Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00278
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: December 28, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00278
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text










SANDWICH" 9
Pm lovinIt,.

HIGH 79F
LOW 67F

rC MOSTLY
SUNNY


The


Tribune


Doaft i mlytlBNii1,11 I
rusuu. m gieas,
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Bo what tastes ight.


Volume: 102 No.31


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


PRICE 750


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Thousands stranded

as radar malfunction

at NIA causes

massive delays


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
THOUSANDS of passengers
were left stranded after the
radar at Nassau International
Airport malfunctioned, creat-
ing massive delays and flight
cancellations during the peak
holiday season.
According to officials of the
Airline Operators Committee,
the radar's failure on Friday had
a disastrous effect on every
flight coming in and out of the
airport. It was perhaps the sin-
gle biggest problem ever expe-
rienced by the airport, they
added.
The AOC told The Tribune
that 26 flights from six major
US carriers had to be cancelled,
eight flights had to be diverted
to Grand Bahama or Florida
and many more were delayed.
While the average delay was
about three hours, a Continen-
tal Airlines flight to Newark was
ddlayed by nine hours, a US
Airways flight to Charlotte took
eight hours to leave and a Jet
Blue flight to New York had a
seven hour delay.
It was expected that Bahama-
sair's international and domes-
tic flights leaving from Million-
Air and other charter flights
would have all been affected.
Alan Sweeting, interim pres-
ident of the AOC, said the 26
cancellations resulted in at least
1,600 passengers being left
stranded. Some returned to
their hotels while at least 300
passengers were forced to spend


the night in the departure
lounge of the airport.
Atlantis staff and the Min-
istry of Tourism's director of
airlift, Tyrone Sawyer, arranged
for food, drinks and blankets to
be delivered to the airport while
airport security tried to appease
disgruntled pkgsagers.
Ricky Dean, general manag-
er of American Eagle, said all
the airlines were equally affect-
ed and said it is hard to place a
dollar value on the damage
caused.
He said in addition to expens-
es incurred by the airline in
diverting passengers, many peo-
ple stranded either in the Unit-
ed States or Nassau had to shell
out money for food and hotel
expenses.
There was also fuel wastage
which occurred as planes sat
idle on the runway for hours
waiting to be cleared for take-
off.
However, he said those
expenses cannot compare with
the damage the radar has
caused the country's main
industry, tourism.
AOC said the domino effect
of the failed radar may have
affected eight to ten thousand
people.
"Apart from the dollar val-
ue, it leaves a bad taste in the
mouths of guests who otherwise
said they had a wonderful time
in the Bahamas."
He said many passengers told
him they would never come to
SEE page 11


Valley Boys win Junkanoo


* A DANCER for The Valley Boys shows off

* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Valley Boys Junkanoo group, por-
traying symbols of freedom and liberty,
rushed its way to first place in the Doyle Bur-
rows 2005 Boxing Day parade.
Wet weather delayed the parade for several
hours, but didn't dampen the spirits of The
Valley Boys, whose performance had the
crowds stomping.
Bahamians were all hyped up when the
parade finally made its way to Bay Street.
And they were served up a treat to remem-
ber.
The parade was officially declared open


his colourful costume
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)
by this year's honouree,.Doyle Burrows, a
member of The Valley Boys since its incep-
tion.
During the late hours on Monday evening,
Valley Boys made their first lap on Bay Street
under the theme: Let My People Go! The
Long Road To Freedom, Liberation and'
Independence.
The group's fans proudly flew Valley Boys
flags, depicting the Israelites being pursued by
the Egyptians on horse-drawn chariots.
One of their lead costumes paid a tribute to
Rosa Parks, mother of the American civil
rights movement, who died earlier this year.
SEE page 11


Son of former
deputy PM is
found dead
ONE of the Bahamas' most
prominent political families was
last night still in shock over the
Christmas 'Day death of attor-
ney Sean Hanna son of for-
mer deputy prime minister, A D
Hanna.
The 45-year-old bachelor was
found dead in his bedroom at
his parents' South Beach home.
A friend said: "This has come as
a big blow to everyone who
knew him. He was a very pleas-
ant man and he will be deeply
missed."
Mr Hanna described as "a
highly intelligent and very cul-
tured person" attended
church on Christmas morning
but was found later in the day
lying in a "doubled up" posi-
tion, according to an informed
source.
"It was as though he died in
agony," said the source. "No-
one is yet sure of the cause."
Mr Hanna, third son and
fourth out of the five children of
PLP stalwart Mr A D Hanna
and his British-born wife Beryl,
lived with his parents and was
partner in the Deveaux Street
law firm started by his father.
His sister, Glenys Hanna Mar-
'ii, is thieMinister of Transport
and Aviation.
SEE page 11


Two children
in hospital
after shooting

TWO young children spent
Christmas weekend recovering
in hospital after being gunned
downed in their home on Sat-
urday night.
Details remain sketchy, but
police say the children, a boy
and girl aged nine and ten, were
in their home on Palm Beach
Street, Englerston, when they
were shot in their legs on
Christmas Eve. They were both
rushed to Princess Margaret
Hospital.
Police do not have a motive
or suspect, but have launched
an intense investigation.
In other crime news, two
men forced their way into a
home on Marlon Drive at mid-
night Christmas Eve. Police say
the men searched the home,
stealing cash, personal items
and the keys to a Nissan car
SEE page 11


NIas sau and Bahama Iadds'l 6e 'INwsppe


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION



he AHAMAS EITeraION
BAHAMAS EDITION


I i I I i ll I ' ' ''













Assessing the age-old year and




sharing the pain of Bimini


WAS it a good year? Or a bad year?
Or is this arbitrary measurement of
time utterly indifferent, like the chalice that is
filled with fine wine one moment and deadly poi-
son the next?
As the year races to its close many will be
doing their personal calculations to deliver a ver-
dict on 2005. For some it will be easy.
Great personal loss, such as the sudden passing
of a loved one, or a string of adversities will clear-
ly dictate the answer.
It will be equally decisive if everything went-
well: the last payment on the mortgage was made,
the youngest child ceased to be a dependent and
good health prevailed.
For others perhaps the majority the year will
have been filled with the usual ups and downs,
successes and failures, pleasures and pains.
At the national level it is far more complicated
and some will make the assessment still based
on personal experience. It will be seen as a very
bad year for the nation if one were unemployed
most of the time. For one who made a bundle of
money it will be seen as a great year.
Others will be able to reach more objective
conclusions. The Bahamas remains one of the
best places in the world to live and enjoy life.
The economy may not be performing as well as
we might have wished but Bahamians are still
enjoying a standard of living that is the envy of
many other developing countries.
While we take great delight in berating the
political class, we still enjoy the benefits of a
healthy democracy and the rule of law which mil-
lions around the world have yet to experience.

B ut there are some ailments and defi-
ciencies in the body of the nation with
potential to undermine the very foundations of
our society and seriously diminish our quality of
life.
Violent crime has plagued us during 2005 and
antisocial behaviour seems to be increasing, not
abating, among our young people.
Our education system is not yet producing
the results that will enable us to hold our own in
a world that is becoming ever more competi-
tive.
Some of the negative influences dragging us
down emanate from a western civilisation that
is itself in a state of decay and desperately in
need of a cultural and spiritual renaissance.
The lessons of Uncle Arthur's Bedtime Sto-
ries and Brer Bookie and Brer Rabbie are lost to
many of the younger generations.
Largely lost, too, is the great literature of writ-
ers like Charles Dickens, which helped to shape


the conscience and refine the emotions of older
generations. Classical poetry seems much neglect-
ed and seldom committed to memory.
Instead, today's youth are bombarded by vast
corporate-owned multimedia networks peddling
violence and vulgarity and glorifying ignorance
and permissiveness.
One writer observed at the turn of the century
that one of the worst ideas of the twentieth cen-
tury was the reversal of roles between parents
and children.
Degrees of freedom for children are no longer
i, esciibed by parents but have become a'iatter
for negotiation, if not right. .
i-' How children dress and deport themselves is


Where once we
celebrated good
manners, refinement
and respect, too many
of us now contribute
to the unpleasantness
with inconsiderate
and rude public
behaviour.


likewise a matter of demand promoted and
encouraged by the cretins in the mass media, not
directed by parents.
These negative external influences have found
fertile ground in our own society which has failed
to nurture the values that went into making us a
polite and gentle people.
Where once we celebrated good manners,
refinement and respect, too many of us now con-
tribute to the unpleasantness with inconsiderate
and rude public behaviour.
The end of one year and the beginning of
another is as good a time as any for a national
examination of conscience and a taking of inven-
tory to see whether we have the cultural memo-
ry, political will and spiritual resources necessary
to start a renaissance right here in these islands.



ome adversities are seasonal like hurri-
canes and 2005 saw the busiest hurri-
cane season in history while we were still reeling
from the destruction of the previous year.
Others pay no attention to the calendar and can
strike at any time. Such was the case when tragedy
devastated the little community of Bimini and
left the nation in a state of shock in the middle of
this holiday season.
Last week Monday 11 Bahamians, including
two infants, plunged to their deaths as a Chalk's
aircraft broke apart and fell into the water off
*Miami. Nine other persons, presumably Ameri-
!,.cans, also perished.
SThe horrifying spectacle took place in full view


of persons on shore and the rest of us witnessed it
by way of television. It was the worst tragedy to
befall the Bahamas in many years, certainly the
worst ever aviation disaster.
Most of us can only imagine the pain and
anguish of those who have been so cruelly
bereaved. Albert Schweitzer, the missionary doc-
tor and philosopher famous for his work in Africa,
referred to a secret bond among the "Fellowship
of those who bear the Mark of Pain"; and
Bahamians like to say, "Only he who feels it
knows it."
The pain of those bereaved by the crash of
Flight 101 is exacerbated by the knowledge that
their loved ones must have suffered intense
anguish in those moments when the airplane
cracked and was falling to earth.

T here is no remedy for such pain. Not
even time can completely erase it. Just as
tears come to the eyes of the old soldier who
recalls the violent death of a comrade a half cen-
tury ago, so too their pain is likely to linger,
always within reach of memory.
Said Doug Anderson, an American poet who
was a doctor in the Vietnam War, when con-
fronted by the overwhelming pain of a mother
and father whose child had been torn apart by
shrapnel:
"There is nothing to say,
Nothing in my medical bags,
Nothing in my mind."
There is nothing we can say to alleviate the
pain of our brothers and sisters in Bimini. They
know that, to one degree or another, we all belong
to the Fellowship of Pain.
The celebrations of this holy season will con-
tinue but each of us will keep them in our hearts
and in our prayers. Life goes on; it is the only
thing that will not die.


THANK YOU!

A t the end of another year I should like
to thank all the readers of this column
for their encouragement during the year, espe-
cially those who call on Tuesdays or take time to
send e-mails.
I should like to thank also all those at The Tri-
bune who make it possible for this-columnr to
appear every Tuesday without fail.
I trust that the New Year will bring many joys
and that we will have the strength to meet its
inevitable challenges.
Happy New Year!


KIA MOTORS


Thompson Boulevard, Oakes Field, Nassau, Bahamas, P.O. Box GT-2947

Tel: 326-6377, 326-6464/5, 326-0013/4, 326-6382 Fax: 326-6315

Email: sanpin.vehicles@coralwave.com


PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


THE TRIBUNE









THET RIB U N E W E DNE SE2 ,


Two teens killed in car accident


Visitor

becomes

68th traffic

fatality

By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

"A CANADIAN male visi-
tor aged 24 became the
Bahamas' 68th traffic fatality
for the year during a motor-
bike ride in Long Island.
The incident, which also
led to a 46-year-old woman
being airlifted to hospital,
has prompted police to
remind motorists to stick to
the rules of the road during
the rest of the holiday sea-
son.
Police say the accident
occurred in the settlement of
Alligator Bay, just south of
Simms, Long Island, on
Christmas Eve. The man was
driving a self-drive motor-
bike and the woman was in a
white 2004 Mitsubishi car.
Police have not released
the name of the victim or the
injured woman, who was
immediately flown to
Princess Margaret Hospital.
Investigations are continu-
,ing.
.However, at 68 deaths,
ppojice say the traffic-fatality
count is simply too high.
,,Press officer Walter Evans
..uged motorists to be
.extremely cautious as they
drive during the rest of the
holiday season. "Already we
are ahead of the traffic fatal-
ity count of last year and we
are close to ,70," he said.
He reminded motorists
that the holiday season
'wbuld forever be ruined if
they or a loved one was
l'tilled in a traffic accident.
'He also urged motorists
attending parties particu-
'!irly those who may be at
New Year's Eve parties not
tq drink and drive.
. "We ask everyone to con-
tinue to drive cautiously and
with regard to the rules of
the road," he said.

Four die in

plane crash
FOUR men died in a plane
crash in Turks and Caicos on
Monday.
Gregory Simms, air traffic
controller at Providenciales,
Turks and Caicos, said a pri-
vately-owned plane departed
South Caicos around 7pm
heading for Providenciales.
"After departure it looked
like the aircraft got some prob-
lems in the air. It crash-landed
into the sea on a bank," he said.
He said the plane crashed
noer-dokwn. The dead were all
froidTtirks and Caicos, he
,aY'd, '3i -;


t -











"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"

0


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT Two teenagers
- 19-year-olds Shantell Reckley
and Maxine Swain of Dundas
Town, Abaco were killed in a
tragic car accident just two days
before Christmas.
Supt Basil Rahming said one
of the two victims was crushed
to death when the vehicle they
were in with three other persons,
including the driver and two


young children, overturned sev-
eral times Friday afternoon on
the Great Abaco Highway.
The two deaths push the traffic
fatality count to four for the year
on Abaco.
According to police, the acci-
dent occurred around 5.28pm on
Friday when Edith Armbrister,
25, of Dundas Town, was driving
her Isuzu Rodeo south along the
Great Abaco Highway.
Ms Armbrister and her four
passengers Maxine Swain,


Shantell Reckley, Alicia Albury,
four, and Jessica Major, three -
were on their way to the ferry
dock at Sandy Point, Abaco.
They had planned to board the
MV Sea Wind to spend the
Christmas holidays in New Prov-
idence.
Just about two and a half
miles north of Sandy Point, Ms
Armbrister lost control of the
vehicle and skidded off the road
into bushes at the eastern side.
The SUV overturned several


In tune with Bay Street at junkanoo


times and landed on top of Ms
Reckley, who was ejected from
the vehicle.
Supt Basil Rahming said
police and EMS officials
responded, but Reckley and
Swain were already dead. It took
an hour to remove the body from
beneath the wreckage.
Ms Armbrister and the two
children sustained serious
injuries. They were later airlifted
to Princess Margaret Hospital in
Nassau.
Their conditions were not
known up to press time.
N MAN WANTED BY
POLICE
A 28-YEAR-OLD Bahamian
man is being sought for ques-
tioning by Grand Bahama police


in connection with a stolen vehi-
cle.
Officers say Leslie McIntosh,
.address unknown, is wanted to
help inquiries into the robbery
of a vehicle at Gibson Radiator
Repair on July 1, 2005. They say
he is considered armed and
extremely dangerous and should
be approached with caution.
He is about 6ft 5ins tall, of
medium build with dark brown
complexion. He has black short
hair and brown eyes.
His weight and occupation are
unknown.
Police are asking anyone with
information concerning McIn-
tosh to contact them in Grand
Bahama at 350-3106, 352-9774/5
or crime tipster at 352-1919. In
Nassau at 328-8477, 322-2561 or
919.


Pedestrian killed


in Grand Bahama
* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT Grand Bahama recorded its 22nd traffic fatality over
Christmas when a 60-year-old pedestrian was struck and killed while
walking along East Sunrise Highway.
The victim, Archelous Thompson, of Freeport, was employed for
many years as a security officer at the Woodbourne Estates Resort on
South Mall Drive.
According to reports, Patrick Stirrup, 48, of Nelson Road, was dri-
ving a 2002 Kia mini-van licensed SD331 east along East Sunrise
Highway when the accident occurred. His 13-year-old daughter, Pre-
cell, was a passenger with him in the vehicle.
Mr Stirrup told police that it was raining. He was travelling at
45mph and, near Aerial Place, a man suddenly appeared in front of his
vehicle.
He swerved, but was unable to avoid hitting the man, he told police.
When police arrived on the scene, they checked the victim, but
found no vital signs. He was taken by ambulance to Rand Memorial
Hospital, where he was pronounced dead on arrival.
Mr Stirrup and his daughter were not injured. The vehicle they
were in sustained extensive damage to the front windshield, hood,
and left front fender.
Investigations are continuing.


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I


(Photo: Mario
Duncanson/
Tribune staff)


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986,
and share your story.


DRESS
FOR THE :
HOLIDAYS


EMILIO PUCCI
of Italy


Gift Certificates
Available
OPEN

- uASA EK


SEstablished in 1956 by an old Bahamian family
Parliament Street (near Bay St.) Tel: 322-8393 or 328-7157
SFaIx: 326-9953
Crystal Court at Atlantis,, Paradise Island Tel: 363-4161/2
Lyford Cay (next to Lyford Cay Real Estate in
Harbour Green House) Tel: 362-5235
e-mail: www.colesofn assau.com P.O. Box N-121


, In brief


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005,. PAGE 3


te






PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


BITRALET *TE TOHEEDTO


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
'Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-


I


Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608


Chaos once more at Nassau Airport


"PARDON OUR appearance as we try to
improve our service".
Loud guffaws and ribald jokes at the sight of.
this sign at Nassau International Airport on
Monday broke the tension of passengers who,
standing in line for more than an hour to clear
security, fretted that they would miss their
flights. They found the sign ironically amusing
as they had received no -service. But even
worse they were given no information.
What they did not know as they slowly
moved through the queue was that the air-
port's radar had broken down, and planes
were stacked up overhead, going nowhere.
Many of the aircraft had to return to home
ports, others were diverted to other tourist
destinations to discharge holiday passengers,
originally destined for the Bahamas.
According to a radio announcement Mon-
day by Airport Authority general manager
Idris Reid, Nassau International Airport was
not closed, but because its radar was down, it
was having to follow FAA regulations and
maintain a certain time lapse between arriving
and departing aircraft. In fact if not in name
- Nassau Airport was closed and the time
lapse between flights was in the region of an
unacceptable eight hours or more. By Tuesday
morning aircraft leaving the US for Nassau
were bumping passengers so that they could
carry enough fuel to get them to Nassau and
back to their home airports.
A Bahamian business man, who, took two
hours in a queue from American Eagle's air-
line counter which he said dispatched him
quickly to the departure lounge, said he
had to suffer in silence the sarcastic remarks of
visitors about the condition of the airport and
the laid back attitude in the Bahamas.
What he did not know at that point was that
the delays were such that even if thie flight on
which he was booked could have taken off it
could not get him to his destination in time to
join a cruise for which he had been booked for
some time. In the end he gave up, returned
home and with his travel agent tried to figure
out how he could pick up his cruise at its next
port of call.
When he realised the full import of the
chaos building up around him, the frustration
and anger of visitors during the Bahamas'
busiest travel period of the year, he com-
mented: "The hurricanes missed' Nassau this
year, but do you realise that what is happening
here today is a worse disaster than any hurri-
cane could have delivered? It has crippled our
tourist industry." He wished that Prime Min-
ister Christie could have replaced him in the
line to hear and experience andl then under-


stand the urgency of getting the airport's man-
agement into experienced hands. He was sat-
isfied that no one in the queue that day wa a
return visitor.
The airport was meant to be privatised y
the end of this year. Negotiations have been
going on for more than a year three mare
days will end the year and still no news
about whether the talks with Vancouver Air-
port Services has been concluded. We have
heard many rumours, one of them being that
government wants more control than is good
for the health of a' private airport. If this is in
fact true, then it spells disaster.
How many more years will it take for gov-
ernment to understand that government is the
airport's major problem; that its continuing
interfering presence in an industry that it
knows nothing about is not only killing the
airport, but is drilling the nail deeper into the
coffin of this country's major industry -
tourism. Any businessman who would ven-
ture into an airport operation with a partner as
clueless as a government should invite close
public observation for something must be
wrong with their judgment.
As is well known by now, this is not the
first time that the radar has broken down at
our airport. However, it is the first time that it
has done so at the most critical period for our
tourist industry. Needless to say, hoteliers and
Ministry of Tourism personnel are upset, as
they should be. All their work, all the hotels'
and taxpayers' money spent on advertising,
all wasted because sufficient care was not tak-
en to make certain that the airport operated
efficiently to get visitors to their destinations
for Christmas and the New Year.
We understand that when the primary air-
port radar system went down on December
15, a back up system remained. It is claimed
that the decision was made that the back up sys-
tem would be sufficient to see Nassau through
the holidays. If this is true, this means that the
primary system had not been repaired. On
Monday morning the back up system failed.
And the Bahamas says it plans to take over
its own airspace by monitoring its own Flight
Information Region (FIR) so that it can collect
tens of millions of dollars in fees now collect-
ed by the United States.
And it doesn't even have the expertise to
keep its own radar system operational!
As the old folks used "to say: Man, don't
make that I laugh!
Government would be well advised to con-
centrate on quickly getting this airport under
competent management before tourism col-
lapses under the weight of total incompetence.


EDITOR, The Tribune
FOR the continued success
of any society, each generation
must pass on its history and her-
itage to the next generation.
Unless we know from whence
we came, how on earth are we
expected to know where we are
going? Those who cannot
remember their past will be
condemned to repeat it. It is
therefore vital that the artifacts
and monuments that tell the
story of our past be preserved
for the future generations to
enjoy. Failure to do so would
be most irresponsible and this
reckless neglect would literally
rob future generations of their
heritage.
The track record of the
Bahamas and the Bahamian
people of guarding our heritage
have been nothing short of dis-
graceful. Neglect and abandon-
ment are the words that best
, ,describe the attitude of those
charged with this responsibili-,
ty. Just look at the conditions
of our forts, buildings of histor-
ical significance and those grand
plantations that existed
throughout the Family Islands.
What kind of condition are they
in now or are some of these arti-
facts gone forever, taking with it
a precious part of the Bahamian
past?
This is not a political state-
ment as it appears that succes-
sive governments of the
Bahamas have not placed
Bahamian heritage as a priority.
It is pointless appointing com-
mittees who are only really
paper shufflers without any real
authority. What is needed is del-
egation of duties along with the-
resources, financial or other-
wise'to accomplis fiheir objec-
tives.
In The Nassau Guardian dat-
ed September 23, 2005, under
the heading "The Eleutheran
Adventurers" Dr Gail Saunders
among others presented some
important historical facts. In
particular the voyage of Cap-
tain William Sayles who
brought that group of travellers
that we now refer to as "The
Eleutheran Adventurers" to the
Bahamas, ushering in the era
of the modem day development
of the Bahamas. The name
"Eleuthera" being derived from
the Greek word meaning: "free-
dom" in itself was a statement
of commitment and apprecia-
tion. Landing at Governor's
Bay and. taking refuge in
Preacher's Cave is just as sig-
nificant a landing as the Pilgrims
aboard the Mayflower at Ply-
mouth Rock, Massachusetts.
However, the big difference is


the way the respective countries
have treated both of these
events. In Massachusetts, Ply-
mouth Rock is well preserved
with a replica of the Mayflower.
Museums, commemorative
plaques, tours and information
about the journey, including the
passenger list being prominent-
ly posted. A plantation show-
ing the way the people lived is
nearby. ' ':
Needless to say that this is a
multi-million dollar tourist
attraction as persons come from
far and wide to learn about the
Mayflower and: their heritage.
On the other hand, Preacher's
Cave has been ignored. As a
boy I can recall the box that taxi
driver JB Barry had at the
entrance begging for donations
to weed around and upkeep
Preachers Cave. So much for us
being proud of our heritage.
Only Columbus Landing at San
Salvador is more significant
than Preacher's Cave. Not only
is Columbus Landing significant
to the Bahamas, but is the gate-
way to the entire western world.
However, the most shocking
display of neglect of Bahamian
heritage and National Treasure
was brought to my attention this
past summer. These are the can-
nons at South Bar guarding
Harbour's Mouth Channel
between the southern tip of
Harbour Island and Eleuthera.
At least six huge cannons have
been left deserted and allowed
to deteriorate _under the ele-'
ments, mostly, hidden by dirt
and the bushes that are taller
than my height. They are so
well hidden that as a boy grow-
ing up in Harbour Island, I have
passed this site a number of
times without realising that they
were there, even though I have
heard of the cannons at South
Bar.
Apparently these cannons
were strategically placed at this
point to protect against pirates
and other invaders. Literally
they have been in this position
for hundreds of years, maybe
as many as three hundred and
fifty years. Clearly, this area
contains a wealth of vital infor-
mation regarding the history of
Harbour Island and indeed the
Bahamas as these cannons may
have predated even the much
talked about Clifton Cay. By
not properly examining and
excavating this site, the Bahami-
an people.will be the biggest
losers.
One of the reasons con-
tributing to the abandonment
of such significant artifacts is
the selfishness of the owners of
the exclusive South Bar Club
who claim to own the property
on which the cannons sit.
Reportedly, they had requested
that these cannons be relocated
to avoid people, especially local
'Brilanders from trespassing
onto their property. The Com-
missioner's residence has been


mentioned as a possible site. To
say that the attitude of the pro-
prietors has-caused tension
between themm-and the:llopal
community is: an understf'te-
ment.
While there 'is' no question
tha'tSouth ,Bar has been of
tremendous benefit to Harbour
Island and that the owrfers
either individually or cbolec-
tively have. always -helped the
community, this extreme effort
to protect their privacy cannot
be tolerated insutch a' s.sall
community, of which Soufthiar
occupies a significant portion.
For example; the rbad leading
to the' end of the island where
the cannons have'sat from'time
'immemorial has, 'lways-been
regarded'as a public road, For
the last halfmile or so is the
'gate establishing the boundary
of South Bar.iThe Bahamas
Electricity Corporation (BEC)
maintains a transformer on'the
site where the cannons-sit as'the
underwater cable crosses Har-
bour's Mouth Channel to bring
electricity to Harbour Island.
The fact that such a major struc-
ture as a transformer is on the
site, undoubtedly the site has
already been molested to some
extent.
However, the shocker to local
government officials earlier this
summer came when during a
power blackout, a BEC vehicle
was denied access to the Trans-
former by being stopped at the
gate by South Bar personnel.
This is absolutely unacceptable
as the rest of the island had to
suffer while local government
and BEC negotiate the use of
what everyone is saying is a
public road. To my surprise,
when I'visited th leite, a pile of
debris had been plc -d in the
middle of the road obviously to
impede anyone driving there.
In fact, the last 300-400 yards,
we had to leave our golf and
walk the rest of the way.
Over the years, the govern-
ment of the Bahamas has been
fully aware of the existence of
these cannons and their signifi-
cance. This site has been visited
by all the major players such as
Dr Gail Saunders of the His-
torical Society, Mr Ge6rge
Mackey of the Artifact and
Antiquity's Committee and Mr
Pericles Maillis of the Bahamas
National Trust. Without reser-
vation I am certain that they all
agree that these cannon's are an
important part of B'ah'ainian
heritage and must be preserved
not just as a tourist'attrabtion
but as something that all
Bahamians can -ie proud off.
The suggestion by SoAth'Blar to
move these s'tr'li'&fu ?f'from
their original s'stting'igiuitter
nonsense, one that no Bahami-
an government should .anter-
tain !. ,; .. :
This area mu5,t- bg, dared
an historical sit6 with priority
given to restore it. as.mucph as
- possible-6 'its brgiral. te.

DR LEATENIfDRE-
PERCENTIE, DDS
Boston, Massachius-tts.
November t22005 ,..


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THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005,CAPAGEWS


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Claims by some spectators of




junkanoo seating problems


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
SOME Junkanoo spectators
were inconvenienced at the
Boxing Day parade when they
encountered problems in
locating their bleacher seats.
At the parade, which
extended from Monday night
to early Tuesday morning, The
Tribune spoke with seven peo-
ple who said they were affect-
ed.
Stephanie Woodside said
she sacrificed $75 to be seated
"comfortably" in Rawson
Square section S.
"I am going to take my tick-
et to Mr Wisdom to see if I
can get a refund," said Ms
Woodside.
Antoin Bowe, who, bought
his ticket on line for Rawson
Square south section N, said
that after ten minutes of being
on line to be seated, the
bleacher marshal said there
were no more seats in his area
and that they were unable to
help him.
"I asked about a refund and
they said they were unable to
give refunds out here. I am
going back to Kendal Isaacs
gym and they are going to
refund me my money. This is
ridiculous," said Mr Bowe.
Lindrick Douglas, who also
had problems with his bleach-
er seats, said he felt that
bleacher marshals could have
done a better job.
Mr Douglas said he arrived
at Scotiabank north section F
at 8.30pm expecting to be
seated. However, when The
Tribune interviewed him at
1.45am he was still standing.
He said bleacher marshals
told him that he could see if he
could find a seat anywhere in
his section. He was also told
that if a seat couldn't be found
it would mean that he would
have to lap up.

Arrived
"When I arrived, there were
still people standing up wait-
ing on seats and were still not
able to be seated and they
left," he said.
Culture minister Neville
Wisdom said the positive in
Junkanoo should be high-
lighted.
However, he pointed out:
"When you have 10,000 peo-
ple being seated and you have
one or two seating problems
in an outdoor theatre with
seating that is temporary, I
think that certainly signals that
the job is well done.
"I would like to personally
apologise to those persons and
assure them that we will try
the best we can to correct any
challenges that we had for the
future," said Mr Wisdom.
Marachella Mott told The
Tribune that Mr Wisdom gave
up three of his seats and
allowed her, her husband and
daughter to occupy them.
"I think it was thoughtful of
him. He didn't have to do
it,"she said.
Jeff Lloyd, deputy chairman
of the parade management
committee, said he was aware


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12:03 Car. Today News Update
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12:30 Krueger's Christmas
1:00 Rudolph The Red Nose
Reindeer
2:00 Elmo Saves Christmas
3:00 Matinee: The Lion, The Witch,
& The Wardrobe
4:58 ZNS News Update
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6:30 News Night 13
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Retreat 2005
9:30 An Evening of Christmas
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10:30 News Night 13
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Movie: National Lampoon
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of the situation.
He said the complaint was
that officials responsible for
seating did not know exactly
where some people were sup-
posed to make their entrances,
and how to be properly seated
for their particular ticket des-
ignations.

Designation
He added that some peo-
ple, on arriving at their par-
ticular designation, found oth-
ers occupying their seats.
"This is a brand new
arrangement and therefore I


am sure (again I don't speak
for the Junkanoo Corporation
of New Providence or the
Ministry of Youth Sports and
Culture but, I am speaking as
Jeffery Lloyd) this is a matter
of growing pains and becom-
ing aware so that they can exe-
cute with efficiency and
competence this issue of seat-
ing.
"However, as you can see,
all of the persons who needed
to be seated have been seated.
The initial hiccups and chal-
lenges that were experienced
earlier on in the evening have
been cleared away," said Mr
Lloyd.


Spectators at the western
end of Bay Street complained
that they were denied a prop-
er view of the parade because
they were not in a "paying"
section.
"It seems that 50 years after
the colour bar was abolished
on Bay Street that another
kind of discrimination exists -
between those who can pay
and those who can't," said one
furious onlooker.
"Why shouldn't poor peo-
ple be able to see Junkanoo
properly? It's a people's festi-
val, not just for those with
money."
Junkanoo groups formed up


between the British Colonial
Hilton and Skans Restaurant,
depriving hundreds of specta-
tors the chance of seeing par-
ticipants "rushing".
While they were able to
appreciate the costumes
and floats, they saw little
action.
"The government needs to
look at this," said another
spectator, "proper provision
needs to be made for those
who cannot, or choose not to,
pay. Junkanoo is not just
about money, it's about
national pride and everybody
is entitled to share in that,
whether rich or poor."


Doyle Burrows honoured in parade


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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


No Santa Claus for the Caribbean



in the Hong Kong WTO meeting


* By SIR RONALD
SANDERS
(The writer is a business exec-
utive and former Caribbean
diplomat who publishes wide-
ly on Small States in the global
community).


THERE was no Santa
Claus and no early
Christmas gift to Caribbean
countries from the Sixth Min-
isterial Conference of the
World Trade Organisation
(WTO) held in Hong Kong


from December 13 to 18.
If Caribbean delegations left
Hong Kong with a deep sense
of disappointment, there was
good reason for it. Nothing was
on offer to meet the special
needs of the Region's small and
vulnerable economies. And, if
anything, what emerged from
the Hong Kong discussion was
that a number of other devel-
oping countries do not agree
that the Region should be treat-
ed differently.
This is very troubling for the
countries of the Caribbean
Community and Common Mar-
ket (CARICOM) and it should
call for an urgent re-think of
their strategy for the WTO
negotiations as well as measures
to strengthen trade links
amongst each other.
The Conference itself had no
great ambition for success in



As it has
done for
years, France
paralysed any
movement by
the EU.


advancing what is called the
Doha round of negotiations.
Prior to the meeting, Pascal
Lamy, the Director-General of
the WTO, and John Tsang, the
Conference Chairman, had low-
ered the expectations of the
meeting just so it would not be
called a failure.

But, a rose, called by
another name, is still
a rose. And, this round of nego-
tiations was always supposed to
have "development" as its cen-'


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tral objective. That objective
has never been seriously pur-
sued. In this connection, Hong
Kong was as much a failure as
Cancun and Seattle before it.
Messrs Lamy and Tsang
knew that there would be great
difficulty over the removal of
agricultural subsidies. The US
had announced its readiness to
reduce the huge subsidies it
pays to its farmers for a range of
products if others specifical-
ly the EU would do the
same.
But, as it has done for years,
France paralysed any move-
ment by the EU, and its chief
negotiator, Peter Mandelson,
went through most of the Hong
'Kong meeting with his ears
firmly glued to negotiations that
were taking place not in the
WTO but in Brussels where a
parallel meeting of the EU
Heads of Government was tak-
ing place. For the outcome of
that meeting dictated what
cards Mr Mandelson was hand-
ed.
The EU meeting was con-
cerned with settling a Budget
over the period 2007-2013 for
the Union of 25 nations, and
there were two principal issues
that bedevilled it.

First, Britain's Prime
Minister, Tony Blair,
wanted to hold on to as much of
a rebate of the UK's contribu-
tions to the EU as he could. The
former Conservative Party
Prime Minister, Margaret
Thatcher, had negotiated the
rebate, and to many in Britain it
had become a kind of symbol
of triumph over Europe par-
ticularly Germany and France.


The second
issue came
back to France
and its
obstinate
position on
not cutting
subsidies to,
its farmers.


Mr Blair was faced with two
difficulties: in domestic politics,
a Labour leader could not be
seen to surrender what a Con-
servative leader had won; and in
European politics, he was the
chairman of the meeting and


its own?
Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com


the current EU President. If the
EU summit failed to agree a
Budget under his chairmanship
because he would not agree to
give up a substantial part of
Britain's rebate, he would have
been accused of sinking an
already unsteady EU ship.
In the end, at much to his
political cost in Britain, Mr Blair
held steady to the worthiness
of the European project, and
agreed to give up 10.5 billion
Euros of Britain's rebate over
seven years to aid new and
needy members of the EU.
The second issue came back
to France and its obstinate posi-
tion on not cutting subsidies to
its farmers. President Jacques
Chirac refused to budge on this
issue until Britain surrendered
a substantial portion of its
rebate.
Then he agreed that subsi-
dies would be phased out but
not until 2013. The US, Brazil,
Australia and others wanted
2010.

Nonetheless, it was this
movement by France
which allowed Mr Mandelson
to make an offer in Hong Kong
to end agricultural subsidies by
2013.
The offer is not uncondi-
tional, and may yet not hap-
pen. Seven years is a long time
in international politics. The EU
says its elimination of subsidies
is subject to an end to US food
aid and export credits as well
as the closure of government-
owned monopoly grain traders
in Canada, Australia and New
Zealand.
What this all goes to prove is
that deals stitched-up between
the big and powerful countries
of the world are still what hold
for a global agenda.
If France, the UK and Ger-
many did not agree in Brussels
on a deal for the EU Budget,
including the phasing out of


agricultural subsidies by 2013,
the representatives of the other
146 countries at the WTO in
Hong Kong would have had no
movement whatsoever.
Developing countries simply
lack the unity and organisation
to negotiate in their collective
interest against the developed
nations, hence the big and pow-
erful rule. Unfortunately, this
seems to apply even to the
WTO where the principle of
one country, one vote is main-
tained and any group of coun-
tries could stall negotiations
until their concerns are satis-
factorily addressed.
And, let there be no mistake
about it, the Caribbean got only
promises to look for answers to
their problems with no certain-
ty that such answers will be pro-
vided.
For instance, paragraph 21 of
the Hong Kong Declaration
reads in relation to market
access for non-agriculture: "We
note the concerns raised by
small, vulnerable economies,
and instruct the Negotiating
Group to establish ways to pro-
vide flexibilities for these Mem-
bers without creating a sub-cat-
egory of WTO Members".

n other words, there
should be no special cate-
gory for "small and vulnerable
economies" such as the


The
Caribbean got
only promises
to look for
answers to
their problems
with no
certainty that,
such answers
will be
provided.


Caribbean which is precisely
what it needs, and Ministers are
asked to provide "flexibilities" -
whatever that means. A special
category for small and vulnera-
ble economies similar to the cat-
egory for Least Developed
Countries with appropriate
rules for special and different
treatment would have given the
Region the chance of extend-'
ing preferential markets for its '
key commodities such as sugar,'
bananas and rice.
While Caribbean Ministers
would have fought hard to get"
language in the Declaration that
reflected the issues that harm
small economies, paragraph 41
only took note of the work pro-
gramme on small economies,
and their specific proposals and
asked that "responses" be pro-
vided by 31 December 2006.
Worryingly, in the report of
the chairman of the committee
on non-agriculture market
access, it was reported that
small and vulnerable economies
stressed that they had charac-
teristics which warranted spe-
cial attention, but "there (was)
a serious divergence of opinion
among developing Members".
Further, when African,
Caribbean and Pacific (ACP)
countries put forward a list of
products on which they wanted
preferences in the EU and US
market, the chairman of the
committee reported: "This sub-
ject is highly divisive precisely
because the interests of the two
groups of developing Members
are in direct conflict".

So ministers are sched-
uled to meet again in
Geneva next March to figure
out how to advance this Doha
round of negotiations on
"development".
At that meeting should the
Caribbean not dig in its heels
and refuse to budge unless it
gets real concessions as small
and vulnerable economies? If
France alone can hold the world
hostage to the fortunes of its
already wealthy farmers, should
the Caribbean not hold out for


--


or


CP%


Qdu&me







THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005, PAGE 7


LOCAL ANDCARIBANEW

Kidnaping ife i Hait


* QUESNEL Durosier gets dressed for his wedding in Port-au-Prince, Haiti on Saturday.
Durosier walked out of a bank with $3,500 tucked into his sock, buoyed by thoughts of his
upcoming wedding. Seconds later, a car cut him off, gunmen sprang out and shoved him and a
woman who was walking nearby inside the vehicle. A wave of kidnappings has earned, at least for
now, this impoverished nation the dubious distinction of being No.1 in the world for kidnappings
and dragged Durosier and the woman into a nightmare of death threats and torture.
(AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)




Book on Oakes




murder is set




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* A COPY of the highly successful book about the Oakes murder Blood and Fire, by John
Marquis has been presented to the Bahamas National Library by LMH Publishers, whose
hardback edition is a near sell-out after only a week on the market. Here the author is seen with
LMH managing director Dawn Chambers Henry (left).and chief librarian Dorcas Pearson.


THE entire hardback edition'
of the book Blood and Fire -
about the Oakes murder mys-
tery looks set to sell out in
Nassau in record time.
Distributor Gregory Lee of
Island Merchants said Christ-
mas demand for the book was
unparalleled, even by noted
bestsellers like J K Rowling's
Harry Potter series.
"I have not experienced any-
thing quite like this," he told
The Tribune. "I can't remem-
ber any book performing this
well over so short a period."
All 2,1'25 hardback copies
shipped into Nassau for the pre-
Christmas launch look set to
sell out over the next few days.
It is not yet known whether
more hardbacks will be pro-
duced, or if the book will go
straight into the trade paper-
back edition.
If the hardback is not reprint-
ed, it could become a collector's
item in years to come, especial-
ly copies signed by the author.
The book's phenomenal suc-
cess took everyone by surprise,
including author John Marquis,
who said he expected "a low-
key launch" with a few friends.
Instead, the book took off
from the start, sparking a pre-
Christmas clamour which left
booksellers reeling.
Jan Roberts of Logos Book-
store, at Harbour Bay Shopping
Centre, was first to spot the
book's sales potential and she
managed to shift nearly half the
island's entire stock in only a
few days.
She said Blood and Fire had
far outstripped Harry Potter
and other bestselling titles.
Mr Marquis, managing edi-
tor of The Tribune, is now
halfway through a biography of
Francois 'Papa Doc' Duvalier,
dictator of Haiti between 1957-
71.
He said: "Every author
dreams of a fantastic launch for
his book, but this one has been
overwhelming. It has been due
to a combination of things the
pre-Christmas rush, the public-
ity the book has received and,
of course, the subject. It seems
everyone wants to hear more


about the murder of Sir Harry
Oakes.
"I'd like to thank all those
who bought Blood and Fire. I
hope they enjoy it and learn
something new about the Oakes
mystery."
LMH, the publisher, is dis-


tributing the casebound version
of Blood and Fire in some
Caribbean outlets and the UK.
But the trade paperback edi-
tion is already selling in North
America, and a mass market
paperback edition is scheduled
for the future.


I


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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005
LOCAL NmS


* SAXONS' dancers put on a show on Bay Street during the junkanoo parade.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)


0 VALLEY BOYS' display set them on the road to victory.
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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005, PAGE 9


-THE TRIBUNE


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Developing a strategy for the




improvement of education


EDUCATION is one of
today's 'celebrity'
issues. The question of how to
fix our failing schools appeared
on the radar earlier this year
and has achieved a certain noto-
riety of late.
Government held a "secret"
national education conference
on Cable Beach last summer
(the 18th so far) and a coalition
of private sector employers and
trade unions finally released a
disturbing report on education-
al failings after spending months
trying to present it directly to
Education Minister Alfred
Sears.
Tough Call drew attention to
some of their conclusions last
August. The Coalition report
(titled the Untapped Resource)
was one of several research
papers included in the Ministry
of.Education's conference jour-
nal, which has never been pub-
licly circulated.
Not surprisingly, there has
been no word from the govern-
ment on the results of last July's
expensive conference. But the
idea was to come up with a
strategic plan for education in
the 21st century, recognising
that "knowledge is the most
important factor in economic
development" today.

T o paraphrase Central
Bank economist John
Rolle: Economic success in a
competitive world requires
greater productivity, which is
achieved by diligently applying
the skills we have learned
through education. If we are
not learning the fundamental
skills of literacy, numeracy and
technological literacy we are
only digging a big hole for our-
selves.
"Our students are going to
have to take care of us in the
future,'" Mr Rolle points out.
"And they are only going to be
able to do this, to our future
comfort, if they are just as pro-


ductive as the future workers
of Asia, Europe or North
America."
But the plain fact is, although
we have allocated significant
human, and financial resources


The plain fact
is, although we
have allocated
significant
human and
financial
resources to
education for
decades, the
actual results
are distressing,
to say the least.


to education for decades, the
actual results are distressing, to
say the least.
There are many theories
about how to bring greater lit-
eracy and numeracy to our
young people...better teachers,
better schools, administrative
devolution, depoliticisation, pri-
vatisation, more computers,
more pre-schooling, more tech-
nical education, more money,
more security, a new curricu-
lum.
And we should not overlook
the ever-popular 'signage solu-
tion'. You know, those unsight-
ly billboards that exhort us to
'protect our tings' and 'arrive
alive'.
There is a movement in the
United States, for example, to
address the behavioural prob-
lems of youngsters by posting
the Ten Commandments in
schools. And some Congress-


men went so far as to suggest
that this could have stopped two
teenage gunmen from shooting
36 fellow students and teachers
at Columbine High School in
Colorado six years ago.
It has been referred to as the
"cosmic bumper sticker" theory
of education.

H ere's what others
have to say about
education in the world's great-
est nation: "American children
can't read or work math prob-
lems without a calculator. They
can't spell, find their own coun-
try on a map, name the presi-
dent of the United States or
quote the founding fathers...
American students placed 19th
out of 21 nations in math, 16th
in science, and dead last in
physics."
Well, if that is what public
education is like over the bar
just think of the problems we
are facing here!
And that is despite the fact
that America has spent huge
sums on education over the past
20 years. This has led some to
argue that the causes of the fail-
ure are the fashionable ideas of
the education bureaucracy itself.
Proponents of smaller gov-
ernment in the US have long
called for the abolition of the
Department of Education,
which was established in 1953
and became a separate cabinet-
level agency in 1980. Its 4,500
employees and $71.5 billion
budget is said to be completely
unnecessary at the federal level.

To deal with America's
education problems,
the Bush Administration pro-
posed four basic reforms. First,
run annual standardised tests
on all schoolchildren from 9-15
years of age, and publish reports
on their progress.
Second, make schools
accountable for their perfor-
mance.


Third, remove federal regu-
lations in exchange for
improved results.
And fourth, let parents spend
federal money to send their chil-
dren to private or parochial
schools if they wish.
Economist John Rolle argues


There are
many Bahamian
children who
were born
simply as a
means of
prying money
from the
pockets of
disappearing
boyfriends, or
as a mistake due
to ignorance,
or as a
demonstration
of fertility.

that we should focus immediate
attention on extending school
hours and changing the cur-
riculum to devote more time
to maths, communications, lan-
guages and computer science:
"Our goal should be to
advance (these) skills by at


least two years beyond those
targeted for the BGCSE," he
said.

Others call for more
accountability, argu-
ing that we should run schools
like airlines, which are gov-
erned by international safety
standards: Pilots must be qual-
ified and certified to fly the air-
craft type. There must be ongo-
ing pilot training and pilots
who don't perform can be
fired, whereas planes that don't
meet the safety code can't be
used.
But in all of this technical
debate, we should not forget
the importance of concerned
and interested parents.
And in this context, the fig-
ures are frightening. Over half
of all births are out of wedlock.
More than two-thirds of young
Bahamians are from single par-
ent homes, and in most of these
cases the single parent is a
teenage woman. More and
more boys are growing up with-
out a male role model. Accord-
ing to some reports, about 40
per cent of boys drop out of the
public school system.
Many experts believe the
issue of parenting is the crux of
the matter because unwant-
ed children have worse out-
comes than children who are
welcomed by their parents.
In fact, there is a strong cor-
relation between the drop in
the American crime rate during
the 1990s and the legalisation
of abortion some 20 years ear-
lier. According to the 2005
bestseller Freakonomics (by
Steven Levitt and Steven Dub-


ner), "The crime rate contin-
ued to fall as an entire genera-
tion came of age minus the
children whose mothers had
not wanted to bring a-child into
the world. Legalised abortion
led to less unwantedness:
unwantedness leads to high
crime."

O f course, our situa-
tion does not exactly
parallel the American experi-
ence. We don't have the same
concerns about abortion. But
the issue here is unwantedness,
and there are many Bahami-
an children who were born
simply as a means of prying
money from the pockets of dis-
appearing boyfriends, or as a
mistake due to ignorance, or
as a demonstration of fertili-
ty.
And as these children reach
their late teens in a society
that hardly bothers to enforce
rules and resorts to arch
hypocrisy on most moral issues
- they often turn to crime.
As the Coalition report con-
cluded: "Refining the public
education system can only be
accomplished with strong lead-
ership over a long time using
strategies that are clearly stated
and widely endorsed."
If the government sees the
issue as one of power and con-
trol (which all governments
tend to do) rather than apply-
ing clear strategies in a non-
political.way, then education
will continue to fail and our
society will suffer the more for
it.
The best new year's gift the
government could give would
be to issue a clear in-depth
report on the choices we face
in education, call for a short,
sharp debate, and agree on a
bipartisan approach for imme-
diate action.
What do you think? Send
comments to larry@tribuneme-
dia.net. Or visit www.bahama-
pundit.com


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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


j








THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, UtCEMBER 28, 2005, PAGt- i


CARIBBEAN


FROM page one
When The Tribune asked
leader Gus Cooper during
the "heat" of the Junkanoo
rush if he thought the group
would win the parade, he
said: "I don't judge, I don't
judge. I just perform."
However, The Valley
Boys won the parade with
3,631points.
The unofficial scores in
the Division A Group were:
One Family placed sec-
ond with 3,578 points
Roots were third with
3,448 points
Saxons came fourth
with 3,174 points
Prodigal Sons placed
fifth with 1,727 points.


In the Best music category:
One Family placed first
Valley Boys were sec-'
ond
Roots placed third
Saxons were fourth
Prodigal Sons came fifth
In the best banner cate-
gory:
Valley Boys placed first
One Family placed sec-
ond
Roots came third
Saxons were fourth
*fProdigal Sons came fifth
Culture Minister Neville
Wisdom said he felt the
Boxing Day parade went
extremely well.
"I am advised that this is
by far the largest parade for
Junkanoo that has ever


been held in this country
and it is very obvious that
it is true.
"Obviously the persons
who represent Junkanoo by
way of producing these
beautiful costumes and all
of this creativity and the
music have to be congratu-
lated. It is a performance of
a world-class standard that
is equalled nowhere in the
world," said Mr Wisdom.
Police said Junkanoo
went without any major
incident. They thanked the
public for their good behav-
iour.
Press liaison officer Wal-
ter Evans said there were
one or two minor incidents,
but "nothing to talk about."


Valley Boys celebrate


winning Junkanoo


Attorney Sean Hanna dies


Crime

FROM
page one
which they used to
escape the scene.
At 7pm Christ-
mas Eve, police
made a firearm
arrest after a 46-
year-old man fired
shots in the Park-
gate Road area.
Police said a search
of the man revealed
a 4.10 gauge shot-
gun.
On Christmas
Day, around 5am, a
49-year-old man was
robbed of cash by a
gunman while in his
Black Ford Ranger
in the Cool Acres
area. Investigations
are continuing.


The friend said Mr Hanna was asth-
matic and a known smoker, but there
was no indication yet that these were
factors in his death.
"Sean was argumentative in a very
positive way. He had a real social con-
science and was always upset when he
felt politicians were not treating people
properly."
His father, Arthur, was a popular PLP
member of the House of Assembly
before the 1967 general election which
brought the party to power. He later
served as deputy prime minister under
Sir Lynden Pindling. He has been hailed
as one of the party's true stalwarts.
Sean's brother Dion and sister Glenys
both qualified as lawyers, but Glenys is
the only one of the Hanna children to fol-
low their father's footsteps into politics.
Last night, a relative at the family
home declined to comment on his death.
"The time is too sensitive," they said,
then indicated they would be making no
comment in the future.


Radar malfunction causes chaos


FROM page one
the Bahamas again because of the
ordeal they faced at the airport..
He also noted that a disgrun-.
tled passenger can often complain
to at least ten persons, which
would have a straggering effect
for the country.
Members of the AOC added
that what made the situation even
worse was that they heard nothing
from the Airport Authority or the
Department of Civil Aviation.
In fact, they said there was a
complete lack of communication
between airlines and officials
whenever there was a major
problem which shut the airport
down, such as a hurricane.
As a result, many said they


were at a loss as to what to tell
their passengers.
Rick Ryan, of Virgin Atlantic,
questioned whether government
officials were aware of how
severe the problem was.
He said that if communications
and conditions did not improve,
in the long term it could mean
that airline companies would
decide not to fly here.
Also making an impact on
flights, although to a lesser extent,
was the lack of jet fuel available
to incoming planes.
Mr Dean said this would not
have the same impact as the radar
because airlines could have car-
ried a smaller amount of passen-
gers to conserve fuel.
The radar had been repaired


and all airlines expected to have
their passengers transported by
today.
Director of Civil Aviation.
Cyril Saunders noted that,
because Nassau and Miami share
radar information, it is impossible
for a situation here not to affect
air traffic in Miami.
The radar problems would
have affected both Miami and
Nassau, automatically creating a
delay in flights. However, he said
the holiday weekend may have
affected communications between
airline pfficials and the airport.
The radar system is 23 years old,
he added.
SEE Business section for the
radar failure's impact on hotels
and tourism


Thousands delayed by failure


THOUSANDS of frustrated
and angry passengers were strand-
ed at South Florida airports for
over 16 hours and in most cases
overnight when the radar system
shut down at Nassau Internation-
al Airport Monday morning.
It could not have come at a
worse time for tourism as the
week between Christmas.and
New Year's is the busiest .travel
period of the year.
This was the second time that I
had been delayed .by malfunc-.,
tioning radar at Nassau.
On the evening of December 15
I was a passenger on a Continental
flight from Nassau to Miami when
the aircraft had to sit on the runway
for more than three hours before
take-off. The pilot announced that
the radar had shut down.
On that occasion it was
explained that the radar failure
was caused by a BEC outage. This
was the second time in four
months that electrical failure had
led to the loss of the airport's radar
system. However, this time the
power was out longer than expect-
ed and the airport's generator ran
out of fuel. Hence the shut down.
I was at Miami International
Airport on Monday afternoon
trying to get back to Nassau.
Although I had bookings I was
prepared to take whatever airline
was flying to Nassau.
On that occasion the response
of Continental's staff at gate G1
in Miami and again at their
counter became a part of the
problem. They did not seem
interested in assisting stranded
passengers.
Passengers who arrived at air-
ports in South Florida for flights
to the Bahamas were never
informed of the indefinite delays
until they arrived at the depar-
ture gates. Flight monitors did
not accurately display delays until
several hours after departure
time. Airlinesxrefused to give any
form of compensation or hotel
vouchers, claiming that on this
occasion the fault was not theirs.
Passengers who, in some cas-
es, had been waiting for more
than 14 hours, were told to go,
and find their own accommoda-
tion and report back at the Con-
tinental counter at 8 o'clock theo
next morning. Continental would
then see what it could do for
them. There were no promises,
and no commitments.
"How are we going to get to
Nassau?" asked an upset Philip
Nichols, who had started his day at
4am driving from Connecticut to
New York, then taking a flight to
Miami to make the Continental
connection for Nassau. "If we don't
get to Nassau tonight then we're
going home tomorrow. To heck
with a week in the Bahamas!" he
told his companion.
When I asked Continental if
they could call the Bahamasair
ticket counter and determine
whether their flight was still oper-
ating they told methat they didn't
have the phone number to the
counter. I told them that their
counter was right next door to
Bahamasair and that they could
just ask them. They refused.
I called The Tribune in Nassau
and through The Tribune discov-
ered from Bahamasair's manag-
ing director that Bahamasair was
sending two jets to Florida to pick
up passengers one to Miami,
the other to Fort Lauderdale.


ROBERT CARRON was among

those delayed on Monday. Here

he tells his story


I told the Continental supervi-
sor, who had just come to the
counter, of the new development
with Bahamasair and its plans to
fly to Miami.to pick up passengers
for Nassau. He told me, and the
group of passengers that were
now forming around his counter,
that no planes were flying to Nas-
sau Monday night.
I, and about 10 other passen-
gers, some of whom I had sent to
the Bahamasair counter, told him
that he was wrong, that Bahama-
sair was flying.
The supervisor told me that a
big plane like Bahamasair's could
not land at Nassau International
without radar as it would be too
dangerous.
I told him that he was wrong
and that, in fact, Bahamasair and
indeed Gulfstream flew daily to
most Bahamian islands, the major-
ity of which had no radar. I sug-
gested that instead of being part
of the problem he should call
Bahamasair and get his passengers
on their 737, because most of those
who were stranded had no hotels
to go to, and could not be con-
firmed on a flight in the morning.
He refused. He said he worked
for Continental Connection,
which had no ticketing agreement
with Bahamasair.
He refused to refund the pas-
sengers' tickets for flights that had
been cancelled or to endorse them
over to Bahamasair, which had


agreed to take them at face value.
He informed is that we had to go
to the ticket counter for refunds,
but that counter had closed at 8pm.
The Continental supervisor
could not even help the, passen-
gers who held tickets for Conti-
nental's evening flight. He
explained to his passengers that
he did not know what he could do
for them as Continental's Tues-
day flights to Nassau were already
full. He could only advise them to
return to the Continental counter
at 8am Tuesday and discuss their
problem then as Continental's
ticket counter had already closed.
I took five people with me and
told about 40 others about the
Bahamasair flight to Nassau, but
because the Continental supervi-
sor had told them that it was too
dangerous to fly Bahamasair into
Nassau without radar only about
20 transferred with me to
Bahamasair.
We arrived in Nassau around
2am, thanks to the magnificent
performance of Bahamasair's
flight crew, ground staff, Miami
ticket counter personnel and Mr
Major in Nassau.
However, the irony of the situ-
ation was that when we eventual-
ly arrived in Nassau there were
not enough taxis to take all of the
visitors. So at 3am I grabbed a
large bus, loaded some of the vis-
itors into it and had them
dropped off at their hotels.


4 A aic, i Ii -


FROM page one
Mr Hanna was an expert on classical
music and frequently reviewed local con-
certs. He was also a keen observer of
local political affairs, though he never
chose to enter politics himself. His tren-
chant letters to the press were usually
well-informed, and rarely pulled any
punches.
A friend told The Tribune: "He was
extremely conservative, but also very
frank. He was a great lover of the arts
and allowed his chambers to be used as a
box-office for classical music events.
"He frequently produced very well-
informed reviews of Nassau Music Soci-
ety events. His death has left the family in
shock. It was totally unexpected.
"He was found at about 5.30pm on
Christmas Day. His death has shaken
everyone. It will be a particularly big
blow to his'mother, who has not been
well lately. He was very, very close to
her."


I








PAGE12,WEDNSDA, DEEMBR 28 205 TH TRBUN


LC AL NEWS


Teac donatN .]~fli[o]n f]or1! ii f'Z ilIo


Quiznos un


* UAKRREN Blastian accepts the donation from lexaco


TEXACO Bahamas Limited
has donated $6,000 to the One
Family junkanoo and commu-
nity organisation to assist with
preparations for the Boxing and
New Year's Day parades.
Accepting the donation,
chairman of One Family Darren
Bastian said: "One Family is
deeply grateful for the financial
support of Texaco. We look for-
ward to building on our shared


interest in the development of
the youth of the Bahamas."
Since its inception in 1993,
One Family has taken a new
approach to junkanoo by focus-
ing more on community devel-
opment than on competing on
Bay Street.
Its community projects have
included the 1994 "Rush to
read" initiative, the donation of
the 1996 parade prize money to


various charities, a 1997 health
fair, a youth symposium called
"Rush to live" and the dona-
tion of three bulletproof vests to
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force in 2000.
Raymond Samuels, Texaco's
district retail manager, said:
"We are particularly pleased to
be able to support One Family
because of its focus on youth
development," he said.


Legal advisor appointed


to UN tax committee


* By Bahamas Information
Services
ATTORNEY Rowena Bethel,
legal advisor at the Ministry of
Finance, has been appointed to
the United Nations Committee
of Experts on International Co-
operation in Tax Matters.
Minister of State for Finance
James Smith Minister Smith
told the Society of Trust and
Estate Practitioners (STEP) at
its monthly meeting on Decem-
ber 15 at Buena Vista Hotel
that the Bahamas has been
engaged, "at this high level," in
examining standards for inter-


national co-operation in tax
matters.
Mrs Bethel was appointed
legal advisor in the Ministry of
Finance in January,2000. She
holds a wealth of knowledge in
privatisation, multilateral and
bilateral matters on interna-
tional co-operation, trade, tax-
ation, information technology,
financial sector regulation in
compliance and money-laun-
dering.
The United Nations Com-
mittee of Experts on Interna-
tional Cooperation in Tax Mat-
ters held its first meeting in
Geneva, Switzerland, last week,


and has established a Working
Committee on Exchange of
Information.
The committee's mandate is,
to look at proposed changes to
the relevant exchange of infor-
mation provisions under the;
United Nations Model DoubleI
Taxation Convention between.
developed and developing,
countries; and to review the'
state of tax information
exchange work carried out by,
other international organism.
tions, including the work ca(-
ried out by the Organization fo.
Economic Cooperation and
Development (OECD).


INISSAJN


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THE TRIBUNE


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Donations from Royal
Society of St George
ABOVE: In response to its annual Christmas appeal, Mrs Judy
Grindrod, president of the Royal Society of St George, recently pre-
sented a cheque to Major Ferguson of the Salvation Army in a bid to
help many families this Christmas.
* LEFT: Last week, 22 members of the British Legion received
Christmas hampers at the Blue Hill Road headquarters. These fine
elderly gentlemen look forward to the annual presentation which
gives the society as much pleasure as it does the recipients.
Mrs Gerry Hillier, welfare officers of the Royal Society, is seen pre-
senting the hampers to Rev Matthais Munroe and Mr Percy Stra-
chan of the British Legion.
Among other donations made this year from the RSSG are the Can-
cer Society of the Bahamas, Abilities Unlimited and Project Read.


With Any Salvatore Ferragamo Purchase Enter To Win A
FOUR DAY, THREE NIGHT TRIP FOR TWO TO NEW YORK CITY*
During The Launch of
The New York Fashion Week.
Includes
Hotel, Airfare, $500 Shopping Money And Tickets To The Champagne Brunch Fashion Show*
Local Residents Eligible Only.


Enl er At ,",, ,,


S.' w '; :in I il u y 2j, 2006.


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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


'8;






PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


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Drop Off:
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4005 NW 28th St
(305) 871-0571
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Open Every Day SAM,8PM
Fort Lauderdale Airport
Bags To Go Inc
(954) 359-8656
(Terminal 3, Lower Level
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Open Every Day 8AM 6PM


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Customs Hall
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Open on-call 422-2318
Save up to
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Kwanzaa


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RISTORANTE
Villagg!o
COCKTAIL & WINE BARR
TEL: 327-0965
Commencng at 7 30 with coAplrewarycod'ails
and nibbles in our newly opened cocktail bar,
Followed by the call to dinner at 8pm *
Dinner starts with an elaborate seafood and Ktaiian
Antipasti buffet extravaganza featuring main and
Abaco lobsters. crab claws oysters, shrimps,
smoked seafood, clams casino, jocal organic
salads and ruch more.
Then choose from our espedaSy prepared menu
featuring Maine lobster beef tendeoin au poiwre
or roast rack of Colorado lamb loin and griled
sea bass.
Dessert is our own chocolate decadence featuring
a plate of different Chocolate desserts and petit
fours.
Your dinner is accompanied by the sounds of ,
"The Henry Moss Trio" who will play downstairs
from 8-30pr unt l11 30pmr foowed by the sounds
of "Capt. Kirk" McKenzie as your DJ in the upstairs
terrace.


Bring in the New Year with a champagne toast
and FIREWORKS display at night and foowed
by fun games and of course dancing.
$220pp Exclusive of gratuity
Price includes ALL wines and drinks with dinner,
entrance to Terrace bar and all entertainment.


Now, Fly Later Drop your bags off the day before you travel,
Sh ip No Fly Later and they'll be waiting for you when you arrive!
We accept most oversize/overweight items and boxes!
Bags arrive 11am Pay in Nassau




WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005, PAGE 15


keh rebels disband armed wings one year

after tsunami destroyed their battlefield





Cop yrighted Material
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THE TRIBUNE











PAGE 16, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


THE


Visit our website atbsv md


CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTISION SERVICES


What is your goal?
/ PROMOTION
/ QUALITY SERVICE
/ SALARY INCREASE
/ NEW CAREER
/ CAREER ENHANCEMENT
we can provide you with superior education and training to
help you accomplish your goal.

Call for an interview today!
For your convenience, the majority of classes are held on Saturdays, 8am- 12noon.
Are you preparing for a promotion, career change or career enhancement? The Professional Development Department can help you achieve
your career goal! A wide array of courses and programmes leading to certificate, certification and licensure are offered. You can become a pioneer
in setting performance standards in your organization. Success is at your finger tips. We have secured partnerships with leading international
institutions to help you accomplish your career goals. You can attain your professional development credentials at The College of The Bahamas.
Choose the courses or programme to help you accomplish your career goals...
Certified Professional Managers Programme
Certificate Programme For The Office Assistant
Certificate Programme In Learning Disabilities
A+ Computer Technician Certification
Certified Computer Operator (Microsoft Office Specialist- MOS)
Certificate In Law
Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Becker Conviser CPA Review
Certified Human Resource Managers Programme
Certificate Programme In Supervisory Management
Journeyman Plumbing License
Master Plumbing License
Certified Security Officer
Managerial Accounting For Non-Financial Managers
Ethics And Professional Responsibility
Writing & Research Skills
Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
No entrance exams. Tuition may be paid per term or in full. International programmes available.
CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL MANAGERS PROGRAMME
This programme is administered in conjunction with The Institute of Certified Professional Management at James Madison University,
Harrisonburg, Virginia. The CM Programme provides Supervisors, Managers, and Team Leaders with the fundamental knowledge needed
for today's management challenges. A comprehensive instructional scheme gives you the competence you need to meet high standards of
performance.
TERM 1 TERM 2
CPM 900 Personal Skills- $500 CPM 901 Administrative Skills- $700
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
TERM 3
CPM 902 Interpersonal Skills- $600
CPS 901 Accounts- $300
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
PREREQUISITE: 3 or more years as a Trainer, Supervisor or Manager with an Associate Degree or a B. A. Degree from an accredited or
recognized college/university; COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME FOR THE OFFICE ASSISTANT
With the advent of the high-tech office, the.Clerks'/Office Assistants' role has evolved as one of the most important support factors in the
operational managementqprocess:'hna;'effort to9equip the support level staff to function efficiently in the work environment, CEES is pleased
to offer a proficiency programme in basic ftice skills.
TERM 1 TERM 2
CPS 909 Business Communication- $300 CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
WRS 900 Writing & Research Skills- $350 CPS 911 Records Management- $200
ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250
TERM 3
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
CPS 903 Office Technology- $500
CPS 910 Managing Physical Resources- $200
CPS 901 Accounts- $300
PREREQUISITE: 3 or more years experience in a clerical position and 3 BGCSE's- Grade C or above;
COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12pm Duration: 3 TERMS
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME IN LEARNING DISABILITIES
The Certificate in Learning Disabilities Programme is designed to equip teachers with the skills necessary for working with diverse learners.
Participants are trained to use the basic techniques to identify students with learning disabilities; analyze and examine disabilities related to
language and communicative arts; and develop strategies that can be used with students who have been diagnosed as learning disabled. The
programme comprises six (6) courses:
TERM 1 TERM 2
SPED 900 Introduction To Learning Disabilities- $84 SPED 903 Strategies and interventions I- $168
SPED 901 Diagnosing Learning Disabilities- $168 SPED 904 Strategies and interventions II- $84
SPED 902 Individual Education Planning- $168 ETHC900 Ethics & Profess. Responsibility.- $250
TERM 3
SPED 905 Assessment- $178
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
PREREQUISITE: AA Degree with a Teacher's Certificate or a BA Degree;
COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring & Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
A+ COMPUTER TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATION
This programme of study is designed to equip students with the skills necessary to successfully sit the international A+ Microsoft Certification
Examination. Techniques to identify and rectify mechanical problems related to the personal computer are explored. It is a hands-on learning
experience with lab exercises that helps the student to apply theory to practice.
TERM 1: COMP 954 Software- $510 TERM 2: COMP 955 Hardware
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Per Demand Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 2 TERMS
CERTIFIED COMPUTER OPERATOR (Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS)
This course of study is designed to train students how to master Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Access, Microsoft Outlook, and
PowerPoint. To help the student to develop navigation and design skills, the instructor provides easy to understand notes and conducts live
demonstrations on how to manipulate the entire MS Office Suite. Upon successful completion of the external international examinations, the
Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Certification is awarded. The programme comprises five Modules and two companion courses:
TERM 1 TERM 2
CO-MP 906 Microsoft Office Specialist- $610 --, C900 Ethics & Professional Responsibility- $250
Microsoft Word, Microsoft Access CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
Microsoft Excel, Microsoft PowerPoint TERM 3
Microsoft Outlook COMP 906 Microsoft Office Specialist- $610
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
CERTIFICATE IN LAW
This programme is offered in conjunction with The Institute of Legal Executives (ILEX), Bedford, England.
ILEX qualification routes are vocationally relevant and designed to build and test legal knowledge and understanding at the paralegal level.
Designed to facilitate the training and educational needs of Legal Secretaries, Legal Clerks, Legal Office Managers, Law Enforcement Officers,
Special Assistants to Lawyers, Justice of The Peace, and all persons interested in acquiring an impressive array of legal office skills, the
Certificate in Law qualification is specifically relevant to The Bahamas legal system. Courses include:
TERM 1 TERM 2
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills -$350 ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250 LAW 900
The Legal Environment -$600.00 LAW 901 General Legal Principles-$600.00
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
TERM 3 (Options- choose one) -$600
NB. Options are subject to change.
LAW 903 Company Law LAW 906 Law of Mortgages
LAW 905 Employment Law LAW 908 Work of The Magistrate's Court
LAW 907 Nature and Role of Criminal Law
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
PREREQUISITE: AA Degree and 3 years work experience; COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am 12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
THE BECKER CPA REVIEW
The College of The Bahamas is pleased to offer the New CPA Computer BasedTest (CBT). Besides the obvious transition from a pencil-and-
paper exam to a computer-based test, the revised CPA Exam will also contain a new content focus broadening the scope of audit and attest
areas and incorporating the assessment of critical skills, such as research and communication. The new exam also has increase emphasis on
general business knowledge and information technology.
CPA 900 Financial Reporting- $650 CPA 901 Accounting & Reporting/Regulation- $520
CPA 902 Law/Business Law- $465 CPA 903 Auditing/Auditing and Attestation- $465
Prerequisite: A BA Degree from an accredited or recognized college/university in any discipline with at least 21 credits hours in accounting.
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:30am 5:30pm Duration: 12 Weeks
CERTIFICATION IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Offered in conjunction with Columbia Southern University, Orange Beach, Alabama, this nine months programme is designed for those
individuals seeking professional development and aspiring to rise through the ranks in the HR field.
TERM 1 TERM 2
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250
HRM 900 Intro To HRM Environment- $200 HRM 902 H/R Development & Training-$200
HRM 901 Securing Human Resources- $200 HRM 903 Rewards Compensation and Benefits-$300
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
TERM 3
HRM 904 Labour Management Relations- $300
HRM 905 Protecting and Evaluating Human Resources- $300
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210


PREREQUISITE: A BA Degree in any discipline from an accredited or recognized college/university or a minimum of 5 years as a manager,
supervisor or trainer; COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME IN SUPERVISORY MANAGEMENT
Supervisors with cutting edge skills know how to accomplish difficult tasks, solve complicated problems and master.choltenges.inecisiog
making. This programme is aimed at supervisors and middle managers who wish to update their supervisory skills, or persons who have bee ,i,
promoted and wish to gain additional insight into the world of supervisory management. This programme entails essential training for persons,
wishing to become an associate manager.
TERM 1 TERM 2
CPfM900 Personal Skills- $500 SUPV 900 Supervisory Management.,(SUPV 1)- $500.
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250
CPS 901 Accounts- $300 CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
TERM 3
CPM 902 Interpersonal Skills- $600
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
PREREQUISITE: 3 or more years experience as a Supervisor/Manager or Trainer and an AA Degree in any discipline from a recognized
or accredited institution; COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12pm Duration: 3 TERMS -,
CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL SECRETARY REVIEW PROGRAMME
The Certified Professional Secretary (CPS) Review, offered in conjunction with The International Association of Administrative Professionals
(IAAP) is a 9 month course of study designed to prepare administrative professionals and clerical assistants to write the CPS international
exam.
TERM 1 TERM 2
CPS 901 Accounts- $300 CPS 906 Human Resources- $300
CPS 909 Business Communication- $300 CPS 911 Records Management- $200
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
TERM 3 OPTIONAL COURSES
CPS9903"Office Technology- $500 WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 (Spring) CPS 910
Managing Physical Resources- $200 ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250 (Summer) v
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
PREREQUISITE: 4 yrs. Experience or an AA Degree+3 Yrs. Experience or a B. A. Degree and 0 .Experience;
COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-lpm Duration: 3 TERMS
JOURNEYMAN PLUMBING LICENSE
The Journeyman Plumbing course is designed to assist students preparing to write the Journeyman Plumbing Examination. Topics includes:
interpretation of codes, disposal and drainage systems, storm drainage disposal systems, installation of sanitary fixtures, basic drawings to
scale, water supply and distribution, use of materials and tools, repairs and maintenance. The examination is offered in conjunction with The
Ministry of Public Works. At the end of the course, candidates are required to take one (1) Professional Development Seminar.
TERM 1 TERM 2 (Optional)
JPLM900 Journeyman Plumbing- $800 SUPV 900 Supervisory Management- $500
ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250 (SUPV900 is available for Plant/Plumbing Supervisors)
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
PREREQUISITE: Students should have working knowledge and skills in the following areas: interpretation of codes, disposal and drainage
systems, storm drainage disposal systems, installation of sanitary fixtures, basic drawings to scale, water supply and distribution, use of
materials and tools, repairs and maintenance.
Begins: Fall Day/Time: Tuesdays 6pm 9pm Duration: 2 TERMS
MASTER PLUMBING LICENSE q
The Master Plumbing course is designed to assist students preparing to write the Master Plumbing Examination. Students should have above *
average knowledge and skills in the following areas: interpretation of codes, disposal and drainage systems, storm drainage disposal systems,
installation of sanitary fixtures, basic drawings to scale, water supply and distribution, use of materials and tools, repairs and maintenance.
Special emphasis will be placed o plant management and foreman responsibilities.
TERM 3 TERM 2 (Optional)
MPLM900 Master Plumbing- $950 CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100
ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250 SUPV 900 Supervisory Management- $500
(SUPV900 is available for Plant/Plumbing Supervisors)
PREREQUISITE: Students should have working knowledge and skills in the following areas: interpretation of codes, disposal and drainage, 0
systems, storm drainage disposal systems, installation of sanitary fixtures, basic drawings to scale, water supplyand distribution, .use of,,,
materials and tools, repairs .and maintenance. ........ .. .
Begins: all Day/Time: Tuesdays 6pm 9pm Duration: LT M .
MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING FOR NON-FINANCIAL MANAGERS
This course is designed to strengthen the candidates' understanding of managerial accounting. Managerial accounting concepts, principles
and functions are the main topics covered. The ability to prepare and accurately read a financial statement/spreadsheet is an essential skill
for all professionals and paraprofessionals; CPS901 covers in a very student friendly way, easy to understand examples that aid the students'
learning experience. This course also helps to prepare candidates to write external examinations.
CPS 901 Accounts- $300
PREREQUISITE: None : ,q i
BEGINS: Per demand Day/Time: Sat/Thurs/Tue. 8am-12:15pm OR 6pm 9pm Duration: 1 F Weeks r,;
ETHICS AND PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY
This course examines guidelines for the professional behavior of members of any organisation. A select group of codes of ethics and ethics
cases will be explored to support a theoretical and practical discourse on why the application of ethics and professional responsibility is
important in all aspects of society.
ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Per demand Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12noon OR Thurs/Tue- 6pm 9pm Duration: 8 Weeks
WRITING & RESEARCH SKILLS *. )lj( 3i
This course is designed to provide mature students with reading, writing, research and critical thinking skills to prepare them'tfor f'
into CEES' professional development programmes. WRS 900 is also structured to provide certification candidates with the skill s '
to successfully write position and research papers.
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills $350
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Per demand Day/Time: Sat.- 8am-12noon or Thursday/Tue- 6pm 9pm 'Duration: 8 Weeks
INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS, WINDOWS & THE INTERNET
This workshop provides a broad foundation for students so that they will have a greater awareness and confidence using personal computers.
Students will gain practical information and skills, such as what a computer is, how to manage personal files and folders that they create.
COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200 .
PREREQUISITE: None .
Begins: Summer, Spring & Fall Day/Time: Sat.- 8am-12noon Durationy WeekSi .
APPLICANTS FOR INTERNATIONAL CERTIFICATION COURSES AND PROGRA IN
All students applying for International Certification Courses and Programmes that are offered in conjunction with foreign insfitutionsae
required to contact the CEES Office for information on external application and examination fees.
Telephone (242) 325-5714/328-0093/328-1936 Fax: (242) 322-2712 .


OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION
FEES


1. COB Registration................................................... .$40.00 (one-time fee)
2. Insurance......................... .............................. $25.00 (valid for 1 year)
3. ID Card................................. .. ... ............ $25.00 (one time fee)
4. Technology Fee...................................... $75
5. Books.................................................... .......... $ Please contact COB Bookstore'for prices.
6. Awards Ceremony......................................... $150.00 (must be paid by the 2 TERM)
7. External Application Fees............................ Please check with the CEES Office for information.
ESSENTIAL COMPUTER KNOWLEDGE: Effective Summer 2005, basic computer and Internet skills will be required of all students.
Assessment for exemption from COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet will be done via proof of a certificate
from an authorized provider or by taking a prescribed computer skills test to verify competency in Windows and Computers. Students failing
the competency test will be required to take the Introduction To The Internet, Windows and Computers. This Workshop is a prerequisite
for all programmes or single courses.
Workshop Title: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet.
Tuition: $200 Duration: 2 Days
Day: Saturdays: 12noon 3pm (5 contact hours per day) Offered: Spring, Summer and Fall
ADVISEMENT & REGISTRATION SESSIONS
Please bring the following items with you to the advisement/registration session:
The first four pages of your Passport
Copies of your certificates/licensures and college/university transcripts
Where applicable, letters of recommendation, job description, special awards, etc.
OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION
1. 'No entrance examination is required for enrollment in professional development courses/programmes.
2. Tuition is charged per term; i.e. you will be billed only for courses offered in the current term.
3. Non-Bahamians add $50 to each course/workshop/seminar
4. Remember to obtain from the Programme Coordinator the correct ISBN Number for all required textbooks
5. At the first class session, ALL students must submit to the Programme Coordinator one copy each
of his/her stamped receipts representing payment for tuition, fees & books for the current term.
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND RE-CERTIFICATION SEMINARS
A compulsory professional development seminar is offered for all candidates enrolled in professional development programmes. Seminars
and workshops address important issues that are vital to the adult students' learning experience. Enrollment is also open to the general public.
This seminar is also designed to facilitate continuing education units for professionals applying for re-certification in their respective disciplines.
Students are required only to take ONE Professional Development Seminar. Effective Fall 2005, the Fee for the Professional Development
Seminar will be $210.
THE ANNUAL AWARDS CEREMONY
The Annual Awards Ceremony and reception is normally held at The British Colonial Hilton Hotel once during the TERM 3. Adult students
successfully completing programmes and courses are awarded certificates, certifications and/or licensure.

Secure Your Seat By Enrolling Today!
Contact The Centre For Continuing Education On Moss Road Campus or

Call (242) 325-5714/328-0093/328-1936 Fax: (242) 322-2712
Fees May Be Paid By Cash, Credit Card, or Bank Certified Cheque To: The College of The Bahamas, Business Office
Cees Reserves The Right To Change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule And Course Materials


ii
, ',
.'I


)


EE~I~











WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005, PAGE 17


I COMPUTER OFFERINGS

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
Course Descriptionf: This diurse is for the beginner who knows very little about computers and does not understand how it works.
Thij course covers the major conlputer concepts with extensive hands on practice of various software using: (I) Microsoft Office Word
Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft Access Database Management.
Pre-requisite: None
Begins: Monday, 6 February 2006 6:00pm 9:00pm Section 01 (CEES)
Saturday, 4 February 2006 10:00am 1:00pm Section 02 (CEES)
Mon. and Wed., 6 Feb., 2006 4:00pm 5:30pm Section 03 (CEES)
Duration: 12 weeks
Velrue: CEES Computer Lab
Tuition: $450.00

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II
Course Description: This course covers the major advanced concepts with extensive hands on practice of various software using: (I)
Microsoft Office Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft Access Database Management.
Pre-requisite: Computer Applications I
Begins: Thursday, 9 February 2006
Time: 6:00pm 9:00pm
Duration: 12 weeks
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fee $550.00

EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
'This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It focuses on developing
effetive and ynamic PowerPoint presentations.
Prerequisite: None d
Beons: Thursday, 2nd March, 2006
Time: i 9:30am 4:30pm
Duration: 1 day
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $160.00
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY I
Coijrse Description: This course covers basic concepts of Information Technology. The course provides training in the following areas;
Basic Hardware Proficiency, Application Features Proficiency, Operating System Proficiency, Internet and Email Proficiency.
Prerequisite: None
Begins: Wednesday, 8th February, 2006
Tinie: 6:00pm 9:00pm
Dunation: 12 weeks
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fee+: $450.00

PC, UPGRADE AND REPAIR
Course Description: This course is a hands-on introduction to technology systems for use in information environments. The course will
cov'r the folblwing topics: Basic Hardware, Operating Systems, Troubleshooting and Repairs.
Prerequisitee. None
Be ins: Tuesday, 7 February, 2006
Tinte: 6:00pm 7:30pm Tuesdays and Thursdays
Duration: 12 weeks
Venue: BHTC Computer Lab
Fees: $500.00

QICKBOOKS
Course Descrptiof: This course is designed to train new and existing small business entrepreneurs (fewer than 20 employees) how to
org nize and inanage their accounting activities using QuickBooks Pro software. Students will learn how to set-up their company files,
cha t of accounts, budget, customers, vendors and employees.
Pre requisite:; None
Begins: Tuesday, 28 February, 2006
Tirte: 6:00pm 9:00pm
Duration: 6 weeks
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fe.: $330.00

UrGRAJDE REPAIR AND TROUBLESHOOT YOUR PC WORKSHOP
This workshop is a hands-on'introduction to upgrade repair and troubleshooting your personal computer. Topics covered are basic hardware,
operating systems, troubleshooting and repairs.
Pretrequisite: None th
Begins: V'': .2 Thursday, 9th March, 2006
Titi: 5 50ardi-,,. -9:30am-4:30pm
Duration: i 1I day
Ve ue: CEES Computer Lab
Fel: i $250.00

3BPAbE DESIGN WORKSHOP
Course Descriptiori ThisQourse, which.targets persons who would like to create their personal web pages will cover Web page creation,
W b site managerenit i;nd HTML. Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web
paes.
Pre -requisite:, Participants must be computer literate and have a basic knowledge of word-processing
Begins: Thursday, 2n March, 2006
Tine: 9:30am -4:30pm
Diuation: 2 days
Vue: CEES Computer Lab
Fes: .... $550.00

A '


ASSAGE 4 1E4SSENTIALS I
s is an introductory course for learning basic techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major topic areas will include
ssage Theory, Manipulations and Techniques, Wellness Education (Psychological and Physiological Benefits), Indications and
itraindications, Serving Special Populations and Complementary Bodywork Systems to :include Aromatherapy Essentials.
rting: Monday, February 27, 2006
6:00-9:00pm
nation: 0 Weeks
tion Fee: .$465.00
sue: CThe College of the Bahamas


MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS II
Th s is an advance course for learning techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major topics include introduction to
hy rotherapy, spa and body treatments; the basic facial; aromatherapy-fundamentals or essential oils; relaxation and meditative methods;
an hot stone therapy .
St rting: 'Thursday, February 23, 2006
J 6:00-9:00pm
D ation: '10 Weeks
Tuition Fee: : $620.00
Veuie: iThe College of the Bahamas

G OUP "FITNESS INSTRUCTOR
This is an introductory course in teaching group fitness instruction. Major topics of discussion will include basic anatomy and physiology;
ch reographi and cueing; the five components of fitness, nutrition, basic exercise testing and how to teach group exercise.
St 4rting: ,Thursday, February 27, 2006
Tinte: 6:00-9:00pm
Nation: 10 Weeks
T ion Fee: $400.00
V Tue: 'TBA


IPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE
s workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior customer service. It focuses on

Ie: Thursday, 23 February 2006
ie: 9:30am-4:30pm
nue: i Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre
tion: $170.00

'FECTI JE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
s workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It focuses on developing
-ctive and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.
te: j Thursday, 2 March 2006
ne: 9:30am 4:30pm
nue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
ition: $160.00
J


HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP
This two-day workshop is designed to equip managers and leaders in organizations and enhance the skills of current Human Resource
professionals with the theory, tools and techniques required for effective human resource management practices in today's workplace.


Date:
Time:
Venue:
Tuition:


Thursday & Friday, 2 3r March, 2006
9:30am 4:30pm
Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre
$350.00


UPGRADE REPAIRS AND TROUBLESHOOT YOUR PC
This workshop is a hands-on introduction to upgrade repair and troubleshooting your personal computer. Topics covered are basic hardware,
operating systems, troubleshooting and repairs.


Date:
Time:
Venue:
Tuition:


Thursday, 9th March, 2006
9:30am 4:30pm
CEES Computer Lab
$250


WEB PAGE DESIGN
This course will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy fiddling with computers and would
like to create their own web pages are encouraged to attend. Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and
Tables and hosting of web pages.


Date:
Time:
Venue:
Tuition:


Thursday & Friday 2nd 3 March, 2006
9:30am 4:30pm
CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
$550.00


COURSE SEC COURSE DESCRIPTION TIME DAY START DUR FEE
ACCT____________________
ACCA900 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS I 6:00-8:00pm Mon/Wed 13-Feb 10 weeks $250
ACCA901 I 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II 6:00-8:00pm M/Wed 13-Feb 10 weeks $275
ACCA902 01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS III 6:00-8:00pm Tue/Thur 14-Feb 10 weeks $300
BUS.
BUSI900 01 CREDIT & COLLECTIONS I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 8 Weeks $225
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER 1 Day $170
CUST900 01 SERVICE W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thur 23-Feb
BUS1904 01 INTRODUCTION TO BUS. I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
COMP
COMP901 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 6:00-9:00pm Mon 6-Feb 12 Weeks $450
COMP901 02 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 10am-1:00pm Sat 4-Feb 12 Weeks $450
COMP901 03 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 4:00-5:30pm Mon/Wed 6-Feb 12 Weeks $450
COMP902 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II 6:00-9:00pm Thur 9-Feb 12 Weeks $550
COMP903 i01 INFORMATION TECH. I 6:00-9:00pm Wed 8-Feb 12 Weeks $450
COMP 941 01 QUICKBOOKS 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 6 weeks $330
COMP953 01 PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR 6:00-7:30pm Tue/Thur 7-Feb 12 Weeks $450
EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT 1 Day $160
COMP960 01 W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thur 2-Mar
WEB PAGE DESIGN 2 Days $550
COMP930 01 WORKSHOP 9:30am-4:30pm Thur/Fri 2-Mar
Upgrade Repair and 1 Day $250
COMP923 01 Troubleshoot Your PC W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thur 9 Mar
COSM
COSM802 1 01 MAKE-UP APPLICATION 6:00-9:00pm Mon 27-Feb 8 Weeks $225
COSM804 '01 MANICURE &PEDICURE '. 6:00-9:00pm- Tue .. 28-Feb 8 Weeks $225
COSM807 : 01" NAIL ART TECHN'ICIAN' 6:00-g:00pii Mon/Thur! 27-Feb 5 weeks $500
DECOR. I ..,
DECO800 01 INTERIOR DECORATING I 6:00-9:00pm Wed 22-Feb 8 weeks $225
DECO801 i 01 INTERIOR DECORATING II 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 8 weeks $250
FLOR800 01 FLORAL DESIGN I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
FLOR801 j 01 FLORAL DESIGN II 6:00-9:00pm; Mon 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
FLOR802 01 FLORAL DESIGN III 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb 10 weeks $275
ENGLISH I
ENG 900 t 01 EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb. 8 Weeks $225
ESL 900 01 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANG 6:00-9:00pm Mon/Fri 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
HEALTH & I
FITNESS
MASSAGE THERAPY $465
MASG900 01 ESSENTIALS I 6:00-9:00pm Mon 27-Feb 10 weeks
i MASSAGE THERAPY $620
MASG901 01 ESSENTIALS'11, ___ 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb 10 weeks
GROUP FITNESS $400
HLTH800 01 INSTRUCTOR 6:00-9:00PM Thur 27 Feb 10 Weeks
LANG
CRE 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE I 6:00-7:30pm Tue/Thur 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
CRE 901 01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE II 6:00-7:30pm Mon/Wed 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
SPA 900 | 01 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I 6:00-7:30pm Tue/Thur 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
SPA 901- 01 CONV. SPANISH II 6:00-7:30pm Mon/Thur 27-Feb 10 weeks $250
FRE 900 _01 CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I 6:00-7:30PM Mon/Wed 27 Feb 10 Weeks $225
MGMT. '_
HUMAN RESOURCE $250
MGMT900 01 MANAGEMENT I I 6:00-9:00pm Thur 9-Feb 12 Weeks
HUMAN RESOURCE 12 Weeks $300
MGMT901 01 MANAGEMENT II 6:00-9:00pm Mon 6-Feb
HUMAN RESOURCE 2 Days $350
MGMT902 01 MANAGEMENT W/S 9:30am-4:30pm Thur/Fri 2-Mar
MEDICAL
MEDT900 G 01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb 10 weeks $225
SEWING 1 1
BASIC OF FREEHAND 10 weeks $225
SEW 800 01 CUTTING I 6:00-9:00pm Mon 27-Feb
BASIC OF FREEHAND 10 weeks $250
SEW 802 01 CUTTING II 6:00-9:00pm Thur 23-Feb
SEW 805 01 DRAPERY MAKING I 6:00-9:00pm Tue 28-Feb 10 weeks $225
SEW 811 01 UPHOLSTERY MAKING I 6:00-9:00pm Wed 22-Feb 10 weeks $225

ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/ 328-
1936 or email All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00
(one time). When submitting application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages
of your passport. CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course
Schedule and Course Materials


ACADEMIC UPGRADING DEPARTMENT


Spring Semester 2006


All persons interested in enrolling in Academic Upgrading, Personal Development and/or Professional
Development courses offered by CEES are advised to register two weeks prior to the starting date
of class.
All students registering must provide a copy of the first five pages of their passport.
Persons registering after the starting date of class will be required to pay a late registration fee of
$60.

i). College Preparatory Programme
ii). Basic Upgrading Programme for Traditional Age Students (under 25 years old)
iii). Mature Upgrading (25 years and older) Programme

New Student Orientation & Advisement/Registration: January 4 & 5, 2006
Classes Begin: January 9, 2006
Late Registration: January 10 & 11, 2006
Time: 10:00am 6:00pm

iv). Preschool and Day Care Centre Practitioners Certificate
v) Infant/Toddler Day Care Educarers Certificate
Classes Begin: January 13, 2006
Time: Fridays 6:00- 7:50 pm & Saturdays 9:00 am -1:30 pm.
Venue: The College of The Bahamas
Tuition: Contact CEES for information.
Additional fees include one time application fee of $40, Insurance $25 (per annum), ID Card $25
(one time), Technology Fee $100 (per semester), Student Activity fee $50 (full-time) $25 (part-time),
(Fall & Spring Semesters), Drop/Add $20 per application.


Is,


I. .


EDUCATING &jTRAINN


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--







PAGE 18, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


WEDNESDAY EVENING


DECEMBER 28, 2005


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

SWild Chronicles Window to the Sea (N) (CC) Inside Passage 0\ (CC) Imagining America: Icons of 20th
I WPBT Gharials. n Century American Art(N) (CC)
(CC)
The Insider (N) Still Standing Yes, Dear Criminal Minds "Plain Sight" Elu- CSI: NY "Zoo York"A tiger kills a
I WFOR ft (CC) Brian returns "Greg's a Mooch" sive rapist/murderer. n (CC) man. / (CC)
from Italy. (CC) (CC)
Access Holly- E-Ring McNulty learns that a Spe- Law & Order: Criminal Intent "Un- Law & Order "Flaw" Fontana and
U WTVJ wood (N) (CC) cial Forces team ma be treading chained" The mob kills a cop's son. Green discover a money-laundering
on Iranian soil illegally. f (CC) scheme. n (CC)
SDeco Drive That '70s Show Stacked A West- Trading Spouses: Meet Your New News (CC)
WSVN "Til the Next ern-themed birth- Mommy Mrs. O'Brien and Mrs.
Goodbye" day party. Shackelford trade families.
Jeopardy! (N) George Lopez Freddie"Food Lost"Collision" Ana Lucia and her Lost Kate's original crime is re-
S WPLG (CC) George tries to Critic" A food crit- group discover the other castaways. vealed; Michael has a mysterious
bully a biker. ic's review. a (CC) encounter with a computer. (CC)
(:00) Cold Case Dog the Bounty Dog the Bounty nked "Get a Leg Inked (N) (CC) Criss Angel Criss Angel
A&E Files Arsonist. Hunter Dogvisits Hunter Jungle Up Thomas" Mindfreak (CC) Mindfreak Feats
(CC) Denver. (CC) fugitive hunt. (CC) of strength.
Hardtalk BBC News World Business BBC News Fast Track BBC News Asia Today
BBCI (Latenight). Report (Latenight). (Latenight).

BET BET Awards '05 Honoring outstanding achievements in music, sports and entertainment, at the Kodak Theatre in Los Angeles.
CBC Coronation HER ROYAL AFFAIR (2005, Docudrama) Joely Richardson. Edward VIII CBC News: The National (CC)
Street (CC) abdicates the throne to marry Wallis Simpson. (CC)
C (00) On the Made in the USA (CC) Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNBC P Money
CNN (00) The Situa- Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)
C N N tion Room
Comedians of The Daily Show The Colbert Re- Mind of Mencia South Park (CC) South Park But- South Park (CC)
COM Comedy Martha's With Jon Stew- port (CC) Lower gas prces. ters'faked death.
Vineyard. art (CCC)(CC) (CC) (CC)
COURT Cops ( (CC) The Investigators "Anatomy of Forensic Files Forensic Files Psychic Detec- Psychic Detec-
U Crime: Eyewitness to Crime (N) tives ties
That's So Raven * THE EVEN STEVENS MOVIE (2003, Comedy) Shia LaBeouf, Nick The Suite Life of The Suite Life of
DISN "The Big Buzz" Spano, Tom Virtue. The Stevens family's free vacation turns into a night- Zack & Cody Zack & Cody
(CC) mare. (CC) "Footloser" Zack schemes.
DIY This Old House Weekend Re- Ed the Plumber Barkitecture (N) Contractor:Va- Kitchen Renova- Bathroom Reno-
DIY Classics (CC) modeling cation Homes tions vations
D( In Focus Journal: Politik Aktuell Journal: In Euromaxx Journal: Im Focus (In
Tagestema Depth Tagestema German)
SEl News It's So Over: 50 Biggest Celebrity Break-Ups! Jennifer Aniston: America's
E! Sweetheart
ESPN College Football College Football Mastercard Alamo Bowl -- Michigan vs. Nebraska. From San Antonio. (Live) (CC)
ESPNI (:00) Figure Skating Grand Prix Final.From Tokyo. (Taped) (CC) SportsCenter -International Edi-
tion (Live)
EWTTM Daily Mass: Our EWTN Live Swear to God The Holy Rosary The Word Made St. Thomas
EWTN Lady Flesh More
FIT TV (:00) Go for It! The Gym Gym owners deal with neat"Hands Off neat Home or- FitTV's Housecalls Regain former
FIT T ftV I their son's emergency surgery. My Stuff!" ganization. (CC) physique. A (CC)
F X- C Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
FOX-NC Shepard Smith Susteren (Live) (CC)
FS FL (:00) NHL Hockey Boston Bruins at Florida Panthers. From the BankAt- Best Damn Sports Show Period Best Damn
FSN lantic Center in Sunrise, Fla. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) 50 Cent; Pam Anderson. (CC) Sports Show
:GO 00) Golf 1994 U.S. Amateur-- Final Round. Tiger Tiger's Prowl Deutsche Bank Open Highlights
GOLF Woods. (N)
GSN Lingo (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire A The Amazing Race Ice bar. A Dog Eat Dog f (CC)
GSN (CC) (CC)
G4T0e h (:00) Attack of G4's Training G4's Training Cinematech (N) Cinema The Man Show Adam and Jimmy
G Tech the Show! (N) Camp Camp vacation in the Caribbean. (CC)
:00) Walker, Walker, Texas Ranger Walker gets * THE UNFORGIVEN (1960, Western) Audrey Hepburn, Burt Lan-
HALL Texas Ranger behind the wheel of eam Chero- caster, Lillian Gish. Pioneers feud with Kiowa Indians over a birthright,
__(CC) kee'snew car. (CC)
BuyMe"Nello Million Pound Property Experi- Selling Houses Hot Property House Hunters Buy Me "Nello
HGTV and Patricia" 0 ment "Harrogate" House in Harro- Trouble selling a "Liverpool" ,1 A doctor looks for and.Patrcia" ,)
(CC) gate. nf (CC) home. (CC) (CC) a home. (CC)
INSP Morris Cerullo Breakthrough Zola Levitt Pre- Inspiration To- Life Today (CC). This Is YourDay Financial Solu-
_____ (CC) sents (CC) day (CC) tions
Transformers Sabrina,the My Wife and My Wife and Friends 0 (CC) Everybody Everybody
KTLA Cybertron"Re- Teenage Witch Kids "Jay Gets Kids Michael Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
treat" n(CC) / (CC) Fired" n(CC) hires a maid. [ fI (CC) "Good Girls
S* THE TROPHY WIFE'S SECRET (1998) Erika Ele- ** BETRAYAL (2003, Action) Erika Eleniak, Adam Baldwin, Julie Du
LIFE niak, Brian Wimmer. A detective attempts to solve a Page. Premiere. An assassin goes on the run with a woman and her son.
multimillionaire's murder. (CC) (DVS) (CC)
Bl00C Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- Rita Cosby Live & Direct Scarborough Country
MSNBC CR mann
NIK Jimmy Neutron: SpongeBob Rugrats (CC) Full House A Fresh Prince of The Cosby The Cosby
Boy enius SquarePants f1 (CC) Bel-Air Show ( (CC) Show CC)
SV 00) One Tree * VIOLET (2000, Comedy) Mary Walsh, Peter MacNeill, Andrew News n (CC) News
NTV" Hill n (CC) Younghusband. A woman dreads the approach of her 55th birthday.
(:00) Survivor: Survivor: Thailand ) (CC) Survivor: Thailand The Reunion
OLN Thailand (CC) __(CC)
SPEED American Mus- Pinks! Pinks! Unique Whips Build or Bust
SPEED cle Car____________
(:00) Billy Gra- Behind the Hal Lindsey Taking Authority Jack Van Impe Praise the Lord (CC)
TB am Classic Scenes (CC) (CC) Presents (CC)
Crusades
Everybody Everybody Everybody Funniest Commercials of the Sex and the City Sex and the City
TBS Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Year: 2005 (N) "A Vogue Idea" Mr. Big is leaving
"High School" [) (CC) (CC) A (C) town.
(:00) The New The New Detectives A murder case Psychic Witness "Circle of Ene- MostlyTrue Stories: Urban Leg-
LC etectives (CC) becomes harder to solve over time mies" An Oklahoma man disap- ends Revealed Examining the truth
as clues fade away. pears. (N) (CC) behind popular folk tales.
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order The murder of a teen Law & Order A murder case hinges ** TWISTER (1996) Helen
TNT der "Untitled" f in Harlem may involve wo patrol of- on a girl who refuses to speak out Hunt. Storm chasers race to test a
(CC) (DVS) ficers. f (CC) (DVS) against her attacker, new tornado-monitoring device.
TOON Robot Boy (N) Grim Adven- Codename: Kids Robot Boy Grim Adven- Ed, Edd n Eddy Cartoon Car-
tures Next Door itures toons
TV5 H Les Yeux tout Acoustic Dalida (Partie 1 de 2)
courts
IT C 6:00) Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
SPiel de Contra Viento y Marea Alborada Don Francisco Presenta Los
UNIV otono Mujeres mejores momentos del programa.
Ivalientes.
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order: Criminal Intent A Law & Order: Criminal Intent After Law & Order: Criminal Intent
I USA der: Special Vic- married and high-profile judge's girl- a parolee is killed, detectives inves- "Seizure" The detectives investigate.
Stims Unit f friend is murdered. f (CC) tigate his sister. (CC) a copycat murder. Af (CC)
V The Surreal Life The Surreal Life The Surreal Life The Surreal Life ft (CC) The Surreal Life "Lost Footage" f
S (CC) (CC) f (CC) (CC)
S:00) America's Becker Chris Becker Becker Home Improve- Home Improve- WGN News at Nine At (CC)
I WGN funniest Home goes out with an- tries to watch a ment 'The Va- ment The Son
Videos (CC) other guy. n movie in peace. sectomy One" Also Mooches"
Everybody One Tree Hill Brooke tries to keep Supernatural The angry spirit of a WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
WPIX Loves Raymond cheerleaders from fighting over the little boy causes a series of mysteri- Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
'"Good Girls" same guy. f (CC) ous drownings. f (CC) & Mr. G (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) Eve Janie and Love, Inc. Veronica Mars "Cheatty Cheatty Dr, Phil Being a good wife.
WSB K (CC) Rita compete Denise's old flame Bang Bang" Cassidy hires Veronica
with Shelly. (CC) contacts her. f to investigate Kendall. (CC)
ANACONDAS: Rome "Egeria" Mark Antony runs Rome "Pharsalus" Vorenus and Pul- Inside the NFL (N) f (CC)
H BO E HUNT Rome while Caesar pursues Pom- lo are marooned in the Adriatic Sea.
pey. f (CC) ft (CC)
(-P 6:15) The Sopranos The Legend of Ten- * HARRY POTTER AND THE PRISONER OF AZKABAN (2004,
H BO-P CONSPIRACY nessee Moltisanti" The FBI closes in Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson. The young wizard
(2001) 'R' (CC) on the Sopranos. (CC) confronts the fugitive Sirius Black. n 'PG' (CC)
i JOHNSON FAMILY VACATION (2004, Comedy) (:15) ** ANACONDAS: THE HUNT FOR THE BLOOD ORCHID (2004,
H BO W Cedric the Entertainer. A man takes his family on a dis- Suspense) Johnny Messner, KaDee Strickland. Explorers encounter mon-
astrous road trip. ft 'PG-13' (CC) strous snakes in Borneo. n 'PG-13' (CC)


(6:45) ***As MISSISSIPPI BURNING (1988) Gene Epitafios (N Subtitled-English) f ** GOTHIKA (2003) Halle Bery.
H B O-S Hackman. FBI agents investigate the 1964 slaying of Strange events plague a confined
three civil-rights workers. ft 'R' (CC) psychologist. R 'R' (CC)
T (6:35) *r* (:15) TAKING LIVES (2004, Suspense) Angelina Jolie, Ethan ** FAT ALBERT (2004, Comedy)
MAX-E SHAUN OF THE Hawke, Kiefer Sutherland. An FBI profiler helps detectives search for a Kenan Thompson, Kyla Pratt. f
DEAD (2004) 'R' killer. f 'R' (CC) 'PG' (CC)
(6:30) *CONTACT (1997, Science Fiction) Jodie** THE TERMINAL (2004, Comedy-Drama) Tom Hanks, Catherine
Mr0O MAX Foster, James Woods. A devoted scientist hears a Zeta-Jones, Stanley Tucci. A European living in an airport befriends a
message from outer space. fl 'PG' (CC) stewardess. n 'PG-13' (CC)
(:15) ** GODSEND (2004, Suspense) Greg Kinnear, * TUPAC: RESURRECTION (2003, Documentary) iTV. The life and
SHOW Rebecca Romijn-Stamos. iTV. A scientist clones a cou- music of rapper Tupac Shakur. n 'R' (CC)
pie's dead son. f 'PG-13' (CC)


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46:45)* BOBBY JONES: STROKE OF GENIUS (2004, Biography) Jim (:10) * MIND THE GAP (2004)
CHOPPING Caviezel, Claire Forlani, Jeremy Northam. A young man becomes one of Alan King. Five stories revolve
MALL (1986) 'R' history's greatest golfers. n 'PG' (CC) around diverse people. 'R'


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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005, PAGE 1


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PAGE 20, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 20, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


Ida


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HIBITIONS


* MUSIC


* ENTERTAINMENT


Death lives on:

Sir Harry Oakes

BLOOD AND FIRE:
The Duke of Windsor and
the Strange Murder of
Sir Harry Oakes
by John Marquis
(LMH Publishing)
0 BOOK REVIEW
By Richard Coulson

SIXTY-TWO years after
the discovery of his partially
burned body at his Nassau
home, Westbourne, the
murder of Sir Harry Oakes,
unlike the unfortunate
baronet himself, continues
to live on and pique the lit-
erary imagination.
In this year, 2005, we have
seen three new books cov-
ering the subject. Preceding
John Marquis's highly read-
able work released just last
week, there was the sub-
stantially updated edition of
the 1988 original, The
Duchess of Windsor: The
Secret Life by Charles High-
am, with a long chapter enti-
tled "Murder in Nassau",
and A Serpent in Eden by
English barrister-journalist
James Owen. For a student
of the Oakes case, the three
together make heady read-
ing.
Marquis was a young
reporter working in Nassau
in the 1960s, pretty innocent
of Bahamian ways but with
some exposure to the
famous case from. an
unnamed informant, a
"grade A source".
When he returned from
England in 1999 to become
managing editor of The Tri-
bune, his fascination contin-
ued and, with the death of
the major players in the
mystery and newly-released
official information, he felt
freer to write.
Like all authors covering
Sir Harry's death (there
have been at least six by my
count), Marquis faces the
problem of being read not
so much for his literary style,
which is admirable, but for
an answer to the question
"whodunnit?"
Every author has had his
own theory, Marquis no less
than the others. Some have
been far-fetched, others
more plausible, but none of
them, as Marquis is frank to
admit about his own, repre-
sents an ironclad case built
on solid proof. All are spec-
ulative.
Like other scribes, he
points a finger at leading
Teal estate operator Harold
Christie, whose denial of
being absent from Sir Har-
ry's house on the night of
the murder was flatly con-
tradicted by an upright
senior police officer. The
strenuous denial itself has
always raised a host of ques-
tions why was it so impor-
tant to him to argue his pres-
ence, rather than his
absence, at the murder
scene?
But Marquis is fair
enough to present the
unvarying views of Christie's
contemporaries, that he was
a gentle man, incapable of
performing, or even autho-
rising, a murder (which hap-
pens to be the view of this
writer, who knew him when
he was old and I was young
and often lost to his superior
skill at backgammon).
The general theory has
been that the indictment and
trial of Sir Harry's son-in-
law Freddy Count Alfred
de Marigny was either a
put-up job or flowed from
utter police incompetence,
and that his acquittal was a
SEE page two


of


* By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Tribune Feature Editor

Art (or the creative arts)
essentially denotes a collection
of disciplines whose sole pur-
pose is in the output of materi-
al whose creation is compelled
by a personal drive and echoing
or reflecting a message, mood,
and symbology for the viewer
to interpret.
Art is a broad term, which
may be interpreted in differ-
ent ways, often relating to cre-
ativity, aesthetics and genera-
tion of emotion
*. Source Wikipedia
encyclopedia.
SO what then should the
response of the artist be to the
tragedies that all too often
occur in our world?
Does the artist have a
responsibility to address,
acknowledge or reflect their
environment when faced with
the heart ache that a commu-
nity, that a nation feels fol-
lowing the sudden loss of many
of its sons and daughters, or
the devastation and tragedy
that follows in the wake of the
destructive force of a hurri-
cane, or the unbelievable hor-
ror of 9/11 and the unimagin-
able pain that overshadows a
region, such as after the Asian
Tsunami of 2004 what has the
response of the art world been
and what should it be?
Curator of the National Art
Gallery Erica James told Tri-
bune Arts that following such
tragic events, art and memori-
al often become very inter-
twined.
"Art is a way of speaking the
unspeakable if you can't
express the pain verbally, or
even physically then people
reach out in creative ways to
express complicated feelings
that they have. It was difficult
for people in the Tsunami to
articulate how they were feel-
ing as if the feelings were
trapped inside of them and
the same thing for 9/11 with
all the memorials.

Grief
"People reach to the arts to
express their grief and memo-
rialize their grief and this is
repeated over and over again
wherever there is devastation -
in Pennsylvania, after the
Oklahoma City bombings, the
Vietnam Memorial," she said.
Well known Bahamian artist
Stan Burnside, who recently
concluded an exhibition that
featured a series of work that
reflect the terrifying experi-
ence of the recent hurricanes,


response


tragedy


"A lot of feelings that I might
have as an artist, that I might
express in my work I'm
always amazed at how many
people are able to connect and
say that's exactly how I feeL"

Stan Burnside


said worldwide, whether in the
Asian Pacific, along the
African Coast or in the moun-
tains of South America, artists
respond to their environment
and when there is a major dis-
aster or tragedy, the artist is
able to express a lot of what
others feel, but have no medi-
um through which to find their
own voice.
"A lot of feelings that I
might have as an artist, that I
might express in my work I'm
always amazed at how many
people are able to connect and
say that's exactly how I feel.
With me I just respond to
things that happen in this life
that affect people in sometimes
very positive ways and some-
times very negative ways -
sometimes my work is about
joy and happiness and some-
times it's about sadness and
tragedy it runs the full spec-
trum of the human experi-
ence."
Said Burnside: "Artists can't
ignore tragedy it's something
that made many of the greatest
artist great, because they have
produced work based on
tragedy, such as Pablo Picas-
so's 'Guernica', which was in
response to the bombing of
Spain during World War II."
Many artists are able to
come to grips with tragedy
through their expression, he
said. It allows them to release
some of the really deep feel-
ings that they have about an
event and they are better able
to deal with it as a result of
putting it in a painting, singing
about it, or writing a play
about it, such as Ian Strachan
did with his play 'Diary of
Souls' about a Haitian tragedy
- most artist, Burnside said,
"just feel those kinds of events
deeply."
Addressing the issue of what
the responsibility of the artist
is when tragedy strikes a com-
munity, Burnside said that
some artists feel they do have a
responsibility but in the wider
context all human beings have
a responsibility no matter what
their professional area to find
a way to contribute, to mahe!


their country better.
"When you have tragedy
like what happened in Bimini,
that everyone can identify with
the suffering visited on that
island, it moves you to the
point where you become a part
of that all of us feel that
tragedy deeply as a Bahamian
community and out of that
feeling artists produce work
that allow us to get through
the event and put it in per-
spective. It's difficult to put
into words what it is that drives
an artist when he is using
tragedy as a subject matter,"
he said..

Decision
Mixed-media artist John
Cox said that to some degree
artist have a responsibility to
respond to events that are trag-
ic the hurricanes that tore
through Grand Bahama, the
plane crash in the waters off
South Beach that killed almost
a dozen residents of Bimini, or
even a war there is a tenden-
cy by some artists to make
their work more socially and
politically conscious. The artist
makes a conscious decision in
their work to speak to issues
that are deeply personal and
deeply emotional some of
which are quite public.
"It's a matter of whether or
not those artists that tend to
do those kind of things one
that is political or social, are
more likely to do something
like that when it is a public
event.
"As an artist, all the work
you do is self reflection and
different artists have different
ways of communicating," said
Co,,x who also work s as an
education officer at the
National Art Gallery. "Some
will give a direct ticket into
their thoughts and feelings and
some tend to work indirectly
- they communicate their own
personal symbols you can
detect their concerns at the
time it can be quite comfort-
ing for a community and soci-
ety pi :p O r i ac rai '!lv ranilt
flul Ito hali c an opportunity to


feel something," he said.
For Burnside an episode -
an age of tragedy that he was
compelled to capture was the
slave experience in 'Whispers
and Screams'. Producing work
based on the experience of
Africans in the New World,
who were essentially brought
here as hostages, Burnside says
"to call them slaves is really
an insult to human intelligence.
They were hostages, kid-
napped, tortured and mur-
dered during an experience
where they were held against
their will to reduce them to a
commodity where they were
being traded you can't do it."
Explaining how he arrived
at the images in 'Whispers and.
Screams', Burnside told Tri-
bune Arts that almost a decade
ago he awoke suddenly in the
middle of the night the result
of a nightmare. Dreaming he
was chained to the bottom of a
boat that was sinking fast in
the middle of a hurricane a
wave of nausea passed over
him as the stench of fecal mat-
ter and body fluids reached his
nostrils. He would recall, years
later, that he could sense that


there were many people
crowded into the tiny space
with him.
"In that moment I felt what
maybe countless Africans felt
being brought to the new
world it was that feeling that
inspired me to produce Whis-
pers the slave experience -
that experience allowed me to
tell the story as I saw it," he
said.
Another artist who uses the
medium of paint to capture
and tlde score his .concerns is
Antonious Roberts, Cox said.
Environmentally conscious,
Roberts produces work that
touches on Bahamian ances-
try, passionate about this top-
ic, the artist has demonstrated
little fear in addressing any
issue that violates that he is
certain to tackle any issue that
de(:1: \vith pro.!rcess lhat lakes
place within the B3ahamian


society at the expense of
recognising where we come
from.
Beyond Roberts and a hand-
ful of other artists however,
there are relatively few within
the Bahamian art community
that consistently look to
address themes relevant to cur-
rent issues before society, or
that address those themes
effectively enough, he said.
Cox said further, that the
Bahamas does not have a tra-
dition of honouring people,
through artistic rendering or
memorializing, who have
passed away.
He added however, that
Junkanoo parades often depict
fallen Bahamian heroes a sit-
uation that offers some sort of
acknowledgment of their con-
tribution to Bahamian society.
He noted: "It's comforting that
art has the ability to symbolize
events visually that cause you
to be reminded of them, in a
way that is not always sad, and
that helps to bring closure."
For Burnside, his present
concern in Bimini is not for his
work. He said that he has a
very good friend and former


National Art Gallery
student in Bimini, James Pin-
der who chose to contribute
to the national good by living
and working in Bimini. Pinder,
he said, stands as a national
hero for his role as a teacher in
the Ministry of Education and
his efforts that have produced
outstanding students on that
island.
According to Burnside, Pin-
der was able to describe for
him how devastated the com-
munity is over the rec.'n air
plane t.'ra!edy ne '( mvin
is that through G(od's grace
they are able to find the
strength to get through this -
whether I am inspired to pro-
duce work related to this
tragedy that comes later -
right now all of us are con-
cerned and very prayerful, in
support of the people of Bimi-
ni as an artist I have to put
things in perspective like that".


The


art to


* WANDSROW, part of the Whispers and Screams Exhibition, is now in the collection of Christian and Jennifer Saunders.


"Art is a way of speaking the
unspeakable f you can't
express the pain verbally, or
even physically then people
reach out in creative ways to
express complicated feelings
that they have."


Erica James, curator of the


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005








PAGE 0, WDNESDY, DCEMBE 28,2005HHE TIBUN


Kala' s


is

By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
IN THOSE hours when
she's not at work, and that's
many hours these days since
she's not working in a tradi-
tional job, Kala Zervos is cro-
cheting using crochet needles
and colourful raffia to make
bags, hats, and coasters or
sewing yarn in between plastic
mesh to create any household
item her imagination can con-
ceive.
It's a hobby she picked up
from her mother, Mavis
Weech, when she was just a
young girl, and she has con-
tinued to perfect it ever since.
"Before they had yarn, my
mother used to crochet using,
what they called Number Ten
thread, so you could imagine
how much work went into
that," Mrs Zervos recalled.
That thread, she added, was
rather thin and far more diffi-
cult to work with than the
larger chords used in crochet-
ing today.
Starting out weaving little
doilies and coasters, Mrs Zer-
vos progressed to creating big-
ger and more functional
pieces, like baby booties and
bonnet sets, crocheted sofa
throws and blankets. A quick
scan of the interior of her
Sears Road home, and it's
easy to see proof to match her
self-proclaimed creative
nature. Several hats decorated
with floral bouquets and
streaming with ribbons deco-
rate the walls, and a sign made
of crochet and plastic canvas
welcomes visitors to the home.
"You can go and buy some-
thing from a store, but for me,
the satisfaction of knowing
that I made something of my
own is satisfying, more satis-
fying than if I bought it in a
store," said the designer.
Mrs Zervos, who got her
creativity from her ffiother,;
does all of her designs free-
hand and without making any
sketches or plans. When asked
about the inspiration behind
her designs, she said with a
laugh: "It all comes from my
head. I just think of an idea in
my head and go with it."
Since she retired from work
as a legal secretary, and
became a housewife and
homemaker "whatever you
choose to call it"- Mrs Zervos
has turned a childhood hobby
into a means of making mon-
ey. Her clientele, mainly
friends and family, get word
of her crafts around, and this
leads to more orders.
Apart from generating
funds, Mrs Zervos says, her
talent is a way for her to relax
and unwind. "It's a way to just
relax and get your mind off of
things.
"The enjoyment that comes
from my work when it's all
done makes it worthwhile. I
can look at it and I'm pleased.
And if 's not done to my lik-
ing, I can just start over. But
that rarely happens," she
added.


'sew'9


crocheting


creative


* KALA ZERVOS and (below) examples of her work


Mrs Zervos doesn't do much
ceramic work anymore, not
since the ceramic school on
Montrose Avenue,
her only outlet to
produce her work
in Nassau, shut
down about a year
ago. But other
forms of creativity,
like working on
plastic canvas,
enable her to pass
the time quite nice-
ly.
Mrs Zervos got
her first introduc-
tion: toa ceramics in
Freeport, where she
lived from 1975 to
1980. During a
ceramics class, Mrs
Zervos learned how
to create ceramic
pieces "from
scratch". She
learned to slip cast,
where the liquid
mixture is poured
into a mold that
absorbs water. As
the water is
absorbed, a layer of
ceramic particles is
deposited onto the
mold, forming such
hollow items as
teapots and vases.
The excess liquid is then
poured out of the mold.
After the product has dried
it is strengthened by firing, a
process that takes place in spe-
cial furnaces called kilns,
where the ceramics are fired
at temperatures ranging from
about 1,200 to 3,000 degrees
F (649 to 1649C). The firing
process hardens the product
permanently. and gives it
strength, durability, and other


Book


review
FROM page one

salutary step for justice.
But one author, James
Owen, believes that Freddy
was the logical culprit, and
cites a 1947 Scotland Yard
report to the Colonial
Office, written by a detec-
tive inspector, claiming that
the investigation was sim-
ply mishandled, allowing
the accused guilty party to
go free.
By contrast, Charles
Higham advances the exot-
ic proposition that Sir Har-
ry was done in by a hitman
(hired by Christie) of the'
so-called Santeria-Paloe
Mayombe cult, who upset off
little piles of gunpowder to
create rutual fires, with ,no
intention of total arson to
incinerate Sir Harry's body
and the entire Westbourne
residence. Well, maybe.
Marquis's stated objec-
tive is not to give us a final
solution to the murder, but
to point out the social ills
for this country arising from
an unsolved murder of such
importance. How can the
Bahamas hold up its head
as a fair society when there
is the lingering memory of a
crime that was covered up
by the Duke of Windsor
(probably egged on by his
dominatrix wife Wallis),,
then Governor, and a small,
cabal of colonial official
and leading Bahamian citi
zens of the day?..
If there is any definite
criminal in Marquis's book,
it is Windsor. He did not
simply bungle the investi-
gation, but deliberately per-
verted it by hiring the pliant
Miami gumshoes Captains
Melchen and Barker and
instructing them whoimto,
arrest Freddy, the free.
spirited, Frenchifiedc
charmer whose style was!
anathema to the Duke's
starchy and antiquated roy-:
alism left over from his
brief tenure as Edward'
In Marquis's view, the
framing of Freddy has "left
feelings of deep unease in
The Bahamas, where foi
more than half a century,
citizens have been forced1
to live with the painful real.
ity that certain people aro
immune from justice...the
Oakes story remains rele*
vant to the way Bahamian"
live their lives."
After so much time has
passed, this may seem an
overheated and distorted
way .of looking at the pre-
sent Bahamian scene, and
no doubt Marquis is held
in suspicion by some mem-
bers of our "establishment"
who regard him as an
extremist creating a fiction-
al power-elite and issues of
race and social class where
none actually exists.
But his view certainly
takes his book out of the
class of simple mystery
thrillers, and elevates it to a
serious probing of our
accepted way of life.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2C, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


ITEMS4E







THE TRBUNE EDNESAY, DCEMBEN28,R005,NAGENT


Who is


Mista Smyth?


* KYM Smith, commonly
known as "Special K", is
onp of the few Bahamian
artists opening up for the
internationally acclaimed
hip-hop duo, the Ying Yang
Twins.


He is a Bahami-
an rapper, pro-
ducer and
songwriter
whose original-
ity and style has the industry
asking, who is Mista Smyth?
This Christmas, he is also one
of the few Bahamian artists
opening up for the interna-
tionally acclaimed hip-hop duo,
the Ying Yang Twins.
Commonly known as 'Spe-
cial K' and now most recently
'Mista Smyth', Kym Smith was
born and raised in the
Bahamas. Whether his intro-
duction to music at an early
age or his employment at 100
Jamz induced Kym's lyrical
style, wit and musical flava, he
is certainly a force to be reck-
oned with. For the past four
years he has flooded the
Bahamian market with hit after
hit, opening concerts for 50
Cent, Bonecrusher, Red Rat,
Trina and Ja Rule. In 2005,
Mista Smyth attended and per-
formed at the annual Power-
summit as one of the opening
acts for the Def Jam concert.
His work at 100 Jamz pro-
motes his true calling pro-
duction and song writing. In
this day of multi-talented, post-
modern artists, Smyth switches
styles and genres with ease.
"It's [my music] like a fusion
of hip-hop, R&B and reggae,
Caribbean style."
He is obviously one of the
hottest hip-hop/reggae artists


coming out of the Bahamas. As
Smyth prepares to introduce
his Caribbean style to the
world, the buzz is spreading
and his fan base is growing.
Thousands are expected to
view his performance at the
upcoming Ying Yang Twins
concert December 29.
The concert will feature the
Twins first ever performance
in sunny Nassau. Fans will get
to hear live and direct pop-
ular club hits such as Wait (The
Whisper Song), Whistle While
You Twurk, Say I Yi Yi and
much more.
Hosted by Capital City Mar-
keting and sponsored by Bac-
ardi Limon and The Fluid
Lounge, the hip-hop dynamic
duo promises to be one of the
hottest concerts this year. The
event, which will be held in the
ballroom of the Radisson
Cable Beach Resort, will also
feature one of the most popular
DJ's of our time DJ Xcite-
ment of 100 Jamz.
Several other surprise guest
artists are scheduled to per-
form, but the public will just
have to wait until the concert
date to find out exactly who
will hit the stage. Tickets are
now on sale at The Juke Box,
Mall at Marathon and fans can
stay tuned to 100 Jamz for
every day ticket giveaways.
Doors open at 9pm.
For more information, call
Capital City Marketing at 323-
5589.


*:.;.: > ^. i ; ;
t.;V j .I
..11|1...'
*il. |


V SEASON'S


GREETINGS

Quality Auto Sales Ltd will close at 1pm on
Friday, December 23 and will re-open on
Wednesday, December 28, 2005.

We will close at 1pm on Friday, December 30
and re-open on Tuesday, January 3, 2006.

Quality Auto Sales Ltd would like to thank
all our valued customers for their
partonage during the year. We look
forward to your continued friendship
LJ and support in 2006 and wish


A
'K


N,
'K


* THE Ying Yang Twins are scheduled to perform live in concert at the Radisson
Cable Beach Hotel ballroom Thursday, December 29.


(Photo courtesy of Capital City Marketing)


* K.A ;.


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005, PAGE 3C


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE0,WENESDADECMBER28,2005THEMRSPEIBUN


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PAGE 4C, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005, PAGE 5C


THE TRIBUNE


W HAT S


' -
i...


E M A I L:


... ..... Parties, Mghtclubs ..... ^:ti ^


$5 Fridays @ First Down every Friday night. Music by Barry Da
Pusher Selector: Dominique. Ladies $5 all night, gents $10. Early
juggling by Mr. Xcitement and DJ Fatal. Drink specials all night
long..

Baiardi Happy Hour @ Power Boat Adventures Bar and Grill (one
door east of Texaco Harbour Bay), every Friday. $3 Bacardi drinks
all night and $3 beers.

Ladies Night @ Power Boat Adventures Bar and Grill, every Sat-
td Ladies free, Gents, $10 all night. Bacardi Big Apple and oth-
r'd*jhnk specials all night long.
J) 'JJ .1
Wild Jungle, each and every Wednesday night @ Club Trappers.
Nassau's "upscale" gentleman's club. Featuring a female body
.painting extravaganza. Free body painting @ 8 pm. Ladies always
,Iweicome. Admission: Men free before 10 pm. Females free. There
Will beffree food and hors d'oeuvres between 9 and 10 pm. Open
'iritil 4 am.

_iadis`Nighf'@ Fluid Lounge, this and every Thursday night.
J1o s open at 10pm. Ladies free before lam, $10 after. Guys: $15
.!tHiight. Drink special: 3 @ $10 (Bacardi) Giveaways and door
prizes every week.

Saturday Night Live every Saturday night @ Club Fluid, Bay St. The
26iggest'party of the week, pumping all your favourite hits all night
long. Ladies in free before llpm. Strict security enforced.

I.ave Saturdays @ Club Eclipse. DJ Scoobz spinning the best in Old
''A$cool. Admission $35, all inclusive food and drink.

Karaoke Music Mondaze @ Topshotters Sports Bar. Drink specials
Sall night long, including karaoke warm-up drink to get you started.
i.;party from 8pm-until.

a (Reggae Tuesdays @ Bahama Boom. Cover charge includes a free
Guinness and there should be lots of prizes and surprises. Admis-
sibn: Ladies $10 and Men $15.

HHump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar every Wednes-
:day 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers and numerous drink specials.

*'he Pit @ Bahama Boom, every Thursday. Doors open at 9pm.
showtime 11.30pm. Cover charge $15. $10 with flyer.

Njntasy Fridays @ Fluid Lounge, featuring late '80s music in the VIP
I unge, Top of the charts in the Main Lounge, neon lights and Go
.jGo dancers. Admission: Ladies free before lpm, $15 after; Guys
,20 all night.

Dicky Mo's @ Cable Beach. Flavoured Fridays Happy Hour, every
'T.iiday. Drink specials: Smirnoff Kamikaze Shots, $1; Smirnofl
Plavoured Martinis, 2 for $10; Smirnoff Flavoured Mixed Drinks,
~ for $10. Bahamian Night (Free admission) every Saturday with live
3'p sic from 8 pm to midnight. Karaoke Sundays from 8pm to mid-
.jight, $1 shots and dinner specials all night long.

i:T-wisted Boodah Lounge @ Cafe Segafredo, Charlotte St kicks,
[idff Fridays at 6pm with deep house to hard house music, featuring
CraigBOO, Unkle Funky and Sworl'wide on the decks.

'hChill Out Sundays @ Coco Loco's, Sandyport, from 4pm-until,
"' laying deep, funky chill moods with world beats.

'S sweet Sunday Chill Out Soiree Lounge, every Sunday, 4pm-mid-
'm night @ Patio Grille, British
colonial Hotel.

-"Wet Sundays, every Sunday, noon-midnight @ Crystal Cay Beach.
Admission $10, ladies free.

,,ToLooSe @ Indigo Restaurant on West Bay St and Skyline Dri-
e .Sfinger/songwriter Steven Holden performs solo with special
L.ggts, Thurisday from 9pm midnight.
,^The Graham Holden Deal @ The Green Parrot....David Graham,
Steve Holden, Tim Deal and Friends perform Sunday, 7pm 10pm
rrcane Hole on Paradise Island.

t eitdell and Hot KC @ Palm Court Lounge, British Colonial
Hilton, Wednesday-Thursday 8pm-12am.

Sunday NightuInterlude @ Briteley's Restaurant & Lounge, Eneas
St 0ff Poinciana Drive. Featuring Frankie Victory at the key board
in the After Dark Room every Sunday. 8.30pm to midnight. Fine
food and drinks.

Pail Hanna, Tabatha and Gernie, and the Caribbean Express
perform at Traveller's Rest, West Bay St, every Sunday, 6.30pm-
9.30pm.
S;. ... .....


ON IN AND AROUND NASSAU
















OUTTH E RE @ TR IBUN'EMEDIA NET


LMON








jAH~l^ J


Dec 28th

SDec, 21st

ox f ,fice The Juke Box Marathon Mail, Doors Open (

ty www.ccmbahamas.com '.



The Aprts$. ::


ART INTERNATIONAL, featuring the work of nine Bahamian
artists, five well known artists from the UK, one from South Africa
and one from Zimbabwe will be held gratis, of the Guaranty Bank,
Lyford Manor, just outside the Lyford Cay gates. The exhibition will
be open to the public until the end of December. The work of the
artists on display can be seen in collections worldwide, and have
been shown in numerous exhibitions. Representing the Bahamas
will be; John Beadle; John Cox; Claudette Dean; Tyrone Ferguson;
Bo Sigrist Guirey; Nora Smith, Dorman Stubbs and Rupert
Watkins. Lady Connery, Sir Sean's wife, has kindly agreed to open
the exhibition. She is an exceptional artist, and will be exhibiting one
of her paintings.

The National Collection @ the National Art Gllery of the
Bahamas, an exhibition that takes the viewer on a journey through
the history of fine art in the Bahamas. It features signature pieces
from the national collection, including recent acquisitions by Blue
Curry, Antonius Roberts and Dionne Benjamin-Smith. Call 328-
5800 to book tours. This exhibition closes February 28, 2006.

The Nassau Music Society The Nassau Music Society is featuring,
in association with Fidelity, RBC and RoyalStar Assurance as
part of their "FESTIVAL OF RUSSIAN ARTISTS", Natalia
Gutman (cello) a living legend in the music world who, along
with her quartet, will play at Government House on J'anuary 13
at 8pm and at St Paul's Church Hall, Lyford Cay on January 14
at 7:30pm. Also featured during the Festival Yuri Bashmet and
the Moscow Soloist Orchestra who return once again to Nassau
on February 24, 26 and 27- their guest artist will be JoAnn
Deveaux-Callender. In April Oleg Polianski is featured on
the piano. Purchase .your tickets from January 4, 2006 at the
Dundas Theatre (394-7179); AD Hanna & Co (322-8306) and the
Galleria JFK (356-seat). Details of the venues and programmes
will be available on the website shortly. Do not miss this oppor-
tunity to listen to live world class musicians.""


f


;a,:".


or for more information.

Diabetes Directions a FREE'diabetic support group meets the
first Monday of each month at 6.30pm at New Providence Com-
munity Centre, Blake Road. Dinner is provided and free blood sug-
ar, blood pressure and cholesterol testing is available. For more info
call 702-4646 or 327-2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third Monday every
month, 6pm @ Doctors Hospital conference room.

The Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third Saturday,
2.30pm (except August and December) @ the Nursing School,
Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital, the official training centre of the American
Heart Association offers CPR classes certified by the AHA. The
course defines the warning signs of respiratory arrest and gives pre-
vention strategies to avoid sudden death syndrome and the most
common serious injuries and choking that can occur in adults,
infants and children. CPR and First Aid classes are offered every
third Saturday of the month from 9am-lpm. Contact a Doctors Hos-
pital Community Training Representative at 302-4732 for more
information and learn to save a life today.

REACH Resources & Education for Autism and related Chal-
lenges meets from 7pm 9pm the second Thursday of each month
in the cafeteria of the BEC building, Blue Hill Road.




JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR Cycling are pleased to offer
a cycling clinic for juniors between 10 and 17. The free clinic will be
held every Saturday in an effort to encourage kids to cycle. Parents
interested in registering their children should contact organisers at
jarcycling@gmail.com

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta Sigma Theta
Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30 pm every third Wednesday at the
SBah mas N tiiNt Pride Building ,'.

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial Hilton Mon-
day's at 7pm.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7.30pm @ C C Sweeting
Senior School's Dining Room, College Avenue off Moss Road.
Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas Baptist Community
College Rm A19, Jean St. Club 3956 meets Thursday, 7.30pm @
British Colonial Hilton. Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8.30pm @
SuperClubs Breezes. Club 7178 meets Tuesday, 6pm @ The J
Whitney Pinder Building, Collins Ave.
Club 2437 meets every second, fourth and fifth Wednesday at the
J Whitney Pinder Building, Collins Ave at 6pm. Club 612315 meets
Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach. Club
753494 meets every Wednesday; 6pm-8pm in the Solomon's Build-
ing, East-West Highway. Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial
Hilton Mondays at 7pm. Club Cousteau 7343 meets every Tuesday
night at 7.30 in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central
Andros. All are welcome.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega chapter meets every
second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham
Nassau Resort, Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday, 7pm @
Gaylord's Restaurant, Dowdeswell St. Please call 502-4842/377-4589
for more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm
@ Atlantic House, IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room.

The Nassau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) meets every
third Monday of the month in the Board Room of the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets the second and
fourth Wednesday of the month, 8pm @ St Augustine's Monestary.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Friday of each
month, 7.30pm at Emmaus Centre at St Augustine's Monestary. For
more info call 325-1947 after 4pm.

International Association of Administrative Professionals, Bahamas
Chapter meets the third Thursday of every month @ Superclubs
Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.


Health








PAGE 6, WEDESDAY DECEBER 2,T200TTHENMENTN


'Hoop Dreams'




among 25 picks




for the National




Film Registry


*f- "Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


,h. .


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

D VD technolo-
gy, since its
introduction,
has served as
an excellent
and fairly permanent- way to
get any message across. One
Freeport religious ministry has
bypassed the typical forums,
the youth rallies on the park,
the small group meetings, the
youth conventions and fun
days, and brought its ministry
to the cutting edge with the
release of a full-length Bahami-
an film.
"IPPUAA: Choose Life", a
simple title that doesn't imme-
diately hold the promise of an
exciting film, is really, once
you've come to the end of the
plot, a powerful movie about
making the best choices in life,
choices that secure a positive
future.
Still, the word powerful, since
it is so overused as an adjec-,
tive, seems a bit cliche, and
doesn't quite capture the
essence of what the producers
have done through the film.
Convincing performances, plus
a believable and, I may add,
true to life-in-the-Bahamas
plot, make the film worth
watching.
The full-length film, pro-
duced by Frank Penn and his
GBI Recording and Television
studios, is based on the stage
production of the same name.
The script was written by Erica
Pierre, in consultation with Mr
Penn. The actors include: Dun-
stan Gomes, Kyle Maycock,
Denika Pierre, Portia Cole-
brooke, Brian Roxbury (the
film's director), Marcia
Knowles, Mia Bodie,
Bessiemae Nottage, Linburg
Cooper, Tawari Rogers.
The story is about a group
of people, mainly young peo-
ple, who are dealing with and
being affected by the struggles
of decision making. The movie
was taped at the Simpson C
Penn Talent Theatre in
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
The movie opens in a family
room where viewers meet the
Ingrahams on the first day of a
new school year. Fletcher
Ingraham (Roxbury) is the
drunken father who lives by
the bottle. His philosophy,
though very serious, comes
across as hilarious on the
screen. Apparently, he works
better when he drinks in the
morning, thinks better when
he drinks in the afternoon, and'
sleeps better when he drinks
in the night a philosophy that
his family is forced to tolerate.
His wife, Rose (Colebrooke),
works as a house cleaner. The
couple have two children;
Michael, who is just beginning
grade twelve and is described
as a "mama's boy" by his father
and Kelly (Pierre), entering


Freeport religious

ministry releases full-

length Bahamian film


senior high with a "fiery" per-
sonality like her pa, and facing
some battles of her own.
Tyrone Johnson (Gomes) is
Michael's smooth-talking,
womanizing friend, whose
promiscuity leads him to almost
face fatherhood, when he gets
the news that one of his lady
friends, Ericka (Marcia), is
pregnant.
Tyrone, who Fletcher hates,
is Michael's' main source of
peer pressure, as he tries to
coax Michael into adopting his
lifestyle. He also shares some
ridiculous mis-information
about sex, a piece of which is
ironically debunked by the
"king of pleasure" himself.
Tyrone tries to encourage his
-best friend, a virgin, to have
sex with his girlfriend of two
years, Tina (Bodie), who is also
a virgin.
Since it is a religious-based
plot, the movie clearly pro-
motes abstinence. And the
acronym in the title sums the
message up in a few words, the











message carried by both the
movie and the Happy Hour
Experience Television Ministry
that distributes the movie.
IPPUAA stands for Intro-
duction (plus) Participation
(equals) Promiscuity and
Unwanted (pregnancy) Abor-
tion or AIDS. The message is
brilliantly expressed without'
giving the viewer the impres-
sion that they are being
preached to.
Abstinence seems to be a
message that many are afraid
to talk about, because it
appears to be unattainable, said
Mr Penn, but he begs to differ
with that attitude. The lyrics to
his song, composed especially
for the movie, say it best:
"Would your decision please
Jesus? Ask yourself this ques-
tion again and again. Live your
life according to the word of
God, and eliminate most of
life's pain.
"Is abstinence before mar-
riage an attainable goal? It
ensures healthier bodies and
peace for your soul. Keep your


temple a place where God can:
reside. Fornication is a sin t-hat'
questions self-pride. Let,no one,
deceive you with empty words.:
If you live by the Spirit, .you:
can soar like a bird. Do; not'
sleep around it's a thing of,the'
past. Sanctification is a sin.,You
can do it, my friend."
What is now the plot of the:
DVD, began as a.stage pro-'
duction at the Simpson C Penn.
Talent Theatre in Freepprt.
But the ministry decided.,.to
tape the show and.put it ii;
DVD form for sale.
So rather than sitting
through a lecture about s,exu-
ality and promiscuity, young
people, the main audience for
the story, can 'listen' with their
eyes. "Since we all are influ-
enced, to some degree, by what
we see and hear, it is my intent
to use this medium to show
that which is pure, excellent
and praiseworthy," said'Mt
Penn in a segment of the DVD.
The DVD also includes short
excerpts from other young peoi-
ple, "the future leaders :of the
country", as to why one should
abstain from sex until marriage.
It also includes a look atThe
Happy Hour's three-volume
series on single parenting 6and
illegitimate children.
From beginning to end;l
"IPPUAA: Choose Life", is
thought provoking. It's an
excellent tool to provokedis-
cussion, and not only abut
issues of sexuality, but also ~f a
parent's involvement and
responsibility to their children.
In it, Fletcher and Rose have a
secret of their own high sclihol
mistake that theythave keptor
so many years, and is just being
brought, or should I say, forced
into the light.
Also, though Fletcher's
drinking habit seems to ha.e
had no other affect on thefam-
ily, than annoying them, it
would be good to discuss what
other affects his drinking 00ight
have had. Domestic vioklrie
perhaps?
Though this movie pa a
dramatic punch, the nr r
downside to the film, ig4.i-y
opinion, is an abrupt eriitC a
conversation between M40i l
and Tyrone that leaves UBany
questions unanswered ;:e
viewer ends up knowing.a^t
Michael's decision is, but kft
in limbo about Tyrone'sgfa(e.
The young man leave te
frame still bent on leadfiga
promiscuous life. But rt'Ae,
what happens to Tyrone i st
left to the viewers imagine itin
after all.


'King Kong" prv










"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content


0*


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Available from Commercial News Providers"


I am


PAGE 6C, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


THE TRIBUNE




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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


SECTION -


business@tribunemedia.net


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Airport fails at 'worst


time'


for tourism sector


* By NEIL HARTNELL
. Tribune Business Editor
THotel industry execu-
tives yesterday told
The Tribune that the
chaos caused by the
failure of Nassau
International Airport's (NIA) radar
system over the four days "couldn't
have happened at a worse time", dam-
aging their earnings and the Bahamas'
overall tourism reputation during one
of the year's busiest holiday periods.
Although Bahamian hotel opera-
tors were yesterday still assessing the
damage done to their occupancy levels
and revenues during the Christmas
week a period when most expect to


liey oine sif pesur o NA maagmet eal


be 100 per cent booked the effect
on airlift was set to have "some degree
of an impact".
Frank Comito, the Bahamas Hotel
Association's (BHA) executive vice-
president, said: "It's unfortunate. It
couldn't have happened at a worse
time. We're just hoping it can get
operational the back up and primary
radar system as quickly as possible."
Michael Hooper, the British Colo-
nial Hilton's general manager, told


The Tribune: "We had more than the
average number of cancellations and
no-shows yesterday [Monday]. We
were still at 96 per cent occupancy,
but we expected to be full."
Mr Hooper said the British Colonial
Hilton yesterday still had "a lot of
arrivals yet to come in" when he spoke
to this newspaper at around 4pm.
Again, the hotel was expected to be at
100 per cent occupancy, but he added
that the airlift woes could reduce this


to possibly 90 per cent.
"We're still very concerned," Mr
Hooper said.
The radar system was said to be
back up and operating normally at
NIA yesterday afternoon, having been
down during the morning and on
Monday, in addition to other prob-
lems experienced over the weekend.
With the radar out of action, no inter-
national flights could take-off from or
land at NIA, bringing the flow of,


tourists into and out of New Provi-
dence to a virtual standstill.
An estimated 8,000-10,000 passen-
gers were affected by the travel dis-
ruption, with.some forced to sleep the
night at NIA an airport previously
condemned by Kerzner International
chairman, Sol Kerzner, as one of the
world's worst and totally put of step
with the top-end nature of the
Bahamian tourism product.
Sources told The Tribune that
numerous passengers caught up in the
chaos were saying that although their
hotels and general Bahamian vaca-
tion had exceeded expectations, they

SEE page 3B


Union hoping for Ministry


meeting over FirstCaribbean


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas Financial Services
Union's (BFSU) president yesterday told
The Tribune that it hoped to meet with
the Minister of Labour and First-
Caribbean International Bank (Bahamas)
executives today, in a bid to resolve a
dispute the bank admitted had negative-
ly impacted operations in Abaco and
Eleuthera last Thursday.
Theresa Mortimer said: "We filed a
trade dispute with the Ministry of Labour,
so we hope tomorrow they will call us in
and we will sit at the table."
In a statement issued on Friday, Sharon
Brown, FirstCaribbean's managing direc-
tor for the Bahamas, said the industrial
action taken by BFSU members as a
result of the bank's failure to "give any
salary increment based on performance"
had impacted its efficiency.
She said: "We regret that we were not
able to perform as efficiently as we would


have liked, and experienced customer
service challenges in Abaco and
Eleuthera yesterday which were today
addressed."
However, Ms Brown said the "majori-
ty" of FirstCaribbean's employees did
not participate-in the industrial action,
which involved workers staging a sick-
-out. Branches in Nassau and Freeport,
nheiadded, "were almost fully staffed"
on Thursday.
The two sides last week disputed
whether the BFSU's industrial action had
breached the agreement between the
two parties, FirstCaribbean claiming it
did, while Ms Mortimer said the union
had already filed a trade dispute.
The BFSU president alleged that First-
Caribbean had breached Article 21 h) of
the industrial agreement, which said the
bank would not withhold benefits such as
an annual salary increment.


* MINISTER VINCENT PEET


SEE page 5B


FPL affiliate's option


over LNG project


'terminated'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A Florida Power & Light
(FPL) affiliate has relinquished
its option to invest in the lique-
fied natural gas (LNG) regasi-
fication terminal and pipeline
project that was initially planned
for Grand Bahama, but is now
considering offshore receiving
facilities.
In a response to testimony
from BG LNG Services, which
said FPL was opposing its pro-
ject because an affiliate, FPL
Resources, had looked at taking
an equity stake in the LNG pro-
ject that also featured Suez
Energy North America (the for-
mer Tractebel) and El Paso Cor-
poration, FPL replied: "While
an affiliate of FPL Group, not
FPL, once had an option .to
invest in a Bahamas LNG pro-


ject, that option has terminat-
ed."
The consortium that FPL
.Resources was part of, the Blue
Marlin group, had initially hoped
to site their LNG receiving and
transmission te.rninal in
Freeport Harbour, but this was
rejected by the Government
because it was too close to near-
by communities and the cruise
ship facilities. This was despite'
the group's commitment to
spend $40 million on construc-
tion of a new cruise ship termi-
nal.
A second site, at South Riding
Point on Grand Bahama, was
also frowned on by the Govern-
ment, forcing Suez and El Paso
to mull creating offshore facili-
ties situated between the
Bahamas and Florida to receive
the gas and then pipe it to the
US.


Bahamian entity


in scheme that


'defrauded' crooks


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
INTERNATIONAL fraud-
sters who bilked investors out of
around $70 million were them-
selves defrauded, court docu-
ments have revealed, paying
$270,000 to a Bahamian com-
pany that appeared to be par-
ticipating in what is typically
known as the 'Nigerian advance
fee scam'.
A report filed with the US
District Court in Washington
by Michael McKay, the receiv-
er appointed for the investment


frauds run by John Wayne
Zidar and his colleagues,
recorded that the defendants
paid $270,000 to "a corporation
based in the Bahamas called
Barefootaire".
Mr McKay reported that
Barefootaire was created by a
Jack Masterman, "allegedly" to
receive a large payment from a
contract in Nigeria.
The receiver said: "In what
appears to be a typical 'Nigerian
scam', a company expecting to

SEE page 4B


US backs Bahamas

Maritime Authority


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
UNITED States regulators
have backed up a Bahamas
Maritime Authority (BMA)
report that found the captain
and crew of a Bahamian-regis-
tered cruise liner acted in a
"prudent and appropriate"
manner in responding to dam-
age inflicted by heavy weather
earlier this year.
The National Transportation
Safety Board (NTSB) found
that the crew on the Norwegian
Dawn acted correctly during
severe weather that affected the
cruise ship as it returned to New
York from a cruise to the


Bahamas and Florida. During
the incident, the ship was hit by
a large wave that damaged
some cabins and injured a small
number of passengers.
"We are pleased with the
report from the NTSB and that
it further clarifies the Bahamas
Maritime Authority's report
that the company, the captain of
Norwegian Dawn and his offi-
cers and crew acted appropri-
ately in this rare large wave inci-
dent," said Colin Veitch, Nor-
wegian Cruise Lines' president
and chief executive, said in a
statement.


SEE page 4B


HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010


- II








THE TRIBUNE


GE 2BWEDNESDAYDECE 5


Ur/ui -e ,- ,


FIITYIMA H K 1 1WA


a By Fidelity Capital
Markets

INVESTORS took time out
of their busy Christmas shop-


ping schedule to trade in excess
of 39,000 shares this past week
in the Bahamian market. The
market saw 10 out of the 19
listed stocks traded, of which


two advanced, two declined
and six remained unchanged.
Volume leader for the week
was Doctors Hospital Health
Systems (DHS) with 11,144
shares changing hands and
accounting for 28 per cent of
the total shares traded.
The big mover for the week
was also DHS, whose share
price rose by $0.07 to close at
$2.17. On the down-side, Cable
Bahamas (CAB) lost $0.14 to
end the week at $9.40.

COMPANY NEWS

Bahamas Property
Fund (BPF) -
For the 2005 third quarter,
BPF posted net income of
$551,000, which represents a
marginal decline of $1,800 over
the same period last year.
Revenues increased by
$29,900 or 2.90 per cent to totMa
$1.1 million, while operating
expenses declined by $46,200
or 9.76 per cent to total
$427,000. As at September 30,
2005, funds from operations
stood at $632,000 compared to
$557,000 in 2004.
BPF took a one-time bad
debt charge of $79,000 in the
2005 third quarter. For the
quarter, Net Asset Value stood
at $10.48 compared to $9.36
year over year.

Cable Bahamas (CAB) -
For the 2005 third quarter,
CAB posted net income of $3.5
million, representing an
increase of $1.4 million or 68
per cent over the same period
last year.
Total revenues grew by $1.7


million or 14 per cent to total
$13.7 million, while operating
expenses declined marginally
to total $6.9 million. Operat-
ing income for the quarter was
*$6.8 million or $1.8 million
more than the $5 million
earned in the 2004 third quar-
ter.
Total revenues generated
from the cable operations
increased by 5 per cent to total
$8.3 million, up from the $7.9
million for the equivalent peri-
od in 2004, while CAB's inter-
net segment contributed $4.1
million in revenue, represent-
ing an increase of 30 per cent
year-over-year. Earnings per
share increased by $0.07 to
total $0.18, and dividends per
share remained constant at
$0.18.

Doctors Hospital Health
Systems (DHS) -
DHS continues to perform
well and posted solid financial
results for the quarter ending
October 31, 2005.
For the 2005 third quarter,
DHS recorded net income of
,,$958,000, up from the $871,000
earned in 2004. Total revenues
increased by $900,000 or 11.5
per cent to total $8.7 million,
while operating expenses grew
by $1 million or 16 per cent to
total $7.5 million.
The increase in operating
expenses was driven primarily
by the rise in payroll costs,
which correlated to the
increase in patient services.
One area to watch is the 50

SEE page 4B


The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 435.63 YTD 1.321%


BISX CLOSING
SYMBOL PRICE


AML
BAB
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
DHS
FAM
FCC
FCL
FIN
ICD
JSJ
KZLB
PRE


$0.73
$1.10
$0.70
$6.90
$10.40
$12.75
$1.26
$9.40
$9.00
$1.64
$10.05
$2.17
$6.05
$1.15
$10.00
$10.90
$9.95
$9.05
$6.94
$10.00


CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
CHANGE
$- 1370 ',334o)i
$- 0 .
$- 1000 4-175%
$- 250 20.00%


$-
$-
$-
$-0.14
$-0.09
$-
$-0
$0.07
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-


500
0
0
2000
10195
0
10000


11144 .67
0 '521.78%OX
0
0 25.00%
250 12.37%:-

3000 r !q ^,^i 1 b 1
0 11.1 i;, ?.. i 4A2%[-
0 0.00%

Ii .i ~ .o *}lm
s?}-)


DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:


FAMGUARD


NOTICE TO SHAREHOLDERS

Re: TENDER OFFER

Shareholders are advised that
the Tender Offer
to acquire 625,000 ordinary shares
of the Company
at a price of $6.20 per share
expires December 30, 2005.

Any questions and requests for assistance I
may be directed by Shareholders to:

Fidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Limited
(242) 356-7764 Ext. 3125 or 3151 (Nassau)
or
(242) 351-3010 (Freeport)


FAMGUARD CORPORATION LIMITED
The parent holding company of
Family Guardian Insurance Company Limited
BahamaHealth Insurane Brokers & Benefit Consultants Limited
FG CGenerat InsuranceAgency Limited
....... .


FOREX Rates


Weekly %Change


0.53
-2.10
-1.17


Commodities


Weekly %Change


0.64
-1.71


International Stock Market Indexes:


%Chlange

0.07-
0.11-
-0.14
5.06


CAD$
GBP
EUR


Crude Oil
Gold


DJIA
S & P500
NASDAQ
Nikkei


1.1654
1.7346
1.1871


$58.43
$505.50


Weekly

10,883.27,
1,268.66
2,249.42
15,941.37


A premier financial firm like UBS runs on exceptional talent like yours. We seek out uniquely gifted individuals who can
bring something different to our organization and offer them superb career opportunities to match their potential.

UBS Wealth Management is looking to hire a recent graduate into the UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. office. UBS seeks candidates,
preferably with relevant previous work experience (summer internship), who have demonstrated outstanding academic
and extracurricular achievement, are flexible and creative, possess strong analytical and interpersonal skills and are
enthusiastic and committed. Strong work ethic and personal integrity are critical. Furthermore, excellent language skills
are an advantage (e.g. English, French, German, Spanish or Portuguese). Candidates must have their BA, preferably with
an emphasis in Finance or Economics.

To apply for this fulltime position, please deliver your resume and cover letter by hand to UBS (Bahamas) Ltd., Human Resources,
East Bay Street, Nassau. The application deadline for this Trainee position is Friday, January 13, 2005.


Wealth Global Asset Investment
ManagementI Management Bank


SUBS
0U.LAO


F inil iaors Ltd
Financial Advisors L-td.


)IFiUBH


Pricing Information As Of:
23 December 2006

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Previous Close Todays Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
1.10 0.73 Abaco Markets 0.73 0.73 0.00 1.370 -0.169 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.40 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 10.40 10.40 0.00 1.456 0.360 7.1 3.46%
7.24 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 6.90 6.90 0.00 250 0.587 0.330 11.5 4.78%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.70 0.70 0.00 0.175 0.020 4.0 2.86%
1.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.26 1.26 0.00 0.112 0.060 11.3 4.76%
1.20 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.10 1.10 0.00 0, 0070, 040 '" 15.7 3.64%
9.60 7.10 Cable Bahamas 9.40 9.40 0.00 0.689 0 240.,3.'; 6. 2.55%
2.20 2.03 Colina Holdings 1.64 1.64 0.00 -0.046 0.000 "NM 0.00%
9.17 7.00 Commonwealth Bank 9.09 9.00 -0.09 3,995 0.791 0.450 11.4 5.00%
2.50 1.50 Doctor's Hospital 2.10 2.17 0.07 11,144 0.429 0.000 5.0 0.00%
6.05 3.96 Famguard 6.05 6.05 0.00 0.428 0.240 12.7 3.97%
10.90 9.68 Finco 10.90 10.90 0.00 0.717 0.530 15.2 4.86%
10.50 7.49 FirstCaribbean 10.50 10.50 0.00 0.695 0.380 14.5 3.62%
10.00 8.00 Focol 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.833 0.500 12.0 5.00%
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 0.022 0.000 52.3 0.00%
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.95 9.95 0.00 0.526 0.405 15.1 5.43%
9.05 8.22 J. S. Johnson 9.05 9.05 0.00 0.572 0.560 15.8 6.19%
6.98 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 6.94 6.93 -0.01 0.138 0.000 50.3 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.760 4.9 7.60%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Veekly Voi EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.75 13.75 11.00 1.768 0.960 7.5 6.98%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.044 0.000 NM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.33 13.33 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Fund Name NA V YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1.2665 1.1993 Colina Money Market Fund 1.266547"
2.4766 2.0704 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.4766 ***
10.6711 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.6711.....
2.2982 2.1530 Collna MSI Preferred Fund 2.298197**
1.1442 1.0782 Colina Bond Fund 1.144217****

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-HI Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for dally volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change In closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
- AS AT NOV. 30, 2005/ .... AS AT NOV. 30. 2005
- AS AT DEC. 12. 2005/ "** AS AT OCT. 31, 2005/ "*. AS AT OCT. 31, 2005
.W M..... fP........ I[,iWff tW ,F I,42[ .. ..


wIMPR


ST. ALBANS DR. OFF WEST BAY ST.
P.O. BOX N-1085
TEL.: (242) 322-8396
FAX.: (242) 323-7745


EAST BAY AND MACKEY ST.
BRIDGE PLAZA COMMONS BLDG.
TEL.: (242) 393-4210
TOLL FREE: (242) 300-7035


* The Bahamas Property Fud (BPF)h'as declared adividendc
of $0.18 payable on December 30, 2005, toall diommon ghatreji
holders as at record date December 22, 2005 ;
* Commonwealth Bank (CBL) has declared, a dividend of
$0.08 payable on Decemiber 31, 2005, to all cdrimon,.share-i1
holders as at record date'December 15, 2005. : 'n-
* Consolidated Water Company (CWCO) has declared a div-
idend of $0.012 per BDR payable on February 7; 2006, to.all .
common shareholders as at' rcord date December 31,-2005.:,
* FirstCaribbean InternationralBank (Bahamas) has declared";
a dividend of $0.30 payable on January 6, 2006, to all common
shareholders as at record date December 28, 2005.
* Bank of the Bahamas will hold its Annual General Meeting
on December 29, 2005, at 6pm at the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel, Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.



International Markets


Please be advised that the

Amoury Company will be

closed to the public on

Thursday, December 29th

and Friday, December 30thl,

2005 for stock-taking and

will reopen on Tuesday, _,_

January 3rd, 2006 a

9:00 am.


We apologize fo.

inconvenience.


-INMS


I


business^^*^^BUSINESH .-----I---I^








THE TIBUN WEDNSDAY DECEBER 8, 205, PGE 3


Exchange control end



would be best present


The Bahamas is on
the threshold of a
period of massive
foreign invest-
ment.
Atlantis continues to expand,
Cable Beach' is about to
explode with development. On
Grand Bahama, long in the
doldrums except for Freeport,
the people will soon see its
West End rise like a Phoenix
from the destruction of hurri-
canes.
Many of the Family Islands
have been targeted by foreign
capital for various development
projects.
Concurrent with this very
substantial inflow of foreign
funds, there continues to be
very significant local funds oil-
ing the wheels of the US and
other international financial
capitals.
Virtually all Bahamians with
savings have some of these held
overseas.
This group includes Bahami-
ans of every economic, social
and political background. Some


funds have been over there
from before independence, and
some have been travelling
abroad ever since.
This is so despite Exchange
Controls.
I maintain that without these
controls many of the invest-
ment opportunities, which are
now being funded with foreign
capital, would be funded by
Bahamian capital currently
residing overseas if there were
no exchange restrictions.
The experience of Jamaica
during the past decade, during
which there have been no
exchange controls, is worth
repeating.
Difficulties
Despite many difficulties,
Jamaicans now hold US$2 bil-
lion in financial institutions in
Jamaica. Additionally,
Jamaicans own over half of the
billions of dollars of Global
Bonds issued in recent years
by the Government of Jamaica
on the US and Euro markets.


In fact, Jamaican nationals
hold 80 per cent of the shorter
term bonds and about 50 per
cent of the longer term ones.
If that could happen in
Jamaica, just think of the flood
of funds that would return
home to the Bahamas should
the exchange control restric-
tions be lifted.
The Government of the
Bahamas would not have to
look to international markets
for funding. It would find it
right here at home. The fees
would be earned here and so


would the interest.
What a great Christmas pre-
sent for the people.
Maybe a New Year's one
anyway.
Need I say more.


Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs


Thurs Dec 22nd


Last day for Student Fee
payment


FROM page 1B
were unlikely to return to this
nation or recommend it to oth-
ers because of the travel delays
and disruption.
The events at the airport
over the past weekend are like-
ly to intensify pressure on the
Government to conclude a
management agreement for
NIA with a private operating
company as rapidly as possi-
ble.
One source, who requested
anonymity, said of the week-
end's events: "It just reinforces
the importance of having a
wholly different approach to
the way we manage things out
there at the airport."
Kerzner International, Baha
Mar Development Company
and the Bahamas Hotel Asso-
ciation (BHA) have been joint-
ly lobbying the Government on
thessue.
Ediison 'Tommy' Thompson,
th`'Ministry of Tourism's
deputy director-general, told
ThieTribune earlier this month


that the Government's negoti-
ating team were "close" to
agreeing a management con-
tract with YVRAS, the inter-
national airport management
subsidiary of YVR, the Cana-
dian company that operates
Vancouver International Air-
port.
Parties
The talks between the two
parties have dragged on for
about a year, and almost broke
down completely at one point
when YVRAS threatened to
walk away, believing they had a
deal only for the Government
to seek to re-negotiate it to the
point where it was unviable
economically.
However, they are still at the
table, and The Tribune under-
stands that one hold-up has
been that the Government is
reluctant to relinquish as much
control as YVRAS wants.
The whole episode will also
have an unwanted effect on the
Bahamian hotel industry, the


economy's largest private sec-
tor employer, which is already
struggling with burdens such
as low productivity, high oper-
ating costs and the high elec-
tricity fuel surcharge.
In addition, the industry
faces the prospect of new bur-
dens such as the National
Insurance Board (NIB)
reforms, which recommend
that hotels pay NIB contribu-
tions of 2 per cent on employee
gratuities they currently do
not pay contributions on this. It
is understood that the hotel
sector fears this could wipe out
a large chunk of their operating
profits.



CARGO REGH


Tues Jan 3rd


Mon Jan 9th


College reopens


Classes Begin


Tues & Weds 10th & 11th Late Registration / Drop-Add
Period


WATER AND SEWERAGE CORPORATION

Holiday Office Closure

Mall at Marathon
frd t, Deember ?)th at 2:10pm


Main Office Thompson Boulevard

Friday, December 30th at 2:30pm

The Corporation will re open for business

on it wda I anuary 3rd 2006


3 KINGSWAY
ACADEMY



VACANCY

SECURITY GUARD/MAINTENANCE
WORKER

Kingsway Academy is seeking the services of a
trained Security Guard with maintenance skills for
January, 2006. Only qualified persons should apply.

Please submit your resume to Ms. Kelcine Hamilton,
Academy Affairs Manager, at the Business Office
by Thursday, December 29th, 2005.

For further information please call telephone
numbers 324-6269 or 324-6887.


Airport fails at 'worst



time' for tourism sector


Mon Dec 26th Jan 2nd College closed


Weds & Thurs 4th and 5th New Student Orientation,
Advisement & Registration


REWARD















A Reward of $5,000

is being offered for the return or information
leading to the return of a
1991 26ft. Sebrich Center Console
Pleasure Craft, Registration
No. FL 880EA.

Telephone Contact

357-7502/356-2110


I "


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005, PAGE 3B


1IMPORT'ANTDATES









PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005 TER I





Bahamian entity in scheme that 'defrauded' crooks


FROM page 1B

receive a large payment con-
tacted investors to pay off cer-


tain fees or expenses that must
be paid in order to receive the
large payout, in exchange for a
huge return on investment......


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that DORCILIN DORMES, #9 TAMARIND
STREET, P.O.BOX F-3170, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 21st day of DECEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama,
Bahamas.


BAHAMAS WASTE LIMITED
CONDENSED BALANCE SHEET (unaudited)

September 30 December 31
2005 2004
ASSETS
Current Assets
Cash and cash equivalents S 168,699 $ 152,161
Accounts receivable, net 966,388 1,328,141
Inventory and other 314,713 911,767
Loans 2,021 12.317
Deposits 12,900 12,900
Total current assets 1,464,721 2,417,286
Non-current assets
Property, plant and equipment, net (notes 5 and 8) 5,565,659 4,525,425
Total assets S 7,030,380 5 6,942,711
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
Liabilities
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities S 268,785 $ 238,518
Security deposits 266,424 274,911
Total liabilities 535,209 513,429
Shareholders' equity
Authorized: 10,000,000 shares of$0.01 each
Issued and fully paid: 4,200,000 shares
Share capital 42,000 42,000
Contributed surplus 2,752,113 2,752,113
Retained earnings 3,701,058 3,635.169
Total shareholders' equity 6,495,171 6,429,282
Total liabilities and shareholders' equity S 7,030,380 S 6,942,711
See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed interim financialstatements.o

COND EED STATEMENTS OF
INCO. AND RETAINED EARNINGS (unaudited)

Nine months ended September 30
S2005 2004
Sales and services rendered $ 4,015,055 $ 3,718,.520
Cost of sales and direct expenses 2,621,864 2,315,238
Gross profit 1,393,191 1,403.282
Expenses
Operating 1,068,149 1,008,919
Interest and bank charges 7,153 4,665
Total operating expenses 1,075,302 1,013,584
Net income Prom operations 317,889 389,698
Retained earnings at beginning of period 3,635,169 3,121,844
3,953,058 3,511.542
Dividends (252,000)
Retained earnings at end of period $ 3,701,058 S 3,511,542
Earnings per share (note 3) S 0.08 $ 0.09

See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed interim financial statements.

CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (unaudited)

Nine months ended September
2005 2004
Cash and cash equivalents provided by (used for):
OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Net income S 317,889 S 389,698
Adjustments for items not involving use of cash
Bad debt expense 19,882 14,685
Depreciation 724,602 650,765
Gain on sale of fixed assets 772 -
1,063,145 1,055,148
Change in non-cash working capital items
Decrease increasee) in accounts receivable 341,871 (516,629)
Increase in inventory and other (425,214) (441,593)
Decrease in loan 10,296
Increase in accounts payable and accrued liabilities 30,67 36,101
Decrease (increase) in security deposits (8,487) 17,509
Net cash provided by (used for) operating activities 1,011,878 150,536
INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Purchase of fixed assets (756,240) (424,652)
Sale of fixed assets 12,900
Net cash used for investing activity (743,340) (424,652)
FINANCING ACTIVITIES
Dividends (252,000)
Net cash used for financing activities (252,000)
Net change in cash and cash equivalents 16,538 (274,116)
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning ofperiod 152,161 726,908
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period S 168,699 S 452,792
Non-cash transaction
Transfer of fixed assets from escrow account S 1,022,268 S
See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed interimfinancialstatements.

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED INTERIM FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Sepimber 30,2005
1. CORPORATE INFORMATION
Batam as Wste Limited ("BWL") was icoporaed under the laws of Ibe Commonwealth of The Bahamas on August 18, 1987
ader the name of Balhuams Waste Systems Limitd. On December 7.1999. he Company changed its name to Bahamas Waste
Limited. The latestaudited accountsofthe BWL wereparedoan Decemabera31,2004.
The quaerr ends of BWL fall on March 31. June 30 and September 30, with the year end of the Company being December 31.
2. SUNMIARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES
Thae condesed iainm financial aaaemants ahaw lbeen prpaaed in accordance with International Accounting Standard 34. In
FiacialpondP g. uinge te -accountint palkies applied i the Deewmbe 31, 2004 audited financial siaten
3. EARNINGS PER SHARE
Earnings per s were avutaaed baled on the shars outstanding a the end of the period, which approximated average shares
oumansdma duta the Wiad


Sbarcs uMradang in u Scpmber 30


4.200000


4,200,000


4. SIGNIFICANT TRANSACTIONS
At December 31, 2004, the Compny had etored into coracs for the construction of the Medwaste facility and purchase of
medical wastequipaenl. Theconolctwerecompletedon March 312005. During May 2005, theMedwaste facility wasopened
The facility is fully operational and deprecia related to those assents is now being expensed

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED INTERIM FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Spternber 30,2005

4. SIGNIFICANT TRANSACTIONS (Continued)
A divided ofS252,000 was declared to the shareholder ofttord i ofMay 13.2005. The dividend was paid on May 18,2005.
During dhe quansr, BWL entered into ramsaon with related panis All transconsm were conducted at arnn length and no
significat obligations to the related paics existed at September 30,2005.
S. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES
The Company guarantee its compactors for a 60-day period frot the date of purchase. The Company is rimbursed by the
manufacturer for any claims paid under such guantes.


In this case, the expected pay-
out was $75 million."
Mr McKay said Masterman
reported he had already paid
out $500,000 to the Nigerian
company, which was supposed
to be running out of money.
He added: "Zidar placed


$270,000 with Barefootaire, with
the agreement that if the Niger-
ian contract paid out, he would
receive 10 times that amount in
return. Masterman testified at
trial that this was a contingent
agreement, so that Zidar would
receive nothing of the Nigerian'


contract did not pay out."
Masterman alleged to Mr
McKay that he was still
attempting to receive a payment
on the Nigerian contract, and
he had no assets.
Mr McKay said: "We contin-
ue to attempt to locate bank
records that confirm that the
$270,000 was sent to the Niger-
ian company alleged to hold the
$75 million contract.
"The receiver recommends
that it continue to search for
the bank records of the
Bahamas corporation and con-
firm that Masterman has no
assets. However, the receiver
believes that the possibility of


FROM page 1B


Office and Education Assistant To be involved in
many of the daily activities at the Bahamas Reef
Environment Educational Foundation (BREEF) office,
s/he is responsible for telephone, public reception and
various administrative duties and office support tasks
including maintaining office equipment, updating
BREEF website, database and mailings. S/he will also
be responsible for coordinating the logistics of
conferences including a summTmriariii- co.scr'atc'
teacher training workshop. S/he will assist with
preparation of marine educational materials and will
work with students and teachers in the field. Duties
may also include assisting with accounting and
bookkeeping functions.

Knowledge! Skills

Associates degree or 2 to 3 years of related
experience or High school diploma plus 3 to 5
years related experience or equivalent
combination.
Excellent organizational and administrative skills
required.
Strong computer skills (work processing,
spreadsheets). Working familiarity with Windows
and the Microsoft Office Suite applications,
Access, Illustrator and Photoshop.
Ability to update website and/or interest in
learning to do so.
Accuracy and attention to detail essential; ability
to set priorities, organize time efficiently, and
work independently on several tasks at once.
Strong communication skills and the ability to
work well with a variety of people. Ability to.
work under pressure and perform as a team
player. Flexible and able to adapt to changing
office situations and procedures.

Interested persons should apply in writing with full
details, including resume and cover letter, to
breef@breef.org by 4th January, 2006.


recovery of this money is low
and does not wish to waste
resources such as the attorney
or investigator fees above these,
activities in the pursuit of th
funds." w:
Another investment purport.
edly made by one of Zidar's co-
defendants, Elizabeth Phillips,
was into something Mr McKa,
described as a 'Bahamas Fund'.
Some $255,000 was wired to an,
account "for Mark C ahen at
Citibank to act as a fund T.a ,n-
ager in a venture capital invest-
ment". .
There is nothing d'to s.g
that Cohen or Citibank did any-
thing wrong.


2005.
The ship had received weath--
er reports predicting storm and,
gale force conditions on,its
intended path, with wind speeds
set to be up to 40 knots, and
waves between 14 'to 28 feet,
high. As a result, the Norwe-
gian Dawn altered its course to,
avoid the worst of the weather,
moving further offshore, with
all passengers warned that
rough weather was forecast at
10am on April 15.
The ship slowed its speed
between 2pm and 8pm that
afternoon, againchanging
course, with the crew complet- ,
ing preparations for heavy
weather at 5pm. Passengers
were updated on the situation
regularly and given safety pre-
cautions. .
The damage was caused at,,,
6.10am on April 16, when the
Norwegian Dawn pitched three ,'
times in succession, with the
bow plowing into the seas. The
third of the waves came over
the bow and struck part of the
liner's main structure.
Two cabins overlooking the ,
bow area were damaged, with 1
one foot of seawater entering
them. Two passengers received
cuts, and another two bruises.
All were treated in a "timely
and appropriate manner".

Encounter


The NTSB said that an
encounter with high winds and
rough speeds was not uncom-
mon for ships in the area the
Norwegian Dawn was crossing
at that time of year.
It added: "When the vessel
encountered heavier-than-
expected wind and seas, the
ship's officers maintained itsg'
heading into the wind and seas'
to minimise rolling, and also,
reduced the vessel's speed'&i'':
"After attempting to min-
imise the ship's exposure to, tl''h
forecast conditions, the
changed his itinerary 'aid1
slowed the vessel. Rather than
attempting to maintain tlie'
scheduled arrival time in New,,,
York, the master decidedd.
lower the ship's speed anid-
change its headingfor the pas-
sengers' comfort,........
"The ship's operating a
reduced speed when the w ,yes.
hit probably limited the damii'-
age."






FROM page 2B

per cent riSe in accounts reediv. .
ables from year-enid'2004 to
total $6.9 million as at Octo-
ber 31, 2005. DHS has had'-
problems in the past' with the
collection of its receivables, but
has since rectified this prob-
lem.

Investors Tip of the week ?

Tips for a Debt-free Christ-
mas
Plan Ahead Work out,
how much you can realistically-
afford before you start spend-
ing.
Put aside a little every!'
week in an interest bearing
Christmas Savings Account. -;
Set a limit on how much:,.
you are going to spend on each'
person and stick to the budget.
Make a "no present" pact,.'
with close friends and adult
family members.
Try to shop with cash -
leave the credit cards at home.."
Shop around you might
find it cheaper elsewhere.
Finally, don't ignore your
regular monthly bills. These
priority bills electricity, mort
gage/rent, telephone should
be kept current even during,
this holiday period.


In the report developed from
its investigation of the incident,
the Bahamas Maritime Author-
ity the lead investigating
agency found that the action.
taken by the Norwegian Dawn's
captain was "prudent and
appropriate throughout".

Evidence

The BMA added that "there
is no evidence that any real or
perceived urgency to arrive at
New York earlier was a factor
in the handling of the ship or
that Norwegian Cruise Line did
anything but support the cap-
tain's on-scene decisions".
In its report, the NTSB said
the Bahamas-flagged Norwe-
gian Dawn had suffered the
damage on the last leg of a
round-trip cruise between New
York and Miami, which includ-
ed stops in Port Canaveral and
the Bahamas. The port call in
Nassau, though, was cancelled
on this occasion for business
reasons.
The vessel left Miami on Fri-
day, April 15, for the return to
New York, a distance of 1,020
miles, where it was set to arrive
in the early hours of April 17,


Bank of The Bahamas

IN T E R NATIONAL

"A growing and dynamic Bahamian institution"


VACANCY FOR THE POSITION OF:

TEAM LEADER OPERATIONS,

PAYMENT CARD CENTRE


Core responsibilities:


Coordinate the activities of the Operations & Customer Services
Teams,
Responsible for overseeing Merchant Services and Account
investigations.
Responsible for problem resolution tracking and compiling reports
relative to same.
Ensure all Visa Regulations and procedures are adhered to Serve
as the primary contact for Visa International.
Responsible for the management of projects and informational analysis.
Evaluate the technological needs of the department.
Implement services and accountability standards for the team.
Ensure that all processes are efficient and meet client's expectations.



Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities:

Associates Degree in Business Administration or relevant area.
Five years banking experience and at least three years in a credit card
dept.
Excellent interpersonal and communication skills.
Strong negotiation, analytical and organizational skills.
Computer literate Ability to work in Excel and use Spreadsheets.


Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience
and qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and life
insurance; and a pension scheme.


Interested persons should apply no later than December 29th, 2005 to:


The Manager, Human Resources and Training
Bank of The Bahamas. International
P.O. Box N-7118
Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas


L - d 49 .-d -


I






THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005, PAGE 5B


Union hoping for Ministry



meeting over FirstCaribbean

FROM page 1B would make the bank uncom- board salary increase of 3 per a Below Standard Performance increased our bonus pool for and this year, $8,947."
petitive and blow its salary and cent was provided to all rating. clerical employees by 25 per Yet Ms Mortimer said
However,' FirstCaribbean operating costs out of line. It employees in the bargaining "Prior to the across the cent this year. Our total bonus Bahamian FirstCaribbean
indicated 'that the payment of said its salaries were among the unit in accordance with the board increases, our salaries spend for clerical employees employees were disgruntled
an increment for January 1, highest in the Bahamian com- Industrial Agreement. This were already at the top of the was $763,200. because they felt they were not
2006, on top of the across-the- mercial banking market. increase was provided regard- market. Hence bonuses were "As an example, the highest being rewarded adequately for
board 3 pir cent salary increase Ms Brown said in an earlier less of performance and includ- utilised in rewarding strong bonus paid to a clerical their contribution to the
that has already been paid, statement: "An across the ed the employees who received performance. We therefore employee last year was $5,286 Caribbean-wide bank's profits.


Wall Srltt M ockt fall



Are you looking for a new challenge?

We are currently seeking qualified Seniors and Entry Level candidates to join our
Audit practice.


"Copyrighted Material """Senior
S. Successful candidates for the Senior position will have approximately two to four
Syndicated Content years of work experience in a public accounting firm and hold a CPA, CA or other
professional designation recognized by the Bahamas Institute of Chartered
Available from Commercial News Providers" Accountants.
Entry Level
Candidates must have obtained the necessary education requirements qualifying
them to write the CPA examinations or have already done so.
S- KPMG's entry level program provides financial support to write the CPA
S. examinations including travel costs, hotel accommodations, paid study leave and
the costs of revision courses such as the Becker Review.
Excellent opportunities exist in our Nassau and Freeport offices to broaden your
professional experience in a varied practice that offers competitive compensation
and benefits packages.
Applicants should submit a cover letter, resume, a copy of their professional certification and a copy of their
transcripts if applying for an entry level position, to: KPMG, Human Resources Manager, P.O. Box N123, Nassau,
Bahamas or _d.a.ve&..kpmaj.m bs.
AUDIT a TAX a ADVISORY
>2005 KPMG. a Bahamian partnership, the Bahtrnian mber irmt'bf KPIMGriternatlbnaila Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved.

VACANCY NOTIFICATION

VACANCY FOR DEPUTY REGISTRAR GENERAL
REGISTRAR GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA

MINISTRY OF FINANCIAL SERVICES AND INVESTMENTS THE CLEARING BANKS ASSOCIATION
Applications are invited from suitable qualified Bahamians to fill the post of Deputy Registrar, Registrar General's
Department, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas. AnnounceS -
Requiremens for the Post
Applicants must be members of at least three (3) years standing of The Bahamas, English, Irish or Scottish Bar
or of t ar of any country of the Commonwealth to which a member of The Bahamas Bar is admitted without BAN KING HOURS
examiniBn.
Specib utiesof The Post Christmas and New Years' Day
The, successful applicant will be required to assist in the formulation and implementation of policies required HOlidaVs
b, the Registrar General's Act, Chapter 186, Statute Laws of The Bahamas (2000 edition). V
Coordinate and, or assign and manage the administration of the Registrar General's Office, Freeport, and
perform such duties as may necessitate policy implementation.
Eidtite allActs, enacted by Parliament of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, in carrying out duties of
the Deputy Registrar.9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
The implementation of all Statutes administered by the Registrar General inclusive of, but not limited to A 1 A
the following: Normal Banking Hours
Domestic iompdnies and International Business Companies B
-Review all documents to ensure that all requirements are met
Signing and issuing certificates of Companies Incorporation, Foreign Companies, Good Standings
aantd Dissolutions.
Exempted Limited Partnership MONDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2005- Closed
-,. All matters.related thereto,
ar Issuing of Marriage Licenses, certified copies TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2005- Closed
S- : Administering Marriage Officers Exams C
S Performing Marriage Ceremonies
Issuing Marriage Certificates
Registration of Records Act FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2005
Recording Deeds and Documents
Deed Searches 9:30 a m.- 4:3 p m.
Issuing Certified Copies of documents 9:30 alm,- 4:30 plm
Responsible for written and oral communications with customers: Normal B/anki Hours
Lawyers, Accountants, Bankers and Government Authorities in relation to matters of administration Bni
and management of the Department.


* Checking documents in order to issue certificates of Good Standing. MONDAY, JANUARY 2, 2006 Closed
* Responding to questions and queries from the public. When and where necessary, provide community education
and general information to the public concerning the role, duties and function of the Registrar General's
Department.
* Responsible for all Human resources matters.
:V Association's Membership
* Applicant should have a working knowledge of computer applications V
* All such duties as assigned by the Registrar General.
Bank of The Bahamas International Limited FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Citibank, N.A. Royal Bank of Canada
The salary of the post is in Scale JL15 $34,600 x 700 $41,600 per annum. Commonwealth Bank Limited Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited
Sering Officers must apply through their Heads of Departments. Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Application forms may be obtained from the Department of Public Service, Poinciana Hill Complex, Meeting
Street. They must be returned complete with the original qualifications and documentary proof of relevant
experience, to reach the Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Financial Services & Investments or the Secretary,
Public Service Commission, Poinciana Hill Complex, Meeting Street, no later than the 19th January 2006. ,'CV.Q, .








PAGE6B, EDNEDAY DECMBER28, 005TRIBNEORTRS


IAAF president is due in





Nassau for awards banquet


M By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
LAMINE Diack, the Interna-
tional Amateur Athletic Federa-
tion president, is due in town today
to attend the Bahamas Association


of Athletic Associations' annual
year-ending awards banquet.
The banquet is scheduled for Fri-
day night at the Sandals Royal
Bahamian Resort and Spa and will
honour the most outstanding junior
and senior male and female


athletes.
While the BAAA have decided
to keep the final selections under
wraps, there's some. consensus as
to who should be declared the win-
ners.
But BAAA's public relations


officer Ralph McKinney said that is
one of the reasons why they will
not disclose the names until the
night of the banquet.
However, he said Diack will also
be in town to present the bronze
medals to sprinter Chandra Stur-
rup and the men's 4 x 400 metre
relay team from the 2003 IAAF
World Championships in Saint-
Denis, Paris.
Sturrup was moved up to the
bronze after American Kelli White
was stripped of her gold medal,
while the men's team of Avard
Moncur, Dennis Darling, Nathaniel
McKinney and Christopher Brown
got the bronze after the American
team was also stripped of their gold.
White and Jerome Young, a
member of the relay team, had both
tested positive for banned sub-
stances.
Diack, according to McKinney,
will be on hand to officially present
the medals to those athletes, in
addition to the Athletes of the
Year.
"Everything is set," McKinney
stressed. "We're just waiting for his
arrival tomorrow (Wednesday)."
McKinney said the BAAA,
headed by president Mike Sands,
has planned a brief welcome cere-
mony at Nassau's International Air-
port for Diack.
While here, McKinney said
Diack will be the guest of Minister
of Youth, Sports and Culture


.I& d
t

Neville Wisdom at the New Year's
Day Regatta on Bay Street before
he departs the capital on January 2.
In anticipation of this year's ban-
quet, McKinney said the tickets
have been going pretty fast and
they are anticipating a good
turnout.
He also noted that the response
from Grand Bahama has been
overwhelming and they expect that
the banquet will be one of the most
exciting ever held.
Without letting the "cat out of
the bag,'" McKinney said there are
at least 3-4 candidates in the run-
ning for all of the individual awards
this year.
He said they are encouraging the
track fans to make sure that they
purchase their tickets so that they
can be a part of this historic
event.
Many are anticipating that
Tonique Williams-Darling will be
declared the Female Athlete of the
Year for the second straight year,
while the men's award will come
down to a two-way battle between
quarter-miler Chris Brown and
long/triple jumper Leevan 'Super-
man' Sands.
Sprinter Nivea Smith and javelin
thrower Tracy Morrison are two of
the leading candidates for the
Junior Female Athlete of the Year,
with javelin thrower from Andros
and triple jumper Gerard Brown
in the Junior Male category.


SPORTS IN BRIEF
* BOXING
ENGAGEMENT FOR CHAMP


Bahamas Super middleweight Champion Jermain Chu Chu "
Mackey walked into another ring on Christmas Day in a small
engagement ceremony during a church service when he asked Tara
Smith to be his wife. The couple have planned their wedding day for
next summer.
* BASKETBALL
GSSSA SEASON OPENING
When the new school year begins in January, the Government Sec-
ondary Schools Sports Association will go full swing into its basketball
season. The season will officially start on Wednesday with junior girls
and senior boys competition at the AF Adderley Gym at 4pm. The
junior boys and senior girls will start play on Thursday.
M SOCCER
GSSSA SEASON OPENING
The Government Secondary Schools Sports Association is prepar-
ing to start its soccer season one week after school reopens. According
to president Edna Forbes, the season is tentatively set to start on
Monday, January 9 at 4pm at the Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field
Stadium.


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TRIBUNE SOHURT. .


PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


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WEDNESDAY, utG-EMBER 26, 2005, PAuLt ,


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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2005


SECTION Al


Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


Rattlers recovePr r m slow


strt for opening d


victor


0 BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
THE CI Gibson Rattlers
knocked off the Government
High Magics 48-35 to recover
from a.rocky start to their third
annual Christmas Tournament
on Tuesday at the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium.
The opening day of the tour-
nament, which serves as a tune-
up for the start of the Govern-
ment Secondary Schools Sports
Association's basketball season
in January, saw a couple of "no
shows".
But tournament director
Kevin 'KJ' Johnson said he
expects the competition to pick
up as the four-pool round-robin


Annual Christmas tournament


tournament heads towards its
closure on Friday.
"When the Minister (of
Sports, Neville Wisdom) told
me that they had to pushed the
junkanoo back (from Sunday
night), I knew he had to do what
he had to do," Johnson stressed.
"I really thought people
would have gone to junkanoo
and then come here. But
Bahamians love junkanoo and
they will support it. The weath-
er hampered the start, so that
was why I think we had the slug-
gish start today."


Despite the slow start, the,
Rattlers picked up where they
left off just before the Christ-
mas break when they won the
Catholic High Crusaders Yule-
tide Tournament in Grand
Bahama by two points over the
Tabernacle Falcons.
Coach Johnson said it was just
an indication of what to expect
from his team.
"I felt we started off real slow,
although we got the win," said
Johnson, counting the fact that
they missed at least 20-plus free
throws and lay-ups combined.


"We were very sluggish, but
we pulled the win off.
"Maybe because of the morn-
ing junkanoo, not trying to find
excuses, but I thought we could
have played a lot better."
The Rattlers controlled the
tempo of the game from start
to finish and while they didn't
have a player in double figures,
their offence was spread around,
which made it even more diffi-
cult for the Magics to contain
them.
David Taylor led CI Gibson's
scoring attack with nine, Sidney


Deleveaux had eight and Danny
McKenzie and Lavardo
Hepburn both chipped in with
seven.
Jackson Joseph and Stanley
Forbes chipped in with four
apiece and Denkyco Bowles
helped out with three.
For Government High, who
didn't have the man power to
stay to in the game, Delroy
Rolle pumped in a game high
13. Kerby Thurgulus added
nine; Rakif Gardiner had eight
and Frederick Rahming scored
five.
IN ANOTHER game
played during the opening ses-
sion of the tournament, the Jor-
dan Prince William Falcons got
by King's College 38-37.


The Falcons had to dig down
deep to come back from a,'7-6
deficit after the first quarter,;i8-
12 at the half and 25-23 after
the third period to pull off the
win.
Lashad Bullard, who scored
all of the Falcons' first quarter
points, came up with six of his'
game high 15 points in their 15-
12 spurt in the fourth to seal the.
victory.
Alexis Thompson added 11,
Ansel Beckles had four and
Elroy Ferguson and Angelo
Cash contributed three points
each.
In a losing effort, Sidney Cim-
ningham had 11, Torreno
Clarke had nine, Morgan Miller
eight and Khyel Roberts fift-
ished with five.


DESPITE facing problems on several service returns, Bradley
Bain and Johnathon Hanna were still able to pull off a two-set vic-
tory in the Brajaxba Christmas Tennis Classic yesterday.
The holiday classic, which started on Monday at the National
Tennis Centre, saw Bain and Hanna take advantage of the old-
er Wes Rolle and younger Phillip Major, destroying them 6-3, 6-
0.
In the first set, Bain and Hanna served up some tough services
that proved too hot to handle.
The hard hit balls troubled Rolle and Major and, by the third
service, the team had already dug themselves in a hole.
But Rolle and Major soon came storming back with Major lead-
ing the charge.
The younger player, who is leading the tournament's under 12
boy's blue division, was able to get his stroke back from behind
the line.
Rolle, who had served a fault on all of his first attempts, eased
off with the power, stroking two short services to Bain.
Both shots caught Bain out of position and the duo were back
in the game.
Major said: "I have to work on my services and angles, that was
my biggest problem in the game. I served too many faults today
and I think that is what cost us.
"I was a little nervous knowing that I was playing with one of
the top coaches in the Bahamas, but I think I played up to stan-
dard on some plays. I was scared on the other services, especial-
ly when Mr Bain was targeting me."


Bain batted back three passes to Major, and two to his partner
Rolle. On the service end, Bain's radar had once again tracked
down Major, who was firing at balls that were about to land out.
It was too late for the team when Rolle screamed out to Major
on several of the services. Major's quick reaction made the con-
nection.
Major said: "All I needed to do was listen a little more to my
partner, but some of the calls he was screaming at me I had
already fired at.
"But this was a great opportunity playing with Mr Bain and Mr
Rolle, I know if I continue playing some of the older players it will
improve my game."
Bain and Hanna wasted no time in putting their opponents
away in the second set. Capitalising on the errors made by Rolle
and Major, the winning duo jumped to an early lead and never
looked back.
Hanna sealed the game for his team with three smashes.
In the boys under 12 division, Rolle had safely secured himself
as the top seeded junior boy with a flawless 4-0 win-loss record.
Ranked second with a 4-1 record is Taylor Simkins. In the green
division Justin Rolle's perfect 4-0 record places him on top with
Nicoy Rolle with a 3-1 record.
The semi-finals in this category will be played on Thursday after
a full day of round robin play. The top two seeded players in each
division will cross over for a shot to play in the championships.
The annual Brajaxba Christmas Classic will continue play at the
National Tennis Centre today with play in the open men's divi-
sion and the mixed doubles division. The tournament, which is
designed to keep the tennis players in shape, will climax on Fri-
day.







O
action

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