Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00387
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: April 18, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00387
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text








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The


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A C a ia 5


I


Minister asks

for understanding

over allegations of

sexual misconduct


A PASTOR at the centre
of an alleged sex scandal
pleaded with his congregation
during his Easter sermon to
support him in his time of
need.
The Baptist minister, who
has been accused of sexual
misconduct with an under-age
girl, likened the allegations to
an "earthquake" in his life.
Police were called in when
relatives of the girl, now 16,
confronted the pastor with
claims that he had been hav-
ing a sexual relationship with
her over a 15-month period.
They told police they had
access to cellphone messages
to the girl in which he made
indecent references to parts
of his anatomy. And they
alleged the relationship devel-
oped while he was supposed
to be counselling her.
On Easter Sunday, the pas-
tor pleaded with his congre-
gation to support him.
During his sermon, he noted
that sometimes earthquakes
come to shake the foundation
of people just as an earth-
quake greeted Mary Magda-
lene and the women who
came to anoint Jesus' body at
the tomb.
However, he expressed con-
fidence that God would bring
the church through its diffi-
culty.
After the sermon, the pastor
called members of the church
up.to the altar and asked them
for their support and under-


standing during this time.
He reminded them that they
needed to have faith in their
"man of God" and not give in
to rumours or speculation as
he had been with them for
more than a decade.
The pastor also reminded
his members that he had been
there for all the congregation
during their times of difficulty
and said now was their time
to support him.
He said he was aware that
some members may lose
friends, or be ridiculed by co-
workers because they attend-
ed the church and that the
coming week might be diffi-
cult. He urged his members
not to allow talk by others to
bring them down.
Instead, he encouraged
them to not say anything and
simply tell others about the
good news of the Easter story.
The pastor acknowledged
that he might lose members
from his church as a result of
what had happened.
He then prayed for his
church, that it would come
through this difficult period
and be stronger than ever.
Throughout his speech, the
pastor's wife stood by his side
mopping his face with a hand-
kerchief while members of the
congregation called out their
love and support to him.
Chief Supt Marvin Dames,
officer-in-charge of CDU, said
investigations are continuing
into the family's claims.


Pair praised after $2m of cocaine

plane's emergency found in container


landing drama
AN AIR traffic controller and a Bahamasair
pilot were praised last night after-a plane was
forced to make an emergency landing in bad
weather at Nassau International Airport.
The drama, which happened in very high winds,
had a safe ending thanks to controller Otis Rolle
and an unnamed Bahamasair pilot.
"It could have been serious if the pilot had pan-
icked," a private pilot told The Tribune. "Con-
troller Otis Rolle did an amazing job in guiding the
pilot in and so did the pilot he did a brilliant job
in landing the plane safely."
The incident occurred at 7am on Thursday when
a Bahamasair Dash-8 had to make an emergency
landing on runway nine under adverse weather
conditions.
"Normally, it would have been a non-event,
except for the weather the wind was just howling
out there," said the private pilot.
No-one was hurt in the ordeal.
The Tribune was unable to contact Mr Rolle. He
was off-duty.


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT Two million dollars worth of
cocaine was found hidden in a container that
arrived from Peru at the Freeport Container
Port on Friday.
Acting on a tip, a team of officers from the
Grand Bahama Drug Enforcement Unit,
Bahamas Customs and Freeport Container
Port security, searched a 20-foot container
holding a shipment of leather goods from
Callao, Peru.
During the search, they discovered
and seized 60 kilos of cocaine in the
container, which was bound for Barcelona,
Spain.
No arrests were made.
However, the DEU has launched an inves-
tigation to determine how the cocaine was
placed in the container and to identify those
responsible.


Pinewood
residents want
'killer' in court
immediately
RESIDENTS of Pinewood
Gardens are calling for the killer
of 20-year-old Deron Bethel to
be brought before the criminal
courts immediately to stave off
suspicions of a police cover-up.
Neighbours of Mr Bethel, who
was allegedly shot by an off-duty
policeman who was called to a
domestic dispute in a nearby
house, are determined to "head
off" what they see as a police
attempt to have the matter
referred to a coroner's hearing.
"The family repudiates the
need for a coroner's court," a
family source said last night, "We
want this to go to a magistrate's
court or by way of an indictment
to the Supreme Court.
"We feel any attempt by police
to have the matter referred to a
coroner's court would be no
more than a manoeuvre to fudge
the issue."
SEE page 11

Body found
floating in sea
BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT The body of 40-
year-old Ian Carroll of Treasure
Cay, Abaco, wasfound floating in
the sea at Green Turtle Cay on
Easter Monday.
Abaco Police have classified Mr
Carroll's death as suspicious and
are awaiting the results of an autop-
sy.
According to police, a resident of
Green Turtle Cay spotted a body in
the water near the beach at Sun-
downers Restaurant and Bar
around 10am.
A team of officers from Marsh
Harbour went to the area by boat
and retrieved the body of a white
Bahamian man from the water.
The victim was naked. There were
also a few superficial bruises.
Supt Basil Rahming, press liai-
son officer for the northern
Bahamas, said it appeared that the
body had not been in the water for
more than five hours.
He said the victim was ferried to
Cooper's Town Clinic and official-
ly pronounced dead.
Arrangements have been made
to have Mr Carroll's body flown to
New Providence, where an autopsy
will be performed to determine the
cause of death. Meanwhile, police
are continuing investigations.


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THE TRIBUNE


t-AUE 2. i ULt=SAY. A P, L. 18. 2006


About those petty politicians



with exclusive rights to God


T HE new Prime Minister of
Jamaica, Portia Simpson
Miller, stunned some of her country-
men just after she took office by
announcing that she had been appoint-
ed by God and therefore Christians
had a responsibility to support her.
Mrs Simpson Miller did a tour of
churches after being sworn in and,
according to The Jamaica Gleamer,
she got a particularly wild reception
at one of them. When asked to address
the congregation, Mrs Simpson Miller
said:
"If I am appointed by the Almighty
to be Prime Minister, then all of you
Christians must give support to the
appointment of the Lord. If it is not
done, the whip will not be drawn
against me, because I am going to be
carrying out His will."
As astonishing as that may sound to
some people, it is nothing new. Here in
the Bahamas we have some politicians
who believe they are appointed by God
and that they are doing His will.
The Americans also have a presi-
dent who seems to believe that he also
has a special commission from God,
and he is strongly supported by reli-
gious fundamentalists like Pat Robert-
son and Jerry Falwell.
These two evangelists believe it is
okay to assassinate the elected leader
of another country and to kill people in
the name of the Lord.
The gift of faith is a wonderful
thing. Many great men and women
have been inspired and sustained by
it throughout their life's work and
have contributed mightily to the
progress of humanity. Some who
have achieved the most have shown
genuine humility and have constant-
ly questioned their motives and direc-
tion.
It seems more than a little arrogant
and presumptuous for political lead-
ers who are mere mortals to claim
appointment by God and to suggest
that what they do is necessarily the will
of God. Where does that leave those
who disagree with them and oppose
their policies?
r i -Ihe claim of divine appoint-
S ment and guidance has been
made throughout the centuries
-,and has more often than not brought
'injustice, persecution and misery to
countless millions.
There was once a nation who ram-
*paged through what we now call the


Middle East. Their leaders told them it
was God's will that they should slaugh-
ter their enemies, including men,
women and children, and in some cas-
es even their animals.
Then there was a Man born into that
same tribe with a different message for
the world. He repudiated the eye-for-
an-eye philosophy which others said
they got from God, preached love, and
told His followers to put away the
sword.
In the words of a well-known Negro
spiritual, Christians were "to study war
no more". But the Prince of Peace had
hardly turned His back when many of
His followers returned to the old ways
- making war and killing in the name of
God.
Jesus had been crucified and his
cross had became the symbol of
redeeming love. Three centuries later
the Roman Emperor Constantine was
going out to do battle with one of his
rivals. He claimed that he saw the cross
over the sun with words, "In this sign


It seems more than a little arrogant
and presumptuous for political leaders
:who are mere mortals to claim
appointment by God and to suggest
that what they do is necessarily the
will of God. Where does that leave
those who disagree with them and
oppose their policies?


There is a Bahamian saying which
rendered into standard English would
go something like this: It is a good
thing that God is more tolerant than
man because if He were not then some
of those who abuse His name.would be
struck dead on the spot.


you shall conquer."
Constantine apparently saw no con-
tradiction in this. He became the first
Christian Emperor of Rome but some
historians believe that his conversion
had more to do with politics than faith,
and that he wanted to use the new reli-
gion to help him unite and control the
empire.
So it continued through the cen-
turies. Humans carried out the most
appalling atrocities against other
humans, claiming they were doing the
will of God.
The Christian princes of the Cru-
sades had the gall to display the sign of
the cross on their shields and banners
as their swords dripped with the blood
of the infidels.
When they became weary of slaugh-
tering infidels, they turned on each
other Christians beheading, tortur-
ing, disembowelling and burning one
another at the stake, all in the name of
the Lord.

President Abraham Lincoln was
not only a great American, he
is respected by millions as one of the
towering figures of world history. It
fell to him to preside over the bloody
American Civil War which resulted in
preserving the Union.
It also resulted in the emancipation
of America's African slaves. If ever a
conflict could be described as a just
war, one that resulted in the unshack-
ling of millions of human beings would
certainly qualify.
Like his latest successor, Mr Lin-
coln was a man of faith. But Mr Lin-
coln was not so cocksure that he had
exclusive rights to God. So in his
humility he agonised over the direction
of the war:
"The purposes of the Almighty are
perfect and must prevail, though we
erring mortals may fail to actually per-
ceive them in advance, We hoped for a
happy termination of this terrible war
long before this, but God knows best
and has ruled otherwise. We shall yet
acknowledge His wisdom and our own
error therein.
"Meanwhile, we must work earnest-
ly in the best light He gives us, trusting
that so working still conduces to the
great ends He ordains. Surely He
intends some great good to follow this
mighty convulsion, which no mortal
can make, and no mortal could stay."


Mr Lincoln has an even more
powerful message for those
who today are certain that God is their
personal political consultant, that He is
at their side in battle, and that He is
their in-house magician.
One day Mr Lincoln was ap-
proached by a certain cleric who said
to him:
"I hope the Lord is on our side."
To which the great one replied:
"I am not at all concerned about
that, for I know that the Lord is
always on the side of right. But it is my
constant anxiety and prayer that I and
this nation should be on the Lord's
side."
There is a Bahamian saying which
rendered into standard English
would go something like this: It is a
good thing that God is more tolerant
than man because if He were not
then some of those who abuse His
name would be struck dead on the
spot.
Obviously God is not like man, and
petty politicians who are inclined, to
puff up themselves by recruiting Him
to their side should think about that.
They should also think seriously about
Mr Lincoln's wise advice and not be so
certain that they are God's appointed
and anointed, and that He is on their
side.
Maybe He is not!
After all, Satan is a liar.


THE INNOCENT

It is quite astonishing how some
people can allow themselves to
be carried away by prejudice and hys-
teria.
One such sent a message to Wen-
dall Jones on the Love 97 talk show
last week discussing the arrest and
detention of Haitians who are in this
country legally.
"The innocent will suffer for the
guilty," he said.
_. wonder what-he would-say-if-the--
police were told to rid us of criminals
and one of them put a bullet through
the head of his innocent son, or broth-
er, or friend.
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0 In brief

Security
officer
shot in the
chest

A SECURITY officer was
shot in the chest during an
armed robbery at a local phar-
macy over the Easter weekend.
Police said that, after 9pm on
Sunday, two masked gunmen
entered the Super Saver phar-
macy and robbed the store of
an undetermined amount of
cash.
On leaving, the robbers fired
shots at a security officer, hitting
him in the rightupper -chest -
area.
The guard was taken to hos,
pital by ambulance where he
was listed in stable condition.

Firemen
free two
drivers after
accidents

POLICE are investigating
two traffic accidents.
Press liaison officer Walter
Evans said at around 9pm on
Sunday, the male driver of a
1997 Suzuki cargo van, regis-
tration number 15436, was trav-
elling east on Sapodilla Boule-
vard, Pinewood Gardens, when
he collided with a utility pole
on the north side of the street.
The man was trapped in the
van and firemen used the jaws
of life to free him.
The victim, who had face and
leg injuries, was taken to hospi-
tal for treatment. He was list-
ed in stable condition.
The second traffic accident
occurred on Monday morning
when another driver collided
with a utility pole.
This time the male driver of a
Honda Civic, registration num-
ber 161151, was travelling on
Farrington Road,.near the PLP
headquarters, when he struck
the pole.
Firemen were called to free
the driver. A female passenger
was said to be unharmed.
The victim was taken to hos-
pital with facial lacerations and
a broken right leg.

Illegal
immigrants
caught in
operation

- --AS-a-result-of the police's
"Quiet Storm" operation on
Saturday night, 13 illegal immi-
grants were apprehended
throughout New Providence.
Two Haitians and 11
Jamaicans make up that num-
ber. They were taken to the
Detention Centre, Carmichael
Road, for processing.


ARTHUR

FOULKES


INE


Dornafld'


-- -- -- ----
Is a I


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Ilk








TUESDAY, APRIL 18, 2006, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


LOA NW


o In brief


Bishop

denies

leadership

rumours

DENYING having aspira-
tions for public office, Bishop
Simeon Hall issued a public
statement yesterday contradict-
ing a report released in a bi-
weekly publication.
The report said Bishop Hall,
who heads the New Convenant
Baptist Church, was "seriously
. considering" an alleged offer
from FNM leader Hubert Ingra-
Sham to run against Independent
MP Tennyson Wells in the
Bamboo Town constituency.
However, Bishop Hall said
that, while the article was
'amusing', it was totally untrue.
"No such overture was ever
made to me," the release read,
"nor do I have plans to run in
the next election. I wish to
invite you in the future to kind-
ly call me if you want to know
anything I am doing."

Epileptic

found

dead in

apartment

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT A Haitian
man with a history of epilepsy
was found dead at an apartment
on Bass Lane on Sunday morn-
ing.
According to police, at about
11am a concerned neighbour
discovered the body of 46-year-
old Robert Augustine on the
floor of his efficiency unit.
The woman phoned police.
She told officers
that she lived next door to
Mr Augustine, who lived alone
and suffered from epilepsy.
She had not seen him for sev-
eral days so went into his apart-
ment through an unlocked front
door and1tliscovered him dead
inside.
Supt Basil Rahming said
police do not suspect foul play
as officers examined the body
but found no visible injuries or
signs of violence. The body was
clad in blue shirt and short blue
jean pants.
He said Mr Augustine was
last seen alive by a relative at
5pm on Thursday after leaving
work.
Police are awaiting the
results of an autopsy to deter-
mine the cause of death.


Immigrants

caught as

boat runs

out of fuel

NINETEEN illegal Haitian
immigrants were apprehended
at Cat Cay, Bimini, early Mon-
day morning when the boat they
were on ran out of fuel during a
smuggling operation to the
United States.
Around 3am, a security offi-
cer at Cat Cay spotted a 25-foot
beige and brown Mako speed-
boat resting on the sand at Gun
Cay Beach. He observed a num-
ber of persons disembarking
and going into the bushes.
The officer alerted police,
who got the assistance of a
Bahamas Customs officer and
two other security officers. On
returning to the area, they
caught 11 men, eight women
and a 13-year-old female juve-
nile. The group was taken into
custody.
It is understood the immi-
grants were on
their way to Miami from Nas-
sau when the boat ran out of
gas. The captain beached the
vessel and left them.
The Haitians were trans-
ported to North Bimini Police
Station, where immigration offi-
cials made arrangements for
them to be flown to Carmichael
Road detention
centre in New Providence to
await repatriation.


Supt Rahming said the vessel
used in the smuggling operation
is believed to have been stolen
from New Providence.

TRPIA


Prison inmates tell of a


'culture of corru


* By MARK HUMES

Recaptured prisoners Bar-
ry Parcoi and Corey Hepburn
testified to a culture of cor-
ruption among prisoners and
prison officials that may have
eventually led to the deaths
of officer Deon Bowles and
prisoner Neil Brown in early
January.
Shuffling into Thursday's
session with shackles on their
feet, both men offered up
condolences to the families of
Bowles and Brown. Then,
one after the other, they told
an eerily silent room how,
with the assistance of a prison
sergeant and a number of oth-
er officers, they made an
attempt for freedom from
Her Majesty's Prison at Fox
Hill.
However, according to one
of the prisoners, the death of
Officer Bowles was not a part
of that plan.
Barry Parcoi, the first wit-
ness to take the stand, told of
being moved to the C-block
around the last part of Octo-
ber and meeting an escape
plot masterminded by Neil
Brown and Forrester Bowe
already in progress.
He told the captivated
courtroom how he believed it
was Neil Brown who told him
of the plan. Brown, he said,
informed him that he had
already spoken to the officers
involved and all they had to
do was go. At the time,
according to Parcoi, Brown
did not say who the officers
were.
The initial escape, Parcoi
informed the court, was to
have taken place in the mid-
dle part of December around
Christmas time, but "certain
things didn't materialise, so
they had to put it off."'
Spending twenty-three and


a half hours in his cell per day,
Parcoi demonstrated how he
used his time and two six-inch
hacksaw blades, supposedly
acquired through Principal Offi-
cer Van Johnson, to cut his cell
bars, leaving only a "little nip"
so that the bars could remain
in place until the appropriate
time.
The appropriate time, Par-
coi said, was to have been
around midnight and 1 o'clock
on the morning of January 17th,
but they missed that window of
opportunity because they had
all been drinking gin and
Gatoraide and smoking mari-
juana.
As a result of being high and
intoxicated, Brown, Parcoi told
the court, fell asleep, so the time
was changed to 3am.
Parcoi went on to offer up
riveting details of the chaotic
events that took place from the
time he left his cell up to their
eventual capture near
Yamacraw Road, including
their scuffle with Officer
Bowles, whom he claims they
left bound but alive.
Recreating the scene near


Yamacraw Road, Parcoi
described how he and Forrester
Bowe were shot in the upper
thigh by Assistant Superinten-
dent James Farrington, who
arrived shortly after they were
recaptured.
"Who that is?" Parcoi imi-
tated Farrington.
"That's Barry Parcoi," an
officer said before Parcoi heard
Farrington fire the shot into his
leg.
Farrington then walked past
him, according to Parcoi, and
asked who the other prisoner
was that the men had captured.
Upon learning it was Forrester
Bowe, Parcoi said he heard Far-
rington fire another shot in the
direction of Bowe.
By now other officers arrived
to "mercilessly" beat the pris-
oners, but Parcoi remembered
the arrival of Deputy Charles
Rolle in particular.
Rolle, he repeated over and
over, kept "stompin' me and
stompin' me and.stompin' me"
in the head and neck, at the
same time asking for a gun to
shoot the men.
He said that ASP Farring-


I


:, *. '*f I
.0 .i:t itti

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141~
was'.


ton tried to bring some
order to a scene that
was quickly getting out
of hand and ordered
that the prisoners be
escorted to a prison
bus.

SEE page 11


* BARRY Parcoi


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PAGE 4, TUESDAY IAPRIT18,R2006 THE TRIBUN


ON MAY 9 the UN will vote 47 members
to the newly constituted Human Rights
Council, which replaces the 53-member Com-
mission on Human Rights.
The Commission, some of whose members
represented countries with the worst human
rights records, met once a year for six weeks.
Those six-week sessions, said an American
official when urging the Bahamas not to sup-
port Cuba for membership, "tended to be
quite confrontational and theatrical."
In other words, the old Commission did lit-
tle to right the wrongs against the citizens of
the world.
It was hoped that the new UN Council,
said Mark Lagon, US Deputy Assistant Sec-
retary of State of the Bureau of Internation-
al Organisation Affairs, would have a more
Credible membership a membership that
would be a "little less subject to some of the
world's worst dictatorships (which) seek
membership so as to deflect criticism of them-
selves." It was hoped that the new Council
would be a leaner and more agile body
"meeting through the year rather than in one
six-week session so that when there was an
urgent situation ... the body will be able to
grapple with it."
However, in urging Bahamians to support
Cuba on May 9 in its bid for membership to
the Council, Cuban Ambassador Felix Wil-
son-Hernandez said his country believed it
had a right and duty to be elected to the
SCouncil.
"Cuba can stand up and tell the Ameri-
Scans and its allies what they need to be told,"
She said in his interview with The Tribune.
From this statement it would seem that
SCuba's object is to continue its political histri-
Sonics instead of getting down to the matters
Sof human rights.
Those rights are enshrined in our Consti-
; tuition. They are the right to "(a) life, liberty,
security of the person, the enjoyment of prop-
erty and the protection of the law; (b) free-
dom of conscience, of expression and of
assembly and association, and (c) respect for
private and family life."
No country should be represented on the
UN Human Rights Council that.guarantees
.its citizens any less.
"If we are going to speak about rights you
'have rights to do what you feel appropriate,"
.said Ambassador Wilson-Hernandez. "You
can't tell me that you respect human rights if
you tell me that you want me to do everything
you want."
;We agree with Mr Hernandez, but would


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his ultimate leader, Fidel Castro, also agree
with him?
If what Mr Hernandez has said is true,
then why are professionals, such as doctors
and dentists, not allowed to travel abroad to
either visit or join their families? How can
these professionals possibly decide what is
appropriate for them in the context of the
family when the Cuban government believes
it has the "right to preserve" their brains and
deny their travel?
How do Cubans have the right to do what
they "feel is appropriate" for themselves if
they are not at liberty to transfer their resi-
dences from one town to another in their
own country without a government certifi-
cate? And even more important, why, if men
and women have the essentials of what the
world considers are their human rights, do so
many of them take to boats under cover df
darkness to find freedom elsewhere?
It would seem that Mr Hernandez by his
own words has defeated his argument. It
would have been more accurate if he had
said that in Cuba human rights means a right
to do what the Cuban government has decid-
ed is "appropriate" for its citizens.
Mr Hernandez claims that education is
one of the most important of human rights in
Cuba. However, in Cuba it is not education as
we know it. There it is selective education. In
other words a Cuban can only read the books
the state says he can read. Their choice is
controlled because libraries have only state
approved books on its shelves.
"And if you can't have an open mind,"
commented one-Cuban,-"you can't have an
open mouth for free expression, and so it
follows that there is no free press, no freedom
of assembly, and the list goes on."
`-As for freedom of assembly, that's anoth-
er story. Just imagine if in the Bahamas on
every block there was a committee in Cuba
it's called Defence of the Revolution (CDR)
- whose members assault you if you have
more than three persons in your home at any
one time. Why there would be a riot in the
Bahamas. But in Cuba it is called freedom of
assembly!
Surely, the Bahamas would not have the
effrontery on May 9 to stand before the world
body on the side of a country that apparent-
ly talks indifferent tongues when it comes to
human rights.
Our man at the UN should remember that
when he casts his vote to select members to
the UN Human Rights Council on May 9,
he is speaking for all the Bahamian people.
I


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1- (242)-352-6608


EDITOR, The Tribune

IS there any credibility in the
opinion of the ex-US Ambas-
sador J Richard Blankenship in
his condemnation and opposi-
tion to the current US Govern-
ment's security policy to verify
cargo (container traffic) at the
mega ports of origin?
A tabloid last Monday first
exposed this story and further
indicated that the ex-Ambas-
sador had also sent a letter to
The Washington Post the
tabloid published the text of this
letter on Thursday.
Clearly ex-Ainbassador
Blankenship is criticising the
Government and the leadership
of President George Bush who
ironically appointed him to the
post as US Ambassador and, as
far as I know, requested his
eventual resignation, least we
forget. If this is so, I believe this
would be the first US Ambas-
sador to the Bahamas t'o be
asked to resign. This will always
be recalled in Bahamian history.
Out of adversity, Ambassador
Blankenship's resignation came
to our shores the current US
Ambassador I would not wish
to pretend to speak for us all but
I am certainly satisfied that
Ambassador Rood is a fair man,
has shown the true and correct
relationship there should be
between next door neighbours
for which we are grateful.
Just days ago Her Excellency
Hon Condoleezza Rice, US Sec-
retary of State clearly thanked
The Bahamas Government for
its solution to the Cuban dentist
matter surely ex-Ambassador
Blankenship is not criticising his
nation's Secretary of State?
The security policy of the US
makes a lot of sense as it asks
for the securing and checking of
all cargo-containers in the mega
transshipment ports like
Freeport, Singapore, Hong Kong
before they sail to the US.
Although originally for differ-
ent reasons US pre-clearance,
we have it at Nassau and Grand
Bahama International Airports.
This is again an off-shore clear-
ance facility where persons wish-
ing to enter the US can be
processed, weeded out and
checked thoroughly limiting
effectively a terrorist entering
the US.
To argue that Hutchison-
Whampao are not qualified and
it is crazy to p'ut this responsi-
bility in their hands shows clear-
ly that Mr Blankenship has not
researched Hutchison's global
operations and the strategic posi-
tion of their port operations.
Hutchison operate the largest
container port in England at
Felixstowe on the east coast of


England as well as a mega port
in Rotterdam, least of all their
presence in Asia. I would cer-
tainly suggest that the US is actu-
ally benefiting from the expertise
of Hutchison as there are few
global container port operators
with such experience.
In passing we cannot miss the
ridiculous policy position over
the intent of Dubai Ports to pur-
chase P&O Ports which would
have given Dubai the manage-
ment of certain US eastern
seaboard ports everyone for-
got that last year the same Dubai
Ports acquired CSX Ports which.
put in the hands of Dubai about
13 ports along the eastern
seaboard as well as ports through
Lakes Heron, Superior, Erie,
Ontario and Michigan through
the heartland of the US.
The ex-Ambassador raises the
legal question of Extradition -
the US would not release a US
citizen or permanent resident to
any other Government on crim-
inal charges if the Government,
Department of Justice were not
satisfied that due process had
taken place. Process in law takes
time and sorry, ex-Ambassador,


we uphold the law.
In recent weeks the world has
seen another side of the US -
an ugly side which was quite
popular some years back in the
MacArthur era of protectionism
and then in the 1960-1970s the
"ugly American" syndrome. We
are witnessing the contrasting
basic principle of the US over
the current storm over illegal
immigration. Surely even a grade
one student will understand if
you deport the millions of illegals
the cost of living will rocket.
Americans, like Bahamians,
refuse to do the low-end jobs.
A past World Bank report on
money laundering very clearly
identified the United States as'\
"the centre.ofthat activity" -
where else have we seen the
Enron-style of fraud regret-
tably for the Bahamas we are
located between the producers
of cocaine and the world's
biggest market, the United
States but this ex-US Ambas-
sador wants this small nation to
somehow interdict all cocaine
with our limited capability and
funding?
I suggest there is little fact in
the ex-Ambassadors' letter or
credibility.

H RAHMING
Nassau
April 1 2006


Bahamians should


beware of Castro


EDITOR, The Tribune
WITH utmost surprise I fin-
ished reading the opinion of E
W W*atkins, about "Latin
America's ideal alliance".
His opinion is evidently not
supported by facts. He has no
idea whatsoever of the history
and present situation of Latin
America.
The tyrant Castro has been
in power for 46 years due to
the terror he instills in his peo-
ple. No free press, no civil lib-
erties, massive killings and
jailings, (and no, Mr Watkins:
voting for the same, only par-
ty for 46 years is not democ-
racy!), impoverished popula-
tion, that is not the idea of a
normal society.
Bear in mind that the
Cuban people prefer to con-
front the dangers of sharks,
high seas, storms, even hurri-
canes, when they leave Cuba
in small crafts than keep on
living under the foot of the
dictator. We should ask the
opinion of the gazillion Cuban
tourists visiting the Bahamas
and shopping Bay Street. Can
you find any? Ooops, they are
not allowed to leave their
country. They cannot have
computers or access to Inter-
net, read no government


newspapers, food is rationed
to African standards, and a
million etceteras.
Lie after lie about the sup-
posedly "well being" of the
Cubans. From where does Mr
Watkins get his facts? Is it all
from his friend, the Cuban
ambassador?
As an Argentina citizen, I
have suffered the exportation
of the Cuban revolution to
South America. Decades of
communist terrorism all over
the world,.with Cuban hand
work, seems to be as forgotten
as the Soviet gulags, due to
leftist propaganda. Sadly we
kicked them hard out of
Argentina three decades ago
- they are making a timid
comeback, disguised as
democrats.
.So may I say "Bahamians,
beware"? Opposed to what
EWW states in the end of his
article, do not use Castro or
Chavez as a guideline. They
are nothing but a bad example
of what a democrat should be.
Don't believe on a bought
opinion. Keep enjoying your
hard earned freedom and lib-
erty.

ARGENTINIAN IN
THE BAHAMAS
April 10 2006


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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, APRIL 18, 2006


-2






id


THE TRIBUNE







TUESDAY, APRIL 18, 2006, PAGE 5


THF TRIBUNE


Iln brief

NHI plan

discussed

at society

meeting

THE new National Health
Insurance plan will be dis-
cussed when Civil Society
Bahamas holds a town meet-
ing at the COB school of hos-
pitality lecture theatre on
Wednesday from Sp n to
10.30pm.
Speakers are Di Stanley
Lalta of the National Health
Insurance Implementation
Project; the Rev C B Moss of
the Bahamas Christian Coun-
cil; Dr Alexander Simmons,
president of the Bahamas
Medical Association; Mr Rick
Lowe, secretary-treasurer of
the Nassau Institute and Mr
Obie Ferguson, president of
the Trade Union Congress.
The public is invited.


Fishing
contest
proceeds to
aid BASRA

MARLIN Marine's 12th
annual fishing tournament
takes place on May 20-21.
"Everyone with a boat should
come and enjoy this tourna-
ment and festivities it's for a
good cause," said a
spokesman.
All proceeds go to
Bahamas Air and Sea Rescue
Association (BASRA):
This year, prize values top
$30,000, with the first prize,
a 2007 Evinrude E-TEC 115
HP engine, itself being val-
ued at $12,000, or $10,000
cash.
"Come on, join the tour-
nament, have some fun, and,
show BASRA you care," said
the spokesman, "The fish are
biting. It will be a close and
exciting tournament."
Application forms, and
rules, are available at Marlin
Marine and BASRA. East
Bay Streetr.


LOCAL NEWS


* By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
GASOLINE prices are
expected to go up today to $4.31
a gallon in New Providence and
officials warn that the price could
jump as high as $5 before June.
Oil prices hit as high as $70 a
barrel yesterday on the New
York Stock Exchange amid
concerns over Iran's nuclear
refinement, the war in Iraq, and
continued unrest in the Nigerian
oilfields.
An appreciable increase in
prices at local pumps is expect-
ed tomorrow, and experts
believe that this upward move-
ment will continue as the sum-
mer months approach.
With this in mind,, acting Min-
ister of Trade and Industry


Leslie Miller, who is sitting in
for Dr Marcus Bethel, who is
on vacation, said it is incumbent
that the PetroCaribe initiative is
revisited to reduce fuel prices
throughout the country.
"It is a pity that those in this
country who are against any
positive action continue to
downplay PetroCaribe," he said.
Mr Miller said those who con-
tinued to grovel and "nit-pick"
at Venezuelan President Hugo
Chavez's political agenda
against the US are missingg the
big picture".
"States within the US have
benefited from PetroCaribe by
getting their winter fuel oils at
40 per cent below market price.
And Puerto Rico continues to
reap huge benefits from the
PetroCaribe initiative as well as


all the countries in the
Caribbean region, especially
Jamaica, which anticipates a
saving of some $12 or $18 mil-
lion this year.
"In fact, the Minister of
Finance (in Jamaica) has initi-
ated a new act before parlia-
ment to enable them to open
up a special bank account for
the savings that are going to be
realized by Jamaica. And like-
wise the people of the Bahamas
could appreciate savings of at
least $25 million by signing on
to the full tenets of Petro-
Caribe," he said.
Mr Miller claimed the Nas-
sau Institute and Tribune
columnist Sir Arthur Foulkes
were fuelling a negative outlook
on the Venezuelan oil deal.
As such, Mr Miller said that


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Filming wraps on B(
FILMING in the Bahamas country will take place in the
for the upcoming James Bond Czech spa town of Karlovy
movie Casino Royale has Vary which will double as
wrapped up after three weeks of Montenegro, Screen Daily
on-location shooting. reported yesterday.
The Bahamas, which doubles The majority of the film was
for Madagascar in the film, serves shot in Prague, but the entire
as the location for the movie's crew packed up and moved
opening scene with Bond down to the Bahamas for filming
(Daniel Craig) chasing down and before returning to the Czech
apparently killing a villain. Republic for a few more weeks,
Director Martin Campbell is before finally wrapping up at
scheduled to conclude princi- Pinewood Studios in England.
pal photography on Casino The Casino Royale crew fined
Royale in the Czech Republic at at locations in Coral Harbour, at
the end of May. the famed Buena Vista Restau-
The final shooting in the rant and on Paradise Island.


)nd movie
Production teams built an
African shantytown near Coral
Harbour, centred around the core
of a decrepit run-down old hotel
that had been gutted, and the set
decorators constructed dozens of
make-shift shacks all around it.
Some 350 extras, mostly
locals and many Haitians,
crammed into what used to be
the hotel's former swimming
pool, all watching and betting
on a fight between a ferret and
a snake, which will be digitally
added in post-production.
The release of Casino Royale
is scheduled for November 17.


when historians revisited this
offer from the Venezuelan gov-
ernment, it would be seen as
one of the biggest "missed
opportunities" in the history of
the Bahamas.
"In my mind this will certain-
ly be one of the biggest blun-
ders in our country. It will be
an economic tragedy that I will
carry in my mind and my heart
for the rest of my political life.
"The justification for it is that
whenever an opportunity pre-
sents itself that does not
adversely affect the people of
our country, we should embrace
it, and not disregard it because
of the views of a small minority
that has shown disdain for the
small man anyhow," he said.



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development and encourages
positive activities that promote
team-building skills among young
persons in the community. Coach
Thompson says that he is,
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continued support of Little League
Baseball in Grand Bahama".


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TUESDAY
APRIL 18
2:00am Community Page/1540 AM
11:00 Immediate Response
12:00 ZNS News Update
12:05 Immediate Response Cont'd
1:00 Tourism Today
1:30 2005 Bahamian Music &
Heritage Festival Exuma
2:30 Fun
3:00 Durone Hepburn
3:30 Sid Roth
4:00 Usa Knight & The Round
Table
4:30 Cybernet
4:58 ZNS News Update
5:00 Gillette World Cup 2006
5:30 Bahamian Things: Easter
Special
6:00 Bahamian Things
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
8:00 Bahamas Coastal Awareness
8:15 Dolphin Encounter: Sea
Ranger
8:30 Island Life Destinations
9:00 Da'Down Home Show
10:00 Caribbean Newsline
10:30 NewsNight 13
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30amCommunity Page 1540 AM


I


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~i-.-


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~~ "
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~lj~d~.~prs~:







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6 TUESDAYAPRIL 18 2006


A free trade agreement between


* By Sir Ronald Sanders
(The writer is a business exec-
utive and former Caribbean
diplomat who publishes widely
on small states in the global
community).


(w


U S Trade Representa-
tive, Robert Portman,
met Trade Ministers of the
Caribbean Community (CARI-
COM) countries on April 12th
giving rise to speculation that a


Free Trade Agreement (FTA)
between the US and CARI-
COM countries might be in the
offing.
No statement had been
issued from the meeting after it
was held. Therefore, whether


or not a FTA was formally
mooted remains a matter of
speculation.
In any event, a meeting
between Mr Portman and
CARICOM trade ministers was.
long overdue. The US is the
Caribbean's biggest trading
partner in both goods and ser-
vices, and it is vital that a keen
awareness of the problems fac-
ing the economies of CARI-
COM. countries should be
understood at the highest levels
of the US government.
For, if the US is disposed to
doing so, it can lead action in
the World Trade Organisation
(WTO) and in the internation-
al financial institutions, such
as the IMF and World Bank,
that could accord CARICOM
countries treatment that is spe-
cial and different from the
rules that apply to larger coun-
tries.
Similarly, Mr Portman should
be made aware that if the US
government were to offer
CARICOM a FTA, it should
not be on the basis of reciprocal
treatment.

CARICOM countries
would require that
such an FTA grants them duty
free access to the US market
equal to Canada and Mexico
(under the North American


in -i ht_ _. v

WORLD VI..


Free Trade Agreement) while
giving them time to adjust their
economies to allow US goods
full reciprocity.
Also, the US would have to
consider the establishment of
some mechanism for compen-
sating CARICOM economies'
for the disruption they will
experience from the unfettered
importation of US goods and
services.
Convincing the US govern-
ment that CARICOM countries
need special treatment is not
easy.
Bureaucrats tend to look at
the traditional criteria, such as
per capital income, for deter-
mining the health of
economies. On these criteria,
except for Guyana which is an
acknowledged Highly Indebt-
ed Poor Country, CARICOM
countries come out as middle
income.
Therefore, it will take more
than one meeting with Mr Port-
man to generate empathy with
the vulnerability of small


If the US is disposed to doing
so, it can lead action in the
World Trade Organisation
(WTO) and in the international
financial institutions, such as
the IMF and World Bank, that
could accord CARICOM coun-
tries treatment that is special
and different from the rules
that apply to larger countries.
I -f


i
* 9'

I.-


n SIR Ronald Sanders ,

Caribbean economies and. the i:;,"
limitations that size imposes. .


his problem may be-,
Sfurther complicated by '
the fact that in 1995 both
Jamaica and Trinidad & Toba-
go had indicated their willing-
ness to join the North American -
Free Trade Area (NAFTA)
with Canada, Mexico and the"
US. It could be argued that, if
these two countries were pre-
pared to join NAFTA eleven
years ago, they should be ready'.
now to.join an FTA with the
US. :
Of course, should Jamaica
Sand Trinidad & Tobago make .
such a decision now, the impli -
cations for the embryonic :'
Caribbean Single Market
(CSM) would be quite serious;i -
so serious, as to render it worth-
less.
In any event; there has been'
such a strong commitment to
: the CSM by the governments '
of Jamaica and Trinidad &i
Tobago that it is most unlikely 1h -,that such a fractious-develop- '''
.ment would occui:'Itlis much .:,i.


Registration/Networking
Invocation


Inlroducton/ Moderatois



Welcome Remarks




GLOBALIZATION AND THE SMALL BUSINESS

COFFEE BREAK
DEVELOPING A WINNING BUSINESS
"Aq Overview"

"Planning the Business"

"Semfl & Medium Enterprise Flnadng"


Prayer and National Anthems
Philip Simon
(ExffLue ve Diretin. Bahoama (hambehr (O Commerne)
Greg Floyd
(Polikal Eminomk Officer US Embo.o)
Tonya Wright, Presideni
(Boahamas Chmbe of Commimrce)
K. Neville Adderly, Chairman
(Bfohafoa Developmpenr Bok)
H.E. John Rood. Ambassado
rU.S Embassy Bahamai)
Asher Epstein
(Managing Director Dingman Center For Entrepreneurship University of Maryland)


K. Neille Adderley, Chairman
(Bahamas DevelopmenI Bank)
Philip Stubbs
Managing Panner (Erns! & Young)
Clement Fosaer,
Manoger (Small BuslnOes Division S0otia Bank Ltd.)


LUNCHEON PRESENTATION
"The Role of Government in Entrepreneurial Development & The Bahamas Domestic Investment Boqrd"
Hon. Vincent Peet
Minister of Financial Services and Investments
Closing
RECEPTION (by invilaotin only)


THE A-ZS OF FRANCHISING


John P. Hayes, Ph.D.
(Hayes Worldwide.com/ Hayes Marketing Services)


COFFEE BREAK


EXECUTIVE ROUNDTABLE -


PANEL DISCUSSION


"Doing Business, Doing Business In The Bahamas lessons Learned!"
Nettka Syrmoneffe, Different of Abaca/ Barefoot Beach Retreat
Dionisio D'Aguilar, Superwash
Marion Johnson, VP Small Business Association


Closing


For Tickets and More Information Phone: 322-2145 or email: bahamaschamber@coralwave.com

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Buller & Sands
Member of The Burns House Group of Companies
presents


2 pm opm
Saturday, April 22nd 2006
Poop Deck, Sandyport, West Bay Street


Artwork and live painting
by:

Antonius Roberts
Andret 3ohn
Chan Pratt
3ohn BeAdle
3onathan Bethel
Kevin Cooper...


Featuring Wines
from:

Kendell l ckson
Dccobs Creek
Wente Vineylards
Bella Serm
eedcliffe.. eind ItIcny
others


The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce



Business Development Seminar


WON


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I I DAY


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F_






TUESDAY, APRIL 18, 2006, PAGE 7


THF TRIBUNE


the US and CARICOM?


In reality, the majority of
CARICOM countries have no
great level of exports to the US;
their imports are far more.
And, they stand to lose both
revenues and businesses in a
FTA with the US unless
advantageous terms, including
non-reciprocity over an agreed
period, are negotiated up
front.


more likely that unity will pre-
vail among CARICOM coun-
tries in their dealings with the
US on trade.
What is driving ambition in
some CARICOM quarters for
an FTA with the US is the con-
clusion of a FTA between the
US and Central America plus
the Dominican Republic.
There is a fear that CARI-
COM products will lose market
share to the Central Americans
and the Dominican Republic
whose goods will enter the US
duty-free once the agreement
comes into full force.

here is legitimacy in
such a fear for some
CARICOM countries, but not
all. Those who now export
goods to the US in competi-
tion with Central America, the
Dominican Republic and Mex-.
ico have a reason to fear. But,
in reality, the majority of
CARICOM countries have no
great level of exports to the
US; their imports are far
more. And, they stand to lose
both revenues and businesses
in a FTA with the US unless
advantageous terms, including
non-reciprocity over an agreed
period, are negotiated up
front.
While this discussion is taking
place, CARICOM countries are



e In brief


Holloway

arrest has

islanders

wondering

about ID


* ARUBA
Oranjestad
AN announcementt that
police made an arrest in the dis-
appearance of teenager Natalee
Holloway left many islanders
wondering Sunday who the sus-
pect is and whether the
arrest marked a real break-
through in the almost year-old
case, according to Associated
Press.
Aruban authorities would
only say late Saturday that the
person arrested is 19 years old
and has the initials "GVC." In
Aruba, when an arrest is
announced, officials usually
release only a suspect's initials,
and not'a full name.
Antonio Carlo, attorney for
Dutch national Joran van der
Sloot, who was arrested last
year but then released for lack
of evidence, said he hoped the
new arrest would shed light on
what happened to Holloway, an
honors student from Mountain
Brook, Alabama, who disap-
peared on May 30. It was the
final night of the 18-year-old's
high school graduation trip to
this Dutch Caribbean island.
Holloway's father, Dave Hol-
loway, said Sunday he has been
informed of the arrested per-
son's identity but did not rec-
ognize the name.
Mariaine Croes, a spokes-
woman for the public prosecu-
tor's office, said on Saturday
that Aruban authorities were
not prepared to disclose why
the person was arrested or how
the arrest was linked to the Hol-
loway case.


actually engaged in negotiations
with the EU on Economic Part-
nership Agreements (EPAs). In
these negotiations, CARICOM
countries partner with the
Dominican Republic in the
Caribbean as well as African
and Pacific states to constitute
the ACP.
The partnership in the ACP
places the Caribbean in a better
position to negotiate with the
EU than if the region were con-
ducting the negotiations
alone. In this sense, more
favourable terms may be wrest-
ed from the EU than might be
achieved in bilateral negotia-
tions between the US and
CARICOM countries for an
FTA.
And, since the US will insist
upon trading terms that are no
less favourable than those which
CARICOM countries grant to
the EU, it would make sense to
complete the EU negotiations
before turning to the US.
In the meantime, time and
effort should be spent in
Washington educating opin-
ion makers in government
departments and in the Con-
gress of the kind of FTA
between CARICOM and the
US that would strengthen their
relationship and give benefits
to the region.
Responses to: sronald-
sanders29@hotmail.co ....,


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51,






PAGE 8, TUESDAY, APRIL 18, 2006


Local churches re-enact


* S'. iM -\ I'HE-\S Plaer% re-enacted the Passion during lih Gutud I [n:id
Service. A series of solo sections were also performed during the drainatis.mli,,n
by Kervinique Fergurson, Catherine Archer, Kirk Seymour and Lawit.lc
Antonio. The play was directed by Mrs Iris Finlayson and narrated by P:,rite
Francis. Pictured here is the entire cast after the production.
(Photo: Anthony Longley/St. Matthew's Communicair,11n i
I -


An account has been opened
at First Caribbean Bank,
Palmdale, account #200631415
c/o Gloria Bethell for Mr. Louis
Bethell of Johnson Road
Estates to assist in medical
expenses. Any donation made
will be greatly appreciated.
Thank you for your prayers
and support and may God
continue to bless you.
THE FAMILY


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E A DRAMATISATION of
the Passion of Jesus was put on
by St. Matthew's Players on
Good Friday, at the historic
Parish. In this photo, Mr Horatio
Bannister plays Jesus and is
escorted into the Judgment Hall
by soldiers (Mr Tommy Treco
and Mr Carlton Darling).
(Photo: St. Matthew's
Communications)


* MARY the mother of Jesus (in blue) is played by Jackie Myck-
lewhyte and is comforted by John, played by Mr. Robert Elliott. The
other Mar), played by Mrs Loretta Burrows, stands at the foot of the
cross. St. Matthew's Players presented the Passion of Jesus in a
dramatisation on Good Friday.
.. (Photo: St. Matthew's Communications)


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THE- -RIBUNE


TU ES DAY, AP R IL 18, 2006, 'PAG E 9


_--- -I~L


A . F A I TH M IN I STRIP I -N I ERN Ti(-)N U


t -- ~k








THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, TUESDAY, APRIL 18, 2006


LOA NW


Griffin calls on public to ensure



protection of nation's children


* By Bahamas Information
Services
MINISTER of Social Ser-
vices and Community Devel-
opment, Melanie Griffin, has
called on Bahamians to rally
together to ensure the care and
protection of children through-
out the Bahamas.


Minister Griffin said one way
of ensuring this happens is
through the strengthening of
families, who are the "back-
bone" of the nation.
"We cannot dismiss the fact
that, apart from the family, the
* schools, the churches and the
community at large share the
responsibility for the protection


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of children," Mrs Griffin said.
"I therefore call on all of the
nation's gatekeepers doctors,
lawyers, teachers, pastors, law
enforcement officers, nurses,
social workers, guidance coun-
sellors, friends, neighbours, the
judiciary, caregivers in child
care institutions and parents -
to heed the call.
"It is imperative that all mem-
bers of society heed this call if
we are to arrest the social ills
facing our country."
Mrs Griffin said the govern-
ment will take the lead in pro-
tecting the natiort's children by
bringing new legislation to par-
liament that will, among other
things, increase the penalties
that are currently in place for
persons found guilty of acts of
cruelty to children.
She said the provisions
included in the proposed legis-
lation will "substantially
increase" both the fine and the
term of imprisonment for per-
sons convicted of those
offences..
The proposed legislation will
also give magistrates the power
to impose supervision orders in
cases where parents are having
difficulty controlling their chil-
dren.
Under such an order, children
will be placed under the super-
vision of the Department of
Social Services while remaining
at home.
Mrs Griffin said "certain
expectations" will be imposed
on both the child and the par-
ents while the order is in force.
Magistrates will also have the
authority to impose an order
requiring parents and the child
to attend counselling sessions
and parenting classes once a
child is found guilty of an
offence in juvenile court.
The proposed legislation will
make it mandatory for parents
of the affected children to'
attend parenting classes as a
means of improving the home
environment in advance of the
child's return home.
Mrs Griffin said child protec-
tion and ensuring children are


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* MELANIE Griffin


safe are issues that cannot and
should not be taken lightly. She
said perpetrators continue to
develop new and innovative
ways to exploit and harm chil-
dren.
"Hence, it is essential for
partners in the fight to stay one
step ahead of them. Continu-
ous dialogue and the sharing of
information are two of the
means by which this is done,"
she added.
Mrs Griffin said parents and
guardians are entrusted with the
responsibility of caring for their
children and providing them
with food, shelter, love and pro-
tection. She said they are also
entrusted with ensuring that
their children receive medical
care, attention and education.
"Unfortunately, we know
that not all parents treat this
entrustment of their children
seriously," the minister said.
"Our life experiences make up
the sum total of who we are. If
our childhood experiences have
been positive and nurturing,,
these will positively influence
how we view ourselves and
relate to other persons.
"However, for many of our
children, the childhol.id e\pe i-
ences are no.t L'-ood -fid nl 'r
result in ni.l.ldjiiti.d hI..!Ii..
and angry young persons and
adults, which can manifest itself
on our streets," she added.
Minister Griffin said the psy-
chological maltreatment can
have a long-term negative
impact on children. She encour-
aged parents and guardians to
refrain from practising this type
of abuse.
"The repeated rejection and
humiliation of children, constant


negative communication, the
withholding of love and
affection and the ultimate
destruction of a child's self-
esteem, all contribute to the
problem," Mrs Griffin said.
"The abuse and neglect
children often suffer at the
hands of their parents can
often result in scars that last
a lifetime," she added.


0 In brief


Woman-

charged'

following

stabbing

* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
FREEPORT A 24-yairould
Freeport woman was charged
in the Eight Mile Rock,'Magis-
trate's Court with causing griev-
ous harm in connection with a
stabbing incident at Lewis Yard.
Melissa Russell, a resident of
Cool Breeze Apartmne.nts,
appeared before Magistrate
Debbye Ferguson. ,
She was not required.to enter
a plea to the charge, which is
an indictable offence. '
It is alleged that on A]pfil 7,
Russell stabbed Rayinoand
Rolle, 26, of Piider Pifnt,' at
the Short 'N Sassy Clothing
Store at Lewis Yard.
Russell was represented,by
lawyer Carlson Shurla d,. She
was granted $6,000 bail with
sureties. The matter was
adjourned to July 12 for a pre-
liminary inquiry.


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TUESDAY, APRIL 18, 2006, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


0'ALEW


Traffic

accidents

RfPORTS coming into the
newsroom late yesterday
evening indicated that there
were two traffic accidents
involving injuries on the
Toriique Williams-Darling
Highway.
poJice were not able to give
any further details as traffic
officers were still on the
scene.



Pinewood

FROM page one

'Pinewood Gardens is still
'in shock following the killing
of the young father-to-be
known locally as "Sharky".
His girlfriend Shakira is six
months pregnant and the
Couple were said to be plan-
ning marriage later this year.
Neighbours of the Bethel
family have accused police
of shooting an innocent man
incold blood.
Last night, the community
said new witnesses who had
not been interviewed by
police were ready to come
'forward. "These witnesses
Swill have a material effect on
what the police have to say,"
the source claimed.
"The police crime scene
people did not properly
investigate the crime scene.
They did not interview a
number of witnesses to the
killing. We have been beg-.
ging for there not to be a cov-
er-up..
"We have made it clear to
police that their preliminary
conclusions can't stand. And
we have told them that we
will db everything we can to
ensure that witnesses are
brought forward for inter-
view tomorrow."
The source said there were
real fears in Pinewood that
.a cover-up was underway.
But police knew, he said, that
their own rules were broken
when a shot was fired at a
Reversing car.


Man cnrtial

A.GRAND BAHAMA
mah.wvas airlifted to New
Providence in critical con-
dition following a traffic
accident on Friday.
Edward Cooper, 44, of
Mathbr Town, was ejected
'from his vehicle after it
crashedd into a tree and
overturned on Sea Horse
Road.
According to reports, the
accident occurred around
1.35pm. on-Easter Friday
near Windsor Place involv-
ing a 1998 Ford Taurus
(licence 30740)
driven by Isaiah Strachan,
'3. of Dragon Plaza, and a
white Chevy Truck (licence
4518) driven by Cooper.
Both vehicles were trav-
elling south on Sea Horse
Road when they collided.
Cooper's truck skidded'
out of control on to the
median and crashed into a
tree and overturned.
He was taken to Rand
Memorial Hospital and lat-
er airlifted to Princess Mar-
garet Hospital in Nassau.
Mr Strachan was not
injured and his vehicle was
slightly damaged.
Police are investigating.


l----


FROM page three Inmates


On the bus, Parcoi described how
once again Farrington attempted to
keep officers from harming them,
as they were already subdued. How-
ever, Parcoi testified, Farrington
was not able to protect him from a
Defence Force officer who forced
his way to the back of the bus and,
using a window to prop himself
against, proceeded to kick him
repeatedly in the face.
While this was going on, Parcoi
said he was able to catch a glimpse
of prison officers Sargent and Sandy
Mackey talking outside the bus. He
told the court that he knew some-
thing was not right, and he became
more fearful when he saw Officer
Mackey board the bus with a gun.
When asked by Magistrate Linda
Virgill about this fear, he replied
that he was afraid because, through-
out the ordeal, he had never seen
Officer Mackey with a gun.
Only Officer Sargent, he said, had
a gun.
He went on to describe how
Mackey came to the back of the bus
with an angry look on his face,
pointed the gun at Bowe's head,
then lifting it from Bowe's direc-
tion, aimed and fired a shot into
Neil Brown's chest.
The emotional testimony that
followed had Parcoi describe the
"Uh!" sound made by Brown upon
being hit and his attempts to plead
with Mackey for his own life. He
said he reminded Mackey how they
used to play basketball together,
only to be told: "This ain't no time
for reasonin'."
He informed the magistrate that
Mackey must have changed his
mind about shooting him and began,
instead, to gun-butt him.
After listening to the testimony
of Parcoi, questions from the jurors
turned, among other things, to the
hacksaw blades and the incidents
of drinking and smoking that took
place .on the night of the escape.
In addition to associating Princi-
pal Officer Van Johnson with sup-
plying hacksaw blades to the pris-
oners,' Parcoi also said that Neil
Brown pointed to Officer Johnson
as the source of the other contra-
band goods.
S He said that on or around
December 15, both he and Neil
Brown had been in possession of a
quarter pound of marijuana, which
they used up until they escaped on
January 17.
The magistrate questioned Par-
coi next, and her first question was:
"Were you the mastermind?"
"No ma'am," Parcoi said.
"When I came from D block to
C block it was already in the mak-
ing."
However, Parcoi's testimony
alluded to Brown as the master-
mind. ,. he upp's,-dJi knew the
officers assisting %tiih the breakout.
Before leaving the stand, Parcoi
told the magistrate how officers beat
him and broke his leg when he first
returned from the hospital, leaving
him to lie in pain before police Chief
Supt Marvin Dames ordered med-
ical attention for them.
He told of being showered by
an Officer Campbell with a bucket
of urine and faeces and being left
naked in the excrement for a full
week.
"Are they still beating you?" the
magistrate wanted to know.
"No, your honour," Parcoi said,
"they changed they tactics now."
He told the magistrate that the offi-
cers did not beat them anymore. He
said: "Now we in a cell where we
can't get any ventilation."
"Rolle tell us this for our pro-
tection," Parcoi continued, "but I
believe this is to give us a slow
death. They refuse to let our people
purchase water for us. One week
we went four-and-a-half days with-
out water."
Parcoi ended his testimony by
telling the court that he is aware of
the abuse he will receive because
of the testimony that he gave.
He said this is a horrible situa-
tion for him, but "I just pray to the
Lord to just be with me still."
Corey Hepburn was next on the
stand, and he too said that Brown
had informed him of the escape
plans. He said he agreed to take


part as long as no-one had to get
hurt.
One of the two prisoners, he
said, went to the extent of getting
the officer on the phone and having
him come by their cell to hang out.
He identified the officer as Sergeant
Sands.
He said he went along with the
escape plans until, in the darkened
cell block, he saw blood around
Deon Bowles. Originally, when he
saw the men attempting to tie
Bowles up, he said he thought that
he was one of the officers working
with the prisoners.
However, knowing that this was
not what he bargained for, Hepburn
said he ran.
As a part of the plan, Hepburn
said, the doors would have already
been opened by the officers on the
shift so there was no problem for
him leaving the building.
Yet, despite the seriousness of
the matter at hand, parts of Hep-
bum's testimony added a bit of com-
ic relief to proceedings darkened by
controversy and contradictions.
When asked by the court about
his nicknames, Hepburn said that
some called him "Cat," while the
news media called him "Kangaroo."
When asked by Magistrate Virgill
which he preferred, he told her that
he would prefer to be called
"Angel."
After hearing about the drug use
that took place on the night of the
escape, Magistrate Virgill asked
Hepburn if he was also high, to
which he answered "No."
When the magistrate asked him
if he smoked marijuana, Hepburn
told her yes, but he said that nei-
ther Brown nor Parcoi sent him any
on that night, seeing that he was on
another part of the block.
The magistrate wanted to know


if this upset Brown and, half smiling,
he told the magistrate that he was in
fact mad that they did not send him
anything to smoke, but had got over
it since.
Hepburn expressed his anger for
being put on death row, when he
was only imprisoned for armed rob-
bery.
He felt that if he were not placed
on death row, he would have never
been caught up in the escape. Hep-
bur said he was not supposed to be
in there in the first place and asked
officials on many occasions why he
was there and if he could be moved
off death row.
Before leaving the stand, Hep-
burn told the court that he was sor-
ry for breaking out and that on
many occasions he wanted to turn
himself in, especially after he
learned that Bowles had been killed
that night.
However, he knew what would
have happened to him if he turned
himself in at that time. He said that
he never intended for anyone to get
hurt and said that he and Bowles
were like family.
He stated that Bowles was one of
the few officers he could talk with
and who came by to talk with him.
After he wrapped up his testi-
mony, the next prisoner, Forrester
Bowe took the stand but was
advised by his representatives not to
testify until such time as he could
speak to counsel.
Bowe's family representatives
held a press conference after the
proceedings asking that all of the
prisoners be allowed to have visits
by counsel so that they can be guid-
ed through the proceedings, some-
thing they said prison officials are
not allowing.
The magistrate granted the
request, but informed the prisoner
and his representatives that he
would have to testify when the court
resumes on Wednesday at 10am.


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making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
:If:so,call us on 322-1986 .-
.andi share your story.


family guardian's calendar photo contest

a celebration of nature
14 winning entries will appear in Family Guardian's 2007 calendar. Winning entries receive a gift certificate valued at $400 each. Entry deadline is May 31, 2006
RULES
1 Family Guardian's Annual Calendar Photo Contest is open to all photographers. The title for the company's 2007 calendar will be
"A CELEBRATION OF NATURE". Photographs may be of any subject (animate or inanimate) or a scene which is a striking example of nature
as found in The Bahama Islands. All photographs must be taken in The Bahamas.
2 DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS MAY 31, 2006.
3 All entries are to be delivered to Family Guardian's Corporate Centre,Village and Eastern Road Roundabout, Nassau, between 9:00am
and 5:00pm weekdays only. Envelopes should be marked "Calendar Contest".
4 All entries must be accompanied by an official enitr form, available at any Family Guardian office or when published in the newspapers.
5 Only colour images in horizontal format will be considered. Images must be provided as 35mm film or digital images on CD. 35mm film can
be positive (slides) or colour negatives. Digital images must be of high quality (2700 x 2100 pixels or larger). Digital images showing
*.iq-ri ,:.t priulu mfaripulijiinr or cr.rmrpresion wilI be rplect[ed Tr. ernure the best colour reproduction, digital images should be supplied in
RAA TIFF or rorn l ualit.' JPEG jnai in mn orilnal colour loil mii ine i:amera uses (LAB or RGB). All entries must be supplied with prints
-.. which will be used in Ihe judging process. If lcie prini turiTnni.ed without 35mm slides or negatives or CDs will not be eligible.)
Tr .r ,;, h,,, r,, ar. 3ia' i -"'TJ utIt-':il'ri,,,il, ,-? r p' uR t r, 6 Of ir print. ...
.6 .ludinj lo e nilrine will Cb o..te3-i oi, tbejulv ineri l. composEiion colour. eoriinialiy and quality of photograph;'Preference will be given
:,. lauria pri :'r.lo'ri-d .rin i'.i nrjurjl sijre raliher arhn in capii.'!y The photographs selected will appear in Family Guardian's 2007
cal3erldr Tree ,aasiL 1ior li lU.ie gu will De Injal
7 All entries are ubrinrd at Irhe owner's rish It is ine company s nientiiori to return all entries in their original conditions. However, Family Guardian
wil: l 3asume no hlability Ior any loss. damage or dererioracion
:8 A gill certificate valued at S400 will be presented lor each of tie photographs selected. More than one entry from a single
pholograpner may be selec led Photograpnic credits wil De giv n in the calendar. The number of entries per photographer is limited to a maximum of
photos.
T. e 'l rne wimnnng phQiogrpris along in a311 pubica.3lion and reproduction rights attached thereto, become the property of Family Guardian and
a company reserves Ihe right to use such in the future r I i I I I I
yees o Famly Guardian. its allialed cimpanes or 2007 CALENDAR PHOTO CONTEST ENTRY FORM
mPAembers aR ncS B liji3ol
ev ou ly p i ed pno o no el le NAM E .......................... ......... ....................................... ......... ..... ..........
TEL BUSINESS ................................. HOME ....................................... I
I .O. BOX ..................... STREET ADDRESS ......................................... I
I agree that in the event one or more of my entered photographs is selected as a winner
in the 2007 Family Guardian Calendar Photo Contest it will become the property of Family
Guardian Insurance Co. Ltd., and I assign to Family Guardian all rights pertaining to its use
in any way whatsoever. I also confirm that the photos entered in this contest were taken in
S The Bahamas by the undersigned and have not been previously published.
SIGNATURE ........................................
DATE ................................. NUMBER OF PHOTOS ENTERED................
(maximum of 5)
Return with photos to: Calendar Contest, Family Guardian Corporate
I Centre, Village & Eastern Road Roundabout, Nassau, Bahamas
ENTRY DEADLINE: MAY 31, 2006
FAMILY


GUARDIAN
INSURANCE
I ~',COMPANY
-RA -C C : ET BA SB
,ERA CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.O. BOX SS 6232


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, TUEDAY, APRIL 18, 2006


YOUrl QQNhiIrtlQ 1i l p Q OIP9


Aoril 18. 2006


Vol.1 Issue XI


Presents AMC Reps With

s for Fun W alk BC presented Darren Basd
Ingraham, Atlantic Medical
a, ^ _-- representatives with 2 N
phones and twenty-five (2
S.- A Williams Darling Signature H
S the AMC Fun Walk.
Pictured (left to right):Alana I


Darren Bastian and Margo Gil


tian and Alana
Center tAMC)
lotorola Razr
5) $3 Tonique
Hello, cards for

ngraham AMC,
bson BTC.


BTC

Partnering

With

the

Youth!!

This past week BTC presented the
athletes of the Junior C.A.C Games with
backpacks and T-shirts for their trip to
the Guadalope. The team will be
traveling to Guadalope on Thursday,
April 13,2006,where they will compete
against a number of Caribbean
countries. BTC wishes the athletes all
the best and we will continue to
support the youth of our country as
they strive to bring home the gold!
Pictured are the Junior CAC athletes,
Mike Sands (B.A.A.A.) and Mrs. Margo
Gibson (BTC).


CARD
...... ., r:- bt--.... W-
Mv V ENDING
YOUR' CONNECTION TO THE WORLD


MIACHIES


The BTC Connection Radio show
TUNE IN & WIN!!!
, .- ;- "


N \


.4>


Episode 2 of the BTC Connection Radio
show was hot, hot, hot! Featured guests
were Mr. Antonio Stubbs, Acting Senior
Vice President & Chief Technology and
Information Officer (CTIO) and Mr. Henry
Romer, Acting Vice President of Northern
Bahamas. Also on hand was host Clint
Watson, and co-host Mr. Leon Williams,
Acting President & CEO of BTC.
Pictured is Mrs. Margo Gibson (right) of
BTC's Marketing & PR Department

:1 ; J



*xi -tfo-^


presenting the first prize trivia question
winner Mr. Shelton Lightbourn (left) with
a Motorola Razr. Other BTC Connection
radio show trivia question winners
included, Kelly Moss who also won a
Motorola Razr, L. Forbes winner of a nokia
phone and Bridgette Smith won a $20
Hello card.
Tune in every Tuesday night on ZNS
1540 AM from 8:30 pm to 9:30 pm as BTC
keeps you connected to the world.


I-, Li~ 8: I I I j \! t_. i ;~I
ii ;1'91, Ei ~- d n a I r.
ji ,~Y i: 8^, U~Ll.t ~C /" & ,I i L~


Brk r; -p -~ u, 1,'5
~i~g~,z,, iF~ebBA -, 41


f
-4
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TUESDAY, APRIL 18, 2006


SECTION



SMiami Herald BBUSiness, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

business@tribunemedia.net Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Toronto developer makes




$40-45m Royal Oasis bid


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
1A Toronto-based real'
estate developer is
among the leading
contenders to pur-
chase the Royal Oasis
Crown resort, sources have told The
Tribune, offering to acquire the still-
dosed property for between $40-$45
million.
SThe Barlow Group, a Canadian
headquartered real estate developer
that has the majority of its projects
located in Europe and Canada, is
understood to be in talks with


*Lehman Brothers' private equity arm
to purchase the troubled Grand
Bahama resort.
The Tribune understands that if its
bid is successful, the Barlow Group is
promising an investment of between
$175-$250 million, inclusive of the
purchase price, to revitalise the Roy-
al Oasis.
Other sources have confirmed to
The Tribune that the Barlow Group is
among groups who have spoken to
Lehman Brothers about the Royal
Oasis deal. Obie Wilchcombe, the
minister of tourism, also confirmed
previously that the Barlow Group was
among parties interested in the Roy-


al Oasis.
However, he indicated at that time
that the leading contender was a
three-strong consortium featuring
Westgate Resorts, the world's third
largest timeshare operator, Planet
Hollywood as casino operator, and
the Irish property development firm,
Harcourt Developments, which
already has interests in Freeport.
That consortium has promised a
$200 million investment to revive the
Royal Oasis, a property central to
Grand Bahama's fortunes as a
tourism destination, but which has
been closed since Hurricane Frances
struck the island in September 2004.


The resort's closure left about 1200-
1300 workers out of a job, and the
Barlow Group would attempt to
entice as many as possible back if it
was successful in buying the Royal
Oasis, sources said.
However, it is Lehman Brothers'
private equity arm, the de facto own-
er of the Royal Oasis as a result of the
mortgage and debenture it holds on
the property, that still holds all the
cards.
It .was previously said to be $5 mil-
lion apart in discussions with the
Westgate consortium, the latter offer-
ing $25 million while Lehman Broth-
ers held out for $30 million.


Yet the Barlow Group's offer
would take talks on price to a whole
new level, although a significant pro-
portion of that money will be required
by Lehman Brothers to pay off debts
owed by the Royal Oasis Group of
Companies and their owner, Drift-
wood (Freeport).
The Bahamas Hotel Industry Man-
agement Pension Fund and Bahamas
Hotel and Allied Industries Pension
Fund have both executed a judge-
ment to "take possession" of the
resort's assets, meaning that a por-

SEE page 5B


$500m investment

great development'

for North Eleuthera
U By A FELICITY INGRAHAM
STribune Business Reporter
and NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A PROPOSED $500 million investment for Royal Island
.will be "an excellent development" for North Eleuthera, the
area's MP told The Tnilbune, \\ ith a Heads of Agreement for
hIle prjiL u expected to be com-
pleted shortly. SEE p e
Vincent Peet, minister ofSE page 8B



Council backs ferry

system 'in principle'


* By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Business
Reporter ..
THE North Andros District
Council has approved "in prin-
ciple" 'plans to launch a daily
operating ferryboat system
between New Providence and
Andros.
Chief Councillor Brian
Cleare told The Tribune that


the approval came at the last
council meeting.
He said that during the next
meeting, councillors would
hae the opportunity to indi-
vidually speak on the proposed
plan.
A petition is being circulated
throughout Andros, and those
in support of the plan have

SEE page 4B


Water company's sales grow 80%


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
CONSOLIDATED Water, the BISX-
listed water producer, said sales at its exist-
ing Nassau-based Windsor plant have
increased by almost 80 per cent over prior
year levels in the first two months of 2006,
following the.facility's expansion in late
2005.
Writing in the company's 2005 annual
report, Jeffrey Parker, Consolidated
Water's chairman, acknowledged that the
company was likely to incur "some penal-
ties" in the 2006 first quarter as a result of
membrane fouling at the Windsor plant, a
problem that has plagued it continually.
The Windsor plant's capacity was


SJEFFREY PA R K E R ;


expanded from 2.6 million to 4.1 million
gallons per day in late 2005, as part of
Consolidated Water's agreement with the
Water & Sewerage Corporation over the
SBlue Hills reverse osmosis plant. The com-
pany is presently constructing that facility.
Mr Parker told shareholders, who
include the Bahamian investors holding
just over two million Bahamian Deposi-
tory Receipts (BDRs), that the over 55
per cent increase in the Windsor plant's
capacity might be retained for some time.
He wrote: "Construction is proceeding
at a feverish pace on our new 7.2 million
US gallons per day Blue Hills plant in

SEE page 5B


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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, APRIL 18, 2006 THE TRIBUNE


I~I:
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SUBS

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd is one of the leading Wealth
Managers in the Caribbean. We look after wealthy
private clients by providing them with comprehensive,
value-enhancing services.

For our newly created UBSI Quality Desk in Nassau
we are looking for a

CLIENT ADVISOR (QUALITY DESK)

In this challenging position you will be responsible
for:

* Advising clients (mainly from Latin America)
* Liaising with UBSI Financial Advisors
* Propsing investment solutions in the client's mother
tongue.

We are searching for a team player with experience
in international wealth management, specializing in
the fields of customer relations and retention,
investment advice and portfolio management as well
as a solid education in Economics, Finance or a related
discipline. A proven track record in a comparable
position with a leading global financial institution
serving Latin American high net worth individuals,
excellent knowledge of investment products and
fluency in English as well as Spanish is essential. Any
other language would be a plus.

Interested? We look forward to receiving your
application.

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas


[UIDEITYARKT,,WRA


* By Fidelity Capital
Markets
IT was a slow trading week
leading into the long Easter hol-
idays, as only 11,298 shares
changed hands. The market saw
only four out of its 20 listed
stocks trade, of which two
advanced, one declined and one
remained unchanged.
The volume leader for the
week was Commonwealth Bank
(CBL), with 7,148 shares chang-
ing hands and accounting for 63
per cent of the total shares trad-
ed. The big advancer for the
week was FOCOL (FCL), up
$0.02 to close at its new 52-week
of $10.42. On the down side,
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) (BAB)
dropped $0.03 to end the week at
$1.15.
The FINDEX declined by 0.12
points for the week to close at
614.11.
COMPANY NEWS
Abaco Markets (AML) -
For the 2005 fourth quarter,
AML posted a net income of
$95,000 compared to a loss of
$646,000 for the comparable
period last year.
Sales increased by 12 per cent
to total $25.4 million, compared
to $22.7 million year-over-year.
AML management has attrib-
uted the quarter's strong per-
formance to improved prof-
itability in all areas of operations,
with the exception of the Abaco
operations.
During the 2005 fourth quar-
ter, the sale of AML's Dunkin'
Donuts franchise also took place
for an estimated $300,000. While
the positive 2005 fourth quarter
results were welcomed by
AML's shareholders, there were
a few large non-cash gains
reflected in this figure, the net
effect of which cannot be deter-
mined until the company releas-
es full financial statements for
the quarter.
Bahamas Property
Fund (BPF) -
For the year ending 2005, BPF


posted net income of $3.8 mil-
lion, representing an increase of
$297,000 or 8.6 per cent over
2004.
Total revenue increased by
$491,000 or 8.7 per cent to total
$6.1 million. Reflected in total
revenue is a $1.7 million non-
cash gain from the appreciation
of BPF's investment properties.
Operating expenses rose by
$224,000 or 14 per cent to total
$1.8 million. The jump in oper-
ating expenses was primarily due
to $173,000 for maintenance
costs and a $194,000 increase in
provision for doubtful accounts.
Earnings per share increased by
$0.13 to total $1.57, while Net
Asset Value was $11!16 as at
December 31, 2005.
FirstCaribbean
International
Bank (Bahamas)
Limited (CIB) -
For the 2006 first quarter, CIB
posted net income of $29.2 mil-
lion, which represents an
increase of $5.5 million or 23 per
cent over the same period last
year. Net interest income rose
by $4.7 million to total $35.3 mil-
lion, while non-interest income
increased by $783,000 to total
$11.1 million.
Operating expenses for the
2006 first quarter increased by
$658,000 to total $16.5 million.
The increase was largely due to
higher employee expenses.
Total assets for the 2006 first
quarter stood at $3.6 billion, rep-
resenting an increase of $318 mil-
lion or 9.7 per cent year-over-
year.
CIB's management has attrib-
uted this increase to the strong
growth in its loan book. Total
loans grew by $502 million to
total $2.2 billion, with residen-
tial mortgages and business loans
accounting for $448 million of
the increase.
Earnings per share for the
2006 first quarter grew by $0.046
to $0.243, compared to $0.197
for the equivalent'period last
year.


The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 614.11 YTD 11.27%


BISX CLOSING
SYMBOL PRICE


AML
BAB
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB'
CBL
CHL
CIB
DHS
FAM
FCC
FCL
FIN
ICD
JSJ
KZLB
PRE


$0.59
$1.15
$0.70
$7.10
$10.70
$14.00
$1.26
$9.20
$10.00
$1.69
$11.50
$2.45
$6.21
$1.15
$10.42
$10.99
$9.50
$9.09
$7.68
$10.00


CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
CHANGE


$-
$-0.03
$-
$-
$- '
$-
$-
$-
$0.01
$-
$-
$-

$-


$-0.06
$-


0
1950
0
0
0
0
0
0
7148
0
0
1000
0
0
1200
0
0
0
0
0


-19.18%
4.55%
0.00%
1.43%
2.88%
9.80%
0.00%
-3.66%
9.77%
3.05%
5.70%
12.90%
2.64%
0.00%
3.68%
0.83%
-4.52%
0.44%
12.12%
0.00%


flE1'DEND/AGM NOTES:


Commonwealth Bank (CBL) declared an extraordinary
dividend of $0.12 per share payable on April 28, 2006, to all
common shareholders as at record date April 18,2006.

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) (BAB) declared a dividend of
$0.03 per share payable on April 28, 2006. to all common
shareholders as at record date April 13. 2006.

Consolidated Water Company (CWCO) declared a div-
idend of $0.012 per share payable on May 5,2006, to all com-
mon shareholders as at record date March 31, 2006.
Family Guardian Insurance Company will hold its Annu-
al General Meeting on May 4. 2006, at 4pm at the British
Colonial Hotel, Bay Street, Nassau. Bahamas.




International Markets

FOREX Rates
Weekly %Change

CAD$ 1.1508 0.15
GBP 1.7525 0.54
EUR 1.2113 ,0.15

Commodities
Weekly %Change

Crude Oil $69.45 3.03
Gold $600.10 1.13

International Stock MarketIndexes:'
Weekly %Change

DJIA 11,137.65 0.16
S & P 500 1,289.12 -0.49
,NASDAQ 2,326.11 -0.55
Nikkei 17,199.15 -2.07


Immigration officers.
The Ministry said: "This would
cost more than $340 million over
five years, or more than $68 mil-


lion a year, an amount that is sim-
ply unaffordable given the cur-
rent revenue base of the econo-
my."


THE Government fears, that
failure to resolve the dispute over
salaries with the Bahamas Union
of Teachers (BUT) in this Budget
year could increase the 2006-2007
fiscal deficit, with the union's cur-
rent proposal costing more than
$56 million.
A statement from the Ministry
of Public Service issued yester-
day said failure to resolve the
issue of salaries before this Bud-
get year ends would "certainly
lead to an increase in the fiscal
deficit for next year".
This was because funds allo-
cated in this year's Budget would


have to be approved, in addition
to payments for the 2006-2007
year, the Ministry said.
It contrasted the $56 million
package demanded by the BUT
!for its 3,500 members with the
$42 million minimum, in phased
increases, that the remaining
17,000 public service workers will
receive over the next five years.
The Ministry said that if the
Government granted the BUT its
proposed request, it would be
forced out of fairness to give sim-
ilar increases to other public sec-
tor workers, such as the police,
doctors, nurses, Customs and


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Featuring some of the finest musicians
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The Orchestra will perform music from the legends of jazz.
Guest vocal artists Anastacia Charlow and Duke Smith.
Also appearing Tap and Jazz dancers from Bahamas Dance Theatre
and Spoken Word Artists. Hosted by "Mr Jazz" Roscoe Dames.


The College of The Bahamas
Band Shell
Poinciana Drive
Doors open at 6:30 p.m.
Concert begins at 8:00 p.m.


Tickets. For ticket
Gala Hors d'OevresTasng $100 Information and


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Teachers demands



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General Admission $25
Students (with I.D.)- $15


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 213, TUESDAY, APRIL 18, 2006











THE T E T Y A


'Two pay cheques away





from total insolvency'


A s a financial
writer, I am
often asked by
strangers for
advice on 'how
to get rich'. My usual response
is that: "... in order to be rich,
you must first become profi-
cient in skills such as saving,
budgeting and investing."
Before I finish this sentence,
most persons move on to
something else or make their
exit... because it is not the
answer they want to hear.
Everybody wants a 'magic for-
mula' to financial success that
produces great gain, with no
pain.
The reality is that most per-
sons I know who did not inher-
it wealth, and achieved finan-
cial success (legally and hon-
estly), worked very hard and
made tremendous personal
sacrifices along the way.

Savings Rate

I do not know what the sav-
ings rate is in the Bahamas.
Like the rest of the world, the
Bahamas has become an


extremely materialistic society
where many persons live far
above their means financing
an unsustainable lifestyle with
increasing levels of consumer
debt. For years, colleagues in
the commercial banking sec-
tor have lamented the fact that
more and more new loans are
being taken out to refinance
and consolidate existing loans.
An unnamed 'politician
friend' of mine mentioned to
me during the last election
campaign that they were
shocked to discover the
amount of Bahamians (from
across all economic levels) who
were living two pay cheques
away from total insolvency.
What this meant was that if
these persons were not paid
for two consecutive 'months,
their entire financial situation
would collapse.
The household savings rate
is defined as the amount of
savings/investments as a per-
centage of disposable income.
For example, if your house-
hold earns $25,000 per year
and you saved or invested
$1,500, your savings rate for


that year would be 6 per cent.
In 2005, the household sav-
ings rate in the US was 0.8 per
cent (the lowest level it has
been since the Great Depres-
sion), which was well below
the Netherlands, Italy, Hun-
gary, Germany and France,
each of which have personal
savings rates of 10 per cent or
more according to the OECD
Fact Book 2005. Most coun-
tries in the Euro-zone have
personal savings rates that
average 10 per cent, and coun-
tries in East Asia boast savings
rates of 30-per cent or more,
with China and Singapore
exceeding 40 per cent.
This contrasts sharply with
the Bahamas, which is gener-
ally regarded as having a very
low household savings rate.
Hopefully, in the not too dis-
tant future, the Department of
Statistics will provide us with
some reliable numbers on a
regular basis.
Total Debt Service
Ratio (TDSR)

On the debt side, several
years ago the Central Bank
issued guidelines to commer-
cial banks suggesting that they
should refrain from granting
additional credit to individu-
als whose total debt service
ratio exceeded 45 pel 'cent of
their income.
TDSR is defined as the per-
centage of gross annual income
required to cover payments
associated with housing and all
other debts and obligations,
such as car loans and credit
cards.


Over the years, the 'rule of
thumb' suggested for the max-
imum TDSR has been creep-
ing upwards as the demand for
credit continues to grow expo-
nentially. The unintended
effect of a rapidly declining
savings rate and a rising TSDR
is that the average household's
financial position is weaken-
ing.
Seven Common
Financial Mistakes

Jim McWhinney, a financial
writer for investopedia.com,
wrote an article last year enti-
tled Seven Common Financial
Mistakes, in which he identi-
fied common financial mis-
takes and how to avoid them.
They are:

1. Excessive Frivolous
Spending
Great fortunes are often lost
one dollar at a time. It may not
seem like a big deal when you
pick up that double mocha
cappuccino, stop for a pack of
cigarettes, have dinner out or
order that pay-per view movie
but, remember, every little
item adds up. Just $25 per
week spent on dining out costs
you $1,300 per year, which
could have gone towards an

SEE page 9B


Financial


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LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


DEVANEY INVESTMENTS LTD.
VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 the Dissolution of DEVANEY
INVESTMENTS LTD. has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register
of Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissoluton was 3rd April 2006.


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LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


THETA STRATEGY FUND LTD.
VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 the Dissolution of THETA
STRATEGY FUND has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register
of Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissoluton was 25th January, 2006.
"


i~...:


TUESDAY, APRIL 18, 2006, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


Question andAnsWer Sessions
Thursday, April 20 at 6:00pm, College of the Bahamas, Classroom B27
Saturday, April 22 at 9:00am, Bahamas Chamber of Commerce, Nassau
TEL305.284.4607 9 mba@miami.edu # www.bus.miami.edu/grad


. ZL-l








PAF 4R TIIFSDflAY APRII 1R 2006


THE TRIBUNE,


Council backs ferry system 'in principle'


FROM page 1B


already signed on, he said.
"It will stimulate revenue
here, and it will create employ-
ment," said Mr Cleare.
He said the proposed ferry
system would be good for
trade between the islands
because, at present, it takes
Andros shop owners about a
week to receive goods from
New Providence. "This gives
them the opportunity to get
their goods every day," he said
of the ferry system.
Mr Cleare said he thought
it would also be good for "day
away" excursions for Bahami-
ans and international visitors,
thus having a positive eco-
nomic impact on Androsian
straw vendors, fishermen, taxi
drivers and other profession-
als on the island.
Mr Cleare added that the
Council plans to work closely
with attorney James Thomp-
son, the man behind the
scheme, and the Government,
and that a series of community
meetings would be held before
any final decision, is reached.
Meanwhile, Mr Thompson
has been advocating that the


proposed ferry system would
mean more than economic
stimulation on Andros. He said
it was a matter of national
urgency in the event of a cate-
gory five hurricane.
Mr Thompson, a native
Androsian, warned the Nation-
al Emergency Management
Agency (NEMA) that close
attention needed to be paid to
the nature of hurricanes and
the way the storms are evolv-
ing today.
He believes that by imple-
menting a ferry boat system,
persons in the capital could
evacuate to Andros, much like
the way Louisianians evacuat-
ed their state due to Hurricane
Katrina.
"I believe that for the first
time in our national history,
we are facing a national diffi-
culty," Mr Thompson told
those responsible for formu-
lating a national emergency
management plan.
"One of the liabilities of an
independent nation is that you
are responsible for your own
safety; no one from somewhere
is going to come to tell us how
to get it right. If we don't get it
right, many Bahamians may
possibly die. In other words,
there is nothing more serious


to government than the safety
of the public, particularly when
disaster is threatened.
"The notion of getting out
of Nassau to avoid being killed
is not yet in our way of think-
ing, and I suggest that if this
exists, then this is your greatest
challenge of preparedness -
and preparing the public is
your duty."
Mr Thompson said he felt
the new Disaster Preparedness
and Response Act accurately
dealt with category four or five
storms. But he said it did not
anticipate the evacuation of
New Providence.
Section 8 (2) (m), he noted,
provides for evacuation of an
area rather than the entire
island.
Mr Thompson said: "Go to
South Beach on the corner of
Blue Hill Road, and imagine
that high tide was 20 feet high-
er, and at the same time, tide
was 20 feet higher on Saunders
Beach, Prince George Wharf,
Yamacraw, and Lyford Cay.
All areas of New Providence
within that plane of 20 feet or
higher will be filled with sea
water at the same time. This
lasts for about six hours. In
other words, a good portion of
New Providence will be under


sea water and this includes any
shelter."
Mr Thompson also warned
that battening down houses are
"death traps" during category
five storms, and windows of
high rise buildings will be
blown out in those conditions.
He pointed to the recent sit-
uation in Australia, where he
said battening down homes
was not an option. Rather, per-
sons were evacuated totally
from certain areas and moved
to safer parts of the country.
In addition, he said homes
built to standards of with-
standing 125 miles per hour
winds may not be able to with-
stand winds like those that vis-
ited Australia at a rate of 180
miles per hour.
"We have prepared an evac-
uation plan for New Provi-
dence to Andros," said Mr
Thompson. "Therefore, my
challenge to NEMA is to
either adopt our plan or pre-
sent an alternative for the safe-
ty of the people. Andros is
large enough where you can
escape to the south if the hur-
ricane hit north or vice versa."
"We ought to know before-
hand what happens if evacua-
tion becomes mandatory to
save Bahamian lives."


Financial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information As Of:
13 April 200 6
BIX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES VISIT WVVW.BISXBAHAMAS.COIM FOR MORE DATA a INFORF.IATION
SBISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,420.38 / CHG 00.16 i "'CHG 00 01 / YTI 69.;7 YTD ?To 05.16
52 aK-.H i 52. k-Lo t S r eb,:el P re ..:,ur. C -lo,, e T.:.d ., C -:. C n -n-i r ,. .D .. 1 : E P I -ui. ir E.'-
0.95 0.59 Abaco rlarkels i0' 9 i1 :: *.' i:i -' i li1 :
10.70 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund' 10.70 10.70 0.00 1.568 0.360 6.8 3.36%
7.24 6.00 Bank of Bahamas 7.10 7.10 0.00 0.643 0.330 11.0 4.65%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.70 0.70 0.00 0.175 0.020 4.0 2.86%
1.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.26 1.26 0.00 0.105 0.060 12.0 4.76%
1.20 1.04 Fidelity Bank 1.15 1.15 0.00 0.070 0.050 16.7 4.35%
9.60 8.00 Cable Bahamas 9.20 9.20 0.00 0.565 0.240 16.3 2.61%
2.20 1.39 Colina Holdings 1.69 1.69 0.00 -0.067 0.000 NM 0.00%
10.00 8.33 Commonwealth Bank 9.99 10.00 0.01 7,148 0.861 0.490 11.6 4.90%
5.68 4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.79 4.82 0.03 0.091 0.045 52.9 0.94%
2.88 1.50 Doctor's Hospital 2.45 2.45 0.00 0.437 0.000 5.6 0.00%
6.21 4.02 Famguard 6.21 6.21 0.00 0.542 0.240 11.5 3.86%
10.99 10.40 Finco 10.99 10.99 0.00 0.738 0.540 14.9 4.91%
11.50 7.75 FirstCaribbean 11.50 11.50 0.00 0.874 0.500 13.2 4.35%
10.42 7.99 Focol 10.42 10.42 0.00 0.833 0.500 12.5 4.80%
1.27 1.15 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 -0.162 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.50 9.50 0.00 0.526 0.540 18.1 5.68%
9.10 8.22 J. S. Johnson 9.09 9.09. 0.00 0.572 0.560 15.9 6.16%
7.95 5.30 Kerzner International BDRs 7.68 .769', 0.01 0.134 0.000 57.3 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.585 4.9 5.85%
Fidelty Ov&r-Thi -Counter Securltie.
5 sk -.H i- 5 2 .L..'.B ; h, j, a L D rFr,.: .e-' I. :1 E-_ I. LI. i i E. iJ
13.25 12 25 Ban mar s Supermrark-- s 1-J 0 i l 1 0 i l.0*C 1 .1- -. J -
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0 54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.084 0.000 NM 0.00%
Colna Over-Tie-Counlter Securities
- 3 00 28 00 %BDAB 4 1 ,,I J ,-, 1 ,_,, ,_, ,,,, ,," .
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.25 14.25 '12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
060 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
5 ..L-H i ,. .:-. Fun. Namej Na '. ', TE,: L i, 1 1.21 r L i I ,3 :
1 261c. 1 2231 Col.na 1:r.-e, .larel Funa 1 261r.1.'
2.6662 2.2420 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.6570 **
2.3294 2.2214 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.329423**
1.1479 1.1006 Colina Bond Fund 1.147907***
FINDBX: CLOSE 614.05 I YTD 11 27% / 2005 26.09%'
Bi X ALL 'sH- i ,E irD E X 1 i, .,-. = I iC2 iiI -,": l il l:. I_ .. .l :'. : I .i : .. r ." :,
52wk-Hi Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelila
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
* AS AT MAR. 31, 2006/ *"" AS ATMAR. 31, 2006
- AS AT MAR. 31. 2006/ AS AT FEB. 28. 2006
TO TRADE CALL; CO..INA 242-502-7i00 1 FIDELITY 242-356-776


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


MAZE INVESTMENTS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above- named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 12th day of April 2006. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas,





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE



PECAN HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation), s,

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 12th day of April 2006. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


LALALOLO LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 12th day of April 2006. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator),






LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


MUSCANTINE VALLEY CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)




Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 12th day of April 2006. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an .
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


M&E Limited


TRAINEE DIESEL TECHNICIANS

WANTED


Applicants are invited for a limited number of positions available in a program
starting July 2006. HigihSthbhl and rBTVg"raduates, or anyone having a passion for
hands-on technical work is needed to train for the opportunity to work with
Caterpillar heavy equipment including generators, marine engines,etc.


/ Industry best 5 year Internship Program
V Overseas state-of-the-art training (2 4 months)
V Potential for growth
Safe working conditions
V Health & Pension benefits


Machinery & Energy Limited is looking for ambitious, diligent and enthusiastic
applicants. Graduates of this Internship Program will be qualified to analyze and
repair highly complex equipment. Applications are available at our office located on
1 College Avenue, Oakes Field next to C.C. Sweeting High School.


Email: apply(dme-ltd.com
Website: http://me-ltd.cat.com


I


YI VV'~ ''BUSINESS-


rt






TUESDAY, APRIL 18, 2006, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE


Toronto developer makes




$40-45m Royal Oasis bid


FROM page 1B
tion of the sales proceeds will
have to be used to settle the
sums owed to them by the
Royal Oasis, which in January
2005 amounted to $4.1 million.
Back in 2005, Mr Wilch-
combe had described the more
than $22 million owed by the
Royal Oasis to various credi-
tors including many govern-
ment and Grand Bahama Port
Authority agencies as a
"quagmire".
However, the insurance
claim from the 2004 hurricane


season has finally been settled,
enabling Lehman Brothers to
reduce its asking price for the
Royal Oasis to levels that have
interested potential buyers
such as the Barlow Group.
Apart from the $25 million
advanced to Driftwood to
enable it to acquire the Royal
Oasis, Lehman Brothers has
also invested at least $70 mil-
lion in renovating it.
The private equity firm is
said by sources to be waiting to
achieve the best sales price
possible, feeling it is in a posi-


tion where it can squeeze more
concessions from a govern-
ment facing a general election
within the next 15 months, and
which has set solving the Roy-
al Oasis "quagmire" as a pri-
ority. While Prime Minister
Perry Christie has twice hinted
at stripping Royal Oasis of its
casino licence, potentially the
property's most valuable asset,
in a bid to force Lehman
Brothers' hand, the threat has
never been followed through.
More aggressive measures
have been adopted by the pri-.


Water company's sales grow 80%


vate sector, in particular the
two hotel industry pension
funds and the Port Authority
Group of Companies. Grand
Bahama Power Company at
one stage was examining
whether to petition the
Supreme Court to appoint a
receiver for the Royal Oasis
Group of Companies, due to
the alleged non-payment of a
$500,000 debt.
Mr Wilchcombe previously
told The Tribune that the Gov-
ernment was also concerned
with ensuring that top-name
hotel and casino brands were
involved in any takeover of the
Royal Oasis.
He added that the Govern-


ment was seeking operators
who would maintain a long-
term presence in Grand
Bahama, and who had the
brand names, marketing and
distribution channels to attract
increasing numbers of tourists
to the island.
Describing the negotiations
surrounding the Royal Oasis
as "very, very fluid", Mr Wilch-
combe said: "We're in the
midst of negotiations right
now. It's a question of the sales
price, but we have active nego-
tiations."
Explaining that the Govern-
ment was seeking "the whole
package" from a buyer of the
Royal Oasis, Mr Wilchcombe


said: "Grand Bahama needs a
real push. A brand to draw
attention to Grand Bahama,
and give it that promotion in
the market.
"West End has Ginn,
Lucaya is doing pretty good.
The centre of Freeport needs
that engine to drive it, and if
we get the right player it
should create tremendous
opportunities for the people of
Grand Bahama."
The Government is looking
for a buyer that already has its
hotel and casino management
components, rather than one
that seeks to sign these agree-
ments once the purchase is
complete.


FROM page 1B
Nassau. Partial construction is
anticipated by late April, with
final completion expected,
essentially on schedule, in late
July 2006.
"In theory, final completion.
of the Blue Hills plant will
replace the temporary Windsor
plant expansion, but in view of
higher demand and new cus-
tomers coming on line, it is
possible that the increased
Windsor plant capacity will be
retained for some further peri-
od."
Penalties incurred as a result
of membrane fouling at Wind-
sor increased by 82 per cent in
2005, growing from $313,408
in 2004 to $571,349 in the 12
months to December 31, 2005.
The penalties result from fail-
ing to supply minimum water
volumes to the Water & Sew-
erage Corporation (WSC).
Mr Parker said: "We believe
that the causes of the mem-
brane fouling that has plagued
our Windsor plant operations
in Nassau have been identified,
and some necessary steps have
been taken to eliminate the
problem.
"No volume penalties were
incurred in December 2005,
although we expect some
penalties in the first quarter of
2006 while plant modifications
are completed.
"With additional capacity
available from the plant expan-
sion late last year, sales for the
first two months of 2006
exceeded prior-year levels by
almost 80 per cent."
Mr Parker said that despite
the membrane fouling prob-
lem, the additional revenue
generated by Windsor's expan-


sion had increased revenues
and pushed up full-year bulk
water revenues from the
Bahamian operation by 8.2 per
cent.
However, the increased
energy costs resulting from the
membrane fouling problem,
and high plant maintenance
costs in Nassau and Belize,
caused bulk water operating
profit to fall from 24.3 per cent
of revenues to 16.1 per cent of
revenues in 2005.
Part of the $1 million
increase in general and admin-
istrative expenses (G&A) Con-
solidated Water experienced
in 2005 came from the $6.8 mil-
lion BDR issue to Bahamian


investors, plus the expansion
of the Bahamian operations.
"In anticipation of the
Bahamas becoming our largest
market in 2006, coupled with
further business potential in
that Commonwealth, we
expanded and strengthened
out Waterfields' subsidiary's
Board and scheduled more fre-
quent meetings to monitor
progress on several business
fronts," Mr Parker said.
The Blue Hills plant is due
to be operational by the 2006
third quarter, with an estimat-
ed total construction cost of
$29 million. That is a 31.8 per
cent increase upon initial esti-
mates of $22 million.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that EMMA K FERNANDEZ OF P.O. BOX
F-43386, WEST END, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 18TH day of APRIL, 2006 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box F-
41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.


Insurance Executive
US$80,000 to US$100,000
Freeport/Anguilla
International boutique life insurance company catering to
the needs of high net worth individuals seeks senior level
insurance executive. Looking for all round experience at
the management level. Will oversee all aspects of the
application process, underwriting, issuing, and maintenance
of life and annuity policies. Offices in Freeport and Anguilla.
This position can be located in either location. Send resume
to: humanresources8751@hotmail.com


WINDERMERE HIGH SCHOOL





SATURDAY, MAY 6TH, 2006
9:00AM 12NOON

AT

The Bluff Primary School
Windermere High School
Green Castle School
Epworth Hall, Nassau.

Children presently in Grade 6 and above are eligible to
write exams for Grades 7-12.

Tel. 242-332-6105
(Monday Friday, 9am 3pm)


* I ~^


-- -I


TEACHERS AND SALARIED WORKERS
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LTD.

THE NOMINATIONS COMMITTEE

wishes to announce that applications are now being invited
from all qualified members who wish to be considered for
recommendation as candidates for the seats to become
available on either the Board of Directors or The Supervisory
Committee at the 29th Annual General Meeting to be held
on Saturday, May 20, 2006.

All members interested in serving in either capacity should
collect an application form from any office of the Teachers
and Salaried Workers Co-operative Credit Union Limited
offices in Nassau, Freeport and Abaco.

The qualification for each post is available upon request.

Completed applications, along with the other information
requested, should be returned to any of the offices on or
before the close of business on Friday April 28, 2006.

Any application, not fully completed or without the requested
supporting information, or received after the aforementioned
date will not be eligible for consideration.

"BIG ENOUGH TO SERVE,
SMALL ENOUGH TO CARE"


PROPOSAL FOR CUSTOMS


BROKERAGE SERVICE

The Water & Sewerage Corporation
invites proposal for the provision of
Custom Brokerage Services for three
years period commencing 1st June
2006. License Brokerage companies
interested in submitting a proposal
should collect a Customs Brokerage
package from the Purchasing Section
#87 Thompson Boulevard.


Proposal are to be submitted in sealed
envelope(s) marked confidential
addressed to THE ACTING
GENERAL MANAGER to be
delivered to the Purchasing Officer
unopened no later then Thursday 20th
April, 2006.


The Water & Sewerage Corporation
reserves the right to reject any or all
proposal.


I MONO"


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BUSINES









PAE .TUSA.A. 26 TH TB I'


H L


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ACCOUNTS FOR BEGINNERS I BUSINESS ETIQUETTE
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Days & Times: M/W 6 -8:00 PM Days & Times: Tue/Thur 6 8:00 PM
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UPHOLSTERY OR DRAPERY MAKING CREDIT & COLLECTIONS PROCEDURES
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Tuition: $225.00 Duration: 30 HRS Tuition: $225.00 Duration: 30 HRS

OTHER COURSE OFFERINGS
COMPUTER COURSES & WORKSHOPS CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL SECRETARY
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IN CASH, BY CREDIT CARD OR BANK CERTIFIED CHEQUE.
THE CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND EXTENSION SERVICES
AT THE NORTHERN CAMPUS OF THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
PROVIDING LIFELONG LEARNING FOR THE ENTIRE COMMUNITY
TELEPHONE: 352-9761; 351-3970 FAX: 352-6167


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Final Draff

KINGS
Script 2 Screevn


'I'


Produced By


CALLING ALL

/ ^ COB ALUMNI!

VOTE for the President of your Alumni Association this Thursday, 20th April, 2006 beginning at 5:30pm in the
Portia Smith Student Services Building. Please bring some form of JD.
MEET YOUR PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES...
DONALD L. SAUNDERS
Current' President of COB Alumni Association
Associate at Halsbury Law Chambers
Served as Vice President of The College of The Bahamas Union of Students (COBUS)
Graduated from COB in 1994 with an Associate of Arts degree in History
Completed a Bachelor of Laws (Hons.) at the University of Leeds, U.K. in 2000
Member of the Honourable Society of Lincoln's Inn
Called to the Bar of England, Wales and the Commonwealth of The Bahamas in 2001
Member of St. Christopher's Anglican Church
Married to Tiffany Saunders (nee Rigby) and has one daughter
CHERYL E. BAZARD
Partner, Cheryl E. Bazard Law Chambers
Former Regional Director of Compliance for First Caribbean International Bank
Former Counsel in The Office of Attorney General and Circuit Magistrate in night traffic and civil courts
Graduated from COB in 1987 with an Associate of Arts degree in History
Completed LLB (Hons.) at the University of Buckingham
Member of the Bahamas Association of Compliance Officers
Member of Salem Union Baptist Church
Married to Dr. Dante Bazard and they have three sons, Dante, Denzel and Diondre.
Other positions for which the alumni will vote are: Vice President, General Secretary, Assistant Secretary,
Treasurer and Public Relations Officer.




STAFF VACANCIES

International Languages and Cultures Institute
The College/University of The Bahamas has the following vacancies in the newly
established International Languages and Cultures Institute.

Instructor ESL and, French, or Spanish or Italian
The ideal candidate should have a Master's Degree in the subject or a related area,
native speaker competence in the foreign language and experience in teaching foreign
languages to adults. Knowledge of the American Council for the Teaching of Foreign
Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines would be an asset. Translation skills would
be desirous.

Part-time Instructors
Part time Instructors are needed in the following areas:
Spanish
French
German
ESL
Haitian Creole
Portuguese
Mandarin
Italian

The ideal candidate should have native speaker competence in the foreign language-.
and possess the minimum of a Bachelor's Degree in the language, although a master's
degree is preferred. Experience in the teaching of adults is mandatory.

The application deadline is April 28, 2006. To ensure full consideration, interested
candidates should submit a College of The Bahamas Employment Application Form,.
a comprehensive resume and up-to-date transcripts by April 28. To expedite the'
appointment procedure, applicants should request three referees to send references
under confidential cover directly to the address listed below.

Please visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs for more information as about The,,
College and to access The College's Employment Application Form.1,

Applications should be forwarded in confidence to:

The Director, Human Resources, The College of The Bahamas, Oakes Field Campus,:
P. O. Box N-4912, Nassau, Bahamas. Facsimile: (242) 302-4539. Email:
hrapply@cob.edu.bs



NOTICE


Change in Academic Policy

The College of The Bahamas is becoming a university. This transition will require
changes in policy, as the evolution progresses.
Students, potential students and interested members of the general public are
asked to note the following new academic policy:

It is no longer permitted to exit at the associate degree level from piogramrimes
that have been upgraded to the bachelor level. Students are advised, therefore,
that the option of exiting at the associate degree in business-related areas is no
longer available. Please check with your Academic Advisor to determine your
current status if this policy change affects you.

For further information contact the,
Office of Academic Affairs at 302-4309


~U~i~slu


I
I .


THE TRIBUNE BUSINE!!"'


PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, APRIIL18, 2006


/Y;CCL~Lki.


Jill AR










THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


TUESDAY, APRIL 18, 2006, PAGE 7B


i.E BA
* :-' *~ w "sr" 8 E


Visit our website at www.cob.ediu.bs


.tI~ J...k L IW~aw'i~r AJZJ.JJB1LVLL4L


CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES


"iCOMPUTER OFFERINGS SUMMER 2006

"COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
:Course Description: This course is for the beginner who knows very little about computers and does not
-understand how it works. This course covers the major computer concepts with extensive hands on practice
of various software using: (I) Microsoft Office Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii)
Microsoft Access Database Management.
:Pre-requisite: None
-Begins: Monday, 15 May 2006 6:00pm 9:30pm Section 01 (CEES)
t' ,trd,-,, 13 Mav 90l 1nn In 0 m 1 30nm Section 02 (CEES)


Duration:
Venue:
Tuition:


1aur Iay, vrly rvvu
9 weeks
CEES Computer Lab
$450.00


COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II
Course Description: This course covers the major advanced concepts with extensive hands on practice of
various software using: (I) Microsoft Office Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft
Access Database Management.

Pre-requisite: Computer Applications I
Begins: Thursday, 18 May 2006
Time: 6:00pm 9:30pm
Duration: 9 weeks
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees $550.00

EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint.
It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.

Pre-requisite: None
Begins: Thursday, "'.June 2006
Time: 9:30am 4:30pm
Duration: 1 day
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $160.00

MICROSOFT EXCEL
Course Description: This course covers the fundamentals of the' Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. Tools that are
.needed for basic entry and manipulation of cells and worksheets are presented. The course assumes no
,particular background.
'Pre-requisite: Keyboarding
SqBegins: Monday, 15 May, 2006
"Time: 4:00pm 5:30pm
,Duration: 6 weeks
AVenue: CEES Computer La
,Fees $250.00

MICROSOFT WORD
.-Course Description: The course assumes no particular background and takes the student from the level of
novice to an advanced level. A thorough grounding in all of the fundamentals of document handling in
iMicrosoft Word is presented.

Pre-requisite: Keyboarding
Begins: Wednesday, 17 May 2006
*Time: 6:00pm 9:00pmr
:Duration: 6 weeks
NVenue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees $250.00

PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR
Course Description: This course is a hands-on introduction to technology systems for use in information
environments.The course will cover the following topics: Basic Hardware, Operating Systems, Troubleshooting
.and Repairs.
P.re-requisite: None
Begins: Tuesday, 16"' May 2006
-Time: 6:00pm 8:00pm Tuesdays and Thursdays
Duration: 9 weeks
Venue: BHTC Computer Lab
Fees: $500.00

QUICKBOOKS
Course Description: This course is designed to train new and existing small business entrepreneurs (fewer than
20 employees) how to organize and manage their accounting activities using QuickBooks Pro software.
-Students will learn how to set-up their company files, chart of accounts, budget, customers, vendors and
!employees.


-Pre-requisite:
,jBegins:
[Time:
A.Duration:
:Venue:
Fees:


None
Tuesday, 16"' May 2006
6:00pm 9:00pm
6 weeks
CEES Computer Lab
$330.00


WEBPAGEE DESIGN WORKSHOP
SCourse Description: This course, which targets persons who would like to create their personal web pages will
*cover Web page creation, Web site management, and HTML. Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics,.
'Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web pages.


Pre-requisite:

Begins:
,Time:
SDuration:
Venue:
Fees:


Participants must be computer literate and have a basic knowledge of
word-processing
Thursday & Friday, 8"' 9"' June 2006
9:30am 4:30pm
2 days
CEES Computer Lab
$550.00 ,


MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I

This is an introductory course for learning basic techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major
Topic areas will include Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniques, Wellness Education (Psychological
and Physiological Benefits), Indications and Contraindications, Serving Special Populations and Complementary
Bodywork Systems to include Aromatherapy Essentials.


Starting:

Duration:
Tuition Fee:
Venue:


Thursday, 18" May, 2006
6:00-9:00pm
10 Weeks
$465.00
The College of the Bahamas


MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS II
SThis is an advanced course for learning techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major topics
include introduction to hydrotherapy; spa and body treatments; the basic facial; aromatherapy-fundamentals
Sor essential oils; relaxation and meditative methods; and hot stone therapy.
, Starting: Monday, 15' May, 2006
6:00-9:00pm
SDuration: 10 Weeks
ITuition Fee: $620.00
SVenue: The College of the Bahamas
I' _________________________


SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior customer
service. It focuses on customer value, retention and relationship building and employee motivation.


Date:
Time:
Venue:
Tuition:


Thursday, 1st June 2006
9:30am 4:30pm
Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre
$170.00


EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft
PowerPoint. It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.


Date:
Time:
Venue:
Tuition:


Thursday 1st June 2006
9:30am 4:30pm
CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
$160.00


WEB PAGE DESIGN
This course will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy fiddling
with computers and would like to create their own web pages are encouraged to attend. Specific topics will
include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web pages.


Date:
Time:
Venue:
Tuition:


Thursday & Friday, June 8t & 9t 2006
9:30am 4:30pm
CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
$550.00


PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
SUMMER SEMESTER


COURSE SECT COURSE TIME DAY START DUR FEE
NO. NO. DESCRIPTION____
ACCOUNTING
'ACCA900 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS I 6:00-8:00pm Tue/Thur 16-May 10 weeks $250
ACCA901 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II 6:00-8:00pm Mon/Wed 15-May 10 weeks $275
S"10 weeks $300
ACCA902 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS III 6:00-8:00pm Mon/Wed 15-May
BUSINESS
BUS1900 01 CREDIT & COLLECTION 6:00-900PM Tue 16-May 8 weeks $225
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE 1 Day $170
CUST900 01 W/S 9:30-4:30pm Thur 1-JunI
-- __ _- ---... -
COMPUTERS ____.... _
COMP901 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 6:00-9:30pm Mon 15-May 9 weeks $450
-. i. r.li-TEF r, ULIT-Ti-',N I i,. 1 ,.. .- , we $450
"- .. -......-..
-d1 .1P -i . u ui.. '- . . . ... .. :" LII 4TI IT . & i.-ee. k $330
COMP953 01 PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR 6:00-8:00pm Tue/Thur 1-May 9 weeks $450
COMP907 01 MICROSOFT EXCEL 4:00-5:30pm Mon/Wed 15-May 6 weeks $250
COMP960 01 MICROSOFT POWERPOINT W/S. 9:30-4:30pm Thur 1-Jun 1 Day $160
COMP905 01 MICROSOFT WORD 6:00-9:00pmo Wed 17-May weeks $250
COMP930 01 WEB PAGE DESIGN W/S ___ 9:30-4:30pm Thur/Fri 8-Jun 2 Days $550
COSMETOLOG
COSM802 01 MAKE-UP APPLICATION 6:00-9:00pm Mon 15-May 8 weeks $225
COSM804 01 MANICURE & PEDICURE 6:00-9:00pro Mon 15-May 8 weeks $225
............................... ... ................. .. .................. .. ................. ...... .. .. ........ Y.... ......... .
COSM807 01 NAIL ART TECHNICIAN 6:00-9:00pm Mon/Thur 15-May 5 weeks $500
DECORATING ____
DECO800 01 INTERIOR DECORATING I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 16-May 8 weeks $225
FLOR800 01 FLORAL DESIGN I 6:00-9:00pm .Thur 18-May 10 weeks $225
FLOR801 01 FLORAL DESIGN II 6:00-9:00pm Tue 16-May 10 weeks $250
HEALTH AND
FITNESS ___
MASG900 01 MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I 6:00-9:00pm Thur 18-May 10 weeks $465
MASG901 01 MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS II 6:00-9:00pm Mon 15-May 10 weeks $620
LANGUAGES
CRE 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE I 6:00-7:30pm Mon/Wed 15-May 10 weeks $225
SPA 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I 6:00-7:30pm Mon/Wed 15-May 10 weeks $225
MANAGEMENT ____
MGMT900 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT I 6:00-9:30pm Thur 18-May 9 weeks $250
MGMT901 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT II '6:00-9:30pm Mon 15-May 9 weeks $300
MEDICAL
MEDT900 01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 6:00-900pm Thur 18-May 10 weeks $225
SEW____
SEW 800 01 BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING I 6:00-9:00pm Thur 18-May 10 weeks $225
SEW 805 01 DRAPERY MAKING I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 16-May 10 weeks $225
SEW 811 01 "UPHOLSTERY MAKING I 6:00-9:00pm Mon 15-May 10 weeks $225

ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/
328-1936/302-4300 ext. 5202 or email nlacroix@cob.edu.bs
All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time).
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content,
Course Schedule and Course Materials.




Personal Development Courses



S CREDIT EQUIVALENCY

The following Personal Development courses have been approved by the
Academic Board for COB credit courses equivalencies.

ACCA900 Accounting for Beginners I
ACCA901 Accounting for Beginners II
MGMT 900 -Human Resource Management I
MGMT901- Human Resource Management II
SPA 900 Conversational Spanish I
SPA 901 Conversational Spanish II

Students may continue to utilize the courses as a means of professional
development in both private and public sectors with the added recognition
that these courses have been equated to courses taken toward a degree
programme.


CHAPTER NPoe9-

CAPU SEUIY-DRETLNS32456 0d43 3a-49


S.


_ IPT 'C~ I-- I I_


:i


.......... \ .... /






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, APRIL 18, 2006


I iiii


The Public Hospitals Authority invites tender for the purchase of
lthe following vehicles:-
1. 1999 Mitsubishi L300 Bus
2.2. 1997 Daewoo Damas Van
3. 1995 Daewoo Racer
4. 1990 Chevy S10
Vehicles 1-4 can be viewed at the Princess Margaret Hospital's
Compound, Shirley Street.
5. 1998 Daewoo Cielo
6. 1997 Daewoo Espero
7. 2000 Daewoo Tico
8. 1999 Kia Pregio Van
Vehicles 5-8 can be viewed at Materials Management directorate's
Compound, Shirley Street.
Sealed envelopes, marked tender should be addressed to the Managing
Director, Public Hospitals Authority, Manx Corporate
Centre/Dockendale House, P.O. Box N-8200, to arrive no later than
April 30, 2006. (Vehicles are sold as is)

Herbert H. Brown
Managing Director


BOAT FOR SALE

noATon FOR SA\LE-


I-.>W':'' ." :- .... :
.4_-..... "717 -
.. ....... =-- -77,%



Poco Loco
35' Tiara 3500 Express. Year: 1995 LOA 38' 10" Beam: 13' 9"
Displacement: 22,0001bs, Draft: 3' 6"
Engines: Diesel Caterpillar 3208's 435hp
Hour.: 620 Cruising Speed: .25 knots
Fuel: 354gals. Water: 124gals. Holding Tank: 30gals.
6.5kW Phasor generator (new 2005)
Maintained to highest standards. Sleeps total of 6. Forward
enclosed stateroom with double bed, L-shaped leather lounge
sleeps 2, convertible dinette seats 5 and sleeps 2, enclosed
head/shower, full service galley with frig/freezer, 2 burner elec.
stove and microwave oven, forward and aft A/C units (new 2005),
Stereo 6 CD changer. Extensive electronics.
(Bahamas duty paid)
For inspection call: Days: 393-2795 or 357-7909
Nights: 324-1462


$500m investment


'great development'





for North Eleuthera


FROM page 1B

financial services and invest-
ments, confirmed that a Heads
of Agreement was being draft-
ed for the investment on Roy-
al Island, located in the North
Eleuthera chain west of Span-
ish Wells.
Mr Peet told Tribune Busi-
ness that his ministry was pro-
ceeding with the compilation
of a Heads of Agreement, and
that it was expected to be com-
pleted "shortly".
Cypress Equities, a retail,
development and acquisition
affiliate of Staubach Retail, a
Dallas-based real estate devel-
oper, has acquired Royal
Island for an undisclosed sum
from a group of private
investors.
Mr Peet said the developers
propose to build a hotel and
spa with accompanying restau-
rants, a golf course and marina
on the island. He said the
development will involve two
phases, with the total invest-
ment pegged at $500 million.
Alvin Smith, FNM MP for
North Eleuthera, said the Roy-
al Island venture would be an
"excellent development" for
his constituency.
"Based on my information,
the developers have the finan-
cial resources and seem to be
serious," he said. "In fact, they
were hoping to have this done
months ago. I think it will
employ large numbers of peo-
ple in the North Eleuthera
area."
Mr Smith said that in spite of
previous announcements made
bv the Government about


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developments in Eleuthera,
nothing significant had hap-
pened to lure former islanders
and their descendants back
home until now.
He said large numbers of
North Eleuthera natives had
left home to get jobs in Abaco
and Exuma.
Mr Smith said "nothing is
happening" at the former Club
Med in Governor's Harbour,
site of an approved resort
investment project headed by
US investor Edward Lauth III.
And on Windermere Island,
site of another resort project
headed by American Joseph
Carry Rich, "very little is going
on except the building of a
store house".
"I was hoping this project
would be approved," he said
of Royal Island.
The Royal Island invest-
ment, Mr Smith said, would
give many a reason to return
home, and would affect
Eleutherans even beyond the
Glass Window Bridge.
, Royal Island is presently a
480-acre undeveloped and
uninhabited island crowned by
30-foot high cliffs near Spanish
Wells, having what Cypress
Equities said was the largest
natural protected deep water
harbour in the Bahamas at its
centre.
According to its parent
Staubach, Royal Island will
offer single-family estate sites
nestled within private enclaves,
most with ocean views.
The company said plans will
include a luxury, boutique
resort with deluxe spa, and
both fine dining and casual
restaurants and a deep water,
marina capable of docking
yachts ranging from 20 to over





ISIGHT


F h o


200 feet in length.
The marina is to be sur-
rounded by a village centre of
retail shops and amenities. The
marina itself will accommodate
yachts between 20-200 feet in
length, and access to Royal
Island will be seaborne only.
This will be either by yacht
or a 10-minute ferry ride from
North Eleuthera.
From initial indications,'the
development appears to be
another high-end, private resi-
dential community, rather than
a pure resort. The boutique
resort is unlikely to be a major
addition to the Bahamas hotel
inventory.
Although the Royal Island
development plans are still
being refined, it is likely that
Staubach ik proposing another
mixed-use resorL a concept
most Family Island developers
are.following With these
developments, the real 'sexy'
bit for investors is the land, as
this is where they get the high-
est returns from sales of lots
and real estates to wealthy vis-
itors.
"This will be a high-quality
investment unlike anything
else in the Bahamas," said
Chris Maguire, president and


chief executive of Cypress,,,
Equities.
"We've assembled a top-
notch development team to
ensure that we reach our goal
of making Royal Island the
new standard for luxury liv-
ing," he said.
"Every detail of the design
and placement of the homes
and amenities is being careful-
ly considered to assimilate nat-
urally into this island paradise.
Royal Island will become
known as the ultimate desti-
nation for those individuals
looking to retreat to the most
exclusive resort and private
estates in the Bahamas."
Cypress Equities is the
acquisition and development
affiliate of Staubach Retail,
focusing on projects ranging-
from mid-sized to large scale
retail centres.
'With'development offices ini
SDallas, Atlanta, New York,
Phoenix and San Francisco, it
is an independent company
with a dedicated staff that
focuses on retail development,
portfolio acquisitions, build-
to-suits, sale-leasebacks, and '.
other development services for
retail, mixed-use, and automo-
tive properties.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JACQUE JULES OF
CARMICHAEL ROAD, P.O. BOX N-7634, NASSAU,,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for.
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as,
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows,
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 18TH dao of APRIL,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that WISNEL DUCAS OF FOWLER
STREET OFF MARKET STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 18TH day of APRIL, 2006 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


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Whether you can raise $50 or $5,000

Ride for Hope is your opportunity to do something
inspiring, something uniquely rewarding, to honor
loved ones touched by cancer.

Ride for Hope is a unique event with a meaningful
purpose. It is a charitable bik a-thon which will occur
along the spectacular island leuthera~It is open to
anyone who enjoys cycling ar Lants tdtontribute to
one of the most important Im
enhanced cancer'procee b
the Cancer Caring Cene lnce
Society of the Bahasw

Be a part ofthe gr t st
those who RIDE J


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Eleuthera,


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_ _ __ I _


I


BUSINESS


:I


mpp


4k


- - ---.-- ---m &-







TUESDAY, APRIL 18, 2006, PAGE 9B


'Two pay cheques away




from total insolvency'


FROM page 3B


extra mortgage payment or a
number of extra car payments.
2. -ever-Ending Payments
Ask yourself if you really
need, items that keep you pay-
ing money every month, year
after year. Things such as cable
television, subscription radio
and video games, cell phones
and pagers can force you to
pay and pay forever, but leave
you never owning anything.
3. Credit Cards
Living on borrowed money
has become somewhat normal,
as an ever-increasing number
of consumers are willing to pay


double-digit interest rates on
gasoline, groceries and a host
of other items that are gone
long before the bill is paid-in-
full. Paying interest as a result
of failure to pay off credit card
bills makes the price of the
charged items a great deal
more expensive.
4. New Cars
Millions of new cars are sold
each year, although few buyers
can afford to pay for them in
cash. But the inability to pay
cash for a new car means :an
inability to afford the car
(being able to afford the pay-
ment is not the same as being
able to afford the car).
Furthermore, by borrowing
money to buy a car, the con-
sumer pays interest on a depre-


88400 sq. ft. warehouse and office building for lease.
Warehouse is 5500 sq. ft. and office is 2881 sq. ft. Plus
extra 1 acre of open property for use at no additional
cost. Close to highway.

-' Lease $8000 per month.
| Tel: 394-4387, 393-7281.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that EDNA PIERRE OF P.O. BOX
N-2557, NASSAU STREET, NASSAU, N.P., BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
BalHamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
ser~d a written and signed statement of the facts within
twnhty-eigbt days from the 11TH day of APRIL, 2006 to the
lin sister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N, 7147, Nassau, Bahiamas.


citing asset, which amplifies
the difference between the val-
ue of the car and the price paid
for it. Worse yet, many people
trade in their cars every two
or three years even though an
increasing number of cars offer
factory warranties that provide
100,000 miles or 10 years of
coverage.
5. Buying More Cars
Than You Need
Sometimes, a person has no
choice but to take out a loan to
buy a car, but how much does
any consumer really need a
large SUV? Such vehicles are
expensive to buy, insure and
fuel. Unless you tow a boat or
trailer, or need an SUV to earn
a living, is an eight-cylinder
engine worth the extra cost of
taking out a large loan?
If you need to buy a car
and/or borrow money to do so,
consider buying one that uses
less gas and costs less to insure
and maintain.
6. Buying 'Too Much' House
When it comes to buying a
house, bigger is also not nec-
essarily better. Unless you
have a large family, choosing a
home with 6,000 square feet
may cause you to pay for more
than you need or use. Taxes,
maintenance and utilities on
such a big home will put a sig-
nificant, long-term dent in your
monthly budget.
7. Refinancing your
mortgage and taking cash out
Your home is your castle.
Refinancing and taking cash
out on it gives ownership of
your castle to someone else. It
also costs you thousands of
dollars- in. interest and, fees:;


Smart homeowners want to
build equity.
The cumulative result of all
this spending puts people into
a precarious position, one in
which they need every dime
they earn one missed pay
cheque would be disastrous.
It's not that people in such a
position don't earn enough
money; it's that they spend
more than they earn. Every-
one has a choice, so it's just a
matter of making savings a pri-
ority.
Conclusion
To steer yourself away from
the dangers of overspending,
start by monitoring the little
expenses because they add up
quickly. Next, you need to
monitor the big expenses.
Think carefully before adding
new debts to your list of pay-
ments, and keep in mind that
being able to make a payment
isn't the same as being able to
afford the purchase. Finally,
make saving some of what you
earn a monthly priority."
Until next week...
NB: Larry R. Gibson, a
Chartered Financial Analyst,
is vice-president pensions,
Colonial Pensions Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Colonial Group
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance
and is a major shareholder of
Security & General Insurance
Company in the Bahamas.
The views expressed are
those of the author and do 'not
necessarily represent those of
Colonial Group International
or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson@atlantic-
house. con. bs


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P~tl lORTIJFflAYAPRL 182006TRIBNEOSOTT
I I\AL IYI V-VI - ~~-*0-


Armbrister runs personal





best on her way to the final


* TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

ABYMES, GUADE-
LOUPE: The Carifta Games
record in the 400m for under
20 women was lowered twice
in one day by two Jamaicans.
In the opening heat of the
event, Jamaican Kaleisa
Spencer clocked 51.82 sec-
onds to erase the meet record
which stood for 20 years by
Olympian Sandie Richards,
who once represented
Jamaica.
Running in this heat for the
Bahamas was Cache Arm-
brister.
Armbrister ran a personal
best time of 55.57 seconds for
the a third place finishing.
The second heat went to
Sonita Sutherland of Jamaica
who ran a time of 52.73 sec-
onds, Keneish Miller finished
up fifth in this heat with 56.91
seconds.
The time placed Miller


But Jamaica takes


gold in Carifta 400m


ninth overall, just seconds shy
of a final round appearance.
With just two hours in
between the heats and the
final rounds, the athletes
took to the track once again,
this time in search for a
medal.

Lead

With another medal in
sight, the Jamaicans had
established a commanding
lead by 150m, by this time
Armbrister was fighting to
Should off the two Trinidad and
Tobago athletes.
But Sutherland of Jamaica
would cross the line in a time


of 51.30 seconds, lowering
the record set just hours
before by teammate Spencer.
Coming in second in the
event was Spencer with 51.99
seconds, third place went to
Marie Andeli Lacordelle of
French Guyana in 54.22 sec-
onds. The two Trinidad and
Tobago athletes took the
fourth and fifth spots with
times of 54.86 seconds and
55.41 seconds, while Arm-
brister ran another personal
best time of 55.84 seconds for
the sixth spot.
In the under 17 girls' 400m,
Deandra Knowles and Shel-
Ikya Rolle were both able to
advance to the final round of
competition after clocking


* LAURIE LIGHTFOOT, winner of the first annual woman's pool tournament
held at Millie's Place on Bay Street receives her trophy from sponsor Jimmy Chea.
(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)


56.89 seconds and 56.75 sec-
onds respectively. Both times
were personal best times for
Knowles and Rolle, which
helped them secure the last
two spots for the finals. The
fastest time heading into the
finals belonged to Latoya
McDermott of Jamaica, who
ran 54.62 seconds.
Rolle and Knowles had
their work cut out for them,
running out of lane one and
eight.

Time

Running out lane five,
McDermott dropped a few
seconds off her heat's time
to take the gold medal in a
time of 54.03 seconds, St,
Lucia's Merica Moncherry
was second with a time of
55.14 seconds while Chanel
Malone of the British Virgin
Islands was third in 55.70 sec-
onds.
Rolle snagged the sixth


spot with 57.72 seconds and
Knowles finished up in the
eight spot with a time of
1:01.05 seconds.
Running in the finals of the
under 17 boys 400m was Jef-
frey Daniels after Darrion
Duncombe failed to advance
to the finals.
Duncombe, who ran out of
heat two, finished the event
in fifth place with a time of
51.33 seconds. The winning
time in that heat went to
Jamaica's Akino Ming with
49.03 seconds.
Gibson would lane up in
lane four of the first heat.
His time of 50.48 seconds
give him a fourth place fin-
ishing in the heat and the sev-
enth fastest time overall.
In the finals, Gibson would
clock 51.03 seconds for a sev-
enth place finish. Winning
the gold medal was Ming in
48.56 seconds, Jevon
Matthew was second in 48.80
seconds and Kadeem Smith
third in 48.90 seconds.


* ROXY WHYMNS receives her second place trophy from Mr Chea.
(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)


Laurie wins inaugural tournament


. . . . i ' """ . :v -


* TOURNAMENT winner Laurie Lightfoot in action during the event.
(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)


Medals for

Bahamas in

400m relay

* TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports
Reporter
ABYMES, GUADE-1
LOUPE: After a great
showing in the century :ol-
Saturday evening, head
coach George Cleare and,
his coaching staff at the 35th-
-annual Carifta Games were.
sure that they would be in,
the medal hunt in the 400m
relays.
Starting things off were
the under 17 girls team,
which consisted of Sparkyl
Cash, Nivea Smith, Carlene
Johnson and Printassia
Johnson.
The team finished up sec-
ond behind the Jamaicans
in a time of 46.17 seconds.
The winning time was
recorded at 45.66 seconds
and the third place time of
'46.21 seconds was claimed
by Trinidad and Tobago.
The under 17 boys team
of Aaron Wilmore, Karlton
Rolle, Shawn Lockhart, and
Warren Fraser ran a time of
41.62 seconds which was
good enough for a silver
medal.
Claiming the gold medal
was Jamaica in 41.39 sec-
onds, Trinidad and Tobago
was third in 42.22 seconds.
The Bahamas captured
another silver medal in the
relays, this time in the senior
women's 4x100m.
Tia Rolle, T'Shondi
Webb, Cache Armbrister.
and Sheniqua Fcrgutson
clocked 45.92 seconds:fo'r-
the medal just aheaobf,
Trinidad and Tobag ,' -5.-.
seconds. Capturing the gold
once again was Jamaica In
44.91 seconds.
The men's team asjr'ti as
lucky this time around. tm-
ishing just h.\ of a medal.
The team finished up
fourth behind Jamaica, Bar-
bados and Trinidad 'nd
.Tobago in a ilime ol 41.10.
seconds.
The winning time pel -
formed by Jamaica \' as
39.81 seconds, Barbados'
time was 40.82 secondsafidd
Trinidad and Tobago's 40.87
seconds



Gold in M

high jump

FROM page :ne

defend my title. but know-
ing that I was ovEd t;h4
record height and just lintle
minor errors were stopping
me from getting it is a'lttle:
disappoiing." ...
The chance of attenrpting
the record in the uriler 2u.
boys never came around for
Wilson and Grant, who had
to end the competition with
a jump-off. ,' -
With both athletes intlir-
ing the competition'at;tlie
same height 1.95m, and hav-
ing the same amount.of
knock downs, Wilsoi and
Grant had to battle each oth-
er in a jump off to determine
who would walk away with
the gold medal.
According to Wilson,
stopping at the 2.05m was a
disappointment for him,
especially since he was con-
fident that he was capable
of jumping-much higher.
He said: "Taking the gold
feels great, but not as good
as I thought it would feel. I
really had an off day and the
height I won with isn't pleas-
ing for me.
"The first jump felt good,
easy for me because I had
no pressure on me, but after
a while when it came to the
heights where I kept knock-
ing them down it started to
feel hard like I was doing
something wrong, but I was-
n't.
"I am very happy to wnym
the gold, but not as happy


as last year."
Grant made the adjustment
from the basketball court to
the high jump bed in late
March at the National High
School Championship-s and
again at the Carifta Games
trials, but this time he"was
well below his personal best
marking.
After losing the jump off
to Wilson, Grant settled for
second with a clearance of
2.00m. Finishing second was
David Cassilingon of Guade-
loupe, 2.00m.


TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 10B. TUESDAY. APRIL 18,20C06








I rliUijrt oruri io
'T7- N


Fred Wright on

/ -A WAftn


aiier wuining trials


course


S^GOLF
:By RENT STUBBS
,Senior Sports Reporter
FRED Wright emerged as
the' overall winner of the
Bahamas Golf Federation's
Southern Divisional trials held
over"the Easter holiday week-
end.
:But' at the end of the four-
day trials.on Monday, it came
down 'fo'a two-way finish in
the regular division between
teenager Richard Gibson Jr
and veteran Milford 'Shaggy'
Lockhart.. ,
.The trials served as a pre-
lude to the BSF's final trials
for the Caribbean Amateur
Golf Championships that;will
be played in Jamaica in
August. .
The-final trials are sched-
uled for the Labour Day holi-
day weekend at the end df
May ifi Grand Bahama, but
some of the local golfers are
calling for a neutral site,,pre-
ferring Treasury Cay, Abaco
so that all of the golfers will be
on an even par.


Golfer credits performance


to 'early morning workouts'


Wright, trying to make his
first national team since 1988,
triple bogeyed the 16th and
bogeyed the 17th, but was still
able to hold onto the lead in
the seniors, finishing with 292,
13 strokes ahead of second
place Raymond Gibson
(305).

Fun

"I was having some fun out
there. The course was set up
pretty easy, so it was just a fun
game," reflected Wright, who
credited his performance to
his early morning workouts
with Minister of Immigration
Share Gibson, a former
national team player.
"But in the seniors, I know I
have to look over for Vernon


Wells, Max Quant, Zack
Smith and Bobby Rose. So I
have to go to Freeport to beat
them."
Holding a slim one-point
lead going into the final day of
competition, Gibson Jr. strug-
gled in the final three holes as
Lockhart used his experienced
to pull even at 294.
"I played alright during the
first three days, but I didn't
play that well at all today,"
said Gibson Jr., a 14-year-old
ninth grader at SC McPher-
son High School.
"I just couldn't putt. I could-
n't keep focused."
Gibson Jr. lost his concen-
tration on the 13th, 15th and
16th holes.
"I still want to thank the
Lord for giving me the health


and strength to come out and
play."
Surprised by the perfor-
mance of Gibson Jr., Lock-
hart said, the way he putted,
he was surprised himself that
he ended up in a tie.
"I guess my ball striking was
still there," said Lockhart, who
took a three-shot lead at the
13th hole before he was
caught by Gibson Jr.
"I'm happy with the way
I'm hitting the ball, but if I'm
going to make any national
team, I'm going to have to
find a way to putt the ball a lot
better, making a lot of them 3-
4-6 putts."
"Richard surprised me. He
held up very well. He made
one stupid mistake on the 13th
hole on the par five when he


hit a tee shot into the water,
then tried to get too much on
his second shot and hit it out
of bounds," Lockhart noted.
"By the time he looked up,
he had nine, but he played sol-
id golf the rest of the way to
catch me. So I didn't give
away anything, but I would
have liked to play better than
I did coming in."

Neutral
As for the final trials, Lock-
hart said they would have pre-
ferred to play on a neutral tri-
al, but he doesn't feel it will
make a difference where it's
played as he attempts to make
his 10th national team.
Another steady perfor-
mance was turned in by Peter
McIntosh, who shot a 296 for
third in the regulars and sixth
overall. ,
"It was pretty good for me,"
he stated. "I got a chance to
practise and I was able to
shoot a 296, so I won't com-
plain about it."


McIntosh, who is shooting
for his seventh national team
appearance, said, while the
field wasn't as loaded as it nor-
Smally is, those who showed up
still played very well.
"The competition was stiff,
considering this was just a pre-
liminary trial," he said.
"Hopefully everybody will
sharpen up their game and
be prepared for the final tri-
als."
Fourth overall in the final
standings, Ozzie Moore
racked up first place in the
super seniors with 295.
Coming from the volleyball
courts where he's been coach-
ing a number of teams, Moore
said he's not had much time to
practise, so "I'm satisfied. I
left a lot of shots out there,
but I'm happy with the
results."
Moore beat out Harcourt
'Coins' Poitier, who shot a
308, but he knows that he will
have to be consistent when he
heads to Grand Bahama if he
wants to make his first nation-
al team.


Explorers defeat


Sunshine Auto

U .COKE EXPLORERS' Dannon Carter passes the ball as the Sun-
shine Auto defence surrounds him on Saturda. at the Sir Kendal Isaacs
Gym. The Explorers won 91-86.
, i RIGHT: Coke Explorers' Valentino Richardson drives to the bas-
ket as Sunshine Auto's Chris Johnson tries to stop him.


..1.......;.........................:









a au


TUESDAY, APRIL 18, 2006


SECTION




Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


N TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports
Reporter
ABYMES, GUADE-
LOUPE: Raymond Higgs
kept the jumpers tradition
alive by capturing the first
gold medal for the Bahamas
on Saturday at the 35th
annual Carifta Games.
Shortly after Higgs
claimed the first gold medal,
Jamal Wilson and Kyle
Grant delivered a 1-2 knock
out combination on the field
in the under 20 boys divi-
sion, securing the Bahamas'
second and third medals.
Higgs, the defending
champion in the under 17
boys high jump event
cleared 2.06 meters for the
win over Daniel Burke of
Barbados. Burke cleared
2.03m for second and
Christopher Waugh had a
clearance of 1.90m.
Opting to enter the com-
petition at 1.90m, Higgs eas-
ily cleared the height on his
first attempt. But this wasn't
the case for teammate Rol-
land Pinder who had
extreme difficulties in clear-
ing. Pinder would end his
hunt for a medal at this
stage. The clearance of
1.85m on his last attempt
was good enough for a fifth
place finishing overall.
With only three competi-
tors left in the competition,
Higgs continued to keep his
composure, placing pressure
on Burke and Waugh.

Trio
The trio were able to clear
1.90m all on their first
attempt at the height, unlike
the other two jumpers Higgs
decided to pass the next
height hoping to save his
legs for the higher heights.
Waugh would find diffi-
culties with height 1.95m
and left the competition.
Burke was also having some
difficulties with the height
but was able to put the right
components together for a
clearance on" his last
attempt.
Entering the competition
once again, Higgs' first
attempt at 2.00m failed but
his second shot at the height
was a success, this was also
the case for Burke.
The final straw for Burke
came at 2.06m. All three of
his attempts at this height
failed and Burke was now
sitting down watching Higgs
attempt to break the 12 year
old record set by Ryan
Chambers of Jamaica in
1992.
Higgs instructed the offi-
cials to raise the bar at
2.11m.
On all three attempts.
Higgs' heel dragged the bar
down, but at the end of the
day, the defending champ
was pleased that he was
able to retain his title.
He said: "'I % as hop-
ing io break the record
this time around, but
hopclull. ne\t \earr
when I return I will be
able to break it."
"It feels great knox-
ing that 1 ,.as able to
SEE page 10B


The Bahamas








stars in the








100im finas


* TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
ABYMES, GUADE-
LOUPE: For the first time
in more than six years, the
Bahamas fielded athletes in
all divisions for the finals of
the century event.
In the girls under 17 divi-
sion it was Nivea Smith and
Sparkyl Cash; and in the
under 17 boys Warren Fraser
and Karlton Rolle; Sheniqua
Ferguson and T'Shonda
Webb in the open women
and Carl Stuart and Ryan
Penn in the open men.

Times
Smith and Cash had posted
the third and fourth fastest
times heading into the finals,
while Rolle and Fraser
would take the top two time
heading into their finals.
Smith and Cash's times
lined them up in lanes three
and five of the heated event.
In a seasonal best perfor-
mance, Smith ran her way
onto the podium, snatching
the bronze medal with 11.90
seconds. Cash would have to
settle for a seventh place fin-
ishing with a time of 12.09
seconds.
Winning the event was
Danielle Jeffrey of Jamaica
in 11.67 seconds, coming in


WARREN FRASER
competed in the
under 17 boys final.
(FILE Photo)


Athletes medal at


the Carifta Games


second was fellow Jamaican
Carrie Russell in 11.70 sec-
onds.
Although their times com-
ing into the finals had posi-
tioned Rolle and Fraser in
the middle of the track, the
fight for the gold medal
would come from the outer
lane.
Both Rolle and Fraser had
their work cut out for them
their toughest competitors
were the Jamaican and
Trinidad Tobago runners.
But neither of the
favourites were in the lead
by the 75m marker. St Kitts
and Nevis runner Allistar
-Clarke had taken the'lead,
but the 50m marker saw
Jamaica's Dexter Lee,
Trinidad and Tobago's Joel
Dillon and Bahamians Rolle
and Fraser emerge.
With less than five meters
to go, Lee. would separate
himself from the pack leav-
ing the silver and bronze
medals for the other field
members.
Only two seconds separat-
ed the four top
finishers


with Lee taking the gold in a
time of 10.72 seconds, Dil-
lon was second with 10.74
while Rolle took the third,
spot in 10.76 and Fraser in
10.78 seconds.
Rolle said: "Eventhough
this is my second time mak-
ing the Carifta Games, I feel
great knowing that I
medalled.
This is my first time run-
ning the 100m at the games
so I am very pleased with my
performance.

Pressure
"I knew I had to get out if
I wanted to be in the hunt
for the medal, but my first
30m I saw myself in fifth
place so that added pressure
on me to work harder at the
last part of the race. The
start wasn't that bad, but
then again it wasn't up to par
to be in front. There are
some things I would change
if I could but you can't. If I
did get a better start and
maintain it I think I could
have won the gold."
For the first time in her
sprinting career, Ferguson
found herself running out of
lane eight in the heats, but
by the end of the race she
posted the third fastest time
coming out of her heat. The
qualifying time of 11.77 sec-
onds placed her in the top
five of the com-
petitors heading
into the finals.
In the second
heat, Webb
would finish
up in second
place with a time of
11.87 seconds.
As the runners lined
up for the finals, Fer-
guson would run out of
lane one while Webb
would" challenge for the
gold medal out of lane sev-
en.
Making the adjustment of
running in an outside lane,
Ferguson would sneak her
way on the podium with a


SHENIQUA Ferguson would sneak her way on the podi-
um with a season's and personal best of 11.63 seconds.
(FILE Photo)


season's and personal best of
11.63 seconds. Webb would
miss out on a medal after
Semoy Hackett of Trinidad
and Tobago nipped her at
the finish lane for the
bronze. Webb clocked 11.81
seconds.
Winning the event was
Schillonie Calvert of Jamaica
in 11.51 seconds.
Ferguson said: "The
adjustment was hard, but I
told myself in order to win I
would have to go out there
and give it more than my all.
The finals was the first time I
dipped for a win and I feel
extremely happy knowing
that I did and it worked. This
is a great feeling winning the
medal. I feel great.
"This is my second Carifta
Games and I wanted to come
here and do my best for my


country. I would be looking
to better my times in my oth-
er events and hopefully I
would be able to get another
medal. Rpnning out of lane
one felt a little funny but it's
the same distance no matter
how you look at it."
Unlike the other divisions
who only had to run two
rounds in the 100m. Penn
and Stuart would have to run
three rounds in order to cap-
ture a medal.
In the finals Penn and Stu-
art would finish up fifth-and
eight in tires of 10.73 sec-
onds ;and 11.05 seconds
respectively. Taking the
crown was Remaldo Rose of
Jamaica in 10.48 seconds,
Keston Bledman was second
in 10.57 seconds and Rarmion
Gittens of Barbados was
third in 10.60 seconds. ,,
; '*)'**


AI


_ __ I ~_
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