Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00339
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: March 1, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00339
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text






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Volume: 102 No.84


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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1, 2006


-'HIUL 750






- U ,dretti


or Cubans


Senator: situation with

dentists is causing a

'diplomatic embarrassment'


Police search for answers after man found unconscious


* By KARIN HERIG
' Tribune Staff Reporter
iGOVERNMENT'S failure to
make a decision in the situation
of the two Cuban dentists who
are still being held at the Deten-
tion Centre after more than 10
months, is "utterly outrageous"
and causing a "diplomatic
embarrassment" for the
Bahamas, FNM Senator Carl
Bethel said yesterday.
Members;.of the Opposition
are finally weighing in on the
continued detention of the two
Cubans, who both Cubd and the
United States want released to
them.
FNM leader Hubert Ingra-
ham is also expected to com-
ment on the situation during
today's sitting of parliament.
Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, former attorney gen-
eral Mr Bethel said that because
government failed to immedi-
ately resolve the issue of the
two Cuban dentists, "we now
have a diplomatic scandal brew-
ing."
."The government should
have acted immediately and in a
humane fashion.
"Having people waiting in
limbo for 10 months is not
humane," he said.
In addition to Senator Bethel,
the Bahamas Democratic
Movement (BDM) yesterday
also commented on the matter,
stating that the case of the two
.Cuban doctors should be turned
over to an international court.
Deputy leader of the party
Omar Smith in a press confer-
ence yesterday said that the fate
of the two dentists should no


longer be the Bahamas'.to
decide.
"Right now the only way out
of this situation appears to be, is
to leave this dispute in the
hands of the International
Court of Justice, an arm of the
United Nations. If the US
claims that these Cubans face
torture and abuse if returned,
then put this case in front of an
international arbiter and let
them decide this should not
be our call," he said.
The twoooctors, David Gon-
zalez Mejias and Marial s
Darias Mesa, were caught 10
months ago in their attempt to
emigrate from Cuba by the n ay
of the "visa lottery" which is
held annually by the US.
Both have relatives living in
the US. Dr Marialys Darias
Mesa's husband Ihovany Her-
nandez, an electrician, settled
in Cape Coral, Florida, where
he has a brother. He now has a
Green Card and is a permanent
resident of the United States.
The couple has a year-old
daughter, Maria Laura.
Dr David Gonzalez Mejias'
wife, Dayami,-and their two
children, Carlos, 14, and
Flavia,7, have settled in Tam-
pa, where they have friends.
According to reports, Cuban
president Dr Fidel Castro
would not let them leave the
country because their medical
training made them too valu-
able to spare.
Senator Bethel said that
although the Bahamas has "cer-
tain obligatory treaty arrange-
ments" with Cuba regarding the
SEE page 10


INSPECTOR WALTER EVANS stands yesterday at an abandoned duplex in Garden Hills where a man was
found bleeding profusely and in an unconscious state on Monday, February 20. The police are searching for
answers as to who harmed the man, who has remained unconscious in the hospital for the past eight days.
*SEE PAGE TWO ( o: llpbune staff)
(Photo: Felipi Major/Tribune staff)


A second dead

whale discovered
* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
JUST days after a 41-foot sperm whale was discovered beached
on Andros, a second dead whale has been discovered in Abaco.
The 25-foot whale was discovered between Walkers Cay and
Grand Cay in Abaco. It is believed that the whale was attacked by
sharks.
SEE page 10

'Ongoing investigation' into

murder of businessman


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
POLICE are investigating
Monday's murder of business-
man Keith Carey.
Currently police have no one
in custody for questioning.
"Since the incident took


place we had a team of investi-
gators out and the investiga-
tion is ongoing," said Mr
Evans.
On Monday morning, Mr
Carey was shot while about to
enter the Bank of the Bahamas
SEE page 10


Bahamas National Trust

on look-out for more

suspicious bird deaths


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Bahamas National
Trust continues to be on the
look-out for further suspicious
bird deaths in Inagua, as reports
of a possible outbreak of the
deadly bird flu remain uncon-
firmed.
Director for Parks and Sci-
ence at the BNT Eric Carey
told The Tribune yesterday that
the park's warden Henry Nixon
is closely monitoring the situa-
tion and will assist the team of
Ministry of Agriculture and
Health officials who are expect-
ed to travel to Inagua today to
determine if a number of unex-
plained bird deaths could be
due to the avian flu.
The team of experts was


scheduled to travel to Inagua
to investigate the matter yes-
terday, however, the trip was
postponed until today.
Yesterday, the Ministry of
Agriculture determined that
most of the dead birds came
from one specific area on the
island. It is speculated that the
bird feed may be responsible
for the deaths.
"We are very anxious to get
the results (of the investigation).
For us, for whom the tourism
industry is vital, it is just as
important to determine that it is
not bird flu," Mr Carey said yes-
terday.
Addressing the theory that
migrant birds from Europe may
have been carriers of the H5N1
SEE page 10


Nassau and IBahama Ilands' Lading Nesp


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G







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1,2006


LOCANW


Police look for answers after




man is found unconscious


* INSPECTOR Evans speaks to the press yesterday at the scene where police found a man lying in a
pool of blood
(Photo: Felipi Major/Tribune staff)


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
POLICE are searching for
answers as to who harmed a
man who has remained
unconscious in the hospital for
the past eight days.
Yesterday, police took
members of the press to the
abandoneddupLex in Garden.
Hills where a man was found
bleeding profusely and in an
unconscious state on Monday,
February 20.
According to press liaison
officer Walter Evans, the man,
who was identified as 49-year-
old Gary Beneby, was found
on the duplex's porch some-
time before 1pm last Monday.
He was located by police as a
result of an anonymous
female caller.
"At this point we are not
satisfied with what has tran-
spired. It is the intention of
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force to get to the bottom of
this incident and to find out
who is responsible," said Mr
Evans.
He also said that the home-
less man, who received
injuries about the body, was
taken to the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital and remains in
an unconscious state in the
Intensive Care Unit.
Police located Mr Beneby's
parents who said their son is a
loner and an alcoholic.
At present, Mr Evans said,
the police have no informa-


tion as to who injured the
man. Police, he said, are seek-
ing the assistance of anyone
who might have been in the
area when the man was found.
"The Royal Bahamas police
force is not satisfied when a
person has been hurt. It is the
job and the role of the force to
ensure that crime is brought,
.as. nuciohaspossible,.to _the
zero level. When things of this
nature happen, it is our duty
to get to the bottom of the sit-
uation and find out who the
perpetrators are and bring
them to justice. We are asking
individuals to partner with the
police, the police can't do it
all by themselves," said Mr
Evans.
Mr Beneby is described as
being of slim built, between
5ft lOins and 6ft and of a
medium brown completion.
Mr Evans also announced
that the police have re-opened
the Police Incident Room at
the Central Detective Unit
(CDU).
He said that the purpose of
re-establishing this room is to
solicit the public's support in
(investigating) crime matters.
He added: "The Incident
Room is not just limited to
homicides and armed rob-
beries, but it involves crime
of any nature."
Persons with information
on the circumstances involv-
ing Mr Beneby are asked to
call the police at 502-9991,
919, 328-tips or 322-2561.


0* I


**






















"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


Ingraham meets former "

US Secretary of State .- -.

_ w -..


S K ..Ht.
O emi *e*
II#mm


* FNM leader Hubert Ingraham is seen with Henry
Kissinger, former US Secretary of State (centre) and _.
Nicholas Brady, former US Secretary of the Treasury and
former Senator in the US Congress (far left). Both were here
to attend a conference of the Holowesko Global Funds.
Mr Kissinger was the feature speaker at the conference last
Friday evening. He served the United States both as National
Security Adviser and as Secretary of State. He has received
the Nobel Peace Prize, the Presidential Medal of Freedom
and the Medal of Liberty. He is a former professor at
Harvard and the author of many books. The Bradys have
been associated with the Bahamas for a very long time, and
spend part of the year here at their home in Lyford Cay.


Airport partner has

faith in government


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
A PARTNER in the private
company that owns the-Stella
Maris airport said he is confi-
dent that both government and
his company will find a tem-
porary "quick solution" while
finding common grounds for
a long-term solution.
In an interview with The Tri-
bune yesterday, Joerg Friese, a
partner in the Long Island
Estate Developers Ltd, said
that the company was
"stunned" by the sudden unan-
nounced closure of the airport..
On Monday, Archie Nairn,
the permanent secretary at the
Ministry of Trini sirt,s-idT-flih
ministry issued a NOTAM or
notice to airmen last Friday
that the airport would have
to be closed indefinitely,
He explained that the clo-
sures were due to safety con-
cerns over the airport's run-
way which, he said, has deteri-
orated over the past few years.
Mr Friese indicated that the
company has communicated
with the Ministry of Trans-
port and Aviation, and that
the ministry is presently work-
ing on setting up a meeting
between himself and govern-
ment agencies involved.
At that time, he said, the
company will present various
suggestions as to how they and
the government can overcome
the problem at the airport.
"We have what we consider
a auick fix and long term solu-


tions to be presented to gov-
ernment, leaving various
choices open for a joint effort
suitable to the government
side as well as to the future
investment side of the Stella
Maris airport," said Mr Friese.
Mr Friese said that they
have never asked for landing
fees from Bahamasair, as they
considered them the major air
carrier for Long Island.
"We anticipated and in a
friendly way argued with gov-
ernment that in exchange gov-
ernment should help us with
regards to the maintenance
and improvement of the run-
way surface."
Mr Nairn said the ministry
ftiy1i-re To-ookiniga t-thh e paossi-
bility of accommodating Mr
Friese, however he could not
set a date for the meeting.
Dyllis Smith, a resident of
Burnt Ground, said that
everyone is affected, espe-
cially the residents of North
Long Island.
"At Stella Maris airport we
have customs and the post
office is close as of this morn-
ing, alpng with Bahamasair's
office. Bahamasair does not
have an office in the northern
area where persons can go
and purchase a ticket.
"Before you can travel on
Bahamasair you have to buy a
ticket and it has to be con-
firmed. To get from Stella
Maris to Deadman's Cay is
$90 one way for you to get up
.there. For-a poor person you
can't survive like that."


Share

your


The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

FLI


*hE1tler ugiie


Jm


Lidtth







WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1, 2006, PAGE 3


o In b


Robbe

chase

gang (

youth.

A TEENAGE
chased and caught
youths yesterd
snatched a bag fr
lege student.
The youths cha
Huyler Street, B
after he attack
Blue Hill Road.
When they cau
held him down
arrived. Then, sai
they allowed her
up."
The robber, wh
was 14, was then h
police.
A source told
"The guys saw wh
chased him. He t
over a chainlink fe
to climb over. Bu
before he could g
"When the girl
a tantrum and bea
guys just watched
The girl was o
the College of t
when the robber
youths retrieved :
The source said
see that there a
good people arou



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of

s

Robber was
Sby a group of
ay after he
om a girl col-
ised him into
lack Village,
d the girl on

eight him, they
until the girl
d a bystander,
to "slap him

ho claimed he
handed over to

The Tribune:
hat he did and
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Developer hits back




at attack by Smith


DEVELOPER Orjan Lindroth has
hit back at attempts by Keod Smith
MP to link him and his late father to
the Nazis.
In a press statement yesterday, Mr
Lindroth pointed out that he was born
in Sweden in 1948 three years after
the end of the Second World War.
And he revealed that his father,
Arne, served in the Swedish Army
during the war, spending the years
1939-45 in Sweden.
The statement followed publica-
tion in The Tribune yesterday of
comments made by Mr Smith in the
House of Assembly, when he linked
Mr Lindroth with Hitler's master-
race ideas and the Hitler Youth
movement.
Mr Smith also accused Mr Lin-
droth of using "Gestapo tactics" and
of having racist attitudes.
In his response, Mr Lindroth said
he was born in Sweden in 1948 and
arrived in the Bahamas in 1952 at
the age of four where he attended St
Andrew's School.
He was graduated from the London
School of Economics in 1970 and is a
permanent resident of the Bahamas,
where he runs Lindroth Development
Company. He holds dual Canadian
and Swedish citizenship.
His father, Mr Arne Lindroth, was
born in Sweden in 1908 and died in
1987. He served in the Swedish Army
during the Second World War and
spent the years 1939-45 in Sweden.
"Arne Lindroth arrived in the


* KEOD Smith


Bahamas in 1951 where he headed
Bank of Bahamas and Andros
Bahamas Development Company for
Axel Wenner-Gren. He developed the
Lighthouse Club and Andros Yacht
Club at Fresh Creek (Andros Town).
"He subsequently developed Par-
adise Beach and the Ocean Club
while president of Huntington Hart-
ford's Beachhead Development Com-
pany. He also managed various off-
shore investments for Richard Burton
and Elizabeth Taylor. Mr Arne Lin-
droth retired to Europe in 1969."
Mr Lindroth said Axel Wenner-
Gren founded the Electro-Lux
Group of companies and arrived in
Nassau on his yacht, the Southern
Cross, in 1939.
By then Wenner-Gren had retired
from active business and wrote a


book, Call to Reason, which was crit-
ical of Nazism, he said.
"On his way to the Bahamas he
rescued hundreds of survivors from
the SS Athenia, a passenger ship
which had been torpedoed by the
Germans in September, 1939, in the
North Atlantic.
"He founded Wenner-Gren Foun-
dation, a renowned social sciences
foundation in New York, and Wen-
ner-Gren Centre and Wenner-Gren
Institute, both in Stockholm. In 1960,
he was awarded an honorary doctorate
by the Weizmann Institute in Israel."
Mr Lindroth also outlined his links
with New Providence Development
Company, which also featured in Mr
Smith's parliamentary attack.
"Orjan Lindrpth has no connection
to the Charlotf ville project. Lindroth
Development Co created a master
plan tor the New Pro\ idence Devel-
opiment Company which sold the land
to New Dimension Properties Ltd, a
licensed nmutual fund which is admin-
istered b\ rinterbotham Trust.
"I am told that Dale Bronstein is
the managing ,de eloper for New
Dimension and Iv one ol many share-
holders. I am also told that Mr Peter
Bascom, who is a Bahafmianr, is the
project engineer for Charlotteville.
"Further, Mr Bascom advises that
he met with Kean Smith, brother of
Keod Smith, as mentioned in the'affi-
davit referred to by Keod Smith in
his personal attacks on me and my
family."


Special technical course


is launched at BTVI


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT The
Bahamas Technical and Voca-
tional Institute has launched
a new technical programme
for academically challenged
senior stiidents to help Iheli
quality tot a diploma during
their high school graduation..
The Bahama-s Technical .nd
Vocational Institute (BBIVI)
coordinator Fred Delancy said
21 students are presently
enrolled in BTVI's Higl,
School Technical Certification
Programme on Grand
Bahama.
The two-year programme
targets those students who are
not meeting graduation
requirements in high schools,
and exposes them to general
education, technical skills
training, as well as social, cul-
tural and community-orient-
ed activities.
"The basic concept is...to
help. them gain knowledge,
skills, and develop their indi-
vidual abilities to enable them
to become responsible and
productive members of soci-
ety," said Mr Delancy.
A special ceremony to
launch the programme was
held on Monday at St
Georges' High School.
Marco City MP Pleasant
Bridgewater, Lucaya MP
Neko Grant, District Super-
intendent for Freeport Sandra
Edgecombe, St Georges'
School principal Kenneth
Romer strongly endorse and
support the programme.
Mr Delancy said students


are taken out of school and GPA is accumulative of grades
attend classes at BTVI cam- 10, 11, and 12, teachers are able
pus, where they are taught to identify the students who
English, Math, General Sci- would be in danger of not grad-
ence, Biology, Bahamian Cul- uating.
ture and Special projects, He stressed that for too long
Maintenance and Construc- those students who are not aca-
tion technology. demically inclined are cast aside
SHe noted tlhaiT slJdents t4e fd ft feeling inadequt
basic ginerajstud\ couir ,One'ntudents would lha
twice a'"%e and lob Itruai, ccesfull completed the fust
ing for itwo'days at \arioui'job cn lat BTVI they would be
sites. He said Friday is sent back to St Georges' High
reserved for group discussions for graduation.
or field trips to enhance the Mr Delancy said that private
'"learning experience. :schools are not yet involved in
There are five instructors, the programme, but added that
and a guidance counsellor vis- many persons have been inquir-
its with students to check their ing about how to get their chil-
progress. dren enrolled.
"The programme runs for "Since the launch the
two years and after.the first response has been amazing, but
year they will receive a high right now the challenge we face
school diploma, but they can is funding the programme," he
continue on a second year added.
when they would select a "We had asked parents to
career choice and be placed pay $100 per month to facilitate
on a job and paid according- instructors' salaries, but that was
ly," he explained, not forthcoming and parents are
Mr Delancy said the pro- being reluctant to pay and that
gramme caters to both male was a major concern right now."
and female students who are He said they expect to open
having problems reaching the the programme to all high
required grade point average schools in September.
for graduation. BTVI is also in the process
"So, as opposed to letting of obtaining industrial sponsor-
them go through an entire .ship for on the job training for
year and not qualify for grad- students in the programme. He
uation they come to BTVI and said students have also planned
we try to qualify them for several events to raise funds to
graduation," he said. help offset the expenses.
About 16 students from St
Georges' are currently
enrolled in the programme.
Principal Romer said senior
students are required to earn a
2.0 GPA for graduation. He 5V
explained that because the


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PARLIAMENT STREET
Tel: 323-6145 Fax: 326-9953
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email:pritcharddesigngroup@coralwave.com


THF TRIBUNE


6'CALNEW


I NSIGHTYI

For thestories
behind th
news rea


"


I


Protests have

'subsided' over

beating of US

journalist

BAHAMIAN ambassador to the United
States, Joshua Sears told The Tribune yes-
terday that the protests over the beating of a
Cuban-American journalist at the detention
centre in Nassau have subsided.
Mr Sears said he has been in contact with
Consular General Alma Adams in Florida
who informed him that no "significant" activ-
ity is taking place.
He did however say that officials continue
to monitor the situation which stemmed from
the disgust the Cuban-American community
felt after it was reported that US reporter
Mario Vallegio was hit in the face with a
baton while using a public pay phone outside
the Detention Centre Compound. According
to witnesses, Mr Vallegio was covering the
reunion of seven Cubans, rescued several
weeks ago from Elbow Cay, and their rela-
tives who flew in from Miami to meet them.
Reports of the incident in US newspapers
and on television sparked protests by Cuban
activists and threats of a boycott against the
Bahamas.
In the aftermath of the incident, Foreign
Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell, met with US
Ambassador John Rood and representatives
from the Ministry of Immigration, and the
Defence Force.
The results of this meeting, he told The
Tribune earlier, will be forwarded on by
Ambassador Rood to the three Florida con-
gressmen led by Ilena Ros-Lehtinen: who
had written to US Secretary of State Con-
dolezza Rice to intervene into the alleged
beating.
Mr Sears added that he is still planning to
meet with the three congressmen very
shortly" and has promised them that he is
committed to providing answers to their
questions.






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1, 2006


EIOI AUL E S T HEEITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES.
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387


Bahamas should stand up to Castro


IN THE past few days we have heard much
about the sacredness of a "treaty" with Cuba
on migratory issues involving their citizens
who land illegally in the Bahamas. In fact the
document is a Memorandum of Understand-
ing, not a treaty. This does not mean that one
is less sacred than the other, however, both
can be breached by a sovereign nation if to
follow the terms to the letter would be either
illegal or immoral or not in the best interest of
its own citizens.
However, no one has mentioned that the
position taken by Fidel Castro on demanding
the return of two Cuban dentists held in the
Bahamas, breaches a similar agreement that
Castro signed with the United States in 1994.
As a result of the Mariel boatlift in 1980
when Castro attempted to embarrass the US
by unleashing hordes of Cuban refugees,
among them criminals and mental detectives,
on Florida, an immigration accord was nego-
tiated. In the Mariel boatlift 150,000 Cubans
were sent to the US. Such an immigrant exo-
dus is what the Bahamas government fears
most should it fail to return the dentists to
Castro.
Against this calamity it will have to again
lean on the US for protection as it did several
years ago when US aircraft drove off Cuban
Migs that strafed Ragged Island, sank HMBS
Flamingo and killed four Bahamian seamen.
However, under a Joint Communiqud issued
on September 9, 1994, the US and Cuba agreed
that every year America would grant entry
visas to 20,000 Cubans. In turn Castro agreed
that whoever won what is today referred to
as the "American lottery" would be allowed
to leave Cuba.
Castro's insistence on the return of the two
Americans now held in Nassau is in breach of
that accord.
Sometime in the Spring of 2002, Ihovany
Hernandez, his wife, and one-year-old daugh-
ter, and Dr David Gonzalez Mejias and his
wife and two children won the visa lottery to
emigrate to the United States.
During their preparations to leave for the
US, Dr David Mejias, and Hernandez's wife,
Dr Marialys Darias Mesa, were told that the
Cuban government would not permit them to
leave. The reason? They were both dentists
and, therefore, their skills were necessary to the
state.
Both families decided that the members who
could leave should do so with the plan that the
doctors would join them in the United States at
a later date. The two doctors were told that
they would have to spend three more years in
Cuba at the end of which time they would be


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allowed to join their families in the US.
Dr Marialys' husband, an electrician, who
settled with his brother in Cape Coral, Florida,
has a Green Card as a permanent resident, is
working and awaiting the return of his family.
Their year-old-daughter, Maria Laura,
remained in Cuba with her mother.
Dr David's wife, Dayami, and their two chil-
dren, Carlos, 14, and Flavia, 7, settled in Tam-
pa with friends.
At the end of the agreed three years, the
two dentists again applied for a release to
leave for the United States. However, con-
trary to the earlier promise, they were told
that they had been classified as "indispens-
able" and would have to stay in Cuba another
two years prisoners of the Cuban state.
Desperate to be reunited with their fami-
lies after having fulfilled their promise to work
three extra years for the state, they boarded a
boat and sailed out into the Gulf Stream head-
ed for America.
Later that night they were picked up by the
US Coast Guard, patrolling Bahamian waters
with a Bahamian "ship rider" on board. They
were taken to Bimini. Of course, by this time,
not having been allowed by the Cuban gov-
ernment to take up their "lottery" visas, their
entry papers for the US had expired. They
were taken to Bimini and for the past 10
months have been imprisoned behind a wire
fence in the Carmichael Detention Centre in
New Providence.
What is interesting is that in 1999 it was
Fidel Castro who shouted from the rooftops
that Elian Gonzalez, the 6-year-old Cuban boy
who floated ashore in Florida after being ship-
wrecked in his mother's bid for freedom, had
to be returned to his father in Cuba. He
preached from behind his shaggy beard abput
the sacredness of the family unit. The Ameri-
can judicial system agreed with him, took the
boy from his American uncle and returned
him to his father in Cuba and a jubilant
Castro.
It seems that the sacredness of the family
unit travels only one way and that is to Cuba.
If this little boy had the inalienable right to be
united with his Cuban family in Cuba, then
these two dentists have the same right to be
united with their Cuban families in America.
Is Castro, who seems to believe that agree-
ments and family unity only have merit when
.it supports his cause and his interests, the kind
of man the Bahamas wants to call friend? It is
now time for Bahamians to speak up and
decide who their friends are.They now have to
make a choice, and give directions to a gov-
ernment that seems incapable of decision.


The perfect





plan for the





NHI scheme


EDITOR, The Tribune
THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce hosted a meeting for
its members on Friday, Febru-
ary 10, 2006 so they could speak
with the country's state plan-
ners the Minister of Health
and the Chairman of The Blue
Ribbon Commission for
National Health Insurance.
When the opening remarks
indicated the press was not wel-
come...even though they were
not there...it became apparent
that control in the guise of con-
sultation is a guiding principle
as the process of nationalising
the health care proceeds. The
press should be invited to these
meetings to help inform
Bahamians about this major
government intervention into
the health care industry.
The Blue Ribbon Commis-
sion has been in operation for
three years or more designing a
"business plan" referred to as
a "model" for health care. Obvi-
ously a lot of work has gone
into designing what they believe
is the perfect plan that will "pro-
vide equitable access, funding
and service" for all Bahamians.
The problem arises when gov-
ernment "plans" are turned into
laws that are not adaptable to
changing economic conditions.
By contrast, plans and pro-
jections by private enterprise
must readily adapt to changes in
the economy. Governments
respond to change by putting
more money... money they get
from taxpayers... into the sys-
tem.
All Bahamians know that
government management of
education, airlines, utilities, air-
ports etc, are costly and provide
poor returns on the huge sums
"invested". The intention to
add health care to the list of
government "failures" requires
additional taxation, the limits
of which are unknown.
Price controls in the Blue
Ribbon "Plan" are called
"caps". Like all price controls,
they will result in shortages of
equipment and services and
probably a lowering of stan-
dards of medical practice.
One Chamber member chal-
lenged Dr. Bethel's premise
with the question "was his plan
not just another socialist plan,
and if it is not socialism, what is
it"?
The questioner was soundly
put down by Dr Bethel's impas-
sioned denial that the health'
care is socialist policy and that it
is wrong to equate the Blue
Ribbon Plan with 'Socialism'.
However, one cannot help but


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recall an often over used but
still irresistible turn of phrase -
"If it looks like a duck, quacks
like a duck and walks like a
duck it is undoubtedly a
duck".
It was at this point that prais-
es were heaped on the wonders
of the National Insurance
Board (NIB). But the audience
was not informed that the NIB
was headed down the road to
financial ruin as predicted at the
outset by, "alarmists" as the
"planners" referred to the citi-
zens that voiced these very con-
cerns. One major obstacle for
the NIB is that administrative
costs are over 20 per cent of
revenue...charges that cannot
be maintained at these levels
for the NIB to survive.
Before the question and
answer period was over the
audience was treated to the usu-
al political rhetoric that gov-
ernments are elected to fulfil
the needs of Bahamians. This
is obviously not what was envi-
sioned by the framers of the
Bahamas Constitution that was
developed out of the commit-
ment to "the Fundamental
Rights and Freedoms of the
Individual..." Government con-
trol does not translate to free-
dom of or for the individual.
In securing their positions the
bureaucrats in the proposed
new state run health care sys-
tem will fail to give credit to the
responsible individuals who
choose to pay their own way
with private insurance.
Instead of government
expanding into the private mar-
ket for health care, the profes-
sionals who are already in the
business of both insurance and
medical, care are better
equipped to finid solutions for
those with limited or no means
to pay for their health care.
The over riding concern is
that wait times for critical care


will worsen and eventually care
will have to be rationed by a
government run health care sys-
tem. Murray Rothbard, the
great Libertarian economist, in
For a New Liberty put it this
way:
"Thus, if consumer demand
should increase for the goods
or services of any private busi-
ness, the private firm is delight-
ed; it woos and welcomes the
new business and expands its
operations eagerly to fill the
new orders. Government, in
contrast, generally meets this
situation by sourly urging or
even ordering consumers to
'buy' less, and allows shortages
to develop, along with deterio-
ration in the quality of its ser-
vice."
Rothbard's thesis is especial-
ly significant today when one
considers that changes in med-
ical technology over the next 50
years is likely to occur at a
rapidly increasing rate...at an
exponential rate rather than a
constant arithmetic rate. Gov-
ernments are very inept at mak-
ing choices and funding them
in such a rapidly changing envi-
ronment.
When the press is denied
access to public information and
discussion on what will be the
largest government initiative
this country has seen in its his-
tory, one has to wonder about
the transparency of the process.
One aspect left out of the dis-
cussion was the ultimate force
of the state that will be applied
to those in private health care
that do not wish to go along
with government's plan. We
should be guided by Rothbard's
classic statement in his book
Planned Chaos (page 30) where
he reminds us that: "It is a fact
that men disagree in their value
judgments. It is insolent to arro-
gate to oneself the right to over-
rule the plans of other people
and to force them to submit to
the plan of the planner."
(Emphasis added).
THE NASSAU INSTITUTE
February 12 2006


Matter of the Cubans


EDITOR, The Tribune
YOUR headline, Friday,
February 24,2006 "Threat of
Sanctions" simply shows
that the Bahamas must
uphold International con-
ventions, their terms, etc,
rather than creating a biased
position where we would
have one rule for one ethnic
group over another.
I am sure you saw the
ridiculous position of a similar
group of Cuban refugees who
landed on one of the founda-
tion supports of the old 7-Mile
bridge through the Florida
Keys and the US Coast
Guard decided, because the
bridge span above the foun-
dation was not connected that
the refugees did not touch the
US, and repatriated the
Cuban refugees back to Cuba.
This is ridiculous as this
interpretation would mean
that if you landed on an
island off the US coast
because of the US biased pol-
icy of "wet-foot" "dry-foot"
in favour of Cuban refugees
over refugees from any other
country you would question-
ably not have landed in the
US.
Yes expediency is all
important in the process of
dealing with illegal refugees -
we may afford these people


all the constitutional rights,
health services and provide
them with appropriate shel-
ter, however they landed
"illegally" in The Bahamas
and therefore they are sub-
ject to Bahamian laws and
the UN conventions the
Bahamas are signatory to.
Recently in the matter of
the Cuban illegal refugees on
Elbow Cay we saw the bla-
tant disregard by the US
Coast Guard of the treaty
between The Bahamas and
the US as the illegal refugee
with an injured finger should
have been flown to Nas-
sau/PMH with the others
who were dehydrated and
not to Florida as the one
male illegal refugee was.
A friend of mine, Bahami-
an, married over two years
to an American who already
has an American-born baby
is still waiting US Immigra-
tion process to be able to
work freely with a Green
Card. In the Bahamas an
American woman marrying
a Bahamianin a similar situ-
ation would have been
processed months ago. It
might be time for us to start
protesting.
H RAHMING
Nassau
February 24 2006


Real threat to democracy


EDITOR, The Tribune
THERE have been many
cries of the threat to democ-
racy due to the absence of
Mr Hubert Ingraham and Mr
Brent Symonette during the
Speech from the Throne.
In my opinion, however,
the greater threat to democ-
racy in a country is when a.
national TV and radio station
either refuses to air or dic-
tates what should be aired by
the opposition party of that


country. ZNS is paid for by
all Bahamians, not just PLPs
and therefore a fair opportu-
nity should be given to the
opposition party. Anything
short of this is clearly a form
of dictatorship and those who
condone this behaviour
should consider the implica-
tions and be very afraid for
the future of this country.
MARSHA KNOWLES
Nassau
February 23 2006








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Probe launched




into dredging


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Department of Physi-
cal Planning has launched an
investigation into a dredging
operation at Dick's Point, after
complaints sparked environ-
mental concerns.
Residents are also furious
that a huge tower has been
built on the site, claiming they
have no idea what it is.
They claim this tower has
been an invasion of their pri-
vacy and has prevented them
from using their patios in the
evenings, because workmen
are in the tower until after sun-
set.
The residents feel this is a
violation of the law and are
urging authorities to deal with
the matter immediately.
SMichael Major, director of
Physical Planning, told The
Tribune yesterday that his
department had conducted a
site visit of the area last week
in an effort to ascertain what is
going on.
He said the Department of
Physical Planning had also
consulted the Port Depart-
ment on the matter.
This is because his depart-
ment works in conjunction
with the Port Authority, of
which the Department is a part
on matters dealing with
changes to ports or access
docks.
Residents are concerned
that the dredging is an attempt
to enlarge the harbour. How-
ever, Mr Major said that inves-
tigations had not yet been
completed.
Earlier this month, The Tri-
bune reported that the opera-


* THE tower which residents say is an invasion of their
privacy


tion was believed to have start-
ed a month ago.
A number of large backhoes
have been in place churning
the small cove and turning the
area into a major construction
site.
Residents believed the oper-
ation had been initiated by the
owner of several parcels of
land in the area.
However, many have
expressed concern about the
environmental' effects of
dredging such a large area.
Residents have also


expressed concern that during
the first two weeks of the oper-
ation, it appeared that all the
fill from the dredging was
being used in an effort to
reclaim land.
One resident said: "This is
cheaper than carting fill away."
Residents said that although
they have repeatedly asked
workmen about the project,
they had no idea why the con-
struction is taking place, nor
have they been able to verify a
building permit for the opera-
tion.


Wilchcombe exhorts youth


to have faith in themselves


* TOURISM Minister Obie Wilchcombe (left) with Keith Rolle, proprietor of the Britannia
Town Plaza at Polaris Drive in Freeport
(Photo: BIS/Vandyke Hepburn)


A STRONG economy
must be built with young
Bahamians who believe in
themselves and.their.country,
Tourism Minister Obie Wilch-
combe claimed.
He made this known while
issuing a challenge to finan-
cial institutions in Grand
Bahama.
Mr Wilchcombe said a par-
adigm shift is required to
cause banks and insurance
companies to rethink their
roles in the economic empow-
erment of young Bahamian
businessmen.
Mr Wilchcombe's com-
ments came at the grand
opening of the Britannia
Town Plaza at Polaris Drive,
owned by Bahamians
Dorothea and Keith Rolle.
Mr Wilchcombe, MP for
West End and Bimini, said:
"The challenge concerns
more economic opportunities
for young Bahamian entre-
preneurs wishing to become
employers instead of just find-
ing a job."
Mr Wilchcombe said he
was so pleased the govern-
ment had finally taken the
decision to put in place legis-
lation allowing Bahamians to
not only have businesses in
Freeport with Customs con-
cessions, "but to put in place
the extension of similar con-
cessions to businesses in West
End and East End, Grand
Bahama, which seemed to be
long overdue."


Also speaking at the event
were Debra Glinton-Ritchie,
assistant managing director,
Trinity Insurance; Leon
Williams, acting CEO and
president, Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company; Willie
Moss, deputy chairman, Grand
Bahama Port Authority; and
Neko Grant, MP for Lucaya.
Mr Wilchcombe said it was
a wonderful honour to speak
at a ceremony which he was
sure represented a defining
moment in Bahamas history.
Citing his concern that
Bahamians were not embrac-
ing all the opportunities,
because more than 90 per
cent of the time young
Bahamians did not have
access to capital, Mr Wilch-
combe said: "Today Brother
Rolle celebrates his dream
with this wonderful under-
taking. I feel wonderfully hap-
py because, when I think of
young Bahamians, when I
think of where we are as a
nation, I am concerned.
"Very few people have the
courage like Keith (Rolle),
whose story is a good one. He
came out of (Hawksbill) high
school and became a bus boy.
After becoming a bus boy he
had an opportunity with
Batelco and he happened to
meet a man, Leon, who would
embrace him, and encourage
him, and cause for him to see
and believe in what he
believed in; and to tell him
that it can happen."


WED. MARCH 1
2:00am Community Pg. 1540AM
8:00 Bajir, ajs' Sunrise '.'
9:00 Thousand Dollar Bee.
9:30 Tennessee Tuxedo & His Tales
10:00 Da' Down Home Show
11:00 Immediate Response
12:00n ZNS News Update
12:05 Immediate Response Cont'd
1:00 Urban Renewal Update
1:30 Spiritual Impact
2:00 Milestones
2:30 Inside Hollywood
3:00 Morning Joy
3:30 Lee Smith
4:00 Dennis The, Menace
4:30 Carmen San Diego
4:58 ZNS News Update
5:00 Fun Farm
5:30 411
6:00 A Special Report
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
8:00 A Classic Weekend
9:00 Talking Wireless
9:30 Partners In Crime
10:00 Caribbean'Newsline
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30 Community Pg. 1540 AM
NOE N T 3rsre


* DR Desiree Cox addressing the forum


More 'sustainable

development' needed

in over-the-hill areas


OVER-THE-HILL areas
need sustainable development,
according to Dr Desiree Cox,
consultant to the Urban
Renewal Commission.
Dr Cox presented the find-
ings of her study "Socio-
Demographic Profiles of Five
Urban Renewal Areas" at a
College of the Bahamas
Research Edge Forum.
She noted that what the
areas needed were economic
efficiency, social responsibili-
ty and environmental stew-
ardship.
Held at Choices Restaurant
on the Oakes Field campus,
Dr Cox's lecture was the latest
in an ongoing series spear-'
headed by COB's Research
Unit, led by Dr Joan Vander-
pool.
Dr Cox said that three ele-
ments are essential to trans-
formation acceptance, enjoy-
ment and enthusiasm. She said
that "Over the Hill" is not just
a place, it is a concept.
Tracing the history of the
area, Dr Cox pointed out that
before the 1790s slaves were
being housed in specific areas
as the slave population had
increased significantly.
By 1953, 53 per cent of the
inhabitants of Grants Town
were tenants and 47 per cent
of houses were rented from
landlords who owned more
thun one building inthearea.
S pr. Cox then presented facts
and statistics about the five
urban renewal areas in the
study.
These five areas, she said,
are of similar population size,
constituting three to four per
cent of the total population of
the country and characterized
by large numbers of churches
and businesses.
Average household incomes
range from $23,000 to $27,367
per annum, with the exception
of Fort Charlotte, with a much
higher figure of $38,466.
In Fort Charlotte, the per-
centage of residents with a col-


lege education working in pro-
fessional jobs is higher than in
the other four areas.
In all five areas, the profile
of the typical employed per-
son was a Bahamian blue-col-
lar worker between the ages of
25 and 44, with at least a high
school education.
The profile of the typical
unemployed person in all five
areas is a Bahamian, aged 25
to 44, with at least a high
school education but without
training for a specific profes-
sion, craft or trade, she
explained.
These profiles, said Dr Cox,
show that Over-the-Hill com-
munities do have resources.
The challenge is to find out
how they can be more effec-
tively utilised.
"What is needed is sustain-
able development, which
"meets the needs of the pre-
sent without compromising
the ability of future genera-
tions to meet their own
needs."
Based on the research find-
ings, a number of initiatives
were undertaken. According
to Dr Cox, the district consta-
ble programme is the most
notable. District constables are
local residents who choose to
patrol the community, assist
with organisng events and who
perform administrative duties
with the Urban Renewal Task
Force.
She added that the future
of The Bahamas depends to a
large extent on finding ways
to sustain itself and that true
urban renewal comes not from
a transformation outside the
people, but a change of vision
within individuals who live in
these inner city areas.
A report of the findings of
this first working paper,
"Socio-Demographic Profiles
of Five Urban Renewal
Areas," is available at nominal
cost from the Transformation
and Research Unit of the
Urban Renewal Commission.


'I ~ a
~ ~ jif.


1`-" .wgt- r


VOt1) N ONN f riOC f iON' 10 i H of 'tDQ



PUBLIC NOTICE

INACTIVE ACCOUNTS


The Bahamas Telecommunications
Company Limited (BTC) wishes to inform
the general pubic that it will begin ceasing
of all GSM, TDMA Wireless, and Wireline
Accounts, which have had no activity for
six, or more months as of February 20,
2006.


Customers interested in keeping their
accounts are asked to come in to BTC
within the next 10 days to make these
accounts current.


Customers, who have financial difficulties
in settling their accounts, can visit our
Credit Administration Department at our
John F Kennedy Drive location to arrange
payment plans to have their services
reactivated.


We thank you for your cooperation and
look forward to serving you our valued
customers.

se ----~ --.~apraana~ llsaaa~s~ -79n


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1, 2006, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


I


4














An update on CARICOM and




the future of the single market


F you thought the
Bahamas' merger with
CARICOM's single market
was off the table after last
year's acrimonious debate,
think again.
A fact-finding team from the
Inter-American Development
Bank was here last week on
the last leg of a 15-nation tour
to update the bank's regional
development strategy. They
met with private and public
sector leaders, including Min-
isters James Smith and Fred
Mitchell.
Although most analysts are
sceptical, Mr Mitchell thinks
we need to join the CSME for
geopolitical reasons specifi-
cally, to have a stronger hand
against the Great White North.
But public opinion is solidly


opposed to integration, which
is why the government backed
down last year.
Six larger countries in the
region went on to sign the inau-
gural protocols of the
Caribbean Single Market and
Economy this past January,
and six smaller ones are expect-
ed to do so by mid-year. But
the Bahamian position is still
far from clear.
Last month in Trinidad.
Prime Minister Christie signed
an agreement to amend the
revised CARICOM treaty so'
that it could enter into force
with only 12 ratifications.
According to Ambassador
Leonard Archer, this could not
have happened without our
consent.
As a CARICOM press
release noted, "The Bahamas is


KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED
22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas



PETER JOHN WITNEY


will officiate.


of Lyford Cay,
Nassau, the
Bahamas will be
held at New
Providence
Community
Church, Blake
Road, Nassau on
Friday, 3rd March,
2006 at 4pm.

Pastor Clint Kemp


Peter was born in 1955 and raised in
England. He came to the Bahamas in
1987 and his work as an architect over
the last 19 years is greatly admired.

Peter is survived by his wife, Dianne
Witney, his children, Matthew, Sean and
Rebecca, his father, Harold and sisters,
Carol and Averil. Peter will be greatly
missed by all his family and friends.

We will Love You Forever.

Instead of flowers the family request
that donations be sent to The Heart
Foundation, P.O. Box N-1706, Nassau
or to a charity of your choice in memory
of Mr Peter J. Witney.


not yet a part of the single mar-
ket arrangement, while
Montserrat, a British depen-
dency, awaits the necessary
authorisationn) from the Unit-
ed Kingdom in order to partic-
ipate. Haiti has not completed
its accession to the revised
treaty and is therefore not a
participant in the single mar-
ket."
This is a clear indication that
our government fully intends
to join the CSME as soon as it


is politically able to do
final cap will be put on
toric regional econoi
gration process wi
CSME is impleme
2008," the CARICO1
continued.

F following on t
Sof the failed W
an Federation, the C
Community (or CAI
was formed in 1973.
leaders like to boast
region has achieved sin
ket status in only 33
compared to the 50
took to create the E
Union.
But that is mostly
reality, the integratic
lines set by CARICC
the years have been fr
postponed or ignor
CSME itself was sup]


be completed in "the shortest
possible time" after member
states agreed to it in 1989 but
analysts say it is still a work
very much in progress.
At the top of the "to-do" list
are such things as creating a
common regime for electronic
commerce, and regionalising
government procurement of
goods and services. Since pub-
lic sector buying represents as
much as a quarter of regional
GDP, this is a significant


so: "The exemption from the integra-
n this his- tion process.
nic inte- In fact, even trade policies
hen the are nowhere near what would
nted in be expected after some 30
4 release years of integration. The Com-
mon External Tariff has been
; described as "a labyrinth of
exceptions and derogations"
he heels that complicates relations with
Vest Indi- third countries, raises transac-
aribbean tion costs and hinders the
RICOM) development of internationally
And its competitive industries which
that the is supposed to be CARICOM's
agle mar- main objective.


years -
years it
uropean
hype. In
Dn dead-
DM over
equently
ed. The
posed to


T here are many reasons
for this lack of
progress and clarity, as a recent
progress report produced by
the same IADB fact-finding
team that was here last week
makes clear. These reasons are
similar to those advanced by


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local critics during last year's
short-lived debate.
.In addition to a. lack of tech-
nical resources, the tremendous
differences between regional
states in terms of size and lev-
el of development make it
hard to reach agreements.
For example, the income
difference between the rich-
est and poorest CARICOM
nations is as high as 35 to 1.
Before its recent enlargement,
the European Union had an
income differential of just 4
to 1. And even if we exclude
the Bahamas and Haiti, the
difference between the rich-
est (Antigua and Barbuda)
and the poorest country
(Guyana) in CARICOM is
still 11 to 1.
Another factor affecting
integration, according to the
IADB report, is the lack of
regional trade: "For Barbados
and Trinidad, CARICOM is a
big market absorbing 45 per
cent and 22 per cent respec-
tively of their total merchan-
dise exports over the past five
years. For Belize, Jamaica and
Suriname, it is not: in these
countries the share of intra-
regional trade in total exports
ranges from 5-7 per cent....The


Bahamas has virtually no trade
with any CARICOM mem-
ber."

O their factors affecting
Sthe integration
process include fears of social
dislocation and the unwilling-
ness of richer countries to foot
the bill for economic adjust-
ment in poorer member states
(which was one of the big prob-
lems in the failed West Indian
Federation). And trade within
the Caribbean is hampered by
a lack of regional transport as
well as the small size and frag-
mented nature of regional mar-
kets.
But the IADB report also
makes clear that deeper region-
al integration is not possible
without broad public and pri-
vate sector support: "Public
indifference to what is often


perceived as a process pursued
by government leaders in qua-
si-isolation from the rest of the
community has plagued the
process throughout its histo-
ry."
One of the strongest disin-
centives (to recently indepen-
dent countries) is the fear of
losing national sovereignty. In
such a diverse group, decisions
will often go against specific
national interests. And for
many countries, especially the
Bahamas, the benefits of inte-
gration are intangible and long
term while the costs are real
and immediate.

T he IADB makes the
point that CARI-
COM has "never undertaken
a full cost-benefit analysis of
integration to assess its net
benefit to their economies and
to the region as a whole. In
the absence of such hard evi-
dence, it is sometimes diffi-
cult for proponents to main-
tain the momentum of the
process.
"In sum, 32 years after its
creation, CARICOM is still an.
imperfect customs
union...Implementation of the
single market is far from com-
plete...The single economy
remains an even more elusive
goal."
And the distinction between
these two terms has never been
made clear. The single econo-
my originally referred to monr
etary union and a common cur-
rency, but those goals were lat-
er deferred. Officials now say
that the single economy refers
to standardisation of laws anj


the coordination of economic
policies.
The August, 2005 IADB
report acknowledges that thdre
have been "some discussions"
in the Bahamas on whether
not to join CSME, but no deci-
sion has been made. This is 'at
variance with the government's
public position issued last July
that "The Bahamas is unable
to sign on to the Treaty and its
provisions."
It also flatly contradicts Fred
Mitchell's recent statement on
Love 97: "About the CSME,
it's finished, it's done...There
is no argument anymore. We
have accepted the wish of the
Bahamian people on this mat-
ter and that's the end of it."
What do you think?
Send comments to larry@tri.
bunemedia.net
Or visit www.bahamapun-
dit.com


O7ur S3ecre~t


Bras sizes 3,-1 t114 c,4C
Boy Shorts, Hi & LAv Rtie Tht'11p'
HiCut&ReIquhv- t. L'[II 'I Pllltt'%i Paim
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Men's undetw'~ii Imhiuh aq Bowr
V Neck & Rilll Nd Tree T I
Shirts in vamaitj tcIOll$. sMlaick. Iialml, j114 t1 e.


Queen size Bvint, Hose. 2 ft? the pice olove"'


The CSME itself was
supposed to be completed in
"the shortest possible time"
after member states agreed to
it in 1989 but analysts say it
is still a work very much in
progress.


In addition to a lack of
technical resources, the
tremendous differences
between regional states in
terms of size and level of
development make it hard to
reach agreements.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1, 2006


~'~~azance~


de







WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1, 2006, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


LOCAL NEWS


o In brief


Bristol

holds

opening

in Exuma

BRISTOL Wines and Spirits
held its grand opening at Emer-
ald Isle in Exuma when guests
were treated to a wine and art
show featuring local artists and
some of Bristol's finest wines.
Guests attending the event
included executives of the Four
Seasons Resort, staff of the local
tourism office, hoteliers, local
businessmen, winter residents
and local customers.
Members of the Bristol
Group attending were: Juan
Bacardi president; Edward
Gardner vice president sales
and marketing and Eric Butler -
financial controller.
The store and entrance area
were beautifully decorated by
Island Florals and Garden Cre-
ations. Aimie Bowe provided
the catering service.
1 Guests were able to view
local art and savour featured
wines and food in a casual,
relaxed atmosphere. "Great
Exuma is an island that is grow-
ing dramatically. Bristol is com-
mitted to assisting local bars,
restaurants and retail customers
with first-class products and ser-
vice," said Mr Gardner.
- Juan Bacardi deemed the
night a success and is proud that
Bristol Wines and Spirits can
Contribute to the local econo-
my of such a dynamic island.
- Bristol Wines and Spirits also
operates retail outlets in Grand
Bahama, Abaco and Harbour
Island.

Symonette

to attend

cheese and

wine social


BRENT Symonette, (
leader of the FNM, is to
a wine and cheese soc
Grand Bahama on Thi
evening.
The event, given by the
GB Women's Associatio
take place in the Ha
Room in Port Lucaya M
place.
Mr Symonette, who
the MP for Montague, w
brief remarks.


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al
providers"


*


S -


Red Cross places



focus on youth



and membership


it various schools to get stu-
dents involved in the youth
arm of the association.
Chairman Cooper said the
appointment of Ms Dean
would greatly assist the organ-
isation in achieving its goals
this year.

Experience

He noted that Ms Dean, a
former employee of the
Bahamas Princess Hotel, was
very experienced in adminis-
tration.
"She is not only capable, but
she has the right demeanour,
cares about people, and is a
very kind individual," he said.
He noted that distribution
of care packages and clothing
to the needy would now be car-
ried out at the centre under the
guidance of Ms Dean.
Mr Cooper explained that
efforts are being made to
heighten efficiency of the cen-


tre and to make it more acces-
sible to the public.
He added that more empha-
sis would be placed on First-
Aid and CPR training at cor-
porate entities and businesses
throughout the community.
"We want to be quite active
in the community because the
perception is that we have' our
hands open, but we want to
give back to the community,"
he said.
Mr Cooper said the organi-
sation will hold various fund-
raising and social events in the
community.
He thanked various bodies
which have assisted the organ-
isation, especially following
hurricanes Frances and Jeanne
in 2004, and Wilma in 2005.
Mr Cooper said the centre
recently renovated its kitchen,
which was in need of major
improvement. He said the
Rotary Club would be provid-
ing utensils, such as a sink,
stove and refrigerator.


Ambassador's award for

Island Relief efforts

AMBASSADOR John Rood visited Eleuthera on February 16
to officially recognize the good works of Island Relief, a non-prof-
it organisation started by American citizen Lisa Krupp.
Island Relief collects books and computer equipment in the
United States for transport to Eleuthera, where they are pre-
sented to local schools.
During his visit, Ambassador Rood presented Ms Krupp with
the Ambassador's Award. The award's citation read, "In recog-
nition of your outstanding efforts to bring educational enrichment
to the children of Eleuthera. You serve as a wonderful example
of the difference one person can make in the lives of others. You
make America proud."
The Ambassador viewed a recently arrived shipment of 25 pal-
lets of books and 100 computers donated through Island Relief.
He also toured the Central High School business department and
technical training centre that Island Relief helped to upgrade.
For more information on Island Relief, visit
http://www.islandreliefinc.com.



Attorneys attend


legal conference


in Puerto Rico


A GROUP of Bahamian
attorneys attended the Amer-
icas regional conference of
Mutilaw in San Juan, Puerto
Rico held February 9 to 12..
Attorneys Anthony Thomp-
son, Yolande Spencer and
Tamika Thompson of Antho-
ny Thompson & Company
were those selected to attend
the event.
Over 35 delegates attended
the Puerto Rico conference
chaired by Steven Garrard of
Sydney, Australia.
Multilaw is committed to
providing services of the high-
est quality and to providing its
members with the opportunity
to improve their professional
skills and service to clients,
highlighting their practices and
interaction with other mem-
bers.
Presentations were made at
the Conference by the Execu-
tive Vice President for the
Puerto Rico Chamber of Com-
merce and representatives of
Lexis-Nexis, Expedia and Ace
Insurance Company.
Practice sessions covered
topics such as E-Billing, Tech-
nology for Law Firms and suc-
cessful Law Firm Planning.
It was pointed out that Mul-


tilaw has strong practice
groups in the areas of Intel-
lectual Property, Insolvencies
and Liquidations and Alter-
native Dispute Resolution.
The areas discussed are
expected to assist practition-
ers and the international finan-
cial community in The
Bahamas where transactions
span across. borders and
involve several jurisdictions.
In response to the confer-
ence, Mr Anthony Thompson,
senior counsel with the firm
said the company is pleased to
be the exclusive Multilaw
member in the Bahamas.
"The conference brought
home the fact that business
transactions and corporate
relationships embrace nations,
continents, cultures, languages
and laws.
Performing effectively in
this complex environment
requires a dual perspective:
local knowledge and global
vision and connections."
Multilaw is a U.K. based
multinational association of
independent law firms The
association has member firms
in six continents in more than
50 countries with over 5,000
lawyers.


It's time to


"Live your Dreams"





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Some Facts About our Company:

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* We manage more than 40,000 Policyholders and
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WAward for fra ~ Iternity].


* DEREK Smith Jr, president of the Beta Beta Lambda
chapter of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity (right) recieves on
behalf of Sigma Bahamas the Partnership of Excellence
Award from William Jennings, Centre Manager, Junior
Achievement Bahamas at the 27th Bahamas Junior
Achievement Conference (BahamaJac) last Friday at the
Nassau Palm Resort Ballroom. Corporate sponsors such as
the Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Deloitte, Bateico, Quick
Kicks, and Royal Bank of Canada help ensure that the
conference, which is held annually, is a success. The
conference, which hosts delegates from various family islands
andNew Providence, was held over the weekend and seeks to
expose the nation's youth through various workshops and
corporate tours to the business community hence expanding
their knowledge or areas of interest.


* EMILLE Hunt and D'Angelo Ried, vice-president and
treasurer, respectively of Beta Beta Lambda chapter
(College of The Bahamas) and Omar Barr, Leslie Davis and
Scott Robinson Delta Epsilon Sigma chapter (Graduate
Chapter); stop to take a snap behind the grill as the fraternity
hosted the official welcome social for more than 200 family
island delegates last Thursday on the opening night of
the Bahamas Junior Achievment Conference






SH
Frtestois bein


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT Grand
Bahama Red Cross Associa-
tion chairman Sam Cooper
said more emphasis would be
placed this year on revitalising
its membership and the re-
establishment of. a youth arm
on Grand Bahama.
He also announced that a
new administrator, Ms Karen
Dean, a 20-year hotel veteran,
had been appointed to deal
with the daily running of the
facility on Jobson Avenue.
Mr Cooper said the organi-
sation had seen a decline in
active membership from about
500 to just over 100 members.
"We have a lot of dormant
members and we want to revi-
talise the membership by
encouraging members to
become active members," he
said.
He. also stressed that the
organisation is planning to vis-


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PAGE 8 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 01, 2006

WEDNESDAY EVENING

S7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00


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to give birth. n


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(CC)


Everybody
Loves Raymond
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Jack Van Impe
Presents (CC)


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n (CC)


MARCH 1, 2006


S9:30 |


Monty Python's Personal Best
"John Cleese's Personal Best" John
Cleese's favorites. (N) (CC)


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'Still Coaching" "Still Bad" (N) I ness" The team reopens the un-
I(N) (CC) (CC) solved case oi a serial killer. (N)
Deal or No Deal (N) 7 (CC) iLaw & )rde -i". '. iBuli
leads a mission to catch the killer of
a frend's daughter. ft (CC)
American Idol Male se""finahisi ; cerorm. (NI l Free Ride Nate
(CC) probes the local
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A Ar e e scar- helps Chris nter- searches for a cure for baby Aaron's
lanist brother. view ches. illness. (N) n (CC)


10:00 10:30


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'Terry Giliam's Personal Best" Terry
Gilliam's favorites. (N) (CC)


CSI: NY "Fare Game" A fantasy
game leads to murder. (N) ft (CC)

Law & Order A woman says she
killed her teenage son in order to
protect society. (N) ft (CC)
News (CC)

(:03) Barbara Walters Special (N)
n (CC)


I i'i iiCase Dog the Bounty Dothe Bounty Dog the Bounty Dog the Bounty Spying on My- Spyingon My-
9 1 "- ,Hunte ... Hunter og Hunter 'The Hunter (CC) self Belina" (N) self "Wendy"N)
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j 1. ii,. Frecr' i1.. i .i. .)-ii: '-. -r meets a mr'agician whose powers are real. Casey has a rep- Tamera forms.a
station. singing group.
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tears his earlobe in two. Door "Wingman"
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Angeles.


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Hot Property.
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(CC)


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Mathis. A nurse falls in love with a formerly comatose patient. (CC)


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f (CC) "Boy, Interrupted
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ing an ark; great flood; location of ond suspect claims responsibility for Califomians are murdered in their
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Earth from an asteroid. (CC)

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itoubled author of plagiarism. n 'PG-13 (CC)
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memories of their relationship. t 'R' (CC)
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i!.-ialian hood joins the 1950s New York Mafia. f 'F

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Ihreaten to gas San Francisco. n 'R' (CC)


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Weather: Evening Edition (CC)

Alborada Don Francisco Presenta Entrevis-
tas con celebridades del deported y
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tectives probe the murder of a fe- murder victim's body shows signs of
male airline employee. n (CC). Botox injections. A (CC)


Celebrity Fit Club ft

Home Jmprove- Home Improve-
ment Tim and Al ment Problems
scalp tickets, with relatives.
Beauty and the Geek The beauties
must ask the geeks out on dates;
photo shoot. f (CC)


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ure out who is haunting the parents
of a bus crash victim. (CC)


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WGN News at Nine n (CC)


WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
& Mr. G (CC)


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rence Fishburne, John Leguizamo. Gunmen attack a crumbling police sta
tion to kill a gangster. n 'R' (CC)


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man and a dentist. f 'PG-13' (CC) (2000) 'R' (CC)


Do You Believe in Miracles? The
Story of the 1980 US Hockey
Team n (CC)


Epitafios (Subtitled-English)r


** 50 FIRST DATES.(2004, Ro-
mance-Comedy) Adam Sandler,
Drew Barrymore. ft.'PG-13'(CC)


*** CITY BY THE SEA (2002)
Robert De Niro. A police officer's es-
tranged son commits a murder.


De Niro, Ray Liotta,.Joe Pesci. An ** THE PHANTOM OF THE
R' (CC) OPERA (2004, Musical) Gerard But
l er. f 'PG-13' (CC)
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Ron Eldard, Desmond Harrington. Salvagers are ca Cabo (N)
trapped aboard a haunted oceanlinet. t 'R' (CC) (CC)


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e,-ar iF V A mean-solted New York author finds love with a waitress. f 'PG-13' (CC) Moira wants to be called Max.
(CC) WOOD
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(2003) R (CC) Ispirited teacher captive. 'PG-13' (CC) Marianne Hagan. I R'.,


v ie Gift Certificat

f make great gifts
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Tel 9 6 3


325. WOOD
46 Madeira Strect


THE TRIBUNE


Inspiration To- Life Today ICC) This Is Your Day Gospel Truth
day_ I CC)


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Top realtor award goes to a


baker of bread fit for a king


ROBERT Arthur of Har-
bour Island has grabbed Cold-
well Banker Lightbourn Real-
ty's 2005 "Top Real Estate Pro-
ducer" award for the third year
in a row.
Mr Arthur, a former TV pro-
ducer and one of Prince
Charles's favourite bakers, was
one of five Lightbourn Realty
agents to receive special awards
at Coldwell Banker Corpora-
tion's recent International Busi-
ness Conference in San Fran-
cisco.
The conference, which cele-
brated Coldwell Banker's 100th
anniversary, attracted more
than 10,000 brokers, agents and
managers.
Also receiving a special
award was Katherine Weech of
Bimini, who won the Coldwell
Banker Island Affiliates "Most
Improved Agent" award for
2005.
Mrs Weech, who also works
at her husband's of Booze and
Screws Hardware and Liquor
Store in South Bimini, was
involved in the sale of Brown's
Hotel and Marina.
Three agents received the
prestigious President's Circle
Award Robert Arthur, Chris
Farrington of Green Turtle Cay,
Abaco, and Heather Light-
bourn-Peterson of Nassau.
This puts them in the top sev-
en percent of the 126,000 Cold-
well Banker sales agents world-
wide.
Receiving the International
Diamond Society Award were
Mailin Sands of Marsh Harbour
and Carmen Massoni of Nas-
sau. Sands and Massoni ranked
among the top 13 percent of
total Coldwell Banker agents in
2005.
"I am extremely proud of my


* ROBERT Arthur (above) and
Katherine Weech (right)

agents. They have worked very
hard and their efforts have paid
off. Last year, 2005, was a strong
year. Business written so far in
2006 is up significantly over the
corresponding period last year,"
said Mike Lightbourn, president
of Coldwell Banker Lightbourn
Realty.
Speaking of Mr Arthur, who
is also the proprietor of
Arthur's Bakery and Caf6 in
Harbour Island, Mr Lightbourn
said:
"His drive, work ethic and
relaxed charm are the perfect
ingredients for a real estate
agent. He's as enthusiastic
about selling real estate as he
is baking the best jalapeno


bread Prince Charles has ever
tasted."
Born in Nassau, Mr Arthur
lived in Miami for most of his
young adulthood, before relo-
cating to Harbour Island 13
years ago with his wife, Anna,
and two sons.
In his former, fast paced life,
he was a producer/director for a
CBS affiliate in Miami and
numerous TV and film projects.
Mrs Weech, a former art
gallery operator, lives in the tiny
fishing capital of Bimini made
famous by Ernest Hemingway.
When she's not showing prop-
erty, Mrs Weech works with her
husband, Marty, a liquor and
hardware merchant.


Hati str ls through a


-


- -


-.a
- S s- a


invites applications for the position of

Graphic Artist



PROFILE:

Bachelors Degree preferably in Graphic Design or related field
Proficient in Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign or Quark Express
Strong artistic skills in design and layout
SAbility to handle multiple projects with changing priorities
I Strong production skills
Excellent work ethic and attitude
Strong organizational skills
a Excellent oral and written communication skills
* Proficient in PC platform



RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

Assisting the Marketing/PR Director
Researching, designing and maintaining a variety of promotional
materials and tools to support the company's image, design
standards and marketing goals
Producing, editing and printing all marketing materials
Building and maintaining mixed media relationships


Portfolio required


Compensation package will include a competitive salary, together
with a comprehensive range of benefits.


Send resume no later than March 10 2006 to:


Human Resources


51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
Fax 326.3000
e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com


I


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1, 20063, P~AGE.


THEF TRIBUNE


o


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*


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Q


- -


ICPM

appoints

member

to Board

of Regents

THE Institute of Certified
Professional Managers (ICPM)
announces the appointment of
Lorraine Bastian, CM, to a
three-year term on the ICPM
Board of Regents.
The Board of Regents is the
governing body for ICPM, a
not-for-profit educational insti-
tute headquartered at James
Madison University in Har-
risonburg, Virginia, US.
ICPM was founded in 1974
by the National Management
Association, the International
Management Council, and man-
agement educators.
ICPM is the world's largest
certifying organisation for the
management profession with
more tha 10,000 certified man-
agers. ICPM's work in manage-
ment research has helped to
develop managers and man-
agement education worldwide.
ICPM has praised the perfor-
mance of Ms Bastian in the
administration and coordina-
tion of ICPM's management
certification program in the
Bahamas.
Her performance was recog-
nised with ICPM's 2005 College
Partner Award for the College
of the Bahamas. The award
was presented by ICPM Regent
and officer of the Board, Cheryl
Brown, CM. The College Part-
ner Award recognizes an acad-
emic institution for its commit-
ment to education, profession-
alism in management, and sup-
port of the certified manager
programme,
Ms Bastian is co-ordinator for
the Centre for Continuing Edu-
cation and Extension Services
at The College of the Bahamas
in Nassau.
She holds a bachelors degree
in communication design from
The American Intercontinental
University in Atlanta, Georgia
and an MBA from Columbia
Southern University in Orange
Beach, Alabama. Additionally,
she obtained management cer-
tification from ICPM in 2000.







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10. WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1, 2006


LOA NW


Senator: situation with dentists is





causing 'diplomatic embarrassment'


FROM page one

repatriation of that country's
nationals, the Bahamas also has
the responsibility to act
humanely.
"It should have been deter-
mined immediately if the two
Cubans are political refugees.
If that were the case then the
Bahamas could not send
them back," he said.
Regarding the US' claim on
the dentists, Mr Bethel said it
should have be ascertained if
the two Cubans are in any
way legally entitled to enter
the US.


"But nothing has hap-
pened. It is typical of this
government to drag its feet.
This administration is always
in a state of crisis control
because it fails to be proac-
tive in these cases," he said.
Last week, during his first
official visit to the Bahamas,
Florida Governor Jeb Bush
discussed the matter with
Prime Minister. Perry
Christie.
Mr Christie said that the
governor left the expectation
on the table that the
Bahamas government would
"aggressively" address the,


concern of continued deten-
tion of the two doctors.
.A few days following Gov-
ernor Bush's visit, two Flori-
da members of Congress
threatened to push for eco-
nomic sanctions against the
Bahamas if the two Cuban
dentists were not freed.
Speaking at a press confer-
ence held in front of the Cab-
inet offices yesterday, BDM
deputy Smith said that by
detaining the two dentists
over the period of ten months,
without having processed add
deported them, "has left the
Bahamas in a national crisis


and on the brink of a nation-
al catastrophe.
"Because of Mr Christie's
inability to make timely deci-
sions on matters of signifi-
cance, the future of the
Bahamas appears to be in
turmoil," he said.
By waiting to make a deci-
sion in the matter, Mr Smith
said, the prime, minister .has
allowed the dispute'tol esca-
late to such a high level,' that
he"has left himself and the
Bahamas "in the middle of
an all but unavoidable disas-
ter."
"The prime minister's
problem 10 months ago was
simple, any decision made
quickly would not have
grown into this international
and very possible national
crisis," he said.
However, Mr Smith con-
ceded th a decision in the
matter is'T'difficult one for
the Bahamas;, which has cor-
dial'relations'ayith both Cuba
and the US.
He said releasing the den-
tists to the US will serve to
maintain the Bahamas' good '


relations with that country,
"but it may be a blow to our
sovereignty this is a serious
question we have to ask our-
selves as Bahamians."
Responding to the com-
ments by the BDM, the Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs yes-
terday stated:
"The BDM statement is
inaccurate; it's wrong because
,there is no national crisis and
no national catastrophe is
imminent. The statement sim-
ply reveals a lack of knowl-
edge about the facts. The
Ministry repeats for public
information that two Cubans,
who are illegal migrants to
the Bahamas, shortly before
they were about to be repa-
triated to Cuba asked for
'their matter to be reviewed.
That review continues, but is
complicated by the fact that
the Migration Accord
between the Bahamas and
Cuba, signed in 1996 and
amended in 1998, does not
allow for exceptions to repa-
triation. The Ministry must
necessarily be circumspect
until this issue is resolved."


FROM page one

Yesterday, the United States Embassy
said it hopes that the autopsy of the
Andros whale will reveal exactly what
caused the animal's death.
The carcass of the 41-foot sperm whale
was discovered beached within sight of
the US research facility AUTEC at the
weekend, once again sparking concerns
about the effects of the testing being car-
ried out there. .
On Monday, cabinet ministers Lslie
Miller and V Alfred Gray along with
members of the media and a team of sci-
entists from Kerzner International trav-
elled to Andros to view the animal's
remains.
Estimated at being over 20 tons, the rot-
ting carcass now sits stranded on a marshy
area near Behring Point.
Outraged residents called for action
from the government noting that
this is the fourth beaching within 12
months.
In the past, AUTEC has come under
fire for the testing of underwater sonar
equipment. It is believed that the sounds
interfere with the. delicate nervous system
of whales and dolphins in the area.
Some people believe that the "intense"
sonar signals are directly linked to haem-
orrhaging of the mammals' brains caus-
ing them to beach themselves in what biol-


ogists refer to as a form of confused stu-
por.
Mike Tayor, the chief political officer
for the American Embassy, told The Tri-
bune yesterday that whale beachings are
mysterious phenomena and not well
understood. He noted that dozens of var-
ious types of whales wash up on shore in
the United States each year.
"Some are ill, some have been attacked
by natural predators, others are just very
old. Who knows why that whale swam up
the river Thames last month?"
He added that-the embassy is hopeful '
that the autopsy will shed some light
as to what happened to this particular
whale.
During his trip to Andros, newly
appointed Minister of Agriculture and
Marine Resources Leslie Miller said that
he is hopeful that the AUTEC base would
volunteer to bury the massive mammal so
that one day its bones could be exhumed
and put on display for future generations.
He added: "We look forward to having
dialogue with those running the AUTEC
base and work out a system where they
can implement a programme that is bene-
ficial for all the marine mammals in the
area."
Mr Miller said he hopes officials at the
AUTEC base will work hand in hand with
his ministry to implement new measures to.
limit any possible effects to nearby marine
animals.


BNT

on the

look-out

FROM page one

virus, Mr Carey said that
"although anything is pos-
sible, it is not likely."
Mr Carey explained that
there are no traditional
bird migrant routes from
Europe or Africa where
cases of bird flu have been
documented to the
Bahamas.
In some cases, he said,
Black Back Gulls can trav-
el over the Atlantic from
northern Europe, but "that
is very rare."
Mr Carey said that the
BNT remains hopeful that
the avian flu was not
responsible for the deaths
of the park's birds.
He pointed out, howev-
er, that the virus may have
been introduced to the
Bahamas through different
channels.
"Anything is possible.
Any time you have two
regions (the Caribbean and
Europe) interact, a virus
can be transferred. And
although there are no birds
travelling per se, there is
still a possibility," he said.
In the past two days, 15
Flamingos, five Roseate
Spoon Bills, and one Cor-
morant (black bird) have
been found dead, with no
exterior sign of the cause
of death.
The bird flu H5N1 virus
has previously been found
throughout Europe with
the most recent cases con-
firmed in Africa in Egypt,
Nigeria, and Niger.
In two years the H5N1
virus has spread from Asia
to the Middle East, to
Europe and finally on to
Africa. It has decimated
poultry flocks in many
countries and has killed
more than 90 persons.
Experts still maintain
that the virus is only spread
to humans through direct
contact with infected birds,
but warn that with the con-
tinued spread of the virus,
the likelihood that it will
mutate into a form that's
easily transmitted between
humans increases.
If such a mutation were
to transpire, which scien-
tists state is highly likely,
they warn that the results
"can be catastrophic warn-
ing that human causalities
could be as high 50 million
worldwide.
Yesterday, Reuters
reported that ,German
health officials said a dead
cat found on the island of
Ruegen tested positive for
the bird flu strain. Dozens
of birds died from the vilus
on that island earlier this
month. Cats in Asia also
have been infected by eat-
ing contaminated birds.
There have been no cas-
es of humans acquiring the
illness from cats.


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Tel: 328-0264 / 328-0267


A second





dead whale is





discovered


'Ongoing


investigation"


into murder of


businessman

FROM page one

International, Harrold Road branch, to make a deposit. He
died of his injuries early Monday afternoon.
Mr Carey was the cousin of Prime Minister Perry Christie
and a nephew of Dr Baldwin Carey.
Mr Evans said they hvve .iOeports that the white Max-
ima, which the gunmanUsed toee the scene, was a stolen
vehicle.
" Police Chief Supt Hulan Hanna advised business person
that it is "unwise" to travel with any amounts of money to
deposit at the bank.
He suggested that they should consider speaking to their
local police chief who can give them advise on how they
should transport their money.
"Those institutions that can afford it may want to contract
the services of the local armor car vehicles that can take the
money safe, not putting the owners or employees at risk,"
said Mr Hanna.
He added that persons within the community have to
take a measure of responsibility for their safety, within the
confines of the law.
"You should be aware of who is around you and what they
are doing, or what they are up to. They should be careful how
they display goods and valuables and money," said Mr Han-
na.
He said police are redoubling their efforts to speak'with the
business community and are continuing with its "Quiet
Storm" initiative to crack down on crime.


General

E/ Entrance Exam



Faith Temple Christian Academy wishes to announce that applications for its
General Entrance
'Examination are now' a\ ailblel,\,

There is limited space in grades 1 thru 9, and
persons wanting to enter the Academy in September 2006, must sit the Examination.

The Examination will be held on Saturday, March 4th, 2006 at 8:30 AM at the
Academy located on Prince Charles Drive.

AllApplications must be submitted alone with a twenty dollar ($20^00) E'.\g1
fee to the Admittance """' .M
Office. ...' '


For More Information Contac
The Admittance Office: 1
Tel: (242) 324-2269 '
Fax: (242) 364-8045
P.O. Box SS-5765
Nassau, Bahamas


FTC I A. .o"The School of First Choice,"for students
seeking a quality education in a Christian environment.


I


i


1






WEDNESDAYMARCH 2006, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


66


CAdU~6


a a


Life. Money. Balance both


-


~23, .






*-~M~.2I~ i~. IV~~e I ..- I,


Commonwealth Brewery Limited

The Brewery of The Bahamas
iBOX N4936 CLIFTON PIER NASSAU, BAHAMAS TEL: (242) 302-2900/2 FAX: (242)


I, -f ^


GilL celebrates its employ
oI '!


.M Jll ALJrn
':Packaging Department 5 years


ALLItlIU I DUI ITYLI 1
Packaging Department 5 years


I i


MIC JHAL WKIUnGH
2 .:GtoupInternal Auditor 5 years


TOMEKO LEE
Warehouse Department 5 years


I


^ **;-
S^'^'.. ** *"


JUbJrilii DULiLIdIl ,-
Packaging Department 5 years


SHERICE MUNROE D I
Purchasing Departit.1ait
1. .... ,,
I -^-^1
3 ''':.


SANDREW NERENAL
pl6yee of the Year 2005 Warehouse

^H^.~~~ ~~~ '.__ M'i'.,-.?;*'*^*


-; RICARDO ROBERTS
:' Brewing Manager 10 years
.
a ,:*t


- TONYA DAVIS
' Purchasing Department 15 years







; :


MARTIN ROLLE
Warehouse Department- 15 years
bA: ;


JONISTUBBS
Employee of the Year 2005 Finance


DARREN BURROWS
Employee of the Year 2005 Packaging


TYRONE BETHEL
Engineering Department 5 years


LEROY ARCHER MANAGING DIRECTOR
BHG Group of Companies CBL 15 years


"Saftey comes in cans. I can, you can,


COLLETTE SAUNDERS -- :
Employee of the Year 2005 Quality Asi
,-
A. -: .-. ,: ..


Employee of the Year 2005-
a"j" ?i",4 .


GEORGE NEWBOULD '-
Warehouse Department 15ye" rs


DWAYNE COOPER .....
Employee of the Year 2005 Engineeringti

WARFIELD BAIN"
Employee of the Year 2005 Brewing

BANNERMAN CAMPBELL .-.. "
Brewing Supervisor 15 years


Congratulations once again from th'ien'
team at CBL, and we welcome m,
successes in 2006!

Swe can. "


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business@tribunemedia.net Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


- I *0


Fiscal deficit 'within




range' of 3% target


a By NEIL HARTNELL in its handling of the public finances, deficit deficit by 0.75 per cent of GDP compared
Tribune Business Editor hawks such as the Nassau Institute think- to 2004-2005, which would have required
tank are likely to argue that the deficit tax rises or spending cuts equivalent to
range" of bringing the 2005- lion national debt are still increasing. Mr Smith yesterday told The Tribune
2006 fiscal deficit below 3 per This could potentially store up trouble that the Government was "still looking
cent of gross domestic prod- for future generations of Bahamians, espe- really good on revenue" as it headed into
uct (GDP), the minister of cially if the nation is unable to meet its the last month of the 2005-2006 third quar-
state for finance said yesterday, a threshold debt repayments, leading to a default. ter.
critical to keeping the Bahamian national At present, though, this is unlikely He had previously told this newspaper
debt and public finances on an even keel. because the vast majority of the national that revenues were ahead of budget for
James Smith said: "We're within range debt is held by government-owned insti- four of the first six months of the year,
of bringing the GFS deficit in at a reason- tutions such as the National Insurance with total revenues for the first half up by
able rate of less than 3 per cent of GDP." Board (NIB). This will minimise any pres- some $30 million compared to the previous
"We're coming inside the broad guide- sure from foreign-owned commercial year.
lines of the size of the deficit and the debt- banks and international institutions such as However, as he has done before, Mr
to-GDP ratio." the International Monetary Fund (IMF).
While Mr Smith's optimism will provide The IMF last year suggested that the EE page 4B
some encouragement for the Government Bahamas needed to reduce its 2005-2006 S pg


PM's wife launches

latest Clipper vessel

THE Prime Minister's wife yesterday launched the sec-
ond vessel in a series of bulk carriers with a 30,000 ton
deadweight, named the CLIPPER TARGET, which is
owned by the Nassau-based Clipper Group.
Bernadette Christie launched the vessel in Cochin, in the
south-west of India. Sixivessels in the Trader series, which
is a series of 30,000 deadweight tons, double, hull handy
size bulkcarriers, are currently being built at the Cochin
Shipyard.
When delivered to her owner, the CLIPPER TAR-
GET will be registered in the Bahamas under the Bahami-
an flag.
The Clipper Group is headquartered in Nassau, the
Bahamas, and currently operates a fleet of more than
250 vessels. One hundred vessels are owned, out of which
76 vessels fly the Bahamian flag.
The Clipper Group has another 38 newbuildings under
construction. These vessels will also fly the Bahamian
flag.
The Clipper fleet ranges in size from 1,500 deadweight
ton small tankers to 84,000 deadweight ton panamax bulk
carriers.
In addition, the Clipper Group has investments in a
number of Very Large Crude Carriers (VLCC), cruise ves-
sels, roll-on/roll-off vessels and reefer vessels.



FirstCaribbean dispute

headed for Tribunal


I SHOWN at Tuesday's launch are Mrs Christie's son,
Steffan; Lowell J. Mortimer, Nassau Attorney: Paula
Hanna, sister of Mrs Christie; Mrs Christie; Henrik Lund
Dal, the Clipper Group's chief financial officer; John
Moyell, Clipper Group Nassau; Gurli Moyell


Airport closure


will hurt 50% of


island's economy


* By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Business
Reporter
FIFTY per cent of Long
Island's economy will be nega-
tively impacted by the closure
of the Stella Maris airport,
according to the owners of the
island's two premier resorts in
the north.
Both Frank Berke, of Cape
Santa Maria Beach Resort, and
Joerge Friese, of Stella Maris
Resort Club Marina and
Estate, are upset about the air-
port's closure, not only because
it will affect their businesses,
but because they say the Min-
istry of Transport and Aviation
gave them no prior notice.
Nearly 400 Long Islanders
who either work directly at the
resorts or are involved in the
construction projects all stand
to be impacted if visitors cancel
their trips, the two owners said,
and that effect would trickle


right down through Long
Island's economy.
"It is instantly affecting us in
the worst possible way because
people dealing with leisure and
real estate, which are supposed
to be associated with fun, will
not accept the inconvenience
of having to travel 45 minutes
to an hour away from the air-
port," said Mr Friese.
"In this modern market, we
cannot see this kind of prob-
lem. You have to see it in terms
of the easy convenience and
comfort level for ownership
and visits. So, the comparison
of a one-hpur ride [to the air-
port in southern Long Island]
will not cut it.
"You have to be concerned
with where your private plane
is parked, how long will you
Swait to reach your destination,
considerations of emergencies,
costs they are the real meat of

SEE page 2B


* By A FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Business Reporter
THE Royal Bahamas Police Force yesterday urged business
owners to contact them if they felt they needed an escort to
make bank deposits, in the wake of the murder of businessman
Keith Carey.
Entrepreneurs were told to take no chances and take nothing for
granted when it came to safeguarding their property, funds and,
most importantly, the lives of themselves and their employees.
Monday's shooting, death of Mr Carey came as a shock for
many in the business community, several of whom said to Tribune
Business yesterday: "What senselessness is going on in our com-
munity?"
The incident has spurred
renewed calls from the police SEE page 3B
force for business persons to nev- E p e


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas Financial
Services Union's (BFSU) pres-
ident yesterday told The Tri-
bune that its dispute with First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas) was headed to the
Industrial Tribunal.
Theresa Mortimer said the
attempts to resolve the dispute
with the bank, which were
mediated by the Department
of Labour, had failed to pro-
vide a solution. As a result, the


Ministry of Labour and Immi-
gration had forwarded the dis-
pute to the Industrial Tribunal.
Ms Mortimer said: "We are
waiting for the date [of the Tri-
bunal hearing]. The Ministry
forwarded it down to the Tri-
bunal."
The dispute centres over the
payment of a salary increment
to FirstCaribbean Internation-
al Bank (Bahamas) employees.
The BFSU is alleging that


SEE page 7B


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1, 2006


SECTION


BUSINESS


HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764
FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010








PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1,2006


THE TRIBUNE


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that LLOYD BENJAMIN LISCOMBE OF
#416 CAVE HOUSE, P.O. BOX F-42727, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 22ND day of FEBRUARY, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama,
Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

AQUINAS ENTERPRISES INC.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) AQUINAS ENTERPRISES INC. is in dissolution under
the provisions of the International Business Companies
Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the
27th February, 2006 when its Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Mr. Lynden
Maycock of Ocean Centre, Montagu Foreshore, East Bay
Street, P.O. Box N-3247, Nassau, Bahamas as sole
Liquidator.
Dated the 27th day of February, 2006.
H & J Corporate Services Ltd.
Registered Agent
for the above-named Company


Legal Notice


NOTICE


AQUINAS ENTERPRISES INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named Company
are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned at Ocean
Centre, Montagu Foreshore, East Bay Street, P.O. Box N-3247,
Nassau, Bahamas as sole Liquidator on or before the 14th day of
March, 2006. In default thereof they will be excluded from the
benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 27th day of February, 2006.

Lynden Maycock
LIQUIDATOR


BUSINESSES


Airport closure




will hurt 50% of




island's economy


FROM page 1B


the problem."
The Stella Maris airport was
indefinitely closed this Mon-
day, after the Ministry of
Transport and Aviation said
there were safety concerns over
the airport's runway, which
"had deteriorated over the past
few years".
Both resorts are still open
for business, without plans for
closure, the owners said.
Mr Berke and Mr Friese are
now incurring extra costs by
paying the $100 taxi fares to
get their guests to the hotels
from southern Long Island,
putting no pressure on visitors
to come up with the extra
funds.
Mr Berke said he is now
seeking permission to have a
shuttle bus to accommodate his
guests. "We need to provide
them with simple, comfortable,
convenient and free trans-
portation,' he added.


PROJECT ACCOUNTANT

POSITION


Local Development Company seeking Project Accountant for
large hospitality construction project. The position is responsible
for management and compliance with all company procedures
and all financial aspects of the project, including but not limited
to review of cost reports, preparation of monthly banking
packages and monthly billings, payment of contractors and
suppliers in accordance with relevant purchase orders and
contracts.

Requirements:

Bachelor's Degree in Accounting and minimum 5 years
previous related construction/development project
experience
Strong managing, organizing and communication skills.
Experience with construction loans



ASSISTANT CONTROLLER

POSITION


Local Development Company seeking Assistant Controller to
be responsible for the monthly accounting close, general ledger
maintenance and reconciliations along with various other duties.

QUALIFICATIONS/REQUIREMENTS

Bachelor's Degree and minimum 3 years experience in this
or a similar position.
Certified Public Accountant or Chartered Accountant a
plus.
Strong verbal and written communication skills.
Flexibility for high production within a changing environment

Qualified persons should send resume with cover letter indicating
position interest to:

Vice President Finance
PO Box EE 17548
Nassau, Bahamas

Or fax to 242-363-4661 Attn: Vice President, Finance.


With gas prices on Long
Island pegged at about $4.50
per gallon currently, taking a
two-hour ride several times a
day for different guests is quite
costly, they agreed.
The inconvenience of having
to take the trip, which is about
one hour, is frustrating to some
guests, who have placed calls
to the resorts to find out exact-
ly what they will be faced with
when they arrive at Long
Island.
Spending
"They are already spending a
great deal of money and time
to come here. They will be very
reluctant and disturbed to pay
over $100 for taxi fares," said
Mr Berke. "We are doing
whatever we can to communi-
cate to our guests about the
change of airport."
His resort is now in the third
year of a $65 million expan-
sion, which will take Cape San-
ta Maria from its present status
as a boutique resort, hosting


up to 85 guests, to a substantial
hotel with about 300 guests
over the next five to six years.
"People here in Long Island
don't have a lot to do. We are
trying to provide a resort that
will help boost the island's
economy, and this could put
the expansion in jeopardy,"
said Mr Berke.
Although the Ministry of
Transport and Aviation's Per-
manent Secretary told The Tri-
bune that airmen were notified
about the closure last Friday,
the resort owners said they
were not informed, and had
anything but kind words to
express how they felt about
being slighted.
"The whole matter is unfor-
tunate and frustrating," said
Mr Berke. "By giving us no
warning, it causes our guests
great aggravation and con-
cern."
His resort has seven guests
that left yesterday who will be
affected, and guests coming in
will also be disrupted "in what
is supposed to be an enjoyable
Bahamian vacation".
"It is very unfortunate that
the Government sent us no liai-
son to give us a warning. We
are good corporate citizens and
we want to see Long Island
prosper," Mr Berke said. "We
have one of the most beautiful
beaches in the world here at
Cape Santa Maria. But instead
of moving ahead in tourism,
here we are moving back-
wards."
He added that the Ministry
of Transport and Aviation had,
in effect, hurt its own people


more than the$ourists, because
of the economic impact it
would have on the community.
Mr Friese, who said he was
"stunned" by not being warned
about the airport's closure, sug-
gested that every Family Island
be equipped with two to three
airports to avoid these kinds of
problems.
Meanwhile, the situation has
left homeowners, many of
whom are piltos and their fam-
ilies, "terribly upset", and
guests have made "indignant
remarks" about it being ques-
tionable if they would return
here, Mr Friese said.
He added that in the next
few days, he expects to have a
meeting with representatives
from several government enti-
ties, including the Office of the
Prime Minister, the Ministry of
Works, the Ministry of Trans-
port and Aviation and the Min-
istry.of Tourism, where he
plans to present a "practical
and intelligent" plan for the
airport, with "short and long-
term benefits".
Airline
Airline such as Bahamasair,
Pineapple Air, and Southern
Air, as well as private charters,
stand to be hurt by the closure
also, said Mr Friese.
He added that five Long
Island-based charter aircraft,
who are badly needed to pro-
vide about 50 per cent of the
air transport needs, are now
facing a nightmare of organi-
sation, time, costs and loss of
business.


citaigrouP

Citigroup, a leading financial institution with a presence in over 100 countries and over 100
million customers worldwide, is seeking candidates for the following positions in our Corporate'
Investment Bank:

Treasury Sales Officer (2 temporary positions)

Reporting to the Treasury Head, the selected candidates will be responsible for customer service
and sales for 1) placement of funds 2) reinvestment of funds upon maturity 3) rate quotes and
4) general client inquiries and problem-resolution for our offshore Corporate Banking clients.

Requirements include knowledge of treasury products (or related product/banking operations
knowledge), strong organizational and client management skills, a proactive problem-solving
approach and excellent attention to detail. A degree in a related field with a minimum of two
years of related experience is needed. Spanish language skills are a definite asset and preferred.

These positions are temporary for a period of six months with the possibility for extension.

Interested candidates should fax OR forward a copy of their resume to Human Resources, P.O.
Box N-1576, Nassau, The Bahamas, Attention: Treasury Sales Officer, Fax: 242-302-8732.
The deadline to submit your resume is March 3, 2006.



kIKOIII I I )l l lllI ,lI

As a leader in the Insurance. Financial Services & Investments industry for over 85 years, British
American Insurance Company of the Bahamas Limited seeks a progressive, self-starter to fill this
challenging position.
Successful candidate will be responsible for:
Processing accounts payable items
Reviewing Invoices and preparation of vouchers for payments
Liaising with Central Bank for foreign vendors
SProcessing summer and Christmas bonus cheques
Bank reconciliation
Daily preparation of journals
Completion of purchase orders
Counting and balancing daily cash with cashiers
SAny other duties as required
Key Competencies Required:
SEffective oral & written communication with a diverse clientele
Results orientated & goal achievement
Planning, organizational ability
Flexibility & resiliency
SQuality oriented & customer focused
SAbility to work honestly and reliably with minimum supervision
Minimum Qualifications Include:
Minimum of Associate Degree in accountinglfinance/business administration
Knowledge of general ledger systems
SBank reconciliation accounts payables/receivables management
Proficiency In Microsoft applications including Excel, Word
Experience in a similar position would be a plus
The successful candidate will receive a competitive base salary and attractive benefits package
commensurate with qualifications & experience. Please forward your resume, documentary proof of your
qualifications and three character references to:
Human Resources Manager
British American Insurance Company of the Bahamas Limited
Independence Drive
P.O. BoxN-4815
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 242-361-2525
UNIM1 A


INSIGHT~l[=--r 1=1111


For te stries ehin








THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1, 2006, PAGE 3B


Financial sector requires compliant 'exit strategy'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN financial ser-
vices providers were yesterday
urged to consider the "back
end" of their investment struc-
tures, ensuring these were com-
pliant with their client's home
country laws so that tax was
legally avoided.
Hywel Jones, president of
Bahamas-based Britannia Con-
sulting Group, said that often,
funds and assets either placed
or invested offshore were held
in "unsatisfactory structures".
As a result, when the intend-
ed lifetime of these structures
or estate planning vehicles
expired, and the funds and
assets were returned to the
client or their beneficiaries in
onshore jurisdictions, they could
be exposed to unintended tax
liabilities.
In his address to the Society
of Trust and Estate Practition-
ers (STEP) luncheon, Mr Jones


said that while Latin American
countries were unlikely to adopt
it "verbatim", the market was
moving towards the aggressive
rules and enforcement methods
that Mexico had brought in dur-
ing 2005.
Mr Jones's co-presenter, Ger-
ald Dickens of Houston-based
William Murphy and Compa-
ny, said Mexico had upgraded
its rules and tax enforcement
ability with help from the US
Internal Revenue Service (IRS)
and the Organisation for Eco-
nomic Co-Operation and
Development (OECD).
Rather than use 'blacklists'
to discourage high net worth
individuals and families from
moving money offshore, Mexi-
co in 2005 had replaced this
with a 'preferential tax regime'
policy targeting nations such as
the Bahamas.
In addition, Mr Dickens said
that failing to report income
earned offshore, along with the
dollar value and nature of assets


er become slack about taking the necessary safe-
ty precautions.
The police also renewed their promise to thor-
oughly investigate crimes against business per-
sons, and to make sure that criminals are prose-
cuted to the fullest extent of the law.
"The murder was tragic and unnecessary,"
the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce's executive
director, Philip Simon, said yesterday.
"It has not only impacted his immediate fam-
ily, but his acquaintances, colleagues, employees
- it's tremendous.
"This is no criticism of Mr Carey, this is just a
reminder to anyone engaged in legitimate busi-
ness activities to be safe and protect themselves.
Be as inconspicuous and unpredictable as pos-
sible in the transacting of cash and cheque
deposits."
Mr Simon said business men and women could
hire a security team, or liaise with police when
making such deposits.
Police press liaison, Inspector Walter Evans,
gave the same advice yesterday, encouraging
business owners to contact the police in advance
if they wished to have an escort and felt uncom-
fortable about making bank deposits.
"You'should have at least two persons, one
serving as a lookout while the other makes the
deposit," said Inspector Evans.
When making a bank deposit, Inspector Evans
advised that the times for drop-offs be stag-


held offshore, was not only a
civil offence in Mexico, but was
now a criminal one.
The Mexican government
had offered an amnesty where
those who "came clean" and
turned over 25 per cent of their
assets avoided such draconian
measures, but that expired at
the weekend.
As a result, Mexicans who did
no declare their offshore earn-
ings and income were now
liable to criminal prosecution.
Much Mexican money current-
ly offshore was transferred
there in the 1970s and 1980s,
meaning that the new law could
cause problems for beneficia-
ries due to the generational han-
dover that was now taking
place.
Mr Jones and Mr Dickens
both warned about the impli-
cations of a US Supreme Court
ruling in the 'Pasquantino' case
for Bahamas-based financial
services providers.
The case had involved Amer-


gered, and never be the same from week to
week.
Also, take a different route to the bank from
time to time, Inspector Evans said.
Of paramount importance for the safety of
employees is the securing of facilities, he said. All
businesses should invest in surveillance systems,
which also help police in catching perpetrators.
Business persons who are granted licences for
the protection of themselves and their employ-
ees could contact the police for assistance with
training, said Inspector Evans.
Leading psychiatrist, author and businessman,
Dr David Allen, has proposed a plan to launch
a major fundraising exercise to provide the police
force with security equipment.
According to Dr Allen, if businesses and the.
general public were to commit to contributing
one dollar each week to that cause, and if 50,000
contributions were made for one year, they could
raise $2.6 million to contribute to the force.
Mr Simon said the Chamber had asked the
police for a list of items they need that would
help them to be better able to protect persons
and businesses.
Inspector Evans also advised that all busi-
nesses should develop a relationship with their
local police station, and forge good methods of
communication and mutual assistance.
Businesses on Carmichael Road were yester-
day warned to be alert, aa within the past two
weeks, a string of armed robberies have occurred
in that area, with the manager at Price is Right
Foodstore being shot in one of those incidents.


ican citizens buying liquor at
US prices and then shipping this
into Canada without paying
Canadian import duties.
Although these taxes were
due to the Canadian govern-
ment, not the US, the US
Supreme Court had ruled that
those involved had participat-
ed in a conspiracy to commit
fraud.
Another example of extrater-
ritorial law, Mr Dickens and Mr
Jones warned that this ruling
theoretically meant that the IRS
and US authorities could come


after Mexican clients, for exam-
ple, to enforce Mexican tax law.
Mr Dickens used the example
of a Mexican family who had
floated their family business on
the US stock market, earning
$56 million from the issue and
transferring this to a Cayman
Islands financial institution.
Although the IRS had looked
at this and found nothing amiss
in regards to US tax law, they
had tipped off their Mexican
counterparts.
The family was still liable for
Mexican taxes.


M
1, TYRONE FERGUSON
of Seaview Drive, Nassau, The Bahamas
have made sworn deposition that Life
of Barbados policy No, 0101542 on my
life has been lost and having made
application to us to grant a duplication
of the same. Notice is hereby given that
unless objection is raised within one
month of the date thereof, the duplicate
policy asked for will be issued.
Dated: January 26, 2006
By Order:
Althea Hazzard,
Corporate Secr tary


As a leader in the Insurance, Financial Services & Investments industry for over 85 years, British
American Insurance Company of the Bahamas Limited seeks a progressive, self-starter to fill this
challenging position.
Administrator will be responsible for:
Interview of Mortgage Clients
Underwriting of mortgage loans
Assisting in marketing of mortgage business
Monthly arrears delinquency reports
Monthly Investment reports
Assist with maintenance of client database
Document maintenance of mortgage clients
Correspond with lawyers on all mortgage issues
Any other duties as required

Key Competencies Required:
Effective oral & written communication with a diverse clientele
Result orientation & goal achievement
Planning, Organizational & Conceptual thinking ability
Flexibility & resiliency
'Quality oriented & customer focused
Ability to work honestly and reliably with minimum supervision
Minimum Qualifications Include:
Bachelor of Arts degree or equivalent in finance/banking
Background in lending and underwriting of loans necessary
Five years experience (three years management) in the financial services industry
The successful candidate will receive a competitive base & productivity-linked salary and attractive
benefits package commensurate with qualifications & experience. Please forward your resume,
documentary proof of your qualifications and three character references to:
Human Resources Manager
British American Insurance Company of the Bahamas Limited
Independence Drive
P.O. Box N-4815
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 242-361-2525

,BRITISH
l^iABMERICAN



I I


Laser or Continuous



Cheques & Forms for



. your Accounting

* S


Software








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S- no
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Fvr infomto C ton a on:
* 9














t Banarrso Cheque ic






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email: chekscoralwave.com
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e-mail: checks@coralwave.com :


PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY


VACANCY

ACCOUNTANT

GRAND BAHAMA HEALTH SERVICES

The Public Hospitals Authority invites applications from suitably qualified
individuals for the post of Accountant, Grand Bahama Health Services.

Applicant must possess the following qualifications:

Professional qualification Certified Internal Auditor (CIA) or Masters of
Business Administration (MBA), Master of Arts (MA) in the relevant area
and one (1) year experience as Assistant Accountant or Bachelors of Science
Degree (BSc), Bachelors of Arts Degree (BA), Bachelors of Business
Administration and two (2) years experience as Assistant Accountant;
Associate Degree and a minimum of four (4) years experience as an Assistant
Accountant and must be computer literate.

The Accountant will report to the Financial and Accounting Officer II and
be responsible for the day to day management of the Payrolls Department,
assisting in the planning, administrative, personnel management, material
management activities and the professional business of the Payrolls.

Duties:

1. Prepares:

Statements for salary advance
Reports on all allowances
Gratuity and vouchers
Appropriation Transfer Warrants (ATW's)
Monthly deductions
Monthly Expenditure Report
2. Assists Payrolls Officer with budget preparation.
3. Codes Salaries
4. Processes all matters for salary in regard to new appointments and
terminations, promotions, reclassifications, etc.
5. Processes monthly pay sheet and inputting the data into the J.D. Edwards
payroll system.
Letters of application and curricula vitae should be submitted to the Human
Resources Unit, Public Hospitals Authority, Grand Bahama Health Services
P.O. Box F-40071 East Atlantic Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama no later
than 17th March, 2006.
Persons applying from New Providence must submit Letters of application
and curricula vitae to the
Director of Human Resources Public Hospitals Authority,
P.O. Box N-8200 or Manx Corporate Centre,
Dockendale House, West Bay Street or
through your Head of Department no later than 17th March, 2006.


_ BUSINESSES














Fiscal deficit 'within range' of 3% target


FROM page 1B

Smith said containing govern-
ment expenditure remained a
problem. Most of it was the
recurrent variety going on
wages, salaries, rents and other
fixed costs which, the minister
added, gave the Government
little room for manoeuvre.


Describing the expenditure
side as relatively "inflexible",
Mr Smith said: "We don't have
too much to play with."
The GFS measurement strips
out redemption of debt princi-
pal owed by the Bahamas gov-
ernment, which in 2005-2006
was estimated to be $55 mil-
lion.


The GFS deficit for this fiscal
year was projected in the Bud-
get to be 2.8 per cent of GDP,
although in absolute terms it
was projected to increase by $9
million or 5.5 per cent to $172
million, compared to 2004-
2005.
Currently, the Bahamas'
debt-to-GDP ratio is about 38
percent, just below the 40 per
cent threshold widely regard-
ed as sending warning signs
that a country may be unable
to repay its debt if breached.
The Government was hop-
ing to reduce this to 37.5 per
cent at the end of fiscal 2005-
2006, bringing it down to 30
per cent within a five-year peri-
od.
Meanwhile, Mr Smith yes-
terday said the Government
was hoping that the bidder cur-
rently doing due diligence on
the Bahamas Telecommunica-


tions Company (BTC) would
"make a firm offer" when its
90-day exclusivity period
expired in April.
He added: "I would expect
that at the end of the 90 day
period, probably the end of
March of the first or second
week in April, they would
come to the table and make a
firm offer."
The bidder is Bluewater
Communications Holdings, a
group that looks like it has
been put together specifically
to make a bid for BTC. Among
its principals are Roger Ames,
former chairman 'and chief
executive of Warner Music
Group, and president of Warn-
er Music International from
August 1999 to August 2004.
Also involved is, the former
chief financial officer of a UK-
based cable operator called
NTL, John Gregg. Their group


NOTICE OF PETITION

THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2004
IN THE SUPREME COURT FAM/div/623

TO: YANUARY ESTRADA PEREZ EVANS
Nassau, Bahamas

TAKE NOTICE that a Petition has been presented
to the Supreme Court by WENDI EVANS nee
WATKINS.

A copy of it is delivered with this Notice.

You must complete the accompanying Form of
Acknowledgment of Service and send it to The
Legal Aid Clinic, Eugene Dupuch Law School, The
Munnings Building, Nassau Street round-about.

If you do not intend to answer the charges, nor
wish to be heard on the other claims made in the
Petition, and if you do not wish to make any
application on your account, you need not do
anything more than send the Form of
Acknowledgment of Service to the above address.
The Court may then, without further notice to you,
proceed to hear the petition and produce judgment,
notwithstanding your absence.

If you wish to-be heard on any matter in connection
with the Petition you (or your Attorney) must
complete the accompanying Memorandum of
Appearance in duplicate and send or deliver both
copies (without fee) so as to reach- the Registry
within Fourteen (14) days after you receive this
NOTICE. You (or your Attorney) will receive Notice
of the case being set down for Hearing. When this
case is heard, you must attend the hearing.

If you wish to defend the case at the hearing, you
(or y our Attorney) must, in addition to sending the
Memorandum of Appearance, send or deliver an
answer in writing together with a fee or $2.26 so
as to reach the Register within Fourteen (14) days
after the time allowed for sending the Memorandum
of Appearance. You (or your Attorney) must at the
same time send a copy of your Answer for the
Petitioner.

NOTE
If you intend to instruct an Attorney to act for
you in these proceeding You should at once complete
and sign the Form or Acknowledgment of service
and Then give him all of the documents which have
been served upon you so that he may take the
necessary steps on your behalf within the time
specified.

Dated this 18th day of October A.D., 2004


The Registrar of the Supreme Court
The Supreme Court Registry
Nassau, Bahamas


EJ MjS f Financial Advisors Ltd..
Pricing Information As Of:
28 February 2006
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES VISIT WWW.BISXBAHAMAS COM FOR MORE DATA F. INFORMATION
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1.364.24 / CHG 00.00 1CHG 00.00 / YTD 13 53 / YTD .; 01.00
- .1 -H. 2'..,-Lo Sr, bcl Previous Close Toda) s Close Cht'inge O.i. '.ol EF 5. I De P E Yield
S0 70 c.,:o Klaraels 0 71 0 7O 1 ,' -0 16 .' L,. N r.1 00 "
10.52 8.00 1 Bahamas Property Fund 10.48 10.48 0.00 1.456 0.360 7.2 3.44%
7.24 5.88 Bank of Bahamas 6.95 6.95 0.00 0.643 0.330 10.8 4.75%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.70 0.70 0.00 0.175 0.020 4.0 2.86%
1.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.26 1.26 0.00 0.105 0.060 12.0 4.76%
1.20 0.95 Fidelity Bank 1.18 1.18 0.00 0.070 0.040 16.7 3.42%
9.60 7.90 Cable Bahamas 9.45 9.45 0.00 0.689 0.240 13.7 2.54%
2.20 1.39 Colina Holdings 1.70 1.70 0.00 -0.067 0.000 NM 0.00%
9.50 7.90 Commonwealth Bank 9.50 "9.50 0.00 0.861 0.450 11.0 4.74%
5.39 4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.34 5.39 0.05 0.099 0.045 51.0 0.89%
2.88 1.45 Doctor's Hospital 2.80 2.80 0.00 0.437 0.000 6.5 0.00%
.21 4.02 Famguard 6.21 6.21 0.00 0.542 0.240 11.5 3.86%
10.99 9.99 Finco 10.99 10.99 0.00 0.738 0.530 14.9 4.82%
11.00 7.50 FirstCaribbean 11.00 11.00 0.00 0.828 0.500 13.3 4.55%
10.05 7.95 Focol 10.05 10.05 0.00 0.833 0.500 12.1 4.98%
1.40 1.15 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 -0.162 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.20 9.60 ICD Utilities 9.50 9.50 0.00 0.526 0.405 18.1 5.68%
9.10 8.22 J.S. Johnson 8.75 8.75 0.00 0.572 0.560 15.8 6.19%
7.00 5.30 Kerzner International BDRs 6.82 6.72 -0.10 0.134 0.000 50.9 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.760 4.9 7.60%
i-lellt. O .er-The-Counler Securitie
.-..r -H 1, 2... *-L_. % S,)m boI BiG sk $ LaI Pi,e E.eerl. ,i EP .1 '3. .1 F Y,.i
i --' Z 12 25 Bal-mas Supermarkets 1325 14 25 11 0- I '91-- .' '20j 2 05
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.044 0.000 NM 0.00%
; .lr.a O.'-r-The-Counter Sgcurillas
I 1:11, 218 0: BDAB ll 00 0J300 0 JI OI 2. 2' 000 i 0 i:0:.
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.75 13.75 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
IS'-X L.sted Mulual Funds
: H. -:.1k-Lo., Fund Name NA '.' YTD"o L 5B 1.2 r.1 r.i s D, i e.-1 :
1 211:6 C.il.r,a More, Markel Fund 1 275.626d
2.6262 2.0704 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.6262 ***
10.8183 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.8183*""
2.3241 2.1660 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.324145*
1.1547 1.0894 Colina Bond Fund 1.154701"*
PIIIDE\ CLOSE 598.76 'YTD 7 957% / 2005 26.09%
I I- -LL ," R E IriDE 1. l .' ..2 = 1 *;'i 0) I LL l .'. .-,". i.l C,,.. :-.] "-.. i,- i i-l. ::1 ,- : ,r::
52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelit)
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelitN
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamlngs FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1. 1994 = 100
- AS AT JAN. 31. 2006/ AS AT JAN. 31. 2006
S-AS AT FEB. 17. 2006/ ** AS AT JAN. 31. 2006/ "*" AS AT JAN. 31. 2006
-O TP.-DE CALL COLINA 242J02-7010 / FIDELITY 242-366-776 4


is likely to be backed by pri-
vate equity financing.
Mr Smith said that if Blue-
water made an offer, a govern-
ment negotiating team would
then be formed, and the two
sides would need to "hammer
out an agreement".
Whether an agreement could
be reached depended on a
number of factors, including
the purchase price Bluewater
offered, and whether its plans
to develop BTC were in line


with the Government's expec-
tations for the company.
Bluewater was now "fine
tuning" the information it was
accessing through due dili-
gence.
Mr Smith said: "They're
bringing their people in.
There's quite a number of peo-
ple coming and going.
"We're kind of keeping a
very positive outlook. It's just
finding the right partner and
the right price."


Legal Notice


NOTICE


EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION
CENTRAL EUROPE LIMITED

Creditors having debt or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the
undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or before
27th March, A.D., 2006. In default thereof they will be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 27th day of February, A.D., 2006.

K. L. Floyd
LIQUIDATOR
16945 Northcase Drive
: Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.



Legal Notice

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION CENTRAL
EUROPE LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION CENTRAL EUROPE
LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 27th
day of February, 2006 when its Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is K.L. Floyd of 16945
Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

Dated the 28th day of February, 2005.

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company


Legal Notice



NOTICE

BUSSEROLE LTD.
In Voluntary Liquidation

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business Companies
Act. No. 45 of 2000, BUSSEROLE LTD., is in dissolution,
as of February 27th, 2006.

International Liquidator Services Limited situated
at 35A Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize
is the Liquidator.


LIQUIDATOR







QUALIFIED ACCOUNTANT

REQUIRED

2 year minimum audit experience with
expertise using ACCPAC.
Respond to:
pgomez@gtbahamas.com
or P.O. Box N-8285



STAFF ACCOUNTANT

REQUIRED

BSc. or Associates in Accounting.
ACCPAC expertise.
Respond to:
pgomez @ gtbahamas.com
or P.O. Box N-8285






























BOAT FOR SALE





.. .-----
....^ -..-ii f-inL-.U- .,'y







The "Majestad 1" has an open deck Defender Hull of fiberglass
construction with a 2nd deck affixed to accommodate passengers,
which also houses the pilot arrangements. Hull is in excellent
condition and all equipment onboard is in good working condition.
Principal Dimensions
Length Overall: 61.0 feet
Breadth: 18.0 feet
Engine: (2) Detroit Diesel 12V71 recently rebuilt
Vessel has five compartments w/ five bilge pumps equipped
with 1 inch discharge hoses and a capacity 2,000gph.

PHONE 363-7163
SERIOUS ENQUIRIES ONLY!
" *' "".i ~ j flP. 0


PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1, 2006


THE TRIBUNE









WEDNESDAY, MARCH 01, 2006, #A S


. .- ... .... ..... ,,..



ROYAL BANK OF CANADA TRUST COMPANY (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

NON-CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
AS OF OCTOBER 31, 2005
(Expressed in United States dollars)

2005 .2004


ASSETS
Cash on hand
Due from banks
Due from related parties (Note 3)
Due from customers
Investments in subsidiaries (Note 4)
Other assets:
Related parties
Other
Fixed assets (Note 6)
TOTAL

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
LIABILITIES
Due to customers: (Note 5)
Related parties
Other
Other liabilities:
Related parties
Other
Deferred income
Total liabilities

SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
Share capital (Note 7)
Contributed surplus
Retained earnings
Total shareholders' equity


$ 141,267
3,604,006
379,247,872
8,034
20,300

255,201
146,668.
611,530


6. FIXED ASSETS


The movement of fixed assets during the years is as follows:


COST:
Land
Furniture and fixtures
Equipment
Leasehold improvements


S. 127,593
S5,157,739
356,940,520
168,025
20,300

116,592
554,576
S 765,208


$ 384,034,878 $363,850,553





$ 2,647,850 $ 7,453,231.
351,547,577 330,174,232


900,921
48,439
1,514,861
356,659,648.


ACCUMULATED
DEPRECIATION AND
AMORTIZATION:
Furniture and fixtures
Equipment
Leasehold improvements


329,591
671,956
1,227,282:
339,856,292


5,005,000 5,005,000
29,088 29,088
22,341,142 18i960,173
27,375,230 23,994,261


TOTAL $ 384,034,878 $363,50,553

See notes to non-consolidated balance sheet.

The non-consolidated balance sheet was approved by the Board of Directors on December 15, 2005.
and is signed on its behalf by:.
Rogs 'MccDonaLcd AfLdrw aeiden
Director Director
ROYAL BANK OF CANADA TRUST COMPANY (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

NOTES TO NON-CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
YEAR ENDED OCTOBER 31, 2005
(Expressed in United States dollars)'"
1. GENERAL

Royal Bank of Canada Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited (the "Company") was incorporated
in The Commonwealth of The Bahamas in September 1962, and is licenced under the.
provisions of the Banks and Trust Companies Regulations Act 20.00. The Company is a
wholly-owned subsidiary of R.B.C. Holdings. (Bahamas) Limited, which itself is a wholly-
owned subsidiary of Royal Bank Holdings. Inc. Its registered office is located at East Hill
Street, Nassau, Bahamas. The Company's principal activities include private banking and
trust services.

The number of persons employed by the Company as at October 31, 2005 is 35 (2004: 22).

2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

The balance sheet has been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting.
Standards. The preparation of the balance sheet in conformity with Interational Financial.
Reporting Standards requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the
reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at.
the date of the balance sheet. Actual results could differ from-those estimates.

Significant accounting policies are as follows:

a. Basis ofpresenttaion The balance sheet is not presented on a consolidated basis since-
the consolidated balance sheet is presented by the ultimate parent, R6yal Bank of
Canada, 200 Bay Street, Toronto, Canada.

b. Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents consist of cash on hand and due
from banks.

c. Due from related parties Due from related parties are balances with related companies
and banks having the same ultimate parent, Royal Bank ofCanada. .

d. Investments In subsidiaries Investments in subsidiaries are accounted for at cost.

e. Fixed assets Fixed assets ares stated at cost less: accumulated depreciation and
amortization.

f. Due to customers Due to customers are carried at cost plus accrued interest..

g. Assets and liabilities under administration -.Assets and liabilities under administration
on behalf clients are not inoluded in the ngn-consolidated balance sheet.

Assets under administration include priceless works of art and historical, artifacts to
which values cannot be assigned.

h. Foreign currency translation Transactions in currencies other than United States
dollars are initially recorded at rates of exchange prevailing at the transaction dates.
Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in such currencies are translated at the rates
prevailing on the balance sheet date.

i. Related parties Related parties include the parent company,. officers, directors and
other companies with common ownership.
3. DUE FROM RELATED PARTIES .

The following is an analysis of amounts due from related parties by scheduled maturity ani
geographical concentration:


Maturity:

0-3 months
4-6 months
7-9 months
10-12 months

Accrued interest


$ 365,135,123
.8,500,000
S5,000,000'

378,635,123
612,749
S379,247,872


Geographical Concentration:

United Kingdom
Bahamas


4. INVESTMENTS IN SUBSIDIARIES


2005 Net book value
2004 Net book value


2005
Beginning Ending
Balance Additions Disposals Balance


$ 100 $ $ 100
387,615 396 17,875 370,136
472,138 32,389 93,570 410,957
367,497 3,200 370697

$1,227,350 35,985 $111,445 $1,151,890

2005"
Depreciation
and
Beginning Amortization Ending
Balance Expense Disposals Balance


$ 185,133
202,433
74,576
$ 462,142


$ 38,618
112,340
37,208
$ 188,166


$ 17,875
92,073

$ 109,948


$ 765,208 $ (152,181) $ 1,497
$ 908,157 $ (141,500) $ 1,449


$ 205,876
222,700
111,784
$ 540,360
$ 611,530

$ 765,208


As at October 31, 2005, the Company reviewed the carrying amount of its fixed assets and
determined that there was no indication that any of its assets had suffered an impairment.


7. SHARE CAPITAL

Share capital is comprised of:


2005


Share capital:
Authorized, issued and fully paid 1,750,000 common
shares ofB$2.86 each


$ 5,005,000 S 5,005,000


8. PENSION PLAN

The Company participates in a defined benefit group pension plan of the Global organization
Royal Bank of Canada. Employees become eligible for membership in the Plan at age 25 on a
contributory or non-contributory basis. The Plan provides pensions based on years of service
and contribution and average earnings at retirement.

An actuarial valuation is performed each year to determine the.present value of the accrued
pension benefits .based on projections of employees' compensation levels to the time of
retirement; The latest actuarial valuation was carried out as at January 1, 2005 at which time
thq actuarial value of the net assets was less than the actuarial present value of accrued pension
benefits. Royal Bank of Canada has the ultimate responsibility for ensuring that the liabilities
of the plan are adequately funded over time and has consequently taken steps to eliminatethe
unfunded liability.


9. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENT LIABILITIES

The Company has the following commitments and contingent liabilities as of October 31,
2005:

Guarantees In the normal course of business the Company undertakes guarantees which me
not reflected in the financial statements. Management does not anticipate any material losses
will result from these transactions. At October 31, 2005, outstanding amounts in respect of
guarantees were $12,903,775 (2004: $5,447,423).

Lease agreement The Company is obligated under an operating lease with a related party,
Royal Bank of Canada Bahamas Branch Operations, which terminates in October, 2006 and
on which the approximate minimum annual rental is $379,049 (2004: $393,161).

Service Level Agreement The Company has a yearly Service Level Agreement with a
related party, Royal Bank of Canada Bahamas Branch Operations, which provides credit
card services to customers of the Company.

10. FAIR VALUE OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

The estimated fair values represent values at which financial instruments could be exchanged
in a current transaction between willing parties. Where there is no available trading market,
fair values are estimated using appropriate valuation techniques.

The following methods and assumptions have been used in determining fair value:

Due from banks, due from related parties, due from customers, other assets and othe
liabilities Due to their short-term maturities, the carrying values of these financial
instruments are assumed to approximate their fair values.

Due to customers The estimated fair values of deposits are assumed to be equal to their
carrying values.


11. RISK MANAGEMENT

SCredit risk is the risk that one party to a financial instrument will fail to perform their
obligation and cause the other party to incur a financial loss. The Company's credit risk is
primarily attributable to deposits due from related companies with the same parent, Royal
Bank of Canada.

Interest rate risk arises primarily from differences in the maturity or repricing dates of assets
and liabilities. Interest rate risk exposures, or "gaps" may produce favourable or unfavourable
effects on interest margins depending on the nature of the gap and the direction of interest tate
movement and/or the expected volatility of those interest rates. When assets have a shorter
average maturity or repricing date than liabilities, an increase in interest rates has a positive
impact on net interest margins, and conversely, if more liabilities than assets mature or are
repriced in a particular time interval then a negative impact on net interest margins results.
Interest rate gaps are carefully monitored and interest sensitive assets and liabilities ae
.adjusted in accordance with changing market conditions.

Market risk is the risk that the value of a financial instrument will fluctuate as a result of
.changes in market prices whether those changes are caused by factors specific to the individual
security, its issuer of factors affecting all securities traded in the market. Theoretically, the
Bank is exposed to a market risk equal to the carrying value of financial instruments
(investments in securities).

Currency risk represents the risk that the value of the financial instruments will fluctuate due
to changes in foreign exchange rates. The Bank ensures that customer deposits in foreign
currency are offsetted with foreign currency holdings.


$ 322,440,481
I 8,000,900
6,500,000
9,500;000
356,440,481,
500,039
S 356,940,520


$ 375,217,689 $ 354,887;616
,4030,183. '2,052,904
$ 379,247,.872 $ 356,940,520


Investments in subsidiaries are carried at cost and consist of the following:


%.ownership 2005.


Multinational Services (Cayman) Limited
Hamaca Nominee Limited
Cassava Company Limited
Matarilla Company Limited


100%
'-" 100%
100%

100%


$ 10,100. $
10,000
100
100


Deloitte


2004

10,100
10,000'
100
100


$20,300 $ 20,300

The Company also owns 33Y/% of the preferred shares of Multinational Services (Caymnan)
Limited.
5. DUE TO CUSTOMERS

The following is an analysis of due to customers by scheduled maturity periods and
geographical concentration:


Maturity:

0-3 months
4-6 months
7-9 months
10-12 months

Accrued interest
Wn


$ 315,519,365 $ 250,652,836
26.828,277 46,891,286.
4,554,906 24,118,936
6,840,891 15,568,645
353,743,439 337,231,703
451,988 395,760
$ 354,195,427 $ 337,627,463


Geographical Concentration:
Bahamas
United States
Canada
Ilaiti
Caribbean other
South America
liurope
Asia
Australia


$ 163,474,600
53,253,821
37,063,272
17,317,183
49,811,245
11,223,672
19,380,034
2,575,504
90,0)96


Dloitte & Touche
Chartered Accountan
end Management Coransents
2nd Terace, Cenreipe
P.O. Box N-7120
Nassau, Bahamas
Te: + 1 (242) 30Z-MW
Fax: +1 (242) 322-31tt
http://ww.dektoltte.om.bt


INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT


To the Shareholders of
'Royal Bank of Canada Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited:

We have audited the above non-consolidated balance sheet of Royal Bank of Canada Trust Company
(Bahamas) Limited (the "Company") as of October 31, 2005. The non-consolidated balance sheet is
the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on
these non-consolidated balance sheet based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on A6diting. Those Standards
require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the non-
consolidated balance, sheet, is free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test
.basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the non-consolidated balance sheet. Ad
audit.also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by
management, as well as evaluating the overall non-consolidated financial statement presentation.
We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the non-consolidated balance sheet presents fairly, in all material respects, the non-
consolidated financial position of the Company as of October 31, 2005, in accordance with
International Financial Reporting Standards.


$ 145,159,410
65,260,377
43,271,509
18,354,507
9,337,317
9,209,850
45,265,792
1,695,113
73,588


4- i a^Aj


December 15. 2005


$ 354,195,427 $ 337,627,463








PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 01, 2006


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


ROYAL BANK OF CANADA BAHAMAS BRANCH OPERATIONS

BALANCE SHEET
AS OF OCTOBER 31, 2005
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)


2005


ASSETS


Cash
Due from banks
Balance with The Central Bank of The Bahamas (Note 3)
Due from related parties (Note 12)
Investments (Note 4)
Loans and advances Net (Notes 5,6,9, and 10)
Fixed assets Net (Note 7)
Other assets
Customers' liability under acceptance, guarantees and
letters of'credit
TOTAL

LIABILITIES

Deposits (Notes 8,9,10, and 12)
Due to banks
Due to related parties (Note 12)
Cheques and other items in transit (Note 12)
Other liabilities
Acceptances, guarantees and letters of credit
TOTAL


S 16,323,413 $
36,283,842
146,896,828
259,480,919
125,661,828 -
906,461,889
16,656,326
16,178,158


5. LOANS AND ADVANCES Net

I. Loans and advances consist of the following:


Mortgages
Personal loans
Business loans
Non-accrual loans (See II below)

Accrued interest receivable
Allowance for credit losses (Note 6)


16,966,614
29,195,342
104,356,148
216,512,284
130,381,313
756,640,194
16,971,038
22,377,546


36,057,847 25,876,272
$1,560,001,050 $1,319,276,751


$1,295,133,348
18,352,365
182,251,039
25,770,464
2,435,987
36,057,847


$ 31,294,560
361,230,711
498,600,058
18,733,812
909,859,141
3,507,499
(6,904,751)
$906,461,889


2004
$ 23,378,765
321,520,507
395,126,300
20,176,920
760,202,492
4,737,702
(8,300,000)
$756,640,194


Loans and advances classified as non-accrual represent 2.06% (2004: 2.65%) of the total
loan and advances portfolio.


I. Non-accrual loans and advances consist of the following:


Business loans
Personal loans
Mortgages


$1,133,742,499
24,500,606
113,917,215
19,733,565
1,506,594
25,876,272


S$,560,001,050 $1,319,276,751


2005

$ 2,103,921
16,109,363
520,528
$ 18,733,812


2004

$ 7,061,922
12,812,344
302,654
$ 20,176,920


6. ALLOWANCE FOR CREDIT LOSSES

Allowance for credit losses consists of the following:


See notes to balance sheet.

The balance sheet was approved on behalf of Management on December 16, 2005 and is signed on
its behalf by:




Senior Vice-President nMana nmancial Control & Planning



NOTES TO BALANCE SHEET
YEAR ENDED OCTOBER 31,2005
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)


1. GENERAL

Royal Bank of Canada Bahamas Branch Operations is a chartered bank operating under the
Bank Act of Canada, with branch operations in The Bahamas (the "Bank"). The ultimate
parent company is Royal Bank of Canada, 200 Bay Street, Toronto, Canada ("head office"
hereafter) in the balance sheet. The Bank is licensed under the provisions of the Banks and
Trust Companies Regulations Act 2000. The Bank is also licensed as an Authorized Dealer,
pursuant to the Exchange Control Regulations Act in The Bahamas. The Bank is globally
referred to as RBC Royal Bank.

The Bank's business activities include the acceptance of savings, term and demand deposits,
the buying and selling of foreign currency, electronic banking, personal, commercial and
mortgage lending in The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

The Bank's local head office is located at Royal Bank House, East Hill Street, Nassau,
Bahamas.

The average number of persons employed by the Bank during the year was 548 (2004: 517).


2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

The balance sheet has been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting
Standards. The preparation of the balance sheet in conformity with International Financial
Reporting Standards requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the
reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at
the date of the balance sheet. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Significant accounting policies are as follows:

a. Due to/from related parties Balances and traniiifioishwith the head office and its
consolidated subsidiaries are described in the balance sheet as due to/from related
parties.

b. Investments Investments are classified as held-to-maturity. Investments are initially
recognized at cost and subsequently re-measured at fair value.

c. Loans and advances and allowance for credit losses Loans and advances are stated at
principal plus accrued interest less allowance for credit losses. Loans and advances are
placed on a non-accrual basis whenever payment of principal and/or interest is ninety
days past due or in the opinion of management there is some doubt as to the ultimate
collectibility.

A loan and advance is normally written off if it is contractually in arrears, no payment
has been received in the last 180 days and all collateral has been realized.

d. Fixed. assets Fixed assets are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and
amortization.

e. Impairment offixed assets Fixed assets and other non-current assets are reviewed for
impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying
amount of an asset exceeds its recoverable amount. The recoverable amount is higher of
an asset's net selling price and its value in use. The net selling price is the amount
obtainable from the sale of an asset in an arm's length transaction, while value in use is
the present value of estimated future cash flows expected to arise from the continuing
use of an asset and from its disposal at the end of its useful life. Recoverable amounts
are estimated for individual assets or, if it is not possible, for the cash-generating unit.

Reversal of impairment losses recognized in prior years is recorded when there is an
indication that the impairment loss recognized for the asset no longer exists or has
decreased, though the carrying amount of the asset may not exceed the carrying amount
that would have been determined had the impairment loss not been recognized in prior
years.

Management has reviewed the fixed assets, and concluded that none of them are
impaired.

f. Pension contributions Pension contributions are actuarially determined on an annual
basis and are accounted for in the head office books.

g. Foreign currency translation Assets and liabilities in other currencies have been
translated into Bahamian dollars at the appropriate rates of exchange prevailing as of
October 31, 2005.

h. Acceptances, guarantees, and letters of credit The contingent liability of the Bank
under acceptance, guarantees and letters of credit is recorded as a liability in the balance
sheet. An offsetting asset is recorded to reflect the Bank's recourse against customers in
the case of a call on any of these commitments.

i. Related parties Related parties include the parent company, officers, directors and
other companies 'ith common ownership.

j. Assets and liabilities under administration Assets and liabilities under administration
on behalf of clients are not included in the balance sheet.


2005

$ 8,300,000
(6,637,149)
1,775,014
3,466,886


Balance, beginning of year
Loans and advances written-off
Recoveries
Provision for credit losses
Balance, end of year

Consisting of:
Specific provisions
General provision


2004

$ 8,310,267
(7,090,183)
1,738,859
5,341,057


$ 6,904,751 $ 8,300,000


$ 6,404,751 $ 7,800,000
500,000 500,000
$ 6,904,751 $ 8,300,000


Allowance for credit losses represents".75% (2004: 1.09%) of the total loan and advances
portfolio and 36.86% (2094: 41.13%) of the total non-accrual loans.
7. FIXED ASSETS Net

The movement of fixed assets during the year is as follows:


Accumulated
Depreciation 2005
2005 and Net Book
Cost Amortization Value


Buildings and improvements
Leasehold premises
Furniture, fixtures and
other equipment
Computer equipment
Motor vehicles



Cost:

Land
Buildings and improvements
Leasehold premises
Furniture, fixtures and
other equipment
Computer equipment
Motor vehicles



Accumulated
Depreciation and
Amortization:
Buildings and improvements
Leasehold premises
Furniture, fixtures and
other equipment
Computer equipment
Motor vehicles


$ 816,238
14,312,918
6,231,439

14,924,278
11,501,989
391,597
$48,178,459


$
5,829,972
4,956,075

11,041,824
9,479,397
214,865
$ 31,522,133


$ 816,238
8,482,946
1,275,364


2004
Net Book
Value

$ 816,238
7,841,679
1,561,515


3,882,454 4,578,499
2,022,592 1,996,375
176,732 176,732
$16,656,326 $16,971,038


2004 Additions Disposals 2005


$ 816,238 $ $
13,239,926 1,072,992
6,231,439


14,803,271
10,510,514


234,496
991,475


391,597
$45,992,985 $ 2,298,963 $

Depreciation


2004
$ 5,398,247
4,669,924

10,224,772
8,514,139
214,865
$29,021,947


Amortization
Expense D
$ 431,725 $
286,151

906,540
965,258


$ 2,589,674 $


$ 816,238
14,312,918
S 6,231,439

(113,489) 14,924,278
11,501,989
391,597
(113,489) $48,178,459


disposal


s 2005
$ 5,829,972
4,956,075


(89,488) 11,041,824
9,479,397
214,869

(89,488) $31,522,133,


8. DEPOSITS

Deposits consist of the following:


2005


599,637
358,727
920,031
254,953


Demand deposits $ 504,
Savings deposits 196,:
Term deposits 590,
Accrued interest payable 3,

S O L A $1,295,

9. MATURITY OF LOANS AND ADVANCES AND DEPOSITS


The following is an analysis of lbans and advances in order of maturity:

2005


2 years or less
Over 2 years through 5 years
Over 5 years through 10 years
Over 10 years

Accrued interest receivable
Allowance for credit losses


2004.

$ 420,748,936
175,830,861
533,860,589
3,302,113.


133,348 $1,133,742,499


2004

$ 292,499,671,
141,553,171
212,084,789
114,064,861
760,202,492
4,737,702
(8,300,000)


$ 319,444,209
135,554,717,
273,309,435
181,550,780
909,859,141
3,507,499
(6,904,751)


$ 906,461,889 $ 756,640,194

The following is an analysis of deposits in order of maturity:


2005


3 months or less
Over 3 months through 2 years

Accrued interest payable


2004


$1,144,968,058 $1,000,536,268
146,910,337 129,904,118
1,291,878,395 1,130,440,386
3,254,953 3,302,113
$1,295,133,348 $1,133,742,499


3. BALANCE WITH THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS

The balance with The Central Bank of The Bahamas is non-interest bearing.


1l. CONCENTRATION OF LOANS AND ADVANCES AND DEPOSITS

Concentration of loans and advances account balance is as follows:


4. INVESTMENTS 2005 % of Total 2004 % of Total


Investments are classified as held-to-maturity and consist of the following securities issued or
guaranteed by the Bahamas Government:


S2005


Treasury bills
Regitered stocks
Educational Loan Authority Bonds
Deposit Insurance Corporation Bonds



The maturity of investments is as follows:


1 year or less
Over I year through 5 years
Over 5 years through 10 years
Over 10 years


$ 17,026,328 $
103,535,500
5,100,000


2004

32,119,313
88,773,700
8,100,000


1,388,300
$ 125,661,828 $ 130,381,313


2005

$ 23,495,028
14,024,900
24,152,800
63,989,100


$0 -$100,000
$100,001 $300,000
$300,001 $500,000
$500,001 and over

Accrued interest receivable
Allowance for credit losses


$ 482,079,202
93,031,726
31,826,167
302,922,046
909,859,141
3,507,499
(6,904,751)
$ 906,461,889


52.98% $ 285,988,177
10.22% 75,222,037
3.50% 37,858,084
33.29% 361,134,194
100.00% 760,202,492
4,737,702
(8,300,000)
$ 756,640,194


37.62%
9.90%
4.98%
47.51%
100.00%


Concentration of deposits account balance is as follows:

2005 % of Total 2004 % of Total


2004


$ 36,384,013
20,908,800
14,025,400
59,063,100


$ 125,661,828 $ 130,381,313


$0 -$10,000
$10,001- $30,000
$30,001 $50,000
$50,001 and over


Accrued interest payable


$ 93,339,097
104,783,362
64,097,459.
1,029,658,477
1,291,878,395
3,254,953
$1,295,133,348


7.23%
8.11%
4.96%
79.70%
100.00%


$ 112,268,046
119,261,957
72,392,356
826,518,027
1,130,440,386
3,302,113
$1,133,742,499


9.93%
10.55%
6.40%
73.11%
100.00%







THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1, 2006, PAGE 7B


11. PENSION PLAN
The Bank participates in a defined benefit group pension plan of the Global organization of
Royal Bank of Canada. Employees become eligible for membership in the Plan at age 25 on a
contributory or non-contributory basis. The Plan provides pensions based on years of service
and contribution, and average earnings at retirement.
An actuarial valuation is performed each year to determine the present value of the accrued
pension benefits, based on projections of employees' compensation levels to the time of
retirement. The latest actuarial valuation was carried out as at January 1, 2005 at.which time
the actuarial value of the net assets was less than the actuarial present value of accrued pension
benefits. The ultimate parent has taken steps to eliminate the unfunded liability.

12. RELATED PARTY BALANCES AND TRANSACTIONS
a. Finance Corporation of Bahamas Ltd. ("Finco"), has a stand-by line of credit with the
Bank of $5.0 million (2004: 55.0 million), for which it pays a fee of 1/4 of 1% per
annum on the unutilized portion.
b. Included in deposits are interest bearing deposits of $167,401,686 (2004: $108,521,700)
Held on behalf of head office.
c. Due from related parties These balances bear interest at market rates and have fixed
terms of repayment.
Due to related parties These balances are non-interest bearing and have no fixed terms
of repayment.
d. The Bank provides cheque clearing services to a related party, Finco, which is shown as
cheques and other items in transit at year end of $25,770,464 (2004: $19,733,565). This
balance is non-interest bearing and has no fixed terms of repayment. Management is of
the view that this amount will ultimately be settled in the normal course of business.
e. The Bank holds non-interest bearing demand deposits in the amount of $8,351,943
(2004: $11,049,734) for group companies.

13. CONTINGENCIES
Various legal proceedings are pending that challenge certain practices or actions of the Bank.
Many of these proceedings are loan-related and are in reaction to steps taken by the Bank to
collect delinquent loans and enforce rights in collateral securing such loans. Management
considers that the aggregate liability resulting from these proceedings will not be material.

14. COMMITMENTS
The Bank has the following commitments as of October 31, 2005:
a. The Bank is obligated under leases on premises, all of which are operating leases, and on
which the minimum annual rentals are approximately as follows:

2005


$ 1,226,218
$ 9,462,938


The annual rentals are to be re-negotiated as the lease agreements expire. On average,
most of the leases expire within four years, with one expiring in approximately 10 years.
b. Commitments for loans as at October 31, 2005 totaled $66,074,000 (2004: $89,092,000).
c. The Bank is obligated under leases on computers, all of which are operating leases, and
on which the minimum annual rentals are approximately as follows:


2006
2007 -2008


$361,616
$509,211


All such leases are three year contracts.

15. FAIR VALUE OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS
The estimated fair values represent values at which financial instruments could be exchanged
in a current transaction between willing parties. Wherever there is no available trading market,
fair values are estimated using appropriate valuation techniques. The estimated fair values of
non-financial instruments, such as fixed assets, are not explained below.
The following methods and assumptions have been used in determining fair value:
Cash resources, other assets and other liabilities Due-to-their short-term maturity, the
carrying values of these financial instruments are assumed.to approximate their fair values.
Investments The estimated fair values of investments are based on quoted market prices,
when available. If quoted market prices are not available, fair values are estimated using
quoted market prices of similar securities, or by appropriate valuation techniques.
Loans and advances- For floating rate loans and advances that are subject to repricing within a
short period of time, fair values are assumed to be equal to the carrying values.
Deposits The estimated fair values of deposits are assumed to be equal to their carrying
values.


16. CREDIT RISK
Credit risk is the risk that one party to a financial instrument will fail to perform their
obligation and cause the other party to incur a financial loss. The Bank's credit risk is
primarily attributable to loans and advances receivable. The amount presented in the balance
sheet is net of an allowance for credit losses. The allowance for credit losses is maintained at a
level that management considers adequate to absorb identified credit-related losses in the
portfolio as well as losses that have been incurred, but are not yet identifiable. The allowance
is determined based on factors including the composition and quality of the portfolio, and
changes in economic conditions.
The credit risk on liquid funds and investments is limited because the counterparties are high-
quality institutions, including the Central Bank of The Bahamas and The Bahamas
Government.
The Bank's credit risk is concentrated in The Bahamas and is spread over a number of
counterparties and customers.

17. LOANS AND ADVANCES GENERAL PROVISION
The Supervisory Department of The Central Bank of The Bahamas has accepted the request of
a wavier from the general provision requirement of 1% on the total loans and advances because
the Bank's general provision is booked in the Royal Bank of Canada- Head Office books.



Deloitte.
Deloltte & Touche
Chartered Accountants
and Management Consultants
2nd Terrace, Centreville
P.O. Box N-7120
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: + 1 (242) 302-4800
Fax: +1 (242) 322-3101
,. http://www.deloitte.com.bs




INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT

To the Management of
Royal Bank of Canada Bahamas Branch Operations:
We have audited the above balance sheet of Royal Bank of Canada Bahamas Branch Operations
(the "Bank") as of October 31, 2005. The balance sheet is the responsibility of the Bank's
management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the balance sheet based on our audit.
We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those Standards
require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the balance
sheet is free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence
supporting the amounts and disclosures in the balance sheet. An audit also includes assessing the
accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the
overall balance sheet presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our
opinion.
In our opinion, the balance sheet presents fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the
Bank as ofOctober 31, 2005, in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards.



December 16, 2005


2007-2013


d0
FirstCaribbean






dispute headed





for Tribunal


FROM page 1B


FirstCaribbean breached Arti-
cle 21 h) of the industrial agree-
ment between the two parties,
which said the bank would not
withhold benefits such as an


annual salary increment.
Claimed
It claimed that First-
Caribbean had taken the posi-
tion that the across-the-board 3
per cent salary increase for
2006, which was negotiated by


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ESMOND VERNON WEEKS OF
P.O. BOX F-40501, #60 WISTERIA, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 22ND day of FEBRUARY, 2006 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship; P.O.Box
F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.





NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given.that LEONIE LOUIS OF JOE
FARRINGTON ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 1ST
day of MARCH, 2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





PUBLIC NOTICE-
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, DRUMECO DEXTER
LAURISTON-ARCHER of Nassau, Eleuthera, Bahamas, intend
to change my name to DRUMECO DEXTER LAURISTON
ARCHER. If there are any objections to this change of name
by Deed Poll, you. may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later'
than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.





NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that FIONA MARY McLEAN
MACDONALD EDWARDS, OF FIRE TRAIL ROAD, EAST, APT.
No. 1, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 1ST
day of MARCH, 2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,*Nassau, Bahamas.


the BFSU, was the same as a
performance increment.
The union, though, is alleg-
ing that the increment should
be paid on top of the 3 per cent
salary increase.
However, FirstCaribbean is
denying this, and had previ-
ously accused the BFSU of fail-
ing to follow the proper griev-
ance procedure when its mem-
bers took industrial action pre-
Christmas something the
union has denied.
Sharon Brown, First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas) managing director,
said in a previous statement
that the 3 per cent salary
increase was paid in line with
the Industrial Agreement. It
was provided regardless of indi-
vidual performance.
Bonuses
She added that "bonuses"
were used to reward strong
performance, with the bonus
pool for clerical employees
having increased by 25 per
cent.
In addition, Ms Brown said
the bank's salaries "were
already at the top of the mar-
ket", indicating that any fur-
ther increases could blow its
operating costs out of line with
the industry average and
impact both its bottom line and
competitiveness.


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If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


I I


REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL TO CONDUCT

EXTERNAL AUDIT


The Education Loan Authority is seeking to contract an accounting firm to conduct
its annual audit for the fiscal years 2006-2008.


The Education Loan Authority is a quasi government corporation established
under the Education Loan Authority Act, 2002, charged with the responsibility
of raising money for the Education Loan Guarantee Scheme established under
the Educational Guarantee Fund Act, 2001. The Education Loan Authority is also
designated as an approved lender and is responsible for the issuance, monitoring
and collection of student loans.


For additional information please contact the
Chief Administrative Officer at 323-6322/25/37.


Deadline for application is March 31st 2006









PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 01, 2006


FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED

BALANCE SHEET
AS AT OCTOBER 31,2005
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)


2005


ASSETS
Cash on hand
Demand deposits (Note 12)
Due from banks
Statutory reserve account with
The Central Bank of The Bahamas (Note 3)
Investments (Note 4)
Loans Net (Notes 5 and 11)
Fixed assets Nt (Note 7)
Other assets

TOTAL

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY


LIABILITIES:
Customer deposits (Notes 8 and 11)
Dividends payable
Other liabilities
Total liabilities

SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY:
Share capital (Note 10)
Share premium
General reserve
Retained earnings
Total shareholders' equity

TOTAL


$ 1,337,251
25,960,822
180,013

23,728,585
28,050,116
511,328,783
2,603,013,
613.537


2004

$ 1,307,511
11,849,394
35,420

20,816,877
27,477,309
461,907,755
2,453,072
462.597


$ 593,802,120 $ 526,309,935


$ 503,931,180
2,400,000
1.314.013
507,645,193


5,333,334
2,552,258
500,000
77,771,335


$ 442,582,173
2,200,000
883.125
445,665,298


5,333,334
2,552,258
500,000
72,259,045


86,156,927 80,644,637

$ 593,802,120 .$ 526,309,935


See notes to balance sheet.

The balance sheet was approved by the Board of Directors on December 12, 2005 and is signed on its behalf
by:




Director


NOTES TO BALANCE SHEET
OCTOBER 31, 2005
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

1. GENERAL

Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited (the "Corporation") is owned 75% by R.B.C. Holdings
(Bahamas) Limited which, in turn, is ultimately a wholly-owned subsidiary of Royal Bank of Canada.
The other 25% of the Corporation's shares are owned by the Bahamian public. Its registered office is
located at Bahamas Financial Center, Charlotte Street, Nassau, Bahamas. The Corporation is
incorporated in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and is licensed under the provisions of the Banks
and Trust Companies Regulations Act 2000. The Corporation is also licensed as an Authorized Dealer,
pursuant to the Exchange Control Regulations Act.

The Corporation's business activities include the acceptance of savings, term and demand deposits, the
buying and selling of foreign currency, electronic banking, and mortgage lending in The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

The average number of staff employed by the Corporation during the period was 126 (2004: 123).
2. SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

The balance sheet has been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards.
S The preparation of the balance sheet in conformity with International Financial Reporting Standards
"requires management to make estimates and assumpuons thai affect the reported amounts of assets and
ihabiis.a and disclosure of contingent assets and hablines: ai the date of the balance sheet. Actual
results could differ from those estimates.

The following is a summary of the significant accounting policies:

a. Investments Investments are comprised of securities which the Corporation has both the intent
and the ability to hold until maturity and are carried at cost, plus accrued interest.

b Fixed assets Fixed assets are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and amortization.

c. Loans Loans are stated net of an allowance for loan losses and uneamed income, which
comprises unearned interest and unamortized loan fees. Loans are classified as non-accrual
when there is no longer reasonable assurance of the timely collection of the full amount of
principal or interest. Whenever a payment is 90 days past due, loans are classified as non-accrual
unless they are fully secured and collection efforts are reasonably expected to result in repayment
of debt within 180 days.past due. When a loan is identified as non-accrual, the accrual of interest
is discontinued and any previously accrued but unpaid interest on the loan is charged to the
Provision for credit losses. Interest received on non-accrual loans is credited to the Allowance
for loan losses on that loan. Non-accrual loans are returned to performing status when all
amounts including interest have been collected, all charges for loan impairment have been
reversed and the credit quality has improved such that there is reasonable assurance of timely
collection of principal and interest.

d. Allowance for credit losses The allowance for credit losses is maintained at a level that
management considers adequate to absorb identified credit related losses in the portfolio as well
as losses that have been incurred, but are not yet identifiable. The allowance is increased by the
provision for credit losses, which is charged to income, and decreased by the amount of charge-
offs, net of recoveries.

The allowance is determined based on management's identification and evaluation of problem
accounts, estimated probable losses that exist on the relining portfolio, and other factors
including the composition and quality of the portfolio, and changes in economic conditions.

i. Specifi provision

The specific provision is maintained to absorb losses on both specifically identified
borrowers and other more homogeneous loans that have been recognized as non-accrual.

ii. General provision

The general provision represents the best estimate of probable losses within the portion of
the portfolio that has not yet been specifically identified as non-accrual. Manageinent has
decided, as a matter of policy, that a general allowance for credit losses should amount to
a minimum of 1% of loans outstanding.

e. Foreign currency translation Assets and liabilities in other currencies have been translated
into Bahamian dollars at the appropriate rates of exchange prevailing as of October 31, 2005.

f. Related parties Related parties include, the parent, the ultimate parent and companies with
common ownership together with their respective officers and directors.
3. BALANCE WITH CENTRAL BANK

The Corporation's statutory reserve account, which it has placed with the Central' Bank of The
Bahamas, is non-interest bearing.

4. INVESTMENTS
Investments are classified as available-for-salc and consist of the following:


2005


Securities issued or guaranteed by
The Bahamas Govemment:
Treasury bills
Registered stocks
Government bonds
Deposit Insurance Corporation bonds
.,. Total investiclnts
Accrued interest thereon



The maturity of investments is as follows:
1 year or less
'Over I year through 5 years
Over 5 years !hrougli 10 years
Ovej ]0 years

ot:l ilnvCStmlllletl


$ 4,000,000 $
20,587,300


3,037,300


2004


3,000,000
22,679,500


671,800
658,300


27,624,600 27,009,600
425,516 467,709

$ 28,050,116. $ 27,477,309


$ 6,533,100
2,500,000
3,449,700
15,141,800


$ 11,584,200
2,534,200
4,113,600
8,777,600


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


5. LOANS Net

Loans consist of the following:


Residential Mortgages
Non-residential Mortgages
Government Insured Mortgages
Demand Loans & Overdrafts
StaffMohtgages '
Staff Demand Loans
Total loans
Accrued interest thereon
Sub-total ..
Allowance for credit losses

Total loans net of an alliowane foi credit losses

S Loans matuireas follows:



3 months or less
Over 3 months through 6 months
Over 6 months through 1 year '
Over 1 year through 3 years
Over 3 years through 5 years
Over 5 years .
Total loans ..'. .
Accrued interest thereon.
Sub-total ,
Allowance for credit losses

Total loans, net

Non-accrual loans (included above) consist of the following:


Residential Mortgages
Non-residential Mortgages .


2005

$ 468,774,574
.29,742,642
4,728,322
8,633,709
4,641,369
1,139,579


2004
$ 419,020,484
29,298,394
5,746,927
8,612,721
4,011,869
1,088,438


517,660,195 467,778,833
2,380,277 2,403,835

520,040,472. 470,182,668
(8,711,689) (8,274,913)

S 511,328,783 $ 461,907,755


2005

$ 11,933,153 $
3,914,658
S9,885,374
7,474,462


2004

7,452,112
4,025,449
11,149,982
7,633,415


15,347,908 14,378,721
469,104,640 423,139,154
517,660,195 467,778,833
2,380,277 2,403,835

520,040,472 470,182,668
S (8,711,689) (8,274,913)

$ 511,328,783 $ 461,907,755


2005

: .. .' $ 18,544,202
1,663,801


$


Government Insured Mortgages :...' 205,567
Demand Loans & Overdrafts 103,235

$ 20,516,805 $
. :.* :"

Loans classified as non-accrual represent 3.95% (2004:3.87%) of the total loan portfolio.


6. ALLOWANCE FOR CREDIT LOSSES


Allowance for credit losses consists of the following:



Provision Created during the year
.Recoveries
Neit provision n '
Balance at beginning ofyear.

Balance at end of year .. '..::'


Consisting of: :. ;
Specific provisions
. General provisions ':


2005
$ 516,442
(79,666)
436,776
S8,274,913


2004

16,668,646
1,337,854
157,878
36,603

, 18,200,981


2004

$ 717,682
(84,554)
633,128
7,641,785


$ 8,711,689 $ 8,274,913



$ 500,354 $ 563,432
S' 8,211,335. 7,711,481

$ 8,711,689 $ 8,274,913


Allowance fr:.credit losses represents 1.68'. (2004: 1.76%) of the total loan portfolio and 42.46%
(2004: 45.446%) of thetotal nor-accrual loan


7. FIXED ASSETS -.Net


Fixed assets consist of the following: :


S : ':;' Land and
. :.: Buildings
COST:
AtNoven ber 1,2004 l,10i,68C


Leasehold

P premises ,

> $ 1,512,917


AdditiOns . 111,027
Disposals :: : :: (28,522) .' ,:

At October 31,2 5 : 1,184,185 $

ACCUMULATED DEPRECIATION:
At November 1,2004 S 515,514 $.
Charge for the year .. 47,362
Disposals .. (21.567) ..'


155,194
"


.Fumiture.
Sand
Equipment


$ 3,430,070
400,5,77
(1,139,322)


Total

$ 6,044,667
666,798
(1,167,844)


1668,111 $ 2,691,325 $ 5,543,621


615,294
136,766


$ 2,460,787
300,654
(1,114,202)


$ 3,591,595
484,782
(1,135,769)


At October 31, 2005 0:. :: ) 541,309 S 752,060 $ 1,647,239 $ 2,940,608

CARRYING AMOUNT:
Atctober3,12005 .; : 642i876 $ 916,051 $ 1,044,086 $ 2,603,013

"At October l, 2004 586166 $ 897,623 $ 969,283 $ 2,453,072



8. .CUSTOMER DEPOSITS 'i
" ': ''L'' .. .." . :r ' t :. ,, ;, . #


Customer deposits consist of the following. ;



Demand deposits '.. :
.Savings deposits.: .;./ I,' : :
* Term deposits .

Total deposits
. Accrued interest thereon



Customer deposits mature as follows:


2005

$ 28,117,169
111,097,205
360,869,272
500,083,646
3,847,534


2004
$ 22,360,348
102,189,948
314,226,595
.438,776,891
3,805,282


$ 503,931,180 $ 442,582,173


2005

$ 365,682,851
62,294,961
71,185,779
920,055


3 months or less .
, Over 3.months'through-6 months
Over 6 months through 1 year
Over 1 year through 3 years

Total deposits
Accrued interest thereon .

Total .


2004
$ 295,701,723
67,374,827
75,562,793
137,548


500,083,646 438,776,891
3,847,534 3,805,282'

$ 503,931.180 $ 442,582,173


9. PENSION PLAN

The Corporation participates in a defined benefit group. pension plan of Royal Bank of Canada.
Elinployecs become eligible for metibership in the Plan at age 25 on a contributory or non-contributory
basis. The Plan provides pensions based' on.years of service, contribution to the plan, and average
earnings at retirement. .

An actuarial valuation is performed each year to determine the present value of the accrued pension
benefits, based on projections of emplccyces' compensation levels to the time of retirement. The latest
actuarial valuation was carried out as at Januairl 1, 2005 at' which time the actuarial value of the net
.asels exceeded the actuarial present value of accrued pensioni benefits.


$ 27,624,600 $ 27,009,600


~ :


... ,.. ..


: . .' .


_ _







I HE TFIIBUNE BUSiNESS


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 01, 2006, PAGE 9B


$ 5,333,334 $ 5,333,334


11. CONCENTRATION OF LOANS AND CUSTOMER DEPOSITS

Concentration of loans by customers' account balance is as follows:


$0- $100,000
$100,001 $300,000
$300,001 $500,000
$500,001 and over


Accrued interest

Sub-total
Allowance for credit losses

Total


2005
$ 241,964,375
248,827,364
17,891,940
8,976,516

517,660,195
2,380,277

520,040,472
(8,711,689)

$ 511,328,783


% of Total
46.74% $


18.07%
3.46%
1.73%


2004 % of Total
241,361,015 51.60% '
203,077,512 43.41%
15,128,515 3.23%
8,211,791 1.76%


100.00% 467,778,833
2,403,835

470,182,668
(8,274,913)

$ 461,907,755


100.00%


Concentration of deposits by customers' account balance is as follows:

2005 % of Total 2004 % of Total


$0- $100,000
$100,001 -$300,000
$300,001 -$500,000
$500,001 and over

Sub-total
Accrued interest

Total


$ 145,876,480
90,166,752
39,615,043 ,
224,425,371

500,083,646
3,847,534

$ 503,931,180


29.17% $ 143,243,105
18.03% 82,133,221
7.92% 37,486,566
44.88% 175,913,999

100.00% 438,776,891
3,805,282

$ 442,582,173


32.65%
18.72%
8.54%
40.09%

100.00%


12. RELATED PARTY BALANCES AND TRANSACTIONS

a. The Corporation has established a $5 million overdraft facility at Royal Bank of Canada. The
facility is part of the Bank's liquidity management contingency plan required by its primary
regulator. The facility is a standby arrangement to be utilized when the Bank experiences short
term illiquidity in its operations.

b. The Corporation has technical service and licence agreements with Royal Bank of Canada. Total
fees under these agreements are $695,153 per annum plus specific service fees depending on
additional services rendered. The Corporation continues to pursue opportunities for outsourcing
with its parent to improve operational efficiency.

c. All clearing accounts are maintained at the Royal Bank of Canada, which acts as a clearing bank
for the Corporation. The balance as at October 31, 2005 was $25,960,822 (2004: $11,849,394).
These deposits are non-interest bearing and are held as a part of the Corporation's Statutory
Reserve Requirement. The funds are also available for investment as opportunities arise.

d. Loans include advances to directors and officers of the Corporation in'the amount of $1,079,689
(2004: $902,692). Some of the loans to officers (as well as those to employees of the
Corporation) are at preferential interest rates. The Corporation waives commitment fees on loans
to its employees and to employees of related entities. Employees of the Corporation receive
concessions on certain fees and services from Royal Bank of Canada.

e. Related party deposits as at the balance sheet date are as follows:


10. SHARE CAPITAL


ASSETS
Cash, deposits and
statutory reserve
Investments
Loans
Fixed assets
Other assets
TOTAL


Within Over Not Interest
3mths 3-6 M 6-12Mts 1-5 Year SYears RateSensti ve TOTAL

S S S S 51,206,671 S 51,206,671
6,498,900 34,200 2,0000,0 18.591500 .:425.516 28,050,116
2.92% 0.00% 5.66% 6.51% 6.07% 0.00%
491.693,316 5,488,976 14,146,491 511,328,783
8.40% 40% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 000%
2,603,013 2,603.013
613,537 613.537
S 498.192,216 $ 5,488.976 S 34.200 S2.500000 S 11.591.500 S 68.995,228 593.802120


2005


Directors and Officers
Royal Bank of Canada Trust
Company (Bahamas) Limited
Royal Employee Savings and
Ownership Plan


2004


$ 308,358 $ 348,578


4,030,707


2,399,994


4,152,254 3,637,644


$ 8,491,319 $ 6,386,216


13. COMMITMENTS

The Corporation has the following commitments as of October 31, 2005:

;,, ,a. The .Corporation is obligated under non-cancellable leases on premises, all of which are
operating leases and on which the minimum annual rentals are approximately as follows:

2006 $829,184
2007 $847,366
2008 $866,095
2009 $885;415

b. Mortgage commitments in the normal course of business amounting to $38,570,156 (2004:
$34,703,987).


14. CONTINGENCIES


LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
Deposits S 365,682,851 62,294,961 $ 71,185,780 $ 920,054 $ S 3,847,534 $ 503,931,180
3.19% 3.70% 3.74% 339% 0.00% 0.00%
Dividends payable 2,400,000 2,400000
Other liabilities 1.314013 1,314,013
Ies,.:.5.., ^y _____________pS 24______7 ____2_____9 06.156.927
; TOTAL ~~ .-.. ,36 682 '71185780 S "'.O, S S5 93,718.474 S 593.802120
Interest Rate Sensitlvlty Gap S 132,509.365 S (56,80 5) S 71.15.580) t 1.579.946 S 18.591500 S 24.7236) S


Cumulative Interest Rate
Sensitivity Gap
Average Yield Earning Assets
Average Yield Paying Liabilities
Net Interest Margin 2005
Net Interest Margin 2004


S 13250965 7703.380 S 4,551800 S 6.131.746 S 24.723246 S -
8.33% 40% 5.66% 6.51% 6.07% 0.00% 814%
3.19% 3.70% 3 3.74% 3.59% 0.00% 0.00% 3.34%
5.14% 4.70% 1.92% 2.92% &.07% 0.00% 4.0%
5.30% 3.30% 2.54% 3.03% 6.50% 0.00% 4.1%


Deloitte


Deloltte & Touche
Chartered Accountants
and Management Consultants
2nd Terrace, Centrevlle
P.O. Box N-7120
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 4 1 (242) 302-4800
Fax: +1 (242) 322-3101
http://www.deloltte.cm.bs


The Corporation has been named as defendant in various legal actions and lawsuits. Although the
ultimate outcome of these actions cannot be ascertained at this time, it is the opinion of management,
'after consultation with its legal counsel, that the resolution of such actions will not have a material
adverse effect on the balance sheet.


FAIR VALUE OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

The estimated fair values represent values at which financial instruments could be exchanged in a
current transaction between willing parties. Wherever there is no available trading market, fair values
are estimated using appropriate valuation methods.


The following methods and assumptions have been used in determining fair value of financial
instruments:

a. Cash resources The fair value of these instruments are assumed to approximate their carrying
values due to their short-term nature.


INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT

To the Shareholders of
Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited:

We have audited the above balance sheet of Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited (the "Corporation") as -
of October 31, 2005. The balance sheet is the responsibility of the Corporation's management. Our
responsibility is to express an opinion on the balance sheet based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those Standards require that
we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the balance sheet is free of
material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and
disclosures in the balance sheet. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and
significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall balance sheet presentation. We
S believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the balance sheet presents fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the
Corporation as of October 31, 2005 in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards.


::;- x^^


b. Investments The fair value of investments approximate cost.


Share capital consists of the following:



Authorized:
.27,500,000 common shares at par value B$0.20
" : Issued and fully paid: 26,666,670 common shares


2005


2004


c. Loans The rates of interest in the portfolio reflect market conditions and the carrying amounts,
net of allowance for credit losses, are assumed to reflect their fair value.

d. Deposits Deposit liabilities payable on demand are assumed to equal their fair value. Deposit
liabilities payable after notice or on a fixed date are at rates which reflect market conditions and
are assumed to have fair values which approximate carrying values.


16. REGULATORY CAPITAL

The Corporation is subject to the regulatory capital requirements as defined by The Central Bank of The
Bahamas. The Central Bank requires the Corporation to maintain a minimum Tier 1 and Total capital
ratio of 4% and 8%, respectively. At October 31, 2005 the Corporation's Tier 1 and Total capital ratio
was respectively 33.70% and 37.11% (2004: 38.01% and 38.25%).


17. RISK MANAGEMENT

There are a number of risks that the Corporation manages on an ongoing basis. Among these risks, the
more significant are credit, operational, liquidity and interest rate risks.

Credit risk Credit risk is the risk that one party to a financial instrument will fail to discharge an
obligation and cause the other party to incur a financial loss. The Corporation's credit risk is primarily
attributable to loans receivable. The amount presented in the balance sheet is net of an allowance for
credit losses, estimated by the Corporation's management based upon prior experience and the current
economic environment.

The credit risk on liquid funds and investments is limited because the counterparties are high-quality
institutions, including the Central Bank of The Bahamas and The Bahamas Government. The
Corporation's credit risk is concentrated in The Bahamas and is spread over a number of counterparties
and customers.

Operational risk Operational risk is the risk to earnings or capital arising from, the possibility that
inadequate information systems, operational/transactional problems in service and product delivery,
breaches in internal controls, fraud, failure to properly adjust to changes in the operating complexities of
the markets, or.unforeseen catastrophes will result in unexpected losses. These risks are mitigated by
strong and robust internal policies and control procedures, sound. Corporate Governance oversight by
the Corporation's Board of Directors and its ultimate parent.

Liquidity risk Liquidity risk arises from the fluctuation in cash flows. The Corporation's Liquidity
Management polidy ensures that the Corporation is able to honour its financial commitments as they
come due.

Interest rate risk Interest rate risk arises primarily from differences in the maturity or repricing dates
of assets and liabilities. Interest rate risk exposures, or "gaps" may produce favourable or unfavourable
effects on interest margins depending on the nature of the gap and the direction of interest rate
movement and/or the expected volatility of those interest rates. When assets have a shorter average
maturity or repricing date than liabilities, an increase in interest rates has a positive impact on net
interest margins, and conversely, if more liabilities than assets mature or are repriced in a particular time
interval then a negative impact on net interest margins results.

There is no developed derivative market in the domestic bank sector in The Bahamas to assist the
Corporation in managing interest rate risk. However, interest rate risk to the Corporation is
significantly mitigated by the fact that the majority of the financial assets are floating rate loans which
are subject to repricing within a short period of time. Thd interest rate risk gap shows more assets than
liabilities repriced within three months, which is typical for a financial institution with a large mortgage
lending customer base for which the majority of the mortgages have floating rates. The following table
sets out the Corporation's interest risk exposure as of October 31, 2005 and represents the
Corporation's risk exposure at this point in time only.


INTEREST RATE RISK (Continued)
Maurity or Repricing Date of Interest Sensitive Instruments as of October 31,2005:


15.


Pulihyortgl oics n Blnc Setsi


J


December 12, 2005








PAGElOBWEDNSDAY MARH 1,2006TRIBNEOSORT


Evangelistic Centre





back to winning ways


* BASKETBALL

LAST year's runners-up
Evangelistic Centre finally got
on the winning track as they
knocked off Calvary Bible 40-
35 in one of games played on
Saturday in the Baptist Sports
Council's 2006 basketball
league.
In other men's games,
Macedonia def. New Bethle-
hem 32-22; Temple Fellow-
ship def. Srt. Mark's 45-24; Mt
Nebo def. Bahamas Harvest
46-38; Mt. Tabor def. St.
Paul's 44-35; Lord's House of
Praise def. New Mount Zion
33-32; Pilgrim def. B.I.B.A.
41-32 and Golden Gates def.
Faith United 31-25.
In the 19-and-under divi-
sion, Macedonia def. New
Mount Zion 32-16 and Faith
United def. Transfiguration
41-31.
And in the 15-and-under


division, Mount Nebo def.
Mount Tabor 17-16 and
Ebenezer def. Macedonia 25-
22.

Here's a summary of the
games played:

* Evangelistic Centre 40, Cal-
vary Bible 35 (M): Lamont
Bain scored 17 points and
Andy Sands added nine in the
win for Evangelistic Centre.
Marvin Nairn came up with
a game high 19 in the loss for
Calvary Bible.

* Macedonia 32, New Beth-
lehem 22 (M): Michael Bain
pumped in a game high nine
and Christian McDonald
added eight as Macedonia
picked up their first win of the
season.
Deangelo Duncombe and
Khyiel Roberts both had six
in the loss for New Bethle-
hem.


* Lord's House of Praise 33,
New Mt. Zion 32 (M): Luke
Frazer scored a game high 15
points and Bacchus Rolle
eight, including the game win-
ning basket to lead Lord's
House of Praise in their debut
win.
Arthur Johnson scored
eight and Ricardo Rolle had
six in the loss for New Mt
Zion.

* Mount Tabor 44, St. Paul's
35 (M): Ernest Saunders and
Kevin Smith shared game high
honours with 19 points apiece
to lead Mt. Tabor as they
stayed undefeated.
For St. Paul's, S. Davis had
12 and Darren McKenzie 11
in the loss.

* Mount Nebo 46, Bahamas
Harvest 38 (M): Brandon
Ingraham exploded for a
game high 19 and Ian Pinder
added 14 as Mt. Nebo


won again.
Robin Shepherd scored 11
in the loss for Bahamas Har-
vest.

* Temple Fellowship 45, St.
Mark's 24 (M): Edwin Bur-
rows canned a game high 15
points and Drexel Burnside
had eight in the win for Tem-
ple Fellowship.
Hubert Hanna scored 10 in
the loss for St. Mark's in their
debut.

* Macedonia 32, New Mt.
.Zion 16 (19): Rohn Johnson
and Mario Curry scored six
apiece and Cordero Thomp-
son added five in the win for
Macedonia. Manford Stubbs
came up with a game high
eight in the loss for New Mt.
Zion.

* Mount Nebo 17, Mount
Tabor 16 (15): Kenneth Hart
scored six to lead Mt. Nebo


to their debut victory. Walton
Charlton scored six in Mt.
Tabor's first loss.


Here's a look at Saturday's
schedule:
Court One 10 a.m. New
Bethlehem vs Faith United
(U15); 11 a.m. Transfiguration
vs First Baptist (U19); Noon
Pilgrim vs Temple Fellowship
(M); 1 p.m. Golden Gates vs
Mt. Tabor (M); 2 p.m. Calvary
Bible vs Lord's House of
Praise (M); 3 p.m. Faith Unit-
ed vs B.I.B.A. (M).
Court Two 10 a.m. St.
Mark's vs Golden Gates
(U15); 11 a.m. Golden Gates
vs New Mt. Zion (U19); Noon
Bahamas Harvest vs New
Bethlehem (M); 1 p.m. First
Baptist vs St. Mark's (U15); 2
p.m. St. Paul's vs St. Mark's
(M); 3 p.m. New Mt. Zion vs
Mt. Nebo (M).


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* SWIMMING
FINAL TEXACO
CARIFTA TRIALS

The Bahamas Swimming Federa-
tion has announced that its final Tex-
aco BSF Time Trials will be held this
weekend at the Betty Kelly Kenning
Aquatic Centre. The primary pur-
pose of the TEXACO Time Trial is
to finalise the selection of the
CARIFTA Swim Team. The meet
starts on Friday at 6.30pm, continues
Saturday Morning at 9.30am and
again Saturday evening at 6.30pm.
The BSF hopes to name it's 2006
CARIFTA Team by Tuesday, March
7, 2006. However, a list of swimmers
that have met qualifying times will
be available after each session at the


sportsinbrief


announcer's booth. A full list will
also be available on Saturday evening
at the conclusion of the Time Trials.

* BASKETBALL
NPWBA SHOWDOWN

The New Providence Women's
Basketball Association will bring its
2005/2006 regular season to a close on
Saturday night at the DW Davis
Gym.
But the league will play a feature


game on Thursday night when the
Sunshine Auto Cheetahs take on the
Johnson's Lady Truckers in what
could determine the second, third
and fourth place finishers.
Two-time defending champions
Cleaning Centre Angels are current-
ly leading the league. They will play
the College of the Bahamas Lady
Caribs in Saturday's feature game.
Here's a look at the remainder
of the regular season schedule:
Thursday
7pm Defense Force vs Cleaning
Centre Angels.
8:30pm Sunshine Auto Cheetahs
vs Johnson's Lady Truckers.
Saturday
7pm Defense Force vs Junior All-
Stars.


8:30pm Cleaning Centre Angels vs
College of the Bahamas Lady Angels.

TENNIS
BLTA TEAM TENNIS LEAGUE

The Bahamas Lawn Tennis Associa-
tion's Team Tennis League is current-
ly underway. Here's a look at the stand-
ings:
A Division Port New Providence
Powder Puffs (8 pts); National Tennis
Centre Top Guns (6 pts); Nassau Lawn
Plbdders (2 pts).
Mixed Social Division Atlantis Par-
adise Gypies (12 pts); National Tennis
Centre Hot Shots (10 pts); Powell's
Gym (8 pts); Nassau Lawn Green
Blades (2 pts).


Share

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or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


PAGE= 10B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1, 2006


TRIBUNE SPORTS


*i *


- .


o


r







WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1,2006, PAGE 11B


TRIBUNE SPORTS


Hugh Campbell thriller




as Rattlers take the title


-lW-


* ACTION from CI Gib-
son Rattlers' title-winning vic-
fory over the Sir Jack Hay-
ward Wildcats on Monday.
Wildcats' Farrintino Wallace
(left) drives to the to the bas-
kel during the game as Rat-
tlers' coach Kevin Johnson
(right) should commands to
his team.
The final score was 67-65.


(Photo: Felipe Major/
Tribune staff)


rs^9


E.I


W .


wi9 ~'
.,d&.-


Rar~.!l
~st~~ 'm
~qdg a~hs I
I
r'
,* ~


J


N WILDCATS' Chest Briffin tries to get around CI Gibson's Calvin Mortimer during the Hugh Campbell championship game


(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)


I:,


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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1,2006


SECTION





Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


Andret Bain imprPesses








at indoor championship


* TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
FORMER St. John's College
standout Andretti Bain repeat-
ed as men's 400 metre champi-
on at the Mid-Continent Con-
ference Indoor Track and Field
Championships, helping Oral
Roberts University to retain
their crown in the process.
Bain, who has the fourth
fastest qualifying time going
into the NCAA Indoor Nation-
al Championships next week-
end, ran 47.56 to go under the
provisional time of 48.05 in the
two-day meet that was held at
the Illinois Wesleyan Universi-
ty in Bloomington, Illinois over
the weekend.
"With the track that we were
on, my goal was to run 47.9 or
at least 47.8, but I ran 47.5,
which was much faster than I
thought, so I was happy with
that," Bain reflected as he led a
1-2-3 sweep for Oral
University.
Bain, who sent his condo-
lences to the family of his for-
mer coach Keith Carey, who
died on Monday, also competed
in the 200, coming in second in
a time of 21.96. The winning
time was 21.85 by his team-mate
Maurice Moss.
"I only used the 200 just for
points for the school. But at the
same time, I really wanted to
win it," Bain stated. "I ended


* ANDRETTI BAIN (No.101) running in the 200 at the Mid-Continent Conference Indoor Track and Field Championships


up getting second, but it was Last Chance Meet at Notre
cool. I enjoyed the meet." Dapme.. .
This weekend, Bain will be "The last meet was our con-
back in action as Oral Roberts ference meet and I didn't have
take their men's 4 x 400 metre to run as hard. We just wanted
relay team to compete in the to score as much points as we


could to win, which we did,"
Bain pointed out.
"But we are ranked at num-
ber 12 in the 4 x 4 and we will
be competing this weekend to
try and lower our times so that


we can assure our spot. They
are only taking the top 12 for
the nationals."
But with the NCAA Cham-
pionships to follow next week-
end, Bain said he hopes that he


can be in tip top shape to com-
pete in that meet.
"I'm extremely confident
because two weeks before I ran
46.4, I ran 48 on a flat 200
track," Bain reflected. "Now I
have two weeks before I go to
the nationals. /
"My goal is to run 45 seconds
at the nationals and right now. I
feel like I'm on my way there. I
truly do."
Also this weekend at the Big
12 Conference Indoor Track
and Field Championships at the
Bob Devaney Center in Lin-
coln, Nebraska, Grand Bahami-
ans Michael Mattieu and
Andrae Williams led Tetas'
Tech to a third place finish in
the men's 4 x 4 relay. :
Mattieu ran lead off aind
Williams anchored the team to
a time of three minutes and
10.64 seconds. The winning time
was 3:08.95 by Bayloi.
Texas A&M got second, in
3:09.34. .
Both Matfieu and Willinins,
also competed in separate indi-;
vidual events, but none ran iir
their specialty in the 400.
Mattieu went down to the
200, placing fourth in the final in
21.34 after he did 21.34 for sec-
ond in his heat in the prelimi-
naries.
And Williams moved up to
the 800 where he placed fourth
in the final in 1:09.99. He won
his heat in the preliminaries in
1:10.93.


CI Gibson Rattlers'


road to title glory

* BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
THE road to their fourth Hugh Campbell Basketball Invitational
Classic title wasn't quite smooth for the CI Gibson Rattlers.
The number one team in the nation had to dodge several eliminating
bullets before they made their championship appearance.
Playing out of pool II, the Rattlers had to ward off the Catholic
High Crusaders, St John's Giants and the Sunland Baptist Stingers.
Although they would get by the other teams easily, the Stingers
would pose the biggest threat and problem for them.
The Rattlers would faced off with the Stingers on the fifth day of the
tournament.
Wanting nothing more than to send the Rattlers home from the
tournament, the Stingers bounced back in the third quarter to extend a
five point lead and, as the buzzer sounded to start the,fourth, the team
was confident that they would get the job done.
The team managed to hold off the Rattlers, forcing them to take the
longer route to the pool championships.
On this route, the Rattlers were scheduled to play two times on the
same day. Their first game would be against the GHS Magics. They
would have to secure the win over the Magics in order to move on to the
play the Stingers once again.
Overthrowing the Magics would be no problem for the tournamen-
t's defending champions and, as they lined-up to face off with rivals the
Stingers, avenging their loss was the only thing on their minds.
Taking to the court with a different strategy, the Rattlers would
dethrone the Stingers 67-58 and seal the only spot in the semi-finals for
New Providence-based schools. The win moved them on to play the St
George's Jaguars.
The pressure was mounting, but the Rattlers would easily get by the
Jaguars.
Then, no strangers to the final rounds, the Rattlers matched-up
against the Jack Hayward Wildcats. The two teams relied heavily on
their free throws, hoping that the open looks to two free points would
separate them from each other.
With 11.9 seconds remaining, Rattlers' Danny McKenzie would step
to the line hoping that his attempts would be enough to give his team the
edge they needed.
McKenzie would sink both shots.
With time running out, the Wildcats tried to respond but the half court
three pointer that was dropping for them all through the tournament was
falling short.
The Rattlers went on to take their fourth title with a two point win in
a 67-65 scoreline.
The Rattlers captured the floating trophy m 2002, 2004 and 2005.
Interrupting their flow of five straight were the Crusaders, taking the
2003 tournament.
The only other team whose name appears on the trophy more than
t three times since 1993 is the Tabernacle Baptist Falcons they won in
1995-6, 1998 and again in 2000. Other winners are the CR Walker
Knights in 1997, the Crusaders in 1999 and again in 2003 and the Wild-
cats in 2001.
(Photo: Felipd Major/Tribune staff)


*. '*..;
* 1v1
* 'C


I









EXHIBITIONS MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT


WEDNESDAY,


MARCH 1,2006


Let's showcase


cultural


'icons'


in Hall of Fame


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
W while the average
Bahamian might be
familiar with names like
Bahamen, Lenny
Kravitz and Sidney
Poitier, and might believe that the actor's
artistic contributions reflect the pinnacle of
Bahamian talent, cultural and art historians
will tell you that there are many Bahami-
aps who received international recogni-
tion long before the renowned actor won
his first Oscar.
Meet Paul Meters, a Bahamian dancer
who left the Bahamas in the 1920s to go to
New York, where he danced with
Josephine Baker, and traveled through-
out the worldidancing before he returned
to the Bahamas. It was Paul Meters who
discovered Peanuts Taylor, who is also
now recognized as a Bahamian cultural
idon.
Then there's Hubert Farrington, a musi-
cian who left the Bahamas to further a
musical career and ended up discovering
dance. He learned ballet at the age of 13,
which was considered to be a bit late. But
he was good enough to join the Company
of the Metropolitan Opera in New York
City. Mr Farrington also founded the Nas-
sau Civic Ballet and trained many classical
Bahamian dances.
And what about Bahamian artist Amos
Ferguson who recently had a street (for-
merly Exuma'Street) re-named in his hon-
our. His work,was being collected in Ger-
many years before he was recognized in the
Bahamas as an artist.
A Cultural Hall of Fame
Bahamian artists and those who love
the arts have long questioned why the
Bahamas does not have a clearly defined
policy regarding culture and the arts, and






Adrian Archer joins New
Jersey's professional arts
community
See Page 3C
**********


South Florida's
premiere dance
troupe to set the
S'momentum' at
Dundas
See Page 6C


Media
tours
set of
Casino
Royale


* BAHAMIAN entertainer/performing artist Kirkland "K B" Bodie speaks during
the first annual National Cultural Conclave on Saturday.
(BIS photo: Eric Rose)


why there has been no consistent attempt
to position these concepts within our
national identity. There are those that have
argued that successive Governments have
failed to preserve, facilitate and showcase
the country's cultural icons in a manner
befitting their contribution to, the con-
sciousness of the nation.
The Cultural Affairs Division, recently
reassigned to the portfolio of Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie however, is putting
plans in place to sensitise the Bahamian
public about the country's cultural giants of
yesterday and today, ensuring that their
legacy does not go unnoticed any longer.
I Hosting its first annual, Cultural Con-
clave at the Wyndham Nassau Resort last
week, the Cultural Affairs Division allowed
the Bahamian art community to pitch their
ideas and give input on the establishment
of a Cultural Hall of Fame and, a national
cultural policy.
Coming from Nassau and throughout
the Family Islands, Bahamian artists,
singers, musicians, entertainers, Junkanoo-
ers and those who have an interest in help-
ing Bahamian culture take its rightful place
as part of the country's national identity,
were on hand to participate in the discus-
sions.
Now complete, the landmark conclave
gave the Cultural Affairs Division an
opportunity to acknowledge what the cul-
tural community wants to see established.
During the next six months, the division
will take the feedback it has collected and
structure a proposal that will be presented
to Prime Minister Christie at the end of the
time period.
Dr Nicolette Bethel, who chaired the
open forum and announced plans for a


Cultural Hall of Fame, told Tribune Arts
that the conclave was a success, though
attendance to the three-day event did not
reflect that. She said that the quality of'
suggestions rather than the number of seats
filled is the benchmark of success.
The conclave discussed many topics
ranging from the current status of Bahami-
an culture, to looking at the international
perspectives on culture and cultural poli-
cies. It also featured the opening of the E
Clement Bethel National Arts Festival.
One of the most interesting aspects of
the conclave came with the announcement
of the Cultural Hall of Fame, which is
expected to open in 2007. The cultural
committee is working on choosing the first
set of inductees by the end of the year and
is also seeking a location for the Hall of
Fame.
In the interim, the committee is looking
at the foyer of the National Centre for the
Performing Arts as a temporary space until
a permanent building can be constructed.
Similar to the Hall of Fame, a Wall of
Fame already exists at the Nassau Inter-
national Airport. Currently, it only holds
pictures of sports greats, but that will soon
change with the induction of cultural icons.
Dr Bethel said: "We want to honour the
greats who are disappearing not only from
our communities, but from our memories.
Some people having no knowledge of who
they are."
The Cultural Affairs Division is cur-
rently using the criteria that the Depart-
ment of Sports uses for induction into its
hall of fame;

SEE page 2C


* DR HONOR FORD-SMITH


Poet shares



her work

0 By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
My mother is beginning her last dance, deep in the valley
of the Rio Nuevo, her first home is now her last. Reaching up
up up to where the kites are trapped in the wires; high high
she goes walking on wires, loosening the children's kites
and bright colours rain down to open hands,: like all the
words she thought but never spoke.
Then the Don, Death, arrives in a big old Benz. He
unfolds his huge height like a long ribbon from the car. His
legs are sharp stilts, and in his white gloved hand is a silver
capped walking stick. His dark glasses are one-way mir-
rors. Guns bulge beneath his pin-striped long-tailed coat. He
looks at the old watch at the end of a long gold chain on his
belly and he flashes his gold-teeth smile, crooks his finger at
my Ma and waits. He stands at one end of the swinging
bridge. I am at the other. He doesn't have to say stop tapping
my wires. The last duel has begun...
An excerpt from Honor Ford-Smith's "My Mother's
Last Dance"
BEGINNING her reading with what she called a "silly"
poem "If Love Were Communist"- the poet provoked a
few laughs as she spoke about the complexities of love.
As the night went on, Dr Honor Ford-Smith read some of
her more gripping pieces that introduced the hearer to life
in Jamaica. Authenticating her work with her heavy
Jamaican accent and native patois, Dr Ford-Smith's read-
ing of "My Mother's Last Dance", a soul-wrenching piece
about her mother's funeral and death, stole the show.
The piece was an elegy, written just after she lost her
mother. "My Mother's Last Dance" shows how the death of
Dr Ford-Smith's mother helped produce the person she is
today. Formal in nature, an elegy is a poem or song com-
posed especially as a lament for a deceased person. It is usu-
ally sombre, as it laments loss, death, or spurned love. It
holds the depth of the writer's emotions, and is usually
seen as therapeutic for the writer.
As part of its most recent guest lecture series, the College
of the Bahamas (COB) and the Bahamas Association for
Cultural Studies invited:Honor Ford-Smith, published poet
and lecturer at the University of Toronto, to share her
work, in an attempt to help Bahamians gain an appreciation
for the poetry of Caribbean region.
Born in Jamaica, Dr Ford-Smith now teaches Caribbean
Studies, and lecturers at the Institute of Women's Studies
and Gender Studies at the university in Canada, and has
made a home there,
Her literary work reflects a view of colonization and the
issues that it brought about. It also, highlights the social
identity of the Jamaica where she once lived.
The scholar's visit was a three-event series which includ-
ed a lecture on "Lionheart Gal Now: Writing Oral Testi-
mony and Making Change" by Dr Ford-Smith at the
Michael H Eldon complex.
The lecturer touched on issues of oral history, women's
struggles, and the new imperialism in Jamaica. Ford-Smith's
book of the same title discusses the relevance of women's
oral narratives from Jamaica in the 1970s, and evaluates
them in the context of the contemporary challenges that are
faced by the people of the region today. .
Dr Ford-Smith also gave a lecture entitled, "Unwritten:
Race, violence, sexuality and
Jamaican performance". EE page 3C
Based on Dr Ford-Smith's SEE page 3C


V INl TASTING


* Tasting wine is not the same as drinking wine,
* When tasting pay special attention to sight, smel, toudh and taste,
* Taste wines in a well lit room,
* B& sure not to wear lipstick strong perfume or l o!wnr.


* The room should be free of smoke or any other ntrusive aroma.
* Cleanse plate with water between wines.

Navme tkw things that you do when tasting wine.
Fint mcoet answer will ceiw afiw gifti E-mail to: wiMeduh@bwnrwHeuecem


.. .. ..


~------'-'-


--- --- ------ --------------------------------------












yet's sho ase our cultural 'icons

Let's showcase our cultural 'icons'


FROM page 1C


The nominee must be a
Bahamian
Thirty-five-years-old or
older
They must have been
retired for a minimum of 20
years
They must have made a
significant contribution to a
sports field over sustained peri-
od of time
And their achievements
must be internationally recog-
nised
Dr Bethel acknowledges
that a change in the selection
process may be required for
the cultural inductees.
"I think in the cultural hall of
fame we would want to be
choosing people from each dis-
cipline of the arts great
dramatists, great musicians,
great dancers,
"And like the sports
inductees who were sports
heroes of yesteryear, many of
whom would have died before
receiving proper national
recognition, a limited number
of outstanding athletes of
recent times have been selected
to give them an opportunity to
smell their roses while they are
alive. It is also a way to educate
and keep Bahamians aware of
the legacy of these people," she
added.
While thecultural depart-
ment is only in the beginning
stages of planning the Hall of
Fame, the main challenge will
be figuring out what criteria
will be used in the selection
process.
Lifetimes

According to Dr Bethel,
Bahamians tend to be "limit-
ed by their own lifetimes" in
that many of them do not know
what happened before they
were born. She noted that the
Bahamas has a cultural history
that is unique and that dates
back many decades. And these
are contributions worth cele-


rating.
"If they can do it in sports,
how much more so in culture.
I'm sure we can think of cul-
tural greats. We have had
Bahamian people from the cul-
tural field on the world stage
long before we had Bahamian
sports heroes...So we must be
recognizing our Bahamian
greats," she said.
Tendency
Dr Bethel also noted that
there is a tendency for Bahami-
ans to name buildings after a
particular person without mak-
ing sure that the population
knows of their contributions.
And twenty to thirty years lat-
er, the persons who walk into
those buildings know absolute-
ly nothing about who that per-
son is or what they did to hold
such an honour.
The Cultural Hall of Fame
will, hopefully, serve as an edu-
cational tool for Bahamians for
generations to come.
At a press conference held
earlier this year, Neville Wis-
dom, then minister of Youth,
Sports and Culture, said the
conclave would signal the intro-
duction of the country's draft
policy, which has been on the
drawing board for a number of
years, but was never clearly
defined. "There have been a
number of attempts toward a
cultural policy but what we
want to do is bring a conclu-
sion to it so we have an agreed
policy for the ministry's devel-
opment and all interested per-
sons can refer to it in matters of
cultural importance," Mr Wis-
dom noted.
He said that the conclave
was an important event that
would begin the transforma-
tion of how Bahamians view
culture. "This is an event that
we believe is so important that
it will begin to bring about a
paradigm shift in our approach
toward the art cultural prac-
tices at our cultural celebra-
tions and a re-definition of the
whole area of culture in our
country."


19ME'9


Would like to extend a huge "thank you" to our sponsors, The
Central Bank of the Bahamas, The Tribune Media Group, Bristol
Wines & Cellars, and the Holiday Ice Company, Ltd. for supporting
artist & fellow Bahamian, Ulrick William Fox in his premiere art
showing at The Central Bank of the Bahamas.

I o ^. '*' : ,' t- "< ' '* 'X .o >S/- a" '. '" '^ '. *

The collection, titled "For Trot" will be showing un'i r.' ._ I 1 ;'. 1.,
and all are encouraged to view the collection and bid on our 3 silern
auction pieces benefiting three ch ri .._ dear to our heart: The il)S '
Foundation, the Heart Foundation and the Ranfurly H ome for C :i1 -'. I .


















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11uOtw cd'Zk' ",4a/o/14e .ze qlle



















If you are Interested in purchasing any of Mr. Fox's originals, please call
'a 1(888) 569-2566 or e-mail curator@ffpcorp.com.

y l I IIIIII II I


TH-lE TRIBUNE\I


PAGE 2C, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1, 2006













Adrian Archer joins New Jersey's




professional arts community


FRESH off a successful intern-
ship in the Choral Activities office
of Westminster Choir College, the
Bahamas' own Adrian Archer is
now a part of New Jersey's pro-
fessional arts community. Archer's
Arts Management class will be col-
laborating with both the Black Box
Theater and Stephen Crane House
of Asbury Park, NJ, to produce
Words from Arbutus Cottage, a
venue specific play written by
Midge Guerrera.
Adrian, the first Bahamian
admitted to the prestigious col-
lege, is a Sacred Music major and
Arts Management minor, and is
participating in one of the many
working groups created to facili-
tate this unusual partnership. His
responsibility includes group sales,
public relations, event planning,
and programming. Students will
work all semester within their
groups, setting and accomplishing
their own goals and deadlines. The
play takes place on April 20, 22
and 23 at the Stephen Crane
House at 508 Fourth Avenue in
Asbury Park, NJ.
"I simply couldn't pass up the
opportunity to get the hands on
experience that this project pro-
vides" said Archer. It gets me out
of the class room and working with
professionals who make Arts Man-
agement their every business, and
I hope that I will be able to use
this knowledge when I return
home to benefit our Arts Organi-
sations like the Dundas Center or
the National Theatre ."
The Arts Management class,
Black Box Theatre, and the
Stephen Crane House are excited
to reach out to the community and
establish a model for other small
museums and arts organizations
to strengthen their reach through
collaborative arts programming.
Westminster Choir College
offers the finest musical instruc-
tion at the undergraduate and
graduate level. The College also
enriches the Princeton community
through Westminster Conservato-
ry and provides an extensive work-
shop series and performances
throughout the year.


* ADRIAN ARCHER (third from right) is shown with members of the arts management team.


FROM page 1C

research, her lecture began by
looking at the international-
ization of the debate on homo-
sexuality in Jamaica. She dis-
cussed the way in which alter-
native and queer masculinity's
appear in nationalist and anti-
colonial narratives of the
region.
For the final event, those
who turned out had an oppor-
tunity to see Dr Ford-Smith's
more creative side as she read
from her book of poetry which
is dedicated to her mother.
That night Choices Restaurant
at the Bahamas Tourism Cen-
tre became the scene for much
food for thought.
Dr Ford-Smith told the Arts
that her work tells the true sto-
ry of Jamaican life, and speaks
to a level of culture above what
most people know about her
country. She also told the Arts
that in Toronto, what most
people know about Jamaica is
ganja and reggae, but there is
so much more to her culture
than that. And she suspects
that the world view of the
Bahamas may also be the
same. "People come here and
they see your beaches and your
culture and festivals and they
may think that is all to the
Bahamas," she told Tribune
Arts.
The pieces that she read
reflect some of the features of
Jamaican life that many per-
sons don't know about folk-
lore and perceptions about
death, superstitions, the atti-
tude towards race, skin colour
and social equality, and how
prayer and respect for God
take centre stage in many lives.
According to Patricia Glin-
fon-Meicholas, president of the
Bahamas Association of Cul-
tural Studies (BACUS), which
co-sponsored Dr Honor Ford-
Smith's visit along with the Col-
lege of the Bahamas, the event
Was a success, measured not


only by the number of persons
who attended, but also by what
they learnt from the Jamaican
scholar.
She told Tribune Arts that
the lecture series and poetry
reading was also a landmark
event in bringing Caribbean
artists together. She noted that
it is important for countries
that have similar histories to
share in each other's cultural
identity.
"We have had the same slave
experience and we tend to have
negative views of ourselves, of
our country's and of what we
do. So it's understandable,
since for generations we have a
people that have heard them-
selves put down, we are taught
kind of to be separate and to be
apart," said Mrs Glinton-Mei-
cholas.
"We find people in one ter-
ritory, although we share a lot
of history, we despise other
people in the Caribbean, but
people who know and appreci-
ate that we are all sisters and
brothers would also appreciate
our art."
Mrs Glinton-Meicholas said
that such events are essential
to the development of Bahami-
an literature, as we become
inspired by our Caribbean
neighbours. And as a writer,
she has made it her goal to con-
tinue to facilitate events that
will help to develop and
advance art in the Bahamas, to
help Bahamians to see that the
Caribbean is an ideal source of
literature.
"I see it as my role as a
writer to try and dispel these
notions that we must look else-
where for good literature. The
truth is, you have some pow-
erful writers in our region," she
noted, adding that the richness
and substantive quality seen in
literary works of European and
American origin, has long been
evident, though rarely recog-
nised, in the work of Bahamian,
and Caribbean authors.


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hher work


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1, 2006, PAGE 3C


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O U T T H E R E @ TR I B U N EM E D I A.NET


S BiS PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

DON'T miss Sizzla's live performance as Roache Productions presents
Still Blazing 9pm Saturday, February 25, at the Crystal Palace Hotel.

LIVE MUSIC @ The Buzz, Nassau's Weekly Jam Session & Musicians
SHook-up. Located East Bay Street two doors East of Esso On The Run,
upstairs Good As New open Wednesday thru Saturday 8pm, Sunday
at 6pm. Amateur musicians try.out & Open mic Wednesday & Thursday
after band practices. Professional musicians welcome to sit in on jams Fri-
day, Saturday and Sunday. Book now for special events, concerts, private
parties. Call 393-2800 (393-BUZZ) or www.thebuzznightclub.biz for
more info Rock, Blues, Jazz, Funk, Reggae THE BUZZ: MAKING
MUSIC LIVE

$5 Friday @ First Down every Friday night. Music by Barry Da Pusher,
Selector: Dominique. Ladies $5 all night, gents $10. Early juggling by Mr.
Xcitement and DJ Fatal. Drink specials all night long.

Bacardi Happy Hour @ Power Boat Adventures Bar and Grill (one.
door east of Texaco Harbour Bay), every Friday. $3 Bacardi drinks all
night and $3 beers.

Ladies Night @ Power Boat Adventures Bar and Grill, every Saturday.
Ladies free, Gents, $10 all night. Bacardi Big Apple and other drink spe-
cials all night long.

Wild Jungle, each and every Wednesday night @ Club Trappers, Nassau's
"upscale" gentleman's club. Featuring a female body painting extrava-
ganza. Free body painting @ 8 pm. Ladies always welcome. Admission:
Men free before 10 pm. Females free. There will be free food and hours
d'oeuvres between 9 and 10 pm. Open until 4 am.

Ladies Night @ Fluid Lounge, this and every Thursday night. Doors
open at 10pm. Ladies free before lam, $10 after. Guys: $15 all night. Drink
special: 3 @ $10 (Bacardi) Giveaways and door prizes every week.

SSaturday Night Live every Saturday night @ Club Fluid, Bay St. The
biggest party of the week, pumping all your favourite hits all night long.
Ladies in free before 11pm. Strict security enforced.

Rave Saturdays @ Club Eclipse. DJ Scoobz spinning the best in Old
Skool Admission $35, all inclusive food and drink. : ,:". :

IKaraoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters Sports Bar. Drink specials all
night long, including karaoke warm-up drink to get you started. Party
from 8pm-until.

SReggae Tuesdays @ Bahama Boom. Cover charge includes a free Guin-
ness and there should be lots of prizes and surprises. Admission: Ladies
$10 and Men $15.

'Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar every Wednesday
'5pmin-8pm. Free appetizers and numerous drink specials.

The Pit @Bahama Boom, every Thursday. Doors open at 9pm, showtime
11,30pm. Cover charge $15. $10 with flyer.

Fantasy Fridays @ Fluid Lounge, featuring late '80s music in the VIP
Lounge; Top of the charts in the Main Lounge, neon lights and Go Go
dancers. Admission: Ladies free before 11pm, $15 after; Guys $20 all
hight:

Dicky Mo's @ Cable Beach. Flavoured Fridays Happy Hour, every Fri-
, day. Drink specials: Smirnoff Kamikaze Shots, $1; Smirnoff Flavoured
SMartinis,2 for $10; Smirnoff Flavoured Mixed Drinks, 3 for $10. Bahami-
J''ah'Night (Free admission) every Saturday with live music from 8 pm to
' midnight. Karaoke Sundays from 8pm to midnight, $1 shots and dinner
- specialss all night long.

Twisted Boodah Lounge @ Cafe Segafredo, Charlotte St kicks off Fridays
;at 6pm with deep house to hard house music, featuring CraigBOO,
Unkle Funky and Sworl'wide on the decks.

Chill Out Sundays @ Coco Loco's, Sandyport, from 4pm-until, playing
deep, funky chill moods with world beats.

Sweet Sunday Chill Out Soiree Lounge, every Sunday, 4pm-midnight @
Patio Grille, British Colonial Hotel.

Wet Sundays, every Sunday, noon-midnight @ Crystal Cay Beach. Admis-
sion $10, ladies free.

TooLooSe @ Indigo Restaurant on West Bay St and Skyline Drive.
Singer/songwriter Steven Holden performs solo with special guests
Thursday from 9pm midnight.

The Graham Holden Deal @ The Green Parrot....David Graham, Steve
Holden, Tim Deal and Friends perform Sunday, 7pm 10pm @ Hurricane
Hole on Paradise Island.

Jay Mitchell and Hot KC @ Palm Court Lounge, British Colonial Hilton,
Wednesday-Thursday 8pm-12am.

Sunday Night Interlude @ Briteley's Restaurant & Lounge,,Eneas St off
Poinciana Drive. Featuring Frankie Victory at the key board in the
After Dark Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to midnight. Fine food and
drinks.

Paul Hanna, Tabatha and Gernie, and the Caribbean Express perform at
Traveller's Rest, West Bay St, every Sunday, 6.30pm-9.30pm.


THE ARTS


Kayla Edwards Chamber Singers will be in concert on Sunday, March
5 at the National Centre for the Performing Arts. The concert is
being held in honour of Kayla Edwards (above), the director of the
Chamber Singers.

Artists Guild International invites the public to its 8th annual Evening
of Classical Music, Thursday, March 16, at Government House, begin-
ning at 8pm. The concert will feature some of the nation's finest
classical musicians as well as a number of promising young perform-
ing artists. We are grateful for the encouraging support received in the
past and eagerly anticipate the public's presence for the event. The
Guild will be donating proceeds from each 'Evening of Classical
Music' to the College of the Bahamas Music Department scholarship
fund. For further information please call 326-3608

Artists Guild International invites the public to its 8th annual Evening'
of Classical Music, Thursday, March 16. at Government House, begin-
ning at 8pm. The concert will feature some of the nation's finest
classical musicians as well as a number of promising young perform-
ing artists. We are gr.aiclIl Ii the encouraging support received in the
past and eagerly anticipate the public's presence for the event. The
Guild will be donating proceeds from each 'Evening of Classical
Music' to the College of the Bahamas Music Department scholarship
fund. For further information please call 326-3608

THE GRAND BAHAMA ART ASSOCIATION: To celebrate their
10th anniversary, the Grand Bahama Art Association announces the
"BIG 10 ART SHOW" at the Freeport Art Centre from March 2 to
March 11 Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm and Saturday, 9am to 12pm.
Admission is free. Groups are welcomed, but are requested to book in
advance by calling 351-4603.

The National Collection @ the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas, an
exhibition that takes the viewer on a journey through the history of fine
art in the Bahamas. It features signature pieces from the national col-
lection, including recent acquisitions by Blue Curry, Antonius Roberts
and Dionne Benjamin-Smith. Call 328-5800 to book tours. This exhi-
bition closes February 28, 2006.

The National Art Gallery of the Bahamas (NAGB) will be holding a
number of events in February. African Art Exhibition "What is Africa
to Me" from the private collection of Kay Crawford running until Sat-
urday, July 29 Bahamian Art History Lecture Tuesday, February 28
@ 6:30pm Max Taylor speaks on Chelsea pottery The lecture is open to
the pubic.

..... HEALTH :fa

The Medical Association of the Bahamas invites the public to the open-
ing night of its annual Scientific Conference 2006, under the theme,
"URGENCIES, EMERGENCIES andjATASTROPHES: Current
Health Care Challenges". Dr Michael eston, medical director of
Broward County Fire/Rescue and Broward County's Health Care Emer-
gency Preparedness Program, will speak op the topic, "In the Eye of the
Hurricane: Delivering Health Care", Wednesday, March 8 @ 7pm.
Conference venue: British Colonial Hilton. Opening night is free.
Please visit the website, www.bahamasmab.com for more information.

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of its meeting
times and places:The Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday Fridays
6pm to 7pm 8:30pm to 9:30pm Saturday mornings 10am to 11am
Sacred Heart Church: Fridays 6pm to 7pm The Kirk: Mondays and
Thursday 7:30pm to 8:30pm New Providence Community Centre:
Monday 6pm to 7pm Wednesday and Fridays 7pm to 8pm.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at 5.30pm on the second
Tuesday of each month at their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centre-
ville. Call 323-4482 for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held 6:30pm Tuesdays and
Thursday at Nassau gymNastics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles
Dr). Doctor approval is required. Call 364-8423 to register or for more
info.

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support group meets the first
Monday of each month at 6.30pm at New Providence Community Cen-
tre, Blake Road. Dinner is provided and free blood sugar, blood pres-
sure and cholesterol testing is available. For more info call 702-4646 or
327-2878
MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third Monday every month,
6pm @ Doctors Hospital conference room.
A-7 Bahanma, Diauheic iocliaiion mi.-i.; cr\ bihird Saturdav.


2:30pm (except August and December) @ the Nursing School,
Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital, the official training centre of the American Heart
Association offers CPR classes certified by the AHA. The course
defines the warning signs of respiratory arrest and gives prevention
strategies to avoid sudden death syndrome and the most common seri-
ous injuries and choking that can occur in adults, infants and children.
CPR and First Aid classes are offered every third Saturday of the
month from 9am-lpm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Community Train-
ing Representative at 302-4732 for more information and learn to save
a life today.

REACH Resources & Education for Autism and related Challenges
meets from 7pm 9pm the second Thursday of each month in the cafe-
teria of the BEC building, Blue Hill Road.

Oin<^iP:- CIVIC CLUBS ..

Earth Village Ranch (petting zoo), St Albans Drive and Colum-
bus'Avenue, offers free admission every Wednesday by appoint-
ment between 9am and 3pm. Bring your class, play group, or
family and experience some of the greatest wonders of nature; a
petting farm, a nature trail, pony/horse rides, and wetlands. For
.more information or to book events call 356-2274 or 434-8981.
Special rates available for groups of 20 or more with a two week
advance 'reservation. Donations are accepted in exchange for
tips.

St Andrew's Kirk After School Programme: The members of St
Andrew's Kirk have launched an After-School-Programme for chil-
dren from the Woodcock and Albury Sayle Primary Schools. The pro-
gramme, is held Monday to Friday at the St Andrew's Presbyterian
Kirk. The activities include tutoring, computers, karata, sports, art,
drama and baking. The programme is free to children from the Bain and
Grants Town communities. Parents interested in enrolling their children
should contact the church at 322-5475 or email:
standrewskirk@.yahoo.com

JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR Cycling are pleased to offer a
cycling clinic for juniors between 10 and 17. The free clinic will be held
every Saturday in an effort to encourage kids to cycle. Parents interested
in registering their children should contact organizers at
jarcycling@gmail.com

*The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta Sigma ThetaSorority
Incorporatdt.meets 6:30 pm every third Wednesday at the Bahamas
National Pride Building.

)Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial Hilton Monday's
at 7pm.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7.30pm @ C C Sweeting Senior
School's Dining Room, College Avenue off Moss Road. Club 9477
meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas Baptist Community College Rm A19,
Jean St. Club 3956 meets Thursday, 7.30pm @ British Colonial Hilton.
Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8.30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes. Club 7178
meets Tuesday, 6pm @ The J Whitney Pinder Building, Collins Ave.
Club 2437 meets every second, fourth and fifth Wednesday at the J Whit-
ney Finder Building, Collins Ave at 6pm. Club 612315 meets Monday
6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach. Club 753494 meets
every Wednesday, 6pm-8pm in the Solomon's Building, East-West
Highway. Club 3596 meets at the British'Colonial Hilton Mondays at
7pm. Club Cousteau 7343 meets every Tuesday night at 7.30 in the
Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central Andros. All are welcome.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega chapter meets every sec-
ond Tuesday, 6.30pm @ the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau
Resort, Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday, 7pm @ Gaylord's
Restaurant, Dowdeswell St. Please call 502-4842/377-4589 for more
info.

Kapph Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @
Atlantic House, IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room.

The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) meets every third
Monday of the month in the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel, Bay St.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets the second and
fourth Wednesday of the month, 8pm @ St Augustine's Monestary.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Friday of each month,
7.30pm at Emmaus Centre at St Augustine's Monestary. For more info
call 325-1947 after 4pm.

International Association of Administrative Professionals, Bahamas
Chapter meets the third Thursday of every month @ Superclubs Breezes,
Cable Beach, 6pm.-

AMISTAD, a Spanish club meets the third Friday of the month at
COB's Tourism Training Centre at 7pm in Room 144 during the acad-
emic year. The group promotes the Spanish language and culture in the
community.

The Essence Club (International Training in Communication ITC) #
3173 will be hosting its bi-monthly meeting on Wednesday, March 1 at
Doctor's Hospital's conference room under the theme: "Budgeting
your time and money" at 7pm. Franklyn Wilson is our guest speaker.
Refreshments will be served after the meeting. The Club meets on the
first and third Wednesday of each month in the Doctor's Hospital con-
ference room at 7pm. The public is invited to attend.


Send all your civic and social events to The Tribune
via fax: 328-2398 or e-mail: ourthere@tribunemedla.net


W H AT S


I I













South Florida's premiere




dance troupe to set the


'momentum'


at Dundas


Dance lovers in
the Bahamas
are in for a
treat, as the
Momentum
D~nce Company, South Flori-
da's premiere dance troupe;
travels to this isle of paradise
to conduct a three-day residen-
cy at the Dundas Centre for the
Performing Arts, Friday March
3 and Saturday, March 4, as it
performs Five Journeys and a
Laugh.
Returning for a third year as
part of its international cultural
exchange programme, spon-
sored by the Florida Division
of Cultural Affairs and the Mia-
mi Dade Country Department
of Cultural Affairs, the con-
temporary dance company is
the oldest and most successful in
Florida and is celebrating its
24th season.
The dance company's activi-
ties during their stay in the
Bahamas will also be sponsored
by the Dundas Centre. The two
performances of Five Journeys
and a Laugh on Friday, March
3, and Saturday, March 4, will
be held at 8pm nightly at the
Dundas.
Five Journeys and a Laugh
includes several exciting dance
works, including: Highway, a
dance which celebrates open
spaces, limitless freedom, quirky
locations, offbeat adventures,
and bonding experiences
between travel companions.
Music is by Jimi Hendrix, Step-
penwolf and Bob Dylan.
Noted soloist Odman Felix
will perform one of his most
introspective and emotional
pieces, Cheers, Darling. He will
also perform a new work enti-
tled Rain, influenced by his
broad dance background of
Brazilian, Afro-Brazilian, mod-
ern dance and Capoeira. The
piece celebrates the joy that rain
brings in a dry climate where
the struggle with nature is con-
stant in its beauty and inex-
orable demand.
Other performances by the
troupe will include Night Spell,
Birds Flying in Warped Time,
Movimento Feroz and Senti-
mentos Profundos.


Vi.




* FISH TALES- Cast members of Fish Tales (above), Momentum Dance Company's newest chil-
dren's work, strike a pose. The second children's performance tells the story of marine life on Flori-
da's coral reefs and its beautiful, but fragile environment.
(Photo: Ddlma Iles)


On Saturday at 2pm, Momen-
tum will perform a special chil-
dren's programme aimed at
families with children ages 4-
10.
The dancers will perform the
classic Peter and The Wolf, the
folk tale with music by Russian
composer Sergei Prokofiev.
Children join the clever Peter
and his friends, the bird and
duck, as they work together to
outwit and capture the Fierce
wolf. Each.character is repre-
sented by a different instrument


of the orchestra and a unique
way of moving.
Fish Tales, Momentum's
newest children's work, and its
second children's performance,
tells the story of marine life on
Florida's coral reefs and its
beautiful, but fragile environ-
ment.
Audience members will meet
Madame Manatee and Senora
Stingray as they lead the under-
water inhabitants (peppermint
strip shrimp, parrot fish, jelly-
fish, grouper and more) in


cleaning up their neglected reef.
Fish Tales is expected to be
fun and empowering as the
characters send a message of
personal responsibility for con-
servation. According to the
artists themselves, colourful,
imaginative costumes and an
original Caribbean style musical
score make Fish Tales essential
for kids who live near the ocean.
Interestedpersons can visit
Momentum's web site at
www.momentumdance.com


* -. ,. .
.


'7


* PETER AND THE WOLF- Pictured above are cast members
of the classic Peter and the Wolf, the fplk tale with music by Russ-
ian composer Sergei Prokofiev. In this act, children join the clever
Peter and his friends, the bird and duck, as they work together to
outwit and capture the fierce wolf.


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S. I


Media


'treated' to tour


of Casino


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
Even as big budget films
like Pirates of the
Caribbean wrap up
filming in the Bahamas,
it seems that the coun-
try just keeps drawing movie produc-
tions in, as the new James Bond film,
Casino Royale, began filming in the
Bahamas last week at Albany House
on JFK Drive.
The Bahamian media was treated
to a tour of the set recently and Tri-
bune Entertainment got a chance to
witness, up close and personal, the
filming of the movie. There were
shouts of "rolling" and "quiet on the
set" and visitors had to.whisper
through interviews and tiptoe quietly
around as Daniel Craig, the newest
actor to take on the role of 007, filmed
a scene with a beautiful temptress.
Set amidst the stunning greenery
and amazing architecture of Albany
House, the crew was filming one of
Casino Royale's pivotal scenes, but
no one was giving away any secrets
of the plot.
While it is very exciting to have the
film shot here, this isn't the first time
that a Bond movie has chosen the
Bahamas as one of its principle film
locations. In fact, this visit marks the
fourth Bond movie that has been shot
in the Bahamas.
Producer Michael Wilson said the
Bond series is an international phe-
nomenon because the writers wanted
to create a character that would be
accepted as an exciting, approachable
movie icon, even though his face
would change throughout the decades.
David Craig has succeeded Brosnan in
the role of MI5's 007 agent James
Bond and emerges in Casino Royale
as the sixth actor to play the title role.
Casino Royale is the 21st Bond film,
and is expected to be released Novem-
ber 17.
Mr Wilson hopes that when people
see the film on screen that they have
an "exciting, dramatic time in the the-
atre".
And as far as scenes shot in the
Bahamas go, he hopes that audiences
see what he and his crew continue to
experience in the country. "Beautiful
sea, and a' beautiful location. And
scenes shot in Coral Harbour, which is
not really the Bahamas, but Mada-
gascar, are also beautiful."
Walking around the sdt, you could
see many young Bahamians working
in different areas, gaining experience
in how to produce a big budget feature
film. Working long hours, in some-
times sweltering heat, they would
realise quickly that show business is
not always as glamorous as people
might have you to believe. It's a real-
ity, Mr Wilson said, he has long stated.
"Usually what you think it's about
you will learn that it's not all about
rubbing shoulders with the stars. Our
Bahamian crew and people from
around the world, they all get up at.
5am in the morning, get down to the
set, start shooting around 6am. And
then they have to pack up everything.
"It's six days a week. They may get
home, get a bite to eat then tumble
into bed, then they are up at Sam the
next morning to do the same thing
again. And six days a week, that gets
to be pretty grueling, even in a coun-
try like the Bahamas where it's so
beautiful."
Any career in film, he said, is a pro-
fession that is demanding and some-
times requires you to go beyond the
call of duty in order to see the end
result. He noted that many people on
the set that day did not have the lux-
ury of calling in sick, denying their
own needs, to stay committed to see-
ing the shooting wrap up on sched-
ule.
Filming in the Bahamas ends in one
month, and the crew is back to Prague,
in the Czech Republic, then onto Italy
and back to Britain, where filming is
expected to wrap in early July.
According to Mr Wilson, there are
many sunny locations around the
world that offer similarly beautiful
beaches as the Bahamas, he believes
however, that the Bahamas is special
on several levels. There is the prox-
imity to the United'States, which
means that if you need equipment
rapidly there is a much shorter turn-


Royale set


James



Bond



to show



his more



sensitive



side

IN Casino Royale, James Bond will
show his more sensitive side, as the
plot reveals how the character became
the Bond we all know and love.
Along with British actor Daniel
Craig, also starring in Casino Royale
are Danish actor Mads Mikkelsen,
who stars opposite Bond as the villain,
Le Chiffre. Eva Green has been con-
firmed as the new Bond Girl, Vesper
Lynd.
Produced by Michael G Wilson and
Barbara Broccoli of Eon Productions,
and directed by Martin Campbell,
Casino Royale is scheduled for release
in theatres November 17.
Photography
Principal photography started on
January 30, with locations in the UK,
Czech Republic (Prague), Italy, and
the Bahamas.
The producers also confirmed that
the cast is rounded out by talented
international actors, including; Gian-
carlo Gianninias Mathis, Caterina
Murino as Solonge, Simon Abkarian
as Dimitrios, Tobias Menzies as Vil-
liers, Ivana Milicevic as Valenka,
Clemens Schik as Kratt, Ludger Pistor
as Mendel, and Claudio Santamariaas
Carlos.
A number of Bahamians are also
expected to have small roles as extras
in the movie.


around time than many of the other
Caribbean countries. Then there are
the friendly people, and the fact that
they speak English, he said.
"Another thing is, this is a wonder-
ful tourist place so the facilities are


excellent and that makes it easier. The
government is really cooperative.
Then we have Bahamian people who
are familiar with filming, so we have
people here who can support what we
are doing," he said.


A HISTORY OF VIOLENCE
Starring: Viggo Mortensen,
William Hurt
A NEAT thriller this, and a
change of pace from horror direc-
tor David Cronenberg. Set in small
town America, the film focuses on
family man Tom Stall (Mortensen)
who inadvertently finds himself por-


trayed as a hero in the media after
overcoming two violent criminals.
Stall's story attracts the attention of
the mysterious Carl Fogaty (Ed Har-
ris) who hints that Tom may have a
dark past. An intriguing premise and
strong performances especially
from Mortensen make this well
worth catching.
JARHEAD
Starring: Jake Gyllenhaal,
Jamie Foxx
AN OFFBEAT military tale set
in the first Gulf War, Jarhead gives
an insight into US troops combat-
ing boredom as well as the enemy in
the middle of the desert. Director
Sam Mendes (of American Beauty
fame) has crafted a highly enter-
taining mix of drama and comedy
with Gyllenhaal and Foxx on top of
their game.
KING KONG
Starring: Naomi Watts,
Jack Black
THERE were so many great
moments in this one, it definitely
deserves a second look. Lord of the
Rings maestro Peter Jackson effort-
lessly recreates the classic story of
ape meets girl, ape falls for girl, ape
falls from building. A blockbuster
in every sense, King Kong is visual-
ly stunning, but the special effects
never betray its emotional core. A
must for your DVD shelf.


I


I llli ~ Iia&.


PAGE 8C, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1, 2006


THE TRIBUNE




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