Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00370
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: April 1, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00370
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text







"FISH FOR

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HIGH 79F
LOW 66F

SSUNNY AND
PLEASANT


The


Tribune


Volume: 102 No.111 SATURDAY, APRIL 1, 2006 PRICE -750

i i .. .


olice


claim


Witness of


Pinewood


incident 'in


fear of his life'


A WITNESS to events sur-
rounding the shooting of 20-
year-old Deron Bethel
claimed last night that police
tried to kill him by opening
fire on his car.
Pointing to a bullet hole in
the passenger door of his
Honda Accord, Jason Cooper
said he is now in fear of his
life.
The 29-year-old Pinewood
resident. has lodged a formal
complaint with police after
two men in a brown Impala
allegedly fired at him outside
his home yesterday morning.
He has told police chiefs he
has good reason to believe the
gunmen were police officers.
Last night, assistant com-
missioner Reginald Ferguson
promised a full investigation
into the incident.
Mr Cooper was on the-
scene shortly after the shoot-
ing of Deron Bethel outside
his home earlier this week. He
claims to know who fired a
bullet through Mr Bethel's car
window, killing him instantly.
Deron's family have
accused police of shooting an
innocent man and have
demanded a full inquiry into
the incident.
Mr Cooper, who lives a few
doors away from the Bethel
family, was in his car outside
his own home at around 5am
yesterday when the Impala
drove up.
Sensing danger, Mr Coop-
er fled, claiming that two shots
-were fired from the Impala,
one bullet penetrating the pas-
senger door of his Accord.
He drove to his girlfriend's
S home in Black Village, telling
her he was in fear of his life.
A source told The Tribune
last night: "If this turns out to
be true, anarchy is going to
take over this country. This is
a shocking and disgraceful
incident."
Mr Cooper was clearly still
shaken last night more than
14 hours after the incident -
when he told The Tribune of
his ordeal.
"This happened right out-
side my own door," he said.
"One bullet hit the passenger
door, right under the mirror."
Mr Cooper was on the


T IBU


JASON Cooper believes the person who put this
bullet hole in his car was a police officer.
(Photos by: Franklyn G Ferguson)


Until evidence had been
gathered, he said he did not
wish to speculate on what hap-
pened or the motive behind
it.
Mr Cooper outlined inci-
dents leading up to yesterday's
shooting. He said at 4.30am
he heard a "bamming sound"
outside his home.
"Me and my mom woke up
and looked outside and there
was nobody. We heard this
bamming. I went outside and
saw some police jeeps and
police cars four or five houses
down by my neighbour's
house."
He said he saw a "clearly
marked" police jeep and a tan
Impala. "I saw guys in an out
with flashlights in the same
person's yard. I guess they
were doing a search."
He added: "I went for a dri-
SEE page 13


The Bahamas to be shown as

'homophobic' on TV documentary


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
FOLLOWING the ban-
ning of the gay-themed
Brokeback Mountain movie,
the Bahamas is now also set
to be shown as a nation with
strong homophobic tenden-
cies in an upcoming cable
television documentary.
HBO is scheduled to pre-
miere the documentary "All
Aboard", which shows US
comedienne Rosie O'Don-
nell's gay family cruise to the
Bahamas in July, 2004.
The programme highlights
the protest of more than 200


Bahamians, who were furi-
ous that the Norwegian
Dawn; carrying 1,600 gay
passengers, had been
allowed to stop in Nassau.
A few weeks ago, the US
audience were shown a dark-
er side of the Bahamas in the
Fox News show Hannity and
Colmes, which showed the
poor living conditions inside
the Carmichael Road Deten-
tion Centre.
Now, on April 6, audi-
ences will be able to see hun-
dreds of Bahamians protest-
ing on Rawson Square
against homosexuality.
In the preview of the "All


Aboard" documentary,
which is now being aired on
the HBO cable channels,
Bahamians are shown hold-
ing up signs which proclaim
"If you're gay stay away."
In one sequence a child of
one of the gay couples
onboard asks her parents:
"Why do they hate us so
much?"
During the 2004 protest,
Bahamians also held up plac-
ards reading "Even animals
have more sense than homo-
sexuals."
The "All Aboard" docu-
SEE page 13


Police woman

one of four

rape victims

in past week

* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
FOUR women, including a
police officer, have been raped
in Nassau over the past week.
Police say the women were
attacked in two separate inci-
dents.
The first occurred a week
ago when, around midday on
Friday, intruders forced their
way into a home and raped
i\vo women.
The second assault was on
Tuesday, after Sam, when a
policewoman and her room-
mate were sexually assaulted.
According to Klarvin
Dames, officer-in-charge of
CDU, police have men in cus-
tody who are assisting them
with inquiries into both inci-
dents.
As early as Monday, some
charges are expected to be
banded down, he said.
Statistics for the first quarter
of 2005 showed there were 19
reported rapes. This year, dur-
ing the same period, there
have been 14 reported rapes.
Mr Dames said police are
advising women to be aware
of their surroundings.
"We have an excellent part-
nership programme in place
where the police are working
in conjunction with all the rel-
evant agencies, such as Social
Services, the Ministry of
Health and the Crisis Centre.
"We have been working
together on sexual-related
matters for a long time and
we continue to build on that
relationship."
Director of the Crisis Cen-
tre, Dr Sandra Dean Patter-
son, said she does not believe
there are a lot of rapists in the
country.
However, she feels there are
men who look for situations
where they can take advan-
tage of females, whether it be
a child or a woman in her 70s.
"If you can't be safe in your
own home, what does that do?
I think this a serious wake-up
call for all of us."
Dr Patterson stressed that
women should not be afraid
in their own country.
"Every time that any
woman or any child is raped, it
puts all of us in fear. How
many women do we hear talk
about not feeling comfortable
leaving their homes at night
and when they leave work
SEE page 13


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PAGE 2, SATURDAY, APRIL1,200
LL I E~*


Minister hopes shooting death will not damage


community's relationship with the police


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
EVERY effort is being made to
ensure that the relationship
between the Pinewood communi-
ty and police does not suffer in the
wake of the shooting death of 20-
year-old Deron Bethel, the area's
MP said yesterday.
Allyson Maynard-Gibson said
that as a mother, she can only
empathise with the pain that
Deron's mother Diana Bethel and
her family are feeling.
She said she is fully confident
that Police Commissioner Paul
Farquharson will make good on
his promise that a full investiga-
tion will be carried out to deter-
mine the circumstances that led to
Deron's death.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said that
Pinewood has always been a com-
munity law-abiding citizens.
She said that she hopes that the
incident will not damage the efforts
that residents and police have
made to enhance the community
and to strengthen community
policing initiatives.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said that


together with Health Minister Dr
Bernard Nottage and Dr Perry
Gomez, she will be meeting with
residents to discuss a number of
concerns, including the shooting.
She said the meeting is only one
of many she plans to hold in the
upcoming months to strengthen
the Pinewood community.
Chief Superintendent of Police
Marvin Dames yesterday con-
firmed that the autopsy on Deron's
body has been completed, but said
he was not in a position to verify
the exact cause of death.
That information, he said, will
be passed on to the coroner, who
will then make a determination as
to whether a coroner's inquest will
be conducted or whether the mat-
ter will be referred-to "another-
place".
Mr Dames said the police force
is moving on with its investigation
into exactly what happened on
Monday night. He said that the
police are always deeply concerned
when there is a police shooting -
particularly if it results in the death
of a civilian.
This case, he said, is particularly
painful given the fact that Deron's


father and brother are both officers
of good standing in the police
force.
"We grieve with them," said Mr
Dames.
He added that he worked with
Dwayne Bethel (Deron's brother)
in the Central Detective Unit and
that he knows his father, Roger
Bethel, who works in the Drug
Enforcement Unit.
Mr Dames said that the officers
investigating the case will approach
it with complete objectivity.
He explained that there are
basic protocols in place which go
into immediate effect in the after-
math of any police-related shoot-
ing.
Mr Dames said that the officers
involved are..immediately placed
on leave and must undergo a series-
of interviews with professionals.
In addition, their firearms and per-
mits are withdrawn until the inves-
tigation is complete.
He explained that this is done in
all cases and is not a reflection of
whether the officers acted correct-
ly or not.
Acknowledging the high tide of
emotions running through the
community and the great loss of

* CORRECTION

BAHAMIAN entertain-
er Wendell "Swain" Arm-
brister died of cancer at his
home around 7pm on
Wednesday.and not at the
hospital on Thursday
evening as reported in The
Tribune. He was 63.and not
60.


the Bethel family, Mr Dames said
Commissioner Farquharson has
made-it his businessto ensure that
all the necessary protocols were
adopted in this case.
He said that the Bethel family
and the commissioner had a meet-
ing on Tuesday morning where a
number of concerns were
addressed.
Police officers have maintained
contact with the family through-
out the week, he added.


GB teachers

'support BUT

measures'
By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport.Reporter..
FREEPORT Grand Bahama
teachers fully support the mea-
sures implemented by the
Bahamas Union of Teachers in
negotiating a new contract with
the government, according to one
union official.
The union is trying to get the
best deal possible for its members,
and Grand Bahama teachers stand
ready to enforce a work to rule
on Monday at all government
schools, according to union area
vice president Rudy Sands.
Sands said the union's 400
members on Grand Bahama were
highly upset that the government
- has not returned with a new coun-
terproposal for an industrial agree-
ment after withdrawing their latest
offeFiast'week:- --.-- -- -


Troy Rolle found

not guilty of murder
M By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter


FREEPORT Troy Rolle
was acquitted of murder in the
Supreme Court on Friday after
a jury found him not guilty by
unanimous vote of the mur-
der of Everett "Bird" Allen in
2002.
Rolle, 25, was on trial for
shooting and killing Allen, 33,
at the Oceanview Club at
Eight Mile Rock between Feb-
ruary 7 and February 8, 2002.
A jury of seven women and
five men returned with the
verdict around 2.30pm after
two hours of deliberation.
According to evidence given
in Court, Rolle and several
other men were with Sean
Knowles, at the club in Eight
Mile Rock. There was an alter-
cation .between Sean.and
Allen.
Prosecutor Neil Brathwaite
of the Attorney General
Office alleged that Rolle shot
Allen after he slapped "his
boss" Sean Knowles.
Ruthamae Martin, a witness
for the defence, testified that
Allen accidentally stepped on
"Sean's" tennis shoe after buy-
ing a beer at the bar.
Allen apologised, but Sean
hit Allen in the back of the
neck and started poking him in
the chest, she said.'
She said Allen hit Sean with
the beer bottle, breaking it
over his face, at which point
Sean pulled out a gun and shot
him.
Ms Martin alsotestified that


TROY ROLLE

several days after the shoot-
ing, she telephoned Eight Mile'
Rock Police Station and told
an officer that the two men on
TV charged with Allen's mur-
der were the wrong men,
but was told by the officer
that they had enough evi-
.dence. .
Last April, Mr Rolle and
another man were charged
with Allen's murder. The
charge was dropped against
the other man, leaving Rolle
as the sole defendant.
An arrest warrant was:
issued for Rolle, who was on
$30,000 bail at the time, after
he failed to appear for trial., '
His lawyer Fayne Thomp-
son said that Rolle was very
pleased with the not guilty ver- i
dict handed down on Friday.
He said his client should;'
never have been charged in
the first place.
"It was the right result-and
we are very pleased with the
outcome," he told The'nTri-
bune.


inmonday's


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PAGE 2, SATURDAY, APRIL 1, 2006


THE TRIBUNE,






SATURDAY, APRIL 1, 2006, PAGE 3


TI F TRIRI INF


o In brief



Businessman

DrRudyl ing

is declared

bankrupt

BUSINESSMAN and
fund-raiser Dr Rudy King has
been declared bankrupt in
the Supreme Court.
The chairman of the King
Humanitarian and Global
Foundation had been pur-
sued for an unpaid debt by
Cavalier Construction Ltd.
Judge John Lyons handed
down the bankruptcy judg-
ment after hearing represen-
tations by attorney Roger
Gomez, for King, and Dr
Peter Maynard and Mr Jason
Maynard, for Cavalier.
Registrar Mrs Estelle
Gray-Evans will take posses-
sion.of all King's property
until a trustee is certified by
the court.
.King, also known as Rudy
King-Laroda, was recently at
the centre of a controversy in
Bermuda, where he was
organising a summer charity
event.
Bermuda's daily newspa-
per, The Royal Gazette,
reported that several big
names "lined up", for the
event including actor Will
Smith had denied they were
attending.
King was said in the bank-
ruptcy order to be living at
Raymond Road, Claridgedale
Gardens, in eastern New
Providence.
A creditors' meeting is to
be held on a date to be fixed.


Students

from US get

first hand

look at Cuba

* HAVANA
A HANDFUL of U.S.
college students are
doing something avail-
able to fewer and fewer
Americans: they're get-
ting a firsthand look at
Fidel Castro's Cuba,
according to Associated
Press.
As the Bush adminis-
tration tightens the U.S.
trade embargo on the
communist-run nation,
students, academics, reli-
gious groups and even
Cuban-Americans with
family on the Caribbean
island are finding their
travel to Cuba increasing-
ly restricted.
"They're trying to find
more ways to get tough
with Cuba," said Philip
Brenner, a Cuba expert
and associate dean at
American University in
Washington D.C. "This is
a foretaste of more
restrictions that will pre-
vent Cubans and Ameri-
cans from dealing with
each other at all."
Brenner helped arrange
a four-month visit to
Cuba by nine American
University students. But
the students' exposure to
Cuba is something
increasingly rare.
In June 2004, the U.S.
Treasury Department's
Office of Foreign Assets
Control began restricting
academic trips to Cuba to
visits of 10 weeks or
more.


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Blankenship advises against US outsourcing




of radiation detection to Freeport office


* By RUPERT
MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

A FORMER United
States ambassador to the
Bahamas has written to six
high-ranking senators advis-
ing them that it is a mistake
to allow Hong Kong firm
Hutchinson Whampoa to
take over radiation detec-
tion operations in Freeport
- a port which he said suf-
fers from "problematic secu-
rity" issues.
Former US Ambassador
to the Bahamas J Richard
Blankenship said in his let-
ter that it would be a mis-
take for the US to outsource
one of its "most important
aspects of homeland
defence" the detection of
radio active material to the
Freeport office of Hutchin-
son Whampoa.

Senators

The former ambassador
told the senators that in his
experience, assistance from
the Bahamas in relation to
US security matters is "non-
existent."
"The Grand Bahama Port
Authority operates the port.
under special powers con-
ferred by the government.
The authority is the largest
private investment in the
Bahamas owned by
investors whose relationship
with the current government
has been rocked recently by
evens unrelated to opera-
tions within the port," the
letter said.
It said that "it is not
uncommon for key person-
nel decisions to be decided


Bunla\ful
intercourse

with girl, 15
A 40-YEAR-OLD
police officer charged
with having unlawful
intercourse with a
young girl was
arraigned in court yes-
terday.
Sergeant Charles
Morris (above) was
arraigned before Magis-
trate Renae McKay on
the sex charge, which
stated that between
October, 2005, and Jan-
uary, 2006, he engaged
in unlawful intercourse
with a 15-year-old girl.
Morris, represented
by attorney Wayne
Munroe, was not
required to plead and
was granted $10,000
bail with two sureties.
The case was adjourned
to September 12.
(Photo: Franklyn
G Ferguson)


(
,,' ,


f!


(


* FORMER US Ambassador to the Bahamas
J Richard Blankenship
(FILE Photo)


without regard to qualifica-
tions or experience but upon
the wishes of the govern-
ment."
Hutchinson Whampoa, a
Hong Kong conglomerate,
is in the final stages of being
awarded a no-bid, $6; mil-
lion contract for screening
at the Freeport Container
Terminal in the Bahamas,
just 65 miles from the US
shoreline.
The Bahamas has agreed
to participate in a bilateral
initiative, the Mega Ports
Initiative.


It is planned that the
Bahamas will provide the
equipment and training nec-
essary to screen containers
going through the ports for
radioactive material.
This week, Minister of
Foreign Affairs Fred
Mitchell refuted claims that
the Bahamas had refused to
let US Customs officials
help screen containers des-
tined for the United States
at the Freeport Container
Port.
Mr Mitchell said that this
accusation was completely
untrue.
"In connection with one
aspect of this project, the ques-
tion of US Customs officials
being involved did not arise.
.That is the:part which has to
do with Hutchinson Wham-
poa," he said.
Minister Mitchell made it
clear that there was no ques-
tion at that time about US
Customs officials being sta-
tioned at the port for the
purpose of helping with the
detection of radioactive
materials.
"It is inaccurate for any-
one to assert that the
Bahamas Government pre-
vented US Customs officials
from being at the port for
thia purpose," he said.

Letter

In his letter, Mr Blanken-
ship said that security
around and in the container
facility is problematic. Law
enforcement actions within
the facility have generally
relied upon intelligence
gained locally by authorities
operating without the co-
operation or knowledge of
Hutchinson Whampoa offi-
cials, he said.
Additionally, Mr Blanken-
ship said, no significant
actions have been initiated
at the port with most law
enforcement successes
occurring in ports of the
United States where signifi-
cant numbers of law
enforcement officials are
stationed.
"While not wishing to


judge what course future
requests may take the secu-
rity of the Unites States can-
not be contingent upon co-
operation of any govern-
ment. I faced just such a sit-
uation during my represen-
tation of our county and
found assistance to be non-
existent," Mr Blankenship
said.
Another point for major
consideration, he said, is the
lack of co-operation the US
has seen from the Bahamas
when the extradition of indi-
viduals charged with major
felony crimes has been


requested.
No Bahamian facing seri-
ous criminal charges has
been extradited to the US
to stand trial, he said.
"There is no doubt Home-
land Security demands we
expand our vision to include
threats which may have
their origins in other coun-
tries. But I hope we do so
in a thoughtful manner, giv-
ing consideration to all fac-
tors which may affect the
success of our efforts and
not giving Americans a false
sense of security," the for-
mer ambassador said.


Fisherman goes


missing off Andros

THE Coast Guard Rescud Co-ordination Centre in Miami is
searching for an unidentified man who fell overboard from the fish-
ing vessel Dona Maura.
Chris Lloyd, the operations manager of Bahamas Air/Sea Res-
cue Association (BASRA), said the name and nationality of the
man is unknown, but that the vessel is believed to be Bahamian.
At about 9.20am yesterday, the Coast Guard received a report
from a vessel that was transiting the Florida Straits that a crewman
of the F/V Donna Maura fell overboard at 5am about 48 miles west
of Andros in the Santaren Channel.
It was reported that the man had no life-jacket on when he went
overboard.
Mr Lloyd told The Tribune yesterday that there is very little
information on the incident, as contact with the vessel had not
been established.
He explained that the alert was relayed through another vessel
and that attempts are ongoing to get through to the Donna Maura.
The Coast Guard dispatched a C-130 search plane, an HH-60
helicopter and the Cutter Tornado to search for the missing man
and gather more information from the Dona Maura.
Mr Lloyd said that BASRA is not involved in the effort as the
vessel is thought to be in the Gulf Stream, and as close to Florida
as it is to the Bahamas.
He said that the man would have to be spotted by air before any
rescue attempt could be made by sea.
The Coast Guard was continuing its search all day yesterday.


G
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1:10 3:40







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, SATURDAY, APRIL 1, 2006


EIOIAULETE S T HEEITOR


THE FATE of the entire U.S. enterprise in
"Iraq now hangs in the balance, as the war has
Entered a dangerous new phase. It is the phase
Lof barbaric identity-card violence between
'Sunnis and Shiites.
. In the late 1970s, I covered a similar moment
-in Lebanon, and the one thing I learned was
this: Once this kind of venom gets unleashed
-- with members of each community literally
beheading each other on the basis of their
religious identities it poisons everything.
You enter a realm that is beyond politics, a
Srealm where fear and revenge dominate every-
one's thinking and that is where Iraq is
heading.
Jeffrey Gettleman reported last Sunday in
the New York Times about Mohannad al-
SAzawi, a quiet Sunni pet shop owner in Bagh-
dad who was abducted from his store and
Found murdered the next morning. His skin
Swas covered with purple welts, and his face and
Slegs had drill holes in them. His brother Has-
san, the story noted, "carries the autopsy pho-
Stos with him, along with a pistol. 'I cannot live
Without vengeance,' he said."
Once embedded, this cycle of fear and
revenge is almost impossible to break. People
,conclude that the only thing that can protect,
them is a militia from their own sect, not the
'police or the army. Then these militias, which
come to life to protect the neighbourhood,
take on a life of their own. They develop pro-
tection rackets, feel the thrill of power and, as
That happens,.start to do all they can to prevent
the government from restoring its authority.
Finally, as the BBC noted in a recent report
From Baghdad, some Iraqi politicians are now
concluding that "they can gain more power
and influence from building on sectarian loy-
Salties than from appeals for national unity."
When politicians decide they can get ahead
by appealing more to fear than to hope,
national reconciliation goes up in smoke..
A Baghdad blogger, the Mesopotamian,
i quoted by AndrewSullivan.com, gave a vivid
description of his neighbourhood: "The con-
Sfusion and conflict between the Americans, the
o army and the Ministry of Interior is producing
a situation where the citizens don't know any-
more whether the security personnel in the
Street are friends, enemies, terrorists or simply
Criminals and thieves. Everybody is wearing
Sthe same uniforms. Whole sections of the city
Shave virtually fallen to gangs and terrorists, and
This is especially true for the 'Sunni'-dominat-
Sed neighborhoods. People and businesses
1_


DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS/TRAINING/PURCHASING
Position Requirements
Ten years multi-unit restaurant management experience.
Proven history of positive financial growth and operational control.
Minimum five years experience in restaurant management and staff
training, in all departments and at all levels.
Strong background in new unit opening and development, menu
and recipe development, and food and equipment purchasing.
Exceptional knowledge-of Microsoft Office Systems and Uniwell
POS cash registers programming and operation.
Associates or Bachelors Degree in Food Service Administration or
related area.

COMPANY ADMINISTRATION MANAGER
Position Requirements

Five years multi-unit responsibility for daily restaurant administrative
and financial data auditing, computing and reporting.
Five years experience in daily, weekly and monthly restaurant
environment payable and receivable accounts entry and auditing.
Total proficiency in the monthly, quarterly and yearly compilation
of budgets, P&L statements, balance sheets and cash flow reports.
Exceptional knowledge of all Microsoft Office Systems and the
ACCPAC Business Reporting System.
Exceptional direction, communication and organizational skills.
Tertiary level education in accounting or related field.
Salary and bonuses for all positions are contingent upon experience
and productivity. Please forward resumes to:
Managing Director email: cvk@sbarrobahamas.com or
fax no: 356-0333
[eki 9 -j j S I =Ij :k1Sill Iiri .,1T4J.A 14


are being robbed and the employees kid-
napped en masse in broad daylight and with
complete ease as though security forces are
nonexistent, although we see them every-
where."
I don't know anymore what can be done
to rescue the situation. At least, those who
are supposed to be in positions of responsi-
bility should stop lying and painting a false
picture. I regret sounding so pessimistic, but
the alarm must be sounded. What is happen-
ing is Baghdad is something really awful."
Donald Rumsfeld's negligent decision not to
deploy enough troops in Iraq to begin with cre-
ated this security vacuum. But the insecurity
was compounded by the unique enemy that
emerged to take advantage of that vacuum
- Sunni Islamo-nihilists. These are a disparate
collection of groups with one common agenda:
America and its Iraqi allies must fail; they
must not be allowed to build Iraq into a West-
ern-style, democratising society. When you
are up against an enemy whose only goal is
that you must fail, and which does not care
about how much death and destruction it
inflicts on its own people, let alone on oth-
ers, It is extremely difficult to establish order.
The Iraqi Shute community\ showed remark-,.
able restraint in the ijace .f the muiJerou.
pro locations b) these'Islamb-nihilist gangs
during the past three years. But that restraint
is over. It's now clear that some Shiite militias
are ready to match the Sunni nihilists, killing
for killing. So the slide into a medieval bar-
barism has begun.
Do not believe any of the Bush team's hap-
py talk. It doesn't matter if Iraq is quiet in
the south and quiet in the north. If Baghdad,
the heart of the country, is being ripped apart,
then there is no Iraq:- because there is no
centre.
There is only one hope for halting this slide
and that is the formation -immediately- of
a national unity government in Iraq, with Shi-
ites, Sunnis and Kurds sharing power, and the
deployment on the streets immediately -
of massive numbers of troops and police, both
Iraqi and American, to prevent more of these
tribal killings. If a national unity government
is not formed soon, and if these identity-card
murderers gain more momentum, any hope
for building a decent Iraq will vanish.
It is five minutes to midnight.
(* This article is by Thomas Friedman of-
The New York Times 2006)


Thursday,
March


Something seems to



have been missed



in situation with



"Cuban dentists


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-191.4

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


Fate of Iraq now hangs in balance


especially business to be con-
ducted between them when
an' embargo to drive out com-
munism is in place. We should
not have put ourselves in a


position that our friends in the
USA have to threaten us with
sanctions over two Cubans
who have (if the evidence is
true) a clear right of passage.


CHRISTOPHER
Nassau,
March 6, 2006.


EDITOR, The Tribune
CONCERNING the Cuban
dentists' situation, which much
information has come out
showing the complexity of the
situation, something seems to
have been missed.
To my knowledge the rea-
son Cubans receive preferred
status of immigration over
Haitians and most other
nations of the world is because
of the Bay of Pigs fiasco. The'
President of the USA (at the
time John Kennedy) promised
to give among other things air
support to.the Cuban people if
they were to rise up against
Castro. Many people took the
risk and put their lives on the
line for freedom. The USA
did not support them, at their
time of need (for whatever
reason) and these good people
were slaughtered. The USA
cannot undo the mistakes of
the past but offering preferred
status to Cubans who can
escape is a way of making
things right.
Is it right for Castro to
spend the people's money to
train doctors and dentists and
then have them abandon their.
countrymen and go to Amer-
ica to seek their fortune? In
this case, if it is true these peo-
pie were asked to stay three
more years, they complied and
then were denied, no doubt
they have the right to leave as
promised.
Because of our geographical
location between the USA,
Cuba :and Haitilwe block 'the
free sea routes.of travel to..
America making it difficult for
immigrants not to violate our
territorial waters. This has put
us in the middle of a heated
debate which even the USA
is struggling with. If there is a
debt the USA owes to the
Cuban people for not helping
them regain their freedom
then why is there a lottery for
visas.
How long does the USA
have to give the Cubans spe-
cial status? ULntil they are
free? These questions must be
worked out by the USA and
we should respect their deci-
sions to accept or reject immi-
grants. Castro should under-
stand our predicament and
not penalize us for accepting
the policies of our democratic ;
and economic partners. Cuba
and the Bahamas should con-
sider themselves lucky that the
USA tolerates travel and


EDITOR, The Tribune.
I WAS thrilled to, see
Brokeback Mountain adver-
tised in the movie section of
the newspaper as showing at
Galleria west. I went to see
it but was disappointed to be
told, at the ticket office, that
"the movie is banned". I
asked if it had been shown at
all: No.
Has the movie actually
been banned? Who has
banned it? The Film Board?
The Christian Council?
Here is a movie that should
be shown.. Here is a movie
that needs to be seen. It is a
movie that is free of. violence.
It is a love story. The cine-
matography matches the sen-
sitivity of the subject it por-
trays, two adult men who fall
in love.
This is not a movie to be
banned. This is not a subject
to be censored, or covered
over or to have a "Blind Eye"
turned onto it. It is a subject
to be aired; a subject to be
confronted openly. This is a
subject to be confronted not
only as it might be present-
ed in the media, but as it
affects our lives and others'


lives in our community.
In a narrower sense, we
must ask this: Is the movie-.
going public in the Bahamas
not considered mature
enough to see a main stream
movie? One that dares to
tackle controversy? A film
that has had so much inter-
est taken in it, and in its acad-
emy award nominations? A
film that has won three
Oscars?
Going to see a movie is a
choice we make, as are the
books we read, the websites
we go onto, the TV pro-
grammes we watch, where
soon anyone will be able to
view this movie, in any case.
Why is it, when we are
encapsulated in a culture that
seems almost indifferent:to
all the many forms of vio-
lence, there should be such
intolerance to the showing of
a movie of this sort?
I am personally saddened
by this "banning". And also,
it should be alarming to us as
a community.

LIZ ROBERTS
Nassau,
March 27, 2006.


SHappy B birthday to


The World's
greatest
husband


Chri to0phcr

Ro0bart




SFrom your loving wife, Michelle; son, De'Shaun; mother, Rosemary;
sister, Daphne; nephew, Christian; nieces, Henrinique and Mya.
Enjoyya day babelli


Friday & Saturday
30th April 1st


Bible
Videos


C Dvd's es
Spreading the Light of the Gospel throughout The Bahamas
LOCATION: ROSETTA STREET & MT. ROYAL AVE.


Mitchell's comments


on Chinese economy

EDITOR, The Tribune.
I WAS absolutely and incredibly.flabbergasted at the remarks by
Minister Mitchell concerning the growth of the Communist Chinese.
economy. Mr Mitchell said "that everyone knows that China willbe'
the leading economic entity in the next 10 to 15 years".
I just read a report prepared by the noted management consult-
ing firm Pricewaterhousecoopers which predicts that China's econ-
omy will double from its present two trillion to four trillion by 2050.
So Mr Mitchell is quoting that apparently the US economy will
sink from its present 12 trillion to below four trillion. That is inter-
esting and so ridiculous. I placed a call to my undergraduate,
school's economics department and discussed at length with a
member of Dr Thomas Sowell's staff this economics quote from Mr
Mitchell.
It was conveyed to me from the staff economist that this quote
from Mr Mitchell was utterly ridiculous and demonstrated a gross
misunderstanding from Mr Mitchell of how the US economy is
diversified and balanced.
All Bahamians know and understand that when the US catches
a cold the Bahamas may well have double pneumonia. I do not have
to remind you of the post 9/11 environment and how we all suffered..
So for Foreign Affairs Minister Mitchell to make such a careless
and insensitive remark that the US economy is going to nose dive
by some 67 per cent and its effect of how it might impact the
Bahamian people, in my opinion shows a crass and uncaring attitude
towards the people he serves. 'Mr Mitchell. please tell me: Who is
the "everyone" that you quoted?

JIM MOORE
Ft Lauderdale,
Florida,
March, 2006


Brokeback ban


THE


CHRISTIAN


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PH: 322-1306



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THE TRIBUNE SATURDAYALHNAPRII, WPAE
^^^^^^^^^^^--^^^^^^^^^^^^----^^^^^^*^^^^^^-^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^* A w^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^j


.iT,

". . .
: '.1









CARLOS VALE1
NO.is making a name
himself worldwide.
(Photo: Mario Duncan
Tribune s


Business

boin g

for Carlo!

bags and

jewelry


NTI-
Sfor

'son/
vtaff)


is



s


BAH IAMIAN Carlos
Valenitino's business of bags,
suits and jewelr is blossom-
ing into a worldwide trend.
Mr Valentino is a local
entrepreneur who reached
for the stars and saw his
dreams become reality.
"The main focus behind
my business is my bags: I :
mak Kiand manufacture my
ow n stra" bags. They are my
own designs," he told The
Tribure yesterday, during an
interviei" 'itt his shop in the
British>CooioialHilt6n. .
Wittiofielocation already
open in New Pro idence, Mr'
v ,lintino',vdJ he plans tbo
open'tkg more locally and
duplic te the idLa in as manS
US states as possible.
He started designing bags
in 1993 and manufacturing
his own bags in 2004.
When he was younger,
Valentino explained, he was
always on the lookout for a
good business idea.
One day, he saw the bags
in the straw market and .
noticed they were selling
well. He decided to design
his own straw bags and see if
they would sell as well as the
bags in the straw market.
But his dream was put on
hold for a while when he
went off to school to study
film.
His store has now been
open for four months and
features jewelry, luggage,
bags, suits, ties, and shirts.
His dream now is to
export his products to differ-
ent locations all over the
world.
"There have been a lot of
business persons purchasing
from my store. I have even
had the prime minister buy a
pair of shoes. His wife pur-
chases my jewelry and bags,"
stated Mr Valentino.
In October, he plans to
open a store in Atlanta,
Georgia. He says his designs
have the potential to sell
well in the United States as
they are already becoming a
hit:with the tourists.
He said Americans who
come into the store are sur-
prised to find out that his
products are Bahamian.
Mr Valentino explained
that he produces three col-
lections a year. They are
known as his spring, sum-
mer, and Christmas collec-
tions.
SHis jewelry is made from
spmi-precious stones that are
imported from India, South
Africa, and Columbia.
S"I decided to name my
store after myself because
my items bear my name and
ifwant my name to become
well known so people will
buy my products -just
like Tommy Hilfiger and
others.
"The fact that the taxis
park In front of my store, put
a hindrance on m\ business.
It is not easily seen b\ peo-
ple on the street. It causes
me to have to work extra
hard for:people to notice my
business," said Mr Valenti-
He is currently working on
a catalog that will feature all
of his products, which he
said should be out in
June.


Lawyers withdraw charges


against San Salvador residents


* By NATARIO MCKENZIE

A LAND dispute case ended
favourably for two San Salvador resi-
dents yesterday after lawyers for a com-
pany reportedly seeking millions in
buried pirate's treasure on the island
said the property in question did not
belong to their client.
Lawyers for the Watlings Archeo-
logical Company, which had accused
Keith Ferguson and Dennis Bethel of
disobeying a court order which sought
to restrain the men from trespassing
and remove any fences they may have
erected at the Fortune Hill property,
where a cave containing buried trea-
sure is believed to be, withdrew the
charges yesterday.
At the last court hearing, lawyers for
the company were granted an adjourn-
ment to have a survey done to prove
the property belonged to the company.


Company reportedly seeking millions in

treasure on the island bring case to an end


At that time Justice Thompson
ordered that no-one other than sur-
veyors access the property.

Pleased
Notably pleased with yesterday's out-
come, lawyers for the two men are now
looking to amicably address the issue
of "costs and damages."
"The plaintiffs were unable to justify
their course of action as a result of a
survey conducted by themselves and
they found that they do not own the
land in question, so they would have


brought wrongful action against both
defendants," Donald Saunders, attor-
ney for Keith Ferguson, said yesterday.
"They had no action by their own
admission. Both defendants are now
left with their hands clean and the issue
of damages will now be referred to the
registrar. First we are going to have to
determine the issue dealing with the
property before we make the same mis-
take that the plaintiffs made and our
clients will be speaking with the plain-
tiffs to see if they can work out the
issue of costs and damages," Mr Saun-
ders said.
Attorney Donovan Gibson, of Alex-


iou Knowles and Co., who is repre-
senting the Watlings Archeological
Company, would not comment.
Dennis Bethel noted that he was
relieved that the legal battle was over.
"I'm happy about the outcome, it's
what I had anticipated," he said.
"The other side is agreeing that we
are not on the land that they brought
the action against us for, so this is over,"
he said.
Mr Bethel said several persons are
claiming ownership of the Fortune Hill
property.
However, no action had been taken
as yet.


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT Minister of
Financial Services and Invest-
ments Vincent Peet announced
that the government will bring
new opportunities to Bahamian
business persons through the
new Domestic Investment
Board.
Mr Peet stressed that every
effort is being made to ensure
that Grand Bahamians in par-
ticular benefit from the many
new developments and invest-
ments taking place in the coun-
try.
"Grand Bahama is going
through its challenges in terms of
recovery and the government is
making every effort to ensure
that investment opportunities
are provided for on Grand
Bahama, and that applications
which are made from Grand
Bahama, and for Grand Bahama
are given early attention," he
said.
Minister Peet met yesterday
with officials at the Grand
Bahama Port Authority, Grand
Bahama Development Compa-
ny and Hutchison Wampoa.
He also met with representa-
tives of, the Grand Bahama
Chamber of Commerce, the
manufacturing association, light
industry and small business indi-
viduals.
After the meeting, Mr Peet
toured South Riding Point to
view hurricane clean-up efforts
at the oil transshipment facility
in East Grand Bahama.
He explained that the purpose
of the meeting with Port Author-
ity officials was to get a briefing
on applications and develop-
ments currently in the pipeline
and to assure them of the gov-
ernment's commitment to assist
in whatever way possible with
the improvement of the island's
economy.
"I also felt it was important to
let everybody know that the
ministry has been given a new
mandate under the Domestic
Investment Board, which is to
bring focused attention to
Bahamian business persons and
to ensure that they are given the
same concessions and incentives
as the foreign investor is given."
He stressed that through the
board, Bahamians will be afford-
ed the focused attention of the
Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation (BAIC),
the Bahamas Development
Bank, the Venture Capital Fund
and other government agencies.
"The importance of the for-
mation of the Domestic Invest-
ment Board is to bring under
one umbrella and grouping
under my ministry of all different
agencies to properly co-ordinate
the applications by Bahamians
for assistance in formation of
businesses, funding, advice, and
business plan etcetra.
"It is important, therefore,
that Bahamians who are inter-
ested in business understand that
they can go to BAIC and apply
to the Ministry of Financial Ser-
vice and Investment for neces-
sary assistance, he said.
Mr Peet also noted that the


MINISTER of Financial
Services and Investments
Vincent Peet

government is encouraging joint
ventures between foreign
investors and Bahamians to
ensure that Bahamians benefit
from the many development and
investment opportunities now
taking place.
"We will be having a series of
seminar and workshops. This is
going to be an all-out effort to
ensure that Bahamian business
persons are a part of the eco-
nomic empowerment going for-
ward," he said.





SATURDAY,
APRIL 1
12:30 Gumbo TV
1:00 Cybernet


All Access
Inside Hollywood
2006 Hugh Campbell
Gillette World Sports
Ballroom Boxing
Bahamas Tonight
Native Stew
Bahamian Things
Tropical Beat
Spoken
Partners In Crime
The Bahamas Tonight
The Lounge
Comm.Pg.1540AM


:

i










I


I : : ..': r
TAXI driver Johnny Williams escaped injury yesterdayafter the accident in the background
- on the corner of Palmdale Avenue and Alexander,Street. '"' ; l '
(Photo: ario Di-aianson/Tribune staff)


Minister: Domestic

Investment Board will

bring new opportunities


21 New eStkip








All in tlie heart


p aradise.
r








A. whole new experience has been unveiled en Paradire Island. Marina
Village at Atlantif effer the finest in world-clas sioing and dining.
Ydaollfind brand name frem around the werld eMJering everything frem
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visit the 21 koutiquer, dine at one of the new refiaurant, with dishes to
satifyr even te most refined palate. The village if situated at the eastern
end of The Marina at Atlantis, just over the Paradife land Bridge.













VILLAGE
-- *-AT -"-




For more information, visit Atlantis.com


_T ^ T ,, ^ - _i i ~r -.-i~7 -i- i,.l j ~~~j -- L r^i __ _ ._ _ri ii ^ V


ir.


SATURDAY, APRIL 1, 2006,- PAGE 5 )i


THE TRIBUNE


SUNDAY,
APRIL 2
2:00 Community Pg. 1540AM
9:00 E.M.P.A.C.T.
9:30 The Voice That Makes The
Difference
10:00 Effective Living
10:30 Morning Joy
11:00 Zion Baptist Church
1:00 Ernest Angley Ministries
3:00 2006 Bahamas National
Spelling Bee Championship
6:00 One Cubed
6:30 The Bible Study Hour
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
7:30 Forging Partner Relations:
Kiwanis Club of Nassau AM
8:00 Living Abundantly
9:00 Ecclesia Gospel
9:30 This Week In The Bahamas
10:00 Swearing In Ceremony of
Portia Simpson Miller
Prime Minister of Jamaica
12:00 Bahamas Tonight
12:30 Comm. Pg.1540AM
NOT:6 NS-V 3 rseve
theight m ake. l. aTStminute
programSW~me hangeU~s!S^^







P I SPT


- .*~'**tE
~ -4
S.t~. - -s


i A'GLUST 9. 1978 Some 274 pounds of pure cocaine
"\eri i-]olved in several buckets of salt unter and Ihen dumped
ino Ith-. ,:-ean from the Defence Force boat Inagua.



W ZICN METIh-.JDIST MINISTRIES
C-uT BECHr -i .-FFIr'j 'CENrTFE
E- PO Box SB-51628. NASSAU. BAHAMAS
PHONE/FAX: 242-392-4100
Come and Worship with us!

k*1S]P TUNlITIIUK*1P
em OSH


Sunday School
Divine Worship


WEDNESDAY
7:30pm Prayer & Bible Study


Minister: Pastor
Charles Lewis


"A Journey In Faith & Obedience To The Will of God"

THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OFTHE METHODIST CHURCH
Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
' P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
mum Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135
CHURCH SERVICES
r SUNDAY, APRIL 2ND, 2006
FIFTH SUNDAY BEFORE LENT


ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH, Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM Rev. Dr. Laverne R. Lockhart/HC

COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH, Bernard Road
11:00AM Pastor Sharon Loyley/HC

CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH, Zion Boulevard
10:00AM Rev. Carlos Thompson
7:00PM Rev. Carlos Thompson

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH, East Shirley Street
11:00AM Pastor Martin Loyley/HC
7:00PM Pastor Martin Loyley

GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH, Queen's College Campus
9:30AM Rev. James Neilly

ST. MICHAEL'S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue
8:00AM Connections
9:30AM Rev. Manette Poitier/HC

TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
11:00AM Rev. William Higgs/HC
7:00PM No Service
RADIO PROGRAMMES
'RENEWAL on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Your Host: Rev. Charles Sweeting

METHODIST MOMENTS' on each weekday at 6:55a.m.
Your Host: Rev. Charles Sweeting
The 2006 Spiritual Growth Conference will be held May 24th to May 28th,
2006 at Ebenezer Methodist Church, East Shirley Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.


!Nrant's~ EoInU elep fletbjobiot C[jurrb
(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) P.O.Box CB-13046
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley. org)
SUNDAY, APRIL 2ND, 2006,
7:00a.m. Bro. Sydney Pinder/Sis. Tezel Anderson/Bro. Ernest Miller
11:00a.m. Sis. Tezel Anderson/Bro. Sherwin Brown
7:00p.m. Bro. Ernest Miller/ Bro. Andre Bethel
|, 4 g II, ge I S B .U.'..,


MONDAY July 20, 1981- Drug ship Seixed Capricorn is
brought into Nassau Harbour by Defence Force marines. She was
followed by seven other boats seized on illegal fishing charges.
The Capricorn is shown loaded to the gills with 286 bales of mar-
ijuana valued at $6 million.


CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL
CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS Tel: 325-2921
SUNDAY, MARCH 26TH, 2006
Speaker 11:30 a.m. & 7:00 p.m.
Speaker: Elder
Sidney Burrows
Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m. *
Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. Evening Service: 7:00 p.m. *
Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays *
Sster' Praer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday ofeach month) j



GRACE AND PACE WESLEYAN CHURCH
A SOCIETY OF THE FREE METHODIST CHURCH OF NORTH AMERICA
(WHERE GOD IS ADORED AND EVERYONE IS AFFIRMED)

Worship time: 11am & 7pm
Prayer Time: 10:15 am to 10:45 am
Church School during Worship Service

Place:Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister. Rev. Henley Perry
PO. Box SS-5631
Telephone number:324-2538 Telefax number:324-2587
COME TO WORSHIP. LEAVE TO SERVE




EVANGELISTIC

TEMPLE
A Life Changing Experience

Collins Avenue at 4th Terrace Centreville
Telephone: 322-8304 or 325-1689 P.O. Box N-1566
Fax No. 322-4793


SUNDAY


8:30am ZNS-1
8:30am
9:45am
ll:00am
7:00pm


WEDNESDAY 7:30PM


Temple Time Broadcast
Early Morning Worship
Sunday School For All Ages
Worship Service
Evening Celebration
Selective Bible Teaching Royal
Rangers (Boys Club) Ages 4-17 Years
Missionettes (Girls Club) Ages 4-17.


VISIT OUR PREMISE BOOKSTORE, TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY


a


FEBRUARY 8,1978 One of two truckloads of marijuana val-
ued at $10 million which was unloaded from the fishing vessel Sea
Nymph. The vessel was seized off Bimini by the Police Marine Divi-
sion with 250 bales stashed in the hold.


BAPTIST BIBLE CH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD r


Sunday School: 10amr
Preachering 11am & 7:30pm
Radio Bible Hour:
Sunday 6pm ZNS 2
Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm


FUNDAMENTAL .
EVANGELISTIC
Pastor:H. Mills


"Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are" I ME
Pastor: H. Mills Phone: 393-0563 Box N-3622j

LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past &
Agb Geared To The Future
Worship time:11am & 7pm !

Sunday School: 9:45am

Prayer time: 6:30pm

Place:

The Madeira Shopping

Center
Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles
ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND
Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles
P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL lynnk@batelnet.bs


SUNDAY
10:15am
1:00am


Ii


ji' -


In Days Gone by: large




drug seizures of the past


With police and DEA officials making substantial marijuana confiscations in recent weeks -
especially on the Family Islands In Days Gone By takes a look at large seizures from the past.


THE TRIBUNE,


PAGE 6,. SATURDAY, APRIL 1, 2006


-


t






V.Jrsm %J tI. ~%I all" 1 I -


from Bureau

of Women's

Affairs
THE Bureau of Women s
Att4.irs rrijdc a donation i0
the N.inmje Ast.'.,ood Scholar-
ship and Mleritoriouw .-Aard
fund. to 1asl Bhahamijns
attendinri the Collcoi e alt the
Bahama' sCOB I
The tourndaji.:n \'ri V
formed io continue the rlegacN
of veterann educjitor NMjamic
Astlood. % ho v.orked [to
advance educational pur.suii'
amona talented .,ung
Baharruans
The ajjrd i hai ted on ica-
demlc achieeemcnt. merit,
extra-curriculr 11cii itle',
good character and refcr-
ences'
Paince Ast'.\ood-lMcDon-
aid. [he daughter of the late
Mljmie A s~tood. said the
:oundation iS J mean- of pre-
scr'ing the legJac of her
mother b\ otienng scholar-
ships to those \ho meet the
requuements
She said former students
described her mother as a
scholar, a woman of valor,
character, strength, and
determination.
Mrs Astwood-McDonald
said her mother is remem-
bered'as someone who
desired the best for her stu-
dents,i exemplified what it
meant to be the best, and
whose wisdom and knowl-
edge-were.complemented by
humility and personality.
Reverend Father Mario
C9nliffe, the Rector of Saint
Andrew's Anglican Parish,
said: "She taught us about life
anrd what it meant to live for
G~dhShe was like an orange
diamond: rare. beautiful and
invaluable. I am happy to
have known Mrs Astwood I
0rly hope that I mill h\e up
to all she has taught."
Lawyer Audrey Sturrup-
Thompson described her for-
mer', pcher as a role mod-
el". .
-"She charmed us into her
net like the spider did the fl\
\\e were mesmensed bh her
dictation. This Bahamian
teacher caused me to hae
self-confidence, tincss-e.
chai-o. aq A e I am lost
for tsords~ d M-sStarrup-
Thompb n
Ms Janer' tortuner. a
Health Inspector tor Depart-
ment o[ En\ ironmental
Health' Services, said. MNirs
Astwood believed that stu-
depts could not learn on a
empi) stomach so. those who
did not have breakfast or
lunch, she took the libertn of
feedme students with food
purchased out of her own
money.
"A true humanitaran and
champion of the poor. She
was a gem. She made me to
be strong. She found time to
help me. Her legacy. will bl e
on as one of my mentors. I
will never forget her," said
Mrs Mortimer.
Ronnie Knowles, treasurer
of the scholarship foundation,
said the scholarship will be
offered every year to students
who qualify and attend COB.


Governor

General

presents

award

THE Go\ernor Gen-
eral Arthur D Hanna.
second from right, pre-
sents Acting Commis-
sio:ner Delano Albertha
Christopher of the
.Antigua and Barbuda
Police Department.
\with a special award at
the Royal Bahamas
Police Force Women in
Laj. Enforcement
jward.s ceremony on
ThursdaN March 30 at
Government House.
Sho n., from left, are
Chief Superintendent
Juanita Colebrooke,
Commissioner of Police
Paul Farquharson. the
governor general and
Acting Commissioner
Christopher.
(BIS photo:
Patri k Ha nna)


THE government is propos-
ing the establishment of a legal
authority to preserve Clifton
Cay and other historic sites
around the country, Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie said.
Mr Christie was speaking at a
press conference after a meeting
with the Board of the Clifton
Heritage Authority.
Clifton Cay, located on the
western end of New Provi-
dence, is home to the ancient
Whylly Plantation, which at var-
ious times was populated by
three civilizations Lucayan
Indians, African slaves and
American loyalists.
Chairman Sean McWeeney
announced that the board is
moving aggressively on Phase I
of a development to ensure that
the Clifton heritage site is fully
accessible to the Bahamian
public for guided tours in the
fall.
The Clifton Heritage Author-
ity is mandated to manage, pre-
serve and develop the Clifton


site into a national heritage and other facilities at Clifton,
park. the land, the sea and the people
Mr Christie said he is con-, of the country all had to be tak-
cerned that Bahamians are -eniinto account.
stealing from-he site a'nfid'thafit .: taim is to create a.ili\ng
parts of the remnants 6f the monument to the civilisation
slave quarters are being that passed through Clifton,
removed. "which means that Bahamians
"That is obviously is a dis- would have an opportunity to
graceful occurrence and some- eek and know what a Lucayan
thing that ever Bahamian villagee was," the prime minis-
ought to help us police against." ter said. "This would be done
he said. "We are trying to create by putting a replica on,,site of
a one and only, experience for 'what the accommodations and
Bahamians at that site. E\er facilities they enjoyed ,a,that,
Bahamiian must haie pride of "time. It would also be protected
ownership and must therefore from the elements such as hur-
be prepared to be a part of pro- ricanes.
tecting the site." "From the point of view of


Reports

The prime minister also said
he has received reports that the
waters and beaches around the
historic area are being pollut-
ed with oil.
"To those who'hear me, they
must stop now or be account-
able for the damage they are
inflicting on that site," he
warned. "We must take all steps
necessary to protect the envi-
rons of Clifton."
Mr Christie said that in plan-
ning the development of a park


opportunity for education, of
the opportunity for enjoyment,
-the opportunity for this inte-
grated level of comfort at this
site, I am greatly encouraged
by the fact that we have a gold
mine in this regard," Mr
Christie added.


Fetlzr Fniie


ru~- ':


'S


J;i
I. i s-


WeaeagoigtilcTanwe











se Energet I c OtGig



Interested, then call for an interview
356-4512, 356-4514, 325-0234 or 325-0235




ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS
-' GOVERNMENT TREASURY BILLS
BK -110 03

Sealed tenders for B$53,000,000.00 of 91-
Day treasury bills will be received by the
banking manager, The Central Bank of The
Bahamas, Frederick Street, Nassau up to
3,00p.m. on Tuesday, April 4,, 2006.
Successful Tenders, who will be advised
should take up their bills against payment
on Thursday, April 6, 2006. These bills will
be in minimum multiples of B$100.00.
Tenders are to be on special forms obtainable
from The Central Bank of The Bahamas or
Commercial Banks.

Tenders must state the net price percent (in
multiples of one cent) and should be marked
"Tender." The Central Bank of The Bahamas
reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.


Financial Advisors Ltd.'
Pricing Information As Of:
31 March 2006
3 reISX LIST~fE &TRiAbeD SECUFRIRTIES VISIT WWW.BISXBAHAMAS COM FOR MORE DATA INFO~I~ATOl "
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,375 55 / CHG 00.00 1 %CHG 00.00 / YTD 24.84 i YTD % 01-84
52,k-HI 52.h -LOA ,mnol Pra.lous CIo Taiu Close Toa Cse Cnarlag Daily V'o EPS D.v 5 PiE Yield
0.95 0.59- Abaco rMrlkets 0 59 0 59 0 O0 -0066 0 000 N/M 0 00'.:
1070 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 10.70 10.70 0.00 3,255 1.456 0.360 7.3 3.36%
7.24 5.88 Bank of Bahamas 6.95 6.95 0.00 400 0.643 0.330 10.8 4.75%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.70 0.70 0.00 0.175 0.020 4.0 2.86%
1.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.26 1.26 0.00 0.105 0.060 12.0 4.76%
1.20 1.04 Fidelity Bank 1.18 1.18 0.00 0.070 0.040 16.7 3.42%
9.60 8.00 Cable Bahamas 9.20 9.20 0.00 0.565 0.240 16.3 2.61%
2.20 1.39 Colina Holdings 1.69 1.69 0.00 -0.067 0.000 NM 0.00%
9.69 8.33 Commonwealth Bank 9.50 9.50 0.00 0.861 0.490 11.0 5.16%
5.68 4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.70 4.89 0.19 0.091 0.091 51.9 0.96%
2.88 1.45 Doctor's Hospital 2.45 2.45 0.00 0.437 0.000 5.6 0.00%
6.21 4.02 Famguard 6.21 6.21 0.00 300 0.542 0.240 11.5 3.86%
10.99 9.99 Finco 10.66 10.66 0.00 0.738 0.540 14.4 5.07%
11.00 7.75 FirstCarlbbean 11.00 11.00 0.00 0.828 0.500 13.3 4.55%
10.40 7.99 Focol 10.40 10.40 0.00 0.833 0.500 12.5 4.81%
1.27 1.15 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 -0.162 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.20 9.60 ICD Utilities 9.50 9.50 0.00 2,084 ,0.526 0.540 18.1 5.68%
9.10 8.22 J. S. Johnson 9.09 9.09 0.00 0.572 0.560 15.9 6.16%
7.95 5.30 Kerzner International BDRs 7.81 7.78 -0.03 0.134 0.000 58.3 0.00%
10 00 1000 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.585 4.9 5.85%
Fidelity Over-The-Cbountar Sacudllaes
5'2AI,-HI E2ak -Lo .,moc,I B1.3 I N 5 La'l Pi..:e .V.Eek, '. EPS $ Div$ PiE Yield
13.25 12.25 Banamas Supermarkats 13.25 1-1 25 1 100' 1 917 0 720 7 5 05%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0 54 0 20 RND Holdings 0 29 0.54 0.00 -0.044 0.000 NM 0.00%
Colira Over-The-Counter Seouritils :
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 1 00 J-3 00 4 1 00 2 220 0 000 194 000%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.75 13.75 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
060 10 35 RND MIo lllng5 0 29 5-1 35 -0 103 0 000 NiM 000%
BSX Listed mutual Fundse
52nk-Hl 52ak-LoA Fund Name NA '. YTD : Last 12 .lrnns Di. $ Ylied
1.2786 1 2144 Colina mrr.,e Markel Fun. 1 2'856E9
2.6662 2.2268 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.6662 **
10.8590 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.8590*****
2.3312 2.1953 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.331152**
1 1592 1 1547 Collna Bond Fund 1.159154***
FINOEX: CLOSE 695.28 / YTO 7.86% / 2005 26.09,
618X ALL 5HA E INDE X 19 De.: i02 = 1 '000:' 0 'iEL "' 1. r.:r. -r, l.'.a r.. 43 ai.i1dea D. :l':,..-..g r: .
52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelit
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change In closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Dally Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
* AS AT JAN. 31. 2006/* AS AT FEB. 28, 2006
*-AS AT MAR 10 2006' AS AT FEB 28 2006/ "'* AS AT FEB. 28. 2006
TO TRADE CAW. WPM 242-5-P2-701iG0 / FfIDPLtTY 24--358-77B 1


Legal body





proposed for





Clifton Cay,





other sites


DON STAINTON

PROTECTION

WE SELL OUTER SPACE
TELEPHONE: 322-8219 322-8160



ALL ALUMINUM PATIO ROOF OR
SCREENED ROOM


WE DO IT WHEN WE SAY WE WILL!


ALL ALUMINUM CAR PORT
Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1978
L. A


A^ '


ij


;:- d ~~; *~
~









PAGE 8, SATURDAY, APRIL 1, 2006


'THE iTRUNE


Garbage disposal boost





for east Grand Bahama


* By BAHAMAS
INFORMATION
SERVICES

A NEW system of garbage
disposal will soon be opera-
tional in east Grand Bahama,
Minister of Energy and the
Environment Dr Marcus
Bethel announced.
Dr Bethel was among the
speakers at a town meeting at
the High Rock All Age
School this week, where he
discussed the new system -
known as a garbage transfer
station.
"Previously each settlement
used its own garbage disposal
site in the bushes some-
thing that was not environ-
mentally sound nor sustain-
able, because all of the old
cars, refrigerators and garbage
contaminated the under-
ground water lens; the water
tables," he explained.

Decision

Dr Bethel said that in his
previous position at the Min-
istry of Health and Environ-
mental Services, he oversaw
the decision to build the trans-
fer station in east Grand
Bahama, which will serve as
a collection point for all
garbage from the various
nearby settlements.
During his time at that min-
istry, Dr Bethel was also
involved in the planning for
several sanitary, landfill
sites in Grand Bahama, he
said.
"The government was
seized and required to estab-
lish in our communities
throughout our Bahamas,
.proper sanitary landfills -
which means that hey-liind -
landfills which were designed
to prevent the seepage of con-


2 i I
~'r 'w N N.
a." t I. ',


I :I p
aTi .


f(

I., ';.


THE new transfer station outside the High Rock Community is almost ready to begin ser-
vicing the communities on East Grand Bahama.
(Photo by Greg Christie)


taminants into the underlying
water tables.
"We are just about com-
pleting that process, which
started in 1999, and -at the end
of the process we will have
established 11 sanitary land-
fills throughout our Family of
Islands from Inagua in the
south to Abaco in the north,
including a very large landfill
site in New Providence. This
has been a build-up period
..over.the.past ix; e:veen.y)ears.
"In East Grand Bahama",
Dr Bethel noted, "we decided
that rather than attempt to put


in a sanitary landfill, because
of its smaller population size,
a transfer station which would
allow for the collection of
garbage from the various set-
tlements to then be forwarded
on to a proper landfill site in
existence in Freeport was
the way to go."

Population

The minister revealed that
on the west end of Grand
Bahama which includes
Eight Mile Rock and West


End there is need for a prop-
er sanitary landfill site because
of the larger population, and
so such a site will be built to
complement the sanitary land-
fill site that exists in the port
area in Freeport.
Dr Bethel told east enders
that when east Grand Bahama
has grown and there is a need,
there may be a sanitar land-
fill site developed in the area.


ImDrovements


for Cat
By BAHAMAS
INFORMATION
SERVICES,
NEW BIGHT Minister of
Works and Utilities Bradley
Roberts said that the planned
' .' expanin'6h hit repair of seawalls
will be only the first of several
infrastructure developments on
Cat Island.
The improvements he said, will
include upgrades to the New
Bight airport.
"The government has held
talks with the European Union
with the view of acquiring funds
to place a new airport terminal
at the New Bight airport in order
to meet the future demand from
domestic air traffic as well as from
the international tourism mar-
ket," Mr Roberts said.
"The spin-off effects of this
project are that the airport will
meet international safety stan-
dards with respect to the location
of the terminal building and
apron.
"The upgrading of the airport
also means that it would then be
able to obtain the minimum
International Civil Aviation
Organisation (ICAO) require-
ments to be classified as an entry
airport for international passen-
gers. The completion of the
process is imminent and will be
open for public tendering. Con-
tractors of Cat Island are urged to
prepare themselves to join in the
tendering process," he said.
Mr Roberts was in Cat Island
for the signing of a $1.13 million
contract with Knowles Construc-
tion and Development for the
repairs and expansion of the
island's sea walls.
The project also required the
placement of around 700 pre-cast
concrete lock blocks, more than
1,700 cubic yards of concrete for
foundations and wall topping
work, and 3,500 square yards of
road surfacing.
Mr Roberts said that under the
Inter-American Development
Bank's Hurricane Floyd loan pro-
ject, a foreign consulting firm was
brought in to carry out the dam-
age assessment, prepare the
design drawings as \ell as super-
\ise the re-construction workss .
Ho\\e'er. he said. following
(he I"o most recent hirncjnes.


Island
the government was able to con-
vince the.IDB that Bahamian
engineers were equally capable
of doing the work.
"I have every confidence that
our Bahamian consulting firm,
Engineering Technical Services
(ETS,) will prove worthy of the
task that the government has
entrusted to the firm's care," Mr
Roberts said.
Mr Roberts added that once
the materials are all on site for a
new dock on Bennett's Harbour,
the project should be completed
within eight weeks, or by the end
of June.
This dock, he said, will be con-
structed using sheet piles, which
will be secured along side the face
of the existing ock formation.
Afterwards the bulkhead, deck
and new rollon/roll off ramp will
becon truced*
The work to the docking facil-
ity will also include the'replace-
ment of the navigational aids that
were located at the enter) to the
Sdock, he said:.

Project
While the'wi&k on thi project
has commenced, Mr koberts
admitted-that: here hae been
some delays.
"Firstly, there was an internal
administrative glitch and the con-
tractor did not receive the mobil-
isation funds in a timelyfashion;
and after the receipt of tfie mobil-
isation funds there was 4smb dif-
ficulty with.-ptruring iie sheet
piling materials out if New
York," he said. "However, I have
been assured that the& minor
problems-have been all resolved
now and that the. required mate-
rials should all be on si( within
the next two weeks."
I Mr Roberts said while most of
the road infrastructure on Cat
Island is in good condition, a
number of potholes haFe devel-
oped at various locationsi~hrough-
out the island as a restt of the
last t\\n hurricanes.
"In this regard, I have advised
my technical officers to arrest the
deca. before it invades the
greater parn o[ the roadvwa.. They
h.at already scoped the works ,
whichh should commence in the
coming months." he said.
'iii


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I I


LOCAL 14EWS








THE TRIBUNE


SATURDAY, APRIL 1, 2006, PAGE 9


MERNST&YOUNG


* Chartered Accountants
One Montague Place
Third Floor I
Easl Bay Street
P.O. Box N-323
Nassau, Bahamas


m Phone: (242) 502-6000
Fax: (242) 502-6090-
www.ey.com


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20 January, 2006


ANSBACHER (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET


31 December 30 June
2005 2004
$000 $000
ASSETS
Cash and cash at Central Bank $ 225 $ 475
Loans and advances to banks (note 4) 218,932 121,069
Loans and advances to customers (note 5) 53,275 25,450
Accounts receivable and prepayments 2,158 1,401
Interest receivable 286 145
Investments (note 7) 12,903 29,422
Tangible fixed assets (note 9) 1.228 2 463
Total. assets $ 289,007 42

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' FUNDS
Liabilities
Customer deposits (note 10) $ 272,878 $ 169,337
Other liabilities (note 11) 1,627 528
Accruals and deferred income 1,782 1,719
276,287 171,5.4
Subordinated debt loan capital (note 12) 3,632 .6
Total liabilities 279,919 175 216

Shareholders' Funds
Called up share capital (note 13) 3,000 1,000
Share premium account (note 13) 1,000
Profit and loss account (note 14) 4,013 3,134
Other reserves (note 14) 1,075 1,075
Total shareholders' funds 9,088 5,209

Total liabilities and shareholders' funds $ 289,007 $180,425

MEMORANDUM ITEMS
Commitments (note 15) S 2,082 $ 647


Approved by the Board:


Ian Towell
Director


Ansel Watson \
Director
\


ANBACHER (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
31 December, 2005 '



1. CORPORATE INFORMATION

Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited (the Bank) is incorporated under the laws of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas. The Bank is licensed under the Banks & Trust Companies
Regulation Act, Chapter 287, 2000 to carry on banking and trust business. The Bank and its
consolidated subsidiary undertakings are collectively referred to herein as the "Group." The
Group's business activities include the provision of trust, corporate, administrative, banking
and financial services.

The balance sheet was approved for release by the Board of Directors on 20 January, 2006.


2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Basis of preparation

The consolidated balance sheet has been prepared under the historical cost convention, except
for certain securities that have been measured at market value, and in accordance with United
Kingdom applicable accounting standards and with the Statements of Recommended
Accounting Practices issued by the British Banker's Association.

Basis of consolidation

The consolidated balance sheet includes the position of the Bank and of its subsidiary
undertakings at the balance sheet date.

Provisions

Specific loan loss provisions are made by specific identification of potential losses on the
collection of certain loans, advances and debt securities. When establishing specific provisions
management considers past and expected credit losses, business and economic conditions, their
knowledge of the borrower and any other relevant factors.

In addition, general provisions are raised in respect of losses which, although not specifically
identified, management considers to be inherent in any portfolio of loans, advances and debt
securities. The general provision is based on risk characteristics of the loan portfolio and an
evaluation of historical level of inherent risk. Its continuing appropriateness is regularly
reviewed.


Investment securities

Debt securities and equity shares intended to be held for the longer term are classified as
investment securities. Investment securities are stated at cost, adjusted for the amortization of
any premium or discount on purchase, less any provisions considered necessary by the
directors. No provisions have been recorded during the period (2004 nil).

Tangible fixed assets

Tangible fixed assets are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and amortization and any
provision for permanent diminution in value. Depreciation and amortization are used to write
off the cost less the estimated residual value of tangible fixed assets over their estimated useful
economic lives as follows:


Leasehold improvements, computer and office equipment
Office furniture
Motor vehicles


3 5 years
10 years
4 years


INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT

To the Shareholders and Board of Directors' of
ANSBACHER (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

We have audited the consolidated balance sheet of Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited (the Bank) as
at 31 December, 2005. The consolidated balance sheet of the Bank as of 30 June, 2004 were
audited by another auditor whose report dated 20 August, 2004 expressed an unqualified
opinion.

The consolidated balance sheet has been prepared on the basis of the accounting policies set out
therein.

Respective responsibilities of directors and auditors
The Bank's directors are responsible for the preparation of the consolidated balance sheet in
accordance with applicable United Kingdom accounting standards. Our responsibility is to audit
the balance sheet in accordance with relevant legal and regulatory requirements and International
Standards on Auditing.

Basis ofopinion
We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing as promulgated
by the International Federation of Accountants. An audit includes examination, on a test basis,
of evidence relevant to the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated balance sheet. It also
includes an assessment of the. significant estimates and judgments made by the directors in the
preparation of the consolidated balance sheet, and of whether the accounting policies are
appropriate to the Bank's circumstances, consistently applied and a equately disclosed.

We have planned and performed our audit so as to obtain all the information and explanations
which we considered necessary in order to provide us with sufficient evidence to give reasonable
assurance that the consolidated balance sheet are free from material misstatement, whether
caused by fraud or other irregularity or error. In forming our opinion, we also evaluated the
overall adequacy of the presentation of information in the consolidated balance sheet.

Opinion
In our opinion, the consolidated balance sheet gives a true and fair view of th&state of affairs of
the Bank as at 31 December, 2005 and has been properly prepared in accordance.with accounting
standards generally accepted in the United Kingdom.


Foreign currencies

Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies at the balance sheet date are
translated at the rates ruling at that date.

Derivative financial instruments

The Bank uses derivative financial instruments such as foreign exchange contracts to hedge the
risks associated with foreign currency fluctuations as a counterpart performed on behalf of its
clients. It is the Bank's policy not to trade in derivative financial instruments.



Related party information

The Bank is utilizing an exemption from disclosing certain related party information in respect
of transactions with the Qatar National Bank Group under Financial Reporting Standard 8:
Related Party Disclosures.

Assets under administration

No account is taken in this consolidated balance sheet of assets and liabilities of clients
administered by the Bank as custodian, trustee, or nominee, or its subsidiaries as custodian,
trustee, or nominee, other than those assets and liabilities which relate to banking services
provided by the Bank or its subsidiaries for their clients. During the period the portfolio of the
Bank's affiliate in the Cayman Islands was transferred to the Bank's local portfolio. The Barik
has a fiduciary obligation to its customers for the administration of these accounts.



Taxation

There are no income taxes imposed on the Group in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

3. RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

A Partner of Graham, Thompson & Co., the Group's legal counsel is also a director of the Bank.

During the period Ansbacher (Cayman) Ltd. transferred a book of business to the Bank
representing cash, securities and loan receivables held by Ansbacher (Cayman) Ltd. These
assets are included in the consolidated balance sheet and in assets under management.

4. LOANS AND ADVANCES TO BANKS

31 December, 2005 30 June, 2004
$000 $000

Repayable on demand $163,755 $ 42,140
Other loans and advances with remaining maturity:
Three months or less 51,921 73,340
One year or less. but over three months 3,256 4,780
Five years or less but-over one year 809
$ 218,932 $121,069

The above amounts include:
Due from parent $ 154,688 $ 98,392

5. LOANS AND ADVANCES TO CUSTOMERS

31 December, 2005 30 June, 2004
$000 $000

Repayable on demand : $ 2,044 $ 209
Other loans and advances ith remaining
maturity to next pricing:"
Three months or less 1,594 1,852
One year or less but over three months 1,525 2,790
Five years or less but over one year 9,283 5,562
Greater than five years 39,178 15,272
General and specific bad and doubtful debt
provision (see note 8) (349) (235)
$ 53,275 $ 25,450

As at 31 December, 2005 there are no loans or advances where interest is suspended (2004 nil).


6. PROVISION FOR BAD AND DOUBTFUL DEBTS

31 December, 2005 30 June, 2004
$000 $000
General:
At 1 July $ 235 $ 89
Charge for the period 176 146
Write back (62)
$ 349 $ 235

7. INVESTMENTS

Investments comprise of the following:

31 December 30 June
2005 2004
Currency
Notes Holding Description Cost Cost
$000 $000
USD 750,000 Bancaja Intl. Finance Float 1/24/2006 $ 750 $ 750
USD 1,500,000 Bank of Western Australia Ltd. 12/16/2005 1,501
USD 5,000,000 Bank One NA Illinois 7/5/2006 5,025 5,025
USD 3,500,000 Banque PSA Finance 3/2/2005 3,499
USD 2,000,000 BCP Finance Bank Ltd. 1/26/2005 2,000
USD 4.500,000 Fin Danish Ind 12/8/2005 4,507
USD 2,000,000 Investkredit Bank AG 2/1/2007 1,999 1,999
USD 1,500,000 Northern Rock PLC 2/28/2006 1,501 1,501
USD 3,500.000 San Paolo IMI Bk Intl SA 2/27/2006 3,503 3,502
USD 5,000,000 SNS Bank Nederland 5/9/2006 5,004
$12,778 $ 29,288
Bond
Central Bank Certificate
BSD 85 Number 01/011 9

Equity
Bahamas International Stock
BSD 6 Exchange 125 125
Total investments $12,903 $29,422

No premium or discount is recognized on the purchase of debt securities. The equity shares are
unlisted and stated at cost.


8. SHARES IN SUBSIDIARY UNDERTAKINGS

31 December, 2005 30 June, 2004
Cost and Cost and
carrying value carrying value
$000 $000

Unlisted investments: $ 200 $ 200


_ I-I -p -- -J~


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II I I I I Ii L. IlIM


iuIII .iAI LULJAT. AML I. LUUC


Listed below are the names of the principal operating subsidiary undertakings of the Bank at 31
December, 2005, all of which are wholly-owned and have an accounting reference date of 31
December. The shareholdings, which are eliminated on consolidation, afe of ordinary share
capital in all cases.

Country of incorporation,
registration and operation Principal activities

Ark Limited Bahamas Trustee and nominee services
Baird Limited British Virgin Islands Nominee services
Bitmore Limited Bahamas Trustee and nominee services
Boyne Limited British Virgin Islands Nominee services
Chester Asset Holdings British Virgin Islands Custodian services
Dunmore Properties Limited British Virgin Islands Custodian services

9. TANGIBLE FIXED ASSETS

Beginning Ending
Balance Additions Disposals Balance
$000 $000 $000 $000
Cost:
Leasehold improvements $ 1,251 $ 66 $ $ 1,317
Computer, office equipment, furniture
and motor vehicle .4,666 113 (81) 4,698
$ 5,917 $ 179 $ (81) $ 6,015

Beginning Depreciation Ending
Accumulated Depreciation Balance Expense Disposals Balance
$000 $000 $000 $000

Leasehold improvements $ 767 $ 197 $ $ 964
Computer, office equipment,
furniture and motor vehicle 2,687 1,196 (60) 3,823
$ 3,454 $ 1,393 $ (60) $ 4,787
31 December, 2005 Net book value $ 2,463 $ (1,214) $ (21) $ 1,228

30 June, 2004 Net book value $ 2,683 $ (194) $ (26) $ 2,463



10. CUSTOMER DEPOSITS

31 December, 2005 30 June, 2004
$000 $000

Repayable on demand $ 207,977 $ 49,238
Other deposits with remaining maturity:
Three months or less but not repayable on demand 61,375 115,955
One year or less but over three months 3,526 4,057
Five years or less but over one year 87
$ 272,878 $ 169,337

11. OTHER LIABILITIES

31 December, 2005 30 June, 2004
$000 $000

Other liabilities $ 1,627 $ 528

The above amount includes:
Due to parent and other related party $ 1,174 $ 274

12. SUBORDINATED DEBT- LOAN CAPITAL

.31 December, 2005 30 June, 2004
$000 $000

Repayable in 2013, carrying interest at
3 month LIBOR plus 90 basis points $ 3,632 $ 3.632

This loan is unsecured and claims in respect of this facility are subordinated to the claims of all
other creditors. The loan is payable to the ultimate holding company and interest is payable at
the end of each quarter. The loan is denominated in United States dollars.



13. SHARE CAPITAL

S 31.December, 2005 30 June, 2004
$000 $000
Authorised:
1,000 Class A ordinary shares of $50
each (2004: 1,000 shares) $ 50 $ 50
59.000 Class B ordinary shares of $50
each (2004: 59,000 shares) 2,950 2,950
$ 3.000 $ 3,000

Allotted, called up and fully paid:
1,000 Class A ordinary shares of $50
each (2004: 1,000 shares) $ 50 $ 50
59,000 Class B ordinary shares of $50
each (2004: 19,000 shares) -2,950 950
$ 3,000 $ 1,000

Share Premium account:
40,000 Class B ordinary shares of $25 each .$ 1,000 $

The Class A shares carry all of the voting rights in the Bank. Both classes of shares carry
equal rights to participate in dividends declared by the Bank.

14. RESERVES

31 December, 2005 30 June, 2004
$000 $000

Profit and loss account:
Beginning of period $ 3,134 $ 4,538
Retained profit (loss) for the period 879 (1,404)
End of period $4,013 $ 3,134

Other reserves $1,075 $ 1,075

15. MEMORANDUM ITEMS, FOREIGN EXCHANGE AND INTEREST RATE
CONTRACTS

At the consolidated balance sheet date the contract amounts and risk weighted amounts or
replacement costs of contingent liabilities, commitments, foreign exchange and interest rate
contracts were:


31 December, 2005 30 June, 2004
Risk Risk
Contract Weighted Contract Weighted
Amount Amount Amount Amount
$000 $000 $000 $000

Commitments:
Undrawn formal standby facilities,
credit lines and other commitments


to lend
One year and over $ 437 $ 437 $ 660 $ 660
Less than one year 1,645 (13)
$ 2,082 $ 437 $ 647 $ 660

31 December, 2005 30 June, 2004
Risk Risk
Contract Weighted Contract Weighted
Amount Amount Amount Amount

Interest rate contracts $ $ $4,071 $

The contract and risk weighted amounts have been calculated in accordance with the relevant
guidelines of the United Kingdom Financial Services Authority.


:i

B


18. PENSION SCHEMES

The Bank's defined contribution plan, was established effective 1 January, 1992.

19. LITIGATION

The Ansbacher Group, through a number of'its subsidiary undertakings, is involved n ;legal
actions in various jurisdictions arising from its nornial business. No material adverse impact on
the consolidated financial position of the Bank is expected to arise from these proceedings.

20. 'RISK MANAGEMENT AND FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

The Bank's financial instruments comprise deposits, money/market assets and liabilities, some
cash and liquid resources and various items that arise directly from its' operations. The main
risks arising from the Bank's financial instruments are credit risk, market risk, operational risk,
liquidity risk and interest rate risk. The Bank has adopted the Ansbacher Group's general
approach of managing each of these risks and they are summarized in the following notes.

Credit risk
Credit risk is the risk that counterparties will be.unable to meeting their obligations to the Bank.
Credit risk arises principally from lending but also from transactions involving on and off
balance sheet instruments.

Credit risk policy is managed and monitored by the Bank's credit committee, which operates
within the authorities and parameters agreed by the Boaid of Ansbacher Overseas Group
Limited. If the Bank requires collateral, this may be cash, or more commonly, security over the
customer's assets. Credit risks are subject to approval by the Bank's credit committee, which is
responsible for agreeing individual credit exposures. These exposures are monitored on a daily
basis and are subject to individual review by the Credit Committee on at least an annual basis.


Market risk
Market risk is the risk that changes in the level of interest rates, the levels .of exchange rates
Between currencies or the'price of securities and other financial contracts which could have an
adverse impact on the profits. The main market risks within the banks activities are interested
and currency risk.


"A


The Group operates a central treasury that is'responsible for the active management of the
liquidity of the Ansbacher Group. The Bank does not take proprietary trading or investment
positions. The principal market risk is regarded as that of interest rate mismatching repricingg!
risk) which is monitored though: the regular analysis of the banking book into various time
buckets (gap analysis). The Bank's positions; are consolidated at an Ansbacher Group level and
monitored by the Ansbacher Group.s'Risk Management Department.

Operational risk .
SThe primary operational risk arises from the potential: for computer system breakdown and the
need for the rapid recovery of operational data. Other operational risks would include front and
* back office errors, fraud, breaches of internal controls and external events resulting in financial
loss or reputational damage. -

The operational risk framework is determined at an Ansbacher Group level through a suite of
detailed procedural policies. The Bank's senior management is responsible for overseeing the
implementation of these policies to meet local requirements and Best practice standards within
the industry. Adherence to these policies is subject to regular review by the Ansbacher Group's
internal auditors and further oversight by the external auditors on an annual basis.

Liquidity risk
SLiquidity risk is the nsk that the Bank will encounter difficulty in realizing assets or otherwise
raising funds to meet commitments. The Bank monitors expected cash outflow on a daily basis.
Its policy throughout the year has been to ensure liquidity by maintaining at all times sufficient
high quality liquid assets to cover expected net cash outflow.

The contractual maturities of assets, liabilities and shareholder's equity have been determined on
,'the remaining period at the balance sheet date to the contractual maturity date. The maturity
profile is monitored by management to ensure adequate liquidity is maintained.



Interest rate risk


31 December, 2005 '
Within 3 3-12 1-5 More than Non-interest
Months months years 5 years Bearing Total

Cash and cash at
Central Bank $ 225 $ $ $ $ 225
Loans and advances
to banks 215,676 3,256 218,932
Loans and advances
to customers 3,619 1,525 9,283 38,848 53,275
Investments 5,754 5,025 1,999 125 12,903
Other Assets -z.. .1.., 3,672 3,672. 7
Assets $ 225,274 $ 9,806 $. 11,282 $ 38,848 $ 3,797 $ 289,007

Customer deposits $269,352 $ 3,526 $ $ $ $ 272,878
Subordinated debt 3,632 3,632
Other liabilities' '. 3,409 3,409
Shareholders' funds 9,088 9,0"88
Liabilities and. .
shareholders'
funds $269,352 $ 3,526 $ 3,632 $ 12,497 '$ 289,007

30 June, 2004
Within 3 3-12 1-5 More than Non-interest
months months years 5 years Bearing Total
Cash and cash at
Central Bank $ 475 $ S $ $ $ 475
Loans and advances
to banks 114,093 6,205' 771 121,069 ,
Loans and advances
to customers 394 2,851 7,120 15.085 25,450
Investments 5,507 23,790 125 29,422
Other Assets 4,009 4,009
OhAssets $ 114,962 $ 14,563 $ 31,681 $15,085 $ 4,134 $ 180,425

Customer deposits $ 165,194 $ 4,143 $ $ $ $ 169,337
Subordinated debt 3,632 3,632
Other liabilities 2,247 2,247
Shareholders' funds 5,209 5,209
Liabilities and -4
shareholders' funds $ 165,194 $ $4,143. $ $'3,632 $ 7,456 $ 180,425 ;


U.-


S16. CURRENCY DENOMINATION OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES .

31 December, 2005

S:United
States Pound Other
S, Dollars ,, Euros Sterling Currencies
S; $000 $000 $000 $000

Assets $ 230,347 $5,952 $31,281 $21,427

Liabilities and Shareholders' funds $226,463 $ 5,700 $29,721 $ 27,123

: "' 30 June, 2004

United
; States Pound Other
Dollars Euros Sterling Currencies
$000 $000 $000 $000

Assets $125,532 $18,876 $8,772 $27,245

Liabilities and Shareholders' funds' $131,051 $18,427 $ 8,693 $22,254

17. OPERATING LEASE COMMITMENTS

Commitment under a non'cancellable operating lease relating to land and buildings to make
payments in the twelve months after the balance sheet date are as follows:

200i 2004
$000 $000

Operating leases which expire:
30 June, 2010 $ 500 $ 500


T~U~ ~)~~-~)~ - -~MEN"_


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:41
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THE TRIBUNE




21. FAIR VALUES OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS
The term financial instruments includes both financial assets and financial liabilities. The fair
value of a financial instrument is the amount at which the instrument could be exchanged in a
current transaction between willing parties, other than in a forced or liquidation sale. Quoted
market prices are used where available. The values presented in these financial statements
would not necessarily be realized in an immediate sale; nor are there plans to settle liabilities
prior to contractual maturity.
An analysis between trading and non-trading assets and liabilities has not been provided as the
Bank does not have any trading financial instruments.
The fair values of listed and publicly traded securities held for non-trading purposes ae
disclosed in note 9.
22. ULTIMATE HOLDING COMPANY

The ultimate holding company is Qatar National Bank SAQ, which is incorporated in Qatar and
heads the largest group in which the consolidated financial statements of the Bank ae
consolidated. The immediate holding company is Ansbacher Overseas Group Limited, a
company incorporated in Guernsey. The smallest higher group in which the consolidated
financial statements of the Bank are consolidated is headed by QNB International Holdings
Limited sarl, a company incorporated in Luxembourg. The consolidated financial statements of
Qatar National Bank SAQ and QNB International Holdings Limited sari may be obtained from
Two London Bridge, London SE1 9RA.


GN-340










MINISTRY OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT
AND CONSUMER AFFAIRS



NOTICE

The public is advised that the notice published in the Tribune March
; 31. 2006 regarding SUN OIL is amended as follows: -
Where the name ESSO appears it is replaced by the smae SUN OIL.

THI PRICE CONTROL ACT, 1971
CHAPTER 339
THE PRICE CONTROL (GASOLINE & DIESEL OIL)
(AMENDMENT) ( .) REGULATIONS. 2002

The public is advised that prices as shown in the schedule for LEAD
SFREE gasoline sold by SUN OIL will become effective on Friday 31"i March

SS CH IE U L E

MAXIMUM WHOLESALE SELLING MAXIMUM
PRICE RETAIL
SPER U.S. GALLON SELLING PRICE
PLACE. ARTICLE PER U.S.
. MAXIMUM MAXIMUM GALLON
SUPPLIERS' DISTRIBUTORS'
PRICE PRICE g
$ $S
PART A 1 INCLUDING SEA F RE I G H T
NEW PROVIDE. .
SUN OIL ; LEAD FREE 3.52. 3.5 3 "


INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
PART C
GRAND BAHAMA .
(NOT FREEP.)
SUN OIL LEAD FREE 3.42 3.60 4.02


PART D NOT INCLUDING SEA F R E IIG H T
ABACO,ANDROS
ELEUTHERA
SUN OIL LEAD FREE 3.52 3.75 4.14


PART E NOT INCLUDING SEA FREI G HT
ALL OTHER
FAMILY ISLAND
SUN OIL LEAD FREE 3.53 3.77 4.17







HARRISON THOMPSON
PERMANENT SECRETARY





you can advertise your

Cars, Trucks, Boats, even your dogs

in




The Tribune's


Bargain Finder


call us at


502-2351


SATURDAY, APRIL 1,2006, PAGE 11


PARLIAMENTARY Secretary, Ms. Agatha Marcelle, of the Ministry of Immigration, Labour
and Training, left, along with Dr. Iva Dahl, Manager of Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute,
right, and Grand Bahama Coordinator for BTVI, Mr. Fredland Delancy, centre, in front of a display
of furniture made by students of BTVI and on display at the Annual Career Exposition for Youth
underway at Our Lucya Resort for the next three days.
/ (BIS Photo by Vandyke Hepburn)




'A new path' for




technical education


* By BAHAMAS
INFORMATION
SERVICES
THE government is commit-
ted to creating a programme that
would ensure the sustainability
of technical and vocational edu-
Cation and training. Parliamen-
tary Secretary in the Ministry of
Immigration, Labour and Train-
ihg Agatha Marcelle said.
J She was speaking at a three-
day career exposition event for
young persons in Grand Bahama,
('Which was sponsored by the
Bahamas Technical and Voca-
tional Institute and the Rqtary
Club of Grand Bahama SunrisB,.
"Such a programme must 8
capable of producing a workforce
which is not only current and
competitive in skills and compe-
tencies, but which also has the
ability to respond and adapt very
quickly to our changing ecodiOm-.
ic environment," she said.
In attendance at the event,
which was held at the Our Lucaya
Resort, were Dr Iva Dahl, man-
. ager of BTVI, and students from
BTVI and other schools on the
island.
Ms Marcelle, who is responsi-
ble for the national co-ordination
of technical and vocational edu-
cation and training, shared with
her audience that the government
is about to embark on a new path
for technical and vocational edu-
cation.
Ms Marcelle said to the young
people attending the opening ses-


sion: "In the Bahamas 68 per cent ing workforce at international and
of our jobs relate in some way to global standards."
technical and vocational educa- In pledging her support and
tion, and this area.has unlimited that of Dr Dahl to taking techni-
opportunities for our young peo- cal and vocational education to
ple. the next level, Ms Marcelle said,
"When you are skilled you "We're still at the place where
have value. vou are now empow- we have to import too much
cred. to b~c-and 1to d0--i.vtid-----|.rhTu.-- e ien tt ih an unemploy-
want You need to know the dif- ment rate of 10.2 per cent; but
feren e between been skilled and that won't change unless you
just wanting a job," Ms Marcelle decide to do something about it.
said. "While it is great and wonder-
at is-wrong, and has been ful that you are interested in
wrong n our country is, too many BTVI, you must also be interest-
young people just want a job. You ed in something else before you
have tolbegin to want more, and get to BTVI. You can never be
that's why you are here, thanks to the best unless you have some
i the Rotary;Club and BTVI. basic education. While you are in
a your high school, you have to
SExnpands concentrate on getting those
: BGCSEs, and those BJCs; you
"As our economy expands and have to concentrate on your read-
develops, and the need for a arg- ing programme, on your writing,
er and more skilled workforce on your arithmetic, on many
becomes an obvious priority, the things so you are able to compete
government is setting the stage when you get out of school, and
to facilitate the radical transfor- before you get to BTVI.
nation that must take place in "It makes no sense going there
the way we have, in the past, per- if you can't read a tape measure;
ceived technical and vocational you can't read a letter; if you can't
education and training, and also use a calculator. While you are
in the way we deliver it," said Ms where you are, make the most of
Marcelle. where you are, all in preparation
A veteran trainer and motiva- of where our country is going in
tor, Ms Marcelle said the focus the future," said Ms Marcelle.
can no longer be on just getting The career day was initiated by
people jobs, or even solely on the Rotary to show the students what
creation of jobs; "Rather, our possibilities are out there so that
focus must be on empowering our they may get a head start on life
people to become highly skilled before they graduate. Exhibits
and more productive; able to are open over the next three days
compete in today's new emerg- until 8pm.


V'






DIRSAN UAN
Y tl C iy c .oo .f. r ,) rY n 1 .' c t c I,








The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) is pleased to invite
Tenders to provide the Company with coverage for our Directors and
Officers.
Interested companies/firms in Nassau may collect a tender package from
the Security's Desk located in the Administrative building on John F.
Kennedy Drive, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday
through Friday.

In Freeport, packages are to collected from the Security's desk, BTC, Mall
Drive.

The deadline for submission of tenders is April 13th, 2006. Tenders should
be sealed and marked "TENDER FOR DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS
INSURANCE" and should be delivered to the attention of the Acting
President and CEO, Mr. Leon Williams by the above date and time.

BTC reserves the right to reject any, or all Tenders.
L 1






'THE TRIBUNE,
,'1 * ., :*' ( ,


PAGE 12. SATURDAY. APRIL 1. 2006


The Tribune's


I - m p m---

InEahAg rop n ah geGou I Ec AeGru
-~~ A


"NPOOCPES. US NWSPPE 7i OLY


-- ------ -- -I:


I CONTEST RULES I=


S







LOCA NT


The Bahamas to be shown as


homophobic'

'ROM page one company targetedsquarely at she found t
ROM page one gays and lesbians with chit overwhelmir
, - AT,1 I TT_- -..-.


mentary chronicles O'Don-
nell and her partner
Keoli's first-ever cruise for
500 gay and lesbian
families.
;'Donnell's R Family
VaCations, the first gay travel
u?, '


dren, chartered the Norwe-
gian Dawn in July, 2004, for a
cruise from New York to the
Bahamas.
Speaking with the New
York Daily News earlier this\
week, the comedienne said\
i'^ ~' :


on

:he event to be
igly positive.
. c n; -1 t ,. '


noweverI, sle saiU, ,tney
were not prepared for the
protesters who greeted them
upon landing in Nassau.
"It was sort of shocking.to
me," O'Donnell said, adding
other Nassau residents were


Police woman one



f four rape victims



in the past week


VROM pageone
thly gq straight home and that
is it? We cannot continue to
live lik'this," she said.
She explained that sexual
as ault-deprives the individ-
uaI of their sense of safety and
their whole world changes for
them.
SThey have problems sleep-
ink. eating and it is hard for
thlm to get the memory of the
e _nt out of their minds.
'Further explaining the trau-
ma a.rape victim can go
through, Dr. Patterson said
womei:feel theyy are "seeing
the rapist il every man", when
they are either walking or dri-
vi~g around.
'She said women should not
h4ve to live under these cir-
camstances.
SA victim of sgxual assault.
does not have to be pialhsed
by the event, stressed CitPtit-
te son.
;She said it is important they
recei e psychological help to
get through the experience.
.-It does not have to paral-


yse them and it does not have
to be the end of the world for
them. There is healing and
you can move out of it. During
that initial period they really


need to get some help," she
said.
The Crisis Centre 24-hour
hotline is 328-0922.


Witness of

incident 'in

fear of his life'

FROM page one
ve right there in South Beach around 4.50am. I turned around
by the police station and went back home.
"Then, around 5arn I turned through my corner. Soon as I
turned I sa~ this bigfbrown tankcar scrFec'lih-,iront ofmne. I
drove on the side angj I pressed gas.
"All I head was 'bim bam', two'shots, so I sped off. I went
by my girlfriend's hdose.
"Then I called South Beach police station and told them 'One
of your officers just shot a gunshot at me'.


documentary


supportive and apologised for
the protest.
The protest was organised
by the Save the Bahamas Ini-
tiatiVe, who expressed their
anger over the gay cruise


being allowed to make port
in the Bahamas.
However, there were no
repeats of the violent scenes
in 1998, when lesbian couples
were chased off Bay Street.


Members of the gay rights
advocate group, the Rainbow
Alliance of the Bahamas,
were also downtown to wel-
come the ship and its passen-
gers.


RIDEFOF
April 29, 2006
Eleuthera,
Bahamas


1K


',~~:" --f: :2


UN mission

condemns the

prolongedjailing

of Haiti prisoners


M PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti
, The U.N. peacekeeping
mission on Friday condemned
the jailing of thousands of
prisoners held without con-
Viction in Haiti's overcrowd-
ed prisons, saying the prac-
tice violated inmates' human
rights, according to Associat-
qd Press.
, Only 10 percent of Haiti's
.ome 4,000 prisoners have
been convicted, U.N. spokes-
woman Marie-Evelyne
letrus-Barry said.
. The impoverished country's
largest prison, the national
penitentiary, has grown so
Overcrowded that it can no
longer iidmit inmates.
f "The U.N. stabilization
force ... firmly condemns this
alarming situation, which is
contraryy to the universal prin-
ciples of human rights and the
guarantees of personal free-
(oms preached by Haiti's
Constitution and laws," the
peacekeeping niission said in
SSatement.
She U.N. mission called on
Haitian authorities to imme-
diately appoint a commission
to review each of the prison-
ers' cases to resolve the prob-
tem.
SOfficials at Haiti's
Justice Ministry didn't imine-
diately return calls seeking
comment.
I Observers say Haitian
courts are underfunded, over-
whelmed by thousands of
backlogged cases and strug-
gle with continuity diurihng
political turmoil, a constant
in Haiti's history.
SHaiti's U.S.-backed inter-


im government, appointed
after a February 2004 reT ol
toppled President Jean-
Bertrand Aristide. has
pledged to reform the judi-
ciary but has been hampered
by a lack of personnel and
equipment after Aristide and
his supporters fled.
President-elect Rene
Preval, whose strong backing
among Haiti's poor propelled
him to victory in Feb. 7 elec-
tions, will be sworn in Ma,
14.
Some inmates haxe been
held for years without seeing
a judge, and most have sern ed
more time than they would
have ificonvicted: according
to local rights groups.
"They've essentially been
found guilty before e%\en
going to court," said JocelI n
McCalla, executive director
of the National Coalition
for Haitian Rights in New
York.
"It's just a symptom of ho~\
bad the entire judicial system
is."
McCalla blamed the t:ilure
to address the cases on a lack
of political will and a shortage
of legal professionals.
,Critics have alleged that
some of the detentions are
politically motivated.
Among the more promi-
,nent inmates is Yvon Nep-
tune, prime minister under
Aristide.
Neptune has been failed
since July 2004 on accusations
that he masterminded the
killings of political opponents
before the revolt. Neptune
denies the charges, and no tri-
al date has been set.


RIDE FOR H PE

Whether you can ride 10 miles or 100 miles
Whether you pedal slowly or like the wind
Whether you can raise $50 or $5,000

Ride for Hope is your opportunity to do something
inspiring, something uniquely rewarding, to honor
loved ones touched by cancer.

Ride for Hope is a unique event with a meaningful
purpose. It is a charitable bik -a-thon which will occur
along the spectacular island o ieutheraIt is open to
anyone who enjoys cycling a ants tfdontribute to
one of the most important c.au. mm
enhanced cancer tare for aiill proceed b
the Cancer Caring Center a i V o Crncer
Society of the Bahamas

Be a part of the great to f
those who RIDE FOR "HOl
.o. : .: '.P -
.;


RIDE FOR HOPE PARTNERSHIP

A.s-.
iIUI ~n


www.rideforhopebahamas.com


SATURDAY, APRIL 1, 2006, PAGE 13


Tur-- TDIRI IIN


Sawa~








THE TRIBUNE:


PAGE 14, SATURDAY, APRIL 1, 2006


W H AT S O N


IN AND


AROUND NASSAU


E MAIL:


O U T T H E R E @ TR I B U N EM E D I A .N E T


Tuff Gong presents the third installment of the Reg-
gae All Stars series. On Saturday, April 1 audiences
can expect to be entertained by performances from
Richie Spice, Capleton, Mr Night Nurse himself,
Gregory Isaacs, Wayne Wonder, the Energy God,
and Anthony B at Arawak Cay. There will also be a
special guest artist from the legendary Marley Fami-
ly. Tickets can be purchased at the Marley's Bou-
tique, West Bay Street and the Juke.Box, Mall at
Marathon. Gates open at 8pm, show starts at 9pm
sharp. There will be a pre-party at the Fort Charlotte
grounds on Friday March 31. Music by Pasarella and
some of the Bahamas' top.selectors. The Royal
Bahamas Police Force will be providing security in
full effect.

LIVE MUSIC @ The Buzz, Nassau's Weekly Jam
Session & Musicians Hook-up. Located East Bay
Street two doors East of Esso On The Run, upstairs
Good As New open Wednesday thru Saturday
8pm, Sunday at 6pm. Amateur musicians try out &
Open mic Wednesday & Thursday after band prac-
tices. Professional musicians welcome to sit in on
jams Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Book now for
special events, concerts, private parties. Call 393-
2800 (393-BUZZ) or www.thebuzznightclub.biz for
more info Rock, Blues, Jazz, Funk, Reggae THE
BUZZ: MAKING MUSIC LIVE

CAFE EUROPA @ Charlotte Street North, kicks
off every Friday night with Happy Hour... special
drinks, live music/DJ from 6pm to 9pm and Nassau's
first European Night Restaurant open Friday night
till Saturday morning 5am, serving hot food all under
$10 and to go, music, drinks and an English break-
fast. Cafe Europa...the perfect place to spend your
night out till the morning.

Bahamian Party Hoppers and Smirnoff presents Fri-
day Fusion @ Dicky Mo's (west of Radisson resort),
Cable Beach. The first group of 10 or more will
receive a free $100 bar tab of Fusion 3 for $10 spe-
cials. Ask about our $13.95 dinner specials. Bahami-
an Night (Free admission) every Saturday with live
music from,8 pm to midnight.
Karaoke Sundays from 8pm io midnight, $1 shots
and dinner special all night long. For further infor-
mation. call (2421 327-131i: or e-matl. bahanuanpar-
tyhoppers@y ahoo.com

$5 Friday @First Down every Fndai night. Music
by Bariy Da Pusher. Selector: Domirmque. Ladies $5
all night, gents $10. Early juggling by MNr Xitement
and DJ Fatal. Drink specials all night long.

Bacardi Happy Hour @ Power Boat Adventures Bar
and Grill (one door east of Texaco Harbour Bay),
every Friday. $3 Bacardi drinks all night and $3
beers.

Ladies Night @ Power Boat Adventures Bar and
Grill, every Saturday. Ladies free, Gents, $10 all
night. Bacardi Big Apple and other drink specials all
night long.

Wild Jungle, each and every Wednesday night @
Club Trappers, Nassau's "upscale" gentleman's club.
Featuring a female bod\ painting e'ara taganza Free
body painting @ 8 pm. Ladies always welcome.
Admission: Men free before 10 pm. Females free.
There will be free food and hours d'oeuvres between 9
and 10 pm. Open until 4 am.

Ladies Night @ Fluid Lounge, this and every Thurs-
day night. Doors open at 10pm. Ladies free before
lam, $10 after. Guys: $15 all night. Drink special: 3 @
$10 (Bacardi) Giveaways and door prizes every
week.

Saturday Night Live every Saturday night @ Club
Fluid, Bay St. The biggest party of the week, pump-
ing all your favourite hits all night long. Ladies in
free before 11pm. Strict security enforced.

Rave Saturdays @ Club Eclipse. DJ Scoobz spinning
the best in Old Skool. Admission $35, all inclusive
food and drink.

Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters Sports Bar.
Drink specials all night long, including karaoke
warm-up drink to get you started. Party from 8pm-
until.

Reggae Tuesdays @ Bahama Boom. Cover charge


includes a free Guinness and there should be loti, of
prizes and surprises. Admission: Ladk s $11l and M en
$15.

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar
every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers and
numerous drink specials.

The Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday. Doors
open at 9pm, showtime 11.30pm. Cover charge $15.
$10 with flyer.

Faiiias3 Fridai)s ,' Fl'aid L.ungi,. leturLtrg laie 'N0s
'music in the \iP Lounge, Top of the char in the
Main Lounge, neon lights and Go Go dancers.
Admission: Ladies free before 11pm, $15 after; Guys
$20 all night.

Chill Out Sundays @ Coco Loco's, Sandyport, from
4pm-until, playing deep, funky chill moods with
" \orldbeajis '

Seel Sunda ChltU OutSoiree Lounge, every Sun-
d .. 4pm-midjmrht 'l' PanJ, Grille, British Colonial
Hotel

Wei Sundais. uc ry Sanda', noon-midnight @ Crys-
tal C.,) Beach Admission $1 l. ladies free.

TooLooSe @ Indigo Restaurant on West Bay St and
Skyline Drive. Singer/songwriter Steven Holden per-
forms solo with special guests Thursday from 9pm -
midnight.

The Graham Holden Deal @ The Green
Parrot....David Graham, Steve Holden, Tim Deal
and Friends perform Sunday, 7pm 10pm @ Hurri-
cane Hole on Paradise Island.

Jay Mitchell and Hot KC @ Palm Court Lounge,
British Colonial Hilton, Wednesday-Thursday 8pm-
12am.

Sunday Night Interlude @ Briteley's Restaurant &
Lounge, Eneas St off Poinciana Drive. Featuring
Frankie Victory at the key board in the After Dark
Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to midnight. Fine food
and drinks.

Paul Hanna, Tabatha and Gernie, and the Caribbean
Express perform at Traveller's Rest, West Bay St,
every Sunday, 6.30pm-9.30pm.




The Bahamas Filmmakers Society invites the public
to its general meeting on Tuesday, April 4 @ 7:30pm,
Corer Hotel. The association extends a special invi-
tation to script writers and amateur filmmakers who
are interested in joining.

Holly Parotti a collection of etchings: The exhibi-
tion is being held 6pm to 8pm at Cafe Europa, Char-
lotte Street north, until April 16.

Organic Fusion Andret John and Imogene Walkine
- is being held at the Central Bank of the Bahamas
until March 31.


Funk) Nassau Redic',ri) rug ld.-ntrl Fc.aiurnng
the artwork ot lohn Beadle. Di:ionne B -niiminr,-
Smith, Lillian Blades, Blue Curry, Michael Edwards,
Antonious Roberts, Heino Schmid, Clive Stuart. The
exhibition will be held 5 to 8pm @ Nassauischer
Kunstverein Wiesbaden, Germany, in conjunction
with the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas. The
exhibition continues through April 30.

African Art Exhibition "What is Africa to Me" from
the private collection of Kay Crawford running until
Saturday. July 29 at The National Art Gallery of the
Bahamais .NAG B)



Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Sunday Fridays 6pm to 7pm 8:30pm
to 9:"3ilpm Siaurd.J morning In0.m to 11am Sacred
Heart Chlirch Fndj\ -6 pm t[ 7pni The Kirk:
Monday and Thursdays 7:30pm to.8:30pm New
Providence Communmit CentrCe: M:Jindias 6pm to
7pm Wednesday :ind Fridays 7pin to :pi .n.

The Cancer Society of theBahaimas meets at 5.30pm
on the second Tuc'id.;\ of eacth month at their Head-
quarters at East Terrace, Ce nt re% ilk Call 323-4482
for more info. ,:

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Tuesdays and Thursdays at Nassau gymNas-
tics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doc-
tor approval is required. Call 364-8423 to register or
for more info.

Diabetes Directions aF REE diibe ic s upp, rt group
meets the first Monday of each month at 6.30pm at
New Providence Community Centre, Blake Road.
Dinner is provided and free blood sugar, blood pres-
sure and cholesterol testing is available. For more
info call 702-4646 or 327-2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third
Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors Hospital con-
ference room.

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third
Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and December) @
th, Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital, the official training centre of the
American Heart Association offers CPR classes cer-
'tified by the AHA. The course defines the warning
signs of respiratory arrest and gives prevention
Strategies to avoid sudden death syndrome and the
most common serious injuries and choking that can
occur in adults, infants and children. CPR and First
Aid classes are offered every third Saturday of the
month from 9am-lpm. Contact a Doctors Hospital
Community Training Representative at 302-4732 for
more information and learn to save a life today.

REACH Resources & Education for Autism and
related Challenges meets from 7pm 9pm the sec-
ond Thursday of each month in the cafeteria of the
BEC building, Blue Hill Road.


Cvc Clubs


Jnd (C'..Iu mhus i ALinuLI. .UI. r_ ticfi ..idJTii.'ioa eer y.
\\'cdlnda-j b,\ ippuinrnicra be,~cci-n 0am and'3p. -
Bring '.our cl ,., pL\ -roup. ur tanuh and expen-,
c 'nl m.imc te ,t ihi c i.ri v.- \. ondi rs ot rinaurn. a per-
tine tLirni J nJiui'- irjI, p.:,ni h,-,rs'z rides. .nd wet- '
ljnd For more n tic ,:ma. ,n ,:,r i,:o b,:,h k eceIntscall
3..n-22 4- or 4_:.4--.'-"' spcie i rate, a -uJJa ble for .
groups o. 2i i >or miure ith i .i cek jdvancereer i''
itition Du.,nriai. nsi. .iri ..cc-pt1'd in c .chjngc- or tip,

SI Andre0 kirk After School Programme: The,
cniml:ber, .:[ AndrNL-'. Kirk ha j'e ,Idlch td .in
A-er-_Schoo'l-PiOuramninic l,'r ctldrcn from ie "
\\ ooidocl and .Mlbur, S.a',,l Prmniar Schiols. bThe
prourammc is held MI.-nda\ t :o Frida\ at thi St '.'.
.Andirc\. s Prcs b\Trienan Kirk. The acti IulMs tncludet ..
tuitrinI co'mpul. Irs. kJarlta sports ar. drama a
baking l; The pro.rammirn. i lici to ctuldren trom.ti.
Bain anid Grants- Ti-,, n commi umues. Parents intr 'i
eited in .. nrolling thl lr ich.ldren should contact tbe
church ai 32.2-S.-475 or eiTuil"
st andre. a k,, k,__ k,,! ho-o. on

J.AR CYCLING: The owners of JAR Cycling are '
please d i. ,:,lcr a c cling clutii for juniors between
10 and 17 The tree clinic illU be held every Saturday
n n anetion:rt ti. ennuragc kids to ccle. Parentsinter-
ested in ticfsteruiw tnhr clh-ildren should contact
.:rganiers ..ii arc\cling,.,_gImaI clum

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter'of Delta Sig--
ma Theta Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30 jd'every'
third Wednesday at the Bahamas National Pride
Building.

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the Britsh Colonial
Hilton Monday's at 7pm.

Toasrmasters Club i1j5 nScets Tuesday. 7 30pm 'C C
C Seiinle Scniur Schot ol s Dmmn Ro~:;V lege
.Axe\lue otffMNlo- Rcid Club 94-7 mceitsfLa, a..
7pm ,l. B-.haJnias Bapnuti CotmniZitx College Rm
A1l, Je:an St CIuhb 3'5h mcctL Thursdayv. 7.3lupm @.
British Colonial Hilton. Club 1600 meets Thursday,
8.30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes. Club 7178 meets
Tuesday, 6pm @ The J Whitney Pinder Building,
Collins A\ c. Club 2437 meets every second, fourth
and fifth 'LWdnesda\ at the J Whitney Pinder Build-
ing, Collins \ .e at rpm Club 612315 meets Monday.
6pm @ WyndhamnNassau Resort, Cable Beach. Club
753494 meets :\ % rn Wednesday, 6pm-8pm in the
Solomon's Building, East-West Highway. Club 3596
meets at the British Colonial Hilton Mondays at
7pm. Club Cousteau 7343 meets every Tuesday night>,
at 7.30 in the Chiekchamey Hotel, Fresh Creek, Cen-ri
tral Andros. All are welcome.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega chap-
ter meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ the
Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort.
Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tues- -
day, 7pm @ Gaylord's Restaurant, Dowdeswell St.
Please call 502-4842/377-4589 for more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second
Tuesday, 6.30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office, 4th
floor meeting room.

The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the month in
the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel, Bay St.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets
the second and fourth Wednesday of the moith, 8pm,
@ St Augustine's Monestary.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Fri- .\
day of each month, 7.30pm at Emmaus Centre at St,
Augustine's Monestary. For more info call 325-1947
after 4pm.

International Association of Administrative Profes-
sionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third Thursday
of every month @ Superclubs Breezes, Cable Beach,
6pm.

AMISTAD, a Spanish club meets the third Friday of
the month at COB's Tourism Training Centre at
7pm in Room 144 during the academic year. The
group promotes the Spanish language and culture in
the community.


i Send all your civic and social events to The Tribune
via fax: 328-2398 or e-mail:
, nrr,,. Otlthd rei'r'LtriburnemlT:di net


I r r II ~~MM"*4%,








By Frankdyn G Ferglson

6 MO --O. -1 .

., t; -
"r


P Pi
[t 3


WV7 r ~ *..


NASSAU


EVENTS


CAPTURED


ON CAMERA


Sharlamae Stubbs celebrates her 50th birthday


* BIRTHDAYS guests (1-r): Friend Kelia Marshall of the Oceanic N BIRTHDAY girl Sharlamae dancing
Bank and Trust with Sharlamae's sister Patrice Dames. with her husband Philip Stubbs.


N MAURICE Tynes, clerk of parliament
since 1993 with his wife Paula, senior exec- SHARLAMAE's son Lamon Stubbs, N PHILIP Stubbs; Sabrina Johnson; Sharla-
utive secretary at the Attorney General's a banker by profession, with Kristy Jones, mae Stubbs; David Johnson, deputy director
Office. account manager at a media house, general at the Ministry of Tourism.


--i~.:. .-I ,- -





* DR ROGER Brown, Registrar of Insurance; Sharlamae;
Sharon Brown, premier travel senior booking agent.


* ERNEST and Young partners (I-r): Philip Stubbs; Michele
Thompson; Hubert A Chipman.


THE SCENE was set last week for an elegant birthday bash at
Luciano's Restaurant on East Bay Street, as Sharlamae Stubbs cele-
brated her 50th year.
.Mrs Stubbs, wife of Philip Stubbs managing partner of the local
branch of the accounting firm Ernest and Young was joined by
family and friends while she enjoyed a luxurious candle-lit dinner.
Prior to the dinner, the birthday girl was treated to a cocktail par-
ty which was held on Luciano's seaside patio.
* Party guests dined on pan seared salmon and roasted lamb and
desserts such as chocolate rum raisin bread pudding, before an impres-
sive set by the DJ brought the evening to an enjoyable close.


* PAULETTE Allen-Dean, former banker, Kavin Hanna, banker; Hubert M JENNIE Cartwright-Demeritte, assistant ortho-
A Chipman, Ernest and Young partner; Laverne Hanna, banker, Tom dentist at the Bahamas Orthodontic Centre, with
Dean, architect and appraiser. Sharlamae.


Jorza1tzvu 'f;


Ivarg ue


?/Eea4?L


(242) 357-8 772


P.O. Box N-4659,
Nassau, Bahamas


I -


(I IL- I ~- - ~__ __ __ urri-i I
II ---~---~--r


r. I- --


XA


~/~-~e





THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 16, SATURDAY, APRIL 1, 2006


o DOCTORS HOSPITAL
Health For Lift


ENTER THE


CARDIO MAN
CONTEST


I
/4-
/ *.;


(Cardio means


heart)


I-
-4


Send your letter to Doctors
Hospital and you can be the
WINNER of$200 dollars

Rules:

1. Children ages 6-10 may enter.
2. Your heart is an important organ.Write a letter
answering the following question "What can
you do to take better care ofyour heart."
3. The body of the letter may not exceed 50
words. Adults may assist the child in filling out
the entry form, but not in writing the letter.
4. Limit one letter per child. All entries must be
received by Doctors Hospital Marketing
Department before March 31st, 2006.


5. Only letters accompanied by original entry form clipped from the newspaper will be
accepted. Photocopy, fax, carbon or other copies will not be accepted.
6. One winner will be chosen. The decision of the judges is final
7. Winner must agree to a photo presentation which will be published in the newspaper.

-.- -

OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM ,
a Child's name:
SAge:
School:
Address:
Parent's namr-ne:
Parent's signatt ire:
Telephone contact: (H) (W)

All 'tri, /c, .I/, '' f ,. t,, H pital and can he used and nre deuced jofr any purpose without compensation.


UI


____ __~_I_ ___ __ 1__111_




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