Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00306
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: January 27, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00306
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text







"NEW CHICKEN 7
SPECIALTIES"

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S SUNNY AND
WINDY


The


Tribune


#1 P A FBI.. I. ...


ihek iBAtiami B traIt
BAHAMAS EDITION


r10 food so fresh five
minutes ago It was only
a dream of delicious
things to come.
Do Vht [tastes right.


Volume: 102 No.56


FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2006


-?-
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Christie speaks

at funeral of slain

prison officer


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
PRIME Minister Christie
said yesterday that he sup-
ports capital punishment.
Speaking at the funeral ser-
vice of slain prison officer
Dion Bowles, the prime min-
ister said he disagrees with
persons who are attempting
.to have the death penalty
revoked in the Bahamas.
"Prime ministers don't go
around saying things like that
- plenty people don't agree.
As long as I am prime minis-
ter, the brothers and sisters
who do believe in it, I am
going to fight with them;" said
Mr Christie.
He made the statement
while paying respects at the
full military service held at the
Church of God Auditorium
for officer Bowles, who was
stabbed and killed during last
week's prison break.
Earlier in the service, Bish-
op Albert Hepburn, overseer
of United Christian Church-
es, said that if capital punish
ment is on the books it should
be enforced.
Mourners clapped in agree-
ment.
"I believe if it is on the
book, that if a man takes
someone's life his life should
be taken if you fail to do it,
if the government fails to do it,
then we would look like a
hypocritical nation," said Bish-
op Hepburn.


FT. LAUDERDALE ADDRESS
Betsy Rodriquez
St. Johns Shipping
Ware House #4
1800 S.E. 19th Ave.
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316
Phone: 1(954) 527-0034
Fax: 1 (954) 522-4828


Mr Bowles was stabbed to
death during an early morn-
ing prison break by four of the
inmates at Her Majesty's
prison last week Tuesday.
Two other officers were also
injured.
Of the four prisoners who
escaped, one was killed by
police, two were recaptured
and one is stillat large.
Corey Douglas Hepburn
has been on the run for a
week. Police believe he is
being sheltered somewhere in
the eastern end of the island.
They have offered a $10,000
reward for any information
that might lead to him being
recaptured.
After the prison break ques-
tions about the enforcement
of capital punishment resur-
faced.
It was reported earlier in
The Tribune that Police Com-
missioner Paul Farquharson
had said that capital punish-
ment should be enforced as
long as it remains on the coun-
try's law books.
Dr Elliston Rahming, super-
intendent of Her Majesty's
Prison, said that Bowles' death
will not be in vain and "jus-
tice must be done."
The casket of Mr Bowles
was centred at the front of the
room, draped with the
Bahamian flag on top of which
was his prison officer's cap.
During the first scripture
SEE page two


NASSAU
Tel: (242) 393-2628
Fax: (242) 394-0847
FREEPORT
Tel: (242) 351-1501
MIAMI ADDRESS
Laser Freight International
3218 N.W. North River Drive
Miami FL 33142
Tel: (305) 633-4274
Fax: 1(305) 635-3304


* OFFICERS march during the funeral of slain prison officer Dion Bowles
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)

Former police officer calls for panic

buttons to help prevent escapes


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
PANIC buttons, trained dogs and an over-
haul of the maximum security wing could pre-
vent another deadly prison escape from occur-
ring, said a former senior police officer.
Paul Thompson said that for years he has felt
strongly that there was no maximum security in
the unit that houses the country's most danger-
ous convicted felons.
He said there have been too many escapes
and attempted escapes by convicts through win-


dows and roofs for officers to think the inmates
are contained.
He said that years ago when he worked with
former police commissioner Salathiel Thomp-
son, the two men believed that the maximum
security wing of the prison might better be sit-
uated on a Family Island Ragged Island or
Inagua, where the Defence Force could lend
back-up.
This, he said, would eliminate the chance of
dangerous criminals escaping into residential
SSEE page 10


Grace period for residents before eviction


THE Ministry of Housing is
giving Spring Point residents
a chance to avoid eviction by
granting them a week to get
their affairs in order before
moving them from their
homes.
New homes were built in
Spring Point for Abaconians
who had been displaced dur-
ing Hurricane Jeanne in 2004.
According to the ministry,
the residents were given 90


days to start payment on their
new homes.
However, the residents said
that they were made to under-
stand that the homes were giv-
en to them for free by the gov-
ernment.
Yesterday the ministry of
housing officials told The Tri-
bune that although the resi-
dents were already given a
"great deal" after the hurri-
cane destroyed their old


homes, government is still pre-
pared to grant them a grace
period before the eviction.
Cay Mills, former chief
councillor for Abaco, on
Thursday vowed that "blood
will be shed in Abaco" if these
persons are evicted from the
homes.
When The Tribune contact-
ed Mr Mills yesterday, he said
SEE page 10


inside


Mario Miller
murder trial
THE jury in the Mario Miller
murder trial heard that the
signed police statement of Ryan
Miller placed his brother Ricar-
do Miller at the scene of the
crime,
Detective-Sergeant Michael
Meronard read from police
statement as he continued his
testimony before the Supreme
Court yesterday.
SEE PAGE THREE

Residents still
demanding that
barge is removed
AFTER months of assur-
ances without action, Abaconi-
ans are demanding that the gov-
ernment finally fulfill its
promise to remove the wreck
of an oil drilling barge from
their waters.
SEE PAGE FIVE


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2006


LOCALN A


PM talks about death


penalty at funeral


FROM page one
lesson a mourner cried out.
Members of the clergy as well
as Philip "Brave" Davis, MP
for Cat Island, Rum Cay and
San Salvador, gave brief
remarks.
Mr Bowles was described as
a man of few words who
meant whatever he said. He
was also a family man.
Persons lined the street as
prison officers marched from
the Shell service station on
Prince Charles Drive to the
graveyard at Woodlawn Gar-
dens.
Mr Bowles, who served as a
13-year veteran at the prison,
is survived by his wife, Jinette
Saunders Bowles, sons, Dion
Dewitt, Diondro and Dupri.
An adopted daughter, Dorissa
Bethel, and his mother Olivia
Bowles.


* THE march to the grave site for the late Dion Bowles


(Photos: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


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FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2006, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


OAL


0 In brief

Cartwright
to announce
return to
FNM at rally

INDEPENDENT MP Larry
Cartwright will officially
announce his return to the Free
National Movement at an FNM
rally at the Regatta site at Salt
Pond, Long Island, tonight.
Mr Cartwright is the MP for
Long Island and Ragged Island.
Party leader Hubert Ingra-
ham will be the principal speak-
er for the evening. Other speak-
ers will include Brent Symon-
ette, MP for Montagu and
Deputy Leader, Mr Cartwright,
Robert Sweeting, MP for South
Abaco, Alvin Smith, MP for
North Eleuthera, Senator Tom-
my Turnquest, Senator Carl
Bethel, and Loretta Butler-
Turner.
Residents in New Providence
and Grand Bahama can hear
the rally, which will be broad-
cast live on Love 97 beginning
at 8pm tonight.

Crewmen
rescued
after ship
goes down

THE US Coast Guard yes-
terday announced the successful
rescue of six crewmen after a
freighter sank in waters off
Grand Bahama on Thursday
morning.
At 1.35 am, the Coast Guard
in Miami received notification
through the Emergency Posi-
tion Indicating Radio Beacon
(EPIRB) satellite system that a
vessel was in' distress in the
N..il h', cst Providencc Channel.
ihc Coast Guard Rescue Co-
,i:iJn..'iion C'cntre in Miami dis-
patched an H60 helicopter from
the AUTEC base in Andros to
investigate.
At around 3.30 am yesterday,
the helicopter located the six
crew; members of the 133-foot
Bahamas registered Coastal
Freighter my Our Jay.
The crew had abandoned the
sinking ship and boarded a life-
raft south-west of Grand
Bahama.
The helicopter flew overhead
ahd monitored,the recovery of
the survivors by the tug Switzer
Apure, which transported them
to Freeport on Thursday.
This is the 17th search and
rescue effort performed by
Coast Guard helicopters
assigned to the Bahamas since
October of last year.
Lieutenant commander Terry
Johns, Coast Guard Liaison for
the Bahamas, explained that
quick response was a major part
of the success of the mission.
"We. encourage all mariners
to carry and maintain safety
equipment such as EPIRBS and
radios that can be used in emer-
gency circumstances like this,"
he said.















"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


I'
TROPICALlllll


Police statement places Ricardo



Miller at the scene of murder


* By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE jury in the Mario
Miller murder trial heard that
the signed police statement of
Ryan Miller placed his brother
Ricardo Miller at the scene of
the crime.
Detective-Sergeant Michael
Meronard read from police
statement as he continued his
testimony before the Supreme
Court yesterday.
Mario Miller, the son of
Minister of Trade and Industry
Leslie Miller, was stabbed to
death on June 22, 2002.
Two men Ricardo Miller,
aka Tamar Lee, and Ryan
Miller are facing murder
charges in connection with his
death.
According to Detective
Meronard, Ryan Miller's state-
ment said his brother Ricardo
came back from a planned
meeting with Mario Miller
with a cut on his hand, claim-
ing that he had been in a fight.
When asked if he wanted to
go after "the fellas" Ricardo
responded "no", adding only
that he wanted to go to the
hospital to have his wound
stitched, Mr Meronard read.
Continuing, Mr Meronard
read that Ryan Miller said in
his statement that Ricardo
offered him a "kilo of coke"
for the use of his car; and
showed him three packages of
cocaine wrapped in a brown
package and a plastic bag in
the trunk of the car.
He also read that Ryan
admitted that the package
looked like the same packages
he had seen earlier in the pos-
session of Mario Miller in his
green Infiniti jeep.
Finishing his reading, Mr
Meronard stated that when he
was arrested, Ricardo Miller
said he was only there to "get
the cocaine" and that "them
other fellas" were the ones
involved with the murder.
Mr Meronard said that when


arrested, Ryan Miller stated
that he only "went to the food
store" with his brother.
Ryan Miller's attorney Mur-
rio Ducille pressed Mr
Meronard about whether or
not he informed his client that
he had the right to have an
attorney present when the
statement was given.
Mr Meronard responded
that Ryan had been made
aware his rights and had
retained a lawyer, but that the
lawyer said that he would not
represent Ryan.
Mr Ducille asked Mr
Meronard if he felt that it would
have been "prudent" for Ryan
to be present while his car was
being inspected by police.
Mr Meronard responded
"no"
Langton Hilton, attorney for
Ricardo Miller, accused Mr
Meronard of writing a state-
ment for his client, as he was
under pressure to ensure that
the case comes to "some kind"
of resolution.
The officer responded, "no"
Mr Meronard said that he
had arrested a number of per-
sons in connection with the


murder, including Ricardo and
Ryan Miller as well as Anwar
Seymour and Ryan Wells -
who were both referenced in
Ryan's police statement.
Anwar Seymour testified,
denying he ever knew Ricardo
or Ryan Miller, and said that
he was not present with either
man when Mario Miller was
killed.
Seymour testified that he
was working at the car wash
on Mackey Street behind the
FNM headquarters during the
time of the murder, and that
he had only been working
there since the beginning of
June 2002.
He claimed that he had nev-
er had a conversation with
either Ryan or Ricardo, but
had seen them in the area
before. Seymour also said that
he did know a Ryan Wells, and
did not go anywhere with a
person by that name on June
21 or'June 22, 2002.
Mr Ducille claimed that Sey-
mour had actually been
employed at the car wash since
the end of 2001, to which the
witness answered "yes".
However, prior to this, Sey-


mour had claimed that he had
only been working at the car
wash for a month from June
2002 to July 2002.


Seymour maintained that
both statements were true.
The case is set to continue
this morning at 10am.


STORE




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* MINISTER of Trade and Industry Leslie Miller talking
with Chief Superintendent in charge of Criminal Detective
Unit Marvin Dames outside court yesterday
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/ Tribune staff)


Tribune launches new


scheme to boost literacy


THE TRIBUNE has
launched an exciting new
reading scheme to boost lit-
eracy in the Bahamas and
introduce children to the joys
of the written word.
The Tribune has partnered
with the Minister of Educa-
tion's Book Club in presenting
its official selection for chil-
dren For Janauru through
March. Story serialization is
a major component of the The
Tribune's Newspapers in Edu-
cation Literacy Programme.
The story Reading the Sky,
which began in The Tribune
yesterday, will continue for 13
chapters, telling the story of
a dyslexic boy called Jamie
and his encounters with a
thief.
Parents are encouraged to
follow the story with their
children to show how exciting
and interesting reading can
be.
The Tribune is also featur-
ing the first three articles by
the Special Services Section
of the Department of Educa-
tion about dyslexia every
Tuesday beginning next week
(January 31) in our Women
and Health section.
Teachers are being encour-
aged to join in the Newspa-


pers in Education Literacy
Programme.
A comprehensive teacher's
guide is available at a nominal
non-profit price of $7, which
covers production costs.
The guide includes daily
vocabulary words, questions
related to the featured story
and a newspaper connection
piece.
Reading the Sky is.the fourth
story serialised by The Tribune,
which is making newspapers
available to schools at a
reduced rate (30c) so that they
can be used as education aids
in a variety of subjects, ranging
from Bahamas history to civic
affairs.
Marketing manager Sean
Moore said the programme
aims to promote reading as a
pleasurable activity.
"Being able to read prop-
erly and enjoy books and
newspapers is a very impor-
tant part .of life," said Mr
Moore.
"Through this programme,
The Tribune and the Ministry
of Education are working
together to share the joy of
words.
"This, in turn, helps chil-
dren become literate and
articulate, enabling them to


express themselves properly
and commit their thoughts to
paper.
"Better reading skills are
essential if people are to create
a role for themselves in 21st
century society. We hope this
programme will help children
make reading an important part
of their lives."
The story, which started in
The Tribune's Religion section
on Thursday, is still available
for those who might have
missed it. Extra copies of this
section can be obtained from
The Tribune's office on Shirley
Street. The first instalment is
printed on page 9C of that sec-
tion.
SEE Page 13 for the sec-
ond instalment of Reading the
Sk).


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UNDERWORLD: EVOLUIIUN C 1:1U 13:25 :UU BI:1b 10U:2
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LAST HOLIDAY B 1:25 3:30 6:10 8:25 10:35
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Editorial/Letters. ........................................ P4
Advts.......................................... P11,13.15,16
BUSINESS/SPORTS SECTION
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C om ics........................................... ......... P8
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CLASSIFIED SECTION 28 PAGES

MIAMI HERALD SECTIONS
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Sports/Business ..........................12 Pages


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PAGE 4, RIDAY, JANUARY 27O2006ETHETRIBUN


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, N-lisair; Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


Time for a decision on LNG


NO ONE will deny that liquefied natural gas
(LNG) is._a hazardous fuel. And, of course,
as with all hazardous material, risks are-
involved.
However, as someone remarked this week:
"Life itself is a risk, it just depends on how well
you manage it."
According to Dr Marcus Bethel, who recent-
ly entered the debate as to whether LNG ter-
minals should be allowed to locate in the
Bahamas, an LNG terminal is safer than the
corer gas station. No one thinks of a gas sta-
tion as dangerous, but light a match while gas
is being pumped into your car, and a massive
explosion will usher you hastily from this
world.
The 1,000 to 10,000-gallon fuel trucks that
almost daily drive up and down our streets
are a terrible hazard, but they are risks that we
have accepted as part.of daily living.
And no one gives a thought to the noxious
yellow fumes probably sulphur spewed
from BEC's chimneys at Clifton. Does anyone
stop to think that these fumes are poisoning
the air we breathe? Weekly large oil tankers
anchor off Clifton to pump their fuel into the
holding tanks of the three large oil compa-
nies. Every time they enter our waters there
could be an accident. One oil spill could
destroy our reefs, beaches, wild life and tourist
industry. Yet it is a risk that we have accepted
because we need fuel to run our cars, and gas
to light our stoves.
These are some of the hazards that we have
accepted as part of our daily living. They have
become so much a part of us, that the fact
that they are a potential hazard never enters
our minds. Without them-we would have to
give up some of life's comforts. And without
those basic comforts,.life would not be worth
living.
The sheiks of Dubai are planning for the
future. Knowing that they have only about
six more years before their oil wells run dry,
they are turning to tourism. We also have to
look to our future.
The world is dependent for its energy on
Mid-East oil, which has now become a weapon
of conquest and destruction. As a result the
West is desperate to find a way to free itself
from the Middle East threat. Like it or not, the
Bahamas' future is caught up in that struggle.
At present the security of the United States'
energy lies in its coal fields. However, the loss
of 14 miners within the past three weeks in two


Jfirst aptist Cburrb
8Mark south P.O. Box N-7984 Nassau, Bahamas

"Begin the Year with God"
SUNDAY SERVICES
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West Virginia mine disasters, shows that there
must be a safer way. No one wants a nuclear
plant nearby, although an increase in nuclear
plants is also another way. But of all these
evils, liquefied natural gas, although hazardous,
appears to have risks that are manageable.
Unlike coal, and fuel, the clear exhaust from
natural gas will not cause our plant life to
decay, nor will it pollute our air or our beach-
es. But like coal, oil, and nuclear energy there
is the potential for an accident there is the
potential for fire, for explosion, for loss of
life. But if we have learned to manage the
dangers of the others, why not LNG, which, on
its record, is the. cleanest and seems to be the
least hazardous of them all?
We were talking this week with a retired
gentleman who has been in the fuel industry all
his life and is most impressed with the future of
natural gas.
He agrees that no LNG terminal should
be sited near a populated area. For example,
instead of Freeport harbour, he would opt for
South Riding Point in High Rock at the old
Burmah Oil terminal. He said one of the con-
cerns of that location was that it was thought
undesirable to have LNG tankers using the
same area as the large oil tankers. However, he
believes there are so few of the latter in the
area that they should not present a problem.
Also, the harbour of South Riding, a good
distance from the nearest settlement, could
accommodate 300,000 tonne tankers with a
draught of more than 76 feet.
He believes the Ocean Cay location would be
very safe, however, its location would not offer
as much of an advantage to the Bahamas as
would the South Riding location. He believes an
agreement should be entered into whereby
BEC would be supplied with its fuel from South
Riding, and, if the LNG fuel delivered there
contained-not-only methane, but also propane
and butane, the latter two components could be
extracted to provide the Bahamas with its cook-
ing oil. He saw many advantages for the
Bahamas, the chief being a regular supply of
fuel that could be bought at Miami prices -
even cheaper and cleaner than that offered by
Venezuela, and with no strings attached.
The urgent need for new gas supplies
should be balanced against public risk, and
how well those risks can be managed to safe-
guard the public.
However, whatever the outcome, it is past
time for government to make a decision.


Socialisation




of national




healthcare


EDITOR, The Tribune
Government has completed
its work for the implementation
of "the long-awaited National
Insurance (NHI) project." The
objective is to "finance" an
"affordable" universal health-
care system for all Bahamians.
In other words, nationalized
healthcare.
Evidence of the effects of
socialization of healthcare is
readily available. In England
and Canada the results are
increased cost for declining ser-
vice. Why would The Bahamas
be any different?
All enterprise whether pri-
vate or government must take
into account economic efficien-,
cy, stability and responsiveness
to consumers. Can a govern-
ment bureaucracy meet these
objectives, or is the Blue Rib-
bon Commission's Plan pri-
marily to serve political objec-
tives and insulate consumers of
medical care from the fact of
scarce resources and knowledge
of how they would be utilized?
There is no end of propagan-
da to promote government
managed health systems and a
shortage of truth and fact about
the way they function.
Dr Max Gammon, a British
physician, and Nobel Laureate
Dr Milton Friedman explain
why government bureaucracies
cannot meet the objectives as
set out in the Blue Ribbon
Commission's Plan.
Gammon's Law
Dr Max Gammon, a British
physician who researches med-
ical care enunciated a theory
called "Gammon's Law".
To explain the "disorder
which for the past fifty years
has surely been destroying our
medical services", Dr. Gammon
formulated a theory he called
"the theory of bureaucratic dis-
placement", which in a bureau-
cratic system is an "increase in
expenditure will be matched by
a fall in production". Such sys-
tems act like "black holes" in
the economic universe, simul-
taneously sucking in resources,
and shrinking in terms of "emit-.
ted production." -
Gammon's Law applies to all
bureaucracies that are rigid sys-
tems, governed by fixed rules
that tend to exclude individual
initiative and eventually dis-
place productive activity with
counterproductive activity.
Dr Gammon tells of working
in a small hospital in which the
quality of care in one particular
ward was outstanding. When he
returned years later he discov-
ered the ward was "in chaos".


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He asked for the Sister who had
previously run the ward so
superbly and was told that she
had been moved to administra-
tion. He found her in an office,
where "she wept as she told me
that she had been forced to
leave her ward and become an
administrator since her salary
would have been reduced
....had she remained in her clin-
ical-post".
This anecdote illustrates
"bureaucratic displacement".
The focus of nursing had been
changed from the ward and the
patient to the office and the
seminar room.
According to Dr Gammon, in
1948 when the National Health
Service began there were
480,000 hospital beds. By the
year 2000 the number had fallen
to 186,000. Official statistics in
2000 indicated there were "just
under 1,000,000 patients await-
ing hospital admission. He
described a close correlation
between the increase in the
numbers of NHS administrative
staff and the fall in numbers of
NHS hospital beds.
Dr Milton Friedman in an
article on American Healthcare
for the Wall Street Journal in
1991 states that a "casual glance
at input and output in US. hos-
pitals indicate that Gammon's
law has'been in full operation in
the US since the end of WW II
and especially since the enact-
ment of Medicare and Medicaid
in 1965".
"Before 1940, input and out-


put both rose, input somewhat
more than output, presumably
because of the introduction of
more sophisticated and expen-
sive treatment. The cost of hos-
pital care per resident of the
U.S., adjusted for inflation, rose
at the rate of 5 per cent per year
from 1929 to 1940; the number
of occupied beds, at 2.4 per cent
a year. Cost per patient day,
adjusted for inflation, rose only
modestly.
"The situation was very dif-
ferent after the war. From 1946
to 1989, the number of beds per
1,000 population fell by more
than one-half; the occupancy
rate, by one-eighth. In sharp
contrast, input skyrocketed.
Hospital personnel per occu-
pied bed multiplied nearly sev-
en-fold and cost per patient day,
adjusted for inflation, an
astounding 26-fold. One major
engine of these changes was the
enactment of Medicare and
Medicaid in 1965. A mild rise in
input was turned into a mete-
oric rise; a mild fall in output,
into a rapid decline."
State-mandated and state
run health services in The
Bahamas will be no different
from other countries where
bureaucrats, not doctors make
major decisions about patient
care.
The Bahamas should take.
the "road less travelled" and
support a framework for the
private market to satisfy health-
care requirements.
Other articles on this subject
are available at www.nassauin-
stitute.org.
THE NASSAU INSTITUTE
Nassau
January 25 2006


Revamping awards


EDITOR, The Tribune
I HAVE written before
concerning and proposing a
total revamp of The Cacique
Awards where these impor-
tant awards will represent
customer acknowledgment of
excellence rather than what
in reality occurs.
Is it impossible with all the
IT available that through the
Ministry of Tourism, the
hotels specifically an elec-
tronic system for recognition
would be established imag-
ine if every visitor was able
through this system to offer
comment and recognition to
the hotel employee or
provider?
At the end of the agreed
12-month period the top six-
employees-provider acknowl-
edged over the previous 12-
months would be short-listed
as nominees for The Cacique.
Real performance acknowl-
edged by the customer -
what better system could you
have?


An international panel of
judges would then scrutinise
the short list and based on
customer comment would
ajudicate who would win the:
Cacique.
To those who are against
Dolphin amenities can you
imagine the value of promo-
tion the Bahamas and
Atlantis has received from
the recent arrival on our
shores of the 15-hurricane
Katrina Dolphin refugees?
Can you imagine with the
CNN audience, global, of mil-
lions again and again the
audience saw Atlantis, saw
the obviously content and
playful dolphins in their new
home? Good wholesome
advertising.
When the sixteenth dolphin
is fully recovered I presume
again CNN will cover that
arrival kudos to Atlantis
yet again!
K MINNS
Nassau
January 23 2006


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THE TRIBUNE


PAG E 4, FR IDAY, JAN UARY 27, 2006









THETRIBNEFRDAYANUARLOC27,006,S I AG5


Residents still demanding that



barge is removed from reef


*in Aw




* -





























"Copyrighted M
Syndicated Con
Available from Commercial N


ars






I



























material
intent
News Providers"














































no


* By KARIN HIERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
AFTER months of assurances with-
out action, Abaconians are demanding
that the government finally fulfill its
promise to remove the wreck of an oil
drilling barge from their waters.
More than a month after port offi-
cials promised they would begin work
on removing the Canadian barge from a
reef off Man-O-War Cay, the 220-foot
Louis J Goulet remains stationary.
South Abaco MP Robert Sweeting
told The Tribune that the barge contin-
ues to be an eyesore to the community.
"The wrecked ship is still out there,
run-aground on the reef. The minister
(of Transport Glenys Hanna-Martin)
said that it was all properly secured,
but that is completely untrue," he said.
Last month, government issued a
press release which stated that the
process of "de-watering" the vessel has
been initiated.
The release explained that in order to
begin the removal process, all the water
which has accumulated in the barge
must be pumped out.
The government further said that spe-
cial repairs had to be undertaken which


will allow the vessel to be removed with-
out damaging the reef.
According to previous reports, the
ship's hull was punctured when Hurri-


cane Wilma pushed the barge into the
reef.
However, Mr Sweeting yesterday said
that although government officials and


representatives of the barge's owner
Kermit Water visited the site, none of
the promised repair .procedures have
been initiated.
"At this point absolutely nothing is
being done about it. This big old barge
is right there. The people around the
area would like to know what the gov-
ernment is doing about it," he said.
Mr Sweeting said that addition to
being "a horrible eyesore", the barge is
also damaging the precious coral reef.
The Louis J Goulet has been in
Bahamian waters for 10 months and
was stranded several times.
In March, 2005, Exuma residents
raised concerns over the barge, which
was reportedly seen floating close to a
nearby national park on Conception
Island.
The barge was then removed and tak-
Sen to Walkers Cay, Abaco, where it
remained until the hurricane caused it
to break loose from its moorings.
According to the Port Department,
the "non-motorised vessel" was only
carrying fuel to operate generators.
Port officials say the vessel poses "no
environmental hazard to waters around
the Abacos" a claim which environ-
mentalists have questioned.


_ -


* DR Elliston Rahming

Memorials announced

after death of guard


IN memory of slain prison
officer Dion Bowles, his sur-
vivors will receive the Her
Majesty's Prison Iron Heart
Medal for Bravery on his
behalf.
Superintendent of Her
Majesty's Prison Dr Ellis-
ton Rahming made the
announcement at Mr
Bowles funeral yesterday.
Last week, Mr Bowles
was killed during a prison
break-out by four inmates.
Dr Rahming also
announced that the western
section of the maximum
security unit will be named
in his honour.
'In the garden of memo-
ries that is to be built at the
prison, Mr Bowles will also
have a "special" place, Mr
Rahming said.
He also announced that a
dependency fund will be
established for prison offi-


cers, and said that the children
of Mr Bowles will be the first to
benefit
Dr Rahming went on to say
that as a result of the escape,
surveillance at the prison will
be doubled, and that the facility
will be monitored around the
clock.
Since the break-out, Dr Rah-
ming's leadership has been
under scrutiny, and has been
criticised by former prison chief
Edwiii Culmer.
Mr Culmer called Dr Rah-
ming a "political predator who
has jumped on the bandwagon
of the government's victory and
who feels the country owes him
something."




FRIDAY,
JANUARY 27


6:30
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Bahamas @ Sunrise live
Immediate Response
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Immediate Response
Ethnic Health America
Spiritual Impact: B. Wright
All Access
Inside Hollywood
.International Fellowship of
Christian & Jews
Lobias Murray
Dennis The Menace
Carmen San Diego
ZNS News Update
Fun Farm
411
Caribbean Passport
News Night 13
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ENT :ZS-T 3rsre h
rih t ak-as int


* By FELICITY INGRAHAM practices through continuous
Tribune Staff Reporter training.
Also in 2006, the Commis-
TRAINING police officers, sioner wants to see the levels
reducing crime, and increas- of crime which affect quality
ing public safety are Commis- of life and cause damage to
sioner Paul Farquharson's personal property drop by five
three top goals for the Royal per cent, while simultaneous-
Bahamas Police Force in 2006. ly bringing perpetrators of
He released the "Commis- crimes to justice.
sioner's Policy Statement" His third policy goal is to
yesterday at a "day away" "create safer public environ-
retreat for senior police offi- ments conducive to family
cers, held at the Lyford Cay bonding and social entertain-
Club. ment by reducing the number
Commissioner Farquharson of offences and external
gave his officers eight main threats that affect public tran-
goals for 2006, with officer quality".
training at the top of the list. -Road safety is another
All members of the force, objective of the RBPF,
he said, must be kept, up to. with a mandate to see the
date with current policies and rate'of traffic fji liies sig-


nificantly drop.
With a significant increase in
the amount of calls to the fire
department, the Commissioner
also wants to see the efficiency
of the fire department improve
this year.
The final three goals are to
see Family Island facilities
upgraded, community relations
uplifted, and more management
and accountability in the force.






321


* THE oil drilling barge the Louis J Goulet


~1



'1 '


i : i Officer training tops Commissioner's

list of police priorities for 2006


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FRIDAY, JANUARY 27,2?006, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE







P 6FAJ A 70TWS
sl I I I0


Bozine Town residents deny



planning to demonstrate


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
RESIDENTS of Bozine
lTon are not planning to
demonstrate in Rawson Square
next Thursday as reported by a
local daily.
Tryone Brown, a member of
the Bozine Town Steering Com-
mitte. told 7Te Tribune yester-
day that reports in The Nassau
G(;,irdian on Thursday that the
residents were planning a
protest are false.
He explained that while resi-
dents have not ruled out the
possibility of a demonstration,
what they are planning to do is


to hold a community meeting
next Thursday.
Mr Brown said that the
steering committee is awaiting
word from the Department of
Lands and Survey as to why a
tractor was allowed to begin
excavation on land in the area
which for the last few years has
been the subject of a bitter land
row.
Earlier this week disgruntled
residents threw sticks and rocks
at the operator of the tractor as
it attempted to clear land. The
situation was so tense that
police had to be called to
restore order.
The dispute began in Octo-


ber 2004 when residents
received letters from the
Lockhart and Munroe law
firm informing them that
their client, Harrold Road
Land Company, had been
granted certificates of title to
property between Bozine
Town and Harrold Road.
Residents were initially giv-


en 30 days to either buy the
land or vacate.
However, residents vowed
to fight back, organising a
steering committee, staging
demonstrations and raising
funds to secure legal counsel.
After a demonstration by
hundreds of Bozine Town res-
idents in February 2005, the


Attorney General
summoned as a n
to review and de
legality of the clai
both sides.
Since the initial
have had a numb
sions and the mati
before the courts
months.


* RONNIE Butler reads to students at Woodcock Primary School



Music legend joi



effort to increase


child literacy


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ty Reading Programme initi-
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students of the Woodcock Pri-
mary School a special
appearance from Bahamian
music legend, Ronnie Butler.
Mr Butler was warmly greet-
ed by students, who sang his
hit song Age ain't nothing' but a'
number.
It has recently been noted
that 80 per cent of students in
the Bahamas are one grade
behind in their reading capa-
bilities.
Many observers claim this
is so because of a failure to
implement innovative
approaches in developing child
literacy.


US Ambassador
said he was deligh
Ronnie Butler pa
the initiative, noti
programme's obje
ply to generate a g
est in reading am
Bahamians.
Mr Butler, who
book to the stu
signed autographs
is one of many o
Bahamians who h
pated in the we
gramme.
Ambassador Ro
aged Bahamian bus
other organisation
er launching their
ing programmes at
primary schools.


's office was
neutral party
termine the
ms made by
notice, they
er of exten-
ter has been
for several






























ns



e





John Rood
cited to have
irticipate in
ing that the
ctive is sim-
reater inter-
long young
read a short
dents and
afterwards,
outstanding
ave partici-
eekly pro-
>od encour-
sinesses and
s to consid-
own read-
other local


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and Bahamian celebrities are
joining the effort to promote
reading in public schools.
The US Embassy's Celebri-
. .. ... ........ . ig \, A


::


(ii


*iI

I.


A'


*


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"





! -l- -


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BA TRE
Telphoe: 22-53


THE TRIBUNE


PAG E 6, FR IDAY, JAN UARY 27, 2006


0 In brief

Guardsman
praises
benefits of
programme

COLLABORATION
between the US and the
Bahamas should be beneficial
to both countries, according to a.
member of the Rhode Island'
National Guard (RING).
State Partnership Programme'
Coordinator, Captain Mike
Morrison was speaking as a del-.
egation from Rhode Island,
wrapped up an almost week-
long trip to the Bahamas last
Friday.
The group met with disaster
managers, key government offi-
cials, senior officials of the
Grand Bahama Port Authori-
ty, Local Government officials,
business leaders and officials of
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force to discuss a number of
issues. They were then given a
tour of Freeport Harbour and
the Freeport Container Port'
before departing Grand
Bahama for New Providence.
Captain Morrison applauded'
the government and officials
from both the private and pub,
lic sectors for "the unbelievable
support we have received."
"The way that the govern-
ment of the Bahamas truly,
seems to be behind this pro-
gramme is not typical. It has
been special," said Captaini
Morrison.
The State Partnership Pro-
gramme brings US states and
territories and partner nations"
together to arrange military and'
civilian activities using thei
National Guard as the conduit'


041100


-







I-HIDAY, JANU/Ai% H ... ,.


I Ml I l IbUI'AJ


Concern for visitors to carnvain



Trinidad and Tobago spar ert


0 In brief

Seminars

on family

issues are

launched

THE government has
launched a series of seminars
on a wide range of topics affect-
ing the Bahamian family.
The "family enrichment"
seminars, hosted by the Min-
istry of Social Services and
Community Development in
collaboration with the Ministry
of Education and the Ministry
of Health, began yesterday.
The sessions will be held over
a six-week period, and each
week a different topic will be
discussed.
Issues including family life
values, sexuality and AIDS pre-
vention, parenting, communi-
cation, nutrition and the envi-
ronment will be covered.
The seminars will be held at
the Family Life Centre in
Flamingo Gardens at 7pm every
Thursday, and will seek to
encourage parents to work with
their children and for families to
spend more time together.




C of





*- - -.
OW C




. "Copyrighted Material -
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"




.- -
o 4



~ - -
-4b
40W


which will be held late next month. The
Tribune received reports that this year,
the airline may be booking an addi-
tional flight due to demand.
According to the British Foreign and
Commonwealth Office, Britons in
Tobago are at risk now, more than
ever of becoming victims of violent
crime in Trinidad.
Over the last three years, the UK, US
and Canada have continuously updated,
their travel advisories about Trinidad,
due to increasing levels of crime.
The latest statistics show a 73.6 per
cent increase in the homicide rate this
year, compared to the same period last
year.
The murders, for the most part,
appear to be domestic, but this did not
stop the UK Foreign Office to re-issue


its warning, due to an increase in the
reports of sexual assault and robbery
of tourists who visited an area known as
"Englishman's Bay".
According to the UK warning:
"There were a number of serious rob-
beries against tourists in Tobago in 2004
and 2005. Some of these incidents were
accompanied by violence, including
rape, against foreign nationals."

Warning

While not commenting on the
Trinidad and Tobago situation in par-
ticular, police press liaison officer
Inspector Walter Evans did issue a
warning to Bahamian travellers.
"The Royal Bahamas Police Force


encourages people who travel out of
this jurisdiction to pay cloSC attetllion to
the activities that may transpire in any
other jurisdiction heflore travelling
there," he said.
Bahamians should exercise all nec-
essary precautions when travelling, and
if they choose to visit dangerous loca-
tions, should keep in mind the crime
prevention tips regularly issued by the
force, he added.
Inspector Evans said it is important
fort, I I...i to get as much information
as possible before making any trip.
He pointed out that there are estab-
lished relationships between the RBPF
and all police forces in the region, and
Bahamians can visit any of the govern-
ment's embassies or consulate offices
if they experience a problem abroad.


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT St George's
High School students were
recognized for capturing the
top spot in this year's junior
junkanoo parade at a recogni-
tion ceremony held at the
school yesterday.
Principal Kenneth Romer
said the win is one of several
recent major achievements for
St George's. -
"We have had a tremendous
year of accomplishments at the N KENNE
school academically, and win-
ning -the junior junkanoo
parade was the icing on the cake," Mr
Romer said.
School patron Lady Henrietta St George,
Lucaya MP Neko Grant, and Ministry of
Education officials including deputy director
Cecil Thompson and school superintendent
Sandra Edgecombe, joined students and
teachers as they celebrated the win.
The St George's High School Jaguars won
the secondary division with 160 points over
Sir Jack Hayward Wildcats and Eight Mile
Rock High Blue Jays.
"Hurricane Wilma was devastating and


TI


the students pulled together
and managed to win the junior
junkanoo parade and I am real-
ly proud of them," said Lady
Henrietta.
Several students were also
recognized for their academic
achievement over the past term
and teacher Vonetta Lowe was
recognized as the school's
teacher of the year 2005/2006.
Mr Romer said he feels it
S. 'was important to recognize the
students for their many
achievements so far this school
H Romer year. '"After several years of
absence we were the underdogs
and that win is an indication of
good things to come from the school.
."We were tremendously challenged after
the hurricane, but our students were resilient
and bounced forward. And we have had a
tremendous record of academic achieve-
ment this year especially among the young
men."
Mr Romer said four male students are
among the top five academic achievers so far.
"My vision for our school is to reclaim
the leadership among young men. And we
intend to have this school be identified as the
number one school in the country," he said.


* THE main school banner displayed by St George's High School at
the Junior Junkanoo parade
(Photos: Denise Maycock)


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LOA L NEWS


St George's triumphs in


Junior Junkanoo parade


* By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
THERE have been 33 murders in 26
days in Trinidad and Tobago a country
that is about to embrace thousands of
tourists, including many Bahamians, at
the annual Carnival festival.
Six of those murders took place in a
17-hour period between Tuesday and
Wednesday of this week, according to
the Trinidad and Tobago Express.
These statistics are cause for alarm,
according to UK news agencies, who
yesterday posted government warnings
for the many British travellers who
make the yearly "party pilgrimage" to
Trinidad.
Bahamasair usually books a charter
flight to Trinidad in time for Carnival,







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2006


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Rock, Blues, Jazz, Funk, Reggae THE BUZZ: MAKING MUSIC
LIVE
$5 Friday @ First Down every Friday night. Music by Barry Da Pusher,
Selector: Dominique. Ladies $5 all night, gents $10. Early juggling by Mr.
Xcitement and DJ Fatal. Drink specials all night long.
Bacardi Happy Hour @ Power Boat Adventures Bar and Grill (one door
east of Texaco Harbour Bay), every Friday. $3 Bacardi drinks all night and
$3 beers.

Ladies Night @ Power Boat Adventures Bar and Grill, every Saturday.
Ladies free, Gents, $10 all night. Bacardi Big Apple and other drink spe-
cials all night long.
Wild Jungle, each and every Wednesday night @ Club Trappers, Nassau's
"upscale" gentleman's club. Featuring a female body painting extravaganza.
Free body painting @ 8 pm. Ladies always welcome. Admission: Men
free before 10 pm. Females free. There will be free food and hors d'oeu-
vres between 9 and 10 pm. Open until 4 am.

Ladies Night @ Fluid Lounge, this and every Thursday night.'Doors open
at 10pm. Ladies free before lam, $10 after. Guys: $15 all night. Drink spe-
cial: 3 @ $10 (Bacardi) Giveaways and door prizes every week.

Saturday Night Live every Saturday night @ Club Fluid, Bay St. The
biggest party of the week, pumping all your favourite hits all night long.
Ladies in free before 11pm. Strict security enforced.

Rave Saturdays @ Club Eclipse. DJ Scoobz spinning the best in Old
Skool. Admission $35, all inclusive food and drink.
Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters Sports Bar. Drink specials all night
long, including karaoke warm-up drink to get you started. Party from 8pm-
until.

Reggae Tuesdays @ Bahama Boom. Cover charge includes a free Guinness
and there should be lots of prizes and surprises. Admission: Ladies $10 and
Men $15.
Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar every Wednesday
5pm-8pm. Free appetizers and numerous drink specials.

The Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday. Doors open at 9pm, showtime
11.30pm. Cover charge $15. $10 with flyer.
Fantasy Fridays @ Fluid Lounge, featuring late '80s music in the VIP
Lounge, Top of the charts in the Main Lounge, neon lights and Go Go
dancers. Admission: Ladies free before 11pm, $15 after; Guys $20 all
night.
Dicky Mo's @ Cable Beach. Flavoured Fridays Happy Hour, every Friday.
Drink specials: Smimoff Kamikaze Shots, $1; Smimoff Flayoured Marti-
nis, 2 for $10; Smimoff Flavoured Mixed Drinks, 3 for $10. Bahamian Night
(Free admission) every Saturday with live music from 8 pm to midnight.
Karaoke Sundays from 8pm to midnight, $1 shots and dinner specials all
night long.
Twisted Boodah Lounge @ Cafe Segafredo, Charlotte St kicks off Fridays
at 6pm with deep house to hard house music, featuring CraigBOO, Unkle
Funky and Sworl'wide on the decks.

Child Out Sundays @ Coco Loco's, Sandyport, from 4pm-until, playing deep,
funky chill moods with world beats.

Sweet Sunday Chill Out Soiree Lounge, every Sunday, 4pm-midnight @
Patio Grille, British
Colonial Hotel.

Wet Sundays, every Sunday, noon-midnight @ Crystal Cay Beach. Admis-
sion $10, ladies free.

TooLooSe @ Indigo Restaurant on West Bay St and Skyline Drive.
Singer/songwriter Steven Holden performs solo with special guests Thurs-
day from 9pm midnight.

The Graham Holden Deal @ The Green Parrot....David Graham, Steve
Holden, Tim Deal and Friends perform Sunday, 7pm 10pm @ Hurricane
Hole on Paradise Island.

Jay Mitchell and Hot KC @ Palm Court Lounge, British Colonial Hilton,
Wednesday-Thursday 8pm-12am.

Sunday Night Interlude @ Briteley's Restaurant & Lounge, Eneas St off
Poinciana Drive. Featuring Frankie Victory at the key board in the After
Dark Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to midnight. Fine food and drinks.
Paul Hanna, Tabatha and Gernie, and the Caribbean Express perform at
Traveller's Rest, West Bay St, every Sunday, 6.30pm-9.30pm.


ST GEORGE'S ANGLICAN CHURCH presents
"Let All The World": Choral music from composers
around the world will be featured next week when the
music ministry of St George's Anglican Church pre-
sents "Let All The World", a concert of Sacred Choral
Music, Thursday, January 26 and Friday, January 27.
The concert is scheduled for 8pm on both evenings in
the sanctuary of George's Church located on Montrose
Avenue.


Thel AM

Transforming Spaces: The National Art Gallery of the Bahamas, Post
House Gallery, Popop Gallery, TYF Ironwork Gallery, Doongalik Art
Gallery, New Providence Art and Antiques, and Malcolm Rae's Stingrae Stu-
dio will participate in the second Transforming Spaces event in March.
Transforming Spaces is an art happening designed to nurture increased
cooperation and a sense of community among art spaces, extend their audi-
ences and deepen their relationships and relevance to Bahamian people
through experience based dialogue. If you're an artist interested in partici-
pating in the "Paint Out", please contact Malcom Rae at stingrae@batel-
net.bs.
Malcolm Rae's Stingrae Studio Gallery's contribution to the Transforming
Spaces 2006 will be a "Paint Out" on Saturday, March 4. The "Paint Out" will
consists of six to ten local artists being present in Montague Park painting in
their style out in the open. The reason the park was chosen was to make the
work of these artists accessible to the general public. Passers by can stop, see
what is happening, ask questions, interact with the artists, learn more about
the art of painting and in a sense become a part of the event. The space will
literally be "transformed" into a classroom.
RINGPLAY announces the launch of a new web forum for discussion
about the arts: http://www.artsbahamas.com. Ringplay has long felt the
need for an online community set up specifically for Bahamian artists and per-
formers. This forum was created for just that purpose.
Stepping Stone Quilters will host its 17th Annual Quilt Show January 26 to
February 4 at the Trinity Church Hall on Frederick Street from 10am to 4pm.
All interested persons are invited.
The National Collection @ the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas, an exhi-
bition that takes the viewer on a journey through the history of fine art in the
Bahamas. It features signature pieces from the national collection, including
recent acquisitions by Blue Curry, Antonius Roberts and Dionne Ben-
jamin-Smith. Call 328-5800 to book tours. This exhibition closes February 28,
2006.
The Nassau Music Society is featuring, in association with Fidelity, RBC and
RoyalStar Assurance as part of their "FESTIVAL OF RUSSIAN
ARTISTS", Yuri Bashmet and the Moscow Soloist Orchestra who return
once again to Nassau on February 24; 26 and 27- their guest artist will be
JoAnn Deveaux-Callender.- In April Oleg Pohanski is etjrured on the piano.
Purchase your tickets from Januaiy 4,.2006'at the Dundas Theatre (394-7179);
AD Hanna & Co (322-8306) and the Galleria JFK (356-seat). Details of the
venues and programmes will be available on the website shortly. Do not miss
this opportunity to listen to live world class musicians.""




The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at 5.30pm on the second Tuesday
of each month at their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville. Call 323-
4482 for more info.
Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held 6:30pm Tuesdays and Thurs-
days at Nassau gymNastics Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doc-
tor approval is required. Call 364-


Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support group meets the first Monday
of each month at 6.30pm at New Providence Community Centre, Blake
Road. Dinner is provided and free blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol
testing is available. For more info call 702-4646 or 327-2878
MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third Monday every month, 6pm
@ Doctors Hospital conference room.
The Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third Saturday, 2.30pm
(except August and December) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close,
Shirley Street.
Doctors Hospital, the official training centre of the American Heart Asso-
ciation offers CPR classes certified by the AHA. The course defines the warn-
ing signs of respiratory arrest and gives prevention strategies to avoid sud-
den death syndrome and the most common serious injuries and choking that
can occur in adults, infants and children. CPR and First Aid classes are
offered every third Saturday of the month from 9am-lpm. Contact a Doc-
tors Hospital Community Training Representative at 302-4732 for more infor-
mation and learn to save a life today.
REACH Resources & Education for Autism and related Challenges
meets from 7pm 9pm the second Thursday of each month in the cafeteria
of the BEC building, Blue Hill Road.




St Andrew's Kirk After School Programme: The members of St Andrew's
Kirk have launched an After-School-Programme for children from the
Woodcock and Albury Sayle Primary Schools. The programme, which
begins February 6, is held Monday to Friday at the St Andrew's Presbyter-
ian Kirk. The activities include tutoring, computers, karata, sports, art, dra-
ma and baking. The programme is free to children from the Bain and
Grants Town communities. Parents interested in enrolling their children
should contact the church at 322-5475 or email: standrewskirk@yahoo.com
JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR Cycling are pleased to offer a
cycling clinic for juniors between 10 and 17. The free clinic will be held
every Saturday in an effort to encourage kids to cycle. Parents interested
in registering their children should contact organizers at
jarcycling@gmail.com i..'
The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority
Incorporated meets 6:30 pm every third Wednesday at the Bahamas Nation-
al Pride Building.
Toastmasters Club 359 meets at the British Colonial Hilton Monday's at
7pm.
Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7.30pm @ C C Sweeting Senior
School's Dining Room, College Avenue off Moss Road. Club 9477 meets Fri-
day, 7pm @ Bahamas Baptist Community College Rm A19, Jean St. Club
3956 meets Thursday, 7.30pm @ British Colonial Hilton. Club 1600 meets
Thursday, 8.30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes. Club 7178 meets Tuesday, 6pm @
The J Whitney Finder Building, Collins Ave. Club 2437 meets every second,
fourth and fifth Wednesday at the J Whitney Pinder Building, Collins Ave
at 6pm. Club 612315 meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach. Club 753494 meets every Wednesday, 6pm-8pm in the
Solomon's Building, East-West Highway. Club 359 meets at the British
Colonial Hilton Mondays at 7pm. Club Cousteau 7343 meets every Tuesday
night at 7.30 in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central Andros. All
are welcome.
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega chapter meets every second
Tuesday, 6.30pm @ the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach.
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday, 7pm @ Gaylord's
Restaurant, Dowdeswell St. Please call 502-4842/377-4589 for more info.
Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ Atlantic
House, IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room.
The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) meets every third
Monday of the month in the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel, Bay St.
Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets the second and fourth
Wednesday of the month, 8pm @ St Augustine's Monestary.
Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Friday of each month,
7.30pm at Emmaus Centre at St Augustine's Monestary. For more info
call 325-1947 after 4pm.
International Association of Administrative Professionals, Bahamas Chap-
ter meets the third Thursday of every month @ Superclubs Breezes, Cable
Beach, 6pm.
AMISTAD, a Spanish club meets the third Friday of the month at COB's
Tourism Training Centre at 7pm in Room 144 during the academic year. The
group promotes the Spanish language and culture in the community.
THE BAHAMAS HISTORICAL SOCIETY is scheduled to hold its next
meeting January 26 @ 6pm at the Museum on Shirley Street and Elizabeth
Avenue. Chris Curry, a History professor at the College of the Bahamas, will
give a presentation on the history of Bain Town. The lecture will be accom-
panied by a power point presentation. The public is invited to attend.


Send all your civic and social events to The Tribune
ia fax: 328-2398 or e-mail: ourthere@rribunemedia.net


r


L


I' I ''111 --


'N


I f







TH RBUEFIDY ANAY27 06,PG


The right to know our rights


why we


must have human rights education


The following is an article pre-
sented by Amnesty Internation-
al Bahamas that looks at the
issues related to using our edu-
cational system to teach our chil-
dren about human rights.
Amnesty International is a
worldwide movement of people
from different cultures and back-
grounds who campaign on
behalf of human rights across
the globe.
Every day in the Bahamas we
read about the importance of
education and the concern that
we are not meeting the educa-
tional needs of our children.
Education in general forges
genuine humanity and character
and is crucial to an individual's
self-development.
The main goal of education
should be to bring out the stu-
dent's latent ability and improve
those areas that are not so
strong which directly trans-
lates into success later in life.
Education should be the cen-
tral pillar of a society. The suc-


Education that
focuses on
global issues
such as peace
and the elimi-
nation of
poverty, forms
the basis for
co-operative
efforts to build
a sustainable
humane
society, one
that we can
pass on to
future
generations.


cess of later generations will be
decided first and foremost by
education. To be liberated, we
must be.educated.
When the United Nations
adopted the Universal Decla-
ration of Human Rights it was
an endorsement for human
rights education.
The principles in the decla-
ration are increasingly invoked
by world leaders to draw the
boundaries of acceptable behav-
iour by governments and indi-
viduals.
Education that focuses on
global issues such as peace and
the elimination of poverty,
forms the basis for co-operative
efforts to build a sustainable
humane society, one that we
can pass on to future genera-
tions.
Human rights education
forges genuine humanity and
character, and constitutes a fun-
damental principle for actual-
ising peace in our world. It pro-
motes the development of cul-
ture and harmony between
mankind.
Children around the world
face problems of violence, child
abuse, crime, gangs, guns, war,
domestic violence, homeless-
ness, hate crimes, hunger,
racism, poverty and discrimina-
tion. It is no different for chil-
dren growing up in the
Bahamas.
Children witness violence in
the schools and our youth deal

Share
youEP
newirs
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


with issues involving drugs,
crime and abuse in their
schools, neighborhoods and
community.


These attacks on the dignity
of their persons must be
addressed through education
and example. How children
learn about these experiences
will affect their development
and futures as local civic leaders
and international citizens.
By teaching human rights, we
assist students to understand
these growing problems and be
part of the solutions by advo-
cating tolerance and respect for
diverse peoples.
The human rights framework
is one that should apply to all
levels of the educational system
as well. Schools are institutions
that should ideally operate on
the basis of human rights prin-
ciples.
Elements of school operation


should be examined from a
human rights view, including
the governance structure, rela-
tions among staff, between staff
and students, providing oppor-
tunities for students to influ-
ence school policies, bullying
and harassment policies, and
discipline measures.
The school should be a place
that promotes and protects the
human rights of students and
staff.
Having human rights
acknowledged and knowing our


ya,'c @x V1,Y (-Dq$mi 7 vjT ineQ7

Kathleen.Louise Toote-Coakley


//^


"/




Your flames have gone out, But your
warmth remains in our hearts.
Like the loss of sunlight on a cloudy
afternoon
--- Gone too soon
Slorever in our Hearts
Randolph Coakley Sr, Rosemary and Ruthanne Coakley, Ruth
Adderley, Randolph Jr and Robert Coakley. Grandchildren,
Steffan, Renauldo, Antoine, Randia, Rechea, Davonia and,
Randanique; Patricia Jervis, Lydiabelle Adderley and Beverley
Deveaux, Other Relatives and Friends.


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Phone: (242) 322-1722
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human rights are required in
today's world. The reason is
stated in the preamble of the
Universal Declaration of
Human Rights: To achieve "a
world in which human beings
enjoy freedom of speech and
belief and freedom from fear
and want" people must come
to a "common understanding
of these rights and freedoms."
Amnesty International USA
has a human rights education
programme that can give infor-
mation on human rights cur-


riculum and instruction.
Please contact them at edu-
cation@aiusa.org to access this
information. Support our chil-
dren and our country by pro-
moting human rights education!
Amnesty International bs
more thanl.5 million members,
supporters and subscribers in
more than 150 countries, includ-
ing the Bahamas. For more
information on this volunteer
organisation, please call 327-
0807 or visit www.amnesty.org.


SCHOOL





world school

St Andrew's School, The International School of The Bahamas, an authorized International
Baccalaureate (IB) World School, invites applications from qualified and experienced Bahamian
candidates for the position of teacher of secondary school music, with effect from August
2006. Full information regarding the school may be found at its website: www.st-andrews.com

Candidates should be qualified teachers who possess the necessary academic qualifications for
the position, including a teaching qualification and a bachelor's degree, and normally need to
have a minimum of two years successful school-based experience. Candidates will be expected
to engage in a full range of extra-curricular activities, including choir and band.

Interested candidates should apply to the school's principal, Mr Dennison J MacKinnon, by letter,
email or fax as soon as possible. All applications MUST include the following:
* letter of application
* a personal statement detailing the candidate's educational philosophy
* a full curriculum vitae,
* either the names, addresses, telephone numbers, fax and email numbers of three people
who may be approached for confidential professional references or the name and address
of the recruiting agency from which the candidate's confidential dossiers may be obtained.

Dennison J MacKinnon
Principal
St Andrew's School
P O Box EE 17340
Nassau
Email: Dmackinnon@st-andrews.com
Fax: (1 242) 364 1654

The closing date for applications is Friday 3 February 2006. Applications from unqualified
candidates, applications arriving without the full information requested, applications from outside
The Commonwealth of The Bahamas or applications received after this date will not be
considered.


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I


FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2006, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


URI-15, H5V






THE TRIBUNE


PA(~F 10 FRIDAY. JANUARY 27. 2006


L


Former police officer calls for panic



buttons to help prevent escapes


FROM page one
arcas and wreaking havoc.
In the meantime, Mr
Thompson added, officers need
to ensure that they have bet-


ter measures in place to pre-
vent incidents like last Tues-
day's deadly prison break that
claimed the life of prison guard
Dion Bowles.
He said that while it is not
feasible for guards to carry


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guns, they should be outfitted
with panic buttons in their uni-
forms. In addition, they should
have hand-held radios and,
instead of weapons, taser guns
might be a practical solution.
Further, he said, trained dogs
could patrol the prison para-
metres aid search for escaped
prisoners.
Mr Thompson also noted
that because the prison is so
"grossly over-populated" and
suffers from a lack of staff, the
Bahamas should look into
alternative sentencing.
Forfexample some persons
awaiting trial, could be granted
bail and given surveillance
bracelets to monitor their activ-
ities until their court date, he
said.
Mr Thompson explained that


one condition of the bail would
be that the persons could not
go into certain areas, including
the docks and the airports.
He added that persons con-
victed of minor crimes, like
possession of small quantities
of marijuana, should instead of
going to prison, be assigned to
do work for government.
This would ensure that
prison guards can be deployed
in maximum security areas of
the prison.
He added that rather than
guards making the routine
checks, which could be timed
by inmates, they needed to be
make more spur of the
moment checks.
He also noted that to ensure
that inmates are not given con-
traband items, it may be nec-


essary to install cameras in cells
to monitor inmate activity.
While he felt the prison
could handle its own internal
investigation into last week's
events, he believed it was
essential that those results be
made public so that recom-
mendations and corrections
could be made.
Mr Thompson said that in
his opinion the recent criticism
levelled at Superintendent of
Prisons Dr Elliston Rahming
was unfair.
While Dr Rahming may not
have the practical knowledge
of running a prison, he is a very


educated man with many ideas
that would make Her Majesty's
Prison a better facility, Mr
Thompson said.
These recommendations by
Dr Rahming, such as repairing
perimeter walls, have yet to
be implemented, he pointed
out.
He said that he feels Dr Rah-
ming would be very suited to
be a commissioner of prisons, a
position which would include
the overseeing of the Fox
Hill prison, the Detention Cen-
tre and the two correctional
facilities for juvenile
offenders.


Grace period for residents
FROM page one
that the residents were given an extension after interventions were
made by the ministry of housing.
Mr Mills said that the residents also met with former prime min-
ister Hubert Ingraham, the MP for North Abaco, and representa-
tives of the Bahamas Christian Council.
Addressing the claims that the homes were given free of charge
to the families now sheltered in Spring City, one local man told The
Tribune that this was not the case.
He said they had to sign an agreement before they were allowed
to occupy the homes. The agreement, he added, included the
clause that the residents would have 90 days to "secure the mon-
ey to pay National Insurance for the (homes)."
A letter dated January 25 and signed by Neil S Campbell,
assistant administrator of the Central Abaco district, stated:
S"Pursuant to several correspondences and our final Notice dat-
ed 6th December, 2005 with regard to the above caption (re: evic-
tion).
"Please be advised that you are in direct breach of the contract
executed with the Ministry of Housing and National Insurance, and
in accordance with all its conveniences that you are hereby evict-
ed.
"The locks will be changed, and you are to make arrangements
with our local office in Marsh Harbour along with the Royal
Bahamas Police Force to remove and/or secure all of your personal
property."
A large eviction notice informed those being evicted that their
property had to be removed by 10am Thursday "at which time all
locks and entry ways will be sealed and returned to the Ministry of
Housing after which time these premises shall be deemed vacant."
It is expected that sometime today.a statement from Minister of
Housing Shane Gibson will be released.


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REWARDING


Opportunity inside the classroom.

Opportunity outside the classroom.

Opportunity in life.

Please join us for an admissions presentation:

Monday, January 30, 2006 at 6:00pm
British Colonial Hilton

R.S.V.P. Mrs. Alisoun Sands at 327-8594



TRINITY

COLLEGE SCHOOL
A four-year high school for students aged 13-18
located in Port Hope, Ontario, Canada


admissions@tcs.on.ca www. tcs.on.ca


F /n A IV)I 1 1L-" I I II


p~p~a~nr~~ I


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190,5-885-3 209







THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2006, PAGE 11


FRIDAY EVENING


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

Issues Round- Washington McLaughlin By the People An online poll focus- World War II The Complete Histo-
* WPBT table discussion. Week (N) Group N) (CC) ing on education and health care. ryErwinRommel and his NorthAfrn-
(CC) (CC) ka Korps. (CC) (DVS)
The Insider (N) Ghost Whisperer "Melinda's First Close to Home "The Rapist Next NUMB3RS "Harvest" (iTV) (N) n
D WFOR n (CC) Ghost Melinda's first ghost reap- Door" (N) (CC) (CC)
pears to seek her help. (N) (CC)
Access Holly- Jamie Foxx: Unpredictable n Dateline NBC C1 (CC) The Book of Daniel "Withdrawal"
8 WTVJ wood (N)(CC) (CC) Daniel tries to quit painkillers, but
his brother tests his resolve. (N)
Deco Drive The Bernie Mac The Bernie Mac Trading Spouses: Meet Your New News (CC)
O WSVN Show Higher Show C (CC) Mommy Silvana Clark and Christina
ranking. (N) n Crowe trade. (N) (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) Dancin With the Stars The Re- In Justice "Another Country" A man 20/20 (CC)
9 WPLG (CC) suits" (N) (CC) kills an unbom child during a strug-
gle with the mother. (N) C,

:00) American Biography "Osama Bin Laden: In Biography Al Qaeda" The al-aida Hand of Fate: I Missed Flight 93
A&E Justice Van- the Name of Allah" Saudi terrorist terrorist organization. (CC) (N) (CC)
ished" (CC) Osama Bin Laden. (CC)
Hardtalk Extra BBC News World Business BBC News Doctors on the BBC News Asia Today
BBCI (Latenight). Report (Latenight). Front Line (Latenight).
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HALL Towns" (CC) Sammo retum from LA. to capture Rebecca McFarland. Two dnfters learn the meaning of home with an ag-
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SPEED cle Car Vaughn. Premiere. A thief on the federal payroll steals a futuristic car. Speed
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k rope. ,n 'PG-13' (CC) discovery about Wolcott. (CC)
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under intemal strains. n 'R' (CC) associate priest. C (CC) ley Tucci. C 'PG-13' (CC)
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Jarell Houston. n 'PG-13' (CC) murder. C 'PG-13' (CC) 'PG-13' (CC)
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MOMAX Science Fiction) Vin Diesel. A fugitive fights an invad- Paz Vega. A housekeeper works for a chef and his neurotic wife. C 'PG-
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THE TRIBUNE


LOA NW


Contract is signed for road




maintenance on Eleuthera


SPANISH Wells Works
Minister Bradley Roberts
signed a $440,000 contract with
Terry Higgs of Eleuthera Con-
struction and Gas for the build-
ing and resurfacing of 4.6 miles
of roads on mainland Eleuthera
and nearby Russell Island.
Spurred by the marina vil-
lage-style development Pelican
Bay, Russell Island is fast
becoming the location of choice
for young Spanish Wells resi-
dents and second homeowners.
The contract covers the con-
struction of 1.3 miles of the
main road on Russell Island
and the resurfacing of 3.1 miles
of main road and less than
half-a-mile of side roads else-
where.
Mr Roberts and his delega-
tion were met in Eleuthera by
that island's administrator
Alexander Flowers, Spanish
Wells chief councillor Abner


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* THE marina village at Pelican Bay, developed by a group of
Spanish Wells residents, has sparked interest in Russell Island


Pinder and other community
leaders.


i


EI


CHRISTOPH ERNEST
BROWN


Anyone with information on the death
of Chris Brown or his whereabouts on
the night of Friday 13th, January 2006
are asked to contact the police at 322-
2561 or 502-9930. Mr. Brown was last
seen around 9pm on Friday night,
driving his white taxi van, plate number
436.
I I '


The minister said technical
officers of the Ministry of
Works have completed the
evaluation of all community
roads throughout Eleuthera
and are putting together ten-
der packages.

Negotiation


* CONTRACTOR Terry Higgs (centre) and permanent
secretary Anita Bernhard (right) sign the contract for
roadwork in north Eleuthera, while Minister of Works Bradley
Roberts observes. Pictured standing, from left, are deputy
chief councillor Linda Sweeting, councillor Gilbert Pinder and
community activist 'Old Pot' Pinder.
(Photo: BIS/Gladstone Thurston)


pletion next year," Mr Roberts
said. Temporary repairs to the
bridge are scheduled to com-
mence shortly, he added.
Mr Roberts paid tribute to


There is no more land avail-
able on St George's Cay for
the residents of Spanish Wells
to build on, noted Chief Coun-
cilor Pinder.


Mr Roberts added that his Spanish Wells community "Even though it is named
ministry is in negotiations with activist 'Old Pot' Pinder "who Russell Island, it is going to be
W F Baird and Associates for has been more than persistent an extension of the communi-
the final design of the new in carrying the flag to have the ty of Spanish Wells," he said.
causeway which will replace long overdue repairs and con- "In the past five years alone,
the Glass Window Bridge. struction of the main road at about 40 or 50 homes have
This will "eventually fully Russell Island, which was left been built here. Ten years
restore the entire road net- undone by the previous admin- from today this will be a big
work of Eleuthera upon com- istration, become a reality." community."


Initiatives introduced to


tackle youth violence


THE Ministry of Social Ser-
vices and Community Devel-
opment has implemented three
new initiatives designed to help
curb youth violence.
The programmes are being
Sfaciliated by the Simpson Penn
Centre 'fo Boys and the Willie
Mae Pratt Centre for Girls.
Social Services Minister
Melanie Griffin said the pro-
grammes are designed to assist
persons at those institutions in
identifying and dealing with the
kind of behaviour that led to
the young person's committal.
"As Minister of Social Ser-
vices and Community Devel-
opment, I see the consequences
faced by young persons who
make wrong choices which
often result in them ending up
at either the Simpson Penn
Centre for Boys, the Willie
- Mae Pratt Centre for Girls or
in prison," said Minister Grif-
fin. "For some it was wrong
choices while for others it was
being in the wrong company
or deficiencies in the home."
S The programmes are known


* MELANIE Griffin


as Young Women Empowered
by Spirit, Skills-training and
Self-respect (YESSS); Girls of
Purpose and Change
(GOPAC); and Boys of
Strength Surviving (BOSS).
Mrs Griffin said there is too
much violence in the Bahamas
- as recent events have shown -
and that violence has impacted
not only "the streets" but also
Bahamian homes and schools.
She said the new initiatives
will help to assist children,
teenagers and young adults to
develop the appropriate deci-
sion-making skills and respons-


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es to difficult situations, and
will also provide positive role
models.
Mrs Griffin explained that
YESSS requires residents of
: the Willie Mae Pratt Centre
for Girls new-eifrants in'par-'
ticuilar to undergo a specially
designed three-month period
of training and reflection.
Officials are exploring the
feasibility of implementing a
similar programme at the
Simpson Penn Centre for Boys.
GOPAC and BOSS, she
said, are conducted by the
Department of Rehabilitative
Welfare Services. "Through
these weekly sessions with
social workers, young persons
are afforded the opportunity
to interact with their peers as
they express themselves,
become more aware of the
issues and changes that they
face as they move from being
children to young adults, devel-
op self-esteem and learn coping
mechanisms for the challenges
that life will present," Mrs Grif-
fin said.


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EUGENE CHARLES
EVERETT GREENE SR.

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Eu.-eii. Jr.lJx, ,'n and iorn.ar Greene. Iu~jn Dclarc:,.
Etulenie EIhi. -%ndronike Greene and Debi Greene
De~iml~rne- ,13 czrmdchildren. brother md ci q-ers.


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E-I~I 12, FR IDAY, JAN UARY 27, 2006


0 In brief

Reverse

osmosis

plant deal

signed

A CONTRACT has been
signed for a reverse osmosis
plant that will supply 400,000
imperial gallons of water per
day to Eleuthera, Works Min-
ister Bradley Roberts
announced.
The "build-own-operate"
contract has been awarded to
Aqua Design, Mr Roberts said.
"This plant has an ultimate
capacity of almost 1 million
imperial gallons per day and
will eliminate water shortages
from Spanish Wells to Winder-
mere in central Eleuthera," he
said.
The facility will service com-
munities south of the Glass
Window Bridge as far as Savan-
nah Sound. It is scheduled to
be completed by the end of
April.
Water also will be provided
residents of Rock Sound and
Tarpum Bay through an agree-
ment with the developers of
Cotton Bay, Mr Roberts said.






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THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2006, PAGE 13


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THE TRIBUNE.


PAGE 14, FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2006


CAR IBEAN


Fidel Castro visits workers at



site outside American mission


"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Conten

Available from Commercial News Providers
v s1 -i i


-SCHOOL




ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS


A limited number of scholarships to attend St Andrew's School is offered annually to students
attending Ministry of Education secondary schools.
These scholarships cover all tuition and book charges throughout years 10, 11 and 12. Eligible
students should meet the following criteria:
Attendance at a government school for at least two years, including grades 8 and 9
Be of the highest academic standing, maintaining a 3.0 GPA or above
Be at least 14 years old and not older than 15 years by 31st August 2006
Applications will require the endorsement of the principal or guidance counsellor of the student's
school. The students awarded these scholarships will be expected to follow a full programme of
BGCSE and advanced courses leading to graduation at the end of year 12.
The scholarships will be awarded on a competitive basis and all candidates will sit the scholarship
examinations at 9am on Saturday, 11h March 2006 at St Andrew's School. Successful
examination candidates will be short-listed and interviewed.
"f.Iiaiil..:.rl iorms w II ie circulated to the Ministry of Education secondary schools in New
F'.r' -lin.:. ar ~r iS' ri in the Family Islands or can be obtained from the administration office of
St Andrew's School."
Further details are available from St Andrew's School, telephone: 1-242-324-2621.
Application fdrms should be returned to: -
Dennison J MacKinnon
Principal
St Andrew's School
The International School of The Bahamas
PO Box EE 17340
Nassau, Bahamas
.The closing date for applications is Monday 13th February 2006.


Authorized by:
INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE
ORGANIZATION


F~1


Accredited by:
S COUNCIL OF INTERNATIONAL SCHOOLS
NEW ENGLAND ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOLS &
S COLLEGES


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Springfield Rd offFox Hill


Saturday, January 28th, 2006 10:00 AM 4:00 PM


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* VIEA FUR MSHED AND LANDS CAPED HOME


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FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2006


SECTION


business@tribunemedia.net Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Insurance & Investments
to Build a Better Life
Telephone 242-393-1023


'Everything




on the table'




over BTC


Sg
0 0.



visis ,


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

"will put every-
thing on the table
for discussion"
regarding the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company's (BTC) privatisa-
tion if it receives an offer from
the bidder currently conduct-
ing due diligence on the state-
owned company, the minister
of state for finance said yester-
day.
Among the issues identified
as potentially yet to be decided
were the size of the stake a bid-
der might want to take in BTC,
James Smith said.
In terms of whether the cur-
rent process would involve sell-
ing a 49 per cent stake in BTC
to a successful bidder, as envis-
aged by the failed 'open beau-
ty contest' approach of 2003,
Mr Smith said: "We haven't
exactly moved on that yet, but
we're putting everything on the
table for discussion.
"If the new partner feels the
need to revisit the allocation,
we could talk about that
again."
Describing BTC's privatisa-
tion, which has now dragged
on for more than seven years
and spanned two administra-
tions as a "continual work on
process", Mr Smith said the
Bahamas "might be one of the
few countries" that had not ful-
ly liberalised its telecommuni-
cations market. It is known to
be the last cellular monopoly
in the Caribbean, with all that
implies for consumer choice,
service and price.
The minister added that
gauged by comments from the


business community, no one
was "particularly thrilled at the
level of service they're getting"
from BTC.
Mr Smith said: "We can't
afford to give up the idea of a
privatised BTC in one form or
fashion."
Invested
He explained that "too
much" had been invested in the
process already, referring to
the more than $100 million
total compensation package
paid to former BTC workers
when the company was down-
sized in the late 1990s. BTC
staff, Mr Smith, were also like-
ly to be fed up with the uncer-
tainty.
The Ministry of Finance
finally revealed the identity of
the interested party in BTC,
which it has kept secret for sev-
eral months.
Bluewater Communications
Holdings, described as a com-
pany that works with existing


management teams to "restruc-
ture and reinvigorate" telecoms
companies such as BTC, is now
conducting an exclusive 90-day
due diligence on the company.
That period began on January
17,2006.
Among Bluewater's princi-
pals are Roger Ames, former
chairman and chief executive
of Warner Music Group, and
president of Warner Music
International from August 1999
to August 2004.
Also involved is the former
chief financial officer of a UK-
based cable operator called
NTL, John Gregg. He was for-
merly managing director of two
European broadband cable
operators, Cablecom GmbH
and iesy Hessen GmbH.
Mr Gregg was also manag-
ing director of the Cellular
Communications Inc group of
companies, which operated cell
phone networks in the US,
Puerto Rico, the US Virgin
Islands and Italy. With NTL,
he had experience of offering
'Triple Play' services, meaning
that telephone, television and
Internet services were provided
down one line.
The Ministry of Finance did
not reveal any further details
on Bluewater, although the fact
that Mr Ames was with Warn-
er until mid-20045 indicates it
was formed relatively recently
- within the last 18 months.
This means that BTC could be
its first play as a company.
The release did not indicate
who Bluewater's financial
backers were, although it is
likely to receive financing from
sources such as private equity

SEE page 7B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Bsusiness
Editor
TOTAL calls on.Bahamian
ports by the cruise ship industry
were down by 7.3 per cent for
the first 10 months in 2005,
data from the Ministry of
Tourism has revealed.
Combined calls based on first
and second port of entry were
down from 2,054 in the period
to October 2004 at 1,905 in the
2005 comparative period. This
was slightly reflected in the
total cruise arrivals figure for
the same period, which had
fallen by 1.8 per cent to 3.53


million from 3.596 million.
Cruise calls on Nassau/Par-
adise Island, by first and sec-
ond port of entry to the
Bahamas, were down by 2.3
per cent for the first 10 months
in 2005, having fallen from 921
in 2004 to 900.
Calls
While total cruise calls on
Nassau/Paradise Island were
up by 4.8 per cent at 305 in the
2005 first quarter, they fell by
11 per cent in the second quar-
. ter to 258, compared to 290 in
the same period in 2004.
Cruise calls to Nassau/Par-


adise Island increased upon
2004 during the 2005 third
quarter, rising by 3.7 per cent
to 250 from 241. However, this
figure was achieved by a 28.6
per cent increase during Sep-
tember, a statistic probably
influenced by the fact that
there were no hurricanes dur-
ing 2005, unlike 2004.
The decline in cruise calls by
first and second port of entry
was most pronounced in Grand
Bahama, where they fell by 22
per cent in the first 10 months
of 2005 to 442 from 567.

SEE page 7B


Airport Authority's doubtful


government accounts triple


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Airport Authority's allowance for doubt-
ful accounts from government-related entities
more than tripled in its financial year ending on
June 30,2004, to $3.042 million from $1.029 mil-
lion, meaning it believes that money may not
be paid.
The Authority's audited financial statements,
the latest to be released, show that out of the
$4.631 million owed by. government entities, by
fare the largest chunk of these accounts receiv-
ables some $4.332 million was owing from
Bahamasair.
The remainder was owed by the Bahamas
Meteorology Department, Civil Aviation


Department, and the Ministry of Tourism.
Some $3.073 million in trade receivables was
owed by the private sector, for which the Airport
Authority had allowed $1.659 million for doubt-
ful accounts.
The Airport Authority's provision for doubt-
ful accounts had increased almost eight-fold in
fiscal 2004, growing to $3.414 million from
$435,180 in fiscal 2003. This accounted for about
half the $4.4 million rise in its operating expens-
es to $23.089 million.
With total revenues relatively flat, the Air-
port Authority's operating loss before govern-
ment subsidies in fiscal 2004 was $12.758 million,

SEE page 6B


Bahamas LNG project

scores partial success

* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
US regulators have agreed with the company proposing a $650
million liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminal in the Bahamas
that the costs of upgrading infrastructure to accommodate its
supplies should be spread "equitably" between all interested par-
ties.
However, staff from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commis-
sion (FERC) did not agree with submissions by AES Ocean
Express that gas quality specifications insisted on by the Florida
Gas Transmission Company (FGTC) were "more restrictive"
than necessary and "not just and reasonable".
They recommended the standards outlined by the FGTC
should be adopted by the judge presiding over the case and their
own body with effect from May 1, 2007.
AES Ocean Express has been embroiled in a regulatory dispute
in,the US with the FGTC, over
an interconnection agreement S e
that would connect the pipeline SEE page 7B


National Health plan's 'rising

costs for lower service levels'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas will experi-
ence rising healthcare costs in
return for declining service if
it implements a National
Health Insurance scheme, a
free-market think-tank has
warned, a fate that has befallen
nationalised health systems in
the UK and Canada.
Taking aim at the Govern-
ment's proposed scheme, the
Nassau Institute said: "Evi-
dence of the effects of Sociali-
sation of Healthcare is readily
available. In England and
Canada, the results are
increased cost for declining ser-


vice. Why would the Bahamas
be any different?
"State-mandated and state
run health services in the
Bahamas will be no different
from other countries where
bureaucrats, not doctors make
major decisions about patient
care.
"The Bahamas should take
the 'road less travelled' and
support a framework. for the
private market to satisfy
healthcare requirements."
Apart from the Nassau Insti-
tute, many doctors are also
opposed to the National Health


SEE page 6B


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2006


State your vision to glue firm together
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FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2006, PAGE 3B


THF TRIBUNE


THE Bahamas Association of Securi-
ties Dealers (BASD) has announced that
elections for its officers and directors will
be held in February 2006, with the date,
time and place to be announced.
Incorpordicd in 2003, the BASD has
established ;a \ebsite a website to illus-
rrate its mission and objectives. The
organisation currently has four corpo-
iate aind Ithre, co.rp,' ate j llihjth e sp n-
sors,..nd 14 indt4 u.. l did (liLtec iindi-
L '(a ; .- ,-?'<-- ? i ,*., . '.. -. .. ... . .. .


vidual affiliate members.
Educate


The BASD said its goals are to educate
the investing public and practitioners on
rules and regulations, plus various types
of investment products. It also seeks to
encourage the industry's communication
with the Government on standards and
leguliLiuons. ...


* THE BASD's present officers are,
from L to R: Ronald Weismann, Finter
Bank & Trust, treasurer; Hiram Cox,
SColina Financial Advisors, vice-presi-
dent; Eugena Granger, director; Sherry
Morris, Cititrust (Bahamas), director;
Lisa Cammaert, Arner Bank & Trust,
secretary; Henio Podlewski, Geneva
Portfolio Management, director; and
Reece Chipman, the Nastac Group, pres-
ident


NOW HIRING!

WAREHOUSE CHECKERS
MAINTENANCE STAFF
FORKLIFT DRIVERS

Must be 25 years or older
Police Record
SComputer literate
Capable of standing for long hours
Previous warehouse experience is a plus

Submit applications to:
Betty K Agencies
Human Resource Department


I


I !


No Phone Calls


FREE


The


FREE


FREE


Bahamas Agricultural and Indust
Corporation (BAIC)
extends a special invitation to the


rial


Business Community to attend an open Forum
on
"How to obtain Funding for Small
Businesses"
presented by Ms. Taiana Mora,
Executive Director of the Caribbean Export
Development Agency.(CEDA)

Place:
Nassau Palm'Resort Conference Centre
Chez Willie Ballroom
West Bay Street

Date
Monday, January 30th 2006


Time:


Don't Miss It!


Seating Is Limited


6:00 p.m.


i


'


I Ir II L


-I Ccl ' 'I


is seeking an experienced
Retail Site Manager and
Assistant site Manager.
Qualified candidates will possess the following skills:
3 to 4 years souvenir imaging program
management experience in theme park /
entertainment venue.
Demonstrate proficiency in EPX program
operations and reporting skills
:g -- Familiarity with Kodak 6800 and 9810 dye
r. .C. Proficiency with Cannon and Nikon SLR cameras

Kodak EPX digital imaging systems
troubleshooting and level one service experience,
-. -in..uding printers digital cameras, touch screen
computers and strobes.
Must be available to work nights, weekends and
." .--.' holidays
Q For consideration, please fax resumes to (407) 426-6919
e iuai__e_______s


~~,tnMAs;~;


: : .


m











PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2006


THE TRIBUNE;


GRAPHIC ARTIST






NEEDED


The Tribune is growing and looking for an experienced
individual to work full time as a Graphic Artist.


The individual must be computer literate and
knowledgeable in InDesign, Freehand, QuarkExpress
and Photoshop.


'Lge'ndarr Past ... Glorious Future!'

SWv accepting applications for teachers for September, 2006

for the following areas:

RFL '' LEARNING CENTRE (AGES 3-5)
'l.-.'room Teachers


Rl:.I'AR'Y SCHOOL (Grades 1 6)
- 1 -.- TeaiJlers


HIGHr SCHOOL (Grades 7 -12) .-
S.,i.: FI s:l EIolog/ Art, History Mathematics. Home Economics, Accounts.
i. :..a.i EJdu.icatin. GIJdnce Counsellor, Modern Languages English Language,
J..il I., LiIeralure- !infrrnatorin Technology


........... .*. r l r. .i -r t rh







1 I L i n iid lc r ni IL
u: il U U.[ i it~ lii F'lli -c



i l t 1 1 crhC


45


QUEEN'S COLLEGE ...
" Is rth old,-st private school in The
p xb.3171 n35
" ESure a s-andr.:, cntulwtr,- .-. )! ducarion

* Udntf.3 idih curruiicwn
S 1e r afl -j Liv talented and d-dicnr-.d


alld *Ct-r '.% .%hct rv itc.w r ji.-. d rnt. .
arT, inn,.. ~at-l .eandhr-e Laring for Otlher
is; Latimsic~
" Ilt-f.rs a compedice kejietit-s pacl.age.
mhulwIdtng gmrui-Lrt. p-sion.bcdtrh
uisiuranc. djscrunl on children s rtrholi

" QUern 3 CoUlege '.as eStabh-lh,-. i Nassail
in I i o b%, The Nferhobist (hwl-h and is a
rrt.mber Oif Thie Inte-rnartrnal -AssocumIoln ill
;%.IhotA tSchoru.ls. CuI.-ges and L-ru\ -rsilri.
I l.-kNISCtUi


/-pr.iicaon forms are available from the Human Re-
scur'es Office at the school or may be downloaded
from our '.ebrlle .- *.. I.. .a" '.t' :' on
The completed applikatlon together with a covering
letter a statement of educational philosophy and a
recent photograph must be sent to- The Principal
Queen's College
P.O. Box N7127
Nassau. Bahamas
Or fah to: 242-393.3248 or mail to
drynch@qchenceforth cor and should
arr..e no later than February 1, 2006. Candidates
shoer Iiled will be contacted by telephone, fax or
email for an interview

'.EEN S C'jLLC.-L


Tel: (242) 393-1666W't93-2153!393-2646 Fax: (242)393-3248


two,


i-ici Information As Of:
i J;.uary 2006


Nassau Conference's





registrations near 100


sau Conference have
said this year's event
is already surpassing
expectations with reg-
istrations nearing the 100 mark.
SJanuary 26, 2006 With registra-
itions nearing the 100 mark, the second
annual Nassau Conference 2006, Feb-
ruary 7 and 8 at the British Colonial
Hilton, is already surpassing the
expectations of Conference organiz-
ers.
"We are very excited by the
Response to the conference," said con-
ference chairman Andrew Law. "Sev-
eral companies, in fact, have regis-
tered multiple staff for the confer-
ence, recognizing it as a special oppor-
tunity to hear world class speakers
present global perspectives on mat-
ters of every day concern to the indus-
try.
The global economy is changing at a
rapid pace, and financial services
providers are looking for ways to keep
ahead of the curve. The broad range
of expertise offered by our guest
speakers will definitely meet that
need."
Under the theme Wealth Manage-
ment in a Diverse World, the Nassau
Conference is being held at the British
Colonial Hilton on February 7-8.
"This is a deliberate strategy on our
part," said Robert Lotmore, chairman
of the Association of International
Banks and Trust Companies (AIBT),
the founding partner for the Confer-
ence.
"We wanted to create a high quali-
ty professional development oppor-
tunity which all of our member firms
and other industry representatives
could attend without the added
expenses of international travel."
Registration for the Conference is
$800. Registration procedures are
available at
www.nassauconfernce.com.
Three new speakers have been
added to the Conference roster: Ivan
Sacks, a principal with Withers
Bergman LLP based in New York;
Margaret Cornish, executive director
of the Canada China Business Coun-
cil (CCBC); and Ramiro Lopez Lar-
roy, director, strategic planning and
.:,:marketing with.Santander Private
Banking in Miami.
In her address, Tapping into Chi-
na's New Wealth, Ms Cornish will
emphasise the importance of under-
standing Chinese patterns of wealth
accumulation and the approach to
financial decision-making in order to
serve this new but elusive market.
Ms Cornish will also give an insight
into the super rich in China and the
careers, ambitions and spending pref-
erences of its populace.
With a special expertise in advising
clients with respect to the interna-
tional structuring of their business and
financial wealth, Mr Sacks will tackle
the various structures available and
appropriate for clients. He will also
cover another critical angle: where to
locate that structure.
Trends in Latin America Private
Banking, presented by Mr Lopez Lar-
roy, will cover pressures facing pri-
vite banks in Latin America including
changes in clients' behaviour, a lower
,appetite for risk and more aggressive
competition. Mr Lopez Larroy will
show how business models must be
redefined to compete successfully in
this environment.


-c Coliina
LAvomm Financial Advisors Ltd.


E'1-/ LI sTED i TRADED SECURITIES VISIT WWVV .BISXBAHAMAS.COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
BIE,< -;LL SHARE INDEX. CLOSE 1.358 66 CHG 00.86 1 CHG 00.06 / YTD 07.95 / YTD % 00.59
- i L ..-j ..T.:n Pr....jou Cl.:.se T:.a, a Chlse Change Dall, .':l EPS $ Di. S P.'E Yield


Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S.Johnson
Kerzner International BDRs
Premier Real Estate


0.73
10.52
7.00
0.70
1.26
1.10
9.54
1.64
9.15
4.25
2..88
6.05
10.90
10.90
10.05
1.15
9.95
9.10
6.71
10.00


0.73 0.00
10.52 0.00
7.00 0.00
0.70 0.00
1.26 0.00
1.20 0.10
9.54 0.00
1.64 0.00
9.15 0.00
4.31 0.06
2.88 0.00
6.05 0.00
10.90 0.00
10.90 0.00
10.05 0.00
1.15 0.00
9.95 0.00
9.10 0.00
6.63 -0.08
10.00 0.00


-0.169
1.456
1,026 0.587
0.175
0.105
2.500 0.070
0.689
-0.046
0.791
0.099
0.429
0.428
0.717
2.000 0.695
0.833
-0.062
0.526
0.572
0.138
2.036


0.00
0.360
0.330
0.020
0.060
0.040
0.240
0.000
0.450
0.045
0.000
0.240
0.530
0.500
0.500
0.000
0.405
0.560
0.000
0.760


0.00%
3.42%
4.71%
2.86%
4.76%
3.33%
2.52%
0.00%
4.92%
1.08%
0.00%
3.97%
4.86%
4.59%
4.98%
0.00%
5.43%
6.19%
0.00%
7.60%


-ck F.- -A E. PiEi,-.
I -.,, -.j _.ik L Pr,:-3 ..6.r .:,1 E.- Cl. i PE Yeld
I''- L =1 : 2u ,-: '.-:la 1 1 "' 1 17 )" 70 7 5 0 :
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.40 RND Holdinas 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.044 0.000 NM 0.00%
()v-.r-The.-Counter r:,i.i.e
28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 'IO0 1l 4 0 i:
13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.75 13.75 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
Listed Mutual Funds
h 52wk-Low Fund Name rl.- TD': Lasi 12 .1:.r.,ns DP. $ Yrd '.


1 20iO Colina Money Market Fund
S07011 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
10 )0000 Fidolity Prime Income Fund
2 1746 Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1.037l8 Coln,- Bond Fund
. 'Y OE 435i 630] / YTDI 1.321% / 3:'003 14 82-.


1.270017"
2.5864 "'
10.7674""*
2.312472"
1.144217""'


S. / I I 1 1I -l I1I- I') Dl'.;. 02 1,00 .00
.,;I I o L o I l,. uslle hr i ll 1S I t 52 wU- ks
Sr : ',I ,-, I f ij lT, rainy's w ightlUd price for daily volume
'-, '. .. ,: .irIII-1t ll y I- -v,(lthterl pric for daily volume
llu i 3 .h g'vr i I tr.lo ln In, fIronrn ay to clda
i' ,1 I bltlr, ,fr If i hal r-har "I, tradnlrl today
,[ '].l3, v (li ';i l-er paid inl the Iast 12 months
.IIIj prii r drivkled Iby the I ns 12 11monrth earnings
\ I[ -(; 31. 2000/ AS AT NOV. 30. 2005
IAN 13. 2006/ AS AT DEC. 31, 2005/ *"' AS AT DEC. 31, 2005
S i '--'-'1'' FIDELIT'r '4. 15d-"3 76


YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelit6
Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV Net Asset Value
N/M Not Meaningful
FINDEX- The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1. 1994 = 100


M RAMIRO LOPEZ


S. f


* IVAN SACKS


PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, STEPHEN ENEAS TINKER,
of Elizabeth Estates, P.O. Box EE-16714, Nassau, Bahamas,
intend to change my name to STEVEN ENEAS DARLING. If
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.






The Centre for Digestive Health



Vacancy for a




Gastroenterologist




United States, UK or Canadian Board Certified



Information available at www.haroldmunnings.com'



Direct inquiries to bahamasgi@coralwave.com


33


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FRIDAY, JANUAHY 27, 2UUbi, IAULt bb


Bahamas' strengths



less understood by



insurance and funds


T he Strategy and
Branding Survey
of the Bahamian
financial services
industry has
shown that the sector needs to
do more to communicate the
advantages of doing business
in this nation, with the global
insurance and investment funds
industries having less under-
standing of the jurisdiction.
The survey, which garnered
some 225 responses and was
conducted by Pricewater-
houseCoopers (PwC), appears
to have provided empirical
data to back up what was
already known or suspected on
how the Bahamian financial
services industry was perceived
by outside intermediaries,
clients and head offices.
Financial
Allyson Maynard-Gibson,
minister of financial services
and investments, told a press
conference following last week-
end's Financial Services
Retreat in Freeport that the
survey provided data showing
Bahamas-based financial insti-
tutions "have stood out as glob-
al leaders when benchmarked
with sister companies around
the world".
"These strong results in areas
of private wealth and fund
administration demonstrate
that globally competitive exper-
tise is available in the
Bahamas," Mrs Maynard-Gib-
son said.
"Our services are better
understood in the private bank-
ing, trust and corporate ser-
vices. However, it is clear that
the strengths of the Bahamas
are less understood by the
insurance and investment funds
area. Additionally, the report
exposes the need to do more
to communicate the benefits of
doing business in the
Bahamas."
Mrs Maynard-Gibson also
announced that Leslie Isaacs
had been appointed as direc-
tor of financial services.


A former first assistant sec-
retary to the Ministry of Public
Personnel, the Attorney's Gen-
eral Office and the Learning
Resources Unit, Ms Isaacs cur-
rently serves as the legal advi-
sor and secretary to the Board
of the Public Hospitals Author-
ity.


Wishes to inform
the General Public that


Mr. Dominic Sturrup


Is no longer employed with
the Company, neither is he
authorized to transact any
business on behalf of:
Colombian Emeralds
International,
Jeweler's Warehouse or
Quantum Dutyfree.


NOTICE
IN THE MATTER OF LEADENHALL BANK & TRUST
COMPANY LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)
AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT 1992
NOTICE TO THE CREDITORS
The creditors of the above-named Company are required, on or before
February 28th, 2006 to send their names and addresses and the particulars
of their debts of claims, and the names and addresses of their attorneys (if
any) to Craig A. Gomez the Liquidator of the said Company at The Deanery
Cumberland Hill Street, P.O. Box N-1991, Nassau, The Bahamas, telephone
number 242-356-4114 or fax number 242-356-4125. The creditors may be
required by notice in writing from the said Liquidator, by his Attorneys or
personally, to come in and prove their said debts or claims at the office of
the Liquidator at such time and shall be specified in such notice. If in
default thereof they will be excluded from the benefit of any distribution
made before such debts are proved.
CRAIG A. GOMEZ
Liquidator


She was called to the
Jamaican and the Bahamas Bar
in 1995.


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
A PROUD MEMBER OF


ATA B
Association of Tertiary
Institutions in the Bahamas

Joins in cordially inviting you
to
ATIB CONFERENCE 2006


Theme: "Academic Research & the College Community-
Informing National Development, Shaping National Identity."
February 1-3, 2006
SuperClubs Breezes, Nassau, Bahamas

CONFERENCE AGENDA


SESSION ONE
7- 9 pm


Speaker:


SESSION TWO
9:30- 10:45 am


Speaker:


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1
Opening Ceremony


Reception


Coffee Break


0'


I,f our He'b'UC oat A.'..cob du.bs


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Prof. Rex Nettleford, UWI
"Academic Research & The College Community -
Informing National Development, Shaping National
Identity"


MINISTER OF FINANCIAL SERVICES &
INVESTMENTS ALLYSON MAYNARD-GIBSON


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2
Plenary Session
"Do We Value Academic Research?"
Prof. Erroll Miller, UWI


FirstCaribbean
Career Opportunity



FirstCaribbean International Bank is the combination of CIBC and Barclays Bank in the Caribbean,
Bahamas and Belize. We are the region's largest publicly traded bank with over 3,000 staff serving
over 5.3 million people in 16 countries. We manage over 700,000 active accounts via 100 retail
branches and corporate/international banking centres.

RESPONSIBILITIES:
Build and develop delivery projects for FirstCaribbean Treasury in support of product lines across the Caribbean
Develop and maintain Treasury Policy to provide best-in-class Treasury controls for the FirstCaribbean group of
companies
Enhance Group interest income and develop/market Treasury products to largest, most discerning regional clients
Implement Portfolio Development and Project Management for Treasury business initiatives
Manage Policy Documentation and Assurance for Treasury
Develop and implement transaction and operational solutions with dealing teams and external partners
Maximise productivity and fully leverage all Treasury resources

PREREQUISITES:
Graduate status with 3 years' minimum experience in financial services
Knowledge of.Treasury Operations, Risk, Finance and Technology activities in large financial institutions with
operations across multiple regulatory jurisdictions
Operational experience in a Dealing room or settlement environment
Financial analysis and financial model building ability
Superior problem solving, negotiating and conflict management skills
Understanding and practice of modern governance
Practitioner-level knowledge and application of: Risk theory, credit grading of sovereign and corporate
institutions, and portfolio management
Adept at working in complex matrix organizations and with multi-stakeholder cross-functional teams

We offer an attractively structured compensation and reward package as well as performance bonuses.

Applications with detailed r6sumes should be submitted no later than 6th February, 2006 to:

Ms. Shannon Holder
Administrative Assistant
FirstCaribbean International Bank
Head Office
Warrens
St. Michael, Barbados
Email: shannon.holder@firstcaribbeanbank.com

Only applicants who are short-listed will be contacted.


C FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.


_ BUSINESS


I M- I IltUi llU






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B. FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2006


National Health plan's 'rising



costs for lower service levels'


THE GNERA PUBIC I






ADVISED THAT`IBI


tive, forcing them to lay-off
staff.
Meanwhile, private health
insurers are waiting to see how
the Government's Blue Rib-
bon Commission arrived at the
statistic that the benefits pack-
age and administration costs
for the plan would be $235 mil-
lion. They want to see the data
used for that, and also in the
calculations that arri ed at the
5.3 per cent of a worker'ss
earned wages contribution rate,
split evenly between employ-
er and employee.
The Nassau Institute pointed
out that a study by Dr Max
Gammon, a UK doctor, on that
country's National Health Ser-
vice (NHS), showed why "gov-
ernment bureaucracies cannot
meet the objectives" outlined
in the National Health Insur-
ance plan.
In 1948, when the NHS
began, it had 480,000 hospital
beds. But by 2000, this had fall-
en to 186,000, despite there
being just under one million
patients awaiting hospital
admission. The Nassau Insti-
tute said: "He described a close
correlation between the


increase in the numbers of
NHS administrative staff and
the fall in numbers of NHS
hospital beds.
"To explain the 'disorder
which for the past 50 years has
surely been destroying our
medical services', Dr Gammon
formulated a theory he called
'the theory of bureaucratic dis-
placement', which in a bureau-
cratic system is an 'increase in
expenditure will be matched
by a fall in production'. Such
systems act like 'black holes'
in the economic universe,
simultaneously sucking in
resources, and shrinking in
terms of 'emitted production.'
"Gammon's Law applies to
all bureaucracies that are rigid
systems, governed by fixed
rules that tend to exclude indi-
vidual initiative and eventually
displace productive activity
with counterproductive activi-
ty."
Dr Gammon's work, the
Nassau Institute added, showed
how a focus on nursing in the
NHS had been changed from
the patient and the ward to
administrative functions.
"Dr Gammon tells of work-


ing in a small hospital in which
Sthe quality of care in one par-
ticular ward was outstanding;
When he returned years later
he discovered the ward was 'in
chaos'," the Nassau Institute
said.
"He asked for the Sister who
had previously run the ward so
superbly and was told that she
had been moved to adminis-
tration. He found her in an
office, where 'she wept as she
told me that she had been
forced to leave her ward and
become an administrator since
her salary would have been
reduced ....had she remained
in her clinical post'."
The Nassau Institute added:
"All enterprise, whether pri-
vate or government, must take
into account economic effi-
ciency, stability and respon-
siveness to consumers. Can a
government bureaucracy meet
these objectives, or is the Blue
Ribbon Commission's Plan pri-
marily to serve political objec-
tives and insulate consumers
of medical care from the fact of
scarce resources and knowl-
edge of how they would be
utilised."


Airport Authority's doubtful


government accounts triple


FROM page 1B
compared to $7.951 million the
year before.
However, the Airport
Authority received $3 million
in direct subsidies from the
Government, and a further
$6.496 million from other con-
tributions and subsidies during
fiscal 2004. The latter figure is
related to payments made by
the Government directly to the
Airport Authority's vendors on
the latter's behalf.
Therefore, although the Air-
port Authority's loss for the
year was.$3.262 million com-
pared to $5.101 million in fiscal
20o3, it 'vould have been much


GET THERE. TOGETHER.


greater had it not been for the
increased government subsi-
dies. This means that the Air-
port Authority was becoming
an increased drag on the Trea-
sury and the Bahamian tax-
payer. And the accounts
warned: "At present, the
Authority is operating at a
deficit, which if continued
would not enable it to service
the current overdraft and cred-
it facilities that it has obtained
to fund necessary operating


and capital expenditures.
Financial support from the
Government is essential for the
continued operations of the
Authority."
The Airport Authority is
asset rich but cash poor, with
most of its $190.134 million
assets some $177.148 million -
tied up in real estate and prop-
erty. It had total current assets
of $4.131 million at year-end
2004, compared to $8.203 mil-
lion in current liabilities.


FROM page 1B
Insurance plan, although few
are willing to speak publicly.:
The Bahamian private sector
and business community is also
concerned that the scheme will
effectively act as a tax, increas-
ing the cost of doing business
and making firms uncompeti-


FirstCaribbean
Career Opportunity




FirstCaribbean International Bank is the combination of CIBC and Barclays Bank in the
Caribbean, Bahamas and Belize. We are the region's largest publicly traded bank with over
3,000 staff serving over 5.3 million people in 16 countries. We manage over 700,000 active
accounts via 100 retail branches and corporate/interhational banking centres.

RESPONSIBILITIES:
Enhance Group interest income and develop/market Treasury Products to largest, most discerning regional
clients
Build and lead a team engaged in selling and trading of Treasury Products
Develop business of trading in Treasury Products
Build organisational structures to support the FirstCaribbean Treasury Business Model
Manage performance and development of three or more direct reports
Drive performance and project management of Treasury Product business initiatives

PREREQUISITES:
Graduate status with 7 years' minimum experience in financial services
In-depth, practical understanding of Treasury business, operations, compliance standards and challenges
Expert understanding of markets, competition, geographic, macro-economic and global factors impacting
Treasury activities
Superior negotiating and conflict management skills
Superior communication and leadership skills able to articulate risk and commercial reward
Highly developed level of risk-awareness and versed in language of modern portfolio
management and risk theory

We offer an attractively structured compensation and reward package as well as performance bonuses.

Applications with detailed resum6 should be submitted no later than Monday 6th February, 2006 to:

Ms. Shannon Holder
Administrative Assistant
FirstCaribbean International Bank
Head Office
Warrens
St. Michael, Barbados
Email: Shannon.Holder@firstcaribbeanbank.com

SOnly applicants who are short-listed will be contacted.


FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK


GN- 317








MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

NOTICE

TENDER FOR THE PROVISION
OF FURNITURE FOR BEST
COMPUTERIZATION PROJECT


1.0 The Ministry of Education invites sealed bids persons
to tender for provision of School Furniture (School Year
2006) for Government Schools in New Providence and
the Family.Islands.

2.0 Interested Bidders may inspect/collect the bidding
documents from the Supplies Section of the Ministry of
Education, Headquarters, Thompson Boulevard from
23rd January, 2006, and obtain further information, at
the second address given below.

3.0 Bids must be in English and should be enclosed in
duplicates in a sealed envelope bearing no identity of
the bidder and endorsed with the subject bided on (e.g.
"Best Computerization Project Furniture")

4.0 Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided
at the first address shown below, on or before Friday
17th February, 2006, by 4:30 pm (local time). It will not
be necessary to submit bids in person since they may
be sent by mail. Late bidw will be rejected and returned
unopened.

5.0 Bids will be opened at a public ceremony, In the
presence of those Bidders or their Representatives who
choose to attend, at 10:00 am on Tuesday, 21st Feburary,
2006 at the address below.

(1) The Chairman Tender
Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield
Cable Beach
P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tel (242) 327-1530

(2) Purchasing/Supplies Section
Ministry of Education
P.O. Box N-3913/4
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tel: (242) 502-8571
Fax: (242) 328-5412

The Ministry reserves the right to reject any and all
Tenders.


I


I


BUSINESS






FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2006, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE


BUSNES


'Everything on the table' over BTC


FROM page 1B
houses.
Mr Ames and Mr Gregg
seem to come from more of a
media and cable broadband
background than a conven-
tional telecoms operator such
as BTC, their previous work
having been more in firms such
as Cable Bahamas.
Mr Smith yesterday hinted
that Bluewater's strategy might
be to introduce 'Triple Play'
services into the Bahamian


FROM page 1B

bringing LNG from Ocean
Cay, a man-made island near
Bimini, to the Florida trans-
mission system.
AES Ocean Express had
filed a complaint against the
FGTC in April 2004, alleging
that the conditions insisted on
by the latter for an intercon-
nection agreement were unrea-


market if it moved forward to
submit a bid, bundling services
such as telephone, television
and Internet.
"It depends on their strate-
gy," Mr Smith said. He added
that if they were looking at
BTC over the long-term, look-
ing to become a major player in
the Caribbean and the world,
the Bahamian company had
"certain attributes" that could
help achieve those goals.
When asked whether Blue-
water was likely to pay a high-


sonable, and would "impose
unwarranted risks and unnec-
essary costs" on the Bahami-
an project.
The position taken by the
FERC thus represents a par-
tial victory for AES Ocean
Express, given that the US reg-
ulator's staff have agreed with
it on spreading costs, but
turned down its position on gas
quality and standards by sid-
ing with FGTC.


FROM page 1B


STotal cruise calls fell by 42.2
per cent in the 2005 first quar-
ter to 126, compared to 218 the
previous year. They were also
down by 27.2 per cent in the
third quarter, but were up 3
per cent in the 2005 third quar-
ter.
Again, the latter statistic is
likely to have been influenced
by the absence of hurricanes
in September 2005, as calls on
Grand Bahama during that
month increased.by 100 per
cent to 54 alls in October were
ahead by 20 per cent at 54,
something that might have
been influenced by the cruise
lines redeploying ships away


from hurricane-damaged
Cozumel and Cancun.
The Family Islands, which
contain the cruise lines' private
islands their favourite desti-
nations, remained the best
ports of call by first and sec-
ond entry, with calls for the
first 10 months only down by
0.5 per cent at 563.
For the whole Bahamas,
cruise calls by first and second
port of entry were down by
13.3 per cent and 13.1 per cent
respectively for the 2005 first
and second quarters. They
were up by 4.1 per cent in the
third quarter, largely due to the
absence of hurricanes.


er price for BTC than Baha-
maTel, which offered $130 mil-
lion during the previously
aborted process, Mr Smith said
it was difficult to assess, as the
rapidly-changing technology in
the industry meant old valua-
tions were somewhat irrele-
vant.
While BTC's fixed-line busi-
ness has been rapidly eroded
by competition, the loss of this
revenue has been compensated
for by the company's cellular


monopoly.
However, Mr Smith said the
Government's intention was
still to end the cellular monop-
oly either one or two years
after privatization, once BTC
had been, given time to adjust
and prepare for competition.
He adqed that "the future"
of the telecommunications
industry lay in wireless appli-
cations, high speed data pro-
cessing and their e-commerce
applications.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that VICTORIA JONES OF FREEPORT,
P.O.BOX 42009, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 20TH day of JANUARY,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.



SQueen's College



AN IMMEDIATE VACANCY EXISTS FOR

A SCHOOL
BUS DRIVER/MESSENGER



The successful candidate should be:

In possession of a public service license/valid
driver's license
A multi-tasker
Team player
Extremely confidential
Minimum of two years experience in this capacity
or a similar capacity

Only Bahamians need apply.

The names and relevant contact information of at least
two professional references should also be listed.

Persons offered appointments will be expected to make
a commitment to work in harmony with Christian
principles and to support the emphases of the.Bahamas
Conference of The Methodist Church of which the
school is a part.

Resumes and covering letters should be addressed to
THE PRINCIPAL, QUEEN'S COLLEGE P.O. Box
N 7127 or faxed to 242 393 3248.


WATER AND SEWERAGE CORPORATION
87 Thompson Boulevard
P.O. Box N-3905, Nassau, The Bahamas
"Striving to serve you with excellence"



SOLICITATION OF INSURANCE PROPOSALS

The Water and Sewerage Corporation invited insurance companies and
brokers to submit proposals for insurance coverage for the year 2006/2009.

TYPES OF COVERAGE REQUIRED:

Crime Protection
Marine Cargo
Motor
Property
Publicity & Product Liability

A Comprehensive "insurance coverage terms of reference package" can be
collected from the Corporation's head office at #87 Thompson Boulevard
on Friday, January 27th, 2006.

All proposals are to comply strictly with the written terms of reference, as
non-compliance can result in the rejection of a proposal.

All companies/Brokers are to confirm their intentions to submit a proposal
to the office of the Financial Controller, Ph 302-5507 on or before Friday,
February 3rd, 2006.

Sealed proposals are to be delivered to the following address on or before
4:00 pm on Friday, March 3rd, 2006.

GENERAL MANAGER
Water and Sewerage Corporation
Att:Financial Controller
P.O Box N-3905
Nassau, Bahamas

All sealed submission are to be clearly labeled, "INSURANCE
PROPOSAL." The corporation reserves the right to reject all or any proposals;.
it also reserves the right to award coverage in the most cost efficient way
to the corporation.


Bahamas LNG project


scores partial success


lrdastra Gardens

Ardastra Gardens is looking for an energetic, reliable,
people-oriented candidate to fill our TOUR
REPRESENTATIVE position on the Prince George
Dock. This position is part-time, requires flexible hours
and owning your own transportation is a must. Interest
in working with small, manageable animals and basic
computer knowledge is a plus.

Please send your resume
and cover letter to the attention of
the Curator, Ms. Robyn Howard
at P.O.Box N-4882
OR
Deliver it to the
SAdmissions Gate
at Ardastra Gardens. ?

SNO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. ...
AIL&L A&LAAAA&hA ~


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THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


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FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2006


SECTION



B
Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


siars



wsapl








* BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS ,
Senior Sports Reporter.
THE Bahamas Academy Stars put
their stamp on a perfect senior boys'
basketball season with a resounding '
84-66 blowout victory over the St.
Augustine's College Big Red '
Machines.
.The Stars clinched the top spot
goirig into the Bahamas Association
oflihdependent Secondary Schools'
playoffs with an unblemished 11-0 -.
record as they eliminated the defend-
ing.champions Big Red Machines.
'It's a familiar situation for
Bahamas Academy, but coach Win-
stor Symonette feels if they can play
the way they did against SAC, they
should finally win the title that has
eluded them in their previous two
trips to the championship.
"We've been here too many times.
It's becoming the norm," said
Syfnonette, of their sixth straight
appearance in the playoffs. "The sea-
son went well."
But Symonette admitted that he
couldn't ask for a better performance
from his Stars.
'"To be honest with you, this is the
first' time that we played this well in
the cold weather. We don't general-
ly play this well in the cold.
"-SAC, to me, wasn't as strong this
year as the teams we've played in
the past. I don't know if that was the
determining factor, but at some
point, I thought the boys from SAC
watched the game more than played
and we took advantage of it."

SExperience
Bahamas Academy outplayed
SAC on their home turf in every -
facet of the game, using their expe- :
rience over the Big Red Machines,
who went through a transitional peri-
od, having lost the majority of their
starters from last year's team.
Travino Carey exploded for a
game high 26 points, including 13 in
the fourth when the Stars extended
their 62-48 margin into a rout. Clyde
Beckford added 19.
- Samson Clare just missed the dou-
bj~,;digits with nine, but he was a
monster on the boards and helped
to ignite the Stars' offensive attack
with the outlet passes.
-At was a well-rounded effort from
the"Stars, who normally don't play as
wdel as they do inside their gym at
Bahamas Academy. But even out-
numbered in fans, they rose to the
oibasion and got the job done.
.ahamas Academy also got eight
from Cordero Hastie, seven from
Keithan Gray and four from Clyson
Beckford. Lasealle Thompson and
Ryan Heastie chipped in with two
apiece.
Cordero Tucker led the Big Red
Machines with 20, while Mario Cur-
ry, who got in foul trouble, had just :,
nine. Both Gilroy Alvury and Lau-
rence Benoit finished with six.
For SAC, coach Reggie Forbes
said it wasn't what they had antici- i;
pated, but they have to live with it. :
"I think the young men gave it all .E"
they had. I just tried to encourage
them and reinforced some of the
things we did in practice," he reflect-
ed.
"It was still a successful season, ______
despite not going back to defend our U THE S
title. We had some growing pains
and we were not as successful as we
anticipated.
"Hats off to all of the other schools
who were successful in beating us. we got in
We will go back to the drawing board some played
and be back next year." their contr
While the season is over for the "God ha
Big Red Machines, the Stars are hop- when we g
ing that this is the year that they will we have be
shine, some sort K
"This team is blessed with a num- "But we
be'r of leaders and you could see we've beer
that," Symonette reflected. "When that we ha,


Sh oo0 thir


nto


pla


ITARS fight for possession on their way to victory yesterday
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


foul trouble, we still had
ers who came in and made
ibution.
s been good to us because
get down to the playoffs,
een affected or plagued by
of injury.
don't say it. This year,
n healthy and so the team
d for the season, we have


that going into the playoffs."
The Stars could not have played
any better than they did as they
rebounded from a shaky start, mak-
ing the necessary adjustments to
playing outdoors as they turned
things around in the second quarter.
By half-time, they had built a com-
fortable 39-29 lead and, every time
the Big Red Machines attempted to


put a dent into the lead, the
Stars were able to surge back out
front.
They held a 62-48 lead at the end
of the third and just cruised to an
easy victory in the fourth. It was nev-
er close as SAC couldn't answer
Bahamas Academy's relentless
attack on the inside with their bigger
line-up.


Grand Bahama

schools to

take part in

Hugh Campbell

* BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
BRINGING closureto t he
ongoing controversy between
the Hugh Campbell Commit-
tee and the Grand Bahama
based schools, Minister of
Youth, Sports and Culture
Neville Wisdom has
announced that the Grand
Bahama schools will be tak-
ing part in the national tour-
nament for high school boys.
After meeting with mem-
bers of the Grand Bahama
Secondary Schools Associa-
tion (GBSSA) and hearing
their arguments, Wisdom
returned to the capital on
Monday, calling a meeting
with the AF Adderley com-
mittee members.
It was revealed by Wisdom
that the meeting with him and
the members of the GBSSA
was very productive and
informative, and that their
requests were noted.
According to Wisdom,
upon his arrival, he immedi-
ately contacted the AF
Adderley committee in an ,
attempt to schedule a meeting
where he can hear their side
of the story.
However, this meeting with
the AF Adderley committee
wasn't able to happen until
yesterday morning.
During this meeting, Wis-
.dom said the requests from
the GBSSA were presented,
with the committee having an
opportunity to express how
they felt.
Taking note to the points
presented to them by the
minister, the committee then
added several objectives they
to believe will help improve
the tournament.
Although both sides were
heard, and an 11 point plan
was designed, the decision to
attend the tournament was
not decided until late yester-
day.
Wisdom said: "All parties
were of the view that the
tournament should continue
under the good name of Hugh
Campbell, and because of the
exposure and opportunity for
all high schools, throughout
the Bahamas, to participate in
basketball tournament at the
level of national champi-
onships, an attempt should be
made to make the tourna-
ment national.
"I was able to sit down and
talk with members of the
Grand Bahama association,
their principals' association
and the teams involved.
"I was advised by them that
I had the authority to confirm
that they were in concurrence
with the new point plan and
will be participating in the
national high school champi-
onships.
"This was on Saturday past.
I asked for the opportunity to
come and present the points
to the New Providence based
schools and most importantly
the tournament committee.
"This morning the commit-
tee had agreed to the 11
points. I am only awaiting the
concurrence of both groups."
The 11-point plan present
by the minister would official-
ly change the tournament's
status and venue.
It is also designed to assist
Family Island teams with
traveling plans.
Family Island teams and
officials will be given a
stipend of $250.00 which will
go towards their accommoda-
tion and discounted airline
fees, all thanks to the Min-
istry of Youth, Sports and
Culture.
An additional $250.00 will
awarded to teams who appear
in the final four of the tourna-
ment.
It is also noted in the plan
that Arthur Thompson will be
available to assist with draw-
ing up the schedule of refer-
ees. His role will also be to
ensure that the teams are
properly seeded in the tour-
nament.


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TRIBUNE SPORTS


-; oE,)i O, FRiDAY, JANUARY 27, 2006







TRIBUNE SPORTS


....Rolle returns to
..i.. i" -A se -- -
:'. ,- ..; .. .. ...
Re helo SCsecure

h7 I SAC


final playoff spot


* BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
LAKEISHA Rolle came back off.the injured
list just in time to help the St. Augustine's College
Big Red Machines secure the fourth and final
playoff spot in the Bahamas Association of Inde-
pendent Secondary Schools' senior girls playoffs.
Rolle came up with a game high 14 points as the
Big Red Machines knocked off the Bahamas
Academy Stars 39-12 on Thursday at SAC.
With the loss, the Stars were eliminated from a
playoff spot as SAC won the decider between
the two schools to improve to 6-3. The Stars
dropped to 4-4.
It wasn't an ending that coach Marco Mullings
anticipated for the Big Red Machines, but he's
delighted that they are in.
"We actually lost to Prince William on Tuesday
because we were the same way we were today,
short," said Mullings, who only had five players in
uniform against the Falcons.
Against the Stars, the Big Red Machines only
had seven players in uniform, but the difference
% as the return of Rolle, who was nursing a right
knee injury from the opening minute of their first
came of the season.
"She still ain't really back, but I'm hoping that
E SAC make a fast break during yesterday's game.


she can give me a couple of minutes here and
there," Mullings stated. "But you see what she
does for us.
"This is actually the first game she played and
she scored a bundle of points with the bad leg."
While Rolle worked her way back into some
kind of condition, the rest of the team rallied
around her with Donee Bethel adding nine, Tes-
sia Rivers eight and Tamara McSweeney chipped
in with six.
The Big Red Machines held the Stars scoreless
in taking a 10-0 lead at the end of the first quar-
ter as Bethel and McSweeney led the way with
four points apiece.
They extended it to 16-4 at the half, but Rolle
really came up big in the second half, scoring
four as they pushed their lead to 26-6 at the end
of the third and she ended up with eight in the
fourth when they put the game out of reach.
Shaniqua Carroll scored seven and Shadia
Major added four, but it wasn't enough.
"I think what happened is the flexibility of the
rim really hurt us because we are accustomed to
playing in the gym," said Stars' coach Trevor
Graves.
"I'm not disappointed in my girls' performances
because most of the shots that they didn't make,
would have been more accurate if they were in
the gym."

(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


A chance for boys and girls to get on the ball

BOYS and girls who want to .
improve their soccer skills will
get a chance to do so beginning :
ot Tuesday January 31st when... -
The Bahamas Soccer Academy ,- ".


commences it's new term, start-
ing with the Western Academy
at their St. Paul's location. The
academy, which was established
inp2005, is for pupils age 6 16
years, and is now in it's 3rd term.
, The after-school programmes,,
which will be conducted by local'
qualified coaches, are from 3.45
- 5.30pm and run year around.
Students will receive expert
guidance in the four areas that
form the game's foundation -
technical, tactical, physical and
mental and learn the discipline
needed to be a successful soccer
player at any level. Skills taught
will include; ball control,drib- -
bling, passing, turning, shooting
arid technique (all using.two
feet). as well as fair play, sport-
ing behaviour, right attitude,
team work and respect.
SThe course will besuitable for
different standards, grades and
ages and the objective is for all-
round development and
improvement that can be repro-
duced in a real match situation,
as well as the students having
fun!
SAttending the academy is an
excellent opportunity to be part
of-a friendly environment that
has. many benefits and is con-
ducted in a structured and pro-
fsiional manner. For more
information about the academy
venues, times and start dates,
please contact; BahamaSports
on 324-3371, info@bahamas-
ports.com or visit their web-site
.v'W.bahamassocceracademy.co


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THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


'AGE 12B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2006


The Free National Movement is pleased and proud
to welcome to membership under
our big tent, Mr, Larry Cartwright,
Member of Parliament for Long
Island and Ragged Island, as the
party moves into a campaign mode
to deliver The Bahamas, once again,


along a Better Way for all.


THE BETTER WAY


TI T
vvelcome to tne


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