Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00316
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: February 6, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00316
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text








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The


Tribune


Volume: 102 No.64

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erar~LLUJ


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2006


PRICE 750


Medical Association

supports concept -

but believes health

care will deteriorate


Hanna's first engagement


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
THE Medical Association of
the Bahamas expressed its
"grave concern" yesterday, that
the proposed National Health
Care Insurance plan, will
adversely affect the quality of
healthcare received by all
Bahamians despite governmen-
t's "noble intentions" to do oth-
erwise.
In a 10-page statement the
Medical Association of the
Bahamas (MAB) said that
while it fully supports any new
funding mechanisms that will
guarantee all Bahamians have
access to a package of compre-
hensive health services, Nation-
al Health Insurance (NHI) will
not work as presently proposed.
About 130 doctors signed the
statement in support of the
MAB's position.
"The Medical Association
acknowledges the increasing
and high costs of health care in
the Bahamas; the need to pro-
vide, for specific funding for
health care is long overdue.
"We do not believe or accept,
however, that the national or
universal health insurance
scheme as proposed is the
viable option for the Bahamas;
every country in the world that
has embarked on this tradition-
al centralized universal nation-
al health plan is now under
major health care reform. We
do not feel that our people
should suffer from the same


mistake," the MAB said.
The organization said that the
"assumptions" used to derive
the conclusions that form the
pillars of the NHI Scheme are
flawed or imprecise.
The MAB acknowledged that
the ti,..'sury has been chal-
lenged to meet the increasingly
costly health care services and
that the impact of these high
costs creates the potential for
sizable budgetary deficits, dras-
tically curtails the available
funds for capital development,
institutionalizes health care
rationing and more importantly
threatens to erode current
accomplishments in health care
delivery.
It also admitted that the
country is faced with the chal-
lenge of having to duplicate
health services throughout the
country.
However, after "thorough
and deliberate review" of the
Blue Ribbon Commission's
Report and the financial pro-
jections the MAB said that it
does not believe that the NHI
Scheme adequately addresses
the real problems and chal-
lenges faced by our health care
system.
It said that it is committed to
the idea of additional dialogue,
thoughtful discussion and care-
ful revision of this with the plan
but in its current form it "will
not get us where we ought to
go."


SEE page 15


* GOVERNOR General Arthur Hanna with his wife Beryl clap as they listen to the Chamber Orchestra of Nazareth College from
Rochester, New York and The National Choir on Saturday night at Christ Church Cathedral
(Photo: Franklyn Ferguson)


Private firms
'will benefit

under NHI'
. By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE implementation of the
proposed National Health
Insurance plan should allow
private insurance firms to make
more money because they will
be able to offer cheaper health
care packages, it was claimed
yesterday.
According to Dr Stanley Lal-
ta, manager of the project, the
financial models of the proposed
programme suggest that private
companies will do more business
in terms of members because
they will not have to provide as
comprehensive a package.
"What we expect will happen
is that there are many persons
who currently have health insur-
ance plans who may find the
SEE page 15


Buyer for
Royal Oasis
could emerge
this week

* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
A BUYER for the Royal
Oasis Resort could be forth-
coming this week, Tourism
Minister Obie Wilchcombe
announced while on Grand
Bahama, according to Associ-
ated Press.
"I am happy to tell you today
that I was informed just this
afternoon that due diligence is
being done as I speak.
"And, hopefully, by the mid-
dle of next week, we will get an
indication from Lehman Broth-
ers as to who should become
the new owners of Royal
Oasis," Mr Wilchcombe said at
the reopening of 200 rooms at
SEE page 15


'1I
Shock at photos of men

believed in Fox Hill


I By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
HUMAN rights advocates
have expressed shock at pho-
tos showing two men shack-
led and naked lying in
smeared blood, believed to'
have been taken at Her
Majesty's Prison.


The Ministry of National
Security has expressed strong
concern over the photos and
has vowed to launch an imme-
diate investigation to deter-
mine their authenticity and
whether the two inmates are, in
fact, escaped convicts Forrester
SEE page 15


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PAGIF 9 MONDAY FEBRUARY 6. 2006


THE TRIBUNE'


Full text of letter from MAB about NHI plan


W HILE agreeing that all
Bahamians should have
access to comprehensive health services,
the Medical Association of the Bahamas
is concerned that the proposed Nation-
al Health Care Insurance plan will
adversely affect the quality of that ser-
vice.
The doctors' statement, released by
the MAB yesterday after a breakfast
meeting with Health Minister Dr Marcus
Bethel on Friday, was signed by about
130 doctors.
The following under the heading:
"Proposed NHI plan won't do as is" -
is the full text of the MBA's statement:
"At the Alma Ata Conference in
1978, the World Health Organization
reaffirmed the declaration of its 1946
Constitution that health care was a fun-
damental human right of all peoples.
Launching the mission 'Health Care for
All', the WHO and member countries
promised to deliver basic health care
for the world's population by the year
2000. Few governments (in both devel-
oped and developing countries) have
lived up to the challenge. They have
found health care delivery systems are
complex, costly to implement, manage
and sustain. In every country, guaran-
teed access and availability of appropri-
ate healthcare to all citizens has
remained a formidable challenge. Each
country is faced with its unique array of
issues.
"The Medical Association of the
Bahamas fully supports and endorses
any new funding mechanisms that will
guarantee all Bahamians have access
and equity to a defined package of com-
prehensive health services. We express
our grave concerns however, that the
current BRC proposed National Health
Care Insurance plan, will adversely
affect the quality of healthcare received
by all Bahamians, and curtail timely
access despite the noble intentions to
do otherwise.
"Over the past thirty years, the
Bahamas has achieved country health
care profiles equivalent to those of
Developed countries. However we


ranked 94th out of 191 countries evalu-
ated by WHO in healthcare delivery.
Given the archipelagic reality of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas, where
duplication and replication of health ser-
vices by the government is a necessity.
However, delivery of healthcare remains
less than perfect.
"The Consolidated Fund has been
saddled with the burgeoning costs of
delivering increasingly more expensive
health care services. The impact of these
high costs creates the potential for size-
able budgetary deficits, drastically cur-
tails the available funds for capital devel-
opment, institutionalizes health care
rationing and more importantly threat-
ens to erode current accomplishments in
health care delivery.
"The provision of adequate funding
for health care services has become a
formidable challenge. The.Government
of the Bahamas once again seeks to
address the issue of guaranteeing health
care services to all citizens.
"In 2002, the National Blue Ribbon
Commission was established to address
this pertinent issue of funding health
care services to determine the feasibili-
ty of implementing a National Health
Insurance Scheme: 'one that would
ensure that health care for ALL could
be guaranteed, protected and free from
financial burden at the time of use'.
"The Blue Ribbon Commission's
report concluded that a national social-
ized health insurance is the favoured
option. First, this mandates that all
employed workers pay health insurance
premiums via joint contributions from
employees and employers. Second, that
the mandatory premiums payment for
the comprehensive benefits package
should be paid to and managed by the
NIB; Third, the participation of the pri-
vate insurance sector will be confined
solely to a "supplementary insurance
responsibility."
"At the Press release in January 2006,
the Medical Association of the Bahamas
and the population at large were
informed of the preliminary price tag
of the proposed NHI initiative, costs of
the comprehensive benefits package to


employees and employers, and hence
the implications of the introduction of
this national financial expense.
"After thorough and deliberate
review of the Blue Ribbon Commis-
sion's Report and the financial projec-
tions, as the primary advocates for health
in the country, we, The Medical Associ-
ation of The Bahamas (MAB) reiterate
our deep concerns that the NHI Scheme,
if implemented as currently proposed,
will adversely affect the quality of
healthcare received by all Bahamians,
and curtail timely access despite the
noble intentions to do otherwise. Further
as the professionals who are duty-bound
to implement and deliver healthcare
(along with others such as nurses, health
administrators, etc.), we do not believe
that the NHI Scheme adequately
addresses the real problems and chal-
lenges faced by our healthcare system.
"Fundamentally, we wish to ensure
that there is additional dialogue,
thoughtful discussion and careful revi-
sion of this far-reaching national plan
to achieve meaningful reform of our
healthcare system. We agree with and
are committed to positively impacting
the health of our nation. This plan will
not get us where we ought to go!
"The Medical Association of the
Bahamas does not accept or support the
conclusions and financial projections of
this socialized health insurance scheme
as the best option for funding health
care in the Bahamas. We can categori-
cally state that the assumptions used to
derive the conclusions that form the pil-
lars of the NHI Scheme are flawed or
imprecise.
"Most importantly, we are not con-
vinced that the prerequisite infrastruc-
tural improvement, equipment and tech-
nology acquisition, and tangible quality
enhancement initiatives all of which
are needed and have been recommend-
ed prior to the launch of such a com-
prehensive and far-reaching plan -
have been adequately planned, realisti-'
cally budgeted or even minimally imple-
mented.
"We highlight three prominent fea-
tures of the proposed NHI Propodal


which ought to cause serious national
concern:
"1. The overall cost of implementing
the programme will have a negative
impact on the individual discretionary
income of Bahamians as well as the
national economy. This is tantamount
to a new tax burden. We believe that
The NHI scheme will be far more
expensive to implement and maintain
than stated. This should force us to care-
fully study the impact of NHI on the
real cost of living and the resultant
impact on the national economy.
"The financial projections to cover
the cost of the comprehensive benefits
and 'infrastructural strengthening' as
outlined in the initial release by the BRC
are unrealistic. Nor do the projections
address future enhancements which will
have to take place in many communities
nation-wide.
"All of our public healthcare facilities
currently face serious challenges to meet
the demands of the population because
of maintenance and capacity woes, struc-
tural inadequacies and obsolete design.
None of these facilities have modern
information technology systems or ade-
quate diagnostic or therapeutic capacity
to meet the current demands of the pop-
ulation. All are in real need of funda-
mental reform predicated on patient sat-
isfaction, quality service and outcomes
based efficiency. Experience of all of
our geographic neighbours attests to the
elusive nature of funding healthcare.
"The MAB challenges the validity of
the proposed scheme to deliver the
promised increased access and quality of
care it so expounds. The hallmark of
every national health care system in
which access and equity are central to its
existence is an exponential increase in
utilization of services. As people will be
paying directly for their healthcare, there
is an entitlement and a right for care.
Noting the current demands on the
emergency services and hospital-based
care, the MAB perceives the experi-
ences will be as that of Canada. We
quote several examples of waiting times
for non-urgent care; an average of four
months for an MRI Scan, 6 months for


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Open Heart Surgery, 1 year for joint
replacement surgery; and people die
while waiting for treatment. How soon
after we embark on the National Health
Insurance Plan will the Government
have a website for waiting lists as they do
in every Canadian Province? The Gov-
ernment recently announced that the
Cuban screening programme for eye
care within weeks revealed hundreds of
Bahamians in need of cataract surgery.
What about screening programmes for
cancers and heart disease, our two
biggest killers? How many more
Bahamians will be identified in need of
care? How long will our waiting lists be
for the very people who now have more.
access to care? And when care is
accessed, what utilization rates have we
projected? And at what costs?
"When Medicare in the USA was
created in 1965, forecasters estimated it
would cost $37 billion a year. By 1990, it
cost $67 billion rising to more than
$200 billion in 2003 a 300 per cent
increase within 10 years. The Medicare
Prescription Drug Improvement Act of
2004 was estimated at $400 billion when
introduced. In an article published by
the CBS News (2/05) "The administra-
tion now concedes that drug coverage,
which starts in 2006, will cost taxpayers
$723 billion over the next ten years,
nearly $200 billion more than earlier
projected." Pharmacy coverage is one of
the covered benefits of the NHI plan as
well! These illustrations highlight the
likely impact of an NHI plan if not care-
fully considered and adequately planned.
"2. It is also important for the public
to be aware that the NHI plan is to be
financially self-sustainable. The Gov-
ernment maintains that it will continue
its present contribution to healthcare
from the National Budget. Our concern
is that as the cost of healthcare increas-
es over time, where will the balance of
funds be obtained? New Taxes? Bud-
getary allocation? Increased premiums?
"The MAB believes that it is also
important for the Bahamian public to
appreciate that while the private insur-
ance sector will be able to participate
in providing health insurance coverage,
its participation is significantly curtailed
with the government's one-payer mech-
anism. While the savings of a one-payer
system as proposed by the BRC has
merit, the implications are that the need
for these related administrative and
management jobs in the private sector
will become redundant. So too will the
right of Bahamians to have their health
insurance services managed exclusive.
of government bureaucracy unless one
-is-ppretpared upaythe-duplicat cos-fo
a comprehensive package of benefits in
the private insurance company; paying
the comprehensive package to NIB is
mandated by law.
"The MAB is concerned of the
potential negative impact on innovation,
quality and productivity by this shift in
management of one of the largest sectors
of our economy. With this legislative
thrust, we will be expanding the public
sector and extending the inefficiencies
and inertia that have historically been
vexing problems in the healthcare sector
to date.
"3. The Medical Association of the
Bahamas fully supports government ini-
tiatives to identify and implement solu-
tions to provide adequatefunding for
health care services.
"But we are even more concerned'
that those additional funds collected are
utilized to the real benefit of the people.
Based on the current problems faced
we are not convinced that this is solely a
challenge of collecting more money. A
new tax burden should only be imple-
mented if the net positive effect of that
tax is worth the real cost to those paying
the bill.
."At a presentation to the Blue Rib-
bon Commission, the Association rec-
ommended that the government seek
to explore and improve the Public-Pri-
vate Partnership initiatives that currently
exist in the country and which have
demonstrated real value for the Bahami-
an public.
"The purchase of health care services
in the private sector (i) reduces signifi-
cantly the need for government to pro-
vide health capital investment; (ii)
ensures the provision of state-of-the-art
technology and its access to both public
and private sector patients and (iii)
negates the inefficiency of the civil ser-
vice bureaucracy (more than 80 per cent
of health care funding in the Ministry of
Health apply to personal emoluments).
"The most prominent factor in the
increasing cost of health care is the price
tag of technology; Public Private Part-
nerships and cooperation can reduce
significantly this capital burden in the
government's health care budget while
reducing some redundancy as the public
sector struggles to catch up in areas of
technology and equipment acquisition.
"The MAB believes that a strong and.
vibrant private sector, well equipped
and efficient will most effectively com-
plement a similarly developed public
sector. Together, we can deliver safe,
timely healthcare to all of our people
while maintaining and increasing real
choice, service and privacy. For too long,
the public sector has been neglected and
has not had appropriate levels of infra-
structural enhancement. As a conse-
quence, many novel approaches of inter-
sectoral cooperation have been devel-
oped and these have dramatically
strengthened the overall health capacity
of the Bahamas.
"As opposed to ownership of health
care facilities and technologies, the gov-
ernment's philosophy should be focused
on ensuring availability of services and
regulatiili otilhesatliaf standarils. As
the largest purchaser of health care ser-
vices, the government can negotiate the
best prices and thus optimize and max-
imize our tax payers' funds. Economies
of scale and quality considerations in a
nation of our size could preclude redun-
dancy of certain services. Hence cer-
tain services will develop in a "public"
institution while others develop else-


where. More importantly, the'Medical
Association of the Bahamas further sug-,
gested that if we incorporate a national
mutual fund (from the health care yle)
and with contributions.from Private
Insurance companies, a formal com-
munity based rating insurance policy
can be established on a national basis;
this tenet of a national health plan is
particularly suited for the senior citi-
zens and retirees. It allows this trea-
sured segment of our population to con-
tinue with major medical insurance cov-
erage at affordable premiums. In so
doing, this would ensure that every
Bahamian who desires to purchase a
private insurance can do so without fear
of rising annual premiums once they
get sick or losing it when they reach
retirement age. This again would relieve
significantly the costs of service provi-
sion in the public institutions.
"The major investment of the private
sector in health care delivery and its
integration into the public sector is
unprecedented in the region. It has been
the driving factor that has enabled
Bahamians to enjoy the highest stan-
dard of health care delivery both in
access, availability and equity in the Eng-
Slish speaking Caribbean.
"There are currently 31 medical and
surgical specialty and subspecialty dis-
ciplines in the Ministry of Health PMH.
The availability, accessibility and afford-
ability of health care for all Bahamians
are national commitments of our physi-
cians; the fact that the government
employed Consultant staff reflects a full
cadre of Bahamian physicians, attest to
this. There is no country in seeking a
national health insurance initiative that
had at its onset, such a comprehensive
spectrum of health care services in the
public sector and particularly one in
which the public sector services can
equate to that of the private sector care.
The government-maintains that no
Bahamian can be denied care in a gov-
ernment facility because of inability to
pay whether in the primary, secondary
or tertiary levels. Hence theoretically,
the current Public Private Partnership
allows every public patient in the
Bahamas the right to essentially every
available modern medical and surgical
diagnostic and therapeutic service, local-
ly. Through advancing our Public-Pri-
vate Partnerships to maximize our indi-
vidual core competencies, initiatives and
strengths, we can make quality health
care accessible available, equitable -
and affordable to all as well.
"Public-Private Partnerships are not
only for Physician Services. The private
- duty nursing agencies provide vital ser-
vices to our private ward services at the
Princess Margaret Hospital. Nurses
NOW provide essential home care ser-
vices in the community. Pharmacists,
physiotherapists, private laboratories
and other healthcare providers must be
encouraged to formalize service rela-
tionships with the Ministry of Health
and thus reduce the Government's cap-
ital expenditure, while improving access
simultaneously.
"The Blue Ribbon Commission's
report highlights that the fundamental
problem in health care delivery is access
and equity. We agree that more funding
is needed to guarantee this health care
privilege or "right" for all Bahamians
even when we have come so close to
achieving it to date.
"The BRC attempts to reform fund-
ing of health care travelling along an
abandoned health care highway of a cen-
tralized health care budget. Experience
in the Canada, Britain and the Euro-
pean socialized medical systems have
caused them to embrace these privati-
7ation principles which lend to individual
rights and personal responsibilities. The
Association supports this new concept to
-sharing health 'are cost wihthe private
sector.
"We believe that any new plan must
include coverage for catastrophic care
while ensuring systematic reform and
improvement in preventative and pri-
mary care.'
"We are not opposed to funding real
reform via the established tax mecha-
nism of the National Insurance Board
provided that the Bahamliant receive
real value and we note that the NIB is
currently) not yet able to maximize value
for the public
"Having been privileged to serve as
the primary providers of healthcare to
Bahamians, we wish to ensure that any
programme introduced will actually
improve and not diminish equity for
all Bahamians. We have stood and
continue to stand in the trenches of
the public health system and have seen
the problems and suffering of our
patients. Daily we have witnessed first-
hand the consequence of an overbur-
dened, centrally directed and under-
funded system. We believe that any
planned solutions should accurately
reflect the opinions of those charged
with implementing the mandate who are
morally and ethically obliged to maxi-
Suze the benefits that accrue to the most
important stakeholder the patients.
The record reflects that we have called
repeatedly for improvements and have
been forced to create solutions when
the improvements were not forthcoming.
"The Medical Association acknowl-
edges the increasing and high costs of
health care in the Bahamas; the need
to provide for specific funding for health
care is long overdue. We do not believe
or accept, however, that the national or
universal health insurance scheme as
proposed is the viable option for the
Bahamas; every country in the world.
that has embarked on this traditional
centralized'.universal national health
plan is now under major health care
reform. We do not feel that our people
should suffer from the same mistake.
"The MAB will not negate its respon-
sibility to inform and engage the people
of the Bahamas to participate in the
national debate on funding and improv-
ing health care. We wish the best for
our patients nothing more and nothing
less!"


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I


I I LOCAL NEWS


m







MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2006, PAGE 3


SUPREME
COURT

* By SAMORA JUSTIN
ST ROSE
Features Sub-Editor
THE trial of two broth-
ers accused of murdering
Mario Miller, son of Trade
and Industry Minister
Leslie Miller, continues
today in the Supreme
Court almost four years
after the killing.
Last week, Senior Jus-
tice Anita Allen postponed
proceedings until today
after a legal disagreement
arose between prosecution
and defence attorneys.
Ricardo Miller, of Mastic
Point, Andros, also known
as Tamar Lee, and his
brother Ryan Miller, who
is free on bail, allegedly
stabbed the minister's son
to death on June 22, 2002.
His body was found near
Super Value's Winton
foodstore.
The prosecution ended
its cross-examination of
Ricardo Miller last
Wednesday.
Prosecutor Bernard
Turner suggested that Mr
Miller, in his testimony on
Tuesday, fabricated a story
about three men, including
one with a Jamaican accent
and "long locks," being
responsible for Mario
Miller's death during a
drug deal involving a num-
ber of kilograms of
cocaine.
Mr Turner suggested to
the defendant that he and
his brother were the
accountable party. Ricar-
do Miller has affirmed that
his testimony was the truth.
In an unsworn statement
on Tuesday, Ryan Miller
said: "Mr Foreman and
members of the jury, I was
at home. I have no involve-
ment in this murder. I
know of no murder. That's
it."
Ricardo Miller and Ryan
Miller are being represent-
ed by lawyers Philip Hilton
'and Murrio Ducille (assist-
ed by attorney Tamara
Taylor) respectively.


* BRENDA KNOWLES


S CAROLE LAY


Inmate thanks volunteers



who taught him to read


AN inmate who has served
17 years in Fox Hill Prison paid
a touching tribute over the
weekend to volunteers who
taught him to read.
Long-term prisoner Nekita
Hamilton was especially appre-
ciative of Arthurlue Rahming -
wife of prison superintendent
Dr Elliston Rahming and
American Carole Lay, both
key figures in the jail's reading
programme.
He said work done by these
and others through Project
Read Bahamas had helped
change his life for the better.
From being illiterate, he is now
a reader, and he recommended
the scheme to all those who
need such tuition.
His comments came during
Project Read Bahamas' first
annual awards banquet on Sat-
urday night at the British Colo-
nial Hilton, where several vol-
unteers received special
plaques of appreciation.
He told the black-tie audi-
ence that Project Read under
Mrs Rahming's guidance was
having a positive impact on
many lives.
Mr Barry Rassin, the chair-
man whose efforts through
Rotary have been a major
influence in the project's suc-
cess, said the poor literacy rate
in the Bahamas had affected
the escalating crime rate and
caused poor ethics and unem-
ployment woes.
In a message in the banquet
brochure, he wrote: "Our
leader, Arthurlue Rahming,
gives all she has out of her love


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He also thanked "our many
tutors who volunteer their time
helping others learn to read.".
They met students in confi-
dential places at difficult times
and generally revolved the
training around the students.
"I have a great admiration
for an adult who can first admit
that they need help and then
take an active role in getting
into our programme and then
working with our tutors to
learn as much as they can. The
benefits to the individuals and
to our society are life chang-
ing."
Mr Rassin described Project
Read as "fiscally responsible"
with audited statements show-
ing accountability for its



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$55,000 annual budget. -
"Considering we have over
200 volunteer tutors consisten-
rly providing assistance to
adults who want to improve
their reading, numeracy and
writing skills, our funds go far,"
he said.
Those receiving awards were:
Iris Arnett, Bruce Bell, Mary
Thompson, Jacqueline Dack,
Dorothy Evans, Brenda
Knowles Carole Lay, John
Haughton, Ursula McKinney,
Ruth Major, Christopher Rolle,
Jeffrey Robertson, Rev Charles
Sweeting and Nathalie Taylor.
During the evening, the
prison choir performed while
the Police Force Pop Band pro-
vided the music.
Student Jessie Charite gave a
liturgical dance presentation
and comic Miss Daisy held the
audience spellbound for 15
minutes of fun.
Keynote speaker was
Richard King, former president
of Rotary International, who
praised the organisation's role
in improving people's lives.



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~ ~B~E~LOCAL NEWSr

Murder
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-


-------






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2006


3 6*' 0 RSTOTH EITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama



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S ~ C **~ S -


EDITOR, The Tribune
THE Ministry of Education
published an extensive and
flashy report on education yes-
terday detailing everything, I
suggest, other than the real
problem with Bahamian Edq-
cation as taxpayers we have
expended over $1.6 billion over
the past 10 years on Education
and even with all the designed
comments of everyone from
Ministers down we still can only
achieve an "F-grade" in our
national examinations.
We deliberately shroud the
failure of the system by over
empathizing the minority suc-
cesses of the very, very few.
We irresponsibly refuse to
address the latent social and
national security disaster that
will come if we are unable to
move the failure grade to.an
acceptable "C-grade" within the
next five years.
Speech after speech from suc-.
cessive Ministers of Education
simply paste over the problem
as we are unable to recognize
the truth, accept that we must
cause a war on literacy and aca-
demic achievement before what
will ominously face us is that
the majority of our youth will be
unable to read or write -
extremely fertile ground for
delinquent behaviour.
My first step would be to


grade annually the teachers -
any with a failing performance
will be required in the summer
months (three months) to have
to go through a remedial course
which they would be required to
obtain a compulsory "B grade"
in that examination or their
teaching status level will be
reduced to meet their perfor-
mance. Annual certification of
all teachers has to be in place
immediately.
Step two a financial incen-
tive scheme will be established
which will reward the teacher,
the school principal whose stu-
dents obtain an aggregate grade
across the board of "C" or
above, yes consider rewarding
the school that achieves a "B
or A grade" further. This could
be a lump cash sum or percent-
age increase to their salary.
Where there is no passing
grades all non-educational cours-
es such as Sports Junkanoo -
School Band, etc, will be can-
celled till the grades improve in
the examinations. If a school is
unable to attain an improvement
in the aggregate results year over
year those grades, students will
be required to lose their sum-


mer vacation and be required to
attend summer school instead.
The cost for this will be borne by
the guardians-parents as they
must participate in this remedial
action.
Editor, we cannot continue
our laissez-faire attitude to edu-
cation and if the current Minis-
ter or the Government that he
forms part of refuse to act effec-
tively then it is certainly, time
for a change as we may not
even suggest we accept medi-
ocrity and sub-standard educa-
tional levels.
If a turn-around in education
requires bringing in teachers,
experts from outside then we
- to put as I see it- a war sta-
tus has to be established as we
are denying our young people a
chance of an equitable future
and no politician, no society, no
nation may do that.

N RUSSELL
Nassau
January 10 2006
P.S. We all must recognize
that in the 9+years of the FNM
between 1992-2002 they could
improve the examination results
or the inheriting current Gov-
ernment but then I will give
them they have only been in
office for 36+months, a too
shorter a time to cause educa-
tional improvements.


The difference between



Hillary and Condoleeza


EDITOR, The Tribune
I REALISE that we have a
lot of exciting happenings right
here at home of late, what with
prison breaks and such, but I
would like to comment on the
recent shenanigans of an Amer-
ican politician for the purpose
of this letter. Thanking you in
advance...
Hillary Clinton says that the
present White House is being
run like a "plantation". This
would be funny enough on its
own, but she made her remarks
at a recent occasion honouring
the late, great Martin Luther
King Jr, and, of course, there
was a very large audience of
black people at this function.
Boy, talk about kissin' political
a--!
Contrast this very cheap shot
by Mrs Clinton with the char-
acter of the Secretary of State,
Condoleeza Rice, who I was


fortunate enough to accidental-
ly catch on C-Span today
addressing Georgetown Uni-
versity.
Ms Rice has got to be one of
the most intelligent individuals
in American politics today. And
even if one does not agree with
her particular brand of politics,
one must concede that she is
one smooth and collected
speaker. She is never flustered,
and she is able to hold her own
in the "boys club". And this in
spite of the fact that she is mere-
ly a house Negro according to
another very hateful liberal, Mr
Harry Belafonte.
Will the Bush Administration
go down as one of the worst in
American history like Mrs Clin-
ton suggests? Perhaps. Will
Hillary Clinton ever quit mak-
ing cheap shots, and try to stick
with the issues? Perhaps not.
Unfortunately, Mrs Clinton
does not represent people who


really care about the issuesas
much as they thrive on emo-
tional motivation to keep them
fired up about the evil Bush
Administration.
I am not a black man, but I
have to tell you that I am
extremely proud of Condoleez-
za Rice. She seems to have rise'
to her very prominent place in
American politics completely
on her own merits, and not rid-
ing anybody else's coat tails;.
Condi for President is some-
thing that would be very excit-
ing.
On the other hand, Mrs Clin-
ton has already been president-
well co-president and she
didn't really excite me too
much. But then again, it takes a
lot to get me excited these days.
WILLIAM (BILLY)
ROBERTS
Abaco
January 22 2006


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Questions about health


insurance premiums


EDITOR, The Tribune

THE premiums announced
by Minister Marcus Bethel for
the proposed National Health
Insurance scheme seem unbe-
lievable and certainly raise the
obvious question: Why do cur-
rent private group health insur-
ance policies cost a minimum
of $6,500-$7,500.00 a year?
Might it be appropriate to
have an inquiry into the current
Health Insurance policies as if
the Government's stated pre-
mium levels are unbelievable in
comparison with what seem-
ingly is being gouged from the
employees.


In the Ministry announce-
ment no mention of the premi-
um for those who have either
taken early retirement or are
retired and now live off a limit-
ed income.
Not as in NIB Government
employees should not have any
breaks, they must pay the full
premium like everyone else.
Minister, my mother and
grandmother wish to know what
are the premiums for them or
are they automatically covered?
Surely they are not excluded?
H RAHMING
Nassau
January 20 2005


A changed





attitude on





education


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O O Q







THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2006, PAGE 5


LOCAL NEW


o In brief

Our Lucaya

reopens

hotel after

renovation

FREEPORT The Our
Lucaya Resort reopened its
200-room Lighthouse Pointe
Hotel for business on Friday
after completing millions of dol-
lars in renovation.
The resort was closed for 16
months as a result of extensive
hurricane damage in 2004. A
ribbon cutting ceremony was
eld' at 5pm on Friday to mark
the reopening.
,Obie Wilchcombe,, Minister
ol 'Tourismi, was expected to
deliver the keynote address.


Union boss

in hospital

following

accident

TAXI union boss Leon Grif-
fi~ has been undergoing hospi-
tal treatment following a fall at
his Nassau home last week,
sources said last night.
Mr Griffin, husband of Social
Services Minister Melanie Grif-
fin, received facial injuries and
was taken to Princess Margaret
Hospital. He was treated in the
men's private surgical unit.
,A source told The Tribune:
,.is understood he was in the
Qathtub at the time. It seems he
fM and hurt his face quite bad-
fy, sufficient to justify a stay in
lhpspital."
-iTolleague Albert Brown
stepped in as acting president
-,the Bahamas Taxicab Union
during Mr Griffin's absence.

Share your
i news
The Tribune wants to hear
fom people who are
making news in their
neighbhui hoodJ.
Call us on 322-1986 and
ashare.your story.


Grant slams employment comments


THE FNM yesterday
strongly condemned Minister
of Labour Vincent Peet for
"arrogantly impugning the
integrity of the professionals
at the Department of Statis-
tics and for callously telling
thousands of unemployed
Bahamians that they can find
work if they want to."
While touring the Atlantis
Phase III project, Minister
Peet said it was ridiculous for
anyone to say that the coun-
try's unemployment rate is
10.2 per cent, and that he was
convinced that due to "devel-
opments all over the country"
anyone in the Bahamas who
wanted to work-could find
work at this time.
FNM MP for Lucaya Neko
Grant said: "It was alarming
to hear the minister dismiss
out-of-hand the diligent and
professional work of the gov-
ernment's Department of Sta-
tistics by charging that it was
'ridiculous' for anyone to say
that the unemployment rate
was 10.2 per cent.
"The fact is that not just
'anyone' provided those sta-
tistics," he added. "Rather,
they were provided by the
same government agency that
has been doing so for the past
30 years and using the same
internationally-accepted stan-
dards that it has been using all
along."
Mr Grant said it must be
disheartening to professional
statisticians at the Department
of Statistics to know that a
government minister refuses
to accept their scientifically-
derived measure of the unem-
ployment rate in the country,
pointing out that regional and
international institutions like
the International Monetary
Fund (IMF), Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB)
and the Caribbean Develop-
ment Bank (CDB) rely on
such statistics.
"This should not be. We
have never had any cause to
question the competence and
integrity of the nation's sta-
tisticians when it comes to
employment measurements,
and there is no need to do so
today. The minister should
apologise to the governmen-
t's chief statistical agency,"


he said
Mr Grant represents resi-
dents who are among thou-
sands of Grand Bahamians left
jobless by a stagnant island
economy and three devastat-
ing hurricanes residents who
say they consistently try with-
out success to secure viable
employment to support them-
selves and their families.
"The more than 15,000
unemployed Bahamians
throughout this Common-
wealth know better, than that.
This is a callous insult to those
unemployed Bahamians who
are more than anxious to work
so they can feed.aind'clthe
themselves and their families.
Mr Grant said the people of
Minister Peet's constituency
of North Andros would also
no doubt be surprised to hear
him make these statements
since there is a high level of
unemployment in his con-
stituency, particularly among
women and young men.
"It is simply wrong and mis-
leading for Minister Peet to
pretend that the Atlantis pro-
ject could provide jobs for all
the unemployed people of The
Bahamas. It is not possible
that construction jobs can pro-
vide work for more than
15,000 unemployed people,
especially since most of those
people have skills other than
in the construction area.
Bahamians are stunned at
the minister's words and in
Grand Bahama they are ask-
ing him to come down and
show them where to look for
all these jobs," Mr Grant said.


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MONDAY,
FEBRUARY 6
6:30 Bahamas @ Sunrise- Live
11:00 Immediate Response :
12noon ZNS News Update Live
12:03 Caribbean Today News
Update
12:05 Immediate Response Cont'd
1:00, Caribbean News In Review
1:30 Spiritual Impact: Eddie Levert
2:00 Jackson Reunion
2:30 Inside Hollywood
3:00 David Pitts
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4:00 The Fun Farm
4:30 Aqua Kids
4:58 ZNS News Update
5:00. Lisa Knight & The Round
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5:30 The Underdog Show
6:00 Gospel Grooves
6:25 Life Line
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8:30 Tourism Today
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10:30 News Night 13
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1:30 Comm.Page1540AM


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THE TRIBUNE


Free movement of people and a r


Free movement of people and a


larger fund


- the price of CSME


i By Sir Ronald Sanders
'' (The writer is a business exec-
utive and former Caribbean
*diplomat who publishes widely
on Small States in the global
community).

TTHE thirteen opera-
tional countries of the
Caribbean Community and
Common Market (CARICOM)
should agree to the completely
free movement of people from
Less Developed Countries
(LDC's) to the More Devel-
oped Countries (MDC's) on a
non-reciprocal basis as the first
step to encouraging them into
the Caribbean Single Market
(CSM).
The Bahamas and Haiti are
excluded from this proposition.
There should also be agree-
ment that the seven LDC's
would be allocated at least 60
per cent of the resources of the
Regional Development Fund
(RDF) to implement structural
adjustment programmes. And,
the Fund itself should be larger
than is presently contemplated.
Since it is unlikely that the
CARICOM countries alone can
contribute the resources that an
enlarged RDF would require,
contributions should be sought
from outside countries and
regions.
Thus, CARICOM should
commit itself to placing on the
agenda of its negotiations with
the European Union (EU) for
Economic Partnership Agree-
ments (EPA's) the proposition
that the EU should contribute
to funding adjustment in the
bDC's through the RDF.
After all, the loss of prefer-
ential treatment for bananas in
the EU market has materially
hurt the economies of St Lucia,
St Vincent and the Grenadines
and Dominica. And, the sugar
industry of St Kitts already
ailing fell to the EU hatchet
that hacked the preferential
price paid for sugar.


Agreement from the EU to
contribute to the Fund for the
structural adjustment of the
OECS countries should find
resonance in Canada, the Unit-
ed States and Japan all three
of which enjoy trade surpluses
with the OECS nations.
These two practical measures
of non-reciprocal freedom of
movement of people from the
LDC's to the MDC's, and the
larger allocation of the RDF's
resources to the LDC's would,
undoubtedly, embolden the
countries of the Organisation
of Eastern Caribbean States
(OECS) to join the CSM on
June 30th without equivocation.
There can be no doubt that




There can
be no doubt
that regional
integration
for CARICOM
countries is a
necessity



regional integration for CARI-
COM countries is a necessity
In this connection, even if the
OECS countries do proceed to
establish an Economic Union
on June 18, they will still be
weaker and less able to
manoeuvre in the international
community than if they were
part of the CSME.
By the same token, a CSME
of thirteen countries is also
stronger than the group of six
that kicked it off on January
30. The two groups need each
other.


ins|
flil
'1; ID VIE'


But there are genuine
concerns among the
OECS countries, and they
should be addressed, particu-
larly as the issues are not insur-
mountable.
The primary concern of the
OECS, or LDC's, is not about
the movement of skilled CARI-
COM nationals into their coun-
tries. Both the governments ano
the private sectors in the OECS
recognize that they need skills if:
their economies are tI
grow. They also recognize that
some of their own skilled peo'-
pie will move to other CARI-
COM countries, and they will
have to be replaced.
Their bigger fear is that,'
under the CSM, competition':
from better resource compa-
nies in larger CARICOM
countries will close their local
companies creating unemploy-
ment and social and political
upheaval. In their view, there-
fore, dislocated labour par-
ticularly unskilled should be
able to move to other coun-
tries.
If such dislocated labour does
move to other CARICOM
countries and finds employ-
ment, then clearly they will be
satisfying a need and contribut-
ing to that country's economic
well being.
Given that there is little
unemployment benefits in
CARICOM countries, labour
is very unlikely to move from
being unemployed in their own
homeland, where they at least
have the benefit of a family net-
work, to being unemployed in
another country where there is
no support at all.


SConsequently, the prospect
of a huge number of unskilled
labour from the OECS swelling
the ranks of the unemployed in
the rest of CARICOM is most
unlikely.

With regard to the
RDF, Trinidad and
Tobago, Jamaica and Barbados
should acknowledge that the
benefits of trade in goods under
CARICOM have flowed pri-
marily to them. In recent years,
a similar development has taken
place in financial services espe-
cially.
Trinidad and Tobago has
been the greatest beneficiary
both in trade in goods and ser-
vices to the rest of CARICOM
and, on a comparative basis,
more particularly to the OECS.
Consequently, it is in
Trinidad and Tobago's self
interest to be generous in its
contribution to the RDF.


Of course, the Trinidad and
Tobago government would be
right in pointing to th,
Venezuelan Petro' Caribe facil-
ity to which the OECS coun-
tries have signed-up as a
diminution of its market within
CARICOM, and, therefore,
reason to be less supportive of
these countries.
That argument, of course,
speaks directly to the danger
that Petro Caribe poses to the
project of deeper integration
within CARICOM.
But, Trinidad and Tobago's
government should take up the
gauntlet thrown down by St
Lucia's Prime Minister Kenny
Anthony it should work with
the Trinidad oil companies to
match the Venezuelan terms,



The prospect
of a huge
number of
unskilled
labour from
the OECS
swelling the
ranks of the
unemployed
in the rest of
CARICOM is
most unlikely.



and by so doing, not only main-
tain its market in CARICOM,
but also safeguard the regional
integration project.,
Other countries within
CARICOM such as Guyana


and Belize may well argue
that their own situation also
demands special attention.
Unquestionably, they do.
Guyana is a Highly Indebted
Poor Country (HPIC) and it
will shortly face the loss of mil-
lions of dollars of annual rev-
enue from the cut in the price
that the EU will pay for its sug-
ar.
Belize has already suffered
the loss of a preferential price
for its banana exports to the EU
and will join Guyana in endur-
ing a slash in the price for its
sugar.

T he situation of these
two countries strength-
ens the argument for a larger
RDF, and one to which signifi-
cant contributions are made by
the EU, the US, Canada and
Japan.
But to encourage the support
of external countries, CARI-
COM nations must show them-
selves ready to make the hard
decisions that are necessary to
show that they are serious.
Therefore, the CSME must
move ahead at full pace with
the OECS joining on June 30
as pledged.
If non-reciprocal free move-
ment of people from LDC's to
MDC's helps, there is no harm
in granting it. And, a larger
RDF with specific allocations
to the LDC's to assist with
structural adjustment is patent-
ly necessary.
CARICOM should now
move to put implementing and
management capability in place
for the CSME one that
would command the support
and confidence of the interna-
tional community.
It is time for the CARICOM
Commission to be established
with the CSME as the full time
task of one of the Commission-
ers.
Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com


Are you JT or - , E ,
Are you ;D E DJ D '- - ::
_9.i u by the Devil? biyo" :
-V-, J J:::.
desire i LJ, .J j..., and '.



COME TO
THE CHURCH OF GOD OF PROPHECY

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CONVENING:
Sunday, February 12th thru
Friday, February 17th, 2006
at 7:30 p.m. Nightly
at the Coral Road Tabernacle
Freeport, Grand Bahama


THEME:


QfGodls AtHa. t


Hear our Anointed Soloists: Glenda Stubbs, Hattie Williams
and Ruth Colebrooke; the Crusade Praise Team, and the
Grand Bahama District Choir

Be blessed by our Pinedale, Seagrape and Coral Road
Sanctuary Choirs


Crusade Co-ordinators:
Minister Barry Morris and Cheryl Forbes


BRING THE WHOLE FAMILY AND BE BLESSED!


The world 's smallest
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Sizel n World's smallest sample size
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N Fast 7 second average test time.

a Test yourself on different, less painful areas, such as
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0 4 alarms to remind patients when it's time to test.

Ask for it at your favorite drug store.

SFreesrele

Fet ~e: 1. .Virtually Painless.


rAEE GLUCOSE TESTING
These dates and locations:


Monday, Feb. 6
All times: Friday, Feb.10
Monday, Feb. 13
10am -1pm Thursday, Feb.16
Monday, Feb.20


Centreville Rx, Collins Ave.
Super Saver, Seagrapes
PrescriRtion Parlour Pharm., East St.
Lowe's pldier Road
Prescription Centre, Rosetta St.


Distributed by L s Se Tel:- 33 -Fa 3 0


PAr F R MhNlDAv FFRRI EARY 6. 2006


MINISTER
PUNCHETTA TAYLOR
Leader of The National
Harvest Team
." % 11


~s~jfS':~ ,~ q
- : ~id
r':I


~'IIP)nT






MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2006, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


Call for ombudsman to



improve government


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
A call for the government to
appoint an ombudsman was
made yesterday.
Bahamian nationalist Dr
Drexel Johnson said a "repre-
sentative of the people" was
vital. .
"Everyone in this country is
dependent to a greater or lesser
degree on services provided by
the government," he said.
An ombudsman would sig-
nificantly reduce some of the
many complaints made daily,
he added.


"Any citizen who believes
that any government depart-
ment or authority has unfairly
treated them can take their
complaint to the ombudsman,
who is established for the spe-
cific purpose of investigating
that alleged unfair treatment.
"If the complaint is justified,
the ombudsman can take cer-
tain steps to redress mistakes,
delays, rigidity and carelessness
of the government bureaucra-
cy," he said.
Dr Johnson said the role of
the ombudsman is both investi-
gatory and advisory, with the
ability to make recdmmenda-


tions to government depart-
ments and authorities.
Report

If there was failure to com-
ply with the recommendations,
the ombudsman could report
the matter to parliament and
the press.
The ombudsman would be
responsible only to parliament
and the office would be non-
political.
"The critical thing about the
ombudsman's office is that it is
not under the influence of the


government of the day.
"Grounding the ombudsman
in the constitution in preference
to ordinary legislation acts to
further insulate the office from
governmental interference," he
added.


Nassau Limousine Service
Sedan, Limo & SUV's


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Village Road Near Shirley Street Tel: 3940323/5 OR 394-1377


All cars In excellent
condition, all tars 3
month warranty, NO
license and inspection
Sincludd.


1994 Toyota Starlet ....................................... $4,500.00
1994 Toyota Tercel...................................... $4,900.00
1993/4 Toyota Camry .................................. $5,300.00
1992 Toyota Windom ( Lexus)........................... $5,900.00
1993 Toyota Windom ................................... $6,500.00
1994 Toyota Windom ................................... $6,900.00
1996Toyace Truck( Diesel) .......................... $8,900.00
1993 Nissan Bluebird .................................. $4,900.00
1994 Nissan Bluebird .................................. $5,100.00
1993 Nissan Sunny ...................................... $4,350.00
1996 Nissan Sunny .............................. ...... $ .. 5,300.00
1993 Nissan Primera ( Infiniti) .......................$4,300.00
1994 Nissan Primera ...................................... $4,700.00
1998 Honda Civic ......................................... $7,900.00


N HIS Excellency Volker Schlegel, Ambassador of the Republic of Germany, paid a courtesy call
on Prime Minister Perry Christie on Friday, February 3; 2006
(Photo: BIS/Peter Ramsay) ..


LWLRL

= tes


LOCA NEW


Visit by .,.German ambassa orF= ~f~? i


OJI99,~






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2006


6y~C


Why you vex?


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
"I vex with the Ministry of
Education and Youth Sports
and Culture for not taking the
health and welfare of their staff
seriously. People must have to
get sick before they decide to
do something about the mould


and mildew in their building."
- Vex and sick of mould
"I am vex because my pro-
fessor gave me an impossible
assignment to do on a subject
no one could possibly under-
stand. And it is due next week,
which gives me absolutely no
time to do it in.


- Vex Student
"I vex because my new apart-
ment don't have no hot water,
no light and no telephone."
-VF
"I vex that the price of gas
keep fluctuating every other
day. Ya can't even figure out a


I


LEISURE TRAVEL AGENCY
"A Complete Travel & Tour Service Company" lAT


6)
Q1erl#


?lAeriai


Nassau Fort Lauderdale.......................................$148.00
Nassau Orlando......... ......................................... $166.50
Nasau- Tampa............. ...................................... $178.00
Nassau Miami............................................. $208.00
Nassau Atlanta...................................................$258.00
(Travel Complete by March 8th, 2006)
Nassau New York.......................................... $226.50
Nassau Dallas................................ ............ $268.00
Nassau Chicago.......................... ............. $230.00

Taxes included Restrictions apply





Tely~H'~ : (22)325688 Fa: 24) 35-86


way to make a decent budget
because you never could tell if
$20 or $50 gone be enough to
fill ya tank."
Broke Driver

Why You
Happy?
I'm thankful for the cool
weather. It gives us a chance to
wear our nice winter clothes at
h..ome.
MSB


94 Honda Civic .4
ALL STOCK'\ 94 Toyota Camry/Vista $5
: MUST G0! 95,Toyota Camry/Vista .-S
to makie way for now 94 Nissan Bluebird .-
st All sales final "AS 94 Nissan Cefiro(Infiniti) $
SIS" NO license and 93 Toyota Windom 4.
inspection inluded.. 94 Toyota Windom j
Most iars $1,000 down 95 Toyota Windom -$
finandng for qualified 96 Toyota Avalon S..
customers. 93 Toyota Hilux Surf .5
0 T oC T..,,i. Cn /rn.^ll, _nJ


7j Iuyuom onIerInI/ o.u
95 Honda Saber
96 Nissan Sunny
98 Nisoon Sunny
97 Toyota Camry Wagon
96 Mercedes E200( leather)


-64


WAS NOW
6Oo- $5,000.00
i,00W- $5,300.00
3eOem $5,800.00
560M $5,100.00
150QO- $6,900.00
6,90-0e- $6,300.00
,s960e- $6,900.00
38OWO- $7,000.00
8t50s $7,900.00
9 $go- $8,800.00
60 0 $5,500.00
0S tr $7,900.00
i5tto $5,500.00 ,
;%e&W- $6,900.00
e;90t $8,900.00
*e&eOf- $17,900.00


MIONTAGU
S MOTORS LIMITED
VILLAGE ROAD NEAR SHIRLEY STREET
TPb ~~~;~ZiSWWW)^^ (ai ?,lff^ s'iWS^


Palmdale, Mall at Marathon,
Sandyport, Freeport


Bay Street


Pie of Peace
Bay & East Street,
Paradise Village

DISCOUNT WAREHOUSE
Bay Street


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Villagglo



LALIOUE


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then enter to win fabulous prizes with
a minimum $50 purchase.


Romantic all inclusive weekend for two at the Treasure Cay Hotel
& Marina in Abaco. Roundtrip airfare on Bahamasair.


Enjoy a Romantic Dinner for Two at
Villaggio Restaurant, Caves Village.

Laique Crysta Heart Pendant.
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SOLOMON'S MINES



Bay Street, Paradise Island, Mall at Marathon, Hurricane Hole,
Caves Village, Freeport and Abaco


36-ff#


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'Tach Me. 0 Lont Thy Way -Psalm 119-33


TEMPLE CHRISTIAN HIGH SCHOOL

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

Temple Christian High School
will hold its Entrance Examination on
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 11th,
2006
at the school on Shirley Street from
8a.m. 12noon for students wishing to
enter grades, 7,8,9, and 10. Applications
are available at the High School Office
and should be completed and returned
to the school by Friday,
February 10th, 2006.


For further information please call
telephone numbers:
394-4481 or 394-4484.


CB
COMMONWEALIh SANK


Employment Opportunity


Part-time Tellers,
Nassau


Commonwealth Bank currently has openings for Part-time
Tellers between the ages of 25 50, who are dependable, honest,
self-motivated, outgoing and enthusiastic
If you fit the above description, need to make some extra cash
and are available to work between 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m.,
three (3) days per week, please forward your resume to:

HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT
"Re: Part-time Teller"
P.O. Box SS-6263,
Nassau, Bahamas
| Fax: 394-0758
E-mail address: anne.lightbourn@combankltd.com


I _
I 1.


I


I I


" "n-all "I'l


5z


a~tSft







THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2006, PAGE 9


LOCAL NEWS


tercedes-Benz C-Class


* Te :I.eI.:u.]L74zij.]gl l4[sLi


* DR Harold Munnings Jr spoke to The Rotary Club of East
Nassau on the History of Hospitals in The Bahamas on Fri-
day. The photograph shows Dr Munnings (right) presenting a
copy of his new book Princess Margaret Hospital The Sto-
ry ofA Bahamian Institution to Patrick Rollins (left), presi-
dent of the Rotary Club of East Nassau.


$O down* Unbelievable!
Finance! Lease! Buy!
Toyota Windom
(Lexus ES300)


Finance/Lease from
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or $7,700 Cash
Includes Full Pre-delivery Service,
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autos"l"us
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Monday Friday 8:30am 5:30pm
Saturday 8:30am 1:00pm
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"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"












The Tribune wants to hear
--me






neighborhoods. Call us
*-W~









S3-are

your s.


The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Call us
on 322-1986 and share
your story.


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k_ _-.,--







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2006


Don't have that special someone looking left out on

Valentine's Day
Waiting for a bunch of flowers or a box of chocolate?
Why not send a

SINGING TELEGRAM?
To that special person in your life letting them know that they
mean the world to you and you are one in a million.
This will definitely be feeling of a lifetime.
Ask forhe gird S
Phne 34-12 -56-62


'Our work here is




quite comprehensive'


FOR years, administrators
and social workers attached to
the Health Social Services Divi-
sion of the Department of
Social Services of the Ministry
of Social Services and Com-
munity Development, have
toiled night and day without
an ounce of recognition, even
though the work they do has
impacted families throughout
The Bahamas.
But walk into any of the gov-
ernment-owned hospitals and
clinics and talk to the many
patients and families they have
helped or the medical teams
they assist with outpatient care,
and you begin to understand
the depth to which these spe-
cialised social workers and
social workers in general -
impact the Bahamian commu-
nity.
"Actually our work here is
quite comprehensive," says
Betty Farquharson, assistant
director, Health Social Ser-
vices, who heads the operations
at the Sandilands Rehabilita-
tion Centre (SRC). '
"We work with the medical
teams that consist of psycholo-
gists, sociologists, occupational
therapists and nurses to ensure
the well-being of the patients,
particularly as it relates to fol-
low-up care.
"We also conduct home
investigations, which include a
psycho-social report for the
medical team. That report
allows them to conduct proper
assessments of the patients.
"We further assist the med-
ical team with the follow-up
care of the patients by ensuring
that the patients are adminis-
tered their medication on a


timely basis once they are dis-
charged, and by ensuring that
they keep their appointments
on a weekly basis, which adds
another layer to the follow-up
treatment of the patient," Ms
Farquharson adds.
Home investigations are nec-
essary to the well-being of
patients and entail working
with families of patients to
ensure there are no "triggers
present in the home situation."
Proper

"We work with family mem-
bers to ensure that persons are
administering proper care to
them, that the family relation-
ships are strengthened, that
families accompany the
patients to hospital to build a
bond not only with the patient,
but also with the doctor which
allows them. (the family mem-
ber) the opportunity to learn
more about the care of the
patient, which we believe is
very necessary to the overall
well-being of the patient," Ms
Farquharson says.
"If the family members are
aware of the illness, its symp-
toms and treatment methods,
and the importance of ensur-
ing that the patients are admin-
istered their medication on a
timely basis, we believe we can
avoid some of the situations
where the patient situation
becomes so chronic that they
have to be re-admitted to hos-
pital.
"So we advocate education
and awareness for the family
members, be they parents,
spouses and/or sons and daugh-
ters...so that they can be a part
of the team that keeps the per-
son functioning outside of hos-
pital care and treatment," Ms
Farquharson adds.
She says the follow-up pro-
gramme is very detailed and
involves quite a bit of work on
behalf of the social workers.
In addition to their work at
the various government-owned


hospitals and clinics, the unit
is also responsible for the day-
to-day management of a series
of government-run group
homes that provide residences
for 27 male and female psychi-
atric patients, who have been
re-integrated into the commu-
nity and who can function on
their own with limited super-
vision.
"Our unit is ultimately
responsible for their mainte-
nance," says Ms Farquharson.
"To maintain the homes we
pool all of their resources.
These would be persons who
receive National Insurance
benefits, and we pool those
resources to pay whatever bills
they may have, whether it is
rent, utilities, groceries, cloth-
ing...to ensure that they func-
tion as any properly function-
ing household would."
Another area of responsibil-
ity is adolescent care. She says
the majority of admissions to
the adolescent unit are court
mandated and generally con-
sist of adolescents with behav-
ioural problems, for whom
court ordered psycho-socio-
logical reports have been man-,
dated.
The unit, once again, has to
hit the ground running, con-


ducting a number of investiga-
tions to analyse home care,
conditions and difficulties,
among a number of other
assessments in an effort to
develop proper recommenda-
tions.
"There are very many areas
that we work in which demand
a lot of hands-on work and
field work, and so the work is
very extensive and intense, but
it is something we enjoy
doing," Ms Farquharson says.'
Social Services Minister
Melanie Griffin says social
workers are the unsung
"he roes and heroines" of the
country who perform their jobs
in a professional manner.
"Healih Social Ser\ ices is an
area that doesn't get a lot of
recognition and people really
don't know the amount'of hard
work and dedication these pro-
fessionals put into their jobs n
a daily basis," says Minister
Griffin.
"They are the unsung arm of
social services in the country. A
lot of people know about social
Services, particularly those who'
access the services, but they do
not know who the persons'
behind the scenes are or how
extensive their work is," Min-
ister Griffin adds.


. Anyone building today should strongly consider using,
permacrete for the exterior walls. It can be directly applied
to concrete blocks. The yearly cost of maintenance is
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Benefits of Permacrete
Twice the strength of concrete (600 psi)
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0 0 rloc
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Sat 8am 1.2 noon
Tel: 322-670516 Fax: 322-671
E-mail: execmotor@batelnet.bs
Salesperson: Pam Palacious,
Barry Pinder, Terrol Cash


CB COMMONWEALTH BANK
-9 Chairman's Report



Chairman's Report on Unaudited Results December 31, 2005

Commonwealth Bank achieved another year of excellence in 2005, recording our ninth
consecutive year of record profits. The Bank's Net Income in 2005 of $31.8 million
represents a 25.5% increase over restated 2004 Net Income of $25.3 million. Earnings per
share increased 32.8% to 85 cents per share up from 64 cents in 2004. Total Assets at
December 31, 2005 were $853.4 million, an increase in the year of 11.5% or $87.8
million. Return on equity was 32.6% an increase of 15% from 2004's 28.3%. Dividends
paid during the year increased from 39 cents to 45 cents per share, an increase of 15.4%.

Adoption of new International Accounting Standards and an amendment to a subsidiary
company's 2004 earnings required the Bank to restate 2004 earnings 1% from $25.6
million to $25.3 million.

New Providence displayed strong economic activity and this was reflected in strong
mortgage lending throughout the year. Mortgage lending increased by $31 million or
27.3% over December 2004.

However, Grand Bahama's economy continued to struggle as Hurricane Wilma dealt
another blow to the island. We anticipate a continuing slow recovery in Grand Bahama in
2006.

Despite the economic struggles in Grand Bahama, the Bank reported very strong portfolio
performance with Impaired Loans falling by $10 million to $9.3 million or just 1.3% of the
loan portfolio, down from 3.28% in 2004.

As the year closed, we completed the acquisition of property and contract signing for our
latest New Providence branch at Golden Gates and launched our online banking product
"CB Online". We believe both steps will give better service to our customers.

An organization is only as good as the people who comprise it. We are proud of our staff
who contribute to making us the leader in personal banking in The Bahamas. Our record
year in 2005 is a testimony to their professionalism and dedication, and we look forward
to working together to make 2006 another successful year.


T. B. Donaldson
Chairman



COMMONWEALTH BANK LTD.
UNAUDITED RESULTS FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 2005

2005 2004
(Restated)
ASSETS (I'000) 853.439 765.657
NET INCOME ($'000) 31,803 25,344
NET INCOME AVAILABLE TO COr.v.AON SHAREHOLDERS ($ 000) 26.942 19.890
EPS (in cenh) BASIC AND FULL' DILUTED 85 64
RETURN ON EQUIl' 32 6% 28.3%


. Donalon
4. Q-n-
T. B. Donaldkn


William Sands


President & CEO Chairman

NB: A full set of audited financial statements will be published within the time frame established by BISX.


I


LOCAL NEWS


I










VALUE
NOW ACCSMRNG
SUNCARD
Qo rdanusaLPRO RESEED
E~l i ,tRKmtv~ cFI.] 'INv
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991,
A






THE TRIBUNE:


PA'GE 12, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 200b


M JOANN Deveaux Callender sings with the Chamber Orchestra of Nazareth College out of
Rochester, New York and The National Choir on Saturday night at Christ Church Cathedral


* CLEOPHAS Adderley stands in front of the Chamber Orchestra of Nazareth College


SIMARCIA Miles place the organ on Saturday
night at Christ Church Cathedral during the
Inaugural Concert of The National Choir


* SIR Clement Maynard and Lady Maynard ^
walk up to be seated at Christ Church Cathedral
on Saturday night before the performance by Ilk
Chamber Orchestra of Nazareth College who '
accompanied The National Clior 4
(Photos: Franklyn Fergusot


M CLEOPHAS Adderely conducts the Chamber Orchestra of Nazareth College


a I -


PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY


VACANCY


NURSING SERVICES ADVISOR
Applications are invited from suitably qualified candidates for appointment to the post of
Nursing Services Advisor in the Public Hospitals Authority (PHA) which is responsible for
the management of the three public hospitals of the Bahamas, Princess Margaret Hospital,
Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre and the Rand Memorial Hospital and the management of
Bahamas National Drug Agency, Materials Management Services, National Emergency
Medical Services and the public clinics in Grand Bahama.
Applicants must possess the following qualifications and experience:
Registered Nurse (with specific registration through the Nursing Council of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, prior to appointment);
Masters Degree in Nurse Management or Equivalent with a minimum of five (5) years post-
qualification experience in a senior administrative position; or Bachelor of Science Degree
in Nurse management or equivalent with a minimum of ten (10) years post-qualification
experience in a senior administrative position;
Experience at a strategic /'policy level in nursing or general health systems planning and
development will be an advantage.
DUTIES
1. The Nursing Services Advisor would report to the Managing Director and would serve
as the principal specialist of the PHA on all matters relating to nursing services operations
and development. The overarching responsibility of the post is to ensure (a) standards
of nursing care are well-defined, relevant and consistently maintained; and (b) the
structure and practice of nursing services are appropriate within and across departments
and institutions.
*2. Main duties and responsibilities of the post include: '
a) Development and revision of policies and operational guidelines for improving the:;
quality and efficiency of nursing services;
b) Monitoring compliance with standards of practice related to general and specialty
nursing care as a means of ensuring continuous quality improvement in nursing and
adherence to the Code of Nursing Ethics:
c) Utilization of nursing productivity statistics to advise on strategic interventions for
greater efficiency of nursing services;
d) Ensuring the maintenance of a system of continuous nursing education at each
Institution;
e) Making recommendations' for organizational restructuring of nursing to best fit a
dynamic public healthcare system;
f) Facilitating and coordinating communication (policy level) between nursing and
other health-care disciplines of the PHA, Ministry of Health and other national,
Regional and International entities;
g) Preparing annual plans and other reports related to Nursing Services Development,
including an annual budget for organizational-wide nursing services development.
3. Applicants must possess strong analytical, conceptual-thinking, strategic planning,
communication and interpersonal skills.
Letters of application, Curricula Vitae, documentary evidence of qualifications and experience
and three (3) references should be submitted no later than 28th February 2006 to the Human
Resources Director, PO. Box N-8200 or 1st Floor Manx Corporate Centre, Dockendale
House, West Bay Street. Serving officers must submit their applications via their Heads of
Department/Hospital.


The Bahamas Hotel Association

Invites Applications for the Following Positions:

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT
MANAGER

The Bahamas Hotel Association seeks a highly competent, motivated and .
energetic individual who is interested in making a positive difference in the
quality of our nation's tourism workforce. -
Position Objectives
To assist the Bahamas Hotel Association in efforts to revise core curriculQm
and programs in education that more adequately address tourism industry
needs in preparing students for careers in hospitality.
To support strong alliances on workforce development matters between '
industry, the Ministry of Tourism, the Ministry of Education, the Bahamas
Vocational Technical Institute, the College of The Bahamas and other
relevant institutions.
To promote the highest standards of service by all employed directly and
indirectly in the industry through an ongoing and aggressive customer '
service training initiative. ,
To advance industry certification programs aimed at significantly increasing :
the number of employees and managers achieving certification status
through CARIBCERT, AHLA and other recognized programs.
To improve the coordination, marketing and delivery of training services-,
provided by BHA, the Ministry of Tourism, the College of The Bahamas ;'
and other providers.
To conduct primary research aimed at assessing human resource needs:
for the industry.
To recognize employee and educator achievement.

Capabilities
Proven project management capabilities. Possess sound verbal and written
communication skills. Computer literate with experience in Word, Excel and
Powerpoint. Experience in developing and delivering training.
**jt* *. *r

SPECIAL PROJECTS ADMINISTRATOR
The Bahamas Hotel Association seeks a highly skilled administrative professional:
to support a range of project initiatives focusing on education, training ands!
sustainable tourism.
Qualifications
Well organized and able to proficiently handle multiple tasks
Excellent written and verbal communications skills
Strong computer skills with emphasis on Word, Excel, Access, Outlook.
and Powerpoint.
Able to work effectively in a team environment


Competitive salary and benefits. Interested parties should email, fax or hand
deliver a brief resume and cover letter by Friday, February 10th to: Executive
Vice President, Bahamas Hotel Association, Hotels Centre, S.G. HarrbroE
Building '(southern entrance), West Bay Street, fax 502-4220; e-mail!
bha@bahamashotels.org.


131


t


The National Choir holds


its inaugural concert
I Iauu





MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2006, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


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.THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14. MONDAY. FEBRUARY 6, 2006


SHai tiprprcs to to polls


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FAMILY ISLANLD-


MURPHY TOWN ABACO
LOT NO. Crown Allotment 122
PROPERTY SIZE: Apartment Complex
(9,000 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Bay Street, Murphy Town
APPRAISED VALUE: $96,940
MALIBOO REEF ESTATES
SUBDIVISION FREEPORT
LOT NO. 104
PROPERTY SIZE: Duplex Building
(11,866 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Galleon Avenue & Outrigger CT
APPRAISED VALUE: $360,000


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LOT NO. 9 Block 29
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence '
LOCATION: Chesapeake Subdivision
APPRAISED VALUE: $143,480


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PROPERTY SIZE: 1:
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PROPERTY SIZE: 19
LOCATION: Treasure
APPRAISED VALUE
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PROPERTY SIZE: 39
LOCATION: The Bluff
APPRAISED VALUE:


A-

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nit 1 ..';
3,800 sq. ft.
Drive .;
: $26,000
DIVISION FREEPORT,,
1,322 sq. ft.
Trove Avenue
:$13,000
OS
1,036 sq. ft. I .
S$95,000 -
A


Dr. Sharon A. Thompson

Practice Relocation


Please join us in welcoming the latest
addition to our center of highly
qualified physicians in the
Renaissance Medical Building.


Dr. S. Thompson received her Doctor
of Medicine degree from Howard
University College of Medicine in
Washington, D. C.


She completed her Obstetrics and
Gynecology Residency at Rochester
General Hospital in Rochester, NY,
where she served as Chief Resident
from 2000 2001. Dr. Thompson is
American Board Certified in
Obstetrics and Gynecology and has
enjoyed serving her Bahamian
community since 2001. Her practice,
St. Elizabeth Women's Medical
Center, will be Opening January 30, 2006. She looks forward to continuing to
provide Individualized and Specialized Care for Women.


St. Elizabeth Women's Medical Center'
155 Shirley Street (opposite Oriental Cleaners)
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 322-3831/323-7477
www.acog.org/niember-lookup


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LOCAL NEWS


FORM page one
tiost iiportatitly, we are not
cdnlinced'that the prerequisite
infrastructure improvement,
equipment and technology acqui-
sitiBt, and tangible quality
einthtncement initiatives all of
which are needed;and have been
recominended prior to the
launichof such a comprehensive
and far-reaching plan have been
adequately planned, realistical-
ly budgeted or even minimally
implemented," the body said.
,Thb MAB highlighted three
features of the proposed NHI



Activists'

alarm at

'prison

photos.


FROM page one
BoWe and Barry Parcoi, as sus-
pected.
R Bowe and Parcoi were
'atn6ng four inmates who
"staged a daring prison break
frmn' the maximum security
-wing on January 17.
During their escape, prison
officer Deon Bowles was
stabbed to death and two oth-
,er officers were wounded.
*Bowe and Parcoi were recap-
*tured just outside the prison
iand'inother inmate, Neil
:Brown, was shot dead by
:AiYsn officers.
The fourth inmate, Corey
;Hepburn, eluded police for
:two .veeks before being recap-
t urged.
,-Attorney Fayne Thompson
said that if the photos are, in
fact, legitimate, then the coun-
try risks not having a civilised
:society. He said the Bahamas
has to ensure it does not resort
to barbarism.
Paul Moss, a human rights
attorney and advocate of
:pris6n reform, said he was
W'shocked, embarrassed and
ismayed" by the photos,
regardless of who the men may
be.
SHe said the incident is rem-
niscent of the scandal involv-
ing the US military prison at
tAbu Ghraib and photos tak-
Mtr war prisoners in- raq.
SMr Moss said that just as
here was a major investiga-
tion into that incident, which
Resulted in demotions and
:court martial of troops, the
government needed to ensure
that this situation does not go
unchecked.
He said that while inmates
ha2 e been convicted of crimes,
,their prison sentence does not
include torture.
He said that while he did not
condone the actions of any of
othe inmates who escaped, or
the actions which led to the
death of the officer, "to have
,them chained and bound in
that fashion was wrong."
S-He said it poses a very seri-
,ous question about the activi-
.tje. of the prison and of
;:A i diS'ith,-president of the
.ffrsRd Bahama.Human Rights
.As dcidtfon, also said the mat-
S tlst be thoroughly inves-
iigat'ed by ant independent
commission.
'"We are shocked and
appalled by the photos. It is
inconceivable that anyone
should be left in that condi-
tion. We are calling for a Roy-
al Commission of Inquiry into
the activities of the prison."
He said the GBHRA also
plans to contact international
human rights organizations
regarding the photos.
Mr Smith added that, with
officer Bowles' death, and the
death of Brown, emotions are
running extremely high.
He said it was for this reason
that prison superintendent. Dr
Elliston Rahmmg. should have
been particularly alert to the
possibility that a prisoner
could hate been abused.
He said it was therefore very
important that Dr Rahming
should take more control of
the prison and ensure that
escaped prisoners are kept in
safe custody.
Mr Snmth said that, while he
does not blame Dr Rahming
for the escape or the death of
officer Bowles, if the photos


are what they suggest, it shows
that the prison is out of con-
trol.
He also said he felt that
Prime minister Perry Christie's
comments supporting capital
punishment at Mr Bowles'
funeral were untimely and
onl fuelled the raw emotion
of the day. He said the prime
minister should have done
more to calm emotions.
"It doesn't help to perpetu-
ate the cycle of violence. We
cannot become the animals
that they became, which put
them in prison."


Doctors' concern at NHI plan


Proposal which ought to cause
"serious national concern" one
of which was the overall cost of
implementing the programme
which it feels will have a nega-
tive impact on the discretionary
income of Bahamians as well as
the national economy.
It has been determined that
the contribution of 5.3 per cent
of an employee's salary is ade-
quate to meet the financing of
the plan.


Employees will have to pay
50 per cent -2.65 per cent of
the contributions, while employ-
er's will be required to pay the
remaining 50 per cent.
However, the MAB said that
this is tantamount to a new tax
burden and the NHI scheme
will be far more expensive to'
implement and maintain than
stated.
"This should force us to care-
fully study the impact of NHI


Buyer for Our Lucaya

may emerge this week


FROM page one
Lighthouse Pointe at Our
Lucaya Resort over the week-
end.
Mr Wilchcombe said there
had been a lack of hotel rooms
on Grand Bahama since the
hurricanes of 2004.
Grand Bahama lost over 900
hotel rooms when the Royal
Oasis closed after sustaining
extensive hurricane damage in
September, 2004.
This had resulted in a 30 per
cent decline in the island's room
inventory over the past 18
months.
Mr Wilchcombe stressed that
more hotel rooms are needed
to sustain Grand Bahama's
tourism industry.,
"We have to make sure that
we add more rooms to the
inventory. And we are trying to
get the property (Royal Oasis)
open, and trying to ensure that
Lehman Brothers move quickly
toward a closure," he said.
"They are doing their due dili-
gence now, and we are very
optimistic and things are looking
good."
Mr Wilchcombe said that the
government wants more brand
hotels on Grand Bahama and
will not just settle for any name.
"We saw the blow after 2004
and we want to see brands here
because Grand Bahama needs
sustainability of its tourism
industry," he said. "We believe


that the groups are commend-
able and will bring what we want
to Grand Bahama."
He said the government is
familiar with the groups that
have been seeking to buy the
resort and what they have
offered.
Mr Wilchcombe also said
employees still owed severance
pay could expect payment as
soon as the insurance settles
with Lehman Brothers.
"The Minister of Labour
spoke to us about it and the
matter is being looked into very
soon. We are very hopeful that
the insurance would be settled
with Lehman Brothers, and
what is owed td not only the
employees, but also to the gov-
ernment would certainly be set-
tled," he said.
Mr Wilchcombe said the Min-
istry of Tourism has also decid-
ed to assist the Isle of Capri
Casino, which has been strug-
gling to remain open since the
hurricanes.
"I am also pleased to tell you
the government has arrived at a
decision to support Isle of Capri
even further with more market-
ing and promotional dollars.
"I want to inform the people
of Grand Bahama to be assured
that we in the government and
the Ministry of Tourism have a
brand new plan for Grand
Bahama that will give it the
tourism sustainability that is
required," Mr Wilchcombe said.


Private firms 'will


benefit under NHI'

FROM page one
costs of their plans may be reduced," he said during an appear-
ance with Health Miniter Dr Marcus Bethel on the radio pro-
gramme Parliament Street.
He explained that this is primarily because persons would
be receiving a significant chunk of coverage under the scheme.
"So it will be left for the companies and the individual to
work out new arrangements with their insurance for financing
those similar things NHI will be financing.
"There is much scope for private insurers to offer new pack-
ages or top off packages with additional service coverage with
respect to those things that may not be covered or things they
would want to have done at private facilities or overseas.
"Since we are covering the same things as private insurers and
we are the primary carrier it would not be necessary to pay
such a large premium to cover the same.thing."
Dr Bethel added that, while concerns were raised at a meet-
ing with private doctors, the meeting was interactive, designed
to bring out the concerns so that they could be addressed.
He said the ministry seeks to answer all of the concerns
because unanswered concerns create fears.
Their particular concerns, he said, related to quality, improve-
merts to the programme and sufficient funding.
He said the programme would probably not come on stream
before the next election because of the research and consultation
which is needed.
"This is a safety net so that people do not fall between the
cracks and find themselves unable to care for themselves in
times of illness," he added.


on the real cost of living and
the resultant impact on the
national economy. The finan-
cial projections to cover the cost
of the comprehensive benefits
and "infrastructural strength-
ening" as outlined in the initial
release by the BRC are unre-
alistic. Nor do the projections
address future enhancements
which will have to take place in
many communities nation-
wide," the organization said.
The MAB also raised con-
cern over the fact that the NHI
plan is to be financially self-sus-
tainable but the commission
made no provisions for funding
if cost increases over time.
"The MAB believes that it is
also important for the Bahamian
public to appreciate that while
the private insurance sector will
be able to participate in provid-
ing health insurance coverage,


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its participation is significantly
curtailed with the governmen-
t's one-payer mechanism.
"While the savings of a one-
payer system as proposed by the
BRC has merit, the implications
are that the need for these relat-
ed administrative and manage-
ment jobs in the private sector
will become redundant. So too
will the right of Bahamians to
have their health insurance ser-
vices managed exclusive of gov-
ernment bureaucracy unless
one is prepared to pay the dupli-
cate cost for a comprehensive
package of benefits in the pri-
vate insurance company; paying
the comprehensive package to
NIB is mandated by law," the
organization said.
The association said that
BRC's report highlights that the
fundamental problem in health
care delivery is access and equi-
ty and agreed that more funding
is needed to guarantee this
health care privilege or "right"
for all Bahamians even when


we have come so close to
achieving it to date.
However, it said that the
BRC has attempted to reform
funding of health care by trav-
elling along an "abandoned
health care highway of a cen-
tralized health care budget".
"Experience in the Canadi-
an, British and European social-
ized medical systems have
caused them to embrace these
privatization principles which
lend to individual rights and
personal responsibilities. The
Association supports this new
concept to sharing health care
cost with the private sector.
"We are not opposed to fund-
ing real reform via the estab-
lished tax mechanism of the
National Insurance Board pro-
vided that the Bahamians
receive real value and we note
that the NIB is currently not yet
able to maximize value for the
public," the MAB said.
The full statement is pub-
lished on page 2.









I NEWS*


* MEMBERS of the Royal Bahamas Police Force run, carrying
a banner trying to encourage recruitment, at the Ministry of
Health's National Healthy Lifestyle Walk on Saturday
(Photos: BIS/Derek Smith)



Walking in the



name of health


* PRIME
Minister
Perry
Chrislie is
joined by
Dr Patti
Symonelle,
left, on the
final leg of
the National
Healthy
Lifestyle
Walk


I -


j


* BERNADETTE Christie, wife of the Prime Minister, takes
part in the National Healthy Lifestyle Walk



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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 16, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2006








MQNDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2006


mrao


SECTION


Collnalmpefia 1
Inu'nc "


bushie~ss~tribunesuedia.net


Miami Herald Business, Stocks,


Analysis, Wall Street


IMF




front


study: Bahamas


Cl


58%


hit


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
ome 58 per cent of
Bahamians who were edu-
cated to a college or uni-
versity level migrated to
the US for work between
1965 and 2000, an International Mon-
etary Fund (IMF) study has revealed,
a statistic likely to renew fears that
this nation's economy is being harmed
by a brain drain' of its best and bright-
est to foreign jobs.
The study for the IMF, entitled
Emigration and Brain Drain: Evidence
from the Caribbean, drew on the US
Census report from 2000 and other
reports, plus its own work, to con-
clude that between 1970 and 2000, the
Bahamas had the 18th highest rate of
emigration to OECD-member states


iNhu~mber for college-e[ducated Baham6U .Y1 U~ians I 'RsbIu Irprisingly shigh'


from among its.nationals who had
been educated to tertiary levels,
The data will cause concern that the
most-highgly educated Bahamians,
those who have attained college
degrees and the best skills, are seeking
and finding work outside this nation.
In turn, this negatively affects the
Bahamian economy, as it is losing sig-
nificant numbers of its most produc-
tive workers, harming competitive-
ness,
Brian Nutt, the Bahamas Employers
Confederation's (BeCON) president,
told The Tribune that the 58 per cent
statistic in the IMF's report was "a
surprisingly high number",


Although he had not seen the
report, Mr Nutt said the impact of the
so-called 'brain drain' where coun-
tries lose their most productive work-
ers to foreign jobs on the Bahamas
had often been debated.
"This is the first time I've heard a
percentage put to it," Mr Nutt said. "It
does seem to be quite high,"
The BeCON president added that it
would be interesting to break the 58
per cent number derived by the IMF
down, to find out why such large num-
bers of colleged-educated Bahamians
apparently stayed away to find work
outside this country.
Part of such a work would have to


assess whether these Bahamians sim-
ply stayed away because they found
jobs and careers paths in the US and
Canada after completing their stud-
ies, or if it was because they were
unable to find a job in this nation.
If it was the latter case, Mr Nutt.
said the reasons for being unable to
find a job needed to be explored -
whether it was because there was no
job in their field due to a lack of eco-
nomic diversification, or if expatriate
work permit holders were holding
posts, for instance.
Referring to the IMF study, Mr
Nutt said: "I would guess the majori-
ty of those are people who left the


Bahamas to go to college and never
came back. They got a job while there,
and their career path led them to the
US.
"It would be interesting to know
how many of that number came back,
looked for a job and left as opposed to
going away and never coming back."
Mr Nutt also conceded that a lack of
economic diversification in the
Bahamas, with its reliance on tourism
and financial services, might also
encourage highly-educated Bahami-
ans to'look for work abroad.

SEE page 4B


Doctors: Proposed BISX stocks: Steady, but not'heady levels' of'05


National Health

plan's 'negative'

economic effect
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE proposed National Health Insurance (NHI) plan will cre-
ate a new tax burden that will have "a negative impact" on the
economy and reduce Bahamians' disposable income, the Medical
Association of the Bahamas (MAB) warned yesterday.
Calling for a careful study of its impact on the cost of living and
wider Bahamian economy, the MAB said that while supporting
-the Government's efforts to ensure accessible, equitable health-
.care, the proposed NHI scheme would "adversely affect the qual-
ity of healthcare received by all
Bahamians, and curtail timely
..access despite the noble inten- SEE page 5B

v V 1tj (.h,: S,"'t Ic I


t(4ljl


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor
THE Government was
ahead of budget on its rev-
enue collections in tour of
the first sLi months of fiscal
2005-2006. the minister at
state for finance told The
Tribune, although holding
down public spending

SEE page 4B-


N JAMES SMITH


Nassau/PI sees 11.6%
stopover increase in 2005


i By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
TOTAL tourist arrivals to
the Bahamas in 2005 increased
by 0.9 per cent to just over five
million, data from the Ministry
of Tourism showed yesterday,


with a 4.4 per cent rise in air
arrivals just offsetting a 0.5 per
cent decline in cruise passen-
gers,
While per capital visitor

SEE page 4B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
STOCKS listed on the Bahamas Inter-
national Securities Exchange (BISX) will
not perform at 2005's "heady levels" in
2006, a Bahamian brokerage has predicted,
although many may remain undervalued
and willdeliver steady retu.ns this year..
In a review of the Bahamian equity mar-
ket, Fidelity Capital Markets said the total


return on Bahamian-listed stocks in 2005,
as measured by its FINDEX Index,
increased by 26,09 per cent year-on-year.
This compared to the 16.94 per cent
increase in the FINDEX, a price-weighted
index created by Fidelity to measure total
returns dividend payments and capital
appreciation in 2004.
Fidelity Capital Markets, in its review
for investor clients, said the increased levw-
el of foreign direct investment into the


Bahamian economy, coupled with eco;
nomic growth and higher stock market liq-
uidity, had helped to drive the performance
of many BISX-listed stocks in 2005,
It added: "While investor sentiment
remains bullish and company fundamentals
remain strong (all indicators of good
prospective performance of the equity mar-
SEE page 5B


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PAGE~~~~~~~~I 2B ODYFBUR 620 HETIUE


* By Fidelity Capital
Markets
IT was another active trad-
ing week in the Bahamian mar-
ket, as over 32,000 shares


changed hands. The market
saw 11 out of the 20 listed
stocks traded, of which four
advanced, four declined and
three remained unchanged.
Volume leader for the week


was Abaco Markets (AML
with 5,200 shares changing
hands and accounting for 1
per cent of the total share
traded.
The big advancer on th
week was Consolidate
Water's BDR, whose share
price increased by $0.20 to en
the week at $4.51. On th
down side, Doctors Hospiti
Health Systems (DHS) shai
price declined by $0.12 to close
at $2.75.

COMPANY NEWS
'1
FOCOL Holdings
(FCL) -
FCL announced this wee
that it had laid off 21 emplo)
ees from the head office of ii
newly acquired She
(Bahamas) operations. Som
$2.8 million in redundancy an
pension benefits were paid ot
to these employees.
This restructuring exercise


Share


your
news
The Tribune wants to h
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perha
you are raising funds fo
good cause, campaignir
for improvements in th
area or have won an
award: .........-... *' ...
fso.. call us on 322-198
and share your story.
.... lf


iear

aps
Dr a
ng
e

36


1


),
!g
16
,es
he
d
re
id
he
al
re
We


by FCL is considered a pru-
dent move, as it was held that
the Shell Bahamas operation
was overstaffed when com-
pared to its competitors. Addi-
tionally, the 'right-sizing' of its
employee base will hopefully
allow FCL to bring to fruition
some of the cost savings and
profit-generating synergies
from this latest investment.
Abaco Markets
(AML)-U


For the nine months ending
October 1 2005, AML posted
a net loss of $397,000, which is
a marked improvement over
the net loss of $2.7 million for
the comparable period in 2004.
.Sales declined by $5.5 mil-
k lion or 7.48 per cent to total
y- $68 million, while cost of sales
ts declined in tandem to total $49
1 million versus $52 million year-
,e over-year. AML had a net
d operating loss for the period
it of $1.4 million versus an oper-
ating profit of $462,000 in 2004.
se Overall, AML's financial
results for 2005 were little
changed from 2004, given that
aside from the $3 million insur-
ance recovery and a $899,000
decline in loss from discontin-
ued operations, AML would
have ended its 2005 third quar-
ter with a net loss of $3.4 mil-
lion.
FirstCaribbean
International
Bank (Bahamas)
Ltd (CB) -


Fiscal 2005 was an excep-
tional year for the regional
financial giant, as the bank
posted net income of $99.5 mil-
lion, an increase of $38 million
or 61 per cent year-over-year.
Interest income grew by $34
million or 22 per cent to total
$188 million, while interest
expense increased by $6.5 mil-
lion or 12 per cent to total $62
million.
Operating inc.ngggrew by
$3 million to $39A,.million,
Swhile-the bank was-able to
reduce its operating expenses
by $8 million to total $66 mil-
lion.
CIB's loan book grew by
$291 million to total $2.006 bil-
lion as at October 31,, 2005.
CIB's management has noted
that the growth in loans is due
to the continued strong per-
formance in residential mort-
gages, as well as business and
government loans.
Total mortgages increased
by $120 million or 16 per cent
year-over-year, while business
and personal loans grew by
$153 million and $18 million
respectively. In 2005, the


The Bahamian StockMarkef

FINDEX 591.41% YTD 7.17%

BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PItE.
SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE


AML
BAB
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
CWCB
DHS
FAM
FCC
FCL:
FIN
ICD
JSJ
KZLB.
PRE


$0.70 $-0.02
$1.17 $-
$0,70 $-
$7.00 $-
$10.48 $-0.04
$13.25 $-
$1,26 $-
$9.53 : $- ::
$9.15 $-
$1.70 $0,06
$10.95 $0.05
$4.51 '$0.20
.$2;75- :, $-0.12
$6.05 $- '
$1.15 $
$10.05' i
$10.95 $0.05
$9.95 ;' :
$9.10 $-
$6.57 : i.$-006
$10.00 $ ,;


5200 -4.11%
0 ': 6.56%'
0 !: 0.00%
0 0.00%
3580 0.77%
0 3.92%.
0 ...' 0.00%
2300 :. -0.21%/
3086 0.44%.
1::000 : 3.66%
5000 : 0.64%/o
3200 5.10%
1000 26.73%
2500 0.00%
0 ... 0.00%
10.00%
5000 0.46%
, 0 0.00%
S... 0.55%
1000 -4.09%
S0 0.00%


DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES :S:: ;
ICD Utilities (ICD) declared a dividend of $0.135 perj"
share payable on February 16, 2006, to all common share- '
holders as at record date February 2, 2006.
Consolidated Water Company (CWCO) declared a divi-"
.dend of $0.012 per BDR payable on February 7, 2006, to all'.
common shareholders as at record date December 31,2005.
SFOCOL Holdings (FCL) declared a dividend of $0.11i
per share payable on February 9; 2006, to all common share'
holders as at record date January 31, 2006.
FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) will hold its,
Annual General Meeting on February 26, 2006 at 6pm at"
the British Colonial Hilton, Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.


return on shareholder's equity
was 28 per cent compared to
19 per cent in 2004, while the


return on assets increase jby
1,1 per cent to stand at $I per
cent as at October 31, 20Q


RBC

FINCO


NOTICE TO

SHAREHOLDERS






The Annual General Meeting of
Finance Corporation of Bahamas
Limited (FINCO) will be held on
Thursday 16th March, 2006 at 6:30pm
in the Governor's Ball Room, British
Colonial Hilton Hotel, Number One
Bay Street,Nassau, N.P., The
Bahamas.


KEVA L. BAIN
CORPORATE SECRETARY


U-- U-~


cit iroup"


CITIBANK N.A.,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS BRANCH




















Ms. W. Denise Kelly, Operations Clerk, for being the recipient of the "Team
Member of the 4th Quarter 2005" Award. Denise was chosen by her colleagues
for her outstanding contributions and tireless efforts. We encourage you to keep
up the great work! L to R Mrs. Pearlene Moxey, Operations Head; Ms. W.
Denise Kelly and Mr. Luis Carlos Ochoa, Business Head.

















Ms. Patrice A. Russell, Treasury Officer, for being the recipient of the "Team
Member of the Year 2005" Award. Patrice has proven herself to be an outstanding
member of the team and was chosen by management as a result. We extend our
sincere appreciation for all your hard work. L to R Ms. Rene6 Nelson, Treasury
Head; Ms. Patrice A. Russell and Mr. Luis Carlos Ochoa, Business Head.


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY

CORPORATION

REQUESTS FOR PROPOSALS
:FOR CUSTOM BROKERAGE SERVICES

TENDER NO. 594/06
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
provision of Custom Brokerage Services in New Providence,.
Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office, Blue Hill
& Tucker Roads by contacting:-
Mrs Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852
Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 10 February 2006 by 4:00pm and
addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Mrs Delmeta Seymour
Marked: Tender No. 594/06
"CUSTOM BROKERAGE SERVICES"
The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders,
*i^^ ^^ ^^^ ^ ^^ ^T


1


B U I SINES


3


FIDELITY MARKET WRAP


I I


THE TRIBUNE?"


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2006


0







MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2006, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


Centralized Regulation:




an FSA for the Bahamas


T hirty years ago,
the City of Lon-
don, the hub of
international
finance, was
housed in a tightly-packed clus-
ter of low buildings veined with
winding avenues, narrow alleys,
and dark courtyards, dominat-
ed by the gloomy bulk of the
Bank of England, which ruled
the regulatory scene by granti-
ng, or withholding, its famous
"wink and a nod".
All has now changed. The
centre of heavyweight finance
has moved east down the
Thames to the purpose-built
complex known as Canary
Wharf, where spanking new
towers of steel, glass and con-
crete elbow each other over a
planned grid of streets and
walkways. Set in its own gleam-
ing 14-storey monolith, the
Financial Services Authority
(FSA), scarcely five years-old,
now regulates with a firm hand
not only the banks that once
reported to the Bank of Eng-
land, but also the business of
insurance and securities, includ-
ing fund managers, investment
advisers, mortgage providers
and brokers, as well as the Lon-
don Stock Exchange and its
rules for listed companies. The
FSA is eager to tell its own sto-
ry, as I learned during a recent
visit when I was given its hand-
some, detailed Annual Report.
The new regime only saw the
light of day in 1997 when the
new Chancellor of the Exche-
quer announced Government's
Intention to put an end to frag-
mentation, where the Bank and
eight other organizations each
supervised separate parts of the
financial community, often with
overlapping and conflicting
responsibilities. Instead, all reg-
ulation would be merged in
one new entity, leaving the
Bank to concentrate on its
essential role of monetary pol-
icy.
By: 2001, the FSA was up and


running, an independent, pri-
vate company limited by guar-
antee and given statutory pow-
ers by the enabling legislation,
funded entirely from the fees
paid by the firms it regulates,
with its own Board of Direc-
tors appointed by the Treasury.
Under chairman Sir Callum
McCarthy, with a staff of about
2,500 persons the FSA over-
sees more than 25,000 entities,
many of them small companies.
Its expenditures in fiscal 2005
were 246 million ($450 mil-
lion), exactly matched by rev-
enues.
This rapid change came as a
shock to the gentlemanly ways
of doing business that had
gradually developed over cen-
turies of more informal regula-
tion. But the new system is now
fully accepted, and is regarded
as essential in a world where
boundaries between financial
products have blurred, and a
menu of financial services is
offered by a single financial
conglomerate, with these ser-
vices becoming increasingly
complex and often confusing
to the public consumer. The
rationale for a single regulator
in the UK was explained basi-
cally as: simplification for users,
consistency of rule making and
decisions, and economies of
scale achieved by combining
all regulatory functions under
one roof.
Just as the UK financial sec-
tor needed this radical shake-
up, so does the Bahamas.
The spate of legislation
enacted over the last few years
certainly has done its job of
defining and attacking finan-
cial crimes, and creating new
products for the financial/legal
^-M~


professions. But it has done
.nothing to streamline our
archaic regulatory structure.
Indeed, the many new laws
have actually complicated the
business of regulation.
Consider the patch-work sys-
tem we now tolerate:
1. The Central Bank, report-
ing to the Ministry of Finance
(MOF), regulates about 250
banks and trust companies.


I
With a Supervision Depart-
ment of about 55 people, it has
gradually developed the staff
and the know-how to investi-
gate and govern these entities -
it is unique in its strong regula-
tory capabilities. It also pub-
lishes warnings about the many
unlicensed companies that put
"bank" in their title to lure
credulous customers. But even
these resources cannot prevent
collapses such as the long-run-
ning Leadenhall Bank & Trust
mess, with depositors unable
to withdraw their funds from
a bank created by Bahamians.
2. The Registrar of Insurance
licences insurance companies.
With a small staff he tries to
micro-manage their activities,
but must refer substantive mat-
ters up to the Ministry of
Financial Services and Invest-
ments (MFI), with significant


SEE page 9B


LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No. 46 of 2000)

SARACEN HOLDINGS LIMITED
IBC NO. 20,634B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)
NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section 131 (2) of the
International Business Companies Act (No. 46 of 2000), SARACEN
HOLDINGS LIMITED, is in Dissolution.
The date of Commencement of dissolution was 1st day of June 2005.
Harold Ross Hutchings and Gertrude Lucille Hutchings c/o Suites 1601-
1603, 16th Floor, Kinwick Centre, 32 Hollywood Road, Central, Hong Kong
are the Liquidators of SARACEN HOLDINGS LIMITED.
SIGNED
For & On Behalf Of


Gp..d eF~ludfHutckin


Harod Ross H.
Liquldator


POSITION AVAILABLE


Applicant must
have a minimum of 5 years experience
as a Legal Secretary
have strong typing skills
book-keeping skills a plus
be proficient in Microsoft Word and Excel
be self-motivated and able to work without
supervision

Applicants with background in real estate, corporate,
commercial, banking, trusts, wills and immigration
matters encouraged.

Medical insurance and Pension Plan offered.

Salary commensurate with skill and experience.

Please submit application letter with resume by
facsimile to:

Facsimile: 362-5788
P.O. Box N-7776 (468),
Nassau, Bahamas




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U I


VACANCY NOTICE

INTERNAL AUDITORS (2)
INTERNAL AUDIT DEPARTMENT

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the post of two (2) Internal Auditors in the
Internal Audit Department.

The job executes various audit and investigation assignments as stipulated in the
Schedule of Activities formulated by the AGM Chief Internal Auditor.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

Producing audit programs and submitting for approval by the Chief Internal
Auditor.
Conducting complete risk assessment for areas being audited.
Conducting financial, operational and ITS audit assignments in accordance with
established audit programs, which involves a complete assessment of the systems
of internal control, risk exposures and the efficiency, effectiveness and economic
use of resources to achieve management objectives.
Producing audit reports on audit concerns, their causes, effects and the audit
recommendations in accordance with the IIA Standards.
Conducting some audit investigations.
Evaluating findings and producing investigations reports; exercising the IIA's
ethical standards (especially confidentiality).
Conducing reviews of budgetary systems (including variances analysis), policies,
manpower efficiency and new computer applications.
Discussing audit concerns with the relevant Department/Section head and seek
agreement to implement recommendations.
Supervising and directing the activities of the Audit Clerks.
Offering technical assistance to the Assistant Internal Auditors.
Assisting the External Auditors with joint audit efforts for the year-end audit.
Producing audit programs, auditing and investigating monthly and quarterly
reports.
Assisting the AGM-Chief Internal Auditor with annual plans and corporate
research.

Job requirements include:

A Bachelors degree in Accounting or other closely related discipline and a
professional accounting qualification e.g. CA/CPA.
Obtaining the'CIA would be highly desirable.
Five years post certification experience in auditing and general accounting with
experience in interviewing, producing reports and making verbal presentations.

Interested persons should apply by completing an application form, Attention Manager
Human Resources & Training, Bahamas Electricity Corporaion, Blue Hill &
Tucker Roads, P.O. Box N-7509, Nassau, Bahamas on or before Thursday, February
16, 2006.


FINANCE MANAGER

A major international financial institution is seeking the
services of a Finance Manager. The successful candidate
must possess:

A professional accounting qualification (C.P.A., CA,
ACA) and at least five (5) years post qualification work
experience in an accounting firm or financial institution
with at least three (3) years in a managerial or supervisory
role.

Duties to include:

*. Assist in the preparation of annual financial plans and
budgets
Completion of regulatory and Group financial returns
Implementing new accounting standards and regulatory
requirements
Daily monitoring of Branch and Subsidiaries Balance
Sheets and review daily exception reports to ensure
corrective action taken as necessary'

Candidate should also:

Possess good Technology Skills MS Office (WORD,
EXCEL, etc.)
Have the ability to work with minimum supervision
Be able to coordinate small teams to achieve reporting
results within tight deadlines.
Possess good interpersonal and communication skills
Have the ability to foster a team environment

Fringe Benefits include:


Life and Health coverage
Pension
Bonus
Parking

Applications should be addressed and submitted to:

Manager Human Resources
HSBC
P.O. Box N-4917
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 502-2566


BUSNES


" `.







PAGE 4B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2006


THE TRIBUNE.


______________________________________BUSINESS11 H


Revenues ahead of budget





in four of first six months


FROM page 1B
remained challenging.
James Smith said the Gov-
ernment was "ahead of bud-
get" on revenues for four of
the six months between July to
December 2005, but he
acknowledged: "Expenditure
still creates a problem for us."
He added that it was diffi-
cult to contain public spending
because so much of govern-
ment funding went on fixed
costs, such as salaries and rents
in the public sector.
The Central Bank's latest


monthly report on the Bahami-
an economy showed that for
the first five months of fiscal
2005-2006, the budget deficit
had fallen by almost 21 per
cent or $13.2 million compared
to the previous year, standing
at around $50 million.
Backing up Mr Smith, the
Central Bank report said total
tax revenues had increased by
16.1 per cent to about $420.4
million. Yet public expenditure
had increased by 14 per cent
to just over $504 million.
Mr Smith said previously
that not too much should be


read into year-to-year compar-
isons on the public finances, as
one period may have involved
a large repayment of debt prin-
cipal that was not incurred the
following year.
On the 2005-2006 fiscal year,
he told The Tribune: "On pre-
liminary estimates, we are
ahead on revenues moderately,
maybe by almost $30 million
over what is projected, but it
could be seasonal.
"This is the period between
now and April when there is a
build up of inventory in the
hotel sector and they are get-


ting payments." It was the peri-
od when the Government tend-
ed to gain most revenues. I
think it's shaping up fairly
good," Mr Smith said of the
2005-2006 fiscal year. "We
don't have any alarm buttons
to press so far."
The minister told this year's
Bahamas Business Outlook
Conference that the Govern-
ment's debt was likely to rise in
the short-term due to capital
infrastructure works that were
required to support investment
projects.
Mr Smith told The Tribune


that this would be less likely to
show up in the Government's
direct debt, but instead be seen
in the contingent liabilities
where it guaranteed borrow-
ings and the debt of the public
corporations.
He pointed to the recent $40
million borrowing by the Air-
port Authority to effect run-
way improvements at Nassau
International Airport (NIA),
which had to be guaranteed by
the Government because the
Authority .was not strong
enough to obtain the money
itself. Mr Smith said the Min-


istry of Finance was still doing
internal studies and trying to
piece together a framework for
launching national discussion
on tax reform in the Bahamas,
the preferred option being a
value-added tax (VAT). "
Reform efforts., wer.
described by the minister as "
"long .haul" projec't.whiere
stakeholders had. to, see the,
long-term benefits. There were
likely to be winners and losers'
as a result of tax.reforim, Mri
Smith said, and the losers liid
to "feel some hat comfort-,
able" with the outcome.


IMF study: Bahamas hit from 58% 'brain drain


POSITION AVAILABLE
for a
SECRETARY
Applicant must:
V Have experience as a secretary.
V Have a High School Diploma.
" Possess strong organizational skills and communications skills
both verbal and written.
V Perform all secretarial responsibilities including use of Microsoft
Office software, filing, answering phones, scheduling meetings,
completing, filing and tracking clients' bills, making travel
arrangements, etc.
/ Manage and coordinate all arrangements for meetings held both
internally and externally, including scheduling, attendance, and
organizing services associated with meetings such as food and
telephone conferencing.
V Handle/forward/delegate routine requests obtained through mail
and over the phone.
V Complete projects as assigned including compiling documents.
V Prepare correspondence, including letters, memorandums,
litigation materials, other documents, spreadsheets.
V Fast typing skills.
V Be willing to learn and be a part of a team.
Applicants with a minimum of 3 years experience as a secretary will
be favored
Pension plan included. Salary commensurate with skills and
experience.
Please submit application letter with resume by email to:
DA#9116A
c/o The Tribune
P. O. Box N-3207,
Nassau, N. P.,
The Bahamas.






5fwaco C'u'
WINOINN IBA
A,,..cO. OA.iAMA
Is seeking a
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with the following experience:

Performing Takeoffs and Preparing Bills of Quantities
Constructing Microsoft Excel Worksheets for Tracking Costs of Construction
Preparing Budgets & Tracking Costs against them
Familiarity with wide variety of Construction Materials
Willing to relocate to Abaco



Please send resumes to:
The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
C/O Development Department
P.O. Box AB-20571
Marsh Harbour, Abaco.


FROM page 1B

The BeCON president used
an example the time when he
worked for Gladstone Farms,
and wet up the only hatchery in


the Bahamas, as evidence of
how limited the job opportu-
nities were in some professions.
"We do not have a diversi-
fied economy. Many people
have gone into career paths
where there is no job in the


w S ist JFinancial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information As Of:
03 February 2006
BIISx STED i TRiAM6E SEiCRITIES -.VISIT WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
; 0ekI ALLSMi E WiNQ.X C,. 4;364.91 CHG 90.72 / %CHG 00.05 / YTD1.49 /'TID% .O Q
52?k-HI 52wk.Lovw Symool Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol EPS $ DI.' PE Yield
1.10 0.70 ADaco rMarkets 0.70 0 70 0 00 1,200 -0169 0000 N/M 000'.
10.52 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 10.25 10.48 0.23 1,650 1.456 0.360 7.2 3.44%
7.24 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 7.00 7.00 0.00 0.598 0.330 11.7 4.71%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.70 0.70 0.00 0.175 0.020 4.0 2.86%
1.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.26 1.26 0.00 0.105 0.060 12.0 4.76%
1.20 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.17 1.17 0.00 0.070 0.040 16.7 3.42%
9.60 7.47 Cable Bahamas 9.53 9.53 0.00 0.689 0.240 13.8 2.52%
2.20 1.39 Colina Holdings 1.70 1.70 0.00 -0.067 0.000 NM 0.00%
9.25 7.24 Commonwealth Bank 9.15 9.15 0.00 0.791 0.450 11.6 4.92%
4.67 4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.51 4.54 0.03 0.099 0.045 45.6 1.00%
2.88 1.40 Doctor's Hospital 2.75 2.75 0.00 0.437 0.000 6.3 0.00%
6.20 3.99 Famguard 6.05 6.05 0.00 0.542 0.240 12.7 3.97%
10.95 9.87 Finco 10.95 10.95 0.00 0.717 0.530 15.3 4.84%
11.00 7.50 FirstCaribbean 11.00 11.00 0.00 0.828 0.500 13.3 4.55%
10.05 7.94 Focol 10.05 10.05 0.00 0.833 0.500 12.1 4.98%
1.99 1.15 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 -0.062 0.000 NIM 0.00%
10.20 9.60 ICD Utilities 9.95 9.95 0.00 0.526 0.405 18.9 5.43%
9.10 8.22 J.S. Johnson 9.10 9.10 0.00 0.572 0.560 15.8 6.19%
7.00 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 6.57 6.43 -0.14 1000 0.138 0.000 47.6 0.00%
1000 1000 Premier Real Estale 1000 1000 000 2036 0760 49 7 60
e-Cotin 6BI.cuWe. ': .. .. *.. : .' :, '
52wK-HI 52,k-Loa, Symbol. Bid S Ask $ Lasi Pr,ce JVeekly Vol EPSS Dv S P/E Yiela
13.25 12.25 Bahamas Supermarkels 13.25 14 25 11 00 1917 0 720 72 5 05.
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
054 0 20 RND Holdings 029 054 000 -0 044 0000 NM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 4100 43 00 41 00 2 220 0 000 194 0 00O
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.75 13.75 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
060 0 35 RND Holdings 029 054 0 35 -0 103 0000 NI/M 0 00'
GXuse;. t u. ..0
52k-HI 52wk-Low Fund Name NA V YTD', Last 12 Months Div S Yield o'
1 2719 1 2075 Colina Money Market Fund 1 2718.'"
2.5864 2.0704 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.5864 ***
10.7674 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.7674*""
2.3125 2.1746 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.312472*
1.1442 1.0782 Colina Bond Fund 1.144217**""
= lF^1 o^^ t, 't .. #"fBro,9' ?i ? .,v ., *..-* : .- "j.: .; -'- "C "-. . '.b.",* .' *"- -:. ,. .. .
BISX ALL SHARE INDE X 19 Dec 02 = 1.000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-Hi Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelit
52wk-Low Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fldelltI
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months NIM Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings FINDOX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
* AS AT DEC. 31,2005/ "" AS AT NOV. 30. 2005
AS AT JAN 2 20061/" AS AT DEC 31 2005 .....AS AT DEC 31. 200-5
TO T rW f O at o ikO N a cK ,: .'. ...- ... .; .-. ,. ---"'. . ".. .' . "


Bahamas," Mr Nutt said.
"There may have been an
opening in the US and a career
path they wanted to follow up,
but no job of that type in the
Bahamas, so they stayed on."
By contrast, the IMF study
said that only 10 per cent of
Bahamians educated to sec-
ondary school level, and 2 per
cent educated to primary
school level, had emigrated to
the US between 1965-2000.
The figures used in the study
stripped out all Bahamians who
had emigrated to the US
before they were aged 16.
The IMF study found that
for the same period of time,
just over 10 per cent of the
Bahamian labour force. had
emigrated. Bar Haiti, that was
the lowest percentage for the
Caribbean region.
However, the Bahamas was
the country where the highest
percentage of its economic
migrants almost 90 per cent -
went to the US.
The IMF study, by Prachi
Mishra, said: "More than three-
fourths of migrants from the
.Bahamas, Belize, Dminican
Republic and Haiti reside in
the US. Geographical proxim-



Nassau/I


11.6% st


increase

FROM page 1B

spending is a better indication
of tourism performance, the
Bahamian hotel sector will be
encouraged by the rise in total
air arrivals from 1.45 million in
2004 to 1.514 million last year.
Sea arrivals dropped from
3.554 million to 3.536 million.
Particularly pleased will be.
hotel and resort properties in
Nassau/Paradise Island, where
air arrivals rose by 11.6 per cent
over 2004, growing from
970,340 to 1,082,519.
Sea arrivals to New Provi-
dence, though, dropped by 5.5
per cent in 2005, falling from
1.987 million to 1.878 million,
giving the island a total
increase of just 0.1 per cent.
The ongoing room inventory


.ity, higher wage differentials
and immigration laws in the US
are the most likely reasons fdi
such a bias." r
The Caribbean, with an aveil
age rate of 12 per cent, has tlid
highest rate of labour force
migration to OECD countries.
The IMF study added
"Total losses due to skilled
migration (which includes the
emigration loss, externality
effects, and government expen-
diture on educating the
migrants) outweighs the record
remittances for the Caribben
region on average, and for
almost all the individual
Caribbean countries."
There was no data on remit-
tances sent home by Bahami-
ans, but the IMF paper drew
on data supplied by the Unitdd
Nations (UN) UNESCO body
to show that the Government
spent a sum equal to 1.1 per
cent of GDP around $50 mil-
lion on educating Bahamian
migrants.
It estimated that this, coq-
pled with the emigration loss
itself, was equity alent to 4.4 per
cenit just bver $20() million -6f
'the Bahamian economyis
GDP.



?I sees


opover


in 2005
,-..! :*,li so.h
capacity problems in Grand
Bahama were largely respon-
sible for the 20':8--per-reent
decline in air aririvalsf to 'at
island, which fell from 263;34
to 209,081 in 2005. Sea arrivals
were recovering, though, down
by just 5.8 per cent at 439,2i3.
Total arrivals to Grlhid
Bahama were off by 1l.l1fer
cent, having fallen from 729,632
in 2004 to 64.334.
In the Famlil Islands jir
arrivals were up 2.8 per cent
for the whole of 2005, stand-
ing at 222,884. Sea arrivals were
ahead by 10.8 per cent, reflect-
.ing the popularity of private
islands With the cruise lines,
standing at 1.219.million. '
Total arrivals to the Family
Islands were ahead by 9.5 per
cent at 1.442 million.


POSITION AVAILABLE
for a
LEGAL SECRETARY

Applicant must:
/ Have a minimum of 3 years experience as a legal
secretary.
/ Perform all secretarial responsibilities including use
of Microsoft Office software, filing, answering phones,
scheduling meetings, completing and tracking clients'
bills, making travel arrangements, etc.
/ Possess strong organizational and communication
skills both verbal and written.
/ Manage and coordinate all arrangements for meetings
held both internally and externally including
scheduling, attendance, and organizing services
associated with meetings such as food and telephone
conferences.
/ Handle/forward/delegate routine requests obtained
through mail and over the phone.
/ Complete projects as assigned including compiling
documents.
/ Prepare correspondence, including letters,
memorandums, litigation materials, other documents,
spreadsheets.
/ Be able to work with personnel at all levels.
/ Be very detail oriented, and flexible on working
extended hours when necessary.
/ Fast typing skills.
/ Be willing to learn and be a part of a team.
Experience in conveyancing, litigation, probate and
company formation and administration is not necessary
but is preferred.
Pension plan included. Salary commensurate with skills
and experience.
Please submit application letter with resume by email or
facsimile to:

DA#9116C
c/o The Tribune
P. O. Box N-3207,
Nassau, N. P.,
The Bahamas.


POSITION AVAILABLE
for an
ASSOCIATE ATTORNEY

Applicant must:

/ Have the ability to work independently.
/ Be proficient in Microsoft Word, Excel and Outlook.
V Have excellent communication skills and the ability
to render appropriate advice based on limited
information and competing considerations under
time pressures.
Applicants with a minimum of 3 years experience in
any or all of the following areas of law will be favored:
conveyancing, litigation (particularly commercial,
divorce and matrimonial, criminal and personal injury
matters), company formation and administration, probate
and applications to the Bahamas Investment Authority.
Pension plan included. Salary commensurate with
skills and experience.
Please submit application letter with resume by mail to:
DA#9116B
c/o The Tribune
P. O. Box N-3207,
Nassau, N. P.,
The Bahamas.


I







MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2006, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE


Doctors: Proposed National Health


plan


FROM page 1B

tiins to do otherwise".
Dr Marcus Bethel, minister
of health, yesterday said the
proposed NHI scheme was
unlikely to be implemented
before the.next general elec-
tion, ard the MAB's opposi-
tion to the plan in its current
format will make it extremely
difficult for the Government
to get it off the ground.
Rather than implement a
mandatory social health insur-
ance programme, the MAB
said yesterday that it had rec-
ommended the Government
improve the existing Public-Pri-
vate Partnerships within the
Bahamian healthcare industry.
y It added that it was not con-
vinced that the healthcare sys-
tem's current challenges could
be solved by throwing more
money at it, as the NHI
promised to do.
"A new tax burden should
only be implemented if the net
positive effect of that tax is
worth the real cost to those


paying the bill," the MAB said
in a statement.
To improve financing, the
organisation suggested that a
national mutual fund be incor-
porated from the health care
levy, and include contributions
from private insurance compa-
nies.
Community
From this, the MAB added:
"A formal community based
rating insurance policy can be
established on a national basis.
This tenet of a national health
plan is particularly suited for
the senior citizens and retirees.
It allows this treasured segment
of our population to continue
with major medical insurance
coverage at affordable premi-
ums.
"In so doing, this would
ensure that every Bahamian
who desires to purchase a pri-
vate insurance can do so with-
out fear of rising annual pre-
miums once they get sick or
losing it when they reach retire-
ment age. This again would
relieve significantly the costs


of service provision in the pub-
lic sector."
The MAB pointed out that
more than 80 per cent of the
Ministry of Health's funding
was eaten up by salaries and
the civil service bureaucracy,
contributing to inefficiency.
Relying on private sector
health care services also
reduced 'the need for capital
investment by government, and
ensured both public and pri-
vate patients had access to the
best technology.
Technology prices were the
biggest factor in rising health-
care costs, the MAB said,
adding that the private sector's
investment and incorporation
into the public sector had
enabled Bahamians to '"enjoy
the highest standard of health
care delivery both in access,
availability and equity" in the
English-speaking Caribbean.
The MAB added that the
Government should focus on
regulating healthcare standards
and availability of services,
rather than facilities and tech-
nologies.
"As the largest purchaser of


healthcare services, the Gov-
ernment can negotiate the best
prices and thus optimise and
maximise our taxpayers funds.
Economies of scale and quality
considerations in a nation of
our size could preclude redun-
dancy of certain services," the
MAB said.
It added that the proposed
NHI scheme would be much
more expensive to implement
than the Government had stat-
edgiwith the financial projec-
tioas "unrealistic".
'Experiences
The Bahamas' experiences,
if it implemented the NHI plan
as is, would be similar to Cana-
da, the MAB said, where wait-
ing times for non-urgent care
under its national health sys-
tem were four months for an
MRI scan, six months for open
heart surgery, one-year for
joint replacement surgery, with
some people dying while wait-
ing for treatment.
And in the US, when its
Medicare system was created,
its costs were pegged at $37 bil-


BISX stocks: Steady, but




not 'heady levels' of '06


FROM page 1B

iets),.we expect BISX perfor-
imance. in 2006 to steady with
,satisfactory returns, but not at
,the heady levels of 2065.
"However, P/E [price/earn-
ings] ratios of many BISX-list-
ed companies remain at or
below levels seen in 2002 and
2003,, when the market
slumped, and a compelling case
could be made for further
increases in stock prices."
Prices
The stock prices of many
BISX-listed companies hit 52-
week highs in 2005. The top
performers last year, as mea-


sured by Fidelity's FINDEX,
were FamGuard Corporation,
parent of life and health insur-
er Family Guardian, which gen-
erated a 56.75 per cent return.
'iarge part of that-'return
will have been derived from
the capital appreciation that
followed the acquisition by
Barbados financial services
group, Sagicor, of a 20 per cent
stake in FamGuard, and the
subsequent share buyback.
Sagicor bought in at $6.20, a
major premium to the compa-
ny's then-price on BISX.
FirstCaribbean International
Bank (Bahamas) delivered
total returns of 49.86 per cent
to investors, with Doctors Hos-
pital Health Systems produc-


ing total returns of 44.67 per
cent.
Those two were followed by
Cable Bahamas with a 37.02
per cent total return; the
BahamasPrpopertyFund \ ith
33.46 per cent; Commonwealth
Bank at 33.25 per cent; and
FOCOL at 30.61 per cent.
Markets
Fidelity Capital Markets said
the 2006 outlook for the
Bahamian economy remained
positive as a result of inward
foreign direct investment and
the tourism sector. In addition,
the US economy was expect-
ed to underpin the Bahamian
economy through its own


growth, with both countries
growing by about 3.5-4 .5 per
cent per annum "over the
medium term".


lion per year. This had
increased to $67 billion by
1990, and reached more than
$200 billion by 2003 a 300 per
cent increase within lo years.
And the Medicare Prescrip-
tion Drug Improvement Act in
2004 was estimated at $400 bil-
lion when introduced, yet it is
now projected to cost US tax-
payers $723 billion over 10
years almost $200 billion'
more than projected.
The MAB said this would be
the likely consequence of the
NHI if it was introduced in the
Bahamas, questioning where
the extra fundswould come
from to cover rising healthcare
costs whether this would
Come from taxes, increased
premiums or a greater Budget
allocation to health.
And the MAB warned that
private insurance company par-
ticipation in providing health


coverage would be "signifi-
cantly curtailed" under the
mandatory NHI plan, with the
implication that administrative
and management jobs in the
private sector.wouldbecome
"redundant".
The MAB said Bahamians
would have to pay "duplicate
costs" if they still wanted to
have private health insurance
because of the NHI's manda-
tory nature.
It added: "The MAB is con-
cerned of the potential nega-
tive impact on innovation,
quality and productivity by this
shift in management of one of
the largest sectors of our econ-
omy.
"With this legislative thrust,
we will be expanding the public
sector and extending the inef-
ficiencies and inertia that have
historically been vexing prob-
lems in the healthcare sector."


economic effect


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


NURICAR S.A.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of NURICAR S.A. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the
-Register


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS


TENDER FOR THE RENOVATION AND UPGRADE
OF OFFICE BUILDING CENTRAL ANDROS
Tender No. 595/06

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders to undertake:
the renovation and upgrade of its office building at Fresh Creek, Central Andros.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office, Blue Hill &
Tucker Roads by contacting:-

Mrs Delmeta Seymour .
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 24 February 2006 by 4:00pm and addressed
as follows:

The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 595/06

"RENOVATION & UPGRADE OFFICE BUILDING CENTRAL ANDROS"

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.


GRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY

/eepi Grad BahkamaF Bri Sht'


VACANCY NOTICE


A vacancy exists in the Generation Maintenance Department of Grand Bahama
P6wer Company, for a Mechanic III.

The duties include but are not limited to performing routine checks to ensure
mechanical and operational worthiness of plant equipment and ensuring cleanliness
of valves, motor, pump, compressors, condensers, coolers and piping in the
Power Plant. The incumbent would also assist in writing of procedures, repairs
and preventative maintenance of all mechanical equipment, while providing
excellent customer service and maintaining the professional reputation and image
of Grand Bahama Power Company.

The applicant will be required to maintain effective communication with co-
workers and upper management, remain abreast of new evolving or changing
technology and maintenance procedures in the electrical power industry and
participate in advancement training.

The successful applicant must be a Bahamian with High School Diploma and
BGCSE or GCE 'O' level passes in Mathematics, English language, and two (2)
sciences with grade C or above. Applicants must also have a minimum of two
(2) years experience working in mechanical maintenance or the equivalent job
training.

Applications with supporting documentation including a clean Police Certificate
and proof of Bahamian citizenship should be sent to:

THE DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES
GRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY, LIMITED
P.O. BOX F-40888
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS
OR BY FACSIMILE: (242) 351-8008
Email: hrdept@gb-power.com

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF
APPLICATIONS IS FEBRUARY 16, 2006

Grand Bahama Power Company Limited
P.O. Box F-40888, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Phone: 242-352-6611 Fax: 242-351-8008 U: www.gb-power.com


BUSINESS


-- -. '
-i:i
a


'























_ ) 1


I


i


PREREQUISITE: A BA Degreena J discipline lrom an crediledsor Coid collegelunlrn ,:r a mlmmum of 5 years as manager,
supervisor or trainer; COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Intemet
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What is your goal? ,CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME IN SUPERVISORY MANAGEMENT
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CPM 902 Interpersonal Skills- $600
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With the advent of the high-tech office, the Clerks'/Office Assistants' role has evolved as one of the most important support factors in the
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TERM 1 TERM 2 (Optional) '\
iPLM900 Journeyman Plumbing- $800 SUPV 900 Supervisory Management- $500
ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250 (SUPV900 is available for Plant/Plumbing Supervisors)
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $,l;:..
PREREQUISITE: Students should have working knowledge and skills in the following areas: interpretation of codes, disposal and draima
systems, storm drainage disposal systems, installation of sanitary fixtures, basic drawings to scale, water supply and distribution,'use'of
materials and tools, repairs and maintenance. o
Begins: Fall Day/Time: Tuesdays 6pm 9pm Duration: 2 TERMS .: at] s
MASTER PLUMBING LICENSE ..v ,.
The Master Plumbing course is designed to assist students preparing to write the Master Plumbing Examination. Students should have:abvelmni
average knowledge and skills in the following areas: interpretation of codes, disposal and drainage systems, storm drainage disposal systems,
installation of sanitary fixtures, basic drawings to scale, water supply and distribution, use of materials and tools, repairs and maintenanTeiupst
Special emphasis will be placed o plant management and foreman responsibilities. '.
TERM 3 TERM 2 (Optional) :oi
MPLM900 Master Plumbing- $950 CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250 SUPV 900 Supervisory Management- $500 iGAsl
(SUPV900 is available for Plant/Plumbing Supervisors) \ !a low
PREREQUISITE: Students should have working knowledge and skills in the following areas: interpretation of codes, disposal and drainrggniil
systems, storm drainage disposal systems, installation of sanitary fixtures, basic drawings to scale, water supply and distribution, use of
r--ihatelials and tools, repiitadnfaifiteia i e :, e.'..,. :. i ;iiup"
..Begins: Fall iiDIy/Time: Tuesdays' ".6pm, 9pin' i; ,., Duration: 1 TERM .; :noir
MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING FOR NON-FINANCIAL MANAGERS .. :. I A
This course is designed to strengthen the candidates' understanding of managerial accounting. Managerial accounting concepts, princiaVta 16.
and functions are the main topics covered. The ability to prepare and accurately read a financial statement/spreadsheet is an essential skills i
I I - --- !_ .... ,- __ .. 1 ., ;A h.


I


TERM 3 for all professionals and paraprofessionals; CPS901 covers in a very student tnendly way, easy to unaerstano examples mat am me stuaens
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210 learning experience. This course also helps to prepare candidates to write external examinations.
CPS 903 Office Technology- $500 CPS 901 Accounts- $300 .' :r!: a,
CPS 910 Managing Physical Resources- $200 PREREQUISITE: None : '.
CPS 901 Accounts- $300 BEGINS: Per demand Day/Time: Sat/Thurs/Tue. 8am-12:15pm OR 6pm 9pm Duration:;l 0Week! 3 '1.2
PREREQUISITE: 3 or more years experience in a clerical position and 3 BGCSE's- Grade C or above;
COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet ETHICS AND PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY ..
Begins: Springand Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12pm Duration: 3 TERMS This course examines guidelines for the professional behavior of members of any organisation. A select group ofcodes ofethicaideics
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME IN LEARNING DISABILITIES cases will be explored to support a theoretical and practical discourse on why the application of ethics and professional responibiliyjs
The Certificate in Learning Disabilities Programme is designed to equip teachers with the skills necessary for working with diverse learners. important in all aspects of society. onsibil .: ;:. ni .
Participants are trained to use the basic techniques to identify students with learning disabilities; analyze and examine disabilities related to PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet.
language and communicative arts; and develop strategies that can be used with students who have been diagnosed as learning disabled. The PREREQUISDayITE:ime: Sat. 8am-12noon OR Thursue- 6pm 9pm Duration: 8 eeks Inter
programme comprises six (6) courses:
TERM 1 TERM 2 WRITING & RESEARCH SKILLS
SPED-900 Introduction To Learning Disabilities- $84 7SPED 903 Strategies and interventions 1- $168 W R S aip
P" 90) Introduction To Learning Disabilities- $184 &PEff3 Strategies and interventions I- $168 This course is designed to provide mature students with reading, writing, research and critical thinking skillsto prepare fth or etr
SPED 902 Individual Education Planning- $168 SPED 904 Strateges and interventions $84into CEES' professional development programmes. WRS 900 is also structured to provide certification candidates wit th skil
SPED 902 Individual Education Planning-$168 ETHC900 hics & Profess Responsibility.-$250 to successfully write position and research papers. : ,
TERM 3 WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills $350 : cq; .i
SPED9035 Assessment- $178 PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet tli,;-f<,n
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100. Begins: Per demand Day/Time: Sat.- 8am-12noon or Thursday/Tue- 6pm 9pm ^Duration 8 Weeks
PREREQUISITE: AA Degree with a Teacher's Certificate or a BA Degree; B n e, 't:O-s l
COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS, WINDOWS & THE INTERNET ,, : -! oi
Begins: Spring & Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS This workshop provides a broad foundation for students so that they will have a greater awareness and confidence using personal computers.
A+ COMPUTER TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATION Students will gain practical information and skills, such as what a computer is, how to manage personal files and.folders.:that.theycftalcdi, i'Jt
This programme of study is designed to equip students with the skills necessary to successfully sit the international A+ Microsoft Certification COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internt- $200
Examination. Techniques to identify and rectify mechanical problems related to the personal computer are explored. It is a hands-on learning PREREQUISITE Spri None& Fall Day".ime: Sal.-8am-12noon : ..Duration:aWeeks ':, : ,.i;:.
experience with lab exercises that helps the student to apply theory to practice. B I:S F DyTI A i..... ,.:Dut on3W es
TERM 1: COMP 954 Software- $510 TERM 2: COMP 955 Hardware APPLICANTS FORINTERNATIONAL CERTIFICATION COURSESANDPROGRAMMES
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and TheIntemet All students applying for International Certification Courses and Programmestfliht are offered in conjunction' wlh foreigri insilulions e
Begins: Per Demand Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 2 TERMS required to contact the CEES Office for information on external application aid examiination fees.
CERTIFIED COMPUTER OPERATOR (Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Telephone (22).325-74/31019)/328-936 Fax: (A2) 322-1712
This course of study is designed to train students how to master Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Access, Microsoft Outlook, and
PowerPoint. To help the student to develop navigation and design skills, the instructor provides easy to understand notes and conducts live" OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION ., ;., ,
demonstrations on how to manipulate the entire MS Office Suite. Upon successful completion of the external international examinations, the FEES
Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Certification is awarded. The programme comprises five Modules and two companion courses: COB Registration ... ............................................... $40.00 (o-tmeee) "
T RTERM 1 ERM 2 ,. 5 :." '= :: 2. Insurance.........................................;...................... A d'f6 'l y ar)
COMP 906 Microsoft Office Specialist- $610 ETHC900 Ethics & Professional Responsibility- $250 3. ID Card....................,..... $25.00 (one time fee)
Microsoft Word, Microsoft Access CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100 .. 4. TechnologyFee .............................. .... $75 "
Microsoft Excel, Microsoft PowerPoint TERM 3 5. Books ............................ ..................... $ Please contact COB BookLIoIelfor pnes
Microsoft Outlook OP906 Microsoft Office Specialist- $610 .i .. 6. Awards Ceremony.................................................. $150(i i usi he paid by tie 2n" TERM ..
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210 E. ''i, "7 Er\ ApplicinFees ..................... ,, Plesebchick Ilh the CEES OfTic lor inlormalon
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Window, and The Iluerrei e "
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERM S .. SENT iA L COMPUTER KNOW LEDGE: Effe i I% Summer 2005, basic computer and Internet'skills will be required of all students.,
CERT..I.FICATE.TT 7 ,LAi'W' 1i cs4 menl for efmpnon from COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet will be done via proof ofa certificate
CERTIFICATE IN LAW n Juih"r.zed provider bt b making a precrnbed computer killltest to vent3 compelenc) in Windows and Computers. Students failtjif -
This programme is offered in conjunction with The Iniiuuie ul Legal Ecuive, 1ILEX1. Bedford, Igld Iroduon To The Internet, Windows and Computers. This Workshop isa rerequiste
ILEX qualification routes are vocationally relevant and designed to build ad and t c legal knr, ledge and undersianding a ithe para.egal le0el all pr.grammes or inLle our .
Designed to facilitate the training and educational needs of Legal Secrelanes. Legal Clerks. Legal Office Manageti. Law Enloriement Offier. "or Oll prI 9 mIntr or inle oure pIaTh t t. "
Special Assistants to Lawyers, Justice of The Peace, and all persons irnteiesed in acquiring an imprcsl\e arra) of legal office kills.,the ,V".orkh.:,p Till. COMP956 Inroducon To Computers, Windows and The Internet. Dr a 2 ',s:
Certificate in Law qualification is specifically relevant to The Bahamja legal s)siern. Courses include. i Tulior $2 Duration: 2 Days Fli
TERM 1 TEtRM 2 .Da. Saturdjys 12noon 3pm 5 contact hours per day) Offered: Spring, Summer and Fall
WRS900 Writing and Research Skills -$350 ETHC i Ehis and Prof Responsibllll). i25ii LAW 900 ADVISEMENT & REGISTRATION SESSIONS ':T:
The Legal Environment -$600.00 LAW 901 General Legal Principles-$600.00 Please bnrng the following items with you to the advisement/registration session: Ord:
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210 The first four pages of your Passport
TERM 3 (Options- choose one) -$600 Copies of your certificates/licensures and college/university transcripts I(> ;.
NB. Options are subject to change. Where applicable, letters of recommendation, job description, special awards, etc. 1enu~ ,,
T AW 903 Comnnv I aw LAW 906 Law of Mortgages :pi P


LAW 905 Employment Law LAW 908 Work of The Magistrate's Court
LAW 907 Nature and Role of Criminal Law
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
PREREQUISITE: AA Degree and 3 years work experience; COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am 12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
THE BECKER CPA REVIEW
The College of The Bahamas is pleased to offer the New CPA Computer Based Test (CBT). Besides the obvious transition from a pencil-and-
paper exam to a computer-based test, the revised CPA Exam will also contain a new content focus broadening the scope of audit and attest
areas and incorporating the assessment of critical skills, such as research and communication. The new exam also has increase emphasis on
general business knowledge and information technology.
CPA 900 Financial Reporting- $650 CPA 901 Accounting & Reporting/Regulation- $520
CPA 902 Law/Business Law- $465 CPA 903 Auditing/Auditing and Attestation- $465
Prerequisite: A BA Degree from an accredited or recognized college/university in any discipline with at least 21 credits hours in accounting.
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:30am 5:30pm Duration: 12 Weeks
CERTIFICATION IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Offered in conjunction with Columbia Southern University, Orange Beach, Alabama, this nine months programme is designed for those
individuals seeking professional development and aspiring to rise through the ranks in the HR field.
TERM 1 TERM 2
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250
HRM 900 Intro To HRM Environment- $200 HRM 902 H/R Development & Training-$200
HRM 901 Securing Human Resources- $200 HRM 903 Rewards Compensation and Benefits-$300
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
TERM 3
HRM 904 Labour Management Relations- $300
HRM 905 Protecting and Evaluating Human Resources- $300
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210


OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION
1. No entrance examination is required for enrollment in professional development courses/programmes. ,?ur1T:!
2. Tuition is charged per term; i.e. you will be billed only for courses offered in the current term. :.U.:o
3. Non-Bahamians add $50 to each course/workshop/seminar
4; Remember to obtain from the Programme Coordinator the correct ISBN Number for all required textbooks -) ? a
5. At the first class session, ALL students must submit to the Programme Coordinator one copy each ,, .
of his/her stamped receipts representing payment for tuition, fees & books for the current term. ,i ~1
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND RE-CERTIFICATION SEMINARS
A compulsory professional development seminar is offered for all candidates enrolled in professional development programmes. Seminars
and workshops address important issues that are vital to the adult students' learning experience. Enrollment is also open to the general pub"K!i,.
This seminar is also designed to facilitate continuing education units for professionals applying for re-certification in their respective discipline;
Students are required only to take ONE Professional Development Seminar. Effective Fall 2005, the Fee for the Professional Developnirrr
Seminar will be $210.
THE ANNUAL AWARDS CEREMONY ; o lot
The Annual Awards Ceremony and reception is normally held at The British Colonial Hilton Hotel once during the TERM 3. Adult students
successfully completing programmes and courses are awarded certificates, certifications and/or licensure. 0O0/,
I(OCP'A
Secure Your Seat By Enrolling Today! V rqA
Contact The Centre For Continuing Education On Moss Road Campus or ,
Call (242) 325-5714/328-0093/328-1936 Fax: (242) 322-2712
Fees May Be Paid By Cash, Credit Card, or Bank Certified Cheque To: The College of The Bahamas, Business Office:n 2'n,!:
Cees Reserves The Right To Change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule And Course Materials hno"ihr'y,


. THE3'


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2006


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EDUCATION & EXTBSION SERVICES


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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2006, PAGE 7B


EBWSW4ESS


IHE


BAHAAMA


EDUCATING & TRAINING BAH-. i':


I .I


iter Offerings Spring 2006
i;. : '.' , .. :.' -:


COMPUTER APPLICATIO-S I
Ciu'rs Desriptionr This course is for the beginner who knows %ery little about computers and does not understand how it works. This
course cot ers ihe major computer concepts w Ith e\iense hands on practice of various software using: (I) Microsoft Office Word
Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft Access Database Management.
Pre equisite:None ,
Beg ns:Monday, 13 February 2006 ,6:00pm 9:00pm Section 01 (CEES)
Saturday, 11 February 2006 10:00am l1:00pm Section 02 (CEES)
Mon. and Wed., 13 Feb., 2006 4:00pm -5:30pm Section 03 (CEES)
Duration: 12 weeks Venue:CEES Computer Lab Tuition: $450.00
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II
Course Description:This course covers the major advanced concepts wilh e\elnsi'e hands on practice ofvarious software using: (I)
Miciosoft Office- Word Processing (ii) Microsof Ei\el Spreadsheetl II1 Microsol Access Daiabjse Management.


equigite:Computer Applications I
ns:T1hursday, 16 February 2006
ie:CEES Computer Lab


Time:6:00pm 9:00pm
Fees: $550.00


Duration:12 weeks


ACTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It focuses on developing
tive and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.


Pre-lequilte:None
Duration:l day


Begins:Thursday, 2 March 2006 Time: 9:30am 4:30pm
Venue:CEES Computer Lab Fees: $160.00


3RMATION TECHNOLOGY I
se Description: This course covers basic concepts of Information Technology. The course provides training in the following areas;
: Hardware Proficiency, Application Features Proficiency, Operating System Proficiency, Internet and Email Proficiency.
equisite:None Begins: Wednesday, 15 February 2006 Time: 6:00pm 9:00pm
tion:' 2 weeks Venue:CEES Computer Lab Fees:$450.00
JPG ADE AND REPAIR
se D'scription:This course is a hands-on introduction to technology systems for use in information environments. The course will
r the following topics: Basic Hardware, Operating Systems, Troubleshooting and Repairs.


equi ,te:None
:6:m 7:30pm
wtionp weeks '


Begins:Tuesday, 14 February 2006
Venue: BHTC Computer Lab


Tuesdays and Thursdays
Fees: $500.00


QU CKBOOKS
Co se Description:This course is designed to train new and existing small business entrepreneurs (less that 20 employees) how to organize
and manage their accounting activities using QuickBooks Pro software. Students will learn how to set-up their company files, chart of
acc untsg budget, customers, vendors and employees.
Pre.-equisiteNone Begins: Tuesday, 28 February 2006. Time:6:00pm 9:00pm
Du tion: 6 weeks Venue: CEES Computer Lab Fees: $330.00
UP RADE REPAIR AND TROUBLESHOOT YOUR PC WORKSHOP
Thit workshop is a hands-on introduction to upgrade repair and troubleshooting your personal computer. Topics covered are basic hardware,
opetatingystems, troubleshooting and repairs.
l i, I |
Prelrequisite:None Begins: Thursday, 9 March 2006 Time:9:30am -:4:30pm. .
Duition:l day ....... .: Venue: CEES;Computer Lab Fe.... Fest$250.00
W PAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP ,,--
Course Description:This course, which targets persons who would like to create their personal web pages will cover Web page creation,
Wet siteirlanagemeni, and HTML. Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web
pages. .
Prelrequisite:Participants must be computer literate and have a basic knowledge of word-processing
Begins:Thursday, 2 March 2006 Time:9:30am 4:30pm Duration: 2 days
Vere-'CEES CompulerLab ; Fees:$550.00

IHAJIH IAND FITNESS COURSE OFFERINGS
M^SSAGE 'TiER1'PY'ESSENTIALS I
This is an introductory course for learning basic techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major topic areas will include
Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniques, Wellness Education (Psychological and Physiological Benefits), Indications and
Coritraindicatipps,ervingSpecial Populations and Complementary Bodywork Systems to include Aromatherapy Essentials.
Sta ting:Monday, February 27, 2006 Time:6:00-9:00pm Duration:10 Weeks
Tuition Fee: $465.00 Venue: The College of the Bahamas 1
Ml SSAGE T'HERAPI ESSENTI'ALSII .
ThiS is an advance course for earning techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits.' Major topics include introduction to
hydrotherapy; spa and body treatments; the basic facial; aromatherapy-fundamentals or essential oils; relaxation and meditative methods;
andrhot stone therapy.
Stafting:Thursday, Februjr) ., 2016i Time: 6:00-9:00pm Duration:10 Weeks
Tuition Fee:$620.00 Venue:The College of the Bahamas
GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR
S' ,.. .
Thi? is an introductory course in teaching group fitness instruction. Major topics of discussion will include basic anatomy and physiology;
choreography and cueing; the:fibi components of fitness, nutrition, basic exercise testing and how to teach group exercise.. ,
Starting'Thursda', 'ebruan 23.' 01.16 Time: 6:00- :00pm Duration:10 Weeks
Tuition F-eC $4-ll. Venue:TBA

PERSONAL biE iLPMENT WiORKSHoPS
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior customer service. It focuses on
customer value, retention and relationship buildingand employee motiiaion o
Date:Thursday, 23 February 2006 '' '' ' Time:9:30am 4:30pm
Verue:Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre Tuition:$170.00
EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS'.
This workshop is designed to provide participants with anoverview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It focuses on developing
effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.
, ... ; ... ., ". .. .V e u .E ',*C o r'a ,d, ,..
Da'Thusda',.2 MNrch 21i)16 Time.9-30am 4:30pm Venu.C EES Compuier Lab, Moss Road ,
Tuilion 6'i) 0( ...
HdMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP
ThiS two-day workshop is designed to equip managers and leaders in organizations and enhance the skills of current Human Resource "
professionals with the theory, tools and techniques required for effective human resource management practices in today's workplace.
Dae:Thursday & Friday, 2nd 3rd March, 2006 Time:9:30am 4:30pm
Venue:Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre Tuition:$350.00
UPGRADE REPAIR AND TROUBLESHOOT YOUR PC
Thi workshop is a hands-on introduction to upgrade repair and troubleshooting your personal computer. Topics covered are basic hardware,
op eating systems, troubleshooting and repairs.


Dal:Thursday, 9th March, 2006
Tui ion:$250


Time:9:30am 4:30pm,


Venue:CEES Computer Lab


B PAGE DESIGN
course will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy fiddling with computers and would
to create their own web pages are encouraged to attend. Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and
les and hosting of web pages.


Dal :Th'm~ day & Friday 2nd 3rd March, 2006
Tui ion:$ 0.00


Time:9:30am -4:30pm


Venue:CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road


PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT


Th( following Personal Development courses have been approved by the Academic Board for COB credit courses equivalencies.
AC A900 Accounting for Beginner I
AC A901 Accounting for Beginners II
M( MT900 -Human Resource Management I
M( MT901- Human Resource Management II
SP 900 -Conversational Spanish I
SP, 901 Conversational Spanish II
Stu ents may continue to utilize the courses as a means of professional development in both private and public sectors with the added
rec ignition that these courses have been equated to courses taken toward a degree programme.


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COUR SE.S COURSE DESCRIPTION TIME DAY START DUR F
ACCT
ACCA900. 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS I 6:00-8:00pm Mon/Wed 13-Feb 10 weeks $250
ACCA901 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II 6:00-8:00pm M/Wed 13-Feb 10 weeks $275
ACCA902 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS III 6:00-8:00pm Tue/Thur 14-Feb 10 weeks $300
.US.... .
'BUS1900 01 CREDIT & COLLECTIONS I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 8 Weeks $225
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER 1 Day $170
CUST900 ) '01 SERVICE W/S 9:30am-4:30prn Thur 23-Feb
BUSI904 01 INTRODUCTION TO BUS. I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
COMP
COMP901 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 1 6:00-9:00pm Mon 13-Feb 12 Weeks $450
SCOMPD0 02 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 10am-i:00pm Sat 11-Feb 12 Weeks $450
COMP901 03 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 4:00-5:30pm Mon/Wed 13-Feb 12 Weeks $450
COIMP902 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II 6:00-9:00pm Thur 16-Feb 12 Weeks $550
COMP903_ 01 INFORMATION TECH. I 6:00-9:00Em ed 15-Feb 12 Weeks $450
COMP 941 01 QUICKBOOKS 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 6 weeks $330
COMP953 01 PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR 6:00-7:30pm Tue/Thur 14-Feb 12 Weeks $450
EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT 1 Day $160
COMP960 01 W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thur 2-Mar_
WEB PAGE DESIGN 2 Days $550
COMP930 01 WORKSHOP 9:30am-4:30pm Thur/Fri 2-Mar
Upgrade Repair and 1 Day $250
COMP923 01 Troubleshoot Your PC W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thur 9 Mar $
COSM _
COSM802 01 MAKE-UP APPLICATION 6:00-9:00pm Mon 27-Feb 8 Weeks $225
COSM804 01 MANICURE & PEDICURE 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 8 Weeks $225
COSM807 01 NAIL ART TECHNICIAN 6:00-9:00pm Mon/Thur 27-Feb 5 weeks $500
DECOR
DECO800 01 INTERIOR DECORATING I 6:00-9:00pm Wed 22-Feb 8 weeks; $225
DECO801 01 INTERIOR DECORATING II 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 8 weeks $250
FLOR800 01 FLORAL DESIGN I 6:00-9:00p. Tue 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
FLOR801 01 FLORAL DESIGN II 6:00-9:00pm Mon 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
FLOR802 01 FLORAL DESIGN III 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb 10 weeks $275
ENGLISH _
ENG 900 01 EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 8 Weeks $225,
ESL 900 01 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANG 6:00-9:00pm Mon/Fri 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
,HEALTH &
FITNESS
MASSAGE THERAPY $465
MASG900 01 ESSENTIALS I 6:00-9:00pm Mon 27-Feb 10 weeks
MASSAGE THERAPY $620
MASGj01 01 ESSENTIALS 11 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb 10 weeks
GROUP FITNESS $400
HLTH800 01 INSTRUCTOR 6:00-9:00PM Thur 23 Feb 10 Weeks $
LANG
CRE 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE I 6:00-7:30pm Tue/Thur 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
CRE 901 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE II 6:00-7:30pm Mon/Wed 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
SPA 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I 6:00-7:30pm Tue/Thur 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
SPA 901 01 CONV. SPANISH II 6:00-7:30pm Mon/Thur 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
FRE 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I 6:00-7:30PM Mon/Wed 27 Feb 10 Weeks $225
MGMT.
_I HUMAN RESOURCE $250
MGMT900 01 MANAGEMENT I 6 00-9 00pr, TrTu, 16-Feb 12Weeks
HUMAN RESOURCE 12 WeeKS $300
'MGMT901 I01 MANAGEMENT II i,00-9:00pm Mon '1'-F6' .- ": ': ;
HUMAN RESOURCE --- :- 2 Days $350
MGMT902 01 MANAGEMENT W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thur/Fri 2-Mar
MEDICAL
MEDT900 01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb 10 weeks $225
SEWING ____ ____
S BASIC OF FREEHAND 10 weeks $225
SEW 800 01 CUTTING I 6:00-9:00pm Mon 27-Feb
BASIC OF FREEHAND 10 weeks $250
SEW 802 01 CUTTING II 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb
SEW 805 <01 DRAPERY MAKING I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
SIEW'806' 01 DRAPERY MAKING II 6:00-9:00pm Wed 22-Feb 10 weeks $250
SEW 811 01 UPHOLSTERY MAKING I 6:00-9:00pm Wed. 22-Feb '10 weeks $225

ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/ 328-1936 or email Al
fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time) When submitting
application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to change
:Tuitin, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials

Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute
INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT

CULINARY COURSES
COURSES BOEGICNS D PV. DAYS TIME TUITION & FEE RSOIRCE "Vwa M$.. Enrrl.
(ADtDIHONAL.L MATERIAL
$40 APPp 'uI FOR
I. nahi mi.nCi.ire COOK 806 Febnar 2 6 weeks Thurs. 6:00-9:(0pm $225.00 $SO-Si2perweek SHTS Main 15
Kitchen
2: CipuMolitCookKing COOK 823 Jiauarv 30 6 weeks Monl. 6:00.-O0plm S200.00 $20 per week SHTS Main 15
S Kitchen
3 (Cokmert Cooking II (.(K)K 824 January 30 weeks IlTon. 6:X00-9:00pm $225.00 $20 perweek SIH LMain 15is
4. Cakc PastryMaking I COOK 813 Januay 31 10 weeks Tues. 6:00-9:00pm $225.00 $10- 15per weck SHTS Lorder 15
Kitchen
StainS APF 1 1.4.n COOK ( 14 January 31 i0eeks Tues. 6:0090O0pm $250.00 510-Si5perweek SIITSPastry 15
6. Bread Making ; COOK 810 Fcbruary2 6 weeks Thurs. 6:00-:00pm $200.00 $5- $10 per week SHTSLarder 15
S________ _____________ Kitchen
7 (al lkei.anm I COO)K 817. Flebruiy. I 10 weeks Wed. 6:0)-9:00(pm $'25.00 StO-SIS perweek SH'IS larder 1
Cal rc Decoraion 11 COOK 818 Febhnuny 1 week. Wel. 6:00.9:00pm $225.00 $10-$15perweek SHTSPastsy 15
Kitchen

For further information please contact the Industry Training Department of the Culinary & Hospital Management
Institute at 323-5804, 323-6804 or fax 325-8175













NOTICE

PROSPECTIVE GRADUATES SPRING 2006
ALL PROSPECTIVE GRADUATES FOR SPRING 2006 MUST TURN IN COMPLETED
GRADUATION EVALUATION FORMS TO THE RECORDS DEPARTMENT
ON OR BEFORE FEBRUARY 10, 2006.
THE FORM WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED WITHOUT
/APPROPRIATE SIGNATURES, (STUDENT'S, ADVISOR'S AND CHAIRPERSON'S), &
/PROOF OF. PAYMENT FROM THE BUSINESS OFFICE.




BOOKSTORE

,, ~ Announces ~
GSM Rockit Prepaid Phone Cards
are now available at the Ticket Xpress Kiosk In the Bookstorel
So don't go without minutes anymore!


I;: ':
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PAGE 8B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2006


I I 1L. 1 I 1 1 L-* &a..- -..f, ..%.


GN-318












SUPREME COURT



THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
Feb. 9, 2006

NO.2006/PRO/npr/00016
In the estate of HAROLD STUART MOE, late of No. 1016
Lakeshore Drive, Barron County, Rice Lake, Wisconsin,
United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its
Probate Side by VERONICA DELORES GRANT of 19D
Santa Maria Avenue, Freeport, Grand Bahama, The
Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, the Authorized Attorney in
The Bahamas for the Resealing Domiciliary Letters
(Informal Administration) in the above estate granted to
THOMAS F. RAASCH, the personal representative, by
the state of Wisconsin, Circuit Court, Washburn, on the
29th day of July, 2005.
Signed
K. Mackey
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
Feb. 9, 2006
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00017
Whereas DEYANE E. RUSSELL, of Yellow Elder Gardens,
New Providence, The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration with the Will annexed of the real and
personal estate of WILLIAM EDWARD DONOVAN JR.
a.k.a. WILLIAM E. DONOVAN JR. late of 108 Sea Lily
Lane, Ponte Verda, St. John's Florida, United States of
America, deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.
K. Mackey
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
Feb. 9, 2006
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00018
Whereas CARLIN CLEARE, of Lindsley Place, Mount
Pleasant, New Providence, The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration of the real and personal estate
of BEATRICE DELORES CLEAR late of Lindsley Place,
Mount Pleasant, New Providence, The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.
K. Mackey
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
Feb. 9, 2006
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00019
Whereas ARTHUR NAIRN, of King Street, New
Providence, The Bahamas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration of the real and personal estate of PRESTON
NAIRN late of Hospital Lane, New Providence, The
Bahamas, deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

K. Mackey
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION


Feb. 9, 2006
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00020
Whereas LISE THIBAULT TURENNE, of Montreal in the
Province of Quebec, Canada, has made application to
the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration with the Will Annexed of the real and
personal estate of RONALD THIBAULT late of Montreal,
in the Province of Quebec, Canada, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

K. Mackey
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
Feb. 9, 2006
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00022
Whereas KELA MCDONALD, SAMUEL MCDONALD,
JR. and SHAWNA MCDONALD, of Imperial Park, Eastern
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the Lawful Children
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the real and
personal estate of SAMUEL ALFRED MCDONALD late
of Imperial Park, Eastern District, New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.
D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
Feb. 9, 2006
No. 2006/PRO/npr/p0025
Whereas LUDELL PRATT, of Gladstone Road, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney
for Olive C. Moss, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of
the real and personal estate of HUBERT MOSS late of
Florida Court, East Street South, Southern District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.
D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
Feb. 9, 2006
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00026
Whereas ROSEMARIE ADELE THOMPSON, of 30
Providence Avenue, Chippingham, New Providence, The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the real
and personal estate of ULA AMANDA BAILEY late of 30
Providence Avenue, Chippingham, New Providence, The
Bahamas, deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.
D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
Feb. 9, 2006
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00027
Whereas STAN O. SMITH, of New Providence, The
Bahamas, and ELTON GIBSON of New Providence, The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas, for letters of administration with the will
annexed of the real and personal estate of GLENROY
ROLLE SR. late of Bimini, The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the
date hereof.
D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
Feb. 9, 2006
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00030

Whereas SALATHIEL WILSON, of Bluff on the Island of
Cat Island, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas for Letters of Administration of
the real and personal estate of JENNY SIMMONS aka
MARION SIMMONS, late of Roker's, Cat Island, one of
the Islands of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the
date hereof.
K. Mackey
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
:Feb. 9,2006
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00031
Whereas DEBORAH MINUS, of Golden Gates No. 1, on
the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the


Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the real and personal estate of
PRINCESS MAJOR late of Golden Gates on the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.
K. Mackey
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION ,
Feb. 9, 2006
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00032 .

Whereas VALERIE E. P. WOOD, of Nassau East, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration Qf-
the real and personal estate of CAPTAIN JOHN,
RICHARDSON WOOD JR., late of Tropical Gardens,,,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth'
of The Bahamas, deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the)
date hereof. ,;


K. Mackey
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS L
THE SUPREME COURT';
PROBATE DIVISION"
Feb. 9, 2006'!
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00034
Whereas CLARA BELLE PINDER, of The Settlement o6f',
Spanish Wells, St. George's Cay, Eleuthera, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, one of.
the surviving Heirs, has made application to the Supreme"
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of,,
the real and personal estate of BEARL ANNETTE PINDER,
a.k.a. BEARL ANNETTE PINDER late of The Settlement,
of Spanish Wells, St. George's Cay, North, Eleuthera, orne,
of the Islands of the Commonwerlth of The Bahamas;%y
deceased. ,,;
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard,
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from theG-
date hereof. "

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COUR'I
PROBATE REGISTR f Y
P.O. BOX N-16l7,
Nassau, The Bahama,,,
Feb. 9, 200C6,
NO.2006/PRO/npr/00035 .^
In the estate of EDITH WESTERGAARD THIELEMANNI*
late of Radhusvej 3, 28 DK-3450 Allerod in the County
of Denmark, At
deceasedfii

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration 'ofi
fourteen days from the date hereof, application willib-0~
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its
Probate Side by GILBERT ANSELM THOMPSON W
Chancery House, The.MMll in the City of Freeport; Grand"r-
Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of Thei
Bahamas, is the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas f&~
the Resealed Grant of Certificate of Probate Regardiri~
* Administration out of Court dated the 23rd day of Februar,
2001 in the above estate granted to ULLA THIELEMANN,:
the Personal Representative by the probate Court of
Hillerod in the County of Denmark, on the 23rdday qgf
February, 2001.


K. Mackey
i (for) Registrar


K]i


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS,
THE SUPREME COURTS
PROBATE DIVISION,
F bb,9 200&
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00038 :

Whereas BERNESE PAUL FRANCIS ALBURY, 'of'
Reginald Road on the Island of New Providence, orie'of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for Letters of Administration of the real and persorial
estate of PETER HERTZ ALBURY, late of No. 43 Tovwi
Court Apartments, Nassau Street, New Providence,,one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,'
deceased. .. -
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard:
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days.from ,the,
date hereof.
K. Mackey:
(for) Registrar "'


No. 2006/PRO/


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
Feb. 9, 20cl
nor/00041


Whereas KENDOLYN V. CARTWRIGHT-ROBINSON 'f
Blair Estates on the Island of New Providence, one of
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, 1r
Letters of Administration with the will annexed of the real
and personal estate of PAUL W. FARRINGTON latesf
505 Harbour House, in the City of Freeport, on the Island
of Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from tfe
date hereof.

K. Mackey
(for) Registrar Wi




FEB. 6, 7 k'

i'ri ,


: i *


L L IL~ I ..._


. / 1 -





FROM page 3B

!delays. His office is not
equipped to fulfil the long-stat-
ed objective of bringing cap-
tive insurance companies back
to the Bahamas.
3. The Securities Commis-
sion, under the MOF, is given
the enormous function of reg-
ulating pot only BISX, and our
'public companies', whether
BISX-listed or not, but also
popping investment funds and
over 60 licensed firms who act
as securities dealers and invest-
mpnt managers for both.
domestic and international '
clihts and trying to catch
those who never even seek a
lichnce. With its present staff
of 45 people, the Comniission
is l.arely up to the task, and
seriously needs more lawyers
an accountants to meet its
responsibilities. Perhaps with
a larger staff it might have been
able to nip in the bud the
alleged shocking activities at
Dominion Investments, which
have recently focused unwel-
come attention on the Bahami-
an financial reputation. Are
there more hidden time-bombs
waiting to explode?
4. The peculiar category of
Financial and Corporate Ser-
vices Providers is licensed inad-
eqiately by an Inspector,
whose duties conflict with his
position as Registrar General,
responsible to the MFI. How-
ever, their activities are offi-
cially overseen by the Compli-
ance Commission, reporting to
the MOF, struggling with divid-
ed~ sponisibility.
'Also; these firms must often
file duplicate applications to
th;Central Bank and the Secu-
rities Commission, ensnaring
thnm in needless paperwork
and: alienating clients.
The Compliance Commis-
sin is also supposed to regu-
lat he financial afairs of.pro-
fcpsional intermediaries -
la.yers, accountants and real-
estatc agents.
% Credit unions, strangely,
fal' under the jurisdiction of
t btf Mlinisry of Agriculture.
.7. Peidin funds, with nearly
a Biif.io'dollars of workers'
savings, are not regulated at
all, nor are non-bank consumer
credit companies.

System
The most obvious flaw in this
a.sften is the multiple reporting
requirements for companies
engaging in multiple activities,
saih as insurance companies
that are also traded on BISX,
or financial groups that include
banking, insurance and securi-
Tres dealing. Such companies
are forced to request authori-
sations from two or three reg-
ulators who seldom coordinate
th er response. '
An even more serious prdb-'
l Pis'ithe lack of uniformity
damoig' itle various regulators
in terms of their expertise and
resources, and the resultant
riaderi and over-regulation of.
many financial acti\ ities, com-
bined with erratic and long-
delayed responses. A strange
anomaly of our system is the
division of regulatory oversight
between the MOF and the
MFI, the latter of which should
limit itself strictly to promo-
tign, quite incompatible with,,
regulation.
,One glaring deficiency in the
etire system is the lack of flex-
ibe sanctions that are applied
and publicised measures that
would not be part of our penal
la. and would not have to go
though our regular courts. The
Sntral Bank seemingly has
oinly two principal measures to
disciplinee an erring bank: sus-
pjl5ision or cancellation of its
lieance, which should be dra-
Oonian measures of last resort.
Tormy knowledge, never has a
fine or similar penalty been
imposed on a bank or any of its
4tiectors or officers.
Another type of unpunished
violation has been in the area
of corporate compliance. Since
the Securities Industry Act and
associated Regulations came
into effect in 2001, there has
never been a reported case of a
public company being sanc-
tioned,. or even officially criti-
9ised, by the Securities Com-
ihrssion for failure to file
reports or to disclose required
information about its business


., share dealings. There
assuredly have been violations,


but we have no indication the
regulator took any action.
However, I am told that the
Commission will soon start to
impose fines on identified vio-
lators.
The record of the FSA in the
UK is very different, showing
that it is not shy about impos-
ing sanctions and naming the
.miscreants. In the year ended
March 31, 2005, the FSA insti-
tuted formal enforcement pro-
ceedings in 79 cases, resulting
in fines totaling 22 million
($39 million). These included
,fining tllh Bank .of Ireland
350,000 for tailing to enforce
its internal money-launderipg
controls, and a ,'hopping 17
million fine on'the i.i rlt Royal
Dutch/Shell oil group for mis-
leading its shareholders about
its proven petroleum reserves,
with some fines as low as
1,000.
Pressure

The Government is certainly
aware of the pressure for cre-
ating a more efficient regula-
tory structure, and is consider-
ing what form it should take.
The study has been concen-
trated by the hiring last year
of Michael Foot as Inspector
of Banks and Trust Companies.
Mr Foot was a veteran of bank
regulation in the Bank of Eng-
land, and then became one of
the FSA's founding executive
directors before moving to the
Bahamas. With the Securities
Commission's Hillary Deveaux
as chairman, there are now
monthly meetings of all the
various regulators, together
with officials from the relevant
Ministries to consider how best
to move forward.
The creation of a single body
similar to the FSA would be
the most,sweeping and com-
SprehensiN e sicololIn Asrin the
'U NA, itpurposd iuouldbe'f:ot
.onl\ the neiaa' oneof'vigor-
,ous prevention of financial
crimes, but also the positive
one of improved efficiency and


reduction of red-tape, so that
customers get better service
and providers can increase
their profitability.
Three important character-
istics of the FSA will be a new
experience for the Bahamas
scene, but must be imported
here to make the system effec-
tive and acceptable to the pub-
lic. The first is transparency.
The FSA makes full disclosure
of all its activities through its
annual report, public meetings,
issues of directives, and reviews
by Parliament and practition-
ers. Expenditures and enforce-
Sment measures are openly
Srevealed,.down to such details
as the compensation of the'
clijirminn and dexecuetledi'rec-
tors. Thi4 open policy will be
a radical assault on the pre-
vailing secrecy that presently
wraps most of our Government ':
operations.
Second, a risk-based
approach to regulation and
allocation of resources must be
followed. The FSA recognizes
that 100 per cent compliance
is impossible and undesirable:
achieving a "zero.failure"
regime would be excessively
burdensome for regulated firms
and would stifle innovation and
competition. The benefits of
enforcing compliance for minor
infractions must always be
weighed against the costs
involved.
Third, regulation should not
look just inward at the opera-
tion of regulated firms, but out-
ward to the public whose inter-
,ests ard the object of protec-
tion. This requires an ongoing
public awareness campaign to
increase financial literacy
among consumers of all finan-
cial products, and to demand
clearer and more complete
financial information dissemi-
nated by both the regulator and
the firms it supervises.
Creating a Bahamian FSA.
will be no easy task. Consoli-
dating the expertise of different
regulatory groups, each. with
great variation in resources and


experienced personnel, senior-
ity, titles, perquisites, and salary
levels, will certainly present a
challenge in human-resource
management. The probable
shortage of qualified Bahamian
staff in the initial period will
require the hiring of foreign
nationals, with all the resulting
political issues. But the effort is
certainly worth making. Studies
must] soon be followed by
action. At the veryleast; we
can reduce duplicated admin-
istrative costs now spread out
over, many agencies.
Nobody actually welcomes
regulation. But there is world-
wide recognition that financial
'services is an industry where
consumer protection cannot be
guiarinteed solely by open-mar-
ket competition, but needs
rule-making and supervision
set'by an independent authori-
ty. Equally, nobody welcomes
bureaucracy, but an FSA
would not, as might be feared,
:add another layer of bureau-
cracy to those we already have
but would replace our many
existing fiefdoms, each busy
protecting its own turf.
Praise

The recent praise given by
The Banker magazine to the
Bahamas as the area's best off-
shore financial centre should
not make us complacent and
blind us to the continuing defi-
ciencies spotted by foreign
observers, still often reluctant
to give us full faith. The Brand-
ing Survey being prepared by
PriceWaterhouseCoopers
(PwC), describing our image
abroad, will pull no punches in
telling us what further steps are
necessary. While much has
been accomplished in the last
few years, both with legislation
and actual banking practices,
much remains to be done to'-
: biing us fully into the modern':'
world of finance, and the cre-
ation of a centralised FSA is
certainly one of the crucial
measures.


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2006, PAGE 9B


Itt~rin T R B N


Centralised Regulation:





an FSA for the Bahamas


Positions at












Kingsway Academy

Kingsway Academy is seeking the services of a
competent Systems Manager to oversee and manage
the School Network and the Students Information
System:

Qualifications:

Possess a degree in Computer studies and
the relevant areas
Have a strong background in computers and
operating systems
Good verbal and written communication
skills
Demonstrate initiative and good work ethics
Honest and reliable
Amiable and resourceful.etc.

All applicants MUST be born again Christians

Letters of application, together with a recent colour '
photograph and detailed Curriculum vita (including
the names and addresses of at least three references,
one being the name of one's-Church Pastor) should
be forwarded to:

Ms. Kelcine Hamilton
Academy Affairs Manager
Kingsway Academy Business Office
Bernard Road

Deadline for application is
Friday, February 17,2006







TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 10B. MONDAY. FEBRUARY 6, 2006


SPORT


COB Lady Caribs




score a lively




triumph over




Lady Cheetahs


. .. . ..
. . . . . .
i~j ;~v~~r' *
r; ~ -I'


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
IN one of their most highly
spirited game, the College of
the Bahamas Lady Caribs ran
circles around the Sunshine
Auto Lady Cheetahs to pull
even in third place in the New
Providence Women's Basket-
ball Association standings.
Finally playing with the
enthusiasm that has made them
one of the top teams in the
league last year, the Lady
Caribs shook off a dismal first
quarter and outplayed the Lady
Cheetahs for the remaining
three in posting a 67-50 victory
on Saturday night.
In pulling off the win in the
feature contest at the DW Davis
Gym, the College of the
Bahamas joined Sunshine Auto
in third place in the six-team
league standings with a 7-5 win-
loss record.
The defending champions
Cleaning Centre Angels stayed
on top of the league, pushing
their record to 11-1 with a 72-62
triumph over the Junior All-
Stars, who slipped to 1-11.
The win by the Lady Caribs
was a gratifying one for coach
Linda Davis as she prepares the
College of the Bahamas for a
series against the top three
teams before the All-Star Clas-
sic on Saturday.
COB will play the second
place Johnson's Lady Truckers
(8-4) in Tuesday night's feature
contest and they have the Lady
Angels on Thursday night.
"Excellent. We have really
come around. We struggled
after our first two games back
from our trip to the Virgin
Islands," Davis said. "We didn't


start to gell and I was a little
concerned about that.
"We started off a little slug-
gish tonight, but once we start-
ed to get inot our rhythm, we hit
a couple of key shots and our
rotation, in terms of passing, got
a little better."
Down 5-13 at the end of the
first quarter, the Lady Caribs
went with their 1-2 punch of
Kimberley Rolle and Christine.
Sinclair and they provided the
in and outside game that COB
lacked at the beginning to turn
the game around.
Up 27-25 at the half, COB
went on a 15-2 tear that started
with a three-pointer from Rolle
and ended up with a jumper
from Sinclair on a pass from
Rolle to extend their lead to 42-
27 with about minutes left in
the third.
The Lady Cheetahs would
make a run of their own, clip-
ping the deficit to 45-40 as Lin-
da Pierre and Lucinda Sylvain
would produce a 1-2 punch of
their own to counter the Lady
Caribs.
But that was the closest that
they came as COB went on to
post a 49-40 margin at the end
of the third and they kept their
intensity throughout the fourth
as they simply ran away from
Sunshine Auto.
"We came out sluggish in the
first quarter, but after we caught
them up at half-time, we pulled
together as a team in the third
and fourth quarter to win," Sin-
clair reflected, "This one was
long overdue. We wanted to
play that way from the start, but
we had to do it at the end."
S Sinclair ended up with a
game-high 27 points with four
steals and three assists in 36


N IN the last seconds of the game Success Training College
plays hard to take COB off their feet


minutes. In 28 minutes, Rolle
contributed 17 points, six
rebounds, three steals and two
assists.
No other player was in dou-
ble figures, but Kavionne New-
bold yanked down 14 rebounds,
scoring seven with a pair of
block shots. Danielle Capron
scored six points and Alyse
Dean helped out with five
points, five steals and four
assists.
The Lady Caribs shot 26-for-
74 from the field and 9-for-27
from behind the three-point
arch, compared to the Lady
Cheetahs' 18-for-61 from the
field and 3-for-10 from three
point.
The Lady Cheetahs, however,
won the battle of the boards
with a 46-37 advantage, thanks
to Pierre's game high 17 with
18 points and seven of their side
high nine blocks in 36 minutes.
But Sunshine Auto did not
have that much offensive pro-
duction from the rest of their
cast as Brooke Smith, Lucinda
Sylvain and Tee Hanna all
scored just seven and Anastacia
Moultrie had six with seven
rebounds.

Irritated

Lady Cheetahs' head -coach
Mario Bowleg was irate about
his Sunshine Auto's perfor-
mances and did not mince on
his words after the disappoint-
ing loss.
"Those girls have lost their
touch about basketball. Teams
have made the adjustments
against them and they are hold-
ing the ball and trying to think
about what to do with it on the
court," Bowleg said.
"We can't go out there and
practise, design the plays for
them and they go out there and
still not make the decision. No
matter what the coaches do in
practice, the players still have
to play the game and that is
what the Cheetahs are not
doing. We are going through
the motion."
Brooke Smith, who added
three assists and three steals in
her 38 minutes on the court,
said it was probably one of their
worse game they played.
"Very poor, very poor," was
how she summed it up. "Our
defence wasn't there and we
didn't have any offence."
At times, Smith found her-
self guarding Kim Rolle, who
used her height advantage to
hit the outside jumpers. But she
said if they can improve defen-
sively, they could play a lot bet-
ter offensively.
Coach Davis said this week
will really tell how serious her
Lady Caribs are this year.


* SUCCESS Training College with the ball tries his best to shake off COB as they play at the-" "')
Kendall Issacs Gym at the weekend
(Photos: Mario Duncanson/Tribune st


Hopefully, she said, their per-
formances will give them the
springboard they need going
into the play-offs.
Angels 72, All-Stars 62: With
just five players in uniform, the
Cleaning Centre got a game-
high 38 points with 16 rebounds,
four assists and three steals
from Suzette McKenzie as they
held off the Junior's.
Chrysantha Strachan helped
out with 15 points and 10
rebounds; Keisha Richardson
had 10 points with a career high
30 rebounds and Felicia
Cartwright chipped in with nine
points and eight rebounds.
Garice McDonald did not score,
but she had four rebounds.
Phillippa Wallace led the All-
Stars with 15 points; Deandra
Williams had 13; Tiffany Wild-
goose 12; Inderia Saunders 11
and Shandia Major seven.
Instead. of playing for the
Lady. Angels, Sharel Cash
coached her Junior All-Stars,
who played well in every cate-
gory except for rebounds where
they were outmatched 68-40.
They beat the Lady Angels 10-
21 in turnovers.
But the more experienced
Lady Angels outscored them
29-84 from the field and 11-for-
17 from the free throw line. The
All-Stars were 26-84 from the
field and 11-for-17 from free
throw. They were also 7-for-15
from three point, compared to
the Lady Angels' 3-for-24.


* COB holds on to the ball and attempts to take it to the rim


Texaco sponsorship for swimming trials


Texaco has stepped forward to sponsor
the Bahamas Swimming Federation as its
2006 CARIFTA Swimming and Water Polo
teams prepare for the Barbados Champi-
onships
Chevron Bahamas Ltd, through its Tex-
aco brand, stepped forward and agreed to
sponsor the Federation's two time trials
that are used for team selection purposes.
The Texaco Bahamas Swimming Federa-
tion Time Trials will be held on February 10
and 11 at the Betty Kelly-Kenning Aquat-
ic Centre, and again on March 3 and 4.
Both Texaco Bahamas Swimming Fed-
eration Time Trials will follow the exact
format of the Carifta Championships and
the February trials will start at 6pm on Fri-
day, February 10. The first race of the Sat-
urday morning session on February 11 at
9am and the final session will start on the
same day at 6pm. The Federation expects
that almost half of its 400 registered swim-
mers will participate in these trials which
will also serve as a qualifying meet for the
National Championships and all interna-
tional meets in 2006.
The Bahamas team has had exceptional
performances during the past 3 CARIFTA
Games and tied for first place in medal
count at the 2005 Curacao Games. Alana
Dillette, who has completed her CARIFTA


eligibility, was the most outstanding swim-
mer at these games and won 10 gold medals
in her 10 events. While the Federation
recognizes that Alana's outstanding per-
formance will be difficult to duplicate, there
are many outstanding swimmers that have
stepped up and are excited to represent the
Bahamas at the Games.
Algernon Cargill, The Federation's Pres-
ident, confirmed that Bert Bell, the head
coach of the Freeport Aquatic Club, will be
the team's head coach in Barbados and he
will be assisted by Marko Sowa, the Bar-
racuda Swimming Club's head coach.
Cargill anticipates that the Bahamas will
be represented by a full 36-member swim-
ming team and a 13-member male water
polo team. The water polo team will be
competing in it is third Carifta Games and
are expected to be strong competitors for a
medal.
The dominant age groups, said the fed-
eration will be the Girls and Boys 15-17
years and the Girls 13-14 years. These age
groups have a wealth of talent.
In thanking Chevron for its continued
support to the development of young peo-
ple, and sports in particular, Cargill encour-
ages other corporate citizens to follow
Chevron's lead and assist the team to trav-
el to Barbados.


,.,.--,-. . ,
* RHONDA Lightbourne, brand marketing specialist at Chevron Bahamas, presents a check to Al
Dlette, secretary of the Bahamas Swimming Federation in support of the Texaco Bahamas Swimming
Federation Time Trials.









.'~i N %1oT,6P I w1


owles and Nestor win first title for 2006

Knowles and Nestor win first title for 2006


I -yBRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
MARK Knowles and Daniel Nestor have final-
ly gotten the monkey off their back.
SIt came on Super Bowl Sunday as the duo
clinched their first title for the new year with a 6-
2, 6-3 victory over the team of Chris Haggard
and Wesley Moodie at the Delray Beach Inter-
national Tennis Championships,
"It's:nice, obviously it's better than what we did
in Australia," said Knowles, referring to their
two first-round exits in the two tournaments they
played in Australia, including the Australian


Open Grand Slam in January.
"We won four matches here and won the title.
You never get tired of winning titles, That's for
sure."
But this was one a little special for Knowles. It
was the first time that he played with his son,
Graham, in the stands.
"It was the exciting part of life that I'm in and
so not only to have my wife, Dawn, but my son,
Graham there as well was quite exciting," he
said.
Knowles and Nestor were the number one seed
in the tournament they were playing for the first
time, Haggard and Moodie were No 3.


On their way to the final, Knowles and Nestor
knocked off the team of Oliver Marach and Cyril
Suk from the Czech Republic 6-7 (5), 7-6 (13), 10-
4 in the semifinal on Saturday.
Their second-round victory was the easiest one
as they pulled off a 6-1, 6-1 decision over Ramon
Delgado and Olivier Patience. It came after they
had a marathon first round 6-7 (4), 6-2, 10-2 win
over Keviri Kim and Hyung-Taik Lee.
Now that they are finally on the scoreboard,
Knowles said they are looking forward to an
exciting year as they head off to Europe next
week,
"We would have preferred to have this start in


Australia last month, but we had a rough start in
Australia," he stated. "It's always tricky coming
off a long break.
"We didn't execute there, burt now we're back
rolling and we have the momentum. We will take
a week off and then we will go to Europe and
hopefully build on this and try to get back to the
spot where we belong,"
Knowles and Nestor will head to Marseille,
France for their next tournament before they go
to Rotterdam, The Netherlands on February 20
and then to Dubai on February 27.
SHopefully, he said, this trip will not be like the
one they took to Australia.


Records tumble at third Star




Performers Track classic


* Wy iKELSIE JOHNSON
lior Sports Reporter
,f. aas a record breaking
w 'tnd in track and field as
(F I meet records were
dy at the 3rd annual Star
.tpme ers Track Classic,
b ing their names in the
Book were Tyrahnique
ipias, Krystal Bodie, Shel-
'BElle, Sheniqua Ferguson,
Armbrister, Romona
l tfls, and Rashard Clarke,
~tsh the CARIFTA Games
glsikgt, the falling of records
,s* ied as a gauge for the ath-
, iwho are gunning to make
tha:tem.
K-fi seconds shy of the stan-
a4set by the Bahamas Asso-
~etih of Athletic Association
(BAAA) ip the 400m, Thomas is
hoping to obtain qualification
standards by this weekends meet,
A -f took the under 17 girls
4QOaf in a record-breaking per-
fiiance time of 58.71 seconds,
beating the one-year-old meet.
ticord of 1:01.42 seconds set by
,NItalya Beneby.
SAIsp dipping under the meet
e9t01d were second and third'
Vli-:ilnishers Nivea Smith of
.QOt.:ld Bahama High and
tfina Burnside. Smith post-
L'ft -ime of 50.05 second and
piqide 59,40 seconds.
T>qmas said: "The race went
very'well, it was a little head-
wii.comiing on the back stretch
buLblnade it through.
SJyas surprise to feel all the
wind'.on the home stretch as
well. Although I was tired I
tried my best to fight the wind.
:'1 would like to thank my
coach for taking the time out
to train me as-I prepare for the
Carifta trials. This time here
today might not ha\e been
enough to qualify me, but I am
working towards quality ing for
the gamess"
SBodie was in full control of
'in the girls 100m hurdles, cruis-
ing to a record breaking win
:with a time of 15.08 seconds,
erasing the old record of 15.23
seconds. Coming in second was
:Tess Mullngs in 17.91 seconds
and Plar Dorsett third in 19,08
seconds,
The loaded 100m open wom r
en's race went to Shenique Fer-
guson.
A late surge by Ferguson with


Athletes


strive to


make the


grade for


CARIFTA


Games

less than 10 metres to go give
her the edge over Tamika
Clarke, who flew down for the
meet.
Ferguson won the event in a
time of 12,05 seconds, Clarke
posted a time of 12,12 seconds
with T'Shonda Webb finishing
third with 12.3) seconds.
This was the second win for
Ferguson, who had anchored
her team to a win in the
4xl00m,

Gold

She would end the day with
three gold medals, taking the
200m in 24.51 seconds over
Armbrister and Chalicia Light-
bourne, who ran 25.15 seconds
and 26.12 seconds respectively,
The time posted by Ferguson
was a record-breaking time,
erasing the old time of 25,70
seconds set by Tyrice Curry,
Armbrister was four seconds
shy of being the first to qualify
for this year's Carifta Games
team,
Running in her second 400m
event, Armbrister's time of
58.13 seconds smashed the
meet's old timing of 1:00,51 sec-
onds, however it was not
enough to qualify for the games.
,:The qualifying time in the
400m was set at 54,00 seconds
by the BAAA,
The attention quickly moved
from the track to the field. Mak-
ing a special appearance at the
meet was national record-hold-


* TINO Sands anchors his team to a victory in the men's 4x100 metres
(Photos: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


er in the triple jump, Leevan
Sands,
Competing in only his third
meet for the season, Sands hop,
skipped and jumped his way
into first with a best leap of
15.92m. The winning leap was
done on Sands' second attempt.
Coming in second was young
Gerard Brown with 14,11m,
while Antillio Bastian was third


with a leap of 13,80,
For Brown, having Sands in
the line-up was a booster as he
tried to match every marking
placed by Sands,
He said: "Having Leevan
here really helped. After I saw
his jumps it motivated me to try
and better my performance. I
really wanted to impress him,
do my best so hopefully one day


I can become just like him or
better,
"He was giving me some
pointers while I was jumping,
telling me stay focused and have
a little more confidence. So
each time I went on the runway
I tried to work in what he told
me,"
Rolle took the under-17 girls
800m in a time of 2:24.57 sec-


ends, finishing in second was
Lexi Wilson in 2:27.23 seconds
and Tai Dorsette coming in
third in a time of 2:34,44 sec-
onds,
In the open women's 800m
Nicolls clocked a time of 2:23.74
seconds for the win over
Shancia Rolle and Getta Petit.
Full results of the meet will
be in tomorrow's edition,


"- ,--~ --a-- _ _ _ _
~t~~r 's? IR*r~r;;l~7LI~1~12~* ~ ill~y-4. q


U LENEICE Rolle of the Star Trackers in the 100 hurdles


E KRYSTAL Bodie is off in the under-17 girls 4x100 metres. Her team won the event in a time of 44.94 seconds.


-


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2006, PAGiE i i b


tq~bptijt SPORTS


4 1 . . ...L











MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2006


SECTION





Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


r -
U".w,,.,r,. r.
*1
:i~~' 3 j"


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
RICHARD 'Dick' Brown
enjoyed a perfect 4-for-4 day at
the plate to help the Adrian
Rodgers All-Star team win the
Masters Softball League's 2006
All-Star Classic on Sunday,
Brown, the centrefielder for
the DH Lions, was just one of
the three players who played
the entire game for the Adrian
Rodgers team in their 9-5 vic-
tory over the Harry Miller All-
Stars,
With a pair of runs batted in
to his ledger, Brown was named
the most valuable player, win-
ning the award in a close battle
over William's Construction
Jets' Gary 'Super' Johnson, who
played a solid second base as
the only other player to play
the entire game for the Adrian
Rodgers All-Stars,
"It just made me day, Seeing
that they were honouring me
and to come out with the win,
That's very great," said
Rodgers, who pitched for the
Miller Lite in the first year of
the league's existence three


years ago,
"I knew the team we had was
a little stronger than the other
team and some of the players
were very good, so I expected
the team to win,"
The victory was not sealed
until the bottom of a four-run
fifth inning when Brown led the
way with a run-producing sin-
gle, as they extended a 3-2 lead
to 7-2,
Panthers' Donnie Sasso had
bloop single and DHL Lions'
Clifford Jones and Adlia Minus
added a RBI sacrifice fly each in
the inning,
The Adrian Rodgers Stars
tacked on two more runs in the
sixth, thanks to Donnie LKock-
.hart's RBI double and Miller
Lite's Joe Demeritte's RBI sin-
gle,
After Doghouse Rangers'
Kendal Feguson led off the first
with an in-the-park home run -
the only four bagger in the
game Brown knocked in
Super Johnson with their sec-
ond run on his first RBI sin-
gle,
The Rodgers' Stars would put
another run on the board in the


* HAROLD Fitzgerald


second on Adlia Minus' RBI
fielder's choice that,drove home
Two Turtles' Larry Thompson
from second,
William construction's Pat
Evans, who managed the
Rodgers' Stars, said it was a
good performance,
"We achieved our goal of
keeping Adrian in the game and
secondly, everybody who was
named to the squad, got a
chance to play," he reflected.
"I think the score was indica-
tive of the effort we gave and
we came out on top."

Regret

Evans, who was assisted by
coaches Spence Lynes of the
Miller Panthers and Foster
Dorsett of the Two Turtles Inn,
said his only regret was there
was not some more Jets' players
making the line-up.
Danny Stubbs of Doghouse
got the start and pitched the
first three innings before his
team-mate John Woodside
came in the fourth and closed
the door for the Rodgers'
Stars,
Harold 'Babnker' Fritzgerald
of Miller Lite got the start for
the Harry Miller All-Stars. He
went four innings before Robert
Gilbert of Two Turtles finished
the game.
The Miller Stars didn't score
until the third when Miller
Lite's Joe McPhee knocked in
Philip Huyler with his one-out
RBI single.
They did not score again until
the fifth when Jet's Anthony
'Hotdog' Pierce sent McPhee
home on his two-out RBI sin-
gle,
A one-out two-run single by
league president and Jets'
Anthony' Boots' Weech scored
Joe McPhee and Dennis Davis
of Two Turtles Inn,
And in the seventh, the Miller
Stars' got their final run from
Pierce, who touched the home
plate on Abe Johnson's RBI
single before the Roidges Stars
turned a double play anqSuper
Johnson snagged down the final
out.
Anthpony 'Poker' Huyler,
the Joshua Knights' manager,
said despite the loss, it was still
a good game.
"It was really competitive,"
he said, "To have the guys of
our age playing as competitive
as they did was good. We lost,
but at least we can look forward
to next year."
Miller, however, was more
appreciative just to have been
honoured.
"When you have friends like
you that much that they will do
something like that, it's just
great," he said. "I would have
liked to win, but if my good
friend Adrian Rodgers win, I'm
satisfied."


* PITCHER Danny Stubbs lines up the ball for a strike


-IT T14 Th1
rI 6y~ri


m


(Photos:Felipd Major/Tribune staff)


___ ~ ~~~ _~~
- 1 -i I, ..?~~Wrirt~z~ll*I~RiB~;~dd~
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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2006


The stories behind the news


COREY Hepburn (pictured), the
inmate who escaped from Her
Majesty's Prison, Fox Hill, was
recaptured last Wednesday night.
Police said Hepburn was found
hiding out in a Coral Harbour
building around 8pim. Officer-in-
charge of CD U Marvin Dames said
police also found a small amount of
marijuana in the building. He told
eager press members that the fugi-
tive was sought by plainclothes offi-
cers acting on intelligence...


MORE than 80 per cent of
the workers on Atlantis' Phase
I expansion are Bahaiauns it
was revealed last % eek ;s the
company announced that the
billion-dollar de, elopmeni is
no% well nnderma:ii. Kerzner '
Inlernalional olticiai*s said t he I
are "-deepl) impressed" %%ilh
the e\perlise o' he Bulianii-
an ththa hae been einplo ed
on the project...


THE College of the Bahamas is still looking for a new president
to replace Dr Rodney Smith, who left last year at the height of a
plagiarism scandal, it was reported last week. Two senior academics
who were thought to be in the running appear to have been passed
over, according to COB sources. College council chairman Franklyn
Wilson said that the search for a new president is continuing. "We
are building a university for ever and ever and this takes time and
patience," he told The Tribune. Acting president Rhonda Chipman-
Johnson, a COB stalwart, is now considered by observers to be out
of the presidential race. The same applies to her colleague Pandora
Johnson. The delay in selecting Dr Smith's successor has led aca-.
demics to conclude that both in-house candidates are no longer
under consideration for a long-term appointment as president...


Top post for a





man of honour


* By JOHN MARQUIS
n 1966, when I first cov-
ered the House of
Assembly, A D Hanna
; was seen by the Bay
Street Boys as a parlia-
mentary sandfly small in size,
certainly, but also a damned nui-
sance with a nasty bite.-
Worse still, the more they
tried to slap him down, the hard-
er he bit, so his very presence
on the opposition benches was a
source of extreme irritation to
them all.
Along with Lynden PinJllng.
Milo Butler and Clarence Ba3n,
Arthur Hanna was a strident
voice of radical Bahamian poli-
tics at a time when he and his
colleagues appeared to have lit-
tle hope of success against the
powerful reactionary forces
ranged against them.
However, Mr Hanna's mes-
sage never wavered. He was a
man committed to overturning
the status quo and bringing jus-
tice to the masses. With a mis-
chievous grin, and a talent for
invective, he chiselled away at
the UBP's defences, which were
finally to collapse at the polls.
Forlorn as his cause seemed
to be in those distant days, A D
Hanna was tireless and irre-
pressible, tossing barbs and jibes
at the government like a
demented jester.
Midge Hanna sometimes
known affectionately as Mad
Midge because of his more irra-
tional outbursts jumped up and
down like a clown on a pogo-
stick, pestering the Speaker,
yelling disparaging asides at the
government, and decrying a
colonial administration symbol-
ised by what he and his col-
leagues.referred to mockingly as
"The House on the Hill".
He and Mr Butler, in particu-
lar, lost no opportunity to casti-
gate the old order, blasting "300
years of bondage" a familiar
phrase in those days and -vilify-
ing eer thing assdciited withl
Great Britjin and its wicked
ways.
As soon as Hanna sat down,
usually after extended tirades in
breach of the Speaker's arbi-
trarily-imposed 15-minute rule,
Butler would stand up, thumping
.the table and invoking God
Himself in bringing damnation
down about the white men's
heads.
This amazing double act the
Abbott and Costello of Bahami-
an politics was a spectacle to
behold. And the theme was
always the same, that the white


Arthur Dion Hanna's appointment
as Governor General of the Bahamas
means that the last of the old-style
radicals of Bahamian politics has now
become a fully-fledged establishment
figure. However, this could be no bad
thing for a nation still struggling to
find its moratlfocus because Midge,
as he is known to his party colleagues,
is one politician who actually stood
for something. INSIGHT reports...


* DEPUTY Prime Minister A D Hanna with the 1981 Budget -
on his way to the House of Assembly on Wednesday, December 3,
1980.
(FILE photo: Derek Smith)


UBP. and their British colonial
sidekicks were the root cause of
the people's woes.
,Odd, then, that these most
vociferous anti-colonialists the
late Sir Milo Butler became the
first Bahamian Governor Gen-
eral in 1973 should have ended
up on Mount Fitzwilliam, where
plumed hats, rigid protocol and
deference to Her Majesty have
always been as much a way of
life as the changing of the guard.
Yet it's very much in line with


an ennobling process now all-
too-familiar among erstwhile
detractors of the British system
who simply can't resist its blan-
dishments, its obsequies, its
grandiose appellations and its
often ridiculous finery.
IfA D Hanna goes the whole
hog and accepts a knighthood,
he will have joined Sir Lynden
Pindling, Sir Clement Maynard,
Sir Clifford Darling, Sir Arling-
ton Butler, Sir Randol Fawkes,
Sir Cecil Wallace-Whitfield and


L-.

* NEWLY-appointed Governor General A D Hanna with his wife, Beryl.
(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)


Su Arihur Foulkes as ex-radi-
cals:who, at the end of the day,
just couldn't resist following the
title trail to Crown-approved
respectability.
Even more astonishing, AD's
redoubtable wife Beryl an Eng-
lishwoman whose commitment
to the progressive cause was, if
anything, even more intense
than her husband's during the
1960s would become Lady.
Hanna. The irony is unlikely to
escape her.


Yet it's hard to be cynical in
Mr Hanna's case because, over
five decades, he has proved him-
self to be one of the few out-
crops of genuine integrity in
Bahamian political life. In
accepting the governorship, his
intentions are likely to be purer
than most. At 78, he may have
mellowed most men do but he
could also have come to the con-
clusion that the Governor's job
gives him an opportunity to
stamp a little of what he stands


for on Bahamian national life,
where it is undoubtedly badly
needed.
For five decades, Mr Hanna
has kept faith with the princi-
ples first formulated in his youth.
While Pindling, who studied
law with him in London during
the early 1950s, quickly suc-
cumbed to the temptations of


SEE page 2C


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The Tibun










Y F R 6, 26 TE T I


FROM page 1C


power following the famous gen-
eral election victory of 1967,
Hanna kept his head and a
straight course.
While Pindling, beguiled by
the prospect of a hilltop man-
sion far from the ghettoes which
nurtured him, began a frantic
campaign to enrich himself
financially, Hanna stayed hum-
ble and, comparatively speak-
ing, poor.
While Pindling, dazzled by
fawning acolytes and the privi-
leges of office, became increas-
ingly dictatorial and high-hand-
ed, Hanna remained resolutely
democratic.
While Pindling, courted by
drug barons, allowed himself to
drift seriously off-course moral-
ly, driving the Bahamas to near-
ruination in the process, Hanna
stood out as one of the few pil-
lars of high principle in what was
being seen internationally as a
fetid snakes' nest where a par-
ticularly coarse strain of venali-
ty reigned.
While Pindling, free of the
restraints imposed by the close
proximity of the USA, might
well have followed Robert


Mugabe's example and reduced
the Bahamas to Zimbabwe's
current state of dereliction, Han-
na could always have been relied
upon to stand up against him.
When Mr Hanna eventually
resigned from the Cabinet in
1984, as the full extent of the
government's moral descent was
becoming obvious, a serious
schism developed between these
two long-standing legal pals.
As very young men in Lon-
don together, they had shared
their dreams of the Bahamas'
emergence from the discrimina-
tory hell imposed by the white
ruling merchant class. With fel-
low radicals, they discussed ways
of unseating, by peaceful and
democratic means, an
entrenched oligarchy backed by
a traditionally conservative colo-
nial power.
When they returned home
from legal studies in Britain,
they knew that a truly progres-
sive movement was required to
break the logjam. The Progres-
sive Liberal Party became the
means of achieving this and,
after more than a decade of
struggle, it attained its objectives


in an election victory very much
in tune with the times.
If progressive politics and lib-
eral ideas were the defining
forces of the 1960s, then the PLP
had managed to ride home on
the prevailing winds. Worldwide,
the arrival of black majority rule
in the Bahamas was seen as a
harbinger of better days for all
those still living under the heels
of oppression. Small as the
colony was, its "quiet revolu-
tion" was regarded as a seminal
event far beyond its own shores.
Triumvirate
Hence, the Pindling-Hanna-
Butler triumvirate, seen as the
core of the reforming move-
ment, triumphed on a
groundswell of international
acclaim. It would be hard to
imagine any government com-
ing to power with so much good-
will at its disposal.
However, when disillusion-
ment set in, it did so big-time,
with liberal elements of the
international media finally se-
ing the Pindling administration
for what it was.


Far from being a movement
with high ideals offering a
Square Deal to the embattled
masses it proved to consist
largely, though not entirely, of
odious wide boys and shysters
with an eye to the main chance.
Within three years, most of
the more intelligent members of
the government had left to form
their own party, later to evolve
as the Free National Movement.
The PLP's collective IQ plum-
meted 40 points overnight, yet
the party was to remain a mas-
sive political burden for the
country right into the 1990s,
buoyed up by the inexplicable
appeal of the tainted Sir Lyn-
den.
By the time the Pindling gov-
ernment lost power 20 years
too late, according to most astute
observers Mr Hanna was out of
the Cabinet fray, estranged from
the deposed prime minister, and
generally at odds with the way
things had gone over the last
quarter century.
With several of his former
part) colleagues mired in:cor-
ruption, and others clearly total
strangers to the PLP's original


Travertine/Stone

4"4 triga


high-flown ideals, Mr Hanna
found himself part of a small
minority whose characters had
remained intact.
In 1987, the depth of his feel-
ings were made known in a letter
to the PLP chairman after it
appeared that Pindling was using
underhand methods in trying to
deny him the party's nomination
at the general election of that
year.
Alleging that the prime min-
ister was using his, supporters to
humiliate him publicly, Mr Han-
na wrote: "Mr Pindling should
be ashamed of himself. After all,
I did take part in the creation
and building of the modern PLP
and, ironically, assisted in devel-
oping the very rules for the pro-
tection of members which are
now denied me."
He added: "Mr Pindling seeks
to support me publicly but his'
friends, supporters and hangers-
on know better and know what
they have to do. Why now
attempt to drag me through all
this? Why treat me worse than
you treat the UBPs and other
questionable characters who
have been considered for nomi-
nation?"
Mr Hanna was objecting, with
justification, at being called upon
to face scrutiny by Pindling's
hand-picked hatchetmen. He
was learning, first-1hand, the
depth and scope-of Pindling's
vindictiveness against those who
challenged his authority.
Claiming, again with justifica-
tion, to have represented his. St
Ann's constituency and the
country well during his long par-
liamentary career, Mr Hanna
wrote:
"I have done nothing politi-
cally of which anyone can be
ashamed. I am the strongest
advocate of PLP principles, phi-
losophy, policies and pro-
grammes, even to'the.extent of
attempting to bring back and'
keep Mr Pindling and.his gov-
ernment in line with the.party,
and its noble ideals, to which we,
originally committed ourselves
so many years ago. .
"The course in which the par-
ty is now being steered is not the
same course to which I, and oth-
ers, dedicated our entire adult
lives."
In fact, the moral bankrupcy.
of the first PLP government
eventually led tO ,tie Bahamas'
alarming decline during the
1980s, when Colombian drug
barons were calling the shots in
Nassau and the islands.,


This descent into chaos infect-'
d society so badly that cocaiee
dealing, gun power and rampant;
materialism fuelled by crime'
became the dominant features
of the new Bahamas. The effects
are still being felt today. I "
Behind his heavy shades,
sharp suits, two-toned shoes anid
practised swagger, Pindling mor-
phed from progressive idealism
into the very worst kind of Third;
World maximum leader.
pumped up by an entourage
which included some disrep-
utable slimeballs. ;
No wonder Mr Hanna wanted
no part of it. And no wonder Mr.
Pindling was so venomous in his
response, given that victimisa-
tion and intimidation had
become dominant components
of his political philosophy.
Today, the PLP is far from
free of the Pindling legacy.
Though Prime Minister Perry
Christie and one or two of his
party colleagues seem decent
types, there is an over-riding
impression that sleaze is still very
much pan of the party's modus
operandi.
However, the Governor Gen-
eral's position is. in every sense.
above politics. From the heights
of.Mount Fizwilliam, Nir Hanna
will be able to view events dis-
passionately, without having to
endure the thick smoke of par-
liamentary conflict, as he once
did. But his presence there will
at least indicate that modem pol-'
itics is not entirely divorced from
the ideals of old.
Generation
In making Arthur 'Hanna
Governor General, the Bahamas
is showing a new generation that
honesty, integrity and honout
still mean something in a world
Where ruthless self-interest often
Prevails.
While part of the old radical
might well recoil from tle pomp
and pageantry of office, and all
they imply, he is smart enough to
know% that his elevation to "The
House on the Hill" is important
for this little country and its
* future.
From Pompey Bay, Acklins,
where Mr Hanna was born in
1928, to Government House,
Nassau. is a long climb for an
Island lad. But it's the way he
got there with his reputation
unsullied that really counts.
,* What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmarquis@tri-
bunemedia.net


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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2006


F22

~5~! ~
ir-


THE TRIBUNE,


cia ;









THE TRIBUNE MO FR 26 P E 3

COREY Hepburn (third from left), the
inmate who escaped from Her Majesty's
Prison, Fox Hill. was recaptured last


COREY Hepburn, the
inmate who escaped from Her
Majesty's Prison, Fox Hill, was
recaptured last Wednesday
night. Police said Hepburn was
found hiding out in a Coral
Harbour building around 8pm.
Officer-in-charge of the Cen-
tral Detective Unit (CDU)
Marvin Dames said police also
found a small amount of mari-
juana in the building. He told
eager press members that the
fugitive was sought by plain-
clothes officers acting on intel-
ligence.
Mr Dames said the recapture
occurred in a matter of min-
utes and was uneventful. Hep-
burn was taken into custody
and first transported to the
Carmichael Road police sta-
tion and then to the CDU for
further inquiries.
!);****

POLITICAL veteran A D
Hanna last week pledged to
unify and not divide the people
of the Bahamas as he took on
the role of Governor General.
Representatives of the polit-
ical, religious and diplomatic
fields filled Government House
ballroom to witness the swear-
ing-in of Mr Hanna, who
served for many years as
deputy prime minister under
the late Sir Lynden O Pindling.
*****

THE College of the
Bahamas is still looking for a
new president to. replace Dr
Rodney Smith, who left last
year at the height of a plagia-
rism scandal, it was reported
last week. Two senior acade-
mics who were thought to be in
the running appear to have
been passed over, according to
COB sources.
College council chairman
Franklyn Wilson said that the
search for a new president is
continuing. "We are building
a university for ever and ever
and this takes time and
patience," he told The Tribune.
Acting president Rhonda
Chipman-Johnson, a COB stal-
wart, is now considered by
obsererrs to be out ofthe pres-


idential race. The same applies
to her colleague Pandora John-
son.
The delay in selecting Dr
Smith's successor has led acad-
emics to conclude that both in-
house candidates are no longer
under consideration for a long-
term appointment as president.
*****

MORE than 80 per cent of
the workers on Atlantis' Phase
III expansion are Bahamians
it was revealed last week as
the company announced that
the billion-dollar development
is now well underway.
Kerzner International offi-
cials said they are "deeply
impressed" with the expertise
of the Bahamians that have
been employed on the project.
*****

INEFFICIENCY and the
nature of government bureau-
cracy will ultimately make the
proposed National Health
Insurance fail, according to a
local business person last week.
Following the recent
announcement of governmen-
t's National Health Insurance
(NHI) project, which will
implement mandatory contri-
butions from the country's
work force, both employees
and business owners have
raised concerns about the
terms of the scheme.






Il ---rm ~t~


The Bahamas Heart Association Invites You to


Celebrate Heart Month

February has been designated as Heart Month, and The Bahamas Heart Association
has planned a month of activities to mark this occasion. Help the Heart Association by
participating in these activities and learn how you can prevent heart disease.

Thru. Feb 2 Health Lecture on Heart Disease
I'ew Providence ICmniurni, church Blake Rioad b 30( p m 8.30 p m
Sat. Feb 4 Get Up and Move
Join rhe r lMirlliw.y, il Health jrid the :riiumunity n, ) ,i0) tot Health and Health fir to develop a healthier Bahamas in 2006.
The event :3rtl s with j F:EE walj. tlhon at 7 a m.a Arawak (Cav t Oueen Elizabeth Sports entire. Immediately following the
wil' until 3 p.m is a health fair ar the Kendal .L Isaacs Gymnasium.
Wed. Feb 15 Kick off Subway Fun Run/Walk
Live R,:moti & Press inferencee Subway Harhuu: Bay Shopping Centre Bo' Office Opens for Fun Run Walk at Subway
Harbour Bay Shopping Centre
Thurs. Feb 16 Distinguish Lecture Series
Speaker- Dr. [elion Farquharson Vaicular Surgeon Topic peripheral artenal disease (PAD) ime- 6:00 p.m.- 7 30 p m.. Doctors
Hospital C(nference Room, Free Blood Pressure, Cholesterol, and Glucose screenings between 5 p.m.& 6 p m.
Fri. Feb 17 Go Red For Womeni
The .y tofighting the [o.-1 killer of women, is stopping heart disease before it starts. By wearing red on Friday,
February 17 you can send an important message: Love lbur Heart! To find out how you can join the Go Red For Women
mouvemiil. all 3 2l080l 10,.
Sat. Feb 18 CPR ICotef$he Cmnmunity
If a cardiac arrest e ij tourfi~oved 'rieor a close fnend, would you know how to perform life-saving CPR, which
can double a vi(rim s ch.aie ofstrvival? Surprisingly. the vast majority of Bahamians don't. That's why the Bahamas Heart
As'. oiaio, a n collaboraIrioqvybTieeA riTan Heart Association Training Centre in The Bahamas will host CPR courses at
Holy Family (hurth, Ri~bInoi~~rf9-5.Foi ntore information call 327-0806-10.9-5.
Sat. Feb 18 42nd Thf AnOuaf ui Victor Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart Ball will be held at the Crown BallRfoomq :
Coi t.ll r~':epion begi'ii at7:.15 p m.and dinner starts at 8-:3 p m The Lady Sassoon GoldHeartAi0vtfwl Ie givenn ;. '"
someniuie who h.is wolked,tirele sly to assist people in the communny. Ticket donations are $200.0: For more Inhonimatlp .,

Thur. Feb 23 Health Fair at Town Cenire Mall '
Need vour bloid, pressure or ,.holeterol checked Then come tI Town Cenlre Mall between the hours of 7:00 a.m.and
ri, i0 p m and h re it done ifor free. L'o:al conpinies, eperrs and healtlhare providers will be on hand to provide with
you ihe late pirodu.i and ,ervilet II : inform.arive its fun and II free!
Sat. Feb 25 7th Annual Subway" Fun Run/Walk
The rare will i[irt promptly at 7-00 a m at the We'tern Esplanade coriinue west to Goodman's Bay and back.Last minute
registration vill itarl at o 00 a m on the day of the race Enriy fee is $12 00 per person Applications can be picked up at any
s Subway restaurant. For more information call 394-6715 or 327-0806.


Fri. Mar 17 Have A Heart Concert
Crystal Palace Ball Room. Box Office Open at 8:30 p.m.concert starts at 9:00 p.m. From
The Bahamas, staring ElonMoxey, K.B.,Extra Band, Visageand Spice. From Trinidad, Sherwin
Winchester. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door.



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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2006, PAGE 3C


THE TRIBUNE







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THE TRIBUNE


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6,,2006, PAGE 5C


MONDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 6, 2006

7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

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WPBT show Texas" Box desk; orange-crate la- James' Jesse James robs the rich the Sundance Kid
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show; missing kidney. (CC).
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Ehe Miami Heralb SUNDAY, FEB



COMMENTARY

The fallen

let us take

a closer look

BY JOSEPH L GALLOWAY
jgallowayd',krwashington cor

C AMP SYKES, Iraq On a cold
January day on this American
base outside Tal Afar, the sol-
'diers of the 3rd Armored Cavalry
Regiment paused to say farewell to
three of their own who had died ear-
lier in the month in a Blackhawk heli- .
coptet crash along with eight other
Americans.
Those who could get away from
duty for an hour filled an auditorium
set up to provide a warriors' memo-
rial service for the three: Maj. Douglas
A. LaBouff, 36, a native of Baldwin
Park, Calif.; Maj. Michael R. Martinez,
43, who grew up in Missouri; and 1st
LL Joseph D. deMoors, 36, who was
born in Montreal,
Canada. LaBouff and
deMoors were mili-
tary intelligence offi-
S cers. Martinez was a
legal affairs officer.
S It is good that on
occasion we look
upon the faces of
GALLOWAY some of the fallen
.and learn the names of their wives
and children. They are not numbers
but Americans whose deaths in a dis-
tant and dangerous land broke the
hearts of three wives, nine children,
mothers, friends and comrades.
The soldiers' memorial service -
which happens far too often in Iraq -
'is as close to a Viking funeral as you
can get these days. On a stage flanked
Sby the American flag and the battle
flag of an old and distinguished regi-
'ment, which dates to the 1847 war
with Mexico, there stood three bayo-
Sneted rifles each with a pair of des-
ert boots in front, a helmet atop the
Frifle butt and a set of dog tags
.attached.
The program provided biographies
of the three, and they were, of them-
selves, enough to make you weep.
Doug LaBouff, the program
said, loved football and collecting
stamps. He came to the Army as an
ROTC graduate of Whittier College.
He is survived by his wife, Karen, and
*TURNTOGALLOWAY


I DEAS
7C.


,Policy is

'white-foot,

black-foot'
W hen the U.S. Coast Guard
recently repatriated a group
of Cuban migrants who'd
landed at an old bridge in the Keys,
lawmakers from South Florida
implored the White House to recon-
sider its bizarre "wet-foot, dry-foot"
Policy.
Under current rules, Cubans who
make landfall in the United States
usually are allowed to stay, while
those intercepted before they reach
shore are typically sent home.
Haitian migrants must have been
discouraged by the
.r public outcry that fol-
'I lowed the Seven Mile
Bridge incident,
: knowing that a Hai-
Stian landing would
d i have drawn no such
n MY OPINION attention in Washing-
CARL ton, D.C.
HIAASEN Like those before
it, the Bush adminis-
tration doesn't care whether the feet
of arriving Haitians are wet or dry.
They're going back, one way or
another.
It's no secret that U.S. immigration
policy is a farce irrational, incon-
sistent, ineffective and discrimina-
tory. And no nationality has been
more consistently singled out for
exclusion than the Haitians.
A prime example is the Depart-
ment of Homeland Security's continu-
ing refusal to grant temporary pro-


ANA LENSE LARRAURI/MIAMI HERALD ILLUSTRATION


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OPINION PAGE
JOURNALISM: Why the story of two
wounded ABC journalists in Iraq
received such prominent play, and
how media and consumers can
reconcile


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BLOGGERS WEIGH IN

The Bush administration's
domestic surveillance pro-
gram has sparked a range
of opinions among Internet
bloggers. Among them:
At Blogs for Bush
(www.blogsforbush.com),
posted by Mark Noonan,
Feb. 1:
As I've said before, we'll
have this one out with you,
Democrats. There isn't a
single GOPer who is wor-
ried about the legal and
electoral outcomes of an
open debate over the NSA
program to intercept ter-
rorist communications.
Over on the left, they are
still having a hissy fit over
this and their rhetoric
about the program'grows
more absurd as time goes
on. To listen to the left, the
NSA program is a massive
and deliberate invasion of
the rights of Americans by
a president determined to
install a dictatorship. We on
the right want very much to
have the Democrats carry
that message into Novem-
ber that, along with [anti-
war activist Cindy] Shee-
han carefully placed 'round
the Democrats neck, and
we could pick up 30 seats.
That said, it is a bit sad
that we have to do this.
America is at war: a war
started by cruel enemies
who wish to destroy us
entirely, and about 1/3 of
the population is acting as
if the enemy were Presi-
dent Bush and the govern-
ment, rather than the peo-
ple who cut off the heads of
the innocent.
At Brooklyn Bridge
(http://barbyawp.blog
spot.com), posted by Glen,
Jan 16:
We trustthat cops will
stop looters, and not loot
homes and stores them-
selves. We trust that judges
will rule according laws and
due process, and not by
winks and nods. It's why we
feel a special outrage -
somewhat akin to rape -
when we read about the
drug-dealing cop or the
judge on the take.
Perversely, even'an
open tyrant relies on trust,
in his way. He trusts that
those around or beneath
him will not get too ambi-
tious or too desperate and
ki!' him. Caligula, anyone?
How that "trust' is main-
tained is, of course, the
subject of many horror sto-
ries. Leader cults are very
helpful.
So when a presideitof a
once-proud republic'::
blandly announces laws be
damned and "the Constitu-
tion is only a piece of
paper" both as a matter
of policy and ongoing prac-
tice, openly daring anyone
to stop him trust dies. Civ-
ilization follows suit at
least any one that I want to
be part of. Anybody's fate',
can be decided based on
real or imagined fear, mis-
take, whim, revenge, or
eeny-meeny-miney-moe
(catch a scapegoat by the
toe). ., ., ..
At Thinkprogress.org, .'
posted by Judd Legum, *'
editor, on Jan. 25: ,..-
The White H-sdouise'devT
operate to change the hriame
of Bush's warrant less, "-" 0o
domestic surveillance pro-'
gram. The White House
wants people to call it a
"terrorist surveillance pro- '
gram." '
... The program should
have a name to accurately
describe it. A combination
of two things distinguish
this program from all other
legal surveillance pro-
grams:
1, It was conducted with-
out a warrant. (Warrant-
less)
2. It involved people on
U.S. soil. (Domestic)
If this wasn't a warrant-
less domestic surveillance
program it wouldn't be a


story. A "terrorist surveil-
lance program" is not
descriptive. It could be
referring to any number of
programs, many of which
have been around for dec-
ades and are not at all con-
troversial.
Journalists are sup-
posed to describe stories
as accurately as possible.
Any journalist who uses the
label "terrorist surveillance
program" isn't doing their
job.


(* ,i Mntu(h 14imalt. is waning


I 111 -1111`11 ~U II IC IIRIIIII slb 1IW MI


8~1SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2006 INTERNATIONAL EDITION


MiamiHeraid.com I THE MIAMI HERALD


ISSUES & IDEAS


........ . I-


i


I
I







. . .. .. .. .


IHE MIArI tikKALU I JVlldlhnllerdIU.cOIII


OPINION
JOHN S. KNIGHT (1894-1981) JESUS DIAZ JR., PUBLISHER I TOM FIEDLER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR I JOE OGLESBY, EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR
- -: . .. . - -: - . -- -... . - -- '- - = .. . .


S".** -..


IMMIGRATION.


The policy


is


*HIAASEN

tected status (TPS) to Haitian migrants
awaiting deportation hearings.
The TPS program was designed to
provide an interim safe haven for
undocumented immigrants who would
otherwise be sent home to dangerous
conditions caused by armed conflict,
natural disasters or other extraordinary
circumstances.
Haiti is a textbook case for TPS.
Lashed by hurricanes, the desperately
impoverished nations again being rav-
aged by political violence, daily kidnap-
pings and marauding street gangs.
The situation is so perilous that U.S.
travelers have been warned to stay
away. American Embassy workers are
forbidden from going out at night, and
their children under age 21 are supposed
to return to the United States. "; '' ""..
A bloody snapshot of life in' Haiti:
Last summer, a U.S.-sponsored soccer
match in Port-au-Prince ended with
approximately 10 deaths when gang
members and riot police attacked the
Haitian crowd..
Incredibly, Bush officials insist that
migrants from Haiti don't need pro-
tected status. The place is too deadly for
tourists and diplomats but not for the
Haitians we're sending home.
The TPS program was meant to be
! humanitarian, but also impartial. In the
past, undocumented aliens from war-
:.tornLiberia, Sudan and Somalia have
been given temporary protected status.
After Hurricane Mitch devastated


Central America in 1998, TPS was
granted to thousands of undocumented
Hondurans and Nicaraguans here. It
was offered again to Salvadorans fight-
ing deportation, after a series of killer
earthquakes racked their homeland in
2001.
TPS isn't an amnesty; it's an 18-month
window of safe haven, which is then'
reviewed periodically. Those immi-
grants allowed to remain here must reg-
ister with Homeland Security and pay
income taxes during their stay.
More than 300,000 Central American
TPS designates are still working in the
United States and sending money home.
Some immigration reformists want the
TPS program scuttled, or absorbed into
guest-worker legislation backed by
President Bush.
Whatever form the new rules might
take; it's-tinrealistic to hope that Hair
tians will be treated as equals with other
migrants.
The disparity is painfully glaring here
in South Florida, where immigration
policy plays out as as "white-foot, black-
foot." Boatloads.of Cuban migrants are
joyously welcomed if they reach shore,
but Haitians are quietly processed and
shipped back.
Officially the U.S. government has
explained the double standard by saying
that the Cubans are political refugees
while the Haitians are fleeing here
purely for economic reasons. The two
issues are patently inseparable, so the
distinction is a sham. Almost everyone
who sneaks into this country is seeking


the opportunity to make a decent living.
Often that requires escaping from inept,
crooked or oppressive governments.
Every year an estimated 700,000
immigrants from all over the world ille-
gally cross the U.S. borders, and few are
true political refugees. By far the largest
single group is from an ally nation and
established democracy Mexico. .
The schizoid actions of our own lead-
ers helped cause the current disaster in
Haiti. After a coup we sent troops to re-
install its first elected president, Jean-
Bertrand Aristide; then we sat on our
hands while his government unraveled
in corruption and rebellion.
Much of the violence throttling Haiti
is between supporters and enemies of
the exiled Aristide, and is pegged to the
long-delayed elections now set for this
Tuesday. More bedlam and bloodshed
are'certain., ;
SImmigration lawyers around the
United States have filed motions to halt
all deportation proceedings against Hai-
tians because of chaotic, life-threatening
conditions there. It remains to be seen
whether any judges will acknowledge
the hypocrisy of the present policy
It makes no sense to offer a haven to
Somalians and Sudanese, and turn our
backs on a human calamity unfolding in
our own hemisphere. Tragically, there
isn't much common sense or decency to
be found in the history of how Haitian
boat people have been treated.
It doesn't matter whether they land at
a bridge or a beach or the steps of the
Statue of Liberty. They still can't get in.


THE MILITARY


Do we deserve their service and sacrifice?


*GALLOWAY

two children, Cassidy, 7, and
Douglas, 3, as well as his mother,
Lela LaBouff.:; ', : "- '.
Mike Martinez enlisted in
the Army out df high schooYlin
1980 ands,ery eda a, paralegal and
court reporter .aiose 1the
rank of staff sergeant. He ,then
went to college'and. graduated
from the University of Missouri
School of. Law, in,, 9!9,,98 $He
returned to the Army as an officer
in the Judge Advocate Corps. He
was a talented amateur photogra-
pher and a weightlifter. He is sur-
vived by his wife, Kelly, and four
children Alex, 20, Kathryn, 19,
Colby, 18, and Ben, 15, as wells
his mother, Beatrice Martinez of
Albuquerque, N.M.
Joseph deMoors enlisted
in the Army in 2001 and was a
French cryptologic linguist. In
2004 he completed Officer Candi-
date School and was commis-
sioned a second lieutenant. He is
survived by his wife, Vendella,
and three children, Moroni,
Demetrius and Chastity.
After the national anthem was
played and Chaplain David Cau-
sey gave the opening prayer, the
regimental commander, Col. H.R.
McMaster, spoke movingly of the
selflessness of soldiers who will-
ingly go into harm's way trying to
help a people escape tyranny and
terrorists. The colonel is a pas-
sionate and emotional leader
when it comes to his troopers.
Half a dozen brother and sister
officers rose to speak of each of
the three and how hard they
worked and how little they com-


MARK REIS, THE GAZETTE / AP
Taps played during a memorial service at Fort Carson, Colo., for Maj. Douglas A. LaBouff, Maj.
Michael R. Martinez and 1st Lt. Joseph D. deMoors, who were killed in Iraq on Jan. 7.


plained and how proud they were
to serve with the Brave Rifles.
A bagpiper played Amazing
Grace, and then there was a last
roll call in which sergeants with
booming voices repeatedly called
the names of the three who will
never again answer "Here, First
Sergeant!" A firing party just out-
side fired three volleys and a
bugler sounded a sweet and
mournful Taps.
With that, two by two, the Cav-
alry commanders and their ser-
geants major or first sergeants
came on stage. Each knelt on one
knee, head lowered, and tightly


gripped the dog tags on each of
the rifles and said a personal
goodbye to Doug LaBouff, Mike
Martinez and Joseph deMoors.
A memorial service for the
three men was held days later at
Fort Carson, Colo., after their cof-
fins arrived in the United States.
There is pain and pride and
pageantry when you say farewell
to a fallen soldier, and rightly so.
The unspoken line I kept hearing
that day was the question Fred-
eric March asks at the end of the
movie The Bridges at Toko Ri:
"Where do we get such men?"
To which I add my own ques-


tion: What are we doing as a peo-
ple and a nation to deserve the
service and sacrifice of such men
and women? We are entering our
fifth year in a declared war
against global terror, but our
leaders ask no sacrifice of the 99
percent of Americans who are
protected by the 1 percent.
They and we leave the sacri-
fices to those like the three sol-
diers, and their widows and their
children.

Joseph L. Galloway is the senior
military correspondent for Knight
Ridder Newspapers.


reporter, for about two days.
In retrospect, it might be better to report
the news when it happens, as we'd probably
do if a prominent nonjournalist were
threatened at gunpoint or abducted.
If consumers and journalists took these
very easy steps, even Ted from Los Gatos
might accept the work of the media less
skeptically.

Jerry Ceppos is a former executive editor
of The San Jose Mercury News and former
vice president/news of the paper's parent,
Knight Ridder.


'white-foot, black-foot'


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JAMES L. KNIGHT (1909-1991)


JOURNALISM


How media,


consumers


can reconcile

BY JERRY CEPPOS
jceppos@aol.com

A day after two ABC journalists were seri-
ously injured in Iraq, Ted from Los
Gatos, Calif., wasn't very sympathetic.
"I never expected the kind of calls you've
been getting," he told one of the Bay Area's
top-rated talk-show hosts, KGO's Ronn
Owens, on Monday, referring to complaints
about the amount of coverage. "But you
know what? It's only justified because the
press is so one-sided in some of their things
that when they get in trouble I don't think
anyone feels sorry for them."
The complaints about coverage could be
summed up by the comments of a different
caller. "I can't help but be a little bit annoyed
by the amount of coverage it's received. It's
almost as though the media is very, very self-
absorbed. I can't help but think that maybe
that's just because the
media feels if something
happens to its own, it's
more important than if it
happens to someone else."
The disdain for the
media (a word I've come to
despise because it's usually
said in a sneering tone) was CEPPOS
almost enough to make me give up my Polly-
anna role. During my 36 years in journalism,
I've preached that media consumers and
journalists could understand each other if
only they took a few small steps together.
Before I surrender the Pollyanna costume,
here's one more shot at three steps that each
side might take to bridge the chasm.
First, for Ted from Los Gatos and other
consumers:
Consult a variety of news sources. It's
not fair to attack "the media" if you're
looking at just one flaky website or even
one newspaper and no other source.
Cut journalists a few breaks. Sure,
we're self-absorbed. But we don't care less
about injured soldiers than about injured
journalists. Lots of people feel that they
"know" a network anchor, making his inju-
ries newsworthy and personalizing the story
of the war and its dangers morethan juSt ter-
rible body counts can..
Point out errors and ask journalists
questions, preferably before you call the
talk-radio show.
Second, for journalists:
Explain why you do what you do,
including why you put an anchorman's inju-
ries on Page 1
Tell consumers how to reach the boss,
even if you're an Internet site or a radio or
TV station. Did you ever try to find the
names of the managers of radio and TV sta-
tions? At least the old broadcast editorials
put a face on station management. (Speaking
of that, what ever happened to informed edi-
torializing on radio and TV?)
If you can't reach the boss, you might not
know where to call when you see a mistake
in coverage. Which might explain why
you've probably never seen a correction on
commercial radio or TV. The real scandal of
American journalism isn't Jayson Blair. It's
the lack of accountability in broadcasting.
Explain how difficult news-gathering
is. My tendency is to want to report the
scary incidents involving journalists, even at
the cost of being accused of being self-
absorbed.

Point out errors and ask
journalists-questions,
preferably before you call
the talk-radio show.

On the other hand, we decided two years
ago not to write that armed men had
stormed the hotel in which a Knight Rid-
der reporter in Iraq was staying and had
tried to abduct the guests. In the end, the
men left, so the incident didn't seem to be a
story and, alas, it's not a terribly unusual
incident. (In fact, probably because the
reporter is a woman, the men didn't touch
our reporter. They didn't even seem to
notice when she sent frantic Blackberry
notes to her editors in Washington. The
editors contacted a tough-as-nails fellow
reporter who found the supervising mullah.
She lectured him and, for that or other rea-
sons, he pulled back his gunmen.) But I sus-
pect that in the back of our minds we
thought that a story might endanger our
reporters even more.
It was for that reason that the press
delayed reporting the abduction of Jill Car-
roll, the Christian Science Monitor






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