Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00400
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: May 1, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00400
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text







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MONDAY. MAY 1, 20UU


Volume: 102 No.133


I '. I ,. I I I l* I II I9slZe~=-


City dump blaze comes

close to threatening


sub-division

* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
FAILURE to follow proce-
dure by government officials
and fire services may have
contributed to the rapid
spreading of the blaze at the
city dump which came close
to tiliLdtL:.ii!ig a sub-division.,
it was revealed last night.
The fire, which broke out
on Friday afternoon, spread
through the construction and
demolition site on the
Tonique Williams-Darling
highway and set the forest
close to the homes in Jubilee
Gardens ablaze.
Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, director of Envi-
ronmental Health Ron Pinder
said that information gathered
so far indicates that, together


with the. strong winds, either
failure on the part of the
department of environmental
health or the fire services was
to blame for the extent of the
blaze.
"What we know right now is
that the fire erupted on Fri-
day afternoon between 3prn
.1id li'l.i ', ...- the t re
Jelp Ilin'-nii was -.,lied they
responded. However, upon
engaging the fire, there was
some sort of explosion caused
by flammable material con-
tained in a 55-gallon container
that was improperly disposed
of," he said.
Mr Pinder said that, once
the explosion took place, the
fire department retreated for
safety reasons.
SEE page two


Dr Bethel: jury still out on whether
AUTEC testing affects marine life
THE jury is still out on whether testing procedures at the
AUTEC base in'Andros are affecting marine life, Energy and
Environment Minister Dr Marcus.Bethel told The Tribune yes-
terday.
This comes after scientists tried to discover on Saturday why hun-
dreds of dolphins washed up dead on a beach popular with tourists
on the northern coast of Zanzibar, an island off East Africa.
According to Associated Press, among other possibilities marine
biologists were examining whether US Navy sonar threw the ani-
mals off course.
Following last week's visit to the US base in Andros by a gov-
ernment delegation, Dr Bethel said to the best of his knowledge.
there is no nuclear testing being undertaken at AUTEC. but inves-
SEE page 12


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;I~.I)JIR.! mi.4 924;tgr? i'.Ji~iSl~ t~n;hri~


N THE fire branch of the Royal Bahamas Police Force was called to Jubilee Gardens on Saturday
to tackle the blaze.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


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Man, 20,

dies after

shooting

THE country's soaring murder
rate continued over the weekend
with the shooting of a 20-year-
old man.
The victim, of Lyon Road, died
in hospital at 9.30pm on Satur-
day after being shot during an
jatercation.
According to police, the victim
got into an argument with an
unidentified man on Sutton
street, in the Kemp Road area, at -
,round 9pm.
Cr ln Ihiit \ !ic -Ii ., d iJ i I the
di.ptiL'e and th victim sustained
iniurice to the left side of.his
chest. He was immediately rushed
Io hospital but died shortly after
lie was admitted.
Chief Supt Hulan Hanna told
The Tribune last week that the
murder rate was up by more than
a third compared to this time last
year.
Press liaison officer Inspector
Walter Evans said this latest mur-
der only contributes to the"
police's already growing concern
over the number of violent crimes
committed in the country.


PM: criticism,

opposing views

are hallmarks

of democracy

By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
PRIME Minister Perry
Christie yesterday cautioned
his fellow PLPs to remember
that criticism and opposing
points of view are hallmarks of
a functioning democracy.
Addressing party members
during an appreciation lun-
cheon for former MPs at the
Wyndham Nassau Resort, Mr
Christie said that the PLP in
the months leading up to the
next general election must be
prepared to receive criticism.
"There will be a major
effort to determine who we
are for the people who will be
asked to make a selection,"
he said.
During this period, he said,
opposing views will be


SEE page 12


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IHE TRIBUNE


LOCALNW


SMOKE fills the air at
Jubilee Gardens on Saturday
after the blaze spread
through the construction and
demolition site on the
Tonique Williams-Darling
highway and set the forest
:close to the sub-division
ablaze
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/
Tribune staff)


Share

your

: news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


SCity dump



blaze close to




threatening




sub-division


FROM page one
"After the explosion the
fire was just monitored, as
opposed to engaging it
overnight," he said.
However, during the
night wind speeds picked
up and the fire spread
rapidly to the bushes and
the pine forest behind
Jubilee Gardens, Mr Pin-
der explained.
"It now appears that
either the department of,
environmental health ser-
vices waited too long to
call the fire department, or
once the fire department
arrived on the scene they
did not engage the fire as
aggressively as they could,"
he said.
Following an extensive
investigation of the fire, Mr


Pinder said, authorities will
have to determine how to
prevent such an incident
from happening in future.
"Immediate changes will
be made, either the imple-
mentation of additional
policy or the purchase of
additional equipment," he
said.

Determined
Mr Pinder added that,
should it be determined
that human error was to
blame for the spreading of
the fire, then personnel
adjustments will also be
made right away.
He said the construction
and demolition site on the
highway continues to be of
"grave concern" to his
department.


Mr Pinder explained that
until a contract is signed to
recycle and reuse the
garbage at this"disposal
site, there will always be
the danger of something
catching fire.
"When the garbage is
taken to the other site, the
landfill, it is immediately
compacted and covered.
However, the (construction
and demolition) site is sim-
ply for construction demo-
lition material. When that
is dumped it sits there for a
period of time. We are
right now still awaiting the
signing of a contract to
reduce and recycle that
garbage and reduce that
danger," he said. -
Mr Pinder apologised to
al residents of Jubilee
Gardens for their inconve-
nience and the fear that
their homes might have
been lost.
At press time last night,
the fire was burning in a
"controlled fashion",
according to the fire
department.
Depending on wind
direction and speed, there
was also heavy smoke
development which caused
significant discomfort to
residents in the area.
Police press liaison offi-
cer Walter Evans told The
Tribune yesterday that fire
services are closely moni-
toring the blaze and will
not leave the area until
it is completely extin-
guished.
As a precautionary mea-
sure, a large buffer zone
was cleared between the
part of the pine forest
which was still on fire
and the Jubilee Gardens
area.

FO 3IN LAW] N SERVICET-WJd
Frtlizer Ful-icde,


MAIN SECTION
Local News..................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,12
Local News......................P14,15,17,18,20,24
Editorial/Letters. ....................................... P4
Advts ...............................P11,13,16,19,21,23
Com ics................................................ ..P22
BUSINESS/SPORTS SECTION
Business ................................. P1,2,3,4,5,8,9'
Advts............ ........................................ P6,7:.
Sports ........................................... P10,11,12.
INSIGHT SECTION
Insight ................................P1,2,3,4,5,6,
W weather ............................... ....... .............. P....7

CLASSIFIED SECTION 24 PAGES

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MIAMI HERALD SECTIONS
M ain ................................................12 Page .
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.II


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THEPL T ND A 2 P


Cuban

migrants

arrive in

Puerto Rico

i PUERTO RICO
San Juan

ELEVEN Cuban migrants
have arrived in a mostly unin-
habited natural reserve in west-
ern Puerto Rico, authorities said,
according to Associated Press.
: The migrants six men,
three women, a child and a 1-
year-old came to Mona
Island on Saturday via the
Dominican Republic. They
were in good health and will be
handed over to the US Border
'Patrol, said Sgt Calex Figueroa,
bf the natural resources depart-
nent.
The boat the migrants trav-
eled in returned to the Domini-
can Republic.
Under the US government's
long-standing "wet-foot, dry-
foot" policy, Cubans who reach
the United States including
-the US territory of Puerto Rico
-- are generally allowed to stay
yhile those picked up at sea are
returned to their country.
h Sinugglers frequently attempt
to bring migrants via the
Dominican Republic to Puerto
Rico, a roughly 70-mile journey
across the often-perilous Mona
Passage. One week ago, at least
five migrants died when their
boat capsized en route to west-
ern Puerto Rico.

Guyana

resumes

night flights

* GUYANA
Georgetown

GUYANESE authorities will
resume night flights on Satur-
day into the South American
country's main airport follow-
ing a temporary suspension due
to equipment failure, the state-
run news agency reported,
according to Associated Press.
Night flights were suspended
Thursday after barometer pres-
sure equipment, lhich allows
the airport's control tower to
tell pdorit. how high their aircraft
is above sea level, stopped work-
ing late Wednesday, rendering
flights dangerous after dark.
Engineers replaced the equip-
ment at the Cheddi Jagan Inter-
national Airport on Friday,
Transport Minister Harry Nar-
mine Nawbatt was quoted as say-
ing by GINA, the state-run
news agency.
The suspension affected about
six flights, including some to
XToronto and London. Overnight
flights from New York had to
arrive after daybreak.
The airport has suspended
,night flights before. In the late
,1980s, thieves stole 915 metres
of copper wire connected to the
runway lighting system, halting
such flights for several days.


'Graduates

wanted for

supplement

THE Tribune will be pub-
lishing its annual Back-to-
School supplement in August
and we would like to feature
graduating high school seniors
who will be attending col-
lege/university both locally
and abroad in the Fall of 2006.
We are currently working to
compile a list of graduates and
we invite the public to submit
,information on graduating
;seniors. Along with a recent
passport-size photograph, par-
ents and/or students should sub-
mit the following:
Name of student
Age
Name of current school
Name and number of exam-
inations taken in 2006
*' *Honours
Extracurricular activities
Name of college/university
,student expects to attend
Title of degree being sought
*.; What student plans to do
once they graduate and return
fiome
; The information should be
submitted to The Tribune on
Shirley and Deveaux Streets no


later than May 31, 2006. Per-
-sons may also e-mail the infor-
mation to ydeleyeaux@tribune-
nmedia.net, fax the information -
Attention: Feature Editor to
'328.2398.
Or mail it to:
Tribune Features Editor
Back-to-School Supplement
The Tribune
Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahanas


Only a third registered to vote


ONLY a third of Bahamian voters
are registered, meaning thousands
could be left out in the cold if a quick
general election is called.
Senator Tommy Turnquest
warned over the weekend that it is
possible the 2002 register would be
used in the event of an early election.
So far there are only 48,678 voters
re-registered out of the 147,160 list-
ed on the current registry.
"Younger Bahamians need to
ensure that they have a voice in
determining the future of their coun-
try as they will feel the greatest
impact of the election results," he
said.
"Moreover, it is important that
every Bahamian participates in the
democratic process of choosing the
next government as it is a right
fought for by the sacrifices of many
Bahamians who came before us, and
which across the globe many citi-
zens of other countries die for.
"Voter apathy in a general elec-


tion is bad for the democratic system
and we want to avoid that being the
case in our Bahamas today."
Sen Turnquest said: "The message
is simple: "In order to effect change,
you must exercise your right to vote,
and in order to vote, you must first
register to vote."
There is an urgent need for those
who have changed their addresses
since the 2002 election to secure
transfers to the constituencies in
which they now live, as the law states
that if you have moved within fewer
than three months, you must cast
your vote in the old constituency.
However, if you have been moved
more than six months, then you have
to transfer to a polling division in
the new constituency to which you
have moved.
Statistics issued by the Parlia-
mentary Registration Department
support Senator Turnquest's con-
cern.
The 2002 register has some


147,160 voters while the register in
preparation has only 48,678, with an
election due in 12 months or less.
This means the register in prepa-
ration has only 33 per cent of the
voters on the 2002 register. Unfor-
tunately, this trend holds true for
New Providence, with 32 per cent,
Grand Bahama, at 36 per cent, and
the Family Islands, collectively at 33
per cent.
"I am a bit concerned with the
rate of voter registration but I trust
Bahamians will become inspired to
register to vote in the next general
election," said Sen Turnquest.
Quoting Samuel Adams, he said:
"Let each citizen remember at the
moment he is offering his vote that
he is not making a present or a com-
pliment to please an individual or
at least that he ought not so to do -
but that he is executing one of the
most solemn trusts in human soci-
ety for which he is accountable to
God and his country."


San Salvador's school



building set for August


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

CONSTRUCTION of new
primary and high schools for
San Salvador will begin in
August at an estimated cost of
$3.85 million and $4.3 million
respectively, it was revealed
over the weekend.
Works and Utilities Minis-
ter Bradley Roberts
announced the projects at the
contract signing ceremony for
the extension of the water
main into United Estates, San
Salvador.
Mr Roberts said it is antici-
pated that the primary school
will be tendered by mid to late
June and the construction peri-
od will be about 16 months.
Mr Roberts said that an esti-
mated construction budget of
$3.25 to $3.85 million is antici-


pated for that school.
It is also expected that the
high school will be tendered
by mid to late June, with con-
struction work beginning by
late July/early August, 2006.
An approximate construc-
tion'budget of $3.5 to $4.3 mil-
lion is anticipated. The con-
struction period will be about
16 months.
Both the high school and pri-
mary school will be located
near North Victoria Hill. The
primary school will have a
building area of about 22,800
square feet and will accommo-
date roughly 250 students.
It will comprise: six standard
classrooms, science laborato-
ry, art room, music room,
library, pre-school classroom,
student restrooms, administra-
tion offices, staff lounge, multi-
purpose building (to serve also


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as a hurricane shelter), cov-
ered walkways, lunch vendors,
sports facilities, including soft-
ball field, basketball court, and
track and field.
The high school will have a
building area of about 25,700
square feet and will accommo-
date around 300 students. It
will comprise: Nine standard
classrooms, one resorts class-
room, science laboratory, food
laboratory, needlework labo-
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business classroom, woodwork
classroom, technical drawing
room, library, student
Restrooms, administration
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pose building (to serve also as
a hurricane shelter), covered
walkways, lunch vendors,
sports facilities, including soft-
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track and field.


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Mother's Day from 02
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* TOMMY Turnquest


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SIn. brief


~a~
WFlill 1 ii I


MONDAY, MAY 1, 2006, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


, -
:3- *"








. .. . ...S.. . .6i-


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VER7,i 1 :STRIF
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeportfax: (242) 352-9348


Tribune answers Mr Rigby


ON WEDNESDAY PLP Raynard Rig-
by called a press conference, ostensibly to
discuss the PLP's fourth anniversary as the
government, but really to chastise Tribune
managing editor John Marquis for an opinion
piece he had written as a result of a survey
done on the performance of PLP parliamen-
tarians.
The article, which was not Mr Marquis'
opinion, but the opinion of the small group of
people he had interviewed, sent Mr Rigby
into a tailspin.
He accused The Tribune staff of reporting
"deception and outright lies."
When bur reporter pressed him to give
an example of what he was talking about, he
referred to the Marquis piece. It was pointed
out to him that this was not a news article, but
an opinion piece. Mr Rigby said he was refer-
ring to news articles of "deception and out-
right lies." Of course, we don't think Mr Rig-
by quite grasps the difference between an
opinion piece and a news report, but he was
again asked to give examples of news events
that were not reported objectively.
All he could think of was what he called an
"unscientific" telephone poll in 2004 (actual-
ly it was in 2003), which he said the PLP
forced The Tribune to discontinue.
Now if Mr Rigby had been a Tr,bune
reporter who had turned in such an "outright
lie", he would have been fired on the spot.
But maybe this proud, but inaccurate boast
of his, confirms our suspicions of what hap-
pened shortly after our poll started in 2003.
On March 17, 2003 the results of our first
telephone poll was published. The question
was: "Do you think Prime Minister Christie is
doing a good job?" By then the Christie gov-
ernment had been in office 10 months.
Between Monday and Friday that week
The Tribune received 875 calls. The callers'
comments were recorded. Of that number
709 said he was not doing a good job; 166
said he was.
The very next day Chairman Rigby called
a press conference to make the same accusa-
tions against The Tribune that he made last
Wednesday. He condemned The Tribune's
"attempt to destroy the PLP" and got all
choked up over his suspicion that The Tribune
didn't like the poor, harmless little PLP and
its leaders. A "history of hostility", he called
it. Of course, he should be reminded that
hostility cuts both ways.
Between Mr Rigby's press conference on
March 18 and March 25, The Tribune had


numerous complaints from persons who were
trying to participate in the poll but were hav-
ing difficulty with the telephone lines.
Actually The Tribune had contracted a
company that did telephone surveys to man-
age the programme. They told us they were
doing their best, but the fault was with BaTel-
Co there was interference on the BaTelCo
lines.
Of course, we were immediately suspi-
cious of what was happening. However, we
had no proof.
But last Wednesday, Mr Rigby seemed to
confirm our suspicions with an interesting
comment. The PLP, he said, had forced The
Tribune to discontinue its poll. Is Mr Rigby
saying what we think he is saying? If so, this
is pretty serious business. Anywhere else
there would be an investigation.
However, for Mr Rigby's information,
whoever or whatever was attempting to inter-
fere with the polls, did not succeed.
The polls continued as planned for the
rest of 2003, the last question being asked
on December 8: "Should Nassau Interna-
tional Airport be named after Sir Lynden
Pindling?"
Again we started to get "technical diffi-
culties", which delayed publication of the
results of that poll, but when it did come
through it was thumbs down on an ain port
with a Pindling name. One caller left the foil-
lowing message on the tape: "I think they
should rename the airport. In its shabby con-
dition, it befits the shabby legacy Sir Lynden
left us."
And with the May 9th date nearing for
the Bahamas to decide whether to cast its
UN vote for Cuba to sit on the Human Rights
Council, the answers we received to our ques-
tion on November 17, 2003 were interesting.
The question was: "Should the Bahamas
strengthen its ties with Cuba?"
That question got a resounding "no" vote
with several callers reminding us of Cuba's
bombing of HMS Flamingo with the loss of
Bahamian lives, and one caller remarking:
"Cuba is a communist country and I don't
want the Bahamas to be communist like
them."
The questions for the poll were not always
political. They were wide ranging covering
whatever was in the news that week.
If Mr Rigby is going to be in politics, he,
and many of his colleagues are going to have
to acquire a thicker skin and become more
politically mature.


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A glimpse of





Baker's Bay Golf





and Ocean Club


EDITOR, The Tribune
I WOULD like to
respectfully respond to two
letters published in your
esteemed paper written by
Mr Robert Emory Miller
(3/18/2006) and Mr Chester
Thompson (4/3/2006). I
also would like for the
record to show that Bak-
er's Bay Golf and Ocean
Club has always main-
tained that anyone who
wants a tour of the project
need only to make a
request at the Develop-
ment Office in Marsh Har-
bour and a tour would be
arranged. To date, less
than a handful have actu-
ally accepted this offer, and
those who did were amazed
and delighted at what they
saw. I suspect that both of
the aforementioned per-
sons did not take the time
to come to Baker's Bay
before casting judgment.
I write this letter not to
"The Prime Minister of the
Bahamas", but as a
Bahamian I write this letter
to "my" Prime Minister of
"my" Bahamas and to all
of my "fellow" Bahamians.
Let it be understood that I
am a "nationalist" first and
foremost and I love my
country.
As such, if I saw anything
that was contrary to the
Baker's Bay EIA or best
practices for protecting our
precious environment I am
in the position to address
these concerns:,and would
be the first to set things in
order.
I firmly believe that the
affairs of my country
should be dealt with by
those who were democrati-
cally elected to do so; with-
out fear, prejudice or inter-
ference.
To those that would ven-
ture an attempt to influ-
ence our Prime Minister
without'knowing or pre-
senting the facts, they
ought to know that deci-
sions made in this country
are made in order to
improve life for Bahami-
ans.
My fellow Bahamians, I
would like to allow you to
take a look into my life and
experience since I began
my new career at Baker's
Bay Golf and Ocean Club.
I began on September


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19, 2005 and from the
interview I knew this place
was special.
As I was being intro-
duced to the executive
team as a potential
employee I remember
vividly the warmth and
kind reception I got.
I was given a tour of the
entire site and was
apprised of every aspect of
the development.
My questions were
answered very candidly
and I appreciated that, At
the end of my tour the VP
for Development gave me
a copy of the EIA and
invited me to study it and
learn as much as I could
because it was the"gospel
according to Baker's Bay
Club.
Immediately I knew this
was the place for me. After
14 years working at BEC I
decided to tender my res-
ignation and join Baker's
Bay Club.
Friends, I tell you, the
two best decisions I have
ever made in my life was
marrying the woman I did
and joining Baker's Bay
Golf and Ocean Club.
I have just completed my
six-month tenure and my
position remains secure. I
never one day wondered to
myself if this was the right
decision I made.
I knew in my heart that


my being in Baker's Bay
was by divine order.
I can't sleep at night
because I look forward to
the morning when I catch
the ferry to go to work, to
be with my extended fami-
ly.
My former co-workers at
BEC continue to compli-
ment, me by saying how
happy and contented I
look, and they are right.
Joining Baker's Bay Club,
however, did not come
without challenges. I did
gain 201bs.
I would like to publicly
thank Discovery Land
Company for coming to my
country and providing
opportunities for Bahami-
ans who want to be more
than just average, and who
want to be a part of some-
thing magical.
I hereby again extend an
invitation to anyone who
wants to know what Bak-
er's Bay Club is all.about
to accept this offer and
come for a tour.
Let the truth be known
and told.
Thank you for your time
and this opportunity to
provide a glimpse of, what
Baker's Bay really means
for me, Abaco, and my
country.

EBAN Q HANNA
Engineer
Baker's Bay Golf
& Ocean Club
Marsh Harbours.,
Abaco.
April 25. 20062


Tabloid story on


former FNM MP

EDITOR, The Tribune
I MAKE reference to an article in one of our local tabloids
regarding the former FNM MP, Algernon Allen.
I wish to say at the outset that while the stories which appear
in the tabloid may not be 100 per cent, where there is smdke
there is fire and on a number of occasions, there were blazes.
If the story is at least 65 per cent correct I would urge Mr
Allen to prove the tabloid wrong and not run for the PLP.
I am a resident of the Marathon constituency and also cam-
paigned for the FNM in that area as well as St Margaret and
Algernon Allen lost that seat himself, not the FNM, not the ref-
erendum, not Tommy, not Hubert but himself.
He turned the residents off completely when he could not
make up his mind as to where he stood after the "leader elect"
issue.
As a matter of fact, Algernon Allen is a poor candidate when
it comes to beating the pavement. The residents wanted to see
him plus they had some personal issues with the person who was
in charge of his campaign.
So Algernon Allen, prove the tabloid wrong and stay in
retirement. If you don't, it would be interesting to see you oh a
PLP platform talking about the "cow business", as it was the
same "cow business" you used on the PLP from an FNM plat-
form.
Avoid embarrassing yourself and your family any further or
would this be your way of showing your displeasure over the
"leader-elect" issue which is political HISTORY like you.

PATRICIA SMITH
Nassau,
April 24, 2006.

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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, MONDAY, MAY 1, 2006


Open onday- Frday 9m 530pr


.


I


AL. %.F








THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 1, 2006, PAGE 5


The worst colonial baggage in



the Bahamas is not physical


SOMEONE recently
took exception to a col-
umn, written some months ago,
in which I argued that colonial
baggage inhibits our develop-
ment in many ways, including
economically.
My critic's point was that
there can be no harm in retain-
ing such odd vestiges (like the
pleasant Octogenarian lady on
our currency) that differentiate
us from more functional feel-
ing places, especially as we are a
country concerned with tourism.
To some extent, my critic is
right, of course. In direct terms,
much of the tradition that we
are saddled with in The
Bahamas does more good than
harm in that it makes us more
'quaint' and keeps the tourists
happy.
But for ex-colonial societies,
the larger picture, which does
not concern itself so much with
.the outward vestiges of the colo-
nial legacy, is far from simple
and not particularly rosy.
While the retention of an
English Queen as our Head of
State and the comical dress,
speech and habits adopted by
members of our Bar Associa-
tion on official occasions are
among the most ridiculous ves-
tiges of the colonial experience,
they are actually among the
least harmful.
Far more pernicious is our
tendency to suppress the growth
of genuine local institutions and
our related tendency to stigma-
tise the appearance of local
ideas and value systems that
Could support such institutions.
Sadly, the two sides tend to go
hand-in-hand.
So while it is harmless

TROICAL

EXER INAOR
I~fr j is


PERSPECTIVES
i, ", A


ANDREW

(though comical) for our highest
court and parliamentary offi-
cials to be dressed up like 18th
century Englishmen when they
make decisions on the most,
serious of matters, it is far from
comical that their decision-mak-
ing will be circumscribed by
ideas that do not evolve in har-
mony with local circumstances.
In a column written some
months ago, I suggested that
Caribbean parliaments' historic
reluctance to curb the right of an
individual to jury trial (although
jury tampering has become
endemic and routine in some
countries) was a demonstration
of their flawed reverence for
Anglo-Saxon judicial ideals.
As was noted in that column,
Britain a few years ago had no
such compunctions (and faced
no such controversy) when it
quietly went ahead and erased
centuries of its own tradition by
abolishing the right to jury trial
in some instances. That it was
moved to do so largely as a
result of jury tampering by
'Yardie' (Jamaican) gangs gives
added poignancy.
ACCREDITATION IS
NEEDED FOR CHURCHES

n his welcome and intelli-
gent response to my col-
umn of the April 10, the Rev J
Emmette Weir offered some
insightful distinctions between
the Bahamian and Jamaican
religious leadership communi-
ties.
While we may never agree
on the legacy of Mr Edward
Seaga in Jamaica, we seem to
agree on many things of sub-
stance upon which his letter
touched.
One of these things is the


ALLEN


practical difficulty associated
with the proliferation of unac-
credited new denominations
among Bahamian Christendom.
As I noted in my column,
this is a prime reason why giving
automatic state power to'self-
styled religious leaders is so

We have in
this country
a harmful
tendency to
suppress or
stigmatise the
growth of local
values and
institutions

risky. And while the situation
in Jamaica may be less risky,
given the greater presence there
of an established hierarchy, the
precedent is one that cannot be
good for this region.
However, insofar as my col-
umn may have seemed to sug-
gest that there is something
inherently negative about either
the numerical proliferation of
new denominations in The
Bahamas or the doctrinal 'drift'
that such proliferation is bound
to engender, that was not its
intent.
As noted above, we have in
this country (as in most ex-
colonies) a harmful tendency to
suppress or stigmatise the
growth of local values and insti-
tutions. This tendency arises
especially when those values
and institutions are associated


with the most "grassroots" seg-
ments of our society.

The reaction of many of
us to some of the less
established churches is a good
example. Many Bahamians,
including those who belong to
the more 'established' denomi-
nations, reflexively scoff at
some of the new practices,
including the use of inventive,
overly-ambitious sounding titles
(Prophetess, Apostle etc.)
among the more 'unofficial'
denominations.
While my column did point
out some of the problems of
giving official sanction to any-
one that invents such a title for
himself, it was certainly not its
intent to suggest that actual val-
idation must always come from
a metropolitan hierarchy out-
side The Bahamas.
There is, to be fair, nothing
more or less intrinsically ridicu-
lous in the idea of a "Prophet"
in'Binnacle Hill, Crooked
Island, than in the idea of an
Archbishop (Gr. 'lead fore-
man') in Canterbury, or a Pope
('Papa') in Rome. Where the
worrying distinction arises is in
the absence of any vetting
process (local or foreign) for
the former.
Without some kind of official
system of recognition, holding
one of these titles will never
warrant a presumption that the
bearer is educated, honest or
represents any respectable,
articulated doctrine at all. The
fact that many of our local
church leaders are all of these
things gives even greater
urgency to the establishment of
a system to weed out those who
are not.
This is where our politicians
fail us so badly. Unlike Jamaica
or Barbados, where the spread
of the English State religion
was far more thorough, we are
a more complex picture. A
very significant percentage of
Christian Bahamians belong
to minor denominations or


to no denomination at all.
Given the myriad views in
our society (including non-
Christian ones) this fact gives
our politicians a duty, firstly, to
maintain the barrier between
state and religion and, secondly,
to ensure that a solid majority
of Bahamian Churches are
headed by leaders that adhere
to established principles and
standards. They can do this only
by a vigorous system of accred-
itation.
Rather than shaking rever-
ently before the pulpit of any
self-named pastor that sum-
mons them, it is the job of politi-
cians to ensure that people
asserting a position of religious
leadership in The Bahamas are
up to par with their counter-
parts anywhere in the world.


MONDAY,
MAY I
6:30 Bahamas@Sunrise
11:00 Immediate Response
12noonZNS News Update Live
12:03 Caribbean News Update:
12:05 Immediate Response Cont'd
1:00 BTC Connection
1:30 This Week In The Bahamas
2:00 Legends Whence We Came:
Hon. Arthur D. Hanna
3:00 David Pitts
3:30 Bishop Neil Ellis
4:00 Teen Spirit: Gang Violence
4:58 ZNS News Update
5:00 Time For Teens- Teenage
Pregnancy
5:30 Gillette World Cup 2006
6:00 Gospel Grooves
6:25 Life Line
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
8:00 You & Your Money
8:30 Tourism Today
9:00 Legends: William Ford
9:30 Night Time
10:00 Caribbean Newsline
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30 Comm. Page 1540AM
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PAGE 6, MONDAY, MAY 1, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


L ALES=


r ,:.I /i I'` '



.il~~l~ ~l Ii,*


'i



4 I
L11


* UNITED ESTATES, San Salvador, The Bahamas -- Minister of Works and Utilities Bradley Roberts (seated, second from left)
looking on as San Salvador resident and owner of BIGN Better Construction lan Greene signs a contract, on April 28, 2006, for
extension of the water main into United Estates, San Salvador. The water will be supplied from the reverse osmosis plant located
in the Cockburn Town wellfield. The plant currently produces some 120,000 gallons of water per day. Pictured from left, seated,
are permanent secretary at the Ministry Anita Bernard, Mr Roberts, Mr Greene and Velda Knowles, Mr Green's acting secretary.
Standing, from left, are Assistant General Manager (Family Islands) at the Water and Sewerage Corporation Robert Deal; MP
for Cat Island, Rum Cay and San Salvador Philip Davis and senior deputy administrator for the San Salvador and Rum Cay
District Chrisfield Johnson.
(BIS photo: Eric Rose)


Don't panic!




Bahama real



Msat tla


PROPERTY IInspcctions are.
conlI'l ii in n1111 \ i' l ri t c '
Li nfls.C lti n'_- ;ind ii re _--
nendi d u\ in l the Iiiiiv-ts
markets.
The question becomes: what
do you do when the inspector's
report comes back with unex-
pected items listed in need of
repair? Whether you're the pur-
chaser or the vendor, just keep
a cool head and approach the
repairs logically.
Focus on the major defects.
Minor repairs are not the ulti-
mate goal of the inspection.
Major repairs should be han-
dled as soon as possible, in
order to avoid any delays in
closing.
Once the purchasers have
secured quotes for repairs, they
should present their requests to
the vendors either for the
repairs or for a reduction in the
selling price. The vendors may
also choose to solicit quotes,
and if there is a significant dif-


ference, the two parties may
negotiate. it
Either party may complete
the repairs, but vendors who
are busy preparing to move may
offer a credit to the buyers sgs
the purchasers may have the
repairs completed later to ihcir
satisfaction.
Once agreed to, the tiinl
terms of the arrangement
should be put into writing, and
then signed and dated by both
parties.
Whoever accepts respond.-
bility for the repairs should ha% e
paid receipts for all of the work
done. Proper documentation ,1"4
each step in this process \ '!U
protect each party and help
ensure a smooth and successful
closing.
A ,,


I, I -


-- QSPECTUS
THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2024. 2025 and 2026
ISSUE OF B$51,645,000.00

Issued under The Bahamas Registered Stock Act, and authorized by Resolutions of the House of
Assembly, 20th June, 2005.

Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 25th April, 2006 and
will close at 3:00pm on 2nd May, 2006. Allocations will commence at 9:30 a.m. on 3rd May, 2006 and will
cease at 3:00p.m. on 4th May, 2006.

If the total subscriptions exceed the sum ofB$51,645,000.00 (Nominal) partial allotment will be made to
subscribers, and a proportionate refund will be made as soon as possible after allotment. No interest will be
paid on amounts so refunded.

The date of this Prospectus is 21st April. 2006------

The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas invites applications for Bahamas Registered
Stock totalling B$51,645,000.00. The Stock will be available in a range of maturity dates; the earliest being
repayable in 2024 and the latest in 2026. The total amount of Stock offered, the rate of interest and the issue
price are given below :-


Rate Of Interest


1/4% Above Prime Rate
9/32% Above Prime Rate
5/16% Above Prime Rate


Amount
B$


Bahamas Registered Stock 2024
Bahamas Registered Stock 2025
Bahamas Registered Stock 2026


11,645,000.00
15,000,000.00
25.000.000.00
51.645.000.00


Issue
Price
B$

100.00
100.00
100.00


The Stock shall be repaid on 4th May, in the year appearing in the name of the Stock.
INTEREST

The Stock will bear interest from 4th May, 2006, at the rate shown against the name of the Stock as the
percent per annum over the Prime Rate (i.e. the prime commercial interest rate from time to time fixed by the
Clearing banks carrying on business in the Island of New Providence in The Bahamas. If there shall be any
difference between them, then that which is fixed by Royal Bank of Canada). Interest shall be payable half-
yearly commencing on 4th November, 2006 and thereafter on 4th May and 4th November in every year until the
Stock is repaid.


CHARGE UPON CONSOLIDATED FUND

The principal monies and interest represented by the Stock are charged upon and payable out of the
Consolidated Fund and assets of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.


SUPPLEMENTARY PROVISIONS

Issue of Stock The Stock will be issued by the Registrar (The Central Bank of The Bahamas).
Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 25th
April, 2006 and will close at 3:00 pm on 2nd May, 2006. Allocations will commence at
9:30 a.m. on 3rd May, 2006 and will cease at 3:00p.m. on 4th May, 2006. All envelopes
enclosing applications should be labelled "Application For Bahamas Government
Registered Stocks".


Units


The Stock will be in units ofB$l00.00.


Applications Applications must be for B$100 00 or a multiple of that sum.

Application Forms Applications for the Stock should be made to the Registrar on the form attached to the
Prospectus and may be obtained from the Registrar offices in Nassau and Freeport, The
Treasury Department (Marlborough Street & Navy Lion Road, Nassau) or any of the
following banks:

1. Bank of The Bahamas International
2. First Caribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
3. Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited
4. Commonwealth Bank Limited
5. Royal Bank Of Canada
6. Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited
7. Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited (formally British American Bank(1993)
Limited)
8. Citibank, N.A.

PUBLIC DEBT

Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts as at December 31, 2005 show the Public Debt of The
Bahamas to be BS2,731,949,000.*

GOVERNMENT REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE

The following information is extracted from the unaudited accounts i ithe Government of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.


FY2003/2004**
B$


Revenue


Recurrent Expenditure (excluding
Repayment of Public Debt)

Capital Development
Expenditure (excluding loans
contributions and advances
to public corporations)


943,760,000


993,987,000




80,890,000


FY2004/2005** FY2005/2006**
B$ B$
Approved Budget


1,039,376,000


1,053,095,000




90,374,000


1,132,774,000


1,145,691,000




132,901,000


** Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts.
The Public Debt amount is inclusive of The Public Corporations contingent liability which as at
December 31, 2005 totalled B$497,483,000.


THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2024, 2025 and 2026


FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY
APPLICATION No
ALLOTMENT No._

DATE:


The Registrar
c/o The Central Bank of The Bahamas
P. O. Box N-4868
Nassau, Bahamas

Sir:


I/We hereby apply for the following amount of Bahamas Registered Stock:


Inenr belol' the amount applied for
in Unit. of B$l100


1/4%
S9/32%
5/16%


Above Prime Rate
Above Prime Rate
Above Prime Rate


Bahamas Registered Stock 2024
Bahamas Registered Stock 2025
Bahamas Registered Stock 2026


and undertake to accept any less amount which may be allotted to me/us.


I/We enclose B$


in payment for the Stock applied for.


In the event of the full amount of Stock(s) applied for above is/are not allotted to
me/us, I/we request that the sum refundable to me/us be applied for the following Stock:


% Bahamas Registered Stock B$
% Bahamas Registered Stock B$
% Bahamas Registered Stock B$
% Bahamas Registered Stock B$
% Bahamas Registered Stock B$
% Bahamas Registered Stock B$

BANK DRAFTS SHOULD BE MADE PAYABLE TO THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMA!



1. (One Person)
Ordinary Signature


Name in Full (BLOCK LETTERS, state whether Mr., Mrs., or Miss and titles if any.)




Address (Corporations etc. should give Registered Addresse )

P. O. Box


2. (Where two or more persons apply as joint subscribers, the additional names and addresses should
be given below.)

Ordinary Signatures


Names in Full


And/OR


Address


Telephone Nos.(H)_


(rw


I/We hereby request semi annual interest to be paid to:


Bank Name


Bank Branch


Account Number


i-i



I


' '


Telephone Nos..f(H











Reflecting on the tradition and the role that the

one-room schoolhouse has played in the life of the community



The One-room Schoolhouse

By Patricia Glinton-Meicholas this Thursday in The Tribune


Read Chapter 12 of The Secret School, tomorrow in The Tribune


TV show to highlight the?

importance of coastal zones

'!;. THIS week on the ZNS TV show .You and Your Molhei,,
viewers will find out why coastal zones are of vital importance
" to the livelihood of all Bahamians, how they are being threat-
Sened and what the public can do to prevent their degradation.
Pictured from left, Edison Deleveaux, deputy director of the
Department of Marine Resources; host Chester Cooper; Dr
S Jennifer Edwards of the University of the West Indies; Kelly
Meister of Dolphin Encounter.
The panel will discuss the significance, threats and preseiv-
tion of coastal zones and the Bahamian way of life at 8pm..


(Photo by Collin Galanos)


MONDAY, MAY 1, 2006, PAGF.7


THE -1 HIL3UNE


"
1., ~
i7
`"


s*
.
1~
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Unfairness of subsidies





in international trade


* By SIR RONALD
SANDERS
(The writer is a business
executive and former
Caribbean diplomat who
publishes widely on small
states in the global commu-
nity).

A MID trade quar-
rels between the
US and the European Union
(EU) that caused the World
Trade Organisation (WTO)
to miss a deadline for
restarting stalled global
trade negotiations, nine
Caribbean Community and
Common Market (CARI-
COM) countries have peti-
tioned the WTO to extend
their export subsidy pro-
grammes to the year 2018
saying that they are "of


great importance" to their
economic and financial
needs.
In a joint communication
presented on April 25th to
the WTO's Committee on
Subsidies and Countervail-
ing Measures, each of the
nine countries gave a list of
their subsidy programmes
with fiscal incentives (con-
cessions on corporate taxes
and import duties) being
common to all.
The nine CARICOM
countries are: Antigua and
Barbuda, Barbados, Belize,


A


VI ILABLE,


Dominica, Grenada,
Jamaica, St Kitts-Nevis, St
Lucia and St Vincent and
the Grenadines.
Pointing out that they
account "for a miniscule
share of total world trade".
the nine CARICOM coun-
tries, along with six others,
including the Dominican
Republic, argued that they
need to continue to sub-
sidise investment to "benefit
from the positive aspects of
international liberalisation".
The WTO Committee
decided that the request for


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INTRODUCTORY PRICE

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ifT I


RONALD SANDERS

an extension will be consid-
ered in October this year.
The CARICOM coun-
tries are relying on a section
of the Agreement on Subsi-
dies and Countervailing
Measures which recognizes
that "subsidies may play an
important role in economic
development programmes of
developing country mem-
bers".
Whether they will get the
extension in October is left
to be seen, but really it
should be automatic. Who,
but the most hardline, would
argue that these small


large developing countries,
and small economies would
have faced even more
requirements to end their
limited subsidies and open
still further their already
open markets to the goods
and services of the industri-
alised nations.
Despite meetings over
the last three months
between the US, EU and a
few large developing coun-
ties --India and Brazil in
particular the WTO
negotiations have been
stalled since last December's
meeting of trade ministers
in Hong Kong.
Throughout the Hong
Kong meeting, the US and
EU were vocal in their crit-
icism of each other. Their
disagreement stems from
their rivalry to sell their
agricultural products in each
other's markets and global-
ly.
For decades, both the US
and the EU have subsidized
their farmers to the tune of
US$1 billion a day.to the
detriment of the farming
communities of developing
countries. Their agricultur-
al exports bear little rela-
tion to the costs of produc-
tion, and contribute to the
inability of the farmers in
developing countries to


"Pointing out that they
account 'for a miniscule.
share of total world trade'
the nine CARIOQM countries,
along with six others,
including the Dominican
Republic, argued that they
need to continue to subsidize
investment to 'benefit from
the positive aspects of
international liberalisation.'"


islands do not need to sub-
sidise investment? They are
obviously physically isolat-
ed, face high transportation
costs for imports, and are.
restricted from concession-
ary financing from interna-
tional financial institu-
tions. If their governments
do not offer incentives for
investment, they would get
very little and certainly not
enough to support their
development needs includ-
ing providing new employ-
ment.
In the meantime, they can
breathe a sigh of relief that
the United States and the
EU failed to narrow their
differences over agricultural
subsidies so as to allow
negotiations to proceed on
April 30th for new global
trade rules at the WTO. Mr
Pascal Lamy, the Director-
General of the WTO, was
forced to announce that dif-
ferences were too wide to
risk calling the meeting.
It is pretty certain that
had the US and the EU set-
tled their disagreements,
they would have acted
together to agree deals with


compete in the global mar-
ket. Little wonder, there-
fore, that poverty in agri-
cultural communities in
developing countries has
increased.
To save the WTO minis-
terial meeting in Hong Kong
last December, the EU's
Trade Commissioner, Peter
Mandelson, announced that
the EU had decided to


insight


Share your news4
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.








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www.bahmasengineers.org
P.O. Box N-4361, Nassau, Bahamas

P.E. EXAMINATION

SEMINAR

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Seminar Cost $30

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phase out .its agricultural^
subsidies by the year'
2013. He did so at the last
minute and on a signal from-i
a EU Heads of Government
conference that bitterly
debated the issue and ended
with a compromise chiefly |
between France, which
wanted to keep the subsi-
dies, and Britain which
urged their elimination.
In any event, the US.'
Brazil, Australia and others
wanted the EU subsidies,
gone by 2010 so thevy ere..
not exactly thrilled by thej
EU announcement which, as-i
it turned out, was notI
unconditional the EUo,'
stated that its elimination of,
subsidies was subject to an
end to US food aid and
export credits.
For its part, the US Trade
Representative's Office,
then headed by Robert Port-
man, pointed out that EU
agricultural subsidies are
three times the level given
by the US to its farmers. ,
Now, the quarrel over^
reducing farm subsidies ha k
been caught up in mid-term
elections for the US Con-
gress.
Both Republicans and
Democrats are far from anx-
ious to tell the farming com-
munities that they will sup-
port any plans to cut subsi-
dies.
Equally, in the EU, While '
the declaration has bee,
made that agricultural sub-'-,
sidies will be phased out by.
2013, no country particu,,
larly France has made an;
effort to reduce subsidies in-
any way.
So, local political survival.:
is now determining interna-
tional action. And, in these
circumstances. the orld is
unlikely 4to see aIny r'ea
movement in the WTO'
negotiations for more trade.
rules until the US mid-tern.
elections for Congress are-
over.
All of this puts into per-
spective the plea to the
WTO by nine small CARI-
COM countries for their
limited subsidies (none of
which is agricultural) to con-
tinue until 2018, and under-
scores that in today's inter-
national trade, like interna-
tional politics, powerful
countries continue to assert
their own interests while
weak states remain at their!'
mercy.
Responses to: ronald
sanders29@hotmail.com
F-i


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THE TRIBUNE`


PAGE 8, MONDAY, MAY 1, 2006








TEtRIBUNer MOnDYMA126PGE


R. N,


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Mercedes-Benz


* PARLIAMENTARY Registration Department staff were stationed at the Government Build-
ing Complex on the Mall to conduct voter registration in Freeport. Seen right is registration super-
visor Shavonne Saunders registering a young voter.
(Photo: Denise Maycock)



DVD tribute for


entertainer Kristin


Penn-Davis


FREEPORT- Seven years
ago, at the height of a successful
and productive music and tele-
vision career, the Bahamas lost
onie of its special daughters -
Khistin Penn-Davis. She was
killed in a head-on collision on
Sergeant Major Road,
Freeport.
Her sudden death deprived
mhny of the opportunity to


experience her positive charm
and dynamism as an on stage
performer.
This month, the family of
Kristin will release a DVD pro-
duction in celebration of what
would have been her 36th birth-
day. Through this audiovisual
medium, viewers will learn of
her musical history, see her live-
in concert and music videos,


Donation to aid

basketball team


i LOCAL government officials of the Pinder's Point Township
itade a donation on Thursday to the Grand Bahama Amateur
Basketball Federation to defray the cost of airline tickets for 15
basketball players to compete at the National Basketball Cham-
pIonship in New Providence on May 5 to 7. Seen from left are
lIernadette Johnson, councillor for Pinder's Point township,
farjorie Darville, president of the GBABF, and council mem-
br Simon Lewis.
i (Photo: Denise.Maycock)


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MONDAY, MAY 1, 2006, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


''"
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i: ...i
..
'- ~d


;1







PAGEB 10, MONDAY, MAY1,2006BTHEAIBUN


Public oncology


will be


centre


'A NEW public oncology
centre is being constructed at
the Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal on Shirley Street in the for-
mer Bahai building.
"'When completed, it will be
a state-of-the-art facility," said


Public Hospitals Authority
managing director Herbert
Brown.
"The staff will be very hap-
py with the accommoda-
tions...and also those patients
who must now go to a building


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which is less than acceptable
to me and the board of the
Hospitals Authority. They will
have first class facilities in the
new building."
Purchased by the govern-
ment, the building is under-
going extensive renovation
and expansion at a cost of
more than $1 million. It is to
be completed and commis-
sioned within two months.
"This is a major invest-
ment," said Mr Brown, "But
we have a responsibility to
ensure that the people we are
mandated to serve receive the
best care possible within the
resources available to us."
The new centre will also
house a University of the
West Indies library and con-
ference quarters.
To the south of the build-
ing is a new parking lot for
Princess Margaret Hospital
staff. It provides another 96
slots.
.All these renovations and
expansions are in line with the
proposed National Health
Insurance plan.
"Clearly, if people are going
to be asked to pay more out of
their salaries, they are going to
be looking for improved
care," said Mr Brown.
"The improvements we are
making, not only to the
Princess Margaret Hospital
but to all our facilities, are cer-
tainly tied in to the proposed
National Health Insurance.


NINETY-SIX more park-
ing slots have been provided
for staffers at the Princess
Margaret Hospital as senior
administrative officer, Dudley
Smith, points out.
(BIS photo by
Gladstone Thurston)


,- f
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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, MONDAY, MAY 1, 2006


.,J"


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MONDAY, MAY 1, 2006, PAGE 11;


THE TRIBUNE


ROCP(F,,IVE


LIBERAL


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the



bahamas


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Keynote Speaker:
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Party Leader & Primer Minister


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OR 326-9688


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Calvary Deliverance Church

East Street South
30th April @11 am






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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12. MONDAY. MAY 1, 2006


I


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M ONE of a number of testing sites near
the main AUTEC facility in Central Andros


FROM page one
tigations are still continuing into
the effects of sonar testing on
marine mammals.
According to Dr Bethel,
AUTEC is collaborating with
the government and its rele-
vant agencies in marine mam-
mal research, research into the
health employees both past
and present, and with respect
to the coral reef situation in
the Bahamas and Caribbean
as it might be impacted by
global warming.
Meanwhile, villagers and
fishermen in Zanzibar are
burying the remains of the
roughly 400 bottlenose dol-
phins, which normally live in
deep offshore waters but
washed up Friday along a two-
mile stretch of coast in Tan-
zania's Indian Ocean archi-
pelago.
The animals may have been
disturbed by some unknown
factor, or poisoned, before
they became stranded in shal-
low waters and died.
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the dolphins' heads to assess
whether they had been affect-
ed by military sonar.
Some scientists surmise that
loud bursts of sonar, which can
be heard for miles in the water,
may disorient or scare marine
mammals, causing them to sur-
face too quickly and suffer the
equivalent of what divers call
the bends when sudden
decompression forms nitrogen
bubbles in tissue.
A US Navy task force
patrols the coast of East Africa
as part of counter-terrorism
operations. A navy official was
not immediately available for
comment, but the service
rarely speaks about the loca-
tion of submarines at sea.
A preliminary examination
of the dolphins' stomach con-
tents failed to show the pres-
ence of squid beaks or other
remains of animals hunted by
dolphins.
That was an indication that
the dolphins either had not
eaten for a long time or had
vomited.
Their general condition,
however, appeared to show
that they had eaten recently,
since their ribs were not clear-
ly visible under the skin.
The most conclusive link
between the use of military
sonar and injury to marine
mammals was observed from
the stranding of whales in 2000
in the Bahamas. The US Navy
later acknowledged that sonar
likely contributed to the
stranding of the extremely shy
species.


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PM: criticism, opposing views

are hallmarks of democracy

FROM page one
expressed by the different sides.
"One of the wonderful traits of our democracy in our
country is we all have a right to disagree, we must always
remember that," he said.
The prime minister emphasised that the criticism expressed
and the statements made in the public forum will some-
times be "very unfair" and not in accordance with the truth.
"But you have to prepare yourselves for that, to not allow
yourselves to be victims of anger to the point where it hurts
you," he said.
Last week, PLP chairman Raynard Rigby, during a press
conference, "cautioned" the Bahamian media, and The Tri-
bune especially, and accused its reporters of printing "lies."
"I am cautioning the press," he warned, "because as the
Fourth Estate, they have a sacred obligation to the people of
the Bahamas to be seen to be objective in their reporting of
events that occur in this country. I have had the occasion to
make the same observations. I trust this is the last time," he
said.
Mr Rigby claimed that some quarters of the press are on a
"systematic campaign of biases and unfair reporting."
The party chairman's comments have since been described
by veteran journalists as an attempt to discredit the free press.











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Dr Bethel: jury still out on whether



AUTEC testing affects marine life





1,2006, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


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Children learn about marine life


BLUE LAGOON ISLAND
Two hundred children from
Nassau Village, Fox Hill,
Englerston and Kemp Road
urban renewal projects and stu-
dents from Gerald Cash Pri-
mary and Carmichael Road
Primary schools took part in
educational and fun field trips
to Dolphin Encounters
throughout the month of April
as part of Coastal Awareness
Month.
The children, aged six to 17,
took part in the Reef Rangers
programme offered by Dolphin
Encounters Project BEACH,
the non-profit affiliate of the
marine facility on Blue Lagoon
Island, to gain first-hand knowl-
edge of marine mammals.
The programme included a
close encounter with Andy and
Stormy, two of the park's 16
Atlantic Bottlenose dolphins,
who kept participants splashing
and laughing as they interact-
ed with them one-on-one in the
dolphins' all-natural sea habi-
tat.
Seventy-five high-school stu-
dents from C R Walker Senior
High School, Gerald Cash Pri-
mary, along with swimmers
from the Urban Renewal Pro-
jects, were also taken on snorkel
trips to see coral reef habitats by
Dive Stuart Cove as part of the
field trip programme.
Majestic Tours supported the
programme by providing a free


bus service to the children
attending the field trips.
"One of the most important
components of our plans for
Coastal Awareness Month was
to provide children with oppor-
tunities to learn first-hand about
our marine environment," said
Dr Jennifer Edwards of the
University of the West Indies
and member of the Coastal
Awareness Committee who
arranged the field trips.
"The children had an incred-
ible time meeting the dolphins
and learning about the impor-
tance of preserving our oceans
and all sea life. The children
who took part in the snorkel
field trips learned about coral
reef habitats. Nothing compares
to experiencing these wonders
first-hand."
John Carey, parliamentary
secretary for the Ministry of
Tourism and MP for
Carmichael, also supported the
field trips for Coastal Aware-
ness Month.
He went on a snorkelling trip
with students and joined chil-
dren with the Fox Hill Urban
Renewal Programme at Dol-
phin Encounters.
"The marine environment of
The Bahamas is unique in the
world," said Mr Carey. "Engag-
ing Bahamian children who
might not have had the oppor-
tunity otherwise in education-
al field trips to see our coun-


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* DAVID YURMAN,'Bay Street

Frida APR


27


28


* JOHN BULL, Exuma
* JOHN BULL, Harbour Bay


1


* JOHN BULL, Marina Village at Atlantis
* LA PARFUMERIE, Marina Village at Atlantis
* DOONEY & BOURKE, Marina Village at Atlantis


* JOHN BULL BUSINESS CENTRE,
Robinson Road
* JOHN BULL BUSINESS CENTRE
WAREHOUSE, Robinson Road


-2


try's extraordinary biodiversity
is very important. It was a plea-
sure to join the children in these
activities and watch them learn
more about their country'stnat-
ural resources.
"We were very happy to be
given the opportunity to bring
our children to Dolphin
Encounters to learn about the
marine environment," said Cor-
poral 1283 Johnson of the Fox
Hill Urban Renewal Pro-
gramme, who along with dis-
trict constables, social workers
and grade level co-ordinators
also participated in the Reef
Ranger programme.
"The children had a great
time and they definitely gained
a greater appreciation for the
ocean. It was a wonderful expe-
rience for these children who I
know benefited tremendously
by what they learned."
Dolphin Encounters is one of
13 stakeholders from the pri-
vate and public sectors involved
in the Coastal Awareness Com-
Smittee of The Bahamas with an
interest in promoting the sus-
tainable development of The
Bahamas. The Committee has
sponsored many events
throughout April which is
Coastal Awareness Month in
The Bahamas. To date, events
have included a National
Church service, a National T-
Shirt Day, poster and science
competitions, the student field
trips and a marine exhibition in
the Mall at Marathon.
There will be a dune restora-
tion on Saturday and Sunday,
April 29 and 30, at Orange Hill
Beach which is being led by


:. .I



* THESE studei
Stuart Cove


its learned about coral reef habitats during a snorkel trip sponsored by Dive


the New Providence Commu-
nity Church. On Sunday, April
30, a church service will be held
on Orange Hill beach at 10am
after the restoration. The public
is invited to attend.
For more information or to
become a sponsor of Coastal
Awareness Month, please con-
tact Earlston McPhee at 356-
6967/63/38 or visit www.Coasta-
1Awareness.org
The 2006 Coastal Awareness
Committee includes members
from the following organisa-


tions:
Ministry of Tourism, Bahamas
Environment Science and Tech-
nology Commission (BEST),
Bahamas Hotel Association,
Bahamas National Trust,
Bahamas Reef Environment
Educational Foundation
(BREEF), Broadcasting Cor-


portion of The Bahama i "
Department of En\ ironmental
Health Services, Department l
Marine Resources, Dive Stuidt'
Cove, Dolphin Encounters Ltd,; :
The Nature Conservancy, Min-
istry of Education, Science and
Technology and the University
of the West Indies


* THIS student gets a hug from Stormy, an Atlantic Bottlenose
Dolphin that lives at Blue Lagoon Island, during a Reef Ranger
programme


LS T



FOR ALE,


M&E Limited




TRAINEE DIESEL TECHNICIANS
WANTED


Applicants are invited for a limited number of positions available in a program
starting July 2006. High School and BTVI graduates, or anyone having a passion for
hands-on technical work is needed to train for the opportunity to work with
Caterpillar heavy equipment including generators, marine engines, etc.


/ Industry best 5 year Internship Program
/ Overseas state-of-the-art training (2 -4 months)
V Potential for growth
/ Safe working conditions
/ Health & Pension benefits


Machinery & Energy Limited is looking for ambitious, diligent and enthusiastic i
applicants. Graduates of this Internship Program will-be qualified to analyze and
repair highly complex equipment. Applications are available at our office located on
1 College Avenue, Oakes Field next to C.C. Sweeting High School.


Email: apply@me-ltd.com
Website: http://me-ltd.cat.com


~mm;F~a~aenan~


THE TRIBUNE


PAILGE 14, MONDAY, MAY 1, 2006


I~Men dy MAY









Making a mark for

coastal awareness


SMIM BERS of the Orange Hill community came together, assisted by the Ministry of Tourism,
to pjlat trees yesterday for Coastal Awareness mouth


* VOLUNTEERS build a entrance bridge to the beach

~:ail


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The Manals ment and Staff of
Bacar; company Limited
would like to e s their heartfelt thanks and appreciation to
Mr. Dwight Sawyer
Vice President of Operations and Jlr t Security on his retirement
after 36 years of dedicated, committed ;:iuable service to the Company
Mr. Sawyer commenced employment. at Bacardi & Company Limited on
October 1, 1969 as a Laboratory Technician in the Quality Control Department.
Having obtained degrees in Chemical Engineering, Food Sciences and an MBA he
was transferred to the Distillery Department and progressed to his pfoA~tl e of
Vice President operations and a Member of the Company's Executive I, LOr.
Sawyer's respoithiKties include the operations of fermentation, distillery, boiler,
desalination, carboiK'dioxide production, maintenance, engineering and plant security.
For several years he, vs responsible for the Human Resources Department, and is a
S .-k..~~f the';Company's industrial relations negotiation team.
'.foacardi & Company Limited on April 30, 2006 and we
eortn o .ish him every success in his future endeavors


MONDAY, MAY 1, 2006, PAGE '1 -


RISTR)RANT[iE

LUCIANO'S

OF CHICAGO
Mothers Day Brunch
Sunday, Nini 140123001S~a
11-3Wi -n t :- 41i

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Italial~l sau-,a,2kt S: Sv. l': r ; u
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* CHILDREN make signs to keep people from walking on the
newly planted plants
(Photos: Felipe Major/Tribune Staff)


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Picnic


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FRESCATA SANDWICHES.


'Ham S *wiss


': nei of 24 Frescata Picnics for up to 12 friends!


:, ," wili he held each week for (4) weeks. Tune in to 100
,iV; i !0y F.M radio stations for details.


what tastes right:


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...


For the past 24 years RBC FINCO has
supported the Junior Clay Court
Tennis Championships. This Easter
tradition began in 1982 and many
top Bahamian junior tennis players
in recent times have used this
tournament as a launching pad for
successful junior and college
careers. During the Easter weekend
there were 67 juniors entered in


various age groups for boys and
girls. The RBC FINCO Junior Tennis
Championships were held at the
Gym Tennis Club in Winton. Mary
Shelley, President of the Bahamas
Lawn Tennis Association, said that
she is "indeed grateful for the
dedication and commitment RBC
FINCO has shown over the past 24
years in support of the junior
Tennis Championships". Mr. Julius
Seymour, Mortgage Manager, RBC
FINCO said that, "RBC FINCO is a
strong supporter of youth
development and is proud to
continue its corporate sponsorship
of the Junior Clay Court Tennis
Championships. We extend special
congratulations to all the champions
and tournament participants."


SPictured from Ieft: Patrice Ritchie, senior manager :'....: sales and
Smarketing, RBC FINCO; G. Baxter, tot.;riainrent director; Julius Seymour,
S.' '- .... RBC FINCO; Mary Shelly, president, Bahamas Lawn
Tennis Association; Paula Whitfield, first vice president, Bahamas Lawn
Tennis Association with resnonsibilitv for Junior Development.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .


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mybahamas@bahamas.com



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mybahamas@bahamas.com


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