Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00330
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: February 20, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00330
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text







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The


Tribune


Vnhlme: 102 No 76


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MONDAY, FtBHUARY 2U, 200U6


A II aI


1A- I IIA


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it


FNM leader slams PM


for 'malicious attack'


PRIME Minister Perry
Christie was chastised by his
predecessor yesterday for a
"personal, malicious and vicious
attack" which, he said, showed
the PLP's love of form over
substance.
Former Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham was hitting
back at criticism of his absence
from last week's Speech From
the Throne ceremony.
Mr Ingraham came out fight-
ing, blaming Mr Christie for
what he described as a "mean-
spirited and un-parliamentary:
diatribe" against him.
"What is worse, the leader of
the governing party, spewing
misinformation, sought to
attribute to me and to my
deputy political shenanigans the
likes of which are typical of his
party's conduct," the FNM
leader said.
Mr Christie dropped hints in
the House of Assembly last
week about "parliamentary
appointments" Mr Ingraham
and his deputy Brent Symon-
ette were supposed to be keep-
ing during their absence.
But Mr Ingraham said Mr
Christie had not revealed either
the information or source
because there were no
"appointments".
There were claims that the
FNM leader and his deputy
were campaigning for funds
from an LNG firm instead of
attending the opening of par-
liament.
"The ridiculous and untruth-
ful statements uttered in con-
nection with my absence from
the.island on Wednesday would
amuse if they were not so
revealing of the complete lack


of understanding by the gov-
erning party of our parliamen-
tary system of government,"
said Mr Ingraham.
"His one-line lame attempt
to cover his mean-spirited and
unparliamentary diatribe
against me by qualifying his
unwarranted attack with the
gratuitous comment that if I had
gone to or was in hospital is
unacceptable suggests to me
that he knew exactly where I
was but chose to ignore the
truth, to insinuate otherwise and
to use his presence in parlia-
ment to misinform the people,"
Mr Ingraham added.
In his criticism of Mr Ingra-
ham's absence, Mr Christie said
the ex-PM continued to demon-
strate "a total disrespect and
contempt not just for parlia-
ment but for the people."
He said Mr lograham's
absence was an example of
"intolerable arrogance that I
hope each of you takes person-
ally."
. And he accused the FNM
leader and his deputy of hav-
ing a "messianic point of view"
that everything must stop
because they had some other
agenda.
"I find it personally offensive,
not just as prime minister, as a
member of parliament...and the
reason I saidto take it person-
al is because it is a personal
insult to all of us."
Mr Ingraham said his
absence from parliament was
not a boycott or protest of any
kind. Nothing could be further
from the truth.
"My absence, as I have
SEE page 14


FNM leader Hubert Ingraham holds a copy of a newspaper page from 1993 at yesterday's press conference. Mr Ingraham said: 'How
poorly the prime minister's memory serves him. He certainly appears to have forgotten that twice, in 1992 and again in 1993, the entire
opposition bench, including his good self and his then leader, Sir Lynden, absented themselves in what they termed a boycott from the
reading of the Speech from the Throne at the opening of parliament under an FNM administration.'
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


PLP women's branch
chairman speaks out
over Ingraham absence
* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
OPPOSITION leader Hubert Ingraham
ought to consider relinquishing the position if
he is not prepared to fulfil his mandate, it was
claimed yesterday.
The PLP's women's branch chairman, Dr
Madlene Sawyer, was referring to Mr Ingra-
ham's controversial absence from the opening
of parliament.
In an interview with The Tribune at the
organisation's garden party yesterday, Dr
Sawyer said elected officials are expected to
perform certain functions.
She said when the highest office-holder in
the country, the Governor General, asks for
persons to be present at something as momen-
tous as the opening of parliament, they should
be present, unless they have a good excuse.
"I don't know Mr Ingraham's reason for
not being present at that event. I am sure in
due course he will tell us why that was.
SEE page 14


Political pundits
.are forecasting

Cabinet reshuffle
THE political wires are vibrating once again
with talk of a possible Cabinet reshuffle today.
Newly-appointed Senator B J Nottage is
once more a prominent feature of the specu-
lation.
Political radio pundits were forecasting a
Cabinet reshuffle over the weekend, urging
listeners to expect an announcement today.
Prime Minister Perry Christie was said .to be
in important meetings with advisers on Thurs-
day.
The latest view is that Dr B J Nottage would
go to the Ministry of Education or Financial
Services.
However, it is also speculated that he may
be moved to the Ministry of Health, where
he would help launch the national health insur-
ance scheme. I
On his return from the CARICOM meeting
two weeks ago, Mr Christie indicated that he
would be making adjustments to various gov-
ernment portfolios.
However, there were doubts among
SEE page 14


inside

New programme
geared towards
helping the poor

TO BREAK the cycle of
poverty in the Bahamas, the
Ministry of Social Services is
Establishing a new pro-
gramme geared towards
helping the extremely poor.
*SEE PAGE THREE

Andrew Alien's
'Perspectives'
COLUMNIST on the
Nassau Institute and Helen
Klonaris.
SSEE PAGE FIVE


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2. MONDAY. FEBRUARY 20, 2006


LOCA NE


Alarm as bush


ftre blazes


near airport


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
A BUSH fire blazed east of Nassau Interna-
tional Airport (NIA) on Saturday.
Police press liaison officer Walter Evans said
the fire started around 11am.
Two fire trucks, one from the airport crash and
rescue depot and another from the Royal
Bahamas Police, were battling the flames.
Mr Evans said firefighters were still on the
scene on Sunday morning. Police could not deter-


mine the cause of the blaze.
An NIA employee said the fire caused a lot of
black smoke in the area. On her way to work
yesterday the bushes were still smoking.
Mr Evans said the fire was burning inland.
Firefighters had difficulty fighting the blaze
because it was close to swamp land and they did
not want to risk their resources.
Mr Evans said the fire did not pose a threat to
nearby property. However, he said, some people
would have experienced some discomfort from
smoke.


I SMOKE from the fire swept over roads and towards the airport


(Photos: Simon Smith)


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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


LAN


0 In brief


Illegal

immigrants

detained

by police

A GROUP of illegal immi-
grants were arrested over the
weekend during the police
"Quiet Storm" operation. They
included six Haitians and one
Jamaican.
Police press liaison officer
Walter Evans said the immi-
grants were captured at differ-
ent locations throughout New
Providence on Friday. All seven
were taken to the Carmichael
Road detention centre.
Police are also investigating
two arined robberies at conve-
nience stores over the weekend.
At 10am on Friday, two men,
one with a gun, entered and
robbed the Century Conve-
nience Food Store, Bacardi
Road.
Mr Evans said the suspects
fled on foot with a large sum of
cash.
Key's Convenience Store,
Zion Boulevard, was robbed of
a small quantity of cash and sev-
eral phone cards, also on Fri-
day.
Police said two masked men
entered the store after 9pm and
demanded cash. They fled in a
car, make and model unknown.







-o W
* -' -


Available


Cd

b"


New programme




launched tohelp




'extreme poor'


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

TO break the cycle of pover-
ty in the Bahamas, the Min-
istry of Social Services is estab-
lishing a new programme
geared towards helping the
extremely poor.
Governor General Arthur
Hanna, in the Speech from the
Throne last week, said that,
according to the 2001 Bahamas
Living Conditions Survey, one
in 12 residents in New Provi-
dence and Grand Bahama and
one in five in the southern
islands are living under the
poverty line of $2,863 per
annum.
Five per cent of households
in the Bahamas live below the
poverty line. The survey found
that more than 50 per cent of
the country's poor are children
14 years or younger.
In addition, Social Services
Minister Melanie Griffin said
that a Living Conditions Sur-
vey was conducted in 2004.


In an interview with The Tri-
bune on Saturday, Mrs Griffin
said one of the main pro-
grammes is a conditional cash
transfer programme.
Mrs Griffin said the pro-
gramme, which is already used
in countries such as Mexico
and Jamaica, is based on mod-
ifying and developing human
behaviour.
She said there will be a for-
mula in place to help the min-
istry to determine who in the
population would be termed
the "extreme poor."
"Those children who are in
poor families would most like-
ly, if any intervention is not
made, continue to be poor.
We have found that there are
grandparents, parents and chil-
dren, all on welfare," said Mrs
Griffin.
Each family, Mrs Griffin
said, would be profiled based
on their needs.
She said the programme will
work through a cash payment
periodically being made to the


family to assist them in their
educational and medical
expenses.
However, the family will
have to account for where the
money has been used.
"In the Bahamas and in sev-
eral other countries, we have
just been doling out assistance
to the poor. (We have been)
throwing money behind pover-
ty, instead of investing in the
human capital investment,"
she added.
In making the programme
work for the betterment of the,
poor, Mrs Griffin said that
Social Services must work very
closely with the families. She
said they will schedule month-
ly sessions with the families to
give support and to ensure that
they are handling the funds
properly.
Mrs Griffin explained that
the programme is still a work
in progress, but it is expected
to be solidified as her min-
istry moves forward in the
year.


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Minister 'too vague' on


housing development


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter


HOUSING Minister Shane
Gibson was "too vague" when
S outlining his redesign of a Per-
pall Tract homes develop-
ment, it was claimed yester-
day.
The founder of the
Bahamas Association for
Social Health (BASH) Terry
Miller was commenting on Mr
Gibson's reference to pre-
serving rare foliage and pro-
tected trees. He said it was
impossible to draw any con-
clusion from his remarks.
In a press release on Friday,
Mr Gibson said he had decid-
ed to redesign the residential
development after being guid-
ed by a Cabinet-appointed
committee, which conducted a
site visit.
Mr Miller said: "I don't
'Copyrighted Material really know how to feel about
Syndicated Content it because it is so vague. It is
e from Commercial News Providers" really too vague for me to
draw a conclusion to exactly
what he is saying.
"He said with 'particular
regard to preservation of rare
foliage and protected trees.'
If that is the case you'll look at
99 per cent of this tract of
land. I would like for them to
be more specific," said Mr
Miller.
In December, Chippingham
residents and environmental-
ists were furious when a trac-
tor cleared away a portion of
the Perpall Tract wellfields.
In early January, Mr Miller,
With others, raised a petition
in a bid to preserve the well-
fields.
Mr Miller felt that BASH
and the Bahamas National
Trust should have been on the
__ __ committee that discussed
technical concerns.


--40





a a -gob
TROPICAL
EXERINATOR

FO'ES ROLM


* BASH founder Terry Miller pictured in December, holding
on to the tractor at the scene of the Perpall Well Fields. He
said the site is a 'living lab' and should never be destroyed.


U


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,.:'. ~;
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The Cabinet-appointed
committee comprised repre-
sentatives from the Water and
Sewerage Corporation,
Department of Housing,
Department of Physical Plan-
ning and the BEST Commis-
sion.
"We look at this as a
national park. This should be
a national park, there is no
two ways about it. It would be
the only national park that is
accessible to Bahamians," said
Mr Miller.


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PAGE 4, MONDAY FEBRUARYT20, 006 THE TRIBUN


AS TWO political leaders pointed accus-
ing fingers at each other across the Florida
Straits last Wednesday it was left to the
Bahamian people to decide who was the
greater "threat to democracy" the leader
who failed to show for the opening of a par-
liamentary session, or the leader who failed to
answer certain questions in parliament.
The fact that Opposition Leader Hubert
Ingraham, who was undergoing a physical
examination at the Cleveland Clinic in Fort
Lauderdale, was not present at the opening of
a new session of parliament was to Prime Min-
ister Christie, the most "scandalous experi-
ence" he had had in his whole parliamentary
career. To make matters worse, deputy oppo-
sition leader Brent Symonette was also absent
from Wednesday's opening. Mr Symonette
had prior appointments in New York and
London. Both leaders were informed of the
prorogation of parliament too late to change
their schedules.
Mr Christie accused the two absent leaders
of disrespecting the parliament and the people
who elected them. Mr Ingraham quickly hit
back from Fort Lauderdale by accusing Mr
Christie of not respecting the rights of the
Opposition, and not according them the cour-
tesy of informing them of important matters of
state in sufficient time for them to change
their schedules.
For example, said Mr Ingraham, when Mr
A D Hanna was to be sworn-in at Govern-
ment House as the new governor-general, Mr
Ingraham and his parliamentary colleagues
were only notified the afternoon before the
ceremony. Also when a special farewell recep-
tion was planned for retiring governor gener-
al Dame Ivy Dumont the Opposition was
again an afterthought invited at the last
minute.
An example of the type of disrespect shown
Her Majesty's loyal opposition which is
very much a part of the parliamentary democ-
racy that Mr Christie so vociferously defend-
'ed in the House on Wednesday was the
invitation to participate in the funeral of for-
mer Fox Hill MP George Mackey.
A letter dated January 5 from the Secretary
to the Cabinet, informed Mr Ingraham that a
funeral service would be held for Mr Mackey
at 10am on January 12.
Mr Ingraham was instructed to advise the
Protocol Division of the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs, no later than Monday, January 9,
whether he would attend the service so that
the necessary arrangements could be made
for seating. He was also asked to submit names


of four opposition MPs to act as honorary
pall bearers. On the face of it everything
seemed to be in order. However, the letter
dated January 5, was delivered to Mr Ingra-
ham's office on the afternoon of January 10, a
day after he was supposed to have contacted
the Protocol Office with the information
requested.
As Mr Ingraham pointed out the proroga-
tion of parliament unlike setting a date for
an election is not a state secret. And, if
only to show respect a respect that Mr
Christie lamented was lacking in parliament -
Mr Christie should have given his opposition
colleagues sufficient notice for them to get
their private affairs in order. He didn't, and so
they didn't.
Some wise wit commented that it was for-
tunate for Mr Christie that Messrs Ingraham
and Symonette were absent from the opening
ceremonies. If they had.turned up, he said,
Mr Christie would, not have had anything to
talk about. At least their absence gave him a
political bone to chew and a public platform
from which to chew it.
FNM chairman Desmond Bannister found
Mr Christie's performance in the House'
"unbecoming". In our opinion he certainly
over reacted but, as we all know, in all'
things theatrical, the show must go on. Mr
Bannister believed thinking people would
understand that the prime minister was "mere-
ly show-boating". In our opinion he was doing
more than "show-boating", he was on a mis-
sion of political mischief-making.
According to Mr Ingraham, Mr Christie has
often bragged that through the police he
always knows where Mr Ingraham is, whether
here or abroad. During his harangue, Mr
Christie paused long enough to suggest that
Mr Ingraham could have been in hospital get-
ting a check-up. To us it suggested that Mr
Christie knew exactly where Mr Ingraham
was. However, Mr Christie preferred to work
"on the presumption that they (Messrs Ingra-
ham and Symonette) have gone in the business
of politics in total disrespect of the people of
the Bahamas," adding in a conspiratorial tone,
that he happened "to have had certain advices
what the parliamentary appointment is, or
what the appointment they have gone to or
he's attending."
Without that presumption and his bogus bit
of advice, Mr Christie probably would not
have had a speech.
Obviously, elections are uppermost in Mr
Christie's mind and the mud-slinging has
already started.


Reporting on


our coun"


S


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
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EDITOR, The Tribune

IN early summer of 2005 the
Ministry of Education issued a
National Call for Papers for the
18th National Education Con-
ference scheduled for July 3rd
to July 7th.
A group of business and
labour organizations from the
tourism industry, the Coalition
for Education Reform, was
already working on such a
paper and responded to the Call
by submitting its paper-
"Bahamian Youth: The
Untapped Resource." It was
included with nine other papers
in a booklet that was distrib-
uted exclusively to conference
attendees.
The Minister's View on July
6, 2005
The Hon. Alfred M Sears, the
Attorney General and Minister
of Education, gave the keynote
address: "Transforming
Bahamian Education for the
21st Century."
He stated that the two major
objectives of the conference
were -
The examination of the con-
cept and state of Bahamian edu-
cation; and,
The mapping of a process to
transform it "taking into
account new realities and
emerging challenges."
The Minister gave the Gov-
ernment's version of the history
of education in the Bahamas.
He emphasised the limited edu-
cational opportunities for the
Bahamian majority prior to the
late 1960s; and then he
described the state of education
after 38 years of majority rule.
The Bahamas now provides
universally available primary
and secondary education for all;
and ...
"There is still much work
for all of us to do to improve
the overall performance of our
students."
He did not say what "overall
performance" meant; but one
can reasonably assume that it
relates to the quality of the pre-
sent school leavers, namely
what do they "know, under-
stand and can do" on leaving
high school.
The Minister did not go
beyond this one sentence
although he could have done so
since the Department produces
the relevant data annually. That
data tells a truly alarming story;
it confirms the public's worst
fears and that is probably the
reason it is kept from public
view.
The Minister did discuss the
problems of attracting qualified
teachers, student/teacher ratios,


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the under achievement of male
students, the challenge of new
technologies and the present
budget of $215 million. How-
ever, he did not set either pri-
orities or measurable goals.
The Coalition Report of June
2005
The Coalition Report that
was submitted prior to the Con-
ference was not released to the
public until December. At that
time its contents were report-
ed in detail by the major news-
papers; and the Report is avail-
able to the reader on the Cham-
ber of Commerce website "the-
bahamaschamber.com". A doc-
umentary based on the Report
was shown on cable television in
January and the Coalition indi-
cates that it will shortly be avail-
able as a streaming video on the
Internet.
Both the BGCSE 2004 and
the Coalition 2005 reports
found the following data trou-
blesome because of its implica-
tions for the country. The
inevitable conclusion is that the
present situation is unaccept-
able.


conclude that this was the typi-,
cal response of government
bureaucracies to a prob-r
lem...namely, create more and,
bigger staff departments.
It was comforting to see'
that order and civility in the
classroom was first on a list of
initiatives shown on page one. '
Discomforting was the
treatment of other critical:
issues.
For instance, the interim
report describes the Extended
Learning Programme (ELP) in
remedial Mathematics and
Reading that is offered to fail-
ing students. But there is no
discussion of Social Promotion,'
the practice of passing failing
students, and how ELP does
or should relate to this prac-
tice.
And...the achievements bf
the Testing and Evaluation Sec-
tion were given a half-page of
space but there is no mention of
the BGCSE results and the
implications for the state of edu-
cation. There are pictures of
three outstanding students with
their scores and awards, this is
the only 2005 student academic
results reported.
The Hope of the Future
If one were setting the agen-
da for the 21st century, it would
appear that the first step would


1 04 GSEEas rae


Average
Grades
All Exams D
New Providence
(Public) F+
New Providence
(Private) D+
Mathematics E
English D-


Percent
Grade "A"
6.4%

3.2%
9.8%


3.2%
3.0%


Percent
Grade "F, G and U"
20.8%

30.9%
10.0%
42.8%
20.2%


The Coalition Report
analysed the data, suggested
quantitative goals and proposed
fourteen specific strategies. Fur-
thermore, it clearly indicated
that the basic problem went
beyond the classroom and suc-
cess in eliminating the problem
would come only with profound
changes in social behaviour.
This would require the long-
term commitment and active
participation of all parts of
Bahamian society.
The Ministry's December
2005 Response
In December the Minister
published an interim report on
the Department's accomplish-
ments. It appeared to be a pub-
lic relations effort to promote
the public image of the Depart-
ment rather than a report on
the state of public education.
It was a 32-page full colour
newspaper supplement that had
the pictures of 35 staff execu-
tives and described what they
had done. In the case of the
Minister of Education, it includ-
ed one-page of testimonials on
his character and performance.
The cynic (or realist) could con-
clude that this was a misuse of
public funds.
It announced the creation
of new staff functions like the
Higher Education and Life-
Long Learning Division, the
Communications Division and
the National Co-Ordination
unit and the restructuring and
expansion of the Planning Sec-
tion. The cynic (or realist) could


be a candid description of the
state of affairs.
The last annual report of a
Minister of Education to Par-
liament on the state of educa-
tion was in 1995 even though it
is a legal requirement of the
Education Act. The overall
mean average for the 1994
BGCSE exams was a D Minus
but this was not mentioned ir
the report. At that time the,
Minister merely noted that,
some students exhibited "a lack,
of knowledge of the relevant
subject matter" and more
research was needed to develop;
a scheme to assist them.
The Interim 2005 Report,
shows that nothing has changed,
in the past decade. Both PLJ:
and the FNM Governmentsi
have not been candid.
The reality is that "we have a
problem with what is coming
out of the education pipeline!
and the relevant question
"How will the country initiate
and sustain meaningful educa
tion reform?" 4'
Hopefully, an arousedpub
lic will cause the Government
(preferably both parties) t,
move beyond the Interim 2005
Report.
Hopefully, there will be a*
Final report that is candid and:
sets priorities and specific goals
against which performance can
be measured.

RALPH J MASSEY
Nassau
February 6 2006


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education


PM's accusation off the mark


Note: The BGCSE system grades student performance on an
eight point scale of A, B, C, D, E, F, G and U


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006








MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


Discussing racism, the Nassau





Institute and Helen Klonaris


THE NASSAU INSTITUTE
AND HELEN KLONARIS

OME weeks ago, Helen
Klonaris, a white
Bahamian, published a letter on
the issue of racism and colonial-
ism in the Bahamas. Her letter
prompted several responses,
among them a rebuttal last week
from The Nassau Institute.
While it is easy to disagree
with some of Ms Klonaris' sug-
gestions (such as the supposed
racism of most whites, or the
extent of 'white' economic pow-
er in The Bahamas today) it
would seem that the writer of
the institute's response either did
not understand or did not want
to understand the broader thrust
of her arguments.
In fact, to her credit, Ms
Klonaris sets out, in a compelling
way, some of the legacies of the
colonial and racial domination
that did undoubtedly blight most
of our history.
While we may or may not
agree with her observations
about race relations today, her
basic ideas about some of the
psychological effects of a colo-
nially imposed value system are
not effectively countered in the
Institute'S long-winded response.
.Itis perhaps natural that the
Institute should focus on eco-
noinic theory in addressing some
of Ms Klonaris assertions. But
it is unfortunate that, having ini-
tially taken up what would seem
to have been her central point,
the letter from the institute then
fails: to directly address it.
That point is that there is, in
our society, a "well defined sys-
tem of relationships" including
educational curricula, the legal
system. Judeo Christian church
hierarchies and ihe English lan-
guage itself \ hose effect is to
"suppress, condemn and ghet-
toise" other cultures.
It would be interesting to see
h6w the critics of Ms Klonaris
can directly deny, for instance,
that, where Judeo-Christian val-.
u4s have been imposed among
indigenous peoples, their pro-
ponents have uniformly stigma-
tised and undermined the legiti-
mracy of the thought systems they
have sought to replace, including
in' The Bahamas.
'This also ties in with the expe-
rience of colonial interactions
throughout the world, where
seemingly indisputable patterns
emerge.
THE FILIPINO
AND JAPANESE
EXPERIENCES


apan's first contacts with
4 the west occurred in the
16th century. This was an era in
which European maritime pow-
ers, taking advantage of the new-
ly discovered Cape of Good
Hope, began large scale trade
with many East Asian societies.
"These trade relations evolved
into domination in some
instances, such as in the Philip-
pines (named after a particular-
ly unsavoury Spanish King).
Here, evangelism and guns went
hand-in-hand to create a west-
ern satrapy, whose language, cus-



eiliz l










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12:05 Immediate Response Cont'd
1:00 Caribbean News In Review
1:30 Spiritual Impact: Xerrona
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3:30 Bishop Neil Ellis
4:00 The Fun Farm
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Franklyn Ferguson
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11:30 Immediate Response
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toms and native religions were
all either obliterated or bas-
tardised.
What replaced them was a
society organised along pre-
dictable lines, with a small, high-
ly westernised elite presiding
over a large, ghettoised majority.
Those with 'native' characteris-
tics (such as followers of the old
religions) were made to occupy a
sub-class, while the ruling oli-
garchy lost all sense of social
responsibility toward the masses,
to whom they were now cultur-
ally alien.
Were it not for the wise deci-
sion of the 17th century Shogun,
Tokugawa Hidetada, to totally
ban the propagation of the
Christian faith in Japan, there
can be little doubt that Japan
would have suffered a similar
fate. Hidetada, sensibly, was hap-
py for the west's guns, its tech-
nology and its learning, but had
no interest in its religion, which
he saw as the vanguard of an
attempt to psychologically dom-
inate Japan and undermine her
independence. So he sent in his
Samurai and expelled all west-
erners except for a few useful,
clever Dutchmen.
At the time of the ban, mis-
sionaries and European "author-
ities" at the ports of Nagasaki
and Deshima (the two points'
where western trade settlements
were initially allowed) had
already begun a campaign of
burning Buddhist and Shinto
texts and had begun debunking
Japanese traditional histories
(such as the origin of the Imper-
ial family) as shameful, savage
myths. Hidetada's expulsion of
westerners and banning of their
faith was therefore a timely one,
arid probably saved Japan from
the fate of the Philippines, 'dis-
covered' by the Spaniards at
around the same time.
Today, Japanese people are
probably more at ease with
themselves, their ancestors and
the historical achievements of
their country than almost any
non-European people. Their
faith, an easy accommodation of
Chinese, Indian and native reli-


PERSPECTIVES
"'"-- ---


AN D R EW

gious traditions, has proved high-
ly adaptable to the rapid changes
through which their country has
gone in the last 400 years. Japan,
incidentally, has the lowest inci-
dence of Christianity of any
major country.

THE INDIAN EXPERI-
ENCE


Though India was the vic-
tim of colonisation, it
had the relative good fortune of
being colonised for commercial,
rather than evangelical purposes.
This was a feature that distin-
guished British (and, even more
so, Dutch) colonial policy from
that of Spain or Portugal. India
was also fortunate in having a
complex and extremely old value
system of its own that was not
easily susceptible to penetration
by alien ones.
These factors saved India's
original thought system intact
and spared it the marginalisa-
tion and stigmatisation that have
inevitably resulted elsewhere
from total colonial immersion.
Though Indians did and still do
suffer some of the traditional ill-
effects of colonialism, a rejec-
tion and stigmatisation of every-
thing associated with Indian-ness
never took root.

THE NEW WORLD SLAVE
SOCIETIES

T he African in the new
world is often wrongly
thought of as a blank slate who
only began accumulating culture
upon contact with his new colo-
nial society. In fact, he brought
with him a fairly complex sys-
tem of social rules, beliefs and
values, including religious ones.
In the case of the Yoruba, for


AL L E N


instance, he brought a pantheon
of Gods, including Ogun, the
chief god of the Santeria religion
still practised in Cuba today. So
he did have values of his own.
But unlike the Indian or the
Japanese, the totality of his
immersion in the colonial sys-
tem produced a psychological
lack of resistance to the preju-
dices and presumptions by which
these were deemed worthless or
even worse. In this respect, he
had much in common with the
Amerindians of the Andean
nations especially.
Insofar as Ms Klonaris sees
racism as being responsible for
the ghettoisation of New World
blacks, I would disagree. Like so
many indigenous peoples, from
Australia to Bolivia, it was the
New World black who inter-
nalised the colonial value sys-
tem, and so ghettoised himself.
To empowered people, the
"racism" of others is a trivial
matter. The tragedy facing the
new world African, the
Amerindian and others was not
someone else's "racism". Rather,
it is that he has internalised
someone else's values not on the
basis of a free exchange, but on
the basis of an uncritical hierar-
chy, which places anything orig-
inating outside western institu-
tions or western values at the
bottom.
He was psychologically pene-
trated to the point that he no
longer recognized value in any-
thing arising from his own her-
itage, ancient or modern. In fact,
he became an active accomplice
in the stigmatisation of such
things.
Take, for instance, the hierar-
chy of religions. To the colo-
nialised new world black, while
Hindu pantheism coniiotes J
neutral Eastern m n\tclsim and"
Greco-Roman pantheism con-


the[Oright to makelsmiute7


Rosetta St.Phone : 325 3336


notes high classicism, African
pantheism connotes a savage and
unequivocally negative "black
magic".

THE BAHAMAS MOVING
FORWARD

S o where does this leave
The Bahamas? For good
or ill, most Bahamians, black,
white and otherwise, today share
cultural and religious values
derived from sources from which
only a minority of Bahamians
physically descend. Most have
also come to accept a basically
western narrative of history,
even though this narrative some-
times propagates harmful myths
and assumptions.
None of this need be fatal to
harmonious national develop-
ment for The Bahamas, so long
as our self-image is constantly
"tweaked" to reflect the inter-
ests of the Bahamas as an inde-
pendent nation of many races.
But huge and monstrous lega-
cies of the colonial psychological
system remain. Black Bahami-
ans routinely associate African
bone structures, curled hair and
dark skin with ugliness, and seem


to assume that there is some uni-
versality to that view.
In religion, it is shocking to
observe the extent to which
black Bahamians have taken up
the almost militant Christian big-
otry that once stigmatised their
own ancestors. Only recently,
Rastafarian students complained
of the horrendous discrimination
they faced at the College of The
Bahamas.
From time to time, local pas-
tors rail about 'black magic' and
voodoo is often cited among the
reasons for looking down at
Haitian immigrants.
Less exposed black Bahami-
ans, of course, will never realise
That all these things come back to
a rejection of the legitimacy of
their own ancestors and, ulti-
mately, of themselves.
On the other hand, some bet-
ter educated black Bahamians
may assume that whiteness in
the Bahamas is a monolithic phe-
nomenon, there being no diver-
sity of views among whites on
these very important, sensitive
issues.
Which is why honest, well
thought-out contributions from
intelligent white Bahamians like
Ms Klonaris are so helpful.


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THE TRIBUNE,


PAGE 6. MONDAY. FEBRUARY 20, 2006


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* MINISTER of works and Utilities Bradley Roberts speaks at
the BTC service of thanksgiving on Sunday at Bahamas Faith
Ministries International


* EXECUTIVE Chairman Gregory Bethel speaks at thie BIC
service on Sunday
(Photos:Felip. MajoriTribunetaffi)


New OPBAT facility is


commissioned in Exuma


THE commissioning of new housing at
the Operation Bahamas Turks and Caicos
base in Exuma marks another important
milestone in the development of the unique
relationship in the war against drugs
between the Bahamas, the UK and US.
Foreign Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell
said: "Those of us who remember the 1980s
remember that some Bahamians used to
argue that the stuff was not staying here so
once it kept going they had no concern.
"Quite apart from the shortsightedness of
that ethic, it was not long before it also
started to stay here, and began to sap the


energies of our young people, both men
and women. It was then that the society
responded in a big way."
He said some institutions felt the problem
dated back to the leadership exercised in
the 1980s.
"By this ceremony today, we signal to pol-
icy-makers and to the people of both our
countries that we can never let up, get it off
our radar scope, lest we be swamped by the
same forces of evil that threatened to swamp
us two decades ago," Mr Mitchell said.
He congratulated the US for the renewal
of this commitment every year, the buildings


being the latest sign of that cq mitment.
"It signals once again that whether ,yop
are large or small, we live, in an interde-
pendent world. Yolu cannot be, big; with-
out someone who is small. We owe each
other to work together in the progress r
and on behalf of our common humanity"
the minister said. ;
He thanked the men and women of
OPBAT, both Bahamians and Americans,
the Turks and Caicos islanders for all their
hard work, their courage and brav~i' in
working at the front line to keep' their
respective countries safe.


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I


LOCAL NEWS
ZJ


BL TC service of thanksgiving


10111C,








THE TRIBUNE MON, F


I Labour off ice opened, on.. Andr


IAint


'VVV


contribution to




PMH Foundation


* By Bahamas Information
Services

NASSAU, The Bahamas-
Esso gas stations have con-
tributed over $36,000 to the
Princess Margaret Hospital
Foundation from their "Help
Us Help" campaign during Sep-
tember 2005.
,Troy Simms, country manag-
er of Esso in the Bahamas,
announced last Monday Mon-
day that 11 gas stations partici-
pated in the drive to raise the
funds by contributing two cents
for every gallon of fuel sold.
SThey are South Beach On the
Run, Oakes Field On the Run,
East Bay Street On the Run,
Carmichael and Faith Avenue
On the Run, East Street and
Balfour Avenue On the Run,
Bargain City, Carmichael Road,
and Heastie's Blue Hill Road.
Two stations on Eleuthera and
Long Island also contributed to
the fundraising campaign.
During the campaign, Esso
invited customers to help them
meet or surpass its target of
$35,000.
"We are honoured to
announce that together we were
able to raise $36,775.77," Mr.
Simms said.
The campaign is an annual
programme focused on assist-
ing organizations that help chil-
dren.
Mr Simms noted that in 2004,
Esso raised almost $28,000 for
The Bahamas Red Cross to
assist in the hurricane relief
effort.
He said that an additional
$50,000 was raised in the "Help
Us Help" campaign to support
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force summer youth initiative
and other summer programmes.
Dr Myles Munroe, President


of the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital Foundation, said the
partnership with Esso is a suc-
cess.
"Funds from the Esso's
'Help Us Help' programme
will be used to purchase much
needed equipment to assist in
paediatric care at the Princess
Margaret Hospital, mainly the
Children's Ward, the Neona-
tal Intensive Care Units and
the Special Care Baby Unit,"
said Dr Munroe.
Dr Munroe said the part-
nership between the Founda-
tion and Esso proved that
"miracles can occur through
partnership and friendships in
the community."
He added that the Founda-
tion will continue to promote


creative partnerships with oth-
er companies and program-
mmes to strengthen the level
of service provided by the
hospital.
Dr Munroe praised Esso
Standard Oil dealers and sta-
tions, the media and the pub-
lic for making Esso their
choice during the one-month
campaign.
He said as a result of the
partnership, the oil compa-
ny's name will be placed on
the "Miracle Donor Tree" in
the front lobby of the PMH
during 2006.
Mr Simms said Esso hopes
to continue the partnership
with the Foundation and will
continue to contribute to pae-
diatric care.


**o


* SAN ANDROS, Andros, The Bahamas Prime Minister Perry Christie looks on during lhe
ribbon cutting for the new Department of Labour office in San Andros, Andros, on February Z17
Pictured, from left, are Minister of Labour and Immigration and Member of Parliament for NorkPi
Andros and the Berry Islands Vincent Peet, Mr Christie, Andrea Smith and Clerks at the new
office, Mablene Bowleg and Cathy Martin.
(Photo: BIS/Eric Rose)


S
*



"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


al. 0--


o -


-mob
- o- b


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


* .: '''1''?




















































































- RBC
SRoyal Banl
Sof Canada

I


)FDEIT


k


Moving or improving


- happiness at home


PEOPLE often move for job
opportunities on another island,
to follow family, or any num-
ber of other motivations. But
what if you're simply too
"cramped" in your home? You
face a dilemma: move, or just
improve?
First consider how long you
might stay where you are. It
doesn't make much sense to
pour money into improvements
if you're planning to sell any
time soon. Potential purchasers
may not agree with your choice
of improvements, and with all
the turmoil and inconvenience
involved in most remodeling
projects, your biggest benefit
comes from remaining and
enjoying the fruits of your
labour!
Investigate how your planned
improvements will impact the
value of your home against oth-


Baaasra
esat today
Came asoi4
..


ers in your neighbourhood.
Your home could actually take
longer to sell in the future if it's
in the "upper end" of choices.
Purchasers historically opt for
the least expensive home in the
most expensive neighbourhood
they can afford.
Of course, there are many
improvements that will add to
your home's resale value down
the road, without pricing you
out of the market. Visit the US
National Association of Home
Builders website at nahb.org for
information about the potential
value of a range of improve-


ments. Although these numbers
are derived from the average of
the US markets these numbers
are pretty much the same here.
Regardless of market condi-
tions, your home is where you
should be happy. "Improve or
move" is an emotional as well
as a financial decision that
requires deep and honest eval-
uation.


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites applications from suitably qualified individuals
for the position of Senior Associate/System Administrator, Wide Area Network in our IT Technical Services
Department
POSITION SUMMARY:
The System Administrator, Wide Area Network (WAN). is responsible for supporting btcbahamas.com network
including the various devices used on the network such as routers, switches, and circuits necessary for the
support of IT systems. System Administrator WAN acts as the organizer, planner, problem solver, decision
maker, resource System Administrator and overall leader for the entire IT supported network and wireline/
wireless data networking devices. Responsibilities include the management of a 2nd level support group and
liaise with the end-user community to maintain, support and enhance solutions for maximum functionality,
availability and performance. This position requires regular interactions with Internal customers to understand
their existing and strategic business needs and that service levels are being met effectively and on time. The
System Administrator WAN performs the creation and analysis of Business Partner requirements, assesses the
impact of changes to the network and network devices, and determines the level of effort needed to implement
changes. The System Administrator ensures adequate documentation and communication of all related system
upgrades, outages, and modifications, keeping users well informed of changes in network systems and policies
and procedures. This position interfaces frequently with other IT staff to resolve issues, implement upgrades,
and deliver solutions.
DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES:
Manage the day-to-day networking connectivity of the WAN and related devices (Cisco routers,
switches etc.)
Effectively maintain the entire IT WAN including; project planning, scope management budget
management, resource (i.e. internal, external, 3rd party resources) management, time management
(activities & task planning), communications, risk management procurement, QA and testing, delivery,
transition planning and ongoing systems maintenance and support (problem resolution, outages,
version control, release management, upgrades, change management)
Manage and track all reported issues received and escalated from the IT Level 1 Service Desk
Regularly interact with internal customers to understand their existing and strategic business needs
and that support service levels are being met effectively and on time
Communicates policy and procedural changes; develops, reviews and updates standard operating
procedure manuals for the WAN support
Ensures staff members provide high quality support for the systems and to IT Business Partners
Escalates and notifies management of all organization issues or situations that affect the overall
operational effectiveness Of the IT WAN
Perform other job-related duties as assigned by management
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:
Bachelors degree in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Information Engineering, Information
Systems, Management Information Systems or equivalent industry experience in related fields.
7+ years experience managing. Implementing and maintaining WAN and peripheral devices such
as mediation devices, routers, Ethernet switches, etc.
Supports Wide Area Network, Voice Over IP, and VPN capabilities
Strong working knowledge of systems support and maintenance processes (includes problem
management and tracking, SLA management, release/version management, escalalions and
notifications)
Strong working knowledge of formal project and development methodologies (includes SDLC
processes, change management discipline, and project management processes).
2 years experience using network monitoring and support tools such as HP Openview to monitor
platform performance
KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:
Broad range of network. network devices, mediation devices and processes
Expert knowledge of VPN and VOIP technologies
S Strong knowledgeofnetwork.securityiequirementsandrocesses .,, .
Knowledge of firewalls, intrusion detection, and other network security protocols
Strong knowledge of wireless networking protocols
S Ability to establish organization standards, operating procedures, SLA's and develop guidelines
Knowledge and experience with trouble management, systems management and remote administration
tools and technologies
Strong leadership ability ,
Knowledge of project management processes, applications (MS Projectl and disciplines
Strong written and verbal communications skills '
Ability to effectively communicate complex technical concepts and ideas in a nontechnical, simple
manner
Proficient skills utilizing MS Office tools and applications.
Proficiency with HP Openview or other network management tools
All applications are to be received at BTC's Head Office, 21 John F. Kennedy Drive, no laler than
Monday, February 27. 2006 and addressed as follows:

DIRECTOR
HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD.
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
RE; SENIOR ASSOCIATEISYSTEM ADMINISTRATOR, WIDE AREA NETWORK


* MINISTER of Labour and
Immigration Vincent Peet
touring the grounds of Grand
Isle Villas, in Emerald Bay,
Exuma, with Senior Vice
President of EGI Ltd, Pamela
McCullough, on February 16.
EGI Ltd, is the development
team behind the villas. Minis-
ter Peet toured various
tourism-related properties in
the Emerald Bay Resort area
and interacted with Bahami-
ans employed there.
(BIS photo: Eric Rose)



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t PICTET N )Tfi I ,f7


Telecommunications/Computer Network Design
Installation & Maintenance
Homes Offices Subdivisions
Call Us Today!
Tel: 393-7733
E-mil ino(4emontwoks a


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Pet' visit to tourisniproeries~E[


A multinational company,
manufacturer of leading
brands in personal hygiene
consumer products, is
seeking a Territory Manager
for the Bahamas and other
islands in the Caribbean.

This position will be based in
Nassau. It requires extensive
business travel with sales and
marketing responsibilities.

A college degree in business and
prior experience in a similar ..
position are required. An M:BA
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need apply.

Please send your detailed resume,
including experience, references
and current compensation to:
PO. Box N-773, .
Nassau, Bahamas
by March 3, 2006.


TH-E TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006













Haiti poses




challenges




for CARICOM


SSUBARU |
~ Y--C


* By SIR RONALD
SANDERS
(The writer is a business
executive and former
Caribbean diplomat who
publishes widely on Small
States in the global commu-
nity).
THE victory by Rene
Preval in Haiti's presidential
elections poses challenges for
the member countries of the
Caribbean Community and
Common Market (CARI-
COM).
'After the former Presi-
dent Jean-Bertrand Aristide
accused the United States of
orchestrating his removal
arid forcing him into exile in
February 2004, CARICOM,
as a group, declined to recog-
nise the interim government
of Mr. Gerard Latortue.
It was well known that the
regional grouping was divid-
ed on how to treat with
Haiti. In the end, the view
prevailed that the Latortue
regime would not be recog-
nised and Haiti would not be
allowed access to the coun-
cils of CARICOM.
Preval's election victory
changes all that and CARI-
COM Secretary-General
Edwin Carrington is report-
ed to have said: "We are
ready to receive Haiti back
into the institutions of the
Caribbean Community."
But, he added, "We will
now sit with Haiti to discuss
the conditions of its re-entry
into CARICOM."

Attention
Importantly, Mr Carring-
ton drew attention to the
Revised Treaty of Chaguara-
mas which includes provi-
sions for the Caribbean Sin-
gle Market (CSM) to which
Haiti is not a signatory
!;He said: "We now have to
sifi with Haiti on this and oth-
er. issues, including how are
they prepared to come on
bbard with the Revised
T eaty and what is the
process of acceding to the
v rious elements of the Sin-
gle Market."
; It is Haiti's accession to
tfe CSM that poses the
greatest challenge to CARI-
C"M.
SHaiti with a population of
83 million is the poorest
country in the Hemi-
sphere. Its people are 3 mil-
lion more than the rest of
CARICOM combined.
Both its economic and
political conditions have
caused many of its people to
flee from its shores in search
of a better life.
SWhile the United States
hhs been the main target of
their refuge, the Dominican
Republic and the Bahamas
hive also experienced the
illegal entry of Haitians into
tteir countries.
! Recently, groups of Hait-
ian refugees have turned up
id Jamaica, Antigua and
Dominica.

Ignite
The election of Mr Preval,
by just over 51 per cent of
the population, does not
speak to a united coun-
try. Haiti continues to live
on a political powder
keg. And, the political
manipulation of its desper-
ate economic circumstances
is the match that could ignite
it any time.
In any event, Haiti is a far
way from the establishment
of democratic institutions,
and even farther away from
the kind of widespread
respect for them that would
underpin their maintenance.
Consequently, CARI-
COM's first duty of care to a
member of its community is
to welcome back into its fold
the constitutionally elected
government of Rene Preval
in elections which have been


insiW
W LV..


:. "!t~LB~~IM11 --H- -


endorsed by the Organisa-
tion of American States.
Having done so, CARI-
COM should take the lead
in the international commu-
nity in raising the financial
and other help that Haiti
urgently needs if the unwel-
come flight of its people to
other countries is to stop.
This will call for a serious
diplomatic effort, and may
well require the creation of a
special CARICOM Task
Force devoted to working
with the Haitian government
and international donor and
financial community for at
least two years to create the
machinery for financing and
managing projects in Haiti.

Projects
Among these should be
health care, particularly
HIV/AIDS, education and
human resource develop-
ment, infrastructural projects
that would encourage foreign
and local private sector
investment, and, very impor-
tantly, the building of demo-
cratic institutions supported
by legislation and enforce-
ment machinery.
In this regard, CARICOM
might enlist the help of
Canada in a joint effort to
engage the US government
at the earliest opportunity in
the peaceful and progressive
development of Haiti.
Reports from the Domini-
can Republic, Haiti's neigh-
bour, reveal that some 800
US troops landed at a port
city in the Dominican
Republic, barely 80 miles
from the Haitian border, last
Thursday. Ostensibly, they
are there for "New Hori-
zons", a military exercise
that is to extend for several
months.
Nonetheless, the US gov-
ernment has congratulated
Mr Preval on his election and
.State Department
spokesman, Tom Casey, said
"We look forward to work-
ing with the new government
to help the Haitian people
build a better future for
themselves."
CARICOM should take
the US government at its
word, and act as an honest
broker to unlock aid for
Haiti that has already been
approved from the US and
other countries and agencies,
and to develop a programme
for additional aid.
Neither democracy nor
development, including the
flight of Haitians seeking
refuge, will come unless gen-
erous assistance is forthcom-
ing.
And, CARICOM coun-
tries, however, determined
they may be, as they have
said, "to end years of isola-
tion and bring Haiti into the
Caribbean family to which it
belongs by geography, histo-
ry and common ancestry",
should require considerable
advancement by Haiti in its
economic and political con-
ditions before it is encour-
aged to join the Caribbean
Single Market.
After all the Single Mar-
ket goes well beyond a free
trade arrangement between
groups of countries; it is a
deep form of integration that
makes a single space of all
the countries' markets and
allows for the free movement
of goods and services, the
right of establishment by
nationals of the participat-
ing countries and free move-
ment of certain categories of
workers.
The countries that enter
such a Single Market, while


conscious of the importance
of "geography, history and
ancestry", must also be alert
to the need to fulfil other
obligations such as the pro-
vision of funding under the
Regional Development Fund
(RDF) for disadvantaged
countries and sectors where
Haiti would be amongst the
neediest.
Also, it may be an oppor-
tune time for CARICOM
countries to revisit the
Revised Treaty of Chaguara-
mas to create principles of
democracy, rights, and oblig-
ations to which every mem-
ber state must adhere as a
basis for entry, and for con-
tinued membership.
All CARICOM members,
including Haiti, should sign it
as a precondition for enter-
ing the CSM or remaining a
member.
CARICOM countries
must do all they can to
improve conditions for Haiti
as a member of the
Caribbean community. And,
Haiti must also play its part.
Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com


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Equal opportunities for



disabled pledge by Griffin


* By Bahamas Information
Services
MINISTER of Social Ser-
vices and Community Devel-
opment Melanie Griffin said
Thursday that the government
will continue to ensure equal
opportunities for the disabled.
Mrs Griffin was addressing a
post-Valentine Day lunch for
persons living with disabilities,
sponsored by the Englerston
Urban Renewal Programme in
partnership with the Disability
Affairs Division of the Ministry
of Social Services and Commu-
nity Development.
The minister said the govern-
ment had launched a number
of initiatives that should con-
tinue to enhance the lifestyles of
persons living with disabilities,
chief among them being the
establishment of a Special
Needs Commission under the
auspices of the Ministry of Edu-
cation.
This is responsible for assess-
ing the special education needs
of persons living with disabili-
ties, the expansion of the Dis-
ability Unit into a Disability
Affairs Division and the hiring of
a consultant on Disability Affairs
to liaise with the ministry and


VACA NC NOTICEI


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites applications from suitably qualified individuals for
the position of Senior Associate/System Administrator, Operating Systems in our IT Technical Services
Department.
POSITION SUMMARY:
The System Administrator, Operating systems (OS) is responsible for the hardware and operating system software.
The System Administrator OS installs new hard e re, ii.u.ill the operating system, maintains the operating system
through patches, maintains security on the devices, ensures effective connectivity with tile network, and'is responsible
overall for the performance of the technical platform of application systems. The System Administrator, OS acts
as the organizer, planner, problem solver, and overall leader for the hardware and software platforms for UNIX,
AIX, Linux, Windows and OS 400 systems. The administrator monitors systems and makes adjustments to maximize
functionality, availability and performance. The administrator manages growth and utilizes capacity planning to
ensure that adequate system resources are always available. This position requires regular interactions with internal
customers to understand their existing and strategic business needs and that service levels are being met effectively
and on time. The System Administrator, OS ensures adequate documentation and communication of all related
system upgrades, outages, and modifications, keeping Business Partners well informed of changes in network
systems and policies and procedures. This position interfaces frequently with other IT staff to resolve issues,
implement upgrades, and deliver solutions.
DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES:
Manage the day-to-day health of the AIX, Linux, Windows, OS 400, Solaris, and UNIX operating
system platforms.
Installs new hardware devices, configures them, and attaches them to the network.
Maintains operating system currency through migration of releases and patch implementation
Researches system patches to determine their suitability for implementation on specific systems
Troubleshoots hardware and software platforms problems
Works closely with the Backup and Archival Specialist to implement system backup procedures to
ensure that data is comprehensively copied
Manages and configures system storage devices, monitors space, plans for future growth, and manages
the growth and performance of the platforms
S Works closely with the Manager of Data Security and implements prescribed security policies and
procedures
Acts as tier 2 Help Desk support to troubleshoot and resolved platform issues in a 24 x 7 environment
Implements systems diagnostic and alarming tools for early detection and notification of potential
problems
Stays current with new system offerings and technology, analyzes new technology and makes
recommendations where applicable
S Works closely with the System Administrator WAN and the Database Administrator to a provide and
maintain a comprehensive IT technical architecture
Manage and track all reported issues received and escalated from the IT Level 1 Service Desk
Regularly interact with internal customers to understand their existing and strategic business needs
andthat support service levels are being met effectively and on time
Communicates policy and procedural changes: develops, reviews and updates standard operating
procedure manuals for the hardware and software platform support
Escalates and notifies management of all organization issues or situations that affect the overall
operational effectiveness of the technical architecture
Perform other job-related duties as assigned by management
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:
Bachelors degree in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Information Engineering, Information
Systems, Management Information Systems or equivalent industry experience in related fields.
7+ years experience managing, implementing and maintaining hardware and software platforms for
AIX, OS 400, Linux, Windows and UN IX platforms
Strong leadership ability
2 years experience managing a storage area network (SAN)
2 years experience implementing and utilizing performance monitoring and alarming tools such as
BMC Patrol, Nagios. Site Angel, Tripwire, or other tools as required
Strong working knowledge of systems support and maintenance processes (includes problem
management and tracking, SLA management, release / version management, escalations and notifications)
Strong working knowledge of formal project and development methodologies (includes SDLC
processes, change management discipline, and project management processes).
KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:
Broad range of hardware experience on IBM platform devices
S Extensive knowledge of specific operating systems including OS 400, Windows, AIX. Linux
Strong leadership ability with the ability to lead and take charge of a technical area
S Strong knowledge of UNIX security, OS 400 security, Windows and Linux Security mechanisms,
knowledge of Peoplesoft security is a plus
Ability to establish organization standards, operating procedures, SLA's and develop guidelines
S Knowledge and experience with trouble management, systems management and remote administration
tools and technologies
Knowledge of project management processes, applications .(MS Project) and disciplines
S Strong written and verbal communications skills.
Ability to effectively communicate complex technical concepts and ideas in a nontechnical, simple
manner.
Proficient skills utilizing MS Office tools and applications.
All applications are to be received at BTC's Head Office, 21 John F. Kennedy Drive, no later than
Monday, February 27,2006 and addressed as follows;
DIRECTOR
HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. L TD
NASSAU. BAHAMAS
RE: SENIOR ASSOCIATE/SYSTEM ADMINISTRATOR, OPERATING SYSTEMS
\,__ _


* MINISTER of Social Services and Community Development the Hon. Melanie Griffin speaks at
the Englerston Urban Renewal Project Disable Citizen Love Luncheon on Thursday, February 16,
2006 at Ebenezer Mission Baptist Church.
(Photo: BIS/Tim Aylei)


the disabled community.
Mrs Griffin said the Special
Needs Commission has
"already made some changes
and recommendations" with
regard to developing further
programmes to enhance educa-
tional opportunities for the dis-
abled.
She said the Disability Affairs
Division, located at Eighth Ter-
race, Centreville, and staffed by
a number of persons living with
disabilities, serves as a resource
centre, complete with comput-
ers.
She said her ministry will con-
tinue to subsidise computer
classes for the disabled in an
attempt to provide equal oppor-
tunity training in a number of
key areas, computer literacy
among them.
Minister Griffin said the gov-
ernment, through her ministry,
is also in the final stages of


preparing draft disability legis-
lation to protect the rights and
opportunities of those living
with disability.

Challenges

She said that despite the suc-
cesses, the government recog-
nised that there are still a num-
ber of challenges the disabled
face, including employment,
housing, education and training
opportunities.
"The government of the
Bahamas is aware of these chal-
lenges and has been working on
how we can have a turnaround
in these areas. The government
has responded and will continue
to respond to the needs of per-
sons living with disabilities,"
Mrs Griffin said.
She said the hiring of Ms Iris
Adderley as a consultant on dis-


ability has had a positive impact
in creating continued dialogue
between the government
through the Ministry of Social
Services and Community
Affairs and the disabled com-
munity.
She commended Ms Adder-
ley for the launch of the radio
talk show, "Spotlight on Dis-
ability", which has had a posi-
tive impact on the disabled
community. The show airs the
second Thursday in each month
over ZNS 1540 in New Provi-
dence and $10AM in Freeport,
Grand Bahama.
"This show has had a posi-
tive impact because it allows
persons living with disabilities
the opportunity to call-in and
give their recommendations for
the improvement and uplifting
and enhancing of persons liv-
ing with disabilities in this coun-
try, and of course, to give their


g FIDELITY~s


invites applications for the position of

Human Resource and
Training Officer


PROFILE:


Bachelor's Degree in related area and/or HR Certification
Proficiency in Advanced Excel, Word, PowerPoint, Access, Outlook
& Internet Explorer
Ability to work quickly and accurately and cope with large volumes -
of work
Strong interpersonal skills and communication skills
Excellent organizational and administrative skills
Facilitation and meeting skills




RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

Assists the Director of HR/Training and the HR Manager
Assists with Training duties and programmes
Assists with HR duties and research projects
Assists in the planning and execution of all social/employee events
Disseminates internal information to personnel as required
S Composes letters, memos and reports
Prepares Training Certificates of Participation/Attendance



Compensation package will include a competitive salary, depend-
ing on experience, together with a comprehensive range of
benefits.


Send resume no later than March 3, 2006 to:


Director of HR & Training


51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853
.Nassau
Fax 326.3000
e-mail: info@fidelitybahamas.com


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THE TRBN MNA, ERAY 0 00,PG


Resort worker claims she





was unfairly suspended


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT A female
"worker at Our Lucaya
'Resort claims she was unfair-
Iv suspended and refused
help by a union representa-
tive at the Bahamas Hotel
Caiering and Allied Work-
:ers Union.
SHair-stylist Sandra Mader,
w.ho is employed at Senses
Spa. is.claiming she was sus-
pended for 90 days after she
"as out sick from work for
six days
NMs lader went to the
union's office on Thursday
-to seek help, only to be told
that there was nothing they
could do to help her.
"I \\as in awe at what I was
.being told," said the moth-
er-of-four. "I was very dis-
appointed because I had
been paying union dues for
four years."

Employed

Ms Mader was initially
employedd as a hair-stylist at
,t-hespa in 2001. She was
.demoted to locker room
attendant after she was
allegedly accused of damag-
>ing a customer's hair in 2003.
-; She says she has been a
professional hair-stylist for
-20 years. Ms Mader said her
'boss explained that she
would only be reinstated if
shie received re-certification
trainingg. .
Ms Mader claims she was
notreinstated as a hair-styl-
i'ste een though she under-
went a two-hour re-certifica-
tion training.


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


* SANDRA Mader, four-year employee at Our Lucaya and Lionel Morley, BHCAWU.

(Photos: Denise Maycock)


After being taken ill with
the flu for six days, Ms Mad-
er returned to work and pre-
sented a three-day sick slip
to her boss. She said she was
suspended after she failed to
present a sick slip for the
additional three days.
Ms Mader turned to the
Labour Board for assistance.
She said a labour official
had advised the resort they
could either issue a two-
week suspension with pay or
without pay, but not a 90-day
suspension.
The labour official and Ms
Mader are expected to meet
with management on Mon-
day.
Senses Spa manager Chris-
tine Hays told The Tribune
that she did not wish to com-
'meint oh-the matter.
Union official Lloyd
Cooper could not be reached
for comment up to press time


on Friday.
Lionel Morley, BHCAWU
executive board member,
criticised the union for not
supporting Ms Mader.

Elections

Mr Morley said he intends
to contest an executive posi-
tion during union elections
in May. He claims that union
representation of workers
has deteriorated.
"The core objective and
purpose of the union is to
protect and preserve the
rights of its members. And
right now the union is in its
weakest state today."
Mr Morley said he will
continue to support and rep-
reseut union membejrsin
need, even though the union
had threatened to lock him
out of his office.


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Call: 323-8888
or fax resume to: 322-4527


V


I-,


IJi.: -L,)


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites applications from suitably qualified
individuals for theposition of SENIOR MANAGERIECONOMIST in our Regulatory Department.
JOB SUMMARY
To develop and apply various telecommunications regulatory requirements to economic efficiencies
including interconnection issues, niarket analysis and pricing methodologies, quality of service standards
and customer codes of practice.
DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES
Provide specialist advice on the economic and financial performance of BTC as a regulated
operator
Provide economic and financial analysis involving marketing research and changes in price
setting methodologies
Provide proficient application of economic principles to the licence compliance requirements
of BTC as a regulated telecommunications operator
Provide market research and other economic studies relevant to the current and future
development of BTC
Become proficient in knowledge of all necessary regulatory documents including the
Telecommunications Act, Sector Policy and BTC's licence


SENIOR MANAGER/ECONOMIST
Advise on and monitor PUC Rate Rebalancing Proposals and all aspects of BTC rates including
price regulated services
Advise on and monitor all relevant sector issues including universal service, price capping and
reference interconnection offer documents (RIO) including Public Consultations
Advise on and monitor all relevant interconnection issues e.g. revenue
To liaise with the Public Utilities Commission on all relevant compliance issues and to attend
to meetings and correspondence related thereto
To assist in the reporting of individual business units in the company on a line of business
basis for various services
To assist in the preparation of network and service development plans for the demonstration
of cost based pricing to assist with the determination of interconnection pricing
To assist in the development and implementation of strategies to keep the company competitive
and to secure its market share
Generally to assist with the division's objective of ensuing compliance with licence provisions
whilst ensuring that the company I
To attend all staff meetings and prepare monthly status reports on tasks and assignments
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS


Proficient in the application of economics to an operator/licence in a regulated
telecommunications sector
Good experience in market research and regulatory methodologies
Some proficiency in accounting required
Computer skills in database, spreadsheets, statistics and word processing
Membership in relevant professional associations
Master's degree in Economics


SENIOR MANAGER/ECONOMIST
(vii) Ten (10) years experience required. Experience in telecommunications would be an asset
and an advantage
(viii) Strong leadership are essential organizational self-motivational and communications
skills
All applications are to be received at BTC's Head Office, 21 John F. Kennedy Drive, no later than
Monday, February 27, 2006 and addressed as follows:
DIRECTOR.
HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD.
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS


RE: SENIOR MANAGER/ECONOMIST, REGULATORY


.f


LOCAL NEWS


-


4:7.'


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20,2i006, PAGE


JHE TRIBUNE


CUM A% W 171


m


m







THE TRIBUNE


COB can still attain university status





with the right person at the helm


S


* By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com
IT COMES as no surprise
that lecturers, staff and stu-
dents at the College of the
Bahamas have raised a peti-
tion calling for the reinstate-


YOUNG MAN'


ment of former president Dr
Rodney Smith.
Having just completed


VIEW


COB, I can assure you that
these notions have existed
under the surface for quite
some time. In fact, since short-
ly after Dr Smith's resignation
in early August, 2005.
The fact that the petition
btQo-r mnrp than AnO4 sirna-


looked them and begun the
search for someone from over-
seas to lead this institution to
university status. Now they are
just keeping the house until
they locate its rightful occu-
pant.
Students have been grum-
bling for months about what
they see as the cold atmos-
phere since Dr Smith's depar-
ture.
Both the acting president,
Ir -ioncla __ Ttpa-Joln


! -fcte~a "^"-, "* jr Khonda Chipman-John-
tures serves as a show of no son, and her colleague, Dr
confidence in the present lead- Poandra Johnson, are COB
ership team. stalwarts, but they are not

"While I'm not pressing for
Dr Smith's return, I do admit
he did wonders for the college.
During his tenure, morale was
boosted, new ideas permeated
the atmosphere and students
felt like they were important
and not just seen as cash
cows."
I- --


hear their queries. He always
presented himself as a man
who was approachable and
steadfast in his belief that a
college/university can only
come to fruition with its stu-
dent body.
It is evident that Mr Wilson
must find someone with an
attractive persona and an evo-
lutionary outlook.
I disagree with my former
lecturer Felix Bethel's notion
that it would take the college
another 20 years to become a
university.
It is my belief that if the
right person is at the helm of
the college, it can still attain
university status, maybe not
in 2007, but shortly thereafter.
Having been a student at
COB during Dr Smith's pres-


idency, I confirm that morale,
work drive and visionary out-
look of both staff and students
were at an all-time high.
The question now becomes:
Does it take Dr Smith to
return to fill this void or do
we find an outsider to rein-
vigorate the college? The lat-
ter seems more likely, because
as an historian, I know the
harsh, embarrassing implica-
tions of plagiarism or any
notion that plagiarism had
occurred.
As things stand, the admin-
istration at COB is far from
appealing. I urge Mr Wilson to
think on these things and
make a decision that is in the
best interest of the college -
not popularity, politics or oth-
erwise.


I %I fw tgw


In its continuing effort to improve its
telecommunications services, The
Bahamas Telecommunication Company
Ltd. (BTC) wishes to inform the public
and its valued customers that we will be
performing a DSL eqPipment upgrade
in the Eastern district of New Providence
on Tuesday, February 21st, 2006
beginning at 1:00am. As a result, some
subscribers in the Eastern district may
experience a brief disruption in their DSL
high speed internet service. Please note,
that telephone services will not be
interrupted, only DSL service.

BTC apologizes for the inconvenience
caused, and assures the public that every
effort will be made to keep the disruption
of internet service to a minimum.


Just this week, The Tribune
reported that COB council
chairman Franklyn Wilson
had indicated that they were
still paying the rent -$4,000
per month for the former
residence of Dr Smith on
Eastern Road.
This can be interpreted as
the council's way of telling
local presidential candidates
withltheir own homes that
members have already over-


expected to lead the college
to university status.
While I'm not pressing for
Dr Smith's return, I do admit
he did wonders for the col-
lege. During his tenure,
morale was boosted, new
ideas permeated the atmos-
phere and students felt like
they were important and not
just seen as cash cows.
Dr Smith made it a point to
meet with the students and


. . u


- ____
q


0

ql .


o --
- -


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Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"














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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


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PAGE 14 MONDA, FEBRARY 20O2006NHETB
~ Cr II I


FNM leader slams PM


FROM page one

already relayed to the press,
was solely the result of previ-
ously scheduled medical tests
and evaluations at the Cleve-
land Clinic in Fort Lauderdale
which I had already been
forced to postpone once due to
pressing business and which I


was reluctant, indeed unwill-
ing, to postpone again.
"I am pleased to advise
that my doctors have found
me to be in good health," he
said.
He also said that Mr
Christie was suffering from a
lapse of memory. He had
asserted that he had not read
about or heard about an


opposition leader not attend-
ing the opening of parlia-
ment, but it had happened on
more than one occasion.
"How poorly the prime
minister's memory serves
him. He certainly appears to
have forgotten that twice, in
1992 and again in 1993, the
entire opposition bench,
including his good self and
his then leader, Sir Lynden,
absented themselves in what
they termed a boycott from
the reading of the Speech
from the Throne at the open-
ing of parliament under an
FNM administration.
"And he appears also not
to recall the central role that
he and his co-deputy leader
played in 1996 in planning a
third PLP boycott of the
opening of a new session of
parliament. Action.which he
took in the absence of his
leader, who was not present
due to ill-health," Mr Ingra-
ham said.
Mr Ingraham produced a
newspaper article from
August 16, 1993, which fea-
tured a press conference
where then PLP deputy lead-
ers B J Nottage and Mr
Christie explained why the
PLP would not be attending
the opening of that session of
parliament.


vOUR COoriCTION TO TNF ViORl.D





The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites applications from suitably qualified individuals for the position
of Senior Associate/Database Administrator in our IT Technical Services Department
JOB SUMMARY:
The Database Administrator (DBA) ii respon-ible for maintaining Ihe health'of BTC Oracle, DB2 andSQL databases. The
DBA implements databases, develops backup and restoration procedures, peiforns databases tuning,:ad manages the growth
and performance of the IT databases. The DBA utilizes diagnostic tools to determine systemieriformance problems and
implements database and indexing changes as needed in order to maximize database performance. The DBA also researches
patches and implements database upgrades and releases to keep the database environment current. In addition, the DBA
serves as the resident expert on data retrieval and management through an expert knowledge of SQL and stored procedure,
providing technical support to developers as needed. The DBA works closely with the Manager of Data Security to implement
prescribed security rules and policies as determined at the database level. The DBA performs special application tuning duties
to improve performance on application systems for billing, accounting and customer service and other application. The DBA
acts as the organzier, planner, problem solver and overall leader for the BTC IT databases. This position requires regular
interactions with internal customers to understand their existing and strategic business needs and that service levels are being
met effectively and on time. The DBA maintains adequate documentation and communication of all related system upgrades,
outages and modifications, keeping Business Partners well informed of changes in policies and procedures. This position,
interfaces frequently with other IT staff to resolve issues, implement upgrades and deliver solutions.
DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES:
Manage the day to day health of the IT Oracle, DB2 and SQL production' databases
Implement and support various test and training database instances as required
S Installs new databases, configures them, tunes them and monitors performance
S Utilizes diagnostic tools and explain plans to identify database performance issues
Modifies the database schema where required to implement application system upgrades
Maintains database currently through migration of releases and patch implementation
Researches database patches to determine their suitability for implementation on specific systems
Troubleshoots database problems and performance issues
S Works with developers to design and create new application databases
Works closely with the Backup and Archival Specialist to implement database backup procedures to ensure that
data is comprehensive copied
Manages and configured database storage, monitors space, plans for future growth and manages the growth and
performance of the IT databases
Works closely with the Manager of Data Security and implements prescribed security policies and procedures
Acts as tier 2 Help Desk support to troubleshoot and resolve database issues in a 24 x 7 environment
Implements systems diagnostic and alarming tools for early detection and notification of potential problems
Stays current with new system offerings and technology, analyzes new technology and makes recommendations
where applicable.
Works closely with System Administrator Operating Systems, and Systems Architect to provide and maintain a
comprehensive IT technical architecture
Manages and tracks all reported issues received and escalated from the IT level 1/2 Service Desk
Regularly interacts with internal customers to understand their existing and strategic business needs and that
support service levels are being effectively and on time
Communicates policy and procedural changes: develops, reviews and updates standard operating procedure
manuals for the hardware and software platform support
Escalates and notifies management of all organization issues or situations that affect the overall operation
effectiveness of the technical architecture
Perform other job-related duties as assigned by management
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:
S Bachelor's degree in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Information Engineering, Information Systems,
Management Information Systems or equivalent industry experience in related fields
7+ years experience managing, implementing and maintain Oracle databases
7+ years experience managing, implementing and maintaining DB2 databases
S 5 years experience with AIX, OS 400, Windows and Linux operating systems
S Strong leadership ability
S I year experience utilizing a storage area network (SAN)
Strong working knowledge of systems support and maintenance processes (includes problem management
and tracking, SLA management, release/version management, escalations and notifications)
Strong working knowledge of formal project and development methodologies (includes SDLC processes, change
management discipline, and project management processes).

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:
Working knowledge of OS 400, AIX, Windows, Solaris and Linux operating systems
S Strong leadership ability with the ability to lead and take charge of a technical area
Strong knowledge of database security, knowledge of Peoplesoft security is a plus
S Ability to utilize performance tools to identify application system performance issues
Ability to monitor and tune database to maintain maximun performance
S Expert knowledge of SQL and stored procedures
Working knowledge of UNIX security, OS 400 security, Windows and Linux Security mechanisms
S Ability to establish organization standards, operating procedures, SLA's and develop guidelines
S Kowledge and experience with trouble management, systems management and remote administration tools and
technologies
S Knowledge of project management processes, applications (MS Project) and disciplines
S Strong written and verbal communications skills
S Ability to effectively communicate complex technical concepts and ideas in a non-technical, simple manner
S Proficient skills utilizing MS Office tools and applications.


All application are to be received at BTC's Head Office, 21 John F Kennedy Drive no longer than Monday, February 27,
2006 and addressed as follows:


DIRECTOR
THE HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD.
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
RE: SENIOR ASSOCIATE/DATABASE ADMINISTRATOR


"In what dream world does
the prime minister exist? I
recommend that in the future
he might exercise his memo-
ry and ensure that his brain is
in gear before he speaks," Mr
Ingraham said.
He said he was surprised
to learn that his absence from
the reading of the Speech
from the Throne so distracted
members of the government
that they permitted their
attention to be diverted from
the real business at hand -
their legislative agenda for
"their final 15 months in
office".
"I am bowled over to learn
that the governing party
holds the office of leader of
the opposition in such high
esteem; and further consid-
ers the presence of the leader
of the opposition so central
to the government's business.
"This is news to me. After
all, this is the same govern-
ment that routinely invites
the leader of the opposition
to formal government func-
tions by telephone on the
night before the function as
was the case for the recent
emission from office of the
former Governor General
and the oath-taking by the
new Governor General, and
as was the notification of the
official arrangements for the
funeral of our late colleague,
George Mackey.
"Of course, this is par for
the course. The governing
party continues to give great-
est attention to form over
substance. They have no real
appreciation, respect or
understanding of and for the
true functioning of a parlia-
mentary democracy.
"For example, they do not
appear to know that the pro-
rogation and opening of a
new session of parliament in
a functioning democracy is
not a secret," Mr Ingraham
said.
He said that in a function-
ing democracy, parliamentary
courtesy ensures thai consul-
tation takes place prior to
prorogation to determine
whether the opposition has
matters of interest they would


wish to have addressed prior
to prorogation or otherwise
carried forward to the new
session of parliament.
"But the governing party
does not understand or prac-
tise these basic democratic
principles. That is why they
could see fit to prorogue par-
liament on January 31 with
no prior notice to the oppo-
sition and leave some 60
questions, with as many as
200 sub-parts, put to the gov-
ernment by members of the
opposition unanswered.
"In a functioning democra-
cy. a government answers
questions put to it by the
opposition," he said.
Mr Ingraham said the gov-
erning party did not observe
any of these democratic
norms. Instead, they deter-
mined "in secret when the
House would be prorogued
and when the new session
would open."
He said: "The absence of
consultation prior to proro-
gation meant that a number
of members of the opposition
found ourselves unable to
rearrange our schedules to
accommodate the secret
schedule of the governing
party.
"Then the leader of the
PLP pretends as if the
absence of a member, a justi-
fied absence, meant to send
no messages explicit or oth-
erwise, constitutes a threat to
democracy.
"I ask all of us, where is the
greater threat to parliamen-
tary democracy? When on
prorogation and the sum-
moning of a new parliament,
the person who represents
himself to be the alternative
PM does not appear, does not
come out, his deputy does not
appear and does not come
out, and they have not pro-
vided notice or excuse to the
parliament or to the Speak-
er?" Mr Ingraham said.
He said the public will be
aware that there is no parlia-
mentary rule or custom that
dictates that a member
inform the Speaker of his/her
intended presence or absence
at a sitting of parliament.


; /!

Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa


Invite application for the position of:

DIRECTOR OF FOOD & BEVERAGE

Applicant must be experienced in their field,
excellent communication skills, written and oral;
Team building and management skills; position
offers attractive compensation packages, competitive
with relevant experience.

Director of Human Resources
P.O. Box CB-13005
Email: cmajor@srb.sandals.com


PLP women's

branch chairman

FROM page one

"If it isn't a good reason, I
think that we ought to be con-
cerned about that. Additionally,
he ought to be considering relin-
quishing the position if he isn't
prepared to fulfil the mandate
of the position," said Dr
Sawyer.
She stressed that, if Mr Ingra-
ham had a good reason for not
attending, there was no debate.
With the upcoming general,
election, Dr Sawyer said she is
moving up a notch, from "cruise
control to full speed."
She said she is sure if the
organisation works hard, it will
be able to attract the women.-
"We want to get out there
and talk about the Progressivq
Liberal Party, talk about th&
issues that we feel strongly
about and how we would want
to see them handled and to pre7
sent our approach to them."
She said the PLP's philoso-
phy was concern for the peo-
ple.


Cabinet

FROM page one

observers that the reshufflp
would take place at all as tbh
government has only .15 montl
left until a general election'had
to be called.
Mr Christie said a new pokl
initiative was due with refers
ence to the economy and:secit-
rts'and safety of Bahamianis::'
According to other reports.
Minister of Immigration and
Labour Vincent Peel will bp
,transferred to Financial Ser:
vices. Shane Gibson may be
moved from Housing an8
National Insurance to Immim
gration, and Allvson Maynard
Gibson will be transferred from
Financial Services.and Inves(-
ments to become 'Attorney
General.
However, other r ports sug-
gested that Figancial Services
would be absorbed by the Mimn
istry of Finance.
Alfred Sears is expected to
remain as Minister of Educq*
tion with Melanie Griffiabeini
given the=Ministry of -Housin
and Social Services.
Dr Marcus Bethel is expecteii
to head National Insurance wittl
Dr B J Nottage taking o'er ar
Minister of Health. ..
V Alfred Gray's portfolio will
reportedly include local gov-
ernment, mailboats and post
offices.
He would be relieved of Agri-
culture and Fisheries, which
would be taken over by Leslie
Miller, who would retain Trade
and Industry under his portfo-
lio.
Fred Mitchell is expected to
remain Minister of Foreign
Affairs but will also take on
responsibility for international
trade, which would include
FTAA, CSME, LNG, and
PetroCaribe.
Obie Wilchcombe will report-
edly remain as Minister of
Tourism and Bradley Roberts
is expected to retain response
ability for the Ministry of Works
and Utilities.
Neville Wisdom will report-
edly remain Minister of Youth,
Sports and Culture and Glenys
Hanna-Martin is also expected
to stay as Minister of Transport
and Aviation.
It has also been claimed that
Pleasant Bridgewater may be
in the running for a Cabinet
post and that Michael Halkitis is
being considered for the post
of Minister of State for Finance,
'oi


S)ABDAB

ASSOCIATED BAHAMIAN DISTILLERS & BREWERS LTD

DIVIDEND NOTICE

TO ORDINARY SHAREHOLDERS

We are pleased to advise that a Final Dividend
for 2003 of $0.30 per share shall be paid on 16th
February 2006 to Ordinary Shareholders of record
as at 31st December 2004. Having paid an interim
dividend of $0.50 for 2003, this makes the total
dividend paid for 2003 $0.80 per share.

The payment will be made in the usual manner,
on 16th February 2006, through Colina Financial
Advisors Limited, our Registrar and Transfer
agents.

Barry Newman
Company Secretary


Negotiation and Mediation skills
* ,.. **.,,,,,.e *.*..*... ..** **. ************************************y*** ***
to be held at the British,
4 day Certificate ADR Workshop March 21-24, 2006 Colonial Hilton Nassau


"The material was very informative and will
definitely add value to me and my company. To
have the ability to resolve internal disputes in
house is a very positive thing."
Marion G. Smith, Bahamas Telecommunications Company, Nassau

"Material was excellent. Instructors very
effective. I work for the U.S. government and I
believe this course would be of benefit."
Dennis M. Weir, Federal Buteauof Prisons; Tu.cdn,; SA


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE -14, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006


1


I









1 A


j1jt~~ ~LL~II.d ~J1


Artists turning up to




spread the gospel


HURRICANE Wilma's
appearance last October may
have delayed the hosting of
one of the most anticipated
gospel music events but the
storm certainly could not stop
it.
Gospel Splash, featuring
international gospel music
stars Anointed and Mary
Alessi, along with home-
grown inspirational music sen-
sations Shaback, TaDa and
Nehemiah Hield, will be held
on February 25 at Sandals
Royal Bahamian Resort.
Doors will open at 8pm.
Angela Cannon, senior
marketing manager of Cable
Bahamas' Gospel Music
channel, said: "Our artists are
raring to go! Both Anointed
and Mary Alessi are truly
thrilled about performing in


,6 6 6 =some ear


* BAHAMAS Heart Foundation chairman R E Barnes presents the Lady Sassoon Golden Heart
Award to Andrea Archer for exemplary community service on Saturday at the 42nd annual Heart
Ball. The Bahamas' first school social worker, Mrs Archer was also lauded for her work with the
PACE and SURE programmes for the nation's youth.
(Photo: Andrew Aitken)


HUNDREDS showed their
support for children with heart
disease at the annual Heart Ball
on Saturday.
Organisers deemed the Ball,
in its 42nd.year, a great.success...
A highlight was the announce-


ment of the Lady Sassoon Gold-
en Heart award. This is presented
to a person who has given exem-
plary service to other people. This
year's recipient was Andrea
..Archer, deputy permanent. sec-
retary in the Ministry of Health.


A silent auction and a grand
raffle featured more than
$30,000 in prizes.
Supporters were entertained
with music from the Soulful
Groovers, the-Police Pop Band
and the Ed Brice Orchestra.


Digicl to enter Gu)ana


cell phone market


the Bahamas and are certain to
put on a memorable show for
the Bahamian audience."
The headline performers are
well-known in the gospel music
field. Anointed has been a pop-
ular gospel music group for
more than a decade and Mary
Alessi has been gaining recog-
nition as a worship and urban
vocalist.
Anointed has been celebrated
for breaking down barriers of
genre, styles and markets, and
in the process building a broad,


multi-ethnic following. Siblings
Da'dra and Steve Crawford,
while still masters of the
smooth, pop/R and B-flavoured
gospel their longtime fans have
come to know them for, also
give the urban, groove-driven
facets of their musical person-
alities plenty of space to shine in
their music. The resulting mix is
familiar but still fresh, as well
as new and innovative-and all
instantly accessible and memo-
rable.
As a singer/songwriter, key-


boardist and speaker, Mary
Alessi has released her second
independent album, More, a
live recording that features
many of her own songs.
A proud sponsor of Gospel
Splash, Joy 101.9 FM, will also
be giving listeners chances to
win free tickets during their
broadcasts.
Gospel Splash has also
received the support of local
companies such as KFC, Pepsi
and is fully supported by Gospel
Music Channel.


HAROLD ANTOR
For delivery of the leading Bahamian R ANT
INSURANCE EXECUTIVE
newspaper, call The Wribune's
Circulation Department at 502-2383
or visit our offices on Shirley Street
to Sign up today! t 'L.


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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 15


THE TRIBUNE


ine inou nel~urrs"T


14ft J%








"4 ar ' j' u1 "' .


Fnity hs Members ot me rPll eta sigma fraternity
Fraterny help got to work at the Simpson Penn School
SP for Boys on Saturday as they continued a

to clean u ) campaign to clean up school environs


school campus


* N'KOMO Ferguson, a member of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity Imc, along with volunteers sve h
helping hand on Saturday at the Simpsom Penn School for Boys by cutting grass


* MEMBERS of the Sigma Beta club of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity move old beds on Saturday
at the Simpson Penn School for Boys


* FRATERNITY members move tin roofing around on Saturday at the school


* MEMBERS of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, along with
volunteers, give a helping hand on Saturday at the Simpson
Penn School for Boys by cutting grass, as part of a sustained
campaign to help clean up schools and public spaces


-o Colina General
-U Insurance Agency
',7 ',7 "i7f. lU i n 't. 9 l -


* MEMBERS of the Sigma Beta club of Phi Beta Sigma
Fraternity paint the walls of the cafeteria on Saturday at the
Simpson Penn School for Boys
(Photo: Fellpi Major/Tribune staff)

Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who aref
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the -
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 16, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006


7








MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006


SECTION


Colinsra pen al

Insurance Ltd.,


business@tribunemedia.net


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Credit union questions:




'Where's our red carpet?'


* By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Business
Reporter
The Teachers and
Salaried Workers
Cooperative
Credit Union told
The Tribune that
it feels the "carpet has been
pulled from underneath" its
proposed $3-$6 million invest-
ment for Inagua, and is urging
the Ministry of Financial Ser-
vices and Investments to seri-
ously consider its proposal.


Phase III set

to generate

$100m

operating

income

* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
KERZNER Intelnation ,I
expects the Phase 11 expan-
sion on Paradise Island to gen-
erate $100 million in operating
income from its first full-year in
operation, a Wall Street ana-
lyst has noted.
Lawrence Klatzkin, an ana-
lyst with Jefferies & Compa-
ny, said in a report for investors
following Kerzner Internation-
al's fourth quarter results that
the Phase III expansion, which
was "proceeding on time and
on budget", and scheduled to
open in April 2007, would gen-
erate an extra $7.10 in value
per ordinary share.
This was based on a rate of
return of 19 per cent on capital
invested by Kerzner Interna-
tional on Phase III.
Mr Klatzkin said of the
Phase III expansion: "Kerzner
plans on making the resort
more of a theme park with
more water rides and a new
'Swim with the Dolphins'
encounter, which should help
the luxury mass market as
management has indicated
there has been a large demand
for a better lodging product at
Atlantis for families who want
to stay where the water activi-
ties are."
In addition, he added that

SEE page 5B


The call comes after hearing
the Government's renewed
commitment to paving a
smooth road for Bahamian
investors in last week's Speech
from the Throne, through the
creation of a Domestic Invest-
ment Board to remove 'red
tape' from the approvals
process.
After initially introducing
their $3 to $6 million Mayagua-
na proposal to the Ministry ear-
ly in 2005, a credit union
spokesman said that to date,
they have gotten no further
than an initial meeting with


* JAMES CAMPBELL


Campbell

brings

contempt

case

against

CFG duo

By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Business
Reporter
CONTEMPT of court
proceedings instituted
against Colina Financial
Group's (CFG) two prin-
cipals, Emmanuel Alexiou
and Anthony Ferguson, by
their former business part-
ner James Campbell have
been adjourned until this
Thursday.
Mr Campbell's attor-
neys, Philip Davis and
Arthur Minns, indicated
that $9 million was paid by

SEE page 5B


Pension funds execute

Royal Oasis ruling

* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE hotel pension funds have executed a judgement that
requires all the monies owed by the still-closed Royal Oasis
resort to be paid when the property is finally sold, The Tribune has
learnt.
The judgement was executed by the deputy Provost Marshal,
and means that when an agreement is
concluded for the resort's sale, the
two pension funds the Bahamas SEE page 7B


officials.
The proposal is designed to
complement proposed major
investment on Mayaguana by
the Boston-based I-Group,
which has engaged in a 50/50
joint venture partnership with
the Hotel Corporation of the
Bahamas.
The credit union aims to pro-
vide affordable housing units,
assisting islanders and descen-
dants with first and second
home constriction through cre-
ating three housing divisions in
Pirate's Well, Abraham's Bay
and Betsy Bay. It will also pro-


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BAHAMIAN employers will have to
undergo a "cultural change" by making
on-time contributions on behalf of their
employees under the proposed National
Health Insurance scheme, with the plan's
advocates telling The Tribune that a
nationwide Information Technology (IT)
system will cut down fraud and eliminate
the need for a large bureaucracy.
Etoile Pinder, a health financing spe-
cialist with the National Health Insurance
(NHI) Implementation project, told The


vide mortgages to homeown-
ers.
Other parts of the invest-
ment include creating a Busi-
ness Centre in Abraham's Bay,
through providing shops and
rental facilities, and building a
shopping mall.
The credit union's.proposal
said: "The situation (in
Mayaguana) is likely to change
in the immediate future with
the developments proposed by
the I-Group of investors, to
whom the Government has giv-
en 'approval in principle'. It is
also anticipated, and certainly


expected, that the Teacher's
credit union would be given the
opportunity to partner in this
development."
However, a spokesman said
the credit union's Board was
disappointed, because instead
of having the red carpet rolled
out for them as with the I-
Group, the "carpet has been
pulled from underneath" them.
He claimed that several
scheduled meetings with Dr
Baltron Bethel, the Hotel Cor-
poration's managing director
and deputy chairman, and a
representative from the Min-


Tribune that companies would "have to
become used" under the NHI scheme to
paying contributions on behalf of employ-
ees on time, rather than three to four
months later.
"We need the money and we need it in a
timely fashion," she explained.
Under the current NHI proposals,
monthly contributions would be paidon 5.3 -


istry were all cancelled, and a
fixed date for the meeting has
yet to be given to the credit
union.
Speaking specifically about
the newly-heralded Domestic
Investment Board, the credit
union spokesman said: "I see
the Domestic Investment
Board as a non-entity, another
means of setting up red tape. If
you have institutions like this
union, the Bahamas Develop-
ment Bank, and BAIC, there is

SEE page 7B


per cent of an employee's earned wages.
This would be split 50/50 between the
employer and employee, with the latter
contributing 2.65 per cent of their own
salary, and the employer making a match-
ing contribution.

SEE page 10B


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006


as more than 50,000 shares
changed hands. The market
saw eight out of the 20 listed
stocks trade, of which one
advanced, three declined and


International Markets

FOREX Rates
Weekly %Change
CAD$ 1.1501 -0.26
GBP 1.7417 -0.13
EUR 1.1936 0.35

Commodities
Weekly %Change
Crude Oil $59.88 -3.17
Gold $554.00 -1.65

International Stock Market Indexes:
Weekly %Change
DJIA 11,115.32 1.80
S & P 500 1,287.24 1.60
NASDAQ 2,282.36 0.91
Nikkei 15,713.45 -3.35




Quality Auto Sales Ltd

PARTS DEPARTMENT

Will be CLOSED for

STOCKTAKING

MARCH 1 thru 4
(Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday)
We will re-open for business as usual on Monday, March 6.
We apologise to our valued customers and regret any
inconvenience this may cause. All other departments
will be open for business as usual.


QUALITYsale
O iUA LI LIMITED
East ShirleyStreet 323-3529/323-3709


four remained unchanged.
Volume leader for a second
consecutive week was Com-
monwealth Bank (CBL), with
34,615 shares changing hands
and accounting for 69 per cent
of the total shares traded.
The big advancer for the
week was also CBL, whose
share price increased by $0.19
to end the week at a new 52
week high of $9.29. On the
downside, J. S. Johnson Com-
pany's (JSJ) share price
declined by $0.35 to close at
$8.75.
The FINDEX advanced 0.47
points for the week to close at
595.28.
COMPANY NEWS
Kerzner International
(KZL) -
For the 2005 fourth quarter,
KZL posted net income of $7.1
million compared to $8.4 mil-


lion for the same period in
2004. However, on an adjusted
basis, net income was $13.2 mil-
lion compared to $9.7 million in
2004.
Revenues increased by $33
million or 23 per cent to total
$177 million, while costs and
expenses rose by $38 million
or 28 per cent to total $176 mil-
lion. Income from operations
stood at $1.2 million versus $6.3
million in 2004.
Atlantis, Paradise Island con-
tributed net revenue and
EBITDA in the 2004 fourth
quarter of $124.9 million and
$29.8 million, respectively, as
compared to $108 million and
$25.1 million, respectively, in
the same period in 2004.
The increase in net revenues
was driven mainly by gains in
food and beverage and casino
revenues, which rose by 23 per
cent and 22 per cent respec-
tively.


The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 595.28% YTD 7.84%


BISX CLOSING
SYMBOL PRICE


AML
BAB
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
CWCB
DHS
FAM
FCC
FCL
FIN
ICD
JSJ
KZLB
PRE


$0.70
$1.15
$0.70
$7.00
$10.48
$13.25
$1.26
$9.53
$9.29
$1.70
$10.95
$4.69
$2.79
$6.21
$1.15
$10.05
$10.95
$9.95
$8.75
$6.73
$10.00


CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
CHANGE


$-
$-0.02
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$0.19
$-
$-
$0.36
$-0.07
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-0 35
S$0.16
$-


1500
2000
0
0
0
0
0
0
34615
5304
0
.0
4200
0
0
1100
0
500
1000
0
0


-4.11%
4.55%
0.00%
0.00%
0.77%
3.92%
0.00%
-0.21%o
1.98%
3.66%
0.64%
8.31%
28.57%
2.64%
0.00%
-3.31%
0.46%
0.00%
-3.31%
-1.75%
0.00%


DITIDEND/AGM NOTES:
* ICD Utilities (ICD) declared a dividend of $0.135 per
share payable on February 1. 2i006. to all common share-
holders as at record date February 2. 2006.
* Commonwealth Bank (CBL) declared an extraordinary
dividend of $0.12 per share payable on April 28. 2006. to all
common shareholders as at record date Aprl 15, 2006.
* FOCOL Holdings % ill hold its Annual General Meeting
on February 23, 2006. at 10.30 am in its Board Room.
FOCOL Holdings Corporate Office. Queens Highvway.
Freeport. Grand Bahama.
* FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) will hold its
Annual General Meeting on February 26. 2006, at 6pm at
the British Colonial Hilton. Bay Street. Nassau. Bahamas.










^ ^ Bjthe news, read Ins~f^M "M |11 ight ---

^^^^ on Monday^siJlI^^


THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST IN
.* SCHOOL OF CONTINUING STUDIES g
COUNTRY CONFERENCE SERIES
June 8-9, 2006

CALL FOR PAPERS

BEYOND WALLS: MULTI-DISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES

The Bahamas Conference:
A multi-disciplinary conference focusing on issues relevant to
The Bahamas

INVITATION

The School of Continuing Studies has established a Country Conference Series focusing
on non-campus countries of the UWI system. The overall aim of the Country Conference
Series is to stimulate and highlight research in each country by academics in the country,
and scholars with interest in Caribbean studies.

OBJECTIVES

The Country Conference Series has the following objectives:

Increasing research on matters of relevance to the country
Enhancing the quality of public discourse on matters relevant to local development
Contributing in a stimulating manner to intellectual activity in the country
Expanding the quality and scope of the outreach programmes of UWI

The conference series would achieve its goal by bringing together scholars who have
a research interest in The Bahamas.

Submissions are invited from j'i bs with an interest in The Bahamas. Conference
presentations will be 20 minutes kong with 20 minutes for discussion. Submissions should
include:
A cover sheet containing the title of the paper, the author's (or authors') address
(email address/fax number), institution and a 25-word summary suitable for
publication in the conference programme
One page with a 250-word abstract of the paper
One page with a 50-word biography of each author

For further information, please contact Donna Nicolls at (242)323-6593, 424-4786 or e-
mail: uwibahamas@hotmail.com.

SEND SUBMISSIONS TO:


Ms. Simone Augier
School of Continuing Studies
University of the West Indies, Mona Jamaica
E-mail: mailto:saugier@uwimona.edu.jm


SUBMISSION DEADLINES:
Abstracts: March 3, 2006
Full Papers: April 21, 2006

The conference presentations are made available on the web following the conference and
the papers are edited and published for distribution.


Fax: 876-977-3443


-U SINESS


FIDELI~ITY M ARKET WRAP


* By Fidelity Capital
Markets
IT was another active trading
week in the Bahamian market


Appeal to


be heard


on $175m


development

THE Save Guana Cay Reef Association will today appeal
a Supreme Court decision that turned down their request
for discovery and cross-examination of witnesses in the
dispute over the $175 million Baker's Bay Golf & Ocean
Club development.
Both the developers, Discovery Land Company, and the
Government defendants the Prime Minister, Treasurer
and Cabinet Secretary Wendall Major had resisted
attempts by the Association and its attorney, Fred Smith,
to cross-examine their witnesses.
Mr Smith's application for an injunction against the
Crown and the developers, plus the discovery request and
permission to cross-examine witnesses, was refused by
Supreme Court Justice Carroll.
A0


VACANCY

The Airport Authority is seeking suitably qualified Bahamians
to fill the positions noted below:-

INSPECTOR- (SECURITY DIVISION)

The Inspector of Security is generally responsible for a shift
and is therefore required to effectively manage, motivate and
coordinate the regular deployment of staff as well as to assist
them in their professional development.

The successful applicant must therefore be self-motivated
with excellent communication and inter-personal skills, ten
(10) years working experience; the last five (5) at the
Supervisory level in addition to tertiary level academic
qualifications. Tertiary level qualifications and experience in
Police or Security related duties and investigations will be
considered an asset.

NETWORK ADMINISTRATOR

Applicants should possesses a Bachelor of Science Degree
in Computer Science or Computer Technology, a Microsoft
Certified Professional Certificate, proficiency in Computer
Software and a minimum of three (3) to five (5) years
experience in installing and maintaining Information Systems
Network.

Qualified Bahamians should submit their Resume, no later
than 24th February 2006 to the

Manager, Human Resources
The Airport Authority
Nassau International Airport
P.O. Box AP 59222
Nassau, Bahamas


I- I I










MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 3B


Consultants get







set to assess NHI







impact 'in next







three months'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A TEAM of foreign consul-
tants will arrive in the Bahamas
"in the next three months" to
assess the economic impact if
the proposed National Health
Insurance (NHI) plan is intro-
duced. The Tribune was told.'
Dr Stanley Lalta, the NHI
project manager, said:
"We have prepared a terms of
reference for a team to come in
and help us to look at all the
macroeconomic impacts from
the NHI. This is an important
part of the whole thing the
impact on employment, wages,
prices and savings."
He added that the consul-
tants would be brought in with-
in the next three months, once
their appointment was con-
firmed at the policy level.
Business groups and individ-
ual companies have long
expressed concerns about how
the proposed NHI would
impact the Bahamian econo-
my, viewing it as another tax
that would act as a drag on
both the economy and individ-
ual incomes.

Financing

Both Dr Lalta and Etolie
Pinder, a health financing spe-
cialist with the NHI imple-
mentation team, acknowledged


Realize


your


dreams


that the National Insurance
Board's (NIB) administrative
costs were still too high for the
NHI scheme to be feasible.

Proposed

The NIB is proposed as the
arm of government to collect
NHI contributions and admin-
ister the scheme, but its admin-
istrative costs for 2004 the last
year for which accounts were
available were 23 per cent of
contributions.
The NHI report said these
costs needed to be at least 10
per cent of revenues, or else
the proposed health care
financing scheme would "not
be feasible". In comparison,
administrative costs in the
Canadian and French social
health insurance systems were
less than 1 per cent of rev-
enues.
In response, Dr Lalta said
the Social Security Reform
Commission's recommenda-
tions on NIB reforms includ-
ed a series of targets aimed at
reducing its costs to 10 per cent
of revenue.
In addition, he said that the
NHI scheme "would buy incre-
mental services from the NIB",
meaning that no new offices
would be needed to adminis-
ter and collect contributions.
As a result, the NHI's costs
would be "much lower" than


the NIB's.
Critics of the proposed NHI
scheme have argued that the
economic assumptions under-
pinning it and cost estimates
are unrealistic, with the plan
unsustainable financially in the
long-term due to an increas-
ingly older Bahamian popula-
tion and rising healthcare costs.
Dr Lalta told The Tribune
that the costings had been
based on the Bahamian econo-
my achieving a 1.5-2 per cent
average per annum growth rate
over a 40-50 year period, some-
thing it had been able to
achieve historically.

Projected

He added that the NHI's
projected $235 million total
cost, it if had existed in 2005,
was just the recurrent costs of
healthcare. It did not include
capital spending on healthcare
infrastructure, the Govern-
ment's Budget allocation to
health care, or the administra-
tive costs of the public sector.
Many doctors and insurance
companies had queried the
$235 million figure as a gross
underestimate, arguing that the
truer cost of healthcare in the
Bahamas was nearer $400-$500
million.


SEE page 6B


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THE TRIBUNE


Rodney W. Braynen
F.I.B.A. B. Arch.


Phone No. (242) 393-1874
P.O. Box N-1423
Nassau, Bahamas


John W. Darville Phone No. (242) 394-2600
Dip. Arch., R.I.B.A., I.B.A. P.O. Box N-4556
Nassau, Bahamas
Amos J Ferguson Phone No. (242) 393-0079
F.I.B.A., AP.A. P.O. Box SS-6261
B. Arch., M. Arch Nassau, Bahamas


Gerald L. L. Higgs
B. Arch. Tech.

Anthony J Jervis, I.B.A.
B.E.D., B. Arch. M. Arch.

Alvan K. Rolle I.B.A.
B. Arch. Tech


Phone No. (242) 356-2740
P.O. Box N-570
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. (242) 323-2628
P.O. Box N-7273
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. (242) 326-8141
P.O. Box N-7401
Nassau, Bahamas


Douglas R A Smith, R.I.B.A. Phone No. (242) 394-2600
I.B.A., Dip. Arch., BSc., MSc. P.O. Box N-4556
Nassau, Bahamas
Gordon C Major, I.B.A. Phone No. (242) 357-8741
B. Arch. Tech P.O. Box N-3326
Nassau, Bahamas
Arthur Colebrooke, I.B.A. Phone No. (242) 322-4061
P.O. Box N-3745
Nassau, Bahamas
Jonathan AAdderley, IB.A. Phone No. .(242) 393-8893
B.E.D., Dip. Arch., M.A., P.U.G. P.O. Box N-9585
Nassau, Bahamas
Michael C Alexiou, I.B.A. Phone No. (242) 325-7363
B. Arch. PO. Box N-672
Nassau, Bahamas
Reginald W Armbrister, I.B.A.Phone No. (242) 323-3157
B. Arch. P. O. Box EE-16704
Nassau, Bahamas
Nell Behagg, R.I.B.A., I.B.A. Phone (242) 327-8109
Dip. Arch. P.O. Box CB-11187
Nassau, Bahamas
Gaetano A Bonamy, I.B.A. Phone No. (242) 367-2496
B. Arch. PO. Box AB-20676
Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Trevor Bridgewater, I.B.A. Phone No. (242) 394-0014
B.A., M. Arch P.. Box N-8244
Nassau, Bahamas
Victor R Cartwright, I.B.A. Phone No. (242) 324-1896
B. Arch. P.O. Box N-4383
Nassau, Bahamas
Winston G Jones, R.I.B.A. Phone No. (242) 325-1520
I.B.A., Dip. Arch. Dip U.D. PO. Box SS-5377
Nassau, Bahamas
Kenneth V Lam, R.I.BA., I.B.A. Phone No. (242) 326-2114
M.B.A. P.O. Box SS-5730
Nassau, Bahamas


IramtLewis, I.B.A.
B, Arch.


Phone No. (242) 363-1605
P.O. Box N-8688
Nassau, Bahamas


John L McKenzie, I.B.A. Phone No. (242) 393-8415
B. Arch. P.O. Box N-3356
Nassau, Bahamas
Clinton W Pearce Phone No. (242)424-1463
B. Arch. P.O. Box EE-17989
Nassau, Bahamas
Andrew 0 Sterling, R.I.B.A. A.I.A. Phone No. (242) 393-7883
B. Arch. P.O. Box SS-5399
Nassau, Bahamas
W Kevin Sweeting, I.B.A. Phone No. (242) 394-8150
B.A., B. Arch. P.O. Box N-3211
Nassau, Bahamas


Wellington Woods, I.B.A.
B. Arch.


Phone No. (242) 323-7042
P.O. Box350
Nassau, Bahamas


Benjamin M Albury Phone No. (242) 393-3552
B. Arch. P.O. Box N-1731
Nassau, Bahamas


Frederick D Albury
B. Arch.

Michael Foster, IB.A.
B.Sc., B. Arch.


Phone No. (242) 325-5916
P.O. Box N-1677
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. (242) 394-3385
P.O. Box N-1190
Nassau, Bahamas


Henry AHepbum, R.I.B.A.,A.I.A. Phone No. (242) 341-9389
B. Arch. M. Arch, M.U.P. P.O. Box N-248
Nassau, Bahamas


Sean R Mattews, R.I.B.A.
Dip. Arch

Chales J Moss
B. So. Arch.

Alicia CA Oxley, I.B.A.
B. Arch., M. Arch.

David S White
R. I.B,A., R.A.I.C

Daniel W J Davies, I.B.A.
Dip. Arch.

Douglas A Minns, I.B.A.


Phone No. (242) 356-4538
P.O. Box SS-19909
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. (242) 352-5204
P.O. Box F-41247
Freeport, Bahamas
Phone No. (242) 394-3251
P.O. Box CB-11836
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. (242) 324-1547
PO. Box N-1013
Nassau, Baharfas
Phone No. (242) 332-2012
P.O. Box EL-25056
Governor's Harbour,
Eleuthera
Phone No. (242) 394-4736
P.O. Box N-7936
Nassau, Bahamas


P. Barry Vanderpool, I.B.A. Phone No. (242) 356-7723
B. Arch., M. Urban Design P.O. Box N-3929
Nassau, Bahamas
R John Paine, R.A.I.A. Phone No. (242) 322-2945
B. Arch. P.O. Box CB-11499
Nassau, Bahamas
D Monty Knowles Phone No. (242) 326-2646
B. Arch. P.O. Box SS-19095
Nassau, Bahamas
Gerard P Brown, I.B.A. Phone No. (242) 377-0027
B. Arch. P.O. Box CB-13248
Nassau, Bahamas
Jackson L Bumside III, R.I.B.A. Phone No. (242) 394-1886
M. Arch. P.O. Box N-1207
Nassau, Bahamas


Larry Forbes
B. Arch.

Leslie Johnson, I.B.A.
B. Arch.

P Curtis Malone


Phone No. (242) 322-2021
P.O. Box SS-6351
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. (242) 393-8415
P.O. Box EE-15920
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. (242) 327-8045
PO. Box CB-12835
Nassau, Bahamas


Jason P Lorandos, I.B.A. Phone No. (242) 393-4372
B. Arch., M. Arch. P.O. Box CB-11275
Nassau, Bahamas
David K Griffiths, R.I.B.A. Phone No. (242) 559-7200
Dip. Arch. P.O. BoxF-40257
Freeport, Grand Bahama


Donald A Dean


Phone No. (242) 352-4835
P.O. Box F-41609
Freeport, Grand Bahama


Bruce LaFleur, A.P.A., A.I.A. Phone No. (242) 328-7240
B.Sc. Envln. Des, M. Arch. P.O. Box FH-14435
Nassau, Bahamas


Michael J. Moss, I.B.A.


Phone No. (242) 356-5913
P.O. Box N-7091
Nassau, Bahamas


Garth W Sawyer Phone No. (242) 346-0173
P.O. Box N-10882
Nassau, Bahamas


Enrique Roldan


Neville Bosfield
B. Arch.

Wesley G R Thompson


Leo D Ferguson


Timothy H Neill, R.I.B.A.
Dip. Arch.

John W McCardy, I.B.A.
B. Arch.

Alberto G Suighi, I.B.A.
Phd. Arch.

Hyacinth Allen
B. Arch.

Tyrone Burrows, I.B.A.
B. Arch.


Phone No. (242) 394-8396
P.O. Box N-1771
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. (242) 322-1900
P.O. Box SS-6351
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. (242) 557-3718
P.O. Box 29101
Exuma, Bahamas
Phone No. (242) 324-5566
P.O. Box SS-6261
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. (242) 366-3110
P.O. Box AB-20006
Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Phone No. (242) 332-2987
P.O. BoxEL-25078
Governor's Harbour,
Eleuthera
Phone No. (242) 327-2335
P.O. Box CB-13177
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. (242) 323-4991
P.O. Box N-966
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. (242) 382-0611
P.O. Box N-9876
Nasau, Bahamas


Dwight M Thompson, I.BA Phone No. (242) 327-3220
B.,Arh. P.O. Box CB-13826
Nassau, Bahamas
Jennifer A Saunders, .B.A. Phone No. (242) 327-1411
B. Arch. P.O. Box CB-12364
Nassau, Bahamas
Lvingston Forbes, I.B.A. Phone No. (242) 356-9738
B. Arch. PO. Box N-4230
Nassau, Bahamas
Hiram H Lockhart Phone NO. (242) 373-1257
Dip. Arch. Tech P.O. Box F42707
Freeport, Grand Bahama


Pier Baldaccl


Lawrence Chisholm


Phone No. (242) 323-4764
P.O. Box N-4574
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. (242) 356-6261
PO. Box N-9025
Nassau, Bahamas


Bruce M Stewart, I.BA,A.I.A. Phone No. (242) 323-8800
B.Arch. P.O. BoxN-336
Nassau, Bahamas


Michael A Diggis
B. Arch.


Phone No. (242)394-1886
P.O. Box N-1207
Nassau, Bahamas


Thomas M Dean Phone No. (242) 324-1170
B. Arch., M. Arch. P.O. Box N-540
Nassau, Bahamas


Dirk K Saunders
B. Arch.

Goodwin Cargll


Robert Whittingham


Stephen J Bain
B. Arh.

Jeremiah Moxey
B. Arch.

C Bemardo Deleveaux


Phone No. (242) 341-4197
P.O. Box CR-54122
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. (242) 356-0218
P.O. Box EE-16270
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone No. (242) 322-6591
P.O. Box CB-13846
Nassau. Bahamas

Phone No. (242) 356-6029
P.O.Box N-1008
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. (242) 341-4846
P.O. Box CR-54501
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. (242) 325-5103
P.O. Box GT-2277
Nassau, Bahamas


Lawrence C Smith Phone No. (242) 427-1565
P.O. Box N-1412
Nassau, Bahamas
Harold S Johnson Phone No. (242) 364-4694
B. Sc. Arch. Tech. P.O. Box N-9420
Nassau, Bahamas
Mark W Henderson, R.I.BA. Phone No. (242) 327-3274
B. Sc. B. Arch. P.O. Box CB-12436
Nassau, Bahamas
Kevin R Bryce Phone No. (242) 356-4538
B. Sc. Arch. Eng. PO. Box SS-19909
Nassau, Bahamas


Mark A Smith, I.B.A.
B. Arch., M.L.A.


Phone No. (242) 323-0486
P.O. Box SS-6888
Nassau, Bahamas


Copeland Moxey, I.B.A. Phone No. (242) 457-2107
B. Arch. P.O. Box CB-12689
Nassau, Bahamas


Carios J Hepbum. I.B.A.
B. Arch.

Timothy F Johnson
B. Arch.


Phone No. (242) 394-5166
P.O. Box CR-54090
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. (242) 364-7813
P.O. Box SS-6906
Nassau, Bahamas


Tariq J O'Brien Phone No. (242) 328-1705
B.A., Dip. Arch P.O. Box N-9116
Dip. Urban Design Nassau, Bahamas


Mark M Braithwaite
B. Arts, B. Arch.


Phone No. (242) 327-7259
P.O. Box CB-11454
Nassau, Bahamas


Stefan P Russell Phone No. (242) 341-4982
B. Arch. PO. Box CR-54423
Nassau, Bahamas.
Terry-Jeanne P Thompson Phone No. (242) 362-6306
B.E.D.S. P.O. Box N-402
Nassau, Bahamas.
Kesna M. Hunt Phone No. (242) 352-4835
B. Arch. P.O. Box F-43578
Freeport, Grand Bahama
lan Brent Creary Phone No. (242) 394-1886
B. Arch. P.O. Box N-3857
Nassau, Bahamas.


0 Samuel R. Williams
056 I

Registrar
8 February 2006


Phone No. (242) 393-1923
P.O. Box CR-54335
Nassau, Bahamas.


057


060


061

063


064

065


066

067


071


072


073


074

075


076


077

078


079


080


082


083

084


085


-087


088


089


090

091

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097

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099

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109


110


PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS BOARD
LICENSED ARCHITECTURAL TEChNICIANS
PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS ACT, 1994 ,
Public Notice is hereby given that the persons listed hereunder are licensed by the "Professional Architects Board"
to practice as Professional Architectural Technicians until January 31, 2007.
NA -C # : MD S .E-


Wayde C. Russell


Henry A. Delancy


Michael A. Jones


Laujin L. Knowles


Bertram Carey


Phone No. (242) 341-6144
P.O. Box CR-12976
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone'No. (242) 334-0485
Whymms Bight
Eleuthera, Bahamas
Phone No. (242) 325-0111
P.O. Box N-3049
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. (242) 337-0025
Mangrove Bush
Long Island, Bahamas
Tarpum Bay
Eleuthera, Bahamas


Ryan A. Archer Phone No. (242) 367-2001
B. Sc. Arch. Tech P.O. Box 579
Marsh Harbour, Abaco,


Livingston V. Evans


C. Jenkin Williams


Phone No. (242) 352-3558
P.O. Box F-40675
Freeport, Grand Bahama
Phone No. (242) 352-2500
P.O. Box F-44107
Freeport, Grand Bahama


T013


Lockhart W
Tumquest


Solomon J Smith


Phone No. (242) 337-1086
Queens Highway
Deadmand Cay, Long Island
Phone No. (242) 361-6517
P.O. Box N-10888
Nassau, Bahamas


Wilfred B Dorsett Phone No. (242) 324-5529
P.O. Box N-842
Nassau, Bahamas
Coralyn T Phone No. (242)341-1247
Addetrey-Dames P.O. Box GT-2315
Nassau, Bahamas


T027 Jermaine Evans

T028 Trevor Butterfield


T030 Brent Key


T032


Phone No. (242) 352-3365
P.O. Box F-60283
Freeport, Grand Bahama
Phone No. (242) 352-7154
P.O. Box F-44042
Freeport, Grand Bahama
Phone No. (242) 367-4143
P.O. Box AB-20702
Marsh Harbour
Abaco, Bahamas


T038


T045


T047


T049


T051


T053


T054


I Registrar
8 February 2006


PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS BOARD LICENSED ARCHITECTS
Commonwealth of The Bahamas
Established by Act of Parliment 1994
P.O. Box CB-13040, 143 Nassau Street, Nassau, Bahamas
The Professional Architects Act, 1994 empowers the "Professional Architects Board" to issue licenses to persons
qualified to practice as Professional Architects in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. The Act stipulates, "no person
shall hold himself out as a Professional Architect or engage in public practice unless he is the holder of a valid licence."
Any person who contravenes this provision is guilty of an offence and is liable on summary conviction to a fine,
imprisonment or both.
Public Notice is hereby given that only the persons listed hereunder are licensed by the "Professional Architects
Board" to practice as Professional Architects" in the Bahamas until January 31,2007.
NAME ADDRESS LICEN CE.# NAME'ADDRESS LCENCE


/ Debt Consolidation

w ith our / Furniture & Hurricane Shutters


HELP!









PAGE 4M YE


I


Bahamas hosts




KPMG Offshore




Group event


THE Board of Directors for KPMG's Off-
shore Group (TOG), a sub-region of KPMG
practices, held its board meeting in Nassau on *
February 13, 2006. The Board is made up of
senior partners from the KPMG practices in


Financial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information As Of:
17 February 2006
BISX LISTED S TRADED SECURITIES VISIT WWW.BISXBAHAMAS COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORrs1ATION
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,364.18 I CHG -01.44 1 %CHG -00.11 / YTD 13.47 / YTD % 01 00
S..--H, Swl*-L, 5. mrr,:, Pre ,ous Close Today s Ciase Grn1Cr. 5n2 l., '. l EPS DI. 1 : 1 E P..- -
0.730 0.70 .o r.larl.eta 0.70 0.70 0 00 -0 Ir.9 .i .: i rI I
10.52 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 10.48 10.48 0.00 1.456 0.360 7.2 3.44%
7.24 5.88 Bank of Bahamas 7.00 7.00 0.00 0.598 0.330 11.7 4.71%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.70 0.70 0.00 0.175 0.020 4.0 2.86%
1.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.26 1.26 0.00 0.105 0.060 12.0 4.76%
1.20 0.95 Fidelity Bank 1.15 1.15 0.00 0.070 0.040 16.7 3.42%
9.60 7.40 Cable Bahamas 9.53 9.53 0.00 0.689 0.240 13.8 2.52%
2.20 1.39 Colina Holdings 1.70 1.70 0.00 3.304 -0.067 0.000 NM 0.00%
9.29 7.60 Commonwealth Bank 9.25 9.29 0.04 7,500 0.861 0.450 10.8 4.84%
4.83 4-12 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.81 4.83 0.02 0.099 0.045 48.6 0.94%
2.88 1.45 Doctor's Hospital 2.79 2.79 0.00 0.437 0.000 6.5 0.00%
6.21 4.02 Famguard 6.21 6.21 0.00 0.542 0.240 11.5 3.86%
10.95 9.99 Finco 10.95 10.95 0.00 0.717 0.530 15.3 4.84%
11.00 7.50 FirstCaribbean 11.00 11.00 0.00 0.828 0.500 13.3 4.55%
10.05 7.95 Focol 10.05 10.05 0.00 1,100 0.833 0.500 12.1 4.98%
1.40 1.15 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 -0.162 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.20 9.60 ICD Utilities 9.95 9.95 0.00 500 0.526 0.405 18.9 5.43%
9.10 8.22 J. S. Johnson 9.10 8.75 ., -0.35 1.000 0.572 0.560 15.8 6.19%
7.00 5.30 Kerzner International BDRs 6.73 6.76 0.03 0.134 0.000 50.2 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.760 4.9 7.60%
Fi- ehit Over-Th--Coumner Securities
:..k-H. 52we -L.:., .,rr.c :I Bid Ask S Lar-t Pr..: .'.ekl ol EPSS D,- -.-il
? 2Ii 12.- 6 i.,armas .F-.-. af'.-.5 1325 14 25 1l1 '00) 1 317 '' '' -
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.044 0.000 NM 0.00%
Lollna Over-The-Countef Securities
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.75 13.75 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdinas 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
BISX Lisled Mutual Funds
'-..-r-H. 52l,.Lovw Fur r.P3 Na,.-_ NA V YTOL' Last 12 r.1M,,nilr s .. ;i
i _. 8 1 2085 C.:,lir. r.1 ,-,. r.1.,-i F..-.d 1 272793"
2.6262 2.0704 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.6262 *"
10.8183 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.8183"***
2.3241 2.1660 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.324145**
1 1442 1 0782 Colina Bond Fund 1.144217***
FIfIDEN CLOSE 595 28 I YTD 7 70.% /I 2005 26 0V
61 I.L -HARE INCDE K S I.: ; = 1 .:,.,:. :,, IELD laE 12 m.;r.lr. ,3i.de.-.3s al.ied v. .I:h-.. i: -
52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fldelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity)
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
- AS AT JAN. 31, 2006/ ".. AS AT NOV. 30, 2005
*- AS AT FEB 03. 2006/ AS AT JAN. 31. 2006/ ***" AS AT JAN. 31. 2006
TO TRADE CALL. COLINA 242-502-7010 / FIDELfTY 242.-',T.770 4


Bermuda, the Channel Islands, the Caymair
Islands, CARICOM, Isle of Man, the Bahamas
and Malta. It has overall responsibility to provide
high-level guidance and decisions on matters
affecting the sub-region.


BUSINESS MANAGER


NEEDED
One of our Firm's clients, a progressive law firm, requires
the services of a business manager. The qualified applicant
must possess experience working in a law firm along with a
working understanding of accounting. Excellent benefits are
available and all responses will be treated as confidential.'
Responses should be sent to the address below:
Paul Andy Gomez
Managing Partner
GRANT THORNTON
Chartered Accountants
P.O. Box N-8285
Nassau, N.P.,
The Bahamas
Fax No. (242) 322-7517
Email: pgomez@gtbahamas.com







An immediate opening is available for the position of:

-ACCOUNTS CLERK-

Applicants should posses the following qualities:


OJPMORGAN TRUST COMPANY
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED



Career Opportunityfor a

SENIOR FIDUCIARY OFFICER

Qualifications:

* LLB degree, Certified Public Accountant, or Bachelor's degree with
strong business analytical or legal components, ACIB/STEP or other
professional qualifications.
* 6 8 years in trust business or legal practice
* Proficiency in PC skills
* Fluency in Spanish and Portuguese an asset.

Personal Qualities

* Ability to work independently as a member of an integrated team
of bankers, investors and capital advisors
* Experience in client contact
* Ability to manage complex structures
* Knowledge of investment products
* Risk assessment and risk management skills
* Excellent leadership skills and ability to influence
* Results oriented
* Commitment to service excellence
* Strong organizational skills
* Effective written and oral communication skills.

J.P. Morgan Private Bank offers competitive compensation and
benefits packages. Interested applicants should submit their
resume/curriculum vitae marked "Private and Confidential" to
the Human Resources Manager, J.P. Morgan Trust Company
(Bahamas) Limited, P.O. Box N-4899, Nassau, Bahamas.


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Demonstrate the ability to multi task
Strong interpersonal skills and self motivated
Organized and detail oriented
Working knowledge of the following:
* Accounts Receivable
* Accounts Payable
* Payroll functions


Interested persons should possess the following
qualifications:

* An Associate Degree in Accounting and two years working
experience or equivalent
* Computer literate- proficient in Excel and Microsoft
Word, experience with ACCPAC a plus

Applicant should fax their resume to
394-8573 or email to burrows.suntee@batelnet.bs


2 /


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006


I








TI-l~ TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 5B


Campbell brings
e Campbel brings Established Bahamian Company

o t is seeking to fill the position of

contempt caseFinancial Controller
contemp cs Assistant Financial Controller

03 Oai -dbQU E -l.U t -1 -____________


FROM page 1B
his $7.10 estimate for the
additional per share value
that Phase III would gener-
ate for investors in Kerzner
International, did not include
the possible contribution
from the Residences at
Atlantis. That is the joint
venture with Turnberry
Associates on the $225 mil-
lion, 495-unit condo hotel.
Mr Klatzkin said Kerzner
International would still have
abput.90 acres available for
further expansion on Par-
adise Island once Phase III
was completed. This could
be; used for timeshare, con-
donminium and real estate
projects, with prices around
$'.5 million per acre.
-Mean\while, Mr Klatzkin
backed Kerzner Internation-
al' view that the $1.6 billion
redevelopment of Cable
Beach by Baha Mar Devel-
opment Company, in con-
junction with its partners
Star\wood and Harrah's,
would also benefit Atlantis.
He added: "We also
believe this project will prove
to be beneficial for the
Bahamas, and it should
result in more flights to the
Bahamas, currently a limiting
factor, and additional visitors
to Atlantis, as the Atlantis
expansion is set up to han-
dle outside visitors to use its
outside water park. Baha
Mar will add to the poten-
tial base of customers."
During a conference call
with Wall Street analysts,
Butch Kerzner, Kerzner
International's president,
said the company was "very
enthusiastic" about the Baha
Mar project.
He added: "Development
on Cable Beach is good for
the destination. The mord
things that happen in the
Biahamas, it's good for all of
u'. We consider it a very
good thing for the island."
Mr Klatzkin added that
Kerzner International also
had "a very strong chance"
of gaining a licence from the
Singapore government to
duild a casino on Sentosa
island.
SThis would be a "very
lucrative investment for
rerzner International, and
e Singapore authorities are
expected to make a decision
before the end of 2006. A
request for Proposal (RFP)
process is expected to begin
ii March.
A _________


4a5C1II ZI U LIVUP


FROM page 1B
cheque to their client after the Court of Appeal
ordered the CFG principals to pay the funds
"forthwith".
The $9 million was the final part of Mr Camp-
bell's $12.5 million pay-off, which represented
the valuation placed on his 45 per cent stake in
CFG. He was ousted in a bitter dispute with Mr
Alexiou and Mr Ferguson, the latter two owning
the remaining 55 per cent stake between them.
Although the $9 million was paid by cheque
just after the ruling was handed down from the
Court of Appeal on February 8, Mr Minns said
his client was still going ahead with the applica-
tion for committal for contempt of court.
He explained that in January, Justice Anita
Allen, who is now hearing the committal appli-
cation in the Supreme Court, ordered that $9
million be paid to Mr Campbell forthwith.
Mr Minns said the funds were not paid within
the required 21-day period, and it is his and Mr
Davis' contention before the court that Mr Alex-
iou and Mr Ferguson "willfully" did not follow
the court's order and should be held in con-
tempt.
Mr Alexiou and Mr Ferguson attempted to
appeal Justice Allen's ruling on the payment,
but the Court of Appeal rejected this. The latter
court also rejected their bid for a stay on exe-
cuting the judgement.
Neither of the two CFG principals was present
in court. Mr Alexiou's attorney, Colin Callender,
told the court his client had sent a letter, explain-
ing that he was out of town and would not be
returning until the beginning of next week.


Mr Davis asked for a warrant of arrest to be
issued against Mr Alexiou, because he should not
have left the jurisdiction, pending criminal pro-
ceedings.
Mr Callendei replied, suggesting that Mr Alex-
iou was sufficiently represented by him. How-
ever, Justice Allen pointed out that for criminal
proceedings, the defendant must appear before
the court.
Mr Ferguson's attorney, John Wilson of McK-
inney, Bancroft & Hughes, indicated that his
client was absent because he was told court was
to begin at 2pm.
Justice Allen said she had to reschedule the
session to 12pm on Friday at short notice, and
therefore would not move to place any penalties
against the defendants.
When court resumes on Thursday, the first
issue to be dealt with is for Justice Allen to
decide whether or not Mr Alexiou was proper-
ly served by a policeman, summoning him to
court.
Mr Davis brought a policeman to court, who
was prepared to take the stand and state that he
personally served Mr Alexiou, although the
defendant claims he was not served.
Also, on February 23, Mr Minns plans to have
Mr Alexiou put on the stand, to be cross-exam-
ined about information he submitted to the court
in an affidavit on February 15.
According to Mr Campbell's attorneys, the
court has three options. Justice Allen could
decide to commit the men to prison for a speci-
fied period, she could impose a fine, or she could
let the men go with a stern reprimand.


MEP


COORDINATOR/SUPERINTENDENT

We are looking for a MEP Coordinator/Superintendent for a mid rise luxury
condominium project now under construction on Paradise Island, Bahamas. This is a
one year contract assignment. The individual must have 5 to 10 years experience in a
similar field, proficient in the reading and interpretation of drawings, specifications and
construction Manager and will be responsible for the monitoring of Construction
Installation, Field Coordination, Problem Solving; Project Completion including Startup,
Testing, Commissioning and Acceptance. The candidate must be skilled in Microsoft
Office, Word, Excel and Project.


Please respond by email to:
Fax:
Mail to:



Delivery By Hand:


info@pbwlbahamas.com
242.363.1279
PBWL
P.O. Box SS-6386
Nassau, Bahamas

PBWL SECURITY MAIN GATE
Ocean Club DRIVE & Harbour Way
Paradise Island


The successful applicant should possess the
following minimum requirements:

Experience in all aspects of financial
accounting including inventory control

Proficient knowledge of accounting
principles and standards

Excellent computer skills

Good communication and management
skills

Duties will include:

Preparation of complete set of financial
statements

Management reporting

Budget preparation, business plans and
special projects, as assigned

Position will include regular travel to Family
Islands.

If interested, please send detailed resume and
cover letter to afcposition@yahoo.com.


NOTICE
IN THE ESTATE OF LAWSON ROLLE
late of Dew Gardens off Cow Pen Road in the
Southern District of the Island of New
Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Banamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having any
claim or demand against the above Estate are required
to send their names, addresses and particulars of the
same certified in writing to the undersigned on or
before the 10th .day of March, A.D., 2006 and if
required, to prove such debts or claims, or default be
excluded from any distribution; after the above date
the assets will be distributed having regard only to the
proved debts or claims of which the Executor shall
have had notice.

And Notice is hereby given that all persons indebted
to the said Estate are requested to make full settlement
on or before the 3rd day of March, A.D., 2006.

SYDBRI LEGAL SERVICES
Attorneys for the Executrix
245 Baillou Hill Road
P.O. Box EE-15075
Nassau, Bahamas


Dr. Sharon A. Thompson

Practice Relocation

Please join us in welcoming the latest
addition to our center of highly
qualified physicians in the
4in ihgsance Medical Building.

-Dr. S. Thompson received her Doctor
oi f'M&dicine degree from Howard
University College of Medicine in
SWashington, D. C.

She completed her Obstetrics and
Gynecology Residency at Rochester
General Hospital in Rochester, NY,
where she served as Chief Resident
from 2000 2001. Dr. Thompson is
American Board Certified in
Obstetrics and Gynecology and has
enjoyed serving her Bahamian
community since 2001. Her practice,
St. Elizabeth Women's Medical
Center, will be Opening January 30, 2006. She looks forward to continuing to
provide Individualized and Specialized Care for Women.

St. Elizabeth Women's Medical Center
155 Shirley Street (opposite Oriental Cleaners)
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 322-3831/323-7477
www.acog.org/member-lookup


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF B1 FUEL SUPPLY LINE -
GREEN TURTLE CAY, ABACO

Tender No. 588/05
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for
the supply, fabrication, installation and commissioning of a new 3" El fuel
supply line from the Government dock to the Green Turtle Cay Power Station
fuel bund facility.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Adrifinistration Office, Blue
Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-

Mrs Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-6852

Tender are to be hand-delivered on or before 03 MARCH 206 by 4:00 pm
and addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Mrs Delmeta Seymour
Marked: Tender No. 588/05
"B1 FUEL SUPPLY LINE G.T.C., ABACO"

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.


TkitF TRIBUNE


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 5B






THE TRIBUNE;
:" "l,-


PAGE 6B. MONDAY. FEBRUARY 20, 2006


companies were more recep-
tive to the costings.
In 2001, health care cost $343
million in total in the Bahamas,
and this was likely to have now
increased to $360-$370' million


Legal Notice

NOTICE


BIRMORE HOLDING CORP.
In Voluntary Liquidation


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, BIRMORE HOLDING CORP., is in dissolution
as of February 16th, 2006.

International Liquidator Services Limited situated
at 35A Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is
the Liquidator.


Liquidator




Legal Notice

NOTICE


FRIEDRUN PROPERTY S.A,
In Voluntary Liquidation


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, FRIEDRUN PROPERTY S.A., is in dissolution
as of February 16th, 2006.

InternationalLiquidator Services Limited situated
at 35A Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize Citj, Belize is
the Liquidator.


Liquidator




RBC
FINCO



NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #39, Blk#12,
Seabreeze Estates Subdivision situated in the Eastern District on the
Island of New Providence one of the islands of the Commowealth of
the Bahamas. Situated thereon is Vacant Land.

Property Size: 10,400 sq. ft. .

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked "Tender 1485". All offers must be
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 27th February, 2006.





RBC
FINMCO


NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Town House Apt #5,
Delaporte Condo situated in the Eastern District on the Island of New
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Situated thereon is a Condominium consisting of (2) Bedrooms, (1)
Bathroom.

Unit Size: 1,800 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked "Tender 9267". All offers must be
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 27th February, 2005.


per annum.
Ms Pinder said the Bahamas
was in the middle of a five-year
exercise to enhance its health
care system, with NIB financ-
ing something called the
Health Infrastructure Plan.
This included building a new
Rand Memorial Hospital in
Freeport, plus other clinics.
When questioned why NHI
was seen as the best option for
the Bahamas' healthcare
financing needs, when similar
systems in the UK and Canada
were experiencing long patient
waiting lists and lack of funds,
Dr Lalta said waiting lists had
always been an issue for the
UK.
He added that this was
linked to large, elderly popula-
tions that were common in
developed countries. In the
UK, the percentage of the pop-
ulation aged over 60, accord-
ing to the 2005 World Health
Organisation (WHO) report,
was 20.8 per cent, while for the
Bahamas it was 8.8 per cent.
However, the NHI's own
2004 study warned that the
number of Bahamians aged
over 65 would increase six-fold
over the next 60 years, growing
from 5.2 per cent of the popu-


..hssa mpo

0~T *' 0*1


lation in 2000 to 22 per cent by
2060.
Dr Lalta said the relatively
small population size in the
Bahamas, and capacity of the
public and private sector,
should combat the problem of
waiting lists under the NHI. In
addition, the Bahamas also had
the ability to send patients to
the US.
Dr Lalta added that NHI
was seen by the Blue Ribbon
Commission as the best option
for healthcare funding in the
Bahamas on both taxation and
equity ground.
He explained that because
personal incomes "seem to be
rising much faster than the abil-
ity of government revenue to
pump funds into the public sec-
tor", income tax was seen as
the best funding option.
This also brought equity with
it, as there would be a "sharing
of resources, pooling of risk"


Legal Notice

NOTICE


LULU BUSINESS LTD.
In Voluntary Liquidation


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, LULU BUSINESS LTD., is in dissolution as of
SFebruary 16th. 2006.

international Liquidator Services Limited situated
at 35A Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is
the Liquidator.


Liquidator




RBC
FINCO


NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #147, Garden
Hills Estates #1 situated in the Southern District on the Island of
New Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting
.of 3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms along with a 1-2 Bedrooms, 1
Bathroomm Apartment.
Property Size: 6,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 2,100 sq. ft.

'This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked "Tender 0735". All
offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday
27th February, 2006.



rURBC
FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #142, Garden Hills
Estates #1, situated in the South-western District on the Island of New
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Situated thereon is a Single Family residence consisting of (3) three
bedrooms, (2) two Bathrooms.

Property Size: 5,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,125 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked "Tender 9821". All offers must be
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 27th February, 2006.


with both high income and low
income persons contributing.
."Those that are better off
will share the cost with those
not so well off," Dr Lalta said.
You still have a large gap
between those in quintiles four
and five, and those in quintiles
one and two."
He acknowledged, though,
that the 5.3 per cent contribu-
tion rates to the NHI system
were not fixed, and might have
to be increased to cope with
any substantial rises in health-
care costs. Dr Lalta said this
was unlikely to happen for 30-
40 years.
Ms Pinder also acknowl-
edged that efficiency in the
public health system was "not
where it needs to be yet" for
the NHI scheme to be feasible.
She added that both the
Department of Public Health
and the Public Hospitals
Authority were implementing


information management sys-
tems to improve this.
While most would agree that
something needs to be done to
aid the poor and indigent with
healthcare funding costs, crirics
of the NHI proposal h've
argued it is not the best \vay i
go.
Other studies have included
the Catastrophic Health Inpur-
ance Fund idea that was Ildoed
at under the former FNM
administration. However,, this
was not looked at in detail by
the NHI Blue Ribbon Co.-,
mission. ,
Ms Pinder said nothing in
regard to the proposed NHI
plan was "set in stone", :and
there was no timeline for. it$
introduction. -n,:;
"We are trying to be as
broad-minded as possible and
not stuck in the :box,'-she
added. I- .,"!
Nevertheless, critics ofthe
NHI scheme are likely to
remain unconvinced of its mer-
its, with some branding it as
'too good to be true'. Others
believe it has only been resu-
citated by the Governmentdue
to the impending general elec-
tion next year, as it will appeal
to a number of voters.


Legal Notice

NOTICE


ALLEGRA OVERSEAS LTD.
In Voluntary Liquidation


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, ALLEGRA OVERSEAS LTD., is in dissoluti$
as of February 16th, 2006.

International Liquidator Services Limited situated
at 35A Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is-'
the Liquidator.


Liquidator





FINCO


NOTICE

RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 80, Corlet Roacd
situated in the Southern and Western Districts on the Island of New
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamasp
Situated thereon is a Duplex Apartment consisting of 1-2 two bedrooms
(2) bathrooms and 1- (2) Bedrooms, (1) Bathroom.
Property Size: 5,864 sq. ft. -
Building Size: 1,727 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgagi
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED,
, ,, -..:, ; 'iT w r:
All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau,
Bahamas and marked "Tender 0213". All offers must be received by the
close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 27th February, 20Q06;




RBC
FINCO


NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot 171, Twynam Heights
Subdivision situated in the Eastern District on the Island of New
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Situated thereon is a Single family Residence consisting of 3 Bedrooms,
2 Bathrooms.
Property Size: 10,149 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,517 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.i:

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,.
Nassau, Bahamas and marked "Tender 1494". All offers must be"
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 27th February, 2005.


FROM page 3B
But Dr Lalta said once the
methodology behind the $235
million had been explained,
two Bahamian health insurance


Consultants get set to assess NHI





impact 'in next three months'







MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE


Credit union




questions:




'Where's our




red carpet?'


FROM page 1B

no need for another board. It's
just another hurdle to put the
Bahamian through."
Nonetheless, the credit union
has, completed another fact-
finding mission to Mayaguana.
According to the credit union,
it was clear that extensive land
had been given to the I-Group,
and a significant amount of
acreage was now being cleared
to prepare for the develop-
ment.
In addition, the credit union
spokesman said roads were
being cleared in all three major
settlements Betsy's Bay,
Pirate's Well and Abraham's
Bay and almost all the beach-
front property appeared to
have been given to the devel-
opers.
The credit union said the sec-
ond visit was successful, in that
Mayaguana residents were
very receptive to its ideas,
designed to benefit all resi-
,dents.
On Friday, the credit union's
team returned from a third vis-
it. They have temporarily set
up office in a hotel room, as
residents were signing up to
join the union and looking for-
ward to having its proposals
implemented.
The credit union has $85 mil-


lion in assets to date, with near-
ly 10,000 registered members.
Its sister company, the
Teacher's Real Estate Hold-
ings Ltd, is reportedly doing
well for its second year in exis-
tence.
Through the Teacher's Real
Estate Holdings Ltd, the cred-
it union has invested in a shop-
ping complex on Harrold
Road, has another under con-
struction in Freeport, and is
seeking Town Planning
approval for a third on the east
side of Ridgeland Park.
The credit union would also
like to open a branch in
Mayaguana, not only to pro-
vide a savings scheme for resi-
dents there, but also to facili-
tate Bahamian entrepreneur-
ship by way of reasonable
loans, especially for tourism-
related services.-
"We are terribly concerned
about what the Heads of
Agreement with the I-Group
will entail," said the
spokesman. "It means Bahami-
ans will have to spend quite a
bit of money to purchase land
in and around the beautiful
beaches in Mayaguana.
"That is another reason why
the credit union is in there; so
those who want to buy prop-
erty before all is consumed by
the I-Group to build homes on


the waterfront, can do so
through the credit union."
The credit union is prepared
to invest about $3 to $6 million
over a period of five years.
"While the credit union is
unaware of the concessions giv-
en to the group, it is fair to
assume that under the Heads
of Agreement to be
announced, there will be the
grant of considerable Crown
Land to cause the proposal to
be successful," said the credit
union. "This, for all intents
and purposes, is standard oper-
ating procedure. A modus
operandi and provision we
believe are also available to
Bahamian companies willing
to take advantage of such con-
cessions.
"As a part of the lessons
learned from previous Heads
of Agreements, we are not
aware -that any Bahamian
counterparts have been given
concessions, nor were they
invited to provide concessions
for the communities which
might not have been part of
the agreement which, when put
in place, would have trans-
formed those communities to
the point where Bahamians
could own and operate many
of the local businesses along-
side their foreign counter-
parts."


CONSTRUCTION SUPERINTENDENT

We require a superintendents) for a mid-rise luxury condominium project now under
construction on Paradise Island, Bahamas. This is a one year contract assignment. The
applicants must have a minimum of 5 to 10 years experience in similar construction.
The successful candidate must be capable of coordinating the activities of the various
trade groups, be proficient in the reading and interpretation of all drawings and specification.
Responsibilities will include communication with trades and suppliers; ensuring schedule
compliance, inspection of material and equipment delivered and to be installed are in
accordance with drawings and specifications. Skilled in the Microsoft Word, Excel and
Project is an asset. Demonstrated leadership ability is essential. The superintendent will
report directly to the Construction Manager.,


Please respond by email to:
Fax:
Mail to:



Delivery By Hand:


info@pbwlbiahamas.com--
242.363.1279
PBWL
P.O. Box SS-6386
Nassau, Bahamas

PBWL SECURITY MAIN GATE
Ocean Club DRIVE & Harbour Way
Paradise Island


FROM page 1B


Hotel and Allied Industries Pension fund and its
equivalent for managerial staff will' effectively,
be. sat around the negotiating table.
Thus when a sale is agreed, the parties
involved (buyer and seller) will have to come to
Fan arrangement where the funds owed to the
two pension funds totalling in the millions of
*dollars are paid in full. However, the issue will
?not impede the sale.
The Tribune understands that Lehman Broth-
rs'-private equity arm, which is the Royal
Oasis's financial backer and de facto owner, is
looking for about $45 million for the property
,once its insurance claim dating back to the
S2004 hurricane season is settled.
That has been embroiled in US court pro-


ceedings, but is said to be near a resolution.
- The action by the hotel pension funds the lat-
est headache for Lehman Brothers. Driftwood
(Freeport), and its affiliates, which act as the
holding companies for the Royal Oasis and its
casino, have also been served with a demand
for payment by Grand Bahama Power Compa-
ny. The latter is owed at least $500,000 by the
Royal Oasis, whose holding companies were
given 21 days to pay up. That deadline is fast
approaching, and failure to meet it could see
Grand Bahama Power Company petition the
court to appoint a receiver/liquidator for the
Royal Oasis.
If this happened, it would complicate Lehman
Brothers efforts to sell the resort.


PRCEWATERHOUSCOOPERS


Position of General Manager


One of our clients involved in the retail business is seeking an energetic experienced
General Manager for their Freeport, Grand Bahamas operations. Interested candidates
should have a proven track record of accomplishments and a desire to advance a chain of
Drug/Convenience Stores and Perfume stores into a new era of growth and development.

,4The qualified candidate must have a minimum of five (5) years hands on experience in
multiple store management, preferably in convenience and perfume store retailing and
,.willreport to the Chief Operations Officer. The General Manager will be directly
Responsible for the stores' management teams and he or she will lead them in the delivery
'of high standards of customer satisfaction, achievement of aggressive sales targets and to
'drive the profitability of the business.

Proven track records in inventory control, merchandising and excellent communication
skills, are essentials the individual must posses. The ability to effectively provide a level
of customer service that exceeds customer expectations, and the expertise to train and
motivate sales staff in exceeding company sales targets are also a must.

An excellent remuneration and benefits package is offered, including generous
performance bonuses, medical, dental, and life insurance.

Interested candidates should submit their resumes to either of the addresses provided
below (by hand or mail) no later than Wednesday, February 22, 2006.


Resident Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
Regent Centre East Suite A
P.O. Box F- 42682
Freeport, Grand Bahama
The Bahamas


Human Resource Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
OR East Hill Street
P.O. Box N- 3910
Nassau, The Bahamas


Re: GM


Re: GM


BAHAMIANS NEED ONLY APPLY


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS


TENDER FOR THE RENOVATION AND UPGRADE
OF OFFICE BUILDING CENTRAL ANDROS
Tender No. 595/06

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders to undertake
the renovation and upgrade of its office building at Fresh Creek, Central Andros.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office, Blue Hill &
Tucker Roads by contacting:-

Mrs Delmeta Seymoubt-,
Administrative Officdil I
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 24 February 2006 by 4:00pm and addressed
as follows:

The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 595/06

"RENOVATION & UPGRADE OFFICE BUILDING CENTRAL ANDROS"

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.


BUSINESS








PAGE 8B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006- THEiF


THE


SOLLtEGE


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SPED 900 Introduction To Learning Disabilities- $84 SPED 903 Strategies and interventions I- $168
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PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
CERTIFICATE IN LAW
This programme is offered in conjunction with The Institute of Legal Executives ilexX), Bedford, England.
ILEX qualification routes are vocationally relevant and designed to build and test legal knowledge and understanding at the paralegal level.
Designed to facilitate the training and educational needs of Legal Secretaries, Legal Clerks, Legal Office Managers, Law Enforcement Officers,
Special Assistants to Lawyers, Justices of The Peace, and all persons interested in acquiring an impressive array of legal office skills, the
Certificate in Law qualification is specifically relevant to The Bahamas legal system. Courses include:
TERM 1 TERM 2
WRS 9O Writing and Research Skills -$350' ETH~T7 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250 LAW 900
The Legal Environment -$600.00 LAW 901 General Legal Principles-$600.00
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
TERM 3 (Options- choose one) -"
-NB.Options are subject to cha
LAW 903 Company Law LAW 906 Law of Mortgages
LAW 905 Employment Law LAW 908 Work of The Magistrate's Court
LAW 907 Nature and Role of Criminal Law
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
PREREQUISITE: AA Degree and 3 years work experience; COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am 12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
THE BECKER CPA REVIEW
The College of The Bahamas is pleased to offer the New CPA Computer Based Test (CBT). Besides the obvious transition from a pencil-laid-
paper exam to a computer-based test, the revised CPA Exam will also contain a new content focus broadening the scope of audiiand attest
areas and incorporating the assessment of critical skills, such as research and communication. The new exam also has increased ephasis'on .
general business knowledge and information technology.
CPA 900 Financial Reporting- $650 CPA 901 Accounting & Reporting/Regulation- $520
CPA 902 Law/Business Law- $465 CPA 903 Auditing/Auditing and Attestation- $465
Prerequisite: A BA Degree from an accredited or recognized college/university in any discipline with at least 21 credits hours in titolitit .
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:30am 5:30pm Duration: 12 Weeks (.?:
CERTIFICATION IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT li.ki;.:t
Offered in conjunction with Columbia Southern University, Orange Beach, Alabama, this nine months programme is designed for those
individuals seeking professional development and aspiring to rise through the ranks in the HR field.
TERM 1 TERM 2
WRS~W0 Writing and Research Skills- $350 ET Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250
HRM 900 Intro To HRM Environment- $200 HRM 902 H/R Development & Training-$200 10 1
HRM 901 Securing Human Resources- $200 HRM 903 Rewards Compensation and Benefits-$300
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100 .
TERM 3
RM Labour Management Relations- $300
HRM 905 Protecting and Evaluating Human Resources- $300
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210


CATION & EXTENSION SERVICES
PREREQUISITE: A BA Degree in any discipline from an accredited or recognized college/university or a minimum of 5 years as a manager,
supervisor or trainer; COMP956 Introduction To Cnmputerq. Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall. Dayf/ime: Sai iam-12.15pm Duration: 3 TERMS '
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME IN SUPERVISORY MANAGEMENT ,
Supervisors with cutting edge skills know how to iccomplih dilTruili ij-ks. saltc complir ied problems and mater challenges in decsibr'
making. This programme is aimed at supervisors arid middic managers i .h h,: sih i.. sudale hr ir super iory skills, or persons who hajt belt..
promotedand wish to gain additional insight into tte world o1 ,uperiwsmr managmnient This progrimmre enials esential training for per D hLb
wishing to:become an associate manager.
TERM 1 TERM 2 N,,-
CPM 900Personal Skills- $500 SUFPV 900 Supri-. iory Managemeni (SUPV I $500
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 ETHC~1.O Eihils and Prol Repopsibilit)- $250
CPS 901 Accounts- $300 CPM 90)3 Proifcional D:,elopmren Seminar- S100
TERM 3
CPM902 Interpersonal Skills- $600 '
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210 ,
PREREQUISITE: 3 or more ears s-\perience J Super' I.r.l'Malrn:er or Trerier and an A Degfee in any discipline'from a recognized -
or accredited institution; COMP956 Introduction To Compute rs. Windo,, and The Inicrr.ei
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sa1 8am-12pm Duration: 3 TERM S
CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL SECRETARY REV IEW PROG RA MME
The Certified Professional Secretary (CPS) Review. offered in conjuncton nih The Internmional As-ociaion ol Administain\e Professiioal .
(IAAP) is a 9 month course of study designed to prepare administrauLe professionals and clerical ajsistahis lo wrte the CPS international
exam.
TERM 1 TERM 2
CPS 901 Accounts- $300 CPS 906 Human Resources- 301.
CPS 909 Business Communication- $300 CPS 911 Records Manpgement- 200


CPM 003 Profes-ional'De\dlrpmeni Seminar- $100 .
TERM 3 OPT IONA L COURSES
CPS6 Office Technology- $500 WRS 900 \ nung and Research Skilkl- $350 Spnng CPS 910
Managing Physical Resources- $200 ETHCU0l) Eihics and Prof Responsibility- 250 ISummeri
CPM 903 Profeqional Development Seminar- $210
PREREQUISITE: J yrs Expenence or an AA Degrcee3 'rs Expenerce.or a B A. Degree,apd OE\perience:
COMP956 Introduction To Computers. W\ndo-s and The Iniemer
Begins: Spring and Fall Dayffime: Sat Sam-lpm Duration 3 TERMS
JOURNEYMlAN PLUMBING LICENSE
The lourrie.man Plumbing course is designed to assist sudenis prpa to write the Journeyman Plumbing Examinaion. Topics include:
inierprclanon of codes, dispiv)al and drainage ssiems. .Iorin drainage disprosi sy',tem, instiallatiorn of anlrar fi\rures. basic drawings to
,cale, taier supply and disinbution. use of maicrnal and Ioils, repaLir and mnainenancie The e\amtiar(ion is offered in conjunction t inh The
Miin isr of Public Works At the end of the course. candidates are.requited'to take one I I Professionbl Development. Seminar.
TERM I" TERM 2 IOptioial.) -
TPLiY, Joume mN n Plumbing. $ SteN SUP\ q00 Super, iory Management. $50(,
ETHC900 Ethic anrd Prol Responsibili\- $i250 ISt'P900 is aaadable for Plan/Plumbming 5upenrvisr I
SCPMN 903, Profes&ional Development Seminar- $100
PREREQUISITE: Studenb should hj e working knowledgeand skills inlhe folloWing areas- inlrpretation of codes. disposal and drainage
s,stemi. storm drainage disposal sytenms. inslallion ol sanitary lti\res. bask draoini.10to iscle, tjier supply and distribution, use o0
matenal, nd lolok. repaii and maimenlane., ,L~ .. .44,,..,
Be ':Fanl Daym: Tuesday 6pm Duration: TERMS
;NiV ER PLUMBING LICENSE' i
Th Master Plumbing course is designed to aJist siudenis preparing to vnte the Mahter Plumbing Examinajtin Siudeni shouldd hate above ,
,avqtRae owledge and skills m the fllo. ng areas interpretalton of codes, disposal and'dririage s\ siems. storm drainage disposal s stems.
n f bamu.ar) lixtures. basic drawings to scale; I tl) a.1,d stributi ou of ma1naJl .and tools. repair and maintenance.
,li1Fephhisti will be placed on plant manrra enni aind'renlli espbsibilltes. '. "
TER 3 TERM 2 tOptional
NPLMNii) Master Plumbing-. S) ,. CPM 903 Polessionrl Deelopnmeri Seminar. $100
ETHC9 .N Ethics and Pri o Rcsponsibilhy- $20 i SLIP\' 900 Super iort ManagemTent. $5J(J
ISL'PI 900. .ilrablh l'r Plant Plimbinmg Spfrn'risris I
PREREQUISITE: Students should ha\ working kno ledge and skills in the following areas inerpreialion ol codes. disposal and drainage
,st'ems. ltorm drainage disposal s\ s!ems. Installation of jsnitary filures. basic drawing to scale. afterr suppl) and dilinbution, useo '.
malcnal anrd took, repairs and mainlteance
Begins: Fall Da)/Time: Tuesda\s 6pm 9pm Duration: I TERM
N E ACCOUNTING FOR'NONFAPT p N. AGERSS .
ko si desi jrcngihcn the candidates understanding o ul.m a a'.iii.urdifig. an 1ail.acdounting concepts, principles
Vanfit unsn afe i)ilmain topics covered The dbtltll 10 pripare and accuraiel\ read a fitincial statemeniusp(eadsheei is an essenital 41 il
o0r all pr..,fe ional; and p.apf',isional. CPSll coacra in ri \er) .ludem fre'ndi:, aJ.' cjt). to urdderiand o : umple, teai aid the iudenl.s'-
learning .penernc Thhis ouise ajlo help- Io priepre candlidaies l to uni e\lemal e sminaions ..
CPS o01 Accounti- $ 3110
PREREQUISITE: None .,l
BEGINS: Per demand Day/Time: Sat/Thur,/iue. Srm-r-1.1.5pm OR 6pm 9pm Duration: 10 Weeks
ETHICS AND PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY
This course examines guidelines for the professional beha' vr ol members of da, organiiaiiinn A selei group of codes of ethics and ethir-.
cases will be explored to support a theoretical and praciit.al discouie on a h\ Ihe appl, .anon iof ih,. and protessiorial iesponsihilily r
important in all aspects of society. ,..
ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250 ..-
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Compuler,. \Windo and The Itr.iemeti
Begins: Pei demand Day/Time: Sat. Sam-lI 'noon. OR Thurr.Tie 6pm 9 9pm Duration: 8 Weeks
WRITING & RESEARCH SKILLS
Thiscourse is designed to provide mature students %ith reading, writing, research and critical thinking skills to prepare them for
into CEES' professional development programmes. WRS 900 1 also siruciured to pro idc cenilficalion candidaict ith the skills neces
to successfully write position and research papers.
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills $350
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Compaiers. Windows s and The Inrlmet
Begins: Per demand Day/Time: Sat.- s8m-I 2noon or Thursday/Tue- 6pm 9pm Duration. 8 Weeks
INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS. WINDOWS & THE INTERNET
This workshop provides a broad foundation for students thai they u ill haie a greater awareness and confidence using personal compu
Students will gain practical information and skills, such as shai a computer i,. ho% to manage personal files and folders that they create. ,
COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and7The Inemel.n $2 01
PREREQUISITE: None
Begins: Summer, Spring & Fall Day/Time: Sat sanm- 12rion Duration, 3 Weeks ,"
APPLICANTS FOR INTERNATIONAL CERTIFICATION COURSES AND PROGRAMNI
All students applying for International Certification Courses and Programmes thai are offered in conjunction wiih foreign institution .
requ'redlto contact the CEES Office for information on e\lemal application and esaiinalion fees'
Telephone (242) 325-5714/328-00931328-1936 Fax: 1242) 322-2712 ,

OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION
FEES ,
1. COB Registration................. ... $ -1. 111 tonc-ume feei l
2. Insurance.......................... ........ ...25 i alid for I ear I ..
3. ID Card...................................... 25 0 lone lime ee ,
4. Technology Fee..................... .... $75 ,' ,
5. Books............................................... Please coniaci COB Bookstore for pnces -, ,
6. Awards Ceremony................................ $150.$li.U must be paid by the 2.. TERMPI
7. External Application Fees..................... Please check with the CEESOffice r formation.
ESSENTIAL COMPUTER KNOWLEDGE: Effectise Summer V265. basit computer and Inlemerl Islls %ill be required of all students,. ,
Assessment for exemption from COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet s ill lb done ia proof of a certiicte..
from an authorized provider or by taking a prescribed computer skills Iesi to ~.nr ci.ompeiency in Wmdo s and.Computers. Students I'all s '
the competency test will be required to take the Introduciior. To The internet. Windows a rd Computer,.;Trli WMrkslop is a .rere te.
for all programmes or single courses. ..:
Workshop Title: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windo, > and The Inlemei
Tuition: $200 Duration 2 Days
Day: Saturdays: 12noon 3pm (5 contact hours per dayit .,.-,.'. 4.. 'i dtip mg,.Su a r r
ADVISEMENT & REGISTRATION SESSIONS
Please bring the following items with you to the advisement/registration session:
.The first four pages of your Passport
Copies of your certificates/licensures and college/university transcripts
Where applicable, letters of recommendation, job description, special awards, etc. ; .
OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION ;.
I. No entrance examination is required for enrollment iih.prd'ifsig alnaI .delelntcoursespmganmes 1
2 Tuiion is charged per term, i.e you will be billed only orcourtes oTereail I 1current term. .
3 Non-Bahamians add $i0 Ioeachcomure/lorkshop/senrinar: . '. '. .
4 .Remember to .obain from the Programme (o i r.l er foralkrequired textooks
5 At ihe first cljs session. ALL students must sltlrmi.tp et Programnl p'qordinator one copy each
of his/her stamped receipts representing pa meant for tuition. fec'sipokss for the current term.
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND. RE-fEiEkTIFICATrON SEMINARS
4 compulsory professional development ,emmar is olered for all candidates enrolled in professional development programmes. Seminars:m
and nril stops address imporani issues thai are %iual to the adult students learning expenence Enrollment isalso open to the general public.': .
This Semmar is. also designed 1, facilitte continuing education unns for professionals applying (or re-cenificariol in their respecliie dijcipliies.
Srade noare retquNrd only 10 take ONE Professional DeIelopme'Seminar. '.Effectise FAi'2005, heFee for the Professional Developmentr
SSiemifnar will be :2 10
THE ANNUAL AWARDS CEREMOhS i Iw :
iThe niNual Aards Ceremony and reception is normally held at The l sh.Colooig.Hilton jotel.once during the TERM 3 Adult students
s 'e; t II completing programme, and courses are awarded cernficais. cernifiaions and/or licensur"e. '

Secure Yo eat By Enrollir today!
S.-Ctact The CentreP eW= li,R*.CpIlnpus or
:' Call (242) 325-5714/328-0093/328-1936 Fax: (242) 322-2712
S Fees May Be Paid By Cash, CreditCard, boJAI Cheque To: The College of The Bahamas, Business Offic&'
Cees Reserves The Right To Change Tulton. Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule And Course Materials i
: .... .:.-


_ _I s








BEN BUINES MODY FERUR 20, 206 PAG 9B


..L HE


AHA J


''C
., rP~


.bedu.bs


EDUCATINg TRAINING B.


COURSE SEC COURSE DESCRIPTION TIME DAY START DUR FEE
ACCT
ACCA900 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS I 6:00-8:00pm Mon/wed 20-Feb 10 weeks $250
ACCA901 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II 6:00-8:00pm M/Wed 20-Feb 10 weeks $275
ACCA902 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS III. 6:00-8:00pm Tue/Thur 21-Feb 10 weeks $300
BUS. 1
BUSI900 01 CREDIT & COLLECTIONS I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 8 Weeks $225
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER f 1 Day $170
CUST900 01 SERVICE W/S 9:30am-4:30o pm Thur 23-Feb
UlS904 01 INTRODUCTION TO BUS. I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
COMP .....
COMP901 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 6:00-9:00pm Mon 0-Feb 12 Weeks .$450
COMP901 02 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 10am-1:00pm -Sat 18-Feb 12 Weeks $450
COMP901 03 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 4:00-5:30pm Mon/Wed 20-Feb 12 Weeks $450
COMP902 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 11 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb 12 Weeks j$550
COMP903. 01 INFORMATION TECH. I 6:00-9:00pm iWed 22-Feb 12 Weeks $450
COMP 941 01 QUICKBOOKS 6:00-9:00pm tTue 28-Feb 6 weeks i$330
COMP953 01 .PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR 6:00-7:30pm Tue/Thur 21-Feb 12 Weeks 1$450
EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT I 1 Day $160
COMP960 01 W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thur 9-Mar
WEB PAGE DESIGN 2 Days $550
COMP930 01 WORKSHOP 9:30am-4:30pm Thur/Fri 2-Mar
Upgrade Repair and 1 Day $250
COMP923 01 Troubleshoot Your PC W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thur 9 Mar
COSM
COSMB02 01 MAKE-UP APPLICATION 6:00-9:00pm Mon 27-Feb 8 Weeks 1$225
COSM804 01 MANICURE & PEDICURE 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 8 Weeks i$225
COSM807 01 NAIL ART TECHNICIAN 6:00-9:00pm Mon/Thur 27-Feb 5 weeks $500
DeCOR... -. ....... .
DECO800 01 INTERIOR DECORATING I 6:00-9:00pm Wed 22-Feb 8 weeks $225
DECO801 01 INTERIOR DECORATING II 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 8 weeks $250
FLOR800 01 FLORAL DESIGN I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
FLOR801 01 FLORAL DESIGN II 6:00-9:00pm Mon 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
FLOR802 01 FLORAL DE GN 111' 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb 10 weeks 1$275
ENGLISH I
ENG 900 .: 1 EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 8 Weeks $225
ESL 900 01 ENGLISH AS A SECOND'LANG 6:00-9:00pm Mon/Fri 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
HEALTH .
FITNESS
MASSAGE THERAPY : $465
MASG900 01 ESSENTIALS ,, 6:00-9:00pm Mon 27-Feb 10weeks
MASSAGE THERAPY : $620
MASG9O1 01 ESSENTIALS II 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb 10 weeks
GROUP FITNESS $400
HLTH800 01 INSTRUCTOR 6:00-9:00PM Thur 23 Feb 10 Weeks
LANG
CRE 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE I 6:00-7:30pm [Tue/Thur 28-Feb 10 weeks i$225
CRE 901 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE II 6:00-7:30pm Mon/WVed 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
SPA 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I 6:00-7:30pm Tue/Thur 28-Feb 10 weeks 1$225
SPA 901 01 CONV. SPANISH lI 6:00-7:30pm Mon/Thur 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
FRE 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I 6:00-7:30PM Mon/Wed 27 Feb 10 Weeks $225
HUMAN RESOURCE $250
MGMT900 01 MANAEM 6:00-9.00pm Thur 23-Feb 12 Weeks
HUMAN RESQURCE ... 12 Weeks $300
MGMT901 01 MANAGEMENT II .. i 6:00-9:00pm Mon 20-Feb
HUMAN RESOURCE 2 Days $350
MGMT902 01 MANAGEMENT W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thur/Fri 2-Mar
MEDICAL
MEDT900 01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 6:00-9:Opm Thur 23-Feb 10 weeks $225
SEWING
SEWoo 8 01 CUTTING I 6:00-9:00pm Mon 27-Feb
BASIC OF FREEHAND 10 weeks $250
SEW.802 01 CUTTING II 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb
SEW405 01 DRAPERY MAKING I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 10 weeks 1$225
SEWbW6 01 DRAPERY MAKING II 6:00-9:00pm Wed 22-Feb I10weeks 1$250
SEW,811 01 UPHOLSTERY MAKING I 6:00-9:00pm Wed 22-Feb 10 weeks $225i
E4uIi'S: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/-328-1936 or
email Al es,are included with the exception of the application fee of-$40.00 (one time) .
When submittjtg application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport.
CEES reserves the iight to change Tuition, Fees, CourseGonitent, Course Schedule and Course
Materials


Prospective Appicants


Master's Dgr
IPrograrimi


m.niy Childhood and Elementary
Teaching
I School Counselling
S' Special Education
and
SEduca lIonal Administration


Appllcations I -i ir,- ir:., .1 .: ".r-.,-,
:,rc now availiblo I
Ihz (Graduale Programmeb Ofikco
MIchael Hartley Eldun Coniplex
T : ,,., , L-I ,J


In collaborarten
with


KENT A lAL.




SOCIAL SCIENCES
FORUM
Social Issues 219
presents a lively forum concerning the
current D+ average of our National
Exam Scores. Learn about the factors
responsible for students'.poor
performance and the proposed solutions
to this growing deficiency.
Wednesday Feb 22, 2006 at 6pm
Room 8, Bahamas Tourism
Training Centre, Thompson Blvd.
GUEST SPEAKERS
SIda Poitier-Turnquest
Pres of The Bahamas Unioniof teachers.
Dressler Sherm'aitr
Pres of The Bahamas Principals Association
Latasha Sherman-Young
COB Psychology Major


COB

Band Festival




Call Dr. Bondurant
at 302-4508 to register!

Open to everyone in the
community all schools all
bands come and learn, have
fun and network with
international musicians as well!

Scholarships available!









(049




is ot*oring.


I~irrrCIL~Ybb~eBaB


10 th Gr&"Ust


_ dlL IL I r II I I
-I I ?I I I, s I-I c II -~ '


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 9B


RUN31E BUSINESS







PATDL~~~~~ ~~~~ ~ lOMNAFBUR 2,20 H RBN


T


U- V *Uw U *WrI
F-i,!MT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, NATASHA DEAN, of
the Fire Trail Road, Nassau, Bahamas,'intend to change
my name to NATASHA CAMPBELL. If There are any
objectiors to this change of name by Deed Pollyou may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of publication of this notice.


FOR SALE

AS 400 E SERVER

-%r L'' CE PARITY PROTECTION-ALL
-V.24/EIA232 20FT. PCI CABLE
-OPERATIONS CONSOLE PCI CABLE
-4317 LOAD SOURCE SPECIFY
!125V 14-FT. LINE CORD
-INTERACTIVE CAPACITY CARD
-MODEL 270 PROCESSOR
-PCI RAID DISK UNIT CTLR
-ENGLISH
-256MB MAIN STORAGE
-8.58GB 10K RPM DISK UNIT
-CD-ROM
-16GB 1/4-INCH CARTRIDGE TAPE
-PCI WAN IOA
-PCI TWINAXIAL WORKSTN IOA
-PCI 100/10MBPS ETHERNET IOA
-TSP SPECIFY CODE
-SOFTWARE VERSION V5R1
-ALT IPL SPECIFY FOR 16GB
-SYS. CONSOLE ON OP. CONSOLE

Sf1iD SEALED BIDS TO BAHAMAS
DEVELOPMENT BANK, P.O. BOX N-3034,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS NO LATER THAN
.r CH 3, 2006.


COl'.; 1 i HEALTHH OF THE BAHAMAS
2005/CLE/equi/001137
IN THE SUPREME COURT
SEqiry Side
IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land
containing Ten (10) acres situate in the vicinity of the Settlement of
Kemp's Bay on the Island of Andros being Crown Grant F-2 at page
148 to Robert Woodside and bounded Northwardly by vacant land
Easa, \ a.,ily by a Thirty (30) Links Road Reservation separating it from
Jane Sturrup Southwardly by a Twenty (20) Links Road Reservation
separating it from land generated to Sarah Whewell and WEstwardly
by vacant Crown Land.
AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles Act, 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of IZM GROUP LTD.

NOTICE OF PETITION

SALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land containing Tea (10) acres
Ssituate in the vicinity of the Settlement of Kemp's Bay on the Island
of Andros being Crown Grant F-2 at page 148 to Robert Woodside
and bounded Northwardly by vacant land Eastwardly by a Thirty (30)
Link Road Reservation separating it from Jane Sturrup Southwardly
by a Twenty (20) links Road Reservation separating it from land granted
to Sarah Whewell and Westwardly by vacant Crown Land. The Petitioner
IZ'v i GROCUP LTD claims to be the Owner of the fee simple estate in
possession of the said lot of land hereinbefore described and the
Petitioner has made application to the Supreme Court of the
i Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles
ij Act 1959 to have its Title to the said land investigated and the nature
and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to
be granted by the Court in accordance with the provision of the said
Act.

Copies of the field plan may be inspected during normal office hours
at:

a. i .. Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher Building, Bank Lane,
Nassau. Bahamas;

,b. ; i C nber of Douglas Sands &Associates, Ltd., East & Shirley
Street .O. Box N-8566, Nassau, Bahamas;

c. The Attorney General's Office, East Hill Street, Nassau, The Bahamas;

d. T' C -mmiissioner's Office in the Settlement of Kemp's Bay, Andros,
B'l:mnas.

Notice is here by given that any persons having Dower or right to
dower or any adverse claim not recognized in the Petition shall before
Stii ;xp a.ion of Thirty (30) days of the receipt of this Notice file in
the Registry of the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner of the
undersigned statement of such claim. Failure of any such person to
file and serve a statement of such claim within Thirty (30) days of the
receipt of this Notice will operate as bar to such claim.
DOUGLAS SANDS & ASSOCIATES, LTD.,
Chambers
2nd Floor, Columbus House
East and Shirley Streets
P.O. Box N-8566
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner
IC~YR~


FROM page 1B

The National Insurance
Board (NIB) has experienced
problems with some companies
not passing on contributions
deducted from their employ-
ees' salaries, and the NHI pro-
ject team is pinning its faith in
the power of IT to ensure this
is not repeated.
Ms Pinder said all Bahami-
ans and residents would receive
an NHI membership card, and
upon seeking treatment, this
would be scanned to determine
whether contributions from
both the employer and employ-
ee are up to date. If Bahami-
ans were not up to date with
their-payments, then they
would be charged user fees to
meet healthcare'costs, as the
NHI would not cover them.
Manager
Dr Stanley Lalta, the NHI


project manager and health
economist, said IT would
enable the NHI to avoid
employing compliance inspec-
tors, as NIB does, thus min-
imising costs.
Employees
It would also enable employ-
ees to avoid having to confront
employers over an alleged non-
payment of contributions on
their behalf.
"We have to have enforce-
ment," Ms Pinder said. To
ensure employer compliance,
the NHI is looking at measures
already under exploration by
the NIB.
These include non-renewal
of business licences for compa-
nies that are not making pay-
ments on behalf of employees,
and refusal of foreign exchange
control approvals allowing
them to import goods into the
country.
The NHI scheme also


NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000
(No.45 of 2000)

ELSON INTERNATIONAL LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation
Notice is hereby given fhat in accordance with Section 138
(4) of the International Busiess Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000)
ELSON INTERNATIONAL LIMITED, is in dissolution.
CONTINENTAL LIQUIDATORS INC. is the.Liquidator and can
be contacted at No. 2 Commercial Centre Square, P.O. Box #71,
Alofi, Niue Islands. All persons having claims against the above-
named company are required to send their, names, addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before, March
17, 2006.



J B. Foster
For C,'ni erd 1 LiquiJ or I i
L~quld.r,,r






PROPERTY



FOR SALE



Lot Number 14, in the

Southern vicinity of

Westridge North Subdivision

Western District of

New Providence

Being sold pursuant to

Power of Sale

Mortgage dated May 14, 2004

Appraised value $140,000

Interested parties,

please submit Bids to




British American Insurance

Co. Ltd,

Independence Drive

P.O. Box N-4815

Telephone: 461-1000


believes that membership cards
and IT will ensure a higher lev-
el of compliance from self-
employed Bahamians, again
eliminating problems that NIB
has experienced relating to
compliance from this sector.
The NHI scheme's own 2004
report revealed that the NIB
was collecting contributions
from just 15 per cent or 3,500
out of 23,000 self-employed
workers who were supposed to
pay contributions.
But Ms Pinder said the NHI
hoped to achieve greater com-
pliance because health care was
something all Bahamians need-
ed to some point in their lives.
She added: "If you don't con-
tribute, you don't get the ser-
vice. That's the most important
thing for the self-employed
"If you don't have a mem-
bership card, don't contribute
or your contributions are out
of date, you have to pay the
full cost. It's not a subsidized
user fee. There's an incentive
to start with."
Dr'Lalta described the IT
system as "the prerequisite"
for an NHI system to be imple-
mented in the Bahamas.
"We're looking at an IT sys-
tem to provide real-time online
claims processing," he added.
This system, which Dr Lalta
told The Tribune already exist-
ed in France, Jamaica and
Puerto Rico countries that
have similar social health insur-
ance schemes would validate
patient memberships and pro-
yide both public and private
healthcare providers with'
assurances that claims would
be met by NHI.
Avoiding

In addition to avoiding the
need for a huge claims depart-
ment and staff, Dr Lalta said
the proposed IT system would
enable bank transfers for
mimme4iatep..ayments by the,
NHI to healthcare providers.
In comparison, he said that
in some Caribbean countries,
healthcare providers had to
wait between 20-40 days for
their claims to be settled by a
social health insurance scheme.
However, the Bahamas does
not have an Automated Clear-
ing House (ACH) yet to settle
real-time transactions between
customers of different banks.
"Once we see that IT system


in place and what it's going to
mean, there's no need for a
huge bureaucracy," Dr Lalta
said.
Ms Pinder said the IT sys-
tem would enable the NHI
management team to conduct
utilisation reviews, health care
provider audits, information
sharing, and deal with each
provider's terms of contract.
She added that it would also
help to combat fraud and mis-
use by healthcare providers. In
one Caribbean country, an'IT
system had shown that doctors
were increasingly recommend-
ing and performing Caesarean
sections rather than normal
births for patients, simply
because the former was more
expensive and would earn them
greater revenues.
Status
Both Dr Lalta and Ms Pin-
der expressed hope that the
NHI would have quasi-
autonomous status, and be
operated with some degree of
independence from govern-
ment, reducing the chances of
political interference.
However, critics of the plan
are likely to be unconvinced.
Bahamian employers across all
industries are worried that it
will impose another tax burden
on their companies, making
them even more uncompeti-
tive, while employees are like-
ly to view contributions as an
income tax that will reduce
take-home pay.
:.The Medical Association of
the Bahamas (MAB), whose
support and co-operation will
be needed to get the NHI
scheme off the ground, has
already said the plan as pro-
posed "will adversely affect the
quality of healthcare received
by all Bahamians and curtail
timely access"...........
Apart from.a "negative
impact" on the overall econo-
my, the MAB expressed con-
cerns that the NHI scheme
would transfer management of
healthcare financing from pri-
vate insurance companies to an
inefficient public sector.
It urged the Government to
continue on the public-private
partnership role, adding that
throwing more money at
healthcare was not necessarily
the answer to better equality
and access in the Bahamas.


Construction Company Seeking

CONSTRUCTION

SUPERINTENDENT

Responsibilities Include:

Supervise the Field Construction of a project,
including its organization, planning and scheduling
to complete the work on time, within budget and
specified quality.
Coordinate, direct, and monitor the activities of.
subcontractors, suppliers, direct labor and material.
Develop and implement project schedules '
Enforce a project site safety and security program
Direct, train and evaluate field staff
Perform other duties and responsibilities as required

Qualification:

Applicants should possess the following qualifications:

Minimum of 12 years building construction
experience
Thorough knowledge and understanding of the
general and subcontract documents, drawings and
specifications;
Extensive knowledge of construction means,
methods and materials
Experience in field engineering' and surveying
Computer skills and knowledge of construction
software programs
Strong management, leadership and interpersonal
.,skills
Competitive Salary, Health and Life insurance and other
attractive benefits.
Interested Persons should send resume to:
The Manager
P.O. Box SS-5580
S"Nassau, Bahamas
RE: Construction Superintendent Position


Employer





'cultural change'


THE TRIBUNE


.PA(-i- I B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006


i









FEBRUARY 20, 2006


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

Antiques Road- nuesRoadshow An 18th-cen- Frank Sinatra: The Man & the The Peoples President: Man,
U WPBT s Goan ivory doll; Russian porce- Myth Frank Sinatra's 60-year career Myth and the Media
lain charger. (N) (CC) as a singer and actor.
The Insider (N) TheKin of How I Met Your Two and a Half (:31) Courting CSI: Miami "Nailed" The team is
SWFOR n (CC) Queens Shear MotherThe Men "Hi, Mr. Alex "A Tale of caught in the midst of a deadly di-
Torture" (CC) Limo" n (CC) Homed One" Two Kisses" 1 vorce case. A (CC)
Olympic Zone XX Olympic Winter Games (iTV) From Turin, Italy. Figure skating: ice dancing, final; alpine skiing: men's giant
S WTVJ slalom, final; freestyle skiing: men's aerials; ski jumping: K125 large hill team final. (Same-day Tape) A (CC)
Deco Drive House "Skin Deep" (N) P (PA) 24 The terrorist mastermind, billion- News(CC)
SWSVN (CC) aire Vladimir Bierko, intimidates the
administration. (N)(CC)
Jeopardy! (N) Wife Swap "Wife Swap Saved My Marriage" Past "Wife Swap" families The Bachelor: Pars Travis reluc-
: WPLG (C) talk about their participation in the show. (N) (CC) tantly faces the fury of the women
he has rejected. ( ) (CC)

(00) Cold Case Flip This House Team's stakeout The Secret Life of a Serial Killer Rollergids "Orange" (N) (CC)
A&E Files (CC) targets thief. (CC) (CC)
Hardtalk BBC News World Business BBC News Click Online Es- BBC News Asia Today
BBCI (Latenight). Report (Latenight). sential guide to (Latenight).
computers.
BET.com Count- Movie The Parkers ,The Parkers A
BET down (CC) (CC)
C C (6:00) XX Olympic Winter Games From Turin, Italy. Highlights of today's action including curling, freestyle skiing, bobsledding,
S hockey, alpine skiing and figure skating. (Live) (CC
XX Olympic On the Money Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNBC Winter Games____________
C N (:00) The Situa- Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)
NN tion Room
BLUE COLLAR The Daily Show The Colbert Re- Christopher Titus' Norman Rockwell Is Bleeding n South Park "ke's
COM COMEDYTOUR With Jon Stew- port(CC) (CC) Wee Wee"(CC)
RIDES AGAIN art (CC)
T Cops Attempted Beach Patrol: Beach Patrol: Forensic Files North Mission Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege
COURT kidnapping. 1 San Diego San Diego Road & Justice (N)
That's So Raven *x THE PRINCESS DIARIES (2001, Comedy) Julie Andrews, Anne Naturally Sadie Sister, Sister Tia
DISN (CC) Hathaway, Hector Elizondo. An awkward teenager leams that she has "Surprise!" (CC) rethinks going to
royal blood. 'G' (CC) college.
This Old House Material Girls Fresh Coat From Junky to Knitty Gritty Bor- Creative Juice Scrapbooking
DIY n (CC) Funky ders; hems. (N) Photo formats.
S In Focus (Ger- Journal: Projekt Zukunft Journal: In Euromaxx Journal: Im Focus "Na-
DW man). Tagestema Depth Tagestema haufnahme"
E! The Soup Dr. 90210 "Minor Alterations: Major Dr. 90210 "Singers, Surfers, Soul Dr. 90210 "Action!" (N)
Changes" Private help. Mates, and Sadness" 4
S:00) College Basketball West Virginia at Syracuse. College Basketball Oklahoma at Texas Tech. (Live) (CC)
ESPN Subject to Blackout) (Live)
ES I Gol ESPN: Personal Water- Women's College Gymnastics Arkansas at Florida. SportsCenter International Edl-
ESPNI Fuera de Juego craft (N) (Taped) Iion (Live)
Daily Mass: Our The Journey Home The Many Faces The Holy Rosary Abundant Life
EWTN Lady of Mary
ST :00) Go for It! FitTV's Diet Doctor "French Mariu Henner's Shape Up Your FitNation "Barefit and Pregnant"
FIT TV Women's Diet" Mirelle Guiliano. Life "Image" Improving image. Healthy pregnancies. n (CC)
v C Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannlty & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
FOX-NC Shepard Smith Susteren (Live) (CC)
:00) Women's College Basketball Boston College at RiverBelle.,nfo Monte Carlo Mil- Nothin'But Best Damn
FSNFL Nort Carolina. (Live) lions Knockouts Sports Show
GOLF Golf Channel Academy Live 43)Golf ChannelAcademy Jim' Playing Lessons (:08) Golf Channel Academy
GOLF Live) MVcLean on Nancy Lopez. (N)..
GSN Lingo (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire High Stakes Poker (CC) High Stakes Poker (CC)
(4Te 00) Attack of Star Trek: The Next Generation Star Trek: The Next Generation The Man Show The Man'Show
G4Tech the Show! The Drumhead" n (CC) "Half a Life" A (CC) (C) (CC)
S* THE PARENT TRAP (1961, Comedy) Hayley Mills, Maureen O'Hara, Brian Keith. *** BEDKNOBS AND BROOM-
HALL Twins separated as infants plot to reunite their parents. (CC) STICKS (1971, Fantasy) Angela
Lansbury, David Tomlinson. (CC)
Small Space, Home to Stay My First Place Designer Super- Debbie Travis' Holmes on Homes "Bar None" Af-
HGTV Big Style Three separate P (CC) starChallenge Facelift Older ter paying a contractor the job was
(CC) living spaces. n (CC) brother's room. never completed. A (CC)
NSP Morris Cerullo Breakthrough RW. Scham- Inspiration To- Life Today (CC) This Is Your Day Gospel Truth
INSP .... (CC) bach (CC) day- ___ (CC)
8 Simple Rules Sabrina,the My Wife and My Wife and' Friends Joey re- Everybody Everybody
KTLA Cate falls asleep Teenage Witch Kids "Of Mice KIds "No Rules" veals his feelings Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
withEd. 1 (CC) and Men" (CC) 1 (CC) for Rachel. "Favors" (CC) "Older Women"
* SEEDS OF DECEPTION (1994, Docudrama) *x BAD SEED (2000, Suspense) Luke Wilson, Norman Reedus, Dennis
LIFE Melissa Gilbert, George Dzundza. A woman learns her Farina. Premiere. A man is accused of killing his philanderng wife. (CC)
doctor inseminated her with his sperm. (CC)
MSNBC I :0 Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- Rita Cosby Live & Direct Scarborough Country
MSNBC cc mann
SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob Full House Fresh Prince of Roseanne P Roseanne "Out
NICK SquarePants ASquarePants ASquarePants A"D.Jl's Choice" Bel-Air (CC) of the Past"
SHow I Met Your Skating With Celebrities P1 (Part 24 "Day 5:3:OOPM-4:OOPM" (N) P1 News P (CC) News
NTV Mother A (CC) 2 of7).CC). (PA) (CC)
:00 Survivor: survivor: All-Stars "Anger, Tears Survivor: All-Stars The eleventh Survivor: All-Stars "Mad Scramble
OLN -ll-tars (CC) and Chaos" f (CC) castaway is voted off. P1 (CC) and Broken Hearts" n (CC)
(:00) Inside Nex- Every Day Is NBS 24-7 (N) Back in the Day NASCAR Past NASCAR Past Men Behind the
SPEED tel Cup RaceDay (N) Champions Champions Wrenches
Bishop T.D. Behind the Mark Chironna Jentezen Jesse Duplantis Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN Jakes (CC) Scenes (CC) Franklin (CC) (CC)
Everybody Friends Phoebe Friends Phoebe Friends Rachel Friends The Family Guy Wit- Family Guy Jeal-
TBS Loves Raymond is asked to carry receives an em- finds a new ro- One With Joey's ness protection ousy rears its
n (CC) a baby. bryo implant. 1 mantic interest. Dirty Day" (CC) program. (CC) ugly head.
:00) Miami Ink Miami Ink "Party All the Time" Miami Ink "Weathering the Storm" Miami Ink Kat Von D surprises the
TLC Ami gives Yoji an Nufiez's partying jeopardizes his ca- Ami skips town. (CC) guys by dropping in from Los Ange-
ultimatum. reer and the shop's reputation. ls.
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order "Fluency" Nine flu vic- Law & Order "Obsession" A contro- Law & Order "Couples" Detecties
TNT derBodies" 1 times suddenly die after being inocu- versial conservative talk show host probe a string of domestic murders.
(CC) (DVS) lated with a fake vaccine, is shot to death. (CC) (DVS) .1 (CC) (DVS)
T O * ACE VENTURA: WHEN NATURE CALLS (1995, Home for Imagi- Grim Adven- Home for Imagi- Home for Imagl-
TOON Comedy) Jim Carrey, lan McNeice. nary Friends tures nary Friends nary Friends
TV5 (:00) Des racines et des ailes Nikan La Fiancee de la vie TV5 Le Journal
6:00 Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
TWC PM Edition (CC) (CC) (CC)
(:00) Peregrina Contra Viento y Marea Alborada Cristina El elenco de "Piel de
UNIV otono".
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order: Criminal Intent Ille- WWE Monday Night Raw Road to WrestleMania Finals: Big Show vs.
USA der: Special Vic- gal financial practices add up to HHH vs. RVD. (Live) P (CC)
times Unit P murder and blackmail. P (CC)
VH (:00) Celebrity Celebrity Showdown 2 P Celebrity Best Friends Examining Fabulous Life Of... "Celebrity Vaca-
VHT Showdown celebrity friendships. P tion Homes" P1
(:00) America's America's Funniest Home Videos The three $100,000 prize winners WGN News at Nine P (CC)
WGN Funniest Home compete for the grand prize. P (CC)
Videos P (CC)
Everybody ** AGENT CODY BANKS (2003, Adventure) Frankie Muniz, Hilary WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
W PIX Loves Raymond Duff, Angie Harmon. A teenager leads a secret double-life as a spy for the Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
"Older Women" CIA. P (CC) & Mr. G (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) One on One "Ti- All of Us "Don't It Girlfriends An Half & Half (N) Dr. Phil P (CC)
WSBK (CC) juana Break Up?" Make My Brown- attendee begs n (CC)
(N) (CC) ies Blue" oni to mentor.

(6:15) ** FAT Real Time Eddie Griffin; Helen * SOMETHING THE LORD MADE (2004, Docudrama) Alaii Rick-
H BO-E ALBERT (2004) Thomas. P (CC) man, Mos Def, Mary Stuart Masterson. Alab technician helps a doctor
Sn.'PG'(CC) with surgical techniques. P 'NR' (CC)
(5:15) ** The Sopranos After Paulie gets re- * SPIDER-MAN 2 (2004, Action) Tobey Maguire, Kirsten Dunst,
H BO-P AMSTAD (1997) leased from jail, Tony and the gang James Franco. Peter Parker fights a man who has mechanical tentacles.
'R' (CC) throw a Bada Bing bash. 1 'PG-13' (CC)
FATHERS' DAY (1997, Comedy) Robin Williams, (:15) * FAT ALBERT (2004, Comedy) Kenan Thompson, Kyla Pratt,
H BO-W Billy Crystal. Two strangers collide while pursuing the Shedrack Anderson III. Live action/animated. The cartoon character be-
same missing teen. P 'PG-13' (CC) comes real and helps a lonely teen. P 'PG' (CC)


(6:45) ** RUNAWAY JURY (2003, Suspense) WELCOME TO MOOSEPORT (2004, Comedy) Gene Hackman,
HBO-S John Cusack, Gene Hackman. A man tries to manipu- Ray Romano, Marcia GayHarden. A man runs for mayor against a former
late an explosive trial. n 'PG-13' (CC) president. n 'PG-13' (CC)
(5:30) *t ** iCONSTANTINE (2005, Fantasy) Keanu Reeves, Rachel Weisz, A** MURDER AT 1600 (1997,
MAX-E CARITO'S WAY Shia LaBeouf. A man who sees demons helps a cop probe her sister's Suspense) Wesley'Snipes, Diane
(1993) 'R' death. P 'R' (CC) Lane, Daniel Benzali. 1 'R' (CC)
(6:45) SPEED 2: CRUISE CONTROL (1997, Ac- *** DODGEBALL: A TRUE UNDERDOG STORY THE BEST SEX
MOMAX ion) Sandra Bullock. A madman seizes the helm of a (2004, Comedy) Vince Vaughn. Dodgeball teams com- EVER: TRUTH
luxurious ocean liner. n 'PG-13' (CC) pete for $50,000 in Las Vegas. P 'NR' (CC) OR DARE'NR'
6:55) * AIR FORCE ONE (1997, Suspense) The L Word "Lone Star" (iTV) Jenny HUFF That F...ing Cabin" (iTV) Huff
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(6:15) ** STRIKE FORCE (2004, Action) William Forsythe, Burt (:45) HOUSE OF THE DEAD (2003, Horror)
TMC CODE OF Sl- Reynolds. The search for her missing sister leads a Jonathan Cherry, Tyron Leitso. Young people battle
LENCE (1985) woman to vigilantes. P\ 'R' (CC) zombies on an island. 1 'R' (CC)


'THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS
MONDAY EVENING


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 1

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TRIBUNE SPORTS


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TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 14B. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006


Knowles and Nestor fall





in final for second year


N TENNIS
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
IT WAS d6ja vu for Mark
Knowles and Daniel Nestor as
they lost for the second straight
year in the final of the Open 13 in
Marseille, France.
Seeded in the same position as
they were last year, number one
Knowles and Nestor fell victims
to the Czech Republic No.4 team
of Martin Damm and Radek
Stepanek.
Last year, they were beaten 7-6
(4) and 7-6 (5). This year, the
result was 6-3, 6-7 (6), 10-6.
Despite the gallant effort they
turned in, Knowles admitted that
the Czechs were just a little bit
more prepared for the final than
they were.
"We had a few chances at the
end, but they beat us in the tie-
breaker," Knowles reflected.

Served
Damm (a part of the world's
No.2 ranked team with Leander
Paes from India) and Stepanek
(who is not ranked) served
extremely well, according to
Knowles.
"We played better in the sec-
ond and the third went to a tie
breaker. But it was just a couple
points at the end where they were
able to pull it off," he said.
Coming off their first two losses
in January in Australia, Knowles
and Nestor went into the tourna-
ment with their first victory under
their belt in before they went to
Europe.
As for losing another tourna-
ment, Knowles stressed: "Obvi-
ously, we're disappointed."
But he said they can take solace
in the fact that "this maybe is one
of those tournaments where we
have to give some credit to our
opponents.
"I think they played at a level
that they are not very comfortable


in playing at. They did a good job.
But we did our best to fight back.
So yeah, we're disappointed
because we always want to win
another doubles title."
Knowles and Nestor will now
head to ABN AMRO World Ten-
nis Tournament in Rotterdam this
week where they hope to redeem
themselves.
Last year as the top seeds, they
got into the quarterfinals before
they were ousted by another
Czech team Cyril Suk and Pavel
Vizner in the semifinal. The
Czechs eventually lost in the final
to Jonathan Erlich and Andy Ram
from Israel.
Knowles and Nestor have been
drawn to play Erlich and Ram in
the first round of the tournament
this year.
"We've been playing well and
had a good streak going. Unfortu-
nately, we didn't pull it out,"
Knowles noted. "We are going
back to the drawing board this
week and hopefully we can
advance and win the tournament."
Like Marseille, Rotterdam will
be another of those tournaments
that will use the new .format for
doubles.
According to the changes, when
you get to deuce in the first two
sets, it's just one point to decide
the outcome. But in the third set,
instead of playing a normal point,
the match is decided by the first
team to score 10 points.
It's a format that Knowles and
Nestor don't particularly like, but
one they are trying their best to
make the necessary adjustments
to.
"I'don't think we will ever like it
because I don't think it's fair to
these type of tournaments," he
stated.
"We can't change it, so we just
have to focus on playing it the way
it is and get more used to it."
The new rule is intended to
speed up the matches and gener-
ate a lot more interest in the game.
"We just have to try and make it
work," Knowles summed up.


* MARK KNOWLES (pictured) and Daniel Nestor were defeated in the Open 13 final
(FILE Photo)


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The Rattlers 'are more than





prepared' for Hugh Campbell


M BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
THE CI Gibson Rattlers are look-
ing forward to defending their title
this year in the prestigious Hugh
Campbell Basketball Classic for
senior boys.
The tournament will get started
today at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um but, up until Sunday, the schedule
had not been released by the organ-
ising committee at the AF Adderley
Junior High School.
Speaking with The Tribune in an
interview from Fort Lauderdale on
Sunday, Rattler's coach Kevin 'KJ'


Johnson said they are more than pre-
pared for the tournament, having got
off to an 8-0 start in the Government
Secondary Schools Sports Associa-
tion's regular season.
"We worked hard to get prepared
and be prepared. We want to stay in
shape because the tournament is a
grueling tournament and you have to
be shape to give yourself a chance to
compete," Johnson stated.
"We're doing that and hopefully
we will continue doing it and hope-
fully we will be successful again this
year."
This year's tournament, however, is
slightly different in that all of the
games will be played at the Kendal


Isaacs Gym instead of just the final
four and championships.
The move from the AF Adderley
Gym was made possible through a
request that was made by the Grand
Bahama schools.

Involvement
But, even though there was con-
troversy surrounding the involvement
of, the Grand Bahama teams this
year, Johnson said they still have to
come to New Providence to play.
"I felt the tournament would have
gone on (with or without them) and
we would have still been successful,"
he proclaimed.


a


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viders'


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The way his Rattlers have been
performing this year, Johnson said it
will have to come down to a self-
destruction on their part for them
not to pull through.
"We just have to remember to do
all the right things that we have to
do," he projected. "Once we do all
that stuff, we will give ourselves a
chance to be successful in terms of
getting back to the championship and
winning it."
While most of the teams will be
relying on their bench'to pull them
through, Johnson said his Rattlers'
bench is definitely going to be their
strength.
"If one of the starters get in trou-
ble, we could go to our bench and
not miss a beat," he stressed.

Difficulties
If there's any weaknesses, Johnson
said it will probably come at the free
throw line where some of his players
have had some difficulties during the
regular season.
Seniors Deniko Bowles, Lavardo
Hepburn, Sidney Deveaux, Darrel
Rolle and Terino Mackey are expect-
ed to lead the way for CI Gibson.
"Hopefully the younger guys in
grade 10 and 11 will step up and help
out," Johnson noted.
They include David Baylor, Nem-
man Strachan, Danny McKenzie and
Jermaine Storr.
"I'm looking for all of these guys to
step up," Johnson stressed. "The key
is being mentally prepared on the
defensive end and, if we are in a posi-
tion to do that, we will be able to
stop the teams. If we don't, we will be
on the outside looking in."
Based on who they're matched
against pool II, Johnson is confident
that CI Gibson will once again be a
team to watch this week.
They have to get through the
Catholic High Crusaders and Sun-
land Lutherans from Grand Bahama,
Nassau Christian Academy Cru-
saders, St John's Giants, Government
High Magicmen, Queen's College
Comets, Old Bight from Cat Island
and Mangrove Cay, Andros in their
pool.
The tournament will run through
Monday when the championship
game will be played.


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Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


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Men's Basketball Team Games


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_ SPORTS


I~I~Ji~- i 1 i-I~Y --u, r-,UUO ,~il


09









MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006


SECTION





Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


Tonique ends hep indoor







season with a victoPry



Track star will not take part in Worjkndoor Championships


* TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
AFTER losing her season open-
er at the Norwich Union Indoor
Invitational last month, Tonique
Williams-Darling closed out her
indoor season with a victory at the
Norwich Union Indoor Grand
Prix on Saturday.
Williams-Darling ran a season's
best of 51.58 seconds, going
through the first 200-lap race in
24.43 as she improved on her sec-
ond place sub-par performance of
53.48 in Glasgow on January 28
behind Russian Olga Zaytseva
(50.62).
Her nearest rival in Birming-
ham on Saturday was Claudia
Marx of Germany in 52.09.
"For me, it was an average
race," said Williams-Darling, who
was off her national indoor record
of 50.87 that she set in Budapest,
Hungary in 2004.

Training
"I felt like I took control of the
race and just ran. There were
some things that I had to do. I did-
n't start like I normally do and I
think that was a reflection of
where I'm at in training. I haven't
been able to peak. I just flat out
ran and was pretty strong."
Already turning down her spot
on the Bahamas Olympic Associ-
ation's team to the Common-
wealth Games that kicks off the
outdoor season in Melbourne,
Australia, March 15-26, Williams-
Darling has now declared that she
will not participate on the
Bahamas Association of Athletic
Associations' team at the IAAF
World Indoor Championships in
Moscow, Russia, March 10-12.
"That was my last competition
for indoor season. I'm pleased
with my indoor. I had two fairly
good meets and I'm pleased with
my conditioning and where I'm at
this time of the year," she reflect-
ed.


"Coming off that win and run-
ning the time that I did yesterday,
I'm just very pleased with my
indoor season. But I had no inten-
tions of doing the World Indoors
at all this year. So I'm calling it
quits for the indoors and just con-
tinuing my training for my first
meet outdoors in June."
Last year, Williams-Darling said
she and her coach, Steve Riddick,
had made a decision that they
would have skipped the indoor
season, but they eventually
changed their plans slightly at the
beginning of the year.
But he said the World Indoors
and the Commonwealth Games
were not in their plans.
"I only took on the two meets
because they were no pressure
meets," she stressed.
"It was just to help me with my
conditioning and strength to see
where I'm at and to break up
some of the routines and
give me a break from all the train-
ing.
"But I decided that after two
indoor worlds, two outdoor
worlds, the Olympics and World
Championships in the last three
. years, I wouldn't do a major cham-
pionships this year."
Williams-Darling said her plans
were to use this year as one for
her to rest a little and recuperate
as she prepares for the outdoor
season and to defend her title at
the World Outdoors next year.
"To be able to run that kind of
time with no competition, I'm real-
ly happy," Williams-Darling stat-
ed. "I've been holding back on
some of my training. I haven't
been working on my speed, so it
was a pretty good time."
Also at the meet, Jackie
Edwards soared to a sixth place
finish with a season's best leap of
20-feet, 9 1/4-inches in the wom-
en's long jump as she prepares for
the Commonwealth Games.
The event was won by Concep-
cion Montaner of Spain with a sea-
son's best of 21-4, the same mark
posted by Kelly Sotherton of
Great Britain for second.


'L A


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content L-,,

Available from Commercial News Providers"
... ..


* BASKETBALL
NPABA DOUBLE HEADER
THE Real Deal Shockers stunned the Y-Care Wreckers 91-88 and
the College of the Bahamas Caribs got by Copy Maxx Sharks 85-58 in
the New Providence Amateur Basketball Association men's division II
double header on Saturday night.
In the Shockers' victory over the Wreckers, Keyrand Brice scored 25
points and Rarif Ferguson matched the game high 25 in the loss.
And in the Caribs' victory over the Sharks, Latario Brooks scored a
game high 28 points in the win. Darvin Dean came up with.a side
high 18 in the loss for the Sharks.
In the men's feature contest, the Coke Explorers won by default over
the Y-Care Wreckers.
* BASKETBALL
NO NPWBA GAMES
The Johnson Lady Truckers won by default over the Junior All-Stars
to improve their second place record to 9-5 behind the front-running
two-time defending champions Cleaning Centre Angels (12-1) in the
New Providence Women's Basketball Association action over the
weekend at the DW Davis Gym.
With the loss, the All-Stars remained at the bottom of the pile at 1-
12.
And the Sunshine Auto Cheetahs took sole possession of third
place at 8-6 and a half game ahead of the College of the Bahamas Lady
Caribs with a defaulted win over the Royal Bahamas Defence Force
Bluewaves in the other game scheduled.
With the loss, the Bluewaves sit in fifth place at 2-11.


-Sponso .f I
Proud o

BaamsHert sscato

Ith nnua Fut Rut/Wak o, Feruar, 2


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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006


The stories behind the news


Former prime minister
Hubert Ingraham and FNM
deputy Brent Symonette were
castigated in the House of
Assembly last week Wednes-
day for not attending the
opening of a new session of
..parliament in what Prime
SI Minister Perry Christie (left)
described as the "most scan-
dalous experience" he has had
in his entire parliamentary
career....


W A

Family members and friends of
a death row inmate at Her
Majesty's Prison, Fox Hill. %ere ---
concerned for his health last
week as they watched him refuse
food to avoid what he thought
was an attempt to end his life
with poison. Ashley Ne%%bold.
charged with the murder of 601
night club manager .Jo
Cartwright, reportedly ,%ent on
a hunger strike...


With only a month and-a-half into 2006 and the num-
ber of murders for the year already at 10, police are
concerned that the Bahamas has got off to a "bad start"
when it comes to violent crime...
***e*
At the opening of a new session of parliament last
week, Government outlined new initiatives to produce
unprecedented economic advancement and social change
for the Bahamas. After inspecting the colour guard,
newly appointed Governor General Arthur D Hanna
was greeted with tremendous applause as he took his seat
on the throne to read the speech prepared by Prime
Minister Perry Christie's government...


Are we a civilised nation?


T he Bahamas is
now a country
with only "a
veneer of civilisa-
tion" a place
where political nastiness and
workplace treachery abound,
and common decency is in
retreat.
Who says so? A leading
Bahamian academic who sees
himself as part of a rearguard
minority who, he feels, need to
become more vocal in defence
of national honour and integri-
ty.
As things stand, he claims,
the Bahamas is so steeped in
corruption, violence, dishon-
esty and venality that "it is a
case of every man for himself
and God for us all."
What's worse is that, in his
eyes, few in power appear pre-
pared to make a moral stand -
or even to state what the
Bahamas represents in terms
of everyday standards of
behaviour.
"When this government says
it is going to get to the bottom
of something, it's really saying
it wants to know who took the
pictures, and who leaked the
story," he said.
Bahamian religion, he added,
is all about "currying favour"
with God. "It is a question of
all for me God is the cus-
toms officer who will fix you
up."
This damning appraisal of
the modern Bahamas follows
a long line of incidents which,
in the eyes of many, suggest
that there is now virtually no
accountability in the country.
An "anything goes" malaise
has descended on the land
which according to the acad-
emic will ultimately lead to a
social implosion.
The situation is exacerbated
by a glorification of material-
ism by the "haves" in a society
where the "have nots" are
barely scraping by.
"All the time poor people
see things around them they
cannot buy, so they take them.
Then you have young black


Response to last week's

article about the detention

centre, and specifically the

alleged attack on a foreign

journalist, shows that many
Bahamian citizens are now

seriously concerned at the

downward turn the country

appears to be taking.
INSIGHT reports...


men and women who are dis-
qualified from working because
of poor attitudes, bad educa-
tion and a whole pile of testos-
terone.
"Parents are not coping and
they are in over their heads.
You have a government which
keeps talking about big invest-
ments, but the average
Bahamian can't work out how
this affects him.
Politicians
"The politicians are not
attending to the social situa-
tion here. They now have an
initiative to protect tourists
because the thugs have hit Bay
Street. Meanwhile, government
officials andthe police want to
keep the truth from the media
because they fear its effects on
the industry."
The alleged beating of a for-
eign journalist by a Defence
Force officer in broad daylight
has conjured up new, unpalat-
able images of the Bahamas in,
the minds not only of many
Floridians, but right-thinking
Bahamians as well.
Whatever happens at the
detention centre is being done.
in their name and they don't
like what they see. "If a guard


can beat a foreign newsman in
daylight OUTSIDE the com-
pound, what is he doing
INSIDE the compound in the
dead of night?" they ask, and
with good reason.
A country which carefully
cultivates alluring impressions
of blissful living in a sun-
splashed paradise is now
engaged in a life-or-death
struggle with the squalid reali-
ty.
While colourful posters pro-
claim the legend "It's getting
better", more.and more
Bahamians are convinced that,
on the contrary, things are get-
ting worse. Much worse.
With no official condemna-
tion of the act, no genuine
expression of moral outrage.
an impression develops that
brutality against innocents
receives implicit sanction from
those in power. There is a
growing suspicion that the go\ -
ernment has neither the will
nor wherewithal to act. seem-
ingly infected by institutional
paralysis.
Last week, the esteemed
Wall Street Journal turned its
sagacious eye on the Bahamas


SEE page 2C


I Read rs sy [ 'sII ti me O tospeak outIO


* THE alleged attack on Mario Vallejo a reporter with Univision by Royal Bahamas Defence
Force (RBDF) officers has left many Bahamians worried.
(FILE photo)


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PAGE2C, ONDY, FBRURY 2, 206 TE TRBUN


Are we a civilised nation?


FROM page 1C


with a comment which should
make every decent Bahamian
reflect earnestly on their coun-


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the last time we checked, a
civilised place," it said.
Now, it added, would be a
good time to prove this by
releasing two Cuban dentists
who have been held at the
detention centre for the past
ten months, having been
picked up by the US Coast
Guard while making a dash for
freedom.
What the Wall Street Jour-
nal didn't state is that the den-
tists, like many Bahamians in
varying circumstances, are
caught up in a mish-mash of
indecision and procrastination
which seems to typify this gov-
ernment's approach to every-
thing.
Blurring issues and hoping
they will disappear before their
eyes now appears to be part of
the government's policy. It
seems to observers that nothing
ever gets done.
A Tribune reader said last
week: "There is only one thing
this government is good at, and
that's travelling. They're always
travelling."
In the last two or three
weeks, disturbing incidents
have occurred which have
tended to underscore the Wall
Street Journal's doubts about
Bahamian civilisationn'.
One was the aftermath of the
Fox Hill Prison breakout, when
two prisoners were pictured
lying prostrate in a blood-
smeared cell. Another was the
attack on the Cuban journal-
ist. Then came a plaintive cry
from a prisoner at Fox Hill who
fears an attempt will be made
on his life to silence him
because of his alleged involve-
ment in a high-profile murder.
What all three cases have in
common is an apparent brutal-
ising or intimidation of indi-
viduals by uncaring authority, a
situation common in totalitari-
an countries but indefensible
in a supposedly free-thinking
democracy.
This lack of compassion, mis-
use of power and selfish grasp-
ing for material riches, are,
according to the academic,
products of a growing realisa-
tion that the Bahamas' current
prosperity cannot last.
"A lot of Bahamians believe
in their bones that what is hap-
pening now is not going to hap-
pen indefinitely.
Success
"Our success is directly relat-
ed to the implosion of Cuba as
a tourist destination. A lot of
people are focused on accu-
mulation of wealth at all costs
while the going is good. But I
think there are about five per
cent of the Bahamian popula-


Share your
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning /
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


tion who are seriously con-
cerned about the nation's
moral bankruptcy. They are
wondering where it is going to
lead."
One reader inspired to react
by last week's INSIGHT wrote:
"With some exceptions, the
police force is corrupt. Many
law enforcement officers are a
threat to the community rather
than protectors.
Profession
"Many get into the profes-
sion so they can run drugs or
assist their criminal friends.
Others join with good inten-
tions, but after a while of seeing
that the system is corrupt, they
too change. Some become
power happy, trigger happy
criminals themselves."
The reader said that once the
Haitian immigration situation
had been factored into mod-
ern Bahamian life, the scenario
was far from reassuring.
"They (Haitians) have been
mistreated and ridiculed and
now they are becoming pow-
erful enough to do something
about it," she said.
Pervasive Bahamian amoral-
ity combined with Haitian
volatility does not bode well
for the country's future, par-
ticularly as there appears to be
no-one in sight with the stature,
gravitas and credibility to lay
the groundwork for a new kind
of society.
One reader, also an acade-
mic, said: "Bahamian society
needs rebuilding from the
foundation upwards. But there
needs to be a real will on the
part of the decent minority to
become more vocal and get
involved.
"At the moment, there is a
sense that many politicians are
in it for themselves, either for
self-aggrandisement or to line
their own pockets. What we
need is a true statesman who
can counter the general air of
sleaziness that prevails here.
"As things stand, there is no
long-term national planning
and, because most politicians
are lawyers, very little entre-
preneurial or business savvy.
"It is interesting that no-one
ever stands up and states cate-
gorically what's wrong with the
modern Bahamas and what
needs to be done to put things
right.
"That's because many politi-
cians here have no moral
authority themselves. Some are
afraid to take moral positions
because they know how squalid
and rancid their own lives are.
It is a sad and depressing situ-
ation."
With children now begetting
children, and feral boys being
spawned in fatherless homes,
the new generation offers lit-
tle hope. The 24-year-old
grandmother is a reality in the
modern Bahamas, and it does
the nation littlecredit.
Increased violence in schools
is another symptom of social
meltdown..With no father fig-
ure or discipline at home, wild
boys are strutting their stuff in
an increasingly feminised soci-
ety, living out their entire early
lives overseen by women.
'On television, ex-druggies
are revered as rap stars.
Reformed gangsters are an


news


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with Drapery Hard

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a-.010


DEFINED
//^ ELEGANCE DEFINED


'ware

vering
h finials,


COMPLETE INTERIORS


Mackey Street
Three doors south of Rosetta St
Tel: 393-6019
Fax: 394-1883
Mon to Fri 9am-4pm Sat 9amJlpm


integral part of the hip-hop.;fi
ture. Violence towards othera-i
seen as cool, and even lauae~i
in lyrics, so it is no surprise i4t
impressionable black youths
roam the blocks with guns and'
knives. They know nothing"
else.
That is why the response tl
incidents like the alleged beat-.
ing of the journalist, and 'the
suspected brutalising of the Fox
Hill escapees, is so important in;
moulding public attitudes.
If prison guards can hammer
prisoners so badly that they are
left prostrate and helpless on
a blood-smeared floor, why
can't youths on the blocks
crack heads at will?
If a Defence Force officer
can split a reporter's face with
a baton, then smash his head
on a car bumper, why can't a
gang of louts set about a pass-
er-by?
If some politicians clan
engage in sleaze with impunimt
why shouldn't Joe Citizen help
himself from time to time?,. .;
In bigger first-world coon-
tries, groups exist which sound'
off on moral and ethical issues;'
taking stands with the objec:-
tive of keeping society on track
In the Bahamas, silence is the,
norm.
Is this the result of long years
of intimidation and victimisa-'
tion under the first PLP gov-
ernment? Or are many if not
most Bahamians so divorced
from the concept of right and
wrong that they genuinely fail
to see the significance of such
events?
Petition
Last week, news broke of a
petition from College of the
Bahamas academics, staff and
students calling for the rein-
statement of Dr Rodney Smith,
who resigned as president last
year after admitting plagiarism.
They feel he gave the college
vision and a sense of direction
and want him back to re-ener-
gise what they claim is now an
apathetic institution.
What they fail to realise is
that Dr Smith's confession was
so fundamental to academic
principles that, whatever his
attributes, there can be no
going back.
Calling for Dr Smith's rein-
statement is like the police
force backing a commissioner
convicted of robbery.
While academics in first-
world societies would not con-
template such a petition, and
recognize fully the untenability
of such a move, a COB lo by
group pushing for Dr Smith's
return simply failed to grasp
the point.
According to INSIGHT's
two academic sources, therein
lies the problem of Bahamian
society. First, you have to
recognize wrong-doing for what
it is, and then react according-
ly. Without that recognition,
the veneer of civilisation is,
indeed, so thin that the rough
wood of lawlessness and unac-
countability shows through.
Perhaps now is the time to
take stock before it's too late.

What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmar-
quis@tribunemedia.net


"--- ; . .-..' '.,7w- '





Grilled Chicken


I


mamma


--ONO


I etm~INSIGHT


THE TRIBUNL"


PAGE 2C, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006


1y-,.
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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 30


7TH ANNUAL


I EKIN REVIEW TJ I


WITHI only a month and-a-
half into 2006 and the number
of murders for the year already
at 10, police are concerned that
the Bahamas has got off to a
"bad start" when it comes to
violent crime. "This does not
bode well for the future. We
are extremely concerned about
this," Chief Supt Hulan said
last week.

**FORMER prime minister
FORMER prime minister


Hubert Ingraham and FNM
deputy Brent Symonette were
castigated in the House of
Assembly last week Wednes-
day for not attending the open-
ing of a new session of parlia-
ment.in what Prime Minister
Perry Christie described as the
"most scandalous experience"
he has had in his entire parlia-
mentary career.
Opposition leader Hubert
Ingraham then criticised Prime
Minister Perry Christie for not
announcing the opening of a


INSIGHT
R -
u k
her,
E ACCUSED OF MURDER -
e Of
Melba Munroe, 25, of


r)to)
inrt
Carmichael Road, was last week
charged in Magistrate's Court
with murdering Dean Archer,
who wasreportedly stabbed in
the heart on February 12.

(FILEphoto)


Registration Fee: $12


Feb.252006
-0 "t


Race starts at 7a.m. at the Western Esplanade to Goodman's Bay & back
Late registration starts at 6:00 a.m. Registration Fee: $12 1117rflud rar f hirl and tdher qlts and surpnses)

S Applications can be picked up at all Subway'- Restaurants in New Providence
t .i ll l, r l. i l,. .t...i- .pp.JI.0 'I '.h'l .,y i A ,,' IIlh H' I ..ul ,i 1 l, Pl...Ill ,. l l'i ll" ..hTl Fyrujry I .
IlP J c i e ..lltrdl l.d.Jri ih -1 j1 Fi l 1f, I .I.. V..- 1 1 ,.l j il F ..h.r in:,. |:.t) i . l r w ,jilt 1 .1 '. l,.rd.t r eil Olegoreni

For More Information, Call 327-0806 or 394-6715

Name:


Date of Birth: / /_


Age (on race day): _


Address:

E-mail:


4F
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.... ri


new session of parliament in
time for members to adjust
their schedules to attend.
Speaking from Ft Lauderdale
where he was undergoing a
physical check-up at the Cleve-
land Clinic, Mr Ingraham said
that the prorogation of parlia-
ment is no state secret.
He said Mr Christie called
him only the day before the
swearing-in ceremonies for Mr

SEE page 4C


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THE TRIBUNE


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P 4 N F R ,T R


Re: Arthur D Hanna
as Governor General
WHILE I applaud Mr
Arthur Hanna for his stand
against the Pindling govern-
ment in 1984, it has to be noted
that it took an awfully long
time to make up his mind.
It was apparent many years
before then which way the PLP
government was going, yet Mr
Hanna hung in there. However,
credit where it's due. He is a
man of honour and therefore a
worthy symbol of the Bahamas.
G M Pratt


ARTHUR HANNA will be
receiving a handsome salary
and, presumably, a hefty pen-
sion as a result of his tenure as
Governor General.
While I'm sure your senti-
ments are correct, and that Mr
Hanna might well have some-
thing to impart to Bahamian
society at large, it's possible
that his acceptance of the
appointment might well be
linked to the remuneration on
offer.
J B Rahming


FEEDBA (


THE piece on Hanna, was
powerful, as usual, and gave
interesting background infor-
mation on the Bahamian polit-
ical situation in the 1960s.
What the Bahamas needs are
more people of high principle.
At the moment, there seem to
be few standards young peo-
ple can look up to, and that
must be considered part of the


country's problems.
J L Lowe


Re: Alleged beating
of foreign reporter
outside detention centre
KEEP the heat on. Innocent
people are suffering and politi-
cians should be forced to stand
on principle once in a while


insight


IT is clear we need indeperi-
dent commissions to look ibto
many aspects of Bahamian life
at the moment, and the deten-
tion centre and the Defence
Force are two of them.
However, how do W
appoint independent commi-s
sions when everyone is com-
promised by political or reli-
gious considerations? It i$ }1
very worrying thought.
Concerned


*****


TA I0moving'.].


FROM page 3C
Arthur Hanna as the new gov-
ernor general to invite him to
attend.
.*** * *

FAMILY members and
friends of a death row inmate
at Her Majesty's Prison, Fox
Hill, were concerned for his
health last week as they
watched him refuse food to
avoid what he thought was an
attempt to end his life with poi-
son. Ashley Newbold, charged
with the murder of 601 night


club manager Joy Cartwright,
reportedly went on a hunger
strike. His lawyer, Michael
Hanna, last week Monday told
The Tribune that his client had
been refusing food for the past
10 days.
*****

AT the opening of a new ses-
sion of parliament last week,
Government outlined new ini-
tiatives to produce unprece-
dented economic advancement
and social change for the
Bahamas. After inspecting the


WEEK N. REIEW


colour guard, newly appointed
Governor General Arthur P
Hanna was greeted with
tremendous applause as he
took his seat on the throne to
read the speech prepared by
Prime Minister Perry Christie?
government.
*****

MELBA Munroe, 25, of
Carmichael Road, was;last
week charged in Magistrate's
Court with murdering Dealn
Archer on February 12. The
victim was stabbed in the heart.


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instead of sitting on their
hands.
-RG
;*****

ONCE again, an excellent
INSIGHT.piece which hit
every button. The Bahamas'
good name as a civilised west-
ern society is at stake here. I
wonder if our politicians are
actually intelligent enough to
realise that.
George L, Grand Bahama


THE TRIBONE~l


PAGE 4C, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006


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<>


A LOOK BACK AT
THE WEEK OF FEB. 12

IRAQ ,
The Iraqi Interior Ministry has
launched an investigation into an
alleged police death squad. Iraq's
Sunni Muslim minority has claimed
for more than a year that members
of Iraq's Shiite Muslim-dominated
security forces intimidate, kidnap
and murder Sunnis, but the probe
was triggered by Iraqi soldiers'
chance discovery of 22 Iraqi men
in police uniforms allegedly
preparing to kill a Sunni man.
As of Thursday, at least 2,272
members of the U.S. military have
died since March 2003, according
to an Associated Press count.


GUANTANAMO
The United States should close
the prison at GuantAnamo Bay,
Cuba, immediately, U.N.
human-rights investigators said in
a report released Thursday. The
report recommended that the U.S.
government either put the
detainees on trial before an
international tribunal or release
them. The report also found that
excessive violence against
detainees "must be assessed as
amounting to torture" as defined
in the international Convention
Against Torture. White House
spokesman Scott McClellan
dismissed the 54-page report as a
"rehash of allegations" made by
some detainees' lawyers.
........................................................................................................................
BOLIVIA
In a major concession to
President Evo Morales, the Bush
administration has agreed to
reconsider its anti-drug trafficking
programs in Bolivia and is even
hinting it could allow more coca
farming. Concerned that more
coca could mean more cocaine,
Washington has so far balked at
easing a 30,000-acre limit on
Bolivia's legal production of coca.
The cap is bitterly opposed by
many poor farmers who helped
Morales gain the presidency.

... ....... ...... ......... ................. ..


CARL JUSTE/MIAMI HERALD STAFF
HAITI
* A young man flips into the pool of the Montana Hotel in Port-au-Prince on Monday. Supporters of Rene
Preval had burst through the gated entrance of the Montana, where the Provisional Electoral Council had its
center, demanding election results. Early Thursday, the council defused a political crisis and declared
front-runner Preval the outright winner of the previous week's presidential elections. Eight of the nine council
members signed an agreement to distribute the high number of blank ballots among the candidates according
to their percentages of the regular vote, giving Preval the outright majority he needed to avoid a runoff. Preval
had just shy of 49 percent of the votes tallied before the counting process was stopped amid reports of
missing 'ballots and allegations of fraud, and the redistribution of the blank ballots pushed him to 51.15 percent.


CUBA
* Cuba's parliament speaker on
Thursday offered support to his
visiting Iranian counterpart in an
escalating international dispute
over the Middle Eastern nation's
use of nuclear power. "No one has
the right to monopolize any
source of energy fundamental for
humanity," National Assembly
president Ricardo Alarc6n said at
the start of a meeting with Iranian
parliament speaker Gholam Ali
Haddad Adel, who was beginning
a two-day visit to the island.


DENMARK
* Consumer boycotts of Danish
goods in Muslim countries in
protest of the publication of
caricatures of the Prophet
Mohammed are costing Denmark's
companies millions. From Havarti
cheesrto Lego toys, Danish
products have been removed from
stores ip Saudi Arabia and other
countries around the Middle East
as Musljmsgawait an apology for
the cartoons, which the
Copenhagen government has said
it cannot give.. .,


THE NORTHEAST


* Drivers shoveled out their cars,
marooned travelers waited
impatiently for trains and planes to '
get back to full service, and utility
crews struggled to restore power
Monday after a record-breaking '-
snowstorm across the Northeast.
Hundreds of schools canceled
classes from West Virginia to
Massachusetts, but youngsters did
not get a holiday in New York City,
where subways ran and streets
were plowed despite a d- .p
breaking 26.9-inch shnoall
.......I ..................... I ................. ........ ..........


WASHINGTON, D.C.
* The White House won two
national-security victories in the
Senate on Thursday, as the Patriot
Act cleared a major hurdle that
ensures it will be renewed soon
and a compromise eased
Republicans objections to a secret
domestic-wiretapping program,
probably ensuring that there won't
be a congressional investigation of
it. The Senate voted 96-3 to move
toward final passage of new civil
liberties protections to the Patriot
Act, which the White House
negotiated with a handful of
Republicans.
* President Bush said Thursday
that he thinks Vice President Dick
Cheney handled his shooting
incident "just fine," and authorities!
in Texas declared the case closed.
Speaking publicly about the
matter for the first time, Bush
endorsed Cheney's decision to
wait about 18 hours before
publicly acknowledging that he
had accidentally shot a hunting
companion during a Saturday
outing in South Texas. The
president offered his views a few
hours after the local sheriffs
department absolved Cheney of
any wrongdoing.
* A detailed federal study of
college completion has concluded
that undergraduates who take
more than a semester break from
their courses are at great risk of
not graduating at all. "Continuous
enrollment ... proves.to be
overpowering," the report said.
"[It] increases the probability of
degree completion by 43 percent.
The investigation of what
happened to 8,90 students who
graduated from high school in
1992 by the federal government's
leading college-completion
expert, Clifford Adelman, also
discovered that those who did not'
Sstart"ollege within a year of
leaving high school were far less
likely to get degrees, but that the
freshman year of college was not
the make-or-break predictor of
college completion that many
experts had thought.


EDITORIAL EXCERPTS


On mistreatment ofprotesters in Iraq


m From Aftenposten,
Oslo, Norway:
ot just the British
army but all of West-
ern society faces a
serious challenge after the
release of a video showing
British soldiers abusing Iraqi
youth.
It makes little difference
that the video shows the
young people first throwing
stones at the soldiers. It
should make little differ-
ence.


The behavior was unac-
ceptable....
The mistreatment reveals
a sky-high stress level of sol-
diers in the pressed situa-
tion.
But it is precisely in such
situations that ethics and
morals, understanding right
and wrong, should kick in.
Soldiers must bring with
them a heavy ballast of val-
ues, values that are strength-
ened in training.
In addition, the military
command structure must be


developed and trained so
that the morals of a group of
soldiers cannot break down
when things get heated.
We have already seen,
especially at the Abu Ghraib
prison near Baghdad, how
wrong things can go when
education, training and
unclear leadership signals
all pull in the wrong direc-
tion.
Such failings are some-
thing no army and no soci-
ety can afford or have the
right to commit.


On conflict over Muhammad cartoons


I From Jyllands-Posten,
Viby, Denmark:
Some have mistakenly
believed that it was
fair game to lunge at a
small country like Denmark
with a trade boycott, threats
and insults.
Of course it is not in a
civilized world, and it is
symptomatic that leaders in
the Muslim world are tem-
pering the outrage as Den-
mark's support in the West-
ern world is reaching full
strength.


The European Commis-
sion's head, Jose Manuel
Barroso, was the latest to
come on stage with his unre-
served and wholehearted
backing to Denmark and the
freedom of speech....
It is especially notewor-
thy that Germany and
France, which split the Euro-
pean Union by taking their
own stands in the action
against Saddam Hussein,
were among the first to
come to Denmark's rescue
without reservations of any
kind in the present Muham-


On reprocessing of nuclear


* From Yomiuri Shimbun,
Tokyo:
he U.S. Energy
Department
announced its Global
Nuclear Energy Partnership
on Feb. 6, reversing a dec-
ades-long policy against
reprocessing nuclear
fuel.
This decision will affect
the atoms-for-peace pro-
grams of not only Japan
but many other coun-
tries.
The partnership would
be a grand initiative to
establish a global recycling
system to separate energy
elements uranium and


plutonium from spent
fuel and turn them into new
reactor fuel.
Nuclear power plants are
very effective in alleviating
the energy crisis as well as
battling global warming.
We support the new U.S.
policy and say Japan should
cooperate with the partner-
ship in developing a new
technology.
If the GNEP were set up,
many countries would be
relieved of the burden of
dealing with spent reactor
fuel.
The potential fly in the
ointment is that countries
with nuclear reprocessing
capabilities, including the


mad crisis.
It is valuable that there is
no doubt that the EU, in
such a serious situation,
stands united behind funda-
mental democratic values.
It could turn out to be
more important than a paper
with a treaty that cannot
gather full support in the
European hinterland. This
could lead to a new and bet-
ter beginning that can give
new meaning and that also
can get the EU to concen-
trate on important initia-
tives in a global context.


-fuel

United States, would gain a
hold over the nuclear plants
of countries that are depen-
dent on their fuel recycling
services.
Japan holds a special
position in this regard as the
only non-nuclear nation in
the world that is approved
internationally to reprocess
nuclear fuel, a technology it
promotes as a national pol-
icy.
Japan must achieve
nuclear fuel recycling
quickly and transmit tohe: ,:
world the fact that it has safe
nuclear technology and a
strong commitment to the
peaceful uses of atomic
energy.


"Copyrighted Material

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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8C. MONDAY. FEBRUARY 20. 2006


SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
BY
HIS EXCELLENCY THE HONOURABLE

ARTHUR D. HANNA
GOVERNOR-GENERAL
OPENING OF PARUAMENT, 15th FEBRUARY,
2006


Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the
Honourable House of Assembly:

We meet early in this New Year to begin a new session of Parliament, the
second since my Government was elected to office in May of 2002.

The session we inaugurate today will continue my Government's efforts to
provide safe and secure communities, alleviate poverty and to provide growth
and prosperity for the Bahamian people.
My Government shall give primacy, therefore, to meeting the following chal-
lenges:
* To grow our economy so as to provide ever increasing benefits and prosper-
ity for all our people throughout our archipelago;
* To protect and secure our borders against illegal immigration;
* To provide the laws, policies, resources and tools necessary for the success-
ful campaign against crime and lawlessness and for the more efficient delivery
of judicial services;
* To create the necessary policies and legislation to modernize, advance and
meet the needs of essential public service delivery in the areas of poverty al-
leviation, health, education and housing;
* To support and protect the most vulnerable in our society, particularly the
poor, the elderly, the disabled and those in special needs;
* To protect and preserve the environment;
* To create a comprehensive system of land use planning; and
* To provide training programmes relevant to our developmental needs.
In broad terms those are the aims to which my Government intends to apply
itself with special determination and vigour during the new porliantintary ses-
sion we open today.
RE-INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:
My Government will re-introduce for early consideration the following Bills
tabled during the last session of Parliament:
* A Bill for an Act to enable The Bahamas to become a Member of The Inter-
national Development Association.
* A Bill for an Act to amend the Supreme Court Act.
* A Bill for an Act to Protect Persons Appearing as Witnesses in Judicial Pro-
ceedings.
* A Bill for an Act to provide for The Establishment and Conferment of Na-
tional Honours and for connected purposes.
* A Bill for an Act to Institutionalize the Recognition by a Nation of the Contri-
bution made to its Emancipation and Growth by its National Heroes.
* A Bill for an act to Repeal the Police Act.
* A Bill for an Act to Prohibit the Payment out of the Consolidated Fund of
a Prime Minister's Pension while any former holder of that office is still in
Parliament.
* A Bill for an Actto amend The Professional Engineers Act.
* A Bill for an Act to Amend the Rent Control and to Increase the Ceiling on
Controlled Rent.
THE ECONOMY

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:
The Bahamian economy is in remarkably robust condition today. This is not
the result of accident. It is due instead to a variety of factors not the least of
which is the disciplined and prudent management of public finances to which
my Government has studiously adhered since May of 2002. Equally note-
worthy is my Government's promotion of economic expansion through sound
and sensible policies that have had wide appeal to investors both foreign and
domestic over the past 31/2 years.

Indeed, my Government's guidance and management of the economy in that
period has been instrumental in making The Bahoamas one.of the most buoy-
ant and competitive economies in the region.

A strong economy provides the launching pad for substantial improvements in
the living standards of all Bahamians. A strong economy means more and bet-
ter employment opportunities and more and better opportunities for business
development for Bahamian entrepreneurs.

A strong economy also means rising Government revenues which can be al-
located to progressively relieve the tax burden on lower-income Bahamian
households and to expand the range and quality of essential Government
services.

Indeed, since 2002, rather than increasing the burden of taxation by introduc-
ing new taxes, my Government continues instead to put primary emphasis on
maximizing revenue collection from existing taxes and duties and decreasing
the burden of taxation. The recent amendments to the Stamp Act represent
an excellent example of this emphasis and have already achieved impressive
results.

My Government is committed to strengthen revenue administration through
improved use of technology and analysis. Where considered necessary, amend-
ments will continue to be made to existing revenue laws to close loopholes, to
enhance the revenue collection process and to reduce leakages of revenue.

GOVERNMENT TO THE PEOPLE

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:


My Government reaffirms its commitment to providing government's services
on-line through The Bahamas Government On-line Initiative.
The Registrar General's Department is already on-line. Other Ministries and
Departments will follow.
Special programmes will be put in place so that government will regularly ac-
count to the people.
ENTREPRENEURIAL DEVELOPMENT

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government will continue its strategy of attracting high quality international
and domestic investment but greater emphasis will now be placed on provid-
ing incentives and concessions for the more rapid development of Bahamian
entrepreneurial talent.
My Government is determined to spread the economic blessings of our land
amongst the widest number of persons possible. This will enable a new cadre of
Bahamian entrepreneurs with the talent, the drive, the management expertise
and the financial backing needed to succeed not only locally but in the highly
competitive global environment.

A new Domestic Investment Board will therefore be formed to act as the prima-
ry catalyst for the management of applications for assistance from Bahamian
entrepreneurs. The Domestic Investment Board will cut red tape for Bahamians
investors. Small businesses will also be supported by enhancing the relation-
ship between the Development Bank, BAIC, the various government loan guar-
antee programmes, the government sponsored venture capital programme and
the Board.

FINANCIAL SERVICES INDUSTRY

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:
Our Financial Services industry continues to hold vast, untapped potential for
the Bahamian economy and the Bahamian people.

My Government will therefore:

* Continue to focus on the implementation of the Strategic Plan for Investment
and the Strategic Plan for Financial Services; and
* Continue to partner with the private sector to bring to market a new array
of financial products and services that will maintain the competitive advantage
of The Bahamas in international private banking, estate-planning and private
wealth management.

To give further support to the industry, my Government intends to place before
you a Bill for an Act to Regulate Private Trust Companies. A Bill for a new
External Insurance Act is also expected to be laid before you.

My Government will continue to be vigilant in its goal of being a "One-Stop-
Shop" for investors, both local and foreign. In addition, my Government will
continue to review its application procedures with a view to further expediting
the processing of applications.
HOTEL CORPORATION OF THE BAHAMAS

Madam President anifHonourable Senators,; .
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government has successfully completed the privatization of its Cable Beach
holdings with Baha Mar Development Co. Ltd. for the development of a mega
world-class resort destination.
The Hotel Corporation of The Bahamas will focus in the immediate future on
securing suitable investors to develop its extensive properties in Andros and
Eleuthera and other Government-owned sites in other Family Islands, consistent
with my Government's anchor resort policy for major islands.

The Report On Poverty shows that the greatest incidence of poverty occurs in
the southern Bahamas. This fact was a catalyst in my government's decision
to enter into an historic public private sector joint venture between The Hotel
Corporation of The Bahamas and the I Group of Boston."
The joint venture entity, to be known as Mayaguana Island Developers Ltd.,
will spearhead the orderly development on the island of Mayaguana of an
eco-sensitive resort community at the island of Mayaguana. It will have all
the infrastructural, social and educational facilities expected of a development
of this magnitude.

A whole new range of economic opportunities for Bahamian families and entre-
preneurs, building and service contractors, and resort workers will open up as
a result of this pioneering venture in Mayaguana.

An initiative to develop Inagua as an eco-sensitive destination is on-going.

During this session, a bill will be laid before you for the establishment of a
Tourism Development Corporation to replace the Hotel Corporation of The Ba-
hamas. The role of this new corporation will be to engender greater ownership
of Bahamians in the tourism industry, whether as owners of resort properties or
as providers of goods and support services.
TOURISM

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:
The Bahamas achieved a second record-setting year in total tourist arrivals in
2005, receiving more than five million visitors.
Demand for the Islands of The Bahamas remains high.

Over the course of this session of Parliament, significant improvements in the
following areas will reap rewards for The Islands of The Bahamas.

* Downtown Redevelopment, including the Straw Market;
* Expanded and improved airport facilities;
* New or expanded cruise port facilities;
On the service-improvement front; renewed focus on the training and re-train-
ing of persons employed in the tourism sector and Awareness Programmes for
the general public will be undertaken.

A new Time Share Act will be introduced to expand the time share business in
The Bahamas.
My Government will also introduce a bill for a Film Incentives Act to stimulate
the expansion of this sector of the tourism industry and to create greater op-
portunities for Bahamians in the film industry.


NATIONAL SECURITY

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:
My Government continues to be committed to ensuring the safety and security
of our communities 'nd to the maintenance of the territorial sovereignty of The
Bahamas.

My Government will therefore spare no effort to reduce crime and lawlessness
in our land and to better defend our borders against illegal immigrants, drug
traffickers and poachers and the possibility of terrorist acts.


ROYAL BAHAMAS POUCE FORCE

My Government will continue the process of modernization of the Royal Baha-
mas Police Force.

The enrollment of the Force will be expanded as will its involvement in school
policing, tourism policing, and the highly successful and internationally ac-
claimed Urban Renewal Programme, which has been proven to be effective in
the prevention of crime.

My Government will lay before you a Bill for a Police Service Act 2006. Whilst
society can never compensate for officers injured or fallen in the line of duty,
this Bill will ensure that their spouses and dependents are properly compen-
sated and maintained. It is also intended that this Bill shall have retroactive
effect for those fallen in the line of duty and that these provisions shall apply to
all law enforcement agencies.

My Government will also build on the capacity of the Police for rapid response
and high visibility in communities throughout The Bahamas.

My Government will effect improvements at the forensic laboratory, including
the ability to conduct DNA testing. Legislation will be introduced to effect this
initiative.

My Government continues to be concerned about the use of firearms and illegal
weapons to perpetrate crimes of violence. As a consequence, My Government
will design and place before you a broad range of strategies and legislation to
combat crime. These will include amendments to the Bail Act.

My Government will continue to intensify its efforts to interdict illegal drugs
and drug smuggling.
ROYAL BAHAMAS DEFENCE FORCE

The Royal Bahamas Defence Force in our archipelagic nation continues to
represent the front line in our ongoing war against illegal immigration and
poaching.

Having engaged in a review, measures will be taken to expand and deepen the
training capacity of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force.

The enrollment of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force will be increased as well.
Efforts will be made to continue to bring Royal Bahamas Defence Force marines
more fully into the national effort to interdict drug trafficking.

Improvements in the conditions of service will be effected in the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force.
ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION

My Government is deeply concerned about the problem of illegal immigration
in our country. We understand and appreciate the mounting concerns of the
Bahamian people over this issue. We shall resolutely protect the integrity of
our borders.

Creative and innovative measures will be taken in this regard, including the
amendment of the Immigration Act to make provision for the following mat-
ters:

- To more effectively combat the illegal trafficking in human persons that has
grown so significantly of late;,', i' !: s
To increase the punishment of persons who assist in the illegal landing of
aliens; and
-To increase the punishment of persons who employ illegal immigrants without
obtaiiingithererquisite work permit.

Policies and strategies will be implemented to address the circumstances and is-
sues arising from the existence of communities of illegal immigrants. Steps will
be taken to eliminate the illegal occupancy of land throughout The Bahamas.

Legislation relating to the management of refugee and or asylum claims will
also be introduced.
PRISON SECURITY

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:
My Government will continue the process of modernization of Her Majesty's
Prison.

My Government will lay before you The Bahamas Department of Corrections Bill
(2006) to replace the Prison Act.
The Remand Court in the vicinity of the Prison will be completed by the end of
2006. This will eliminate the need to transport persons on remand along the
streets of New Providence.

My Government's initiatives will enhance security systems at the Prison and
increase training resources as well as enhance conditions of service for Prison
Officers.

My Government will also continue with the necessary planning for a new, mod-
ern, maximum security prison.

IMPROVING THE DELIVERY OF JUDICIAL SERVICES

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government recognizes that access to an efficient and fair justice system is
essential to our democracy and the rule of law.
My Government will provide every support to the Judiciary in implementing
its case management systems, using information technology, revised rules and
improved facilities and resources to address the backlog of cases.
My Government remains resolute in protecting the judicial process from any
interference or intimidation of witnesses. Therefore, my Govemment will pro-
ceed with a Justice Protection Bill in this session of Parliament to criminalize
acts which impede the cooperation of persons as witnesses in court. This new
measure will also establish a Witness Protection Programme to provide protec-
tion and safety for witnesses who may be the object of intimidation and threats
of harm.

My Government will bring to Parliament very early in this session an amend-
ment to the Jurors Act to provide for alternate jurors in criminal trials in the
Supreme Court. This will avoid the loss of time and resources when 6 juror, for
whatever reason, has to be excused.


Further, my Government will establish a career path within the Public Service
for Court Reporters, to improve the efficiency of the recording of judicial pro-
ceedings.

Initiatives will be taken to address the rights of victims of crime.

The hard work and diligence of my Government have led to the removal of The
Bahamas from the monitoring list of the Financial Action Task Force ("FATF").
My Government will continue to increase the resources and capacity of the
Office of the Attorney General to respond in a timely manner to judicial and
regulatory requests for international co-operation.
Further, my Government is committed to improving the terms and conditions of
service of legal officers.


--I
---








MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 9C


THE TRIBUNE


SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

The per capital income in The Bahamas is $17,883, one of the highest in the
region an indication of our strong economy.
The 2001 Bahamas Living Conditions Survey, received by my Government in
2005, has for the first time provided a factual assessment of the level of poverty
in our country. The survey found that more than 50% of the country's poor are
children 14 years or younger.

At the same time 1 in 12 residents in New Providence and Grand Bahama and 1
in 5 in the Southern Islands are living under the poverty line of $2,863 per an-
num. Five percent of households in The Bahamas live below the poverty line.

My Government finds this state of affairs intolerable and unacceptable.

My Government has, therefore, designed policies to address this issue and will
resolutely continue our innovative empowerment and support programmes.

My Government shall also present initiatives to assist families experiencing
challenges with the support and control of children and to increase the effi-
ciency of rehabilitative efforts and to promote alternatives to the sentencing of
juveniles, including the mandate that the child and parent attend parenting or
counseling sessions.

The following legislation will be introduced: -
(i) Affiliation Proceedings (Amendment) Bill
(ii) Domestic Violence & Sexual Harassment (Amendment) Bill
(iii) Children & Young Persons (Administration of Justice) (Amendment) Bill

" ,: EQUALITY OF OPPORTUNITY FOR THE DISABLED

My Government, after consultation, will also introduce legislation to protect the
rights of persons with disabilities.
LAND POLICY

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
SMr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:
My Government, in consultation with all stakeholders, including the Bahamian
public will create a new land policy. This land policy will address, amongst
other things; availability of land fbr current and future generations of Baha-
mians and beach access. The policy will also include a regulatory framework,
environmental components and monitoring mechanisms.

VMy Gqyernment has also initiated a project that will address key land issues
including the development of a modern land registration, system, the better
utilization of commonage and the availability of Crown Land to Bahamians.

My Government is finalizing Master Development Plans for the Islands of Eleu-
thera, Exuma and Mayaguania; Aplan'for New Providence is expected to be
completed by the end of 2006. ::. :; .

AVIATION

Madam President and Honourable Senators; i. .
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

Legislation will be laid before Parliament for the renaming of Nassau Interna-
tional Airport as The Sir Lynden Pindling international Airlqrt in tribute to the
memory of the late Founding Father of our Nation.
My Government recently signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Vancou-
ver Airport Services, a company with worldwide airport management experi-
ence, for the operation, management and re-development of Nassau Interna-
tional Airport for a term of 10 years. Nassau International Airport, a principal
gateway to our nation, will be transformed into a world-class facility.

Legislation will also be introduced to support airport development and enhance-
ment, including the creation of a Civil Aviation Authority.

My Government will install and inaugurate the ASR-9 Radar which was recently
acquired at a cost of more than $8 million.

METEOROLOGY

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government will improve its preparedness to combat the effects of natural
weather disasters by the use of the Doppler Radar System. My Government will
further enhance its capabilities by a Direct Readout Ground Station which will
collect and post information from 14 major islands on the Internet.

MARITIME AFFAIRS

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

.My Government is committed to the modernization of legislation governing
maritime affairs. My Government will introduce legislation to amend the key
maritime laws. A commercial Watersports Bill to provide regulatory oversight
for commercial watersports activity in The Bahamas will be introduced to the
Parliament.


ROAD TRAFFIC

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:
My Government will introduce legislation to create a unified bussing system.
My Government is concerned about road safety and will introduce a series of
initiatives and legislation, including seat belt and breathalyzer provisions to
address this critical matter.

PUBLIC UTILITIES,
WATER & SEWERAGE CORPORATION

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

SSince'May 2002, my Government has demonstrated its commitment to the
implementation of a Long-Term Strategic Plan to ensure that each and every
citizen of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas has access to a high quality, reli-
aoblb potable water supply system and a modern sewerage collection, treatment
and disposal network in compliance with local and international standards.

My Government will continue to provide adequate supplies of potable water in
New Providence and the Family Islands through public private sector partner-
ship.

BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANY LTD.
My Government is pleased to report thal The Bahamas Telecommunications
Company Limited has been able to reduce its Domestic Long Distance Rates
by some fifty-five (55%) percent and its International Long Distance Rates by
some 70%.


My Government remains committed to the privatization of The Bahamas Tele-
communications Company.

My Government is committed to enabling affordable, reliable communication
across The Bahamas. This will be accomplished by BTC's fibre-optic cable link
of the entire Bahamas and by cable television services. These links will also
enable the entire Bahamas to receive cable television service.
BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

During 2006, the Bahamas Electricity Corporation, at a cost of some $21.8 Mil-
lion, will conclude the installation of three additional generators. The addition
of these units to the BEC and Paradise Island network will increase capacity and
improve reliability and efficiency. Substantial cost savings should also be real-
ized through lower fuel costs. These savings will be passed on to consumers as
indeed was done for the first time in 2003 under my Government.
PUBUC WORks

The maintenance and continued expansion of public infrastructure is a major
priority of my government. Major road construction works presently in prog-
ress in New Providence, Grand Bahama, Bimini, Russell Island, and mainland
Eleuthera will be completed. The hurricane restoration project throughout the
Family Islands as well as in the western portion of New Providence will also
continue.
The other important elements of my Government's ongoing programme for
infrastructural development, whether in terms of roadworks, bridges, health
care facilities, docks or other construction activity, will be laid out in detail.
HOUSING

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

Recognising the right of Bahamians to decent, affordable housing, my Govern-
ment has constructed more than eight hundred (800) homes since assuming
office and is now in the process of constructing an additional one thousand
homes (1,000) in New Providence, Grand Bahama and the Family Islands.

My Government will also continue the construction of additional rental units
and will develop new housing initiatives, particularly in islands experiencing
rapid economic expansion.

In tandem with these initiatives, my Government, through The Bahamas Mort-
gage Corporation, will provide assistance to the Ministry of Housing & National
Insurance with financing of subdivisions totaling in excess of $42 million dollars
and for the completion of a corporate office complex to house the Bahamas
Mortgage Corporation, the Department of Housing and the Ministry of Hous-
ing.

URBAN RENEWAL PROGRAMME

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

Recognising the success of the Urban Renewal Programme and its positive effect
on communities and citizens, my Government will allocate more resources to
expand the programme to communities across The Bahamas.

EDUCATION

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:
My Government recognizes that education is the primary means to sustain and
advance the economic, social and cultural growth and development of The Ba-
hamas. Far reaching initiatives will be introduced to continue the transforma-
tion of the system of education.

My Government, determined to give all Bahamian children a head start, will
continue its expansion of pre-school education by building additional pre-school
units in New Providence and the Family Islands.

Reaching out to children of special needs, my Government will continue to imple-
ment the recommendations of the National Commission on Special Education,
especially in relation to early identification, implementation and remediation.

The infrastructural requirements of the education system will be addressed by
the construction of new schools, the modernization of existing schools and a
dedicated maintenance programme.

My Government reaffirms its commitment to provide quality and equity in the
delivery of education throughout The Bahamas. A National Distance Education
Programme will be established. A Bill for the establishment of the Accreditation
and Equivalency Council will be introduced

Legislation will'also be introduced to accredit all institutions of learning.

My Government appreciates the requirements of aligning technical and voca-
tional education and training to industry demand and the rapid expanding
economy. The Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute will be restructured
to improve the delivery of technical and vocational education and training, and
major initiatives to equip Bahamians, particularly those who are presently un-
employed, will be established.

My Government will continue to transform the College of The Bahamas into an
accredited university.
HEALTH CARE


Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government remains convinced that health care is a basic right to which all
people are entitled as a matter of moral imperative.

Therefore, my Government will continue with its announced programme of
building modern community clinics and mini hospitals across The Bahamas.
Major improvements will also be made to the Princess Margaret and Rand Me-
morial Hospitals and to the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre and other health
care facilities.

The Healthy Lifestyle Initiative will be introduced throughout The Bahamas.
THE ENVIRONMENT

My Government will continue to assiduously pursue policies to protect our pris-
tine environment, a gift from God for generations of Bahamians yet unborn.

Legislation will be introduced to enhance and strengthen the regulatory and
enforcement powers of the BEST Commission.

NATIONAL HEALTH INSURANCE

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable Hquse of Assembly:

My Government is convinced that a fully functioning, sustainable system of
National Health Insurance is necessary.

My Government will continue with extensive public consultations in this regard
and has mandated an independent review of the costing.


PUBLIC SERVICE

Madam President and Honourable Senators
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly;

In furtherance of my government's new training thrust, an Institute for Public
Service Training will be created.
A comprehensive review of the system for engagement and pensions for all
classes of public employees will be conducted.

Legislation will be introduced to amend the Parliamentary Pensions Act.

FOREIGN AFFAIRS

My Government will also amend the Passport Act. My Government will pur-
chase a system for machinereadable passports which will introduce a signifi-
cantly higher level of security for Bahamian passports.

My Government will cause Foreign Service Orders to be laid before you to estab-
lish and regulate the terms and conditions of service for diplomats and Consular
Officers who serve at home and abroad.

YOUTH, SPORTS & CULTURE

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Honourable Members of the House of Assembly:

It is the intention of My Government to erect multi-purpose facilities, inclusive of
Track and Field, Softball, Baseball, Basketball, and Volleyball, on a scheduled
basis in the Family Islands.

My Government will immediately commence the construction of sports facilities
at the Doris Johnson High School and the C. V. Bethel High School.

My Government has successfully completed a pilot project towards the estab-
lishment of a Notional Youth Service and is committed to expanding the pro-
gramme.

My Government is committed to creating opportunities for our youth to maxi-
mize their potential so as to enable them to participate fully in the social and
economic life of our country. In this regard, we will continue to pursue initia-
tives to empower them.
CULTURE

Culture touches every facet of our national life. It contributes more than any-
thing else to the consolidation of our national identity and an awareness of our
uniqueness.

My Government will redouble its efforts to find and support Bahamian novel-
ists, playwrights, poets, artists, musicians and actors.

The Clifton site has been purchased and is now being developed into a Notional
Heritage Park.

My Government will place before you legislation to establish a National Endow-
ment for the Arts.

LOCAL GOVERNMENT,
AGRICULTURE & FISHERIES; CO-OPERATIVES
Mr. President and Honourable Senators,
Madam Speaker and Members of the Honourable lHouse ofAssembly,
Amendments to the Local Government Act will be introduced to enable the sys-
tem of local government to operate more efficiently.

Regulations to give effect to the Cooperatives Act passed in 2003 will also be
promulgated.

The Food Safety legislation will be modernized to meet the current world situ-
ation with respect to international trade and new and emerging food safety
concerns.

The Animal Control Act will be amended to create greater responsibility and
accountability of owners of animals.

The Public Slauglter House Act will be amended to permit the designation of
locations other than New Providence as approved slaughter facilities and to
allow for the licencing of facilities as necessary.

My Government will also introduce a number of initiatives within the area of
agriculture in on effort to effect rapid and significant results. Of particular note
in this regard, my Government will establish a demonstration and training farm
at North Andros. This demonstration and training facility will be associated
with the Ministry Agricultural Fisheries, the College of The Bahamas and the
National Youth Programme.

My Government will expand the cascarilla industry in the Southeastern Baha-
mas.
CONCLUSION

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Honourable Members of the House of Assembly:

The measures that I have outlined to you today will in their totality move the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas and its people to unprecedented heights.

Unprecedented heights may be measured by the strength of our economy.

Today, my government challenges all Bahamians to another measure a mea-
sure where the weakest amongst us is safe and our society is secure, cohesive
and strong a society where no Bahamian is left behind and persons who may
have failed are empowered to seize the opportunity of a second chance.

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly;

If we are to be successful in this effort, we must become our brother's keeper
and each Bahamian regardless of race, denomination or gender, experiences
their God-given meaning, dignity and value.

Each Bahamian must also accept the challenge to fully develop their God given
talent.


Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honorable House of Assembly;

As we move forward, upward, and onward together let every section of the Ba-
hamian orchestra the Church, private sector, charity groups and Government
Some together to create symphony that will resound the length and breadth of
The Bahamas a symphony that will cause all to acknowledge The Bahamas as
the best little nation in the world.

May Almighty God rest upon your counsels
and guide your deliberations.













ISSUES IDEAS


Dhe Mliami -eratO


INTERNATIONAL EDITION


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2006


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