Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00344
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: March 6, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00344
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text








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The


Tribune


Volume: 102 No.88


MONDAY, MARCH 6, 2006


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Twenty-nine

guns captured

in new initiative


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
A NEW inter-branch police
initiative designed as an aggres-
sive approach to the country's
gun problem has led to the cap-
ture of 29 illegal firearms for the
first six weeks of the year.
Presenting the press with a
sample .ofthe seized firearms at..
headquarters yesterday, Chief
Supt Marvin Dames said police
have embarked on a "nation-
wide and multi-prong" initiative
to combat illegal gun possession.
"Criminal possession of
firearms and the use of firearms
in the commission of crimes con-
tinue to rise.
"The 2005 figures show that
65 per cent of reported homi-
cides and 76 per cent of armed
robberies involved the use of a
firearm.
"Already our efforts are deliv-
ering encouraging results. For
the first six weeks of this year we
have recovered 29 weapons off
our streets, both here in Nassau
and in Grand Bahama," he said.
Also speaking at the press
conference yesterday, Inspector.
Ricardo Taylor explained that
most of the captured firearms
were seized in urban areas such
as Bain Town, the Grove,
Carmichael Road, Nassau Vil-
lage and Pinewood Gardens.
Of all the firearms confiscat-
ed, 99.9 per cent originated in
the United States, with 70 per
cent coming into the country
from Florida, Mr Taylor said.
In addition to ongoing opera-


tions in the fight against illegal
firearms, Supt Christopher
McCoy, officer-in-charge of the
uniform branch, said police will
be launching an island-wide ini-
tiative to target persons
suspected of being in possession
of weapons such as cutlasses,
knives, handguns and shot
guns.
Beginning March 6, the police
uniform branch, in conjunction
with the plain-clothes division,
will launch a three-month oper-
ation to target suspicious per-
sons and vehicles, he said.
"It will be an aggressive
search and stop of vehicles and
persons. We will conduct name
checks of these persons who
may be wanted on warrants, or
for questioning," he said.
After three months, he added,
police will evaluate the success
of this operation.
Chief Supt Dames said the
Bahamas also continues to
strengthen its ties and improve
its networking with regional
partners in the fight against ille-
gal gun possession.
Mr Dames said that, although
the Bahamas remains a country
with many vulnerable ports, the
"signs are good" that 2006 will
bring an increased number of
firearm seizures and a reduction
of crimes in which firearms are
used.
He said police will increase
its focus on firearm smuggling
into the Bahamas, adding that
officers will have to devise more
creative means to expose gun
smugglers.


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* GUNS collected by the Royal Bahamas Police Force so far this year
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


Anti-Bahamian
demonstration

takes place
in Florida
CUBAN-American protest-
ers staged another anti-
Bahamas demonstration in
Florida yesterday.
They picketed cruise ships
destined for the Bahamas and
called for a tourist boycott.
The protest aimed to high-
light alleged human rights vio-
lations at Carmichael Road
Detention Centre.
The incarceration of Cuban
dentists David Gonzalez-Mejias
and Marialys Darias-Mesa, and
the recent alleged beating of a
Miami television reporter by a
detention centre guard, are at
the centre of their concern.
Florida Congressmen Ileana
Ros-Lehtinen and Connie Mack
said they will ask the federal
government to pressure
Bahamian authorities to release
the dentists and improve treat-
ment of immigrants.
Prime Minister Perry Christie
announced last week that the
government had made a deci-
SEE page 11


Intercepted
roosters are
believed to be
for cock-fighting

OFFICIALS believe they
have thwarted a Nassau cock-
fighting ring by intercepting
50 roosters being flown in
from Haiti.
The Ministry of Agriculture
thinks the birds were intended
for illegal gambling activities.
Minister Leslie Miller told
The Tribune that the birds
were confiscated around noon
from a flight arriving from
Cap Haitien.
The cockerels were
addressed to a Faith Gardens
man who denied knowing
what was in the bags contain-
ing the birds.
Mr Miller said that, while
the man had a permit for
importing chickens, the per-
mit indicated the birds would
be coming from the US.
"We will be conducting an
investigation to see if it was
the intention of this man to
defraud customs because he
SEE page 11


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L0 TE TRIB


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Bahamas Teachers
Union is expected to sit down
at the negotiating table with
government officials this week
in an effort to reach an agree-
ment regarding a new five-year
industrial contract for public
school teachers.
However, president Ida
Poitier-Turnquest told The
Tribune yesterday that the
union will not "budge" on the
sticking points of their pro-


posal for the contract.
"We will not be backing
down on issues such as salary,
the introduction of hardship
allowances and disaster man-
agement, which includes safety
at schools," she said.
The union will also not
accept any suggestion of
extended working hours for
teachers from 8.30am to 5pm.
"That is something that is not
up for debate," she said.
Mrs Poitier-Turnquest said
she does not expect the nego-
tiations to be resolved any


time soon. "I expect these
talks to last quiet a while," she
said.
The president said she could
not say if teachers will stage
another protest.
Around 1,000 public school
teachers protested in Parlia-
ment Square last Wednesday,
rejecting the government's
counter- proposal to a new
industrial agreement.
.On January 12, the union
executive presented a proposal
to government negotiators,
which was answered on Febru-


/1 1

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ary 21 by a counter-proposal.
Teachers protesting last
week called the counter-pro-
posal an insult and an outright
"slap in the face."
However, the Ministry of
Public Service called the strike
by teachers an "illegal, irre-
sponsible and reprehensible
act."
The ministry criticised the
union for bringing teachers to


Bay Street in protest while
leaving children unattended in
the classrooms.
The ministry also stressed
that the union misinterpreted
the facts about government's
counter-proposal.
A ministry release said gov-
ernment did not propose to
eliminate salary increments or
propose a longer work day for
teachers.


BUT 'will not budge' over



salary during negotiations


IN THE view in Rawson Square last week when hundreds of
teachers turned out to protest working conditions



Police hunt three

men in connection


with robbery and


murder of Carey


* JAMAL Glinton

POLICE are searching for
three men wanted for ques-
tioning in connection with the
murder and armed robbery of
well-known businessman Kei-
th Carey.
The men are 24-year-old
Jamal Demetrius Glinton (aka
Jamal Deveaux aka Jamal
Forbes) of Nassau Village; 25-
year-old Dwight Dellington
Knowles of Rocky Pine Road;
and 37-year-old Sean Brown,
who has only two fingers on
his left hand.
Mr Carey, 42, died last
Monday after being shot down
while about to enter the Bank
of the Bahamas International,
Harrold Road branch.


* DWIGHT Knowles


According to police, a
masked gunman fired several
shots at Mr Carey before tak-
ing the deposit bag the busi-
nessman was carrying. The
gunman then fled the scene in
a white Maxima, licenceplate
number 80654.
Mr Carey operated On the
Run Carmichael and Faith
Avenue, Keishel's 99 cents
breakfast stand, and the
Junkanoo Shack restaurant.
Police are now appealing
for anyone with information
on the three men wanted for
questioning to come forward.
This latest murder is the
country's only unsolved homi-
cide.


~--- .........
TX


0 In brief

Woman

stabbed
during fight
with man
ON Saturday morning near
Sparkling Wash on Faith
Avenue, a 29-year-old female
was stabbed to the upper chest
during a fight with a 24-year-
old male.
She is in hospital in stable
condition.
A person has been arrested
in connection with this matter.

Firearm

and ammo

found by

police

POLICE confiscated a black
Glock 9mm pistol with 10 live
rounds of ammunition yester-
day at 4am from a club through
Ragged Island Street.
Officers also found a plastic
bag containing more than 22
packets of marijuana.
Three persons were arrested.

Gunshot

victim in

serious

condition

POLICE are investigating a
shooting which occurred yes-
terday off Lazaretto Road in
the Carmichael Road area.
A 15 year-old was in the area'
when a shot fired from a white
Toyota Corolla hit him in the
stomach area.
He currently is in hospital in
serious ,condition.
Two persons are being ques-
tioned in connection with this
matter.





















"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


i '~ II ,~,~,~a --rs~r


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, MONDAY, MARCH 6, 2006








iE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, MARCH 6, 2006, PAGE 3


L*OCA N


o In brief


Man stable

after being

shot in

the hip

On Friday night in the vicin-
ity of Okra Hill in the area of
City Lodge around 9 pm, police
received a report about a shoot-
ing in that area.
Upon arrival they found a
male in his 30s who had
received a gunshot wound to
his right hip.
The man was taken to hospi-
tal and remains in stable con-
dition.
He told police that a another
male known to him drove up in
a green Nissan Maxima and
fired several shots from a hand-
gun.



Church

service for

Scotiabank

anniversary

In CELEBRATION of Sco-
tiabank's 50-year anniversary,
staff began their week of obser-
vance with a service at Christ
Church Cathedral.
Employees celebrated a
week of activities and enjoyed a
special visit by company presi-
dent and chief executive officer
Rick Waugh. Scotiabank began
its operation in Nassau on Feb-
ruary 20, 1956, with one branch
since then, the institution has
grown to 20 branches that oper-
ate full banking services on six
major islands across the
Bahamas.
Scotiabank is one of North
America's premier financial
institutions and operates in 50
countries around the world.









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"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"




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o


Experts consulted on airport


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

LONG ISLAND Minister
of Transport and Aviation
Glenys Hanna-Martin said she
will shortly be briefed by a
technical team on the way for-
ward for Long Island to estab-
lish a port of entry either in
Stella Maris or Deadman's
Cay.
On Friday, Mrs Hanna-Mar-
tin, along with a technical team
from the Department of Civil
Aviation, the Ministry of
Works and an engineer from
an international firm, travelled
to the Stella Maris airport to
inspect its runway.
A week ago, the airport was
shut down after being deemed
in an "extremely hazardous"
state.
Reporters walked with the
technical team along the
severely cracked and uneven
surface of the runway.
"We want as soon as possi-
ble to close the gap which is
now being created by the clo-
sure of this airport. However,
much will depend on what is
considered to be a 'quick fix'
and how soon it can be done,
or if it can be done at all.
"Whatever we do, the objec-
tive is to establish as quickly
as possible a port of entry sta-
tus for Long Island," said Mrs
Hanna-Martin.


* MINISTER of Transport Glennis Hanna Martin (centre)
surveys the closed airport runway in Stella Maris Long Island
with the island's administrator, Rev Dr Cunningham (left), and
one of the engineers John Renton (right).
(Photo: Tanya Cartwright)


Last week residents were
angry that the closure came
with no prior notice from gov-
ernment.

Explanation

However, on Friday, at a
brief meeting with the island's
district council, Mrs Hanna-
Martin explained that she
requested that relevant parties
be notified, but unfortunately it
did not happen.
She said she "deeply regrets"


the lack of communication.
She also said she was obliged
to act quickly and immediately
in closing the airport and that,
based on advice, there was no
time to hold town meetings.
"I have no lack of love for
Long Island than any other
place. I would not wish it to be
said that there was any moti-
vation that moved us to do
what we had to do, other than
for the well-being of our peo-
ple," she said.
Stella Maris airport is pri-
vately owned by Long Island


Date set for funeral



of Anglican priest


THE funeral service for
the late Dean Foster Ban-
croft Pestaina will be held
at Christ Church Cathedral
on Thursday, March 9 at
11am, the Anglican Dio-
cese announced yesterday.
The 78-year-old priest
died at his residence, 50
Mount Vernon, on Thurs-
day, March 2, following a
long illness.
The chief celebrant will
be the Most Rev Drexel
Gomez, and the preacher
will be Rev Canon Dr D
Kortright Davis, rector,
The Holy Comforter Epis-
copal Church, Washington;
D.C., and Professor of
Theology, Howard Uni-
versity School of Divinity.
The body of Dean Pes-
taina will lie in the chancel
of Christ Church Cathe-
dral from Wednesday, N
March 8, at 2pm to 9pm,
and again on Thursday
from 8am to 10am.
Described as a humble,
hardworking pastor, Dean
Pestaina brought people
together.and got them to per-,
form at their best.
His legacy to the diocese
and the wider Bahamian com-
munity is in the number of
buildings he erected and ren-
ovated in various parishes in
which he served, and the many
lives that he touched through-
out his ministry.
During his five-year tenure
as rector of the cathedral, Feb-
ruary 9,1992, to December 31,
1997, Dean Pestaina spear-
headed a one million dollar
renovation project which
resulted in man refurbishments
including.a free-standing altar,
stained glass windows, new
pews, new lavatory facilities,
Our Lady's Chapel, new gran-


I ; j. ,

DEAN Foster Bancroft Pestaina

ite floors, air conditioning,
offices for the dean, colum-
barium andchapter room.
Although a native of
Antigua, Dean Pestaina
served his entire 50-plus years
as a priest in the Bahamas and
Turks and Caicos Islands.
He arrived in the Bahamas
in September, 1951, one
month after being ordained to
the diaconate. He was
ordained deacon on August 6,
1951. His first assignment was
at St Agnes Church as an
assistant to the late Canon
Milton Cooper. He also
taught at St John's College.
On August 20, 1952, he was
ordained priest by Bishop
Spence Burton at Christ
Church Cathedral.
In February, 1953, Dean
Pestaina was posted to St
Andrew's Parish, George


Town, Exuma, with
responsibility for six
churches, and served
there until 1955.
Following a one-year
sabbatical, in November,
1956, Bishop Burton
appointed him rector of
St Patrick's parish, Gov-
ernor's Harbour,
Eleuthera.
7- In January, 1963, Dean
Pestaina was transferred
to Clarence Town, Long
Island, by Bishop Bernard
Markham.
In May, 1966, Dean
Pestaina returned to Nas-
sau to establish the parish
of Holy Cross. His living
room was converted into
a chapel, and the dining
room table served as the
altar. On May 22, 1966,
with 12 parishioners, the
first Mass was held.
In June, 1971, Dean
Pestaina was transferred
to Christ the King Parish,
Freeport, and appointed
Archdeacon of Grand Bahama.
On June 19, 1984, Dean Pes-
taina was installed as canon of
Christ Church Cathedral.
On February 9, 1992, Dean
Pestaina was inducted rector of
Christ Church Cathedral and
Dean of Nassau, and held that
post until December 31, 1997.
Dean Pestaina earned the
OBE in the Queen's New
Year's Honours List in 1994 for
his outstanding contributions to
the Anglican Church and
Bahamian society.
His wife, the late Ruby
Hallpike Pestaina, predeceased
him in October, 2000. His sur-
vivors include two sisters, Ivy
Pestaina Jeffers and Daisy Pes-
taina, and three brothers; Earl,
Ra'mond and Dr Basil Pes-
tainia.


-


Estate Developers and govern-
ment is not responsible for its
maintenance.
Joerg Friese, a partner in the
company, said that perhaps gov-
ernment could immediately fix
"something" so they can now
have limited operation of the
airport.
He added that government
can then clear its planning,
share it with them and together
or one side of the two can per-
haps take care of the problem.
"We are not developers by
design, we are developers by
happenstance. In plain words
we ain't gat the money," said
Mr Friese.
Ronald Smith, a resident
from Glintons, recommended
that government, along with the
owners, work together to try
and resurface the runway.
"We have two resorts located


in the area and with this being
closed down it is most likely
that tourists would not be com-
ing in this area," he said
At Deadman's Cay airport
there are problems with per-
sons living on the perimeter and
individuals crossing the runway.
Marty Fox, of Island Wings
charter service, who is deputy
chief councillor, added that
there is not enough ramp space
to park planes at the Dead-
man's Cay airport.
Long Island MP Larry
Cartwright told The Tribune:
"I am happy to see that the min-
ister took quick action to come
down here. I would have liked
to see that she would have come
here, had a meeting with the
people and be able to tell them
something about what they
could look forward to in the
future."


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PAGE 4, MONDAY, MARCH 6, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


EIOI*AULETES T HEEITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published.Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352



Indecision and delay brought crisis


WE HAVE heard much lately of how a
1996 agreement with Cuba must be followed
to the letter.
It is a shame that those who talk about the
duty of honouring contracts did not realise
this 10 months ago. If they had, this country
would not now be in the predicament it is
in.
It is good to take time to deliberate, but it
is a catastrophe when those deliberations in
the name of prudence and good governance,
take too long. The Cuban crisis at the
Carmichael Detention Centre is now a case in
point.
All of a sudden an agreement, which will
work an injustice to two Cuban families, must
be blindly followed, despite the fact that for
10 months two key requirements in that
agreement had been broken by the Bahamas
government.
The two Cuban dentists now at the centre
of this international embarrassment were
picked up by the US Coast Guard in Bahami-
an waters and turned over to Bahamian
authorities at the end of April last year.
If the Memorandum of Understanding with
Cuba had been followed, 72 hours later Cuba
would have been notified of their existence
and 15 days after that they would have been
in Cuba.
If Bahamian authorities dithered because,
on learning the Cubans' story, they had
doubts about the equity of following the
agreement, then they should have quietly
checked the story of the two refugees. Obvi-
ously Dr Marialys Mesa and Dr David Mejias
would have told their captors that they had
United States' visas and were on their way to
join their families. They would have explained
why they were escaping by boat, and not by
plane as normal people who live in a democ-
ratic country would have done.
It would seem that logically the next move
for Foreign Affairs would have been to have
called their good friends the Americans -
unless, of course, they are no longer good
friends and checked the Cubans' story.
When the story had been confirmed they
would have handed them over to the Amer-
icans who would have quietly flown them
out. No one would have been any the wiser.
But indecision set in. Obviously the
Bahamian officials didn't know what side of
the fence to jump, and, as in this situation, it
was certainly not possible to fence-sit, they sat
on their hands, sealed their lips and appar-
ently did nothing.
The American Embassy knew nothing
about the situation; the Bahamian people
still knew nothing.
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Cuban community and the wheels were set in
motion to have the dentists released.
In June two months after their arrival
- the dentists, with the assistance of a pow-
erful committee made up of US congress-
men and the American Ambassador, had the
dentists write a letter to government request-
ing political asylum. At this point nothing
was public.
The US Embassy, which had learned in
June through the Cuban community of the
dentists' situation, also wrote a letter to gov-
ernment, verifying the Cubans' story and for-
mally requesting they be turned over to US
custody for return to their families.
Apparently the Cuban government was
still not aware of the hot potato that was
scorching nervous Bahamian hands.
We understand that when the American
Embassy had neither acknowledgment of,
nor reply to its letter, a telephone call was
made to a government official.
The Embassy was told still nothing in
writing that it was too bad that the
Embassy had not written earlier, because just
the day before the Embassy's letter of request
had arrived, Cuba had been notified of the sit-
uation. A bit of a coincidence? Readers can
judge for themselves.
The Memorandum of Understanding
signed with Cuba on January 12, 1996, and
the attached Protocol, signed in 1998, stipu-
lated that Cuba was to be notified within 72
hours of any Cuban arriving illegally in the
Bahamas. And here it was, June, two months
later and Cuba was, according to the
Bahamas' own admission, just being notified.
If we had had a decisive government, the
dentists' problem could have been solved in
72 hours. Either they would have been quietly
turned over to the Americans, or Bahamian
officials would have lived up to the agree-
ment and notified Cuba. But, no, the Bahami-
an government waited. Eventually, the situ-
ation unravelled and now it is out of control.
Prime Minister Christie keeps taunting
Opposition leader Hubert Ingraham about
how one night during his administration the
Detention Centre's gates opened and Cubans
disappeared into the darkness of the night.
Deep down Mr Christie probably wishes that
opening gates would also take this monkey
off his back.
Cuba is not a normal country. When one
thinks of the persecutions these families will
face if they are returned to Cuba, an agree-
ment that would produce such an evil result
is, in our opinion, worthless.
Because of all the publicity surrounding
this case, these dentists are now political'
refugees and are entitled to protection.


Concerns






on Briland


EDITOR, The Tribune.
AT A special reception for the
winter residents of Harbour
Island last Saturday evening,
Prime Minister Perry Christie
recounted the story of a similar
small town in the Midwestern
United States. This town was in
the midst of rolling hills and
beautiful valleys and streams that
was a natural attraction for curi-
ous visitors. So magnetic was this
town, that tourists flocked to it
once it had been discovered,
attracted by its natural beauty
and tranquility. To accommodate
this increase in traffic, the Town
Council decided to cut down one
of the hills to make a large park-
ing lot. Next, another hill was cut
down to build a new Town Cen-
tre and Mall. Then the streets
had to be widened and new
hotels built. This resulted in the
destruction of even more hills.
Finally, there were no more hills
to be cut down, as the town
became a victim of its own suc-
cess.
Ironically, the beautiful hills
that attracted the visitors in the
first place, had to be destroyed to
accommodate the development
that they required.
Many concerned persons feel
that Harbour Island will suffer
the same fate as that small Mid-
western Town. This island par-
adise with the world's best beach
has long been a playground for
the rich and famous. Along with
the charm and the friendliness of
the native "Brilanders", this slice
of heaven on earth has been
awarded with the distinction as
"The Best Destination in the
Region in 2005."
With the availability today of
the Internet, convenient travel,
such as the "Fast Ferry" and
large sums of disposable cash by
"yuppies" with their .com com-
panies, the secret of the Harbour
Island experience is discussed at
cocktail parties around the world
on any given evening.
Harbour Island is certainly the
"cool" place to visit. Just one
occasion of having pink sand
between your toes, chances are
!: extremely high, 90 per cent plus -:
that you will return, not just once,
but many, many times.
This fact is certainly as many of
the winter residents had been
coming to Harbour Island for
generations.
There were those visitors who
not only visited Harbour Island
many times over, but also went
on to build their own private
homes and retreats, being
encouraged and facilitated by
pioneers such as Allen Malcolm
who ran the Pink Sands Lodge.
These persons in those days
would spend their winters at their
Harbour Island homes; hence
they were referred to as "Win-
ter Residents."
It wasn't long before these win-
ter residents realized that not
only were their Harbour Island
homes an escape from their
stressful life back home, but the
fact that their homes were also
a good investments. When not


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visiting Harbour Island, they
would be able to rent their homes
to other visitors for a handsome
return.
Once the economical potential
of Harbour Island real estate
became obvious, with time the
demand is fast outpacing the sup-
ply. With just one and a half
square miles of land, Harbour
Island is fast approaching its lim-
it as far as development. With
the skyrocketing prices for Har-
bour Island real estate with excel-
lent returns for any investor, the
great Harbour Island land rush
has been on for some time now.
In general, the bulk of the
,winter resident investors is hon-
est, decent and respects Harbour
Island for what it is, along with
the local people.
However, undoubtedly, there
are a few bad apples who disre-
gard the delicate balance needed
to maintain harmony on Harbour
Island and who only look at their
investment as a business decision.
Rather than try to fit in, they self-
ishly do whatever is in their best
interest. One such investment
recently felt the wrath of Prime
Minister Christie as he described
the development as "shameful"
because of its excessive size and
one that differed from what was
originally agreed.
The message'of Prime Minister
Christie was absolutely quite
clear to all those who heard it.
"Any development on Harbour
Island must fit in and be inte-
grated into the Harbour Island
community". The Brilanders
must be consulted on develop-
ment that will drastically affect
them." The tone of Prime Min-
ister Christie's speech was remi-
niscent of Sir Lynden Pindling's
"Bend or Break" speech back in
1969 in Grand Bahama where a
similar social set of circumstances
existed. The result of which was a
devastating fallout between the
Bahamas government: and
investors. Freeport has never
recovered from the plight of
investors along with their capi-
tal. Hopefully sensible and wise
decisions will avoid the same cat-
astrophe on Harbour Island.
As Harbour Island continues
to develop at such an alarming
rate, concerns in the strongest
possible terms have been voiced
as to what will happen to the
indigenous "Brilanders"?
Already, an educated estimate
would conclude the fact that
about seventy five (75%) percent
of the land on Harbour Island
already belong to Winter Resi-
dents or investors. As Harbour
Island real estate is now demand-
ing a premium price, it is expect-
ed that this figure could go even.
higher as Brilanders themselves
take advantage of this seller's
market. This means that the Bri-
lander's are being squeezed into
a smaller and smaller area of the
island. This is bound to result in
some tension and'an adverse
atmosphere of "them against us"
has been created.
This tension is exacerbated by
the fact that Brilanders access to
parts of the island is being
restricted more and more. Both
ends of the island are virtually


exclusively foreign. Almost the
entire stretch of Harbour Island's
Pink Sand Beach is owned by
Foreign Investors. Many of the
traditional pathways to the beach
are now gone, being replaced or
obstructed with signs that read
"Private Property" and "No
Trespassing!" Incredibly, just two
public beach accesses now exist,
notably the one between the Pink
Sands and Coral Sands and the
one by the Ocean View. God
help you if there is an emergency
on the beach some distance from
these two accesses, as emergency
vehicles, personnel, etc will be
delayed in providing assistance.
Even the massive coconut groves
that once dominated the Harbour
Island landscape are now gone.
According to my cousin, Neville
"Baretta" Major, he now has to
bring in dry coconuts from other
islands such as Andros, some-
thing that once existed in abun-
dance.
Tragically, it is possible that in
just a few short years, the indige-
nous Brilanders could end up like
the native Americans. They could
end up being relocated to a less
desirable "reservation" such as
being moved to the Eleuthera
mainland. Or, in their own lank,
they end up being at the bottom
of the socio-economic scale, with
all of the undesirable social prob-
lems. They have already wit-
nessed the desecration of one of
their most historical and cultural
sites, such as The Ramp to the
convenience of investors. Brilan-
ders are being denied access to
"The Cannons" at South Bar, a
vital part of not just the history of
Harbour Island, but also the his-
tory of the Bahamas.
Efforts to construct the only
public restroom facility on the
Pink Sands Beach, the most
beautiful beach in the world, was
frustrated because it was chal-
lenged by foreign investors.
When mother nature calls, you
have no choice but to defecate
or urinate on the World's Best
Beach. This is a shameful dis-
grace!
Unless visitors to Harbour
Islafid'continue to respcct and
observe the very delicate harmo-
nious balance that exists, the
result could be disastrous. As
Prime Minister Christie took time
out to listen to the concerns of
the winter residents, he must now
take time out to listen to the
"Brilanders." Much criticism has
been voiced by Brilanders that a
meeting hosted by the Prime
Minister of the Bahamas to
entertain concerns about Har-
bour Island, only a selected
group, notably the winter resi-
dents were invited, none of
whom to my knowledge are able
to vote. When dealing with, the
problems on Harbour Island,
there can be no secrets as over
the years the goodwill that has
developed between the 'Brilan-
ders and the winter residents is
one of trust, friendliness and
openness. All parties concerned
have an interest to ensure that
this wonderful symbiotic rela-
tionship continues!

DR LEATENDORE
PERCENTIE
Boston,
Massachusetts
February 21, 2006.


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TI T N M M 6,2006, P


Further thoughts on racism


MY column of Febru-
ary 20 elicited a wel-
come response from the.Nas-
sau Institute, which took issue
with my describing Helen
Klonaris' comments on racism
as thoughtful and intelligent.
In its response to me (which
seemed more directed at Ms
Klonaris' original contribution
than at my column), the Insti-
tute suggests that concentrating
on white racism is a "dangerous
diversion" for those looking for
answers to the problems of
blacks, American or Bahamian.
In fact, I agree entirely with
this central thesis of the Nas-
sau institute's response, as I
stated (albeit briefly and par-
enthetically) in that column.
In a column written some six
years ago, I went even further
and argued that the tendency
to demonise the European and
his descendants, or to belittle
their historical accomplish-
ments, is a sad trap into which
many black Americans keep
falling.
Rather than address the real-
ity of a self-destructive cultural
mindset, many continue to
delude themselves with the
notion of an unsurmountable
wall erected around them by
racists. Meanwhile immigrants,
black and white, continue to
arrive and outpace the black
American.
This much we agree. But
where I would differ with the
Institute is in its inference that
the wholesale adoption of a
(western) European value sys-
tem would be either possible or
desirable for others.
To state that "Western
Europe and its British off-
shoots dominated economic and
social development of the world
from the 15th to the 21st centu-
ry" is to state the obvious. Noth-
ing in my column denied either
this or its postulate that many
aspects of the western value sys-
tem are worthy of emulation
precisely on account of their
indispensability to the west's
historical successes.
But it would be wrong to con-
clude from all this that there is a
single correct definition of
human progress, or that because
the rate of western progress is
to be emulated, so must be its
trajectory.
Many inside and outside the
west now openly question some
of the powerful, conventionally
held western notions of
progress.
Is the individualism and per-
sonal freedom that characteris-
es the Judeo-Christian ethos
necessarily to be equated with
progress in a crowded, frontier-
less world of deep mutual
dependency? Is the attainment
of wealth in the conventional
sense a constructive ethos in a
world unable to physically sus-
tain even the relatively small
number of wealthy societies that
exist today?
These are questions to which
I will not now venture an
answer. But the mere fact that
they are so often asked suggests
a whole world of human defin-
itions of progress, rather than
merely one.
In places like The Bahamas,
where we have ingested a colo-
nial value system as a whole
package, we seldom exhibit a
positive understanding that such
questions might exist. Certainly
they almost never originate
from within us.

JAPAN REMAINS A
GOOD EXAMPLE

R father than fixating on
race, my column sim-
ply recommended that Bahami-
ans step back and question their
uncritical acceptance of Judeo-
Christian values, especially
where they tend to suppress the
emergence of home-grown val-
ues that fit our cultural realities
better.
We, like others colonised in
the same way, have inherited
many good things from our
coloniser. As the Institute right-
ly suggests, it would be the
height of inanity to deny this.
But unless we are to become
cultural clones of western Euro-
peans, we must permit the evo-
lution among us of values that
do not derive from their history
and culture.
Japan is a good example of a
non-western society that has
done this very well, which is why


I so often cite aspects of the
Japanese historical experience.
The institute rightly points
out that there is no comparison
between the levels of develop-
ment of Japan and that of West
Africa at the time of contact
with the west. But its compari-
son, to be fair, should have con-
centrated on the cultural state
of Japan at the time of its first


contacts with Chinese civiliza-
tion, which was much earlier.
The Japanese, at the time
they 'discovered' Chinese civi-
lization in the seventh century,
were in fact as backward cul-
turally as the Yoruba or Igbo
when the Europeans came to
their lands eight centuries later.
They had no writing, no
advanced cultivation tech-
niques, no organised religion or
polity, no temples or palaces (in
fact, no structures more com-
plex than cottages).
But where Africa and her
progeny found themselves sub-
jects of a colonialism imposed
from without, Japan sent people
to China to learn civilization on
her own terms, which she then
incorporated at her own pace
and in harmony with the exist-
ing fabric of her basic culture.
Had she received her civi-
lization through Chinese inva-
sion or subjugation, or through
Christian infiltration and the
consequent stigmatisation and
replacement of her indigenous
value system, none of this could
have been the case. That is the
central tenet of my ("anti-Chris-
tian") view of history.'
It is why Japan has a healthi-
er sense of self than non-western
countries that have allowed
themselves to be drawn entirely
into a western value system. The
key is co-existence the co-exis-
tence of borrowed techniques
with a value system that evolves
according to local needs.

There is an anecdote
that Japanese people
sometimes cite when they
reflect on their country's reten-
tion of its original (arguably
primitive) cultural impulses in
the face of its modernisation,
first under Chinese, now under
western influences.
It is a profound demonstra-
tion of wabi-sabi, the Japanese
cultural ethos that emphasises
understatement and the aes-
thetic appreciation of "elegant
poverty".
The tale is of an illustrious
general who served his emperor
so well that, near the end of his
life, the emperor expressed a
curiosity as to the magnificence,


of his general's palace, which
he had never seen, but assumed
to be impressive. He asked just
how imposing a structure it was
and whether it was as regal as
the imperial palace.
. The general gave his response
in a short poem:
My little hut is on the beach
Nestled among the pines
In the august shadow of
Mount Fuji
When he concluded his poem
and looked up, he found the
emperor weeping not in sor-
row, but in envy. Trapped in a
massive palace, from whence
he could neither gaze upon Fuji
nor hear the wind whistling
through the coastal pines, he
had reverted.(on hearing 'the
poem) to the Japanese cultural
heart still beating deep within
his ornate Chinese-style court
robes. What he longed for was a
simple hut on a beach.
Today, the site of General
Dokwan's hut is smack in the
middle of metropolitan Tokyo,
a city of intense ugliness and
congestion, where the sheer vol-
ume of heat-absorbing concrete
has raised summer tempera-
tures some 10 degrees above
surrounding areas.
Sadly, the transformation of
that area is emblematic of some
of the wider sacrifices Japan has
(consciously) made in adopting
aspects of the western develop-
ment model. It recognized (as
does the Nassau Institute) the
contribution that elements of
this model have made to the
spectacular rise of the west since
1500. But it also recognizes the
value of an independent cultur-
al outlook in maintaining a
cohesive nation with high self-
esteem and values that work.
Since the early days of her
badly planned, rapid westerni-
sation, Japan has now slowed
down in more ways than one.
The re-emergence of tradition-
al values has helped to mellow
and counter the effects of the
sometimes badly-adapted
imported ones.
This explains the fondness of


PERSPE

ANDR EW

the Japanese for remembering
the story of General Dokwan
at times when their country
becomes disoriented under the
weight of useful, but sometimes
ill-fitting imported values be
they Western or Chinese. It also


to create the massive 'ghetto'
culture that exists.
This situation exists because
we have systematically stigma-
tised norms and ethics that have
emerged in natural response to
our circumstances and held fast
to a heavy Judeo-Christian doc-
trine that in often responds bad-
ly to our cultural needs though
it elicits an almost universal
emotional response.
For example, the strong cul-
tural emphasis on individualism
that is part of the Judeo-Chris-
tian 'package' (viz. a "personal"
God; the promise of'individual
redemption) is an example of'
one side of the %wester n value
system that is not only ill-suited,
but positive harmful when
applied to a place like Thie,
Bahamas.: ::
We are clearly a society that
would function best under a less
individualistic ethos than that
which prevails in the west: Cul-
iural features that \e share with
Asians and Africans, such as
the discomfort ~ith interper-
sonal confrontation, all point to
a more collectivist original val-
ue system. In Japan or Korea,.' i
such a collectivist value system
co-exists happily with a vibrant,
but culturally superficial, west-
ern capitalism.

One of the first things
you note on visiting
Asia for any length of time is
that Japanese and Koreans go
to extraordinary lengths to
avoid disharmony or con-
frontation. This is because,
unlike most European western-
ers, but very much like most
black Bahamians, they are cul-
turally ill-equipped to deal with
interpersonal confrontation.



T ICA

EXERIATR


CTIVES

ALLE N

In Japan and Korea, as in
The Bahamas, any confronta-
tion that involves a loss of 'face'
(especially by a male) is liable to
end in violence, be it on a bus, a
restaurant or the floor of par-
liament. But in the former two


We push individualism in our
educational environment, in the
workplace and through the
exceedingly individualistic
teachings of western religion,
yet we have no cultural
framework to support it.


explains the extraordinary har-
mony of a society that has
undergone rapid change under
outside influence.

OUR CHALLENGE IN
THE BAHAMAS

T he cultural/psycholog-
ical problem in places
like The Bahamas is that, while
we too have opted to follow a
western development plan and
have adopted western ideas of
economic and social progress,
we have, unlike the Japanese
or Koreans, no underlying
indigenous value system capa-
ble of absorbing the disruption
that such change brings to a
society.
As we develop, it is no coin-
cidence that genuine black
Bahamian values are increas-
ingly the values of the market
alone. Success is defined by con-
sumption and little else. At the
lower end of the community,
these values blend easily with
an existing,culture of oppor-
tunistn and dishonesty and help'
T *i!" i !*'" '"r.f.K ''"~


societies, acknowledged cultur-
al norms, such as the subordi-
nation of individual to group
interests, ensure that such con-
frontations seldom arise.
Here, on the other hand, such
supporting cultural norms as
exist are both weak and unac-
knowledged, as we forcibly pre-
sent alien ones and commit our-
selves never to change them.
We push individualism in our
educational environment, in the
workplace and through the
exceedingly individualistic
teachings of western religion,
yet we have no cultural frame-
work to support it.
It is therefore no coincidence
that our existing system of
acknowledged values are futile
at countering social ills and that
they have had little success in
constructively channelling
behaviours. The simple reason
is that they were created by and
for a different kind of culture.
The almost total failure of
their supposed 'Christianity' to
curb immoral behaviours in
many black Bahamians o-ft~ii
h S'01i ,c Imi lll' 'ul 'i '.r im .l-iill


nist's grandmother was recently
robbed at knifepoint by a gen-
tleman who quickly described
himself as a Christian when he
saw.a bible on her table. He
then proceeded to pray with her
before robbing her..

o some extent, this rob-
ber is a microcosmic
representation of Bahamian
society. While he acknowledges
the supremacy and singularity
of a European-based ethical
doctrine, his own underlying
culture is actually unrelated to
it. Moreover, it has (through
neglect) become a culture that
tolerates a high level of dishon-
esty, glorifies materialism and
promotes a cheap view of
human life.
Many people wrongly put
this phenomenon down to
hypocrisy,'whiclh,suggests a per-
sonal failing. This cannot be cor-
rect. as it would suggest some-
thing genetic in Bahamians that


makes them so much more
prone to hypocrisy than others.
In fact there is something at
work that is far more deep-seat-
ed than mere hypocrisy: a strong
but superficial acknowledged
ethical system masking a weak
genuine ethical system. The for-
mer is superficial because it is
foreign, the latter is weak
because it is suppressed and per-
mitted to remain backward.
The result is that most
Bahamians may have what they
recognize to be values. But
these values do not function as
they do in the societies that cre-
ated them. They neither influ-
ence behaviours on a large scale
(hence the rampant
"hypocrisy") nor reinforce gen-
uine communal ethics.
So there is this disconnect
between Bahamian "values"
and Bahamian culture. And it is
the backwardness of the latter
(and not our failure to preach
Sthe formerloud enough) that is
the root of our problems.


,.'~' P


Rosetta St.


Phone : 325 3336


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Is the attainment of wealth in
the conventional sense a
constructive ethos in a world
unable to physically sustain
even the relatively small
number of wealthy societies
that exist today?


m


MONDAY, MARCH 6, 2006, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


~j~ --


- 4







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, MONDAY, MARCH 6, 2006


Bahamas bid to attract Chinese *'


* By Bahamas Information
Services
AN estimated 31 million Chi-
nese travelled in 2005, spend-
ing as much as $75 billion and
the Bahamas government aims
to attract this lucrative market
to its shores.
Addressing the China Sym-
posium last Thursday at the
British Colonial Hilton, Minis-
ter of Tourism Obie Wilch-
combe said that although 80 per
cent of the Bahamas tourism
business comes from the United
States, long range plans are
underway to lure visitors from
Europe and the Far East.
He pointed out that should
the US economy fall into a
slump, the Bahamian economy
would be impacted; hence the
need for a broadened market-
ing strategy.
Additionally, the "My
Bahamas" campaign is designed
to educate students and the
wider Bahamian public about
Chinese culture and way of life,
Mr Wilchcombe said.
The object of the half-day
symposium was to educate and
inform tourism industry part-
ners of the requirements nec-
essary to successfully deliver an
enjoyable and unique Bahami-
an experience to Chinese visi-
tors.
Mr Wilchcombe said the
Bahamas government is also
committed to enhancing rela-


tions with China, noting the $30
million gift of a national stadi-
um for which ground would be
broken on Independence Day,
July 10.
He said, however, that Grand
Bahama is the leader in recog-
nising the importance of Chi-
nese relations by way of the
container port, which is sub-
stantially contributing to that
burgeoning economy.
"China has been progressing
continuously, which speaks to
Chinese philosophy, education,
productivity, systematic growth
and continued investment at
home and abroad," Mr Wilch-
combe said.
He said efforts must be made
to keep tourists safe in The
Bahamas and that one murder
is too high a price to pay.
Ambassador of the People's
Republic of China to the
Bahamas, His Excellency Li
Yuamming, was among the list
of speakers who addressed the
symposium.
Ambassador Li said China is
becoming a fast-growing tourist
generating market in the world.
Tourists arrivals totalled 120.2
million in 2005, a 10.3 per cent
increase over the 2004 figures.
The overnight-tourists totalled
46.8 million, an increase of 12.9
per cent in comparison to the
previous year. The tourism
receipts in foreign exchanges
reached $29.2 billion (US), an
increase of 13.8 per cent over


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


* THE Ministry of Tourism and the Chinese Embassy staged a China Symposium on ways the
Bahamas can make Chinese visitors enjoy their stay. Pictured from left are Philip Miller, Charge
d' Affairs and Head of Mission, China; His Excellency Yuamming Li, Ambassador of the Peo-
ple's Republic of China to the Bahamas; Colin Higgs, permanent secretary, Ministry of Tourism;
and Obie Wilchcombe, Minister of Tourism.
(BIS Photo: Derek Smith)


the 2004 figures.
The World Tourism Organi-
sation has predicted that by
2020, China will become the
number one tourism destina-
tion and fourth generating mar-
ket in the world.


"There is no doubt that with
the development of China's
economy, more and more Chi-
nese will be able to afford the
expenses during the long dis-
tance travel," the ambassador
said. "I firmly believe that more


PROPERTIES FOR SALE


LITE POERIE -RSIENIA CMMRCA


7 r


SEA BREEZE ESTATES
LOT NO. 132
PROPERTY SIZE: Two-storey
Residence (10,400 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Golf Course Boulevard
APPRAISED VALUE: $397,256


BEL-AIR ESTATES
LOT NO. 259
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family
,. Residence,(6,000 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Turtle Drive
APPRAISED VALUE: $178,000


4 I


SUNSET MEADOWS SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 1
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family
Residence & Triplex Apt. Building
(10,149 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Cow Pen & Golden Isle
Roads
APPRAISED VALUE: $461,000


ANDROS AVENUE
LOT NO. 9
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family
Residence Wooden Structure
(3,600 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: East Side of Andros Avenue
APPRAISED VALUE: $51,000


________________________ ______________________


COWPEN ROAD-HOLLYWOOD
SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. Crown Grant A-66
PROPERTY SIZE: Incomplete Commercial
Structure (10,875 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: 350 West of Refuge Court
APPRAISED VALUE: $133,000


GRANTS TOWN
LOT NO. 9 Block 219
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family
(3,610 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Southern Side of Mason's
Addition Road & East of Spence Street
APPRAISED VALUE: $75,000


11%


GLENISTON GARDENS SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 0 Block 7
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family
(10,875 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Southeastern Corner of Jean
Street & Kent Avenue
APPRAISED VALUE: $165,000


GLADSTONE ROAD ALLOTMENT
LOT NO. Crown Allotment No. 53 Lot D
PROPERTY SIZE: Residential
(5,995 sq. ft)
LOCATION: Bellot Road West of Faith Ave.
APPRAISED VALUE: $183,000


SEVEN HILLS ESTATES
LOT NOS. 29 & 30
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family
Residence (10,000 sq. ft)
LOCATION: Blue Hill Road, South of
Seven Hills Drive
APPRAISED VALUE: $273,000


L PE CS


OLDE TOWNE AT SANDY PORT
SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 14
PROPERTY SIZE: Footpath (1,300 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: North of Sandy Port Drive
APPRAISED VALUE: $110,000
GARDEN HILLS NO. 2
LOT NO. 677
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family
(6,000 sq. ft)
LOCATION: Frangipani Avenue off
Chenille Avenue
APPRAISED VALUE: $56,000


SILVER GATES SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 123
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family
(5,200 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: East Side of Silver Gates
Drive off St. Vincent Road
APPRAISED VALUE: $42,000
MALCOLM ALLOTMENT
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family
Residential Development (85,950 sq. ft/
1.50 acres)
LOCATION: East Street South
APPRAISED VALUE: $216,000


GLADSTONE ALLOTMENT
LOT NO. 24
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family
(5,457 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: 228 Feet South of Fire Trail
Road
APPRAISED VALUE: $50,000


Chinese will visit the
Bahamas in the near future."
He also predicted that the
Chinese tourist market will
become one of the new
important tourism market
for the Bahamas.
In order for this to be
effective, he said, the
Bahamas must strengthen
information on tourism
exchanges between both
countries; enhance cultural
exchanges through cross-cul-
tural training programmes
and introducing Chinese
cable-TV into main hotels
and tour sites; and promote
marketing strategies in Chi-
na.


-w


- w -


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Vol 3.3



S-DC in

Re-Accreditation Process
-- --,-- -i f.ln or prepar,
li.-n ard inslilulional se
s,.i study lnaliy paid ,oil
early January when Ti
"i:.. "-i. h.i Bah-ilm s CaiTipuis of SC
i'.f 'C iinler\veiil four dCays
Sri' .:l3 er.':alual iCin Dy [II
''- iddle Slal:e
As cc ation of CoiilaI

Dr Edis,:n (
Jacnsrn i Chair of ir
Piddle Slale
Accrreditltion leam ma:
DR. CEDIO\ ]t ar.\c his offical visit I1o th
Cli. r i.ii',lthe h crar, campus and spent irr
Sleam o'he thldhlh '%role e.'amining sludel
S':; .\wcalin it (.Cf"llg- o recrdsacu lClly protile
and chtoolws recctrrly pail administration police
Oni and tiscal procedure
a it.'esii, >ut tr ilT~ The purpose of the V'
Hlahama. innIpr\ \ vas to determine the ;u
S').'C' .ahillv of the irinsltu iorn I


7"c


IE


"Bringing Opportunity to the






nts Of Ti


, ., ;*' :. :,. *


ruth


March 2006


a-
ill

le
ie
D-
le


s

3e



s,
is


s.
:II
n1t
it-
ojr


... k.. .
continued membership in
and endorsement by Ihe
Middle Slates aci:reditaiion body
'All accredine intrirutioris are obliaed to
undergo minSlruticoarl seltl udv and then Io submit
to formal assesrrsmen by Ire accrediting organia-
tion." Dr jJcksorin e-plained Tne visits come at
regular irier'.als usually in ten-year cycles. and my
job is to determine II the particular school s living up
to it s intended mandate if it is delivering a quality
educational pro.uci r its record-K.eeping and firan-
cial management are sound and ii students and
alumni are satisfied vrth me end-prodiuct We re
also inritresiedl to Inowi if the institution is serving a
worthlhille purpose within the community
Tihe Bahamas visit represents Ihe lirst phase
01 SD-'Cs re-accredilalion process, the main cam-
pus in Balilmore Maryland .will be assessed in early
April Once the visitation process has been com-
pleled instilutions receive a linal report Irom the
accreditng body
In the meantime. to quote Dr Jackson, 'this
campus can be proud or the great lob it is doing in
offering a line quality educational product to stu-
dents and in helping then to Iranstorm Iheir lives
The qualifications and credentials of your faculty
are also very impressive
Dr. Jackson is also the president of Medgar
Evers College, one of the colleges of tre City
University of NI*ew 'ork.


S-DC Ed Majors Take

to the Classrooms

.'t '. ; ;//0" ',/il. H I '.j"
pr t^ /) Su -v


"Rrriniing O(pportluitiy It the ruConn iti "



Professional

Development

Courses


Business Writing Basic English
\lSeedu' \\odne.icati
Speech Communication
"iev'\t/ m


6 Weeks
6pm 9pm
$275.00 per course
525 00 (one time fee per quarter)
Wednesday 1st, March 2006


Duration-
Time
Coo
Registration
Courses Begin


Who should take these courses?

Community Leaders: Entry &.Middle Managers;
Private Business Owners Insurance Agents: All
Other Interested Persons













~t~V


General and Methods Courses just for Teachers
(ECE and Elementura' levels)

SIntroduction to Special Education Tuesidals. 5:30 pin
Methods of Teaching Reading Tuesdays. 5:30 pm
NMet lhds of Teaching Mathemnalics Tuesda s, 8:00) pm
Early 'Childhood Education \Wednesdlras,. 5:30rpm
Methods of Teaching Phirsic;i Education W\edneisday. '800 pm






These courses are especially recommended for
Teachers needing certification
Special Education Teachers
SPre-School I& Early Learning Teachers
Day Care & Pre-School Owners and
Operators

All courses are approved. college-letel 3 credit courses
Credits are translerahle into Bachelor's Degree programS-

Requirements for Registration: High School diploma (minimum)

Cost per Course: $565.00 per course
$20. 00 registration fee

Classes begin: 6th March, 2006

Certificate Courses at
Sojourner-Douglass College
Regisler nIw for a Certificate Course' in;
* Contemporary Issues of Adolescent Psychology
A college-level. 3-credit course which explores adolescent
psychology, current issues and challenges lacing today's young
people, and analyses selected intervention strategies
Course recommended for Parents, Counselors, Youth Workers.
* Conversational Creole
A college-level, 3-credit course which Introduces you to Haitian Creole and to:,
the culture of Haiti.
Course recommended for everyone.
* Employment Law & Practices
A college-level, 3-redit course which introduces the employment
legislation of The Bahamas and analyses current workplace practices and
obligations.
Course recommended for middle managers, business owners. human resource
personnel.
All courses are fully approved for college-level instruction.
Experienced, qualified lecturers and presenters
Current, relevant materials and case studies
Certificate offered upon completion
SCourses transferable into full Bachelor's degree programs
SSpecial company rate available for 5 or more
persons registering from same company / school / church (20% off
course fee)
Cost per Course: $565.00 (plus registration fee of $20.00)


Once again stu-
dents enrolled in the
Bachelor s Degree in
Early Childhood
Education or in
Secondary Education
will be under the micro-
scope during Ihe
months o0 February and
March as lhev undergo
several weepl of
inlense leaching rrac-

SDC Adminiistrator
Mrs t3iadorn
Sutherland, ,.Ahr: als
ihas respc'nsiDiily for
coordinating ire
Education program.
Srecently announced
. that as usual Tea.ching
* P a, Pra tic- -r.i-1 -: in
January and r.rn.
;: Ihrui ql c, l',10 Ma.r,
The h-,rrmai n slT,
-:i O) the Cp i ir,.. Dire.:
Sulherla cid e -plne. T
COUrse tv.here vou aCIuaI


sP I(IN4, 1)iii ( II Ii) I I


SIflfltD \


IIRSI. H I RRIFTT
PR I I/, vult-run edurtn-
trp arnid -eirid Dl wgpjirl
%np.mmrttendetnl Hill bt
lispcrr irrig ing)( 1.1)




ma tors tri the %, ii-ork~r
thrminihlize lTeaching





ic.i -ompor eit Ce olthe
m~la etI student l ieacre7rc


into Ihe part: ulars 01 leaching meihod.ology. lesson
planning strategies lojr maintaining discipline and
the like Thre ecniond .:omponPni is the actual reac.h-
ing practice whereit, rhe studenri plan lessonri.
stand before class-e and teach'
This year SDC is proud Io announce thai they
have secured trie ser.ices :I Mrs Harrie Pratt a
veteran educator and relired District
Superiniendeni Mr- Prilt hrrinq. a wealth of expe-
rieni:e anid e.pOisure t', iie role oi supervising our
Ed maslrs and v.'e are certain Ihat she will impart
many si5ills an. a Jreal rdegrree o i .:rrlidlence tr, our
stuidenl lea:hers



o.r'visit s. S www. sdc5edu
or atGldCrleHueEs BayStree.


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PAGE MODAYMARC 6, 006 HE T IBN
- EpI


,


*5,,? .4
a'++ ++- w ?w-a



.*





We, the St. John's College Classes of '99,

'03, '04, '08 and St. John's alumni

everywhere wish to extend our deep

condolences to the Carev familV

During this period of pain and loss.


We love you and you are in our prayers.


Keith Carey was a "Giant" of man!



I"Iay God keep you, for joy truly
cometh in the morning.l ,


a'.. V -:. x. .. .....


IT'S 4 TIME OF JOY 4nD JUBILATION!
IT'S. I GR D TI. IE OF PR uISE ,I D CELEBRI ITIO
'0,'04,'0 an t Jh' aun
e\'rvher wshto xtndourdep


*-- J .. J r .,- ., -..' .


March 12-19, 2006 East Street Tabernacle
THEME:
"Serve the Lord with Gladness"
Psalm 100:2


GUEST SPEAKERS:
BISHOP FRED S. FISHER, Sr.
General Overseer I'World'..,del
BISHOP SAM N. CLEMENTS
General PresbTer
BISHOP DR. BRICE H. THOMPSON
General Prcsb,'ter
BISHOP WILLIAM M. WILSON
International Ministr) D> Ector
BISHOP DR. E. C. McKINLEY
Stare O.c.r '.:c
BISHOP LEVI CLARKE
Naional ODei seer
BISHOP CLARENCE N. WILLIAMS
ln-troil0 CJ .: ;.:i
MINISTER JANET A. WAITE
P i.,onal [H r, i ., L :.:,I
rP l lr i[Lr,,ij ,,, .:~._.,..: . _:.. _.,'1 ,,. +. ,: ,: 1
Ci ',.el,. jr, C' .c.r -,.d P, ;i.1: j. TI.: T't .n ", :. ,
'jh' i r ,.id .A[1c, tij' ,:r, :i .-: ,,-, 1 :'r.L-,,-i,. i r.' I I' : ': .
wiv h the A.:rl.J I',i.,,-u BF h .n ,', Bin, J "h t ,,r -
EPa In, d r,.L Jur.,r B' i.; E L.; il,

LOG ON TO: www.CogopbaOamas.0
FOR LIVE WEBCAST EVEN G SESSI




"'t missi tuAr
IB *ll;^


Monday, March 13th, 2006
ljaio rni' OiL r,.,i b'Iii.p Di ElO.iiDi c B Rihmiirg
'.l, jl.'cr hi, Anrui l Addr-: Lr:'E V'IA PADIO
BaH Mt .S
Sunday, March 19th, 2006
Annual Bapusmal Pr'w..:':icn will Ilav'e the Tabernii-,
for Lhe 'Vestern Esplanade oll.o..ed b'. the live ZNS
F adio alfnJ TV I r- i 'ajg' bra'J;i esrC er.ce
Final Message on Convention Theme:
5i .- rthe Lord ,wrh Crladnc: .11 be delivered by
D a i l O.El crwi B P -la r.r; '
Di li iinci B Rabr.,r.;


The dilemma




and territories


* By Sir Ronald Sanders

(The writer is a business exec-
utive and former diplomat who
publishes widely on Small States
in the global community).

C-ARIBBEAN territo-
ries that remain over-
seas territories of the United
Kingdom or departments of
France and The Netherlands
face a dilemma: how to balance'
a desire for greater autonomy
with the benefits they' receive
from their non-independent sta-
tus?
In the case of the French
departments,,jschia'S Mar-
tinique and Guadeloupe, they
are treated as part qf France
and their people benefit from
all the social welfare conditions
that apply'to French :citizens,
.and they are free tojriiq;e to
France. Additionally their secu-
rity and defence are the respon-
sibility of the French govern-
ment.
There have been movements
for independence within the
French Departments, but in
recent years these movements
have become muted, particu-
larly as the experience of inde-
pendence in some neighbour-
ing Caribbean countries has not
resulted in the great economic
and social advancements that
were predicted.
Greater autonomy for the
French departments is arguably
not an issue at this time.
But, the dilemma is now evi-
dent in Bermuda and the British
Virgin Islands (BVI).
With regard to the BVI, dis-
cussions are taking place
between that territory's local
government and the govern-
ment of the United Kingdom
for greater powers to be
devolved to the BVI adminis-
tration.
In Bermuda there is continu-
ing debate over the desire for
independence expressed by the
government of Premier Alex


n ht.

WORLD VIEW -


Scott. Independence is opposed
by a significant number of the
Bermuda populace who
demand a referendum on the
issue.
While Bermuda, with a pop-
ulation of 68,000 people, is not
geographically a Caribbean
country, its proximity to the
region and historical adminis-
tration links it to the area.
The per capital income and
quality of life in both the BVI
(population: 27,000) and
Bermuda is higher than in many
independent Caribbean coun-
tries, and the citizens of both
countries have the right to move
to the United Kingdom to live
and work.
Both territories enjoy low
unemployment and are homes
to immigrant labour.

n recent years, the health
of the BVI economy, and
its tourism sector, has attract-
ed workers from neighboring
islands and Guyana.
But, their non-independent
status has saved their budgets
significant costs for external
affairs, defence and security for
which the United Kingdom gov-
ernment has responsibility.
These are significant costs
given the area's vulnerability to
drug trafficking, and the myriad
organizations to which inde-
pendent countries have to
belong, and in which they have
to be represented to safeguard
their interests.
Many independent Caribbean
countries are finding the costs of
security extremely onerous, and,
in.reality, they-could not pro-
vide such security as now' exists


04


E SIR Ronald Sanders


without help from donor coun-
tries and agencies.
Further, several Caribbean
countries cannot afford repre-
sentation in key international
organizations. As a result, many
times their interests go unat-
tended, or they have to fight
rearguard actions to defend
their concerns after decisions
have been taken or rules
made. The World Trade Organ-
isation (WTO) is one such
organisation. '
In the case of Bermuda,.;a
break from Britain is regarded
by some as harmful to the
island. 0i
The constitutional tie to
Britain, the Head of State being
Queen Elizabeth and the Privy
Council being the final court of
appeal all are seen as ele-
ments of stability that are
important to the financial ser-
...vices.sector, x which accounts for
'60 percent of the island's gross
v."


POSITION: Development Construction Manager


REPORTS TO: Vice President of Development

ESSENTIAL FUNCTION:
Plans, directs, and coordinates activities of designated projects to ensure that goals and objectives of
the development are accomplished within prescnbed time frame and funding parameters by perform-
ing th tolloiowing duties personally or through subordinate supervisors. Manage the construction of
assigned project.site imnpro .emenrs including amenities on-site and off-site infrastructure construction.

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES:
I Manage and assist the design team in tevie.ring construction plans. suggesting c;.l and time
a ;.ing methods and improving construction coordination and equipment ujt;liac.on
DManage and assist the design team in expediting subdivision approvals and other permits.
Prepare field reports, status reports, incident reports, construction schedules and other information
requested. .
0 Assist in the bidding and negotiation of construct tion contracts with general contractors.
l Administer the construction contracts and changes thereto, protecting Project's interest at all times.
0 Establish good working relationships with governmental inspectors, the design team and general
contractors.
0 Monitor civil construction costs during construction and suggest ways to avoid unnecessary costs.
Pro..'lde construction quality control, through regular monitoring of construction,
*... lParlicipate in meetings *..ith developer and design earn as requested.
10 Elablisri work plan for staff and'controcfors
13 direct dnd'coordinatle activities of project personnel contractors to ensure project progresses on
schedule and i'.'thin prescribed budget.
0 Review status reports prepared by project contractors and modifies schedules or plans as required.
.l Prepare project reports for owners, management, and others.
0 Coordinate project activities with activities of government regulatory or other governmental
agencies.
MINIMUM EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENTS
0 Minimum 20 years experience in design or construction management of civil engineering works.
EDUCATION AND CREDENTIALS
LI Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering or Construction Management
0I Registration as a Professional Engineer or Certification as a Construction Manager by CMAA/CMCI

Bahamians only, please send applications and resumes by mail or email to:
IFo r I,, ABC m




Te:1-242-3 7-0 612
Email: dshipman^ discoveryland^^^^om
Deadline for Receip fftof Aplcaios sFridayMarch 24, 2006^


J~g~~~L~k~HdS~es~s~8aa~~b~de~i~;i~d~';~


PAGE 8, MONDAY, MARCH 6, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


i *- ;---
rl; 1
~...c


i


i '"'














of dependence




in the Caribbean


The desire of a people for
self governance and the right
to determine their affairs is
understandable, but the cost
is high and burdensome on
national budgets.


domestic product (GDP).
Like Bermuda, financial ser-
vices and tourism are the major
contributors to the economy of
the BVI.
The government of Chief
Minister Dr Orlando Smith in
the BVI is not seeking inde-
pendence; it wants greater
autonomy in keeping with rec-
ommendations made by a local-
ly appointed Constitutional
Commission.
Dr Smith has said that past
Economic improvements of the
territory have been linked to
constitutional advancement,
and he clearly believes that if
the local government has a freer
hand, economic development
would take place at a faster rate.

As it is, the BVI enjoys
S la large measure of
internal self-government, but
,the Governor, as the UK rep-
.resentative, has direct responsi-
bility for external affairs,
defence and internal security
(including the Police), the Pub-
lic Service and the administra-
tion of the courts. The Consti-
,tution provides for a ministerial
system of government headed
by the Chief Minister.
;: Specifically, what the BVI
,government is seeking from
Britain is what the Chief Minis-
ter descries as "a better align-
ment of rights and responsibili-
ties between local government


and the UK's representative (the
Governor) in the territory".
This, of course, is. the age old
problem that every former
colony faced, and which, to
some degree, pushed them into
seeking independence: how
to balance the authority of
elected local representatives
with the powers of the colo-
nial governor?
The price of the protection
of the colonial power and.its
financial responsibility for exter-
nal affairs, defence and security
is the direct involvement in gov-
ernment decision-making by the
Governor and the offices in the
colonial Capital from which. he
takes his guidance.
The desire of a people for self
governance and the right to
determine their affairs is under-
standable, but the cost is high
and burdensome on national
budgets.
And, individual small states
in today's global community are
so increasingly marginalized in
international relations as to
make their political indepen-
dence almost meaningless
except for the votes they cast
in international bodies. But,
even the issues on which they
cast votes, and the organizations
in which they cast them, make
little difference to their individ-
ual capacity to influence global
issues.
This is a principal reason
underlying the movement of the


member countries of the
Caribbean Community and
Common Market (CARICOM)
to ceding some of their individ-
ual sovereign powers into a sin-
gle pool.
Both the BVI and Bermuda
are confronting the dilemma of
dependence, and there is no
easy solution to it. How the gov-
ernments deal with it in ways
which do not overburden their
national budgets, and promote
their continued economic
growth will be a real challenge.
Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com




MONDAY,
MARCH 6
6:30 Bahamas @ Sunrise Live
11:00 Immediate Response
12noon ZNS News Update Live
12:03 Caribbean Today News
Update
12:05 Immediate Response Cont'd
1:00 Caribbean News In Review
1:30 Spiritual Impact
2:00 Gimmie A Beat
2:30 Inside Hollywood
3:00 David Pitts
3:30 Bishop Neil Ellis
4:00 Dennis The Menace
4:30 Carmen San Diego
4:58 ZNS News Update
5:00 Fun Farm
5:30 411
6:00 Gospel Grooves
6:25 Life Line
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
8:00 You & Your Money
8:30 Tourism Today
9:00 Legends Whence We Came
10:00 Caribbean Newsline
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30 Comm. Page 1540AM
N13 -
th igttomk ls mnt


Mercedes-Benz , ,' .;
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Tel: 393-6651 or 393-6693


EAST ST. & SOLDIER RD
Tel: 356-2940 or 356-2941


Open: Monday Saturday
8am~5pm


Fax 326-4865 P. O. Box SS-6766 Nassau, Bahamas

AUTO SYSTEM EXPERTS

^'M "Midas is a business based on service, quality and reliability.
Factory scheduled maintenance is car card.
Midas services your car fully. Our system takes the guesswork
out of auto care for every car model out there.


We are the leading garment care organization
who has the following challenging positions for
energetic, dynamic and team oriented individuals.
DRY CLEANER
Are you a skilled stain removal technician?
Do you take pride in your work? Would you like to earn
more money? Experience preferred but will train.
PRESSER
Are you an experienced presser who would like
to make $375 or more a week?
TEAM LEADER
Are you fed up with "graveyard shifts" or low pay?
Do you like to smile? Do you have a positive attitude?
If you have answered YES to ALL of these questions
for a given position, please fax your resume detailing
work experience, training and salary requirements
to 393-8902, or pick up an application form.
NO TELEPHONE CALLS, PLEASE.


- ,--- I --


MONDAY, MARCH 6, 2006, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE




rrpi.1L IV, IVIJINILMI IVlrl'j I J,
U


"Your Behivian Superniamcts"



VALUE
NOW ACcwnwG
ojSUNCARD
OVRGHTS ANO PMCES ME V
)I I,


MEAT m

SIZZLERS


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$ 59.
PER LB


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PICNIC
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PER LB
$ 119
PICNIC HAM SLICES
PER LB $1.29


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Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448! j


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89%PER LB
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4 LB BAG
$399
PLt___ I

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CARNATION
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PER LB $- EACH
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rc---------







THEAL TOC6
I~~~~ A I--


Anti-Bahamian

demonstration

takes place
in Florida

FROM page one
sion on what to do with the
dentists and will reveal this
"after some formal arrange-
ments are in place".
Gus Garcia, Democraci-
a's legal co-ordinator, said
the protest was against only
Bahamian policy on immi-
grants, not the people of the
islands.
"As long as these abuses
continue, we will continue
our protest," Rodriguez said.
"We will only stop when we
see some results."
Members of Cuban exile
groups gathered for a protest
Saturday on Watson Island
to flash signs and blare ear-
splitting trailer truck horns.
The demonstrators targeted
passengers boarding
Bahamas-bound cruise ships.
According to the Miami
Herald, vehicles across the
channel displayed large ban-
ners: "Fair Treatment of All
Migrants in the Bahamas"
and "Bahamas, Be Beauti-
ful Again. Respect Human
Rights."
The exile groups were
Movimiento Democracia
and Agenda Cuba, whose
members urged a tourist
boycott of the Bahamas.
One ship was Carnival's
Imagination. As it made its
way up Government Cut,
passengers flocked to the top
deck at the sound of the
truck horns. Some waved,
others captured the moment
on video.


Intercepted roosters




are believed to be




for cock-fighting


FROM page one
said that he was a farmer.
"If he is, there is no reason
he should be unaware of the
difference between fighting
cocks and other types of
chickens," Mr Miller said.
Officials are expected to
inspect the man's farm as
part of their investigation.
However, this is not the
first time this has happened.
Customs confiscated another
consignment in November
which also came from Haiti
addressed to the same man,
said the ministry.
A vet was expected to
destroy the birds yesterday
with the exception of one or
two being kept for display
at a press conference this
morning before being put
down.


"We want to inform the
Bahamian people that it is
illegal to bring in any fruit,
vegetables or animals from
Haiti," said Mr Miller. The
cockerels had not been test-
ed, he added.
The minister said controls
on imported birds were
important, particularly from
countries with no regula-
tions, in light of global fears
about the spread of
the lethal H5N1 bird flu
virus.
Mr Miller said there were
no agricultural officers post-
ed at the airport at the time
of the confiscation, but he
promised that from now on
officers will be required to
work weekends to ensure
those who bring in live ani-
mals illegally "do not slip
through the crack."


The minister said it is
believed the birds were
being brought into the coun-
try for cockfights.
"We want to remind
Bahamians and our Haitian
brothers and sisters that
cock-fighting is illegal in the
Bahamas and this activity
will not be tolerated," he
said.i
Mr Miller also sounded a
warning for those who bring
Pitbulls into the country for
fighting or breeding.
"There are no permits
being issued for these ani-
mals and persons found
bringing these dogs in ille-
gally will be arrested and
punished to the fullest extent
of the law," Mr Miller
said.
Cock-fighting is a popular
form of.gambling in Haiti.


ATPIA ENTREPRENEURIAL

MANAGEMENT TRAINING &

CONSULTANCY (AEMTC)
presents

HOW TO START & OPERATE
A SMALL BUSINESS
DATES: March 13, 15, 16, 20, 21 & 22, 2006
TIME: 6:00p.m. 9:00p.m.
VENUE: C.W. Saunders High School Room 13, Jean
Street, Gleniston Gardens.
PRICE: $250.00 p/p (Includes Materials)

A special meeting & registration will be held on Saturday,
March 4, 2006 from 10am to 11:30am at the high school.

Participants will hear from certified entrepreneurs, engage
in lively & informative presentations, discussions, networking
& group activities.


For further details contact:
(242) 393-5961 or 323-5195 or
email:alphaenttraining@yahoo.com

CALL & REGISTER RIGHT NOW!


get read to take on the toor/d in the all neo


IIHB H III I


ONE TIME PROMOTION ONLY


UEAL CO A LIfETIAM
Retail Price $40,661.00
special discounts and factory rebates $ 7,261.00
one time only, applies oin chicles in stock
Additional Customer Incentive $ 1,500.00
YourSpecial Cash Price $31,900.00
$312900.000


FRIENDLY MOTOR CO. LTD
THOMPSON BOULEVARD TEL.: 356-7100 FAX: 328-6094 EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com WEBSITE: fdendlymotorsbahamas.com


"Built For The Road Ahead"


Share

your

news
;The Tribune. wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
:good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
:area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Xalable at your fauourite

liquor store and Hi all
Burns House Beuerage Depot

and Butler & Sands stores.

S st,.,,d retail privv in Nasqiu Store


MONDAY, MARCH 6,'- 006, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


"*)







PAGE 12, MONDAY, MARCH 6, 2006 THE TRIBUNE


Lagan Holdings Ltd.

Tel: 377-0094 thru 8


For Sale


SURPLUS MATERIALS


Due to the successful completion of the Phase 1A of
the Nassau International Airport Airside Improvement
Project, we now have a quantity of surplus material
for sale:


* Roadbase Material


Imported Crushed Stone:


4,500 Cubic Yards


(Excellent compaction qualities)


* Imported Screen Size Stone:


Various sizes 5/8" 1/4"


Dust
Sand


* Sub base Fill Material


* Electrical Ducting:
6" HDPE Electrical ducting
2" HDPE Electrical ducting
4" PVC ducting
3/4" PVC conduit


5,200 Cubic Yards
2,500 Cubic Yards
50 Cubic Yards


1,800 Cubic Yards


3,560 feet
3,128 feet
1,200 feet
600 feet


E p m. LII d [* els [*e4 i call377 0094 i hu 98


PRIME Minister Perry Christie spoke of the opportunities available to Exumians during the
opening of the Bank of the Bahamas branch there.
(BIS photo by Peter Ramsay)


Bank of Bahamas opens its


sixth Family Island branch


EXUMA The Bank of the
Bahamas International opened
its sixth Family Island branch
here last Friday with Prime
Minister Perry Christie touting
the "manifold opportunities
unfolding before the very eyes
of Exumians."
"In today's Bahamas there is
this extraordinary state of inter-
est that has now manifested
itself in investment after invest-
ment opportunity for our coun-
try," he told officials gathered
for the event.
"Investors are looking to the
Bahamas in increasing numbers
and committing billions of dol-
lars in investment to our coun-
try."
Scores of Exumians, bank
representatives, Cabinet Min-
isters, and government officials
inspected the new full-service
Hooper's Bay facility situated
on Queen's Highway, north of
George Town. The government
is the major shareholder of the
bank.
"We are here for the long
haul," said chairman Alfred Jar-
rett. "We're going to be your
umbrella during the good and
the bad times. -.
"Every cent we make is going
to be reinvested in the country


and pay dividends for Bahami-
ans."
The bank and its managing
director Paul McWeeney are
the reigning bank and banker
of the year honourees of the
Bahamas.
Mr McWeeney told of the
impact the bank "will be capa-
ble of making in empowering
Bahamians to participate in the
continuing, careful, prudent and
planned growth of Exuma."

Reality
"The time has come for us to
face the reality of the unques-
tionable need for not just any
growth, but sustainable growth
that protects our land, does not
endanger our marine resources
and allows sufficient time for
infrastructural development,"
he said.
"If we allow growth to
explode unchecked, unfettered,
we do so at our own peril," Mr
McWeeney said.
The Bank of the Bahamas
boasts assets of more than $519
million, an increase of some
$132 million from December 31,,
2004.
Through this new branch,


Exuma residents will be able to
do banking business which
before they had to go to Nassau
for.
"The immediate availability
of operating capital," said Mr
McWeeney, "will further posi-
tively impact how business is
conducted in Exuma, reducing
waiting periods, making payroll
immediately available, aiding
shipping and deliveries, pay-
ment for and reimbursement of
services."
Prime Minister Christie said
Exumians have "manifold
opportunities" to improve their
way of life here in "the most
dynamic developing area in our
country."
"Even though beginning new
businesses may be a new
endeavour for them," he said
"it is important that they devel-
op the understanding that their
lives will be materially
improved, that their island will
be greatly impacted and their
country will rise to new levels if
they dare to take the risk and if
they import into their own way
of doing things the determina-
tion to succeed and the
discipline to make the
sacrifices along the path to suc-
cess."


.9:
S .. * '


The Roman


7- :. .,..=. .


Catholic Archdiocese of Nassau
Announces Its:


Annual


The deadline for the receipt of resumes is March 15, 2006.


Employment Opportunity


GENERAL MANAGER


BAHAMASAIR HOLDINGS LIMITED


The Board of Directors at Bahamasair is seeking to fill the position
of General Manager at the airline. The successful applicant should
possess the following:

Qualification and Experience
A Bachelor or Master's Degree in Business Administration or equivalent
academic qualifications or work experience and having a wide range of
managerial competencies with at least ten years experience as a Chief
Executive Officer, or a comparable management role in a recognized firm.

Responsibilities
The successful candidate will be required to manage the airline in a manner
conducive to optimizing revenue, service quality, and safety, within the
philosophical framework of the Board of Directors and Shareholder.

More particularly, the successful candidate will be responsible for:

4 Providing strong leadership for a complement of 750 staff members;
< Ensuring that quality service is provided in order to enhance
customer satisfaction and Brand quality;
< Ensuring that safety is of paramount importance at the airline;
< Promoting and positioning the airline to engender an attitude of
"Carrier of Choice" among users;
< Providing user friendly and credible Management Information
Services ("MIS") to Shareholder, Board of Directors and other
constituents in a timely and consistent manner;
< Motivating the airline's resources in order to maximize efficiency,
by optimizing fleet deployment, route structure and financial
resources;
< Instituting the necessary controls to ensure operational and financial
integrity and transparency, and;
< Foster harmonious relationship with all stakeholders.

Applicants are invited to submit sealed detailed resumes to:

The Chairman
Board of Directors
Bahamasair Holdings Limited
Bahamasair House
Windsor Field
Nassau, Bahamas


LOCALNEW





THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, MONDAY, MARCH 6, 2006


t: !,








THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, MARCH 6, 2006, PAGE 13


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

TENDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE
ALL RISKS (BUILDINGS & CONTENTS, PLANT, MACHINERY
& EQUIPMENT INCLUDING SUB-STATION SITES


TENDER NO. 597/06

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
provision of general insurances as described above.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-
Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 30 March 2006 by 3:00p.m.
and addressed as follows:

The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 597/06

"GENERAL INSURANCE BUILDINGS, PLANT & MACHINERY"
The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

TENDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE
PUBLIC & EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY, PERSONALACCIDENT,
PRIVATE CAR & COMMERCIAL VEHICLES


TENDER NO. 598/06

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
provision of general insurances as described above.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-

Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 30 March 2006 by 3:00p.m.
and addressed as follows:

The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 598/06
"GENERAL INSURANCE PUBLIC & EMPLOYERS'
LIABILITY AND MOTOR VEHICLES"

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

TENDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE
MONEY & FIDELITY


TENDER NO. 599/06

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
provision of general insurances as described above.
Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-
Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 30 March 2006 by 3:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows:

The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 599/06

"GENERAL INSURANCE MONEY & FIDELITY"


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION


TENDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE
MARINE INSURANCE


TENDER NO. 600/06

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
provision of general insurances as described above.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-
Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 30 March 2006 by 3:00p.m.
and addressed as follows:

The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 600/06
"GENERAL INSURANCE MARINE INSURANCE"
The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.



BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION


TENDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE
PROFESSIONAL INDEMNITY (DIRECTORS & OFFICERS)


TENDER NO. 610/06

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites.tenders from eligible bidders for the
provision of general insurances as described above.
Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-

Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

.Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 30 March 2006 by 3:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 601/06
"GENERAL INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL INDEMNITY
DIRECTORS & OFFICERS"

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

TENDER FOR GENERAL. INSURANCE
ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT & MOBILE RADIOS


TENDER NO. 602/06

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
provision of general insurances as described above.
Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-
Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 30 March 2006 by 3:00p.m.
and addressed as follows:

The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 602/06

"GENERAL INSURANCE ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT & MOBILE RADIOS"


The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.


. L


I


The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.





PAGE 14, MONDAY, MARCH 6, 2006
DANISH

PORK RIBS
$217
LB
LAYS BAG ASSTD

CHIPS

$299
6.5 OZ
CROWN POINT BARBER CREAM

TUNA CRACKERS
2/99 200 GR
6 OZ 8 S 30
SAVE $0.18 SAVE $0.30,


HUNTS DICED

TOMATOES
(IN JUICE)
$ (1 59
*14.5 OZ
SAVE 0S.10
QUAKER
OLD FASHION/ QUICK
OR CRYSTAL WEDDING

OATS

18 OZ
SAVE $O.70


GATORADE
ALL FLAVOURS
$ 29.9,
20 OZ
SAVE $0.30
QUAKER
ASSORTED BAG

CEREALS

$249
215 OZ
SAVE $0.70


THE TRIBUNE


CAMPBELLS CHUNKY

SOUPS
ALL VARIETY
$039
23 19 OZ
SAVE $1.20
McCORMICK
BLACK
PEPPER


SAVE $0.60
JOY
LEMON
DISH
LIQUID
2/$300
18 OZ 0
SAVE $0.49


CARIBBEAN

SUGAR
$139
4 LBS
SAVE $0.30
ENSURE OR
PEDISURE ASSORTED

SUPPLEMENTS

$ 99
I8 OZ
SAVE $0.60
AIREL
REGULAR

DETERGENT
2$/$50
400 GR $
SAVE $0.39


PASTA
RONI
AL FLAVORS
41,59
6.4 OZ
SAVE $0.49
AUNT
JAMIMA ASSORTED
PANCAKE
MIX

21 OZ229
SAVE $0.66
DOWNY
ENHANCERS
VANILLA & JASMINE/ MORNING
GLORY/ HONEY SUCKLE.


-1t


WHOLE ROTISSERIE
CHICKEN EACH .......................$7.99
PRESTIGE
COOKED SALAMI LB.................$1.99
TAUFAYAN ALL VARIETY
PITA BREAD 8'....................... $1.39
HOT
CHICKEN WINGS 12 z..........8/$.3.00


W/D
CORN ON COB 12 EAR .................$5.29
T.M. CUT 6X48 OZ
GREEN BEANS, SWEET PEAS, SWEET CORN,
MIXED VEGETABLES, CUT OKRA, BROCCOLI
CUTS AND LIMA BEANS .....................$4.89
SUMMERDALE STRAIGHT CUT
POTATOES .................................$3.79
W/D ALL FLAVOURS
ICE CREAM 5QRTZ....................$8.99


W/D
SPREAD 3LB ..............................$1.89
W/D regular & light
CREAM CHEESE 8 OZ ............$1.89
LENDERS ASSTD
BAGLES ................................$2.49
BLAST PUNCH
MANGO /PEACH, TROPICAL PUNCH, PINEAPPLE
BANANA, STRAWBERRY KIWI, PINEAPPLE GUAVA,
APPLY & PINK GRAPEFRUIT
.....................................................$3 .19


POTATOES 10 Ib bag .............$3.99
CALIFORNIA NAVEL
ORANGES ..........................3/$0.89
RED SEEDLESS
GRAPES LB ........................... $1.99
CELLO CARROTS ...............$1.49
ONION 3LB BAG ............. $1.39
ROMAINE HEARTS EACH .....$2.49


MEAT SW- "INGS W


MINI
PORK RIBS LB ......................$0.97
FRESH
GROUND TURKEY LB .............$1.37


FRESH
TURKEY WINGS


LB...............$0.89


N.Z.
LAMB SHOULDER


CHOPS LB ....$1.97


PORK LOIN ASST CHOPS
(INCLUDING CENTER) LB ..........$1.97


MIS CUT
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LB................$1.19


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BONELESS SIRLOIN TIP ROAST
LB....$2.97
FLANDER
BEEF PATTIES 5LB BOX .......$5.97
TYSON TWIN PACK
CORNISH HENS PER PAK.....$7.97


TM
CORNED
BEEF
99 12 0Z
TM
WHOLE KERNEL
CORN
$169
B 29 OZ


HELLMANS
REGULAR/OW FATI
LIGHT
MAYONNAISE
33932 OZ
AUNT JEMIMA

SYRUP

$294 OZ


ROBIN HOOD

FLOUR
$489
I 4 LBS
CAMPBELLS.
PORN-N-
BEANS
2/$0309


MAHATMA

RICE

S 5 10LBS
NIAGRA
ASSORTED
STARCH
22 OZ


JBI
GREEN PIGEON
PEAS
(WITH COCONUT MILK)
$165 Oz
PAMPERS
NEWBORN
SWADDLERS
$49940CT
4 0 .....I..........


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1 STOP AT OUR DELI ON THE WAY HOME FOR DINNER TO GO. NOW OPEN TILL 8PM.


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$2 ROLL










L A


* THE Bahamas Red Cross Society 64th Annual Red Cross Fair was held on Government House
grounds over the weekend.
(Photos: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)



Fun for all at



Red Cross Fair


-A VISITOR enjoys a snack at the fair
** VISITOR enjoys a snack at the fair


* LADY Pindling stops and has a smile with a
little boy at the Bahamas Red Cross Fair


L4pI
invent
I


COMPUTERS LIMITED


Island Traders Building, East Bay Street
Tel: (242) 322-2115 Open Monday-Saturday
Email: answers@customcomputers.bs
*a www.customcomputers.bs


* THE Royal Bahamas Police Force pop band puts on a show for the many people at the fair



Bahamian Book News
:" A powerfidi and reflective novel, both
.., enraging and hypnotic"
'' -Amazon.com


Meet the Bahamian author
Garth Buckner


At the official book launch & signing of
"THE ORIGINS OF SOLITUDE"
Thursday, March 16th
5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at
The National Art Galleray of The Bahamas,
"Villa Doyel",
West Hill Street,
Nassau, Bahamas.
"Are you ready for the peril of the real?"
Gordon Lish, former fiction Editor Esquire
HII
Triple Press


S "Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


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MONDWAY, MARCH,6, 2006, PAO, '-'


TH,5 TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 16, MONDAY, MARCH 6, 2006


I


>-


"-1-
- .g


* DR Conville Brown explaining the linear accelerator (radiation therapy machine) in the vault at
The Cancer Center to His Excellency, Arthur Hanna. Also pictured are Officer Roberts on left
and Aide De Camp ASP Phillip Gibson.
(Photos: Franklyn G Ferguson)


* L-R: Professor Ralph Dobelbower, chairman of practice accreditation for The American
College of Radiation Oncology (ACRO); Dr Gregory Cotter, chairman of standards for ACRO;
Professor Arthur Porter, managing director for The Cancer Center Bahamas, and CEO of the
McGill University Health Centre; Dr Conville Brown, chairman and president of RTSBL and The
Cancer Center Bahamas. The centre is now only the second centre in the world to be accredited
by the ACRO outside the US. The only other is in Rome, Italy.


: IA






.1,



GRAHAM


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4 4
.1 .I r 'tt l~4t


*'~~


RBC FINCO has been supporting art
programs in our community for nearly 30
years. As a part of their continued
commitment to the development of arts
and our nation's youth, RBC FINCO recently
partnered with the Ministry of Education's
Art & Design Unit during the recent 8th
Visual Arts Exhibition held at the Mall at
Marathon. The program is designed to
develop and improve the performance of art
skills of students, who are enrolled in the
secondary schools in New Providence and
the Family Islands. Students were able to
showcase their competency with materials
and components of the art curriculum in
twenty-five optional categories.
Mrs. Patrice Ritchie, senior manager
Mortgages, Sales and Marketing said, "RBC
FINCO is proud to sponsor this program.
This Exhibition serves as an excellent
introduction to RBC FINCO's upcoming
Summer Arts Workshop, which we have
sponsored since 1980. More than 2000
high school students have participated in
this program since its inception." Mrs.
Ritchie applauded the students for the


quality of their presentations and
encouraged them to continue their efforts.
The winners were as follows:
Senior High School Category:
1st Government High School
2nd C. I. Gibson Sr. High School
3rd C. R. Walker Sr. High School
Junior High School Category:
1st- C. C. Sweeting Jr. High School
2nd S. C. McPherson Jr. High School
3rd L. W. Young Jr. High School
Family Islands Category:
1st L. N. Coakley Secondary School
2nd Eight Mile Rock High School
3rd N. G. N. Major High School
About RBC FINCO
RBC FINCO is a lead provider for home
mortgages to Bahamians and attractive
interest rates for its depositors. Its majority
shareholder is Royal Bank of Canada, which
is Canada's largest diversified financial
institution as measured by market
capitalization and assets, and is one of
North America's leading diversified financial
services companies. This is RBC FINCO's
52nd year of operation and 22nd year since
the company went public and Bahamians
became shareholders. RBC FINCO continues
to be a lead provider of mortgages to
Bahamians. The company employs 127
persons who service more than 50,000
clients through offices in New Providence
and Freeport, Grand Bahama.


Photo shows school representatives in each category with Mrs, Patrice Ritchie senior
S manager ., ,-. i...-, Sales arnd "*., ._(;I.I RBC FINCO standing in center.

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. .., .; ..- -


* PRIME Minister Perry Christie discussing the ten phases of The Centreville Medical Pavilion
Project with his Minister of Health and National Insurance, Senator Dr Bernard Nottage, and its
founder and CEO, Dr Conville Brown, as Governor General Arthur Hanna looks on


_


Officials look at



cancer centre


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Th t ,uu.


MONDAY, MARCH 6, 2006


SECTION .- -.


OCOIm
V enMia
^~~ 1feftr '"%


business@tribunemedianet Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Government will not


allow


BTC break-up


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Government will
reject any bid that plans
to break-up the
Bahamas Telecommuni-
cations Company
(BTC), the minister of state for
finance told The Tribune, acknowl-
edging that rivals to the group cur-
rently conducting exclusive 90-day due
diligence on the state-owned company
had also submitted offers.
When asked by this newspaper to
confirm that other groups apart from
Bluewater Communications Holdings


had expressed interest in acquiring a
stake in BTC, James Smith said: "Yes,
there have been.
"But under our process, we say that
we will just note your interest, and if
we're unable to compete with the cur-
rent Bluewater people, we will go
back to the drawing board."
The Tribune understands that at
least one offer has been made by a
New York-based group, which is only
interested in BTC's cellular monopoly
- the most lucrative part of its opera-
tions.
This group is understood to have
been especially keen to exploit the
potential revenue streams from 'roam-


* JAMES SMITH


ing' agreements a privatised BTC
would enter into with other interna-
tional telecoms carriers.
Roaming allows tourists and inter-
national business travellers to use their
US, Canadian and European-issued
cell phones while in the Bahamas, an
important attraction for a country
whose economy is based on interna-
tionally-provided services.
Mr Smith acknowledged the New
York group's interest indirectly,
although he declined to name any oth-
er bidders. He said, though, that the
Government would not entertain any
offers that aimed to break BTC up
into different business lines.


Mr Smith said: "One of them was
interested in cellular only. We all
know that represents a very lucrative
field for BTC itself, but the question of
breaking BTC up into profitable lines
is not what we want to see happen at
this stage.
"It would not be consistent with the
development long-term of a telecom-
munications framework for the entire
country."
He pointed to the tremendous
investment BTC had made over the
years in establishing a fixed-line

SEE page 9B


Corporation talks to BISX rights issue fullv subscribed'


Kerzner on delaying

R/O plant finish

i By A FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Business Reporter
THE Water & Sewerage Corporation is negotiating with Kerzn-
er International to move back the April 2007 deadline for com-
pleting the Arawak Cay reverse osmosis plant, which will supply
water to the Atlantis Phase III expansion.
The Corporation and by extension the Government and
Bahamian taxpayer face possible fines if the Arawak Cay plant
is not completed by that date. Phillip Beneby, a senior executive
with the Water & Sewerage Corporation, said previously that
an agreement had been signed, and "if we don't do it, we'll be
penalised."
Kerzner International was
seeking to have the plant ready in
time for the completion of its SEE page 8B


Buyer faces decision on

Bahamas Food tie-up


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE deal to purchase a large
stake in Bahamas Food Ser-
vices, the nation's leading food
wholesaler, now lies in the
hands of a major US foodser-
vice corporation, The Tribune
has learnt, the Government
having approved the move in
principle.
: Sysco Corporation, the New
York Stock Exchange (NYSE)
listed company that generated
$26.1 billion in sales during its


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Government's fiscal
deficit fell by 15 per cent during
the first half of its 2005-2006
fiscal year to $71.3 million, due
to continued improvements in
revenue collection.
The Central Bank of the
Bahamas' review of monthly
economic developments for
January 2006 found that in the
six months to December 31,
2005, improved enforcement
and "buoyant economic condi-
tions" had increased govern-
ment revenues by $79.8 million


2003 fiscal year, is now under-
stood to be debating whether
to go through with the pur-
chase, given that the wait for
Bahamian government
approval has dragged on for
almost two years.
The US conglomerate is now
in the process of assessing
whether to complete the deal
as originally envisaged, and
how it would work.
The Tribune earlier this year

SEE page 7B


to $544.9 million, a 17.5 per
cent increase.
Tax receipts, which account-
ed for 92.2 per cent of govern-
ment revenues, rose by 13.2 per
cent. Import duties, which
account for about 50 per cent '
of government revenue, were
up by 32.53 per cent from
$158.6 million to $210.1 mil-
lion.
Total government spending,
though, was up 12.2 per cent
for the fiscal 2005-2006 first
half, standing at $616.1 million

SEE page 9B


UP1


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas International Securities
Exchange (BISX) "successfully complet-
ed" its rights offering to existing share-
holders, raising around $250,000 in capital
to fund its future operations, as the
exchange seeks to move forward on creat-
ing a "formalised debt market".
Keith Davies, BISX's chief executive,
told The Tribune that the rights issue was


Next step creation of 'formalised debt market'


fully subscribed, and immediately following
its completion, the Government moved on
long-term plans to revitalise the exchange
and wider Bahamian capital markets by
taking an equity stake in BISX.
He said: "What was very encouraging
for us was that we had a majority of share-
holders subscribe for their rights, and then
those rights that were not subscribed for,


we had a number of individuals purchase a
bit more [than their allocation].
"We were therefore fully subscribed on
the rights issue. It signals our shareholders
believe in what we're doing, and under-
stand what we're doing."

SEE page 7B


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Fiscal deficit falls by 15%


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-r .r- Tr1. 1i IINhI


E 2B, MONDAY, MARCH 6, 2006 1irt= I HIUli-



The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 596.89% YTD 8.16%

BISX CLOSING 'CHANGE; VOLUME YTD RICE
dCi1A1NdlM


i By Fidelity Capital
Markets

A MODERATE level of
trading activity took place in
the Bahamian market last week
as more than 43,000 shares
changed hands. The market
saw five out of the 20 listed
stocks trade, of which three
advanced and two remained
unchanged.
Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
was the volume leader for the
fourth straight week, with


I.-


30,100 shares changing hands
and accounting for 69 per cent
of the total shares traded.
The big advancer for the
week was Bank of the
Bahamas (BOB), whose share
price increased by $0.05 to end
the week at $7.

Week

Also advancing this week
was Abaco Markets (AML),
up $0.01 to end the week at
$0.72.


The FINDEX gained 1.13
points for the week to close at
596.89.
COMPANY NEWS

FINCO (FIN) For the 2006
first quarter, FIN recorded net
income of $5.1 million, repre-,
senting an increase of $567,000
or 12.43 per cent over the $4.6
million achieved for the com-
parable period last year. Total
assets grew by $58 million or
10.5 per cent to total $612 mil-
lion as at January 31, 2006.


EXCELLENT JOB OPPORTUNITY


SF7N7IR L iL


The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) is seeking a suitably qualified
attorney with drive and ambition to fill the position of > N
i 1'r 'I \ liNS t' 1 The successful candidate will provide legal
services to the Commission in respect of its operations, particularly
in the preparation of various legal documents and enforcement of
licence conditions and any instructions issued by the Commission
in accordance with the Public Utilities Commission Act and the Acts
governing the industries regulated by the Commission.

Qualifications: LLB; Membership in the Bahamas Bar Association;
',i -i: -i.' ,- -m.,ti'i'al law experience. Practical experience in
Administrative Law will be an asset.

The PUC offers a very attractive benefits package and excellent
opportunities for further development. Starting salary will be
commensurate with relevant experience. Further information about
the PUC can be obtained from its website:



Applications should be received by March 14, 2006.


In related news, FIN's board
of directors has declared a
$0.12 per share dividend
payable on March 14, 2006, to
all ordinary shareholders as at
record date March 7, 2006.

Bank of the Bahamas
(BOB) For the 2006 sec-
ond quarter, BOB posted net
income of $2.6 million, which
represents an increase of
$551,000 or 27.6 per cent over'
the equivalent period last year.
Interest income grew by $2.2
million to total $8.8 million,
while interest expenses rose by
$488,000 to total $3.2 million.
Net provisions for loan losses
increased by $504,000 to total
$703,000, while non-interest
revenue also increased by
$572,000 to total $1.7 million.
BOB's loan portfolio grew
by $118 million or 36 per cent
to total $446 million year-over-
year, while total deposits
increased by $124 million or 40
per cent to total $436 million.
Total assets grew by $131 mil-
lion or 33.8 per cent year-over-
year to total $518 million as at
January 31, 2006.
BOB's management also
revealed that its $25 million
Rights Offering was oversub-
scribed in January 2006. The
bank has said the funds will be
used for further expansion and
development.

Bahamas Supermarkets
(BSL) BSL has released
its financial results for the 2006
second quarter. Net income
stood at $3.1 million, repre-
senting an increase of $364,000
or 13.3 per cent over the $2.7
million achieved for the same
period last year.
Net sales grew by $2.8 mil-
lion or 6.7 per cent to total $44
million, while cost of sales
increased by $1.9 million or 6.2
per cent to total $32 million.
The increase in sales was dri-
ven primarily by competitive
pricing and merchandising,
along with reduced competi-
tive pressures in the Grand
Bahama market. Operating
and administrative expenses
increased by $575,000 to total
.$9.2 million.
BSL management has attrib-
uted the increase in operating
expenses to increases in pay-
roll, utility and supply costs.
Earnings per share for the 2006
second quarter grew by $0.08
year-over-year to total $0.68 as
at January 31, 2006.


SYMBOL PRICE


AML
BAB
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
CWCB
DHS
FAM
FCC
FCL
FIN
ICD
JSJ
KZLB
PRE


$0.72
$1.18
$0.70
$7.00
$10.48
$13.25
$1.26
$9.45
$9.50
$1.70
$11.00
$5.46
$2.80
$6.21
$1.15
$10.05
$10.99
$9.50
$8.75
$6.76
$10.00


$0.01
$-
$-
$0.05
$-

$-0.
$-
$-
$0.04
$-
$-
$0.34
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$0.06
$-


8333
0
0
2966
0
0
0
0
30100
0
0'
0
1000
0
0
0
950
0
0
0
0


-1.37%
7.27%
0.00%
0.00%
0.77%
3.92%
0.00%
-1.05%
4.28%
3.66%
1.10%
6.64%
29.03%
2.64%
0.00%
0.00%
0.83%
-4.52%
-3.31%
-1.31%
0.00%


DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:
SBank of the Bahamas (BOB) declared a dividend of $0.10
per share payable on March 6, 2006, to all common share-
holders as at record date March 1, 2006.

Commonwealth Bank (CBL) declared a dividend of $0.12
per share payable on March 31, 2006, to all common slare-
holders as at record date March 15, 2006.

Commonwealth Bank (CBL) declared an extraordinary
dividend of $0.12 per share payable on April 28, 2(X)6, I all
common shareholders as at record date April 15,2006. .

FINCO (FIN) declared a dividend of $0.13 per share
payable on March 14,2006, to all common shareholders at
record date March 7, 2006. I

FINCO will hold its Annual General Meeting on March 16,
2006, at 6.30 pm at the British Colonial Hilton, Bay Street, Nas-
sau, Bahamas.



International Markets
'


FOREX Rates

CAD$
GBP
EUR


Commodities


Crude Oil
Gold


Weekly


%Chauge .


1.1348, l-
1.7543.6
1.2037 1.36


Weekly %Change :

$63.50 0.94
$567.00 098k


International Stock Market Indexes:


'*1*-~


Weekly %C~ange


DJIA
S & P 500
NASDAQ
Nikkei


11,021.69
1,287.23
2,302.60
15,663.34


-0.36
-0.17
0.68
-2.72


Share


your


news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


'.
.2~ : y


, -w *,* ,a,


irm tovin' ft


"Public Utilities Cornnlissiol
.- --., .
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0060"WROM.


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THEINES T


Bank


chief


calls


for


sustainable growth


BANK of the Bahamas
International on Friday opened
its Exuma branch and expand-
ed its footprint to six Bahamian
islands, but its managing direc-
tor cautioned that the growth
of his organisation and the
wider Bahamas had to be sus-
tainable.
Speaking at the opening cer-
emony for the full-service Exu-
ma branch, Paul McWeeney
said all Bahamians and resi-
dents had "to face the reality"
that while growth was essen-
tial, it had to take place in a
way that protected land and
marine resources, and did not
outpace infrastructure devel-


opment. Mr McWeeney said:
"If we allow growth to explode
unchecked, unfettered, we do
so at our own peril.........
"Surely, as responsible cor-
porate citizens, we understand
that we must base our decisions
not merely on the support of
growth, but growth that is
sound not just for today but for
tomorrow, and the years of
tomorrow that follow."
He added that growth in
Exuma and throughout the
Bahamas had to be "careful,
prudent and planned".
Mr McWeeney said Bank of
the Bahamas International, in
addition to empowering


Bahamians living on Exuma,
would also be able to provide
mortgages and capital to
approved foreign investors.
He added that the new
branch would "positively
impact" business operations on
Exuma, reducing waiting peri-
ods and enabling payroll to be
immediately available. Ship-
ping and deliveries to the island
would also benefit through
payment for, and reimburse-
ment of, services.
Credit card services would
also become available for all
merchants, Mr McWeeney
said.
"Residents who felt like the


Bank of the Bahamas


Int. enjoys 40% loans


and advances rise


BANK of the Bahamas Interna-
tional has seen a 40 per cent
increase in loans and advances,
which have driven a $132 million
increase in assets over one year.
The rise in loans and advances, :-
the ,bank said, was driven by an
aggressive mortgage campaign
across several islands that bolstered
further its long-term lending port-
folio. It helped take total assets
from $387 million at December 31,
2004, to $519 million at December
31,2005.
The announcement was made as N PAUL l1
Bank of the Bahamas International
revealed that net income for the first half of its
2006 fiscal year rose by 17 percent, with second
quarter net income up 28 per cent.


Return on equity and dividends
were up by 23 per cent and $0.42
respectively.
Paul McWeeney, the bank's man-
aging director, said in a statement:
S "We are extremely pleased to
announce outstanding results in all
areas of Bank of the Bahamas' per-
formance. We believe that these
excellent numbers reflect the effec-
tive delivery of customer experi-
ences and the positive reception to
innovative products and services."
During the 2006 second quarter,
:WEENEY the bank launched its VISA pre-
paid and gift cards. It also com-
pleted a $25 million rights issue to raise extra
capital to sustain its growth, an issue that was
oversubscribed.


SUNSINE FINANCE LTD.
LENDING & MORTGAGE SERVICES
A .Cl"/ DARY S OF1lM9a/t'NEHO$L.'CSV Z 7


Position Available
for
SECURITIES OFFICER LOAN PORTFOLIO


Our Services

Our Parentage




Our Thrust





Only Apply If You










Compensation
Assurance of
Confidentiality


We provide mortgage brokerage, lending and other
financial services.
We are a part of a financially strong group. Specifically,
we are a subsidiary of Sunshine Holdings Co. Ltd., which
is also the parent company of Arawak Homes Limited and
Sunshine Insurance (Agents & Brokers):Ltd. as well as the
largest investor in Focol Holdings Co. Ltd. and Cotton Bay
Developers Ltd.
Our clients are. primarily persons who benefit from
another chance to re-organize their financial affairs,
especially, but not exclusively, within the context of seeking
to achieve a meaningful goal like home ownership, most
typically with the co-operation of another institution. We
are not focused on casual consumer lending.

Have a diploma, or degree or certificate in Banking,
Accounting or Law, at the professional or college
level.
Have been employed in the Risk Management or
Collateral Department of a Bank or other financial services
institution, with direct involvement in credit administration
and collections as opposed to strictly lending.
Have a strong work ethic, and a motivation to have an
opportunity to be a meaningful part of a small and dynamic
team with the determination to build a leadership position
within a niche section of the overall capital markets of the
country.
Commensurate with both qualification and experience.

Assurance is given that every applicant will be treated
in the strictest of confidence.


Apply, only in writing to:


The Operations Manager,
Sunshine Finance Ltd.,
P.O. Box N-3180,
Nassau, Bahamas.


or email to: fsmith(@sunshinefinanceltd.com


Kindly include three references.


stepchild going to Nassau to do
most of their banking will be
able to fulfil all their banking
needs on the spot on the out-
skirts of Georgetown, Exuma,"
Mr McWeeney said.
"You will be able to apply
for a mortgage or an Ameri-
can Express Platinum Card,
order supplies, put funds in a
CD or talk to someone about


setting up a trust without ever
encountering a red light."
He added that the bank's
growth had enabled more
Bahamians to obtain financing
for small and medium-sized
businesses, while larger com-
panies had obtained capital
allowing them to provide more
competitive products and ser-
vices.


iV^\


REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL TO CONDUCT
EXTERNAL AUDIT


The Education Loan Authority is seeking to contract an accounting firm to conduct
its annual audit for the fiscal years 2006-2008.

The Education Loan Authority is a quasi government corporation established
under the Education Loan Authority Act, 2002, charged with the responsibility
of raising money for the Education Loan Guarantee Scheme established under
the Educational Guarantee Fund Act, 2001. The Education Loan Authority is also
designated as an approved lender and is responsible for the issuance, monitoring
and collection of student loans.

For additional information please contact the
Chief Administrative Officer at 323-6322/25/37.

Deadline for application is March 31st 2006









invites applications for the position of

Graphic Artist


PROFILE:
Bachelors Degree preferably in Graphic Design or related.field
Proficient in Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign or Quark Express
Strong artistic skills in design and layout ,
Ability to handle multiple projects With chagingngriorities,
Strong production skills
Excellent work ethic and attitude
e Strong organizational skills
A Excellent oral and written communication skills,
1 Proficient in PC platform'



RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:
Assisting the Marketing/PR Director
Researching, designing and maintaining a variety of promotional
materials and tools to support the company's image, design
standards and marketing goals
Producing, editing and printing all marketing materials
Building and maintaining mixed media relationships

Portfolio required

Compensation package will include a competitive salary, together
with a comprehensive range of benefits.



(I Send resume no later than March 10 2006 to:

Human Resources

I 51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
Fax 326.3000
e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com


I CABINET MAKER
With 5yrs or more experience
Able to use Tuing-late Machine
And able to Carved
I FINISHER
With 5yrs or more experience
All types of Finishes
including Pickling
1 UPHOLSTERER
1 Qualified Upholsterer with 5yrs
or more experience
Able to work alone
Please produce References.
For an Interview please called
326-4976


~B~B~BIB~LWR~R~RWa~R~RRL~~


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


MONDAY, MARCH 6, 2006, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, MARCH 6, 2006


Compliance officers urged





to lobby for. legal changes


Bahamas Association of Com-
pliance Officers (BACO), told
the group that their greatest
role as compliance officers may
be in becoming a lobbying
group for legislative change.
She said that while BACO's
mission statement points to
bringing anti-money launder-
ing efforts to a "Bahamian
environment", she wants to see
them "strive to drive your local
standards to a global standard".
Referring to the actions lob-
bying groups in the US recent-
ly took over the Patriot Act,


Legal Notice



NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT (No. 45 of 2000)


CLC CORPORATION
In Voluntary Liquidation

"Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137(4) of the
International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), CLC
CORPORATION is in Dissolution."

The date of commencement of dissolution is 9th day of December,
2005.

David Gaskell
of 7 boulevard des Moulins
MC98000 Monaco
Liquidator






NOTICE OF SALE


The Town Court Management Company (hereafter "the
company") invites offers for the purchase ALL THAT Unit
Number B-26 of The Town Court Condominiums situated
on Nassau Street in the Western District of the Island of
New Providence being a two bedroom/one bath apartment
unit together with ALL THAT 1.60% share in the common
property of the Condominiums.

The Company makes no representations or warranties with
respect to the state of repair of the building situate thereon.

The Company will sell under Power of Sale contained in
a Declaration of Condominium of Town Court
Condominiums dated 8th October 1979 which is recorded
in Book 3189 at pages 366 to 405.

TERMS: Ten percent (10%) of the purchase price at the
time of contract and the balance upon completion within
Sixty (60) days of contract.

This sale is subject to reserve price. The Company reserves
the right to reject any and all offers.

Interested persons may submit written offers addressed to
the Attorney SSS, P.O. Box N-272, Nassau, Bahamas to be
received no later than the close of business on the 18th day
of March, A.D., 2006.


Mrs Wright said: "We must not
remain silent when legislative
and other reforms are
advanced upon us.
"Your voice as a lobbying
group could be the most impor-
tant role for BACO in the
nation. You have the expertise
to assist government to [help
the Bahamas attain] its rightful
place in financial services."
Mrs Wright said technology
will continue to play an even
greater role in the globalisa-
tion process, and is most impor-
tant to compliance officers'


careers. "More money is stolen
by the click of a mouse than
by a gun around the world,"
she said.

Warned

Mrs Wright also warned
them to stay current and rele-
vant, and ensure those who
work in the field of financial
services recognize and respect
compliance officers for the val-
ue their input really holds.
Walking away as Compli-
ance Professional of the Year


Legal Notice



NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT (No. 45 of 2000)


KOLTON HOLDINGS LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137(4) of the
International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), KOLTON
HOLDINGS LIMITED is in Dissolution."

The date of commencement of dissolution is 9th day of December,
2005.

David Gaskell
of 7 boulevard des Moulins
MC98000 Monaco
Liquidator






NOTICE OF SALE


The High Vista Management (hereafter "the Company")
invites offers for the purchase of ALL THAT Unit Number
6 of The High Vista Condominiums Complex situate on
Eastern Road in the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence being a two bedroom/one bath condominium
unit together with ALL THAT 1/24th share in the common
property of the Condominium Complex.

The Company makes no representations or warranties with
respect to the state of repair of the building situate thereon.

The Company will sell under Power of Sale contained in
a Declaration of Condominium of High Vista Condominium
complex dated the 26th day of October, A.D., 1978 and
recorded in Volume 3009 at pages 457 to 483.

TERMS: Ten percent (10%) of the purchase price at the
time of contract and the balance upon completion within
Thirty (30) days of contract.

This sale is subject to reserve price. The Company reserves
the right to reject any and all offers. ,

Interested persons may submit written offers addressed to
the Attorney S. Smith, P.O. Box N-272, Nassau, Bahamas
to be received no later than the close of business on the
18th day of March, A.D., 2006.


Financial Advisors Ltd.I

Pricing Information As Of:
03 March 2006
BISX LlsTbE & TRADED SECURITIES VISIT WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX. CLOSE 1,364.60 / CHG 00.00 1 %CHG 00.00 / YTD 13.89 / YTD % 01.03
,..l. H., 52wk-L ba S., mbol Pre.,ous Close Tcod ,'s Clois Change Dail '. :. EPS i Di $ P.E Yield
u.s5 0.70 ADaco Markets 0.72 0 72 0 00 .0 169 000 000 N/ 00
10.52 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 10.48 10.48 0.00 1.456 0.360 7.2 3.44%
7.24 5.88 Bank of Bahamas 7.00 7.00, 0.00 0.643 0.330 10.9 4.71%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.70 0.70 0.00 0.175 0.020 4.0 2.86%
1 80 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.26 1.26 0.00 0.105 0.060 12.0 4.76%
1.20 0.95 Fidelity Bank 1.18 1.18 0.00 0.070 0.040 16.7 3.42%
9.60 7.90 Cable Bahamas 9.45 9.45 0.00 0.689 0.240 13.7 2.54%
2.20 1.39 Colina Holdings 1.70 1.70 0.00 -0.067 0.000 NM 0.00%
9.50 7.90 Commonwealth Bank 9.50 9.50 0.00 20,100 0.661 0.450 11.0 4.74%
546 4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.46 5.36 -0.10 0.099 0.045 55.1 0.83%
2.88 1.45 Doctor's Hospital 2.80 2.80 0.00 0.437 0.000 6.5 0.00%
6.21 4.02 Famguard 6.21 6.21 0.00 0.542 0.240 11.5 3.86%
10.99 g.99 Finco 10.99 10.99 0.00 0.738 0.530 14.9 4.82%
11.00 7.50 FirstCaribbean 11.00 11.00 0.00 0.828 0.500 13.3 4.55%
10.05 7.95 Focol 10.05 10.05 0.00 0.833 0.500 12.1 4.98%
1.27 1.15 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 -0.162 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.20 9.60 ICD Utilities 9.50 9.50 0.00 0.526 0.405 18.1 5.68%
9.10 8.22 J. S. Johnson 8.75 8.75 0.00 0.572 0.560 15.8 6.19%
7.00 5.30 Kerzner International BDRs 6.76 6.85 0.09 0.134 0.000 50.1 0.00%
1000 10 O0 Premier Real Estate 1000 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.760 4.9 7.60%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Sec urties
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Veekly Vol EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
13.25 12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.25 14.25 11.00 1.917 0.720 7.2 5.05%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
S54 0 20 RND Holdings 0 29 0.54 0.00 -0.044 0.000 NM 0.00%
Collins Over-The-Counttr 6ecurlttes
J-. .-11 2800 ABDAB -I 100 .1300 1100 2 220 00 I0iu 14 0 000-
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.75 13.75 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 NM 0.00%
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
57.-.k.Hi 521uk-Lo. Fund Name NA */ YTD: Last 12 T.l.:,rihs D. i. Yiela
1 2756 1 2106 Colhna Mone, Mlarkel Fun 1 275626"
2.6262 2.2268 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.6262 ***
10.8183 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.8183****
2.3241 2.1660 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.324145*
1 1547 1 0894 Colina Bond Fund 1 154701""
FINDE.: CLOSE S85.72 r YTP 8.131% j2005 B.O0%
6i < ALL SH-ARE INDE X 19 Dec 02 w 1 000 00 YIELD ,1.l 12 monir. ai.iaends ra liaed 0, closing clce
52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelit)
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fldelit)
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for dally volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to dac EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
S- AS AT JAN. 31. 2006/ AS AT JAN. 31. 2006
S AT FEEB 17 ?iO2 -* AS AT JAN 31 2006/.*** AS AT JAN 31 2006
1TC TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 1 FIDEI.TY 242-356-776 *i


was Tameka Burrows-Forbes,
of Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national.
Mrs Burrows-Forbes told her
colleagues that the job was a
stressful one, with many rules
to follow, but she encouraged
them to continue and said she
was surprised and honoured by
the award.
Jackie Hunt-Ferguson, of
Pictet Bank and Trust, Keva
Bain of RBC FINCO, Wendell
Gardiner of Deltec Bank and
Trust, and Fabian Bain of Got-
tardo Trust Company were also
nominated for the top award.
Speaking just before the win-
ners were announced, former
Minister of Financial Services
and Investments, Allyson May-
nard-Gibson said the event
strengthened the view that "we
have a very deep intellectual
bench in the Bahamas".
Detective Superintendent of
Police, Edward Smith, received
a special award along with Kim
Bodie.


Superintendent Smith has
spent the past 18 years investi-
gating financial crimes, spe-
cialising in the fight against
money laundering since 1996.
He is a certified fraud examin-
er, certified financial investiga-
tor and trained criminal intelli-
gence analyst.
Mrs Bodie joined the
Bahamas Institute of Financial
Services in 1980 as Secretary
to the Registrar. She was pro-
moted to executive adminis-
trator in 1986, and also serves
as secretary to the council.
The International Compli-
ance Association Award recip-
ients were: Jacqueline Cony-
ers, of the Central Bank of the
Bahamas; Linda Lowe of Bear
Bull International; Pauline Sey-
mour of 'BSI Overseas
(Bahamas); Dwayne Swaby of
J S Johnson; Debra Thompson
of the Central DetectiverUnit;
entrepreneur Sally Thompson;
and Sandra Walker of Pictet
Bank and Trust.


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


WESTERHAM BUSINESS INC.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of WESTERHAM BUSINESS
INC. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck
off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


BROSSARD LTD.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of BROSSARD LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)






NOTICE OF SALE


The Town Court Management Company (hereafter "the
company") invites offers for the purchase ALL THAT Unit
Number C-53 of The Town Court Condominiums situated
on Nassau Street in the Western District of the Island of
New Providence being a one bedroom/one bath apartment
unit together with ALL THAT 1.35% share in the common'
property of the Condominiums.

The Company makes no representations or warranties with
respect to the state of repair of the building situate thereon.

The Company will sell under Power of Sale contained in
a Declaration of Condominium of,ToWn Court
Condominiums dated 8th October 1979 which is recorded
in Book 3189 at pages 366 to 405.

TERMS: Ten percent (10%) of the purchase price at the
time of contract and the balance upon completion within
Thirty (30) days of contract.

This sale is subject to reserve price. The Company reserve
the right to reject any and all offers.

Interested persons may submit written offers addressed to
the Attorney S. Smith, P.O. Box N-272, Nassau, Bahamas
to be received no later than the close of business on the
18th day of March, A.D., 2006.


* By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Business
Reporter

COMPLIANCE officers
were urged this weekend to
become a lobbying force for
legislative change, in addition
to their primary job of detect-
ing and fighting money laun-
dering in the Bahamas.
The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce's president, Tanya
Wright, speaking at the fifth
annual awards dinner for the


II


m


I I BUSINESSES







THF RIBUE MNDAY MACH 6200, PAE 5


Doctors



Hospital



finishes



system's



installation

DOCTORS Hospital Health T O more
Systems (DHHS) has complet- phases to come
ed the first phase of installing s
its Heathcare Information Sys-
tem (HIS), having gone live on from one source, with changes
March with its clinical, finan- to these records made in real
cial and administrative func- time. The new system will cov-
tions.: er all facets of the health care
Thesystem, developed by spectrum, from primary care
Medial Information Technol-. to continuing care manage-
ogy lic (MEDITECH), aims ment. Information will be inte-
to enhance DHHS's healthcare grated across the hospital
delivoy practices by aligning among the physicians orches-
its IT system with customer ser- treating care, the nurses deliv-
vice aid business objectives, ering care, and the clinical
"I (an honestly say that I departments supporting this
have lever seen a Go-Live pro- care.
ceedis smoothly as this one DHHS plans to implement
did; te implementation and the rest of its advanced clini-
execition was streamlined," cal applications in Phase II,
DHI-S chief executive, Barry which will finish this July.
Rassh, said of the first phase These applications include
impltmentation in a statement. Laboratory, Community Wide
Tie new system is intended Scheduling, Meditech Internet
to improve access to appropri- Gateway, Patient Care System,
ate dihical information; stream- and Nursing Documentation,
line vorkflows and decrease followed by Operating Room
repetitivee paperwork; improve Management and Comput-
comrunications between care- erised Physician Order Entry
gives; enable better co-ordi- in Phase III. That will be com-
natin of care; hasten reim- pleted by January 2007.
burnements; and most impor- Once Phase II is completed
;tanly, enhance patient safety, in July 2006, physicians and
Operational efficiency and other clinicians will be able to
Icutomer satisfaction are view clinical information
}viewed by DHHS as the major through MEDITECH's Elec-
.gains from Phase I, as the tronic Medical Record.
reductionn in paperwork should DHHS expects the new sys-
result in fewer delays in patient ter will attract more physi-
care. cians, which will in turn attract
Physicians will be ,able,,to morepatients and increase the
;access all patient information hospital's revenue.



NOTICE
NOTCE is hereby given that LAURI VILDOR OF #8 COOL
BREEZE APT., HUDSON AVENUE, P.O. BOX H-45016,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minster responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
anyperson who knows any reason why.registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 27TH
day of FEBRUARY, 2006 to the Minister responsible for
Naionality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

ir U r --


BUSINESS


* DARRON Cash, DHHS' chief financial officer, executing the Go-Live switch at midnight, with Core Team Leaders
Dorcena Nixon, Sara Appleton and Meditech representative Elizabeth Hadley


CARIBBEAN EXPORT DEVELOPMENT AGENCY
(Caribbean Export)

The Caribbean Export Development Agency (Caribbean Export) has the following
vacant positions to facilitate the core activities of the Agency and the implementation
of the 9th EDF Caribbean Trade and Private Sector Development Programme
(CTPSDP) financed by the European Commission and CARIFORUM Member
Countries:

CARIBBEAN EXPORT CORE
9TH EDF (CTPSDP) STAFF

Project Manager (1) Administration Officer
Finance Advisor (1) Financial Officer
Senior Technical Advisor Business Development Officer
Technical Advisor (4) Webmaster and Database Officer


For complete details please visit Caribbean Export's website: www.carib-export.com.


VENTURE CAPITAL FUND
We are seeking an Assistant Project Manager for an
international life science venture fund.
The General Partner of a Bahamas Limited Partnership
is seeking an Assistant Project Manager to assist in
the evaluation of investment opportunities in
international markets. The Partnership invests in the
life sciences field and is particularly interested in
identifying innovative approaches to prevent chronic
diseases.
The job is specialised and requires that the candidate
have a sound degree in Biology while at the same time
it is vital that the candidate has hands on analytical
experience and has developed and monitored clinical
studies for an international pharmaceutical company,
preferably in an international context. Fluent English
is a prerequisite, other language a plus.
The candidate will be based at the company's office
in Nassau and international travel will be required.
A competitive salary package commensurate with
experience will be offered.
Please reply to Inventages Ventures Capital Investments
Inc., Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen
Streets, Nassau or by email to chairman@vip-wtb.com
for the attention of Dr. Wolfgang Reichenberger.
The deadline for applications is March 15th, 2006.


CCYrTON BAY

ASSISTANT TO
THE DIRECTOR OF SALES


Cotton Bay Developers Limited, the developers of
Cotton Bay Estates and Villas, Eleuthera, is looking
for a suitable candidate to join our Sales team.

Must Possess:

Previous experience in the Real Estate Industry
Good miptitei skills
, Customer database management experience
Excellent organization and administrative skills
Exceptional customer service and interpersonal
skills
High energy
Innovative thinking
Willingness to work flexible hours

Should you meet these requirements, please submit
a resume to infofcottonbayeleuthera.com or via fax
242-334-2849.


AMERICAN

EMBASSY
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS

Offers for Sale by sealed bid

3 Brand New 20' Containers
which meet the highest Industry
Security standards.









Closed bids are due by 2:00 p.m.

Contact
Mrs. Belgin Vanderploeg at
322-1181 ext 4275 or 427-7582


MONDAY, MARCH 6, 2006, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE


I -I I ,I I I .t.II--,







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B, MONDAY. MARCH 6, 2006


Bahamas Supermarkets posts 14.8% profits rise


BAHAMAS Supermarkets
continues to shrug off the
Chapter 11 bankruptcy protec-
tion problems of its majority
shareholder, US retailer Winn-
Dixie, posting a 14.8.per cent
increase in net income during
the 2006 second quarter to $3.1
million.
The improvement from the
$2.7 million net income earned
in the 2005 comparative period
came despite what Bahamas


Supermarkets described as a
"strong competitive environ-
ment" on New Providence dur-
ing the 16 weeks to January 22,
2006.
Operates
Despite this, Bahamas
Supermarkets, which operates
under the City Markets and
Winn-Dixie brands, saw a $2.8
million or 6.7 per cent increase


in gross sales during the sec-
ond quarter to $44.1 million.
The company attributed this
to "competitive pricing, and
merchandising", likely mean-
ing price discounts, and
"reduced competitive pres-
sures" on Grand Bahama. The
latter is likely to refer to the
fact that competitors such as
Solomon's SuperCentre, which
is owned by Abaco Markets,
are still rebuilding market


share, having been hit harder
by the September 2004 hurri-
canes.
Bahamas Supermarket
added that its sales had also
been boosted by low inflation
and the strong performance of
the Bahamian economy.
Sales for the first six months
of fiscal 2006 were up by 8.5
per cent or $5.8 million on the
previous year, standing at $75
million.
Company
Bahamas Supermarkets
emphasised again that as a sep-
arate company that operates
independently of Winn-Dixie,
the Chapter 11 situation in the
US had no impact on its finan-
cials. Winn-Dixie holds its
majority stake in Bahamas
Supermarkets, around 75 per
cent of the issued share capital,
through its Bahamian sub-


sidiary, W-D (Bahamas).
Winn-Dixie has stated pub-
licly that Bahamas Supermar-
kets is not for sale, but The Tri-
bune understands that inter-
ested parties have been con-
tacting Winn-Dixie's office in
Jacksonville to sound out
whether the troubled retailer
would be prepared to sell its
Bahamas operations. Nothing
has happened, though.
The Bahamian supermarket
industry is viewed by some as
ripe for consolidation, given
that there is a relatively large
number of stores chasing after
a finite market, particularly on
New Providence.
Meanwhile, Bahamas Super-
markets' gross profits for the
2006 second quarter rose by 8.1
per cent over the previous year.
As a percentage of sales, gross
profits increased to 27.7 per
cent compared to 27.4 per cent
in the 2005 second quarter, and


ahead of the 26.5 )er cent in
the first quarter 20(6.
Gross profit for tie 2006 first
half rose by 10.2 percent. As a
percentage of sales,'t was 27.2
per cent, compared to 2005's
26.7 per cent.
Bahamas Superm'irkets said
the gross profit rise were dri-
ven by sales rises, vhile their
percentage of sales figures weie
aided by a reduction in total
inventory shrinkage? '
For the 2006 second quarter,
operating and administrative
expenses increased by$0.6 mil-
lion or 6.7 per cent c mpared
to the previous year.
As a percentage cf sales,
operating and administrative
expenses were 20.8 ptr cent,
which matched 2005's figure.
For the 2006 first half, oper-,
ating and administrative
expenses were up by$0.9,m nij
lion or 6 per cent. 4s a per-
centage of sales, tl y we'ry
down to 21.1 per ceit, com-
pared to 21.6 per cent ast year.
The sales increaseensured
that operating and adninistr-
tive expenses decreased as a
percentage of sales,but the
overall rise was drivenby rises
in payroll, utilities ant supply
costs.
Quarter
During the 2006 second
quarter, net cash fronioperat-
ing activities rose to $1.4 mil-
lion compared to $1.2 million in
the same period the p-evious
year.
"The increase in cash pro-
vided by operating acivities
was due primarily to, hn
increase in net earnitig offset
by increases in account, receiv-
able, inventories andtrepaid
expenses, and a net decrease
in current liabilities, ; Whieh
include accounts payabe'"afid
accrued expenses anj ariounts
due to W-D (Bahamas5 aid
Winn Dixie Stores." Bahamas
Supermarkets said..
For the 2006 first halt net
income rose from $3.6 mjlion
the year before to $4.7 million,
or grew from $0.79 per share
to $1.02 per share.


PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY


VACANCY
REGISTRAR IN PSYCHIATRY
SANDILANDS REHABILITATION CENTRE
Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the post of Registrar
in Psychiatry, Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre, Public Hospitals Authority.
Applicants must possess.the following qualifications:-
Basic medical degree from a recognized medical institution; registration with the
Bahamas Medical Council and three (3) years post registration experience.
The successful applicant will be expected to have completed part one (1) of the
Membership Examinations for the Royal College of Psychiatrists or part 1 of the
Doctor of medicine (UWI) or other equivalent credentials.
The Registrar will report to the Senior Registrar and Consultant in charge of the
firm. The Registrar supervises Senior House Officer(s) and House Officer(s) attached,
to the firm.
Duties:
1. Applicants should be capable of communicating without difficulty in speech
or writing in the English Language.
2. The Registrar will be expected to be prepared to work in a busy hospital
setting with a wide mix-of patients and should be competent in the management
of common psychiatric problems in young adults, adults and geriatric
population.
3. The Registrar will be expected to provide care for in-patients and out-patients
under the supervision of the Consultant Psychiatrist and as part of a multi-
disciplinary team.
4. The Registrar is expected to actively participate in the Continuing Medical
Education and teaching programmes of the hospital and Public Hospitals
Authority.
Letters of application, resume, documentary evidence of qualifications and three (3)
references should be submitted, no later than 17th March, 2006 to the Director Human
Resources (Acting), Public Hospitals Authority P.O. Box N-8200, or 1st Floor
Corporate Office, Dockendale House, West Bay Street. Serving officers must apply
through their Hdd 6f-1ipaiim nt? ' '

.. .. .. - . I


U U


BOAT FOR SALE.




.". . r





The "Majestad 1" has an open deck Defender Hull of fiberglass
construction with a 2nd deck affixed to accommodate passengers,
which also houses the pilot arrangements. Hull is in excellent
condition and all equipment onboard is in good working condition.
Principal Dimensions
Length Overall: 61.0 feet
Breadth: 18.0 feet
Engine: (2) Detroit Diesel 12V71 recently rebuilt
Vessel has five compartments w/ five bilge pumps equipped
with 1 inch discharge hoses and a capacity 2,000gph.

PHONE 363-7163
SERIOUS ENQUIRIES ONLY!


GOVERNMENT NOTICE
MINISTRY OF ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL
HEALTH SERVICES


NOTICE
INVITATION FOR TENDERS FOR THE SUPPLY OF VEHICLES

Packer Garbage Trucks
Flat Bed Trucks
All Terraine Vehicle
Pannel Van Pick-up Truck
Single Cab Truck
Cars
Mini buss

The Government of The Bahamas is inviting tenders for the above
vehicles for the Department of Environmental health Services.
Specification for these vehicles may be obtained from:

The Department of Environmental Health Services,
Farrington Road
P.O. Box SS-19048
Nassau, N P
The Bahamas

Telephone Numbers: 322-8037/322-8048
Facsimile numbers: 322-8118/322-8120

Between the hours of 9:00am 5pm Monday Friday

Tenders are to be submitted in sealed envelope (s) marked "Tenders
for The Supply of Vehicles to the Department of Environmental
Health Services" and sent to:

The Tender's Board
c/o The Financial Secretary
Ministry of Finance and Planning
P.O. Box N
Nassau, The Bahamas
No later than 27th March, 2006
All tenders must be submitted in triplicate.
The Government reserves the right to reject any or all tenders


L cO


NOTICE


REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS


PROVISION OF EXTERNAL AUDIT SERVICE

The Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation,
(BAIC) invites Proposals from suitably qualified firms
for the Audit of its Financial Statements for the years
ending December 31, 2005, 2006 and 2007.

A copy of the Corporate Profile of the Corporation is'
available upon request beginning Friday, February 17,
2006, from the Accounting Department, Levy Building,
East Bay Street.

Proposals, in sealed envelopes, must be returned to the
address below, no later than 4:00pm on Friday, March
10, 2006.

General Manager
Bahamas Agricultural & Industrial Corporation
East Bay Street
P.O. Box N-4940
Nassau, Bahamas

Re: PROPOSAL EXTERNAL AUDIT SERVICES

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject.
any or all proposals


IBUSINES







THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, MARCH 6, 2006, PAGE 7B


FROM page 1B
The rights issue's success indicates
that BISX and the capital markets are
continuing to progress on the right
lines, with the exchange and the Gov-
ernment moving to enact the plan for
their revitalisation.
The Government last year unveiled
its policy statement backing the
exchange and capital markets, and the
amendments to the capital account
side of the exchange controls will fur-
ther aid BISX.
And, as,long envisaged, the Gov-


ernment has now acted on the rec-
ommendation for it to take a major
stake in BISX via the Central Bank.
The size of its stake is around 44 per
cent, still leaving BISX's 45 private
shareholders in majority control.
"I'm already hitting the ground run-
ning," Mr Davies told The Tribune.
"It's March and we have work to do. I
have things lined up, entities and indi-
viduals lined up, and it's full steam
ahead. The time for talking is now
over, and I'm focused on the work we
must do."
Top of Mr Davies's priorities is


establishing a formal market for the
listing and trading of debt securities,
such as preference share'issues and
corporate bonds.
The other side if this is working with
the Government to list aiid trade its
government-registered stock and
Treasury Bills on BISX.
Mr Davies described this as "putting
in a few more mechanisms to make
the market more efficient and attrac-
tive for investors ".
The Tribune understands that the
Government is keen to move ahead
with listing its debt instruments, and


BISX has identified the vendor that
will supply the software to facilitate
creation of its debt market.
Mr Davies said the exchange was
"taking the steps to put that in place",
and already knew how to set it up and
use it.
He added that the switch to a for-
mal debt market would require some
adjustment, as government debt
instriiments would be accessed
through broker/dealers, rather than
sold via an auction process overseen
by the Central Bank of the Bahamas.
The Bahamas would transition to


"a more formalised environment, one
that is used all over the world and one
that we need to implement in the
Bahamas if we are to introduce over-
seas players into our market", Mr
Davies said.
"We're taking the time to dp it right,
taking the steps to ensure it's done
right, and delivering something that
is innovative and efficient."
He praised the roles played by
James Smith, minister of state for
finance, and the Government in sup-
porting and revitalising the capital
markets.


FROM page 1B


was told that a key condition of gov-
ernment approval was understood to
be that a hare offering to the Bahami-
an public will take place. When The
Tribune first revealed the potential
tie-up between the two companies on
July 30, 2004, a share offering was
being mulled then.
How anr share offering would work
is s'fill unclear, although it is likely to
give Bahamian investors the oppor-
tunity to buy only a minority stake,
as Sysco will want to retain control.


Any offering could take the form
of Bahamian Depository Receipts
(BDRs) in Sysco, or ordinary shares in
Bahamas Food Services.
When contacted about develop-
ments late last year, Philip Light-
bourne, Bahamas Food Services'
operations director, declined to com-
ment.
He said: "I refuse to comment right
now. It's in the Government's hands
right now."
However, Mr Lightbourne indicat-


ed he might be able to say more to
The Tribune "in a few weeks" "what-
ever the outcome might be".

Indication

Earlier this year, he said he had "no
knowledge" of any indication of
approval or conditions such as a share
offering being set.
"To say that has happened or is in
the making, no one here at Bahamas
Food Services would know or be able


to comment on that," Mr Lightbourne
said.
Sysco bills itself as the leading sup-
plier to "meals-prepared-away-from-
home" operations in the US, servicing
20,000 customers from 148 locations in
the US, Canada, Alaska and Hawaii.
The company has made no secret
of its desire to expand internationally,
and Bahamas Food Services, which
supplies all the major resorts such as
Kerzner International and Baha Mar's
Cable Beach Resorts, is likely to be


viewed as an attractive proposition
given the revenues that could be gen-
erated by ongoing investment projects
at both sites.
When acquiring International Food
Group, a Florida company that sup-
plies foodservice products to chain
restaurants in regions such as the
Caribbean, Sysco's chief executive,
Richard J. Schneiders, said: "This is
another step towards establishing a
Sysco presence in foodservice mar-
kets outside of North America."


.1-
f- ,4E
4 ~ .r


Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs


'S:aturday, March 18, 2006 beginning at 6:30am
;RUN ROUTE:
IBeginning at Chapter One Bookstore, Thompson Boulevard, traveling onto Poinciana Drive,
;Blue Hill Road, Bay Street and Nassau Street and ending at the Bahamas Tourism Training
i entre.(OB Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute).
IWvL' ROUTE:
Beginning at Chapter One Bookstore, Thompson Boulevard onto Nassau Street, Bay Street,
BI ie Hill Road, Poinciana Drive, Thompson Boulevard and ending at the Bahamas Tourism
',Tr inirig Centre (COB Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute).
p CATEGORIES INCLUDE:
Under 10
11-16
17-20
21-30
Under 40
Under 50
Under 60
60 plus
Registration fee is $8.00 and forms are available at the Student Activities Department.
All funds raised have been earmarked for the Harry C. Moore Library. For more
Information, please call 302-4592 or 302-4525.


TtL


O o kes Field Camnsat T
1, March 17-18, 2006


h i e

fo one.idsy RM< r.h 37
: 4:00-9:00 p.m
p :r ., i- ijrir ,i.. -'r.i renr .- ,ri e.: Tem'o


S9:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m.
V ,inm.i sh, il,. s'c,:,i-s edvd d
6:00 p.m.
Concert ot Participating Bands at the COB
.; Er-an,:l Shell
: EligibiWsiy
SThe Bni., ~ Festival is open to all community
e musicians who have played band instruments
S'for one ,.ear or rnor, '

SWorkshop Progranme
5 The Band Festival will cover aspects of
-i niril.enial playing, performance and
S': ensemble skills. Musicians \.iIt be divided
into two bands, a.-irliri rgirerl o .dre tnd
Advanced, according to skill level. Masterclass
Topics includerange, power,, musical styles
S(jazz, classical, etc.) jazz improvisation,
embouchure, breathing and overall sound
production.
'i Guest Musicians/Facillitators
S:: Trumpeter, Keith Fiala, (formerly of the
Maynard Ferguson Band-rated among the
top ten trumpeters in the world)
',- : Adam Cartwright, conductor, clinician
and low brass specialist
j S Andrew Peschka, recording artist,
d nductor, adjudicator and woodwind
specialist
Chris Justilien, trombonist, percussionist,
composer, arranger
: '. i .i


under the dieclion of(Inr Chrislian 1
kD tpOlw; ( r kathteen gllirOilriwal':





ompsn Boulevarnd9
l;o A~


Co st
0 r--upzciii-~ cIC:'
I-:rr(.up-s cl o10j 3r more 50
C C)B Alumni $50


(0.
-... -t *


For moree information contact
Dr KIhthleen Bondurant ..i 302-4508'3'23-4541
ks3hleernbc.ndu(rar-tria'yaho j com
C.hris ian Jus.Iiier. ,I 302-4511 1 r
F.'r? L3toa Fr.sieru. 302-4314
Registration forms are 3sailable Irtir
the Music Faculty (H Blocli or room A86
'.,r-rpleted iorrmrls wih lee mnubl be submitted to
44 b., Mar.h iIE
Pathfinder Workshop Thursda,. March 16
A preliminary e'-enng of instrurnenlal
*.'.'ork shops leCiunng guesl clinicians and
-la is:3al azz guilarisl. Chris Vincentl wrl also
be sponsoredd by the Se\enth Day Adven[ist
Patlilinder Band 31 Bahamas. Academy on
Trur-da', March 16 for $25 from 5 00 9 00
p' n Schr'larS'hip.F' are available
For iif:.rm ati:,rn call
Dr Bondurani :: 302-4508.323-4541
Mr Edward Hanna :: 395-8918 or
Mr Tony Roach :: 436-0689.


GRADUATION MEETING

All December 2005 and prospective April 2006 graduates are
encouraged to attend a graduation meeting on
Thursday, 16th March at 6pm
at Choices Restaurant, Thompson Boulevard.

For more information, persons may call the Student Activities
Department at 302-4525 or 302-4591.


THE COLLEGE OF THE OAHAMAS





NEW TELEPHONE LINES
NOW YOU CAN DIAL DIRECT

To contact the following units of The College:


Graduate Programmes Office
School of Education
School of Social Sciences
Faculty of Social & Educational Studies


397-2602
397-2603
397-2607
397-2609


CHAPTER ON,:OOKSTORE...397-'2603...a direct line!



Prospective Applicants





Master's Degree
c^'^ *^


*1


rammes


"
. t.,s
a;..
.1-


in collaboration
with






WH E LOCK
C >iLfEGf


;1;1BUSINESS


I I - - I -


-- - I- I -


pd~B~E~*1?~Cs~i~~:'~:
~goaar















Corporation talks to Kerzner





on delaying R/0 plant finish


FROM page 1B

$630 million Phase III devel-
opment, and a clause within
the agreement stipulated that
fines would be imposed on the
government if it was not com-
pleted by April next year.
Water

But the Water and Sewerage
Corporation executive spear-
heading the project, Glen Lav-
ille, told The Tribune that the


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT


fines clause would not affect
the corporation at this time.
He added that the Arawak
Cay contract had yet to be
awarded to any private com-
pany, but could not say why.
The status of the process has
not changed since the whole
procurement exercise started
in March/April 2005, said Mr
Laville.
Although plans for the
Arawak Cay plant are present-
ly lying on the back burner, Mr
Laville said there was no aim to
abandon it. The Corporation


2005/CLE/qui/01407


plans to have three reverse
osmosis plants that serve spe-
cific areas on New Providence
- located at Blue Hills, Arawak
Cay and one at Winton.
Shortage

From time to time, especial-
ly during a water shortage, one
plant may be used to support
other areas.
However, Mr Laville said
there were no plans to expand
the Blue Hills reverse osmosis
plant, currently being con-
structed by Consolidated
Water's Waterfields subsidiary,
to enable it to supply Atlantis
as well.
The Arawak Cay plant
would operate in a similar fash-


ion to the $27 million Blue
Hills plant. Consolidated Water
was one of the companies that
submitted a bid to construct
the Arawak Cay plant, along
with French entity, Veolia
Enerserve.
Veolia was a losing bidder
on the Blue Hills tender, and
has linked up with a group of
about five to six Bahamians,
headed by Jerome Fitzgerald
and Mark Finlayson. Both their
bid and that of Consolidated
Water's were previously
annulled, and the two rivals are
understood to be waiting to see
what happens next.
Consolidated Water, upon
completion of the Blue Hills
facility, will sell water to the
Water and Sewerage Corpora-


tion, which will be responsible
for distribution.
Sources have told The Tri-
bune that one minor problem
for the Arawak Cay plant was
determining whether the area
should be set aside for tourism
or industrial development.
The reverse osmosis plants
are being designed to lighten
the load on the largest island in
the Bahamas, Andros, which
services Nassau with millions
of gallons of fresh water daily,
arriving by barge.
Operations
Kenneth Lightbourne, Water
and Sewerage's operations
manager, said once the new
plant starts production, the


barging of water to New Prov-
idence will end.
This, he said, will allow for
the wellfields in Andros to
replenish their fresh water sup-
plies.
Buy
"It will be the freshest water
you can buy," said Mr Light-
bourne. "Compared to bottled
water, it is 40 per cent fresher
that typical bottle water."
Waterfields Company, a sub-
sidiary of Consolidated Water,
will pull 18 million gallons'of
water each day, from 13,0'to
250 feet underground, which
will then be purified into seven
million gallons of potable
water.


IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT ALL THAT tract of land containing
by admeasurements a total area of Five hundred and Fifty-five and Seventy-
three hundredths (555.73) acres being land originally granted to James
Menzies and a portion of land originally granted to Thomas Atwood situate
near the Northwestern end of the Island of Crooked Island one of the Islands
in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas which said tract of land is bounded
NORTHWARDLY partly by the Sea partly by Crown Land partly by Great
Brine Pond and partly by land originally granted to Joseph Hunter and
running thereon a total of Four thousand Four hundred and four and Ninety-
five hundredths (4,404.95) feet EASTWARDLY partly by land claimed by
The Estate of George Lloyd partly by land the property of Arnold Ferguson
and partly by land the property of Tartan Limited and running thereon a
total of Four thousand Six hundred and Twenty and Sixty-one hundredths
(4,620.61) feet SOUTHWARDLY by land originally granted to Thomas
Atwood also known as Williams Hope and running thereon a total of Four
thousand Five hundred and Four and Ninety hundredths (4,504.90) feet
WESTWARDLY partly by the Sea partly by Crown Land and partly by
Great Brine Pond and running thereon a total of Six thousand three hundred
and Eleven and Sixty-one hundredths (6,311.61) feet which said tract of
land is more particularly delineated and shown on a plan recorded in the
Department of Lands and Surveys as Plan No. 71 of Crooked Island filed
herein and is thereon shown coloured PINK save and except all existing
road reservations and a parcel of land containing a total of Fifteen and
Ninety-six hundredths (15.96) acres owned by the decedents of Joseph
Napoleon Scavella also described and delineated on the Plan filed herein
and is thereon shown coloured BROWN.

AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Hatman Scavella

NOTICE

The Quieting Titles Act 1959

The Petition of Hartman Scavella of the Island of New Providence one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas in respect of:-

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT ALL THAT tract of land containing
by admeasurements a total area of Five hundred and Fifty-five and Seventy-
three hundredths (555.73) acres being land originally.granted to James
Menzies and a portion of land originally granted to Thomas Atwood situate
near the Northwestern end of the Island of Crooked Island one of the Islands
in the commonwealth of The Bahamas which said tract of land is bounded
NORTHWARDLY partly by the Sea partly by Crown Land partly by Great
Brine Pond and partly by land originally granted to Joseph Hunter and
running thereon a total of Four thousand Four hundred and Four and Ninety-
five hundredths (4,404.95) feet EASTWARDLY partly by land claimed by
The Estate of George Lloyd partly by land the property of Arnold Ferguson
and partly by land the property of Tartan Limited and running thereon a
total of Four thousand Six hundred and Twenty and Sixty-one hundredths
(4,620.61) feet SOUTHWARDLY by land originally granted to Thomas
Atwood also known as Williams Hope and running thereon a total of Four
thousand Five hundred and Four and Ninety hundredths (4,504.90) feet
WESTWARDLY partly by the Sea partly by Crown Land and partly by
Great Brine Pond and running thereon a total of Six thousand Three hundred
and Eleven and Sixty-one hundredths (6,311.61) feet which said tract of
land is more particularly delineated and shown on a plan recorded in the
Department of Lands and Surveys as Plan No. 71 of Crooked Island filed
herein and is thereon shown coloured PINK save and except all existing
road reservations and a parcel of land containing a total of Fifteen and
Ninety-six hundredth (15.96) acres owned by the decedents of Joseph
Napoleon Scavella also described and delineated on the Plan filed herein
and is thereon shown coloured BROWN.

Hartman Scavella claims to be the owner of the fee simple estate
in possession of the tract of land hereinbefore described free from
incumbrances.
AND the Petitioner has made application for the Supreme Court
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting
titles Act 1959 to have his title to the said tracts of land investigated and the
nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of Title
to be granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any persons having Dower
or a Right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the
petition shall on or before the 12th day of May A.D., 2006 file in the Supreme
court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of his claim
in the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure
of any such person to file and serve a statement of his claim on or before
the 12th day of May 2006 will operate as a bar to such claim.

Copies of the Field Plan may be inspected at:
1. The Registry of the Supreme Court; and
2. The Chambers of Graham, Thompson & Co. attorneys for the
Petitioner, Sassoon House, Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas.
Dated the 15th day of February A.D., 2006

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner
TRH


FirstCaribbean
Career Opportunity,

L'A F~hy~U I L L1A,,,PAPP --I%,Jr. IT U ~I L~iaL


FirstCaribbean International Bank is the combination of CIBC and Barclays Bank in the Caribbean, Bahamas and Belize. ,
We are.the region's largest publicly traded bank with over 3,000 staff serving over 5.3 million people in 16 countries. We:'
manage over 700,000 active accounts via 100 retail branches and corporate/international banking centres.
RESPONSIBILITIES:
* To reengineer bank processes end-to-end with the objective of eliminating redundant processes, simplifying the complex nature of processes
and outlining opportunities to automate the manual process
* To reengineer processes in order to achieve enhanced customer satisfaction, stringent control and cost reduction
* To lead focused teams to accomplish end-to-end process efficiencies in all the areas of the Bank's operations
* To train staff on scientific Process Mapping and Reengineering techniques
PREREQUISITES:
* Extensive knowledge and a wealth of experience of between 10-15 years in banks of international repute at the middle to senior management;


level
* A minimum of 5 years' banking experience at the senior management level in the function of business process mapping and reengineering
* Black-belt in Six Sigma techniques for process improvement and reengineering
* Experience in conducting Six Sigma training programmes for reporting staff
* Good analytical, communication, leadership and negotiation skills
* Good crisis management and problem analysis skills
We offer an attractively structured compensation and reward package as well as performance bonuses.
Applications with detailed resumes should be submitted no later than Monday 13th March 2006 to:
Mrs. Sabrena Forde
FirstCaribbean International Bank
Head Office
Warrens
St. Michael, Barbados
Telephone number: (246) 367-2154
Email: sabrena.forde@firstcaribbeanbank.com
Only applicants who are short-listed will be contacted.


-


S'


FIRSTCARIBBEAN:I
INTERNATIO AL BANK
GET THERE. TOGETHER.


KINGSWAY ACADEMY
Positions For September 2006
Kingsway Academy invites qualified applicants for the following
positions for September, 2006
Elementary School:
Teacher for Grades 1- 6
High.School Teachers:
Auto Mechanics and Woodwork
Biology
English Language and Literature
Food and Nutrition and Needlework
Information Technology and Economics
Music
Religious Studies and Bible/Christian Values
Track and Field Coach Part-time
Librarian/Media Specialist Knowledge of Computer
Studies a must

Successful applicants must:
Be a practicing, committed born-again Christian
Have minimum qualifications of a Bachelor's Degree
in the appropriate subject areas or higher from a
recognized college or university
Have a valid teacher's certificate or diploma where
appropriate
Be willing to participate in extra curricular activities,
etc.

Applications must be made in writing together with full
curriculum vitae, a recent color photograph and names of at
least three references, one being that of your Church Pastor.
to:
Ms Kelcine Hamilton
Academy Affairs Manager
P.O. Box N-4378
Nassau, Bahamas
For further information, please contact the Business Office
..at telephone numbers 324-6269 or' 324-6887.
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS IS
FRIDAY, MARCH 31, 2006,


Immediate positions available


Kingsway Academy



SYSTEMS MANAGER
Kingsway Academy is seeking the services of a'.;
competent Systems Manager to oversee and,
manage the School Network and the Students,
Information System:

Qualifications:

Possess a degree in Computer studies
and the relevant areas
Have a strong background in cormputrs
and operating systems ;
Good verbal and written communication
.skills
Demonstrate initiative and good work-
ethics
Honest and reliable
Amiable and resourceful, etc.

Information Technology/Economics Teacher

Security Guard with Maintenance Skills

All applicants MUST be born again Christians.

Letters of application, together with a recent color
photograph and detailed Curriculum Vitae
(including the names and addresses of at least:
three references, one being the name of one's,,
Church Pastor) should be forwarded to::

Ms Kelcine Hamilton
Academy Affairs Manager
Kingsway Academy Business Office
Bernard Road
Deadline for applications is Friday, March 10,'
2006.


-m"


_


I 1


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MARCH 6, 2006







MONDAY, MARCH 6, 2006, PAGE 9B


THE TRIBUNE


Government will not




allow BTC break-up

FROM page 1B


profits.
telecommunications system That
throughout the Bahamas, in private e
addition to its current commit- Private
ments. look for
S These included providing fibre al return
optic telecommunications to all from thi
'Bah'amian schools and educa- troubled
tional institutions, plus the $63 ing ext;
million fibre optic telecommu- before e
nications cable that will con- The e
nect the southern Bahamas to involves
servuces such as Internet and public (
'a'le television, stake or
'M.ir Smith also pointed to the to anoth
G:'~ernment's objectives for e- The Tr
government, enabling its citi- about wl
jzens to access services such as arise wh
4i'dication and health online, as was in f(
reasons why BTC should not water at
be broken up. other inl
' "We have very clearly bemakin
'dMined objectives that go ter, at le
beyond price to further devel- He ac
op telecommunications in the could ha
country," he added. offers w
His comments indicate that sidered
M~-Government is seeking a Howe
|4ng-term partner for BTC's confirmed
pivatisation, rather than one would v
that might be seeking quick ment's

SFROJM page 1B
lue to increased subsidies and what the
Central Bank described as "non-interest
tansfers".
;Recurrent spending, which is the Gov-
einment's fixed costs, was up 8.4 per cent
at $347.1 million.
SWhile the revenue news and fiscal deficit
n I o're encouraging, the latter remains
along with an increasing national debt,
raising further fears about whether the
3ahamas can get its fiscal affairs in order -
particularly combating rising government
spending.
'However, the Central Bank said the
Bahamian economy continued to grow in
0ub1, bolstered by tourism, real estate
investment and private sector demand.
SIt added: 'The forecast for the economy
remains positive for 2006, with anticipated
increases in tourism related foreign invest-
tients combined with sustained construc-


might rule out some
equity-backed bidders.
equity firms typically
a 20-30 per cent annu-
n for their investments
e off, turning around
I companies or extract-
ra value from them
xiting.
exit strategy usually
two routes an initial
offering (IPO) of its
'flipping' the company
er buyer.
ribune.asked Mr Smith
whether a scenario could
ere, if the Government
normal talks with Blue-
bout privatising BTC,
terested parties would
ng offers that were bet-
ast in terms of price.
knowledge that this
.ppen, but said all such
would have to be con-
carefully.
ever, Mr Smith also
ed that such a situation
vork to the Govern-
advantage, creating a


bidding war that could help to
drive up the final price for
BTC. The highest offer in the
previous process, which was
offering a 49 per cent stake,
was the $130 million submitted
by BahamaTel.
"It will, in that kind of sce-
nario, give the leverage to the
Government," Mr Smith said.
"[But] everything depends
on the outcome of this first shot
with the Bluewater people."
He added that once the
group's 90-day due diligence
process was completed, "imme-
diately following that they
intend to come in and speak
with us".
"What we'll be doing, we
could be speaking to Bluewater
while another group is itself.
trying to do an assessment,"
Mr Smith said.
He added that the Govern-
ment was taking the BTC
process "one day at a time",
given the previous failure and
protracted attempt to privatise
it.
Cellular is the one area effec-


tion activity providing the main stimulus
for economic growth. '
"In this context, it is expected that
employment conditions will improve and
the continued stabilisation of oil prices
should lead to some enhancement in the
current account position in the near term."
Inflation
During 2005, consumer price inflation
rose to 2.2 per cent from 0.9 per cent,
reflecting higher prices for medical and
healthcare, education and food and bev-
erage.
Total tourist arrivals during 2005 rose
by 0.9 per cent to just over five million,
the 4.4 per cent growth in air arrivals off-
setting the 0.5 per cent decline in sea
arrivals.
The "most notable" increase took place


tively keeping BTC afloat
financially, as its fixed-line long
distance revenues are under
attack from illegal callback and
Voice over Internet Protocol
(VoIP), plus IndiGo Networks
legal service, while Cable
Bahamas is leader in Internet
services.
IndiGo Networks' own esti-
mates for BTC's 2004 and
2005 revenues showed that
while fixed-line long distance
revenues were likely to have
fallen by 26.2 per cent in
2004, dropping to $47.994
million from $65.018 million
the previous year, cellular
revenues for that year had
increased by almost 24 per
cent to $111.767 million.
For 2005, IndiGo Networks
was estimating that BTC's
fixed-line revenues will drop
by a further 53 per cent to
$22.534 million, but cellular
revenues were forecast to
rise 25 per cent to $140.177
million. Since 2000, BTC's
cellular revenues had risen
by more than 400 per cent.


in the Family Islands, where total visitor
numbers rose by 9.5 per cent to 1.442 mil-
lion. New Providence showed a slight
increase in visitor arrivals to 2.991 million,
with Grand Bahama seeing an 11.2 per
cent fall-off in arrivals.
Room revenues increased by 9.2 per
cent in 2005 for the Bahamas as a whole,
driven by 4.4 per cent growth in average
room rates and a 4 per cent rise in occu-
pancy levels.
For 2005, residential mortgage commit-
ments for new construction rose by 555.94
per cent. On the monetary front, Bahami-
an dollar credit'narrowed due to a reduc-
tion in net credit to the Government. The
banking system's deposit base narrowed
due to funds being invested in the Gov-
ernment's registered stock issue, the pro-
ceeds of which were used to pay down
public sector debt, expanding liquidity.


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS'
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law & Equity Division


2005
CLE/GEN/01361


NOTICE

THE QUIETING TITLES ACT, 1959

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THOSE two (2) pieces
parcels or lots of land containing by admeasurement
One and Two Hundred and Eighty-eight Thousandths
(1.288) acres situate on the Western side of the Main
Public Road and approximately One Hundred and
Forty (140) feet North of N.G.M, Major High School
in the vicinity of St John's Anglican Church in the
Settlement of Buckley's, in the Island of Long Island,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas;
AND
IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles
Act, 1959
(Chapter 357 of the Statute Laws of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas);
AND
IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Peter Leon Strachan

PETER STRACHAN claims to be the owner in fee
simple in possession of the tract of land hereinbefore described
and the Petitioner has applied to the Supreme Court to have his
title to the said land investigated under Section 3 of the Quieting
Titles Act, and nature and extend thereof determined and declared
in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance
with the provisions of the said Act.
Copies of the Plan may be inspected during normal
office hours at the following places:
1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher House,
East Street North in the City of Nassau; and
2. The Chambers of Lincoln Bethel & Co, Malcolm
Building, Bay Street & Victoria Avenue in the City of Nassau,
Bahamas.
Notice is hereby given that any person having dower
or right to dower or an adverse claim or a claim not recognized
in the Petition shall before the 30th day of March, A.D., 2006
file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or his
Attorney a Statement of his or here claim in the prescribed form,
verified by an Affidavit and other: related documents to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such persons to file and serve a Statement
of his or her claim together with the other related documents on
or before the 30th day of March, A.D., 2006, will operate as a
bar to such claim.
DATED the 17th day of February, A.D., 2006.

LINCOLN BETHEL & CO.
CHAMBERS
MALCOLM BUILDING
BAY STREET & VICTORIA AVENUE
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
ATTORNEYS FOR THE PETITIONER


BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established
international priVate bank, with'its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland,
is presently accepting applications for

PRIVATE BANKING RELATIONSHIP OFFICER

Applicants for the position of PB Relationship Officer must have
banking or financial degree or equivalent and at least 3 years experience
in the offshore banking sector, fluency in Italian and French, have
knowledge of international investment instruments & money markets,
ability to partner with team members, must be confident regarding
customer relations, investments & portfolio management and have
thorough knowledge of local legislation, regulatory & statutory matters
as well as international banking practices.

Personal qualities:-

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
S Commitment to quality and service excellence
Able to work with minimal supervision
Financial and analytical background
Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary

Responsibilities:-

Service and advise customers
Maintain and follow up account relationships
Liaise directly with customers or their investment advisors or
agents:
Monitor, analyze positions and evaluate reports
Foster and maintain communication with intenal/external banking
professionals
Meet deadlines on timely basis

Deadline for receipt of applications is 17th March, 2006.

Resumes should be faxed to #702 1253 or mailed or delivered to the
offices of BSI, addressed to:-

Personnel Officer
BSI overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Bayside Executive park, W. Bay St. & Blake Road
P.O. Box N-7130
Nassau, Bahamas

S(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted
I * ___________ ^ ^ _


GRADUATE ENGINEER



POSITION

Progressive Professional Engineering Firm
has an immediate opening for a recent
graduate engineer.


Minimum Requirements:

Bachelor's Degree in Civil Engineering
from an accredited college or university

*Fundamental of Engineering Certification
or ability to obtain within 6 months of
employment

Strong oral and written communication
skills

Flexibility and focus to work in a
changing environment

Strong skills in AutoCADD, Excel, Word,
and Surveying a must

Qualified persons should reply with resume,
cover letter, and three references to:

nibod@earthlink.net or;

Human Resources
P.O. Box SB-50040
Nassau, N.P. Bahamas

The Engineering Firm is an Equal Opportunity
Employer


BUSINESS


I I I-








PAGE 10B, MONDAY, MARCH 6, 2006


TRIBUNE SPORTS


1m)a'

S6Ir

boak a

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- ._


N JACINDA WILLIAMS in the girls 50 LC metre freestyle at the Betty Kelly Kenning Aquatic Centre
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)





High numbers make the

mark at swimming meet



mark at swimming meet


Texaco


Carifta


trials




* SWIMMING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

WHILE the number of ath-
letes qualifying in multiple
events for the Carifta Games
increased, the Bahamas Swim-
ming Federation also saw at
least 16 qualifying marks
achieved for the CISC Cham-
pionships.
The achievements were pro-
duced over the weekend at the
Betty Kelly Kenning Aquatic
Centre as the BSF hosted its
final Texaco Carifta Trials on
Friday and Saturday.

Surpassed

Most of the athletes who
attained the Carifta standards
have surpassed those marks
up to the initial Texaco trials
that were staged over the
weekend of February 10-11.
The Carifta Games are
scheduled for April 5-10 in
Bridgetown, Barbados and the
BSF is expected to release the
full list of the team this week.
However, the CISC Cham-
pionships are set for June 24-
July 1 in Puerto Rico and it's
expected that they will also
release the names of that team
in short order.
Here's a look some of top
qualifiers:

Shante Moss, represent-
ing.the Sea Bees, swam 3:06.46
to win the girls' 11-12 200
breast, which was better than
the CISC qualifying time of
3:06.69 and the Carifta mark
of 3:15.19.

Bria Deveaux, a member
of the Barracudas, did 5:55.09
in the girls' 11-12 400 IM to
surpass the CISC mark of
5:55.29 and the Carifta time
of 6:11.39.
Deveaux also took the girls'
11-12 100 free in 1:097.60 to


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* RAVEN WOOD in the first heat of the girls 50 LC metre freestyle
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


go under the CISC qualifying
time of 1:07.89 and the Carif-
ta time of. 1:10.99, pulling
three others along, inclusive
of Shanta Moss (1:09.68),
Shayla Campbell (1:09.99) and
Je'Nae Saunders (1:101.59).

Ashley Butler of the Sea
Bees won the girls' 13-14 100
free in 1:04.61, which was bet-
ter than the CISC qualifying
time of 1:05.09. She also went
under the Carifta qualifying
time of 1:08.09 along with Bar-
racudas' Jade Thompson
(1:05.29), Sea Bees' Anthaya
Rolle (1:05.68) and Sea Bees'
Amber Weech (1:06.90).

Ariel Weech, represent-
ing the Sea Bees, won the
girls' 13-14 50 free in 28.70 to
go well under the CISC time
of 30.09 and the Carifta's 31.39
and she was joined by
Anthaya Rolle, who swum
29.97 to go under both times.
Also going under the Carif-
ta mark in the race were Jade
Thompson (30.70), Amber


Weech (30.86), Jessica Greene
(31.13), Aliyah Gaskins
(31.25) and Kadesha Culmer
(31.25).

Alicia Lightbourne, also
representing the Sea Bees,
clocked 2:51.89 to win the
girls' 15-17 200 breast, which
was well under the CISC time
of 2:52.79 and the Carifta's
mark of 3:00.59.

Older sister Teisha Light-
bourne, also representing the
Sea Bees, clocked 1:03.75 to
surpass the CISC qualifying
time of 1:03.79 in the girls' 15-
17 100 free and the Carifta
mark of 1:06.69 with Alicia
Lightbourne attaining the lat-
ter mark in 1:04.60 and Fran-
shon Francis, also from the
Sea Bees, in line in 1:05.05.
Teisha and Alicia Light-
bourne also did the qualifying
times of 29.59 for the CISC
and 30.89 for Carifta in the
girls' 15-17 50 free when they
swam 28.66 and 29.53 respec-
tively.


And Franshon Francis
(30.27) and Chanicia Mus-
grove (30.74) also went under
the Carifla mark.

Evante Gibson, repre-.
senting the YMCA Club in
Grand Bahama, clocked.
1:13.55 to take the boys' I1-
12 butterfly. eclipsing the
CISC mark of 1:13.99
and the Caj fl'la' mark of'
1:18.09.
Gibson was also the lone
competitor in the boys' 11-12
400 IM and he still managed
to go under the CISC mark of
5:52.29 and the Carifta timc
of 6:08.29.
Gibson also produced
another CISC qualifying mark
when he swam 31.29 to win
the boys' 11-12 50 fly, sur-
passing the CISC mark of
33.09 and the Carifta time of
34.79. Devonn Knowles of the
Barracudas joined him in
going under the Carifia mai k
with his second place finish in
33.94.
And before lie \vas finished,


Gibson clocked 1:23.24 to take
the boys' 11-12 100 breast, bet-
tering the CISC time of
1:25.19 and the Carifta time
of 1:29.39.

SMatthew Lowe, repre-
senting the Barracuda Swim
Club. clocked 20 minutes and
33.24 seconds to win the boys'
11 12 1.500 metre freestyle,
going under the CISC stan-
dard of 20:35.59 and the Carif-
ta mark of 21:31.69.

Barrington Miller of the
Barracudas clocked 58.48 to
win the boys' 15-17 100 free
and surpassing the CISC qual-
ifying time of 58.79 and the
Carifta time of 1:01.39 as
Shane Armbirster (58.82),
Jcvaughn Saunders (1:00.12)
and Michael McIntosh
(1:0(0.81) all going under the
Carifta time.
Anmd Miller also clocked
26.37 to surpass the boys' 15-
17 50 free qualifying time of
26.89 for CISC and 28.09 for
Carifta.


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Lady


Angels win thriller


against the Lady Caribs


ACl'ION from Salurdam nightl* %eaon finale
in the Ne%% Pro'idence i onnen'' Bakelbhall
Association's regular season.
The Cleaning Central Lad' .-ngel- ,ur'iked a
late ;care againcl the College ol the Baha:ini;
Lad. Carihs to record an 85-82 'ictorl.
SEE SPORTS FRON
(Pholo: tlario Duncansoni/Tribune sta[fl


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Teams gear up


for the playoffs
* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
WITH an intense and competitive regular season completed,
the New Providence Women's Basketball Association is now
gearing up for the start of its postseason.
The first round best-of-three playoffs begins on Thursday
night at the DW Davis Gym.
The three-time defending champions Cleaning Centre Lady
Angels closed out the regular season with an impressive 14-1 win-
loss record after they knocked off the College of the Bahamas
Lady Caribs 85-82 on Saturday night at the DW Davis Gym.
The pennant-winning Lady Angels will now face the 8-7 first
year Sunshine Auto Lady Cheetahs in the opener of the playoffs
on Thursday. But, the way swingwoman Sharell Cash sees it, it
doesn't matter who they play.
"First come, first served," Cash quipped. "I'm sorry for the first
one we meet. Their party will be short."
The Angels, coached by Sharon 'the General' Storr, will rely
on their wealth of experience to pull them through. Along with
Cash, who could light it up from behind the three-point arch, the
Lady Angels have perennial most valuable player Suzette
McKenzie, who knows how to step it up in the post-season.
Additionally, they have three other seasoned players in Keisha
Richardson, Roberta Quant in the middle and Felicia Cartwright.
Against the Lady Cheetahs, coached by Mario Bowleg, the
Lady Angels will have to find a way to contain the 1-2 punch of
Linda Pierre and Anastacia Moultrie in the paint. If they can
keep them off the boards, they have a chance of going for the
sweep as Cash predicted.
Coach Storr had these few words of advice for their rivals
after Saturday's victory: "We're ready. I think we've played
enough close games now for the girls to realise that everybody is
gunning for us. I think they realized that we cannot coastbecause
everybody has improved."
In the meantime, the series should provide just as much atten-
tion or more as last year's runners-up Johnson's Lady Truckers
and the College of the Bahamas Lady Caribs.
The Lady Truckers, coached by Jean Minus, probably have the
most potent backcourt in the league in Chantell Rolle and Glen-
da Gilcud. Both players, when they're on their game, are dan-
gerous. They helped the Lady Truckers to remain in second all
season long, finishing at 10-5.
But this year, more than last year, the College of the Bahamas
Lady Caribs have proven that they are a legitimate challenge to
the throne and they proved that in the season finale.
Coach Linda Davis has a squad,'led by Kimberley Rolle,
Christine Sinclair, Alyse Dean and Kiovonne Newbold, which is
primed and ready to go. Only time will tell if they have arrived.
"We're going to take care of the Truckers and then look for-
ward to a rematch with the Angels in the championship," Davis
projected. "I really believe that this year we can do it.
"We match up very well with them (Angels).
"But I think as a team, they gel together and that is what
makes the difference."
Rolle, a former long-time player with the Lady Angels, said
after Saturday's heartbreaking loss, they just have to take the
momentum that they developed in the game into practice and get
ready for the Lady Truckers.


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MONDAY, MARCH 6, 2006


SECTION


Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com
.. jd


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS 1


E TENNIS
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter
MARK Knowles and
Daniel Nestor came so
close to winning their sec-
ond tournament of the
year.
But on Saturday they
were denied their second
Dubai doubles title los-
ing in the final to the num-
ber two seeded team of
Australian team of Paul
Hanley and Peter Ullyett
1-6, 6-2, 10- in the match
tie breaker.
Knowles and Nestor, the
No.1 seeded team, were
the 2002 Dubai champions
- the same year that they
won their first ever Grand
Slam at the Australian
Open.
They went on to become
the number one ranked
team at the end of the
year.
After taking a break
from their first victory of
this year in Florida,
Knowles and Nestor were
hoping to rebound from
their previous trip to
Europe.
In January, they trav-
eled to Australia where
they didn't get.past the
first round in their first
two tournaments, includ-
ing the Australian Open -
the first Grand Slam tout-
nament of the year.
Even though they didn't
win, Knowles and Nestor
did advance to the final.
They just couldn't pull off
the comeback victory over
the Aussies.
Despite their loss,
Knowles and Nestor were
quite pleased with their
performances leading up
to the final.
They ousted the team of
top singles player Roger
Federer and Yves Allegro
1-6, 7-6 (4), 10-6 in the first
round. Federer, by the
way, was upset by Rafael
Nadal 2-6, 6-4, 6-4 in the
men's singles final on Sat-
urday.
.In the second round,
Knowles and Nestor got
by the team of Petr Pala
and Cyril Suk 3-6, 7-6 (5),
10-4.
Knowles and Nestor,
however, wanted this vic-
tory. They were hoping to
pick up their second victo-
ry for the year and at the
same time, increase their
point standings in the ATP
Doubles Race.
Going into the tourna-
ment, they were ranked at
No.12 with 66 points.
They're sure to improve
on that, but winning the
title would have given
them so much more points
as runners-up.
Knowles was unavail-
able for comments as he
was headed back to the
-United States. There's no
indication as to where and
when their next tourna-
ment would be.
But next on the calender
is the ATP Masters Series
in Indian Wells, Califor-
nia, starting today. That
will be followed by the
ATP Masters Series in
Miami from March 20.


gels sSUPr


e


a ast asp scare


* THE Lady Angels and the Lady Caribs go head to head.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


* BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
KIMBERLEY Rolle had a
golden opportunity to hand
the pennant-winning three-
time defending champions
Cleaning Central Lady Angels
their second loss of the New
Providence Women's Basket-
ball Association's regular sea-
son.
In the season finale on Sat-
urday night at the DW Davis
Gym, Rolle took a three-point
shot with 0.7 seconds left on
the clock. The ball went in the
rim, but bounced out as Rolle
and the College of the
Bahamas Lady Caribs' antici-
pated celebration turned into
despair.
On the next play, Sharell
Cash converted one of two
free throws as the Lady
Angels went on to post an 85-
82 triumph to end the season
on a brightnote with an 14-1
win-loss record going into the
playoffs.
The Lady Caribs dropped to
9-6 as they finished in third
place, but Rolle said it was the
perfect set-up for the upset.
The ball just didn't stay in.
"All or nothing," was how
Rolle summed up the play.
"We decided to foul their
weakest player. We did that
and she missed the two free
throws. So we decided to come
down and go for the three and
win the game. We didn't want
to force the overtime."

Lead
After Nadja Armbrister
came off the bench and was
fouled with 14 seconds remain-
ing and, as she missed the
charity shots to extend the
Lady Angels' lead, the Lady
Caribs tried to take advantage
at their end.
But Sharell Cash said she
knew all along that it wasn't:
going to be an easy night at
the office as the Lady Angeld
are being hunted by every
team in the league.
"It was a good win. We got
off to a slow start, but we
came around and we had some
players who stepped up," Cash
noted. "But right now, nobody
has anything. Thursday, the
big dance will start.
"Everybody wants to feel
what it's like to be the cham-
pions and to beat the champi-
ons, but the Angels will stick it
out like we did in the past.
There's no doubt about it. We
will be there again this year."
While Cash's final.free
throw with 0.5 seconds denied
the Lady Caribs any further
chance of coming back into
the game, she also came up big
with a game high 39 points,
shooting 12-of-23 from the
field, 8-of-12 from the three-
point arch and 7-of-8 from the
foul line to keep the Lady


Angels in the game. She also
pulled down eight rebounds.
: Suzette McKenzie had a rel-
atively quiet night with just 13
points, but the remainder of
their veteran squad, coached
by Sharon 'the General' Storr,
made their impact in a bal-
anced scoring attack behind
Cash's efforts.
Keisha Richardson and
Roberta Quant contributed 12
points apiece, while adding
eight and 12 rebounds respec-
tively and point guard Felicia
Cartwright netted seven with
five steals.
"Somehow, COB plays us
well, but with our experience-
and our limited depth no. w\.
were able to do some things,"
coach Storr stated. "I think
our experience was what did it
for us tonight."

Matched
The Lady Angels were able
to run with the Lady Caribs
and they matched up well,
especially in the paint. And
even thought they led 65-60 at
the half, Cleaning Centre
weren't able to put away the
College of the Bahamas
as easily as they had anticipat-
ed.
Despite missing the crucial
three-pointer, Kim Rolle was
still able to keep COB in the
game. She came up with a side
high 22 points and six
rebounds and was joined by
Kavionne Newbold in the
frontcourt with 15 points and
10 rebounds.
The Lady Caribs' backcourt
produced the majority of the
rest of their points with Chris-
tine Sinclair held to just 13,
while Alyse Dean had nine
with six rebounds and Adina
Knowles helped out with
eight. ,
Coach Linda Knowles said it
was a game her Lady Caribs
should have won.
"We had it. I think the girls
played very well. They stepped
up on the defensive end, which
is what we have to do against
the Angels," she pointed out.
"I think that's the best defen-
sive effort I've seen them put
together.this year.
"But we almost had them. I
think we lost our intensity in
the last two minutes of the
game and we came back at the
end and had a chance with the
clinching three-pointer. But
sometimes that's the break."
The break for the Lady
Angels really came in a four
minute span in the second half
when they were able to build
on a 65-62 advantage at 9:42
that they turned into a 79-66
margin at 6:07.
Now it's on to the best-of-
three playoff series that starts
on Thursday and both teams
are hoping that they will meet
again when the best-of-
five championship series fol-
lows.


L'""""r-" ~,


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