Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00295
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: January 16, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00295
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text







"SATISFY YOUR
CRAVING"


HIGH 77F
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" SUNNY AND
S. PLEASANT


The


Tribune


Volume: 102 No.46


MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2006


PRICE 750


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Project accused of Hard workafterigh wins


being a 'clean-up'

without tackling


social ills
* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Urban Renewal project
is a failure because it is used as
a mere "clean up" campaign
instead of addressing the major
social ills plaguing the country.
In an interview yesterday,
Clever Duncombe, the founder
of Bahamian Fathers for Chil-
dren Everywhere (BFFCE),
said that while government
praises the initiative, which was
designed to foster a stronger
community by forging ties with
urban areas, police and various
government departments, it vir-
tually ignores 70 per cent of the
Bahamian population.
According to the activist,
recent studies suggest that 70
per cent of Bahamians are born
outside the traditional family
structure.
Mr Duncombe said that addi-
tional statistics suggest that chil-
dren born to single parents are
100-200 per cent more likely to
develop behavioral problems,
and were 50 per cent more like-
ly to have learning problems.
In addition, he said, statistics


suggest that children of single
parents tended to have lower
grades and had more difficulty
responding to their peers. Girls
in these situations were also
more likely to become promis-
cuous and get pregnant.
He claimed that the Urban
Renewal project has done noth-
ing to combat the challenges
these statistics suggest.
"I find it hypocritical to sug-
gest that it has been a success,"
he said.
He claimed that rather than
use the project as a way to com-
bat these issues, the government
instead uses it as a "clean up
campaign.
"The grassroots areas still
have pressing concerns, but for
whatever reasons the govern-
ment chooses to ignore it."
He added that BFFCI is call-
ing for a clear concise report
from the government regarding
the urban renewal project.
"Children still face child
abuse, old people are still chal-
lenged by the $200 they
receive a month in pensions,
SEE page 12


Woman dies during flight


A FEMALE passenger died
onboard a charter flight from
Cape Haitian, Haiti, to the
Bahamas yesterday.
According to ZNS, the
woman suffered physical dis-
tress during the flight.
Passengers reported that the
woman was having a heart


attack. When her vital signs
were checked it was discovered
that she had no pulse.
A stop was made in Great
Inagua where the woman was
pronounced dead.
The woman's body was later
transferred to New Providence
for an autopsy.


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* WORKERS at the Sandals resort in Cable Beach had their hands full removing sand yester-
day morning after high winds passed through the area
(Photo: Felipi Major/Tribune staff)

Body of missing man is found

after hotel fire on Bimini


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE BODY of the son of
the owners of Bimini's Com-
pleat Angler hotel, which was
burned to the ground in the
early hours of Friday, has been
found.
The charred remains of
Julian Brown, 60, were discov-
ered in the basement of the
gutted hotel at 5.15pm yester-


day by Inspector Floyd Bastian
of Grand Bahama and a group
of civilian volunteers.
Following Friday's blaze
which destroyed the world-
famous hotel and its Ernest
Hemingway Museum, a spe-
cial team made up of Grand
Bahama fire personnel and
CDU officers began the task
of sifting through the debris,
attempting to determine if Mr
Brown became the victim of


Friday morning's blaze.
Although Mr Brown was
last seen by the Angler's only
guest at the time, Nicholas
Rademaker, inside the build-
ing fighting off the flames,
Biminites remained hopeful
that he had somehow made it
out.
.Mr Rademaker said that Mr
Brown a former Olympian
SEE page 12


Multiple

stabbing

leaves


woman in

hospital

* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT A 35-year-old
woman, who was stabbed sev-
eral times at her home on Sun-
day, is detained in serious con-
dition at Rand Memorial Hos-
pital.
Alaria Elizabeth Dawkins
Taylor, who is separated from
her husband, was attacked
sometime around 10am at her
home on Scott Avenue.
Grand Bahama Police have
arrested a 38-year-old man for
questioning in connection with
the stabbing.
According Chief Superinten-
dent Basil Rahming, police
received information of a stab-
bing at No 6 Scott Avenue
around 10.30am Sunday.
When police arrived at the
scene, they found Ms Taylor
SEE page 12

Tourism

award for

veteran

hotelier
* By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
VETERAN hotelier George
Myers received the coveted
Clement T Maynard Lifetime
Achievement Award at the
Ministry of Tourism's Cacique,
Awards this weekend.
The Caique Awards culmi-
nated a successful week for the
Ministry, after launching
National Tourism Week, and
engaging in the third national
Tourism Conference.
He was chosen by a blue rib-
bon panel of industry experts,
who decided that his dedication
to enriching his community and
improving his industry is stel-
lar.
Mr Myers has played an inte-
gral role in the success of the
Bahamas and Caribbean
tourism industry for more than
SEE page 12


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2. MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2006


LOCLNW


o In brief


37 illegal

immigrants

captured
LONG ISLAND police cap-
tured a group of 37 illegal immi-
grants over the weekend.
The group was discovered on
Cabbage Beach at 11.30am Satur-
day.
"It is believed that they were
dropped off at that spot just a few
hours before by boat. They were
dehydrated, but otherwise okay,"
press liaison officer Inspector Wal-
ter Evans said.
The 37 immigrants, 33 men and
four women, were turned over to
customs and immigration officials
and have been flown to New Prov-
idence for further processing.




---- ---


Call for legislation to





protect rights of the child


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
A LOCAL organisation that advo-
cates the rights of the father is calling for
the government to enact legislation to
protect the rights of the child.
Clever Duncombe, the founder of
Bahamian Fathers For Children Every-
where (BFFCE), yesterday called on
Social Services Minister Melanie Griffin,
Foreign Affairs Minister Fed Mitchell
and Attorney General Alfred Sears to
subscribe to the Convention on the
Rights of the Child, legislation he said


the country subscribes to as a member of
the United Nations, but has yet to pass it
into law in the Bahamas.

Convention
Under the convention, children would
not be discriminated against, children
would have a right to a name and nation-
ality and birth and, as far as possible, to
know their parents and be cared for
them. The convention also says that the
child has the right to maintain contact
with both parents if separated from one


or both of them. Under the convention,
parents have joint primary responsibili-
ty for raising the child.
The best interest of the child would
also be taken into account in every cir-
cumstance.
.Mr Duncombe said that although the-
government formed a committee to
research the matter in 2004, to date no
apparent progress has been made public.
He added that Mrs Griffin in her PLP
convention last year hinted that the leg-
islation would be passed.
"We are looking at it as a delaying
tactic, because how can the government


bring this legislation to parliament with-
out at least one town meeting to see
what the people want." :
He claimed that hundreds of thou?,
sands of children throughout the world
are lost because of discriminatory laws;
the convention would eliminate.
"I believe this is genocide," he said.,
He explained that the convention
would provide benefits and rights to the
70 per cent of the population born out of
wedlock who are not protected.
"This is a serious issue," he added.'
"This convention is critical for social
reform."


Av


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
ailable from Commercial News Providers"






-






W.
-


Man assists in


armed robbery


investigations


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
FREEPORT A man tak-
en into custody on Sunday is
now assisting Grand Bahama
Police in their investigations
into an armed robbery at
Eight Mile Rock. Police are
still looking for a second man.
According to reports, some-
time around 8pm on Friday
two masked men, armed with
handguns, entered the Texaco
Service Station at Bartlette
Hill, Eight Mile Rock.
The gunmen robbed the
establishment of an undeter-
mined amount of cash.
After the robbery, the cul-
prits fired two shots at the
building while fleeing the
scene on foot. No one was
injured in the shooting.
Chief Supt Basil Rahming
said the suspects were wearing
dark coloured clothing. One


suspect was described as being
tall and the other short.
Acting on a tip from the
public,.a team of officers went
to a house at Jack Smith Cor-
ner at Hanna Hill, Eight Mile
Rock, sometime around 3am
on Sunday.
Police arrested a 22-year-
old man, suspected of arped
robbery. While conducting a
search of the suspect, police
also discovered 46 packets of
suspected cocaine in a clear
plastic bag under his clotHiing.
Police are continuing their
investigations into the matter.
THREE ARRESTED IN
DOMESTIC DISPUTE
BIMINI Police have arrest-
ed three persons in connec-
tion with a domestic dispute
at an apartment on South
Bimini.
According to reports, some-
time around 6.15pm on Fri-
day police received a call
about the domestic distur-.
bance at No 4 Noah's Apart-
ment, where a man was seen
brandishing a shotgun.
Police at North Bimini fer-
ried over to South Bimini,
where they arrested a 26-year-
old Freeport woman, a
31-year-old Jamaican man
and a 23-year-old-man from
Nassau.
They also confiscated a 12
gauge shotgun containing sev-
en live cartridges. The sus-
pects are to be charged in the
Magistrate's Court on Mon-
day.


Police move to assure public on Arawak Cay


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
POLICE officers want to assure the public that
"knife wielding youths" are not rampant at Arawak
Cay.
Last week, The Tribune reported that a group of
tourists were held up and robbed by knife-wielding
youths.
The report quoted witnesses who said the attack
happened right outside the Arawak Cay Police
Station in broad daylight.
Police were urged to tighten security after the
incident.

Statement
However yesterday, ASP Chris Rahming, officer
in charge of Nassau Street police station, issued a
statement, which he said he hoped would allay
the public's fears that groups of individuals were
attacking visitors to the popular hangout.
According to Mr Rahming, while an incident
did happen, it did not happen in front of Arawak
Cay, but rather happened in the Long Wharf area.


He explained that the incident was an attempt-
ed armed robbery of a Florida couple, who had just
visited the Ardastra Gardens and were returning to
their cruise ship along the Wharf.
He said that the woman noticed a "young black
man" walking behind her when the attempt
occurred.
According to the reports the couple gave police,
the young man attempted to rob the woman of
her handbag, but was spotted by the woman's hus-
band, who tackled him to the ground.
The husband told police that the young man
then pulled out a knife and demanded that he be
let go. A struggle followed and the husband sus-
tained several cuts.
The husband said that when he saw another
young male approaching -whom he thought he
had seen with the attacker earlier, he let him up.
It was then that the suspect dropped the knife
and ran off in the direction of the second man.
The couple were escorted to the hospital and the
husband's superficial cuts were treated. They then
went back to their cruise ship.
Mr Rahming said police do not consider the
man who observed the incident to be involved.
However, police investigations continue.


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
FREEPORT A Grand
Bahama resident is strongly
opposed to foreign whole-
salers operating rental booths
at national festivals and
events on the island.
Freeport resident Brad
Roberts said he believes it is
unfair for foreign entities to
compete with small Bahami-
an..vendors at junkanoo
parades and other cultural
events.
He claims that a Chinese
wholesale store occupied one
oft40 booths at the New
Year's Junkanoo Parade in


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Freeport.
"I think it is unfair for for-
eign wholesalers to be in
direct competition with the
small man, especially at a
national cultural festival such
as junkanoo," Mr Roberts
said.

Denied
Grand Bahama Junkanoo
Committee Chairman Derek
King denied that any of the
booths were--rented to for-
eigners at this year's parade.
"We do not rent stalls to
foreigners or wholesale enti-
ties, and the GBJC records
reflect that all booths were
rented to Bahamians," he
said.
Mr Roberts, however,
claimed that the Chinese enti-
ty sold everything from bicy-
cles, handbags, toys and nov-
elty items at booth 19.
The Committee initially
offered booth space at $300,
which was later increased to
$350 following the hurricane
in October.


FR3INI LAW SERIES


Mr King said that only 40
booths were rented this year
instead of the usual 50. ',
He explained that once
booths would have been reht-
ed to Bahamians it is out of
the committee's hands as to
who a person chooses to put
in their booth.
Mr Roberts claims that
nowadays there are more for-
eigners operating booths,at
parades and cultural events
in Grand Bahama.
"This-should not be
allowed to happen and I feel
that more vigilance needs to
be carried out by parade
organizers to ensure that
Bahamians are given the first
opportunity for booths as
they prepare for the Junior
Junkanoo on January 21," he
said.

Calling

Mr Roberts is calling pn
Youth, Sports and Culture
Minister Neville Wisdom to
look into the matter.
"Please help the poor peo-
ple here in Grand Bahama as
we are at a serious crossroads
and have lost so much in
recent times. Please don' take
junkanoo from the people
who really need it.
"We are a long way from
recovery, and the future here
remains very bleak so
we need help and hope," he
said.


Grand Bahama resident speaks out over

'foreign wholesalers' at national events


kI q 4

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I_







MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2006, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALNW


o In brief


Three men

injured in

armed

robbery

POLICE are investigating
an armed robbery turned
shooting in Fox Hill.
Two men, dressed in white
jackets with hoods and
armed with handguns,
entered the Da Bing club on
Fox Hill Road at 11pm on
Friday.
They robbed the club of a
small amount of cash and
while making their exit, fired
several shots.
Of the six patrons in the
club at the time, three men
sustained minor injuries as a
result of the shots fired.
All three were rushed to
hospital, treated for their
injuries and later discharged.
Although police have not
yet been able to establish the
identities of the two men, it
is believed that they are 24
and 28 years old respective-
ly.
"Also from witness reports
we understand that one was
short and one was tall," press
liaison officer Inspector Wal-
ter Evans said yesterday.
Investigations into the
matter continue.









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"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


seajd


*
mj


a -


Ingraham: policies of FNM resulted




in full employment for Exuma


* FNM Leader
Hubert Ingraham


EXUMA is the fourth largest
employment centre in the Bahamas
due to the efforts of the former gov-
ernment and in spite of the lack of
vision on part of the PLP, FNM leader
Hubert Ingraham said at the party's
rally in George Town.
Addressing a crowd of hundreds on
Friday night, Mr Ingraham said that
before two terms of FNM government,
"many, many Exumians had to leave
this island, their families and their
communities to make a living."
"That's changed now. Exumians
who left can come back now to be
employed or to go into their own busi-
nesses taking advantage of all the spin-
off opportunities being generated in
your booming economy," he said.
Mr Ingraham said that statistics
show that Exuma had 1,495 employed
persons registered with National Insur-
ance in 2001.
"Today, there are some 2,657 NIB
contributors living and working in
Exuma. The number of employers has
gone from 183 to 281 and the number
of self-employed persons increased
from 139 to 221 over the same period.
NIB contributions income increased
from $827,915 in 2001 to $2,459,395
last year, 2005. We, the FNM, caused
that," he said.
The policies of the FNM, said Mr


Party leader speaks at


rally in George Town


Ingraham, have resulted in' full
employment for Exuma and today
continue to deliver new and expanded
investments and jobs for Exuma and
its Cays.

Investment
Among these policies to create job
opportunities, were the advancement
of small, eco-friendly developments
throughout the Exuma Cays, as well as
residential and vacation home devel-
opments.such as February Point and
Grand Isle with the most significant
investment for Exuma having proven
to be the Four Seasons at Emerald
Bay, Mr Ingraham said.
The smaller hotels and resorts, in
particular, the FNM leader added,
benefited from customs duty conces-
sions made available to them under
the Hotels Encouragement Act and
the Family Island Development Act.


"(The PLP) let the Family Island
Development Act die," he said.
Mr Ingraham criticised the current
government for taking too long to
address some of the most pressing
issues faced by Exuma.
"How much longer do you think it
will take this government to deal with
expanded and upgraded infrastructure
and public services forecast and
planned for during the development
stages of the Four Seasons Resort?
"I'm thinking about your police sta-
tion and police manpower. I'm refer-
ring to your docking facilities. I'm
thinking about the increased traffic on
your roads and congestion in George
Town. What is this government doing
to address these matters now?" he
asked.
Mr Ingraham said that when its
comes to the PLP they have shown
that they can "talk the talk," but their
record in office is proof positive, they
do not "walk the walk."


Turnquest: it's important




for Bahamians to play



a more meaningful



role in their economy


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff
Reporter

A MORE meaningful
role in the future of eco-
nomic growth of the
Bahamas was promised to
the community of Exuma
by Senator Tommy Turn-
quest at the FNM's latest
rally.
Addressing hundreds of
Exumians at Friday
night's rally in George
Town, the former leader
of the FNM spoke of
empowering Bahamian
stakeholders and creating
stronger communities.
"Exuma, your FNM is
not only concerned about
providing new jobs but it
is our vision and our
objective that you become
greater stakeholders in
your economy," he said.

Policies

Mr Turnquest said that
should his party win the
government back, new
policies would be imple-
mented to affect empow-
erment for ordinary
Bahamians.
"The Bahamas Devel-
opment Bank and the
Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation
(BAIC) will be central to
these policies as they must
play a pivotal role in
transforming our econo-
my into one in which
entrepreneurship is both
encouraged and reward-
ed," he said.
Mr Turnquest said that


while it is good to create
new jobs for the popula-
tion, it is also important
for Bahamians to play a
more meaningful role in
their local economy.
To achieve this goal, he
said, young Bahamians in
particular must be made
to feel that they have a
stake in the country and
that they are able to ben-
efit from its development.
Mr Turnquest said that
there is further potential
for sustainable growth and
prosperity for Exuma, if


the mistakes of the PLP's
"mismanagement" of the
island are corrected.
The FNM senator told
The Tribune that espe-
cially in Moss Town, Exu-
ma, the government has
failed to help build strong
communities, which
"would uplift and
help develop proper citi-
zens."
"What we see there, as
in many of the islands
where the government
touts new housing subdi-
visions, you have the
problem of there being
new houses, but no'com-
munities. It takes so much
more to create communi-
ties," he said.
An FNM government,
he said, would "solve the
housing problem by facil-
itating the development of
planned communities with
proper infrastructure and
zoning."
"We want to ensure that
green spaces and recre-
ational facilities necessary
to build strong neigh-
bourhoods are provided
within your communities,"
he said.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4. MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2006


EIOI A ETR-toTH EITOR


LAST week the Ministry of Tourism host-
ed its third National Tourism Conference
that dealt with many subjects related to
tourism and the ways in which the industry
can be expanded and improved.
During the conference the media was
urged to be more cautious in reporting
because negative reports about the Bahamas
are published worldwide. These reports, it
was said, had far-reaching effects on tourism
in this country. The request to soft-pedal the
news was made by both the Ministry of
Tourism and a spokesman for the Royal
Bahamas Police Force.
It was unclear whether they meant that a
story involving a tourist should be buried on
the back page or whether it should not be
published at all. Still this might have been a
plea to drop all crime reports from its
columns.
In discussing the subject of "safety and
security" it was pointed out that the media
plays a major role in a potential tourist's per-
ception of the country.
"People will generally assume we're safe,
and it only changes when something happens
and someone tells them otherwise," said
tourism director general Vernice Walkine.
What we read into this comment is that if
the press stopped publishing crime reports
- especially those involving tourists the
Bahamas' reputation as a crime free desti-
nation would remain intact. In other words
the press would not have informed them that
- like every country in the world today -
the Bahamas has its share of crime and that
they should take precautions, particularly in
certain areas.
This is a most dangerous position to take.
Obviously Ms Walkine is too young to
remember the furore caused some years ago
when a tourist was lulled into a false sense of
security about the Bahamas' safety, took no
extra precautions and walked late at night
the short distance between two Cable Beach
hotels. He was mugged and robbed. We don't
remember all the details, but believe he was
connected with a branch of the American
police force. This was before the lights went
up on the Cable Beach strip. It was because of
the serious fall-out from this incident that
Cable Beach was quickly lighted.
This gentleman was horrified to learn how
many times such incidents along this strip
had gone unreported, and how often gov-
ernment talked about, but did nothing to
erect lights to make the area safer for pedes-
trians. This was the era when police officers
refused to include crimes against tourists in
their police reports in fact they suppressed
most serious crime. It was a mental attitude
that we fought then and which we now see
trying again to insinuate itself through the
back door all in the name of protecting
tourism. After about 50 years of experience at


this news desk we assure the ministry and
the police that this is indeed a step back-
wards. If implemented it will lead to a worse
news disaster than the ones they are now try-
ing to avoid.
This particular tourist chastised the
Bahamas about its false advertising as to the
paradise-like safety of these islands, and on
his return to the United States took out full
page advertisements in three prestigious US
newspapers we believe The New York
Times was one warning about the dan-
gers of the Bahamas.
His argument was that a fully informed vis-
itor was better able to enjoy a holiday without
an unpleasant incident if he knew what pre-
cautions to take. He condemned the govern-
ment for suppressing the information.
This attitude also had a serious local fall-
out. The public accused the press of sup-
pressing the news. However, when told that it
was not The Tribune, but the police doing the
suppressing, members of the public became
their own reporters. They started to, tele-
phone in daily crime reports from their areas.
The columns of this newspaper were not
only filled with crime, but, instead of the
sketchy information from the police blotter,
which was generally error-ridden, we had
first hand interviews of some pretty grue-
some tales from rape, abductions to murder.
They were stories far worse than the police
would have ever given.
Members of the public were incensed that
the police would withhold information that
they felt they should know in order to protect
themselves. If the police want tobe trusted by
the public, then this is the last path they
should ever think of walking down again -
even in the name of tourism.
Police are upset about a report published
in The Tribune about a tourist allegedly being
robbed at Arawak Cay. This was a report
that quoted a caller to radio Love 97's talk
show. Details of the robbery were given by
the caller, who claimed to be an eyewitness.
However, although a robbery did take place,
it did not take place at Arawak Cay. Instead
it was at Long Wharf when a visiting hus-
band and wife were returning to their cruise
ship. The caller to the radio station, if the
police version is correct, had obviously exag-
gerated the story. However, having not seen
a report in the press, he was obviously anx-
ious to let the public know what was hap-
pening to visitors to this country. If the police
had given the report out in the first place,
this caller might not have taken the initia-
tive to phone the radio station. (See story
page 2).
The conference also took as a "case-in-
point" the "negative media perception" of
the Paul Gallagher case.
We shall deal with this subject in this
column tomorrow.


Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama


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EDITOR, The Tribune.

Abstract: It is entirely possible
for the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas to benefit from the
potentially enormous socio-eco-
nomic benefits of the develop-
ment of an LNG industry, prop-
erly managed and monitored,
without compromising the com-
mitment to preserve its "Clean,
Green and Pristine" environment!
Introduction A World Hun-
gry for Alternative Sources for
Energy.
The possibility of developing a
Bahamian LNG industry, a sub-
ject which has long been under
discussion, requires urgent con-
sideration, especially in the light of
the recent support given to same
by the Ambassador of the United
States, His Excellency Mr Rood.
The writer, while no expert in this
field of human endeavour has giv-
en much thought to same, and
would like to take this opportuni-
ty to make a contribution to this
ongoing debate, which is of crucial
importance to the socio-econom-
ic development of the Northern
Bahamas.
Now, it is submitted that there
are three "realistic factors of fun-
damental importance" as my
former principal Mr H W Mid-
dleton would say- which must
be taken into consideration with
regard to the pros and cons of
developing a Bahamian LNG
industry:
1) The urgent need to find
alternative sources of energy in
the world today. There can be no
doubt that the world, with its
tremendous growth in industry
and technology, is consuming fos-
sil fuel (mainly petroleum) at a
fantastic rate, literally millions of
barrels everyday. Moreover, with
rapid industrial and technological
development, especially in those
two Asian giants, China and India,
each with more than a billion
souls, taking place in the world
today, it is expected that oil con-
sumption will more than double
over the next two decades. Such
being the case, one does not have
to be a rocket scientist or char-
tered accountant to figure out that
before long, the world will "run
out" of this most valuable
resource, in any event, according
to the law of supply and demand,
it is reasonable to assume that its
price will continue to escalate.
Such being the case, the world is
desperately in need of alternative
sources of energy. LNG (Lique-
fied Natural Gas), is certainly a
very convenient and readily
available alternative source of
energy. This is precisely why,
there are major plans on the draw-
ing board to construct new LNG
plants in every corner of the
globe. And why there are those
who consider the Bahamas,
because of its close proximity to
the United States, the world's
largest consumer of energy, to be
an ideal place for the devel-
opment of a viable LNG indus-
try.
2) The urgent need for the
Bahamas to explore additional
sources of revenue traditionally,
the Bahamas had depended main-


many years in the oil industry in
the Far East before returning


Crime, tourism and the Press


Freeport Grand Bahama
December 28,2005


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.


ly upon Customs Duty and prop-
erty taxes for its revenue. How-
ever, with the advance of globali-
sation, and the constant demands
for more money to meet the
salaries of public servants, pro-
vide more educational facilities,
upgrade infrastructure, etc, the
government of the Bahamas is in
urgent need of additional sources
of revenue. Taxes on LNG plants
can provide a viable additional
source of revenue.
3) The commitment to preserve
the unique environment of The
Bahamas: There can be no doubt
that it is the sacred responsibility
of every Bahamian to see to it
that the natural environment
of our country, including its beau-
tiful seascape, sandy beaches,
teeming marine life, etc, are pro-
tected. This is essential for the
promotion of two of our main
industries tourism and marine
products.
The question that now arises is:
is it possible for the Bahamas to
reap the economic benefits of the
development of an LNG indus-
try, while making provision for
the protection of its environment?
The writer intends to proceed
by examining the advantages, the
risks and the socio-economic ben-
efits to be derived from the devel-
opment of a Bahamian LNG
industry.
The Advantages of the
Bahamas
LNG or Liquefied Natural Gas
is simply natural gas, which has
been frozen to such a point that it
has become a liquid. Vast quanti-
ties of this gas are to be found,
especially where there is petrole-
um.
The geographical factor which
makes The Bahamas a suitable
location for the installation of
LNG plants to supply the USA
market is the same as that which
makes Aruba suitable for the
refining of oil from Venezuela -
the availability of deep water fabil-
ities, capable of accommodating
huge tankers, in close proximity to
the mainland!
With regard to the possible
damage to the environment of the
Bahamas, I recall that sometime
ago, I was invited to attend a pre-
sentation by a major company
which proposed to erect an LNG
plant in Freeport. Being no expert
in such matters, I requested a
member of the church, who is
qualified in science, to represent
me, and to let me know what his
thoughts about the possible threat
of such a plant to the Bahamian
environment, especially marine
life. He came back and gave the
proposal a "thumbs up".
Explaining that LNG is highly
soluble in water, he opined that a
submarine LNG pipeline, even if
it should burst, should pose no
serious long term threat to marine
life. Concisely, it would appear
that the installation of LNG plants
pose no more serious threat to
the ecology and environment of
The Bahamas than, say, the oil
bunkering facilities already oper-
ating at BORCO here in Grand
Bahama or, for that matter, those
at Clifton Pier in New Providence.
By the same token, the risk of
explosion in the case of LNG is
probably less than in the case of
say oil tanks. For petroleum can
be ignited much more readily than
LNG, which is very cold. Again,
LNG is potentially no'more harm-
ful than oil installations already
operating in the Bahamas.
The Economic Benefits of an
LNG Industry
The possible economic bene-
fits on.an LNG industry are two-
fold:
1) Increased employment
opportunities for Bahamians,
many jobs will be provided in the
construction of LNG plants. Thus,
the construction of LNG plants
would do much to "jump start"
the economies of the islands of
the northern Bahamas, most
adversely affected by the three
major hurricanes which have dam-
aged these islands over the past 15
months.
Moreover, while it is true that
comparatively few jobs will be
provided during the operation of
these plants, it is essential to bear
in mind that many of them would
be 'Hi-Tech', paying posts with
very good salaries. This would
provide employment for Bahami-
ans who are skilled in the oil
industry and those who are well
qualified in technological disci-
plines. Opportunities then would
be available not only for qualified
Bahamians in the field but also
for young Bahamians, with a flair
for maths and science, to train for
very good jobs. There may be
Bahamians abroad who could be
persuaded to return home to serve
in such an industry. Mr Durward
Archer, for instance, served for


home to manage the Burmah Oil
interests at South Riding Point,
Grand Bahama. The writer has a
relative now employed in the oil
industry in Texas. No doubt, there
are other Bahamians abroad who
may be invited to return home to
help in developing an LNG
industry. Moreover, it must be
kept in mind that many more jobs
would be created for Bahamians
in supervision, security services,
etc. Bahamians also may be
employed on the specially built
tankers used for the transporta-
tion of LNG and more industries
may be attracted by the existence
of LNG plants, thus creating more
employment. The possibilities,
then, in terms of direct and indi-
rect employment, are boundless.
2) Increased revenue for the
government of The Bahamas as
indicated above, the development
of an LNG Industry, would pro-
vide a useful additional source of
revenue for our Government pre-
cisely at a time when it is urgent-
ly needed.
Here we come up against the
claim that The Bahamas will
receive only a fraction of the huge
amount of money to be made by
the LNG plants. Well, the only
response can be: "Is not The
Bahamas in the driver's seat when
it comes to this matter?" Con-
cisely, why should we be content
to receive only minimum benefit
from the operation of such plants?
I am no expert in such matters,
but surely, in a country with such
a highly specialised financial sec-
tor as ours, there must be a huge
cadre of qualified accountants,
attorneys, financial analysists, etc.,
who can advise the Government
with regard to receiving maximum
financial benefit from such an
industry! It seems to me that in
negotiating such agreements, The
Government, would receive rev-
enue not only in the form of rent
but also on some sort of levy on
the product exported, with claus-
es built in for further periodic
review as the industry expands.
The Jamaican government, for
instance, gets far more revenue
from the bauxite/alumina industry
today than it did when the indus-
try was initiated more than 50
years ago.
But tax on LNG is not the only
way to benefit. Government may
go a step further and enter into
partnership/ownership covenants
with the LNG companies, thus
sharing in the huge profits to be
derived from the industry as the
price of the product inevitably
escalates. (Note that Exxon, the
biggest corporation in the world,
riding the crest of high oil prices
realized, $10 billion in profit
according to its latest quarterly
statement, about 10 times the rev-
enue of this country in a year).
While, the economic benefits to
be derived from LNG plants may
be modest in the initial stages, the
prospects from a long term per-
spective are mind-boggling.
The practical prospects for the
Bahamas
In light of the above discus-
sions, it is reasonable to consider
the possibility of the construction
of two LNG plants in the islands
of the Northern Bahamas, which
are very near to the main market
Florida.
Here, there can be no doubt
that pride of place must go to the'
islet, Ocean Cay, which for many
years was used for the mining of
limestone. Another possible site-
is South Riding Point in Eastern
Grand Bahama, or The Hole-in-
the-wall region in Abaco, where
deep water facilities are available
or may be economically dredged.;
The writer, then on the basis of
careful study of relevant docu-
ments, and informal discussions,
with persons who are very well
qualified in science, engineering
and technology, including Messrs.
Michael Moss, Jacob Cooper and
Charles Hepburn has come to the
conclusion that it is possible to
develop an economically viable,
environmentally friendly LNG
industry in The Commonwealth
of the Bahamas.
On balance, then, it is submit-
ted that, as the wise and compas-
sionate ambassador of the USA.
has rightly pointed out, the poten-
tially enormous socio-economic
benefits to be derived from the.
development of a Bahamian LNG,
industry, properly supervised,,
managed and monitored, far out-
weigh the remotely possible con-
comitant risks involved.
This matter has been under
consideration for a long time. The
BEST commission has made its
recommendations, the critics have
voiced and continue to voice their
objections even as the energy cri-
sis of the USA becomes more
acute. There is not much more:
time for further delay. In the
words of Dr Robert Schuller:
"A price must be paid!
A decision must be madc!"

DR J EMMETTE WEIR, JP,
PhD


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Please send resume to:
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----7


Take another





look; at L,-NG







MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2006, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


in:t uesday









ARTHUR FOULKES: NOTED JOURNALIST,
UNIVERSAL PERSPECTIVE, HISTORICAL CONTEXT A MUST-READ COLUMN THAT GETS TO THE POINT





There is too much display of




power among our public servants


LAST week, the Com-
missioner of Police
reaffirmed his office's determi-
nation to continue the crack-
down against individual police-
men who abuse their power and
embarrass the force. This
emphasis on bringing to justice
those policemen who fall foul
of their duties is a commend-
able new direction on the part
of the force's leadership.
But, unfortunately, the prob-
lem of policemen abusing their
powers and behaving in a cor-
rupt or aggressive manner
towards members of the public
is by no means an isolated prob-
lem. It is part of a deep cultural
problem that finds expression
at the highest level of the
Bahamian public service.
Too many of those with pub-
lic power in The Bahamas are
eager to show it, presumably
lest it be overlooked. It is part
of the same cultural phenome-
non that causes those with mon-
ey (and even many of those
without) to seek to display it by
building implausibly large
homes as close to the public
road as possible minimum
comfort, maximum visibility.
But unlike private home-
owners, the actions of public
servants, especially elected
ones, reflect on us all, whether
we like it or not.
Anyone unfortunate enough
to be driving through town at
around the time our Prime Min-


ister goes to lunch will have wit-
nessed a spectacle that is an
embarrassment to all thinking
Bahamians: a loud convoy led
by bullish policemen on
motorcycles pushing motorists
aside so the chief can pass on his
way to some mundane appoint-
ment.
Imagine for a minute that you


Too many of
those with
public power
in the Bahamas
are eager to
show it,
presumably
lest it be
overlooked.

are shopping in Super Value or
Kelly's at the Mall at Marathon.
You are just going about your
daily business buying what you
need and in the process keep-
ing the company afloat. All of a
sudden, the chairman of the
company comes bustling
through, led by two burly young
men who, by their grimaces and
aggressive gestures, let ordinary


PERSPECTIVES


AND


R EW


shoppers know that it is time to
step aside, because "the big
man reach".
As the chairman is hurried
through to meet his lunch
engagement, shoppers get back
to buying the goods that ulti-
mately pay the salary of both
him and his burly cronies.

ound ludicrous? It
should. But to anyone
not accustomed to the Bahami-
an political psychology it sounds
no more ludicrous than the
behaviour of Prime Ministers
and their cronies on the roads of
our capital.
These public servants, who
live at the expense and the
leisure of the public, see nothing
wrong with having their police
cronies "clear the road" of
members of that same public so
that they can pass on their way
to lunch.
"Clearing the road" is of
course a euphemism. What
actually happens is that mothers
on their way to collect children,
workers on their way to the
office and the service vehicles
that keep this island running are
all shunted to the side so that
the PM's procession can be


JngW*.I0 M -'Mf % it o "krn

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t4OS, Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


DMr1MIvl M3.j-


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January 23,2006 8:30am
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The Counsellors Ltd
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6:30 Bahamas @ Sunrise Live
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12:03 Caribbean Today News
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1:00 Caribbean News In Review
1:30 Spiritual Impact:
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2:30 Inside Hollywood
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ALLEN


made as conspicuous as possi-
ble. With loud, annoying horns,
members of the Royal Bahamas
Police Force seek to intimidate
those motorists who appear
insufficiently awed by the mere
presence of their chief.
Seeing the whole thing, it is
easy to suspect that, as with the
police force, politics in the
Bahamas continues to be attrac-
tive to precisely the wrong kinds
of people partly on account of
the aggressive displays of pow-
er that it involves. It is a natur-
al home for those who feel' the
need to flaunt their office at any
time they come into contact
with members of the public.

t. isn't like that every-
where. Living in West
London, I lost count of the
times I saw the likes of Michael
Heseltine, William Waldegrave
or other senior ministers idling
in traffic (or even sitting in
underground trains reading the
newspaper) on their way to cab-


LI


inet. Like everyone else, they
just adapt to the inconveniences
of living in a city.
In Scandinavia, more gov-
ernment ministers go to work
by bicycle than in cars. In doing
so, they send the message that
the society they have created is


Many of our
visitors know
instantly how
to categorise
the Bahamas
when they see
our Prime
Minister's dai-
ly procession
to his lunch
break.


.one with which they are at ease,
requiring no special treatment
or isolation. They also send the


message that service, and not
privilege, is the essence of pub-
lic office.
By contrast, in Haiti, Iraq and
most of the worst run parts of
Africa, those with power seem
to see their status as naught
unless they are able to throw it
in other people's faces wherev-
er they go.
For them, public service is not
an opportunity to help create a
better, more progressive and
well-run society, but rather an
entr6e to the perks of petty
chieftainship.

f this is indeed a world of
two camps, then many,
many of our visitors know
instantly how to categorise The
Bahamas when they see our
Prime Minister's daily proces-
sion to his lunch break.
Prime Minister, it is time you
stopped your cronies embar-
rassing both yourself and our
country, by drawing daily, pub-
lic attention to this most primi-
tive reaction to power that has
somehow entrenched itself in
the Bahamian psyche. As a
keen junkanooer, you should
reserve your "rushing through
the crowd" for two special days
of the year.


Please be informed that


Mrs. Valerie Pinder-Lynes

is no longer employed at



DIAMONDS



INTERNATIONAL

and is not authorized to

transact or conduct any business

on behalf of Diamonds International's

Clients, Staff or Stores.




Mrs. Lynes is in no way associated

with Diamonds International or

any other of its affiliates.


..i







PAGE 6, MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


Free trade over a separating





wall? The nonsense of NAFTA


* By SIR RONALD ed. If there are no significant r final offences even though their
r SANDERS and sustained funds to build up hose who advocated connection to the Region is no


S(The writer is a business exec-
utive and former Caribbean
diplomat who publishes widely
o0 Small States in the global
community).

THHE Mexican President,
S Vincente Fox, has
scribed it as a "wall of
ame", Foreign Ministers of
n South and Central Ameri-
n countries, including Belize,
nounced it on January 9, and
S businessmen have criticised
Yet the majority in the US
house of Representatives are
termined to build a wall to
parate Mexico from the US.
Last month on December
the US House of Repre-
ntatives approved a border
curity Bill which would not
nly authorise the extension of
wall along part of the Mexi-
n-US border, but would also
assify persons living illegally
the US as criminals.
The Bill, as a whole, makes
nonsense of the idea that the
ral creation of a Free Trade
irea integrates communi-
es. For, it targets Mexicans and
central Americans, both of
Shom are partners with the US
SFree Trade Agreements.
Worse, it suggests that free
ade can take place over a wall.
Indeed, support for the pas-
age of the Bill strongly sug-
bests that free trade arrange-
nents between unequal coun-
ies are bound to run into trou-
le if machinery is not estab-
ished to help poorer partners to
overcome unemployment and
very.
In this connection, there are
lessons to be learned by the
Caribbean in respect of the Free
trade of the Americas Agree-
aent (FTAA) with countries of
he Western Hemisphere and
he Economic Partnership
Agreements (EPA) with the
U which are being negotiat-


the economies and institutions
of Caribbean countries, neither
the FTAA nor the EPA may
be worth it.
Mexico and the US, along
with Canada, are the three
members of the North Ameri-
can Free Trade Area (NAF-
TA), a common market that
came into being in 19194. Under
the terms of NAFTA, compa-
nies of all three countries have
the right to move capital and
goods and services into each
other's territory, but labour is
restricted.
Of course, by and large, US
companies are better resource
than are Mexican ones, and
they have sold goods and ser-
vices in Mexico, purchased
lands, and established competi-
tive businesses that have led to


JL the passage of this Bill
have done so on a wave of pop-
ulist sentiment that Mexican
immigrants in particular are
drug addicts and free loaders
who are sneaking into the US to
pollute the country, living off
the social welfare system and
committing crimes.
This view of the Mexicans has
been spread by irresponsible
and ill-informed media and reli-
gious groups who neglect to
point out that many of these
same Mexicans work as farm
labourers, construction work-
ers and domestic help jobs
most Americans won't do and
without them, the economy
would decline.
Of course, the policies of the
government of Mexico have not
helped either.


The US House of Representatives
approved a border security Bill
which would not only authorise
the extension of a wall along part
of the Mexican-US border, but
would also classify persons living


illegally in the US


the collapse of some Mexican
businesses and to unemploy-
ment.
But, since NAFTA makes no
provision for the free move-
ment of labour, Mexicans who
are dislocated from their jobs
cannot legally cross the borders
into the territories of their
NAFTA partners to seek
employment. So, they try to do
so illegally.
This has added to the already
great number of Mexicans who,
for decades, have been illegally
crossing the border into the US
in search of a livelihood.


as criminals.


Social and economic circum-
stances in Mexico are pushing
Mexicans out of their country
just as much as they are pulled
to the better economic condi-
tions in the US.
Despite its significant oil rev-
enues, successive Mexican gov-
ernments have failed to estab-
lish programmes of empower-
ment for all but a small minori-
ty of Mexicans.
Ruben Aguilar, a spokesman
for President Fox, says that the
rate of migration from Mexico
to the US has slowed in recent
years due to the "social policy


insigni
,: :'* L"'..:, .:, iJ. .:' ,


of the Mexican state which is
reducing extreme poverty".
This may be so, but the pro-
grammes are evidently inade-
quate. And if there are any pro-
grammes to revitalize the rural
areas giving small farmers land
tenure on a bankable basis, to
build housing, and to create
jobs, the vastly overcrowded
cities and slum areas particu-
larly in Mexico City brutally
deny their success.
Equally, the governments of
the United States and Canada -
both wealthier than their free
trade partner have not offered
the Mexican government pro-
grammes of assistance that
could help to improve educa-
tion and training in Mexico, cre-
ate new businesses and jobs,
and widen the middle class.
Instead, there is a wall, a bar-
rier that says "stay on your side,
keep away from our side". It
is an awful symbol of division
and separateness, a condemna-
tion of those on the other
side. How could such a barrier
be justified between two coun-
fries that have agreed in NAF-
TA to tear down barriers to
goods, services and capital?

nd what will it do to
business? US compa-
nies that have established busi-
nesses in Mexico, could even-
tually become targets of those
who resent the existence of a
wall that defines them as unde-
sirable and substandard.
The second part of the border
security bill, classifying illegal
immigrants as criminals, has
implications as much for
Caribbean persons as it does for


* SIR Ronald Sand

the Mexicans an(
Americans.
Already, tens of



How could
such a ban
be justified
between t
countries t
have agree
NAFTA to t
down barr
goods, serv
and capital


of Caribbean-bor
have been deported
United States becau


r
it


much more than the accident
of their birth. Now that being
in the US illegally is to be
made a criminal offence, many
thousands more will be shipped
out.
Crime in the Caribbean is
already a problem that is over-
whelming local law enforcement
agencies, many of whom believe
that it has been made worse by
the large number of criminals
deported from the US and
Canada:
But, crime is also being fed
by growing unemployment and
S poverty as the Region loses
S markets for its principal exports
bananas and sugar especial-
ly. The deportation from the US
of persons, who are not crimi-
nals but who are there illegally,
will add to the burden of jobless
persons in the Caribbean who
must be catered for at a time
. when government revenues are
dropping in real terms.
ers The border security bill,
therefore, will not be good for
d Central the Caribbean either.
America already opens its
thousands doors to legal immigrants
every year. No other country
does as much, and the US
should be admired for it. And,
d illegal immigration is a prob-
lem, particularly because it
rier forces people into life in the
shadows and feeds the crimi-
i nals who live off the plight of
wO illegal immigrants.
But, declaring illegal immi-
:hat grants to be criminals further
hurts people who, in most cases,
'd in are only immigrants because
their lives are already battered
ear by desperation.
iers to The US Senate is yet to con-
sider the bill. The governments
ices of the Caribbean Community
countries should join their
I? South and Central America
counterparts and many US busi-
ness leaders in discouraging the
n persons bill, while there is still time for
d from the the US to seek better ways of
use of crim- dealing with illegal immigration.


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2006, PAGE 7


THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTJ OF THE BAHAMAS
BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2021.2024.2025 and 2026


FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY
APPLICATION No__
ALLOTMENT No.
DATE:


The Registrar
do The Central Bank of The Babamas
P.O. Box N4868
Nassau, Bahamas
Sir.


I/We hereby apply for the following amount of Bahamas Registered Stock:

Insert below the amount applied for
in Units of BS100


* THE service at the Central Church of God on Sunday.
(Photo: Derek Carroll)


Marking the start




of the legal year


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT Members of
the judiciary, lawyers and
senior police officials on
Grand Bahama gathered at
the Central Church God on
Sunday to mark the start of
the new legal year.
Chief Justice Burton Hall
and Attorney General Alfred
Sears of New Providence were
among those attending the
annual church service held for
members of the legal profes-
sion in the northern Bahamas.
Church of God pastor Bish-
op Dr Fred Newchurch
encouraged members of the
judiciary to put God first in
their dispensation of justice in
legal matters.
Attorney-General Alfred
Sears stated that the past year
has been one of significant
achievements.
He said the first major
achievement was the removal
of the Bahamas from the
monitoring list of the Finan-
cial Action Task Force
(FATF) for money launder-
ing and terrorist financing.
Minister Sears said another


significant achievement was
the establishment of a judicial
review committee to address
the concerns of the judiciary
and legal office.
"The committee has made
recommendations in a report
which I have receipt of to
improve salaries and benefits
of justices of the Court of
Appeal, Supreme Court, Mag-
istracy, Industrial Tribunal,
and of the Office of the Attor-
ney General.
"With respect to the Office
of the Attorney General we
have already begun the
process of implementing some
of the draft proposal.
"We have received cabinet
approval and are currently in
consultation with the
financial secretary in the Min-
istry of Finance with respect
to improving salaries, he
said.
Minister Sears said the
Attorney General's Office has
significantly increased its
capacity with 15 new lawyers
over the past year.
"We have also been able to
improve and expand the
opportunity for training of our
lawyers in Europe, the
Caribbean and the United


States as legislators and pros-
ecutors for the serious crimi-
nal offences," he added.
Mr Sears said another sig-
nificant achievement is the
construction of a new 12-court
magistrates' complex in New
Providence.
"It will provide proper and
comfortable accommodations
for magistrates, support
staff, the public, and a
proper remand facility for
persons held on remand," he
said.
He also noted that this year
additional magistrates, and
justices of the Supreme Court
and Court of Appeal would
be appointed.
He also said that the chief
justice is also considering the
appointment of a second jus-
tice to the Supreme Court on
Grand Bahama.
Minister Sears said that
another major initiative
undertaken by the govern-
ment was the establishment of
a legal aid commission chaired
by Dr Eneas Thompson.
He said recommendations
by the commission would
assist the government with the
implementation of a national
system of legal aid.


5/32%
1/4%
9/32%
5/16%


Above Prime Rate
Above Prime Rate
Above Prime Rate
Above Prime Rate


Bahamas Registered Stock 2021
Bahamas Registered Stock 2024
Bahamas Registered Stock 2025
Bahamas Registered Stock 2026


and undertaketoaccept any less amount which may be allotted to me/us.


I/We enclose BS


in payment for the Stock applied for.


In the event of the full amount of Stock(s) applied for above is/are not allotted to
me/us, I/we request that the sum refundable to me/us be applied for the following Stock:


% Bahamas Registered Stock
% Bahamas Registered Stock
% Bahamas Registered Stock
% Bahamas Registered Stock
% Bahamas Registered Stock
% Bahamas Registered Stock


BS
B$
BS
BS
BS


BANK DRAFTS SHOULD BE MADE PAYABLE TO THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS.

SUPPLEMENTARY PROVISIONS

I e of Stock The Stock will be issued by the Registrr (The Central Bank of The Bahamas).
Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 4th
January, 2006 and will close at 3:00 pm on 16th January, 2006. Allocations will .
commence at 9:30 a.m. on 17th January, 2006 and will cease at 3:00p.m. on 18* January,
2006. All envelopes enclosing applications should be labelled "Application For Bahamas
Government Registered Stocks".

U~gt The Stock will be inunits ofBS100.00.
Apoications Applications must be for B$100.00 or a multiple of that sum.

Aplication Forms Applications for the Stock should be made to the Registrar on the form attached to the.
Prospectus and may be obtained from the Registrar offices in Nassau and Freeport The
Treasury Department (Marlborough Street & Navy Lion Road, Nassau) or any of the
following banks:
1. Bank of The Bahamas International
2. First CaribbeanInternational Bank (Bahamas) Limited '
3. Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited
4. Commonwealth Bank Limited
5. Royal Bank Of Canada
6. Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited
7. Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited (formally British American Bank(1993)
Limited)
8. Citibank, N.A.
PUBLIC DEBT

Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts as at September 30, 2005 show the Public Debt of The
Bahamas to be BS2,753,126,000.*


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GOVERNMENT REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE

The following information is extracted from the unaudited accounts of the Govemment of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.


F2003/2004*
BS


Revenue


Recurent Expenditure (excluding
Repayment of Public Debt)

Capital Development
Expenditure (excluding loans
contributions and advances
to public corporations)


943,760,000

993,987,000



80,890,000


FY2004/2005"*
BS

1,051,624,000

1,067,259,000



117.296,000


FY200

Appro
1,1320


05/2006* ,
ved Budget
,774,000


1,145,691,000



132,901,000


** Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts.
The Public Debt amount is inclusive of The Public Corporations contingent liability which as at
September 30,2005 totalled BSSO5,982,000.
PROSPECTUS
THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS


BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2021. 2024,2025 and 2026
ISSUE OF B75.000.000.0O


The Plus ,Group, Nassau, Bahamas, is seeking
a young, intelligent, computer literate individual.

This individual must be a team player who is self-
motivated and has a strong desire to achieve goals that
are both customer & company driven.

Qualifications: Six (6) BGCSE's
Knowledge of Excel &
Microsoft Office Software


* Health Insurance & Pension
(both after a qualifying period)
* Two weeks vacation.
* Assistance with training / COB
(if courses taken are relevant
to job performance)

* Po[ting & payment of
au horised invoices
* Reconciliation of supplier
statements
* Rev ew & reconciliation of
daily cashier reports & deposits
* Perry cash disbursement



ai-s Group
)f Companies

Please submit your application via
Mail to: The Plus Group
P. O. Box N713
Nassau, Bahamas
or eMail ro: jobs@theplusgroup.com


Issued under The Bahamas Registered Stock Act, and authorized by Resolutions of the House of
Assembly, 20th June, 2005.

Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 4th January, 2006 and
will close at 3:00pm onl6th January, 2006. Allocations will commence at 9:30 a.m. on 17th January, 2006 and
will cease at 3:00p.m. on 18thJanuary, 2006.
If the total subscriptions exceed the sum of BS75,000,000.00 (Nominal) partial allotment will be made to
subscribers, and a proportionate refund will be made as soon as possible after allotment. No interest will be
paid on amounts so refunded.
The date of this Prospectus is 28th December, 2005

The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas invites applications for Bahamas Registered
Stock totalling B$75,000,000.00. The Stock will be available in a range of maturity dates; the earliest being
repayable in 2021 and the latest in 2026. The total amount of Stock offered, the rate of interest and the issue
price are given below:-


Rate Of interest


5/32% Above Prime Rate
1/4% Above Prime Rate
9/32% Above Prime Rate
5/16% Above Prime Rate


AmSou
BS


Bahamas Registered Stock 2021
Bahamas Registered Stock 2024
Bahamas Registered Stock 2025
Bahamas Registered Stock 2026


10,000,000.00
20,000,000.00
20,000,000.00
25.000.000.00
75.000.000.00


Issue

BS
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00


The Stock shall be repaid on 18th January, in the year appearing in the name of the Stock.':


The Stock will bear interest from 18th January, 2006, at the rate shown against the name of theStock as
the percent per annum over the Prime Rate (i.e. the prime commercial interest rate from time to time fixed by
the Clearing banks carrying on business in the Island of New Providence in The Bahamas. Ifthere shall be any
difference between them, then that which is fixed by Royal Bank of Canada). Interest shall be payable half-
yearly commencing on 18th July, 2006 and thereafter on 18th January and 18th July in every year ril.the .
Stock is repaid.

CHARGE UPON CONSOLIDATED FUND

The principal monies and interest represented by the Stock are charged upon and payable out of te
Consolidated Fund and assets of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
,t Y


Benefits:


Duties:


LOCAL NEWS


~ "~~i-














Barbara Ellen Clarke remembered


* By Anthony Forbes
THE late Barbara Ellen
Clarke, 70. mother of photog-
rapher Derek Smith, was buried
at Lake View Memorial Gar-
dens Saturday following a funer-
al service at Blue Hill Gospel
Chapel on Bue Hll Road.
Ms Clarke, who retired from
Ba TelCo 10 years ago, died on
January 8 after a seven month
battle with cancer.
Mr Smith, chief photograph-
er at the Bahamas Information
Services Department, also


worked at The Tribune and The
Nassau Guardian.
News and free-lance photog-
raphers were among the hun-
dreds of mourners at the two-
and-a-half hour service.
They included Pastor Jeffrey
Thompson, President of the
Cayman Islands Seventh-Day
Adventist Church, a close friend
of the family who worked as a
news photographer at The Tri-
bune during the early 1970s.
The eulogy was delivered by
Associate Pastor Perry Wallace,
assisted by Elder Arnold Dorsett.


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BaTelCo retirees rendered a
selection and reflections of fond
memories were delivered by
Venencia Thompson, a former
BaTelCo colleague.
Pastor Rex Major of Grace
Gospel Chapel, assisted by
attending Ministers of the
Gospel, prayed for the family.
In his tribute, Pastor Thomp-
son said Ms Clarke loved her
children, her church and her
community. "The law of love
and kindness was written in her
heart and showed itself in her
tongue," said Pastor Thompson.
"I never heard her criticise any-
one. I never heard her complain
about anything. She lived a
good life. She had a sweet fam-
ily. She took pleasure in her
duties around her home. She
lived a godly life."
He said that over the years her
quiet example rang out loud in
the lives of her children, an exam-
ple that demanded emulation.
In her tribute, Mrs Thomp-
son said Ms Clarke took her job
seriously as a teletype operator
at BaTelCo, which she joined
in 1955 and retired in'1995.
"During this time, there were
no cell phones, or hardly any
kind of phone, and telegram
was the main source of com-
munication. Telegrams were
done by way of teletype and
'BC' (as Ms Clarke was affec-
tionately known) was one of the
fastest and most efficient tele-
type operators we had in the
company," she said.
Mrs Thompson described Ms
Clarke as a very kind and com-
passionate person, who was
always concerned about the
welfare of others.
"After we retired, we all kept
in touch with each other. When-
ever Barbara called, the first
thing she would do is ask about
my family. She would call every-
one by name, and wanted to
know if everyone was alive and
kicking," she said.
Mrs Thompson also noted
that Ms Clarke was a single
mother who did a wonderful job
raising her seven children. "As
far as I know, not one of her
children made her hang her
head in shame," she said.
Mrs Thompson said she was
devastated when Ms Clarke told
her she was terminally ill.
"However, she was so posi-


N IN front from left are Robert Munroe, Merriel McIntosh, aunt, Wellington Smith, father, and
Kevyn R Smith, son. At rear from left are Derek Smith, Kyle R Smith, son; and Sandra
Dean-Smith, wife.


M VENENCIA Thompson, a former employee of Bahamas Telecommunications Corporation
paying tribute 'As I Knew Her' to Barbara Clarke


tive. She said that she was not
afraid, and that God promised
her three score years and ten,
and that she had just turned 70
and she was ready. Her positive
attitude was an inspiration to
others," she said.
Ms Clarke was born in New
Providence on August 18, 1935,
to Herbert and Marie Clarke.


She spent her childhood in the
close-knit community of Eneas
Jumper Corner and later Burial
Ground Corner.
She attended Western Junior
and Western Senior Schools,
and later went to work for the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Corporation as a teletype oper-
ator at the East Street Station.


(Photos: Franklyn G Ferguson)
Over the years, she qualified
and was elevated to a member
of the senior management team.
She spent her entire working
life at BaTelCo.
Ms Clarke is survived by her
children Antoinette Curtis,
Derek Smith, Robert, Shane,
Tyrone, Clarice Hamilton and
Kimberly Stubbs.


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PAGE 8, MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


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THE TRE MON


; : . .. -.
* THE Bahamas local police complete a maritime course put on by US Coast Guard officers at
the RBDF base in Coral Harbour.


S.'1.


* SENIOR Immigration
officer Kirklyn Neely receives
certificate of completion of
the Maritime Law
Enforcement Boarding
Officer Course
(Photos: Mario
Duncanson/Tribune staff)


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graduate



training


A GROUP of 25 law
enforcement officers were grad-
uated from the Maritime
Boarding Officers Course dur-
ing a small ceremony at the
RBDF Coral Harbour base yes-
terday.
Officers from the Defence
Force, Police Force, Port
Department, Customs and the
Immigration Department took
part in the week-long course,
which was conducted by the
United States Coast Guard
(USCG) Mobile Training Team
based in Yorktown, Virginia. It
was sponsored by the US Navy
and Coast Guard liaison office
at the US Embassy.
The syllabus consisted of class-
room instruction that focused on
interpersonal communication,
international law, boarding
preparation and procedures, the
use of force, detection of hidden
compartments, and occupation-
al hazards awareness training.


Students were required to
participate in scenarios mimic-
king high-risk situations.
These included conducting a
search while armed, searching
for weapons onboard a vessel
and arrest procedures.
Coast Guard instructor SKI
June Bingham said the training
was very well received and the
participants were alert, atten-
tive; and fully involved. "They
were able to successfully pul
everything we taught them into
practice during the scenarios,"
she said.
Lieutenant junior grade Steve
Nutting said: "The tactical pro-
cedures used by the RBDF are
quite similar to those used by
the USCG and this made for a
good platform on which to train.
The other agencies have slight-
ly different tactics and exper-
tise but this made the training
environment good for learning
on all sides," he said.


* LIEUTENANT Stephen Nutting of the US Coast Guard
mobile training team gives a thumbs up
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/ Tribune Staff)


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THE TRIBUNE


Is
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PAGE 10, MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2006











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MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2006, PAGE I -


THE TRIBUNE









*. A
MQ,


Woman in serious condition after

being stabbed multiple times


FROM page one
bleeding profusely from mul-
tiple stab wounds to the face,
neck, hands and stomach.
She was rushed by ambu-
lance to the hospital, where
she was admitted to the Inten-
sive Care Unit.
Supt Rahming said the vic-
tim was recently separated
from her husband, who is
employed as a security officer
at Grand Bahama Interna-
tional Airport.
Supt Rahming said'a sus-
pect was apprehended by a
team of officers from the Cen-


tral Detective Unit at the
Grand Lucayan Waterway in
the vicinity of Casaurina
Bridge.
He is presently assisting
police with their investigation
into the incident.
In other news, a 29-year-
old man was stabbed in the
chest during an altercation
between a group of men over
the weekend.
According to police reports,
Reynold Phillip, 45, Jean St
Louis, 29, and Emmanuel Alti-
dor, 45, were hanging out in
front of their residences at
Bruce Avenue around 6.15pm


DOCTOR!


on Friday when they were
approached by three men.
The six men got into a heat-
ed argument. There was an
altercation. St Louis was
stabbed in the chest with a
knife, Phillip was stabbed in
the right hand, and Altidor
was struck in the head with a
stone.
The men were taken to
hospital. Phillip and Altidor
were treated for their injuries
and discharged.
St Louis was detained in
serious condition.
Police are investigating the
matter.


'ITAL


Body found after fire


FROM page one
who also served as the hotel's
security guard helped him
escape the fire, thereby saving
his life.
The fire, which broke out
shortly after 4am on Friday,
destroyed the Compleat Angler
Inn and Museum reducing
one of the favourite haunts of
noted American novelist Ernest
Hemingway to rubble.
The fire destroyed priceless
memorabilia and irreplaceable
historical artifacts, which were
kept at the Hemingway muse-
um adjacent to the hotel.
Most notably included in the
museum's inventory was a pho-
tograph of Hemingway holding
up a 500-pound blue marlin
which had been mauled by a
shark.
The photo, it is believed,
helped inspire the novelist to
write the Nobel Prize-winning
The Old Man and the Sea.
Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, press liaison officer
Inspector Walter Evans said the
investigation into the cause would
not go ahead until the remains
of Mr Brown had been found.
"First we have to determine
what happened to Mr Brown,
then we can turn our attention
to what caused the fire," he said.


Mr Evans pointed said that
investigation was being made
more difficult due to the nature
of the burnt down structure.
"We are facing some struc-
tural challenges, the floor was
made out of wood and has bro-
ken through. It is making the
search more difficult," he said.
A further factor complicat-
ing the operation are the hun-
dreds of gallons of water used to
extinguish the fire which are
now filling the basement of the
charred building.
This incident comes just
weeks after the community of
Bimini was dealt the crippling
blow of losing 11 of its residents
in the crash of the Chalks Air-
line Flight 101 from Miami to
Bimini.
Residents are now faced with
yet another loss of life, as well
as an economic fallout, as the
Compleat Angler was the
island's most popular tourist
attraction.
Upon learning of the fire,
Minister of Tourism Obie
Wilchcombe, who is also the
MP for the area, immediately
flew to Bimini Friday morning.
He returned to the island on
Saturday together with Foreign
Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell
to assess circumstances sur-
rounding the blaze.


Complaint

at project

FROM page one
yet politicians are making hun-;
dreds of thousands in salaries'
and retirement benefits while'
the people who built the coun-
try are suffering," said Mr
Duncombe.
Urban Renewal, he added,
should have also addressed the
country's massive rodent prob-
lem by teaching residents the
proper way to dispose of
garbage.
He said his organisation is
also demanding that the
Department of Child and Fam-
ily release a comprehensive
number of the children at the
centre of complaints.
For example, he explained,
that over the past several years
there have been thousands of
complaints. However he said
that often complaints may
involve several children which
could mean that thousands of
children are being affected with-
out the public getting a clear
picture of just how many chil-
dren are involved.
He said government must go
into the community and do
more to reach out to people in
areas of their lives where it mat-
ters most.


guish d


lecture erieT


r


Hotelier's tourism award


2006 Lecture Series

Schedule


FREE Monthly Health Lecture
Every 3rd Thursday of the Month


January 19
Womev's Health
February 16
National Heart Month
March 16
Kidney Month
Diabetes & Khwey Disease
April 20
Asthna/!Lung iseasfe
May 18
Ardtritis
June 15
M.n's HeIalmh
July 20
Chiidren' tlealth
August 17
HIaedaches

September 21
Thyroid Awareness

October 19
Mental IHeaft


November 16
Alzhenier's Disease

December 21
Menopause


Speaker: Dr. Reginald Carey,
Obstetrician/Gynecologist


Topic:

Date:

Time:


Women's Health

Thursday, January 19, 2006

6:00pm 7:30pm, followed by Q & A


Venue: Doctors Hospital Conference Room

Q & A: Question and Answer Session

RSVP: To ensure available seating.

Screenings: Free Cholesterol, Blood Pressure and
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RSVP 302-4603

S DOCTORS HOSPITAL
1Healih For Life


* TOURISM director Vernice Walkine (left) and President of the Bahamas Hotel Association
Earl Bethell (right) posed with Cacique's top winner for 2005, George Myers


FROM page one
40 years. As a youngster, he
worked in his family's hotel, the
Miranda Lodge in Jamaica. In
his early 20s, he started as a
management trainee in Lon-
don's Westbury Hotel and
rapidly worked his way through
the various departments.
His direct impact on the
Bahamas began in 1963 when
he joined the Nassau Beach
Hotel. Shortly afterwards, he
was appointed manager of the
Lucayan Harbour Inn and
Marina on Grand Bahama. He
returned to Nassau Beach Hotel
in 1967 as resident manager and
was later promoted to Vice
President and General Manag-
er.
In 1977, he was appointed
executive vice president and


subsequently president and
CEO of Resorts International,
where for 15 years he guided
the company's growth of hotels,
casino and property develop-
ment on Paradise Island.
Presently, Mr Myers is the
Chairman and CEO of the
Myers group Ltd, a resort man-
agement company, founded in
1992 which until May of this
year, operated the 700-room
Radisson Cable Beach Resort.
He is a shareholder and oper-
ating partner of the Best West-
ern Bayview Suites on Paradise
Island.
In addition to the hotel indus-
try, he is involved in the restau-
rant business. He is involved in
several restaurant concepts with
more than 20 units, ranging
from fast food operations such
as KFC, to upscale fine dining.


The Minister's Award for
hospitality went to Israel
"Bonefish Foley" Rolle, who
exemplified Bahamian hospi-
tality through genuine friendli-
ness and concern toward visi-
tors as a bonefish guide in West
End, Grand Bahama.
Mr Rolle has fished with a
United States President, sport-
ing franchise owners, actors and
screen stars, and noted big game
fishermen.
His interaction with thou-
sands of visitors to the Bahamas
for more than 60 years has
resulted in life long friendships
and repeat visits to the destina-
tion. He has hosted numerous
film crews for the Ministry of
Tourism, and appeared on sev-
eral television programmes,
including National Geograph-
ic.


,4V


Now

-"-


(,i skMjanges I microwaves I washers I dryers I refrigerators I


I I I I


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-


---.---- I-Fr-n~- r~-n~rsnrrr~ir rurrirriu~~crlyn~O.~nr~sYIU~rT~.~ia .--~-----.


THE TRIBUNE -


PA~IGE 12, MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2006


Out with the ',Old


: :


Enjoy the New Season

at Master Technicians!

Village Road
393-5310 0


4 4 X


hers]






THE TRIBUNE
-i -


SAV.A.CHEK 'Extra-Special': on each item you purchase, over
Sa dollar, with One filled SAV.A.CHEK certificate get a Dollar Off!
REDEEM your SAV-A-CHEK now at:
Johns S George, Sandys, Epic Battery, GNC,
Home Fabrics, Godetts Jewelry.
FREEPORT: Dolly Madison Home Centre, GNC, Epic Battery, Play Time Sports


STORE MON. SAT.: 7:30AM 9:00PM
HOURS: SUN.: 7:00AM 12:00PM 7:00AM 2:00PM CABLE BEACH &
HARBOUR BAY ONLY


Extra Extra! _ _
SAV.A.CHEK Special! WE ACCEPT


MINI

PORK

RIBS
PER LB

970


i I
L
SUPERBRAND
YOGURTS REG & FAT FREE ............................$2/1.49
W/D
SPR EAD ................................. ......... .. ..........:$1.89
W/D
SLICE CHEESE.................................................... $1.89
LENDER'S
REF ASSTD BAGALES, PLAIN, EGG, RAISIN, ONION,
BLUE BERRY, HONEY WHEAT..............................$2.59

WINN DIXIE
CORN ON COB 12-EAR ......................................$4.99
PRESTIGIO
4 CHEESE, PEPPERONI, 3 MEATS, DELUXE &
SUPREME PIZZAS 32& 34-OZ..................................$7.99
WINN-DIXIE
ASSTD & MIX VEGETABLES 16-oz..........................$1.89
W/D
ICE CREAM ALL FLAVOURS 64-OZ.........................$3.49

DELI
FOUR STAR ROAST BEEF LB.............................$4.99
WHOLE
ROTISSERIE CHICKEN EACH..................................$7.99
NEW YORK
PRE-MADE LIBERTY ASSORTED
BAG ELS 6-PK..................::i. ..... ............................ $2/5.00
ALL VARIETY
PUDDING CREAM CAKES 18-oz............................$4.39


DL LEE
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LB
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1 8L9
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511 BOBONELESS
BREAST 5.LB BOX CHUCK OAST
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64 OZ EACH 8 OZ


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EXTRA FANCY APPLES HEARTS
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POTATOES BROCCOLI
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$ 99 $l 99
EACH LB

CANTALOUPES ONIONS 3,LB BAG
$249 $59
EACH EACH


JBI


MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2006, PAGE ll.


II- I' -


-II
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---~--~---- -------- --


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14. MONDAY. JANUARY 16. 2006


71 :_0 a~ktS



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u





NOWA CCEPI1NG
'E s RES.ERVED~


SMOKE PICNIC


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Supervalue 4PK Tissue .... $1.29
Carnation Evaporated Milk .... 24/1 .29


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THE TRIBUNE


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IN E N TON LNW1..... .
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Open: Monday Friday 8am 5pm Tlephone: 394-8014


The A.G. Electric Co.





DIVISION B
Boxing Day 2005 & New Year's Day 2006


Boxing Day 2005 Banner


New Year's Day 2006 Banner
Wish to congratulate all participants and fans for a successful Junkanoo season.
We also wish to thank the following organizations for their support: ;
Dozer Heavy Equipment New Providence Community Church
SCarl G. Treco Aqua Design Cavalier Construction
SEpic Batteries Rod land Tyre Repair


-- -" . ~ - . -
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THE TRIBUNE


.3aE 16, MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2006


': .* '' '... -.
.' : .' -.* *f ; ^
-- T^ *. b r.-"?^
*, *-' *^ 1.1.~ -..f-t:- V
' "" ,, '>,;-
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"The Tribune believes strongly in the
people's right to know, holding both
the public and the private sector to a
high level of accountability and
transparency. At the Tribune, we
provide news and information that
people need to help make decisions in
their lives. I'm proud to be a part of the
leading print medium inThe Bahamas.
The Tribune is my newspaper."

RUPERT MISSICK, JR.
CHIEF REPORTER
THE TRIBUNE

T" ^pr the eS, call our
:'I-I; 1w tit 502-5359,


pQ


The Tribune

ft~~~~u lriv rrr ^e- ,^yw


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MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2006


SECTION I- -


ax4Colinalmperial.
olBi Insurance Ltd..


business@tribunemedia.net


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


BISX plans


rights


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
he Bahamas
International
Securities
Exchange (BISX)
is planning a
rights issue to existing share-
holders as it moves ahead on its
revitalisation plans, with the
Government due to take a sig-
nificant stake of between 40-
50 per cent in the exchange.
BISX is currently in the
process of informing its 45 pri-
vate sector shareholders of the
issue and providing them with
the details. The Government
will take its stake through the
Central Bank of the Bahamas,
and this is effectively a debt-
for-equity swap, in return for
the advances and loans made in
previous years to ensure BISX
kept operating.
Although sizeable, the stake
will not give the Government
majority control, leaving that
in the hands of the private sec-
tor, although it will have a sig-
nificant voice and weight.
Keith Davies, BISX's chief
executive, declined to reveal
how much the proposed rights
issue was seeking to raise, but
said the development was in
accordance with the plan for
revitalising the exchange and
the broader capital markets.


issue


Government to take stake


* KEITH DAVIES,
CEO OF BISX


A previous Extraordinary
General Meeting (EGM) of
BISX shareholders saw them
promise to pump another
$450,000 into the exchange, in
return for the Government
making a capital markets poli-
cy statement and moving to
implement the recommended
policy changes to stimulate the
sector.
Both those things have now
happened, following the


exchange control amendments
announcement on Friday (see
other story on Page 1B).
Mr Davies said: "We're rais-
ing enough funds to allow the
exchange to run its operations
comfortably for quite a period
of time.
"The goal is to have a self-
sufficient and self-sustaining
exchange that is fully compliant
with international rules."
He explained that the rights
issue's timing was "triggered"
by the Government's capital
markets development policy
statement and exchange con-
trol amendments, which sent
the signal to BISX and its
shareholders that it was time
"to proceed with our side of
things".
"As part of the entire process
of revitalising the exchange and
capital markets, it was always
contemplated that there would
be another round of fund rais-
ing," Mr Davies said.
"We are simply carrying
through with the terms, condi-
tions and plans that were in
place."
He added that BISX was
looking forward "to working
hand in glove with the Gov-
ernment', .. ...


'Strong buyer interest'



in Hilton, South Ocean


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THERE is "strong buyer
interest" in the British Colo-
nial Hilton and still-closed
South Ocean Golf & Beach
Resort, the properties' Cana-
dian pension fund backer said,
meaning that they "should
realise positive gains" for the
fund from their sale or further
investment by joint venture
partners.
The announcement was con-
tained in the Canadian Com-
mercial Workers Industry Pen-
sion Plan's (CCWIPP)
response to a set of damning
findings by Canadian regula-
tors, which found that the pen-
sion fund appeared to have
invested in the Bahamian prop-
erties without conducting prop-


er due diligence.
The report by the Financial
Services Commission of
Ontario also said it had seen
no evidence that CCWIPP's
investments in the British Colo-
nial Hilton and South Ocean
were properly secured, in light
of the debt for preference share
and voting rights control
restructuring agreed with Ron
Kelly's RHK Capital venture.
In a statement released to
coincide with the FSCO's find-
ings, CCWIPP's Board of
Trustees said: "The FSCO
examination focused on four
hotel and commercial proper-
ties in the Bahamas and
Jamaica In view of strong buy-
er interest by major interna-
tional investors, the Board
believes these properties
should realise positive gains for


the plan."
CCWIPP said that in,
response to allegations that'
trustees "may not have ade-!
quately fulfilled their fiducia-'
ry obligations under the Pen-'
sion Benefit Act" with respect,
to the Bahamian hotel proper-
ties, it had produced "a three
inch binder" containing due
diligence, investment commit-
tee and investment reports,
plus investment committee,
meetings, since April 2001.
CCWIPP has been seeking
buyers or joint venture part-,
ners for its two Bahamian'
resorts for some time.
A New York-based develop-
er of luxury marinas is behind a
proposed $150 million invest-

SEE page 4B


Exchange control changes

'first step to elimination'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
CAPITAL markets participants have hailed
the Government's liberalisation announce-
ment as "the first step in a long journey
towards the elimination of exchange con-
trols", and "a giant step" in developing the
Bahamian capital markets.
The amendments unveiled by the Govern-


ment and Central Bank of the Bahamas will
help to both broaden and deepen the Bahami-
an capital markets though increasing the pool
of eligible investors, and enlarging the number
of available securities for them to invest in.
The capital markets-related investments
(see table on turn page) included expanding

SEE page 4B


'Hot' Bahamas


makes hotels


attractive for


investment by


Bahamians


* By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
BAHAMIAN citizens have
been encouraged by a local
developer to take advantage of
this nation's attraction as a
"hot" destination for high-end
tourism development by invest-
ing in such long-term projects.


Franklyn Wilson, chairman
of Bahamian-owned Eleuthera
Properties, the company
behind the $300 million Cot-
ton Bay resort development in
Eleuthera, said that 21 years
after his idea of owning a
prime-time resort in the Fami-

SEE page 6B


Tourism must 'go all

out' on entertainment


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas needs to "go
all out" to make Bahamian
entertainment the foundation
of its tourism product, an enter-
tainer and consultant told the
National Tourism Conference,
in a bid to widen the distribu-
tion of tourism revenues and
generate greater visitor spend-
ing.
Fred Ferguson said the Gov-
ernment needed to find a way


to bind hotel developers to
using Bahamian entertainment
in the Heads of Agreement for
their developments and project
expansions.
He added that this nation
needed to provide more
nightlife, shows, dances and
restaurants to give tourists
more opportunity to interact
with Bahamian culture and
improve their vacation experi-

SEE page 3B


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PAGE 2B M Y N 12


Companies must


out'


how to business with giants


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The "onus" is on Bahami-
an companies to "figure
out how to do business
with us", Kerzner Inter-
national's purchasing
director told the National Tourism
Conference, as the Atlantis resort
owner's focus was on its own business
and delivering the guest experience
expected.
Amanda Seymour said Kerzner
International would try to incorpo-
rate as many Bahamian products and
culture within its resorts as possible,


given that Atlantis was a brand and
resort destination in its own right.
Opportunity
"We are creating a great deal of
opportunity, but in truth it's the
responsibility of the business owner
to figure out how to do business with
us," Ms Seymour said. "We will flex to
incorporate as much of the Bahamian
culture and products as we can, bear-
ing in mind this cannot be 100 per
cent Bahamian.....We need Bahamian
businesses to be successful. If you're
not successful, we're not going to be
successful. [But] we don't have sole


responsibility.......
"We'll try new things, take chances,
take risks, but if it doesn't pan out or
is not a wise decision, we will take
corrective action, as at the end of the
day our business will not suffer."
Ms Seymour said Kerzner Interna-
tional's buying department spoke
directly to suppliers and producers to
communicate the company's needs,
but it was "very dependent" on dis-
tributors, who understood its require-
ments and went out into the Bahami-
an market directly to deal with sup-
pliers.
The company also relied on distrib-
utors to grade product and ensure it


met Kerzner International's quality
standards.
Earl Deveaux, the former FNM
manager who is now marketing direc-
tor for Lucayan Tropical Produce,
echoed Ms Seymour's remarks, telling
the Conference: "We have to earn the
business. We have progressed as a
nation. We are not longer a fishing
village, but that progress has brought
challenges.
Advantage
"Kerzner cannot tell us how to be
good. We have to take advantage of
the opportunities presented by Kerzn-


Mr Deveaux added that if Bahami-
ans did not recognize there were "sys-
tematic problems" in the agricultural
sector, and recognized their part in
them, farmers would not produce
good quality products.
He said there was potential agricul-
ture that was going "unexploited",
adding that farming in the Bahamas
was "doomed to failure" without help
from the Ministry of Agriculture.
Mr Deveaux said: "The integrity of
the Bahamas as a brand, and as a peo-
ple, is so unique and special that we
should approach it with a mentality
that is worthy of the best."


Competition, not free trade, Bahamas 'greatest challenge'


The Bahamas' real challenge
is to work out how it will com-
pete in the global economy,
rather than whether it should
remain outside the World
Trade Organisation (WTO) or
free trade agreements, a
Bahamian economic think-tank
is arguing.
Minister
The Nassau Institute said
that while it was fine for Leslie
Miller, minister of trade and
industry, and Bahamians Agi-
tating for a Referendum on
Free Trade (BARF) to focus
on the potential pitfalls of
WTO membership, they would
do even better to focus on the
Bahamas' competitiveness.
The Institute said: "It would
be even more productive if
they focused on how the
Bahamas will prosper in the
global market of the 21st cen-
tury. This is the 'Greatest Chal-


!i: W th management in. a Diverse World

T.esdiy, February 7th Wednesday, February 8t, 2006
SThe British Colonial Hilton Nassau,The Bahamas
S Founding PartnEr Pn.Menrng Spomnor,


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Nassau
C. 0 N f F FR E U


lenge.' The Bahamas can hide
from this challenge only at
great peril."
Drawing on the National
Tourism Taskforce report from
2003, the Nassau Institute
recalled how the report showed
that high operating costs meant
the gross operating profitabili-
ty of Bahamian hotels was 59
per cent to 74 per cent below
those of hotels elsewhere in the
Caribbean and the US.
The report said the Bahamas
needed to become "a desirable
place to do business", with its
workforce becoming its great-
est asset. To do this, the
"norms of behaviour, conven-
tions, and codes of conduct"
must change.
Report
The Nassau Institute said the
Taskforce report showed: "It
[the Bahamas] must take con-
certed action to improve its
competitive position for all
businesses, and it identified
areas such as education, pri-


vatisation and the rule of law
where action should be taken.
The purpose of these measures
was to avoid even more drastic
remedial measures."
Economic
The economic think-tank
said, though, that there was a
problem preventing the
Bahamian workforce from
becoming the economy's great-
est asset. It added: "Since 2003
investors have made significant
commitments to hire Bahamian
workers in connection with
their approved expansion pro-
grammes. A major problem is
the hiring of competent
Bahamian workers, and this
has caused business and labour
to form the Coalition for Edu-
cation Reform. The result was
'Bahamian Youth: The
Untapped Resource', a report
presented to the Ministry of
Education in June 2005.
"The Coalition analysed the
Government's own BGCSE
report for 2004 on what stu-


dents 'know, understand and
can do after completing three
years of high school study', and
agreed with that report that the
present situAtion is 'unaccept-
able.' The Coalition made 14
specific proposals."
The Nassau Institute effec-
tively pointed out that globali-
sation was already here and
impacting the Bahamas, with
Bahamians competing for jobs
with foreigners regardless of
whether the latter are actively
coming here to seek work.
This increased competition
would happen regardless of
whether the Bahamas signed
on to the WTO and other free
trade agreements.
Institute
The Nassau Institute added
that the Tourism Taskforce
report recommended that the
Bahamas join the Free Trade
Area of the Americas (FTAA),
"but with a concerted effort to
delay the imposition of the
National Treatment clause".
The National Treatment
clause requires each country to
grant each other country and
its citizens the same induce-
ments, legal privileges and pro-
tections that it extends to its
own citizens.
The Most Favoured Nation
clause requires each country to
grant to each other member
country the same tax, legal and
regulatory framework that it
extends to its most favoured
trading partner.


Change of Pace
EXERCISE STUDIO
East Avenue. Center de







before after






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BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION


FOR SALE BY TENDER


The Bahamas Electricity Corporation offers for sale by closed tender
miscellaneous electricity meters that have been removed from the
system. The meters are to be destroyed or rendered unusable under the
supervision of the Corporation at the buyer's site.


Interested persons may collect the tender documents from the
Administration Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads, by contacting:


Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852


Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 19 January 2006 by
4:00p.m. and addressed as follows:


The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas


Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour


Marked: Tender No. 591/05


The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tendrs.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2006


the news, readr~I Insight

on Mondays)










E T E M J


* By Diane Phillips

It's been called the
hottest new trend in
hotel construction and
one of the fastest
growing niches in the
real estate market. USA Today
declared it a "boom" and Busi-


.-* -- .:. ..
, .. ; :. ,:


'-8 0%: : ,.
F..t. F'' ~ :a i" d
F F F


I
'.-
*. '
r
-r


F. i
FT
F. 'F'. A': L?


M GRAND ISLE VILLAS Night Pavilion




Tourism must 'go all out' on entertainment


FROM page 1B
ence.
He was backed up by the Ministry of
Tourism's Brendan Foulkes, who told a
different Conference session that he had
been informed there were five full-pro-
duction Bahamian shows ready to go that
night if they got the call from the hotels.
"It drives me crazy that policymakers
today are not making it contingent in the
hotel licences to have Bahamian enter-
tainment," Mr Foulkes said.
He added: "I don't know what is
Bahamian any more in the Bahamas. We
as a people have plagiarised, we have tak-
en........

Grips

"We need to come to grips with who we
are. We have to decide what we are going
to be as a destination. I don't know what


our point of difference is in this country."

Managers

Mr Ferguson said Bahamian entertainers
had allowed hotel managers to "pass the
excuse" that they were too expensive to
hire. He added that entertainers had also
been their own worst enemy at times, and
had "taken advantage of a good situation"
by not properly training and preparing
themselves to exploit the opportunities
offered by the tourism sector.
Mr Ferguson said he was talking to the
College of the Bahamas about providing
training courses and after-school pro-
grammes for budding musicians. Confer-
ence participants said the.Bahamas had
to be careful to share its culture, rather
than create cultural activity for visitors.
Angela Cleare, senior director of prod-
uct development at the Ministry of
Tourism, pointed to the festivals that took


place annually in the Family Islands, such
as the San Salvador Discovery Festival,
Cat Island's Rake N' Scrape Festival, and
the Long Island Corn Fest.
She added that the Ministry had played
an active role in cleaning up and enhancing
the Queen's Staircase in Nassau, which
attracted some .11 I ,,i visitors annually.
Renovation
Preacher's Cay in Eleuthera was under-
going a "full renovation", with beach huts
and bathrooms also being installed for vis-
itor comfort, and there were plans for com-
bined tours of this location with the island's
pineapple fields.
Also on the drawing board were eco-
tourism and nature tours in Andros, tours
of New Providence settlements, and ferry
tours in the Berry Islands, the latter in
conjunction with Royal Caribbean Cruise
Lines.


ness Week devoted a full-length
feature story to it last montl.
It's the new wave sweeping
the hotel industry, condo hotels
or condotels, a phenomenon
so recent spell check doesn't

SEE page 7B


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MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2006, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


r:-
i








P 4 O J R2INEUSH


GRAPHIC ARTIST





NEEDED

The Tribune is growing and looking for an experienced
individual to work full time as a Graphic Artist.

The individual must be computer literate and
knowledgeable in InDesign, Freehand, QuarkExpress
and Photoshop.


FROM page 1B

the list of eligible investors in
Bahamian securities to include
temporary residents, perma-
nent residents with a restricted
right to work and companies
such as British American Insur-
ance Cc.,pany, which although
foreign majority-owned are res-
ident for exchange control, pur-
poses.
Other amendments include
regional cross-border listings,
with BISX-listed firms now
able to list on the major CARI-
COM exchanges and
Caribbean companies to list on
BISX; and permission for
Bahamian broker/dealers to
finance Bahamian Depository
Receipt (BDR) issues from the
country's foreign exchange
reserves.
Measure
The latter measure effec-
tively means that the likes of
Fidelity Capital Markets and
Colina Financial Advisors can
structure BDR issues of New
York-listed stock, previously
inaccessible to Bahamian
investors, without needing
them to be sponsored by the
listed company first.
The Central Bank and the
Government are understood to


have followed almost to the let-
ter the recommendations put
to them by the committee
responsible for revitalising the
Bahamian capital markets and
Bahamas International Securi-
ties Exchange (BISX).
Amendments
Describing the amendments
as the "first step" towards
exchange control liberalisation,
Keith Davies, BISX's chief
executive, told The Tribune: "I
believe this is an historical
event, a watershed event, for
our capital markets, and puts us
where I always thought we
could be.
"It takes our capital markets
to new and higher levels. It is a
giant step in our evolution."
Larry Gibson, is vice-presi-
dent pensions, Colonial Pen-
sions Services (Bahamas), said:
"These are welcome changes
and certainly herald a step in
the right direction. I look for-
ward to the day when, in a
managed and systematic way,
we can totally eliminate
exchange controls.
"It's a significant first step
on a long journey to the elimi-
nation of exchange controls."
Michael Anderson, head of
Fidelity Capital Markets,
added: "It will significantly
change the capital markets. It's


a really big step in the right
direction, and consistent with a
policy statement announced a
year ago, when the Govern-
ment pledged to support the
capital markets. I think it's test-
ing the waters."
Mr Davies warned, though,
that the next task was to imple-
ment all the amendments
made, and BISX would work
with the Central Bank and
Securities Commission of the
Bahamas to put in place the
operational frameworks and
structures to give the regula-
tors confidence the measures
they had taken were working
correctly.

Fitted
Adding that the exchange
control amendments fitted in
to his strategy of taking "small,
incremental steps" forward
with the exchange, Mr Davies
said BISX would have to do
"the heavy lifting and hard
work to make it successful".
He added: "This is a bold
step a first for the Bahamas.
What it does, it broadens the
pool of eligible investors as we
as the pool of eligible securi-
ties. That is what permits mar-
kets to grow and I believe our
markets will really take off. It's
going in the direction I want-
ed."


FROM page 1B


ject being financed by Lyford Cay billionaire
Joe Lewis and golfers Tiger Woods and Ernie
Els.
However, the missing link in the chain has
been finding a solution for South Ocean's re-
opening, which has delayed moves towards
announcing Albany and the other projects,
The Tribune has been told.
Meanwhile, CCWIPP acknowledged that
"past due diligence processes were not always
as rigorous as they could have been for real
estate and private equity" code speak for the
British Colonial Hilton and South Ocean.
They also acknowledged that "the plan was
previously offside" on Canadian regulations
that restricted investments in real estate agabn
the Bahamian hotels and securities to a cer-
tain percentage of plan assets.
CCWIPP added that some of these breaches
were caused by "follow-on investments to pro-
tect the original investment", and all were
being corrected.
The Board of Trustees had taken "substan-
tive actions" in relating to the regulator's find-
ings, ensuring the plan came into full compli-
ance with all laws and regulations.
CCWIPP added that allegations that trustees
and plan officials had benefited personally or
received improper payments had been sho%\ n
to be totally without merit.
Nevertheless, CCWIPP's Canadian critics
are likely to view the response as a 'spin
attempt' to minimise and downplay the seri-
ousness of the findings.


PUBLIC NOTICE
TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
s hereby advised that I, BRIAN LUBIN, of #57
Street, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my
IAN ELISME. If there are any objections to this
ame by Deed Poll, you may write such objections
af Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau,
o later than thirty (30) days after the date of
of this notice.



NOTICE

NATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No. 46 of 2000)

NOBLE GROUP LIMITED
IBC NO. 84,476 B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)
lereby given that in accordance with Section 131 (2)
national Business Companies Act No. 46 of 2000,
Limited is in Dissolution.

having a Claim against the Noble Group Limited is
before February 15, 2006 to send their name, address
; of the debt or claim to the Liquidator of the Company,
hereof they may be excluded from the benefit of any
nade before such claim is approved.

sultants Limited, of 2nd Floor Ansbacher House,
ast Street North, is the Liquidator of Noble Group

LIQUIDATOR


An opportunity arises for a few years qualified accountant to provide accounting ment that would be located in downtown Nas-
services to the Group holding company and its shareholders in Nassau. The role sau adjacent to the British Colonial Hilton.
Island Global Yachting, a subsidiary of Island
represents a ground floor opportunity in the establishment of an increasing physical Capital Group, a private equity firm specialis-
presence in Nassau and will provide an exciting challenge to an ambitious accountant ing in real estate transactions and securitisation,
who is looking to gain entry to a successful and fast growing international firm. said in a statement that it had "entered into var-
The role will include support to activities beyond the group's property interests. ous agreements" to buildand develop a mega-
yacht facility in Nassau Harbour.
The Prime Minister himself alluded to the
The successful candidate will be Bahamian or will have the right to work in The project in his address to the PLP Convention,
Bahamas, be fully qualified (USA CPA, Canadian or UK CA or equivalent), and saying: "In downtown Nassau, the landmark
.British Colonial Hilton, along with the vacant
will have gained some sound practical experience in an audit firm, commercial properties to the west, are to be redeveloped to
or industrial business. The candidate must be able to demonstrate excellent incorporate a multi-use harbour front and mari-
interpersonal communication and first class English Language skills (other language na facility, residential condominiums and an
skills will be a plus), IT literacy and an attention to detail. For the right applicant upscale shopping complex, all without inter-
0 afering in any way with the traditional rights of
the position offers the opportunity to develop existing analysis and associated access Bahamians have to the beach and waters
commercial business skills. The position calls for a young but mature executive at the Western Esplanade."
with lots of energy and a willingness to work whatever hours may be necessary, CCWIPP and its broker/adviser, Florida-
based Allen & Co, have had a much harder
as transactional circumstances require, in order to get the job done accurately and time in resolving the South Ocean situation.
on time. Some international travel will be necessary. The Tribune has heard unconfirmed reports
that a buyer or joint venture partner, with
The terms and conditions of employment will be commensurate with the altnoughaeira c ntiy ns,e a myteyfound,
qualifications and experience of the applicant and will be attractive to the right The ongoing South Ocean dilemma has
candidate. caused problems for other projects in the area.
Prime Minister Perry Christie wants to make a
e sd o vr ur d il C t T C irma T Win rb m major announcement involving the port relo-
Please send or deliver your detailed CV to The Chairman, The Winterbotham cation from downtown Nassau to south-west
Trust Company Limited, Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, New Providence, the re-routing of South West
P.O. Box N-3026, Nassau, The Bahamas or email to: chairman@vip-wtb.com Bay Street and, finally, unveil approval of the
Albany Project, the upscale residential pro-


PI
INTENT
Co 01- ^SSSlinSa The Public i
Financial Advisors Ltd.. Te Pu c
Brougham
Pricing Information As Of:
11 January 2006 name to BR
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES VISIT WWW BISXBAHAMAS.COM F"OR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
BISX ALL SHARE INDEk: CLOSE 1.352.06 / CHG -01 61 / "%CHG -00 12/ YTD 01.35 / YTD % 00.1 change of n
. "-I 5,2..... -LvS ,m.nbl Pre...iu.C Clc,.e T,:.Oj s Ci.:- Cr.ang. E,,'.I '.'01 EPS Di, $ P6E YIol to the Chie
1.10 0.73 Abaco Markets 0.73 0.73 0.00 -0.169 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.52 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 10.40 10.52 0.12 1.200 1.456 0.360 7.2 3.42% Bahamas n
7.24 5.55 Bank of Bahamas --.._7.00 7.00 0.00 0.587 0.330 11.6 4.71%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 6:70 0.70 0.00 0.175 0.020 4.0 2.86% publication
1.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.26 1.26 0.00 0.105 0.060 12.0 4.76%
1.20 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.10 1.10 0.00 0.070 0.040 15.7 3.64%
9.60 7.20 Cable Bahamas 9.55 9.55 0.00 24.069 0.689 0.240 13.9 2.51%
2.20 2.03 Colina Holdings 1.64 1.64 0.00 -0.046 0.000 NM 0.00%
9.17 7.10 Commonwealth Bank 9.11 9.00 -0.11 1,997 0.791 0.450 11.4 5.00%
2.50 1.50 Doctor's Hospital 2.26 2.26 0.00 2,000 0.429 0.000 5.0 0.00%
6.20 3.96 Famguard 6.20 6.20 0.00 0.428 0.240 13.0 3.87%
10.90 9.75 Finco 10.90 10.90 0.00 0.717 0.530 15.2 4.86%
10.90 7.50 FirstCaribbean 10.90 10.90 0.00 0.695 0.500 13.2 4.59%
10.05 8.00 Focol 10.05 10.05 0.00 0.833 0.500 12.1 4.98% INTER
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 -0.062 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.95 9.95 0.00 0.526 0.405 15.1 5.43%
9.10 8.22 J. S. Johnson 9.05 9.10 0.05 5,000 0.572 0.560 15.8 6.19%
7.00 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 6.98 7.00 0.02 1,983 0.138 0.000 50.5 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.760 4-9 7.60%
Fidehty Over-The-Counter Secunte a
52.'.k-H I _.'.. "Lo.% Symbol B.d S ai L -ai Prcl .eveeki, '. i EPS S DI. i P E Yield
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.75 13.75 11.00 1.768 0.720 7.5 5.24%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.044 0.000 NM 0.00% NOTICE is h
Colina Oer-Tre-Counte Srcuriutas
a4 0o 28 u'0 OE BD 8 O .':. :J I 00r .220 o o C00 194 0'o :C' (a) of the Inte
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.75 13.75 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93% Noble Group
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
,2."K Hi 5.-.'K.L,.'. Fund Namr. Ni 'V YTD. LaSt 12 l. l:,r.m D.. S Y.el3 : Any person h
1.2689 1.2014 Colina Money Market Fund 1.268882*
2.5864 2.0704 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.5864 required on or
10.7674 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.7674*** and particulars
2.3220 2.1746 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.321976**
1.1442 1.0782 Colina Bond Fund 1.144217"** or in default t]
FINDEX CLOSE 435.630 YTD 1 321, / 2003 14.88% distribution m
BISX ALL SHARE INDE X 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Collna and Fidellth
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelit) Redcorn Con
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for datly volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price Shirley and E
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to da EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Limited.
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
"* AS AT DEC. 31, 2005/ ** AS AT NOV. 30, 2005
- AS AT DEC. 30. 2005/ *"* AS AT DEC. 31. 2005/ ."" AS AT DEC 31. 2005
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 I FIDELITY 242-366-776 '


Exchange control




changes 'first step




to elimination'


Ground floor opportunity for ambitious

QUALIFIED ACCOUNTANT


Our client is a successful Bahamas based international property company, which
manages in excess of a billion USD in commercial properties in Europe, The Far
East and the USA. The holding company of the Group, which has a substantial
equity base, is located in Nassau and the Group uses partnership and corporate
structures domiciled in Nassau for many of its investment projects. Group projects
include joint ventures with international Investment Banks institutions and family
offices.


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2006


THE TRIBUNE








TH TIBNEMODA, ANAR 1, 00, AG 5


AExcangDe ConDETAI



AMENDMENTS IN DETAIL


Investment currency
market rate
FOR Bahamians to make investments in securities and
real estate overseas, they have to go through the Investment
Curreny Market at the Central Bank.
The premium bid and offer rates the rates at which
Bahamians purchase foreign currency to make the invest-
ment, and what they pay when they redeem it are to be
halved from 25 and 20 per cent respectively to 12.5 per cent
and 10 per cent.
Current investors, should they wish to do so, will be allowed
until March 31, 2006, to liquidate their investments at the
old rate.

Publicly traded securities list-
ed on BISX as BDRs
ANNUALLY, up to five per cent of the external reserves
at previous year's end, but not to exceed $25 million, can be
used to fund the structure of BDR issues at the official
exchange rate. Approvals will be required from regulators, and
the operational framework for this is still being worked out.
Broker/dealers will be allowed to structure and market the
BDRs.

Broadening of capital
markets investors
TEMPORARY Residents and Permanent Residents (with
a restricted right to work) can invest in "obligations" of BISX-
listed companies up to an aggregate total of 10 per cent of the
issue/offering They can also invest in government-registered
stock, for which the Central Bank acts as registrar, subject to
a $100,000 per person/entity limit.
Companies designated as resident for exchange control
purposes, and with no term restrictions on their domestic
operations, such as insurance companies and brokerage hous-
es, can now invest in BISX-listed stocks up to a limit of 10 per
cent of the issue/offering per investing entity. There are no lim-
its on their investments in other public and private sector
securities. All investments have to be in Bahamian dollars.

Regional Cross
Border Listings
BISX-listed companies can list their stock on CARICOM


exchanges Trinidad & Tobago, Jamaica, Barbados subject
to a limit of 10 per cent of their issued share capital, and a max-
imum of $20 million per annum.
CARICOM companies on the main regional exchanges
can list on BISX, provided the cost value of net capital (pur-
chases less sales) invested by Bahamians does not exceed $5
million per quarter and $20 million annually.

Foreign investments by
the National Insurance
Board (NIB)
NIB has been allowed to invest a maximum of $25 million
annually abroad, at the official exchange rate.

Employee Stock Option/
Share Purchase Plans
TO allow Bahamian employees of foreign-owned institu-
tions in the Bahamas to take advantage of opportunities aris-
ing from their employment, the investment limit on employ-
ee contributory ESOPs has been increased from $10,000 per
year to $25,000 per year through the official market.

Timeshare investments
RESIDENTS may now invest up to $25,000 per family
unit, once every ten years, at the official rate to purchase
timeshares abroad.

Emigration
.BAHAMIANS taking up permanent residency abroad may
now transfer out the foreign currency equivalent of $250,000
per annum, at the official rate, which is an increase over the
previous $125,000 limit.

Credit Facilities for
Temporary Residents
TEMPORARY Residents may now borrow up to $50,000
for consumer loans, up from $15,000. Further, Temporary
Residents who have resided and worked in the Bahamas for
at least three years, may borrow up to $200,000 to finance own-
er occupied dwellings, eliminating the need for a case by case
consideration of requests.


EMPLOYMENT SEARCH

A Financial Training Company is currently in
search of a Seminars and Marketing Coordinator, who
possesses the following Skills; organizational and
coordination skills, computer literate in Microsoft
Word and Excel, and event planning.

A Bachelor degree in Marketing, Business
Management, Business Administration or Event
Planning is also a requirement.

If you meet the above qualification please call us at
242-326-7314



VACANCY NOTICE


SENIOR RESEARCH OFFICER
Core Functions: Produce quality economic research for
policy decisions, publication, and
dissemination at conferences in areas
relating to the monetary and financial
sector, public finance and fiscal policy,
the real sector, and internal economics.
Education, Knowledge and Experience Requirements:
Master's degree in Economics, Finance or Policy
Research related area from a recognized tertiary
institution;

Sound knowledge of analytical and econometric
techniques;

Excellent oral and written communication skills;

Ability to work in a team and under pressure;

Proficiency in MS Windows based applications
and statistical software;

A minimum of three (3) years relevant experience.
Interested persons should provide copy(ies) of their
degrees) and transcripts) to:

The Human Resources Manager
DA No. 9438
P.O.Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline: Friday, January 20, 2006


r N'


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MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2006, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B. MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2006


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


NOTICE

KLEENAIR SYSTEMS
INTERNATIONAL, INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in
dissolution, commencing on the 6th day of January, 2006. Articles
of Dissolution have been duly registered by the Registrar. The
Liquidator is Paul A. Gomez, P.O.Box N-8285, Nassau, The
Bahamas.
All persons having Claims against the above-named Company
are required on or before the 11th day of February, 2006 to send
their names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims
to the Liquidators of the Company or, in default thereof, they
may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before
such debts are proved.
Dated this 11th day of January, 2006
PAUL A. GOMEZ
Liquidator



NOTICE

C-MAX ADVANTAGE FUND LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in
dissolution, commencing on the 14th day of January, 2005.
Articles of Dissolution have been duly registered by the Registrar.
The Liquidator is Paul A. Gomez, P.O.Box N-8285, Nassau, The
Bahamas.
All persons having Claims against the above-named Company
are required on or before the 11th day of February, 2006 to send
their names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims
to the Joint Liquidators of the Company or, in default thereof,
they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made
before such debts are proved.
Dated this 11th day of January, 2006 .
PAUL A. GOMEZ
Liquidator









Regional Head of

Risk and Compliance
RBC Caribbean
The successful candidate should possess the
following qualifications:
University Degree in Law (or a related field)
Minimum 7 years banking experience in Compliance.
Previous experience in Compliance and Money
Laundering would be an asset.
Problem solving skills
Thinking skills (analytical, breakthrough, conceptual
and strategic)
Strong communication and coaching skills
Proven leadership and management experience
SProficiency in Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, Power Point)

Responsibilities include:
Responsible for the implementation and continuance
of an effective Anti-Money Laundering programme
across the Caribbean, that meets the requirements of
local regulations, RBC policies, and GPB requirements.
This includes ensuring that sufficient training is carried
out, that clients are monitored in a way that minimizes
risk to RBC whilst respecting business necessities.
Responsible for ensuring that any potential Money
Laundering incidents are dealt with effectively.
Centre of expertise on regulatory requirements in the
different countries in the Caribbean in which RBC
Caribbean Retail Banking and Global Private Banking
operate.
Providing a forum for on-going analysis of the risks
GPB faces in the region, and assessment of any changes
in those risks, and a means to mitigate unacceptable
risks.
Travel is required.
A competitive compensation package (base salary and
bonus) is offered based on experience and qualifications.
Please apply before January 20, 2006 to:
The Manager
Human Resources
Bahamas & Caribbean


Royal Bank of Canada
Bahamas Regional Office
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, N.P, Bahamas
Via fax: (242)328-7145
Via email: bahcayjp@rbc.com





9


Bahamas makes





hotels attractive





for investment





by Bahamians


FROM page IB

prime-time resort in the Fami-
ly Islands was born, he was on
the brink of realising his dream.
Speaking at the National
Tourism Conference, Mr Wil-
son said despite the numerous
obstacles that exist to Family
Island development, Bahami-
ans should not be afraid to take
the first brave step.
"These are the best times to
get started," he said. "Do not
let this opportunity pass. The
Bahamas is hot right now.
Florida is essentially sold out
of the high-end home invest-
ments, and we have the poten-
tial to sustain this for a very
long time."
Pension funds offered a good
way for Bahamians to partici-
pate in Family Island develop-
ment, because the investment is
long-term, ripening around the
time when the investor is ready
to retire.
Mr Wilson said: "Resort
development is a good invest-
ment for long-term. We haven't
had dividends yet, but the val-
ue of our assets has gone up
tremendously. Eleuthera Prop-
erties does not owe one bank
one penny. If we did we'd be
out of business:"
He added it has become a
sort of culture in the country,
where Bahamians are general-


ly shy to put their money into
investment pools. However, he
said "people are becoming
more open-minded about
investing".
The 1,500 acre Cotton Bay
project is expected to be
unveiled in two phases, with
Phase I comprising of two and
three-bedroom villas, 114
estate lots, and a 20,000-square
foot clubhouse.


While everyone can be
involved in investment, "there
is something called passion"
that will determine the level of
success, said Mr Wilson. "You
can have a great vision, but you
must have passion. I remem-
ber Sir Lynden recalling the
calypso man's words to me -
'Do something, say something'.
Not say something, do some-
thing."


* ~~iX~lCI I@ S ms
sae.onlttsooti


fo-avrylogtie
Franklyn Wilson


The soft opening is sched-
uled for December 2006, with
25 beach front units and a club-
house with full amenities and
services, and a private marina.
The minister of tourism,
Obie Wilchcombe, addressed
the issue in his closing charge
to the Conference, calling on
those involved in the industry
to begin to think of themselves
as owners, rather than simply
service providers.


NOTICE

Kendolyn V. Cartwright
Counsel and Attorney at Law
Notary Public

is pleased to announce that effective 16th January
2006 the name of the Law Firm has changed from:-

LEGAL SERVICES CENTRE
TO
AKSUM LAW CHAMBERS
Okra Hill Road
P.O.Box N-919
Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone: (242) 393-5984\5
Facsimile: (242) 393-5982




NOTICE


IN THE ESTATE OF IRVIN LIVINGSTONE
BAIN late of Jackfish Drive, Golden Gates #2 in
the Island of New Providence in the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas.
Deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claims
against the above-named Estate are required, on or before
the 31st day of January 2006 to send their names and
addresses and particulars of their debts or claims, to the
undersigned, and if so required by notice in writing from
the undersigned, to come in and prove such debts or claims,
or in default thereof they will be excluded from the benefit
of any distribution AND all persons indebted to the said
Estate are asked to pay their respective debts to the
undersigned at once.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the expiration
of the time mentioned above, the assets of the late IRVIN
LIVINGSTONE BAIN will be distributed among the
persons entitled thereto having regard only to the claims
of which the Executors shall then have had notice.

c/o Nadia A. Wright
Attorney for the Executors
Graham, Thompson & Co.
Sassoon House
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue
P.O. Box N-272
Nassau, Bahamas


In giving pointers to confer-
ence delegates for when they're
ready to "do something", Mr
Wilson said they should make
sure they have a high tolerance
for risk, and remember they
"can't control all the variables".
"When you are planning
your development, make
assumptions. You should con-
stantly be asking yourself 'what
if', and try every assumption
you could dream," Mr Wilson
added.
He also advised: "Be slow to
develop on borrowed money,
and if you do borrow, be quick
to pay it back. Don't be afraid
of partners we have over 40.
Be slow to depend on the
unwritten word of any politi-
cian. You have to realise their
circumstances also change.
Technology is proving to be a
great ally. The Internet opens
many opportunities to small
developers on the Family
Islands."
Also on the conference's
development planning panel
was the executive director of
the Public Utilities Commis-
sion (PUC), Barrett Russell.
He said the PUC was push-
ing for the liberalisationn of the


utilities service providers".
Mr Russell said the use of
private capital was necessary,
and the PUC was created to
give investors a level of comfort
and fairplay.
Due to the problems that
Nassau faces in terms of traffic,
water, electricity and telecom-
munications, "the only way to
curb that is to develop the
Family Islands", Mr Russell
said.
"The development of the
Family Islands are, out of
necessity, tourism-based. The
PUC can use its regulatory
powers to give advice to
investors. We hope there will
be some new developments in
the future that we can partici-
pate in."
Distinguished Caribbean
educator and cultural icon, Pro-
fessor Rex Nettlefor,d
addressed the delegates during
the opening of National
Tourism Week, giving them the
charge: "The Bahamas must be
for Bahamians".
He said: "Jamaica has a pop-
ular folk song which goes: 'Gi
me back mi shilling wid me lion
pon it', and the Rastafarians
have continued that particular
self-asserting struggle by adopt-
ing the Lionof Judah as sym-
bol in deifying Haile Selassie,
bearing one of his many titles,
'Conquering Lion of Judah'.
"'My Bahamas', in the spirit
of such self-assertion to own
not just turf, but a whole vision
of self as concentrated, self-
reliant, creative agents, totally
responsible for the shaping and
determining one's destiny.No
government or set of leaders
displacing the colonial dispen-;
sation dare betray this mission.
"It is significant, then, that
your Ministry of Tourism
should settle on a theme like
this as if to send signals that
despite our heavy dependence
on would-be latter day Colum-
buses, including the architects
of globalisation the newest
agent of world domination, the
land ('My Bahamas'), the sun
that shines on it, the sand, that
fringes it, and the sea that sur-
rounds it must belong to


t UBS
UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd., a leading international
trust company, is presently looking for a


Trust Officer

This position is open to candidates with the following
minimum requirements:

Qualifications
* Bachlor's degree in a relevant discipline;
Post graduate degree in law and/ or a STEP
designation;
* Several years experience in an offshore trust
company:
* Ability to speak a second language is a plus;
* Extensive PC knowledge

Personal qualities
* Good analytical, organisational and
communication skills:
* Committed to service excellence:
* Able to work on own initiative;
* Positive and flexible attitude;
* Teamplayer

Interested persons meeting the above criteria should
apply in writing, enclosing a full resume with cover
letter to:

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O.Box N7757
Nassau, Bahamas


I


I


BUINS








MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2006, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE


Condo hotels the latest trend


FROM page 3B

recognize the word. But its
rapidly-growing popularity
blurs the line between vacation
and investment making
where you play pay, particu-
larly in popular tourist desti-
nations in the US, Caribbean
and Bahamas. No longer just
a room with a view, many of
today's new or yesterday's
converted properties are
rooms with revenue. And not
just for developers or hotel
companies, but for individual
owners to enjoy.
Based on a principle similar
to condo ownership, condotels
allow owners to buy a room,
unit or as in the case of one
high-end property in Exuma in
the Bahamas a complete two-
storey villa with the option to
use it when they want and
place it in a hotel management
company's hands when they
don't.
Unlike timeshare, the owner
is not buying one or two weeks
per year, but actually buying
the room or villa outright and
then agreeing to place it in a
pool so it can be rented out,
with the hotel management
company splitting the rental
revenue with the owner. Like
condos, condo hotels come
complete with a condo associ-
ation and maintenance fees.
Like hotels, they come com-
plete with maid service and all
the amenities. At the property
in Exuma called Grand Isle
Villas, they come complete
with someone to unpack your
bags, turn down your bed and
offer you en-villa (or on patio
overlooking sea) dining.
"What we have created is
really a hybrid," says Jim
Clabaugh, president of EGI
Ltd, developers of Grand Isle
Villas. "It's the best of both
worlds, a luxurious place to
stay when you want to vaca-
tion, and a revenue-earner
when someone else does."
Some analysts say the largest
wave of new construction in
the resort industry will be
based on the concept of indi-
vidual ownership; others add
that it has rescued older prop-
erties, providing the capital
injection needed for renova-
tions and upgrade.
Although Grand Isle Villas is
the highest end hybrid-hotel -
owners can write a cheque for
up to $5.5 million for a pent-
house and guests can stay for a
week with family and friends
for about $25,000 it isn't the
only place in the Bahamas rid-
ing the wave. Pineapple Fields
in Eleuthera, a 110-mile long
island about an hour's flight
from Fort Lauderdale, is selling
villas at $299,000 with the
option of resort rentals.
Says USA Today in a Sep-
tember 27 issue: "At a time
when traditional hotel financ-
ing can be hard to get, devel-
opers like the upfront capital
from buyers' deposits and the
higher per-square-foot prices."
Ironically, Grand Isle Villas
did not start out as a condo
hotel. The project, located on
the highest peak of Emerald
Bay, a stone's throw from the
posh Four Seasons resort with
a 360-degree view of ocean and
bay waters, was conceived as a
high-end condominium on a
Family Island in the Bahamas
that was so laid-back that it still
does not have a traffic light and
the only time a driver honks is
to hail someone he knows.
"We wanted to create a com-
munity on a quiet island that
would combine the best of all
worlds, and that meant marry-
ing the freedom of being away
from it all with the reality of
having everything you ever
dreamed of in a perfect vaca-
tion at your fingertips. This
isn't like New York or even
Miami. When you run out of
something, you can't just run
down the street to get it. When
machinery breaks down, the
part most likely has to be
imported. This is an island. It
presented its challenges," says
Mr Clabaugh, who with his
senior vice-president, who is
also his wife, first discovered
the Exumas as boaters many
years before.
Even as they built tall and
high-end condos that changed
the skyline of southwest Flori-
da in the Sarasota, Longboat


Key areas Sarabande, Tan-
gerine Bay Club, Villa di Lan-
cia, Tessera, Lighthouse Point -
the almost startling beauty of
Exuma kept teasing them.
"Exuma has been called the
yachting capital of the West-
ern Hemisphere," says Mr


waters are just about as beau-
tiful as any you will ever find
anywhere."
When Mr Clabaugh, McCul-
lough and their team decided
to develop a property in Exu-
ma, other pieces of the puzzle
had begun to fall into place.
The Government of the
Bahamas had built a 7,000-foot
long runway at the airport,
enough for a Boeing 737 to
land on comfortably. The Four
Seasons resort was going up.
Property that had sat idle for
years attracting frogs in rain
was now attracting foreign
investors in droves who recog-
nised the potential, most want-
ing a single-family residence as
a second home. Bahamians
who could afford it began buy-
ing lots, building rental units.
For an island that had only
changed by 20 persons from
the 1990 census to the 2000
census, the next few years
proved almost overwhelming.
Then, as the first model units
went up at Grand Isle Villas,
guests wandered over from the
Four Seasons down the beach,
some out of curiosity and oth-
ers to tour villas for possible
purchase. "We heard the words
'Why can't we stay here?' so
many times," says Pamela
McCullough, senior vice-presi-
dent of EGI Ltd, "that it final-
ly sank in. Why can't we have
guests who enjoy the villas?
"They'd have far more than
they would get in a hotel, even
a fine one. The villas are more
than 2,000 square feet. They've
got natural stone flooring,
vaulted cypress ceilings, 8-foot
sliding glass doors, marble
baths, gourmet kitchens with
Sub Zero and Dacor appli-
ances, plasma and LCD TVs.
Everything from the dishes in
the cabinets to the duvets on
the beds was first class. So we
began investigating the new
concept of condo hotels and
we made the switch."
In place of one of the resi-
dential buildings originally
planned, a two-storey building
is rising, restaurant on top
floor, administration offices,
reception area, library and
more on the first floor.
There will be 75, one, two
and three-bedroom villas, and
several penthouses when the
project is complete. Now, as a
condohotel, the resort compo-
nent will be managed by Grand
Caribbean Resorts Ltd, a sep-
arate company from the devel-
opers and one that specialises
in operating a first class hotel.
Villas at Grand Isle start at
$750,000 for the furnished one-
bedroom, and run up to more
than $5 million for a penthouse.
Membership in the Greg Nor-
man Golf Course that wends
its way through Grand Isle is
included with the purchase of
the two and three-bedroom vil-
las and penthouses.
Condotel guests are entitled
to use the same amenities own-
ers are a fitness centre over-
looking the sea with plasma
TVs, a freeform infinity pool,
outdoor dining or they can
use the 16,000 square foot spa
at Four Season,s where they
pay just as a hotel guest there
would to be pampered.
They also have access to the
Emerald Bay Marina & Yacht
Club with dockage fees or club
membership, a separate cost
from villa ownership. They can
dine at either. They can even
have Grand Isle's concierge
staff pre-stock their kitchen
with foods they request or pop
the corks on their bubbly.
"Kerzner International,
which created such a phenom-
enal success with Atlantis, has
discovered the benefits of con-
do hotels, that's why they are
building on Paradise Island
now," says Mr Clabaugh.
"There must be more than
two dozen projects in Miami,
from the Fountainbleau to Le
Meridien. People, even those
of means, are far more con-
scious of how they spend and
how they earn today than they
ever were before. A condo
hotel like Grand Isle Villas
offers the best of both worlds, a
place of your own to vacation
in with all the pampering of a
five-star hotel and when you're
not there, it continues to pay
for itself because someone else
is enjoying it as much as you
did, but you are deriving
income.
"And it gives you a sense of


being in the hotel business, just
a little bit, like owning shares in
a company, but you can actu-
ally sleep, swim, play golf and
enjoy the benefits in a tangi-
ble way. I predict strong suc-
cess and growth in the condotel


Vacancy for Sales Manager

Del Sol is a growing company with two locations in Nassau.
We are committed to creating fun, joy smiles and memories for
everyone under the sun.

The successful individual should possess the following:-

- Educated to a degree level preferably but not essential with
concentration in Business, Marketing or Tourisum.
- Experience in Retail or Tourism a plus but not necessary.
- Strong leadership and coaching skills.
- Ability to deal tactfully with customers, clients and suppliers.
- Excellent communication skills, both written and oral.
- Commitment to customer service excellence.
- Knowledge of PC skills (MS Word, MS Excel).
- Must be highly energetic, a people's person and self motivated.
- Must have strong sales ability.and is able to manage with out
any supervision.

We offer good benefits and salary is commensurate with
experience and education.

Interested persons please submit a cover letter and your resume
no later than 20 January 2006 via;

Fax: 323-4622/ 356-4514 or
e-mail: anissa@delsolbs




NOTICE OF SALE


The Town Court Management Company (hereafter "the
company") invites offers for the purchase ALL THAT Unit
Number B-26 of The Town Court Condominiums situated
on Nassau Street in the Western District of the Island of
New Providence being a two bedroom/one bath apartment
unit together with ALL THAT 1.60% share in the common
property of the Condominiums.

The Company makes no representations or warranties with
respect to the state of repair of the building situate thereon.

The Company will sell under Power of Sale contained in
a Declaration of Condominium of Town Court
Condominiums dated 8th October 1979 which is recorded
in Book 3189 at pages 366 to 405.

TERMS: Ten percent (10%) of the purchase price at the
time of contract and the balance upon completion within
Sixty (60) days of contract.

This sale is subject to reserve price. The Company reserves
the right to reject any and all offers.

Interested persons may submit written offers addressed to
the Attorney SSS, P.O. Box N-272, Nassau, Bahamas to be
received no later than the close of business on the 31st day
of January, A.D., 2006.


POSITION AVAILABLE

AIR AMBULANCE SERVICES LTD.

The premier emergency air ambulance in The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Turks & Caicos
& South Florida.

Requires: Full Time/Part Time Registered Nurses
& Paramedics.

Qualifications:
i) Must have at least three years experience
ii) Significant postgraduate experience i.e. critical
care
iii) Competent in procedural skills i.e.

a) Advance Cardiolife Support
b) emergency Management of Trauma
c) IV Insertion
d) Interpretation of ECG & Defibrillator

iv) Excellent Communication Skills

Attractive Compensation Package

Please send resume to:

ADMINISTRATOR
Air Ambulance Services Ltd.
P.O. Box N 1043
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 242-362-0274
Email: admin@aaslifeflight.com







.Y"mIle W"&& 3_a;F Yrcwod
"Teach Me, 0 Lot Thy y",...Psal m 119:1

TEACHING VACANCIES

Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street

Invites applications from qualified Christian teachers for the
following positions for the 2006-2007 school year:

Health Science (Gr. 7-9)
Agriculture (Gr. 7-9)
Religious Knowledge/ Bible (Gr. 7-9)

Applicants must:

A. Be a practicing born-again Christian who is willing to
subscribe to the Statement of Faith of Temple Christian
School.
B. Have a Bachelor's degree in Education or higher from
a recognized College or University in the area of
specialization.
C. Have a valid Teacher's Certificate or Diploma.
D. Have at least two years teaching experience in the
relevant subject area with excellent communication
skills.
E. Applicants must have the ability to prepare students
for all examinations to the BJC'BGCSE levels.
F. Be willing to participate in the high school's extra
curricular programmes.

Application must be picked up at the High School Office on
Shirley and be returned immediatley with a full curriculum vitae,
recent coloured photograph and three references to:

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O.Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas







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MONDAY EVENING


JANUARY 16, 2006


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

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B WPBT show Marblehead art pottery date back to public first lady Eleanor Roosevelt. n (CC) (DVS)
1910; character canes.
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Special f (CC)
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S WSVN Jack tnes to follow up on the leads he has developed. (N) n (PA Part 2
of 2) (CC)
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D WPLG (CC (CC) meets beautiful women in the City of some of the women on a tour of
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A&E Files(CC) an skater tries to stage a comeback.
(N) (CC)
Extra Time BBC News World Business BBC News Click Online Es- BBC News Asia Today
BBCI (Latenight). Report (Latenight). sential guide to (Latenight).
computers.
SBET Movie Special ** LITTLE RICHARD (2000, Biography) Leon, Jenifer Lewis, Carl Remixed (N) The Parkers n
BET (N) Lumbly. The flamboyant musician experiences highs and lows. (CC)
BC Coronation CHARLES & CAMILLA: WHATEVER LOVE MEANS (2005) Laurence CBC News: The National (CC)
C Street (CC) Fox. The prince has a furtive romance with his longtime love. (CG)
C(:00) The Suze The Apprentice f (CC) Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNBC Orman Show
CNN (:00) The Situa- Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)
C. N tion Room
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DISN A former jazz Too Much Pres- 'The Grill Nexl "Hearts and "Out of Control" A former jazz (CC)
singer. (N) sure" Door" Minds" (CC) singer.


This Old House Weekend Deco- Material Girls Fresh Coat
n (CC) rating


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Funky


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Knitty Gitty


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SESPN :0 College Basketball Kansas at Missouri. (Live) College Basketball Connecticut at Syracuse. (Live) (CC)

ESPNI (:00) Tennis Australian Open -- Early Round -- Da.2. From Melbourne, Australia. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) (CC)
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baby;(CC) Talent show. ( ..(CC). feels negiecied night together. (V(CC), "Bob Jobn )
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LIFE balist, Dan Lauria, Finola Hughes. An inmate risks her reporters set out to solve their mentor's murder. (CC)
life to expose a prison sex ring. (CC)
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OLN :00) Wanted: NHL Hockey Tampa Bay Lightning at San Jose Sharks. From the HP Pavilion at San Jose, NHL Postgame
OLN ed or Alive Calif. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) Show
SPEE American Mus- Dream Car Dream Car Barrett-Jackson: Life on the My Classic Car MotorWeek (N)
SPEED cle Car Garage Garage Block (N)
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dy Express" aunt. (N) A (CC) for music. (N)

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(1992) (CC)
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n 'PG-13' (CC)
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man at college. t 'PG'(CC) family. f 'R (CC)
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PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2006


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First camp for

VMG Racing

programme
* CYCLING

THE new VMG Racing
(VMG) professional pro-
gram completed its first
full training camp in Nas-
sau last week getting an
early season head-start
with on and off road team
building. The team logged
over 24 hours of cycling
in New Providence and
Eleuthera, were treated
to a seminar on sports
nutrition, held an infor-
mal race at week's end,
and participated in formal
photo shoots for sponsors
and publicity.
While the week's
schedule was full of var-
ied training, educational,
and social events and the
riders were thrilled to be
in the Bahamas, the main
focus of the training camp
was certainly serious busi-
ness. Team Manager Dan
Larson stated, "The idea
behind the training camp
was to give the riders a
chance to get some base
mileage in while getting
to know their team mates,
to get a feel for the riders
they will be spending
much of 2006 with."
The low-intensity, high-
duration training camp
gave the riders an oppor-
tunity to get a feel for
their form compared to
the rest of the team and
enabled them to set their
personal andteam goals




Taylor, 2005 US National
Junior Time Trial Cham-
pion, commented, "I
think the experiences we
got to share down in the
Bahamas gave us all a
common bond that will
help us function better as
a team throughout the
coming year."
While many other UCI
teams develop team
familiarity and cohesive-
ness as the season
progress, VMG Racing is
now well on its way to
having achieved these
early in the season.
The seminar on sports
nutrition was held early in
the week supporting the
importance VMG places
on this aspect of the
demanding sport of
cycling. Riders were
treated to a robust sport
nutrition discussion host-
ed by esteemed US
researcher/nutritionist/wri
ter Monique Ryan. Hav-
ing worked as a nutrition-
ist for several profession-
al cycling teams in the
past, Ryan offered


insights into specific
issues facing athletes at
the elite levels of cycling.
In addition to basic topics
of pre, during, and post
race nutrition, the discus-
sions delved into areas of
sport supplement safety,
weight control, and disor-
dered eating all impor-
tant, and some challeng-
ing, issues for profession-
al riders.


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Bahamians in action


in collegiate scene


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

EVERY year on the Unit-
ed States' collegiate scene,
you can expect to see a clash
between two Bahamians.
This year is no exception
with Tiavannia Thompson
and Alexandria Oembler
expected to go head-to-head
in the women's short sprint
hurdles.
The first encounter between
the two competitors was
scheduled for this weekend in
the women's 60 metres hur-
dles at the Arkansas Invita-
tional at the Randal Tyson
Track Center at the Universi-
ty of Arkansas.
But, while Thompson came
up with a fourth place finish in
the final in 8.47 seconds on
Saturday, Oembler didn't get
to complete her race in the
preliminary round.
There was no indication of
exactly what happened to
Oembler, but the St.
Augustine's College graduate
did run in the preliminaries
of the 60 metre dash, coming
in 31st overall in 8.23.
She didn't make it to the
final, but Oembler also ran in
the preliminaries of the 200,
coming in 29th overall in
26.61.
Also at the meet, Adrian
Carey, competing for Kansas,
was 15th overall in the men's
60 dash preliminaries in 7.00.
Carey also competed in the
400, finishing ninth in 21.81.
And Anthon Bowleg, also


competing for Kansas, ran
51.12 for 26th place in the
men's 400.
Meanwhile, there were a
couple of Bahamians compet-
ing in other meets around the
United States.
At the Virginia Tech Invi-
tational at the Rector Field
House in Blacksburg, Virginia
over the weekend, Kenrick
Brathwaite clocked 7.01 sec-
onds for second place in the
fourth of eight heats in the
preliminaries of the men's 60
metres.
It turned out to be the 18th
best time, eliminating him
from the semifinals.
Brathwaite, representing
Norfolk State, also produced a
fourth place finish in four0of
five flights in the long jurip
with a best leap of 22-feet; 6
1/4-inches.
The St. Augustine's College
graduate was the lohe
Bahamian competing at the
meet.
At the Houston Indoor
Opener at the University of
Houston's Bill Yeoman Field
House, Jason Edwards sur-
prisingly raced to a sixth place
finish in the second of eight
heats in the men's 55 dash,
turning in a time of 6.69.
He didn't advance to the
next round.
Also at the meet, Devario
Johnson of the University of
Texas at-Arlington was ninth
in the men's long jump with a
leap of 21-10. The winning
jump was 24-3 3/4 by Chris
Gillis of Baylor.


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SECTION


Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


I ,.


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


HUGH CAMPBELL INVITATIONAL LATEST


M BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
THE Johnson Lady Truckers
delivered a one-two knock-out blow
to put away the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force Bluewavcs team on
Saturday night.
Glenda Gilcud and Shantell Rolle
were the driving force behind the
Truckers' 68-64 victory over the
Blucwaves.
The duo accounted for 14 of the
Truckers" 20 points in the third quar-
ter. The run sparked by Gilcud and
Rolle not only helped the team close
an eight-point gap, but gave them
the lead as the third quarter came to
a close.
The Bluewaves team were in foul
trouble early in the game but with
only six players reporting for game
time. coach Freddie Brown was
forcedcl to stop the Truckers' run by
calling time-outs.
But the time-outs weren't suffi-
cient for the Bluewaves, who were
slow on getting back on defence.
With fresh legs to spare, Truck-
ers' head coach Jeanne Minus
instructed her team during the break
to push the ball down the court, hop-
ing to spark the fast break game.
Gilcud and Rolle had no problem
doing the job for the team. They
sparked the run from as late as the
second quarter, taking advantage of
the fact that the Bluewaves were in
foul trouble.
The fearless Rolle drove through
the lane just in time, getting Blue-
waves' Chryshan Percentie to com-
mit to her third foul.
Wasting no time in ushering Per-
centie out of the game, Brown quick-
Iv sent the replacement Nakera
Davis on the court.

Control
With Percentie out of the game
and Natasha Miller feeling the
fatigue, Gilcud gracefully took con-
trol of the ball.
Minus said: "We knew we had
them where we wanted them, it was
just a matter of delivering on the
play. The team was tired, they had
no substitutions and they were in
foul trouble, so pushing the ball hard
on them was just perfect timing.
"After the second quarter I told
them to just run, they did and the
other team couldn't stop us. In the
last quarter they were trying to make
a run, but we weren't scared, we
knew they were down for the count."
The run by the Truckers give
Minus an opportunity to insert some
of her bench players, who were just
as aggressive as the starters.
In the third quarter the Truckers
outscored the Bluewaves 20-12, but
the Bluewaves weren't about to give
up after such sluggish play.
The presence of Miller and Per-
centie in the post shook up the
Truckers, who now resorted to the
outside shot.
Also stepping up for the Blue-
waves in this quarter was Veral
Davis.
With a come back in mind, Per-
centie, Miller and Davis tried to use
the Truckers' plan against them, the
only difference was their's included a
third man.
But the charge came to late for
the Bluewaves, despite the excellent
shooting from the free throw line.
The cautious play because of early
foul problems by the team wasn't
helping either.
Brown said: "The girls played very
well today, they played with heart
and that's what the game is all about
playing with heart really counts."
Rolle was the leading scorer for
the Truckers with 19 points, seven
assists, and four steals; Gilcud
chipped in with 18 points, four assists
and one steal.
Miller ended the game with game
high with 24 points and two steals
while Davis assisted with 14 points,
Iour assist and five steals.


Alfred Forbes: comments








'were taken out of context


* BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

ALFRED Forbes said
comments he made last year
at the Hugh Campbell Bas-


ketball Classic were not
pointed any one particular
team, but were taken out of
context.
In trying to clear the air
on his comments, which
turned out to be a part of a


controversy that may result
in the teams from Grand
Bahama not coming to the
tournament next month,
Forbes said he was respond-
ing to a question on the
schedule put forth by a


reporter.
"The statement was really
about the integrity of the
tournament and was not
against any team from
Grand Bahama, or any team
in particular," Forbes said.


"I think the reporter said
that they got word that some
of the teams from Grand
Bahama didn't like how they
were scheduled and placed,
in the pools."
In his response to the
question that was posed to
him, Forbes said he told the
reporter that "when I make
the schedule and the pools,
it is given to the committee
for their approval and it is
sent out to the teams
involved.
"I simply said to the
reporter that "It's an AF
Adderley Tournament and I
compared it to a restaurant.'
I said 'If you go to a restau-
rant and you don't like the
menu, you could probably
eat from another menu.'
"It was never said that if
Freeport didn't like the tour-
nament, they didn't have to
come. It wasn't directed at
anybody. It was just to say
what type of tournament it
is. But for some reason, it
was taken out of context."

Teams

Forbes said he wants the
teams to know, especially
those from Grand Bahama,
that it was not intended to
target any team in particu-
lar, but rather it was just a
blanket statement that he
made.
"It's an invitational and
people have their right to
decide whether or not they
want to come," he insisted.
"But I was really disap-
pointed when I heard that
the teams were saying that
they are not coming because
of the comments that I
made.
"The tournament has been
going on for 24 years and
,Freeport has been a part of
it for 22 years, so definitely
we consider them a part of
the heritage of the tourna-
ment and we don't want
them to feel that they are
not appreciated."
While the teams from
Grand Bahama are calling
for him to make a public
apology, Forbes said he
doesn't wish to be made the
scapegoat for his comments
that weren't intended to
affect any of the teams.
"But if Freeport thinks I
need to apologise for a state-
ment that was not intended
for them, the least I can say
about that is I'm sorry that
the statement was taken out
of context, but the comment
was never, ever intendedfor
any team from Grand
Bahama," he emphasised.
A meeting is being
planned for today with rep-
resentatives from Grand
Bahama coming to town tc
meet with the organizers
Forbes said he's hoping thai
whatever disputes they have
pending will be ironed out.


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MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2006


The stories behind the news


Just weeks after a fatal plane crash
killed 11 members of its community,
Bimini once again faced a tragedy with
the destruction of the island's main
tourist attraction and the presumed
death of a prominent resident last
week. A fire destroyed the world
famous Compleat Angler Hotel...


Make


Labelling the expansion of the
Valentine's Resort in Harbour
Island an "obscenity", Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie (left) last week
announced that this project will be
re-examined to determine the best
course of action.
S t Mr Christie made this statement
j while responding to questions by
; ... North Eleuthera MP Alvin Smith
regarding a lease on a public ramp
in Harbour Island during last
week's House of Assembly session...


A bitter feud between two top bosses at the Water and
Sewerage Corporation will lead to both being fired, it was
claimed last week. Chairman Donald Demeritte and
general manager Abraham Butler will be "relieved of
their positions" in the very near future, The Tribune
was told.
Well-placed sources said the "public bust-up" between
the executives had landed both on the "unemployment
line". A leading government source said: "It is unheard
of for executives of a corporation to be at each other like
this. This outward fighting can't be condoned, so it's
best to do away with both of them. And you can't move
one without moving the next...


a


'unique'


tourist draw


* By JOHN MARQUIS

ditionally been big
money-makers among
those who know how
to exploit them.
Writer Kitty Kelley has made mil-
lions exposing the frailties of the
British monarchy and its various
dependants. So has Andrew Morton,
biographer of Princess Diana.
In fact, more bestselling writers
thrive off the Royals than almost any
other subject in the world. And, apart
from the loyal few who toe the estab-
lishment line, most specialist in scan-
dal, especially of the sexual kind.
Well, Government House in Nas-
sau was for five years home to the
most scandalous Royal couple of all
time, the Duke and Duchess of Wind-
sor.
While the world was at war, this
extraordinary pair were, in the eyes of
the FBI and others, a major embar-
rassment'to the allied cause, harbour-
ing pro-Nazi sympathies and engaging
in illicit financial transactions. In fact,
the Duchess herself was treated by
Washington as a Nazi spy.
Not only that, the Duke himself
presided over the biggest murder mys-
tery of the twentieth century right
here in the Bahamas and, by most
accounts, made a total hash of
it...though evidence now suggests
more sinister chicanery behind the
scenes.
The commercial mileage to be
enjoyed from their escapades is almost
incalculable. But Nassau does noth-
ing, absolutely nothing, to tap into a
story that Americans, in particular,
would find totally enthralling.
With tourists giving Nassau such
low marks for "uniqueness", perhaps
authorities should now be looking
round for new opportunities to cre-
ate interest.
As Government House remains the
official residence of the Queen's rep-
resentative in the Bahamas, treatment
of the Windsors would, of course,
need to be rather circumspect.
There could be no reference in the
tour brochure to Wallis Windsor's pas-
sionate affair with Joaquim von
Ribbentrop, Hitler's foreign minister.
Nor could there be allusions to her
bedroom frolics with one Guy Trim-
ble, a Ford car salesman, while the
Duke was preparing to abdicate the
Throne for her.
Even more disquieting would be
any reference to her torrid relation-
ship with the outrageous homosexual


Nassau scored poorly when an exit poll of tourists
showed that only six out of every 100 regarded it as
a resort with unique attractions. Yet, in Government
House, the Bahamian capital has potentially one
of the great lures for Americans of the entire
Caribbean region. INSIGHT reports...


* TOGETHER, Government House and the Duke and Duchess could become vacation attractions;
(FILE photo)


Jimmy Donahue, a dissolute figure
who the Duke himself was also said to
fancy.
However, there is still much to
savour in the Windsor story, even
when their peculiarities and peccadil-
loes are set aside.
And the Bahamas, a resort which
tourists say lacks unique features,
could be forgiven for making full use
of its dramatic potential.
As things stand, it's likely that most
American tourists in Nassau know


nothing about- Government House
other than the fact that the Governor
General lives there. For them, it's
merely an oversized pink birthday
cake standing on a.hill.
Surrey drivers sometimes point out
Christopher Columbus standing fop-
pishly, one arm akimbo, on the steps.
Others with knowledge of recent polit-
ical history will no doubt relate how
the first Bahamian GG moved in after
independence in 1973.
But how many refer to the Duke


and Duchess, the incredible murder
,of Sir Harry Oakes in 1943, and the
many suspicions flying around the
Bahamas and Florida about this
shameless pair?
One only has to note the popularity
of TV host Larry King's Royal guests
to know that Americans never lose
their appetite for the continuing story
of the British Throne.
Yet Government House, a costly
drain on national resources, has so far
failed hopelessly to tap into an endur-


ing tale which could be the key to its
financial future.
Even sticking to the basic, less con-
troversial facts, the Windsor yarn has
much to commend it. Banished from
Europe, bored and humiliated in exile,
the Windsors were by far the most
glamorous and fascinating figures of
their time. And they were installed in
Nassau during an era when their alle-
giances were considered highly sus-
pect, especially as they had met and
admired Hitler and made close friends
of the appalling British fascists Oswald
and Diana Mosley.
The angular, scheming Duchess and
the doe-eyed Duke were the most cap-
tivating duo on the international
celebrity circuit during the mid-20th
century, far outstripping other soci-
ety pairings. Physically slight as they
were, they towered over the likes of
the Roosevelts and Rockefellers in
terms of social cachet and sheer gossip
column mystique.
No-one since and that includes
Queen Elizabeth and the Duke of
Edinburgh, Prince Rainier and
Princess Grace of Monaco, and even
Jack and Jackie Kennedy has
eclipsed them in the glitz stakes. Only
Charles and Diana approached them
in the scandal department, but the
Windsors' alleged indiscretions were
far more serious than those of the
blundering young royals.
If jazz, F Scott Fitzgerald and the
Charleston dominated the 1920s, then
the Duke and Duchess bestrode the
1930s and 1940s like twin titans, fig-
ures so steeped in romance, intrigue,
glamour and wealth that all others
were left in the shadows.
Properly presented, and ingenious-
ly promoted, the Windsors could yet
become one of the Bahamas' most
enduring attractions. And wouldn't
they give homeward-bound Ameri-
cans something to talk about, other
than Atlantis, Bay Street and the Fish
Fry?
Sensitively abridged, the Windsor
story could still be made irresistible.
Their arrival in 1940, the excitement
they generated in an austere wartime
environment, their dissatisfaction with
Government House, their frequent
trips to see their Palm Beach friends,
and the ambitions they harboured of
greater postings in far-off lands could
all be worked into a gilded tale of
wartime intrigue and thwarted
dreams.
Add to all that what was seen at


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P E 2, M


"It is unheard of for exec-
utives of a corporation to be
at each other like this. This
outward fighting can't be
condoned, so it's best to do
away with both of them.
And you can't move one
without moving the next.
First off the general manag-
er shouldn't have gone pub-
lic, and when the union pres-
ident sided with one execu-
tive his position was also
seen as void."
Leading government
source on bitter feud
between top bosses at the
Water and Sewerage Cor-
poration
"We determined to do this
because Nassau Internation-


al Airport is a critical gate-
way into this country. It
facilitates millions of people
on an annual basis and it is
essential to our economy.
"I wouldn't say the failure
had catastrophic results, but
it had very, very serious con-
sequences in terms of our
economy. It also brought
into question how the matter
was addressed. We need to
have an objective inquiry to
look at all the facts fearless-
ly and without any corners
cut, to find out exactly what
went wrong."
Minister of Transport
and Aviation Glenys Han-
na-Martin on radar failure
at Nassau International Air-
port


* POLITICAL LEADERS MOURN GEORGE MACKEY- Local and national political
leaders are pictured among crowded congregation at a service of honour and thanksgiving for
the life of former Fox Hill MP George Mackey. Thursday. January 5. Among those shown
are Fred Mitchell, Fox Hill MP, government ministers Shane Gibson, Leslie Miller and
Melanie Griffin; Deputy FNM Leader and llonlagu MlP Brent Sn monelle and chairmaJLoLf
the Progressive Liberal Party Raynard Rigby. :
(BIS photo)
y: '


I


IWIINNERS
CHRISTMAS TREE
Edna Fowler Soldier Road
Elaine Forbes Town Centre
Lynne Barrett Harbour Bay
Coby Cartwright Palmdale


TOY CAR
Tiffany Stevens Soldier Road
SLakeisha Thompson Town Centre
Stephen Duffy Harbour Bay
Jacqueline Lockhart Palmdale

MICROWAVE
Tamara Brown Soldier Road
Leotha Kemp Town Centre
SHelga Longsworth Harbour Bay
Sandra Muncur Palmdale

$200 CITY MARKET
GIFT CERTIFICATE
Latia Armbrister Soldier Road
Joshua Rolle Town Centre
Tiffany Clarke Harbour Bay
Z. Bethel Palmdale

ROCKY FARMS
GIFT CERTIFICATE
Terrance Johnson Soldier Road
Keenya Pinder Town Centre
Jennifer Bethel Harbour Bay
Deborah Barry Palmdale


I WEEK IN REIEW3 I


bitter feud
between two
top bosses at
the Water and
Sewerage Cor-
poration will lead to both being
fired, it was claimed last week..
Chairman Donald Demeritte


and general manager Abraham
Butler will be "relieved of their
positions" in the very near
future, The Tribune was told.
Well-placed sources said the
"public bust-up" between the
executi e.s had landed both on
':the "unemployment line".


A leading government
source said: "It is unheard of
for executives of a corporation
to be at each other like this.
This outward fighting can't be
condoned, so it's best to do
away with both of them. And
you can't move one without


Yvonne Felton


DVD HOME THEATRE SYSTEM
Rudolph Kerr Soldier Road I
Tanria Wright Harbour Bay
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PAI'U SEI'
Laverne Dean Soldier Road
Sandra Martin Town Centre
Yvonne Felton Harbour Bay
Effie Sawyer Palmdale

TELEVISION
Sharrell Hamilton Soldier Road
Marvalyn Hamilton Town Centre
Sasha Ramsay Harbour Bay
Meagan Thompson Palmdale

AIR CONDITION UNIT
Mia Cooper Soldier Road
Tiffany McDonald Town Centre
Julia Symonette Harbour Bay
Brenda Solomon Palmdale

IPOD
G. Peterson Soldier Road
Margaret Bain Town Centre
Laverne Turnquest Harbour Bay
Paula Dickson Palmdale

WASHING MACHINE
Wallis Sargent Soldier Road
Gretal Dames Town Centre
Prescola Stubbs Harbour Bay
Alexander Lasea Palmdale

REFRIGERATOR
Ms. Bain Soldier Road
Natasha Thompson Town Centre
James Major Harbour Bay
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(son of Walib Sargent)


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moving the next. First off, the
general manager shouldn't
have gone public, and when the:
,union president sided with one
executive (Mr Demeritte) his)
position was also seen as void,'-
the source revealed.
However, Mr Demeritte'has
stated he is "quite confident"
his contract would be renewed
for 2006, despite accusations
that the feud was disrupting the
day-to-day business of the cor-
poration.
*****

THE Nolan Law groupla.st
week filed separate lawsuits on
behalf of the families of three
of the victims in the fatal
Chalk's plane crash last month.
The law group, which oper-
ates out of Chicago, Illinois, is
filing the suit on behalf df the
families of Genevieve Ellis,
Salome Gertrude Rolle and
Niesha Fox.
**** *

LABELLING the expansion
of the Valentine's Resort in
Harbour Island an "obsceni-
ty", Prime Minister Perry
Christie last week announced
that this project will be re-
examined to determine the best
course of action.
Mr Christie made this state-
ment while responding to ques-
tions by North Eleuthera MP
Alvin Smith regarding a lease
on a public ramp in Harbour
Island during last week's
House of Assembly session.
*****

GEORGE Mackey's body
lay in repose in the foyer of the
House of Assembly last week,
drawing crowds of curious
onlookers, friends, and political
friends on both sides of the
political divide. Described as a
friend to all, and inspiration for
many, Mr Mackey, a former
MP for St Michael's and Fox
Hill who held numerous posts
in the Progressive Liberal Par-
ty, was highly praised during
the House's first sitting for the
new year.
PLPs and FNMs alike made
their entire contributions to the
honour of Mr Mackey's mem-
ory, paying homage to a man
they described as well worthy
to be called a "National Hero".

JUST weeks after a fatal
plane crash killed 11 members
of its community, Bimini once
again faced a tragedy with the
destruction of the island's main
tourist attraction and the pre-
sumed death of a prominent
resident last week.
A fire destroyed the world
famous Compleat Angler
Hotel, reducing one of the old
stomping grounds of noted
American novelist Ernest
Hemingway to rubble.


Quotes of


the Week


THE: TRIBUNE


PAGE 2C, MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2006


RIDTE THEE


- L-A Y .4.A i.









THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2006, PAGE 3C


Re: Nassau International
Airport

Personally, I cannot
think of anyone
better to name the
airport after than
Lynden Pindling.
After all, the comparisons
between the state of the air-
port and the state of the
country as a result of his rule
and his legacy are all too
obvious.
The airport is neglected
and dilapidated. Both
descriptions reflect the condi-
tion the Bahamas found itself
in back in 1992 and finds itself
in once again.
The airport is a monument
to the poor planning, greed of
both politicians and contrac-
tors and enormous cost over-
runs of the PLP as is our poor


Bahamas. Both the airport
and our government reflect
poorly on us as a nation.
The airport and the country
are treated with the same off-
hand disrespect and indiffer-
ence by the heirs of Sir Lyn-
den as they were by
him. Both were offered to us
with unrealistic promises.
The airport was to be a
modern monument to our
first world status: our children
would all be white collar
workers and professionals
with first world status. No
thought was given to the hard
work and dedication that'
would have been needed to
make either one
possible. Only rhetoric.
Who better to name the air-
port after than the undefeat-
ed master of rhetoric?

L. Major


ENJOYED your article. It
is interesting to look at just
how appropriate is the pro-
posed re-naming.
Unless there is a radical
improvement, which I don't
see happening, it will forever
be known as SLOPI Airport!
Some legacy! Happy New
Year

DR, Nassau

YES, the airport should be
named after Sir Lynden Pin-
dling. After all, he left the


country in a state of derelic-
tion a shabby, rundown,
third world resort where slack
work practices and bone-idle-
ness were the order of the
day.
The airport is a direct lega-
cy of the appalling Pindling
era, so why not name it after
him?
Then, whenever something
goes wrong as it undoubted-
ly will, into eternity we'll
know who to blame.

Bill G, Winton


xe rrsier Irerg vi


insight
CK _


Ke: Presiaent George w
Bush

CONTRARY to your point
about the US "pussycat
press" they have been any-
thing but. The press has bru-
talised GWB on every level
and he was never given a shot
from the very beginning as
many believe he was an ille-
gitimate president when
elected in 2000.
I, too, am disappointed
with Dubya, but on a differ-
ent level than you and your
colleagues in the liberal press.
As far as I am concerned,
he is more liberal than his
predecessor Bill Clinton. Can
someone please tell me where
he is conservative? Certainly
not in government spending.
He has been spending like a
drunken sailor on failed social
programmes and other pro-


Make the Windsors a 'unique' tourist draw


FROM page 1C

the time as the greatest love
story of the age, and you have
the ingredients for a king-size
attraction, even though the
Duke had by 1940 turned his
back on the monarchy and all it
implied.
The story could cover their
friendship with the Oakes fam-
ily, their fears of abduction by
German submariners, the
Duchess's charity work with
the Red Cross and local ser-
vice personnel...and even their
frequent trips on Axel Wen-
ner-Gren's lavish yacht, the
Southern Cross, at a time when
he was also under suspicion by
the US Secret Service.
The main thrust of the Wind-
sor story could be relayed as
part of the old building's histo-
ry while Nassau's bookshops
and other retail outlets could
feast off its more scandalous
aspects.
Government House, the
expensive maintenance of
which has been an issue for
well over half a century, would
be the beneficiary, attracting
much-needed funding from vis-
itors attracted by its very spe-
cial history.
For all those who scoff at the
idea of such exploitation, espe-
cially of such a potent symbol
of governance, consider this:
Buckingham Palace, Windsor
Castle, Balmoral Castle and
Sandringham House all gener-
ate revenue by opening to the
public. Even the Houses of
Parliament in London have
become a tourist trap.
The Queen allows certain
apartments in her own London
home to be opened for much of
the year. And the cash accruing
helps offset the palace light bill
and other expenses.
In fact, stately home owners
throughout Britain have long
since had to face up to eco-
nomic reality and allow Joe
Public into their estates to help
maintain cherished examples
of the English heritage.
Some have even built lavish
theme parks around their
homes. At least two have safari
parks where visitors can enjoy
close contact with elephants,
rhinos, giraffes and other exot-
ic creatures. One has its own
motor museum.
Government House, in truth,
is no more than a modest state-
ly home, albeit with' a more
interesting tale to tell than most
of its British counterparts.
It's true that Blenheim
Palace was the birthplace of Sir
Winston Churchill, Compton
Wynyates the "headquarters"
of the Gunpowder Plot, and
Althorp House the childhood
home of the doomed Diana.
But none has a story to tell
richer than Nassau's 'royal' res-
idence.
All draw revenue from their
colorful past and publish scads
of literature to help promote
their history. But do any com-
pare with Government House
and the highly unusual story of
the Windsors as they endured
wartime exile in this far-off
speck of empire?
A prominent Bahamian told
me: "For years, Government
House has had to beg from the
government of the day to keep
body and soul together.
"There appears to be no
proper system in place for
financing the upkeep of the
building. Yet, in its own way, it
is the most important building
in Nassau, a symbol of gover-
nance and the centre of our
Commonwealth connections.
"The Bahamas needs to find
ways of keeping it up to scratch
with the least possible drain on
public resources."


In 1940, when the.Windsors
arrived, the first thing they not-
ed was the down-at-heel state
of Government House. They
insisted the local assembly
make money available for
refurbishment.
In my book, Blood and Fire,
published last month, -I
described the Duke's attitude
to his Bahamas appointment
in this way:
"The Duke saw it as the
colonial equivalent of a county
council lord lieutenantship, a
meaningless job offering a
plumed helmet, a ceremonial
sword and little else...:
"At Government House,
things were even less to their
liking than the climate. The
colonial mansion, standing aloft
on Mount Fitzwilliam, its win-
dows looking out over Nassau
harbour and the rooftops of the
downtown area, was in a run-
down state. There was a fusty
shabbiness about the place,
with its drab curtains, thread-
bare carpets and peeling paint-
work...The entire structure
looked like a creaking ban-
queting hall for termites, its
balconies flaking in the scorch-
ing sun."
Today, 65 years on, Govern-
ment House is still an issue
when it comes to costly main-
tenance and upkeep. With its
extensive woodwork, its leak-
ing roofs, its permanent staff
of cooks and butlers, its
Defence Force guard unit and
other considerations, Nassau's
most imposing colonial struc-
ture does not come cheap.
Although the Treasury tra-
ditionally stumps up any
expenses required, successive
Governors have found them-
selves going cap in hand for
contributions, not always with
resounding success.
Government House
undoubtedly benefited from
the "reign" of Sir Orville and
Lady Turnquest, but insiders
claim that was due in part to
the fact that their son Tommy
was Minister of Works.
Familial loyalty inevitably
made him favourable to Gov-
ernment House's cause and the
old building was, consequently,
given some much-needed ten-


der loving care.
For the most part, though,
its existence is seen as an essen-
tial, but deeply irritating, fact of
Bahamian political life, an
anachronistic symbol with a
hefty price tag.
Some Bahamians and espe-


cially those who disapprove of
everything it represents even
advocate getting rid of it. But
, that would be extremely short-
sighted, because as a tourist
draw it potentially has no
equal.
At the moment, Nassau


offers few genuine attractions
for those who want to do some-
thing other than lie on the
beach or play the casino tables.
A typical complaint of tourists
is that, after three or four days,
there is nothing more to see
and do in New Providence.
Yet travellers are becoming
increasingly demanding when
seeking tourist destinations
nowadays. Sea, sunshine and
sand are fine for short trips,
but most intelligent long-term
vacationers want mental and
cultural stimulation as well.
Modern politicians may hate
colonialism and all it stood for,
but it happens to be one of the
best things Nassau has going
for it when it comes to making
the old city into a unique
resort.
Imaginative and enterprising
packaging of colonial Nassau -
with the Duke and Duchess of
Windsor as the key attractions
- could be a tremendous draw
for those tired of trawling
around stalls full of straw hats,
conchshell jewellery and dec-
orated coconut fronds.
Properly marketed, Govern-
ment House could become the
central feature of the "Colo-
nial Nassau" package, which in
turn could be built into a much
wider Bahamian experience.
History is increasingly being
seen as a revenue-earner, a fact
borne out by Charleston,
Williamsburg, Savannah and,
of course, New Orleans, all of
which have traded on colonial
associations to lure visitors.
Yet their colonial ties are
much more distant and, in
many ways, much less interest-
ing than those on offer in the
Bahamas.
Nassau has its pirates, block-
ade-runners," bootleggers and
old forts to draw on. But, just
as importantly from a tourist
.standpoint, it was home to a
couple whose exile and subse-
quent wanderings continue to
excite the imagination of mil-
lions.
With an open Cuba and its
tremendous wealth of fine art,
theatre, music, dance, archi-
tecture and colourful colonial
history potentially the greatest
tourist draw in the Americas,


Nassau can no longer afford to
offer a third-rate product to an
increasingly discerning world.
At the moment, the tourist
product appears to be hope-;
lessly unfocused, with cruise'
passengers having little to do-
but trawl the Bay Street jew-.
ellery shops and liquor stores.
There is little to catch their'
attention or give them some-
thing to talk about.
Casino resorts, a less-than-
pristine Bay Street and the Fish
Fry are all very well, but they
need to be reinforced by attrac-
tions of substance which can
be expected to leave an impres-
sion in the tourists' minds.
Tacky trinkets from the Far
East are not going to cut it. Nor
are endless supplies of T-shirts
and beach shorts.
Junkanoo is certainly an
appealing festival, but it is a
seasonal draw which reflects
only one aspect of Bahamian
life. Nassau's colonial past
needs to be promoted as part
of the mix required to give the
city the "unique" year-round
flavour tourists feel is lacks.
The Windsors may not have
found favour among many
Bahamians, mainly because of
their sniffy racial attitudes, but
they could yet prove useful to
the island folk they once
despised.
Promotional experts need to
be engaged to work on Gov-
ernment House as the primary
component in a Royal tourist
draw. And the Duke and
Duchess ought to become its
unique selling point, with
books, postcards, brochures
and DVDs all playing their part
in promoting one of the great-
est Royal stories of the last 100
years.
To ignore such potential is
to ignore much of what
Bahamian history is all about.
Political prejudice ought not to
interfere with the kind of deci-
sions that could help secure the
country's future. If only six of
every 100 tourists think Nas-
sau has something special to
offer, something needs to be
done...and fast.
What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmar-
quis@tribunemedia.net


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You'll wonder how you ever got a


Sl S(3JONES & O


grammes such as education
etc. This 'right-winger' has
spent more on the welfare
state than LBJ! He certainly
isn't conservative on immi-
gration, with the USA having
the most open borders in its
history.

CA

GEORGE W BUSH looks
very unsure of himself nowa-
days. The same old words
come out of his mouth, but
no-one believes him anymore.
I think the last two years of
his term will be very painful
and difficult for him because
he looks more like a lame-
duck president every day. His
constant references to God
heighten the impression that
he has lost contact with reali-
ty.
Bright, The Grove


* THE DUKE OF WINDSOR


I __ _ _INSIGHT





THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4C, MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2006


The Tribune and the

Minister of Education's jffp

Book Club present A Bright Start



pea 4 Ifl jkj

Beginning Monday January 26 through February
13, read this engaging thirteen part story about a .
dyslexic boy, Jamie, and his encounter with a thief.
Also read special weekly articles from the Special
Services Section of the Department of Education
about dyslexia in the Bahamian school
system and community.
The Tribune, like the Minister of Education's Book Club, believes that reading helps
young people to focus on constructive choices through exposure to worlds beyond
their immediate environment. Breakfast Serials stories are short, engaging and com-
pelling so that the reader keeps coming back for more.
Read, learn, enjoy.


peadnathe Sk
Written by Avi
S. Illustrated by Joan Sandin

Jamie, being dyslexic, may not be able to
read words on a page, but he can read clouds
and what he sees is as wondrous as it is unbe-
lievable-to others. One summer day he sees a
man in a business suit parachute from an air-
plane. When he tells his family and friend
Gillian, no one believes him. But, not only are
: Jamie's perceptions accurate, the man is a thief
who has stolen a million dollars and kidnaps
Gillian. When she leaves a written note as to
where she's being taken, Jamie. is in a double
bind: no one thinks he's seen anything real and
he can't read the message. Reading the Sky
brings high adventure from the sky and on and
A off the page.

P Read "Reading the Sky" with us ...
every weekday from January 26
to February 13, 2006.




I .- "G ood Books Unbound


The Tribune
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