Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00280
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: December 30, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00280
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text








FOR AIDS55

HIGH 79F
LOW 65F

MOSTLY
SUNNY


The


Tribune


Volume: 102 No.33


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005


PRICE 750


"-I


dile


am


Source alleges system in Former school site remains empty Dolphins'

place is malfunctioning, fate in the


replacement is

riddled with faults


* By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
GOVERNMENT has no
immediate answer to the NIA
radar dilemma, as the system in
place has been malfunctioning
for some time and the recently
purchased replacement system
is riddled-witi-faults, a-souree -
close to the problem revealed.
In an exclusive interview with
The Tribune, the source, who
wished to remain anonymous,
said the repeated breakdown of
the current system has forced
air traffic controllers to revert to
navigating local and interna-
tional flights without the use of
radar a process that one
senior official called "playing
chess in the dark".
The source claimed that the
radar failure at the weekend,
which stranded 2,000 travellers,
is now a normal occurrence at
the airport.
According to airport employ-
ees, a similar incident happened
not even a week earlier.
A new radar system was
recently purchased to replace
the ailing system for $1 million.
However, according to the
source, pilots and controllers
have not even been trained to
use it as yet, as it has already
been displaying a number of
problems and is still going
through a number of tests.
The source claimed that the
Ministry of Transport and Avi-
ation is aware of the airport's
radar dilemma, as it has been
going on "for quite some time".
The new radar system has its


advantages such as allowing
controllers to see weather sys-
tems better however target
acquisition is a problem, as con-
trollers have to enter a great
deal of data in order to generate
a landing target for an aircraft -
thus prolonging flight times.
According to an airport offi-
- cial, the present system;-which -
was installed in 1986 has already
outlived its life expectancy of
15 years, but was "worth it's
weight in gold" in terms of
effectiveness.
With the replacement system
so riddled with faults, buying
yet another one might be the
best option, but this could cost
anywhere between $10 million
and $25 million, observers say.
According to The Tribune's
source however, something
must be done, as the frequent
radar blackouts mean that con-
trollers have had to revert to a
more complicated method of
navigation called a VOR, or
VHF Omni-directional Radio
Range.
VOR broadcasts a VHF
radio signal, encoding both the
identity of the station and the
angle between it and the target
aircraft. This tells the pilot in
what direction he lies from the
VOR station, referred to as the
"radial".
By comparing two such mea-
surements on a chart, con-
trollers get a "fix" on an air-
craft, and can direct it safely to
the runway.
Within an hour, an aircraft
SEE page eight


S THE former site of the T G Glover Primary School, which remains empty and littered
with garbage. Parents say they are still waiting for the reconstruction of the school,
which had already been condemned before it was demolished during the filming of After the
Sunset in 2003.
SEE PAGE THREE
(Photo: FelipeMajor/Tribune staff)


Experts: improvement needed to

tackle shortages of skilled labour


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
ECONOMIC experts agree
that a better job must be done
in identifying the needs of the
Bahamian economy if short-
ages of expertise in some sec-
tors are to be reversed.
Some commentators believe
this shortage stretches across
the spectrum of the Bahamian
workforce, however president
of the Bahamas Chamber of


Commerce Tanya Wright dis-
agrees.
While recognising that some
shortages do exist, she said this
"begs the question whether or
not that lack means that
employers are unable to train
Bahamians because if you
don't have skills you can
acquire skills."
"To sit back and say that
there are none (no skilled
workers) is just a cop-out for
those employers who are look-


ing for an excuse to bring in
workers from another jurisdic-
tion to do a job that, in my
strong view, Bahamians either
are qualified to do or can easi-
ly obtain those qualifications,"
she said.
Raymond Winder, a partner
at the accounting firm of
Deloitte and Touche and Co-
Chair of the Bahamas Com-
mission on Trade, pointed out
SEE page eight


hands of

the courts
THE fate of 17 dolphins at
the Marine Life Oceanarium in
Gulfport, Louisiana that were
left homeless after hurricane
Katrina and are supposed to be
on their way to Atlantis is now
in the hands of the courts.
According to The Associated
Press, a court order is prevent-
ing Marine Animal Productions,
the company that owns the dol-
phins, from moving them.
MAP has asked the Harrison
County Chancery Court to
rescind an order that prohibits it
from selling its assets,,includ-
ing the dolphins. No hearing
date has been scheduled.
The Oceanarium's 17 surviv-
ing dolphins have been kept in
several temporary pools at the
Naval Construction Battalion
Centre and sites in Florida and
New Jersey since Hurricane
Katrina destroyed the facility
on August 29.
MAP president David Lion
said on Wednesday that
Atlantis personnel were on site
"to familiarise themselves with
the animals".
SEE page eight


inside

Crash victim
support group
planning branch
in Bimini
THE International Associa-
tion of Victims of Airplane Dis-
asters Worldwide are seeking
to establish a branch in the
Bahamas following the deaths
of 12 Biminites in the recent
crash of Chalk's Flight 101.
SEE PAGE FIVE

Claim over LNG
THE energy company AES is
only seeking to build an LNG
facility in the Bahamas so that it
can circumvent US laws and
restrictions, it was claimed last
night- a claim the company has
denied in the past.
SEE PAGE THREE


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PAGE FRIAY, ECEMBR 30,2005THE TIBUN


Tourist in agony as Shirley



Street slick causes accident


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
FOR the Grevers family from
Deerfield, Illinois, their Bahami-
an vacation hit an unexpected
bump in the road following a
motor-cycle accident yesterday.
The family was out sightseeing
.when 18-year-old Michael Gre-
:vers and his sister Nicole toppled
off the scooter they were riding.
The pair said they slipped on a
oil slick that covered a large sec-
tion of Shirley Street just in front
of The Tribune's office.
'The rest of the family riding on
two other bikes saw the fall and
were able to stop and jump off
their bikes.
Although Nicole escaped with
minor bruises to her legs, her
Brother was not as lucky.
When paramedics from Medi-
Vac arrived at the scene, a pre-
liminary examination suggested
that Michael, who lay in obvious
pain on the sidewalk, may have
suffered a dislocated knee.
Nicole told The Tribune that


her family had three days left in
their two-week Christmas vaca-
tion and were staying at the Sun-
Spree Hotel on Paradise Island.
She said that she, Michael and
their parents, Jan and Beatrice,
and brother Daniel had had a
wonderful time, particularly at
the Boxing Day Junkanoo
parade, which she described as
incredible.
Nicole took the whole accident
in her stride, saying that during
every vacation her family has tak-
en they have had to go to a doctor
or a hospital.
Her father, however, was a bit
more upset that such a large spill
was not cleaned up. He said a
passing motorist had told him
that, prior to his family's incident,
another cyclist had also fallen.
However, he said he doubted
that the incident would dampen
his family's visit.
Police officers were on hand to
divert traffic, call for an ambu-
lance and alert the hotel to collect
the bikes, while the family rushed
to the hospital.


* THE scene of the accident yesterday. Michael Grevers sits on the kerb after suffering a
suspected dislocated knee


N THIS Tropical Shipping trailer came loose from the truck towing it on Bay Street on
Wednesday night. The incident took place at around 8.15pm and the road was blocked
for about an hour. Traffic had to be diverted through Dunmore Lane and onto
Dowdeswell Street, from where it could rejoin Bay Street east of the blockage. The
matter was resolved when a forklift known as "Big Boy" arrived on the scene.


0 In brief

Restaurant
is held up
by lone
gunman

POLICE say that the Chinese,
Palace Express restaurant in the
Sea Grape Shopping Centre
was held up by a lone gunman
sometime after 8pm on,
Wednesday evening.
According to police press liair.
son officer Walter Evans, a tall,
dark male entered the estabk,
lishment and produced a hand-;
gun.
The gunman reportedly
pointed the weapon at an,
employee and demanded cash,.
According to Mr Evans, the.
robber was given an undeter-:
mined amount cash, but was nqt,
satisfied with what he was given.
The gunman reportedly took
the entire tray from the cash,
register before fleeing the scene-
on foot.

Drugs and
gun found
during raid,
police say

FREEPORT A 38-year-old
South Bahamia man was arrest-
ed after police allegedly seized,
of a pound of marijuana and a
semi-automatic pistol at an
apartment on Wednesday. *
According to police reports,
DEU officers executed a search
warrant at around 10.45am' on'
an apartment at Crown Cycle
Drive, South Bahamia.
During a search of the
premises, officers report dis-
covering a black Taurus semi-
automatic pistol containing sev-
en live rounds of .9mm ammu-
nition along with a plastic bag
containing one pound of mari-
juana.
As a result, police arrested
an occupant of the home.
The man is to be arraigned
in Magistrate's Court on drug
and firearm possession charges.


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Phone: 3236920 Fax! 325-8486


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005








THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005, PAGE 3


* I AL


0 In brief

Man is
charged
with armed
robbery

A 21-year-old Toote Shop
Corner man was arraigned in
Magistrate's Court yesterday on
five counts of armed robbery.
'The first count alleged that
dn Tuesday, December 27
Renaldo Braynen, being con-
cdrned with others and armed
with a handgun, robbed Larry
Riley of his $120 cell phone,
$100 watch and $205 hand-
chain.
"The other four counts alleged
thAt on the same day, Braynen
also robbed Winston Beneby of
$5' in cash, Hyly Moss of $20,
Jameel Johnson of a $150 hand-
chain and Albert Moss of $50.
Braynen, who appeared
before Chief Magistrate Roger
G6mez at Court One, Bank
Line, was not required to enter
a plea to the charges.
The case was adjourned to
March 16, 2006. Braynen was
remanded to Her Majesty's
Prison, Fox Hill until that time.

Accused of

stealing

$4,000 of

jewellery

A 20-YEAR-OLD Nassau
Village man accused of stealing
nearly $4,000 in jewellery was
arraigned before Chief Magis-
trate Gomez yesterday.
.It was alleged that on Novem-
ber 15, 2005 Donaque Forbes
stole $4,909 in jewelry from
Naomi Gaitor' Bart Road
home.
,Forbes pleaded not guilty to
the charge and was granted
$5,000 bail with two sureties.
The case was.adjourned to
March 16 2006.


Man admits
to stealing
mobile
phones
:^RICARDO Richardson, 29,
pleaded guilty to shop-break-
iqg and stealing over $6,000 in
N11 phones and phone cards.
'*Richardson was remanded to
prison until January 4, 2006
wen he will reappear for sen-
ncing.

Pair appear
in court on
cocaine
charge

KTWO Elizabeth Estates men
wre arraigned in Magistrate's
Court on a cocaine possession
g(arge.
- William Nairn, 24, and 26-
year-old Lavardo Kenyon both
pleaded not guilty to the charge.
/It was alleged that on Friday
December 23 the two were
found in possession of a quan-
t ty of cocaine which authori-
ties believed they intended o
supply to another.
,The prosecution alleged that
tl two were found in posses-
s(on of 13 foil wraps, together
containing one ounce of
cocaine.
Nairn was granted $7,500 bail.
Kenyon was denied bail
because he has three previous
convictions, two of which were
drug related.
The case was adjourned to
February 27, 2006.

Two Haitian
nationals
are held by
Immigration


TWO Haitian nationals have
been handed over to the Immi-
gration Department after being
spotted in the Crown Cycle Dri-
ve in South Bahamia.
DEU officials spotted the
men, who appeared to be very
nervous.
While checking their person-
al documents, the officers dis-
covered that the men had no
valid permits allowing them to
be in the Bahamas.
They were reportedly arrest-
ed and handed over to Immi-
gration Department.


LNG planned in Bahamas to



avoid US laws, say opponents


* By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE energy company AES
is only seeking to build an LNG
facility in the Bahamas so that it
can circumvent US laws and
restrictions, it was claimed last
night a claim the company
has denied in the past.
Sam Duncombe, president of
the local environmental watch
group ReEarth, stated that
although the Bahamas Envi-
ronment Science and Technol-
ogy Commission (BEST) gave
the proposal the green light,
none of the officials in BEST
are experts on LNG.
"The government still has-
n't done its homework in
regard to AES' LNG proposal
for Ocean Cay. That argument
of a deep water port is ridicu-
lous to me because we are
dredging at Ocean Cay to
accommodate the facility there.
"So if we are dredging why


doesn't AES follow Tractebel
and build a floating dock for
their LNG facility?" she asked.
Tractebel, along with AES
have been anxiously awaiting
approval for a regasification
facility to be built in the
Bahamas, that would receive
liquefied natural gas (LNG) via
ocean going tankers, and pump
it via pipeline to South Florida.
Tractebel has since uprooted
its interests in the Bahamas is
currently looking at building
a regasification facility 10 miles
off the coast of Florida.
"If this is such a brilliant
project, then why doesn't
Florida want it? Because they
want to build it in the
Bahamas to try and circum-
vent a barrage of laws and
restrictions that they would
face if the LNG project was
built in the US.
"They are here because they
only have to go through the
BEST Commission, and, I'm


sorry, but nobody in the BEST
Commission is an expert. AES
is the fourth dirtiest company
in the US, so why are we even
entertaining them?" she asked.
US Ambassador John Rood
recently broke his silence on
the LNG topic, stating that in
his opinion, the financial ben-
efits that would be derived
from the AES proposal would
"far outweigh" any possible
related risks from having the
terminal built in the Bahamas.
"Everything has a risk. The
cruise ships that we allow in
this harbour are a terrorist tar-
get; they are environmental
targets. A lot of things can
happen; one could sink we
can go on and on about all the
*potential dangers of a cruise
ship in your harbour.
"The people of the Bahamas
have looked at the economic
benefit, and said that without a
doubt the economic benefit far
outweighs those risks. And


they have made that decision
and that is why the cruise indus-
try is so strong here," he said.
AES has denied the claim it is


trying to avoid US laws, and
says its decision is based on the
lack of available land in South
Florida


In the meantime, he con-
firmed that the students are still
being taught at Albury Sayle.



3 5


PARENTS in the Far-
rington and Horseshoe Drive
areas say they are still wait-
ing for the reconstruction of
the T G Glover Primary
School, which was demol-
ished during the filming of
After the Sunset in 2003.
The site of the old school
remains vacant after the film
crew paid for its demolition
to create a construction site
set for the movie.
The school had already
been condemned and was
slated to be torn down.
The movie's publicist Cid
Swank told the media during
filming that permission was
granted by both the Ministry
of Education and the Min-
istry of Works and Utilities
to demolish the building and
to turn it into a movie set.
She explained that the
movie's script called for lead
actor Pierce Bronsan to vis-
it a construction site.
As they felt that'the
school fit their needs per-
fectly, the film donated the
cost of the demolition and
made a donation to the
school as well.
Following the demolition,
more than 400 displaced stu-,
dents had to be sent to the
Albury Sayle Primary
School, and many had to be
taught in trailers.
But meanwhile, the TG
Glover site remains empty
and littered with garbage.
Late last night, Education
Minister Alfred Sears told
The Tribune that he has
been advised by the Ministry
of Works that their engi-
neers are still doing their
final assessments of the facil-
ity.
Once the engineers have
completed their assessment,


the minister said he expects that
the bid for construction of a
new facility could go to tender
as early as January of next year.
Following the bidding
process, he said, construction
can begin. Mr Sears said that
the construction is expected to
take a while, as a new facility
will be quite large.,
Construction, he said could
take from 10 to 15 months.


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* GARBAGE lies in front of what used to be the old TG
Glover Primary School. Parents are concerned about why a new
school has not been built since being demolished for the movie
After The Sunset.
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)


I


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


I


I


MWW.GALLERIACINEMAS.COM I









PAGT4RFIDYTECMBRT0,200 TEIRIUN


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MA GISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Failing to grasp damage to country


SOME YEARS ago we heard an interesting
speech given to a group of Rotarians by Paul
O'Neil, at that time president and managing
director of the Atlantis resort.-
The gist of his talk was that no matter how
good Atlantis was, no matter how much mon-
ey the company spent on making the resort
the best in the world, if one of their guests had
a bad experience outside of their complex, it
could destroy all of their efforts. In other words
unless and until every Bahamian realised that
it was important that each and every one of
them made a contribution to this country's
number one industry -- if only with a pleasant
smile then all Atlantis' efforts and that of the
island's other resorts would have been in vain.
This is a concept that even members of gov-
ernment have failed to grasp.
When Nassau International Airport's radar
eventually collapsed early Monday morning,
bringing all movement at the airport to a stand-
still and stranding thousands of passengers on
both sides of the Gulf Stream, no government
official could be found for either advice or
information.
No wonder airline managers are angry and
demand answers. They are responsible for their
passengers. However, over the weekend they
could give passengers neither information on
what was happening nor advice on whether
they should remain at the airport or go back to
their hotels. Passengers' loudest complaint was
that they could get no information. And so
airline staff were being bombarded for news
that they did not have.
Where was the Airport Authority? Trans-
port Minister Glenys Hanna Martin had a sud-
den death in her family on Christmas day and
was understandably out of circulation, but sure-
ly this did not cripple her whole department.
Airline managers realise that unhappy cus-
tomers mean loss of future business for their
airlines. But their hands were tied.
The reputation of the Bahamas was at stake
as a crescendo of angry voices vowed they
would never return to such a rinky-dink, third
world town again. And they would certainly
pass the word on to their friends.
Prime Minister Christie was at junkanoo
during the crisis. As a former Valley Boy, this
festive activity is close to his heart. We were
told that the radar was being repaired, and
that Mr Christie was being kept informed.
What more could he do?
It is probably a safe guess that he would
have been the first to have been informed of


I -" 0eM -OR-T-- WEE


the airport's problems. He should have realised
the chaos that would have followed and dele-
gated someone with authority to organise assis-
tance to visitors who were stranded. Hoteliers
tell us that they had no idea what was hap-
pening until it was too late. As many of their
guests had not arrived because of the airport
fiasco, they had spare rooms that could have
been made available at bargain prices if
only someone had contacted them.
Meantime the Bahamas' reputation as the
region's number one resort was haemorrhaging.
Of course, we all know how Rome burned,
while Nero fiddled. This country's reputation,
like Rome, was in flames.
Anyone who has been to the airport knows
how unsatisfactory the toilet facilities are at
NIA at the best of times. One can only imagine
what they were like over the weekend with
hundreds of people milling around.
Before the day was out, the one small
restaurant had run out of food and drink.
Meanwhile managers at Atlantis resort
knew that the country's reputation was hanging
in the balance, which meant that their whole
investment was in jeopardy. What could they
do to help? When told of the situation, George
Markantonis, who has replaced Paul O'Neil
as president and managing director of Atlantis,
immediately mobilised his staff.
The hotel's room sefviceteam made 500 fifif-
ger sandwiches, which, with two cases of fresh
oranges, 100 pints of ice cream' and 20 caisesf '
water and sodas were loaded into a Ministry of
Tourism representative's vehicle and an
Atlantis vehicle and driven to the airport lat
1.45 am Tuesday. Atlantis also offered 58
rooms for one night free of charge, which
accommodated 200 guests. One hundred pas-
sengers opted to stay at the airport because
luggage was in such confusion that they were
afraid of losing theirs.
This country, if it could get its priorities
right, would realise that unless we all chip in to
protect our tourist business, it could disappear
overnight. It should give the Minister of
Tourism nightmares to realise how many visi-
tors have been lost many forever because
of faulty radar, and a bad weekend experience
that could have been turned in our favour with
the right management skills.
Unfortunately, knowing how politicians
think, we will wager that at the moment,
instead of considering the country, many of
them are now trying to figure out how they
can cover their own political hides.


EDITOR, The Tribune
It appears international pres-
sure is mounting against
Venezuela's PetroCaribe initia-
tive.
At a press conference on
Regional Outlook on Decem-
ber 7, 2005, Mr. Augustin
Carstens, Deputy Managing
Director of the International
Monetary Fund said: "...But
our recommendation would be
to look and analyze seriously
this option and weigh it for the
impact on debt, on social expen-
ditures, and on the involvement
of the government in some sec-
tors where they might not be
involved today."
(http://www.imf.org/extemal/np/
tr/2005/tr051207.htm)
On Saturday, December 17,
2005 The Miami Herald ran a
story under the headline:
Caribbean Community Criti-
cizes Oil Deal.
The brief article quotes
CARICOM Secretary-Gener-
al, His Excellency Edwin Car-
rington as saying "...that some
ministers didn't understand the
details before signing the agree-
ment in September." See this
link for the full story:
http://www.miami.com/mld/mia'
miherald/news/world/americ-
as/13429363.htm
It came as a surprise that
CARICOM would express
these views publicly, particular-
ly as they confirm what we have
been saying, so it prompted a
call to Mr Carrington.
HE Carrington was very cor-
dial in a telephone interview
where he indicated that on
December 13 the press was
invited to view the new CARI-
, X.CQM building and epjpy an
informed discussion at the end of
tlte. tour ..... .
i' '.Whilehe wotld riot go into
detail on his discussion with the
press he advised us that "Petro-
Caribe brings benefits to coun-
tries by delaying payment for
purchases of crude oil." How-
ever, he did point out that, "on
the other side of the equation is
the build up of debt -for the par-
ticipating countries."
Regarding the position of
Trinidad and Tobago Mr. Car-
rington added that: "As a
region, there was not enough
time to review the arrangement
on a regional basis to discuss
implications for Trinidad and
Tobago."
"Of course," the CARICOM
head continued, "Ministers
came to sign to meet their
national objectives."
The headline from the
Trinidad & Tobago Express


(http://www.trinidadexpress.co
m/index.pl/article?id=123231526
) screamed "Carrington: Cari-
com far too quick to join
Chavez oil scheme" and the sto-
ry is very much as printed in
The Miami Herald.
Leslie Miller, Minister of
Trade and Industry, has been
very quiet on this matter in
recent weeks. Is it too early to
think that common sense has
now prevailed in the Bahamas'
haste to sign on to the Petro-
Caribe agreement with
Venezuela?
Of course, Mr. Miller has
been shouting from the rooftops
that the price of gas would
reduce considerably once the
deal with Venezuela was
finalised.


However, Jamaica was t'he
first country in the region to
sign and their gas has actually
increased in price, according, t
a source in Kingston.
So in the final, we prefer
to think that Mr Carringtpn
and his CARICOM staff
have now had an opportunity
to review the details of .the
PetroCaribe agreement a49
the potential debt th4t
could accrue to the member
countries for ,an expendable
product and they are nowv
advising the ministers of the Pi-
falls.
In any event, the price of oil
has dropped considerably with-
out implementing the deal w#h
Venezuela, proving that the
market has worked yet. ag n
- without government inter-
ference. .
THE NASSAU NSTTPE
Nassau
December 26 2005


Discrimination against

the ordinary shopper

EDITOR, The Tribune who enjoyed, thiis: ndtai.
they could -,
I WROTE and you pub- It is not only thsiie a
lished my protest to a Bay that discriminates but also we
Street merchant discriminat- can list banks, furniture
ing interesting this story stores, appliance 'stbore d'
was picked up by The Nassau restaurants/night clubs who
Guardian who ran a story and design their promotionsin
photographs of one of the this discriminatory mannerp.-,,
merchant's shop fronts which When did my dollar sud-,
seems to have rammed home denly become tainted and'
the disquiet amongst the buy- unacceptable?
ing public of this.practice. This writer hopes that nie,
The response by the mer- chants/business people,, are
chant in an, ad in The Nassau warned thelpower of the.yrit-
Guardian rubs salt into the ten word and th,-press, stiW
wound as clearly the owners lives.,
are refusing to take the blame By the way...Merry Christ-
and blame the marketing per- mas to all why are we so}
son for the copy they wrote, ashamed to say this? Isn't Th q
Sorry merchant, the owners Bahamas still a Christian,
had to have approved the believing people? We cele-
copy and the terms of the dis- brate Christ's birth not the
count. anniversary of the introduc-,;
It was obvious what this tion of a credit card or some-,,
merchant was trying to do thing material. ,
the civil service had $700
extra money to spend and H HUMES
they wanted to attract as high Nassau ,;
a percentage of the 26,000 December 20 2005

Praise for interview


EDITOR, The Tribune
THIS is my first time writ-
ing to you and after watch-
ing the programme with the
Governor General I had to
write.
I write to say congratula-
tions to Governor General
Ivy Dumont and the gentle-
men who hosted the pro-
gramme, Mr Mario Newry.
The programme I watched
on television Friday past was


an excellent interview and
just had to write to say keel,
up the good work.
As I end I hope that more
of these programme will b4
on television to encourage the
younger generation who have
to walk in the footsteps like
Governor General Ivy.
Dumont and others. ,ri
SUSAN MORTENSEN j
Nassau
December 17 2005


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005








T T UR DE R, 5A


0 In brief


Five men

charged

with drug

offences

Five men were arraigned sep-
arately in Freeport Magistrate's
Court on charges of possessing
dangerous drugs.
Michael Pratt, 19, of Gar-
den Villas, pleaded guilty to
possessing 2.5 ounces of mari-
juana on December 24 with
'the intent to supply to anoth-
r.
He was fined $5,000. Failure
'to pay will result in a one-year
.prison sentence.
'Keith Ricardo Fowler, 25, of
Winchester Circle, pleaded not
'guilty to the charge of possess-
-ing four grams of marijuana at
Club Rock 'N Roll on Decem-
'ber 24.
.' He was granted $5,000 bail
Wtith one surety and the mat-
ter was adjourned to May 4,
2006.
Patrick Moss, 18, of 15 East
Ihdianman Road, Nevin
'Andrew Harding, 25, of Spin-
'-nfey Road, and Maxwell Jose
Hudson, 19, of Winchester Cir-
lre, all pleaded not guilty to pos-
session of 28 grams of marijua-
na with the intent to supply on
-December 23.
The men were each granted
$5,000 bail with one surety and
Sthe matter was adjourned to
May 4, 2006.

Woman is

airlifted

after car

accident

A GRAND Bahama woman
who sustained serious injuries
in a traffic accident early on
Tuesday morning was airlifted
to the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital in New Providence.
Ruth Missick, 36, of Light-
bourne Apartments, was walk-
ing along the main road' in Sea-
grape, Eight Mile Rock, around'
12am when she was struck by a
1999 green Chevy Malibu,
which, according to police, was
driven by Gerard Major of
Ringwood Drive.
Missick was taken to Rand
Memorial Hospital, where she
was treated and stabilised
before being airlifted to Nas-
sau.
Her condition was not known
up to press time.


Abraham's
Bay looks

forward to

New Year

THE New Year's Day junior
Junkanoo parade in Abra-
ham's Bay, Mayaguana, looks
like being one of the two great
events of the year on the
island.
Between 50 and 100 children
are expected to turn out for the
occasion, and costumes are
Aikely to be better than ever
,before.
STeacher Muriel Charlton
rom Nassau has spent Christ-
mas min Mayaguana supervising
preparations for the parade,
vhich will start out from Abra-
ham's Bay High School and
proceedd through the streets
tb'efore forming a circle.
; Ms Charlton was assigned to
,nsuring the island's parade
_oes smoothly and has been
offering suggestions on how to
mtake the best of the Bahamas'
annual festival.
:'An islander told The Tri-
bune that about 75 per cent of
on the island for the festive
season.
S"Apart from the annual
-homecoming, the junior
Junkanoo is the biggest thing
,that happens here," she said.


Credit card
found in

The Tribune
car park

A PLATINUM credit card
'(GM) has been found in The
Tribune's car park in Shirley
Street. The owner can contact
the editorial department at 322-
1986.


T 1 iv to l t


Barto Dean


Bethany Sherman


Jervis Stuart Jr Niesha Fox


Carolyn Burke


Sabre'a Dean


Don Smith


Sabrena Dean


Jaquline Stuart


Sophia Sherman


Crash victim support group




planning branch in Bimini


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
FREEPORT The Interna-
tional Association of Victims
of Airplane Disasters World-
wide are seeking to establish a
branch in the Bahamas follow-
ing the deaths of 12 Biminites
in the recent crash of Chalk's
Flight 101.
Representatives of the asso-
ciation met with grieving fam-
ilies in Bimini on Wednesday
to discuss plans of starting an
association on the island.
Julia Bowser, association


director of strategic planning,
said the association offers sup-
port, advice and services to the
families of airplane victims to
help them cope with the
tragedy.
Ms Bowser said the Chalk's
disaster was a devastating situ-
ation because the families and
the entire community of Bimi-
ni were impacted by the loss
of so many people at one time.
"We help countries and fam-
ilies that are victims of airplane
disasters anywhere in the
world. And the reason for our
visit here is to help the families
get organised so they can


understand what their rights
are, and what our purpose is
in establishing international
associations," she said.

Worldwide

The association, which is
based in Chicago, is a non-prof-
it organisation with associations
in countries around the world.
Ms Bowser, a representative
of the association in Pennsyl-
vania, said associations were
recently established this year
in Peru and Indonesia follow-
ing airplane disasters in those


countries on August 23 and
September 5 respectively.
She said they are also in the
process of starting an associa-
tion in Nigeria, where there
were recently two airplane dis-
asters.
Ms Bowser stated that fami-
lies of victims are. usually con-
fused while in mourning and
do not know what their rights
are following such a disaster.
"In many cases, families are
left helpless when the bread-
winner dies. And we provide
information of what their rights
are and to how they can get
assistance. We can also assist


by providing a list of people
that can provide them assis-
tance if they choose to take
legal action," she said.
In addition to offering sup-
port to victims, Ms Bowser said
the association's mission is to
change international standards
of aviation. She said that there
are too many airplane disas-
ters occurring because inter-
national standards are too low.
The association, is support-
ed by private donations from
foundations and is made up of
volunteers of members, who
are families of victims of air-
plane disasters.


From across the Bahamas they came...


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
BIMINI People from
near, far and all walks of life
travelled to Bimini to offer
their condolences and support
to the grief-stricken families
and bereaved residents as they
mourned the loss of 12 fellow
Biminites in last week's tragic
plane crash.
Dignitaries from the United
States including US Con-
gressman Kendrick Meek and
Miami Mayor Raul Martinez -
joined many ordinary citizens
from throughout the Bahamas
at the memorial service held
on Wednesday at Bayfront
Park in Alice Town.
A cadre of religious minis-
ters and clergymen from
Grand Bahama and from New
Providence were also atten-
dance, including Baptist Bish-
op Neil Ellis and Anglican
Archbishop Drexel Gomez.
During the four-hour ser-
vice, tributes were paid to the
20 victims of the ill-fated
Chalk's flight 101 that crashed
on December 19 off Miami.
Bishop Ellis, who is a native
of Bimini, told the victims'
families that the entire nation
shares their pain.
"I want to ask the people
of Bimini to take a look
around and see how many
people from across the waters
made some sacrifices coming


... to pay their respects

to those who died in the

Chalk's plane crash


here and to be with you.
"I want say to my people
here in Bimini you can sur-
vive this. You must survive
this," he said.
Former Bimini MP George
Weech said the incident was a
senseless, unexpected tragedy
- one that Biminites will not
forget.
"Over the past days, we in
Bimini have been forced to
search the innermost parts of
our hearts to find answers to
the burning questions sur-
rounding the fatal crash of
Chalk's Flight 101," he said.
Tasha Bullard-Rolle,
Bimini's chief councillor, paid
tribute to 12 victims: Jaquline
Stuart, 39, and her 18-year-
old daughter Niesha Fox; Bar-
to Dean, 32, his 31-year-old
wife Sabrena and their four
month old infant Sabre'a;
Sophia Sherman, 38, and her
16 month-old infant Bethany
Sherman; Donald Smith, 65,
and his 15-month old grand-
son Jervis Stuart; Genevieve
Ellis, 64; Salomi Rolle, 57; and
Carolyn Burke,;60.


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Laurie Smith says she will
miss her husband Don and
grandson.
"We were married for 44
years and he was a wonderful
person. He was a gem, she said.
Smith, who has been
described as an ambassador for
Bimini, was a well-known and
respected resident of the com-
munity.
Derek Saunders, the broth-
er-in-law of Carolyn Burke, said
Mrs Burke fell in love with
Bimini during a visit from North
Carolina five years ago.
Mr Saunders and Mrs Burke
were the operators of the Bimi-




FRIDAY,
DECEMBER 30
6:30 Bahamas @ Sunrise- live
7:30 Bugs Bunny Looney Xmas
8:00 Batman Oliday Night
8:30 Christmas Experience In
Bethlehem
9:00 Nestor The Long Eared
Donkey
9:30 Leprechaun's Xmas Gold
10:00 The Night The Animals
Talked
10:30 The Little Crooked
Christmas Tree
11:00 Rudolph The Red Nose
Reindeer
Noon ZNS News Update live
12:03 Car. Today News Update
12:05 Santa & The Magician
12:30 Glofriends Save Christmas
1:00 The Stingiest Man In Town
2:00 The Christmas Toy
3:00 Matinee: Snowbound
4:30 Ministry of Education:
Festival of Carols 2005
4:58 ZNS News Update
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
8:00 Gary's Gift III
9:00 Movie: My Brother's Wife
10:45 News Night 13
11:15 The Bahamas Tonight
11:45 Movie: Sleepless In Seattle
1:00 Community Pg./1540AM
SAT. DEC., 31
6:30 Community Page
9:00 Bahamas @ Sunrise
10:00 A Mirthworm Masquerade
10:30 Tukki & His Search For A
Merry Christmas
11:00 Benji's Very Own Special
Christmas
11:30 Tiny Toons Adv. Xmas
NOE0 N-V13rsre h
rih t ak as int
programme hang0s


ni Art Centre, where he made
pottery and stained glass.
"She was the backbone for
the centre and now it is going to
be real tough without her. She
was a walking angel and she did
so much for the community and
the kids on the island," he said.
Cicely Stuart lost her father
Don Smith, her 15 month-old
son, her best friend and two
godchildren in the crash.
"My husband, Jervis, and
my son were very close.
Although 15 months might be
a short time with my son, I
can truly say that I have a lot
of memories to hold on to.
She said that the support giv-
en to her family has been
tremendous.
Jervis Stuart said: "I lost my
youngest child and son and I am
trying to deal with it as the days
go by. I will miss him being with
me everyday. I dreamed that this
was all a dream but when I woke
up I realised that I was it was
not," he said.


Representatives of the Chica-
go-based International Associ-
ation of Families of Victims of
Airplane Disasters Worldwide
were in Bimini and met with
the families to offer support and
explore the possibly of forming
a local organisation.








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Salomi Rolle


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE FRDAYDECEMER 3, 205LTHEAL'NEWS-


Ophthalmologists question



expertise of Cuban doctors


NEW concerns were raised
last night over Cuba's offer to
provide eye care to Bahamians,
with local doctors questioning
the standard of expertise on
offer.
Bahamian ophthalmologists
claim that no-one from the
Bahamas government has been
to Cuba to check the standard
of care being given.
Nor have they taken into
account whether patients receiv-
ing cataract operations really
need them, or have been exam-
ined for possible associated
problems.


Earlier this month, Health
Minister Dr Marcus Bethel said
the offer was not designed to
take business away from local
eye doctors, but make free
treatment available for those
with surgically correctable eye
disorders.
However, one Bahamian eye
doctor asked what would hap-
pen if Cuban lawyers were
brought into Nassau to offer
free legal advice or if Cuban
taxi-drivers were brought in to
take over from Bahamian cab-
bies.
"There are only about six


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Bahamian ophthalmologists,
so they represent only six
votes. Imagine what the reac-
tion would be if the govern-
ment was targeting a political-
ly more powerful group," he
said.
Local doctors' fears centre
not s6 much on loss of busi-
ness as possible sub-standard
care for Bahamian patients.
One who examined case notes
of patients lined up for
cataract operations in Cuba
said 50 per cent of them would
not benefit from such surgery.
"This begs the question as
to whether these Cuban doc-
tors are properly trained," he
said, as they had overlooked
co-existent diseases.
The doctor cited a Fortune
magazine article which alleged
that Dr Fidel Castro "farmed
out" Cuban doctors around
the world to net a billion dol-
lars a year. It was a means of
getting US currency.
And he asked why the
Bahamas was making use of
this service when there was no
significant waiting list.
The government, he said,
had chosen ophthalmologists
"because there are only six of
us" but would not bring in
Cuban dentists because 200
votes would be at stake.
"We have said we are will-
ing to do the work because
these guys (Cuban doctors)
don't speak English," he said.
"That presents potentially real
problems. Also, what happens
about post-operative care?
The last doctor to touch a
patient carries the blame."
The doctor asked what
would happen if Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie began out-
sourcing legal conveyancing
work to India.
"It would be much cheaper
and ten times quicker, but he
has chosen us because there
is no comeback."
He added: "We are pre-
pared to do these cases for
nothing. Why send 300 peo-
ple down to Cuba? It's going
to be a mess. Whatever the


l "Copyrighted Material
ASyndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


_______* as
4b al-ep 49P a -
:r= uFAIuft Wo"0


need for surgery, you want to
ensure proper treatment and
standard of care. How do you
know what is going on down
there?"
He said Bahamian doctors
had achieved a certain level
of academic success, but
Cuban doctors were largely
unable to speak English itself
a major problem in any med-
ical relationship.
"None of these guys could
get a licence to practise in the
UK, Canada or the US," he
added, and lack of language


skills disqualified them under
the Medical Act.
The Bahamas Medical
Association has written to the
Ministry of Health expressing
doctors' concerns, he said.
Last week, Cuba's ambas-
sador in Nassau, Felix Wilson,
urged Bahamians to make use
of his country's medical ser-
vices.
He said his homeland had
more doctors per capita than
any other country, and was
able to offer medical services
much cheaper than elsewhere.


o In brief

Rum Cay
celebrates
'best ever'
Junkanoo
RUM CAY had its best-eveA,
Junkanoo parade this year,
thanks in part to Canadian,
dance teacher Michelle Higginm
She spent a lot of time before,
Christmas teaching island chi)W
dren a few new steps. Ant
island women joined in to make
fantastic costumes.
"All round it was a spectacu5
lar event," said Delores Wilsopy
who runs Kaye's Bar in King
Street. "Every child on th-
island took part and some everq
came back in from Nassau t9
join in. I think it was probably
the best Junkanoo we ever had'
Two large yachts moored o2
shore also provided Mrs Wil
son with plenty of Christma4
business.,;,
"We sometimes close 9on
Christmas Day, but there'was.
high demand for food and
drinks and we have to take, the,
business while it's there' s,s
said.


















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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005


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THE TRIBUNEi







FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005, PAGE 7


0 In brief

Ragged
Island pulls
out stops for
Christmas

TINY Ragged Island may
consider itself the Cinderella
isle'of the Bahamas, but resi-
defits know how to put their
troubles behind them at Christ-
mat time.
On Boxing Day, islanders
threw a big party at Sheila's
Fishermen's Lodge in Duncan
Town. And all agreed it was an
occasion to remember.
'"We had a big feast and a big
dance," said one islander. "You
naihe it and we had it."
T'he menu was impressive by
any standards. Ham, turkey,
duck, lobster...all featured
am ng the festive fare.
Although water troubles have
bedevilled the island in the past,
drink was no problem over the
holiday. "From Kalik to rum,
we had the lot," said the
islander.

rj1


S..


S "Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Availablefrom Commercial News Providers"







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onllo. 40q
-
WOD 4W Q1W
-.moe 4
IN ~


RG office staff




work to rule


I A Un punt

!mr^ IN tp I Cas I



"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content


after leak


* By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
EMPLOYEES of the Reg-
istrar General's office, who
were displaced on We.dnesday
after water came pouring
through the roof, will not
report to work today.
Yesterday, the workers
turned up at the office's 50
Shirley Street location, where
they waited for about two
hours for word from their
superiors.
A Bahamas Public Service
Union (BPSU) representatives
met with Registrar General
Shane Miller in the morning,
and the workers were
informed that it was decided
that for Thursday, the office
would operate on a "work to
rule" basis.
Therefore, they worked on
slim shifts and rotation sched-
ules, but are not due to report
to work at all today.

Restrictions

Members of the public who
only wanted to pick up their
documents were allowed to do
so, but those seeking any other
form of help had a difficult
situation on their hands on
Thursday morning.
One woman said she flew in
for the day from Andros just to
pick up her son's birth certifi-
cate.
The mother said she found it
difficult to understand why
such a vital government ser-
vice should be allowed to
remain handicapped.
The Registrar General's
office is the country's third
largest revenue generator.


M ONE of the bathrooms in the Registrar General's office


Workers did their best to
accommodate everyone who
was in need of their services -
including a tourist couple who
wanted to see their dream of
being married in the Bahamas
realised.
BPSU assistant secretary
general Frederick Hamilton
told The Tribune on Thursday
afternoon that at least some
services would continue to be


available to the public, and that
operations are expected to be
back to normal on Tuesday,
January 3.
According to a press release
from the Ministry of Financial
Services and Investments,
which is the ministry respon-
sible for the RG's office, the
decision has been made to,,.
relocate the office to the Beau-.
moit, House, ,


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THF TRIBUNE


LOCAL NEWS


I.-.,
I-


ON THE SPOT FINANCING WITH

COMMONWEALTH BANK


1 - -- -------


Available from Commercial News Providers"









PAGE FRIAY, ECEMBR 30,2005THE TIBUN


Experts: improvement needed to





tackle shortages of skilled labour


FROM page one

that in a country the size of the
Bahamas, an interesting situation
can develop with regard to skilled
labour.
"You can find a situation where
you have an abundance of labour
at one level and a real shortage in
another. In the financial services
sector there is a shortage of
skilled workers world-wide and
now the Bahamas finds itself hav-
ing qualified new entrants in the
financial services sector, in the
accounting area in particular, and
these individuals find themselves
being exposed to recruiters in the
United States, Canada and the
UK.
"Now because we have a num-


ber of Bahamians who find it
financially more attractive to
work in the US and Canada that
creates a shortage in certain areas.
Now the financial services sector
finds itself having to go and
recruit from different parts of the
world where the level of com-
pensation may not be commen-
surate with the level of US, Cana-
da and other offshore sectors,"
Mr Winder told The Tribune yes-
terday.
He said that the same situation
presents itself in the tourism
industry.
"I was talking to a major
employer and he asked me where
are the qualified Bahamians in
the professional tourism sector
and he meant qualified accoun-
tants and auditors because we


haven't generated a surplus of
those so that the various hotels
coming on stream who find it very
difficult to find individuals
with that specialty," Mr Winder
said.
In addition, he said that an
interesting dilemma presents itself
when one looks at the education-
al system.
"While there are major prob-
lems at the lower level, the
Bahamas has been able to pro-
duce what I call a volume of good
employees in the financial ser-
vices sector. Last year I looked
at the number of individuals who
applied to this firm (Deloitte and
Touche) and it was amazing the
increase in the number of indi-
viduals who made higher than a
3.00 average. But five years ago
you had to struggle to find
Bahaniians graduating from
schools in Canada and the US
with higher than a 3.00 average,"
Mr Winder said.
When it 'comes to the financ-
ing of training in the Bahamian
workforce it is argued that
employers must make more
investment in the work force.
Ms Wright said that Bahamian
employers need to realise' that
they have a stake in the skill lev-
el. of the workforce and must
invest in it.
"If they do not have the staff
complement that have the skills
that they need, they need to
recognise that some resources
need to be deployed into train-
ing those people because people
who go away to acquire certain
skills basically do it on their own
time.
"I think it is unfair for the busi-
ness owners to just sit back and
just wait for the skills to be placed
on the auction block for them to
purchase," Ms Wright said.
The Chamber of Commerce
president said that while there has
been an increase in employers
offering training for their employ-
ees recently, there are still a num-
ber of employers, particularly
those Wo h iave imt'rfiatibnial


presence, who still do not have
the confidence in Bahamian
skills.
"I think that they need to
appreciate that confidence comes
with experience and a lot of times
they are not prepared to build
that confidence from within. They
have a comfort level with those
people they may identify as their
own whether based on origin
or familiarity of another work
experience but employers who
are given the opportunity to
invest or do business in the
Bahamas and whose businesses
flourish in the Bahamas, need to
recognize a further investment
needs to be placed in the Bahami-
an workforce in order to have
confidence in the abilities of pro-
fessional Bahamian workers," Ms
Wright said.
She pointed out that there are
many young people who are leav-
ing college every year on their
own money, investing in them-
selves.
"These persons should be given
the same opportunities that they
would be given in a sister organi-
zation outside of the Bahamas,"
Ms Wright said.
Mr Winder said that when he
examines his own industry there
has been a stepping up on training
and with the shortage of financial
service professional world wide
they are discovering that there is
a need to invest more.
However, he said that it is a
frustrating point for employers
who spend money developing
people and these employees do
not spend enough time in their
position for the company to reap
the benefit of their investment.
"In the other areas like the car-
pentry and the electricians you
have the same situation. You have
individuals who work with
employers but after the individual
has had a year or two years expe-
rience they can go to the market
place they can demand a consid-
erable salary even though they do
not have the strong level of exper-
tise," Mr Winder said.


Dolphins' fate in the


hands of the courts

FROM page one

The dolphins' fate is at the centre of a lawsuit between
the two owners of MAP, Donald Jacobs and Dr Moby
Solangi, former president of Marine Life.
The suit involves a dispute over the percentage of
Solangi's stock ownership and the animals' future.
Rusty Walker, a spokesman for a local group called'
Save Our Dolphins, claimed Lion is trying to move the
dolphins to the Bahamas with specialised marine care.,
because some are sick with Morbillivirus.
Walker said the virus has never appeared in the
Atlantic Ocean and the arrival of Gulfport's dolphins to
the Bahamas could introduce the disease.
"Once they are taken out of the country we're not
sure the courts would have any jurisdiction," Walker
said. "The current management at MAP has no appar-
ent experience in marine mammal care and yet they-
seem to be making animal-care decisions."
Thirteen of the dolphins were originally supposed
to go to the Dolphin Research Centre in the Florida
Keys until the Gulfport Oceanarium was rebuilt, said_
Kimberly Perron, spokeswoman for the DRC.


Radar dilemma claim

FROM page one

controller can expect to direct anywhere between 70 to-
80 planes. As a result, with only 20 persons on during
each shift, these controllers are required to work conf-
secutively for only two hours, as the possibility of mis-
judging flight paths or speed due to worker fatigue or
stress heightens under the circumstances.
Although still quite safe, and within international
standards, the VOR system does not allow for flights to
be handled as expeditiously as a fully functional radar
system would.
As a result, a number of pilots, who prefer not to
wait on the VOR system, have either diverted their
course, or simply not flown to avoid extended waits on
the runway.
"We need to ensure that this sort of thing doesn't hap-
pen again, by making sure that we have a back-up sys-
tem in place that can reinforce that if this radar system
goes out again, we can have a system in place," the
source said, adding that parallel runways are also dras-
tically needed at-NIA, as they allow for more free
movement and aid increasing the efficiency of land-
ings and take-offs.
"Procedurally, controllers have to restrict the move-
ment of airplanes. You just can't have one airplane
crossing another aircraft's flight paths they're going
to hit.
"If you go into Miami centre you could see two air-
planes, one landing on the left and one on the right. In
and out, all day, no problems. But when you have the
flight paths of those airplanes crossing one another,
you have to restrict it, otherwise someone is going to get
killed."
NIA handles 190,000 aircraft each year.


ASSEMBLIES OF GOD IN THE BAHAMAS


WARWICK STREET, SHIRLEA
ANNOUNCES THE FIRST CYCLE OF
JANUARY 9TH MARCH 17TH, 2006


CLASSES


MONDAY

ACTS....................................................................... BRO. ERIC BROW N

TUESDAY

MINOR PROPHETS................................................ REV. NEIL HAMILTON

THURSDAY

THEOLOGY II....................................................REV. VERNON MOSES

CLASSES HELD 7:00p.m. 10:00p.m.
Registration Begins January 3rd, 5th, 6th, 2006 2.pm 4p.m.
January 9th at 6p.m.

Classes begin January 9th, 2006 at 7p.m.

$20.00 Registration, $30 Late Registration (After Jan. 13th, 2006)
$60.00 Tuition Per Course (Plus Price of Texts)
ALL CHARGES ARE ON A CASH BASIS



APPLICATION FORMS ARE AVAILABLE AT THE NATIONAL OFFICE
& FROM PASTORS OF THE ASSEMBLIES OF GOD CHURCHES FOR
FURTHER INFORMATION
TELEPHONE: 393-3453 or 393-3141 FAX 394-6361

THIS SCHOOL IS RECOGNIZED BY THE MINISTRY OF
EDUCATION TO OFFER COURSES TO THE POST
SECONDARY LEVEL


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005







THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005, PAGE 9


fRIDAY EVENING DECEMBER 30, 2005

| 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

Issues Round- Washington NOW Global cli- McLaughlin Foreign Ex- Frontline Diet Wars' Factors lead-
WPBT table discussion. Week (N) A mate change. C Group (N) change With Fa- ing to obesity in Ameca. n (CC)
(CC) (CC) reed Zakaria
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0 WFOR n (CC) spirit of a woman who died dudng a tion" Prostitution ring of suburban Store owner's family is kidnapped.
routine surgery, n (CC) soccer-moms. A (CC) n (CC)
(:00) Making of Dateline NBC Farmers' feud ends with murder; woman charged in baby's Law & Order: Criminal Intent A
WTVJ an Angel death. (N) r (CC) promising chef disappears and a
restaurant critic is murdered. (CC)
Deco Drive The Simpsons Popeye's Voy- Family Guy n The War at News (CC)
1 WSVN Homer disap- age: The Quest (PA) (CC) Home "Like a Vir-
Spoints. n for Pappy (CC) gin" (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) Supemanny The wife of a National Hope & Faith Hot Properties 20/20 (CC)
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seeks assistance. (CC) a story. bration. (N)

American Jus- Biography "Aileen Wuomos" Serial *A LAKE PLACID (1999, Suspense) Bill Pullman, Bridget Fonda, Oliver
A&E tice: Teen Mur- killer Aileen Wuomos. (CC) Platt. A monstrous crocodile chomps on villagers in rural Maine. (CC)
^ der Mystery
Hardtalk Extra BBC News World Business BBC News Life "Trouble in BBC News Asia Today
SBCI (Latenight). Report (Latenight). Paradise" (Latenight).
BET BET.com Count- SOUTH CENTRAL (1992, Drama) Glenn Plummer, Byron Keith Comicview
BET down Minns. Gang members prowl L.A.'s South Central slum.
Coronation Royal Canadian Air Farce: 2005 Hatching, Matching and Dispatch- CBC News: The National (CC)
SBC __ Street (CC) Year of the Farce (N) (CC) ing (CC)
C(:00) On the The eBay Effect: Inside a Worldwide Obsession Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
NBC Money
CNN (:00) The Situa- Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)
CNNm tion Room
(:00) Chris Rock: Bigger & Black- Comedy Central's Last Laugh '05 Comic reflect on Comedy Central Roast "Pamela
CO M er Comic Chris Rock erforms a the past year. (CC) Anderson" Pamela Anderson. (CC)
stand-up routine. (CC)
Cops "Cops in The Investigators "Anatomy of Forensic Files Forensic Files Forensic Files Forensic Files
COURT Kansas City Crime: Under Siege" "Memories" "Sip of Sins"
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DISN Parties at the Elizondo. An awkward teenager leams that she has royal blood.'G' (CC) Zack & Cody
Chill Grill. Dad is in town.
U, This Old House Weekend Me- Classic Car Classic Rides Tricked Out Tricked Out Radio Control
Classics (CC) chanic Restoration Hobbies
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Tagestema many Depth Tagestema
E, E! News THS Investigates: Plastic Surgery Nightmares Risks of plastic surgery. The Soup "Best of..." Best mo-
E! ments.
ESP N College Football Chick-Fil-A Peach Bowl -- LSU vs. Miami. From Atlanta. (Live) (CC)
E7 Gol ESPN: Ms. Bikini Cal- NBA Basketball New York Knicks at Milwaukee Bucks. From the Bradley Center in Milwau-
ESPNI Fuera de Juego endar kee. (Live) (CC)
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FIT TV __their son's emergency surgery.
v Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
FOX-NC Shepard Smith Susteren (Live) (CC)
F .N L NHL Hockey Montreal Canadiens at Florida Panthers. From the BankAtlantic Center in Sun- Totally Football: FSN Pro Foot-
FSNFL rise, Fla. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) Bowl ball Preview
,r (:00) Golf 1996 U.S. Amateur-- Final Round. Tiger Tiger's Prints Deutsche Bank Open Highli hts
-GOLr Woods.(N) Tiger Woods tops the 2002 field.
GSN Lingo (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire n1 The Amazing Race "Quit Following Poker Royale: Comedians vs.
GSN (CC) Us" Slave house. ) (CC) Poker Pros (CC)
G 4Tecl- (:00) Attack of Brainiac Brainiac Flatu- Judgment Day Electric Play- The Man Show The Man Show
,4 ec6i the Show! (N) Acupuncture. lence. ground (CC) Millennium. (CC)
S:00) Walker, Walker, Texas Ranger Walker must *** GUNFIGHT AT THE O.K. CORRAL (1957, Western) Burt Lan-
I ALL TL exas Ranger stop a loan shark who is exploiting a caster, Kirk Douglas, Rhonda Fleming. Premiere. Wyatt Earp and Doc
"Mind Games" minister's son. (CC) Holliday pursue the notorious Clantons.
Designed to Sell Mission: Organi- Love It or Lose Craft Corner Design to Win Weekend War- Curb Appeal A
HGTV Making an old zation Redoing a It "Time Travels" Deathmatch Model suite. ,) riors n (CC) (CC)
home chic. den. A (CC) Original trivet. (CC)
INSP Morris Cerullo Breakthrough Jay Sekulow Inspiration To- Life Today (CC) This Is Your Day Possess the
INSP(CC) day (CC) ,. Land with
Transformers Sabrina, the My Wife and My Wife and Friends Ross Everybody Everybody
KTLA Cybertron "Rev- Teenage Witch Kids "Learning to Kids Home child- vows to try some- Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
elations" Sabrina's party. Earn It" (CC) birth. (CC) thing new. Ray volunteers. Midlife crisis.
TOO YOUNG TO BE A DAD (2002, Drama) Kathy ** FATHERS AND SONS (1992, Drama) Jeff Goldblum, Rory
LIFE Baker, Bruce Davison. Ateen has to grow up fast when Cochrane, Mitchell Marchand. Premiere. A widowed bookseller and his
he becomes a father. (CC) (DVS) teenage son drift apart. (CC)
0 0 Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- Rita Cosby Live & Direct Scarborough Country
MSNBC cc mann.
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NICK Airbender ,l (CC) ,l t Show A (CC) Show (CC)
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;NTV Mother ( (CC) death. (N) ,A (CC)
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OLN America Tred Barta One Outdoors tures
American Mus- ** GONE IN 60 SECONDS (1974, Adventure) H.B. Halicki, Marion Busia, George Cole. Athief goes after
SPEED cle Car over 50 luxury cars in less than a week.
Primary Focus Behind the Great Souls Joel Osteen Dr. Frederick K, Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN Scenes (CC) (CC) Price (CC)
Everybody Friends Chandler Friends Tom Sel- Everybody Everybody *** AUSTIN POWERS: THE
TBS Loves Raymond finds a new leck guest stars. Loves Raymond Loves Raymond SPY WHO SHAGGED ME (1999,
"Civil Wars" ,C roommate. (CC) .) (CC) ,) (CC) "Mia Famiglia" Comedy) Mike Myers. (CC) (DVS)
(:00) What Not What Not to Wear "Courtney" What Not to Wear "Laurie" (CC) What Not to Wear
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firefighter. ____________ ____________
(:00) Law & Or- ** MISS CONGENIALITY (2000, Comedy) Sandra Bullock, Michael ** OVERBOARD (1987, Come-
TNT der "Sundown" Caine, Benjamin Bratt. A clumsy FBI agent goes under cover at a beauty dy) Goldie Hawn, Kurt Russell, Ed-
1 (CC) (DVS) pageant. (CC) (DVS) ward Herrmann. (CC)
TIONM Codename: Kids Home for Imagi- Camp Lazlo Se- Grim Adven- Ed, Edd n Eddy Grim Adven- Ed, Edd n Eddy
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*TI C (6:00) Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
I _PM Edition (CC) Crash landing. (CC)
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valientes.
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USA der: Special Vic- "Night" A serial rapist preys on ille- Detectives link an assault to illegal The dismembered body of a woman
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VH 1 (:00) America's America's Next Top Model America's Next Top Model America's Next Top Model ,l
V_'_ Next Top Model (CC) (CC) (CC)
(:00) America's ** HEAVEN CAN WAIT (1978, Fantasy) Warren Beatty, Julie WGN News at Nine (CC)
WG N Funniest Home Christie, Jack Warden. An inept angel prematurely summons a pro foot-
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WPIX Loves Raymond Gabrielle Union, Duane Martin. A legendary Lothario is hired to romance Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchlano
Midlife crisis, a meddling woman. C (CC) & Mr. G (CC)
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WSBK (cc) challenger. (N) t (CC)

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HBO-E NFL (CC) emperor. C (CC) warded. C (CC) and Vorenus are rewarded. C (CC)
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H BO-P U.S. Women's Christopher and Adriana meet a fa- James D'Arcy, Izabella Scorupco. A former priest fights demonic posses-
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(:45) *** SOMETHING'S GOTTA GIVE (2003, Romance-Comedy) Jack Nicholson, Di- Inside the NFL Cl (CC)
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a cruise ship. Cl 'R' (CC) sure to sell the family business, the Trojan War. Cl 'R' (CC)
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6:45) ** THE PEACEMAKER (1997, Suspense) ** FAT ALBERT (2004) Kenan Thompson. Live ac- (:35) NIGHTCAP:
MO MAX George Clooney, Nicole Kidman. A scientist and a sol- tion/animated. The cartoon character becomes real SEXUAL COM-
dier seek stolen nuclear weapons. Cl 'R' (CC) and helps a lonely teen. C 'PG' (CC) PETITORS
(:25) ** THE STEPFORD WIVES (2004, Comedy) * SUPER SIZE ME (2004, Documentary) iTV. A (:45) Horrorfeast
SHOW Nicole Kidman. iTV. Acouple move to a town where all filmmaker eats food from McDonald's for 30 days. ) (iTV) (CC)
women act the same. Cl PG-13' (CC) 'PG-13' (CC)
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TMC STICKUP (2001) an Culkin, Jena Malone, Emile Hirsch. Students plot against a nun who Horror) Jonathan Cherry, Tyron Leit-
'R' (CC) seized their comic book. 'R' (CC) so. Cl 'R' (CC)


(Coming Soon)






BACARDIL


--T-;. .-..:--- - -~\--.-; : - --,-:^:c, ;-1'- -r-ri;- r.-...l. -












E1, ID E 0 2 I


W H AT S ON I N


AND AROUND


NASSAU


E MAI L. O UTTHERE @ TRIBUNE MEDIA. NET


mIm Mw& Parmns, ightch *JnN


$5 Fridays @ First Down every Friday night. Music by Barry Da
Pusher, Selector: Dominique. Ladies $5 all night, gents $10. Early
juggling by Mr. Xcitement and DJ Fatal. Drink specials all night
long.

Bacardi Happy Hour @ Power Boat Adventures Bar and Grill (one
door east of Texaco Harbour Bay), every Friday. $3 Bacardi drinks
all night and $3 beers.

Ladies Night @ Power Boat Adventures Bar and Grill, every Sat-
urday. Ladies free, Gents, $10 all night. Bacardi Big Apple and oth-
er drink specials all night long.

Wild Jungle, each and every Wednesday night @ Club Trappers,
Nassau's "upscale" gentleman's club. Featuring a female body
painting extravaganza. Free body painting @ 8 pm. Ladies always
welcome. Admission: Men free before 10 pm. Females free. There
will be free food and hors d'oeuvres between 9 and 10 pm. Open
until 4 am.

Ladies Night @ Fluid Lounge, this and every Thursday night.
Doors open at 10pm. Ladies free before lam, $10 after. Guys: $15
all night. Drink special: 3 @ $10 (Bacardi) Giveaways and door
prizes every week.

Saturday Night Live every Saturday night @ Club Fluid, Bay St. The
biggest party of the week, pumping all your favourite hits all night
long. Ladies in free before 11pm. Strict security enforced.

Rave Saturdays @ Club Eclipse. DJ Scoobz spinning the best in Old
Skool. Admission $35, all inclusive food and drink.

Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters Sports Bar. Drink specials
all night long, including karaoke warm-up drink to get you started.
Party from 8pm-until.

Reggae Tuesdays @ Bahama Boom. Cover charge includes a free
Guinness and there should be lots of prizes and surprises. Admis-
sion: Ladies $10 and Men $15.

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar every Wednes-
day 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers and numerous drink specials.

The Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday. Doors open at 9pm,
showtime 11.30pm. Cover charge $15. $10 with flyer.

Fantasy Fridays @ Fluid Lounge, featuring late '80s music in the VIP
Lounge, Top of the charts in the Main Lounge, neon lights and Go
Go dancers. Admission: Ladies free before 11pm, $15 after; Guys
$20 all night.

Dicky Mo's @ Cable Beach. Flavoured Fridays Happy Hour, every
Friday. Drink specials: Smirnoff Kamikaze Shots, $1; Smirnoff
Flavoured Martinis, 2 for $10; Smirnoff Flavoured Mixed Drinks,
3 for $10. Bahamian Night (Free admission) every Saturday with live
music from 8 pm to midnight. Karaoke Sundays from 8pm to mid-
night, $1 shots and dinner specials all night long.

Twisted Boodah Lounge @ Cafe Segafredo, Charlotte St kicks
off Fridays at 6pm with deep house to hard house music, featuring
CraigBOO, Unkle Funky and Sworl'wide on the decks.

Chill Out Sundays @ Coco Loco's, Sandyport, from 4pm-until,
playing deep, funky chill moods with world beats.

Sweet Sunday Chill Out Soiree Lounge, every Sunday, 4pm-mid-
night @ Patio Grille, British
Colonial Hotel.

Wet Sundays, every Sunday, noon-midnight @ Crystal Cay Beach.
Admission $10, ladies free.

TooLooSe @ Indigo Restaurant on West Bay St and Skyline Dri-
ve. Singer/songwriter Steven Holden performs solo with special
guests Thursday from 9pm midnight.

The Graham Holden Deal @ The Green Parrot....David Graham,
Steve Holden, Tim Deal and Friends perform Sunday, 7pm 10pm
@ Hurricane Hole on Paradise Island.

Jay Mitchell and Hot KC @ Palm Court Lounge, British Colonial
Hilton, Wednesday-Thursday 8pm-12am.

Sunday Night Interlude @ Briteley's Restaurant & Lounge, Eneas
St off Poinciana Drive. Featuring Frankie Victory at the key board
in the After Dark Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to midnight. Fine
food and drinks.

Paul Hanna, Tabatha and Gernie, and the Caribbean Express
perform at Traveller's Rest, West Bay St, every Sunday, 6.30pm-
9.30pm.


Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support group meets the
first Monday of each month at 6.30pm at New Providence Com-
munity Centre, Blake Road. Dinner is provided and free blood sug-
ar, blood pressure and cholesterol testing is available. For more info
call 702-4646 or 327-2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third Monday every
month, 6pm @ Doctors Hospital conference room.

The Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third Saturday,
2.30pm (except August and December) @ the Nursing School,
Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital, the official training centre of the American
Heart Association offers CPR classes certified by the AHA. The
course defines the warning signs of respiratory arrest and gives pre-,
vention strategies to avoid sudden death syndrome and the most
common serious injuries and choking that can occur in adults,
infants and children.' CPR and First Aid classes are offered every,
third Saturday of the month from 9am-lpm. Contact a Doctors HoQ-,.
pital Community Training Representative at 302-4732 for more
information and learn to save a life today.

REACH Resources & Education for Autism and related Chal-
lenges meets from 7pm 9pm the second Thursday of each month
in the cafeteria of the BEC building, Blue Hill Road.




JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR Cycling are pleased to offer
a cycling clinic for juniors between 10 and 17. The free clinic will be
held every Saturday in an effort to encourage kids to cycle. Parents
interested in registering their'children should contact organisers at
jarcyclih@gma :l.com

The Nassau IBahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta Sigma Theta
Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30 pm every third Wednesday at the
Bahamas National Pride Building.


Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial Hilton Mon-
day's at 7pm.
Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7.30pm @ C C Sweeting
Senior School's Dining Room, College Avenue off Moss Road.
ART INTERNATIONAL, featuring the work of nine Bahamian Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas Baptist Community
artists, five well known artists from the UK, one from South Africa College Rm A19, Jean St. Club 3956 meets Thursday, 7.30pm @
and one from Zimbabwe will be held gratis, of the Guaranty Bank, British Colonial Hilton. Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8.30pm @
Lyford Manor, just outside the Lyford Cay gates. The exhibition will SuperClubs Breezes. Club 7178 meets Tuesday, 6pm @ The J
be open to the public until the end of December. The work of the Whitney Pinder Building, Collins Ave.
artists on display can be seen in collections worldwide, and have Club 2437 meets every second, fourth and fifth Wednesday at the
been shown in numerous exhibitions. Representing the Bahamas J Whitney Pinder Building, Collins Ave at 6pm. Club 612315 meets
will be; John Beadle; John Cox; Claudette Dean; Tyrone Ferguson; Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach. Club
Bo Sigrist Guirey; Nora Smith, Dorman Stubbs and Rupert 753494 meets every Wednesday, 6pm-8pm in the Solomon's Build-
Watkins. Lady Connery, Sir Scan's wife, has kindly agreed to open ig, East-West Highway. Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial
the exhibition. She is an exceptional artist, and will be exhibiting one Hilton Mondays at 7pm. Club Cousteau 7343 meets every Tuesday
of her paintings. night at 7.30 in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central
Andros. All are welcome.
The National Collection @ the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas, an exhibition that takes the viewer on a journey through Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega chapter meets every
the history of fine art in the Bahamas. It features signature pieces second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham
from the national collection, including recent acquisitions by Blue Nassau Resort, Cable Beach.
Curry, Antonius Roberts and Dionne Benjamin-Smith. Call 328-
5800 to book tours. This exhibition closes February 28, 2006. Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday, 7pm @
Gaylord's Restaurant, Dowdeswell St. Please call 502-4842/377-4589
The Nassau Music Society The Nassau Music Society is featuring, for more info.
in association with Fidelity, RBC and RoyalStar Assurance as
part of their "FESTIVAL OF RUSSIAN ARTISTS", Natalia Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm
Gutman (cello) a living legend in the music world who, along @ Atlantic House, IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room.
with her quartet, will play at Government House on January 13
at 8pm and at St Paul's Church Hall, Lyford Cay on January 14 The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) meets every
at 7:30pm. Also featured during the Festival Yuri Bashmet and third Monday of the month in the Board Room of the British
the Moscow Soloist Orchestra who return once again to Nassau Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.
on February 24, 26 and 27- their guest artist will be JoAnn
Deveaux-Callender. In April Oleg Polianski is featured on Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets the second and
the piano. Purchase your tickets from January 4, 2006 at the fourth Wednesday of the month, 8pm @ St Augustine's Monestary.
*Dundas Theatre (394-7179); AD Hanna & Co (322-8306) and the
Galleria JFK (356-seat). Details of the venues and programmes Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Friday of each
will be available on the website shortly. Do not miss this oppor- month, 7.30pm at Emmaus Centre at St Augustine's Monestary. For
tunity to listen to live world class musicians."" more info call 325-1947 after 4pm.

International Association of Administrative Professionals, Bahamas
Salt Chapter meets the third Thursday of every month @ Superclubs
Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.


The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at 5.30pm on the second
Tuesday of each month at their Headquarters at East Terrace,
Centreville. Call 323-4482 for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held 6:30pm Tuesdays
and Thursdays at Nassau gymNastics Seagrapes location (off Prince
Charles Drive). Doctor approval is
required. Call 364-8423 to register


AMISTAD, a Spanish club meets the third Friday of the month at
COB's Tourism Training Centre at 7pm in Room 144 during the
academic year. The group promotes the Spanish language and
culture in the community.

Send all your civic and social events to The Tribune
via fax. 328-2398 or e-maiL" outthere@tribunemedia. net


*


It GY (. N:


THE TRIBUNE


PiAGE 10, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005








THE TRIBUNE


LOCAL NEWS


* MA.AD Cobra addresses the crowd



Celebrating a very



reggae Christmas


S'By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
BAHAMIAN artists who
focus on the genre of Reggae
music known as "culture" are
making strides in the industry
according to Ali Cole, and are
almost to the point where they
can host the kind of successful
concert he pulled off this Christ-
mas Eve.
Speaking to The Tribune the
day before the second annual
"Reggae Christmas" was held
at the Wyndham Crystal Palace
Resort, the Tuff Gong promot-
er said, "They can do it! We just
have to force it out of them."
While world-renowned per-
formers like Warrior King and
Morgan Heritage were the dri-
ving force behind the produc-
tion, Mr Cole said giving
Bahamian artists more oppor-
tunities to showcase their tal-
ent is important.
The Bahamian artists, how-
ever, said they find that their
fellow countrymen and women
are not often supportive of
them a view with which Mr
Cole agreed.
But the crowd at Reggae
Christmas proved them wrong -
at least this time. They cheered
and showed support for the fea-
tuied Bahamian artists, who
appeared before Kiprich, Mad
Cobra, Warrior King and Mor-
gaii Heritage took to the stage.
Davon Knight, also known as
M'Deez, performed first around
1.30am, when the show finally
bqgan after DJ Pencil, DJ Xtra
Large, Selector TY, and DJ
Rsseralla out of Jamaica.
Landlord also performed,
singing the audience favourite,
We Need Peace.
.The audience was then treat-
ed to a rap/chat/culture song
fusion when Bay-Bee Weed -
the lone female performer of
the night graced the stage.
:.Bay-Bee Weed, also known
as Tamika Armstrong, per-
formed the song Three in One
along with Jah Torah, also
known as Quincy Jacques, who
had songbird origins in his
church's youth choir.
"At 24, Bay-Bee Weed has 12
years of performing under her


* LANDLORD, one of the many Bahamians performing at
Reggae Christmas, sings his number one hit


belt, and has won numerous
song competitions, including the
2001 Budweiser Freestyle com-
petition.
Avaran made his debut per-
formance in the Bahamas since
becoming an internationally
recognised name in culture
music.
He made the brief trip home
just for the concert; as he is
presently working on his album
in studios in Jamaica.
He is now on the Penthouse
label, doing works with Bigship,
and says his success proves that
Bahamians do have what it
takes to grab their place in the
world of culture and dancehall.
He was backed by his brother
Aydee's band, who accompa-
nied all of the Bahamian stars.
"That's what culture music is
really all about," said Mr Cole.
And according to Jamaica's
own Warrior King, positive
vibes are the only kind he push-
es through his music, and his


hits like My Life, Hold the Faith
and Virtuous Woman prove this
fact.
"This music is inspiration for
the masses," he said.
He performed along with
Reuben I, while his manager E
Watson looked on.
His performance was preced-
ed by Kiprich, whose tunes
Telephone- and A Letter made
him an instant hit.
Kiprich, once known as "the
Crazy Kid" during his deejay
days, was born in Jamaica as
Marlon Plunkett.
He told The Tribune that he
is about to release his first
album, Out a Road in 2006, and
he plans to continue touring in
North and South America, the
Caribbean and Europe.
The concert was closed out
by the legendary Reggae family
Morgan Heritage, who gave an
performance of their number
one hit I'm Coming Home,
along with numerous others.


E WARRIOR King serenaded the beautiful Bay-Bee Weed with the song Virtuous Woman



C .NEW YEAR'S EVE CELEBRATION 2006


gBRAZILIAN CHURRASCARIA


NEW YEARS EVE CONSOMME

PASTA, RICE AND BEAN STATION

IL SHRIMP-SALMON
SALA1)S AND APPETIZERS

w GRAND CHEESE PLATTER

U SPECIAL GAUCHO CUTS SERVED NON STOP Z
Z
PICANHA RUMPSTEAK (HOUSE SPECIALTY)

FILET MIGNON q
0 Succulent Tenderloin Seasoned to perfection And Wrapped in Bacon
ALCATRA
A Tender Top Sirloin Z
RACK OF LAMB
.J Flavoured With Garlic
FRALDINHA
A Bottom Cut Sirloin z
BEEF RIBS
Tender, Juicy beef Ribs Slowly Cooked to Preserve,Rich NaturTl Flavours
U CORDEIRO
Fresh Young Leg of Lamb Sliced Off the Bone
LOMBO
< Pork Loin Sizzling With Flavour and Parmesan
O COSTELA DE PORCO
Tender Pork Ribs Slow Roasted To Perfection 1
^ FRANGO
.a Tender Chicken Breast And Legs Wrapped In Bacon
LL LINGUICA
Robust Port Sausages, Seasoned To Perfection
ROASTED BABY RACK OF VEAL

SWEET CELEBRATION 2005

FRIANDISES

PETIT FOURS
S $145.00 PER PERSON + SERVICE CHAGE
> THIS WILL BE AN EVENING OF PRIZES AND SURPRISES
FUN I FUN! AND MORE FUNI
WE ARE LOOKING FORWARD TO WELCOMING YOUI


iS HOUSEWARES



AItemas


rn. -t .. .,, iUo, i





PAGE 12, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY
PFEE Fountain Soda
small (all Flavours)


THURSDAY
FREE Coffee WEDNESDAY
small (all Flavours) FREE Hotdog



We'redrivers too.




A A









FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005


SECTION


business@tribunemedia.net


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Insurance & Investments
to Build a Better Life
Telephone 242-393-1023


Management




contract for





airport signed





'in week or two'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
AIRLINE operators are
today set to meet with the oil
companies who supply aviation
fuel to Nassau International
Airport (NIA) to determine
the reasons behind the Christ-
mas weekend fuel shortage,
The Tribune was told yester-
day, amid reports that the Gov-
ernment was set to sign the air-
port management contract for
NIA "within a week or two".
"We're not getting anything
at all from the oil companies,"
one member of the Airline
Operations Committee (AOC)
said yesterday. "We the airlines
are trying to get to the bottom
of this."
The AOC is in the process
of establishing a committee to
examine what went wrong at
NIA-over-the Christmas week-
end, causing travel chaos for
several thousand tourists look-
ing to enter and exit the
Bahamas.


Apart from the radar being
out of action, the pipeline sys-
tem, which pumps aviation fuel
from Clifton to NIA's fuel farm
was not functioning, forcing the
three companies that form the
consortium supplying the air-
lines Texaco, Shell and Esso -
to instead truck the fuel from
Clifton Pier to the airport,
where it was pumped through
the hydrant system to refuel
planes.
Trucking
The trucking system was
unable to keep up with
demand, The Tribune under-
stands, leaving some airlines
with a two-and-a-half to three
hour turnaround time on the
tarmac. If the system had func-
tioned normally, fuel would
have been available to planes
within their allotted turnaround
time and well before they took
off on their scheduled flights.
AOC members are under-
stood to agree that "something


got cut off" on the pipeline,
causing major refuelling prob-
lems from Christmas Eve (Sat-
urday) through to Tuesday,
December 27. Exactly what
was cut off is still unclear,
although one rumour circulat-
ing yesterday was that a key to
turn on a certain part of the
pipeline was unavailable.
The Tribune was unable to
confirm whether this was true,
as Raymond Samuels and Troy
Simms country managers for
Texaco (Bahamas) and Esso
Standard Oil respectively, did
not return this newspaper's
calls seeking comment.
AOC members have not yet
received any explanation for
the problems from officials
who manage the NIA fuel
farm, and some sources said
the oil companies' head offices
had been unaware there were
any problems until Tuesday.
"Somebody's head should

SEE page 6B


s t in l tui


Diligence on





BTC to last





until 2006 Q


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
he mystery bidder
interested in buy-
ing into. the
B ahamas
Telecormmunica-
tions Company (BTC) is
unlikely to complete due dili-
gence on the state-owned car-
rier until the 2006 first quar-
ter, the minister of state for
finance told The Tribune,
describing the process as "still a
work in progress".
James Smith said the latest
attempt to privatise BTC had
suffered a "set back" in terms
of the due diligence start date
and the interested bidder being
able to access relevant infor-
mation and meet with senior
management.
He added of the BTC pri-
vatisation: "That's still a work
in progress in that the interest-
ed party is still doing due dili-
gence, and that's not likely to
be completed until the first
quarter."
Despite repeated attempts,
no one in government or the
private sector has been able to
inform The Tribune as to who
the interested party is, although
several sources have speculated
that it has Swiss connections
and may be private-equity led.
That, though, is unconfirmed.
The interested party has a
90-day exclusivity period in
which to conduct due diligence
on BTC, which in turn is sup-
posed to open its books to
scrutiny and not engage,in any
capital expenditures that might
change the company's material
nature.


SJAMES SMITH


Rather than employ an open
'beauty contest', the process
used in the run-up to the failed
2003 privatisation process, the
Government is now employing
a three-stage procedure
through which groups can
express an interest in BTC,
conduct due diligence and then
make an offer, to negotiate,
with the Government.
Process
The process is currently at
the second stage, which
involves the interested bidder
paying a non-refundable fee of
$250,000 to the Government.
Finally, if both the Govern-
ment and the interested bidder
are still interested in a "strate-
gic alliance", an offer will be
submitted on the "terms and
conditions" via which it will
seek an equity stake in BTC.
It is unclear how much of
BTC would be available, and


whether any privatisation will
follow the 2003 formula. which
envisaged the strategic partner
taking a 49 per cent stake.
Whether the Government is
successful in privatising BTC
with the current group or not, it
is unlikely to realise as much
as the $130 million offered for
a 49 per cent stake by the
BahamaTel consortium last
time round. That bid featured
the private equity arms of Cit-
igroup and JP Morgan Chase,
and involved no leverage.
The real value remaining in
BTC is locked in its cellular
monopoly, but this will end up
costing the consumer in terms
of both choice and price the
longer it is maintained. The
Bahamas is the last Caribbean
nation to permit a cellular
monopoly.
The 2003 privatisation
process collapsed after the
Government and its Tenders
Committee decided none of the
three finalists met their valua-
tion of the company and crite-
ria for enhancing it.
In a previous interview, Mr
Smith said there was "an
urgency" in government circles
to privatise BTC, as the com-
pany's value was being eroded
on a daily basis both by legal
competition such as IndiGo
Networks and illegal Voice
over Internet Protocol (VoIP)
and callback operations.
Mr Smith added that any
successful outcome with the
current bidder depended on
whether they made a realistic
offer that fitted in with the
Government's objectives for
BTC and the overall telecom-
munications sector.


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BAHAMIAN hotels face a
"heightened" challenge to con-
tribute to sustainable tourism
because of the high operating
costs they face, a report has
found, as this makes it more
difficult to remain profitable
and enhance the environment
at the same time.
The report by Dr T Jennifer
Edwards, which won the award
for Best Empirical Study at this
year's National Tourism Con-
ference, drew on a 1995 Pan-
nell Kerr study of hotel per-
formance in the Caribbean
region to show how the high
costs base impacted efforts on
sustainable development.
The 1995 Pannell Kerr study,
she said, found that high oper-
ating costs throughout the
Caribbean cause an average


net loss per room of $2,358.
That study also found that
the average cost for property,
operation and maintenance, at
$3,270 per available room, was
70 per cent above the global
average."
Dr Edwards wrote in her
report, Incentives for Sustain-
able Tourism: Making it better
for small hotels in the Bahamas:
"Caribbean Tourism Organi-
sation estimates that $529 mil-
lion is spent just on operations
and property maintenance by
regional hotels. Research also
reveals that the cost of fuel,
electricity and water in these
hotels, at an average of $3,045
per available room, is 95 per
cent above the global aver-
age......
"The challenge is clearly for

SEE page 4B


think you can't get a healIth plan

as individual as you?
Reality Check.
With BahamaHealth you can.
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Nassau Institute: 'Common

sense has prevailed'

on PetroCaribe


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
AN economic think-tank
yesterday said it appeared
"common sense has now pre-
vailed" in the Bahamas'
approach to PetroCaribe. after
both the International Mone-
tary Fund (IMF) and CARI-
COM warned about the "pit-
falls" signing on could cause in
terms of an increased debt bur-
den.
The Nassau Institute, which
has been the leading critic of
PetroCaribe and its chief advo-
cate, Leslie Miller, minister of
trade and industry, pointed out


that Augustin Carstens, the
IMF's deputy managing direc-
tor, and Edwin Carrington,
CARICOM's secretary-gener-
al, had this month warned
about the potential negative
implications PetroCaribe could
cause.
At a press conference on the
regional economic outlook for
the Caribbean, Mr Carstens
said in response to a question
on PetroCaribe: "We don't
know many of the -details of
this proposal. I think that the
countries have to analyse it


Bil iali Health




S FAMILY4

GUARDIAN
U INSURANCE
COMPANY
ATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.O. BOX SS 6232


SEE page 5B


I ill 111 11 I Ir I --


- ------









PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


LEGAL NOTICE




NOTICE




International Business Companies Act, 2000

In Voluntary Liquidation



Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 of the International

Business Companies Act 2000 Ferrylane Limited is in dissolution. The

date of commencement of dissolution was December 29, 2005. Douglas

Mackintosh is the Liquidator of Ferrylane Limited.


Markets that the infant





business should avoid


I


a a


a

- ~


- a


Douglas Mackintosh
Liquidator


... -
a -- a r.


V



1 mm


a' r


- -
'~ -
- - a -


- a a'
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--..M -


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'-'a -


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"Copyrighted Materiali


"Syndicated Content -

Available from Commercial News Providers"


40. 0- & -


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41' - a.




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- '-~ 'a -
-'a'


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a40 4W
a - '

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-o '


ing Information As Of
IPricing Information As Of:


Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Kerzner International BDRs
Premier Real Estate


Financial Adsors Ltd.


10.40 10.40
6.90 7.00
0.70 0.70
1.26 1.26
1.10 1.10
9.40 9.55
1.64 1.64
9.00 9.09
2.17 2.17
6.05 6.05
10.90 10.90
10.50 10.88
10.00 10.05
1.15 1.15
9.95 9.95
9.05 9.05
6.84 6.85
10.00 10.00


0.00
0.00
0.10
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.15
0.00
0.09
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.38
0.05'
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.01
0.00


-0.169
1.456
1,000 "10.587
S0.175
0.105
250 0.070
1.500 0.689
"-0.046
7,410 0.791
0.429
0.428
2,000 0.717
1.400 0.695
1.000 0.833
0.022
0.526
0.572
0.138
2.036


) FlsDEaL


0.000
0.360
0.330
0.020
0.060
0.040
0.240
0.000
0.450
0.000
0.240
0.530
0.500
0.500
0.000
0.405
0.560
0.000
0.760


N/M
7.1
11.6
4.0
12.0
15.7
13.9
NM
11.5
5.0
12.7
15.2
13.1
12.1
52.3
15.1
15.8
49.5
4.9


0.00%
3.46%
4.71%
2.86%
4.76%
3.64%
2.51%
0.00%
4.95%
0.00%
3.97%
4.86%
4.60%
4.98%
0.00%
5.43%
6.19%
0.00%
7.60%


52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price /Veekly Vol EPS $ Div $ PIE Yield
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.75 13.75 11.00 1.768 0.720 7.5 5.24%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.044 0.000 NM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.33 13.33 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NA V YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1.2665 1.1993 Colina Money Market Fund 1.266547*
2.4766 2.0704 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.4766 **
10.6711 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.6711"*"
2.2982 2.1530 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.298197"
1.1442 1.0782 Colina Bond Fund 1.144217 .**

BISX ALL SHARE INDE X 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-HI Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelit,
52wvk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fldelitl
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for dally volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change In closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1. 1994 = 100
" AS AT NOV. 30. 2005***/ AS AT NOV. 30. 2005
* -AS AT DEC. 12, 2005/"" AS AT OCT. 31, 2005/ "". AS AT OCT. 31, 2005


I 1-1I


TO
ALL OUR CUSTOMERS & FRIENDS FROM


IE


May The New Year of 2006
Bring Good Health, Peace and Prosperity


WE WILL CLOSE
For the Holidays
at 4:15 pm Friday, December 30th
& RE-OPEN at 7:30 am, Tuesday
January 3rd, 2006

ST. ALBANS DR. OFF WEST BAY ST. EAST BAY AND MACKEY ST.
P.O. BOX N-1085 BRIDGE PLAZA COMMONS BLDG.
TEL.: (242) 322-8396 TEL.: (242) 393-4210
FAX.: (242) 323-7745 TOLL FREE: (242) 300-7035


WATER AND SEWERAGE CORPORATION


Holiday Office Closure



Mal at arton 1

Friday December 30th at 2:30m



Main Office Thompson Boulevard


Friday, December 30th at 2:3pm



Th Corp oration will open for business


on TueS a January 3rd 2


Legal Notice

NOTICE


GRABILLES LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) GRABILLES LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on December 23,:
2005 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and registered
by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Rue de Lausanne 17 bis Geneva.

Dated this 30th day of December, A.D., 2005.

. Cie. -C diftSisse Trust Limited
Liquidator


OM WORM
BUSINESS


I '


ori


O O


r






FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


Johnny Rockets

_d s
__on onday


pMarina u


THE first Johnny Rockets Restaurant
has this month opened at the Marina Vil-
lage on Paradise Island, taking the vil-
lage's retail and restaurant line up to the
point where all outlets are open.
Bahamian franchisee, Paradise Restau-
rants Ltd, will be operating the restaurant,
which primarily serves hamburgers and
hand-dipped shakes.
Thrilled
"We're thrilled to open our first John-


oUUrs


111


Village


ny Rockets at the famed Atlantis Resort,"
said Dino Matsas, vice-president of oper-
ations at Paradise Restaurants Ltd, in a
statement.
Bringing
"We look forward to bringing the all-
American Johnny Rockets experience to
this popular destination."
"Johnny Rockets and the Atlantis
resort make a perfect combination, just
like our hamburgers and American fries,"


said Mike Shumsky, chairman and chief
executive of The Johnny Rockets Group,
Inc.
Provide
"They both provide an escape from
everyday life, offering an enjoyable, out
of the ordinary experience. We are excit-
ed to bring the flavour of American cul-
ture to the islands of the Bahamas and
look forward to continued international
expansion."


Share your

news
The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making nqws in their
neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising
funds for a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Legal Notice

NOTICE

MONDIAL CONSULTING LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance
with Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act. No. 45 of 2000, MONDIAL
CONSULTING LTD., is in dissolution as of
December 29th, 2005.

Mr. Ricardo Augusto Grecco Teixeira of Rua
Tabapua, 114, Sao Paulo/ SP Brazil is the
Liquidator.
LIQUIDATOR.



THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
BAHAMAS NATIONAL DRUG AGENCY


PUBLIC NOTICE
TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF DRUGS
AND RELATED ITEMS
Tenders are invited for the Supply of Drugs and
Related items for the Public Hospitals Authority and
the Ministry of Health, The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas.
The Tender Document, which includes instructions
to the Tenderers along with other relevant information,
can be collected from the Bahamas National Drug
Agency, Market & McPherson Streets, Monday
through Friday 9am 5pm.
A Tender must be submitted in duplicate in a sealed
envelope or package identified as, "Tender of the
Supply of Related Items" and addressed to:
Managing Director
Public Hospitals Authority
1st Floor, Mannax Corporate Centre/Dockendale House
West Bay Street
P.O. Box N-8200
Nassau, The Bahamas
All Tenders must be received at the above address
on or before 5pm Friday, February 10th, 2006. A
copy of a valid business license must accompany all
proposals.
The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to
reject any or all Tender(s).


A premier financial firm like UBS runs on exceptional talent like yours. We seek out uniquely gifted individuals who can
bring something different to our organization and offer them superb career opportunities to match their potential.
.UBS Wealth Management is looking to hire a recent graduate into the UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. office. UBS seeks candidates,
preferably with relevant previous work experience (summer internship), who have demonstrated outstanding academic
and extracurricular achievement, are flexible and creative, possess strong analytical and interpersonal skills and are
enthusiastic and committed. Strong work ethic and personal integrity are critical. Furthermore, excellent language skills
are an advantage (e.g. English, French, German, Spanish or Portuguese). Candidates must have their BA, preferably with
an emphasis in Finance or Economics.
To apply for this fulltime position, please deliver your resume and cover letter by hand to UBS (Bahamas) Ltd., Human Resources,
East Bay Street, Nassau. The application deadline for this Trainee position is Friday, January 13, 2006.


Wealth Global Asset Investment
Management Management Bank


I


Legal Notice

NOTICE

RIVIERA ENTERPRISES S.A.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance
with Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act. 2000, RIVIERA
ENTERPRISES S.A., is in dissolution as of
December 29th, 2005.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at
35A Regent Street, P.O.Box 1777, Belize City,
Belize is the Liquidator.
LIQUIDATOR.


0 UBS


FirstCaribbean
Career Opportunity


FirstCaribbean International Bank is the combination of CIBC and Barclays Bank in the Caribbean, Bahamas
and Belize. We are the region's largest publicly traded bank with over 3,000 staff serving over 5.3 million
people in 16 countries. We manage over 700,000 active accounts via 100 retail branches and
corporate/international banking centres.
RESPONSIBILITIES:
* To carry out end-to-end audits of business areas, as advised by the Audit Director, across FirstCaribbean regional territories with
the objective of supporting an independent assessment of the level of control over risk (This post includes a significant
portion of specialist work in the areas of Capital Markets, Treasury and Asset Management)
* To be responsible for Relationship Management and liaison with Business Management in discussing findings and gaining
acceptance of recommendations
* To undertake the creation of audit work programmes, test and analyse findings and make recommendations for improvement in
controls
PREREQUISITES:
* Strong PC skills
Awareness of financial services issues will be an asset
Specialist expertise in Capital Markets, Treasury and Asset Management
* Expertise in Audit/Risk Management.
* 3-5 years experience at a supervisory/junior management level with a financial institution, accounting firm or financial services
consultancy
* Excellent communication skills (both written and oral)
* Relevant professional qualifications in the areas of Auditing, Accounting, Banking Financial Management or Risk Management
will be preferred. For example: ACCA, CPA, CGA, CFA, ACIB, CIA, CFSA etc and/or relevant graduate or postgraduate degree
* Strong team working and influencing skills
We offer an attractively structured compensation and reward package as well as performance bonuses.
Applications with detailed resumes should be submitted no later than 6th January, 2006 to:
Judith Nelson
Internal Audit
FirstCaribbean International Bank
Head Office
Warrens
St. Michael, Barbados
Telephone number: (246) 367-2579
Fax number: (246) 367-2503
Email: Judith.Nelson@firstcaribbeanbank.com
Only applicants who are short-listed will be contacted.


( FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK
GET THERE. TOGETHER.





THE TRIBUNE.


PAGE 4B FRIDAYDECEMBE 005


Operating costs give


Hotels 'heightened'


SEASON'S challenge over


GREETINGS sustainable tourism


FROM page 1B
hotels to contribute positively
to sustainable tourism by both
remaining commercially viable
and enhancing rather that
detracting from the environ-
ment.
"This challenge is heightened
by the high property, operat-
ing and maintenance costs


faced by the hotel sector, which
emphasises the need to realise
the cost savings that environ-
mental management can
bring."
Addition
In addition, Dr Edwards said
hotels were being further chal-
lenged "by the increasing trend
of tour operators", such as the


-,




Since 1922
Www.HGChristie.com



NOTICE

TAKE NOTICE that the parking lot
of H. G. CIIRISITIE LTD., at Millars Court
and East Street in the City of Nassau will be
closed to the public on the 1st January, 2006
to preserve property rights,


European company, TUI, and
British Airways Holidays, to
require their partners to meet
environmental standards they
have set, and not be wasteful of
resources or dest&ctive to the
environment. :i
Dr Edwardsiat'a; other
area Bahamian hotels had to
watch was "the intensification
of international, and egipial"
environmental certification
programmes, whisch give
hotels a competitive edge from
an environmental marketing
"standpoint'".:'- ."'' ,
"With the increasing con-
cerns for the environment glob-
ally and the World Travel andl
Tourism Council prediction of
worldwide tourism expansions
in the years ahead, a complex
challenge arises 'Jin -tlhe
Hotel/Environment issue," Dr
Edwards said. ' .
"There is no doubt, for
example, as to the need to pro-
vide more accommodation for
the increasing number of
tourists as travel and tourism
expand. At the same time',
however, there is a need to
ensure that all developments
have minimal negative impact
on the environment."
Standing at ,15,258 rooms
spread across 297 hotels, Dr
Edwards said the hotel industry
generated about 70 per cent of
total tourism revenues.
Room revenues in 200
stood at over $345 million, and
Dr Edwards described the 4
per cent tax levied on hotel dai,
ly room rates as "significant',
given that 90 per cent of the
estimated 1.5 million stopover
visitors per year stayed i#
hotels.


I,


HOURS OF OPERATION


BAY STREET


TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY


12J27105
12/28105
12/29105
12/30105


7AM-8PM
7AM-8PM
7AM-8PM
7AM-9PM


SUNDAY NEW YEARS DAY OPEN 8AMTH RU
TO MONDAY JANUARY 2, 20066PM


MARATHON MALL


TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY


12127105
12/28105
12/29105
12130105


SATURDAY NEW YEARS EVE
SUNDAY NEW YEARS DAY


MONDAY


01/02106


7:30AM-8PM
7:30AM-8PM
7:30AM-8PM
7:30AM-9PM
7:30AM-9PM
1:00PWM8PM
1:OPWM-8PM


. . . . .


VACANCY NOTIFICATION

VACANCY FOR DEPUTY REGISTRAR GENERAL
REGISTRAR GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA


MINISTRY OF FINANCIAL SERVICES AND INVESTMENTS
Applications are invited from suitable qualified Bahamians to fill the post of Deputy Registrar, Registrar General's
Department, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.
Requirements for the Post
Applicants must be members of at least three (3) years standing of The Bahamas, English, Irish or Scottish Bar
or of the Bar of any country of the Commonwealth to which a member of The Bahamas Bar is admitted without
examination.
Specific Duties of The Post
The successful applicant will be required to assist in the formulation and implementation of policies required
by the Registrar General's Act, Chapter 186, Statute Laws of The Bahamas (2000 edition).
Co-ordinate and, or assign and manage the administration of the Registrar General's Office, Freeport, and
perform such duties as may necessitate policy implementation.
Execute all Acts, enacted by Parliament of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, in carrying out duti s'f
the Deputy Registrar.
The implementation of all Statutes administered by the Registrar General inclusive of, but not limited to
the following:
Domestic Companies and International Business Companies
Review all documents to ensure that all requirements are met
Signing and issuing certificates of Companies Incorporation, Foreign Companies, Good Standings
and Dissolutions.
Exempted Limited Partnership
All matters related thereto,
Marriages Act
Issuing of Marriage Licenses, certified copies
S Administering Marriage Officers Exams
Performing Marriage Ceremonies
Issuing Marriage Certificates
Registration of Records Act
Recording Deeds and Documents
.. .... .D eed S e arc h e s -
Issuing Certified Copies of documents
Responsible for written and oral communications with customers:
Lawyers, Accountants, Bankers and Government Authorities in relation to matters of administration
and management of the Department.
Checking documents in order to issue certificates of Good Standing.
Responding to questions and queries from the public. When and where necessary, provide community education
and general information to the public concerning the role, duties and func:ion of the Registrar General's
Department.
Responsible for all Human resources matters.
Applicant should have a working knowledge of computer applications
All such duties as assigned by the Registrar General.

The salary of the post is in Scale JL 15 $34,600 x 700 $41,600 per annum.
Serving Officers must apply through their Heads of Departments.
Application forms may be obtained from the Department of Public Service, Poinciana Hill Complex, Meeting
Street. They must be returned complete with the original qualifications and documentary proof of relevant
experience, to reach the Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Financial Services & Investments or the Secretary,
Public Service Commission, Poinciana Hill Complex, Meeting Street, no later than the 19th January 2006.


C


- I S


i







FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE


Nassau Institute:




'Common sense




has prevailed'




on PetroCaribe


FROM page 1B

Carefully.
"Basically they have to eval-
uate the convenience of this
offer in terms of how it affects
their overall macroeconomic
picture. Because, yes, it would
imply more debt. It might
imply the government getting
involved ini the energy sector. It
might imply certain commit-
ments with respect-to social
expenditures; that by itself is
not wrong at all.
Conclusion
"So at the end of the day, I
.would say that I have come to
,the conclusion that it is a
,option that governments have,
,and obviously all options are
good. Now it's up to govern-
,ments to decide what's best for
them. We cannot really decide


for them.
"But our recommendation
would be to look and analyse
seriously this option and weigh
it for the impact on debt, on
social expenditures, and on the
involvement of the government'
in some sectors where they
might not be involved today.
So I'd say it's an open question
at the moment and I would say
that the IMF would be 'very'
respectful of any decisions that
the countries might take."
Meanwhile, the Nassau Insti-
tute drew attention to com-
ments made by Edwin Car-
rington, CARICOM's secre-
tary-general, that were report-
ed in the Miami Herald on
December 17, in which he said:
"Some ministers didn't under-
stand the details before sign-
ing the agreement in Septem-
ber."
The economic think-tank
said it spoke to Mr Carrington


to validate this, and' added:
"While he would not go into
detail on his discussion with the
press he [Mr Carrington]
advised us that: 'PetroCaribe
brings benefits to countries by
delaying payment for purchas-
es of crude oil.'
"However, he did point out
that, 'on the other side of the
equation is the build up of debt
for the participating coun-
;;tries'."
The Nassau Institute said Mr
Carrington also pointed out
that the Caribbean region did
not spend enough time think-
ing about the impact signing
ton to Petfd'Caribe would have
on Trinidad & Tobago's oil
industry.
Economic
The economic think-tank
added: "Leslie Miller, Minis-
ter of Trade and Industry, has
been very quiet on this matter
in recent weeks. Is it too early
to think that common sense has
now prevailed in the Bahamas'
haste to sign on to the Petro-
Caribe agreement with
Venezuela?
"Of course, Mr Miller has
been shouting from the
rooftops that the price of gas
would reduce considerably
once the deal with Venezuela
was finalised. However,
Jamaica was the first country
- in the region to sign and their
gas has actually increased in


AAAi
.MA


YOUR CONNECTIO fO THE WORLD
} "0,0


NOTICE


TO OUR VALUED RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS


BTC is implementing a
Local Access Rental Rate Increase


EFFECTIVE JANUARY 1, 2006


Residential Access Rental
will increase to $15.00 per line


Did You Know?

For the first time in 30 years BTC
is increasing the charge to
it's customers for Local Line rentals.

Local calls will remain free of charge

There will be no charge to the one time
installation charge of $50 per line


For further infomation


price, according to a source in
Kingston.
"So in the final, we prefer to
think that Mr. Carrington and
his CARICOM staff have now
had an opportunity to review
the details of the PetroCaribe
agreement and the potential
de bt that could accrue to the
mntmber countries for an
expendable product and they
art now advising the ministers
ofithe pitfalls.
"In any event, the price of
oil has dropped considerably
without implementing the deal
with Venezuela, proving that
the market has worked yet
again without government
interference."



Toad eris -i
The Tibune
call 32-198


IN THE ESTATE


OF HAROLD


BERTRAM JOHNSON a.k.a. BUCK
JOHNSON late of the Eastern Road in the
Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence. Deceased


NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
any claim or demands against the above Estate
are required to send the same duly certified in
writing to the Undersigned on or before the 23rd
day of January, 2006, after which date the
Executors will proceed to distribute the assets
having regard only to the claims of which they
shall then have a notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all
persons indebted to the said Estate are requested
to make full settlement on or before the date
hereinbefore mentioned.



MCKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Attorneys for the Executors
Chambers
P.O. Box N-3937
Mareva House
No. 4 George Street
Nassau, Bahamas.


NOTICE


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ORENCIA V. FERRIL, P.O.BOX N-
356, BALTIC AVENUE, HILLSIDE ESTATES, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 30TH day of
DECEMBER 2005 to the Minister responsible,for-Nationalityand-,
Citizenship, P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas>.


PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY


VACANCY


NURSING SERVICES ADVISOR
Applications are invited from suitably qualified candidates for appointment to the post of
Nursing Services Advisor in the Public Hospitals Authority (PHA) which is responsible for
the management of the three public hospitals of the Bahamas, Princess Margaret Hospital,
Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre and the Rand Memorial Hospital and the management of
Bahamas National Drug Agency, Materials Management Services, National Emergency
Medical Services and the public clinics in Grand Bahama.
Applicants must possess the following qualifications and experience:
Registered Nurse (with specific registration through the Nursing Council of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, prior to appointment);
Masters Degree in Nurse Management or Equivalent with a minimum of five (5) years post-
qualification experience in a senior administrative position; or Bachelor of Science Degree
in Nurse management or equivalent with a minimum of ten (10) years post-qualification
experience in a senior-administrative position;
Experience at a strategic / policy level in nursing or general health systems planning and
development will be an advantage.
DUTIES
1. The Nursing Services Advisor would report to the Managing Director and would serve
as the principal specialist of the PHA on all matters relating to nursing services operations
and development. The overarching responsibility of the post is to ensure (a) standards
of nursing care are well-defined, relevant and consistently maintained; and (b) the
structure and practice of nursing services are appropriate within and across departments
and institutions.
2. Main duties and responsibilities of the post include:
a) Development and revision of policies and operational guidelines for improving the
quality and efficiency of nursing services;
b) Monitoring compliance with standards of practice related to general and specialty
nursing care as a means of ensuring continuous quality improvement in nursing and
adherence to the Code of Nursing Ethics:
c) Utilization of nursing productivity statistics to advise on strategic interventions for
greater efficiency of nursing services;
d) Ensuring the maintenance of a system of continuous nursing education at each
Institution;
e) Making recommendations for organizational restructuring of nursing to best fit a
dynamic public healthcare system;
f) Facilitating and coordinating communication (policy level) between nursing and
other health-care disciplines of the PHA, Ministry of Health and other national,
Regional and International entities;
g) Preparing annual plans and other reports related to Nursing Services Development,
including an annual budget for organizational-wide nursing services development.
3. Applicants must possess strong analytical, conceptual-thinking, strategic planning,
communication and interpersonal skills.
Letters of application, Curricula Vitae, documentary evidence of qualifications and experience
and three (3) references should be submitted no later than 27th January 2006 to the Human
Resources Director, P.O. Box N-8200 or 1st Floor Manx Corporate Centre, Dockendale
House, West Bay Street. Serving officers must submit their applications via their Heads of
Department/Hospital.


BUSINESS


I -


j







PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


YOUR CONNECTIO-O THE WORLD
o.R .. .o.o.,


NOTICE


TO OUR VALUED BUSINESS CUSTOMERS


BTC is implementing a
Local Access Rental Rate Increase


EFFECTIVE JANUARY 1,2006


Business Access Rental
will increase to $36.00 per line


Did You Know?

For the first time in 30 years BTC
is increasing the charge to


it's customers for Local Line rentals.

Local calls will remain free of charge

There will be no charge to the one time
installation charge of $50 per line

For further infomation


THE CLEARING BANKS ASSOCIATION


Announces-


BANKING HOURS
Christmas and New Years' Day
Holidays




9:30 a.m,- 4:30 p.m.
Normal Banking Hours


MONDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2005- Closed


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2005- Closed


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005
9:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
Normal Banking Hours

MONDAY, JANUARY 2, 2006 Closed Q



Association's Membership

Bank of The Bahamas International Limited FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Citibank, NA. Royal Bank of Canada
Q Commonwealth Bank Limited Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited v
S Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited


"V ^^^V^k^


'in week oi


FROM page 1B

roll for this, or be carpeted at
least," one source told The Tri-
bune.
AOC members yesterday
met with their counterparts in
the Bahamas Hotel Associa-
tion (BHA) to "come up with a
plan for these major events",
aimed at dealing with tourist
customers and ensuring the
inconvenience to them was
minimised.
Among the areas understood
to have been looked at were
the feeding of stranded pas-
sengers, getting them to hotels
for the night, and obtaining
good rates. Other issues dis-
cussed were how to manage
and locate properties that had
available rooms. It is under-
stood that the proposals devel-
oped will be presented to the
Government shortly.
Sources
Sources also told The Tri-
bune that AOC and BHA
members were informed that
the Government was due to
sign the management agree-
ment for NIA with YVRAS,


the international subsidiary of
YVR, the Vancouver Interna-
tional Airport operator, "short-
ly".
"There was an understand-
ing that within a week or two
they would sign the contract
with Vancouver," The Tribune
was told.
Contract
Negotiations on the contract,
which will be for between 15
to 25 years and will see
YVRAS manage construction.
of a $200 million terminal and
enhance NIA's commercial
venues and US pre-clearance
facilities, have dragged on for
10 months.
Apart from the immediate
loss of revenues for both
Bahamian hotels and airlines
as a result of the weekend air-
port chaos, the greatest impact
is likely to be the Bahamas'
reputation as a top-notch
tourism destination something
that cannot be quantified.
Michael Sansbury, Baha
Mar's executive vice-president
of hotel operations, experi-
enced the situation first hand,
having waited in vain for eight
hours at Orlando International
Airport on Monday to catch a


two'
flight to NassajlI tg
were cancelled, and th riwas,
no information for passengers,.
causing his return; to the
Bahamas to be dejaye;upnt,
Tuesday, .., r(
"IIt was not a goodithing at:
all," Mr Sansbury said: "Lknow,
from my personal experience
there were very many frustrat-v
*ed people'". ,; .
Of the impact otit the hieed
Cable Beach Resorts, Mr Sarins
bury said: "We had a grani
total of about 200 reservations
from people that weren't able
to get here,but, that was off et
by those people 'who couldn't
get out."
Optimismn
Meanwhile, there was a ray
of optimism peaking through
the gloom at NIA, as The Tri-
bune was told that the CTX
baggage security screening
machines something the
Bahamas must have in place
by January 1, 2006, to retain
US pre-clearance and enable
aircraft taking off from here to
land at other international air-
ports, have been installed.
They are due to be trialled
today and tomorrow before the
real thing begins on Sunday.


PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY

VACANCY

MANAGER III (Human Resources)
Corporate Office
Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post of Human
Resources Manager III, Corporate Office, Public Hospitals Aiutho6ity.
Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-
Bachelors Degree in Business Management or equivalent and three (3) years
experience in Human Resource Management with good analytical and computer
skills. ,
The Human Resources Manager III is responsible for all Human Resource matters
forwarded to Corporate Office from the institution assigned; assists with Huian
Resource policies review and formation.
RESPONSIBILITIES & DUTIES
1. Prepares recommendation and submits for approval the following from the,
institution assigned:


i) appointments
ii) pension/gratuity benefits
iii) promotions
iv) disciplinary actions
v) transfers
vi) reassessment of salaries
vii) reemployment
viii) renewal of contracts
ix) salary advances
x) medical loans
xi) industrial accidents


2. Processes to completion the following recommendations:-
i) reclassifications
ii) reimbursement for passage
iii) resignation without benefits
iv) confirmation in appointment
v) resumption of duty after study leave and un-coding of incremental month
3. Researches all matters of complaints from the institution assigned, prepares
documentation and submits with recommendation.
4. Reviews Human Resources systems and makes recommendations for update
periodically.
5. Assists with review and formulation of Human Resource policies.
Letters of application, resume, documentary evidence of qualifications and three
(3) references should be submitted, no later than 20th January, 2006, to the Director
Human Resources, Public Hospitals Authority P.O. Box N-8200, or 1st Floor
Corporate Office, Dockendale House, West Bay Street. (Serving officers must
submit their application through the Head of Department).


-"4


Management



contract for



airport signed


THE TRIBUNE,


PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005


j






FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005, PAGE 7B


F


iO


a


orecasts


'slight slowdown



In tourism growth'


X.


4m ,o


I -


Available from Commercial News Providers"


-o

q, -P ~~ --


w---M
.o... . -



Sb -
- a.- o
-um o .







o -m 04-o W

oI -gi ,D4


ft a


b


-o S


- O


S ARGOSA CORP. INC.
S -,:i (Liquidator)

| LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
I (No 46 of 2000)
| UNIKOIL U.A.E. LIMITED
F IBCN 131,614 B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)
NO'I1-E is hereby giten that in accordance with Section 131 (2) (a) of the
Internmional Business Companies Act No:46 of 2000, Unikoil U.A.E. Limited
is in dissolution.
Any pnrs6n having a Claim against Unikoil U.A.E. Limited is required on or
beforeauary 26, 2006 to send their name address and particulars of the debt
or cla t the Liquidator of the Company, or in default thereof they may be
exclude from the benefit of any distribution made before such claim is
approvedi


I Redcornm Consultants Limited, of 2nd Floor Ansbacher House, Shirley and
East Street North, is the Liquidator of Unikoil U.A.E. Limited.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

OLD WILLOW CREEK INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 29th
day of December 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp.
Inc., of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
(No 46 of 2000)
AMFIELD ILMITEAi
IBC NO 106,555 B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)
NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section 131 (2) (a) of the
International Business Companies Act (No 46 of 2000), Amfield Limited is
in Dissolution.
Any person having a Claim against Amfield Limited is required on or before
January 26, 2006 to send their name address and particulars of the debt or
claim to the Liquidator of the Company, or in default thereof they may be
excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before such claim is
approved.
Redcorn Consultants Limited, of 2nd Floor Ansbacher House, Shirley and
East Street North, is the Liquidator of Amfield Limited.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
DAEDALIAN INVESTMENTS
FOUR LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000), DAEDALIAN INVESTMENTS
FOUR LIMITED is in dissolution. Ms Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can
be contacted at The Winterbotham Trust Company Limited,Marlborough & Queen
Streets, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names, addresses and particulars of their debts
or claims to the lhuidator before the December 31, 2005.



Ms Alrena Moxey
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


ANCHOR TIDES INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 19th
day of December, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp.
Inc., of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE

APOLAR COMPANY LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
29th day of December 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

CLOCK TOWER THREE CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
29th day of November 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

SHARLIMAR VALLEY INC.
(In Voluntai Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 13th
day of December, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp.
Inc., of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Office and Education Assistant To be involved in
many of the daily activities at the. Bahamas Reef
Environment Educational Foundation (BREEF) office,
s/he is responsible for telephone, public reception and
various administrative duties and office support tasks
including maintaining office equipment, updating
BREEF website, database and mailings. S/he will also
be responsible for coordinating the logistics of
conferences including a summer marine conservation
teacher training workshop. S/he will assist with
preparation of marine educational materials and will
work with students and teachers in the field. Duties
may also include assisting with accounting and
bookkeeping functions.
Knowledge/ Skills
Associates degree or 2 to 3 years of related
experience or High school diploma plus 3 to 5
years related experience or equivalent
combination.
Excellent organizational and administrative skills
required.
Strong computer skills (work processing,
spreadsheets). Working familiarity with Windows
and the Microsoft Office Suite applications,
Access, Illustrator and Photoshop.
Ability to update website and/or interest in
learning to do so.
Accuracy and attention to detail essential; ability
to set priorities, organize time efficiently, and
work independently on several tasks at once.
Strong communication skills and the ability to
work well with a variety of people. Ability to


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


SWANLAKE ENTERPRISE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
29th day of December 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

). .*
y _______


I.


work under pressure and perform as a team
player. Flexible and able to adapt to changing
office situations and procedures.
Interested persons should apply in writing with full
details, including resume and cover letter, to
breef@breef.org by 4th January, 2006.


i


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PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005


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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005, PAGE 9B


TRIBUNE SPORTS


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N lSWIMMING sensation Alana Dillette makes a splash yesterday.


(Photo: Felip. Major/Tribune staff)


Alana Dillette and the Tigers






take a break in the Bahamas


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SWIMMING
; ByBRENT STUBBS
-'Sbnior Sports Reporter

ALANA Dillette and a 60-
,Waber contingent from the
.Ai.burn University Tigers'
scwiamming team, including their
&n'ltire coaching staff, are in
town for their winter training
at the Betty Kelly Kenning
,Aquatic Centre.
-".C'Yd Dillette said she's glad to
'R, ome on this break to get
rq-ernergised for the remainder
Q-'the season.
*" "Yreally enjoy the team and
geyrybody on it. I think I'm pro-
-gressing there," said the St.
Andrew's graduate who went
Ith iAuburn University having
'fudriidari one of the most spec-
ct6ilar performances at Carifta
. -inng an unprecedented 10
gl4 medals.
Although there were a lot of
.Xpe..tations for Dillette when
,sheentered college and she
admitss that it's been a tough
transition, so far she's been able
tf86pdp with the situation.
"Th'i most difficult thing I
thlrik is having so many people.
-Training at the same time," she
reflected. "The whole team is
Kthe,vlwhich is around 60 per-
soihs. It's unlike here where
there* are about 10-15 people.
,Sp I think that was the biggest
adjustmentt."

Competition

Sd far, Dillette has also had to
red6sorme stiffer competition
than she faced here at home,
but that is one of the reasons
why she's so comfortable with
her new environment at
Auburn University.
For the past 10 years, Auburn
University has dominated the
Southeastern Conference and,
while their men's team won
three straight national titles,
their women's team came out
with three of the past four
crowns.
Dillette, an 18-year-old major
in Hotel Management, is confi-
dent that the Tigers will have
another great season when they
return to competition in Janu-
ary.
Women's co-head coach
Dorsey Tierney said Dillette has
progressed far beyond their
expectations.
"She has come along a lot
better than we had anticipat-
ed," she noted. "She's a very
talented athlete and we have
been focussing on developing
her technical skills. But she's a
very coachable girl and she will
improve tremendously in the
future."
As for the team's visit, Tier-
ney said they are humbled by


the Bahamian experience.
"We hope to use this time for
the team to come together and
spend some quality'time away
from school and bond together
and appreciate each other a lit-
tle more and get some good
specialised training in," she
pointed out.
Only a part of the team was
in attendance for the first prac-
tice yesterday. But the remain-
der of the team arrived later in
the afternoon and will be avail-
able for the rest of the practice
sessions through January 4.
This is the second time that
Auburn University have been
in town. The last time was when
Jeremy Knowles was a member
of the team. Knowles, however,
is also here with the team as a
graduate in training.
His father Andy Knowles,
coach of Swift Swimming, said
they are delighted once again
to host the Tigers and they are
looking forward to sharing the
Bahamian experience with
them.
"We take them to the Watch
Night Service at Grace Gospel
Chapel, which we all look for-
ward too," he stated. "I know
they will have a good time this
year as well."
Additionally, the Bahamas
will also host a 45-member team
from Michigan State through
January 7; a 70-member team
from Indiana University
through January 5; a 30-mem-
ber team from Ashland College
through January 8; a 25-mem-
ber team from the University
of Nebraska through January 8
and a 40-member team from
Colombia University through
January 13.
Kevin Colebrooke, manager
of the Aquatic Centre, said this
serves as a good opportunity for
the Bahamas to branch out in
the sports tourism and at the
same time, provide the younger
swimmers with a view of what
the top notch college pro-
grammes are all about.
"We hope that this will
inspire the swimmers to further
their education and swimming,"
Colebrooke stressed. "At the
same time, we hope that some
of the schools will take an inter-
est in a swimmer or two and
offer them a scholarship.
"In addition to that, we also
view this as an opportunity to
tap into the Sports Tourism
market, which was the original
intent when this programme got
started."

In yesterday's junior female
athlete of the year story, it was
stated that Alana Dillette was on
a scholarship contract at her uni-
versity. That is incorrect. She
does not attend college on a con-
tract or scholarship.


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* ALANA DILLETTE yesterday with her Tigers teammates
(Photo: Felipn Major/Tribune staff)


......... .......OR
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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005


SECTION





Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


Tennis ace Ryan weeting is our








junior male athlete of the yeap


* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
AS WE count down the
days and hours to the new
year, the Tribune Sports
Department reflects on the
many successes of our junior
male athletes on the interna-
tional and local scenes.
As in part one, which fea-
tured the success of some of
our top female athletes yes-
terday, the accomplishments
of the junior males have made
this a year to remember.
And, carrying the flag as
the Tribune's junior male ath-
lete of the year, was Ryan
Sweeting.

1) Ryan Sweeting- The first
Bahamian to win the US
Open Junior singles title. The
champion is ranked number
three in the world.
Sweeting's breakthrough
started last year, with an
appearance in the fourth
round of the Australian Open
and topping the ranking
charts at 30.
He also participated in
tournaments in Europe, the
French Open and Wimble-
don.
Since August, Sweeting has


won the B18 singles Chanda
Rubin Pan American match,
the US Open, doubles quar-
terfinalist at the US Open,
doubles winner and semifi-
nalist at the Canadian Open
and the singles winner at the
JITIC, (Central American
and Caribbean).
Prior to his success to the
US Open, Sweeting played as
the number three seed on the
Davis Cup team.
He is hoping to continue his
top form in 2006 for the Uni-
versity of Florida.
2) Gerard Brown- The
Bahamas golden boy at the
Carifta games is a junior
standout in both triple and
long jump.
Brown became the only
person to win two individual
gold medals at the games. At
the World Youth Champi-
onships, Brown advanced in
the semifinals of the triple
jump with a leap of 14.40 a
personal best marking of the
year.
The approaching year in
track and field is filled
with junior meets, and Brown
is hoping to attain the quali-
fying standards for all of
them.


3) John Bradley- Bradley
has been making a splash in
the pools this year. With three
national records already
under his belt, he is gearing
up for the annual Carifta
Games, the Bahamas Swim-
ming Nationals and the CAC-
SO Sports Games.
The swimmer took part in
the annual Bernie Butler Bas-
ra Marathon, the Carifta
Games and. the Central
American and Caribbean
Swimming Champions last
year. One of Bradley's many
medals at the Carifta Games
was a gold medal in the 200
metre free.
Bradley will be looking for-
ward to bettering his person-
al best times as the new year
approaches.
4) Carl Heild- The last man
to be named to this year's
World Championship boxing
team.
Despite the late notifica-
tion, Heild stepped into the
ring with confidence and,
despite losing, impressed
against the experienced Karl
Dargan of the United States.
He is one of the leading
contenders for the Common-
wealth Games team.


5) Cameron Hepple- The
local soccer player has kicked
off his career at the Bowling
Green State University, Ohio,
this fall.
Before beginning collegiate
life, Hepple was the starting
midfielder for the Bahamas
national team, where he
served as captain. Hepple has
represented the Bahamas
more than six times on the
under 17 boys' squad and
three times on the under 23
team.
He has scored two interna-
tional goals in his soccer
career.
6) Jason Collie- Collie glid-
ed his way into the history
books of the most prestigious
basketball tournament in the
Bahamas, the Hugh Campbell
Basketball Invitational.
Collie, one of CI Gibson's
point guards, produced a
game high 15 points in the
championship game against
the Tabernacle Falcons,
enough to give the Rattlers a
58-52 edge victory.
Taking charge in the fourth
quarter became an easy task
for Collie, who netted in six
points, nine rebounds, three
assists and two blocks.


WaeKig



c usCba


* BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
THE CR Walker Knights were firing on all
cylinders as they blew out the CC Sweeting
Cobras 63-45 on Thursday at the third CI Gib-
son High Invitational Basketball Classic.
Although'they only had two players in dou-
ble figures, the Knights used a balanced scoring
attack to outrun the Cobras. and secure their
berth into one of the four pool championships.
Their performance, however, was outshone
by the visiting Sir Jack Hayward Wildcats, who
routed the St. Anne's Bluewaves 56-28 to also
clinch a berth into a pool championship.
Also yesterday, the Jordan Prince William
Falcons beat the Government High Magics 56-
46 in the early session action at the Kendal
Isaacs National Gymnasium.

Coached
CR Walker, coached by Throne Thompson,
were simply no match for CC Sweeting, who
were coached by Julian 'Swish' Coakley.
Davahtyn Baker scored six and Philip Mox-
ey and Tavano Jones both had five to help the
Knights jump out to a comfortable 22-6 lead at
the end of the first quarter and they were able
to stay on top.
'CR Walker were able to use a smothering
defence with their taller line-up as they con-
tained CC Sweeting in the paint, getting the
rebounds and the extra chance at the basket to
take control of the game.
In the second half, the Cobras were able to
turn things around a bit as coach Coakley sub-
stituted his players at will. The different line-up
resulted in CC Sweeting making a small dent in
the lead.


Invitational Basketball Classic


But, coming out of the half-time, CR Walk-
er went back into their offensive attack and
they managed to build on what they started in
the first quarter. They continued to run the ball
in the fourth.
. "They put together a really good effort today
and we were able to get the contribution from
the bench, which was good for us," coach,
Thompson said.
"We're just coming off the long Christmas
break, so this is a good tournament for us to
take a look at what we get for the start of the
season in January and hopefully the Hugh
Campbell Tournament in February."
Moxey would finish with a game high 15,
Baker had 10, Coleby seven, Bachelette LaFleur
and Jones six apiece, Leon Bain five and'
Shavaro Bowleg and Lennox Mackey added
four each.
For the Cobras, Eugene Bain scored 13, Cruz
Simon nine, Wayde Higgs five and Giovanni
Seymour, Kataran Ferguson, Clarence Dean
and Luke Frazier all chipped in with four.
Making his coaching debut in the tourna-
ment, Coakley said he expected a much better
performance from his Cobras, but he feels the
tournament will help them as they march
towards the Hugh Campbell Tournament.
"They're young and they have some attitude
problems that I have to take in hand," he
stressed. "But I know that as we continue to
play, they will get better."
Sir Jack Hayward, coming off an appearance
in the quarter-final of the Catholic High Christ-
mas Invitational Tournament in Grand
Bahama, is hoping that they can iurn things
around here.


Their impressive win left coach Dudson Hig-
gins talking big about the rest of the tournament
that wraps up tonight.
"The guys have been coming out and they
have been playing the way we would like them
to play," Higgins stated. "We're playing in a
relaxed environment and they are executing."
The Wildcats jumped out to a quick 13-7
lead at the end of the first quarter and they
extended it to 29-13 at the half and were never
challenged the rest of the way.
Lavar Rolle paced their attack with 14, Jef-
frey Adderley had 12 and Amado Hepburn
chipped in with 10.
For the losing Bluewaves, Anthony Gardiner
scored a game high 15, Wellington Mullings
had six and Benagh Watson helped out with
five.
The tournament was the coaching debut for
former Bluewaves' point guard Horiatio 'Yel-
low' Poitier, who admitted that St. Anne's did-
n't play near their capacities.
"Sir Jack played an excellent game. They
slowed down our offence, they caused us to
take a lot of bad shots. We didn't play as well as
we would have liked to," Poitier pointed out.
"But Sir Jack just played that much better as
they out-pounded us on the boards."
Falcons 56, Magics 46: Elroy Ferguson's
game high 18, Angelo Cash's 10 and nine each
from Alexis Thompson and Lashad Bullard,
along with Rashad Williams' nine, was good
enough to lead Jordan Prince William to victo-
ry.
Fredrick Rahming and Delroy Rolle b4th
scored 13 and Joshua Rollins added six ina
losing effort for Government High. 'K


L, NA







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