Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00286
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: January 7, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00286
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text







"SATISFY YOUR /
CRAVING" Jr

HIGH 68F
LOW 54F

SSUNNY AND
CHILLY


The


Tribune


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION AGAIN


Ehe Liami AI=eratl
BAHAMAS EDITION


Volume: 102 No.39 SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2006 PRICE 750







4 .0 .. .. _, .4


0U


55,000 patrons


impacted by


stolen credit


card and bank


account data


By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
MORE than 50,000 Atlantis
customers have been left
exposed to possible identity
fraud following a massive theft
of personal information from
the hotel, it emerged yesterday.
-Kerzner International has
revealed details of the theft in a
document filed with the Securi-
ties and Exchange Commission.
Information stolen included
names, addresses, credit card
details, social security numbers,
driver's licence numbers and/or
bank account data.
SIt is thought the information
went missing from the hotel's
computer database and was the
work of either an insider with
technological know-how or an
outside hacker.
Based on information
received and its own internal
investigation, the management
is notifying affected customers
in writing so they can take steps
to protect themselves from pos-
sible identity fraud.
The hotel is also providing,
at no cost to them, a credit mon-
itoring service for one year.
According to the FBI, identi-


ty theft is generally perpetrated
to facilitate other crimes, such
as credit card fraud, cheque
fraud or mortgage fraud.
With a person's identifying
information, an identity thief
can open new accounts in the
name of a victim, borrow funds
in the victim's name, or take
over and withdraw funds from
existing accounts of the victim,
such as their checking account
or their home equity line of
credit.
In Kerzner International's
document, the resort said it
believes around 55,000 cus-
tomers may be affected.
"To date, the resort has not
received any evidence that the
information has been used to
commit identity fraud or in any
other manner adverse to its cus-
tomers.
"The resort has engaged out-
side counsel and a firm special-
ising in information security to
assist it in responding to this
incident," the statement said.
The resort has notified
Bahamian and US law enforce-
ment authorities and is co-oper-
SEE page 10


$20.00 SHOP
"Plenty for Twenty"
OPEN:
8:00am 8:00pm Daily


#1 East St. (South of Wluff Rd.) 323-5300
#2 Blue Hill Rd. (opp. Stardust) 326 3452
#3 Village KRd. (Between Bank ofBahamas & Supersaver) 394 3045
Where the Prices are great and there
is somethingfor every one :-








QUALITT PROD]aC
(Do 't eFoedB h-Co)Ca


Thirteen dolphins destined for the Atlantis resort make it
over Paradise Island bridge in the early morning yesterday.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/ Tribune Staff)

SEE page 3


Airport

security

workers

walk out
A. DISPUTE between a pri-
vate security firm and its
employees caused a "momen-
tary gap" in service at Nassau
International Airport yesterday.
The firm, contracted by pri-
vate international airlines, has
been in dispute with its employ-
ees. This resulted in some of
them walking off their jobs yes-
terday afternoon.
Lorine Armbrister, under-
secretary at the Ministry of
Transport and Aviation, told
The Tribune: "The airport
authority moved to fill the gaps
with its own employees and
screening points are now oper-
ational and the security of the
airport has not been compro-
mised."
She said the walkout caused
some inconvenience, resulting
in a "little gap" in service, but
the airport authority immedi-
ately moved in to fill these gaps
and the points were now oper-
ational.
"The Ministry of Transport
and Aviation is reviewing all of
its options and, until a full inves-
tigation has been conducted, I
am not at liberty to say what
action will be taken.
"The immediate problem is
to secure the security points to
make sure that we are in com-
pliance with what is required,"
Ms Armbrister said.


Corporation


feud bursts


into open


By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE feud between the Water
and Sewerage Corporation's
general manager and chairman
came to a head yesterday as
both men broke their silence.
General manager and CEO
Abraham Butler accused Mr
Donald Demeritte of being a
disruptive force and setting the
corporation years back in its
development.
Mr Demeritte in turn stood
by his actions as WSC's chair-
man in the past year and
declared that he w:s fcoinid. that government wiM r'nw'in v hlc i
contract for 2006.
Earlier this week, The Tri-
bune reported that a dispute
between Mr Demeritte and Mr
Butler over the number of pro-
motions Mr Demeritte had
ordered was fast reaching boil-


ing point.
Yesterday, Mr Butler told
reporters that the promotions
proposed by Mr Demeritte
were "obviously not properly
thought out." He said that since
Mr Demeritte's appointment in
January, 2005, the corporation
had regressed.
Mr Butler further said that
Mr Demeritte was a major dis-
traction to the day-to-day busi-
ness of the corporation and is
"no longer deserving of trust."
"The present issues (facing
the corporation) are a result of
abuse of power, personal agen-
0('n1 :41 : 1 .r 'I ; !, ei ol p t!rop 'r
'I PI I n 4 fl;t I I '< i'jP I P ;)i!-
maunu (It lhmnall) I l'mci iltlc, ail ot4
which are not in line with cor-
porate objectives.
"This has resulted in chaos
SEE page 2


By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Stall' Reporter
THE new Coroner's ('lrlf
magistrate, displaced iitlfi
deplorable conditions ait lhe
Rodney Bain building fo'teed
the court's closure, is expressing
serious health and safety con-
cerns about her new location.
In a scathing letter exclusive-
ly released to The Tribune
about conditions at Court Six
on Parliament Street, Magis-
Ir:1l, imlda Vir il said ii(ll 1n l only
!s; h ln cjuritl ;1nd-'lt iisI I h
I' ,,c inl;i qu el; lc fir her 1(1-ff
She said she refusess" to go
there.
Court Six was only made
available as a temporary loca-
tion for Magistrate Virgil after
the presiding magistrate there,


Rencrt MCkclI ., rcporlcdlv
Ir igntiodl s list lidalv over poor
NVlt ny. condittilions.
She told The Triniune that
,liii tp giving a letter from
r hi" I Mgitistrate Roger Gomez
o(n I.iimu.1. 5. stating that she
would he relocated to the Salem
I1lidlnti on Parliament Street,
she wrote a letter of response,
which basically expressed her
discontent with this decision.
Her letter said the Coroner's
Court includes the coroner,
police officers, seven jurors, and
support s;taill
"'h1 C COU I 11 i'4r'l1mli) '4l
Iti- c out kn l'rh(n ni
Sitrc l is ifad.l'qutil' I h1 inr.'4 ,
all of these persons," said Mrs
Virgil.
She said the court had one
entrance and one exit, which
SEE page 10


325-WOOD
-Kw;E~l~rs~aaa

~at 6j
34wP


Magistrate's~








THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2006


LOCAL NEWS


Dispute leaves Water

& Sewerage in turmoil


]*to backs c azzi Frm


FROM page one

and division within the organi-
sation, and has set the Water
and Sewerage Corporation back
several years in its transforma-
tion plans," he said.
As Mr Butler made these
statements, two WSC executives
left the press conference in
protest.
Mr Butler continued by say-
ing that the financial impact of
the proposed non-management
promotions would be between
$800,000 and $1 million, and not
$20,000, as reported by Mr
Demeritte.
Mr Butler said this estimated
cost is something the corpora-
tion cannot afford as it strug-
gles to meet its present payroll.
"For the past several months,
I've found it very difficult to
meet payroll. As a matter of
fact, we have exceeded our
overdraft facility and we are
paying a very high interest
rate," he said.
Mr Butler said that before the
appointment of Mr Demeritte,
the WSC for the first time in
many years recorded a profit.
"Under me as chairman the
net profit for the fiscal year 2004
was $7.5 million," he said.
Trouble reportedly began
brewing between Mr Butler and
Mr Demeritte a few months ago
over the proposed Arawak Cay
Reverse Osmosis project, and
reached breaking point when
Mr Demeritte made several
promotional changes in the
organisation allegedly without
consultation with the WSC
board.
Mr Butler said that a new
operating model implemented
last year to make the corpora-
tion a measurement-manage-
ment organisation, had been dis-
rupted by Mr Demeritte.
"Since the arrival of chair-
man Demeritte, the following
have resulted: interference with
day-to-day operation, intimida-
tion of executives and other
staff, threats to fire executives
'to make a mark on the organi-
sation', delay of implementa-
tion of the Arawak Cay Reverse
Osmosis Plant, confusion with
'backdoor' union negotiations,
undermining the general man-
ager and executive manager's
authority, board minutes were
either not produced or always
late and usually not reflecting
what was discussed in the pre-


vious meeting," Mr Butler
charged.
In March, 2005, the govern-
ment gave the corporation-per--
mission to solicit proposals for
the Arawak Cay Plant to meet
the Phase III Atlantis demand,
Mr Butler said.
"It was determined that the
contract needed to be awarded
by the end of June, 2005, to
ensure the required deadlines
were satisfied and to avoid addi-
tional costs through the exten-
sion of shipping contracts.
"The Water and Sewerage
Corporation was well on its way
to meeting this deadline through
competitive bidding. Chairman
Demeritte, however, decided to
annul the process and instructed
executive managers to negoti-
ate directly with a firm that had
not been pre-qualified nor had
been invited to submit a pro-
posal. Executive management
recorded its objections but car-
ried out the instructions," the
general manager said.
Mr Butler said whenthe pro--
posal was received, it was
reviewed by executive manage-
ment and external consultants.
"It was determined that the
proposal was not competitive as
the price was exorbitant and
would result in an additional
$40 million over the life of the
contract. It was argued that this
would be a drain on the Public
Treasury and the corporation's
revenue and could result in rate
increases for the public," he
said.
Mr Butler said he is confident
that when Cabinet finishes its
review of the dispute, it will
determine that Mr Demeritte
had not made a positive impact
on the WSC.


Water and Sewerage workers along with Union leaders meet on the front lawn for a press conference.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/ Tribune Staff)


By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THROWING its full support
behind Water and Sewerage's
Corporation chairman Donald
Demeritte, the Bahamas Utili-
ties Services and Allied Work-
ers Union warned that if the
dispute between the chairman
and general manager is not
resolved within the next week, it
will call for the removal of gen-
eril manager Abraham Butler.
Mr Demeritte, who has given
out more than $1 million in rais-
es to 100 employees at the cor-
poration, is locked in a heated
battle with Mr Butler over this


and other issues.
As a result of the raises and
promotions granted by Mr
Demeritte, senior staff say they
now find themselves in a "role
reversal" and are answering
to "less seasoned" junior staff.
In a letter obtained by The
Tribune, a number of con-
cerned employees have asked
for Prime Minister Perry
Christie to step in and remove
Mr Demeritte, who they claim
does not have the professional
.expertise to run the corpora-
tion.
It is alleged that the final
decision in the matter rests
largely.on the shoulders of Min-


ister of Works and Utilities
Bradley Roberts who, it is
believed, is wholeheartedly
behind Mr Demeritte.
Carmen Kemp, president of
Bahamas Utilities Services and
Allied Workers Union
(BUSAWU) thanked Mr
Demeritte and the rest of the
corporation's board for "hav-
ing the wisdom and resolve" to
make the necessary staff
restructuring changes.
"As the board continues to
correct anomaly situations
brought on by previous unfair
promotions and demotions, the.
union hereby confirms that it
will continue to work hand-in-


hand with the board in sup-
porting all its well-intended
efforts," she said.
Mrs Kemp also vehemently
denied that the union is backing
Mr Demeritte because of the
recent promotions that he
granted to its members.
"If this matter isn't resolved
in the next few days, we will be
calling for the removal of one of
the executives, and we will be
backing the one who respects
the union, and who works with
the union," she said.
"Mr Demeritte is bringing
fairplay and the recent promo-
tions that he granted went
through the board," she said.


Chairman confident of new contract


By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
DESPITE severe criticism of
his conduct at the Water and
Sewerage Corporation over the
past year, chairman Donald
Demeritte said he is confident


government will renew his con
tract for 2006.
As thedispute between Mi
Demeritte and Water and Sew
erage Corporation CEO anc
general manager Abraham But
ler reached boiling point yes
terday, the corporation's chair


Sl l Colinia
Financial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information As Of:
06 January 2006
S january 206 .LIViEiW fa TRlADED 1ECURFTrES VISIT WWNW.BISXBAHAMAIS.COM FOR MORE. DATA &.INFORMATION
.. .....li AiLLa..i~ JIMDeEX CLOSE 1,352.44 I CH 00. I2 / %CHG 00.07 YTD 01.731 YTD % 00-13 -
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Previous Close Today's Close Change Dally Vol. EPS $ Div S PIE Yield
' 10 073 Aoa.o Markals 0 073 0 00 -0 69 0 000 N.'M 0 0.
10.40 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 10.40 10.40 0.00 1.456 0.360 7.1 3.46%
7.24 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 7.00 7.0000.00 0.587 0.330 11.6 4.71%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.70 0.70 0.00 0.175 0.020 4.0 2.86%
1.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.26 1.26 0.00 0.105 0.060 12.0 4.76%
1.20 0.87 Fidelity Bank .... ". 1..10 0.00 0.070 0.040 15.7 3.64%
9.60 7.10 Cable Bahamas 9.55 9.55 0.00 0.689 0.240 13.9 2.51%
2.20 2.03 Colina Holdings 1.64 1.64 0.00 -0.046 0.000 NM 0.00%
9.17 7.10 Commonwealth Bank 9.11 9.11 0.00 0.791 0.450 11.5 4.94%
2.50 1.50 Doctor's Hospital 2.20 2.26 0.06 8,400 0.429 0.000 5.0 0.00%
6.20 3.96 Famguard 6.20 6.20 0.00 0.428 0.240 1.3.0 3.87%
10.90 9.70 Finco 10.90 10.90 0.00 0.717 0.530 15.2 4.86%
10.88 7.49 FirstCaribbean 10.88 10.88 0.00 0.695 0.500 13.1 4,60%
10.05 8.00 Focol 10.05 10.05 0.00 0.833 0.500 12.1 4.98%
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 0.022 0.000 52.3 0.00%
10.20 '9.50 ICD Utilities 9.95 9.95 0.00 0.526 0.405 15.1 5.43%
9.05 8.22 J. S. Johnson ...... 9.05 9.05 0.00 0.572 0.560 15.8 6.19%
6.98 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 6.92 6.94 0.02 107 0.138 0.000 50.3 0.00%
10 00 10 00 Premier R.al EsilI.: 0l i' lio 1. 0 0LI 0.16 =..i 760 44 7 60'
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid 5 Ask 5 Last Price JVeekly Vol EPS S Dv S PIE Yield
13 00 12 50 Bahamas Supermarl'keI 12 75 13 75 11 00 1 '68 0 720 7 5 1 24,.
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0 F0 0j I40 RND HOIJ,.gJS Qu Z 0, 54 GO 0 00) NkM 0 0i
Colna Over-ThbeCounair-Seclrfle
4300 21 00 ABD48 4100 43 (0 41 r00 2220 000 10-1 0 001,
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.33 13.33 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
SX Ld Mutuwl Fuds ....
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Nami NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %l.
I 2665 11993 CoIr.,n MGney Mlarkel F.ina 1 206547"
2.5864 2.0704 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.5864 *"
10.7674 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.7674."""
2.2982 2.1530 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.298197"
1 1442 1 0782 Cc.l;i. Bo-lnd Fun, 1 144217-"
FINDEX CLOS 43530a r IYTD 1.321% I 2003 14.88%
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-HI Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fldelit)
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to dae EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Dally Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months NIM Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamet Stock Index. January 1. 1994 = 100
"- AS AT NOV. 30, 2005/ AS AT NOV. 30, 2005
S- AS AT DEC 12, 2005/ - AS AT DEC. 31. 20051 AS AT DEC 31. 2005
TTAd &Xi "3AB- ak __...... E*,4R RI R &"- h20-, 404 *


-man was accused of disrupting sign something I don't know
day-to-day business and cost- about. If I see something here, I
r ing the corporation millions of want to learn about it. If I'm
-dollars due, it was alleged, to going to sign off on anything
d mismanagement, that says we're going to have
At a press conference yester- an expenditure of millions of
-day Mr Butler said that Mr dollars, I want to know about,"
-Demeritte did not understand he said.
his role as statutory chairman Mr Demeritte said he thinks
and exceeded his responsibili- that at this stage his daily pres-
ties by interfering with the exec- ence is needed at the WSC.
utive management in running "They ask me why I am here
the Water and Sewerage Cor- until 11pm some nights. If the
portion (WSC). government is subsidising us $12
Responding to these accusa- million last year, nine the year
tions, Mr Demeritte said he is before, maybe nine or eight the
simply doing all in his power to year before that shouldn't
bring the WSC to the next level, we all be here.
Mr Demeritte said his objec- "Monies being funnelled here
tive is to ensure that govern- and we have problems in the
ment's multi-million dollar sub- schools, we have urban renew-
sidy to the WSC is stopped in al problems and money is fun-
the future, nelled here. That is what we
"We have real financial should be looking at," he said.
opportunities from BahaMar The WSC chairman said he
and Kerzner International. We would gladly spend less time at
missed Emerald Bay, I was not the corporation and will do so
here at that time. C once he is confident the right
-- Gone are-the-days when the ..' p s bns are i-i the right posi-
Bahamas should be suffering tions.
from cash flow problems. Look Mr Demeritte said yesterday
at Boynton Beach, look at Indi- he would not respond further
anapolis, the water corpora- to Mr Butler's accusations until
tions, the water resource com- he had collected all the neces-
panies actually run the entire sary information.
city. They pay for the police, He explained that two inves-
they pay for the firemen, why tigations had been launched by
should we be any different him into all the internal process-
here?" he asked. es at the corporation.
Responding to criticism by The first investigation, started
GEO Butler that he is in office in November last year, has been
more than any previous chair- completed; the second one is
man and writes more e-mails due to be finished by early next
than any other staff member, week, he said.
Mr Demeritte said that he puts "We've all been appointed by
every effort into "turning this government, let the government
corporation around." speak to what I'm doing and
"I think I'm a new breed of what he (Mr Butler) has done.
chairman that they cannot I'm not going to cast aspersions
understand. I am not going to on anybody's character.
come in here, as someone sug- "I will rise and defend myself,
gested, for two minutes once a my actions speak for them-
month, look at something and selves," he said.





MAIN SECTION
Local News............P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12
Editorial/Letters. ....................................... P4
SPORTS SECTION
Sports .............................................P1,2,3,4,5
Com ics................. ... ............ .......... .P6
T.V. G uide................................................... P7
W eather..................................................... P8


CLASSIFIED SECTION 20 PAGES


MIAMI HERALD SECTIONS
Main ...............................................12 Pages
Sports/Business ...........................12 Pages


Legal Notice


NOTICE

PALM REEF LIMITED


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) PALM REEF LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the Intemational.Business Companies.
Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on 5th January,
2006 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and- --
registered by the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated Ltd.,
Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI.

Dated this 7th day of January, A.D. 2006.


Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator


Legal Notice


NOTICE

MARACUJA INVESTMENT LIMITED


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) MARACUJA INVESTMENT LIMITED is in voluntary
.-: dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on 5th January,
..- -..2006 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated Ltd.,
Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVL... .........

Dated this 7th day of January, A.D. 2006.


Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator









THE TIBUN SATUDAYJANUAYL7C006,NAGES


Dolphins arrive







at Atlantis resort


Alvin Forbes
(BIS Photo: Tim Aylen).

University

next stop

for blind

student


By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

OFFERING heartfelt
praise to many, and special
thanks to God, 21-year-old
blind student Alvin Forbes
embarked on the next phase
of his tertiary education
career.
He will soon be leaving
the Bahamas to attend
Heron University in Cana-
da.
Frances Singer-Hayward,
who has made substantial
donations to various educa-
tional programmes in the
past. and who was the major
benefactor for Alvin's edu-
cation in Canada, offered
encouraging words at a
small ceremony at the Gray-
cliff Restaurant yesterday.
:.Alvin to lime is an inspi-
I I., .n to us' all. And what I
want from Alvin is, I want
Alvin to become a symbol
and inspiration for all peo-
ple with various challenges
of various types. And I want
us all to see that a challenge
is merely that a challenge,
to be overcome.
"I don'ant want anyone ever
to feel that just because they
are challenged in some way
it means that they cannot
realise their dream. And
that is what I want imparted
by Alvin's story," she said.
Ms Singer-Hayward said
tlat helping Alvin gives her
unbelievable joy. Being able
to help someone as talented
and tremendous as Alvin
has been a gift to her, she
said.
"Here we are. Here is
Alvin. He has made it, and
so can you that is what I
want today to represent,"
she said.
Alvin told those gathered
that lie faced a number of
hurdles in completing two
years at the College of the
Bahamas (COB).
"Life is a challenge for all
of us. It is a challenge to
embrace the Christian life.
It's a challenge to use the
gifts of learning that God
has given us not only for
own benefit, but for the
enrichment of the lives of
others around us.
"And this has always
been echoing in my mind as
1 journey tlhrouglh this life,
and study. and1 learn daily,"
he said.
Alvin explained that the
first time he felt God calling
for him to devote his life in
SOmle \v I1 to tIle church was
at age i), when lie joined
Father Tynes' confirmation
class.
c"After 1 graduated from
the School of the Blind, I
entered the college of the
Bahamas. Yes, there was
challenges, and I met them.
I was able to do the best I
can, and not only to succeed
in rmy studies but also to
open the eves of the gener-
al public and persons in edu-
cation causing them to
realise that thlie mental abil-
ities of a disabled person is
not lost by misconceptions
brought about by physical
illnesses of the human body.
"COB ;has prepared me
to face the challenges of a
university abroad, and I
express my thanks for all
those at COB who assisted
me and challenged me to
excel in all I did." he said.


The 13 dolphins go across the bridge to their new home at Atlantis under heavy police protection.
(Phloto: Mario Duncanson/ Trtibune Staff)


r,; ''~J


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gaiI


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Two truck loads of dolphins under police protection going across the
I .,(Ph!ot Mar



Activist alleges


buy 'irresponsible'


By CARA BRENNEN.
Tribune Staff Reporter

THIRTEEN dolphins dis-
placed by Hurricane Katrina
arrived at the Atlantis Resort
yesterday, where they will fea-
ture as the centrepiece of a new
interactive aquatic attraction.
However, the acquisition by
Kerzner International is being
labelled "irresponsible" by' one
local animal activist.
Kerzner decided to purchase
the animals after they were dis-
placed when the Gulfport
Marine Life Oceanarium in
Mississippi was destroyed dur-
ing Hurricane Katrina.
In an interview with The Tri-
bune yesterday, Sam Dun-
combe, the founder of ReEarth,
criticised the resort for its deci-
sion.
She claimed that all of the
dolphins may have been
exposed to another dolphin
infected with the Morbillivirus -
which causes serious diseases in
marine mammals.
"I don't think that Kerzner
has enough information," she
said.
Mrs Duncombe claimed that
while Kerzner has said it is bet-
ter for all of the dolphins to
remain together, the one sick


0 In brief

A 27-year-old male resi-
dent of Sea Breeze Lane was
shot in the chest, neck, and
forearm when the driver of a
Black Mitsubishi Montero
drove past a group he was
standing with and opened
fired.
The incident occurred near
Hospital Lane and Dunmore
SStreet. The man was rushed
to Princess Margaret Hospital
where he remains in critical
condition.

Police arrested a 29-year-
old male resident of Garden
Hills after they executed a
search warrant on his home
and discovered three and half
pounds of marijuana worth
between $350 and $375. He
was expected to be arraigned
in court yesterday.


dolphin has been left in Missis-
sippi to die alone.
She said the company has act-
ed as if it is taking action to save
the dolphins when in reality,
the dolphins are being moved
from one form of captivity to
another.
Mrs Duncombe also noted
that the dolphins' former home
was destroyed by hurricanes; a
disaster which could be repeat-
ed in the Bahamas.
"Do any of these facilities
have the ability to protect these
animals if there is a major hur-
ricane here?" she asked. "At
least if they are in the wild, they
can swim to safety."
Mrs Duncombe said that the
journey to the Bahamas must
have been a traumatic experi-
ence for the dolphins.
"Imagine how you would feel
if someone put you in a little
box where you could hardly
move, and transported you far
away to a strange new environ-
ment."
She noted that any transfer
of dolphins is traumatic because
the animals have to first be cap-
tured.
"It is very stressful, there is a
scientific paper that says that
captured animals are six times
more likely to die after they are
moved."
It her view, Kerzner Interna-
tional was only interested in
using the animals for financial
gain. "Thisis a Christian coun-
try, I think it is wrong," she said.
Mrs Duncombe added that
as many countries have dolphin
encounter programmes, Kerzn-
er is not creating anything new
or exciting.
She suggested that a bigger
impact could have been made
with a Cirque du Soleil-type
show, featuring acrobats por-
traying Bahamian themes.
"This would be something
that people from all over the
world would be motivated to
come to the Bahamas just to
see," she said.



M W RTLI-kil


Paradise Island bridge.
io Duncanson/ Tribune Staff)


I i Cinema


I f.t The Mall-at-Marathon
iE BOX OFFICE OPENS AT 10:00 AM DAILY


N H
GRANDMA'S BOYS NEW 1:15 3:35 N/A 6:10 8:25 10:40
RUMOR HAS IT C 1:10 3:20 N/A 6:15 8:30 10:45
WOLF CREEKC___ C" 1:00 3:25 N/A. 6:00 8:25 10:50
MEMOIRS OF A GEISHA T 120 N/A 4:20 7 .:20 tl N/A 1:20
THE RINGER T 1:05 3:30 N/A 6:10 8:20 10:45
THE MATADOR T 1:10 3:35 N/A 6:05 8:30 10:55
FUN WITH DICK & JANE T 1:15 3:50 N/A 6:20 8:35 10:50
CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN 2 B' 1:05 3:40 N/A 6:05 8:20 10:40
KING KONG T 1:00 N/A 4:30 N/A 8:40 N/A
KING KONG T 2:00 N/A N/A 5:30 N/A 9.30
THE CRONICLES OF NARNIA B 1:30 N/A 4:30 7:30 N/A 1030
I IF YVl IR F-CARI TO RFSFRVF TICKFTS AT R-30 49 OF WIWW A I FRIA1IMIDAS M
THE FAMILY STONE NEW 1:25 3:30 6:20 8:25 10:35
RUMOR HAS IT C 1:20 3:40 6:25 N/A N/A
WOLF CREEK C N/A N/A N/A 8:20 10:30
FUN WITH DICK & JANET 1:0 3:35 6:30 8:40 10:35
CHEAPER BYTHEDOZEN 2 B 3:30 6:15 8:25 10:25
KING KONG 12:30 N/A 4:30 N/A 8:30
.THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA B 1:00 4;00. N/A 7:10. 10:00
E 0 5 -


CAREER OPPORTUNITY

BRANCH MANAGER EXUMA

As a leader in the Insurance, Financial Services & Investments
industry for over 85 years, British American Insurance Company of
the Bahamas Limited seeks a progressive, self-starter to fill this
challenging position at our newest branch in George Town, Exuma.

Manager will be responsible for:
Successful launch of the Branch during January 2006
Business Development for the Island of Exuma & Cays
Marketing & Sales of the full range of the company's
products & services including life & health Insurance,
Mortgages, Annuities, Pensions & Investment products
Managing operations of the branch (including claims
processing & sales support) engendering a "can do"
approach, working to "best practice" and "continuous
improvement" philosophy
Providing customer service to a diverse existing & new clientele

Key Competencies Required:
Effective oral & written communication with a diverse clientele
Networking & public speaking skills
Result orientation & goal achievement
Planning, Organizational & Conceptual thinking ability
Flexibility & resiliency
Quality-oriented & customer-focused
Ability to work honestly and reliably with minimum supervision

Minimum Qualifications include:
Bachelor of Arts degree or equivalent
Series VII, Canadian Securities Course or FLMI a plus
Five years experience (three years management) in the
financial services industry

The successful candidate will receive a competitive base & productivity-
linked salary and attractive benefits package commensurate with qualifi-
cations & experience. Please forward your resume, documentary proof of
your qualifications and three character references to:

Human Resources Manager
British American Insurance Company of the Bahamas Limited
Independence Drive
P.O. Box N-4815
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 242-361-2525




a 1AMIERIC AN9 ,20
E,!abli[hiad 1920 D


SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2006, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


.8


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4. SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2006


EIOI AULETE S T HEEITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.


Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348













SSyndicated C - -'








Available from Commercial News Providers"


a. -
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0=0 0 -N.-


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9


I


EDITOR, The Tribune
THE NEWS coverage of
Junkanoo over the past several
weeks has been quite marvelous
and the photo of the empty
bleachers in yesterday's Tribune
was perhaps the icing on our
national cake.
I began picking up on this
around about the time last
month that The Tribune was'
carrying news of Junior
Junkanoo on one side of the
front page and on the other, the
abysmal failure of our educa-
tion system. No one seemed to
connect these two phenomena
but it was quite clear to me any-
way that perhaps our national
focus ought to be repositioned.
I have no doubt that the thou-
sands of our school children that
get wrapped up in Junior
Junkanoo have absolutely noth-
ing else on their minds from the
beginning of the school year to
the end of it. Homework clear-
ly is perfecting the Junkanoo
shuffle and to hell with read-
ing, writingg and 'rithmetic.
Then we had the story of the
collapse of our number one
industry's gateway with no gov-


S



ernment official even being
aware of the crisis and this sto-
ry culminating with the revela-
tion that our principal junkanoo
shuffler was watching Junkanoo
but was being kept informed of
the crisis nonetheless.
And through it all we have
the greasy spoon of our bleach-
ers which quite clearly were
brought in several years ago to
make some "Christmas money"
and which has done this at the
very high cost of destroying Bay
Street business at the tradition-
ally busiest time of the year.
And the picture in The Tribune
yesterday of a quarter mile of
empty bleachers begs the ques-
tion: "Can we all ultimately eat
Junkanoo when everything else
has been destroyed"?
Junkanoo is undoubtedly a
unique Bahamian art form and
unquestionably a significant
part of the Bahamian culture
but it has become today the
essence of our being to the total


.exclusion of everything else,
including our economy both
now and for many years into
the future. Like everything else
in this country we can't seem
to see disaster until it actually
happens and even then we col-
lectively bury our heads in the
sand and pretend it hasn't hap-
pened. Junkanoo has got to be
relocated from Bay Street or
reverted to what it used to be
with no bleachers, no Guap-
tanamo style chain link fenciig
and quick and effective clean
up afterwards.
Tourists are not interested jn
Junkanoo and simply see the
downtown aftermath as dis-
gusting and nasty. And they are
not going to shop between
Christmas and New Year in
what essentially is a sports sta-
dium. Imagine some American
politician trying to close off
Broadway at Thanksgiving and
privately sell bleacher seating
for the Macy's parade. It just
couldn't happen! And we still
think "It's better in Tlje
Bahamas" Better than what?'
BRUCE G. RAINE
Nassau,
January 5, 2006.


Single mother's house


present is bad example


EDITOR, The Tribune.


I THINK that the wrong
precedent is being set by "The
church", in their choice of giving
a house to a single mother with
numerous children. I also think
that it is a great idea for the civ-
il or members of the civic soci-
ety to bestow such a gift upon
an individual in their time of
need, however it is also my
belief that those individuals that
say that they follow the princi-
ples which are stated in the
Bible must be held to a higher
standard. There must be other
persons who are also in need,
unless what example are we tru-
ly setting for those generations
yet to come? That the o worthy
of being given a house, are
those who are single and for
whatever reasons are unable to
cover the cost.
I can understand being sin-


gle, and having one child prior
to marriage, due to circum-
stances arising whereby one
might not be fully prepared,
however publicly rewarding
individuals that seem to make
consistent mistakes, or errors
in judgment of a similar nature,
is not meritorious, but, in my
opinion, rather irresponsible. I
am not attempting to judge or
cast aspersions upon any indi-
vidual who happens to find
themselves in such a predica-
ment, for only God can perform
such a task, but I do think that
additional guidance is needed.
I remember that while attend-
ing university, I also chose to
place myself in situations
whereby, an unprepared for
child might have been the
result, though I feel like I was
extremely lucky. I often think of
the many days at the end of
each month, when I would be


extremely apprehensive while
waiting, hopiAg, and praying,
that the young lady in my life:
was not pregnant. I am not say-
ing that persons who 1nuke mnJi
takes do not desci\ citt''.
rewards; or othei' acIs ot kint ,
ness being e\pressedJ t 'oIrM
them, ho\'e er this should nif'
be the priman or onl\ crterda
upon whichh it is derrned, -,
I reahse that this le(it r nu'
cause discomfort. jnno:'ancs,
or possibly irritatnn. Io\\ e\
that was no; it' intent I v'. rot
because I simply wanted ti
express my views on the issue at
hand.
I would like to thank you for
your time and consideration.

PAUL CUMBERBATCf
Jr
Nassau,
January 5, 2006.


-* ---. .-. .
'" '
West Bay St. Chip
(opposite Fish Fry, in the bqck ofit f

-a r'- '


January 3rd -


on all items while
supplies last '


Open 12:00 8:00pm


rm *


*r


)
)

)



)
).
)


t


(y a//2tr/ e co i//ia/iy



The Island Promotions
International



BLOCK PARTY

for

ANTI-EXTRADITION
MARCHERS


9



te


Come Share

I Your Views! .4

t FREE .
SREFRESHMNENTS ',
, e.


Use LNG as


trade-off on


US
EDITOR, The
I READ in to
the American a
Arthur Foulkes
cerned that
approved the p
nal for liquid
(LNG). I also r
are significant
tourism levels w
tourists provide
national income
A greater c
mind is the U
move to require
zens to have
return to the US
The Bahamas o
nations.
Our Caribbea
specifically th
Islands and Puel
territories, do
requirement. Ca
ico are already
cerned about wl
to their tourism
cans can get tl
experience else
a passport, our t
will be in trouble
work of govern
vate industry.
Your paper t(
to the Prime Min
about allowing t


passports

Tribune and its resultant effect on th4
environment (read: bad), its
day's paper that effect on tourism (read:bad)
ambassador (Sir and on security (read: terrorist
' article) is con- target). I have a modest pr&e
we have not posal that might be of interest
proposed termi- to our Prime Minister and tlik
Natural gas pro-energy President of thd
read that there USA. ;
concerns about Since my first letter against
here American LNG published by The Tribuiie
the bulk of our in 2003, you will understand
;. that this is difficult for me, bit
concernn in my there is a greater good, o.td
S's unilateral national economy. S
American citi- I propose that in lieu 6t
a passport to allowing the Americans to build
S after a visit to an LNG terminal in Tth'
r other foreign Bahamas and meeting all eriii
ronmental requirements hadit
in competition, been built in the USA, that the
he US Virgin United States allows special stall
rto Rico, as US tus to The Bahamas as they d<
not need this to Puerto Rico. This would
nada and Mex- allow Americans to visit heri
y greatly con- and return without a passport;
hat this will do The US would provide any
i. Since Ameri- required security as they would
he Caribbean in their territories. Perhaps pror
where without Bahamas tourist support coutl
tourist industry also be added to offset any ne'g
e despite all the ative impact of the LNG ternfii
iment and pri- nal here.


today also refers
lister's dilemma
he LNG facility


ALAN JACKSON, M-c
Nassau
January 3, 2006


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that FAITH MARCIA MOWATT,
VILLAGE ROAD, P.O.BOX N-8497, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 31ST day of DECEMBER, 2005
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147,, Nassau, Bahamas.


DATE:


DATE:
Saturday, January 7th, 2006

TIME: 6:00pm

PLACE:
Taylor & Market St. Parking Lot


Nation must




switch focus




away from




Junkanoo


-- -- -


I I


MEN%
amp








THE TRIBUNE


SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2006, PAGE 5


Ia
Minitry ost


THE Ministry of Tourism
is to host a special class next
week for persons who aspire
to a career in the film indus-
try.
The class, scheduled for
3pm on Tuesday, January 10,
is part of a series of "master
classes" being put on as part
of National Tourism Week.
"Anyone who is interested
in films and movies, who
wants to be in films or to
learn more about the film
industry can benefit from
attending the National
Tourism Week master classes
session 'So you want to be in
the movies?'" said the min-
istry in a statement yesterday.
The session targets aspir-
ing actors, producers, cam-
eramen and support person-
nel with the aim of providing
valuable information "and
showing how Bahamians can
'benefit economically from on-
location film production in
the islands of the Bahamas
and beyond," the statement
said.
"Participants should expect
to have a better understand-
ing of what being in the film
industry entails. They will be
taught about working with
agents and how to stay con-
nected with various persons
in the industry" said Craig
Woods, film commissioner for
the Ministry of Tourism.
"This session is not about
meeting celebrities, it is about
getting a better understand-
ing of what it takes to be in
the film industry" said
Woods. "Many people
believe that because they
have a pretty face they will
make it in Hollywood, but
that's far from the truth. This
session will teach you how to
make the right contacts to get
where you want to be."
The panelists for this ses-
sion are experts in the film
industry.
Morgan O'Sullivan of Ire-
land formed the Bahamas
Film and Television Consul-


TROPICAL
EXTEMINTOR Yong an



PES COTRO


SATURDAY,
JANUARY 7
12:30 411
1:00 Treasture Attic
1:30 In This Corner
2:00 All Access
2:30 Inside Hollywood
3:00 Sports Desk
3:30 Sports Lifestyles
4:00 A Dose of Reality
4:30 Pilot Central
5:00 Cricket World
5:30 Gillette World Sports
6:00 Ballroom Boxing
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
7:30 Partners In Crime
8:00 Bahamian Things
8:30 Island Jams
9:00 Tropical Beat
10:00 Band of Gold: Early Day of
Motown
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 The Lounge
12:30 Community Pg. 1540AM


SUNDAY,
JANUARY 8
2:00 Community Pg. 1540AM
9:00 E.M.P.A.C.T.
9:30 The Voice That Makes The
Difference
10:00 Effective Living
10:30 Morning Joy Special
11:00 St. Barnabas Anglican
Church
1:00 Gillette World Sports
1:30 Sports Desk
2:00 A Rhema Moment
3:00 Ever Increasing Faith
3:30 Ernest Angley Ministries
4:30 Spiritual Impact
5:00 Walking In Victory
6:00 One Cubed
6:30 Listen Up
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
7:30 This Week In The Bahamas
8:00 Flashback: A Year In Review
9:00 Bahamas Conference of
Seventh Day Adventist
Annual Conference
10:00 Turning Point
10:30 Bobby Jones
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Gospel Video Countdown
12:30 Comm.Pg. 1540AM
NOE0 N-V3rsre


tancy Limited. He has acted
as an executive producer or
co-producer on films such as
Braveheart, Angela's Ashes,
Animal Farm, David Cop-
perfield, The Count of Monte
Cristo, and Reign of Fire.
His production company,
World 2000 Entertainment
Limited, is a privately held
Irish-registered company
formed in 1994 to develop,
produce and distribute fea-
ture and television entertain-
ment for the global market.
Tara Walls is an experi-
enced product placement
executive at two Hollywood
studios. She oversees all
entertainment marketing
accounts for Rogers & Cow-
an.
She has more than eight
years experience in develop-
ing and implementing prod-
uct placement programmes,
promotional campaigns and
sponsorship opportunities for
numerous categories, includ-
ing automotive, packaged
goods, fast food, travel, bev-
erage and alcohol, and com-
puter software.
Tara joined Rogers & Cow-
an from Miramax Films,
where she started their prod-
uct placement division in
1997. While at Miramax, Tara
worked on such films as She's
All That, Scream 3, Choco-
lat, Scary Movie 1 and 2,
Bounce, Dogma, Serendipity
and Kate and Leopold.
Actress, writer, and pro-
ducer Pamela Poitier has
recently completed the script
for her first original situation
comedy.
"She lobbies the media to
not project a prejudiced or
stereotyped view of anyone
and speaks on the responsi-
bility of the audience to
respond and empower them-
selves," said the statement.
It said Ms Poitier is active
in the community and nation-
al organizations such Women
in Film and the American
Cancer Society.


Bank launches






prepaid cards


By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bank of the Bahamas
International launched its new
line of Visa prepaid credit and
gift cards yesterday.
The bank's manager of busi-
ness development and public
relations Tanya Wright said that
the cards promote controlled
spending and will make life eas-
ier for consumers.
"You won't ever have to wor-
ry about going overboard,
because your credit limit is up
to you deposit your cash and
charge away.
"With the Bank of the
Bahamas Visa prepaid card you
call the shots. Forget about
monthly payments and interest
rates, deposit your cash, charge
at will, and no strings attached,"
she explained.
The card will be made avail-
able on January 9 and will tar-
get both teenage and adult cus-
tomers.
Mrs Wright said she feels that
with the prepaid card, teenagers
can learn valuable lessons about
managing their funds.
"Don't hand over cash, hand
them a Bank of the Bahamas
prepaid Visa card. You set the
limit, no over-spending and
complete control," she told par-
ents.
Applications for the card can
be picked up at any of the
bank's branches or service cen-
tres in New Providence and the
Family Islands.
Customers with an online
banking account can apply for
the card on the Internet.
The card can be used any-
where Visa is accepted and is
valid for 12 months after the
issue date.
A minimum deposit of $50 is
needed to load the card. Loads
over $10,000 may be permitted
at the discretion of the bank. ,
The gift cards ar51 n'lt I load-
able. If not used for-r "1i days, the
account will be de-activated.


Card holders must agree not
to use the card for any illegal
transactions such as Internet
gambling. Mrs Wright stressed
that such transactions will be
blocked.
Managing director of the
bank Patul Kc\\ ee ncy saiid the'
cards are the first of many prod-'


ucts that will be introduced this
year.
Deputy managing director of
information technology and
human resources: Vaugh
Delaney said the prepaid card is
v.~ ll-tirlJd l:r the Bahamian
nrirket.' i.eause it is tfie kind
of environiAent where persons
tend to be "spend-happy."
"This is something that the
bank has been working on for


some time. We are pleased to
be the first bank in this country
to be able to offer such a pre-
paid card.
"The bank is being very, very
careful in its approach in deliv-
ering products to the market.
We are certainly proud that we
are in a position to be, again, a
Bahamian bank and leading the
way in delivering new products
to this market," he said.


by ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmaiLcom

AS we enter the New Year, Bahami-
ans face an eventful year of high drama in the
political arena. Will there be an early election
- or will it go on as scheduled for 2007?
Campaigners on all sides of the polit-
ical divide will be jostling for votes, and no
doubt offering groundless assurances includ-
ing those PLP parliamentarians set to lose
seats they may have been surprised to have
won in 2002.
Even if the PLP returns to government,
they will do so with fewer seats as Shane Gib-
son, Allyson Maynard-Gibson, Vincent Peet,
Agatha Marcelle, Sidney Stubbs, Veronica
Owens, among others, are expected to concede
defeat after dismal terms.
The FNM cannot afford to lose more
seats, yet it is questionable how many of their
current MPs will survive the electoral fray.
As for independent Long Island MP
Larry Cartwright, will he be fish or fowl, as
questioned by FNM leader Hubert Ingraham at
last year's FNM convention.
In my estimation, Bahamians should expect
Mr Cartwright to join the FNM or decide not
to run in 2007, as I'm doubtful that he can
retain his seat as an independent in this newly
intensified arena of party politics.
Who will be COB's next president
and lead them into university status? Although
deposed former president Dr Rodney Smith
became embroiled in a plagiarism fiasco last
year, his visionary approach to developing
COB into a university was unmatched in 30
years.
What Dr Smith facilitated in just 10 months
has led to more university-style infrastructural
developments, better college courses and
scheduling, and a more realistic outlook in
attaining university status.
Having just completed studies at the
college, I feel emboldened to state that no top
executive currently at COB and who were
there years before Dr Smith's tenure should
be appointed president.
As a student, I have personally seen and
heard other students state that some of these
executives lack interpersonal skills, are poor


leaders and are merely political appointees
rather than true candidates to lead a universi-
ty.
I am aware that many Bahamians have a
xenophobic approach when it comes to bring-
ing in foreign talent, but I would suggest that
council chairman Mr Franklyn Wilson import
a foreign president in the interim, if only to
assist in developing potential Bahamian can-
didates for the university presidency.
If an election is called today, will the victor
be the PLP or will we see the FNM return in
throngs to power?
As it stands today, my early estimation is
that the election results could go in favour of
either major party, as neither PLP nor FNM
seems to have an upper hand when it comes to
the Bahamian populace.
Some people say the PLP government is
too indecisive and suffers from inertia, while
others believe there is too much infighting
within the FNM to establish a convincing agen-
da and bring stable governance.
Will we see a revamp of the education sys-
tem?
Education is suffering immensely from poor
decisions and what seemingly is overall igno-
rance of the needs of both the teachers and
students. Firstly, education needs a single min-
ister, one whose full attention can be directed
towards the educational advancement of
Bahamian society.
Educational facilities must be given a facelift
and new schools must be built to accommodate
the multitude of students now filling the class-
rooms. The government must do a better job at
providing supplies for teachers.
Further, teachers have expressed to me their
desperate need for a pay raise in these times of
overwhelming prices. While the government is
continually raising the salaries of public ser-
vants, who in many instances may not deserve
a raise based on their performances, teachers
still flounder at virtually the bottom of the pay
scale, although all of them hold degrees and are
expected to be the gatekeepers of our society.
Will crime escalate to the point that the US
blacklists the country, just like Jamaica?
Judging from the 2005 crime statistics, I am

SEE page 10


Election year? It


could go either way...


+ THE BAHAMAS, +
E ~TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS
CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST
CHURCH IN THE CARIBBEAN AND
THE AMERICAS
L'EGLISE METHODISTE DANS LA CARAIBE ET LES AMERIQUES
NASSAU CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES
108 Montrose Avenue
PO. Box EE-16379, Nassau, Bahamas; Telephone:
325-6432; Fax: 328-2784; rhodesmethod@batelnet.bs
METHODISM: RAISED UP IN THE PROVIDENCE OF GOD,
TO REFORM THE NATION, BUT ESPECIALLY THE CHURCH AND TO
SPREAD SCRIPTURAL HOLINESS THROUGHOUT THE LAND
(Father John Wesley)
"Celebrating 223 years of continuous Methodist witness for Christ in The
Bahamas"
SECOND LORD'S DAY AFTER THE FESTIVAL OF THENATIVITY,
JANUARY 8, 2006 (The Holy Name)
INTROIT AND COLLECT:
Unto us a Child is born, unto us a Son is given, and His Name shall be called
Wonderful Counsellor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.
Glory to God in the highest and peace among God's people of goodwill.
ALMIGHTY GOD, who named Your only begotten Son Jesus as the sign
of our salvation, give unto us the Holy Spirit that we may recognize Him
as Your Son andtrust in Him as our Saviour; who shed His blood in death
for us and is alive'and reigns with You in the unity of the same Spirit, one
God, now and for ever.
(Prayer Book of the Methodist Church, 16)
WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd East)
7:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes (Sacrament of Holy Communion)
11 ::00 a.m. Sis. Patrice Strachan, Lay Preacher
RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108 Montrose Ave. at
Wulff Rd)
7:00 a.m. Rev. Dr. Raymond R. Neilly (Sacrament of Holy
Communion)
10:00 a.m. Rev. Mark S. Christmas
11:00 a.m. ... Rev. Mark S. Christmas (Youth and Children's Service)
6:30 p.m. Rev. Dr. Raymond R. Neilly (Forum on Methodism)
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (Rose Street, Fox Hill)
11:00 a.m. Rev. Leonard G. Roberts, Jr.
PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza)
11:00 a.m. Rev. Stacia M. Williams-Christmas (Commitment
Service)
HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST CHURCH (28
Crawford St, Oakes Field)
9:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes (Sacrament of Holy Communion)
GOOD SHEPHERD (20 Cedar Terrace, Tall Pines)
5:15 p.m. Rev. Stacia M. Williams-Christmas
CROIX-DES-MISSIONS ALDERSGATE (Quackoo Street)
9 a.m. New Creation Fellowship
METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St)
Thrift Shop and other Ministries
JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford St., Oakes
Field)
CIRCUIT DISCIPLE PROGRAMS
Tuesday at 6:45 p.m. at Wesley Methodist Church, Malcolm Road, East
Thursday at 10 a.m. and at 6:45 p.m. at Rhodes Memorial Methodist Church
OBSERVING THE FAST Thursdays after the evening meal to Friday
lunchtime
RADIO PROGRAMS: Vision On the Lord's Day, ZNS I at 9 p.m.; Great
Hymns of Inspiration On the Lord's Day, Radio 810 at 5:00 p.m.; Family
Vibes, ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.
194TH ANNUAL SESSION OF CONFERENCE: JANUARY 13-23, 2006
Saturday, January 14 Quiet Day at St. David's Methodist Church for Ministers
and Spouses; 6:15 p.m. Vesper Service with Wesleyan Love Feast at St.
David's Methodist Church;
Tuesday, January 17 2:30 p.m. Opening of the Representative Session, St.
Paul's Methodist Church; 7:30 p.m. Communion/Welcome Service at St. Paul's
Methodist Church
Saturday, January 21- 7:00 a.m. Prayer Breakfast at St. Paul's Methodist
Church; 7:30 p.m. -Youth Rally at St. Andrew's Methodist Church;
Lord's Day, January 22, 10:00 a.m. Official Conference Service at St. Paul's
Methodist Church
PRAYERS
OUR BROTHERS AND SISTERS AFFECTED BY HURRICANE WILMA
AND OTHER NATURAL DISASTERS; THE PRIVY COUNCIL APPEAL
THE 194TH ANNUAL SESSION OF CONFERENCE AND THE ANNUAL
SESSIONS OF THE DISTRICT CONFERENCES OF THE MCCA


LOCA NEW








PAGE 6. SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


OAL


Bahamians unaware

of Majority Rule

Day's importance


REVEREND CB Moss,
president of the Bain and
Grant's Town Advancement
Association, said Bahamians
are not sufficiently informed
about the importance of
events like Majority Rule
Day.
In an interview with The
Tribune, Mr Moss called for
schools and churches to teach
students about important
events in Bahamian history,
and asked the government to
make Majority Rule Day a
permanent holiday.
"I am disappointed that to
date, this Majority Rule Day
has not been institutionalized
in the Bahamas.
It is my hope that every
community and island in the
commonwealth should do
,something.
"I think that it is up to the
government to ensure that it


happens. The government
should seek to institutionalise
this day, whether as a holiday
or a day that is observed,"
said Rev Moss.
In commemoration of the
occasion, the association will
hold an outdoor thanksgiving
service at the corer of Mead-
ow and Augusta Streets in
Bain Town.
The service begins at
7.30pm and will be followed
by a fireworks display and
Junkanoo rush-out.
Rev Moss said that it is
most appropriate that the ser-
vice be held in the communi-
ty of Bain and Gfant's Town
for a number of reasons.
However, he pointed out that
the most important reason is
that the late Sir Lynden Pin-
dling was a "son" of the area,
and was most instrumental in
bringing about majority rule.


CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL
CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8th, 2006

Speaker 11:30 a.m. & 7:00p.m.

Pastor Dexter Duvalier
Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. Evening Service: 7:00 p.m. .
Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays) *
SSisters' Prayer Meeting: 11:00 a.m. (1st Thursday of eactlmonth)



GRACE AND PEACE WESLEYAN CHURCH
A SOCIETY OF THE FREE METHODIST CHURCH OF NORTH AMERICA

1 HERE GOD IS ADORED .AND EVERYONE IS AFFIRMED
Worship time: 1lam & 7pm

Adult Sunday School: 10am

Church School during Worship Service


Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

PO. Box SS-5631

Telephone number:324-2538

Telefax number:324-2587
COME TO WORSHIP. LEAVE TO SERVE


THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE
OF THE METHODIST CHURCH
Hillside Estates, Baltic.Avenue, off Mackey Street
PP.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax: 393-8135
S CHURCH SERVICES
* SUNDAY, JANUARY 8,2005
SUNDAY AFTER EPIPHANY

9:00 a.m. Mr. Philip Clarke
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH, Bernard Road
11:00 a.m. Pastor Sharon Loyley
CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH, Zion Boulevard
10:00 a.m. Rev. Carlos Thompson
7:00 p.m. Rev. Carlos Thompson
EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH, East Shirley Street
11:00 a.m. Pastor Martin Loyley
7:00 p.m. Pastor Martin Loyley
GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH, Queen's College
Campus
9:30 a.m. Rev. James Neilly
ST. MICHAEL'S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue
8:00 a.m. Connections Rev. Philip Stubbs
9:30 a.m. Rev. Philip Stubbs
TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
11:00 a.m. Rev. William Higgs
S7:00 p.m. Rev. William Higgs
RADIO PROGRAMMES
"RENEWAL" on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Your Host: Mr. Sidney Pinder
"METHODIST MOMENTS" on each weekday at 6:55 a.m.
Your Host: Mr. Sidney Pinder

IN MOMENTS LIKE THESE
In moments like these. I sing out a song.
I sing out a love song to Jesus.
In moments like these, I lift up my hands
I lift up my hands to the Lord
Singing, "I love You Lord."
Singing, "I love You Lord."
Singing, "I love You Lord."
I Love You.


(rant'se Qotun ?elep 01 let)jobist Cburd)
(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) P.O.Box CB-13046
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)
SUNDAY. JANUARY 8th, 2005
7:00a.m. Rev. Dr. Colin Archer/ Lay Preacher
11:00a.m. Sis. Tezel Anderson/ Rev. Dr. Colin Archer
7:00p.m Women's fellowship


Police imposters shoot




man in home invasion


By CARA BRENNEN a warning against bogus law
Tribune Staff Reporter enforcement officials, a man has
been shot by four impostors
JUST days after police issued who entered his home.


e, ZION METHODIST MINISTRIES
SSOUTH BE,-.C H -,'FF.NC CE,.jT-PE
EAT STREET SOuT-T
PO BOX SB-51628. NASSAU, BAHAMAS
PHONE/FAX: 242-392-4100


Come and Worship with us!




SUNDAY
10:15am Sunday School
11:00am Divine Worship Service

WEDNESDAY
7:30pm Prayer & Bible Study
Minister: Pastor
Charles Lewis
"A Journey In Faith & Obedience To The Will of God"

LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past &
12%.- Geared To The Future


Worship time: 11am & 7pm

Sunday School: 9:45am

Prayer time: 6:30pm

Place:

The Madeira Shopping

Center


'h2- Ahh.


Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles


ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND
Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles
P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL lynnk@batelnet.bs




EVANGELISTIC


TEMPLE
A Life Changing Experience

Collins Avenue at 4th Terrace Centreville
Telephone: 322-8304 or 325-1689 P.O. Box N-1566
Fax No. 322-4793


SUNDAY 8:30am ZNS-1
8:30am
9:45am
ll:00am
7:00pm

WEDNESDAY 7:30PM


Temple Time Broadcast
Early Morning Worship
Sunday School For All Ages
Worship Service
Evening Celebration

Selective Bible Teaching Royal
Rangers (Boys Club) Ages 4-17 Years
Missionettes (Girls Club) Ages 4-17.


VISIT OUR PREMISE BOOKSTORE, TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY


This latest incident occurred
early yesterday morning when a
group, claiming to be police offi-
cers, went to a home on Sugar


Hill Road, Fox Hill.
After being admitted by a
male occupant, police say the
impostors stole $1,200 from the
house. Before leaving they shot
the man twice in the left leg.
He was rushed to Princess Mar-
garet Hospital and is expected
to recover.
Earlier this week, police
issued a warning regarding
three persons who committed
several robberies while posing
as officers during a three-day
period.
Press liaison officer, Inspector
Walter Evans, said five com-
plaints had been lodged with
police already against the three,
who seemed to be targeting
areas such as Kennedy Sub-divi-
sion and Podoleo Street.
With this latest incident, Mr
Evans reiterated the warning to
the public to be very aware of
who they allow into their home.
"These men are frequenting
homes between midnight and
6am. So if anyone is knocking at
your door claiming to be detec-
tives in plainclothes, and you
feel uneasy in any way, we are
asking persons to contact the
police immediately at 911," he
said.
Mr Evans explained that
detectives out of uniform should
be carrying a warrant card with
photo identification, rank, and
signature of the commissioner
of police.
If anyone claiming to be a
detective cannot produce such
identification, or badge, home
owners should not open their
doors to them.


THE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS CONFERENCE'
OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE CARIBBEAN AND THE
AMERICAS
L'EGLISE METHODISTE DANS LA CARAIBE ET LES AMERIQULES
+ .
S194th Annual Session of Conference
S Friday, January 13-Monday, January 23, 2006
Ministerial Sessions and Representative Sessions at St. Paul's Methodist Church
East Sunrise Highway and Beachway Drive
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Services and Activities also at
St. David's Methodist Church, Seagrape, Grand Bahama
St. Andrew's Methodist Church, Hawksbill, Grand Bahama
Theme:
"Ready for Miracles: Equipping the Church for Proclamation that the
World May Know Jesus"


Friday, January 13
Saturday, January 14


Lord's Day, January 15








Monday, January 16
Tuesday, January 17









Wednesday, January 18-
Friday, January 20
Saturday, January 21


Arrival of Ministers
8 a.m. Quiet Day for Ministers and Spouses
of Ministers
6:15 p.m. Vesper Service with Love Feast
led by Rev. John Stubbs*
Divine Worship Services with those Leading
the Services*
St. Paul's Methodist Church, 7 a.m.
Rev. Colin C.L. Newton
St. Paul's Methodist Church, 10 a.m.
Rev. Mark S. Christmas
St. Paul's Methodist Church, 7 p.m.
Mrs. Julia Williams
St. David's Methodist Church 9 a.m.
Rev. Kenneth P. Lewis
St. Andrew's Methodist Church 11 a.m.
Rev. Leonard G. Roberts. Jr.
8:45 a.m. Ministerial Session and Conference
Ministerial Training Committee
8:45 a.m. Ministerial Session
2 p.m. Meeting of the Conference General
Purposes Committee
2:30 p.m. Flag Raising Ceremony, St. Paul's
Methodist Church*
2:45 p.m. Opening Devotions and Formal
Opening of the Representative Session.
Devotions led by Mrs. Annette Poitier, Vice
President of Conference*
7:30 p.m. Conference Communion/Welcome'
Service at St. Paul's Methodist Church-Led
by Rev. Dr. J. Emmette Weir and Rev.
Hilgrove Hamilton; Preacher: Rev. Frednor
Toussaint*
7:30 a.m. Devotions led by the Circuits of
the Conference*
9:15 a.m. Representative Session and
Conference Committees
7 a.m. Prayer Breakfast. Speaker: Rev.
Emily A. Demeritte*
9:15 a.m. Representative Session
11 a.m. Ministerial Session
12:30 p.m. Tours and other Activities
7:30 p.m. Youth Rally at St. Andrew's
Methodist Church, Hawksbill
Preacher: Rev. Mark S. Christmas*


Lord's Day, January 22 10 a.m. Official Conference Service at St.
Paul's Methodist Church*
Liturgist: Rev. Derek C.O. Brown, Secretary
of Conference
Preacher: Rev. Dr. Raymond R. Neilly,
President of Conference
Monday, January 23 Departures Indicates Services and functions
open to the Public
Bahamas, Turks and Caicos Islands Conference Officers:
President: Rev. Dr. Raymond R. Neilly
Vice President: Mrs. S. Annette Poitier
Secretary: Rev. Derek C.O. Browne
Treasurer: Rev. Kenneth P. Lewis
Legal Adviser: Mr. Anthony Thompson
Assistant Secretary: Rev. Leonard G. Roberts, Jr.
Assistant Treasurer, Mr. Kendrick Christie
Connexional Conference Officer in attendance:
Mr. Theodore Fahie, Treasurer of the ConnexioAal Conference Funds


I








THE TRIBUNE


SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2006, PAGE 7


LOCA L NW


Law Lord: try





to simplify





damages


By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Stdff Reportet

THE address given in Nas-
sau yesterday by Privy Coun-
cillor Lord Scott of Foscote was
well-received by members of
the legal community.
Lord Scott addressed the top-
ic: "Damages the purpose of
monetary awards in private and
public law compensatory, resti-
tutionary- aggravated, exem-
plary, punitive, vindicatory,
curative, and what else?"
His speech was heard by
almost all of the justices and
magistrates of the Bahamas;
leaders in the legal profession;
law students; and court admin-
istrators.
His wife Lady Scott and the
Registrar of the Privy Council
was also in attendance.
Said Bahamas Attorney Gen-


eral Alfred Sears: "It was a very
thoughtful and interesting
analysis about damages and thel
purpose of its civil actions. He
was advancing a theory to
streamline the category of dam-
ages to give this area of law
more simplicity, certainty, intel-
lectual rigour, and consistency.
It was a very stimulating expe-
rience."
The seminar was held at San-
dals Royal Bahamian Resort,
and was organised by Court of
Appeal Registrar Indira
Demeritte Francis and the Judi-
cature Social Club.
The law lord reminded the
gathering that judges dealing
with actual cases shape the
development of law, and if the
law is incoherent or misinter-
preted, "it is the judges at
whom the finger of blame
should be pointed".
Lord Scott stressed that


where there is excessive com-
plexity in the jurisprudence on a
particular subject, judges should
try to do something to simplify
the issue.
"I believe that to be the case
with damages," he said.
Last October, the Privy
Council created a new category
of redress known as vindication
damages for breach of consti-
tutional rights.
This followed Lord Scott's
historic judgment in a case
involving the abuse of an Amer-
ican visitor by police on Grand
Bahama.
American Tamara Merson
was awarded damages by the
Privy Council for the abuse of
her constitutional rights by
police.
She also claimed that she was
assaulted, battered, falsely
imprisoned and maliciously
prosecuted in 1987.


Luncheon for Privy Councillor


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT An English Law Lord of the
Privy Council in England and his wife were host-
ed to a special luncheon during his visit to Grand
Bahama on Thursday.
Lawyers and members of the judiciary in
Freeport attended the luncheon, held at the West-
in at Our Lucaya Resort, where the Right Hon-
ourable Lord Scott of Foscote spoke on the grant-
ing of damages, or monetary awards by the courts.
Lord Scott said that the award of damages is
becoming increasingly complex.
"Damages ought to be simple and not a com-
plex subject good law is simple law. And it is
down to the judges and practising Lords of course
to make contributions through their submissions
because at the end of the day, the development of
the law is down to them," he said.
Lord Scott said the various categories of dam-
ages,awarded by the courts are: compensatory,
aggravated, restitution, punitive and exemplary.
He noted that American courts have devel-
oped a new award called curative damages, which
are not awarded to the victim, but rather to a
charity of the victim's choosing.
"I learned about this two months ago when I
read an article by the American Bar Association
that courts in America are now awarding curative
damages.
"The notion that courts can contemplate the


awarding of curative damages I find absurd, and
I am sure the Supreme Court in the US would
sooner or later say that." Lord Scott said that
there are two useful categories of damages com-
pensatory and vindicatory. Every other kind of
award, he said, should be "scrapped."
"Comp, ,satory damages are the main form of
damages intended to compensate the victim for
the loss the victim has suffered. It may be an
intangible kind of loss such as defamation; loss of
reputation.
"And we sometimes need damages to vindi-
cate rights and to demonstrate that rights exist
and to demonstrate that conduct is unlawful.
Anything else should be scrapped," he said.
While law textbooks say that damages are not
awarded for hurt feelings in contract cases or
negligence cases, Lord Scott said that if some-
one has a contract which entitles them to a par-
ticular type of contractual benefit and they are not
provided with that benefit, they can have com-
pensatory damages for the loss.
In cases where no loss has been suffered at all
by the victim, but there has been a breach of
contract and the contract breaker makes a sub-
stantial profit to their benefit, then the victim is
entitled to the value of the measure of loss.
"If you award damages on that footing to the
victim you're not awarding anything other than
compensatory damages, measuring as best you
can the value of the benefit the victim has been
deprived of," he explained.


THE GOVERNMENT OFTHE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2021. 2024, 2025 and 2026


FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY
APPLICATION No_
ALLOTMENT No.

DATE:


The Registrar
do The Central Bank of The Bahamas
P. O. Box N-4868
Nassau, Bahamas

Sir


I/We hereby apply for the following amount of Bahamas Registered Stock:

Insert below the amount applied for
in Units of 85100


5/32%
1/4%
9/32%
5/16%


Above Prime Rate
Above Prime Rate
Above Prime Rate
Above Prime Rate


Bahamas Registered Stock 2021
Bahamas Registered Stock 2024
Bahamas Registered Stock 2025
Bahamas Registered Stock 2026


and undertake to accept any less amount which may be allotted to me/us.


IWe enclose BS


in payment for the Stock applied for.


In the event of the full amount of Stock(s) applied for above is/are not allotted to
me/us, I/we request that the sum refundable to me/us be applied for the following Stock:

% Bahamas Registered Stock BS
% Bahamas Registered Stock BS
% Bahamas Registered Stock BS
% Bahamas Registered Stock BS
% Bahamas Registered Stock BS
% Bahamas Registered Stock BS

BANK DRAFTS SHOULD BE MADE PAYABLE TO THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS.

SUPPLEMENTARY PROVISIONS

Issue of Stock The Stock will be issued by the Registrar (The Central Bank of The Bahamas).
Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 4th
January, 2006 and will close at 3:00 pm on 16th January, 2006. Allocations will
commence at 9:30 a.m. on 17th January, 2006 and will cease at 3:00p.m. on 18 January,
2006. All envelopes enclosing applications should be labelled "Application For Bahamas
Government Registered Stocks".


Units


The Stock will be in units ofBS100.00.


Aiplcations Applications must be for B$100.00 or a multiple of that anm.

Application Forms Applications for the Stock should be made to the Registrar on the form attached to the
Prospectus and may be obtained from the Registrar offices in Nassau and Freeport, The
Treasury Department (Marlborough Street & Navy Lion Road, Nassau) or any of the
following banks:

1. Bank of The Bahamas International
2. First Caribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
3. Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited
4. Commonwealth Bank Limited
5. Royal Bank Of Canada
6. Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited
7. Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited (formally British American Bank(1993)
Limited)
8. Citibnirk NA
PUIMBC DEBT

Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts as at September 30, 2005 show the Public Debt of The
Bahamas to be B$2,753,126,000.*
GOVERNMENT REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE

The following information is extracted from the unaudited accounts of the Government of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.


Revenue


Recurrent Expenditure (excluding
Repayment of Public Debt)

Capital Development
Expenditure (excluding loans
contributions and advances
to public corporations)


FY2003/2004**
BS

943,760,000

993,987,000



80,8s j,000


FY2004/2005**
BS

1,051,624,000

1,067,259,000



117.296,000


FY2005/2006**
BS
Approved Budget

1,132,774,000

1,145,691,000



132,901,000


** Provisional estimates from the utfaudited accounts.
The Public Debt imount is inclusive of The Public Corporations contigent liability which as at
September 30, 2005 totalled BS50,982,000.
PROSPECTUS
THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2021. 2024 2025 and 2026
ISSUE OF BS75,000000.00

Issued under The Bahamas Registered Stock Act, and authorized by Resolutions of the House of
Assembly, 20th June, 2005.

Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 4th January, 2006 and
will close at 3:00pm onl6th January, 2006. Allocations will commence at 9:30 a.m. on 17th January, 2006 and
will cease at 3:00p.m. on 18th January, 2006.

If the total subscriptions exceed the sum of BS75,000,000.00 (Nominal) partial allotment will be made to
subscribers, and a proportionate refund will be made as soon as possible after allotment No interest will be
paid on amounts so refunded.

The date of this Prospectus is 28th December, 2005

The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas invites applications for Bahamas Registered
Stock totalling B$75,000,000.00. The Stock will be available in a range of maturity dates; the earliest being
repayable in 2021 and the latest in 2026. The total amount of Stock offered, the rate of interest and the issue
price are given below -


Rate Of Interest

5/32% Above Prime Rate
1/4% Above Prime Rate
9/32% Above Prime Rate
5/16% Above Prime Rate


Amount
BS


Bahamas Registered Stock 2021
Bahamas Registered Stock 2024
Bahamas Registered Stock 2025
Bahamas Registered Stock 2026


10,000,000.00
20,000,000.00
20,000,000.00
25.000.000.00
75.000.000.00


Issue
Price
BS

100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00


The Stock shall be repaid on 18th January, in the year appearing in the name of the Stock.

INTEREST

The Stock will bear interest from 18th January, 2006, at the rate shown against the name of the Stock as
the percent per annum over the Prime Rate (i.e. the prime commercial interest rate from time to time fixed by
the Clearing banks carrying on business in the Island of New Providence in The Bahamas. If there shall be any
difference between them, then that which is fixed by Royal Bank of Canada). Interest shall be payable half-
yearly commencing on 18th July, 2006 and thereafter on 18th January and 18th July in every year until the
Stock is repaid.


CHARGE UPON CONSOLIDATED FUND

The principal monies and interest represented by the Stock are charged upon and payable out of the
Consolidated Fund and assets of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

I I I I I







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2006


I I I


W H A T S ON IN A N D A R O UN D N A S S A U















E M A I L: O UT TH ERE @ TRIB UNEMED IA. NET


gaggI Par0es, ightchs ,ill---
--I -ei^^R. & Restaurants T* ^t"BiBMBB

$5 Friday @ First Down every Friday night. Music by Barry Da
Pusher, Selector: Dominique. Ladies $5 all night, gents $10. Ear-
ly juggling by Mr. Xcitement and DJ Fatal. Drink specials all
night long.

Bacardi Happy Hour @ Power Boat Adventures Bar and Grill
(one door east of Texaco Harbour Bay), every Friday. $3 Bacar-
di drinks all night and $3 beers.

Ladies Night @ Power Boat Adventures Bar and Grill, every
Saturday. Ladies free, Gents, $10 all night. Bacardi Big Apple and
other drink specials all night long.

Wild Jungle, each and every Wednesday night @ Club Trappers,
Nassau's "upscale" gentleman's club. Featuring a female body
painting extravaganza. Free body painting @ 8 pm. Ladies always
welcome. Admission: Men free before 10 pm. Females free.
There will be free food and hors d'oeuvres between 9 and 10
pm. Open until 4 am.

Ladies Night @ Fluid Lounge, this and every Thursday night,
-Doors open at 10pm. Ladies free before lam, $10 after. Guys: $15
all night. Drink special: 3 @ $10 (Bacardi) Giveaways and door
prizes every week.

Saturday Night Live every Saturday night @ Club Fluid, Bay St.
The biggest party of the week, pumping all your favourite hits all
night long. Ladies in free before llpm. Strict security enforced.

Rave Saturdays @ Club Eclipse. DJ Scoobz spinning the best in
Old Skool. Admission $35, all inclusive food and drink.

Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters Sports Bar. Drink spe-
cials all night long, including karaoke warm-up drink to get you
started. Party from 8pm-until.

Reggae Tuesdays @ Bahama Boom. Cover charge includes a
free Guinness and there should be lots of prizes and surprises.
Admission: Ladies $10 and Men $15.

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar every Wednes-
day 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers and numerous drink specials.

The Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday. Doors open at 9pm,
showtime 11.30pm. Cover charge $15. $10 with flyer.

Fantasy Fridays @ Fluid Lounge, featuring late '80s music in the
VIP Lounge, Top of the charts in the Main Lounge, neon lights
and Go Go dancers. Admission: Ladies free before llpm, $15
after; Guys $20 all night.

Dicky Mo's @ Cable Beach. Flavoured Fridays Happy Hour,
every Friday. Drink specials: Smirnoff Kamikaze Shots, $1;
Smirnoff Flavoured Martinis, 2 for $10; Smirnoff Flavoured Mixed
Drinks, 3 for $10. Bahamian Night (Free admission) every Sat-
urday with live music from 8 pm to midnight. Karaoke Sundays
from 8pm to midnight, $1 shots and dinner specials all night long.

Twisted Boodah Lounge @ Cafe Segafredo, Charlotte St kicks off
Friday at 6pm with deep house to hard house music, featuring
CraigBOO, Unkle Funky and Sworl'wide on the decks.

Chill Out Sundays @ Coco Loco's, Sandyport, from 4pm-until,
playing deep, funky chill moods with world beats.

Sweet Sunday Chill Out Soiree Lounge, every Sunday, 4pm-mid-
night @ Patio Grille, British
Colonial Hotel.

Wet Sundays, every Sunday, noon-midnight @ Crystal Cay Beach.
Admission $10, ladies free.

TooLooSe @ Indigo Restaurant on West Bay St and Skyline
Drive. Smnger/songwriter Steven Holden performs solo with spe-
cial guests Thursday from 9pm midnight.

The Graham Holden Deal @ The Green Parrot....David Graham,
Steve Holden, Tim Deal and Friends perform Sunday, 7pm -
10pm @ Hurricane Hole on Paradise Island.

Jay Mitchell and Hot KC @ Palm Court Lounge, British Colonial
Hilton, Wednesday-Thursday 8pm-12am.

Sunday Night Interlude @ Briteley's Restaurant & Lounge, Eneas
St off Poinciana Drive. Featuring Frankie Victory at the key
board in the After Dark Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to midnight.
Fine food and drinks.


Paul Hanna, Tabatha and Gemie, and the Caribbean Express per-
form at Traveller's Rest, West Bay St, every Sunday, 6.30pm-
9.30pm.


S ~ The Ps AM1

Stepping Stone Quilters will host its 17th Annual Quilt Show
January 26 to February 4 at the Trinity Church Hall on Frederick
Street from 10am to 4pm. All interested persons are invited to
attend.

The National Art Gallery of the Bahamas (NAGB) will host a
series of workshops during January that will feature a number of
guest lecturers. Sue Katz-Lightbourn will be the lecturer for the
Youth Workshop on Collage. The workshop is open to children
eight years and older and will be held Saturday January 14 from
10am to 1pm at the NAGB. Jolyon Smith will be the lecturer for
the Open Workshop on Drawing from Nature.
The workshop is open to children 12 years and older and will be
held Tuesday, January 17 and Wednesday, January 18 from
6:30pm to 9:30pm at the NAGB. Interested persons should con-
tact the NAGB for more details and to secure a space in the
class of their choice. The NAGB will also be hosting a Narrow
Focus Film Series on the New Directions in Filmmaking in the
Bahamas guest lecturer will be Dr Ian Strachan. The workshop
is free and open to the public ard will be held Thursday, January
19 at 6:30pm at the NAGB.

The National Collection @ the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas, an exhibition that takes the viewer on a journey through
the history of fine art in the Bahamas. It features signature pieces
from the national collection, including recent acquisitions by Blue
Curry, Antonius Roberts and Dionne Benjamin-Smith. Call 328-
5800 to book tours. This exhibition closes February 28,2006.


The Nassau Music Society The Nassau Music Society is featur-
ing, in association with Fidelity, RBC and RoyalStar Assurance
as part of their "FESTIVAL OF RUSSIAN ARTISTS", Natalia
Gutman (cello above) -_ a living legend in the music world -
who, along with her quartet, will play at Government House on
January 13 at 8pm and at St Paul's Church Hall, Lyford Cay on
January 14 at 7:30pm. Also featured during the Festival Yuri
Bashmet and the Moscow Soloist Orchestra who return once
again to Nassau on February 24,26 and 27- their guest artist will
be JoAnn Deveaux-Callender. In April Oleg Polianski is fea-
tured on the piano. Purchase your tickets from January 4,2006
at the Dundas Theatre (394-7179); AD Hanna & Co (322-
8306) and the Galleria JFK (356-seat). Details of the venues and
programmes will be available on the website shortly. Do not
miss this opportunity to listen to live world class musicians.""

r ls$8ai~Healh O R


The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at 5.30pm on the sec-
ond Tuesday of each month at their Headquarters at East Terrace,
Centreville. Call 323-4482 for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held 6:30pm Tuesdays
and Thursdays at Nassau gymNastics Seagrapes location (off
Prince Charles Drive). Doctor approval is required. Call 364-8423
to register or for more information.


call 702-4646 or 327-2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third Monday every
month, 6pm @ Doctors Hospital conference room.

The Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third Saturday,
2.30pm (except August and December) @ the Nursing School,
Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital, the official training centre of the American
Heart Association offers CPR classes certified by the AHA. The
course defines the warning signs of respiratory arrest and gives pre-
vention strategies to avoid sudden death syndrome and the most
common serious injuries and choking that can occur in adults,
infants and children. CPR and First Aid classes are offered every
third Saturday of the month from 9am-lpm. Contact a Doctors
Hospital Community Training Representative at 302-4732 for
more information ard learn to save a life today.

REACH Resources '&Education for Autism and related Chal-
lenges meets from 7pm 9pm the second Thursday of each
month in the cafeteria of the BEC building, Blue Hill Road.




JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR Cycling are pleased to
offer a cycling clinic for juniors between 10 and 17. The free
clinic will be held every Saturday in an effort to encourage kids to
cycle. Parents interested in registering their children should con-
tact organizers at jarcycling@gmail.com

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta Sigma Theta
Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30 pm every third Wednesday at the
Bahamas National Pride Building.

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial Hilton
Monday's at 7pm.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7.30pm @ C C Sweeting
Senior School's Dining Room, College Avenue off Moss Road.
Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas Baptist Community Col-
lege Rm A19, Jean St. Club 3956 meets Thursday, 7.30pm @
British Colonial Hilton. Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8.30pm @
SuperClubs Breezes. Club 7178 meets Tuesday, 6pm @ The J
Whitney Pinder Building, Collins Ave.
Club 2437 meets every second, fourth and fifth Wednesday at the
J Whitney Pinder Building, Collins Ave at 6pm. Club 612315
meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach.
Club 753494 meets every Wednesday, 6pm-8pm in the Solomon's
Building, East-West Highway. Club 3596 meets at the British
Colonial Hilton Mondays at 7pm. Club Cousteau 7343 meets
every Tuesday night at 7.30 in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh
Creek, Central Andros. All are welcome.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega chapter meets
every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ the Eleuthera Room in the
Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday, 7pm @
Gaylord's Restaurant, Dowdeswell St. Please call 502-4842/377-
4589 for more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm
@ Atlantic House, IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room.

The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) meets
every third Monday of the month in the Board Room of the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets the second and
fourth Wednesday of the month, 8pm @ St Augustine's Monestary.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Friday of each
month, 7.30pm at Emmaus Centre at St Augustine's Monestary.
For more info call 325-1947 after 4pm.

International Association of Administrative Professionals,
Bahamas Chapter meets the third Thursday of every month @
Superclubs Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.

AMISTAD, a Spanish club meets the third Friday of the month
at COB's Tourism Training Centre at 7pm in Room 144 during the
academic year. The group promotes the Spanish language and cul-
ture in the community.


Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support group meets the first
Monday of each month at 6.30pm at New Providence Community
Centre, Blake Road. Dinner is provided and free blood sugar,
blood pressure and cholesterol Send all your civic and social events to The Tribune
t.ting is a jladablc. For more into via fax: 328-2398 or e-mail: outthere@rribunemedia.net








SATURDAY, JANUARY ', 2006, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


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THE INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK (IDB)
seeks an Administrative Assistant
County Office in Nassau, Bahamas

f Immediate Supervisor: Administrative Officer

Objective,

To assist the Administrat'ive Officer in all the tasks related to office management, budget
administration and personnel administration.

Basic Functions

Responsible for the Revolving Fund expenses control, including the management of the
electronic system and the petty cash.
Assist in all activities related to personnel administration, including contracts management
of Bank personnel as well as consultants, payroll preparation, control and reimbursement
of medical insurance expenses, control of personnel attendance and management of
ad ministrative files.
Asist in the office administration functions, including vehicles inventory, office supplies,
equipment, services contracts administration and control of courier personnel.
- Assist international staff, their dependents and consultants in the control of visas and passports
validity.
Coordinates all the procedures and visa requests, customs clearance, staff members'
accreditation, plate requests, etc., before the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
Coordinates events organized by the Country Office
Supports headquarters missions in logistics and administration issues.

,;i Position Requirements

Education: Bachelors degree in Business Adminzistration, Humman Resources oi- related areas.

Experience: Four years of relevant experience.

Languages: Written and spoken command of English anzd Spanish.

Systems: Command of Excel and Word, Kniowledge of other- Microsoft Office Pr-ogramts.
Experience in the data base management.

Competencies

Service Orientation: Understanding stakeholder relationships. Partners with stakeholders to
resolve issues and challenges. Collaborates effectively with, stakeholders, and demonstrates
commitment to servicing stakeholder needs.I

Communication: The ability to engage others, adapting one's communication to the needs,
interests and style of the audience. Expressing facts and ideas clearly and in an organized
manner in writing and in speech.

Initiative and Drive for Results: Acting independently and resourcefully in response to work
demands. Demonstrating motivation to produce quality, and acting with a sense of urgency to
meet the objectives of the Bank and its member countries.

Analysis and Problem Solving: The ability to make critical decisions based on systematic
analysis and sound judgement.

Planning, Organizing and Executing: Prioritizes, develops and follows through on plans to
carry out goals and objectives.

Salary: will be commensurate with education and experience.

Bahamian nationals only need apply.

IDB application forms may be obtained from our website (http://.www.iadb.org) or from the
IDB office located at:

IDB House
East Bay Street
P.O. Box N-3743
Nassau, The Bahamas

The deadline for -receipt of applications and a resume of no more than two pages is
January 20, 2006. These are to be returned to the IDB Office Nassau, attention
The Administrative Officer.

Only applications that best match the requirements of the position will be acknowledged


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March 1967 Roy Tucker showing off a nurse shark to visitors.


%%fith I le impending arri% al al1 I ie XI ooawk Re~orl 4.1
7' 16 Gul Coasl dolphins displaced b3h Hurricane haflrimi.l
In Da)s Gone B3 looks back al 1he once populml
Seanoor A-quarium. % which enferlained generalions of
I~aBahamian,; o~er 1he iear-;.
Dvccmhmcr 11 ILI'll1 1_11111N [..ii~? I hi the dolphin ;h%-i%%


kno~v. I lic a uood pci'lornict -ind eikmcsc III tile Jclt



'Johnson.


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Exuma study




dispels fears IJ








on coral reefs
o n' coy*y^ ^ *i^^ y. ^ ^fliidS J,^


A NEW study conducted in
the Exumas has dispelled fears
that large fish returning to pro-
tected areas of the Caribbean
could disturb the delicate bal-
ance of reefs.
According to a BBC online
report, scientists were worried
that marine predators could be
eating smaller fish that graze on
coral and keep down harmful
algae.
"But a study published in the
journal Science found that coral
in a marine reserve in the
Bahamas is flourishing.
"Rather than eating all the
parrotfishes the main creatures
that clean up the reef the
returning predators, such as the
Nassau grouper, only eat the
smaller species," the report said.
"Parrotfish bigger than about
25 cm (10 inches) long are able


to escape the predators' jaws,
and do a more efficient job at
removing algae from coral,
stopping it from being smoth-
ered," it explained.
The removal of algae from
coral was described as "critical"
for Caribbean reefs, "which
were hit by the mass death of
sea urchins, the main creatures
to feed on the algae, in 1983,
due to disease".
The report said that parrot-
fish have become the dominant
grazers on many Caribbean
reefs, but in areas where fish-
ing is allowed, numbers have
been decreasing.
This, according to the report,
sparked fears about the fate of
the species in marine reserves
like the Exuma Cays Land and
Sea Park.
"The answer quite clearly is


that this is not going to be a
problem," said Peter Mumby of
Exeter University in the south
of England, who led the study.
He was quoted as saying that
marine reserves are very bene-
ficial for coral reefs, helping
them withstand the impact of
climate change, coral bleaching
and other threats.
"This is the first time that
anyone has shown that allow-
ing a reserve to be successful in
allowing fish to recover can
reduce the amount of seaweed
on the reef, which (in turn)
increases the ability of coral to
recover from things like hurri-
canes, tsunami and coral bleach-
ing," Dr Mumby told the BBC
News website. The Exuma Cays
Land and Sea Park was estab-
lished in 1959 and has been a
no-fishing zone for 20 years.


UN: *wctlom ti Haiti

Sto b e bM w *I -qqv 7
"Copyrighted Material

-- Syndicated Content ----

Available from Commercial News Providers"
ft*.N. -. . -

e- -glop,


THE Atlantis resort, Paradise Island
(The Tribune archive photo),


Kerzner contacts


FBI over personal


information theft.


FROM page one
ating with them.
However, Assistant Commissioner Reginald
Ferguson told The Tribune that he had no specific
knowledge of the incident. But he acknowledged
that they do investigate instances like this from
time to time.
Officer in charge of the Bahamas commercial
crime division, Drexel Cartwright, said he was
also unaware of the incident.
S IA call to the.;Kerzner International offices in"
New York revealed that the company contacted
the FBI and US Department of Justice.


"We understand that this type of crime card
cause great concern for people whose personal
information may have been stolen," said Gedrge
Markantonis, president and managing director
of the Paradise Island operations.
"I want to assure our customers bhat we take
our obligation to safeguard their personal infor-
mation very seriously and 'e are taking a'nuiiber
of steps to respond, including notifying customers
in writing and suggesting ways they can help pro-
tect themselves from identify:fraud." '
As this involves an ,pging ,criminal investi-
gation, the resort saidl~t i. ws not in. a wsition
to provide any more details p at this time, but will
do so as and when appropriate.


Coroner's Court concerns


FROM page one
posed a serious security and fire hazard prob-
lem.
The building is also a health hazard due to the
presence of rodents, she said.
The letter added: "The building is unsafe and
unsanitary. Please be further advised that I am
aware that it is an active court, hearing criminal
and civil matters. To relocate the Coroner's Court
in this complex will create a severe backlog for the
Coroner's Court and the Criminal Court, as I am
also completing criminal matters.
"I am willing to relocate as I have no choice in
the matter, as the building here (the Rodney
Bain building) is closed for health and works,
but I refuse to work in an unsafe and hazardous
environment. Of paramount importance is my
safety and that of the persons that work with
me."
Magistrate Virgil also asked the Chief Magis-
trate to arrange assistance for her in the packing
and packaging of files.
Her letter was also sent to Prime Minister Per-


ry Christie, Leader of the Opposition Haurt
Ingraham, Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall, Ctan-
missioner of Police Paul Farquharson, Attorney
General Alfred Sears, Supreme Court Registrar
Estelle Gray-Evans, Director of Court Services
Dolly King, and O/C of Prosecutions Berriise-
Pinder. ':',
Mrs Virgil said Mr Gomez had agreed with
her about the conditions at Court Six.
Speaking with The Tribune yesterday, Magis-
trate Gomez said the work of the court must cpn)
tinue, and that the court on Parliament StreetCis4
only a temporary location for the judge. ; -
Mrs Virgil suggested that the former offices of
Higgs and Johnson, which recently moved to a
new building on Montagu Bay, be considered fgo
her court.
She also expressed concern about completing
her criminal cases, handling her present cases in
Coroner's Court, and possibly having to fill:in
on cases left behind by Magistrate McKay. ..
This concern, she said, came about after the,'
Supreme Court Registrar had informed her that.,
an appointment for a replacement for Ms McKay-.
will be put on hold.


FROM page five
curious as to whether or not we'll have another
Aruba brewing if better intelligence and tactics
are not hurriedly implemented to combat the
surge in crime.
As witnessed in Aruba, it only takes one
extreme act against a tourist to bring the nation's
tourism industry crashing to a halt.


The government must do more to remove
vagrants and undetermined young men off op r,
streets. Instead of smoking dope on the blocks
and planning their next robbery or murder, mre
programmes must be implemented, more jobs.
created, more recreational activities fostered and
a deeper sense of community leadership must be
encouraged to produce industrious, law-abiding
active citizens.


The American Embassy
is presently considering applications for the following position:

PROCUREMENT AGENT

Serves as senior FNS member of the GSO Procurement Unit, reporting directly
to the General Services Officer. Has direct responsibility for processing all non-
secure procurement and contracting actions to the point of final review, approval
and signature by the GSO/Contracting Officer. Procurement includes supplies,
services and contracts with local and Offshore Private Sector Vendors, GSA and
other US Government Sources, for this large mission consisting of nine agencies
with over one hundred and fifty direct hire American employees as well as over
fifty locally employed staff members. The incumbent must become throughly
familiar with all applicable Procurement Regulations, including the Federal
Acquisition Regulations (FAR); the Department of State Acquisition Regulations
(DOSAR); the Overseas Contracting and the Simplified Acquisition Handbook.
This position directly supervises the purchasing agent.

This position is open to candidates with the following requirements:

A Bachelor's degree in Business, Management or related area is required.
At least five years in Purchasing/Sourcing or Contracting either in the public
or private sector is required.
Must have a good working knowledge of local market conditions, sources
of supply, pricing structures and local law which impacts on the Procurement
and Contracting Office.
Excellent command of the English Language, both written and oral.


Personal Attributes:

Excellent managerial, supervisory and training skills
Highly confidential in nature
Must be able to effectively communicate both orally and written to local
vendors, contractors, end-users and others to obtain the best possible
price/product to meet the government's requirements.
Computer knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel is required.

Benefits Provided Include:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation package
including outstanding benefits such as performance-based incentives, medical
and dental insurance, life insurance, pension and opportunities for training and
development.

Applicants must be Bahamian Citizens or US Citizens who are eligible for
employment under Bahamian Law and Regulations.

Application forms are available from 8:00 am to 5:30 pm, Monday through Friday
at the security area of the American Embassy, Queen Street, completed applications
should be returned to the Embassy: Attention of the Human Resources Office no
later than Wednesday, January 18, 2006.


Pressing general



election issues


THE TRIBUN-f-t:


PAGE 10, SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2006











LOALEW
we -w

Anrwsep pa


S"Carmen Thompson (left), a $1000 winner, shopping .at Accessory Haven in the Town Centre Mall.




Mall gives New




jYear presents


CHRISTMAS came and
went, but lucky winners at
Toivn Centre Mall still had a
little something left in their
stockings.
After winning jackpots worth
$1000, Desmond Sweeting and
Caimen Thompson could look
forward to some New Year's
shopping at the mall.
The promotion was called
"the 12 days of Chrigtmas" and
allowed customers to enter by
m king $5 or more purchase at
any of the 30 stores in the Town
Centre Mall.
Holiday shoppers won week-
ly prizes from Fashion Hall,


Fashion Hall Plus, Accessory
Haven, Super Video, Designer
Replicas, Shoe Depot,, Subway,
Cost Rite, Tops And Jeans,
Electrojack, Dairy Queen,
Sports Locker, Deep South and
Good News Bookstores.
During the promotion, the
mall also hosted barbers from
HereCuts, who generously
donated all their earnings to the
Ranfurly Home for Children.
HereCuts expertly provided
mall-goers with shape ups, hair
designs, eyebrow designs for
ladies, and of course, haircuts
at discounted prices.-
As if weekly prizes, the $2000


in jackpot money and discount-
ed haircuts weren't enough, the
Town Centre Mall provided
tons of entertainment including
a junkanoo rush-out, perfor-
mances by the Dereck Adams
band and a special Christmas
performance of The Chocolate
Nutcracker by Roderick's
School of Dance.
"I am thrilled that our loyal
customers benefited from the
entire promotion and equally
elated that the Ranfurly Home
for Children received a dona-
tion in the process," said Selina
Roberts, spokesperson for the
Town Centre Mall.


Carbon Bethel (left) and Marion Bethel (right) of HereCuts present Ms Gardner (middle), administrator of the
SRanfurly Home, with a cheque for all the proceeds generated by their booth at the Town Centre Mall.



RBDF Marine finishes


engine training in US

IEADING Mechanic Jeffrey teams.
Brown of the Royal Bahamas During the training, both the-
Defence Force successfully- oretical and practical exercises
completed a five-week diesel were carried out in a classroom
engine inspector (DEI) course setting. Students were required
in Norfolk, Virginia. to know the duties and func-
the training was sponsored tions of a DEI, the principles
by ,the American Embassy by and specifications of several
way of the International Mili- types of engines, as well as safe
tay Education Training engineering practices.
(IMET) scheme, through which Course participants were
several officers and persons required to test their new
enlisted on the force have knowledge by participating in
received training over the yeais. a two-week on the job training
The aim of the course, which programme.
was conducted from October 13 Leading Mechanic Brown
to November 18, 2005, was to was assigned to the USS Tor-
prepare candidates to become tuga, a US Navy 186-metre
certified DEIs. dock landing ship.
Some of the areas covered A 20-year veteran of the
included engineering funda- -gg Defence Force, Leading
metals related to diesel Mechanic Brown is presently
engines, engine testing, fuel and assigned to the engineering
diesel combustion processes, department aboard HMBS
lubricating oil, engine perfor- Bahamas.
mance, fuel injection systems, (RBDF photo: Leading Sea-
turbochargers and exhaust sys- man Jonathan Rolle)


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AMr


8-13, 2006
THE ISLANDS OF THE
)O TOmas




)a h1br),,'


Join us in Rawson Square

9:00am Monday January 9th, 2006

to hear the Official Declaration


of Hello Phone Card's

National Tourism week


Contributing Sponsors

AmericanW.. oh
ABecn.ani* IrB C W P^Afl C.n
3 B t r*-
m ~, 1 a n
82n -. ., nr


5 Scotiabank


;N X4~


ntw.tourismbahamas.org


ANDREW Hanna is the
new face of the Hilton's front
office department.
,He rejoins the department
team as manager of front
desk
According to the resort's
management, Hanna "has
enjoyed'a prosperous career
with Hilton" beginning in
August 1999 as a duty man-
ager.
"Andrew then moved on to
the Hilton Marquette in Min-
neapolis in 2004 as the assis-
tant front office manager.
"There his primary respon-
sibilities included daily man-
agement of hotel guests, staff
concerns and assistance with
all VIP clients," said the resort
in a statement.
Hanna is the first Hilton
team member in the Bahamas
to be transferred within Hilton
International.
He returned to the
Bahamas and to the British
Colonial Hilton in August
2005 to assume his new role
of front desk manager.
Hanna describes himself as
organised, dedicated and
enthusiastic.
"He is professional and pro-
ficient in the carrying out of
his daily duties. He has begun
to impact the Hilton by
improving all areas of cus-
tomer service by continuously
guiding the front office team
to be more competent in the
use of Hilton's brand stan-
dards," said the statement.
Hanna now oversees the
concierge department, the
front office switchboard, the
executivelounge and the busi-
ness lounge.
"Andrew one day aspires to
be the general manager of a
small resort," the statement
said.


ANDREW Hanna


SATU RDAY, JAN UARY 7, 2006, PAG E 11


THE TRIBUNE


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NASSAU


EVENTS


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The 25th gathering


- A Splendid Affair


ago, a group of
friends gathered at
the Lyford Cay
Club to celebrate
the New Year. That tradition
began a legacy that has contin-
ued uninterrupted.
After a few years at Lyford


Cay, the members began hold-
ing the gathering at private
homes. For four years it was
held at another location.
This year, the gathering was
held at the historical, elegant
and lushly-landscaped Mount-
batten House on East Hill
Street. The guest list, always
exclusive, is spectacular.


* FROM left, Dr Conville Brown, heart specialist and major N FROM left, Bahamian Counsul General in.New York Ed
investor in health care services, Dr Corrine Sin Quee, pediatrician Bethel, Dawn Hanna-Bethel, US Congresswoman Maxine
and Dr Arthur Porter, chief executive officer of McGill Univer- Waters, and former US ambassador to the Bahamas Sidney
sity Health Centre in Montreal and his wife Pamela. Williams.


* THE Mayor of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, The Hon Melvin
Holden presents a rose to his wife Lois, herself an executive at
Southern University in Baton Rouge.


* THE lady entrepreneurs show another.side Patricia Mortimer,
owner of Sweet Delights, Mae Morton-Curry owner of Indulgence
Shoes and Jan Major, owner of Flora Fantasia.


* LADIES' man or photographer? Or maybe ilf just lthe Acklins
connection Acklins-born photographer Franklin G Fergusoei
enjoys a light moment with Dawn Hanna-Belhel and Sharon
Wilson, daughter of Vespra Lockhart of Spring Point. Acklins.
(Photo: Franklyn R I 'ilson)


* CHERYLL K Gomez, left, president of Consolidated Health
Services with her husband Paul 'Andy' Gomez, managing partner
of Grant Thornton International.


* YOUNG DOCTORS Dr Valentine Grimes, having com-
pleted his studies at Cambridge University and his fellowship in
orthopedics in Canada, joins his sister Dr Varon Grimes and
her fiancee Dr Obie Tenubu.


M HOST and Hostess for the evening Dr Anthony Davis and hjs
wife, jewellery entrepreneur, Ella Davis.


gll^igM.EGA-W^.Sls'saa^Nri'i??-. -L.:.-ssi assIi
* THE Member of Parliament for St Thomas More, and opera-
tions manager at Sunshine Finance Frank Smith appears to be
pleased that his wife, attorney Sharlyn Smith can get back into
fashionable clothing after, in 2005, having had their first child.


* FRIENDS FOREVER These eight friends have brought in the new year together
for the past 25 years. From left, attorney Valentine Grimes and his wife Thelma, a senior
guidance counsellor at Dame Doris Johnson High School; Senate President Sharon Wil-
son and her husband Franklyn R Wilson, chairman of various companies including
Arawak Homes, Sunshine Insurance and Eleuthera Properties; Rowena Finlayson and
her husband Garet Fimalyson, OBE, chairman of companies including Solomon's Mines
and Burs House; Hartlyn Roberts and her husband the Hon Bradley Roberts, the Min-
ister of Works.


* ATTORNEY Maurice Glinton ai
wife Lin flew in from Freeport just ft
occasion.


,U{rankld~n 3Td iijcrgxn~n


9?a 4 ta


3t7-8472


P.O. Box N-4659,
Nassau, Bahamas


I ---


I I -I - -, ii


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12. SATURDAY. J.ANUIARY 7, 2006


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SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2006


SECTION





Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


A busy year

ahead for the

Bahamas

Swimming

Federation

0 SWIMMING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
THE BAHAMAS Swimming
Federation is anticipating a busy
year.
Federation president Alger-
non Cargill said that, in addition
to Carifta, they also have the
Commonwealth Games, the
FINA Short Course World
Championships and the CAC
Games to look forward to com-
peting in.
"PRight now, we are focusing
on Carifta because it will be held
a little earlier than usual in Bar-
bados," said Cargill, of the
regional junior meet that will be
staged from April 6-11.
"It's going to be held a week
before Easter, unlike last year
when it was a week after Easter.
So we have to get the team
ready early. But we will have a
very strong team in Barbados.
"We are going to win. I hope
that the team live up to that
expectation. The team size has
been increased from 30 to 35
swimmers, so it should be a pret-
ty good meet for us."
Before Carfita, the federation
is hoping to take at least 4-5
senior swimmers to compete in
the Commonwealth Games in
Melbourne, Australia from
March 15-29.
That will be followed by the
FINA Short Course World
Championships in Shangai, Chi-
na -from April 5-9 and then the
Central American and
C ,Ii I.. in Games will take place
in Colombia from July 16-29.
In preparation for the upcom-
ing season, the federation will
kick off the new year with their
first meet at the end of January
when the Swift Invitational will
take place at the Betty Kelly
Kenning Aquatic Centre.
"That's going to be a unique
meet. It's going to be freestyle
only, Cargill said. "The Carifta
trials follow in February and
then will be another one in
March and the team will be
slectcd by mid-March."
Cargill said they have a num-
ber of swimmers who they
expect will lead the charge. But
on the whole, he said they expect
that the team will be very strong
right across the board in all of
the age groups.
By next week, Cargill said
they intend to have the list of
coaches for all of the national
tCealns s-lc' d.


SPABLO MORALES, swimming coach of the University of Nebraska, talks to his team yesterday at the Betty Kenning Aquatic Centre.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)





US swim teams are full





of praise for Bahamas


* SWIMMING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

DESPITE poor weather on Fri-
day, members of both the Univer-
sity of Nebraska and Michigan
State have enjoyed their training in
the Bahamas.
Yesterday, the two teams par-
ticipated in a dual meet at the Bet-
ty Kelly Kenning Aquatic Centre,
but they had to do it in chilly
weather, far from the bright sunny
days they experienced since they
got here last week.
"It's been wonderful. Our girls
have loved it here," said head
coach Pablo Morales of the
Nebraska Huskies' 18-member
female team. "Our girls have real-
ly enjoyed the arrangement here.
"The arrangement that was
made with Sports Tours Interna-
tional have really worked well for
us. The beaches and the facilities
here have been great. It has every-
thing that we need. It couldn't
have been any better."
The Huskies, who came in town
on January 2 and will depart on
Sunday, will have a dual meet at
Kansas on January 14. Morales
said the trip here will certainly
help to get his swimmers ready.
"We got some great training in
and we have our meet today and
we will have our last training
tomorrow, so it's been great," he
stressed. "We will be back in the
water at school on Monday and
we will have a series of competi-
tions on the weekend leading up to
our conference championship in
March."
This is the first time that
Nebraska has visited the Bahamas
and Morales said because of what
they experienced, he's confident
that they will be back.
Morales, in his fifth season as
Nebraska's head coach, was a 1984
Olympic Games' silver medalist
in the 100 butterfly and 200 indi-
vidual medley and a gold medalist
on the 400 medley relay.
After coming out of a three-
year retirement, Morales went on
to win a gold medal in the 100 fly
in the 1992 Olympics and a gold in
the 400 medley relay as well.
But he admits that, compared
to then, the competition is so much
different.
"It's a lot faster," he said. "Since
winning in '92, the times have got-
ten really fast. The swimmers are
very well trained, they are tall,
they have a good feel for the water


Visit by University of Nebraska and Michigan State


and their techniques have
improved."
Although the Huskies don't
have any Bahamians on their ros-
ters yet, Morales said they have
been looking at all potential
Bahamians and if there are any
here, they will seriously consider
them for the future.
"I know there are several won-
derful Bahamian swimmers here,
so we hope that they can continue
to improve because we would cer-
tainly like to have any of them
that we can get," he insisted.


Neither Nebraska or Michigan
State did any recruiting while they
were here.
But like Morales,, Matt Gian-
iodis, the head coach of the Spar-
tans, said they too have enjoyed
their stay.
"It's been great, the people have
been very hospitable. It's been the
ideal situation for us to be in,"
Gianiodis charged. "We have been
enjoying ourselves."
This is the first trip here for the
Spartans, but Gianiodis said they
couldn't ask for abetter situation


to be in.
"The facilities here are great.
They have been well kept," he
stated. "I've been to Hawaii and
many different places in Florida.
This is the best place that we have
been."
Gianiodis, however, said that
it's been a costly venture, but
because of what they experienced,
they will definitely be back in the
future.
Bahamas Swimming Federation
president Algernon Cargill said
the visit by the schools has cer-


tainly provided them with a net-
work.
"Just being here, we have been
able to talk with the coaches about
scholarships for our swimmers and
we have been made some linkages
to place our kids abroad," he said.
"We've even had some of our
swimmers training with the colle-
giate swimmers and they made
some very positive impressions on
the coaches. So it's been a posi-
tive experience for the federation
and we welcome the foreign swim-
mers here."


Bahamian holds court at ABA


* BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THE American Basketball Association,
known for its red, white and blue colored ball,
is back in operation and the chief operator is
Bahamian Ricardo Richardson.
Ricardson, a 1987 graduate of St.
Augustine's College, is the co-owner of the
league the alternate to the National Basket-
ball Association that has its head office in
Indianapolis, Indiana.
After missing his long-time dream of play-
ing in the NBA, Richardson set his sights on
being involved in a professional team. In 2001,
he secured the executive vice president job
with the ABA.
The league was re-organised in 2000 after a
25-year lock-out by the NBA. It was reor-
ganised by co-founder/special counsel Richard
'Dick' Tinkham, the founder of the Indiana
Pacers. The other co-founder is chairman Joe
Newman.
As the third in the chain of command in
the organisation, Richardson is primarily
responsible for the formation of teams and
the marketing of the league.
The 35-year-old Richardson, who graduat-
ed from St. John's University in 1991 where lie
played for the Red Storm, said his role now is
to try and find a way to give back to his birth-
place the Bahamas.
"When several countries like Mongolia and
China decided to have a tournament there, I
decided to try and see if I could orchestrate
some sort of tournament here," he noted.
With the Florida Pit Bulls, whose general
manager and head coach is former Miami
Heat guard Tim Hardaway, stationed as close
as Fort Lauderdale, Richardson said it's now
his dream to try and have a team based in


an players because of my involvement. So it's
always a great opportunity for us to field a
team in the Bahamas so that we can show the
world what we are capable of doing."
Interested players only need to come up
with their try-out fees of $100-150, which
include their uniforms. They will workout for
two days and get exposed to the scouts.
"Once you make a team, you are relocated
to that area," Richardson pointed out. "You
can make anywhere up to $150,000 per year
on the salary cap.
"So you are exposed to play professionally
and you are watched on a nightly basis by the
NBA scouts."
Richardson, however, said it would be good
if the Bahamas could field a team because it
could eventually give the players the expo-
sure as they continue to prepare to play in
the Olympic Games.
At present, there is an all-Chinese team
called the Beijing Aoshen Olympian playing
in Los Angeles. In three years, Richardson
said they will be playing out of China where
they intend to have their own division.
Hopefully, Richardson said the long-term
goal is for there to be an Asian, American,
Canadian and possibly the Caribbean Division
where the champions will all emerge to play
for the ABA World title.
In the meantime, the ABA follow a similar
pattern as the NCA where they use a single
elimination format to the championship,
instead of the best-of-seven finals as played by
the NBA.
The BankAtlantic Cetre in Sunrise, Fort
Lauderdale, will be the site for the ABA 2006
All-Star weekend from February 10-12. The
event will also pay homage to the original
ABA legends including Dr. J, George Gervin,
Moses Malone, Spencer Haywood and Connie
Hlawkins, among others.


the Bahamas, or at least have games played in
the Bahamas with some Bahamian players
participating.
"We organised a team in Hawaii this sum-
mer, so I thought I could use that as a model
in trying to put one together for the
Bahamas," Richardson stressed.
"Eventually, what we hope to do is have a
Caribbean Division where teams from the
Bahamas and Jamaica and other countries
can play in the ABA."
As he's done in other countries that have
expressed an interest, Richardson said he aims
to meet with the powers that be, namely
Neville Wisdom, the Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture, and any businessmen, who are
interested in promoting the ABA in the
Bahamas.

Grow

"If there is no big arena there, we will work
with what's there and as we continue to grow,
we will build one," Richardson stated. "I go
into the major cities in the United States and
do that on a daily basis, so it's fairly easy to
come home and do that."
Without a draft to rely on, Richardson said
the ABA teams have wide open trial sessions
where players who didn't go to college or did-
n't make a NBA team are allowed to come
and try out for one of the 12 spots on the 40
teams that currently make up the league and
the 20 expansion teams that will join next
season.
"We have some players in the Bahamas
who can flat out play, so we want to try and
expose them," Richardson declared. "If they
are good enough, they can make the team
and they're one step below the NBA.
"So several teams want to pick up Bahami-


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7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

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THE RENDERING (2002, Suspense) Shannen Doher- THE PROMISE (1999, Drama) Isabella Hofmann, Tracy Nelson, Neil Maf-
**LIFE ty, Peter Outerbridge, John Brennan. A former as- fin. A woman feels an abusive husband beat her sister to death, (CC)
sailant threatens a woman's jailed husband. (CC)
MSN Inv: DIagnosis MSNBC Investigates: The Vanish- MSNBC Investigates Returning to MSNBC Investigates: Pamela
MSNBC Murder ing the prison. Smart, A Deadly Affair
ICK SpongeBob Drake & Josh "Drake & Josh Go Hollywood" Drake Ned's Declassi- Full House "Ra- Fresh Prince of
:ICK SquarePantsn land Josh go to Los Angeles. n (CC) fled School dio Days" (CC) Bel-Air
Sr (:00) Blue Mur- ZoeBusiek: Wild Card A sports W-FIVE (CC) News (CC) NTVEntertain-
NTV der C (CC) ,,. agent hires M's company. (CC) ment News
'OLN PBR TotalBull Bull Riding PBR Worcester Classic. (Taped) PBR Total Bull PBR Total Bull
EED Two.Guys ** THE BETSY (1,97, Drama) Lurence Olivier, Tommy Lee.Jones, Katharine Ross. Premiere. A powerful
G GEr Garage Detroit family stops at nothing to haV its way.
00) The Coral InTouch (CC) Hour of Power (CC) Billy Graham Classic Crusades
TTBN, (id ge Hdur (CC) , .
**s OVER- *** SAVE THE LAST DANCE (2001, Drama) Julia Stiles, Sean *** SLEEPLESS IN SEATTLE
TBS BOARD (1987) Patrick Thomas, Kerr Washington. A white teen tries to fit in at a mostly (1993, Romance-Comedy) Tom
Goldie Hawn black high school: (CC)" Hanks, Meg Ryan (CC)-"' .
S:00)Proerty Moving Up Heather and her Trading Spaces "Hudson River Val- Wild Weddings "Weddings You
LC adder (CC) boyfriend do work that on their prop- ley: Merritt Avenue" New York neigh- Won't Believe (N)
erties. (CC) bors. (N)
S*A PERFECT ** ALONG CAME A SPIDER (2001, Mystery) Morgan Freeman, Moni- ALONG CAME A SPIDER
T MURDER (1998) caPotter, Michael Wihcott. Alex ross probesekiapping of asena- 2 terry) Morgan Freeman,
tor's daughter. (CC)tVapnonica goter. (CC)
TOON Dragon Ball Z Teen Titans Final Zatch Bell (N) Naruto (N) One Piece C Bobobo-boB o- IGPX "Holiday"
TOON ____ mission. (CC) Bobo(N) (N)
5 I Le Plus grand cabaret du monde Venus et Apol- TV5 Le Journal
T C 6:00) Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
W IM Edition (CC) North Carolina. (CC)
:00) Casos de Sbado Gigante
UNIV Familia: Edici6n
S.-' Especial
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
' OSA der: Criminal In- A man accuses his wife of endan- Detectives look for suspects at a Achild dies after being in atten-
tent C (CC) gearing their unbom child, dead bully's school. C\ (CC) dance at a prayer vigil. (CC)
Shocking Mo- 100 Most Shocking Moments in *** PRIVATE PARTS (1997, Comedy) Howard Stem. Premiere. Ra-
,. 1 ments in Rock Rock & Roll C dio's Howard Stern becomes king of the New York airwaves. C
-- (:00) America's Bulls Eye (Live) NBA Basketball Memphis Grizzlies at Chicago Bulls. From the United Center in Chicago.
WGN Funniest Home nC (CC) (Live) C (CC)
Videos C (CC)
(:00) Fighting for *** AN OFFICER AND A GENTLEMAN (1982, Drama) Richard Gere, Debra Winger, WB11 News -
WPIX Life Chidrenfac- Louis Gossett Jr. A hardened loner enlists in the Naval Aviation Corps. l Peter Thorne &
ing disease. Mary Murphy
Jeopardyl (CC) * * JAWS (1975, Horror) Roy Scheider, Robert Shaw, Richard Dreyfuss. A man-eating Veronica Mars
W SBK shark terrorizes a New England resort town. "Green-Eyed
Monster" (CC)

6:15) s BATMAN & ROBIN I** ** MILLION DOLLAR BABY (2004, Drama) Clint Eastwood, Hilary Swank, Morgan
H BO-E 1997, Adventure) Arnold Freeman. Premiere. A cantankerous trainer bonds with a female boxer. 'PG-13' (CC)
Schwarzenegger. 'PG-13' (CC)
(6:30) * MR, HOLLAND'S OPUS (1995, Drama) Six Feet Under Time Flies" Brenda Entourage "The Entourage "New
HBO-P Richard Dreyfuss, Glenne Headly. Life steers a musi- is upset by Nate's reaction to her Scene" n (CC) York" C (CC)
cian toward teaching. C 'PG' (CC) news. C (CC)


:45) ** THE GRUDGE (2004, Horror) Sarah :(15) BATMAN & ROBIN (1997, Adventure) Arnold Schwarzenegger,
HBO-W Michelle lar, Jason Behr. A woman and her George Clooney, Chris O'Donnell. The dynamic duo returns to take on an
boyfriend encounter vengeful spirits. C 'PG-13' (CC) icy villain. C 'PG-13' (CC)
:00)Dare to Dream: The Story of ** LOVE ACTUALLY (2003, Romance-Comedy) Alan Rickman, Bill The Producers:
HBO-S he US. Women's Soccer Team Nighy, Colin Firth. Various people deal with relationships in London. C Movie Musical:
n (CC) 'R(CC) First Look
(6:15)** CATWOMAN (2004, Action) Halle Berry, Benjamin Bratt, Sharon ***s SIDEWAYS (2004) Paul
MAX-E OBSTERS Stone. Ashy artist acquires feline strength and agility. r 'PG-13' (CC) Giamatti. Two friends ponder their
S (1991)1'R'(CC) lives during a road trip.'R'
:15) ** NAPOLEON DYNAMITE (2004, Comedy) *s TAXI (2004, Comedy) Queen Latifah, Jimmy Fal- (40) Hollywood
MOMAX on Heder, Jon Gries. A gawky teen helps a friend run Ion, Jennifer Esposito. A bumbling policeman and a excapades C
for class president. C 'PG' (CC) cabby chase bank robbers. C 'PG-13' (CC) (CC)
* SOUL PLANE (2004, Comedy) Kevin Hart, Tom Boxin O'Neil Bell vs. Jean-Marc Mormeck. (iTV) O'Neil Bell takes on
SHOW Arnold, Method Man. iTV Premiere. Passengers and Jean-Marc Mormeck in cruiserweight bout. Also: Carlos Baldomir vs. Zab
crew party aboard an airliner. C 'R' (CC) Judah in a welterweight bout. (Live)
(6:30) **u ** JEEPERS CREEPERS 2 (2003, Horror) Ray Wise, Jonathan Breck, *** THE SCHOOL OF ROCK
TMC AME1ICAN GUN Garikayi Mutambirwa. A winged creature terrorzes stranded high school- (2003, Comedy) Jack Black, Joan
(__ 2002)'R' ers. 'R' (CC) Cusack. 'PG-13' (CC)


SUNDAY EVENING JANUARY 8, 2006

7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

00) The Nature "Life in Death Valley" Wildlife Masterpiece Theatre "Hen VIII" Hen VIII marries Crown &Coun-
B WPBT Lawrence Welk and animal life survive under severe Anne Boleyn. A (Part 1 of ) (CC) (DVS) try ) (CC)
Show landscape. (N) n C
60 Minutes Accused New York de- Cold Case "8 Years" Lilly reopens a CSI: NY The team probes the death CSI: Miami
0 WFOR tective; Sony CEO Howard Stringer; case involving the death of a high- of a baseball fan found in a stadium "Vengeance"
Skier Bode Miller. (N) school student. (N) (CC) parking lot,. (CC) (iTV) C (CC)
(:00) Dateline The West Wing "Running Mates" Law & Order: Criminal Intent Crossing Jordan A snowstorm
S W VJ NBC (N) n (CC) (N) n (CC) "Dollhouse" (N) (C (CC) traps Woody and Jordan in a haunt-
ed bed-and-breakfast. (N)
S The Simpsons The Simpsons The War at Family Guy "Bri- American Dad News (CC)
B WSVN Marge is "Homer's Patemi- Home Vicky gets an Sings and Stan and Roger
shunned.3\ ty Coot" (N) ambitious. Swings (N) swap lives. (N)
(:00) America's Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Desprate Housewives Lynette (:01)Grey's Anatomy "Straight to
SWVPLG Funniest Home The Nutsch family lost its house in catches Gabrielle kissing Tom; Mike the Hear(N) (CC)
Videos (N) (CC) an explosion. (N) (CC) tries to bond with Zach.(N)

:00) 24 "Day 2:24 CTU suffers a serious setback; The First 48 A neighborhood's si- Intervention Troy and Salina"
A&E 0:00 11:0 AM" President Palmer uncovers decep- lence hinders a gang-related murder Crystal meth; bulimia and a shop-
( (CC) tion on his staff. (CC) investigation. (CC)ping addiction. (N) (CC)
Extra Time BBC News Dateline London BBC News Earth Report BBC News Talking Point
BBCI (Latenight). (Latenight). (Latenight).

BET :00) An Evening of Stars: Tribute to Stevie Wonder Celebrities make an annual appeal for the United Negro Access Granted
BET Rllege Fund. 1)
C C (:00) Market- ** BEND IT LIKE BECKHAM (2002, Comedy) Parminder Nagra. A CBC News: Sunday Night (CC)
GaG place (N) (CC) teen hides her soccer-playing from her strict parents. (CC)
B Wall Street Jour- High Net Worth Chris Matthews Cover to Cover Host Liz Claman. The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNBC nal Report1
CNN 4:00 CNN Live CNN Presents Larry King Live CNN Sunday Night
*C BLUE COLLAR COMEDY TOUR RIDES AGAIN (2004, Documentary) Comics Bill Christoher Titus' Norman Rock-
COM Engvall, Jeff Foxworthy and others perform. (CC) well Is leading (N) n (CC)
U T :00) The Investi- Cops Prostitution Cops Alleged Cops "Coast to Cops"Coast to Cops "Coast to Cops "Coast to
COURT gators sting. (CC) sexual assault. Coast" C (CC) Coast" C (CC) Coast" A (CC) Coast" A (CC)
Little Einstelns THE MUPPETS' WIZARD OF OZ (2005, Adventure) Ashanti, Queen Lati- The Suite Life of Naturally Sadie
DISN (N) (CC) fah, Quentin Tarantino. Dorothy and friends fight the Wicked Witch of the Zack & Cody n "Be Our Pest"
West. (CC) (CC)
DIY Barkitecture DIY to the Res- Assembly Re- Trade School (N) Throwing Clay The Whole Plc- Making Home
IY cue quired ture Movies
DWn Focus (Ger- The Journal Kultur.21 Journal: The Euromaxx The Journal Im Focus
DW man). Week
E! 101 Sexiest Cel- The Baldwins: The El True Holly- Meg Ryan: The E! True Hollywood The Girls Next The Girls Next
El ebrity Bodies wood Story (N) n (CC) Story Meg Ryan. A (CC) Door Door
ESPN (:00) PiA Golf Mercedes Championships -- Final Round. From the Plantation Course at Ka- NFL Primetime SportsCenter
ESPN papua in Kapalua, Hawaii. (Live) CC) (CC)(C)
ESPNI (:00) PGA Golf Mercedes Championships -- Final Round. From the Plantation Course at Ka- SportsCen international Edi-
pES NI alua in Kapalua, Hawaii. (Live) (CC) S tion(Live)
EWTN Father Father Corapi and the Catechism Holy Mass and Baptism of Infants With Pope Benedict XVI from the
Groeschel of the Catholic Church Sistne Chapel, Rome.
IT TV Chasin FitNationWhat's Next" Fitness trends and gadgets. n The Gym Low-calorie dinner party.
FIT TV ance n (CC)n
FOX-NC (:00) Fox Report War Stories With Oliver North The Line-Up (Live) Big Story Weekend Edition (Live)
FSNFL College Basket- College Basketball Duke at Wake Forest. (Live) PRIDE Fighting Championships
FSNFL ball (Taped)
GOLF Golf Channel Golf Channel Golf lf Cnel Golf Channel Golf Channel Post Game Show (Live)
GOLF Academy Academy Academy Academy Academy
GSN :00) Greed (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire The Amazing Race 6 "4 Continents, 24 Cities, 40,000 Miles" The final
GSN o(CC) four teams race for the prize. C (CC)
G Tech Star Trek: Next Star Trek: The Next Generation Star Trek: The Next Generation Star Trek: The Next Generation
4 ec 3ener. "Encounter at Farpoint (CC) "The Naked Now' C (CC) "Code of Honor" C (CC)
MYSTERY WOMAN: SING ME A MURDER (2005) JANE DOE: THE WRONG FACE (2005, Mystery) Lea Thompson, Joe
HALL Kellie Manin, Clarence Williams III. An amateur sleuth Penny, Billy Moses. Agent Cathy Davis must find a missing woman. (CC)
investigates members of a folk band. (CC)
Designed to Sell Holmes on Real Renos Buy Me Helen House Hunters Holmes on Homes "Bar None" Af-
HGTV "Design Interven- Homes n (CC) Happy Home- has to sell her "Dual-Purpose ter paying a contractor the job was
tion" (CC) owner" (CC) home. A (CC) Home" never completed. n (CC)
NSP: It's a New Day In Touch The Gift of Prophecy" The King Is Voice of Revival Jack Van Ime Manna-Fest (CC)
Commungablpg God's word. (CC) Coming (CC) Presents (CC)
SPHERE Charmed "Just Harried" Piper's What I Like Twins Mitchee Reb Reba's Reba Kyra and
KTLA (1998) Dustin wedding day is jeopardize by About You First takes Lee's ad- birthday party Reba's double-
Hoffman. n Prue's late-night shenanigans. C fight. C (CC) vice. A (CC) plan backfires. dating dilemma;
S* 28 DAYS (2000, Drama) Sandra Bullock, Viggo Strong Medicine "My Sister, My Missing"Sring Break" Spring
LIFE Mortensen, Dominic West.A writer is forced to come to Doctor, Myself Fertility. (N) (CC) break. (N)CC)
terms with her addictions. (CC)
Inv: Rampage City in Fear: Beltway Snipers MSNBC Reports "Phoenix Homi- Meet the Press (CC)
M N C Killers cide" Murder case.
NICK (:00) Drake & Josh Drake and Josh Zoey 101 'The Full House "Edu- Fresh Prince of Roseanne "Slice Roseanne ,C
NICK go to Los Angeles. C (CC) Election" (CC) casting Jesse" Bel-Air of Life" (CC)
NTV American Dad Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Crossing Jordan "Loves Me Not News A (CC) News
NTV "Rough Trade" "Nutsch Family" (N) C (CC) (N) C (CC).
OLN (:00) Fearless Bull Riding PBR Worcester Classic. (Taped) Wanted: Ted or Alive (CC)
SPEE :0) Seed Unique Whips Unique Whips Unique Whips
JackHayford Joel Osteen Taking Authority Believer's Voice ChaningYour Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN (CC) (CC) (CC) of Victory (CC) Word (CC)
*** SAVE *s LEGALLY BLONDE (2001, Comedy) Reese Witherspoon, Luke ** s LEGALLY BLONDE (2001,
TBS THE LAST Wilson, Selma Blair. A fashion major follows her ex-boyfriend to Harvard. Comedy)Reese Witherspoon, Luke
S DANCE (2001) (CC) Wilson, elma Blair. (CC)
:00) Miami Ink Miami Ink "Finding Balance" Ami Miami Ink "Hawaii" Hawaiian master Sports Disasters (N) (CC)
TLC Daren's wife exacerbates an old back injury. (CC) of traditional Polynesian tattooing.
gets a tattoo. (N) (CC) _
(:00) Law & Or- *** REMEMBER THE TITANS (2000, Drama) Denzel Washington, Will Patton, Donald REMEM-
TNT der Tragedy on Faison. White and black football players overcome their prejudice. (CC) BER THE TI-
Rye" ClTANS (2000)
TOON Camp Lazlo Codename: Kids Ed, Edd n Eddy Grim Adven- Cartoon Car- American Dad Family Guy C
Next Door Ed's pen pal. tures toons (CC) (CC)
TV5 (:00) Vivement dmanche LA BETE DU GEVAUAN (2002, Drame) Sagaore Job trotter TV5 Le Journal
St6venin, L6a Bosco, Guillaume Gallienne.
TWC 6:00) Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
TWC PM Edition (CC) "Oregon Fire" (CC)
(:00) La Parodia La Hora Pico Jo Ver Para Creer
UNIV Jo Jorge Falc6n.
****aX CASINO (1995, Drama) Robert De Niro, Sharon Stone, Joe Pesci. A mob employee makes a play for power in 1970s
USA Las Vegas. (CC) (DVS)

VH1 (:00) 40 Most Shocking Celebrity Mugshots Cn Celebrity Fit Club n The Flavor of Love n
:00) Maximum 24 CTU scrambles to retrieve vital 24 "Day 2:1:00 2:00PM" Jack WGN News at (:40) Instant Re-
WGN Exposure information; Kate faces her sister's manhandles a prisoner; Tony inter- Nine (CC) playU (CC)
wrath, C (CC) rogates Reza. C (CC)
Reba Kyra and Charmed "Mr. & Mrs. Witch" Billie Supernatural "Home" A vision of a WB11 News at Ten Weekend
WPIX Reba's double- unknowingly contacts a demon pos- woman trapped in his childhood Edition With Peter Thome and
dating dilemma. ing as a human. (N) C (CC) house haunts Sam. C (CC) Mary Murphy (CC)
That '70s Show CSI: Crime Scene Investigation CSI: Crime Scene Investigation Red Sox This Red Sox Report
WSB K "Winter" Donated "Burked" The son of a Las Vegas The CSI team searches for a miss- Week
toys. (CC) entrepreneur is found dead. ing college freshman. (CC)

(15) *** MEN IN BLACK (1997, Science Fiction) The Sopranos "Sentimental Educa- Deadwood "New Money" A scout
H BO-E Tommy Lee Jones. Secret agents monitor extraterres- tion" Carmela spends time with for a powerful mining operation ar-
trial activity on Earth. C 'PG-13' (CC) A.J.'s college advisor. C (CC) rives. C (CC)
6:00) ** I * THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA (2004, Musical) Gerard Butler, Emmy Rossum, Taxicab Confes-
HBO-P HEARTHUCK- Patrick Wilson. A masked figure becomes jealous of a singer's romance. C 'PG-13' (CC) slons: New York
ABEES (2004)


6:4 NEW YORK MINUTE x CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN (2003, Comedy) (15)*** MEN IN BLACK (1997,
HBO-W 2004) Ashley Olsen. Twin sisters Steve Martin, Bonnie Hunt. A man must handle the Science Fiction Tommy Lee Jones.
spen a wild day in Manhattan. chaos surrounding his 12 children. C 'PG' (CC) C 'PG-13' (C)
(:00) *s MEET THE FOCKERS 2004, Comedy) * x EMPIRE FALLS (2005, Drama) (Part 1 of 2) Ed Harris, Philip Sey-
H BO-S Robert De Niro, Ben Stiller, Dustin Hoffman. Future in- mour Hoffman, Helen Hunt. Unfulfilled lives abound in a declining New
laws clash in Florida. C 'PG-13' (CC) England town. C, 'NR' (CC)
:45) * SLING BLADE (1996, Drama) Billy Bob Thomton, Dwight Yoakam, J.T. Walsh. * THE HARD WAY (1991,
MAX-E A mentally impaired man with a violent past befriends a boy. C 'R' (CC) Comedy) Michael J. Fox, James
Woods. 'R' (CC)
(6:45) * SIDEWAYS (2004, Comedy-Drama) * BULWORTH (1998, Comedy-Drama) Warren Beatty, Halle Berry,
MOMAX aul Giamatti. Premiere. Two friends ponder their lives Don Cheadle. A disenchanted U.S. senator turns his campaign upside
during a road trip. C 'R' (CC) down. C 'R' (CC)
g(6:&05)* ** (:15) *% SAW (2004, Horror) Cary Elwes, Danny Glover, Monica Pot- The L Word "Labia Majora" (iTV)
SHOW HOST- ter. iV Premiere. A doctor must kill his cellmate or his family will die. Cl Bette and Tina rekindle. (N) n
BUSTERS (1984) 'R'(CC) (CC)
THEUNITED ** THE FIGHTING TEMPTATIONS (2003, Comedy) Cuba Gooding (:05) ***t HEATHERS (1989,
TMC STATES OF LE- Jr., Beyoncd Knowles, Melba Moore. A man forms a gospel choir to co- Comedy Winona Ryder, Christian
LAND (2003)'R' lect an inheritance. n 'PG-13' (CC) Slater, Shannen Doerty. 'R' (CC)


TRIBUNE SPORTS


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