Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00309
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: January 30, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00309
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text







"NEW CHICKEN /'A
i m lovin' it.

HIGH 78F
LOW 67F

SUNNY AND
CLOUDS


The


Tribune


Volume: 102 No.58 MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006 PRICE --750

















In r hami: Govt sacrilicing lRand


FNM leader


hits out over


environment


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE PLP government has
"betrayed" the environment by
continuously approving new
tourism and housing develop-
ments in areas which are vital to
the country's ecosystem, leader
of the FNM Hubert Ingraham
charged during his party's rally
in Long Island.
Addressing the crowds in Salt
Pond on Friday night, Mr Ingra-
ham accused the current gov-
ernment of selling land to devel-
opers which should never be
used for building.


"They are sacrificing the land,
approving more and more pro-
jects which, if brought into full
fruition, will clear virgin hard-
wood and pine forests, cut down
hills, close-off from the public
miles of our coastline, pollute
our water table and expose
increased numbers of residents
to greater and greater danger
from sea surges that increasing-
ly accompany summer storms.
"They are incapable of learn-
ing from the experience of oth-
ers Katrina and Rita are only
names to them," he said.
SEE page 11


Bahamas cruise ship industry to expand


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FNM leader Hubert Ingraham (right) with Larry Cartwright at
Friday night's rally in Long Island. Cartwright, in his first official
appearance as newly appointed representative for the FNM, also
spoke at the rally.
SEE PAGE THREE
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


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CRUISE ships pack
into Nassau Harbour at the
weekend. Minister of
Tourism Obie Wilchcombe
says the country should
look forward to expanding
the cruise ship industry.
(Photo: Felipe Major/
Tribune staff)

* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff
Reporter
THE Bahamas' cruise
ship industry is set to
expand to multiple ports,
Minister of Tourism Obie
Wilchcombe said yester-
day.
Despite the latest data
from the Ministry of
Tourism revealing that
total calls on Bahamian
ports by cruise ships were
down by 7.3 per cent for
the first 10 months of 2005,
the country has a had a
good past year and should
look forward to signifi-
cantly expanding the
industry in 2006, the min-
ister told The Tribune.
"Those numbers reflect
the problems we are faced
with in Grand Bahama, in
New Providence in fact the
numbers were up by over
four per cent," he said.
Mr Wilchcombe
explained that Grand
Bahama is still in the
SEE page 11


Hawksbill Creek Agreement-type

concessions for all of Grand Bahama


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT The Government will extend
Hawksbill Creek Agreement-type concessions to
the entire island of Grand Bahama, Financial
Services and Investment Minister Allyson May-
nard-Gibson said Saturday while on Grand
Bahama.
Mrs. Gibson said the acceptance of the Ginn
Development in West End, and concessions giv-
en to developer Bobby Ginn and his team, are


indicative of what the government is doing.
The Ginn Development at West End will
impact the entire northern Bahamas, she said.
"As we speak, Bahamians are involved in and
benefiting from the preparatory work at that
development."
Minister Gibson was the keynote speaker at
the Grand Bahama Chamber of Commerce's
Annual Installation Banquet held at Our Lucaya
Resort.
SEE page 10


No aircraft found despite distress signal


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter,
NO AIRCRAFT has been
found following Friday's report-
ed plane crash off Abaco.
Authorities are puzzled as to
what caused the activation of
an emergency power indicating
radio (EPIR), which was last
registered to the aircraft that
was believed to have crashed in
rough seas off Abaco on Friday
afternoon.
The Tribune reported on Sat-
urday that according to police
reports, a single engine Drag-


onfly aircraft with registration
number N 50453 piloted by a
James H Wells crashed around
1.05pm in waters between Gua-
na Cay and Scotland Cay on the
ocean side.
However, on Friday the air-
craft was not located and the
US Coast Guard only con-
firmed that a distress signal had
been sent.
Chris Lloyd, operations man-
ager at BASRA, told The Tri-
bune yesterday, that checks of
airports and flight plans all
turned up negative. He further
said that no person or aircraft


was reported overdue.
Mr Lloyd said that it is con-
firmed there was a signal from
an EPIR registered to an air-
craft. The EPIR is a distress
beacon which is activated either
manually, when it gets wet, or
on impact. When activated it
sends a signal to a satellite.
The EPIR gave a location of
a plane believed to be in dis-
tress and both BASRA and US
Coast Guard emergency work-
ers were sent to the site. How-
ever, there were no signs of a
SEE page 10


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006


LOA NW


Multi-million-dollar shopping



centre opened on Exuma


S I'; 'i tfO


*tw*IYIIi mI


0 By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
A BAHAMIAN business-
man has contributed to the fur-
ther expansion of the island of
his birth with the investment of
a multi-million-dollar shopping
centre on Exuma.
On Friday, Roy Bow and his
family officially opened the
Emerald Isle shopping centre
in Emerald Bay, Farmers Hill.


The shopping cerpre is located
opposite the Four Seasons
resort, another of the island's
major investments.
Mr Bowe, a descendent of the
settlement of Rolleville, is also
one of the founders of Emer-
ald Bay.
In an interview with The Tri-
bune at the official opening, Mr
Bowe explained that he made
the major investment to benefit
the economy of his home island.


The shopping centre, which
was opened in November last
year, includes such prominent
businesses as Scotia Bank and
Bristol Cellars. It also houses
the Emerald Isle supermarket.
In the very near future the cen-
tre is expected to gain such
additions as Mail Boxes Etc as
well as a pizza and ice cream
parlour.
Mr Bowe advised Bahamians
to take the initiative to invest
in their country.
"You must go after it and do
it. I know that there are finan-
cial bridges that you have to go
over, the point is that bridge
you can go over because you
can make arrangements," said
Mr Bowe.
Prime Minister Perry Christie
in his keynote address at the
opening ceremony, pointed out
to Exumians that the Emerald
Isle shopping centre investment
should signal to all Bahamians
that becoming an investor is
possible.
He said that all that is needed
is the will and desire to do so.
He added that there will be
obstacles, but they must be
overcome.
He added: "Indeed, no one
could of imagined a little boy
born in a small, but isolated
village some 30 miles west of
this very spot, would have one
day come to make a single
investment of some $8.5 mil-
lion."
Pierre Bowe, son of Mr
Bowe, told those gathered that
his family believes that Bahami-
an investment of this magnitude
is the beginning of many things
to come for Exuma.


4p *ii l .. .......























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* PRIME Minister Perry Christie addresses the crowd
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THE TNA0


o In brief

Man shot

three times

stable in
hospital

A MAN is in stable condition
in the PMH hospital after being
shot three times over the week-
end.
According to press liaison
officer Walter Evans, a 49-year-
old man was walking in Cul-
mersville area around 5am on
Sunday when a dark-coloured
vehicle pulled up alongside him.
The vehicle was only occupied
by the driver, who pulled out a
handgun and fired several shots.
The victim was shot in the
thigh, hip and calf.
He was taken to hospital and
police are continuing-their
investigation into the matter.


a p-
=tsus,


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


Cartwright condemns current



administration as 'ineffective'


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
SALT POND, Long Island
- Larry Cartwright, in his first
official appearance as newly
appointed representative for
the FNM, told a mass rally he's
convinced the present admin-
istration is ineffective.
Speaking at the FNM's rally
in Salt Pond, Long Island Fri-
day night, the former Inde-
pendent MP said his return to
the party was due to an over-
whelming consensus among his
constituents.
He said the results of a poll
held last week showed that 75
per cent of the people voted for
him to join the FNM, 15.85 per
cent wished for him to remain
independent, and 8.5 per cent
suggested he join the PLP.
"I have come to the conclu-
sion that I can best serve the
people of Long Island and
Ragged Island and The
Bahamas as an FNM repre-
sentative," Mr Cartwright said.
FNM leader Hubert Ingra-
ham said Mr Cartwright's addi-
tion to the parliamentary team
will "broaden and strengthen
our party's commitment to
integrity, decency, hard work
and common sense." His
return to the party also repre-
sented a new step in strength-
ening the FNM's political arse-
nal since the party secured sup-
port from former PLP Senator
Ediston Key late last year.
"He is a fine man, a good
citizen. I am happy to have
him as one of my parliamen-
tary colleagues and my friend,"
Mr Ingraham said.
Following his triumphant
return, Mr Cartwright took the
stage on Friday night to relay
the problems in Long Island
which, he said, the PLP has
failed to solve.
The MP said that he sub-
mitted a long list of his con-
stituency's needs to the cur-
rent government in 2002.


* LARRY Cartwright gives his speech on Friday


However, he said, the PLP
off-handedly viewed this list
as merely a "shopping list."
"I wondered why Long Island
and Ragged Island are always
left out. I said to myself there
must be a better way," he said.
Mr Cartwright said he com-
pared the list with the many
promises made by the govern-
ment, and the "very few
accomplishments."
He pointed to needs for
infrastructural repairs at the
docks in Salt Pond and Simms,
broken and damaged roads at
Bella Lake in Simms and
Buckley's (caused by last
year's hurricanes), as well as
unfavourable conditions on the
island brought about by poor


drainage systems.
Mr Cartwright expressed
disappointment that the gov-
ernment had not acted on
plans left in place by the FNM
to add runway lights and build
a new terminal building for the
Deadman's Cay airport, and
that the government had not
constructed a port of entry for
South Long Island.
Mr Cartwright said that
teachers on the island continue
to work in adverse conditions
despite the high academic
achievements they share with
their students, and said plans
had been left on the drawing.
board by the FNM for the con-
struction of a new High School
for Long Island.


Cartwright in FNM 'will


give Long Island a voice'


* By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
WITH Long Island MP
Larry Cartwright now in the


ranks of the FNM, Long Island
can expect to finally have their
voice heard, and much needed
repairs done, said FNM Chair-
man Desmond Bannister.
Mr Bannister mentioned how
Mr Cartwright, who had writ-
ten countless letters to various
ministers of the current gov-
ernment requesting basic assis-
tance for the island, has never
had any positive response.
"Mr Cartwright, who is hon-
est, has approached so many
members of parliament in the
current government and has
had no positive results in assur-
ing that the people of Long
Island get what they are enti-
tled to.
"So it doesn't show a caring
government. It shows a govern-
ment that has taken advantage
of the people of Long Island
and I believe that once.the next.
election is over, you % ilI see a
lot more activity in Long
Island," he said. .
Mr Bannister highlighted an
all too common scenario where
mailboat captains have to wait


for hours just feet away from
the government dock for the
tide to rise to allow their vessels
to dock. Mr Bannister said that
the simple idea of not having
the harbour properly dredged
is a "disgrace".
"You have Captain Munroe,
who has gone out and spent mil-
lions of dollars to get a state-
of-the-art mailboat to.serve
Long Island. And then he has to
stay out there sometimes for
eight or nine hours before he
can bring that boat in to bring
basic commodities, basic items,
basic needs, for Long Island.
. "That's a disgrace and the
government should be ashamed
of it and they need to do better.
The people of Long Island are
patient enough to know that if,
the\ w\anr a few more months,
the FNM is going to do.better
for them," he said.
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MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


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PAGE 4, MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


3 6*' ETES T HEEITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398


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Regarding





the dolphins





at Atlantis


EDITOR, The Tribune

WHAT caught my interest
initially was the statement in
the article which indicated that
the 11-acre inland lagoon con-
tained over six million gallons
of sea water to house 16
Atlantis Bottlenose dolphins.
The article further said that this
"new home" will provide 10
times the gallons of water per
animal which is required by law.
While it is true that captive
dolphins require a specific vol-
ume of water, there are a num-
ber of other issues which must
also be addressed. Some of
these issues are as follows:-
1) What is the average depth,
minimum depth and maximum
depth of the water in the lagoon
in general and the resident
pools in particular?
2) What is the nature and
composition of the benthos or
lagoon bottom?
3) What type of experience
with the dolphins is being
offered? Will dorsal fin tows be


conducted? How many times
per day will the dolphins have
to perform?
4) In a lagoon set up, water
quality will be very important.
What is the anticipated volume
of water exchanged daily in the
lagoon? How is this achieved?
5) What is the contingency
plan to deal with aggressive
males or injuries to both dol-
phin and people? Yes, injuries
do sometimes occur during dol-
phin experience encounters.
6) What is the absolute max-
imum stocking density for the
lagoon?
7) How are identity profiles
for each individual dolphin
established?
8) Who conducts the envi-
ronmental audit of the facility
and how often will they be con-
ducted?


9) What are the quarantine
procedures?
10) What is the length of con-
tinuous exposure of the dolphins
to human swim participants?
11) How long is the training
programme for each dolphin
before they interact with peo-
ple?
12) How often will water
quality samples be taken?
Where in the lagoon will the
samples be obtained? What
parameters will be tested?
13) Will Atlantis engage in a
breeding programme? If so,
where will the maternity pools
be situated? What is the work
schedule for pregnant and nurs-
ing dolphins?
While the 270 new jobs is
ostensibly a good thing, protec-
tion of these captive animals is
also of great importance.

ROMAULD S FERREIRA
BSc Ecology & Chemistry
Barrister-at-Law
Nassau
January 23 2006.


Concern about 'faith healing'


EDITOR, The Tribune

PROMOTED on ZNS TV-
13 and now with advertisements
appearing in at least one of our
daily newspapers a US-based
Faith healing so-called Ministry
has approval from Government
to use historic Clifford Park for
what is promoted as a healing
event and encouraging persons
\\ith various health defects to
attend, obviously and implied
in these matters, come with a
full pocket-book.
Around New Year the inter-
nationally known Dr Richard
Roberts appeared on a local
radio talk show with the
Catholic Deacon Jeff Lloyd and
shocked many with the goings
on and suggestions that even if
you place your hand on your
radio, at home, your ailment
will be healed.
When one carefully examines
these alleged faith-healers ones
suspicions are raised for obvious
reasons if so many miracles
were taking place why has there
not been some reaction from
the medical sector?
Too many people will flock
to Clifford Park with the few
precious dollars they have hop-
ing that there will be a healing.
However, like the old Snake Oil
Trader of the Wild West, the
healer will,not be seen the next
morning nor your healing.
I think government needs to


be very, very careful when
granting immigration permits
for such events and also surely
there must be some caution
from Central Bank as to how
much foreign currency will be
taken out of the country?
We have enough churches or
alleged churches around here
now, probably even more than


licensed bar rooms, and this; is
already one of the best busi-
nesses to enter whilst society is
totally corrupted, unethical and
immoral to the core and no one
cares.

N MOSS
Nassau
January 26 2006


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MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


r OA NW'


o In brief

Prisoner

still on the

run after

14 days


6,000 plus living with




HIV/AIDS in Bahamas


TODAY makes 14 days
since Her Majesty's Prison
inmate Corey Hepburn
escaped and has been on the
run from police.
Police press liaison officer
Walter Evans told The Tri-
bune that he has not been
caught as yet, but police are
continuing their investiga-
tion.
Last week he said police
believed Hepburn is being
sheltered somewhere in east-
ern New Providence.
Hepburn, who is convicted
of armed robbery, overpow-
ered maximum security
prison guards with the help
of three other inmates as
they mounted their escape.
Prison officer Dion Bowles
was stabbed during the
break-out and was laid to
rest last Thursday.
Mr Evans said that a
$10,000 reward still remains
for any information that
might lead to Hepburn being
recaptured.


MORE than 6,000 persons
are living with HIV/AIDS in
the Bahamas, according to the
latest figures.
HIV Centre director Rosa
May Bain said that of that
number, 131 are children.
Mrs Bain made the disclo-
sures during the AIDS Secre-
tariat annual breakfast meet-
ing at Bishop Hill, formerly
Addington House.
She also spoke about some
of the recent successes in fight-
ing the disease, including the
Direct Observation Therapy
programme.
"The National AIDS Pro-
gramme implemented Direct
Observation Therapy, which
allows staff to monitor children
and some adults twice a day to


ensure that they take their
medication."
SDirect Observation Therapy
was introduced in the early
1990s when it was decided
internationally that efforts
should be made to curb the
problem of tuberculosis.
The same principles were
adopted for patients with
HIV/AIDS, who were moni-
tored when taking their med-
ication.
"We have seen tremendous
results since we implemented
the system," Mrs Bain said.
She mentioned the pro-
gramme sponsored by the Pan
American Health Organisation
(PAHO) "Getting to know
your HIV status" which was
created in response to an


increase in the death rate of
HIV/AIDS patients in Octo-
ber of last year.
Mrs Bain said the reason for
the high death rate was that
many infected persons failed
to follow-up after diagnosis and
never received anti-retroviral
treatments.
"The Bahamas is being
recognised around the world
among five countries which has
had tremendous success with
its national AIDS pro-
gralmnes," Mrs Bain said. "The
Bahamas' success cannot be
accredited to the healthcare
providers alone, but because
of partnership with non-gov-
ernmental organizations."
PAHO representative Lin-
da Campbell said the World


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Health Organisation (WHO)
supports and works closely
with the AIDS Secretariat of
the Bahamas.
The programmes offered by
the Bahamas have many
strengths, and are therefore
being used as the model across
the Caribbean, she said.
Ms Camille Barnett, head of
the Bahamas AIDS Founda-
tion, said: "The primary focus
of the foundation is education
and awareness of HIV/AIDS,
whether it is sending persons
off for training in Toronto or
bringing children from the
Family Islands to Nassau for
treatments."
Ms Barnett circulated read-
ing materials to the committee
in an effort to have them


placed in various schools in the
Bahamas.
Mr James Catalyn, chairman
of the National AIDS
Resource Committee, urged
those related to HIV/AIDS
patients to educate themselves
about the disease and include
its victims into family life.
He noted that "one cannot
obtain the virus through hug-
ging someone, but rather it is
only transmitted sexual inter-
course or blood transfusion."
Mr Catalyn said the govern-
ment and the AIDS Founda-
tion should be commended for
their hard work over the years
and their success in making
medication available to all
HIV/AIDS patients free of
charge.


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PAGE 6, MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


STourism: For whose benefit?


* By Sir Ronald Sanders

(The writer is a business exec-
utive and former Caribbean
diplomat who publishes widely
on Small States in the global
community).

C ARIBBEAN govern-
ments and private sec-
tor bodies should urgently
establish a Tourism Research
and Development Institute at
the University of the West
Indies if the industry is to deliv-
er the much vaunted social and
economic growth that its advo-
cates proclaim.
Tourism is now a huge con-
tributor to the economies of all
Caribbean countries and the
biggest contributor to many of
them such as Antigua and Bar-
buda, the Bahamas and the
British Virgin Islands. Over the
next few years the industry is
expected to play an even larger
role replacing agriculture in
many countries.
The World Travel and
Tourism Council reports that in
2004, travel and tourism con-
tributed 14.8 per cent of the
Caribbean's GDP and 2.4 mil-
lion jobs, representing 15.5 per
cent of total employment. Over
the next ten years, the contri-


m-ht


R - ''E "

WORLD VIEW -


bution to both GDP and
employment is expected to rise
even more.
But, the danger exists that, if
research and development is
not undertaken to strengthen
the industry and spread its ben-
efits more widely, it will not
deliver the sustainable devel-
opment its advocates predict.
There are several pressing
problems associated with
Caribbean tourism.
One of the most important is
the racial divide between its
ownership and management on
the one hand, and its workers
on the other. And, this prob-
lem is likely to worsen in the
future unless it is tackled now.
Given the size of financial
investments that will be
required for resorts in the
Caribbean, it will be principally
white expatriate companies with
access to capital that will build
and own the resorts and other
aspects of the tourism business.
Tourism may, in fact, become
a "plantation industry", not dis-
similar to the old sugar planta-
tions with absentee owners,
expatriate managers, profits
repatriated abroad and locals
relegated to wage earners only.
And, not unlike the "planta-
tion" system, if the disparity of
benefits grows between foreign
owners and indigenous labour,
revolts may occur starting with
industrial unrest but expanding
to other forms of social insta-
bility.

T he notion of a racial
divide in the industry
is a problem that dare not speak
its name. It creates discomfort
amongst many of the expatri-
ate hotel owners and managers,
and governments are fearful of
dealing with it.
Yet, it will not go away. And,
if World Trade Organisation
(WTO) rules continue to devel-
op in the way that they are,
companies from developed
countries will have the right of
establishment in the service
industries in developing coun-
tries, including the Caribbean,
almost on demand. Thus, the
obvious racial divide between
the owners and the workers in
the tourist industry and the
unevenness of the benefits -
will intensify.
To pretend that the problem
does not exist would be as
unwise for hoteliers as it would
be imprudent for governments.
Policies should be put in place
to ensure that the benefits of
tourism are spread widely


CFA Society of The Bahamas

MONTHLY LUNCHEON MEETING


2005/2006BSFA Officers & Directors
President
Magali Granges, CFA
Pictet Bank & Trust Limited
PO Box N-4837, Nassau Bahamas
Ph: (242) 302 2217
Fax: (242) 327 6610
Email: mnrangesad@ictet.com
Vice-President
David Slatter, CFA
Fidelity Merchant Bank & Trust
PO Box CB-12337, Nassau. Bahamas
Ph: (242) 356 7764
Email: david.slatterf(ifidclitvbahamas.com
Treasurer
Kristina M. Fox, CFA
Templeton Global Advisors Ltd.
PO Box N 7759, Nassau. Bahamas
Ph: (242) 362 4600
Fax: (242) 362 4308
Email: kfox(ctempleton.comi
Secretary
David Ramirez, CFA
Ansbacher Bahamas Ltd.
PO BoxN-7768
Nassau Bahamas
Ph: (242)322-1161
Fax: (242) 326 5020
Email:david.ramirez(i ansbacher.bs
Membership/University Liaison
Charlene Lewis, CFA
KPMG Corporate Finance Ltd.
PO Box N-123 Nassau. Bahamas
Ph: (242) 394 9951
Fax: (242) 393 1773
Email: clewis(c.kpom.com.bs
Education
Christopher Dorsett, CFA
Citibank
PO Box N 8158. Nassau. Bahamas
Ph: (242) 302 8668
Fax: (242) 302 8569
Email: Christopher.a.dorsetiacitigroup.co

Past President
Warren Davis, CFA
Gibraltar Global Securities
Nassau. Bahamas
Ph: (242) 394 2553
Fax: (242) 394 1 I89
Email: warren@ggsibahamas.com


ICIFA.
-- INSTITUTE
PROFESSIONAL
_1 L-\. ~. ~.


Topic:

Date:

Time:


Currency Markets: "Making Sense of the Dollar"

Thursday, February 2, 2006 i

12:00 noon General Meeting
12:30 pm Lunch and Speaker's Address
Please arrive promptly!


Location: British Colonial Hilton
Governors Ball Room A

Speaker: Marc Chandler
Global Head of Currency Strategy
Senior Vice President
Brown Brothers Harriman

Cost: $25 members; $35 non-members
(If paying by cheque, please make cheque
CFA Society of The Bahamas)

Reservations: PRE-REGISTRATIONREQUIRED


e payable to:

S- by Jan. 31


* SIR Ronald Sanders


throughout Caribbean commu-
nities, not only in providing jobs
but more importantly in facili-
tating ownership.
But such policies should be
guided by research conducted
by a Tourism Research and
Development Institute which
resides in the University of the
West Indies and has relation-


In the absence
of studies that
scientifically
examine the
contending
positions and
quantify their
benefits or
losses over a
spectrum of
considerations,
government
allocation of
scarce resources
has been based
on hunches
and political
pressure.


\ships with other universities in
the region such as the Univer-
sity of Guyana, the University
of Puerto Rico and the Univer-
sity of the US Virgin Islands.
The institute should be fund-
ed by governments, the
Caribbean Hotel Association
and other private sector organ-
isations in the area.
It is in the interest of the
wider private sector to support
such an institute, for, if tourism
is the engine of economic
growth in the region, then
almost every enterprise in the
private sector is dependant
upon it to some extent,


T here are several other
issues in tourism devel-
opment that require research.
Constraints of space do not per-
mit a full list of the other prob-
lems or a discussion of each of
them. Suffice, therefore, to iden-
tify a few.
There is a marked absence of


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David Ramirez, CFA
David.Ramirez@ansbacher.bs
Telephone: 502-3683
**Prepavment required through one of the Board
Members

Marc Chandler joined Brown Brothers Harriman in October 2005 as the
Global Head of Currency Strategy. Previously he was the Chief
Currency Strategist for HSBC Bank USA and Mellon Bank.

Marc is a prolific writer and speaker. In addition to being frequently
called upon by the newspapers and news wires to provide insight into
the developments of the day, Chandler's essays have been published
in the Financial Times, Barron's, Euromoney, Corporate Finance, and
Foreign Affairs. He is also the contributing economic editor for Active
Trader Magazine and to TheStreet.Com. Marc appears often on
business television and is a regular guest on CNBC. He frequently
presents to business groups and investors.

Marc has been analyzing, writing and talking about the foreign
exchange market for more than 20 years. He has a Master's degree in
American history (1984) from Northern Illinois University and a Master's
in International Political Economy from the University of Pittsburgh
(1984). Marc also is an Associate Professor at New York University
School of Continuing and Professional Studies where he teaches
courses on International Affairs.


--


ESIAEPRPRDFO IACNGA H BN FYORCOC
MUTIDICUN FRITREADF**S
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scientific research in the mar-
kets from which tourists.come.
The entire Caribbean 'a's,long
suffered from poor econonlc
and marketing-related research
and forecasting.
With the exception of a few
countries of which the Bahamas
is pre-eminent, Caribbean coun-
tries also suffer from inadequate
funding for marketing and pro-
motion. But, because the tourist
boards are advised by public
relations and marketing firms
in London, New York and else-
where such monies as are dedi-
cated to tourism are spent on
promotion, not on research.
Yet, it is a truism that no
product can be marketed bene-
ficially in a highly competitive
world without market research.
To do so is akin to shooting in
the dark.
A further problem is the bal-
ance of the relationship
between land-based tourism
and cruise ship tourism. Increas-
ingly, governments are being
encouraged to spend tax dol-
lars on infrastructure for cruis-
ships. This has spurred the coai-
tention from hoteliers that thps
is misplaced expenditure sincp
the benefits of cruise touris~i
do not justify its costs.
Hoteliers argue that goverr-
ments should improve anid:
expand airports, modemise util.
cities to reduce costs for eleC
tricity and water, and create tle
environment for developing
new attractions.
In the absence of studies tlit'
scientifically examine the co'j
tending positions and quantik,
their benefits or losses overai
spectrum of considerations, govy,
ernment allocation of scarce
resources has been based 04
hunches and political pressure


The same observation
holds good for
inclusive" holidays in which
hotels trap visitors within thlg
compounds. Should govern-
ments continue to use taxpay;
ers' money to build airports
and in some cases to.subsidije
flights by foreign airlines siqi
ply to supply a few hotels wi
captive guests while restauraqni
shops, arts and crafts centreS,
and street vendors outside t1d
hotels see no benefit at all? "'
It is very unlikely that any
government will adopt a policy
of no "all inclusive" hotels,,
unless all governments doiit
simultaneously. And, govern-
ments are most unlikely to take
such action unless they can j4s-
tify it by hard facts and figures
- the kind of job w Research
and Development Institute cai
do.
The Caribbean has alb
talked about "backward and
forward linkages" to tae
tourism industry for almost t#o
decades without acting in a s ri-
ous way to integrate Caribbean
agricultural production, maru-
facturing and services'with the
tourism industry. '
Much of the food consumed
by the tourist industry is siil
imported from outside thie
region as are manufactured
products and services. '
A Caribbean Tourism
Research and Development
Institute could provide the sc-
entific studies and plans to turn
two decades of talk into action.
One thing is certain: if there is
not serious research and devel-
opment of the tourism indus-
try, it may continue to cdn-
tribute to Caribbean economic
growth and development, but
not for long.
Reponses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com
j







Ttl TRBN MODY JAUR 0 20,PG


I


* By Bahamas Information
Services
MINISTER of Social Ser-
vices and Community Devel-
opment, Melanie Griffin says
straw vendors have helped to
frim the backbone of Bahami-
ani society by contributing sig-
nificantly to the socio-econom-
ic,'political and religious devel-
opment of the nation.
A''Addressing a Service of
Praise and Thanksgiving hosted
by the Straw Market Unity
Prayer Breakfast Band, Minis-
ter Griffin called straw vendors
the "unsung heroines and
heroes" of this nation.
"Minister Griffin said not only
w~re straw vendors able tp "rise
up to serve in the highest cham-
lier of Parliament in this coun-
try", but that they have provid-
ed the nation with some of its
finest sons and daughters who
have and will continue to ensure
the future development of this
country, be it in medicine, law,
accounting, business, banking
ad finance, religion, engineer-
ing, architecture and politics,
aiiong others.
'"Straw vendors have raised
children to become doctors,
lawyers, accountants, secre-
tiies, bankers, businesspersons,
ministers of religion, contrac-
tdrs, engineers, teachers, archi-
t'ects, nurses, politicians, admin-
itfrators and on and on," said
Minister Griffin.
"I don't know them all, but I
i :,..'...


SMELANIE Griffin
*MELANIE Griffin


think of people like Franklyn
Wilson, prominent businessman,
politician, developer, accoun-
tant and all-round patriot;
Wendy Craigg, the first female
Governor of the Central Bank
of The Bahamas and Cynthia
Pratt, first female Deputy Prime
Minister, among others.
"I call these names because
they are persons who you will
recognize easily. There are hun-
dreds more who not only make
their parents proud but serve
as part of the leadership and
developmental framework of
this great county of ours.
"They (vendors) through sac-
rifice and hard work have left
vast legacies that Bahamians of
all generations will continue to
benefit from," Mrs Griffin added.
Herself a daughter of a straw


vendor, Minister Griffin said
education and training were two
important aspects of the ideals of
straw vendors and that many of
them ensured that their children'
received the best quality educa-
tion possible even though they
themselves did not have one.
"Education and training for
their children was and still is of
paramount importance to straw
vendors, particularly those who
may have experienced an
upbringing where they were
denied the better things in life
because their parents could not
afford it," Mrs Griffin said.

Virtues

Minister Griffin said the
"very nature of the business"
instilled numerous virtues in the
vendors which they passed on to
their children. She said that in
the early days, straw vendors
had to stay up practically all
night preparing their straw work
for the next day and then had to
rise early the next day to make
their way to their stalls.
"They did all of this while
having to take care of their fam-
ilies, babies, young children and
husbands," said Minister Grif-
fin. "If a straw vendor wanted
to be successful, he or she had
to be responsible, hardworking,
industrious, creative and deter-
mined, which are all good traits
that they have handed down to
their children.


Look Out, Avery's is back in da swing!





The Presiding Bishop of


People's Assembly Fellowship of Churches

and General Overseer of



Great Commission Ministries

International

Apostle Walter S. Hanchell, J.P.

Announces and extends to you
this invitation to

The Sacred Service of Ordination
To the Gospel Ministry
and Service of Installation to the Office of
Senior Pastor of People's Assembly Word
Centre for


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UNIVERSAL PERSPECTIVE, HISTORICAL CONTEXT A MUST-READ COLUMN THAT GETS TO THE POINT





Straw vendors win praise from minister


r


MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006, PAGE~ 7


TH~E TRIBUNE


eStuart






PAGE 8, MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006 THE TRIBUNE


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006


i


7.
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t~B~P-

I






MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006,.PAGE 9


* THE members of Phi Beta Sigma Faternity, along with its auxiliary club from Aquinas College
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* THE president of the Delta Epsilon Chapter of Phi Beta Sigma, Kareem Hanna, doing his bit
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THE TRIBUNE


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RAGE10,MONDY, ANURY 3, 206 HE TIBUE-"


k MDREt^
SCHOOL






ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS


A limited number of scholarships to attend St Andrew's School is offered annually to students
attending Ministry of Education secondary schools.
These scholarships cover all tuition and book charges throughout years 10, 11 and 12. Eligible
students should meet the following criteria:
Attendance at a government school for at least two years, including grades 8 and 9
Be of the highest academic standing, maintaining a 3.0 GPA or above
Be at least 14 years old and not older than 15 years by 31st August 2006
Applications will require the endorsement of the principal or guidance counsellor of the student's
school. The students awarded these scholarships will be expected to follow a full programme of
BGCSE and advanced courses leading to graduation at the end of year 12.
The scholarships will be awarded on a competitive basis and all candidates will sit the scholarship
examinations at 9am on Saturday, 11h March 2006 at St Andrew's School. Successful
examination candidates will be short-listed and interviewed.,
Application forms will be circulated to the Ministry of Education secondary schools in New
Providence and several in the Family Islands or can be obtained from the administration office of
St Andrew's School. ,
Further details are available from St Andrew's School, telephone: 1-242-324-2621.
Application forms should be returned to: :. -
Dennison J MacKinnon
Principal
St Andrew's School
The International School of The Bahamas
PO Box EE 17340
Nassau, Bahamas
The closing date for applications is Monday 13th February 2006.


Authorized by:
INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE
ORGANIZATION


Accredited by:
L_ COUNCIL OF INTERNATIONAL SCHOOLS
NEW ENGLAND ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOLS &
COLLEGES


Concessions for Grand Bahama


FROM page one

She said the investment and
economic climate of the coun-
try's third largest island, Grand
Bahama, has always been the
focus of the government efforts
for robust growth and sustain-
able development.
Chamber president Dr
Doswell Coakley wishes to see
that business opportunities are
made available to and
embraced by entrepreneurs in
the eastern and western districts
of the island, just as they are
available to residents of the
Freeport and Lucaya areas.
"Our hope is that every
potential investor would be able
to objectively evaluate the vary-
ing advantages of doing busi-
ness in the different sectors of
our island community," he said.
SDespite the challenges over
the past two years following
hurricanes Frances and Jeanne
in 2004, and hurricane Wilma
in 2005. Dr Coakley and Minis-
ter Gibson weie very optimistic
about Grand Bahama's future.
"The government appreciates
that the past two years have not
been easy for Grand Bahama,"
said Minister Gibson.
"I want to leave you with the
message tonight that there is a
great deal of opportunity for
Grand Bahama and that Dr
Doswell Coakley and his team
are the right people for this
time," she said.
She pointed out that signifi-
cant progress has been made in


Buying a home?




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several projects in Grand
Bahama. According to the Min-
ister, the Pirates of the
Caribbean II and III are being
filmed at the Gold Rock Creek
Enterprises' Bahamas Film Stu-
dios, which has a projected cap-
ital investment of $70 million
for the project.
Of the more than $7 million
already spent, she noted that $2
million worth of contracts have
been awarded to Bahamian
entrepreneurs.
She noted that the developer
of the proposed $650 million
project at Old Bahama Bay
Resort has spent $70 million on
its project at West End. She
added that $9 million in con-
tracts has been awarded to
Bahamians.
She also mentioned that
PharmaChem Technologies has
invested more than $10 million
of a projected $18 million capi-
tal investment on Grand
Bahama.
She said the company manu-
factures a widely prescribed
drug for use in combination
*therapy to treat HIV/AIDS.
She revealed that the facili-
ty, which produces the active
ingredient for the antiretrovi-
ral Viread, is now ready to pro-
duce large industrial quantities
of Tenofovir DF in full compli-
ance with the US Food and
Drug Administration standards.
The company has also agreed
to work with the Ministry of
Health in supplying it with the
HIV/AIDS medication at a
reduced cost and to assist in the
national HIV/AIDS treatment
programme, she said.
Former US President Bill
Clinton, who was recently in
Nassau, pointed to the Bahamas
as a model success story in its
treatment of HIV/AIDS, she
said.
Mrs Gibson said for the past
two successive years there has


been no mother-child transmir-
sion of the HIV/AIDS virus ift
the Bahamas.
"Grand Bahama is playing its
part in this effort and should
celebrate this accomplishment,"
she said.
And she believes that Grand
Bahama has the potential to be
the fasting growing island in the
Bahamas.
She explained that Grand
Bahama's financial services sec-
tor has access to considerably
more cable capacity than most
developed countries.
The container transshipment
terminal, and a 600-acre sea/air
business centre being planned
in close proximity to the US and
a highly qualified cadre of
Bahamian professionals, make
Grand Bahama a perfect loca-
tion for international e-com-
merce.
Minister Gibson commend-
ed the Grand Bahama Port
Authority for what it is doing
in Freeport and the Bahamas:
She noted that with the
Chamber's help, the govern-
ment and Port Authority. must
work together in order for
Grand Bahama to realise its
potential.
"We believe Grand Bahama
can be the fastest growing island
over the next 10 years and we
fully endorse and support your
efforts and that of your team,,"
she told Chamber president Dr
Doswell Coakley.
The othef newly installed
officers for 2005-2006 were
Daniel Lowe, first vice presi-
dent; Christopher Lowe, second
vice president; Kevin Seymou',
Treasurer; Malvese Caproni,
Secretary; and directors
Gilbertha Gaitor, Janet Albury,
Dr Barry Iseard, Cyril Cox,
Donald Ward, Greg Langstaff,
Carey Leonard, Christopher
Gouthro, Jason French and
Angela Gibson.


No aircraft found


despite signal

FROM page one
plane crash.
"BASRA Abaco put up planes and sent boats to the location.
When you have a downed aircraft there is generally oil spillage,
debris, and the signal continues to transmit for about 48 hours.
"There was no debris, no oil, nothing to indicate that there had
been a downed aircraft in the area. They searched for as long as the
light permitted and there was no radio call," said Mr Lloyd.
He explained that there have been instances where EPIR's reg-
istered to aircraft have been sold to persons and they have put them
on boats. He said that this may have been a scenario where the
EPIR was on a boat and not in an aircraft. He added that it may
have gotten wet and been activated, but-,he boat was not in distress
and did not realise it was activated and moved on or shut it off.
Mr Lloyd said that the case is not closed, but suspended pending
the gathering of further information.





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- -------


I


i I


I


THE TRIBUN-.-


.2


PAGE 10, MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006


T
d






MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


LOC ANE


ENM leader


hits out over


environment


FROM page one

Criticising the government's
approval of new golf courses
and upscale housing on water
bearing land in New Provi-
dence, Mr.Ingraham asked
Prime Minister Perry Christie
if it is not "indecent" to
approve such construction on
'lands protected from the ear-
liest of times as an important
source of potable water for
the Bahamian people."
He further asked if Mr
Christie does not find it inde-
cent "to advise Bahamians not
to rebuild in low lying West
Grand Bahama, but to
approve a mega internation-
a. residential marina resort
development in close proxim-
ity."
Addressing the PLP's hous-
ing policies, Mr Ingraham con-
beded that the government is
making "good progress" in
delivering on the promise to
build more than double the
number of low and middle-
income homes than were built
by the FNM.
'However, he said, many of
6e government's housing ini-
tiatives are proving to be envi-
ronmentally unsound.
"In their haste to build
houses, they are building in
opme very inappropriate
-Ir


areas, areas prone to flooding
and, areas that will be unsafe
during heavy rains, storms
surges and hurricanes," he
said.
As during the FNM's rally
in Exuma two weeks ago, the
PLP government was also
once again criticised for build-
ing houses, but not communi-
ties.
"They are building houses,
not planning communities.
They don't appear to under-
stand the importance of
including open green spaces
in the design of new neigh-
bourhoods, nor are they pay-
ing enough attention to the
role of stands of native trees in
reducing summer tempera-
tures or of wetlands to serve
as water catchments during
the rainy season," Mr Ingra-
ham said.
The FNM leader further
criticised the continued grant-
ing of permits for the excava-
tion of hills, "indiscriminate
land-clearing and back-fill of
low-lying areas."
"Apparently the billions of
dollars lost to sea surge and
flooding damage along the
Gulf Coast of the United
States last year was not suffi-
cient to educate those making
decisions on the location of
new housing developments,"
he said.


W I jisuuuul hneI


FROM page one
recovery stage after having
been dealt major blows in the
form of three destructive hur-
ricanes in the past two years.
"Overall room occupancy in
Grand Bahama is up, that is of
course in part due to the film-
ing of the Pirates of the
Caribbean. But generally there
is a significant lack of rooms,"
he said.
The minister said that cruise
lines, such as Discovery, were
not able to offer their cus-
tomers stay-over opportunities
in Grand Bahama due to the
insufficient rooms on the
island.
"We face many challenges,
but we hope to soon offer
friendlier docks in Grand
Bahama and throughout the
Bahamas," he said.
The repositioning of the
Grand Bahama's cruise ship
port will play a large part in


Bahamas cruise ship industry,


the revitalisation of that
island's cruise industry, Mr
Wilchcombe added.
"(The port) will be moved
to Williams Town, near
Freeport, which will make it
more central and offer better
shipping lanes," he said.
In addition to concentrating
on boosting Grand Bahama's
cruise tourism, said Mr Wilch-
combe, the time has come to
look towards cultivating more
ports throughout the islands.
The minister pointed out
that compared to other coun-
tries in the region which have
only one or two cruise ship
ports the Bahamas is in the
unique position of being able to
offer multiple ports.
"We have so many islands,
and so many opportunities, we
can offer cruise tourists the


entire Caribbean," he said.
Mr Wilchcombe said that he
has been in discussions to this
end and is particularly looking
forward to the introduction of
inter-island cruises in the near
future.
With other Caribbean coun-
tries working on improving and
enhancing their cruise ship


industry, it is important for the
Bahamas not to become "lax"
in its efforts, he said.
However, at the end of the
day, he added, the Bahamas
has only itself to compete with
and should therefore intensify
its work in ensuring the country
becomes the number one in the
world of cruise tourism.


Looking for

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New Arrivals Weekly

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Suzuki
Toyota
Nissan
Honda
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at

Bahamas Bus & Truck

call:


BahamaHealth is relocating

to harbour bay shopping centre
BahamaHealth, the Group Division of Family Guardian,
will relocate to Harbour Bay Shopping Center
on January 30.


Phone us at:
242 396 1300 Main Line-
242 396 1303 Care Advocates
242 300 2458 Family Islands Toll Free
242 396 1301 Fax Line
or visit our new convenient location.
BahamaHealth Good health is within your reach!







1









7e






hamnia Health


Ph FAMILY4
GUARDIAN
INSURANCE
COMPANY


ra'.Ira.


CHRISTOPH ERNEST
BROWN

Anyone with information on the death
of Chris Brown or his whereabouts on
the night of Friday 13th, January 2006
are asked to contact the police at 322-
2561 or 502-9930. Mr. Brown was last
seen around 9pm on Friday night,
driving his white taxi van, plate number
436.


OFF





storewide
SHOES* HANDBAGS
CLOTHING ACCESSORIES







NINE VEST


MARATHON MALL TEL: 393-4155


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F/AE1,MNAY AUR 0 20 H RBN


Bahamas Bus &
MONTROSE AVE. PHONE:


Truck Co., Ltd.
: 322-1722 FAX: 326-7452


Chavez


for


end of US 'empire'


and war in Iraq





"Copyrighted Material;
Syndicated7Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"

S_ - -
OW4 0M4401 "NNW 4AMNWGA
wow MON


*3.7 L V6 Engine

* Automatic Transmission

* Power Windows & Locks

Front Air Bags

Air Conditioning

* Radio/Cassette/CD Player


$36,79500


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On Becomin- a

Professional Engineer


NaC ospS ,



F% HOVOI

PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY

VACANCY

NURSING SERVICES ADVISOR
Applications are invited from suitably qualified candidates for appointment to the post of
Nursing Services Advisor in the Public Hospitals Authority (PHA) which is responsible for
the management of the three public hospitals of the Bahamas, Princess Margaret Hospital,
Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre and the Rand Memorial Hospital and the management of
Bahamas National Drug Agency, Materials Management Services, National Emergency
Medical Services and the public clinics in Grand Bahama.
Applicants must possess the following qualifications and experience:
Registered Nurse (with specific registration through the Nursing Council of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, prior to appointment);
Masters Degree in Nurse Management or Equivalent with a minimum of five (5) years post-
qualification experience in a senior administrative position; or Bachelor of Science Degree
in Nurse management or equivalent with a minimum often (10) years post-qualification
experience in a senior administrative position;
Experience at a strategic / policy level in nursing or general health systems planning and
development will be an advantage.
DUTIES
1. The Nursing Services Advisor would report to the Managing Director and would serve
as the principal specialist of the PHA on all matters relating to nursing services operations
and development. The overarching responsibility of the post is to ensure (a) standards
of nursing care are well-defined, relevant and consistently maintained; and (b) the
structure and practice of nursing services are appropriate within and across departments
and institutions.
2. Main duties and responsibilities of the post include:
a) Development and revision of policies and operational guidelines for improving the
quality and efficiency of nursing services;
b) Monitoring compliance with standards of practice related to general and specialty
nursing care as a means of ensuring continuous quality improvement in nursing and
adherence to the Code of Nursing Ethics:
c) Utilization of nursing productivity statistics to advise on strategic interventions for
greater efficiency of nursing services;
d) Ensuring the maintenance of a system of continuous nursing education at each
Institution;
e) Making recommendations for organizational restructuring of nursing to best fit a
dynamic public healthcare system;
f) Facilitating and coordinating communication (policy level) between nursing and
other health-care disciplines of the PHA, Ministry of Health and other national,
Regional and International entities;
g) Preparing annual plans and other reports related to Nursing Services Development,
including an annual budget for organizational-wide nursing services development.
3. Applicants must possess strong analytical, conceptual-thinking, strategic planning,
communication and interpersonal skills.
Letters of application, Curricula Vitae, documentary evidence of qualifications and experience
and three (3) references should be submitted no later than 28th February 2006 to the Human
Resources Director, P.O. Box N-8200 or 1st Floor Manx Corporate Centre, Dockendale
House, West Bay Street. Serving officers must submit their applications via their Heads of
Department/Hospital.


IL -I ~sll~~rr-sI Now'


CARIBBEAN NEWS


calbs


PACE 12, MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006


14Ell


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THE TRI13UNE






E ODY ANAY3,206 AE1


Jailed Haitian


Catholic priest



"flown to US


fit trdtWwqt^
"Copyrighted Material
-Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


; N OL


IAI


~*~b~~s"~Bpa"~I


lips


- __


040 00 w0 a0so e e M. ww ob4w4 b f-lpt 400
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I U U *


ScScholarsh
S_ available


$7,500 Lyford Cay Foundation
Technical Training Awards


Interested in a career in...
Sagriculture/agribusiness
air conditioning & refrigeration
auto, marine & aviation mechanics
,construction & related trades
diesel technology & mechanics
Heavy equipment operation
Machine shop/welding
computer service technology
hospitality & tourism
technical instruction & education
* health care, medical technology &
more


Apply today for a Lyford Cay Foundation Technical Training Scholarship
Applicants must be
Bahamian with high school diploma
Plan to pursue a vocation valuable to The Bahamas
Pledge to return to The Bahamas upon graduation
Other qualifications may apply
Applications available from The Manager's Office, BTVI, or write to
Technical Training Scholarships, Lyford Cay Foundation, P.O. Box N 7776, Nassau,
or onlin e at :'.... j.; . i -- .-;- ,.1- r.
DEADLINETO SUBMIT COMPLETED APPLICATION MAY 1, 2006 :i':,.

--~I lY rr~ra~arrr~r lyl-I I I- I I


Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


and Move


Date:
Saturday February 4th, 2006
Time:
7am sharp
Place:
Arawak Cay
Route:
From Arawak Cay to Nassau Street, along
Thompson Boulevard ending at the Queen Elizabeth
Sports Centre
Fair:
Kendal G.L. Isaacs Gymnasium, immediately following the
Walk until 3pm. Fair Activities include Sporting Events,
Health Screenings & Counselling,
Nutrition & Fitness Demonstrations,
Music & Entertainment

Join the Ministry of Health and the community in a
"WL For Health and Health Fair"
A;,,et Up and Move" towards
",a healthier Bahamas in 2006
__'- '. ., _.


__


wIllw,,


MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006, PAGE 13


E


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*'*


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PAGE 14, MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006

"Your Bahamian Supeimaets



SUPER

VALUE IIfll


THE TRIBUNE,


SMOKE PICNIC


II


99.
CE


Sheet Sets Plush Toys Bakeware Sets
Towels Space Savers Glass Sets
Comforters Pot Sets Picture Frames
Rugs Toasters
Shower Curtains Coffee Makers
Bed Rest Car Mats

PAY LESS AT DISCOUNT MART
--~ A = t- kA ]B- 1m]= 4 v S*l Sl l I b -]lI -'lL I -


SWEET SWEET RED SEEDLESS' SWEET EXLARGE SIZE
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RUGS
TOWELS
SHEET SETS
TABLE CLOTHS
BATH SCALES
THROW PILLOWS
COMFORTER SETS
SHOWER CURTAINS
BATHROOM ACCESSORIES
, LAMPS


BLENDERS
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BAKEWARES
WALL CLOCKS
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SALE STARTS: MONDAk, JANUARY 30TH SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 4TH, 2006
Located: Harbour Bay Shopping Center
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448


j NW ACCEPTNG
oSUNCARDD
QUALRYSI~HTS AND PRICOS REMOD
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THE TRIBUNE-


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Pop calls on world

lea rs to unite in fight

a ginst pore l disets


"Copyrighted Material
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PAGE 16, MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006


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"Searching the world for attractive and affordable

goods for our customers is part of my job,

showcasing them is The Tribune's; it is an integral

part of our business, and our partner for success.

The Tribune is my newspaper."
e,

SUSAN GLINTON

SENIOR BUYER, KELLY'S HOME CENTRE LTD.





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MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006


SECTION


BUSINESS 11l[1
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HP^^B~ame nomaH MEMELM.H^ H flK"*""@r^ B |gr'^T a~^i
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business@tribunemedia.net Miami Herald Business, Stocks,


Analysis, Wall Street


US company



in Freeport



distribution



facility deal


1/3 of young



Bahamians



'have no



qualifications'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THutchison Port
Holdings
(Bahamas) has
"concluded an
agreement"
with a leading US-based gro-
cery wholesaler to develop a
warehouse/distribution facility
at Grand Bahama's Sea Air
Business Centre.
Derek Newbold, Hutchison
Port Holdings (Bahamas) sales
and marketing manager, told
a seminar on the opportunities
presented by doing business in
Freeport that the deal with
Associated Grocers of Florida
would initially see 20 acres of
land set aside for development
of a 30,000 square foot ware-
house.
The US distributor, which
supplies grocery products to
more than 42 different coun-
tries, has an option over an


additional 20 acres, and long-
term the goal is to expand its
warehouse to 100,000 square
feet by the fifth year of its
investment.
"We have concluded an
agreement with a major whole-
saler/distributor to develop a
warehouse and distribution
facility at the Sea Air Business
Centre," said Mr Newbold.
Partner
Terence Gape, a partner at
the Dupuch & Turnquest law
firm, said development of the
Grand Bahama distribution
facility would "save a tremen-'
dous amount of trouble and
expense" for Associated Grow-
ers and its customers.
The company had a lot of
non-US customers, but was
finding that importing produce
from China and other markets
to its US distribution facilities
for re-export to other markets


was "knocking the price up".
Therefore, the Bahamas
facility would be used to
receive product from other
markets that was due to be
exported to regions such as
Latin and South America.
Mr Newbold said the Sea Air
Business Centre had been
"strategically located", on 741
acres lying between Grand
Bahama International Airport
on one side and the Container
Port and Harbour on the other,
to attract international investor
interest. This effectively puts
the complex at the centre of an
air and sea transhipment hub
for the Americas.
China's CITIC Group has
also been looking at the Sea
Air Business Centre as the
location for a warehouse and
distribution facility. CITIC
would use it as an emporium
SEE page 4B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
ALMOST one-third of
Bahamians aged between 16-
24 have no academic qualifica-
tions, with one in five from that
age group neither in the edu-
cation system or employed,
new data on this nation's edu-
cation crisis reveals.
Another Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB)


20% of 16-24 year-olds neither
in school or employed, creating
conditions for crime and drugs


report, a follow-up to earlier
ones on the $60.5 million pro-
gramme for reforming the
Bahamian educational system,
draws upon data from the Gov-
ernment's 2001 Living Condi-
tions Survey to show how many


young Bahamians are effec-
tively being left behind, drifting
into a life of anti-social activi-
ties such as crime and drug use.

SEE page 7B


Demand for payment served on Royal Oasis


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
GRAND Bahama Power Company's attor-
neys have served a statutory demand for pay-
ment upon the holding companies for the Roy-
al Oasis resort, demanding that they settle the
property's unpaid six-figure electricity bill with-
in 21, days or face a possible winding-up peution.


Callenders & Co, Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany's attorneys, confirmed that the demand
for payment had been served on the still-closed
resort's holding firms when contacted by The
Tribune on Friday.
If the resort and its owners do not settle with-

SEE page 10B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BUSINESSMEN in Nassau and other islands are not taking
advantage of Freeport's Bond system to minimise heavy upfront
customs duty payments on materials, goods and vehicles import-
ed solely for use in their business Operations.
That was the message coming from several panellists at a sem-
inar on the opportunities presented by doing business in Grand
Bahama, where business licencees of the Grand Bahama Port
Authority are entitled to apply to the Customs Department for a
Bond number and Open Ware-
house Status.
STerence Gape, a partner in the SEE page 5B


$572m expansion

plan for Freeport

Container Port


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
FREEPORT Container Port
expects "to exceed" in 2006 the
1.1 million throughput volume
of technical equipment units
(TEUs) that it processed in
2005, with its parent company
looking at investing $572 mil-
lion in the port's long-term
expansion.
Derek Newbold, Hutchison
Port Holdings (Bahamas) sales
and marketing manager, told
a seminar on the advantages of


6% growth in
Grand Bahama
cruise passengers
expected for 2006
doing business in Freeport that
the Container Port was the
"transhipment hub of the
Americas".
He said: "Over the past five

SEE page 5B


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THE TRIBUNE,


PAGE 2B. MONDAY. JANUARY 30, 2006


Port Authority turns down 'one


application in seven


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Grand Bahama Port
Authority's (GBPA)
licensing committee has
only turned down one
application from a
Bahamian business in the past seven
years, with an attorney describing the
process as "the quintessential one-
stop shop" for giving investors "red
carpet" treatment.


Carey Leonard, the GBPA's gen-
eral counsel, said its licensing com-
mittee, consisting of GBPA execu-
tives and two local government rep-
resentatives, met once a month to
approve licence applications from
Bahamian businesses. The whole
process, on average, took from two
to four weeks.
Process
Adding that the process had "a


good degree of transparency", Mr
Leonard said: "All Bahamian appli-
cations submitted to that committee,
bar one, have been approved over the
last seven years."
He added that the Port Authority
planned to put all information regard-
ing the licensing process "on our web-
site in the not too distant future",
enabling licencee applications to be
completed and submitted online.
Apart from the completed applica-
tion form, prospective licencees had to


pay a non-refundable $250 process-
ing fee; provide evidence that they
had occupancy or a lease agreement
for property in an area that was con-
sistent with that location's planning
objectives; submit Bahamian citizen-
ship proof; and submit business and
bank references.
Previous
Mr Leonard echoed previous com-
ments by W. Albert Gray, the


period


GBPA's president, who said their had
been a complete about change in the
composition of Freeport's licencees.
Whereas 15 years ago some 85 per
cent had been foreign-owned, now
that proportion was Bahamian-.
owned. ,
Under the Hawksbill Creek Agreer.
ment, all responsibility for licensing.


SEE page 11B


FIDLITYIAE1 3 1R1P111


* By Fidelity Capital
Markets
TRADING activity slowed
last in the Bahamian market as
only 23,116 shares changed
hands. The market saw 11 out
of the 20 listed stocks traded,
of which one advanced, four
declined and six remained the
same.
Volume leader and big
advancer for the week was
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas)
(BAB), with 6,500 shares
changing hands and accounting
for 28 per cent of the total
shares traded. BAB's share
price increased by $0.07 to end
the week at $1.17. On the down
side, FamGuard Company's
(FAM) share price declined by
$0.15 to close at $6.05.
The FINDEX ended the
week at 591.41, down 0.21
points. The FINDEX is a price-
weighted total return index, cre-
ated by Fidelity to measure the
total return, including both


price changes and dividend pay-
ments, of all the stocks of public
companies in the Bahamas.
COMPANY NEWS
FOCOL Holdings Limited
(FCL) -
FCL announced that on Jan-
uary 17, 2006, it finalised an
agreement to purchase all the
outstanding shares of Shell
Bahamas for $32.5 million. The
purchase includes Shell's Turks
and Caicos Islands operations.
Within the next 90 days, FCL
hopes to disclose the final pur-
chase terms and any additional
material information related to
the transaction. It was specu-
lated that the $25 million pref-
erence share issue by FCL in
December 2005 was conducted
to help finance the purchase of
Shell. In related news, FCL's
Board of Directors has declared
a dividend of $0.11 per share
payable on February 9, 2006, to
all common shareholders as at
record date January 31, 2006.


For this and more fantastic World Traveller offers
book at ba.com, or call your travel agent, by 6 February, 2006.


BRITISH AIRWAYS

For sale until 6 February 2006 for outbound travel on or before 31 March 2006. Minimum stay 5 days, maximum stay: one
year. Tickets must be purchased 72 hours after the booking is made, but no later'than 6 February 2006. No changes, senior
discounts, upgrades or refunds allowed. Valid on direct services only. Weekend surcharge of $30 will apply. This fare attracts
additional taxes and fees. Other conditions apply.


The Bahamian Stock Market:i


FINDEX 591.41% YTD 7.17%


BISX CLOSING
SYMBOL PRICE


AML
BAB
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
CWCB
DHS
FAM
FCC
FCL
FIN
ICD
JSJ
KZLB
PRE'


$0.72
$1.17
$0.70
$7.00
$10.52
$13.25
$1.26
$9.53
$9.15
$1.64
$10.90
$4.31
$2.87
$6.05
$1.15
$10.05.
$10.90
$9.95
$9.10
$6.63
$10.00


CHANGE VOLUME


$-
$0.07
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-0.02
$-0.10
$-
$-
$0.03
$-0.01
$-0.15
$-_
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-0.25
$-


2215
6500
0
1026
0
0
0
6000
1500
0
2325
0
1000
1100
0
950
400
0
100
0
0


YTD PRICE
CHANGE ''
-1.37% .
6.36% N
0.00% '
0.00%. ,
1.15.?/o: ,
...3.92% '; ,
0.00%
-0.21%
0.44%
0.00% :,,;
0.18% .,;
0.70% .;
32.26% ,
0.00% -
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.55%
-3.21%
0.00%


DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:

ICD Utilities (ICD) has declared a dividend of $0.135;
per share payable on February 16, 2006, to all common share- 1
holders as at record date February 2, 2006.

Consolidated Water Company (CWCO) has declared a,
dividend of $0.012 per BDR payable on February 7, 2006, td
all common shareholders as at record date December 31;.,-;
2005.

FOCOL Holdings (FCL) has declared a dividend of $0.11'
per share payable on February 9,2006, to all common share- ?|
holders as at record date January 31, 2006. i





NOTICE


ESTATE OF LEE CALVIN;
ASHCRAFT late of 503 N Quaker Lane,
Alexandria, Virginia 22304 one of the United
States of America.


NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
any claim or demand against the above Estate
are required to send their names, addresses and
particulars of the debts or claims certified in
writing to the undersigned on or before the 1st
March, 2006 and if required, to prove such debts
or claims, or in default be excluded from the
benefit of any distribution made before such
debts or claims are proved; after the above date
the Executor will distribute the assets having
regard only to the proved debts or claims of
which he shall have had notice.


And Notice is hereby given that all persons
indebted to the said Estate are requested to make
full settlement on or before 1st March, 2006.


McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Attorneys for the Executor
Mareva House
4 George Street
P.O. Box-N-3937
Nassau, Bahamas


International Markets

FOREX Rates
Weekly %Change

CAD$ 1.1499 -0.16
GBP 1.7679 -0.18
EUR 1.2102 -0.27

Commodities
Weekly %Change
Crude Oil $67.76 -0.86
Gold $559.00 -0.97

International Stock Market Indexes:
Weekly %Change

DJIA 10,907.21 2.25
S & P 500 1,283.72 1.76
NASDAQ 2,304.23 2.52
Nikkei 16,460.68 4.87


.. I ---~-, i


BUSINESS


*







MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006, PAGE 3B


Talks to grow Kerzner's





Bahamian purchases


T he Minister of
Financial Services
and Investments
is holding talks
with Kerzner
International to see how the
Atlantis resort owner can
increase its support for
Bahamian light industry and
begin "significant purchases"
from Bahamian retailers.
Allyson Maynard-Gibson
disclosed the talks during an
address to the Rotary Club of
East Nassau on Friday, part of
the Government's drive to
deepen the linkages between
Bihamian entrepreneurs and
~jajor foreign direct investment
projects.
iShe added that her Ministry
vould also work closely with
groups such as engineers, archi-
tects, planners and interior
designers to ensure they bene-
fited from foreign direct invest-
ment projects.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
her ministry was also working
to enable applications to the
Investments Board to be com-
pleted and submitted online.
Among the projects to be
underway by end-January 2007,
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
these included the second five-
year 'Strategic Plan' for the
Bahamian financial services
industry and promotion of the
'Bahamas Brand' for the sec-
tor.
She added that she hoped
fundraising and curriculum
planning for the proposed
School of Financial Services at
the College of the Bahamas
(COB) would "be well on the
way" by early 2007.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson then
returned to investment project
data, saying that the total value
invested in such projects that
were underway was $4.6 bil-
lion.
The total capital investment


in projects already started was
$1.3 billion. She added that
6,000 new jobs had been cre-
ated by these projects, and $418
million spent with Bahamian
contractors.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said in
relation to investment projects
approved by the Government:


"While the full blossoming of
the fruit has not yet taken
place, everyday we are seeing
the ripening of that which is to
come, and when in full bloom
the seeds planted by this gov-
ernment will yield a harvest
pressed down and overflow-
ing."


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and REDUCED LEGAL FEES! We can show you how
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QUALIFICATIONS REQUIRED:
EDUCATION
o High School Diploma plus 5 or more years experience a must
o Art Degree or Technical School Certificate required
o Demonstrated ability in graphic design and desktop publishing
TRAINING & EXPERIENCE
o Applicant must have artistic skills in design and layout
o Must know how to work with commercial printers
o Must be able to execute designs/publications in standard computer
drawing and publishing software
SKILLS
o Prepare design layouts, specifications and mechanicals for brochures, ads,
journals, posters, signage, booklets and other printed and graphic materials.
o Demonstrate ability to create technical illustrations, designs,
layouts and electronic presentations and publications for commercial print
o Exhibit knowledge of commercial art methods, techniques, prepress, and
scanning,
o Work independently and as part of a team
o Work under extreme deadline pressure and handle multiple assignments
o Monitor scheduling and overall job production and coordinate
interrelated activities with other departments
o Adhere to excellent organizational skills
o Excellent oral and written communication skills
o Enthusiastic with excellent customer service skills
o Must be able to work with little or no supervision
o Must be familiar with PC & Mac operating systems
o Demonstrate expertise in QuarkXPress 6.0, Macromedia FreeHand
MX, Adobe PageMaker, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator and
Microsoft PowerPoint
POSITION SUMMARY:
Under the direction of the Assistant Vice President of Operations, the Graphic Artist
will perform duties in accordance with established marketing practices and policies
and special instruction as well as perform a variety of duties involved in the design
and layout of printed and graphic materials, and perform routine and complex duties
in the preparation of printing specifications.
Portfolio required
Salary to commensurate with experience
Excellent benefits


THE TRIBUNE


Dr. Sharon A. Thompson

Practice Relocation

Please join us in welcoming the latest
addition to our center of highly
qualified physicians in the
Renaissance Medical Building.


Dr. S. Thompson received her Doctorad f .
of Medicine degree from Howard
University College of Medicine in : ..
Washington, D. C.


She completed her Obstetrics and
Gynecology Residency at Rochester
General Hospital in Rochester NY, l
where she served as Chief Resident
from 2000 2001. Dr. Thompson is
American Board Certified in
Obstetrics and Gynecology and has
enjoyed serving her Bahamian
community since 2001. Her practice,
St. Elizabeth Women's-Medical
Center, will be Opening January 30, 2006. She looks forward to continuing to
provide Individualized and Specialized Care for Women.

St. Elizabeth Women's Medical Center
155 Shirley Street (opposite Oriental Cleaners)
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 322-3831/323-7477
www.acog.org/member-lookup


MINISTER OF FINANCIAL SERVICES &
INVESTMENTS ALLYSON MAYNARD-GIBSON


Realize

your

dreams

with our

HELP!


____BUSINESS


124a,







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4B. MONDAY. JANUARY 30, 2006


95% of commercial land deals Bahamian


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

commercial land transac-
tions that have taken place
in Freeport over the past
20 years have been with
Bahamian businessmen and business-
es, the Grand Bahama Port Authori-
ty's president said.
Addressing a seminar in Nassau on


the advantages of doing business in
the Bahamas, W. Alb'rt Gray said
the Port Authority had just commis-
sioned a world-leading master plan-
ner, Ed Stone, to re-masterplan
Freeport.
President

Graham Torode, the Grand
Bahama Development Company's
(Devco) president and chief execu-


tive, described this process as "taking
master planning to the next stage",
with a heavy investment in technology
as well as planners.
Mr Torode urged Bahamian citi-
zens and businesses to take advan-
tage now of Freeport's relatively low
real estate prices, "about one third"
lower than Nassau on average, and
take a stake in their own land.
He added that 2005 was the first
year in which Devco, which owns


70,000 acres on Grand Bahama,
including 20 miles of beachfront, sold
more land to the Nassau market than
Freeport.
Built

Devco had built three low to mid-
income level communities on Grand
Bahama over the past three years,
constructing some 250 homes and
putting more than $25 million in con-


tracts out to local construction coin-
panies.
Devco also planned to take Gratid
Bahama's position as a tourism and
residential destination "to the next
level", tapping into its location jpst
70-80 miles from Palm Beach and ladk
,of beachfront space on the US east
and west coasts to aggressively target
the 'Baby Boomer' generation.


Jury selection




proves difficult



for Enron trial


.) -


- -do


Trade talks are




at standstill


Of 4


- 0~
S


Available from Commercial News Providers"


C *,~ -
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-


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o- US company in Freeport



-- -- distribution facility deal


FROM page 1B


S -- to showcase Asian and Chi-
nese-made goods, enabling
buyers from the US to fly in
* from Florida to assess the prod-
-* ucts.
-- -- It would also give the US
S market access to factory pricing
-- *- and direct shipping.


Over at Grand. Bahama
International Airport, which
had recently seen some $35
million invested in it, Mr New-
bold said 75 per cent of the ter-
minal facilities were dedicated
to US pre-clearance and the
Department of Homeland
Security. It had been built to
meet the new Us pre-clearance
requirements post September
11. The airport is still recover-


ing from damage inflicted
Hurricanes Frances ad
Jeanne, with the new 10,0 0
square foot cargo facility ei1
for completion in March 20*,.
The previous building had b6gi
condemned and demolished
Also under construction *
new control tower a,
crash/fire and rescue facilii,
which should be completed,
July 2006.


Financial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information As Of:
27 January 2006
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES VISIT WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,357.68 / CHG -00.98 / %CHG -00.07 YTD 06.97 / YTD % 00.5 ;
52w.-H. 52.vK-Low S,mbol Pre.lou Close Today Close Chnge Dail, ',l EPS $ Di. P E Yield
1.10 0.72 Aoac.O Markets 0.73 0 '72 -0 01 1,000r 0 169 r 000o N .1 0 '
10.52 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 10.52 10.52 0.00 1.456 0.360. 7.2 3.42%
7.24 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 7.00 7.00 0.00 0.587 0.330 11.6 4.71%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.70 0.70 0.00 0.175 0.020 4.0 2.86%
1.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste, 1.26 1.26 0.00 0.105 0.060 12.0 4.76%
1.20 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1:20 1.17 : -0.03 4,000 0.070 0.040 16.7 3.42%
9.60 7.20 Cable Bahamas 9.54 9.53 -0.01 1,000 0.689 0.240 13.8 2.52%
2.20 1.39 Colina Holdings 1.64 1.64 0.00 -0.046 0.000 NM 0.00%
9.25 7.15 Commonwealth Bank 9.15 9.15 0.00 0.791 0.450 11.6 4.92%
4.49 4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.31 4.49 0.18 0.099 0.045 42.1 1.08%
2.88 1.50 Doctor's Hospital 2.88 2.87. -0.01 1,000 0.429 0.000 16.7 0.00%
6.20 3.99 Famguard 6.05 6.05 0.00 0.428 0.240 12.7 3.97%
10.90 9.75 Finco 10.90 10.90 0.00 0.717 0.530 15.2 4.86%
10.90 7.50 FirstCaribbean 10.90 10.90 0.00 0.695 0.500 13.2 4.59%
10.05 7.95 Focol 10.05 10.05 0.00 0.833 0.500 12.1 4.98%
1.99 1.15 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 -0.062 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.20 9.60 ICD Utilities 9.95 9.95 0.00 0.526 0.405 15.1 5.43%
9.10 8.22 J. S. Johnson 9.10 9.10 0.00 0.572 0.560 15.8 6.19%
7.00 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 6.63 6.67 0.04 0.138 0.000 48.0 0.00%
10 00 10 00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.760 4.9 7.60%
FIdelty Over-The-Counter Seurtitle
52nk-H, 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask. $ Lat Price A'eekly */o EPS D, $ P Y.elI
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.25 14.25 11.00 1.917 0.720 7.2 5.05%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
S60 0 40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.044 0.000 NM 0.00%
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
4 00 Z8 00 ABDAB -11.0 0-3 LCi 0 1 r:l 2 ;020 0. 1 4 C0 0, 0.
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.75 13.75 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0 60 0 35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
5s.ik-Hi 52,k-Low, Fund Name N4 D. 'YTD'.. L551 11 ,t1; nth. Di. $ YeG 'e :
1.2700 1.2060 Colina Money Market Fund 1.270017*
2.5864 2.0704 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.5864 **
10.7674 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.7674"".
2.3125 2.1746 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.312472*
1 1442 1 0782 Colina Bond Fund 1.144217""
FINDEX CLOSE 436.630 1 YTD 1 321%! 2003 14.88%
BISX ALL SHARE INDE X 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months NIM Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock .ndex. January 1, 1994 100
"- AS AT DEC. 31, 2005/ "" AS AT NOV. 30, 2005
S- AS AT JAN 13 2006/ ** AS AT DEC. 31. 2005/**** AS AT DEC. 31. 2005
O TRADE CALL CDUNA 242-502-7010 / FIDELITY 242-356-776 -


HELP WANTED




with five years experience with the
ability to work on their own initiative.,

Please send Resume to:
P.O.Box N-1462,
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tel: (242) 394-0043
Fax (242) 393-4910




THE GNERA IPUB I CIS


- "Copyrighted Material


.- Syndicated _Content


4 6wq


S


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


I


IBUSINES


-


O


L


- 4b .10-


Sc ~
r
r


o o o


- ft


I







MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006, PAGE 5B


/THE TRIBUNE


$572m expansion



plan for Freeport




Container Port


FROM page 1B

years, we have realized a steady increase in
volumes, with the exception of 2004, when
hurricanes Frances and Jeanne devastated
Freeport.
"This year, we expect to exceed the actu-
al figures for 2005."
Meanwhile, Freeport Harbour Compa-
ny's cargo facility, which received cargoes
from both ferries and ro-ro (roll-on, roll-
off) ships, dealt with 350,000 tons at its
domestic facility in 2005.
Mr Newbold said the 12 per cent annu-
al growth rate in domestic cargo volumes
had prompted the facility's expansion by
2.5 in November 2005, enabling it to store
an extra 600 containers.
On Freeport Harbour's cruise facility,
Mr Newbold said his company had bud-
geted for a 6 per cent increase in passenger
throughput the number of passengers
arriving and departing through Freeport -
during 2006.
He added: "This year, we were a bit
optimistic and budgeted for a 6 per cent
increase to take us to just over one million


passengers for 2006."
Mr Newbold added that the Freeport
Container Port had "a lot of room for
growth and opportunity", having devel-
oped "a very comprehensive expansion
plan".
The potential Phase V North Beth
expansion would see an additional 450
metres of capacity and nine blocks stacking
area, while Phase Vi could lead to a further
340 metre expansion of the North Berth.
And Phase VII might see a 335 metre
Berth expansion and three blocks stacking
area. Another 600 metre area was also
available for expansion.
Completed
When completed, all this expansion
would give Freeport Container nine berths
- with total docking length of 2,749 metres
- 30 quay cranes, a 4.5 million TEU capac-
ity, and create employment for 650 work-
ers.
Mr Newbold said this did not include a
possible eighth Phase of expansion, which
would require dredging and land reclama-


tion at Billy Cay. At a cost of more than
$200 million, this could provide 1,219
metres in berth space and 12 quay cranes
on a 42-hectare site.
Only 1 per cent of the containers han-
dled by the Freeport Container Port were
destined for the Bahamian markets, with
the largest share some 44 per cent going
to South America, and another 32 per cent
going to Mexico and the US Gulf Coast.
Mr Newbold added that as part of the
Memorandum of Understanding signed
between the Bahamas and US on Decem-
ber 30, 2004, in relation to the Megaports
initiative, a mobile straddle designed to
detect illicit radioactive material concealed
in shipping containers was handed over to
the Freeport Container Port.
The straddle is due to become opera-
tional in February 2006, and can test up to
9,000 TEUs in 30 hours.
Mr Newbold said the straddle was part
of a plan to have the Container Port
become a pre-clearance facility for cargo
bound for the US, meaning it did not have
to be inspected again after going through
Freeport.


Freeport's Bond advantage not being exploited


FROM page 1B

Dupuch & Turnquest law firm, explained
that Port Authority licencees could import
duty free and store in a closed warehouse
all materials for use in their business oper-
ations.
Advantage
The advantage for businesses in Nassau
and other Family Islands of this arrange-
ment is that rather than having to make
heavy upfront duty payments on imports of
such equipment, they could instead bring


them into the Bahamas via Freeport.
This was not a way of evading tax pay-
ments, though, but instead enabled busi-
nesses to take out vehicles, materials and
goods for use when their operations on
other islands needed them. As a result,
duty payments were spread out and min-
imised, helping business cash flow.
Mr Gape said: "This is a terrific saving
and not something a lot of Nassau entre-
preneurs know and appreciate."
He added that written into the Heads
of Agreement for the Ginn Development
Company's $3.7 billion investment in
Grand Bahama's West End was a clause
allowing Port Authority licencees to take


their bonded vehicles, materials and tools
down to the project site.
General
Carey Leonard, the Grand Bahama Port
Authority's general counsel, said that when
licencees applied to the Customs Depart-
ment for a Bond number and Open Ware-
house Status, they also had to provide a
surety from a bank or insurance company.
This surety was usually in the range of $5-
$10,000.
Bondholders can import duty free items
for use in the operations of their business,
but these cannot be resold.


ACE MIANAGENIENT SERVICES LTD.

Wishes to inform the General Public that
effective 5th January 2006



is no longer employed with the
Company and accordingly is not authorized
to transact any business on behalf of the
Company or any of its clients.




i Queen's College
wa.. '.mw BEst. 1- 890 4W

AN IMMEDIATE VACANCY EXISTS FOR

A SCHOOL
BUS DRIVER/MESSENGER


The successful candidate should be:
In possession of a public service license/valid
driver's license
A multi-tasker
Team player
Extremely confidential
Minimum of two years experience in this capacity
or a similar capacity

Only Bahamians need apply.

The names and relevant contact information of at least
two professional references should also be listed.

Persons offered appointments will be expected to make
a commitment to work in harmony with Christian
principles and to support the emphases of the Bahamas
Conference of The Methodist Church of which the
school is a part.

Resumes and covering letters should be addressed to
THE PRINCIPAL, QUEEN'S COLLEGE P.O. Box
N 7127 or faxed to 242 393 3248.


Sfr ATERHOUSFPERS *
PJc4VA os pER5 i


INTERNAL AUDITOR

One of our clients is seeking to employ an Internal Auditor.

The successful applicant is expected to plan and execute audits in
accordance with accepted professional standards to determine compliance
with company policies and procedures and adherence to applicable laws
and regulations.

Primary Duties and Responsibilities

Develop detailed audit plans and programmes
Evaluate the adequacy and effectiveness of internal controls
Execute detailed audit procedures including reviewing transactions,
documents, financial records, policies and operating procedures
and prepare work papers documenting the audit procedures
performed
Evaluate strategies and develop recommendations
Prepare comprehensive written reports
Undertake follow-up to determine adequacy of corrective actions
Provide assistance to external auditors as requested

Qualifications and Experience

Bachelor's degree in accounting or related field and professional
certification (CPA, CA, ACCA, CFA)
Strong oral and written communication skills
Excellent computer skills
Five (5) years experience in a managerial position

Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Interested applicants meeting the above qualifications should submit
copies of relevant degrees and certification as well as a recent Police
Record and resume including the name, address and telephone contact
of three references to:

PricewaterhouseCoopers
Providence House
East Hill Street
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, Bahamas
Reference: Internal Auditor


BUSINESS








PAGEF 6B. MONDAY. JANUARY 30, 2006


I'nemployment in lorida hits 0-year low


"Copyrighted Material


- 4D


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


- a


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


AIR MOBILE CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 25th
day of January, 2006. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc.,
of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)







Eatma nKodllllak


is seeking an experienced
Retail Site Manager and
Assistant site Manager.
Qualified candidates will possess the following skills:
3 to 4 years souvenir imaging program
management experience in theme park /
entertainment venue.
Demonstrate proficiency in EPX program
operations and reporting skills
Familiarity with Kodak 6800 and 9810 dye
sublimation printers
Proficiency with Cannon and Nikon SLR cameras
Kodak EPX digital imaging systems
troubleshooting and level one service experience,
including printers digital cameras, touch screen
computers and strobes.
Must be available to work nights, weekends and
holidays
For consideration, please fax resumes to (407) 426-6919


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Legal Notice

NOTICE

MENARD ASSETS LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) MENARD ASSETS LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business.
Companies Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on 25th Januayr,
2006, when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Diodata Holdings Ltd.,
Wickhams Cay, P.O. Box 146; Road Town, Tortola, BVI.

Dated this 30th day of January, A.D. 2006.


Diodata Holdings Ltd.
Liquidator



Legal Notice

NOTICE

EAGLE CREST VENTURES LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) EAGLE CREST VENTURES LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on 26th January,
2006 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Paul Evans, Helvetia Court,
South Esplanade, St Peter Port, Guernsey, Channel Islands, GY1
4EE.

Dated this 30th day of January, A.D. 2006.

Paul Evans
Liquidator


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, ADAM BENOIT CULMER,
of Elizabeth Estates, P.O. Box EE-16714, Nassau, Bahamas,
intend to change my name to ADAM'BEN CAREY. If there
are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.





TAMEKO BANNISTER .











PROGRESSIVE SERVICE ORIENTED COMPANY
LOOKING FOR A
GENERAL MANAGER


Extensive background in managing an OEM Heavy
Truck Sales / Service / Parts facility a must.
Background and knowledge of truck
specification/application mandatory. Background in
Parts and Service management required on a daily
basis. Must be able to effectively administer all facits
of business. Minimum of 10 years experience preferred.
Good people skills a must. Must have prior experience
in parts order entry and supervising employees. ,
Computer skills required on daily basis. Must be self
motivated and work with little or no supervision.

Top wages
We thank all applicants, however, only candidates to
be interviewed will be contacted.
Please hand deliver resumes and references to:


Bahamas Mack Truck Sales Ltd.
Oakes Field
P.O. Box N-44
Nassau, Bahamas


THE TRIBUNE-
' ,-".' l '


Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa

Invites Application for the following position:

PROJECT MANAGER


> Applicant will be responsible for deploying and
supporting a wide range of hotel refurbishing staff

> Must have a strong architectural interior design
engineering background

> Must have good interpersonal and organizational skills
the ability to work as part of a large corporate team.

> Must be prepared to travel to offshore properties and
work weekends when required

Bachelor's Degree in one of the engineering technology
disciplines five years supervisory experience in construction
with emphasis on assessing finishes and refurbishing works.
Basic computer skills Microsoft Word, Excel and project
scheduling programs.

PROJECT MANAGER

MUST HAVE PROOF OF QUALIFICATIONS

EXPERIENCED CARPENTERS

Send resume to:

DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES
P.O. Box CB-13005
e-mail: CMajor@srb.sandals.com


I W I I II I ) W -, .. -


BUSINESS I


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ftm amm


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40
0% em














1/3 of young Bahamians




'have no qualifications'


FROM page 1B

The Living Conditions Sur-
vey found that while 68 per
cent of Bahamians aged
between 16-24 had completed
higi school, the other 32 per
cent "has no form of academic
qualification".
The report added: "Of the
reasons given for not attend-
ing,' and therefore not com-
pleting high school, non-health
related reasons figure promi-
nently.
'Nationwide 44 per cent 'do
not want to attend', a figure
that increases dramatically to
more than 85 per cent in Aba-


co, Andros and Eleuthera....."
These new findings pub-
lished by the IDB will gain gen-
erate concern among the
Bahamian private sector about
whether they will be able to
find qualified workers, and in
sufficient quantity, to help
maintain their company's com-
petitiveness.
While the 2001 Living Con-
ditions Survey found a strong
positive relationship between
the household head's level of
schooling and chances of escap-
ing poverty, "merely attaining
literacy and other basic skills
through primary schooling is
not enough to succeed eco-


nomically". The IDB report
added: "About 40 per cent of
poor households have com-
pleted some secondary school-
ing, implying either a low qual-
ity of education or a mismatch
between subjects currently
taught in secondary schools
and labour market demands.
"The focus of the project on
strengthening the link between
the supply of education and
training and the demand for
skills in the labour market thus
appears well-placed.
"This, in turn, is expected to
decrease the costs employers
currently bear in terms of
recruiting and training the


human resources required."
The IDB said the 2001 Liv-
ing Conditions Survey found
that 20 per cent of all Bahami-
ans aged between 16-24 were
"unattached", meaning they
were neither in school nor
employed. "The lack of acade-
mic qualifications" was "a
major factor contributing to
their detachment".
While almost 20 per cent of
all Bahamians aged 16-24 had
some tertiary education, only
4 per cent of those "unat-
tached" did. And while 90 per


cent of "unattached" had com-
pleted high school, some 53 per
cent had only a School Leaving
Certificate or no qualification.
The IDB report said that
while the Bahamas Technical
and Vocational Institute
(BTVI) provided entry-level
skills training for the trades,
the College of the Bahamas
had "practically eliminated" its
technical programmes at the
associate leyel. This meant
there was no technical training
in the Bahamas at the journey-
man or technician levels.


Part of the solution devel-
oped by the IDB for the pro-
gramme involves the public-
private partnership, involving
the creation of a secretariat at
the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce.
This secretariat will be
charged with mobilising busi-
ness and industry involvement
in education reform, designing
a structure to capture financial
contributions and recruit pri-
vate sector staff to assist as
trainers during an expansion
of BTVI programmes.


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
A PROUD MEMBER OF


AT B
Association of Tertiary
Institutions in the Bahamas

Joins in cordially inviting you
to
ATIB CONFERENCE 2006


Theme: "Academic Research & the College Community-
Informing National Development, Shaping National Identity."'
February 1-3, 2006
SuperClubs Breezes, Nassau, Bahamas

CONFERENCE AGENDA


SESSION ONE
7- 9 pm

Speaker:


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1
Opening Ceremony

Prof. Rex Nettleford, UWI
"Academic Research & The College Community -
Informing National Development, Shaping National
Identity"


Reception


SESSION TWO THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2
9:30 10:45 am Plenary Session
"Do We Value Academic Research?"
Speaker: Prof. Erroll Miller, UWI

Coffee Break
SESSION THREE Panel Discussion
11 12:15 pm "Types ofAcademic Research"
Speakers: Dr. Jane Gibson, NSU- "Research for Teaching
& Learning"
Dr. Dana Tesone, NSU "Research for Practice"
Dr. Kathleen Sealey, COB "Advancing the Discipline"

Workshop
"Accessing Research Funding"
Facilitator: Dr. Donald Cooper, BEST Commission

12:30 1:30 pm Lunch

SESSION FOUR Plenary Session
1:45 3 pm "Scientific Research, Politics & Industry"
Speaker: Dr. John Hammerton

SESSION FIVE Plenary Session
3:15 pm 4:00 pm "Informing National Development, Shaping National
Identity: What remains to be done, what you can do"
Speaker: Patricia Glinton-Meicholas, COB

SESSION SIX FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 3
9:30 10:30 Plenary Session
"After Research, What? Applying Research to Practice"
Speaker: Dr. Elliston Rahming, Bahamas Prisons Service

10:45 11:45 Panel Discussions
"Has Location Limited our Research?"
Speakers: Dr. Sebastian Peter, Bahamas Hospitals Authority
Mr. Dillon Bernard, UG

"Assuring Academic Integrity in Research"
Speakers: Dr. Jane Gibson, NSU
Dr. Earla Carey-Baines, COB
Dr. Dana Tesone, NSU

SESSION SEVEN Plenary Session
2 noon 1 pm "Who's Telling Our Story? The Who,
What & How ofResearch in the Caribbean"
Speaker: Dr. Gail Saunders, Dept. ofArchives


SESSION EIGHT Lunch & Closing
1 pm
End Of Conference




Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs


NOTICE

The public is asked to note that the deadline for applications
for entry to The College of The Bahamas in the Fall Semester
is February 3, 2006. The fee for applications submitted on
Sor before the deadline is forty dollars ($40.00). The fee for
late application (received after February 3 and no later than
February 10, 2006) is fifty dollars ($50.00). All payments
must,be made between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00
p.m. at the Business Office, Ground Floor, Portia M. Smith
Building, Oakes Field Campus, The College of the
Bahamas.

:It is important that applications be properly completed
and all supporting documents attached. Incomplete
applications will not be processed.

For more information, please call 302-4498/9.



Sisit our websile at www.cob.edu.bs .


WATER AND SEWERAGE CORPORATION
87 Thompson Boulevard
P.O. Box N-3905, Nassau, The Bahamas
"Striving to serve you with excellence"


SOLICITATION OF INSURANCE PROPOSALS

:The Water and Sewerage Corporation invited insurance companies and
-.brokers to submit proposals for insurance coverage for the year 2006/2009.

., TYPES OF COVERAGE REQUIRED:

Crime Protection
Marine Cargo
SMotor
;, Property
Publicity & Product Liability

,-A Comprehensive "insurance coverage terms of reference package" can be
, collected from the Corporation's head office at #87 Thompson Boulevard
on Friday, January 27th, 2006.

All proposals are to comply strictly with the written terms of reference, as
non-compliance can result in the rejection of a proposal.

SAll companies/Brokers are to confirm their intentions to submit a proposal
;; to the office of the Financial Controller, Ph 302-5507 on or before Friday,
February 3rd, 2006.

SSealed proposals are to be delivered to the following address on or before
4:00 pm on Friday, March 3rd, 2006.

GENERAL MANAGER
Water and Sewerage Corporation
Att:Financial Controller
P.0 Box N-3905
Nassau, Bahamas

All sealed submission are to be clearly labeled, "INSURANCE
PROPOSAL." The corporation reserves the right to reject all or any proposals;
it also reserves the right to award coverage in the most cost efficient way
to the corporation.


MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006,. PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE







THE1TRIS


PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006


MHE


SOLL EGE


Visit our website at wsm


BEUC


What is your goal?
/ PROMOTION
/ QUALITY SERVICE
SALARY INCREASE
/ NEW CAREER
/ CAREER ENHANCEMENT
we can provide you with superior education and training to
help you accomplish your goal.
Call for an interview today!
For your convenience, the majority of classes are held on Saturdays, Sam 12noon.
Are you preparing for a promotion, career change or career enhancement? The Professional Development Department can help you achieve
your career goal! A ivide array of courses and progranunes leading to certificate, certification and licensure are offered. You can become a pioneer
in setting performance standards in your organization. Success is at your finger tips. We have secured partnerships with leading international
institutions to help you accomplish your career goals. You can attain your professional development credentials at The College of The Bahamas.
Choose the courses or programme to help you accomplish your career goals...
Certified Professional Managers Programme
Certificate Programme For The Office Assistant
Certificate Programme In Learning Disabilities
A+ Computer Technician Certification
Certified Computer Operator (Microsoft Office Specialist- MOS)
Certificate In Law
Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Becker Conviser CPA Review
Certified Human Resource Managers Programme
Certificate Programme In Supervisory Management
Journeyman Plumbing License
Master Plumbing License
Certified Security Officer
Managerial Accounting For Non-Financial Managers
Ethics And Professional Responsibility
Writing & Research Skills
Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
No entrance exams. Tuition may be paid per term or in full. International programmes available.
CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL MANAGERS PROGRAMME
This programme is administered in conjunction with The Institute of Certified Professional Management at James Madison University,
Harrisonburg, Virginia. The CM Programme provides Supervisors, Managers, and Team Leaders with the fundamental knowledge needed
for today's management challenges. A comprehensive instructional scheme gives you the competence you need to meet high standards of
performance.
TERM 1 TERM 2
CPM 900 Personal Skills- $500 CPM 901 Administrative Skills- $700
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
TERM 3
CPM 902 Interpersonal Skills- $600
CPS 901 Accounts- $300
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
PREREQUISITE: 3 or more years as a Trainer, Supervisor or Manager with an Associate Degree or a B. A. Degree from an accredited or
recognized college/university; COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME FOR THE OFFICE ASSISTANT
With the advent of the high-tech office, the Clerks'/Office Assistants' role has evolved as one of the most important support factors in the
operational management process. In an effort to equip the support level staff to function efficiently in the work environment, CEES is pleased
to offer a proficiency programme in basic office skills.
TERM 1 TERM2
CPS 909 Business Communication, $300 CP l9i Professional Development Seminar- $100
WRS 900 Writing & Research Skills- $350 CPS 911 Records Management- $200
ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250
TERM 3
CPM903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
CPS 903 Office Technology- $500
CPS 910 Managing Physical Resources- $200
CPS 901 Accounts- $300
PREREQUISITE: 3 or more years experience in a clerical position and 3 BGCSE's- Grade C or above;
COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12pm Duration: 3 TERMS
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME IN LEARNING DISABILITIES
The Certificate in Learning Disabilities Programme is designed to equip teachers, with the skills necessary for working with diverse learners.
Participants are trained to use the basic techniques to identify students with learning disabilities; analyze and examine disabilities related to
language and communicative arts; and develop strategies that can be used with students who have been diagnosed as learning disabled. The
programme comprises six (6) courses:
TERM 1 TERM 2
SPED 900 Introduction To Learning Disabilities- $84 SPE 903 Strategies and interventions I- $168
SPED 901 Diagnosing Learning Disabilities- $168 SPED 904 Strategies and interventions II- $84
SPED 902 Individual Education Planning- $168 ETHC900 Ethics & Profess. Responsibility.- $250
TERM 3
SPED 905 Assessment- $178
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
PREREQUISITE: AA Degree with a Teacher's Certificate or a BA Degree;
COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring & Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
A+ COMPUTER TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATION
This programme of study is designed to equip students with the skills necessary to successfully sit the international A+ Microsoft Certification
Examination. Techniques to identify and rectify mechanical problems related to the personal computer are explored. It is a hands-on learning
experience with lab exercises that helps the student to apply theory to practice. -
TERM 1: COMP 954 Software- $510 TERM 2: COMP 955 Hardware
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet


Begins: Per Demand Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 2 TERMS
CERTIFIED COMPUTER OPERATOR (Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS)
This course of study is designed to train students how to master Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Access, Microsoft Outlook, and
PowerPoint. To help the student to develop navigation and design skills, the instructor provides easy to understand notes and conducts live
demonstrations on how to manipulate the entire MS Office Suite. Upon successful completion of the external international examinations, the
Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Certification is awarded. The programme comprises five Modules and two companion courses:
TERM 1 TERM 2
COMP 906 Microsoft Office Specialist- $610 ETHC900 Ethics & Professional Responsibility- $250
Microsoft Word, Microsoft Access CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
Microsoft Excel, Microsoft PowerPoint TERM 3
Microsoft Outlook COMP906 Microsoft Office Specialist- $610
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
CERTIFICATE IN LAW
This programme is offered in conjunction with The Institute of Legal Executives ilexX), Bedford, England.
ILEX qualification routes are vocationally relevant and designed to build and test legal knowledge and understanding at the paralegal level.
Designed to facilitate the training and educational needs of Legal Secretaries, Legal Clerks, Legal Office Managers, Law Enforcement Officers,
Special Assistants to Lawyers, Justice of The Peace, and all persons interested in acquiring an impressive array of legal office skills, the
Certificate in Law qualification is specifically relevant to The Bahamas legal system. Courses include:
TERM 1 TERM 2
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills -$350 ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250 LAW 900
The Legal Environment -$600.00 LAW 901 General Legal Principles-$600.00
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
TERM 3 (Options- choose one) -$600
NB. Options are subject to change.
LAW 903 Company Law LAW 906 Law of Mortgages
LAW 905 Employment Law LAW 908 Work of The Magistrate's Court
LAW 907 Nature and Role of Criminal Law
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
PREREQUISITE: AA Degree and 3 years work experience; COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am 12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
THE BECKER CPA REVIEW
The College of The Bahamas is pleased to offer the New CPA Computer Based Test (CBT). Besides the obvious transition from a pencil-and-
paper exam to a computer-based test, the revised CPA Exam will also contain a new content focus broadening the scope of audit and attest
areas and incorporating the assessment of critical skills, such as research and communication. The new exam also has increase emphasis on
general business knowledge and information technology.
CPA 900 Financial Reporting- $650 CPA 901 Accounting & Reporting/Regulation- $520
CPA 902 Law/Business Law- $465 CPA 903 Auditing/Auditing and Attestation- $465
Prerequisite: A BA Degree from an accredited or recognized college/university in any discipline with at least 21 credits hours in accounting.
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:30am 5:30pm Duration: 12 Weeks
CERTIFICATION IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Offered in conjunction with Columbia Southern University, Orange Beach, Alabama, this nine months programme is designed for those
individuals seeking professional development and aspiring to rise through the ranks in the HR field.
TERM 1 TERM 2
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250
HRM 900 Intro To HRM Environment- $200 HRM 902 H/R Development & Training-$200
HRM 901 Securing Human Resources- $200 HRM 903 Rewards Compensation and Benefits-$300
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
TERM 3
HRM904 Labour Management Relations- $300
HRM 905 Protecting and Evaluating Human Resources- $300
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210


RE FOR CONT


~pcii mpass it o pacu pahI-t ---iniL tJIU iuifuiaii rpqU1ihiU11u.e


Special emphasis will De place o plantmalagelllclt ulu iu nd Iciuan IspouIsiumuc.
TERM 3 TERM 2 (Optional)
'MPTMI 0 Master Plumbing- $950 CPM 903 fssional Development Seminar- $100
ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250 SUPV 900 Supervisory Management- $500
(SUPV900 is available for Plant/Plumbing Supervisors) -'i
PREREQUISITE: Students should have working knowledge and skills in the following areas: interpretation of codes, disposal and diaifage
systems, storm drainage disposal systems, installation of sanitary fixtures, basic drawings to scale, water supply and-distribution, use of
materials and tools, repairs and maintenance. '
Begins: Fall Day/Time: Tuesdays 6pm 9pm Duration: 1 TERM
MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING FOR NON-FINANCIAL MANAGERS ; ,
Thiscourse is designed to strengthen the candidates' understanding of managerial accounting. Managerial accounting concepts, principles
and functions are the main topics covered. The ability to prepare and accurately read a financial statement/spreadsheet is an essential skill
for all professionals and paraprofessionals; CPS901 covers in a very student friendly way, easy to understand examples that aid the students'
learning experience. This course also helps to prepare candidates to write external examinations.
CPS 901 Accounts- $300
PREREQUISITE: None
BEGINS: Per demand Day/Time: Sat/Thurs/Tue. 8am-12:15pm OR 6pm 9pm Duration: 10 Weeks/


ETHICS AND PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY .E-i :
This course examines guidelines for the professional behavior of members of any organisation. A select group of codes of ethics and ethics
cases will be exploded to support a theoretical and practical discourse on why the application of ethics and professional responsibility is
important in all aspects of society.
ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250 ,
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Intemet
Begins: Per demand Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12noon OR Thurs/Tue- 6pm 9pm Duration: 8 Weelks
WRITING & RESEARCH SKILLS "iT
This course is designed to provide mature students with reading, writing, research and critical thinking skills to prepare them for eptry
into CEES' professional development programmes. WRS 900 is also structured to provide certification candidates with the skills ne erary
to successfully write position and research papers. .
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills $350 .
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Per demand Day/Time: Sat.- gam-12noon or Thursday/Tue- 6pm 9pm Duration: 8 Weeks
INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS, WINDOWS & THE INTERNET i.T
This workshop provides a broad foundation for students so that they will have a greater awareness and confidence using personal computers.
Students will gain practical information and skills, such as what a computer is, how to manage personal files and folders that they crebi)
COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
PREREQUISITE: None .''lI
Begins: Summer, Spring & Fall Day/Time: Sat.- 8am-12noon Duration: 3 Weeks ndI:
APPLICANTS FOR INTERNATIONAL CERTIFICATION COURSES AND PROGRAMcES
All students applying for International Certification Courses and Programmes that are offered in conjunction with foreign institutionare
required to contact the CEES Office for information on external application and examination fees.
Telephone (242) 325-5714/328-0093/328-1936 Fax: (242) 322-2712

OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION
FEES .,r:
1. COB Registration.................................................. $40.00 (one-time fee) ,t .'
2. Insurance........................................... ........... $25.00 (valid for 1 year)
3. ID Card................................... ............................. $25.00 (one time fee)
4. Technology Fee................................... $75 f uV
5. Books................................... $ Please contact COB Bookstore for prices.
6. Awards Ceremony.................................................. $150.00 (must be paid by the 2n TERM) 3
7. External Application Fees..................................... Please check with the CEES Office for information. f
ESSENTIAL COMPUTER KNOWLEDGE: Effective Summer 2005, basic computer and Internet skills will be required of all stodfits.
Assessment for exemption from COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet will be done via proof of a certificate
from an authorized provider or by taking a prescribed computer skills test to verify competency in Windows and Computers. Studentsf Iing
the competency test will be required to take the Introduction To The Internet, Windows and Computers. This Workshop is a prereuste
for all programmes or single courses. l
Workshop Title: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet. ,il I
Tuition: $200 Duration: 2 Days : i I
Day: Saturdays: 12noon 3pm (5 contact hours per day) Offered: Spring, Summer and Fall
ADVISEMENT & REGISTRATION SESSIONS a W
Please bring the following items with you to the advisement/registration session:
The first four pages of your Passport
Copies of your certificates/licensures and college/university transcripts '
Where applicable, letters of recommendation, job description, special awards, etc.
OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION
1. No entrance examination is required for enrollment in professional development courses/programmes. i ,:'i
2. Tuition is charged per term; i.e. you will be billed only for courses offered in the current term.
3. Non-Bahamians add $50 to each course/workshop/seminar
4. Remember to obtain from the Programme Coordinator the correct ISBN Number for all required textboboks,
5. At the first class session, ALL students must submit to the Programme Coordinator one copy each ,....,-
of his/her stamped receipts representing payment for tuition, fees & books for the current term. .,I
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND RE-CERTIFICATION SEMINARS .
A compulsory professional development seminar is offered for all candidates enrolled in professional development programmes. Seminars
and workshops address important issues that are vital to the adult students' learning experience. Enrollment is also open to the general public.
This seminar is also designed to facilitate continuing education units for professionals applying for re-certification in their respective disciplines.
Students are required only to take ONE Professional Development Seminar. Effective Fall 2005, the Fee for the Professional Development
Seminar will be $210.
THE ANNUAL AWARDS CEREMONY "
The Annual Awards Ceremony.and reception is normally held at The British Colonial Hilton Hotel once during the TERM 3. Adult students
successfully completing programmes and courses are awarded certificates, certifications and/or licensure. '

Secure Your Seat By Enrolling Today!
Contact The Centre For Continuing Education On Moss Road Campus or o-
Call (242) 325-5714/328-0093/328-1936 Fax: (242) 322-2712
Fees May Be Paid By Cash, Credit Card, or Bank Certified Cheque To: The College of The Bahamas, Business Office
Cees Reserves The Right To Change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule And Course Materials '1


BUT


ACTIONN & EXTBESION SERVICES
PREREQUISITE: A BA Degree in any discipline from an accredited or recognized college/university or a minimum of 5 years as a manager,
supervisor or trainer; COMP956 Introduction To Cornputers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME IN SUPERVISORY MANAGEMENT
Supervisors with cutting edge skills know how to accomplish difficult tasks, solve complicated problems and master challenges in decision
making. This programme is aimed at supervisors and middle managers who wish to update their supervisory skills, or persons who hav b.en
promoted and wish to gain additional insight into the world of supervisory management. This programme entails essential training for pi'rsons .,i
wishing to become an associate manager.
TERM 1 TERM 2"'
CPM 90 Personal Skills- $500 SUPV900 Supervisory Management (SUPV I)- $500
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250 :-
CPS 901 Accounts- $300 CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100 'a
TERM 3
7P= 2 Interpersonal Skills- $600 i(
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210 G
PREREQUISITE: 3 or more years experience as a Supervisor/Manager or Trainer and an AA Degree in any discipline from a recogpi d
or accredited institution; COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Intemet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12pm Duration: 3 TERMS ,'
CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL SECRETARY REVIEW PROGRAMME
The Certified Professional Secretary (CPS) Review, offered in conjunction with The International Association ofAdministrative.Professioftals
(IAAP) is a 9 month course of study designed to prepare administrative professionals and clerical assistants to write the CPS intenirtinal
exam. 'r;t
TERM 1 TERM 2
CPS 901 Accounts- $300 CPS 906 Human Resources- $300 .. 3
CPS 909 Business Communication- $300 CPS 911 Records Management- $200 4i1T
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100 :"fTi.s
TERM 3 OPTIONAL COURSES
CPS 903 Office Technology- $500 WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 (Spring) CPS9O10
Managing Physical Resources- $200 ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250 (Summen)! I
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
PREREQUISITE: 4 yrs. Experience or an AA Degree+3 Yrs. Experience or a B. A. Degree and 0 Experience; i; l
COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet iuo
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-lpm Duration: 3 TERMS ..., .i
JOURNEYMAN PLUMBING LICENSE
The Journeyman Plumbing course is designed to assist students preparing to write the Journeyman Plumbing Examination. Topic' incjcs: I
interpretation of codes, disposal and drainage systems, storm drainage disposal systems, installation of sanitary fixtures, basic dra ing 1to
scale, water supply and distribution, use of materials and tools, repairs and maintenance. The examination is offered in'conjunction.with[The
Ministry of Public Works. At the end of the course, candidates are required to take one (1) Professional Development Se!icar.
TERM1 TERM 2 Optional) ... ,.,;i ,i
JPEM~ Journeyman Plumbing- $800 SUPV 900 Supervisory Management- $500
ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250 (SUPV900 is available for Plant/Plumbing Supervisprs)
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- i I00
PREREQUISITE: Students should have working knowledge and skills in the following areas: interpretation of codes, disposal and diramge
systems, storm drainage disposal systems, installation of sanitary fixtures, basic drawings to scale, water supply and distribution, use of
materials and tools, repairs and maintenance. '
Begins: Fall Day/Time: Tuesdays 6pm 9pm Duration: 2 TERMS r 'O Iu)
MASTER PLUMBING LICENSE "
The Master Plumbing course is designed to assist students preparing to write the Master Plumbing Examination. Studentssliould haveabbve
average knowledge and skills in the following areas: interpretation of codes, disposal and drainage systems, storm drainage disposal systems,
installation of sanitary fixtures, basic drawings to scale, water supply and distribution, use of materials and tools, repairs and maintenfice. .


!









maSINESS MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006, PAGE 9B
iois1NEss


cwk.edu.bs


ED URAi


Ce


Computer Offerings Spring 2006

,~dMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
"Cirse Description: This course is for the beginner who knows very little about computers and does not understand how it works. This
course covers the major computer concepts with extensive hands on practice of various software using: (I) Microsoft Office Word
Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft Access Database Management.


Pre-requisite:None
Begins:Monday, 13 February 2006
Saturday, 11 February 2006
Mon. and Wed., 13 Feb., 2006
Duration: 12 weeks


6:00pm -9:00pm
10:00am 1:00pm
4:00pm -5:30pm
Venue:CEES Computer Lab


Section 01 (CEES)
Section 02 (CEES)
Section 03 (CEES)
Tuition: $450.00


Ei6P UTER APPLICATIONS II
Course Description:This course covers the major advanced concepts with extensive hands on practice of various software using: (I)
Microsoft Office Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft Access Database Management.


,l Prearequisite:Computer Applications 1
i:iBins:Thursday, 16 February 2006
Venue:CEES Computer Lab


Time:6:00pm 9:00pm
Fees: $550.00


Duration: 2 weeks


EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It focuses on developing
effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.


I Pifrequisite:None
Duration:l day


Begins:Thursday, 2 March 2006 Time: 9:30am 4:30pm
Venue:CEES Computer Lab Fees: $160.00


INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY I
Course Description: This course covers basic concepts of Information Technology. The course provides training in the following areas;
Basic Hardware Proficiency, Application Features Proficiency, Operating System Proficiency, Internet and Email Proficiency.
Prq-requisiteiNone Begins: Wednesday, 15 February 2006 Time: 6:00pm 9:00pm
' burtlion 12 weeks' Venue:CEES Computer Lab Fees:$450.00
G'I ti RADE AND REPAIR
C'itre D6iDi'iption!ihis course is a hands-on introduction to technology systems for use in information environments. The course will
cover the f6llowing.t9pics: Basic Hardware, Operating Systems, Troubleshooting and Repairs.
,PT-req'iisite:one 'Begins:Tuesday, 14 February 2006
"Time:6:00pm 7:30pm Tuesdays and Thursdays
"I5Ditatioh:12 weeks Venue: BHTC Computer Lab Fees: $500.00
QUICKBOOKS
Course Description:This course is designed to train new and existing small business entrepreneurs (less that 20 employees) how to organize
and manage their accounting activities using QuickBqoks Pro software. Students will learn how to set-up their company files, chart of
: ,aeguoQtsi:budget,.customers., vendors and employees.
,.,er-reqti~site;)oe. ne Begins: Tuesday, 28 February 2006 Time:6:00pm 9:00pm


Duration: 6 weeks


Venue: CEES Computer Lab


Fees: $330.00


UPGRADE REPAIR AND TROUBLESHOOT YOUR PC WORKSHOP
This workshop is a hands-on introduction to upgrade repair and troubleshooting your personal computer. Topics covered are basic hardware,
:..operating systems, troubleshooting and repairs.
Pre-requisite:None Begins: Thursday, 9 March 2006 Time:9:30am -4:30pm
Duration:l day .. Venue: CEES Computer Lab Fees:$250.00
WEBPAGE DE$SIGN WORKSHOP. ., ', .. .....,, ,,... 0 .,,
.:Course Description:Thiscourse, which targets personswho would like to .eaicj ilri preilc.r.-l .ieb przi ;ii cover Web page creation,
I: iW~, site.management, and HTML. Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web
pages.
Pre-requisite:Participants must be computer literate and have a basic knowledge of word-processing
Begins:Thursday, 2 March 2006 Time:9:30am 4:30pm Duration: 2 days
Venue:CEES Computer Lab Fees:$550.00 .

E.,AEALTH AND FITNESS COURSE OFFERINGS
' PASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I
This is an introductory course for learning basic techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major topic ,.IlJ II I m ludc
Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniques, Wellness Education (Psychological and Physiological Benefits), ldiii: i- in- d d
Coptraindications, Serving Special Populations and Complementary Bodywork Systems to include Aromatherap: E,.'i,.i. ,
Statiing:Monday; February 27, 2006 Time:6:00o9:00pm Duration:l0 i ce-l.
Tuition Fee: $465.00 Venue: The College of the-Bahamas
..iASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS II
1fhis is an advance course for learning techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major topics include introduction to
hydrotherapy; spa and body treatments; the basic facial; aromatherapy-fundamentals or essential oils; relaxation and meditative methods;
and hot stone therapy.


Starting:Thursday, February 23, 2006
Tuition Fee:$620.00
GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR


Time: 6:00-9:00pm
Venue:The College of the Bahamas


Duration:10 Weeks


This is an introductory course in teaching group fitness instruction. Major topics of discussion will include basic anatomy and physiology;
choreography and cueing; the five components of fitness, nutrition, basic exercise testing and how to teach group exercise.


?Wgrting: Thursday, February 23, 2006
'";Tdilion Fee:$400.00


Time: 6:00-9:00pm
Venue:TBA


Duration: 10 Weeks


PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOPS
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior customer service. It focuses on
customer value, retention and relationship building and employee motivation.
Date:Thursday, 23 February 2006 Time:9:30am -4:30pm
Venue:Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre Tuition:$170.00
EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS.
This workshops designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It focuses on developing
.Affitive and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.
' e:"i Thursday, 2 March 2006 Time:9:30am 4:30pm Venue:CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
l tion:$160.00
HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP
This two-day workshop is designed to equip managers and leaders in organizations and enhance the skills of current Human Resource
professionals with the theory, tools and techniques required for effective human resource management practices in today's workplace.


Date:Thursday & Friday, 2nd -3rd March, 2006
Venue:Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre


Time:9:30am 4:30pm
Tuition:$350.00


UPGRADE REPAIR AND TROUBLESHOOT YOUR PC
This workshop is a hands-on introduction to upgrade repair and troubleshooting your pers-.al computer. Topics covered are basic hardware,
operating systems, troubleshooting and repairs.


Date:Thursday, 9th March, 2006
Tuition:$250


Time:9:30am 4:30pm


Venue:CEES Computer Lab


WEB PAGE DESIGN
This course will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy fiddling with computers and would
like to create their own web pages are encouraged to attend. Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and
Tables and hosting pf web pages.


' Die Thur-di:, & Friday 2nd 3rd March, 2006
". T m .,n-'S Ci fii


Time:9:30am 4:30pm


Venue:CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road


. PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
The following Personal Development courses have been approved by the Academic Board for COB credit courses equivalencies.
ACCA900 Accounting for Beginner I
ACCA901 Accounting for Beginners II
MGMT 900 -Human Resource Management I
MGMT901- Human Resource Management II
SPA 900- Conversational Spanish I
SPA 901 Conversational Spanish II
Students may continue to utilize the courses as a means of professional development in both private and public sectors with the added
recognition that these courses have been equated to courses taken toward a degree programme.


TIME


-T- -- miw MAW I O'rA=-rI Mai Ico


SEC COURSE DESCRIPTION


ACCT -
ACCA900 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS I 6:00-8:00pm Mon/Wed 13-Feb 10 weeks $250
ACCA901 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II 6:00-8:00pm M/Wed 13-Feb 10 weeks $275
ACCA902 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS III 6:00-8:00pm Tue/Thur 14-Feb 10 weeks $300
B U S .............................................
BUSI900 01 CREDIT & COLLECTIONS I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 8 Weeks $225
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER 1 Day $170
CUST900 01 SERVICE W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thur 23-Feb
BUS1904 01 INTRODUCTION TO BUS. I 6;00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
COMP
COMP901 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 6:00-9:00pm Mori 13-Feb 12 Weeks $450
COMP901 02 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 10am-1:00pm Sat 11-Feb 12 Weeks $450
COMP901 03 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 4:00-5:30pm Mon/Wed 13-Feb 12 Weeks $450
COMP902 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II 6:00-9:00pm Thur 1'6-Feb 12 Weeks $550
COMP903 01 INFORMATION TECH. I 6:00-9:00pm Wed 15-Feb 12 Weeks $450
COMP 941 01 QUICKBOOKS 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 6 weeks $330
SCOMP953 01 PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR 6:00-7:30pm Tue/Thur 14-Feb 12Weeks $450
EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT 1 Day $160
COMP960 01 W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thur 2-Mar
WEB PAGE DESIGN 2 Days $550
COMP930 01 WORKSHOP 9:30am-4:30pm Thur/Fri 2-Mar
Upgrade Repair and 1 Day $250
COMP923 01 Troubleshoot Your PC W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thur 9 Mar
COSM
COSM802 01 MAKE-UP APPLICATION 6:00-9:00pm Mon 27-Feb 8 Weeks $225
COSM804 01 MANICURE & PEDICURE 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 8 Weeks $225
COSM807 01 NAIL ART TECHNICIAN 6:00-9:00pm Morn/Thur 27-Feb 5 weeks $500
SDECOR ......
DECO800 01 INTERIOR DECORATING I 6:00-9:00pm Wed 22-Feb 8 weeks $225
SDECO801 01 INTERIOR DECORATING II 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 8 weeks $250
FLOR800 01 FLORAL DESIGN I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
FLOR801 01 FLORAL DESIGN II 6:00-9:00pm Mon 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
FLOR802 01 FLORAL DESIGN I1I 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb 10 weeks $275
ENGLISH_
ENG 900 01 EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 8 Weeks $225
ESL 900 01 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANG 6:00-9:00pm Mor/Fi 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
HEALTH &
FITNESS
MASSAGE THERAPY $465
MASG900 01 ESSENTIALS I 6:00-9:00pm Mon 27-Feb 10 weeks
MASSAGE THERAPY $620
MASG901 01 ESSENTIALS II 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb 10 weeks
GROUP FITNESS $400
HLTH800 01 INSTRUCTOR 6:00-9:00PM Thur 23Feb 10 Weeks 0
LANG
CRE 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE I 6:00-7:30pm Tue/Thur 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
CRE 901 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE II 6:00-7:30pm Mon/Wed 27-Feb 10 weeks $250 .
SPA 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I 6:00-7:30pm Tue/Thur 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
I SPA 901 01 CONV. SPANISH II -- 6:00-7:30pm Mon/Thur 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
FRE 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I 6:00-7:30PM Mon/Wed 27 Feb 10 Weeks $225
MGMT._
HUMAN RESOURCE $250
MGMT900 01 MANAGEMENT I 6:00-9:00pm Thur 16-Feb 12 Weeks
HUMAN RESOURCE 12 Weeks $300
MGMT901 01 MANAGEMENT II 6:00-9:00pm Mon 13-Feb
-. 1 HUMAN RESOURCE'.. 2 Days $350
Mrr1T9u' I 01 I..1ANAGIEMENT W SV 3,,am-4 30prr. ThuriFn 2-Mar
MEDICAL
_MEDT.900 01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb 10 weeks $225
SEWING
BASIC OF FREEHAND 10 weeks $225
SEW 800 01 CUTTING I 6:00-9:00pm Mon 27-Feb
BASIC OF FREEHAND 10 weeks $250
SEW 802 01 CUTTING II . 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb __
SSEW 805 01 DRAPERY MAKING I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
I SEW 806 01 DRAPERY MAKING II 6:00-9:00pm Wed 22-Feb 10 weeks $250
SEW 811 i01 UPHOLSTERY MAKING I 6:00-9:00pm Wed 22-Feb 10 weeks $225


ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordiiatoir at Tel: (242) 325-5714 7(242) 328-0093/ 328-1936 or e-mail All
fees iare included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time) When submitting
apflicition, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to change
Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials

Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute

INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT

CULINARY COURSES
COURSE CODE BEGINS DUV DAYS TIME TUITION & FEE RE SOURCE V.r. ax. Ela
(ADDITIONAL MATERIAIl
I40 APP F.5 OR
F.W STmlE,"-s, _____________ _______
1. Bahamian Cuisine COOK 800 February 2 6 weeks ThurS. b:00-9:Opmi $225.00 $10-$12 per week SHTS Main 15
Kitchen
2. Gourmet Cooking I COOK 823 Januanv 30 6 \eeks Mon. 6:0)0-:00pni $200.00 $20 per week SHTS Main 15
Kitchen
3. Gourmne Cooking II COOK 824 Januan 30 6 weeks Mon. 6:00-9:00pn $225.00 $20 per week SHTS Main 15
I 1 IKitchen
4. Cake & Pstry Making I COOK 813 January' 3 10 weeks 'ues. 6:00-9:00pm $225.00 $10 -$15 per week SHTS Larder 15
Kitchen
5. Cake & P.try MakingII COOK 814 Jamnuv 31 Il weeks Tues. 6:00-9:00pin $250.00 $10- SIS per week SHTSPanry 15
Kitchen
6. Bread Making COOK 810 February 2 6 weeks Thurs. :00-9:00pmn $200.00 SS $10 per week SHTS Larder 15
Kitchen
7 Cake Deconiring I (OOK 817 February I t0 weeks Wed. 6:00-9:00pm $225.00 $10 $15 perwek SHITS larder 15
Kitchen
8 Cake Decoration II COOK 818 Feral)ar I I0 weekss Wed. O6:00-:00pm $225.00 $S10-$15 per e Seek SHTS Paslr IS
I _______Kitchen

For further information please contact the Industry Training Department of the Culinary & Hospital Management
Institute at 323-5804, 323-6804 or fax 325-8175




-stlbT oll


N7
WHEEI LOCK
1 1I


KENT SLATE
Colle lc' & .;Grattu.tc
St hool of l'dulatinr


TOWN MEETING

A Meeting for Prospective Applicants
to
Master's Degree Programmes
in
Early Childhood and Elementary Teaching
School Counselling
Special Education and Educational
Administration
offered by
The College of The Bahamas
in collaboration with
Wheelock College and Kent State University

Saturday, February 4, 2006
10:00 am

Michael Eldon Complex, Thompson Blvd.
Lecture Theatre, 4th Floor


BOOKSTORE


S Announces ~



GSM Rockit

Prepaid Phone Cards

Are now available at the

Ticket Xpress Kiosk

In the Bookstore!



So do not go

without minutes anymore!


11!~1~1OE 311~II


COURSE


UUn


IARnI


e*'.







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006


BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK
SS Cable Beach, West Bay Street, P.O. Box N-3034
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 327-5780/327-5793-6
Fax: (242) 327-5047, 327-1258
www.bahamasdevelopmentbank.com



NEW PROVIDENCE

1. Lot #13 (5,000 sq. ft.) with duplex (1,344 sq. ft.) white trim lime green Bancroft Lane
Bamboo Town (Appraised Value $147,000.00)

2. Vacant lot #1038 (6,000 sq. ft.) Orange Blossom Avenue, Garden Hills #3. (Appraised
Value $35,000.00)
3. Lot #171 (100'x100') with two story building East Street opposite Deveaux Street.
(Appraised Value $300,000.00)
4. Lot #27A (55'x90') with incomplete split level house Bostwain Hill or Bosun Hill
(Appraised Value $139,580.00)
5. Vacant Lot (18,644 sq. ft.) Situated on the western end of Carmichael Road about 250
feet east of Unison Road. (Appraised Value $95,000.00)

6. Lot #210 (7,225 sq. ft.) with house and Efficiency Apartment Unit Yamacraw Beach
Estates Drive pass the Fox Hill Prison turn left onto Yamacraw Hill Road, take first corner
on the right Yamacraw Beach Drive then the fourth corner on the right Current Road then
thrid corner on the left, corner property with house and efficiency #18. (Appraised Value
$214,905.00)

7. Lot #39, BIk #35 (2,500 sq. ft.) with wooden House #64 Lincoln Boulevard, Englerstone
Subdivision. (Appraised Value $52,000.00)
ANDROS

8. Property (4,344 sq. ft.) with duplex (1,174 sq. ft.) in the settlement of Fresh Creek, Central
Andros (Appraised Value $73, 258.00)

9. Vacant property 100' x 150' in the settlement of Pinders, Mangrove Cay, South Andros.
(Appraised Value $22,500.00)
GRAND BAHAMA

10. Lot #9 with house 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom and an incomplete split level extension
west Pinedale Road, Pinedale EMR Freeport, Grand Bahama (Appraised Value $90,000.00)

ABACO

11. Lot #54 (6,500 sq. ft.) with triplex foundation in Murphy Town, Abaco (Appraised Value
$29,916.00)
12. Vacant Lot #58 100' x 100' at the junction of Queens and Clinic Streets, Sandy Point,
Abaco. (Appraised Value $30,000.00)
ELEUTHERA

13. Property 31' x 111' with house Lord Street in the settlement of Tarpum Bay, Eleutheral
(Appraised Value $45,000.00)
14. Property 70' x 80' with shop and two storey dwelling home Fish Street, Rock Sound,
Exuma. (Appraised Value $70,000.00)
CAT ISLAND
15. Property 151'x145'x150'x123' with Hardware Buildinrg (3,640 sq. ft.) situated 0.4 miles,
south of The Bight Airport, New Bight;,'at Island. (Appraised Value $192,000.00).

16. Property with twelve (12) room motel 1.39acres -"In the settlement of Arthur's Town,!'
Cat Island. (Appraised Value $1.3 Million Dollars)
EXUMA
17. Lot #134 (4,350 sq. ft.) with two story building 4,160 sq. ft., apartment upstairs and
shop downstairs, George Town, Exuma (Appraised Value $468,000.00)

INAGUA
15. Lot #43 (9,000 sq. ft.) with house Matthew Town, Inagua, Russell Street (Appraised
Value $120,000.00)

Electronic Equipment
* (1) Compaq Presario Computer Monitor & Tower
* (1) Whirl Microwave
* Tec Cash Register


Cart


S Hot Dog Cart with Umbrella


Tents


(1) Canopy Tent (Plastic)


Tables

(1) Wood Table (Round)
(1) Marble Table (Rectangle)


Machinery

(1) Food Mixer
(1) Wall TV Stand
(1) Chrome Juice Filter
(1) Multi Fruit Juicer
(1) 200 Gallon Water Tank (Black)
(1) Chrome Mixer

Vessels

24' (2002) Chris Craft w/engine
29' (1983) Vessel (Lady Rece)
28' Vessel
45' (1985) Vesesl (Deborah)
29' (1992) Vessel (Liminos)
29' Phoenix w/engines (Jannette2)


Coolers/Freezers

(1) Two Door Chest Freezer
(1) One Door Chest Freezer
(1) Blue Coleman Cooler
(2) Double Door Coolers


Vehicles

(1) 2003 Yumbo 125cc Motorcycle
(1) 1996 Ford Explorer
(1) 1997 Dodge Stratus
(1) 1999 GMC Truck
(1) 2000 Toyota HI-Ace Bus
(1) 2004 Lincoln Town Car


Serious inquiries only. Sealed bids marked "Tender" should be submitted to:
Bahamas Development Bank
P.O. Box N-3034, Nassau, Bahamas or telephone 327-5780
for additional information
Please note that all bids on the aforementioned properties and assets should be
received by February 3rd, 2006.
The Bahamas Development Bank reserves the right to reject any or all offers.


Demand for



payment served



on Royal Oasis

FROM page 1B


in the timeframe given, then
Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany and its attorneys are like-
ly to appear before the
Supreme Court and petition
for Driftwood (Freeport), the
resort's main holding compa-
ny,, to be wound-up and a
receiver/liquidator appointed.
The development adds
another twist to the fate of the
Royal Oasis, which has been
closed after being heavily dam-
aged during Hurricane Frances
in September 2004. It could
add to the pressure on the US-
based owners to resolve the
resort's fate through a speedy
sale.
Lehman Brothers' private
equity arm, the de facto owner
of the Royal Oasis by virtue of
the mortgage it held on the
property the security for loans
advanced to Driftwood
(Freeport) has been attempt-
ing to sell the resort, and it is
unclear whether this process
may be impacted by the
demand for payment.
At least two interested par-
ties were said to be talking to
Lehman Brothers about a pos-
sible purchase of the Royal


Oasis.
The demand for payment
stems from an earlier Supreme
Court action initiated by
Lehman Brothers, which
sought to get electricity to the
Royal Oasis switched back on
after Grand Bahama Power
Company cut the supply last
October over an alleged
$500,000 unpaid bill it was
owed.
The two parties had been
unable to settle their differ-
ences, either by a payment of
the full amount owed or agree-
ment over a payments sched-
ule.
Lehman Brothers had initi-
ated the action because it was
concerned that the loss of elec-
tricity supply could cause the
resort's condition to deterio-
rate, making it unattractive to a
buyer and preventing it from
realising the sales price it was
seeking.
The private equity firm'
alleged that as mortgagee, it
was not obligated to pay Drift-
wood (Freeport's) debts, and
was seeking a Supreme Court
declaration that Grand
Bahama Power Company had
a public duty to supply elec-


tricity under the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement and the Out
Islands Electricity Act.
However, The Tribune
understands the Grand
Bahama Power Company
counter-attacked by alleging
that Lehman Brothers and
Driftwood were effectively one
and the same, as the former
holds a substantial stake in the
latter.
Lehman Brothers has been
seeking to recover the $25 mil'-
lion it loaned to Driftwood
(Freeport) for the original put-
chase, plus the $70 million in
additional loans advanced to
upgrade the property.
However, the resort's trou-
bled history and lack of beacli-
front have meant that buyers
have been unwilling to match
the asking price.
An additional complicating
factor has been the insurance
claim settlement from the 2004
hurricane season, which has
been bound up in litigation ii
the US courts. This was recent-
ly said to be close to a resolu-
tion, and any collection by the
Royal Oasis resort's owners
could result in a reduction: in
asking price.


'~


GRAPHIC ARTIST,


EE


ED


The Tribune is growing and looking for an experienced
individual to work full time as a Graphic Artist.

The individual must be computer literate and
knowledgeable in InDesign, Freehand, QuarkExpress
and Photoshop.


Interested persons
can send their
resumes in at
The Tribune
between the hours
of 9am 5pm
or fax: 328-2398


BUSINESS


--


c-







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MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006, PAGE 11B


.on clubs


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Port Authority turns down 'one


application in seven year-period'


FROM page 2B

and regulating commercial activity within the
230 square mile Port Authority area lies with the
GBPA.
Fred Smith, an attorney and partner with Cal-
lenders & Co, said GBPA licencees did not have
to apply for approvals and permits from any
government department.


"In Freeport, you don't have red tape, you
have the red carpet," Mr Smith said.
He added that Freeport was the ideal loca-
tion "if'you want to do business in an environ-
ment that is regulated with a very light touch".
The licensing process was quick and simple,
and Mr Smith said licencees were able to enjoy
exemptions from business licence fees and real
property taxes until 2015, and from customs
duty until 2054.


Science (Physics, Biology) Art, History, Mathematics, Home Economics, Accounts.
Physical Education. Guidance Counsellor, Modem Languages. English Language.
English Literature, Information Technology


CRITERIA FOR EMPLOYMENT
* .A mininium of a Bachelors Degree hum a
recognized university confirmed by a
certified copy of certificate
* A post graduate certificate in education or a
teaching certificate confirmed by a certified
cop.' of certificate
* IJamiEs and contact information of at least
t'o professional references must be subrru-
ted
* W\Vldngness to support the school's Accel-
erated Programme. including teaching
advanced courses such as Advanced Place-
ment and Advanced Subsidiary. Experience
in teaching advanced courses is preferred.
* Successful apphcants will be expected to
make a commitment to work in harmony
with Christian principles and to support the
emphases of the Bahamas Conference of
The Methodist Church of which the school
is a part


QUEEN'S COLLEGE ...
* I the oldest pri'.:at.r scihoi l m Th'i
Bahamas
* Ensures a seamless ccinitmitv ol education
and a strong sense of courm1uut
* Offers a rich cu riculum
* Is staffed by a talented and dedicated
teacliiiig staff
* Is a place where exce.Ullne is respettcd
and pursued. l her,- te.ichllng andil 1'.-r ng
ar e unno\ ant c and *,vh.re, carmg for others
is mi rinsic
* Offers a competritie benefits package.
including gratutuv pnciotn. health
insurance. disc.iunt on children s rullto

* Queen s College w s -siabbhsh lid in Nassau
m 1i99 b,' Th t.lethodist Church and is a
member of The internatonld A.socia ,tLn of
Methochr t 3 rhooi. oill-gk and rl imnUati.s
(IAMSCU',


Application forms are available from the Human Re-
sources Office at the school or may be downloaded
from our website vYr.w '.h.ncefo'th rom
The'completed application together with a covenng .
letter, a statement of educational philosophy and a
recent photograph must be sent to: The Principal
Queen's College
P.O. Box N7127
Nassau, Bahamas
Or fax to. 242-393-3248, or email to
dlynch@qchenceforth.com and should
arrive no later than February 1, 2006. Candidates
short listed will be contacted by telephone, fam or
email for an interview.

I.^^^^M~i~u^TF^MS


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
BETWEEN
GULF STREAM LUMBER COMPANY
Plaintiff
AND


2005/CLE/genfoollO


JOHN WILLIAM LEFLER
Defendant


ELIZABETH THE SECOND, by the Grace of God, Queen of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas and of
Her other Realms and Territories, Head of the Commonwealth.
To: The Defendant
John William Lefler
Love Beach
S West Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas
WE COMMAND YOU that within fourteen days after the service upon you of this Writ on you, inclusive
of the day of such service, you do cause an appearance to be entered for you in an action at the suit of Gulf
Stream Lumber Company of 1415 South Federal Highway, Boynton Beach, Florida 33425-0160, U.S.A.
Whose address for service is c/o their attorneys, Messrs Gibson and Company, G.K. Symonette Building,
Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas.
And take notice that in default of your so doing the Plaintiff may proceed therein, and judgment may be given
in your absence.
Witness, the Honorable Sir Burton Hall Our Chief Justice of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas the 31st
day of January in the year of Our Lord Two Thousand and Five.
REGISTRAR
N.B. This Writ is to be served within twelve calendar months from the date hereof, or, if renewed,
within twelve calendar months from the date of the last renewal, including the day of such date, and
not afterwards.
The Defendant may appear hereto by entering an appearance either personally or by Attorney at the
Registry of the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau, in the Island of New Providence, of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas. A Defendant appearing personally may, if he desire, enter his
appearance by post.
If the Defendant enters an appearance he must also deliver a defence to the Attorney of the Plaintiff
within fourteen days from the last day of the time limited for appearance, unless such time is extended
by the Court or a judge; otherwise judgment may be entered against him without notice, unless he has
in the meantime been served with a summons for judgment.
ENDORSEMENT OF CLAIM
The Plaintiff's claim against the Defendant is for:
1. A declaration that the Plaintiff is entitled to have the corporate veil lifted in respect of
Nassau Construction Company Limited, a company incorporated under the laws of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
2. A declaration that the Defendant is the alter ego of Nassau Construction Company Limited.
3. An Order that the Defendant do pay to the Plaintiff all amounts due pursuant to the
Judgment entered against Nassau Construction Company in favour of the Plaintiff in
Supreme Court Action No. 1902 of 2002.
4. Costs.
5. Such further or other relief as this Honourable Court deems just.
DATED the 31st day of January A.D., 2005.
GIBSON & COMPANY
Chambers
G.K. Symonette Building
Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Plaintiff

And the sum of B$ (or such sum as may be allowed on taxation) for costs and also in case the Plaintiff
obtains an order for substituted service the further sum of B$ (or such sum as may be allowed on
taxation). If the amount claimed be paid to the Plaintiff or his Attorney within fourteen days from the service
thereof further proceedings will be stayed.
Provided that if it appears from the endorsement of the writ that the Plaintiff is resident outside the Scheduled
Territories as defined by the Exchange Control Act 1947, or is acting by order or on behalf of a person so
resident, proceedings will only be stayed if the amount claimed is paid into Court within the said time and
notice of such payment in is given to the Plaintiff or His/Her Attorney. This writ is issued by GIBSON &
COMPANY whose address for service is their Chambers situate at the G.K. SYMONETTE BLDG., SHIRLEY
STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, Attorneys for the said Plaintiff.
ENDORSEMENT OF SERVICE

This Writ was served by me................................
at....................................... ........ .....
on the Defendant JOHN WILLIAM LEFLER on..............the.............day of................2005.
Datedthis...........day of ....i......b.,25. -.

...................................................
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
BETWEEN


GULF STREAM LUMBER COMPANY

AND

JOHN WILLIAM LEFLER

WRIT OF SUMMONS


2005/CLE/gen/00110


Plaintiff


Defendant


GIBSON & COMPANY
Chambers
G.K. Symonette Building
Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Plaintiff


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
BETWEEN
GULF STREAM LUMBER COMPANY
AND

JOHN WILLIAM LEFLER


2005/CLE/gen/00110



Plaintiff


Defendant


ORDER

BEFORE: The Deputy Registrar Mr. Ernie Wallace
DATED: The 18th day of January A.D., 2006
UPON THE APPLICATION of the Plaintiff by Ex-Parte Summons filed herein on the 9th December 2005
AND UPON READING the Affidavit of Nicole Ramkellawan-Watkins filed herein on the 9th December
2005 ... .
AND UPON HEARING Miss. Wanda S. Dean of Messrs. Gibson & Company of Counsel for the Plaintiff.
IT IS HEREBY ORDERED that:
1. The Plaintiff be granted leave to effect substituted service of the Writ of Summons herein by serving
the same at the registered office of Nassau Industrial Group Ltd., H&J Corporate Services, and by
advertisement twice in a daily newspaper of wide circulation.
2. The costs of this application be costs in the cause.

BY ORDER OF THE COURT
REGISTRAR
This Order was drawn by Messrs. Gibson & Company, Chambers, G.K. Symonette Building, Shirley
Street, Nassau, Bahamas, Attorneys for the Plaintiff.
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
BETWEEN


GULF STREAM LUMBER COMPANY
AND

JOHN WILLIAM LEFLER


2005/CLE/gen/00110


Plaintiff


Defendant


ORDER
GIBSON & COMPANY
Chambers
G.K. Symonette Building
Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas


Attorneys for the Plaintiff


THE TRIBUNE


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MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006, PAGE 13B


JANUARY 30. 2006


9:00 9:30


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(5:45) THE DAY The Sopranos Bobby "Bacala" Bac- ** THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA (2004, Musical) Gerard Butler,
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ROW (CC) displeasing Uncle Junior. singer's romance. ,T 'PG-13' (CC)
(6:45) * * MILLION DOLLAR BABY (2004, Dra- *x CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN (2003, Comedy) (:45) *** SPI-
SHBO-W ma) Clint Eastwood. A cantankerous trainer bonds with Steve Martin, Bonnie Hunt. A man must handle the DER-MAN 2
a female boxer. 'PG-13' (CC) chaos surrounding his 12 children. T 'PG' (CC) (2004) 'PG-13'
(:00) r* MEET THE FOCKERS (2004, Comedy) * RAY (2004, Biography) Jamie Foxx, Kerry Washington, Regina
H BO-S Robert De Niro, Ben Stiller, Dustin Hoffman. Future in- King. Ray Charles overcomes hardships to become a legend. f 'PG-13'
laws clash in Florida. n 'PG-13' (CC) (CC


(6:30) SUR- * THE JACKET (2005, Science Fiction) Adrien Brody, Keira Knight- ** COLLATERAL (2004) Tom
MAX-E VIVING CHRIST- ley, Kris Kristofferson. An amnesiac has flashbacks and visions of the fu- Cruise. A contract killer uses a cab-
MAS n ture. n 'R'(CC) driver for his jobs. 'R'(CC)
** THE REPLACEMENT KILLERS (1998, Action) *** SCREAM (1996, Horror) Neve Campbell, David Arquette,
MOMAX Chow Yun-Fat, Mira Sorvino. An Asian it man and a Courteney Cox. A psychopath stalks the teens of a sleepy California town.
forger flee a drug lord's henchmen. n 'R' (CC) f 'R' (CC)
* SAVED! (2004, Comedy-Drama) Jena Malone, The L Word "Light My Fire" (iTV) HUFF "Control" (iTV) Huff faces his
SHOW Mandy Moore, Macaulay Culkin. iTV. A pregnant Moira disappears. n (CC) insurance hearing. n (CC)
teenager faces ostracism. 0 'PG-13' (CC)


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TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAcF 1 R-MONDfAY .JANIUARYf 30,2006


Mackey Williams recaptures running





title after opponent's wrong turn


* FUN RUN/WALK
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

MACKEY Williams took
advantage of Jason Williams'
mistake to recapture his title in
the Baptist Sports Council's
sixth annual Family Fun
Run/Walk Race on Saturday.
Jason Williams led the 4.2
mile race from the Charles W.
Saunders High School, Jean
Street through the Fox Hill
area, but instead of making the
turn to go back to Jean Street,
he went towards the Village
Road round-a-bout before he
made the turn-around.
By then it was too late as
Mackey Williams had already
surged to the line in 28.02 with
19-year-old Anthony Saunders
in pursuit in 28.04. Sidney Col-
lie, 26, got third in 28.10. Jason
Williams, 25, eventually came
in fifth in 28.47.
Mackey Williams, 37, said he
didn't see Jason Williams con-
tinue straight, but he was sur-
prised that he didn't see him


Romana Nicholls


takes ladies' title


ahead of him when he went to
the line.
"Me and Jason went hard at
it, but as we went up the final
hill, I didn't see him anymore,"
Mackey Williams said. "I didn't
know what happened to him,
so I just hard at it at the fin-
ish."

Trailing

Despite trailing Jason
Williams for the entire race,
Mackey Williams said he was
more relaxed than he was in
the previous times he competed
in the race. He said he's looking
forward to returning next year
to successfully defend his title.
Saunders, who improved


from a eighth place finish the
year before, said he's been
training harder this year and
already it's paying off the big
dividends with his result.
"It was easy at the beginning,
but it was really a push coming
to the finish line," Saunders
reflected. "It got harder and
harder, but I just decided to
hold on."
There was a Striders Club
connection for the battle of the
ladies' title with Romana
Nicholls emerging as the cham-
pion, repeating her dominance
from last year, in a time of
33.11.
Lexi Wilson led the remain-
ing team-mates in second in
42.19. Monica Woodside
(48.20) held off Carmene


Oxgenor (48.22) for third place.
Melony Zonicle was the only
other female who competed in
the run. She was a distant 54.02
after getting off to a late start.
A 2-mile run that left Charles
W. Saunders and head to
Bernard Road, onto Village
Road and Prince Charles Drive
before ending up at the finish
line, produced the largest
amount of participants.
But the overall result was still
the same, with Philip Moss
walking away with the title. He
completed the course in 19.56,
leaving his strongest challenger,
coach Steven Murray behind in
21.16.
"Today, I did the race better
than I did last year. Every year
I get better," Moss pointed out.
"I don't have any competition.
I'm the best in the Bahamas,
the best the Bahamas ever had
and the best the Bahamas will
have for a long time."
The meet was officiated by
the Bahamas of Certified Offi-
cials, headed by Val Kemp,
who indicated that they will


continue to support the organ-
isers, although they expect that
the meet will grow in the num-
ber of participants with each
year.
Since its inception, Thomp-
son Trading and Gatorade have
been a sponsor of the event and
Prince Turnquest said they
intend to keep it on their cal-
endar.

Opportunity

"We look at it as an oppor-
tunity to give back to the com-
munity because Gatorade has
been a community minded
product," Turnquest stressed.
"So this is an opportunity to
get involved in the Church and
give back to the community at
the same time."
The road race kicked off the
BSC's 2006 sporting calendar.
Next up is the basketball league
that will commence on Satur-
day at 10am at the Charles W.
Saunders High School, Jean
Street.


FROM page one


Knowles and administrators Benedict
Dorsett and Reggie Forbes.
At SAC, Musgrove said-he could
have easily advised Symonette's moth-
er to let him stay and help the Big
Red Machines win more basketball
titles. But he had to do what was best
for him.
"This is his dream and he's accom-
plished part of that today," Musgrove
continued. "Another part will come.
when he makes it to the NFL."
Minister Wisdom said it was an
excellent decision for all the right rea-
sons.
"I thought it was a wonderful deci-
sion for the Bahamas because obvi-


ously with the proximity to the
Bahamas and its impressive record in
football, Bahamians will have the
opportunity to see one of our own
play on a regular basis," Wisdom
declared.
"I just can't want for September to
see two Bahamians play, one in
Ramon Rolle for Florida State and
the second from the University of
Miami, our own Ian Symonette. I
think it's going to be a good time. I
think half of the sporting Bahamas
will be there. I'm very excited."
Wilchcombe, the former starting
quarterback for the Nassau Sunburn-
ers, said he believed Symonette's deci-
sion had a lot to do with what hap-
pened in Louisiana last year and
where he is in proximity to the


Bahamas.
"The University of Miami is an
excellent programme. They have sent
a lot of players to the pros (National
Football League)," Wilchcombe stat-
ed.
Pros' sponsor Derek Sands said he's
delighted that Symonette will be
attending his alma mater.
"It's a great decision. I think it's
definitely going to have an impact on
football in this country, especially
since he chose a university so close to
home," he insisted.
"A lot of Bahamiaqs who follow
college football will definitely be mak-
ing the flight to watch their home
game.
"I think it will definitely do a lot
for football in the country."


S. -- --
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MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006


SECTION




Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com MIAMI HER
; .. . .- . i ...-.- ... .. _^ t-t- a- T _v =.PSt -rw i S. 'r-tr*;.!'-"f ... -,'- '-7., 'r., --* -z.*.-.**.- _-* -..'* -*'-*"--


ALD SPORTS


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
TONIQUE Williams-Dar-
ling got off to a slow start in
her 2006 indoor debut, while
newly wed Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie's comeback was a
tough one.
Competing at the Norwich
Union in Glasgow over the
weekend, Williams-Darling
ran 53.48 seconds for second
place behind Russian Ola
Zaybeva, who took the victo-
ry in 50.62 in the women's 400
metre race.
Williams-Darling, last
year's World Championship's
quarter-mile champion said
she doesn't intend to compete
in the IAAF World Champi-
onships or the Common-
wealth Games, both in
March.
Instead, she will just hon-
our the few commitments she
has and then she will continue
her concentration on the
upcoming outdoor season.
Meanwhile in the United
States, Williams-Darling's
Jamaican-born American
rival, Sanya Richards posted a
victory at the Reebok Boston
Indoor Games at the Reggie
Lewis Track and Athletic
Centre.
Richards, the runner-up to
Williams-Darling at the
World Championships,
crossed the line in Boston in
the 400 in 52.10. That would
have been good enough for
second in Glasgow.
Also in Boston, Ferguson-
McKenzie, in her first meet
since getting married in
December, had to settle for a
fifth place in the women's 60
in 7.37 behind Jamaican
Keiron Stewart's fourth place
time of 7.31.

Sweep
It was a clean American
sweep with Me'Lisa Barber
taking the tape in 7.09, leav-
ing Ferguson-McKenzie's
training partner and Angela
Williams in second in 7.13.
Angela Daigle-Bowen was
third in 7.30.
Myrian Mani from
Cameroon, back in action
after serving a two-year sus-
pension, finished seventh in
7.39 behind American Angela
Williams, who did 7.37.
Over at the Rod McCravy
Memorial Track and Field
Meet at the University of
Kentucky's Nutter Fieldhouse
in Lexington, two Bahamian
sprinters were in action in two
races.
Competing unattached,
Addis Huyler ran in the
men's 60, coming in tied for
13th in 7.00. The race was
won by American Gordon
McKenzie, a freshman from
the University of Kentucky in
6.73.
Also unattached, Jamial
Rolle ran 21.25 for fourth
place in the 200. Huyler also
competed in the race, coming
in 11th in 21.91. Winning the
race in 20.61 was Milton
Campbell, who was unat-
tached.
,And at the Penn State Invi-
tational Track National,
Michael Sands entered the 60,
winning his preliminary heat
in 6.81. However, in the final,
he had to settle for sixth place
in 6.87. Justin Byron, a senior
from North Carolina, was the
winner in 6.78.


Bahamian


signs for the


Hurricanes


* FOOTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
AFTER developing his
skills for the past 2 1/2 years at
St. Pius High School in Hous-
ton, Texas, lan 'Big Bahama'
Symonette will come closer to
home for his'collegiate career.
Before his family, fans and
his team-mates from the Orry
J. Sands Pros and other mem-
bers of the Commonwealth
American Football League,
Symonette announced on Sat-
urday that he has signed to
play for the University of Mia-
Smi Hurricanes.
The announcement was a
well kept secret and wasn't
revealed until he took the
podium at the Eastern Parade
where he honed his skills with
the Pros before he left for
Houston in March, 2003 with
Olympic bronze medalist
Frank Rutherford.
With his choice hidden on
a large, folded sign, Symon-
ette said "It came down to
Miami and LSU. A lot of peo-
ple want me to go to Miami
and some want me to go to
LSU."
As the cardboard was
unfolded, the 6-foot-9, 334-
pound offensive dispelled all
speculations by saying: "I'd
like to announce that my deci-
sion is go to the University of
Miami."

Cheers
With cheers from the spec-
tators, his former Pros' coach
Anthony 'Skeebo' Roberts
was the first to shake his hand,
followed by his mentor and
quarter-back Mike Foster and
Pros' coach Shervin Johnson.
Johnson, who acted as the
master of ceremonies for the
celebration, attended by both
Minister of Youth, Sports and
Culture Neville Wisdom and
Minister of Tourism Obie
Wilchcombe, handed over a
Hurricanes' hat and jacket for
Symonette to wear as he con-
tinued to speak.
"Now you know that I'm
going to the University of
Miami, I wish that everybody
will come out on September
4 when we play our first game
against Florida State."
Symonette, who will gradu-
ate from St. Pius in May, said


he had not officially informed
'Canes' head-coach Larry
Coker of his final decision. He
said he wanted to let the peo-
ple who supported him
through the years to get the
word first.
"I'm sure that he knows by
now," said Symonette said.
"If he doesn't, I'll let him
known when he calls 1
ater today or tomorrow (Sun-
day)."
The decision, a choice
between more than 60 schools,
including Texas Tech Univer-
sity, the University of Okla-
homa and the University of
Florida (in the top five) pur-
suing him, was one that his
parents left up to him.
His mother, Teresa, who
played an integral part in his
appearances at the many
recruiting trips he made, said
it was a "good choice, consid-
ering it's close to home."
"He didn't tell us until last
night after we discussed it and
he went out to be back him-
self," she said.
Anthony Roberts, who
coached Symonette the first
year he began playing foot-
ball, said there was a lot of
suspense over whether or not


iami choice


he would have selected the sons who played a significant out well for Symonette'
'Canes. role in getting Symonette to because the 'Canes need the'
"I think he decided to go to consider UM. help that he can bring to their
UM for obvious reasons: it's in "The Pros are die-hard Hur- offensive line.
his backyard, everybody ricanes' fans and every Labour "He will get a lot of support
knows the team, so I'm not Day weekend we religiously over there," Johnson noted.'
surprised," Roberts said. "I go to their game," Foster said. "I'm a part of a group that'
goes up there every year to
"N w you ow hat I'm watch the Hurricanes play.
"NOW yOu iOW that Im The Pros have a pipeline into
goini to the University of Miami right now that will take
%a, %.R p care of lan."


Miami, I wish that everybody
will come out on September 4
when we play our first game
against Florida State."

Ian Symonette


am very happy that he made
the choice because it now
gives us the opportunity to see
one of our very own perform,
watch his progress and watch
his growth. I think it will be
an interesting four years. I
pray that things work out very
well for him."
Foster, credited for finding
the "diamond in the rough"
playing basketball at SAC,
was one of the happiest per-


"It just came down to previous
talks about his decision and
how it could affect this coun-
try.
"He no doubt would have
still gotten the support in LSU
because they have a great pro-
gramme, but we thought he
could do more for this country
based in Miami than any-
where else."
Shervin Johnson said it was
a decision that should work


Basketball I
Felix 'Fly' Musgrove, who
along with John Todd assisted
in preparing Symonette eor
basketball with the Big Rid
Machines, said they knew that
football was his passion and
it wouldn't have been long
before his days at St.
Augustine's College were
numbered. 1
"If Ian wants to go to
next level, the University ,
Miami is the right place
because they are known f -
putting players in the NFL"
said Musgrove, who attended
the ceremony along with
Todd, principal Sonia
SEE page 14B


lan Symoneo e closer o


home with


_ _____
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MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006


-TherTribune


The stories behind the news


An


island


in


crisis


S ome former drug
traffickers are still
making big money
in Bimini. They are
smuggling humans
to Florida for up to $200,000
per boatload.
Sometimes they make two
trips a night, gunning their mas-
sile outboard engines to cross
the 50-mile straits in quick
time, landingtheir cargoes on
deserted beaches.
Desperate Chinese are hap-,
py and willing to pay $10,000
apiece to young Biminites.-
often fired up on crack cocaine
- for a go-fast trip to the US
coast during the dark hours.
Racing under the radar,
dodging US Coast Guard
patrols, these high-powered
supercraft can prove a lucra-
tive investment for those will-


someof 7~iVTI itsN~best-loved residents in a horrifying spate of ill-fortune whichrL v

SoeasosrenwlamigobeGo' revengeINSIGTrp rt


ing to face the risks.
Some immigrants are never
heard of again, lost in choppy
seas and ferocious currents.
But most make it to the
promised land and regard ten
grand as a modest price to pay
for the prospect of a new life in
the world's most prosperous
society.
With 20 orientals aboard,
intrepid Biminites can clear up


more money in one night than
most of their compatriots make
in a lifetime of honest endeav-
our.
For Haitians, the price is low-
er around $3,000 but a boat-
load of 20 can still net $60,000
per trip, which is more or less
the annual salary of the
Bahamas police commissioner.
If they manage to squeeze in
another run before dawn, one


night's takings can eclipse.even
the prime minister's annual
salary.
"Yes, it's still going on," an
islander told INSIGHT. "There
are a couple of groups of guys,
mostly former drug dealers;
who are into the human smug-
gling business.
"They don't see it as a crime,
more as helping people, and
themselves. But it's against the


law and more and more Bimini
people are beginning,to feel
that money isn't everything. It's
time for ius to straighten up, to
clean house. It's time to get
back to the standards we used
to know'"
The decimation of Bimini's.
landscape by. US developer
Gerardo Capo over the last few
years had already traumatised
this small island community


even before the events of the
last five weeks, when a double
disaster deprived it of two of
its best-loved institutions and
12 of its most cherished inhab-
itants.
Chalk's seaplanes had been
serving Bimini for as long as
residents can remember. And

SEE page 2C


- "' E I- * -. .- m. * __ m r. . *
;~ I- in.. Af- 4 1 0I 0 *


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I







THE TRIBUNE


PA(,F 2( ,- MONDAY JANUARYY 30. 2006


An island in


crisis


'M's


FROM page 1C

The Compleat Angler the inn
where Ernest Hemingway held
court was the one place
where every visitor to the
island had to go.
But during the most calami-
tous Christmas season
Biminites can remember,
Chalk's and The Compleat
Angler were snuffed out like
yuletide candles the airline
by its first major crash involv-
ing passengers, the inn by a fire
which also killed its beloved
caretaker, Julian Brown.
Families

In addition, island families
were left bereaved by the loss
of loved ones, and relatives are
now struggling to cobble
together new family units to


ensure surviving children get
through the crisis mentally and
emotionally intact.
Still grief-stricken, hardly
daring to contemplate an
uncertain future, churchgoing
Biminites are now beginning
to think that God is trying to
tell them something.
Pastors are holding street
meetings in Alice Town in an
attempt to interpret the extra-
ordinary sequence of events
which turned this miniscule,
joy-filled paradise into a som-
bre and reflective place.
"We are still struggling to
comprehend and trying to ask
why it happened," said long-
time resident Lloyd Edge-
combe. "This has been a very
trying time for Bimini.
"I have been living here all
my life and I have never seen
anything like this. The island
was still highly emotional from


the Chalk's crash when we lost
an island icon, Julian Brown,
in The Compleat Angler fire.

Favorite

"He was a favourite son of
Bimini. He ran for the
Bahamas in the Rome
Olympics in 1964. We learned
from him how to love and how
to share. People are still suf-
fering badly."
Mr Edgecombe says he is not
an overly religious man, but
recognizes that God has been
talking to Bimini. "During the
drug era we had a very good
time and everyone became
very materialistic. We did a lot
of things we should not have
done.
"A long time ago Bimini was
a peaceful, tranquil community,
but I think we lost that during
the 1980s and 1990s. We had


40 years of feast now it is
famine time.
"However, people are
preaching love again. This is
one of the best communities to
live in. People always looked
after one another. That's how it
used to be. But we got off-
track, lost focus and God is try-
ing to bring us back in line."
The preachers have taken up
the cry, urging Biminites to
"become closer to God" as
they absorb the reverberations
of recent events.
Having survived a battering
from the 1926 hurricane, and
the rampant and ultimately
destructive excesses of the
bootleg era, Bimini knows all
about recovery. But finding its
way back to anything resem-
bling normality is going to be a
long haul this time.
The environmental impact
of the controversial Bimini Bay
development had already taken
a mighty toll on the island long
before the festive season
degenerated into a solemn
period of tragedy and mourn-
ing.
Destruction of the island's
marine resources, the hideous
scarring of a huge area of land,
and the mass importation of
Mexicans to work at Bimini
Bay had created tension and
ill-feeling in a community once
noted for tranquillity and good-
will.
The American boaters who
provide the island's economic
lifeblood were already begin-
ning to give Bimini a wide
berth because of the degrada-
tion of its unique marine envi-
ronment.
Now the two remaining
world-renowned fixtures of
Bimini tourism Chalk's and
The Compleat Angler have
gone, leaving little for visitors
but a defaced and disfigured
island that isn't half the place it
used to be.
Mr Edgecombe said: "Peo-
ple have been calling to say
they are not sure they want to
come back to Bimini anymore.
When we losfChalk's aid Th-e
Compleat Angler, we lost
much of our heritage.
"Bimini has always been not-
ed for Ernest Hemingway,
Gary Hart, Adamn Clayton
Powell and others. That was all
part of our attraction. And they
all found their way to The
Compleat Angler because it
was the mainstay of our her-
itage.
"In the old days, before
Hemingway, we were only a
fishing village. Now it's hard
to see how something like The
Compleat Angler can ever
recover because all the memo-
rabilia waslost.
"Chalk's itself was also a
landmark. People don't feel it's
the same coming to Bimini
when there is no seaplane. It
is going to be a tough year. The
economy has not been good
generally, but this has not
helped."
Already, the effects of eco-
nomic decline are being felt.
Some Biminites are falling into
debt. Many can't even afford
to pay their light bills. There
are fears that BEC will soon
begin switching off their power,
casting a new shadow over
Bimini life.
"Biminites are catching hell
right now," said Mr Edge-
combe, "at this time of year we
are experiencing low occupan-
cy, and hotels are running with


half their usual staff.
"Bimini Bay is doing noth-
ing for the local economy. They
are not employing the local
boys. People are scratching by
from day to day. They can't
afford their light bill, nothing."
If there is one cause for opti-
mism, it is Bimini's reputation
for bouncing back from diffi-
cult times. It has done that
more than once before. But sel-
dom has the challenge been as
daunting as the one facing it
now.
The island's position on the
map has dictated the course of
its history, and continues to
control the present. During
Prohibition, its early 20th cen-
tury equivalents of go-fast
boats dodged US authorities
with cargoes of liquor. Bimini
bootleggers were the scourge
of US excise men.
During the 1980s, islanders
were handed massive amounts
of money for turning their
backs on the cocaine trade,
sometimes up to $100,000 a
time. It became renowned as a
trans-shipment base, with
planes buzzing around the
island all the time with huge
handouts for compliant locals.
Deposits at the island bank
multiplied enormously during
the drug years, but Bimini has
been paying the price ever
since.
Not only did drugs spawn a
generation of idle, spaced-out
and totally useless and unem-
ployable young Biminite males,
it eroded the community's
moral base.
From being a mutually sup-
portive and exceedingly friend-
ly group, some Biminites
became greedy, flashy, vulgar
and debased. The more
grotesque of them began
importing garish sedans with
tinted windows and chromed
rims.

Ethic

Work ethic and everyday
decency were sacrificed for a
mercenary-mindset which came
close to destroying Bimini and
everything it stood for.
Now, however, many ex-
druggies have hit upon hard
times. One, it is claimed, whose
wealth was squandered in an
orgy of high living has suffered
the indignity of seeing his
predatory female partner take
off with a Mexican laboured.
Others are applying for
menial jobs, having blown for-
tunes on booze, drugs and the
so-called "good life".
One Biminite told
INSIGHT: "It's amazing just
how many former drug lords
have ended up broke, dead or
in prison. Very few of them
ended up as winners.
"Some have gone into
human smuggling and that is
something still going on today.
Some former drug dealers are
into human smuggling now. It
is a lucrative business here. It
also shows that the government
doesn't have a handle on illegal
immigrants.
"According to my sources,
the Chinese are the biggest
payers. They will pay up to
$10,000 for a quick trip to the
United States. The Haitians
pay less than that, about $3,000,
but it's still good business for
the human traffickers."

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* RICARDO Miller, also known as Tamar
Lee, is facing a murder charge in connection
with the death of Mario Miller, son of Minister
of Trade and Industry Leslie Miller. Mr Miller
was stabbed to death on June 22, 2002.


(FILE photo)


united States
Ambassador
John Rood
last week
urged the
Bahamas to re-examine its
stance on some human rights
issues criticising the coun-
try's decision to be among
those who stay "in the shad-
ows" rather than taking an
active stance against human
rights abuses in other coun-
tries.
Speaking at the 2006
Bahamas Business Outlook
Conference, he also recom-
mended that the Bahamas do
all it can to help rebuild Haiti.


k


LI --


PUBLIC transportation in
New Providence is not safe and
should undergo a complete
overhaul, according to the find-
ings of a government survey,
it was reported last week.


A GROUP of graffiti ban-
dits have wreaked havoc in the
southwestern part of New
Providence by defacing a num-
ber of business establishments
in the middle of the night.
Last week, police said the
group, which includes both
adults and juveniles, has
caused hundreds, if not thou-


sands, of dollars damage.
PRIME Minister Perry
Christie said last week that he
supports capital punishment.
He was speaking at the funer-
al service of slain prison officer
Dion Bowles.
Mr Christie said he disagrees
with persons who are attempt-
ing to have the death penalty
revoked in the Bahamas.
*****

FREEPORT Grand
Bahama Police last week
launched an investigation into
the discovery of a badly
decomposed body in the Lin-
colnshire Park Subdivision.


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FEBRUARY 10 & 11, 2006 at 7:00pm
FREE TICKETS
Available at
100% Bible Book Store Palmdale & Marathon Mall
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Best Buy/Master Technicians Village Road
For any further inquiries call Grace Community Church at 394-7223


The National Choir of The Bahamas


presents its


INAUGURAL CONCERT


with the


Chamber Orchestra of Nazareth College
Rochester, New York

February 3 & 4, 2006

Christ Church Cathedral, George Street
8:00 pm
* "Gloria" by Antonio Vivaldi
(for Chorus, Soloists and Orchestra)

* Works for Soprano Soloist and Orchestra performed by Mrs. Joann
Callender

* Works for Chamber Orchestra by George Frederick Handel and Arcangelo
Corelli

Tickets $20.00

Box Office:
Dundas Centre for The Performing Arts, Mackey Street
Tel: 393-3728, 394-7179


The Choir is established and subsidized by
The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas


~-.iu:
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MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006, PAGE 3C


THE TRIBUNE


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PAGF 4C MONDAY. JANUARY 30. 2006


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FROM page 2C


The human smuggling racket
has brought challenges of its
own to Bimini, with boat theft
from local marinas now a dis-
turbing development guaran-
teed to further deter seagoing
visitors.
Wealthy
Wealthy foreigners who call
into Bimini with their expen-
sive yachts and support craft
like to feel they have left crime


behind in their homelands.
However, that's not necessari-
ly the case anymore.
The trade has also brought
tragedy. According to one
island source, three young
Biminites were lost at sea last
year allegedly while engaged
in illegal trafficking.
"They set off with boatloads
of immigrants and were never
seen again," said the source.
"It's possible they were high
on crack and did not pay due


respect to the weather condi-
tions. Sometimes this happens
and they never make it to the
other side."
Climate
In the current climate of con-
trition and reflection, Bimini's
bad boys are not viewed with
the tolerance they once
enjoyed.
Prayer warriors some of
them former druggies are


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now taking the message of
repentance to all corners of the
community, demanding that
Bimini answer God's warnings
by turning its back on nefarious
activities.
"Some of those who are now
radical for Christ used to be
bad boys of the 1980s," said the
source. "A lot of lives were
ruined by that era. We need to
get out of this kind of thing
once and for all. We also need
to recognize this is the only way
to go."
Addled brains, broken lives,
squandered fortunes...all were
drug trade legacies, along with


the many spent-out dealers
who found their way to early
graves.
Bimini has had a far from
wholesome past, but optimists
believe its future can be sal-
vaged if the people adopt a
more honourable course.
Religious
For the fervently religious,
there is only one interpretation
of recent'tragedies. Through
Gerardo Capo, Chalk's airline,
The Compleat Angler and the
gently affable Julian Brown,
God's voice has been heard,


they say.
Bimini has received its divide
warning. An isle once blessed
with neighbourly love and
goodness needs to find its w4y
back to nobler days, or suffer
the consequences. For islanders
of faith, the word from on high
has been unequi\ocal, arjd
Bimini will ignore it at its peril.

** *******
What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmar-
quis@tribunemedia.net


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MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2005, PAGE 5C


THE TRIBUNE


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6C, MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006


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MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2006, PAGE 7C


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SOME EVANGELICAL CHRISTIANS HAVE SOUGHT COMMON GROUND
WITH JUDAISM, BUT THEOLOGICAL DIVISIONS STILL RUN DEEP

BY ALEXANDRA ALTER
aalter@MiamiHerald.com

The Christians who pray every week at Fellowship Church sing Hebrew psalms and
contemporary hymns. They celebrate Jewish holidays on Passover, Yom Kippur and Sha-
vuot, and pray for God's intercession in Israel. They gather in a sanctuary adorned with a
cross, a representation of a Torah scroll, and an Israeli flag.
Pastor Ken Garrison says he isn't looking to convert Jews to Christianity or vice versa.
Rather, like the 60 families who worship at Fellowship, Garrison sees himself as a Chris-
tian who loves Israel.
"We're not Jewish wannabes, and we're not Jews for Jesus," said Garrison, who founded
the church in Casselberry, Fla., after visiting Israel for the first time in 1980. "It's my sense
that many evangelical Christians, they realize there's something inherently righteous in
Israel."
Evangelical support for Israel has increased dramatically in recent years, Christian and
Jewish leaders say. Christian groups who view Israel as a fulfillment of God's prophecy
are now emphasizing theological ties to Judaism, subsidizing Israeli settlements in the
West Bank and building political alliances with pro-Israel Jewish groups.
But scholars and community leaders say efforts to gloss over theological differences
often fail to bridge deep divisions between Christian conservatives and Jews. Remarks
made earlier this month by televangelist Pat Robertson, who suggested that Israeli Prime
Minister Ariel Sharon's stroke was divine retribution for his decision to withdraw settlers
*TURN TO EVANGELICALS


MIAMIHERALD.COM: CLICK ON TODAY'S EXTRAS TO TAKE PART IN A FORUM ABOUT THIS ARTICLE


4 -O 0








THE MIAMI HERALD I MiamiHerald.com iSSUES & IDEAS


WORLD VOICES


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,C I SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2006 INTERNATIONAL EDITION


munities in the West Bank and a
yeshiva in Hebron, he said.
"We decided it would be
appropriate for us as a congrega-
tion to present a tithe of the
church's income to this process
of building Israel," Garrison
said. 'We felt there was a biblical
precedent for that."
Other South Florida churches,
among them Calvary Chapel, an
18,000-member megachurch in
Fort Lauderdale, and Christ Fel-
lowship, a 20,000-member con-
gregation in Palm Beach Gar-
dens, offer classes on the Jewish
roots of Christianity and raise
money for organizations that
support Israel, church staff
members said,
Yet often the same groups
that support Israel financially
also call for the conversion of
Jews to Christianity. Both Cal-
vary Chapel and Christ Fellow-
ship have "outreach" ministries
to bring Jews to Christianity.
Jewish leaders have long
accused Messianic Jewish
groups such as Jews for Jesus
and the Chosen People Minis-
tries with using deceptive tactics
to lure Jews to Christianity.
The belief held by many evan-
gelicals that the Jews must con-
vert to Christianity to complete
God's covenant is "always going
to be a bone," said Nathan Katz,
professor of religious studies at
Florida International University.
"The attempt to convert Jews
to Christianity has been going on


ISSUES & IDEAS


RELIGION




Evangelicals try to bridge




wide gap with Judaism


opyrig hted Material



'Syndicated Content*

Available from Commercial News Prc


*EVANGELICALS

from Gaza, shed light on the
often uneasy alliance between
Jews and evangelicals.
Many Jewish leaders remain
wary of evangelicals' interest in
Israel, citing .iyisions tied to
centuries bto piiselytizing and
wide disagreement on domestic
issues.
"There is a divided opinion
about the evangelical support of
Israel," said Rabbi Solomon
Schiff, executive vice president
of the Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami "Some feel that
their support may be for the pur-
pose of eventually converting
Jews. On the other hand, there
are those who feel Israel needs
all the support it can get."
THE PROMISED LAND
Evangelicals' support for
Israel has roots in the controver-
sial theological view that the
Jews must return to the land God
promised Abraham before Jesus
returns to battle the Antichrist.
In recent years, many of Israel's
Christian supporters have toned
down messianic views, empha-
sizing God's covenant with the
Jewish people rather than the
Second Coming.
"The evangelical picture of
the Messiah coming is sort of
odious to most Jewish folks. It
leaves them holding the bag, so
to speak," Garrison explained.
Not all evangelicals have
muted such beliefs, however.
Robertson's statement that
"God has enmity against those
who 'divide my land' caused
many Jewish leaders to question
evangelicals' support of Israel.
Robertson later issued an apol-
ogy after Christians and Jews
condemned his remarks and
Israeli tourism officials wavered
on his bid to build a $50 million
Christian center in Galilee.
"The suggestion that Mr.
Sharon is being punished by God
is profoundly offensive to all
Jews, regardless of their reli-
gious outlook or political persua-
sion," Rabbi Eric Yoffie, presi-
dent of the Union for Reform
Judaism, wrote in a Jan. 5 state-
ment.
Comments such as Robert-
son's are nothing new. In a 2003
interview with the CBS program
60 Minutes, a pro-Israel Chris-
tian activist attributed the assas-
sination of Prime Minister Yit-
zhak Rabin to God's wrath over
Rabin's efforts to trade land for
peace. Kay Arthur, the head of a
Tennessee-based Christian orga-
nization that brings thousands of
Christian pilgrims to the Holy
Land, said Rabin was killed
because God opposed the Oslo
peace accords with the Palestin-
ians.
Views espoused by Christian


conservatives such as Arthur
and Robertson have proved
damaging to interfaith relations
even at a time of unprecedented
dialogue and cooperation
between the two faiths. While
Christian conservatives and
Jews often differ greatly on
domestic policy issues from
the role of religion in public life
to stem cell research they
have found a common cause in
Israel.
Groups such as Christian
Friends of Israeli Communities,
the International Fellowship of
Christians and Jews, and the
Friends of Israel Gospel Ministry
have raised millions of dollars
from evangelical donors to sub-
sidize settlements in the West
Bank and finance the return of
Jews living in diaspora.
Garrison's church sends 10
percent of its annual income to
building projects in Israel,
including Orthodox Jewish com-


for centuries, so it's nothing
new," said Rabbi Schiff of the
Rabbinical Association. "What
we in the Jewish community are
concerned about is that Jews fall
prey to those who are trying to
convert them by misrepresent-
ing what Judaism is."
Christian groups who seek
Israel's return to its biblical ter-
ritories counter they're not
pushing for the conversion of
Jews.
"We're not there to convert
them, we're not there to make
them Christians, we're there
because we believe they're God's
people," said Kimberly Troup,
U.S. director for Christian
Friends of Israeli Communities,
an international evangelical
organization that raises hun-
dreds of thousands of dollars for
Jewish settlers in the West Bank
and organizes tours of the Holy
Land.
But as Robertson's comments


vid
w I


interreligious affa
American Jewish
who recently attend
with leaders of tl
Association of Evani
Many Christians
to such views believe
solution to the Isra
ian conflict would
God's plan for hun


revealed, Jews and evangelicals
do not always see eye to eye
when it comes to Israel, either.
Troup's organization, for exam-
ple, opposes the Israeli govern-
ment's decision to withdraw
from Gaza settlements.
"You find many evangelicals
to the right even of right-wing
Jews," Katz said.
BIBLICAL PROPHECY
Robertson's view shared by
many on the religious right -
that Israel must maintain control
of the Palestinian territories or
risk offending God has roots in
theology as well as politics.
Christian Zionism the
belief that the modern state of
Israel is the fulfillment of bibli-
cal prophecy grew out of the
19th century theological move-
ment called premillennial dis-
pensationalism. The movement
emphasizes the central role that
Israel will play in fulfilling
events described in biblical
prophecy, including the Rapture,
the rise of the Antichrist, the
Battle of Armageddon, and
Christ's 1,000-year reign.
Modern Christian Zionists see
the state of Israel as the staging
ground for the countdown to the
second coming, when Jesus will
return to battle the Antichrist.
Jews and other non-Christians
will face conversion or death.
"For that group, the destruc-
tion of the Jews is the endgame,"
said David Elcott, director of


MiamiHerald.com THE MIAMI HERALD


BLOGGEIS ON ROBERTSON


Televangelist Pat Robertson's remarks on
Jan 5 suggesting that Israeli Prime Minister
riell Sharon's stroke was divine retribution
for his decision to withdraw settlers from
Gaza ere o. erv'helmingly criticized by Inter-
net bloggers Arnong them:
S* At Amy Ridenour's National Center
Blog, "What [Some] Conservatives Think."
|Jan. 6: "Pat Robertson Has a Lot of Self-
Confidence"
(www.nationalcenter.org/Blog.html):
Pat Robertson i, entitled to his opinion, but
I belie .,e God's m.,steries are beyond human
understanding


At www.blogs4God.com, which bills
itself as a "semi-definitive list of Christians
y y who blog." Submitted by Dean Peters of
ers North Carolina, Jan. 6:
Pat Robertson could really use a few pages
out of Billy Graham's playbook such as
knowing when to hand over his ministry to his
son. like NOW! Especially after the elder Rob-
ertson's latest rant where he linked Ariel Shar-
on's recent stroke to God's enmity for dividing
Gaza. That's not just my opinion, as you'll see
listed at the end of this post, there are at least
I' other Christians .',ho bloog 'ho've made it
known in writing that they feel same way
about Pat's propensity to put his foot in our
collective mouths.
First let me sa,. I believe in God's vrath
3nd judgment However, unlike Pat Robert-
son. I believe both are often manifested in
what those practicing historic Christianity call
original sin sin nature' if you're a Baptist,
'total depraity" for you pedal-to-the-metal
Calvinists
In other words, those who understand the
tenets of historic Christianity 101 understand
that the Bible teaches that man was originally
a special creation of God, made to lv'e for-
ever. But because mankind opted to be born
Into sin, we now must pay the ultimate wage -
death. Our only hope is in our salvation
S through Christ our Lord. So simple a 6-year-
old can get it
[The following paragraph is shown near a
irs for the picture of Sharon puffing on a cigar.] So yes,
in one sense, Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's
Committee, stroke is being di.'inely punished but no
ed a meeting more so than my Christ-loving grandfather
ie National whose strong Spartan body suffered the same
gelicals. affliction at age 93. In fact the only difference
who adhere is that my PoPou vas a health nut who retired
e a two-state at 6-1 whereas Mr. Sharon is morbidly obese
eli-Palestin- arnd obviously working massively long hours
undermine at age 77...
undri. ns a which is ..''h, I think Pat Robertson's latest
vanity. As a remrk is v.ell stupid!..


result, some Jewisn leaders nave
grown wary of accepting their
financial and political support.
"The dilemma is that those
evangelicals who would ask
Israel to fight to the last Jewish
soldier to uphold their theologi-
cal viewpoints, those I would not
consider a friend of Israel,"
Elcott said.
Evangelicals have also sought
to shape U.S. policy on Israel.
Conservative Christian leaders
such as Robertson and the Rev.
Jerry Falwell have at times pres-
sured the Bush administration to
take a more pro-Israel stance. In
2002, after President Bush urged
Sharon to withdraw troops from
Gaza, Falwell organized an
e-mail campaign of 100,000
Christians who opposed Bush's
plan.
Bush didn't raise the subject
of troop withdrawal again.
"There's nothing that would
bring the wrath of the Christian
public in this country down on
this government like abandoning
or opposing Israel in a critical
matter," Falwell said during an
interview with 60 Minutes.
BACKING PALESTINIANS
Christian support for Israel is
by no means monolithic. In 2002,
40 evangelicals wrote a letter to
President Bush seeking a more
balanced policy toward Israel
and the Palestinians, arguing
that "biblical reasons" for sup-
porting Israel had been distorted
by some Christian groups.
In recent years, mainstream
and liberal Protestant denomina-
tions have called for Christian
divestment from Israel, citing
concerns over violations of Pal-
estinians' human rights.
Jewish leaders say maintain-
ing good relations with U.S.
evangelicals has become a mat-
ter of pragmatism, particularly at
a time when evangelicals have
formed powerful political net-
works.
"This segment happens to
have a tremendous influence on
public policy. It's important that
Jews as a minority here have
relations with them," said Rabbi
Yechiel Eckstein, chairman of
the International Fellowship of
Christians and Jews, which
raises $50 million a year for
Israel from about 400,000 evan-
gelical donors.
"My philosophy has been
cooperate whenever necessary,
oppose whenever necessary."


Here are what some other practitioners of
historic Christianity have to say about Robert-
son's comments regarding Sharon's stroke:
LAMLand: 'Clearly Pat Robertson has
totally and completely lost it.
++ relapsed catholic ++ religion politics
culture blog: I'm getting really sick of point-
ing out that the onl, people who pay any
attention to Pat Pobertson are mainstream
journalists. The man owns his own TV station,
which nobody watches. He is talking to him-
self.
Martin's Musings: "Memo to Pat Robert-
son Please. knock it off."
The Blind Beggar: "Pat Robertson
makes another c careless and thoughtless
statements today declaring that Ariel Shar-
on s stroke was divine retribution for "dividing
God's land" of Israel It is sad to know that
many Americans only knowledge of evangeli-
cal Christianity is from the likes of Robertson
and other TV type personalities of his ilk. No
wonder they are so repelled.
* *
e At The TrueTalk blog,
www.truetalk.net: "God Awful Thinking" by
Tom Guarriello (who bills himself as "Chief
Idea Officer of TrueTalk, Inc., a management
consulting firm") on Jan. 18:
'V"hat is it that entices popular figures to try
to read God's mind"
There have been so man,. es'amples of this
characteristic that ,ou d think, by now. any-
one in public life would immediately censor
any remark that comes within a light-year of
attributing natural occurrences to divine
intention. But, no. they just keep shooting off
their mouths, and their toes
Recently. we'.'e had Pat Robertson inter-
preting Ariel Sharon's stroke to be a signal of
the Almighty's disdain for Sharon's peace
efforts (strange duck that Almighty, eh>)
Here's what he said:
'God considers this land to be his. You
read the Bible and he says 'This is my land;,
and for any prime minister of Israel who
decides he is going to carve it up and give it
away, God says,'No, this is mine. "
I guess Robertson felt God was having a
sort of "Woody Guthrie moment "
Then, at... [a] Martin Luther King Day
parade, New Orleans mayor Ray Nagin had .
this to say,
"Surely God is mad at America. He sentfus
hurricane after hurricane after hurricane, and
it's destroyed and put stress on this country,"
Mr. Nagin said..
"Surely he doesn't approve of us being in
Iraq under false pretenses.
"But surely he is upset at black America
also. We're not taking care of ourselves."
He also said that New Orleans must be a
mostly black city again because "it's the way
God wants it to be."
"This city will be chocolate at the end of
the day," he said.
Double whammy there, Rayll Let's ask the
Source if we should have a Willie Wonka float
in this year's Mardi Gras parade!...
Compiled byRORY CLARKE-
rclarke@MiamiHerald.com


Jewish leaders say maintaining good relations with

U.S. evangelicals is a matter ofpragmatism,

particularly at a time when evangelicals have

formed powerful political networks.


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P 30, 2 H TRBUin


Re: Fox Hill Prison
I agree with much of
what you say in your
article titled "Time is
running out for Nas-
sau's prison". I read
with interest the report of Dr
Rahming's exchange with for-
mer Superintendent Edwin
Culmer, and in fact my reac-
tion was to laugh.
It is interesting that he has
a problem with the criticism
that is being levelled against
him, but had no problem
dishing it out before his
appointment.
The degree of his criticism
was so harsh that Mr
Culmer was unceremoniously
packed off to detention cen-
tre purgatory, allegedly with
the implied "advice" to keep
his gripes to himself if he
wanted to get his pension. At
least he had a chance to
defend himself. Edwin Cul-
mer was not given that cour-
tesy.


I wonder, though, what Dr
Rahming expected to
happen. I wonder if anyone
else out there finds something
extremely troubling about the
way things transpired in Dr
Rahming's appointment or
is it only me?
It cannot be right for the
head of the commission
appointed to look into the
prison system to be appointed
to head the very same prison.
I also laughed to see Dr
Rahming dressed in the
prison officers' uniform with
the accompanying "stripes"
of the superintendent. I
thought that prison officers
were a disciplined force and
therefore, unless you were of
the ranks, you could not wear
the uniform of the ranks. But
perhaps I am assuming too
much.
However, isn't it interesting
that the person put in charge
of the prison to end what was
termed its poor management
(a clear aspersion on Mr Cul-


FEEDBACK

mer), including prison
breaks, has had two of the
most notorious escapes of
very dangerous criminals
from that facility in recent
history? Barry Parcoi, who
got as far as North Andros
during his last escape, and
then of course the Notorious
Four.
The history books will for-
ever record that "while under
the management of Dr Ellis-
ton Rahming, four maximum
security convicts of Her
Majesty's Prison, Fox Hill,
escaped, killing a prison
guard in the process..." or
"...For possibly the first time
in prison history, a prison


guard has been killed on
duty".
I note also that when Dr
Rahming's credentials were
quoted upon his appointment,
it was stated that he has had
experience working in several
prison systems in the United
States, but I daresay that,
whatever experience Dr Rah-
ming may have had in those
prisons in the United
States, it meant nothing in
terms of managing "Fox Hell
Prison", where inmates live in
animal-like squalor.
I think that there was a cer-
tain amount of arrogance
involved in the appointment
of Dr Rahming and now the


chickens are coming home to
roost. "I reach now, let me
show ya'll how it's done."
Keep in mind the proverb
that pride goeth before a
fall. I am also reminded of the
proverb concerning "new
wine in old skins". Did no-
one, and by no-one I mean
the politicians, think that the
first point in transforming the
prison would have been to
build a new prison, otherwise
the appointment of an
"expert" to run it means
nothing when the same physi-
cal conditions that make it a
"hell" on earth continue?
And what about the ranked
officers who were treated just
marginally better in the work
environment than the prison-
ers? Didn't they almost have
to crawl with palms out-
stretched for the government
to give them better uniform
allowances?
And certainly let's not for-
get the pay. How right is it for
those officers to be constantly


lobbying for better pay for
years, a commission is
appointed, and the result is
pittance, yet no-one has a
problem with paying the emi-
nent doctor upwards to
$100,000 a year, never mind;
the other perks?
You mean to tell me thai
no-one understands that a
body cannot function with
only a "big" head, but needs a
torso, arms and legs as
well. Like I said, the chickens.
are coming home to roost and
it will certainly get worse
before it gets better.
With regards,
FROGZLEGZ
*****
FOX HILL PRISON briigs
shame on us all. Build a new'
prison community on a Fani-
ly Island and get this institu-'
tion out of the capital once
and for all.
James L,
Camperdown area


Last year's record


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