Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00288
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: January 9, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00288
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text








,,SATISFY YOUR '
CRVING" i'm lovin' It.

HIGH 77F
LOW 66F

SUNNY AND
-- PLEASANT


The


Tribune


Volume: 102 No.40


MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006


PRICE 75o


Man shot after


foodstore robbery


iU


ai


Police force band keeps in line during annual march


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
AN ARMED robber was
shot and killed by police
after raiding a Cable Beach
foodstore on Saturday night.
The man, in his thirties,
was struck by bullets during
a shoot-out in a nearby resi-
dential area following a car
chase.
He was found lying on his
back next to his vehicle and
died at the scene.
The raid occurred at City
Markets foodstore on Cable
Beach around 7pm on Sat-
urday.
Two masked and armed
men entered the store and
fled with an undetermined
amount of cash in a white
Nissan Sentra.
* Police located the getaway
car in the Skyline Drive
area. They gave chase until
the car reached Oak Hill
Road, where the robbers
leapt out and began firing at
officers.
Press liaison officer Walter
Evans said police fired back,
striking one of the men in
the left upper back. When
officers approached, they
found him lying face-up and
dying. He passed away at the
scene.
The dead man, described
as of dark complexion and
medium build, was wearing a
black tam, a blue Dickies
coverall and tennis shoes.
Police are looking for the


second robber, who is still
on the run.

POLICE are searching
for a gunman and his accom-
plice suspected of robbing
two gas stations over the
weekend.
Press liaison officer Walter
Evans said at 5am on Satur-
day a man armed with a
handgun entered the Shell
Service Station on Blue Hill
and Carmichael Roads.
He tried to rob the store's
cashier, but the cash regis-
ter would not open. A cus-
tomer was then robbed of
cash and a gold chain.
The robber made his get-
away in a green Hyundai
Accent, which was being dri-
ven by a man of light com-
plexion.
Fifteen minutes later the
suspects struck again, this
time at Esso Service Station
on Harrold Road.
Again a male robbed the
service station of an undis-
closed amount of cash. A
patron on the inside was also
robbed.
The suspect made his
escape in the same green
Hyundai Accent, believed to
have been stolen earlier in
the day, said police.
At both locations the sus-
pect was described as being
a dark male about 5ft llins
tall.
Police believe both mat-
ters are connected.


-" Did you miss someone special
on your Holiday Gift list?,.

xr



Gift Certificates
are available all year round!

Call: or visit one of
our offices today!

| 393-6900



. .



-;-:....
5.; 4T.,.


I TIHE Royal Bahamas Police Force Band marches north on Baillou Hill Road towards Bay Street yesterday afternoon ahead
of the annual church service at the Southland Church of God.
S, SEE PAGES EIGHT AND NINE
(Photo: Felip6 Major/Tribune staff)


Formal

inquiry

into radar

failure

* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
A FORMAL inquiry into
what caused the failure of the
radar at the Nassau Interna-
tional Airport (NIA) last month
has been directed by Minister
of Transport and Aviation
Glenys Hanna-Martin.
At a press conference yester-
day, Mrs Hanna-Martin said the
inquiry is not a means to "point
fingers." However, she said, it is
intended to enable her ministry
to objectively and thoroughly
evaluate the circumstances and
responses to the failure, to
ensure accountability, review
protocols and to take any nec-
essary steps to correct any short-
comings, where they may have
occurred.
"We determined to do this
because Nassau International
Airport is a critical gateway into
SEE page 14


Wilchcombe: we must be able to
respond to tourists' security needs


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
A MASSIVE theft of per-
sonal customer information
from Atlantis has highlighted
the need for the Bahamas to
heed tourists' security require-
ments, it was claimed last
night.
Tourism Minister Obie
Wilchcombe said failure, to do
SEE page 14


* MINISTER of Tourism
Obie Wilchcombe


Ruling on extradition

proceedings due today
* By A FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
SEVEN men fighting extradition proceedings will appear before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel today to hear her ruling on the evidence
presented against them.
Trevor Roberts, Sheldon Moore, Brian and Lynden Deal, Devroy
Moss, Shanto Curry and Gordon Newbold, who were arrested in
Jude, 2004, are wanted in the United States to stand trial for alleged-
ly conspiring to traffic cocaine and marijuana.
Evidence presented against the men during their 18 months of
SEE page 15


'Tremendous increase'
in trade between the
Bahamas and China
* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
THERE has been a
tremendous increase in trade
between the Bahamas and
China up from $35 million
annually two years ago to
around $120 million at the
end of 2005, Foreign Affairs
Minister Fred Mitchell told
The Tribune yesterday.
This figure; he said, is like-
ly to increase because of the
tourism market opening
between the two countries
and the increasing interest of
Bahamas businessmen in
Chinese-made products.
He said the increase is due
to Bahamians seeing oppor-
tunities and capitalising on
China's expanding manufac-
turing centre and relatively
inexpensive goods.
Relations with countries
like China and Cuba, he said,
are purely practical matters
and had nothing to do with
ideology.
"A government is sup-
SEE page 14


Stain atn
-.- --. . .. ... .- ." ...*... ...-S U
QUIZNOS (479ilaM^%
: Presents The Newest *Q i os
"- Toasted Snsatin wAdd ,,u -, :
original Quiznos Fries
SESAME GINGER and a Fountain Drink to S.3lu ,.p .e..h ..Sg .
0-1 V TV I ly your favorite sub and ra3*3-193?7 P an. 3:3-425s3 Pw;


make it a combo


%*me P Id


Prices slightly higher on PtrditsM oslard


Nassau a1a s 6c Leadiiiig.Ne'WslnalSaer


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION


Bhe iiami IIeraITI
BAHAMAS EDITION


HASSLE FREE MORTGAGES...
"1For PeopLe j lis Like VIm'
Monalisa, a single
mother visited
Approved Lending
Services and says:
l. yApro ed Lending
wp welkedp sep by ep with
e me io hlllmown yerhFisr.
S ". 7Tis Chris ismwa., s Im
f' leepipq, in y oiwn
S OALISAf E. APPROVED
S Hotel W'rker L Wndig 'n ~sL J
This could be YOU next Christmas!
CALL US TODAY!
328-LOAN
www.approvedlendingservices.com


---- --- .7 --- I I--- -I-lr-~-- I--II^- --- CI -- II -- -1


I? 'w L';11 I ? "b I:d I I 1L.1J I I u
'' I I
;rr 41~1 '


re


UHIU KLNm~n













Archbishop makes a



Mass plea to judiciary


FREDERICK STREET NORTH
Open Daily from 6:30am 9pm


OTHER
LOCATIONS:
Palmdale
Paradise Island
Oakes Field


FREDERICK STREET NORTH
S Open Daily from 6:30am 9pm


OTHER LOCATIONS:
Village Rd. Roundabout
Harold Road
Prince Charles Plaza


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
CATHOLIC Archbishop
Patrick Pinder has charged the
judiciary to do more to make
sure that the youth of the
Bahamas are not abandoned to
meaningless prison terms.
Delivering his homily at the
Red Mass at St Francis Xavier
Cathedral yesterday, the arch-
bishop told members of the
judiciary that he continues to
believe that social and restora-
tive justice should be the pri-
mary motives in the enforce-
ment and administration of jus-
tice.
He stressed to those gathered
that in their profession they are
well situated to offer good
examples in regards to practis-
ing good citizenship and neigh-
bourliness.
"We can't continue to leave
so many of our young men and
women to be lost to prison
terms that don't do enough to
reform and restore. Too many
are foundering in education and
training programmes that
increasingly exhibit a poor fit
with the demands of institutioiAs
of higher education and jcb
opportunities," said Archbishop
Pinder.
Pointing out social ills in odr
society which need to be
addressed, he stressed that theie
is a need to find out why domes-


* FATHER Evado Turnquest, Archbishop Patrick Finder and Father Kendrick Forbes at St
Francis Xavier Cathedral for the Red Mass on Sunday, January 8 2006


tic abuse and school violence
are escalating to the harm of
Bahamian women and children,
as well as why so many youth
are abandoning the faith of their
mothers and fathers:


11.4746c
11.981

10.8948c
10

9 8.84892
7.8112( .8882
8
6.8239


5.52690 5.1712 5.

.5 ...
4 4.6237e


3

2

1

n ___ ___------


FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG


He said that it cannot be said
that we are followers of Christ
and turn our backs on the chal-
lenges of our lives together -
our community life.
"Again, I say that the path of


Your electricity bill is
made upof the basic
rate, which is constant
and has not changed
since October 2003,
and the fuel sur-
charge, which is
based onthe price of
petroleum in the
international market
and is calculated
monthly using fixed
formula.


SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN


(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)

hope is to be engaged through
concerted action involving every
element of civil society," said
Archbishop Pinder.
Acting:in accordance with
civility, he said "means that the
young man who espouses the
hip-hop lifestyle, or the finan-
cially strapped single mother
from over the hill should be
affordedno less justice and
compassion than the child of a
friend or individuals of high net
worth," he said.


Get your Prepaid Visa Card!
Colled the Bank of The Bahamas
Heritage Club Seres of Prepaid Visa Cards.
Part proceeds will benefit an educational initiative
highllgiding the need to preserve our unique heritage.


SBank of The Bahamas
IN T E R N AT I O NA L
Call 242-326-2777 for more information or apply online at www.bankbahamabonline.com


Qulznos Su


FUEL SURCHARGE 2005 2006


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


..m.j


PAGE 2, MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006


THE TRIBUNE,








THF TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006, PAGE 3


IC E


o In brief


Bahamas is

named top

financial

centre

THE Bahamas has been rat-
ed as the top international
financial centre in the western
hemisphere by the banking
industry magazine, The Banker.
Launching its first ever 'Finan-
cial Centres of the Future'
awards, The Banker said that the
time had come to "provide recog-
nition to those centres excelling in
terms of growth... quality of reg-
ulation and supervision; infra-
structure and business support
services; as well as overall politi-
cal and economic stability."
The magazine, a Financial
Times publication, said that it
awarded the accolade to the
Bahamas on the basis of its
attractive location, favourable
tax environment, political sta-
bility, legal structure and regu-
latory framework. The Cayman
Islands was awarded the run-
ner-up spot by the magazine.
Welcoming the favourable
media exposure, Wendy War-
ren, CEO of the Bahamas
Financial Services Board, said
that she was "pleased" to
receive the award.
"It not only reflects our long
history in providing financial
services, which dates back to
the 1930s, but also recognizes
the many progressive develop-
ments in our jurisdiction as we
continue to meet the require-
ments of an increasingly sophis-
ticated financial services mar-
ketplace," she observed.
Ms Warren also pointed to
other features that complement
and support the financial ser-
vices sector in the Bahamas.
"These include a robust infor-
mation communication frame-
work, a wide variety of Class A
office facilities and business sup-
port services, excellent flight
connections and compelling
lifestyle choices, including world
renowned residential commu-
nities, premier hotels and
restaurants," she stated.
"Most important is our capac-
ity for growth through the avail-
ability of qualified professionals
and land in an ideal location,"
Ms'Warren added..
According .to Stephen
Timewell, editor-in-chief of The
Banker, a panel of senior edi-
tors and industry experts picked
the Financial Centres of the
Future, with The Banker award-
ing the leading International
Financial Centre (IFC) in four
geographic regions: Europe, the
Middle East and Africa, Asia
and the Pacific, and the Western
Hemisphere including North,
South, Central America and the
Caribbean.
The Isle of Man scooped the
European award, with Jersey
nominated as the runner up.
In Asia Pacific, the panel
deemed Singapore to be the
leading IFC, with Sydney in sec-
ond place.
Meanwhile, Bahrain was
awarded the best IFC in the
Middle East and Africa, with
Dubai the runner up.


Police are 'let down'



by court system


THE Bahamas court system
is letting down the police force
in the fight against crime, it
was claimed Friday.
Many cases are being
dropped because of long court
delays and vanishing witnesses,
said former assistant police
commissioner Paul Thompson.
As a result, defence lawyers
were having a field day, he told
listeners during a More FM
talk show.
"Some of these cases don't
come up until two or three
years later," he said. "Wit-
nesses either disappear, or are
killed, or forget the testimo-
ny."
Mr Thompson, now gener-
al manager of Wemco Security
in Nassau, said the court sys-
tem is leaving police very frus-
trated, especially in view of the
impressively high detection
rate.
"The detection rate here has
topped 70 per cent, which is
good compared with anywhere
else in the world. But the
police are so often let down by
the courts."
Mr Thompson also ad-
dressed police brutality and


1 PAUL Thompson


said it was often the result of
stress and long hours.
But he acknowledged that
discipline had been a problem
and urged the Police Staff
Association to commit itself to
restoring discipline in the force.
"We want the kind of disci-
pline we had when the English
officers were here. We were
well-trained," he added.
The former officer also
called for tighter security mea-
sures in hotels and greater
public co-operation in reducing


preventable crimes.
Seventy per cent of all
crimes committed in New
Providence were preventable,
he said. This was particularly
true of car theft and house bur-
glary.
He said police would have
more time to concentrate on
violent crime if the public were
more careful and vigilant.
Mr Thompson said licences
for hotels ought to be issued
only when proper security
measures were in place.
He said one Nassau hotel
was being sued by an Ameri-
can family following a rape
incident last year.
Keener awareness of secu-
rity was making it a worthwhile
career for those with a good
character and sound elemen-
tary education.
"There is a dire need for
security officers by most secu-
rity firms in the country," he
said.
"Wemco's criteria is that we
need mature and responsible
men and women who are will-
ing to learn, have a sound ele-
mentary education, and have
no criminal record."


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

A GROUP of concerned
citizens has raised a petition
in a bid to preserve the Per-
pall Tract Wellfield.
Terry Miller, founder of
Bahamas Association for
Social Health, (BASH), along
with others launched the peti-
tion out of the concern for the
rapid decline of green space,
and destruction of broad leaf
coppice and quiet space
throughout New Providence.
In mid-December, Chip-
pingham residents and envi-
ronmentalists were furious that
a tractor cleared away a por-
tion of the Perpall Wellfield,
noted as an area of "indis-
pensable" ecological value.
The site was apparently
being cleared for a new gov-
ernment low cost sub-division.
An assessment of Perpall
Tract by University of Tampa
professor Ethan H Fried
revealed that 156 vascular
plant species were identified
in the area. He also noted
where the areas contain at
least 52 species that are or
have been used medicinally
throughout the islands.
At a press conference on
Saturday at BASH, Mr Miller
revealed that more than.100
signatures were solicited from
residents in the Chippingham
area last Thursday.
He said that, of the 104 sig-
natures solicited, 100 persons
signed almost immediately.
However, some were appre-
hensive.
"One lady said 'I really want
to sign this petition, but I have
mixed feelings. I have applied
for a.house and I need a


house,'" he said.
"We will present 5,000 sig-
natures in two weeks to the
government of the Bahamas
and if that's not enough, we
will collect 10,000 or 15,000
until the Ministry of Housing
takes notice and listens," said
Mr Miller.
Mr Miller quoted an article
from the December 31, 2005,
edition of The Bahama Jour-
nal, where housing minister
Shane Gibson "revealed that
the tract of land in the Perpall
Tract area that was at the cen-
tre of controversy two weeks
ago will be developed as
planned."
Mr Gibson said yesterday
that his ministry had not
moved away from the devel-
opment.
"Any trees that they think
should be protected, then we
will not knock them down. We
won't preserve it just to have a
forest there, simply because
they are asking for it to be
done so.
"If they came up with a
legitimate concern, where you
have the Mahogany tree or
some tree that they considered
to be endangered, we won't
knock it down. If you take
their argument about what
they want to protect there, that
is in every single wooded area
on New Providence."
He said the land is owned
by the Water and Sewerage
Corporation and the govern-
ment-had given his ministry
the "green light" for develop-
ment.
Mr Miller suggested a hous-
ing plan where homes could
be constructed on the land
without decimating the forest.
"(With) one house deep


with a wall to the rear to protect
the ,remaining forest from crim-
inal elements, we have calcu-
lated at least 10 houses along
this.strip alone.
S"If you continue this same
process along the new road thaIt
will cut through the western
boundary of this area, another
150 houses are possible. We are
with you all the way, Mr Minis-
ter," said Mr Miller. .


r The Nal I -al--vlirathoml
SBOX oFFicE oPENS AT to.:cK AIM DAILY

GRANDMA'S BOYS NEW 1:15 3:35 N/A 6:10 8:25 10:40
RUMOR HASIT C 1:10 3:20 N/A 6:15 8:30 10:45
WOLF CREEK C 1:00 3:25 N/A 6:00 8:25 10:50
MEMOIRS OFA GEISHA T 1:20 N/A 4:20 7:20 N/A 10:20
THE RINGER T 1:05 3:30 N/A 6:10 8:20 10:45
THE MATADOR T 1:10 3:35 N/A 6:05 8:30 10:55
FUN WITH DICK & JANE T 1:15 3:50 N/A 6:20 8:35 10:50
CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN 2 B 1:05 3:40 N/A 6:05 8:20 10:40
KING KONG T 1:00 WA 4:30 N/A 8:40 N/A
KING KONG T 2:00 N/A N/A 5:30 N/A 9:30
THE CRONICLES OF NARNIA B 1:30 N/A 4:30' 7:30 N/A 10:30

SUSE YOUR E-CARD TO RESERVE TICKETS AT 380-3549 OR WWW.OALLERIACINEMAS.COM
THE FAMILY STONE NEW 1:25 3:30 6:20 8:25 10:35
RUMOR HAS IT C 1:20 3:40 6:25 N/A NIA
WOLF CREEK C N/A N/A NIA 8:20 10:30
FUN WITH DICK & JANE T 1:30 3:35 6:30 8:40 10:35
CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN 2 B 1:10 3:30 6:15 8:25 10:25
KING KONG T 12:30 N/A 4:30 N/A 8:30


* *
t



"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


-








0410


6Oi NILANSRI

FerilierFnicide


CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE
THE MOST THOROUGH RESTORATION & CLEANING EVER, OR THE JOB IS FREE!
NASSAU'S ONLY PROFESSIONAL, CERTIFIED STONE CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CARE SYSTEMS.
Carpet, Upholstery, Stone and Marble Cleaning &
Restoration Specialist.
Prochem Cleaning Systems removes Deep & Heavy
Soil, Bacteria, Grease, Watermarks and Stains from
Carpeting & Furniture, restoring them to like new
at a fraction of replacement cost.
Carpet, Sofa's, Loveseats, Chairs, Dining Chairs, Cars,
Boats, Grout, Tiles, Marble & Stone
Persian, Wool & Silk Carpet Cleaning Specialist
Restoration & Care
Authorized StoneTech Professional Contractor
YOUR LOCALMEMBER OFTHE.
CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS PROHEM SYSTEM (sm)
PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594
ONLY WE CAN DO IT RIGHT
www.prochemsystem.com www.stonetechpro.com www.iicrc.org
Spsp@coralwave.com,











Telecommunications/Computer Network Design
Installation & Maintenance

Homes Offices Subdivisions
Call Us Today!

Tel: 393-7733


Petition launched to save


Perpall Tract Wellfield


I


A IN 7:10 10:00


THE CRONICLES OF NARNIA


1:00 14:00


- "I








PG4M ODA A 9,0TERITOU
IN IS *


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeportfax: (242) 352-9348


Hopes (and fears) for new airport


TOMORROW is January 10, the thirty-
ninth anniversary of majority rule in the
Bahamas.
It commemorates the day that the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party, led by London trained
lawyer, Lynden Oscar Pindling, 36, defeated
the minority United Bahamian Party, led by
Sir Roland Symonette. It was the day on
which the balance of power was reversed in
the Bahamas.
Tomorrow is also the day if rumour is to
be believed that Prime Minister Perry
Christie is expected to announce the privati-
sation of Nassau International Airport (NIA).
If the announcement is made, NIA is, in
the words of Transport and Aviation Minis-
ter Glenys Hanna-Martin, "well on its way to
a complete transformation resulting in a facil-
ity that will be the envy of the region and a
place of which we can all be justly proud."
We certainly hope so.
However, another troubling rumour mak-
ing the rounds at the airport is a suggestion
that one of the greatest stumbling blocks to
the conclusion of the agreement with Van-
couver Airport Services (YVRAS) of Cana-
da is the airport's exclusive concessions.
Unlike the present NIA, which daily drains
the Public Treasury, a privatised NIA will
not only have to pay for itself, but it will have
to make a profit. This not only means that
everyone hired at the facility will have to
earn his/her salary, but it also means that the
exclusivity clauses in the present concessions
will have to go. Airport concessions will be a
large part of the revenue that the new man-
agers will have to depend on to operate the
airport.
If, as Mrs Martin predicts, NIA is to be the
envy of the region, then it must offer many
and varied facilities. It can't do this with
exclusive concessions particularly the pre-
sent ones, which are constantly being criti-
cised for not measuring up to standards
expected of an international airport.
The most common complaint is that if an
evening flight is delayed there is nowhere at
the airport to even get a cup of coffee. There
is no point in airline staff giving out food
vouchers, because there is nowhere to buy
anything to eat.
According to the story told by Opposi-
tion deputy leader Brent Symonette in the
House of Assembly last year, Mr Bradley
Roberts, who was not a cabinet member at


the time and was therefore free to watch over
his various business interests, approached
him. Mr Symonette was then chairman of
the Airport Authority. Mr Roberts, according
to Mr Symonette, was upset that a Bahamian
woman was selling cooked food to airport
employees from the boot of her car in the air-
port parking lot. He wanted Mr Symonette, as
the man in overall charge, to put an end to
this kerbside business because this hard-
working, grassroots lady was interfering with
his exclusive food concession at the airport.
Now as a cabinet minister, Mr Roberts
cannot take the same kind of interest in these
concessions. However, the company that
operates them is still there, the remaining
principals are still there, and presumably the
concessions are still intact.
But for the new, privatised airport to be the
envy of the region it will have to offer a variety
of food outlets casual dining, coffee bars,
bars and restaurants, fast food and fine dining.
There must be shops for apparel, books
and newsstands, confectionery, convenience
stores, fashions, flower shops, golf shops, lug-
gage and travel accessories, souvenirs, gifts,
airport art, personal care, and the list goes on.
There must be duty free shops. In many air-
ports there are health centres, children's areas,
baggage storage areas, internet access, banking
facilities, car rentals, parking facilities and valet
parking. The airport could be a shopping mall
in itself, and with the revenue from these con-
cessions it should be a highly successful, finan-
cially independent money-maker.
Some airports even have hotels attached to
accommodate transiting passengers. At Lon-
don airport there are facilities for passengers
arriving on the overnight trans-Atlantic flight
to take a shower, change clothes and have
breakfast before driving into London for a
morning appointment.
All of this would be another outlet for
many enterprising Bahamian business per-
sons.. One of the rules will have to be that
whoever gets the various concessions cannot
close shop at 5pm and go home. They are
there particular the restaurants to pro-
vide service to the travelling public, and they
will have to be on duty until the last plane
leaves.
If the airport is to be the envy of the region,
the cry from a stranded passenger can no'
longer be: "At Nassau International I could-
n't even get a cup of coffee!"


Getting to the





business of





government


EDITOR, The Tribune
NOW that church service is
over I hope that the Progres-
sive Liberal Party will now get
down to good governance.
As always when listening to
the ruling party in conventions
one must listen well to separate
fact from the fiction. As always
in conventions the truth is often
the first casualty. One has to
always be careful not to get lost
in the pomp and pageantry of
conventions and listen well to
what our leaders didn't say and
conveniently forget.
Take as an example the figure
quoted by minister of financial
services, Allyson Maynard Gib-
son of an investment of some
four billion approved, yet the
unemployment hovers at near
11 per cent for almost a year.
If you factor BahMar potential
investment of near two billion
into that which is expected to
start in early 2007, things have
the potential to get worse
before they get better.
Another point to ponder is
that many of these potential
investments were promised by
Mr Christie almost two years
ago. We are acutely aware that
a promise is a comfort to a fool.
What Mr Christie has not told
the Bahamian people is that
most of these potential investors
were on the verge of packing
up and leaving when the gov-
ernment went scrambling to
save face. An example of that is
the potential investment of the
Ginn Developers in Freeport.
The bungling and indecisions
of this administration have
become legendary.
I must ask the Bahamian peo-
ple a question: If the PLP real-
ly cared about you, why would
it allow the BahMar develop-
ers a space of more than two
years to put the first shovel in
the ground? Don't you need a
job as soon as possible to feed
your family? Contrast that to
the Sun International contract
with the FNM administration,
which started within six months
of the signing of the heads of
agreement!
Another smoke and mirror
issue is the privatization of
BaTelCo and Bahamasair.
The sanctimonious PLP will
tell you that the FNM wasted
millions of dollars on the pri-
vatisation of BaTelCo, yet
amazingly three and half years
later under a Christie adminis-
tration, BaTelCo is still not pri-
vatised and continues to haem-
orrhage with increased compe-
tition from Indigo and the like.
Bahamasair is where you put


me. Minister Bradley Roberts
had promised the Bahamian
people with much gusto that
Bahamasair would be privatised
by the end of summer. The
summer has come and gone, the
Bahamian people have dressed
the Christmas tree and still no
privatised Bahamasair.
On the matter of LNG: why
has not the government of Per-
ry Christie give the Bahamian
people a definitive answer as
yet? The last time I heard from
the Prime Minister was that the
government was merely trying
to tie up some loose ends. That
must have been a lot of loose
ends. For it has been almost a
year since that particular
announcement.
Many people might have
missed the announcement by
Minister Miller that another oil


company was given approval to
drill in our beautiful waters.
Was this done without consult-
ing the Bahamian people?
One of the major promises of
the PLP was the National
Health Insurance, which was
promised to be in motion some
90 days into their administra-
tion. Some three and a half
years later the cost of the said
insurance has yet to be worked
out! How long, Lord, how long!
Talking fool is a serious thing!
My dear mom always
reminds me that everyone that
says, 'Lord! Lord!' will not enter
the kingdom of God. If 'talking
God' could have helped men
enter the kingdom, the PLP
would be on that train bound
for glory. My Bible says that
faith without works is dead.
Mind you the PLP have plenty
"faith" it is just the "works" part
that they so desperately lack.
STEPHEN ROLLE
Nassau
November 20 2005


'Jonesing' a problem

for tourism industry


EDITOR, The Tribune
AS a resident of this beau-
tiful island, I am strongly
moved to write this letter to
express my shock and shame
while dining at Traveller's
Rest on West Bay Street, the
afternoon of Friday, Decem-
ber 30,2005.
I have been a customer of
this fine establishment too
many times to remember dur-
ing the past 15 years without
being approached by "jone-
sers" begging for money. After
getting out of my vehicle I was
approached by a man on
crutches begging for money. I
wag even more stunned to see
that there was not only one,
but two men, hassling each
tourist-filled taxi for money as
well as hanging around the
property wall on West Bay
Street. One of these men had
the nerve to walk onto the
property of Traveller's Rest
and boldly sit at a table.
This was lunch time and the
restaurant was full of tourists
enjoying delicious local cui-
sine while at the same time
absorbing the incredible
ocean view that Traveller's
Rest offers. I asked the wait-
ress if these men begging for
money was something new at


the restaurant and she replied
that it had become a problem.
I told her that one of the men
was sitting at a table and she
then proceeded to chase him
off the property. The joneser
then went across the street to
the parking area and blatant-
ly began throwing empty beer
bottles into the sea.
I have resided in this coun-
try for 15 years making Nas-
sau my home. The series of
events that I have just
described have left me feel-
ing very ashamed for this
nation. The Ministry of
Tourism spends millions of
dollars annually promoting
The Bahamas, but all it takes
is one inconsiderate simple-
minded fool deliberately dis-
respecting the natural envi-
ronment in full view of visi-
tors to this country, to con-
tradict all that the Ministry of
Tourism promotes with
regards to eco-tourism and
pristine beaches.
I hope that this disgraceful
situation will soon be resolved
so that patrons of Traveller's
Rest can enjoy a hassle-free
experience.
KIM SMITH
Nassau
December 31 2005


MARINE NAVIGATION COURSES

When you are ready to venture over the horizon make
sure that you are prepared for the challenge. On Monday,
January 9th take the time to attend the free first class
of the TERRESTRIAL NAVIGATION COURSE
offered by The Bahamas School of Marine
Navigation at 7p.m. at BASRA Headquarters on East
Bay Street then consider enrolling in the 3-month
course.designed to impart essential theoretical and
practical navigational skills. Other courses available
are Celestial Navigation and Marine Safety/
Seamanship.

Telephone: 364-5987, fax 364-5988
or
e-mail pgk434@netscape.net



A leading Computer Company is seeking


Office Assistant

This position requires a highly organized, energetic,
self-starter with effective people management and
communications skills. The new Office Assistant must
have proven PowerPoint, Excel and Word expertise. The
experienced candidate must be goal oriented, demonstrate
strong work ethic, computer literate, Professional
preference, Possess good conversational skills, and a
team player.

Only applicants meeting above criteria need apply.

Must have own transportation.

Fax: (242) 394-4971


Quality Auto Sales

PRE-OWNED CARS

& TRUCKS

We have pre-owned cars
with warranty starting from




$4,995

NOW IN STOCK

'9- SUZUKI SW: D0RSfATCHBAK

1'0;"O.i 'BALENO

'03 SUZUKIALENO

'98 HYUNDAI ELANTRA

'89 TOYOTA BUS

Visit us and see other used cars
and make your own deal!



QUALITY ,,A,
LIMITED
#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET 322-3775 325-3079
Vit our showroom at Quallty Auto Sales (Freepot) Ltd for similar deals Queen's Highway 352-6122


A local, well established Beverage Company is seeking qualified
applicants to fill the position of:

NETWORK ADMINISTRATOR

Responsibilities:
Manage Local Area Network (LAN) performances; hardware
and software maintenance and licensing;
Install software;
Documents the network and maintains LAN security.
Evaluates vendor products in hardware, software and
telecommunications equipment and recommends purchases
consistent with short and long term objectives.
Recommends and implements LAN policies and standards,
ensuring adherence to security procedures.
maintains contact with outside organizations in the
maintenance, service and/or purchase of LAN hardware and
software.

Qualifications:
Bachelor's degree in Computer Science or a related degree,
or equivalent education and work experience. Microsoft
Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE), Cisco Certified network
Administrator (CCNA) certification/training would be an
asset. Significant knowledge of or background in integrated
online systems, LANs/WANs, telecommunications networks
and application software, preferred.

Knowledge of Microsoft Windows NT 4.0. a minimum of
one (1) year experience working with Windows (2000/2003)
Server, Microsoft Exchange, Microsoft office Professional
and Internet applications, preferred.
Please send resume to:
PO. Box-CB-11182.
Nassau, Bahamas


I


PAGE 4, MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006


THE TRIBUNE








THE TRBN MODY JAUR 9 06,PG


0 In brief

Former

Tribune

editor dies

in Wales at

age of 83

JIM (;raves, an editor at The
7ribiru from 1965 to 1972, died
December 29 at his home in
Wales. He was hale and hearty
at 83 and died suddenly.
A Yorkshireman by birth,
Mr Graves began his journal-
ism career at the Huntingdon
Post in Cambridgeshire, Eng-
land. He joined the Royal Air
Force during the Second World
War and'was posted' overseas
where 'he gained certification
on Catalina flying boats.
He served the final years of
the war with 201 squadron of
RAF Coastal Command from
a home base in Wales, where
he met his future wife, Joan
Griffiths.
Their retirement home for
the past several years directly
overlooked the Milford Haven
waterway where he piloted Sun-
derland flying boats to provide
air cover for transatlantic con-
voys during the war.
After the war Mr Graves
rejoined the East Midlands
Allied Press group of newspa-
pers where.he worked his way
up the ranks to become editor
of one of the region's most
respected weeklies, the Peter-
borough Citizen and Advertiser.
In 1965 he took his wife and
their two young children to Nas-
sau to work with Sir Etienne
Dupuch at The Tribune, where
he later became editor.
In 1972 he moved to the
Cayman Islands to join
Desmond Seales' fledgling news
magazine the Nor'wester and
set about the task of recruiting
writers here in the islands and
maintaining links with other
journalists in this region, in the
US and Europe.
He encouraged a number of
local writers in their early
careers and enjoyed warm
friendships with a wide variety
of regular contributors he
maintained contact with many.
of them ,until his death:
Ini the;-eaTly 1980s.'he was..
involved i-n-thei successful.
launch of the first pan-
Caribbean news and feature
magazine Caribbean Life &
Times another publication of
Desmond Seales' Diversified
Services Group. In 1985 he
became Director of Govern-
ment Information Services in
Cayman.
Mr Graves is survived by his
wife, Joan, their daughter Jane
Beales and son David. Both
Jane and David attended
Queen's College High School
in Nassau. Jane's husband,
Richard, was a fisheries officer
in the Bahamas during the
1970s.














MONDAY, JAN. 9
i71





6:301 Sraarr usvSunrise Live
11:00 '-mmerljate Re:ponse
12nopn ZNS News Update Live
12:03 Caribbean Today News
Update
12:05 Immediate Response Cont'd
1:00 Caribbean News In Review
1:30 Spiritual Impact: D. McClurkin
2:00 Evening Exchange
2:30 Inside Hollywood
3:00 David Pitts
3:30 Bishop Neil Ellis
4:00' Dennis The Menace
4:30 Carmen San Diego
4:58 ZNS News Update
5:00 Fun Farm
5:30 411
6:00 Gospel Grooves


6:25 Life Line
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
8:00 National Tourism Conference
Town Meeting
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30 Comm. Page 1540AM


W hat began four
W years ago as a
troubling sign of political inter-
ference with the corporations
has now escalated into a pat-
tern of confrontation between
members of this government
and those charged with man-
aging public institutions.
We can all, perhaps, be
thankful to Sidney Stubbs for
having given us allan earl\
warning of what to expect.
Back in 2002, as part of an
exuberant generation of new
PLP MPs, Mr Stubbs began
throwing around pretensions
of power literally within weeks
of his appointment as chair-
man of BAIC.
In a now well-publicised let-
ter, he used shockingly abu-
sive and threatening language
against the general manager
when their swords crossed
over his (the chairman's) sum-
mary dismissal of staff mem-
bers.
Despite the principled, anti-
victimisation position taken by
Leslie Miller,'the minister in
that instance (who was barely
on speaking terms with his
chairman during the whole
affair) Mr Stubbs' behaviour
at BAIC cast a long shadow
over the early days of Mr
Christie's government.
It was a chilling reminder to
many Bahamians of the kind
of shady political interference
with corporations that was
embarrassingly revealed to the
world during the last commis-
sion.of Inquiry.
Unfortunately, it would not
be the last public row between
the head of a public organ and
the politician in charge.

Less than a year ago, a
particularly embar-
rassing row erupted between
the Registrar General and the
Minister with responsibility for
Financial Services and Invest-
ments.
For "ceks' the running of
this' most'important depart -
ment was left' virtually on hold
as the Registrar, claiming.
unfair (and ultra vires) dis-
missal, refused to demit office.
Ultimately, the Registrar did
demit office following govern-
ment's agreement to accom-
modate her elsewhere. Hoy-
ever, she maintains that she
was victimised to this day.
Additionally, her central
allegation (that she was hound-
ed from office for failing to car-
ry out an illegitimate request)
has never been satisfactorily
countered or explained by
either the minister or the gov-
ernment as a whole.
More recently, the ongoing
spat between the president and
CEO of the Bahamas
Telecommunications Compa-
ny (BTC) and the Minister for
Utilities, Bradley Roberts, has


cast an aura of uncertainty
over a corporation which the
government still claims to want
to privatise.
Again, the issue appears to
be over a staffing decision.
This time it is the CEO and
president. who was asked by


- ..... ...., ....
the Minister to
pension of a n
company. Whe
was denied by
he was then si
by the minister
AND NOW T
AND SEV
CORPOR

T he circus
latest r
The general m

It would
sad ind<
we peri
the bad
instinct.
political
contrive
against
good co.
govern
those w
we have

Water and Sewe
tion last Friday
to accuse the


ANDR EW


reverse his sus- The matter is further com-
nanager of the plicated by the support that
n this 'request' the chairman seems to be
the president, receiving from some members
summarily fired of the board and from the
union, whose president blames
the actions of the general man-
'HE WATER ager for the row.
VERAGE Whatever the truth of the
ATION... allegations made so far, a few
points are worth noting:
Firstly, one of the main
instances of the points of contention seems to
ow are typical. be the chairman's attempted
manager of the dismissal of individuals within
the corporation in circum-
stances which the general man-
ld be ager says amount to 'victimi-
sation'. This charge should nev-
eed if er be taken lightly, given the
S. governing party's well estab-
nitted lished record of victimisation
during its last tenure in office.
It also resonates with allega-
sof tions made in all of the other
S f politician/management rows
that have taken place during
ins to this government's tenure.
Secondly, the chairman is
accused of acting outside his
the powers in increasing the wages
of some 100 employees, tak-
rporate ing the wage bill of the corpo-
ration above sustainable lev-
tce of els. This allegation (which.
may, if true, explain ith.e
which union's siding with the i'hadit
Sman) simply has to be taken
.. ,.',, seriously since it comes fitor' a
:: GMi Abraham Butler, Whose
success at containing the costs
rage Corpora- and increasing the profitabili-
went on record ty of the corporation has'beben
corporation's beyond contradiction.


chairman (a political appointee)
of inappropriate interference in
the workings of the corpora-
tion. He has suggested that the
chairman's apparently vigorous
brief within the corporation is
unsupported by any relevant
'expertise. :' : ; 1" in
The chairman,' meanwhile;
suggests that he is acting in full
accordance with the wishes of
the minister, Bradley Roberts,
upon whom he calls for reso-
lution of the matter.


WHAT DOES IT
ALL MEAN?


iven the frequency
of these public rows
under the pre-tenf''ive'nment i.
-Bahamians 4reentitled to ask
'w.ihat A ill beth longg 't.'r'n
effect of this government on
the viability of our public insti-
tutions. This is an important
question because of the over-


Given the frequency of
these public rows under the
present government,
Bahamians are entitled to ask
what will be the long term
effect of this government on
the viability of our public
institutions.


ALLE

whelming importance
integrity of public insti
to the orderly governan
developing society.
While the creation and
opment of solid, well rui
institutions is far bigger


tions at independence and,
-S owing largely to the general
quality of our politicians, have
developed virtually no signifi-
cant indigenous ones.
N It would be sad indeed if we
permitted the bad instincts of
politicians to contrive against
of the the good corporate governance
itutions of those which we have.
ice of a
d devel- unfortunately, at their
n public best, all these inci-
er than dents point to a breakdown in


While the creation and
development of solid, well
run public institutions is far
bigger than any individual
government, it does not take a
few bad politicians very long
to do them irreparable harm.


any individual government, it
does not take a few bad politi-
cians very long to do them
irreparable harm.
For confirmation of this we
need look no further than
Jamaica, where a previous col-
umn pointed out the virtual
'destruction of the institutional
ittegrity of a once-admired
Jamaica Constabulary.
r, :As in the case of Jamaica, we
iiiherited!most:of:these institu-
':" .""


communication (or perhaps
trust) between politicians and
the public service under the cur-
rent administration. This, by its
nature, must further compromise
the effectiveness of an already
slow and weak public service.
At worst, they indicate a
growing pattern of ministerial
assault upon the integrity of
public institutions. The conse-
quences of this hardly bear con-
-templating.


BED BATH & HOME


,i'







GIFT


Harbour Bay Shopping Centre
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448


& BRIDAL REGIS TRY
-' -, g < '

." ,ri,, 1 -* .
<





a BRIDAL RE GISTR


AS.


- lit- ;,. r I"-''


.i~ ~


THEY BOUGHT!


THEY ENTERED!



THEY WON


oI~F


OTHER



WINNERS!


., .'=
.$, :;-


ii .:. t; '-i.


FREEPORT WINNER!
'' o
TL~ C:


jiJ


Fckrnadeitc Bcrnard
LAfDOGDAMPD
YURMA"I BRtACELET

FREEPORT WINNER!
I Allysha Fishbacker
i EilisA~f tiAil~iM4~B~


3:'',


1A I i .:5 '.;


FREEPORT WINNER
T ei f. r;: .' : '


i.rB .


Political interference and the




viability of our institutions


PERSPECTIVE


MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


L


-;;



-i--~-~ .-
; ~ :


a:~ i'.; : i'


,4"cFI'~


B,







PAE ,MONDAY JAUR 9,20 H RBN


Two to tango


diplomatic relations


M By Sir Ronald Sanders
( T/e writer is a business exec-
utive and firmer Caribbean
diplomat who p]iblislh's widely
('o Siiial Stat,' in ti ghlohall
C llillllllh il ).

M adlclinc Albright,
the former US Sec-
retlr\ of State in President Bill


Clinton's Democratic adminis-
tration posed a pertinent ques-
tion to President George W
Bush on Thursday, January 5.
According to the New York
Times, Ms Albright, asked the
President whether his foreign
policy team with the Iraq war
"taking up all their energy" had-
n't let US relations with Latin
America suffer by "benign
neglect".


The reference to Latin Amer-
ica is relevant to the Caribbean
because the two areas are
linked both by international
organizations and the US State
Department.
In reality, Latin America and
the English-speaking Caribbean
are very different. They are dif-
ferent in size of territory and
population, in culture, in lan-
guage, in history and even in


their foreign policy objectives
in the global community.
But, the truth is that Ms
Albright is right, the Bush
administration has neglected
both Latin American and the
Caribbean at a high political
level.
In trying to get some move-
ment in the international trade
negotiations at the World Trade
Organisation (WTO), the US has


fashion

,. Top of The Hill Mackey Street, Ma
.-/ f? ** >


Catch 18 days of Fantastic savings...

SJanuary 9 thru 28, 2006


i

I'


had to engage Brazil particularly,
because it has emerged as a
leader in negotiations on behalf
of several developing countries.
But, the engagement with
Brazil, in the WTO context,
does not amount to the kind of
serious interaction with Latin
America and the Caribbean
that was envisaged when Presi-
dent Bush announced his "third
border initiative" soon after tak-
ing up his first term in office.
At the Summit of the Amer-
icas held last November, Presi-
dent Bush tried to get agree-
ment to proceed with the Free
Trade Area of the Americas
(FTAA) to include all the coun-
tries (except Cuba by US
desire) of the Western Hemi-
sphere. He failed to persuade
many of the larger Latin Amer-
ican states to do so. For the
most part, they regard the

The same
lack of
meaningful
US high level
engagement
that is evident
in relations
with Latin
American
countries is
equally true of
the Caribbean


FTAA as being little more than
an effort to secure greater US
influence over their economies
at the expense of local owner-
,,. ship and employment. . ,,


* SIR Ronald Sanders


In the meantime, through-
out the two Bush AdminT
istrations, Latin Americap
countries have been moving to
the left.
The ,boisterous and vocqa
Hugo Chavez of Venezuelais;
the. best known of the Latin
American leaders who viewthe
US government with deep sus-
picion. ,
But, the leadership .in
Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay and
now Bolivia under Presidept-
elect Evo Morales also reveals a
profound animosity toward the
Bush administration andits
policies.
And, it seems that another
left-leaning leader, Ollanta
Humala, may emerge in Peru
in presidential elections later
this year.
Al of these leaders have^a
closer relationship with Cubl's
Fidel Castro than has been the
case in the past a fact whiWli
instead of promoting US
engagement with them, Iis.
'elicited only US mistrust.
Significantly, two of the big'g&
Latin American countries -
Argentina and Brazil hav
decided to pay off debt to j
International Monetary Fung
(IMF), leaving themselves free
.4
'* r


The 39th



COMMEMORATION


Of Majority Rule

JANUARY 101", 1)7 JANUARY 1020' 2006
"On the 10"' day


.4I





of.


January, 1967 the Bahamian ;'
r people took a major step forward ,'-
towards full self-determination .
The Leaders of the Movement were, ',.
ordinary men and women who stood for ..
equality and justice for all.


On the 39'" Anniversary of the attainment of Majority Rule,
the Progressive Liberal Party pays tribute to the heroes and
heroines of the struggle."


"Forward ever...backwards never"
. .. ..' . ... -. '


'V...


'V. '.
"V.8E~ [


. i :

"!:
'.'% '


A .-


T jk ,. * *'.
.. i ,,, ,. .




., ... ^^j-< .' d. ,. 1
MB^Bj^w- a '^^"E


insight
W d i'6N ,


all

II at Marathon & Town Centre Mall


All Rewards Club Members
will get an additional 5% OFF


~ II


~90~


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006


1: ; -.yr "- -" .--,o-, .


*
..:,i : i


: ::
S







I I I4~ S **~~* *~


between the US and the Caribbean


of the controls of the Organisa-
tion and its board which is dom-
inated by Western industrialized
nations, particularly the US.
Many countries in Latin
America are also busily estab-
lishing new markets for their
products, including oil and gas,
in China, India and the Euro-
pean Union (EU).
None of this augurs well for
US-Latin American relations,
which have deteriorated under
the Bush administration.
Former Secretary of State
Colin Powell was too involved
with the conflicts in Afghanistan
and Iraq to pay attention to
Latin American and the
Caribbean, and his successor,
Condoleeza Rice, was always
going to be more focused on
the big international issues,
especially the Middle East.
Latin American and
Caribbean policy seemed to be
left to successive Under-Secre-
taries of State first, Otto
Reich who was obsessed with
Cuba, then Roger Noriega who
extended animosity beyond
Cuba to Venezuela, and now
Tom Shannon who served on
the National Security Council
under Ms Rice, and who, unlike
his predecessors, should have a
wider perspective of the
Region. Among his qualifica-
tions, Mr Shannon holds a Ph.D
from Oxford University; this
British experience should give
him a better understanding of
the former British colonies in
the Caribbean.

But, so far, the same
lack of meaningful US
high level engagement that is
evident in relations with Latin
American countries is equally
true of the Caribbean.
While there have been
encounters between Secretaries

It seems that
another
left-leaning
leader... may
emerge in
Peru in
presidential
elections later
this year

of state Powell and Rice with
Caribbean Foreign Ministers,
these have been brief and oblig-
atory with little real discussion
of the issues that bother the
sub-region.
In the meantime, President
Chavez of Venezuela is trying
to extend his influence and
ideas into the Caribbean main-
ly through his Petro-Caribe
agreement under which
Venezuela would sell oil to
Caribbean countries at market
price but with part of the cost
being treated as a loan.
Some governments have
jumped at his offer so as to
defer payment for part of the
oil to a later date, a develop-
ment that has caused a rift
among Caribbean countries and
alarmed the IMF.
Trinidad and Tobago previ-
ously provided oil supplies to
the countries which have
jumped on the Petro-Caribe
bandwagon, and the IMF is con-
cerned at the prospect of
increased debt by these coun-
tries which will now owe
Venezuela huge sums of money.

It is easy to blame the US
administration for the pre-
sent state of poor relations
between the US and Latin
America and the Caribbean.
For, it is a truism that any US
government is a Belle of the
Ball, and there is no shortage
of suitors who would line up for
a dance, particularly if it is a
tango. In this connection, the


US simply had to make its
dance card available to attract
willing partners.
The US has not done so,
choosing instead to isolate itself


America. The sub-region of
small countries with few
resources, no military might,
and little economic clout needs
the US far more than does


The boisterous and vocal
Hugo Chavez of Venezuela is
the best known of the Latin
American leaders who view
the US government with deep
suspicion.


from some of its closest neigh-
bours and generating their
resentment rather than their
support.
But, in terms of the
Caribbean, blame does not lie
with the US alone.
The Caribbean is not Latin


Latin America.
In the WTO negotiations, in
the IMF and in the World Bank,
Caribbean countries espe-
cially those of the Caribbean
Community and Common Mar-
ket (CARICOM) need spe-
cial and different treatment in


Consult your local i HP COMPAQ BUSINESS
reseller for prices. NOTEBOOK NX6110

* Intel Centrino Mobile Technology
* Microsoft Windows XP Professional
* Battery with up to 8 hour's autonomy
* 90% of the charge in 90 minutes
* Secure Data with HP ProtectTools.(HP exclusive)
* HP Mobile Data Protection System helps safeguard
your hard drive form shocks and bumps
Anti scratch and shocks screen protection system
Metal reinforce chassis








Consult your local I Basic Docking
reseller for prices. station
* Desktop convenience
* Full port replication in a space-saving design
* Cable management


the application of the rules of
these organizations. They need
financial grants, better access to
soft loans, and access to mar-
kets for their limited products
on preferential terms.
These very desires by the
Caribbean have been opposed
by some Latin American coun-
tries.

To achieve their ambi-
tions, Caribbean coun-
tries need a sympathetic US
government and Congress that
fully understands the plight that
Caribbean countries now face
as they struggle to earn enough
from their goods and services
to stem the tide of increasing
unemployment and poverty,
while they battle with the effects
of global warming, HIV/Aids
and international demands for
increased security against drug
trafficking and terrorism.
If the US takes up their cause


in the international communi-
ty, the Caribbean would have a
far greater chance of success.
But, such sympathy and under-
standing in Washington will only
come if the Caribbean region
works tirelessly to secure it.
The Caribbean needs a new
and constructive engagement
with Washington that is based
on mutual advantage. That
mutual advantage could include
working with the US to promote
better relations across Latin
America as a whole and the
US needs this if tension in the
Hemisphere is to be eased and a
good neighbourly relationship
established all round.
In any event, the US and the
Caribbean are at the Western
Hemisphere's Ball. It takes two
to tango. Both Tom Shannon
and Caribbean Foreign Minis-
ters should open the floor in
their mutual interest.
responses to:ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com


To achieve
their ambitions,
Caribbean
countries need
a sympathetic
US government
and Congress
that fully
understands
the plight that
Caribbean
countries now
face


Add convenience to the many possibilities that Intel Centrino
Mobile Technology can offer you. Be connected anywhere for
up to 11 hours If you are in your office, enjoy working with the
HP Dock Station* allowing you to plug and unplug all your
accessories in seconds without loosing the comfort that your
notebook gives you.


Consult your local Advanced Docking
reseller for prices. Station
* Desktop convenience
* Full port replication in a space-saving design
* Cable management


Consult your local
onreseller your prices. Standard Monitor Stand
reseller for prices. ;
* Compact Design and durable construction
* Can Support up to 21" Monitor
* Open-sided design
* Easy access to frequently used bays, slots and ports


Consult your local 90 W Auto
reseller for prices. Adapter/Charger
* Charge your notebook while
traveling or while away from the office


Consult your local NX6110 Travel Battery
reseller for prices.
* Up to 8 hours of battery life without having to plug
in or swap out!
* Excellent tool to take your office wherever you want


SMART ADVICE SMART TECHNOLOGY SMART SERVICES


Contact in Bahamas :
Bahamas Business Solutions: 322-7674.
Custom Computers Ltd: 322-2115, Fulitsu: 356-3700,
Micronet: 328-3040, Systems Resource Group (SRG)
325-0011, The Amoury Company. 322-2733,
www.latintech.net


VisI The HP distributor
Click www.hp.com
Offer Valid until 01/31/06


Promotion valid until January 31st, 2006 or until stock is solo out Pices are in Anerican Dollars VAT of 7% included Cost to deliver out of store not included The puces and specihcations can be subject to changes thout previous notice. 'HP D ock Station is sold separaly. Suggested retail puces Purices products, accesses and aailabity may vary as per drbu
lor Intel, Intel logo, Intel Inside, Int inside logo, Intel Cenin. Intel Centrino logo Celeron, Intel Xeon, Intel SpeedSep Ita ium, and Pentium are trademarks or ]egstered trademarks of Intel Copati on or is subsidiaries n in the United States and other countries Microsoft and tlndovis are registered brands of the Microsoft Corporation HP is not responsible for typos and
/ or photographic errors in this material. Hewlett-Packard Development Company. L P. 2005 All rights reserved


Share



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


w







PAGE 8, M D J


Police march



to church for



annual service


Looking for
Japanese used cars?

New Arrivals Weekly

Mitsubishi
Suzuki
Toyota
Nissan
Honda
We have various makes

Check our prices

Before Buying
at

Bahamas Bus & Truck

call:


MINISTER of Labour
and Immigration Vincent
Peet said that if they are
going to be effective, both
the police force and gov-
ernment must keep
abreast with the changes
in society.
Speaking at the Royal
Bahamas Police Force
annual church service yes-
terday at the Southland
Church of God, Mr Peet
said that today's social
environment demands the
ability to operate in ever-
changing conditions and
the capacity to remain
focused, not withstanding
rapid and sometimes rad-
ical changes.
"If the police force is to
be an effective institution
and if the government is
to formulate and adopt
sound law enforcement
policies, together we must
keep abreast of these
changes and make the
necessary adjustments to
accommodate them."
He said that in recogni-
tion of the challenges that
the police face, the gov-
ernment is committed to
providing the police with
the tools they require to
fight crime at all levels and
to provide the training
necessary to develop the
officers.


* POLICE 2480 Dixon and Sargant Moxey ride in front of the police march iesterda lto their
annual church service


rTHE Police Force drill squad parade eesterda3 in the build-up to the police annual church
service


Aretiau iBn imdr
tArey 0n-ib or r -. -by the ,Deil
desire l .iII.and "- ....ij.

COMETO ., '
THE CHURCH OF GOD OF PROPHECY <
Mind Changing! Heart Cleansing!
Body Healing! Life Transforming 1"'
f and Soul Restoring!


CONVENING:
Sunday, January 15th thru
Friday, January 20th, 2006
at. 7:30 p.m. Nightly
at the East Street Tabernacle, East St. and
Sunlight Village

THEME:


"N.INE ISM INDOM'

Hear our Anointed Soloists:
Philip Sunmons, Esther O'bnen, Graham McKinne\ & Lynn Thursion and our
National Praise Team, Notional Crusade Choir and the
Tabernacle Concert Choir
Be blessed by our Shirley Street, Wulff Road, Blue Hill Road. Palm Tree
Avenue. Augusta Street and Englerston Sanctuarn Choirs
Crusade Co-ordinators:
Ministers Timothy Johnson, Jarenda Rahming and Scott Wilson
BRING THE WHOLE FAMILY AND BE BLESSED!


CAREER OPPORTUNITY

BRANCH MANAGER- EXUMA
As a leader in the Insurance, Financial Services & Investments
industry for over 85 years, British American Insurance Company of
the Bahamas Limited seeks a progressive, self-starter to fill this
challenging position at our newest branch in George Town, Exuma.
Manager will be responsible for:
Successful launch of the Branch during January 2006
Business Development for the Island of Exuma & Cays
Marketing & Sales of the full range of the company's
products & services including, life & health Insurance,
Mortgages, Annuities, Pensions & Investment products
Managing operations of the branch (including claims
processing & sales support) engendering a "can do"
approach, working to "best practice" and "continuous
improvement" philosophy
Providing customer service to a diverse existing & new clientele
Key Competencies Required:
Effective oral & written communication with a diverse clientele
Networking & public speaking skills
Result orientation & goal achievement
Planning, Organizational & Conceptual thinking ability
Flexibility & resiliency
Quality-oriented & customer-focused
Ability to work honestly and reliably with minimum supervision
Minimum Qualifications include:
Bachelor of Arts degree or equivalent
Series VII, Canadian Securities Course or FLMI a plus
Five years experience (three years management) in the
financial services industry
The successful candidate will receive a competitive base & productivity-
linked salary and attractive benefits package commensurate with qualifi-
cations & experience. Please forward your resume, documentary proof of
your qualifications and three character references to:
Human Resources Manager
British American Insurance Company of the Bahamas Limited
Independence Drive
P.O. Box N-4815
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 242-361-2525



Established O 920 ,


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006







T TIB E M DAY, J


* The Police parade to Southland Church of God yesterday to attend their annual church service


Mercede -Benz


* IMMIGRATION officers
march to the police annual
church service


* THE police dogs are out in full force during the march
(Photos: Felipg Major/Tribune staff)



British Colonial Hillton
Nassau



The BRITISH COLONIAL HILTON
wishes to advise the public of the
cancellation of a series of company cheques.
The serial numbers of these cheques are
46460 to 46568 inclusive. There has been
a "Stop Payment" put on each of these
cheques.

If you are presently with a cheque within
this number range, do not attempt to cash
it. Instead, please contact the British
Colonial Hilton Security Department at
322-3301 ext. 4137.


Your car.


Your trust.


*,~ V \t*<~WWWW*.,


Our responsibility


Brake Service Suspension & Alignment Exhaust
Oil, Lude & Filter "GOODYEAR TYRES"

*American & Imported Cars Light Trucks Vans & SUV's
*Complete Inspection & Estimates Before we start the work


24-1 -fiATIflMA Tnm cRVsrFr vYUIA


MACKEY ST. & ROOSEVELT AVENUE EAST ST
Tel: 393-6651 or 393-6693 Tel: 356-i

pen: Monday Saturday
S' 8amn 5pm


r. & SOLDIER RD
2940 or 356-2941


Fax 326-4865 P. O. Box SS-6766 Nassau, Bahamas
AUTO SYSTEM EXPERTS

"Midas is a business based on service, quality and reliability. C-
SFactory scheduled maintenance is car card.
Midas services your car fully. Our system takes the guesswork i I
out of auto care for every car model out there.


. ... .. ------ --l--.- -- -


MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


lV






PAclF 10, MONDAY..JANUARY 9. 2006


~* A


Remembering life of George Mackey


.. PACKED CHURCH FOR MACKEY MEMORIAL National and community leaders joined
hundreds of others from all walks of life at St Paul's Baptist Church in Fox Hill last Thursday for a M E
memorial service in honour of former Fox Hill MP and Cabinet Minister George Mackey. Mr
Mackey's successor as the Member of Parliament for Fox Hill, Fred Mitchell, is shown addressing
the congregation. Mr Mitchell said he would keep the teachings of Mr Mackey 'in my eyes' and 0 AMAZING GRACE A police bagpiper filled St Paul's Baptist Church with the sound of
that he would find a way to remember Mr Mackey properly for the generations to come. George traditional Scottish bagpipes, delivering a solemn rendition of the hymn Amazing Grace at a
Mackey is to be buried in the cemetery at St Anne's Anglican Church in Fox Hill after an official service of honour and thanksgiving for the life of former Fox Hill MP George Mackey last
funeral service on Thursday January 12 at Christ Church Cathedral. Thursday


Need an agent?



.committed


From start to finish, the agents at morleyrealty.com
will help you find the perfect property.


* RELIGIOUS LEADERS GATHERED Fox Hill religious
leaders, including Rev Dr Philip Rahming, former president of
the Bahamas Christian Council (pictured) gathered together
with hundreds of villagers and others


Condos


Apartments


,.c om


Use our address...
to find yours.


Lots


Acreage


Tel (242) 394-7070
www.morleyrealty.com


* POLITICAL LEADERS MOURN GEORGE MACKEY -
Local and national political leaders are pictured among a
crowded congregation at a service of honour and thanksgiving
for the life of former Fox Hill MP George Mackey last
Thursday. Among those shown are Fred Mitchell, Fox Hill MP,
government ministers Shane Gibson, Leslie Miller and Melanie
Griffin; deputy FNM leader and Montagu MP Brent
Symonette and chairman of the Progressive Liberal Party
ZRaynard Rigby.
(Photos: BIS/Raymond Kongwa


I Ht I hit~uliut:


I i







THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JANU.",." V :,, .'9''


SoALNW


PLP celebrate



anniversary of



majority rule



in Bahamas


THE PLP yesterday held a prayer
service to mark the upcoming anniver-
sary of majority rule on January 10.
For decades, the white-dominated
United Bahamian Party (UBP) under
Sir Roland Symonette ruled the
Bahamas, then a British colony, while a
group of influential white merchants,
known as the Bay Street Boys, domi-
nated the local economy.
In 1953, Bahamians dissatisfied with
UlBP rule formed the opposition Pro-
gressive Liberal Party (PLP).
In 1967 the PT P matched the number


of seats in the house, both coming out
with 18 seats.
The deadlock was broken by an inde-
pendent called Alvin R Brennen, who
agreed to accept the post of Speaker
of the House of Assembly in return for
his support of the PLP, and Labour
Party leader Randal F Fawkes (later
Sir Randal Fawkes), which was appoint-
ed Minister of Labour and Commerce.
Under this coalition government the
Bahamas was led to full independence
in 1973, under the prime ministership of
Lynden Pindling


samat ied for


arrest o


mister


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


t'', ':b 4 i ;: .: .; .,:.





















, PRIME Minister Perry Christie (left) and J' .. "'," ' Utilities BradlkV toi ttr:b th ,e
moment as Bahamas Faith Ministries (BUM) P 1 M-0,~ d na engages BeRRRIfeic ll 'o I'miiig a service
at BEN. to mark the thirty-ninth anniversary of Pd14J6 o6 w te, "alnaias. 'ihe ngr 4 PF, r wn tiddrcssed during
the service by M'arguerite,.Lady.Pindlimig, wido's, 1w r t K Prime l ii je';,I j i' .lp f kledow)
:
., -: .r. ,,- ,'-


















"4 7"'.......-'. ... .












I'V
. .. .
~~- .i- ,., .. .
,'..;






















/, d
.. . ..
RM Mnse PryCrite(lf)a bi;l,," r,' dUiile hadL' i,. ,hm l
momet a Baama Fath Mnisrie (BM) a, hl : '~m'e e gaes ermem" I ;, h ng sevic
atBM omakte hrt-inhanie'syoi i-- ', ;, h ahns.Tec [.h dd' se, drn
th srvceb M rg erte ad Pndin .wim h. ,,, 'r ,'i e ~i,,i z q, L-,": ';,! (elw

.. _.. T ".- . .. ....' :'", t




.'"! .- '




.. -. l
..; .,. ? i -- : .="L % ,
", ;: / ,
r,, i; :: ::' :"



" B M t m r h :"" -nnt .nie~ a ... ..:~~h- B .,: : ;::, ,,. : -~ln~al. 'F'. -. ,,rrg ..rit s ...r : .~r(se dar

: ~~~ ~~i 't
"....: :.r .
: ;,.. .,. ,.,,
. .. ;. . .
.. .. .. .,..,; 4'i :. . -:. ,:.





".?' H I.: ,,;-.,,,
i'. .: / . Y" '- ,--- -
i . b i ::,- .. .-
: ,,~ ~ ,-, .. ......: :..


-CP









03
u



Ir

(D


II ~- II ---_-- I


L ~l~n~R1m~-n~p~rausa~o~n~a~a~a~p~~


Moments Of Truth


i
~IX
.;) I I,; II .i II ~-~


Mimi -111




















1.,~fi bnrn g 0/3l

-l lilt oit irc oid to b
I 11 ",( ll, lo ld
wli w ih hol of sla

ill ric 1" thr1 seaee


.

a


Vol 3.1


1 ; 1, L / -, (11 .',


i % gtn jari tim -.


I fn~lt~ n4


Likc I've


,Straillill" w~~~




Pesprrow
1)'\I'~' "


I


, k l '\11 ,


in fe d l i


;.-,:r~
b
i -


I lo(" ;


We little knew th,
In life we loved yoL


It broke our hearts to lose you,, you did not go alol ie,
For part of us went iivilh your, the day G(,,-,'
You left us peacefurl memof-loreSs Your /01/ ,e
And though we caminii~ see You, you are "Mr,
Our family ch,in is hiol-,en, and no~thin~q
But as God calls il., onre /)J one, the ch(-w)'

Lovingly missed an~d lemomhetedere by your wife Clii.l
Anne, Hammond, Joan7, Shirlejp) Valigy,~ Char-les, Andie ;?iO I
Grandchildren.


1


hat moroing~ that God was go~iilc
)LI dearly~ in dUeath7 we do the salnee


17th Marchl


ct-CAi.
rl,


S-DC M~ourns the Passing of the

George W. Mackeyt OAE.
.i ..,"'.1h BelovedI
I Lis mir, d,,p corr-, if, lhal %rt mark the paasing u I I h Honn.,rat-i F-:,llgi VV vlrrI

former Cabinet Ministerjlls?. de, ou I churchman anj~j al I 3w-una twi d rtr
A man ui the pidcjrrl I ihcl ru .? Irom j ry hurntlr ti. nl1iiininc l 3ii-I -, :,a d w. iie igr
aChcae.3 Yo his ,crnmin IT1lry anti gractws i.) ail r :.ja rcc l n :, fLorln i i ii:D r, in b ir.

At Sqoumer Douglars College. vive J~lake our name and nj~all~prai:jlc.r, iforr, wi. gri B
ho auroe ano Treedorr. liah j ~ers cut cil the ani, 1`1`10,rn nv in in I Lini ih- rj Sivi:
chaiieriges na r.,an-, ijni pr~Un ional ber jqd c-nG )I h-:-p :.u and i.lur .r p;?ll rU .:.I~

The rjvj -r -jlnj miscon 7kf our College is 16 prc rocl q uaw Goula: n\ ol experienc,n
for Maiure 3d rJlls-: 0.1 c l~privse have r E- r. li~~lln:i n-Cj io the g,~r-o~it.

Ac rcounts of thel Iii-m ot Gorq f.1 dukey arx I& To r lim ind us ci ir~ ii : .1,ii ztronq I 3 1nd
seltips, individuals tn~le Fredr ncl. Douglasii and Sopu- -wrimr Trijin Arl apr nrccia-cjr, -DI
Mr Mackay-'4 r.? i,?nile jri e i,) rie 3bove hi ciir.,U[Ti:eian.:e oep. a ri vV *i pai i-vze.
anea con nil bui- ici' ir. ljan d socil r celopnwni ol NS Ci,'' i fr', a' o I' H,1 '11,411ir
mission and manrjzii jI C-u r inhlm31111.1110ri
vali lip a puilit. r; -I.- rnb~xit a l [he Board C-f Dir CICo P 3no ir,11:- Ipii rr
naird lor ~plrllu.lr: In 1P v rtndlrcccrilerur. ant I-Iir ni Ihq- Hon or~r~ ~ ry11
bled bV N gr.:ici: 3n dr-lgneo0,1`.n 1`3 101 - lri -11 1, i F-jjll: Hill Viin i n ;:,],ir

toI dt-ulcop comrrirlri(Ty learipr, il~e him whco i I..li;~ n tilI:jll
Maljy h~E z niul rEci in peiir





Ac
I VIb~
44. 16r~:
j~g~- g~N.-

_T ,
S-DCPresdent Dr Chales immos (eft) andDr Mria Staton icE
Prsdetad rvst(igt sss heHn.GogeW ace wt heaa
dei oo o teHnoayDotrteo UMn etesatteColg q21
Comeceen in ue 05






THE TRIBUNE -


PACF 12 .MO)NDAY..IANIUARY9 92006


aI


CLICKI?


Brazilian bead ofIN


kerpmr in Haiti


in appamt suicide


"Copyrighted Material

l f CSyndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


CB Online Banking, our newest service, offers you
complete control, flexibility and convenience of
24 hour access to your financial information.


- a -


a. -


Vdfm 1-mp=410
- aL


-

-

- 5 a a


e- -
a I-


a -


Vi11's1it your home branh to Get Sz ~'tarte Now


*--mob


!RBC
Roya Bank
of C;.i. .I


cR y lStar


in Association with

The Nassau Music Society
Present

I,. [\ ,..,s,,l I| l\, issial, A\,iisrs


Are you striving for

personal growth with a passion for


SUCCeSS, in a company that

prides itself on customer service?

If we've peaked your interest, Let's Talk!.!

The Plus Group, Nassau, Bahamas. Is seeking
a young, intelligent, computer literate individual.
This individual must be a team player who is self-
motivated and has a strong desire to achieve goals that
are both customer & company driven.


Qualifications:


Benefits:





Duties:


,:'
,a


PS



S.-


* Six (6) BGCSE's
* Knowledge of Excel &
Microsoft Office Software
* Health Insurance & Pension
(both after a qualifying period)
* Two weeks vacation.
* Assistance with training / COB
(if courses taken are relevant
to job performance)


* Posting & payment of
authorised invoices
* Reconciliation of supplier
statements
Review & reconciliation of
daily cashier reports & deposits
Petry cash disbursement


WVs Group
I Companies

Please submit your application via
Mail to: The Plus Group
P. O. Box N713
Nassau, Bahamas
or eMail to: jobs@theplusgroup.com


p


i1
U


a
tb D


a


Ilh*-I~- I L) IIIV )r --1


ieA I .....


~~BB~~II~IIPI~I~lII~


I CA~~RIBBA NW


!


~----~-~-


~


"lsI %e~
~gF~lp~i
b ": ; 2~


pc2KCI


w


IFIDELITY I~


* *


r


" ';~
:.;- --.9
*.,I
'rl


I-


a
..,


~~"5;3






THE TRIBUNE


VALUE
NOW ACCE11NG
dbSUNCARD
ouQLxRIGHTS AND PUCES REMV J/D


BONE-IN
SALT
BEEF


PER -LB


RED DELICIOUS
APPLES
$269
2 3 LB BAG
HARVEST FRESH
ROMAINE
HEARTS
$_39
.- 3 HEADj


FRESH
GROUND


TURKEY

$1 39 ..

CENTER CUT

PORK
S CHOPS
$289
PER- LB
TRYK E H I
BONEL ESS
I^CEN TER
EAST Ki

$499 2
PEER--LB


HARVEST FRESH -
BROCCOLI
BUNCH


$1 89 IJ "99
IDAHO BAKING t YELLOW

POTATOES ONIONS
LOOSE
3/990 $1 B59
3- LB BAG


GROCERYELSsIBYS


LIBBY'S
WHOLE KERNEL
CORN
OR SLICED
BEETS

99!
~1 1504


MONDAY, JANUARY 9,2006, PAGE 13
--.1


/.!d~


~- -


.... ,
K
-, . .. .,. .:.. "' .,,. .. '
i --' ,-. .-'*

.... iiK -. .^ .' .
;.-. ~: ,,
.,,


.AIR BEDS
BAIH SCALES
WALL PICTURES
TOASTERS
IRONS
DINNERWARE SETS
DECORATIVE RODS


Rl'Gs
SHEET SEIS
COMFORTERS
KITCHEN CURTAINS
TOWELS
THROW PILLOWS
TABLE CLOTHS


PAY LESS AT DISCOUNT MART
WE ACCEPT AMERICAN EXPRESS MASTER, VISA AND SUNCARD, WE ALSO REDEEM QUALITY STAMP CARDS
MACKEY STREET, TOP OF THE HILL (next to Super Vale) PHONE: 393-3411/393-5569


EVERCANE


SUGAR

4 LBS




IS -o


FDiCOUNT MART


oell


SWEET RED GLOBE
GRAPES
PER LB


r4'


~-------


T A 1 0 I T.ql .-TirT ''a


- -- -- I


'Yvurlo


Hew


~~
-'
' ' -~:I'
'''
:irlF
L~L~i~
I
.~86~'


v








'~ NDAY JANUARY 9,


S.. page one.

s. ,'! i.~d visitors to steer
( : ': hc I amas.
hi,. nernational dis-
( ,! ',ice weekend that
I I, 50 .i()() of their cus-
t ~~i. e been left
; ,' o0 possible identity
1 i :l\wing a huge theft
S..;i.; information from
', result, the Bahamas
1 .'..i io ensure that it had


Wilchcombe: we must be able to

respond to tourists' security needs


the capability to respond to
the security needs of tourists,
Mr Wilchcombe told The Tri-
bune.
Kerzner said it believed
around 55,000 customers had
been left exposed following
the theft.


In a document filed with the
Securities and Exchange Com-
mission, the resort said infor-
mation stolen included names,
addresses, credit card details,
social security numbers, dri-
ver's licence numbers and/or
bank account data.


..I. ""-"".





YCUR CONNECTION TO THE WORLD


2006 BAHAMAS TELEPHONE
DIRECTORY DISTRIBUTION

T, Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd., is pleased to advise the public
:b a the 2006 Bahamas Telephone Directory will be available for distribution in
Ni:w Providence and all of the Family Islands as of Thursday, January 5th, 2006
t !friday, January 13th, 2006.

':,ibscribers in New Providence may collect directories from any of the sub-
ieots, which will be opened from Monday to Friday between the hours of 9:00
i:i and 4:30 pm at the following BTC locations:

John F. Kennedy Drive
Shirley Street Plaza
Mall at Marathon
Camperdown

! ul.ii'ess customers requiring more than 50 directories may collect them directly ,
Sr!moi our Stores Department at Perpall's Tract from Thursday, January 5th, 2006.
'tween the hours of 9:00 am and 4:30 p.m.

Ai! family island customers may collect their directories from their local BTC
' f ce.

:Aowever, after January 13th, 2006 directories may be collected for a limited
tnie, from BTC's Administrative Building, John F. Kennedy Drive, or our Mall
,i iV'arathon location.

.._ _._____________ ;' ** * ^ * .


It is thought the information
went missing from the hotel's
computer database and was
the work of either an insider
with technological know-how
or an outside hacker.
The hotel's management is
notifying affected customers
in writing so they can take
steps to protect themselves
from possible identity fraud.
With a person's identifying
information, a thief can open
new accounts in the name of a
victim, borrow funds in the
victim's name, or take over
and withdraw funds from
existing accounts of the vic-
tim, such as their cheque
account or their home equity
line of credit.
Recently there has been a
push by the Ministry of
Tourism to have a closer
working relationship with the
police in order to ensure the
safety of tourists.
"It is unfortunate when


these things happen, but it
tells us that when you are a
tourism economy and attract-
ing very high-end visitors, you
have to be very careful and
you have to protect them
because they bring their mon-
ey, their credit cards, their
jewellery, and millions of dol-
lars into our country and this
is another challenge we have
to meet," Mr Wilchcombe
said.
He said the Bahamas should
never find itself where it's
unable to respond to these
challenges.
"We have to ensure that we
plug the holes and provide vis-
itors with the safety they
require. On the one hand we
think of safety to the body,
and on the other hand there
are these areas that we have to
be very concerned about.
Sometimes there are things
that go over our heads," the
minister said.


Inquiry into radar

FROM page one

this country. It facilitates millions of people on an annual basis and
it is essential to our economy.
"I wouldn't say the failure had catastrophic results, but it had
very, very serious consequences in terms of our economy. It also
brought into question how the matter was addressed. We need to
have an objective inquiry to look at all the facts fearlessly and
without any corners cut, to find out exactly what went wrong," she
said.
After the radar failure Mrs Hanna-Martin said she immediately
requested reports of what occurred. The reports have been reviewed
by the ministry and will form the basis of the inquiry.
Matters to be investigated include the maintenance history of the
radar, the quality of response and if the appropriate decisions
were made to address the matter.
On December 23,2005, the radar at NIA malfunctioned, causing
flight cancellations and thousands of passengers to be stranded.
'Officials of the Airline Operators Committee described it as
perhaps the single biggest problem experienced by the airport.
It was reported that 26 flights from six major US carriers had to
be cancelled, eight flights had to be diverted to Grand Bahama or
Florida and many more were delayed.
Mrs Hadna-Martin said she expects the inquiry to be completed
within the shortest possible time.
The team of professionals conducting the inquiry are Dr Baltron
Bethel, former Director General of Tourism, who will be heading
the inquiry, Dr Jack Fersides, consultant to the Ministry of Trans-
port and Aviation, and Arthur Symonette, trained air traffic con-
troller.
The terms of reference of the inquiry include:
Why did the ASR8 radar fail?
Was the response to the radar's failure adequate and appro-
priate within the context of the operations of NIA?
Mrs Hanna-Martin said the inquiry is first and foremost an inter-
nal review to find out what went wrong for the benefit of the rele-
vant agencies at NIA.
However, she said, when the report is finished she would be
making a statement as to the findings and the way forward.


Li' I


It's time to


"Live yoar Dreams"


k.



I.
:Ii"


'k:





I 'T

















'1
,1,-



. 2'-
.i
'

?Fi
'- :,a.


of Initial or*ihi tdiio$J iuhiinu
h nxmhlay tmh#bWm as ulow a
$100pernuib


To help with:

SRetirement

College

*Savings

* Investments


&


Camibtinm ti$ wZmitineun
Gmabulo mmFom0 mbRi&s


Some Facts About our Company:
* We have been operating in the Bahamas since 1920.
* We managemore than40,00 Policyholdersand morethan
400 Institutional Clients.
* We offer Professional and Prudent Management of your money.





LE / AinincutH

A-- tongfink in ymfiumiufiatm


Pallet Racking


Rivet Shelving


British American Insurance Company of the Bahamas Limited
Telephone: (242) 461-1000 Fax: (242) 361-2525
Email bafinancial@babinsurance.com


Lockers


Pallet Jacks


Steel Shelving


Rolling Ladders


59i Mont.* .ro Av 1 Bo x i Slo45

^^^^HT: 242.325.8914 1 F: 242.325.1305


I.-I.ibmlIi, Vz~~sl


Trade'

FROM page one".

posed to be able to provide a.
level of protection for the
interest of its citizens. We are;
country where people are
free to travel anywhere they;
wish and Cuba is a plade
where people go for educa-'
tion tourism and health cAre-
and the Bahamas should hav'e
a mission there," Mr Mitch61l'
said.
"It is clear what our view is
in the world. The same thiig'
with China; the fact is buSi-
nessmen from the Bahamas,
are going there and invest,-
ment from China is coming,
here. We now have designat-,
ed tourism status by the Chit
nese government; what we,
are doing is really looking,
after our interest.
"That does not change and
our primary interest ,which-is.
the United States of Amerida;"
does not change," Mir
Mitchell said.
In addition, he said, when'
the populace considers its'
own needs, ideology does 6do
come into play either..
"People want health care,
and if health care is free and
it's good health care they will
go where that health care is,
available. And in a free sopi-,
ety the Bahamas government.
can't prevent anyone from
going where they want to go.
to get the health care or buy-
what they want and bring in
into the country, provided it's
not unlawful," Mr Mitchell
said.' '
As the Bahamas looks for-
ward into 2006, the minister
said he is hoping the projects
that the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs did not complete in
2005 will be completed.
There will be an official
opening of an embassy of the.
Bahamas in China at the end
of the month and the opening.
of the embassy in Cuba will
take place in February...
"We are now reaching the,
end of the first term and ,my
objective is to have the last,
major international agree;,
ment for the year concluded
and that will be the co-opera-'
tion agreement with India
and we got approval fori'
brief visit to India at the ehd
of the monthh" said Mi'
Mitchell.


"'


HANNA-MAYSON LTD.I-


THE TRIBUNE


I ;.t~:~;i~,MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006;












FROM page one

incarceration is based solely on
the affidavits of Bahamian police
officers, who said they intercept-
edthe men's telephone calls. No
drugs are being held as evidence
against the men.
A team of lawyers, including
Maurice Glinton, Henry Bost-
wick QC, Murrio Ducille, Paul
Moss, Godfrey Pinder and
Jerome Roberts, have argued
during the case that the manner
in,which the officers eaves-
dropped on their clients' phone
calls was not in accordance with
thp standard form, prescribed by
the Listening Devices Act.
If Magistrate Bethel finds that
the lawyers are right, she may
release the men, on the basis that
they have been illegally incarcer-
ated.
If she rules against them, the
lawyers plan to take their argu-
ment, to the Supreme Court, Mr
Moss told The Tribune last night.
The lawyers have argued that
the men were arrested on search
warrants, which stipulate that the
suspect is to be arrested if any
evidence against them is found.
However, say the lawyers, the
men were arrested although
nothing was found.
For this reason, they plan to
take their case to the Supreme
Court if necessary, with the view
that the arrests were illegal.
Mr Ducille and Mr Pinder
pressed Assistant Commissioner
Reginald Ferguson during his tes-
timony, stating that,information
from a Bahamian investigation is
being used as evidence against
the men to have them tried in the
US.
They said the authorisation
forms, which allowed the men's
phones to be tapped, have no US
seal and were not authorised by
the US Attorney General, and
therefore should not be used as
the basis for a US trial.
Furthermore, the lawyers want
to challenge the constitutionality
of the Listening Devices Act.
The -act, they said, allows the
Commissioner of Police to simply
coiisult with the Attorney Gen-
erafin order to eavesdrop on any
Bhhimian citizen.
Mr Moss has said in court that
he'sees this process as an abuse of
the fundamental right to priva-
cy, which is enshrined in the Con-
stitution. They have called for
the immediate release of their
clients on these grounds.
,In an interview with The Tri-
byne-last night, Mr Moss said that
although their battle in the
Supreme Court extends the
amount of time their clients are
incarcerated without having had
any charges brought against


Ruling
them, the fight is necessary,
because it protects the rights of
every Bahamian citizen.
On Saturday night, anti-extra-
dition marchers met on Taylor
Street to plan a protest, not only
for the seven men, but against
the process of extradition itself.
They plan to take to Bay Street
today at 9.30am with their mes-
sage that Bahamian citizens must
be tried by their own courts.
One of the night's speakers,
Phillipa Russell, noted that the
men are being imprisoned along-
side sentenced inmates. She
blasted the government for con-
ditions at the prison, which
human rights groups, including
Amnesty International, have
deemed "inhumane".
Encouraging all Bahamians to
"stand up for their rights" and
protect the future generation,. Ms
Russell said the extradition
process affects everyone.
She recalled the work of
nation-builders like Sir Randol
Fawkes, who stood for what they
believed in, and lobbied until
changes were made governmen-
tally.
She seemed optimistic about
the appointment of US ambas-
sador John Rood, stating that he
appeared to be respectful of the
Bahamian way of life, and sensi-
tive to the needs of the citizens of
this country.
She encouraged government
leaders and the courts to not
arrest or attempt to extradite any
Bahamian based on the present
process which, she said, is being
challenged due to its "illegality".
The specific case in which a
decision will be rendered today, is
a part of the US Drug Enforce-
ment Administration's operations
"Busted Manatee and Double
Talk".
The focus was on Elias Cobos
Munoz, dubbed "one of the
largest drug trafficking and drug
transportation organizations".
In a press release, which coin-
cided with the seven men's arrest,
the DEA said its agents, assisted
by their foreign law enforcement
counterparts, executed arrest
warrants for the members of the
Cobos organisation in Colombia,
Panama, Jamaica, the Bahamas,
the United States, and Canada.
It said the operations were the
result of a 29- month-long inter-
national Organised Crime Drug
Enforcement Task Force investi-
gation into cocaine and marijua-
na trafficking, conducted by the
DEA and seven state-wide law
enforcement agencies, along with
partners in six foreign countries.


Travel with Destinations & nexr tin'e iit could be you


3~ -. n.- ,,
"~~ 3 .I.


' "- .
V- -m


Me 'i"O "A do


Ym.. qI- Asem ctfu~~sr; J~a~;irc rMla
I; j li, tric

.. ; fie": Ncdi4- S~erranno


AIM
i-W- *ur S P


3' 3 -~ ''~3.3~


*3*~~**~ ~ ~ -


RBC FINCO REPORTS RECORD 2005 FISCAL YEAR
FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE


RBC FINCO has reported
record net income for fiscal
year ending October 31,
2005, of $19.1 million,
which is up $1.8 million or
10.5% compared to the pre-
vious year. During 2005,
RBC FINCO net assets
grew by 12.8% to just under
$600 million. Earnings per
share in 2005 increased to
$0.72 from $0.65 in 2004.

,-BC FINCO also an-
A'unced it increased its
gDarterly dividend payment
t4~0.13 per ordinary share
mrn $0.12 per ordinary
share. Along with a special
dividend of $0.04 per ordi-
nary share declared in


December 2005, all share-
holders of record as of
December 2, 2005, were
paid a total dividend of
$0.17 per ordinary share on
December 8, 2005. For
2005, shareholders re-
ceived a record dividend of
$0.53 per ordinary share,
compared to $0.48 in 2004.

"We are pleased to deliver
record financial results and


of the Bahamian economy,
RBC FINCO is well-
positioned for continued
success."

This is RBC FINCO's 52nd
year of operation and the
22nd year since the compa-
ny went public and
Bahamians became share-
holders. RBC FINCO con-
tinues to be a lead provider
of mortgages to Bahamians
offering mortgages for sin-
gle and multi-family residen-
tial properties. The Bank
also provides a full range
of Bahamian dollar deposit
accounts with attractive in-
terests rates, and foreign
exchange services.

The company employs
127 employees who serve
more than 50,000 clients
through offices in Nassau
and Freeport. The company
trades as FINCO on The
Bahamas International
Securities Exchange (BISX)
and has approximately
4,000 shareholders. Its ma-
jority shareholder is Royal


o r2 g rfor a t ou k o n h ch


shareholders," said
Nathaniel Beneby Jr.,
Managing Director, RBC
FINCO. "This level of
growth and profitability is
unprecedented. With the
expected continued growth


Canada's largest diversified
financial institution as mea-
sured by market capitaliza-
tion and assets, and is one
of North America's leading
diversified financial services
companies.
P -lse~s~ss1~


bO


Bk!.


RESORT & kACHT HARBOUR
Nest End. Grarn Sahtarna tslanIW


Ezra Russell


Bob Kramm Keith Cooper


Congratulations to kji (( -i. finalistst.
(j



Ce wish you all the best and



Snow you wll n t well.




For information and local reservations 350-6500.
www.oldbahamabay.com
A member of Small Luxury Hotels of the World.
l1~K~^W!Wi,^^t^


I I IOL _.O W__INU I


~-cs ~ ll-r-"iuulrr ............


1. ~--~--~s~~-s~l-~~--------------


LOCL EW


i-"


I I %I Ni %..01 -,


I M+t- I -itJUIMI-


. . . ..........
. . . . . . .


Aw






PAGE 16, MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006





lOt at 4h# AarjtArd 4 BaSaMO:


I rHt- I t1Ua-Jdl.


'#


Sunday can also be a time for
preserving the environment.
Members of NPCC spend a day in
the garden planting indigenous
vegetation.
t" r b_ :vtp' _
to up F,.. .


Sat, ":~ Staff from the Cable Beach Resorts
spend their Saturday cleaning and
beautifying Goodman's Bay.






Community Church have made it
Pier, mr, .. .: up I
. . . a t II


Join the New Providence Community
Church's diversified Sundays
One Sunday per quarter, the New Providence Community
Church organizes community related projects that include
beach cleanup, tree planting and other activities aimed
at improving communities in the Western portion of the
island. Call NPCC at 327-1660 for further information on the
next diversified Sunday activities, or send qn email to
renalda@npcconline.org

Save our planet! Recycle aluminum
cans and support Cans for Kids
Reduce, Reuse and Recycle and save our planet. Support
the Cans for Kids programme and teach our kids the
benefits of recycling. Cans For Kids uses the net proceeds
from the sale of recycled aluminum cans to finance
ongoing children programmes throughout The Bahamas,
Begin recycling your aluminum cans today! For more
information on where to donate cans, contact Cans for
Kids at 394-7513 or cansforkids@hotmail.com

Protect The Bahamas' eco-system;
plant more indigenous vegetation
The Bahamas National Trust is looking for Bahamlans to
participate in the planting of native plants and vegetation
In their yards and around their communities For more
information or for a list of native plants contact The
Bahamas National Trust at 393-1317 or nlgape@batelnet.bs


Baharas


La T ANDS OTH
b Lahdamas


*-
,-.- T' /,


'AT,
... .. .. 'gr :" ; "-r



If you wish to start your own project,
here are some suggestions:
* A cleanup drive In your community
*A Cans For Kids recycling campaign: :
" Cleanup of historical sites
* Seminar(s) for Primary/High School
Students highlighting Bahamian culture
and the Importance of Ecotourism
*A tree planting drive In your community
(native or flowering trees)
SA beach cleanup
* Painting of dumpsters by students
*Anti-litter campaigns
*Special church services including a For help in promoting yotr,
message "to encourage public project phone 302-2000
participation in ways that will create a or e-mail'
cleaner environment" mybahamas@bahamas.comT
SBest kept yard competition-
* A cleanest "settlement" competition on
your Island
*A cultural show or competition for school
on your Island
*An environmental exhibition in your ,
community or school s "
* Nature walks t. V


:':' '''''
- .' . .'.








*1 'S~


MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006


SECTION


sA: Colinalmperial
oIlw Insurance Ltd.


business@tribunernedia.net


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Propane Gas Retailers
Association is expected to sug-
gest that price controls for the
liquefied propane gas (LPG)
industry be ended when it
meets with the Minister of
Trade and Industry, The Tri-
bune has learnt.
Peter Adderley, the public
relations director for the Asso-
ciation, told The Tribune he
was due to contact Leslie
Miller, the minister of trade
and industry, today to set up a
meeting that would attempt to
resolve the latest controversy
over pricing in the LPG indus-
try.
rWhen this newspaper asked
Mr Adderley whether price
controls for the LPG industry
should bp abolished, he replied:
"Absolutely."
"That's exactly our point,"
Mr Adderley said. "We think it
should lend itself to the best
price and the best service, and
not be left at the behest or at
the discretion of any sitting
minister at.any time."
Mr Adderley added that the
LPG industry had suffered
"broken promises for a year",
and until the $15 price rise
granted at the end of 2004, had
not received a price increase
for nine years.
This was despite increased
operating costs and inflation,
which in many cases had left a
number of LPG retailers mak-
ing a loss on the sale of 100-
pound bottles of cooking gas.
In the latest episode, which


N LESLIE MILLER


kicked off in December 2005,
Mr Miller had warned LPG
retailers who were selling 100-
pound LPG cylinders above
the Gazzetted price of $70 that
the \\ere breaking the law. His
Ministry had granted retailers a
$5 increase in late November,
taking the maximum price up
to $70 from $65.
Until December 2004, the
Gazzetted maximum price had
been $50, but following retailer
protests and a threatened
strike, the Ministry of Trade
and Industry increased the
price to $65. However, this $15
increase was below the $22 the
Association had been seeking,
which would have taken the
price of a 100-pound cylinder
to $72.
However, during the latest
controversy, a number of retail-
ers were able to sell below the
$70 price. LP Gas on Glad-
stone Road was selling its 100-
pound cylinders at $63, while
Nassau Propane, Country Gas
and Nassau Gas and Tanks
were all selling at $65.


This seems to show that price
controls in the LPG industry
are unnecessary. Indeed, many
have argued that price controls
should be abolished in the
Bahamas, as they effectively
subsidise inefficient producers
and keep prices artificially high,
failing to reward the best com-
panies and acting as a disin-
centive to improve service.
Instead, advocates of price
control abolition are suggest-
ing that the market be allowed
to determine prices and which
producers are best. In the LPG
industry currently, due to price
controls, it is currently a sales
volume-driven business, with
success achieved by keeping
operating costs low and
increasing market share.
However, the Government
is likely to argue that price con-
trols are essential to safeguard
the poorest Bahamians, ensur-
ing the price of food staples
and other essentials is kept
within their means and thus
preventing poverty.
The Ministry of Trade and
Industry has already
announced that a review of
pricing in the LPG industry,
affecting both retailers and
wholesalers, is to take place.
The review is to cover margins
and safety, consumption and
distribution of LPG through-
out the Bahamas.
Mr Miller said previously
that a 'Mount Belvieu' pricing
system, used in the US, would
be used to reflect US propane
prices on a per month basis,
and will be used as a bench-
mark for the Bahamas.


Failure to





enforce Act





may harm





Bahamas


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Bahamas' fail-
ure to enforce the
Data Protection.
Act 2003 more
than two years,
after it became statute could
harm foreign direct investment
into this nation and the ability
of Bahamian companies to
compete globally, the head of
IBM (Bahamas) told The Tri-
bune.
Speaking in the wake of
Kerzner International's reve-
lation that a theft from per-
sonal information databases
may have compromised data
held on 55,000 former Atlantis


Two-yea waoi



Data ProtectionAcm det

a
foregn nvesmen andmak


guests, Felix Stubbs said the
Act had yet to be enforced
because a Data Protection
Commissioner to oversee it had
not been appointed.
He pointed out that multi-
national companies wanting to
establish subsidiaries and oper-
ate in the Bahamas would


"expect the same kind of regu-
lations and protection they
enjoy in their own country".
As a result, the Bahamas' fail-
ure to enforce its cyber crime
and data protection legislation

SEE page 2B


AquaPure seeks buyer


* By NEIL HARTNELL.
Tribune Business Editor
AQUAPURE, the bottled water compa-
ny, is seeking a buyer for the business, multi-
ple business sources have told The Tribune.
"They have been seeking a buyer for some
time," one source with knowledge of the sit-
uation told The Tribune. Other forms of
attracting additional capital into the business
have also been explored.
John McSweeney, AquaPure's managing


director, did not return The Tribune's phone
call seeking comment. However, there are
understood to be two major stumbling blocks
that AquaPure has to overcome in interesting
buyers.
The most critical is continuing union unrest.
The' company has been locked in a dispute
with the Bahamas Beverage, Water and Dis-
tribution (BBWDU) union for over a year,

SEE page 8B


Professionals 'may be held

liable' over data thefts


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Chamber of Com-
merce's crime prevention com-
mittee chairman has warned
that professionals such as
lawyers and accountants could
be held liable for negligence
and breach of confidence if
confidential information they
send Via e-mail or store on
computer systems is stolen.
Speaking after Kerzner
International admitted a theft
from its customer database
may have compromised per-
sonal information held on
55,000 former Atlantis guests,
Branville McCartney said an
incident of this nature "must


be a wake-up call" to both
large and small Bahamian busi-
nesses.
Mr McCartney, an attorney
and partner in the Halsbury
Chambers law firm, said e-
mails containing sensitive data
could be intercepted by cyber
criminals, and any loss expose
the sender to potential legal
action.
He said examples of sensi-
tive data included bank
account numbers, a writ of
summons, and details on the
custody of a child.
Warning, that attorneys could
be "held liable" for loss of such

SEE page 9B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
CONFUSION over the
treatment of bonded goods
within Freeport's "economic
development zone" has been
exacerbated by the fact that the
guide to the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement (HCA), which out-
lines the procedures and
allowances all interested par-
ties must follow, is not sup-
ported by law.
The Tribune has learnt that
the recent controversy that saw
the Customs Department


rescind its proposed new policy
of requiring Port Authority
licencees to obtain stamped
approvals before purchasing
bonded goods has its roots in
the fact that the guide to the
HCA has never been enacted
in law.
Instead, the guide which
was drafted by the Grand
Bahama Port Authority, the
Government and Ministry of
Finance has relied on an
informal arrangement, whereby


SEE page 4B


BLUE MARLIN PENSION PLAN

Colina Financial Advisors Ltd. specifically

designed the BLUE MARLIN PENSION PLAN,

because one plan .does not it all when it

comas tQ Retirement,


Plan Features:
- Multiple Invesenant Options
SQne-on-Qne Profee on~ial Advai
O $50 Mlninmumll initial Inver.sment
> Onllne Accounr Accass ^
> $10,000 Personal AcAidentm CoveraIge
:- FEE $5,000 Funerial BRanef
> Ongoing Plan Support



502-7019
COLINAFINANCIAL. com


'n Colina.
- Financial Advisors


al toend


'Bonded' goods

case has roots in

Hawksbill deal's guide


I


I II II,


-- ----I__... .__1___~_____1~ -______1_1___^-___-----L~-l- I_____ (-


00 YOU KNOW WHO TO TRUST'iF ':'fS 1I








PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JANUARY 9,2006 THE TRIBUNE


[.11 BSI i!a'NiS


INSURANCE BROKER Co. Ltd.

Career Opportunity

ASSISTANT OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR
Duties:
SProvide administrative support to the daily operations of the company
Must be capable of prioritizing multiple tasks efficiently and effectively
SMust be customer service driven and self-motivated
SExcellent interpersonal, written and verbal communication skills
Confidential and capable of handling sensitive information
SWorking knowledge of Microsoft Office Software essential
SHave at least 3 years experience in same or similar position
RECEPTIONIST
Duties:
Answer and address incoming telephone calls
Greet Clients
Provide administrative support
SMust be personable, customer service driven, and have excellent verbal
communication skills
Working Knowledge of Microsoft Office Software essential
Benefits:
Excellent salary, competitive health and benefits package, rewarding inentive.._
system, dynamic workplace, career development assistance
Interested persons should submit a resume on or before Wednesday, January
11th, 2006 via fax 328-6357 or e-mail joy@andeaus.com


Failure to enforce Act


may harm Bahamas


FROM page 1B

could act as a deterrent to such
companies coming here.
And Mr Stubbs added that
Bahamian businesses "will start
having to the same thing" in
terms of implementing tech-
nology and security features to


POSITION AVAILABLE

AIR AMBULANCE SERVICES LTD.

The premier emergency air ambulance in The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Turks & Caicos
& South Florida.

Requires: Full Time/Part Time Registered Nurses
& Paramedics.

Qualifications:
i) Must have at least three years experience
ii) Significant postgraduate experience i.e. critical
care
iii) Competent in procedural skills i.e.

a) Advance Cardiolife Support
b) emergency Management of Trauma
c) IV Insertion
d) Interpretation of ECG & Defibrillator

iv) Excellent Communication Skills

Attractive Compensation Package

Please send resume to:

ADMINISTiATOR
Air Ambulance Services Ltd.
P.O. Box N 1043
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 242-362-0274
Email: admin@aaslifeflight.com


The Local Stock Market

FINDEX 435.63 YTD 1.321%
BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRI(
SYMBOL PRICE CHAN(
AML $0.73 $- 0 -33.64
BAB $1.10 $- 0 14.58
BBL $0.70 $- 0 -17.65
BOB $7.00 $- 0 21.74
BPF $10,40 $- 0 30.00
BSL $12.75 $- 0 -1.92
BWL $1.26 $- 0 -30.00
CAB $9.55 $- 100 34.51
CBL $9.11 $- 0 28.31
CHL $1.64 $- 600 -25.45
CIB $10.88 $- 1000 45.26
DHS $2.26 $0.09 16400 50.67
FAM $6.20 $0.15 625000 56.57
FCC $1.15 $- 0 -42.21
FCL $10.05 $- 0 25.63
FIN $10.90 $- 0 12.37
ICD $9.95 $- 0 0.61
JSJ $9.05 $- 0 10.10
-KZLB- -- -$6.-92- $0.07-.- 107 14.19
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00


By Fidelity Capital
Markets

The first trading
week of 2006
began with a
bang as qver
640,000 shares
changed hands. However, the
market saw only six out of the
19 listed stocks traded, of which
three advanced and three
remained the same.
Volume leader and big
mover for the week was Fam-
Guard Company (FAM) with
625,000 shares changing hands,
accounting for 97 per cent of
the total shares traded. FAM's
share price increased by $0.15
to end the week at its 52-week
high of $6.20.
... Also._advancing this week
was Doctors Hospital Health--
Systems (DHS), which rose by
$0.09 to close out the week at
$2.26.
COMPANY NEWS

Kerzner International
(KZL) -
For the 2005 third quarter,
KZL posted a net loss of $4.9
million compared to a net loss
of $11.1 million for the equiva-
lent period in 2004.
Revenues increased by $32
million or 25 per cent to total
$160.6 million, while expenses
rose by $23 million or 16 per
cent to total $164 million.
Atlantis contributed $129
million or 80 per cent to the
total revenues earned by KZL
in the 2005 third quarter. The
operating loss was $4 million
versus $13 million in 2004.
KZL's adjusted net income


* "Many businesses underes-
timate the cost of losing cus-
tomer data from a marketing
and PR standpoint," Mr Stubbs
said.
Meanwhile, Philip Simon,
the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce's executive direc-
tor, urged Bahamian compa-
nies to go the extra mile in pro-
tecting themselves and their
customer databases against
electronic crime, despite
increased costs.
Precaution

Mr Simon-said:-'They-must -
take the extra precaution, even
if it involves extra expenses, to
ensure they safeguard them-
selves against cyber crime.
"We live in a truly globalised
community and we tend to
underestimate how involved
we are in this global village. As
mentioned at the conference,
the criminal is just a click away.
No one is immune from the
Internet and the impact this
type of crime has on them.
"People still probably believe
it doesn't affect them, but it


affects everybody who oper-
ates in the digital world."
Mr Simon said that even if
they did not work for a com-
pany that used information
technology, Bahamians would
still come into contact with
those who did. Personal infor-
mation, such as credit card, dri-
ver's licence, social security and
bank account numbers, were
held by the likes of insurance
companies, hotels and car
rental agencies.
The Data Protection Act
requires persons collecting and
using personal data on individ-
uals to observe and abide by
specific standards of confiden-
tiality. They are prohibited
from transferring personal data
to jurisdictions with less strin-
gent data protection legislation,
without the consent of the per-
son from whom the data is
obtained.
Members of the Bahamian
public are also able to make
requests of companies, asking
what personal data they held
on them, and giving them the
right to check and whether this
was correct and make changes.


H
G HIGGS &JOHNSON

(- Counsel & Attorneys-at-Law

iIIrKr FI Iheopiltari


is pleased to welcome our new partner

Stephen Jenkins Melvin

Mr. Melvin has been with the firm for over seven years and
specialises in real property and conveyancing, estate law,
and commercial law.



Ocean Centre Montagu Foreshore East Bay Street P. O. Box N3247 Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 502 5200 / (242) 394 8410-4 Fax: (242) 502 5250 / (242) 394 8430


II


for the 2005 third quarter was
$10.5 million or $0.28 per share,
compared to $3.6 million or
$0.11 per share for the same
period in 2004.
Other noteworthy events
that took place within the 2005
third quarter included the
acquisition of Hurricane Hole
Marina for $28 million. KZL
also sought to strengthen its
balance sheet with the refi-
nancing of $400 million senior
subordinated debt, and increas-
ing its revolving credit facility
from $500 million to $650 mil-
lion.

Investors Tip of the Week

Happy New Year to all our
readers and we certainly wish
you all the best in your invest-
ing endeavours in 2006.
Chances are you might be one
of many persons who have
made a resolution-or two per---
taining to your financial health
in 2006. One tool that can assist
you in achieving your invest-
ment goals in 2006 is a budget.
You might ask the question:
What is a budget?.
A budget is a guide that tells
you whether you're going in
the direction you want to be
headed in financially. Simply
put, it lets you control your
money instead of your money
controlling you.
A budget will let know you if
you are living within your
means. Before the widespread
use of credit cards, you could
tell if you were living within
your means. Now, many people
do not realise they're living
beyond their means until_
they're drowning in debt.


protect customer data "if they
want to play in the global econ-
omy".
Mr Stubbs said: "It's critical,
if we are intending to be part of
the global community and
world economy, to have this
kind of legislation in place and
enforced."
IBM recently sponsored a
conference dealing with elec-
tronic crime that was staged by
the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce and the Royal
Bahamas Police Force.
Mr Stubbs said the compa-
ny and speakers from its inter-
national office had taken great
care to go through various
steps on how companies and
their employees should protect
their customers' personal data.
He added that any data on
customers that a company no
longer needed should "be dis-
carded as it can come back to
haunt-you at a later.date" ..--.
Describing the need for com-
panies to safeguard themselves
against electronic crime as
"very important and very sig-
nificant", Mr Stubbs said sev-
eral US-based firms had suf-
fered an "adverse financial
impact" from the theft of cus-
tomers' personal data. In
Kerzner International's case,
is providing a one-year credit
monitoring service to 'affected
customers, the costs of which
are being borne by the compa-
ny.


SAINT AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE



2006 Entrance Exam


The Entrance Examination for students wishing to enter
Grade Seven at St. Augustine's College for September,
2006 will be given on Friday. .anuarv 27th. 2006.

Deadline for registration for this examination is Friday,
January 20th .

Eligible students may register at their Primary Schools
or at St. Augustine's College. ONLY students in Grade
Six will be allowed to sit the Entrance Exam.


I

I


DInVDEND/AGM NOTES:
* Consolidated Water Company (CWCO) has declared a div-
idend of $0.012 per BDR payable on February 7, 2006, to all
common shareholders as at record date December 31, 2005.

:* FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) has declared a
'dividend of $0.30 payable on January 6. 2006, to all common
I shareholders as at record date December 28, 2005.


International Markets

FOREX Rates
Weekly %Change
CAD$ --. -- --. -. 1.1654 0.28 :
GBP 1.7703 2.85
EUR 1.2149 2.63

Commodities
Weekly %Change

Crude Oil $64.21 5.19 '
Gold $540.80 4.60

International Stock Market Indexes:

Weekly %Change
DJIA 10,959.31 2.26
S & P 500 1,285.45 2.98
NASDAQ 2,305.62 4.55
Nikkei 16,428.21 1.97


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


CE
GE


4%



1%,






MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


Bahamas First incurs $1.5m




in net Wilma claims


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BAHAMAS First incurred
$1.5 million in net claims as a
result of Hurricane Wilma, an
international insurance credit
rating agency has reported in
reaffirming the company's A-
(Excellent) financial strength
rating.


A.M. Best Company, which
also gave Bahamas First a sta-
ble rating outlook, said that
despite the claims resulting
from Wilma-inflicted damage
in Grand Bahama which
paled against those caused by
Hurricanes Frances and Jeanne
in 2004 the Bahamian carri-
er's "strong catastrophe rein-
surance programme has proven


effective in protecting its sur-
plus position and losses to a
manageable level".
Bolstered
Bahamas First bolstered its
capital base and ability to write
additional business through a
$5 million preference share
issue in 2005, and A.M. Best


said"last week that the reaf-
firmed rating was based on the
company's capitalisation, "his-
torically profitable operating
results", and conservative risk
management strategies.
In addition, the company's
use of reinsurance and "con-
servative" investment strategy
had enabled it to increase its
capital base and bolster finan-


Rum Cay developer in



$1.5m wind turbine buy


THE developers behind the $90 mil-
lion Rum Cay Club resort and residential
community have bought three wind tur-
bines for $1.5 million to provide electri-
cal power to the island.
A release from Gold Rock Holdings,
I-the vendor's parent, said a purchase
Agreement had been finalised with Octa-
gon Resources, a joint venture partner of
Montana Holdings, the Rum Cay Club
- developer.
The Gold Rock release said: "The tur-
bines will provide power to the utility


for the entire Rum Cay Island. The sale
is estimated at $1.5 million, and delivery
is scheduled for the 2006 third quar-
ter...."
Principal
John M1ittens, the lead principal at
Montana Holdings. told The Tribune
back in November that construction
work on the marina, along with further
landscaping and infrastructure work,
would start this month.


He projected that when completed,
the Rum Cay Club would have a similar
economic and social impact on the island
to what Club Med had done for San Sal-
vador.
Describing the project, for which a
Heads of Agreement was signed with
the Bahamian government in April 2004,
as having "significant momentum now",
Mr Mittens said: "The roads are under-
way and we have the funds to under-
take all this development. We should be
up and running in the New Year."


Deloitte partner replaces Campbell at Colina helm


A FORMER Deloitte &
Touche (Bahamas) partner has
been appointed to replace
James Campbell as president
of .Colinalmperial Insurance,
with effect from January 1,
2006.
Chartered
A chartered accountant, Mr
Braithwaite spent his last 20


years with Deloitte & Touche
(Bahamas) before taking up his
new post. In a statement, Terry
Hilts, chairman of Colina Hold-
ings, the BISX-listed holding
vehicle for Colinalmperial,
said: "We know for a fact that
there is a wealth of talent
among our employees, and we
want to create an environment
where that enthusiasm and
willingness to make Colinalm-


perial a great company will be
called upon in every circum-
stance.
Proven
"Monty has proven over the
years that he is a consummate
professional and his style is one
of inclusion. We feel this is
exactly what the company
needs now and in the long


term." The Tribune had heard
of Mr Braithwaite's appoint-
ment just before it was formal-
ly announced at the weekend.
Other insurance industry exec-
utives spoken to by The Tri-
bune on the matter were sur-
prised that Colinalmperial had
appointed a president from
outside the insurance industry,
albeit one with a strong finan-
cial background.


cial strength.
Praising
Praising Bahamas First for
its "sound underwriting prac-
tices", A.M. Best said:
"Bahamas First continues to


benefit from the sustainable
competitive advantages derived
from the ownership of key
island agents and strategic
agency relationships, which
have allowed it to establish
name recognition and market
share."


KINGSWAY

ACADEMY



HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE
EXAMINATION


Kingsway Academy High School
will hold its entrance examination on

Saturday, January 14, 2006
at the School on Bernard Road from
8:00a.m. 1:30p.m.
for students wishing to enter grades

7,8,9,10 and 11.


Applications are available at the
High School Office and should be
completed and returned to the school by
Friday, January 13, 2006.


For further information please call,

324-8811, 324-3409 or 324-6269.


Rand Nature
Centre Education Director
Bahamas National Trust

Primary Responsibility: Develop and oversee educational programs
and outreach activities for the Rand Nature Centre.

Position location: Rand Nature Centre, Freeport, Grand Bahama

Reports to: Director of Education and Communications, Nassau

Primary Tasks:
Develop and oversee educational programs and outreach activities
for the Rand Nature Centre, Peterson Cay and Lucayan National
Parks.
Coordinate volunteer activities in Grand Bahama
Supervise staff working in the educational department in Grand
Bahama
Assist with membership services and membership outreach activities
on Grand Bahama.
Assist in developing short and long-term strategies for raising
money for BNT on Grand Bahama.
Prepare monthly reports and coordinate and assist in the
implementation of scientific and educational projects on Grand
Bahama.
Assist with gift acknowledgement process on Grand Bahama
Organize and carry-out special events and parties.
Assist with setting up and attending fundraising visits to individuals,
companies, government and foundations to support activities in
Grand Bahama and beyond.

Primary Skills Required:
Enthusiasm for environmental education and working with people
of all ages.
Minimum five years work experience, preferably in the education
field.
Exceptional writing and interpersonal communications skills.
Demonstrated ability to organize time, manage diverse activities,
meet deadlines and pay attention to details. Proven administrative
skills.
Experience in organizing and motivating volunteers
Knowledge of marketing, public relations, fundraising, a plus.
Working knowledge of MS Office, Word, Excel, Powerpoint.
Demonstrated commitment to natural resource conservation in the
Bahamas.
Willingness to occasionally work long hours to meet tight deadlines.

To apply for the position email or send cover letter, resume, three
references including telephone numbers and email address to P.O. Box
N 4105, or bnt@batelnet.bs by February 3, 2006.


VACANCY
Senior Manager (Human Resources Department)
Princess Margaret Hospital

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post of Senior Manager,
Human Resources Princess Margaret Hospital, Public Hospitals Authority.
Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-
Bachelors Degree in Human Resources Management, Public Administration, or related field
and five (5) years supervisory, relevant experience in Human Resources Management with
outstanding computer skills.
The Senior Manager will report to the Chief Hospital Administrator.
Responsibilities and Duties
1. Coordinates the development of the Human Resources Department policies, procedures
and practices in the Hospital and assists with policy development.
2. Prepares the Human Resources Department component of the Personnel Emoluments
Budgets and assists with the preparation of departmental budgets.
3. Assists with identification of the Human Resources Department strategic direction
of the Hospital including the development of the hospital's Human Resources
Department Strategic Plan.
4. Advises and assists with interpretation of Human resources policies for Department
Heads, Area Supervisors, Administrative Officers and Human Resources Officers.
5. Responsible for the collaboration and coordination of Human Resources activities
with Corporate Office.
6. Participates in and assists with labour relations and negotiations.
7. Assists area supervisors with the recruitment of staff by developing interview formats,
serving on the interview panels, testing and conducting background and reference
checks.
8. Develop career paths for new and existing staff in collaboration with Human Resources
Officers, Area Supervisors and Administrative officers.
9. Coordinates the training, education and development of the Human Resources
Department staff.
10. Ensures that the performance appraisal process is done in a timely manner and assists
supervisors in the area of staff evaluation.
Letters of application, resume, documentary evidence of qualifications and three (3) references
should be submitted, no later than 27th January, 2006 to the director Human Resources
(Acting), Public Hospitals Authority P.O. Box N-8200, or 1st Floor Corporate Office,
Dockendale House, West Bay Street. Serving officers must apply through their Head Of
Department.


II~) _


BUSINESS


,' .-. :?I I.; i,.- ~l''i .., I: -: ;;, r~.
I; ~















Indusa to open Bahamas centre in first quarter


I ndusa Global, the
company that works
with the Ministrv of
Tourism on its Inmi-
gration Card, is build-
ing a data centre to expand its
business intelligence practice
in the Bahamas. The facility
will be operational in the first
cluarter of 2006.
The Bahamas Ministry of
Tourism's Immigration Card
will tomorrow be used as a case
study to show how information
management technology can
be used to enhance business-
es.
Gary Young, director of
research and statistics at the
Ministry of Tourism, will be
moderating a discussion of The
best use of Information Man-


agement Technology to increase
your Business during a Mas-
terClass that is part of Nation-
al Tourism Week.
"It's a great wealth of practi-
cal information, not just theo-
retical stuff, that puts us well
ahead of everyone else in the
world including the United
States, Canada and Europe,"
Mr Young said of the immi-
gration card data.

Bolstered

The MasterClass will show
how the information is gath-
ered, distributed and used by
the Ministry of Tourism and its
industry partners. The discus-
sion will also examine how
small businesses can take


advantage of the internet.
Among the panellists dis-
cussing the Ministry of Touris-
m's research strategy are Jo
Ram, chief operating officer
and vice-president of Product
Development for Indusa Glob-
al, and Les Ottolenghi, chief
executive and president of
INTENT Media Works.
Ms Ram, whose firm is a
leading IT consulting and soft-
ware provider, will speak about
data gathering, analysis, dis-
semination and business intel-
ligence. Business intelligence
(BI) technologies are changing
the landscape for conducting
'business as usual.'
Ms Ram said: "With Busi-
ness Intelligence, what we've
done in various industries is


help decision makers under-
stand their customers, under-
stand their business and the
whole environment.

Bolstered

"Specifically, in tourism we
take the immigration card then
we integrate this data with var-
ious other sources, whether it is
US postal codes, (or) purchas-
ing data and then we build [...]
analysis tools so that the Min-
istry of Tourism as well as their
partners [...] can utilise this
data in making targeted deci-
sions."
Mr Young added that the
Ministry has used the immi-
gration card data to better tar-
get its spending. The informa-


tion provided on the cards
allows it to identify even the
zipcodes that more tourists
come from. "When you find
out that kind of information,
you know where to put your
money," said Mr Young.
Indusa Global began work-
ing with the Ministry of
Tourism several years ago, and
in 2005 it made the data avail-
able to partners such as the
promotions boards, hoteliers
and airlines. Indusa is current-
ly building a data centre to
expand ts business intelligence
practice in the Bahamas. The
facility will be operational in
the first quarter of 2006.
Panellist Les Ottolenghi is a
world expert in e-commerce
and internet business. He was


crucial in designing and intro-
ducing the first internet-based
reservation system in the
world.
Mr Ottolenghi will examine
the major issues that affect
tourism as a result of the devel-
opment of electronic com-
merce, the expected impact of
e-commerce on tourism and he
will look at how business-to-
business and business-to-con-
sumer e-commerce can
improve customer service;
reduce costs and promote mar,
ket expansion.
Mr Ottolenghi is the co-
founder, chief executive anld
president of Intent Media
Works, one of the leaders in
online entertainment mediA
distribution.
.'


FROM page 1B


The American Embassy
is presently considering applications for the following position:


PROCUREMENT AGENT

Serves as senior FNS member of the GSO Procurement Unit, reporting directly
to the General Services Officer. Has direct responsibility for processing all non-
secure procurement and contracting actions to the point of final review, approval
and signature by the GSO/Contracting Officer. Procurement includes supplies,
services and contracts with local and Offshore Private Sector Vendors, GSA and
other US Government Sources, for this large mission consisting of nine agencies
with over one hundred and fifty direct hire American employees as well as over
fifty locally employed staff members. The incumbent must become throughly
familiar with all applicable Procurement Regulations, including the Federal
Acquisition Regulations (FAR); the Department of State Acquisition Regulations
(DOSAR); the Overseas Contracting and the Simplified Acquisition Handbook.
This position directly supervises the purchasing agent.

This position is open to candidates with the following requirements:

A Bachelor's degree in Business, Management or related area is required.
At least five years in Purchasing/Sourcing or Contracting either in the public
or private sector is required.
Must have a good working knowledge of local market conditions, sources
of supply, pricing structures and local law which impacts on the Procurement
and ContractiigtOtfife"- ', .* '
Excellent command of the English Language, both written and oral.


Personal Attributes:

Excellent managerial, supervisory and training skills
Highly confidential in nature
Must be able to effectively communicate both orally and written to local
vendors, contractors, end-users and others to obtain the best possible
price/product to meet the government's requirements.
Computer knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel is required.

Benefits Provided Include:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation package
including outstanding benefits such as performance-based incentives, medical
and dental insurance, life insurance, pension and opportunities for training and.
development.

Applicants must be Bahamian Citizens or US Citizens who are eligible for
employment under Bahamian Law and Regulations.

Application forms are available from 8:00 am to 5:30 pm, Monday through Friday
at the security area of the American Embassy, Queen Street, completed applications
should be returned to the Embassy: Attention of the Human Resources Office no
later than Wednesday, January 18, 2006.


._o wa.Financial Advisors Ltd.

Pricing Information As Of:
06 January 2006
Bi.: \ LISTED 8 TRADED SECURITIESS ViSIT WWVVW BISXBAHAMAS.COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
EIS'-. ALL SHARE INDE I CLOSE 1.352.44 / CHG 00 92 / %CHG 00.07 / YTD 01.73 / YTD % 00.13
'..-n. .i L: -: .: I- T: .:, Change Da.l EPS S D. tEP Y.eld
1.10 0.73 Abaco Markets 0.73 0.73 0.00 -0.169 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.40 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 10.40 10.40 0.00 1.456 0.360 7.1 3.46%
7.24 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 7.00 7.00 0.00 0.587 0.330 11.6 4.71%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.70 0.70 0.00 0.175 0.020 4.0 2.86%
1.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.26 1.26 0.00 0.105 0.060 12.0 4.76%
1.20 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.10 1.10 0.00 0.070 0.040 15.7 3.64%
9.60 7.10 Cable Bahamas 9.55 9.55 0.00 0.689 0.240 13.9 2.51%
2.20 2.03 Colina Holdings 1.64 1.64 0.00 -0.046 0.000 NM 0.00%
9.17 7.10 Commonwealth Bank 9.11 9.11 0.00 0.791 0.450 11.5 4.94%
2.50 1.50 Doctor's Hospital i 2.20 2.26 0.06 8,400 0.429 0.000 5.0 0.00%
6.20 3.96 Famguard 6.20 6.20 0.00 0.428 0.240 13.0 3.87%
10.90 9.70 Finco 10.90 10.90 0.00 0.717 0.530 15.2 4.86%
10.88 7.49 FirstCaribbean 10.88 10.88 0.00 0.695 0.500 13.1 4.60%
10.05 8.00 Focol 10.05 10.05 0.00 0.833 0.500 12.1 4.98%
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 0.022 0.000 52.3 0.00%
10.20 950 ICD Utilities 9.95 9.95 0.00 0.526 0.405 15.1 5.43%
9.05 8.22 J. S. Johnson 9.05 9.05 0.00 0.572 0.560 15.8 6.19%
6.98 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 6.92 6.94 0.02 107 0.138 0.000 50.3 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.760 4.9 7.60%
S.i "- ._ ,.,,,.:. ,il. -:K i. Lail Prnce ..'.ea rl', oI EPS$ t ,. I PE Yel1
12.00I- l....SC Eia-i. A. su l.T a.'. 5.L 12..7' 12.7 11.00 1 068 i:. -2 5 24'.
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdinas 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.044 0.000 NM 0.00%
Ao: ll. c j. r -TrE - -.,"-1 ,il.:.0 .)_
j .. '"- ,.,, =,, ec 41 ,, :' 00 1 ,', 2 22 0 ,-,',"." ') J 0 ,o :
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.33 13.33 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdinas 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
BIS,' LIi 1 r .1ul ,,. 1 i-i -j DI. .,
1-- I : ," -hii-, ii-, ,R I,,. 1, I F i.--i-


2.5864
10.7674
2.2982
1.1442
FIIIDEX


2.0704 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
2.1530 Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1.0782 Colina Bond Fund
,'C LC, E J '- ., T -T ..1 2 .3 .: .1 ,-


2.5864 ***
10.7674'*^*'
2 298197-'
1144217***


BISX ALL SHARE INDE X 19 Dec 02 = 1.000.00
52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close -.Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
PIE C!osing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
** AS AT NOV. 30. 2005/ A.* AS AT NOV. 30, 2005
* A T DEC 1 2 n205/ ** AS AT DFC 31 2005/ *.. *AS AT DEC 31 2005
r(T rFTp ',D% LL I'-LI J- IJ'-F..' 11 I iL iEL T 2,12 -7' -'* -


YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV Net Asset Value
N/M Not Meaningful
FINDEX -The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100


to change its policies.
The minister explained that
Port Authority licencees had
been able to obtain an annual
letter from the Customs
Department that allowed them
to purchase goods in the
"bonded area" of Freeport.
The letter entitled them to
purchase these goods "duty
free", meaning Port Authori-
ty licencees could purchase
these products 'over-the-
counter' without first having to
receive stamp approval and
obtaining a Customs sign-off.
Duty could also be post-paid
on sales of these goods.
However, non-licencees were
unable to buy bonded goods
duty free. Mr Smith said his
understanding was that one
company challenged the Cus-
toms Department's decision
that it was not eligible to pur-
chase bonded goods duty free,
and apart from winning its case,
the court ruling also implied
that procedures should be
changed so that "each time" a
good was imported to Freeport,
the Customs Department had
to give stamp approval first.
The policy was due to be
implemented as a "blanket
approach" on January 1, 2006,
for every bonded product pur-
chased over-the-counter.
Although the Customs
Department said it was only
following the interpretation of
the court ruling, the Grand


Bahama Chamber of Coni-
merce protested against tlk
new policy, arguing that Ir
would tie up Port Authoritf
licencees in more bureaucracy
and red tape. Not only would
the cost of doing businesA
increase, but some companim
might go out of business if thed
could not get the goods they
wanted.
As a result of the protest, tli
Customs Department decided
not to implement the new sys,
tem at this time.
Meanwhile, The Tribune has
learnt that the Customs
Department used to conduct
an audit every four to five years
on each bonded Port Authori;
ty licencee to ensure the correct
duty was being paid, but this
came to a halt after attorney
Fred Smith won an injunction
preventing them from doing
this.
And the informal bonded
arrangement has already to
come under further pressure,
this newspaper has learnt. Busi-
ness sources have told The Tri-
bune that Freeport Concrete,
the BISX-listed company, has
been lobbying the Customs
Department to.allow it to bring
in the entire inventory for its
new $6 million Home Centre
outlet as bonded goods, with
this stock sold as bonded, too.
Other companies believe that if
this is allowed, they should be
able to do the same.


any changes or amendments
are carried out through con-
sultation. The rules and proce-
dures have been altered infor-
mally a number of times when
practices were deemed to be
too bureaucratic and a hin-
drance to Freeport's growth.
An e-mail from one busi-
nessman, describing the roots
of the current situation, said:
"In the last 10 years, however,
Customs have figured out that
maybe they gave up too much
because, after all, Freeport has
grown, and they are now giving
up a lot of revenue. Nassau
really needs the revenue, and
maybe they don't have as much
control as they thought they
had.
"So, they get arbitrary and
implement new rules and get
sued three times (in the last six
years) and lose every time. So
now they have almost no con-
trol and the abuse of the 'bond'
is getting serious, what with
bonded goods being shipped
to Nassau and all. Now they
say that maybe the guide was-
n't such a good idea after all, so
we are here to regain control."
James Smith, minister of
state for finance, last week told
The Tribune that it was unclear
what impact the about turn by
the Customs Department
would have on government
revenues as he was still trying
to find out the necessary infor-
mation.
Mr Smith said the situation
had been caused by a court rul-
ing that appeared to make it
necessary for the Department


MANAGING EDITOR



WANTED

THE TRIBUNE seeks a Managing Editor to add a new
chapter to this newspaper's continuing success story.

Candidates will need to be seasoned journalists of
the highest calibre with relevant professional
qualifications and a proven track record in newspaper
management.

Superior editing skills, excellent command of the
English language, sound judgment and outstanding
writing ability are essential requirements for this
demanding position. You will also need to be totally
conversant with the Apple-Quark Xpress computer
editing system, with relevant page make-up expertise.

If you think you qualify, please send a covering letter
and resume, together with work samples, to The
Publisher, The Tribune, PO Box N-3207, Nassau,
Bahamas.

Please include references from past employers and
a short statement saying why you qualify for this post.

An attractive salary package, paid vacation and
company medical insurance scheme are on offer to
the successful candidate

No Phone Calls Please
Our benefits include paid vacation
& medical insurance.


The Tribune
N,,tu 1~nI| tmmB ffl l ~l iui~~~ ,hUU


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006


THE TRIBUNE.,I








MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006, PACE 51b


I nz= i runouNL )bU,5INESS


-= c,..


~i.


Visit our website at wti www,.cob.edu.b


I HE BAHAMAS

s EDUCATING && TRAINCN BAHAMIANS


M U TAFVAC ANC IES]


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Lecturer Computer Information Systems (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach aspects of Computer Information Systems up to the bachelor's degree level.
Proficiency in at least two of the following areas is required: Visual Basic Programming (basic and advanced);
Object oriented C++ and JAVA programming; Local Area Network Design and Implementation; Website
Design and Management; Database Management Systems Design and Development; Desktop Publishing;
Microcomputer Applications; and Client/Server Application Development. Professional certifications in
relevant areas are desirable.
Lecturer Accounting (New Providence and Northern Bahamas Campuses)
Candidate must be able to teach Financial and Intermediate Accounting, Business Mathematics, Advanced
Accounting, Accounting Theory, Management, Cost, Fund and Tax Accounting up to the bachelor's degree
level. Knowledge of computerised accounting would be an asset.
Lecturer Management (Northern Bahamas Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach a full range of Management courses from the introductory to the senior year
in a bachelor's degree programme. A minor concentration in Marketing would be an advantage; knowledge
of the Bahamian economy is desirable.
Lecturer Statistics (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach Business and Intermediate Statistics, Techniques of Research and Quantitative
Methods. Ability to teach some upper level Economics, up to the senior year in a bachelor's degree
programme, is desirable. Knowledge of computer applications is essential.

SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION AND CREATIVE ARTS
Lecturer in Journalism and Communication (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach courses in all or most of the following areas: reporting, photojournalism,
video production, business writing and oral communication and should have experience with curriculum
and programme development. The ideal candidate must have at least a master's degree in the subject or a
related area, a minimum of five years' teaching experience at the tertiary level and some professional
experience.
Lecturers in Foreign Languages (Spanish and/or French) (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must be ableto teach Spanish and/or French at the beginners, intermediate and advanced levels.
The ideal candidate will have at least a master's degree in the subject or a related area, native speaker
competence in the foreign language and will be able.to teach language, literature and culture courses up to
the bachelor degree level. A teaching certificate or equivalent and experience in teacher training are desirable.
Lecturer in Foreign Languages (Haitian Creole) (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach Haitian Creole at the beginners and intermediate levels. The ideal candidate
will have at least a master's degree in the subject or a related area, native speaker competence in Haitian
Creole and will be able to develop courses in Haitian culture. A teaching certificate or equivalent and the
ability to teach French language and literature courses are desirable.
Lecturer in Art (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach 2-Dimensional.Design, Commercial Art (illustration and graphic design)
and Printmaking. Experience in 3-Dimensional Design, mixed media, painting and drawing would be an
asset. The ideal candidate will have at least a master's degree in the subject or related area. A teaching,
certificate or equivalent is desirable.
Part-time Lecturer in Foreign Languages (Spanish) (Northern Bahamas Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach Spanish at the introductory level. The ideal candidate will have at least a
master's degree in the subject or a related area and native speaker competence in Spanish. A teaching
certificate or equivalent is desirable.

SCHOOL OF ENGLISH STUDIES
Lecturers College Composition/Literature (New Providence Campus)
Candidates must have at least a master's degree and must be able to teach College Composition and Literature
up to the bachelor's degree level. The ideal candidates will have a background in Composition and Rhetoric
as well as in American, British and African Literature. A background in creative writing or experience in
a writing lab setting would be an asset. Teacher training is preferred.

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES
Lecturer History (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must have a master's degree or a PhD in History and should be able to teach and develop courses
up to the senior year in a bachelor's degree programme. The ideal candidate will be able to teach Bahamian,
West Indian, European and/or American History. Experience in teacher training would be an asset.
Lecturer Public Administration (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must have a master's degree or PhD in Public Administration. The ideal candidate will be able
to develop Public Administration courses and be able to teach up to the senior year in a bachelor's degree
programme. Knowledge of the Bahamian Civil Service or a comparable context is desirable.
Lecturers in Law (New Providence Campus)
Candidates should have at a least a first degree in Law, with no less than an Upper Second Class Honours
or equivalent. Possession of a postgraduate degree and some experience as a legal practitioner are desirable.
The curriculum includes all branches of Common Law and courses pay special attention to the place of Law
in Commonwealth Caribbean jurisdictions. The ideal candidates should be competent in at least three of
the basic or core Common Law subjects including, but not limited to, Law and Legal Systems of the
Commonwealth Caribbean; Criminal Law; Legal Writing and Research; Law of Torts; Commonwealth
Caribbean Constitutional Law; and Law of Contract. Experience in teaching in a semester system would
be an asset. The successful candidates will be expected to pursue individual and departmental research
. interests and to publish in reputable law journals.

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
Lecturer Family and Consumer Life/Home Economics (New Providence Campus
Candidate must be able to teach Family and Consumer Life/Home Economics and Education Foundation
courses to prospective primary and secondary teachers. The successful candidate must have a Teacher's
Certificate, at least five years' teaching experience and the ability to supervise teaching practice and research
studies.
Lecturer Religious Education (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach Religious Education content and methods to prospective primary and
secondary teachers, as well as the general student population in other academic areas up to the senior year
in a bachelor's degree programme. The successful candidate must have a Teacher's Certificate.
Lecturer Science Education (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach Science Education courses to prospective primary and secondary teachers.
The successful candidate must have a Teacher's Certificate, at least five years' teaching experienceand the
ability to supervise teaching practice and research studies.
Part-Time Lecturer Social Studies Education (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach Social Studies Education courses to prospective primary and secondary
teachers. The successful candidate must have a Teacher's Certificate, at least five years' teaching experience
and the ability to supervise teaching practice and research studies.

CULINARY AND HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE
Pastry Chef (New Providence Campus)
The ideal candidate should possess a bachelor's degree or equivalent in Culinary Arts and be certified as
an Executive Pastry Chef or higher. A minimum of five years' working and management experience is
required and three years in Culinary Education, preferably with a teaching certificate. The ideal candidate
should be able to teach introductory through advanced pastry and baking. Knowledge in confectionery and
wedding cake design is desirable.
Chef (New Providence Campus)
The ideal candidate should possess a degree in Culinary Arts/Hospitality Management and be Certified as
a Executive Chef or higher, have a teaching certificate or equivalent with a minimum of five years teaching
experience. Candidate should be able to teach introductory through advanced cooking, baking, pastry, garde
manger, sanitation, menu design and food preparation.

SCHOOL OF NURSING AND ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS
Lecturers Nursing (New Providence Campus)
The successful candidates will be required to teach in both the associate and bachelor degree programmes.
Responsibilities will include classroom as well as clinical supervision of students. Applicants should have
strong interpersonal skills and a commitment to excellence in integrating teaching, clinical practice and
research. Applicants should have well-rounded clinical nursing experience and should be able to teach at
least three of the following areas: Fundamentals of Nursing, Medical-Surgical Nursing, Psychiatric. Nursing,
Maternal and Child Health Nursing, Community Health Nursing, Management/Leadership, Health Assessment,
Nursing Theories, Transcultural Nursing and Nursing Research. The successful candidates must be registered
with the Nursing Council of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, have college-level teaching experience
and at least a master's degree in Nursing.

SCHOOL OF SCIENCES AND TECHNOLOGY
Lecturer Biology (New Providence Campus)
The successful candidate should have an advanced degree (PhD preferred) in the biological or agricultural
sciences with strong background in entomology, specifically agricultural entomology. The successful
candidate will be expected to teach biology up to the senior year in a bachelor's degree programme and
develop a research programme related to the needs and priorities of The College. Teaching experience at
the college level is essential.
Lecturer Mathematics (New Providence and Northern Bahamas Campuses)
The successful candidate should have an advanced degree (PhD preferred) in pure or applied mathematics.
Candidate will be expected to teach Pure and Applied Mathematics up to the senior year in a bachelor's
degree programme as well as develop a research programme in his or her area of specialty. Teaching
experience at the college level is essential.


Lecturer Chemistry (New Providence Campus)
Th6 successful candidate should have an advanced degree in Chemistry, preferably a PhD, with experience
teaching up to senior year in a bachelor's degree programme. A broad background in chemistry would be
an asset as teaching areas span courses in Organic, Inorganic, Analytical and Environmental and Physical
Chemistry. Research interests and foci applicable to the use of current facilities and The College's research
stations are desirable.
Lecturer Geography (New Providence Campus)
The successful candidate should have an advanced degree in Geography, preferably a PhD, in Geography
or a related field. Candidate must be able to teach courses and supervise field work in physical geography
and climatology as well as a wide range of courses relating to the geography of The Bahamas and the region.
A strong demonstrated commitment to teaching and research programmes would be an asset.
Interested candidates should submit a College/University of The Bahamas Employment Application,
a Comprehensive Resume and up-to-date transcripts, giving full particulars of qualifications and
experience, along with three work references no later than 16th January, 2006 to:
Director, Human Resources, The College of The Bahamas
P. O. Box N-4912
Nassau, N. P., The Bahamas
Facsimile:. (242) 302-4539
E-mail: hrapply@cob.edu.bs
Web Site: www.cob.edu.bs

Serving Officers are asked to apply through their Head of Department.



EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute
The College/University of The Bahamas seeks a dynamic and creative individual to provide leadership in
the newly established Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute. The Executive Director, reporting
to the President and Vice President Academic Affairs, has supervisory responsibility for the Institute and
oversight of all aspects of its operation.
This Institute will become the centre of excellence for culinary and hospitality management in the Caribbean
Region, producing skilled and knowledgeable individuals in response to the human resource needs of
hospitality and allied industries, with a revived focus on quality vocational and technical training, professional
development and research. Avenues will be provided through which instructors, both full-time and adjunct,
will participate in various research initiatives and exchange experiences enhancing not only educational and
training opportunities, but services offered throughout the industry.
The College/University of The Bahamas is the national higher education institution of The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas. The institution grants mostly bachelor degrees and some joint master's degrees in
conjunction with other institutions. It has a student enrolment in excess of4,000 students located throughout
the Bahamian archipelago. It has extensive links with tertiary institutions in the Caribbean and North America
and its credits are accepted by more than 200 colleges and universities in those regions and in Great Britain.
It has embarked aggressively upon a major expansion of its programme offerings, research activities and
its physical facilities and is incorporating e-learning methodologies into its repertoire of strategies for
delivering instruction, all with a view to attaining a charter as a university by 2007.

Education and/or Experience
The successful candidate must possess an earned doctoral degree and at least eight to ten years administrative
experience, including teaching in higher education and related hospitality sector industry exposure. Excellent
oral and written communication skills (including computer skills) are essential.




EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
The Bahamas Marine and Environmental Studies Institute
The College/University of The Bahamas seeks a dynamic and creative individual to provide leadership in
The Bahamas Marine and Environmental Studies Institute. The Institute is intended to facilitate the
discovery of knowledge about the marine and island environment of The Bahamas and build on the solid
foundation of research and monitoring programmes. The mandate of developing specialised laboratory and
field courses to compliment the current Bachelor of Science degree courses at The College/University will
be a significant focus.
The Executive Director, reporting to the President and Vice President Academic Affairs, has supervisory
responsibility for the Institute, comprising appointed faculty fellows. He/She will provide leadership in
programme development and research initiatives to take full advantage of The College/University location
in a small island state and year round access to the unique sub-tropical ecosystems of the coastal, coral reefs,
mangrove and sea grass communities in The Bahamas. Toward this end, the Executive Director will work
closely with administrators at the existing facilities at The College/University field stations in San Salvador
(Gerace Research Centre) and Andros (The Bahamas Environmental Research Centre). Such engagements
will include the traditional academic initiatives as well as certificate and general environmental and resource
management outreach courses/programmes. In this regard, the Executive Director, through the resources
of the Institute and in collaboration with the School of Sciences and Technology, will assist with the
development of a flagship multidisciplinary degree programme in Marine Science. Efforts will also entail
attracting researchers and scholars with marine and related interests as well as local, regional and international
students with exceptional academic credentials and future potential, demonstrating a genuine interest in
marine science. The Executive Director must have exceptional skills in grantsmanship and the ability to
develop collaborations to build long-term research and monitoring initiatives that can help document and
catalogue the ecological systems that make up the Bahamian archipelago.
The College/University of The Bahamas is the national higher education institution of The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas. The institution grants mostly bachelor degrees and some joint master's degrees in conjunction
with other institutions. It has a student enrolment in excess of 4,000 students located throughout the Bahamian
archipelago. It has extensive links with tertiary institutions in the Caribbean and North America and its
credits are accepted by more than 200 colleges and universities in those regions and in Great Britain. It has
embarked aggressively upon a major expansion of its programme offerings, research activities and physical
facilities and is incorporating e-learning methodologies into its repertoire of strategies for delivering instruction,
all with a view to attaining a charter as a university by 2007.
The successful candidate must hold a doctorate in an appropriate field with a minimum of eight to ten years
experience at an accredited university, a proven research record and have relevant work experience including
appropriate supervisory level exposure.




INDUSTRY TRAINING ADMINISTRATOR
Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute
Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the Industry Training Administrator (ITA)
post in the Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute. The Industry Training Administrator reports to
the Executive Director, Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute. The successful candidate must
possess at least a bachelor's degree in a relevant subject area plus five years' related industry experience
or a master's degree in a relevant subject area plus three years related industry experience. Excellent
organisational, presentational and interpersonal communication skills are required for this position..
The portfolio of the ITA includes the organisation and oversight of all matters relative to Industry Training,
including the design, development and review of new and existing skills level training and education curricula;
and the coordination of the offering of such programmes and courses, both throughout the College Network
and within industry.
The Industry Training Administrator is responsible for working in concert with Industry Partners in the
Hospitality and Tourism Sectors to develop and implement training opportunities to meet special needs
identified within the industry. The successful candidate will coordinate the review and updating of existing
education and training programmes offered through the industry arm of the Culinary and Hospitality
Management Institute; prepare training proposals, including costing, for special needs as requested by various
establishments; negotiate training consultants' contracts; and organise and conduct training seminars and
workshops. In addition to coordinating the preparation of Industry training manuals and guides and maintaining
reference copies of current standard operating procedures and job descriptions and specifications for all
major jobs within the hospitality and tourism sectors, the Industry Training Administrator must also coordinate
job placement for students and graduates and serve as Secretary to the Culinary and Hospitality Management
Institute Advisory Board.

Interested candidates should submit a College/University of The Bahamas Employment Application,
a Comprehensive Resume and up-to-date transcripts, giving full particulars of qualifications and
experience, along with three work references no later than 16th January, 2006 to:

Director, Human Resources, The College of The Bahamas
P. O. Box N-4912
Nassau, N. P., The Bahamas
Facsimile: (242) 302-4539
E-mail: hrapply@cob.edu.bs
Web Site: www.cob.edu.bs


I I I ~


(


i _
.1
s










PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


IHE


COLLEGE


Visit our website at ww*


CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDU(



What is your goal?
/ PROMOTION
/ QUALITY SERVICE
/ SALARY INCREASE
/ NEW CAREER
/ CAREER ENHANCEMENT
we can provide you with superior education and training to
help you accomplish your goal.
Call for an interview today!
For your convenience, the majority of classes are held on Saturdays, 8am 12noon.
Are you preparing for a promotion, career change or career enhancement? The Professional Development Department can help you achieve
your career goal! A wide array of courses and programmes leading to certificate, certification and licensure are offered. You can become a pioneer
in setting performance standards in your organization. Success is at your finger tips. We have secured partnerships with leading international
institutions to help you accomplish your career goals. You can attain your professional development credentials at The College of The Bahamas.
Choose the courses or programme to help you accomplish your career goals...
S Certified Professional Managers Progranme
S Certificate Programme For The Office Assistant
S Certificate Programme In Learning Disabilities
A+ Computer Technician Certification
S Certified Computer Operator (Microsoft Office Specialist- MOS)
Certificate In Law
S Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Becker Conviser CPA Review
Certified Human Resource Managers Programme
Certificate Programme In Supervisory Management
Journeyman Plumbing License
Master Plumbing License
Certified Security Officer
Managerial Accounting For Non-Financial Managers
S Ethics And Professional Responsibility
S Writing & Research Skills
S Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
No entrance exams. Tuition may be paid per term or in full. International programmes available.
CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL MANAGERS PROGRAMME
This programme is administered in conjunction with The Institute of Certified Professional Management at James Madison University,
Harrisonburg, Virginia. The CM Programme provides Supervisors, Managers, and Team Leaders with the fundamental knowledge needed
for today's management challenges. A comprehensive instructional scheme gives you the competence you need to meet high standards of
performance.
TERM 1 TERM 2
CPM900 Personal Skills- $500 CPM90 Administrative Skills- $700
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
TERM 3
CPM 902 Interpersonal Skills- $600
CPS 901 Accounts- $300
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
PREREQUISITE: 3 or more years as a Trainer, Supervisor or Manager with an Associate Degree or a B. A. Degree from an accredited or
recognized college/university; COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME FOR THE OFFICE ASSISTANT
With the advent of the high-tech office, the Clerks'/Office Assistants' role has evolved as one of the most important support factors in the
operational management process. In an effort to equip the support level staff.to function efficiently in the work environment, CEES is pleased
to offer a proficiency programme in basic office skills.
TERM 1 TERM 2
CPS 909 Business Communication- $300 PM 03 Professional Development Seminar- $100
WRS 900 Writing & Research Skills- $350 CPS 911 Records Management- $200
ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250
TERM 3
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
CPS 903 Office Technology- $500
CPS 910 Managing Physical Resources- $200
CPS 901 Accounts- $300
PREREQUISITE: 3 or more years experience in a clerical position and 3 BGCSE's- Grade C or above;
COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12pm Duration: 3 TERMS
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME IN LEARNING DISABILITIES
The Certificate in Learning Disabilities Programme is designed to equip teachers with the skills necessary for working with diverse learners.
Participants are trained to use the basic techniques to identify students with learning disabilities; analyze and examine disabilities related to
language and communicative arts; and develop strategies that can be used with students who have been diagnosed as learning disabled. The
programme comprises six (6) courses:
TERM 1 TERM 2
SPED 900 Introduction To Learning Disabilities- $84 SPED 903 Strategies and interventions I- $168
SPED 901 Diagnosing Learning Disabilities- $168 SPED 904 Strategies aqd interventions II- $84
SPED 902 Individual Education Planning- $168 ETHC900 Ethics & Profess. Responsibility.- $250 )
TERM 3
SPED 905 Assessment- $178
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
PREREQUISITE: AA Degree with a Teacher's Certificate or a BADegree;
COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring & Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
A+ COMPUTER TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATION
This programme of study is designed to equip students with the skills necessary to successfully sit the international A+ Microsoft Certification
Examination. Techniques to identify and rectify mechanical problems related to the personal computer are explored. It is a hands-on learning
experience with lab exercises that helps the student to apply theory to practice.
TERM 1: COMP 954 Software- $510 TERM 2: COMP 955 Hardware
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Per Demand Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 2 TERMS
CERTIFIED COMPUTER OPERATOR (Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS)
This course of study is designed to train students how. to master Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Access, Microsoft Outlook, and
PowerPoint. To help the student to develop navigation and design skills, the instructor provides easy to understand notes and conducts live
demonstrations on how to manipulate the entire MS Office Suite. Upon successful completion of the external international examinations, the
Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Certification is awarded. The programme comprises five Modulesand two companion courses:
TERM 1 TERM 2
COMP 906 Microsoft Office Specialist- $610 ETHC900 Ethics & Professional Responsibility- $250
Microsoft Word, Microsoft Access CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
Microsoft Excel, Microsoft PowerPoint TERM 3
Microsoft Outlook CKOM! 6 Microsoft Office Specialist- $610
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
CERTIFICATE IN LAW
This programme is offered in conjunction with The Institute of Legal Executives ilexX), Bedford, England.
ILEX qualification routes are vocationally relevant and designed to build and test legal knowledge and understanding at the paralegal level.
Designed to facilitate the training and educational needs of Legal Secretaries, Legal Clerks, Legal Office Managers, Law Enforcement Officers,
Special Assistants to Lawyers, Justice of The Peace, and all persons interested in acquiring an impressive array of legal office skills, the
Certificate in Law qualification is specifically relevant to The Bahamas legal system. Courses include:
TERM 1 TERM 2
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills -$350 ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250 LAW 900
The Legal Environment -$600.00 LAW 901 General Legal Principles-$600.00
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
TERM 3 (Options- choose one) -$600
NB. Options are subject to change.
LAW 903 Company Law LAW 906 Law of Mortgages
LAW 905 Employment Law LAW 908 Work-of The Magistrate's Court
LAW 907 Nature and Role of Criminal Law
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
PREREQUISITE: AA Degree and 3 years work experience; COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am 12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
THE BECKER CPA REVIEW
The College of The Bahamas is pleased to offer the New CPA Computer Based Test (CBT). Besides the obvious transition from a pencil-and-
paper exam to a computer-based test, the revised CPA Exam will also contain a new content focus broadening the scope of audit and attest
areas and incorporating the assessment of critical skills, such as research and communication. The new exam also has increase emphasis on
general business knowledge and information technology.
CPA 900 Financial Reporting- $650 CPA 901 Accounting & Reporting/Regulation- $520
CPA 902 Law/Business Law- $465 CPA 903 Auditing/Auditing and Attestation- $465
Prerequisite: A BA Degree from an accredited or recognized college/university in any discipline with at least 21 credits hours in accounting.
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:30am 5:30pm Duration: 12 Weeks
CERTIFICATION IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Offered in conjunction with Columbia Southern University, Orange Beach, Alabama, this nine months programme is designed for those
individuals seeking professional development and aspiring to rise through the ranks in the HR field.
TERM 1 TERM 2
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250
HRM 900 Intro To HRM Environment- $200 HRM 902 H/R Development & Training-$200
HRM 901 Securing Human Resources- $200 HRM 903 Rewards Compensation and Benefits-$300
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
TERM 3
HRM904 Labour Management Relations- $300
HRM 905 Protecting and Evaluating Human Resources- $300
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210


CATION & EXTENSION SERVICES
PREREQUISITE: A BA Degree in any discipline from an accredited or recognized college/university or a minimum of 5 years as a manager,
supervisor or trainer; COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME IN SUPERVISORY MANAGEMENT
Supervisors with cutting edge,skills know how to accomplish difficult tasks, solve complicated problems and master challenges in decision i
making. This programme is aimed at supervisors and middle managers who wish to update their supervisory skills, or persons who have be*,p ,
promoted and wish to gain additional insight into the world of supervisory management. This programme entails essential training for person,,
wishing to become an associate manager. jT,,'.
TERM 1 TERM 2
CPMW 9 Personal Skills- $500 SUPV 900 Supervisory Management (SUPV 1)- $500
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250
CPS 901 Accounts- $300 CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
TERM 3 i
CPM 902 Interpersonal Skills- $600 :X
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
PREREQUISITE: 3 or more years experience as a Supervisor/Manager or Trainer and an AA Degree in any discipline from a recognized'
or accredited institution; COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet 3 Mi
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12pm Duration: 3 TERMS .,
CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL SECRETARY REVIEW PROGRAMME fie
The Certified Professional Secretary (CPS) Review, offered in conjunction with The International Association of Administrative Professional"!-i.
(IAAP) is a 9 month course of study designed to prepare administrative professionals and clerical assistants to write the CPS international :s'
exam.
TERM 1 TERM 2 -coi
CPS 901 Accounts- $300 CPS 906 Human Resources- $300
CPS 909 Business Communication- $300 CPS 911 Records Management- $200
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
TERM 3 OPTIONAL COURSES 3'
'C-PS9W Office Technology- $500 WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 (Spring) CPS 91~so,
Managing Physical Resources- $200 ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250 (Summer) 1, .\ i
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210 ip
PREREQUISITE: 4 yrs. Experience or an AA Degree+3 Yrs. Experience or a B. A. Degree and 0 Experience;
COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Dayhnime: Sat. 8am-lpm Duration: 3 TERMS :noiJ
JOURNEYMAN PLUMBING LICENSE
The Journeyman Plumbing course is designed to assist students preparing to write the Journeyman Plumbing Examination. Topics includes:
interpretation of codes, disposal and drainage systems, storm drainage disposal systems, installation of sanitary fixtures, basic drawings fl,
scale, water supply and distribution, use of materials and tools, repairs and maintenance. The examination is offered in conjunction withTe .
Ministry of Public Works. At the end of the course, candidates are required take one (1) Professional Development Seminint.
TERMERM1 TERM 2 (Optional)
JPLM900 Journeyman Plumbing-$800 SUPV 900 Supervisory Management- $500
ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250 (SUPV900 is available for Plant/Plumbing Supervisors)
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100oi
PREREQUISITE: Students should have working knowledge and skills in the following areas: interpretation of codes, disposal and drainage
systems, storm drainage disposal systems, installation of sanitary fixtures, basic drawings to scale, water supply and distribution, use of
materials and tools, repairs and maintenance.
Begins: Fall Day/Time: Tuesdays 6pm 9pm Duration: 2 TERMS ,
MASTER PLUMBING LICENSE .
The Master Plumbing course is designed to assist students preparing to write the Master Plumbing Examination. Students should have above rt
average knowledge and skills in the following areas: interpretation of codes, disposal and drainage systems, storm drainage disposal systems jp-
installation of sanitary fixtures, basic drawings to scale, water supply and distribution, use of materials and tools, repairs and maintenance. :-
Special emphasis will be placed o plant management and foreman responsibilities.
TERM 3 TERM 2 (Optional) :,
PLMoE Master Plumbing- $950 PM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250 SUPV 900 Supervisory Management- $500
(SUPV900 is availablefor Plant/Plumbing Supervisors)
PREREQUISITE: Students should have working knowledge and skills in the following areas: interpretation of codes, disposal and drainage~
systems, storm drainage disposal systems, installation of .niiar, fimrures, basic drawings to scale, water supply.and distribution, use of)
materials and tools, repairs and maintenance .
Begins:Fall Day/Time:Tllesdays 6pm -9pm Duration: TERM ,. ,..
MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING FOR NON-FINANCIAL MANAGERS Aii
This course is designed to strengthen the candidates' understanding of managerial accounting. Managerial accounting concepts, principles
and functions are the main topics covered. The ability to prepare and accurately read a financial statement/spreadsheet is an essential skill :,
for all professionals and paraprofessionals; CPS901 covers in a very student friendly way, easy to understand examples that aid the students'
learning experience. This course also helps to prepare candidates to write external examinations.
CPS 901 Accounts- $300
PREREQUISITE: None
BEGINS: Per demand Day/Time: Sat/ThursTue. 8am-12:15pm OR 6pm 9pm Duration: 10 Weeks
ETHICS AND PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY
This course examines guidelines for the professional behavior of members of any organisation. A select group of codes of ethics and ethics"
cases will be explored to support a theoretical and practical discourse on why the application of ethics and professional responsibility is
important in all aspects of society.
ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Per demand Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12noon OR Thurs/Tue- 6pm 9pm Duration: 8 Weeks
WRITING & RESEARCH SKILLS .
This course is designed to provide mature students with reading, writing, research and critical thinking skills to preare them forentry
into CEES professional development programmes. WRS 900 is also structured to provide certification candidates wit the skills necessa
to successfully write position and research papers. ,,
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills $350
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Per demand Day/Time: Sat.- 8am-12noon or Thursday/Tue- 6pm 9pmI Duration: 8 Weeks
INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS, WINDOWS & THE INTERNET
This workshop provides a broad foundation for students so that they will have a greater awareness and confidence using personal computers.
Students will gain practical information and skills, such as what a computer is, how to manage personal files and folders that they create.
COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Window s and The Internet- $200
PREREQUISITE: None
Begins: Summer, Spring & Fall Dayf/ime: Sat.- 8am-l2noon Duration: 3Weeks .
APPLICANTS FOR INTERNATIONAL CERTIFICATION COURSES AND PROGRAM
All students applying for International Certification Courses and Programmes that are offered in conjunction with foreign institutions ark?
required to contact the CEES Office for information on external application and examination fees. ,,
Telephone (242) 325-5714/328-0093/328-1936 Fax: (242) 322-2712

OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION
FEES
1. COB Registration..... ................... $40.00 (one-time fee)
2. Insurance................................................................ $25.00 (valid for 1 year)
3. ID Card.................................................................. $25.00 (one time fee)
4. Technology Fee......................................... $75
5. Books...................................................................... $ Please contact COB Bookstore for prices.
6. Awards Ceremony.................... ... ... $150.00 (must be paid by the 2 TERM)
7. External Application Fees.................................... Please check with the CEES Office for information.."
ESSENTIAL COMPUTER KNOWLEDGE: Effective Summer 2005, basic computer and Internet skills will be required of all students. -.
Assessment for exemption from COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet will be done via proof of a certificate
from an authorized provider or by taking a prescribed computer skills test to verify competency in Windows and Computers. Students failing
the competency test will be required to take the Iniroduction To The Internet, Windows and Computers. This Workshop is a prerequisite
for all programmes or single courses. ,
Workshop Title: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet.
Tuition: $200 Duration: 2 Days
Day: Saturdays: 12noon 3pm (5 contact hours per day) Offered: Spring, Summer and Fall ,
ADVISEMENT & REGISTRATION SESSIONS
Please bring the following items with you to the advisement/registration session:
The first four pages of your Passport
Copies of your certificates/licensures and college/university transcripts
Where applicable, letters of recommendation, job description, special awards, etc.
OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION
1. No entrance examination is required for enrollment in professional development courses/programmes. ." q
2. Tuition is charged per term; i.e. you will be billed only for courses offered in the current term.
3. Non-Bahamians add $50 to each course/workshop/seminar
4. Remember to obtain from the Programme Coordinator the correct ISBN Number for all required textbooks
5. At the first class session, ALL students must submit to the Programme Coordinator one copy each '
of his/her stamped receipts representing payment for tuition, fees & books for the current term.
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND RE-CERTIFICATION SEMINARS
A compulsory professional development seminar is offered for all candidates enrolled in professional development programmes. Seminars ?
and workshops address important issues that are vital to the adult students' learning experience. Enrollment is also open to the general public'.d-
This seminar is also designed to facilitate continuing education units for professionals applying for re-certification in their respective disciplines?'
Students are required only to take ONE Professional Development Seminar. Effective Fall 2005, the Fee for the Professional Develooment
Seminar will be $210.
THE ANNUALAWARDS CEREMONY
The Annual Awards Ceremony and reception is normally held at The British Colonial Hilton Hotel once during the TERM 3. Adult students
successfully completing progranmmnes and courses are awarded certificates, certifications and/or licensure.

Secure Your Seat By Enrolling Today!
Contact The Centre For Continuing Education On Moss Road Campus or
Call (242) 325-5714/328-0093/328-1936 Fax: (242) 322-2712
Fees May Be Paid By Cash, Credit Card, or Bank Certified Cheque To: The College of The Bahamas, Business Office
Cees Reserves The Right To Change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule And Course Materials









MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006, PAGE 7B
I I


I'F


1HE


*Si

4'.


rolbedu.bs


ED UCATING T-.M:':


U .1 mrn1.1 i nvi


COMPUTER OFFERINGS
C MPUTER APPLICATIONS I
Corse Description: This course is for the beginner who knows very little about computers and does not understand how it works.
Thi coure covers the major computer concepts with extensive hands on practice of various software using: (I) Microsoft Office Word
ProCessing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft Access Database Management.
Pre exquisite: None
Be ns: Monday, 6 February 2006 6:00pm 9:00pm Section 01 (CEES)
Saturday, 4 February 2006 10:00am 1:00pm Section 02 (CEES)
SMon. and Wed., 6 Feb., 2006 4:00pm 5:30pm Section 03 (CEES)
Duration: 12 weeks
Vedue: CEES Computer Lab
Tuiton: $450.00
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II
Course Description: This course covers the major advanced concepts with extensive hands on practice of various software using: (I)
Mic'rosoft Office Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft Access Database Management.
Pre-~equisite: Computer Applications I
Begins: i Thursday, 9 February 2006
Time: 6:00pm 9:00pm
Durtion: 12 weeks
Venfie: CEES Computer Lab
Feel $550.00
EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
Thisjworishop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It focuses on developing
effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.
Pre-equisite: None d
Be : Thursday, 2nd March, 2006
TimT: 9:30am 4:30pm
Durition: 1 day
Venie: CEES Computer Lab
Fees $160.00
INlORIATION TECHNOLOGY I
Course Description: This course covers basic concepts of Information Technology. The course provides training in the following areas;
Basi4 Hardware Proficiency, Application Features Proficiency, Operating System Proficiency, Internet and Email Proficiency.
Pre-tequisite: None
Begis: Wednesday, 8th February, 2006
Tims: 6:00pm -9:00pm
Duration:. 12 weeks
Ven e:' CEES Computer Lab
Feesi $450.00
PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR
Coure Description: This course is a hands-on introduction to technology systems for use in information environments. The course will
cover the following topics: Basic Hardware, Operating Systems, Troubleshooting and Repairs.
Pre-iquisite:' None h
Begi4s: : Tuesday, 7 February, 2006
Time: 6:00pm 7:30pm Tuesdays and Thursdays
Duration: 12 weeks
Venue: BHTC Computer Lab
Fees:- $500.00
QUICKBOO(S
Course Description: This course is designed to train new and existing small business entrepreneurs (fewer than 20 employees) how to
organize and manage their accounting activities using QuickBooks Pro s.:.r.,are Silcri. 1.;lI Ir,- lbow to set-up their company files,
chart'of accounts, budget, customneis, vinddo and employees.
Pre-requisite: None
Begins: Tuesday, 28t February, 2006
Time 6:00pm -9:00pm
Duration:'' :' : 6 weeks
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees:, $330.00
UPGRADE REPAIR AND TROUBLESHOOT YOUR PC WORKSHOP
This workshop is a hands-on.introduction to upgrade repair and troubleshooting your personal computer. Topics covered are basic hardware,
operating systems, troubleshooting and repairs.
Pre-requisite: None ,h
Begis: Thursday, 9 March, 2006
Time 9:30am -4:30pm
Duration: I day
Venu4: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $250.00
WEpPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP
Course Description: This course, which targets persons who would like to create their personal web pages will cover Web page creation,
Web site nrangement, and HTML. Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web
pages
Pre-requisite: Participants ust be computer literate and have a basic knowledge of word-processing
BeginS: Thursday, 2" March, 2006
Time- 9:30am 4:30pm
Duration: 2 days
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $550.00




MA$S4GE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I
This it an introductory course for learning basic techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major topic areas will include
Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniques, Wellness Education (Psychological and Physiological Benefits), Indications and
Contraindications, Serving Special Populations and Complementary Bodywork Systems to include Aromatherapy Essentials.
Starting: Monday, February 27, 2006
S 6:00-9:00pm
DuratiOn: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee: $465.00
Venuet The College of the Bahamas
MANSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS II
This i an advance course for learning techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major topics include introduction to
hydrot erapy; spa and body treatments; the basic facial; aromatherapy-fundamentals or essential oils; relaxation and meditative methods;
and hdt stone therapy.
Starting: Thursday, February 23, 2006
6:00-9:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuitioi Fee: $620.00
Venues The College of the Bahamas
GRQUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR
This isan introductory course in teaching group fitness instruction. Major topics of discussion will include basic anatomy and physiology;
choreography and cueing; the five components of fitness, nutrition, basic exercise testing and how to teach group exercise.
Starting: Thursday, February 27, 2006
Time: I 6:00-9:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee: $400.00
Venue TBA


SUPI
This w
custom
Date: I
Time:
Venue:i
Tuition


RIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE
rkshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior customer service. It focuses on
.r value, retention and relationship building and employee motivation.
Thursday, 23 February 2006
9:30am -4:30pm
Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre
$170.00


EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It focuses on developing
effectiVe and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.
Date: Thursday, 2 March 2006
Tim~. 9:30am-4:30pm
Venue:i CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
Tuition $160.00


HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP
This two-day workshop is designed to equip managers and leaders in organizations and enhance the skills of current Human Resource
professionals with the theory, tools and techniques required for effective human resource management practices in today's workplace.


Date:
Time:
Venue:
Tuition:


nd rd
Thursday & Friday, 2 3 March, 2006
9:30am- 4:30pm
Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre
$350.00


UPGRADE REPAIRS AND TROUBLESHOOT YOUR PC
This workshop is a hands-on introduction to upgrade repair and troubleshooting your personal computer. Topics covered are basic hardware,
operating systems, troubleshooting and repairs.


Date:
Time:
Venue:
Tuition:


Thursday, 9th March, 2006
9:30am 4:30pm
CEES Computer Lab
$250


WEB PAGE DESIGN
This course will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy fiddling with computers and would
like to create their own web pages are encouraged to attend. Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and
Tables and hosting of web pages.


Date:
Time:
Venue:
Tuition:


Thursday & Friday 2nd 3r March, 2006
9:30am 4:30pm
CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
$550.00


COURSE SEC COURSE DESCRIPTION TIME DAY START DUR FEE
ACCT I
ACCA900 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS I 6:00-8:00pm Mon/Wed 13-Feb 10 weeks $250
ACCA901 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II 6:00-8:00pm M/Wed 13-Feb 10 weeks $275
ACCA902 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS III 6:00-8:00pm Tue/Thur 14-Feb 10 weeks $300
BUS. [
BUSI900 01 CREDIT & COLLECTIONS I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 8 Weeks $225
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER 1 Day $170
CUST900 01 SERVICE W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thur 23-Feb
BUSI904 01 INTRODUCTION TO BUS. I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
COMP
COMP901 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 6:00-9:00pm Mon 6-Feb 12 Weeks $450
COMP901 [02 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 10am-1:00pm Sat 4-Feb 12 Weeks $450
COMP901 03 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 4:00-5:30pm Mon/Wed 6-Feb 12 Weeks $450
COMP902 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II 6:00-9:00pm Thur 9-Feb 12 Weeks $550
COMP903 01 INFORMATION TECH. I 6:00-9:00pm Wed 8-Feb 12 Weeks $450
COMP 941 01 QUICKBOOKS 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 6 weeks $330
COMP953 01 PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR 6:00-7:30pm Tue/Thur 7-Feb 12 Weeks $450
EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT 1 Day $160
COMP960 01 W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thur 2-Mar
WEB PAGE DESIGN 2 Days $550
COMP930 01 WORKSHOP 9:30am-4:30pm Thur/Fri 2-Mar
S Upgrade Repair and 1 Day $250
COMP923 i01 Troubleshoot Your PC W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thur 9 Mar
COSM
COSM802 I01 MAKE-UP APPLICATION 6:00-9:00pm Mon 27-Feb 8 Weeks $225
COSM804 i 01 MANICURE & PEDICURE;* 6:00-9:0dpmi Tue 28-Feb 8 Weeks $225
-OSM807 01 NAIL ART TECHNICIAN 6;00-9:00pm Mon/Thur 27-Feb 5 weeks' $500
DECOR
DECO800 01 INTERIOR DECORATING I 6:00-9:00pm Wed 22-Feb weeks $225
DECO801 [01 INTERIOR DECORATING II 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 8 weeks $250
FLOR800 !01 FLORAL DESIGN I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
FLOR801 01 FLORAL DESIGN II 6:00-9:00pm Mon 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
FLOR802 i01 FLORAL DESIGN III 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb 10 weeks $275
ENGLISH
ENG 900 01 EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 8 Weeks $225
ESL 900 01 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANG 6:00-9:00pm Mon/Fri 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
HEALTH &
FITNESS
MASSAGE THERAPY $465
MASG900 01 ESSENTIALS I 6:00-9:00pm Mon 27-Feb 10 weeks
MASSAGE THERAPY- $620
MASG901 01 ESSENTIALS II 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb 10 weeks
GROUP FITNESS $400
HLTH800 01 INSTRUCTOR 6:00-9:00PM Thur 27 Feb 10 Weeks
LANG
CRE 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE I 6:00-7:30pm Tue/Thur 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
CRE 901 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE II 6:00-7:30pm Mon/Wed 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
SPA 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I 6:00-7:30pm Tue/Thur 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
SPA 901 01 CONV. SPANISH II 6:00-7:30pm Mon/Thur 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
FRE 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I 6:00-7:3JPM Mon/Wed 27 Feb .10 Weeks $225
MGMT.
HUMAN RESOURCE $250
MGMT900 i01 MANAGEMENT I 6:00-9:00pm Thur 9-Feb 12 Weeks
HUMAN RESOURCE 12 Weeks $300
MGMT901 01 MANAGEMENT II 6:00-9:00pm Mon 6-Feb
I HUMAN RESOURCE 2 Days $350
MGMT902 01 MANAGEMENT W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thur/Fri 2-Mar
MEDICAL __
MEDT900 01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb 10 weeks $225
SEWING _
BASIC OF FREEHAND 10 weeks $225
SEW 800 01 CUTTING I 6:00-9:00pm Mon 27-Feb
BASIC OF FREEHAND 10 weeks $250
SEW 802 01 CUTTING II 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb
SEW 805 01 DRAPERY MAKING I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
SEW 811 01 UPHOLSTERY MAKING I 6:00-9:00pm Wed 22-Feb 10 weeks $225

ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/ 328-
1936 or email All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00
(one time). When submitting application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages
of your passport. CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course
Schedule and Course Materials

ACADEMIC UPGRADING DEPARTMENT
Spring Semester 2006

All persons interested in enrolling in Academic Upgrading, Personal Development and/or Professional
Development courses offered by CEES are advised to register two weeks prior to the starting date
of class.
All students registering must provide a copy of the first five pages of their passport.
Persons registering after the starting date of class will be required to pay a late registration fee of
$60.

i). College Preparatory Programme
ii). Basic Upgrading Programme for Traditional Age Students (under 25 years old)
iii). Mature Upgrading (25 years and older) Programme

New Student Orientation & Advisement/Registration: January 4 & 5, 2006
Classes Begin: January 9, 2006
Late Registration: January 10 & 11, 2006
Time: 10:00am 6:00pm

iv). Preschool and Day Care Centre Practitioners Certificate
v) Infant/Toddler Day Care Educarers Certificate
Classes Begin: January 13, 2006
Time: Fridays 6:00- 7:50 pm & Saturdays 9:00 am -1:30 pm.
Venue: The College of The Bahamas
Tuition: Contact CEES for information.
Additional fees include one time application fee of $40, Insurance $25 (per annum), ID Card $25
(one time), Technology Fee $100 (per semester), Student Activity fee $50 (full-time) $25 (part -time),
(Fall & Spring Semesters), Drop/Add $20 per application.


,OPMENT COURSES


r


I L~
I , -


A.







PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JANUARY a, /uuo


I nr- I tniDuii-


Dear Shareholders,

We present our audited financial statements for the year ended August 31" 2005.
Up to August 31" 2005 the company owned 90% of the outstanding shares of Robin
Hood Enterprises Limited. Effective August 31' 2005, the company sold its entire
investment in Robin Hood. As a result of the sale our consolidated balance sheet no
longer contains Robin Hood's performance however our income statement does still
include Robin Hood's operating results.

Other income totaling $2,501,203 primarily represents the insurance proceeds from the
hurricanes in September 2004, the gain on the sale of Robin Hood and proceeds to be
received from a settlement related to leasehold improvements at the Home Centre in
Freeport. Extraordinary expenses totaling $1.739,205 represents write off of damaged
inventory due to the hurricanes, including the insurance deductible and the write off of
our leasehold improvements at the Home Centre in Freeport.

After extracting these extraordinary items from the income statement our day to day
operating expenses have increased by 17% over 2004 primarily due to increases in
payroll costs and bad debt expense.

Payroll costs have increased mainly because of additional staff being added in Freeport
relating to the opening of the new Home Centre store in the Seahorse Plaza, The opening
Sof this store in March 2005 has helped us maintain our market share of appliance sales,
hardware and houseware sales that we lost at the Home Centre, Peel Street store due to
the distressed state of the building.

Bad debt provision for the year included Robin Hood's bad debt provision as well as its
write offs and at the Home Centre and the concrete division in Freeport we have made
additional provisions for certain slow paying customers. We have also written off oldh
debts against provisions, but we still continue to pursue recovery of these debts tihriu -
the courts and have been successful at our recovery efforts in most cases.

Resultantly our net income for the year fell to a loss of $290,174 versus a profit of
$117,345 in 2004. Despite this loss however we feel confident that our operations are
making the necessary changes to become con~isientll. profitable including but not limited
to the opening of our new Home Centre Super Store in Freeport d urine L April 2006. We
expect a minimum of a 20% increase in our sales from The Home Centre as a result of
this relocation,

Also on another positive note we have seen increased business at the concrete plant since
the start of our new fiscal year in September 2005 and expect, this division to contribute
positively to our bottom line in 2006.
We have experienced some severe challenges in 2005 primarily in Grand Bahama related
to the hurricanes, however, we are confident that with the sale of Robin Hood behind us
and our focus on growing our concrete and building supplies operations in Grand
Bahama, especially at our new location in Freeport, we are poised to be a very successful
company.

Thank you for continuing to support us.


Hannes Babak
Chairman

December 22"~ 2005
Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Consolidated Balance Sheet,
August 31. 2005, with corresponding figures for 2004
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)
Note 2005 2004

Assets
Current assets:
Cash B$ 107,747 6 8a.
Time deposits 3 61,626 -). 740
Accounts receivable, net 4 1,309,237 1.7168031
Due from former subsidiary 10 578,500
Due from former subsidiary's shareholders 10 571,500
Inventories 5 1,861.349 3,431,533
Inventory of spare parts and supplies 92,143 93,246
Deposits and prepaid expenses 113,376 94,980
4,695,478 5,476.425
Property, plant and equipment 7 2,997.002 3.197.387
B$ 7,692,480 8,673,812

Liabilities and Shareholders' Equity
Current liabilities:
Bank overdraft 8 B$ 320,532 750,341
Accounts payable and accrued expenses 2,791,916 3,050.784
Warranty provision 15,809 35,267
Due to shareholder 6 440,272
Current portion of tong-term debt_ 6& 9 177,788 39,810
3,306,045. 4,316,474
Long-term debt 6 &9 516,223 196,412
Shareholders' equity:
Share capital 13 47.083 47,083
Contributed surplus 5,774868 5,774,868
Appraisal excess 7 1,433,867 1,43 3 367
Accumulated deficit (3.385.606) (3,094892)
3,870,212 4,160,926
Commitments and contingencies 12
B$ 7,692.480 8,673,812

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Consolidated Statement of Operations
Year ended August 31, 2005, with corresponding figures for 2004
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)
Note 2005 2004

Sales, net of discounts B$ 22,625,063 22.083.350
Cost of sales 5 17,028.578 16.330,084
Gross profit 5,596,485 ..: .
Other income:
Insurance proceeds 11 1,476,737
Net gain on sale of subsidiary 10 620,179
Other income 4 349,504 12,004
Finance charges on trade receivables 52,160 27,641
Interest income on time deposits 2,623 1,376
2.501,203 41,02"

8.097,688 5,794,287
Operating expenses:
Payroll related costs, including employee
benefits and commissions 6 3.249,728 2,979,462
Inventory damaged by hurricane 11 1,263,610
Rent 6 & 12 506,206 484,592
Bad debt expense 4 482,921 139,896
Impairment of property,
plant and equipment 7 & 11 475,595
Other operating costs 6 300,597 102,192
Utilities, postage and delivery 296,570 311 077
Bank charges and exchange 294,218 207,802
Depreciation and amortisation 7 284,165 324,156


Vehicle, maintenance and repairs 249.479 154,970
Advertising 232,297 340,291
Legal and professional 170,064 102,382
Computer and office supplies 140.535 115,400
Licence fees and permits 138,577 118,608
Business insurance 74,448 53,317
Interest expense on bank overdraft 56,207 77,301
Interest on long-term debt and
due to shareholder 6 &9 53,603 53,141
Travel. trade shows and entertainment 49,291 55,668
Donations 33,091 25,777
Security 33,074 15,906
Loss on disposal of property, plant and equipment 4,126 15.004
8,388,402 5,676,942

Net (loss)iincome B$ (290,714) 117,345

Basic (loss)/eamings per share 14 B$ (0.062) 0.025

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.


Panel set to examine




targeted e-marketing


business represen-
tatives attending
the Ministry of
Tourism's
National
Tourism Week MasterClasses
tomorrow will learn how to
target individual i-Pod and cell
phone users through market-
ing tools and strategies
Kerry Fountain, executive
director of the Bahama Out
Islands Promotion Board, will
lead a panel in a master class
entitled Technology: Driving
the Business of Tourism -
Where we need to be.
On the panel will be Phillip
Simon, executive director of
the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce; Laura Veglia,
Caribbean Regional Director
of Expedia; designer and retail-
er Harl Taylor of Harl Taylor
Bags; and Robert Ricci, direc-
tor of web relations at Weber
Shandwick, one of the world's
leading global public relations
agencies.
"Mr Ricci is going to present
us with very cutting edge
approaches to marketing,
including directly targeting
video i-Pod users and even
using text-messaging via cell
phones," says Mr Fountain.


Weber Shandwick uses pod
casting and 'blogging' to reach
customers for their client list,
which includes Coca-Cola, the
Walt Disney Company and
MTV Networks.
'Podcasting' allows users to
download broadcasts, inter-
views and such to i-Pods. Blog-
ging, ( a derivative of 'web
log'), is the practice of keep-
ing an online diary that has
mostly been of a personal
nature. But now, even Fortune
500 companies have begun
using this for PR and market-
ing.
Ms Veglia will outline the
evolution of online travel book-
ings, sharing how Expedia has
grown and, more specifically,
how their Bahamas business
has been impacted.
She will answer whether
online booking engines are lev-
elling the playing field for small
hotels, thus helping small hotel
operators in the Bahamas. Mr
Fountain also wants to explore
how Expedia can help on-shore
vendors such as straw vendors
and woodcarvers.
Bahamian designer and
retailer Harl Taylor, whose
handbags are purchased by
Oprah Winfrey, Elle Macpher-


son and Barbara Walters, will
tell how he is using technology
to sell and promote his product
in the global marketplace.
Mr Taylor, whose product
can be found online as well as
in Bergdorf Goodman, will dis-
cuss how he competes with
manufacturers such as Coach
and Gucci.
Mr Simon will speak on the
potential of and obstacles to -
e-commerce in the Bahamas
and what the Chamber is doing
to promote e-commerce.
"We have the technical infra-
structure where 95 per cent or
more of Bahamians can actu-
ally have access to the internet
if they wanted it," says Mr
Simon.
Mr Simon cites two key
obstacles to e-commerce. The
first is simply that businesses
need to be prepared. Legisla-
tion is also currently an obsta-
cle to e-commerce.
"We still have a ways to go in
terms of completing the trans-
actions over the Internet with
the financial institutions. The
local banks have not yet pro-
vided the necessary clearing
mechanisms, merchant
accounts, that is, for Internet
transactions," said Mr Simon.


Aquaxure see s b y er,


FROM page 1B
since AquaPure failed to pay Christmas 2004
bonuses to non-managerial staff, citing the fact
that sales were down and the company had
endured a "bad year".
AquaPure said there was nothing in its con-
tract with the union to stipulate that Christmas
bonuses were mandatory, but the situation esca-
lated after the company fired 11 workers for
allegedly participating in an illegal strike outside
the company's headquarters on Bernard Road.
That situation and several other labour-relat-
ed issues have since ended up before the Indus-


trial Tribunal, and any buyer will want an end to
union-related unrest before showing interest.
In addition, the AquaPure business is also
understood to need more than $1 million in cap-
ital investment to upgrade plant and vehicles,
another factor that will act as a disincentive to
any buyer.
Apart from facing increased competition from
rival bottled water producers such as Chelsea's
Choice and Arctic Water, Aquapure is also like-
ly to receive a fresh challenge from the new $25
million Blue Hills reverse osmosis plant being,
constructed by Consolidated Water. That is due
to enter service later this year.


Public Utilities Commission


UNIQUE JOB OPPORTUNITY


Senior Regulatory Economist

The rapid evolution of the telecommunications sector combined with
novel approaches to regulating the sector has made it mandatory for
the Public Utilities Commission (PUC) to strengthen its capacity in
regulatory economic analyses.

THE JOB

The successful applicant for the position will provide specialist advise
on the economic and financial performance of regulated utilities. The
candidate will also work as an integral part of a multi-disciplinary team
of professionals to ensure effective oversight by the PUC of the various
providers of utility services in The Bahamas. The candidate will perform
market research and other economic studies relevant to the current and
future development of the telecommunications, electricity, and water
and sewerage sectors in The Bahamas.

TRAINING

The candidate will be trained to carry out economic and financial analyses
involving market research, and changes in price setting methodologies.
This specialist training will be offered principally via short courses and
seminars, in The Bahamas and overseas.

QUALIFICATIONS

Bachelor's Degree in Economics or Economics and Accounting; and
Master's Degree in Economics, or Finance; and
Minimum of five (5) years relevant experience.

REMUNERATION

The PUC offers a very attractive benefits package and excellent
opportunities for further development. Starting salary will be
commensurate with relevant experience. Further information about the
PUC could be obtained from our website at: www.PUCBahamas.gov.bs.

Applications should be received by 23 January, 2006.







THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006, PAGE 9P


High energy
costs, particu-
larly for elec-
tricity and oil,
are a major
concern for Bahamian hoteliers
and businesses, the Ministry of
Tourism's general manager for
sustainable development said,
because they harmed this
nation's competitiveness
through adding to an already
high-cost environment.
Earlston McPhee said: "The
cost of energy for the Bahamas
is very high relative to other
destinations, so in order to
remain competitive and.prof-
itable, hotels and other busi-
nesses must explore ways to
reduce energy costs and utilise
renewable energy sources.
Meanwhile, homeowners are
also searching for ways to con-
serve energy and reduce their
electricity bills."
He said both businesses and
homeowners can expect to find




Professionals

'may be held

liable' over

,data thefts


FROM page 1B


information and breaches of
confident, Mr McCartney said:
"It puts the burden on profes-
sionals to ensure their infor-
mation is protected.
"We should know that this
type of crime is going on, so all
professionals must be at the
stage of securing and protecting
information."
Describing the theft of infor-
mation from customer data-
bases as "almost a silent
crime", Mr McCartney empha-
sised that it could impact all
businesses both large and
small including those that
were operating from home.
"At the end of the day, this
could have serious repercus-
sions. You could lose your busi-
ness or be held negligent," he
added.
Advanced
"As we become more
advanced, this type of crime
will continue. It's about being
educated and protecting your
information."
Information stolen in the
Kerzner International case'
included names, addresses,
credit card details, social secu-
rity numbers, driver's licence
numbers and/or bank account
data.


solutions to the "energy crisis"
at this week's National
Tourism Conference.
Ministry
This year, for the first time,
the Ministry of Tourism and
College of The Bahamas are
presenting a series of 10 Master
Classes on Tuesday, January
10, including a session on Ener-
gy Conservation.
Among featured panellists in
the Energy Conservation Ses-
sion and Tradeshow are
experts such as Roger Ballen-
tine, former advisor to the Clin-
ton administration, and James
Husbands, advisor to the Bar-
bados government. Also fea-
tured on the panel are Jack
Kenworthy, director of systems
at Cape Eleuthera Institute,
and Burlington Strachan, man-
ager of distribution planning,
BEC.
Harvard Law School gradu-


, I)


ate Roger Ballentinc, president
of Green Strategies, is a fre-
quent speaker on energy and
environmental matters world-
wide. From 1999 to 2001 he
served as chairman of the
White House Climate Change
Task Force and deputy assis-
tant to the president for envi-
ronmental initiatives, where he
managed and developed
administration policy on cli-
mate change, directed con-
gressional strategy on the pres-
ident's top coastal and land
conservation initiatives, and co-
ordinated inter-agency posi-
tions on energy, air, land and
coastal conservation policy.
Mr Ballentine also served as
senior adviser for Environ-
mental and Energy Policy to
the Kerry for President/Kerry-
Edwards Campaign, and is a
senior fellow at the Progres-
sive Policy Institute, Washing-
ton, D.C.
As adviser to the Barbados


Government, James Husbands,
president of Solar Dynamics,
was instrumental in facilitating
the mass adoption of solar
heating panels by Barbados
homeowners, which has result-
ed in substantial savings for the
country. His company also has
operations in St Lucia and
Jamaica. Mr Husbands will dis-
cuss the benefits of solar ener-
gy.
Manager
Burlington Strachan, man-
ager of distribution planning at
BEC, is an electrical engineer
with special expertise in the
areas of Demand Side Man-
agement, Load Research,
Alternative Energy, Forecast-
ing and Generation System
Expansion Modeling. Mr Stra-
chan will provide advice on
energy conservation techniques
and the use of energy efficient
appliances.


Z2~~~~~L[ -i *j L .,i


COPY AND LAYOUT


EDITOR
THE TRIBUNE requires a Copy and
Lay-out Editor to join a new editing and page
design unit covering all sections of the
newspaper.

The successful candidate will become
a key player in The Tribune's continuing
development as the Bahamas' number one
daily newspaper.

He or she will be proficient in full colour
pagination on an Apple-Quark Xpress system
and will possess a bachelor's degree, full
professional qualifications and a proven track
record as a copy editor and page layout
specialist.

If you think you qualify, please send a
cover letter, resume and work samples to the
Managing Editor, The Tribune, P.O.Box N-
3207, Nassau, Bahamas.

A competitive salary, paid vacation and
company medical insurance scheme are on
offer to the successful candidate.

No Phone Calls Please
Our benefits include paid vacation
& medical insurance.

The Tribune
M I iii,i,ix ,tr i, h ,,i Pm,[w I kt ,f i -Ft[m, 'tii,m m nii


Jack Kenworthy's work at
Cape Eleuthera Institute focus-
es on research and develop-
ment of sustainable technolo-
gies, particularly in the fields
of renewable energy and bio
fuels.
For the past four years, Mr
Kenworthy and Cap.e
Eleuthera Institute have
worked closely with the Min-
istry of Works and Utilities,
BEC, and the Office of the
Prime Minister to build a mod-
el "pilot project" using renew-


able energy.
The Cape Eleuthera campus
now features 18 kilowatts of
photovoltaic panels, and a 10
kilowatt wind turbine that
feeds power to the campus,
making it entirely self sufficient
in energy production. Mr Ken-
worthy will discuss the concept
of 'net metering' for hotels.
Mr McPhee said the Energy
Conservation Master Class
should be beneficial to hote-
liers, engineers, architects, busi-
ness owners and homeowners.


WATERFIELDS COMPANY
LIMITED


PUBLIC NOTICE


The public is advised that demolition procedures of
one of the Water Storage Tanks will be in progress
at the Water Storage facility, Blue Hill Road.

The work will commence on January 3rd, 2006.

The demolition works will continue between the
hours of 7:30am and 5:00pm, Monday through
Saturday.

The public is further advised to exercise extreme
caution when approaching this area.




CALLENDERS & CO.
Counsel and Attoreys-at-Law

are pleased to announce that

CHAD D. ROBERTS
and
TRACY A.A.A. FERGUSON

have been made Partners in the Firm
effective 1st January, 2006

The Firm maintains offices at:
One Millars Court
P.O. Box N-7117
Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 322-2511/(242) 322-1381
Facsimile (242) 326-7666
E-Mail: nassau @ callenders-law.com
Sand
Suite C
Regent Centre East
The Mall
P.O. Box F-40132
Freeport, Grand Bahama
Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 352-7458
Facsimile: (242) 352-4000
E-Mail: freeport@callenders-law.com




VACANCY NOTICE

ECONOMIST

Core Functions:

Produce and disseminate economic research, provide
technical advice and analysis on matters and supervise the
work of subordinate staff.

Education, Experience and Knowledge Requirements:

Master's degree in Economics, Finance or Policy Research
related area from a recognized tertiary institution;
A minimum of three (3) years supervisory experience in
economic policy research or similar experience within
a ministry of finance, central bank, central monetary
authority or international agency;
Sound knowledge of econometrics;
Sound knowledge of the domestic and international
financial sector;
Sound knowledge of the domestic regulatory framework;
Excellent oral and written communication skills;
Sound analytical skills;
Experience with spreadsheet/word processing/database
software applications.

Interested persons should provide copy(ies) of their
degrees) and transcripts) to:

The Human Resources Manager
DA 9430
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas



NOTICE OF SALE


'The Town Court Management Company (hereafter "the
company") invites offers for the purchase ALL THAT Unit
.Number B-26 of The Town Court Condominiums situated
on Nassau Street in the Western District of the Island of
New Providence being a two bedroom/one bath apartment
unit together with ALL THAT 1.60% share in the common
property of the Condominiums.

The Company makes no representations or warranties with
respect to the state of repair of the building situate thereon.

The Company will sell under Power of Sale contained in
a Declaration of Condominium of Town Court
Condominiums dated 8th October 1979 which is recorded
in Book 3189 at pages 366 to 405.

TERMS: Ten percent (10%) of the purchase price at the
time of contract and the balance upon completion within
Sixty (60) days of contract.

This sale is subject to reserve price. The Company reserves
the right to reject any and all offers.

Interested persons may submit written offers addressed to
Sthe Attorney SSS, P.O. Box N-272, Nassau, Bahamas to be
received no later than the close of business on the 31st day
Sof January, A.D., 2006.


--I ~ ~ I ~ BUSIN SP


I












First NFL season ends in



defeat for Bahamian Smith

0 AMERICAN FOOTBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
ALEX SMITH wrapped-up his first
football season in the professional ranks
on Saturday, with a wildcard game loss.
Smith, who plays with the Tampa Bay
Buccaneers, was in search for his first
playoff opportunity but the team quickly
fell to the hands of the Washington Red-
skins, 17-10.
Despite the tough defence being played
by the Buccaneers, the Redskins were still
able to capitalise on the two turnovers
early in the first quarter. The two conver-
sions give them a 14-0 lead heading into
the second quarter.
Down by two touchdowns, the Bucca-
neers offensive game turned around. With
better protection from his frontline, quar-
terback Chris Simms continued the charge
in search for the team's first touchdown.
But the sack at the Redskins' 30 yard line
would throw the Buccaneers back by 13
yards.
Attempt
Having to make up for the yards lost,
Simms looked to Ike Hillard for the 21
yard completion, which would have given
the team the much needed first down. But
Hillard was only able to collect six yards,
bringing on the fourth down and 15. The
43 yard field goal attempt was good and
the Buccaneers were on the board.
However, the team wasn't as lucky on
the second possession of the quarter, hav-
ing to punt after a quarterback's sack.
In this possession, Smith caught an 11
yard pass, adding to the three yards in the
first quarter.
With little action happening on the
offensive end for the Buccaneers in the
second quarter, Smith wouldn't see any
more action until the final minutes of the
fourth quarter. But, Smith would finish
his first season with the Buccaneers with
an impressive statistics sheet.
Having played in 16 games, Smith fin-
ished up with a total of 367 yards, averag-
ing nine yards per game. On the defensive
end he recorded four tackles and one kick
return for 12 yards.
The Buccaneers ended their season with
an 11-6 win-loss record.










A weekend ()f shocks in FA (:up


--C
0. -.,,-.





"C'o ri hted Material


-. Synd i cated Content
---. A" .




-. Available from Commercial News Providers
" -"
a
0


-Rob


0

- S -


TRIBUNE SPORTSu"


PAGE 1 OB, MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006







TRIBUNE SPORTS


The Wizards


cast their spell


over the Giants

FROM page one

tis finished with 13, Adrian Miller 11 and Creto Knowles 10. Dean
was held to six and Horton was scoreless.
Giants' coach Perry Thompson knew his squad would be in for
a long night. He just felt that they missed too many shots.
"We just have to get back in some sort of conditioning," he
insisted. "The long delay in getting started really put a damper on
the guys' spirits. Once we get back in some conditioning and doing
the things that we know we are capable of doing, we will be one of
the teams to reckon with."
Thompson, however, said if they had either or both Anselm
Culmer and Fabian Lightbourne out, they could have been able to
match-up better against the Wizards.
Instead, they found themselves having to pressure the ball and try
to force the Wizards to pick up the dribble and make the long
passes.
Commonwealth Bank enjoyed their best quarter in the first
period when they raced out to a comfortable 25-15 advantage as
Creto Knowles, Carl Curtis and Salathial Dean all canned six
points and Dencil Edgecombe added five, including a three-point-
er.
But the Wizards used a swamping defence inside and they limited
the Giants to just eight six from Edgecombe as they surged to a
33-30 deficit at the half. The Wizards went to the foul line four times
down the stretch and hit seven of their eight charity shots.
It was in the third that the Wizards made their mark with
Kweemada King scoring on a lay-up to start a mini run that was
ended with two consecutive three-pointers from Devon Johnson as
they took a slim 38-37 lead with 7.20 left.
And with 18.5 remaining before the break, Ricardo Smith sank
four straight free throws as they held onto a 51-46 margin. They
would never trail in the fourth, although the Giants made one last
surge at the end.
,As the season progresses, Deveaux said, if they can get a little
tougher and they have everybody out, including centre Javan
Goodman who also missed the opener, they will be tough to beat
again.


The Giants have their


revenge on the Shockers


FROM page one
who was injured in the game
and was rushed to the hospital
before being treated and dis-
charged.
Before he left, Robinson
scored eight. The Shockers also
got 10 apiece from Corrington
Dean, Dsun Clarke and Amond
Baker.
The league, headed by Keith
'Belzee' Smith, was put on hold
in November and December as
attempts were made to secure a
suitable venue to play in with
the AF Adderley Gym in need
of repairs.
While the league has secured
the rights to play weekend
games at the gym, they will play
on Monday and Wednesday
nights at the DW Davis Gym,
sharing with the New Provi-
dence Women's Basketball
Association, who play there on
Tuesday, Thursdays and Sat-
urdays.


Tonight, the NPBA will be
back in action at the DW Davis
Gym with the Y-Care Destroy-
ers playing against the Cable
Bahamas Entertainers in a dou-
ble header in the division II and
one match-up.
On Wednesday at the same
venue at the same time, the
Farm Road Stars will face the
Coke Explorers in division II
and the D'Albenas Cleaners
will take on the Lil Nell's Rock-
ets.
All teams will play a round
robin format in their division
with the top four teams advanc-
ing to the best-of-three
crossover playoffs.
The championship will be a
best-of-five. series.
The winners advancing to the
Bahamas Basketball Federa-
tion's national round robin
series against the Family Island
champions in April for
the national championship
titles.


A : "



* THE GIANTS fight to keep possession against the Real Deal Shockers
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)


, -, % II .


6I" c-s,*

*


SPORTt,









MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006


SECTION



B
Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


4;-w -


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


ds


iza


cast their


ianti


sPe

BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
THE Fantasy Web Wizards,
formerly the Wolverines,
worked their magic to contain
the smaller Commonwealth
Bank Giants and pull off a 65-
64 victory on Saturday night at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.
It was a rematch of the New
Providence Basketball Associ-
ation men's division one finals
from last year with the defend-
ing champions Wizards picking
up where they left off.
They did it with the towering
play of Vincent 'Six' Knowles,
who lit up the nets for a game
high 21 points, including the
winning basket on a free throw
with just 17.4 seconds left on
the clock.
The Wizards were leading 65-
61 at the point and, on their
possession, quick guard Dencil
Edgecombe canned a three-
pointer to cut it down to 65-64
at the 10.1 mark.
The Giants would go for the
steal, but Creto Knowles
stepped out of bounds with the
ball.
It went back to the Wizards,
who were having trouble all
game long dribbling up the
court. They attempted a jumper
to put the icing on the cake, but
it missed and, on the rebound,
the Giants got a long out-let
pass, but time expired before.
they could get a shot off.

Performance
Wizards' coach Sean
Deveaux said it wasn t the type
of performance he anticipated,
but they will take the victory.
"The guys came out and
played a pretty hard game, but
we didn't finish at the end,"
Deveaux claimed. "It turned
out to be a one point win, but it
should have been at least 10-
15."
Deveaux, however, blamed
the tight ball game to the fact
that he missed a couple key
players in the backcourt in
Ricardo Pierre and William
Delancy, whom he knew would
have been able to better con-
trol the tempo of their game.
Despite their absence,
Kweemada King had to step it
up in the backcourt and he
joined Ricardo Smith in scor-
ing 12 points apiece to assist
Knowles. Devon Johnson
added 11.
The Wizards trailed the
Giants for most of the game
until they really put together a
good third quarter effort, using
their height inside. The differ-
ence in the game came when
Commonwealth Bank lost
Salathial 'Donkey' Dean to five
fouls, leaving just Eugene Hor-
ton to post up.
And while Dencil Knowles
led the way with 18, they only
got double digits from the rest
of their back court as Carl Cur-
SEE page 11B


crw oteRalDl

H BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter
AFTER losing their New
Providence Basketball
Association division II
crown to the Real Deal
Shockers last year, Wilmac's
Giants had their revenge
with a 79-78 victory.
Floyd Armbrister, who
scored the game-winning
basket, finished with a game
high 21 points. The only oth-
er player in double figures
was Michael Bain with 13.
Dencil Knowles added nine,
Durchen Sands had eight
and Mitch D'Haiti and
Tameko Moxey both con-
tributed seven.
Giants' coach Perry
Thompson, whose division
one Commonwealth Bank
Giants' would lose their sea-
son opener to defending
champions Fantasy Web
Wizards, said it wasn't the
type of performance he
expected.

Playing
"To be honest, I was dis-
appointed, especially with
the first three quarters,"
Thompson lamented. "I
don't think this team played
half of what they are capa-
ble of playing. But the
Giants are all about heart
and I know that the fourth
quarter was when we had to
put it all together."
They did, coming frdm a
64-51 deficit to take control
of the game, which they
trailed 13-16 after the first
and 34-35 at the half. Unlike
they did in the first three
quarters, the Giants were a
little bit more patient on
offence.
For the Shockers, it was
a hard pill to swallow for
coach James Price.
"We have more chemistry
to put together and we have
to hit the free throws," Price
stressed. "We also have to
do a much better job of
rebounding the ball if we
want to win again."
The Shockers also lost
forward Dale Robinson,
SEE page 11B


ROR SE W..R
T,4c"tWEW OREAt
5(.RiVLtY r 7 7 A,


- -- -- --- --


-~ePCIP


;a~i~uY~ rp~s~rsrrar









MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006


The stories behind the news


PLAC


Former parliamentarian George
Mackey (left), OBE, a "hero of Fox
Hill, and a man of the people", died
at Doctors Hospital last week after a
S two-year fight with prostate cancer.
He was 67.
During his extensive tenure in
active politics, Mr Mackey held
numerous positions in the PLP, rang-
ing from party chairman to deputy
speaker of the House of Assembly
and Minister of Housing and Social
Development...


Long lines at the departure
hall once again plagued Nas-
sau International Airport last
week.
According to reports
much of the delays were due
to the installation of the six
new CTX security screening
machines at the airport. It 1-
also was speculated that the 'j-,
radar system at NIA might
have malfunctioned again... *.


THE unofficial results of the Phil Cooper 2006 New
Year's Day Parade had the Valley Boys victorious once
again. Saxons fans screamed in disbelief on Arawak
Cay last week when the unofficial results announced
the Valley Boys as the overall winners with One Fami-
ly second, Saxons, third, and Roots, fourth.
***S**
NINE Bahamian families are expected to join in with
the class action lawsuit planned against Chalk's Airline,
The Tribune learned last week. Six Bahamian families are
already suing the airliner, and three more are expected
to join following their relatives' funerals...


Ready for take-off?

I0]ke'Ih f


t's like playing chess in the
dark, according to one airport
worker. As aircraft loom from
the skies over New Provi-
dence, ready to land hundreds
of vacationers in search of their
Bahamas dream, air controllers wres-
tle with a radar system which doesn't
work.
Not only does the main system not
work, nor does its $1 million back-up,
which is so full of faults that traffic
controllers often prefer to do without
and use othet means to guide incom-
ing planes to safe landings.
If that were the only problem, it
would be bad enough to make most
airport officials turn uneasily in their
beds. But, as the Christmas chaos at
NIA proved, malfunctioning radar is
but one of this terrible terminal's
ongoing woes.
A breakdown in the fuel supply
kept finger-rapping airline captains
on the runway for hours on end during
the Christmas debacle. Allegedlabour
unrest delayed matters even more. In
the end, 32 flights were cancelled,
stranding more than 2,000 travellers
and causing untold damage to the
Bahamas' reputation as a holiday
resort.
For the aviation industry as a whole,
this would have had far-reaching
effects. Airlines operate tight flight
diagrams which, if distorted by unfore-
seen events, create serious back-ups,
massive inconvenience for literally
thousands of passengers, and run up a
fortune in losses they can ill-afford in
the present climate of falling revenues.
By now, Nassau International Air-
port's failings will be known through-
out the international aviation frater-
nity. Perhaps it's fortunate, therefore,
that the government is about to call it
the Sir Lynden Pindling International
Airport, though the ex-premier's crit-
ics-will not be pleased with the choice
of name. But will a change of name
alter the unacceptable reality?
While four decades of neglect have
brought Nassau's airport to its pre-
sent lamentable state, no single
calamity during that time has exposed
its defects quite so much as the 2005
Yuletide fiasco, with one airline skip-
per having to scrounge from three
separate suppliers to accumulate
enough jet fuel to get his plane back
across the Atlantic.
One wonders what he will be telling
his aircrew pals back in London. No
doubt the joke will be on Nassau, a
place with no radar to guide you in,
and no fuel to get you out. If it weren't



.0 HYunalRI



o.l:- 1 4, i% l


It is the single most important

facility in the Bahamas and the

nation's economy depends on it.

Yet for nearly 40 years it has been

the victim of appalling neglect.

INSIGHT takes a close look at

Nassau International Airport...


* LONG lines at the departure hall plagued Nassau International Airport last weekend.


(FILE photo)


so serious, and potentially tragic, the
airport's vaudeville and music hall
potential would be considerable.
What made things worse, however,
was the inexplicable official silence
which followed. True, Minister of
Transport Glenys Hanna-Martin had
good reason to be unavailable due to
a family bereavement. But no-one
stepped in to fill the information vac-


uum. Most were busy junkanooing, it
seems, including former Valley Boy
Perry Christie, whose shuffling ability
has yet to be applied where it is most
needed, in a Cabinet which continues
to fail in most key areas.
Airlines were left perplexed at what
appeared to be official indifference
to a situation which was potentially
catastrophic for the national econo-


my. There appeared to be no-one in
authority able or willing to tell them
what was going on.
However, the total breakdown in
communication between government
departments and airline operators will
come as nothing new to all those
familiar with NIA and the way it
works. Failure to communicate has
long been part of the airport's prob-


lem.
The one thing that immediately
becomes obvious to anyone meeting
friends in the arrivals hall at NIA is
that no-one is told anything. The
screens installed for announcing flight
departures and arrivals have been on
the blink for so long that few can
recall a day when they actually
worked.
Hence, people waiting for arriving
passengers resort to gleaning what bits
of intelligence they can from car rental
staff and impatient baggage handlers.
Some even stop startled passengers
as they crash through the automatic
doors from the customs hall to ask:
"Were you on the 10.15am from
Chicago?"
Others scan faces for signs of British
pallor, or cock an ear for telltale
accents from Canada or Jamaica. It's
the only way of knowing guessing, in
fact which planes have landed and
from whence they came. It's possible
to sit for hours in that arrivals hall
before discovering that Cousin
Annie's flight was forced to land in
Tallahassee or hi-jacked to Haiti.
All this would be slightly more bear-
able if there was somewhere pleasant
to linger. However, the only options
available are a cramped bar (often
closed) down the hallway and a cafe
remarkably like a transport drivers'
chippy, with hotdogs and soda the star
turns on the menu.
The restrooms offer no respite
unless you favour blocked sinks and
malodorous surroundings. And the
concourses themselves are notable
only for their stark lack of aesthetic
appeal. NIA is to airports what Fox
Hill is to prisons...utterly and despair-
ingly atrocious.
Most airports offer the waiting pub-
lic enticing vistas of the runways, with
aircraft coming and going. Not Nas-
sau, where there's nothing to see but
rowdy throngs of cab-drivers, usually
jostling over fares or heavily engaged
in high-volume political arguments.
At the US departure terminal build-
ing, mediocre but overpriced sand-
wiches are on offer at the Cafe in the
Clouds facetiously known as Pie in
the Sky where a local triumvirate
with high-level political influence
holds a monopoly which works only to
the flying public's detriment.
All around the airport there is a
down-at-heel feel, an over-riding
impression that the authorities

SEE page 4C


Sonata

A New Generation



~J4qg *diai pdudu i*'.n g tklcmnp *nd Iri4UI~HIM ~fUIImSfi&kl USI.k~
P1.000 mbimttrP moniu WwbfiOc~ fn rlntU sYWS~ aYfYY


QUALITYIMI&
#1 AUTO D&AIfl IN THP "A BAKA
AST Sh1Rl SR SThlbT322-377 m315328-379


the imstiouti KNOW.


~ __ .___ _I_


11 heTrbu e








PAGE 2C, MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


Re: Forty years of failure

I read with interest
your article published
in The Tribune of
Monday, December
19. What a pity you
did not choose to elaborate on
the dismal average GCSE
results of the private school
system which, let's be honest,
are not significantly better
than the Government school
records.
Does the time-worn and
unproven maxim that scholas-
tic failure is directly attribut-
able to dysfunctional single



Quotes of


the Week

"We live in very interest-
ing and challenging times,
and there will be differ-
ences...And it is not unusual
for there to be differences;
from the time I have been
involved as the minister, for
there to be challenges
between a general manager
and the chairman of a
board."
Minister of Works and
Utilities Bradley Roberts
following reports of "trou-
ble" at the Water and Sew-
erage Corporation

"I felt like they were at
fault. Most people said that
that was an act of God. But
I don't see it that way. I'm
going to tell you why. The
reason Isay that is because
stress on the wing of a plane
isn't an act of God. And
them flying passengers back
and forth from Miami with
cracks on the wing of a
plane, and other stuff wrong
with it, and the black box
not working isn't an act of
God. Hurricanes are an act
of God. Tornadoes are an
act of God..."
Kendrick Sherman,
who lost his wife and
daughter when a Chalk's
Ocean Airways seaplane
crashed into the ocean,
killing all 20 people on
board.
"I have three children in
university, have a mortgage
to pay, all the banks are on
my back. My insurance col-
lapsed and I have a sick,
paralyzed mother, 84 years
old, that I help take care of.
I have no solid income and
at my age I don't have to go
looking for a new career, no
one will hire me. "
Police veteran
Edward Rolle, 53, whose
job in the Road Traffic
Department was terminat-
ed without explanation


parent matriarchies apply to
the underachiever at the so-
called "Top Three" and other
private institutions? Of
course not, another anecdotal
based paradigm would have
to be produced to avoid alien-
ating the middle classes.
Yours Sincerely
Margaret Watson
BY failing to provide prop-
er schooling for ordinary
Bahamians, the so-called
"quiet revolution" fell down
in the basics. Apart from the
elevation of a chosen few, the
events of the 1960s achieved
little. The Pindling govern-
ment was interested only in
its cohorts and was ultimately
a terrible failure.
GMH, Nassau Street


ins'




Re: Haitian immigration
MY brief comments on Mr
Jacob Saunders' letter are as
follows:
1) First of all Mr Saunders
should bear in mind that
these immigrants were not
invited to The Bahamas.
They breached our laws by
sneaking into the country in
the early morning hours.
These immigrants were not
recruited in an orderly fash-


ion. Moreover, they agreed
with their employers in Aba-
co and elsewhere for the
wages which they received.
2) Upon completion of
their term of employment,
the farm workers should have
returned to their homeland,
but they opted to remain in
The Bahamas.
3) Further, they openly
showed their contempt for
Bahamian building regula-


tions, by squatting on land
not their own, and connecting
several houses to one BEC
meter, all of which pose haz-
ards not only to the occu-
pants, but to neighbours.
4) If Mr Saunders wants
these people to be integrated
into Bahamian society, he
should-see -o-it that they keep
their premises clean and
abide by normal health and
safety rules. For example,
they should refrain from
throwing bottles and other
rubbish on neighbours' prop-
erty.
5) The illegal immigrants
believe that Bahamian and
The Bahamas owe them a liv-
ing. This is wrong.; These
same immigrants offer their


services as gardeners, but the
wages sought are higher than
those paid to Bahamians for
similar work of mowing
lawns.
6) Most of these illegal
immigrants are not only envi-
Sous and spiteful, but most of
all they are ungrateful.
7) Instead of adapting to
Western standards and The
Bahamian way of life they
retaliate by practising their
own traditions and keep noisy
gatherings.
8) If these immigrants want
their own homeland to
become a democracy, why do
they continue to vote for dic-
tators even after a dictator
has left the country.
A Bahamian


FORMER parliamentarian
George Mackey, OBE, a "hero_
of Fox Hill, and a man of the
people", died at Doctors Hos-
pital last week after a two-year
fight with prostate cancer. He
was 67.
During his extensive tenure
in active politics, Mr Mackey
held numerous positions in the
PLP, ranging from party chair-
man to deputy speaker of the
House of Assembly and Minis-
ter of Housing and Social Devel-
opment.
He also held the post of MP
for St Michael's from 1972 to
1982 and for the Fox Hill con-
stituency from 1982 until 1997,
before "passing the mantle" to
Fox Hill's current MP Fred
Mitchell.
*****

LONG lines at the departure
hall once again plagued Nassau
International Airport last week.
According to reports, much
of the delays were due to the
installation of the six new CTX
security screening machines at
the airport. It also was specu-
lated that the radar system at
NIA might have malfunctioned
again.

THE unofficial results of the
Phil Cooper 2006 New Year's
Day Parade had the Valley Boys
victorious once again.
Saxons fans screamed in dis-
belief on Arawak Cay lat week-
when the unofficial results
announced the Valley Boys as
the overall winners with One
Family second, Saxons, third,
and Roots, fourth.
*****

NINE Bahamian families are
expected to join in with the class
action lawsuit planned against
Chalk's Airline, The Tribune
learned last week.
Six Bahamian families are
already suing the airliner, and
three more are expected to join
following their relatives' funer-
als.
AN Oakes Field family is
AN Oakes Field family is


A -i CAL L


NOW IN STWOK
*9 Power Chairs Mobility Scooters Lift Chairs Wheel Chairs


Full Life Products is
dedicated to developing
innovative products to ease
and enhance the lives of those
WAN' ~with mobility challenges.






WAtKER
A Step Ahead

SCome see our showroom at
SCOTTDALE BEDDING CO. LTD.
Hill Top on the East West Highway
Open: Monday Friday 8am 5pm Telephone: 394-8014


* THE unofficial results of the Phil Cooper 2006 New Year's Day Parade had the Valley Boys
victorious once again. Top and above, Saxons members parade down Bay Street.

(FILE photos)


INSIGHT


WEEK IN REVIEW:















Wanted: a truly great president





to restore Uncle Sam's name


* By JOHN MARQUIS

isturbingly for
all those who
cherish the
moden o west-
ern \\w:y ofl life,
.a significant Ill \\ ing axis of
anti-US regimes is now gather-
ing strength in the Americas.
They not only express distaste
for the US itself, they are chal-
lenging some of the most cher-
i hed principles of the Ameri-
edn dream.
>Dr Fidel Castro has, of
Sairse. always been resolutely
a~ti-UJS as he has ridden on the
b ick of Marxist philosophy for
Aiarly half a century. In his
Ves, selfish capitalism is the
iot cause of the world's woes,
4*d the US has epitomized its
yerv worst excesses.
,Venezuela's Hugo Chavez,
n more vocal than Castro,
inow whipping up support
ong smaller nations includ-
the Bahamas by using his
ntry's massive oil reserves
i4,i..it Though assurances are
(fered all round that such alle-
inces do not affect long-stand-
w friendships between the US
,Iii its Caribbean neighbours,
r.1 hard to imagine that such
ties are riot being recorded in
Washington DC for future ref-
erence.

SSignificant

,The new Bolivian president,
4vo Morales, has now become
~te third significant component
in this leftist triumvirate with
il- >Ilini-. tirades against free
iarkhci e. inomics and a spir-
itd denunciation of what he
4 'es as first world imperialism.
hliat does all this mean?
'c II, it means many things, not
ast that the Americas no
ni'ci ncL., i. ili' leIe! in hall
I l ui I pi i i.us n>I n ihern
ll.ijghboul, .nd in hflCur ,t !tcp int ll l. .ip.:,p...' e it
f h.ce-iipp :jncd it., oL. In poorer:.


Tyso o 4 years 41 A *b e 1 yin theselvs fo




prbalyth mstimpotan prs*identiaelcioninrcet itoy


countries, the impression is
growing that the US is powered
primarily by self-interest and
that the wealth chasm is widen-
ing by the day.
Corporate greed, growing
social imbalance and a per-
ceived erosion of America's tra-
ditional ideals have not been
good for US-style capitalism in
recent years.
It's hard not to connect this
undoubted decline in US pres-
tige to the calamitous misjudg-
ments of the George W Bush
regime and its manic pursuit of
policies the rest of the world
now rates as flawed and possi-
bly suicidal.
When people like Chavez and
Morales feel emboldened to
pour scorn on the White House,
and openly challenge the US's
hegemony in its own backyard,
it's time for all committed west-
ern democrats to take stock.
Communism is now a thor-
oughly discredited ideology.
Seventy years of failure in the
Soviet Union following the Bol-
shevik Revolution proved that a
political system at odds with
human nature can only survive
if buttressed by savage oppres-
sion.
A return to anything resem-
bling this misguided philosophy
is as repugnant to western
democrats as the rise of reli-
gious fanaticism among the
Muslims. Both would gladly
return us to the Stone Age with-
out hesitation. And both would
subject us to totalitarian dog-
ma and loss of freedom as \e


know it.
However, increasing disen-
chantment with US-style capi-
talism and its attendant corrup-
tion and social injustice is
preparing fertile ground for
Washington's most vehement
enemies. And it will take an
extraordinarily fine president
to turn things around in the four
or eight years they have at their
disposal.

Mixture

What the west needs now is a
USA with the right mixture of
economic strength, political
gravitas and empathetic com-
passion to re-establish itself in
the affections of its allies. It also
needs a USA whose perception
of freedom and democracy is as
clear and uncompromising as
that of the Founding Fathers.
Both words have become seri-
ously devalued under the cur-
rent Republican government.
The damage caused by Bush
and his associates has not only
alienated doubters, it has left
the US's closest friends won-
dering what the world's most
powerful nation is all about.
Sleaze allegations against
leading Republicans, the dis-
grace of Abu Ghraib, the con-
tinuing scandal of Guantanamo
and the now highly question-
able premise on which the Iraq
War was waged have combined
to severely weaken the US's
moral standing. Add to this a
wo-rvino appetite for s~icrc!'i.
peisis.tent ni.inlpuLaLnion ol


America's pussycat press, and
a bullish disregard for all those
with contrary views and you
have an America far removed
from its roots.
The question arises: what
exactly do Bush, Cheney and
Rumsfeld stand for other than
ruthless self-interest, corporate
avarice and the kind of lower-
deck patriotism that gave the
Republicans such a bad name
in the 1950s?
In fact, the same crude, crass,
simplistic, unthinking patriotism
that motivated the execrable
Joe McCarthy seems to be at
work in the Bush team. The
notion that to be anything oth-
er than a Republican is to be a
traitor to the cause has found
expression more than once dur-
ing the last three years.
Yet the impression grows by
the day that not one of this grim
trio has any moral authority to
pontificate on anything, and
that includes patriotism. If
Rumsfeld pointed to a hot,
golden ball in the sky and told
me it was the sun, I would feel
compelled to search the rest of
the blue yonder to make sure
he was telling the truth. Mean-
while, Bush appears more and
more like a man of limited intel-
ligence who has been merci-
lessly manipulated from behind
by unscrupulous, self-serving
neocons. When he appears on
the podium nowadays, even he
seems to doubt what he's say-
ing.
It11 di-- ,ll'. i-:trin t nori thati
.. ills d& clhn, 1 hi.s L.LL ,.n pl.it..


against a background of mount-
ing hubris. The high-handed-
ness of the John Boltons of the
world, and their belief that the
US can act the way it' does
merely because it has the pow-
er to do so, does not bode well
for the country's future.
Soaring arrogance has invari-
ably preceded the decline of all
great nations and empires, The.
errors of the Bush regime have
exposed gaping fissures in
American society and left even
its most ardent admirers deeply
disillusioned. The growing con-
fidence of Castro, Chavez and
Morales is a sign that the bar-
barians are already gathering at
the gate, ready to pick over
whatever's left of US credibility
when Bush finally steps down.
Americans need to regroup fast
or see their influence slide.
So what is required? In 2008,
the US has to elect a president
of the highest calibre, a states-
man or woman with a global
perspective who can inspire
trust among the nation's friends
and respect among its enemies.

Elite

If Washington, Lincoln, Roo-
sevelt, Jefferson et al are the
presidential elite, then the US
now needs someone of similar
standing to reverse what has
undoubtedly been a disastrous
decline in the country's standing
worldwide.
A superficially slick popinjay
tike Bill Clinton is not the
answer. Nor is an affable, but


essentially out-of-the-loop
frontman like Ronald Reagan
who, in spite of his successes,
never seemed totally in com-
mand of his brief or in control
of his underlings.
The next US president needs
to be a man or woman of true
substance and stature, soaring
intellect and the kind of vision
that can provide a true leader-
ship model for the western
world. More than anything, he
or she needs to strengthen the
western alliance by setting
examples others can identify
with and understand while
underlining and promoting
America's constitutional ideals.
After six years of Bush, the
US appears to its European
friends like a nation of Bible-
thumping hicks and voraciously
acquisitive neocons who have
no understanding of the wider
world, and no interest in finding
out more. That's okay for an
inconsequential little nation
with no. say, but for the only
global superpower it is extreme-
ly disturbing.
With China in the ascendant,
and India challenging for its
place as a significant democrat-
ic power of the 21st century, the
US needs to buttress its lead-
ership credentials with a presi-
dent outsiders can respect and,
indeed, venerate.
The.current regime has
become so demeaned, so
scorned, that even relatively
small-time South American
presidents feel they can take
slugs at it with impunity.
George W Bush has much to
answer for. The next president
needs to provide those answers
in a form the rest of the world
can understand, and extricate
the US from the fix in which is
now finds itself. Another duf-
fer in the White House could'
damage the world's greatest
nation almost beyond repair.
What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail
jmarquis@tribunemedia.net


Now In Stock!... ALL NEW '06


S: MN + 5 DR HATCHBACK

.1 .Bf^PI? T^~lf^


Expand Your Features include:
Imagination 1.6-litre 4-cylinder engine
The 2006 Suzuki Liana takes Automatic transmission
you out of the ordinary and AM/FM/CD Player
into a realm where your Power steering, windows,
imagination and sense of door locks & mirrors
adventure have free reign. -me .. f


Dependable, Reliable Quality
Dependable, Reliable Quality


pacfJoCf IUUs nIIenor wII
plenty of leg room




ION-THE-SPOT FINANCING


Price includes rustproofing, licensing and inspection to birthday, full tank of fuel,
24,000 miles/24 months warranty and emergency roadside assistance.


#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET 322-3775 325-3079
Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals, Queens Hwy, 352-6122
or Abaco Motor Mall, Don Mackay Blvd, 367-2916


S .
i l :-.' 'i.' '- k '


i* '
I' i,. . L...,- i


LJ


MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006, PAGE 3C


1

_ ::,:i~~


.
~i11;1?
, .


I


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4C, MC


_. ; ..
-, ':?~8~


C; ~

*4W


-. a'--,
I
J-r r ;


a .


.,C '-.l ..,
^,.^


FROM


stopped cariFl '
NMethusalah wasvt it
has now come to ie
Interested and Apathit
the international aviatil
muni\. This is n6lb.
for a country with tl
tions in tourism. .
Fortunately, the goqi
has now apparently tik
long-overdue decision tL
management of the.,
over to a private ojl
pan\. Soon, the C.
Y\'RAS. the inte "
sidiarv of the Vancouve
port operator, YVR. wi
control under a 15 to 2
agreement aimed atp
NIA back on track; ..
Speculation is thaV
Minister Christie will'fh
announcement to aorr
capitalise on the mo&i
tant date in the PLP I
January 10 is the
the party dislodge
whitee regime at'&i
1967, and it will ,,
usually well-inforMt
be the date on'wbi
Christie will make -
the biggest annon$t
l.^


LONG lines at the departure hall once again plagued Nassau International Airport last weekend.


iai n- .. negligence, incompetence and bri'khl etficient management must ha\e \\on
A "'.Te tl.he name Pindling sheer slackness ha\e combined sit Ic which takes no prisoner s. it was to sink i
,. h ,i'whti!'.tibe a national to create a shambles other many (One critc of NIA saiJ It had into an inacces
,aiupl .ill always stick in years. bee'n -outi ,- sichi ur 011 of E enrtuall\.
lrots, but the travel- With the Alantis third phase mind' tor too long., ta .'ihi comment. MI S
h'l i less concerned already underway, and the buried in the bush far out \\et a classic undel
i;.ly titejlthan the services prospect of a billion dollar-plus here iuccessite go\ernnment- was not a goo>
. d, failltii&itoffers. casino development at Cable consistcntll under-perfornmd. kno\t fiorn m\
aq Nitlnd,NIA is what Beach, it was unrealistic to in 'piti at the inlpoit's enoi- riencn theic \
A*.soibce called "a expect NIA to cam on the \ a\ mon'u importance- to the tlated people."
i batrassment". If it was going. With the in\ol\e- Bahamian c'onom\ pri\at~e thougL
ii is true that ment of YVRAS, it w ill be hat less diplo
.ieoir have a second interesting to see ho\ long it CriS S island while.
-lheto make a first impres- takes to break down the cul- along the coast
i, cat.NIA ,has already tural deficiencies which ha'e Perhaps the Christmas ci sis fuming about
hrIpf dafiage to the undermined the airport's oper- bad as it \ais fto the national .iii pot as h
44l4:.There can be action in the past. imagc at le.is bought lcuLs businc-'.. Stati
*i camt inals -in the In addition to the catering to nc cotn.ilion's \ ichl h.d \e're bad enoL
"fidu quite sodepress- monopoly. w which most dragcd on tor the bc-i par i F dreds l income
I dire. Aad none at all, one informed observers feel must a \cir, and ,cipulted the oI2\ and di\ at Am
ii ltwhere the radar and fuel goat all costs, the companN\ ill ernrment into long-a\ aited and lust a' man
-l',pUly fail simultaneously at have to confront sub-standard action. out of Najssau.
peakbusnessperiodof the work practices and eliminate Michael Sansbur\ Baha country's oei
iua-t, any suggestion of the kind of Mar'sxecutie ice-president that \womed the


nefarious schemes deemed
endemic in the government ser-
vice here.
Although supervision of a
new $200 million terminal is
part of the contract, it will
require more than maior struc-
tural improvements to get NIA
where it needs to be. This is an
institution ripe for streamlin-
ing, with radical rationalisation
of staff and resources and a


of hotel operations, and ione of
the ke\ figures in the massive
Cable Beach project %was one
of those se\e-rel incon e -
nienced b\ NI.'s variouss fail-
ure Ilast month.
Stranded for eight hours at
Orlando International Airport.
forced to delay his tourney to
the Bahamas for a full da\.
kept in the dark about \ hat
\was caulsin the problem, he


the uie of prone
at great e\pens
can get there o
out again.'
Eentually.
cafe had run o
drink. Atlantic
send supplies to
customers. ho[
at least some
impressions th
of the Baham,


V; ii itors

jFji Towsafands of visitors must
mt ined over the years to
l l ous state of NIA
Skd of resort city Nas-
t f to be. How can any-
obt ,SIoktfr. for'a first-class
Mr' p t hke.'Atlantis be expected
impressed by a fifth-rate
l he airport, where
., .' '.


dered how wise-
i billion dollars
sibic city
encouraged to'
ansbur\ said in
statement. "It
d thine at all I
personal expe-
ere many trus-
Presumably. his
its were some-
mnjtic.
fellow hoteliers
at Atlantis were
the impact the
a\ing on their
stically, things
uah. l it, h hun-
ing guests high
erican airports.
I\ unable to get
But it was the
all reputation
em most. What's
noting paradise
se when no-one
r find their w a\

- hen the airport
iut of food and
felt obliged to
Their departing
ping to salvage
of the positive
e\ had formed
as during their


1


.J





tC






















It was never going to be easy
because, after several hours at
NIA, passengers' frustrations
were running high. But, with
an enormous financial cori-



babwe, they had beei visiting:
i.

,(



















By providing a new name for
the airport, and using the occa-
sion to gain political mileage
the government will be apply-
ing a superficial salve to heal
whatever wounds the facility's
shortcomings have caused over
ference. They will need to






sweep away an entire culture
of mediocrity and undnser
achievement and replace it
th wano-nonsenseregime t full







of drive and dynamism.i
The Bahamfters needs a shows
NIA, passengers' frustrations













piece airport. With the dead
an enormous financial com-













hand of government off thl
wheel, and a reputable private
company in charge, the country
this was the Bahamas, not Zim-













will at least have a fighting






chance ofacquiring a one.
Airline operators, tourist;
and all those with the country
int erests at het will be drapp
ing a deep breath and offering
thaevenks forte deliverance.'







Christmas 2005 was the ulti-
mate low-point n NIA's undis-






tinguished history. Now, with
hopefully ready for take-off.
managers to make the real dify















eWhat eedo you think? Fax






328-2398 or e-mail jmar
quis@tribunemedia.net
of drive and dynamism.






and all those with the country,$
interests at heart will be dravj-
ing a deep breath and offering
thanks for their deliverance. :,
Christmas 2005 was the ulti}
mate low-point in NIA's undis
tinguished history. Now, with
YVRAS in the cockpit, it"
hopefully ready for take-off.

What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmar;
quis@tribunemedia.net '


The fine 1l 4
and fit eve,
ultimate

pricing al.
:;


J Electric .appliances found at Geoffrey Jone, cater to tod.av Ii,\ bl ,ls' hseholdJ
lirdedvariety of GE appliances are designed to suite \our n eJ. prov\iditn the
,;tc per mance and style. With the best that technolog- haI to otiler, innmipitit.i:

'dep rtment, Geoffrey Jones is your ultimate appliance len!re.


GEOFFREY


Wonder how you ever got along withoutt it.


1,11l~wil kseil & M ntg meryStrets 22-2 88/
"gri


JONES & CO


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


", l
;i".1.


--







SAV.A.CHEK 'Extra-Special': on each item you pra$e, over
pople a dollar, with One filled SAVA.CHEK certificate get a llarOff!
---------------------------------- 7-~`---------
REDEEM your SAV-A-CHEK now at:
ST Johns S George, Sandys, Epic Battery, GNC,
Home Fabrics, Godetts Jewelry.
M -*FREEPORT: Dolly Madison Home Centre, GNC, Epic Battery, Play Time Sports


STORE MON. SAT.: 7:30AM 9:00PM
HOURS: SUN.: 7:00AM 12:00PM 7:00AM 2:00PM CABLE BEACH &
HARBOUR RAY ONIY


1 Extra Extra!
SAV.A.CHEK Special!


THRIFTY MAID JBI
VEGETABLES McCKERAL BRINE/
ASSORTED TOMATO SAUCE
15- -OZ

99gg 9 91,o,


WINN DIXIE
CORN
FLAKES


18-Oz
Is o


THRIFTY MAID


SPAGHETTI RINGS
W/ MEATBALLS
15-OZ

000o


SO-DRI WINN DIXIE
PAPER APPLE
TOWELS JUICE
1 -ROLL 64- OZ
e99E $299


, ~.4?MPBELL. :,
PORK-N-.
BEANS
19-OZ


THRIFTY MAID
LEMON JUICE OR
SOLD CROWN
LIME JUICE

2/$400
2/ 32 oz


I I


POTATOI


POTATOES
WHITE POLY 5LB BAG

i EACH
ONIONS 3.LB BA
EACH
MIX-N-MATCH
GOLD DELICIOUS & RED DELICIOI
EXTRA FANCY APPLES
AND ANJOU PEARS
EACH
3/.994


W/D
REG & NON FAT
YOGURTS ASSTD
FLAVORS
2/8- o39
8 8-OZ


WINN-DIXIE
ENGLISH MUFFINS
2/$299
-- 6 CT


WINN-DIXIE
CORN ON
THE COB
$499
12 EAR
PICSWEET
DELUX LIMA, BROCCOLI
FLO BABY BRUSSELS
0 $i 79
__ ^ 728 OZ
p. zp


CHARMING
ULTRA
ALOE A&E
12 ROLL



KRAFT
MACARONI&
CHEESE DINNER
7.25 OZ
2/$1 69


THRIFTY MAID

CORNED
BEEF
12- OZ
99


G


US


BANANAS
DOLE
LB
.890

CANTALOUPES
$ 49
LETTUCE
CELLO
$ 139
EACH


HOME MADE
64 OZ
PREMIUM ORANGE JUICE...............4.29
PREMIUM NO PULP ORANGE J........29
OCEAN SPRAY 100% JUICE........... 6.49


W/D
SLICE CHEESE
$ 4 89
*a 10.67 OZ


W/D
ICE CREAM VANILLA,
CHOCOLATE,NEAPOLITAN
64 OZ
CAVENDISH
STRAIGHT CUT
POTATOES
2/$o30
S32 OZ


POWE 8pY


HUNTS
SNACK PACK
PUDDING/JELS
4-PAK



RICE LAND
LAND REG &
PERFECTED
RICE
5-LB
9239


CAMPBELLS
VEGETABLE &
VEGETARIAN SOUP,
CHICKEN NOODLE
10-OZ

Q99


TM
ANIMAL COOKIES OR OATMEAL
CHOCOLATE 8 oz.......................2/$3.00

LIBBYS
VIENNA SAUSAGE REGULAR
OR CHICKEN 5 oz..........................2/994


SUNCHY 100%
APPLE & FRUIT PUNCH
JUICE 11.5 OZ...................

ZIPLOCK
SANDWICH/ SNACK BAG

LIBBY'S
MIXED FRUIT OR DICED
PEACHES 4-pak......................

ISLAND QUEEN
COCNUT WATER 11.5 -OZ...

CUTRITE
WAX PAPER 75 FT..........

SAWYER


5I.CT......$2V59


..................$3.49


.......................890


...............$2.1 9


GUAVA JAM
(BUY BAHAMIAN) 1o oz..................$2.49


NIAGARA
SPRAY STARCH ASS'T
SCENTS ORIGINAL HEAVY,
LEMON, LEMON HEAVY
22 OZ0



EVERCANE


SUGAR
4 LBS
$4 39


ARIEL
REGULAR

DETERGENT
400 GR

79o


HELLMANS
MAYONNAISE
REGULAR
32 OZ

7299

BARBER

CREAM
CRACKERS
200 GR
g99o

KELLOGGS
TRI PACK
CEREAL

40-OZ

m 2m


OBIN HOOD


GRITS
: 5-.LBS



WINN DIXIE

PLAIN & IODIZE
SALT
S26 -OZ

, -, s.


MINI


FRESH
CHICKEN


RIBS
LB


PORK LOIN USDA DL LEE
ENDCUT eEmCOiB WHOLE
END CEUT SMOKED
AC BONELE PICNIC
CHOPS CHUCK ROAST HAM
S LB9 2 LLB


SMITHFIEL -- PIGS .
Sn v ,,.-r- .1" ... .... .. ..
SUPERTRIl LB
SMOKED
HAM -LB
S199'" '6
I m ,L'S I'm 69, ql


DELI SLIC5.L
TURKEY BREAST
OR COOKED HAM

WHOLE
ROTISSERIE
CHICKEN
$"799
__ EACH EAC


DOWNY
JASMINE, WATER
LILLY & ASMINE







ASSORTED
8-
/$300oo

ROBIN HOOD:

FLOUR:
5 LB
<&/89kQ(


HICKORY


PECAN
"CHEESE OR
WALNUT
DANISH RINGS
$569
PUMPKIN
SWEET POTATO &
APPLE PIES
BE29
$4 8' EACH


P.p Rc 1VY


BOUNTY
SELECT A SIZE
DESIGNER TOUCH
2 ROLL


P WRBY
**'l&C^ Xf


CARIBBEAN
CHUNK LITE
TUNA (WATER)
S .6 OZ


2/$


CARDINAL
EVAPORATED
MILK
S410- GR
2/,$ 39


U-.SI


i


I


I I


I


_ -I lp


I I
I


I I


MoNDA -JAN UAII' :~!:~'l 2005, PAG E 5C


I H-t I hittru~j


-I


I


I


-m 39.








PE NYA R 90T TB


V


-E_


-S*
o**


on! ji %wpm %%


9


- F O


41 w

a...

4--.
--

0*PO ~4pow
soo 40 04


4-40
"no 40m -
4w 0
* M W- m a








ma 4
* .




a.
*

*


A


A'i~ri
4.


0 -.40


K4


Availab


a


'p
a',
d


4-
*mdm a


- -
Ir


S am
-l dp.


Sdp
"a


a


do- 04
--
M 4--o- a









qw..G
-a




* 4 --0



a a- 0--
* -

a.
* a4-


- -lsp Nw4


4-


a4D- -
a a.
* 4- 4---


4 01a a. 0 0aqw
4w aa -ama
40 4110


* a a.1 b


4- a 4- 4
40 4-a1W -aa
awa. 4--4-


4- 4-
a a
a. 4-


* mw

.
4-

a
a.


4040 Aw. 4-
-m 41w w- 40


4-
4-a
a. 0*
a.
4-
a.
* -'4-
* a
4-.
* a.
* ~.
*
* 4-.
*a.
0 -
a
S -
*
* -
*
0 -
* a.
*
. a.


-C -


Vat


-


eriala


)ntent-


-ompa .40OEM qft
Mdu
a *


D -


4,- C -

.4-:ir~


Sc -oma


News Providers" -
: -- t- --.3


-cow lob 4w- o
,.-imp ~


.m


S.






I(a
La
"4

it'


-- -



-r --
- 4-
Uzi2 -


---
-- -


- a

aC a






- 4Db -1M
mr









4-
- *4- ~

- c44

4- (


; "P q, 401,
41 00 XO





*0.t
1 ii.


4


Cop rig hted F



Syndicated C(


le from Commercial


- - __ -_


= m
~4 __ 0 -


__


IL


THE TRIBUNE'


PAGE 6C, MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006


o0


t q


I


I







THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006, PAGE 7C


MONDAY EVENING JANUARY 9, 2006

7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

Antiques Road- Antiques Roadshow Autographed Elvis '56 Special n (CC) Frontline Two classmates over-
B WPBT show scrapbook documents Joe DiMag- come their dysfunctional family life
_________ gio's 1941 hitting streak. (N) in different ways. (N) (CC)
The Insider (N) The King of How I Met Your Two and a Half (:31) Out of CSI: Miami A man is murdered
a WFOR 1 (CC) Queens Fresh Mother"The Men That Spe- Practice Family while trying to leam how to pick up
Brood" (N) (CC) Wedding" (N) cial Tug" (N) n togetherness, women at a nightclub. (N) (CC)
Access Holly- Surface Laura talks with a person Las Vegas The Montecito prepares Medium "Doctor's Orders" The spirit
S WTVJ wood (N) (CC) who claims to have information for the grand opening of Wolfgang of a murderous doctor targets Alli-
about the creatures. (N) (CC) Puck's restaurant. (N) son's daughter. (N) (CC)
Deco Drive House "Histories" Dr. Foreman be- House "Control" Entrepreneur Ed- News (CC)
S WSVN lives an uncooperative homeless ward Vogler buys his way into be-
woman is faking seizures. coming chairman of the board.
Jeopardy! (N) Wife Swap "Roy/Maness" (N) n Emily's Reasons Jake in The Bachelor: Paris Travis im-
WPLG (CC (CC) Why Not Pilo Progress(N) presses the women with his bedside
((N)(CC) (CC) manner. (N)(CC)
(:00)Cold Case Flip This House (CC) Intervention "Kelly and Mark" Mark Rollerirs The Holy Rollers taken
A&E Files (CC) is addicted to painkillers; Kelly's the underdog Hellcats in the season
self-destructive path. (CC) opener. (N) (CC)
Hardtalk BBC News World Business BBC News Click Online Es- BBC News Asia Today
BBCI (Latenight). Report (Latenight). sential guide to (Latenight).
i.nTipulir1
B T BET.com.Count- Movie The Parkers The Parkers n
BT down (CC) (CC)
C C Coronation Leaders' Debate (Live) (CC) CBC News: The National (CC)
CBC Street (CC)
CNBC I00) On the The Apprentice ( (CC) Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNBC eoney
NN (:00) The Situa- Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)
N ltion Room
Ron White: They The Daily Show The Colbert Re- Ron White: They Call Me Tater Salad Comic Ron South Park
OM Call Me Tater With Jon Stew- port Dermot Mul- White talks about bouncers and his ex-wife. (CC) Wealthy people
Salad art (CC) roney. (CC) invade. (CC)
CTops n (CC) Beach Patrol: Beach Patrol: North Mission North Mission Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege
COURT Cs San Diego (N) San Diego (N) Road Road & Justice
'. That's So Raven *** HERCULES (1997, Adventure) Voices of Tate Donovan, Joshua Naturally Sadie Sister, Sister
IISN "To See or Not to Keaton, Roger Bart. Animated. The strongman becomes a Greek hero. Researching a Montell Jordan
See" 'G' (CC) legend. guest stars. ,1
This Old House Weekend Deco- Material Girls Fresh Coat From Junky to Scrapbooking Knitty Gritty
DY n (CC) rating Funky
DW In Focus (Ger- Journal: Projekt Zukunft Journal: In Euromaxx Journal: Im Focus "Na-
DW man). Tagestema Depth Tagestema haufnahme"
El :00) El News Home Improvement: The E! True Hollywood Story "Home Improve- Dr. 90210 (N)
!____ (N) ment." n (CC)__
ESPN :00) College Basketball Cincinnati at Connecticut. College Basketball Texas at Iowa State. (Live) (CC)
ESPN (Live) (CC)
PN I Gol ESPN: Beach Soccer Beach Soccer SportsCenter International Edi-
!J jPNI Fuera de Juego tion (Live)
: r L Daily Mass: Our The Journey Home Super Saints The Holy Rosary Abundant Life
T National Body FitTV's Diet Doctor "Atkins" The Marilu Henner's Shape Up Your FitNation "Generation Xtra Large"
I*IT TV Challenge 2 A Atkins diet. A (CC) Life Removing junk. n (CC) Measuring fat. A (CC)
SFox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
FOX-NC Shepard Smith Susteren (Live) (CC)
SNFL (:00) Women's College Basketball North Carolina at Best Damn Sports Show Period Totally Football Best Damn
FSN iami. (Live) (Live) (CC) SSports Show
G:LF 31) Golf Channel Academy Live (:43) Golf Channel Academy Trick Shots- (:08) Outasight Trick Shots
(,,O L Live) U.K. Style
LSN Lingo (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire f) Big Bucks: The Press Your Luck Scandal
G4Te h (:00) Attack of Star Trek: The Next Generation Star Trek: The Next Generation The Man Show The Man Show
the Show! (N) -Justice" n (CC) The Battle" 0 (CC) (CC) (CC)
(:00) JAG "Whole Walker, Texas Ranger Walker tries A PERRY MASON MYSTERY: THE CASE OF THE WICKED WIVES
1IALL ew Ballgame" to protect crime boss Vince Ter- (1993, Mystery) Paul Sorvino, Barbara Hale, William R. Moses. Suspicion
A man's former accountant. (CC) is cast on a murdered photographer's ex-wives.
SSmall Space, Home to Stay My First Place Debbie Travis' Facelift 'Trevor's Holmes on Homes "Honeymoon
HGTV Big Style Cot- Living in a tiny Dragonfly design Wish" Mother wish come true. n Ensuite" (CC)
stage; apartment, condo. l (CC) project. (N) (CC)
I SP. Morris Cerullo Breakthrough R.W Scham- Inspiration To- Life Today (CC) This Is Your Day Love a Child
I N P :C) bach (CC), day .... -4
8' Simtple Rules Sabrina, the My Wife and My Wife and Friends Chandler Everybody Everybody
KTLA Kery and Kyle Teenage Witch Kids "Table for Kids Michael ad- bonds with Moni- Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
smooch. (CC) Interview. (CC) Too Many" (CC) vises Jr. (CC) can's father. ( (CC) Robert changes.
* A FATHER'S CHOICE (2000, Drama) Peter FOR THE LOVE OF A CHILD (2006, Drama) Peri Gilpin, Ten Polo, Maria
1I FE Strauss, Mary McDonnell. A rodeo cowboy raises his del Mar. Premiere. Sara O'Meara and Yvonne Fedderson found Childhelp
..;, ,, .: daughters after his ex-wife dies. (CC) USA. (CC)
ISN BC I00 Hardball Countdown With KeithOlber- Rita Cosby Live & Direct Scarborough Country
K Jimmy Neutron: SpongeBob Zoey 101 A\ Full House C( Fresh Prince of Roseanne A Roseanne A
Boy Genius SquarePants n, (CC) (CC) Bel-Air __ (CC) (CC)
t :31) Out of Surface "Episode 12" (N) A (CC) Las Vegas The Bitch Is Back" (N) News n (CC) News
l P.raictIce (N)n ( I (CC)
LN (:00) Wanted: Wanted: Ted or Alive (CC) NHL Hockey St. Louis Blues at Colorado Avalanche. From the Pepsi
Ted or Alive Center in Denver. (t:.ut ?:l i Bli: ji:.iur (Live)
S American Mus- Dream Car Dream Car Barrett-Jackson: Life on the My Classic Car MotorWeek (N)
EED cleCar Garage Garage Block (N)
,o .. Bishop iD. Behind the Mark Chironna Jentezen Jesse Duplantis Praise the Lord (CC)
-TBN Jakes (CC) Scenes (CC) Franklin (CC) (CC)
S Everybody Friends Phoebe Friends The Friends Monica Friends The Ugly Family Guy Pe- Family Guy
,TBS Loves Raymond offers Frank Jr. a One With the buys a new bed. Naked Guy may ter seizes control Family shops on
(u n (CC) massage. / Flashback" (CC) 1 (CC) be dead. of a play. Christmas Eve.
:00) Saving Trauma: Life in the ER "Putting It Untold Stories of the E.R. An Real Life: Being Terri (N)
TLC ace: Lives Re- Together Rocky Mountain Regional emergency room receives plane
stored Trauma Center in Denver. crash victims. (N)
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order Fontana and Green Law & Order: Trial by Jury "The Law & Order Detectives investigate
N er "Judge uncover a cult that encourages sex- Abominable Showman" 1) (CC) after a comic's infant son is dropped
Dread" A ual relations with children. ,1 from a window. C,
.T Grim Adven- Grim Adven- Codename: Kids Hi Hi Puffy Ami Home for Imagi- Ed, Edd n Eddy Cartoon Car-
IOON tures tures Next Door Yumi nary Friends toons
5 00) Vie privee, vie publique Des gens don't la vie Nikan Le Baiser Les differentes facettes TV5 Le Journal
y prvee et a vie publique s'entremelent. du baiser.
- 6:00) Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
SM Edition (CC) Capsized boat. Crane operator.
UNV :00Pielde Contra Viento y Marea Alborada Cristina
UNIV M uonojueres
valientes.
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order: Criminal Intent Po- WWE Monday Night Raw Who is champion after the Elimination Cham-
fUSA der: Special Vic- lice suspect an architect designed a ber Match? (Live) n (CC)
Stims Unit A blueprint for murder. n (CC)
1 Awesomely Fabulous Life Of... "Weddings" n Embarrassing Moments 2 Celebri- Fabulous Life Of... "Celebrity Super
1 B'Badder Fashion ties face humiliation. ,l Spenders '05" C\
S (:00) America's America's Funniest Home Videos America's Funniest Home Videos WGN News at Nine AC (CC)
GN Funniest Home Bad dogs; a tot who can name A monkey steals a man's watch; a
Videos C (CC) spices by smell. ,C (CC) fish is memorialized. n
Everybody The 11th Annual Critics' Choice Awards The Broadcast Film Critics As- WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
W PIX Loves Raymond sociation honors the finest in cinematic achievement. (Live) C (CC) Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
Robert changes. & Mr. G (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) One on One Ar- All of Us ,C Girlfriends Joan Half & Half Phyl- Dr. Phil n (CC)
WSBK (CC) naz becomes (CC) is pursued by a lis tries to set
jealous. C (CC) older man. (CC) Mona up.
* THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA (2004, Musical) Gerard Butler, Emmy Rossum, * * MILLION DOLLAR BABY
HBO-E Patrick Wilson. A masked figure becomes jealous of a singer's romance. C "PG-13' (CC) (2004, Drama) Clint Eastwood, Hi-
lary Swank. C 'PG-13' (CC)
5:45) **** The Sopranos Deceased mob boss ** a SOMETIMES IN APRIL (2005, Docudrama) Idris Elba, Debra
H BO-P CHINATOWN Jackie Aprile's ex-convict brother Winger, Carole Karemera. Rwandan genocide tears apart a Hutu family.
(1974) 'R' (CC) looks for action. n (CC) 'NR' (CC)


HB (6:15) *~ *** CONTACT (1997, Science Fiction) Jodie Foster, Matthew McConaughey, James *** THE
HBO-W FROZEN AS- Woods. A devoted scientist hears a message from outer space. n 'PG' (CC) PHANTOM OF
SETS (1992) C THE OPERA n
S** BEFORE SUNSET (2004, Romance) Ethan ** FOOTLOOSE (1984, Drama) Kevin Bacon, Lori Singer, John Lith-
HBO-S Hawke, Julie Delpy, Vemon Dobtcheff. Two people re- gow. Small-town teens fight for their right to dance. 'PG (CC)
unite in Paris after nine years. Cl 'R' (CC)
(6:15)** ** *a SIDEWAYS (2004, Comedy-Drama) Paul Giamatti, Thomas (:15) *** TRUE ROMANCE
MAX-E ALIE VS. Haden Church, Virginia Madsen. Two friends ponder their lives during a 1993, Drama) Christian Slater, Pa-
PREDATOR road trip. Cl 'R' (CC) ricia Arquette. C 'NR' (CC)
(6:15) ** SCENT OF A WOMAN (1992, Drama) Al f FAT ALBERT (2004) Kenan Thompson. Live ac- (:35) BEDTIME
MOMAX Pacino, Chris O'Donnell. A blind man introduces a stu- lion/animated. The cartoon character becomes real STORIES 3
dent to life's pleasures. n 'R' (CC) and helps a lonely teen. C 'PG' (CC) (2000) 'NR' (CC)
( 6:30) *** A PERFECT WORLD (1993, Drama) The L Word "Labia Majora" iTV) HUFF "Pilot" (iTV) A tragedy occurs
SHOW evin Costner. iTV. A boy begins to admire the es- Bette and Tina rekindle. n (CC) an a psychiatrist's office. (C (CC)
caped con who kidnapped him. Cl 'PG-13'
(6:30) HI- * OUT OF TIME (2003, Suspense) Denzel Washington, Eva THE PUNISHER (2004, Ac-
TMC I(1998) Ka- Mendes, Sanaa Lathan. A police chief is accused of setting a deadly fire. tion) Thomas Jane, John Travolta,
trin Cartlidge. C 'PG-13'(CC) Will Patton. C 'R' (CC)


Le-f L.I1clie iSe
BcavaMicm PLppei ctxd
[xis sidekick Decprk, ,p t
so'e. s'ie-s Ov OVOA O
kids's faces. j


L1
A


Bvviyg yow, ckilche-rpi to 4w

MV~cfappy flow, atc]VicMooald's in

hcAloI,,LAqkc4 Sfreeii. evefAy Tku'tsday

fiiov 3:30pmr to 4:3Opm dw.tin i ke-
MOA of -M civ y 2006,




EnjoN Great Food APrizes and.Lots of fun.




i'm lovin' it


I


I


****-


~91OF











ISSUES.


IhC' iiami ceral SUNDAY, JANUAI










;. I"-W. ,-





'



-*
- -- -
r-











___
a. 1 t,-













a.pa1 1
S %..."ar% / 16 1t,










mwf -





.. W m MNI=



















"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


W --




a -- em
w 4
400.0 b O 1O m


0 a-


4b- am 4


IDEAS


STHE GULF STREAM "
4- ..-





The devil in th













Scientists fear that the Gulf Stream -

the inunense, enigmatic force behind ferocious

weather and mild climate is being remade.


The effects could be profotuid.


BY ANTHONY R. WOOD
Knight Pidder New'-js Ser4ice

The last time the planet endured a dramatic temperature shift, with ice
invading Europe and North America, there were no smokestacks and SUVs
to blame.
But there were changes in a mighty engine that balances global tempera-
tures. a meandering, mysterious force that flows unseen only in the South
Atlantic.
It's the fabled Gulf Stream. Traveled by whalers and sailors for centuries
but never accurately charted until it aroused the curiosity of none other
than Benjamin Franklin, the current has emerged in the last decade as a focal
point for scientists studying global climate change.
The concerns about the state of the ocean today run so deep that an
unprecedented international effort is underway from the Straits of Florida
to Greenland to track changes in the North Atlantic.
And the Gulf Stream is a narrow but critical piece of the larger
system: It moves warm surface water from the tropics toward
the North Pole and pumps cold water back toward the equator
*TURN TO GULF STREAM

This article is a condensed version of a three-part series that
first appeared in The Philadelphia Inquirer. The entire series
can be found online at www.MiamiHerald.com.


I -AA -s -





4awa-- q-mod
__ ___ - 'Uf
14- w.- __
U -P-am





4NO
am




.. 40M qm.-am

-- ..
-a.. --one. am,


-mom
- S -

_


~-- a a


4 0. -
40011011


THE GULF STREAM: A FORCE OF NATURE
Pushed by the sun, trade winds and the Earth's rotation, the Gulf Stream meanders across the Atlantic
before it slows and disperses. It is the western edge of an enormous circle of water, or "gyre."


Global dynamics create Gulf Stream
\ Sun
SSolar energy
Equator warms equator;
Gulf Stream carries
part of that heat
t.:w'ard i orth f','l

Origin: W arm ljatr ir:. iijl .:.1
.-l t ihrou'h Flo'rida '-.tr ) i.'ar, a
n.:.rtr


4 1i


SContinental '
S sl'elf-
f,. ,

2 Charleston Bump
11:-'. n-, ,r r, 1000^

:,3 l ,ri.j d; .ci ; it
,- r,', anI i-ddi:: .


-'a-,


Wind
Trade winds from
east move warm
water from equator
into Gulf of Mexico

Canada


The Gulf Stream


Some water circles
back and renters
Gulf Stream


SI
r'


Spin
Earth's spin pushes
Currents westward
S' against continent,
makes them narrow
and fast

Tempering influence: :tream crplals mnil:
S theirr current in Nor nh A rij rii. trinr.
nilId :limlnae to Europe



current to Northern
Europe and Arctic


Current to Africa


, Atlantic Ocean


The deep: Curren c ool' in INorth
............... ...........:. 4 rrl m e to o: n flo ir
Cold, dense 4 andl tIlows sOuhvinrd urdC-r ,'ulf
water from itramn ICowrd equa3,tr
Arctic Circle mu


-.:.urr A r j a i :a i-31.. a a,1, C iie. ur r- i -1 ,.-i Mifli -M 6 R03eIeI Sr o:.Ie IS t% % iVi.: .F,1,. .
"I ,muiCn jC .n E c..',c I l nC .'A u sfty irj r.Ieqr, 0! ').1fr~ial A.,j p.i.I.p.j -


R lI rIIAMI H~iALL


* t


Sr;;


Isr







!^ I SUNDAY, JANUARY 8,2006 INTEHNA. OiAL ED I- ON.


THE GULF STREAM





Majestic, mysterious, monstrous


*GULF STREAM, FROM 1C

in a deep-sea current a
mechanism scientists have
come to call the North Atlan-
tic "conveyor belt."
Scientists believe if the
Gulf Stream were to slow or
take a more southerly route,
the change could disrupt the
system and the world's
weather. Over time how
much time is a key uncer-
tainty in the theory the
North Atlantic could cool,
turning Europe and eastern
North America colder as the
rest of the world heated up.
That's what many
researchers think happened
the last time there was a
global big chill 12,000 years
ago and during a less severe
"Little Ice Age" that chilled
Greenland and North Amer-
ica just 700 years back. The
question today is: Could it
happen again?
Some studies suggest it
already is happening, with the
Stream showing signs it may
be slowing.
"This is going to be one of
the big issues facing humans
in this century," said Ruth
Curry, a researcher at the
Woods Hole Oceanographic
Institution in Massachusetts.
Debate may rage over how
much humans are to blame,
but there is little doubt the
planet is warming, which has
prompted dark and counterin-
tuitive scenarios envisioning
a fresh Ice Age.
The 10 warmest years on
record all have occurred since
1990, with 2005 the second
hottest. Last hurricane season
exhausted the alphabet.
Water temperatures in the
North Atlantic and the Gulf of
Mexico have been near record
highs. Arctic ice is melting at
alarming rates.
Few foresee an imminent
glacial outbreak, and some
scientists insist one is all but
impossible, but ice-core
records show clear evidence
that rapid cooling and warm-
ings have happened long
before humans started burn-
ing fossil fuels many scien-
tists blame for at least some of
the modern warming.

TRANSPORTS HEAT
The Atlantic's influence on
the world's weather is pro-
found.
It transports more heat
northward than the Pacific
Ocean, although it. is only'
about a third the Pacific's size.
The Gulf Stream really the
western flank of a vast circle
or "gyre" of water is what
moves the heat, a ceaseless
cycle powered by one of the
most prosaic substances on
Earth: salt.
Salt makes water heavier,
and the Atlantic is saltier than
the Pacific. Heavier water
sinks faster. So as salty tropi-


cal water moves into the far
North Atlantic, it begins to
sink, pulling yet more warm
water northward and keeping
the conveyor moving.
William Johns, a professor
at the University of Miami's
Rosenstiel School of Marine
and Atmospheric Science, is
helping monitor a 3,000-mile-
long measuring network all
the way from Florida to the
Canary Islands in a coopera-
tive venture with the United
Kingdom.
His research has tracked
the source of the stream,
which moves along at from 2
to 6 miles per hour like an
immense serpent, all the way
to the Brazilian coast and the
South Atlantic.
The stream pours through
the straits of the Caribbean
islands, a main branch shoot-
ing north up Florida's East
Coast, with offshoots squeez-
ing into the Gulf of Mexico
through the Yucatan Strait,
making the Gulf waters warm
and deep. The water swirls
into "loop currents," such as
the particularly deep one that
fueled Hurricane Katrina.
The 2004 disaster movie
The Day After Tomorrow used
the conveyor as a plot device,
shutting it down and turning
the United States arctic in
about 24 hours. While the film
had dipped a toe in scientific
waters, thankfully it bears lit-
tle resemblance to cold real-
ity.

CLIMATE CHANGES?
But some recent studies
found some unsettling signs
in the Stream.
Satellite data have detected
a slowing of circulation from
Ireland to Labrador, accord-
ing to a research team led by
NASA's Sirpa Hakkinen. The
team said that if the slowing
continues, it might lead to
large-scale ocean and even-
tually climate changes.
In a second study, about
1,500 miles to the south, a
group of British scientists-last-
month reported a 30 percent'
slowdown in the movement
of Atlantic deepwater, based
on measurements between
1957 and 2004.
But Hakkinen and Henry
Bryden, the head of the Brit-
ish, team, cautioned their
results weren't conclusive.
Hakkinen said it was impossi-
ble to predict whether the
slowing in the North Atlantic
gyre would continue or was
part of a natural cycle.
The problem is a funda-
mental one of oceanic
research: The period of
record is short.
Carl Wunsch, a respected
oceanographer at the Massa-
chusetts Institute of Technol-
ogy, says researchers are just
beginning to build a baseline
to track the movements of the
North Atlantic conveyor.


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


___t__ -


Right now, they have little
basis for comparison.
"Only in the last 10 years
have the observations begun
to be available to allow you to
know what's going on out
there," Wunsch says. "Is the
system changing? Yes. Is the
system slowing down? Possi-
bly. Are we undergoing a
major climate change? We
don't know."
Still, Woods Hole oceanog-
rapher Ruth Curry doesn't
like what she sees when she
looks at a color-enhanced ver-
sion of the world on her com-
puter screen. A band of bright
yellow covers tropical waters
- an indication of salty
water.


"The tropics in the lower
latitudes are getting more
saline," she says, "and the
high latitudes in both hemi-
spheres are getting fresher."
That could be because as
the planet warms, more water
evaporates, causing more rain
and snow in the higher lati-
tudes. The freshwater precip-
itation is evaporating from
the trdpics, leaving the ocean
saltier, and wringing out as
rain and snow farther north,
making the ocean there
fresher.

FRESHWATER IMPACT
Some of the freshwater
pouring into the Atlantic is


trickling off Greenland, she
believes, and that is discon-
certing. The Greenland ice
sheet has shrunk by about 20
percent since the late 1970s,
coinciding with dropping salt
levels in the North Atlantic.
"It's been known for some
time that it's been freshen-
ing," Curry says, "and we've
just recently figured out how
much. We've never experi-
enced it in our time of taking
measurements."
Curry believes the freshen-
ing is almost assuredly the
result of worldwide warming.
The planet's rising tempera-
ture could be causing that
extra rain and snow.
Greenland ice, however, is
a far scarier source of fresh-
water. It is estimated that if all
the Greenland ice were to
melt, worldwide sea levels
would rise more than 20 feet
- roughly the equivalent of
the worst of Hurricane Katri-
na's storm surge.
Realistically, for anything
that catastrophic to happen, it
would have to become a
whole lot warmer, and given
the current rate of increase in
carbon-dioxide levels, that
could take one or two centu-
ries.
The very notion of such
instability in the climate was
unheard of until the 1950s.
"The whole notion of rapid
climate change was very hard
for science to accept," said
Spencer Weart, a physicist-
historian and head of the his-
tory center for the American
Institute of Physics. "The
guys who said there could be
rapid climate change had to
drag the rest of the climate
community kicking and
screaming."
It wasn't until the 1980s
when Wallace Broecker, a
chemical oceanographer and
paleontologist with Columbia
University's Lamont-Doherty
Observatory, published a
paper that helped launch
global-warming research and
gave the science its icon a
conveyor belt. :-
The article, which
appeared in the journal Natu-
ral History, posited that tun-
dra conditions overspread
Europe as the Gulf Stream
and the North Atlantic heat-
transport system broke down.
Europe turned arctic during
what he called the Younger
Dryas period, after an Arctic
shrub that mysteriously
appeared throughout Europe.
Broecker theorized that a
mighty pulse of freshwater
from melting glaciers stopped
the sinking action. Freshwater
accumulated in the far North
Atlantic, and it froze. The
conveyor suddenly slowed,
interrupting the northward
flow of warm water and
warm air.
The Gulf Stream couldn't
do its job.
Naturally, the editors


asked for graphics.
"They wanted a diagram,"
he said, "so they hired an art-
ist in Hoboken, N.J. I never
met the man, so I made
sketches that went through
them to him. I didn't really
pay that much attention."
What Broecker gave him
was a sketch of his famous
"conveyor belt" to describe
how warm surface water
moves north, is chilled by the
cooler air, sinks to the sea
bottom, and returns south-
ward. It is a simplified model
of what oceanographers pre-
fer to call the Meridional
Overturning Circulation, or
MOC, and it was an instant
hit.
"People started to pick it
up right away," Broecker says.
The reality of rapid change
was further re-enforced in
1992 when Richard Alley, in
central Greenland examining
ice cores, saw radical shifts in
the layers representing the
climate 12,000 years ago. The
temperatures had plunged
and risen suddenly. He saw a
swing of 15 degrees in a mat-
ter of 10, or no more than 30,
years.
"This was a flipped switch,
not a slowly turned dial," he
recalled. "Something really
dramatic had happened."

IN THE PAST
Now, two decades after his
landmark paper, Broecker
believes recent findings and
more refined computer mod-
eling have postponed The Day
After Tomorrow indefinitely.
Only a major icing-over of
the North Atlantic would
bring about a radical cooling
of the Northern Hemisphere.
Ice would repel the sun's
energy and create more icing.
That would happen only if all
the Greenland ice melted and
injected enough freshwater to
shut down the conveyor belt.
No computer models see that
happening in the foreseeable
future.
... ':Thered flag wentway up
because of these abrupt
changes, and it was scary,"
Broecker says. "It took us 15
years to get it in context. Now
I think we can lower the red
flag to half-mast."
But not lower it all the way.
Unfortunately, no one
knows exactly how sensitive
the climate system is, or how
rapidly changes might dccur.
What is the tipping point?
Many researchers stress
the changes they see and the
uncertainty of what may hap-
pen make it even more impor-
tant to find out what the con-
veyor belt is up to. For the
volatility of climate is inargu-
able.
"These scenarios are con-
ceiveable," said MIT's
Wunsch, "and we sure as hell
want to know what's going on
out there."


A prodigious achievement by Franklin


M Benjamin Franklin's
pioneering measurements
of what we now know to be
the Gulf Stream laid the
groundwork for
generations of researchers.
BY ANTHONY R. WOOD
Knight Ridder News Service
Hundreds of miles from
land, the waters of the North
Atlantic suddenly developed
an odd deep-blue hue and
turned incongruously warm.
Patches of peculiar brown
seaweed rode the surface, and
the ocean brewed mild, damp
-winds that the muscular 20-
year-old could feel on his skin.
To the sailor, Benjamin
Franklin, it was a puzzle, one
that would baffle and bedevil
him for decades.
It would take him 40 years
to figure out what he had
encountered back in 1726. He
had crossed a moving, mean-
dering mass of warm water,
300 times stronger than the
flow of all the rivers emptying
into the Atlantic Ocean.
Franklin would call it "the
Gulf Stream," following the
lead of generations of whalers.
Today, on the eve of the
300th anniversary of his birth,
scientists now know that


Franklin had crossed a system
that dramatically influences
the global climate. But in
Franklin's time, the age of sail,
its movements remained a
mystery to even the most sea-
soned salts.
In the 1760s, some 40 years
after Franklin's first encounter
with the blue water, he found
himself again pondering the
Stream. He was in London
serving as deputy postmaster
for the colonies and doing
so with the imagination and
energy that he apparently
applied to everything.
He had recently introduced
an important innovation, a
fleet of "packet ships" to
deliver mail across the Atlan-
tic. Unlike the heavy cargo
ships that didn't leave port
until full, the packets adhered
to schedules. The packets
were also lighter and faster
than the freighters.
But a mysterious force was
outwitting the great innovator.
Inexplicably, the cargo ships
were completing mail runs to
the colonies 17 days quicker
than the packets. Franklin was
flummoxed.
He was told some of the
captains were dawdling
because they were unhappy


.. .......




AP FILE
PUZZLE SOLVED: Benjamin
Franklin published the
first scientific chart
of the Gulf Stream.


with their pay. He sought a
second opinion from his
cousin, Timothy Folger, a
Nantucket whaling captain
and dealer in sperm-whale oil
who frequently visited London
on business.
Can you explain this, Frank-
lin asked.
Easily, Folger said.
Unlike the savvy freighter
captains, the British packet
captains obviously knew noth-
ing about the Gulf Stream,


which was the lifeblood of his
whale hunters. The borders
flanking the swift, steady cur-
rent worked for whales like a
superhighway, complete with
rest stops where plankton
flourished at the boundaries of
warm and cold water.
In following their quarry,
Folger's whalers were tracing
the outlines, of the Gulf
Stream.
The whalers often ran into
British packet captains, who
evidently were no match for
the whales in terms of naviga-
tional intelligence. They were
trying to buck the stream.
Even with a favorable
breeze, Folger told his cousin,
"they are carried back by the
current more than they are
forwarded by the wind." If the
packets got caught in the
stream, that would explain the
delay.
Folger's whalers often
advised the British captains to
get out of the current that they
called the Gulf Stream, "but
they were too wise to be coun-
seled by simple American fish-
ermen."
The British captains had
their reasons for following
such a circuitous route to
reach New York, says Yale


Franklin-ologist Ellen Cohn.
They sailed so far south to
avoid the treacherous shoals
of Georges Banks off the New
England coast, but had no idea
of the east-flowing trap that
awaited them on that course.
They were following an unal-
tered British sailing manual
published 70 years before.
Franklin threw the book
away.
He and Folger drew up a
remarkably accurate chart
whose path closely parallels
that shown by satellite data
today and included detailed
information on how to stay
out of the stream's way.
It was a prodigious achieve-
ment. Before Franklin's chart,
the Gulf Stream had ambushed
countless merchant seamen
and pirates, but whatever they
learned they kept to them-
selves, eager to keep their
competitive advantage in the
new global economy.
Once Franklin figured out
the Gulf Stream, he could not
leave it alone.
On April 28, 1775, with the
fate of the 13 colonies in the
balance, Franklin was on his
way to France looking to enlist
help for the burgeoning Revo-
lution.


Along the way, he decided
to do something that would
change the course of history
- climate history.
In the company of two of
his grandchildren, he carefully
lowered a thermometer into
the ocean at 8 a.m. on April 29.
He noted an 11-degree jump in
water temperatures, to 71
degrees. He knew he was in
the Gulf Stream. Franklin took
his measurements four to six
times a day, until May 2.
He would take similar read-
.ings every time he crossed the
big current.
"I find that it is always
warmer than the sea on each
side of it," he observed to a
French colleague. His advice
to captains: Keep a thermome-
ter handy, and use it diligently.
Seventy years later, Frank-
lin's great-grandson Alexander
Bache persuaded the U.S. gov-
ernment to take systematic
measurements. Ultimately,
Franklin's pioneering mea-
surements laid the ground-
work for generations of
researchers who still work
today trying to fathom the
stream's deepest secrets.

Anthony R. Wood reports
for The Philadelphia Inquirer.


I -' I I I I I


i~SFj~133 ~ GDPil~S


..'i~ ............ ,









THE MIAMI HERALD I MiamiHerald.com. INTERNATIONAL EDITION SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2006
... ....................... ...............................................


OPINION
JESUS DIAZ JR,, PUBLISHER I TOM FIEDLER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR I JOE OGLESBY, EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR


JOHN S. KNIGHT (1894-1981)


JAMES L. KNIGHT (1909-1991)


- w _do____ -






-
49w- bo- a a
410 woo 0 04b w



























ftommilm 4




--C-




-~ r
d-4 M -
404 a*ag a nnw
as opmam 4ow 0 4b

ma w 1m 4bQ
aneb41 s mmp 0



































-- .



-~ ___
aim41M 4bMO



w ow40






m-m mmm f mw- -

44 0 db 4 -0 ow __

0 ob- po w 4 -0010- -



4amno- .0






=Availabl




OMEN0 4 -a& f


4m ONN _0 u N

ft- w OM aoet"o
ow -_

om a w- am --w


ft -N

- bw m a 00R





- ___4"w M -40Qb ef
eftamumqm
--am- 4ft

SNOW 400D_


ql- - -


40 4now









- ho- a munsmm- w

___ do- doow
dp




4M4o- 4

____b 4_P


q -w-0

d~p ft p-09bb. -

*w m-- 0

- 0do 4 w -aw


^ '-a- .Hjrn ru.. n-
--- --





"Copyrighted Material




-Syndicated .Content


lwxrU9J


---
q --- -
60.mop- m0*


__ m s~-

~CI C
- 4o


le from Commercial News Providers"


dm -w db b- 41

40 b S---ft
4 ow.- -Ip

-a p-m qmm -

mldb . 4m

OW. 10 4b --
OP-%- 4w~
S. -






-0-0 in -lS 4


ft -


__ .. -


-0



-.o

qw


0w -n
4b -

*m Qw-- a
a. b S -0


-aC

-S. -. 4-4100


--0 - M. o -d
-0






* 0


0 --

-


ftf. m amo -f

--.4 m 0 0*N


- --m


4- 40- d-p M 4
41P- -o -0

.140- 41





40
-1)










- "GM~o-down-
* mm- S.



~dp ml lm
0 .440. -*


0 ___am 0 S.
~ S
C -r *


('an tIh 7N. \ comahtl Mhth mn and bmadlhl*


da. .40 - *m
a- 4- q --- -
aWQW - 010od ft-0-.0

-o .4 ab. - a.
441P. S ma amS.


Sr c
--

MW -0-.
".a.
-o - .
0 a S.






4b .00 411. *p


pm m- 4-a m -


. JI m m-- -qa -


4b a


- 0 S a-


duo-ae-410. am
g-a-4
dow0 mo 0 a * -
an. Nm 60 4b 4b- -m

am. -a aMMW
S- -- mom- up -
- -N --a

ow- 4w -0--P

Q-o -0w- Go
d 1b- -go- -mop-dub a
4b p .N0.qp.= -

41b om- -.10. -
a. S- -~-a
-ap -

- -


-0Go. ORO 0-M.


-- -.M mma. ft








S. -
4N. .0 o- P
4 .0 -0 -
- - -G-


S -


-a
0
-a-


ab 40a 4b
.Imp fow 4p


mea oga fSw.wa u, loa m - -
4b .1m, al,





.- Q
am4 410- o q a-- *
0-40 401100-- a p m ,a,
aw qun"40 y m G.". - -
aw- 0.600 419MP*- -am
- 0dw.4M-M Aw -a up
- mu, mmsm m, --o b--a am
- b. -- awa- alow
-amb- -am- 40
40. a- -110P, -411
ft. *' w Of.
-albm 4- -0nf a
mamn- 4-qw - -
4b am- -M also,

401 dN 0 099MW 4MW -

-a0 .08.

a 40Pa AW q'p


Shllw-.I- Mdm .
- .-
L a.


ReadingI is goo for you.


So C is -recycling. I


Keep an er m




Iraq. ('hina. Iran

ft*t ft-- -p a M*- f


I L -L.AN.- ,L A-A. *& -


a






, 'II$; I


I -II to: "16 *.4


10 -. 0 *@0.10 g


* 1


* . 0
* .9
,
**..**e ..
* S S 5 0 0


Ir


*1
'if


I I -1 1-


It. 1 .1-1


* *SO9***


I o I Io I


* 0


$lots* feel


0 0 0 0


It


I I100 1 11 111.,


1 11;19


S 0 5 0(l))rc
* giiet I


Ul


0 ,


*a


4,0o1


I


.*


ag,'


h


'II.


t

+,


;t


Ava
*.1


ible
I

*1I


opyrighted Material i

Syndicated Content,,
S 0 0 a W
"om Commercial News Providers
1 *1l1l I I II' i I


0 W w1I

0e


* O .


e *


0
I
S


a,
'It
I.
0
0

a'


'*U '11* of 11I
ts Op Iti;ri;~r(~

to v 411 00111 little 9


0 0. *


* *


offr ?I S


'pg I


*g~qo~g*0)g5*~egO9


0


1 t'1 1 I .4


*.g 0


tI listVi3t 01,


s e I0


:tt ~st


0 11 16


*9,
*


* 1gB?.. I :
~99 *g5lg a.'''** 0..!.


l o *


I t*I


I~lnI


p


m


1~


4


-too


I. I


mlmmmm


of 0 to $


0 0
$*logo 1 06,191,1.1


I I I f I 1 0 1 16 0 0 0 0 I


11!Jil







PAGE 12C, MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2006


~ --- -


.,,-.

_O j 4 Z QQ A 'A Mo. 11 .1 1





*; -4L-~.;St 1;- --- -.~*".



A5 - -
-qq-
4,4- __


The dream life is real life with
FirstCaribbean.



Talk to our Home Finance

Specialists today!


Offer valid from December 5th 2005 March 31st 2006.


FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.


Thk2~~


4e


~ _I___~I____________~


THE TRIBUNE




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - Version 2.9.9 - mvs