Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00282
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: January 3, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00282
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850

Full Text









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The


Tribune


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BAHAMAS EDITION


Volume: 102 No.35


TUESDAY, JANL'AHY 3, 2006


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'Showdown expected'

between general

manager and chairman


Valley Boys are unofficial winners


* By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
TROUBLE is brewing at
the Water and Sewerage
Corporation with a show-
down between its general
manager and chairman
expected to erupt at any
moment.
Through confidential
sources, The Tribune has
learned that Water and
Sewerage Corporation
,WSC) chairman Dominic
Demeritte, CPA, is at odds
with general manager Abra-
ham Butler, who is ques-
tioning a number of promo-
tions that Mr Demeritte
is claimed to have autho-
rised.
According to reports, the
situation is now beyond the
control of the corporation
and has found its way to the
ear of the prime minister,
who, it is claimed, is seeking
a quick resolution to the
escalating problem.
It is almost guaranteed,
The Tribune's source
claimed, that one of WSC's
executives will be sent home
"with their walking ticket"
within the next 10 days, with
the majority of the decision
resting on the shoulders of
Minister of Works and Util-
ities Bradley Roberts.
It is speculated that Mr
Roberts might be leaning


more favourably towards
Mr Demeritte.
According to sources, Mr
Demeritte is alleged to have
given lucrative promotions
to a number of persons at
the WSC, placing individu-
als who were once "in. a
minor role" in positions of
power over their previous
bosses.
Sources close to the issue
claim that Mr Demeritte
actually informed Mr But-
ler "very unceremoniously"
of the promotional changes
through an e-mail.
The situation of role
reversals, where senior staff
now have to answer to
junior staff, is not being
looked upon very kindly
by Mr Butler, it was
claimed.
It is now being alleged
that Mr Demeritte, who is
not an executive chairman,
appears to be usurping Mr
Butler's position at the
WSC.
Speaking with The Tri-
bune from his office late last
night, Mr Roberts would
not comment directly on the
matter.
"We live in very interest-
ing and challenging times,
and there will be differ-
ences," Mr Roberts com-
mented.
"And it is not unusual for
SEE page 10


George

Mackey

dies at the

iage of 67
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THE N'alle Boys lake
to Bay Street for Ihe New
lear's Day Parade
(Photo: Felipe Major/
Tribune staff)
* By NATARIO
MCKENZIE
THE unofficial results of
the Phil Cooper 2006 New
Year's Day Parade have the
Valley Boys victorious once
again.
Saxons fans screamed in
disbelief on Arawak Cay
yesterday evening.when the
unofficial results announced
the Valley Boys as the over-
all winners with One Fami-
ly second, Saxons, third,
and Roots, fourth.
In the unofficial results
the Valley Boys were tied
with One Family for first
place in the best banner cat-
egory. The Valley Boys
were also tied with the Sax-
ons for the Minister's Cup
Shirley Street, however
Saxons unofficially won the
best music category.
The Valley Boys, under
SEE page 10


Airport is plagued

by long lines again


* By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
LONG lines at the depar-
ture hall once again plagued
Nassau International Airport
over the weekend.
According to reports, much
of the delays were due to the
installation of the six new
CTX security screening
machines at the airport. It
also was speculated that the
radar system at NIA might
have malfunctioned again.
However, this claim could.not
be confirmed up to press
time.
This new baggage scanning
system, that scans checked-
in luggage for explosives, tests
every bag that goes into the
holding compartment on


flights leaving NIA.
The scanner utilizes a swab,
or piece of cloth, being
rubbed over a bag at points
where its owner or a handler
would have touched it. Tak-
ing about seven seconds, the
swab is then tested for every
known explosive.
Sources at NIA said that
flights were delayed up to 45
minutes before aircraft were
given permission to taxi out
onto the tarmac. And it was
claimed that when there, it
was another half an hour wait
before a flight was given the
green light to take off.
Bahamasair also reported a
number of setbacks over the
weekend as it was operating
with only one jet to service
SEE page 10


i By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
GEORGE MACKEY, OBE,
a "hero of Fox Hill, and a man
of the people", died at Doctors
Hospital shortly before 11
o'clock yesterday morning after
battling prostate cancer for two
years. The former parliamen-
tarian was 67 years old.
During his extensive tenure
in active politics, Mr Mackey
held numerous positions in the
PLP, ranging from party chair-
man to deputy speaker of the
House of Assembly and Minis-
ter of Housing and National
Insurance.
He also held the post of MP
for St Michael's from 1972 to
1982 and for the Fox Hill con-
stituency from 1982 until 1997,
before "passing the mantle" to
Fox Hill's current MP Fred
Mitchell.
At the time of his death, Mr
Mackey was the chairman of
the Antiquities, Monuments,
and Museum Corporation, a
weekly columnist for The Tri-
bune, co-chair of the Nassau
Redevelopment Association,
and a substantial force behind
the redevelopment plans for
Bay Street and downtown Nas-
sau.
Born on January 19,1938, Mr
Mackey is survived by his wife
Betty, the former Mary Eliza-
beth Thompson, daughters
Phaedra Mackey-Knowles, and
Dr Michelle Mackey-Pople, and
grandsons, Devonn and
Dominique Knowles.
Getting his early start as a
Linotype operator at The Tri-
bune, Mr Mackey's initial
SEE page five


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THE TRIBUNE;


PAGF 9 TilFSDAY. JANUARY 3. 2006


*i E


U S Ambassador John Rood is a
good friend of the Bahamas.
Indeed, he has had a long association
with this country even before he took up
his ambassadorial post.
His friendly, outgoing manner has
endeared him to many and his public
statements have been couched in prop-
er terms, even when they were meant to
be critical. In this respect Mr Rood tow-
ers over his immediate predecessor who,
to be blunt, was seriously deficient and
somewhat susceptible to foot-in-mouth
disease.
Mr Rood has been an excellent rep-
resentative for the US in the Bahamas.
Those Bahamians who long to see a
more liberal administration in Wash-
ington will not be happy when the time
comes for his demission. Nevertheless,
Bahamians must bear in mind that the
ambassador's first responsibility is to
protect and promote the interests of
America and Americans.
In specific areas such as drug traf-
ficking, terrorism and crime in general,
our interests are just about identical
and our collaborative efforts to combat
these evils will ho doubt continue
regardless of the political shade of gov-
ernment in office in either country.

In today's world it is not consid-
ered a breach of diplomatic eti-
quette for an ambassador to speak
openly in a host country with regard to
general and specific matters and even


It is quite
disturbing that some


Bahamians can
advocate that we
slavishlyr fllow the
dictates of the
administration
of President George


W Bush,
or any other US
administration for
that matter.


disagreements over particular issues
once this is done in a spirit of mutual
respect.
So there was nothing wrong, at least
in my opinion, about Mr Rood's weigh-
ing inon the highly controversial pro-
posal.for an LNG plant and pipeline to
Florida. It is a matter of interest to both
countries.
Presumably, the ambassador will have
made his position clear to the govern-
ment of the Bahamas in advance of his
public statements, so Foreign Minister
Fred Mitchell cannot complain about
being blindsided.
Now it is the responsibility of Prime
Minister Perry Christie and his cabinet
to examine this issue and to make a
decision based on what will be in the
best interests of the Bahamian people in


ARTHUR

FOUL KES



the long run.
It is quite disturbing that some
Bahamians can advocate that we slav-
ishly follow the dictates of the adminis-
tration of President George W Bush,
or any other US administration for that
matter.
As small as we are, we are still a sov-
ereign nation. We are America's best
friend but we should not want to revert
to colonial status. The new world order
envisioned by enlightened people is
about reasoning together with goodwill
and mutual respect.

M r Christie, and those in his
cabinet who are opposed to
the LNG project, are facing a serious
challenge. Ranged against them are one,
of the most powerful industrial con-
glomerates in the world openly sup-
ported by one of their own cabinet col-
leagues and the representative of the
US Government.
Despite his recent ruminations about
whether the LNG project will spoil this
country's image as a leading tourism
destination (which it will), Mr Christie
seems to be tottering on the edge of
capitulation. The Americans see this.
and no doubt hope the ambassador's
public comments will tip him over.
In an interview- with-The. Bahama
Journal, Mr Christie might have given
the Bahamian public some hope with
his talk about juxtaposing the LNG
plant with the fact that vast sums of
money are invested in making the
Bahamas a great tourism destination.
"I wasn't sure that LNG plants in the
Bahamas were consistent with that."
In the next breath he makes it clear
that his concerns had been magically
allayed. Or perhaps he thought that the
act of merely talking about them would
do the trick. Said the Prime Minister: "I
think the new revelations of energy


To THE


POINT


US ambassador unconvincing on



LNG project in the Bahamas


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problems and the need for the Bahamas
to take advantage of its proximity to
the United States of America have giv-
en us a different perspective and a dif-
ferent value to that process.
"Provided as we have had envi-
ronmental impact assessments say that
it is safe and that (there would be) very,
very, very minimal implications to the
environment then we, I believe, would
go ahead in the very near future."
What "new revelations of energy
problems" is he talking about? All the
news from that front has been quite
depressing. Except for some powerful
ostriches, the world now accepts that
the fossil fuel industry is the biggest
contributor to environmental degrada-
tion and global warming.
Mr Christie should not want to deliv-
er future generations of Bahamians into
those ruthless and callous hands. But it
looks as if he will do just that.



imagine what Paul Adderley could
have done with all this if he were
not on the Hill, and if he were so
inclined! Some people will reinember
how he characterized the negotiations
between FNM Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham and that ever-so-clever South
African, Sol Kerzner.
As it turned out Mr Kerzner did not
take advantage of a supposedly naive
government in the negotiations for the
Atlantis development as Mr Adderley
suggested. The Bahamian people got a
good deal in the form of a great resort,
and without giving away hundreds of
acres of prime public land for residential
development.
Mr Adderley could have had a field
day describing the drama. A weak, bum-
bling, indecisive, shuffling, loquacious
People's Champion (fresh from a dis-
astrous encounter with Land Grabber)



We have a
wonderful head start
in: the Bahamas but
our government is
considering
sacrificing it all on
the altar of gas and
oil, an altar that will
not stand forever.



is in an arena facing terrifying Big
Energy who is armed with trident and
net, Imperial Proconsul nrmed with nar-
cotic powder and chartf, and the most
dangerous gladiator of all: Weapons
Carrier disguised as a minister of state
intoxicated'with power.
Obviously it is an unfair match and
PC will be vanquished, much to the sor-
row of his admirers in the stands. They
will murmur as they amble off into the
night that they may have lost their


birthright but at least PC was still good
for some great speeches in the future.



n a conversation with Jeff Lloyd on
the radio show Real Talk, Ambas-
sador Rood brought nothing new to the
debate. The best argument for putting
the plant in the Bahamas and laying
miles of pipe is that there is-no suitable
spot on the Florida coast to do it.

Mr Christie should
not want
to deliver future gen-
erations of Bahami-
ans into those ruth-
less and callous
hands. But it looks
as if he will do just
that.

That argument has been advanced by
others and it is just as unconvincing
coming from the ambassador. The truth
is that the Floridians want the gas but
they also want to sleep nights knowing
that the Bahamians are willing to risk
terrorist attack, environmental degra-
dation and damage to their tourism
industry.
The equally familiar argument that
there is a risk in everything is ridicu-
lously facile. Of course risk is involved in
everything we do. Yes, the cruise ships
represent a risk. But that risk and its
benefits cannot be compared to the risk
of mammoth LNG tankers in our
waters, each with a billion cubic feet of
LNG on board.
Taking a shower is a risk. You can
slip and crack your skull in the bath tub
any morning, but only a damn fool will
grease the tub before stepping into it.


FIX THE AIRPORT

instead of agonising over whether
we should take the risks involved
in being Florida's gas station, the PLP
government should just say no and turn
their energies into doing something
about the disgraceful state of our pre-
mier international airport here in Nas-
sau.
The oil-rich emirate of Dubai in the
Persian Gulf is pouring money into
tourism development and is busy trans-
forming itself into a superior destina-
tion against the time when the oil will
run out---. ---
We have a wonderful head start in
the Bahamas but our government is
considering sacrificing it all on the altar
of gas and oil, an altar that will not stand
forever. The Floridians are not so stu-
pid. They are protecting their natural
heritage and their lucrative tourism
trade.
www.bahamapundit.typepad.com
sirarthurfoulkes@hotmail.com


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TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2006, PAGE 3


0 In brief

Man dies

of gunshot

wounds in

hospital

* By NATARIO MCKENZIE
THE year 2005 ended on a
sad note as the homicide count
rose to 52 on the very last day.
Police say that on Saturday,
December 31, Kercheval Miller
of Shady Tree Lane died of
gunshot wounds.
According to police press liai-
son officer Walter Evans, on
Friday, December 30, Miller
and two other men were repair-
ing their vehicle off Mackey
Street when a dark male
approached them.
" The.man drew out a handgun
and fired shots at the three men,
wounding two of them and crit-
ically injuring the third. Police
identified one of the victims as a
23 year old of Montrose
Avenue who was shot in his left
forearm and hip, the second as a
23-year-old male of Jerome
Avenue who was shot in the left
forearm and shoulder.
' Miller, the third man, was
reportedly shot in the upper
back, abdomen and left hand.
He died of his injuries shortly
,After 3am on Saturday.

'No major

incidents

during

Junkanoo


POLICE say there were no
major incidents to report at this
New Year's Day junkanoo
parade.
Yesterday police inspector
and press liaison officer Walter'
Evans thanked the public for
its behaviour and cooperation
at the event.
Mr Evans admitted that
-police had to break up one or
;,two fights, but otherwise no
serious incidents took place at
'the parade.

-


. m


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


Crowd's frustration at seating




arrangements for Junkanoo


* By NATARIO MCKENZIE
THERE was no lack of
seating at New Year's Day
junkanoo parade as rows of
bleachers remained empty on
Bay Street. However, this did
not stop the complaints about
seating arrangements.
All did not go well for some
attending Phil Cooper's New
Year's Day Parade. Shortly
after midnight, as crowds filed
in, agitation over seating start-
ed.
Many persons voiced their
frustration at being "turned
around" because they did not
have wristbands for their
respective seating areas.
The situation grew tense at
the Parliament Street entry-
point as persons who had been
allowed inside the fence at
Charlotte Street and other
entrances told marshals that
they had been sent to this
entrance to get their wrist-
bands.
This created confusion
between those trying to get in
and those already behind the
fence inquiring about wrist
bands. These wrist bands,
which were to have been given
out when persons got their
tickets, allowed the holder to
walk in and out of the fenced
area.
For one man and his family
the situation was particularly
troubling.
"I'm very disappointed in
how they have this seating
arrangement and operations,"
said taxi driver Robert Allen.
"I have a family of seven.
We paid for our tickets, we
came to the gate they directed
us to 'H', then they told us to
go someplace to the north; we
went to the north then they
sent us someplace to the south,
then we ended right back here


to 'H". We still don't have the
wrist bands. We have our tick-
ets, they won't let us go
through. I came to see the Val-
ley Boys make their first lap
and I haven't seen anything.
It's a disgrace, my money has
gone to naught. It's something
like $500 just gone down the
drain.
"I have two young sons per-
forming with the Valley Boys
group.They wanted me to con-
gratulate them as they rushed
and worse off I brought two
tourists with me and they can't
get proper seating either," he
said.
"This is just ridiculous, this
don't make any sense they
have us walking up and down
like this," one woman com-
plained furiously.
"I'm just ready to punch
someone. This is frustrating,
over $100 and we can't even
get to our seats," grumbled
another angry man as he and
his wife were caught in the con-
fusion.
The difficulty was appar-
ently resolved sometime later'
in the morning and the
entry/exit process started to
move smoothly. There were
. just as many people standing
outside the fence as those who
had bought tickets to fill the
bleachers.
Greg Butler, from the Min-
istry of Youth Sports and Cul-
ture in charge of the entry/exit
process, told The Tribune that
the process had gone "okay".
However, he admitted that he
was surprised at the number
of vacant seats on Bay Street.
"Usually we do have more
people come out to the Boxing
Day parade, but I didn't
expect it to be this low at New
Year's," Mr Butler said.
Amanda Davis and Karen
Cash, two visitors from Ohio,


* THERE were complaints
about seating arrangements,
despite the fact that many
bleachers were empty


were delighted with the
Junkanoo festivities.
"We heard about the parade
from locals," Ms Davis said.
"I like the costumes, they are
very exotic and detailed and
the music is fantastic," she
said.
"What I admire is that per-
sons from all age groups can
do this. What a great family
activity and I envy that
because our country doesn't
have it ," Ms Cash said.


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT Grand
Bahama recorded its first traf-
fic fatality for the year on
Sunday when a 65-year-old
Freeport man lost control of
his vehicle, plowed through a
fence and plunged into a
canal off Bahama Reef
Boulevard.
The victim, identified as
James Alexander Roberts, a
resident of 566 Jamaica
Avenue and No 7 Grenada
Avenue, was driving his 1995
Toyota Windom sometime
around 3.10am when the acci-
dent occurred.
According to police reports,
Christina Bevans, a resident of
Coral Gardens, was driving her
black Mitsubishi Galant,


license 31658, north on Coral
Road in the vicinity of Bahama
Reef Boulevard when she was
side-swiped by a dark green
and grey Windom, licensed
29272.
The Windom, which was
being driven by Mr Roberts in
the opposite direction, skidded
out of control and knocked
down a stop sign at the inter-
section.
As she was stopping, Ms
Bevans noticed that the vehicle
had disappeared. She then
heard a loud noise and con-
tacted the police.
When police and EMS per-
sonnel arrived at the scene,
they saw a trail of tyre marks
leading from the road through
a fence that had been knocked
down. The marks continued to'
the edge of a nearby canal


some 250 feet from the road.
Police diver Corporal 581
Pratt discovered the vehicle at
the bottom, resting on its roof
in some 20-ft of water. A
wrecker retrieved the badly
damaged vehicle from the
water.
The man's body was taken
to Rand Memorial Hospital,
where he was pronounced
dead on arrival.
Mr Roberts had been a
longtime employee in the
accounts department at the
hospital before retiring several
years ago. An autopsy will be
performed to determine the
cause of death.
Ms Bevans was not injured
in the accident. Her vehicle
was only slightly damaged.
Supt Basil Rahming said
investigations are continuing.


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65-year-old dies




in traffic accident


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4







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4. TUESDAY. JANUARY 3, 2006


EIOI AULETE S T HEEITOR


GEORGE MACKEY, OBE, died yes-
terday morning in Doctors Hospital after a
long and hard battle with prostate cancer. He
was 67.
Today he will be remembered by the com-
munity as a stalwart member of the PLP, a
Member of Parliament for the Fox Hill con-
stituency, and a sportsman as well as for his
many contributions to the Bahamas. Readers
of this newspaper got to know him through his
weekly column Viewpoint by George
Mackey.
But we prefer to recall the George Mack-
ey of nearly half a century ago the young
lad who in his own words grew up in Fox Hill
when "most of us were dirt poor, family wor-
ship was an imperative and good manners
and respect for our elders were the order of
the day."
George Mackey never forgot his roots.
Family worship was ingrained in him as he
found his anchor in St Anne's Anglican
Church, Fox Hill. He was orphaned at 15 with
his father dying in 1953, eight years after his
mother's death. And so his church from his
early years was his foundation.
At the age of 26 he joined the staff of The
Tribune as an apprentice Linotype operator.
"So much of our life changed," he wrote in
The Tribune's centenary edition on Novem-
ber 21, 2003, "from the very moment that we
began our association with The Tribune, and,
by extension with the Dupuch family, nearly
a half-century ago."
Not only did his life change, but it was at
The Tribune that he met his future wife, the
then Betty Thompson. She was The Tribune's
switchboard operator, who later moved into
the accounts department. When she joined
the staff young George was already a pro on
the Linotype.
In his article, "Learning from Sir Etienne in
'The School of Life"', George Mackey told of
the special interest that Sir Etienne Dupuch,
the late editor and publisher of this newspaper
took in him. It was only natural that Sir Eti-
enne would show special attention to this
young man. He was bright, had an inquiring
mind, was respectful, gentle and hard working.
He was an example to the staff, who always
referred to him as "Honest George".
"With the passage of time," Mr Mackey
wrote, "we were to learn very much from Sir
Etienne, so much so that going to work with
him each day became tantamount to going
to school, only a different kind of school: the
school of life. It never failed to amaze us how
people, so different in many ways, could yet
still be so tolerant and respectful of each oth-
er, as was the case with.Sir Etienne and us."


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Politically the Editor and the Linotype
operator were polls apart, but this never once
- as long as George Mackey was a part of
The Tribune clouded their respect for each
other.
"During our initial stay with The Tribune,
Sir Etienne became a mentor and a friend to
us," he wrote. "In a way, he assisted us in the
continuation of our education, in that he
taught us the art of pubic communication,
both orally and in print. During our last 10
years in his employ, from 1959 to 1969, he
allowed us to almost exclusively typeset all of
his editorials on the Linotype."
Very few persons, in his long writing career,
ever had the privilege of typesetting Sir Eti-
enne's editorials his handwriting was
almost impossible to decipher. But George
was one of the few who mastered it, and
always got Sir Etienne's copy letter perfect.
Young George had dropped out of Gov-
ernment High at the age of 15. So in fact it was
at The Tribune that he got his education.
But in 1969 politics drew him away. He
left The Tribune in 1969, having served as
assistant secretary general of the PLP for the
previous two years.
The year he left The Tribune he was elect-
ed chairman of the PLP and then in 1972 he
was elected to the House of Assembly where
he served for 25 years.
One day in the columns of the PLP news-
paper George Mackey severely criticised The
Tribune. We knew that what he said was not
true, and that deep in his soul he did not
believe it. But in those da.s this was the only
way to prove loyalty to the "Chief", who
demanded undivided loyalty.
A short time afterward we received a mes-
sage that he hoped that one day he would
find the courage to climb The Tribune's stairs
and apologise.
Years passed. We heard no more. And
then one day he did climb those stairs. This
time he wanted to write a weekly column.
No mention was ever made of his public crit-
icism. He was welcomed back into the fold
and only put down his pen when his illness
conquered him.
But during that time, he took every oppor-
tunity to express his appreciation for his years
at The Tribune. This was his way of making
amends, and showing that he had learned his
lessons well across the table from his mentor
- to always respect the views of others.
And so we take this opportunity today, on
behalf of ourselves and The Tribune family, to
send our condolences to his wife, children
and grandchildren on the departure of one of
our own.


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387


George Mackey remembered


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sure that you are prepared for the challenge. On Monday,:
January 9th take the time to attend the free first class
of the TERRESTRIAL NAVIGATION COURSE
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Navigation at 7p.m. at BASRA Headquarters on East
Bay Street then consider enrolling in the 3-month
course designed to impart essential theoretical and
practical navigational skills. Other courses available
are Celestial Navigation and Marine Safety/
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Telephone: 364-5987, fax 364-5988
or
e-mail pgk434@netscape.net



WATERFIELDS COMPANY
LIMITED


PUBLIC NOTICE


The public is advised that demolition procedures of
one of the Water Storage Tanks will be in progress
at the Water Storage facility, Blue Hill Road.

The work will commence on January 3rd, 2006.

The demolition works will continue between the
hours of 7:30am and 5:00pm, Monday through
Saturday.

The public is further advised to exercise extreme
caution when approaching this area.


their suggested that the
Caribbean economy as a whole
was too small to make CSME
worthwhile. The challenger
seemingly failed to appreciate
that joining CSME makes us
part of an economy significant-
ly larger than standing on our
own.
Curtailment of preferential
banana and sugar tariffs for the
region in 2007 will force those
islands, where these once sta-
ple crops remain a significant
component of the economy, to
alter their focus. Tourism will
likely become an even bigger
component of their economies.
The Tourism Minister recent-
ly pointed to the significant
hotel construction boom which
has taken place in Cuba,
Jamaica and the Dominican
Republic. Nevis, a relative new-


plan


comer to the tourism market
place, is building hotels and has
adopted an aggressive market-
ing strategy.
While we enjoy a better GDP
than our Caribbean neighbours,
primarily due to our proximity
to the United States and the
foresight of a few to commit to
tourism as one of our major
economic pillars early in the
game, that GDP margin is grad-
ually but surely being eroded.
Those in power have done a
less than admirable job educat-
ing the nation to the realities
which globalisation will bring.
Creating additional barriers
which encourage wallowing in
mediocrity rather than prepar-
ing for the globalisation
onslaught is not the answer.
The demise of CSME is
hopefully only temporary. I
trust we can expectantly look
forward to its resurrection.
MICHAEL R MOSS
Freeport, Bahamas
December 19 2005


EDITOR, The Tribune
FROM a Bahamas perspec-
tive, a mortally wounded
CSME, chopped in the chest
and stabbed in the back, suc-
cumbed to the onslaught and
was interred some weeks past. I
was minded to offer a few com-
ments while the debate, signifi-
cantly less pro than con, raged.
I refrained from doing so and
have come more and more to
regret my reticence.
Recent articles, touching on
the World Trade Organisation's
(WTO's) stripping of preferen-
tial tariffs enjoyed by the
African, Caribbean and Pacific
(ACP) states, as well as major
deficiencies highlighted in our
educational system leading to
growing uncompetitiveness in
our economy, have caused me
to earnestly hope CSME can be
quickly resurrected from its pre-
mature, ignominious demise.
Before proceeding further, a
little digression may be in order.
I fully admit that my views may
be considered by some as being
clouded. Influenced by a won-
derful period spent at the St
Augustine campus of the Uni-
versity of the West Indies,
Trinidad and Tobago, where I
obtained my Electrical Engi-
neering degree in 1969. Affect-
ed by my recent, enjoyable four-
year employment as Chief
Technical Officer at the Jamaica
Public Service Company (JPS),
a wholly integrated (generation,
transmission, distribution, cus-
tomer service) utility company
with a staff complement of 1600,
providing electricity to 550,000
customers across Jamaica.
While accepting the argu-
ment that my views may be
somewhat 'predisposed,. IF
believe that opinions expressed
by some otherwise well think-
ing individuals are likely jaun-
diced. Jaundiced by a lack of
familiarity regarding the state
of affairs existing in the
Caribbean region today. Jaun-
diced by public opinion. Jaun-
diced by negative social issues
we are currently experiencing
because of our government's
failure to address the mammoth
illegal migrant problem hanging
like the proverbial millstone
around our necks.
A while back the Foreign
Affairs Minister, while promot-
ing CSME, noted that Barba-
dos' Gross Domestic Product
(GDP), was fast closing on ours.
He was strongly challenged
regarding his facts. Yet, the data
presented by his challenger
merely served to confirm the
minister's assertion. It was fur-


from America for one rea-
son and that's to watch
junkanoo on Boxing Day.
Some of these tourist tickets
cost up to $3,000 or $4,000
and to be told that junkanoo
is not going to take place on
Boxing Day as was planned,
this could be very frustrat-
ing. The tourists have plans,
schedules and reservations of.
their own, like return flights
back on the next day. This is
where the government has to,,
be concerned about our num-
ber one industry which is
tourism.
If you don't realise by now
that junkanoo is now inter-
national and should be treat-
ed that way. Look at other
countries when it comes to"'
their tradition like Trinidad:
and the Carnival, some of the
most beautiful little girls in'
the world are out there in
rain storms celebrating car-
nival because it's a tradition.
Look at Ireland when it
comes to Saint Patrick's Day
parade, it could rain hale but
the parade must go on. The
same thing in America when,
Thanksgiving time comes
around, in New York and
California those parades
must go on. This should be
the same standard we should
follow. Soplease take care
of our bread and butter, keep .
the millions of tourists happy
and protect our economy.
PAUL ROLLE
Nassau
December 28 2005


New sign spoils the

beauty of Cable Beach


EDITOR, The Tribune
THE unfortunate part of
this letter is that the proba-
bility that my complaint being
corrected is almost impossible
however it is important that I
write to question and protest
an approval of this huge ugly
electronic sign being installed
on Cable Beach by BahaMar.
To Sarkis Izmerilan may I
remind you the promises you
made to the Bahamas to
"improve Cable Beach" if
this is an example of how you
and your people think they
will improve the aesthetics of
Cable Beach then for sure
you should be on the line
when the Cuban eye doctors
open their clinic.
The Bahamas has a prod-
uct very clearly identified as
the tradition of offering a
colonial ambiance, architec-
ture not this ugliness of Las
Vegas. We certainly have no
need for this ugliness.
What I fear is that slowly
this style of billboard is
being approved the first
on the eastern wall of the
old Astra Hotel if Physi-
cal Planning has approved


that sign and now the Cable
Beach sign what is to stop
anyone applying'for any
location to erect similar signs
and here we go very, very
soon we will have a forest of
electronic signage. Has
someone forgotten we live
in a hurricane zone let alone
these signs are ugly?
What is to stop having
West Bay Street Inner Field
Road East-West Highway,
etc, etc, all the highly trav-
elled roads having a forest of
over large electronic bill-
boards? Approve one how
can you refuse the next?
I am frightened that Mr
Izmerilan of BahaMar and his
architectural designers have
not been able to appreciate
the beauty of Bahamian
architecture, its vernacular
and design and what we sell
as a destination.
This new sign arising in
front of the Cable Beach
Casino is simply... ugly! Un-
Bahamian and should be
removed, yes removed.
HHUMES
Nassau
December 15 2005-


We should





resurrect


EDITOR, The Tribune
MY views on the junkanoo
festival are that from the time
the PLP won the election
there seems to be a problem
with junkanoo. I believe
someone should tell the gov-
ernment that you don't
change tradition.
Junkanoo is a Bahamian
tradition which is celebrated
during the Christmas times
and on Boxing Day. For the
last three or four years, there
were major problems con-
cerning junkanoo. I am an
entrepreneur when it comes
to tourism. I realise over the
last three years with some of
the repeat visitors to this
country, who came to watch
junkanoo, they were highly
disappointed with the parade
and so was I, because I am a
true believer that tradition
should not be changed under
any circumstances.
The government should
not let leaders of groups hold
Junkanoo hostage. There
should always be a back-up
plan when it comes to the
rain and weather. The Val-
ley Boys and the Saxons,
groups like this spend months
in the shacks preparing for
junkanoo, so you can't expect
for them to go out in bad
weather; but at the same time
we must think about our
bread and butter.
Some of my friends came
all the way from places like
Japan, China, Russia and the
Middle East; some came


CSME


More preparation is

needed for Junkanoo


I









THA TR 3,2


o In brief

13kg haul of

cocaine is

found on

board plane


FREEPORT United States
Customs and Bahamian DEU
officers discovered 13 kilos of
cocaine aboard an American
Airlines flight at Grand
Bahama International Airport
Saturday morning.
The drugs, which have a
street value of $400,000, were
found in a black travel bag dur-
ing a routine pre-departure
check of baggage on board the
flight to Miami, Florida.
Supt Basil Rahming said US
Custom officers, assisted by a
K-9 unit officer, made the dis-
covery sometime around
8.10am before the flight's depar-
ture.
Mr Rahming said the black
travel bag had been tagged for
that particular flight. It con-
tained 13 kilos or 30.5 pounds of
suspected cocaine in taped plas-
tic packages.
DEU officers confiscated-the
unclaimed bag, which has been
flown to New Providence
aboard an OPBAT helicopter.
Mr Rahming said police have
launched investigations to find
out how the bag and its con-
tents got aboard the aircraft.


New Year

Honours

facing

delay

NO Bahamian honours were
listed in the New Year's Hon-
our's List at the beginning of this
year. A government spokesman
said honours for the Bahamas
would be deferred until the
Queen's Birthday Honours are
announced in June.


-*



*O-




"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


- .dkID


Former PMH doctor and Bahamas



squash player dies in Australia


DR Grahame Maxwell Bar-
ry, 75, died in hospital in his
hometown of Ettalong Beach,
Australia, over the weekend.
His two surviving daughters,
Tracy and Tina, were with him.
Dr Barry died on New
Year's Day Nassau time,
which would have been 10am
the following day in Australia
Monday, January 2. He had
suffered three strokes in one
year, his last one only a few
days ago, when his eldest
daughter Tracy flew out from
Harbour Island to be with
him.
He last visited his family in
Harbour Island in August
2004. He was there when they
received news of second
daughter, Kim's death in a
Traffic accident in New York
in November. Dr Barry's
health went into decline after
her death. He returned to Aus-
tralia at the end of that year
with his youngest daughter,
Tina, who remained in Aus-
tralia to take care of him.
Dr Barry, lived in the
Bahamas for 22 years, marry-
ing Bahamian Brenda Major,
the Bahamas' first Miss
Bahamas, in September, 1965.
He was appointed a medical
officer at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital in 1959 and held
the status of Belonger from the
early 1960s. He was president
of the Medical Association and
the Lawn Tennis Association.
A dedicated sportsman, he
was a grade A squash player
and represented the Bahamas


internationally on several occa-
sions. He excelled in golf and
swimming. In later years he
opened a medical practice in
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
He was negotiating with the
Pindling government for
Bahamian citizenship when he
was called to Australia because
his mother was taken seriously
ill.
He had his family join him in
Australia while negotiations
continued with the Bahamas
government about his status in
the Bahamas. Eventually his
application for citizenship was
turned down.
"From all this, it appears to
me that, despite the fact that
all regulations have been com-
plied with; despite the fact that
I am personally known to most
officials in Government;
despite the fact that I have
lived and worked in the
Bahamas for 20 years, and
despite the fact that my refer-
ees for permanent residency
are Bahamians of the highest
rank, there still exists some
doubt as to my desirability as a
resident," Dr Barry wrote in
a letter to The Tribune on July
16,1981.
Although his family even-
tually returned to the Bahamas
and opened and operated The
Landing at Harbour Island, Dr
Barry, hurt by his rejection,
returned only twice.
His last family reunion with
his wife, daughters, and grand-
children was in 2004 before his
daughter Kim's death.


* Dr Grahame Barry
pictured with his wife, Brenda,
on their seventeenth wedding
anniversary in Australia


Dr Barry is survived by his
wife, Brenda, two daughters,
Tracy and Tina, four grand-
children -Alessandra, Ade,
Isabella and Kwinn and
son-in-law, Toby Tyler.
Funeral services will be held
in Australia. Anyone wishing
to may make donations to the
Dunmore School at Harbour
Island in his memory.


George Mackey passes away


FROM page one
"claim to fame" was that for
many years he set Sir Etienne
Dupuch's editorials. In fact, it
was at The Tribune where he
and his wife, Betty, met. He
was already there when she
joined the staff, first as a switch-
board operator, later moving
to the accounts department.
During a small ceremony at
the Fox Hill parade yesterday,
Minister of Foreign Affairs and
MP for Fox Hill Fred Mitchell
said that with the death of Mr
Mackey, he could not find the
words to express fully what his
loss would mean for the coun-
try, and Fox Hill in particular.


"As his successor as the rep-
resentative for Fox Hill, I
express my deepest condo-
lences to his family; his wife
Betty, daughters Phaedra and
Michelle, to his grandsons,
Devonn and Dominic.
"I feel a great sense of per-
sonal loss. I can find no prop-
er words to express fully the
loss to our country and our
loss in Fox Hill. We pray for
the repose of his soul,' he said..
A previously setservice.in
honour of Mr Mackey will
take place as scheduled on
Thursday, January 5, at
7.30pm at St Paul's Baptist
Church in Fox Hill. All friends
of Mr Mackey are invited to


support the community event,
which is being organised by the
religious and community lead-
ers of Fox Hill.


TROPICAL*
UTERMINATORS~l


FU RN


* LEADERS of the Fox Hill community gathered under the
shade of the Silk Cotton Tree on the Fox Hill Parade
yesterday to announce the death of George Mackey
(Photo: BIS/Raymond Kongwa)


-r -



* -


- -


-- a O


TUESDAY
JANUARY 3
2:00am Community Page/1540 AM
11:00 Immediate Response
12:00 ZNS News Update
12:03 Caribbean Today News
Update
12:05 Immediate Response Cont'd
1:00 Ethnic Health America
1:30 Spiritual Impact: Andy Young
2:00 Portraits In Black
2:30 Inside Hollywood
3:00 Durone Hepburn
3:30 Sid Roth
4:00 Dennis The Menace
4:30 Carmen San Diego
4:58 ZNS News Update
5:00 Fun Farm
5:30 411
6:00 Bahamian Things
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
8:00 Music Mix: GVC Presents
Southern Sounds
9:00 Phil Cooper 2006 New Year's
Junkanoo Parade Highlights
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:00am Community Page 1540 AM


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We apologize to our valued customers for any inconvenience

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''I.:


I


TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2006, PAUiE 5


THE TRIBUNE


'~' '


r


O





THE TRIBUNE


PAGF R T IFRSDAY JANUARY 3, 2006


Junkanoo groups shaking up


A photographic round-up of the New Year event
(Photos: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)


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who passed away on Saturday 24th December 2005.


We apologize to our valued customers for any

inconvenience this may cause and thank you for your
prayers, love and support at this very difficult time.



"`leep in heavenly .eace"


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the streets for New Year parade


* VALLEY Boys


M SAXAUNS leader Percy Vola Francis


* VALLEY Boys


* SAXONS


* SAXONS


TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2006, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


* ROOTS






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8. TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2006


Absence of regional action




justifies DEA office in Guyana


* By SIR RONALD
SANDERS
(The writer is a business exec-
utive and former Caribbean
diplomat who publishes widely
on Small States in the global
community).

THE Guyana govern-
ment is reported to be
considering the establishment
of a presence in Guyana of the
United States Drug Enforce-
ment Agency (DEA).
This announcement was


made by the Head of the Presi-
dential Secretariat in Guyana,
Dr Roger Luncheon.
In making the announcement
Dr Luncheon appeared to con-
cede that the local drug and law
enforcement agencies need help
in combating the scourge of
drug trafficking that has
plagued not only Guyana but
practically every country in the
Caribbean.
There is no shame in this.
The resources of the drug
traffickers are simply much
greater than the meagre
resources of small countries
which must allocate such
resources to delivering a wide
range of goods and services to
its citizens including health care,


education, roads and other infra
structure.
Governments of small coun-
tries cannot match the amount
of money that drug traffickers
can spend. The international
drugs industry for that is
what it has become is proba-
bly second only to oil and gas in
the scope of its reach and the
scale of its resources.
Governments of rich coun-
tries, such as the United States,
cannot cope on their own
either. If the US could have suc-
cessfully fought the battle
against the traffic in narcotics


within its own borders, it would
have no need to extend its reach
into other countries.

But the US takes the
position that the bat-
tle against drugs is better fought
by cutting off the supply from
outside countries, rather than
trying to stop the demand with-
in its own country.
In a sense, the US position is
helpful to countries in the
Caribbean because drug traf-
ficking has become a major
scourge within the Region
itself. It is now believed that
drug trafficking is the single
largest contributor to the
increase in violent crime which


nsgh

WORLDVItlFW


is evident throughout the area.
It has led to an increase in
illegal firearms, to ritual execu-
tions, to turf wars between rival
drug trafficking gangs, and to
kidnapping. On another side,
the creation of a drug habit
amongst the local populations,
especially young men, has also
spurred increased robberies of
both homes arid businesses.
More than any other phe-
nomena, drug trafficking in the
Caribbean has destabilised the
region, and if it continues to fos-
ter crime at an increasing pace it
will frighten away foreign
investment as much as it will
panic local people to move
abroad.
The region, therefore, needs
help to cope with drug traffick-
ing, and a relationship between
the Guyana and US govern-
ments to tackle the problem in
Guyana may indeed be neces-
sary now.
The US Bureau for Interna-
tional Narcotics and Law
Enforcement in its 2005 report
described Guyana as "an easy
transit point for cocaine traf-
ficking from South America to
the US, Europe and the
Caribbean". It said: "Crimes
believed linked to narcotics traf-
ficking are on the rise in
Georgetown and the informal
economy (believed to be fuelled
by drug proceeds) is suspected
to be between 40-60 percent of
the formal sector".
The terms of the arrangement
between Guyana and the US
will be problematic.
For instance, what powers
will be given to the officers of
the DEA? Will they be


M SIR Ronald Sanders


accountable to the Commis-
sioner of Police in Guyana or
will they be an independent
body? Will the officers enjoy
immunity for their actions in
Guyana? How long will they be
present in Guyana? And, who
will pay their costs?

These are questions that
no doubt the Guyana
government is debating with the
US, for while US assistance is
clearly needed to fight the prob-
lem, the framework in which
such assistance is given should
not lead to resentment from
local law enforcement officers
or to legal challenges.
But, for all that, the problems
posed by an arrangement for a
DEA presence on Caribbean
territory are not insurmount-
able.
There is already in the


Region experience of agree-
ments with the US on dealing
with drug trafficking. Guyana
could draw on this experience.
For instance, the Bahamas
has signed a Comprehensive
Maritime Agreement to pro-
vide US law enforcement offi-
cers a legal framework for their
operations, and the seven East-
ern Caribbean States have mar-
itime law enforcement agree-
ments with the US that allow
"hot pursuit" of drug traffickers
in territorial waters of an East-
ern Caribbean State by the US
coast guard.
The sad thing about all this
is that Caribbean Community
and Common Market (CARI-
COM) countries did not collec-
tively negotiate agreements with
the US and other countries for
assistance in coping with the
illicit traffic.
Of even greater concern is
that while agreements have
been signed with the US gov-
ernment allowing for US activ-
ity in Caribbean territories,
CARICOM countries have not
established agreements among
themselves for local police and
coast guards to pursue traffick-
ers in each other's waters.
What this points to is the
weakness in the joint gover-
nance system of CARICOM.

The problems of drug
trafficking and crime
have been on the CARICOM
agenda for years, and compre-
hensive reports have been sub-
mitted by expert groups with
firm recommendations, for a
CARICOM architecture to deal
with crime.
There has long been a pro-
posal for the creation of a
CARICOM rapid response
force with cross-territorial law
enforcement powers. But, so far
no action has been taken.
In this connection, countries,
such as Guyana, faced not only
with the increasing problem of


drug trafficking and crime with-
in its borders, but also with the
strong disapproval of the inter-
national community, cannot
await Caribbean-wide action.
To both cope with the chal-
lenges of drug trafficking at
home and to meet the concerns
of powerful countries upon
whom it relies, small countries
like Guyana are compelled to
contemplate agreements such
as allowing the US DEA a pres-
ence in its territory.
As the Caribbean enters 2006


There has
long been a
proposal for
the creation of
a CARICOM
rapid response
force with
cross-territori-
al law enforce-
ment powers.,

with the break-up of the \ est
Indies Federation now 44 years
behind it, and the integration
process now 38 years old since
the formation of the Caribbean
Free Trade Agreement
(CARIFTA) in 1968, it is time
that solutions to national prob-
lems be sought in a regional
context, particularly where the
problems, such as drug traffick-
ing, are also shared regionally.
The alternative is a contin-
ued dependence on external
agencies in critical areas of
national and regional life, and a
continuous show of the hollow-
ness of national independence.
responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com


H


Ltd.


have moved to new offices as of

2ndJanuary 2006.



Our new contact information will be:


Higgs &Johnson
(Counsel &c Attorneys-at-Law)

Ocean Centre
Montagu Foreshore
East Bay Street
P. O. Box N-3247
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (242) 502 5200
Fax: (242) 502 5250


H

Corporate Services Ltd.

Ocean Centre
Montagu Foreshore
East Bay Street
P. O. Box SS-19084
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (242) 502 5200
Fax: (242) 502 5225


Are you striving for

personal growth with a passion for


success, in a company that


prides


itself on customer service?


If we've peaked your interest, Let's lalk!!


The Plus Group, Nassau, Bahamas, is seeking
a young, intelligent, computer literate individual.
This individual must be a team player who is self-
motivated and has a strong-desire to achieve goals that
are both customer & company driven.


Qualifications:


Benefits:


Duties:


L'4

4r-*


* Six (6) BGCSE's
* Knowledge of Excel &
Microsoft Office Software
* Health Insurance & Pension
(both after a qualifying period)
* Two weeks vacation.
* Assistance with training / COB
(if courses taken are relevant
to job performance)
* Posting & payment of
authorised invoices
* Reconciliation of supplier
statements


Review & reconciliation of
daily cashier reports & deposits
Petty cash disbursement


4U.sGroup
,of Companies

Please submit your application via
lail to: The Plus Group
P. O. Box N713
Nassau, Bahamas
or eMail to: jobs@theplusgroup.com


The US takes the position that
the battle against drugs is
better fought by cutting off the
supply from outside countries,
rather than trying to stop the
demand within its own
country.


h rkn" Et Inta. itas


RELOCATION


NOTICE


Higgs & Johnson
(Counsel & Attorneys-at-Law)


-and


Corporate Services


JL








THE TRIBUNE


Selling a home?


Morleyrealty.com is the link

between you and your agent.


*'


A


:~ ti.r


I,,,
A4


r


Oi


r, ;"Ot-
lii z


Homes




Condos


.com


Use our address...


to find yours.


Apartments


Lots


Acreage


Tel (242) 394-7070

www.morleyrealty.com


TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 200,5, PASGE 9


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10. TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2006


LOCAL-NEWS


Valley Boys are the





unofficial winners


FROM page one

the theme "My World", were the first onto
Bay Street to get the crowd started, although
quite a few spectators missed their first per-
formance because they were stuck outside
the fence in a confusion over wristbands.
Not to be outdone, Roots under their "Let's
Play Cards" theme gave a solid performance
and One Family with pieces depicting
ancient Egypt also made its presence known
with a heart-thumping performance as well.
"Saxons gat their hand full tonight,"
said one spectator.
When the Saxons, under the theme,
"United We Stand, A Message For A Bet-
ter World," finally made it onto Bay
Street for theirfirst performance of the
early morning, they were greeted with a
mixture of cheers and boos. The group
had been delayed for several minutes and
made its first showing on Rawson Square
sometime after 3am. The crowd was much
involved in the parade by then and as the
Saxons approached Rawson Square their
fans had started to exchange chants with
those of the Valley Boys. Chants of "Sax-
ons", "Valley" echoed and re-echoed for
most of the groups first outing.
The Valley boys seemed determined to
make a statement on their second time
around, getting their supporters to their
feet chanting "Valley -Two Straight".
One Family also seemed to double its
efforts as it gave a strong performance on
its second time around, lifting some of the
crowd to its feet as well. However by this
time Saxots' fans had grown restless and
were anxious to see their group give a
stronger performance so as to quiet the
bad-mouthing of the rival Valley Boys.
When the Saxons took Bay Street for the
second time their fans let them know that
they had had it right. Chants of "Saxons",
"Saxons" accompanied the group's perfor-
mance. Spectators were ultimately divided
as to who had the best musical perfor-
mance. Some argued that it was the Valley
Boys, some the Saxons, others said that
One Family dominated, while a few even
marvelled at the intensity of the Prodigal
Sons' musical performance. Some argued
that the Valley Boys took the crowd with
their performance while others were cer-
tain that it was the Saxons.
A AN ELABORATE Valley Boys costume
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)


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Long

lines at

airport

again

FROM page one

its Miami/Fort Lauderdale
route up until 3pm yester-
day.
The airline was forced to
utilize a number of Dash 8's
to make up for the loss of
capacity with the "new jets"
that were sidelined because
of overdue inspections or
oil leaks.
One jet, the C6 BFM had
its oil leak repaired shortly
after 3pm yesterday and was
pushed back into schedule
to help the Dash 8 fleet
cope with the Miami/Fort
Lauderdale routes.
However, this also had
already created another
problem as the duty times
for the Dash 8 pilots was
-being stretched.
The pilots are flying on
duty up to 19 hours, and
one pilot was actually sus-
pended for exceeding his
flying quota.



Trouble at

Water and

Sewerage

FROM page one

there to be differences;
from the time I have
been involved as the
minister, for there to be
challenges between a
general manager and the
chairmaii of A board."
The, Tribune was
unable to reach Mr But-
ler on the issue, and Mr
Demeritte declined to
comment.


--- (f 5 I--







RONALD DAVIDSON
1938 to 2005
i "MR BRITA"
. ,. WE would like to express our sincerest thanks to all who
have expressed their condolences and shock with "Mr Brita"
Ronald Davidson's passing. Unfortunately we are at a loss
i for answers as to why or what exactly happened to Ron as
She wasn't able to tell us. Our assumption that this was a
health issue was clarified with both the CAT scan and post-
and why?
Ron was the only child of Sophie Well, a University of Toronto
graduate, who married Mr Philip Davidson at the Royal York
Hotel in Toronto in 1936. Ron's mother was a homemaker
to Ron and Philip, who was a lawyer.
Ron received his B.A. in languages and authors also at the University of Toronto shortly after
his mother passed away. Ron's parents wanted him to be a lawyer, expecting him to carry
on the family business. Ron's passion was to be a writer, but out of loyalty and respect he
attended law school. Ron's father passed away unexpectedly within a year of his mother's
passing, leaving Ron an orphan at a young age. Through encouragement from two of Ron's
uncles, he was graduated from law school and passed his Bar exams.
Ron was extremely intelligent. He fulfilled his parents' dreams and expectations by becoming
a lawyer. At the same time Ron was alone without siblings to share his childhood or his loss
of his parents in later years.
Ron practised Real Estate Law and his clients were multi-cultural. His original and distinctive
appearance attracted people of mixed culture, feeling he could possibly be of mixed heritage.
Once people met or saw him, it was hard to forget him.
Ron's wife, Carol, started to work with Ron part-time in the evenings in 1973. Both Ron and
Carol shared a love for the Bahamas with Ron coming to Freeport originally in 1968 and Carol
taking her daughters and brother to Nassau in 1969. In 1974, Ron and Carol, together with
daughters, Tracie and Connie, took their first "family vacation" in Freeport, staying at Xanadu
and the old Atlantic Beach. Ron and Carol worked hard, at times seven days a week, so they
could take off to Freeport and spend time with family. Both girls also worked in the law office
after school, making it a family business and allowing Tracie and Connie the opportunity to
earn money while developing strong work ethics.
In 1975 Ron and Carol purchased a house in Bahama Terrace, Freeport with the goal of
moving here one day. In 1984 Ron had come to Freeport for a much needed break from
working. Unfortunately, he fell ill and required blood transfusions. It was Bahamians who came
forward to donate blood. Bahamian blood was running through Ron and it was at that time
serious efforts were made to permanently live in Freeport.
Finding the Brita business was by accident. Connie introduced the first hand filter in Toronto
basically to remove the chlorine. Noticing the difference, they brought one to Freeport. Guests
and friends didn't want a coffee or any other cold drink they wanted a glass of water first.
Carol not realizing she was filtering local tap water through the Brita pitcher, just thought
Bahamians loved to drink water. When friends started to ask them to bring them a Brita system,
they approached Brita Canada to become distributors and receive training. To Ron, this was
the basic gift a good health product to launch a business in the Bahamas.
Ron loved to supply water for Bahamian events from sports, games, marathons, wine
tasting, Junkanoo and regattas, he met and knew many people from the man who sells
fruit out of his van at the bank to hotel and restaurant executives.
Ron was his own character and treated people with respect. He would help where and when
he could if asked. He travelled to Nassau at least once a week building up the business to
include Abaco, Andros, Cat Island, Exuma, Harbour Island, Inagua, San Salvador, The
Caymans, Puerto Rico, Cancun and Florida. He loved his work which will be faithfully carried
on by our family and trusted employees.
Finally, Ron loved animals and any donation to the Freeport Humane Society in his memory
would be greatly appreciated by the family and current building drive to replace their building
badly damaged by hurricanes over the past two years.
With our sincere gratitude.


' *_ '. -';,? iLt


In honour of our founder


Mr. Tyrone d'Arville


who passed away on Saturday 24th December 2005.


We apologize to our valued customers for any inconvenience


this may cause and thank you for your prayers,

love and support at this very difficult time.


" eep in heavenly Peace"


Town Centre Mall Monday-Saruldiil
Tel: (242) 325-6461 eMail: info@autopli


I


WILL BE CLOSED

Tuesday 3rd January, 2006






I Mt I iltDUIr"


* 1**.


o
,%,


TH ISLANDS OF THE
Qt bahamas


B P-t..,:':,,-. , ..
.... .. s



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-4,


YOUR CONNECTION tO trf WORLD


The Hello Phone Card brings you


National Tourism Week


January 8-13, 2006
Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach


SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2006

3. National Church Service at St. Barnabas Anglican
SChurch, Wulff and Balliou Hill Roads, 11:00 a.m.

: MONDAY, JANUARY 9. 2006

to' urism Careers Fair at the Sir Kendal G.L. Isaacs
Gymnasium 9:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m.

Town Hall Meeting Broadening the reach of tourism
to communities outside traditional resort areas, 8:00
Sp.m. 10:00 p.m., Freedom Park, Fox Hill.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2006

College of The Bahamas MasterClasses In Tourism.
Session topics:

Energy and Conservation
Human Resource Development innovation and
Best Practices
The Power of Branding
.: Using Information Technology to Increase Business
S Transportation Planning for the Future
: Myths and Models of Events Management
Becoming a Celebrity Chef
: Implications of new Convention Tax Exempt Status/
Increasing Group business
E-commerce
So you want to be in the Movies ?

Start times for classes are: 9:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m., 2:00
p.m. and 3:00 p.m. at the Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach. Cost: $25, all proceeds go to the
Cacique Scholarship Fund


i



A.-
I.-


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11


Official.Opening Ceremony, National Tourism Confer-
ence at the Wyndham Nassau Resort, 8:30 a.m.
Keynote Speaker: Professor Rex Nettleford, Vice
Chancellor, University of the West Indies.

Travel Trends for 2006. Speaker: Ellison Thompson,
Deputy Director General, Ministry of Tourism

Ministry of Tourism's Business Plan, 2006. Speaker:
Vernice Walkine, Director General of Tourism

Panel Discussion Topics:

- Going back to the Island Exploring the need for
migration to the Out Islands
- Crisis Management

THURSDAY, JANUARY 12,, 2006

Day 2, National Tourism Conference

Panel Discussion Topics:

- Are we Building Hotels and Losing Ground?
- Are we Meeting Visitor Expectations?
- Development and Training Task Force

FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2006

Day 3. National Tourism Conference

Panel Discussion Topics:

- Development Planning
- Safety and Security in a Tourism Environment
- Minister's Closing Charge

10TH ANNUAL CACIQUE AWARDS CEREMONY
AND AFTER PARTY, Friday, January 13, 2006 from
8:00 p.m. until 12 midnight. Location: Wyndham
Nassau Resort,'Cable Beach.

For more information on the conference, contact the
secretariat at 242-302-2005 or
acoakley@bahamas.com.

Registration Is also available online at:
S ntw.tourismbahamas, org


:*C ; .









THE TRIBUNE


Dit--C: 10 T I Er c= .IAYNIIJARY 3.2005


r


SUNSHINE INSURANCE
(Agents & Broker) Lid
~, MARSH


X ivol stvt-.ua nl *jaiet Cartivrsyigh


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Ca ndice 'Wiffiams


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Along with our many colleagues






HAPPY NEW YEAR



from


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Oil ia Knowles


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THE TRIBUNE


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YOUR


CONNECTION


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enior



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LOCALANCAR AN


Tak from mayor]~L.


MELVIN Holden, Mayor of
Baton Rouge, Louisiana and his
wife, Lois, visited Nassau over
the New Year.
The mayor met with Franklyn
Wilson, CMG, chairman of the
Bahamas for the America Hur-
ricane Katrina Relief Initiative
and his wife, Sharon Wilson.
The mayor personally conveyed
his. gratitude, and that of oth-
ers who were affected by Hur-
ricane Katrina, to the Bahamas.
"The prayers and generosity
of the people of the Bahamas
are deeply valued," said the
mayor.
Also present were US con-
gresswoman Maxine Waters
and her husband, former US
ambassador to the Bahamas
Sidney Williams. Ms Waters


also saluted the efforts of the
people of the Bahamas and
undertook to ensure that an
appropriate entry about the ini-
tiative is made to the congres-
sional records of the US House
of Representatives, so "that
many more persons would have
the evidence of the depth of
friendship and shared values
which exist between our two
countries."
Pictured at Mountbatten
House on East Hill Street, from
left: Franklyn Wilson, Senate
President; Sharon Wilson; Cal-
ifornia congresswoman Maxine
Waters; Lois and Melvin Hold-
en.
(Photo: Franklyn
G Ferguson)


Two kidnapped US



journalists released



for ransom in Haiti
*am -V








"Copyrighted, Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


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Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an ''
,award.
If so, call us on 322-1986 aa ,
and share your story.


Our people are the key to our success

Receptionist/ Office Clerk

PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT AND REAL ESTATE

Montana Holdings Ltd is undertaking a major land
development programme in Rum Cay. This project will
comprise international hotels, a large marina, over 400
homes and a range of holiday resort facilities in one of
the most beautiful Family Islands of the Bahamas. We
are now seeking a Receptionist/Office Clerk to join our
rapidly expanding Nassau office and to become a team
member of a growing property development business.

Requirements

The successful candidates will be organized, personable,
ambitious and very productive and shall have at least:

* 3 years office experience
* Excellent communication skills both written and oral
* Capable of working independently and/or as a team
member
* Excellent typing skills with a minimum of 50wpm
* Must be computer literate with excellent knowledge
of Microsoft Office and especially proficient in Word
and Excel
* General office duties

The Montana Holdings office environment is challenging,
energetic and very demanding. It calls for staff to accept
responsibility for all types of work activities, which shall
be undertaken to high professional standards.

Please send cover letter and resume by e-mail quoting
above reference (Clerk-1) to
island_developmentl@yahoo.com or by post to P.O.
Box N-9322, Nassau, The Bahamas.

The closing date for receipt of applications is January
10, 2006.


THIE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2006






TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2006, PAGE 15


THF TRIBUNE


Separatist leaders


arrive in Pakistan


to visit q


uake zone


W "O _

"Copyrighted Material --
Syndicated Content -
Available from Commercial News Providers"


5, -
0


Russia-Ukraine gas


dispute hits Europe


om


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PAGE 16, TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


HE


COLLEGE


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With the advent or ihe tirh- l.ci.h -fl th Clrk.'/Office Assistants' role has evolved as one of the most important support factors in the
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CPS 909 Business Communication- $300 CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
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PREREQUISITE: 3 or more years experience in a clerical position and 3 BGCSE's- Grade C or above;
COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12pm Duration: 3 TERMS
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME IN LEARNING DISABILITIES
The Certificate in Learning Disabilities Programme is designed to equip teachers with the skills necessary for working with diverse learners.
Participants are trained to use the basic techniques to identify students with learning disabilities; analyze and examine disabilities related to
language and communicative arts; and develop strategies that can be used with students who have been diagnosed as learning disabled. The
programme comprises six (6) courses:
TERM 1 TERM 2
SPED 900 Introduction To Learning Disabilities- $84 SPED 903 Strategies and interventions I- $168
SPED 901 Diagnosing Learning Disabilities- $168 SPED 904 Strategies and interventions II- $84
SPED 902 Individual Education Planning- $168 ETHC900 Ethics & Profess. Responsibility.- $250
TERM 3
SPED 905 Assessment- $178
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
PREREQUISITE: AA Degree with a Teacher's Certificate or a BA Degree;
COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring & Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
A+ COMPUTER TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATION
This programme of study is designed to equip students with the skills necessary to successfully sit the interationalA+ Microsoft Certification
Examination. Techniques to identify and rectify mechanical problems related to the personal computer are explored. It is a hands-on learning
experience with lab exercises that helps the student to apply theory to practice.
TERM 1: COMP 954 Software- $510 TERM 2: COMP 955 Hardware
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Per Demand Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 2 TERMS
CERTIFIED COMPUTER OPERATOR (Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS)
This course of study is designed to train students how to master Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Access, Microsoft Outlook, and
PowerPoint. To help the student to develop navigation and design skills, the instructor provides easy to understand notes and conducts live
demonstrations on how to manipulate the entire MS Office Suite. Upon successful completion of the external international examinations, the
Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Certification is awarded. The programme comprises five Modules and two companion courses:
TERM 1 TERM 2
COMP 906 Microsoft Office Specialist- $610 ETHlC900 Ethics & Professional Responsibility- $250
Microsoft Word, Microsoft Access CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $1001
Microsoft Excel, Microsoft PowerPoint TERM 3
Microsoft Outlook .COMP 906 Microsoft Office Specialist- $610
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $2100
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
CERTIFICATE IN LAW
This programme is offered in conjunction 'with The Institute of Legal Executives ilexX), Bedford, England.
ILEX qualification routes are vocationally relevant and designed to build and test legal knowledge and understanding at the paralegal level.
Designed to facilitate the training and educational needs of Legal Secretaries, Legal Clerks, Legal Office Managers, Law Enforcement Officers,
Special Assistants to Lawyers, Justice of The Peace, and all persons interested in acquiring an impressive array of legal office skills, the
Certificate in Law qualification is specifically relevant to The Bahamas legal system. Courses include:
TERM 1 TERM 2
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills -$350 ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250 LAW 900
The Legal Environment -$600.00 LAW 901 General Legal Principles-$600.00
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
TERM3 (Options- choose one) -$600
B. Options are subject to change.
LAW 903 Company Law LAW 906 Law of Mortgages
LAW 905 Employment Law LAW 908 Work of The Magistrate's Court
LAW 907 Nature and Role of Criminal Law
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
PREREQUISITE: AA Degree and 3 years work experience; COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am 12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
THE BECKER CPA REVIEW
The College of The Bahamas is pleased to offer the New CPA Computer Based Test (CBT). Besides the obvious transition from a pencil-and-
paper exam to a computer-based test, the revised CPA Exam will also contain a new content focus broadening the scope of audit and attest
areas and incorporating the assessment of critical skills, such as research and communication. The new exam also has increase emphasis on
general business knowledge and information technology.
CPA 900 Financial Reporting- $650 CPA 901 Accounting & Reporting/Regulation- $520
CPA 902 Law/Business Law- $465 CPA 903 Auditing/Auditing and Attestation- $465
Prerequisite: A BA Degree from an accredited or recognized college/university in any discipline with at least 21 credits hours in accounting.
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:30am 5:30pm Duration: 12 Weeks
CERTIFICATION IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Offered in conjunction with Columbia Southern University, Orange Beach, Alabama, this nine months programme is designed for those
individuals seeking professional development and aspiring to rise through the ranks in the HR field.
TERM 1 TERM 2
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250
HRM 900 Intro To HRM Environment- $200 HRM 902 H/R Development & Training-$200
HRM 901 Securing Human Resources- $200 HRM 903 Rewards Compensation and Benefits-$300
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
TERM 3
HRM 904 Labour Management Relations- $300
HRM 905 Protecting and Evaluating Human Resources- $300
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210


CATION & EXTENSION SERVICES
PREREQUISITE: A BA Degree n any discipline from an sacredied or recogruzed college/umnr ersiy or a snmumu of 5 years as a manager,
supervisor or trainer; COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet.,
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12:15pm : .. Duration: 3 TERMS
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME IN SUPERVISORY MANAGEMENT
Supervisors with cutting edge skills know how to accomplish difficult tasks, solve complicated problems anidiaste 'chalkengeh.jcdecji~g
making. This programme is aimed at supervisors and middle managers who wish to update their 'ipervisory skills, or persons Whp have.be*n
promoted and wish to gain additional insight into the world of supervisory management. This programmeentails essential;trainingfqr persons
wishing to become an associate manager. ;
TERM 1 TERM 2
CPi 900 Personal Skills- $500 SUPV 900 Supervisory Management (SUPV 1)- $500
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250
CPS 901 Accounts- $300 CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
TERM 3
CPM 902 Intepepersonal Skills- $600
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
PREREQUISITE: 3 or more years experience as a Supervisor/Manager or Trainer and an AA Degree in any discipline from a recognized
or accredited institution; COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring andFall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12pm Duration: 3 TERMS
CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL SECRETARY REVIEW PROGRAMME
The Certified Professional Secretary (CPS) Review, offered in conjunction with The International Association of Administrative Professionals
(IAAP) is a 9 month course of study designed to prepare administrative professionals and clerical assistants to write the CPS international
exam.
TERM 1 TERM 2
CPS 901 Accounts- $300 CPS 906 Human Resources- $300
CPS 909 Business Communication- $300 CPS 911 Records Management- $200
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
TERM 3 OPTIONAL COURSES
CPS 903 Office Technology- $500 WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 (Spring) CPS 91(
Managing Physical Resources- $200 ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250 (Summer)
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
PREREQUISITE: 4 yrs. Experience or an AA Degree+3 Yrs. Experience or a B. A. Degree and 0 Experience;
COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-lpm Duration: 3 TERMS
JOURNEYMAN PLUMBING LICENSE
The Journeyman Plumbing course is designed to assist students preparing to write the Journeyman Plumbing Examination. Topics includes:
interpretation of codes, disposal and drainage systems, storm drainage disposal systems, installation of sanitary fixtures, basic drawings to,
scale, water supply and distribution, use of materials and tools, repairs and maintenance. The examination is offered in conjunction with The,
Ministry of Public Works. At the end of the course, candidates are required to take one (1) Professional Development Seminarh
TERM 1 TERM 2 (Optional
JPLM190 Journeyman Plumbing- $800 SUPV 900 Supervisory Management- $500
ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250 (SUPV900 is available for Plant/Plumbing Supervisors)
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
PREREQUISITE: Students should have working knowledge and skills in the following areas: interpretation of codes, disposal and drainage
systems, storm drainage disposal systems, installation of sanitary fixtures, basic drawings to scale, water supply and distribution, use of
materials and tools, repairs and maintenance.
Begins: Fall Day/Time: Tuesdays 6pm 9pm Duration: 2 TERMS
MASTER PLUMBING LICENSE
The Master Plumbing course is designed to assist students preparing to write the Master Plumbing Examination. Students should have above
average knowledge and skills in the following areas: interpretation of codes, disposal and drainage systems, storm drainage disposal systems;:
installation of sanitary fixtures, basic drawings to scale, water supply and distribution, use of materials and tools, repairs and maintenance.
Special emphasis will be placed o plant management and foreman responsibilities.
TERM 3 TERM 2 (Optional)
SMP 900 Master Plumbing- $950 CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250 SUPV 900 Supervisory Management- $500
(SUPV900 is available for Plant/Plumbing Supervisors)
PREREQUISITE: Students should have working knowledge and skills in the following areas: interpretation of codes, disposal and dt ai~ gy,
systems, storm drainage disposal syste'imsinstallation bf iani ary fiirure s. hbaic arjmuing to al..ei. valter supply and distribution, use. of
materials and tools, repairs and maintenance.
Begins: Fall Day/Time: Tuesdays 6pm 9pm Duration: 1 TERM
MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING FOR NON-FINANCIAL MANAGERS
This course is designed to strengthen the candidates' understanding of managerial accounting. Managerial accounting concepts, principles
and functions are the main topics covered. The ability to prepare and accurately read a financial statement/spreadsheet is an essential skill
for all professionals and paraprofessionals; CPS901 covers in a very student friendly way, easy to understand examples that aid the students'
learning experience. This course also helps to prepare candidates to write external examinations.
CPS 901 Accounts- $300
PREREQUISITE: None
BEGINS: Per demand Day/Time: Sat/Thurs/Tue. 8am-12:15pm OR 6pm 9pm Duration: 10 Weeks
ETHICS AND PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY
This course examines guidelines for the professional behavior of members of any organisation. A select group of codes of ethics and ethics
cases will be explored to support a theoretical and practical discourse on why the application of ethics and professional responsibility is
important in all aspects of society.
ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Per demand Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12noon OR Thurs/Tue- 6pm 9pm Duration: 8 Weeks
WRITING & RESEARCH SKILLS
This course is designed to provide mature students with reading, writing, research and critical thinking skills to prepare the fi %tf
into CEES' professional development programmes. WRS 900 is also structured to provide certification candidates with the skill nece
to successfully write position and research papers.
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills $350
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Per demand Day/Time: Sat.- 8am-12noon or Thursday/Tue- 6pm 9pm Duration: 8 Weeks
INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS, WINDOWS & THE INTERNET
This workshop provides a broad foundation for students so that they will have a greater awareness and corifidenci using personal computers.
Students will gain practical information and skills, such as what a computer is, how to manage personal files and folders that they create.
COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
PREREQUISITE: None
Begins: Summer, Spring & Fall Day/Time: Sat.- 8am-l2noon Duraton. 3 Weeks
APPLICANTS FOR INTERNATIONAL CERTIFICATION COURSES AND PROGCpAMMES
All students applying for International Certification Courses and Programmes that are offeredjin.conjpnct!on with foreign insrut lo o ire
required to contact the CEES Office for information on external application and examination fee. ; ,, i ,
Telephone (242) 325-5714/328-0093/328-1936 Fax:,(242) 322-2712:

OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION
FEES
1. COB Registration................................................... $40.00 (one-time fee)
2. Insurance................................................................ $25.00 (valid for 1 year)
3. ID Card................................................................... $25.00 (one time fee)
4. Technology Fee....................................... $75,
5. Books............................................................. $ Please contact COB Bookstdreor prite.
6. Awards Ceremony.................................................. $150.00 (must be paid by the 2', TERM)
7. External Application Fees..................................... Please check with the CEES Office for nformaton.;
ESSENTIAL COMPUTER KNOWLEDGE: Effective Summer 2005, basic computer and Internet skills will be required of all students.
Assessment for exemption from COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet will be done via proof of a cehIcate
from an authorized provider or by taking a prescribed computer skills test to verify competency in Windows and Computers. Spudentifailing
the competency test will be required to take the Introduction To The Internet, Windows and Computers. This Workshop is a prerequisite
for all programmes or single courses.
Workshop Title: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet.
Tuition: $200 Duration: 2 Days
Day: Saturdays: 12noon 3pm (5 contact hours per day) Offered: Spring, Summer and Fall
ADVISEMENT & REGISTRATION SESSIONS
Please bring the following items with you to the advisement/registration session:
The first four pages of your Passport
Copies of your certificates/licensures and college/university transcripts
Where applicable, letters of recommendation, job description, special awards, etc.
OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION
1. No entrance examination is required for enrollment in professional development courses/programmes.
2. Tuition is charged per term; i.e. you will be billed only for courses offered in the current term.
3. Non-Bahamians add $50 to each course/workshop/seminar
4. Remember to obtain from the Programme Coordinator the correct ISBN Number for all required textbooks
5. At the first class session, ALL students must submit to the Programme Coordinator one copy each
of his/her stamped receipts representing payment for tuition, fees & books for the current term.
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND RE-CERTIFICATION SEMINARS
A compulsory professional development seminar is offered for all candidates enrolled in professional development programmes. Semingas
and workshops address important issues that are vital to the adult students' learning experience. Enrollment is also open to the general publh"c
This seminar is also designed to facilitate continuing education units for professionals applying for re-certification in their respective disciplines.
Students are required only to take ONE Professional Development Seminar. Effective Fall 2005, the Fee for the Professional Development
Seminar will be $210.
THE ANNUAL AWARDS CEREMONY
The Annual Awards Ceremony and reception is normally held at The British Colonial Hilton Hotel once during the TERM 3. Adult students
successfully completing programmes and courses are awarded certificates, certifications and/or licensure.

Secure Your Seat By Enrolling Today!
Contact The Centre For Continuing Education On Moss Road Campus or
Call (242) 325-5714/328-0093/328-1936 Fax: (242) 322-2712
Fees May Be Paid By Cash, Credit Card, or Bank Certified Cheque To: The College of The Bahamas, Business Office
Cees Reserves The Right To Change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule And Course Materials


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TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2005, PAGE 17


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COMPUTER OFFERINGS

COMPJUTERAPPLICATIONS I
course DscriFtion': 6 i'Tiis course is'for the beginner who knows very little about computers and does not understand how it works.
,This course covets'tht inhor;computer concepts with extensive hands.on practice of various software using: (1) Microsoft Office Word
rocessing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft Access Database Management.
Pre-requismte: None
Begins: Monday, 6 February 2006 6:00pm 9:00pm Section 01 (CEES)
Saturday, 4 February 2006 10:00am 1:00pm Section 02 (CEES)
.Mon: and.Wed.,i6,Feb., 2006 4:00pm 5:30pm Section 03 (CEES)
Duration: 12 weeks
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
fTuition: $450.00

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II
(Course Description: This course covers the major advanced concepts with extensive hands on practice of various software using: (1)
iMicrosofiOffice Word Processing (ii) Microsoft.Excel Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft Access- Database Management.
PPre-requisite: Computer Applications I
Begins: Thursday, 9 February 2006
Time: I 6:00pm 9:00pm
(Duration:' 12 weeks
Venue: 1 CEES Computer Lab
Fees P $550.00

EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It focuses ofi developing
effective end dynamic PowerPoint presentations.
Pre-requiiite: None
Begins: I Thursday, 2nd March, 2006
Time: 9:30am- 4:30pm
Duration l.day
Venue: I CEES Computer Lab ,
Fees: $160.00
INFO NATION TECHNOLOGY I
Course Description: This course covers basic concepts of Information Technology. The course provides training in the following areas;
Basic H*dware Proficiency, Application Features Proficiency, Operating System Proficiency, Internet and Email Proficiency..
Pre-requisite: None
Begins: Wednesday, 8th February, 2006
Time: 6:00pm 9:00pm
Duratio 12 weeks
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $450.00

PC UP GRADE AND REPAIR
Course description: This course is a hands-on introduction to technology systems for use in information environments. The course will
cover th following topics: Basic Hardware, Operating Systems, Troubleshooting and Repairs.
Pre-req site: None
Begins: Tuesday, 7 February, 2006
Time: 6:00pm 7:30pm Tuesdays and Thursdays
Duratio : 12 weeks
Venue: BHTC Computer Lab
Fees: $500.00
QUIC BOOKS ;....... .
Course )esciption:;This course is designed to train new and existing small business entrepreneurs (fewer than -'2T In l pi eI~N I hu I
organize and manage their accounting activities using QuickBooks Pro software. Students will lear how to set-up Ithir compI: lilc,.
chart of accounts, budget, customers, vendors and employees.
Pre-req site: None t
Begins: Tuesday, 28 February, 2006
Time: E 6:00pm 9:00pm
Duration: 6 weeks
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $330.00

UPGkADE REPAIR AND TROUBLESHOOT YOUR PC WORKSHOP
This workshop is a hands-on introduction to upgrade repair and troubleshooting your personal computer. Topics covered are basic hardware,
operating systems, troubleshooting and repairs.
Pre-relisite: None th
Begin "si bi:l.','.. Thursday, 9 March, 2006
Time: Y. :.' 9:30am- 4:30pm
Duration: I day
Venue:I CEES Computer Lab
Fees: i $250.00

WEI PAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP
Course'Description: This course, which targets persons who would like to create their personal web pages will cover Web page creation,
Web site m~ n r firent d HTML. Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web
pages.
Pre-reduisite: Participants must be computer literate and have a basic knowledge of word-processing
Begins Thursday, 2n March, 2006
Time: 9:30am- 4:30pm
Duration: 0 2 days
Venue! CEES Computer Lab
Fees: ; .nm;u i!:i.". i "i,, $550.00,


HA AND F ITNSAORE FEIG

MLASSA. 'H E RAPID ESSENTIALS I
This i4 .ri nlieodtc.ll'.r, ,:.urse fir learning t'j: techniques ..-I rma,..:3ge therapy and its many benefits. Major topic areas will include
Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniques, Wellness Education (Psychological and Physiological Benefits), Indications and
Contraindications, Serving Special-Populations and Complementary Bodywork Systems to include Aromatherapy Essentials.
Starting: Monday, February 27, 2006
i 6:00-9:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks
TuitiohFee: $465.00
Venue: The College of the Bahamas

i
MASSAGE THERAyY ESSENTIALS II
This is an advance course for learnirhg techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major topics include introduction to
hydroherapy; spa and body treatfiints, fhi basic facial; arbmatherapy-fundamentals or essential oils; relaxation and meditative methods;
and hpt stone thetapyi.. .. i..,
Start g: Thursda February 23, 2006
",6:00-9:60pm "
Dur on: 10 W.:ek.. ..
Tuition Fee: $620.00
VenuF: The College of the Bahamas

GRUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR
This s an introductory course in teaching group fitness instruction. Major topics of discussion will include basic anatomy and physiology;
choreography and cueing; the five components of fitness, nutrition, basic exercise testing and how to teach group exercise.
Star g: Thursday, February 27, 2006
TimS 6:00-9:00pm
Du ion: 10 Weeks
Tuitn Fee: $400.00
Venme: TBA


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ERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE
work op is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior customer service. It focuses on
mer value, retention and relationship building and employee motivation.
: f- Thursday, 23 February 2006
: 9:30am- 4:30pm
ie: Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre
on: $170.00

EECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It focuses on developing
tive and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.
I: Thursday, 2 March 2006
e: 9:30am-4:30pm
ue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
ion: $160.00


HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP
This two-day workshop is designed to equip managers and leaders in organizations and enhance the skills of current Human Resource
professionals with the theory, tools and techniques required for effective human resource management practices in today's workplace.


Date:
Time:
Venue:
Tuition:


nd rd
Thursday & Friday, 2d- 3 March, 2006
9:30am- 4:30pm
Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre
$350.00


UPGRADE REPAIRS AND TROUBLESHOOT YOUR PC
This workshop is a hants-on introduction to upgrade repair and troubleshooting your personal computer. Topics covered are basic hardware,
operating systems, troubleshooting and repairs.


Date:
Time:
Venue:
Tuition:


Thursday, 9th March, 2006
9:30am- 4:30pm
CEES Computer Lab
$250


WEB PAGE 'DESIGN
This course will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy fiddling with computers and would
like to create their own web pages are encouraged to attend. Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and
Tables and hosting of web pages.
Date: Thursday & Friday 2nd- 3r March, 2006
Time: 9:30am 4:30pm
Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
Tuition: $550.00

COURSE SEC COURSE DESCRIPTION TIME DAY START DUR FEE
ACCT
ACCA900 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS I 6:00-8:00pm Mon/Wed 13-Feb 10 weeks $250
ACCA901 101 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II 6:00-8:00pm M/Wed 13-Feb 10 weeks $275
ACCA902 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS III 6:00-8:00pm Tue/Thur 14-Feb 10 weeks $300
BUS.
BUSI900 01 CREDIT & COLLECTIONS I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 8 Weeks $225
I SUPERIOR CUSTOMER 1 Day. $170
CUST900 01 SERVICE W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thur 23-Feb
BUSI904 01 INTRODUCTION TO BUS. I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
COMP
COMP901 01 .COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 6:00-9:00pm r Mon 6-Feb 12 Weeks $450
COMP901 02 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 10am-1:00pm Sat 4-Feb 12 Weeks $450
COMP901 03 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 4:00-5:30pm Mon/Wed 6-Feb 12 Weeks $450
COMP902 I01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II 6:00-9:00pm Thur 9-Feb 12 Weeks $550
COMP903 01 INFORMATION TECH. I 6:00-9:00pm Wed 8-Feb 12 Weeks $450
COMP 941 101 QUICKBOOKS 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 6 weeks $330
COMP953 01 PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR 6:00-7:30pm Tue/Thur 7-Feb 12 Weeks $450
EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT 1 Day $160
COMP960 01 W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thur. 2-Mar
WEB PAGE DESIGN 2 Days $550
COMP930 01 WORKSHOP 9:30am-4:30pm Thur/Fri 2-Mar
Upgrade Repair and 1 Day $250
COMP923 1.01 Troubleshoot Your PC WIS 9:30am-4:30pm Thur 9 Mar
COSM i
uO [.lir.i- PLi -Ci'P -Ti,,I OO. 00. pn, 1:.r-, 7.Feb 8Weeks $225
j _o_.i ui I: IJ F r & .___ 00-i9 r_.. 3l- : Feuo 8 Weeks ,$225
'..-O'SMi'07 0| 1 NAIL F FT TECHIJI':I-14 6 00.9 iupiT r,.or..Tr.,,r 7. Feb 5 weexs $500
DECOR -
DECO800 01 INTERIOR DECORATING I 6:00-9!00pm Wed 22-Feb 8 weeks $225
DECO801 101 INTERIOR DECORATING II 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 8 weeks $250
FLOR800 01 FLORAL DESIGN I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
FLOR801 01 FLORAL DESIGN II 6:00-9:00pm Mon 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
FLOR802 01 FLORAL DESIGN III 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb 10 weeks $275
ENGLISH
ENG 900 01 EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 8 Weeks $225
ESL 900 01 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANG 6:00-9:00pm Mon/Fri 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
HEALTH &
FITNESS I
| MASSAGE THERAPY $465
MASG900 01 ESSENTIALS I 6:00-9:00pm Mon 27-Feb 10 weeks _
MASSAGE THERAPY $620
MASG901 01 ESSENTIALS 11 .6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb 10 weeks
GROUP FITNESS $400
HLTH800 101 INSTRUCTOR 6:00-9:00PM Thur 27 Feb 10 Weeks
LANG
CRE 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE I 6:00-7:30pm Tue/Thur 28-Feb 10 weeks $225'
CRE 901 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE II 6:00-7:30pm Mon/Wed 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
SPA 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I 6:00-7:30pm Tue/Thur 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
SPA 901 0 01 CONV. SPANISH II 6:00-7:30pm Mon/Thur 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
FRE 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I 6:00-7:30PM Mon/Wed 27 Feb 10 Weeks $225
MGMT.
HUMAN RESOURCE $250
MGMT900, 01 MANAGEMENT I 6:00-9:00pm Thur 9-Feb 12 Weeks
S HUMAN RESOURCE 12 Weeks $300
MGMT901 I01 MANAGEMENT II 6:00-9:06pm Mon 6-Feb
HUMAN RESOURCE 2 Days $350
MGMT902 01 MANAGEMENT W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thur/Fri 2-Mar
MEDICAL ____I
MEDT900 01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb 10 weeks $225
SEWING
BASIC OF FREEHAND 10 weeks $225
SEW 800 01 CUTTING I 6:00-9:00pm Mon 27-Feb
BASIC OF FREEHAND 10 weeks $250
SEW 802 01 CUTTING II 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb
SEW 805 01 DRAPERY MAKING I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
SEW 811 101 UPHOLSTERY MAKING I 6:00-9:00pm Wed 22-Feb 10 weeks $225

ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/ 328-
1936 or email All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00
(one time). When submitting application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages
of your passport. CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course
Schedule and Course Materials


ACADEMIC UPGRADING DEPARTMENT


Spring Semester 2006


All persons interested in enrolling in Academic Upgrading, Personal Development and/or Professional
Development courses offered by CEES are advised to register two weeks prior to the starting date
of class.
All students registering must provide a copy of the first five pages of their passport.
Persons registering after the starting date of class will be required to pay a late registration fee of
$60.

i). College Preparatory Programme
ii). Basic Upgrading Programme for Traditional Age Students (under 25 years old)
iii). Mature Upgrading (25 years and older) Programme

New Student Orientation & Advisement/Registration: January 4 & 5, 2006
Classes Begin: January 9, 2006
Late Registration: January 10 & 11, 2006
Time: 10:00am 6:00pm

iv). Preschool and Day Care Centre Practitioners Certificate
v) Infant/Toddler Day Care Educarers Certificate
Classes Begin: January 13, 2006
Time: Fridays 6:00- 7:50 pm & Saturdays 9:00 am -1:30 pm.
Venue: The College of The Bahamas
Tuition: Contact CEES for information.
Additional fees include one time application fee of $40, Insurance $25 (per annum), ID Card $25
(one time), Technology Fee $100 (per semester), Student Activity fee $50 (full-time) $25 (part -time),
(Fall & Spring Semesters), Drop/Add $20 per application.


- __ __ __ _ __ __ _ __ __ _


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nj.


___________ _








THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 18. TUESDAY. JANUARY 3. 2005


JANUARY 3, 2006


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

New Florida f Nova Archaeologists try to deter- Tales From the Tomb: Lost Sons Frontline "Is Wal-Mart Good for
8 WPBT mine if a mummy is Ramses I. (N) of the Pharaoh P (CC) (DVS) America?" Wal-Mart and its tenden-
n (CC) (DVS) cy to rely on Chinese imports.
The Insider (N) NCIS "Silver War" (iTV) A dead staff NCIS (iTV) An officer working as the 48 Hours Mystery A Detroit teacher
WFOR n (CC) sergeant is found in a Civil War-era Navy's liaison with a defense con- says she killed her husband with an
tomb. (CC) tractor is kidnapped. n (CC) ax in self-defense.
SAccess Holly- Fear Factor "Psycho Fear Factor 1" Scrubs "My In- Scrubs J.D. con- Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
WTVJ wood (N) (CC) Six couples compete while living to- team's Eyes Dr. sides his intems. "Infected" A teenager becomes a
gether in the Bates Motel. Cox tests J.D. (N) (CC) vigilante. (N) (CC)
i Deco Drive Bones Brennan identifies remains House TB or Not TB" A renowned News (CC)
SWSVN of a 6-year-old boy who went miss- physician has symptoms of tubercu-
S ___ __ing from a local park. (CC) losis. (PA) (CC)
S WPLG Jeoardy! (N) College Football FedEx Orange Bowl -- Florida State vs. Penn State. From Miami. (Live) ,1 (CC)

(:00) Cold Case Rampage Killers: Looking for Dog the Bounty Dog the Bounty Rollergirls The Rookie" Puta Venis
A&E iles (CC) Signs (CC) Hunter Mother Hunter "Double Envy faces her fears. (CC)
daughter case. Trouble" (CC)
Hardtalk Extra BBC News World Business BBC News Tsunami BBC News Asia Today
SBBCI Baaba Maal. (Latenight). Report (Latenight). Prayers (Latenight).
BET.com Count- The Ultimate Hustler The Ultimate Hustler Comicview
BET down
C S Coronation The Tournament The Tournament Cheap Draft-Bad Rabbittown (N) CBC News: The National (CC)
iC Street (CC) (N) Language (CC) (DVS)
i BC (:00o) On the The Suze Orman Show (CC) Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
~i'ELJi Money
(:00) The Situa- Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)
CNN tion Room
Reno 911! Dys- The Daily Show The Colbert Re- Chappelle's South Park Chappelle's Mind of Mencia
COM functional sher- With Jon Stew- port Craig Craw- ShowJamie Kyle's cousin Show "Pretty Rapper Method
iff's department. art (CC) ford.(CC) Foxx. (CC) makes trouble. Woman."(CC) Man. (CC)
CO T ops "Las Ve- Cops "Coast to Cops "Coast to The Investigators Maximum securi- The Investigators 'The Hunt for a
COU T gas" (CC) Coast" f (CC) Coast" f (CC) ty penitentiary. Serial Killer"Serial killers.
That's So Raven ** LIFE-SIZE (2000, Fantasy) Tyra Banks, Lindsay Lohan, Jere Burns. American Drag- Sister, Sister A
DISN "If I OnlyHad a A motherless child casts a spell that beings a doll to life. (CC) on: Jake Long dubious double
Job" (CC) date. n (CC)
This Old House Weekend Gar- Fresh From the Garden Sense Weekend Land- Grounds for Im- Rock Solid (N)
DIY Classics (CC) dening Garden scaping provement
Dn In Focus (Ger- Journal: Politik direkt Journal: In Euromaxx Journal: Im Focus
DW man). Tagestema Depth Tagestema _
E! E! News 101 Sexiest Celebrit Bodies 101 Sexiest Celebrity Bodies Gastineau Girls Money-Bad
E! Beautiful celebrity bodies. Beautiful celebrity bodies. (N)
:00) College Kickboxing Kickboxing Kickboxing Karate: ISKA Karate: ISKA Karate: ISKA
ESPN ameday CCI.) Strike Force Strke Force Kickboxing
ESPNI Spanish Soccer 2005 World Series of Poker From 2005 World Series of Poker From SportsCenter International Edi-
E PNI Las Vegas. (CC) LasVegas. (CC) tion (Live)
EWTN LDaily Mass: Our Mother Angelica Live Classic Religious Cata- The Holy Rosary Threshold of Hope
EWTN Lady Episodes logue I
T T (:00) Go for It Blaine's Low Blaine'sLow Reunion Story Spouses attend a Ultimate Goals A woman strives to
FIT TV I Carb Kitchen Carb Kitchen training session. n (CC) lose weight. n (CC)
SFox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
FOX-NC Shepard Smith Susteren (Live) (CC)
FS L NHL Hockey Florida Panthers at New Jersey Devils. From Continental Airlines Arena in Totally Football College Basket-
FSN FL East Rutherford, N.J. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) ball
GOLF PreGame (Live) Playing Lessons Playing Lessons Inside the PGA PGA Champions
GSN Lingo (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire n Dog Eat Dog f (CC) Extreme Dodgeball 3 (CC)
GSN (cc)
G4Te (:00) Attack of X-Play Cheat "Viewers Cheat "Guitar Icons "Star Wars The Man Show The Man Show
ech the Show! Request" Hero."(N) Games" "Bets/Zembic"
(:00) JAG "Hail Walker, Texas Ranger Alex goes Matlock'The Fatal Seduction" Mystery and murder follow when Ben trav-
HALL and Farewell" f after arsonist gang members who els to the funeral of his high-school sweetheart at a ritzy beach resort. f
(CC) (DVS) try to kill firefighters. n (CC) (CC)
reDesign n Design Inc. So- Designer Guys How Not to Decorate "Romford" Debbie Travis' Facelift "The Hon-
HGTV (CC) phisticated earth Spa-inspired (Series Premiere) (N) n eymooners" f (CC)
tones. n style. n (CC)
NISP Morris Cerullo Breqkthrough Christ in Inspiration To- Life Today (CC) This Is Your Day Missions
(CC) Prophecy day (CC)
8 Simple Rules Sabrina, the My Wife and My Wife and Friends n (CC) Everybody Everybody
KTLA "Wins" Driver's Teenage Witch Kids "Quality Kids "Fantasy Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
test. (CC) n (CC) ime" f (CC) Camp" (CC) (CC) Debra's mother.
** A CRIME OF PASSION (1999, Drama) Tracey * THE: GIRL NEXT DOOR (1998, Drama) Tracey Gold, Sharon Gless,
LIFE Gold, Powers Boothe. A medical student is framed for Tom Irwin. A woman's married lover manipulates her into murder. (CC)
her father's murder. (CC) (DVS)
M0 Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- Rita Cosby Live & Direct Scarborough Country
MSNBC {cc) mann
IK Jimmy Neutron: SpongeBob Ned's Declassi- Full House "Cap- Fatherhood A Roseanne t Roseanne "Ra-
NICK Boy Genius SquarePants f fied School tain Video" (CC) (CC) dio Days" (CC)
T My Name Is Earl Fear Factor "Psycho Fear Factor 1" House A renowned physician has News f (CC) News
NTV n (CC) (N) (CC) symptoms of tuberculosis. (CC)
:00) NHL Hockey Minnesota Wild at Detroit Red Wings. From Joe Louis NHL Postgame Home Coming Wanted: Ted or
_LN rena in Detroit.ve) Show (Live) Alive (CC)
E American Mus- 2 Wheel: Best of Texas Hardtails Texas Hardtails Corbin's Ride V-Twin Motorcy- The Motocross
SPEED cle Car 2005 On -cle TV (N) Files
Unfolding Behind the Enjoying Every- John Hagee To- Bill Gaither (CC) Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN Majesty Scenes (CC) day Life With day (CC)
Joyce Meyer
Everybody Friends "The Friends Barry Sex and the City Sex and the City Daisy Does Seinfeld Jerry's
TBS Loves Raymond One With the and Mindy's wed- "Anchors Away" "Unoriginal Sin" America Plan- new best friend.
"Traffic School" Chicken Pox" ding day. t (CC) f (CC) ning a wedding. n (CC)
:00) Rides "702 Overhaulin' "U.S. Navy Steal" 1950 Overhaulin' "Snaked" Overhauling Miami Ink The Apprentice" Yoji
ITLC Motoring" Sin City Ford truck. (CC) a sick woman's Mustang. (CC) finds he still has a lot to learn. (CC)
place to go.
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order "Embedded" A contro- Law & Order A man motivated by., The Closer "About Face" A movie
TNT der "Merge" versial war correspondent gets shot religious beliefs becomes the prme star's wife is murdered. (CC)
(CC) (DVS) in the back. n (CC) (DVS) suspect in a homicide. n
TOON Camp Lazlo Grim Adven- Codename: Kids Hi Hi Puffy Ami Home for Imagi- Ed, Edd n Eddy Cartoon Car-
TOON tures Next Door Yumi nary Friends toons
TV5 (:00) Graffiti 60 Himalaya Objectif jungle Soda TV5 Le Journal
6:00 Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
TWC IM Edition (CC) (C)(CC)
(:00)Piel de Contra Viento y Marea Alborada Casos de la Vida Real: Edici6n
UNIV Otono Mujeres Especial Amada Sol; Las Peores
valientes. Intenciones.
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order: Criminal Intent * JOHN GRISHAM'S THE RAINMAKER (1997, Drama) Matt Da-
USA der: Special Vic- "Blink" An investigation of a college mon, Claire Danes, Jon Voight. Premiere. A rookie lawyer goes up
timrs Unit f math student. f (CC) against a big insurance company. (CC)
*I* 8 MILE (2002, Drama) Eminem, Kim Basinger, Brittany Murphy. A white man's talent The Flavor of Love Brigitte Nielsen
RVH1 for rap may be his way out of poverty. and Flavor Flav. ,
:00) America's Da Vinci's Inquest "We All Fall Da Vinci's Inquest The Stranger WGN News at Nine n (CC)
W G N Funniest Home Down" Da Vinci questions the ethics Inside" A woman dies mysteriously.
Videos f (CC) of senior care. (CC) (CC)
Everybody Gilmore Girls Richard tries to et Beauty and the Geek Car repair; WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
WPIX Loves Raymond information from Logan about Rory's massages. n (CC) Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
Debra's mother, future plans. ft (CC) & Mr. G (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) t*x DEVIL'S POND (2003, Suspense) Kip Pardue, Tara Reid, Meredith Dr. Phil f (CC)
WSB K (CC) Baxter. A newlywed learns that her husband plans to kill her. n (CC)

S (6:15)* Real Sports ft (CC) The New World: * x MAN ON FIRE (2004, Crime Drama) Denzel
HBO-E FIRSt DAUGH- HBO First Look Washington, Dakota Fanning. A bodyguard takes re-
TER (2004) 'PG' (N) (CC) venge on a girl's kidnappers. ft 'R' (CC)
(6:15) **P The Sopranos "Isabella" Tony day- * II HEART HUCKABEES (2004, Comedy) Jason Schwartzman, Is-
H BO-P CADDYSHACK dreams about an Italian exchange abelle Huppert, Dustin Hoffman. Two men hire existential detectives to
(1980) 'R' (CC) student living next door. examine their lives. f 'R' (CC)
* MEN IN BLACK (1997, Science Fiction) Tom- (:15) * FIRST DAUGHTER (2004, Romance-Comedy) Katie Holmes,
H BO-W my Lee Jones. Secret agents monitor extraterrestrial Marc Blucas, Amerie Rogers. The president's daughter falls for a man at
activity on Earth. n 'PG-13' (CC) college. n 'PG' (CC)


:00) * HE SAID, SHE SAID (1991, Comedy) Kevin * MEET THE FOCKERS (2004, Comedy) Robert De Niro, Ben
H BO-S Bacon, Sharon Stone. Conflict adds spice to an affair Stiller, Dustin Hoffman. Future in-laws clash in Florida. f 'PG-13' (CC)
between rival columnists. f 'PG-13' (CC)
(6:40)* FAT (:15) WHITE NOISE (2005, Suspense) Michael Keaton, Chandra * ALIEN VS. PREDATOR (2004,
M AX-E ALBERT (2004) West, Deborah Kara Unger. A man believes his dead wife is communicat- Science Fiction) Sanaa Lathan. ft
6 'PG'(CC) Ing itr him. tn 'PG-13 (CC) 'PG-13'(CC)
Orhans of Nkandla The stories of some of the * GARDEN STATE (2004, Comedy) Zach Braff, :45) Best Sex
MOMAX 75,000 children in South Africa orphaned by AIDS. Ian Holm, Ron Leibman. A disaffected actor finds a Ever"Nice and
A (CC) soulmate in a quirky woman. t 'R' (CC) Easy" ft (CC)
r *** MURIEL'S WEDDING (1994, Comedy-Drama) (:15) *' TEACHING MRS. TINGLE (1999, Suspense) Helen Mirren,
SHOW Toni Collette. iTV Premiere. A new friend inspires a Katie Holmes, Jeffrey Tambor. iTV. Three teens hold a mean-spirited
misfit to make a fresh start. f 'R' (CC) teacher captive. n 'PG-13' (CC)
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TUESDAY, JAIflUAR r 3, "Ii6


SECTION


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business@tribunemedia.net


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH
NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764
FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010


* By NEIL HARTNELL by the IDB on December 19, is
Tribune Business Editor divided into four components
and will be executed through


THE Inter-American Devel-
opment Bank (IDB) has
approved a $127,050 project
that aims to improve the
Bahamas' ability to negotiate
free trade agreements and help
Freeport "adjust" when this
nation signs on to such deals.
The Information as a Tool
for Negotiating Effectiveness
project, which was approved


the Ministry of Trade and
Industry.
Goals
Explaining the project's
goals, the IDB said: "This pro-
ject seeks to improve the
[Bahamas] ability to negotiate
market access in services,
understand and implement


multilateral trade obligations
arising from accession to the
World Trade Organisation
(WTO), address negotiated
rules and obligations pertain-,
ing to international investment,
and facilitate required adjust-
ments to the operation of the
Freeport free trade zone that
will arise from trade liberalisa-
tion agreements."

SEE page 4B


Over 70% of



Bahamians



feel tourism



needs 'great



improvement'

* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor Citizens believe industry not

per cent of
M ore than 70 'Bahamianised' enough, with
S ahamians large percentage feeling it is
believe "the
quality of the not first choice for graduates
tourism product needs great
improvement", a survey for the
Ministry of Tourism found,
with the majority of citizens Islands (Andros, Abaco, Exu- who felt there needed to be
interviewed feeling the industry ma and Eleuthera) last year, "great improvement" had
is not sufficiently 'Bahami- found that while perceptions declined by 10 per cent
anised'. of the Bahamian tourism pro- between 2003 and last year's
The Bahamian Residents' duct's quality were improving, survey, falling from 81 per cent
General Public Survey, which much work remained to be to 71 per cent, the final statistic
saw interviews conducted with done.
residents of New Providence, While the percentage of the
Grand Bahama and the Family 300 New Providence residents SEE page 4B


'Bridge the gap' between tourists

and Bahamians over gratuities


* THE Nassau International Airport was buzzing with people trying
to clear the United States departure hall.


(Photo: Mario Duncansoni Tribune Staff)


N By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Ministry of Tourism has called for a
study to look at the relationship between service
quality in the tourism industry and the auto-
matic 15 per cent gratuity, believing this would
help to "bridge the gap" between the views of
Bahamians and tourists.
In the recommendations flowing from the


findings of the 2005 Bahamian Residents' Gen-
eral Public Survey, the Ministry of Tourism said:
"Although the elimination of the 15 per cent
gratuity was not recommended by the majority
of Bahamians surveyed, there is a need for fur-
ther study that would attempt to bridge the gap
between the views of Bahamians and the views

SEE page 4B


Expansion expected

to solve NIA queues

'within three weeks'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
SBAHAMIAN hoteliers and
tourism executives are hoping
that the weekend queues for
passengers departing Nassau
International Airport (NIA)
will become a thing of the past


within "three weeks", when the
area containing the first secu-
rity checkpoint for US pre-
clearance is expanded.
The Tribune was told yester-
day that, while their were no

SEE page 2B


f,."' .
,' 7 '. ".
, ...,. .: . ~ -.i.. i '


Fidelity Bahamas Growth & Income Fund
Total Performance through November 30, 2005*


21.70%
12 months to November 2005


41.85%
Cummulative Since Inception
(February 1999)


5.20%
Average Annual Return
6 years


- -~-"II-


i I - I I I Il -- IIL










PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2006


AML
BAB
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
DHS
FAM
FCC
FCL
FIN
ICD
JSJ
KZLB
PRE


$0.73
$1.10
$0.70
$7.00
$10.40
$12.75
$1.26
$9.55
$9.11
$1.64
$10.88
$2.17
$6.05
$1.15
$10.05
$10.90
$9.95
$9.05
$6.85
$10.00


$-
$-
$-
$0.10
$-
$-
$-
$0.15
$0.11
$-
$0.83
$-
$-
$-
$0.05
$-
$-
$-
$-0.09
$-


0
250
9640
1000
0
0
0
1500
27410
0
1400
8500
0
0
1000
2000
0
119
0
0


THEI. TRIBUNt


The Local Stock Market

FINDEX 435.63 YTD 1.321%


International Markets


FOREX Rates


CADS
GBP
EUR


Cotnmodities


Weekly %Change

1.1622 -0.28
1.7213 -0.77
1.1838 -0.28



Weekly %Change

$61.04 4.47
$517.00 2.27


Crude Oil


Gsoldl








s I p 51

N A SD
- i---i-- -- -


adional Stock Market Indexes:


Weekly %Change

10,717.50 -1.52
1,248.29 -1.61
2,205.32 -1.96
16,111.43 1.07


500
AQ


* By Fidelity Capital
Markets


he last trading
week of 2005
ended with a
bang as over
52,000 shares
changed hands. The market
saw 10 out of the 19 listed
stocks traded, of which five
advanced and five declined.
Volume leader for the week
was Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) with 27,410 shares
changing hands and account-
ing for 52 per cent of the total
shares traded.
The big mover for the week
was FirstCaribbean Interna-
tional Bank (Bahamas) (CIB),
whose share price rose by a
whopping $0.83 to close at its
new 52-week high of $10.88.
Also advancing handsomely
this week was Cable Bahamas
(CAB), whose share price
increased by $0.15 to end the
week.at $9.55.


The management and staff
of Fidelity Capital Markets
wish you a Happy and Pros-
perous New Year.

COMPANY NEWS

Bahamas Waste (BWL) -
For the nine months ending
September 30, 2005, BWL
posted net income of $318,000,
representing a decline of
$72,000 or 18.4 per cent over
the same period last year.
Sales increased by $297,000
or 8 per cent to total $4 mil-
lion, while the cost of sales
grew by $306,000 or 13.2% to
total $2.6 million. Gross profit
margin stood at 35 per cent
compared to 38 per cent year-
over-year. Operating expens-
es also increased by $62,000 to
total $1.1 million as at Septem-
ber 30, 2005.
Earnings per share for the
period was $0.08, down $0,01
from the equivalent period in
2004,










b i S nr-
reains0 h

on- onay


CHANGE VOLUME


BISX CLOSING
SYMBOL PRICE


YTD PRICE
CHANGE'

-33.64%
14.58%
-17.65%
21.74%
30.00%
-1.92%
-30.00%
34.51%
28.31%
-25.45%
45.26%
44.67%
52.78%
-42.21%
25.63%
12.37%
0.61%
10.10%
13.04%
0.00%


DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:

* The Bahamas Property Fund (BPF) has declared a divi-
dend of $0.18 payable on December 30, 2005, to all common
shareholders as at record date December 22, 2005.

* Commonwealth Bank (CBL) has declared a dividend of
$0.08 payable on December 31, 2005, to all common share-'
holders as at record date December 15, 2005.

* Cable Bahamas (CAB) has declared a dividend of $0.06
payable on December 31, 2005, to all common shareholders as
at record date December 16, 2005.

* Consolidated Water Company (CWCO) has declared.p div-t
idend of $0.012 per BDR payable on February 7, 2006, tb all
common shareholders as at record date December.31, 2005'

* FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) has declared a
dividend of $0.30 payable on January 6, 2006, to all common
shareholders as at record date December 28, 2005.


* LONG lines plague Nassau International Airport.

(Photo: Mario Duncanson/ Tribune Staff)




Expansion expected to solve NIA



queues 'within three weeks'


FROM page 1B


radar problems or fuel short-
ages that had plagued NIA and


-0 Colinar
,m Financial Advisors Ltd.


Pricing Information As Of:
29 D-mrnbhr 2005


52wk-Low Symbol


0.73 Abaco Markets
8.00 Bahamas Property Fund
5.55 Bank of Bahamas
0.70 Benchmark
1.26 Bahamas Waste
0.87 Fidelity Bank
7.10 Cable Bahamas
2.03 Colina Holdings
7.00 Commonwealth Bank
1.50 Doctor's Hospital
3.96 Famguard
9.68 Finco
7.49 FirstCaribbean
8.00 Focol
1.27 Freeport Concrete
9.50 ICD Utilities
8.22 J. S. Johnson
4.36 Kerzner International BDRs
10.00 Premier Real Estate
-r-Tne.Courier Securidles


P/E Yield


U.UUY/c
3.46%
4.71%
2.86%
4.76%
3.64%
2.51%
0.00%
4.95%
0.00%
3.97%
4.86%
4.60%
4.98%
0.00%
5.43%
6.19%
0.00%
7.60%


Previous Close Today's Close


0.73
10.40
6.90
0.70
1.26
1.10
9.40
1,64
9.00
2.17
6.05
10.90
10.50
10.00
1.15
9.95
9.05
6.84
10.00


0.73
10.40
7.00
0.70
1.26
1.10
9.55
1:64
9.09
2.17
6.05
10.90
10.88
10.05
1.15
9.95
9.05
6.85
10.00


Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $


0.00
0.00
0.10
0.00
0,00
0.00
0.15
0.00
0.09
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.38
0.05
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.01
0.00


-u.1oC
1.456
1.000 0.587
0.175
0.105
250 0.070
1.500 0.689
-0.046
7.410 0.791
0.429
0.428
2,000 0.717
1.400 0.695
1,000 0.833
0.022
0.526
0.572
0.138
2.036


u.uuu
0.360
0.330
0.020
0.060
0.040
0.240
0.000
0.450
0.000
0.240
0.530
0.500
0.500
0.000
0.405
0.560
0.000
0.760


.. -L. L.'. Svrntol Bt$e Ass 1 Lal Pi.c vee*l, .ol EPS $ D., PiE Ylela
13 00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.75 13.75 11.00 1.768 0.720 7.5 5.24%
S, I 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
I" '-" R J NO H,:.i.3;-,, i' ~0 0 5.1 i 'j .0 0441 0 u000 N,.1 0 Cu.
S'. ,r TI,--Counler Securities
i43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.33 13.33 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
Si5 R .ND P Holdirgs 0 29, 5 3', -0 103 0000 N'M 0 00
i- .: luual Funds
S- .'*L: Fu.,.3 Nan.e N. YTD Lasi 1.2 r.I,,r.ir, Li,. i. Ya1ed
1.1993-- Coin Moe ake ui


1.1993 Colina Money Market Fund
2.0704 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
2.1530 Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1.0782 Colina Bond Fund
CLOSE 435 630 YTD 1 321'.. 12003 14 D8%


1.266547"
2.4766 **
10.6711.*
2.298197"
1.144217"**


TI:i;X ALL SIHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
'5i'w-H Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
G!;'wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
i'rvious Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Ioday's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume
(,1hnnge Change in closing price from day to day
S1i-ly Vol. Number of total shares traded today
[)IV 5; Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months
I 1' Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
AS AT NOV. 30. 2005/ "" AS AT NOV. 30, 2005
AS Al DEC. 12. 2005/*** -AS AT OCT. 31, 2005/ ... AS AT OCT. 31, 2005
-.' t-I-- C-'LL COLINA 242-602-7010 1 FIDELITY 242-35663776


YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelitq
Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV Net Asset Value
N/M Not Meaningful
FINDEX The Fidelity BahamasiStock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100


travelling tourists over the
Christmas weekend, the hotels
and Ministry of Tourism had
correctly anticipated the long
departure queues and moved
to reduce any impact on visitor
perceptions of the Bahamas.
The Ministry was said to
have had "a full complement
of staff", numbering at least 10,
on duty at NIA over the week-
end, while the hotels ensured
there were sufficient supplies
of water and food on hand to
quench thirst or hunger.
NIA was said to have had six
of the new CTX baggage secu-
rity screening machines oper-
ating during peak hours, while
capacity for the upstairs secu-


rity checks at NIA had dou-
bled in capacity, from two to
four stations.
"The bottleneck was at the
front part," a source told The
Tribune. "The system for just
before pre-clearance, that was
where the bottleneck was."
The expansion of the first
security check area is due to
be completed within three
weeks, and The Tribune was
told: "We're hoping we can
mitigate any further problems
by the third week in January,
because this front part will be
completed. Hopefully, that will
sort the whole problem. It's
unfortunate we weren't ready"
for the New Year weekend.


Spirit's New Year

0

.price promoti on



to boost tourism

n


SPIRIT Airlines has
unveiled its Winter Caribbean
Chic sales promotion, with its
each way fare between Nassau
and Fort Lauderdale priced at
$39.
To take advantage of the
promotion, tickets have to be
booked on the airline's web-
site, spiritair.com, by midnight
tonight. They must be for trav-
el between January 8, 2006,
and February 28, 2006.


Apart from the Fort Laud-
erdale route, during the pro-
motion period Spirit will prine
each way tickets to Nassau
from New York at $79, and at
$49 for flights to Nassau from
both Orlando and Tampa.
Each way fares to Nassau vla
Spirit will be priced at $79 fropi
both Atlantic City and Dallas
Fort Worth, while the eadh
way price from Detroit will be
$89,


I-ii


BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES VISIT WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1.350 34 / CHG 27.1 %9CHG 02.05 / YTD 310.96 / YTD % 29.92


1.10
10.40
7 24
S1.00
1.20
9.60
2.20
9 17
2.50
6.05
10.90
S1088
10.05
.'1.99
* 10.20
9.05
G.98
10.00
S .rt-i.a


1.26S65
4766

1442


i-


"i~i i ~A nn T^^


) 1, SDE L IT Y


.
1
'


, 1









THE TR E T Y J Y 3, 2 P E E


Bahamian


- The nation's future


I have just read the very
excellent study,
Bahamian Youth, The
Untapped Resource. I
had not seen it when I
wrote about the characteristics
of nations with the highest
quality of life. Those of you
who read my column will recall
that common to these countries
is a highly educated popula-
tion..
This study on youth and
education is sponsored by an
impressive group of institutions
called The Coalition for Edu-
cation Reform. These institu-


tions include:
1. The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce
2. Bahamas Employers Con-
federation
3. National Congress of
Trade Unions
4. Bahamas Hotel Catering
and Allied Workers Union
5. Bahamas Hotel Associa-
tion
6. Bahamas Hotel Employers
Association
7. Nassau Tourism Develop-
ment Board
This is a most impressive list.


Groups that would normally
be in conflict are united in this
push to improve the future of
their country.
Those in charge of the coun-
try's education establishment
should sit up and listen when
unions and employers agree on
such an important social prob-
lem.
More important is the fact
the report offers a comprehen-
sive list of solutions.
I won't attempt to repeat the
contents of the study in a brief
column, and I am advised that
the report received much pub-


licity. I am also well aware that
the public's attention is being
bombarded by many special
and commercial interests. Thus
it is probably useful to again
highlight this very valuable
report.
However, I.also feel com-
pelled to support this study and
respectfully suggest to the Edu-
cation Ministry to get an annu-
al report to Parliament.
I am advised that one has not
been presented since 1995. Our
parliamentarians need this
report if they are to fulfil their
duty to our youth.


BRIAN Self, the Rotary inception in 2001. Looking on Essay/Speech Competitions.
Club of East Nassau's Voca- at (centre) is Patrick Rollins, Standing in the background are
tional Services Committee Club President. Patrick Rollins, club president;
chairman, presents a cheque to and Brian Self, chairman of
Michael Allen, vice-chairman the club's Vocational Services
of the Bahamas Financial Ser- 0 PICTURED (top right) is Committee.
vices Board (BFSB), as the Bahamas Financial Services
Club's contribution to BFSB's Board (BFSB) vice-chairman,
2005 School-Outreach pro- Michael Allen, addressing
gramme, including the Careers members of the Rotary Club
Fest and Essay/Speech Com- of East Nassau at a recent lun-
petitions. cheon meeting, in which he


Club
The Rotary Club of East
Nassau has been a co-sponsor
of the programme since its


gave appreciation for the
Club's ongoing support of BFS-
B's School Outreach Pro-
gramme.
This programme includes the
annual Careers Fest and


View


from


Afar


byJon 0 s


Sprisorwit
5 rso mr


PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY


VACANCY


NURSING SERVICES ADVISOR
Applications are invited from suitably qualified candidates for appointment to the post of
Nursing Services Advisor in the Public Hospitals Authority (PHA)'which is responsible for
the management of the three public hospitals of the Bahamas, Princess Margaret Hospital,
Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre and the Rand Memorial Hospital and the management of
Bahamas National Drug Agency, Materials Management Services, National Emergency
Medical Services and the public clinics in Grand Bahama.
Applicants must possess the following qualifications and experience:
Registered Nurse (with specific registration through the Nursing Council of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, prior to appointment);
Masters Degree in Nurse Management or Equivalent with a minimum of five (5) years post-
qualification experience in a senior administrative position; or Bachelor of Science Degree
in Nurse management or equivalent with a minimum of ten (10) years post-qualification
experience in a senior administrative position;
Experience at a strategic / policy level in nursing or general health systems planning and
development will be an advantage.
DUTIES
1. The Nursing Services Advisor would report to the Managing Director and would serve
as the principal specialist of the PHA on all matters relating to nursing services operations
and development. The overarching responsibility of the post is to ensure (a) standards
of nursing care are well-defined, relevant and consistently maintained; and (b) the
structure and practice of nursing services are appropriate within and across departments
and institutions.
2. Main duties and responsibilities of the post include:
a) Development and revision of policies and operational guidelines for improving the
quality and efficiency of nursing services;
b) Monitoring compliance with standards of practice related to general and specialty
nursing care as a means of ensuring continuous quality improvement in nursing and
adherence to the Code of Nursing Ethics:
c) Utilization of nursing productivity statistics to advise on strategic interventions for
greater efficiency of nursing services;
d) Ensuring the maintenance of a system of continuous nursing education at each
Institution;
e) Making recommendations for organizational restructuring of nursing to best fit a
dynamic public healthcare system;
f) Facilitating and coordinating communication (policy level) between nursing and
other health-care disciplines of the PHA, Ministry of Health and other national,
Regional and International entities;
g) Preparing annual plans and other reports related to Nursing Services Development,
including an annual budget for organizational-wide nursing services development.
3. Applicants must possess strong analytical, conceptual-thinking, strategic planning,
communication and interpersonal skills.
Letters of application, Curricula Vitae, documentary evidence of qualifications and experience
and three (3) references should be submitted no later than 27th January 2006 to the Human
Resources Director, P.O. Box N-8200 or 1st Floor Manx Corporate Centre, Dockendale
House, West Bay Street. Serving officers must submit their applications via their Heads of
Department/Hospital.


t"


Tuonble into 2006 at


Nassau gymNastics!






Spring Session begns January 3, 2006
Open to new students only
Restrictions apply

Contact us for more information o1r to register!




Oakes Field Seagrapes NPCC
Phone/Fax 356-7722
Phone/Fax 364-8423
W W "W ", 1:1 .-h :'i1n l S.,i-.- i CS. c 0111
nas samastic s(ftVvahoo .con
a proudmember of the Gymnastics F ederati on of the Bahamas


,,,MUM"


I


TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2006, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


work toget h. e Zr on





Outreachi~ initiative


ce~_-- I .- 4
v-















Over 70 per cent of Bahamians feel




tourism needs 'great improvement'


FROM page 1B

was still seen to be too high.
"Most respondents in the
2005 Bahamian residents sur-
vey indicated for the third year
in a row and agreed with the
Minister of Tourism that the
quality of the tourism product
needs great improvement," the
Ministry of Tourism wrote in
its recommendations paper on
the survey findings.
In Grand Bahama, 89 per
cent of those questioned felt
there needed to be "great
improvement" in the quality of
the Bahamian tourism product,
while in the Family Islands the
figure was 77 per cent.
Ministry
The Ministry of Tourism
added: "We need to demon-
strate the Bahamianisation of
the tourism industry. Bahamian
residents did not feel sufficient
effort is being made to ensure
that Bahamians are trained to


take positions held by foreign-
ers or expatriates in the tourism
industry.
"They also thought that not
enough Bahamian food, music
and other products and ser-
vices" are employed in the
tourism industry. The latter
aspect appears to be generally
perceived by Bahamians even
though all Heads of Agree-
ment signed with developers
of tourism-related projects stip-
ulate that they will make best
endeavours to use Bahamian
products, arts, crafts and music
in their designs.
The survey again highlighted
what some perceive to be a
"severe disconnect" between
the Bahamian public's attitudes
towards working in the tourism
industry, which is the largest
private sector employer in the
Bahamas.
In 2005, the percentage of
New Providence residents who,
when questioned, said they felt
tourism was not the first career
choice for.high school and col-


lege graduates, increased by 9
percentage points over 2003,
reaching 35 per cent.
Meanwhile, 56 per cent of
Grand Bahama residents and
30 per cent of those inter-
viewed in the Family Islands
felt that tourism was not the
top option for graduates.
Choice
In New Providence and
Grand Bahama, when asked
why tourism was not the first
choice, 33 per cent and 38 per
cent respectively gave the most
popular answer, that there was
"not enough money/low
salaries" in the industry. For
the Family Islands, lack of
knowledge and exposure to
tourism was the most frequent
answer, given by 26 per cent of
respondents.
The Ministry of Tourism
said: "One of the reasons that
tourism is not attracting the
best -and brightest is because
the salaries/pay are perceived


as low. There are many high-
paying jobs that the best and
brightest should be educated
about. High school and college
graduates were said to perceive
tourism jobs as not prestigious
and at the bottom of the lad-
der."
This continued perception is
likely to further worry govern-
ment and tourism executives,
who are already worried about
being able to access a quality
supply of labour due to defi-
ciencies in the Bahamian edu-
cational system.
Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace, the former director gen-
eral of tourism, repeatedly said
that as the Bahamas' leading
private sector industry, tourism
needed to attract its brightest
and best graduates.
The 2005 survey found that
in response to the statement
'jobs in tourism are not con-
sidered very prestigious', 36 per
cent of interviewees in New
Providence, 50 per cent on
Grand Bahama, and 29 per


cent in the Family Islands
either agreed or strongly
agreed.
When asked for responses to
the statement that 'many par-
ents do not think it is a good
idea for their children to have a
career in tourism', 34 per cent
of those questioned in New
Providence, 31 per cent in
Grand Bahama, and 21 per
cent in the Family Islands,
agreed or strongly agreed.
And when it came to being
asked whether 'the salaries and
benefits in the tourism industry
are not on par with the private
sector', some 46 per cent in
New Providence, 51 per cent
in Grand Bahama, and 30 per
cent in the Family Islands
either agreed or strongly
agreed.
Concerns
Other concerns also.
appeared to play a part in atti-
tudes towards work in the
tourism industry, for in


response to the statement that
'there is little job security ini
the tourism sector', 50 per cent,
of those interviewed in New
Providence, 48 per cent in
Grand Bahama and 41 per cent
in the Family Islands either
agreed or strongly agreed.
On New Providence, while
the proportion of residents who-
said they would choose to work
in tourism remained relatively
stable compared to 2003, stand-i
ing at 72 per cent as opposed to
73 per cent, some 18 per cent of
those employed in the sector
indicated they would rather not
be there. The Ministry of
Tourism report said: "Eighty-
two per cent of the persons,
employed in tourism declared
that given a choice they would
choose to work in tourism,;
"Although the proportion of
those in the non-tourism indus-
tries that felt the same way had
increased in 2005, 62 per cent
over 2003's 60 per cent, it wa
still much lower than that. of
the tourism industry."


IDB project aids Freeport



to 'adjust' to free trade


FROM page 1B

The most intriguing aspect of the IDB-
financed project is that it appears to imply
there could be consequences for Freeport,
whose free trade zone and rights are
enshrined in the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment of 1955.
Government ministers and officials have
said in the past that Freeport would not be
impacted if the Bahamas joined organisa-
tions such as the World Trade Organisa-
tion (WTO), or signed up to agreements
such as the Caribbean Single Market &
Economy (CSME) or Free Trade Area of
the Americas (FTAA).
However, this 'alphabet soup' or free
trade organizations and agreements are all


based on philosophies of 'most favoured
nation' you cannot offer companies from
one nation better trade preferences than
those from another and reciprocity, which
means that domestic producers cannot be
treated better than foreign ones.
Essentially
This essentially implies that if the
Bahamas ever signed on to free trade
agreements, the benefits, preferences and
economic incentives offered by Freeport's
free trade zone would have to be brought
into line with those offered by the entire
Bahamas.
Private sector contacts spoken to by The
Tribune late last week had generally not


been informed about the IDB project. ay
Winder, co-chair of the Bahamas, r~.~e-
Commission, said he was aware f its.exis-
tence through IDB officials, not the Gpv,-
ernment, but had received not details on it.
When asked about the implication for,
Freeport of signing, on to free trade agree-,
ments, Mr Winder said: "I canr',tsaypr,
sure whether Freeport will be mpate
or not." ,
The IDB project's components are
expert advice in services, costing $49.750:
WTO awareness and compliance, $57,500;,
a review of the Bahamas' investment pol.
icy, $12,800; and free trade zonesand
Freeport, $19,750.
The Bahamas will put up $11,550 of the
$127,050 in total funding.


'Bridge the gap' between tourists


and Bahamians over gratuities


* MINISTER LESLIE MILLER


FROM page 1B

of the tourists, as noted in the
Tourist Exit Surveys.
"A study of the automatic 15
per cent gratuity and its rela-
tionship to the quality of ser-


vice should be conducted."
When asked to respond to
the survey statement that 'the
15 per cent gratuity should be
eliminated', some 65 per cent
Sof those questioned in New
Providence, 60 per cent in
Grand Bahama, and 69 per


cent in the Family Islands
either disagreed or strongly dis-
agreed.
Although not linking the two
questions, the survey also
asked Bahamians whether the
standard of service in the
tourism industry needed
improving. Some 81 per cent
of respondents in New Provi-
dence, 92 per cent in Grand
Bahama and 83 per cent in the
Family Islands either strongly
agreed or agreed with that
statement.
"S.M.A.R.T. programmes
should be encouraged as more
residents in 2005 said tfiat the
standard of services in the
islands of the Bahamas needs
improvement," the Ministry of
Tourism recommended.
Yet when presented with the
statement that 'tourists are giv-
en their money's worth while
visiting the islands of the
Bahamas', some 74 per cent of
respondents in New Provi-
dence, 53 per cent in Grand
Bahama and 71 per cent in the
Family Islands either agreed or
strongly agreed.
"More tourism workers felt
that tourists are given their
money's worth while visiting
the islands of the Bahamas.
Tourism workers should be
exposed as frequently as possi-
ble to the Exit Survey results,
particularly visitor complaints,"
the Ministry of Tourism wrote.
"Older Bahamians (50+
years) tend to have more posi-
tive views toward the tourism
industry. These gems could
train and educate the young
Bahamians......
"Training, educating in
schools, workshops and an
annual careers fair where par-
ents are invited, along with stu-
dents and where the best and
brightest are carefully select-
ed, are recommendations to
attract the best and brightest.
Emphasis should be placed on
prestigious, high salaried career
opportunities in the tourism
industry," the Ministry of


Tourism added.
"Continued tourism educa-
tion for all Bahamians is very
highly recommended. Bahamu-
ans should be made aware of
the direct economic impact f
tourism to each individual
rather than just for the countIq
overall. I
"Tourism industry and nor-
industry employees should ie
shown how tourism affect s
them personally. Bahamia s
should be informed about te
different culture, lifestyles a
idiosyncrasies of tourists."
The recommendations alo
suggested that the Ministry 6f:
Tourism and industry partners'
should offer scholarships 1o0
tourism students and employ-;
ees, as a significant percentage;
still felt that the only jobs cre-!
ated for Bahamians by tlie
industry were "at the bottofn
of the ladder".
When asked whether they
agreed with this in the survey,
only 45 per cent of New Pro i-
dence residents disagreed. Onry
53 per cent of Grand Bahama
residents disagreed, and 47 per
cent of Family Island residents
disagreed.
Yet in response to the st4te'
ment 'tourism will have to'E'
the main industry for at Isst
the next 30 years', some 64 pe
cent of respondents on Niv
Providence either agreed or
strongly agreed. For Grand;
Bahama, the percentage 'a*
71 per cent, and in the Fai '"It
Islands it was 68 per cent. i
Meanwhile, the Ministryot
Tourism recommendati nS.
said: "Drugs and crime arc
among the things seen hapK
opening in the islands of h6
Bahamas that are a result'of!
tourism.
"This is the case for all;'hof
destinations, and has boepo.
mentioned in New Providencet
since 1996. We need to niea-
sure the correlation betweehi
tourism and drugs/crinfe tb?-
determine if there is a rel5la
tionship."


Office and Education Assistant To be involved in
many of the daily activities at the Bahamas Reef
Environment Educational Foundation (BREEF) office,
s/he is responsible for telephone, public reception and
various administrative duties and office support tasks
including maintaining office equipment, updating
BREEF website, database and mailings. S/he will also
be responsible for coordinating the logistics of
conferences including a summer marine conservation
teacher training workshop. S/he will assist with
preparation of marine educational materials and will
work with students and teachers in the field. Duties
may also include assisting with accounting and
bookkeeping functions.

Knowledge! Skills

Associates degree or 2 to 3 years of related
experience or High school diploma plus 3 to 5
years related experience or equivalent
combination.
Excellent organizational and administrative skills
required.
Strong computer skills (work processing,
spreadsheets). Working familiarity with Windows
Sand the Microsoft Office Suite applications,
Access, Illustrator and Photoshop.
Ability to update website and/or interest in
learning to do so.
Accuracy and attention to detail essential; ability
to set priorities, organize time efficiently, and
work independently on several tasks at once.
Strong communication skills and the ability to
work well with a variety of people. Ability to
work under pressure and perform as a team
player. Flexible and able to adapt to changing
office situations and procedures.

Interested persons should apply in writing with full
details, including resume and cover letter, to
breef@breef.org by 4th January, 2006.


w ieftk CAM4w* 3y4 9Pc/zo&
"Teach Me. 0 Lor, Thy Wis"..FPsalm 11933




OPEN HOUSE:




report cards will be issued


Wednesday, 4th


January 2006


10:00a.m. to 1:30p.m.





School will re-open on


Thursday 5th


January 2006 8:10a.m.


--;I --I-


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2006







TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2006, PAGE 5B


Economic realditis hurt low-skilled empl(es


S-


"Copyrighted Mater


'-

4 .




riaI -bon


-Syndicated Content -.-.:


Available from Commercial News Providers"'


-.-d -

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-


- m


-L
- -


-9
S ~
~ -
.~ *
- -~


S -


- *



~-

-S


q


I. .1-- II I- --


SA Reward of $5,000

is being offered for the return or information
:- leading to the return of a
1991 26ft. Sebrich Center Console
Pleasure Craft, Registration
No. FL 880EA.


Telephone Contact

.357-7502/356-2110

.*; '* I ---: :" ;"; I -


THE.TRIBUNE


JTA t'


I": :.:!r :


-t


PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY


VACANCY


MANAGER III (Human Resources)
Corporate Office
Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post of Human
Resources Manager III, Corporate Office, Public Hospitals Authority.
Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-
Bachelors Degree in Business Management or equivalent and three (3) years
experience in Human Resource Management with good analytical and computer
skills.
The Human Resources Manager III is responsible for all Human Resource matters
forwarded to Corporate Office from the institution assigned; assists with Human
Resource policies review. and formation.
RESPONSIBILITIES & DUTIES
1. Prepares recommendation and submits for approval the following from the
institution assigned:
i) appointments
ii) pension/gratuity benefits
iii) promotions
iv) disciplinary actions
v) transfers
vi) reassessment of salaries
vii) reemployment
viii) renewal of contracts
ix) salary advances
x) medical loans
xi) industrial accidents
2. Processes to completion the following recommendations:-
i) reclassifications
ii) reimbursement for passage
iii) resignation without benefits
iv) confirmation in appointment
v) resumption of duty after study leave and un-coding of incremental month
3. Researches all matters of complaints from the institution assigned, prepares'
documentation and submits with recommendation.
4. Reviews Human Resources systems and makes recommendations for update
periodically.
5. Assists with review and formulation of Human Resource policies.
Letters of application, resume, documentary evidence of qualifications and three
(3) references should be submitted, no later than 20th January, 2006, to the Director
Human Resources, Public Hospitals Authority P.O. Box N-8200, or 1st Floor
Corporate Office, Dockendale House, West Bay Street. (Serving officers must
submit their application through the Head of Department).
"" ________________


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I HIOUi'J orurl 10


PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2006


* MINISTER of Youth, Sports and Culture Neville Wisdom with
(top) Ramon Farrington and Tracey Morrison.
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)


Ramon and Tracey




Make their mark





With junior awards


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
JAVELIN throwers Ramon Far-
rington and Tracey Morrison
emerged as the Junior Male and
Female Athletes of the Year for 2005
by the Bahamas Association of Ath-.
letic Associations.
Diane Woodside was awarded the
Henry Crawford Coach of the Year
award, while Doris Ramsay collected
the Roderick Simms Official of the
Year award and Carlisa Robinson
was the recipient of the Senator Dr.
Bernard Nottage Academic Award.
SAfter the announcements.on Fri-
day night at the Sandals Royal
Bahamian Resort, both Farrington
and Morrison spoke about their
awards.
"First of all, I was surprised, but I
had some incentive of what was
going to happen," said Farrington,
a native of Andros. "But to hear it, I
was surprised."
Farrington produced his best per-
formance at the Jr. Pan Am where
he finished fourth.
After the stellar performance he
produced in 2005, 19-year-old Far-


rington said he's already started his
training for what should be his start
on the senior circuit.
Morrison, who is heading off to
junior college in Texas this month,
said she's going to begin her
base work for the road to the
2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, Chi-
na.

Proud
"I was very proud and surprised,"
Morrison stated. "I didn't know that
I would have won it, but I'm proud.
I did good in Carifta, coming third, I
was scared at Sr CAC and at Jr. Pan
Am I got third again, so I think I
did good."
Both Farrington and Morrison
made the BAAA's national teams
that participated in the Carifta
Games in Tobago, March 26-28; the
Senior Central American and
Caribbean Championships in Nas-
sau, July 9-12 and the Junior Pan-
American Championships in Wind-
sor, Canada from July 30 to August
1.
Woodside, onr the other hand, was


pleasantly surprised and elated wh she was announced as the Coac a f
the Year. 4*
"It's quite a privilege and hoaia(
to know that my hard work has fe
recognized and I appreciate tiMy.
persons who have decided to kaist
our me," she pointed out. *
Not willing to rest on her lautreis!
Woodside said her main concernisc,
that her athletes are in the "besti-con*
diti-on" to perform "at their bIst'"
when the new season gets undewya:
this month.

Hurdles
Woodside was an assistant colIi
on the Carifta team. She speciahI t
in the hurdles, having held:thae
national 100 hurdles record. VW&C
side also formed the Club Mo6iHa
Track Club.
And Doris Ramsay, a physical ef4-.
cation teacher at the Sir Gerald; i'-
Primary School, has worked'fia
lessly with the Bahamas Associitri
of Certified Officials (BACO) iftit
officiating of local track and:.tii:l
meets.


U.:i~


M CHRIS BROWN, Nathaniel McKinney, Carl Oliver and Dennis Darling pose with their bronze medals.
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune 'staff)


Bronze medals presented





to men's 4x400 relay team


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
IAAF president Lamine Diack
came to town with a set of bronze
medals that he presented to the
men's 4 x 400 relay team and Chan-
dra Sturrup for the 9th IAAF World
Championships in Paris, France in
2003.
And, after the presentation on Fri-
day night at the Bahamas Associa-
tion of Athletic Associations' awards
banquet at the Sandals Royal
Bahamian Hotel, the athletes all
were awarded some extra cash.
Minister of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture Neville Wisdom announced that,
as a result of Sturrup being elevated
from fourth to the bronze medal
after American Kelli White was
stripped off her 100 metre gold, the
Bahamas Government will pay her
an extra $10,000.
Sturrup, who emailed a communi-


IAAF president makes presentations for


World Championships in Paris, 2003


cation to the BAAA explaining her
absence, was represented by her
mother, Deborah Dean.
And Chris Brown, Carl Oliver,
Dennis Darling, Nathaniel McKin-
ney and Avard Moncur who was
the only member of the 4 x 400 relay
team not present will collect an
extra $7,000 each.
The relay team also finished fourth
in Paris, but were moved up to the
bronze after the American relay
team was disqualified and stripped
off their gold medal.
For the Olympic Games and
World Championships, the ministry


presented cash incentives to all
medalists and finalists.
Brown, the male Athlete of the
year, reflected on finally receiving
the medal.
"It would have felt better know-
ing that I had gotten it at the right
time on the right day," he stated.
"It's a pity they had to go back to
the history books and erase this stuff.
"But me and my team-mates real-
ly deserve it. I'm happy for myself
and for my team-mates. I was glad
that we were able to finally receive
the medals."
Darling,.who claimed his first


major international medal after miss-
ing out at the Olympic Games, said it
was a great accomplishment, albeit
two years late.
"It took two years to get it, but it's
a great accomplishment and I'm hap-
py about it," he stressed.
"I just thank God for the bless-
ing."
It was a double celebration for
Darling after he watched his wife,
Tonique Williams-Darling, pick up
the Athlete and Female Athlete of
the Year awards for the second
straight year.
"She's been doing her thing for


two years now, so it's good to receive
a little bit of hardware when she
received her's," he added. "It's a hus-
band and wife team, so I'm thank-
ful."
McKinney, who also won a silver
medal at the 2005 World Champi-
onships in Helsinki, said, "It defi-
nitely feels like justice was
done. That's about it. But it feels
good."
Diack, who oversees a 28-member
council of a 200-member country
membership in the IAAF, said both
Sturrup and the men's relay team
deserve the medals and he was
delighted to be on hand to present
them.
Back here for the first time since
he made his initial presence at the
2002 Carifta Games, he said it's
always encouraging when athletes
from such small countries with limit-
ed resources can do what the
Bahamas has done.


- -... -.-.. I.. ~....- ;:- .







TFREUNE SPORTS


SPORT


*e TONIQU W IIAMDA .. sister of Yt, Spts ad Cltre Nevile Wism an is n
0 TONIQUE WILLIAMS-DARLING, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Neville Wisdom and Chris Brown.


(Photo: FelipO Major/Tribune staff)


Chris Brown takes Male


Athlete of the


Year award


FROM page one
just want to thank him for it
and for all the fans who sup-
ported me through thin and
thick.-my fanmill members and
friends. I just feel good coming
here tonight and achieving this
award I feel real good."
SAlthough he knew Sands
had a great year, falling just
short of a medal as well in the
triple jump at the World
Championships after winning
both the long and triple jump
l.ities at the Senior Central
Atierican and Caribbean
Championships, Brown said
he knew\ his own performance
would speak for itself.
"You always expect the
unexpected. In this track and
'field world and knowing how
Ithe judging system works, you
have to expect the unexpect-
ed, said Brown, who won
the coveted award for the
pst time.
"But you know, I felt I
worked hard this season, I
ran a:few personal bests, so I


was confident, but not
cocky," said Brown, who fin-
ished just shy of breaking
Avard Moncur's national
record of 44.46 seconds when
he ran a personal best of
44.48.
Also, during the banquet,
Brown and his team-mates on
the men's 4 x 400 relay team
(Carl Oliver, Dennis Darling,
Nathaniel McKinney and
Avard Moncur who was
absent), were presented with
their bronze medals after they
were elevated to bronze from
the 9th IAAF World Cham-
pionships in Paris, France,
following the stripping of the
gold from the US team.
But Brown, ranked at num-
ber five in the world in the
400 in 2005, was more thrilled
about the BAAA's award
and he had nothing but praise
and admiration for Sands, his
team-mate and arch rival.
"Leevan is a very good
competitor, but next year I
hope to do it like Tonique did
- way out of sight," the native
from Eleuthera said. "In


2006, if the Lord allows me
to stay healthy, I really expect
a showdown that Chris
,Brown has never done bet-
ter."
Sands, the 2003 Male Ath-
lete of the Year, who finished
at No.6 in the triple jump and
13th in the long jump this
year on the IAAF chart,
agreed with the BAAA that
Brown was the right choice
for this year's selection.
"I feel good. I'm happy for
Chris. I won it before. Chris
had an awesome year this
year." Sands said.
"It was close between me
and him, but I think he
deserved it more because he
did good in the individual 400
and on the 4 x 4 team.
"I'm happy and proud for
him."
Having graduated on
December 16 with a degree
in Adult Education, Sands,
24, will remain at Auburn
University where he will train
under the supervision of
Bahamian coach Henry Rolle
for the upcoming season.


'I's.


* NATHANIEL MCKINNEY with Chris Brown
(Photo: Fellpi Major/Tribune staff)


Tonique at the double


Sfor annual awards

FROM page one
For every athlete before you hang up
-,your spikes, you want to have something on
,your shelve to say that this is what I accom-
-:plished and with him getting his medal today,
he was able to achieve that," she quipped.
S'So I really wanted to be a part of it. So we
.decided that we would come home and cel-
ebrate it together."
X-- This year, however, Williams-Darling is
_it expecting ats much as she did over the
past two. She's already announced that she
will skip the Commonwealth Games in Mel-
:,bourne, Australia in March and will just
,focus on the outdoor season.
"I'm just going to go out there and have I
some fun, compete when I want to and just
Shave some good races and see how far I can 7
push it," she projected. "I haven't changed
my:mind about Commonwealth.
. .: "I'm looking forward to a stress free year
and just have some races of my choice, noth- i~ .
ing major like Olympics or World Champi-
onships. I'm just looking for a slow year this 0 TONIQUE WILLIAMS-DARLING with
year to regroup and get ready for training for Prime Minister Perry Christie
2007." (Photo: Felipt Major/Tribune stafJ)


_ __ ___


*n^ ^ <-


I k- --, ., _i i.







aO a


TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2006

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


Unique


fop


Track star is
Female Athlete
of the Year and
the Athlete of
the year


annu


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
TONIQUE Williams-Dar-
ling not only repeated as the
Female Athlete of the Year,
but she also emerged as the
Athlete of the Year for the
second straight year at the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations' annual
awards banquet.
For Williams-Darling, who
earned the feats by claiming
her second straight gold medal
- this time at the, 10th IAAF
World Championships in
Helsinki, Finland in August -
the awards were the culmina-
tion of a banner year for the
world's numbertwo ranked
quarter-miler.
"It's great. Coming off the
Olympic experience you don't
expect much more, but to
come out here and duplicate it
again and have all these great
things like the renaming of the
road and being named the
Athlete of the Year again, it's
been a whirlwind experience,"
said a modest Williams-Dar-
ling, whose name is now on
the former Harrold Road
highway.
"I'm just very, very pleased
and excited and happy."
She said she was touched to
be back for the BAAA's ban-
quet on Friday night at the
Sandals Royal Bahamian
Hotel.
The event was dubbed
"Glorious Moments" and was
held under the patronage of
IAAF president Lamine
Diack, who presented the
Female Athlete of the Year
award to Williams-Darling.
The Athlete of the Year
award was presented by Prime
Minister Perry Christie.
"The banquet was really
good. This is my second year
coming and they always do a
great job," Williams-Darling
reflected. "I think it's good
because it really motivates the
younger athletes because
everyone wants to receive an
award for their hard work."
Williams-Darling said it also
gives the athletes an opportu-
nity to come out of their track
suits and really dress down
and enjoy a delightful evening.
This year's banquet was


e\en more special because she
able to share a special
moment with her husband,
Dennis Darling, who received
his first individual world
championship medal.
Diack, the special guest of
the BAAA and the Ministry
of Youth, Sports and Culture,
presented bronze medals to
the team of Darling, Carl
Oliver, Avard Moncur (who
was no present), Nathaniel
McKinney and Brown after
they were elevated to bronze
following the stripping of the
United States' gold at the 9th
IAAF World Championships
in Paris, France.
Williams-Darling said they
opted not to come home for
the Christmas holiday just so
that they could be here to
share the moment together as
husband and wife.
SEE page 7B


,is Bpo wn' t ke1 Male Ath Iet ft hel Y a w ad I


N CHRIS BROWN
with IAAF president
Lamine Diack.
(Photo: Feiipe Major/
Tribune staff)


N By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
THE hard work and determination that produced two gut-
sy performances at the 10th IAAF World Championships
paid off for quarter-miler Chris Brown on Friday night.
He was awarded the Bahamas Association of Athletic Asso-
ciations' 2005 Male Athlete of the Year award, alongside his
training partner, Tonique Williams-Darling, who took the
Female and Athlete of the Year for her repeat gold medal per-
formance in the women's 400 metres.
Brown's fourth place finish in the men's 400 and anchoring
the men's 4 x 400 relay team to the silver medal in Helsinki,
Finland in August enabled him to cart off the award in the
much anticipated showdown with long/triple jumper Leevan
'Superman' Sands.
"It was a good feeling," said Brown at the end of the gala
awards banquet at the Sandals Royal Bahamian Hotel. "I
just want to give thanks and praise to the Lord. With him, any-
thing is possible, once you set your mind on it.
"With me coming in here and having the year that I had, I
SEE page 7B


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B A H A M I A N

.-, d..-. -. ,, "..


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TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2006


'Don't make a resolution


you're not likely to


keep'


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
If, over the years,
you've noticed a con-
stant pattern of failed
resolutions and broken
personal promises, you
may be expecting another arti-
cl!pon how to make that reso-
lution stick this time around.
Maybe Tribune Woman has the
miracle tip that will help you
figure out just how to stick to it
this time.
,J3ut you've tried them all
already writing your resolu-
tions on a piece of paper and
sticking it to the refrigerator,
the bathroom mirror and in
yqur personal journal; set what
you thought to be a reasonable
resolution (you didn't try to
save the world, only quit smok-
ing); informed family members
of your resolutions in hopes
that they would help keep you
inline. But year after year, it


Psychologist says making New Year's resolutions

'at a neutral time makes them more meaningful'


hasn't worked.
Binged
Never mind that. You're sure
about January 2006. Yes, at the
turn of midnight, you binged
on your last bag of chips, you
smoked your last cigarette, you
started saving to get out of
debt, you began spending more
time with the family, started
being less stressed out on the
job. Yes, New Year's Day sig-
nifies for you a new beginning.
These are promises made
every year, but one thing that
never changes is that many of
these resolutions don't make it


past February. In Mark
Twain's words: "Now is the
accepted time to make your
regular annual good resolu-
tions. Next week you can begin
paving hell with them as usual.
Yesterday, everybody smoked
his last cigar, took his last
drink, and swore his last oath.
Today, we are a pious and
exemplary community. Thirty
days from now, we shall have
cast our reformation to the
winds and gone to cutting our
ancient shortcomings consid-
erably shorter than ever."
According to psychologists,
it's usually the pressure of the
new season and the fact that


everybody is doing it, that
keeps people steaming out of
the gates, only to blow out of
steam somewhere at the end
of the new month, or mid-year
if they're lucky. Granted, many
people will meet December
2006 having fulfilled their res-
olution, but psychologists are
considering a whole new
approach to the new year's
resolve maybe making none
of them at all.
Experts.
According to experts, the
winter season is not the best
time for reflection. Wait until


summer. Don't rush into any-
thing you may regret on New
Year's Eve by making a reso-
lution you're not likely to hon-
our. Instead, consider waiting
until June to make a resolu-
tion.
"Making them at a neutral
time makes them more mean-
ingful. That's why I say that I
like to think of New Year's res-
olutions in the context of a
growth experience, not as a full
stop and start over again thing.
So now, at the new year, I just
want to re-evaluate the year
and move into another year
fresh.
"That doesn't have to be
done on January 1. You can do
that in September or in Janu-
ary; in March or August, any-
time. We think of the calendar
year, but September to Sep-
tember is also a year," psy-
chologist Barrington Brennen
told Tribune Woman.
In January, persons are gen-
erally so preoccupied with end-
ing the holiday celebrations
that they don't take the time
to truly reflect on setting new
goals. So for some of us, the
beginning of the summer is a
better time for introspection
and thoughtful change. Fulfill-
ing a resolution requires tak-


ing time to identify something
you really want to accomplish
and then working out a plan of
action with specific steps that
will help you achieve your goal,
not making a rushed decision
because you feel the need to
make a change along with
everybody else.
Goal
You tell yourself that you are
going to reach your goal and
here's how. Start mapping it
out in a way that will work for
you. It is essential to make
plans, not just to have good
intentions to make a change.
And of course, this kind of
committed planning requires
energy and effort, which may
be difficult to drum up as
you're trying to recover from
the hectic holiday season.
Mr Brennen believes that it
may help to take a different
approach to life as a whole, "I
like to look at life not as a book
with many pages so that at the
end of the year you start on a
new page. I like to look at life
as a book with one page. And
God has given us one page, we
can renew it.
"So when I make my New
Year's resolution, if that's what
you want to call it, it's a con-
tinuum on that page. I think
that it's okay to make a resolu-
tion that is meaningful for
growth, not make a wish list.
Set goals. Resolutions are sup-

SEE page 3C


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S,'. 7.. ....... r L-- . ... .. ...... -- -,, '- ----- --- --


New job for Sharon Gibson

-IBy YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
Tribune Feature Editor
WITH continuing questions about the level of skill available
in the Bahamian workplace, and issues surrounding the need
to expand the country's immigration policy to attract a greater
number of experts, a recent development in the career of
Sharon Gibson highlights both the level of skill available in the
country, and possibly the way forward to assure the continued
growth of the Bahamian economy as witnessed by one coun-
try's attempt to build its economy based on a modernised
immigration policy.
Mrs Gibson, formerly the executive administrative assis-
tant to Nan Palmer, Atlantis' chief operating officer, was .
asked by Alan Leibman, president/managing director of Kerzn-
er's destination resort casino development, Mazagan, in El
Jadida, Morocco to accompany him as he takes responsibility
.for Atlantis, The Palm, Dubai, where she will serve as his ,
executive assistant and office manager: "I am so excited, words ,
can't even describe the feelings that I am having."
Employed with the Lyford Cay Club for some ten years
before joining the Atlantis team September 7, 1998, Mrs Gib-
son worked with Mr Leibman for six years, before he left the
Bahamas.
Accompanied
Mrs Gibson, who will be accompanied by her husband Elton,
is expected to begin a two-year stint in Dubai, when she leaves
Nassau January 9. Mr Gibson will remain with his wife for a
few weeks before returning to Nassau, and then join her again
on a permanent basis later in the year. With an abundance of
opportunities in the expanding economy of the Middle East
state and the completion of The Palm resort expected shortly,
Mr Gibson, with a background in accounting, is also expected 5 .
to find work in Dubai.
Asked about leaving the rest of her family behind, Mrs Gib-
son said her two adult children, a daughter who is finishing
medical school in June and will begin her residency pro-
gramme shortly after, and a son who is completing the last
semester of his master's programme, are both able to fend for
themselves. She added however, that the family home will
not be sold in case either
of them return to Nassau
and need a place to stay. SEE page 6C 0 SHARON GIBSON
...... ----L ~


I I II- 1 111


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TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2006, PAGE 3C


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SFROM page 1C

posed to be goals for the com-
ing new year."
According to University of
Scranton psychology professor
John Norcross, PhD, in an
:'online report posted on the
American Psychological Asso-
-,ciation website, to lose weight,
Suit smoking and exercise reg-
Sularly are America's top three
,New Year's resolutions,
Accounting for nearly three-
.fourths of the goals adults
undertake on January 1.
.:,:;,he article also made men-
;,-on of a 1998 study, published
in the Journal of Substance
Abuse (Vol 1, No 2), which
showed that dieters and those
attempting to mend relation-
,ships enjoyed the same rates
.of success: Only 19 percent still
,-stuck to their resolution at the
,two-year mark.
..In that study, Norcross and
Shis colleagues tracked 200 res-
olution-making adults over a
-two-year period. He and his
colleagues conducted inter-
,views of the participants at
weeks one, two and three, and
:again at months three and six.
.They also conducted one final
interview two years from the
initial resolution.
During the interviews, par-
Sticipants reported on their suc-
cess to date as well as the kinds
of strategies they were employ-
ing to keep the resolutions
going. The successful resolu-
tion-makers employed strate-
gies such as stimulus control-
for example, avoiding a smoky
bar after resolving to quit
smoking. The unsuccessful par-
ticipants tended to use what
INorcross terms "consciousness-
.,rising strategies", for exam-
pie, some might have taped pic-
.tures of tar-blackened lungs to
.their office walls in an effort
S.to kick the smoking habit.
Maintain
Additionally, Norcross found
.,that self-efficacy, or the belief
that one can effect and main-
-tain change, also predicted res-
.olution success. A concept
,developed and studied by
,Albert Bandura, PhD, of Stan-
-ford University, self-efficacy is
.a measure of personal belief in
,one's ability to succeed at
.something-in this case, to suc-
c, ceed at changing ingrained
habits.
If resolutions, which are real-


ly made with the intention that
change will be affected, are to
be realized, the persons making
them should think more along
the lines of making a lifestyle
change, said the psychologist.
He added: "At the end of the
year you can make a new year's
resolution as if you're making
another step forward. We have
a problem when people are
making the same New Year's
resolution every year because
what's the point of it all. I'm
not sure what you call it then
because its surely not a reso-
lution.
Unrealistic
"Its an unrealistic and point-
less promise that is not tied to
any growth process. These peo-
ple are making wishes, 'oh I
want a car, I'll never drink
again'. But what are you doing
to set up your lifestyle to
accommodate that.
"This is what the psycholo-
gist (Norcross) is saying. Per-
haps we think that there is
some magic at the turn of the
year, but if you do it in Sep-
tember you're not connected
to that. You do it in August,
then you have to make a con-
scious decision."
If you're making a New
Year's resolution to stop drink-
ing, what are you doing about
it, the psychologist asked. "Are
you still gonna have the same
friends? Are you still gonna go
to the bar just to chill out and
have fun and sit down and you
know that's your weak point?
"People don't do that. Reso-
lutions themselves don't really
mean anything."
.Instead of dubbing your ven-
ture a New Year's Resolution it
may be helpful to call it a New
Chance Resolution an oppor-
tunity for you to get a much
needed second go at it.
The people who succeed at
losing weight and maintaining
the loss for example, have usu-
ally been motivated by a dream
much bigger and more positive
than just wanting to lose
weight. They see themselves
living a healthy lifestyle.
They begin to act and think
like people who are in good
physical shape, and make
appropriate choices. There's
more of a radical change in a
person's thinking and actions
than you see with most resolu-


tions. It wouldn't be possible
to affect and sustain such a rad-
ical change unless the person
is motivated by a big dream
that is positive in nature,
maybe a desire to participate
in an upcoming walkathon.
If you're going to make a
New Year's Resolution this
year, make one with a high
probability for success. Make
a Resolution to develop a life
plan. Working with a life plan
you're much more apt to be
excited by what the future
brings even if you succeed at
attaining only a small part of
your plan.
One of the strange ways that
people motivate themselves is
to feel bad about their habit,
which really doesn't help in the
long run, especially when
you're talking about making
resolutions to change.
A University of Washington
study (1998) conducted by Eliz-
abeth Miller, a former UW
doctoral candidate in psychol-
ogy, and Alan Marlatt, director
of the university's Addictive
Behaviors Research Center, set
out to understand the factors
that best predict success in
keeping New Year's resolu-
tions.
Study
That study found that "reso-
lutions are a process, not a one-
time effort that offer people a
chance to create new habits."
Marlatt, who has studied the
subject for more than 20 years,
suggests that to be successful
with your own resolutions you
must: Have a strong initial
commitment to make a change,
develop strategies to deal with
problems that will come up,
and regularly track your
progress. The more reviewing
and monitoring you do, the
better you will do.
And even if people are suc-
cessful, they need to follow-up
on their behaviour over the
years. Take credit for success
when you achieve a resolution,
but it is a mistake to blame
yourself if you fail. Instead,
look at barriers that were in
your way. See how you can
improve your efforts for the
next time and figure out a more
successful plan.
Remember, behavioral
changes occur throughout the
year, not only at New Year's.


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PAGE 4C, TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


'Set realistic fitness goals'


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer


exercise more, eat
less junk food,
lose weight, and
generally live a
more health conscious lifestyle,
tops most New Year's resolu-
tion lists. But just how many
fitness hopefuls end up bring-
ing their ambitious pursuits to
reality?
If you ask John Ellis II, a
personal trainer at Bally Total
Fitness, he'll probably confirm
your suspicions that there is an
influx of new members at the
gym at the beginning of each
new year. He'll also confirm
that many of these fitness
hopefuls fall short of their goals
somewhere in mid-January.
And not necessarily because
they made a resolution at the
wrong time of the year, but
because they didn't stop to
work out a plan to reach their
goal.
"You really have to set fit-
ness goals or it won't work. But
people are jumping to the gyms.
without having a realistic goal.
If you're going to do it you


have to do it right. It doesn't
make sense to start it and fall
off," he told Tribune Health.
Another reason that people
fall short of their fitness goals
may be a level of disinterest,
or the pressure of trying to ful-
fill someone else's fitness inter-
ests or goals. Mr Ellis believes
however, that if a person enjoys
their exercise they have a fight-
ing chance. He said that at Bal-
ly, trainers try to tailor work-
outs to the individual's inter-
ests, using traditional aerobic
exercises, Tai Kwon Do (a mix-
ture of aerobics and boxing
sequences), reaction cycling
and pilates, to name a few.
Fun

"We try to make fitness fun,"
said Ellis. "Find something that
you enjoy and it's more likely
that you'll stick to it."
A resolution to be healthier
should really begin with a
change of mind, and should
continue with changes in other
areas of your life. It is also a
decision that may require some
assistance. "Set your whole life
towards you reaching that res-
olution. It would be easier if


Do you have



sensitive skin?


* By SARAH SIMPSON

NO other skin condition
is more misunderstood than
sensitive skin. In fact,
almost 90 per cent of the
population report having
sensitive skin at one time or
another! To understand
whether you have sensitive
skin, you first have to
understand what causes it.
Sensitive skin is a geneti-
cally-inherited condition
that predominately affects
very fair-skinned individu-
als, usually of Northern
European ancestry. Some-
one with truly sensitive skin
is highly prone to blushing,
has a very fine complexion
and may experience bad
hay fever, allergies or asth-
ma.

Suffer

What most people suffer
from is in fact sensitized
skin. Rather than a result
of genetics, sensitized skin is
a reflection of your envi-
ronment, lifestyle and phys-
iology. Pollution, stress, hor-
monal imbalance, cosmetic
allergies, alcohol, a poor
diet and over-exfoliation
can all trigger the sensitized
skin condition.
The good news is that
sensitized skin can be treat-
ed. The bad news is that,
left untreated, the skin's
response can actually result


in permanent cellular dam-
age, which can lead to pre-
mature aging. How can I
avoid trigger factors?
A few lifestyle modifica-
tions can usually solve most
people's skin sensitization.
Nlaintaining the skin's bar-
rier function is vital, so
remember to always apply
your moisturizer after
cleansing, and whenever
your skin feels tight or dry.
Also, always avoid over-
exfoliating your skin -
remember, more exfoliation
is not better. If you notice
redness or tightness that
lasts more than a few hours,
you should discontinue the
use of your exfoliation for a
few days.
Sun protection is also crit-
ical because sensitized skin
is even more vulnerable to
UV damage. Use a chemi-
cal-free sun shield that was
developed specifically for
sensitized skin. Lastly,
avoiding trigger factors such
as hot drinks, spicy foods,
MSG, alcohol, caffeine and
cigarettes can help your skin
recover and rebuild its nor-
mal resistance.

Sarah Simpson is a med-
ical skin care specialist at the
Dermal Clinic at the Walk
In Medical Clinic Sandyport.
This information was taken
from the Dermalogica web-
site. For more information
log on to www.dermalogi-
ca.com.


you start off with a personal
trainer and a fitness evaluation,
so you can have a programme
that fits your needs," said Ellis.
The same principle applies
to eating, since a diet should
also be tailor made to suit spe-
cific fitness goals. "We must
consume fewer calories than
we burn to lose weight, and
consume more calories than we
burn to gain weight. It also has
to do with each person's
metabolism," he told Tribune
Health.
Sustained weight loss dqes
not come from a New Yes's
Resolution made with tie
mouth. It's really about wlat
you eat and how much you
exercise. It begins in your mind
and is nurtured, or fed if you
will, by your actions, giving new
meaning to the term you are
what you eat.
There is no miracle product
or any fad diet that will see you
succeed, until you decide to
add will and determination.
Once a person chooses a dif-
ferent view of themselves,
when they can actually see
themselves as that stronger,
healthier and fit person, then
the process can get underway
and results are on the way.
"There is no quick fix to
health and fitness. There is no
magic pill to take and all your
problems will go away. It
comes with time and determi-
nation."
Simply pit, fitness is not a
one shot deal. "Fitness is a
gradual change. Once you start
off and say, 'hey I can do this',
it becomes easier. So for some-
one who eats Bamboo Shack
everyday, you won't be able to
stop right away. Everything is
gradual you'll see the changes
along the way and you'll be
motivated to continue," said
Mr Ellis.
But what discourages many
persons is that progress might
be slow. However, Ellis
encourages them to hang in
there and commit to memory
twelve important steps as they
make a pledge to get fit this
New Year:

Set realistic goals
It's important to remember
that results don't come
overnight. In order to achieve
your goals, you need to stay
focused and committed to your
exercise and nutrition pro-
gramme. A healthy goal is to
lose 1-2 pounds per week. With
a little determination, you'll
soon see a change in your body
shape and size, as well as your
energy level, and will be well
on your way to achieving your
goals.

Make fitness a date
The best way to stick to your
exercise programme is to make
it a date. At the beginning of


IT is important to remember that results don't come overnight.In order to achieve your goals,
Syou need to stay focused and committed to your exercise and nutrition programme.
(FILE photo)


the week, plan out the days and
times you will hit the gym and
write it on your calendar. By
scheduling fitness into your
routine and treating it like an
appointment, you'll be more
likely to stick to your goals and
less likely to put it off to anoth-
er day.

SIncorporate fitness into
your daily routine
Working out 3-5 times a
week is not as difficult as it may
sound. When you can't hit the
gym, simply sneak small work-
outs into your day wherever
possible. A brisk walk at lunch,
a series of sit ups before bed
or lunges while you Watch your
favourite TV show are all good
ways to keep your body mov-
ing and get exercise through-
out the day. Another great way
to get some exercise into your
day take the stairs.

Choose a.gym that offers a
programme suited to your
needs
As you make the commit-
ment to get back into fitness;
be sure to select a fitness center
that meets your individual
needs. Important things to
keep in mind are the proximity
of the fitness club to your work


or home, the variety of group
exercise classes offered, per-
sonal training and the amount
and type of equipment they
offer.

Enlist a workout buddy
If you're having trouble
motivating yourself to hit the
gym, enlist a friend to join you.
Working out with a partner is a
great way to keep your energy
and motivation high. A work-
out partner can also increase
the level of your workout, as
he/she will push you physically
and mentally, which will help
you meet your potential and
assure results. A partner will
also be able to check your form
and help you adjust your tech-
nique to maintain muscle iso-
lation and prevent injury.

SChange up your routine
Changing your routine from
time to time will help prevent
boredom. For example, instead
of your usual run on the tread-
mill, try taking a group exer-
cise class that will help you pre-
vent boredom and stay moti-
vated. The class will also add
variety to your workout, which
can target muscle groups you
may be missing during your
normal routine.


The most important thing is
to engage your full body. While
a trek on the treadmill provides
a great cardio workout, it's
important that you maximize
your workout by also targeting
other muscle groups. Be sur
your fitness program
includes a combination of car-
dio and resistance training,
which will help you achieve a
full body workout and meet
your goals.

SConsider a personal trainer
A personal trainer can help
you identify and set realistic
goals, and prescribe a fitness
programme that will help you
achieve results. By providing.
one-on-one training advice and
support, a trainer will also help
keep your motivation high and
your eye on the prize. Whether
you are a first tuner who is not
sure of Where to begin or a sea-
soned fitness buff who waiiA`
to hone in on a specific arew,
consider a personal trainer tw1
help you meet your potential.'
If you. can't afford one-q.rf
one training sessions, takl"g
advantage of the Bally's SmaIll
Group Personal Traininrgilic


SEE page 5C


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TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2006, PAGE 5C


THE TRIBUNE


'Unexpected death tends to be





more difficult to deal with'


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

n one day a communi-
ty is shattered by the
19ss of twelve of its res-
idents a mother loses
lier daughter, a hus-
band loses his wife and young
child, a sister loses her sister,
one person loses five relatives
in the crash of Chalk's Airways
flight 101, in what has been
described as the worst airplane
tragedy to affect the Bahamas
in recorded history.
And as family members in
Bimini continue to deal with
the initial shock of such a
tragedy, the country receives
word of another crash. This,
time, three Bahamian-born
men, along with a resident of
the Turks and Caicos. crash in
a Piper Aztek 23 aircraft en
route to Providenciales
Thopg'h these deaths were
considered tragic on a national
leeel. el 'sehere in the coun-
try, the death of someone's
love one doesn't quite make it
to the front page of the dailies.
Hiddernsomew here in the obit-
uary section are the names and
faces of someone's child, some-
one's mother, someone's
father, aunt, uncle, sister. Grief
is absent from no commumti.
But how does one deal with
such tragedy or cope with such
loss? Is-there a right and a
wrong way to grieve? Should
you cry, or perhaps try and set
an example for the other
bereaved? Should you shrink
into a state of isolation or with-
drawal? What do you say, in
fact, what can you say, to some-
how ease the pain of someone's
loss?
The truth is that grief is a
natural process that comes in
various stages, so there is no
specific science to it. One does
not follow a simple pattern that
ensures quick relief. Managing


ones emotions after a loss is a
complex process that has dif-
ferent variations depending on
the individual.
Barrington Brennen, a
nationally certified counseling
psychologist who represented
the Adventist Conference of
Churches at last week's memo-
rial service held at Bayfront
Park, Bimini, to remember
those killed in the fatal Chalk's
flight, was among dozens of
other denominational leaders,
local government officials, and
Floridian representatives who
came to offer prayers and con-
dolences for the families affect-
ed by the tragedy.
According to the psycholo-
gist, hundreds of Biminites, and
also tourists visiting that island,
turned out to the memorial ser-
vice to pay their respects.
Describing the mood in the
community as "comforting and
hopeful", rather than "mor-
bid", Mr Brennen said that he
heard only one loud outburst as
the family members shed tears
when the names of those killed
were being called. But com-
plete healing may be far from
over, he added, since grief is
an ongoing process.
"Unexpected death tends to
be more difficult to deal with,
like in this case, but the loss of
a loved one no matter what the
circumstance unexpected or
expected is still a great loss,"
Mr Brennen told Tribune
Health.
"The unexpected death,
especially of a young person in
their prime or someone who
seemed to have a lot going for
them, is very hard to cope
with."
According to the psycholo-
gist, the youngest person killed
in that crash was just a few
months, and the oldest was 65
years.
A sudden unexpected death
can catch people off guard and


really test their coping
resources, said Mr Brennen.
People may be shocked and
confused initially and have a
need to go over and over in
their minds the events sur-
rounding the death. For many,
he added, this process is made
worse because sudden, unex-
pected deaths are often the sort
of deaths linked with more
traumatic ways of dying.
"Losing someone close
through a traumatic circum-
stance can lead to a whole
range of emotions including
shock, sorrow, confusion, guilt,


and depression. The question
of why a person was taken
away is commonly asked, but
the reasons are often complex
and may never be resolved,"
he said.
Many people who are
bereaved through unexpected
death may also experience feel-
ings of guilt. They may feel
they should have seen it com-
ing maybe they shouldn't
have allowed their loved one
to take a flight or drive the car
that day. But according to the
psychologist, it's important for
the bereaved individual to


realise that they acted on the
information they had at the
time.
Grief, an emotional reaction
to any irretrievable loss, can
lead to many emotional, phys-
ical and behavioral reactions
and bring about feelings of
helplessness, overwhelming
sadness, sometimes confusion
and anger. The intensity of the
grief usually depends on the
nature of the loss. But allowing
oneself to experience the pain
is a "natural, necessary and
time limited process".
As most psychologists would


agree, there is no right or
wrong way to grieve. Mr Bren-
nen says that his way may be to
cry in silence, but it does not
mean that the person who
chooses to make loud outbursts
is not "doing the right type of
grieving".
The shedding of tears in any
event, he added, is emotionally
beneficial, and a failure to shed
them may be a sign of repres-
sion of feelings or denial.
"Some women tend not to
withhold tearswhile most men
get angry rather than crying.
But to keep it all in causes


more damage. The more you
can express your fears, express
your pain and your grief, the
faster you heal.
"But to say that we must all
cry for one hour, we must all
not eat, that's not right."
Shock and disbelief, yearn-
ing and protest, despair, disor-
ganisation and resolution, said
Mr Brennen, are all considered
normal reactions to grief. To
accept the reality of the loss;
experience the pain and grief;
to re-adjust to life through ful-
filling everyday tasks; as well
as to emotionally detach one-
self from the loss and open up
a "new source of nurturance"
through new relationships, are
effective stages in learning to
survive the loss of a loved one,
the psychologist noted.
Upon hearing bad news, the
most common reaction is a
feeling of numbness or shock.
We may experience disbelief
that this is just not
possible...there must be some
mistake here...you must have
the wrong family...that just
can't be true. It's called denial,
a defense mechanism of the
mind.
Maybe if we pretend that
something isn't true, then
somehow the blow is softened.
At any moment, our loved one
could reappear, or so we imag-
ine. Time seems to briefly sus-
pend itself, at least until the
cruel reality of the truth sets
in.
According to the psycholo-
gist, this is a stage that passes
fairly quickly. But in some
extreme cases, denial can go
on for years. "It's a natural
stage in the grieving process,
but it becomes a challenge
when the denial goes on for an
inordinate period of time, for
years and years. Five, some-
times ten years later in some
cases, the\ break down and cry,
finally accepting the death of


the loved one."
Anger and resentment is also
a reaction in the grief process.
We may get angry at the mes-
senger who delivers the news,
the doctor, the person who
caused us this pain, even anger
towards the deceased person
for leaving you alone, anger
even towards God for allow-
ing this to happen.
This reaction is perfectly
understandable. There is a
need to know why this hap-
pened and whether the loss
could have been prevented.
Somehow pointing the finger
allows us to divert the pain,
while others may turn their
anger inwards and blame them-
selves for what happened.
After denial has passed, and
one realises that the loss is real
and unchanging, sinking into
deep sorrow is often seen. In
many cases, a person moves
into a feeling of guilt that they
are still able to enjoy life while
their loved one no longer can.
Acceptance comes in time,
said Mr Brennen. Not that you
forget how much that loved
one meant to you, but in this
stage the bereaved person
come to terms with the reality
of the situation. He recognizes
death as a fact of life, and grad-
ually learns to let go of his pain.
Though passage through
these stages is not an
"overnight process", the
process can be made easier
with support, Mr Brennen
believes.
He encourages the bereaved
individual to talk to others who
have experienced loss and
grief, talk about how the loss
affects them and what it means
to them. "Seek support from
those able to give it. Accept a
hug. Recognise your feelings
and be forgiving and patient in

:SEEpage 6C


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is a'gieat way to get the indi-
vidtiil attention you need from
a highly qualified personal
trainer at a fraction of the cost
of dne'bn-one training. It's also
fun;,as you'll be working out
with a group of 2-3 other peo-
ple- who have similar goals
which provides you with sup-
port and keeps your motiva-
tion high.

Remember exercise is only
half of the equation.
Exercise and nutrition go
hard in hand, so don't try to
justify the junk food just
because you hit the gym. Pay
attention to portion sizes and
make sure you are eating well-
rounded meals. There are
many resources available to
help you, so take advantage of
all your fitness center has to
offer. For example, Bally Total
Fitness offers an interactive


nutrition web site that includes
a daily food diary, suggested
meals plans, Q&A with a reg-
istered dietician, nutrition tips,
grocery lists and more. Bally
also offers one-on-one phone
counseling with a registered
dietician, which can be a great
way to better understand nutri-
tion and start making healthier
food choices.

Always warm up before
your workout
Always warm up before
engaging in exercise. An effec-
tive warm up should last
between 5-10 minutes and be
followed by stretching. The
purpose is to get your body
moving and your muscles warm
so you can begin your work-
out.

Give your muscles a break
It's important to rest each


muscle group 48-72 hours
between workouts. Over-train-
ing a muscle increases the risk
of injury and can be counter-
productive.

Go ahead and snack
Eating a low fat snack in the
afternoon before you load up
your plate for lunch or dinner is
a good idea and can help you
resist temptation to overeat
and indulge in high fat foods.
And like he always tells his
clients: "If you have five good
days and one bad day, don't be
so hard on yourself because its
better than having one good
day and five bad ones."

Stay hydrated
Avoid dehydration by drink-
ing plenty of water before, dur-
ing and after your workout.
Our bodies need 6-8 glasses of
water each day.


~'


--


I rr~r;HEALTH


"The unexpected death

-:.especially of a young
:iwrson in th ir: orime',
I r someoneWh6 seemed

to -have a.lot going for
ver ard
y h

to'F cope with.

Barrington.Breftne,









PAGE 6C, TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2006


THE TRIBUNE


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has been
available for
many years, its acceptance as
a routine procedure has not
been widely received by the
pet owning public until the
last few years. Because den-
tistry has long been one of
the most neglected of veteri-
nary disciplines, the veteri-
nary profession is now plac-
ing special emphasis on it.
Our family dentist begins
teaching our children very
early in life the importance of
brushing, flossing, fluoride
treatments and regular dental
checkups. Preventative den-
tistry is the accepted norm in
most families, but where our
pets are concerned we sel-
dom think about dental care
until breath odors from
infected teeth and gums
becomes so offensive we can
no longer ignore the prob-
lem.

Problems

Approximately 75 per cent
of all dental disease problems
in pets result from periodon-
tal disease. This process starts
when food is trapped in the
channel between the teeth
and gums. This food causes
the deposit of a substance
called plaque, which in turn
supports the growth of bac-
teria. The bacteria are the
real villains as they help form
the hard substance called cal-
culus (tartar) which contin-
ues to separate the tooth
from the gum. Pus pockets
form, the periodontal bone
supporting the tooth
becomes infected, and the
tooth loosens and eventually
falls out.


As a concerned pet owner,
you should be aware that
chronic dental disease can
result in the same complicat-
ing health problems in dogs
and cats as in human beings.
These include disease of the
liver, kidney and heart as
well as contributing to the
development of arthritis,
sinusitis, and throat infec-
tions.

Breeds

.Miniature and toy breeds
exhibit dental problems more
frequently and much earlier
in life than do the larger
breeds. Cats also produce
dental tartar and subsequent
gingivitis. Felines appear to
have more sensitive gums
than dogs, and as a result of
poor dental health, will often
stop eating, lose weight, and
suffer from nutritional defi-
ciencies. The factthat dogs
and cats are now living
longer and enjoying a better
overall level of health care
reinforces the necessity of an
ongoing programme of den-
tal care.
As we so often stress, pre-
ventive medicine is always
better than treating a resul-
tant infection. Yo.ur vet
strongly recommends that
dental exams and prophylac-
tic treatments be a part of
your pet's yearly heath pro-
gramme. We would also like
to discuss with you the things
you can do at home to pre-
serve the health of your pet's
teeth.

Dr Basil Sands is a vet-
erinarian at the Central Ani-
mal Hospital. Questions or
comments should be directed
to features@100jamz.com or
potcake59@hotmail.com. Dr
Sands can also be contacted
at 325-1288


health


calenntar


The Cancer Society of the
Bahamas meets at 5.30pm
on the second Tuesday of
each month at their Head-
quarters at East Terrace,
Centreville. Call 323-4482
for more info.

REACH Resources &
Education for Autism and
related Challenges meets
from 7pm 9pm the second
Thursday of each month in
the cafeteria of the BEC
building, Blue Hill Road.

MS (Multiple Sclerosis)
Bahamas meets the third
Monday every month, 6pm
@ Doctors Hospital confer-
ence room.

The Bahamas Diabetic
Association meets every
third Saturday, 2.30pm
(except August and Decem-
ber) @ the Nursing School,
Grosvenor Close, Shirley
Street.

Doctors Hospital, the offi-
cial training centre of the


American Heart Associa-
tion offers CPR Classes cer-
tied by the AHA.
The course defines the
warning signs of respirato-
ry arrest and gives preven-
tion strategies to avoid sud-
den death syndrome and the
most common serious
injuries and choking that can
occur in adults, infants and
children.
CPR and First Aid classes
are offered every third Sat-
urday of the month from
9am-lpm. Contact a Doc-
tors Hospital Community
Training Representative at
302-4732 for more informa-
tion and learn to save a life
today.

Alcoholics Anonymous
meets @ 16 Rosetta St,
Monday-Friday and Sunday,
6pm-7pm & 8.30pm-9.30pm,
and on Saturday, 10am-
llam & 6pm-7pm &
8.30pm-9.30pm; @ Sacred
Heart Catholic Church,
Shirley St, on Friday at 6pm.


: "Copyrighted Material


-- Syndicated Content -


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FROM page 5C


your healing. Seek empathetic
guidance and professional
counseling," he suggests.
The "prominent" support,
said Mr Brennen, is simply
being there for that individual
physically and emotionally:
"Some people you can't leave
alone, you have to be there to
take them out for walks or ride.
But just take them out for
walks or rides. For some, just
calling their phone is enough.
"It's important that if you
can't be there physically, try to
make some sort of contact. The
bereaved person will tell you
that they're okay and doing all
right, but never take that as a
sign that they don't need you.
Sometimes they don't know
that they're not okay. They are
bluffing for themselves because
they feel like they are not sup-
posed to mourn. They feel as if
they are supposed to repress
what they're feeling."
When it comes to helping
children cope with death, it's
very good for parents or
guardians to let them express
their feelings in creative ways.
Children are usually less open


to talking about their pain.
"You don't have to sit down
with them and say, okay, let's
talk about it now. You don't'
have to say anything necessar-
ily. Sometimes you just have
to be there for the person,"
said the psychologist.

Someone

When someone close to us
dies, not only do we lose that
person on the physical level.
We also face the loss of poten-
tial, in what could have been,
especially in a young marriage,
or a parent losing a child in
their formative years. So the
pain can involve missing that
person's presence: Sleeping in a
bed that's half empty, craving
the smile they gave or longing
for their embrace.
More than that though, per-
sons are almost constantly
reminded of their absence,
especially at certain life mark-
ers like anniversaries or holi-
days. For this reason, Mr Bren-
nen suggests that support
should continue for at least a
year after the death. "Let all


the holidays celebrations,
anniversaries, pass for one
year," he told Tribune Health.
As a pastor and psychologist,
Brennen likes to visit with a
member on that death anniver-
sary every year for 3-5 years.
"I don't go knocking on their
door saying hello, you're hus-
band died last year, so I just
wanted to come and visit you.
"You should just go and vis-
it and I can tell you that for
every time, the person will
bring it up because it's on their
mind. And then from there you
can try and comfort them."
It doesn't take a degree in
psychology to be able to lend
support to a bereaved individ-
ual. Mr Brennen believes that
the simplest acts, maybe chip-
ping in to clean the house, can
make a big difference.
While making some memor-
ial to that individual is healthy,
leaving their room as it is, may
not be a healthy decision. Cas-
es where the room is never
changed, can be a sign of
denial, said the psychologist.
"If you want to have a
memorial of some kind


whether it's a picture, naming a
tree after them, but this tradi-
tion that something must
remain a certain way because"
that's the sheet he slept on last,
is a sign of repression. Leaving
things the way they are because
you are afraid to change it hints
that you haven't accepted the
finality of the death."

Decisions

Making major life decisips"
too quickly, using alcohol or
drugs to numb the pain, deny-
ing your feelings, even expecSf
ing that everyday will be better
is not an effective way to cdpe
with grief, the psychologist riot
ed. People should accept that
there will be ups and downs. ,
"Healing is not going to jusi
happen smoothly. It's a process
where you may accept the
death then the next day you're
back in denial. You might"ba
experiencing anger, resent
ment, denial all at once. Yob
have to realise that there will
be some good days and there
will be some bad days," he t6ld
Tribune Health.,


FROM page 1C


With a population of about one million,
some 90 per cent of Dubai's workforce are
foreign nationals. Many of the Muslim
women of Dubai, said Mrs Gibson, do not
work outside of the home, and with a fast
growing economy, based in'large part on
tourism, the government and private sector
have had to look outside the country's bor-
ders to bring in workers, both at the pro-
fessional and non-professional level.

Force

"A lot of the work force is made up of
people from all around the world and
women are going there by the 'drey load'.
Their immigration policy is such that they
are very good about granting work per-
mits for people who want to work for a
few years or even for a life time," she said.
Mrs Gibson will be the. first Bahamian
employee of Kerzner International to work
in Dubai.
While the opportunity to work in a exot-
ic location, especially when accompanied
by a loved one, is very exciting, initial con-
cerns about terrorism and strict Muslim
laws would likely impact whether a person
was willing to take on the.opportunity.


For Mrs Gibson however, educating her-
self about the community that she will call
home, has meant that she now has no con-
cerns and is eagerly looking forward to
this newest phase in both her career and
her life.
"Once you are in someone else's country
and respect their laws, everything should
be fine. I'll definitely have to adjust to the
work week it starts on Sunday and ends
on Thursday, with Friday and Saturday as
the weekend. Friday is the Muslim Sab-
bath that's when the Muslims have their
religious activities. There is also a certain
time of the year Ramadan a holy period
of fasting for Muslims and you can not be
seen in public chewing gum, drinking, eat-
ing, it is actually an insult to their religious
beliefs."

Concern

Another concern for anyone, especially
a woman, travelling to a Muslim country in
the middle east, is dress. Dubai women
typically are shrouded head to toe in black,
their faces veiled, often entirely, to shield
them from the gaze of any man other than
their husbands. According to an online


report however, since so many residents
and visitors to Dubai come from othet
parts of the Arab world, there is an almost
endless variety of national dress seen.

Article

An article on Copley News Service, said
that while Dubai is very much an Arab
state with Islam as its official religion, it is
not comparable with any other country ir
the Arabian Peninsula. It is by any mea-
sure a liberal society and ratd as among
the safest in the world.
Assured of her safety and ready forea
new challenge in a new year, Mrs Gibspi;
recognizes this as a wonderful opportunity
particularly as it is a a first for a Bahamian
and a Bahamian woman at that. She said,ii
symbolises what Kerzner Internationaf'iS
all about, and she encouraged oth-e'
Bahamians to take advantage of all the
opportunities available to them.
"I'm looking forward to the experience
a once in a lifetime experience some!
times you need to move from your comfort
zone and see what's out there."
Mrs Gibson officially starts work Januar
15.


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