Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00372
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: April 3, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00372
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text












HIGH 80F
LOW 68F

.- SPARNY
SSUNNY


The


Tribune


Volume: 102 No.112 MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006 PRICE 750







fill


Multiple wounds Man shot dead in front of home

sustained during

evening raid

on food store


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
A WOULD-BE armed rob-
ber was shot dead in an
attempted "military style raid"
on a John Chea foodstore over
the weekend.
Anton Smith died at Princess
Margaret Hospital late Friday
night after sustaining multiple
gunshot wounds.
Police believe Smith received
the injuries during an attempted
armed robbery of foodstore
owner Sidney Chea which
quickly escalated into a shoot-
out.
According to reports, four
armed men tried to rob the
John Chea and Sons Food Store
No 8 on Carmichael Road, close
to Golden House Road.
Mr Chea was closing up the
store sometime after 9pm and
walking to his vehicle when he
was accosted by a group of men
who had just got out of a black
Nissan.
They demanded cash and
subsequently began to beat him,
officer-in-charge of the CDU,
Chief Supt Marvin Dames, told
The Tribune yesterday.
The incident was witnessed
by the store's security guard,
who came rushing outside to
assist Mr Chea.
According to eye-witnesses,
Mr Chea had just managed to
"wriggle free" of his attackers
when a shoot-out ensued


between, the security guard and
the would-be robbers.
It is believed the foodstore's
security guard is part of an elite
unit within the Defence Force-
and a marksman who "moon-
lights" at the John Chea store.
Witnesses to the incident
claim that one of the would-be
robbers was carrying an AK-47
automatic.
"It seemed like the men were
planning a military-style raid
using that kind of weapon," The
Tribune was told.
Witnesses claimed a church
event, which was being held
across the road from the food-
store, was used as a cover by
the attackers to camouflage
their operation.
A Tribune source said.there
were many people and vehicles
in the area at the time, which
initially made it easier for the
suspects to go unnoticed.
During the shoot-out one of
the four men was shot and, as
he slumped to the ground, he
sprayed the store and a truck
standing nearby with bullets.
His three accomplices then
dragged him away to their vehi-
cle, which sped off in an
unknown direction.
"A short time afterwards,
police received reports that a
man had been admitted to
SEE page It


* THE body of Angelo Strachan is being placed in a hearse on Friday night after he was shot outside his residence in South Beach
(Photo: Felip6 Major/Tribune staff


A MAN was gunned down in front of
his home on Friday night, bringing the num-
ber of murders, to 12 for the year.
Angelo Strachan, 40, had just arrived at
his home on Zion Boulevard in the South
Beach area at llpm when he was shot by an


unidentified man.
"He had just pulled into his driveway
and exited his black Dodge Ram 1500 when
he was accosted by a lone gunman," Chief
Supt Marvin Dames, head of CDU, said
yesterday:


COB faculty staff

threaten to strike


The man reportedly opened fire on Mr
Strachan without provocation.
"He was hit several times about the body
and collapsed in his driveway, where he
died," Mr Dames said. Police are investi-
gating.


Police investigating

string of robberies


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
COB faculty members are
threatening to strike if negoti-
ations for a new industrial
agreement with the college
council fail.
Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, president of the
Union of Tertiary Educators
of the Bahamas (UTEB) Jen-.
nifer Isaacs-Dotson said mem-
bers are open to the possibility
of striking following govern-
ment's perturbingg" actions
during the negotiating period.


UTEB on Friday filed a
trade dispute with the Depart-
ment of Labour.
"Following three years of
arduous negotiations, UTEB
is growing increasingly impa-
tient with the council and its
stalling tactics and general
indifference with respect to the
concerns of faculty.
"Over the last three years,
UTEB has been in negotiations
with the team led by the exec-
utive vice-president and is now
being informed that the team
SEE page 11


POLICE are investigating a
series of robberies which took
place over the weekend.
On Friday at 4.30pm, a 21-
year-old man was robbed out-
side of the Senor Frog's restau-
rant in downtown Nassau.
According to reports, he was
struck in the head with a blunt
weapon by an unidentified
assailant and robbed of the
small amount of cash he was
carrying.
Later that same day, at
around 5.45pm, a 40-year-old
man was robbed while walk-
ing near the Church of God


on Soldier Road.
He was assaulted by two men
armed with box cutters, who
robbed him of $850 in cash, two
cellular phones, and other per-
sonal effects.
On Saturday at 8.45pm, a 69-
year-old woman became the
victim of an armed robbery.
The woman was just about to
enter her home on Baillou Hill
Road South when she was
approached by two masked
men.
They threatened her with a
silver handgun and robbed her
of $500 in cash.


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PAGE~~~ 2, MONDAY API 3,00 Il--- -IL I-iIBU


LOCAL NEWS


Colombian minister

meets with Castro


N HAVANA

COLOMBIA'S Foreign
Minister Carolina Barco said
Saturday she met with Presi-
dent Fidel Castro the previ-
ous evening and invited him
to visit her country, according
to Associated Press.
Barco arrived in Cuba on
Friday for an official two-day
visit to thank the communist
government for hosting talks
between her government and
Colombia's second-largest
rebel group, the National
Liberation Army, or ELN.
In brief comments to
media during a tour of Old
Havana, the Colombian for-
eign minister characterized
her Friday night talks with
Castro as "constructive and
frank."
She meet earlier Friday
with Cuban Foreign Minis-
ter Felipe Perez Roque.


FNM Torchbearers


NI


SIn brief y in A

Colombia's peace envoy y
and the ELN did not reach


agreement in talks neld in
Havana in February, but will
meet here again in April in
hopes of further progress..
The ELN has been fight-
ing Colombia's government
since the 1960s for social
changes, but has seen its
forces dwindle to fewer than
3,500 fighters after a military
offensive by President
Alvaro Uribe.
Barco was accompanied on
her visit by Colombia's min-
isters of commerce and min-
ing and the government's
peace envoy.
After Cuba, they will trav-
el to Trinidad and Tobago,
Barbados and Guyana.


....P13,14,15,1820,24



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' ... ".. .., ............ P14,1 5, 16


^^...........,...,......... ...-..,, P4
.... ......P1,2,3,,5,6,71


I IDSECTION 24 PAGES


-.-STA$ QCij.24 PAGES

LD SECTIONS
... ... ....................12 Pages
..... ....... ..... .....12 Pages
. .. .


FNM Torchbearers from New
Providence and Grand Bahama
joined newly-installed North Aba-
co colleagues over the weekend.
Hundreds of young adults in
Abaco turned out for the Torch-
bearers' rally in Cooper's Town
on Friday night.
"Young people are disillusioned
because when they come out of
school there are no jobs," said
Gary Smith, chairman of the new-
ly-established North Abaco Torch-
bearers Association.
"They feel that the government
does not have their best interest at
heart, but I am here to re-light the
fire of our young people and tell
them all is not lost. They still have
a voice and their vote counts."
According to Philcher Grant,
public relations officer for the
Grand Bahama Torchbearers,
Bahamians now see that the PLP
government has defaulted on its
promissory note issued to the
country in 2002 and rallied those in
attendance to make their protest
heard in the voting booth.
"Those who [think] that the
young people of The Bahamas are
here just because we want to blow
off steam will have a rude awak-
ening on election day," she point-
ed out.
"We can never be satisfied so
long as there are hundreds of
Bahamians out of work and won-
dering daily where their next meal
is coming from," she added.
"We can never be satisfied so
long as a government that claims
inclusiveness pulls the colour-card
to divide its people...and we can
never be satisfied so long as '.e
remain the joke of the interna-
tional press because this govern-
ment is unable to make decisions
on anything."
The GB Torchbearer was one
of two speakers from the island'
hardest hit by three hurricanes in
a one-year period.
Leslie Cover, president of
Grand Bahama Torchbearers, also
highlighted the stagnation of that
island's economy, urging young
Bahamians to send the PLP gov-
ernment a clear message about
how they feel they have been
treated over the past four years.
"We are tired of hearing about


M TORCHBEARERS from New Providence and Grand Bahama joined members of the pwly,. ;
established North Abaco Torchbearers Association in a rally in Cooper's Town Abaco Friday, night..! i,
(Photo Courtesy of the FNM News Service) .


projects that never seem to get off
the ground," she said. "We see a
lot of pictures of signing of heads
of agreement, but very few pic-
tures of actual groundbreaking.
"You see, on Grand Bahama
hotels are closed; unemployment is
rising, education is declining, peo-
ple are suffering and this govern-
ment is doing absolutely nothing.
We deserve a government that
wants to work for us."
Education was also a key con-
cern expressed by the Torchbear-
ers, who pointed out that the
FNM's record on education com-
pared to that of the present gov-
ernment makes them confident
that their future will be brighter
after the next general election is
held and the FNM is returned to
power.
"I cannot stand by and watch
the deterioration of our educa-
tional system, a D average is total-
ly unacceptable. And with the


increasing level of crime we
should be ashamed!" said 18-year-
old Vanessa Cornish, vice-chair-
man of the North Abaco Torch-
bearers.

Identity
"it is truly encouraging when I
see the party I love the FNM.-
with a clear identity and an iden-
tity people can point to and say
'the FNM stands for us, the FNM
cares for us'," she said.
Renaldo Roxbury, national
vice-president of the Torchbear-
ers, asked: "Tell me why should
the youth suffer any longer? The
PLP has built no new schools since
2002, so could you imagine the
overcrowding in a place like Nas-
sau, where the population is rapid-
ly growing?
"Education is the key to our
future," he added. "This so-called


caring government cannot even ,,
keep our teachers happy, but we, ,.
want to say to our teachers we ..,
appreciate:you, and because of.,
you people like me can stand here ,-.
and speaktonight. They say ,edu-
cation is the key to ouir success.''
Well, teachers are also a key to
that success."
Expressing confidence in the
hierarchy of the FNM asit heads
into the next general electibli f'
Antonio Lockhart, national public
relations officer, said: "1 decided to
join the Torchbearers because I
love the FNM'sideals and.because
the FNM has a heart for-the young':
people.
"I was even more rejuvenated
by the return of Mr Hubert Ingra-- ,
ham, who we know holds the ,
youth of the country dear to his
heart. .
"Under his leadership ie youth
of this country we l iven a 'y,.
voice."


Jon My... B, .h am s. .
; ^'* ^ ~ i^ ^ ~ iK -^-s1"?'-.elk,'


Join My Bahamas...

Support a community project






*i


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Get Your School or Community Project Endorsed by My
rjhamais1 email details to mybahamas@bahamas.com


Jo.!nec a My Bahamas initiative lately? Tell us abolt It. Emroll. .
tesimonial and photos to mybahamas@bahamos.com
'


--


I HL I HltBUNL


PAGE 2, MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006


.*'


'"~ `








THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006, PAGE 3


0 In brief


0 In brief


Brad Pitt

scouts real

estate in

Caribbean

country

* SANTO DOMINGO,
Dominican Republic
BRAD PITT visited the
Dominican Republic this
week to scout real estate
development locations,
according to Associated
Press.
The actor took a heli-
copter to the Samana penin-
sula, on the island's north
coast, and the eastern towns
of Miches and Punta Cana
to look into real estate pro-
jects with art dealer and pro-
moter George Nader.
It was not clear what kind
of project Pitt was explor-
ing.
He was photographed
Friday afternoon following a
meeting with German archi-
tects Lars Kruckeberg and
Wolfram Putz at a hotel in
the capital's colonial district.
The architects had previ-
ously refurbished Pitt and
girlfriend Angelina Jolie's
house in Los Angeles.
The couple, who
costarred in 2005's "Mr. &
Mrs. Smith," are expecting
their first child later this
year.
Jolie who was in the
Caribbean nation in Janu-
ary filming the movie "The
Good Shepherd" with
Robert De Niro did not
accompany Pitt, said her
publicist, Holly Goline, who
confirmed Pitt's trip.
Pitt will narrate a series
on environmentally friendly
structures and sustainable
architecture in June on
American public television.


Volcano dome

W experienced
quick growth

in February

M OLVESTON,
Montserrat

MONTSERRAT'S vol-
canic dome experienced
quick growth in February,
but it will be another year
before it reaches propor-
tions similar to those
when it collapsed in 2003,
spewing ash in the air that
reached some neighbor-
ing Caribbean islands, sci-
entists said, according to
Associated Press.
The dome of the
Soufriere Hills volcano
started growing again in
November, experiencing
a brief spurt in February
before returning to nor-
mal growth rates.
"Thus far there have
been no major collapses
or explosions," the
Montserrat Volcano
Observatory said in its
regular six-month report
released on Wednesday.

Ash

The volcano had been
continuously venting ash
recently, with some
sandy-like ash falling in
safe areas in the island's
north.
Scientists on Montser-
rat monitor the volcano
and report changes to the
island's more than 4,500
residents, who live in the
British territory's north-
ern hall.
The volcano began
erupting in 1995, chasing
away more than two-
thirds of the population.
April 3 is the 10th
anniversary of one of the
volcano's major explo-
sions, which sent a cloud
of ash more than 3 miles


into the air and marked
the final evacuation of all
residents from the capital
of Plymouth and areas
south of that.


LOCALNW


Teachers' work to rule may




move into 'another mode'


* By RUPERT
MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

TEACHERS in the public
school system will begin a
week-long work to rule today
with the possibility that they


will move into "another
mode" next week if there is
no compromise from govern-
ment negotiators, Belinda
Wilson, secretary general of
the Bahamas Union of
Teachers, told The Tribune.
While Ms Wilson would


not expand on what this
"other mode" may be, she
said that government will
have "no other choice but to
soften their position."
She said: "The law is on
our side and we are going to
stick to our points, those that


'Acting President' suggestion


for College of the Bahamas


THE College of the Bahamas should have a
Bahamian president and there is no one Bahami-
an who possesses all, or even most of the search
criteria listed, it was claimed yesterday.
Dr Albert Ferguson, a member of the Gov-
ernment High School class of 1968 and the initial
COB formation leadership team in 1975, said in a
press release yesterday:
"My advice is to simply drop the apparently
unreasonable deadline for university status, and
appoint Dr Rhonda Chipman-Johnson to head a
three-person presidential council, which will per-
form in the role of president.
"The three persons Dr Chipman-Johnson will
lead will be practising, well-known and well-
established foreign experts and consultants in
the various areas represented in the search crite-
ria," said Dr Ferguson.
After three years, he suggested that the foreign
experts will fall away and you will have an oper-
ating Bahamian president with all of needed
international exposure and expertise.
"Dr Chipman-Johnson can continue as 'Acting
President' whilee the council finds the ideal team
capable of helping to lead the college into uni-
versity status, etc., and to support and further
sharpen Dr Rhonda Chipman-Johnson as presi-
dent," said Mr Ferguson.
"The public silence of members of the GHS
class of '68, over which Dr Rhonda Chipman-
Johnson currently serves as president, is not
indicative of the pure disgust and frustration
members of this class, (and other GHS alumni of


Police search
IN THEIR bid to reduce the
number of illegal firearms in the
country, police carried out a search
for weapons and ammunition at a
home on Ficus Street, Pinewood
Gardens, over the weekend.
CDU officers found live rounds
of shotgun ammunition in the bed-
room. Further inquiries led them to
a second location where they dis-
covered a black Maverick shotgun.
Police arrested a 22-year-old
man in connection with illegal pos-
session of the firearm. He is now
assisting police with the investiga-
tion. Officers on Friday also recov-
ered a .9mm Ruger revolver on
Moore Avenue in the Englerston
area with the help of a concerned
resident.


this era) feel toward the College of the Bahamas'
council, as well as toward others in national lead-
ership," said Dr Ferguson.
He said that those in the GHS class of '68, as
proud Bahamian professionals, "have given our
all, and in instances, continue to give our all to
serve our beloved Bahamaland with dignity, pride
and compassion.
"We deeply resent and are highly upset over
the degrading treatment being meted out to Dr
Rhonda Chipman-Johnson, one of the nation's
choice intellectuals and collegial professionals.
Such hurt is of the nature which will not be con-
fined to one generation alone," said Dr Ferguson.
He said his sentiments were shared by.others
"so tied to the system that their public utterances
might be deemed inappropriate, or potentially
have undesirable consequences."
He added: "Over the past 20 years, I have
personally seen newly elected political persons,
and other hand-picked business professionals,
who did not know beans about highly technical
and complicated ministries, yet being assigned
:to lead them,randin the course of time, doing so
successfully.
"I am certainly familiar with all who ha\ e been
assigned to the Bahamas Electricity Corporation
in my time there. Therefore, I do not know what
the problem is. It seems beyond professional
management-sense. It is perhaps political, or per-
haps management best understood or explained
in the council room of academia," Dr Ferguson
added.


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we are not prepared to move
from."
However, she did not rule
out the possibility that both
sides may reach a compro-
mise.
"The teachers are support-
ing us 100 per cent and we
intend to go through this
process until it is complet-
ed," Ms Wilson said.
Government negotiators
have said they are "disap-
pointed" by the BUT's deci-
sion to institute a work to
rule but have yet to give a
more comprehensive
response to the union's deci-
sion.
Last Wednesday, the BUT
told its members to start a
work to rule this week and
suspend all extra-curricular
activities as their negotiations
with government took anoth-
er "turn for the worse".
Starting today, teachers are
being asked to report to
school at 8.45am and leave
promptly at 3.15pm.
They were encouraged not


"The teachers
are supporting us
100 per cent and
we intend to go
through this
process until it is
completed."

Belinda Wilson,
secretary general
of the BUT
to do any work beyond the
minimum required by their
contract.
Also starting next week, all
sporting activities in high
schools will be cancelled until
further notice.
Union president Ida Poiti-
er-Turnquest said this action
comes on the heels of gov-
ernment negotiators offering
the union the "same old con-
tract" first offered when the
negotiations began.


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Public Notice


All persons interested in attending the
Funeral Service of Mr. W. Livingston
Forbes in Long Bay, San Salvador on April
8, 2006 should contact Dykton Mechanical
Co. Ltd., at 356-9738, 356-9296 or 356-
5474, as we are in the process of chartering
a flight on Friday, April 7th, 2006 to
accommodate those persons who wish to
attend. The flight will return to Nassau on
Sunday, April 9, 2006.








THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4. MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006


EIOIAULETT S T HEEITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama


The Tribune and the bird flu story


THE LOCAL media have been blamed
for the bird flu scare, the news of which,
spreading almost as quickly as the flu itself,
threatened to cripple this country's tourist
industry.
The Ministry of Tourism was quick with its
management control. The story was denied
and international panic was averted.
"The recent coverage by all the media of
the dead birds in Inagua raised some concern
in the tourism industry, both here and
abroad," wrote a member of the Bahamas
Hotel Association in a letter to The Tribune.
"While we know that The Tribune makes
every effort to report the facts in a fair and
balanced manner as you see them, the head-
lines and implication that the dead birds may
be a result of the avian virus created an
impression, when picked up overseas, that
the virus may very well have arrived in The
Bahamas. Initial medical reports have shown
no signs of the flu?"
He ended his letter in a most respectful
tone: "While we are reticent to tell the media
what to do, and respect your vital role in
keeping the public informed, we do request
that you share our sensitivity as to how del-
icate matters such as this are conveyed to
the public."
We were fully aware of this. We were
also fully aware of the sensitivity of the mat-
ter when the story was published.
Tourism Minister Obie Wilchcombe, who
had to try to mop up the fall-out, had this to
say:
"We did this ourselves, no one else, it was-
n't the American media who did it, it wasn't
the Briitsh media or the media from the
Caribbean it was ourselves who put this
information out there. So now we have to go
out and clean it all up."
Mr Wilchcombe, a former radio news-
man, then added: "We're not trying to tell
the media don't do your work. Do your job
but when I was a journalist, I was.always
told to check the story, check behind the
story, check on the side of the srory, check
on top of the story to make sure that when I
carried that story I didn't have to apologise
for making a mistake."
We were tempted to answer, Mr Wilch-
combe on this last comment, because The
Tribune always checks its stories. But
because of the frightening consequences of
this particular story, we doubled our efforts.
Our reporters checked and doubled checked
the information with the best government
sources available. Our reporter even inter-
viewed the head of the National Trust in
Inagua for first hand information.
We decided to let Mr Wilchcombe's com-
ments slide on this occasion because to go
too deeply into detail would have revealed
our impeccable source, who had given us
the tip in good faith. At the time he/she
believed it might have been a case of bird flu,


and Bahamians, for their own security need-
ed to be alerted immediately.
And so we kept quiet, and decided to let
The Tribune take the blame. This would not
be the first time that The Tribune has backed
off from the truth, just to protect its sources.
However, it was drawn to our attention
last week that in a COB journalism class, a
lecturer, herself a journalist, asked her stu-
dents to bring back to the next class research
on irresponsible journalism. She suggested as
an example, The Tribune's bird flu story.
This was the straw that broke the camel's
back.
We shall write this very carefully because
we have no intention of revealing our initial
source, except to say that the source was so
good that most journalists including Mr
Wilchcombe would have published the
story without checking further. We did not
do this.
As soon we received the report of Inagua's
fears, our reporter contacted Agriculture
SMinister Leslie Miller who said that a Min-
istry of Agriculture and Environtmental team
was flying to Inagua the next morning to
investigate the deaths. He confirmed that
the possibility of bird flu could not be ruled
out. Our reporter interviewed Glenn Ban-
nister, president of the Bahamas National
Trust, and president of Morton Salt Com-
pany, for many years an Inagua resident.
"This is a very large number of birds to be
found dead at Inagua, I usually drive around
every'week and almost never find a single
dead bird, so this is highly unusual," Mr Ban-
niser said.
On discovery within a two-day period of
15 dead flamingoes, five Roseate Spoon Bills
and one Cormorant, and no external signs of
the cause of death, the alarm was sounded.
Mr Bannister contacted Public Health Direc-
tor Dr Baldwin Carey in Nassau who then
alerted the Agriculture Ministry.
The fear on the island that day was that
although they hoped they were wrong, all
signs pointed to the possibility of avian flu.
Although the dead birds were not migratory,
Mr Bannister said that such migratory birds
as geese and ducks wintered in Inagua and
mixed with the local birds. There was indeed
fear that day that these birds might have
died of bird flu, brought in by the winter vis-
itors.
Waiting a day or two before the story was
published would not have lessened those
fears. Four days later it was announced that
the deaths were not caused by bird flu. How-
ever, as far as is known, even today no one
knows for certain what killed those birds.
And so The Tribune published an accu-
rate story on February 28. That story
remained accurate in every detail for four
days "Bird flu virus fears on Inagua."
To be continued.


Local


egg


producers


EDITOR, The Tribune.
MINISTER of Agriculture
Leslie Miller says local egg pro-
ducers should be protected from
competition by foreign egg pro-
ducers.
According to press reports
(Tribune Business, Thursday,
March 9, 2006) he has "moved
to prohibit the importation of
foreign eggs, and yesterday
warned that tariffs will be
imposed on any Bahamian com-
pany failing to comply" with the
import ban.
This debate over tariffs has
raged for centuries, but when
John Stuart Mill wrote his Prin-
ciples of Political Economy in
the mid-1800s and said, "It can-
not be expected that individuals
should, at their own risk, or
rather to their certain loss, intro-
duce a new manufacture..." it
provided support for the pro-
tectionist argument.
It is reported that Mill retract-
ed these sentiments in later edi-
tions of his book, but the dam-
age had already been done.
When according to Douglas
Irwin, "Mill saw how U.S.,
Canadian and Australian pro-
tectionists had used his work to
justify higher tariffs on imports,"
he changed his tune. (Against


the Tide: An Intellectual Histo-
ry of Free Trade.
Tariffs are a tax alternative
to other forms of taxation such
as income tax.
In most instances in The
Bahamas tariffs are not meant
to control or limit trade.
Checking egg prices and selec-
tion at a local grocery store
revealed the following:
Rainbow Farms Large $1.50
per dozen
Rainbow Farms Extra Large
$1.55 per dozen
Egg-Land's Best $3.09 per
dozen
Organic Extra Large $5.99
per dozen
It is obvious that price is not
why people buy the foreign
eggs, when locally produced
eggs are roughly half the price.
Based on this information
increased tariffs are not likely
to make people shift from buy-
ing the eggs they prefer...they
would still not buy the eggs the
Ministry of Agriculture wants
them to. Consumers make deci-


Correcting one



important detail


EDITOR, The Tribune.
OVER the past week the controversy around the selection of
a President for the College of the Bahamas has placed certain
items of my personal life in the spotlight, and while I have no
intention of "weighing in" on the subject, I would like to correct
one very important detail of your reports and to make my posi-
tion on another quite clear.
Several "news" stories have indicated that Janyne Hodder and
I have two Bahamian children. I am not sure which of our
three children you wish to ignore, but the three children we
share are Dr Anne Rahming and Messrs Mwale and Dylan-John
Rahming. Anne is a lecturer at Carlton University and Mwale
and DJ live and work in Montreal.
Secondly, anyone who knows me knows that what my sister-
in-law does in pursuit of her beliefs is her business, and that I
certainly do not take her actions personally. While I may dis-
agree with her union's views, it would take more than that to cre-
ate tension in my family.
I suggest that those suggesting that possibility are themselves
seeking to create mischief.
Finally, Ms Hodder was married to Patrick Rahming, the
architect and entertainer. Your avoidance of my professional
standing seems somehow deliberate, and is not at all appreciated.

PATRICK A RAHMING RIBA
Nassau,
March 30, 2006.


sions to suit their personal needs
and desires, not those of gov-
ernment, which explains why
government planning usually
fails to meet the stated inten-
tions.
Then the power of govern-
ment will be applied even fur-
ther...as already threat-
ened...and imported eggs will
be'banned. And as with previ-
ous bans on agricultural prod-
ucts, the imported eggs will find
their way into the country
through "illegitimate" business-
es where they will be stored in
less than ideal circumstances,
creating a possible health prob-
lem.
The effort of local egg pro-
ducers should be applauded.
They have taken personal risk to
develop their businesses. Not all
people are born with this entre-
preneurial spirit, but the answer
to their sales decline is not to
use the power of the govern-
ment to force Bahamians to buy
their product.
It might take a little more
effort, but the local producers
need to educate consumers
about their product and the ben-
efits of buying from them. They
should also consider surveying
potential customers in the local
grocery stores to see why they
do not buy the homegrown
product. They might find that
something as simple as packag-
ing has an impact on their sales.
It is interesting that bureau-
crats believe they know best
what eggs everyone should buy,
but to allow any government
minister the power to apply tar-
iffs or import bans at the stroke
of a pen is dangerous, no matter
how well intentioned.
Dr. Milton Friedman said it
best: Concentrated power is not
rendered harmless by the good
intentions of those whb:create it.
If the Ministry of Agriculture
is allowed to enforce this policy,
more businessmen can then seek
protection from competitive
imports. But just as it would be
unconstructive to prevent
Bahamians from buying and
importing what they wish of oth-
er products like food, clothes,
furniture, appliances, cars etc -
the egg industry should not be
exempted from competition.
In his recent book titled Free
Trade Today, Jagdish Bhagwati
noted tha trying to correct mar-
ket failure with government
intervention only makes mat-
ters worse. Hopefully cooler
heads will prevail and the coer-
cive force of government will
not be implemented and the egg
industry will resolve their issues
on their own.

THE NASSAU INSTITUTE
Nassau,
March, 2006.


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THE TRIBUNE


Jamaia's nw Prme Miiste


Jamaica's new Prime Minister



steps forth.., and stumbles


O NE of the many
ironies of Jamaica is
that, for all its myriad political
and social problems, it has (with
the single exception of Edward
Seaga) been blessed with a suc-
cession of decent prime minis-
ters.
If you look at oil and gas rich
Trinidad, a few hundred miles
to the south, the situation is
quite the reverse.


PERSPECTIVES


ANDREW

ty of irresponsible politicians
ready to engage in 'garrison pol-
itics' (notably by encouraging
party-affiliated gangs in inner
city communities), it has almost


It is hard to make sense of one
of the new prime minister's first
moves since taking office: her
instruction to all her ministers
that, henceforth, all state boards
created within their ministries
"m(6ust have a pastor as chair-
: a. .


With one or two notable
exceptions, a succession of
idiots, bunglers and thieves in
the highest office of that land
,has ensured that Trinidadians
S have, benefited only marginal-
: ly from their immense natural
.. wealth. Barbados, with no
S resources,. leads them in both
". i income per head and human
; development.
By contrast, although it has
certainly made huge policy mis-
takes, Jamaica's problems of the
;*; .. last 30 years have related most-
ly to factors beyond its leaders'
.'immediate control.
.: :Itsprime ministers, mostly
Coming from ,an educated and
highly civic-minded class, have
::generally been far above either
personalcorruption or gutter
politics.- Nowhere was this
: essential gentlejmanliness bet-
:: ter exemplified than in the dig-
Snifi4 rivalry between Michael
,- ManioV and hi% c:ouin and pre-
debessor, Hugh-Shearer.
.While Jamaica has had plen-


always been lesser politicians
and acolytes, rather than prime
ministers themselves, who have
borne most of the guilt here.

Many have not shied
away from the mean
streets of Jamaican urban poli-
tics, with its violent culture and
criminal undertones.
Worryingly to some, it is from
such a strong inner city 'grass-
roots' background that the new
prime minister, Portia Simpson
Miller, hails. In the 1970s, she
gained a reputation as a hard
woman of Kingston's urban pol-
itics, gaining the respect of
many in Mr Manley's adminis-
tration, but the fear and
loathing of others.
The departure last week of K
D Knight, the foreign minister,
signalled the culmination of a
rift between the new leader aAd
many establishment figures.
Mr Knight had been her most
prominent critic, questioning


AL L E N

the character and intellect of
Mrs Miller during the recent
campaign, and implying that her
image as a hard woman was a
little too close to the reality for
comfort in a place like Jamaica.
Still, many other erstwhile
critics have opted to give Mrs
Simpson Miller an opportunity
to prove herself, especially as
she has brought a wave of pop-
ularity to the party that has sel-
dom been seen since Manley's
time.
A DISAPPOINTING
EARLY MOVE

Except as a political ges-
ture of the first order,
it is hard to make sense of one
of the new prime minister's first
moves since taking office: her
instruction to all her ministers
that, henceforth, all state boards
created within their ministries
"must have a pastor as chair-
man".
Her reasoning for this strange
instruction is that having a pas-
tor on public boards will be the


and politics are evident all
around us (most recently in the
Christian fringe's censorship of
a film about homosexuals).
So the unabashed association
of church and state is worrisome
enough. But the prime minister's
choice of the term "pastor",
rather than, for instance, "clergy"
gives rise to another danger: the
possible elimination of objective
criteria in deciding who qualifies
to serve on these boards.
In lay terms, the word "pas-
tor" is an archaic way of refer-
ring to a shepherd, an impor-
tant symbolic idea in Christian
doctrine. In modern religious
language, (where it is most often
used today) it is a generic term
that covers a worryingly wide
assortment of people asserting a
position of religious leadership.

A s we have seen in the
Bahamas, the use of
this word does not imply
accreditation by anyone other
than oneself and one's own fol-
lowers.
Sadly, it requires neither hon-
esty, ethics nor a basic level of
education to attract a flock. In
fact, many of the most success-
ful local examples seem at times
to have benefited from an
absence of these attributes both
in themselves and among their
followers.


The dangers of mixing religion
and politics are evident all
around us (most recently in the
Christian fringe's censorship of
a film about homosexuals).


best way "to ensure probity" in
the affairs of the boards.
In the Bahamas, where politi-
cians have, since the 1960s,
played a dangerous pandering
game with the religious element,
the dangers of mixing religion


All of this makes it very wor-
rying that a woman charged
with leading a country with one
Sof the highest murder, rates pn:'
,. e arth. and endmic violee, and,
corruption should see, the ele-
vation of 'pastors' to state


MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006, PAGE 5


MONDAY,
APRIL 3
6:30 Bahamas @ Sunrise I iv
11:00 Immediate Response
12noon ZNS News Update Live
12:03 Caribbean Today News
Update
12:05 Immediate Response Conl'd
1:00 BTC Connection
1:30 Eye On Health
2:30 Caribbean News In Review
3:00 David Pitts
3:30 Bishop Neil Ellis
4:00 Lisa Knight & The Round TFblP
4:30 Cybernet
4:58 ZNS News Update
5:00 Battle of the Brains
Semi Finals #1
5:30 Gillette World Cup 2006
6:00 Gospel Grooves
6:25 Life Line
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10:00 Caribbea Newsline
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30 Comm. Page 1540AM
1 0 I ILYAt


boards as a way to promote
integrity in public affairs, rather
than, for instance, public sector
reform or more vigorous anti-
corruption legislation.
More self-appointed leaders
handed power on account sim-
ply of an assumption of 'pro-
bity' that comes along with the
ability to attract a flock?. One
would have thought that that is
one of the last things Jamaica
needs at this moment. One
hopes that, in the final analy-
sis, the same will not be said of
Mrs Miller.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006


CARICOM-US conference on the




Caribbean and its challenges


* By Sir Ronald Sanders
(The writer is a business exec-
utive and former Caribbean
diplomat who publishes widely
on small states in the global
community).

AFTER US Secretary
of State Condoleezza
Rice had a meeting with CARI-
COM Foreign Ministers in
March, an Editorial in the Bar-
bados Nation newspaper pro-
claimed: "Nothing new from
Rice Meeting".
Rightfully, the editorial sur-
mised that "no more than a
one-hour working session" pro-
duced "nothing new of signifi-
cance" in the US-CARICOM
relationship.
The agreement "on the
importance of the international
community remaining engaged
in Haiti over the long term, in
order to promote stability and
socio-economic progress" was
the least they could say.
Except for one line, the joint
press statement issued at the
end of the meeting, which was
held in the Bahamas, tended to
confirm the conclusion of the
Nation's Editorial.
The single sentence that tan-
talized the reader declared:
"They agreed to convene a
Conference on the Caribbean
at a mutually convenient time in
2007".
It has to be assumed that this
proposed "Conference on the
Caribbean" will be a full-blown
discussion of the enormous
challenges and threats that con-
front the Caribbean from loss
of preferential markets for tra-
ditional exports, through
decreased aid and investment
and the adverse effects of drug
trafficking, to the survival of the
unique Caribbean culture and
identity.
And, if indeed, the Confer-
ence on the Caribbean will tack-
le these issues, it has to be fur-
ther assumed that other mem-
bers of the international com-
munity with a Caribbean inter


est such as Britain, France and
The Netherlands will be invited
to attend as well as the Euro-
pean Union (EU), the Interna-
tional Monetary Fund (IMF),
the World Bank and the Inter-
American Development Bank
(IDB).

similarly, it is assumed
that the Dominican
Republic and Haiti will be
asked to attend since they are
amongst the largest countries
in the region.
Predictably, Cuba which
should also be present at such a
meeting will not be invited in
keeping with current US policy.
But, there is every reason why
Canada and Mexico, and now
Venezuela and Brazil should be
asked to attend.
Canada has traditionally
played an important role in
development assistance in the
Commonwealth Caribbean, and
it has strengthened its contri-
bution to the Caribbean by its
more recent involvement in
Haiti.
Brazil, too is emerging as sig-
nificant in the region even
though not always with
approval. Its challenge at the


insighl
WORLD VIE
IOR LD V E~r


has led the UN peace keeping
forces in Haiti, and it is a lead-
ing voice in negotiations at the
WTO, although again its
agenda for cuts in subsidies and
reduction of tariffs is out of sync
with the interests of the smaller
CARICOM countries which
continue to require protections
and longer periods of adjust-
ment if their economies are to
survive.
And, notwithstanding the stri-
dency in the relationship
between the US and Venezuela,
the Caribbean should want a
senior representative of Presi-
dent Hugo Chavez's govern-
ment at the Conference
table. The Venezuelan offer of
deferred payment for a part of
the cost of oil supplies to
Caribbean countries is not with-
out significant difficulties to
these territories including
increase in their already bur-


Canada has traditionally
played an important role in
development assistance in the
Commonwealth Caribbean,
and it has strengthened its
contribution to the Caribbean
by its more recent
involvement in Haiti.


WTO of EU subsidies to Euro-
pean beet sugar producers pre-
cipitated the EU cut in prices
to CARICOM sugar produc-
ers. At the same time, Brazil


densome debt. and these diffi-
culties should be considered in
any multilateral conference
which is sincerely concerned
with the plight of the


between themselves. For, if that
is the case, what has been the
focus of these meetings between
Ms Rice and CARICOM For-
eign Ministers, three of which
have been held since she
assumed the office of Secretary
of State?
In any event, a bilateral meet-
ing between the US and CARI-
COM countries could hardly be
classified as a "Conference on
the Caribbean", and a US-
CARICOM encounter even
if it lasted a day rather than an
hour could not deal with the
myriad other conjunctures of
' the Caribbean with the inter-
'. national community.
'. Of immediate importance to


Caribbean.
Mexico, has tended to view
the Caribbean, through the
prism of the North American
Free Trade Area (NAFTA)
where it secured an advantage
over the Caribbean for exports
into the US, indeed causing sev-
eral enterprises in the region to
collapse. Its principal interest
in the region has been
Cuba. But, Mexico remains a
big player in the hemisphere,
and a more thoughtful.focus on
the region would be helpful.

If, indeed, it is such a Con-
ference (albeit without
Cuba) that the US Secretary of
:State and CARICOM.Foreign
Ministers envisaged, then it
.should be welcomed as long
:overdue.
One cannot imagine thai
~ hai the LIS Secretar\ of Sitate
and CARICOM 'Foreign Min-
isters had in mind was strictly a
Conference on the Caribbean


Of immediate
importance to
Caribbean
countries is
their trade,
aid and
investment
relationship
with the EU.


Caribbean countries is their
trade, aid and investment rela-
tionship with the EU where
they have lost preferential mar-
kets for sugar and bananas cre-
ating deep anguish over the lev-
el and duration of compensa-
tion that they require to adjust
their economies and find gainful
employment for their people.
While the US played a signif-
icant role in initiating action at
the World Trade Organisation
(WTO) which led to the loss of
preferential markets in the EU
for bananas, and Washington
should play an active part in


finding a solution to the adverse
effect on the region, the EU is
also a crucial player.
This same argument holds
good for crime and security in
the Caribbean.

The rise of drug traffick-
ing from South Ameri-
ca through the Caribbean is tar-
geted as much to Europe as it is
to the United States.-The EU,
therefore, has as much interest
in addressing this problem as
does the United States. The
presence of European territo-
ries in the Caribbean the
British and Dutch overseas ter-
ritories and the French Depart-
ments bolster the funda-
mental importance of the EU's
continued and active participa-
tion in contributing t- the
Caribbean's struggle \%ith secu-
rity issues.
And, it should be Ihe
Caribbean that takes the lead
in preparing the discussion
papers for such a Confer-
ence. After all. Caribbean coun-
tries should best kno\ what
their problems are, and ihey
should be in the best position
to determine the solutions
including what assistance they
need from the international
community and in which areas.
Amongst these should be. a
programme of adjustment for
Caribbean economies, includ-
ing how they will diversify away
from traditional agricultural
commodity exports which can
no longer compete; and a plan
for a mutual regional security
system with reciprocal obliga-
tions that embraces all the play-
ers in the Caribbean, including
the US, Britain, France and the
Netherlands.
If such a Conference will tru-
ly be convened in 2007, work
on the preparation of its work-
ing documents by the
Caribbean's most able people
drawn from the universities and
the public and private sectors
should start now.
Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com


THE SIR LYNDEN PINDLING
&
ARCHDEACON WILLIAM THOMPSON





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Pa rj.rpi f: .pn;nspi s.
7"A-llt *PLThT


Tickets Available at
THE DUNDAS THEATRE 39.-7149 or 39.3-3728,
GALLERIA CiNEMAS (JFK) 356-7328
A.D. HANNA & CO. 322-8'306
MOIR & CO. L'FORD CA' SHOPPING CENTRE 382-4895


FFrNK I r ThiAPLE ON
NN t l.'IfNT,


-7


THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANY LIMITED
P. O. BOX N-3048 NASSAU, BAHAMAS
TELEPHONE. (242) 302-7000

VACANCY NOTICE

SECRETARY
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites applications from suitably qualified
individuals for the position of SECRETARY in its Marketing Department.
JOB SUMMARY
The holder of this post will perform the normal duties of a secretary exercising an appropriate degree
of independent judgment and maintaining strict confidentiality with respect to sensitive information.
ESSENTIAL DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES
-Type correspondence, forms and other items which may require some independence of
judgment as to content, accuracy and completeness.
Take dictation as required and transcribe to draft or final copy as appropriate.
Demonstrate competence in the English language, take and transcribe minutes or notes
at conferences or meetings.
Receive telephone and personal callers, take messages, and respond to any questions
of a routine nature whilst directing others to the appropriate staff members.
Establish and maintain filing systems, control records and indexes using independent
judgment.
-Schedule appointments, make reservations, arrange conferences and meetings as requested.
-Compose routine correspondence and refer to appropriate staff members with relevant
attachments or notes.
-Operate a variety of office equipment required in the Marketing Department and take action
necessary to preserve the equipment in proper working condition.
-Demonstrate adequate knowledge of the Company's personnel policies and procedures.
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS
1) Energetic, highly motivated and proficient in Microsoft Office Applications especially Power
Point Presentation.
2) Bachelors Degree in Secretarial Science.......or
3) Associate Degree in Secretarial Science with four (4) year experience....or
4) Six (6) years experience in related field.

All applications are to be received at BTC's Head Office, 21 John F. Kennedy Drive, no later than
April 7, 2006 and addressed as follows:

DIRECTOR
HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD.
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS

RE: SECRETARY


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006


)FIDEwa








THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006, PAGE 9


Ever e'


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Bend
Be,


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This veli .


w4ith c;oll.iy ..
your v,-hi!. .
'l'rn i ,,' l l ... I ,


7777 777

d" 1AIM"'I",

"An"


our


Our responsibility

Brak Service Suspension & Alignme.
Oil, Lude & Filter "GOODYEAR T


*American & Imported Cars Light Truck;s


*Complete inspection & Estimates Before it"..


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Tel: 35 u .


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Open: Monday Saturday
8am-5pm



Fax 326-4865 P.O. Box SS-6766 Nas ,.
AUTO SYSTEM EXPE ::


"Midas is a business based on service, quality a .
Factory scheduled maintenance is car card.
Midas services your car fully. Our system takes t;' gueswortk
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EASTER IN

ELEUTHERA



VEHICLE PASSENGER
FERRY SCHEDULE
(AIR-CONDITIONED PASSENGER CABIN)
THURSDAY APRIL 13TH
DEPT. NASSAU 4:00PM
ARRIVE GOVERNOR'S HARBOUR 8:15PM
FRIDAY APRIL 14TH
DEPT. NASSAU 7:00AM
ARRIVE HATCHET BAY 10:35AM
RETURN MONDAY APRIL 17TH
DEPT. HATCHET BAY 10:00AM
ARRIVE NASSAU 1:35PM
DEPT. GOVERNOR'S HARBOUR 6:00PM
ARRIVE NASSAU 10:15PM
RATES
Passenger: One Way $40. Round Trip $70.
Vehicles: Cars One Way $150. Round Trip $250.
Trucks & Suv's: One Way $175. Round Trip $300.
WITH DRIVER

Ft S JED MUNROE: 422-3594 fss.
cO CONRAD SWEETING: 477-6162 stW
THE ISLAND LINK TICKET BOOTH AT EASTERN END POTTERS CAY DOCK


MACKEY ST, & ROOSEVELT AVENUE
Te" 393-6651 or 393-6693


---.11 -






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PAGE 10,B MONAY APRIL 3,_LA 2006$ THEBB TRB- IBUN


Under the distinguished patronage of Their Excellencies Hon. Arthur D. Hanna,
Governor General of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and Mrs. Hanna

THE BAHAMAS

o t7Mv o^/c Jp


M THE coffin is borne out of the church


* ST Agnes was full for the funeral of Peter Andrew Bowe


(Photos: Franklyn G Ferguson),


Family and



friends gather



for funeral of


Peter Bowe


9., BEST


CoColinaImperial
00 Insurance Ltd.

If you are: thorough, customer focused, team-oriented, enthusiastic, and have a
passion for excellence, we want to meet you!


Underwriter


PositionSummary
Processing of medical insurance claims.

Job Requirements
SExcellent reading, writing and communication skills
Excellent interpersonal skills
Good numeric and computer skills
Associate Degree minimum or equivalent
Instu:ance Underwriting Courses in FALL or LOMA
3 years Underwriting experience

Responsibilities Include
Complete risk assessment of Life Insurance policies within
an authority limit.
Liaise with Reinsurance companies.


Compensation will be commensurate with experience and qualifications,
Please submit your resume to our Corporate Headquarters, attention:
Vice President, Human Resources,
or submit via email using the subject line:"Undewtriter"
to
Careers@Colinalmperial.com
Deadline for all submiissions Thursday Ap, il 20th 200(.


Colinalmperal is 100f' Baharrnan-owned and offers excellent employee benefits including
share ownership rnd career development opportunities.


ticeship at The Tribune. he was
offered a post as a journalist
and supervisor as a result of his
expertise and hard work.


However, he opted to attend
St John's at the behest of his
then mentor, Fr Alvin Fong,
Ben.


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PHONE: 322-8160 OR 322-8219
SServingDthelBahamianOCommunitylSince11978


FRIENDS and family ot well-
known lawyer Peter Andrew
Bowe gathered at St Agnes
Anglican Church for his funer-.
al.
The 53-year-old lawyer was
employed at The tribunee in his
youth during the summer holi-
days and Saturdays where he
and the Ilte George Mackiey
commandeered. restored and
installed a discarded linotype
machine tor their personal use.
Mr Bowe became an expert
linotypist and subsequently was
made responsible for headline
features editorials a major task
at this tender age. He became
so adept ai his job ilat Sir
Ettiene Dupuch made him an
apprentice.
At age 15, Andrew graduated
from St Augustine's'College
with a partial merit scholarship
to attend St John's University in
Minnesota.
After completing his appren-


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006








MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


Robber

'FROM page one
BMH by persons describing
themselves as his friends. He
xvs suffering from gunshot
wounds and died shortly after
l~`was admitted," Chief Supt
times said.
iVitnesses claimed that all
fp ur men received gunshot
vounds during the attack.
[Police are now investigating a
possible connection between
the death of Smith and the
sjoot-out at the John Chea
store.
iThe store's owner, Sidney
d(ea the son of John Chea,
f Dnder of the foodstore chain
01h.o died in 1968 was
u hjil mned during the incident.


College

FROM page one
was not given the authority to
finalise the agreement," a
1JUEB statement said.
'This latest dispute between
the union and the council comes
after UTEB's protest over the
council's handling of the intro-
duction of former college pres-
ident candidate Janyne Hodder.
UTEB objected to the man-
ner in which Ms Hodder was
introduced to the institute,
claiming that the council had
failed to follow the correct
prodecure.
When asked if there was any
connection with the filing of the
trade dispute and the recent dis-
.jrcement between the coun-
cil and ITEB Mrs [saacs-Dot-
sop said. "The public can read
Into this whatever they want
She said that, at the moment,
faculty members at COB are
taking the delay in reaching an
industrial agreement "in their
,tride."
"Lecturers in COB continue
to work, we have not withdrawn
our labour despite a lot of issues
we have dealt with at COB,"
she said.
She said many found it "a bit
disturbing and distressing",
especially those who had been
negotiating with the college for
three years.
However, Mrs Isaacs-Dotson
said she expects the Labour
Department to tackle this issue
as soon as possible.
"I will check with them this
week and I told them that it was
urgent," she said.
In its statement, the union
said it has since the expiration
of its last contract been
"patiently waiting while negoti-
ating in good faith."
"The union is of the view that
the council should work in con-
cert with faculty in resolving
this issue.
"It should be noted that the
faculty union is prepared to
work with the council in
advancing the institution. The
faculty is simply asking to be
respected as a partner in the
development of the college and
its transition to a university,"
UTEB said.


ere


The new

mellow wine from


Lamothe Parrot













Ti. table wi' wiLth class.


' ii I i


I.- -


YOUR CONNECTION TO 'HF WORLD


The Bahamas Telecommunications Copnpany Ltd. (BTC) is pleased to invite
Tenders to provide the Company with coverage for our Directors and
Officers.
Interested companies/firms in Nassau may collect a tender package from
the Security's Desk located in the Administrative building on John F.
Kennedy Drive, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday
through Friday.

In Freeport, packages are to collected from the Security's desk, BTC, Mall
Drive.

The deadline for submission of tenders is April 13th, 2006. Tenders should
be sealed and marked "TENDER FOR DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS
INSURANCE" and should be delivered to the attention of the Acting
President and CEO, Mr. Leon Williams by the above date and time.

BTC reserves the right to reject any, or all Tenders.
__ _


LO CA NE W


- --- --


B
~EjE~laEj~S~


I"r


Anximom









PAGE12,MONAYAPRLO3,206LTENRIWNE


YOUR CONNECTION TO THE WORLD

THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANY LIMITED
P. O. BOX N-3048NASSAU, BAHAMAS
TELEPHONE. (242) 302-7000


VACANCY NOTICE
MANAGER
PRODUCT MANAGEMENT
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites.applications from suitably qualified individuals for
the position of MANAGER/PRODUCT MANAGEMENT in its Marketing Department.
JOB SUMMARY
This position is responsible for directing, promoting, planning, coordinating and managing all life cycle activities
for BTC product lines, including revenue and profitability, either personally or through subordinates.
Manage:
Manage and direct the Product Management staff including recruitment, training, and development
Plan / Implement:
Manage provision of product definition, pricing, direction and positioning throughout product's life cycle
Monitor technological, competitive, customer and market factors to identify positioning and promotional
requirements
Manage development of programs and plans, ensuring cross- functional implementation, monitoring results
and initiating corrective action
Lead the department in development of strategies, goals and tactics necessary to achieve product/service
performance goals and objectives
Manage tracking and reporting of product performance
Manage vendor and channel management and support
*Manage and provide day-to-day sales support for product issues, positioning, special pricing and non-
standard products
Provide messaging and content to Marketing Communications for product collateral and sales tools

Relationships:
Establish and maintain effective and productive relationships with industry influencers and key strategic
partners/suppliers internally and externally
*Work effectively across cross-functional departmental boundaries
Goals / Performance:
Set performance goals consistent with corporate objectives
Direct performance evaluations
Manage product development implementations to schedules
Reporting:
*Track and report product performance and other customer and segment data
Initiative:
*Take independent action and calculated risks
Look for and take advantage of market opportunities
Product I Industry Knowledge:
Have in-depth knowledge of BTC's products and services
Be cognizant of technological trends in the telecommunications industry
Have in-depth knowledge of customers and competitors
Education / Experience:
Bachelors Degree in Marketing or Business with a minimum of eight years related experience in
telecommunications industry
Minimum five years in marketing functions in high tech company
Advanced degree such as MBA(or equivalent experience desirable
Required Skills and Abilities:
Capable of working in a team environment as a team member or team leader in managing the product
implementation process across diverse departments and levels
Demonstrated assertive, persuasive and creative problem solving and project management skills
Product management and/or product support planning experience
Excellent verbal and written communication, presentation, organization and time-management skills
Capable of interfacing at all internal management levels and representing the company with customers,
partners and vendors
*Able to work and lead effectively in a changing environment
*Strong qualitative and quantitative analytical skills
Demonstrated effective people management skills
Computer Literacy
*Proficient use of Microsoft Office and e-mail applications
All applications are to be received at BTC's Head Office, 21 John F. Kennedy Drive, no later than April 7. 2006
and addressed as follows:

DIRECTOR
S HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD.
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS

RE: MANAGER/PRODUCT MANAGEMENT


Doves', 'The Boy and the Butterfly' and 'Sea-
weeds', addresses issues such as intolerance, spir-
ituality and love- sometimes in a fairy tale like
manner, other times in a matter-of-fact Way. The
book also contains poems which seek to voice
some of the dreams and whispers we all carry
inside of us."
Coppies of the book can be purchased from
the Chapter One Book Store on Thompson Blvd.




2,500 expected





for fun walk


THE date is April 8, the time
6.30am, the place Montagu
Beach and the event the
Atlantic Medical Insurance
Company Ltd and Weight
Watchers Bahamas eighth
annual fun walk.
Once again Atlantic Medical,
along with its numerous part-
ners, will "walk the walk" to
demonstrate the right way to
healthy living.
The Bahamas Diabetic Asso-
ciation and the Bahamas Can-
cer Society will join in again this
year for the biggest-ever
Atlantic Medical Fun Walk.
Expected turnout 2,500!
The main objective of the
walk, says Darren Bastian,
senior account executive,
Atlantic Medical Insurance
S!.nitmed, is to encourage and to
create an increased awareness
Sof living healthy.
"Additionally, proceeds from
this walk will support The Can-
cer Societo of The Bahamas and
The Bahamas Diabetic Associ-
ation, so we encourage every-
one to come out and support
these two worthy charities."
The route will go west on
Shirley Street to Church, north
on to Church Street to the new
Paradise Island Bridge, east of
S'the bridge to the Paradise Island
Golf Course and then back to
Montagu Beach via the old
bridge, east on East Bay Street
to Montagu.
Last year the walk attracted
thousands of participants who-
enjoyed the biggest and best
organised fun walk in the
Bahamas.
Numerous corporate entities
have pre-registered in great


get ready' to take on the world in the a nllew





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special discounts and factory rebates $ 7,261.00
one time onl., applies to 'chicles in stock
Additional Customer Incentive $ 1,500.00

YourSpecialCashPrice $31,900.00


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THOMPSON BOULEVARD TEL.: 356-7100 FAX: 328-6094 EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com


"Built For The Road Ahead"


* ELNMA Garraway. Ministry of Health permanent secretary
and Nlinisler of Health Dr Bernard Nollage are presented nith
registration kits by Darren Bastian, senior account executive at
Atlantic Medical Insurance


numbers as they await the big
day to "walk the walk" as
Atlantic Medical reminds every-
one through the event oftheirr
most valuable asset. good-
health.
Special prize draws will fea-
ture exciting items such as free
Weight Watchers passes, round-
trip tickets for two to New York
on Jet Blue Airlines, Razr Tele-
phones from BTC, a lifetime
membership from Bally's Gym,
$30 worth of gasoline from
Esso, Wulff and Mount Rose,
and free gym passes at Better
Bodies.


All participants will be eligi-
ble to win. Additionally, every-
one who registers for the walk
will receive a free T-shirt, and
an Atlantic Medical pack. Fruit,
water and healthy snacks will
also be available on the morn-
ing of the walk.
Walkers of all ages aie asked
to contact Atlantic Medical
Insurance Company Ltd; at 326-
8191 or Weight Watchers
Bahamas 394-0148 to register
in advance for the event. Cate-
gories for the event include
under 15, 16-25, 26-35, 36-45,
46-59, and 60-plus.


Medical Receptionist Mature female
with at least two years of college
experience.

Must be computer literate, pleasant
personality and excellent
communication skills.

Kindly fax resume to 302-4690





[ 3I




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RE*BATH BAHAMAS
Open Monday Friday, 9:00am 5:00pm
Saturday 11:00am 4:00pm
Telephone 9
(242) 393-8501 "Authorized Dealer"
.Visit our Showroom & Office located at the Red Carpet Inn, East Bay Street


Tribune reporter

presents copy of

book to Christie

PRIME Minister Perry Christie accepts a new-
fy-published book of short stories by The Tri-
bune's chief reporter, Rupert Missick Jr.
The book, Dreams and Other Whispers, will be
launched officially at the Bahamas National Trust
in Village Road on April 10.
Dreams and Other Whispers deals with night-
time imaginings and flashbacks. Mr Missick, pic-
tured here with Mr Christie, said the stories "illus-
trate the quirks of our fellow humans, as well as
the meaningful and whimsical moments that mark
all our lives. i
"The stories 'The Two Islands', 'The Valley of


I ONE TIME PROMOTION ONLY


PAGE 12, MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006


THE TRIBUNE/


psg%;~


i








MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


C IE ANEW


:Venezuelans train for




Militias as Chavez




warns of US threat


VENEZUELA
S' Charavalle
,.-. THE women, some trem-
bling, grasped the assault rifles
Sanded to them and awkwardly
S lowered themselves spread-
eagled into sniper positions as
they took aim and fired at white
,,. targets in the distance, accord-
-ing to Associated Press.
These women jeans-and-
sneaker clad housewives and
Students are the unlikely heart
.'of a new civilian militia being
trained as President Hugo
_. Q*Chavez warns his country must
be ready for a "war of resis-
tance" against the United
States.
"Those who come here have
never fired a shot in their lives,"
explained Lt Col Rafael Angel
Faria Villalobos, who led train-
ing for the Territorial Guard
volunteers Saturday in Char-
.allave, just west of Caracas.
The volunteers included con-
struction workers, social work-
.' and many unemployed.
S Taria said 20 consecutive Sat-
; -'urda.ys of training through June
tu ill turn them into resistance
fighters prepared to defend
'their communities in the event
of a conflict.
The US government dismiss-
es Chavez's claims of a possi-
ble invasion as ridiculous, but
he insists Venezuelans must be
prepared for anything, citing a
short-lived .2002 coup that
S briefly\ unseated him.
Faria led more than 900 vol-
'~unteers who began their first
day of bootcamp after finishing
classroom training He said
S 3,000 people have volunteered
'for his training camp, while 42
o their camps jie hldinm, smi-
lar weekend 'dhlls nationwide.
Ten at a time, the volunteers


* A TERRITORIAL guard member, left, is helped by a Venezuelan army officer to points a FAL
7.62-mm assault rifle during a military training session at a rural military base in Charallave just
outside of Caracas on Saturday
(AP Photo/Fernando Llano)


lined up as officers coached
them to fire the military's stan-
dard-issue Belgian FAL assault
rifles from standing, kneeling
and prone positions at num-
bered targets in an open field.
"It was exciting, too good,"
-gushed Yomaira Alas, a 28-
,year-old housewife, after firing
for the first time. The Territor-
ial Guard will not be issued
weapon.: commanders said
guns \ would be made available
only in emergency situations, at
designated neighborhood loca-
tions. /
SThe.' olu nt.1 i,1receive a
16,000 bolivar stipend for every
training session, but most said


that barely covered transporta-
tion and a meal.
"I'm here voluntarily and
because I adore my president,"
said Marasierra Diaz, 40, who
helps promote neighbourhood
social programs.
Officials say the force will be
capable of defending commu-
nities, protecting hospitals and
schools, keeping order and pre-
venting looting. Some Chavez
opponents express concern the
force could be used to quell
internal dissent.
But soldiers who led Satur-
day's drills made clear ,US
troops were the hypothetical
enemy as men and women


swarmed across an obstacle
course of barbed wire, burning
tires and concrete fortifications.
"Kill the gringo! That gringo
is taking away your women,"
yelled a soldier as he tossed a
man a rifle to butt a target a
military uniform stuffed with
straw swaying in the wind. A
siren wailed while the acrid
smell of smoke hung in the air.
In addition to the Territorial
Guard, Chavez also has called
for an army reserve of 1 million
fighters and has sealed arms
deals to supply regular soldiers
with 100,000 new Kjl:.hnmkos
assault rifles and helicopters
from Russia.


Under the Distinguished Patronage of

Sev. Dr. Timothy
& LJMrs. Sharon Stewart
(Moderator of Bethel Baptist Assoc.)
&

ev. Dr. 3. Carl
& 714in. vangelyn Sahming
(Senior Pastor of St. Paul's Baptist Church,
Bernard Rd.)

The Officers & Members of
St. Paul's Baptist Church
Presents to you

"A GRAND GOSPEL

EXPLOSION"


St. Pail's Baptist Govpel Choir
JI


4" Jj'5
~%~a .~


Shabak
The Region Bells
Friends For Life
Bethel Baptist Associauon Choir
The Gospel Flames
Her Majesty's Pnson
Inmate Choir
Ms. Synovia Williams
The Singing Prophet
Lawrence Rolle
Soloists:
Ms. Erune Claridge,
Mr. Lorenz Wnght,
& Mr. Kenvatta Taylor


St. Paul's Baptist Children's Choir


NC's
Mr. Jack Thompson & Min. Clint Watson

PALM SUNDAY NIGHT
April 9th, 2006
7:30pm
Church of God Auditorium -
Joe Farrington Road

Tickets can be purchased from the church and members
$10.00 in advance $15.00 at the door
Prced are in id fte.cuchsbil*g


job OSS

..xeutveAdri ltatieAsitn


Are you striving for


personal growth with a passion for


SUCCeSS, in a company that


prides itself on customer service?


If we've peaked your interest, Let's Talk!!


Plus Group of Companies is an established
Bahamian owned group that is growing &
continuing to build it's team of professionals
in various areas.
We are seeking an individual to fulfil the
position of Executive Administrative
Assistant to the President.
We offer a competitive salary & benefits
package as well as ongoing professional
development & personal growth.
The applicant must have secretarial credentials
as well as the Skills listed with a minimum
of five (5) years experience working in this
: type of position.


i' ' '- ," : i


--."'.. -
I: ."


Skills Required:
* Multi-tasking & Project reporting abilities
* Must be computer literate & proficient
in Microsoft Office including Word,
Excel, Power Point
* Excellent organizational skills & the'ability
to meet deadlines
* Developing & maintaining effective filing
systems
* A results-oriented individual
* Energetic team player with leadership
skills & ability to problem solve
* Excellent communication skills including
telephone etiquette
'- l -l... [ l 4 ..:u.Cd



4PlusGroup
of ComI panies

I'ki. r.. i l' ii ,, ir pplk:caRon via
i .lai1 r.. Dir. O Ir ..i1 Hunman Resources
The Plus Group
I' (. B,-.. h r13
Najsau, Bahinias
or c i!.. ii r,,- L.. ib. -i'th plu-..roup.Lom
ei: th-ni l, l .i ppii hc:in ;s hov.ever only
hi-..'s i c J, cl ci t i i1 ii tricv. will be


., iII.itCL i


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* ;l*.























Y I


FIRSTCARI BBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK


CAREER OPPORTUNITY

for a

OPERATIONS PROJECTS &
RELATIONSHIP SERVICES MANAGER

QUALIFICATIONS:
Bachelor's degree in Business field
Minimum of 3-5 years banking operations experience
Project management experience and good business analysis
methodolgies skills
Practical knowledge of the financial market and/or regulatory
environment sufficient to apply relevant issues or developments to
work performed
Strong computer literacy especially in Excel, Work, and PowerPoint
Good leadership, negotiation skills and well-developed influential
skills sufficient to resolve distinct differences or opinion or approach
General knowledge of accounting principles

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS / RESPONSIBILITIES:

To support the overall strategic mandate of the Northern Operations
Group by identifying and executing process improvements that
increase profitability
Successfully implement significant business change in the Operations
Centres by ensuring business requirements are identified, planned
and implemented in line with the changing needs of the business
Perform activities relative to the analysis,, development and
implementation of various initiatives to directly or indirectly improve
customer service.
IF YOU ARE INTERESTED:
Submit your resume private & confidential in WRITING ONLY before April
14, 2006 to:
Chaunte Toote
Administrative Assistant, Northern Caribbean Operations
P.O. Box N-3221
Nassau, Bahamas
Or email: chaunte.toote@firstcaribbeanbank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank thanks all applicants
for their interest, however only those under consideration
will be contacted.
Vacancies are open to Bahamian residents only.


i" I."
i .. ~














Catholics remember John Paul II


BAHAMIAN Catholics
observed the anniversary of the
death of John Paul II yesterday
during the church's observance
of the fifth Sunday of Lent, the
40 weekdays from Ash Wednes-
day until Easter observed by
Christians as a season of fast-
ing and penitence.
During his reign, the Pope
travelled extensively, visiting
over 100 countries, more than
any of his predecessors. John
Paul II's first and only visit to
the Bahamas was in January,
1979.
On April 2, 2005, at 9.37pm
local time, Pope John Paul II
died in the Papal Apartments
while a vast crowd kept vigil in
St Peter's Square below.
Millions of people flocked to
Rome to pay their respects to
the body and for his funeral.
The last years of his reign had
been marked by his fight against
the various diseases ailing him,
provoking some concerns that
he should abdicate, although his
determination was widely seen
as an exemplary display of
courage.


Pope John Paul II was
extremely popular worldwide,
attracting the largest crowds in
history (at times attracting
crowds of over one million peo-
ple in a single venue and over
four million people at the
World Youth Day in Manila),
and being respected by many
even outside of the Catholic
Church, despite strident criti-
cism from some quarters.
John Paul II was fluent in
numerous languages: his native
Polish, Italian, French, German,
English, Spanish, Russian, Por-
tuguese and Latin.
Pope John Paul II, born
Karol J6zef Wojty, was Pope
for almost 27 years, from Octo-
ber 16, 1978, until his death,
making his the second-longest
pontificate.
On May 9, 2005, current
Pope, Benedict XVI, waived
the five year waiting period for
a cause for beatification to be
opened.
John Paul II was the first Pol-
ish pope and the first non-ital-
ian pope since the 16th century.
His early reign was marked by


his opposition to communism, and
he is often credited as one of the
forces which brought about its
fall.
In the later part of his pontifi-
cate, he was notable for speaking
against consumerism, unre-
strained capitalism, abortion, cul-
tural relativism and what he
deemed as the "culture of death".
His concern for the poor, the
weak and those who suffer, his
firm stances against warfare, vio-
lence, and capital punishment, his
views of evolution and his sup-
port for world debt forgiveness,
combined with his willingness to
visit socialist nations and his
strong relationships with leaders
of non-Catholic churches and
non-Christian faiths (ecumenism)
were considered by some to be
proof that he was "liberal."
His affirmation of the long-
standing Catholic doctrine that
abortion, homosexual sex, and
contraception are immoral, his
continuing the tradition of ordain-
ing only men to the priesthood,
teaching that divorced persons
could not remarry without a dec-
laration of nullity, that valid sacra-
mental marriage exists between
one man and one Woman, empha-
sising the benefits of retaining the
discipline of mandatory priestly
celibacy, and his opposition to
secularism are cited by others as
proof that he was "conservative."


/ "


I


.*.. I. .. :
"*' .,7 -.


M POPE John Paul II


(Photo: AP Archive)"'


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THE EVENT BEGINS AT 6.30 A.M. Late registration will not be possible.


THE ROUTE commences from iONTAGU BEACH then WEST on Shirley Street,
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round-about at Paradise Island Golf Course, BACK to New Providence via the "Old
Paradise Bridge", EAST on East Bay Street and back to Montagu Beach.

TROPHIES ARE AWARDED ACCORDING TO THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES:
(Male and Female awards)
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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006


-It


L


9


j.,








I 117 I nMI UNt ...... "





Building powered



by solar energy



opens in Eleuthera
o p e n s 11lDL __________________ ___________*^^_


* By Bahamas Information
Services
CAPE ELEUTHERA,
Bahamas The commissioning
of the administrative building
of the Cape Eleuthera Institute
- a pioneering research facility -
has set the trend in the devel-
opment of alternative energy in
the Bahamas.
Powered by solar energy, the
CEI campus represents an
unparalleled opportunity to live,
work and study in an innova-
tive atmosphere.
The facility is mainly
designed for research in tropical
sciences a place for college
and graduate level courses.
About 45 students, of whom
two: are Bahamians, are
enrolled in the programme.
Addressing official opening
ceremonies on Friday, March
31, :Prime Minister Perry
Christie, though supported such
a facility, declared that the Col-
lege of the Bahamas must be
involved in such innovative
techniques.
"Our tertiary level institutions
must be involved in the process
of development and they must
be integrated into the process
of research that is taking place
here in the Bahamas." the
prime minister said.
Hd noted that, as the College
of the Bahamas is headed for
university status, the institute
must be involved in research of
such levels, if only by sharing
the results and observation.
"It would be a great tragedy if
the research were taken back
to the home offices of the sci-
entists who are being commis-
sioned to engage in that
research," Mr Christie said.
In looking at the colleges the
Cape Eleuthera Institute isi
working with. he concluded that
decisions had to be made to
empower future-generations
and the way to guarantee that
was through the tertiary educa-
tional system already in place.
On March 10, 2006, the Cape
Eleuthera Institute commis-
sioned the first grid-connected
renewable energy system in
Baflamian history.
It'is a collaboration effort
with;Bahamas Electricity Cor-
poration, which also calls for
the supply of power to the near-
by Deep Creek settlement.
The campus is outfitted with
custom-built furniture from
local woods, rainwater catch-
ments for domestic water needs,


and treats onsite sewerage sys-
tem to tertiary standards to pro-
tect marine and freshwater
resources.
Students and scientists are
able to access real-time data on
solar output and building con-
sumption waste processing effi-
ciency. They also learn elements
of green building design and
construction.
The Cape Eleuthera Institute
is part of the Cape Eleuthera
Foundation a United States
non-profit organisation that
provides funding for scientific
research and related areas. The
foundation's projects include
The Island School, the Deep
Creek Middle School, and the
CEI.


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The prime minister said that,
in creating a Ministry of Energy
and Environment, he was
attempting to show that the
future of the country would be
heavily influenced by decisions
on the question of energy -
whether it is LNG or solar pan-
els.
"When we speak of the
Bahamas and we speak in
despairing terms of being a
country without natural
resources, only having the sand
and the sea and therefore
designing industries around the
sun, sand and sea and having a
predominantly driven tourist
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* PRIME Minister Perry Christie chats to students during the official opening ceremony


resources," Mr Christie said.
Brief remarks were also ren-
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al manager of BEC; Senator Dr


Marcus Bethel, Minister of
Energy and the Environment;
Alfred Sears, Minister of Edu-
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PAGE 16, MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006


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THE TRIBUNE


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CNEST SDMH WGWM~








MONDAY, APRIL 3,2006


SECTION


business@tribunemedia.net


BUSINESS Clioe

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


BISX planning for 'incubator' listings


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

tional Securities
Exchange (BISX) is
planning to create "incu-
bator listing" facilities
for domestic and international com-
panies who do not want to be includ-
ed among its primary listings, having
"received some very creditable inter-
est" in both platforms.
In an address to the Bahamas Soci-
ety of Financial Analysts, Keith
Davies, BISX's chief executive, said
the exchange was working with the
Securities Commission of the
Bahamas to establish both listings
facilities.
He explained that the domestic
incubator platform would be for com-
panies who did not want to be a pub-
lic company and trade as one of
BISX's primary listings, but still
desired to be subject to certain rules
and regulations.


Exchange works with Commission on fines for BISX Rules infractions; seeking to

toughen timely disclosure, shareholder rights, corporate governance provisions


Mr Davies added that such a facil-
ity would enable such companies to
provide a "track record" to investors
if they ever decided to become fully
public through an initial public offer-
ing (IPO).
The BISX chief executive said the
exchange was working with the Secu-
rities Commission because the Secu-
rities Industry Act's "legal require-
ments don't cover those companies"
at present that would be interested
in the incubator facility.
The Securities Commission was
constrained by Section 53 of the Act,
Mr Davies said. In what is likely to be
seen as a reference to the $5 million
preference share issue by RoyalStar
Assurance, which the company want-
ed to list on BISX, Mr Davies


* KEITH DAVIES,
CEO OF BISX


referred to an instance where an
unnamed company sold securities,
then wanted to list them so they could
be traded among those who bought
them.
Yet by listing on BISX, these shares
would be available to the entire
investing public, Mr Davies pointed
out, the Securities Commission having
viewed this as a back door route to
going public without going through
the IPO process.
"We have to bridge that gap," Mr
Davies said. "BISX is in no way going
to abrogate the purpose and intent
of the Act."
Hence the development of the incu-
bator listing facility, enabling Bahami-
an companies to list and "say we're
not a public company, but we want


comply with everything a public com-
pany does", Mr Davies explained,
such as providing quarterly results
reports to the market.
"We have to allow the market to
grow, allow companies to show who
they are," the BISX chief executive
added.
On the international incubator
front, Mr Davies said BISX had
received interest from an Asian
source. This facility would be used by
companies "not quite making the Big
Board" on New York and European
exchanges, but who wanted to raise
capital and be subject to certain rules
and regulations, generating a "com-

SEE page 2B


New A/C product may lower Bahamian energy costs 20%


* By A FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Business Reporter
THE Bristol Group Of Companies is eyeing further expan-
sion into the Family Islands, after it was awarded the exclusive
distribution contract for Bacardi brand products in the
Bahamas, the deal taking effect from Saturday, April 1.
The company takes over from Butler & Sands, part of the
rival Burs House group, whose contract with Bacardi ended
on lMarch 31,2006.
BristoI's ice-president of sales and marketing, Eddie Gar-
diner. said it was a business decision that Bacardi made not to
renew its former contract, "in a plan to move forward".
"We had been counted out so many times before," Mr
Gardiner told Tribune Business.
Juan Bacardi, the group's president, added: "It is a com-
pliment to our entire organisa-
tion and we are very excited to
be a part of Bacardi, looking SEE page 4B



Atlantis RevPAR up

2.1%/ in early 2006


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
PARADISE Island's
Atlantis resort grew its rev-
enue per available room
(RevPAR) by $5 or 2.1 per
cent to $239 in the first two
months of 2006, despite aver-
age occupancies being down
by 2 per cent against the pre-
vious year's comparatives.
In a Securities & Exchange


No Athol golf course
without condo hotel

Commission (SEC) filing relat-
ed to its 2005 annual report,
Kerzner International said
Atlantis achieved an average
occupancy of 81 per cent, and

SEE page 7B


'No concern' on rival

Winn-Dixie offers


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamian group
behind a $50 million offer for
Winn-Dixie's 78 per cent stake
in Bahamas Supermarkets has
told The Tribune it is not con-
cerned about the possible
emergence of a rival bidder.
Jerome Fitzgerald, a direc-
tor of BK Foods, said in a
voicemail message: "We are
not concerned about another
bidder."
Tribune Business reported
last Friday that BK Foods'
offer was likely to flush out


rival bidders, and that at least
one other group was willing to
"match or exceed" the $50 mil-
lion offer.
Speculation as to the iden-
tity of the rival offer has
focused on Hi-Lo Food Stores,
Trinidad's largest supermarket
chain, which has its own dis-
tribution network and can
import some food and drink
products directly from the US.
The Bahamas, with its rela-
tively high per capital income,
would be seen as a lucrative

SEE page 10B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BAHAMIAN businesses could reduce
energy costs associated with running their
air conditioning (A/C) systems by up to 20
per cent through a new product being
introduced to this market, which could
also increase worker productivity and
reduce absenteeism via ill-health.
Innovative A/C Systems (Bahamas) has
been appointed as the exclusive licencee
and distributor in this nation for Steril-
Aire's UVC Emitters, iftra-violet hghts
that kill bacteria and mould in A/C sys-


teams before they pass into the cold air cir-
culating around residential and commer-
cial buildings.
Guilden Gilbert, co-owner of Innova-
tive A/C Systems (Bahamas), said that
A/C systems typically "run at their most
efficient" when they are first installed, but
over time mould built up on the coils that
created the cold air pumped around build-
ings.
Not only did this reduce energy effi-
ciency, as more power was needed to oper-
ate the condenser, but the mould build-up
also meant that bacteria %were being
pumped around buildings by.the A/C sys-


tem, creating health problems and
increased worker absenteeism.
Mr Gilbert added that at least two atten-
deesat a presentation given by Steril-Aire'
and Innovative A/C Systems (Bahamas)
had acknowledged their companies had a
problem with mould in the A/C systems.
He explained that the Steril-Aire UVC
emitters killed the mould and bacteria
that caused it, plus any other microbes
entering the A/C system from the outside,
ensuring it ran at maximum efficiency and

SEE page 6B


S.~






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1I~JI"PI~rF7








THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B. MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006


FIDEUITY MA RKE TR1P


S By Fidelity Capital
Markets

IT was a brisk trading week
in the Bahamian market, as just
under 96,000 shares changed
hands. The market saw a whop-
ping 18 out of its 20 listed stocks
trade, of which two advanced,
two declined and 14 remained
unchanged.
The volume leader for the
week was Consolidated Water
Company's BDR (CWCB),
with 20,000 shares changing
hands and accounting for 21 per
cent of the total shares traded.
Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
followed in second place with
19,987 shares.
CBL was also the big
advancer for the week, up $0.12
to close at $9.50. On the down
side, CWCB lost $0.35 to end
the week at $4.82.


The FINDEX declined by
3.16 points for the week to close
at 595.19.
COMPANY NEWS
Bahamas Supermarkets
(BSL) -
IT has been reported that a
Bahamian investment group,
BK Foods, have put forth an
offer to purchase Winn Dixie's
78 per cent ownership interest
in BSL at an estimated price of
$50 million.
BSL operates 12 stores
throughout Nassau and Grand
Bahama, and trades its shares
in the Over-the-Counter mar-
ket.
If the deal is approved by the
US Bankruptcy Court, officials
from BK Foods have said the
current management team
would remain in place, with
staff unaffected.


International Markets

FOREX Rates
Weekly %Change


CAD$ 1.1687 0.11
GBP 1.7374 -0.28
EUR 1.2114 0.65


Commodities
Weekly %Change

Crude Oil $66.32 3,21
Gold $583.50 4.10


International Stock Market Indexes:
Weekly %Change

DJIA 11,109.32 -1.51
S & P 500 1,294.83 -0.62
NASDAQ 2,339.79 1.17
Nikkei 17,059.66 3.01





BISX planning for listings


FROM page 1B


fort level" for investors.
Elsewhere, Mr Davies sig-
nalled that BISX was looking
to strengthen transparency,
timely disclosure and corpo-
rate governance throughout
the Bahamian market, work-
ing with the regulators on
introducing fines where
breaches of BISX rules were
proven.


"We have an intention to
amend our rules to include
stronger requirements on dis-
closure, corporate governance,
mergers and acquisitions and
the protection of shareholder
rights," MR Davies said.
"The Securities Commission
has indicated its willingness to
consider various levels of fines
for infractions under BISX
rules.
"This will send a very clear
message to issuers and the
market that we are very seri-


RBC
FINCO




FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED


Chairman's review of the unaudited results
For the three months ended 31s January, 2006



We are pleased to report that Net Income for the three months ending 31st January, 2006
increased by $567,436 or 12.43% over the corresponding period last year to $5,130,819.

The company's return on equity was 25.78% compared to 24.19% and earnings per share
totaled .19 up from .170 for the comparable period last year.

An interim dividend of .130z per share was declared for the quarter ending 31s January,
2006, which was paid on 14' March, 2006 to all shareholders of record as of 7* March,
2006. The dividend payment of.130 represents an increase of .010 compared to the same
period last year.

The bank experienced strong growth and profitability during the first quarter offiscal
2006. We are optimistic that this level of performance would continue for the remainder
of fiscal 2006.


Managing Director


Copies of the entire interim financial statements are available to the public free of charge and may be obtained at
FINCO's Head Office, 2"'floor Bahamas Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, The Bahamas
during business hours.



RBC
FINCO


Balance Sheet
As of:

Total Assets
Total Loans net
Total Liabilities
Total Shareholders' Equity


Income Statement
3 months ending:

Total Revenue
Total Expenses
Loan Loss Provision
Net Income
Earnings per share


31 JANUARY, 2006

$ 611,766,969
524,968,095
525,012,422
86,754,547



31 JANUARY, 2006

$ 12,153,398
6,905,441
117,138
5,130,819
0.19


31 OCTOBER, 2005

$ 593,802,120
511,328,783
507,645,193
86,156,927


31 JANUARY, 2005

$ 553,745,481
478,852,584
472,537,462
81,208,019



31 JANUARY, 2005

$ 11,658,265
6,961,903
132,979
4,563,383
0.17


BISX CLOSING
SYMBOL PRICE


AML
BAB
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
CWCB
DHS
FAM
FCC
FCL
FIN
ICD
JSJ
KZLB
PRE


$0.59
$1.18
$0.70
$6.95
$10.70
$14.00
$1.26
$9.20
$9.50
$1.69
$11.00
$4.82
$2.45
$6.21
$1.15
$10.40
$10.66
$9.50
$9.09
$7.81
$10.00


CHANGE VOLUME


$-0
$-0
$-0
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$0.12
$-0.01
$0.10
$-0.35
$-.
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$0.04
$-


50
4050
50
10133
3255
0
50
9450
19987
5500
12880
20000
50
4250
50
2900
800
2438
50
0
0


The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 595.19% YTD 7.86%


YTD PRICE
CHANGE
-19.18%
7.27%
0.00%
-0.71%
2.88%
9.80%
0.00%
-3.66%
4.28%
3.05%
1.10%
-6.77%
12.90%
2.64%
0.00%
3.48%
-2.20%
-4.52%
0.44%
14.01%
0.00%


DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:
Cable Bahamas (CAB) declared a dividend of $0.06 per
share payable on March 31, 2006, to all common shareholders
as at record date March 16, 2006.

Commonwealth Bank (CBL) declared a dividend of $0.12
per share payable on March 31, 2006, to all common share-
holders as at record date March 15, 2006.
Commonwealth Bank (CBL) declared an extraordinary
dividend of $0.12 per share payable on April 28,2006, to all com-
mon shareholders as at record date April 15, 2006.
Consolidated Water Company (CWCO) declared a divi-
dend of $0.012 per share payable on May 5,2006, to all common
shareholders as at record date March 31, 2006.


ous about compliance, and will
aid investor confidence.
"Perception of our markets
is what creates a sense that
everything is or is not OK."
Transparency and timely dis-
closure of material informa-
tion affecting BISX-listed com-
panies has been a recurring
issue throughout BISX's
almost six-year history, as has
been the protection of minori-
ty shareholder rights and cor-
porate governance.
Mr Davies said BISX was
working on the creation of a
centralised, electronic news
bureau that would release
news of a material nature
impacting listed companies to
the market and the media.
He added that this would
ensure "immediate, frank dis-
closure of information to our
investors", correcting problems
where information was not
released in a timely fashion, or
was not uniform or consistent".
Mr Davies said that in most
cases listed issuers had com-
plied with BISX rules, but it
had taken several days after a
material event had happened
for the information to be
released to the market.
"We will be working to cor-
rect'this anomaly while work-


ing to improve the efficiency
of our market," Mr Davies
said.
To complement the' pro-
posed news bureau, Mr Davies
said BISX was also looking to
develop an electronic filing
platform for its listed compa-
nies. They would use this to
file information on material
events, plus details on the trad-
ing of company stock involving
insiders, such as officers and
directors.
Mr Davies said this would
"remove the mischief of
whether compliance is
achieved", adding of, tip cur-
rent system: ,'They [public
companies] have to go through
hoops to make sure it's in my
hands."
The BISX chief executive
said the exchange would also
seek to create a balance
between regulation, and the
needs of the market and
investors, and "issues facing
smaller companies as opposed
to large cap stocks".
He acknowledged that in the
past he had received numer-
ous complaints from smaller
companies alleging that they
were being forced to follow the
rules, while larger firms were
not.


He needed a knee replacement.


DOCTORS HOSPITAL
HIP AND KNEE
REPLACEMENT
CONSULTATIONS

Date:Tuesday, April 3
Time: 2:00pm 6:00pm

FOR AN APPOINTMENT
CALL 302-4684


41


And he had one here.


Do you have daily joint pain? Do you
suffer from severe Osteoarthritis? Does
your pain affect your daily activities?
Do you have stiffness of your knee
or hip joint?

Dr. Jimmy Lee M.D., F.A.C.S.,
Orthopedic and Total Joint
Replacement Surgeon will be
conducting his monthly Total Joint
(hip and knee) Replacement
Consultations at the Doctors Hospital
Sessidnal Clinic. Join the many
patients who lead an active lifestyle
and n w live pain free.

For bre information, or to schedule
an appointment call Doctors Hospital's
Sessi nal Clinic at (242) 302-4684.



DOCTORS HOSPITAL
SHealhFor Lif


NlHSEEDBED URGENTLYBS^^

W Te arl agrowinTg retail companywe

(III
o f fS erigB .Sl .5 -ryonuesPenio.





Plan, Trainig au'nd lots of FUN!!








Interested, then call for an interview
3564512, 3564514, 3250234 or 3250s235
MaurStbeHadWrig



Interested, then call for an interview
356-4512, 356-4514, 325-0234 or 325-0235


I


BUSINESS










THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006, PAGE 3B


BISX develops rules for new members


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas International
Securities Exchange (BISX) is
developing rules to regulate the
new members it expects to
attract when the capital markets
are "transformed overnight" by
the formal listing and trading of
government debt securities over
the exchange.
Addressing a Bahamas Soci-
ety of Financial Analysts lunch,
Keith Davies, BISX's chief exec-
utive, said the exchange was
working with the Central Bank
and regulators "to electronically
duplicate" the current auction
system used in government
paper issues.
He said this system, which
would be phased in gradually,
would eliminate any disruption
in the issuance of government
debt instruments, such as gov-
ernment-registered stbck and
Treasury Bills.
Mr Davies said the creation
of a formalised, electronic plat-
form for listing and trading debt
instruments issued by the Gov-
ernment and other public sector
agencies would "lead to a
greater efficiency in the debt
markets".
This would be achieved by
shorter lead times for issues, and
the ability to track the transfer-
ring and pledging of securities.
Mr Davies said the current
market "does not capture the
benefits that could be realized
from primary debt dealers and
secondary market trading".
Outstanding issues of govern-


ment-registered stock numbered
more than 100, and had a total
value of more than $1.6 billion.
Mr Davies indicated that the list-
ing and trading of this on BISX,
in addition to Treasury bills and
other government paper, would
more than double the exchange's
market capitalisation and give it
critical mass.
Once the electronic platform
was in place, access to the Gov-
ernment debt markets would be
through BISX members who
were broker/dealers, Mr Davies
explained, and all participants -
the exchange, brokers, govern-
ment and the Central Bank
would have to know and under-
stand how it worked.

Issues

"There are a whole hots of
issues that need to be addressed
at all levels," Mr Davies said.
With the advent of secondary
trading in government debt, the
BISX chief executive said other
Bahamas-based financial insti-
tutions were likely to be attract-
ed in to become BISX members.
"We are in the process of
developing new rules and guide-
lines for this new type of BISX
member," Mr Davies said.
BISX had also selected its new
electronic trading system, which
Mr Davies said was "ideally suit-
ed" to .net and Microsoft plat-
forms, enabling maximum Inter-
net usage and data feeds.
He added that the Bahamas
had to develop new investments
and new opportunities to ensure
the pool of available funds was


not always chasing after the
same investments, citing the
Central Bank exchange control
amendments involving Bahami-
an Depository Receipts (BDRs)
and cross-listing on regional
exchanges as helping to achieve
this.
-Companies listed on
Caribbean exchanges were
"chomping at the bit to get into
this jurisdiction", Mr Davies
said, either to raise capital or to
get Bahamian participation in
their firms.
He added that the amend-
ment allowing broker/dealers to
invest a total of $25 million per
annum in structuring unspon-
sored BDR issues was likely to
have "the greatest impact" on
the Bahamian capital markets.
This would unlock the "cre-
ativity and financial wherewith-
al" of BISX members, particu-
larly its broker/dealers, in struc-
turing BDR issues and develop-
ing further varieties of this deriv-
ative.
"Members are working on this
and making representations to
the Central Bank," Mr Davies
said. He indicated that the like-
liest way of structuring an
unsponsored BDR issue would
be through the formation of a
mutual fund.
Mr Davies indicated BISX
would also seek to attract fur-
ther mutual fund listings, partic-
ularly given that some 700-800
investment funds were domiciled
in this jurisdiction. "There has
to be a way to capitalise on that;
they can't just be sitting here
doing nothing," he said.


Abaco resort 'close to sold out'


* By A FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Business Reporter

ABACO Beach Resort & Boat Harbour is
"very close to being sold out" for the Easter sea-
son, while its Phase II construction project is
underway.
According to its director of sales and marketing,
Michele Steegstra, the Easter season is looking
quite promising for the resort.
Persons making last-minute arrangements to
stay at the island getaway will only be able to
get a minimum reservation for the Easter week-
end, booking from the 14th of April through to
the 17th.-" f'r
During,'April 17 -24, bookings can only be
made for the whole week.
Abaco Beach Resort's success comes after the
company just recently announced the launch of its
Phase II development project, which is to cost


between $10 and $15 million.
Last week's groundbreaking signalled the
beginning of the construction project, which the
company stressed would not interrupt operations
at the resort.
The project includes second homes, condo-
miniums, and additional slips in the marina.
Abaco's promising Easter mirrors the book-
ings being enjoyed by hotels in new Providence
and Paradise Island, which all report full or near-
ly full occupancy.
The Atlantis Resort on Paradise Island and
Baha Mar's three properties the Radisson, Nas-
sau Beach Hotel and Wyndham all report near-
ly 100 per cent bookings, after a successful Spring
Break season.
However, Long Island resorts Cape Santa
Maria and Stella Maris Resort are facing a tough
Easter ahead, with reservation counts dropping
due to the closure of the Stella Maris airport.


*rllt lr lD d us-t o'ur I lui-,. ['.ini ..--m- r r
Tei +'44 0)121 355 Oft)
Goodmanats Bay Cnrporate Centre, Bahama' F- 444(01 1.1 6- 73J10
.i- 10.00am (.Opni 7-rmad CITSTE- Irdgisbaeallaw.com ior'r 1-rohure puck
-n 25 Apr il 2006 F. i.uwL-r irdorrslu-n w.
wAw.kemtliw..om Jfl r nw.step.or
And -r- .1k t--, tim'. urN D -lor Or nt,.l F-byr c'a~. al
Lu lk h i, Ir.".m'.id 12.00pm .OOpm ~ 'tl Tra'jr k'b4 G...djwr. Bay C,'r1,~r~Int.
Til 326612
.i: -rnat mbyt-sqkphauAniorg


.. : ......:..... .: ...,

.-.




Introduction
Tl .. ST EP Dipl .n-n'I. pli.lo'il\ r.o-.igrun _d programmer e and is currently offered
in Is juriJ'.~ t'. ni i Elr- pI,. -idJ t. announce ad nLew intak' for the Foundation
P'r"ormilm.. .,.ur, w', pen ', er'n:,r'lnmnt

Programme Features
ThI. .r- ,,,ninn .. ill t.k- .appro.-mnatal-l) y rs to Oomphlte, de'pendtng on
[.- r'i ,inju\ Iinud ..i.ptmnudti ..uid -hr:duJing o1" c:rur', iand .xarrunditions It is


Foundation Certificate C':-nt.irunn module'; ,:n ol'shore financial
F...i.i._.. th.: ,5 ,lutin '.1 EqLut\ typo5s .and uses of shoree trusts, features
' ..'.,..J iliu-i .l..IiniMtra.,-i'.n u-'-- anJ typo' ofsl'shior-. Jon'iparme- and the


Diplomna Ii.: .I.. .. .t llow g I,.,uUr adv- n,.d papers,


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Benefits
0* 'i.'L.kill, r.
M Lk.A Ihi r'. Fii 'IT T Er 'P'n i.p.Frl 'tE n o1f the Dipmlonu
M Fl1 r% int. v.d I m' prop'r.iim t hot includes' '-,mprehensi'e
miur' mi t I, rm.iN uprorb-d by k-Cl..l IUN. in UL' Lour,-14 and web!Mte

M H1IhI .' ioorii rd and kri-_' ml tig .k'lcprseesLn~ r-i
M '\I nd.,n, it .,t. 'i. . 'Infr-nr ,n ( i t Ihe .mreir e or ei mnatLTI o in any
-1 1 1.IL_ . ii. nn


STEP
'1c i'.,I aI % I rus.tand
2',i.. Prachltioners


A Single Storey Commercial Building of concrete structure approximately 5 years old which an incomplete Gas
Station and Underground Fuel Storage Tank and comprising 2,121 sq. ft. situated on Lot No. 90-F (27,738 sq. ft.)
being a portion of a Lot of Land totaling 4.646 acres on Main Eleuthera, Queens Highway, Lower Bogue, Eleuthera
The property is well landscaped and is in close proximity to a Shopping Centre and Gas Station. Area Utilities:
Electricity, City Water and Telephone


. .. . ...




-.--A ....".
,J ,
For conditions of the sale and other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit at: 356-1685, 356-1608 Nassau; Bahamas
Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit,
PO. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us before April, 2006
Directions: Travelling on the western side of the Main Eleuthera Highway and approximately 2,219 feet northerly
from Four for Nothing Road on the Island of Eleuthera, Bahamas
Financing available for the qualified persons
Serious enquires only


a


MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006, PAGE 3B


I

i
I
I

r
i

I
I

I


THE TRIBUNE









PAGE 4B. MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


* SHOWN (from left to right):
Brian Major, brand manager,
Bacardi & Co; Eddie Gardner,
vice-president of sales and
marketing, Bristol Wines &
Spirits; Juan Bacardi, president
of Bristol Wine & Spirits;
Arame Strachan, assistant mar-
keting manager, Bristol Wines
& Spirits; Kimani Smith, mar-
keting manager, Bacardi & Co


-------,,--------,..-----------









We are looking for an accountant to join our team. The ideal candidate will have
2 years accounting experience in all aspects of accounting. Exceptional written
and oral communication skills combined with the ability to work with minimal
supervision will be key to this position. Advanced skills in Excel and Word are
required and knowledge of Accpac accounting system would be an asset.

You would be reporting directly to the General Manager and Financial Controller
with the responsibility of preparing daily cash and sales reconciliations, accounts
payable, weekly inventory and cost of sales reports, reconciliation of credit cards
and other administrative duties.

If you fit the above requirements please either fax your resume to the attention
of the General Manager at 325-0141, or email your resume to
Nassau_gm@hardrock.com.bs for consideration.






BOAT FOR SALE


Bristol eyes Family Island




growth after Bacardi deal


FROM page 1B

forward to working with
them."
Mr Gardiner said the com-
pany had augmented its sales
department to give support for
the Bacardi brand it now car-
ries.
He said that at Bristol Cel-
lars, there was an ability to
focus better on the Bacardi
brand because "there isn't
numerous brands to give atten-
tion to".
Rather, he said their distrib-
ution contracts were stream-
lined into certain areas, creat-
ing a "very balanced" atmos-
phere: Rothman's, the most
popular cigarette brand in the
country; Red Bull, the leading
energy drink; a "sizeable wine
portfolio"; and a "good line" of
spirits.


"Our distribution system is
quite expansive and we will
work very closely with the one
in place," said Mr Bacardi.
The men did not disclose
what the distribution contract
was worth for Bristol Cellars.
The Bristol Group has 125
employees and 13 stores
throughout the Bahamas, and
is watching current develop-
ments in the Family Islands
with the goal of establishing
more outlets.

Headquarters
Its headquarters is located
on Gladstone Road, where a
44,000 square-foot warehouse
contains its collection of drinks.
On Saturday, the company
held a customer appreciation
day, with a grill-out, conch sal-
ad and complimentary drinks


and giveaways.
The Bacardi & Company
distillery has been operating
in New Providence since 1965.
It is the only rum produced
locally in the Bahamas ,and it
is the first major product to be
exported from the Bahamas,
according to the company web-
site.
All phases of rum produc-
tion are carried out at its 61-
acre headquarters on Bacardi
Road. They include fermenta-
tion, distillation, ageing, blend-
ing and bottling.
Bacardi & Company exports
the equivalent of seven million
standard cases of rum, to
Europe per year.
Its five-storey tower at its
facility houses fiVe distilling
columns, with a total produd-
tion capacity of 27 million litres
of distilled spirit per year.
-' ;" :


Sea Ray F16 Jet Boat, Mercury 125HP Engine, Comes with trailer
This boat is garage kept and in excellent condition. Seats 5 and
has tow bar for water skiing. Convertible Bimini Top.
Excellent for Island Hopping!

Wants to sell, owner is not an avid boater and needs the
garage space!!


Asking $9,800 O.N.O.


PHONE 356.6782 SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY!!


lit AP f Financial Advisors Ltd.

Pricing information As Of:
31 March'2006
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES VISIT VWWV\' BISeS\AHAr.1S.COM FOR MORE DATA & IIIFORMILr TION
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX CLOSE 1.375.55.' CHG 00.00 / 1%CHG 00.00 ;TCL 24 64 YTD ". 01.54
...k'-.-H. .SclT.-L.D S.T.L. r.,. _-- ,_l ,. .:I EF, i L .iU F:,-1
10.70 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 10.70 10.70 0.00 3,255 1.456 0.360 7.3 3.36%
7.24 5.88 Bank of Bahamas 6.95 6.95 0.00 400 0.643 0.330 10.8 4.75%
0.85 0.70 Penchmark 0.70 0.70 0.00 0.175 0.020 4.0 2.86%
1.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.26 1.26 0.00 0.105 0.060 12.0 4.76%
1.20 1.04 Fidelity Bank 1.18 1.18 0.00 0.070 0.040 16.7 3.42%
9.60 8.00 Cable Bahamas 9.20 9.20 0.00 0.565 0.240 16.3 2.61%
2.20 1.39 Colina Holdings 1.69 1.69 0.00 -0.067 0.000 NM 0.00%
9.69 8.33 Commonwealth Bank 9.50 9.50 0.00 0.861 0.490 11.0 5.16%
5.68 4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.70 4.89 0.19 0.091 0.091 51.9 0.96%
2.88 1.45 Doctor's Hospital 2.45 2.45 0.00 0.437 0.000 5.6 0.00%
6.21 4.02 Famguard 6.21 6.21 0.00 300 0.542 0.240 11.5 3.86%
10.99 9.99 Finco 10.66 10.66 0.00 0.738 0.540 14.4 5.07%
11.00 7.75 FirstCaribbean 11.00 11.00 0.00 0.82 0.500 13.3 4.55%
10.40 7.99 Focol 10.40 10.40 0.00 0.833 0.500 12.5 4.81%
1.27 1.15 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 -0.162 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.20 9.60 ICD Utilities 9.50 9.50 0.00 2,084 0.526 0.540 18.1 5.68%
9.10 8.22 J.S. Johnson 9.09 9.09 0.00 0.572 0.560 15.9 6.16%
795 5.30 Kerzner International BDRs 7.81 7.78 -0.03 0.134 0.000 58.3 0.00%
10 00 10 00 Premier Real Estate 10 00 10 00 0.00 2.036 0.585 4.9 5.85%
Fidelity Over-The-Counler Securues
13.25 12'.- -~Srnjm S.cnri.srl',. I I I 1 1-
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0 54 0 20 RND Holdincs 0 29 0.54 0.00 -0.044 0.000 NM 0.00%
Collna Over-The-COLIte" Securitias
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.2Z0 u.uuo 1l.4 0.Ou/o
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.75 13.75 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
060 0 35 RND Holding- 029 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
-2,- 5 K.'-L1." .-- FT3, n__- TC I 1_-.-i t C._ ,
1.2766d 1..1144- Cclhna r.l.:,, r.aii,.e] FJi3 1 :_ r':"
2.6662 2.2268 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.6662 **
10.8590 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.8590****
2.3312 2.1953 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.331152**
1 1592 1 154~ Colins Bond Fund 1 1915'4***
FINDEX CLOSE 596.25 YTD 7.8.0 2005 6 209-;
eISX ALL SH-'E Ir E 1 .:'-'- =' 1.: ". -n 1_.-. i-'. i
52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and FidelitN
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ -Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume WeeKly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change In closing price from day to da EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last12 month eamings FINDEX -The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1. 1994 = 100
AS AT JAN. 31. 2006/- AS AT FEB. 28. 2006
".f AT raR 1in 2n00n'l" a AT FEB 28 2006/ .* AS AT FEB 28 2006
TO T RAiE CALLJ; COJNA -249-52-T7010 / FIDELITY 242-356-77.6


CITCO



Citco Fund Services
(Bahamas) Ltd


Fund Accountant

Internationally recognized Fund Administrator,
requires an experienced Hedge Fund Accountant. The
only acceptable candidates will have at least 3 years of
related fund experience including excellent knowledge
of complex financial instruments including derivatives,
OTC securities and private equities. Candidates must
be able to demonstrate their understanding of financial
statements preparation.

We offer a competitive salary and comprehensive :
benefits plan.

Please fax your CV along with references to the attention
of:
Citco Fund Services (Bahamas) Limited
Vice President
Fax Number: 242-393-4692


_ __


I


_~__


BUSINESS


esPi

1_~; ~s"r


it









MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006, PAGE 5B


ibTETRIBUNE


BHA's members to





display products,





services at Trade





Show and Expo


Insurance Executive
US$80,000 to US$100,000
Freeport/Anguilla
International boutique life insurance company catering to
the needs of high net worth individuals seeks senior level
insurance executive. Looking for all round experience at
the management level. Will oversee all aspects of the
application process, underwriting, issuing, and maintenance
of life and annuity policies. Offices in Freeport and Anguilla.
This position can be located in either location. Send resume
to: humanresources8751@hotmail.com





seeks to employ an

Owner Representative
for projects in Nassau and the Islands.
Applicants must have a background in construction or
SArchitecture and possess people skills.
Reply to chara@coralwave.com


MORE than 40 of the
Bahamas Hotel Association's
(BHA) allied members will
display the products and ser-
vices they supply to Bahamian
hotels at this week's fourth
annual BHA Trade Show and
Expo.
-The show, being held at the
Wyndham Nassau Resort
'Convention Centre from
'12pm to 5pm on Thursday,
-April 6, will feature exhibits
'from food suppliers, suppliers
of beverage equipment, beds,
bedding and linens, security
technology, safes, office fur-
niture and supplies, uniforms
and logo products, specialty
foods, and energy saving prod-
ucts and services.
Companies
Other companies displaying
.products will include busi-
,nesses involved in purification
products, mildew fighting
agents, cleaning solutions,
guest notions and supplies, gift
items, candles, crafts, waste
disposal products and services,
and human resource services.
: "We are excited about this
Sear's show and the great net-
*"''", '* ''


working and showcasing
opportunities which it presents
for hotels, restaurants and
those who do business with
them or wish to do business
with them," said BHA execu-
tive vice-president, Frank
Comito.
Exhibition
Apart from the exhibition,
pre-scheduled One-On-One
meetings with purchasing rep-
resentatives from the nation's
leading hotels are also being
arranged.
"We're particularly pleased
with the number of appoint-
ments which have already
been scheduled between our
allied members and seven
hotels which will have pur-
chasing representatives on-
site. There are 24 remaining
timeslots, so we encourage our
allied members to contact
BHA if they are interested in
a 15-minute appointment.
These are provided on a first-
come, first-serve basis," added
Mr Comito.
BHA Allied Member Ger-
shan Major, whose company
Mail Boxes Etc Caribbean,


will be prominently show-
cased, said: "The popularity
of this show offers tremendous
exposure for Allied Members
such as Mail Boxes Etc. Over
the past several years, we have
seen significant growth of the
show and the benefits for both
participating businesses and
visitors alike. This is an excel-
lent opportunity for all Allied
Members to expose their
products and services"
The show will also feature
some of the nation's finest
commercial craft-work, under
the guidance of the Ministry of
Tourism's Authentically
Bahamian initiative.
Range
"The range of Bahamian-
made handicraft, accessories,
and special items are a testa-
ment to the quality of prod-
ucts of interest available to
our visitors, hotels and restau-
rants.
"It keeps expanding every
year with new and different'
creations" said Rowena Rolle,
manager for the Ministry's
Authentically Bahamian pro-
gramme.


For conditions of the sale and other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit at: 356-1685 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas
Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit,
P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us before April 28, 2006
Directions: Travelling on the westem Side ofi th Main Eleuthert Highw.a and approximately 2,219 feet northerly
from Four for Nothing Road on he Ila.nd of Eleulhera, Bahama'
Financing available for the qualified persons
Serious enquires only












PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY


VACANCY

BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER
GRAND BAHAMA HEALTH SERVICES

The Public Hospitals Authority invites applications from suitably qualified individuals for the post
of Manager, Business Office, Grand Bahama Health Services.
Applicant must possess the following qualifications.
Professional qualification Certified Public Accountant (CPA), Association of Certified Chartered
Accountant (ACCA) or Chartered Accountant (CA), Masters of Business Administration (MBA),
Master of Arts (MA) in the relevant area and one (1) year experience as Assistant Accountant or
Bachelors of Science Degree (BSc), Bachelors of Arts Degree (BA), Bachelors of Business
Administration and two (2) years experience as Assistant Accountant; Associate Degree and a
minimum of four (4) years experience as an Assistant Accountant and must be Computer literate.
The Business Office Manager will report to the Financial and Accounting Officer and be responsible
for the management for the management of all operations of the Business Office.
Duties:
1. Prepares department budget and strategic plans for each fiscal year.
2. Prepares comparative analytical report on revenue collection for each fiscal year.
3. Prepares monthly analysis of revenue collected and ensures monthly financial reports are
reconciled.
4. Ensures policies and procedures are in place to prevent opportunity for fraud and system
manipulation.
5. Reconciles end of year accounts receivable for private patients and submits findings and
recommendations to Finance Officer.
6. Ensures all effort is made to meet monthly and yearly revenue collection targets.
7. Establish new job functions to improve customer service and revenue collection.
8. Consults and assists patients with financial constraints.
9. Liaises with Social Services Department regarding approvals for patients medical procedures.
10. Ensures patients are made aware of outstanding balances and receive bills in a timely manner.
11. Evaluates staff and ensures that all business office employees adhere to their job descriptions
and any other duties assigned pertaining to their job function.
12. Assists in any other duties assigned by the Finance Officer to provide excellent customer
(internal and external) satisfaction and revenue enhancement.
13. Ensures that National Insurance Board and companies billings are forwarded for payments in
a timely manner.
Letters of application and curricula vita should be submitted to the Director of Human Resources,
Public Hospitals Authority, P.O. Box N-8200 or Manx Corporate Centre, Dockendale House, West
Bay Street or through your Head of Department no later than 10th April, 2006.


A Single Storey Commercial Building of concrete structure approximately 9 years old which houses 3 Commercial
Offices (units are currently being rented) and comprising 2,014 sq. ft. situated on Lot No. 90-A (17,807 sq. ft.)
being a portion of a Lot of Land totaling 4.646 acres on Main Eleuthera, Queens Highway, Lower Bogue, Eleuthera
The property is well landscaped and is in close proximity to a Shopping Centre and Gas Station. Utilities: Electricity,
City Water and Telephone


SA .-.-..... .-- A
-- ,-----.... -


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE
DATABASE ADMINISTRATOR
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICES DEPARTMENT
FINANCE DIVISION
A vacancy exist in the Corporation for a Database Administrator in the Finance
Division.

The Database Administrator is responsible for planning, designing, implementing
and maintaining efficient operations of corporate databases and preparation of
logical data base, design for in-house application development.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

* Chairing and/or participating on committees to define date requirements.
* Ensuring all aspects of data administration is addressed.
* Participating in Information Systems development and implementation teams.
* Defining and implementing data level security for all corporate databases.
* Managing data migration/conversion issues during system installations.
* Defining, establishing and operating databases for executive information needs.
* Developing procedures for the integration of corporate systems.
* Defining, establishing and operating a database to serve Document Management
System requirements.
* Leading and participating on committees assessing business information technology
needs.
* Managing installation of release upgrades to installed RDBMD products.
* Facilitating smooth transition of all business systems vendor upgrades.
* Assisting with department annual budgeting process.

Job requirements include:

* Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science or equivalent qualifications
* Sound working knowledge of relevant database management systems
* Sound knowledge of computer programming
* Strong analytical skills and good judgment
* Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing
* Good time management skills
* Strong technology background married with good business skills
* Project management skills

Interested persons may apply by completing and returning the Application form
to: The Manager, Human Resources & Training, Head Office, Blue Hill and
Tucker Roads, P.O. Box N-7509, Nassau, Bahamas, on or before Friday, April 7,
2006.


Iq i~


IJ:


BUSINESS I r


r I


1







THE TRIBUNE


I 'AGE 6B, MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006


New


A/C


duct may lower


'Bahamian energy costs 20%


FROM page 1B


pr quality.
"What Steril-Aire has expe-
r enced in the 11 years it has
I een operating, the energy sav-
igs are around 20 per cent,"
l Ir Gilbert said.


"The unit runs more effi-
ciently, so the condenser is not
cutting in as often, so you're
not using as much electrical
power to cool the building."
Hotels
Mr Gilbert said that US
businesses such as hotels, casi-


nos, government buildings,
retail stores and shopping
malls had experienced energy
savings of 25-30 per cent
through the use of UVC emiti'
ters in their A/C systems, plus
improved air quality and lower
maintenance costs.
He said a Bahamas Electric-
ity Corporation (BEC) bill


MUST SELL
An Office Building with a Warehouse comprising 2,300 sq. ft. situated
on Lot No. A (6,266 sq.ft.) being a portion of Lots 1 & 2, Block 2 of
Peardale Road in Peardale Subdivision off Wulff Road.

,...


..
..: .




For conditions of the sale and any other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit at
356-1685 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas
Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas to
reach us before April 14, 2006
Directions: Traveling west along Wulff Rd from Claridge Rd, take the first corer on the left, Peardale Road.
Heading South along Peardale Road the subject property is situated at the junction of Peardale Road and the
first corer on the left (Peardale Manor Road)
Financing available for qualified pers s. .
Serious enquiries,only


*1


seen recently had shown that
the cost of electricity in the
Bahamas was around $0.18 per
kilowatt hour, while in the US
the average was around $0.10
per kilowatt hour.
As a result the 20 per cent
sa' \ng promised by Steril.
Air's product ini the Bahamas
\\ ulJ be "a larger actual num-
her" Itan ii the'US. :
Mr Gilbert said that if Steril-
Air's UVC'emitters had been
installed in the building hous-
ing the Ministry of Education
Iand the Ministiy of Youth,
S.Sports and Housing, it would
not have suffered its recent
much-publicised problems with
mould. :
'By killing the mould at
source, Mr Gilbert added that
UVC emitters would also
reduce A/C maintenance costs
for Bahamian businesses. They
"removed that whole step in
the process", he explained,
noting that some Bahamian
companies hires cleaning spe-
cialists from south Florida to
come in and clean their sys-
tems.
Companies
"Companies have to spend
a lot of money cleaning coils,"
Mr Gilbert said.
However, he pointed out
that method of cleaning A/C


coils using solvents and high
pressure hoses often failed to
achieve the desired results,
simply pushing the mould
deeper into the system "
Insurance
Mr Gilbert, an insurance
broker, pointed out that in
property insurance policies' in
the Bahamas, "mould is an
excluded item". As a result,
companies cannot claim on
cases involving illnesses relat-
Sing to mould.
."That, in and of itself, means
the client has to ensure it has
adequate risk management
tools to protect itself from any
liability associated with
mould," Mr Gilbert added.
Although Steril-Aire's prod-
ucts held out the possibility
that maintenance revenues for
some Bahamian A/C compa-
nies might be reduced, Mr
Gilbert said: "We want to
working partnership with the
A/C companies, to educate
them on installing the product
and sell it to them.
"We think it's in our long-
term interests to get the other
companies involved. It would
be impossible for us to cover
the entire market without the
A/C companies."
Peter Beale, Steril-Aire's
international director of sales


and marketing, told The Tri-
bune that A/C costs were like-
ly to account for 50-60 per cent
of a Bahamian company's elec-
tricity costs during the summer
months.
He added: "A two to three
degree reduction in tempera-
ture is a significant increase in
energy costs. Our design effi-
ciency is at least 10 per cent
better than all systems, and
probably 20 per cent better
than most."
Mr Beale said companies
who installed UVC emitters
often received a return on their
investment within months.
Studies
He added that studies had
shown the installation of these
emitters in a government
building in Canada had helped
to reduce the number of sick
days taken by staff by 20 per
cent, while their use in Cali-
fornia schools had lowered thp
time taken off by teachers and
staff by 50 per cent.
"Fifty thousand teachers,
that's a hell of a lot of days,"
Mr Beale said.
Steril-Aire's products are in
17 countries, including the US,
Singapore, Hong Kong.and
Indonesia. They are used in
150 US hospitals.
******.********


U


Former
infrmaio
pese contac

MathewM Sll
at 24-32-27


CALEDONIA
G R O U P L I T E fD


Caledonia Corporate Management Group Limited
:is a well established, independent and licensed
Bahamian brokerage and financial services firm,-
'offering'a comprehensive range of wealth management
solutions for.private, clients. We are looking to
dramatically increase the size of their brokerage
division in terms of trading volume and assets under:
management. As a result, we are currently seeking
qualified brokers and investment advisors with existing,
books of business to join their expanding Nassau team.


As a member of the firm, you will develop and manage
your own book of business and serve as an informed
resource for clients dealing anywhere in the world.


You will benefit from a well established trading
platform with direct access to the US and Canadian
equity and fixed income markets as well as a seasoned
and efficient back-office and compliance support.


The organization offers competitive compensation
packages, based on the book size, signing bonuses and
in certain cases, the costs associated with moving
clients.


All applications wil be treated'il
utmost c nfidenc&Z', ,,.y :
*. Q::.+) i. ++.A-+


Applications are invited form suitably qualified persons for
the position of Part-time Instructor (Welding) at the Bahamas
Technical & Vocational Institute for the spring Semester.

The applicants must possess a Bachelor's Degree in a related
field area. However, consideration will be given to those
individuals with a three year diploma from a recognized
institution. A teacher's certificate or a minimum of three
years teaching experience is also required.

The successful applicant will be required to teach in the
following areas:-

a) Welding Fundamentals
b) Oxyfuel gas arc Welding
c) Shield metal are welding
d) GTAW and GMAW (Tig and Mig)
e) Arc Cutting
f) Pipe and tube welding
g) Resistance Welding
h) Metal technology

The successful candidate must be knowledge in their
prospective discipline area, be able to communicate well
with students and maintain a good rapport in the classroom.



The salary for the position is $17.00 per hour.

Applications forms can be obtained from Bahamas Technical
& Vocational Institute, Old Trail road and should be returned
completed with copies of qualifications to the Human
Resources Department, Bahamas Technical and Vocational
Institute at P.O. Box N-4934, Nassau, Bahamas no later than
April 7, 2006.


BUSINESS


To avertse i TheTribne
the #1 newspaper in circulation


i

:.








THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006, PAGE 7B


$45m network completed by company




owned by leading Cable shareholder


THE Jamaican affiliate of
Cable Bahamas' largest share-
holder has completed its $45
million submarine fibre optic
network linking Jamaica to the
ARCOS Network.
.Fibralink Jamaica said the
network, which has cable land-
ings in Montego Bay, Ocho
Rios and Bull Bay in Jamaica,
and Puerto Plata in the
Dominican Republic, would
with ARCOS, which is also
majority-owned by Columbus
Communications. The latter
owns the majority stake in


Cable Bahamas.
FibraLink has a 20-year
licence to build and operate
fibre optic networks from
Jamaica tothe Network Access
Point in Miami and to provide
any type telecommunications
services within Jamaica or
between Jamaica and any oth-
er point in the world on a
wholesale basis.
Philip Paulwell, Jamaica's
minister of commerce, science
and technology, said:.
"FibraLink is playing an
extremely important role, as


Atlantis RevPAR up


Jamaica seeks to realise the
full benefits of a liberalised
telecommunications sector,
through investment in the con-
struction of fibre optic net-
works linking Jamaica to North
America and the rest of the
world.
"The opening up of compe-
tition in the routing of data and
voice traffic into Jamaica using
non-satellite infrastructure will
not only result in more afford-
able rates in the provision of
high-speed broadband Inter-
net and other data services, but


will also allow more entrepre-
neurs to invest in the deploy-
ment of domestic fibre net-
works, and to bring retail ser-
vices closer to businesses and
the homes of consumers.
Richard W. Pardy,
Fibralink's chief executive,
said: "We are extremely
pleased with how this project
has progressed. We were
licensed just 14 months ago,
and with support from the
National Works Agency,
JAMPRO, Ministry of
Finance, National Environ-


2.1% in early 2006


mental Protection Agency and
the Office of Minister Paulwell,
we have been able to bring
much needed bandwidth to
Jamaica in record time.
"With the addition of this
important component of
Jamaica's international
telecommunications infra-
structure, there is now ample
bandwidth to provide every
household and business in
Jamaica broadband Internet
access."
Mr Pardy added" "The time-
ly development of FibraLink's
submarine cable systems
required the efforts of hun-


dreds of people. We were par-
ticularly pleased with Alcatel
Submarine Networks who
engineered, commissioned and
supplied the cable system and
IT International Telecom who
installed the submarine cable.
"The professional staff at
AT&T International went the
extra mile to assist us at the
cable station in Bull Bay, while
Verizon Dominicana has been
fully supportive of the
FibraLink cable in their Puer-
to Plata cable station. I would
like to thank all the people
who have made this project a
success."


FROM page 1B
average daily room (ADR)
rates of $294, during the Janu-
ary-February 2006 period.
This compared to an aver-
age occupancy of 83 per cent
'during the same period in 2005,
but the ADR rate in the first
two months this year was $10
or 3.5 per cent ahead of 2005's
$284. This indicates that while
occupancies may be down on
2005, the difference not being
significant, there is still high
demand for the Atlantis prod-
uct among US tourists, giving
Kerzner International further
pricingppower with regard to
room rates.
On the Atlantis casino front,
Kerzner International said in
the SEC filing that slow win
for the first two months in 2006
stood at 7.6 per cent. compared
;to last year's 8.5 per cent.
Slot win was down by 7.3 per
:'cent or $0.9 million compared
:to the same period in 2005.
'while slot volume in the
:;Atlantis casino was up by 3.7


per cent.
Kerzner International said:
"Table win for the first two
months of 2006 increased by
$1 million despite a decrease in
table hold of 0.3 per cent. Due
to the normal volatility pat-
terns experienced in the
Atlantis casino, particularly
with table games, these results
may not necessarily be indica-
tive of continuing trends."
In addition, Kerzner Inter-
national said sales, general and
administrative expenses for the
first two months in 2006 were
higher by $1.2 million com-
pared to 2005, chiefly due to
the adoption of new account-
ing treatments.
Sales and marketing expens-
es increased upon 2005 by $1.4
million.
Meanwhile. Kerzner Inter-
national said it "-would not
expect to proceed" with the
proposed Athol Island Golf
Course. part of the Phase III
expansion, if its joint venture
495-unit condo hotel failed to


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, STEPHANIE SAINTIL,
of Joe Farrington Road in the Eastern District of the Island
of New Providence, intend to change my name to
STEPHANIE DELVA. If there are any objections to this
cfiange of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objectionss to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.



NOTICE

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
New Providence

SWE, THE CAREFREE LIMITED, a body
corporate established and existing pursuant to the
provisions of The Law of Property and Conveyancing
(Condominium) Act of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas for the purpose of managing and operating
"CAREFREE LIMITED" Condominium situated in
Western District in the City of Nassau in the Island of
New Providence, HEREBY GIVE NOTICE in
accordance with the provisions of Section 21.of The
Law Property and Conveyancing (Condominium) Act
aforesaid of the constitution of change upon Unit B24
and B25 in the said Carefree Apartments AND
HEREBY DECLARE THAT:-

(1) The Declaration of the Lease (Condominium)
relating thereto is recorded in the Registry of
Records in the said City of Nassau in Book 301
at pages 186 and 229;

(2) The name of the owner of the said Units
designated as Unit B24 and B25 Joyce
Mongeon.

(3) The balance of common expenses in respect of
which levies have already been made upon the
owner of the above units and the date or dates
upon which same were payable to us and also
interest charged and accrued thereon are shown
on the attached Statement of Account.

IN WITNESS
WHEREOF THE
CAREFREE
LIMITED has caused
its Common Seal to be
hereunto affixed this
16th day of February,
AD, 2006.



P( C IeDENT



VICrPRESIDENT


attract enough reservations.
As at February 28, 2006,
Kerzner International and its
partner Turnberry Associates
had "entered into binding con-
tracts" for 119 units in the Res-
idences at Atlantis condo
hotel, accounting for 24 per
cent of its capacity.
Kerzner International said:
"We expect to commence con-
struction of the condo hotel if
the joint venture receives a suf-
ficient level of reservations and
secures financing for the devel-
opment.
"If we elect not to proceed
with the development of the
condo hotel, we would not
expect to proceed with the
development of the Athol Golf
Course."
At the Ocean Club Resi-


dences & Marina, Kerzner
International said deposits for
59 of the 88 units in the $130
million project had been
received as at February 28,
2006.
During 2005, Kerzner Inter-
national said it had spent about
$25.4 million on sales and mar-
keting for its Bahamas opera-
tions.
It added that PIV Inc, its
tour operator, described as "an
indirect wholly-owned sub-
sidiary", was used to distrib-
ute an inventory of rooms at
Kerzner International's
Bahamas operations.
For the year to December
31, 2005, PIV generated tour
operations revenue of about
$35 million, compared to $26.6
million in 2004.


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2005/COM/bnk
IN THE SUPREME COURT NO. 00051
Bankruptcy and Insolvency
BETWEEN
CAVALIER CONSTRUCTION CO. LTD.
Judgement Creditor
AND
RUDOLPH KERMITT KING aka
RUDY KING-LARODA
Judgement Debtor

BANKRUPTCY ORDER

BEFORE the Honourable Justice John Lyons of the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
DATED this 9th day of March, A.D., 2006
UPON HEARING the Petition of Cavalier Construction
Co. Ltd., a company incorporated under and carrying on business
in accordance with the laws of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas and having its registered office situated in the city of
Nassau in the Island of New Providence, and upon proof,
satisfactory to the court, of the debt of the petitioner and of the
act of bankruptcy alleged to have been committed by the
Judgement Debtor having been given.
UPON HEARING Mr. Roger Gomez holding brief
for Mr. Wayne Munroe of Counsel for the Judgement Debtor
AND UPON HEARING Dr. Peter D. Maynard with
Mr. Jason T. Maynard of Counsel for the Judgement Creditor
IT IS ORDERED THAT:
1. The Judgement Debtor, RUDOLPH KERMITT KING, also
known as RUDY KING-LARODA, carrying on business as
Chairman of the King Humanitarian and Global Foundation
and lately residing at Raymond Road, Claridgedale Gardens in
the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence one of the
Islands of the said Commonwealth, be arid he is hereby adjudged
bankrupt.
2. Until such time as the appointment of a trustee by the creditors
shall have been certified by the court, it is hereby certified and
declared hat the Registrar of the Supreme Court, Mrs. Estelle
Gray-Evans, is the trustees of the property of the said bankrupt
and the said Registrar is hereby ordered to take possession of
the said property forthwith.
3. A copy of this Order adjudging the Judgement Debtor bankrupt
shall be published in the Gazette.
4. The first meeting of creditors shall be held at a date to be
fixed.
5. The costs of and incidental to this application are to be paid
by the Judgement Debtor to the Judgement Creditor, to be taxed
if not agreed.
BY ORDER OF THE COURT
REGISTRAR

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all persons having any
claim or demand against the estate of the above-named Rudolph
Kermitt King aka Rudy King-Laroda, carrying on business as
Chairman of King Humanitarian and Global Foundation and
lately residing at Raymond Road, Claridgedale Gardens in the
Eastern District of the Island of New Providence, who was
adjudged bankrupt on the 9th day of March A.D. 2006 by the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, are required to send their names,
addresses and the particulars of their debts, duly verified by
affidavit to the undersigned on or before the 18th day of April
A.D. 2006, and, if so required, be prepared to prove such debts
or claims.
AND NOTICE IS GIVEN that first meeting of creditors in the
above matter will be held at the Office of the Registrar, Second
Floor, Ansbacher Building, East Street North, Nassau, Bahamas
on Tuesday, the 2nd day of May A.D., 2006 at 12:30 o'clock
in the afternoon.
AND FURTHER NOTICE IS GIVEN that only those creditors
whose debts have been lodged with the Registrar and proved as
aforesaid will be admitted to vote and entitled to participate in
the first meeting of the creditors.
Dated this 3rd day of April A.D, 2006.




S LE G. ILY GEVANS
Registrar of the Suprem Curt of The Bahamas
Trustee-in-Bankruptcy
Supreme Court Registry
Second Floor
Ansbacher House
Bank Lane
P.O. Box N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


COWART INVESTMENTS LTD.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 139 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 that the dissolution of
COWART INVESTMENTS LTD. has been rescinded on the 31st
March 2006.


NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF PAUL
PATRICK TYRONE
D'ARVILLE late of Cloister Drive,
Paradise Island, Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased.



NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against or
interest in the above-referenced Estate
are required to send same duly certified
in writing to the undersigned on or before
31st May, 2006 after which date the
Executors will proceed to distribute the
assets of the Estate having regard only
to the claims, demands or interests of
which the Executors shall then have had
notice.



LENNOX PATON
Attorneys for the Executors
Fort Nassau Centre
Marlborough Street
P.O. Box N-4875
Nassau, The Bahamas
Ref: Estate of P.P.T. D' Arville









PAGE 8B. MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


THE OFFICE OF ALUMNI AFFAIRS


Wanted!

A Few Good Men and Women!

The Alumni Association is seeking committed individuals to fill executive positions within the
Association. Elections for the 2006-08 Executive Board of the Alumni Association will take place
on Thursday, 20th April at 6pm in the Portia Smith Student Services Building.
The Executive Board, which consists of the President, Vice President, Treasurer, General Secretary,
Assistant Secretary and Public Relations Officer, shall have administrative and managerial responsibility
for the conduct, affairs, and activities of the Association. Members of the Executive Board shall
be elected for a period of two years and shall be eligible for re-election but for not more than two
consecutive terms.
Executive Duties:

President
Presides at all general meetings and executive board meetings at which he/she is present
Serves as the official spokesperson and representation of the Association
Serves as ex-officio member of all standing committees of the Association
Provides overall management and guidance for the day to day operations of the Association
Serves on The Council of The College of The Bahamas

Vice President
Presides at all meetings in the absence of the President
Performs duties of the President in his/her absence
Serves as liaison officer between the Executive Board and standing committees of the
Association

Treasurer
Keeps track of all accounting records and render financial reports at the request of the
Executive Board
Maintains bank accounts in the name of the Association for the purpose of depositing and
withdrawing monies
Serves ex-officio fund-raising committee
Tenders all information required by the audit committee

The General Secretary
Records minutes of the Association's meetings and present such minutes to the Association
Maintains a file of all correspondents
Compiles a book of all activities and functions of the Association
Maintains a roster of all members of he Association

The Assistant Secretary
Acts in the absence of the General Secretary
Acts as instructed to by the General Secretary in the execution of his/her duties

Public Relations Officer
Under the direction of the President and membership, liaises with the public including the
media
Initiates and spearheads promotions for the Association's activities
Chairs the Public Relations Committee
Works closely with The College of The Bahamas' public relations office on matters of mutual
concern and benefit ,,\iC : ", ,. '. ..
Persons seeking nomination or seeking to nominate others should complete a nomination form
by 13th April, 2006. Forms (below) may be obtained from the Office of Alumni Affairs, 2nd floor
west, A-Block. For more information, please call the Office of Alumni Affairs at 302-4365/6.
----- -------- ------------ ---------------------------------
II

NOMINATIONS FORM

COB ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

EXECUTIVE BOARD

200 2008


Nominee's Name:

Executive Position:
(Being nominated for)

Class & Major:

Telephone Numbers:


Nominator's Name:

Class & Major:

Telephone Numbers:


Email Address (es):-


Hm


Hm


Wk


Wk


Cell


Cell


Signature: Date: _

Please indicate below why you believe the person whom you
nominate will be an asset to The College of The Bahamas' Alumni
Association.









NOTICE OF CHANGE OF DATE

BILL COLLECTION
NOW BEGINNING APRIL 10, 2006

Scheduled previously to begin April 3, 2006, bill collection will now
begin on April 10, 2006 between the hours of 9:00am to 4:30pm.

Students are encouraged to be prompt in taking care of their financial
obligations.
obligations.


I -


tL\TN AIBUmMLANS


Alumni Gifts for Advaacement P jt
'* .; i .,, ,, ? :f. ,=" .:,*,W: ':,.;
Members of The College of The Bahamas' AlumniHall. of Fme -me cked ofltr ;iu (a b flr ;' nJ.lt project with
a $10,000 donation to The College or The Bah.mas 1
The idea is to get as many alumni and friends of The College involved in pthprojeci i ihriee g ip iing leieli.
$19.74;' '
S $197.40; and m.
; $1,974.00. .. "
Why these numbers? To remind persons that something great happened in 1974 The College of The Bahamas was bornm
Funds can be paid in a lump sum or installment throughout the 2006 ,, cr. ran Hiall i4 Fame members challenged the more
than 11,000 graduates to become involved in this effort.
Funds can be designated for specific projects or the general fund. For more information, contact the Office of Alumni
Affairs at 302-4365 or 6.


Pictured L-R: Denton Brown, VP, Finance &
S' ''Administration, Don Saunders, president of COB
S a lmni association, Dr. Rhonda Chipman-Johnson,
Acting President and Hall of Fame members Tanya
SMcCartney and Laura Pratt-Charlton. Other Hall
o Fame members contributing to the project but
i nmissinginthe photo are Bishop Neil C. Ellis, Larry
R. Gibson and Vemice J. Walkine.
U. - -.--.














S C . . th' . ..




Under t he oqf His .. Artur D Hanna
G OertPr General f The Commoniealt of .








SO T Powe Campus n i to e sidn*' na*''i
The ClefhBau f ThPo -;r'-m Ca o

dvisementst ration he n mre,." 's wdvi" i
tte Clo(i:ng o .e" a :

the tah Annual Coloud r n fttntu mny :r-'n tn
S' nmber isetec
and register for Summer Sessio. f e artistic (022 talents of our ... 1, '.. i
Por3. For subsequent semesters Student will udenal Servicesd 1, r!.w'.7,; erampus
Oakbes .;in all contact ps0 ( ;.COB h.., .ruir, ..., t i -)D : .. ,-.-' :; "
T5. Listsege f e e e e il l e e in e f i ie:
















a. .Main Officeof Chair of SchooI/Academic Uhit a' .:.
'b. Office of HOD 'Programme, ; 2006 a 6 :o:ait




d. Office of the VP-Academic Affairs





e. Office of the VP-Student Affairs
TheCollege of The Bahamas has introduced SCT/PowerCampus, COB's new College Management SyId ste
designed to enhance advisement, registration and, payment proeesseswTth the ultimate goal of permitting
full on-line registration and payment. In connection with the Offi aton of SCAT/PowerCampus, kindlynote i,
the following the changes:Aic P i
1. All current College of The Bahamas student nu;s itio will required and a new plicy, as t
SCT/PowerCampus number issued to each st" ehi.r"if s'w *i-,^ g
2. As of Early Advisement/Registratioprpn-the 27%Mar.,a.v%,a.advised
evand register for Summer Sessios I (0.2006)'"us. iM6Eheiirier
3. For subsequent seiesters Studeentrs alsof be geqera pubi are ed to note twerC ampusfoll g
d numbers n all contacts WhpolCOBhicyl require,, a .
4. e eeStudents will be notified of their new IDnumbers na letter from the Vice President of bus
S Academic Affairs. .,Please check with your 'Academic Ad r ."to determine your cur t
5. Lists of the new student numbers will also belonged in the following offices: :
For further a. .. Mainth Offieof hirof choo cademic'Uhii ;i Affairs :.;.. at 302-49..,.! ;i
S; ,' : b ::".Offlce'ofHOD/Programme Coordinator """;..':"":;',c: ."."; ,... "
: i *c. *' Office of Dedhar-,i w.
d. Office of the VP-Academic Affairs "" "*: *
e. Office of the VP-Student Affairs
6. NOTE WELL: All students withe issued new College of The .Bahamas Student ID Cards,
to be collected beginning 27 March, 2006 in the Foyeriofthe Portia Smith Building from,
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ': -.. :
For further information contact the Office of Academic'Affairs at 302-4309
............................................ " .. ............. "..................



Change in Academic Policy
The College of The Bahamas is becoming a university. This transition will require changes in policy, as the
evolution progresses.
Students, potential students and interested members of the general public are asked to note the following new
academic policy: . *", '.. ,. .'..,'..',;".. .'. '* " .
It is no longer permitted to exit at the associate degree level from programmes that have been upgraded to
the bachelor level. Students are advised, therefore, that the opiton of exiting at the associate degree in business-
related areas is no longer available. Please check with your Academic Advisor to determine your current status
if this policy change affects you. : .
For further information contact the Office of Academic Affairs at 302-4309 "


THE COLLEGE OF TIHE L

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs ,- CATIN T.. .


I ~~.~.....T~1..'~.....-..~. .-1~:!












:-SiETRIBUNE BUSIN



',I






-3



CENTRE

COMPUTER 0]

S COMPUTER APPLICA
S Course Description: This course
it works. This course covers the
Microsoft Office Word Process
Pre-requisite:
Begins:
Duration:
4 Venue:
S Tuition:

S COMPUTER APPLICA
Course Description: This course
using: (I) Microsoft Office Wo
Management.
Pre-requisite:
Begins:
Time:
Duration:
Venue:
Fees

EFFECTIVE POWERPI
This workshop is designed to prove
S on developing effective and dyna
Pre-requisite:
Begins:
Time:
Venue:
Fees:

MICROSOFT EXCEL
Course Description: This course
basic entry and manipulation of c
Pre-requisite:
Begins:
Time:
Duration:
Venue:
Fees


Pre-requisite:
Begins:
Time:
Duration:
Venue:
Fees:


IESS





THE COLLE GE O(' THE I


Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs '1 --pr "


FOR CONTINUING EDU

OFFERINGS SUMMER 2006

TIONS I
e is for the beginner who knows very little about computers and does not understand how
major computer concepts with extensive hands on practice of various software using: (1)
sing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft Access Database Management.
Section 01 (CEE


None
Monday, 15 May 2006 6:00pm 9:30pm
Saturday, 13 May 2006 10:00am 1:30pm
9 weeks
CEES Computer Lab
$450.00


Section 01 (CEES)
Section 02 (CEES)
,,. , ' q o', ;'i' :, :


LTIONS II
e covers the major advanced concepts with extensive hands on practice oft .irlouu, u1I :ir
rd Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel- Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft .\cce .. Djijtba.e

Computer Applications I
Thursday, 18 May 2006
6:00pm 9:30pm
9 weeks
CEES Computer Lab
$550.00

POINT PRESENTATIONS
vide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It focuses
muic PowerPoint presentations.
None
Thursday, 1" June 2006
9:30am 4:30pm
I day
CEES Computer Lab
$160.00


e covers the fundamentals of the Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. Tools that are needed tor
cells and worksheets are presented. The course assumes no particular background.
Keyboarding
Monday, 15 May, 2006
4:00pm 5:30pm
6 weeks
CEES Computer Lab
$250.00


MICROSOFT WORD
Course Description: The course assumes no particular background and takes the student from the level of novice to an
advanced level. A thorough grounding in all of the fundamentals of document handling in Microsoft Word is presented.


Pre-requisite:
Begins:.
Time:
Duration:
Venue:
Fees


Keyboarding
Wednesday, 17 May 2006
6:00pm 9:00pm
6 weeks
CEES Computer Lab
$250.00


CATION & L ETEIL

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
SUMMER SEMESTER'


COURSE SECT COURSE
NO. NO. DESCRIPTION
ACCOUNTING_____ _'
----- ---- -I-.--t------ ...- -___ __ ___
C.C9 01 I CCA FOR BEGINIJEP I
SriCA'0 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II
A'ir .o?_ 0u 1 It1 A FORfH B4NNERS Ill

BUSINESS
BUSI900 01 CREDIT& COLLECTION
SUPERIOR CUS OMER SiRVICE
CUST00 01__ W/S

COMPUTERS.... ... ............ .......... ..
C'.MF'lr I 0) COMPUTER .PPLICATION3 I
,Lr.IiP I01 0- C: rrMPUTEP 4PPL ICh TIONS I
C.i_ II_2 1:1 C rPUTER 4PiF LITION.- II
C'O.1-F 41 i01 uCi'-CBOOKS I
lCoi1P.: P i PC uFL-F ADE .ANE'D REPAIR
COMP907 01 MICROSOFT EXCEL
COMP960 01 MICROSOFT POWERPOINT W/S
COMP905 01 MICROSOFT WORD
COMP930 01 WEB PAGE DESIGN W/S
COSMETOLOGY
COSM802 01 MAKE-UP APPLICATION
COSMr.0 01 MANICLRE & IPEDIGURE
COSM807 01 NAIL ART TECHNICIAN
DECORATING
DECO800 01_ INTERIOR DECORATING I
FLOR'01' __ FLOROdL DESIGN I
FLOOR i_ il FLORAL DESIGN II

HEALTH AND
FITNESS
MASG901i 01 MAESrAGE THER"NP ESTENTIA.LS I
MASG901 al 3. T-HERAPv ESSENTIALS I
LANGUAGES
CRE 900 ~ 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE I
SPA 9ul0 ) I1 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I

MANAGEMENT
MGMT900 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT I
MGMT901 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT II
MEDICAL
MEDTi00) 01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOG' 'i
SEW S,00 0 I PASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING I
SEW 80!: 0 DRAPERY MAKING I
SEWV 1 1 01 LUPHOLSTER R MAKING I /


-- ... 1- --.--
T .t' I DAY ST tI .. ~
-I.
.4 1-


'10', 4'


US I'Q-


30fp



Ann"
(001
Q1''


.00 r9:00prr


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51'

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."' ''S


ENO li RES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tej: (.-: .; "-5.7 .,-, : ,
328-1936/302-4300 ext. 5202 or eua iillcruix tu.I.'e~d'.uits
,,., ;-,-AUlfees-are-included with the exception of ith ',.-. .'. ..' (o.'e timA.tc..
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course c /: (',C ,',pc : !


MNI HNiC,. ? I;."i


Enjoy indigent,, I :..

drinks from Latin Amrn -. -; ..

Mexican -'.;ae:
And much morf e ill, 1 ,: .-



Cultural show with ^. ;: :- i. ;


S I.
CI



P 4

5~r


F V;~


&f


CAe4 P


Or .

Saaboa To. ApurifSm2008 p'j'
JIB~ham~ai Tourism.1ri's :i,~


1.


!.':
.i.;is;Q, r p.


For Infor A i0i ic


Under the st.s :

"In Our Quest Forever F w .

The School oi F-Iucat1io,.
Writers-Readers Retreat and lltVo l/.snop
with Linda E. Russell, The (Ccl!eIe of The7 Bahea'fn
&
Jane Hansen, Ph.D., LI, iveisity ot V:rginia


7th 8th April. 22006
Exuma ( centre
The College of The B ah:amas
&
Mount Pleasant Ho, j Suite;. :, i',,
Georgetown,. F;-i, if-

For more information, please call
Ormanic Bien-Aime at 397-2603 or Lind Rssel 53 t '. .:


I,
'I


None
Tuesday, 16h May 2006
6:00pm 8:00pm Tuesdays and Thursdays
9 weeks
BHTC Computer Lab
$500.00


QUICKBOOKS
Course Description: This course is designed to train new and existing small business entrepreneurs (fewer than 20
employees) how to organize and manage their accounting activities using QuickBooks Pro software. Students will learn
how to set-up their company files, chart of accounts, budget, customers, vendors and employees.


Pre-requisite:
Begins:
Time:
Duration:
- Venue:
Fees:


None
Tuesday, 16h May 2006,
6:00pm 9:00pm
6 weeks
CEES Computer Lab
$330.00


WEBPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP
Course Description: This course, which targets persons who would like to create their personal web pages will cover Web
page creation, Web site management, and.HTML. Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms
and Tables and hosting of web pages.
"TiSKV?; bl'L: ":.": ;*'.. ... -i '
-Prerequisite:. Participants must be computer literate and have a basic knowledge of word-processing
Begins:. Thursday & Friday, 8'"h9" June 2006
Time: 9:30am- 4:30pm
Duration: 2 days
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $550.00





MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I
This is an introductory course for learning basic techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits.; Major topic areas
will include Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniques, Wellness Education (Psychological and Physiological Benefits),
Indications and Contraindications, Serving Special Populations and Complementary Bodywork Systems to include
Aromatherapy Essentials.
Starting: Thursday, 18^ May, 2006 .
6:00-9:00 pm
Duration: 10 Weeks


Tuition Fee:
Venue:


$465.00
The College of the Bahamas


MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS H
This is an advanced course for learning techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major topics include introduction,
to hydrotherapy; spa and body treatments; the basic facial; aromatherapy-fundamentals or essential oils; relaxation and
meditative methods; and hot stone therapy.


Starting:
Duration:
Tuition Fee:
Venue:


Monday, 15 May, 2006
6:00-9:00pm
10 Weeks
$620.00
The College of the Bahamas


SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior customer service. It
focuses on customer value, retention and relationship building andl employee motivation.


Date:
Time:
Venue:
Tuition:


st
Thursday, 1t June 2006
9:30am 4:30pm
Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre
$170.00


EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It
focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.


Date:
/ Time:
cVenue:
Tuilion:


Thursday 1st June2006
9:30am 4:30pm
CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
$160.00


WEB PAGE DESIGN
This course will co\er Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy fiddling with computers
and would like to create their own web pages are encouraged to attend. Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics,
Multimedia. Forms and Tables and hosting of web pages.
th th
Date: Thursday & Friday, June 8 &9 2006
Time: 9:30am -4:30pm
Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
-"Tition: $550.00


PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR
Course Description: This course is a hands-on introduction to technology systems for use in information environments.The
course will cover the following topics: Basic Hardware, Operating Systems, Troubleshooting and Repairs.


. .. .. . .-


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'No concern'



a al1mon rival Winn-
^^^^^^^ ----^^ j|M11111IB ---Sk 1 __ 1 __ fit_ w___ ___ __-. __ ___ o


Dixie offers


For conditions of the sale and other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit at; 356-1685 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas
Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit,
P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us before April 28, 2006
Directions: Travelling on the western side of the Main Eleuthera Highway.and approximately 2,219 feet northerly
frbm Four for Nothing Road on the Island of Eleuthera, Bahamas
Financing available for the qualified persons
Serious enquires only





RIDEFORI PE

Whether you can ride 10 miles or 100 miles
Whether you pedal slowly or like the wind
Whether you can raise $50 or $5,000

Ride for Hope is your opportunity to:do something
inspiring, something uniquely rewarding, to honor
loved ones touched by cancer.

Ride for Hope is a unique event with ma meaningful
purpose. It is a charitable bik -a -thoin which will occur
along the spectacular island ofleuthera.. It is open to
anyone who enjoys cycling arnIants tdo4ontribute to ,
one of the most important causpear mmunrty??'
enhanced cancerareorare fr aL~'Il proceet-Afili bE~iefit
the Cancer Caring Center.n andi.Po .rfh.ts.of f. Cancer
Society of the Bahamras ; -:

Be a part of the gre things to o o e s ft
those who RIDE F~i O OP f:'. :.:
S.--. -: ^ :. .. .-... -..... -
-i;-


RIDEFOR 7l
April 29, 2006
Eleuthera,


Bahamas


RI


:DE FOR HOPE PARTNERSHIP


~n E


www.rideforhopebahamas.com


FROM page 1B

market for it to enter.
Industry analysts said BK
Foods' $50 million~ offer, which,'
iA probably could increase
should a rival emerge, was a
good opening salvo if a bid-
ing war erupted. Between
$50-$60 million was cited as
the likely price Winn-Dixie's
78 per cent stake would fetch.
SIt is unclear how BK Foods
plans to finance the purchase,
although The Tribune under-
stands that some form of share
offering .is being contemplat-
ed.
It is likely that this will take
the form of a preference share
issue in BK Foods a form of
debt, with the remainder raised
from commercial bank loans. It
is likely that preference share
capital and bank debt will form
an equal share of the mix, and
repayments financed by the
upstreaming of dividends to
BK Foods from Bahamas
Supermarkets.
If a rival bidder does
emerge, it is likely that BK
Foods will have one distinct
advantage. If the rival offer
involves a foreign investor, it
would have to be approved by
the Investments Board and
National Economic Council
(NEC) effectively the Cabi-
net. As an all-Bahamian group,
BK Foods would not require


such approvals.
The BK Foods-Winn-Dixie
arrangement is not a 'done
deal', though, as it "provides
an opportunity" for higher and
better offers to be submitted
for Bahamas Supermarkets.
This would kick-start an auc-
tion process for Bahamas
Supermarkets, which operates
12 stores in New Providence
and Grand Bahama under the
City Markets and Winn-Dixie
labels. Any auction process is
likely to last for 45 days due
to the fact that Winn-Dixie is
in Chapter 11 bankruptcy pro-
tection in the US, although it is'
unknown how long the win-
dow to receive bids will remain
open.
One interesting scenario that
may yet occur is if the US
Bankruptcy Court approved a
rival offer involving foreign
investors, as this would con-
flict with the Government's
stated policy of allowing
Bahamians 'first crack' at any
investment opportunities, espe-
cially in a sector supposed to
be exclusively reserved for
Bahamians.
All 12 Bahamas Supermar-
kets stores are expected to
remain open once the purchase
is complete, and the current
management team would
remain in place under BK
Foods, with staff unaffected.
If the BK Foods deal is com-
pleted, Bahamas Supermarkets


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT


will remain publicly traded and
listed on the Over-the-Counter
market, with 22 per cent of its
ordinary shares remaining in
public hands.
BK Foods has to purchase
the 78 per cent stake from W-
D (Bahamas), Winn-Dixie's
wholly-owned Bahamian sub-
sidiary.
Part of the purchase includes.
a transition services agreement'
to ensure that management
knowledge and know-how is
transferred to BK Foods, plus:
a non-compete agreement that,
lasts for two years.
BK Foods will not be able
to use the Winn-Dixie trade,
name or trademark on its;
stores, which will be removed;
within six months of the deal'
being completed.
Bahamas Supermarkets leas'-
es all 12 stores it operates;
from, meaning that it does not;
own real estate. Therefore, BK,
Foods is buying an operating,
business, its fixtures, furniture,
and inventory.
Bahamas Supermarkets genri
erated a 14.8 per cent rise ir1
net income to $3.1 million for
the 2006 second quarter, with
gross sales up 6.7 per cent dur7
ing the 16 weeks to January,
22, 2006, at $44.1 million. .
Sales for the first six months!
were up by 8.5 per cent at $751
million, with net income upl
from $3.6 million to $4.7 milL
lion.
S ., .. . . 1
- " ';' *. .


2005
S: No.00453


Equity ,ide
;r


.,,,. A.


IN THE MATTER of all that piece parcel or lot of land
having an area of 54,890.88 square feet situate in the Island
of Crooked Island one of The Islands of The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas and being a lot of land situate on the
southern side of The Queens Highway bounded on the North
by the said Queens Highway and running thereon One
Hundred and Fifty one and Eighty Hundredths (151.80) feet
and on the WEST by land said to be the property of Virginia
Deleveaux and running thereon Three Hundred Sixty one
and Sixty Hundredths (361.60) feet and on the SOUTH by
land now or formerly the property of The Anderson Family
and running thereon One Hundred and Fifty one and Eighty
Hundredths (151.80) feet and on the EAST by land said to
be the property of Lucky Winter and running thereon Three
Hundred and Sixty one and Sixty Hundredths (361.60) feet.

AND IN THE MATTER of tih Qietiing Tites Act 1959

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of FLORENCE
ANDERSON -' : '"

S' NOTICE OF PETITION : -

Notice is hereby given that Florence Anderson of the Southern district of the Island
of New Providence (hereinafter called "the Petitioner" Iclaims to be the owner of
Sthe encumbered fee simple in possession of the land hereinafter described, that is
Stosay :: '
ft 'ALL THAT pieceparcel orlot of lahd'havigan area of 54,890.88 square
fee situate in the island of Crooiked Tland one of the Islands of The Commonwealth
of The; Bahamas and being a lot of land situate on the southern side of The Queens
Highway bounded on the NORTH by the said Queens Highway and running thereon
One Hundred and Fifty-one and Eighty Hundredths (151.80) feet and on the WEST
by land said to be the property of Virginia Deleveaux and running thereon Three
Hundred Sixty-one and Sixty Hundredths (361.60) feet and on the SOUTH by
land now or formerly the property of The Anderson Family and running thereon
One Hundred and Fifty-one and Eighty Hundredths (151.80) feet and on the EAST
by land said to be the property of Lucy Winter and running thereon Three Hundred
and'Sixty-one and Sixty Hundredths (361.60) feet.

A Plan of the said land may be inspected during normal office hours in the
following places:-

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau
(b) The Chambers of McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes situate at Mareva
House, 4 George Street, Nassau, Bahamas
(c) The notice board at the office of the Administrator, Crooked Island

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower or right of dower
or any adverse claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or before
the 28th day of May A.D., 2006 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
and the undersigned an statement of their claim in the prescribed form, verified
by an Affidavit to be filed therewith together with a plan of the area claimed and
an abstract of their title to the said area claimed by them. Failure of an such person
to file and serve a statement of claim on or before the 28th day of May, A.D. 2006
will operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated this 20th day of February A.D., 2006

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Chambers
Mareva House
4 George Street
Nassau, Bahamas !
Attorneys for the Petitidner


A Single Storey Commercial Building of concrete structure approximately 11 years old which houses a Restaurant
& Disco comprising 6,456 sq. ft. situated on Lot No. 90-D (42,616 sq. ft.) being a portion of a Lot of Land totaling
4.646 acres on Main Eleuthera, Queens Highway, Lower Bogue, Eleuthera
The property is well landscaped and is in close proximity to a Shopping Centre and Gas Station. Utilities: Electricity,
City Water and Telephone


- -


7H:E"TRIBU.NE.


PAGE 1 OB, MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006










THE TB B SA0


THE BAHAMAS



CONSTITUTIONAL REVIEW



COMMISSION





PRELIMINARY REPORT & PROVISIONAL
RECOMMENDATIONS 2006





Royal Victoria Gardens
East Hill Street, Nassau
Bahamas

March, 2006



SECTION 1


1.1 In this section, the Commission encapsulates the main subjects and concerns
addressed by the public and thqjr thinking on these issues. Many of these matters are
elaborated on in the following chapters.

1.2 Throughout its consultations, several topics and issues arose with sufficient
recurrence and preeminence to be considered as themes. It is likely that some of these
viewpoints were influenced by the questions posed in the booklet "Options for Change",
the political platform indications for constitutional change, and the 2002 Constitutional
Referenda Acts. But the Commission is also convinced that many had their origin in the
common experience and shared perception of Bahamians, from vastly different social,
economic and educational backgrounds. Several of these concerns are, strictly
speaking, outside the remit of a constitutional review exercise. But they come within the
context of general political or governmental reforms, and hence share a close affinity
with the functioning of the constitutional and basic legal order of society.

1.3 Some of the common themes, which are not presented in any order of
precedence, are as follows:
SThe early town meetings of the Commission held in New Providence and
the Family Islands were dominated by a discussion of the Preamble, and
there was unanimous support for retaining the Preamble in its current
form. This single topic would have controlled the agenda of the town
meetings had the Commission not come to an early recognition that the
people would support no change to the Preamble. A policy decision was
taken by the Commission to reassure audiences of this position, and steer
the discussion away from an inordinate focus on the Preamble.

By and large people felt the enormous powers of the Prime Minister,
whether real or perceived, had to be limited without affecting the Prime
Minister's authority. It was their view that there should be greater
opportunity for the involvement of civil society before the exercise of
executive power.

There were many criticisms leveled at the devotion to duty provided by
some Members of Parliament, and many persons expressed the view that
There should be some system for penalizing or recalling delinquent
representatives.

Generally, there was not any great dissatisfaction with the basic system of
parliamentary democracy and the two-chambered Parliament (elected
House of Assembly and appointed Senate.) However, there was
widespread agreement with the need for reform of the Senate to make it a
more mature representative body with membership drawn from broader
segments of the community. Many persons expressed the view that the
Senate should be an elected body, but without altering its powers; others
felt that some Senators should have security of tenure.

There were mixed feelings about the retention of the Queen of England as
Queen of the Bahamas and Head of State of The Bahamas. There was a
significant' number of persons who expressed no opinion as, to .the _
institution of Monarchy; there were others who were of the opinion that the
status quo should remain, while others were of the view that this link to
the British Monarchy was inconsistent with Bahamian independence and
sovereignty and should be severed while preserving membership with the
Commonwealth of which the Queen is symbolic Head.

There was overwhelming support for equality between the sexes and for
the removal of any form of discrimination on the grounds of sex or gender,
especially with regard to the ability of a married Bahamian woman to
transmit citizenship to her child born outside the Bahamas. So far as
acquisition of citizenship by marriage is concerned, the majority of
persons felt that acquisition should not be automatic for either non-
Bahamian males or females, and that a waiting period would be
appropriate for both. There was wide divergence between persons
regarding the time period for the grant of citizenship ranging from those
who preferred 5 or 10 years, to those who said "never" and others
"automatic" on marriage.

There was wide support for the elimination of discrimination on the basis
of sex or gender with respect to citizenship but almost unanimous
opposition and rejection of the concept of same-sex marriage, in the face
of a determined minority committed to the concept of absolute non-
discrimination. Emerging out of this discussion, the majority of persons
would wish Bahamian law of marriage as a union between a man and a
woman to be enshrined in the Constitution.

There were concerns generally over the need for greater participation of
civil society in the process of governance, and for Governments to be
more overtly accountable to the people for their policies and actions and
more forthcoming.

There was a common concern that the government did not have
command of the immigration situation, and most people thought to some
degree this was linked with the state of the citizenship and immigration
laws. In particular, there was concern over the status of children born in
the Bahamas to non-Bahamian parents.

A large number of Family Island persons resonated a call for greater
autonomy in Local Government and for the Constitution to specify the
relationship between the Central and Local Government. A realistic study
of the governmental needs of the more developed islands "nd the less
developed should be undertaken.


SECTION 2

GENERAL FEATURES OF THE CONSTITUTION


2.1 The method by which the new Constitution will enter into force was not a subject
that attracted the attention of a significant number of persons. This is understandable
because it raises highly sophisticated defining issues of politics, law, national identity,
emotion, symbolism and sovereignty. At the heart of the matter is how we would
disengage ourselves from our imperial past.

2.2 There is a persuasive constitutional argument to be made for the enactment of
the new Constitution by amendment, as an enactment by statute law of The Sovereign
Bahamian Parliament would be said to be symbolic only.

2.3 On the other hand, the technical remote possibility that the United Kingdom
Parliament would repeal the Order in Council conferring Independence on the Bahamas
is a remote possibility verging on the impossible; the Order remains a device structured,
not by Bahamians, but by an Imperial power. Symbolic though it might be, should not
the Constitution of the Bahamas be a product of Bahamians?

2.4 Both the Jamaican Constitutional Reform Report in 1995 and the Barbadian
Constitution Review Commission in 1998 opted for an enactment by their Sovereign
Parliaments. In the case of Jamaica, the Commission suggested that the British
Government be invited to revoke the Jamaican Independence Order simultaneously with
the coming into.force of the new Jamaican Constitution.



Provisional Recommendation(s)

(1.) The Commission recommends that reforms to the present Constitution be
achieved by repealing the Order-in-Council (Bahamas Independence Order) to which the
Constitution of the Bahamas is scheduled, and simultaneously replacing it with an Act of
the Parliament of The Bahamas entitled the Bahamas Constitution Act, subsequently
approved by Referendum.


2.5 One of the most riveting topics during the early phase of the public debate on
constitutional reform was the wording of the Preamble. Indeed, it is correct to say that,
with the possible exception of the discussion revolving around sexual orientation and
citizenship in the immigrant context, no other aspect of the Constitution came close to
generating the kind of attention as the Preamble.

2.6 At issue was the question of whether consideration should be given to changing
the Preamble to avoid any appearance of a constitutional bias towards Christianity,
notwithstanding the substantive guarantees of freedom of religion in the fundamental
rights provisions.

2.7 As far as its approach to religion is concerned, it might be said that the Preamble
is all-embracing and does not necessarily favour any particular religion. The
Commission, is not of the view that the reference to "Christian values" is exclusionary of
or discriminatory against other religions. Even if it could be interpreted as being pro-
Christianity, there could be nothing wrong with the framers of the Constitution stating in
the Preamble what they thought should be the defining spiritual basis of the State. The
important thing is that the Constitution itself guarantees freedom of religion to all, which
is unimpeded by anything in the Preamble.


Provisional Recommendationts)

(2.) The Commission recommends that the Preamble be retained in its current form
and that no amendments be made to its content.






2.8 In the exercise of our function as Constitutional Commissioners, we considered
whether the Bahamas ought to adopt the concept of directive principles of state or
directive principles of social policy, which have been adopted in several European
countries, a Commonwealth country and at least one Caribbean country (i.e) Austria,
France, Germany, Ireland, Spain, India and Guyana). The Barbadian Constitutional
Review Commission recommended that a broad statement of principles defining the
general policy framework within which Barbados would be governed should be included
In the reformed Constitution of Barbados. The Commission will give further
consideration to whether or not similar principles should be included in the reformed
Bahamian Constitution. Attached as an Annex is a sample of such principles
recommended by the Barbadian Report of their Constitutional Review Commission.


Entrenchment devices

2.9 The majority of the provisions of the Constitution of The Bahamas can only be
changed by an act of the Legislature with a 2/3 or % majority and supported by
referendum. Significantly, these entrenchment devices also extend to provisions of the
Independence Order and the Independence Act. A noted Caribbean constitutional
scholar, Francis Alexis, has pointed out that the purpose for the entrenchment devices
was to ensure that changes to the Constitution could "not be brought about by accident".

2.10 Consideration has to be given to the question of whether there should be removal
of certain Articles of the Constitution or what new provisions should be added to the list
of entrenched Articles for example, (i) the right to Vote, (ii) Leader of the Opposition (Not
now entrenched) or (iii) that the Bahamas be a Democratic Parliamentary Republic.


Provisional Recommendation(s)

(3.) The Commission is of the view that there is a need for greater in depth study
and wider consultation on these entrenched provisions before any specific
recommendations are made which ought not to be done until all significant
Articles of the new Constitution are agreed to be recommended.





SECTION 3

SPECIFIC CHAPTERS OF THE CONSTITUTION



The Supreme Law Clause

3.1 The importance of the supreme law clause is that it specifically declares the
primacy of the Constitution, although the case law indicates that even without such a
specific declaration the Constitution would be supreme. There are two very important
consequences that flow from this: firstly, it creates a system of constitutional supremacy,
where Parliament is subject to the Constitution, as opposed to the British system of
Parliamentary supremacy. Second, it provides the written basis for the superior courts to
review and question the legality of primary legislation against the standard of the
Constitution at the request of an aggrieved person.


Provisional Recommendation(s)

(4.) The Commission recommends the retention of the Supreme Law Clause. Any
person (whether aggrieved or not), with the leave of the Court may be given the right to
challenge the validity of any law in the Court which may be ultra vires the Constitution
and given such declaration and redress as may be appropriate.


I


MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006, PAGE 11 B


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS










PAGE 12B, MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006 THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS
I I I I I I I I


3.2 The principles which are to govem the grant of citizenship in a small country
occupying the geo-strategic space of The Bahamas must be carefully conceived. They
must be conceived with compassion for the rights of others and regard for international
legal principles, but realistically to protect our identity and culture as Bahamians. The
issue which consumed the people most was who should be made citizens under the
Constitution.

3.3 It appeared to be the view of the majority of those who expressed opinions on the
Constitution that gender bias, wherever it applies to the acquisition or transmission of
citizenship, should be removed.



Provisional Recommendation(s)

(5.) It must be ensured that every person who at the commencement of the
Constitution was a lawful citizen of The Bahamas should continue to be a citizen. It
should also be ensured that no person, with vested rights with respect to citizenship
should have that right adversely affected. : '

(6.) Different treatment accorded to non-Bahamian spouses of Bahamian citizens, or
gender discrimination should be deleted from relevant provisions of the Constitution. The
Constitution should provide that non-national spouses'of Bahamial"(citizens should be
treated equally. Such persons upon marriage should have a right to reside and work in
the Bahamas and own property jointly and upon application the right to become a
Bahamian citizen 5 years after marriage subject to such exceptions or qualifications as
may be prescribed in the interests of national security or public policy.

(7.) The Commission recommends that the Constitutional provision which provides
for children born outside The Bahamas to married Bahamian men have automatic
Bahamian citizenship, should also provide for children bom outside the Bahamas to
married Bahamian women (regardless of the nationality of their spouse) to have the
same automatic'entitlement to citizenship.

(8.) With respect to the position of children born in The Bahamas to non-Bahamians,
the Commission recommends that the waiting period be 18 years of permanent
residence. This provision should import the international law criteria of the "genuine
link" for the applicant to qualify for registration. These changes would ensure that only
those persons who are able to demonstrate that their attachment, in terms of their family,.
social relations, and other interests are in the Bahamas and not elsewhere would qualify.
The Commission recommends that persons born in the Bahamas neither of whose
parents is a Bahamian should be entitled to citizenship upon attaining the age of 18
provided that the person was ordinarily resident in the Bahamas for a period of not less
than 10 years immediately prior to his attaining the age of 18 subject to such exceptions
or qualifications as may be prescribed in the interest of national security or public policy.
This right to citizenship should be lost if no application is made before the person attains
the age of twenty-one.

(9.) With respect to the ability of children bom in The Bahamas to acquire citizenship
if either parent is Bahamian (the situation described by Article 6 of the Constitution), a
proviso should be added to make it clear that the entitlement to pass on citizenship
applies equally to both parents, except that proof of paternity is required where the
unmarried parent is a Bahamian male. That parent must prove-paternity by means of a
Declaration of Paternity from the Supreme Court as prescribed by Parliament.

(10.) The position of children born outside The Bahamas to unmarried Bahamian
parents, male or female, should be the same and should provide for the automatic
acquisition of citizenship, subject to proof of paternity in the case of the Bahamian male
by a Declaration of Paternity from the Supreme Court as prescribed by Parliament. If
men and women are granted the same ability to transmit their citizenship and the
citizenship provisions proclaim true gender equality, it would eliminate the need to
equate the status of an unmarried mother to that of a father, in respect of children born
outside The Bahamas.

(t:t); Ti.peyesition wittrespect;tq dual citizenship orihaflonilityshould be stated,,and
Persons whnoareaeligiblefafory;Bahamian citizenship,:shotuldfeot-be denied -registration
simply because they possess another nationality. However, renunciation of another
citizenship should be made a condition-precedent to the grant of citizenship.


3.4 It'was no surprise to the Commission that the fundamental rights provisions in the
Constitution attracted significant debate and discussion. From the perspective of the
citizen, this must be the most important feature of the Constitution. The most interesting
debate focused around the non-discrimination clause, in particular the apparent
uncertainty of the Constitution to non-discrimination on the grounds of sex (or gender).

Discrimination on the grounds of "sex"

3.5 There is an inherent tension that exists between the preambular Article 15, which
grants certain basic rights to persons regardless of race, place of origin, political
opinions, colour, creed or sex, and the enumerated rights that follow from Article 16 to
Article 27. The conflict arises from the inclusion of "sex" as a basic right to which a
person is entitled in Article 15, and its omission from the particular article designed to
protect against discrimination (Article 26). This leads to the conclusion that the
Constitution does not explicitly prohibit discrimination on the grounds of sex. Article 26
,also excludes from the protection against discrimination matters of personal law
(adoption, marriage, divorce, burial, devolution of property on.death-and discriminatory
laws "reasonably justified in a democratic society".- .Interestingly, the Status of
S Children's Act, also exempts adoption, inheritance, domicile andicitizenship.


i'nnciple orgenderequality
3.6 The Commission can hardly underscore the point Ihat equality of treatment must
be the cornerstone of our Constitution. It is significant that.theibillcof'rights in the 1999
South African constitution begins with the simple proclamation that "Everyone is equal
before the law and has the right to equal protection and benefit of the law." There can
be no room in our Constitution for any omission that permits persons of the female
gender to be treated differently from those of the male gender..

The right to vote

3.7 The Commission received several representations for the right to vote to be
enshrined as one of the fundamental rights. It cannot be denied that the right of a people
to vote freely and secretly to elect their representatives to Parliament is the very bedrock
of democracy. All of the other political powers of the state flow from this act. The
Commission is of the view that the right to vote and to do so by secret ballot should be
enshrined and entrenched in the Constitution. Obviously, however, it needs to be
appreciated that unlike the other fundamental rights, which are granted basically to
"everyone within the Bahamas" the right to vote is a limited one, and can only belong to
citizens of the Bahamas.

Freedom of the Press

3.8 The Commission also heard from a number of advocates for freedom of the
press, radio and television media to be included as part of the principle of free
expression. It cannot be denied that a free and unbridled press is one of the most
important institutions in a democratic society, and may be deserving of constitutional
protection.

Freedom of Information

3.9 A corollary of the right of free speech is the right to have access to public
information. The right of free expression embraces the right to impart and receive
information, and thus it is not surprising that some Constitutions link the right of freedom
of information to that of free speech. Some provide for extensive rights of freedom of
information, such as the South African model, which provides a right of access to
information held by the state. Others do not elevate it to a constitutional right, but have
adopted freedom of information laws.




Provisional Recommendation(s)

(12.) The Commission recommends that "sex" (gender) be included in the protected
category of enumerated rights in Article 26 in the definition of "discriminatory". The
Commission does not agree that "sexual orientation" deserves special constitutional
protection. We support the proposition that the institution of marriage should be defined
in the constitution as a union between man and woman.


(13.) The Commission does not recommend the elevation of additional factors such as
language, age, handicap or disability for the non-discriminatory provision of the
Constitution. These factors call for specific, limited protection, by separate legislation.;:

(14.) The right to vote in general elections and referenda by citizens of the Bahamas
should be included in the constitution subject to whatever qualifications that may be
necessary. ; ,.

(15.) The Commission recommends that Parliament prescribe a Freedom of :.'''
Information Act.







3.10 It is apparent that the position of the Head of State of The-Bahamas is not: een in
reality to be the Queen of Great Britain etc. who constitutionally is the Queen of the
S Bahamas too. People appear not to be troubled by the concept and are apparently
satisfied to regard the Governor-General, although wrongly, to be Head of State of The
S -.Bahamasls The reaction to the proposition that the Queen is constitutionally Queen of
T.he Bahamas was usually met with silence.

i:,3lB1o ,The. abolition of;the English monarch as Head of State of the Bdhamas is part of
-the evolutionary process toward a truly peoples Govemment, not one of the Queen's
Dominions but part of the Commonwealth. The Commission would wish the Bahamian
people to focus on whether the position of a "foreign monarch" and one that is shared
.with many other countries, is reconcilable with the founding provisions which state that
7 t,,';heiBahamas shall be a "sovereign" democratic state. We cannot on the one hand
S assert'ourselves as a sovereign country and a free and independent actor in
S international affairs while relying on the legal fiction of "Her Majesty in Parliament" and
i "Her Majesty's Government" in the "speech from the throne" to give legitimacy to, our
:i : i-Government.

S -3.12. It is conceded that in an increasingly interdependent world the concept.of
sovereignty as it denotes a self-sufficient national territory is waning; sovereignty must
denote an independent legal entity, where some supreme body has Virtually unlimited
capacity to make-laws. Although the existence and validity of the rules in our legal
system are determined by reference to a written Constitution, those laws still require the
participation of "the Queen-in-Parliament" to be properly enacted. This is inconsistent
with being a completely independent legal entity.

A local Head of State

3.13 The time has come for the transition to a Bahamian Head of State to be elected
by both Houses of Parliament. This Bahamian Head of State would function in a role
similar to that of the Queen's Representative, the current Governor General, who now
exercises powers on behalf of the Queen of the Bahamas.

3.14 Another curious point about the appointment of the Governor-General is that
there is no requirement for the holder of that office to be a citizen of the ;Bahamas.
Because of the method of appointment of the Governor-General, it hardly seems logical
that the person appointed to this office would be a non-Bahamian. To remove.all:doubt it
should be declared that the Governor General or Head of State shall be a~Bahamian
citizen. .

Provisional Recommendation(s-

(16.) The Commission recommends that the English Monarch shallUnolonger be. the
Head of State of The Bahamas and the office of Governor General be abolished. The
Head of State should be a citizen of The Bahamas duly elected for a term of years by
both Houses of Parliament. The Bahamas should be a Democratic Parliamentary
Republic with the Head of state being the President. Executive Powers shall continueito
be exercised by the Cabinet with the Head of Government being the Prime Minister, s,'

S,17.)' ~he provision of the Constitution which permits:.theiGbieflieusice-iandrnlhe
W res iddn of the Senate to serve as acting Head of State,should, .rte)n ov to avoid a
A conflictof interest. Deputies should be appointed from among eminentcitizepaitofill any
vacancies in that office.


I~I..


I Chater V Parlamen


Strengthening the institutions of Pariamept


:,i


3.15 Despite the widespread criticisms of the function of the Senate, there was
general agreement that the bi-cameral nature of the Parliament should be retained. '' ,


3.16 The Commission thinks it a point of substance that the suggestion to expand the
Senate to provide for the representation of the "islands" was the unique contribution
primarily of the Family Island participants, who were adamant that they should have a
voice in the Senate. This suggestion is reasonable, and while it is obviously impractical
to have individual island representation, this'could be achieved by means of sector
representation (northern islands, central islands, southeastern-islands, southem-
islands).. ..
,. ; .' .w '-? .*"'' a1 *' a"' s t


Provisional Recommendation(s)


(18.) The Commission does not recommend any change in the system by which
members of the House of Assembly are elected. The Parliamentary system should be
S. ..inodified to make allowance for representation in the Senate by members without
political affiliation from special community institutions, for example the church, trade
unions, professional bodies, commerce and other major fields of endeavour, although
,the Government must maintain the.miajority~. This will necessitate an increase in the
,.. membership of the Senate . '

s i(19;); ,The(Commission recommends that the membership of-the senate should be
,. .increased to twenty-three (23) persons. Twelve (12).senators appointed by the Prime
, Minister, six (6) appointed by the Leader of the Opposition and five (5) appointed by the
Head of State acting in his own discretion from leading citizens in the church, trade
unions, professional bodies, commerce, community organizations and other major fields
,. :oQf.endeavour after consultation with the Prime Minister and the Leader of the Opposition.

S:.,20;),,t iJs recommended that the Constitution be amended to create a truly
independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission and remove the power of the Prime
Minister to modify the report of the Commission. The office currently styled
Parliamentary Commissioner should be the ex-officio Chairman of that Commission with
constitutional protection and security of tenure similar to the Chairman of the other
Service Commissions together with 3 persons nominated by the Prime Minister and 3 by
-the Leader of the Opposition (not including members of Parliament).' Decisions of the
Commission ought to be subject to appeal to the Supreme Court.

(21.) The Commission does not propose any interference with Parliamentary privilege
of the timeless right of freedom of speech of Members of the House of Assembly.
However, this freedom is sometimes abused by overt personal attacks on persons who
have no right of response in the House. It is recommended that the Constitution
provide for a written response from any offended person to be published in Hansard with
the approval of the Speaker to prevent baseless or frivolous responses.

(22.) The Commission recommends that Parliament prescribe controls and limits over
donations to political parties, candidates and political campaign expenditure to ensure
transparency and accountability in local and national elections and fairness in
referendum. The Commission suggests that there be public funding provided by the
Government for the cost of referendum. It is also recommended that theselimits apply
to non-Bahamians contributing to parties or candidates. .

(23.) The Commission recommends that an Integrity Commission be established
under an Integrity in Public Life Act, that would serve as a watchdog committee over the
affairs of political and senior civil servants, and which will replace the Public Disclosure
Act. It is recommended that this Integrity Commission, in addition to some of the
provisions from the Public Disclosure Act, shall provide that Members ofParliament and
Senior Public Officers disclose all business interests, investments and shares in
companies held by them in which they are beneficial owners.

(24.) The office of Clerk to Parliament, and a Deputy Clerk, with responsibility for the Senate,
should be established by the Constitution as public offices, with appropriate security of tenure,
and control over their staff.


U ;.i~: /.ii AAl. .~.: A;~,, 3in;,tl4? A~









THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


-Cabinet

3.17 The Cabinet of the Bahamas is charged with the direction and control of the
Government of the Bahamas and is "collectively responsible and answerable to
Parliament" Although this time honoured tradition may have worked well.in the context
of British politics, there are problems with it in the Caribbean. In this regard the
Commission bore in mind the advice of the Wooding Commission that the executive
powers in the Westminster system, especially in small states, have "a propensity to
become transformed- ..............in societies without political cultures which support
its operative conventions."

3.18 The Commission recommends that the committee system, which operates well in
the United Kingdom and the United States, be utilized to demand greater accountability
of Government to the House of Assembly from where it gets its support.. These
committees should be drawn from the House and they should be given real powers, with
the regular power of House committees (i e., power to send for persons and papersetc.).
They can be a very valuable tool in the democratic process if used effectively. These
Committees which have a Government majority ought to be studied in other jurisdictions
for their working in reality and in practice:, .

Powers of the Prime Minister

3. 19 Under our system the Prime Minister possesses.a plenitude of powers that range
from the ability to appoint (and therefore some removals) the Governor General, and the
appointment of many senior persons, including senior judicial officers (Court of Appeal,
Chief Justice), Chairmen of most. of. the -permanent,, commissions, foreign
representatives, Permanent Secretaries, Commissioner and Deputy Commissioner of
Police, etc.

3.20 There was a nearly unanimous call for the.reduction of some of the Prime
Minister's powers of appointment. The Commission agrees with the suggestion that
there should be reforms in the procedures for the appointment of many of the offices
currently appointed by the Prime Minister. At the same time, while it is possible to divest
the Prime Minister of appointment powers over judges, it is obvious that he ought not to
be divested over the appointment of the Commissioner and Deputy Commissioner of
Police, as the Prime Minister is ultimately responsible for the security of the Statei-New
procedures would have to be devised for the sharing of power by a consultative process.

Localgovemment

3.21 Although the Government of the Bahamas remains a unitary one, the
archipelagic nature of the country has made some degree of decentralization and local
governance a necessity. The system of local government is purely statutory, ard is
established by the 1992 Local Government Act. This creates a system, of District
Councils and Town Committees filled by locally elected officials to take care of basic'
administrative duties (e.g., sanitation, public health, some road works, and some
revenue collection). Many persons from the Family Islands voiced concerns about the
effectiveness of this system. Particular criticisms focused around the lack of power'
relative to the central government, lack of financial independence and control oyerttaxes .....--
raised, and the overlap of functions and possibility of political partisanship and control
through with respect to the repair or creation of public infrastructure. .

3.22 It was also pointed out that since the system of local government is a post-
independence development, it is not included in the Constitution. However, since the
control of the government is vested in the Cabinet of the Bahamas, the powers of the
local government authorities, though set out in statute, can only be a form of delegated
power from the executive.

3.23 The Commission has noted that the inclusion of provisions for local government
in the Constitution is an ordinary feature of constitutions in countries where there is
developed local government. Since one of the functions of a Constitution is to set out the
.powers of.goverhment, which extends to central government as well as to intermediate
levels of government, the Constitution should make provisions for local government.

3.24 :The Commission has given consideration to the role of the Ombudsman and for
.the creation of a Public Defender to which the people would have free access for advice
on their rights and the means of enforcing them. The Commission believes that many.of:
the potential conflicts which arise between the Government and the citizen can be dealt
enWitbrthroughuthe'a'gency of a functioning Ombudsman The Commission has decided
a that it is rnightotr aise the'irrmpoettnc(df tIft Orfbjdsrhfi b' giving iltConstitulional Status
.,and givingthe position the status of a Supreme Court Judge.


Provisional Recommendation(s)

(25.) The Commission recommends the establishment of a number of parliamentary
committees tohave,oversight of areas of ministerial responsibility, This will also
enable these Committees to have access to technical and administrative expertise from.
the public service or civil society, who could bring much needed expertise to the work of
these committees.

(26.) The:Commission recommends that the powers of appointments by the Prime
Minister be amended by transferring some of those powers to the Head of State, which
will be exercised-subject to consultation with the Prime Minister and with the Leader of
the Opposition where appropriate; as well as joint recommendation by the Prime Minister
and Leader of the Opposition agreed between them.

(27.) The Commission recommends ;the appointment of an Ombudsman, with:
constitutional tenure similar to that of a Supreme Court Judge.

(28.) The Commission recommends the creation of the Office of Public Defender along
the similar. lines of appointment and security of tenure given to the Director of Public,
Prosecutions.

(29.) The Commission has yet to decide whether to make a recommendation-on ----.
whether the concept of local government should be given constitutional recognition. "




Retirementageforfudges, ... '. ; ::. . ., .....

.3.25 ,The question of extending the servicelives of'Judges was one of the issues taken
up by the constitutional referendum of 2002. Provisions'were made inr The Bahamas
Constitution (Amendment) (No. 9) Act, 2002, to extend the ages of Supreme Court
justices from 65-68, with an extension to 72,'and of appeal justices from 70-72, with a
possible extension to 75. The Commission is of the opinion that the age limit for the
retirement of all Justices of the Supreme Court and their Court of Appeal should be the
same and that the limit should be fixed at age.70 without any extension. '

3.26 The Commission is of the view that the appointment of 'Justices of the Supreme
Court and the Justices of the Court of Appeal should all be made by the Head of.State on
the recommendation of the Judicial and Legal Service Commission after consultation
with the Prime Minister and the Leader of the Opposition. I. .'; ,' "

Composition of the Judicial and Legal Services Commission ,

3.27 Consideration should be given to the reform of the composition of the Judicial
and Legal Services Commission. The standing members are the Chief Justice
(Chairman), a Justice of the Supreme Court or Court of Appeal, the Chairman of the
Public Service Commission, and two other persons, appointed by the Head of State and
nominated by the Prime Minister after consultations with the Leader of the Opposition.
These two nominees must be lawyers, which creates a rather invidious situation. These'
members will participate in the appointment of judges and magistrates, whom they may
be required to appear before, and public legal officers, who may be their opponents in
courts.

Tenure of magistrates

3.28 It cannot be denied today that a stipendiary and circuit magistrate is a part of the
judiciary and that a magistrate's court is a court or tribunal within the meaning of the
Constitution, so as to be caught by a "fair and impartial" tribunal of law mentioned in the
Constitution.


3.29 The appointment of magistrates in the Bahamas is vested in an independent
Judicial and Legal Services Commission, which implies that their position has
constitutional standing. However, it would certainly put the magistracy on better footing if
their security of tenure was spelt out in the Constitution. The Commission thinks that it
.is unsatisfactory for magistrates, who are really at the fount of justice in this country
because they hear the majority of disputes that eventually reach the courts, should be
without some protection. The same imperatives which demand insulation for superior
court judges against improper influence, should also operate in the case of inferior
judges, magistrates, chairman of tribunals and the like. They should all be covered by
similar protection afforded High Court judges with respect to appointment, pay and terms
of service, security of tenure, and discipline and dismissal. In addition, magistrate's
courts should be given specific recognition in the Constitution as part of the judicial
system.


MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006, PAGE 13B


U II -


Provisional Recommendation(s)


(30.) The Commission recommends that the retirement age for Judges,of the Supreme
Court and Justices of the Court of Appeal should be 70 in all cases, with no possibility of
extension save to complete outstanding work.

(31.) The Commission recommends that the provisions dealing with the appointment
of Magistrates, their appointment and security of tenure should be dealt with in the
Constitution under the.Chapter on the Judicature. The magistracy should also be given
a form of protection of tenure, not necessarily on par with superior judges, but sufficient
to achieve a constitutional guarantee of independence.

(32.) With respect to the appointment of Judges, the Commisskai recommends the
following procedure:

(a) The Chief Justice and President of the Court of Appeal should be
appointed by the Head of State on the recommendation of the Judicial
and Legal Service Commission after the Head of State has consulted with
Sthe Prime Minister and the Leader of the Opposition.
(b) Other Justices of the Supreme Court should be appointed by the Head of
State acting on the recommendations of the Judicial and Legal Services
Commission after the Commission has consulted with the Prime Minister
and Leader of the Opposition.
(c) The Prime Minister and Leader of the Opposition should be required to
consult Senior Members of the Bar and the Bar Council of the Bar
Association before tendering advice to the Head of State on appointment
of Judges.

(33.) The. Commission recommends reform of the Judicial and LegalServices
Commission by providing for the members appointed by the Head of State, on
recommendation of the Prime Minister after consultation with the Leader of the
Opposition, to be non-practicing attorneys.

(34.) The Commission does not recommend the abolition of appeals to the Judicial
Committee of the Privy Council at this time.


V ..11. : TePbi c Service- ':"



3.30 Over the past months there has been much discussion between the Ministry of
The Public Service and other Agencies on the idea of Public Sector Reform, but no
decision has been made to date.
The Commission is therefore of the view that it should not make any recommendations
on this chapter at this time, but allow a period for greater in depth study based on what
action is taken as a result of those discussions.


Control ofpublic finances:

3.31 In approaching this area, the Commission bore in mind that.one of its specific
directives was to' examine existing institutions to ensure that they provide for
"transparency and accountability in the expenditure of public funds". The current system
for the control of public finances, erected by the Constitution and legislation, envisions a
process that starts and ends with Parliament, which may be conveniently set out as
follows: (i) Parliament debates and approves the annual budget; (ii) the Ministry of
Finance and the Treasurer supervise disbursement of funds, along with the Central
Tenders Board; (iii) the Auditor General receives financial statements from the Ministry of
Finance and .conducts his audits of various department of government; and (iv) the
Auditor General submits his reports to Parliament (via the Speaker) for the scrutiny of the
Public Accounts Committee and debate in Parliament. It is clear that the Constitution,
. however, recognizes the Auditor General as.the primary means of the control of public
m,: finances., and the mechanism by which any irregularities are brought to the attention of
the House.


Independence of the Officeof the Auditor General

3.32 The independence of the Office of the Auditor-General should be strengthened by
making provisions for the independent funding of that office out of the Consolidated Fund
and for the appointment and control of the staff of the Auditor General's Office to be
vested in the occupier of that Office

Public Accounts Committee

3.33 The Public Accounts Committee should be elevated :to direct Constitutional
standing by enshrining that body and its mandate in the Constitution. The Constitution
should declare the relationship of this body with the Auditor General. -Consideration
should also be given to strengthening other components of the public financial system to
ensure that there is efficiency and current (as opposed to post-facto) mechanisms for
control.


. ......_.........--. .....-.... ...... ... ...
Provisional Recommendation(s) ;.

(35.) It is recommended that the Auditor General should have power to audit the
accounts and other financial statements of all corporations and companies owned or
controlled by the State.

(36.) The Public Accounts Committee should be given Constittional existence by
specifically providing for its establishment in the Constitution under the chairmanship of
a member of the Opposition in the House of Assembly with a majority of members of
those opposed to the Government.





Interpretation of the Constitution

3.34 Article 30 of the Constitution provides for the savings ,of existing written.law by
excluding from the effect of human rights provisions set out in Articles 16-27 any law
"that was enacted and made before 10 July 1973 and has continued to be part of the law
of The Bahamas at all times since that day." All pre-independence laws would therefore
not be affected by the Chapter of the Constitution that provides for the "Protection of
Fundamental Rights and Freedoms".

3.35 The following .has been extracted from the report of the Barbadian Constitutional
Review Commission:

"It has been drawn to the attention of the Commission that the absence of an
'existing law clause' in the Constitutionr of Belize, drafted in-terms very similar
to the Barbados Constitution, has posed no significant problems in that
jurisdiction. The Commission has also taken note of the fact that Jamaica's
Joint Select Committee of the Houses of Parliament on' Constitutional and
Electoral Reform, in its May 1995 final report recommended the deletion of a
similar clause in the Jamaica Constitution."

The Commission thinks there is some logic in the experience of'Belize, as
well as the endorsement by the Barbadian Commission, and is of the-opinion that
the deletion of the savings clause would enable a more certain interpretation of the
Constitution.



Provisional Recommendation(s)

(37.) The Commission recommends the deletion of Article 30 (the savings clause) from
the Constitution.


JI








PAE M


Bahamian Rolle i




action in final fou


* BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
IT'S not everyday that a
Bahamian player steps in the
spotlight to play in the
NCAA men's collegiate bas-
ketball final four.
Magnum Rolle, a freshman
from Grand Bahama, joined
an elite field on Saturday
night in Indianapolis, Indi-
ana, when he came off the
bench for the Louisiana State
University Tigers.
The Tigers, considered
underdogs, were blown out
59-45 by the University of
California at Los Angeles
Bruins.
One of three players who
came off the bench to play in
the game, Rolle. scored two
points a lay-up that he
made 13 minutes and four
seconds in the first quarter.
He caught a pass from the
free throw line from starting
guard Garrett Temple, his
only assist in the game.
The 6-foot-10, 215-pound
forward played a total of 14
minutes in the game. He was
1-for-1 in field goals and 0-2
from the free throw line.
Rolle also pulled down a
team high eight rebounds,
including three on the offen-
sive end.
His rebounding total
matched the eight that was
produced by Bruins' centre
Lorenzo Mata off the bench.
Luc Mbah, the starting for-
ward for UCLA, topped both
of their performances with
nine rebounds to go along
with his game high 17 points.
Rolle, 20, was the first
Bahamian to play in the final
four since Rick Fox did it
with the North Carolina Tar
Heels in 1992. The closest any
other player came to the final
four was when guard Quentin
Hall played with the Gonzaga
Bulldogs.
A small group of Bahami-
ans, headed by Minister of
Youth, Sports.and Housing
Neville Wisdom, attended the
game from New Providence.
Rolle's family from Grand
Bahama were also there.
The Bruins, winners of the
South Eastern Conference,
were ranked at number 19
nationally going into the


LSU's Magnum Rolle, right, tries to block a shot by UCLA's Ryan Hollins during the first half of their Final Four semifinal
game in Indianapolis, Saturday, April 1, 2006.


game. They were impressive
in the past two games, upset-
ting top ranked Duke Uni-


versity 62-54 and the Univer-
sity of Texas 70-60 in over-
time.


Playing during the regular
season in 32 of their 35
games, Rolle scored a total


(AP Photos/Michae
of 69 points. He con
29-of-64 shooting
percentage.


BSC basketball season




reaches the playoffs


* BASKETBALL
THE Baptist Sports Council will kick
off its 2006 basketball playoffs on Tues-
day night at the Baillou Hills Sporting
Complex.
The best-of-three series will be
played between the men's divisional
teams.
From the president's division,
defending champions and pennant win-
ners Mount Tabor Full Gospel (7-0)
will take on fourth place St. Mark's (4-
3) in the opener on court one at 7pm.


In the other game at 8pm, second
place Temple Fellowship (6-1) will face
third place St. Paul's Fox Hill (5-2).
From the vice president's division,
rookie pennant winners Lord's House
of Faith (6-1) will meet fourth place
Mount Nebo (3-4) in the opener on
court two at 6pm. At 7pm second place
New Bethlehem (5-2) will take on third
place Evangelistic Centre (5-2).
The 19-and-under playoffs will get
started on Tuesday, April 18, while the
15-and-under playoffs will get under-
way on Saturday, April 22.


First Baptist, last year's runners-up,
won the 19-and-under pennant at 5-0
with defending champions Macedonia
second at 4-1. Third place went to
Transfiguration (2-3) and fourth is
Golden Gates (2-3). First Baptist will
play Golden Gates and Macedonia will
meet Transfiguration.
In the 15-and-under division, Golden
Gates won the president's divisional
pennant at 3-1, while Faith United
clinched the vice president divisional
penant at 4-0.
The league turned out to be a very


Birtnhdai bi Shcrinnglun


is denied goal ,lon is 0)th


W*.G. doom-


Oll, 010ot ft.




a *a


competitive one and the ph
expected to be just as excitii
The BSC, however, will tal
on Saturday when they hos
Star Classic at the DW Da
starting at 2pm with the 15-a
divisional game. That will be
by the 19-and-under division
A three-point shooting
dunk contest will also be tak
The festivities will conclude
men's All-Star game.
The Classic is being held in
the Rev. Harrison Thompso
mer Permanent Secretary at
istry of Youth, Sports and
who has been transferred to
istry of Local Government.
Rev. Thompson is a mem
Faith United Missionary
Church, headed by his bro
Rev. Dr. William Thompson
ident of both the Bahamas
Council and the Bahamas
Baptist Missionary and Ed
Convention.


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TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 1413, MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006






TRIBUNE SPORTS


SPORTS


Athletes attempt to

make Carifta team
* ABOVE: Bertram % illiams in the open boys high jump.
* LEFT: 1'arren Fraser (#1306) closes his eyes as he pulls in Ior first in the
heals for the under 17 boys 200 mere dash.
* BELO%% LEFT: \\ith no pressure in the heals for the under 17 girls 200
metre dash. lesha % white comes in lirsl.
* BELO1\ RIGHT: Ninea Smith in the heats for the under 17 girls 200 metre
dash.


(Photos: %Iario D,,,,a,,so/lTribunae sin!])


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MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2006


SECTION


Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


Sherman

Williams

wins title
* BOXING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
SHERMAN 'the Tank' Williams
made history on Friday night when
he added the National Boxing
Association's World Intercontinen-
tal Heavyweight title to his resume.
Williams' latest crown the third
in the past two years came before
a capacity crowd in Ybor City,
Florida when he knocked out
American David Washington in the
third round.
After flooring Washington at the
end of both the first and second
rounds, Williams put an end to his
opponent's night one minute and 51
seconds into the third.
"The fight was interesting. There
was a couple of different things that
occurred," Williams reflected. "For
starters, it was never put in the con-
tract that he was a southpaw.
"At 6-foot-2 and a southpaw, I
realized that I was going to be in for
a long night, so I had to make some
major mental adjustments and I
did."
Having spent the past five weeks
training to fight from his right,
Williams found himself changing
his game plan to go his left to
counter-punch with Washington.
"With him being so tall and a
southpaw, all this guy did was laid
back to avoid my punches,"
Williams stated. "But I managed to
get inside to get off my shots.
"He caught me a little early with
his combinations, but it didn't hurt
me or bother me. At the end of the
first round, I stepped in and hit him
with a kidney shot and went
upstairs with a left hook and caught
him flush on the chin."
Although Washington didn't go
completely down, the referee ruled
it a knockdown and from there,
Williams continued to apply the
pressure.
"In the second round, he went on
his bicycle after he tasted a little bit
of my power and he tried to box
and make it a long night," Williams
noted.
"But I managed to cut him down
and I threw some punches on him
that had him hurt really bad mid-
way in the round. 1 threw some
combinations, but it was a straight
left hook and a threw two rights
that put him on the canvas again."
Avoiding an early night, Wash-
ington managed to bounce right
back up as the round ended. Wash-
ington probably wished he had
stayed down after Williams was all
over him in the third.
"My corner told me I can either
keep the pressure on this guy or let
him get on his bicycle and let him
run and we could be out there for
another 40 minutes," Williams
reflected.
"I decided that I didn't want to
be out there all night because this
guy was boxing and running. But I
stuck him on until I caught him with
a vicious body shot and then went
upstairs with a left-right that fell
him flat on his face."
Washington, who dropped to 15-
9 with nine knockouts, was no
pushover, considering the fact the
he fought against Chris Byrd, the
current IBF champion. He also
fought contender Talmadge Griffis
and had a victory over Otis Tisdale.
Against Williams, 29-10-2,
Williams said he's really elated
about his victory to claim the title
that was once held by Roy Jones
and James Toney.
Williams currently holds the
World Boxing Council's Caribbean
Continental heavyweight title and
the World Boxing Association's
FEDECARIBE heavyweight title.
"To me, it's a good accomplish-
ment. I feel good to be the first
Bahamian and the first Caribbean
to actually capture this title," he
stressed. "It's a great feeling."
Williams said he's now predicting
that "within 14 months, I will be the
undisputed heavyweight champion
of the world."


* JAMAL FORBES #1300 and Jonathon Davis #1271 battle for first in the heats for the under 20 boys 200 metres dash.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/ Tribune siajf)


ah


lea

* TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
AFTER two days of gru-
elling competition and hours
of deliberation from the coun-
cil body of the Bahamas Asso-
ciation of Athletic Association
(BAAA), a 64-member team
was named to represent the
Bahamas at the 33rd Carifta
Games, set for the Easter
weekend in Guadeloupe.
According to president of
the BAAA Mike Sands, the
performances by the athletes
this year made the selection
progress very easy and the
BTC Carifta team is well bal-
anced.

Excited
Sands said: "When we sat
down here yesterday to dis-
cuss the team, the executive
members were very excited.
"I hate to pick out any divi-.
sion, but the team is very bal-
anced this year. This is some-
thing we haven't seen in a very
long time. I am looking for-
ward to great performances
from all the athletes.
"We have a process in which
we select the team. Once the
trials are over we have statis-


as


an


ticians along with the persons
who have been selected to sit
on the committee in a meeting
and we go down every event
and the athletes and what they
would have done at the trials.
"We also take into consid-
eration the athletes that we
have overseas in college. So I
am very satisfied that the
process is very transparent."
Loaded with sprinters who
can easily double-up in events,
the team falls short on the dis-
tance end, and will have their
work cut out for them on the
field.
Out of the 64 athletes
named to the team, only six
athletes will compete in dis-
tance events. They are Ken-
neth Wallace-Whitfield, Ash-
er Cooper, Dwayne Ferguson,
Bianca Strachan, Shellyka
Rolle and Waltonique
Bartlett.
But Sands is excited with the
fact that the future in the sport
is looking bright.
After the names were rati-
fied yesterday evening, seven
athletes who are still eligible
to compete in the under 15
divisions were selected
- Sparkyl Cash, Zinnia Miller,
V'Alonee Robinson, Printas-
sia Johnson, Carlene Johnson,
Dominic Duncombe and
Aaron Wilmore.


5'/


0


Sands added: "It all looks
bright for the future of our
country in this sport. Being
able to name at least five or
more athletes to the, team is
great.
"As a matter of fact there
were so many of young ath-
letes who were capable of
making the team but we had
to take into consideration if
they were too young or was it
time for them.

Mindful
"Although we won't deny
the opportunity to compete,
but we were very mindful of
their age. We look at closely at
their performance, and we'
won't force anything to them
that they are not ready for."
The official team list has 21
athletes from Grand Bahama,
42 from New Providence and
one from Abaco.
The three college athletes
named, Tracey Morrison,
Bianca Strachan and Rudon
Bastian, are expected to arrive
in the capital three days
before the team heads out for
competition.
The Grand Bahama
based athletes will be in town
starting next week for train-
ing.


anP









'Ace'


* Under 17 Girls
Nivea Smith
Sparkyl Cash
Deandra Knowles
Shellyka Rolle
Waltonique Bartlett
Tess Mullings
Krystal Bodie
Zinna Miller
V'Alonne Robinson
Jennie Jacques
Printassia Johnson
Carlen Johnson
Rashan Brown
M Under 17 Boys
Warren Fraser
Karlton Rolle
Dominic Duncombe
Jeffery Gibson
Kenneth Wallace-
Whitfield
Kristen Taylor-Hep-
burn
Jaquan Williams
Nathan Arnett
Raymond Higgs
Rolland Pinder
Gerard Brown
August Campbell
Daniel Cash
Shawn Lockhart
Aaron Wilmore
Fenton Williams
* Under 20 Girls
Sheniqua Ferguson


T'Shonda Webb
Cache Armbrister
BiancaiStrachan
Michelle Cumberbatch
Laniece Rolle
NataylaBeneby
Gabrielle Noxon
Deandra Rolle
Tracey Morrison
Andrea Moss
Shannise Wright
Tia Rolle
Keniesha Miller
Tryanique Thomas
U Under 20 Boys
Ryai Penn
Carl Stuart
Jonathan Davis
Demetruis Pinder
Jameson Strachan
Juan Lewis
Dwayne Ferguson
Asher Cooper
Kayuse Burrows
Caryle Thompson
Jamal Wilson
Kyle Grant
Rudon Bastian
Lamar Delaney
Wendell Lawerance
Rashaan Forbes
La' Sean Pickstock
Lavardo Sands
Jamal Forbes
Cardinal Minnis


@2006 DAI


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