellent a'linituliti on l and

interpersonal skills.


illerestc'd aipplic' - i timm tslh itt an
an ii hctk and lesutili.tNo P'i'lnt. Calls).

There will be No LCo sidratioii for
resumes without Air ( Click,. Apply to
DA 11411 c/o Ihe li ibuni I'( ) ox
N '1,)07 Nassan.,


file (meaning the matter is not
ready for trial) matters set for
* trial by way of a voluntary bill of
Indictment matters being tried
.and matters set for retrial.
"By the end of August we
hope to have analysed the entire
list to determine which cases can
and in fact proceed to trial,"
. Minister Maynard-Gibson said.
She added that her ministry
is attempting to determine the
root causes that have prevented
trials in this session from pro-
ceeding.
However, she pointed out that.
some factors are immediately
apparent, such as the failure of
witnesses to attend trial or poor
recollection of details when they
do attend; victims deciding to
Sdrop the charges or in many
instances the double booking of
matters by counsel..
Another factor contributing
to the back-up of Supreme court
proceedings is the failure of
Magistrate Courts to follow law-
lul "Itradition. '
"Traditionally the magistrates
court matter must stand down


BTC reserves the right


produce list
pending competition of the
Supreme court matter," Attor-
ney General Maynard Gibson
explained. "We are finding that
this tradition is not being'fol-
lowed. This causes loss to society
not only in waste of costly
Supreme Court time -(the cost
of convening the Supreme
Court, including empanelling
jurors, is higher than the cost of
convening the Magistrate's
Court) and causes hardship to
victims who do wish to proceed
with their matters."
Another major issue is key
evidence'necessary for trial is
not always available at trial.
For example, the matter of
the trial or retrial of Monte
Thompson and Kedon Brown,
accused of the murder of Nurse
Joan Lunn, had to be moved to
July 17, even though the trial
started as scheduled on June 19,
2006 for two judicial weeks after
the jury had been empanelled
and the prosecutor was ready to


proceed, as the court could not
produce for the set trial essential
.exhibits in the court's custody.
The minister meanwhilee
explained that she is determined
to eliminate these factors under
the swift justice initiative -
designed to facilitate the speedy
and efficient disposal of crimi-
nal matters.
"Our Swift justice team will
ensure that these factors do not
become endemic to the system
of justice in the Bahamas," Min-
ister Maynard-Gibson said.
"Significant steps will be tak-
en to address some of these
issues."
Officials are hoping to analyse
the entire list by the end'of
August to determine which cas-
es can in fact proceed to trial.
Officials say the Judiciary has
agreed to appoint a.team to
reorder and classify the evidence
room.
Acting Director of Public
Prosecution, Cheryl Grant
Bethel meanwhile revealed that
of 28 matters scheduled to be
heard in the Supreme'Court,
between April and June, 18 werq-
tried and resolved.


FROM. page one Team to


U U


TENDER- GENERAL

INSURANCE 2006 - 2007

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) is
pleased to invite Tenders to provide the Company with
General Insurance. Policies include Money, Group Personal
Accident, Employers Liability, Public Liability, Open Marine,
Burglary and Fidelity Guarantee.

Interested companies/firms may collect a Tender Specification
from the Security's Desk located in the Administrative building
on John F. Kennedy Drive, between the hours of 9:00 a.m.
and 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Thi deadline for submission of tenders is on or before July
18 l, 2006 at 5:00pm. Tenders should be sealed and
marked "TENDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE" and
should be delivered to the attention of the Acting President
and CEC, Mr. Leon Williams


to' reject any, or all Tenders.


q V, 0 R L 0


I I


iml.Al q6-� M lWqqhlWJILJLImL%-w









THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006, PAGE 7B


COISPG


(__Tribune Comics

JUDGE PARKER
NO0 r AIIAI I CAN'T FOROET I VVA.' HURT RAND ACTUALLY, Il ...u-nL I E 4
/TH-JNS YOU S, - .IWED ATTCK- iEED EON


APARTMENT 3-G


BLONDIE


NON SEQUITUR


TIGER


CRYPTIC PUZZLE


ACROSS
1 Sells wood forth fire, Inally (5)
6 Good quality; share about
vth eam end (5)
9 An w eansconfusedby
a MuV(7)
10 Not ahamedto be n favourof a bit
of eudy (5)
SIn anden Rom, theywere
common (5)
12 Poi apart? Buzz off (5) .
13 Approbtionshown by more
spea-o (7)
15 JuIce of saraparilla (3)
17 Tray deign showing aesthetic
. enltvity (4)
18 Comlin abouthe beef? (6)
19 In hrd, being broks (5)
20 Bea uit(6)
22 Rig name for an academy (4)
24 Stil bit malay, lbu backward (3)
25 I'm ethical, but this is
sIply wrong (7)
26 More than aton weight? (5)
27 Black mark, perhaps, when a chap
gets out of line (5)
2n Mendelmohn's cat? (5)
21 Surrenders to a soldier with bad
vein" (5,2)
39 A motor may contain one,
just in case (5)
31 He goes to the club to have
a swim (5)


Yesterday's cryptic solutions
ACROSS: 3, W-h-ist 8, Relay 10, Pos-i-t 11, Far 12, S-LA-in
13, M-od-ic-um 15, Ke-VI-n 18, Nag 19, Medico 21,
Debased 22, Thor 23, Dive 24, De-bat-ed 26, Wan-Ted 29,
Cub(-ism) 31, Ste-l-n 32, Me-X-ican 34, Athos 35, Ton 36,
Ub.-RA 37, W-edge 38, A-lien
DOWN: 1, Def-O-e 2, Marine-R 4, H-elm 5, Spiked 6, Ton-
Ed 7, Civic 9, Lad 12, Sugared 14, CAB 16, VIVID 17,
Nove-L 19, Menaces 20, Stews 21, Do-n-ne 23, De-bit-ed
24, Dental 25, Tux 27, Attic 28, Ti-a-RA 30, Tango 32,
More 33, Cod


DOWN
2 Greater Elgar composition with a
rousing start (6)
3 Peevish as a Dwarf? (6)
4 Sorry about the publicity for the
leisure centre (3)
5 Delivered port to the Turk's Head (5)
6 Irascible but not tasteless (7)
7 Lies around being
insular (4)
8 Just the man to
prejudice things? (6)
12 Sadly, they could be a
wee bit peelle-wallle!(5)
13 Like a shrew who's been called-
mousy? (5)
14 Strong drink (5)
15 How can it be sweet when a uniform
Is in rags? (5)
16 Something afoot for
the cyclist (5) '
18 Guardian of wealth, but has he no
gem? (5)
19 As put in the sink, perhaps, or in
outer space (7)
21 He's in the phone book (6)
22 Ivanhoe's lady in a squabble with
another (6)
23 People rather like Dan? (6)
25 The man who came
to dinner (5)
26 An indication of good amid evil? (4)
28 Not really a bad lie? (3)


Yesieroay s easy solutions
ACROSS: 3, Trait 8, Refer 10, Robot 11, Tic 12, Depot 13,
Derided 15, Named 18, Ban 19, Dilate 21, Demonic 22,
Hurt 23, Seal 24, Refuses 26, Spires 29, Tot 31, Tenet 32,
Central 34, Cited 35, Log 36, Begun 37, Debit
38, Rally
DOWN: 1, Deter 2, Decibel 4, Reed 5, Ironic 6, Total 7,
Comet 9, Fir 12, Denotes 14, Dam 16, Makes 17,
Deltp 19, Diluted 20, Chest 21, Drain 23, Settler
24, Retina 25, Son 27, Peter 28, Recur 30, Magic 32, Cell
33, Rob


ACROSS
1 Musty (5)
6 Clever (5)
9 Bathroom (2,5)
10 Tasteless (5)
11 Stage whisper (5)
12 Ship's bed (5)
13 Dwells (7)
15 Wager (3)
17 Spoken (4)
18 Book (6)
19 Symbol (5)
20 Insult (6)
22 Mountain
range (4)
24 Number (3)
25 Master-of-
ceremonies (7)
26 Reverie (5)
27 Jewelled
headdress (5)
28 Understood (5)
29 Dress (7)
30 Foe (5)
31 Enquired (5)


.1 PNV WTGS1 IT. IF ll� A MtPR OUNT1RY, -lWO
COME MY PAP WASTO FAY O MANY SIUl."V


Contract Bridge c

By Steve Becker J

A Crucial Decision


North dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.
NORTH
4-
VAKJ110984


+107 2
+J 7 3
WEST
*QJ 1085
FQ 72
*63
4854


EAST
476432
V5
*9854
41092,


SOUTH
+AK9
V63
*AKQJ
+AK Q6
The bidding:
North East South West
4 V Pass 4 NT Pass
5 Pass 5 NT Pass
6 + Pass 7 NT
Opening lead - queen of spades.

Some hands stand or fall on one
key decisiofi, and declared is best
advised in such cases to delay that
decision until the last possible
moment. South failed to do that in
this deal when he impetuously went
down in an ice-cold grand slam.
West led the queen of spades, and
it was immediately apparent to
declarer that the outcome would
hinge:on how he fared in hearts.
Having learned that with nine


cards of a suit missmg four to the
queen, it was better to play for the
drop of the queen rather than attempt
a finesse, South won the spade lead
and all too hastily cashed the A-K of
hearts to go down one, losing a spade
trick at the end.
Declarer was extremely remiss
when he plunged headlong into tack-
ling the hearts in this fashion. With
12 sure tricks in sight - two spades,
two hearts, four diamonds and four
clubs - there was no need to make
the crucial decision in hearts so early
in the play.
Upon winning the sparde lead
with the king, he should have played
a heart to the ace and then cashed
four clubs and the A-K-Q of dia-
monds to produce this position:
North
V K J 109


West
SJ 10
Q07


East
4764
+9


( Calvin &_H_


I 'TIN NE PRIK AL
15A/kS UX5q


Triburw,

Horoc,'


WEDNESDAY,
JUNE 28

ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20
You've been the recipient of great
rewards, but that doesn't stop you
from putting in continuous effort. This
week you are ready and raring to meet
any challenge that comes along.
TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21
You hate being crass, but someone
owes you and you want them to pay
up. Finances are tight,, so be sure to
budget for those emergency situations
that always pop up.
GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 '
Let someone else do the driving
right. now, Gemini. Sit in the back
seat, relax and enjoy the ride. You
deserve a nice break to watch the
scenery go by.,
CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22
You're flattered by someone's atten-
tion, but their intensity might make
you a bit self-conscious. Don't
underestimate how fabulous you are.
Bask in it a while.
LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23
This week is right for one of your
famous expressions of personal
warmth. Your willpower can over-
come any negativity that comes your
way. Share the weakh with others.
VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22
You have to learn that there are some
people who are dragging you down,
Virgo. Cat these people free and save
your energy for those who really care
about you.
LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23.
This week will be a breeze, Libra.
Friends are prevalent, there is no
shortage of activities to keep you
busy, and all eyes are on you. Turn
up the music and have fun.
SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22
Your boss has been on your back
and won't leave you alone. Since
you've been doing your job well,
more has been added to your plate.
Speak up before stress sets in.
SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21
Your spirits are good this week,
Sagittarius, and so is your luck.
See if you can upgrade it even
more. Capitalize on your good
fortune at work and with friends.
CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
You'll need a bit of humor to get you
through this murky week. Expect it to
offer a hum-drum series of events.
See if friends can help pull you
through. Things will look better.
AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
It's time to accept that that list, of
plans needs an urgent revision. New
prospects have made changes essen-
tial. You will be happy with the
results, Aquarius.
PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20
Your life is a bit chaotic, so retreat to
the background and use the noise
and confusion to. assess things.
Later, you'll emerge looking great.


South
+A9
V 6
*J
The lead of the jack of diamonds
at this point would have destroyed
West Whatever he discarded, South
would score the rest of the tricks.
Guessing whether or not to finesse in
hearts would not have entered the
picture at all.


TARE


HOW many words of
four letters or more
the letters shown 'F
here?In making a
word, eacdletter may
be used once only.
Each must contain the
centre letter and there
must be at least one MI M
nine-letter word. No
plurals or verb forms
ending in "s", no words with initial capitals and no
words with a hyphen or apostrophe permitted.
The first word ofa phrase is permitted (e.g. inkjet
in inkjet printer).
TODAY'S TARGET
Good 23; very good 34; excellent 46. "
Solution tomorrow.


DOWN
2 Cashier (6)
3 Pulse (6)
4 Finish (3)
5 Melodies (5)
6 Post (7)
7 . Network (4)
8 Regain (6)
12 Produced (5)
13 Criticise (5)
14 Material (5)
15 Brass instrument (5)
16 Anxious (5)
18 Poison (5)
19 Treatment (7)
21 Military urnt (6)
22 Horrifies (6)
23 Extol (6)
25 Man-made
waterway (5)
26 Small drink (4)
28 Beverage (3)


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Thomas Nixon v Alvar Kangur,
Cambridge v Oxford, Royal
Automobile Club 2006. The
varsity match is the chess
world's longest running annual
fixture, staged every year apart
from during the world wars
since 1873. Its 2006 renewal
was sumptuously hosted at the
RAC with support from the
Vantis accountancy group and
banker Henry Mutkin.
Cambridge looked like winning
for almost the entire match until
the final half-hour when today's
position occurred on top board.
Cambridge's Nixon is three
pawns up so should win barring
accidents, but he became
worried about Black's intended
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TRIBNE SORTSWEDNSDA, JUE 28 200,PPAET9


Agassi wins

first match

at last

Wimbledon
U TENNIS
WIMBLEDON, England
Associated Press
WHEN Andre Agassi
stepped out Tuesday for
the first match of his final
Wimbledon, he lingered a
moment, taking in the rau-
cous standing ovation.
All the applause and
whistles and hoots of good
will got to him, so much so
that Agassi played an
awful opening set before
righting his racket and
beating 71st-ranked Boris
Pashanski of Serbia 2-6, 6-
2;,6-4, 6-3.
"To feel that sort of sup-
port - it just meant the
world to me. I just wanted
to do 'em proud," Agassi
said. "So I got a little ner-
vous about trying too hard
early, overhit a lot. Took
me awhile to settle down."
Long a crowd favorite,
he's drawing extra interest
and adulation this fort-
night. He missed Wimble-
don the past two years
with injuries, and, more
significantly, he
announced Saturday he'll
retire after the U.S. Open.
That made Agassi the
focal point at the All Eng-
land Club on a day filled
with all manner of matches
-thanks to rain Monday
tliat;permitted only about
30 minutes of play. With
bits of blue sky peering
out between the clouds on
Day 2, fans wandered the
grounds to sneak peeks at
star players everywhere.
Among the winners
were three-time defending
champion Roger Federer,
1997 champion Martina
Hingis, and Grand Slam
champions Rafael Nadal,
Marat Safin, Justine
Henin-Hardenne and Kim
Clijsters.
- Federer completed a 6-
3, 6-2, 6-2 victory over.
Richard Gasquet for his
42nd win in a row on grass,
breaking Bjorn Borg's
record set in 1976-81.
"It's nice, isn't it?" said
Federer, who next faces
four-time semifinalist and
local favorite Tim Hen-
man. "To get any streak is
obviously nice. I'm still
going, so even better."
Federer worked only 37
minutes Tuesday; he led 6-
3, 1-2 when action was sus-
pended Monday. Hingis,
Swho won Wimbledon at
age 16 in 1997, also took a
one-set lead into Tuesday,
and she polished off Olga
Savchuk of Ukraine 6-2, 6-
2. Hngis hadn't played at
Wirnbledon since 2001; she
was off the tour for three
years because of assorted
foot and ankle injuries
before coming back full
time in January.
Agassi pame to Wimble-
don having played one
match the past three
months because of back
problems; he also missed
the Australian Open with
an ankle injury.
When he won the first of
his eight Grand Slam titles
Sat Wimbledon 14 years
"- ago, he beat Boris Becker
in the quarterfinals, John
McEnroe - yep, that John
McEnroe - in the semifi-
nals, and Goran Ivanisevic
in the final. Agassi was 22
at the time, reveling in his
rebelliousness.
Now he's married to
Steffi Graf, is a father of
two - 4-year-old son
Jaden strung together the
necklace Agassi wore on
court Tuesday - and
emblematic of the tennis
establishment. Plus, he's
Splaying guys he's never
S- heard of.
- - Pashanski is 23, had nev-
er played at a major until
this year, and was the one
on court with a hat turned
-> backward Tuesday. Agassi
:. is 36-and looked it for
" moments, particularly near
the end, with an extra


hitch in his step.
"You could see that he
is not really moving
great," Pashanski said.
At the final changeover,
Agassi leaned forward in
his chair, stretching his
bothersome back.
"I've had years where I
felt better; sort of don't
want to harp on any of the
negatives," he said. "This
is a challenge for me in
- more ways than I probably
ever communicate."


Big guns


in


the


advance


World


Cup


French find form

to defeat Spain
SPAINISH goalkeeper Cauillas front right. and team-
mate Sergio Ramos 15) react atler France's Patrick
'Vieira scored during the second hall' of thlle Spain is.
France World Cup Round of1 16 %occer malch al the
World Cup stadium. Tueda.. June 27. 2006. in
Hanover, Gennanm. France "on 3-1 to sel up a quarter-
final tie with Brazil.


* 144-


44 44 ~.
- . .


1*-


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WEDNESDAY, JUNE,28,2006, PAGE 9B


TRIBUNE SPORTS


Ile


COO,




The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00458
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: June 28, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:00458

Full Text







"THINK M
SWEET"


HIGH 90F
LOW 77F

CLOEDS,UN
C~~T-co~


Volume: 102 No.179


The


Tribune


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION



BAh HAiami EDITIONral
BAHAMAS EDITION


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006


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3u" A, ,3i T


is


Sears seeks bishop to


help in negotiations


By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
NEGOTIATIONS between
the Bahamas Union of Teachers
and the government have dimin-
ished to I he point that a religious
mediator has been called in to
ease tensions.
Speaking at his ministry's head
office late yesterday, Minister of
Education Alfred Sears revealed
that after execute es from the
BUT walked out of their latest
negotiations on Friday night (ear-
ly Saturday morning) he opted to
phone Bishop Neil Ellis to ask
him for his help.
"When they walked out of the
meeting at 1.45am I took it upon
myself to-call one of our minis-
ters, I called him because I felt
That it was that urgent. I called
'.Bishop Neil Ellis. I apologized
for waking him at that time in the
morning and I asked him for his
intervention, because I know that
he was helpful with respect to the
BEC and the Electrical Workers
Union.
"We spoke with him at about
2am and we asked him if he could
meet us at 8am on Saturday
morning. So this is 2am Saturday
and we asked him to come and
meet us here. We met with Bish-
op Ellis, briefed him, and asked
for his intervention as a mediator,
to see if he could speak to the
other side. I understand that there
have been some talks, and I am
hopeful that we will be able to sit
down once again very soon and
conclude this agreement." he said.
However the president of the
Bahamas Union of Teachers Ida
Poilier-Turnquest said that they
have not seen or spoken with
Bishop Ellis. In fact, Mrs Poiti-
er-Turnquest said that she had
"no idea" what Mr Sears was


talking about.
"There has been no talks. Not
one call not anything that I
know of. No contact whatsoever.
As of this hour, which is 7pm on
June the 27th, I have not heard
from Bishop Ellis," she said.
During the press conference
Mr Sears said that the negotia-
tions are still in the hands of the
government and the BUT, and
that they only asked for a "small
intervention" from Bishop Ellis
for this particular stage.
"We asked for the intervention.
for a particular stage to help low-
er the temperature, to see if we
can reach some appreciation of
what the issues are. We will be
speaking with the union to see if
we can get back around the
table," he said.
Admitting that they did walk
out of their negotiations, Mrs
Poitier-Turnquest said she did
not believe government was pre-
pared to negotiate.
She said the union was on "red
alert" but would not expand on
what exactly the heightened alert
precaution could entail.
However, she did say that they
have encouraged their teachers
not to complete any final term
report cards, or participate in the
distribution of them on National
Report Card Day (tomorrow).
She also explained that the union
* is discouraging its teachers from
attending any of the Ministry of
Education's workshops, summer
school programmes or teacher
development courses.
"The BUT has made their
offer. It is now time for the gov-
ernment to make a counter
offer," she said. "We are not mov-
ing from our stance. Do you real-
SEE page seven


0 THE former 'Sea Gardens', a site


which has been the focus of the Bahamas
Environmental Science and Technology
Commission (BEST).
..(Phoo: Mario Duncanson/
(Photo Tribune stq#ff)


* By KAHMILE REID


KERZNER International's pending
development of the proposed golf course
on Athol Island will increase the land mass
by 35 acres and erase a part of Bahamian
history in the process, according to envi-
ronmental activist and Re-Earth director
Sam Duncombe.
* "They are erasing a part of our history
and there are sponges, coral and fish in
this area that they want to fill in, that is
really the biggest issue," said Ms Dun-
combe.
Declared a protected marine reef in


S .' ..,'. A .. I -
:;'*' ,** i5,7

' a S


1892. Athol Island created history in being
the first marine sanctuary in the world.
however the continuation of Phase IIl of
Atlantis' original design will erase this piece
of Bahamian history, she said. However, if
Kerzner International has its way the Athol
Island National Marine Park will be no
more, she said.
The development, scheduled to begin by
the end of the year, has already been
appro\ ed by government and will be built
on the former "Sea Gardens", a site which
has been the focus of the Bahamas Envi-
ronmental Science and Technology Com-
mission (BEST).


'Social discomfort
between Bahamians
of differing races'


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
A HISTORY of resentment,
class divisions and insecurity has
for years contributed to the
social discomfort between
Bahamians of differing races.
Many Bahamians rely on
stereotypes, assumptions and
stories told by their parents to
determine how they relate to
persons of another race. This
coupled with the fact that most
debate on race issues in the
country occurs, in the last place
it should, on the stage of parti-
san politics, widening whatever
divide between black and white
there may be.
Whatever the reason for the
existence of this divide, educa-
SEE page two


* GRAND Bahama Port Authority CEO Sir Albert Miller, and
chairman Hannes Babak met with lawyers, bankers, and accoun-
tants in Grand Bahama to share their new vision for the Port Author-
ity at the Our Lucaya Resort on Tuesday. Mr Babak and Sir Albert
are seen speaking to the media following the meeting.
(Photo: Denise Maycock)

Freeport could be set for

two major investments


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
FREEPORT Two new
major investments for Freeport
could be announced in the next
two weeks, Grand Bahama
Port Authority executives
Hannes Babak and Sir Albert
Miller announced Tuesday.


Since the appointments of
Mr Babak and Sir Albert as
chairman and CEO, respec-
tively, two major investments
totalling $23 million in
Freeport were recently
announced over the last sever-
al days.
Nassau businessman James
SEE page seven


.1


Ecologist and research associate from
the Cambridge Coastal Research Unit,
Mark Spalding told the Tribune earlier this
month that the Sea Gardens were protect-
ed in 1892 from which time it was illegal to
"dredge for or remove by any means coral,
sea fans, or other marine thereupon grow-
ing, lying or being in the area". This act
was, however, rescinded in 1986 in an
amendment to the Fisheries Act.
The proposed golf course will be creat-
ed by filling 35 acres on the south side of
SEE page seven


Team to list
'all outstanding
criminal matters'
M By ROYANNE
FORBES-DARVILLE
WHILE the backlog of court
cases persists. Attorney General
Allyson Maynard-Gibson yester-
day announced the appointment
of a team to produce a compre-
hensive list detailing "all out-
standing criminal matters."
-"This list is critical to the effec-
tive administration of Justice,"
Minister Maynard-Gibson said
during a press briefing on swift
justice, held at her office.
"It will enable a true assess-
ment to be made as to the state of
affairs in the criminal courts and
an accurate assessment to be
made as to the resources neces-
sary to deal with the matters."
The list will contain matters set
for preliminary inquiry, matters
where the preliminary inquiry is
in progress; matters where the
preliminary inquiry is complete,
the transcript on file and matter
ready for trial, matters where the
preliminary inquiry is complete
and the transcripts are not yet on
SEE page seven


A A A A 3,, IIAPE


I














Public speaks on racial issues.:


THE Bahamas as a whole is
made up of a number of mul-
tiracial and multicultural soci-
eties.
According to the Depart-
ment of Statistics' Living Con-
ditions survey done in 2001,
89 per cent of the country's
population is made up of
Bahamians, leaving the other
11 per cent to be of foreign
descent.
With this in mind The Tri-
bune took to the streets yes-


terday, to ask the Public their
views on "Racial Issues in the
Bahamas."


Most persons interviewed
believed strongly that there
are some racial issues in the
country, mainly in office envi-
ronments.
Others didn't think the
racial issues are as prominent
as some make them out to be
and some went so far as to say
"it doesn't impact society sig-
nificantly."

History

Vicar of Christ Church
Cathedral Michael Gittens
said: "There are some race
issues here, but I don't think
it's as bad as we make it out to
be. It's there, it's even in our
history. Although you do have
some persons that make more
of it to cover for their own
inadequacies."
"I think there is always an
issue between Bahamians
and most foreigners," com-
mented one Bahamian. "We
are always afraid of the
unknown. There are also


FROM page one

tor, social commentator and
Bahamian author Patricia Glin-
ton-Meicholas, said that there is a


* MICHAEL Gittens said:
"There are some race issues
here, but I don't think its as
bad as we make it to be."


racial barriers in the business
world, mainly in corporate
sectors."
Jason Evans said: "Yes, I
think that there are race
issues in the country, but it's
more of a class issue as well."
Some races, he said, can
migrate to the Bahamas and
find better jobs than others
because of small factors like
skin colour. "It's still ulti-
mately a class issue, it's how
we perceive foreigners in
some cases. The lighter your
skin is the more money you
have, it's just the way some
of us think."
. "There has always been a
growing issue between


need for persons to always
"beware of a simple explanation
for anything".
"I always feel that you should
look at several possible expla-
nations because there are many
things contributing to that sepa-
ration but there is still some of
the separation based on notions
of skin colour," she said. "It has
always been in modern times
very quiet in the Bahamas.
There are no signs saying that
you cannot come into a club or
that sort, but there are a lot of
issues."
This level of discomfort
between the races, Mrs Glinton-
Meicholas, said is quite natural
because of history even if a per-
son hadn't lived it.
"There are echoes of it all
around you.. Now and again
someone in the papers would
bring up history, especially dur-
ing election time so that there
is always this discomfort and the
rest of the world comes in on
you, so there is always this sense
of discomfort, especially for
whites who are a real minority in
numbers.
"I heard my parents talking
about active discrimination, but
even they had no kind of anti-
white thing going on but had a
great sense of self-possession
and a sense that they had just as
much right as anyone else to be
here although some may'have
been stupid enough to try and
keep them away from what is
owed to them as Bahamians,"
Mrs Glinton-Meicholas said.
Mrs Glinton-Meicholas point-
ed out that in the Americas
there had been imposed a sepa-
ration of races from early on
because the whole economy in
these areas after the "discovery"
of the New World involved the
introduction of a variety of racial
groups, obviously the most
salient of which was that of
Africans brought here to work
the plantations.
"When you look at that eco-
nomic base you already suppose
superiority/inferiority because
,at the least lethal level you have
a supervisor and those who are
supervised but we know that it
went deeper than that. We had
owner and people owned and so
there is that great separation
that is imposed and made legal
and has all kinds of control
incorporated in society to have it
stay that way," she said.
On August 1, 1834, all slaves
in the British Empire were
emancipated, but still indentured
to their former owners in an
apprenticeship system which was
finally abolished in 1838.
Only then did this end a sys-
tem which had for centuries
imposed notions of inferiority
and superiority connected to
skin colour.
Mrs Glinton-Meicholas
explained that the baggage that
came with this system of slavery
and ownership obviously did not
provide blacks and whites the


* KENVA Sands said: "In
some cases we have race issues
on jobs and sometimes it's just
our perception."


Bahamians and Haitians," said
M. Dawkins. "Even more so
now after the malaria scare. I
feel it's mostly because some
Bahamians feel like they are
trying to take over."
Kenva Sands said: "In
some cases we have race
issues on jobs and sometimes
it's just our perception.
You'd sometimes find per-
sons of different persuasions
other than Bahamians, being
promoted to executive posi-
tions and Bahamians are not
being promoted," she con-
tinued. "Otherwise we don't
have any racial issues, unless
some people perceive it that
way."


opportunity to
relate to one another or share
% ith one another.' .' -. -
If the race problems of the
1800s seem too far removed
,from the present date to explain
why there is still that divide, one
cannot forget that less than 40
years ago the Bahamas still
wrested with the issue of insti-
tutionalised segregation and the
growing pains leading up to
majority rule.
"Majority rule is a very recent
date and until that time you had
the same notions of inferiority
and superiority connected to
skin colour carried forward into
modern times because of minor-
ity rule and that minority hap-
pened to be white and the
majority happened to be black.
"So because of that you are
not in the habit of socializing
together. Added on top of that
the vast majority of the black
people would fall into a certain
socio-economic category and I
would think that the majority of
whites fall into another," Mrs
Glinton-Meicholas said.
However, many have
remarked that with the ugliness
of the system pre-majority rule
in the Bahamas is still within liv-
ing memory, it is remarkable
that the Bahamas is as integrat-
ed as it is.
This, she said, is due to the
insouciance that Bahamians had
to develop in order to survive in
the "bad old days".
There is a temptation for
some Bahamians to identify
with the struggle of black Amer-
icans of that era, but Mrs Glin-
ton-Meicholas said that while
some things may be valuable for
black Bahamians to take some-
thing from the experience of
black America, both groups do
not share the same pathology.
"How can they? The whole
development of it was quite dif-
ferent and you will notice, for
me personally, with some black
Americans you always feel a
sense of guilt that I am not feel-
ing this great burden they feel
and don't have the same com-
plaints.
"The dissolution of the plan-
tation system came far earlier
(in the Bahamas) than happened
in the States and was less well
organised. That along with the
isolation of the islands made
people less able to keep a social


* JASON Evans said: "Yes, I
think that there are race issues
in the country, but its more of
a class issue as well."


N M Dawkins said: "There
has always been a growing
issue between Bahamians and
Haitians."


hierarchy based


on race.
"If you read the account of
the plantation on San Salvador
you will see that they. tried very
hard to keep that separation, but
when you are very poor and the
plantation is not in the best
shape it is difficult to keep the
kind of strict hierarchy that you
would have seen in the great
plantations in the Southern
United States," Mrs Glinton-
Meicholas said.
However, despite all this, she .,
said, Bahamians are still afraid
to speak about race for fear of'
being labelled racist.
There are many who feel that
the Bahamas has never had the
benefit of a sincere dialogue on
race or racism which afforded
blacks the opportunity to ask
questions and heal the hurt, par-
ticularly of those who lived dur-
ing the tumultuous period lead-
ing up to majority rule. Nor did
whites receive the opportunity
to address the hurt they may
have experienced during the
fiery political climate of the day.
Nevertheless, Mrs Glinton-
Meicholas said that with every
new generation this "divide is"
lessening.
"I think because of the school
system and people going to
school more and more together
at a certain level, I think this
certainly is likely to improve
race relations," she said.
However, there may be anoth-
er divisive sociological phenom-
enon creeping quickly into
Bahamian society which will cre-
ate another divide social class
and economics.
"That will have black Bahami-
ans on both sides of the divide.
In New Providence you have
enclaves of local whites, the
majority of black people still live
over the hill, but you have had
the development of new subdi-
visions, the expensive ones for
the nouveau riche, and you see'*'.
that separation of class arising J
and now you have to look and s
decide is this only a matter of
race or skin colour or is this a
thing of class coming in here?
"There is a huge element of
class that you see exhibited
among those who seem better
off, even by the schools children
attend, there is that separation,
you tend to go where your
friends are, this is where you
socialize," Mrs Glinton-Mei-
cholas said.


i-
-









PAYo





AVOID RAYEPOSSESSIN


AVOID REPOSSESSION


..................... ...... ...... ................... .......... ... .................. ............................... ....................................................................................................... .................................. ................. ......


PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006


THE TRIBUNE








THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006, PAGE 3


o In brief

Kozeny
lawyers to
mount final

defence

LAWYERS for Viktor
Kozeny are expected to mount
one last defence for the Czech-
born investor in late July before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel gives
a final ruling in his extradition
case.
Kozeny's lawyers are expect-
ed to return to court on July 25
with a final defence to avoid his
extradi on to the United States.
Last ,veek Magistrate Bethel
dismissed charges of money
laundering against Czech-born
investor Viktor Kozeny, stating
that she was not satisfied that
those acts for which the US had
indicted him constituted the
offence under Bahamian law.
Kozeny's lawyers will now
have to argue against the more
than 20 bribery charges still
against the investor.
Kozeny, 43, was arrested at
his Lyford Cay home on Octo-
ber 5, 2005, just a few hours
before being indicted on a long
list of bribery and money laun-
dering charges in the US Dis-
trict Court in Manhattan. He
has been on remand at Fox Hill
prison since October 7 last year
having been denied bail. His
lawyer Philip "Brave" Davis
again brought up the issue of
bail yesterday. However, bail is
still being withheld.
Kozeny is accused of being
the driving force behind a mul-
ti-million dollar bribery scheme
which sought to corrupt Azer-
baijan officials so as to gain a
controlling interest in that coun-
try's state owned oil company
SOCAR during its privatization
process in the early 1990's. The
Czech investor is charged with
conspiracy to violate the US
Foreign Corrupt Practices Act
(FCPA) which makes it an
offence to offer to pay, or to
pay, foreign government offi-
cials in order to gain or retain
business.

tName of

hit-and-run

victim is

released

POLICE have released the
identity of the elderly woman
who was struck down and killed
ii a hit and run accident over
the weekend.
According to reports, around
10.30 Friday night a Honda
vehicle travelling north on
Montrose Avenue hit 60-year-
old Emily Pierre, a resident of
the ar, .
Pierre was taken to hospital
where she later died of her
injuries.
Pierre is the country's twenty-
second traffic fatality this year.
The incident is still being inves-
tigated, according to police
press liaison officer Walter
Evans.

Hanged
detainees
'passed

exam'

CUBA
Guantanamo
. -THREE Guantanamo Bay
detainees who hung themselves
in their cells received psycho-
logical exams only days prior to
their suicides and showed no
signs of being depressed, a mil-
itary doctor s-aid Tuesday,
according to Associated Press.
The doctor suggested the
exams, performed one to two
weeks before the June 10 sui-
cides, supported assertions by
military officials that the pris-
oners killed themselves as a
political act.
"None had showed any signs
of being depressed or having a


mental condition," said the doc-
tor, who is the medical officer in
change of the remote US.prison
on Cuba's southeastern tip.
The three detainees two
Saudis and a Yemeni were
given psychological exams as a
formality because they had
recently participated in a
hunger strike, including one
who refused meals for 180 days.


TROICA
EXTERINAR
FOR PEST PO LEM
PHNE I 2 25


Fabulous Shopping


at
A 'OND'

ISON DECOR


THE l R'Tl'CHARD DESIGN GROIUTP


* A VIEW of the lightning storm which broke off the coast of Nassau on Monday night



Decrease in drug



arrests may be due



to route alteration


* By KAHMILE REID
THE decreasing number of
drug-related arrests are not
necessarily a cause of celebra-
tion, according to
Assistant Commission-
er of Police Reginald
Ferguson.
In an interview with
The Tribune yesterday,
he said the reduction
may not be due to the
efforts of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force,
but to drug traffickers
altering their routes.
"There is a fall off in
drug activity in that
they change route.
When they find that
law enforcement is
effective in an area,
they switch to other
routes" Mr Ferguson
explained.
Since the start of the
year until May 31, the
number of drug- relat-
ed arrests have
amounted to 626, in the N RE
same period last year
it was 718.
"You may find that we have
less arrests and seize more
drugs".
Over the years the Family
Islands have been a target
alternative location for drug


traffickers. This is mainly due
to their isolation.
"The isolation of Family
Islands sometimes contribute
to trafficking in that they find


GINALD Ferguson


these isolated cays, coves et
cetera. In order to do their
operation, however, eventual-
ly they come to the more pop-
ulated areas," Mr Ferguson
said.


Earlier this year, it was esti-
mated that 150 million worth
of marijuana was being culti-
vated and that some Family
Islands were host to more
than 14,000 marijuana
plants.
In February, 12,000
marijuana plants were in
found in Eleuthera, and
in January, 2,000 plants
were found in Andros.
According to police,
Marijuana in the
Bahamas has a street val-
ue of $1,500 to $2,000 per
pound, and since the
country is a transit point,
upon reaching the US
these figures usuallyl,
increase.
Despite the fact-that
police efforts may not be
the reason for the arrests
decreasing, officers still
work very hard, using all
possible tactics includ-
ing undercover agents -
to combat drug traffick-
ing.
According to Mr Fer-
guson, "when your are
fighting crime, you utilise
whatever tactic is legally per-
mitted in this territory, going
undercover is one ot these tac-
tics. If the scenario requires it,
then our intelligence will advise
us accordingly."


Symposium to focus on


raising male achievement


* By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
TO raise awareness and the
focus on a number of issues
relating to men, mainly vio-
lence, conflict resolution, and
health, the Catholic Archdio-
cese of Nassau will hold a
"Men and Boys Symposium"
tomorrow at Loyola Hall on
Gladstone Road.
Starting at 6.30pm the event,
which was initiated by the men
of St Francis Men's Associa-
tion, is open to the public.
Archbishop Patrick Pinder
said that it is far too easy to
find examples of under-
achievement in men.
"When we look around us
we see so many themes that
speak of the underachieve-
ment of men, so we know
there is a need for us to place
some emphasis on this matter.
It is not just the question of
the academic achievement. We


look around and we so often
see those who are achieving in
academics are the girls and the
women, and we realise that
there is definitely some imbal-
ance here.
"On the other side we look
and we see that so much of the
violent crimes in our commu-
nity are being perpetrated by
the men, and even in some cas-
es the.boys. So we certainly
need to address this question
of men and boys in our com-
munity. It is a very significant
issue, a very importance issue
to the life of our community
as a whole," he said.
The archbishop continued:
"We have to think carefully
about our self understanding
of the church. We don't simply
exist for our own existence.
The church really has a Gospel
to proclaim, and an important
aspect of that Gospel has to
do with the living of the faith.
"The living of the faith real-


ly has to connect with growing
the common good. And the
common good really has to do
with the quality of life in our
community. And if the quality
of life in our community is
being impacted by the under-
achievement of men, certainly it
is a matter we have to look to
with great seriousness, and
something we have been look-
ing to with great seriousness,"
he said.


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Tel: 323-6145 Fax: 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121
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June 30th



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Including: clothes, household goods
(linens, kitchen things), books, CD's,
golf clubs, handbags, jewelry
...and much more!


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE






~!!:UNU5UAY, JUNL 25, 2UUb ifltz fl-IIbUNL


1L,. EDIOR AULTTES T HEEITOR6


IN I llIS colunm yesterday we said that if,
as (4m{i-ed, to ety,'>nd that this is the society from which our
police lIocu ic K uing recruited, then a strong
outside inlluncite is needed to point these
recruits in a new direction.
The tend in the ('aribbean, which is
plagued %w ith the same local problems as the
Bahamas. i, n,1,. looking to London's Met-
ropolitan Police tor help.
Commissioner of Police Paul Farquhar-
son, a fine *ole model and strong commis-
sioner. who is presently investigating com-
plaints "irho: l!h' public, is determined to root
out the bad applhs in his force.
We do no' know his feelings on the matter
of foreign recruitment, but, as do many
Bahamians. '. -:think he needs help outside
help from well disciplined, experienced police
officers.
No longer can' we turn to the Caribbean for
recruitment.
This is the m.iic from which many of our
policemen were drawn, particularly from Bar-
bados. Howe\ er, even Barbados is in trouble
and has now turned to Britain for help,
because crime has also overwhelmed its local
force.
It is throumit such recruitment that the
Pindling name took root in the Bahamas. Sir
Lvnden': ftlihe was a police recruit from
Jamaica.
What is needed in the Bahamas at this
time are policemen with no ties to the com-
munity no ma. pa, brothers, sisters, cousins
or friends t', lean on them for favors and
protection.
In other words no one to quietly "fix
things" when they cross the law.
We recall with amusement years ago when
a young sltfT member would remind her fel-
low workers wOhenever they annoyed her of
how nman; uncles she could call in from the
force to t[atk' c a'le of them.
Needles's to 's v she is no longer with The
Tribune.
Foreign oi ;.'is. who have no axe to grind,
no lav-t ,'it ;! and nothing to fear, are
needed in office to make' c. retain that no complaints fall
between the chr;i'ks and no case files disap-
pear.
The ('ommi :sionier will have to reinforce
the cc; ::Ih book.
I1he ito i -.n ficers would serve their time
and retlu! n In Eingland, having set an example


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of discipline and integrity, leaving no trail of
having been in anyone's pocket.
We recall the days when members of the
public were afraid to give so much as a Christ-
mas gift to a serving officer. Today, gifts are
not only given, but letters from members of
the force soliciting donations for certain pro-
jects are written. All of this is proper if done
with the approval of the Commissioner, but
today how much of this slips under the radar
of propriety?
Taking an officer to lunch or dinner was
also against the rules as it was open to mis-
interpretation.
It would be helpful to both sides if the
Commissioner would take out the rule book
and let both public and serving officer know
what is allowed and what is frowned on. And
how each side should treat the other.
We recall when The Tribune and Radio
Station 100 JAMZ, supported by the public,
donated bullet proof vests for the police force.
We wanted to find the best vests on the mar-
ket for our men.
However, we ran into a few snags behind
the scenes when some persons within the
force were representing certain companies
and, of course, were pushing their products.
In what Bahamians disparagingly refer to as
"those nasty old colonial days" such prac-
tices were unheard of. Bahamian officers
would not dare entertain such ideas. Ask Sir
Albert Miller and Mr Conrad Knowles and
others of that era who can tell you what was
expected of an officer.
The Tribune has reported case files that
have disappeared in the past, persons who
have complaints that they cannot, no matter
how hard they try, get before the courts; per-
sons who cannot get legal representation
because of public figures involved. And the
list can go on and on.
And now we are faced with a future of
under-educated Bahamians; Bahamians who
can't make their school grades, yet are being
socially promoted up and out of the schools
without qualifications.
Young people, both girls and boys, who
are dabbling in drugs as 10 year olds, who by
the time they hit their teens will have a police
record.
Is this the level of citizens from which our
future police force is to be drawn?
The situation is serious. Now is the time to
come to grips with the problem and try to find
solutions.


Criticism of




newspaper's





editorial


Ihe Tribune Limited
I IIS AI)DICTUS.IURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
PcingR Hound to Swear to Ti'h Dogmas of No Master

I 1 .'(VN E. I/. DUPUCII, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

S!M ,.''IENNE DUPIUCII, K., O.B.E., K.M., KC.S.G.,
(lHon.) LLD., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

ll.EE1l'N DUPUCII CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
', ,n, 'l Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
.ichboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport f'ai: (242) 352-9348


Situation in Police Force serious


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I
I




I


For The lEditor's informa-
tion. if Mr Ward's sign was
excmipled from customs s
dutiess, ndcr Seaward's
"I leads of Agreement" with
the government, then it was
for liimi to l)rovidc the Let-
ter of Appioval to the Cus-
toms officer, who would have
kept tihe sign until Mr Ward,
or his Customs broker, sub-
mitted the proper entries to
Customs for processing.
The Uditor should know
that it is not enough for any-


ment project and automati-
cally get a waiver of all the
statue laws in place, govern-
ing work permits for foreign
workers and customs duties
on imports. It just doesn't
happen that way; notwith-
standing whose friend is who.
Your editorial, was an
unfair attack, in these
instances, on both Bahamas
Immigration. and Customs
and I condemn you for doing
so.
FORRESTER
CARROLL
Freeport,
Grand Bahama,
June 22, 2006.


EDITOR, The Tribune.
I CONDEMN The Editor
of The Freeport News, for
the unfair, sneak attack on
Bahamas Customs and Immi-
gration, in the paper's edito-
rial published on June 21,
2006.
Anyone reading this edito-
rial, would readily conclude
that this, somewhat, subtle
attack on Bahamas Customs
and Immigration, was moti-
vated, not by any particular
concern for the welfare of the
general public, but by some
other factors, more personal
in nature.
While it might be true that
Mr Ward's Seaward project
pales in comparison with the
Ginn Corporation's mega-
project at West End, Grand
Bahama, it is not true, I sub-
mit, that this is the reason for
Bahamas Immigralion
Department requiring the
two men accompanying Mr
Ward, to be issued tempo-
rary work permits before
being allowed to work in the
country; neither was it the
reason for Bahamas Customs
Department collecting Cus-
toms duties on the sign that
Mr Ward admitted bringing
with him.
If the Editor did not know
the facts, I am of the view
that as a journalist, he/she
ought to have availed, them-
selves of the right informa-
tion before "pen lashing"
those officers.
With respect to the Immi-
gration Department and the
two men in question applica-
tions should have been sub-
mitted to Bahamas Immigra-
'tion, prior to their arrival in
the country, requesting tem-
porary work permits. The
permits would have been
granted for a nominal fee. I
do this all the time, in con-
nection with my ship agency
business, for persons coming
into the country to perform
ship inspections, etc,
The Customs Department,
on the other hand. has no
authority, under law, to
waive Customs duties only
the Minister of Finance is so
empowered: hence the rea-
son for Mr Ward having to
pay the applicable Customs
duties on the sign he brought
with him. Customs officers
were not targeting Mr Ward,
I submit, as the editorial
comments seem to imply.


Do what tastes right:'


p! .,., ... -1 1*,


Fruition of dream at


graduation ceremony


EDITOR, The Tribune.
I EXTEND congratulation to Mr Fred Delancy, Mr Joseph
Fox, BTVI staff and graduating Class 2006, Freeport Grand
Bahama.
Sometime ago, I watched a TV programme on Cable 12. The
host was Dr Keith Wisdom and the former Governor General
Sir Clifford Darling was his guest. One of the pertinent things Sir
Clifford Darling noted was his desire to see more young Bahami-
an men equip themselves with at least two trade skills.
On Thursday, June 15, 2006, I witnessed the fruition to Mr
Darling's dream at BTVI (Freeport) graduation ceremony.
The keynote speaker was Parliamentary Secretary "Agatha
Marcelle".
She was dynamic in her speech and encouraged the graduation
class to strive on until they met their goals.
Those students were not the smartest in their academics at
their high school, .but their determination to excel were unprece-
dented. Mr Fred Delancy and Mr Joseph Fox took up the chal-
lenge to work with them and to make them respectable citizens
of our country.
Those young men in particular obtained their qualifications in
automobile mechanics, air-conditioning, carpentry, II and III
phase electrician, masons and welders; the list goes on.
I am therefore challenging the Ministry of Education, that if
these same classes are extended to our family islands, we can
have qualified workers in our islands.
This experience for us as parents was filled with joy and hap-
piness. One mother expressed herself as feeling as pic:d as a
peacock.
Again, special thanks to Mr Fred Delancy, Mr Josepbh .'-x,
staff and students of BTVI the Northern District.
May God continue to bless them as they strive in helping
our children fulfill. their dreams.

MANASSEH C
HEPBURN Sr
Freeport,
(irand Bahama,
.June 19. 2006.









Wendy's is now recruiting


Crew Members,


Cashiers &


Maintenance Staff


for all locations.


Iileresled persons should apply in person

al Any Wendy's Locations from

Wednesdayy June 28 to Friday, June 30

Between 9:00 a.m. to 12 noon

NlIusl be able to work shifts & weekends.

No phone calls please. L


!"V'I; WIt:-.UNL-5UAY, JUNt 2t, 2UUb


1 it 1 i I lbUNEL


.ok






THE TIBUNEWEDNSDAYJUNL 8,OCAL, NEWS


0 In brief

18-year-old

in serious

condition

after fight

FREEPORT An 18-year-
old resident of Pinder's Point
remains hospitalized in serious
condition after being struck in
the head with a cutlass during
an altercation over the week-
end in Freeport.
Kemeron Pinder was at Pizza
Hut Restaurant on the Mall
Road sometime around 9.30pm
when he was involved in a heat-
ed argument with another man,
who hit him several times in the
head with a cutlass.
Inspector Loretta Mackey,
assistant press liaison officer,
said Pinder was taken to Rand
Memorial Hospital, where he
was admitted to the male surgi-
cal ward.
Inspector Mackey said inves-
tigations are continuing into the
matter and police are searching
for the perpetrator who has
been identified in connection
with the matter.

Three-car

collision

puts woman

in hospital

FREEPORT A 49-year-old
woman is listed as "ill" in the
Intensive Care Unit following
a three-car collision on Satur-
day.
According to reports, the traf-
fic accident occurred sometime
around 3.20pm at the intersec-
tion of Pioneers Way and
Columbus Drive involving three
cars a silver 2002 Chevrolet
Cavalier licence 38849, driven
by George Duncombe, 33, of
Adventurer's Way; a 2001
Hyundai Accent licence 24338
driven by Ella Guarro of Sea-
horse Village; and a silver 1991
Isuzu Rodeo licence 6246 dri-
ven by Amy Watson, 29, of Sea-
, horse Village.
All three vehicles were exten-
sively damaged.
Ms Guarro and Ms Watson
were taken to Rand Memorial
Hospital, where Guarro was
treated and detained with seri-
ous head injuries, and Watson
was treated and discharged.
Inspector Loretta Mackey
said that as of Sunday after-
noon, Guarro was listed as "ill"
.in the Intensive Care Unit.
.Investigations are continuing
'into accident.


Share.

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Call us
on 322-1986 and share
your story.











WED. JUNE 28
2:00am Community Pg. 1540AM
8:00 Bahamas@Sunrise
9:00 Underdog Fun
9:30 Tennessee Tuxedo & His Tales
10:00 Da' Down Home Show
S11:00 Immediate Response
12:00n ZNS News Update
12:05 Immediate Respbnse Cont'd
1:00 Island Ufestyles
1:30 Inside Hollywood
2:00 The Fun Farm
3:00 Morning Joy
3:30 Ecclesia Gospel
4:00 Dennis The Menace
4:30 Carmen San Diego
4:58 ZNS News Update


5:00 Fun Farm
5:30 Treasure Attic
6:00 A Special Report
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
8:00 Eye On Health
9:00 Labour Speaks
9:30 BTC Connection
10:00 Caribbean Newsline
10:30 News Night 13
11:00. The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30 Comm. Pg. 1540 AM
SNT:N -V3rsre
th rgt. o ae.as int


Transit union says supplement



on traffic system was 'flawed'


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
PUBLIC Transit Association
Bahamas (PTAB) president Reuben
Rahming is claiming that the govern-
ment's recent supplement on a pre-
ferred model for the unification of the
bus system for New Providence, is
"exceedingly flawed".
At a press conference yesterday, Mr
Rahming said the government claimed
the supplement published in the Nas-
sau Guardian on June 21 was a "full
copy" of the preferred module.
However, he claimed, the supplement
was not a "true representation" of the


final Icporl issued to the industry.
, Mr RItahing pointed out two major
issues with I le contents of the supple-
ment.
In the final draft of the model, he
said, it was stated that: "It'is important
for government to hold minority shares
in the new company." It added that the
government should obtain 20 to 30 per
cent of the equity at no cost.
He claimed that after he made this
point publicly two weeks ago, four days
later the supplement was issued.
However, this point was omitted in
the supplement and replaced with:
"That government does not take up any
equity in the new bus company."


"Although we would accept that posi-
tion, if it is true, it can not officially be
accepted as true so long as it has not
been reflected or amended in docu-
ments presented to the industry to
date."
Mr Rahming also expressed concern
about a foreign consultant who is
preparing a business plan for the indus-
try. He claimed that industry personnel
have not been introduced to this con-
sultant, or provided any information.
"There is no way someone can create
a business plan for a company owner,
without consulting the owner; that is
something flawed," he said. "The
process that is being conducted here is


one in which it seems that the govern-
ment would go ahead and built a house,
then come to us and ask us what colour
to paint it and then say we had an
input into it.
"Yet we who have built this indus-
try through blood, sweat and tears, we
who are now second and third genera-
tion of transportation franchise hold-
ers are saying that we want to be a part
of the building and the renovation of
our industry, from the ground up, and
we want it to be done very transpar-
ently," said Mr Rahming.
Road Traffic Controller Jack Thomp-
son was not available for comment up
to press time.


Almost five years on, still no new Straw Market


* A WOODEN barrier being erected around the site in May last year. Today
little has changed behind the barrier.


* By KRYSTEL ROLLE
IT was almost five years ago
when the old straw market
burned to the ground and
straw vendors are still with-
out a permanent market.
In his 2006-2007 budget
contribution Bradley Roberts,
Minister of Works and Utili-
ties, made no significant
remarks about the straw mar-
ket. He said only: "The gov-
ernment has already com-
menced or will be carrying out
a number of other dredging
and construction projects,
including the Bay Street Straw
Market."
Although, in last year's bud-
get debate, he did state that


the government had allocat-
ed $2.7 million for the recon-
struction of the Bay Street
Straw Market.
A number of straw vendors
are concerned about how much
longer they will have to remain
in the temporary quarters pro-
vided for them by government
after September 2001 fire.
Some vendors say that not
enough "serious" improve-
ments have been made to the
old straw market site to give
them any indication that the
straw market will be rebuilt
anytime soon.
"I haven't seen any serious
changes to the site which
makes me believe that not
much is being done to build


* THE temporary Straw Market in use today


the new straw market," one
vendor said.
Over the years vendors have
complained about the heat that
continues to smother the mar-
ket, especially during the hot
summer months. They also
complain about the cramped
conditions and the lack of suffi-
cient rest rooms. The govern-
ment, and private sponsors,
have tried to improve condi-


tions for the vendors and
tourists by installing fans and
performing massive clean-ups,
but still provisions in the market
are not of the standard that ven-
dors want.
"I don't think anyone will be
totally happy with this market
because there is not much you
can do to improve it," another
vendor added. "The govern-
ment has done the best they can


do. We just need to relocate to
an environment that can afford
better conditions and I don't
think that will be possible until
the new straw market is built."
The new straw market, once
completed will be three stories
high with two mezzanines -
extended decks or patios. Con-
struction began last year with
work on the foundations.


PHOENIX WILSON
for a successful school year for making the Principal's
Award List and for skipping K5 and moving
on to grade one in September keep up the good work,
We Love You Honey,
from your Parents Marvin and MaryAnn, Bmrther
Marvin Jr.., Teacher Ms. Johnson
and Bread of Life Christian Academy.


MISSING DOG


Old Female Chow, spayed and with a shaved coat.
She is brown with a bald tip to her tail and
shrivelled ears. She is wearing a tick and chain collar.
Last seen on the night of Sunday 25th June.
Lost in the Camperdown Sans Souci area.
Any information on her whereabouts appreciated.
Reward offered.
Phone 324 7392 or 324 0134


WEDNESDAY, JUNE- 28, 2U006, HAUL 5 b


THE TRIBUNE




PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006


THE TRft


'Inadequate funding' of Defence Force



is blamed for immigration failures


INADEQUATE funding of
the Defence Force has been
blamed by the FNM as one of
many reasons that the PLP's
immigration policies are failing
the country.
In a statement released yes-
terday, the Opposition cited "a
gross inadequate budget for the
Defence Force" was responsi-


ble for its inability to discharge
its duties.
The party added that the
Defence Force could not rely'
on the PLP government for
funding for a seaworthy fleet.
and that the aircraft that is
meant for the enhancement oel
patrol and detection capabili-
ties remains parked and unused


a:l 11I alir '| .oil
I he I N's s itatiement comes
in lthe \'aLke of ;I highly putIN i
cisi'd crI. tldownv by inimigra-
lion Ministei Shiane Gibson in
l-h itilin comumuntl ilies
1i inuir. in the document
S,. kled lint under the PI P,
rip]ILi iati'in ot illegal immi-
grants haI decreased. In 201)2,
thie year \\lien FNM left office,
(>.357 illegals were repatriated.
I l i ,imi hcer lell to 4 642 in
ktu> J Ji 4 4 i 1 ti, ) -I 1 0
.Ltlo i ia >i ,.4. SUo til Lip to
May this year, it was 3,015.
lihe i'\ elinlent seeks to
hide its failure in immigration
behind a smoke screen of lies
and distortions," the statement
said
I he INM said that it left inl
place plans lor construction of a
new docking and holding facili-
ties that would enable immi-
,-.ralion authorities to hold
iniiilgrants detained at sea,


;.a -i-
. ''; ~ y --. .
i ,-.- .... 4
5A,,tSee~ ~ lg *
I ^ 'i^


SGUARDS patrol the detention centre

* GUARDS patrol the detention centre


rather than having to take them
to Nassau. However, according
to the statement, the PLP has
"failed to continue and to build
on the immigration policies left
in place by the FNM and now


attempting to mislead the pe<,
pie."
The statement added that I lie
-overcrowded detention centre
has frustrated security guard
and other security personnel


into sometimes responding
in.ippropli iatcly to emergencies
A,, a result. theie havr been
oui bhicakouts from the centre
inll lecent mnontlis.
'I he first breach was not con-
firmed by the government until
it aIs i vealed exclusively by
I lh' I ribuiine
I he statement added that
since May 2002 there has been
an obvious breakdown in the
"nir, minent ol nnouglil ilnii l\.ai
i ,h i, 01 I. 'I
inlllini lc lieud ii inI the phi,.) Cs
of immigration applications-
I. ('L, I l, I l I i h l k elI lIi .,i
C'ons sk i ing ill thesi- l.ctoi,.
no initiatives have been
launched to determine the need
in t lih loail economy for illegals
whose presence is pe mitted to
continue.
The FNM maintained: "The
government has utterly failed
I he Bahamian people in the
protection for our borders."


Bahamians are urged to take



precautions against the heat


4 4 Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa


Invites Application for the following positions.

One Household Manager
Applicant must have knowledge in Food & Beverage, Good
communication and supervisory skills, must be fully cognizant
of high domestic standards and the ability prepare gourmet
meals for special functions at least three years experience in a21
similar position would be an asset.

One Assistant Controller
Applicant must have a Bachelor Degree minimum of three
years experience in Hotel Accounting. Proven knowledge of
financial and operational management, strong communication
and supervisory skills

Cooks
Applicants are needed for the position of 1st. & 2nd. Level
cooks. Must Have proof of kitchen skills, flexible workings
hours.

Salary and other benefits commensurate with qualifications
and experience.

Resume' to cmajoreg)srb.sandals.com hand deliver or
faxed to 327-6961

Sandals Resort International is the leading Ultra All-inclusi 4,
Resort in the Caribbean. Seeks a FT Senior Internal Auditor
based in the Bahamas. Required to travel to surrounding
Caribbean Islands.
Candidate must possess CPA, CIA or equivalent, minimum of
years
Auditing preferably at a supervisory level. Sound knowledge
of Hotel Accounting & Cost Control an asset. Working
knowledge ofACL a plus. Excellent oral and written
communication skills. Send salary history with resume to:
mharding@srb.sandals.com


stroke dehydiation and sun-
burns.
, She said that heat exhaustion
is the most prevalent heat-relat-
ed illness in her practice. This
occurs when the body has not
had enough fluids and has diffi-
, lilt. )A i2 dow n and can
cause nausea and dizziness
On the othel hand, the hot
weather can cause involuntary
muscle spasms as a result of not
taking in enough fluid and the
body's inability to control its
temperature.
Dr Hanna said that these
spasms should not last longer
than an hour, and would be alle-
viated by resting and light mas-
sages.
However, a heat stroke is a
form of illness that can be "life-


threatening".
"This is actually when the
body is basically having a lot of
difficulty dealing with the heat
stress itself. The body's tem-
perature becomes very high,
usually higher than 104 degt c,_'
and the nornii l I' i
ature is 98.4 degi h. >sl
explained.
Veatrice Johnson, a nurse at
the Geriatric Hospital, said that
the number of fans have beeic
increased on both the wards and
the porch. They have also
increased the seniors' fluid
intake.
The American Red Cross
advises persons to follow se%
en simple guidelines to prec enl
becoming a victim of a heat
related illness:


Waii lightweight light
coloured clothing and wear hats
or use an umbrella.
Carry water or juice and
drink continuously, even if you
do not feel thirsty. Avoid alco-
hl ,nd o.,-iifuiL. which dehvy
SL..l. llidll lll..dl, .illUN U1 l illlM I.
ol0n. Avoid lhigi pioteliii toods
which increase meiliboli li eal
Avoid strenuous activities.
11 you miiit do strenuous activ-
ity, do it during the coolest part
of the da), usually between 4am
and 7ain.
Stay miduois when possible.
Take icgulai breaks when
engaged in physical activity.
A\,oid using salt tablets
unless directed to do so by a
physician.


TO THE 1IORLD


REDUCED RATES

FOR INTERNATIONAL CALLS



The Bahamas Telecommunications Company

Limited (BTC) is pleased to announce to the general
public and our valued customers that effective July

1st, 2006 all international calls will be reduced as
follows:


$ per minute or part thereof

0.47


0'.50


Caribbean (Except Cuba) 0.66

Cuba 0.85

All Other Countries 0.85


BTC thanks the public for their continued support
and we look forward to Connecting You To The

World.


Make the

SmartOhoice


J.,A


'.4
I'.


Si


2006 ESCAPE $30,874.00



FRIENDLY MOTORS LTD
THOMPSON BOULEVARD TEL.: 356-7100 FAX: 328-6094
PART OF YOUR LIFE EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmaiLcom WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
BAHAMIANS have been
warned to take precautions
against the scorching heat.this
suniner.
Sr lu ti I h 111 ,nA th )1 .luneC
ihe liti's recorded tempera-
liimH n Cs ieen a scorching 91
degiees Fhiliiniiheit a mark
whI L lhi.s hieeni recorded three
limes this month.
And as the temperature rises.
the probability of one being
plagued by heat related illness
becomes greater if one does not
take the necessary precautions.
Dr Chenilyn Hanna, a paedi-
atrician. told 'I he Tribune that
persons can staffer from heat
Exhaustion. heat cramps, heat


YOUR CONNECTION


t ~wt,..


DESTINATION

United States of America


Canada







WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 200.6, PAGE 7


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FROM page one

file (meaning the matter is not
ready for trial) matters set for
trial by way of a voluntary bill of
Indictment inlmtels being I.ried
Ind matters sc lui retrial.
"By the endl of August we
* hope to have analysed the entire
list to determine which cases can
and in fact pinceed to trial,"
Minister Maynard-Gibson said.
She added that her ministry
is attempting to determine the
root causes that have prevented
Irials in this session from pro-
ceeding.
However, she pointed out that.
some factors a M immediately
apparent, such as the failure of
witnesses to attend trial or poor
recollection ol details when they
do attend; victims deciding to
drop the charges or in many
instances the double booking of
matters by counsel..
Another factor contributing
to the back-up of Supreme court
proceedings is the failure of
Magistrate Courts to follow law-
ful "tradition.
"Traditionally the magistrates
court matter must stand down


Team to

produce list
pending competition of the
Supreme court matter," Attor-
ney General Maynard Gibson
explained. "We are finding that
this tradition is not being'fol-
lowed. This causes loss to society
not only in waste of costly
Supreme Court time (the cost
of convening the Supreme
Court, including empanelling
jurors, is higher than the cost of
convening the Magistrate's
Court) and causes hardship to
victims who do wish to proceed
with their matters."
Another major issue is key
evidence necessary for trial is
not always available at trial.
For example, the matter of
the trial or retrial of Monte
Thompson and Kedon Brown,
accused of the murder of Nurse
Joan Lunn, had to be moved to
July 17, even though the trial
started as scheduled on June 19,
2006 for two judicial weeks after
the jury had been empanelled
and the prosecutor was ready to


proceed, as the court could not
produce for the set trial essential
exhibits in the court's custody.
The minister meanwhile
explained that she is determined
to eliminate these factors under
the swift justice initiative -
designed to facilitate the speedy
and efficient disposal of crimi-
nal matters.
"Our Swift justice team will
ensure that these factors do not
become endemic to the system
of justice in the Bahamas," Min-
ister Maynard-Gibson said.
"Significant steps will be tak-
en to address some of these
issues."
Officials are hoping to analyse
the entire list by the end of
August to determine which cas-
es can in fact proceed to trial.
Officials say the Judiciary has
agreed to appoint a.team to
reorder and classify the evidence
room.
Acting Director of Public
Prosecution, Cheryl Grant
Bethel meanwhile revealed that
of 28 matters scheduled to be
heard in the Supreme'Court,
between April and June, 18 werq.
tried and resolved.


!HI 1 I


'I "~


I 5


I ,'\ S [1


. I I I


.1 I


U U


TENDER GENERAL

INSURANCE 2006 2007

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) is
pleased to invite Tenders to provide the Company with
General Insurance. Policies include Money, Group Personal
Accident, Employers Liability, Public Liability, Open Marine,
Burglary and Fidelity Guarantee.

Interested companies/firms may collect a Tender Specification
from the Security's Desk located in the Administrative building
on John F. Kennedy Drive, between the hours of 9:00 a.m.
and 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

The deadline for submission of tenders is on or before July
18 H, 2006 at 5:00pm. Tenders should be sealed and
marked "TENDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE" and
should be delivered to the attention of the Acting President
and CEC, Mr. Leon Williams

BTC reserves the right to' reject any, or all Tenders.


j, ., .:I nj i t I \,I,


,' *. ,.;:* ; '. ', '. i ''- *' w 7 1')' v c -


I. II






PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


The fever of the earth and looking




to the future of the environment


Everybody talks about the
weather, but nobody does any-
thing about it."
Mark Twain

AT THE height of the
Cold War, a huge
underground bunker deep in
the Rocky Mountains was
crammed with sophisticated
instruments to detect and deter
military threats from the Soviet
bloc.
'The North American Aero-
space Defence Command (or
NORAD) was a "doomsday"
machine designed to fight a
nuclear war that no-one could
survive. The Cold War, is over
now, but life on Earth is still
under threat although from a
very different quarter.
Recently, newspapers report-
ed the building of another kind
of 'NORAD' in the heart of a
mountain on a frozen island in
the Norwegian Arctic. And
some say the future of humani-
ty could' rest within this multi-
million-dollar concrete vault.
But instead of radars and
computers, it will contain a col-
lection of two million plant
seeds, representing all known
varieties of the crops that
mankind developed in the
10,000 years since agriculture
was invented.
0 The UN-approved vault will
be built to last forever, protect-
ed by airlocks and high-security
blast-proof doors. It is designed
to safeguard crop diversity in-
the event of a global environ-
mental catastrophe. This
doomsday seed bank is one


more sign of rising concern over.
the impact of climate change on
human civilisation and life in
general.
As if to underline the threat,
the US National Academies of
Science reported just last week
on surface temperature recon-
structions over the last few
thousand years. The report was
commissioned by Congress last


Arctic sea ice
is melting
faster every
year, and
satellites have
determined
that Antarctica
is losing about
36 cubic miles
of ice a year.


year and it supports a key find-
ing of previous research that
there has been unprecedented
global warming during this peri-
. od, and particularly in the last
century or o.
Reliable records go back only
about 150 years, so scientists
estimate this information from
tree rings, corals', marine sedi-
ments, cave deposits, ice cores,
boreholes, glaciers and docu-


S-,. Resorts International
.Invites applications for the position of
PHOTO SHOP SITE MANAGER
The successful applicant should satisfy the following minimum requirements:-
SHave a diploma or degree in Management/Marketing or a related field
> Have a minimum of 3 years experience in the hotel/hospitality industry in
a management position "t
> Have a minimum of 3 years experience in sales/retdil
> Have a strong command of MS Excel, MS Word, MS PowerPoint
> Experience in Photo Shop Editing Suite (Adobe PhotoShop) is a definite
asset
> Have a basic knowledge of digital photography
> Be bright, energetic and must be a self-starter
>- Must demonstrate flexibility and assertiveness in generating sales'proposals
and concepts for increasing Photo Shop revenue
> Be a team player with the ability to manage staff and daily Photo Shop
operations
Other duties will include:
> DAily supervision of work area ensuring maximum overall performance
through effective crew/staff management
> Maintenance of employee records, as well as establishing and maintaining
fair and consistent crew/staff practices
) Liaising with resort Sales Manager and assisting the resort General Manager
and Photo Shop Group Manager with all internal communications, site
reporting, evaluations and meeting coordination within designated site.
Applications should be emailed or faxed to:
GROUP MANAGER, PHOTOGRAPHY OPERATIONS
Sandals Resorts International
P. O. Box 100
Montego Bay
Fax: 518-0995
Email: ehanna@sri.sandals.com and hrd@sri.sandals.com
Applications close on Friday March 31, 2006









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ments: "There is sufficient evi-
dence," the report concluded,
"to say with a high level of con-
fidence that the last few decades
of the 20th century. were
warmer than any comparable
period in the last 400 years."
Ever since the 1970s scien-
tists have been warning that ris-
ing levels of greenhouse gases
(such as carbon dioxide) in the
atmosphere could cause signifi-
cant changes in climate that
could be disastrous. But there
was resistance by some to the
idea that human activity was the
cause of global warming, and
even greater scepticism that it
would lead to global catastro-
phe.
In 1988 the UN.set up the
Intergovernmental Panel on
Climate Change (IPCC) to
analyse and report on scientific
findings. And four years later
180 nations signed the Climate
Change Convention in Brazil,
agreeing to prevent "danger-
ous" warming from greenhouse
gases and setting an initial target
of cutting emissions from indus-
trialised countries to 1990 levels
by the year 2000.

T he Kyoto Protocol in.
1997 agreed on emis-
sions cuts for industrialized
nations of less than 6 per cent,
to be met by 2010. But the US
under George Bush refused to
ratify the agreement, citing the
lack of controls over emissions
from big developing countries
like China and India. So far, the
best plan offered by American
politicians the Climate Stew-
ardship act aims to cut emis-
sions in the US merely to 2000
levels by 2010. And the Senate


has rejected it twice.
But scientists say that if cur-
rent trends continue, green-
house gas concentrations will
rise to double pre-industrial lev-
els during this century: "That
will probably be enough to raise
global temperatures by around
2 to 5C," according to New Sci-
entist Magazine. "Some warm-
ing is certain, but the degree
will be determined by feedbacks
involving melting ice, the
oceans, water vapour, clouds
and changes to vegetation."
The visible evidence of glob-


The Bahamas
is more
vulnerable
than most to
the effects of
climate
change since
80 per cent of
our land is
within five
feet of mean
sea level.

al warming is all around us.
Glaciers are receding. Arctic
sea ice is melting faster every
year, and satellites have deter-
mined that Antarctica is losing
about 36 cubic miles of ice a
.year. Experts say human activ-


ii.


Under the Distinguished Patronage
of Marguerite Lady Pindling
The Sir den Pindling Foundation
: -. ., ,


ity could trigger an irreversible
melting of the ice sheets in this
century that would raise sea lev-
els more than 15 feet enough
to flood land occupied by bil-
lions of people, including the
low-lying Bahamas.
Besides a rise in sea level, the
BEST Commission identifies
many other potential dangers
from global warming that could
affect us including more and
stronger hurricanes, droughts,
spreading tropical diseases, loss
of farm land, and extinction of
many species of animals and
plants with dire and unpre-
dictable consequences for
humanity.

The Bahamas is more
vulnerable than most
to the effects of climate change
since 80 per cent of our land is
within five feet of mean sea lev-
el. Coastal facilities are likely
to suffer heavy damage from
storm surges. Fresh water reser-
voirs will be contaminated and
we can expect increased flood-
ing from heavier rains, as well as
more malaria, dengue and oth-
er tropical diseases. Tourism
will decline as our major mar-
kets become warmer.
As former BEST Commis-
sion advisor John Hammerton
said recently, "Given that most
of the Bahamas is a low-lying
coastal zone subject to storm
surge and sea level rise, we
should be anticipating the pos-
sible impacts of climate change
and developing strategies to
protect our habitats and land-
scapes based on the best pre-
dictions."
The question is: Should we
bother to do anything about the
possible effects of climate
change? And if the answer is
'yes', what should we do, and
how should we go about it?'
According to Gordon Brown,
the British finance minister, the
challenges of global warming
point principally towards less
burning of fossil fuels and


What do you think? Send
comments to larry@tribuneme-
dia.net
Or visit www.bahamapun-
dit.com


C e Ilk "E. YI: CY


greater energy efficiency: "We
must make climate stability,
energy investment and energy
security central to economic
policy," he said in a recent
speech. "All governments must
work together to tackle it."
Brown said the economic
costs associated with an increase
in average global temperature
".could lead to instability in
some countries. And as eco-
nomic instability increases risk
and undermines investment, so
climate change will come to
threaten our economic devel-
opment and growth."
And the New Scientist said:
"The bottom line is that we will
need to cut carbon dioxide
emissions by 70 to 80 per cent
simply to stabilise temperatures.
The quicker we do that, the less
unbearably hot our future world -
will be."
Of course, the sceptic's view
is of a planet where global
warming isn't happening or,
if it is, it isn't happening because ,
of anything we are doing wrong.
Or, if it is happening because
of what we are doing, it isn't
going to be a big problem. And,
even if it is a big problem, we
can't realistically do anything
about it other than try to adapt.
But sceptics are becoming few-
er on the ground these days..
There is a related scientific
theory which sees the Earth is a
single giant organism and the
balanced interrelationship
between animals, plants, the
land, the sea and the atmos-
phere as critical to the survival
of the whole. This is called the
Gaia hypothesis, and it was first
proposed in the 1960s by a
British scientist named James
Lovelock.

Gaia was the ancient
Greek name for
Mother Earth. As the primor-
dial element from which all the
gods originated, Gaia was wor-
shipped throughout Greece,
and in Roman mythology was
known as Terra.
Lovelock, one of the world's
most distinguished ecologists,
has written a new book called
the "Revenge of Gaia", which
talks about global catastrophe
on a biblical scale. According
to Lovelock, the Earth is about
to pass into a morbid fever that
may last a hundred thousand
years: "I have to tell you, ars
members of the Earth's family
and an intimate part of it, that
you and especially civilisation
are in grave danger."
Before this century is over,
he predicts, billions will die and
the few who survive will be in
the Arctic where the climate
remains tolerable.
"Our planet has kept itself
healthy and.fit for life, just like
an animal does, for most of the
more than three billion years of
its existence. It was ill luck that
we started polluting at a time
When the sun is too hot for com-
fort. We have given Gaia a
fever and soon her condition
will worsen to a state like a
coma. She has been there
before and recovered, but it
took more than 100,000 years.
We are responsible and will suf-
fer the consequences."

A nd what can we do
about it? "First, we
have to keep in mind the awe-
some pace of change and realise
how little time is left to act; and
then each community and
nation must find the best use of
the resources they have to sus-
tain civilisation for as long as
they can. The big threat to the
planet, Lovelock says, is peo-
ple: "There are too many of us
doing too well economically;,
and burning too much oil."
According to the latest edi-
tion of the Pew Global Atti-
tudes Survey, the two countries
least concerned about global
warming are the two greatest
producers of greenhouse gases
the US and China, where
only 19 and 20 per cent respec-
tively say they "worry a great
deal" about the problem.
But clearly, energy security-
has become the key issue of our
age. Not only will it affect the
prospects for global'war or
peace, it could determine the
future of the entire planetary
ecosystem. And remember, it's
not nice to fool with Mother
Nature.







THE HLOCALWENEWAYSUN 6,206 AGI


'Growing need'




for residential




care for elderly


Spend the summer with the Bahamas'
leading news and information source.
Read along with us in:



The T.ibune


By Bahamas Information
Services
PRIME Minister Perry
Christie said that there is an
"escalating need" to provide
residential care and accom-
modation for the country's
senior citizens.
Mr Christie's remarks were
made at the official opening
of the Residential Care
Establishments Licensing
Authority office on Eighth
Terrace, East Centreville on
Tuesday.
He said the opening of the
office marked a "defining
day" for the Ministry of
Social Services and Commu-
nity Development.
Also in attendance were
S Minister of Social Services
-. '. a-nd Community Levelop-
fment Melanie Griffin and St
Thomas Moore MP Frank
Smith.
The functions of the Resi-
dential Care Licensing Author-
ity include the registration of
buildings as residential care
establishments;, registration of
operators and administrators of
residential care establishments;
regulation of residential care
establishments; regulation of
the conducts of operators and
employees of residential care
establishments; the establish-
S ment of standards of qualifica-
tion for operators and employ-
ees of residential care; issuance
of licenses to operators of resi-
dential care establishments.
Prime Minister Christie noted


that the government has spon-
sored -entire homes and
increased subsidies to some
$150,000 over the years to resi-
dential care establishments such








* PERRY Christie (fourth from
left) and Mrs Vylma Curling,
chairman of Residential Care
Establishment Licensing
Authority (second from left), cut
the ribbon at the official opening
of the Residential Care
Establishments Licensing
Authority office on Eight Terrace,
Centreville, on Tuesday, June 20.

as the Children's Emergency
Hostel.
He urged the new authority
to ensure that as the islands of
the Bahamas develop, residen-
tial care facilities are in place
for senior citizens.
"There is an escalating need
in our country to provide resi-
dential accommodation to
senior citizens," Mr Christie
said.
In recognition of this, he
added, the College of the
Bahamas, through its Continu-
ing Education Programme, will
introduce training initiatives for


residential care providers to
ensure the delivery of proper
care.
Mrs Griffin said the Residen-
tial Care Establishments Act,
enacted on December 3,
2004, was a milestone in the
country's history and the cul-
mination of years of discus-
sion.
She said the authority has
been functional since July 1,
2005, and serves as the regu-
lator of residential care
throughout the Bahamas.
In addition, the authority
has produced a booklet of the
various residential care facil-
ities throughout the country
and has organised a five-day
training programme which
will cover of first aid and car-
diac pulmonary resuscitation
(CPR).
Mrs Griffin encouraged
persons to register their facil-
ities in.an effort to comply
with the law.
She commended the various
civic and religious organizations
that have established residen-
tial care facilities for persons in
need.
The chairman of the authori-
ty is Mrs Vylma Thompson-
Curling. Mr Bertram Knowles
serves as deputy chairman. Oth-
er members include: Mrs
Andrea Archer, Ministry of
Health; Mr Basil Cleare, Min-
istry of Works and Utilities; Mr
Leslie Bowleg, Civil Society; Mr
Ivan Evans, Civil Society; Ms
Mellany Zonicle, Director of
Social Services.


Children's Choir to perform


classic Bahamian opera


WHEN E Clement Bethel
wrote the Cat Island-based folk
opera Sammie Swain he had no
idea he conceived a classic.
He also had no idea that his
little, character would one day
;be played by a talented 11 year-
-ld during the most.patriotic
veek on the Bahamian calen-
dar.
Pint-sized performers from
the National Children's Choir
will prove that there are indeed
no small parts in theatre when
they take on the pulsating musi-
cal during this year's 33rd Inde-
pender 'e Celebrations under
the theme, "Past, Present and
Future: A Bahamian Cultura-
ma.
More than 50 youngsters
between ages six and 16 will be
taking part in the production,
which is set to take the stage on


July 8 and 9 at the National
Center for Performing Arts on
Shirley Street.
Choir director Patricia
Bazard said: "Sammie Swain is
a rich part of our cultural and
musical heritage. The young-
sters are all thrilled to be a part
of the play. While the choir is
vocally able to meet the chal-
lenges of the musical aspect, a
lot of them have discovered new
talents through acting and
dance."
Playing Sammie Swain will
be Osano Neely, a choir mem-
ber for three years. Lauren Rus-
sell, 13, will take the role of the
energetic Belinda.
Veteran dancer and choreog-
rapher Robert Bain is working
closely with the choir to pro-
vide his expertise in dance.
"The kids are doing all.of the


work," said Mrs Bazard. "My
main challenge each rehearsal is
to contain them from bursting
with excitement. The musical
hasn't been performed here for
years and now it meets a whole
new generation for the first
time. From what I see, the kids
are experiencing something
they will not soon forget."
Mrs. Bazard feels that this
.double performance of Sammie
Swain by her choir members
will allow the audience to see
the play in a completely differ-
ent light.
"You'll get to see the play
through children's eyes," she
said. "More importantly, this
classic folk opera lives on with
the performers who will
undoubtedly reintroduce it to
their peers when they are
adults."


SThe Tribune

I'Patnership

for literacy.
The College of The Bahamas -




The Secret of


Smith's Hill


Tuesday, and Thursdays


W hen the Claver family moves to a rural town to escape the dangers of their
big-city neighbourhood, 10-year-old twins Kelly and James look for-
ward to exploring their 18th-century house. But, th, family's first night's sleep is dis-
turbed by loud crashing sounds. As more odd events take place, the twins realise that
someone or something is trying to communicate with them-and when their
mother finds part of an old war diary, they suspect a connection between an 18th-
century occupant of the house and the present-day disturbances. Could a ghost be
haunting the Clavers-and if so, why? Read The Tribune every Tuesday and Thurs-
day from July 4 through August 31, to find out if the twins finally restore peace to
the old house on Smith's Hill.


sponsored by


lU l


Out-


Island



Doctor



Wednesday
and Fridays


Dc e doctuh done reach! De doctuh done reach!" Share in the adventures
of Evans Cottman, the man who left behind his life in America, and
lived and worked in the Bahamas as "unqualified practitioner." Read about "De doc-
tuh's" life while attending to the medical needs of Bahamian residents in the Fam-
ily Islands in excerpts from the beloved book, Out-Island Doctor. Read Out-Island
Doctor every Wednesday and Friday from July 5 through August 18.
sponsored by


Purity Bakery Ltd.
^'^S^SS~s 4 nff~t~Mt' KMO-'( yO'WEE AR'W


YOUR CONNECTION TO THE WORLD


TENDER APPRAISAL OF
BUILDINGS AND LAND


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) is
pleased to invite Tenders to provide appraisal of its Buildings and
Land.

Interested companies/firms in Nassau may collect a Tender
Specification from the Security's Desk located in the Administrative
building on John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau, Bahamas between
the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Packages can also be collect in Freeport, from the Security's desk,
BTC, Mall Drive.

The deadline for submission of tenders is 5:00 pm July 17th,
2006. Tenders should be sealed and marked "TENDER -
APPRISAL OF BUILDINGS AND LAND" and should be
delivered to the attention of the Acting President and CEO, Mr.
Leon Williams by the above date and time.

BTC reserves the right to reject any, or all Tenders.


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE:







PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006


THE TRIBUNE;;


JUNE 28, 2006


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

L Wild Florida in Perfon ic t t WhIb' Amedican waters 'No Direction Home: Bob Dylan' Archive footage of
-W 1BT "Butterflies" House The 37-year history of the Bob Dylan's childhood and lie on the road. A (Part 1 of 2) (CC)
Dance Theatre ofHarem. (N) A
The Insider (N) Shal Mind of a Demon With Fa- Criminal Minds The Tribe' The CSI: NY 'Necrophilia Americana' A
0 WFOR A (CC) blen Cousis (N) A (CC) BAU team investigates a mass mur- confused young boy witnesses the
der of college students. (CC) murder of a museum curator.
Access Holly- America's Got Talent Hopeful stars America's Got Talent (N) 0 (CC) Law & Order 'Cost of Capital' A
WTVJ wood (N) (CC) of all ages compete for the $1 mil- murder victim had hundreds of thou-
lion prze. A (CC) sands in a bank account. n
WSVN DecoDrve So You Think You Can Dance Top 16 perform. (N) A (CC) News (CC)

,foaerdyl (N) George Lopez Freddie 'Two Lost Abandoned' Sawyer's wound Lost The first 48 days in the lives of
* WPLG (CC) George gets his Times a Lady" becomes life-threatening. A (CC) the tail section survivors are re-
niece a job. A A (CC) sealed. A (CC)

(:00) Cold Case Dog the Bounty Dog the Bounty Inked 'Dizzle Out Inked 'Not Your Crids Angel Criss Angel
A&E Files (CC) Hunter Dog tar- Hunter Hunting to Pastor (N) Average Joey Mindfreak (N) MindheakWine
gets godfather. female fugitive. (CC) (CC) (CC) barrel escape.
Hardtalk BBC News World Business BBC News Fast Track BBC News Asia Today
BBCI (Latenight). Report (Latenight), (Latenight).
BET Access Granted ** CIVIL BRAND (2002, Draina) Mos Def, N'Bushe Wrght, Monica Comicview Scruncho; JJ; Turae;
P;_;;; I (CC) Calhoun. Abused female inmates lead a prison uprising. (CC) Shawn Morgan. (CC)
CCB 11 Cameras (N) The Canadian Antiques Road- Hustle Albertis vidousy beaten af- CBC News: The National (CC)
CB (CC) show 'Winnipeg' (CC) ter cheatirigat cards.(CC)
CNBC 00)On the Fast Money Mad Money The Big Idea WithDonny Deutsch
CNN 0)The Situa- Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)
CNN lton Room
C ** ZOOLAN- The Dally Show The Colbert Re- Mind of Mencli South Park Cart- South Park Dog Bites Man
COM DER (2001) Ben With Jon Stew- port Chris Matt- 16th and 20th man's foul mouth. Communicating Leadership con-
Stiller. (CC) art (CC) hews. (CC) centlife. (CC) with the dead. ference. (N)
COURT CopsnAc(CC) Texas SWAT Texas SWAT Forensic Files Forensic Files Psychic Detec- HauntlngEvi-
That's So Raven **A GOOFY MOVIE (1995, Comedy) Voices of Bill Kim Possible Life With Derek American Drag-
DISN 'Boyz'N Commo- Famnner, Jason Marsden. Animated. Gofy drags son (CC) Parents plan a on: Jake Long
tion Max along on a fishing trip. 'G' weekend trip. (CC)
DIY This Old House DIY to the Res- DIY to the Res- Kitchen Renova- Kitchen Renova- Home Transfor- Assembly Re-
YA (CC) cue cue tions tons motions (N) quired
DW Euromaxx Journal: In In Focus (Ger- Journal: Made In Ger- Journal: In Euromaxx
DW Depth man). Tagestema many Depth I
E! The Dally 10 (N) Naomi Campbell: TheEl True Hol- Rod & Kim StewartThe El The Simple Life: The Simple LIfe:
plywoodd Story A(CC) ue Hollywood Story (CC) 'T Dea l Death
ESPN 2006 NBA Draft From New York. (Live) (CC)
E PNI XBS(N) 2005 World Series of Poker From 2005WorldSeries of Poker From GofESPN: Germany Today
I _____ Las Vegas. (CC) Las Vegas. (CC) Fuera de Juego
Ew Daily Mass: Our EWTN Live The Lamb's The Holy Rosary Silent Witness History of St Ethel-
EWTN Lady _____Supper dreda's Cathedral.
FIT TV 00)Cardio Ship Out, Shape Up (CC) The Gym A (CC) FitTV's Housecalls A (CC)
FIT TV tiast A (CC)
FOX-NC Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannlty & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
FOX-NC Shepard Smith Susteren (Live)(CC)
FS NFL (:00) MLB Baseball Tampa Bay Devil Rays at Florida Marlins. From Dolphin Stadium in Mi- Best Damn Sports Show Period
FSNFr L ami. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) BestDamnSpor(Li ve) (CC)
GOLF Inside the PGA Big Break AlI-Star Challenge How Low Can You Go? (N) 19th Hole (N) PGAChai-
GSN Lingo (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire A Dog Eat Dog A (CC) Greed (CC)
GSa__N ______N _(CC)_______________________
G4Tech :0o)Attack of Star Trek TheNext Generation Star Trek:The Next Generation The Man Show The Man Show
tec he Showl (N) 'Dark Page'" (CC) 'Attached" 1 (CC) (CC) (CC)
(:00) Walker, Walker, Texas Ranger Alex finds an BACK TO YOU AND ME (2005, Drama) Usa Hartman Black, Dale Mid-
HALL Texas Ranger abandoned baby and the Rangers kiff, Rue McClanahan. Asuccessful doctor returns home after many years
"Retribution race to find its mother. away. (CC)
Buy Me 'Mark D o Sell T ing Go. ig oses ot rrpy house Huntars Buy Me 'Mark &
HGTV Connie' 1 (CC) Sesde r i P'Gr.t vano s Conna f egaay Connie'M
n (CC) homes., n (CC) Abode A (CC)
NSP Morris Cerullo Breakthrough Zola Ledv1t Pre- nspratiooy LSe Tlay (CC) This Is Your Day The Gi( el
INSP (CC) sets (CC) day _____ (CC) Truth
8 Simple Rules The Fresh My Wife and My Wife and Friends "The Everybody Everybody.
KTLA Video shock. A Prince of Bel-Air Kds nA (CC) Kids Michael's One With Ross' Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
(CC) A (CC) brother visits. New Girlfriend' "The Mentor 'Ping Pong' .
*i DAWN ANNA (2005, Docudrama) Debra FOR THE LOVE OF A CHILD (2006, Drama) Peri Gilpin, Ted Polo, Maria
LIFE Winger, Alex Van, Sam Howard. A woman must con- del Mar. Sara O'Meara and Yvonne Fedderson found Childhelp USA.
tend with her child's death at Columbine. (CC) (CC)
MSNBC 1(-RHardball Countdown With Keith Olber- Scarborough Country Rita Cosby Live & Direct
MSN ) ~ mann
NICK Jimmy Neutron: SpongeBfob Just for Kicks 'I Full House "Air Fresh Prince of Fresh Prince of Roseanne A
NICK Boy Genius SquarePants nA Love Lucy" Jesse' (CC) Bel-Air Bel-Air (CC)
T A WRINKLE IN TIME (2003, Adventure) Alfre Blue Murder 'Family Reunion'" News A (CC) News
NTV Woodard, Kate Nelligan, Alison Elliott (CC)
OLN (:00) Survivor: All-Stars The winner is revealed at Survivotr All-Stars "Reunion" A Survivor: All-Stars 'The Sole Sur-
Madison Square Garden. A (CC) (CC)' _ _, vivngAll-Star' A (CC)
SPEED C Cut Re- Sports Car Rev- Super BikesI Pinks! Pinks! Unique Wh Gary Sheffield's Es-
_PEElutl ondcalade; twin ercury Milans.
(:00) Billy Gra- Behindthe AgainstAll GreatSouls JackVan Impe Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN ham Classic Scenes (CC) Odds Presents (CC)
Crusades
Everybody Everybody Everybody everybody Everybody Sex and the Cty Sex and the City
TBS Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Rarond Loves Raymond Loves R nd 'Evolution" A "La Douleur Ex-
'Be Nice (CC) A(CC) (Cho Am ?' A (CC) 'The Sigh (CC) (CC) quisel'
T:00) A Face for Conjoined Twins: Erin and Jade Untold Stories of the E.R. 'Moun- Mystery Diagnosis A baby is irdta-
TLC Yulce (CC) (CC) tain Uon Attack' Big-cat attack sur- ble, has trouble nursing and stops
vivor. (N) I gaining weight.
S:00) Without a Without a Trace Jack endures a Without a Trace 'Party Girt" The Without a Trace "The Bogie Man'
TNT Trace 'Shadows' brutal deposition in his divorce pro- team must find a kidnapped heiress. A (CC)
S___(CC) ceedings. A (CC) A (CC)
T Home for Imagi- Grim Adven- Ed, Edd n Eddy Naruto Xiaolin Show- Ben 10 Futurama'God-
I N ary Friends tures down A (CC) fellas' A
TV5 Compl6ment d'enqulte Acoustic Avocatset assocl6s TV5 Le Journal
TWC 6:00) Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
TWC PM Edition (CC) "Wild Wind" (N) (N)(CC)
UNIV :00) Peregrina La Fea Mais Bella (N) Barrera de Amor (N) Don Francisco Presenta Entrevis-
UNIV N) tas con celebridades del deported y
_el entretenimiento.
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Criminal Intent De-
USA de, Criminal In- Two men claim they robbed a Benson and Stabler investigate a tectives stumble upon a terrorist plot
tent'Con-Text" woman but didn't kill her. (CC) woman's deadly plunge,. invoking explosives. A (CC)
VH1 Hogan Knows ws ws Hollywood Se- *** THE BREAKFAST CLUB (1985) Emilio Estevez, Molly Ringwald.
____ tBest A Besjt A crets Five teenagers make strides toward mutual understanding. A
:00) MLB Baseball Chicago White Sox at Pittsburgh Pirates. From PNC Park in Pittsburgh. WGN News at Nine A (CC)
WGN ULive) n (cc)
WPIX, ver d Blue Collar TV Blue Collar TV One Tree Hill The whole town gears WB11 News at Ten With Kalty
WPIX m The O.C.: Ozark White-trash soap up for the Ravens' first basketball Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchlano
______ "Ping Pong" A County." opera. A game. A (CC) & Mr. G (CC)
WSB K. Jeoardyl (N) Oneon One Allof UsRobert Eve Shelly and Cuts "Mack Dad- Dr. Phil Family members who cre-
WSBK CC 'Who's the meets a great Janie argue over dies" A (CC) ate conflict. A (CC)
Boss?" A (CC) woman. A (CC) money. A n

** MADAGASCAR (2005, Comedy) Voices of Deadwood True Colors" Bullock Lucky Louie Entourage
HBO-E Ben Stiller, Chris Rock. Animated. Zoo animals must discovers the truth about the Gem Louie must be a "Dominated" A
l______ earn to survive in the wild. A 'PG' (CC) killings. A (CC) night watchman. (CC)
5:00) ** ** CRIMINAL (2004, Crime Drama) John C. Reil- * CLOSER (2004, Drama) Julia Roberts, Jude
HBO-P ALEXANDER ly, Diego Luna. A con man and his protege try a com- Law, Natalie Portman. Four people grapple with love
(2004)'R'(CC) plicated scam. A 'R' (CC) and betrayal. A 'R' (CC)


HBO-W 6:30 T (:lA'15)**** A MILLION DOLLAR BABY (2004, Drama) Clint Eastwood, Hilary Swank, *** MADA.
HBO-W DAT Morgan Freeman. A cantankerous trainer bonds with a female boxer. A 'PG-13' (CC) GASCAR (2005)
BERNIE'S II1 A 1A 'PG' (CC)
(:15) *** THE MAMBO KINGS (1992, Drama) Ar- *t* THE INTERPRETER (2005, Suspense) Nicole Kidman, Sean
HBO-S mand Assante. Based on Oscar Hijuelos' novel about Penn, Catherine Keener. A U.N. translator overhears an assassination
two Cuban musicians. A 'R' (CC) plot. A 'PG-13' (CC)
(6:30) ** THE UPSIDE OF ** THE WEDDING DATE (2005) Debra Messing, ** THE RING TWO (2005) Naomi
MAX-E ANGER (2005, Comedy-Drama) Dermot Mulroney. A woman brings a male escort to her Watts. A journalist must protect her
Joan Allen. A 'R' (CC) sister's wedding. A 'PG-13' (CC) son from evil Samara.
(:00)* DOMINION: A PREQUEL TO THE EXOR- *~ WAR OF THE WORLDS (2005, Science Fiction) Tom Cruise,
MOMAX CIST(2005) StellanSkarsgard.Aformer rest fights. Dakota Fanning, Miranda Otto. A man and his children try to survive an
demonic possession In Egypt 'R'(CC) alien invasion. n'PG-13'(CC)
(6s15)** s THE (7: **THE PUNISHER (2004, Action) Thomas Jane, John Travolta, HUFF "Which Up Is the Cervical
SHOW CURVE (1996) Wll Patton. iTV. An FBI agent seeks revenge for his family murder. A Up?' (r) Huff answers Russell's
______ 'Fr(CC) 'R'(CC)_call. A (CC)
(6:15) ** THE ** WICKER PARK (2004, Suspense) Josh Hartnett, Rose Byme, ***s TRAINSPOTTING (1996,
TMC ROSARY MUR- Matthew Ullard. A man searches obsessively for his former lover. A 'PG- Comedy-Drama) Ewan McGregor,
__DERS (1987)'R' 13' (CC) Ewen Bremner. A '' (CC)


MULTIPURPOSE


(f" Tel: 9 6 6 3

WOOD. WOOD


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A A6 ..."


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WEDNESDAY EVENING


C -




k.
"1.:.






THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006, PAGE 11


LOA NW


Fire' could take out



ov r 100 houses'


'THIS aerial shot oif the Pigeon Pea shanty
settlement in Marsh Harbour shows what some
fear could be a fire hard.
There are concerns that with shacks packed
so closely together it wouldd be impossible for
firefighters to get access to the site.
A local resident sail; "This has many of us
nervous as a fire in theimiddle of this could eas-
ily take out 100 or morb houses and there is not
much anyone could d4 to put it out."
The large, three-roof building is Abaco Hard-
ware's lumber yard with houses backed up to
their fence.


The two joined roofs beyond the lumber
sheds are Abaco Hardware's retail and dis-
play store.
Parts of Don MacKay Boulevard can be seen
in front of the hardware store and extending
into Marsh Harbour to the left.
Left of the lumber sheds where trailers are
parked is the area of Pigeon Pea where 70
houses burned down some years ago.
The hardware store quickly bought the land
from the man claiming it and fenced it for stor-
age.
The picture was taken by Colyn Reese.


CONGRATULATIONS


*;COLDWELL Banker Island Affiliates visited Lightbourn
Realty during a recent tour of properties on Nassau and Par-
adise Island. Pictured (front, fourth from left) are: JC Cal-
houn, president of Cold.Well Banker Island Affiliates master
franchise; Mike Lightbo un, president, Coldwell Banker Light-
bouni Realty; Jim Gillespie, president, Coldwell Banker Cor-
por4tion and Beth Makatsra, vice president, international ser-
vicep and operations.
(Photo: Vision Photography)


Coldwell Banker Island

Affiliates hold conference

on Paradise Island

THE 14-member group of 'The entire group was
Coldwell Banker Island impressed with what they
Affiliates recently held: its saw,' said Mike Lightbourn,
2000 Business Management president of Coldwell
Conference at Atlantis, Iar- Banker Lightbourn Realty.
adise Island, which coincided "They are looking forward
wit4l the parent company's to returning and were very
100th anniversary celebra- jealous that we lived in such
tiogls. a wonderful place. Our high-
SThe conference was host- end properties got rave
ed by Coldwell Ban er reviews and fantastic expo-
Lightbourn Realty with head sure."
offices in Nassau.
DIuring his keynote Dinner
address, Jim Gillespie, pres-
ident of Coldwell Banker
Corporation, likened Delegates were hosted to
'the Island Affiliates td a a dinner at Luciano's of
bea dlon. Chicago, and Mr Gillespie
I-e said they know whatito and his wife, Jenny, got a
do.,get on with the job and real taste of the Bahamas
do it correctly. with a trip to Rose Island.
'-. -I applaud what you gys Gifts from The Plait Lady,
areldoing,' he added. Bahama Handprints and the
Mr Gillespie said Coldwell Bacardi Rum Cake factory
Banker's largest growth is 'in were distributed. i
thelinternational market. Coldwell Banker is a real
d ur ing the conference, estate network comprising
bro rs and managers frdm approximately 3,800 offices
the'Bahamas, Bermuda and and 126,000 sales agents
the Caribbean blitzed NOw worldwide.
Providence and Paradiie Its global reach places
Island, touring select high- offices on six continents, 29
end properties.. countries and territories.


Coinalinamperial








Keith Major, LLIF

on being awrded on
Honorary Doctorate of Humane Lefter
from SoouerDougtass College
On SUnday. JU 4.2006


Coglnalrperial expresses warm regards and congratulations to Keith Maor. center Vihe Prealdent. Mweetlhg. who seceoty meteed o
Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from Sojourner Douglass Cllege.
Theresa Moxey-Ingraham, President of the local campus of Sojoumer Dougkl aus. aid the ch oughttt onl y tIbMet Ngth M. NMar -
celve the honor as he Is well respected both profeslonalty and personally for his eonlitbulens to the tbharian saelet. Mr. Mviai was
selected because of his role In making a positive impact on the country and on ecommm iallonm the o"l~%' WMdet t ts t
and local Advisory Board.
Apart from his Innate desire to make a difference In the ives of his clients ad cowAM ltl. Mr. Majer b t sb ., fdulA.i. ed hmul pi-
fessionally by achieving the LIMRA Leadership Institute Fellow dealnalon. bThl dynmit. qaduaeJeeel pusageteaclauimn sumket
Ing, financial, personal effectiveness, and leadership strateges to provide a eompehensh'e d-,-elopte-* peua SeitltmiMuat Mso-
vices executives. To date some 500 executives from around the world have earned this delwtalln.
Commending Mr. Major on the receipt of his Honorary Doctorate. Mr. Modmauwy kialIhate, psiredldetal Calmtustal -sM "Ite
Collnalmpedal family could not be happier for Mr. Major. Kelth's success has been a dret deut ofl hh utuwuvBtd ade ke 1 to acet-
lence and client service and true skill for assessing the marketplace. I can ttnk at nobody who deseswes ih he1 r se*r
As a 1199 recipient of Rotary International's highest honor The Paul Mani Felm w i no suwpie tha Mr. Mat et ead toe tenet eof
service above self In every facet of his life*, He has played an active role In chatbable causes witbtw ur eawtlly. wet ,eesituh ov-
Ing as a member of th6 Action Bahamas Committee which raised almost $SOA,00 toD i Hiunteam Whma tvitUr theuaghouithe sMdte ie
also has a strong sense of civic duty as evident by his wflngnes to sve as Chairman of te AahwiMN ecmtcft Coeinmstba Mte he
has held since 2006.
Mr. Major Is married to the former Linda Lewis. The couple has three children- Keth Jr.. y and lndaon. ..


"The Woman & Health
Section of The Tribune is
a great resource to me and
my family. We love its
timely articles on food,
health, fashion and beauty.
The Tribune is y
newspaper."
DESEREA WALKINE
"My Gourmet Lunch &
Picnic Baskets"


READ

woman
EVERY TUESDAY


The Tribune
0* vmoko- ;*


........... .............................. ....... ... .. ........... ..........olool................................... ................. ......... ....................................................i............


THE TRIBUNE!


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006, PAGE 11






PAGE 2, WENESDY, JUE 28,2006THE TIBUN


Names announced for awards banquet


* MARGARET McDonald Policy Management Administration Centre (MNPMAC), announced
the names of those receiving awards at their annual awards banquet on Monday at the Cultural
Commission Office, Royal Victoria Gardens. From left, Alberta Byer, CEO, and Beverly Wallace
Withfield, assistant director.
(Photo: BIS/Raymond Bethel)
.................................................................................................................................................................................................. *i


EU offers millions in aid to Haiti



if stabilizing reforms continue


* BELGIUM
Brussels
THE European Union
offered millions in extra aid to
Haiti's President Rene Preval
Tuesday if he continues reforms
,to stabilize and anchor democ-
racy in his troubled Caribbean
nation, according to Associated
Press.
European Commission Pres-
ident Jose Manuel Barroso said
the EU's 'executive office was
readying to send /233 million
(US$293 million) in new aid and
possibly more if progress con-
tinues.
"We think the developments
are in the right direction," Bar-
roso told reporters after meet-
ing Preval at EU headquarters.
"There was a real effort after
the election tb build a national
consensus. President Preval


came here with an important
delegation with former oppo-
nents."
Preval said he aimed to foster
new co-operation between
political factions to address the
needs of the population, notably
on fighting poverty and improv-
ing basic needs like education,
proper shelter and job creation.
"A big effort has been under-
taken since the elections... to
establish political stability,"
Preval said. He said his govern-
ment's aim was to boost foreign
investment in Haiti.
EU Development Commis-
sioner Louis Michel said
"depending on progress" fur-
ther aid on top of the 233 mil-
lion was also being planned. He
said a majority of the
announced aid package would
go toward education and build-
ing infrastructure like roads, as


well as filling the current gov-
ernment budget shortfall in
Haiti.
The EU last October
unblocked 72 million (US$90
million) in aid to Haiti, ending a
freeze imposed almost five
years ago in protest over elec-
toral irregularities.
Preval has appealed to inter-
national donors to help fund
road construction. The presi-
dent has said he hopes invest-
ment will make Haiti attractive
to tourists and bring the island
nation out of its deep economic
rut, which has made it the west-
ern hemisphere's poorest coun-
try.
Haiti had been relatively calm
since Preval was elected Feb-
ruary 7, but recent kidnapping
and attacks on police and UN
peacekeepers have raised fears
of a flare-up of violence.


wards frU m


* MINISTER of Foreign Affairs Fred Mitchell, and Murray Forde, assistant district gover-
nor, Rotary Clubs of the Bahamas present winners of the United Nation Model competition
last Friday at the Department of Public Service. From left are Charles Stuart, Christopher
Russell, Forde, Amielle Major, Rachel Fielding, Jade Pratt, Fred Mitchell, Frank Coyle,
Rhoda Jackson and Rev Samuel Boodle.
(Photo: BIS/Raymond Bethel)


THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS
COMPANY LIMITED

P. O. BOX N-3048, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
TELE. (242) 302-7000

SENIOR MANAGER
CREDIT & COLLECTIONS DEPARTMENT
(FINANCIAL DIVISION)

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites applications from
* suitably qualified individuals for the position of SENIOR MANAGER in its
Credit & Collections Department.

ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Determine collection strategies including, but not limited to:
Setting credit limits for customers.
Setting collection targets for staff.
Reviewing collection activities of staff.
Determine contact procedures to inform customers of amounts owing.
Identification of customers who exceed their credit terms.
Determine procedures to collect amounts owing by customers who exceed
their credit terms.
Determine the timing of collection activities, to maximize collections.
Ensure that customer's accounts are ceased in accordance with Company
Policy.
Determine a strategy to engage the Company's major customers to address
issues and collections.
Engage external agencies as required to supplement collection activities.
Ensure that all transactions relating to the receivables are completely and
accurately recorded in the books of the Company.
Regularly review documentation of Policies and Procedures for the
department to ensure the documentation is current.
Ensure security deposits held on behalf of customers are accurately
recorded in the books of the Company.
Ensure Coin Collection Policies & Procedures are correctly defined and
properly controlled.
Ensure Executive Management is regularly updated as to the status of the
receivables and collection activities using key performance indicators.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS
* Bachelor's Degree in Fianance
* Minimum of five (5) years managerial experience preferably in a Credit &
Collections environment
* Proven experience in managing a Credit & Collections Department
* The ability to make sound business decisions
* Excellent leadership, oral and written communications skills

All applications are to be received at BTC's Head Office, 21 John F. Kennedy
Drive, no later than June 30th, 2006 and addressed as follows:

DIRECTOR
HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD.
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS

RE: SENIOR MANAGER/CREDIT COLLECTIONS DEPARTMENT


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006


* '* ,.{, -i r,; t- T- 7 r w oC4.oL0








WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006


SECTION -


business@tribunemedia.net


- U EYE htiTfliY


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Bahamas eco-tourism




ratings under threat


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business
Reporter
at the Caribbean Hotel
Industry Conference
MIAMI, Florida Inap-
propriate development may
.cause the Bahamas' standing
as an eco-friendly tourism des-
tination to fall, the director of
the Centre for Sustainable
Destinations at National Geo-
graphic warned yesterday at
the Caribbean Hotel Industry
Conference.
During his presentation on
Sustainable Tourism, Jonathan
Tourtellot said that in the last
destination scorecard oiern-
ised by his company in 2(1113.
lhe Bahamian Family Islands
:placed 63rd out of 115 popular
destinationsi, based on their
environmental stewardship and
ability to remain "unspoilt" in
the face of mass tourism devel-
opment.
Mr Tourtellot described the
Family Islands rating as aver-
age, and said he suspected that
the next time they were fea-


Sustainable tourism chief criticises 'inappropriate development' in Bimini
and other Family Islands; questions government's anchor property strategy


fured in a destination survey,
v which could be in 2008,; their
ratings will go down. He told
The Tribune that this was
because of what has been per-
ceived as inappropriate
tourism development in the
Family Islands, particularly on
Bimini.
Mr Tourtellot added that
recent criticism also suggested
that Abaco has turned into
what he described as '"a sub-
urb of Florida", and he pointed
to concerns that real estate on.
the more popular Family
Islands was increasingly being
priced out of reach for many
Bahamians.
The mention of Bimini is a
thinly-veiled reference to the
controversial Bimini Bay resort
project, being developed by
RAV Bahamas and its princi-
pal, Cuban-American real
estate and property bhtrepre-


neur, Gerardo Capo.
Mr Capo's Bimini Bay pro-
ject has frequently had to con-
tend with heavy criticism from
Biminites and environmental-
ists, who have claimed that the
project is totally out of pro-
portion to Bimini's size, popu-
lation and scale.
In addition, environmental-
ists have claimed that dredg-
ing, excavating and other activ-
ities carried out during Bimini
Bay's development have dam-
aged the environment and eco-
system, particularly mangrove
swamps and fish breeding
grounds.
Mr Capo has consistently
refuted criticism of his project,
saying environmental reports
and assessments have been
submitted to the Government,
and that none of the critics
have ever visited the develop-
ment to see what is going on


first hand.
He said in October 2005 that
Bimini Bay would make the
island "a real jewel".
Meanwhile, Mr Tourtellot
agreed yesterday with the com-
ments made by former
Bahamian tourism director-
general, Vincent Vanderpool
Wallace, earlier in the confer-
ence that there was a place for
large scale developments, such
as Kerzner International. How-
ever, he warned about the sus-
tainability of current Family
Island developments.
"New Providence and Grand
Bahama have already cast their
lots," Mr Tourtellot said, "but
my concern is that that kind of
development be contained so it
stays on Paradise Island and it
stays on Cable Beach, but does
not start popping up in places
like Bimini and Cat Island."
Mr Tourtellot said he also


had some reservations about
the Family Island 'anchor
property' model, which has
been highly touted by the Gov-
ernment as a means of eco-
nomic development.
"I question that approach,"
he said. "It is based on an
assumption that you have to
have an anchor in order to
improve infrastructure, and
that is not necessarily true.
You can look at other places.
"It is kind of like treating an
island like a shopping mall,
where you've got to have a big
department store to anchor the
shopping mall. But an island
is not a shopping mall; it is a
place, and I think rather than a
big development, a series of
smaller boutique-style hotels
with the maximum amount of

SEE page 2B


PUC guidelines to d telecom competition Employers warn on
BNational Health pla
M By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribunne u seiness ditor


THE Public Utilities Commission
(PUC) has published proposed guidelines
to govern interconnection agreements
between different Bahamian telecoms
operators, saying,these rules are designed
to ensure "dominant operators" such as
the Bahamas Telecommunications Com-
pany (BTC) "do not seek to impede com-
petition".
Describing interconnection as "essen-
tial" for competition to thrive in the
Bahamian telecommunications market,
the PUC, which regulates the sector, said
the guidelines were designed to prevent
operators such as BTC from delaying


22


.44%


1.-i
'.'nli'. t~


interconnection between its network and
other carriers.
It added that the guidelines were
designed to prevent carriers such as BTC
from charging rival carriers "in excess of
costs" for interconnection between its net-
work and theirs.
Interconnection agreements between
different carriers enable calls originating
on one operator's network to be routed to
the receiver who may be on a different
operator's network.


60.81%

(February 1 )


The PUC said: "Without interconnec-
tion, new operators would be obliged to
duplicate expensive infrastructure, and
consumers would have to subscribe to dif-
ferent operators' networks to be able to
call each other. Such complexities will
increase costs to consumers.
"Therefore, interconnection goes
beyond competition issues and bears on

SEE page 5B


- .. ..... "
: " *
*. . .> :; : ..,. :-;; .:-^ t^:-:-;.; .. *-!A
S. '-l ; .-..; ..S.:;
::" Aq::. : ,, ,,.


8.39%
\Fr--ie Amval 1ideun
Since Inception
(February 19w)


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor,
THE Government's pro-
posed National Health Insur-
ance (NHI) plan may be nei-
ther affordable not sustainable,
the Bahamas Employers Con-
federation (BECon) has
warned, arguing that.its med-
ical benefits would far surpass
those provided by any private
group health insurance plan.'
Articulating its concerns on
the proposed NHI scheme, the
employers body pointed out
that it planned to offer a com-
prehensive package of health-
care benefits ranging from
primary care visits and spe-
cialist visits to laboratory and
diagnostic services, emergency
airlift and overseas cata-
strophic care.
BECon also questioned
whether the level Of contribu-
tions to the NHI plan from
both employers and employ-


ees currently shared at 2.65
per cent of an employee's
earnings would have to
increase, when and by how
much in future years.
It pointed out that increased
NHI contributions were likely
to be required due to increas-
ing medical costs, which rose
faster than inflation. Costs
rose, BECon said, due to tech-
nology advances and innova-
tions, while at the same time
people were living longer with
a higher quality of life.
I Rising costs would make it
difficult for Bahamian pen-
sioners, living-, an fixed
incomes, to afford NHI
expenses.
On the comprehensive ben-
efits package, BECon pointed
out: "There is no private group
health insurance plan that
offers these types of benefits.

SEE page 4B


Government's 'free'

20-30% jitney stake

* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Government should take a 20-30 per cent equity stake -
"at no cost" in the company that would be established to unify
New Providence's jitney and public transportation, a report com-
piled for the Government has recommended.
A 46-page report on developing a model to unify New Provi-
dence's public transport system suggested that while the Gov-
ernment effectively be given a free stake in the company, it
should hold a different class of shares from franchise holders and
jitney operators.
This, the report, said was to ensure the Government did not
take a dividend from the'company and thus dilute the earnings
accruing to franchise holders who owned and operated their
own jitneys.
The report recommended that the Government's stake should
be held in trust, and used to "fund future development of public
transport facilities, such as bus terminals". In addition, the Gov-
ernment would have no voting rights, in theory allowing the
company to operate at arm's length from political interference.
The report eventually recommended that the Government
stake in the unified bus company be sold to the Bahamian pub-
lic once it was profitable and well-established.
It suggested that franchise holders who owned and operated
their own jitneys be given 100 shares in the new company for each
franchise plate held and the option to buy more; franchise hold-
ers who were not owners or operators also be given 100 shares per
plate held; and owner-operators who did not have their own
franchise be given the option of buying shares.
The document also recommended that the Government should
lease land that it owns to the unified bus company "on favourable
terms', so that it could develop
jitney depots and passenger ter- SEE pa-g- e
minals. SEE page 4B


HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010


* VERNICE WALKINE


Ministry


in talks


on 'star


ratings'


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business
Reporter
at the Caribbean
Hotel Industry
Conference
MIAMI, Florida The
Ministry of Tourism is in
talks with FreemanGroup
Destinations and its part-

SEE page 6B


r'.-ance oun '

*ffl orance ... CoUnts


Fidelity Bahamas Growth & Income Fund
Total Perfumiance throuhL!- May 31, ,2(O 6*


...........
stich is BTC pI.iy fair on itim-colincolOll


IIIPI IW L OII 1000 L.UILJ


n












MO EASY TO Bahamas eco-


tourism ratings



under threat


FROM page 1B

involvement from local peo-
ple, which may mean training,
is quite possibly a safer way to
go because once you have an
anchor, how do you com-
plain?"
Mr Tourtellot said he was
concerned that once a proper-
ty had such a large interest on


a Family Island, there may not
be enough stewardship on that
island by the residents and gov-
ernment.
Comments
His comments are likely to
reignite debate on the Gov-
ernment's chosen method for
creating sustainable economic
development on the Family


Islands.
Critics have argued that
some of the projects are too
large for the island communi-
ties being asked to sustain
them, and their implementa-
tion as seen with the Emerald
Bay resort on Exuma is
changing the character, envi-
ronment and feel that attracted
tourists to such locations in the
first place.


5 otiabank's 'Forgive & Forget' Mortgage Campaign

,To celebrate our 50th year in The Bahamas, Scotiabank Is giving
away 50,000 in prizes.
Down-payment as low as 5% (with Mortgage Indemnity Insurance)
Campaign runs until July 14 2006
Cal or visit us today and let Scotlabank hep you to Forgive & Forger


Life. MiJi,-. Bamnce both'.


a'I Est
v_ .^* qf,*****^ Ji ,_ftct(ml iit et


PUBLIC NOTICE ,
FRIDAY CLOSURE OF
ALL NATIONAL INSURANCE OFFICES -

The National Insurance Board wishes to advise


the general


public that all


of its


departments/offices throughout The Bahamas,
including the Pay Windows at the Post Offices,
will- be closed on Friday, June 30, 2006.




The Board's New Providence offices will re-open
on Monday at the usual time.


has a vacancy for the position of

GROUP AUDIT MANAGER

PROFILE:
Relevant graduate or postgraduate degree and/or professional
4 qualifications e.g. ACCA, CPA, CGA, CFA,
RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:
Management of the Internal Audit function within all Fidelity Group
operations (Bahamas, Cayman, Turks & Caicos Islands)
Liaison with Price WaterhouseCoopers to oversee their internal audit
functions
Formalization of the risk management process
Updating and maintaining the policy and procedural manuals
Overseeing the implementation of the disaster recovery plans
Preparation of business-focused recommendations/reports that
provide clear actions to address control weakness.

CRITICAL SKILLS & KNOWLEDGE:
Good level of business awareness and an. understanding of
Fidelity's strategic and tactical goals.
Specialist expertise in capital markets, asset management, financial
management, audit and risk management
An awareness of general financial services issues including regula-
Story requirements.
Reasonable knowledge of core banking processes and banking
functions
Strong communication & PC skills
The person will report directly to the Audit, Risk and Compliance Committee.
1 The successful candidate will be offered a competitive
compensation package including benefits and bonuses
commensurate with his/her experience and performance.


$f
I.




4I
V.
4:h
a,


Send resume no later than Friday June 30th, 2006 to:


The Human Resource Director
Fidelity
51 Frederick Steet
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
f: 326.3000
e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com


PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006


THE TRIBUNE








THE~UINS T RBNWDEDYIUN 8 06 AE3


Bahamas a model




for public-private




tourism partnership


N By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business
Reporter
at the Caribbean Hotel
Industry Conference
' MIAMI, Florida The Bahamas can
be looked at as a model for effective pub-
lic-private partnership in the developing
the tourism industry, two prominent
Bahamians told delegates attending the
Carribean Hotel Industry Conference yes-
terday.
Frank Comito, executive vice-president
of the Bahamas Hotel Association, and
Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, the Car-
ribean Tourism Organisation's secretary-
general, said the Bahamian government
and the private sector have developed an
effective way of ensuring that both sides
work together.
Agreements
Mr Comito said that while there were
not always agreements on every issue,
both sides have expressed a willingness


to at least listen to each other.
Critical
Mr Comito said it was critical that there
be a well-structured leadership in the pri-
vate sector, which in this nation's case was
the Bahamas Hotel Association (BHA),
the promotion boards and the Nassau
Tourism and Development Board. They
needed to speaking from one voice.
"That voice has to be well supported
and well funded," he added. "There has to
be a huge commitment to providing the
resources, staffing and the training, the
support to develop on infrastructure side
of the private sector, otherwise you lose
out.
According to Mr Vanderpool Wallace,
one of the challenges that face public-pri-
vate .partnerships is the political divide
between what each sector wants and .what
the current minister of tourism sees as a
politically advantageous agenda.
"The political is always thinking I have
to do the right thing and the popular
thing," he said. "What is clever" is the


private sector coming to us and suggesting
how we can accomplish both these goals.
Mr Comito agreed, but noted there has
to be a commitment to the partnership
that transcends politics.
He said one example of partnership has
been co-operation in marketing, promo-
tions and public relations.
"The most significant thing we have
done in that regard is agreed to share in
the marketing cost of creating a volun-
tary room levy arrangement," Mr Comito
said.'
Funds
"To generate the funds to do that, the
Government from that time to today
recognizes that business people are in a
much better position to market them-
selves."
Mr Comitio added that there has also
been a partnership in research and edu-
cation and culinary arts through pro-
grammes such as BahamaHost, which is
lead by the Ministry of Tourism and sup-
ported by the private sector industry.


M VINCENT VANDERPOOL-WALLACE


FAB! FINDS GIFT SHOP
2 Week Long Pre-Sumnin'fSale
June 26 through July 8, 2006




in 'ourFAB!


Located in the Lyford Cay Shopping Center
Sale hours: 10am-4pm
Monday Saturday



PROGRESSIVE SERVICE ORIENTED
COMPANY LOOKING FOR A FEW
GOOD PEOPLE

DIESEL MECHANICS

Prior experience on repairs to heavy
trucks advantageous. Top wages and
incentive program. Uniforms furnished
after probationary period.

Please come by and fill out an application,
or give us a call at:

328-2463

Bahamas Mack Truck Sales Ltd.


2 Way Radio Sales Representative

2 Way Radio Radio

Repair Technician and

Mobile Radio Install

Excellent oral and written
communication skills are essential as
position requires frequent interaction
with clients;
Strong analytical skills;
- Knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel
applications and Quickbooks
Ability to work in team concept.


Interested persons should send resume
with a cover letter to:

Personnel Department
P.O.Box CB 12385
Nassau, Bahamas


WINDING BAY
ASACO. OAHAMAS
Has two (2) vacancies for
Membership Sales Executives:
-Exceptional written and verbal communication skills, organization
skills
-Exceptional Telephone skills
-Public speaking preferred
-Ability to demonstrate strong relationship sales capability
-Ability to interface professionally with all members of staff
-Generation and execution of an annual business plan
-Self generation of buisness through referrals and other personal
contacts
-Exceptional skills in long range guest relaional maintenance
-Use of tracking system for effective follow up andcustomer purchase
sequence
-College degree preferred
Please Send Resumes to:
Attn: HR Director
The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O. Box AB2057
Mash Harbour, Abaco
or
Fax: 242-367-0077


P.O.Bdx N-44 p
Nassau, Bahamas


' >* ,


FirstCaribbean
Career Opportunity
RI MAN AGER
(Based in BVI-


FirstCaribbean International Bank is the combination of CIBC and Barclays Bank in the Caribbean, Bahamas and
Belize. We are the region's largest publicly traded bank with over 3,500 staff serving over 5.3 million people in 17
countries. We manage over 700,000 active accounts via 100 retail branches and corporate/international banking
centres.


RESPONSIBILITIES:
* Source new clients and new business opportunities with existing clients
* Conduct thorough needs assessment and identify business opportunities, client issues and risks
* Provide consultancy-based approach to customers, involving specialists and credit manager as needed
* Actively collaborate with credit manager, product specialists (e.g. credit cards, leasing) and corporate finance
managers to develop solutions which meet and create business opportunities with existing and prospective clients
* Review, agree and sign off on mortgages and credit applications or recommendations
* Take active role in delivery of risk management and ensure compliance with the Bank's internal control and
assurance framework
PREREQUISITES:
* At least 5 years' experience in.the corporate and financial services business with proven experience in developing
successful relationships and in closing quality deals
* Graduate status with ACIB qualification or related work and business experience
* Highly numerate with related IT skills in applicable Bank systems
We offer an attractively structured compensation and reward package as well as performance bonuses.
Applications with detailed r6sum6s should be submitted no later than July 7, 2006 to:
Michael Spencer
Head of Corporate Banking and Country Manager
FirstCaribbean International Bank
P.O. Box 70
Road Town, Tortola
British Virgin Islands
Tel: (284) 494-2171
Email: Michael.Spencer@firstcaribbeanbank.com
Only applicants who are short-listed will be contacted.


(^ FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK
GET THERE. TOGETHER.


WINOINO BAY
ABAC). PAIAMA
Has two (1) vacancies for
Sales & Marketing Project Director:
-Responsible for onsite coordination of sales, sales administration and
marketing.
-Achievement of targeted sales volume and maintaining inventory.
-Develop fnture(MVCI experience preferred) managers and implement
self developed program
-Implementation of tour efficiency and building of strong team values
-Forecast and budget annual sales targets.
* -Ensure communication, between personnel and others
-Strong leadership skills
-Minimum 5 years marketing vacation ownership
-Minimum 5 years marketing in management of sales, marketing and /or
administration
-College degree preferred, but not required.
Please Send Resumes to:
Attn: HR Director
The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O. Box AB2057
Mash Harbour, Abaco
or
Fax: 242-367-0077


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006, PAGE 3B


-f


--Am
maw








PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


National Health plan, from Page 1B


Even the most comprehensive group
health plan requires the patient to
pay a deductible before any benefit is
given by the insurance company, then
an out-of-pocket amount has to be
paid as a percentage of costs (usually
20 per cent), after which the insur-
ance company pays 100 per cent for
major medical, provided the facility
and physicians are in the insurance
company's network."
It added that in cases where the
cost of medical and surgical proce-
dures was more than the 'customary'
cost determined by a health insurer,
the carrier would only cover the 'cus-
tomary' amount.
Private health insurers also capped
the total amount they paid for ser-
vices such as air ambulances, and lim-
ited the amount of payments made
per individual during their lifetime.


BECon said: "The truth of the mat-
ter is that even those with "good"
group health insurance policies find
themselves in so much medical debt
for items not covered that they resort
to fund raising activities such as cook-
outs to service their debt."
It questioned whether the NII11
would, like private health insurance,
require deductibles, out-of-pocket
expenses and "lifetime limitation".
BECon added: "NHI's policy will
be to invite all private sector providers
to join the NHI network of services
and will reimburse the private
providers at the same rate as the pub-
lic sector.
"Private providers will have the
option of charging a co-payment to
the patient, to be paid for through
out-of-pocket payments or supple!
mental private health insurance.


"Will NHI produce a two-tiered
health system in the Bahamas, one
being the public sector and the other
being the private sector, similar to
the Bahamian education system?"
BFCon said it was vital for the
Government and private sector to
conduct studies on the economic
impact that NHI would have.
Under the proposed plan, NHI
would be funded by employees, who
would contribute 2.65 per cent of their
monthly earnings through payroll
deductions. Employers would con-
tribute an equal amount, making pay-
ments equivalent to 5.3 per cent of a
worker's wages. Self-employed work-
ers would be required to pay the full
5.3 per cent.
NHI would be capped at $5,000 per
month, compared to the National
Insurance Board (NIB). which is


capped at $400 per week.
BECon said the $234 million esti-
mated cost for NHI was likely to be
too low, as it did not account for
Bahamians who had health insurance
outside the Bahamas, persons who
were unable to pay for treatments,
and those who were unable to afford
the costs of recommended proce-
dures.
BECon added: "Government sub-
sidises a lot of health care costs in the
Bahamas, but even the huge amount
they spend is insufficient in many cas-
es. Therefore, even public sector costs
may be under quoted in the NHI
report. "One example of this is gov-
ernment dialysis patients. For those
whose kidneys have failed, dialysis is
required to keep them alive and this
treatment is very expensive. The nor-
mal dialysis patient usually requires


dialysis three times a week, with each
session lasting between three to four
hours.
"There are times when government
dialysis patients are scheduled only
twice a week with sessions that)ast
only one-and-a-half to two hours. This
is due to the fact that dialysis equip-
ment is very expensive and there are
a limited number of dialysis machines
available for government patients.'
BECon also questioned how NtiI
was feasible when the National Insu'r-
ance Board's (NIB) administration
costs were currently equivalent to
more than 20 per cent of contribu-
tions. The NHI Blue Ribbon Com-
mission's own report said that for it to
be feasible, NIB's administration costs
needed to be at least 10 per cent of
contributions, given that NIB would
administer its scheme.


Jitney stake, from Page 1B


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that VILLIAN CIVIL OF MIAMI
STREET, P.O. BOX-C.R. 54802 NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 21ST day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.


Legal Notice



NOTICE


TBN ONE LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation




NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act.No. 45 of 2000,
TBN ONE LIMTED., is in dissolution as of June 23rd, 2006.

International Liquidator Services Limited situated at 35A Regent
Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the Liquidator.




LIQUIDATOR




Legal Notice

NOTICE


GUN POINT INVESTMENTS LIMITED


This is to inform the General Public that all that private thoroughfare
or roadway known as Gun Point situate northeastwards of the
Settlement of Spanish Wells at the northwestern end of the Island
of North Eleuthera will be closed to the public from 6:00 a.m. on
Saturday, 8th July, 2006 to 6:00 a.m. to Sunday, 9th July, 2006 to
protect the right of ownership.





Everette Sands
President


racing Information As Of
ricing Information As Of:


1.75 8.70
.24 6.35
.85 0.70
.80 1.26
.49 1.05
.60 8.00
.20 1.39
0.80 8.50
.26 4.12
.88 2.10
.21 4.02
1.50 10.45
2.43 8.60
1.15 8.42
.27 0.95
0.20 9.50
.10 8.27


10.14
3.54


43 00
16.00
3.60
52wk-HI


1 2933
2.8564
2.3915
1.1744


Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable tahamas
Colina Holdings
'Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FiratCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Kerzner International BDRs


10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings


28.00 ABDAB
13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.35 RND Holdings


52wk-Low F


1.2387 Moneyo Marey KI und
2.3667 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
2.2487 Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1.1246 Colna Bond Fund


BISX ALL SHARE IWDEX 19 Dec 02 1.000.00
52wk-HI HigW doing prie in lost 52 e.ksU
52wk-LAw Low st closing prte In le a 2 weeks
Prevous Cloge Prmvku da's w lId pril for dlly volume
Today Coge Cm.nt dey's wepghtd pries for dally volume
Chong* Chanage In doing prles hon day to day
Daly Vol. Numberof total shares traded today
DIV $ Divkdnds per share paid In the lest 12 months
P/E Closing price dvkkded by the last 12 month eamings


The report said: "Govern-
ment's investment in the
ground transport sector has
been targeted towards road
infrastructure, whereas there
has been minimal investment
in public transportation and
supporting infrastructure.
"To reduce traffic conges-
tion in New Providence, and
improve future use of public
transport, much greater pub-
lic investment is needed, pri-


marily towards the provision
of bus bays and passenger ter-
minals. The economic benefit
in terms of road safety and
vehicle operating cost savings
would far outweigh the capi-
tal investment needed."
T6Aunify New Providence's
jitney system, the report said
the new company would have
to buy all jitneys currently in
service.
It pegged the cost of doing


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ERICK ALCIME OF WULFF
ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 21ST day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that SAMUEL FENELUS OF MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, P.O. BOX: AB-20681, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization. should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 21ST day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RP.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.



PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, PATRICIA JOSEPH, of
Bellots Rd., Nassau, Bahamas, P.O. Box SS-6156 intend to
change my name to PATRICIA DIROSIA. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box
N-792, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice.


Financial Advisors Ltd.


S I ELp.I iY


BwIRS '-VISIT WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
M'tSE 1,515.62 / CHG 01.01 / %CHG 00.07 / YTD 164.91 / YTD % 12.21
Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E


1.70
11.75
7.23
0.80
1.43
1.49
9.21
1.90
10.80
4.98
2.50
6.21
11.50
12.43
11.15
0.95
9.50
9.10
7.91
10.00
-.' Fifdlty Over
Bid $
14.00
10.00
0.29


41.00
14.00
0.29


1 293348'
2.78564 ""
2.391480"
1 174411""


1.85
11.75
7 23
0 80
1.43
1.49
9.21
1.90
10.80
5.06
2 50
6.21
11.50
12.43
11.15
1.03
9.50
9.10
7.90
10.00
-The-Counter Securities
Ask $ Last Price


15.00
10.35
0.54


11.00
10.00
0.00


MMi Wil il W-The-Counter Securities


4 3 )0 J 1 :01,
15.00 12.50
0.54 0.35
I Mutual Funds
YTDI. Lal 12 m.,.,n Di. S


0.000
0.380
0.330
0.020
0.060
0.050
0.240
0.000
0.600
0.045
0.000
0.240
0.540
0.550
0.500
0.000
0.405
0.560
0.000
0.585


1.923 0.720 7.8
0.000 0.800 NM
-0.084 0.000 NM
2 2', 0 000 194
1.750 0.360 8.0
-0.070 0.000 N/M


Yield
0.00%
3.23%
4.56%
2.50%
4.20%
3.68%
2.61%
0.00%
5.56%
0.90%
0.00%
3.86%
4.78%
4.42%
4.48%
0.00%
4.26%
6.15%
0.00%
5.85%


P/E Yield


4.80%
7.80%
0.00%
0 0,').
2.57%
0.00%


VI.Id .


N-'. iEv
" 16 June 2006
" 31 May 2006
" 30 April 2006
S- 31 May 2006


..... .M6l.. D7 ., r-- .- -


this at $12.3 million, based on
the value of all jitneys current-
ly in service. The report did
not appear to account for cash
flow, revenues and future prof-
it forecasts in reaching this val-
uation, let alone goodwill.
The $12.3 million was based
on there being about 336 jit-
neys in the public transport
system, some 280 on the roads
and 56 some 20 per cent -
being off the roads for repairs.


Using Department of Cus-
toms' Cost of Imported Freight
(CIF) figures, and adding on
45 per cent import duty, 7 per
cent stamp duty, and dealers'
margins and costs, the report
pegged the average jitney's
market value at $36,644.
But the report warned: "The
legal owner of many jitneys is
not known, nor is the informa-
tion currently available on
vehicle particulars reliable."


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MAYBELL MOREAU OF MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization -
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 28th day of Jun&
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship',
P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that DENNEISHA PRYCE OF #279
JACKFISH ST, P.O. BOX F-43218,.CARAVEL BEACH, GRAND
BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 21ST day of JUNE,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that DANIEL COICOUS, MALCOLM
ROAD WEST, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 21ST day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.


Legal Notice



NOTICE


TBN THREE LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation




NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act.No. 45 of 2000,
TBN THREE LIMTED., is in dissolution as of June 23rd,
2006.

International Liquidator Services Limited situated at 35A Regent
Street, P.O. Box 1.777, Belize City, Belize is the Liquidator.



LIQUIDATOR




Legal Notice



NOTICE


TBN TWO LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation




NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act.No. 45 of 2000,
TBN TWO LIMTED., is in dissolution as of June 23rd, 2006.

International.Liquidator Services Limited situated at 35A Regent
Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the Liquidator.



LIQUIDATOR


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that SHERLA THURENE OF FIRST
ST., COCONUT GROVE AVE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 28TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas,


2,300 -0.019
1.568
0.738
0.292
0 143
0.188
0.618
750 -0.067
0.931
0.115
0.283
0.539
0.745
0.885
0.885
51,095 -0.162
0.526
0.565
0.160
2.036


e WIeekly Vol EPS $ Div $


*. .19.685% / 2005oos ae.o0%
MARKET TERMS VIELD last 12 rr.,, .' l. a...,a'n.l's ..-l D, ....,,.g p... :e
Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV Net Asset Value
N/M Not Meaningful
FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1. 1994 = 100


BUSINESS I


___j


NA V


I 293348"
2.78564"**
2.391480**
1 _174411"**








WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 200b, P-AUL .3


PUC guidelines to aid telecoms competition


. FROM page 1B

questions of consumer protec-
J ion and economic efficiency.
"Interconnection enables
* consumers to contract with the
supplier of their choice, and
still be able to receive all
incoming calls regardless of
where they originate."
The PtUC said the guidelines
would help BTC prepare its
standard or Reference Inter-
connection Offer (RIO), mak-
ing it easier for other licensed
operators to enter intercon-
nection agreements with the
state-owned carrier.
It is unclear if the PUC's
publication of the guidelines is
in any way linked to the cur-
S- rent dispute between BTC and
sits only legal competitor in
-. fixed-line, long and short-dis-
tance telecommunications,
IndiGo Networks, over inter-
;,connection between the two
companies in Abaco.
Paul Hutton-Ashkenny,
.!president of IndiGo Networks,
wrote in a previous letter to
,:the PUC that interconnection


"Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people ywho are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, callus on 3224.986
and share your story.


between its network and
BTC's had not happened since
IndiGo first requested this 17
months ago in December 2004.
He alleged that BTC had
"refused all efforts" to deal
with this, despite being man-
dated by its licence to provide
interconnection with other
operators at any technically
feasible point.
Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said
the issue was brought to the
PUC's attention on March 22,
2005, and IndiGo subsequent-
ly filed a formal dispute on the
issue on June 20 last year.
He added that IndiGo's two
suggestions for interconnection
locations had been rejected by
BTC, and the PUC had taken
no action to address the situa-
tion.
Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said:
"BTC has been permitted to
disregard the terms of its
licence with impunity, while
IndiGo's legitimate business
interests and legal rights have
been frustrated.
"Furthermore, Abaco resi-
dents have been denied the
opportunity to share in the
benefits of the competitive


telephone service and lower
rates that other Hl.ihilian I reis-
idents have been cile I i, cjoy
since Septemhce .'(l)()4.
IndiGO held a meeting with
the PUC on September 22,
2005, to address Ius, anid other
issues, and subsCqi uently wiote
to the regulate scceeking fur-
ther guidance, which it alleged
was not forthcoming.
In response. Bariett Russell,
the PUC's executive director,
said the PUC had held discus-
sions with BTC' over its refusal
to interconnect with SRG's
network on Abaco in an
attempt to move that situation
forward.
Mr Hutton-Ashkenny had
added in his letter: "BTC
appears to have been iincreas-
ingly adopting a policy of non-
cooperation with respect to
cross-carrier relationships,
even though such relationships
are a normal part of a profes-
sional, competitive telecom-
munications sector.
"The PUC, of course, as the
regulator of the telecommuni-
cations sector, must ensure that
no service provider within the
sector, and particularly the


dominant incumtiibeiit is pel
mitted to Ii lusluale the devcl
Oinetlt oI coLnlpetition, which
is against the interests of the
consumer iand contrary to the
PUC's statutory mandate.
"NotwithstLanding the' salu-
taily effect of.cotmpetition
between BIT and IndiGo on
rates within the sector, the gen-
eral public is, in our view,
being deprived of the wider
benefits of L.uch competition


by a number ol open issues,
between the two companies,
which to date have not been
resolved."
The PULJC said the proposed
guidelines would ensure inter-
connection agreements \were
not used by two providers to
the detriment of competition.
or be against the public inter-
est.
It said its role would be to
review RIOs, particularly those


involving "dominant opera-
tors", to ensure they met the
requirements of the Telecom-
munications Act and sector
policy.
The telecoms sector regula-
tor said the guidelinesiu applied
to telecoms services where
there existed competition, such
as fixed-line, and others that
were still subject to a BTC
monopoly, particularly cellu
lar services.


Position Available

Network Engineer
Profile:
- MCSE or MCP with N+

CCNA or higher a distinct advantage

Key Responsibilities:

- Day to day operations of a datacentre
- Providing support to clients
- Network and System troubleshooting

Knowledge and Skills:

- Good Organisational Skills
- Polite And Well Presented

- Experience with PCs and IP Networking
S Must be willing to travel

Salary & Benefits Negotiable

Send resume no later than Friday July 7th, 2006 to:
The Human Resource Director
Fidelity
51 Frederick Steet
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
f: 326.3000
e mail: careers@fidelitybaharnas.com


NOTICE


Hope Town residents and

decedents of Hope Town. There

are foreigners who are surveying

land between the Nigh Creek and

Back Creek. If you have or know

of anybody that has property there

please notify them to go and check

on it or you might have it taken

away from you by Quieting Title.


PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY

VACANCY NOTICE
RISK MANAGER II
Princess Margaret Hospital

Applicants are invited from suitably qualified person for the post of Risk Manager 11. Princess
Margaret Hospital, Public Hospitals Authority.

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-

Bachelors degree in Healihcare or Business Administration with a miniimnm of two years relevant experience.
Proficient use of Personal computer Software including presentation graphics and
statistical reports. Experience in health care environment preferred.

The Risk Manager 11 must be able lo plan effectively, organize and direct various activities relating to risk and
insurance functions, and demonstrate effective communication skills with indiNiduals at all le els of the
organization. including clinician patients and families.

.job Summah':
The Risk Manager coordinates the hospitals risk management program. i.e.. risk detection,
assessmnenl, prevention and appraisal.

Duties:
I. (ntirali/ thel risk prioilam, mii nain land coordinate tlhe admnistaliives acti iti,,ie and
reports rclaiiing to otllt itnicirnal and et\rtIal risks
2. Invesligates and Iollot -up o- f pol'ntiall comX-pns'ahle cenis identified through i the
incidetiok cmicniicc re(polm sntcmn.
II tltlishn: hospital- ide imelhods (it avoid, reductl or niniin/te risks including re\ in'S
l sk itmanagement Jdal anid intradepartlnental policies and pr.cedureis with departinit heads
4 Kevi'is lthe language ol 1iwlinent hospitals t ilicies niid procedties to assinc tihir
defensibilitN
5 Mitntain- close liasnnantl cooi.ti raIit.ion ith (' r ( 'ip il' !Iisl M;.n Iigi1 l td 'gal
\dvisoi A li l tlhe ipI rI)pos.t' o I rcporiiiig ins'. I ng..itii.,anail>zingii. setting and detendin g claims.
6. Coniers ith all department of the institution inclihlinig the medical staff as the need
,arises, It iitesligalt a po it'lrlial risk sitoulion
7. I)e clops and implements aind evaluates patilifiiamiln cIomplaint
8 Integrates iisk nilanaililtenti' acli\tlics %idh ,issiiriiiinc.
l) ( oidinatic', risk ilmanage ei lcntat iliti i ith mLcdkial I taf. inlction control. emploce
hlitlhli l.cgal Adti.son ( tipol)ratc isk M\1aager imi'itceriIng. nursing. lpievcnifie
maintenance., patlic repircsintaive.e' c.
10 tiovides ongoing educatioinal sessions ial assisi(ance, fi.i relt ant iisk mainnagemient issuss. to all levels oi
,lall
II ( -. s erio dic applaisals o1 hospital ii.imanaiDmt .ii tiles It' dctlrtil' ine program efnectiveness
12. i cans t..scurrent know ledge I risk iican. itt: Iluoiiiu; lih ilidtlt ance at loal, regional and national meeting
and thioug'h rv\eicv of current lileratne.
Lciter.. ol fapl)lation tniume and three (3) references slioutld be iubhmiltcd, no late than 14tht .,ul). 2006 to the Human
rcut.out-, i.ictor, Publit H)ospl)itijI Astlthority, P.O Box N .2(00 or Isi Floor Corpotate Office, Docken-
dale House, West Bay Street.


-THE TRIBUNE


I-I


BUSINtSS






I HI- IHILiUNt


PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006


Ministry in talks on


'star ratings'


FROM page 1B

nier, Mobile Travel Guide, to
apply star ratings to this coun-
trv's resorts.
The company held a press
conference during the first day


of the Caribbean Hotel Indus-
try Conference to officially
launch its partnership, and dis-
cuss plans to talk to individual
Caribbean governments about
implementing its rating system.
Kendrick Malone, a manag-


ing partner at the Freeman-
Group, said he had broached
the ratings idea to Bahamian
tourism director-general, Ver-
nice Walkine, and other Min-
istry of Tourism officials while
in New York for Caribbean


Tourism week.
He said the response was
very favourable, and the Min-
istry of Tourism showed par-
ticular interest in training
tourism vendors as well.
According to Mr, Malone,
Mobile is the only group which
can apply the star rating to
hotels. The group sends rep-
resentatives to each property
to analyse the resort on a wide
criteria, usually arriving unan-
nounced. At the end, Mobile
then applies a star rating of
between one to five, five being
the highest. This rating allows
potential visitors to have an
understanding of what they can
expect a resort or hotel to be
like.
Any other star ratings used
in the Caribbean are often, Mr
Malone said, ratings applied
based on the amenities the
hotel offers, and by persons
who have not actually visited
the resort.


According to Bill Freeman,
the company will be approach-
ing countries on an individual
basis.
Press
During the press conference,
FreemanGroup officially
launched FreemanGroup Des-
tinations (FG Destinations),
an initiative designed to offer
tourism destinations a fully
integrated and comprehensive
approach to establishing,
implementing and maintaining
international service standards
through measurable training
processes.
Service workers, especially
those with direct visitor con-
tact, hospitality workers, gov-
ernment employees and public
services workers can benefit
from the service.
Mr Malone, who is a former
Director of Tourism for the
British Virgin Islands,


explained that the services
being offered are essential to
the continued global competi- --.
tive position of the Caribbean.
Mr Freeman added: "We
saw a clear need to provide
destinations with an all-encom- .
passing approach to quality -
issues directly affecting their;,
.visitor's intent to return and'
recommend."
. FG Destinations, he added,
has partnered with Mobile
Travel Guide, which is begin-
ning to identify countries inter-
ested in adopting the rating, It
has also linked up with AIG,
the insurance company and
underwriter of voluntary
employee benefits, a move
designed to alleviate the high
cost of health care services for
businesses and employees, and
eCornell, a subsidiary of Cor-
nell University and a provider
of a vast library of training
modules accessible via the
Internet in electronic format.


Bank Automation Specialist


Profile:
Bachelors Degree

(L Key Responsibilities:

Assist in implementing the bank's automation project
Liaise with Service Centres to set up scanning process
0 Scan days work and documentation from Service Centres
and accounting and operation areas

Knowledge and Skills

Attentive to detail
PC Skills
Some knowledge of bank processes and functions
^ Ability to process high volumes of work accurately and
efficiently

Send resume no later than Friday June 30th, 2006 to:

The Human Resource Director
Fidelity
51 Frederick Steet
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
f: 326.3000
e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com


PUBLIC NOTICE

TO RECIPIENTS OF LONG-TERM BEWIiTS

AND ASSISTANCE IN NEW PROVIDENCE

Pensioners are reminded that effective July 2006,
the National Insurance Board will require all recipients
of Long-Term Benefits and Assistance in New
Providence to have their monthly cheques deposited
directly to their banks accounts.


If you have not already made' arrangements to have
your cheques deposited to your bank accounts,
you are advised to immediately visit your nearest
NIB Local Office to avoid any delay or suspension
of payments.





Clearing Banks Association



NOTICE


The Central Bank of The Bahamas issued Guidelines on the
Prevention & Detection of Money Laundering for Licensees
(Guidelines) in October 2005. The Guidelines direct licensees
to complete verification of existing clients by June 30t 2006
in accordance with section 6(6) of the Financial Transactions
Reporting Act, 2000.

Failure to verify your facility may negatively impact the normal
operation of your account/facility. Customers are encouraged
to visit their respective Bank (s) to update u verified
accounts/facilities on or before June 30t 2006.

The following documents, in addition to your respective bank's
verification documentation, are required for updating personal
accounts.

Official Current Photo for example:

Current Valid Passport;
Driver's License;
or Voter's Card

Verification of Address for example:

Voter's card;
Utility bill;
National Insurance Card ;or
Bank or credit card statement.

In the case of Corporate/Business accounts/facilities please
contact your nearest Bank for verification requirements.


Bank of The Bahamas Limited
Citibank N.A.
Commonwealth Bank Limited
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited
FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited
Royal Bank of Canada


GN-366


THE PRICE CONTROL (GASOLINE & DIESEL OIL)
(AMENDMENT) REGULATIONS, 2002


The public is advised that prices as shown in the Schedule for LEAD FREE
gasoline and DIESEL OIL sold by ESSO will become effective on Wednesday, 28th June,
2006.

SCHEDULE

MAXIMUM WHOLESALE SELLING MAXIMUM
PRICE PER U.S. GALLON RETAIL
SELLING PRICE
PLACE ARTICLE MAXIMUM MAXIMUM FERU.S.
SUPPLIERS' DISTRIBUTORS' GALLON
PRICE PRICE
S S
PART
NEW INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
PROVIDENCE
ESSO STANDARD LEAD FREE 4.02 4.02 4.46
OIL
DIESEL OIL 3.33 3.33 3.52
PART C
GRAND BAHAMA INCLUDING SEA FREIG H T
(NOT FREEPORT)

ESSO STANDARD LEAD FREE 3.92 4.10 4,52
OIL
DIESEL OIL 3.21 3.37 3.56
PART D'
ABACO,ANDROS NOT INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
ELEUTHERA
ESSO STANDARD LEAD FREE 4.02 4.25 4.64
OIL
DIESEL OIL 3.34 3.50 3.69

ALLOTHER NOT INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
FAMILY ISLANDS
ESSO STANDARD LEAD FREE 4.03 4.27 4.67
OIL
DIESEL OIL 3.35 3.50 3.70


Signed:
HARRISON THOMPSON
PERMANENT SECRETARY


BUAINESS








THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006, PAGE 7B


COISPG


JUDGE PARKER...
JUDGE PARKER ___ ____


APARTMENT 3-G


BLONDIE


NON SEQUITUR


TsIEt. 4e 0W.""",e MIo.
TIGER


P11 CRYPTIC PUZZLE 1-12 4 5 7
1T i


ACROSS
1 Sel wood tor the Are, iially (5)
6 Good qually ham about
heelooend(5)
9 kAn N M emonfAed by
aMng(7)
10 Notashwmed to bel n favourof a bt
OfaLdy(5)
A In indeinlRoM they were
convmn (5)
U2 Pots apart? Buzz offl (5)
13 Approbation own by more
pedaors (7)
15 JuIce of araparela(3)
17 Tray design showing aesthetic
sn v(tty4)
18 Compin aboulthe bet? (6)
19 Ms hard, being brokl (5)
20 Bet siul(6)
22 Rgh name for an academy (4)
24 Stl a bN maley, albe;t badcwud (3)
25 I'm ethical, but this is
simply wrong (7)
26 More than a ton weight? (5)
27 Hack mark, perhaps, when a chap
gets out of line (5)
2 MendelaMohn's cat? (5)
29 Surrenders toa soldier with bad
veins(5,2)
36 A motor may contain one,
Just in case (5)
31 He goes to the dub to have
a swim (5)


Yesterday's cryptic solutions
ACROSS: 3, W-h-ist 8, Relay 10, Pos-i-t 11, Far 12, S-LA-in
13, M-od-ic-um 15, Ke-VI-n 18, Nag 19, Medico 21,
Debased 22, Thor 23, Dive 24, De-bat-ed 26, Wan-Ted 29,
Cub(-ism) 31, Ste-l-n 32, Me-X-lcan 34, Athos 35, Ton 36,
Ub.-RA 37, W-edge 38, A-lien
DOWN: 1, Def-O-.e 2, Marine-R 4, H-elm 5, Spiked 6, Ton-
Ed 7, Civic 9, Lad 12, Sugared 14, CAB 16, VIVID 17,
Nove-L 19, Menaces 20, Stews 21, Do-n-ne 23, De-bit-ed
24, Dental 25, Tux 27, Attic 28, TI-a-RA 30, Tango 32,
More 33, Cod


DOWN
2 Greater Elgar composition with a
rousing start (6)
3 Peevian as a Dwarf? (6)
4 Sony about the publicity for the
leisure centre (3)
5 Delivered port to the Turk's Head (5)
6 Irascible but not tasteless (7)
7 Lies around being
insular (4)
8 Just the man to
prejudice things? (6)
12 Sadly, they could be a
wee bit peelle-wallie (5)
13 Like a shrew who's been called
mousy? (5)
14 Strong drink (5)
15 How can it be sweet when a uniform
Is in rags? (5)
16 Something afoot for
the cyclist (5) ,
18 Guardian of wealth, but has he no
gem? (5)
19 As put in the sink, perhaps, or in
outer space (7)
21 He's in the phone book (6)
22 Ivanhoe's lady In a squabble with
another (6)
23 People rather like Dan? (6)
25 The man who came
to dinner (5)
26 An Indication of good amid evil? (4)
28 Not really a bad lie? (3)


resteruay s easy solutions
ACROSS: 3, Trait 8, Refer 10, Robot 11, Tic 12, Depot 13,
Derided 15, Named 18, Ban 19, Dilate 21, Demonic 22,
Hurtd 23, Seat 24, Refuses 26, Spires 29, Tot 31, Tenet 32,
Central 34, Cited 35, Log 36, Begun 37, Debit
38, Rally
DOWN: 1, Deter 2, Decibel 4, Reed 5, Ironic 6, Total 7,
Comet 9, Fir 12, Denotes 14, Dam 16, Makes 17,
Delta 19, Diluted 20, Chest 21, Drain 23, Settler
24, Retina 25, Son 27, Peter 28, Recur 30, Magic 32, Cell
33, Rob


ACROSS
1 Musty (5)
6 Clever (5)
9 Bathroom (2,5)
10 Tasteless (5)
11 Stage whisper (5)
12 Ship's bed (5)
13 Dwells (7)
15 Wager (3)
17 Spoken (4)
18 Book (6)
19 Symbol (5)
20 Insult (6)
22 Mountain
range (4)
24 Number (3)
25 Master-of-
ceremonies (7)
26 Reverie (5)
27 Jewelled
headdress (5)
28 Understood (5)
29 Dress (7)
30 Foe (5)
31 Enquired (5)


Dn~


North dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.
NORTH
0-
VAKJ 10984
*1072
+J 7 3
WEST EAST
4QJ1085 476432
VQ72 T5
S63 49854
4854 41092
SOUTH
*AK9
V63
*AKQJ
4AKQ6
The bidding:
North East South West
4 I Pass 4 NT Pass
5 Pass 5 NT Pass
6 4 Pass 7 NT
Opening lead queen of spades.

Some hands stand or fall on one
key decisiofi, and declareris best
advised in such cases to delay that
decision until the last possible
moment. South failed to do that in
this deal when he impetuously went
down in an ice-cold grand slam.
West led the queen of spades, and
it was immediately apparent to
declarer that the outcome would
hinge: on how he fared in hearts.
Having learned that with nine


cards of a suit missing four to the
queen, it was better to play for the
drop of the queen rather than attempt
a finesse, South won the spade lead
and all too hastily cashed the A-K of
hearts to go down one, losing a spade
trick at the end.
Declarer was extremely remiss
when he plunged headlong into tack-
ling the hearts in this fashion. With
12 sure tricks in sight two spades,
two hearts, four diamonds and four
clubs there was no need to make
the crucial decision in hearts so early
in the play.
Upon winning the spade lead
with the king, he should have played
a heart to the ace and then cashed
four clubs and the A-K-Q of dia-
monds to produce this position:
North
YKJ 109"


West
SJ 10
VQ7


East
4764
*9


South
*A9
T6
*J
The lead of the jack of diamonds
at this point would have destroyed
West. Whatever he discarded, South
would score the rest of the tricks.
Guessing whether or not to finesse in
hearts would not have entered the
picture at all.


TAREI


HOW many words of
four letters or more |,
can you make from
the letters shown
here?In making a
word, each.letter may
be used once only. 0 AI
centre letter and there
must be at least one
nine-letter word. No :
plurals or verb forms
ending in "s", no words with initial capitals and no
words with a hyphen or apostrophe permitted.
The first word of a phrase is permitted (e.g. inkjet
in inkjet printer).
TODAY'S TARGET
Good 23: very good 34; excellent 46. *
Solution tomorrow.


DOWN
2 Cashier (6)
3 Pulse (6)
4 Finish (3)
5 Melodies (5)
6 Post (7)
, 7 Network (4)
8 Regain (6)
12 Produced (5)
13 Criticise (5)
14 Material (5)
15 Brass Intrument (5)
16 Anxious (5)
18 Poison (5)
19 Treatment (7)
21 Military unil (6)
22 Horrifies (6)
23 Extol (6)
25 Man-made
waterway (5)
26 Small drink (4)
28 Beverage (3)


Thomas Nixon v Alvar Kangur,
Cambridge v Oxford, Royal
Automobile Club 2006. The
varsity match is the chess
world's longest running annual
fixture, staged every year apart
from during the world wars
since 1873. Its 2006 renewal
was sumptuously hosted at the
RAC with support from the
Vantis accountancy group and
banker Henry Mutkin.
Cambridge looked like winning
for almost the entire match until
the final half-hour when today's
position occurred on top board.
Cambridge's Nixon is three
pawns up so should win barring
accidents, but he became
worried about Black's intended
rook probe Rb3. The simple 1
Qd2 would keep everything
inder control, but White chose a


M -d'U6 6
a.0
Lt
o-m





I.,
,
1E E- 2




-8 -
3 _Aa


I THINK NWE PRIK\P.
S A. 5PCE A.UE 5W.

/


WEDNESDAY,
JUNE 28

ARIES Mar 21/Apr 20
You've been the recipient of great
rewards, but that doesn't stop you
from putting in continuous effort. This
week you are ready and raring to meet
any challenge that comes along.
TAURUS Apr 21/May 21
You hate being crass, but someone
owes you and you want them to pay
up. Finances are tight, so be sure to
budget for those emergency situations
that always pop up.
GEMINI May 22/Jun 21
Let someone else do the driving
right now, Gemini. Sit in the back
seat, relax and enjoy the ride. You
deserve a nice break to watch the
scenery go by.
CANCER Jun 22/Jul 22 ,
You're flattered by someone's atten-
tion, but their intensity might make
you a bit self-consciogs. Don't
underestimate how.fabulous you are.
Bask in it a while.
LEO Jul 23/Aug 23
This week is right for one of your
famous expressions of personal
warmth. Your willpower can over-
come any negativity that comes your
way. Share the wealth with others.
VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
You have to learn that there are some
people who are dragging you down,
Virgo. Cut these people free and save
your energy for those who really care
about you.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
This week will be a breeze, Libra.
Friends are prevalent, there is no
shortage of activities to keep you
busy, and all eyes are on you. Turn
up the music and have fun.
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
Your boss has been on your back
and won't leave you alone. Since
you've been doing your job well,
more has been added to your plate.
Speak up before stress sets in.
SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
Your spirits are good this week,
Sagittarius, and so is your luck.
See if you can upgrade it even
more. Capitalize on your good
fortune at work and with friends.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
You'll ned a bit of humor to get you
through this murky week. Expect it to
offer a hum-drum series of events.
See if friends can help pull you
through. Things will look better.
AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
It's time to accept that that list of
plans needs an urgent revision. New
prospects have made changes essen-
tial. You will be happy with the
results, Aquarius.
PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20
Your life is a bit chaotic, so retreat to
the background and use the noise
and confusion to assess things.
Later, you'll emerge looking great.


a b c d e f g h
different way to block the b8
rook's advance. It proved a
blunder which put Black right
back into the game, and led a
dozen moves later to White's
resignation and match victory for
Oxford. Can you spot White's
plausible mistake?
LEONARD GARDEN


PUZZLE SOLUTIONS
ulm 4 uo 9M ipei 'sJ m alM
ja y un WAe intmo poo6 w I=o xi fw
puedosiq uoM sa lpeiM ipue iO ZqN 9P qxO
E +L-Iq qxN 1 iSq~i SIq iS% I up8 AUr sset3
*


I I


Ib e -o 6e o O










PAE BSWDESAOUER8T20STIUN POT


Swimmers

make a splash

in Puerto Rico
* SWIMMING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

WHILE Vereance Bur-
rows turned in a surprise
record breaking perfor-
mance, Ariana Vanderpool-
.Wallace, Alana Dillette and
Nikia Deveaux all lived up
to the Bahamas Swimming
Federation's expectations.
Burrows, 16, led the way
for the Bahamas on the first
day of competition at the
XVI Caribbean Island
Swimming Championships
in Salinas, Puerto Rico by
inking his name in the
record books.
Improving on his prelimi-
nary time of 25.92 seconds,
Burrows came back and
won the gold in the boys 15-
17 butterfly final in 25.39 to
secure the first CISC record
at the championships.
He erased the previous
mark set by Shawn Clarke
of Barbados in 25.87 in
2004. Juan Serrano of Puer-
to Rico also went under the
old mark in 25.72 for the sil-
ver and Brad Hamilton of
Jamaica did 26.28 for the
bronze.
Burrows' feat was one of
the six gold produced in the
Bahamas' 10-medal haul.
Deveaux came up with a
pair of gold, while Vander-
pool-Wallace and Dillette
had one each to go along
with their silver each.
Their performances,
along with a silver from Ali-
cia Lightbourne and a
bronze from John Bradley,
had the Bahamas sitting in
third place in the standings
with 144 points behind
Trinidad & Tobago (201).
Puerto Rico is on top of
the leaderboard with 309.
. Federation president
Algernon Cargill, when
contacted in Puerto Rico
after the completion of
Tuesday's morning prelimi-
nary round, said they are
still beaming with excite-
ment over the performance
from Burrows.
"It was the first CISC
record as well. It has to be
the most outstanding swim
for us and at the meet so
far," Cargill stated.

Performing

Even though the
Bahamas only has a 24-
member team at the cham-
pionships, Cargill said they
are performing exceptional-
ly well, considering the fact
that all of the other teams
are much larger.
As the championships
continue, Cargill said their
primary objective is for all
of the swimmers to improve
on their personal best per-
formances.
If they can do that,
Cargill said he's convinced
that the Bahamas will be a
contender for the title at
the end of the week-long
competition.
"Our team is not as large
as the other countries, so all
we are asking for them to
do is to perform their best,"
Cargill noted. "So far, they
have been doing just that."
While Burrows had the
single most impressive per-
formance so far, Deveaux
struck for her pair of golds
in the girls' 18 and over 100
free in 59.93 and the 50
butterfly in 30.67.
Dillette, also competing
in the girls 18 and over,
picked up the silver in the
100 free behind Deveaux in
59.93 and posted a gold in
the 400 individual medley in
5:13.78.
Vanderpool-Wallace
came through with her pair
of medals with a gold in the
girls 15-17 100 free in 59.68
and a silver in the girls 15-
17 50 fly in 29.92.
The gold went to
Wilmarie Velez of Puerto
Rico in 29.72.
Lightbourne's lone silver
medal came in the girls' 15-
17 400 IM in 5:31.09 behind


Puerto Rico's Keshia
Vazquez winning time of
5:12.86.
Bradley's bronze was in
the boys 13-14 200 free in
2:03.05. The gold went to
Victor Munoz of the
Dominican Republic in
2:02.43 with Trinidad &
Tobago's Walter Romany
getting the silver in 2:03.05.
The Bahamas' team of
sisters Alicia and Teisha
Lightbourne, Jenna Chaplin
and Vanderpool-Wallace
won the gold in the girls 15-
17 400 free relay in 4:08.84.


NBA stars hold court with





Bahamian youngsters

0 BASKETBALL
"By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter


A


...2 ". . "
* ,-"* *.;. -i ,,." ^.. .
', '..,':;. ... ,. ':,. .. '. . .'':,l


5.,'
'4


YESTERDAY, more than 100
Bahamian children got a first
hand opportunity to learn from
their National Basketball Asso-
ciation (NBA) idols.
Thanks to the thriving Sport-
ing Tourism programme, the
Ministry of Youth Sports and
Housing, the Bahamas Basket-
ball Federation and NBA play-
ers, the first annual basketball
camp was hosted at the Sir
Kendal Isaacs gymnasium.
With more than 30 profession-
al NBA players in town, the
excitement level at the national
gym was at an all time high.
After a light warm-up, the
campers went through several
fundamental drills which includ-
ed dribbling, shooting and box-
ing out.
On the dribbling exercise, the
campers were instructed to drib-
ble the ball with their finger tips
instead of using their palms,
which they were accustomed to.
According to the players, drib-
bling with the finger tips gives
you more control instead of slap-
ping the ball.
The players also tried to cor-
rect the shooting form of the
campers, who were throwing the
ball at the rim.
Representative from the
Tourism Office Cecile Rose said
that, through the Sporting
Tourism programme, more
camps will be introduced to the
Bahamas where aspiring athletes
can have this opportunity with
professional players.
He said: "The turnout to this
camp is overwhelming, the
response was huge. We have two
more camps like these planned
and I know that if the response
for the first one is this big that
the other two will be crowded.
"What we try to do is work
closely with the federations
when we host camps such as
these. We allow the executive
members of the federation to
invite the campers out, noting
that they are more hands on
with them.
"Camps like these are an
excellent opportunity for both
the Bahamas and the federa-
tions."
Although the campers were
eager to get started, the Sir
Kendal Isaacs gymnasium is only
.equipped with six baskets.
7 Rose explained that if they
had a bigger facility would
be able to invite more campers
out.


* DIKEMBO MUTOMBO of the Houston Rockets instructs one of the youngsters yesterday.
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)


Sprinters


to go


* TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
SPRINTERS Derrick Atkins
and Adrian Griffith are ready to
take the professional circuit by
storm. The duo have recently
wrapped up their college careers
and are ready to compete for the
'big bucks.'
Both Atkins and Griffith are
recent graduates of Dickinson
State University (BlueHawk), in
North Dakota, and have assisted
the BlueHawks with three nation-
al championships, 2004-2006.
Winning the title of the fastest
male in the Bahamas in the 100m
at the recent senior national
championships hosted by the
Bahamas Association of Athletic
Associations, Atkins is hoping to
take over in the event, saying it is
just a matter of time, especially if
the nagging injury, which he has
been nursing, doesn't flare again.
Atkins posted a winning time
of 10.03 seconds in the 100m at
the meet. The time had a power-
ful wind reading of +3.7, which
will not stand'for the national
record.
The sprinter said the time was
something in the 'woodworks' for
a long time, but the nagging ham-
string injury has forced him to
change his plans.
He said: "I am just hoping and
praying that I can remain healthy
and produce more fast 'times, that
10


1'*'*












,-! ,;




b r '4
C -
-.






p..




















4..
'I ~44
5~


~2 ..X'
~.! ~i


ready


professional


Derrick Atkins and Adrian Griffith


wrap up their college careers


is my main focus right now. I have
some other goals in mind, like
breaking the national record at
the first meet, if I can't do it at
this meet, I will be looking for-
ward to doing it at the CAC
games.

Time

"I know a lot has been said
about me especially now since
I've ran that time. But I want,
everyone to know that I as long as
I am healthy they can expect
times like these or faster from
me, I will show up to big meets. I
was injured and I gave it an hon-
est effort last year. It just didn't
work out to my advantage and
people just tend to base their facts
on that.
"I am still nursing that injury
'from last year that is why I start-
ed this season very late. This year
I was just trying to stay focused
on staying healthy so I won't fall
too far off the wagon. I am still
nursing and trying to stay posi-
tive in the process."


Atkins has officially been
placed in the government's elite
programme in the past he was
on the developmental subvention
programme list.
The North America, Central
America and Caribbean Athletic
Association (NACAC) under 23
meet and the Central American
and Caribbean Championships
(CAC) championships might be
Atkins' final meets for the year,
but the sprinter, who is gunning
after the national record of 10.18
seconds held by Rudy Lavarity
and Renward Wells, said he will
be open to compete at any meet
scheduled after July.
At the recent National Asso-
ciation of Intercollegiate Athlet-
ics (NAIA) championships, Grif-
fith accumulated 22 points to
assist the Hawks in their victory.
He competed in the 100m,
200m, long jump and the 4x100m.
Atkins, who completed his eli-
gibility in 2005, holds the school
records in both the 100m and the
200m, and has helped the team
to establish a new record in the
4xl00m.


The success in track and field
on the collegiate level has
inspired both Atkins and Griffith
to move forward.
According to Griffith, who has
clocked 10.29 seconds in the 100m
at the NAIA championships, tak-
ing it to the next level was always
a dream of his which will come
from hard work and dedication.
Griffith has had surgery on his
knee and is coming off a two sea-
son vacation.

Absence
Griffith said: "I just want to
thank God for the year and the
performances, especially since I
am coming off a two year absence
from the sport and a knee injury.
When you add up all those factors
I have really worked hard and I
must say that this year has been a
great year.
"I had a long season which
started with indoor and went into
the outdoors. I didn't have a
break, but it's something I will
do again. My first meet from


indoor I came out rocky, but as
time went on I got stronger and it
propelled me for the outdoor sea-
son.
"It was basically the same thing
for the outdoor, I had a rough
time adjusting but once I did it
was like know stopping me. So I
must say that the season has gone
pretty good for me on the colle-
giate level, the big test Will come
in the two meets I have coming
up.
"I am quite certain that my last
year in college will help me with
my transition process, I am not
afraid to make adjustments, so if
I get a chance to go on the circuit
I will be ready."
Griffith's season's best time in
the 200m is recorded at 21.43 sec-
onds and a best jump of 25-4 in
the long jump event. Both
recordings were done at the
NAIA championships held in late
May.
In 2004, Griffith was named to
the NAIA All-American team,
and again in 2006 in both
the indoor and the outdoor sea-
son.
His stellar performances for the
school landed him with the most
valuable player award for the
Dakota Athletic Conference
(DAC).
Griffith revealed that he will
focus on the 100m and the long
jump on the professional level
instead of trying to compete in
three events.


5'?

'-I


it
p. ~-


TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY,


JUNE 28, 2006


F







TRBUESPRT EDESAORUNT8,206 PGE9


Agassi wins

first match

at last

Wimbledon
*TENNIS
WIMBLEDON, England
AMsoclated Press
WHEN Andre Agassi
stepped out Tuesday for
the first match of his final
Wimbledon, he lingered a
moment, taking in the rau-
cous standing ovation.
All the applause and
whistles and hoots of good
will got to him, so much so
that Agassi played an
awful opening set before
righting his racket and
beating 71st-ranked Boris
Pashanski of Serbia 2-6, 6-
2; 6-4, 6-3.
"To feel that sort of sup-
port it just meant the
world to me. I just wanted
to do 'em proud," Agassi
said. "So I got a little ner-
vous about trying too hard
early, overhit a lot. Took
me awhile to settle down."
Long a crowd favorite,
he's drawing extra interest
and adulation this fort-
night. He missed Wimble-
don the past two years
with injuries, and, more
significantly, he
announced Saturday he'll
retire after the U.S. Open.
That made Agassi the .
focal point at the All Eng-
land Club on a day filled
with all manner of matches
thanks to rain Monday
tliat;permitted only about
S 30 minutess of play. With
bits of blue sky peering
out between the clouds on
Day 2, fans wandered the
grounds to sneak peeks at
star players everywhere.
Among the winners
were three-time defending
champion Roger Federer,
1997 champion Martina
Hingis, and Grand Slam
champions Rafael Nadal,
Marat Safin, Justine
Henin-Hardenne and Kim
Clijsters.
Federer completed a 6-
3, 6-2, 6-2 victory over
Richard Gasquet for his
42nd win in a row on grass,
breaking Bjorn Borg's
record set in 1976-81.
"It's nice, isn't it?" said
Federer, who next faces
four-time semifinalist and
local favorite Tim Hen-
man. "To get any streak is
obviously nice. I'm still
going, so even better."
Federer worked only 37
minutes Tuesday; he led 6-
3, 1-2 when action was sus-
pended Monday. Hingis,
; who won Wimbledon at
age 16 in 1997, also took a
one-set lead into Tuesday,
and she polished off Olga
Savchuk of Ukraine 6-2, 6-
2. Hhigis hadn't played at
Wiribledon since 2001; she
was off the tour for three
years because of assorted
foot and ankle injuries
before coming back full
time in January.
Agassi came to Wimble-
don having played one
match the past three
months because of back
problems; he also missed
the Australian Open with
an ankle injury.
When he won the first of
his eight Grand Slam titles
Sat Wimbledon 14 years
S ago, he beat Boris Becker
in the quarterfinals, John
McEnroe yep, that John
McEnroe in the semifi-
nals, and Goran Ivanisevic
in the final. Agassi was 22
at the time, reveling in his
rebelliousness.
Now he's married to
Steffi Graf, is a father of
two 4-year-old son
Jaden strung together the
necklace Agassi wore on
court Tuesday and
emblematic of the tennis
establishment. Plus, he's
playing guys he's never
--- heard of.
"- -" Pashanski is 23, had nev-
S er played at a major until
this year, and was the one
on court with a hat turned


;backward Tuesday. Agassi
:is36-and looked it for
moments, particularly near
the end, with an extra
hitch in his step.
"You could see that he
is not really moving
great," Pashanski said.
At the final changeover,
Agassi leaned forward in
his chair, stretching his
bothersome back.
"I've had years where I
felt better; sort of don't
want to harp on any of the
negatives," he said. "This
is a challenge for me in
more ways than I probably
ever communicate."


Big guns


in


the


French find form


~A. II ~
~


advance


World


Cup


WEDNESDAY, JUNE,28, 2006, PAGE 9B


TRIBUNE SPORTS








WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 2006

SECTION




Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


urThe Tifbm'iw


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


eon/m


thPrough


in


Prst round







na-il-biter


* TENNIS
By ANDRE DAVIS
DAY two of the Security
and General International
Junior Tennis Open produced
success for Bahamian athletes
as they continued to advance
beyond the opening round.
Jacob Fountain of the
Bahamas defeated Haris
Radzematovic of the US in an
intense first round match, 6-2,
3-6, 6-4.
Early in the match, Radze-
matovic made it apparent he
was determined to use his
power to out muscle his oppo-,
nent, however Fountain's
finesse game was the perfect
counter.
Rdipinni chnwr dhp


Junior Tennis Open


forehand shots.
Despite his power he was
no match for the quick Foun-
tain in the beginning stages of
the match.
Fountain, ranked 26th in the
tournament, used a brain over
brawn strategy throughout the
match and it worked quite
well for him, as he took a 6-2
lead at the end of the first set.
The second set, however,
belonged to the 30th ranked
Radzematovic as he powered
his way through.
The momentum shifted in
his d irection cas man/ rf hi


pointing for Fountain as he
only managed to win three
games.
Then, with Radzematovic
seemingly in control of the
match, Fountain mounted an
inspired comeback in the third
set.
He forced Radzematovic to
lose his focus in the latter
stages, and frustrated him with
timely drop shots throughout
the third set.
This lead to a high intensity
tie breaker and it seemed as if
both athletes were going to
hriTbn their' A ,Pm.'


nomenal strength throughout forehand shots proved to be It was Fountain, however,
the match, which he incorpo- too quick for Fountain. who rose to the occasion to M JACOB FOUNTAIN in action yesterday.
rated with his backhand and The second set was disap- win in a great match. (Photo: Fellpi Major/Tribune stkff
_._....................................................., ,"...........,............................................................................. .. "
11eI A.
C euTT ed q sh 1


Well-rounddteam,


seiectea


for CAC Junior Championships


* TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
EXECUTIVE members of the
Bahamas Association of Athletic
Association (BAAA) are confi-
dent that they have put together
the strongest junior team to com-
pete in this year's Central Ameri-
can and Caribbean (CAC) Junior
Championships.
The event, which will be held in
Trinidad and Tobago in July 14th-
17th, will be led by Carifta Games
standouts Nivea Smith and Sheni-
qua Ferguson along with six other
medallists from the recently held
Carifta Games. The 48-member
team was named yesterday by the
BAAA.

Strength
According to public relations
officer Ralph McKinney, the
strength of this year's team doesn't
lie solely on the Carifta medallists,
but the presence of college ath-
letes who weren't able to compete
at the Carifta Games.
Those persons include Lanece
Clarke, Tamara Rigby, who's par-
ticipation is pending on a physical
test, Ramon Miller and Bianca
Stuart.
Although the team is pending
fitness test results from four ath-
S" ... .. .... ii,.,


Forty-eight athletes

named by the BAAA


the team will do exceedingly well.'
McKinney said: "This is truly a
well rounded team. There are
some veterans from Carifta Games
along with the college athletes who
weren't given that opportunity to
compete at the Carifta Games due
to school commitments.
"If we break down the athletes
who have qualified in each divi-
sion you can see that all the divi-
sions are strong. Like in the under
17 girls we have Nivea and Warren
in the under 17 boys.
"When we look at the under 20
boys and girls there is Ryan Penn
and Sheniqua Ferguson on the
track and Tracy Morrison and
Jamal Wilson on the field. So we
can truly say that the team is bal-
anced on the field and on the
track."
Smith and Ferguson will have
their work cut out for them, as
they brandish four medals from
the Carifta Games along with
World and Youth rankings.
Taking charge of the under 17
division, Smith will compete in the
10Il'm 100m. and both relays. She


secured her spot on the team by
winning the 100m and 200m, at the
junior nationals, in times of 11.92
seconds and 24.64 seconds respec-
tively.
Smith is currently ranked on the
World Youth top performance list
in the 200m with a season's best
of 23.66 seconds, she is ranked
fifth.

Charge
On the field, defending champi-
on in the men's high jump Jamal
Wilson will led the men's charge
along with Johnathon Davis and
Rudon Bastian in the long jump.
Tracey Morrison is coming off a
college and Carifta Games high
and is hoping to better her perfor-
mance from two years ago in the
javelin.
The Bahamas will also stand a
great chance on snagging four
medals in each divisional relay.
The only medal secured at the
games in 2004 was in the under 17
boys and girls division.


CACJUNIO[R]TEAM


* Under 17 Girls
1. Krystal Bodie
2. Jennie Jacques
3. Carlene Johnson
4. Tess Mullings
5. V'Alonee Robinson
6. Shellyka Rolle
7. Nivea Smith
8. Skyller Wallen
9. lesha White


* Under 17 Boys
1. Raymond Armaly
2. Nathan Arnett
3. Tradecio Davis
4. Darion Duncombe
5. Warren Fraser
6. Raymond Higgs
7. Shawn Lockhart
8. Brandon Miller III
9. Rashad Moxey
10. Pedro Oliver
11. Kristian Hepburn-Taylor
12. Kenneth Wallace-Whitfield
13. Fenton Williams
Pending Fitness Test:
14. Karlton Rolle
Pending Verification of Time:
15. Laquardo Newbold
M Under 20 Girls
1. Lanece Clarke
2. Michelle Cumberbatch
3. Sheniqua Ferguson
4. Ashlee Hanna
5. Tracey Morrison
6. Ramona Nicholls
7. Leneice Rolle


8. Tia Rolle
9. Bianca Stuart
10. T' Shonda Webb
11. Shannice Wright
12. Cache Armbrister
13. Tamara Rigby
0 Under 20 Boys
1. Anwick Alexis
2. Rudon Bastian
3. Livingstone Brown
4. Kayuse Burrows .
5. Jamaal Butler
6. Johnathan Davis
7. Lamar Delaney
8. Dwayne Ferguson
9. Juan Lewis
10. Ramon Miller
11. Ryan Penn
12. Jameson Strachan
13. Carl Stuart .
14. Charles Williams ;
15. Jamaal Wilson
Pending Fitness Test:
Carlyle Thompson
Also pending the results of the pole
vault and decathlon.
* The team will be headed by:
Team Manager: Foster Dorsette
Asst. Manager: Laura Pratt-
Charlton
Chaperones: Ann Thompson &
Angie Rolle
Head Coach: Dianne Woodside
Asst. Coaches: Stephen Murray,
Peter Pratt, Claudel McNabb,Paul
Hanna -