Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00408
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: May 9, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00408
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text




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"COOKIES
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SAND SUN


The


Tribune


Volume: 102 No.139 TUESDAY, MAY 9, 2006 PRICE 750

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Speculation that Maynard,

Neymour will run as

opposition candidates


By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
WHAT many.regard as the
Bahamas' third party, the Coali-
tion for Democratic Reform
(CDR), will be absorbed into
the FNM or limp on into the
next election without most of
Sits leadership, it was claimed
yesterday.
Speculation is that CDR
leader Charles Maynard and the
party's chairman Phenton Ney-
mour will run as FNM candi-
dates for the Adelaide and
South Beach constituencies,
respectively.
This move, some commenta-
tors said yesterday, will force
"those left behind" to either
take up the mantle of the CDR
alone or move into the opposi-
tion party.
However, neither leader of
the FNM, former Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham, nor CDR
leader Charles Maynard would
confirm that either scenario is
true.
"I am not in a position today
to comment on what we are
doing but I can say that both
Mr Neymour and myself are
doing something in co-opera-
tion with our party. There is
nothing personal, we are mov-
ing forward with our party.
"We are scheduled to make
an announcement in about two
weeks. It's a CDR announce-
ment not a Charles Maynard,
Phenton Neymour announce-
ment. Whatever decision is
made we are moving the whole
patty forward with us," Mr
Maynard said.
Nevertheless, there are those


in the CDR who are very clear
on whether party members will
be heading wholesale into the
FNM.
"For anyone to assert that the
CDR has gone with Charles
Maynard into the FNM is flat
out false. Now the question is:
can members of the CDR who
want to continue find the way to
continue? That is the challenge
those people face," said CDR
member Fayne Thompson.
"It is true that the CDR had
an impact in the last election,
that the FNM indicates that
they felt it more than the PLP,
but we.are not concerned about
who feels what, we believe in a
message.
"It is false to say that the
CDR has decided to join the
FNM in mass or any other polit-
ical organisation. Charles May-
nard cannot take anyone but
himself, his friends or his sup-
porters," said Mr Thompson.
He said there are other peo-
ple in the CDR who feel the
party should and can go on.
"Now the question is, is the
facility there to go on? But the
ideas of the CDR are eternal.
They predate the CDR and
they will postdate the CDR.
The CDR needs organisation
and needs to move on. If Mr
Maynard and Mr Neymour
want to move on that is their
right. But it is also my right and
the right of others to stay," he
said.
In November, former CDR
leader Dr Bernard Nottage
returned to his party of origin,
the PLP. While the move did


SEE page five


[i[ill [ Builders

hit out at

awarding

of govt

contracts"

BUILDERS in Nassau have
lashed out at the way govern-
ment contracts are being award-'
ed, claiming three "conglomer
ates" are being favoured over
others.
The builders have accused
.' the government of failing to jus-
tify the Ministry of Housing's
policies.
One told. The Tribune yester-
day that the process is not fair
and that one contractor' had
received most of the island's
road work.
It was now suspected that the
same firm had been given the
Perpall Tract drainage contract
for the new Fort Charlotte
housing project announced by
the Ministry of Housing over
the weekend.
Another builder said while
one contractor might get two to
four homes, others get 10, 20
and sometimes 25 at the same
tiihe.
Asked how the government
justified allocating such volumes
of work to these three contrac-
tors, the builder said: "We com-
plain about it, but if you ask
them about it, they don't giye
any justification.
One builder said, however,
that complaints against the
CONSTRUCTION continued yesterday on the new Sira %lMarket on Bas Street and Housing Ministry amounted'(o
contractor E.R. Hanna has declared that excavation is almost complete. The original Stra ness han grudgeful-
lMarket was destroyed by fire in 2001.
(Photo: Onan Bridgewater)
SEE page 10ntal


Death of boy crushed by tractor was accidental


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT The death of 10-year-
old Licson Josaphat, who was crushed to
death by a tractor on Sunday at BORCO,
has been officially classified as accidental;
Chief Supt Basil Rahming, press liaison
officer, reported that the police intend
to forward their findings to the Coroner
on completion of their investigation into
the matter.
Licson, a fifth grade student of Lewis
Yard Primary School, and four other
young Haitian boys between ages nine
to 13 years, were playing on the tractor
when the accident occurred sometime


around 11.30am.
According to reports, Licson was killed
instantly when he was run over by a back-
hoe. He suffered extensive injuries to his
skull.
The Bahamas Oil Refining Company
International Ltd said the incident
occurred in the scrap metal area of the
compound, where security had discov-
ered the body of a young boy lying on the
ground and several unauthorised indi-
viduals.
Supt Rahming said Licson, and his
friends, Jemly Homere, 13, Evans
Dormeus, nine, Gregory St Ainge, 11,
and Wilne Jean, 10, breached a security
fence and entered the compound.


They all climbed onto the tractor. Gre-
gory reportedly started the tractor and
began driving it when Licson accidental-
ly fell off and was crushed.
The tragedy has sent shock waves
throughout the small Haitian community
in Pinder's Point, where Licson had lived
with his father, Delicieux Josaphat, and
his 14-year-old brother, Macmer.
Many persons had gathered at the Lic-
son's home on Monday to pay their con-
dolences to his father, who is having a
hard time coping with the tragedy..
"He was my youngest and I raised him
myself since he was two after his mother
SEE page 11


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THE TRIBUNE


ANTI-HAITIAN campaign-
er Jeffery Cooper got the shock
of his life when he turned up to
dismantle a shack at the Hid-
den Valley immigrant site near
Treasure Cay.
The elderly woman living
there came outside, lifted her
dress, took down her pants and
said: "You can my kiss my
backside I ain't going'
nowhere!"
An islander told The Tribune:
"Mr Cooper was very surprised
and very distressed by what
happened. I don't think he'll
ever get over it."
The long-running saga of
Abaco's Haitian settlements is
due to enter a new phase this
week when government work-
ers move in to demolish all
shanties built at The Mud in
Marsh Harbour since last
November's devastating fire.
Haitians were warned at the
time they must not build any
more homes or extensions on
the site. To back up their
threats,-government officials
painted numbers on all homes
that survived the flames.
However, many immigrants
countered this tactic by painting
over the numbers a move that
may well backfire on them
when, the demolition gangs
arrive this week.
For the workers, armed with


chainsaws, have been told to
chop down all homes and exten-
sions with no numbers on them.
One islander said: "There--
could be chaos. The workers
have been told to take down all
extensions and rental units built


since last year's fire. All those
without numbers will go...and
the Haitians aren't going to be
happy."
An ultimatum was laid down
last week by Ministry of Works
co-ordinator Roland Bevins,
who gave immigrants 10 work-
ing days to remove new build-
ings or face the consequences.
"As I understand it," said a
Marsh Harbour resident, "the
workers will simply chop off any
building thought to have been
erected since last November.
The message was relayed to the
.people in the presence of two
Haitian priests, who translated
everything that was said into
Creole. So there can be no mis-
understanding of what was
said."
The neighboring settlement
of Pigeon Pea is not affected
because it is so congested that
there is no more room for build-
ings of any kind.
One resident who tried to
build a second storey on an
existing shack was stopped in
his tracks. The offending "high
rise" was quickly removed as
part of the government's get-
tough policy.
However, this week's
-onslaught could lead to further
tension between locals and
immigrants. During last year's
blaze, volunteer firemen were


FI Ly -I hib RI OUS N k-UpI~im


threatened by Haitian youths
who claimed they were delib-
erately failing to fight the
blames properly.

STILL in Abaco, mystery
hangs over the Marsh Harbour
airport improvement project,
due to start next month.
Bahamas Hotmix, contractors
for surfacing the runway, are -
according to Abaco sources -
still waiting for up-front pay-
ment before beginning work.
Crews are due to move on-
site during the first week in
June, but locals are wondering-
not only whether this will hap-
pen, but also whether the air-
port will close during the pro-
ject.
Their concern is that July is
one of Abaco's busiest tourist
months, and that prolonged clo-
sure of the airport will lead to
loss of much-needed revenue.
"There are some worried
folks around here," said a resi-
dent, "They're all wondering if
they are going to lose out."
The airport as it stands is now
inadequate for the island's


needs. A new taxiway will be
built off the resurfaced main
runway to accommodate
increased traffic from Nassau
and the United States.

LONG-SUFFERING
Ragged Islanders are again
under the hammer, having had
their government salaries
delayed by a week, causing
inconvenience and-hardship for
many.
Their newly-appointed
administrator a Mr Flowers -
was due to fly in on Monday
with around $2,000 in cash for
those who rely on government
pay to survive.
,However, Mr Flowers was
diverted to Acklins on unspeci-
fied "emergency" business,
leaving Ragged Islanders fum-
ing over the unpaid dues.
"It means financial life on this
island has come to a standstill,"
said one angry resident. "I do
work for everyone on the island
- but they all rely on govern-
ment pay.
"If they don't get paid, I don't
get paid. It means we'll miss our


chance to place orders on the
next mailboat and that will
end up costing us money
because everything's dearer
here."
Ragged Island, frequently
referred to by residents as the
"Cinderella isle" of the
Bahamas, is dependent on an
Exuma-based administrator.
Every month, the adminis-
trator flies in to attend a council
meeting and hand out govern-
ment pay, which covers clean-
up staff, janitresses and other
workers.
"This is very basic but very
necessary money for many of
the people- here," said the
islander. "If they don't get it,
they can't buy anything, and
they can't order provisions from
Nassau."
The government has told
them that Mr Flowers will be
there next Monday, complete
with cash. Pity him if he doesn't
turn up!

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Chaos looms as government prepares



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THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, MAY 9, 2006, PAGE 3


LOCAL nEWSI


0 In brief

Man

drowns

after diving

into canal

FREEPORT A 47-year-old
Freeport man drowned on Sun-
day afternoon while swimming
in a canal in the Lucaya area.
According to police reports,
Harcourt Smith of No 38 Faw-
cett Lane went swimming with
three friends Samuel Hanna,
Joseph McKinney, and Wilton
Smith around 2.30pm at Silver
Point Canal.
According to police reports,
Smith dove into the canal, and
while swimming to the other
side, went underwater and did
not resurface.
An off-duty emergency med-
ical worker who was in area
jumped in after Smith and
pulled him ashore.
The man administered CPR
and other emergency proce-
dures, but could not revive'
Smith.
The police said two residents
placed Smith on their speed-
boat and ferried him to the
Island Seas dock, where he was
placed in an ambulance.
He was taken to Rand
Memorial Hospital where he
was pronounced dead on
arrival.
Police do not suspect foul
play.

Man found

dead in

abandoned

vehicle

ABACO A 50-year-old res-
ident of Dundas Town, Abaco,
was .found dead in an aban-
doned vehicle in that settlement
on Sundi\
According to police, a female
resident was walking past the
vehicle when she noticed a man
identified as Roger Anderson,
l\ ing on the backseat.
The woman tild'police that
she called out to the man se\-7
eral times, but he did not
respond. She then alerted a
neighbor who contacted the
police.
When officers arrived they
examined the body but could
detect no vital signs.
The body was taken to the
Marsh Harbour Clinic, where
Mr Anderson was officially pro-
nounced dead.
Police do not suspect foul
play and are awaiting the results
of an autopsy to establish the
cause of death.


US and Cuba hope for Bahamas vote


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
and KARIIN HERIG
AS the United Nations votes
on the membership of the new
Human Rights Council today,
both Cuba and the United
States hope that the Bahamas
will cast its vote in accordance
with their respective interests.
At 10am today, the UN Gen-
eral Assembly in New York will
elect the first members of the
UN Human Rights Council -
the new body that is supposed
to be an improvement on its
predecessor, the discredited
Human Rights Commission.
As CARICOM has officially
not taken any position on the
candidates as a bloc, the
Bahamas is free to make its
own decisions on which con-
tenders it will support..
The US hopes that countries
which it says have "question-
able human rights records" -
such as Cuba receive no
votes.
Meanwhile Cuba says that-
due to its own track record, the
US is hardly in a position to
pass judgment on other coun-
tries.


* DR Brent Hardt

Dr Brent Hardt, deputy chief
of mission at the US Embassy,
said that with a number of
countries with "dubious"
human rights records, such as
Iran and Cuba, attempting to
get elected to the council, it is
important to remember that
this new body is intended to
restore credibility to the UN's
handling of human rights.
"This is really critical in the
sense of how this new council
will be better than the Human
Rights Commission which


existed before and-the only way
it will be better is if we get
countries elected who have a
genuine commitment to human
rights as laid out in the Human
Rights Declaration," he said.
Dr Hardt said the US does
not want countries with "seri-
ous cases of human rights abus-
es" to sit on the council coun-
tries such as Iran, Cuba, Zim-
babwe, Sudan and North
Korea.
However, Felix Wilson-Her-
nandez, Cuban Ambassador to
the Bahamas, said that he does
not believe that any country is
qualified to dictate the mea-
sure of human rights to anoth-
er country.
"One thing that is important
is that I don't think any country
in the world can teach another
on what human rights are. I
think if there is one county that
cannot it is the US.
"Think about Guantanamo
Bay, Abu Ghraib and the dis-
crimination against black and
poor people during the hurri-
cane last year," he said.
Mr Wilson-Hernandez said
that Cuba is confident that it
will win a seat on the new


* FELIX Wilson-Hernandez

human rights council.
The ambassador also pointed
out that the Bahamas and the
rest of the Caribbean have
been close friends with Cuba
and that it is hoped that Cari-
com will support the Cuban bid
for the UN position.
However, as the election will
be held by secret ballot, it may
never be known how the
Bahamas voted.
In all, 68 states have submit-
ted candidacies to be among
the Council's 47 members 13


from African States, 13 from
Asian States, six from Eastern
European States, eight from
Latin American and Caribbean
States and seven from West-
ern European and other states.
The countries endorsed are
Argentina, Albania, Canada,
Costa Rica, the Czech Repub-
lic, Ecuador, Finland, France,
Georgia, Germany, Greece,
Guatemala, Honduras, Hun-
gary, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania,
Mexico, the Netherlands,
Nicaragua, Peru, Poland, Por-
tugal, Romania, Slovenia,
Switzerland, Ukraine, Uruguay,
and the United Kingdom.
The UN Watch also
endorsed the following coun-
tries, on the condition that they
pledged to stop opposing UN
human rights resolutions for
victims in Darfur and else-
where around the globe: Brazil,-
Ghana, India, Jordan, Mali,
Mauritius, Senegal, South
Africa, South Korea, Tanzania,
and Zambia.
In yesterday's editorial it-
was stated that the vote was to
be held on Monday. This was,
an obvious error. The vote takes,
place this-morning.


Teachers 'did not initiate school closure'


PUBLIC school teachers
did not initiate the island-wide
school closure on Friday,
according to BUT president
Ida Poitier-Turnquest.
Mrs Poitier-Turnquest
addressed the media on Mon-
day after an update meeting
with Bahamas Union of
Teachers (BUT) members.
"I do not understand what
action they are accused of tak-
ing," she said, explaining that
the teachers were involved in
no industrial action and that
no trade dispute was filed.
The union boss said that on
Friday, she received a call
indicating that teachers in
New Providence were hold-
ing a sit-out.
However, Mrs Poitier-
Turnquest claimed that she
"drove from one end of the
island to the other" to in' es-
tigate and found that "every
teacher wagsat school."
According to Mrs Poitier-
Turnquest, teachers were at
school at 8.45am on Friday
and were there all day until
3.15pm.
She reiterated the.union's


claim that it was the govern-
ment that closed the schools
on Friday and said she
remains confused as to why
they did so.
"They are the only ones
who can close school. Teach-
ers can't close school, princi-
pals are not allowed to close
school. That is strictly a direc-
tive coming from the Ministry
of Education," she said.
Mrs Poitier-Turnquest said
she appreciates the support
that parents and community
members have shown for the
teachers.
"With their support of the
teachers, they are in turn sup-
porting their own children,"
she added.
The closure was the latest in
a series of incidents stemming
from a bitter dispute between
thu g,:ernntmern and the BUT
mo\er ia nee IndIllUstrl.l ,gic -.
'rmelVtrtieachers. ,
The teIach,-rs are reportedly
seeking salary increases and
improved working conditions.
Mrs Poitier-Turnquest also
took the opportunity yester-
day to reiterate the union's


commitment to students.
She said the BUT has plans
for a number of new initiatives,
including alternative, pro-
grammes for students who fall
outside the normal academic
strata.
"We must now take our edu-


cation to a new level, where we
teach a child and not just the
body of a person," she said.
Mrs Poitier-Turnquest said
the BUT intends to identify the
needs of every child and teach
towards their individual styles
of learning.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4. TUESDAY. MAY 9. 2006


EIOIAULETTRS T HEEITOR


OUR WAR, through their eyes, is not a
pretty picture.
As they see it, war with Iraq weakens
America and strengthens a mutual enemy -
Muslim fundamentalists.
A small delegation of women journalists
and media professionals from Morocco visit-
ed Boston last week to "break the ice between
the US and Muslim countries," as they
explained in French, through a translator.
When the discussion turned to war in Iraq,
their message was loud and clear, in French or
English.
"C'est une catastrophe," said Hinde Taar-
ji, a journalist and author of several books,
including one about women and Islam.
"C'est terrible," said Maria Latifi, director
of an educational television station in Moroc-
co.
The others in this band of four Muslim
women echoed these sentiments.
They came to America, first, to get the
word out that not all Muslim women are
swathed in veils and burkas, living lives of
oppression and misery. But they also have a
larger mission, to fight on behalf of those who
still struggle.
To that end, they seek a longstandifig-
weapon of mass influence: American moral
authority. Yet, in their eyes, that sharp and
precious tool is dulled by America's policy
in Iraq.
Didn't they and other progressive Muslims
see the proudly purple fingers of voters in
Iraq?
No, said Latifi. They "went completely
unnoticed." People see "the mayhem ... the
sectarian war."
"They see a country sinking," she said.
And, as she pointed out, they see it every-
day, as America does, via CNN.
Because of the negative perception in the
Muslim world of what is happening in Iraq,
these women believe hard-line religious fun-
damentalists are gaining strength.
Bahia Amrani, founder and publisher of a
newsweekly magazine, Le Reporter, said that
America does not understand that democra-
cy cannot be secured through force. Before
people can fight for freedom on their own
behalf, she said, "There has to be a fight
against illiteracy, poverty, exclusion."
This perspective on democracy comes from
citizens who live in what is considered an
emerging democracy.
"We are in a situation of transition the


process of democratization." said Fatiha Laya-
di, the director of communication and press
for the Kingdom of Morocco and part of this
women's delegation.
Morocco achieved independence from
France in 1956 and is governed by a parlia-
mentary monarchy. Under King Hassan II,
who ruled from 1960-99, the country went
through "les annees de plomb" the years of
lead. This was a period of repression and
political unrest that was fiercest in the 1970s
and 1980s. Newspapers were closed and books
banned. Dissidents were arrested and exe-
cuted; people "disappeared." During the
1990s, pressure from the United States and
European countries led to improvements.
Under King Mohammed VI. who took over
in 1999, Morocco is achieving what are viewed
as slow, incremental reforms. The press is
freer, and the king is allowing public review of
Morocco's past human rights violations. This
delegation of women is also touting the
promise of a new family law code. Proposed
by the king and passed by the Moroccan Par-
liament in 2004, the law recognizes women as
equal to their husband; it allows divorce, child
custody, and inheritance rights that were pre-
S-viously denied them.
Barbara Bodine, a former ambassador to
Yemen and now a fellow at Harvard's
Kennedy School; calls <:1. r.., i.: of the
ci cdli5L-. clni LLiri, dL 'Is, 111 i i IIi IIlcM us-
lim world. The family law code makes Moroc-
co "one of the leaders in the Islamic world"
when it comes to women's rights.
Still, re Iig ,il. [in, ll. nm e ,Ialll_. still fight
hard against reforms.
For these Moroccan women, the pressure
America applies to the cause of women's
rights is very important. They see tangible
results in Afghanistan. But in their view,
American policy in Iraq is now "helping fun-
damentalists, preventing the voice of moder-
nity from being heard."
These women should be invested in democ-
racy as the key to greater freedom for all.
But they are not invested in the US. fight in
Iraq and its stated goal of establishing some
form of democracy in that country. They
believe fundamentalists are drawing strength
from the war and that strength threatens pro-
gressive goals.
Many American see what they see, too.
How sad for that to be our common ground.
(* This article is by Joan Vennochi of The
Boston Globe 2006)


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL:D.,;D.Litt .

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

SShirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising.Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242)-352-9348


EDITOR, The Tribune.
PLEASE allow me to ask
the Bahamian people a very
important question.
Was majority rule ushered
in on January 10, 1967, or did
we always have majority rule?
Since we have no history of
any other form of government
other than democratic, in a
democracy whoever in an
election received the majority
of votes, or in our system the
majority of seats, would be
declared the winner.
In the Bahamas, blacks
were always the majority, but
stranTgely-eifoufgh t,-neiij6ffi-
ty continuously voted for a
minority group to govern. So
in a sense the majority was
ruling, but the rulers were the
minority, and that minority
was ruling on behalf of the
majority until 1967. To me,
that is an indictment on the
majority, to allow this to con-
tinue for so many years.
I found no evidence where
the majority was under duress
to vote for the minority, unless
the "Willie Lynch" Syndrome
was a factor.
Andros was the only Family
Island in the lead towards the
real majority rule, when she
elected two members to par-
liament in 1956.
Andros was the spark that
ignited into what is being cel-
ebrated as majority rule. That
is why it is inconceivable to
me as to why Andros is being
treated with contempt by the
party it gave the mandate to
usher in majority rule. I fear
that if this neglect of Andros,
particularly South Andi ,s
continues, there \\ill be a mnass
exodus auotofAndrospartic_.
ularly the south, which would
set the stage for illegal immi-
grants to settle on the land
while Androsian venture to
other Family Islands for
employment.
Andros supplies New Prov-
idence with water, and mil-
lions of dollars from AUTEC
but what does Andros receive
in return? The taxpayers, of
Andros subsidies Bahama-
sair but Bahamasair gives no
service to Andros, North,
Central, or South. The people
of Andros should ask why. I
am sure Bahamasair will find,
its way there during the elec-
tion campaign!
History has recorded that
Stephen Dillet, a man of
colour, was elected to Parlia-


ment in 1833, that was one
year before King William IV
began emancipation proceed-
ings in 1834, five years before
Queen Victoria signed the bill
in 1838. History will also show
that Cyril was not the first
Stevenson to represent the
Island of Andros; Henry
Stevenson was elected in 1849,
giving Andros 118 years lead
towards majority rule.
S-For-the-benefit of those who
were too young, or not yet
formed, this is a history les-
son...when majority rule was
being ushered in, in 1967 a
Bahamian of colour in the
person of the late Captain
Audley Russell, was a candi-
date for the UBP Party, he
was defeated by Maurice


t
Moore, a PLP. Two other
Bahamians of colour were
also defeated, Mr Bertis Grey
who was a labour candidate
and Mr Artis Neely, an NDP
candidate,
Another Bahamian of
colour, Mr Cleophas Adder-
ley, was elected as an UBPtb
represent the City of Nassau,'a
constituency once represented
by the late Sir Stafford Sands,
and that was after majorityy
rule was ushered in. So who-
ever wants to criticise those
brave men who were later
known as the "dissident
eight", check your history,
because what took place in
1970-71 is another chapter in
our history.

PRINCE G
SMITH
Freeport,
Grand Bahama,
April, 2006.


Reaction to letter


from realtor


EDITOR, The Tribune.
THE letter to the Editor from realtor Chester Thompson ~;
certainly is interesting.
This question as to the validity of the established approvals
against subsequent complaints by parties who are obviously t
non-resident on Guana Cay raises serious legal questions.
-:-As a real estate developer Mr Chester Thompson possibly.
if the'Guana Cay opportunii\ had come his \a3) might be
writing and positioning himself differently.
- -s.-there a developer -who would by purpose spoil pristine
location just for the almighty dollar?
As with the uproar seemingly with every development pro'
ject it is reasonable to suggest that the existing application
and process for approval is faulty and should in future
require all developments to be Gazetted immediately after
receipt and make available all development plans and pro-
posals allowing the public and interested persons 30 days to,.
place, in written form, their support or objections. After the -t
30-day period complaints will no longer be accepted. We canki
not have what is happening a project is approved and t:;er,
the objectors come out of the woodwork after the develoip-s
and Government have expended hundreds of thousands of (
dollars or more on the process.
Yes, we must ensure we safeguard our natural environment
but we must also remember that we must benefit from what '
has been given to us it certainly is not right to simply leaVd8
everything fallow.
H RAHMING
Nassau,
April 13, 2006. *, '


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Did the Bahamas





always have





majority rule?


A clear message on Iraq






TUESDAY, MAY 9, 2006, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


LOCA LNEWS


0 In brief

Jamaican

admits to

counterfeit

charge

A 35-YEAR-OLD Jamaican
was fined yesterday after plead-
ing guilty to possession of
forged currency.
According to court dockets,
Leon Anthony Rainford, of St
Andrews, Jamaica, was found
in possession of a quantity of
fake US currency on Thursday,
.May 4.
The prosecution alleged that
,Rainford was found with 80
fake US $50 notes as well as 30
fake US $30 notes without a
lawful excuse.
Rainford, who appeared
before Magistrate Susan
Sylvester at Court 11 on Nas-
sau Street, pleaded guilty to the
charge and was fined $3,000.
He was told that failure to
pay the fine will result in a one-
year prison sentence.

20-year-old

denies

charge of
stealing

A 20-YEAR-OLD Rocky
Pine Road man was arraigned
in Magistrate's Court yesterday
on charges of shopbreaking and
stealing.
It was alleged that, while
being concerned with others,
Lathario Sturrup broke into
Bahamas Battery and Tire and
stole a safe containing $11,000
in cash, $31,000 in cheques and
other documents between Sat-
urday, April 29, and May 1 of
this year.
Sturrup, who appeared
before Magistrate Susan
Sylvester at Court 11 on Nas-
sau Street, pleaded not guilty
to the charges and was granted
$3,500 bail.
; The matter was adjourned to
August 24.

Kiwanis to
undertake
clean-up

campaign

THE Kiwanis Club AM has
announced that it will be under-
taking a clean-up campaign at
the Clifton Heritage Park site
on Saturday, May 9.
SThe clean-up, which will
begin at 8am, is part of the
club's continuing commitment
tp giving back to the communi-
ty and maintaining a clean envi-
ronment for the benefit of all,
said club secretary Keith Tin-
ker in a statement.
"The effort of this club is not-
ed as the first by a local service
club to assist with the clean-up
of the Clifton Heritage Park
site," it read. "The support of all
the other civic and service clubs
is welcomed by the Clifton Her-
itage Authority."

Antigua
joins US firm
on condo_
project

* ANTIGUA
St John's

ANTIGUA has partnered
with a Florida development
company on an US$80 million
deal to build condominiums on
the country's southwest coast,
officials said Sunday, according
to Associated Press.
The Caribbean island nation's
government will own 33 percent
of the proposed 200-condo pro-
ject, and Miami-based BAP
Development will own the rest,
officials said.
"The 'project is an example
of how we intend to (manage)
future development in Antigua
and Barbuda," Tourism Minis-
ter Harold Lovell said.


The development on 10 acres
of scrub land owned by the gov-
ernment is expected to take two
years to complete, with ground-
breaking scheduled for mid-
2007, BAP President Willy
Bermello said.
Officials said hundreds of
new jobs will be created.
Prime Minister Baldwin
Spencer called the project "a
new and exciting chapter" in
Antigua's development.
Revenue from tourism makes
up about 60 per cent of the
nation's gross domestic prod-
uct.


Rigby pledges to fight on issues

I m to the Bahamas and the need of their leader is because we fee
_i candidates to fly from island to confident that we will win. We


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
THE next general election
will be fought on "the issues"
and will only descend into "the
gutter" if the opposition wants
it to, PLP chairman Raynard
Rigby told The Tribune yester-
day.
Many Bahamians are expect-
ing a very contentious election
and believe that the two major
parties are poised, as one
observer put it, "like two glad-
iators viewing each other from
behind the closed gates of their
cells."
However, Mr Rigby said
that, personally, he is hoping


the election is fought on the
issues.
"How much we get into the
gutter depends on how dirty
the opposition wants to play
but I know we intend to take
the high road.
"We are going to say to the
electorate that this is what we
have done in the five years we
have been in power, our agen-
da is unfinished but we believe
that, based on where we
brought the country, we
deserve a second or third
term," Mr Rigby said.
However, spreading the mes-
sage of either party will come,
as always, at a considerable
price given the make-up of


ELECTION



Scount

1$8d own
sBfi dcv c ngs


island.
Mr Rigby could not estimate
what the cost would be but said
he imagined that it will be close
to what it was during the last
election.
"We continue to do what we
have to do in terms of finalising
our candidates, finalising the
promises of Our Plan Two and
ensuring that all of the party's
machinery is working at the
high level that we are expecting
at this stage and we continue to
do what we have to do to win
the confidence of the Bahami-
an people," Mr Rigby said.

Expectation

While the governing party
has not officially confirmed
their slate of candidates, it is
expected that the PLP will pre-
sent their 29 incumbents for
the 2007 election.
"Those seats that we don't
have will be filled by the per-
sons who the party believes,
based on the evidence we have,
will be able to win the seats,"
the chairman said.
Many have speculated that


feel confident that whenever
the next election is called we
will be returned to the govern-
ment of the Bahamas.
"We believe that Hubert
Ingraham and his return has
brought no traction for them,
that he has been on a wagon
of dissociating himself from the
key players of that organisa-
tion," Mr Rigby said.
He said the PLP believes
that, when the Bahamian peo-
ple hear the record of the gov-
ernment and see where the par-
ty has brought the economy,
"they will say that we are better
off today than they were in
May, 2002, and we will return
the PLP to the government."
The party's leader, Prime
Minister Perry Christie, has
made it a point on several occa-
sions to show publicly that he
has fully recovered 'from his
mild stroke in mid-2005 and
has publicly stated that he is
ready for the gruelling trek that
will be the run-up to the next
election.
Mr Rigby said the party will
place the same level of demand
on Mr Christie that it did in the
last general election.


CDR leader is 'being



courted by the FNM'


FROM page one
not create any hard feelings
among CDR members, it did
leave a leadership void in the
minds of the public.
With their political lives
being entwined for nearly
eight years, Mr Maynard
said that Dr Nottage's
absence feels "strange".
"It feels strange not to be
on the same team but he has
to be guided in the direction
his heart wants to be guided
and my heart has to be guid-
ed where my heart wants to
carry me. It has not created
any disunity between he and
I we chat often. We just see
things different politically,"
he said.
Stephen Mitchell, former
head of the party's public
relations, left the CDR for
the PLP just before Dr Not-
tage went over.
He said: "Charles May-
nard and Phenton Neymour
are being courted by the
FNM to run for the FNM.
As far as them taking the
CDR over with them, I don't
see that happeningat all.
Most of the CDRs like
myself, although I came back
before Dr Nottage, thought
that we would come with Dr
Nottage.
"I came over before
because I just couldn't wait
anymore. It didn't make
much sense. Last election
'Mother' Pratt got more total
votes than the CDR alto-
gether.
"Fayne Thompson is the
only one at the leadership
level who wants to carry on
with the CDR. Maynard and
Neymour seem to be headed
to the FNM," Mr Mitchell
said.
Leading up to the last gen-
eral election, Mr Maynard
said the CDR learnt some
real lessons from the



TUESDAY
MAY 9
2:00am Community Page/1 540 AM
11:00 Immediate Response
12:00 ZNS News Update
12:05 Immediate Response
Cont'd -
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1:30am Community Page 1540 AM
NOT:.. V 3 rseve


Bahamian electorate. Since the
election the CDR had been lis-
tening and talking to as many
people as possible about what
the party's role should be and
how best its members could
serve the country.
Mr Maynard told The Tri-
bune that the spirit of the CDR
would never die and that it had
changed the political culture in
the country.
"The bottom line is that, to
survive in politics and to make a
real contribution, you have to
be prepared to serve in the way
the people want you to serve.
"Sometimes you have to be
flexible. If we have ideas and
policies we can implement in


governance that can transform
the country we have to decide
how best that can happen.
"We could say let's stick it
out for 30 years and see what
happens, but in 30 years would
our ideas be relevant? Would
the country be better off for the
wait?
"So all of those considera-
tions we have to make going
forward. As a result of that, all
the members of our party have
had the-time to reflect and we
have come up with a decision
we are all comfortable with. In
about two weeks we are going
to make an announcement on
what we will do," Mr Maynard
said.


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* RAYNARD Rigby

former Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham's return to the helm
of the FNM has placed that
party in a better position of
winning the general election
than it was under the previous
leader, Tommy Turnquest.
However, Mr Rigby dis-
missed this and maintained that
regardless of who the leader of
the FNM is, the PLP will walk
away victorious.
"For us, we don't care who


LA


l


~i~e~s







PAGE 6,TUESDAYMA9,2006LTHEWTIIBN


Figurehead of



Greek community


die at age of 89


etai





for Clarks &
Shoe Village Shoe Stores.
Please fax your applications to

326-0570
or mail to
P.O. Box N 3009
Nassau, Bahamas


ONE of the pillars of Nas-
sau's Greek community,
Father Theophanis Kolyvas,
has died at the age of 89. He
was a major figure among his
compatriots in the Bahamas
for more than half a century.
A member of the Greek
Orthodox Church in West
Street said: "This has come as
a great shock. He was active
right up until the end. He was
a wonderful man."
Father Kolyvas formally
retired several years ago, but
remained committed both to
his church and the Greek com-
munity in the Bahamas, pre-
siding at funerals, weddings
and baptisms.
Another church member
said: "He had been a major
part of our lives for more than
50 years. He was a much-loved
figure and will be greatly
missed."
The priest,-who was an
ever-present figure at the
Orthodox Church's many fes-
tivals and rituals over the
years, died when complica-
tions set in following an oper-
ation.
One of his church helpers,
Mr Tony Zervos, served round
the altar at the West Street
church with Father Kolyvas
for the entire 53 years the
priest was in the Bahamas.
Yesterday, Mr Zervos said:
"If anyone can be called a
saint, it would be Father Koly-
vas. This year's Easter services
were the first he had missed
since he arrived here from
Greece in 1953. He was just
too ill to take part."
He added: "He was a
tremendous man, a loving and
compassionate man who was
also very humble and always
had a smile. He was always
there for anyone who needed
him.
"He was a spiritual father


a FATHER Theophanis Kolyvas is seen here clutching a copy
of the Gospels during a Greek Orthodox Church procession to
the sea in Nassau during the 1980s. The picture was taken dur-
ing celebration of Epiphany. Far right is Metropolitan Ger-
manos Polyzoides of New York.


to everyone. He was certainly
my spiritual father, my priest
and my friend."
Father Kolyvas died on
Thursday in the intensive care
unit of Princess Margaret Hos-
pital following an operation


on April 7. His funeral is due
to be held tomorrow followed
by burial in the church
grounds.
SEE tomorrow's Tribune
for a full profile of Father
Kolyvas::' ' % .- .'


o In brief

Student
overcomes
hurricane
to excel




4 ... ,X "


* DENIRO Chase .

A BAHAMIAN student who
lost everything in last year's:
Gulf Coast hurricane disaster'
has defied the odds and maitn-
tained a top academic standard.
Despite being left with only ia
blanket to his name after all his'
school supplies and personal'
belongings were destroyed ih
hurricane Katrina, Deniro Edi-
son Chase has made his family
proud by managing to maintain
a 4.0 GPA.
Deniro's mother said that no
matter how his difficult his
ordeal became, her son
remained confident.
She said that at a time when
many other students might have:
given up or become discour-
aged, Deniro turned his misfor-
tune into inspiration.
A former student and well'-
known basketball player alt
North Long Island High Schoot,'
Deniro who is now a college
freshman of Dillard University'
in New Orleans continues t6
work hard in the pursuit of: a
degree in visual arts.
Deniro was honoured just;.
two weeks ago as one of the top,
students in his physics class anqt
was a\\jrded an all-expenses'-
paid trip to Phoenix, Arizona.:,;


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, TU ES DAY, MAY 9, 2006







THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, MAY 9, 2006, PAGE 7


What political parties need





to look for in candidates


THERE are only 40 seats
T in our House of Assem-
bly and some people believe that
is too many for a country of only
300,000 people.
If we were all living on one
island, like Barbados, we could
very well consider reducing that
number. But we are an archipel-
agic country with communities
scattered on a score of major
lands and many cays; and our
constitution makes provision for
that.
. There are credible reports that
the PLP Government is planning
redistribution of Family Island
soats before the next election but
it is unlikely that the number will
g'p back to the all-time high of
49.
For those 40 or so seats there
are hundreds of persons who
want to offer. Some will no
doubt run under the banner of
small parties and some as inde-
pendents, but most of them hope
to be nominated by one of the
two national parties.
; Except for leadership contests,
there is nothing that can place
more strain on the unity of a
political party than the process of
candidate selection.
This was always a serious mat-
ter but in this age of rapid glob-
alisation and with more complex
problems confronting even a
small country like ours, both par-
ties have a grave responsibility
to manage this process so that it
will provide voters with the best
possible choices.
*Both parties should take to
heart the lesson of the last elec-
tion when the PLP won by an
unexpectedly big margin. The
leadership of the PLP did not
expect to win until quite late in
the game and certainly not by
such a margin. So it appeared
that in many cases they were not
careful about some of their selec-
tions.
It has happened many times
before that a party has put up
an unsuitable candidate in a con-
stituency it did not expect to win,
and usually the result was as pre-
dicted. But sometimes the sacri-
ficial lamb returns as a conquer-
ing hero.


To THE


POINT


ARTHUR

FOULKES



The lesson is clear. The par-
ties have a responsibility to put
up qualified candidates in all
constituencies, even the ones pri-
vately conceded to the opponent.
The people deserve a decent
choice and who knows? there
might just be a surprise or two.
One balance a political party
has to strike is between experi-
enced hands and bright new
prospects. A party is like a
nation. One generation does not
simply disappear overnight to
allow the next generation to take
its place. That would destroy
continuity and sacrifice the con-
siderable benefits of experience.
Generational change; like every-
thing else, must be managed with
sense.
The great challenge facing the
parties is deciding who is quali-,
fied and who is not, because the
mix of qualifications necessary
for a productive political career
is not always easy to determine.
There are some indispensable
attributes, of course, and Miami
Herald columnist Carlos Alberto
Montaner listed some of them in
a discussion about Panama's


presidential election. Honesty
and integrity are paramount, but
prudence, good judgment and
common sense are also indis-
pensable. And a little humility
does not hurt.
But there are other things to
look for.
In the present House of
Assembly nearly all of the mem-
bers have had exposure to high-
er education, formal or other-
wise, and there are perhaps more
university graduates than ever
before.
Yet, with a few exceptions,
they can hardly be described as a
lustrous lot.
So while higher education can
be a most valuable tool, it alone
does no.t qualify one for the
political life. Many effective,
indeed brilliant, political careers
started without it.

O ur sister Caribbean
countries have pro-
duced some great political lead-
ers who were also high academ-
ic achievers, such as Eric
Williams and Norman Manley.
But there was also Alexander
Bustamante who was challenged
academically but nevertheless a
brilliant political leader.
Here at home we have had our
"share of academically or profes-
sionally accomplished politicians,
such as Stafford Sands and Lyn-
den Pindling.
But we have also had Milo
Butler whose courage and dedi-
cation inspired more than one
generation, and Roland Symon-
ette whose shrewdness and
doggedness took him to the top.
Good politicians come in all
shapes and sizes and with many
different talents. So perhaps it is
best in the end to remember the
old advice, which is that while
we might not be able to define a
thing, we will recognize it when
we see it.
Two great attributes are the
ability to relate to. ordinary peo-
ple while at the same time being
able to pursue noble objectives.
As US'President Theodore Roo-
sevelt put it almost 100 years ago,
a good politician must "possess
the gifts of sympathy with plain


GOVERNMENT NOTICE
MINISTRY OF IMMIGRATION, LABOUR & TRAINING

THE MINISTRY OF IMMIGRATION LABOUR and TRAINING,
BAHAMAS TECHNICAL and VOCATIONAL INSTITUTE (hereafter
called the Purchaser) now invites sealed bids, from suppliers for the following:-

1. THE SECURITY SERVICES OF SCHOOL CAMPUS GROUNDS.
2. THE MAINTENANCE OF SCHOOL CAMPUS GROUNDS.
3. THE RENTAL & MAINTENANCE OF COPIERS FOR B.T.V.I.
CAMPUS.
4. THE RENTAL & MAINTENANCE OF SANITARY DISPOSAL
UNITS FOR ALL FEMALE BATHROOMS ON SCHOOL CAMPUS.

Interested Bidders may inspect CAMPUS between the hours of 9:00am
to 4:30pm, Monday through Friday. Collection of specifications and
bidding documents can be obtain from the Accounts Section of BTVI,
Old Trail Road, Wednesday, 3rd May, 2006.

Bids must be in English and should be enclosed in duplicates in a sealed
envelope bearing no identity of the bidder and endorsed with the subject
bided on ("Security of BTVI Campus").

Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the first address,
on or before Friday, 26th May, 2006 by 4:00pm (local time). It will not
be necessary to submit bids in person since they may be sent by mail.
Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those
Bidders or their representatives who choose to attend, at 10am on
Tuesday, 29th May, 2006 at the first address below.


(1)









(2)


The Chairman Tender
Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield
Cable Beach
P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242) 327-1530
Fax: (242) 327-1618

Accounts Section
Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute
Old Trail Road
P.O. Box N-4934
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242) 393-2804


The Ministry reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders.


people and of devotion to great
ideals".
An indispensable tool for
relating to people and pursuing a
vision is the ability to communi-
cate. This has been the case
throughout the centuries from
Cicero to Churchill to Clinton -
and it is particularly true in a
country like ours with a strong
oral tradition.
Having regard to this tradi-
tion, it is mystifying and disap-
pointing that so many members
of the present House seem
unable properly to read a speech
much less to speak without read-
ing.
It is interesting that two or
three of the most effective speak-
ers on the government side hap-
pen to be women, and one of
them is particularly good at con-
vincing her listeners that she
believes what she is saying even
when she is reading.
The representative for the 21st
century must be,'of all things, a
generalist.
He must have a good knowl-
edge of his own country and of
the world around him. He must
know that salt is produced at
Inagua by evaporation, not min-
ing, and he must know the dif-


ference between the WTO and
the WHO.
He must be able to explain the
world to his constituents and to
explain his constituents to the
world, especially those who come
to invest and live among us.
But there is another require-
ment. It is commitment will-
ingness to stay the course. Per-
sons who are in for the full 15
rounds, as Garth Wright used to
say, are the bone and marrow of
any party.

Ml any are attracted by
the perceived glam-
our of politics and soon fade
away when the going gets tough.
Some run, are defeated, then dis-
appear. Clarence Bain called
them fly-by-nights.
Some who are otherwise emi-
nently qualified never commit
but are content to stand on the
sidelines and complain about the
qualifications of those who do
make that lifetime commitment.
Theodore Roosevelt spoke
about them in his famous speech
at the Sorbonne in Paris in 1910
when he railed against ivory tow-
er critics and poured scorn on
those whose intellectual aloof-


ness would not allow them to
accept contact with life's reali-
ties.
So, said Mr Roosevelt: "The
credit belongs to the man who
is actually in the arena, whose
face is marred by dust and sweat
and blood; who strives valiant-
ly; who errs, who comes short
again and again, because there
is no effort without error and
shortcoming; but who does actu-
ally strive to do the deeds; who
know great enthusiasm, the
great devotions; who spends him-
self in a worthy cause; who at
the best knows in the end the tri-
umph of high achievement, and
who at the worst, if he fails, at
least fails while daring greatly,
so that his place shall never be
with those cold and timid souls
who neither know victory nor
defeat."
That is perhaps the most
important quality to look for in a
representative: the willingness to
expose himself to scorn, abuse
and betrayal and still stay in the
arena, because he is committed
to fight for a cause greater than
himself.

www.bahamapundit@typepad.conx
sirarthurfoulkes@hotmail.com


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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MAY 9, 2006
IP l Isr ~ "


THE TRIBUNE
IIIIIN W


School visited


by musicians


and minister




N FLORIDA Memorial College Gospel Choir sings yesterday
at the Simpson Penn for boys

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED
22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas '

I '" I .


THE REVEREND .. ."4. ~ .1 ,. ;. -
THEOPHANIS %~: 'U
KOLYVAS FLORIDA Memorial College Gospel Choir's performers
fell asleep in the Lord on HMINISTER 01 Education Alfred Sears talks to ho s at the
,Thursday, May 4th, 2006. He "" Simpson Penn Centre )eslerdam
'lovingly served the parish of the
"Annunciation Greek Orthodox
Church for 53 years. Born on
the island of Kalymnos, Greece,
~pn October 23rd, 1916, he was
a. printer, career civil servant, chanter, and instructor. of .
'Byzantine music, prior to his ordination in 1953 when he was i
Salted by the Greek Orthodox community in Nassau to .
become their new permanent priest. He arrived in the Bahamas '4
on July 1st of the same year, accompanied by his wife, A .
Presbytera Maria, and first child, Emanuel. Although he retired
some 25 years ago, he continued to serve his community
liturgicallyy, sacramentally and pastorally, with humility, love K I .
and dedication until the very end. A minimum of four
generations were recipients of his pastoral love and care.F
His Eminence Archbishop Dimitrios, on behalf of all the
hierarchs, clergy and laity of America and The Bahamas,
expresses his deep condolences to Father Theophanis' family.,.
His Eminence said,. "we note and praise God for the selfless
and unprecedented decades of ministry offered by Father
Theophanis." FLORIDA Memorial College Gospel Choir line up for their, 1 FLORIDA Memorial College Gospel Choir members
He is survived by his wife, Maria; four children, Emanuel, performance celebrating yesterday.
Angelina, George and Anthony; daughters-in-law, Panagiota
Kolyvas and Loretta Kolyvas; son-in-law, Frank Coyle: 4
grandchildren, Petros and Andreas Kolyvas, Michael and
Yiorgo Coyle, Alexa, Costa and Lauren Kolyvas; sister, Mana.
Spanondis; brother-in-law, George Skandaliaris; sisters-in-
law, Anna Skandaliaris, Evdokia Kokkinou, and Sophia
Skandaliaris; nephews, Tasso Spanondis, Emmanuel, Tony
and John Skandaliaris; nieces, Vassiliki and Angelna
Skandaliaris, Angelina. anr-..Kaliope Kokkinou. -.. -
Prayer and viewing will begin at 1 lam on Tuesday. May 9th.
at the Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church, West Street.
followed by a Memorial Service (Trisagion) at 6pm. Divine
Liturgy.will be served at 10am on Wednesday, May 10th,
followed by the Funeral Service and Interment, on Church
grounds at 1pm, to be celebrated by His Grace, Bishop
Savas of Troas, Chancellor of the Greek Archdiocese of
America, assisted by Fr. Nicholas Triantafilou, President of
Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of Theology. In lieu of
flowers, donations maybe made in memory of Father
Theophanis Kolyvas to the Annunciation Greek Orthodox .
Church, P.O. Box N-823, Nassau, Bahamas.
ChurchNISER of Education Alfred Sears speaks to the Florida a MINISTER of Education Alfred Sears talks to girls from
Memorial College Gospel Willamae Pratt School for Girls eslerda. at the Simpson Penn
Choir yesterday at the Centre for Boys
Simpson Penn Centre for (Photos: Felipe Alajor/Tribune srafj)


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TUESDAY, MAY 9, 2006, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


More political scandal in Trinidad


Lin AST month in
Trinidad, former-Pfime--
INinister Basdeo Panday was
sentenced to two years hard
labour for corruption in rela-
tion to an airport bidding scan-
dal and his failure to disclose a
UK bank account while he was
in office.
Mr Panday is merely the lat-
est victim of Trinidad's highly
adversarial and deeply
racialised politics. He joins a list
of Trinidadian politicians from
both sides of the divide who
have been publicly shamed fol-
lowing the exposure of a cor-
ruption scandal.
Only recently, a minister in
the present government was
forced from office over bribery
allegations, an event from which
Mr Panday's party duly capi-
talised. I
Some may regard Trinidad's
record of exposing (and now of
imprisoning) malfeasant politi-
cians as a demonstration of the
efficacy of the adversarial sys-
tem, which, by encouraging the
exposure of corruption, keeps
corrupt-minded politicians at
heel.
The problem with this view
is that, while adversarial poli-
tics in our region has helped to
create an atmosphere of mis-
trust and mudslinging between
parties and individual politi-
cians, it has signally failed to
create an atmosphere of gener-
al probity or integrity among
the political classes.
Indeed, within the particular
context of this region, it may
well be argued that overly
adversarial politics had the
effect of producing among
politicians a zero-sum approach
to political power.
As Mr Panday well demon-
strates, many Caribbean politi-
cians gloat over the public
shaming of their rivals with the
same relish that attends their
own venality once they get their
turn with the spoils of office.
TOO MUCH POLITICS
MAKES BAD
GOVERNMENT

n The Bahamas,'iWvihere
le els of venality among


dL


politicians are certainly lower
than in Trinidad, the biggest
r r -_ _- r -... .1-.--.Y ^


--taiingUlruuowuigimyi-aIverv---
sarial political environment has
been the-over-politicisation of
important national issues that
it has promoted.
This atmosphere has led gov-
erning parties into self-con-
scious, defensive policy-making
and has compromised the
process of consultation. At its
worst, this has undermined the
quality of the institutions that
governments are charged with
creating.
The best example that comes
to mind is the introduction of
the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force in 1980. At the time,
politically charged national
opinion was divided into those
in government who recognized
the need for a Defence Force

The biggest failing
of our own highly
adversarial political..
environment has
been the over-politi-

tant national issues
that it has promoted


and those in opposition who
claimed to fear the creation of
"Pindling's army".
This polarity and the resulting
lack of genuine consultation
between different political sides
over the form the force should
take led to some of the glaring
deficiencies that are only being
addressed today in the impend-
ing amendment to the Defence
Force Act.
SThe same risk now exists with
the National Health Insurance
project and the introduction of
local government in New Prov-
idence, two commendable and
necessary measures being pro-
posed by the present govern-
ment.
Both these proposals risk,
being introduced in a less than
optimal manner on account,
firstly, of (opposition) politi-
cla nsi~ i entfinalf misusingthe
consultation process that should;


_P ER SP E CTIVES

A N D RE W A L E N


precede them and, secondly, of
a defensiveness on the part of
government that may lead it to
pass controversial aspects of the
proposals off on to future gov-
ernments.
.Indeed, such political defen-
siveness can be the onlI expla-
nation for the FNM's iniroduc-
tion of local government legis-
lation that excluded the most
crucial 67 per cent of the popu-
lation from its ambit.
The then government, under
constant harassment from an
opposition that was typically
short on constructive alterna-
tives, simply left the most
important decisions on local
government to a future one.
The justification for such
timidity was, of course, every-
where to be seen during the
FNM's last term. It culminated
with the PLP's highly unscrupu-
lous political lambasting of con-
shittitional- -: amendments
designed to modernise our soci-
ety.
ALTERNATIVE
POLITICAL
CONVENTIONS SHOULD
NOT BE SHUNNED

defenders of a vigor-
ously adversarial
political environment generally
point to British experience, and
lament that all that we lack in
this region are the "conven-
tions" that make the system tick
over so well in the 'Mother
Country'.
But Britain's conventions
(like everything else authenti-
cally British) arise out of her
historical experience, and
nobody else's. That is why they
work for her. And that is why
they cannot arid should not.in
all cases be assumed to work
for others.
And one crucial difference
(aside from all the obvious ciul-
tural and historical ones) is that
all the countries in this region
are, unlike Britain, at a stage of


national development where
they are only now creating the
institutions that will come to
define them as nations.
Almost all of the important
institutions that now charac-
terise the British state predate
British democracy in the sense


that we would recognize today.
Those that do not, such as the
National"Health Service, were
all created during times of
extraordinary national consen-
sus, such as the period imme-
.diately after the 1939 to 1945-
war.
Lively, adversarial, Westmin-
ster-style politics may indeed
be a good way of promoting
management of a developed
society, whose institutions only
require that their political man-
agers remain defensive and on


their toes. But it has not been
convincingly demonstrated to
assist in the process of long-
term institutional state-building
even in Britain, much less our
own very different region.
- Those few ex-British Colo-
nial success stories, like Singa-
pore and Malaysia, have all
effectively replaced an adver-
sarial governing process with an
institutional governing party
and promoted a consultative,
Sconsensus-based style of gover-
nance.


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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MAY 9, 2006


THE TRIBUNE
LOCALN


Courtesy call on Deputy PM

BRITISH High Commissioner Jeremy Creswell paid a courtesy call on Deputy Prime Minis-
ter and Minister of National Security Cynthia Pratt on Monday, May 8.
(BIS photo: Patrick Hanna).
......................................................................................................................................................................................................

Builders hit out at the

awarding of govt contracts


FROM page one
Calling it "the black crab syn-
drome," he added: "We
Bahamians are going to contin-
ue to kill one or two Bahamians
because they are getting an
opportunity. Man, more power


to them. "
The ministry declined to com-
ment. An official said she would
make public what she feels the
public ought to know.
'Last night Minister Neville
Wisdom said his ministry had
put together a complete list of
all contracts awarded. He


claimed transparency was -of
utmost importance to himself
and his colleagues. '. '
"I think that this exhaustive
list is testament to that," he
said.
Details of the list will be pub-
lished in The Tribune tomor-
row.


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accidental


FROM page one
die.I feel very bad," said the
distraught father.
Macmer said his brother
Was a very helpful person.
'He was a good little
brother and I will miss
him," he said.
S"'He was a very respectful
young boy and it is very
hard on everyone in the
community because he
always around here play-
ing," said one woman
known as Emma.
BORCO has also offered
condolences and sympathy
to the young boy's family.
The company is urging
unauthorised persons not
to enter its facilities or to
compromise the safety of
the facility byfimaking or
attempting unlawful entry.
"The Bahamas Oil Refin-
ing Company International
Ltd is saddened with the
loss of life resulting from
an unauthorised entry to
its facilities by a group of
boys from the area
adjourning the southern
perimeter of the com-
popnd.
'"According to a state-
ment issued by the compa-
ny, a security team encoun-
tered a group of unautho-
rised individuals on its
premises sometime late
Sunday morning.
'Upon questioning one
of the individuals about the
r'eison for their presence
in the unauthorised area,
he pointed to the direction
of the young boy lying on
the ground in the distance.
"Investigation revealed
that the young boy was
apparently run over by a
backhoe that was still run-
ning at the time."
Police were dispatched to
the scene to investigate.
Teachers and students at
Lewis Yard Primary School
were also devastated by the
tragedy, according to
school principal Rodney
Smith.
"It has been a very rough
morning for us, but we
were fortunate enough to
have Dr Mills come in and
talk with students.
"Many of his classmate
are not taking it good and
have been crying for most
of the morning. It is defi-
nitely a big loss to them,"
he said.
Mr Simith said Licson was
a well liked student. He
added that the school will
hold a memorial service at
a later time since students
are presently sitting for
their GLAT exams.
U I


* LICSON JOSAPHAT

School psychologist Dr
Pamula Mills and t\o oth-
er officials conducted grief'
counseling sessions with
students and teachers.
"It has been rather over-
whelming for the children.
Students made cards and
"rote personally letters to
him that teachers % ill dis-
play during the next sever-
al days and remembered
the fun times they shared
with him." she said.


strength

in numbers
Natasha Lightbourne-Dillett, FLMI, Claims Supervisor
in Family Guardian's Group Life & Health Division,
has been awarded the Fellow, Life & Health Claims
(FLHC) professional designation.

Conducted by the International Claim Association (ICA)
of Washington, D.C., the FLHC programme comprises
ten study courses and examinations covering the medical,
legal and administrative aspects of claims management.
ICA was founded in 1909 to provide a forum for
information exchange and education to promote high
standards of performance in claims administration
by member companies.

SFamily Guardian congratulates this dedicated
professional for her commitment to personal
development and customer service excellence.



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Share

your

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from people who are
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you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
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area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.







PAGE~~~~ ~~~~ 12 TUSAMY920 H RBN


LOCALNW


Junkanoo leaders




play their part in




reading initiative


JUNKANOO leaders
reached out to students at
Woodcock Primary School
when they participated as
celebrity readers in US
Ambassador John Rood's
ongoing reading initiative at
the school.
Percy 'Vola' Francis, leader
of the Saxons Superstars; Win-
ston 'Gus' Cooper, leader of the
Valley Boys; and Jackson Burn-
side and Mrs Arlene Nash-Fer-
guson of One Family junkanoo
group along with Ambassador
Rood and a group of US
Embassy volunteers took to the
classrooms at Woodcock Pri-
mary and read a variety of
books.
Jackson Burnside said it was


a privilege for him to partici-
pate and interact with the stu-
dents.
Percy 'Vola' Francis, whose
junkanoo group has an ongo-
ing junior junkanoo programme
at Woodcock Primary,
explained that it was a wonder-
ful opportunity to work with the
students in another capacity and
help them to develop their
minds.
Gus Cooper said he was
delighted to be able to help to
promote literacy among our
children. Mrs Arlene Nash-Fer-
guson, a former educator, she
welcomed the opportunity to
get back in the classroom and
help students excel through
reading.


Ambassador Rood launched
the Woodcock Primary Read-
ing Programme in January 2005
to help students to become bet-
ter readers.
SEach Wednesday, a group of
Embassy volunteers participate
in the programme.
Previous celebrity readers
include actor Sir Sean Connery;
permanent secretaries Mr
Archie Nairn and Mrs Camille
Johnson; Director of Immigra-
tion Vernon Burrows; enter-
tainer Ronnie Butler; Bahamian
athlete Chris Brown; chief exec-
utive officer of Mail Boxes Etc.
Gershan Major;.and acting pres-
ident at the College of the
Bahamas Dr Rhonda Chipman
Johnson.


SJACKSON Burnside,leader of One Family, enjoys interacting with students
M JACKSON Burnside, leader of One Family, enjoys interacting with students


* ARLENE Nash-Ferguson, lead dancer with
One Family, reads to students


* PERCY 'Vola' Francis, leader of the Saxons
Superstars reads to'a class at Woodcock Primary


* WINSTON 'Gus' Cooper (left) and US Ambassador John Rood chat with a class at W oodcock
Primary School prior to reading.
............................................... ..................................................... ........................................................... ........... ..... ... ...^...:"-...

Puerto Rico's bonds downgraded

amid government fiscal crisis


* PUERTO Rico
San Juan
A KEY Puerto Rican bond
was downgraded to one notch
above junk status on Monday,
likely forcing the US territory
to pay higher interest rates
amid a budget impasse that has
partially shut down its govern-
ment, according to Associated
Press.
Moody's Investors Service's
rating cut of Puerto Rico's gen-


eral obligation bond to "Baa3,"
the agency's lowest investment
grade above junk status, affects
about US$25 billion of govern-
ment debt, Moody's Vice Pres-
ident John Cline said.
The bad news came as the
island's government was in.the
eighth day of a partial shutdown
after running out of most
operating funds. Puerto Rico is
operating off the 2004 budget
after the governor and the leg-
islature failed to agree on spend-



" i .. r,

. .+?s


-RSL.'ra '&Rg.'Fries 2 oSoda..NASSAU
--j, v Scda eg. s


ing plans for 2005 ard 2006
"This action reflects the com-
monwealth's strained financial
condition, and'ongoing politi-'
cal conflict and lack of agree-
ment... to end the governmen-
t's multi-year trend of financial
deterioration," Cline said.
He said Moody's was keep-'
ing the cash-strapped US terri-
tory's rating on a watch list for
possible further downgrades.
Even before the fiscal crisis
led to a-partial goaernnient:
shutdown, both Mood's .and
Standard & Poor's, the other'
major credit rating agency,,
warned that the Puerto Rican
government had to collect more'
money and reduce expenses to
make their bonds more attrac-,
tive to investors.
A bitter divide between Pder-
to Rico's two leading political
parties has stalled talks to end
the partial government shut-
down that has closed the
island's public schools and put
more than 95,000 public
employees.- roughly half of the
central government work force
- temporarily out of a job.
Gov Anibal Acevedo Vila
and the opposition-dominated
legislature have floated com-
peting proposals to close a
US$740 million budget gapWihat
led on May 1 to the closure of
43 government agencies :dnd
nearly 1,600 schools. :: .
The House has repeatedly
rejected the governor's plan to
bridge the gap by imposing the
island's first-ever sales tax. :
Cline said the partial govern-
ment shutdown "indicates that
the debate between the gover-
nor and legislature over issues
of budget and tax reform is
more intractable than has pre-
viously been represented."
He said that if the US
Caribbean territory's political
leaders agree on a significant
tax increase, such as the pro-
posed sales tax, and other is;
cal measures, credit quality
could be improved.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MAPY 9, 2006


rlF
,.,..




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4;i~01


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TUESDAY MAY 9, 2006


SECTION


Si


99


business@tribunemedinetMiami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


'Lift-off' for


business help

0 VINCENT Peet, minister of financial services and in est-
ments, speaks at yesterday's opening of Loram Corporate &
Family Services, based in Mackey Street's Royal Palm Mall.
The company) was founded by Marlo Murph -Braynen. an
accountant, and business partner Tyrone Gibson to provide
"a one-stop olffie" for aspiring small businessmen and
women, and a "launching pad" for Bahamians to transition
from employee to entrepreneur and take away headaches
associated with 'back office' functions.


Private equity firms to




buy Emerald Bay hotel


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ty firms have a
signed a Letter of
Intent to acquire
Exuma's Four
Seasons Emerald Bay resort,
The Tribune can reveal, and
are now conducting due dili-
gence on the property before
completing the deal.
The.Whitehall Street Real
Estate Funds and Rockpoint
Group are the two investment
companies seeking to acquire
the resort, multiple sources
have told The Tribwue, for a
purchase price as yet unknown.
Although the Letter of
Intent signing does not mean
that the purchase will be corm-
pleted, it is a sign of the two
private equity firms' intent to
close, provided due diligence
turns up no unexpected sur-
prises.
If a deal is concluded, it is
thought that the Four Seasons
*will remain as the resort's man-
aging/operating partner, with
management unchanged.
Kevin Clemente, Emerald
Bay's president and chief exec-
utive, did not return The Tri-


Company that is part of Kerzner buyout signs Letter

of Intent for Exuma's anchor resort property


bune's call seeking comment
yesterday, despite this news-
paper leaving a detailed phone
message.
Emerald Bay would be
Whitehall Stiedl Real Esiate
Funds' second Bahartiian hot-l
deal concluded within a rela-
tively short period of time.
Whitehall, which effectively
acts .i the vehiclee for all pri-
vate equitN real estate in\est-
ments made b\ Wall Street
investment bank. Goldmain
Sachs, is part of the bu out
group put together b\ Sol and
Butch Kerzner Kerzner Inter-
national's chairman and chief
executive resprcti el, to take
Kerzner International private.
Goldman S.ichs manages the
Whitehall funds, and is their
largest investor. Since 1991,
W\hitehall has invested $16 bil-
lion'in real estate and other
instruments, at a gross cost of
about $51.1 billion. It has invest-
ments in 20 countries.
Meanwhile, its partner


Rockpoint Group was formed
in 2003, and is a real estate
investment and management
firm with offices in Boston,
Dallas, San Francisco and
Tokyo.
Since 1994, Rockpoint's
founders have invested in two
Rockpoint funds and four pri-
or funds, resulting in about $5
billion of equity being pumped
into 192 transactions with a
peak capitalisation of about
$20 billion, including various
real estate assets worldwide.
The private equity-backed
deal is a significant one for
Exuma, as the Four Seasons
Emerald Ba\ resort is the main
economic engine for the island.
Its construction and opening
in November 2003 has attract-
ed additional foreign direct
investment to Exuma, and Pin-
nacle Entertaihment is sched-
uled to open its small casino
at the resort this quarter.
The resort employs almost
500 staff, and features an 18-


hole Greg Norman Golf
Course, two restaurants, three
pools, spa, six meeting rooms
and 450-person capacity ball-
room.
Other investment projects
attracted to the Emerald Bay
vicinity include the $110 mil-
lion Grand Isle Villas devel-
opment, plus the 80/50 frac-
tionalownership complex.
A shopping complex has also
opened at Emerald Bay, the
anchor retailer being the
Emerald Isle supermarket. The
complex also includes busi-
nesses such as Scotiabank and
Mail Boxes Etc.
The Emerald Bay Resort
was the first so-called 'anchor
property' to open in the Fami-
ly Islands, and has since acted
as the model for the economic
development scheme that was
pioneered and started by the
FNM, and then taken further

SEE page 2B


Inagua tourism scheme.to reduce depopulation


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A SPANISH consulting firm will be
hired to prepare a Sustainable Regional
Development Plan for Inagua, an almost
$250,000 venture that aims to reduce the
island's dependency on Morton Salt and
prevent its population migrating to other
islands.
An Inter-American Development bank
(IDB) document details the scheme to
revitalise Inagua's economy in a sustain-
able fashion, in keeping with the island's
character and size, through the Plan that


will lay out a tourism development vision
for the island o\ er the next 10 years.
The consultants hired to develop the
Plan will detail strategies for growing
Inagua's economy, including measures for
supporting sustainable tourism and relat-
ed infrastructure, and the installation of
roads and public utilities such as water,
solid and liquid waste disposal, and power
including renewable energy .
The IDB said the Bahamian govern-
ment aimed "to reduce the economic
dependencN on salt production, as to curb
the current trend of depopulation and
migration from the Inaguas to other parts


of the Bahamas and overseas.
"To do so, the Government hopes to
be able to create a sustainable tourism
destination that will help tell the story of
the Inaguas, preserve biodl\ersith for
future generations, and creates meaning-
ful economic opportunities and employ-
ment for local residentss"
The IDB noted that economic develop-
ment in the Bahamas had been "uneven",
with most of the wealth concentrated in
New Providence and Grand Bahama,

SEE page 2B


Guana Cay


developers


must wait


until May-end


[ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Court of Appeal yes-
terday ruled that the develop-
ers behind the controversial
$175 million Baker's Bay pro-
ject on Great Guana Cay will
have to remain faithful to their
undertaking not to do any
more work until at least the
end of May, as they await the
Supreme Court ruling of Act-
ing Justice Norris Carroll.
President of the Court of
Appeal, Dame Joan Sawyer,
said that unless Acting Justice
Carroll hands down his ruling
on the Judicial Review's sub-
stantive issues on or before
May 31, the undertaking will
be relieved as of that date.
Acting Justic Carroll had
heard the merits raised by the


Save Guana Cay Association's
case in February, and reserved
his judgement, which is still
pending.
The Baker's Bay Golf &
Ocean Club developers, Dis-
covery Land Company, had
instructed their attorneys to
give .the undertaking on
November 22, 2005, in
response to the Court of
Appeal's concern that there be
no "irremediable damage" to
the environment pending the
determination of the Judicial
Review.
Michael Barnett, of Graham,
Thompson & Co, who repre-
sents the developers, told the
court yesterday that his clients'
motion to end their undertak-


SEE page 4B


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--- --- -- -- - I






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MAY 9, 2006


Reopen beach access roads for public


ed the better part
of two weekly
columns to the
issue of public
beach access on the island of
New Providence, where the
problem is most acute, I was
extremely pleased to hear
Prime Minister Perry Christie
speak with passion on this
most vexing problem at his
party's one-night convention
held last Tuesday.
The Prime Minister told his
audience how he took it upon
himself to visit every public
beach during our last 'Easter
Monday' public holiday, and
he reiterated his unhappiness
over the fact that Bahamians
are being denied the ability to
enjoy our wonderful beaches,.
simply because of the lack of
public ones,
For years I have been very
concerned by the fact that the
average Bahamian was being
systematically excluded from
the very product that we spend
millions of dollars per year
promoting... beautiful white,
sandy beaches.
Public Policy
While the Prime Minister's


comments last week were a
source of optimism for me, the
reality was that they were
essentially a repeat of com-
ments made at the PLP's Party
Convention in November 2005,
where he said:
"While on the subject of
beaches, let me say that my
government has already com-
mitted itselfto the acquisition,
by private contract with inter-
ested landowners, of addition-
al beach properties that will be
converted to public use by
Bahamians and visitors alike,
"Further, let me reassure
you that none of the develop
ments I am discussing this
evening will involve in any way
any deprivation of the rights
of access to beaches that
Bahamians presently enjoy,
On the contrary, the thrust of
my government's policy in this
area is to augment the nation-
al inventory of public beach-
es, especially here in New
Providence, so that all Bahami-
ans will have ready access to
a much greater number of
beaches than is presently the
case. This will be an important
element of a new, comprehen-
sive land policy that is right
now the subject of consulta-


tion with our private sector
partners."
Since that time, numerous
'Heads of Agreements' have
been signed for tourism and
second-home developments
throughout the country. I hope
that in each and every case,
the public's beach rights are
preserved,
Wider Implications
In response to my article,
entitled Reopen public beach
accesS, which appeared on
November 29, 2005, 1 received
an e-mail from Joyce RoVle of
East Grinstead. England, who
wrott:
"I just wanted to drop you a
quick e-mail to say well done


for the article that appeared in
The Tribute on 29 November,
2005. At the time of the article
I was on holiday in the
Bahamas. I love your country,
and have visited many times,
and have subsequently invest-
ed in a couple of timeshare
weeks,
"However, the one problem
i find is access to beaches. I
read constantly in guide books
that all beaches are public
beaches, but have not seen any
indication that the beaches at
places like Love Beach or the
each on Paradise Island are,
"1, too, have been to Barba-
dos and the difference that
public access signs make is
tremendous. In my humble


Financial


Focus


opinion this is one major area
that lets the Bahamas down.
"I am glad that there is
someone who has noticed and
is keen for action to be taken
in this regard. I just hope that
the people that matter are lis-
teningreading and take note."
Perhaps there is a much
wider implication to our lack of
public beach access, and that is
to what extent are we disap-
pointing tourists by effectively
not allowing them the oppor-
tunity to actively explore our
beaches and coves, How many
visitors to the Bahamas share
Ms Royle's views?
Curious
I am increasingly curious as
to why there seems to be a lack
of appetite by successive gov-
ernments in opening the public
access roads to beaches that
have been blocked off by prop-
erty owners,
In response to my 11/29 arti-
cle, I received a telephone call
form a very prominent attor-
ney who confirmed that pri-
vate landowners could not
legally block off public access
roads, as has been done in
numerous place throughout
New Providence,.


Inagua tourism scheme to reduce depopulation


FROM page 1B

which had attracted the lion's
share of foreign and Bahamian
investment.
:In contrast, Inagua and
iany Family islands were
"struggling to maintain stan-
dards of living and population
levels". On many of these
islands, up to 20 per cent of
the population was living in
poverty, while in New Provi-
dence the rate was 83 per cent.
SA June 2004 survey had
shown that Inagua had good
potential for tourism growth,
the IDB said, describing it as
Having good access and a solid


infrastructure base, coupled
with "a rich and diverse mix
of potential product offerings".
Apart from having the
world's largest population of
West Indian Flamingos and
multiple other bird species, the
IDB survey identified as other
attractions Inagua's flora and
fauna, plus coasts and coral
reefs,
"Its sparse population of
some 1,000 inhabitants is high-
ly skilled and keenly focused
on pursuing tourism develop-
nment," the IDB said.
SHowever, the June 2004..
assessment had show n that the
island's existing product base
was weak, "with shortfalls


including awareness, industry
and market knowledge. acOffi
modations, interpretation,
tourist-related services and
amenities"
Product

The IDB added: "However,
the potential product offering
is rich and diverse, and the
existing accessibility provides a
good base for low-impact
tourism development,
"With the right mix of cre-
atlt\el developed services and
facilities, and focused market-
ing and promotion, the Inaguas,
have the potential to develop a
significant tourism industry
that is financially and environ-
mentally sustainable .....
"The Government and the
IDB agreed there is significant
potential for tourism develop-
ment in Inagua, but the
approach should be very tar-
geted, carefully planned and
developed on an incremental









be hind henews
readI:Eg
on Mondas


basis, as demand for the desti-
nation grows over time.
"The first step in that
process should be more
detailed integrated planning
and analysis to ensure that
future development is under-
taken in an environmentally,
economically and socially sus-
tainable fashion,"
The IDB indicated that the
project would also reduce
Inagua's dependency on Mor-
ton Salt, which currently
accounts for 80 per cent of the
island's workforce.
"Inagua is also of strategic
concern to the Government of
the Bahamas, given its local
tion at the southern end of the
Bahamas archipelago, and in
the centre of the major ship-
ping lane between the
Caribbean basin and Bastern
Seaboard of North America,"
the IDB said.
The IDB document says the
Bahamian government will
commit $$0,000 to funding the


project, with almost $200,000
coming from an IDB affiliate,
The tentative approval date
has been set for June 2006.
This latest IDB document
follows on from a previous
project document, in which the
bank said Morton Salt would
be encouraged to renovate the
Salt House,
The IDB suggested that the
company and its parent, Rohm
& Haas, convert the property
and surrounding oceanfront
into a Plamingo and Salt story
programme; an arts centre,
producing handicrafts and art
from recycled material: visitor
information centre; and equip-
ment rentals,
Inagua was seen as the ideal
destination for the SAVE (Sci-
entific, Academic, Volunteer
and Educational) travel mar-
ket, due to its wildlife and sea
life,
The IDB document said:
"There are a number of aspir-
ing entrepreneurs in Inagua


today, but in addition to a lack
of access to capital, most lack
an understanding of target
markets and the tools and
technologies available to devel-
op the island's tourism indus-
try.
"Some are sophisticated
business people with a wide
range of skills, but know little
about the kind of tourism that
is best suited to inagua's mix of
existing and potential products,
including the SAVE market,
ecotourism, soft adventure,
diving, and bird watching.
Energy
"Use of renewable energy
technology, both wind and
solar, will also be explored in
depth, both as a'means of
establishing the island's repu-
tation as an eco-friendly desti-
nation, and as an economic
alternative to the costly import
of diesel fuel required to run
Inagua's two generators."


Private equity firms to

buy Emerald Bay hotel


FROM page lB

by the current PLP administration,
SSeveral, sources have told The Tribune that
Emerald Bay needs a further infusion ofeapital
for more infrastructure development at the
resort, particularly landscaping and irrigation.
Its existing owners are understood to have
already committed about $6 million for repairs


A mAifldi rLtd.


to the marina that will prevent wind coming in
off the sea to prevent docked yachts and boats
rocking from side to side,
Deveon, the Nasdaq-listed, Florida-based con-
struction and security services company owns a
small 1.2 per cent stake in Emerald Bay, while
the same firm's chairman and chief executive,
Donald Smith, has an 11,3 per cent stake and sits
on the resort's managing committee.


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1.184b 1;.1 CoInahnnd uBo d I.i24 5.V'l'
'rS J l -5Mb~ifi'd hivdl d~ IVIdbd yb dl31,u 3tit
Owk-wk H i hesit blbslhd 13HOJ i lik6 52 Weelk s Ibld bUY1rit It 6611hi likit ldbilh
S2!wkmLboW LoW bit lbblhU fftdb ih Imst i5 WebkC Abk Ct lhU ,ilhiib( 5f oilHi e d iiddeits
OhaV-lbUs Cbee s;PvIous day a weighted price i daily volhiga Libt I060 Lfllt ift~itd OVb--dbUhlef t*
Today's cloee Cu~renl data weighted pices tr dilly volutl WeeNkly V&l.- 'hUitt vtlhum Oif the tWllO whe
bhdhpo chat-the Ib oltieiti3 boo Ofidylfi day to LdM C 5 A btbity' Rpitepoftbied eahi PoDi tIb t-elt the biel 12 mlth
teily Vol. NumBdibt bfttael 6hetusb ledod toatii NAV Net Arset ValuO
b -V $ btvtdehde jet- eheti peld i t his last 10 menthte N/NMzNt Meefl'M&
Pit ltteth price divlded by thie eelit 19 mItibi enihift I1NI"5- 'fll deoltly Seklttific Sk Itt Ihtlti. JJluea t1 1, 4 1004
Ab At AP01: 30 b, 2bi A' AS AtMAY. di, 5002
'AS At APW 9 d5, 200/'" AS At APt. 12 .


Conclusion
My view is that the Govern-
ment can save a lot of the mon-
ey it plans to spend on buying
beachfront properties by sim-
ply reopening the access roads.
There was a very good reason
for putting them there in the
first place, and this was fully
recognized by the early town
planners.
Until next week,,.


NBS Larry R. Gibson, a
Chartered Financial Analyst,
is iice-president pensions,
Colonial Pesinsions Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Colonial Group
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance
and is a major shareholder of
Security & General Insurance
Company in the Bahamas.
The views expressed are
those of the author and do not
necessarily represent those of
Colonial Group International
or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson@atlantic-
housecotn.bs


IndiGO



Employment Opportuity -Nortel PBX and Key System Egineer


Indigo Networksis seeking to ill a seniorposition inits Technial Services
department for an experienced Telecommlications and Networkig
engineer,

Applicatis are invited from individual who have:


SAminimumof 0 years experience in Nortel telecommunications
techniealsupportrole,
SAbility to meet with Customers in a Sales Capacity,
Ability to perform analysis, reco endations, and Implementation to
Customer's Voice and Data Networks,
SIn depthDesig, Programming, Implemetation, Maintenance of
NotelNorstar, BCM, Meridian Option 1IC and 81C systems,
Knowledge of ESN is essential,
Pro~pa ingandInstaltion of Tl's andPRIs.
KnowledgeofPBX trNetworkingand VOP Integration.
Routing, Trnking, QOS, and VLAN experience as it relatesto the
Integation of Voice and DataNetworks
Excellent customer service skills
ood oral and wrttenskills
Ability to work with inium supervision,


A competitive salary commnsute with experience is offered along with
product train, medical, pension and car allowance aer a qualifying
period,


Interested candidates should submit their resumes in writing to Indigo
Networks PO Box N3920 for the attention of the Technical Services
Manager.


Ababi Met~et
8mffitig5pmpeurty Fulid
Bank of Bahemens
Benchmark
b~hhbi'fiibW&MO, i
Pldetity bSwk .I
Collhe Holdings
Cntiimonweatlh fthk
Ointtiolldaeed Watbt Oikei
Otigtti' Hbeptiel

r~tit~o
rbFi~6t-t Oooi'ets
J, S. dhifigb
thki Umatlthill
Pi.Ane I Itaffita iD#


- - --- - ---------r---------~-- -..utr-.-.lsp-.-.-' `~-. I~C~-'~-'-.l. L~' '~r-- ~~ L~liiiislP*Y)SYLlr~IILiCIYYIIL~LI)


~I~IRLS~CIP~I~






TUESDAY, MAY 9, 2006, PAGE 3B


Shareholders expected to




back Kerzner buyout deal


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A WALL Street investment
bank has maintained its 2006
first quarter and full-year earn-
ings per share (EPS) forecasts
for Kerzner International,
adding that the agreed $81
buyout price was "consistent"
with its valuation of the
Atlantis resort owner and that
shareholders were likely to


vote in favour of the deal.
CIBC World Markets ana-
lysts, William Schmitt and
David Katz, estimated that
Kerzner International had gen-
erated $1.13 in 2006 first quar-
ter EPS, compared to $1.30 in
2005. Their full-year earnings
estimates for Kerzner Interna-
tional are $2.80 per share.
Meanwhile, Joseph Greff, an
analyst with Bear Stearns, pre-
dicted that Kerzner Interna-


tional's 2006 first quarter EPS
was likely to have been $1.16
per share, with the full-year
coming in at $2.11 per share.
Kerzner International has
yet to announce its results for
the 2006 first quarter, the com-
pany having been busy deal-
ing with the offer by Sol and
Butch Kerzner, the company's
chairman and chief executive,
and their investor group, to
take it private.


* THE Bahamas Association of Securities Dealers (BASD) has elected a new slate of officers.
The new officers, chosen at elections held last month, are from L to R: Roland Weisman, trea-
surer; Sherell Johnson, assistant secretary; Ivylyn Cassar, president; Sherry Morris, secretary;
Reece Chipman, vice-president.






1 FIRST CARIBBEAN
INTEPN NATIONALL B.i N-


CAREER OPPORTUNITY

for

CONSUMER FINANCE SPECIALIST
(ABACO)


Qualifications/ Experience Required:

Experience in sales and lending
Proven negotiation, communication and interpersonal skills
High level of quality of management
Demonstrated excellence in lending roles over a reasonable period
of time


General Requirements/ Responsibilities:

Identify and pursue sales opportunities, providing assistance as
necessary
Perform account opening and closing
Update and maintain customer personal, business and credit
information
Sell and deliver appropriate personal banking product
Be responsible for referring high net worth customers to Premier
and Business Banking Centres

If you are interested:

Submit your resume & confidential in WRITING ONLY before May 10,
2006 to:

Marvin Adderley
First Financial Centre Building
East Mall Drive
P.O. Box F-42556
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Or email: marvin.adderley@firstcaribbeanbank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank thanks all applicants for their
interest, however only those under consideration will be contacted.

Vacancies are open to Bahamas residents only.


Their $3.8 billion offer, valu-
ing Kerzner International at
$81 per share, has been accept-
ed by the Special Committee
set up to scrutinise and
approve the buyback offer. As
a result, the committee has
stopped seeking any rival bids.
The CIBC World Markets
analysts had raised their share
price target for Kerzner Inter-
national from $71 to $79 just
before the final $81 price was
agreed.
However, Mr Schmitt and
Mr Katz said the increase was
not caused by Ron Baron and
his Baron Capital Group,
which controlled 15.8 per cent
of Kerzner International's out-
standing issued ordinary
shares, saying he would not
accept the initial buyout offer
of $76 per share a signal that
the offer price was likely to
rise.
The CIBC World Markets
pair said their higher valuation
was based on their 2007 full-
year EPS estimates of $3.90
per share.
Mr Schmitt and Mr Katz
noted that with Istithmar, part
of the Kerzners' buyout group,
owning 12.3 per cent of Kerzn-
er International shares, and
Butch and Sol Kerzner own-
ing another 12.1 per cent
between them, they already
had over 24 per cent of the
stock ready to vote in favour of
the buyout.


Caledonia Investment and
Cement Merchants, two other
institutional shareholders that
sat on the committee that
approved the transaction, held
9.1 per cent and 5.9 per cent
of the shares respectively, and
were likely to vote in favour,
taking the Kerzners-support-
ing block to 39.3 per cent.
Baron Capital Group's back-
ing would give the Kerzners
the majority they need.
Mr Schmitt and Mr Katz


said: "Given that a majority of"
shareholders, or 50.1 per cent
is needed to vote in favour of
the transaction, we would
expect the deal to go through."
CIBC World Markets has'
estimated that Kerzner Inter-
national will generate EPS of
$0.95, $0.36 and $0.36 in the
2006 second, third and fourth
quarters.
For Bear Stearns, the com-
parative EPS projections are
$0.78, a $0.03 loss, and $0.20.


I POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR


. PricewaterhouseCoopers has vacancies -for .qualified,accountants whose
qualifications make them eligible for membership in the Baharmas Institute,
of Chartered Accountants. Prospective candidates should have at least three
(3) recent years of public accounting and auditing experience and be computer
literate.


The positions offer challenging work in the financial services industry and
other areas of industry and commerce. The salary scale, which recognizes
different levels of experience and skill, is designed to reward high performance.
In addition, the Firm provides excellent medical insurance and provident
fund benefits.

Please submit your application with Curriculum Vitae to:

Human Resources Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, The Bahamas





Needed


SSeectd&' VDrtectcv

The Bahama Out Islands Promotion Board, based in Plantation, Florida, is looking for
an Executive Director to lead, strategize, plan, develop and execute all marketing activities
on behalf of its fifty plus hotel membership. In addition, candidate will be responsible for
the hotel membership program, i.e., retaining the existing members through quality service
and tangible results and obtaining additional relevant hotel members with an increasing
list of benefits. Candidate will continue efforts for increasing airlift to all relevant Out
Islands, improving the Board's sales distribution channels, as well as maintaining and
improving the working relationship between the Board and the relevant Bahamas Government
Ministries. Candidate will also liaise with the local hotel association in areas such as product
development and lobbying/advocacy initiatives, all in an effort to "protect and enhance the
natural beauty of the Bahama Out Islands" while increasing business for the Board's
members.

Candidate must, above all, be a solid leader that is also articulate, tenacious, persuasive,
prepared, organized, and self motivated. He or she must possess at least a four-year business
degree from an accredited university and at least 10 years of successful work experience
in tourism marketing and management. Candidate will also be responsible for preparing
annual budgets, overseeing the Board's financial activities and for maintaining and improving
the financial health of the Board. Candidate will be responsible for a staff of approximately
five persons and previous management experience will be critical for utilizing this team
for the successful implementation of the above outlined responsibilities.

Candidate must also be a team player and a team leader; ready and willing to work in a
diverse and small team environment. Some experience in working with Caribbean government
tourism ministries is preferred. The ability to travel is a must and product knowledge of
the Bahama Out Islands and tourism market is preferable, but not mandatory.
Send rdsumd to: HumanResources@boipb.com.


BASD elects new slate of officers



A.


THE TRIBUNE


I.


I














Government spending still outpaces revenues


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
GOVERNMENT spending
increased by 12.2 per cent in the six
months to December 2006, expendi-
ture totalling $323.9 million, $50.9
million more than total revenue of
$273 million.
Bank
The Central Bank of the Bahamas,
in its review of Domestic Economic
Developments for the 2005 fourth
quarter, said that although govern-
ment revenues increased by 8.3 per
cent, spending also rose.
According to the report, the Gov-
ernment's deficit widened from $36.6
million in the year before period to
$50.9 million for the 2005-2006 fiscal
second quarter.


Total revenue rose as the result of
a 4.5 per cent growth in tax receipts
(to $250.9 million), a $9.1 million rise
in non tax revenue (to $21.1 million)
and grants totalling $1 million.
However, government spending
exceeded the revenue increase. The
Government spent $329.9 million,
with a 17 per cent hike in current out-
lays to $286.1 million and a 44.1 per
cent increase in capital investments to
$23.6 million.
The Central Bank report went on
to say that in contrast, net lending to
public enterprises contracted by
almost 50 per cent to $14.3 million.
In 2005, the majority of govern-
ment loans came from Bahamian
sources, primarily short-term
advances from commercial banks.
A much smaller portion was
derived from external creditors.
There were $11.1 million in repay-


ments, which went mainly towards nights and hotel occupancy levels,, .
retiring Bahamian dollar debts. Following a contraction of 1.5 per
Consequently, the Central Bank cent in the 2004 fourth quarter, total
said this repayment decreased the arrivals to the Bahamas advanced by
direct charge on government by 0.4 15 per cent to 1.3 million during the
per cent to $2.235 billion-over the 2005 quarter.i --- -- ..
previous quarter. In additioii, there was more traris
The Government was able to low- portation to the Bahamas, with air
er the national debt by 0.4 per cent to traffic and sea arrivals seeing increas-
$2.732 billion, compared to the pre- es.
vious quarter, because the contingent Air traffic rose by 15.5 per cent to
liabilities lowered by 0.05 per cent. 329,142 visitors, an improvement over
However, the national debt registered the previous year's fall off of 9.6 per
an increase of $194.2 million.(7.7 per cent, and sea arrivals growth strength-
cent) over 2004. ened to 14.8 per cent from 1.7 per


Industry
In regard to the Bahamas' largest
industry and main source of revenue,
tourism, the Central Bank noted that
tourism activities were underpinned
by an upsurge in available room


cent.
While New Providence received
the majority of visitors -56.6 per cent
- its overall totals did decrease pri-
marily because of sea arrivals, which
decreased by 8.9 per cent This offset
the 10.7 per cent growth in air
arrivals.


., ,.Following a downturn in its econo-
my, Grand Bahama saw strong per-
formances in both air and sea arrivals
and was able to record a 36.2 per cent
rebound in visitors. This was also true
ford their remaining Family Islands,
where a marked expansion in cruise
traffic supported a 59.9 per cent
upturn in visitors.
Hotels
Hotels also saw a rebound in hotel
room revenue 17.4 per cent from a
downturn of 9.1 per cent. The aver-
age occupancy rate firmed to 62 per
cent, up from 59 per cent in 2004.
There was also higher room night
sales 24.5 per cent, an increase from
the 15.5 per cent decline in 2004.
The average room night cost was
$136.60, based on price softening in
the Bahamas.


Guana Cay developers must wait until May-end


a skeleton crew and having
contractors on stand by.
"Any further,delay would
only increase their costs," Mr
Barnett added.
However, Fred Smith, the
attorney for the Save Guana
Cay Reef.Association, which-
has vehemently opposed the
development ,on the grounds
that it would destroy the envi-
ronment, argued that the
developers were in breach of
the undertaking by conducting
construction while bound by


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that YOLETTE ANAIS TELFORT
OF HAWKINS HILL, P.O. BOX N-4401, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 9TH day of MAY,
2006 to the Minister responsiblefor Nationality-,-and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that SIDNEY NOEL JACQUES OF
P.O. BOX SS-6360, PEARDALE ROAD, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 9TH day of MAY, 2006
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JULIE JOSEPH OF ROCK
SOUND, ELEUTHERA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 9TH day of MAY, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and-Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that CHRISTIANNA NOEL OF #17
WINSDOR PLACE 1, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any.reason-why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 9TH day of MAY, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.


Legal Notice

NOTICE


ESSO EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
PAPUA NEW GUINEA LIMITED

Pursuant to the provision of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice is hereby
given that the above-named Company has been'dissolved
and struck off the Register pursuant to a Certificate of
Dissolution issued by the Registrar General on the 26th day
of April, A.D., 2006.

Dated the 5th day of May, A.D., 2006.


K. FLOYD
Liquidator of
ESSO EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION PAPUA
NEW GUINEA LIMITED


the court order, and he asked
that their senior executives be
committed to prison for
alleged Contemp of Court.
He also argued that while
the developers relied on the
Heads of Agreement with the
Government as proof that they
were entitled to start construc-
tion, they had not lived up to
that agreement, because no
environmental management
plan had been completed.
Mr Smith alleged that local
government officials on Abaco


did not have an) permits or
licences to suggest that the
developers were legally autho-
rised to continue work on the
property.
Mr Smith claimed that by
reversing the undertaking irre-
versible damage would occur
on Great Guana Cay, whereas
leaving it in place would not
have the same effect on the
developers, as compensation
could occur.
'However, Dame Joan dis-
missed as "misconceived," the


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JEFFREY JOSEPH OF BAIN
STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 9TH day of MAY, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for, Natig ality and Qitizenship, PO.Box N- 714.7, Nassau.
Baamas.- -




SNOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JEAN ALEX TELFORT OF
HAWKINS HILL, P.O. BOX N-4401, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 9TH day of MAY, 2006 to the
Minister responsible forNationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


ESSO EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION PAPUA
NEW GUINEA (JUHA/P'NYANG) LIMITED

Pursuant to the provision of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice is hereby
given that the above-named Company has been dissolved
and struck off the Register pursuant to a Certificate- of
Dissolution issued by the Registrar General on the 26th day
of April, A.D., 2006.

Dated the 5th day of May, A.D., 2006.


K. FLOYD
Liquidator of
ESSO EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION PAPUA
NEW GUINEA (JUHA/P'NYANG) LIMITED


Legal Notice

NOTICE


EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
SENEGAL DEEPWATERR) LIMITED

Pursuant to the provision of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice is hereby
given that the above-named Company has been dissolved
and struck off the Register pursuant to a Certificate of
Dissolution issued by the Registrar General on the 26th day
of April, A.D., 2006.

Dated the 5th day of May, A.D., 2006.


KAREN FLOYD
Liquidator of
EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
SENEGAL DEEPWATERR) LIMITED


appeal by Mr Smith, saying
that while his arguments may
or may not have been valid,
the appellant court could not
make a determination on a rul-
ing not yet handed down by a
trial judge.
In addition, she said she and
her fellow Justices of Appeal,
Osadeb\ and Lopgley, were
not satisfied there had been
any breeches of the undertak-
ing.
The court ruled that the
undertaking should not be held
'ad infinitum', and said that the
fairest decision to both parties


would, be to remove it after
allowing the trial judge a rea-
sonable time to render his ver-
dict.
Mr Barnett said the devel-
ope.rswere pleased with the
decision, although they had
hoped that the undertaking
.would have .been relieved
immediately.
Mr Smith said his clients
were thankful and relievedthat
the environment has been
saved if for "a brief moment."
"We look forward to the
decision of the Supreme
Court," he added.


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE

ISCOR TRADING CO. LTD.


Notice is hergeb gien th ha in .L'ordaiice %ith Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act
No. 45 of 2000, ISCOR TRADING CO. LTD., has
been dissolved and struck off the Register according
to the Certificate of Dissolutionissued by the Registrar
General on the 27th day of April, 2006.

MORLAN ASSOCIATES LTD.
c/o Icaza, Gonzalez-Ruiz & Aleman (Bahamas) Trust Limrnfid,
Winterbotham Place, .
Marlborough & Queen Streets, .
P.O. Box N-10429, .
Nassau, Bahamas
Liquidator


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No. 45 of 2000)

S In Voluntary Liquidation


Notice is hereby given in accordance vith Section 131 of
the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
WEBINVESTOR PRIVATE EQUITY LIMITED is in
dissolution.. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be
contacted at Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen
-Streets; -Nassau Bahamas.Ail-tersons-having-claims against
the above-named company are required to send their names,
addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator before June 6, 2006.

Alrena Moxey
Liquidator


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


CENTURY TOWN CORP.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137(8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of CENTURY TOWN CORP.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck
off the Register.




ARGOSA CO INC.
(Liquidat r)


FROM page 1B

ing to halt any new work on
the project was borne out of
frustration for the unanticipat-
ed length of time that had
passed without a Supreme
Court ruling.
The delay, he said, was plac-
ing a financial burden on his
clients because although work
had come to a standstill, and
some persons had been laid
off, Discovery Land Company
still had the cost of maintaining


.4




1-
*e

4
4















I









ii


1'


Legal Notice

NOTICE


THE TRIBUNE:''


ill. I


PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MAY 9, 2006






Ut::DAY, MAY 9, 2006, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


mA
PO Bo N 123
MmLA 'SuwwKCAC*6
East Bay Stre I
Naau. BW ehSm


Fix i w42w satw
Ukibmt wim miKlAg*J


AUDITORS' REPORT TO THE SHAREHOLDIA


We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of Bank IIoftmann (Overseas) Limited at
December 31, 2005. This balance sheet is the responAiblity of the Bank's management Our
responsibility is to express an opinion on this balh nc st k based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with Internaional Standrds on Auditing as promulgated
by the International Federation of Accountants. 'hose Standads require that .we plan and
perform the audit to obtain reasonable assuirane as to whether thebalance sheet is free of
material misstatement An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the
amounts and disclosures in the balance sheet. An dit also includes assessing the accounting
principles used and significant estimates made by smanai mebst, as well s evaluating the overall
balance sheet presentation. We believe that our audit pirdvdes a reasonable basis.for our opinion.

In our opinion, this balance sheet presets faity, in all material rpets, the iancial position of
the Bank as of December 31, 2005 in accordance wit Ilternational Pincial eporting
Standards as promulgated by the Internatidnal Adcounting 6tadards Board.


Chartered Accountants


Nassau, Bahamas
May 2 2006


BANK HOFMANN (OVERSEAS) LIMIT :
Balance Sheet .'.' .'

December 31,2005, with corresponding figures for 204..
(Expressed in United States dollars)


S' 20 0' ; 2004

Assets
Due from affiliates: .: '
Demand deposits $ .42 ..5:, 2 79 4.282.854
Time deposits (note3)2 ".: '443: ",, : ; ,089,92. S ,9L
35.442,722 19,372,766
Due from customers and other banks: ;
Demand deposits 90,643 1,115-
Time deposits (note 4) 50217 3 ,08.6.
... .93.060 3.009.811
Investment (note 5) 5 .9871 ,8 05
Accrued interest and other assets 251.231 123.594
Total Assets 42,274,157 28.327676


Liabilities. .
Due to affiliates .
Time deposit 864 .25
'2.864.125


Due to customers and other banks:
Demand deposits
Time deposits (note 4)


* : ... . * "' *, - :. -
14,5937,001
19,515.497


3;Lr2,49S


1.623A50
-15,90241
17.613,700


Accrued interest and other liabilities 25.012 1I,0S9
Total Liabilities 34.369510 20,577,884


Shareholder's Equity
Share capital:
Authorized, issued and fully paid -
3,000,000 shares of B$ each 3 4000,000 3,00000
Retained earnings 4.04;647 4.749.792
Total Shareholders Equity .. 7,904,6 47 7,749,792
Total Liabilitiesand Shareholder' Equity : 42.274.157 28.327,676

See accompanying notes to balance sheet

This bale hee was on behalfoftheBoad o(DiMirsi n May 2.2006 by ie .Hwi
^ ^S^ ^~~~~~~~.krsa .^^ :/:.*..^*;'*'_:^^. \


Notes to Balance Sheet


December 31, 2005


1. General. "'.
Bank Hofmann (Overseas) Limited ("the Ba"), is 4opotd inder0 the, laws of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas and is licensed by the Ministry of Fihaic of The.Batiia
to carry on banking business. The Bank is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Bank Hofmann AO,
Zurich, Switzerland, which is in turn 100% o*wed by Credit- S lis Zurich Switierland.
Bank Hofmann AG and Credit Suisse andi its ibidiaries ar 6d referred it n this balance sheet
as "Affiliates". .

The registered office of the Bank is in The Bahamas Fincial Centtr, Nassau, Bahamas.

2. Significant accounting policies .: '
(a) Accounting convention: .
This balance sheet has been prepared in accodaice ith International Finaicial
Reporting Standards as promulgated by thcln" national counting Standrds Board
and under the historical cost convention.' ..


(b) Foreign currency translation:
Management considers the reportngt urecy of th Bank to.be United States dollars,
this is the Bank's primary operating currency;,. .
Assets and liabilities maintained in foreigfi.cunrr*cies re tranlted into United States
dollars at the rates of exchange prevailing at the dal f the balance sheet.

...................


i UaUncialU instruments
Classification
Cash and cash equivalents are short term "highly liquid .vestelmsl" which ate readily
convertible into known amounts of cash wilout notice ad which ae with n three ()
months of maturity when acquired...
Held-to-maturity investments are financial assets with ixed or deteminable payments
and fixed maturity that the Bank has the positive intent and ability t hold to maturity.
The Investment in US Treasury Note is classified a a held-tiihnarity investent .


Due from customers aid other banks are considered to be loans and advances that are
originated by the Bank.
Financial liabilities that are not held-for-trading are d added deposits and time depOsits
due to customers and other banks .


m"


I _II II.


(I


Recognition
The Bank recognizes financial instruments on the day it becomes a party to the
contractual provisions of the instruments.

Measurement
Financial instruments are measured initially at cost, including transaction costs.
Subsequent to initial recognition all held-to-maturity investments are carried at amortized
cost. Premiums are amortized over the remaining life of the instruments. Loans and
advances originated by the Bank are measured at amortised cost, less provisions for
losses as appropriate.

Derecognition
A financial asset is derecognised when the Bank loses control over the contractual rights
that comprise that asset. This occurs when the rights are realized, expire or are
surrendered. A financial liability is derecognised when it is extinguished.
Held-to-maturity instruments are derecognised when the Bank no longer has control over
the contractual rights that comprise the instruments. This occurs when the rights are
realized, expire or are surrendered.


(d) Impairment
Financial assets are reviewed at each balance sheet date to determine whether there is
objective evidence of impairment. If any such indication exists, the asset's recoverable
amount is estimated. Provisions are established and are maintained at a level considered
by the directors to be adequate to provide for potential losses.


(e) Use of estimates
The preparation of a balance sheet in accordance with IFRS requires management to
* make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the balance
sheet and the accompanying notes. These estimates are based on relevant information
available at the balance sheet date and, as such, actual results could differ from those
estimates.


3. Due from Affiliates time deposits
Due from Affiliates time deposits earned interest at annual rates ranging from 0.65% 2.39
at December 31, 2005 (2004 ranging from 1% 2%).

4. Due from/to customers and other banks tune deposits
Due from customers and dther banks time deposits earned interest at annual rates ranging
from 2.67313% 3.89675% at December 31, 2005 (2004 1.13% 2.07%).
Interest was paid on balances due to customers and other banks time deposits at annual rates
ranging from 0.15% 2.05% at December 31, 2005 (2004 0.405% to 2.07%).


5. Investment

2005 2004

US Treasury note (inflation linked), earning interest
At the annual rate of 3.375%, maturing in 2007
(Market value $6,330,324; 2004 $6,377,381) $ 5,987,138 5,821,505



6. Financial instruments
Interest rate, liquidity and currency risks
The Bank manages its exposure to interest rate changes, liquidity and currency risk related to
its portfolio of loans (Due from customers and other banks), asset and liability deposits by
maintaining a matched book of assets and liabilities by currency and maturity. Its objective is
to manage the impact of interest rate changes on earnings. Derivative financial instruments
(forward contracts) used by the Bank to manage currency risks for clients at the balance sheet
date were comprised of $0.00 (2004'-$7,443,472) of purchase conmitnmnts and $0.00 (2004
.. $7,443,472) of sale commitments.' '

Credit risk
Credit risk is the risk that a counterpart to a financial instrument will fail to discharge an
obligation or commitment that it has entered into with the Bank.
The majority of the Bank's financial assets are either on deposit with or due from affiliates.
Accordingly, there is minimal credit risk.

Fair values
Due to their short terms to maturity, the carrying values of cash and cash equivalents are:
considered to approximate their fair values.
Management estimates that the total fair values of deposit assets and liabilities do not differ
materially from their carrying values given that the average effective interest rates
approximate the current interest rates available to the Bank for loans and placements and
offered by the Bank for deposit liabilities with similar maturities.
The fair value of the investment is disclosed in note 5.

7. Maturities and concentrations of assets and liabilities
All time deposits due from and to Affiliates, customers and other banks are scheduled to
mature within one year.
Significant concentrations of assets and liabilities by geographical locations are as follows:

Switzerland United States Other Total

ASSETS
Due from affiliates $ 4.712,239 19.318,862 11,411,621 35.442,722
Due from customers
and other banks 593,060 593,060
Investment 5,987,138 5,987,138
S 4,712,239 25,306,000 12,004,681 42,022.920

LIABILITIES
Due to customers
and other banks $ 4,681,071 25,465,796 3,965,631 34,112.498
$ 4,681,071 25,465.796 3,965,631 34,112,498

8. Commitments
The Bank has arranged outstanding guarantees amounting to $1,141,857 (2004 $2,124,558).
on behalf of its clients.

9. Assets under management
The Banic manages assets on behalf of its clients. The assets are held for the account and risk
of the clients, and are therefore treated as off balance sheet items. Total assets under
management at December 31, 2005 amount to $162.8 million (2004 $109.1 million).

10. Subsequent event
The board of directors declared a divide nd of $600,000 on January 26, 2006.
III


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THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


PAGE 6B. TUESDAY. MAY 9. 2006


Tr.7 COLLf "


Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs


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PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

PROGRAMMES 2006


What is your goal?

/ PROMOTION
S/ QUALITY SERVICE
/ SALARY INCREASE
V NEW CAREER
/ CAREER ENHANCEMENT
We can provide you with superior education and training
to help you accomplish your goal.
Call 242-328-0093 or 242-328-1936 for an interview
today!


For your convenience, the majority of classes are held on Saturdays, 8am 12noon.
Are you preparing for a promotion, career change or career enhancement? Our Professional
Development Department can help you achieve your career goal!
No entrance exams. Tuition may be paid per term or in full. International programmes available.


SUMMER COURSES

CERTIFICATION IN PROJECT MANAGEMENT
PROJ90.1 Mastering Project Management $800
This course explores the core competencies of project management, and the following topics are
discussed at the advanced level: leadership, project performance management, project plan
development, and people-based project management, project quality, scope, time, cost, human
resources, communications, risk, procurement, and integration management. Upon successful
completion of the programme, candidates are encouraged to sit the American Academy of Project
Management Executive Level Certification Examination. To be awarded the Master Project
Manager Certification, candidates must score a minimum of 75% on the AAPM Master Certification
Final Examination.

Prerequisite: A Master's Degree in any discipline from an accredited or recognized college/university
and a minimum of one year's experience as a project management apprentice; or a Bachelor's
degree with four years' project management experience; Curriculum vitae.


ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250
Begins: Spring, Summer and Fall Day/Time: Saturday 8:00am 12n


Master Project Management Intensive Review- $800


Begins: Spring, Summer or Fall


Duration: 8 Weeks


Duration: 4 Weeks


Day/Time: Saturday 8:00am 12n


THE BECKER CPA REVIEW
The College of The Bahamas is pleased to offer the New CPA Computer-Based Test (CBT). Besides
the obvious transition from a pencil-and-paper exam to a computer-based test, the revised CPA
Exam will also contain a new content focus broadening the scope of audit and attest areas and
incorporating the assessment of critical skills, such as research and communication. The new exam
also has increased emphasis'on general business knowledge'and information technology. Students
may sit the final exams under the'United States CPA Board for which they have qualified.


CPA 900 Financial Reporting- $650
CPA 902 Law/Business Law- $465


CPA 901 Accounting & Reporting/Regulation- $520
CPA 903 Auditing/Auditing and Attestation- $465


Prerequisite: A BA Degree from an accredited or recognized college/university in any discipline with at least
21 credit hours in accounting.
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:30am 5:30pm Duration: 12 Weeks



A+ COMPUTER TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATION
This programme of study is designed to equip students with the skills necessary to sit the international
A+ Microsoft Certification Examination. Techniques to identify and rectify mechanical problems
related to the personal computer are explored. The programme provides hands-on learning experience
with lab exercises that help students to apply theory to practice.

TERM 1: COMP 954 Software,- $510 TERM 2: COMP 955 Hardware- $510
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
Begins: Per Demand Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 2 TERMS

CERTIFIED COMPUTER OPERATOR Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS)
This course of study is designed to train students how to master Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel,
Microsoft Access, Microsoft Outlook, and PowerPoint. To help the student to develop navigation
and design skills, the instructor provides easy-to-understand notes and conducts live demonstrations
on how to manipulate the entire MS Office Suite. Students who complete the external international
examinations successfully will be awarded the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Certification. The
programme comprises five Modules and two companion courses:


TERM 1
COMP 906 Microsoft Office Specialist
Microsoft Word, Microsoft Access
Microsoft Excel, Microsoft PowerPoint
Microsoft Outlook
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350
(Optional).


TERM 2
ETHC900 Ethics & Profes. Responsibility- $250 (Optional)
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
TERM 3
COMP 906 Microsoft Office Specialist
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210


NOTE: COMP906 is offered in Spring, Summer and Fall terms. Students are free to select the term of study.

PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS


IMPORTANT INFORMATION
APPLICANTS FOR INTERNATIONAL CERTIFICATION COURSES AND PROGRAMMES
All students applying for International Certification Courses and Programmes that are offered in
conjunction with foreign institutions are required to contact the CEES Office for information on
external application and examination fees.


FEES


1. COB Registration........................................$40.00 (one-time fee)
2. Insurance ......................................................$25.00 (valid for 1 year)
3. ID Card........................... ......................... $25.00 (one time fee)
4. Technology Fee ......................................$100
5. Books.................. .......... ....... .............. Please contact COB Bookstore for prices.
6. Awards Ceremony (Optional).......................$150.00 (must be paid by the 2nd TERM)
7. External Application Fees.......................... Please check with the CEES Office for
information.

THE ANNUAL AWARDS CEREMONY
The Annual Awards Ceremony and Redeption is normally held at The British Colonial Hilton Hotel
once during TERM 3. Adult students successfully completing programmes and courses are awarded
certificates or certification documents.


Secure Your Seat By Enrolling Today!
Call (242) 325-5714/328-0093/328-1936 or visit us on Moss Road in Oakes Filed.
Fees May Be Paid By Cash, Credit Card, or Bank Certified Cheque To:
The College of The Bahamas, Business Office
Cees reserves the right to change tuition, fees, course content, course schedule
and course materials.


'Inlcrna.onal
dieugates'*:
:-A
-"Itural cjqfhollnss
-p.bIc awarennC-..1, ..
and workshop-.
Wcafn Lbecalion
Day ck.ebralIon.
-trade show a N
parade l
Government l
co.rtG4V Calli
Bfareral agreement ::
'Sabbathe. vice .
'Reggnaconcert


'1A.I1 food and hoas
pitallty

IrAscOTn yahoo.Lcrn

BAHAMAS RASTAFARI NATIONAL GATHERING
COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS MAY 22- 28, 2006


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Tuesday. May 23rd, 2006


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Thursday. May 25th, 2006

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Friday, May 26th, 2006




Saturday, May 27th, 200b

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*Sunday, May 28th 2006
.... -. ?1<. ..
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National Booksellers tllusko
& Home Cantre

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Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute
INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT


CULINARY COURSES

SUMMER SEMESTER 022006


COURSE CODE BEGINS DUR. DAYS TIME TUITION RESOURCE Venue Max. Enrol.
&FEE MATERIALS


1. Gourmet Cooking I COOK 823 May 15 6 weeks Mon. 6:00-9:00pm $200.00 $20 per week SHTS Main Kitchen 15
2. BahamianCuisine COOK806 May18 Sweeks Thurs 6:00-9:00pm $225.00 $10-$12peweek SHTSMainKitchen 15

For further information please contact the In[ustry Training Department of the Culinary
& Hospitality Management Institute at 323-5804, 323-6804 or fax 325-8175


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THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


TUESDAY, MAY 9, 2006, PAGE 7B


THE COLL


A. -


HE BAHAMAS


Visit our website at wwnw.cob.edu.bs


eeTknrv-;..4 MIANS~_43i~


CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES


COMPUTER OFFERINGS SUMMER 2006

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
Course Description: This course is for the beginner who knows very little about computers and does not
understand how it works. This course covers the major computer concepts with extensive hands on practice
of various software using: (I) Microsoft Office Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii)
Microsoft Access Database Management.


Pre-requisite:
Begins:
Duration:
Venue:
Tuition:


None
Monday,.15 May 2006 6:00pm -9:30pm
Saturday, 13 May 2006 10:00am 1:30pm
9 weeks
CEES Computer Lab
$450.00


Section 01 (CEES)
Section 02 (CEES)


COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II
Course Description: This course covers the major advanced concepts with extensive hands on practice of
various software using: (I) Microsoft Office Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft
Access Database Management.
Pre-requisite: Computer Applications I
Begins: Thursday, 18 May 2006
Tmne: 6:00pm 9:30pm
Duration: 9 weeks
Vnue: CEES Computer Lab
F es $550.00

EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint.
I focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.
?e-requisite: None
begins: Thursday, 1" June 2006
Trime: 9:30am 4:30pmr
Duration: 1 day
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fges: $160.00

IICROSOFT EXCEL
course Description: This course covers the fundamentals of the Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. Tools that are
needed for basic entry and manipulation of cells and worksheets are presented. The course assumes no
particular background.
Pre-requisite: Keyboarding
Efegins: Monday, 15 May, 2006
'ime: 4:00pm 5:30pm
Duration: 6 weeks
ienue: CEES Computer La
F\es $250.00

RMICROSOFT WORD
Course Description: The course assumes no particular background and takes the student from the level of
novice to an advanced level. A thorough grounding in all of the fundamentals of document handling in
Iicrosoft Word is presented.
Pre-requisite: Keyboarding
Begins: Wednesday, 17 May 2006
Time: 6:00pm 9:00pm
Duration: 6 weeks
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees $250.00

PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR
Course Description: This course is a hands-on introduction to technology systems for use in information
eovironments.The course will cover the following topics: Basic Hardware, Operating Systems, Troubleshooting
and Repairs.
Prie-requisite: None
Begins: Tuesday, 16'h May 2006
Time: 6:00pm- 8:00pm Tuesdays and Thursdays
Duration: 9 weeks
Venue: BHTC Computer Lab
Fees: $500.00

QUICKBOOKS
Course Description: This course is designed to train new and existing small business entrepreneurs (fewer than
.20 employees) how to organize and manage their accounting activities using QuickBooks Pro software:
Students will learn how to set-up their company files, chart of accounts, budget, customers, vendors and
employees.
Pre-requisite: None
Begins: Tuesday, 16'h May 2006
rime: 6:00pm 9:00pm
Duration: 6 weeks
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $330.00

WEBPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP
Course Description: This course, which targets persons who would like to create their personal web pages will
Over Web page creation, Web site management, and HTML. Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics,
Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of Web pages.
Pre-requisite: Participants must be computer literate and have a basic knowledge of
word-processing
egins:Thursday & Friday, 15h& 16"' June 2006
eime: 9:30am 4:30pm
Duration: 2 days
venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $550.00







MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I
;his is an introductory course for learning basic techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major
topic areas will include Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniques, Wellness Education (Psychological
and Physiological Benefits), Indications and Contraindications, Serving Special Populations and Complementary
,odywork Systems to include Aromatherapy Essentials.
Starting: Thursday, 18" May, 2006
4 6:00-9:00pm
EDuration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee: $465.00
,Venue: The College of the Bahamas

MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS II
sThis is an advanced course for learning techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major topics
include introduction to hydrotherapy; spa and body treatments; the basic facial; aromatherapy-fundamentals
-|r essential oils; relaxation and meditative methods; and hot stone therapy.


Starting:
*Duration:
Tuition Fee:
Venue:


Monday, 15" May, 2006
6:00-9:00pm
10 Weeks
$620.00
The College of the Bahamas


SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior customer
service. It focuses on customer value, retention and relationship building and employee motivation.


Date:
Time:
Venue:
Tuition:


Thursday, 1st June 2006
9:30am 4:30pm
Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre
$170.00


EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft
PowerPoint. It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.


Date:
Time:
Venue:
Tuition:


Thursday 1st June 2006
9:30am 4:30pm
CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
$160.00


WEB PAGE DESIGN
This course will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy fiddling
with computers and would like to create their own web pages are encouraged to attend. Specific topics will
include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web pages.


Date:
Time:
Venue:
Tuition:


Thursday & Friday, June 8t & 9t 2006
9:30am 4:30pm
CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
$550.00


PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
SUMMER SEMESTER


COURSE SECT COURSE TIME DAY START DUR FEE
NO. NO. DESCRIPTION
ACCOUNTING
ACCA900 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS I 6:00-8:00pm Tue/Thur 16-May 10 weeks $250
ACCA901 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II 6:00-8:00pm Mon/Wed 15-May 10 weeks $275
10 weeks $300
ACCA902 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS III 6:00-8:00pm Mon/Wed 15-May
BUSINESS
BUSI900 01 CREDIT & COLLECTION 6:00-900PM Tue 16-May 8 weeks $225
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE 1 Day $170
CUST900 01 W/S 9:30-4:30pm Thur 1-Jun
COMPUTERS
COMP901 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 6:00-9:30pm Mon 15-May 9 weeks $450
COMP901 02 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I ., .1 ':. _. Li. .a1 M 9 ee-k
1COMP9O2: i'i- v C.n^ lOMPU1^ERAPF^PLICATQ 1'4_ II IMB" S 1Uacls i_ _
COMP 941 01 QUICKBOOKS O. 0.. 00pm u Tue 16-May 6 weeks $330
COMP953 01 PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR 6 00.00ppm Tue'Tnui if-May 9 weec 5450
COMP907 01 MICROSOFT EXCEL 4:00-5:30pm Mon/Wed 15-May 6 weeks $250
COMP960 01 MICROSOFT POWERPOINT W/S 9:30-4:30pm Thur 1-Jun 1 Day $160
COMP905 01 MICROSOFT WORD 6:00-9:00pm Wed 17-May 6 weeks $250
COMP930 01 WEB PAGE DESIGN W/S 9:30-4:30pm Thur/Fri 8-Jun 2 Days $550
COSMETOLOGY
COSM802 01 MAKE-UP APPLICATION 6:00-9:00pm Mon 15-May 8 weeks $225
COSM804 01 MANICURE & PEDICURE 6:00-9:00pm Mon 15-May 8 weeks $225
COSM807 01 NAIL ART TECHNICIAN 6:00-9:00pm Mon/Thur 15-May 5 weeks $500
DECORATING
DECO800 01 INTERIOR DECORATING I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 16-May 8 weeks. $225
FLOR800 01 FLORAL DESIGN I 6:00-9:00pm Thur 18-May 10weeks $225
FLORS01 01 FLORAL DESIGN II 6:00-9:00pm Tue 16-May 10 weeks $250
HEALTH.AND
FITNESS
MASG900 01 MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I 6:00-9:00pm Thur 18-May 10 weeks $465
MASG901 01 MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS II 6:00-9:00pm Mon 15-Mayi 10weeks $620
LANGUAGES
CRE 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE I 6:00-7:30pm Mon/Wed 15-May 10 weeks $225
SPA 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I 6:00-7:30pm Mon/Wed 15-May 10 weeks $225
MANAGEMENT
MGMT900 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT I 6:00-9:30pm Thur 18-May 9 weeks $250
MGMT901 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT II 6:00-9:30pm Mon 15-May 9 weeks $300
MEDICAL _
MEDT900 01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 6:00-900pm Thur 18-May 10 weeks $225
SEW
SEW 800 01 BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING I 6:00-9:00pm Thur 18-May 10 weeks $225
SEW 805 01 DRAPERY MAKING I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 16-May 10 weeks $225
SEW 811 01 UPHOLSTERY MAKING I 6:00-9:00pm Mon 15-May 10 weeks $225

ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/
328-1936/302-4300 ext. 5202 or email nlacroix@cob.edu.bs
All fees are included with the. exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time).
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content,
Course Schedule and Course Materials.




Personal Development Courses


CREDIT EQUIVALENCY


The following Personal Development courses have been approved by the
Academic Board for COB credit courses equivalencies.

ACCA900 Accounting for Beginners I
ACCA901 Accounting for Beginners II
MGMT 900 -Human Resource Management I
MGMT901- Human Resource Management II
SPA 900 Conversational Spanish I
SPA 901 Conversational Spanish II

Students may continue to utilize the courses as a means of professional
development in both private and public sectors with the added recognition
that these courses have been equated to courses taken toward a degree
programme.


CA EO Phe920 F 3 74

CAMPS ECRIY DRET INS602456,3244930324494


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SUPREME COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
May 11,2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00222

Whereas EDMUND PHILUP PINDER, of Main Street, Spanish
Wells, Eleuthera, one of the Islandsof the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, the eldest son has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
for the real and personal estate of PHILIP EDMUND PINDER
late of Sea Breeze Estates, Eastern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by
the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.
D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Ph: (242) 322-4348
Nassau, The Bahamas
May 11, 2006

PROBATE DIVISION
NO.2006/PRO/NPR/00228

In the estate of JOHN H. LEWIS, late of 7121 Lexington Lane,
Fox Lake, Chicago, Illinois, United States.of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application Will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by ELLEN
SERVILLE of No. 10 Collins Avenue, New Providence, The
Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas, for obtaining the Resealed Letters of Office in the
above estate granted to HARRIS TRUST & SAVINGS BANK,
the Independent Executor, by the State of Illinois, in the Circuit
Court of the 19th Judicial Circuit, on the 7th day of September
2004.

Signed
K. Mackey
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
STHE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
May 11, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00229

Whereas SHANTEL HEPBURN-STUBBS, of New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for Letters of Administration of the real and personal estate of
CUFTON HEPBURN late of Kool Acres, New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by
the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.
K. Mackey
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
May 11, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00230

Whereas AUDLEY FARRINGTON, of Golden Gates
Subdivision, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
for the real and personal estate of WILLAMAE FARRINGTON,
late of Golden Gates Subdivision, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by
the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.
K. Mackey
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
May 11, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00232


Whereas MIKE A. KLONARIS, of Lyford Cay, Western District,
New Providence, one of the Islands.of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for
Michael Hawes, the sole Executor has made application to
the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration with the Will annexed of the real and personal
estate of PAUL VASSER SEYDEL, late of 2165 Clubside
Terrace in the Country of Alpharetta in the State of Georgia,
U.S.A., deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by
the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.
D. Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Ph: (242) 322-4348
Nassau, The Bahamas
May 11, 2006

PROBATE DIVISION
NO.2006/PRO/NPR/00233

In the estate of DOROTHY HILDA BOURNE, late of Flat 3,
Old Market Court, Glastonbury, Somerset, United Kingdom,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by
SHANNELLE S. SMITH of Ruby Avenue, Western District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, the Authorized Attorney in
The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Grant of Probate in
the above estate granted to BELINDA JAYNE MULCAHY,
BASIL WILLIAM BARTLETT and ROBIN ALOYSIUS
WEELEN, the Co-Executors by the District Probate Registry
in Bristol County, United Kingdom on the 5th day of April,
2005.

Signed
D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE 'DIVISION
May 1, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00236

Whereas SHELMAR WINTERS, of Key West Street; New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration with the Will annexed
of the real and personal estate of EHUD WINTERS late of Key
West Street, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by
the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.
D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
May 11, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00241

Whereas LILORENE KING, of Golden Gates No. 2, Western
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas the Lawful Widow, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters.
of Administration of the real and personal estate of OTIS KING
late of Golden Gates Estates No. 2, Western District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The;
Bahamas, deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by
the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.
D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
May 11, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00242

Whereas EUDANCEL IVAN McPHEE of No. 94 Gambier Drive,
Mayfield Subdivision in the City of Freeport, Grand Bahama,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas the
Lawful Child has made application to the Supreme Court of
The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the real and
personal estate of IVAN DAVID McPHEE late of No. 28
Chichester Crest in the City of Freeport, Grand Bahama, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by
the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the date hereof.
D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
May 11, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/0048

Whereas WALTER EUGENE ALBURY of #3 Orchard Terrace,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme Court of
The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the,real and
personal estate of MARJORIE LEE ALBURY late of #3 Orchard-
Terrace, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by
the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.
K. Mackey
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT


PROBATE DIVISION
May 11,2006.

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00249

Whereas CHELON M. CARR of Seabeach Boulevard, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme Court Of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration with the Will annexed
of the real and personal estate of LORD LUIS DEL CAMPO
BACARDI late of Villa Daiquiri, 38 Boulevard, d'ltalie,.Monaco,
Principality of Monaco, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by
the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.
K. Mackey
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
May 11, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00251

Whereas BETTYMAE EWING of 48 Pine Forest, New
Subdvision, Holmes Rock, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the real and personal estate of INDERA
EWING late of 48 Pine Forest, New Subdivision, Holmes Rock,
Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by
the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the date hereof.

K. Mackey
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
May 11, 2006


No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00252


Whereas ARENETTA N. DAVIS of 63 Royal Palm Way and
Seabreeze Lane, Lucayan Beach Subdivision, Freeport, Grand
Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the real and personal
estate of SEBASTAIN ALEXANDER MAJOR late of 63 Royal
Palm Way and Seabreeze Lane, Lucayan Beach Subdivision,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by
the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the date hereof.

K. Mackey
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
May 11,2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00253

Whereas ANNAMAE KEMP of the Island of New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, -'
and JOYCELYN SMITH of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and
SHEILA SWEETING of the Island of New Providence, one of ,
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, have made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters
of Administration of the real and personal estate of RICHARD
ADDERLEY late of Strachan's Alley, New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.;

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by
the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.
K. Mackey
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT'
PROBATE REGISTRY
PO. BOX N-167
Ph: (242) 322-4348:,
Nassau, The Bahamas
May 11, 2006

PROBATE DIVISION
NO.2006/PRO/NPR/00254

in the estate of FRED WILLIAM KRAHENBUHL JR., late of':
631 Woodland Avenue, City of Hamilton, State of Ohio, United -
States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen.
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
SSupreme Court of The Bahamas on its Probate Side by JAMES (
SLENNOX MOXEY of West Bay Street, New Providence, The
Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The -
Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Entry Appointing Fiduciary; )
Letters of Authority in the above estate granted to RICHARD
.L KRAHENBUHL, the executor, by the Probate Court of Butler'
County, Ohio, on the 30th day of August 2005. i

Signed
K. Mackey
(for) Registrar
'-- ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~ _, ^ - - -* *r


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Ih
THE SUPREME COURT -
PROBATE DIVISION.
May 11,2006_


No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00255

Whereas JOAN AUGUSTA SAWYER of No. 11 Sandford Drive; -
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, and SAMUEL ANTHONY SAWYER of West.
Avenue, Centerville, New Providence, one of the Islands of'"
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, have made applicatio'n:-:
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the real and personal estate of GEOFFREY,
RUDOLPH SAWYER late of No. 1 Coxswain Close, Soldier,.
Road West, New Providence, one of the Islands of the-
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. ,

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by -
the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.-.


D. Robinson
(for) Registrar


May 8,10


49~91 1


I I I





TUESDAY, MAY 9, 2006, PAGE 9B


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


TUESDAY EVENING MAY 9, 2006

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New Fla Nova Hitler's Sunken Secre A sal-Secrets of the Sexes FrontllneWorld Kate Seelye talks
WPBT vage expedition seeks to recover to Hamas insiders about how the
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IB WFOR n (CC) pressed memories overwhelmhim. es Jonas to cancel a dignitary's threatened by the son of a former
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feels threatened by a female employee. n 'PG-13' touch by passingalong a pair of jeans. C 'PG' (CC)
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Yesterday's junior





boys volleyball action

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TUESDAY, MAY 9, 2006


SECTION




Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.Com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


bLO~~b~f~~l~ef-~~i~?FI~~*~'-i~~~;~; ~-~~ eJQe27~~~i-'I;TLL_ 1~.--5i IT- ~


* BOXING
By KELSIE
JOHNSON
Junior Sports
Reporter
JERMAINE -Choo-
Choo' Mackey validated
his standing in the pro-
fessional rankings with
his first international
win over the weekend.
And the Bahamian
super middleweight
champion made sure
that his first win would
be a memorable one.
Mackey travelled to
Key West Florida to
take on Luis Hodges.
Also fighting on the card
was Ekeno Saunders,
who scored a win over
Terry Moore.
With stitches over his
right eye, Mackey said
that he never felt the
shot that tore his skin
open, admitting that his
main concern was to get
the win in his column.
Both fighters stepped
into the ring with perfect
win-loss records, but at
the end of the final bell
it was Mackey who
walked off with a unani-
mous judges decision.
The win couldn't come
at a better time for
Mackey, who is sched-
uled to fight an eight
round bout with Mexi-
co's super middleweight
champion Eduardo
Calderon on May 19th.
Even though the win
has Mackey focused on
the fight ahead, the
fighting machine said he
just wants to bask in his
first international victo-
ry.
He said: "I went into
the fight as an underdog.
Why? Because -I was
fighting a great boxer
who is originally from
the Dominican Repub-
lic, training and fighting
out of the Warriors fight
club.
"His managers are
really building him up,
so they felt as though if
they took on a Bahami-
an boxer it wouldn't be
much of a challenge,
even though I am 8-0.
They thought that the
Bahamian belt was a
fluke and that I was no
match for their fighter."
But according to
Mackey, the coaches in
Hodges' corner had to
change their positioning
after the first round.
Mackey admitted that
both he and Hodges
were pretty even after
the bell in the first
round, but he knew that
in order to win the
crowd over, he would
have to turn up the heat.
The second round bell
couldn't sound quick
enough for Mackey, and
just four punches in,
Hodges was introduced
to the canvas. Down for
the eight count, Hodges
recovered, but the shot
delivered by Mackey in
round six was too much
and gave the Bahamian
champ the edge he was
looking for.
Mackey said: "I didn't
press him like how I
wanted to, I knew'he
was quicker than I was,
so I worked on his body
until I got the shot I was
looking for.
"I slowly worked him
where I wanted him and
when I saw the opening
I went after it. After the
fourth round I had him
beat, he was just hang-
ing on, trying to stick it.
By then I had the crowd


I and the judges in my
corner."'


aints


* VOLLEYBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
THE smallest member on
the Kingsway Saints' ros-
ter became the playmaker
for the team yesterday.
Celtson Toote, the Saints


setter, had one plan in
mind and that was to set-
up his big hitter Kriston
Moore for the kill.
With Moore sending
down thunderous spikes,
the Saints were able to put
away the St John's Giants
17-05, 16-17 and 15-11.


arc


Also snatching a win on
the opening day of compe-
tition in the junior boys
regular season were the St
Augustine's Big Red
Machines.
The Big Red Machines
held off the fight by the
Queeri's College Comets


15-17, 17-6 and 15-8.
But the Saints' game
became the centre of atten-
tion, all thanks to Toote
and his hustling plays.
Although his teammates
towered over him, Toote
controlled the Saints'
offensive flow and while in


Crusaders leave the Falcons grounded


* NCA Crusaders' Earlin Carey spikes the ball over the net yesterday
against the Prince William High Falcons. Crusaders won the game.
(Photo: Felip6 Major/Tribune staff)


Oon


the front court he attempt-
ed several blocks.
The pint size setter scuf-
fled to the front, calling for
the ball so he could ensure
that Moore was awarded a
kill. And on the runs made
by the Giants, Toote
switched up the team's
flow from a three play
game, pushing the ball
back over on one.
Confidence was riding
high on the Saints' side,
with another game sched-
uled, the team tried to fin-
ish off the game in two
sets, but the Giants camtle
charging back.
The second set saw a
breakdown in commutnica-
tions from the Saints and a
golden opportunity for the
Giants to cut into the lead.
Rally

Down hy four points. the
Giants were able to rally
back with three service
aces. With the game set at
12-all, the Giants contin-
ued on with their surge,
getting a two point edge.
Although the Saints would
come marching back one
last time, the Giants were
able to hold them off, forc-
ing a third and decisive set.
It was all Saints in the
third set and by the eighth
point the team looked to
close out the game with a
win in their pockets.
Looking to Moore to
spice up the closing, Toote
went back to a game plan
that handed them a con-
vincing first set victory.
Going up against weak
blockers, Moore's domi-
nance shined through anti
the Saints were able to
head into their double
header with a win.


Communicators

come out on top

against Pearls
M SOFTBALL
IN THE ladies fast pitch
action the BTC Communica-
tors won over the Triple Play
Pearls 6-5. Winning pitcher
was Latoya Humes with three
strike-outs, losing pitcher Ner-
issa Lockhart with nine strike-
outs.
Communicators Carolyn
Laing was 1-for- 4-with a dou-
ble and an RBI, Hiumes was 1-
for-4 with -an RBI 'and
Romieka Kno' les was 1-for-3
with an RBI.
Pearls Monique Sears was
2-for-4 with an RBI and Lock-
hart was 1-for-4 with a triple
and an RBI.
In the men's the Esquire
Knights won over the BLT
Blazers 14-13. Winning pitch-
er Alonzo "Chompy" Pratt
and Brian "Ninja" Neely were
tagged with the loss.
The second game saw the
Kalik Panthers defeating the
Rainbow Warriors 28-7. Win-
ning pitcher was Anthony
Cooper and Charlie Jones Sr
was the losing pitcher.
Softball action will continue
on Wednesday with the Triple
Play Pearls will take on the
New Kids.


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