Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00356
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: March 18, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00356
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text








"FISH FOR
I EuT"'


The


Tribune


L.-I
HIGH 81F #1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION AGAIN

LOW 64F ih ami ratb "

PARTLY
3. SUNNY BAHAMAS EDITION


Volume: 102 No.99 SATURDAY, MARCH 18, 2006 PRICE- 750


Mother accuses


school of 'boot


camp rules'


A FURIOUS mother has
slammed a Nassau school after
her daughter was expelled for
attending a party at which rap
and reggae music was played.
The school was accused of
having "boot camp rules" after
the girl was punished for
allegedly holding a party that
violated school regulations.
Expulsion came after the stu-
dent, Marquinique Taylor,
refused to accept corporal pun-
ishment for the alleged offence.
Tiffany Fox, Marquinique's
mother, said she is considering
suing Teleos Christian School
for dismissing her daughter.
Last Saturday, Ms Fox threw
a birthday party for her daugh-
ter which fellow students
attended.
She claimed that when the
students went to school on
Monday they were beaten for
attending the party.
Ms Fox said her daughter was
called into the office by the
school's principal, Dr David
Adams. She advised her daugh-
ter not to take any beating, but
to tell the principal to call her.
Ms Fox claimed that Dr
Adams told her daughter that
he was not calling her, but she
needed to call him. She said her












TWO men charged with
stabbing a spring breaker
this week were arraigned in
court yesterday.
The spring breaker is
reportedly still at Princess
Margaret Hospital with stab
wounds to the body. He
received injuries to his left
lung, allegedly during a fight
with two men.
Facing charges are
Dwayne Jeannude, 22, a
Haitian, and 32-year-old
Bahamian Shervin Arnett
of Centreville. They were
arraigned before magistrate
Susan Sylvester at Court 11
in Nassau Street.
According to a court
docket the men caused
harm to Eric Boucher on
Thursday, March 16.
Both men both pleaded
not guilty and were remand-
ed to prison until next Tues-
day, when a bail hearing will
take place.


daughter was held in the
school's office for the entire
day.
Ms Fox told The Tribune she
then received a letter from the
school dated March 13 inform-
ing her that Marquinique was
expelled.
The Tribune received a faxed
copy of the letter, which read:
"It is with much regret that I
write the following to you. Due
to numerous infractions, includ-
ing inappropriate conduct with
the opposite sex, participating in
(a) party that violated school
rules which played music that
promoted sexual immorality,
taking drugs and sensual danc-
ing.
"This party also had liquor
which is also against school
rules. She being clearly aware of
the school rules blatantly vio-
lated them and led others to dis-
obey the school rules. There-
fore, upon her refusal to accept
the school's punishment. %e
therefore have expelled Mar-
quinique Taylor."
Ms Fox denied any of the
alleged breaches of rules took
place. She stressed that there
were no drugs and alcohol at
the party.
A DJ was present, she said,
who played all sorts of music,
including reggae and rap. How-
ever, she emphasised there was
no cursing in any of the music.
"I went on the mike and said
I don't want anyone touching
nobody's children, because I am
responsible for them. The par-
ents dropped the children off
and picked them up. I had no
complaints about the party,"
said Ms Fox.
She said that a copy of the
school's handbook was sent
home with her daughter on
Monday.
A parent, who wished to
remain anonymous, claimed her
daughter was beaten for attend-
ing the party. She said her
daughter received five lashes
and, as a result, she withdrew
her child from the school.
A faxed copy of the standards
of conduct of the school out-
lined that: "Acts of immorali-
ty, profanity, gambling, lying,
cheating, stealing, smoking and
the use (or possession) of alco-
hol, narcotics and other dan-
gerous drugs are unacceptable
behaviour, whether a student is
at school or off the school
grounds while enrolled at
Teleos Christian Schools.
"Students are not to give nor
attend any parties or get-togeth-
ers at which any of the above
mentioned activities take place
or are made available. Rock,
reggae, or rap concerts, night
clubs and the like are included
SEE page 10


LAWYERS and defendahts;in a San Salvador land dispute involving the Watlings Archeological Com-
pany standing outside of Justice Jeanne Thompson's court on Parliament Street yesterday.
L to R: attorney Norwood; Rolle, Mr Dennis Bethel (defendant), Ms Garnell Bethel, Senator Carl Bethel.
(not involved in the matter), Mr Keith Ferguson (defendant) and attorney Donald Saunders.


Ruling by month's end


over treasure hunt land


By NATARIO McKENZIE
BY the end of March a judge is expected to
give a ruling in a San Salvador land dispute
case involving locals and a company reported-
ly seeking buried pirates treasure on the island.
Yesterday, Justice Jeanne Thompson ordered
that all parties, excluding surveyors, refrain
from entering the property at Fortune Hill,
where the treasure is reported to be buried,
until she hands down her ruling at the end of
the month.


On January 24, lawyers for the Watlings
Archeological Company filed an injunction
against Keith Ferguson and Dennis Bethel
seeking to stop them from trespassing on their
client's land and to remove any fences they
may have erected.
Donald Saunders, lawyer for Keith Ferguson,
told The Tribune yesterday that he hoped that
by month's end a conclusion would be reached.

SEE page 10


Mitchell hits back at FNM


over diplomatic postings


By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
FOREIGN Affairs minister
Fred Mitchell yesterday hit back
at the FNM for allegedly
spreading "misinformation"
regarding the activities of his
ministry and the postings of top-
level Bahamian diplomats in
China and Cuba.
At a press conference yester-
day, Mr Mitchell said he took
the opposition's criticism as a
"back-handed compliment"
that his ministry was doing
exactly what it was supposed to
be doing.
However, he stressed that the
government did not rush any
appointments of ambassadors
of the two countries.
He said that in both cases
there were compelling reasons
to establish consular services.
Mr Mitchell explained that in
the case of Cuba the embassy
was opened in response to the
rising complaints of Bahamian
citizens who were requesting
the services of Bahamian diplo-


Fred Mitchell


mats in Havana.
In the case of China, Mr
Mitchell said: "Everyone knows
that China will be the most
powerful economy within ten
to 15 years. It is right now a
source of significant investment
and tourism business. The Chi-
na embassy was opened in
response to the pleas of
Bahamian business people and
ordinary citizens for the service
of Bahamian diplomats in Bei-


jing. The FNM would have us
fail the Bahamian people."
Mr Mitchell defended the
government's decision to have
the diplomats in the country
while the embassy space.is
being refurbished.
"What the FNM expects now
is for an embassy building to be
remodelled, repaired, furnished
and outfitted, security cleared
by the diplomats sitting in Nas-
sau and it all being done in their
absence, then parachuting into
an embassy. That shows what
little they think they know and
they seem to think that the
Bahamian people are short of
understanding."
Mr Mitchell said that, in
order to establish an embassy,
one has to have the diplomats
on the scene setting up the
premises.
"To do otherwise would, in
fact, be irresponsible, spending
thousands of dollars of public
money on renovations, sight
SEE page 10


Bahamian

embroiled

in Bermuda

controversy
Bahamian businessman Dr
Rudy King was last night at the
centre of a controversy over an
awards ceremony due to be
held in Bermuda this summer.
Dr King reportedly told a
press conference in Bermuda
that world leaders and Holly-
wood stars would attend the
glittering event.
But Bermuda's daily news-
paper, The Royal Gazette, has
been told by agents of certain
celebrities named by Dr King
that they will definitely NOT
be there.
Now doubts hang over the
event, called the 2006 Global
Vision Awards of Excellence,
scheduled to be held at a pre-
mier Bermuda hotel on June
30.
Dr King told the Bermuda
press that Archbishop
Desmond Tutu, actors Will
Smith, actress Halle Berry and
singer Rick Springfield, plus
three unnamed world leaders,
would attend the ceremony on
June 30.
The Gazette reported that Dr
King announced that the cere-
mony would be televised to 185
countries around the world and
would herald "the accomplish-
ments of men and women who
have significantly contributed
to enhancing the quality of life
for all."
However, agents for Halle
Berry, Will Smith and Rick
Springfield said they knew noth-
ing about the event and that
their clients would not be visit-
ing Bermuda for the awards,
the Gazette said.
Dr King, founder and chair-
man of the King Humanitarian
and Global Foundation, told
reporters in Bermuda that
world leaders and Hollywood
stars would be "coming in
droves" to the awards dinner.
Described on printed materi-
al for the event as "His Excel-
lency", Dr King was said to
have a doctorate in economics
from Cambridge University and
to be an ambassador for
Dominica.
Dr King told the press con-
ference: "This is the very first
time that these great awards will
be happening in Bermuda. It's
an awards dinner where we will
be inviting local persons to
attend as well. This will be a
fabulous time, a night one will
always remember," he said.
However, the Gazette said
Dr King's claims had been
"thrown into doubt" by the
denials of several celebrity rep-
resentatives.
Spokesmen for Oscar winner
Ms Berry, Oscar nominee Mr
Smith and Mr Springfield all
said they knew nothing of the
event and that their clients
would not be visiting Bermuda.
But Dr King insisted to the
SEE page 10


Nassuad BhmaIlad'LedngNwsae


er








PAGE 2. SATURDAY, MARCH 18, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


m


GOVERNMENT is going against Bahamian
and international laws in an attempt to bury the
Bahamas Union of Teachers (BUT), union pres-
ident Ida Poitier-Turnquest claimed yesterday.
Union executives and government negotia-
tors have had no contact with one another since
-negotiations between the two sides collapsed
earlier this week. However, Ms Poitier-Turn-
quest said that the union hopes that on Tuesday,


both sides can sit and discuss their issues civilly.
"We cannot believe that the government is
going against the laws of the land and interna-
tional laws in an attempt to bury our union, and
that is the reason why we have impasse," said the
union president.
On Thursday, union executives appeared for
a scheduled meeting
but government negotiators failed to show up.


Mrs Poitier-Turnquest has warned the gov-
ernment that "bully" tactics will not work with
the union, and called for all members to be on
"amber alert" until further notice.
However, the union president was reluctant to
say what type of industrial action, if any, her
union was willing to participate in.
The present negotiations, if they resume,
would represent a landmark for the BUT, as it


would be the first time that the union is over-
seeing the formation of an entire contract.
"In the past, the union negotiated the salary
section and that was it. This is the first time we
are dealing with working conditions and all oth-
er benefits," Mrs Poitier-Turnquest explained.
The Tribune was unable to contact the gov-
ernment's labour negotiators for comment yes-
terday afternoon.


Duran Dencil Deal


CABLE BAHAMAS


VACANCY

UNIX/AIX
System Administrator

SDuties & Responsibilities
Assistance with the daily administration of, but are not
limited to the following:

*UNIX server installs, configuration & migrations with AIX
*Configuration & administering servers in high availability
environment using HACMP
*Perform UNIX system administration, troubleshooting,
user and account management
*UNIX shell-scripting to automate administration tasks
*Provide on call support for the various Unix systems
*Support for approx. 50 users on site with IBM P-Series

*Scripting experience in several languages necessary
*System set-up including hardware and OS installation
.*Patch management and Unix environment control
*Design, implement and manage LAN & WAN systems
*Work under general direction from direct management
*Establish and recommend system usage policies
S "Complete milestones on time & produce reliable and
manageable systems
*Documentation of systems, procedures and solutions

*Report/Escalate issues to relevant groups for resolution

Other Administrator-related Duties
To be considered, the candidate must have strong UNIX
experience. Preference will be given to applicants with an
AIX background. Distinguishing characteristics include.

* Punctuality and Dependability
* Solution-oriented
* Detail-oriented
S* Strong oral and written communication skills
* Effective time management skills

Working Conditions & Physical Effort

* Work normally done in an interior/office environment
'* Periodically will be required to work flexible hours
* Considerable physical work required at times


Resumes to be submitted hy March 21st, 2006 to
Mr. Richard B. Adderley or sent via e-mail to
rbadderley@cablebahamas.com.


PES CONTROi P'ICLl
PHON' 322-1]5


oFinanlin ra
Financial Advisors Ltd.


130,mo & ,pt SE-U":VIef., V, O G-AT.0 A TISPO r.. s
PO9XR ALt SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1 .3j0:49,O .I .f J,,i ,tlV YT0. O? C%.' .P/A 0.Y.;I 2 .' :,,
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symool Previous Close Todasa Close Cnange Dally Vol EPS S Div $ P'E Yield


0.95. 0.69 ADaco Markets
10.52 8.00 Bahamas Propert!
7.24 5.88 Bank of Bahamas
0.85 0.70 Benchmark
1.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste
1.20 0.95 Fidelity Bank
9.60 8.00 Cable Bahamas
2.20 1.39 Colina Holdings
9.69 8.27 Commonwealth B
5.48 4.12 Consolidated Wat
2.88 1.45 Doctor's Hospital
6.21 4.02 Famguard
10.99 9.99 Finco.
11.00 7.50 FirstCaribbean
10.40 7.99 Focol
1.27 1.15 Freeport Concrete
10.20 9.60 ICD Utilities
9.10 8.22 J.S. Johnson
7.00 5.30 Kerzner Intematio
10 00 10 00 Premier Real Esia
VollM i rounter Securitie .
52"kM 0""5 2 .k -L owS b l


y Fund




ank
er BDRs





nal BDRs
tle


0.69
10.40
6.97
0.70
1.26
1.18
9.30
1.64
9.38
5,35
2.55
6.21
10.99
10.97
10.05
1.15
9.50
9.09
6.93
10 00


Bid,S


0.59
10.40
6.97
0.70
1,26
1.18
9.30
1.69
9.38
5.48
2.55
6.21
10,99
10,97
10.40
1.16
9.50
9.09
6.95
10.00
Ask $S
.*t .O'-'*' ''
&&W tk


-0.169
1,456
0.643
0.175
0.105
0.070
0.565
1,000 -0.067
0.861
0.099
0.437
0.542
0.738
0.828
3,000 0.833
-0.162
0.526
300 0.572
0.134
2036


0 000
0.360
0.330
0.020
0.060
0.040
0.240
0.000
0.490
0.045
0.000
0.240
0.540
0.500
0.500
0.000
0.405
0.560
0.000
0 7610


I .i Pnrca e ,'.eeki-Vol FPS S Div S


N/M
7.1
10.8
4.0
12.0
16.7
16.5
NM
10.9
54.0
5.8
11.5
14.9
13.2
12.5
N/M
18.1
15.9
51.7
4 9
P.E


0 00%'
3.46%
4.73%
2.86%
4.76%
3.42%
2.58%
0.00%
5.22%
0.84%
0.00%
3.86%
4.91%
4.65%
4.81%
0.00%
5.68%
6.16%
0.00%
7 60.
Ylaid


13.25 12 25 Bahamas Supermarkets 13 25 14 25 11 00 1917 0 720 7 2 5 05%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
.54 20 RND Holdings 0 29 05 0 00 -0 044 0 000 NM 0 00..
. -l.m u.un t .- : ', .
3.00 2800 ABDAB 41 00 4300 4100 2 220 0000 194 0 000
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.75 13.75 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
.60 05 RND Holdings 0 29 054 0 35 0 103 O000 NM 0 00"'
5wk-HI 52wk-Low Fund Name NA V YTDLo Lest 12 Months Div $ Yield *;
1.290 1.2129 Collna Money rMarKel Furnd 1 290869"
2.:662 2.2268 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.6662 **
10.8590 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.8590****
23312 21953 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2 331152"
1 152 1.1547 Colna Bond Fund 1 159154"""
',.,YTO 7.69% / 2900"6o *- :... ,.. ., s..... ',' *- ,...- .
BISX ALL SHARE INDE X 19 Dec 02 I 000 J0) YIELD esi 12 monin alidends d.I.ded bt closing oricr
52wk-li Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelilt
e2wk-Low Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Collna and fidelity)
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for dally volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today'sClose Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change In closing price from day to day EPS, $ -A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daly Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV S Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
PI Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1. 1994 = 100
AS AT JAN. 31,20086/ AS AT FEB. 28, 2006
AS AT FEB 24. 2006/* AS AT FEB 28. 2006/. "* AS AT FEB 28 2006
2 2-502-7011QLf I FP)gTT 42-36- 776 ";-.;*.'*.. *.3 ,-4 .::. *


Don Edgar Lewis


Jason Marshall


POLICE ale searching for
four men in connection with
several murders.
Following the arrest and
arraignment of two of men
accused of the February 27
shooting death of local busi-
nessman Keith Carey, police are
now searching for Kendrick
Sean Brown.
Brown, 27, is considered by
police to be armed and
extremely dangerous. He is
described as being of slim built
and brown complexion.
His last known address was
a residence on Palm Beach
Street.
Police are also asking the
public's assistance in locating
Jason Marshall, 26, who is want-
ed for questioning in connec-
tion with the murder of Fabian
Joffer.
He is considered armed and
extremely dangerous. Marshall
is of a slim built and light brown
complexion.
He last address was on Ham-


ster Avenue, off Faith Avenue.
Don Edgar Lewis, 35, and
Duran Dencil Deal aka "Fat-
head" are also wanted for ques-
tioning.
Lewis, who has been known
to have lived on Maxwell Lane
and Farrington Road in New
Providence and in Nichol's
Town, Andros, is wanted for
questioning in connection with
the January 2 murder of Judith
Price.
Deal, of the Fox Dale Subdi-
vision, is also being sought by
police for questioning in refer-
ence to a murder.
He is described as weighing
140 pounds, stands 5 foot, 5
inches tall, has dark brown eyes
and a dark complexion.
Deal is considered to be
armed and extremely danger-
ous. Members of the public with.
any information about these-
men are asked to call the crime;
tipsters hotline at 328-8477,.
CDU at 502-9991, or the police
at 919 or 322-3333.


Kendrick Brown


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that GRETEL MOSS OF FRITZ
LAND, P.O. BOX N-4042, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 11TH day of MARCH, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.


: IS
Pricing Information As Of:
S1 Mdroh 2008


MAIN SECTION
,Iocal News.......................P1,2,3,5,6710,11M 1
E itorial/Letters. ..................... ... .,

SThere. ............ .............


SPORTS SECTION
'; orts . .......... ................. .
SCortics ............... ......
c m ids ....................... .......
I.--.
.ST iGuide......................... ...



CLASSIFIED SECTION 20 PAGES I.



ua ine s ................ ,

- o.s: ..u..n esm........, .. ,. ..;... "' ..
-.. ,, -,.. ;. :v ..... --*.:
-... *. ; .,' . .. ,- - . .' ?, ,,


__


Teachers claim the government




'going against laws of the land'


7-


n nn


---


) f; DE













Distraught father




urges law change
.:: i'


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT A bereaved
father and minister is calling on
the government to amend the
law that prohibits parents and
guardians from disciplining
minors older than 16.
Rev Glenroy Bethel of King-
dom Worship Center believes
that the law is too archaic for
modern times and gives young
people too much leeway.
Rev Bethel said his 16-year-
old year son, Rishawn Bethel,
who was murdered, used the
law to his advantage by not
obeying rules of his parents'
household.
"He slept out of the house
four days a week without our
consent and came and went as
he pleased and I could do noth- .
ing about it," Rev Bethel told
The Tribune.
Although Rev Bethel went
to the police and the Depart-
ment of Social Services for help,


Minister whose son was
murdered urges increase in age
for disciplining minors to 18


they could do nothing to assist
him because of his son's age.
The Penal Code Chapter 84
Section 110 (1) states that: "a
parent may correct his or her
legitimate or illegitimate child,
being under 16 years of age, or
any guardian or person acting as
a guardian, his ward, being
Sunder 16 years of age, for mis-
conduct or disobedience to any
lawful command."
Said Rev Bethel: "This law is
an ancient law from 1927 that
governs us today in modern
time, and now children are get-
ting hold of it on the Internet."
"My son got a hold of this law
and used it against his parents
so he go and come as he please


in my house and slept out at
any time of the night and felt
that he was protected by law."
Rev Bethel believes that the
law should be amended to make
parental control extend to the
age of 18.
He pointed out that even
though parents cannot correct
or discipline their 16-year-old,
they can still be held liable if
that child gets into any trouble.
Grand Bahama Police found
the body of Rishawn Bethel, 16,
in Lincolnshire Subdivision in
February.
Three persons have been
charged in Magistrate's Court
with his murder.
Rev Bethel said he never


reported his son missing to the
police because it was normal for
him to leave and not return for
up to four days at a time.
Prior to his son's death, he
had gone to the police station
seeking help but was told that
the police could do nothing
since his son had not broken
any law.
He was told to take the mat-
ter to Social Services.
He claims that Social Services
officers did nothing to help him
either.
"Now, I have lost a son and I
can't change that, but there are
thousands of Bahamian children
and parents I don't want this
happen to.
"As a parent, I didn't know
about this law in our country,
which tied my hands in my own
house.
"I am, therefore, calling on
the Bahamian people to stand
with me in seeking to have this
law amended in our country,"
Rev Bethel said.


Police chief hopeful witness


protection will reduce fear


By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
SPEAKING on the plan for the first-
ever witness protection programme in the
Bahamas, Commissioner of Police Paul
Farqharson said he hopes witnesses will
now be able to come forward without fear
of reprisals.
Citing recent instances in which wit-
nesses have been shot or otherwise
harmed, Commissioner Farqharson said
it is up to the state to assure its residents
that they will be safe and protected from
all harm.
"The witness protection programme's
aim and objective is to protect witnesses
who must give evidence to the courts, with
the end result of a case in court without


intimidation or otherwise threats or harm
that may come to those persons.
"We already have several examples of
witnesses being shot, and in some cases
great harm has come to witnesses in the
past. Any material witness who proposes
to give evidence in a court of law, to assist
with the prosecution or the defence for
that matter, those witnesses must be pro-
tected," he said.
Commissioner Farqharson said that he
believes that the cause of justice can now
be better served, as witnesses will have
the assurance that the state is concerned
about their safety, especially in connec-
tion with more violent or dangerous cases.
According to Commissioner Farqhar-
son, some persons have already been
enrolled in the programme. He added that


in light of the present culture of crime,
the numbers are bound to increase.
"In the climate of things, criminals have
no compulsion about killing me or you,
or threatening me or you or anyone in the
public for that matter. We have seen evi-
dence of this over and over again."
Mr Farqharson added that the police
will remain alert to the possibility of per-
sons abusing the programme by using it as
a method of accusing innocent people.
"I see no evidence of that at the
moment, but persons running the pro-
gramme must always be aware that this
is a programme that can be exploited if we
are not careful. When we look at what
has been done in other places, where there
have been attempts to take advantage of
the programme.


0 0 0rs- Cne a


THE HILLS HAVE EYES C 1:00 3:20 N/A 6:00 8:20 10:40
FAILURE TO LALNCH T 1:45 N/A 4:45 7:30 N/A 10:45
16 BLOCKS C 1:15 3:45 N/A 6:0 8:30 1:50
ULTRAVIOLET T 1:20 3:35 N/A 6:15 8:35 10:45
AQUAMARINE B 1:05 3:40 N/A 6:05 8:20 10:45
MADEAS FAMILY REUNION B 1:00 3:35 N/A 6:00 8:30 10:50
MADEAS FAMILY REUNION B 2:00 N//A 4:30 7:30 NA 10:30
FINAL DESTINATION 3 C 1:05 3:30 N/A 6:15 8:35 10:55
USE YOUR E-CARD TO RESERVE TICKETS AT 380-3649 OR WWW.GALLERIACINEMAS.COM
V FOR VENDETTA NEW 1:00 3:50 N/A 7:30 10:10
EIGHT BELOW B 1:15 3:25 6:00 8:15 10:25
THE SHAGGY DOG B 1:00 3:35 ':15 8:20 10:20
FAILURE TO LAUNCH T 1:20 3:35 6:05 8:35 10:30
16 BLOCKS C 1:15 3:30 6:20 8:25 10:40


MADEA'SFAMILY REUNION


3:40 6:10


10:40 I


invites applications for the position of
BRANCH OPERATIONS MANAGER

PROFILE:
* Bachelor's Degree in Business Administration or Finance
* 10 years retail banking experience with a minimum of 3 years in a
managerial position

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

* ADMINISTRATION, OPERATIONS & SALES SUPPORT
o Functional responsibility for the day-to-day management of the
branch
o Training, coaching and assessment of Sales Support Staff
o Monitoring cash limits
o Accurate and timely processing of all accounting entries, banking
fees & service charges
o Compliance reviews for new and continuing accounts to ensure
adherence to Central Bank Anti-Money Laundering Guidelines,
KYC requirements of FTRA/FTRR and Fidelity's internal
instructions
o Reporting losses and exceptional occurrences
o Reporting on business development & financial results

* CREDIT
o Review of loan documentation
o Disbursement of loan proceeds

* OTHER
o Sales initiatives and business development
o Review of workflows and procedures
o Maintain and update all procedure/training manuals
o Monitor dormant accounts .


* TIME ALLOCATION
o Sales=15%
o Customer Service=20%
o Operations/Administration=35 %


o Training & Coaching=15%
o Change Management=15%


BACKUP FOR
o Service Centre Manager

Compensation package will include a competitive salary, together
with a comprehensive range of benefits.

Send resume no later than March 21 2006 to:
Human Resources Department

51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
Fax 326.3000
e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com


l u Il "4' "I


Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.
MONTROSE AVE. PHONE: 322-1722 FAX: 326-7452


'El


L;-m M- M

0


$36,79500


rJeep~


3 8 ASSURE


Rev Glenroy Bethel


0






4u

Am



0



u





z


3.7 L V6 Engine

* Automatic Transmission

* Power Windows & Locks

Front Air Bags

*Air Conditioning

* Radio/Cassette/CD Player


SATURDAY,, MARCH 18, 2006, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNF-


~fn~m\c~


US Czlm I


J


i,
:: :~
Illr.
~; 6
si.:
rd


UO

BU~







Y, MARCH 18, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


I .


#The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

|z LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., KC.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Fiance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department- (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


W---- d % d


40I* .m 0
%- bdm-


O.O0b ME-O-MO-

4= -.m
4 si.
i L -


- b- -
a- w

- 00mim- 4 -


-amp- 4D-Now

mlmw' a--mob -
*md -b 4m. 0


S"Copyrighted Material -

S Syndicated Content._ _

Available from Commercial News Providers"


*4w ---Em .Em




1111 a -- o -d

mile40D-


.0 - M w -. -

4bamsa 0 -00"
o- 4bqa. 4010 b bW.01-"


40IED. mdb--i
4

Ob a
I
am .* U-,


LTH OF THE BAHAMAS
2005/CLE/gen/No. FP/107
NE COURT
Equity Division


Ss J.,. JOHNSON & COMPANY LIMITED
Plaintiff


AND

RICARDO PATTON


Defendant


NOTICE

To: RICARDO PATTON
Nassak'Bahamas

TAKE NOTICE that an action has been commenced against
e Court of The Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
E/gen/No. FP/107 by J.S. JOHNSON &
TED .v RICARDO PATTON in which the
laintrh clams:

e and owing to the Plaintiff by virtue of a
te dated the 26th February, 2003.

order dated the 12th day of December, 2005 leave
as anted for service of the writ of summons in the said action
by this advertisement.

NOTICE that you must within Fourteen
late of this notice (inclusive of the day of
ication), acknowledge service of the said writ of
Sby entering an appearance at The Registry of the Supreme
itate at the Garnet Levarity Justice Centre, Freeport,
and on the Firm of Counsel and Attorneys whose
liftess appears below, otherwise judgement may be
t you.
McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes
Chambers
Chancery House
The Mall
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Attorney for the Plaintiff


Em. N -. AO
4b -.am .b
44D

40 Quo

*-

*- -
ot 40 4
0. p* ow o a-Now.
4W _4mdl-W- qV-.
4% -a fto-m
AD4 40 m-m m -
4 ,jjjpjjm -
m- ho- -
4m
--w--"L:. d..


-- -

m o --0- -
400mm qm.*m .. .
0 b


Making the





case for LNG





in Bahamas


EDITOR, The Tribune.

I WOULD like:to take this
opportunity to share some
thoughts with the Bahamian
public %ih regard to the Impor-
tant subject of developing an
LNG industry in our nation, in
the light of recent statements by
those who have reservations
about it. Let me begin with one
of the mostv\ivid of *my child-
hood, memories;.
I recall growing up as a young
person in Nassau when in our
family, we used to cook on an
old time three burned kerosene
oil stove. Indeed, as the eldest
child in the family, it was my
responsibility to buy kerosene
oil from one of the grocery
stores in the neighbourhood.
The one operated by the late
great "Bob" Turnquest and the
other by one Mr Newman of
Jamaica. In time, as he grew old-
er, my younger brother, Roger,
shared in this chore!
Well, we were excited about a
new product known as "gas
stove" which was supposed to
be cleaner and nore efficient
than the kerosene stove. More-
over, one would not have to go
to the grocery store to buy
kerosene oil every few days
because the fuel, stored in big
cylinders could last as much as
three months. But there was one
reason for alarm. According to
some of our friends, gas stoves
were very dangerous as they
could...explode! Still, we looked
forward to the installation of
that gas stove, which would
relieve us of the task of having
to go to the grocery shop to fill
our little "tin cans" "with earl"!
So, the big day came when
the long-awaited gas stove was
to be installed. With gas cylin-
ders safely located outside the
house and the stove inside our
kitchen, we were ready to
"begin cooking" with gas! But,
fears still lingered as to whether
it was safe to use the gas stove.
So much so that when it was lit
for the very first time, our faith-
ful housemaid, a plump Bahami-
an' lady who hailed from
Andros, ran out of the house!
Apparently, she feared that this
solidly built two-storey struc-
ture, might, if the gas stove
exploded, be blown to
smithereens! Well ("to cut av
long story short"), nothing hap-
pened to oui homestead and, in
time our maid got so used to the
gas stove that. oie, could not
imagine her going back td'the
old time kerosene stove!
:"In the fifth -odd \earsi since
that event I can recall only one
case in the Bahamas where
there was serious injury and loss


is seeking to employ a

Development Manager
for projects under construction in Abaco and Nassau.

Applicants are required to have a background in
construction and possess people skills.

Applications to be submitted to info@carletonlading.com



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that PHARNES LOUIS, #2 SILVER
ARMADA AVENUE, P.O. BOX F-44981 FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 18TH day of MARCH,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




LAW FIRM








Apicans'ustaply i n/wr i:' tingto:
TheOffce dmiistato


of life as a result of the explosion
of a gas stove. On the other
hand, many homes, especially
in crowded neighborhoods,
have been destroyed by fires
resulting from out of control
"kerosene stoves"!
Whenever I hear people
speaking about how dangerous
LNG plants can be, and how
much damage they can cause if
they explode, I remember this
childhood experience. Just as
we, as children, were terrified
about possible destruction that
could come from using gas
stoves, so many today seem
quite frightened about the dan-
gers which might result from the
explosion of LNG plants. It is
submitted, however, that just as
such fears in the past proved
groundless, so much fears about
explosions of LNG plants today
are really exaggerated.
After all, what is LNG? It is,
quite simply liquefied natural
gas, a natural product which has
been converted from a gaseous
state to a liquid state by freezing.
Or, to put it another way, just as
ice is frozen water, so LNG is
frozen natural gas: This fact has
important implications for
understanding the circumstances
under which LNG may explode.
You see, there are two ways
in which substance may explode
either by ignition or by
expansion. Because LNG is so
very cold. It cannot explode by
ignition. Strike a match in a tank
of gasoline and...bam, a big
explosion. Strike a match in a
tank of LNG and the match will
burn itself out withoutt. in any
way, having an effect on the
product!
In the process of freezing, nat-
ural gas contracts to one six hun-
dredth the volume of its gaseous
state. This is precisely why it is
economical to transport it in
especially built tankers from
places where it exists in vast
quantities to markets in densely
populated energy-hungry com-
munities such as South Florida.
The only way that an explosion
may occur is if something goes
wrong in the process of "re-gasi-
fication". There have been a few
isolated instances of explosion in
the past. However, with
advanced technology, such
explosions are extremely rare,
and properly handed, the possi-
bilidt of such'an explosion is
most remote.
With regard to danger to the
environment, let use remember,
that, generally speaking, natur-
al producisare far more friend-
lyon the e vironment' than
chemical or man-made ones.
Take, for instance, fertilisers. If
\ou use natural products -
horse manure, seaweed, etc, to
fertilise your garden, very little
harm will be done to the soil in
.your backyard. However, the
excessive use of chemical fer-
tilisers can result in much pollu-
:,tion. Natural gas poses no major
danger to the environment. It is
my understanding that even if
the submarine pipeline trans-
porting natural gas were to
burst, it would soon be absorbed
in the sea water.
Concisely, therefore, it is not
too much to assert that a prop-
erly managed LNG plant would
be no more dangerous (in terms
of explosiveness) and certainly
more environmentally friendly
than the oil bunkerage faculties
at Borco and Riding Point, or
even the huge oil storage thanks
at Clifton Pier, for that matter!
It is, therefore, rather mis-
leading to suggest that not
enough is known about LNG to
install such plants in the
Bahamas. Already, millions of
dollars have been spent in all
kinds of EIA studies, and if,
after all this effort, we do not
know whether or not it is safe to
install such plants in the
Bahamas, then, perhaps we nev-
er shall! It is hard to imagine
what more can be done, other
than actually going ahead and
installing such plants, to deter-
mine whether they are safe. To
refrain from building LNG
plants at this stage of the game,
after spending millions on
research and much deliberation,
is acting like the person who
refuses to jump in the water to
learn to swim lest he drown!


Now, there are those who
oppose the building of LNG
plants in the Bahamas on the
grounds that they will prove of
great benefit to Florida, and that
the gas companies will benefit
by making huge profits with the
Bahamas gaining little or noth-
ing from such industrial machin-'
ery.
Well, let us be practical and;
realistic here. In our highly
materialistic Western world,
where the free enterprise prin-
ciples of Adam Smith prevail
over socialistic concepts most
companies are interested in "the,
bottom line". Companies that
come to the Bahamas, whether
investing in tourism such as the
anchor projects touted by our
government of industry, want
to make a profit. They are not
coming because they want to
help our people; they are corn
ing to make a profit. It is as sim-
pie as that!
Therefore, it behooves us to
ensure that we, for our part,
exact the maximum benefit that
we can. It is lacking in wisdom
for us to allow companies, espe-
cially those involved in energy
supplying (whether engaged in
oil storage, oil refining or LNG)
to come into this country, makV
big profits while contributing lit-
tle to us in terms of taxes and
the creation of employment for
our people. We can only blame
ourselves if we "let them gdt
away" which such exploitation!
There can be no doubt that
Florida stands to benefit much
from such plants; for it is a state
in dire need of energy as its pop-
ulation grows rapidly. But, does
that mean that the Bahamas will
not also benefit? Certainly not.
Rather, we too stand to benefit
substantially from such plants
in our nation. :;
The benefits from the6instal-
lation of LNG plants in the
Bahamas are four-fold:
Major opportunities fdr
employment, which should
prove of immense benefit,
especially in the Northeii
Bahamas. The many jobs cr6-
ated in the construction stage,
and the "'high tech" jobs cre.
ated in the long run can'onf
prove helpful to many fami-
lies in the communities where
as such plants are built. I wa
in Nassau last week and
noticed that the economy was
booming. In stark contrast
things are slow in "the hurri
cane ravaged Northern
Bahamas. An LNG plant or
two would go a long way to
"jump start" the economy of
the Northern Bahamas! :
Increased revenue for gobv'
ernment. Any careful study of
the budgets over the past few
years would reveal that there
is a crying need for more
sources of revenue. LNG
plants can contribute millions
of dollars to the public trea-
sury at a time when such reV-
enue is needed without
increasing taxes!
Cheaper energy. As petro-
leum becomes more expen-
sive, electricity must also
increase in cost, if generated
by diesel as is the case here
in the Bahamas. LNG can be
used instead of petroleum
products, which would result
in a reduction on the cost Of
electricity.
Expansion of light industry.
The availability of cheap fuel
attracts high energy consum-
ing industries to the Bahamas.
Bear in mind that the main
reason why Jamaica did nlt
realise that vast economic
benefit from its huge bauxite
reserves was the fact that, fOr
several years that island sir-
ply exported the raw material,
"red dirt" to Canada and tlfe
USA. The economies of tho0e
industrialized nations benefit-
ed more than that of Jamaica,
the source of the product,
because they had the cheip
energy required to convert
bauxite to aluminium. Cheap
sources of energy, such s
LNG, comprise the key to
industrial development.
Coming now to the contea-
porary situation, it is evide at
that there are now just t,4o
viable options for the supply
of LNG to Florida vij a
submarine pipeline from an
LNG plant in the Bahamas or
via a much shorter 'ubmarine
pipeline from a huge platforin,

SEE page 5


"Wom" qp







SATURDAY, MARCH 18, 2006, PAUL t


TFf-TflLUNttUL2


LOCALNEWS


BylCAt .BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
BHYYOU VEX?
"I vex at the attitude of
people in government offices
who see you there needing
j.asiiance and just go about
their jguiess.kj ke,%ou'lon'L
m-nail and the\ blind and
can't see you there."
Jay.
S:" vex at how these vendors
always renting out these
scooters to people who ain
know how to ride them. All


Ahey doing is blocking up the
(Ioad and.causing people to
.get into accidents."
-i i-Vex Driver..
bc3 .. ..,oA , '
. I I %e\ because I gave up
eating red meat for Lent and I
have a craving for a good juicy
!steakl"
f;:- TA ,.Western District of
rNassau., ... .
- "Well, I.couldn't be more
zsex with the bad service you
;get at some of these restau-
.-antsJp Nassau. For any of
jiinna' reading this vex com-
zment,tman if you does serve
food, ya gatta smile and be
-sicjiPeople.don'r .,ant to eat


SATURDAY,
MARCH 18
1230 GumboTV
1:00 Cybernet
1:30 411
2:00 .,rCicketWorld ,
230 .Giletre World Sport ,:,-
3:00 2004 National Spelling.Bee
Championship
6:00 ': Ballroom Boxing,
7:00 Bhmrna Tobnight' 'i., '
7:30 Native Stew
8:00 Ray: More Than A Movie
8:30 ,Island Jams
9:00 Tropical Beat
10:00 Spoken
10:30 Partners In Crime
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 The Lounge
12:30 Comm.Pg.1540AM


SUNDAY,
MARCH 19
Community Pg. 1540AM
E.M.P.A.C.T.
The Voice That Makes The
Difference
i Effective Living
I Morning Joy
I Zion Baptist Church
Gillette World Sports
Sports Desk
A Rhema Moment
Ever Increasing Faith
Video Gospel
Bobby Jones Presents
Temple Fellowship
International Ministries
Walking In Victory
Apostolic Hour
Bahamas Tonight
85th Annual National
Convention Church of God
Sof Prophecy
STurning Point
SLook Up Sing Out
0 Bahamas Tonight
0 Gospel Video Countdown
) Comm. Pg. 1540AM


i I


.from mean people!!!"
Debby Rolle, Nassau.
"I vex because as a young
man working hard, the rent
in Nassau is too high to meet
my salary. I mean, the average
pay is about $300 each week,
and the average rent is about
$600 per month nowadays,
specially if you have children
like me. This is ridiculous!
The government needs to step
in and control the rent situa-
tion,Lbecause landlords are
earning grands off of us each
year, and will not even fix the
toilet or paint outside your
."I ": ,. , :


temporary home."
- P Davis, working in the
wholesale industry
"I vex because I tired of
pedestrians wanting to walk
three abreast in the road, they
see a car approaching and
refuse to get on the side.
When your car gets close to
them they want to tell you a
piece of their mind."
A concerned motorist.

WHY YOU HAPPY?
"I am happy that the week-
end is here and I can sleep
late today."
Happy Girl.


FROM page four

similar to the "oil rugs" in the
North Sea and the Gulf of
Mexico, erected just twelve
miles off the coast of Florida.
According to latest reports,
only one of these plants is
required, especially as plans
are now advanced for the con-
struction of an LNG plant in
Georgia also designed to meet
the needs of the huge, growing
Florida market. Concisely,
upon approval of either of
these two proposals the other
will become...redundant!
What, then, can we do in this
situation?
. Well, there cannot be a
shadow of a doubt that both
the electrical companies of the
energy hungry State of Florida
apd the huge billion dollar
multinational gas
conglamenorates will benefit
(IE profit) tremendously from
the installation and operation
of LNG plants in the


SI SN VIP


Director General of Tourism, Ms Vernice Walkine delivered a stirring keynote address Thurs-
day at the opening of the National Sustainable Tourism Workshop.



Europeans demand



sustainable tourism


THE Bahamas must focus on
developing sustainable tourism
if it wants to capture the Euro-
pean visitor market, Tourism
director-general Vernice
Walkine said.
Speaking at the National Sus-
tainable Tourism Workshop on
Thursday, Ms Walkine said that
policies which protect the coun-
try's natural heritage are vital
for the future of the industry.
"Poorly planned or regulat-
ed tourism can be hard on an
environment, overwhelming a
culture and insensitive to local
traditions and ways of life.
When that happens, the visitors
lose interest, the locals become
resentful and the basis for busi-
ness between them in eroded,"
she said.
According to Ms Walkine, to
an increasing extent, "particu-
larly in the European market,
consumers wish to be reassured
that resorts they frequent oper-
ate under the highest and most


Bahamas, it should be appre-
ciated that our nation, too
stands to reap substantial eco-
nomic and social'benefits from
same.
Thus, it is submitted that a
properly managed, carefully
monitored, environmentally
sensitive, revenue- producing
LNG industry can prove to be
beneficial, in some measure
- whether in terms of
employment opportunities,
more revenue or lower elec-
tricity bills for Bahamians in
all walks of life!
Well, there is a contempo-
rary school of philosophy
known as "existentialism". Its
complex arguments, often
expressed in highly theoretical
jargon, can, essentially speak-
ing be summed up in three
words: "Life is decision!"
REV DR J EMMETTE-
WEIR, JP, PhD
Freeport,
Grand Bahama.
March 2, 2006.


environmentally-friendly stan-
dards."
This, she said, is why the gov-
ernment has implemented poli-
cies such as the catch-and-
release fishing initiative in
regards to bonefish resources
and is leaning towards such a
policy for the game-fishing
industry as well.
Ms Walkine noted that while
sustainable tourism is most con-
cerned with the conservation of
natural resources, it can also be
interpreted in a number of oth-
er. ways that are significant for
the Bahamas.
She explained that in devel-
oping the Family Islands as des-
tinations, Bahamians must be
aware that according to statis-
tics, recent growth in this area
is largely accounted for by
increases in cruise ship popu-
larity not destination popu-
larity.
"Herein lies a sustainability
challenge for the Bahamas: cre-


ate a sustainable demand for
travel to the Out Islands that
will drive these figures, rather
than demand for cruises," she
said.
Ms Walkine noted that
another sustainability challenge
is posed by an increase in hotel
accommodation capacity.
She explained that the
Bahamas must determine how it
will manage the need for
accommodation growth while
minimising or avoiding the
potential impact on the envi-
ronment. Related to this issue,
she said, is the question of sec-
ond home ownership.
"People are viewing their
vacation as an entitlement and
not as an optional activity and
are integrating this into their
life plans.
"This gives rise to an
increased demand for vacation
homes. How do we accommo-
date this demand, given finite
land?" she asked.


THE CLIFTON HERITAGE AUG
S....
: .l.... L





ESTABLISHIMENT OFA NAP N .
44-7 1X.. '"


HIERITAGE PAK..
.-, .~~~~'''w v~, .r t:.


TlE tIEUBIJC IS
!. L, L .1 . 1


ON
M, ,


LEAN-UPCLW


SATU11)AY,..141%
~i~nl~u~4


SUNDAY, MAJ' 1


COMMENCIG AT


cI,



BRING YOUR :GL t K



ETC. AND JOIN THE ACTION


R:FF 1NTS; WI:F i; R


6. '
~aaslss-,a~i%; ~
r'4 t'


12


6me and see all ofour ne) wfa71CIrie thi1n I
ants ~d bt~ f condol_4-04he



Dur Q\Spniig








Q6ample ourmefcd


7 mi at r~n~al Jeo ffle 03tore
:,~~~~i all S hsapp ernn;a I 56qeQ5d
77th &R 18th Cla-rckh, 2006'
C a~O&zc Olde (ZUe ,nm- CMall
/0.00 a-n 6X00pm
65amd and ayov thef6#nlII
327-1132


Bimini

man gets

five years

for rape
BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT Bimini
resident Fredrick Francis
was convicted of rape on
Tuesday in the Supreme
Court and sentenced to five
years at Fox Hill Prison.
Francis, 23, changed his
plea to guilty shortly after
11am, just before Justice
Stephen Isaacs was to give
his summation to the jury.
The trial began on Mon-
day before Justice Isaacs,
who dismissed the jury of six
men and six women after
Francis changed his plea.
Prosecutor Sandra Dee
Gardiner appeared on
behalf of the Crown. Francis
was initially represented by
attorney Simeon Brown, but
later defended himself.
Francis was charged with
raping an American tourist
from Kansas, Missouri on
January 29, 2002 at Bimini.
The woman was on vacation
with several friends.
According to evidence
given in court, the victim was
walking along on the beach
collecting seashells at Bimi-
ni Bay when she was
attacked, dragged into bush-
es and raped.
The woman testified that
the man had threatened to
kill her if she screamed.
Prosecution witness
Sebastian Saunders testified
on Tuesday to seeing Francis
at Bimini Bayshortly before
the tourist was raped.
SHOOTING VICTIMS
IDENTIFIED
Grand Bahama Police are
searching for a suspect in
connection with a shooting
incident early Tuesday
morning at Hudson Avenue.
Police have identified the
two victims as Troy Bene-
by, 36, and Claudia
Williams, 26.
Beneby was shot in the
head and had to be airlifted
to New Providence.


e3pnn- ifm here at
ra~ee 9oume 3'Gtore





t






THE TRIBUNE-


PAGE 6. SATURDAY, MARCH 18, 2006


LOCALNW


CF CQaVcps rone 5B i


.: :


Controversial


discovery recalls


Dead Sea Scrolls


IN what promises to be one
of its most controversial unveil-
ings in recent history, the dis-
tinguished National Geograph-
ic magazine is about to publish
what it believes is an extract of
the previously unknown Gospel
of Judas.
The newly-found gospel
states that one of history's great-
est villains Judas Iscariot -
was actually Christ's favorite
disciple and was fulfilling a
divine mission when he
betrayed his Lord for 30 pieces
of silver.
The papyrus document is
written in the ancient Coptic
language of the Egyptian Chris-
tians and dates from the fourth
century, but experts hired by
the magazine say it is a transla-
tion of a Greek text dating from
about AD 187.
According to the UK news-
paper, The Mail on Sunday, the
gospel says that Jesus actually
fold Judas to betray him.
According to leaked versions
of the script, Jesus also says to
Judas: "Step away from the oth-
ers and I shall tell you the mys-
teries of the kingdom. It is pos-
sible for you to reach it, but you
will grieve a great deal."
For more than 2,000 years
Christians have been taught that
Judas betrayed Jesus to Roman
soldiers in the Garden of Geth-
semane and was paid 30 pieces
of silver for his treachery.
The full contents of the man-
uscript will be unveiled in
Washington on April 6 and
according to reports, it contains
another major surprise. Christ-
ian scholars, particularly in the
Vatican, have dismissed the
document.


Ii


lfJ


The text was found in an
Egyptian tomb in the late 1970s
and spent 16 years in a New
York bank vault after numer-
ous dealers did not recognize
its significance.
It was acquired by a Swiss
art foundation in 2002 and a
deal was struck with National
Geographic to publish the
material.
The timing of the publica-
tion just before Christianity's
holiest period and a month pri-
or to the release of the Da Vin-
ci code movie, has led critics to
label the exercise sensational-
ism.
National Geographic will
also screen a two-hour docu-
mentary about the gospel on its
satellite TV channel on April
9. The Vatican refused to com-
ment on the manuscript and in
January a senior Vatican histo-
rian, Monsignor Walter Brand-
muller, denounced the docu-
ment as a "product of religious
fantasy".
In a statement, National Geo-
graphic said it had done due
diligence and was working with
a team of experts to save the
manuscript before it turned to
dust.
The magazine is also cam-
paigning for the return of the
document to Egypt.
This week, IN DAYS GONE
BY looks back at another con-
troversial religious find, the dis-
covery of the Dead Sea Scrolls.
The scrolls, portions of which
were found in 11 caves in Pales-
tine between 1947 and 1956, are
thousand-year-old copies of the
Old Testament which include
several previously unknown
texts.


ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH, Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM Rev. Manette Poitier

COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH, Bernard Roadl
11:00AM Pastor Sharon Loyley

CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH, Zion Boulevard
10:00AM Rev. Carlos Thompson
7:00PM Rev. Carlos Thompson

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH, East Shirley Street
11:00AM Pastor Martin Loyley
7:00PM Pastor Martin Loyley

GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH, Queen's College Campus
9:30AM Rev. James Neilly

ST. MICHAEL'S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue
8:00AM Connections Rev. Philip Stubbs
9:30AM Rev. Philip Stubbs

TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
11:00AM Rev. William Higgs/Youth Service
7:00PM Rev. William Higgs
.............................................--......
RADIO PROGRAMMES
'RENEWAL' on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Your Host: Pastor Sharon Loyley
METHODIST MOMENTS' on each weekday at 6:55a.m.
Your Host: Dr. Reginald W. Eldon
EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH will be holding an Evangelism Crusade
in their Sanctuary East Shirley Street from Saturday, March 25th Wednesday,
March 29, 2006. The guest preacher will be Bishop Michael Watson the
Resident Bishop for South Georgia. The theme for this Crusade is "THE INNER
LIFE OF SPIRITUAL BELIEVERS".


(brant'e 0oTtun eIep Eflletbobist (Cburrb
(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) P.O.Box CB-13046
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)
SUNDAY, MARCH 19TH, 2006,
7:00a.m. Rev. CarlosThompson/Sis. Rosemary Williams
11:00a.m. Bro. Jamicko Forde/ Bro. Vandiks Bension
7:00p.m. Sis. Tezel Anderson/Bro.Sherwin Brown
MI0* 1113.00RINI! e~


Researchers study thousands of fragments of the Dead Sea Scrolls.

-j dIN-
4s"i-iAri Si* e 1


A fragment of the Dead Sea Scrolls shown
here is part of a complete photographic set.

LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In ThePast & ;
Geared To The Future


BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLRD iTRAi :|,
Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL
Preachenng 11am & 7:30"m EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour: ..
Sunday 6pm ZNS 2 Pastor:H. Mlls
Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

"Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are"
Pastor: H. Mills Phone: 393-0563 Box N-3622



EVANGELISTIC


TEMPLE
A Life Changing Experience

Collins Avenue at 4th Terrace Centreville
Telephone: 322-8304 or 325-1689 P.O. Box N-1566
.Fax No. 322-4793


SUNDAY 8:30am ZNS-1
8:30am
9:45am
ll:00am
7:00pm

WEDNESDAY 7:30PM


Temple Time Broadcast
Early Morning Worship
Sunday School For All Ages
Worship Service
Evening Celebration

Selective Bible Teaching Royal
Rangers (Boys Club) Ages 4-17 Years
Missionettes (Girls Club) Ages 4-17.


VISIT OUR PREMISE BOOKSTORE, TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY


Yusef Sadd (Center) curator of the Palestine ArchaeologichlMuse-
um, discusses special problems in photographing frqgf.ents, of
the Dead Sea Scrolls with consultants from the; Eastmarnp odalk
Company who made a special trip to Jordan to provide technical
assistance. At left is Lou Gibson, an expert on infrared photography
and at right Joseph ladarola a microfilming engineer.


tZiON METHODIST MINISTRIES
.\ SOUTH BE-'C 5-i S3Fr. t Cer-jTFE
EAST'STREET S:-,_,-T
EIA,-7J)rif'(hB0SS-51628 NASSAU, BAHAMAS.... .
RHONE/aX" 242 92-4100 ...____. -

Come and Worship with us!:--
DR1 ing the Lenten Season we shall be
Rvis ginth,40Days ofPurpose Proagiamme .

OPP OMNITII ,


SUNDAY
..b, -, ll0:15am
'I 11.0am


Sunday School
Divine Worship,


WEDNESDAY
7:30pm Prayer & Bible Study


Minister: Pastor
Charles Lewis


"A Journey In Faith & Obedience To The ill of God"


GRACE AND PEACE WESLEYAN CHURCH
A SOCIETY OF THE FREE METHODIST CHURCH OF NORTH AMERICA

(WHERE GOD IS.ADORED .ND EVERYONE IS AFFIRMED

-c
l'b)orsbip time. I lamn & "p& in -' r

Prayer Time: 10:15 am to 10:45 am

Church School during Worship Service


Place: Twynam Heights an "
off Prince C(liaes Dri 'e '


Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

PO.Box SS-5631

Telephone number:324-2538 Telefax number. 3 -B42587

COME TO WORSHIP. LEAVE TO SERVE


**1* I


CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL
r CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS Tel: 325-2921
SUNDAY. MARCH 19TH, 2006
Speaker 11:30 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.
Pastor
Marcel Lightbourne
SBible Class: 9:45 a.m. Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m. *
Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. Evening Service: 7:00 p.m. *
Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays) *
Sisters' Prayer Meeting: 11:00 a.m. (1st Thursday of each month)


THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH
Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
"m P.O. Box SS-51.03, Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135
CHURCH SERVICES
I 1 SUNDAY, MARCH 19, 2006
THIRD SUNDAY BEFORE LENT


Worship time: llam & 7pm

Sunday School: 9:45am

Prayer time: 6:30pm

Place:

The Madeira Shopping

Center


Re%. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME, TO' ATEN
Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles
P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 53-S 2,S-,:,r', ,,
EMAIL lyOink@bateln&etr.bs- ". .: v, :.:. .,__ .;


I,


I I -, .. - ", .-" .- --- - -1 -


- -- ;;


I Ii I; .


*


i







THE TRIBUNE


SATURDAY, MARCH 18, 2006, PAGE 7


Mitchells 'bunch of baloney'




over Cuban dentists decision


By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com
IT CAME as no surprise to
discover that the PLP govern-
ment snuck Cuban dentists Drs
David Gonzalez-Mejias and
Marialys Darias-Mesa out the
backdoor, falling prey to an
onslaught of foreign pressure,
specifically led by the Cuban-
American lobby.
According to the govern-
ment, they decided to respond
;with "diplomatic initiative and
maturity". However, this posi-
tion is questionable, as for 11
months they acted without ini-
fiative, were indecisive and
diplomatically confounded
until international pressure
began to mount.
* During Wednesday's session
of Parliament, Foreign Affairs
Minister Fred Mitchell said:


"The integrity of our country-
is intact. All of our interna-
tional obligatonlshae been,''
honoured. Our relationships"
have been preserved with all
parties."
Mr Mitchell's statement is
a bunch of baloney and sidiply B
government propaganda to
swathe their quivering to
threats by a few US Congres-
sional representatives to pur-
sue economic sanctions with
one congressman specifically tions.
threatening to hijack,the :,anFilkly it was rather igno-
Bahamas' pre-clearance privi- .rant, because anyone can tell
leges. that this was really\ a ploy to
The government essential- ,senVthemlo.'^scond country
ly allowed US go\emrment offi- to portray fheiimdge of abiding
cials and Fox News to make by bur agreements while still
their decision for them. Send- answering "Big Br6ther's' calls.
ing the doctors to Jamaica and The fact is. the original
then on to the US did little in departure point was the
the way of honouring the Bahamas. Regardless of the
Bahamas' international obliga- dipjQmatic manoeuvreing. the
f ;,


man




government might as well have
spared a few hours and just
sent the doctors on a 30-minute
flight to Florida!
It can be argued that the
government violated the
Bahamas' 1996 memorandum
of understanding with Cuba by
not returning these doctors.
Government representatives
have attempted to spin the
decision, referring to anyone


contending this position as
unpatriotic.
Both the Bahamas' Depart-
ment of Immigration and the
United Nations High Commis-
sion for Refugees (UNHCR)
earlier this year advised that
neither of the two doctors had
a well grounded fear of perse-
cution in Cuba, did not qualify
for political refugee status'and
should be returned to Cuba.
Even further, neither doc-
tor asserted a claim for political
asylum, and it was the US that
requested on behalf of their
families that they be paroled
on humanitarian grounds.
That being said, it is obvious
that these doctors should have
been returned to Cuba in
accordance with our agree-
ments some 10 months ago.
The government claims that
after considering the humani-


tarian issues, and engaging in
"intense consultations at the
highest levels of government",
they decided to allow this
exception in favour of the two
dentists.
Now, if one exception can
be made, what happens.when
more Cuban immigrants in sim-
ilar positions illegally enter the
Bahamas? Would the govern-
ment parole them as well?
And, what about the indis-
putable political refugees:-
Haitians. IWhy aren't they
being paroled on humanitari-
an grounds and sent to'the US?
At the moment, the Cuban
American lobby are aware that
they can pressure the Bahamas
government into a favourable
decision, and in future, would
play their cards in much the
same way should another crisis
occur. '


Defence Force mechanic


becomes honour student


,ABLE Mechanic Andrew Darling (pictured
right of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force has
returned home an honour student following a
six-week Electric Motor Rewind course at a
Unites States Naval Base in San Diego, Califor-
nia.
' The training was sponsored by the Interna-
tl nal Military Education Training (IMET) and
fi tated by the US Embassy in Nassau.
,Fhe electric motor rewind course, which was
iducted at the Naval Station Training Centre
fen January 7 to February 15, taught partici-
ints how to rewind, troubleshoot and make
airs to all types of alternating current (A/C)
eltric motors.
6me of the topics covered included quality


assurance, fundamentals of single and three phase
motors, winding connections of A/C motors,
mechanical and electrical tests of equipment and
safety.
In addition to theoretical class work, the prac-
tical aspects of the course required students to dis-
assemble and reassemble electric motors both
ashore and at sea.
With a 95 per cent average, Able Mechanic
Darling completed the course as the top student
in his class.
He joined the Defence Force in April 1997,
and is currently assigned to HMBS Nassau in the
mechanical section.
(RBDF photo: Leading Seaman Mark Arm-
brister)


pbwu ~-'w cronin


W - -

a-


___ ~ __
~- -
-C -
*~ ~ -- ~ ~


tz- -


- -


- -. ynaicatea C;ontent -.
Available from Commercial News Providers"


- --O


Adm


am - op -m 4 40b
- .- -Ato 0
0 w- - a -


am -
b- m 4 q 4


W ~- -


- *


* - - --
-
-a- ~ -
-a -. -
-e
-~


.
-~ -
- ~- -
a ~ .~ ~
- -. -


"D -
qftm. quim
0 4* mb-- ft a. 4
4b qw a q
-d-OW m bwa-
qmmmmwl
ow__4=.0M


a* & 1-
_m 40 4b ft4


-- -


LA CAST



T--NT
The AIrt of Il{and Living





















Bay St., 2 Doors West of Victoria .ve.
* lel 242-356-7302 email ariana@batalnet.6s


-dip -


-- Copyrighted Material -
SI' U j I i i -


- an


2 I
/I


-NOOL~"~


a


quo..w qm -M -0.


r,


e
ba


Am81








PAGE 8, SATURDAY,


MARCH 18, 2006


- .


THE TRIBUNE
-,I"Ii),-,.-'^.'~ *-iAM;itrAIfff&.aaW iaia


VW HA:T' S ON iN A ND:
......................... ..... ... ........... .. .... ....... ........... ............


E-MAIL:


Mitjir~AMIAM


Stacy Campbell live in concert, "My Life Through Music", at the Nation-
al Centre For The Performing Arts 7pm March 18,

CAFE EUROPA @ Charlotte Street North, kicks off e\ ery Fridai\
night with Happy Hour... special drinks, live music/DJ from 6pm to -
9pm and Nassau's first Eumopean Night Restaurant open .Friday*
night till Saturday morning 5am, serving hot food all.under $10 and to
go, music, drinks and:an Englishbreakfast. Cafe Europa...the perfect
place to spend your night out till the morning..

Middle Men Enterprises. in conjunction \sith Batilles Mlarkieirin. to,
present an R&B Extrasaganza teatunng Faith Evans & Cjrl Thomnij
with a number of special guests at Botanical Gardens Spm lMarch 75


Bahamian Parti Hoppers and Smirnoff presents Friday Fusion 0 Dick\ B' .'." ". ,-'.'"'." i
Mo's ( i.st ot Rjadison resort). Cable Beach. The first group of 10 or '
more will receive a free 100 bar tab of Fusion 3 for $10 Cipecials k ". '
about ,ourr $13.05 dinner specials. Bahamian Night IFree admi.,nionil 0
every Saturdaiy n\h h\e music from 8 pm to midnight. Karaoke Sundays
from 8pm to midnight. $1 shots and dinner specials all night long. For tur-
ther information, call 1242) 327-1300 or e-mail: bahamianpartyhop-
pers@yahoo.com -.

LIVE MUSIC@ The Buzz. Nassau's Weekly Jam Session & Musicians
Hook-up. Located East Bay Street two doors East of Ess,, On The,,
Run, upstairs Good As New open Wednesday thru Satuida.\ Sm. I PT '..
Sunday at 6pm. Amateur musicians try out & Open mic Wednesda) & .. -
Thursday after band practices. Professional musicians welcome to sit in
onjams Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Book now for special events, con- JM lMitchell and Hot KC ( Palm Court Lounge. British Colonial
certs, private parties. Call 393-2800 (393-BUZZ) or www.thebuz- Hirlion. We-dnesday-Thurda, Spm-12am.
znightclub.biz for more info Rock. Blues. Jazz. Funk, Reggae -- THE .
BUZZ: MAKING MLI$1C LIVE "
SBUZZ: MAKING USIC LIVE da Nigh Interlude Bntele's Restaant & Lounge. Eneas St ott
.- . .....' "" .. Poincijn.i Dniic. Feaiurini Frankie iciorv at the ke board in theL
$5 Friday First Down eerv Friday rught Music; b Barfy .Da Pusih-. ,Xer Dak Room .mcrn' Sunda,. S 30pm to midnight. Fine food and
er, Seletior. Dominique. Ladies $5 all nght, gents $10. Early juggling by drinks
Mr. Xciiement and DJ Fatal. Drink specials all night long
t . .. . .. .. .. Paul Hanna. Tabalha and Gernie. and the Caribbean Express pertor m
BacardiHappyHour@Power Boat Adventures Bar and.Grill (one door at Trja clle R' Re Wet s Bay Si, eer Sunday, 6 3Opmm-9.0'pm.
east of Texaco Harbour Bay). every Friday $3 Bacardi drinks all night
and $3 beers. ...
S, : .. "- :. THE ARTS ..
Ladies Night @Power Boat Adeniures Bar and Grill, e erin Saturda\
Ladies free, Gents, $10 all mght Bacardi Big Apple and other drink spe-
cials all night long. Holl Parotti a collection of etchings: Will host the.official opening
.;*l -.;. at";aie Europa. Chartorie Street north. Thursday. March lb from 6pm
Wild Jungle, each and eery Wednesday night @- Club Trappers. Na:sau s t Spm. Thee echlbiuone Streethrougr April 16m
"upscale" gentleman's club Featurmg a female bod\ paintim elitraja-. :
ganza. Free body painting @ 8 pm. Ladies always welcome .Admni- Organic Fusion Andret John and Imogene Walkine is betng held at
sion: Men free before 10pm. Females free There wdil be tree food and the Central Bank of the Bahama- until March 31
hors d'oeuvres between 9 and 10 pm. Open until 4 am. .
. . Funkl Nassau Redisco ering Idenlilv: Featurrne the artwork oft
Ladies Night @Fluid Lounge.ithis and every Thursday night. Doors open : John Beadite. Dionn. B-:nlamim-S'mith Lillian Blades. Blue Cum.
at 10pm. Ladies free before lam. $10 after Guys- $15 all night Drinkspe- Michael Edw.jrd, Anto.nious Robcrit. Heino Schmid. Cl\ne Sluar't
cial: 3@$10 (Bacardij Giaeaways and door prizeieveryweek.: he :eihib;,l.-cn ,.'ill he held S:iurda',I. March 1, trom 5 to Spmc,,,
r';u-.aLii'uch.-i Kunsti~erei' Wiesbaden. Gerrnans. in conjuneiton v th
Saturday Night Live every Saturday night @ Club Fluid, Bay.St. The the Natcn-nal Art G.iller of the Bahama. The exhibition continues
biggest party of the ~eek. pumping all your favourite hits allnightlong: through Aprn: 3i
Ladies in free before llpm. Strict security enforced.. .
African Art Ehihition \\ hat i .Africa to Me from the pr ate col-
Rave Saturdays @ Club Echpse. DJ Scoobz spinning the best in Old lectiun ,ot aK.\ Cra,. ord inounrg until Salarday. J.ul.24 at The
Skool. Admission $35, all inclusive food and dnnk National Art Gallery oth Bahamai NAGBi

Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters Sports Bar Drink peill. 1 11
nightlong, including karaoke warm-up drink to get ,onu s.taiicJ. Part, : .''- HEALTH .
from 8pm-until. .... ...

ReggaeTuesdays @ BahamaBpomn.Cover charge includes a free.Guinr- Ailcholic, Anonymous. v.,ihe t ininform the public o -.ts meiung
ness and there should be-lots of prizes and surprises. Admission : Ladies trn and nJ ,.-,:.' The Na. sau Group RoSetta Striee Sundavy"-Fr,-
$10 andMen $15. : ; "d: opm to 'pm n .3.im t,: 9 30pm Saturda mornihrn 10am
Ilim Scrd Hrear Chliici- Frida\s 6pm to 7pm The Kirk. Non-
Hump Day Happy Hour @ TopshottersSports Bar every Wednedi jja\s and Tliurda \s 7 .30p to 8 30 pm New Proxidence Communit%
5pm-8pm. Free appetizers and nunmrous drink specials. i",.ns \Inda\ 6pm to 7pm Wed\jnsdat 3nd Fridayi pmn to

The Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday Doors open at 9pm he.- h ', .
time 11.30pm. Cover charge $15. $1 with tlyer l he Cncer Societs r l the Bahamas meets at 5.30pm on the second


Fantasy Fridays @ Fluid Lounge. featuring late '80s music.in the \'IP
Lounge, Top of the charts in the Main Lounge, neon lights and GGo
dancers. Admission: Ladies frci-before llpm, $15. after. Gui~s $2i'l1 ll
night. .


Chill Out Sundays @ Coco Loco's. Sandyport. from 4pm-uniil. playing
deep, funky chill moods with wprld beats. .

Sweet Sunday Chill Out Soiree Lounge every Sunday, 4pm-midnihi @
Patio Grille, British ColonialHotel ,

Wet Sundays, every Sunday, noon-midnight @-'Crystal Cay Beali
Admission $10, ladies free.


'Tueda' .jl eadch month iL their Headquarters at East Terrace.
Centre ilhc Call 323-.4 12 ior more into.


AROUND N A S S A U


0 U T i H ~ ''' U N'E M E D I A EE T


den death syndrome and the most common serious injuries and
Sph ': choking that can occur in adults, infants and children. CPR and First
gli^saj" Aid classes are offered every third Saturday of the month from
9am-lpm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Community Training Rep-
resentative at 302-4732 for more information and learn to save a life
today.

REACH Resources & Education for Autism and related Chal-
rlenes meets from 7pm 9pm the second Thursday of each month
-in the cafeteria of the BEC building, Blue Hill Road.

-". CIVIC CLUBS


Earth Village Ranch (petting zoo), St Albans Drive and'
Columbus Avenue, offers free admission every Wednesday by
appointment between 9am and 3pm. Bring your class, play
group, or family and experience some of the greatest wonders
of nature; a petting farm, a nature trail, pony/horse rides,
and wetlands. For more information or to book events call'.
356-2274 or 434-8981. Special rates available forg'roups of 20i:'
or more with a two week advance reservation.tbonations areas
accepted in exchange for tips.

The next meeting of the Bahamas Historical Society is scheduled fork
6pm on March 30, at the Museum on Shirley Street and Elizabeth!
A\ enue. William Fielding of the College of the Bahamas will speak on-
E -ery\body in Nassau has aDog, and TheyBarik All Night": Potcakes|
a -lstory.' A PowerPoint presentation will be gn en. The public is invit-"i
ed to attend. '.


St Andrew's Kirk After School Programme: The members of S
Andrew's Kirk have launched an After-Schobl-Progranime for chil
dren trom the Woodcock and Albury Sayle Primary schools The
prueramme, is held Monday to Friday at the St Anrew's Presby
terian Kirk. The activities include tutoring, computers, karata
sports, art, drama and baking. The programme is free to childreE
from the Bain and Grants Town communities. Parents interested ii
enrolling their children should contact the church' at 322-5475 o
e-mail standrewskitk@yahoo.com

JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR Cy cling ae plsed to offer ,
.-cycling clinic for juniors between 1'' anjn 1 '.The f're clinic will b.
held every tturday in an effort to erncilurage kid' cycle. Parent!
interested in registering their children should con ri organizers a
jarcycling@gmail.com

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Soror
ity Incorporated meets 6:30 pm` eier% third \ wednesday at th
Bahamas National Pride Building.

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets atthe British Cokfial Hilton Mon
day's at 7pm. '

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7,3upm CC Sweetin,
Senior School's Dining Room, College Avenue off Mo Road
Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @B.ahamas Baptist ~omrulty Col
lege Rm A19, Jean St. Club 3956 meets Thursday, 7.30pni @ itis]
Colonial Hilton. Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8.30pin @ Sdpefrlub
SBreezes, Clh 7178 mppet Tupesdav 6nm (@ The T Whitney Pi'de


Building;' Collins Ave. Club 2437 meets every second, fourth and
Sifth Wednesday at the"J Whitney Pindei Biif irg,i~ollins'A e at
6ppi Club 612315 meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Ca e1. h (C'yb 753494 meets every Wednesday, 6pm-8pm in the
Solomon's Bpilding, East-West Highway. Club 3596 meets at the
Britih (hobnial Hilton Mondays.t 7pm Club Cousleau 73431
:nit 'gcry Tte,day night 730,in the Ch'iAckharni\ Holre! Ftr-b
'e'k,; Central Andros. All re welcome.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega chapter meets every
second Tuesday, 6.30pm ,'' the Eleuthera Room in the ~\ndham
Nassau Resort, Cable Beach ,- .

Alpha Phi AlphaFraternil) meets e\er) first Tuesda), 7pm' Ga\-
-lor's Restaurant., Dowdeswell St. Please call .502-4842/377-4589

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second Tuesda), 6.30pm @
A' antic H6use, IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room.


Pre & Post Nalal Fitness Clases are being held t.:30pm Tuesdas. 'he au,Bahamas Pan-Heleni Coci (NPH) meets every
.id 1 hursJa\ ait Nassjau g Nastici Serpe location oil Prince third Moday of the month in-theBoard Robm of the British Col-
Charle, Dri. Doctor approval requned Call 364-S423.to,registeli ni.':.alln Hotel, Bay St.
or for more into
r or mr Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets the second and
DiaElces Directions -cFREE di., iL support groul' mets the is ':fourth Wednesday of the month, 8pm @ St Augustine's Mones-
Mlooda\ ot jach mith .t -i I3 ipm at New Pi.:,\iden: c Coommunit. ..t'Yy ': ; -C .t y. T
C ni.r:. Blak R,:'ad Dinner ia prodded and free blood sugar.
bliod prtsute and cholest rol testing is a lahble. For more info call Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Friday of each
u. -4 rs. ,r t 7-7 month, 7.30pm at Emmaus Centre at St Augustine's Monestary. For
S" more info call 325-1947 after 4pm.


TooLooSe @ Indigo Restaurant on West Bay St and'Skyline Driec
Singer/songwriter Stesen Hoiden performs solo with speciall guesi .
Thursday from9pm midnight

The Graham Holden Deal @The GreeinParrot.....Daid Graham, Steve
Holden, Tim Deal and Friends perform.Sunday, 7pri lOpmri 'q. Hiurr-
cane Hole on Paradise Island.


~1HL ~Ll.T


* ..flI ,
12--'--


F.) IF
4II ~
I.r'i 3%


; ..hJ'l_
~. -~L~?
~idi.~s~::'
(~I~"
P


MS (Multiple Sclerois) Bahamas meet.-, the thud Monday every
month tpm '. Doctor. Hospital conference room. :..

Bahamas Diabetic Association mects 'er\ third Saturday, 2:30pm
el ,:cp[ A.-uiii and December i -i' lie Nursing School, Grosvenor
Sl h r...; ..' rt' 're Li


)uctor-i Ho.Ipital. rIt ol;t;ial iiaminn' centioe of tih .Ameri ar. Heart
\..:i.~ [lr,, :ffter4 CPR clauses cc-rtifed by the AHA.
The ;our:c d.:tines the warning signs ot respiratory
Jlrcit and tives prevention strategies to a\old .sud-


PIZ KFi


International Association of Administrative Professionals, Bahamas
Chapter meets the third Thursday of every month @ Superclubs
Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.

AMISTAD, a Spanish club meets the third Friday of the month at
COB's Tourism Training Centre at 7pm in Room 144-during..he aca-
demic year. The group promotes the Spanish language and culture
in the.community.

Send all your civic and social events to The Tribune
via fax: 328-2398 or e-mail: outthere@tribunemedia.nei


S


4


'.


__ ~ n


_ Ir


1

i
I


<*


& .. .


.~EPPI
.;.~";~'l~i6~8~s~sl~





SATURDAY, MARCH 18, 2006, PAGE 9


The Tribune's & Kell's


F ARST-PRIZE-SECONDPRIZE THIRD-PRIZ
GIFT ASKE 'GIT BAKET IFT ASKE
InEahAg Gop n ah geGou I ac AeGru


1. Children ages 4-5, 6-8, and 9-10. Staff members and relatives aren't eligible to enter.
2. Coloring may be done with crayons. Adults or older child may assist the child in filling out the entry form, BUT NOT IN COLORING THE ENTRY
3. Enter as much times as you wish. All entries must be in The Tribun.bhyA4pmion Monday, April 10, 2006. Winners will be announced Wednesday,
April 12, 2006. Look for your names in The Tribune i~ listen toiOJA"0Z / JOY FM or COOL FM to hear your name.
4. There will be one first-prize winner, one second-prize winner and one third-prize winner in each age.groups.
5. All entries become the property of The Tribune and may euseduci for any purpose including, but not limited to, publication in a future issue.


I "O POTOOPIS. SE EWSAPER AD0


Parent/Guardian Signature

Tel:


Age:


*Toys
* Stuffed Bunnies
* Easter Candies
* Basket Fixings
* Games
* Decorations
* Party Goods
SSilk Flowers


* Egg Colouring Kits
* Reading Books
* Beach Toys
* Yard Decorations
* Gift Items
* Baskets
* Stickers
and much more!


Kely I Houses
Home
Tel: (242) 3934002 Fax: (242) 3934096


THE TRIBUNE


Child's Name:


Address:


..I


A


I


CONTEST RULES


--I----








PAGE 1SUAM H
aC c~P I rI I


Hopes for conclusion to



San Salvador land dispute


FROM page one

We are hopeful that this
matter will come to a conclu-
sion at the next hearing, as this
whole ordeal has caused my
client much stress," Mr Saun-
ders said.
According to Mr Saunders,
yesterday he submitted an
application to have the order
against his client discharged and
to have him struck off as a
defendant.
Lawyer for the Watlings
Archeological Company,
Donovan Gibson of Alexiou
Knowles and Co., yesterday
requested more time to have a


surveyor's report submitted,
which would in essence indi-
cate whether the men were, in
fact, invading his clients prop-
erty.
Mr Gibson said he was not
sure whether the surveyor had
been hired by his client but
noted that the findings would
be inarguable.
"I don't know whose sur-
veyor it is, a lot of people are
interested in the land, but peo-
ple will abide by what the sur-
veyor says," Mr Gibson stat-
ed.
The Watlings Archaeologi-
cal Company has already
cleared a large plot of land in


the Fortune Hill area that is
being contested by a number
of families laying claim to the
property.
Mr Gibson admitted that
there are, in fact, several par-
ties claiming entitlement to the
property at Fortune Hill. How-
ever, none other than Mr Fer-
guson and Mr Bethel have
engaged in legal action.
FNM Senator Carl Bethel
told The Tribune yesterday
that he plans to take legal
action against the Watlings
Archeological Company on
behalf of his client, who is also
claiming entitlement to the
land where the site is located.


"There are several tracts of
land in contention and my
client's father's home is actu-
ally situated on a tract of land
where the site is located," Mr
Bethel said.
Dennis Bethel, who is being
represented by attorney Nor-
wood Rolle, told The Tribune
yesterday that he was also
hopeful that the matter would
come.to conclusion by mon-
th's end.
Mr Bethel said the company
had originally made an offer
to lease the land and give his
family one per cent of what
was found. However, the offer
had been refused.


Foreign policy dispute


FROM page one

unseen."
Mr Mitchell claimed that,
during the FNM's tenure, their
foreign policy was to be asleep
at the wheel, a policy which
resulted in the Bahamas being
blind-sided by international
developments.
He further maintained that
the source of the attacks on the
ministry were merely payback
for comments he made at the
PLP's convention last year
regarding Mr Ingraham and the
amount of money he was being
paid by the treasury.
Responding to Mr Mitchell's
remarks, Mr Ingraham told The
Tribune yesterday that it was
nonsense that diplomats would
have to be in the country of the
embassy while the premises
were being prepared.
Rather, he said, they could


have flown to the city when nec-
essary as non-resident ambas-
sadors do.
He said that preparing the
embassy offices should have
been the work of contractors
hired by the Bahamian govern-
ment.
Further, he said that no-one
with concern for public funds
would have allowed diplomats
to spend an extended amount of
time in hotels at the public's
expense.
Mr Ingraham denied he was
"double or triple dipping" by
collecting a prime minister's
pension, an opposition leader's
salary and an MP's salary.
He said he only accepts the
pension, which he said was
enough to live on.
His banks have been instruct-
ed not to deposit the other
salary because he does the job
for the love of the country, he
stated.


Rudy King leves Bermuda


NOTICE OF SALE


The Town Court Management Company (hereafter "the
company") invites offers for the purchase ALL THAT Unit
Number C-53 of The Town Court Condominiums situated
on Nassau Street in the Western District of the Island of
New Providence being a one bedroom/one bath apartment
unit together with ALL THAT 1.35% share in the common
property of the Condominiums.

The Company makes no representations or warranties with
respect to the state of repair of the building situate thereon.

The Company will sell under Power of Sale contained in
a Declaration of Condominium of Town Court
Condominiums dated 8th October 1979 which is recorded
in Book 3189 at pages 366 to 405.

TERMS: Ten percent (10%) of the purchase price at the
time of contract and the balance upon completion within
Thirty (30) days of contract.

This sale is subject to reserve price. The Company reserves
the right to reject any and all offers.

Interested persons may submit written offers addressed to
the Attorney S. Smith, P.O. Box N-272, Nassau, Bahamas
to be received no later than the close of business on the
18th day of March, A.D., 2006.


saying.
Dr King would not, howev-
er, name the world leaders lined
up for the event "for security
reasons."
Last night, Dr King could not
be reached.
A source in Bermuda said he
had left the island.


I FuIr' yKtxusion[*I


FROM page one

in our definition of gatherings
where unwholesome activities
prevail and are therefore off
limits for our students."
Ms Fox said: "They are tak-
ing it to a different level and it is
not fair to me or my child. It is
also not fair to the students who
got beaten because their par-
ents allowed them to come to
the party."
"The rules are boot camp


rules because that ain't any
boarding school. My child lives
with me.
"As long as I am not mis-
treating her or she isn't to
school cursing and carrying on,
dancing like she isn't supposed
to or coming to school high or
drunk, I don't see that being his
business," asserted Ms Fox.
The Tribune contacted the
school, but Dr Adams was said
to be off the island. Other offi-
cials said they were not able to
comment.


NOTICE OF SALE


The Town Court Management Company (hereafter "the
company") invites offers for the purchase ALL THAT Unit
Number B-26 of The Town Court Condominiums situated
on Nassau Street in the Western District of the Island of
New Providence being a two bedroom/one bath apartment
unit together with ALL THAT 1.60% share in the common
property of the Condominiums.

The Company makes no representations or warranties with
respect to the state of repair of the building situate thereon.

The Company will sell under Power of Sale contained in
a Declaration of Condominium of Town Court
Condominiums dated 8th October 1979 which is recorded
in Book 3189 at pages 366 to 405.

TERMS: Ten percent (10%) of the purchase price at the
time of contract and the balance upon completion within
Sixty (60) days of contract.

This sale is subject to reserve price. The Company reserves,
the right to reject any and all offers.

Interested persons may submit written offers addressed to
the Attorney SSS, PO. Box N-272, Nassau, Bahamas to be
received no later than the close of business on the 18th day
of March, A.D., 2006.


FROM page one

Gazette that the event would
go ahead with all the famous
guests he had named.
"I know for sure. I have con-
firmation that they are coming.
I will stand by what my office
has sent out," he was quoted as


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION


VACANCY NOTICE

NETWORK SUPPORT ASSISTANT
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICES
DEPARTMENT FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the post of Network Support Assistant
in the Information Technology Services Department Finance Division.

The Network Support Assistant is responsible for assisting with the continuous
operation of the Corporation's computer network system.
Duties for this job may included, but are not limited to the following:
Assisting with the continuous operation and maintenance of the
Corporation's Local and Wide Area Networks (New Providence & Family
Islands).
Troubleshooting and resolving network hardware/software conflicts
Ensuring that all network devices are properly configured and functioning
Providing end-user support for hardware, software and network access
issues.
Network performance monitoring and the maintenance of corresponding
statistical data.
Maintaining network architecture documentation.
Repairing Personal Computers and peripheral equipment.
Monitoring and maintaining computer equipment inventory/supplies
Identifying and recommending Information Technology solution

Job minimum requirements include:
A minimum of an Associate Degree with concentration in Computer
Science or the successful completion of a 1-2 year Community
College/Technical
A minimum of 3-5 years experience maintaining LAN/WAN environment.
Network + and/or A+ Certification (Cisco CCNA a plus).
Sound technical knowledge of network and computer operating systems
Demonstrates knowledge of the operation and function of standard
networking equipment.
Sound knowledge of the office automation software such as the Microsoft
Office suite.
Troubleshooting skills
Excellent written and verbal communication skills
Knowledge of effective user support services

Interested persons may apply by completing and returning the Application form
to: The Manager, Human Resources & Training, Head Office, Blue Hill
and Tucker Roads, P.O. Box N-7509, Nassau Bahamas, on or before Friday,
March 31, 2006.
Human Resources Department,
March 14, 2006
MDMS/asf
~lim~-r .-- L Pe"


GONET BANK&


TRUST LIMITED


CAREER OPPORTUNITY
FOR


PRIVATE BANKING/TRUST

ACCOUNTANT

Responsibilities include:-

* Financial controlling and accounting with hands-on approach
* Compile and submit monthly Profit and Loss and Balance Sheet.
* Preparation of client trust and company accounts.
* Private Banking and trust administration and controlling expertise.

Qualifications:-

* Proven experience with a track record in a similar position.
* Qualified as a Chartered Accountant or Certified Public Accountant.
* A minimum of five (5) years post qualification experience gained
in a private banking environment is essential.
* Extensive experience with accounting and administration of a bank
& trust company.
* Significant experience in the preparation of client trust and company
accounts.
* Knowledge of securities, offshore products and services.
* Clear understanding of operational and administrative banking
processes of KYC, AML and risk and control management.
* Familiarity with the relevant local legislation and regulations,
particularly the Trustee Act, 1998, the Financial Transactions
Reporting Act, 2000 and the Bank Supervision guidelines issued
by the Central Bank.
* Strong organisational and supervisory skills.
* Ability to work independently and in a multicultural environment.
* Knowledge of French would be an asset.

Interested qualified candidates are invited to submit a full Resume,
cover letter and two (2) employment references by March 31, 2006
to:-
The Managing Director
Gonet Bank & Trust Ltd.
Bayside Executive Park
P.O. Box N-4837
Nassau, Bahamas
ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED
I:


a~ras Ir I ~s~hn~


PAGE 10, SATURDAY, MARCH. 18, 2006


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE


LOA NW


Enhancing


the tourist


experience
MINISTRY of Tourism has announced a new campaign to
improve the Bahamas experience for visitors.
As part of this effort, staff from the ministry's airlift development
and visitor reception departments conducted a site inspection vis-
it to Kerzner International's Atlantis Resort.
Conducting the tour was Chiquitta Bonamy, Atlantis' director of
VIP services, who spoke about the resort's wide range of vacation
options.
The tour included an educational visit to Atlantis' fish hospital,
a browse through the super-deluxe One&Only Ocean Club, lunch
at Festival Place in the Royal Towers.
It also included a leisurely walk through the newly completed
Marina Village and a site inspection of several rooms and suites,
including the world-famous Bridge Suite, which was featured in the
movie After The Sunset, starring Pierce Brosnan and Selma Hayek.
"Our goal in doing tours of this nature," explained Linda Thomp-
son, the ministry's senior manager of airlift and visitor reception, "is
to keep our staff constantly abreast of hotel, restaurant and sight-
seeing developments so that we could advise arriving visitors of the
variety of local attractions."
The ministry, she said, has also begun to upgrade the level of
reception services offered at all ports of entry.


















VISITOR reception staff members, Brentina Taylor, Angel Chase, Corey Ferguson and
Thompson are fascinated by the inner workings of the starfish pointed out to them by Crispin Sn
senior aquarist in Atlantis' water features department.


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear from people
whoare making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps you are raising
funds for a good cause, campaigning for
improvements in the area or have won
an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your
story





RIDE FOR PE

Whether you can ride 10 miles or 100 miles
Whether you pedal slowly or like the wind
Whether you can raise $50 or $5,000

Ride for Hope is your opportunity to do something
inspiring, something uniquely rewarding, to honor
loved ones touched by cancer.

Ride for Hope is a unique event with a meaningful
purpose. It is a charitable bik a-thon which will occur
along the spectacular island o leuthera It is open-to
anyone who enjoys cycling ar l ants tdontribute to
one of the most important c
enhanced cancer proceed t
the Cancer Caring Cente o encer
Society of the Baha

Be a part of the gr ti s t ftr
those who RIDE O


RIDEFORH PE


April 29, 2006 r "
Eleuthera,
Bahamas RIDE FOR HOPE PARTNERSHIP
e"oi mG
1,8lt-- flI~ /V


www.rideforhopebahamas.com


SHANRISE Curry (centre) and Ms Bahamas, Denia Nixon (right) gingerly
inspect a starfish while Catherine Ferguson (left) listens attentively to the lecture.


MINISTRY of Tourism airlift and visitor reception staff paused on the portico of Festival Place,
Atlantis for a group photo with Chiquitta Bonamy of Kerzner International (far right). Pictured (left
Toni to right) are: Marsha Thompson; Toni Thompson; Linda Thompson, senior manager of airlift and recep-
nith, tion services; Catherine Ferguson; Tyrone Sawyer, director of airlift development; Denia Nixon (Ms
Bahamas); Shanrise Curry; Phillipa Cooper; Tario Bowe; Angel Chase; Corey Ferguson; Marshalees
Levarity.


5 New Restaurant,

21 New Ships,



All in the heart

of aradise.





A wkole new experience hal keen unveiled en Paratise Isandd. Marina
Village at Atlantis offers the finest in world-clas sfheing and dining.
You'nfind brand names from around the world offering everything from
exquisite jewelry and timepieces to resort wear and accessories. After you
visit the 21 kbutiques, dine at one of the new restaurant, with dishes to
atisfiy even the most refined palate. The village is situated at the eastern
end of The Marina at Atlantis, just ever the Paradise Iland Bridge.





NRIN4


VILLAGE
--Fo -AT 4- .



For more information, visit Atlantis.com


'- r I ;u









THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MARCH 18, 2006


By Franklyn G Ferguson


r': fry;'.


I''
r;_
1.-
L' '~-'~~ '1
I - i:

.; "~;
:I


NASSAU


EVENTS


CAPTURED


ON CAMERA


Reception at Cancer Centre for its accreditation with



the American College of Radiation Oncology (ACRO)


* L-R: Consultant Urologist Dr Robin Roberts, chief of surgery at
Princess Margaret Hospital with his partner in the Cancer Center, Dr
Brown, enjoying comments made by Prime Minister Perry Christie,
former Minister of Health, as he reminds the doctors of his keen
interest in the health of the nation.


* L-R: Prime Minister Perry Christie along with Dr Conville Brown
with Edward Penn, president of Penn's Renovations and Construction,
the builder of the Centreville Medical Pavilion which houses the Can-
cer Center.


Arthur Hanna said:
"I congratulate our
Bahamian medical
professionals for this historic
achievement in the delivery of
health care in the region.
Through a voluntary initiative,
the health care team at Radiation
Therapy Services Bahamas, Lim-
ited sought to achieve accredita-
tion by the world renowned
American College of Radiation
Oncology (ACRO). This accred-
itation verifies that the Cancer
Center has met one of the highest
standards of practice in this high-
ly specialised field of medicine.
"Our health care services have
indeed showed major advances
since the Sir Wilfred Beverage
Report on the 'Public Health and
on Medical Conditions in New
Providence, Bahamas Islands' in
1927.
"As the first and only facility in
the western hemisphere outside
the USA to have achieved the
stamp of approval by the ACRO,
our medical professionals have
established the Bahamas once
again as a benchmark for health-
care excellence and entrepre-
neurialism in delivering health
care in the new world. This pub-
lic-private sector partnership
demonstrates their commitment
and dedication to ensure that all
Bahamians are guaranteed the
best health care in the region.
This is a noble and patriotic ideal.
Bahamians everywhere can be
proud of this international recog-
nition.
"In commending this visionary
group of professionals associated
with the Cancer Center Bahamas,
on behalf of the people of the
Bahamas, I thank them for their
contribution to the nation's health
and the many lives saved for gen-
erations to come. We wish them
continued success."


* PICTURED at the reception following the accreditation and renaming of the Cancer Center Bahamas
by the American College of Radiation Oncology (ACRO) are, from left: Dr Arthur Porter, managing direc-
tor of the Cancer Center and chief executive officer for the McGill University Health Center; Dr Grego-
ry Cotter, chairman of the standards committee of ACRO; Governor General Arthur Hanna; Alex Cot-
ter, son of Dr Cotter, Professor Ralph Dobelbower, chairman of the practice accreditation committee for
ACRO, which is headquartered in Toledo, Ohio. The American College of Radiation Oncology main head-
quarters are in Chicago, Illinois.


* L-R: Governor General Arthur Hannishown with Dr Dionne Dames, resident in the internal medicine
programme at Princess Margaret HospitiEva Turner, Dental Assistant, and Dr Omala Ablack, resident
in the internal medicine programme at Pricess Margaret Hospital.


* PRIME Minister Perry Christie meets the Browns and friend. L-R: Dr Brown, Chelsea, friend Charlotte
Porter, daughter of Dr Arthur and Pamela Porter, and Corey Brown.


* L-R: Dr Perry Gomez, chief of Department of Medicine at Princess Margaret Hospital; Minister of Health
and National Insurance, Senator Dr Bernard Nottage; Dr Mercilene Dahl-Regis, chief medical officer, Min-
istry of Health; former minister of Health and president of Renal House, Dr Ronald Knowles; director of
Public Health Dr Baldwin Carey.


* L-R: Governor General Arthur Hanna greets Janet Walker, who just
arrived from Saudi Arabia in her capacity as radiation therapist at the
Cancer Center, while Dr Conville Brown, chairman and president of
the Cancer Center looks on.


* L-R: Fashion-conscious pedi-
atric haematologist and oncolo-
gist Dr Corrine Sin Quee and
Optometrist Dr Charlene C Wal-
lace share a light moment during
the reception.


S(242)3 7rnkln .








(242) 357-8472


," s N-4659,
, "-, Bahamas


IIC wI -- I


~~:-j~-Y~-%YB~#~~anrrra~s9~plparmonr~YF -


i,, r I I _


--


," .


: .;--.i~e~F~


;
:.1
i .


'''




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - Version 2.9.9 - mvs