Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00302
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: January 23, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00302
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

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Volume: 102 No.52


MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006


PRICE 750


I y 0 '[P Io


P Ia I-As


suit


Pilot's family


makes $100m


claim against


airline


N By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE family of the woman
pilot who died in the Chalk's
seaplane crash is suing the com-
pany for $100 million double
the cover provided by its insur-
ance policy.
The latest lawsuit against
Chalk's has been filed by the
father of Michele Marks, who
was at the controls of the plane
when a wing fell off after take-
off from Miami.
She was one of 20 people who
died as the ageing aircraft nose-
dived into the sea trailed by
blazing wreckage.
Ms Marks' father has filed a
lawsuit on behalf of her estate,
suing Chalk's Ocean Airways
for $100 million.
Foreseeing large lawsuits such
as this one from either the Bac-
ardi family or relatives of vic-
tims not from Bimini, attorney
John Ruiz asked a Miami-Dade
Circuit Court to make sure fam-
ilies of Bahamian crash victims
received their share of the insur-
ance money.
Mr Ruiz, representing plain-
tiff Kendrick Sherman of Bimi-
ni, said: "Chalk's is on shaky
financial ground and the only
money victims might have
access to is a $50 million insur-
ance policy.
"There is really not much


more in the way of assets," he
said.
The attorney also said he
thinks the financial value of the
airline is "minimal if not non-
existent".
He is representing Mr Sher-
man, who lost his wife and child
during the crash, as well as hav-
ing received verbal confirma-
tion from the families of six oth-
er victims to do what is neces-
sary to protect their interests as
well.
Any successful claims against
Chalk's should be paid out equi-
tably from the insurance pro-
ceeds, Mr Ruiz said.
"That would mean that,
regardless of how much courts
award to the passengers' fami-
lies in lawsuits involving the
crash, each family.would get a
proportionate share of the $50
million available," Mr Ruiz told
the Florida newspaper, the Sun
Sentinel.
This latest lawsuit seeking
$100 million for Marks, from
Boynton Beach, comes after
Chalk's flight 101 crashed just
over a month ago.
On December 19, the sea-
plane plummeted into waters
near the Government Cut just
after taking off from Watson
Island in the Florida Cays.
Twelve Biminites died in the
SEE page 11


Parade to mark International Customs Day


* CUSTOMS celebrated International Customs Day with a march to Saint Paul's Baptist
Church in Fox Hill on Sunday. See pages eight and nine for more pictures
(Photo:Felipg Major/Tribune Staff)


Police find
2,000
marijuana
plants in
Andros field

N By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
POLICE and drug officers
have discovered a field in Andros
containing more than 2,000 mar-
ijuana plants.
Drug Enforcement Unit offi-
cers and North Andros-police
made the discovery over the
weekend.
At about 5pm on Saturday,
officers swooped on Owen Town,
North Andros, confiscating a bag
containing seven pounds of mar-
ijuana, a .22 rifle with 41 live
rounds, and a .35 revolver.
No arrests have been made so
far as police say the field was
abandoned at the time of the raid.
It is not known how long the
farm had been in use or the
amount of marijuana it may have
cultivated so far.
But this latest find is in keeping
with a DEU report earlier this
year warning that marijuana cul-
tivation seemed to be "on the
rise" in the Bahamas.
In March last year, DEU offi-
cers discovered a field' near
Savannah Sound, Eleuthera, con-
taining 2,600 plants ranging in
height from three inches to one
and half feet. In this raid two
Bahamians and one Jamaican
were arrested and charged.
In the second discovery of such
farms, DEU officers in November
found a field off Grand Bahama
Highway containing over 5,000
plants of various sizes.
In addition to the plants, one
AK-47 assault rifle was found
with 50 .762 bullets, and 107
.40mm rounds of live ammuni-
tion. In this case, a Jamaican was
arrested and charged.
Police investigations are con-
tinuing.


......................................................................
... ... .. . ... .. ... . ... .. .. .. .. . .... ... . .... ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... .. ... .. .. .. .. ... .. . ... . .... .


Public warned against

harbouring fugitive


Trial continues in

Miller murder case


* By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
ANYONE giving refuge to
jailbreaker Corey Hepburn
could face a prison term them-
selves, a senior policeman
warned yesterday.


With Hepburn still at large
following almost a week of
intense searches, police
appealed to anyone harbour-
ing the fugitive to turn him in.
Chief Supt Hulan Hanna
SEE page 10


* By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
A NINE-WOMAN, three-
man jury will continue to hear
testimony in the Supreme Court
today, as two brothers are on tri-
al for the murder of Mario Miller.


Prosecutor Bernard Turner,
assisted by Neil Brathwaite and
Calvin Seymour, will seek to
close their case with the inten-
tion of proving the brothers
caused the death of Mr Miller,
SEE page 11


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Diabetic clinic opens 'over the hill' facility


0 By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Diabetic Association
has opened a new clinic in the
heart of the "over the hill" area,
offering much-needed care and
treatment to sufferers.
The clinic is on East Street,
opposite McCullough Corner,
and was officially opened by
Ron Pinder, parliamentary sec-
retary at the Department of
Environmental Health.
"I think the location of the
clinic is very symbolic. It means
that it is in the heart of the inner
city, and therefore people who
would not have ordinarily got-


ten the kind of sup
need to deal wil
vent, and educa
about diabetes no
derful opportunity

Netw
"The headqua
accessible, and it'
backyard. So they
the network of h
fessionals, as wel
betic patients, to
bat the disease,"
Mr Pinder sa
would provide a
accessibility and t
viously unseen i


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pport that they areas.
th, treat, pre- "I specifically mean the right
te themselves kind of counselling and access
)w have a won- to information because that is
ty. all part and parcel of treatment
as well.
-k "In addition to that, I think
OTo L that the executive officers of the
association as well as the mem-
rters is easily bership really need to be com-
s right in their mended for their hard work,
y benefit from dedication, and commitment to
ealthcare pro- assist the Ministry of Health, in
1 as other dia- particular, in helping to address
properly com- this problem.
he said. "Private partners, or stake-
id the clinic holders, are critical to address-
new level of ing conditions such as diabetes
treatment pre- because the government cannot
n these rural do it alone.
"And the association has
overcometremendous obstacles
and challenges to establish their
headquarters, and they have
done it with limited funding.
But through it all they have con-
i T tinued to be enthused and
focused," he said.
Mr Pinder said the govern-
ment, though the Ministry of
Health and the Department of
Public Health, will be partner-
ing with the Bahamas Diabetic
Association to ensure that there


M RON BINDER, parlia-
mentary secretary at the
Department of Environmen-
tal Health
(BIS Photo: Tim Aylen)

are branches of their associa-
tion throughout the Family
Islands.
"This is to help in educating


persons, preventing the spread
of the disease, and treating the
disease. That is very, very
important because at, present
there are 30,000 persons in the
Bahamas who have been diag-
nosed with diabetes.
"And worldwide, according
to the International Diabetic
Association, there 194 million
persons living with diabetes.
That number is expected to rise
to 333 million by 2025."

Tested
Mr Pinder said there were a
number of persons living with
the disease without knowing.
He therefore asked those who
believe they have diabetes to
get tested, so that they can
properly manage the disease.
"The disease can be man-
--aged, but education is -impor-
tant in that regard. There are a
lot of persons who I suspect
know they are living with this
disease, but they are afraid.
"And that fear is predicated
by ignorance, because this dis-
ease is certainly something that
can be managed," he said.


Fifty-year anniversary of Sir Etienne Dupuch's

landmark anti-discrimination resolution


FIFTY years ago today, the
late Sir Etienne Dupuch moved
a parliamentary resolution that
_was. to change life in the
Bahamas forever and lay the
groundwork for majority rule.
The Tribune's publisher and
editor proposed the anti-dis-
crimination resolution that was
to outlaw the colour bar in the
Bahamas and throw open public
places to people of all races.
The date, January 23, 1956,
has gone down as one of the tru-
ly significant landmarks in
Bahamian history, and the occa-
sion when racial equality first
gained parliamentary recogni-
tion.
Until then, blacks were barred
from Nassau's downtown hotels
and restaurants and forbidden
to see shows at the Savoy movie
theatre in Bay Street.
Sir Etienne's resolution in the
House of Assembly called for a
commission of inquiry to inves-
tigate the discrimination issue
and "make recommendations


for removing this evil by legisla-
tion or otherwise."
He deliberately tried to pre-
vent its referral to a house
"graveyard" committee because
he thought the members would
never meet and never report.
Sir Etienne was outraged
when a motion to set up such a
committee was carried by two
votes and rose to protest.
When Speaker Asa Pritchard
ordered him to sit down and
threatened to call the police to
arrest him, Sir Etienne said:
"You can call the whole police
force, you can call the whole
British Army, I will go to jail
tonight, but I refuse to sit down."
From the public gallery, the
voice of musician Freddie
Munnings was heard to say
"Don't touch him" as a chorus of
protest forced the House to
adjourn in uproar.
The Speaker never carried out
his threat to have Sir Etienne
arrested and next day full-page
advertisements appeared in the


newspapers saying racial dis-
crimination was at an end.
Afterwards, Sir Etienne was
to declare that a "large body"
of white opinion and the entire
black population was behind his
move.
And he urged fellow Bahami-
ans to show restraint and, in
their hour of victory, "show that
they can measure up to the
responsibilities of first-class citi-
zenship."
In an article in The Tribune's
centenary edition in 2003, jour-
nalist Sir Arthur Foulkes wrote:
"So it was that Sir Etienne's
greatest achievement came
about after a tireless campaign in
The Tribune and one night of
high drama in the political are-
na."
Eleven years later, the
Bahamas moved to majorityrule ,-
in the general election of 1967: -
But many observers believe
that memorable night in 1956
was the real beginning of "the
quiet revolution".


0 In brief

Office

location
THE Registrar General's
office is located at the Centre of
Commerce and not the British
Colonial Hilton, as stated in Fri-
day's Tribune.
The entrance is through
doors next to Scotiabank, not
via the hotel lobby.




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i ii "i 111- ;1


THE TRIBUNE,


PAGE. 2, MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006


~ ~ ~ ~









LOCAE N M Y


* In, hrwf










s -


Work schemes to resume at prison after 'lock down'


& "---- _----]
* PRISON superintendent
Dr Elliston Rahming


* By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
PRISONERS on work schemes will
resume normal activities today after being
on "lock down" for a week following last
Tuesday's prison break.
Classes for inmates around the Fox Hill
compound are also set to resume today.
Inmates who leave the compound dur-
ing the day on work schemes, or to clean
police stations and Government House,
will be allowed to 'continue their work
today, with stern warnings from prison
officials.
Prison superintendent Dr Elliston Rah-
ming told The Tribune yesterday that spe-


cial efforts are being made to fortify the
maximum security blocks and the cells
within.
He added that no inmate will be
allowed to venture out of the cell, even to
go to the bathroom, without being let out
and carefully supervised by a guard.
Also this week, the first set of material
for the construction of a perimeter wall is
due to arrive. The prison produces cement
blocks, so the additional material such as
sand and cement is all that is needed to
begin construction.
Dr Rahming said his management staff
is engaging in a total assessment of the
surveillance capability of the system in
place at the maximum security unit, and


admitted that the system must be
enhanced.
The prison break resulted in the escape
of four convicts a serial rapist, an armed
robber, and two murderers.
Prison officer Deon Bowles was tied
up and stabbed to death during the escape.
While prison officers were able to chase
and detain three of the escapees, one
remains on the run.
Up to press time last night, police were
still unable to find Corey Hepburn, who
has reportedly escaped from the prison
before.
Police continue a massive manhunt for
the armed robber, combing all areas of
New Providence.


Men facing extradition to


appear before Magistrate


SBy FELICITY
-- INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
SEVEN men facing joint
extradition on allegations of con-
spiring to traffic cocaine and
marijuana to the United States
are set to appear again before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel
today.
She has referred their case to
the Supreme Court.
"Copyrighted Material The men, represented by a
Syndicated Content team of attorneys, including
Available from Commercial News Providers" Maurice Glinton, Henry Bost-
wick QC, Murrio Ducille, God-
frey Pinder and Paul Moss,
intend to apply to the Supreme
Court for a constitutional
- - motion against the extradition
S - process.
Magistrate Bethel may be
able to tell the men today when
they will be able to have an audi-
ence in the Supreme Court.
They are: Trevor Roberts, Shel-
S don Moore, Brian and Lynden
-' Deal, Devroy Moss, Shanto Cur-
ry and Gordon Newbold.
_ __ After last week's prison break,
family members phoned to reg-
Sister their disgust that the men
are being housed along with
convicts accused of heinous
crimes.
Two of them, who wished not
to be named, said they thought it
unfair that their loved ones, who
have been imprisoned for 18
months with no formal charges
S. having been brought against
S-. them, are grouped with death
row inmates, rapists, and other
criminals.
S Another relative told The Tri-
S.. ._ . bune that the men had been
stripped of all their personal pos-
.- sessions, save one shirt and a
. pair of pants, and that the items
had all been dumped into a big
bin with the rest of the belong-
ings of those in maximum secu-
S rity.
S He said the forecast categori-
S- station of prisoners must be has-
Stened to assist those who do not
S belong with hardened criminals.
Relatives said after the prison
escape, which claimed the lives
of an officer and an inmate, fears


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for their safety spurred them to
call the media to alert the public
to the fact that the men are inno-
cent until proven guilty.
Their lawyers argue that their
arrest was illegal, because they
were held on search warrants,
which stipulated that illegal
items must be found for capture.
However, the lawyers say no
drugs have been found in this
case.

Challenging
They are also challenging the
constitutionality of the Listen-
ing Devices Act, which allows
the Commissioner of Police to
authorise wire taps without hav-
ing gone through the courts.
The issue is presently receiv-
ing heavy scrutiny in the US,
after it was revealed that Presi-
dent George Bush allowed
eavesdropping and e-mail inva-
sions without a court order on
the suspicion that certain indi-
viduals were involved with ter-
rorists.
There are just a few days left
before the American upper
house meets to decide whether
to ratify Mr Bush's actions or


F NS
Fetlzr Fniie


put a stop to it.
Looking at the process of
extradition itself, the lawyers
argue that the only evidence
being used to extradite the men
is taken from the affidavits of
Bahamian police officers, who
conducted the eavesdropping.
They say the charge of
conspiracy, having been alleged
to occur in the Bahamas,
should be tried in the Bahamian
courts.
The seven men were picked
up as part of multi-national drug
enforcement efforts, called
"Operation Busted Manatee"
and "Operation Double Talk",
in which the US Drug Enforce-
ment Agency attempted to
break the suspected drug ring
of Colombian Elias Cobos-
Munoz.
Mrs Bethel ruled on January 4
that authorisation forms, which
had been "inadvertently left
out" of the indictment, would
be accepted by the court as the
case goes forward.
Some countries still refuse to
extradite their own citizens.
However, in 1994 the Bahamas
parliament moved to pass its
own Extradition Act to replace
the one inherited from Britain.


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MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


-


I


I


*I


I.-~



~






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006


EITORA*ETTRSTOTHEEDTO


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeportfax: (242) 352-9348


The LNG proposal needs decision


WITH IRAN threatening to use its oil as
a weapon to whip "pro-Israeli Western
states" into line, the world and in par-
ticular the United States is facing a grave
crisis to find ways to ledsen its dependency
on Mid-East oil.
"The oil belongs to the people and can be
a weapon against the West and.those coun-
tries who support the savage regime of
Israel," Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah
Ali Khamenei said in a sermon during Fri-
day prayers in Tehran.
Iran, the second largest exporter of oil
from the Middle East and a member of the
OPEC producers' cartel, has proposed a
cut off "for a symbolic period of one
month" to show the world who's boss.
Unfortunately, the world is in no position to
tell this supreme leader to take a flying
leap from the top of Mount Damavand.
Although the Bahamas would like to opt
out of this world problem, there is nowhere
that it can hide and remain secure it too
is caught up in this dilemma.
As the US desperately looks for replace-
ments for oil, many Bahamians would
rather have Americans take their energy
troubles elsewhere so that our environment
can remain safe for them to continue to
swim in our waters and spend their dollars.
in our shops. What we fail to realise is that
if we do not become a part of the energy
solution, we could find ourselves high and
dry without enough power to keep our own
generators turning.
Are we going to put our future and our
fuel supply in the hands of the leader of a
country as unstable as Venezuela? We only
have to recall the panic caused the day the
radar shut down, and the oil companies got
their signals crossed as to who was to refu-
el the planes that day to know what it
would be like if there were a serious break
in our fuel supply. One day's lack of fuel, in
addition to a faulty radar system, did incal-
culable harm to our tourist industry.
Bahamians know how helpless they are
when the electrical supply shuts down for a
few hours. Well, just let's stop for a moment
to imagine the unimaginable. Suppose this
country were completely cut off from fuel,
how many of us know how to rub two sticks
together to make fire? How many of us
know how to take a rock to shape and
sharpen a tree limb into a spear to catch
fish? Or even to make rope from the


coconut to fashion into a fishing net? Yes,
the cave man was better equipped for that
lifestyle than we are today. But without
fuel or its substitute where would Bahami-
ans be? We would be surrounded by a pris-
tine environment, but no means of survival.
At least the cave man knew how to sur-
vive.
Several proposals have been made to
the Bahamas to locate a liquified natural
gas storage terminal one in Grand
Bahama, the other in the Biminis from
which gas would be pumped through a sub-
terranean pipeline to a site near Port Ever-
glades, Fla.
The LNG debate has been going on
since 2001. The FNM government agreed
the proposals in principle, subject to an
environmental study.
However, before they received the envi-
ronmental report, the PLP government
came into power. The debate continued.
As the FNM government had already
agreed-to the proposals all that was left to
Mr Christie was to receive the environ-
mental report, and depending on that
report, make a decision. The Christie
administration is now entering its fourth
year and still no decision.
SSpeaking at a Chamber of Commerce
function in Freep`rt last year, Prime Mini
ister Christie was quoted assaying that as
long as he 'was prime minister he would
not approve the terminal for Freeport. It is
understood that there was concern for Hep-
burn Town residents. However, last sum-
mer Hurricane Wilma washed the town
away and residents will have to be relocat-
ed.
Then word arrived in Freeport that the
terminal might be considered for the har-
bour if the cruise ship facility could be reldo
cated. It is understood that the Grano
Bahama Port Authority has identified
new port area and is working with the
cruise lines and tourism to relocate.
Also last year Mr Christie's own Health
Minister Dr Marcus Bethel told a
town meeting at Eight Mile Rock that an
LNG terminal would be safer than the cor-
ner gas station..
However, it is: incredible that it would
take three years to make a decision that
has already been made in principle by
another government. This is a matter of
urgency and should be treated as such.


Health tax will be




'huge yoke round




the public's neck'


EDITOR, The Tribune.
IT SEEMS like this PLP
administration is hell bent on
placing another huge yoke on
the necks of the Bahamian
public. The proposed health
tax will prove to be a giant
yoke.
The PLP is prepared to dis-
regard all the cumulative
experience of countries who
have unadvisedly and unwise-
ly instituted health taxes, and
who now wish to God that
they had never started down
this slippery slope into a high
tax bottomless pit.
The critical problem for a
small population of course is
the impossibility of a tax base
of 100 thousand workers pay-
ing the cost of a comprehen-
sive health care system.
Regardless of any low intro-
ductory tax rate, it will be
imperative that the true cost
be imposed very early. This
will inevitably be a major
inflationary factor in causing
an increase in your cost of liv-
ing. Have they the guts to tell
you the true cost?
The answer will not be
Cuban medical care. That will
merely increase the medicole-
gal needs.
The Nationalist as an inter-
nationally registered consul-
tant surgeon (go to the Edin-
burgh FRCS website if you
wish to check this), and as a
medicolegal specialist attor-
ney foresees that there will be
a major and unbudgeted for
consequence of this exercise.
There will be a very big
increase in the number of per-
sons needing nmedicolegal
relief. Be advised that the
Nationalist is well equipped
to defend the public interest in
all relevant medicolegal mat-
ters. The announcement that
this Health tax will be insti-
tuted demands that the
medicolegal specialty firm be
restarted to provide the public
with the necessary medicole-
gal services.
To come back to the tax
itself, one of the initially
unforeseen and impossible to
control aspects of a health tax,
is the unavoidable conse-
quence of the overuse and
abuse of the health system
which it inevitably generates.
This makes a mockery of any
projected cost to operate the
system, and cost overruns are
inevitable. So the tax has to
be progressively increased


each budget.
The experience of Health
tax countries is that once peo-
ple pay a government tax for
health care, the use of the
health services rises dramati-
cally. It is used to the max,
regardless of whether or not
the use is justified. There is
also the inevitable trend to
press for more and more eso-.
teric services to be paid for by
the tax. Just ask any National
Health Services senior adviser
in the UK.
Note also that Cuba makes
millions of dollars by encour-
aging countries to use their
doctors and health services.
This is not free. It will be paid
by the Petrocaribe money.
Venezuela will kick back to
Cuba, in oil or hard currency.
The Bahamas will pay
Venezuela it is as simple as
that.
In time Bahamians will
learn that these Trojan horses,
these Greeks bearing gifts are
not to be trusted, but it looks
like these lessons will have to
be learned the hard way.
The problem is that after
you have allowed the PLP to
kill off the existing health
insurance industry it will be
difficult to bring it back to life.
If you doubt me, ask those in
control of the British NHS.
They and the Europeans are


busy now trying to encourage
private insurance to assist in
paying for the inordinate
financial load of their Health
tax systems.
Doctors always hope that
they are wrong when they-
diagnose serious problems in'
their patients. Unfortunately
the number of times they are
actually wrong is only a small;
percentage. The Nationalist
wishes that this is one of the
times that he is wrong, how-
ever unfortunately that will'
not be the case. The country
will shortly see that thB*
Nationalist was right to con-
demn this inflationary and ill
advised move to place this tax
yoke on your necks. To afl
who think that they will enjoy'
free medical care under this:
tax system, you obviously stilt
believe in the tooth fairy and
you are in for a rude awaken:
ing.
Let the PLP go ahead with
this major mistake. The
Nationalist was among the
first to say that CSME was ndt
in the nation's interest nod
desired by the majority. .,
Once again the Nationalist
will be among the first to prel
dict that this boondoggle of a
health tax will be recogniseA
in time by all for what it is, a
major yoke around this coun-
try's collective neck.
DR DEXTER JOHNSON
The Nationalist
Nassau,
January 19, 2006.


All dogs need is

food and shelter
EDITOR, The Tribune.
MY NEW YEAR'S wish is that Bahamians learn to have more
empathy towards God's dumb creatures. The serious stray dog prob-
lem in the Bahamas is the fault of irresponsible people who get animals
and then neglect to take care of them, failing to keep them confined
resulting in them roaming neighborhoods, especially at night, howl-
ing and barking, disrupting ones sleep; indiscriminate breeding (pro-
ducing more unwanted puppies); and pulling down garbage cans. It's
a vicious cycle that needs to be broken.
All they need is food and shelter and in turn they give unconditional
love. A dog is indeed man's best friend, trained as guide and therapy
dogs, body, drug and bomb sniffers, fierce protectors of their families,
and the list goes on. They also feel the elements just as we do, so take
them in when it's hot or too cold. Believe me, they're cleaner and more
obedient than children.
The fact that the laws on the books are not enforced doesn't help, and
the look on tourists faces when they see dogs travelling in packs
throughout the city is one of disbelief. Remember, there are no bad
dogs, only irresponsible owners, and did anyone ever stop to think what
dog reads backwards? Please, if you don't intend to look after an ani-
mal, never even entertain the idea of getting one cute puppies and
kittens do grown into adults. Let's eradicate this nuisance now!

AN ANIMAL LOVER
Nassau,
January 10, 2006.


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MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006, PAGE 5


OIn brief

Pedestrian:
dies in
hospital two
weeks after
accident

* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
FREEPORT A 60-year-
old pedestrian who was
struck down two weeks ago
on Grand Bahama has died
at-Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal in Nassau.
Samuel Louis, of Garden
Villas, died on January 16 -
five days after being airlifted
from Rand Memorial Hos-
pital in Freeport.
Supt Basil Rahming said
Louis' death is the second
traffic fatality for the year
on the island.
.According to reports, the
traffic accident occurred
around 11.30pm on January
2,on East Atlantic Drive,
near Bruce Avenue.
-Mr Louis was walking
when a green.1998 Chevy
Cavalier driven by Philip
Moxey, 25, of Eight Mile
Rock, knocked him down.
He was taken to the hospital
alad detained for several
days in critical condition
hbfore being airlifted to Nas-
sau on January 10.
,jPolice are continuing
investigations.

Sailor dies
after falling ill
on US-bound
freighter

A YUGOSLAVIAN
sailor died Friday after expe-
riencing severe chest pains
on a US-bound.freighter,
which was diverted to Grand
Bahama.
Supt Basil Rahming said
the US Coast Guard report-
ed at about 3.37am that the
.1VIfl 'VAh idria r was.i-Headed
toTFreeport wth a"sick"cre\\
member.
-When th vessel.-arrived
at Lucayaii Harbour around
4.15am, chief engineer Boris
Sindan, 57, was taken by
ambulance to Rand Memo-
rial Hospital, where he was
pronounced dead on arrival.
4Captain Ivica Zupan, 51;
of Croatia, told police that
the vessel was sailing from St
Thomas in the US Virgin
Islands, and was headed to
West Palm: Beach, Florida.
,, He said they were passing
Grand Bahama when Mr
Sindan began complaining
of severe chest pains so he
diverted the ship to
report.
SSupt Rahming said an
autopsy will be performed
to determine the cause of
death.












JANUARY 23
$:30 Bahamas @ Sunrise Live
1 00 Immediate Response
noon ZIS News Update Live
32.03 Caribbean Today News
Update
12-05 Immediate Response Cont'd
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.:30 Spiritual Impact: K. Whalum
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:30 Inside Hollywood
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:58 ZNS News Update
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1:30 Comm. Page 1540AM


Magistrate reluctantly continues in court six

' By A FELICITY While she has her hands tied, in that Gomez had agreed with her about the Mrs Virgil also expressed concern tt
INGRAHAM the court's work must go on, she has not conditions. the court had one entrance and one e)
Tribune Staff Reporter taken on any of court six's criminal mat- causing a fire hazard.


MAGISTRATE Linda Virgil has
reluctantly continued her work in court
six as coroner's court judge after publicly
voicing her complaints about the build-
ing.
She exclusively released her letter of
discontent to The Tribune earlier this
month, hitting out at "deplorable" con-
ditions at the Parliament Street premis-
es.
She called the place a fire and health
hazard, claiming it was inadequate to
house all of her staff.


ters. Lawyers, plaintiffs, and suspects all
have their matters suspended until
another judge is found to replace for-
mer acting magistrate Renee McKay.
Ms McKay resigned about a month
ago, reportedly upset with the less-than-
suitable conditions there.
Magistrate Virgil told The Tribune
that she does not plan to take on court
six cases because she is still wrapping
up old matters from her tenure at court
one, Bank Lane, and she is dealing with
her new coroner's cases.
She said chief magistrate Roger


Bahamas





opens ii


THE BAHAMAS officially
opened its embassy in China's
capital on Friday nearly nine
years after establishing diplomat-
ic relations with Beijing.
Speaking at a reception at the
Kuntai Royal Hotel to mark the
opening, Minister of Foreign
Affairs Fred Mitchell called the
event an important day in bilat-
eral relations between China and
the Bahamas.
Mr Mitchell recalled that diplo-
matic relations began some nine
years ago, on May 23,1997.
The minister highlighted some
of the visits between state, gov-
ernment and party officials of the
two countries since diplomatic
relations began.
He pointed out that Prime
Minister Perry Christie and for-
mer prime minister Hubert Ingra-
ham made official visits to China
and that Chinese vice-president
and health minister Wu Yi had
visited Nassau and Freeport.
Mr Mitchell announced that
the prime minister had appointed
Phillip Miller as charge ,d'affaires
and head of mission in Beijing.
Mr Miller's previous posting was
that of under-secretary of the
trade and economic affairs divi-
sion in the Ministry of Foreign
A. l'failrl .
SMr'Mchell said'Mr NlMiller


"comes well-qualified, following
distinguished service to two prime
ministers of the Bahamas in the
area of trade and investment,
agriculture and foreign affairs.
He has the fullest support of
Prime Minister Christie and this
minister."
Chinese vice-minister of for-
eign affairs, Li Jinzhang, wel-
comed Mr Mitchell to China, con-
gratulated Mr Miller on his
appointment, and said the open-
ing of the embassy would further
strengthen ties between China
and the Bahamas.
The opening was attended by
Beijing's-liplomatic corpsj:indl.dr
ing. Caribbean representatives.
These included Guyana's charge


MINISTER of Foreign Affairs Fred Mlilchell, left. and Li
Zhaoxing, Minister of Foreign Affairs People's Republic of Chi-
na, raise their glasses together as a toast to their meeting at the
Fangfeiyuan Guesthouse in Beijing, China on Saturday, January
21, 2006. Former Chinese Ambassador to The Bahamas Jiao
Donhcun is shown looking on. (BIS Photo: Tim Aylen)


CHINESE Minister of Foreign Affairs Li Zhaoxing has
pledged a 30 million yuan (US $ 3.75 million) gift from the
Chinese Government and people to the Government and
people of the Bah:amas.
The pledge was made on Saturday 21st January in Beijing,
during talks between Mr. Li and the Minister of Foreign
Affairs and the Public Service, Fred Mitchell, and is in addi-
tion to the gift of a US $30 million sports stadium, the con-
struction of which is scheduled to commence this year.


Temporary
Mr Gomez told The Tribune that court
six will represent only a temporary place-
ment for the judge, whose offices at the
Rodney Bain building were shut down
for similar health reasons. He said the
court work "must go on", and that anoth-
er location would be sought for Mrs Vir-
gil.
Her letter, copied to Prime Minister
Perry Christie and Attorney General
Alfred Sears, talked about rats and
roaches invading the court.


hat
ait,


Her letter said the coroner's court
accommodates the coroner, police offi-
cers, seven jurors, together with support
staff, and that court six cannot ade-
quately house them, in addition to being
sub-standard.
"The building is unsafe and unsani-
tary. Of paramount importance is my
safety and that of the persons that work
with me," she said.
Mrs Virgil is hoping the government
will look at the former offices of attor-
neys Higgs and Johnson as a new home
for the coroner's court.


Embassy




i Beijing

SMINISTER of Foreign Affairs and the Public Service Fred
Mitchell speaks at the reception marking the official opening of the
Embassy of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas at the Kuntai
Royal Hotel in Beijing, China on Friday, January 20,2006.
11. (BIS Photo: Tim Aylen)


d' affaires, Cecil Pollydore;
Jamaica's ambassador Wayne
'McCook; Suriname's ambassador,
Roy M. Wong Lun Hing and
Grenada's ambassador, Josylyn
Whiteman.
Mr Mitchell explained that the
embassy's office at No 14 Liang
Ma He Road, which is under ren-
ovation, would not be fully ready
for business for another four to
six weeks.
He thanked the British for pro-
vidirig consular service through
the transition phase.
Several Bahamian and Chinese
business people who trade
between the two countries were
also onharid, aln'g:with Bahanii-'
hn studedits iudS i ing Chin C i..


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LOCAL NEWS


THE TRIBUNE














The paralysis of fear: CARICOM's




greatest enemy in development


* By Sir Ronald Sanders
(The writer is a business exec-
utive and former Caribbean
diplomat who publishes widely
on Small States in the global
coonilunlnity).

N January 1 last year
the CARICOM coun-
tries were scheduled to launch
the Caribbean Single Market
(CSM) with the development
into a Single Economy by 2008.
It didn't happen.
But the citizens and residents
of CARICOM countries as
well as the rest of the world -
were assured that the CSM
would be inaugurated on Janu-
ary 1, 2006.
Numerous public statements
from the CARICOM Secre-
tariat declare that the Single
Market started on January 1st
this year. In contradiction to
those statements, there is to be
a ceremony to launch the Single
Market in Jamaica on January
30, and then only by six of the
member states: Barbados,
Belize, Guyana, Jamaica,
Trinidad and Tobago and Suri-
name.
In truth, the world knows that
over the last two years great
fears have surfaced about the
CSME, particularly among the
member countries of CARI-
COM who are also members of
the Organisation of Eastern
Caribbean States (OECS).
These countries are: Antigua
and Barbuda, St Kitts-Nevis,
Dominica, Grenada, St Lucia
and St Vincent & The
Grenadines.
These fears have paralysed
the necessary action to launch


the Single Market by all the
countries of CARICOM col-
lectively and joyously.
The OECS members have
now made it known that they
will not sign up to the Single
Market at the Jamaica ceremo-
ny on January 30.
We can list some of the fears.
They include: fear among
some of the people that their
country will be swamped by
persons from other Caribbean,
countries bringing crime, drug.
addiction and even "another
culture"; fear by some of the
people that their jobs will be
taken by persons from other


There will be
competition in
the production
and sale of
goods and
services, but
competition
will also
reduce prices.

Caribbean countries; fear by
some business people that their
enterprises will be put out of
business by other Caribbean
companies or by imports into
their local markets from other
Caribbean countries; fear by
some governments that unem-
ployment will rise from the col-
lapse of local businesses; fear
by some governments that their
indigenous people will turn


Isi ht
WORLD VIEW -


against them politically for
allowing entry to "foreigners"
from other Caribbean countries;
and, fear by some governments
that their countries will be rele-
gated to markets for exports
from other Caribbean countries
while their own exports will
decline, thus retarding their
development.

D during the course of
2005, in light of the
failure to launch the CSME on
January 1, 2005 and with some
of the public fears being
revealed by the press, the Sec-
retariat did mount region-wide
public education
programmes. But, by then many
of the fears had become deeply
ingrained.
And, what is very significant
is that few of the CARICOM
leaders actually went out to
public meetings, to town hall
occasions or even on radio and
television to allay fears and con-
vince people of the importance
of the CSME. Barbados' Owen
Arthur was a notable excep-
tion.
Over the tast few months
Barbados Prime Minister Owen
Arthur and a special Technical
Team visited several countries
to discuss their concerns, and
to indicate that special and dif-
ferential treatment including


i ". '" t
* SIR Ronald Sanders

compensatory measures and
preferred access to a Regional
Development Fund would
be given to Guyana, as a highly
indebted poor country, and to
the OECS countries.
But, a month ago on
December 23 the OECS
countries indicated to the
CARICOM Secretariat that
they had decided "individually,
and as a group", that they are
"unable to be party to the
CSME at this time".
Then this month, the same
group of countries promised to
sign on to the Single Market by.
March 31, 2006, provided cer-
tain measures are put in place
by then. Among the measures
are: a meaningful Development
Fund, special industry protec-
tion for the OECS, and delayed
removal of Alien landholding
restrictions.

similar circumstances
occurred when the


Caribbean Free Trade Associa-
tion (CARIFTA) was being
inaugurated in 1968.
The governments of Antigua,
Barbados and Guyana had
signed the Caribbean Free
Trade Agreement at Dicken-
son Bay in Antigua in 1965 with
the intention of reviving the
regional integration movement
which appeared to have died
with the collapse of the West
Indies Federation in 1962.
After painstaking work by
regional technocrats and much
bickering among regional gov-
ernments, the terms of a Treaty
to be signed on 1st May 1968
were agreed. But, on that date
only Trinidad and Tobago
joined the original three coun-
tries.
Except for Antigua, which
was a founding member of
CARIFTA, the Leeward and
Windward Islands (now the
OECS), at the last moment laid,
a declaration of intent to join
on 1 July 1968. A major hold
up then was their insistence on.
the establishment of the
Caribbean Development Bank
from which they expected
development funds would flow
mainly to them.
Earlier, they had insisted
upon and been granted -
various compensatory mecha-
nisms which were embodied in
the CARIFTA Treaty.
Further, as a response to
CARIFTA, they formed the
Eastern Caribbean Common
Market (ECCM). Not dissimi-
larly the same countries are now
talking about forming an Eco-
nomic Union.

he development of an
OECS Economic
Union would be a good thing,
particularly if it means that the
Union would be a single mem-
ber of the CSME setting trade
policy and speaking and acting
on behalf of OECS countries as
a whole. It would make the
OECS group a stronger entity
and better able to bargain with-
in the CSME since it would


command greater resources and
would itself become a bigger
market.
While history repeats itself,
the fears about the Caribbean
Single Market live on. They
need to be quelled.
A clear picture needs to
emerge about the establishment
and funding of the Regional
Development Fund. OECS-
countries should understand
that while they may be given
preferential access to its
resources, they also need-to
contribute to it.
It is also time that it is said
that some inefficient andz
uncompetitive companies will
collapse throughout the region,
but stronger Caribbean com-
panies will replace them .pro-,
viding job security and con;
tributing to economic growth:
some skilled workers will 'b
displaced in their native loca-
tions, but they will have thli
option of transferring to other
places in their Caribbean home
land; criminals from one are6
of the Caribbean will not,.
able to travel to other parts o
the region to commit crimes foi
immigration controls will still.
be in place, and information
about criminals will be bett6,r
organised; there will be con.'
petition in the production ai..
sale of goods and services, buf;i
competition will also reduce'
prices.

Here is still much '
do. CARICOM has to.
develop reliable and tsustainab
air and sea transportation links
if the region's production is to
be truly integrated, and L thip
region is to become a market,,
for its own production: '
It will notbe .plain sailing
everyday; but everyday as a sin-
gle market, the Caribbean w1%
be better placed to endure in a
highly competitive world. It-',
boldness not fear that will take
the people of CARICOM for,
ward.
Responses. to: ronald-.
sanders29@holmail.com


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PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY


VACANCY NOTICE

DEPUTY DIRECTOR HUMAN RESOURCES (TRAINING)
AND DEVELOPMENT

Applications are invited from suitable candidates for the post of Deputy
Director Human Resources (Training) and Development at the Public Hospitals
Authority which is responsible for managing the three public Hospitals
(Princess Margaret Hospital, Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre, Rand Memorial
Hospital) and also for the Bahamas National Drug Agency, materials
management Services, National Emergency medical Services and the public
clinics in Grand Bahama.

PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES

The Deputy Director Human Resources (Training) and Development reports
to the Director of Human Resources, Corporate Office; and is responsible for
assisting in planning, developing and implementing a Master Training &
Development Plan that strategically aligns training and learning activities
with PHA overall business strategy, performance and results.

SPECIFIC RESPONSIBILITIES

* Conducts training needs assessment to determine gaps in core competencies,
focusing on critical areas of the organization.

* Develops comprehensive training and learning programmes to close
competency gaps, and to advance and develop employee careers within
and between occupations.

* Evaluate and selects appropriate technology and strategies (informal and
formal) for delivering training programmes and facilitating individual and
group learning.

* Collaborates with PHA institutions, Government agencies and private sector
institutions to facilitate exchange of information and strategies and a sharing
of resources.

* Establishes a process for validating training and learning programmes to
ensure that they result in desired outcomes.

JOB REQUIREMENTS

The successful applicant must:-

* Possess a Bachelors Degree, or preferably a Masters Degree in Education,
Management, Human Resources or equivalent qualification.

* Have at least five (5) years, post qualification experience in staff training,
technical and managerial, at all staff levels;

* Be competent in assessing training needs, oral and written communication,
curriculum development, writing training manuals, seminar presentation
and group facilitation, leadership and project management.

APPLICATION DEADLINE

Letters of application, resume, evidence of qualifications and experience, and
three (3) references should be submitted, no later than 14th February, 2006
to the Human Resources Director, Public Hospital Authority, P.O. Box N-
8200, or 1st floor, Manx Corporate Centre, Dockendale House, West Bay
Street.


I


CLICI :b;


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''i ".I L


-THE TRIBUNE,


PAGE 6, MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006


2 ''L':,:,


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intuesday's


Ad*





ARTHUR FOULKES: NOTED JOURNALIST,
UNIVERSAL PERSPECTIVE, HISTORICAL CONTEXT A MUST-READ COLUMN THAT GETS TO THE POINT





Young people get a fresh start


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT Minister of
Youth, Sports and Culture
Neville Wisdom presented grad-
uation certificates on Friday to
the first group of participants
in the Fresh Start Programme
on Grand Bahama.
Mr Wisdom commended the
17 graduates and 20 businesses
for their involvement in the 12-
week job training and skills
development programme.
."This is the first time the pro-
gramme has been implement-
ed on the island of Grand
Bahama and we hope that it will
continue to provide opportuni-
ties for a fresh start for many
young people," he said. Mr Wis-
dom said employment of young
people is a government priority.
According to statistics, he
reported that the unemploy-
ment rate among young people
was the highest of all groups in
the Bahamian labour force.
He further noted that
research in 2004 indicated that
the unemployment rate among
young persons on Grand
Bahama was 34 per cent the
highest in the country.
Mr Wisdom said 15 per cent
of young males and 18 per cent
of young females between 16 to
19 years were unemployed.
"Further research showed
that many young people were
unemployed because the wages
were considered inadequate,"


17 graduate 12-week training programme


N MINISTER of Youth, Sports and Culture Neville Wisdom at
the event on Friday


he said.
Mr Wisdom said the problem
of unemployment is a major
concern to the government
because it contributes to a num-
ber of social problems, such as
crime and violence.
He stressed that young peo-
ple must feel empowered and
become constructively engaged
in wholesome activities to make
their contribution to the devel-
opment of the Bahamas.
"When I became Minister of


Youth I challenged myself and
the government to see if we can
develop programmes to allow
young people the opportunity
and better quality of life they
were entitled to."
The Fresh Start programme
caters to young people between
15 and 25 years of age. The pro-
gramme consists of three com-
ponents a four-week comput-
er-training programme, two
weeks of community service
and a six-week internship.


Mr Wisdom thanked various
businesses that provided intern-
ship to the participants in the
programmes.
Freeport News editor Oswald
Brown commended Mr Wis-
dom and the ministry for imple-
menting the programme in
Freeport.
"I started myself as an 18-
year-old intern at The Tribune
back in 1960. And I had the
good fortune to have as my
mentors Sir Arthur Foulkes and
Sir Etienne Dupuch. They
taught me the craft of journal-
ism and that was my fresh
start," he told the graduates.
"I have been in the business
now for some 45 years and I
credit my start at The Tribune
for anything.I have accom-
plished in the field of journal-
ism," he said.
Mr Brown believes that more
young men need to be involved
in the Fresh Start programme.
"Of all the participants in the
programme there is only one
male, and that is indicative of
what is happening in our society
today. And it has so many ram-
ifications for us as a people, as a
country, and for our families,
that we have got to find a way
to get our men involved in pro-
grammes of this nature because
it is a wonderful programme,"
he said. '


e92WiU~y~ ~Je~aaw rY 12 290-6


2.i26?rkYn -~=aum


9"#e4I?~;c?(a4/Aeeye4
eS`lw' EaW'f~zr~l'


(F orhckes, peasecall 3562589


?I- 9 .--


The Tribune and the Minister of Education's Book Club present


he S.


- 13






^M^I( 'i^^^~pC~


Beginning Thursday 26 January through February
13, read this engaging thirteen part story about a dyslex-
ic boy, Jamie, and his encounter with a thief. Also read
special weekly articles from the Special Services Section
Sof the Department of Education about dyslexia in the
Bahamian school system and community.


The Tribune, like the Minister of Education's Book
Club, believes that reading helps young people to focus on constructive choic-
es through exposure to worlds beyond their immediate environment. Breakfast Serials
stories are short, engaging and compelling so that the reader keeps coming back for more.

Read, learn, enjoy.


pea4 n Sk-


Written by Avi
Illustrated by
Joan Sandin


Jamie, being dyslexic, may not be able to where she's being taken, Jamie is in a double


read words on a page, but he can read clouds
and what he sees is as wondrous as it is unbe-
lievable-to others. One summer day he sees a
man in a business suit parachute from an air-
plane. When he tells his family and friend
Gillian, no one believes him. But, not only are
Jamie's perceptions accurate, the man is a thief
who has stolen a million dollars and kidnaps
Gillian. When she leaves a written note as to


A Bright Start


bind: no one thinks he's seen anything real and
he can't read the message. Reading the Sky
brings high adventure from the sky and on and
off the page.

Read "Reading the Sky"
with us ... every weekday from
January 26 to February 13, 2006.






Good Books Unbound


The Tribune
iewspaperineducation


d4


'Ni-


I


MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


i ~/,:; ..i';.i~,~,-r. 'i;ilr;~ .'~:1, li/,i, ~,,, ,c~'~


.. i~
I ~~
II

j

1
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PAGE 8, MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006





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THE TRIBUNE




International Customs


Day marked with parade


a CUSTOMS celebrated International Customs Day with a full uniform procession
(Photos: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)


BahamaHealth is relocating

to harbour bay shopping centre
BahamaHealth, the Group Division of Family Guardian,
will relocate to Harbour Bay Shopping Center
on January 30.
Phone us at:
242 396 1300 Main Line
242 396 1003 Care Advocates
242 300 2458 Family Islands Toll Free
242 396 1301 Fax Line
or visit our new convenient location.
S. f f.i ,s:, With BahamaHealth Good health is within your reach!






Baha, ina H lit
F L EL G A..' -







Tel: 396 1300
Harbour Bay Shopping Centre .-


B


(I......V Ba lt HEA t


O- FAMILY
^ GGUARDIAN
INSURANCE
COMPANY


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their'
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


EXCELLENT CAREER COMMUNITY

CATV Headend Manager/Consultant.


-w ....Wms!F a nn mI-.,
CAIBLE BAHAMAS
Cable Bahamas Ltd. operating one of the most advanced broadba
networks, seeks the services of a top-notch professional. The id
candidate will have extensive experience in the reception a
distribution of off-air, satellite and tape originated programming to
outside plant utilizing fiber optic transmission technologies.
four headends with high-speed cable modem services, in-house
channel di.,i.L video server, analog conditional access services, and
advanced upstream management system.
Resposibilities Include:
* Engineer, design and upgrade existing and new headends and-hubs.
* Evaluation and procurement of headend equipment options based on
sound judgement of i- 1 i; .I i -...- I 11 li i 1 cost of same.
Operation and maintenance of:
* All headend signal-processing equipment for analog and digital vide
* High-Speed data network components and monitoring equipment l
* Antennas, Dishes, Towers and microwave equipment
* Fiber optic path cabling and management systems (Fwd.'and Retu
* Assist with planning and implementation of new product introdtct
SCoordinate completion of projects on schedule and on budget
* Prepare, submit and manage a departmental budget
Plan and insure Headend/Hlub Preventativc maintenance programs
* Prepare and keep current headend/hub documentation I
* Manage a i .,.1 I.' ,1 (4) teclinicians
* Coordinate the training of all headend personnel
* Complete departmental performance reviews and
* On call as a backup to headed technicians
Minimum Qualifications:
An Associates degree in Electrical/Electronic Engineering or equivalent
A minimum of at least 10 years experience in Headend Operations andi
engineering, 5 years of which, as a manager. Salary commensurate witM
qualifications and experience.
Cahle Bahamas Ltd. owns and operates one of the world's mot
advanced Broadband networks and provides world-class television
service and high-speed internet access services throughout tke
Bahamas. The company also owns and operates a private submarine,
fiber-optic system connecting the Bahamas and Florida. Cable Bahama4'
ordinary shares trade on .the Bahamas International Stock Exchange
(symbol: CAB). Additional information can be obtained from the
companies website at www.cablebahamas.com.

jlH~sii-
CAN L_. E BAHAMAS
Resumes to be submitted by January 27th 2006 to Mr.,
Richard B. Adderley or sent electronically to
rbadderley@cablebahamas.com.







THE TBEN
S


:^!*!,^s ''-


* '"" .
, i'.. -. '-, >
&.^..-.,,",,.* ,.-
. .,' ,-:'. ,.


4;



.:I. --'4.:
MercedesIB-:en ;


SAINT Paul's Baptist Church marching band makes some joyful sounds while marching on Fox
ill Road yesterday, as the Customs department celebrated International Customs Day


Applicant must:
* have a minimum of 5 years experience as a Legal
Secretary
have strong typing skills
book-keeping skills a plus
be proficient in Microsoft Word and Excel
be self-motivated and able to work without supervision.
Applicants with background in real estate, corporate,
commercial, banking, trusts, wills, and immigration matters
, encouraged.
Medical insurance and Pension Plan offered.
Salary commensurate with skill and experience.
Please submit application letter with resume by e-mail
or facsimile to:
Facsimile: 362-5788
P. O. Box N-7776 (514), Nassau, Bahamas


rour car.


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Our responsibility

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*American & Imported Cars Light Trucks Vans & SUV's
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Tel: 39346651 or 3934693


EAST ST. & SOLDIER RD
Tel: 356-2940 or 356-2941


Open: Monday Saturday
8am~5pm


Fax 326-4865 P. 0. Box SS-6766 Nassau, Bahamas
AUTO SYSTEM EXPERTS


"Midas is a business based on service, quality and reliability.
Factory scheduled maintenance is car card.
Midas services your car fully. Our system takes the guesswork
out of auto care for every car model out there.


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-I I ~--- I --- ---a, r.


- ---~~~


~Trust-


MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE


PA(F 10. MONDAY. JANUARY 23. 2006


SAL


Black female potcake with white
blaze on chest and collar found
Tuesday, January 10th
in Brace Ridge/Eastern Road area.






^I.&.^, -ve-



BLOWOUT

Storewide Sale


""50% off


Swissamassadorpaysa isi


* THE Ambassador of Switzerland, His Excellency Anthon Thalmann paid a farewell courtesy call on Minister of State for
Finance James Smith last Friday
(Photo: BIS/Raymond Bethel)



Warning on escaped inmate


FROM page one
warned that harbouring a fugi-
tive is a criminal act punishable
by law.
Hepburn has been at large
for almost a week following
Tuesday's deadly prison escape,
when both an inmate and a
prison guard lost their lives.
Two other inmates who tried
to escape were immediately
caught, and two other guards
were injured in the resulting
melee.
Since the escape, reported
sightings of Hepburn on
numerous Family Islands have
been passed on to police.
But Mr Hanna said Hep-
burn is still believed to be


in New Providence.
"The investigation is going
quite well and we are making
significant process. Of course,
the longer a person stays out
the greater the likelihood is that
someone is aiding him in con-
tinuing to be on the outside.
"But nothing has changed in
regard to our intensity. In fact,
we have become more inten-
sive more organised.
"We have implemented addi-
tional strategies that we are
unable to discuss publicly, but
that we have implemented in
our plan to get a hold of him,"
he said.
Mr Hanna said it was possi-
ble Hepburn was being har-
boured by a friend and cau-


tioned against such an act.
"Persons who may be giving
safe haven to this individual
ought to know that it is criminal
offence, punishable by law, in
fact punishable by jail time.
"The fact that he is in the
company of others, or may be
in the company of someone,
also makes those persons more
likely to participate with him
in any other criminal act that he
may be likely to perform.
"For example, they may be
driving him around town in a
vehicle and he commits an
offence. They then have effec-
tively conspired to commit that
offence with him.
"So the public ought to know
and be %er\, very clear when,


they take these decisions to-
harbour these individuals," he
said.
Mr Hanna warned that
under the deadly circumstances
of the prison breakout, the
courts might in fact inflict a
harsher penalty on anyone har-
bouring Hepburn. ,
"This is \% by we want to
appeal to anyone who knows
this man, maybe family mem-
bers or good friends of his, to
come out, to use the media to
appeal to him to turn himself
in. Because he is not doing any
good to himself remaining at
large," he said.
An\ one with.information
can phone 502-9991, 919, or
328- TIPS.


jobOppotuit
Ac u t Sig lr


Are you striving for

personal growth


with a passion for


SUCCeSS, in a company that

prides itself on customer service?

If we've peaked your interest, Let's Talk!!

The Plus Group, Nassau, Bahamas, is seeking
a young, intelligent, computer literate individual.
This individual must be a team player who is self-
motivated and has a strong desire to achieve goals that
are both customer & company driven.


Qualifications:


Benefits:


DutieC:


I 4'


* Six (6) BGCSE's
* Knowledge of Excel &
Microsoft Office Software
* Health Insurance & Pension
(both after a qualifying period)
* Two weeks vacation.
* Assistance with training / COB
(if courses taken are relevant
to job performance)


" Posting & payment of
authorized invoics
ReLoneiiiation of supplier
tatcemennts
Review & reconciliation of
daily cashier reports & deposits
Penr cash disbursement


LisGroup
Sof Companies

PIlca'e submit your application via
Mail to: The Plus Group
P. O. Box N'13
Najsau, Bahamas
or eNlail to: jobs"_'tcheplusgroup.com


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Prosecution argues



that two brothers



caused Miller death


FROM page one
soii of Trade and Industry Min-
ister Leslie Miller.
Mr Turner first sought to
prove that Mr Miller was
involved in a drug deal with the
two brothers, aged 31 and 25,
the day before his death.
Ednol Mackay testified that
oriJune 21, 2002, he was in a
vehicle with a man known to
him as "Manny" (Ryan Miller)
when he saw a "bright-skinned
fellow" in a green Infiniti jeep
pass a black package of what he
believed to be cocaine to Man-
ny.l
He told the court that Manny
got out of his Nissan Sentra,
entered the jeep, and rode with
the man off a side street for
atLout three to five minutes
before he returned with the
package, asking him if he knew
anyone who wanted it.
A, day later, two detectives
fouhd Mr Miller with fatal stab
wounds about the face, arms,
and neck.
Detective Constables James
Colebrooke and Anderson,
acting on information, went to
the western side of Super Val-
ue Winton supermarket, where
they found the body of a "light-



Fresh

lawsuit

is filed

against

Chalk's

FROM page one
crash, as well as an American-
born Bimini resident.
SSergio Danguillecourt, 42, a
member of the board of Mia-
mi-based Bacardi, Ltd., and his
wife, Jacqueline Kriz Danguil-
lecourt, were the only two pas-
sengers to board the ill-fated
flight at Chalk's Watson Island
terminal, according to the air-
iinhe. All other passengers
boarded at Fort Lauderdale-
Hollywood International Air-
port.
'The Tribune travelled to
Bimini the day after the crash
to meet a community still in
slock. Residents there said
using Chalk's to get to Miami
Was a routine they had engaged
m for decades.


skinned" male lying on his
right side with multiple stab.
wounds.
Minister of Trade and Indus-
try Leslie Miller testified that
he went to the morgue at
Princess Margaret Hospital and
identified the body of his son,
whom he had not seen since the
21st.
He, along with Mr Miller's
mother Helen, sister Yasmin,
and other family members, have
been present in the Supreme
Court throughout the proceed-
ings.
Detective Colebrooke took
pictures of the crime scene, and
detective Anderson took blood
samples.
Detective Constable 673 Ellis
testified that he took pictures
from various angles of a green
Infiniti jeep, which had blood-
stains on its exterior and interi-
or. He also collected blood sam-
ples from the front door, roof,
and head and hand rest of the
vehicle.
Police Corporal Kervin Jones
testified that on July 3, 2002, he
searched a 1996 Nissan Sentra
licensed to Ryan Beneby and


found a small amount of sus-
pected blood on the inside door
panel of the passenger side of
the car, where he took photos
and collected samples.
Detective Constable Dwayne
Stubbs told the court that he
took a picture of the left hand of
Ricardo Miller, also known as
Lamar Lee, which depicted a
deep wound.
During Friday's proceedings,
United States DNA experts
revealed the results of their
tests, which linked Ricardo
Miller to the crime.
DNA analyst Julie Schurman
found that Mr Miller's blood
was found in the sample taken
from the Nissan Sentra, and that
Lee's blood was found mixed
with the victim's in the sample
taken from the steering wheel of
the Infinity jeep.
The samples were prepared
for foreign testing by Corporal
Phyllis Smith and Corporal
Rochelle Deleveaux.
Attorneys Murrio Ducille and
Tamara Taylor are represent-
ing Ryan Miller, while his older
brother is represented by Phillip
Hilton.


(Association of Tertiary Institutions in The Bahamas)
3rd Biennial Conference
1 -3 February, 2006
SuperClubs Breezes Cable Beach


THEME: Academic Research & the

College Community Informing National

Development, Shaping National Identity"

SRegi.w l i'r iwl' fin i3 d' i \ i'/ imulhl tih dis .( ,sin.s. Ino. inl.s ip. and



TO IS I
presentatimn. on the role, lilt halh'n.ges and respoi.'sibilitie. to/ research in




Research. Politics & Indtustry
Do We Value Academic Research
Assuring A cadeinic Integrir' in Researcch
After Research, What? Applying Research to Practice
Who's Telling Our Story? The Who, What & How of
Research in the Caribbean
Accessing Resear'cl Fmnding
Many., manlyv niori'.

SOME FEATURED SPEAKERS & PRESENTERS:
Hon. Rex Nettleford, University of the West Indies
Patricia Glinton-Meicholas, College of The Bahamas
Dr. Erroll Miller, University of the West Indies
Dr. Elliston Rahming, HM Prisons
Dr. Jane Gibson, Nova Southestern University
Dr. Gail Saunders, Dept. of Archives
Pr. John Hammerton, Agricultural Consultant
- ---------------. ----------m---


ATIB
(.Association of Tertiary Institutions in The Bahamas)
cordially invites you to attend


A Public Lecture
marking the opening of our 3rd Biennial Conference

bTpic: "Academic Research & the College Community Informing
National Development, Shaping National Identity"

Speaker: The Hon. Rex Nettleford, OM
Vice-Chancellor Emeritus
The University of The West Indies

Wednesday, 1st February, 2006
7:00pm
/ SuperClubs Breezes Cable Beach
Nassau, Bahamas

Reception to Follow
Dress: Lounge Suit



ATIB
A.-.socia7lon> i;f Tertiaty Institutions in Thei Bahaman)
3rd Biennial Conference
1 -3 February, 2006
SuperClubs Breezes Cable Beach

S-''Academi Resea-ih & the College Coniunuvy Informing National
.'", Devcht 'pmen'. Shaping National lihn'iti"


RENCE REGISTRATION FORM
(Plea'e Prini)

:" ..Mr, Mrs, Ms Other
' (circle onel


urnanic


i First Name)


ORGANIZATION


ADDRESS


E-MAIL ADDRESS

REGISTRATION FEE: $250.00 IATIR members)
ON-SITE REGISTRATION: Additional $25.00


$300.0


,00 (non-memhbers')
:;~~~II:?') 1
-St;Cteae


FOR FURTHER INFORMATION OR TO RETURN COMPLETED FORM:
Dr. Bridgctte Rolle: 356-2589 1 FAXi


. . ... .. .


ROYAL HOLIDAY
Is looking for
Energetic, Self Motivated, Career Minded
Individuals for it's high volume sales centre

THE POSSIBILITIES ARE ENDLESS!!
Highest commissions and
bonuses in the industry.

SMust be over 25yrs '
Have a positive mental attitude,
Excellent conversational skills
Ability to think on feet
Articulate and outgoing
Minimum 3 BGCSE

Also seeking to employ representatives
fluent in Spanish

Become a part of our Winning Team
Please contact:
Royal Holiday
327-5595 Ext 251
or in person:
Royal Holiday, ground floor,
Nassau Wyndham Resort and Casino.
10am 3pm


SThe National Choir of The Bahamas

presents its

INAUGURAL CONCERT

with the


Chamber Orchestra of Nazareth College
Rochester, New York

February 3 & 4, 2006

Christ Church Cathedral, George Street
8:00 pm
S"Gloria" by Antonio Vivaldi
(for Chorus, Soloists and Orchestra)

Works for Soprano Soloist and Orchestra performed by Mrs. Joann
Callender

Works for Chamber Orchestra by George Frederick Handel and Arcangelo
Corelli

Tickets $20.00

Box Office:
Dundas Centre for The Performing Arts, Mackey Street
Tel: 393-3728, 394-7179


The Choir is established and subsidized by
The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas


- I-I


I


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-.00


MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006, PAGE 11


DAV'MIFN1T ILFTUI-Tn.


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............................


THE TRIBUNE





THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12. MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006


LOCALNW


(nuan Vn pvi wrrsnn rpbv n %
%a Aiwr' s140 IN aduihobt iftiA


O e-


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


a -


Security dk'na [ItA io[.1to p]rison]


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P IYO S!~ L [ ..;I-ii!~~i; i] Iil!i l ! S


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* THE Superintendent of Her Majesty's Prison, Dr Elliston Rahming (right), shaking hands
with manager-administration of Security Plus, Claudette Bain during her company's
presentation of over $2,000 worth of restraints to the institution last Thursday. Also pictured
is Deputy Superintendent of the prison Charles Rolle. The company donated 50 pairs of
handcuffs and 60 Hiltra Flex MP-10 Restraint Systems. The latter has more than 300 pounds
of tensile strength and is flexible. The owner of the company, Samuel Pinder, is also in the
process of donating pepper sprays to the prison.
(Photo: BIS/Eric Rose)


ii SC HOLARSHIP


OPPORTUNITY


Wendy's and Pepsi are offering a full six year
scholarship, including an annual $225 book
allowance to 2 boys and 2 girls.

To be eligible for the scholarship, you must be a student graduating from
GRADE 6 PUBLIC SCHOOL this year, have been accepted to one of the participating
schools (listed below), and must have a legitimate financial need. An acceptance
letter from the school of your choice must accompany your application.


* St. Anne's High School (Feb. 4 exam date)

* St. Augustine's College (Jan. 27 exam date)

* Aquinas College (Jan. 30 exam date)

* St. John's College (Feb. 4 exam date)

* Grand Bahama Catholic High (Feb. 4 exam date)

* Freeport Anglican High School (Feb. 4 exam date)


Application forms should be collected from
the Wendy's Head Office on Harold Road,
Monday Friday between 9:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m. from now to February 28th.

Deadline for submitting applications
is Friday, March 24th at 5:00 p.m.
Applications to be returned to the
Wendy's Head Office on Harold Road
attention Ms. Allison Ferguson.


Afe you7L pierrj!v o


[A;J


O


I '


- -- ----


FULL HIH SCHOO


O
9


PRAX1,13


I.d


ic' ,


I


..
.,.
_. -





MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006, PAGE 13
Y^ ^ Jni F


THE TRIBUNE


GOLDEN RIPE
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NO


" TURKEY

WINGSOR

DRUMSTICKS
PER LB

199


N.Z. FROZEN
WHOLE
LAMB
LEGS
$A99
3 PER LB


a
G:A
SEE


SWEET RED SEEDLESS SWEET LARGE

GRAPES CINPhOUPES
22PER -LB 2M EACH
SIDAHO BAKING YELLOW
POTATOES ONIONS
LOOSE
3/9 0 $3 BA59
S3 LB BAG


T". N-s


R







SMACK RAMEN

NOODLES
3- OZ
s/9Am


0
EI IF
c ` O Z $ .
CEREAS 40 bz $


:.HELLlAN *S

,O ,E Q' L ,A R,
2 O


I


*.".


a


S

L
. 1. : '
.' ,.-: .,' .. '.,
.. ."." ,


RUGS
TOWELS
SHEET SETS
TABLE CLOTHS
BATH SCALES
THROW PILLOWS
COMFORTER SETS
SHOWER CURTAINS
BATHROOM ACCESSORIES
S LAMPS


BLENDERS
FIGURINES
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WALL CLOCKS
WALL PICTURES
PICTURE FRAMES
FLATWARE SETS
COOKWARE SETS
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DINNERWARE SETS


SALE S.TRTS: NIONDAY, JANUARY 23RD SATURDAY, JANUARY 28TH,
Located: Harbour Bay Shopping Center
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448


I.


~P~ ii
J P:~j II
e"K


Sheet Sets 4PC Bathroom Accessories Dinnerware Sets
Towels Patio Tables Toasters
Comforters Decorative Rods Irons
Rugs Car Mats Blenders
Throw Pillows Bed Trays Wall Mirrors
Table Cloths Wall Pictures

PAY LESS AT DISCOUNT MART
WE ACCEPT AMERICAN EXPRESS MASTER, VISA AND SUNCARD, WE ALSO REDEEM QUALITY STAMP CARDS
MACKEY STREET, TOP OF THE HILL (next to Super Value) PHONE: 393-3411/393-5569


L SPECI~A 1L60tIJ
I IID-JN.5T .2 0


>UNT 1
oWf GMoit
Wedding GiflR


MAHATMA
LONG GRAIN/
PARBOILED

RICE

$289
5 5LB


CUT,



NGS

29


JA 1 0IL~'Ns"'.


hismtl


,%ah


mad


NW/ I

To)


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14 ..


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SALE






PAGE14,MONDAYJANUARINTER30I N IEWSIB


Whale stranded in


dies during


Quality Auto Sales
PRE-OWNED CARS
& TRUCKS
We have pre-owned cars
with warranty starting from


$4,995
NOW IN STOCK
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Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals Queen's Highway 352-6122


Thames


rescue attempt

on *m-
ONO- mI
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Rivet Shelving


Lockers
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i i



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Mezzanines


UQLIDA7NOFWGH|| VALLE AMCARGO,MCANCLLED EXPOt SR ISTN
Urgent Auction Disposal '
Guaranteed Genuine Authentic Handmade

F INE PR SI Al A EAStLR
RUGS RUNNERS & CAR
Connoisseur & Decorative items of highest Exhiition calire excl selected
Cargo manife u udes: investment
cateal Fiest Grae Prersian
Isfahan sil Ghom (100%
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B' jar,`1a etc. Large Decorative
W:' ca~ ry: Superb Kaimuri Ziegler,
ire gra, Chobi Ziegler,Ersari Filpa
4 'ii tribal Nomad category: unique
Kashkai, Belouch, Nishapur etc,
Village weaving category: highly
decorative Nahavand, Kolyai,
S Tuisarkhan etc ~ Sizes: scatter,
runners, area, medium room size,
TT' extra large.
All goods Customs cleared
S ld piece by piece with no Liens or outstanding charges

/SUNDAY JANUARY 29TH
AUCTION 5 pm INSPECTION FROM 4 pm
a THE BRITISH COLONIAL HILTON HOTEL
NUMBER ONE BAY STREET, NASSAU
Further Detairl at View andAuction Only
TERMS: .CASH, APPROVED CHECKS, MASTERCARD & VISA.
.15% FREIGHT AND HANDLING CHARGES TO BE ADDED TO EACH PURCHASE.
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MM 'F: 42.25.30


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006


- t


i


i
I
i
i
r






MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006, PAGE l


iCopyrighted Material

-SSyndicated Content -
Available from Commercial News Providers"


(W -.L rl 4. ~ U- ~ I .
.. m m, .. .... s

ll*I ~. 4.-lreI II ._.
...- a.m. -

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torrowknf a a oprr tas any am" t somm tcrm.rlta mcd oopsrs mhethoerwton;o; mat boelwreeoyo aW dthe r trupet!r or to Itoelrtm a tt.


'b. Sr'


I 'I


"Credible. As a writer, my goal is to present news and information, that is
and objective. People can trust what' I write. I'm proud to be a part of
leading print medium in The Bahamas. The Tribune is my newspaper

RUPERT MISSICK
CHIEF REPOF
THE TRIED
To report the news, call our
News Tips Line at 502-2359.


fair
the


JR.
RTER i une
3UNE The Tnbune


^1 ff@ ^ ^wtyw


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------------------------------- --I


THE. TRIBUNE





PAGE 16, MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006


,7Proudest


Our Most Important Asset:


You


Inspiration:


Providing opportunities for Bahamians


Country Attraction:


Significant Accomplishment:


The warmth and friendliness of the Bahamian people


Restoring the environment at Baker's Bay


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THE TRIBUNE


:r "








i A O l


MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006


SECTION m -


4lCofinanIperia,

Insurance Ltd


business@tribunemedia.net


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Bahamian bank could


have $11.3m


'black hole'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
ABahamian bank and
trust company's lia-
bilities "may exceed
its assets" by about
$11.3 million, mean-
ing that it will not have the funds to
fully repay depositors and creditors.
The first report from the liquidator
for Leadenhall Bank & Trust Com-
pany said that while the bank's June
30, 2005, balance sheet showed the
bank had net assets of $1.6 million,
this did not reveal the full picture.
Leadenhall's balance sheet included
some $6.6 million in loans, and $6.3


million in past due credit card receiv-
ables from the bank's former Master-
Card portfolio, that were either unse-
cured or did not have adequate col-
lat ral.
Craig A. Gomez, the liquidator,


wrote: "My review suggests that the
recovery of these loans and credit card
receivables will prove extremely dif-
ficult and time-consuming, and in
many cases it is likely that they will not
be recoverable at all.


"As a result, I conclude that the
bank's assets are likely to be insuffi-
cient to satisfy its liabilities. Indeed,
the bank's liabilities may exceed its
assets by approximately $11.3 mil-
lion."


Mr Gomez said the main challenges
facing Leadenhall's liquidation includ-
ed the ongoing litigation it was
embroiled in against Axxess Interna-
tional, its former partner that admin-
istered and processed the MasterCard
portfolio, and Turks & Caicos-based
First Financial Caribbean Trust Com-
pany.
A further concern, he added, is a
class action lawsuit from investors in
Cash 4 Titles, a company that Lead-
enhall previously provided banking
services to, and which collapsed amid
allegations it was a Ponzi scheme.

SEE page 6B


Guana Cay opponents


seek fresh injunction


* By NEIL HARTNELL
:Tribune Business Editor
PARTICIPATION in the Gosvernment's pro-
posed National Health Insurance scheme is
mandatory, the minister of health confirmed to
The Tribune, as private healthcare insurance


executives and the business community queried
how the plan would work.
Dr Marcus Bethel said: "The National Health
Insurance scheme is designed for everybody, It

SEE page 10B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
OPPONENTS of the $175 million Baker's
Bay Golf & Ocean Club on Great Guana Cay
have filed a summons seeking an injunction from
the Supreme Court to prevent the developers
from carrying out any new construction work


until the case's final outcome is determined.
The summons, filed last Thursday on behalf of
applicants the Save Guana Cay Association and
Aubrey Clarke, seeks an injunction that would
restrain the developers, their employees and

SEE page 7B


YVRAS 'keen' to invest

in Nassau airport


E By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
'THE Canadian company
selected to transform Nassau
International Airport (NIA)
into a first-class product has
told The Tribune it remains
"keen" to invest and become
a shareholder in the airport
management company, even
though it was initially only
rewarded with a 10-year oper-
ating partner contract.
Frank O'Neill, YVRAS chief


executive, said Prime Minister
Perry Christie had publicly stat-
ed he was looking to make
shares in Newco, the Bahamian
company to whom NIA will be
leased for 30 years by the Air-
port Authority, available to
Bahamians and his firm.
"As a company, we are cer-
tainly willing and prepared to
invest in the airport company,"
Mr O'Neill said, hinting that

SEE page 11B


Bill for online

incorporation

of Companies

Ac firms ready


M.By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
LEGISLATION to enable
all firms that fall under the
Companies Act to be incorpo-
rated online is ready for tabling
in Parliament, the minister of
financial services and invest-
ments has said.
A new "solution" to the Reg-
istrar General's intellectual
property section is also set to
kick-in this month.


Addressing the Bahamas
Financial Services Board's
annual retreat, which was held
over the weekend in Freeport,
Allyson Maynard-Gibson said
the legislation would permit
electronic seals and signatures
on all documents, which was
necessary for companies to be
incorporated over the Internet.
She said: "The Registrar

SEE page 12B


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Leadenhall's professional indemnity coverage
withdrawn by Carib Insurance Agency
US lawsuit seeks $75m damages
* Unsecured credit cardholders owe $1.452m


_ I_ ___


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tobe"MxLadtoy


1IZLI








PAGE B, MODAYJANUAY 23,2006THE TIBUN


The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 435.63 YTD 0.00%


International Markets

FOREX Rates
Weekly %Change
CAD$ 1.1517 -0.72
GBP 1.7711 -0.30
EUR 1.2135 -0.04

Commodities
Weekly %Change

Crude Oil $68.35 6.93
Gold $564.50 1.43

International Stock Market Indexes:
Weekly %Change
DJIA 10,667.39 -2.66
S & P 500 1,261.49 -2.02
NASDAQ 2,247.70 -2.99
Nikkei 15,696.69 -4.60


YTD PRICE
CHANGE
-1.37%
0.00%
0.100%
0.100%
1.15%
3.92%
0.00%
0.00%
1.54%
0.00%
0.18%
32.72%
2.48%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.55%
0.44%
0.00%


AML
BAB
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
DHS
FAM
FCC
FCL
FIN
ICD
JSJ
KZLB
PRE


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BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME
SYMBOL PRICE


$0.72
$1.10
$0.70
$7.00
$10.52
$13.25
$1.26
$9.55
$9.25
$1.64
$10.90
$2.88
$6.20
$1.15
$10.05
$10.90
$9.95
$9.10
$6.88
$10.00


1370
0
0
0
0
0
1538
0
39584
1681
0
4000
0
0
0
0
0
0
1924
0


$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$0.50
$-
$-
$0.15
$-
$-
$0.40
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-0.12
$-


* By Fidelity Capital
Markets

slowed last week
in the Bahamian
market as just
over .50,000


shares changed hands. The
market saw six out of the 19
listed stocks traded, of which
two advanced, two declined
and two remained the same.
Volume leader for the week
was Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) with 39,584 shares
changing hands and account-
ing for 79 per cent of the total
shares traded. The big
advancer for the week was
Doctors Hospital Health Sys-
tems (DHS), which rose by
$0.40 to close out the week at
$2.88.
On the down side, Kerzner
International's Bahamian
Depository Receipts (KZLB)
share price lost $0.12 to close at
$6.88.
COMPANY NEWS
Consolidated Water
Company (CWCB) -
CWCB listed its Bahamian
Depository Receipts on BISX
this week, increasing BISX's
market capitalisation by $8.8
million. CWCB started trading
at an initial opening price of
$4.38.


Dividend/AG
M Notes:
Consolidated Water
Company (CWCO) has
declared a dividend of
$0.012 per BDR payable
on February 7, 2006, to
all common sharehold-
ers as at record date
December 31,2005.


I


I I nmBUSINESS


FID!LIT




iMARKET




^HWRAP^


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006








THE TIBUNEMONDY, JAUARY 3, 206,IPGES3


Hilton developer





seeks permission





to appeal $3m





preference ruling


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor


nial Hilton's
developer will
today seek the
Court of Appeal's
permission for leave to appeal
to the Privy Council against a
ruling that found he received
a $3 million "fraudulent pref-
erence" from a failed offshore
bank run by Prime Minister
Perry Christie's brother.
The Court of Appeal's Janu-
ary Cause List shows that Ron
Kelly, through his attorneys
Bostwick & Bostwick, has filed
a Notice of Motion with the
Court of Appeal seeking leave
to appeal on January 23 to the
highest court in the Bahamian
legal system, the UK Privy
Council. The Court of Appeal
had in November 2005 backed
a Supreme Court verdict, find-
ing that the $3 million paid by
Americas International Bank
Corporation (AIBC) to a com-
pany controlled by MrKelly,
the man who acquired both the
British Colonial Hilton and
South Ocean Golf & Beach
Resort through his RHK Cap-
ital vehicle, was made just
weeks before the bank was


A BAHAMIAN-owned
company has added casino-
themed parties to its menu of
services, but without the gam-
bling and a single cent changing
hands.
Marilyn Johnson, president
of the C. N. Robinson Centre
for Training Development
(CRNC), said the casino party
services would be offered in
the same way as clients hired a
band or entertainment.
We are very excited to be
offering this much needed ser-
vice to Nassau and the Family
Islands" said Ms Johnson, who
has 20 years' experience of
working in casinos.
"The whole concept behind
the casino theme party was
incorporated into my business
plan long before I even applied


placed into voluntary liquida-
tion.
Justices Dame Joan Sawyer,
Justice Ganpatsingh and Jus-
tice Ibrahim upheld the
Supreme Court verdict in
favour of AIBC's liquidator,
BDO Mann Judd accountant
Clifford Culmer, saying: "This,
in our view, was clearly a fraud-
ulent preference made within
three months of AIBC going
into liquidation."
An October 16 entry in
AIBC's ledger showed $3 mil-
lion going to Mr Kelly's com-
pany, Techstar, on September
4, 2001.

Shareholders

AIBC's shareholders
resolved to place AIBC into
voluntary liquidation on Octo-
ber 11, 2001, and under Sec-
tion 72 of the Bankruptcy Act,
a fraudulent preference is made
if anyone unable to pay his
debts transfers money to a
creditor within three months
before becoming bankrupt.
The court found that by Sep-
tember 4, 2001, the day Mr
Kelly received the $3 million
transfer, it was clear that AIBC
"was in financial difficulties and
unable to pay its debts". There-


for my licence. I knew I would
want to offer my graduates a
lot more than a certificate, a t-
shirt, and good luck. I wanted
to give them all an opportunity
to feel fhe excitement of work-
ing in the casino environment
without the pressure, but still
gaining the opportunity to
become more comfortable
behind the tables and in front
of different kinds of people."
Casino parties are popular
fund-raisers for non-profit
organizations all over the world
to raise money, Ms Johnson
said in a statement.
"Using play money and
prizes, I can organise a casino
theme party for organizations
to raise money," she added.
CNRC brings the casino
games and provides uniformed,


fore, it was "clearly a fraudu-
lent preference".
In their 13-page judgment,
the Court of Appeal justices
recorded that Mr Kelly became
embroiled with AIBC in 2000,
the year it "began to experi-
ence financial difficulties".
Mr Kelly was approached to
provide capital support, and it
was proposed that he take over
the bank's "entire sharehold-
ing" from existing sharehold-
ers, Goes Damiano, Barry
Denison and Martin Bernholz.
To show his seriousness and
ability to pay, Mr Kelly
arranged to deposit $3 million
with AIBC to be held in
escrow. He had already opened
up a current account with
AIBC, numbered 306900, on
August 31, 2000.
SWhen no approval came
from the Central Bank, Mr
Christie gave instructions to
transfer the loan monies to Mr
Kelly's company, Techstar.
The Court of Appeal found
that on both occasions when
the $3 million was credited to
Mr Kelly's business account,
and when .they were trans-
ferred following the failure to
obtain Central Bank approval,
he was an unsecured creditor of
AIBC.


professional dealers. "All deal-
ers are either trainees from
CNRC, current or former casi-
no dealers. Their major objec-
tive is to insure the good time
of party guests," Ms Johnson
said.
CNRC casino-themed events
are available for parties ranging
from private events in your liv-
ing room to a gala event.
"We generally suggest set-
ting a date for your party at
least one month in advance,
but when it comes to the holi-
day season, two or three
months in advance is suggested
to ensure we can accommodate
the date you want" said Ms
Johnson. Founded in 2004,
CNRC offers casino theme
functions and casino games
training. It also offers a supply
of casino gift items for sale.


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,


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SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE
FOR MORE INFOM,,IATION, I'LLASE CONTACT OUR ADMISSION OFFICE:
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Pricing Information As Of:
19 January 2006
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES VISIT V;VWV.BISXBA-HAMAS.COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,360 11 / CHG 03.14 / %CHG 00.23 / YTD 09.40 / YTD % 00.7
52~k-.HI 5-Ak.-LOw Symool Pre.oious Cl..-s Today's Ci.c.e :Change DDly \.'ol EPS $ Di$ PE ,el
1.10 0.73 Abaco Markets 0.73 0.73 0.00 -0.169 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.52 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 10.52 10.52 0.00 1.456 0.360 7.2 3.42)
7.24 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 7.00 7.00 0.00 0.587 0.330 11.6 4.710)
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.70 0.70 0.00 0.175 0.020 4.0 2.86,
1.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.26 1.26 0.00 1.538 0.105 0.060 12.0 4.76%
1.20 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.10 1.10 0.00 0.070 0.040 15.7 3.644,
9.60 7.20 Cable Bahamas 9.55 9.55 0.00 0.689 0.240 13.9 2.511
2.20 2.03 Colina Holdings 1.64 1.64 0.00 681 -0.046 0.000 NM 0.003
9.25 7.10 Commonwealth Bank 9.14 9.25 0.11 2.000 0.791 0.450 11.7 4.866
4.38 4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.20 4.28 0.08 0.000 0.000 0.0 0.00%
2.88 1.50 Doctor's Hospital 2.75 2.88 0.13 2.000 0.429 0.000 6.6 0.00)o
6.20 3.96 Famguard 6.20 6.20 0.00 0.428 0.240 13.0 3.87,
10.90 9.73 Finco 10.90 10.90 0.00 0.717 0.530 15.2 4.860/o
10.90 7.50 FirstCaribbean 10.90 10.90 0.00 0.695 0.500 13.2 4.59%
10.05 8.00 Focol 10.05 10.05 0.00 0.833 0.500 12.1 4.98%
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 -0.062 0.000 N/M 0.00'
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.95 9.95 0.00 0.526 0.405 15.1 5.43-o/
9.10 8.22 J. S. Johnson 9.10 9.10 0.00 0.572 0.560 15.8 6.19%
7.00 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 6.80 6.88 0.08 0.138 0.000 49.2 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.760 4.9 7.60o
Fdelity Over-The-Counter Securttle s
52V. k.Hi *SJv,-LLow Symbol B-.a 5t La'st ir.ice Veeij '.'.I EPS $ D.. $ P'E .el.
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 13.25 14.25 11.00 1.917 0.720 7.2 5.05%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.044 0.000 NM 0.00 '
Colina Over-The-Ccuner Securities
.2 00 28 00 ABDAB 1 Li.j 4i0:. -2I 1)' 2 220 0i000i 19.4 t::.
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.75 13.75 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54. 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
BISX Listed Muluel Funds
2 .M'. f.M, 5f ...,-Lc.. Fu.-.j rpa.T. r- TCi L jI 12 f.onlh j D.. t Yield
1.2691 1.1716 Colina Money Market Fund 1.269050"
2.5864 2.0704 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.5864 **
10.7674 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.7674*** *
2.3125 2.1746 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.312472"
1.1442 1.0782 Colina Bond Fund 1.144217"'*.
FINDEr: CLOSE 435 630 fTD 1.321'., / 2003 14 688'
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided.by closing price
52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidellt)
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
* AS AT DEC. 31, 2005/ .* AS AT NOV. 30. 2005
S- AS AT JAN. 06, 2006/ ** AS AT DEC. 31, 2005/ **** AS AT DEC. 31, 2005
TO TRADE CALL COLINA 242.502-7010 t FIDELITY 242-356--77 -


PrgrssveCopay eein aquliie "I


Accontan




Prefered equiemens include B..r,;',-,',


Ba ami*a rm,

IN

expa ds "servitces


MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE4ONDA, JAUARY23, 006BUSNITEHTRBN
ea


Banking must


personal


be a


experience


commercial banks
must be careful
to ensure that the
banking experi-
ence does not
become depersonalised as a
result of moves to online bank-
ing, Scotiabank (Bahamas)
managing director said.


Financial
"Steadily, financial institu-
tions are seeing emerging
trends. Among these are legal
and compliance challenges,
mergers and acquisitions and
the virtual banking experi-


ence...access to full online
banking services enhances pro-
ductivity and lends to the vir-
tual banking experience. How-
ever, we must proceed with
caution lest we are seen as
depersonalising the banking
experience," said Minna Israel.
Ms Israel will address the
topic Facing the Future Togeth-
er at today's 15th Annual
Bahamas Business Outlook,
which returns to the Wyndham
Nassau Resort under the theme
Creating Successful Public-Pri-
vate Partnerships.
Her presentation will focus
on emerging trends and inno-
vation in financial services, and
will offer recommendations for
overcoming challenges that
currently face the industry.
Career
Ms Israel has had a 21-year
career in banking, covering
multinational, corporate and
commercial banking. Prior to
her appointment, Ms Israel
held the position as Scotiabank
'Jamaica's executive vice-presi-
dent and deputy chief execu-
tive, where she provided the
strategic leadership for the
bank's commercial branch net-
work, corporate and private
banking units, and the insur-
ance and investment sub-
sidiaries.
Her previous experience also
included positions as district
general manager and general
manager corporate and com-
mercial banking.
While in Jamaica, Ms Israel
served as vice-president of the
Jamaica Chamber of Com-
merce, director of the Ameri-
can Chamber of Commerce,
and treasurer of the United
Way Women's Leadership Ini-
tiative.


NOTICE


ESTATE OF MARION MADILL

Notice is hereby given that all persons having
any claims or demands against the above-named
estate are requested to send the same duly certified
to the undersigned on or before the 10th day of
February, 2006, and notice is hereby also given
that at the expiration of the time mentioned above,
the assets of the late Marion Madill will be
distributed amongst the persons entitled thereto
having regard only to the claims of which the
Personal Representative shall then have had
notice.


CASH, FOUNTAIN
Chambers
P.O. Box N-476
Armstrong Street

Attorneys for the Personal Representative


Sun Oil Limited

Exuma Island Manager

Resumes are invited from suitably qualified candidates who possess
a sound knowledge of the various settlements, people and culture
of the island of Exuma, to fill the position of Island Manager,
Based at our depot in Georgetown, Exuma.

PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTABILITIES

To manage the depot, supervise the staff and oversee the operations
and marketing activities throughout Exuma, including customer
and distributor relations.

The successful candidate must:
Be a mature individual
Be a team player who is self-motivated and results-oriented
Possess good interpersonal skill and the ability to carry out
both supervisory and operating level tasks
Experience in controls and selling activities
Sound knowledge in planning and computer software
applications
Have a college degree from an accredited institution,
preferably in Business Administration, Economics,
Marketing or Technical fields.

The successful candidate must be able to demonstrate:
Excellent communication and human relation skills
Attention to detail and ability to implement and follow-up
timely
Energy and drive with a "Can Do" approach, strong self
motivation and determination to succeed

Preference will be given to candidates with previous experience
in operations, preferably in the Oil Industry. Career development
prospects are excellent for the right candidate.

This position will be well suited to energetic professionals who
can challenge multi-tasking and wish to expand their experience.
Must be flexible, lead by example; possess a positive congenial
attitude with team spirit and motivation.

Resumes should be forwarded to Sun Oil Limited at our Clifton
Pier Office or to P.O.Box N-3717, Nassau, Bahamas or faxed to
362-4917 by 31st January, 2006; marked with reference to the
Exuma Vacancy.


E SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) MANAGING DIRECTOR MINNA ISRAEL


LEGAL NOTICE
International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000)

SOUTHERN SUN GROUP INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), SOUTHERN
SUN GROUP INC., has been dissolved and
struck off the Register according to the
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the
Registrar General on the 29th day of December,
2005.
ATC NOMINEES INC.
Arango-Orillac Building,
East 54th Street, Panama,
Republic of Panama,
Liquidator


Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Emnbroild ..
CASUALLY DRESSING HE WORLD "

"Worlds Largest Uniform Embroidery Franchise"


WANTED

GRAPHIC ARTIST
Well established company with 22 years in business seeks top-
notch, experienced Graphic Artist.
Must be well versed in all graphic art software and able to work in
a Macintosh based environment. Some knowledge of Screen Printing
would be an asset, but is not necessary.
The individual must be computer literate and knowledgeable in
Photoshop 7, Freehand 10 and Illustrator 10. rm--R
Salary negotiable according to experience.


Email Resumes to:
suntee@batelnet.bs


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006


~;"~?!












Private




banker



passes




Series 7


A MEMBER of Banca Del
Gottardo's private banking
team has passed the
broker/dealer Series 7 exami-
nation, which is administered
by the New York Stock
Exchange (NYSE) and Nation-
al Association of Securities
Dealers (NASD).
Ghianetta Stewart, who is flu-
ent in Italian and often travels
to Switzerland on her employ-
er's behalf, is one of the first to
benefit from Banca Del Got-


.........)



7
"P2~d*,~f


FREE


FREE


FREE


i The Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial
I Corporation (BAIC)
extends a special invitation to the
Business Community to attend an open Forum
on
"How to obtain Funding for Small
I Businesses"
presented by Ms. Taiana Mora,
Executive Director of the Caribbean Export
Development Agency. (CEDA)

Place:
Nassau Palm Resort Conference Centre
Chez Willie Ballroom
West Bay Street

Date
Monday, January 30th 2006

Time: 6:00 p.m.



Don't Miss It!


Seating Is Limited
ea n tm


,- : o ", '



S ...YES, YOU CAN
JGet your finances into shape.


I' '
-. : .. !




"i.; i...


ti ~ I-


'.. n .Li I.' F I -I E.. '" r IL .
It can happen quickly All of a sudden you've got movie debt
than jOL re conifortable carrying and more month at the
enrd of the money "
Let a Scotiabank representative help you become financigllv
tit We Otffte practical solutions to consolidate *,our debt
into one affordable monthly payment, access somrne of the
equity in :,our huorrle to lovFer your interest cost',, or transfer
to a lower interest credit options We can introduce you to
credit life protection and even help yc'u start saving for your
children education Start buildings a stronger financial
future today
Visit your nearest branch and let's talk.


.W2 f


tardo's graduate training pro-
gramme in Florence, Italy, and
Lugano in Switzerland.
Ms Stewart, who is pictured
(right) with Reece Chipman,
the Nastac Group's managing
director, can now apply for reg-
istration with the Securities
Commission of the Bahamas.
She trained for the exam with
the Nastac Group, which stands
for National Association of
Securities Training and Com-
pliance.


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

NORTHEND LTD.
(Company number 53.169B)
An International Business Company
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

I, Mr. Michel Delauzun, Liquidator of NORTHEND LTD.
hereby certfnl that the winding up and disolution of NORTHEND
LTD. has been completed in accordance \\ ih the Articles of Dissolunon
aid that NORTHEND LTD. has been dissolved as of the 30th day
of December, 2005.,
Dated this 20th day of January, 2006.
Mr. Michel Delauzun
: Liquidator


'I


MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE


i..
;-
''i' i'
'- d


..ir-.-
r-
i;


I looms MISMONIMM
Life. Nlcwle. D'alanoc.






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B. MONDAY. JANUARY 23, 2006


Bahamian bank could have $11.3m 'black hole


FROM page lB
That lawsuit "represents a
major exposure for the bank",
as it is seeking damages of $75
million from Leadenhall, which
the bank cannot cover from its
own assets or insurances. How-
ever, Leadenhall's US attorney
was not convinced that the law-
suit would succeed or had mer-
it.
Mr Gomez wrote in his
report that Leadenhall had
"experienced recurring losses
from its operations in recent
years" as a result of both legal
actions, the loss of its Master-
Card business in late July 2003,
and "shareholder fallout". All
prompted its placement into
voluntary liquidation, which
has now become a court-super-
vised process.
Leadenhall's accounts show
that it suffered a net loss of
$583,980 in 2004, and the nine
months to October 3, 2005, saw
another net loss of $386,312.
Mr Gomez added that Lead-
enhall faced further potential
exposure over its professional
indemnity insurance, which was


placed through Bahamas-based
Carib Insurance Agency.
Carib alleged that Leaden-
hall did not properly disclose
details about. the litigation
involving Axxess/First Finan-
cial when applying for cover-
age and, as a result, cancelled
the bank's professional indem-
nity insurance for 2003 and
2004.
Responsible
The lead Lloyds of London
syndicate responsible for insur-
ing Leadenhall had agreed to
return the $108,987 paid in pre-
mium by Leadenhall during
those two years, but this refund
had been placed on hold pend-
ing a review by the Lloyds
Oversight Committee.
Mr Gomez wrote: "The can-
cellation of the bank's profes-
sional indemnity insurance
arose after a claim was submit-
ted to Carib Insurance Agency
in the amount of $2 million rel-
ative to legal fees incurred in
the preliminary stages of the
First Financial litigation."
He added that cancellation


NAME

ADDERLEY, Shannell
BETHEL, Liveatte
BHATTACHRYA, Nirmalendu
BLAKISTON-HIND, William
BOYLE, Shameana
BRAITHWAITE, lan
BROWN, Pearline
CALIZAIRE, Ruth
CARTWRIGHT, Cathyann
CHARLTON, Zilpha
CLARKE, Edward
CLARKE, Louise
CLEAR, Cassie
DALEY, Clive
DAMES, Steve
DAVIDSON, George
DAVIS, Ormond
DENIS, Lauretta
EDWARD, Idamane
ELTHAM, Yvonne
FAIRHURST, Michael


of the bank's professional
indemnity insurance meant it
would have to pay all claims
for 2003 and 2004, and all legal
bills from the First Financial
action, out of its own pocket.
This, in turn, would cause "fur-
ther depletion of the bank's
cash resources".
Mr Gomez's attorneys, Cal-
lenders & Co, are reviewing
the issue to see whether cov-
erage for 2003 and 2004
"should be pursued", as the
premiums were paid in good
faith.
First Financial is alleging that
it is the new trustee of the $33
million in deposits placed in
trust with Leadenhall by the
latter's former MasterCard cus-
tomers, and was appointed as
such by a Deed of Retirement
and Appointment executed on
March 15, 2002.
It is requesting that the out-
standing balance of $19 million
be transferred to it, Leaden-
hall having transferred $14 mil-
lion on September 4, 2002.
Leadenhall, though, is
attempting to regain the trust
assets, and has counter-alleged


that it cannot transfer the $19
million because "significant
sums" had already been repaid
to cardholders on First Finan-
cial's authorisation something
the latter has denied.
Leadenhall is also alleging
that it cannot transfer the trust
assets because the basis on
which the Deed was made no
longer exists, as its MasterCard
issuing licence was cancelled
on July 29, 2003.
Mr Gomez said information
reaching him showed that $20
million, not $14 million, had
been transferred to First Finan-
cial, leaving a $13 million
"shortfall". However, First
Financial was still disputing
this, and the case continues in
the Supreme Court.
Incurred
Leadenhall had "incurred
significant legal costs" of about
$1.5 million over the First
Financial matter. It spent
$411,227 in 2003, some
$728,238 in 2004, and about
$393,707 for the first six months
in 2005. During that time, it has


been represented by Lennox
Paton and, latterly, McKinney,
Bancroft & Hughes.
Mr Gomez said the bank's
MasterCard credit card records
showed that some 146 Bahami-
ans were issued unsecured
cards, meaning that no deposit
was ever handed over to Lead-
enhall as security for the card
balances.
The liquidator added: "The
fact that a significant number of
accounts remain outstanding
to the date of this report, all of
which have been settled with
MasterCard by the bank, is a
concern.
"There is a possibility that
those outstanding amounts
may have been settled with
MasterCard from the trust's
funds."
Adding that the outstanding
amounts would be pursued, Mr
Gomez said: "The bank
presently has 464 unsecured
credit cardholders with out-
standing balances totalling
$1.452 million.
"These cards were issued by
Axxess International without
prior authorisation from the


bank. Axxess' apparent author-
ity to issue these unsecured
credit cards was the result of
the bank giving Axxess unfet-
tered powers to operate the
credit card business."
Five unsecured cards were
held by Leadenhall staff, with
an outstanding amount of
$8,498.32. Some 105 Bahamas-
based customers had rung up,
per capital, three times as much
debt on their unsecured cards
as foreign clients, reaching
$735,590.34. '
MasterCard, meanwhil1Y
owes Leadenhall $1.898 mil'-
lion through the refund of it;
deposit, minus a terminati6di
fee. "
Leadenhall's loan receivable
totalled just over $4.059 miP
lion. Mr Gomez said $124,554
due from an Alfred Lenarciak
may have to be recovered b"y
attaching a lien to a property
he owned in Old Fort Bay: '
One debtor's offer of a $1.2
million settlement to Leaden-
hall had been accepted, whiI6
two others were likely\ to be'
pursued through legal actionri
Leadenhall had also filed' a
suspicious transaction report
last year against a client
BAVT Corporation;: over '
$125,937 cheque diromiihated
in Canadian dollars. '
The cheque; which ( a'h
payable to a Daniel Rosenthal;
was received in January 2005
and endorsed by Timothy
Lightbourne, a 50 per cent
owner of BAVT.
The cheque was depositedto
a Leadenhall account at First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas) on February 1, for
credit to BAVT, and the funds
cleared. BAVT's accounts
and the funds were then
transferred to Sentinel Bank &
Trust in March 2005.
Mr Lightfopt said he had
been assured by a-Montreal
contact that the cheque was
valid, but Mr Rosenthal signed
a declaration of forgery in May
2005, saying he did not ask any-
one to endorse the cheque on
his behalf.
The Financial Intelligenci
Unit (FIU) is investigating the
cheque situation.
The Leadenhall situation is
likely to prove embarrassim
for the bank's shareholders,
who include a number cf
Bahamian businessmen. Promi-
nent among them is Williai
Saunders, owner of Majestc
Tours, who is described as '
"major shareholder" of botd
Leadenhall and Axxess Intei-
national.
Leadenhall's other share-
holders, apart from former
managing director William Je4-
nings, are Neil macTaggar,
John Bethel, David Rounco,
Robin Symonette, Joan Light-
bourne, and Andrea O'Ddfi-
nell.


NOTICE


The following persons or their nearest relatives are kindly asked
to visit the PENSION DEPARTMENT of the National Insurance
Board located in the Board's Jumbey Village complex on Baillou
Hill Road. For further information, you may contact the
Department at telephone number 502-1607/8:


N.I. NUMBER

14276763
15347653
10951296
11361298
14135590
11051590
10145230
10270311
15928608
11117230
10411127
10786104
10677135
18084648
13824708
10833293
10153411
11135417
12407488
12218340
10741291


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Creating a Simple Drawing,
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Monday & Wednesday 6:00 8:00pm
Call now to reserve your seat!



Lignum Technologies
(Bahamas) Ltd.

P.O. Box SS-6295
Nassau, Bahamas

LICI n Tel: 393-2164 or 394-4868;
TECHNOLOGIES Fax 394-4971


Dr. Sharon A. Thompson

Practice Relocation

Please join us in welcoming the latest
addition to our center of highly
qualified physicians in the
Renaissance Medical Building.


Dr. S. Thompson received her Doctor
of Medicine degree from Howard
University College of Medicine in i .
Washington, D. C.


She completed her Obstetrics and
Gynecology Residency at Rochester
General Hospital in Rochester, NY,
where she served as Chief Resident
from 2000 2001. Dr. Thompson is ..
American Board Certified in
Obstetrics and Gynecology and has DA
enjoyed serving her Bahamian
community since 2001. Her practice,
St. Elizabeth Women's Medical
Center, will be Opening January 30, 2006. She looks forward to continuing to
provide Individualized and Specialized Care for Women.


St. Elizabeth Women's Medical Center
155 Shirley Street (opposite Oriental Cleaners)
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 322-3831/323-7477
www. acog.org/member-lookup


PRESS RELEASED

..... ... ....
,',K;-. ,
IiN l "' '" '.: '1





















Reginald Grant

Mr. Eric Lopez, Board Chairman of Armoured Express (Bahamas) Limited is very pleased
to announce the appointment of Mr. Reginald Grant as the new Chief Executive Officer
(CEO) of the company effective December 5, 2005.

Mr. Grant brings with him a wealth of experience in aviation and airport business operation
and management having worked with Pan American World Airways, Bahamasair and
Nassau Flight Services over the last 30 years. In addition Mr. Grant is the past immediate
president of The Airport Operators Association.

As a seasoned administrator, Mr. Grant will play a vital role in the transformation and
expansion of the company's businesses throughout The Bahamas, as we seek to position
ourselves to compete effectively in the brave new world of security services.


Armoured Express (Bahamas) Limited


I


I ~rBUSINESS


an":("r~
Q



14H ~h ~;







MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE


Guana


Cay


opponents


seek fresh injunction


FROM page 1B

agents from cutting, tearing
down or removing any vegeta-
tion; disturbing or removing
any mangrove or wetlands;
excavating or dredging the land
or seabed; erecting any further
buildings or structures; and
constructing or paving any new
roads.
, At a Court of Appeal ruling
in late November 2005, which
referred the Great Guana Cay
dispute back to the Supreme
Court for a trial on the merits
of the case, the developers'
attorney, Michael Barnett, gave
the exact same undertaking
that the Association is now
seeking through the courts.
This undertaking was to last
until the Supreme Court heard
the matter, which was supposed
to happen before January 31.
However, an affidavit filed
with the Supreme Court on
January 20 from Troy Albury,
one of the development's lead-
ing opponents, alleged that a
January 9 letter from Mr Bar-
nett to his attorney, Fred
Smith, "made clear that his
clients would not continue with
their undertaking after Janu-
ary 31, 2006".
This prompted the summons
seeking a Supreme Court
injunction last week.
Mr Albury alleged: "First,


the developers have, through
Mr Barnett, their counsel, indi-
cated that they will not contin-
ue to abide by their undertak-
ing after January 31, 2006.
"As mentioned above, the
undertaking contains no such
time limit, but clearly states
that it is given and will remain
in place until the hearing and
determination of the substan-
tive application for judicial
review. The developers are,
therefore, it appears threaten-
ing to breach their undertak-
ing......
Applicants
"The applicants believe that
unless restrained by an injunc-
tion, the developers will sim-
ply ignore their undertaking in
the future, causing irreparable
harm should the judicial review
application succeed."
The summons was filed just
prior to this week's Supreme
Court hearing on January 26,
which was supposed to, the start
of the trial on the merits of the
case against the Baker's Bay
project, which is being devel-
oped by San Francisco-based
Discovery Land Company.
Mr Albury's affidavit alleged
that while the trial would start
on January 26, it would last for
three to four days. The first day
would focus on resolving inter-
locutory issues that had arisen.


LEGAL NOTICE

THE STANDARD EMERGING MARKETS
DEBT FUND, INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given in pursuance of Section 137(8) of
The International Business Companies Act, 2000 (as
amended), the Dissolution of the above-named company
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the above-named company has therefore been
struck off the Register. The date of the completion of the
dissolution was the 10th day of January 2006.



Bennet R. Atkinson
Liquidator




LEGAL NOTICE

THE STANDARD EURO EMERGING
MARKETS DEBT FUND, INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given in pursuance of Section 137(8) of
The International Business Companies Act, 2000 (as
amended), the Dissolution of the above-named company
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the above-named company has therefore been
struck off the Register. The date of the completion of the
dissolution was the 10th day of January 2006.



Bennet R. Atkinson
Liquidator



NOTICE
IN THE MATTER OF LEADENHALL BANK & TRUST
COMPANY LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)
AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT 1992
NOTICE OF THE CREDITORS MEETING

The creditors of the above-named Company are requested to attend a
Creditors Meeting on the 23rd day of January, 2006 at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel at 2:00 pm. The purpose of the meeting is to update the
creditors of the captioned Company on the status of the liquidation to date
and on matters relevant and to facilitate the election of a Creditors'
Committee that will liaise with the Liquidator during the period of the
liquidation.

Please make every effort to attend either personally or to be represented
by an attorney.
CRAIG A. GOMEZ
Liquidator


Mr Albury alleged that it was
possible the case would not be
resolved until April 2006.
One interlocutory issue is
whether Discovery Land Com-
pany's subsidiary companies,
Passerine at Abaco Holdings
and Passerine at Abaco, should
be brought in as respondents
to the case.
Currently, the only respon-
dents are Wendall Major as
secretary to the National Eco-
nomic Council; the Prime Min-
ister as the minister responsible
for Crown Lands, and the
Treasurer of the Bahamas.
Mr Albury alleged, though
that Mr Barnett had informed
his attorney that the developers
would not consent to being
joined as a party to the pro-
ceedings. The Association's dis-
covery requests would be
resisted, and Discovery Land
Company's principals would
not attend for cross-examina-


tion.
Mr Barnett also denied alle-
gations by the Association that
the developers had already
breached their undertaking, Mr
Albury's affidavit detailing 10
such alleged breaches.
Apart from seeking to join
Discovery Land Company as a
party to the Supreme Court
case, the summons also seeks
to restrain the Government
respondents and developers
from entering into any leases,
conveyances and agreements
relating to the Heads of Agree-
ment, or granting concessions,
permits or licences.
It also seeks an order for the
developers and government
defendants to produce within
14 days all permits, approvals
and licences issued with respect
to the Baker's Bay develop-
ment.


LEGAL NOTICE

THE STANDARD SHORT TERM BOND
FUND, INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given in pursuance of Section 137(8) of
The International Business Companies Act, 2000 (as
amended), the Dissolution of the above-named company
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the above-named company has therefore been
struck off the Register. The date of the completion of the
dissolution was the 10th day of January 2006.



Bennet R. Atkinson
Liquidator




LEGAL NOTICE

EURO EMERGING MARKETS DEBT
FUND, INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given in pursuance of Section 137(8) of
The International Business Companies Act, 2000 (as
amended), the Dissolution of the above-named company
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the above-named company has therefore been
struck off the Register. The date of the completion of the
dissolution was the 10th day of January 2006.



Bennet R. Atkinson
Liquidator





NOTICE



ESTATE OF HILDE M. AUFOCHS a.k.a
HILDE MARIANNE AUFOCHS

Notice is hereby given that all persons having
any claims or demands against the above-
named Estate are requested to send the same
duly certified to the undersigned on or before
Friday the 10th day of February, 2006, and
notice is hereby also given that at the expiration
of the time mentioned above, the assets of the
late Hilde M. Aufochs a.k.a Hilde Marianne
Aufochs will be distributed amongst the
persons entitled thereto having regard only to
the claims of which the Personal
Representative shall then have had notice.


CASH, FOUNTAIN
Chambers
Armstrong Street
Nassau, The Bahamas

Attorneys for the Personal Representative.


LEGAL NOTICE

THE LATIN AMERICAN MONEY MARKET
FUND, INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given in pursuance of Section 137(8) of
The International Business Companies Act, 2000 (as
amended), the Dissolution of the above-named company
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the above-named company has therefore been
struck off the Register. The date of the completion of the
dissolution was the 10th day of January 2006.



Bennet R. Atkinson
Liquidator




LEGAL NOTICE

THE LATIN AMERICAN SHORT TERM
BOND FUND, INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given in pursuance of Section 137(8) of
The International Business Companies Act, 2000 (as
amended), the Dissolution of the above-named company
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the above-named company has therefore been
struck off the Register. The date of the completion of the
dissolution was the 10th day of January 2006.



Bennet R. Atkinson
Liquidator




LEGAL NOTICE

THE STANDARD LATIN DAILY LIQUIDITY
FUND, INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given in pursuance of Section 137(8) of
The International Business Companies Act, 2000 (as
amended), the Dissolution of the above-named company
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the above-named company has therefore been
struck off the Register. The date of the completion of the
dissolution was the 10th day of January 2006.



Bennet R. Atkinson
Liquidator




NOTICE


IN THE ESTATE OF THE IRVIN
LIVINGSTONE BAIN late of Jackfish Drive,
Golden Gates #2 in the Island of New Providence in
the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.

Deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claims against the
above-named Estate are required, on or before the 31st day of January,
2006 to send their names and addresses, and particulars of their debts
or claims, to the undersigned, and if so required by notice in writing
from the undersigned, to come in and prove such debts or claims, or in
default thereof they will be excluded from the benefit of any distribution
AND all persons indebted to the said Estate are asked to pay their
respective debts to the undersigned at once.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the expiration of the time
mentioned above, the assets of the late IRVIN LIVINGSTONE BAIN
will be distributed among the persons entitled thereto having regard only
to the claims of which the Executors shall then have had notice.

c/o Nadia A. Wright
Attorney for the Executors
Graham, Thompson & Co.
Sassoon House
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue
P.O. Box N-272
Nassau, Bahamas


BUINS









PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006


1 r.
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THE TURIUNE


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Visit our website at w.


CBITRE FOR CONTINUING EDU



fWhat is your goal?
/ PROMOTION
/ QUALITY SERVICE
/ SALARY INCREASE
/ NEW CAREER
/ CAREER ENHANCEMENT
we can provide you with superior education and training to
help you accomplish your goal.

. P ....Call for an interview today!
For your convenience, the majority of classes are held on Saturdays, 8am 12noon.
Are you preparingfor a promotion, career change or career enhancement? The Professional Development Department can help you achieve
your career goal! A wide array of courses and programmes leading to certificate, certification and licensure are offered. You can become pioneer
in setting performance standards in your organization. Success is at your finger tips. We have secured partnerships with leading international.
institutions to help you accomplish your career goals. You can attain your professional development credentials at The College of The Bahamas.
Choose the courses or programme to help you accomplish your career goals...
S Certified Professional Managers Programme
S Certificate Programme For The Office Assistant
Certificate Programme In Learning Disabilities
Certified Computer Operator (Microsoft Office Specialist- MOS)
Certificate In Law
Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Becker Conviser CPA Review
Certified Human Resource Managers Programme
Certificate Programme In Supervisory Management
Journeyman Plumbing License
Master Plumbing License
S Certified Security Officer
S Managerial Accounting For Non-Financial Managers
S Ethics And Professional Responsibility
S Writing & Research Skills
S Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Intemet
No entrance exams. Tuition may be paid per term or in full. International programmes available.
CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL MANAGERS PROGRAMME
This programme is administered in conjunction with The Institute of Certified Professional Management at James Madison University,
Harrisonburg, Virginia. The CM Programme provides Supervisors, Managers, and Team Leaders with the fundamental knowledge needed
for today's management challenges. A comprehensive instructional scheme gives you the competence you need to meet higltestandards of
performance. 0O
TERM 1 TERM 2 o
CPM 9 iPersonal Skills- $500 CPM 901 Administrative Skills- $700
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility-$250
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
TERM 3
CPM 2 Interpersonal Skills- $600
CPS 901 Accounts- $300
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
PREREQUISITE: 3 or more years as a Trainer, Supervisor or Manager with an Associate Degree or a B. A. Degree from an accredited or
recognized college/university; COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet'
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME FOR THE OFFICE ASSISTANT
With the advent of the high-tech office, the Clerks'/Office Assistants' role has evolved as one of the most important support factors in the
operational management .prce.ss. In an effort`to equip the support level staff to function efficiently in the work environment, CEEj :pleased
to offer a proficiency programme in basic office skills. ,
TERM 1 TERM 2
CPS 909 Business Communication- $300 CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
WRS 900 Writing & Research Skills- $350 CPS 911 Records Management- $200
ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250
TERM 3
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
CPS 903 Office Technology- $500
CPS 910 Managing Physical Resources- $200
CPS 901 Accounts- $300
PREREQUISITE: 3 or more years experience in a clerical position and 3 BGCSE's- Grade C or above;
COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12pm Duration: 3 TERMS
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME IN LEARNING DISABILITIES
The Certificate in Learning Disabilities Programme is designed to equip teachers with the skills necessary for working with diverse learners.
Participants are trained to use the basic techniques to identify students with learning disabilities; analyze and examine disabilities related to
language and communicative arts; and develop strategies that can be used with students who have been diagnosed as learning disabled. The
programme comprises six (6) courses:
TERM 1 TERM 2
SPED900 Introduction To Learning Disabilities- $84 SPED903 Strategies and interventions I- $168
SPED 901 Diagnosing Learning Disabilities- $168 SPED 904 Strategies and interventions II- $84
SPED 902 Individual Education Planning- $168 ETHC900 Ethics & Profess. Responsibility.- $250
TERM
SPED 905 Assessment- $178
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
PREREQUISITE: AA Degree with a Teacher's Certificate or a BA Degree;
COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring & Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
A+ COMPUTER TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATION
This programme of study is designed to equip students with the skills necessary to successfully sit the international A+ Microsoft Certification
Examination. Techniques to identify and rectify mechanical problems related to the personal computer are explored. It is a hands-on learning
experience with lab exercises that helps the student to apply theory to practice.
TERM 1: COMP 954 Software- $510 TERM 2: COMP 955 Hardware
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Per Demand Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 2 TERMS
CERTIFIED COMPUTER OPERATOR (Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS)
This course of study is designed to train students how to master Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Access, Microsoft Outlook, and
PowerPoint. To help the student to develop navigation and design skills, the instructor provides easy to understand notes and conducts live
demonstrations on how to manipulate the entire MS Office Suite. Upon successful completion of the external international examinations, the
Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Certification is awarded. The programme comprises five Modules and two companion courses:
TERM 1 TERM.2
COMP 906 Microsoft Office Specialist- $610 ETHC900 Ethics & Professional Responsibility- $250
Microsoft Word, Microsoft Access CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
Microsoft Excel, Microsoft PowerPoint TERM 3
Microsoft Outlook COMP 906 Microsoft Office Specialist- $610
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
CERTIFICATE IN LAW
This programme is offered in conjunction with The Institute of Legal Executives ilexX), Bedford, England.
ILEX qualification routes are vocationally relevant and designed to build and test legal knowledge and understanding at the.paralegal level.
Designed to facilitate the training and educational needs of Legal Secretaries, Legal Clerks, Legal Office Managers, Law Enforcement Officers,
Special Assistants to Lawyers, Justice of The Peace, and all persons interested in acquiring an impressive array of legal office skills, the
Certificate in Law qualification is specifically relevant to The Bahamas legal system. Courses include:
TERM 1 TERM 2
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills -$350 ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250 LAW 900
The Legal Environment -$600.00 LAW 901 General Legal Principles-$600.00
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
TERM 3 (Options- choose one) -$600
NB. Options are subject to change.
LAW 903 Company Law LAW 906 Law of Mortgages
LAW 905 Employment Law LAW 908 Work of The Magistrate's Court
LAW 907 Nature and Role of Criminal Law
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
PREREQUISITE: AA Degree and 3 years work experience; COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am 12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
THE BECKER CPA REVIEW
The College of The Bahamas is pleased to offer the New CPA Computer Based Test (CBT). Besides the obvious transition from a pencil-and-
paper exam to a computer-based test, the revised CPA Exam will also contain a new content focus broadening the scope of audit and attest
areas and incorporating the assessment of critical skills, such as research and communication. The new exam also has increase emphasis on
general business knowledge and information technology.
CPA 900 Financial Reporting- $650 CPA 901 Accounting & Reporting/Regulation- $520
CPA 902 Law/Business Law- $465 CPA 903 Auditing/Auditing and Attestation- $465
Prerequisite: A BA Degree from an accredited or recognized college/university in any discipline with at least 21 credits hours in accounting.
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:30am 5:30pm Duration: 12 Weeks
CERTIFICATION IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT i,
Offered in conjunction with Columbia Southern University, Orange Beach, Alabama, this nine months programme is designed for those
individuals seeking professional development and aspiring to rise through the ranks in the HR field.
TERM 1 TERM 2
WR'966 Writing and Research Skills- $350 ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250
HRM 900 Intro To HRM Environment- $200 HRM 902 H/R Development & Training-$200
HRM 901 Securing Human Resources- $200 HRM 903 Rewards Compensation and Benefits-$300
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
TERM
HRM 904 Labour Management Relations- $300
HRM 905 Protecting and Evaluating Human Resources- $300
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210


CAION & EXTENSION SERVICES
PREREQUISITE: A BA Degree in any discipline from an accredited or recognized college/university or a minimum of 5 years as a manager,
supervisor or trainer; COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME IN SUPERVISORY MANAGEMENT
Supervisors with cutting edge skills know how to accomplish difficult tasks, solve complicated problems and master challenges in d4i on
making. This programme is aimed at supervisors and middle managers who wish to update their supervisory skills, or persons who havgi4en
promoted and wish to gain additional insight into the world of supervisory management. This programme entails essential training for rppns ..
wishing to become an associate manager. ,~
TERM 1 TERM 2
CPi I Personal Skills- $500 SUPV 900 Supervisory Management (SUPV 1)- $500
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250
CPS 901 Accounts- $300 CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
TERM3 .,3
CPM 92 Interpersonal Skills- $600 ,,'
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210;ji
PREREQUISITE: 3 or more years experience as a Supervisor/Manager or Trainer and an AA Degree in any discipline from a recognized
or accredited institution; COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins! Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12pm Duration: 3 TERMS '
CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL SECRETARY REVIEW PROGRAMME ,.;
The Certified Professional Secretary (CPS) Review, offered in conjunction with The International Association of Administrative Professionill
(IAAP) is a 9 month course of study designed to prepare administrative professionals and clerical assistants to write the CPS internmiidial
exam. .*-ri1"
TERM 1 TERM2 .' :.f,
CPS 901 Accounts- $300 CPS 906 Human Resources- $300 V
CPS 909 Business Communication- $300 CPS 911 Records Management- $200 i
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
TERM 3 OPTIONAL COURSES ... '. K -' '4
C=PS-- Office Technology- $500. WRS 900 Writing and Research Skillsr.$350 (Spring:) CPS910
Managing Physical Resources- $200 ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250'(Summnieri
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210 i
PREREQUISITE: 4 yrs. Experience or an AA Degree+3 Yrs. Experience or a B. A. Degree and 0 Experience; -
COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-lpm Duration: 3 TERMS
JOURNEYMAN PLUMBING LICENSE ;
The Journeyman Plumbing course is designed to assist students preparing to write the Journeyman Plumbing Examination. Topics inclirdes:
interpretation of codes, disposal and drainage systems, storm drainage disposal systems, installation of sanitary fixtures, basic drawipgs,to
scale, water supply and distribution, use of materials and tools, repairs and maintenance. The examination is offered in conjunction with The
Ministry of Public Works. At the end of the course, candidates are required to take one (1) Professional De.elopment Setiinir.
TERM 1 TERM 2 (Optional)
JPiLM i Journeyman Plumbing- $800 SUPV 900 Supervisory Management- $500 '
ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250 (SUPV900 is available for Plant/Plumbing Supervisors) ;;
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $'0O
PREREQUISITE: Students should have working knowledge and skills in the following areas: interpretation of codes, disposal aidd' diiai e
systems, storm drainage disposal systems, installation of sanitary fixtures, basic drawings to scale, water supply and distribution, 1 ,of
materials and tools, repairs and maintenance.
Begins: Fall Day/Time: Tuesdays 6pm 9pm Duration: 2 TERMS
MASTER PLUMBING LICENSE "3
The Master Plumbing course is designed to assist students preparing to write the Master Plumbing Examination. Students should have, abye
average knowledge and skills in the following areas: interpretation of codes, disposal and drainage systems, storm drainage disposal systems,
installation of sanitary fixtures, basic drawings to scale, water supply and distribution, use of materials and tools, repairs and maintenpqCe.
Special emphasis will be placed o plant management and foreman responsibilities. '.diT
TERM 3 TERM 2 (Optional) -.
FE1M00 Master Plumbing- $950 CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100 ita.'
ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250 SUPV 900 Supervisory Management- $500 z. 5?
(SUPV900 is available for Plant/Plumbing Supervisors)
PREREQUISITE: Students should have working knowledge and skills in the following areas: interpretation of codes, disposal and dralIge
systems, storm drainage disposal systems, installation of sanitary fixtures, basic drawings to scale, water supply and distribution,.pyf
materials and tools, repairs and maintenance .. .. ., .I. -
Begins: Fall Day/Time: Tuesdays 6pm- 9pm .n Duration: I TERIM .
MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING FOR NON-FINANCIAL MANAGERS
This course is designed to strengthen the candidates' understanding of managerial accounting. Managerial accounting concepts, pri "ies
and functions are the main topics covered. The ability to prepare and accurately read a financial statement/spreadsheet is an essential, ill
for all professionals and paraprofessionals; CPS901 covers in a very student friendly way, easy to understand examples that aid the st ls'
learning experience. This course also helps to prepare candidates to write external examinations. :
CPS 901 Accounts- $300
PREREQUISITE: None
BEGINS: Per demand Day/Time: Sat/Thurs/Tue. 8am-12:15pm OR 6pm 9pm Duration: 10 Week,"
ETHICS AND PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY
This course examines guidelines for the professional behavior of members of any organisation. A select group of codes of ethics and ethcs
cases will be explored to support a theoretical and practical discourse on why the application of ethics and professional responsibijis
important in all aspects of society. ,cr
ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250 n .i
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet ,
Begins: Per demand Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12noon OR Thurs/Tue- 6pm 9pm Duration: 8 Weeks'
WRITING & RESEARCH SKILLS f
This course is designed to provide mature students with reading, writing, research and critical thinking skills to prepare them f6d iy
into CEES' professional development programmes. WRS 900 is also structured to provide certification candidates with the skills neisr
to successfully write position and research papers. ''s1q
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills $350 ,
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet .is
Begins: Per demand Day/Time: Sat.- 8am-12noon or Thursday/Tue- 6pm 9pm Duration: 8 Week "li
INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS, WINDOWS & THE INTERNET ,,nV
This workshop provides a broad foundation for students so that they will have a greater awareness and confidence using personal complteis.
Students will gain practical information and skills, such as what a computer is, how to manage personal files and folders that they create.
COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
PREREQUISITE: None
Begins: Summer, Spring & Fall. Day/Time: Sat.- 8am-12noon Duration: 3 Weeks .
APPLICANTS FOR INTERNATIONAL CERTIFICATION COURSES AND PRO
All students applying for International Certification Courses and Programmes that are offered in conjunction with foreign instituid re
required to contact the CEES Office for information on external application and examination fees. In
Telephone (242) 325-5714/328-0093/328-1936 Fax: (242) 322-2712 ro


OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION
FEES


!ie~2


1. COB Registration.......................... ......... $40.00 (one-time fee) -i,,
2. Insurance ............................................................... $25.00 (valid for 1 year) : tiu r
3. ID Card............................................... ....... .......... $25.00 (one time fee) '
4. Technology Fee................................... $75
5. Books................................ ... $ Please contact COB Bookstore for prices RAM
6. Awards Ceremony........................................ ...... $150.00 (must be paid by the 2" TERM) .
7. External Application Fees..................................... Please check with the CEES Office for information.' ;
ESSENTIAL COMPUTER KNOWLEDGE: Effective Summer 2005, basic computer and Internet skills will be required of allstudnti.k
Assessment for exemption from COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet will be done via proof of a certificate
from an authorized provider or by taking a prescribed computer skills test to verify competency in Windows and Computers. Students fifii g
the competency test will be required to take the Introduction To The Internet, Windows and Computers. This Workshop is a prerequisite
for all programmes or single courses., ,,
Workshop Title: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet.,,
Tuition: $200 Duration: 2 Days
Day: Saturdays: 12noon 3pm (5 contact hours per day) Offered: Spring, Summer.and aI);o
ADVISEMENT & REGISTRATION SESSIONS
Please bring the following items with you to the advisement/registration session:.
The first four pages of your Passport. .
Copies of your certificates/licensures and college/university transcripts
Where applicable, letters of recommendation, job description, special awards, etc. ,
OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION
1. No entrance examination is required for enrollment in professional development courses/programmes. .
2. Tuition is charged per term; i.e. you will be billed only for courses offered in the current term. ,,r.
3. Non-Bahamians add $50 to each course/workshop/seminar
4. Remember to obtain from the Programme Coordinator the correct ISBN Number for all required textbooks
5. At the first class session, ALL students must submit to the Programme Coordinator one copy eatih
of his/her stamped receipts representing payment for tuition, fees & books for the current term:
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND RE-CERTIFICATION SEMINARS
A compulsory professional development seminar is offered for all candidates enrolled in professional development programmes: Sentiits
and workshops address important issues that are vital to the adult students' learning experience. Enrollment is also open to the general public.
This seminar is also designed to facilitate continuing education units for professionals applying for re-certification in their respective disciplines.
Students are required only to take ONE Professional Development Seminar. Effective Fall 2005, the Fee for the Professional Developent
Seminar will be $210. .
THE ANNUAL AWARDS CEREMONY
The Annual Awards Ceremony and reception is normally held at The British Colonial Hilton Hotel once during the TERM 3. Adult students
successfully completing programmes and courses are awarded certificates, certifications and/or licensure.

Secure Your Seat By Enrolling Today! "
Contact The Centre For Continuing Education On Moss Road Campus or

Call (242) 325-5714/328-0093/328-1936 Fax: (242) 322-2712
Fees May Be Paid By Cash, Credit Card, or Bank Certified Cheque To: The College of The Bahamas, Business OffieW':'
Cees Reserves The Right To Change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule And Course Materials "'













BUlSINESS MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006, PAGE 9B


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COMPUTER OFFERINGS

"'COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
I'obiitse Description: This course is for the beginner who knows very little about computers and does not understand how it works.
"Ti'lcourse covers the major computer concepts with extensive hands on practice of various software using: (1) Microsoft Office Word
Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft Access Database Management.
Pre-requisite: None
Begins: Monday, 6 February 2006 6:00pm -9:00pm Section 01 (CEES)
Saturday, 4 February 2006 10:00am 1:00pm Section 02 (CEES)
Mon. and Wed., 6 Feb., 2006 4:00pm 5:30pm Section 03 (CEES)


'Date:
Time:
Venue:
Tuition.


Thursday, 23 February 2006
9:30am-4:30pm
Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre
$170.00


EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It focuses on developing
effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.


Date:
Time:
Venqe:
Tuition:


Thursday, 2 March 2006
9:30am-4:30pm
CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
$160.00


HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP
This two-day workshop is designed to equip managers and leaders in organizations and enhance the skills of current Human Resource
professionals with the theory, tools and techniques required for effective human resource management practices in today's workplace.


Date:
Time:
Venue: *
Tuition:


nd rd
Thursday & Friday, 2n 3d March, 2006
9:30am- 4:30pm
Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre
$350.00


UPGRADE REPAIRS AND TROUBLESHOOT YOUR PC
This workshop is a hands-on introduction to upgrade repair and troubleshooting your personal computer. Topics covered are basic hardware,
operating systems, troubleshooting and repairs.


Date:
Time:
Venue:
Tuition:


Thursday, 9th March, 2006
9:30am 4:30pm
CEES Computer Lab
$250


WEB PAGE DESIGN
This course will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy fiddling with computers and would
like to create their own web pages are encouraged to attend. Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and
Tables and hosting of web pages.


Date:
Time:
Venue:
Tuition:


Thursday & Friday 2nd 3r March, 2006
9:30am 4:30pm
CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
$550.00


E E .


Duration: 12 weeks
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Tuition: $450.00
\hA -':
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II
Course Description: This course covers the major advanced concepts with extensive hands on practice of various software using: (1)
Microsoft Office Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft Access Database Management.
.Pre-requisite: Computer Applications I
': gins: Thursday, 9 February 2006
Time: 6:00pm 9:00pm
Duration: 12 weeks
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees $550.00

EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
iiTliliworkshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It focuses on developing
effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.
Pre-requisite: None
Begins: Thursday, 2nd March, 2006
Time: 9:30am 4:30pm
Duration: 1 day
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $160.00

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY I
Course Description This course covers basic concepts of Information Technology. The course provides training in the following areas;
Baic Hardware Proficiency, Application Features Proficiency, Operating System Proficiency, Internet and Email Proficiency.
Pre-requisite: None
Begins: Wednesday, 8th February, 2006
Time: 6:00pm 9:00pm
Duration. 12 weeks
VePnue- CEES Computer Lab
'"'ees $450.00

PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR
Course Description: This course is a hands-on introduction to technology systems for use in information environments. The course will
co eir the following topics: Basic Hardware, Operating Systems, Troubleshooting and Repairs.
,Pre-requisite: None
:Begins: Tuesday, 7th February, 2006
Time: 6:00pm 7:30pm Tuesdays and Thursdays
Duration: 12 weeks
Venue: BHTC Computer Lab
Fees: $500.00

cQUICKBOOKS
"~Corse Description: This course is designed to train new and existing small business entrepreneurs (fewer than 20 employees) how to
organize and manage their accounting activities using QuickBooks Pro software. Students will leam how to set-up their company files:
chart of accounts, budget, customers, vendors and employees.
Pre-requisite: None h4
Begins: Tuesday, 28t February, 2006
.1hm: 6:00pm 9:00pm
!'diation: 6 weeks
'Veine: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $330.00

UPGRADE REPAIR AND TROUBLESHOOT YOUR PC WORKSHOP
Thfi workshop is a hands-on introduction to upgrade repair and troubleshooting your personal computer. Topics covered are basic hardware,
operating systems, troubleshooting and repairs.
Pr-requisite: None
'ens: Thursday, 9th March, 2006
te : 9:30am -4:30pm
Duration: 1 day
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $250.00

WEBPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP
..Oue Description: This course, which targets persons who would like to create their personal web pages will cover Web page creation,
sitesie management, and HTML. Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web
pages.
Pre-requisite: Participantsn ust be computer literate and have a basic knowledge of word-processing
Begins: Thursday, 2" March, 2006
Time: 9:30am- 4:30pm
Duration: 2 days
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fesi $550.00




4fSSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I
This is an introductory course for learning basic techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major topic areas will include
Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniques, Wellness Education (Psychological and Physiological Benefits), Indications and
Contraindications, Serving Special Populations and Complementary Bodywork Systems to include Aromatherapy Essentials.
Starting: Monday, February 27,2006
6:00-9:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee: $465.00
Venue: The College of the Bahamas

MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS II
This is an advance course for learning techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major topics include introduction to
hydrotherapy; spa and body treatments; the basic facial; aromatherapy-fundamentals or essential oils; relaxation and meditative methods;
anridot stone therapy.
Skiing Thrsday, February 23, 2006
S 6:00-9:00pm
"urtibon: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee: $620.00
Venue: The College of the Bahamas

GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR

This is an introductory course in teaching group fitness instruction. Major topics of discussion will include basic anatomy and physiology;
choreography and cueing; the five components of fitness, nutrition, basic exercise testing and how to teach group exercise.

Starting: Thursday, February 27, 2006
Time: 6:00-9:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee: $400.00
Venue: TBA




.SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior customer service. It focuses on
customer value, retention and relationship building and employee motivation.


Monday 23 January 10 a.m.
Tuesday 24 January
Wednesday 25 January
Thursday 26 January

Friday 27 January


Official Opening, and Database Demo Main Library
Open House Law Library and Culinary and Hospitality Library
Open House Hilda Bowen Library, GCC
Open House ( with database demos) and Media'Demonstrations
(2:00 4:00p.m.) Main Library
Open House at Northern Bahamas Campus Library Freeport


Story Hour for School Children Mable Walker Primary School 1.30pm at Main Library

For more information call 302-4552 or e-mail us at library@cob.edu.bs


"In an"effort to expose our nation and our students at The College of The Bahamas to an horrific growing
trend in murders and current studies on Homicide in The Bahamas, COB's Research Edge Forum Series
for 2006 presents this Friday "A descriptive Research Study of Homicide in The Bahamas." Corporal
Chasiell Hanna,'MJC, author and homicide detective with The Royal Bahamas Police Force has promised
a presentation that will describe the profiles of murder victim suspects, how The Bahamas' solvency rate
compares to that of other countries, the murder conviction rate, a Bahamian's chances of being murdered
and numerous other facts about murder in our island nation."

The lecture will be held on Friday, January 20, 2006, beginning promptly at 12 noon to 1:30pm in
the Lecture Theatre at the Culinary Hospitality & Management Institute on Thompson Boulevard.


I ii e7 I.IJ


COURSE DESCRIPTION


.4d


,OPMENT COURSE


___~__ I ___ I ______________ _____ ) I I I I


s
: :
L

...~:


;' ~i
:1


:::


7
1 i i
~
B ry


ACCT
ACCA900 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS I 6:00-8:00pm Mon/Wed 13-Feb 10 weeks $250
ACCA901 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II 6:00-8:00pm M/Wed 13-Feb 10 weeks $275
ACCA902 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS III 6:00-8:00pm Tue/Thur 14-Feb 10 weeks $300
BUS.
BUSI900 01 CREDIT & COLLECTIONS I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 8 Weeks $225
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER 1 Day $170
CUST900 01 SERVICE W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thur 23-Feb ___
BUSI904 01 INTRODUCTION TO BUS. I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
COMPt
COMP901 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 6:00-9:00pm Mon 6-Feb 12 Weeks $450
COMP901 02 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 10am-1:00pm Sat 4-Feb 12 Weeks $450
COMP901 03 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 4:00-5:30pm Mon/Wed 6-Feb 12 Weeks $450
COMP902 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II 6:00-9:00pm Thur 9-Feb 12 Weeks $550
COMP903 01 INFORMATION TECH. I 6:00-9:00pm Wed 8-Feb 12 Weeks $450
COMP 941 01 QUICKBOOKS 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 6 weeks $330
COMP953 01 PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR 6:00-7:30pm Tue/Thur 7-Feb 12 Weeks $450
EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT 1 Day $160
COMP960 01 W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thur 2-Mar
WEB PAGE DESIGN 2 Days $550
COMP930 01 WORKSHOP 9:30am-4:30pm Thur/Fri 2-Mar
Upgrade Repair and 1 Day $250
COMP923 01 Troubleshoot Your PC W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thur 9 Mar
COSM
COSM802 01 MAKE-UP APPLICATION 6:00-9:00pm Mon 27-Feb 8 Weeks $225
COSM804 01 MANICURE & PEDICURE 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 8 Weeks $225
COSM807 .:; :01 NAIL ART TECHNICIAN 6:00-9:00pm Mon/Thur 27-Feb 5 weeks $500
DECOR .- .I ,
DECO800.. 01 INTERIOR DECORATING I 6:00-9:00pm Wed 22-Feb 8 weeks $225
DECO801 01 INTERIOR DECORATING II 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 8 weeks $250
FLOR800 01 FLORAL DESIGN I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
FLOR801 01 FLORAL DESIGN II 6:00-9:00pm Mon 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
FLOR802 01 FLORAL DESIGN III 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb 10 weeks $275
ENGLISH
ENG 900 01 EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 8 Weeks $225
ESL 900 01 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANG 6:00-9:00pm Mon/Fri 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
HEALTH &
FITNESS
MASSAGE THERAPY $465
MASG900 01 ESSENTIALS I 6:00-9:00pm Mon 27-Feb 10 weeks
MASSAGE THERAPY $620
MASG901 01 ESSENTIALS II 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb 10 weeks
GROUP FITNESS $400
HLTH800 01 INSTRUCTOR 6:00-9:00PM Thur 22 Feb 10 Weeks
LANG
CRE 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE I 6:00-7:30pm Tue/Thur 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
CRE 901 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE II 6:00-7:30pm Mon/Wed 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
SPA 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I 6:00-7:30pm Tue/Thur 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
SPA 901 01 CONV. SPANISH II 6:00-7:30pm Mon/Thur 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
FRE 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I 6:00-7:30PM Mon/Wed 27 Feb 10 Weeks $225
MGMT.
HUMAN RESOURCE $250
MGMT900 01 MANAGEMENT I 6:00-9:00pm Thur 9-Feb 12 Weeks
HUMAN RESOURCE 12 Weeks $300
MGMT901 01 MANAGEMENT II 6:00-9:00pm Mon 6-Feb
HUMAN RESOURCE 2 Days $350
MGMT902 01 MANAGEMENT W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thur/Fri 2-Mar
MEDICAL
MEDT900 01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb 10 weeks $225
SEWING
BASIC OF FREEHAND 10 weeks $225
SEW 800 01 CUTTING I 6:00-9:00pm Mon 27-Feb
BASIC OF FREEHAND r 2 10 weeks $250
SEW 802 01 CUTTING II 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb
SEW 805 01 DRAPERY MAKING I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
SEW 806 01 DRAPERY MAKING II 6:00-9:00pm Wed 22-Feb 10 weeks $250
SEW 811 01 UPHOLSTERY MAKING I 6:00-9:00pm Wed 22-Feb 10 weeks $225
ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/
328-1936 or email All fees are included with the exception of the application fee
of $40.00 (one time). When submitting application, kindly provide copies of the
first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees,
Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials



NOTICE

The sixth annual Libraries and Instructional Media Services (LIMS) Week will be held 23-27 January
2006, under the theme "Information Destination: Anytime, Anyplace!" With activities taking place at
each of the five branches, the focus is on bringing awareness to the vast and varied formats easily accessible
to the College community, primarily, but some of which may also be explored by the general public.

The activities for the Week are as follows:


COnURSF ISFC


L%


DAY


START


DUR I FEE


TIME


fi:
t-s




.,a







PAEuB MNAJAUR 3,20IH T IBUN


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law & Equity Division


2005
CLE/qui/00805


IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF LOVE HILL
ESTATES COMPANY LIMITED
AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT, 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land
together comprising of 200 acres of property more or less on the
Settlement situate at Love Hill on the Island of Andros one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and having such
position shapes marks and boundaries as are shown on the plan
filed herein and thereon coloured Pink.

NOTICE

The Petition of LOVE HILL ESTATES COMPANY LIMITED
a company incorporated under the Laws of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas in respect of:-
ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land together comprising of
200 acres of property more or less on the settlement situate at
Love Hill on the Island of Andros one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
The Petitioner LOVE HILL ESTATES COMPANY LIMITED
claims to be the owner of the fee simple estate in possession of
the tract of land hereinbefore described free from encumbrances.
And the Petitioner has made application to the Supreme Court of
the aforementioned Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section
3 of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959, in the above action, to have
his title to the said tract of land investigated and the nature and
extent thereof determined and declared in.a Certificate of Title
to be granted in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.
Notice is hereby given that any person having a Dower or a right
to Dower or an Adverse Claim or claim not recognized in the
Petition shall on or before the expiration of Twenty-one (21) days
after the final publication of these presents file in the said Registry
of the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned
a Statement of his claim in the prescribed form verified by an
Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file
and serve a Statement of his Claim on or before the expiration
of Twenty-one (21) days after the final publication of these
presents shall operate as a bar to such claims.
Copies of the said plan may be inspected during normal working
hours at the Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street North,
Nassau, N.P. Bahamas, the Office of the Local Administrator's
Office at Fresh Creek, Andros, the Chambers of Messrs Evans &
Co., Samuel H. Evans House, Christie and Shirley Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas.
DATED the llth day of January A.D., 2006.

EVANS AND CO.
Chambers
Samuel H. Evans House
Shirley & Christie Streets
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner


Health Insurance


GN 313







GOVERNMENT NOTICE

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

Tender for Security Services


The Ministry of Education invites suitably
qualified firms to submit bids to provide security
services at the following schools/facility in New
Providence

Government High School
R M Bailey Sr High School
C R Walker Sr High School
C V Bethel Sr High School
C H Reeves Jr High School
L W Young Sr High School
H O Nash Jr High School
Thelma Gibson Primary
Learning Resources Section

Tender Documents outlining the scope of services
may be obtained from the office of the Director
of Security located in the Ministry of Education
Building, Thompson Boulevard, between the
hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through
Friday.

Tenders must be submitted in sealed envelopes
marked "Tender for Security Services" and
delivered on or before Friday, 27th January,
2006 to the attention of:-

Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
Cable Beach
P.O Box N-3017
Nassau, The Bahamas

The Tenders Board reserves the right to reject
any or all Tenders.


'mandatory'


to b4


FROM page 1B

is a mandatory health insur-
ance scheme."
That confirmation is likely
to set off alarm bells in the
Bahamian insurance industry
and private sector generally.
Bahamian health insurance
professionals fear the proposed
National Health Insurance
scheme could effectively put
them out of business if the
Government brings it into
effect with the benefits pack-
age that is currently contem-
plated.
Proposed
Meanwhile, businesses fear
the proposed scheme will add
further to the high costs of
doing business in the Bahamas,
effectively acting as a tax on
their companies. As a result,
many may be forced to look at


staffing levels.
It was announced last week
that the proposed contribution
rate to finance the National
Health Insurance Scheme
would be 5.3 per cent of an
employed worker's earned
wages. This would be split
evenly between the employer
and employee, meaning each
would pay the equivalent of
2.65 per cent of earned wages.
Self-employed persons, though,
would have to pay the full 5.3
per cent.
Marlon Johnson, the Small
Business Association of the
Bahamas' corporate secretary,
said of the proposed scheme:
"Yeah, we are very coiicerned,
given the cost of doing busi-
ness, generally speaking in the
Bahamas, and the tough regu-
latory requirements we have
to deal with."
Mr Johnson said the pro-
posed National Health Insur-
ance plan might not have such


a large impact on the business
community if transactions costs
were reduced and the way of
doing business in the Bahamas
became more efficient.
Members
While the Association's
members were always con-
cerned about the welfare of
their employees, Mr Johnson
said: "Additionally, one of they
key concerns we've had from
the jump start is ensuring that,
at the end of the day, we have
an efficient delivery of health-
care services..........
"The last thing we want is
another government bureau-
cracy."
He added that if the Gov-
ernment moved to implement
National Health Insurance, the
Association hoped as much of
the administration as possible
was left in private sector hands
to ensure efficiency and effec-
*tiveness in delivery.
One insurance source, speak-
ing on condition of anonymi-
ty, said of the National Health
Insurance scheme: "It's the last
thing the private sector wants -
to have to deal with another
layer of government bureau-
cracy. Government has an
awful track record in business."
However, Dr Bethel
described as "not true" con-
cerns expressed by the private
insurance industry that Nation-
al Health Insurance would
effectively replace private
group and individual health
coverage, squeezing them out
of.business as employers would
not pay for the same coverage
twice.
He said the proposed scheme
offered a level of basic mini-
mum coverage, with the pri-
vate sector left to deal with
treatments above that.
However, last week's
announcement said the pro-
posed National Health Insur-
ance benefits package included
paying for doctor visits to pub-
lic and private hospitals; cov-
ering drugs prescribed by doc-
tors; covering laboratory test
costs; covering surgical opera-
tions costs; covering hospital


room and board; and paying;
for overseas care not available
in the Bahamas.
Insurance industry execu-
tives were not convinced, one
questioning how employers
could afford to pay for both
private and National Health
Insurance coverage for their,
employees, especially given the,
latter's benefits range..
The executive questioned
whether the Government and,
Blue Ribbon Commission
knew what they were doing,
and urged the Government to
tackle the deficit in the present
public health system. The new
system was effectively a tax to
redistribute monies to cover
that deficit, they said.
Another insurance industry
source said: "The big question
is: How much is it going to
cost?"
This was especially given that
private healthcare insurers
were struggling to be able to
provide the level of coverage.
demanded in the present mar-
ket, plus control of premium
costs, which raised questions
of whether the Government
would do any better.
There were also questions of
whether the Government
would be able to afford it, giv-
en the current fiscal deficit and
national debt.
Insurers
Dr Bethel, though, said the
major insurers had been con-.
suited and involved in the
National Health Insurance
process, their interests repre-
sented on the Blue Ribbon
Commission by Gerald Stra-
chan, Family Guardian's pres-
ident and head of the Bahamas
Association of Life and Health
Insurers (BALHI).
He added: "Now we have
the costing and funding aspects,
we are about to begin another
round of consultation and go
back to the public.
"We're encouraging every-
one to get involved and not, As
sometimes happens in the
Bahamas, to sit back and say
they didn't know."
_' .


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

SAUSUALITO INVESTMENT
CORPORATION
(In Voluitary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
19th day of January, 2006. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp.
Inc., of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

NURICAR S.A.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named',
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the'i
19th day of January, 2006. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp.,
Inc., of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.,





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


NOTICE
N O T I C-E



IN THE ESTATE OF
CONSTANCE ANN
COCKWELL late of 8 Poinciana
Drive in the Western District of the
Island of New Providence one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas, deceased.


NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the
above Estate are required to send the
same duly certified in writing to the
Undersigned on or before the 24th Day
of February, 2006, after which date the
Executors will proceed to distribute the
assets having regard only to the claims
of which they shall then have had notice.


AND NOTICE is hereby given that all
persons indebted to the said Estate are
requested to make full settlement on or
before the date hereinbefore mentioned.



HIGGS & JOHNSON
Attorneys for the Executors
Chambers
P.O. Box N-3247
Ocean Centre
Montague Foreshore
East Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas


As part of our commitment to employ 200 Bahamians on our
project we are seeking qualified Bahamians to apply for the
position of:

Sous Chef
Resident Butler

Salary and benefits will be in based on experience and will include
health benefits.
Applications can be directed to:
Indira Edwards
Director, Human Resource and Training
P.O. Box AB20766
Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Or iedwards@bakersbayclub.com

Baker's Bay Golf & Ocean Club is a $500 million project under
development on Great Guana Cay. It includes 381 residential.
homes, a 70-acre environmental preserve, a 180-slip marina. a'
championship golf course and a 70-room luxury hotel.


PAGE 1 OB, MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006


THE TRIBUNE







MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006, PAGE 11B


YVRAS 'keen'





to invest in





Nassau airport


FROM page 1B

thl initial 10-year deal could
become a longer-term, expand-
ing relationship.
"He added that by attracting
private sector money into the
airport enhancement process,
the Governmerit would free up
finds' for social projects such
as'education and health spend-
ing.
The NIA management con-
tract was initially intended to
be a 15-25 year build/oper-
ate/transfer arrangement,
whereby the airport would be
leased directly to YVRAS.
Instead, the Government has
opted for a watered-down ver-
sion that still gives it significant
c',n i1t I over finances and other

The Airport Authority is
instead leasing NIA to Newco,
which it owns 100 per cent.
Several sources have speculat-
ed this may have been done to
safeguard Bahamian jobs and
election votes as there was a
suspicion a private manage-
ment firm would downsize staff
levels.
"I think it's more the Gov-
ernment's preference to move
in this direction, and what I
describe as a first step," Mr
O'Neill said. "It gives the Gov-
eirnment time to assess our per-
f6rmance. We are very confi-
dent we can perform well.
"It's much more to the Gov-


ernment's timeframe and pref-
erences, but from the begin-
ning we've always been keen
to be an investor."
Referring to YVRAS's man-
agement of Sangster Interna-
tional Airport in Jamaica, Mr
O'Neill described how the
company had overseen the con-
struction and recent opening
of a new pier there within 18


When asked about the con-
struction of a new $225 million
terminal building for NIA,
work on which is scheduled to
begin in the third year of the
management agreement and
last for 48 months, Mr O'Neill
said the review would deter-
mine whether an entirely new
building was needed or
whether parts of the existing


"I think it's more the
Gn se





to moei0ti ircin


months, funded by private sec-
tor money.
Describing YVRAS's inten-
tions for NIA as transforming it
into a "seamless product", Mr
O'Neill added: "The first thing
we will do is to establish a crack
team of expert executives that
will down there. We will be
conducting a review of devel-
opment requirements."


facility could be included.
"You can be assured it [NIA]
will have facilities'that match
the tourism investment on the
island, and you are currently
well behind that," Mr O'Neill
said.
He added that YVRAS's
objectives were to make NIA
the best airport in the
Caribbean.


l
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
BETWEEN


2005/CLE/gen/00llO


GULF STREAM LUMBER COMPANY
Plaintiff
AND
JOHN WILLIAM LEFLER
Defendant


ELIZABETH THE SECOND, by the Grace of God, Queen of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas and of
Her other Realms and Territories, Head of the Commonwealth.
To: The Defendant
John William Lefler
Love Beach
West Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas
WE COMMAND YOU that within fourteen days after the service upon you of this Writ on you, inclusive
of the day of such service, you do cause an appearance to be entered for you in an action at the suit of Gulf
Stream Lumber Company of 1415 South Federal Highway, Boynton Beach, Florida 33425-0160, U.S.A.
Whose address for service is c/o their attorneys, Messrs Gibson and Company, G.K. Symonette Building,
Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas.
And take notice that in default of your so doing the Plaintiff may proceed therein, and judgment may be given
in your absence.
Witness, the Honorable Sir Burton Hall Our Chief Justice of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas the 31 st
day of January in the year of Our Lord Two Thousand and Five.
REGISTRAR
N.B. This Writ is to be served within twelve calendar months from the date hereof, or, if renewed,
within twelve calendar months from the date of the last renewal, including the day of such date, and
not afterwards.
The Defendant may appear hereto by entering an appearance either personally or by Attorney at the
Registry of the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau, in the Island of New Providence, of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas. A Defendant appearing personally may, if he desire, enter his
appearance by post.
If the Defendant enters an appearance he must also deliver a defence to the Attorney of the Plaintiff
within fourteen days from the last day of the time limited for appearance, unless such time is extended
by the Court or a judge; otherwise judgment may be entered against him without notice, unless he has
in the meantime been served with a summons for judgment.
ENDORSEMENT OF CLAIM
The Plaintiff's claim against the Defendant is for:
1. A declaration that the Plaintiff is entitled to have the corporate veil lifted in respect of
Nassau Construction Company Limited, a company incorporated under the laws of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
2. A declaration that the Defendant is the alter ego of Nassau Construction Company Limited.
3. An Order that the Defendant do pay to the Plaintiff all amounts due pursuant to the
Judgment entered against Nassau Construction Company in favour of the Plaintiff in
Supreme Court Action No. 1902 of 2002.
4. Costs.
5. Such further or other relief as this Honourable Court deems just.
DATED the 31st day of January A.D., 2005.
GIBSON & COMPANY
Chambers
G.K. Symonette Building
Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas
:] Attorneys for the Plaintiff
4nd the sum of B$ (or such sum as may be allowed on taxation) for costs and also in case the Plaintiff
obtains an order for substituted service the further sum of B$ (or such sum as may be allowed on
taxation). If the amount claimed be paid to the Plaintiff or his Attorney within fourteen days from the service
thereof further proceedings will be stayed.
;Provided that if it appears from the endorsement of the writ that the Plaintiff is resident outside the Scheduled
Territories as defined by the Exchange Control Act 1947, or is acting by order or on behalf of a person so
resident proceedings will only be stayed if the amount claimed is paid into Court within the said time and
Notice of such payment in is given to the Plaintiff or His/Her Attorney. This writ is issued by GIBSON &
COMPANY whose address for service is their Chambers situate at the G.K. SYMONETTE BLDG., SHIRLEY
STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, Attorneys for the said Plaintiff.
ENDORSEMENT OF SERVICE
This Writ was served by me..................................
at ;...: ................................................
on the Defendant JOHN WILLIAM LEFLER on.............the.........day of:;.........200. :'
Dated this..... ..........day of...............A.D., 2005.


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
BETWEEN


GULF STREAM LUMBER COMPANY
AND
JOHN WILLIAM LEFLER

WRIT OF SUMMONS


2005/CLE/gen/00110


Plaintiff


Defendant


GIBSON & COMPANY
Chambers
G.K. Symonette Building
Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Plaintiff


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
BETWEEN
GULF STREAM LUMBER COMPANY
AND
JOHN WILLIAM LEFLER


2005/CLE/gen/00110


Plaintiff


Defendant


ORDER

BEFORE: The Deputy Registrar Mr. Ernie Wallace
DATED: The 18th day of January A.D., 2006
UPON THE APPLICATION of the Plaintiff by Ex-Parte Summons filed herein on the 9th December 2005
AND UPON READING the Affidavit of Nicole Ramkellawan-Watkins filed herein on the 9th December
2005
AND UPON HEARING Miss. Wanda S. Dean of Messrs. Gibson & Company of Counsel for the Plaintiff.
IT IS HEREBY ORDERED that:
1. The Plaintiff be granted leave to effect substituted service of the Writ of Summons herein by serving
the same at the registered office of Nassau Industrial Group Ltd., H&J Corporate Services, and by
advertisement twice in a daily newspaper of wide circulation.
2. The costs of this application be costs in the cause.
BY ORDER OF THE COURT
REGISTRAR
This Order was drawn by Messrs. Gibson & Company, Chambers, G.K. Symonette Building, Shirley
Street, Nassau, Bahamas, Attorneys for the Plaintiff.
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
BETWEEN


GULF STREAM LUMBER COMPANY


AND


2005/CLE/gen/00110.


JOHN WILLIAM LEFLER

ORDER
GIBSON & COMPANY
Chambers
G.K. Symonette Building
Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas


Plaintiff


Defendant


Attorneys for the Plaintiff


THE TRIBUNE


NOTICE

The public is asked to note that the deadline for applications
for entry to The College of The Bahamas in the Fall Semester
is February 3, 2006. The fee for applications submitted on
or before the deadline is forty dollars ($40.00). The fee for
late application (received after February 3 and no later than
February 10, 2006) is fifty dollars ($50.00). All payments
must be made between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00
p.m. at the Business Office, Ground Floor, Portia M. Smith
Building, Oakes Field Campus, The College of the
Bahamas.

It is important that applications be properly completed
and all supporting documents attached. Incomplete
applications will not be processed.

For more information, please call 302-4498/9.


I Lit our ebsile at Ki- Wb.edict. b v


GRAPHIC ARTIST




NEEDED

The Tribune is growing and looking for an experienced
individual to work full time as a Graphic Artist.

The individual must be computer literate and
knowledgeable in InDesign, Freehand, QuarkExpress
and Photoshop.

Interested persons
can send their
resumes in at
The Tribune
between the hours
of 9am 5- pm
or fax: 328-2398
e e 1


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12B, MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006


Fo h stories behind


3r. 4 ?
the news, read Insigh


Legal Notice

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL ABU DHABI
SERVICES LIMITED


Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned
c/o P.O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 15th day of
February, A.D., 2006. In default thereof they will be excluded from
the benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 19th day of January, A.D., 2006.

K. L. Floyd
Liquidator
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.




Legal Notice

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL ABU
DHABI SERVICES LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) EXXONMOBIL ABU DHABI SERVICES LIMITED is in
dissolution under the provision of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 18th
January, 2006 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted
to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is K. L. Floyd of 16945
Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

Dated the 19th day of January, A.D. 2006.
HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company


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FROM page 1B

General's Department is a piv-
otal and vital agency to the
proper functioning of financial
services and the country at
large. All.of the services at the
Department are now available
online.
"We expect the WIPO solu-
tion to our intellectual proper-
ty section to commence this
month.. We have ready for
tabling in Parliament the
amendments to legislation nec-
essary to enable electronic sig-


natures and seals on all docu-
ments. This will mean that
companies incorporated under
the Companies Act can be
incorporated online."
Working

Mrs Maynard-Gibson added
that the Registrar General's
Department was working on a
solution to enable electronic
real time payments for all ser-
vices, but warned this was con-
tingent on Bahamian commer-
cial banks developing an Auto-


"T'rah Me. 0 Lord Thy ay"... Palm 19:33

TEACHING VACANCIES

Temple Christian High School
J Shirley Street

Invites applications from qualified Christian teachers for the
following positions for the 2006-2007 school year:

Health Science (Gr. 7-9)
Agriculture (Gr. 7-9)
Religious Knowledge/ Bible (Gr. 7-9)

Applicants must:

A. Be a practicing born-again Christian who is willing to
subscribe to the Statement of Faith of Temple Christian
School.
B. Have a Bachelor's degree in Education or higher from
a recognized College or University in the area of
specialization.
C. Have a valid Teacher's Certificate or Diploma.
D. Have at least two years teaching experience in the
relevant subject area with excellent communication
skills.
E. Applicants must have the ability to prepare students
for all examinations to the BJC/BGCSE levels.
F. Be willing to participate in the high school's extra
curricular programmes.

Application must be picked up at the High School Office on
Shirley and be returned immediatley with a full curriculum vitae,
recent coloured photograph and three references to:
Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O.Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas


mated Clearing House (ACH).,,
The minister added that the'
Registrar General's Depart,,
ment's temporary move to the
British Colonial Hilton's Cen-
tre of Commerce, to be fol-.
lowed by permanent relocation
to Beaumont House, "wilt
deliver substantial improve,
ments in the quality and con-
sistency of the services deliv-
ered."
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
her ministry planned to appoint-
a Director of Financial Ser-
vices. This person would work
closely with the sector but also-
"monitor the extent to whiclf
financial institutions give their
employees the opportunity toi
develop and deepen their intel
lectual capital".
She added that she contain;
ued to advocate the creation
of a School of Financial Ser:
vices at the College of the,
Bahamas (COB), and that
Bahamian financial sector
employees be trained so they.
could transfer to their institu-
tion's operations in another
country.
Given that average financial
services sector salaries were,
$40,000, double those of
tourism, Mrs Maynard-Gibson
said it was critical for Bahami-,
ans to have the same opportu-
nities to work and train abroad
as those offered to expatriate
personnel who came to the
Bahamas.
Increase

She added that she would
"make every effort" to ensure
the BFSB saw an increase in
its annual subvention from the
Government, given that over-
seas marketing trips to meet
head offices and intermediaries
were vital to the Bahamas'
growth.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said an
advisory group, similar to tht
Financial Services Consultative
Forum, would be appointed
this year to help Freeport
realise its objective of becom-
ing a financial services centre.
This year's Annual Retreat.
was held to gain input for shap-
ing the next five-year strategic
plan for the financial services
industry, to run from 2007 to
2012.


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THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006, PAGE 13B


JANUARY 23, 2006


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

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B WPBT show 1750s classic black walnut Philadel- often sought the advice of his wife, Abigail. (N) N (CC)
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n (Part 2 of 7) (CC) begins to break down. (N)
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computers.
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cadets are charged with the murder of a student. embark on a decadelong crime spree. (CC)
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n (CC) ing. (CC) ing. (CC) abound. (CC) romantic advice, is razed. (CC)
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1805. n 'PG-13'(CC) PG-13 (CC)


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The SKYBOX Sports Bar & Cafe, located @ The
Marathon Mall, is seeking friendly, passionate and
energetic members to be. on our All-Star Team. If
you are outgoing and have a passion for success,
we are interested in meeting you.

We have immediate Full and Part tirre positions
available for Supervisors, Hostesses, Servers,
Bartenders, and Cooks. Successful Applicants must
be available to work nights, holiday's and
weekends.




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* THE Big Red Machines take control of the under 15 division 4x200m


(Photo: Felipg Major/Tribune staff)


Machines firing on






all cylinders in relays


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


I TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

WHEN the results were in, the St
Augustines College Big Red Machines pre-
vailed as champions at the annual Bahamas
Association of Athletic Association High
School Relays held on Saturday at the
Thomas A Robinson track and field stadi-
um.
The Big Red Machines dominated the
six divisions, taking four top prizes in each.
Out of the five relays in the under 15
division for both boys and girls, the Big
Red Machines claimed five first place fin-
ishes.
They took the girls 4x800m and the
4x400m, while their boys grabbed first
place prizes in the 4x200m, 4x400m and
the 4x800m.
In the girls 4x100m the Big Red
Machines clocked a time of 54.82 seconds


for fourth place. Winning the sprint relay
was the team from Mount Carmel in a time
of 53.73 seconds, Queens College was sec-
ond in 54.06 seconds with Sunland com-
ing in third in 54.38 seconds.
Queens College edged out the'Sunland
team in the 4x200m, winning the event in a
time of 1:49.71 second to Sunland's 1:56.50
for second place.
The time of 2:01.84 seconds give
Tabernacle a third place finishing in the
event.
Only seconds separated the winners and
second place finishers in the boys 4xl00m.
The winning time, which was ran by mem-
bers of the Sunland team was 49.12 sec-
onds to the Queen's College's 49.42 sec-
onds.
The Big Red Machines were third in
49.76 seconds.
After falling short in the 4xl00m, the
Big Red Machines improved on the track
to claim the next two relays.


The Big Red Machines had separated
themselves from the pack by the second leg
of the 4x200m, taking the event in a time of
1:44.98 seconds to Sunland's 1:46.26 sec-
onds and CH Reeves 1:49.13 seconds.

Factor

Endurance was the key factor in the
boys 1600 sprint medley and the Big Red
Machines were able to top the charts.
Pulling away from the Sunland's anchor-
man in the event at the 150m marker give
the team the edge they needed to defeat
Sunland. The Big Red Machines ran an
impressive 4:23.43 seconds for the win to
'Sunland's 4:24.56 second place timing.
The race for division leader in the under
17 categories were between the Grand
Bahama Catholic High (Crusaders) and
the Big Red Machines. When it was all
over the Crusaders would reign over the


Big Red Machines.
The Big Red Machines weren't about
to allow the Crusaders to just run away
with the title, the team put up a great fight,
closely trailing the Crusaders in each event.
Seconds determined the winners in the
girls' 4xl00m, 4x200m and the 4x800m
sprint medley.
The Crusaders took the 4xl00m in a
time of 49.66 seconds, the Big Red
Machines were second in 49.94 seconds
with CR Walker Knights coming in third in
52.16 seconds.
The results were the same in 4x200m
with the Crusaders coming out on top with
1:46.48 seconds, the Big Red Machines
with 1:47.97 seconds and the Knights
1:54._ seconds.
The Big Red Machines would get the
better part of the Crusaders in the 4x800m,
taking the sprint medley in 1:54.80 sec-
onds, Crusaders clocked 1:55.61 seconds
with the Knights timing a 1:58.76 seconds.


* ... I.. .. ._ -_..200 reaya -Bi ( _M__ s..ak)Lr
ACTION from the boys 4x200m relay oto: elip ajor/Tribne staf)
0 ACTION from the boys 4x200m relay (Photo: Felip6 Major/Tribune staf])


I


-- l


TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 14B, MONDAY, JANUARY 23,22006


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... . _" _ _- ... .... ._. -j
ALEX ROLLE of the Pros catches the ball for a touchdown on Saturday against the Jets
(Photos: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)


IBE-. ,e~~n~ sr.~PWI. 'aS ,,fl,-'p -


I PROS quarterback Micheal Foster tries to get rid of the ball as the Jets apply defence.
(Photo: Felipi Major/Tribune staj])


* PROS running back Charles Edwards runs the ball during Saturday's game.
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)
... . . . .


FROM page one

went for it."
Sylverster stayed in sight
of LaFleur for the entire
race, but he was never able to
catch him, coming through
the line in 14:01.91, just
ahead of Isaacs Neely of
Albury Sayle in 14:08.25.
Eleven-year-old sixth grad-
er Sylvester, who improved
on a sixth-place finish last
year, said, "I saw him
(LaFleur), but I was too, too
tired. It was a long course,
so I just tried to finish it."
In the girls' 11-12 2.5K
race, Rita Petit-Frere came
from second place and took
control after the leader
stopped. She was clocked in
9:56.06 to out-distance the
rest of the field to improve
on her second place finish
last year.
Her nearest rival, Paulette
Strachan, from Stephen Dil-
let did 10:36.98, while Tem-
ple Christian's Krystal
Roberts was timed in
10:44.58 for third.
"It was great, but it was a


little tough. I had to make it
through," said Petit-Frere, an
11-year-old sixth grader.
"When I saw the girl ahead
of me, I knew I had to catch
her. When I did, I know I
had the race."
The toys' 9-10 division was
also keenly contested with
Timothy Neely of Temple
Christian surging to a 9:25.31
victory over Merlin Bowe
(9:30.97) and Laquar Nairn
(9:58.66), both of Albury
Sayle.
The crowd on hand was
cheering on the sidelines for
Bowe and Nairn, but Neely
made sure that neither of
them caught him.
"It was good. I ran it fast
because I saw the guys
behind me," said Neely, who
ran the race for the first time.
In the girls' 9-10 division,
Dannielle Gibson brought
the title home for Temple
Christian in 10:12.18 as she
held off her team-mates
(Talia Thompson (10:16.99)
and Zahra Powell (10:20.49).
Sadie Curtis' Danielle
Shaw emerged as the girls'
8-and-under champion, leav-


ing Anya Moss from Temple
Christian behind in second
and Tatianna Evans of
Albury Sayle in third.
And in the boys' 8-and-
under division, Julius Not-
tage of Temple Christian ran
10:23.28 to snatch the 1.5K
title. Emmanuel Hepburn of
Xavier's Lower School had
to settle for second in
10:41.56 and Tyrique Cox of
Temple Christian was third
in 11:38.75.
Meet director Shirley
Mireault said after ten years,
they have finally put togeth-
er the type of meet that she
expected. She commended
the Bahamas Association of
Certified Officials (BACO).
the Bahamas Red Cross and
Gatorade for their assistance.
"Everybody was here on
time and we started fairly on
time," she pointed out.
"Some kids came late. hut
they had to go in an age
group that was just above
their's. But we had a big pep
rally at Albury Sayle and
because it was a inter-house
competition, we had such a
large crown and we won."


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SPORTS


"


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I- "6~
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,A.tioon from Prodss victory over jets


*.' "' '' *-.
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MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006


SECTION


Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


F CROSS COUNTRY
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter
USING the event as an
inter-house competition,
Albury Sayle dominated
their 10th annual Nation-
al Primary Schools Cross
Country Championships,
winning five of the six
divisions to cart off the
overall title on Saturday
at Fort Charlotte.
The Bahamas Associa-
tion of Athletic Associa-
tions' sanctioned event
was held in memory of
the late Oscar Anderson,
a former teacher at
Albury Sayle Primary
School.
Neria Holbert, one of
the coaches for Albury
Sayle, said they demon-
strated the true meaning
of competition because
"even though they may
not have won, they were
committed to finishing
the races".
Holbert said they had a
"competition within the
competition" as there was
an inter-house competi-
tion for Albury Sayle and
then they had the wider
participation in the
"inter-school" competi-
tion.
"Temple Christian real-
ly put on a show. You
could see that those ath-
letes have been training,"
Holbert noted. "Our kids
really had to struggle to
keep up with them
because they are really
good."

Results
While Temple Christ-
ian produced some of the
better individual results,
the final outcome of the
event was based on a
team point system. In
order to win a divisional
title, a school had to have
six or more competitors
complete the course.
As a result of their
"inter-house" competi-
tion, Albury Sayle cap-
tured the girls' 8-and-
under, boys and girls 9-10
and both the 11-12 age
group divisions for the
overall title. The only
division they didn't win
was the boys' 8-and-
under division. That went
to Temple Christian.
The most competitive
division came in the boys'
11-12 division as Lopez
LaFleur of Sir Gerald
Cash held off Stephen
Dillet's Kensey Sylvester
to repeat as champion in
their 3 kilometre race on
the obstacle course in 13
minutes and 13.81 sec-
onds.
"It was easy," reflected
LaFleur, a 12-year-old
sixth grader. "I just took
my time going up the hill
when I came down, I just
SEE page 15B


lets








OOs


grounded


gPrab


* PROS running back Charles Edwards Jr runs over the competition during the victory over the Jets
(Photo: Felipi Major/Tribune staff)


as


ic0or


* FOOTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
ALEC Rolle wasn't too
pleased with the way Michael
Foster was running the Pros'
offence. But the rookie wide
receiver \\aired patiently until
the veteran quarterback made
the right connection to him.
It came mid-way in the
third quarter. hen Rolle
caught a 3i-\ ard pass from
Foster that he \as able to run
in the end zone to put the
Pros as the scoreboard. The
Pros went on to beat the John
Bull Jets 14-8
mohwealth
Ameri-
c a n
can
Football
League's
abbreviat-
ed season
opener on Sat-
urday at the \'indsor playing
fi e l d '
Roll. back home from
school felt hle could have
scored earlier in his debut in
the league. but said "Foster
was experimenting with a new
offence that I really didn't
like."
\\ith his team-mates
encouraging Foster to "throw
the ball more" to Rolle, it
finaUly happened and it turned
out to be the 'bread and but-
ter" play for the Pros in the
game.

Competitive
For Rolle. \% ho played col-
lege football in Florida and
Minnesota before he returned
home, it \\ as good to start the
season off in such a close
competitive game rather than
the blowout.
"It was more intense, so it
was much more pressure;"
Rolle insisted. "That's the
\av I like it rather than blow-
ing out a team.
Thc Jets. w ho scored their
first two points of the game
on a safety in the first quarter,
answered the Pros in the
fourth quarrcr when wide
recekier Daitin Newball
caught a 30-yard pass as well
from hih qua rterback Dameko
Clarke for their thirst TD.
For Nve\ball. a four-year
pla\ er in the league who did-
n'i arrive in the game until
the third quarter. it was a play
that a.1s set up perfectly for
him to get in the end zone.
"My running backs were
doing a good job on the left
side, so it opened up the
whole hield." he reflected. "It
froze the safety on the fake
run to the left' side and that
left me wide open for the
touchdown."


They missed another
opportunity to pull off the
season opener in the fourth,'
but Newball said they have to
chalk it up to a lack of players
available as some of his team-
mates were weary from play-
ing on both ends of the field.
Unlike the Jets, the Pros
had a pretty good comple-
ment of the players out and
they managed to seal the deal.
on the game late in the fourth
quarter when running back
Charles Edwards darted his
way through the defence for a
five-yard TD run.
Despite the loss, John Bul-
l's coach Jim LaRoda said
they just wanted to get the
season underway.
"We have a good young
team. They played well, but
they didn't play hard," LaRo-
da noted.
"We held the Pros to just
14 points, so that gives us
some momentum at this stage
in the season."
The Pros will be back on
the field on Saturday, Febru-
ary 4 when they travel to
Grand Bahama to play the
Grand Bahama Rattlers. Ken
Parker, the Rattlers' quarter-
back, was in town, not only
to scout the Pros, but to make
sure that the league will play
this year.
"As you know, we've had
a lay off for about two years
and the guys back home don't
want to practise and know
that there won't be a league
for us to play in again this
year," he insisted.
"So since they are serious; I
can go back home and let
them know so we can get
ready. Once the Pros show
up, we will be prepared to
play them."
Parker, however, declined
'to give any hints about what
the Rattlers will look like. .
Rolle said whether it's-a
long or short season, the Pros
will be ready to play;
"The best thing about this
team is that they care about
the game," he pointed out.
"They take a lot of strides on
progressing from year to year.
That's what I like about this
team."
On their return from Grand
Bahama, the Pros will face the
Jets in a rematch on Satur-
day, February 11 before the
Jets travel to Grand Bahama
on February 18 to play the
Rattlers.
LaRoda, the acting chair-
man of the league, said the
remainder of the season will
depend on whether or not the
Rattlers will be able to travel
to New Providence.
If they are unable; the
league championship game
will be played on March 4 at
Windsor.


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SWvfT ONION
C.ICK.FN TEtVIalr,


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-- ---
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24 25 26 27 28 2









MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006


The stories behind the news


ACE A


In the House of Assembly last
week, Prime Minister Perry Christie
(left) lashed out at FNM leader and
former prime minister Hubert Ingra-
ham for what he termed irresponsible
comments regarding the prison break,
sparking a heated shouting match
between the two party leaders.
Mr Christie said that Mr Ingraham
was using the prison break out to
underhandedly "play politics", and
challenged the public to "not allow
him to do so"...


AN exit outside of the MIinistr
of Health (not pictured) was
blocked by overflowing garbage
last week. The Tribune contacted
the ministry's parliamentary sec-
retary, Ron Pinder, who is in
charge of environmental health
and garbage collection, to com-
ment on the matter. Mr Pinder
said the ministry was having a ",
clear out after installing new
furniture and equipment.


Prosecutors in the trial of the 2002 murder of Mario
Miller, son of Minister of Trade and Industry Leslie
Miller, told the jury last week that although the pros-
ecution intends to prove that Mario had been involved
in drug activity, seeking to sell cocaine the day before
his death, there must still be justice for his murder.
Attorney Bernard Turner, who with Neil Brath-
waite is prosecuting the case, told the jury of nine
women and three men that just because Mario was
involved in such activity they themselves should not
decide that he got what he deserved or that some
form of "street justice" was served...


Time is running out


for N


p politicians are already jump-
ing all over last week's
deadly jailbreak, milking it
for all the mileage they can
get. Both major parties are
locked in disputes over who failed to
do what, and when.
Fingers are being pointed at prison
superintendent Dr Elliston Rahming, a
PLP appointee, with claims he is "the
wrong man for the job." Allegations of
slackness and indiscipline abound. Cor-
ruption among some officers is ram-
pant, it is claimed.
Now ex-superintendent Edwin Cul-
mer has weighed in with an attack on Dr
Rahming, calling him a political preda-
tor. Harsh words exchanged between
the two last week carried strong politi-
cal overtones. In the Bahamas, every-
thing is political, and that is part of the
problem.
Dismay is being expressed that hack-
saws, knives and other edged tools have
found their way into this appalling insti-
tution. There's even disgust that some
inmates can co-ordinate their nefarious
schemes by mobile phone.
Ih fact, the term cell-phone has taken
on a whole new meaning at Fox Hill,
where according to Tribune sources -
the most influential inmates can sit in
their cells chatting away to their heart's
content to their criminal brothers on
the outside.
It's possible no, likely, say well-
placed sources that new criminal enter-
prises are being hatched right there,
under the noses of prison guards, where
inmates have little constructive to do
but let their distorted minds run riot.
However, little of this is new. Few
politicians of the last 40 years have clean
hands when it comes to Fox Hill Prison
and its brutal, dehumanising past. Its
ethos still reflects an approach the Vic-
torians would have recognized. And
most of its pathetic inhabitants find their
way back to this fetid compound
because they have acquired neither the
will nor wherewithal to do anything but
offend again.
One ex-politician who visited the jail
confessed his utter shame at what he
saw there. How could he have been in
politics so long, he wondered, without
having his conscience torn apart by this
horrendous place?
What happened last week was, there-
fore, highly predictable and, indeed,
totally expected by those with intimate
knowledge of the jail and those who
run it.
When four bad men and the
escapees were among the worst in the
maximum security unit can flee at the
same time, with eight others primed to
join them in their bid for freedom, there
is clearly something deeply wrong with
the system.


1assau'es prison





red obo..So 6s change
aI a *- a
V' S.~


* THE Maximum Security section of Her Majesty's Prison, Fox Hill.
(FILE photo)


If this was not an inside job and
that's the most plausible theory at this
point then it was the product of mon-
umental incompetence and mind-bog-
gling neglect.
Several fundamental procedures were
ignored in preventing this co-ordinated
stampede, which came perilously close
to total success. Among them was a rou-
tine test normally carried out twice a
day which would have detected that
cell bars had been cut, and that a big
breakout was in the offing.
Critics say this bar-rattling procedure,
which tests the integrity of the metal,
was overlooked. Whether this oversight
was by design will be something inves-
tigators will want to probe very assidu-
ously indeed, for the ramifications of
the jailbreak run very deep.


Had the escape bid gone to plan, Nas-
sau would now be facing an extremely
disturbing threat, with no fewer than
12 homicidal hardmen on the loose,
including a serial rapist with 26 offences
behind him. The island would have been-
on full alert until this herd of wildmen
had been rounded up.
Yet accountant Matthew Mitchell
warned INSIGHT in November, 2001 -
more than four years ago that Fox
Hill's toxic and supercharged atmos-
phere would one day reach flashpoint,
possibly with a mass jailbreak.
While there, he said, he experienced
scenes reminiscent of the worst of the
gulag, with widespread brutalisation of
prisoners, rampant graft, and a total
absence of anything resembling com-
mon decency.


For its $12 million annual budget, he
said, the prison offered poor returns a
mass of embittered, misanthropic men
who would, on release, almost certainly
descend into the pit of criminality from
whence they came, creating yet more
havoc in society. This dehumanising
process, he warned, would render these
misfits even more of a threat than they
had been before.
To be fair, the appointment of Dr
Rahming, a qualified criminologist, was
seen by some observers as an attempt
by the present government to move
away from the purely punitive prison
system of old to a more progressive
form of incarceration.

SEE page 10C


Security


expert


says the


Bahamas


needs


its own


Alcatraz

THE Bahamas needs its
own Alcatraz a high secu-
rity prison unit on a remote
island.
That's the view of for-
mer assistant police com-
missioner Paul Thompson,
now a senior security
expert.
And it's a proposal he
and his ex-boss Salathiel
Thompson put to the gov-
ernment in the early 1980s.
But nothing was done
about it.
At the time, Salathiel
Thompson proposed
Inagua as the ideal spot for
the new prison. Paul
Thompson favoured
Ragged Island.
"Now, however, I think
Inagua would be the best
place because the Defence
.Force base is there," said
Paul Thompson, general
manager of Wemco.
"Defence Force officers
could help support prison
staff, and there could be an
entire community based
around the installation."
Mr Thompson said.it was
"madness" for a prison like
Fox Hill to be situated near
the heart of the metropoli-
tan area.
He said the prison did
not have a high security
unit worthy of the name.
As an island nation, the
Bahamas had several sites
suitable for such a unit,
where prisoners who
escaped its walls would
have nowhere, to go, he
said.
"By creating this new
unit, prison congestion
could be eased. In the past,
visiting rights have been
given as a reason for not
pursuing the plan.
"But that's no reason for
not going ahead with it.
The Bahamas could get
outside financial help to
fund the project."


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'' J-;'~













0 CORPORAL Godwin Taylor reflects j.
beside a wreath placed at the gate of ,
Her Majesty's Prison, Fox Hill, following
last week Tuesday's breakout in which
Corporal Deon Bowles was killed.
(FILEphoto)

call 322-1986


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Healthy Choice is a registered
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.~L---* 3 -- .-.,-- --.i..... _P1I:* Ei s. f "i -tffl l^Tfd


n the House of Assemn-
bly last week, Primp
Minister Perry Christie
lashed out at FNM
leader and former
prime minister Hubert Ingra-
ham for what he termed irre-
sponsible comments regarding
the prison break, sparking a


heated shouting match
between the two party leaders.
Mr Christie said that Mr
Ingraham was using the prison
break out to underhandedly
"play politics", and challenged
the public to "not allow him to
do so".


PROSECUTORS in the tri-
al of the 2002 murder of Mario
Miller, son of Minister of Trade
and Industry Leslie Miller, told
the jury last week that although
the prosecution intends to
prove that Mario had been
involved in drug activity, seek-
ing to sell cocaine the day
before his death, there must


still be justice for his murder.
Attorney Bernard Turner,
who with Neil Brathwaite is
prosecuting the case, told the
jury of nine women and three
men that just because Mario
was involved in such activity
they themselves should not
decide that he got what he
deserved or that some form of
"street justice" was served.


THE island of New Provi-
dence recorded its third traffic
fatality for the year last week-
end. According to police
reports, on Saturday at around
1:45 pm a Chevy Lumina and
Nissan Sentra were involved in
an accident at Collins Avenue
and Fifth Terrace, Centreville.
**:**

RESPONDING to calls for
answers, a special Court of
Inquiry was appointed last
week to determine the circum-
stances which led to the break-
out of four inmates of Her
Majesty's Prison and the death.
of a prison officer.
+****

IN an effort to make them
more easily identifiable in the
event of another prison break,
uniforms and permanent wrist-
bands will be made mandatory,
for inmates of Her Majesty's,
Prison, Fox Hill.
Superintendent of Prisons Dr
Elliston Rahming said last week
that the escape of four inmates,
which cost the life of prison
guard Corporal Deon Bowles;
has given "new impetus to has-
ten the pace" of prison reform.;
*****

HITTING out at currf eia
Superintendent of Prisonscr:
Elliston Rahming,.for.merx
prison chief Edwin Culmer:,
denied that there were more;
than 20 breakouts when he was
in charge of Her Majesty's
Prison.
In an exclusive interview wit
The Tnbune last weegk,.ft.I


SEE page 3C


I WEEK IN REVIEW I


1- -104i Ice'


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2C, MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006









THErl TVINSIGHT J


The Windsors as a tourist
attraction

assau has so
much history,
so many oppor-
tunities, but
fails to capi-
talise on them.
The slave ruins at Clifton
have yet to be turned into any-
thing worthwhile, even though
there was a hullabaloo a few
years ago about what a great
asset they were.
Government House would,
indeed, be a great attraction if
it was properly packaged. The
Windsor connection is
undoubtedly a draw.
Nassauvian

TOO much talk and too little
action has always been a
Bahamian fault. However, if
we don't do something about
Nassati, its all-round shabbi-


FEEDBACK

ness and the general lack of
something to do, we will suf-
fer in the face of more
'switched on' competition.
JHH, Winton

YES, Government House
ought to be right at the centre
of a 'Colonial Nassau' package.
And, yes, the Windsors should
be right at the heart of the sto-
ry.
At the very least, GH could
become a small, self-support-
ing business, easing the drain
on the Treasury.
George Pullen


WHEN modern politicians
talk of "the history of the
Bahamas" they are actually.
referring to the period after
1967. That's because they are
so puny-minded that they can-
not think beyond island poli-
tics.
The fact is that the post-1967
era accounts for less than one-
tenth of this country's history
and I would suggest it's far
from being the most interesting
part.
The Lucayan indians were,
in themselves, a tremendously
interesting group, and lived in


insight


these islands for about 600
years that's twice as long as
the entire British colonial era.
The colonial era itself lasted
three centuries that's nearly
ten times as long as the so-
called "modern history" of the
Bahamas.
Taken as a whole, the
Lucayans and the British colo-
nial era were far more inter-
esting, and far better for the
Bahamas, than the squalid,
degrading era of Pindling and
his dreary, tenth-rate cohorts.
Or, indeed, anything that has
followed since.
Let's get things into per-
spective and focus more on the
period 900AD to 1967AD
instead of the last 39 years,
most of which have been noth-
ing to shout about.
-KEV, Palmdale

**** ******


T.


* PRISON Superintendent Elliston Rahming shows pictures of new prison uniforms to be
implemented.photo)
(FILE photo)


FROM page 2C

mer labelled Dr Rahming a
"political predator" and refuted
allegations made by the super-
intendent that there had been
24 escapes while he held the
office as acting superintendent
from 2000-2005.


THE body of a black male
believed to be in his thirties was
discovered in bushes near Born
Again Deliverance Church last
week with gunshot wounds to
the chest.
Police were summoned to the
scene on Independence Drive
after members of the commu-
nity stumbled onto the body.
.*!**

TEACHERS at C I Gibson
Senior High School staged a sit-
out last week after a student
allegedly beat up a teacher.
According to union officials,
teachers have given the admin-
istration until this week
Wednesday to implement a
number of security initiatives -
or face further sit-outs and
industrial action.


DNA experts have linked
Ricardo Miller, also known as
Tamiar Lee, to the murder of
Mario Miller through tested
blood samples collected from
the victim's vehicle, it was
reported last week.



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THE TRIBUNE:







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4C MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006


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ISSUES IDEAS


SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2006


Ir-JTEPIL TICI ILL ECDITcI


N MY OPINION
ARL HIAASEN


LATIN AMERICA


Tale of tragedy

-a car, abat,

some time to kill

W hat's a kid supposed to do
for giggles go to the mall?
Check out the skate park?
Hang out at the football game? '
Borrrring.
Come on, let's go stomp some bums.
Talk about fun!
Imagine the stimulating level of
discourse among the four troglodytes
as they cruised into downtown Fort
Lauderdale hunting for homeless to
pummel.
Hey, man, you wanna use the golf
club or the baseball bat?
Gimme the bat, dude. Sounds sweet
when it cracks their bones.
Those boys had a helluva night,
too. Killed one man and put two oth-
ers in the hospital
Unbeknown to the bat swingers,
one of the assaults was recorded by a
security camera. The tape subse-
quently was broadcast all over the
country, and arrests soon followed.
Now jailed as accused murderers
are Brian Hooks, age 18; Tommy
Daugherty, age 17; and Billy Ammons,
age 18. A fourth teen who supposedly
watched the revelry from an SUV has
not been charged or named by police.
South Florida's Plantation is where
I grew up, and nobody I knew drove
around looking for homeless persons
to bludgeon. We certainly had our
share of moronic bullies, but none
were that ambitiously crueL
In the pleasant subdivision of Plan-
tation Isles, where at least two of the
murder suspects live, the initial reac-
tion to the arrests predictably was one
of puzzlement. Neighbors said they
seemed like normal "redneck" kids,
incapable of such savagery.
*TURN TO HIAASEN



How D. C

has changed

in seven years

BY FRANK DAVIES
fran, d3avies,''co< net
ASHINGTON The call
from the White House was
urgent. Could I be there in
45 minutes for a "special briefing" on
national security, on deep back-
ground? Only five or six reporters
were invited.
I just finished a tour covering
Washington for seven years as a
Miami Herald corre-
spondent, but I never
became so jaded that
I could pass up an
Intimate briefing in
S the West Wing.
X Now, months
J later, I'm disclosing
two big secrets. Our
DAVIES briefer was Stephen
Hadley, the national security advisOr.
And. off the record, he leaned forward
and earnestly told us things that were,
well. exactly what President Bush was
saying publicly.
The talking points were familiar:
Iraq was making political progress,
U.S. soldiers were hunting down ter-
rorists, the training of Iraqi forces was
going well, the insurgents' lethal
attacks showed their desperation.
This was worth a special briefing?
It was more like a marketing cam-
paign. I know Iraq is not Vietnam. But
suddenly I had a flashback to my stu-
dent days, when government officials
assured the nation that everything
was going fine in Vietnam. I bet an
aide to Henry Kissinger briefed
reporters on how "Vietnamization"
was a success.
So it goes in official Washington,
where the reality of the mess in Iraq
rarely intrudes, public relations often
substitutes for policy and government
by secrecy grows stronger. Mean-
*TURN TO DAVIES


OPINION PAGE
SILVER ANNIVERSARY: In his first
inaugural speech, Ronald Reagan
outlined an agenda for reform while
stressing that Americans had the
capacity 'to do whatever needs to
be done to preserve this last and
greatest bastion of freedom


From


PATRICIA RINCON/AP
Antonio Navarro Wolff,
Colombia: Then: Led
M-19 group. Now: A
senator who seeks
the presidency.


to-
toPOLITICIANS



Ex-rebels in Latin America choose a new weapon the ballot box

- to drive the political systems they once tried to overthrow


BY TYLER BRIDGES
tbridges@MiamiHerald.com
LIMA One staged the dramatic kid-
napping of the U.S. ambassador to Brazil.
Two others were members of Uruguay's
notorious Tupamaro guerrillas. Another
belonged to a group that bombed pipe-
lines and electric pylons around Bolivia.
And now all are legitimate politicians
and even senior government officials,
carried by the left's increasing success at
the ballot box in Latin America into posi-
tions of power in the very government
systems they once fought to destroy.
Latin American specialists say the
trend does not present a threat to democ-
racy.
"The ex-guerrillas tend to be the most
consistently pragmatic and pro-demo-
cratic forces on the left," Oxford profes-
sor Timothy Power wrote in an e-mail.
"Those who have been arrested, exiled,
or tortured tend to value democracy and
civil liberties more than other leftists
who have not yet stuck their hand into
the fire of repression,"
Of course, not every former guerrilla
who stuck his or her hand into the fire of
repression has since run for Congress or
pledged fealty to the democratic system.
That is especially true of the Shining
Path, who engaged in terrorist attacks in
Peru beginning in 1980 before being deci-


mated after the capture of their leader in
1992.
But guerrillas who willingly laid down
their arms in the 1980s and 1990s have
generally made a smooth transition into
the democratic system. And the U.S. gov-
ernment has generally welcomed the
new role of the ex-guerrillas, except for
in a few cases.
Power noted that two former Brazil-
ian guerrillas, Jos6 Dirceu and Jose Gen-
oino, led the "pragmatic transformation"
of the once hard-line Workers Party in
the late 1990s that opened the way to the
election of President Luiz InAcio Lula da
Silva.
In Uruguay, former Tupamaro guer-
rillas from the 1960s and early 1970s now
hold two of the 13 Cabinet ministries
under leftist President Tabar6 VAzquez,
Selected in 2004. About 10 of the 130 mem-
bers of Congress are also former Tupa-
Smaros, said Luis Rosadilla, who is one of
them.
Alvaro Garcia, elected last month as
. the next vice president of Bolivia, was a
Leader in the Tipac Katari Guerrilla
Army that bombed 48 pipelines and elec-
tric pylons in the late 1980s and early
1990s. Garcia was captured in 1992, tor-
tured and spent five years in prison.
And Brazilian Congressman Fernando
Gabeira was part of a group that kid-


napped U.S. Ambassador Charles Elbrick
in 1969 to protest U.S.-backed military
rule. The group released Elbrick four
days later in exchange for the freedom of
15 political prisoners, one of whom was
Dirceu, who went on to become Lula's
chief advisor before resigning last year
amid a corruption scandal.
Gabeira has since repented for the
kidnapping, but that wasn't good enough;
for the United States, which has denied
his visa requests.
Gabeira said the fall of the Berlin Wall
in 1989 and contact with European Social,
Democrats convinced many guerrillas to
give up the armed struggle. If they,
remained committed to social;change,
then entering politics was the bes place
to go, he added. ,.
"It was important to understand tha4hc
socialism wasn't the answer and that youy
could use [taxes from] the profits of,capi-,,
talism to deal with the prQbler si',
Gabeira said by telephone from Brasilia,,:
He said living in exile in the Soviet
Union and seeing first-hand that it was
not a workers paradise also eliminated
his youthful illusions; "I learned you'
have to develop capitalism with social
responsibility."
Rosadilla, who was a 17-year-old stu-;
*TURN TO EX-GUERRILLAS


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LATIN AMERICA


Ex-armed rebels now shape nations through peaceful means


SOME FORMER REBELS WHO TURNED TO POLITICS


Fernando
Gabeira, Brazil:
Then: Part of
Oct. 8th
guerrilla
group that
kidnapped
U.S. Ambas-
sador Charles
Eldrick in
1969. Was
jailed for a
year, also
lived in exile.
Now: Green
Party
member of
Congress.


!Eduardo
Bonoml,
Uruguay:
Then:
Member of
Tupamaro
guerrillas.
Now:
Minister of
Labor and
Social
Security.


Shafik Handal, El
Salvador: Then: A
commander of
the Farabundo
Marti National
Liberation Front
guerrillas. FMLN
signed a peace
treaty with the
government in
1992. Now: A
Communist, he
was the losing
candidate in the
2004
presidential
campaign.


*EX-GUERRILLAS

dent and part-time baker
when he took up arms against
the Uruguayan government,
was later captured and spent
nine years in prison. He said
he couldn't have imagined in
those days that he would one
day be a member of the Con-
gress but that his goals remain
unchanged.
"I want better social justice
and a better distribution of
resources over the middle
term," Rosadilla said in a
phone call from Montevideo.
"I want a socialist system
over the long term."
CHANGES IN 1980s
Kenneth Roberts, a Cornell
University professor who
specializes in Latin America,
said the door for guerrillas
entering government began
opening with the wave of


democratization in the 1980s
that replaced military
regimes.
The process may be accel-
erating now, he said in an
e-mail, because the ex-guerril-
las "have worked their way up
to higher-level (and more
publicly visible) positions. In
other words, they have gone
from guerrillas to party activ-
ists or [nonprofit] workers to
congressional candidates and
party leaders and eventually
to ministers, etc. They paid
their dues [and] established
their democratic credentials."
That's true in the case of
Antonio Navarro Wolff, once
a commander of Colombia's
Cuban-backed M-19 group.
Navarro, who lost a leg to a
grenade attack, surrendered
after a negotiated peace
agreement and ran for presi-
dent in 1990, then served as
health minister, was elected


to the Colombian House, was
elected to the Senate and is
running for president again in
upcoming elections.
In fact, Jonathan Hartlyn, a
professor at the University of
North Carolina who special-
izes in Latin America, blames
non-guerrillas for the greatest
attacks on democracy in
recent years.
"Threats to democracy
have tended not to come from
former guerrillas but from
elected presidents who were
not former guerrillas (such as
Alberto Fujimori in Peru), or
from military conspirators
(Hugo Chavez himself in
1992) or business and military
conspirators (such as in the
aborted 2002 coup in Venezu-
ela)."
DIFFERENT FATES
Other ex-guerrillas who
tried to enter politics met a


different fate. Former M-19
commander Carlos Pizarro,
who ran for president after
laying down his weapon as
part of a peace pact with the
government, was fatally shot
in April 1990.
Then there's Nicaragua's
Daniel Ortega, a former San-
dinista guerrilla leader and
president who allied with for-
mer President Arnoldo
Alemin, convicted of massive
corruption, in an unsuccessful
effort last year to oust Presi-
dent Enrique Bolafios.
But other Sandinistas first
won representation in the
Congress in 1990 when Nica-
ragua elected a democratic
president and ended the San-
dinista revolution. Today, five
former Sandinista guerrillas
serve in the Congress, as well
as two former Contra guerril-
las who fought against the
Sandinista government, said


Xiomara Chamorro, political
editor of La Prensa.
In El Salvador, Shafick
Handal, the losing candidate
in the 2004 presidential elec-
tion, and about 15 of the 84
members of Congress are for-
mer members of the Fara-
bundo Marti National Libera-
tion Front, said Sigfrido
Reyes, who is one of the 15.
The FMLN waged a 12-year
guerrilla war ended by a 1992
peace pact. "I joined the
armed struggle because we
lacked democracy," Reyes
said by telephone from El Sal-
vador.
The latest ex-rebel to enter
government is Alvaro Garcia,
who took up arms against a
democratically elected gov-
ernment in Bolivia that he
believed excluded the coun-
try's poor and Indian major-
ity.
Since his 1997 release from


prison, Garcia has won wide-
spread respect as a sociology
professor and political com-
mentator.
He will be sworn into his
new job today, the day that
Evo Morales is inaugurated as
Bolivia's first Indian presi-
dent.
Despite his new path,
Garcia is not completely for-
swearing his past.
"I have never rejected the
violent path," Garcia said in a
telephone interview from La
Paz, "but it should be the
absolute last of all the options
because it's such a terrible
way to go. Going down that
road was part of the matura-
tion process, part of the learn-
ing process. I will be a better
leader as a result."

Herald researcher Jenny
Gonzdlez in Bogotd contrib-
uted to this report.


*- aui 01


"Ie


&


Gustavo
Petro,
Colombia:
Then: A
mid-level
member
of M-19
guerrilla
group.
Now: A
member
of
Congress.


I I I


ow 1m







THE MIAMI HERALD MiamiHerald.com INTERNATION T ............... JANUARY 2


BY ED FEULNER
staff@heritage.org

"It is time to check and reverse the
growth of government, which shows
signs of having grown beyond the
consent of the gov-
erned."
p hat could be a --.-
S clip from one
of today's talk-ra-
dio shows. After
all, federal spend-
ing has jumped 33 FEULNER
percent since President Bush took
office. Washington now spends
nearly $22,000 per household, the
most since World War II. Govern-
ment is doing so much "for" us, it's
difficult to keep track of everything
it's doing "to" us.
But the quote above actually
comes from Ronald Reagan's first
inaugural address on Jan. 20, 1981.
Reading that speech again 25 years
later an exercise that would ben-
efit many conservative policymak-
ers today shows how far our
country has come since then, and
how far we still have to go.
"It is no coincidence that our


present troubles parallel and are
proportionate to the intervention
and intrusion in our lives that result
from unnecessary and excessive
growth of government," Reagan
told his countrymen back then.
Those "troubles" included high
unemployment, gas lines and the
Iranian hostage crisis. His prede-
cessor's attempts to respond to
those troubles had failed. Indeed, in
his famous "malaise" speech in
1979, President Carter basically told
the American people to get used to
a lower standard of living.
Reagan chose a different route:
Cut taxes to generate economic
growth. Stabilize the value of the
dollar to ease inflation. Trim federal
spending. Ease regulation.
Getting government out of the
way allowed our economy to flour-
ish. GDP growth averaged 3.2 per-
cent a year in the 1980s. Unemploy-
ment dropped and, with inflation
under control, so did interest rates.
Reaganomics produced a genuine
economic miracle, and we're still
enjoying its effects to this day.
Overseas, too, Reagan launched
a new era. "As we renew ourselves
here in our own land, we will be


"Copyrighted


Syndicated C

Available from Commerci
%W W -A


*DAVIES
while, the routine exchange of
money for influence a form of
legal corruption may dwarf
what lobbyist Jack Abramoff did.
When I first came to Washing-
ton, I watched large pharmaceuti-
cal companies pressure Congress
into extending expiring patents for
some of their most popular drugs
beyond the normal time frame. The
drug-makers made more money,
and consumers had to wait longer
for lower-cost generic medica-
tions.
In the last seven years, the phar-
maceuticals and health products
industries spent $800 million on
lobbying and campaign contribu-
tions, according to the Center fot
Public Integrity.
Is there any wonder why there
is such consternation over the new
Medicare drug benefit, with recipi-
ents angry and confused while
drug companies quietly enjoy huge
profits and an absence of any price
controls?
BIGGEST STORY
Of course, the biggest story in
years in Washington has been the
9/11 attacks, the war on terrorism
and the invasion of Iraq. These
events brought out some of the
best and worst in government.
I have met dedicated FBI agents,
military officers and ex-CIA offi-
cials who exemplify the ideals of
public service. One who stands out
is Kevin Shaeffer, a Navy officer
badly burned in the attack on the
Pentagon who served on the 9/11
Commission, investigating the
emergency response to the terror-
ist assaults.
At Ground Zero, where the
World Trade Towers fell, I talked
to hardened construction workers
at the end of long shifts who almost
broke down after clearing debris


and finding body parts. They saw it
as sacred work. A nurse, Win
Burge, told me she used her two
weeks of vacation serving food for
the Salvation Army at the site.
I also saw a government that
moved fitfully, sometimes desper-
ately, to counter a terrorist threat
that took top officials by surprise.
Fateful decisions were made in
those chaotic months after 9/11 that
we will live with for years, such as
withholding Geneva Convention
protection from prisoners and
opening the Guantinamo prison
camp.

Will the media shy away
from a complicated,
politically charged issue?

Even the most ruthless Viet
Cong guerrillas, who often
attacked civilians in South Viet-
nam, were given POW status,
mainly to ensure that they were
treated humanely. Not so al Qaeda
and Taliban members caught in the
war on terrorism.
In a January 2002 memo,
Alberto Gonzales, then the White
House counsel, advised Bush that
Geneva protections should not
apply in this new war, even though
that "could undermine U.S. mili-
tary culture which emphasizes
maintaining the highest standards
of conduct in combat."
Sadly, as we saw in Afghanistan,
Iraq and Guantinamo, that's just
what happened, aided by secret
memos that justified abusive treat-
ment and were repudiated only
after they were leaked.
A group of current and retired
military officers I got to know,
including two recent U.S. Navy
judge advocate generals, fought
this radical departure from law and
tradition. But they were ignored by


OPINION
JESUS DIAZ JR., PUBLISHER I TOM FIEDLER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR I JOE OGLESBY, EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR


- 25years later


seen as having greater strength
throughout the world. We will
again be the exemplar of freedom
and a beacon of hope for those who
do not now have freedom," he
announced.
Renewal was especially impor-
tant, since earlier that day Iran had
finally released the 52 Americans it
had held hostage for 444 days.
American pride was at a low ebb.
But Reagan rebuilt our military,
allowing Americans to regain our
confidence and allowing the United
States to remain the beacon of
democracy.
Of course, Reagan's reforms
weren't always enacted. "It is my
intention to curb the size and influ-
ence of the federal establishment
and to demand recognition of the
distinction between the powers
granted to the federal government
and those reserved to the states or
to the people," Reagan added in his
inaugural
Unfortunately, this worthy goal
was thwarted. As American afflu-
ence grew, we also allowed our
government to grow one reason
it spends so much and promises
even more than it can ever afford.


Reagan was always optimistic,
though, as we should be today. "The
economic ills we suffer have come
upon us over several decades," he
said. "They will not go away in
days, weeks, or months but they
will go away. They will go away
because we, as Americans, have the
capacity now, as we have had in the
past, to do whatever needs to be
done to preserve this last and great-
est bastion of freedom."
Some of the challenges we face
today are different than the ones
Reagan faced in 1981. Today, for
example, we have to solve illegal
immigration and fix unsustainable
programs such as Medicare and
Social Security. Some, though, are
all too familiar, such as federal
overspending, which was "mortgag-
ing our future," Reagan said.
But we'll solve those problems,
just as we solved the problems of
unemployment, inflation and mal-
aise in Reagan's time. Because, as he
would remind us 25 years after he
took office: We're Americans. Solv-
ing problems is what we do.

Ed Feulner is president of The
Heritage Foundation.


Material '


onl tent Provi

al News Provi



ijAAL


the Bush administration.
When the abuse of detainees is
examined years from now, and
"people have looked at it from
every angle, we are going to be
ashamed of what we allowed to
happen," said Larry Wilkerson, a
retired Army colonel who was Sec-
retary of State Colin Powell's chief
of staff.
"I understand the radical change
in the nature of our enemy, but that
doesn't mean we make a radical
change in the nature of America,"
he said last fall. "But that's what we
did, and we did it in private."
Now we know another momen-
tous decision made in secret a
vast surveillance program
designed to catch terrorists that
also monitored U.S. citizens. It was
created without the approval of a
special court set up for that task or
by Congress.
PRESIDENT BUSH
The president, who bears
responsibility for all this, talks
about protecting his nation with
heartfelt passion. As a participant
in two group interviews with Bush,
I found him charming and testy,
superficial and patronizing.
And when I review the tran-
script of the interview from one
year ago, I have to conclude that he
was also misleading to keep a
secret.
It was an undeniable rush to be
sitting directly across from the
president, one of 15 reporters
invited to the White House on the
eve of his second term. I was trying
to ask him about his policies on
detention, interrogation and tor-
ture. My tape recorder, picked up
his words and something else -
the loud, steady drumming of his
fingers on the table. His impatience
was palpable.
The answers were so short, I
was able to ask a couple of follow-


d I "


ders"
I1


ups. One question was almost an
afterthought. Gonzales was about
to be confirmed as attorney gen-
eral. He had supported a very
expansive view of executive power
- that the commander in chief,
without oversight, could override
laws and treaties in a national secu-
rity emergency. In effect, Congress
and the courts would be kept in the
dark during wartime. Did Bush
agree?
Bush: "I need to talk to Al, to
understand where he is coming
from. He wouldn't have said it
unless he believed it."
Question: "But that isn't some-
thing you discussed as an option?"
Bush: "No, that's the short
answer."
Now we know that's the general
theory Bush and Gonzales used to
defend the secret National Security
Agency monitoring in 2002. And
they argue that the urgency to
bypass the law has not expired,
that they have the authority four
years later in a war on terror that
may never end.
Such a stunning assertion of
executive power might have
sparked a constitutional crisis in
another Washington at another
time. I'm not sure that will happen
in this Washington, where those
who question such authority are
attacked for being soft on terror-
ism. Will Congress continue to be
AWOL on these wartime issues?
Will courts avoid a challenge to
presidential authority? Will the
media with their short attention
span shy away from a complicated,
politically charged issue?
I hope not. To paraphrase Larry
Wilkerson, if we don't have this
debate, we should be ashamed.
Frank Davies was a Miami Her-
ald reporter and editor for 29 years.
He is now a freelancer living in
Northern Virginia.


SAMES L KNIGHT (1909-1991)


JOHN S. KNIGHT (1894-1981)


POLITICS


Surely the suspects' lawyers air
out trolling for sympathetic psy-
chologists who'll tflify as to the;
weak and troubled' nature of their
impressionable yot.o clients. :
One thing is s~ igly eliar:-
For those kids, that giddy rampage'
wasn't just a spontaneous eruption
of hate. It was premeditated and
provisioned and choreographed. -
It was entertainment.


Reagan's legacy


HOMELESS MURDER



Tragic tale


of car, bat,


time to kill

*HIAASEN

As the days passed, though, for-
mer classmates of Hooks and
Daugherty at South Plantation
High began to speak more openly.
One said it was no secret that there
were groups "who beat up bums on
the weekend" for sport.
"I don't think they ever intended
to kill anybody," Garrett Hann told
a Miami Herald reporter.
Another student, James Upp,
said that pounding on homeless
people was "the thing to do" for a
certain circle of kids. In a touch of
morbid irony, Upp recalled that
Daugherty once shared a bag of
chips at Esplanade Park with Nor-
ris Gaynor, the man he's now
charged with killing.
We know what happens nxt.
Each of the boys will blame the oti-
ers for the murder while mmiiii~-
ing his own role to that of horrified'
bystander. Hoping to save his own
skin, Ammons already gave a state-
ment to police that implicated his'
pals. He also smoothly managed to
implicate himself, allegedly admit-,
ting to shooting Gaynor with a
paintball gun during the fatal
attack.
It's impossible to guess what, if
any, cognitive activity was occur-
ing in the brains of these knuckle-
heads that night. The trials are
likely to be more dispiriting than
revelatory.
SERIES OF KILLINGS
We know already why this awful
thing happened. Somebody was
bored and mean-spirited and none
too bright, which is always a bad
combination.
Think about it. How pathetically
empty does your life have to be if
the highlight is sneaking out with
your buddies to torment the weak,
the sick and the mentally ill?
According to the National Coali-
tion for the Homeless, there were
105 attacks on street people in
2004, including 25 homicides. Most
of the suspects were young men
between 16 and 25 years old. One of
the worst series of attacks on the
homeless took place in downtown
Denver during the fall of 1999.
Seven men were murdered in sepa-
rate incidents, with few clues.
Eventually three suspects,
including a 16-year-old boy, were
arrested and successfully prose-
cuted for one of the killings and for
the brutal beating of a musician.
But unlike the Fort Lauderdale,
case, the Denver suspects weren't:
so-called good kids from the sub-'
urbs. According to trial testimony,
they were part of a gang of young
men who lived on the streets and
had clashed on occasion with at
least one of their victims.
The goons from Plantation had
no grudges against those they alleg-'
edly attacked. What they had,
police say, was a car, some baseball
timber and some time to kill.

Each boy will blame the
others while minimizing
his own role to that of
horrified bystander.

Are teenaged marauders symp-
tomatic of a cynical, morally numb
generation that has lost its way? It's
an explanation that' appeals, to
those who think Ameriiacondig
apart at the seams. .. ..:.
The truth isn't so cpsmic.
Among young maesof a aet*"
age are always a3ialit few -Wo
behave shockingly, horribly, in;
ways unfathomable reven to those
closest to them. r.mA U1 - ti
It's been goidi' nsinc' :thie
beginning of mankiL lmnted ~.
poetry, plays an lieatsre. (
defense attorney ineuoi e iqh
youthful defend ~ the Denit~e
case gamely involeE William G ot
ding's Lord of th e thouighf't
failed to soften thi
What happened ownfown:
Fort Lauderdale iS to wato l
on that jerky snip5 hbfyide6tape.


Fl -


COVERING WASHINGTON



Things have changed a lot in seven years


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PAGE 100, MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006 17'HE TRIBUNE


INS IGH


Time


is


running


out


for


Nassau's


prison


FROM page 1C

Like Mr Mitchell, Dr Rah-
ming believes in restorative jus-
tice, with an emphasis on reha-
bilitation. In this way, he
hoped, prisoners would be rein-
troduced to society with the
ability and inclination to make
better lives for themselves.
Mr Mitchell alleged that Fox
Hill in the pre-Rahming era
exacerbated prisoners' prob-
lems. Many inmates emerged
as resentful misfits with anti-
authoritarian mindsets who
were programmed to offend
again. Nothing, he said, pre-
pared them for re-entry into
life outside the prison walls.
INSIGHT added, signifi-
cantly, at the time: "He
believes a full inquiry into the
prison, its physical shortcom-
ings and the prevailing ethos is
long overdue." Indeed it was.
Ultimately, the reign of
superintendent Edwin Culmer,
who had struggled to the top
after working at the prison as


Our Members:


man and boy, was brought to
an abrupt end by a government
intent on applying theory to a
host of practical problems.
Inevitably, politics was said to
be at the root of it, a belief sup-
ported to some extent by last
week's events in the House of
Assembly, and by the angry
comments of Mr Culmer him-
self.
Admirers
To his admirers, however, Dr
Rahming was brought in to add
a human element to an insti-
tution frequently compared
with the very worst of its kind,
with its chronic overcrowding
and reputation for callousness
and corruption among some
officers. The new philosophy
was based on "brain over
brawn", an academic approach
to prison reform, they said.
Mr Culmer the grassroots
veteran who was both respect-
ed and feared was replaced
by someone whose good inten-


tions were beyond question,
but whose knowledge of the
harsh reality of prison admin-
istration was considered piti-
fully inadequate by many staff.
It was a classic case of home-
grown pragmatist being
usurped by a college-trained
idealist, according to Dr Rah-
ming's detractors. And, in their
eyes, it inevitably led to trou-
ble, with several staff obstinate
in their opposition to the new
regime.
When a bucket of excrement
was thrown over a prison offi-
cial an act of flagrant provo-
cation inmates felt there was
no longer a basis of respect on
which to build. Insiders claim it
has been downhill all the way
ever since, an allegation strong-
ly denied by Dr Rahming him-
self, who says the prison is now
making real progress, despite
last week's debacle.
If Mr Culmer faced
internecine warfare between
senior staff, Dr Rahming
encountered difficulties of a


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Our objectives include a commitment to
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consumers about the benefits of general
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A. Scon Fitzgerald Tnsiuance Brvi'kkel s & Ag'es Ltd.
Algoma Adjusters tBahamas. ILnd.
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General Brokei s & Agenti Ltd.
Insurance Company of the Bahama- Ltd.t.
Insurance MNanagt.memni (Bah:;mais'] LTiJ.
3. S. Johnson & Comnpany, Itd.
K. A. P. Insurance Age:nt & Brkcrs LTd.
Moseley Biumsiide I'nsurancc- .'\ci.cy JtL.
Nassau 'l'ndcr\ r-iters C' lC AlbA1, \ h'l,',lii i \ci'n.\ c _%IA
Orry Sands. & Co. Ltd.
RoyalSta.r Assurance 'Ld.
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Sunshine Insurance (Agents '& B~3ke t) LTd.


#8 Royal Palm Plaza. Mackey Street 1 P.O. Box N-6BO I Tdlephone 1424 394b6 15 I ~ ei ~ (N 1446


different kind, with some offi-
cers seriously at odds with a
boss they regarded as an over-
paid interloper. An inmate's
relative even suggested last
week that the jailbreak was a
way of, showing contempt for
the new regime.
At the heart of the plot were
some of Nassau's worst crimi-
nals, men whose dangerous
deeds rendered them ineligible
for some of the restorative
treatment Dr Rahming pre-
cribed.
Barry Parcoi the rapist was
said to be the prime conspira-
tor. He is acknowledged to be
one of the least likeable of Fox
Hill's most feral hardmen.
Priest killer Neil Brown joined
in, as did murderer Forrester
Bowe and armed robber Corey
Hepburn. All were considered
vile and vicious and none,
according to insiders, was per-
mitted the kind of self-
improvement programmes
offered to more trusted pris-
oners.
Apart from a 30-minute dai-
ly exercise session, maximum
security prisoners face a 24/7
lockdown. The question
inevitably arises: how did they
hatch last week's conspiracy?
And how did they co-ordinate
the operation without some
kind of official co-operation?
Prison guard Deon Bowles, a
father of three, was knifed to
death in the ensuing melee as
this foursome cut through the
bars of their cells, acquired a
set of keys, and proceeded to
breach Fox Hill's distinctly
shaky security screen.
Brown died like a dog as he
tried to make his getaway, col-
lapsing in the bush with a single
bullet wound, Bowe and Parcoi
were recaptured, and Hepburn
managed to flee.
At the end of it all, those
responsible for running Fox
Hill were left wringing their
hands and agonising over what
has to be considered a major
calamity which, had proper
checks been carried out, could
have been averted.
Meanwhile, a source close to
one prisoner's family said Par-
coi was given a brutal beating
on his return to Fox Hill, where
biblical notions of retribution
still tend to hold sway, as frus-
trated officers reflected on the


Powe






S l
ARi .IL-'?










w '


* PRISON SUPERINTENDENT ELLISTON RAHMING.
(FILE photo)


horrors of what might have
been.
Had the full plot succeeded,
with the deaths of more guards
and a wide-scale breakout, a
story which remained primari-
ly local in appeal would have
mushroomed into an interna-
tional newsbreak.
The damage to the Bahamas'
tourism business could have
been incalculable. A country
already noted for rising crime
would have suffered further as
a result of a catastrophic secu-
rity lapse.
Neglect
Like Nassau International
Airport, itself the victim of
chronic neglect, Fox Hill Prison
teeters right on the edge of a
deep chasm. Left untreated,
the plunge could be sudden,
dramatic and extremely
destructive, as ex-prisoner
Stephen Seymour predicted
during a radio debate last
week.
Warning that trouble lies
ahead at Fox Hill if things go
on as they are, Mr Seymour
not only said "an element"
there would never work along-
side Dr Rahming, but that
"blood is going to flow" which
will land on the heads of those


leaders "who are listening to
nobody"
This was a frighteningly
familiar prediction, especially
to readers of this newspaper.
In 2001, INSIGHT said: "As
'things stand, rage is a major
concern among inmates, the
Spent-up anger born of frustra-
tion. It leads to violence
between prisoners, an atmos;
phere of hostility in which
grievances, real and imagined,
ferment to the detriment of all,
It also shows in their attitude to
'screws' the prison officers
who control their daily lives.";
It quoted Mr Mitchell as say-
ing: "There are fellows in therd
right now who would do an
officer in if they had the oppor-
tunity to do it. Politicians
should address the issue of the
prison before it's too late."
His words echoed through
Fox Hill Prison last week as
Parcoi, Brown, Bowe and Hep-
burn set off the prison sirens
in an escape bid which left a
guard dying in a pool of his
own blood. It's already too late
for Corporal Deon Bowles. FOr
Fox Hill Prison itself, time is
running desperately short. ,
What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmar-
quis@tribunemedia.net


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PAGE 1 OC, MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2006


I


*f-E TRIBUNE


96LP~., "' ~.~ .~F
~j~i)




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