Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00269
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: December 1, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00269
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text






"NARNIA" WITH
McDONALqD'S
& LOGOS i8,wt
HIGH 80F
LOW .67F

SUN AND
CLOUDS


The


Tribune


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION AGAIN


he ASiami SfDeraTON
BAHAMAS EDITION


ITop ofThe Hill Mackey Street,
Mall at Marathon & Town Centre Mall
SWe're ready for the holidays
with the latest trends in '





ww.fas nhallbahamascom
www.fashionhallbahamas.com'


Volume: 102 No.10


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1,2005


PRICE 750


brans


IUmmo
Ee& Ag


p


Keod Smith hits

out over remarks

on his nationality


* By KARIN HERIG and
CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporters


Dam.e Ivy officially retires ..om office


not like those of Haitian or
Turks Island descent. How can
he expect to lead this country
where more than 30 per cent of


YESTERDAY's parliamen- te people can trace their roots
tary proceedings descended into to one of these two countries?"
chaos after Mount Moriah MP he asked.
Keod Smith accused Opposi- Mr Smith called upon Mr
tion Leader Hubert Ingraham Ingraham to "stop being a big-
of being a racist bigot for ot."
remarks he made about the While the leader of the oppo-
member's nationality. sition said that he would not
After.Mr- -Sitnh-.rsee to-pre- --.- dignify- Mr Smith's statement
sent detailed information on his with a response, he called the
family background, stating that Mount Moriah MP's comments
he is of Bahamian and Turks a "vicious attack" on his char-
and Caicos lineage, and alleging acter.
that Mr Ingraham is a racist, the He added that to call some-
Lower Chamber erupted in dis- one a racist or a bigot is "surely
array with parliamentarians unparliamentarian."
engaged in a shouting match. Mr Smith, however, said that
He said that Mr Ingraham's he stands by his statements
allegations that he is of Haitian about the leader of the opposi-
descent are "disparaging" and tion.
"ill-conceived," and show that Mr Ingraham explained that
the leader of the opposition has when he last week informed
a racist attitude. members of the House that he
In his statement to parlia- was to assume the leadership of
mentarians, Mr Smith outlined the opposition, Mr Smith made
his ancestry all the way back to the comment "let the blood-let-
the African Baracau tribe, giv- ting begin."
ing dates and place of birth of He said that he responded by
his parents and grand-parents. telling the Mount Moriah MP
"While I cannot lay claim to that "no Bahamian blood would
any Haitian heritage, my heart be spilled, that it would be un-
goes out to them when I see the Bahamian to spill blood over
member of North Abaco make political matters."
fun of Haitians on the one hand, This resulted in a shouting
and then goes into the Mud in match between government and
Abaco with crocodile tears over opposition parliamentarians,
their plight for a recent devas- with Mr Smith denying that he
tating fire. had ever made the "blood-let-
"Based on actions and com- ting" remark.
ments of the Rt Honourable To this Montagu MP Brent
member over the past three Symonette said: "Yes you did,
years, I conclude as do many
across the country, that he does SEE page 11


WITH a last ceremonial
inspection of the guard on
Rawson Square and a spe-
cial joint-session of the
House of Assembly and the
Senate, Governor-General
Dame Ivy Dumont yesterday
retired from office.
Remembered by parlia-
mentarians and senators as
a great woman who gave
much to the country through-
out the years, Dame Ivy
stepped down from the post
she held for the past four
years.
Arriving shortly after
10.30am, Dame Ivy was wel-
comed by the Royal
Bahamas Police Force band
playing the national anthem,
before entering the Senate
building to give her farewell
speech.
Addressing senators and
House members in the
Upper Chamber, she said:
"Today, I conclude 57 1/2
years of public service, the
last four being those as Her
Majesty's representative in
the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas. The honour of
SEE page two


Nottage, Bethel sworn in


* By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter
DR BERNARD NOT-
TAGE, former CDR leader,
and FNM chairman Carl
Bethel were officially, sworn
in as Senators yesterday.
On Monday, Dr Nottage
and Mr Bethel both received
their instruments of appoint-
ment from Governor Gener-


al Dame Ivy Dumont at Gov-
ernment House.
At the time, Dr Nottage
affirmed his goal to serve the
public, stating that leaders
needed to be more than just
"pure politicians", but peo-
ple who were looking at the
country's problems and try-
ing to solve them.
SEE page 11


Wanted for questioning
0 By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
FREEPORT Grand
Bahama police are looking
for an 18-year-old man who is
wanted for questioning in
connection with murder.
Natario Francis, whose last
known address was Beginning
Drive, South Bahamia, is con-
SEE page 11


e Mitchell

invites

police to

investigate
II By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
AS A result of allegations
made during the FNM's rally,
Foreign Affairs Minister Fred
Mitchell has invited police to
perform their own investiga-
tions in the Department of For-
eign Affairs.
Allegations of the illegal
issuance of hundreds of visas
Sby the Foreign Affairs Depart-
ment were a "hot button" topic
throughout the FNM's conven-
tion and rally.
In the House of Assembly
yesterday, Mr Mitchell said he
had asked the opposition on
numerous occasions to either
report specific allegations of
impropriety or take their evi-
dence directly to the police.
"Since they failed to do so, I
SEE page 11

Anger outside
of court
as murder
accused arrive
By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
FREEPORT Family and
friends of slain 34-year-old
Tanya "Penny" Pinder cried
shame" as two.men were
escorted by police to Magis-
trate's Court to face murder and
other related charges on
Wednesday.
The accused 22-year-old
Raymond Darling, and a 17-
year-old male, wore sweater
hoods to conceal their faces
from news photographers and
the crowd of onlookers assem-
bled at the rear of the court-
house around 10am.
Angry relatives and friends
of the deceased woman shouted
as the two were escorted from
an unmarked police vehicle.
Darling and the juvenile
appeared before Magistrate
Helen Jones in Court Three,
where they were charged with
SEE page 11


N 3 u and Bahama Isands' Leading Nespaper







PAGE 2, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005


THE TRIBUNE .


LOCALNW


Farewell to Dame Ivy

FROM page one
serving as governor-general will fall
to only a few citizens, of whom I am
the sixth.
> "My expressions of gratitude to the
government and people of the
Bahamas cannot convey the true
depth of the emotions that have
buoyed my spirits over these years, as
: I have discharged the constitutional,
f .legal, advisory and social roles of the
Governor-general's office," she said.
Dame Ivy said she was able to
complete all four of her objectives
as governor-general.
"I selected only three major objec-
tives for my tour of duty. Firstly to
maintain my relationship with stu-
dents and youth groups, secondly to
encourage volunteerism, and thirdly
to emphasise the importance of fam-
ily," she said.
A fourth objective of restoring the
physical structure of Government
House, she said, was added after she
ST, RL ...a........a ... ......., took residence in January 2002.


* THE drill sergeant speaks to Dame Ivy Dumont as Prime Minister Perry
Christie and MPs look on


* WOMEN officers salute Dame Ivy


M MEMBERS of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force honour guard on parade
(Photos: Felipi Major/Tribune staff)


0 In brief


Oil barge

remains

stranded

on reef

THE Louis J Goulet, a 220-
foot Canadian oil drill barge, is.:
still stranded on a coral reef;off
Abaco after running aground.
almost a month ago.
Despite assurances from the
Port Department weeks ago.
that the vessel would 1,e
removed from the reef, several
Abaconians have phoning The,
Tribune to complain that the,
Louis J Goulet is still stranded
off Man-O-War Cay.
The barge has been stranded
in the Bahamas a number ,of
times and has sparked several'
environmental concerns.
The vessel is thought to have":
threatened national parks near,
Long .Island before running
aground in the Exuma Cays after
Hurricane Jeanne. It then broke,
free from its moorings in Walk-
er's Cay, Abaco during Hurri-,
cane Wilma and drifted until it
ran aground again this time 100,
yards off Man-O-War Cay.
Abaconians complain that the,
vessel is posing a significant.
threat to the reef, as a hole was,
punctured in the ship's hull dur-
ing the storm.
However, the Port Depart-
ment has stated-that the non-
motorised vessel is only carrying
enough fuel to operate its gen-
erator, and as such, "poses no
environmental hazard to the
waters around the Abacos".
Port Controller Captain
Anthony Aliens could not be
contacted for comment on the
matter up to press time.


'Ite', Ocyt ClubRResid.(M. &'Marma i~ your Oaaoppw tnuiiy for, a hon4u in;e Puar'ise.
D)isc.cer this i onit'i:ng nemw haii'.Wii1thitn :tht.O .; ap :.lb Btiat;es & Golf Course omni. 'u )
Thtse eigh y icighlt. O.pxuriius.tco miuonimiofii ,. toir Mpie,-salpltncthr, a private mrar, ia and
a flltsri-v ipn. bcach lub, plus a 1cvc.1of servh.e likc-e you; would; ;expeCt at One&Only Ccean. Club.


X, 1. A ,I It T A K I N a R L 'S 1 J L ; l S 0\.N P A Y A 0 I S 1 S t L A N D .R H A M A S F R U M i 1 0 ti M I L L I O N
i.l tl' i^ tJs r ff1li3n L 4 t ?q .'Usizg. ~ ctr a t~idp .c.i^ ,* -t.4 f *t! o.v v lv dla-. 4 hr ,7..U isi neit a0,. t/fcr,4 in ais~ ts..4. g-if # fl t? is zi iV 1d ,rci ,t s f-i fi. h tno jfgri n1w m h r mo .n rt f, gh.,







THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005, PAGE 3


CALu


In brief Fears of sewage pollu
Ingraham
'committed to E By TIFFANY GRANT ken sewer line the ground was satu- was part of the gc
democracy Tribune Staff Reporter rated with grey-brown liquid and green ply, everyday he
mould. erage truck visit
in Baha mas' A CONCERNED resident of Star Only a few yards away was a capped "Children wall
Estates fears that an open sewer in the well enclosed by a gate. next street. Som
area is in danger of contaminating the While the well area was being the area. Some
By CARA BRENNEN government water supply. inspected, liquid began gushing from and they can get
Tribune Staff Reporter The resident of Jupiter Way, who the sewer pipe. General manage
wished to remain anonymous, said that "The sewer's popping up and chil- planning at the
'ON his first official day as after a lot was cleared in his commu- dren live in the area," said the con- Corporation Cl
leader of opposition business in nity three weeks ago, he saw liquid cerned resident, who added that with the concern
the House of Assembly, Hubert spurting into the air from what smelled because of the proximity of the well, the complaint wc
Infgraham told parliamentarians like an open sewer. "sewage may get into the water lines Parliamentary
that he remains committed to Yesterday, The Tribune visited the and it may make you sick." istry of Health R
enhancing and deepening site. The man said that while there was to accompany T1
democracy in the Bahamas. Around what appeared to be a bro- no sign indicating that the nearby well as parliament wa
'Mr Ingraham was sworn in as
le'a'der of the opposition on
Monday in a short ceremony at *
Government House. Mi t a cu
"'This commitment necessar- 1fU
ily includes transparency,
accountability and high ethical
standards on the part of all per-
sons who hold public office --
standards that we on this side ofBethel of m misleading
the House adhere to and will
demand of the government," he t
said.
In congratulating his col-
Minister Perry Minister said he o v.s a
hopes that Mr Ingraham retains
the position for "quite some j By PAUL TURNQUEST minister should do with regard fall within the rules.
time Tribune Staff Reporter to a complaint from any citi- "The right of expectation of a
MP Tennyson Wells, on zen," he said. member of parliament is iden-
behalf of the Independent FOREIGN Affairs Minis- "On the same day, and the tical to the right of expectation
members, added that he is hap- ter Fred Mitchell yesterday e-mail discloses this on the of a citizen of the Bahamas.
py Mr Ingraham has assumed charged that FNM Senator face 6f the record, I e-mailed This has not, and I will never
the role he should have in May Carl Bethel "misled the the permanent secretary Patri- engage in preferential treatment
2002. Bahamian public" with his cia Rogers with the words: of any citizen over another," he
claims about the minister's 'For your advice'. It is true said.
M a s ot involvement in the issuance that the subject is 'Your Mr Mitchell said that he has
.n t of visas. Approval' but when you authorised no.one to act on his
Mr Bethel alleged that Mr examine the e-mail, it shows behalf, and challenged the
Mitchell forwarded an e-mail quite clearly that the subject opposition to "produce the
d uring communication, dated May 6, 'Your Approval' was not one paperwork" to prove that he
2004, to his permanent secre- I typed in but one which was has.
d rm m tary, Dr Patricia Rodgers, con- in the original sender of the "I have no agents who work
a cerning a request for the e-mail," the minister said. on riy behalf as minister. If I
issuance of a number of visas. Mr Mitchell said that he had give an instruction that instruc-
robbery The e-mail, Mr Bethel said, not seen, or heard anything tion is in writing. I go further,
rb, b ry was marked "Re: Your more about the matter until Mr Speaker, and say that even if
Approval".' hheard.tlit c given a direction t i
_I LICE are investigating an Mr Mitchell told the House. mail was in the possession of tet'visas provided I actedWith-
pted armed robbery and a yesterday that this "is not Mr Bethel with the title in my discretion and the law
s ting around 9pm on Tues-. what the document shows at "Approved for issue." and"ini- the is absolutely nq hing
all" and that Mr Bethel's tialed by the permaiient sec- 'wroin with the exercise oifthat"
superintendent Water Evans claims were totally false and retary on May 11, 2005. discretion.
sjW that a 60 year-old male had misleading. He proposed to "I did not issue any such "This view that because
Ned at his home on Skyline lay a copy of the e-mail on the direction. The matter was han- politicians exercise political
Ijve when he was accosted by table of the House. died entirely by the public ser- power there is somehow some-
t~ men. "The e-mail comes from vice," he said. thing'wrong with it, it is simply
i.he men forced him into his Senator Trevor Whylly who Mr Mitchell also defied any- misguided. It cannot stand the
e.-and tried to rob him of is an assistant in the office of one to produce evidence that gravity of logic or the light of

hip. Bruce Bain whose complaint to five Chinese persons on
He was taken to hospital was that he was not getting February 13, 2005, as claimed
where he was listed as stable. approval for visas for seamen by Mr Bethel. I
The two robbers escapedin a on his boat. "It is always my position _
white Chevy Cavalier. "I e-mailed the senator the that if visas can be lawfully
next day May 6, 2004 to say 'I issued then the person should P
_" j will look into the matter'. This be facilitated, and being a
K iw a n I s was no promise of anything member of parliament does
other than to have the matter not deny you the right to the
d o n at io n investigated.' It is what any issuance of visas provided you

to Unity

House

THE Kiwanis Club of Over
the Hill teamed up with its
sponsored youth club the Key
Club of Jordan Prince William
Baptist School to make a
charitable donation to the Uni-
ty House.
The home, which houses
about 40 elderly persons as well
as individuals who that have
been abandoned, is located on
East Street South.
Rev Janet Butler, the admin-
istrator of the institution, said
she was extremely grateful for
the contribution.
Club president Frederick
Rodgers, president-elect James
McNiel, treasurer Berry Sweet-
ing and Key Club president Ms
Jovan Saunders were on hand
to make the presentation.
Ms Saunders was also sup-
ported by members of the Key
Club, including Dominic Stubbs
and Tanishka Storr.
The donation included sup-
plies of grits, corned beef,
cream, tuna, fruit juice and oth-
er food items.


Flight held g
A BAHAMASAIR aircraft was
being held at Miami International '
eAirport laStnightnypaUS officials SPECIAL STORE HOURS "


bond.4f Re...... .. .
As The Tribune was going to
press Bahamasair's board was ing. .
session last night trying to sort outP
the matter. It is understood that fr .. .
Bahamasair has claimed that what-
ever money was owed whether it
was a "bond" or "fine" was unclear
- had already been paid. IM
It was also reported that
Bahamasair was trying to engage
Falcon Air to fly its passengers to
Nassau. However, is was claimed
that US Customs asked Falcon Air
if it did so would it be prepared to
pay whatever Bahamasair owed.
The Tribune was told that the word
used was "fine".
No further information was
available up to press time.


C


OEl


EFFETIE CM 2D 2005


AL L i6=iN AF, l DRI]-VE=


USE YOUR E.CARD TO RESERVE TICKETS AT 380-3549 OR WWW.GALLERIACINEMAS.COM I


ition


government water sup-
sees a Water and Sew-
the well.
k across it to go to the
ietimes, they play in
ne could walk on it
sick," he added.
ger of engineering and
Water and Sewerage
hris Sherman spoke
ned resident and said
would be investigated.
secretary in the Min-
on Pinder was unable
"he Tribune yesterday
as in session.







, ,6


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS A DDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to, Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Press hindered in Dame Ivy event


ON WEDNESDAY Bahamas Information
Services published a news item from the Cab-
inet office announcing Thursday morning's
farewell ceremony for retiring Governor-Gen-
eral Dame Ivy Dumont.
The "ceremony is a public event and spec-
tators are welcome," said the BIS statement.
However, although the press is the public's
eyes and ears, and despite the number of emp-
ty seats in the Senate chamber, the press was
not welcome.
Al Dillette of Bahamas Information Ser-
vices (BIS) telephoned The Tribune after
deadline Tuesday evening asking that space be
made for the Cabinet's announcement. At
6.06 pm the short notice was e-mailed to our
local news editor, and a news page was rejigged
to accommodate it.
The next day a reporter was assigned as
usual to the Senate, where the ceremony was
to take place, and another two were sent to the
House, where members were to start their
meeting before being summoned to the Senate.
Tribune reporter Karan Minnis, arrived ear-
ly and took her usual seat in the press section
of the Senate chamber. Shortly afterwards,
she said, a woman came up to her and asked
where she was from. When told she was The
Tribune Miss Minnis was informed that she
would have to move. "She said I could not be
there because they had np space for the press;
they had been reserved."
Miss Minnis told the lady that she must
have been mistaken because this was a press
event, and sitting in a press seat, she was there
to cover it. "Okay", said the lady and left.
"About two minutes later Andrew McKin-
ney came over, held my upper arm and said I
had to go outside because they only had room
for two members of the press, BIS being one,
but they had not decided who the other was to
be," said Miss Minnis.
She told him she was remaining inside to do
her job as his information must have been
incorrect.
He insisted on the correctness of his posi-
tion, and she persisted in hers. Mr McKinney
walked off.
Miss Minnis then stepped into the hall to
use her phone. Mr McKinney returned, told
her she could stay until BIS came to sort out
the seating. But, he said, she had to remain
outside. She refused. When she had finished
her call, she returned to her seat in the cham-
ber. By now a BIS staff member was also seat-
ed in the press section. The BIS reporter told


our reporter that the plan was that only BIS
and ZNS would be allowed to report inside the
chamber. All other reporters were to be kept
outside. "Oh, we shall see!" a confident Miss
Minnis replied.
She remained undisturbed in the Senate
until the Governor-General was about to
arrive. She and a Love 97 reporter were' then
asked to step outside the chamber. Theycom-
plied. They were left standing in the hall for a
few minutes, when, without explanation, they
were escorted back to their press seats.
Members of the public who were "welcome"
did not respond to the invitation, leaving many
Senate seats empty.
Meanwhile downstairs our two reporters
and photographer were also being hindered in
their work. The two House reporters were
stopped from entering the Senate building.
They were told by a plainclothed official that
it had been agreed that BIS would brief the
press as to what area they would be allowed in
to report proceedings. He said a table with
speakers was to have been set up outside for
the press. Our photographer was not allowed
to move freely to cover the event. He, with
other photographers, had to remain in a cer-
tain section, while free movement was allowed
BIS and ZNS staff.
The official was surprised that BIS had not,
briefed the press the day before, nor had who-
ever was responsible for doing so, provided
speakers for them to hear proceedings or a
table at which they were to work.
It is not unusual for a photographer to be
chosen as a "pool" photographer. This means
that he is responsible for supplying photos for
all members of the press corps. This was done.
Six photos were posted on the internet from
which the press could choose. Of course, The
Tribune editor was annoyed because he want-
ed a wider selection of photos, which he would
have had from his own man.
Whoever bungled the arrangements for yes-
terday's ceremony must remember that the
press members should not be hindered in
doing their job. These men and women were
there to represent the public those who
BIS said were so "welcome", but who could
not be present. They are the readers who
expect their newspaper to report the event for
them.
BIS personnel must also be reminded that
they are being paid to facilitate, and not hin-
der, the press in the discharge of their duty to
keep the public informed.


Computers, Monitors, Printers, Ink
Cartridges, Video Games and more....


SATURDAY

DECEMBER 3RD, 2005

10AM 4PM2

Tel: 242-328-0048


TECHNOLOGY
COMPANY LIMITED


Call 322-8219
or 3228160
Fax 3260945


Embarrassed




by the Hous'e




of Assembly


EDITOR, The Tribune
ON November 23, 2005 I
watched the proceeding of Par-
liament at home by myself and
I was embarrassed and ashamed
to know that these proceedings
were being broadcast on our
airwaves.
If at all possible I would like
for someone to dig into the
archives of Parliament and send
to the Speaker a video of the
Honourable Speaker Italia
Johnson's methods of operat-
ing when she sat in the Speak-
er's chair.
It appears to. my little mind
that whenever there is a ruckus
in Parliament the Speaker, for
whatever reason when he is try-
ing to obtain peace and calm,
always without exception looks
at the Opposition as if they are
at fault.
However, I am an avid watch-
er of Parliament, and most of
the time -if not all it is start-
ed by a Government member.
Is the Speaker afraid to
rebuke his colleagues, and if so
why?
As far as I am aware the
Speaker even though appointed
by Government is supposed to
be fair and impartial during the
proceedings.
During the past two weeks I
have been greatly disturbed to
see and hear the governing par-
ty stoop to the level which they
have done to try and stir up
racial hatred in our Bahamas
once again. They are constantly
asking why white Bahamians
do not get involved in the
Bahamas. I wonder why they
ask this, because they are giving
themselves the answer. It is
because of these same racial
overtones that white people are
afraid to get involved.
It was amusing to see white.
Bahamians in the PLP conven-
tion hall sitting and having to
listen to this type of rhetoric. I
wonder how they must have
felt.
I wonder if any speaker at the
PLP convention would like it if
their father or grandfather had
gone to jail for stealing and the
people of this country called
that person a thief because of
what their foreparents had
done.
It is time that we as a people
realise that no one can change
the past. It is the future that we
have to be concerned about,
and if any one in this country,
be they red, yellow, black or
white, believes that we as a peo-
ple can progress by preaching
this racial hatred then I have to
assume they do not and have


not read the Bible. God in his
Holy Word makes it clear that
we are all his children and as
such we should love on another.
It is very disturbing that to
date I have not heard one
church leader in our Bahamas
who has the nerve to speak out
against this. Are these leaders
sincere in what they preach or
are they only interested in
pleasing their earthly masters.
I do not expect preachers to
become involved in any political
war, but they have a duty to
God and his children to speak
against anything that is wrong.
I wonder which Convention
Mr Rigby attended, or maybe it
is because he thinks the rhetoric
at convention by almost every
speaker is normal.
If what I heard each night is


not intended to create raciall'
barriers in our Bahamas thentl'
suppose I am an idiot. I believe's
the PLP now realise that this
fuse will do them more harm-
than good so now they waht'to"
change what was expounded aF,
great lengths. Well it is too late
for that because most of our!c
young, intelligent voters know?.
exactly what they meant and
they do not want any part of
this.
Editor, I can voice my 6pin-.
ion on this because my grand-
mother was a dark lady, and It
was raised by a black woman. Is
learnt to play and socialise with
her children and never knew";
the difference until I got older
and listened to the politician of
that era. By the way I am 56
years old, so anyone knows the
era I am talking about.
A CONCERNED
BAHAMIAN 2
Eleuthera
November 2005 *,


Alfred Gray and


the UBP menace

EDITOR, The Tribune
OF all the demons from the past, perhaps none is so divisive
and therefore destructive, as.the demon of racism. And of all
the endeavours that one could embark upon, there is none
more capable of eventually demonstrating that person's true
character than the practice of politics. And when those who
have embarked upon a career of politics have their true char-
acter revealed in that they will not let this demon of racism dif ,
an awful and painful death, then we are to take them to task ol !
their lack of good character.
The assertion that we should be fearful of a return toQ. tlie,
days of the UBP should the FNM win the next election, '4fn d
something should happen to Hubert Ingraham thus leaving
Brent Symonette in charge, is such a preposterous assertion,'
that I cannot find anything more of an intelligent nature to say -
about it. That's a first for me.
Actually, there are two things that I have just thought of:
1) To Alfred Gray and anybody who willingly agrees with his
assertion, I say shame on you weaklings, and
2) Surely there are a greater number of those Bahamians thakt'
can see straight through such evil, than those who cannot."7' ,
Let me implore my fellow Bahamians -that includes Alfred'
Gray by the way, because he's still my brother, even thoughI
don't even know him personally to please refrain from such :i
destructive rhetoric. How can we claim to be a Christidn'
nation while fanning the flames of hell? Obviously Mr Grfay,
knows not that racism is a tool of the Deceiver. As long as W-'"'
remain divided, we will remain less than all we can truly- le.
God forbid!
A white man in Brent Symonette's position has got to'beb'"
making us look to the rest of the world as if we are united here -
in the Bahamas. And that's a good thing, a very good thing.' -
An' I ain' sayin' dat jus cuz I white, cuz I really ain' white. I is
a conchy Joe. I more red dan any ting else. But I ain' one' bit-
shame.
WILLIAM (BILLY) ROBERTS
Abaco -'
November 18 2005


CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE
THIE MOST THOROUGHi RESTORATrION & CLEANING EVER. OR THE JOB IS FREE!
NASSAU'S ONLY PROFESSIONAL. CERTIFIED STONE CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CARE SYSTEMS.
* Carpet, Upholstery, Stone and Marble Cleaning &
Restoration Specialist.


* Prochem Cleaning Systems removes Deep & Heavy
Soil, Bacteria, Grease, Watermarks and Stains from
Carpeting & Furniture, restoring them to like new
at a fraction of replacement cost.
Carpet, Sofa's, Loveseats, Chairs, Dining Chairs. Cars,
Boats, Grout, Tiles, Marble & Stone
* Persian, Wool & Silk Carpet Cleaning Specialist
* Restoration & Care

Authorized StoneTech Professional Contractor
CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS
PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594


[I 1


YOUR LOCAL MEMBER OF T19.
PROHEM SYSTEM (sm)


ONLY WE CAN DO IT RIGHT!
www.prochemsystem.com v www.stonetecipro.com wwwi.iicrc.org
psp@coralwave.coni


:": = = == ,==.: From
WEATHER
Retactableawtnings for
(Prote patios and Limitedk
High-qtuaitycustotn-made in
a 100 ctolturs and patterns
Also cus tom-mad .aluminium
patio roofs, rooms and car


Don Stainton SINCE
10(Protedion) Limited


PROTECTION


FOR REN




PimeLcto


Fax: 242-328-0049

#4 Patton & Rosetta Sts,
Palmdale
(Next to City Market)
Nassau, Bahamas
Email: sales@dctpc.com


THE TRIBUNE-


PAGE 4 THURSDAYDECEMBER 1, 2005


I


~ii~a~






THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


L N


In brief
.... .. .................... ......................

New Family

Island

projects are

announced

DURING a communication
to the House of Assembly yes-
terday Works and Utilities Min-
ister Bradley Roberts unveiled a
schedule for a number of con-
tracts for the repair and con-
struction of roads in the Family
Islands.
Eleuthera main road the
contract is progressing and com-
pletion is expected to take
another 5 months.
,, Eleuthera settlement roads
-contracts are expected to be
awarded within the next 60 to
90, days.
South Andros roads and
airstrip contract valued at
some :$3 million is completed.
LMangrove Cay airport and
roads a contract was awarded
on Monday, with a projected
completion date of April 2007.
;.,North and Central Andros
rbads a contract is to be
awarded in first quarter of 2006.
r,* ,Roads in East Grand
Bahama a contract is in
progress for the repair and
reconstruction of 21 miles of
road.
Roads in West Grand
Bahama a contract will be
awarded shortly.
Roadworks in Acklins and
Ragged Island are currently
being considered to go to tender
in January, 2006. These projects
are earmarked to be funded by
the European union.
Roadworks in Marsh Har-
bour -, a contract will be award-
ed in the first quarter of 2006.
Roadworks in Long Island
settlements the first contract
;ill be issued shortly and the
second in the first quarter of
2006.
Roadworks in Cat Island -
Scontract will be awarded in
first quarter of 2006.


Festival

Noel in

Grand

Bahama


THE 11th annual Festival
Noet will be held this weekend
in Grand Bahama.
Qrganisers say the event will
featuree many fine wines and
champagnes, works of art cre-
iate,dby several Bahamian
artists, a silent auction and food
from, the best restaurants on
[Grand Bahama.
i The festival, themed:
["Evening under the stars"' will
be held on Friday, December
2, at:the Rand Nature Centre.
Silent auction prizes will
include jewellery adorned with
diamonds, emeralds, rubies and
sapphires.
I There also will be gift baskets
filled with local fragrances and
"designer perfumes, courtesy of
Parfum de Paris.
- Island Galleria will be show-
casing gifts donated by the Min-
Wine selections will come
from countries around the
World, including the United
States, Chile, Argentina, Aus-
tralia, France, South Africa and
Italy. .
SThose attending will have the
opportunity to vote and crown
Chef Noel 2005.
SNoted artist Malcolm Rae
will be the guest artist, and
there will be many other artists
pnd crafters displaying their cre-
ations.
STickets for Festival Noel
2005: An Evening Under the
Stars are on sale for $45 at the
Rand Nature Centre, Bristol
Wines and Spirits and Colom-
.bian Emeralds International in
Port Lucaya. The evening starts
tit 7pm.


St Andrew's


residents
to hold
meeting


ST Andrews Beach residents
are.asked to attend a commu-
nity meeting to be held on Sun-
day,December 4, at 3pm.
Thle community Christmas
pay and other important issues
Wilt be discussed.
1T'iose attending are asked to
beohn time.


Road improvement planned




for completion by 2008


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
THE seven remaining corridors for
the New Providence Road Improve-
ment Project are expected to be com-
pleted by 2008 at a cost of $75 to $80
million.
This was revealed by Works and Util-
ities Minister Bradley Roberts during
a communication to the House of
Assembly yesterday.
The remaining corridors, which have
been divided into seven smaller indi-
vidual contracts called 'slices', are ear-
marked for completion through both
local and international bidding as fol-
lows:
Slice 1, which comprises Baillou Hill
Road, Market and East Streets, is for
international bidding and has an antici-
pated contract award date of April,
2006;
Slice 2, which includes Robinson
Road, Prince Charles Drive, Marathon
and Wulff Roads, is also designated for
international bidding with the antici-
pated contract award date also for April,
2006,
Slice 3, which includes the Bamboo
Boulevard and East Street Junction;
Bamboo Boulevard; the Milo Butler
Highway extension to Carmichael Road
and the Abundant Life Road, will be
tendered locally.
The bid documents for this project
were issued to the bidders last month
and it is anticipated that the contract
will be awarded in March, 2006.
Slice 4, which includes the Bethel
Avenue extension from JFK Drive to
East Bay Street and the new Cordeaux
Avenue link between Baillou Hill Road.
and Thompson Boulevard, is also for
local bidding with the anticipated con-
tract award date set for September,
2006,


Slice 5, which includes the Bethel
Avenue realignment between the
Tonique Wiliams-Darling Highway and
JFK Drive and the New Oakes Field
distributor from Yellow Elder to the
New Bethel Avenue realignment, is for
local bidding with an anticipated con-
tract award date scheduled for Septem-
ber, 2007.
Slice 6, which is also for local bid-
ding, is on hold pending final designs
of the Bah-Mar Development.
Slice 7 comprises a local contract
signed on October 18, 2005, with works
scheduled to be completed in June,
2006. This project is intended to
improve that section of Baillou Hill
Road between Robinson Road and the
Independence Drive/Tonique Williams-
Darling Highway/Baillou Hill Round-
about.
The contract for.this slice was award-
ed to the local joint venture partner-
ship of Bethell's Trucking and Heavy
Equipment and the Bahamas Hot Mix
Company.
The contract sum for Slice 7 is
$3,334,531.61 and the project is expect-
ed to be completed within seven
months.
As an incentive for the contractor to
complete the works on this highly traf-
ficked and vital corridor, the govern-
ment has approved a bonus of
$166,726.58, to be paid to the contractor
if the project can be completed within
five months.
Upon taking office in May, 2002, gov-
ernment met in progress an extensive
road improvement project valued at
some $66 million and funded mainly by
a loan from the Inter-American Devel-
opment Bank (IDB) with counterpart
funding of some 30 per cent by the
Bahamas government.
Mr Roberts said that by July 2002,
the international contractor for the pro-


* MINISTER of Works and Utilities Bradley Roberts


ject, Associated Asphalt, went into
bankruptcy and the project came to a
premature halt.
Eventually, arid with the agreement of
the IDB, the ministry embarked on a
new strategy to. tender to Bahamian
prequalified contractors one of the
major components of the roadworks
from the overall project. This compo-
nent was the dualling and rehabilita-
tion of the Harrold Road corridor.
"This strategy was an ambitious one
in that, although this corridor was
removed from the project, there was,
nevertheless, the IDB requirement to
maintain the same international stan-
dards as obtained in the original con-


KW


tract.
"I am both pleased and proud to
report that for a contract sum of
$5,716,710.20, inclusive of an agreed dis-
count from the contractor of
$363,215.76, the contract was executed
to the required stringent international
standards by a local joint venture part-
nership comprised of Bethell's Trucking
and Heavy Equipment and the
Bahamas Hot Mix Company," the min-
ister said.
The project began in April, 2004, was
completed in September, 2005, and
renamed the Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway during the commissioning cer-
emony on October 3, 2005.


ALL


2006 EDITION 3|^'

BAHAMAS
HANDBOOK
ALL THE BAHAMAS
IN ONE BOOK
672 pages
informative stories,
full-colour illustrations
E and maps
EXCITING FEATURES
,* HISTORY
FAMILY ISLANDS
BUSINESS
FREEPORT/LUCAYA
GOVERNMENT
HANDY BLUE PAGE
INFORMATION
SECTION


OOK FOR YOUR NAME e39
People mentioned
rom all walks of life!

AN ETIENNE DUPUCH JR PUBLICATION
Etienne Dupuch Jr Publications, PO Box N-7513,
Nassau, The Bahamas (242) 323-5665


95


CONGRATULATIONS
to






25 YEARS OLD TODAY
and still going strong, thanks to you

Johnny, Christine, and Grace.


Still a leader in IT and software development,
IBM business partner, and now

LANSA
distributor for the Bahamas.

Keep up the good work!


a................


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
THE government has
approved the purchase of a
new $1.6 million state-of-the-
art asphalt plant to help con-
tain the cost of the New
Providence Road Improve-
ment Project.
According to the Ministry
of Works, the new plant will
be used by the government-
owned Bahamix company to
supply asphalt to the project
at cost.
The government expects
to obtain the plant from the
Almix manufacturing com-
pany in Fort Wayne, Indi-
ana. The deal is to include
ground preparation and
installation.
Works and Utilities Minis-
ter Bradley Roberts said the
asphalt plant acquired in
1989 has surpassed its useful
lifespan and is now experi-
encing more downtime than
productive periods.
This, he said, has resulted
in diminishing quantities of
asphalt being produced -
which in turn directly affects










THURSDAY
DECEMBER 1
6:30am Community Pg./1540
11:00 Immediate Response
12:00 ZNS News Update
12:03 Caribbean Today News
Update
12:05 Immediate Response Cont'd
1:00 Legends Whence We Came
2:00 The Stingiest Man In Town
2:30 Inside Hollywood
3:00 Bishop Leroy Emmanuel
3:30 Gilbert Patterson
4:00 Gospel Video
4:30 Gospel Grooves
4:58 ZNS News Update
5:00 Jessye Norman Sings For
The Healing of AIDS
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
8:00 Native Stew
8:30 Kiwanis: Forging Partner
Relations
9:30 The Darold Miller Shining
Star Show
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
1:30am Community Page
NOE N-V 3rsre


the level of profit that could be
realised from the sale of asphalt.
The new plant will be located
in the industrial park area off:
Firetrail Road and is expected.
to arrive within 30 days.
Unlike the existing Bahamix
Asphalt Plant, which is an
"Astec" model manufactured
some 30 years ago, the new
Almix model 76 duo drum is a
counterflow "zero emissions"
with an environmentally friend-
ly "bag house", Mr Roberts said.
This "bag house" is designed
to eliminate atmospheric conta-
mination caused by particle mat-
ter, with the end result that the
public will not see pollution in
the form of steam which hovers
over the existing Astec plant.
This new plant is designed to
produce anywhere from 90 to
200 tons of asphalt per hour
depending on aggregate and
moisture variables.
On average, the Almix 76 duo
drum can produce 160 tons per


hour at 300 degrees fahrenheit.
Despite challenges created by
the frequent downtimes, Mr
Roberts sdidtBahamixihaspbeera ,, ;
instrumental in the paving of a .
number of streets, including the-'
Faith Avenue extension, East
Street South, several main roads
in the San Souci and Eastwood
areas, Wulff Road and Nassau
Street, among others.
"Most importantly, however,
the acquisition of the new plant
is most timely for the resump-
. tion and completion of the New
Providence Road Improvement
Project.
"Commencing in January,
2006, therefore, I look forward
with great anticipation to the
launch of a new invigorated
road paving programme that
will provide concrete help in
restoring the New Providence
road network to a state of excel-
lence to the extent of available
financial resources," Mr
Roberts said.


Government to buy asphalt


plant to keep costs down


ORALErS FASHIONS

NewArrvals 1
Clothing, Shoes & Accessories,
Ifor theHoliday Season


GIFT & BRIDAL REGISTRY
Harbour Bay Shopping Centre
%.^/ Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448 '


I ~


=


/


!


LI
f


lAmAkf








, ALE


Destitute American offered




help by government agency


DESTITUTE American
Patricia Freed, whose plight
touched the hearts of Tribune
readers, has been offered food
and shelter by a government
health facility.
The 52-year-old architecture
graduate, whose troubles were


spotlighted in an INSIGHT
feature, was found wandering
the streets by health workers.
"Things have improved," she
told The Tribune yesterday. "I
have a room and I am being
fed. I am very grateful."
Twice-divorced Ms Freed,


who says she gained Bahamian
residency through marriage,
claimed she was reduced to
penury following a road acci-
dent seven years ago.
Medical costs, legal fees and
lost earnings had drained away
$250,000, she claimed, leaving


I, t, 1 C Ing i mirj n e




^lil~s- ^ l iv; $Lh/ iv;:
ik"" "a m o i d,,. w 1B ;;a Mtid br







R s a> 0 R Ta

0yOT.AWM CsNO
k om fr or ifomoim o 37.20 ea, 675


her walking the streets in
search of food.
Although she was using a
room offered by a young
couple, she had no money
and no access to meals,
except a daily cup of soup
from the Salvation Army.
When the article exposing
her plight appeared, several
Tribune readers responded
with offers of help. Some
even wanted to accommo-
date her in their homes.
The United States
Embassy also asked for Ms
Freed to contact them so that
they could arrange assis-
tance.
However, Ms Freed had
no phone and deliberately
avoided reading the story
recording her woes, claiming
she felt humiliated.
So health officials tracked
her. down and offered food
and shelter, using her pub-
lished photograph to identify
her.
Ms Freed said her troubles
began when she was struck


by a garbage truck seven
years ago.
Although the driver admit-
ted leaving the scene and was
dealt with by the courts, she
claims her civil action for
damages has been bogged
down for years.
Gradually, her resources
dwindled to nothing and she
found herself wandering
around Nassau asking for
sugared water from fast-food
restaurants and eating
ketchup from plastic sachets.
She said she had been
unable to get work and was
left with a paralysed hand
after being mugged in down-
town Nassau.
She finally approached The
Tribune in desperation,
claiming she was on the edge
of a social abyss.
"I am one step from skid
row," she said, claiming she
had been reduced to taking a
daily dip in the sea to keep
clean.
Now she is hoping to get
her life back on track.


* PATRICIA Freed has
had several offers of help
since her story was
published by The Tribune.


0 In brief

Conference

planned on

sustainabl*
tourism

THE next Caribbean Media
Exchange on Sustainable
Tourism event will be held at
SuperClubs Breezes, Cable
Beach on December 8 to 12.
The conference, which brings
together regional tourism
experts and the international
media, will be the 10th of
kind held throughout it
Caribbean region.
The focus of this year's con-
ference will be the oii0poranc
of multicultural riarkets 'ftie
Caribbean and the
These markets incl.d dem'-
graphics like the' Af-iWa rer-
ican, Hispanic-Amei i n an
Asian-Amrerican m iar'es a's
well as the millio'ns'.f
Caribbean nationals 'whod'ave
made their libime ini thb itf,
States. '
According to CounteiA a
International Presid 'et L.ei1
LeLaulu, tliese a s
tremendous resources
countries in the region iust.l l
ways of tapping into thmee"
AS th, B aihamis "mates
strides toWards bradeiis
customer base by breaking. ntb
new lucrative markets, tis con-
ference will serve to no.t ngify
provide internationalexpiosure
to the tourism product, butaisp
elicit advice on how tourism
across the Islanids. Of' he
Bahamas can be .strengtheindq'
said the oigamsers in a state-
ment.



-f o. gf


'-

"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


S


- l.~. o i


-


- -4


-


_ .


* -


.-4


Are -you just back from College?
Maybe you are saving up to go to college?


WE WANT YOU!

You are young and energetic between 35 years old.
Love team work and are good with people
Like working at night, "6p.m. 12a.m."
Have your own Transportation and currant driver's licence
Have a current police and health certificate.
Posses a high school Diploma
Have legal status to work in the Bahahias.

If you can say yes to 7 out of 7 of these questions we want
to meet you, to interview for an exciting new job in the
entertainment field. We presently have openings for 1 bar ;
manager, 1 bartender; 1 bar back &,5 wait staff.

Contact us with a written resume at mail box...

DA-1417
clo The Tribune
P.O.Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6 THURSDAYDECEMBER 1, 2005






-gE TRIBUNE




Abaco tycoon



takes on English



soccer club


';tYCOON Peter de Savary,
developer of the luxury Winding
,By resort in Abaco, has taken
on a new role in life as a soccer
club chairman.
r"'The flamboyant multi-mil-
lihnaire says he intends to take
ith unfashionable London club
Millwall into Britain's top 15
over the next few years.
.Miliwall, known as the Lions,
'haie been best-known in the
.past for their rowdy supporters.
'Their ground is fittingly known
as The Den a place where vis-
iting fans frequently get mauled
by their rivals.
Mr de Savary got a taste of
their unruly behaviour when his
tearn crashed out of the Carling
iip competition against Birm-
irgham City this week.
Qnly five minutes into the
miite, 100 Lions fans ripped up
security netting and charged
'towards Birmingham support-
ers.
"'Police had to restore order,
eventually closing the tea bar
' a .d arresting five men.
" iMr de Savary, worth an esti-
mated $65 million, jetted into
Londoin for his first game in
charge and, according to The
Sun newspaper, put his foot in it
by comparing the crowd to
"hordes of under-privileged
Africans."
However, he said his new job
was "one hell of a challenge",
declaring that in five years he
hoped'Millwall would be among
the top 15 clubs in the country.
The bald, cigar-chewing de
Savary is building The Abaco
.Club at Winding Bay for high-
end visitors. The resort is situ-
ated on one of the island's most
'curesque beaches.
'In his colourful career as a
'dleeloper, Mr de Savary has
adatered for wealthy pleasure-
's"ekers at a magnificent Scot-


* PETER de Savary,
developer of the Winding Bay
resort, who has just bought
the infamous Millwall soccer
club in south-east London


tish castle and a splendid Wilt-
shire mansion.
At one time, he simultane-
ously owned both Land's End
and John O'Groats the two
extremities of the British main-
land.
Expert as he is at creating lux-
ury clubs for the plutocracy, he
admits to being a greenhorn in
the world of soccer.
"I am not an expert on foot-
ball at all," he said. "But I do
realise we need to start winning.
This is a team effort the sup-
porters will be on the wall with
me. We're in it together," he
was reported as telling The Sun.
This is not the first time the
high-energy Mr de Savary has
been involved in sport. He first
sprang to prominence in the
Americas Cup sailing competi-
tion.


FOR Ci
EVERYONE
FuR CHILD
HtiBAND, WIFE
BOsS SECRtTARY
" BBSIMNESS
ASSOCIATES








BAHAMAS


HANDBOOK
OUtILBAT M sCAT-OS


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005, PAGE 7


DAYS ONLY
fr DEC. 2ND & SAT. DEC. 3RD


PALMDALE BRANCH ONLY!

BEST PRICES... BEST SELCECTION1.. SIMPLE!





.-_ IVBiHL.A


UPON his return from
CHOGM, Prime
Minister Perry Christie wasted
no time responding to criticisms
of new Leader of the Opposi-
tion, Hubert Ingraham.


This represented a major shift
in the political dynamics of the
country. Before Ingraham
regained the leadership of the
FNM, Mr Christie left it to the
chairman of his party, Mr Ray-
nard Rigby, to answer criticisms


~a~a~ag~eBM


BRAS I


from the FNM's leadership.
By doing so, Mr Christie
seemed to suggest that he did
not have an equal in the former
leader of the FNM. Now, not
only has the PM immediately
addressed criticisms by Mr
Ingraham himself, he has vowed
to respond to all such criticisms
as they are made.
As one young man.said to me
on my way from Nassau Inter-
national Airport just two days
ago: "This is the most I have
heard from Mr Christie in three
years." So the saying goes, "what
a difference a day makes".
This dynamic exchange
between these two giant politi-
cal figures is precisely what our
democracy needs. A democracy
must have fierce competition
between opposing sides to keep
it honest. That is just what is
happening now. Mr Christie will
no doubt produce his A-game
for a political personality like
Mr Ingraham, who is highly gift-
ed in this area of life.
The exchanges between the
two men will make for good
public debate and will produce
a much more interesting arena
in which to observe politics. Let
the games begin!
PERFORMANCE WILL
MATTER

I wrote last week that per-
formance will be a key
issue in the upcoming general
election. While I overlooked the
fact that in 1997 both political
parties had recent records that
could be compared in the elec-
tion campaign, as will be the
case in the next general elec-
tion, this oversight did not dis-
miss the fact that performance
will surely be an issue.
In fact, it is the performance
of the present government that
Mr Ingraham is criticising and
that which Mr Christie is
defending. Voters can expect to
be treated to many more
exchanges over the performance
of both parties while in office.
Take for instance the econo-
my. Mr Christie, in answering
Mr Ingraham, referred to a
Financial Times article saying
the Bahamian economy recov-
ered much quicker than expect-
ed, noting the positive growth
rates of the economy over the
last three years as compared to
the decline by two per cent in
2001, as well as mentioning the
billions of dollars in investments
in the pipeline.
It is true that the economy
has recovered and that it has
been a relatively quick one.
However, the FT article may
not have noted that the decline
in the Bahamian economy in
2001 was largely a result of the
terrorist attacks in 2001 and the
recession in the US that began
in March that year.


STRAIGHT UP TALK

Z H IVAR GO LA I N G


Additionally, it did not reveal
that before Mr Christie came
to office in May, 2002, the Inter-
national Monetary Fund (IMF)
was already forecasting eco-
nomic recovery for The
Bahamas, predicting growth
rates of 2.5 per cent and three
per cent in 2002 and 2003. As it
turned out, the economy grew
by 1.9 per cent and three per
cent in those years.
Indeed, when PM Christie
gave his first budget communi-
cation in May, 2002, one he said
was really the FNM's, since it
was mostly prepared by that
administration, he noted the
IMF's forecast for positive
growth of the economy.
This was before his govern-
ment had been able to execute
any economic policies of its own.
Mr Christie said the positive
IMF forecast was based on a
number of investments the IMF
knew were in the pipeline and
the recovery of both the US
economy as well as Bahamian
tourism following the terrorists
attacks of September 11, 2001.
In essence, then, the recov-
ery and performance of the
economy within at least the first
two years of the Christie admin-
istration were based more on
factors that preceded the
administration's effort rather
than policies of its own. This is
what Mr Ingraham argued at
the FNM rally held recently.

T he FT article also failed
to point out that
notwithstanding the positive
growth of the economy over the
last three-and-a-half years,
unemployment in the country
has actually risen from 9.1 per
cent to 10:2 per tent.
Indeed, on some islands,
namely Grand Bahama, the
unemployment rate is higher
than the national average. Per-
haps this is because so much of
the billions of dollars of invest-
ments in the pipeline mentioned
by the Times article remained in
the pipeline and have not been
put in the ground. This, too, was
a point that Mr Ingraham made
in recent comments.
It was also interesting to note
that Mr Christie, in reading the
Times article, pointed out that
the financial services sector of
The Bahamas was holding its
own despite significant global
competition.
Interestingly, there have been
no legislative, policy or program-
matic changes in the financial ser-
vices sector of the Bahamas over
the last three years.
In fact, where many thought


that the Christie administration
would move quickly to reverse a
number of the financial laws put
in place in 2001 by the Ingra-
ham administration, no such
thing has happened to date.,
To the contrary, where those
laws were once criticisediby
members of the administration
prior to coming to office, they
now seem to refer to them'when
telling the world that the
Bahamas is a "well-regulated,
blue-chip" financial services
centre. It seems, therefore, that
whatever factors contribute to
the strengths that exist in the
sector today predate Mr
Christie's administration.
Both parties will have to
sharpen their wits to ensure that
they make sensible representa-
tion of themselves before a
much more enlightened public
than they have ever faced
before. Let the games continue!
BAHAMAR AND TRANS-
PARENCY

n Grand Bahama, I host a
radio talk-show. On one
of my recent shows, a caller
asked how it was that the gov-
ernment had a "confidentiality
clause" in the Bahamar agree-
ment if it was a transparent
agreement.
The fact of the matter is that
transparency and confidentiali-
ty seem to be at odds with each
other in matters of public
affairs, particularly where the
state is making an agreement
between itself and a private
investor in the public interest.
Indeed, if a document can be
commented upon extensively
by a minister in the House of
Assembly and even tabled in
that sovereign place, it seems
highly illogical that it would
include any provision that calls
for secrecy or confidentiality.
This is a point to which the
government must speak, if it is to
settle the public's mind as to its
handling of the Bahamar deal.
Admittedly, it was also curi-
ous to me that while I was able
to get my hands on the
Bahamar Heads of Agreement,
what I received did not include
a number of appendices to
which the document referred.
THOUGHT FOR THE
WEEK

Sound public debate is
characterised by
exchanges over ideas rather
than the hurling of personal
insults.


20% OFF

STOREWIDE
on ALL tile, thin
set and grout.
CASH S CARRY


November
29, 30,
December
1, 2, 3


NASSAU TILE


THE AIDS FOUNDATION OF THE BAHAMAS


AIDS WALK
DECEMBER 3RD, 2005 AT 6:00 AM
Route 1. (Dr. Richard Knowles)

Beginning at St Ann's School on Fox Hill Road, then northward along Fox Hill
Road to the Eastern Road then Westward along the Eastern Road to Bay Street and
Westward along Bay Street to Arawak Cay.

Route 2. (Lowell Mortimer)

Beginning at Caves Point Shopping Centre, then Eastward Along West Bay Street
to Arawak Cay.

Route 3. (Camille Barnett)

Beginning at the City Market parking lot on Village Road, then westward along
Wulff Road to Poincianna Drive and westward along Poincianna Drive to Nassau
Street, then northward along Nassau Street to West Bay Street, the westward along
West Bay Street to Arawak Cay.

Route 4. (Dr Perry Gomez)

Beginning at the Clinic on East Street South, then North along East Street to East-
West Highway, west on the East West Highway to Blue Hill Road. North on Blue
Hill Road to Ba Street, then West alon B Street to Arawak C


Il~$~:~'~l~~:~e~i~~~~"~:~~~~~~~i~ii~i~i


-1


F"m


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005


a


THE TRIBUNE


Ingraham and Christie




are locking their horns




THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005, PAGE 9


STHE TRIBUNE


read ndmiss


deas


F7URL


UP TO SIZE XXXXL


SUP TO SIZE 42


LAW


I~






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1,2005


LOCAL NEWS


Crossing America


-the hard way


Fancying a challenge,
Nassau attorney Tony
Hepburn decided to cross
America the hard way by
bicycle. Here's how he did


Having practised law in the
Bahamas for many years, with
little time for pursuits such as
long-distance cycling. Tony Hep-
burn took a sabbatical from his
law practice in 1989, bought a
bicycle and went on a one-week
tour in the USA.


QUALIFICATIONS
* High School Diploma
* Patient Care Technician Certificate from an
accredited training program
Minimum of one year experience
Knowledgeable and proficient in basic principles
and functions of nursing and hygienic care for
patients
Excellent oral and written communication skills
Excellent customer service skills
POSITION SUMMARY
Under the direction of the Registered Nurse, the
PCT will provide the intermediate and basic care
needs with consideration for personal hygiene,
mobility, comfort, and safety in the environment,
based on the nursing philosophy.
Duties are carried out in accordance with established
nursing service practices and policies and special
instruction from nursing or medical staff.
Salary commensurate with experience
Excellent benefits

S.. .. -0. e:*1 . =- -


He found the experience so
enjoyable that he has been on
one or two such tours every year
since.
After several one-week tours
in the USA and Canada, he ven-
tured further abroad with tours
in Europe, Central and South
America, Australia and New
Zealand. Having read about
cycle tours across America, he
decided this was the kind of chal-
lenge and adventure for him.
So, early last year, he contact-
ed CrossRoads in Connecticut,
which specialises in annual rides
from Los Angeles to Boston.
The 3,415 mile journey through
15 states takes over seven weeks,
riding six days with .one day off
each week.
So, on May 15, 2004, the great
adventure began. Tony said: "The
first ceremonial gesture was at
Manhattan Beach in Los Ange-
les, where I dipped my rear wheel
in the Pacific, knowing that I had
to go another 3,415 miles to dip
the other wheel in the Atlantic."
At first he wondered if he had
taken on an impossible chal-
lenge. However, he said: "I'm
the type of person that, once I've
decided to do something, I am
determined to finish it.
"There was a great feeling of
doing it all together, of natural
camaraderie. The seven-week
cycling trip was a challenge that
we had all been thinking about,
and were now finally beginning."
CrossRoads' ride was well-
planned and well-run. Along the
way, he bought a CD player and
listened to music as he pedalled
the miles away, especially on the
long straight flat sections which
could be quite boring.
He said: "I was a bit con-
cerned about some of the motn-
tains being strenuous climbs,
having had little hill climbing
practice beforehand in the rela-
tively flat Bahamas. However,
after a few good climbs, the hills
were no longer a problem."
The first week had been hard
work, as many of the cyclists
were not all that fit, and had to
endure back-to-back century
rides in the Mojave Desert,
which, said Tony, "had long
straight flat boring roads with
temperatures over one hundred
degrees."
The ride cooled down as they
entered the Sonora Desert after
climbing several thousand feet.
Thesceneirywaalsa niore' inter-


esting, and some mornings when
they started out the temperatures
were in the low 30s!
Their first day off was in
Flagstaff, Arizona, where they
enjoyed a day trip to the Grand
Canyon. On reaching Santa Fe,
New Mexico, Tony e-mailed
home: "Everything is going
smoothly, other than the bumps
and cracks in some of the roads,
which can make riding a bit
uncomfortable."

Kansas

Next stop was Abilene, Kansas,
where Dwight D Eisenhower had
a home around which a centre
was built several years ago.
He had been led to believe
that Kansas was a flat, boring
state when, in fact, he said, "I
found the crop and dairy farms
quite interesting, also pleasant
scenery, gently rolling hills,
smooth roads for comfortable
cycling, and trains passing by
from time to time."
By this stage of the tour, Tony
had a total of eight flat tyres, "all
caused by small pieces of wire
from steel-belted truck tyres."
While the ride across America
is not a race, with most cyclists
going along at their own pace,
there are always a few hot shots
who like to be the first out every
morning and the first in every
afternoon!
*: Topeka, Kansas, was the half-


way mark of the entire trip. Also,
they visited Boot Hill in Dodge
City, where several gunslingers
were buried with their boots on.
Next stop was Springfield, Illi-
nois, to which they had cycled
over 100 miles from Quincy, Illi-
nois, named after John Quincy
Adams.
Tony safd: "The weather was
now much warmer and more
humid, so we were getting wetter
from perspiration than we got
from our first day of rain, when
we cycled to Topeka, Kansas!"'
They had passed the 2,000,
mile mark, and were now head-
ing into the last two and a half
week's cycling which, according
to Tony, should be (apart from
Vermont and New Hampshire),
less hilly than some of the areas
they had covered.
In Indianapolis, they visited
the velodrome and cycled a few
laps, after which they went to
the famous Speedway, where
they just missed the Formula 1
practice session.
Quite often a speed in excess
of 20 mph was maintained for
most of the day. Tony said he
was now fitter than he had been
in years. They would have
climbed over 90,000 feet by the
time they got to Boston.
In Ohio, relatives of one of
the cyclists set up a stand with
fresh fruit and drinks, which
were greatly appreciated.
After Ohio, they cycled to
Erie in Pennsylvania, then to


Hamburg (near Buffalo),
Canandaigua, Syracuse, Little
Falls and Albany (the state cap-,
ital), all in New York State, and
arrived in Brattleboro, Vermont;
"The scenery in Vermont was,
spectacular, with just one full;
day's ride to Lexington, Massa-
chusetts (via New Hampshire),,
and a short ride to the Atlantic,
Beach in Boston.
"We had all arrived safely to a:
great welcome by several of the,
cyclists' families and friends.
While I was pleased to finish.the
ride and return home to, family
and friends,,I was also a bit sad
to end such a great adventure,
and to leave all my new-found
cycling friends."
This year Tony cycled from
Maine to Florida, passing through
New Hampshire, Massachusetts,
Connecticut, New York, New Jer-
sey, Pennsylvania, Maryland,
Washington DC, Virginia, North
Carolina, South Carolina and
Georgia for a total of 1,800 miles
over three and a half weeks.
Having cycled across Ameri"
ca last year, Tony thought this
shorter ride would be much eas-
ier. Well, it wasn't Tony wag
less fit at the beginning of the
ride and there were many more
hills during the first section down
to Washington, some with gral-
dients of 15 per cent or more! -,
Undaunted, Tony is contem-
plating another long ride this
time down the west coast or
.across Canada.


PARADISE ISLAND RESORT & CASINOl


CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LTD. !










"Partners to Financial Freedom"



DUE TO THE LACK OF A QUORUM


Notice is hereby given that The Twentieth (20th)
Annual General Meeting of the Paradise Island

Resort& Casino Co-operative Credit Union Limited `

will now be held on Saturday, December 3rd, 2005 i
commencing at 9:00 am at the Eugene Cooper
Building, # 9 Village Road, Nassau, Bahamas. AllI
members are asked to attend.


The purpose of this meeting is to:


* Receive the report of the Board of Directors for:
2004
* To elect members to the Board of Directors
* To receive the audited Accounts for 2004
* To discuss the Annual Budget
* To take action on matters that may come before

the meeting


The annual report may be viewed under
publications on our website listed below.


www.pircccu.org


i!


i..


I






THE TRIBUNE


LOAL


Mitchell

invites

police to

investigate
IFROM page one

instructed the permanent
secretary to invite the police
tcQcarry out an investigation
into the allegations made by
the spokesman for the side
opposite, and to determine
at~the same time how they
c4ne to be in possession of
documents which appear to
b stolen from the Ministry
o wiio.reign Affairs," he
,Mq Mitchell promised that
ti'e results of the investiga-
ti,nwill be made public, and
sad;hiis comment about the
du m.:e .n ts possibly
b.1ing'stolen was in no way
neanht to "intimidate any-
.'The.fact is. that ministers
must have confidence in the
fidelity ,and. work of public
officials-; and the advice
th ey:, :d isch arg e,, an d
what 'is exchanged between
them.
'If it were otherwise, it
would erode the very fabric
of the'development -of public
policy. From the other side,
the public must have confi-
dence that information
whi6h they disclose on a con-
fifdeitial basis is, in fact, con-
fdential," he said.
v'Mr Mitchell said he will
nr6t prejudice the investiga-
tio6h police have started by
dwelling deeper into the
specifics of the case.
"The. police are seized of
tiis matter and their investi-
gations continue as to vari-
ous individuals and will no
dpubt be soon completed. I
do,not wish to prejudice any
investigation with regard to
those names until that inves-
tigation is complete.
- "It is my hope that mem-.
hers opposite will co-oper-
ate fully with the police as
they seek to finish their
work. I will do nothing here
t-his morning which com-
ments on their work," he
said.


Anger outside of court

as murder accused arrive
FROM page one
the murder of Ms Pinder on November 25.
They were not required to enter a plea to the murder
charge, which is an indictable offence.
According to reports, Ms Pinder, an office clerk at Bud
Ann Investment was shot dead last Friday in the office build-
ing during an attempted-armed robbery at Cool Breeze
Apartments on Hudson Avenue.
A masked man was seen running from the scene with a
shotgun, eyewitnesses reported to police.
In addition to murder, the juvenile was also charged with
possession of an unlicensed 12 gauge Maverick shotgun on
November 25. He pleaded not guilty to the charge.
Darling, who was represented by K Brian Hanna, was
charged with being found in possession of 16, 12 gauge
ammunition on November 28.
He pleaded not guilty and elected summary trial in Mag-
istrate's Court.
Magistrate Jones denied the men bail. They were remand-
ed in custody until February 28 for preliminary inquiry.
Meanwhile, police are still searching for a third man in con-
nection with the incident.


FROM page one
that is exactly what you said, so sit down."
Mr Smith stated that to say that he is
Haitian, is to suggest that "someone other
than my father fathered me or that my
father was indeed Haitian this is a direct
assault on the good name of my parents,
myself and all my siblings, it is therefore
defamatory as it is untrue and designed to
injure my mother's reputation and to
embarrass my family."


Keod Smith
"At least I know who my father was -
without question," he said.
Mr Smith further said that his father had
a facility for languages, one of which was
Haitian Creole, which he spoke fluently.
He added that his two sisters married
Haitian nationals.
"Elmira (Mr Smith's deceased sister)
and her late husband James Dues-day had


two children who are proud to say they
are Haitian-Bahamians as I am delighted,
honoured and proud, not only to call them
my niece and nephew, but love them as if
they were own offspring," he said.
Emphasising that his niece and nephew
speak three languages, he said that hav-
ing observed Mr Irigraham's political trek
for many years, he can "understand why
the member has no appreciation for
higher education or one's facility for for-
eign languages and speaking proper Eng-
lish."


FROM page one Wanted
sidered armed and extremely
dangerous.
He is believed to be one of Raymond Darling, 22, were
three suspects accused of shoot- charged with murder in con-
ing ind killing 34-year-old nection with the woman's death.
Tanya Pinder last Friday at Anyone with information
Cool Breeze Apartments dur- about Francis' whereabouts are
ing an attempted armed rob- urged to contact police at 350-
bery. 3089, 352-9774/5, 352-8224 or
A 17-year-old juvenile, and crime tipster at 352-1919.
FROM page one Senators
Senators officially welcomed
the new members during their Mrs Wilson said their experi-
evening session. ence would bring sharp focus on
President Sharon Wilson said: issues debated by the Senate and
"It gives me pleasure to welcome ensure that the interests of all
both of our newest members. Bahamians continued to be best
"I first heard the name Dr B J served.
Nottage, as associated with social The decision to appoint Mr
activism and political change, Bethel as Senator was
perhaps some four decades ago. announced by FNM leader
Mr Bethel, relatively speaking in Hubert Ingraham earlier last
the start of history, does not month. He replaces Tanya
come far behind Dr Nottage," McCartney, who resigned earlier
she said. this year.


time to drive a bargain
It's time to drive a bargain with your vehicle insurance. No


Your car.


Your trust.


Our responsibility



irake Serice SuspensionI Alignen Eihaust
o Oil, uibe I Filter "iOODY1 R TlHES"


'*Alnerican Imporled Cars Light Trucks Vans & SUV's

Complete Inspection & Estimates 1efor We we sar the work
LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU-----

MACKEY ST. & ROOSEVELT AVENUE EAST ST. & SOLDIER RD
Tel: 393-6651 or 393-6693 Tel: 356-2940 or 356-2941

Open: Monday Saturday
-8am-5pm

Fax326-4865 P. 0. Box SS-6766 Nassau, Bahamas

AUTO SYSTEM EXPERTS OS

"Midas is a business based on service, quality and reliability.
Factory scheduled maintenance is car care.
*B Midas services your car fully. Our system takes the guesswork
out of auto care for every car model out there.


SUBARU
f "i"WSflBf


JN IBAlAMA:

I$U9U7M F'Ua'NS


Man found
floating near
South Ocean
A MAN was found float-
ing in the waters near Stuart
Cove's, South Ocean on
Tuesday afternoon.
It was reported that the
man was on a private diving
trip at the time. He was later
pronounced dead at the hos-
pital.
His identity has not yet
been determined.

rn alak


"Best Small


,;!.i q ....M






PAGE 2, THRSDAY DECMBER ,2005THENTIBU.


Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa

Invite application for the following positions:

ENTERTAINMENT DIRECTOR
SPA DIRECTOR
JAPANESE AMBASSADOR

Applicant must be experienced in their field with at
least three years experience, excellent communication
skills written and oral strong organizational and
leadership skills. The position offers attractive
compensation packages.

Please send resume to:

Director of Human Resources
P.O. Box CB-13005
Email: cmajor@srb.sandals.com


IF YOU SEE THIS

YOUNG LADY TODAY
WISH HER

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!!


QUALITY INSIDE

AND OUT


REFRIGERATOR
Model RM46-W

9.6 Cube Feet


$39500


(RM46- W)


S* 0
PRICESUNOT
iBETfflBOUCETRALMJOCEIAR
AIl[P Monros Aenu (Jst orh f BhamasBus &Truc Co.
MVW404 22-2536- 325-240 32-7758 -328-749


E


* Bed Bath & Home

Curves

* DryClean Alternative


*John Bull







Su Video
& Impressions Dentistry

Windermere Day Spa & Salon
Windermere Day Spa & Salon


Shop at any of these participating stores in the Harbour Bay
Shopping Plaza between November 25th and December 10th
and become eligible to WIN a brand new computer!
AMD SEMPROM 2500 Soc 754
80GB 7200RPM Hard Drive- 52X
CD-RW Drive- 256MB DDR
Memory- 7-1 Internal Card Reader
-10/100 PCI Lan Card- 5.1 Code'C
97 Sound- 56K V.92 Modem 3.5
Floppy Drive Intemrnet Keyboard
and Mouse- Stereo Speakers-
Windows XP Home (Registered
__ .CD) PLUS a Printer!
Entry Rules are simple:
1.) A minimum purchase from participating stores qualifies you to enter the drawing to win your
very own computer. 2.) Harbour Bay Plaza staff & family not eligible. 3.) Winner will be announced
at our Live Remote with Love 97 Radio, December 10th between 4:30 and 6:30pm!


SV 'Two Convenient

AYJ SHOPPING Entrances From
PLAZA East Shirley Street


RAZOR V3


ONLY
$424.79'


Fashion fundraising



for Humane Society

E By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE clothing of the Cole's of Nassau ladies boutique took
to the stage yesterday at the annual Bahamas Humane Society
fashion show and luncheon. 4
The event at the British Colonial Hilton, which is spon-
sored by Diane Cole-Morley proprietor of Cole's of Nassau, is
expected to raise $10,000 for the society.
Mrs Cole-Morley told The Tribune: "It's all in aid of the
Humane Society, and helps out all of our little animals which
they need lots of help."
She urged persons to report any cruelty to animals to the
society in order to curb the problem of animal abuse.
"I see a lot of animals that seem to just get mistreated. So,
I think we need to take care of that. I.think it is an important.
cause for the animals that can't speak for themselves," she V |
added.
Models from the Yodephy Dance and Modelling Academy
with poise and elegance showed off the clothing designs of
Gottex of Israel, Nicole Miller and Bahamian designs of Jean-
nie McQueeny.
One of the models wore a Basil and Maude designed skirt,
accented with a number of golden sequins and beads. As the
model walked the runway, the gold beads bounced almost
having a blinding effect.
The creator of the Jeannie McQueeny clothing line, Eugenie
Nuttall, who attended Tuesday's function, has been. designing
clothing for a year.
Mrs Nuttall said that she uses natural fabrics such as silk to
create her garments.
Ella Davis, a Bahamian jewellery designer who also dis-
played her products, has produced a collection of semi-precious
stones which she calls Bella Designs.
See page 14 and 15 for more pictures
PHYLLIS Garroway from Yodephy Dance and Modelling |
Academy addresses the audience at the Cole's of Nassau
fashion show, held in aid of the Bahamas Humane Society


b.


)on t lust



drive bv..


MOTOROLA SAMSUNG


A 255
ONLY
$279


MoorlaV6T $697
Noi 226 -$13.7


'-"' L'; """ "~ " ~"


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005


1 -







THURSDAY, NDECEMBER 1, 2005, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1,2005


LAN


COMMONWALTH BANK


,ty


es


Employment Opportun


Credit Officers
Nassau r Freeport Branche


Commonwealth Bank is the premier Bahamian Bank with
branches located in New Providence, Abaco and Grand
Bahama. We are committed to delivering superior quality
service, to training and developing our employees, to creating
value for our shareholders and to promoting economic growth
and stability in the community.

This position is open to candidates who meet the following
minimum requirements residing in Nassau or Freeport.


Core Job Responsibilities:
* Carrying out a range of lending activities, including but not
limited to:
Interviewing applicants to determine purpose of credit
requirements, i.e. mortgage, loan, overdraft
Advising applicants of financing options terms, rate costs, etc.
Ensuring loan applications are responded to in the specified time
frame
* Maintaining ongoing customer relationships and participating in
Branch Marketing efforts
" Carrying oun a range of administrative functions


Qualifkations, Skills and Experience:
Three years commercial banking experience with some experience
in Lending
Strong sales abilities
Ability to deal tactfully with customers
Strong communication skills, both written and oral
Commitment to Customer Service Excellence
Strong PC skills (MS Word, MS Excel)


0


4;
4;
4;
4;

4;


Remuneration Package:
Competitive salary commensurate with experience
Performance-based incentives
Health, vision and dental insurances
Life insurance
Pension plan


Interested persons should submit their resumes and copies of certificates
in WRITING or E-mail along with copies of their certificates before
December 16, 2005 to:


HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT
"Re- CREDIT OFFICER
Head Office, The Plaza, 2"' Floor, Mackey Street
P.O. Box SS-6263
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 394-0758
E-mail address: Tanya.Astwood@ecombankltd.com


- I






THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1,2005, PAUE lb


THF TRIRUNE


Some model behaviour

More pictures from the Cole's of Nassau fashion
show in aid of the Bahamas Humane Society


ex:cessbaggage


Our Rates

You can bring 3 bags with us for the price of 2 with our competition.


Less than 701bs
70-100lbs
101bs or more
Oversize bags add
Children's Electric Cars


Drop Off:
MIami
4005 NW 28th St
(305) 871,0571
(between Thrifty and Budget)
Open M-F 8AM-8PM
Fort Lauderdale Airport
Bags To Go Inc
(954) 359-8656
(Terminal 3, Lower Level
Next to American Airlines baggage)
Open M-F 8AM-6PM


$55
$75
$1/Ib
$10/bag
$125


Pick Up:
Customs Hall
(242) 377.-6593
(insld4 the Alrpomt Termninelt
Opmen on-call 422-7418
Save up to
55%*
on airline
excess baggage fees


'*!.44liilll .v II i ( 4 ff! 1n I b a go, I! U 4 '. ,l '4 i .AW'o < H t, kl" 14. f!40W,
With (44444444440 44-t4li1I4 4 ,1 .1 '~lo hi. w ', h44. 114, #4444,g s44r41Vi"! t, 4 fr49 '44 444 4444
A~t-i WB] (Dnli|>,tr Ofiln Al cnfiiittii tinltl tafitia ftvm. wilffli fr Volit 1 4rfwMlhlg Pgbl~tacc 'A*t-, S q* s 14 ch viali
1tni thlt444 (I'tkq b oo wwo >4i> 914 0 wit'N 0.44 f'44 U ws4im !!, 9'. (li 91 4> aW !6 0"'n 1ro 4 i-'ol;44 inmqf4d4im


Get more information at
www.pdxbahamas.com
(242) 341-6593


pd.: ~ffotd24ble air t~oi~h~


PLUS
Authentic Fashion Show, Junkanoo Rushout, Photos with Santa and a
special addition:
**Culinary Corner with Chefs cooking tasty Christmas recipes**
Win lots of prizes & enjoy a complimentary eggnog with us!


Fantastic Values with Over 100 Exciting Holiday and Vacation Gifts.

WYNDHAM NASSAU RESORT & CRYSTAL PALACE CASINO
BALLROOM FOYER, CABLE BEACH

Sponsors: J.S. Johnson, Royal Bank of Canada, Bahamas Development
Bank, Purity Bakery, D' Albenas Agency Ltd., Scotiabank Bahamas Ltd.,
Solomon & Associates.
Bacardi's Nassau Royale


Ship Now, Fly Later: Drop your bags off the day before you travel,
Ship N w! ly Lae and they'll be waiting for you when you arrive!
We accept most oversize/overweight items and boxes!
Bags arrive 11am Pay in Nassau


I


w


---^--^H|H1^^1^LOCAL NEWS^^H^^


4X4 Automatic, 2.5 Tui*o Diesel.





PAGE 16, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1 2005


Soom on's


THE TRIBUNE













a;


Celebrate this

Christmas with


1 ~":


nFC.


,.~
2;
I'


'F
A
Ci t


'S


r


GLROCE R IES


Enter to win with every $50 purchase
in December and January.


Solomon's SuperCenter Old Trai Road Nassau 2421934041 M -Sat: ftam-9pm & Sun 7a.m-.12nor
Solomone Queen's Highway Freeport 24-.2-732018* tm-Sat 8am-apm & Sun: &im-naxn
Solomon's SuperCenter Nathan Key Drive* Marsh Harbour *242-367-260')2 Mon-Thur. Sam-7pn, Fri & Sat: tam8pm, Sun: 8am-2pm
Solomon% Treasure Cay Treasure Cay Shopping Centre Treasure Cay, Abaco 242-365-8350 Mo.-Sat: 8am6pm & Sun: 9am-dxn
gfit carnt aieped OCft c as salable


III


I -^^^^^^^^^^^^^


I , _


4


P : .


,,,


WORTH





THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005, PAGE 17


p


Butler & Sands
Company Limited


SPIR


WIN


Bottle of


Piper-Heidsieck
Champagne!


00.00 Worth of
WINES, BEERS,


Bottle of


iv XO


2005


e Datei: I
JPPLIES LAST. !M
ONE NET


NOT CUMULATIVE.
N T.


Best Choices, Best Dealsl


Caves Village, Shirley Street, JFK Drive, Harbour Bay
Roundabout Cable Beach, East-West Highway,


Shopping Center,
Lyford Cay


PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY.


THE TRIBUNE


V/T'


IS,





THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 18, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005


"Every day I look forward to reading The Tribune.
It always provides valuable information and something
to talk about like local news, sports, entertainment
and world news.The Tribune provides everything
I need to know about life in The Bahamas and
internationally. The Tribune is my newspaper."
JASON RAHMING
CONSTRUCTION FOREMAN

Purchase The Tribune from your
local storO or street vendor,


The Tribune

u I .A





THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005, PAGE 19


THE TRIBUNE


LAN


GOVERNMENT High
Scdlool students who captured
topi honours..in BAIC's Battle
of the Bands were presented
with their prizes on Tuesday.
The team of students from C
V Bethel High School placed
second, C R Walker students
came third and Doris Johnson
High School fourth..
They all received new instru-
ments.
The competition was a high-
light of Bahamas Agricultural
arni Industrial Corporation
(BAIC) BahamaArts Festival
last month.
Popular coconut artist Tim-
othy Moss, with his caricatures
of everyday Bahamian life, won
the best booth award. Deborah
Strachan was second and
Sharon Ferguson third.
"The festival was a tremen-
dous success," said BAIC chair-
man Michael Halkitis. "We
improved over last year in size,
level of participation from the
exhibitors and the level of
enthusiasm and reception from
members of the public.
The festival was sponsored
by Simmons Construction Com-
pany, First Caribbean Bank,
and inter-American Institute for
Cooperation on Agriculture.


* BAHAMAARTS Festival best booth
winner, coconut artist Timothy Moss
(centre) receives his award from BAIC
chairman Michael Halkitis. Pictured at
left is handicraft development
department manager Donnalee Bowe,
and at right are BAIC consultant
Benjamin Rahming and First
Caribbean's representative Teresa
Williams.


TRANSFERED FROM FREIGHT & STORAGE WAREHOUSE
HORT NOTICE


PUBLI AUCTION
LIQUIDATION OF HIGH VALUE AIR CARGO. CANCELLED EXPORT ORDER-. STOPPED IN TMANST
Urgent Auction Disposal
Guaranteed Genuine Authentic Handmade

FINE PERSIAN & EASTERN
RUGS RUNNERS & CARPETS
Connoisseur & Decorative items of highest Exhibition calibre exclusively selected
Cargo manifest includes: Investment
category: Finest Grade Persian
Isfalhan(with silk), Silk Ghom (100%
silk), Nain (with silk), Silk Srinagar
(100% silk) etc. Luxury category:
Finest Persian Tabriz, Meshed, Sarouk,
Bidjar, Kashan etc. Large Decorative
category: Superb Kaimuri Ziegler,
Empire Agra, Chobi Ziegler,Ersari Filpa
etc, Tribal Nomad category: unique
Kashkai, Belouch, Nishapur etc.
Village weaving category: highly
decorative Nahavand, Kolyai,
Tuisarkhan etc ~ Sizes: scatter,
runners, area, medium room size,
extra large.
AM goods Customs cleared
Sold piece by piece with no Liens or outstanding charges

SUNDAY DECEMBER 4TH
AUCTION 5 pm INSPECTION FROM 4 pm
at THE BRITISH COLONIAL HILTON HOTEL
NUMBER ONE BAY STREET, NASSAU
Further Details at View and Auction Only
TERMS: .CASH, APPROVED CHECKS, MASTERCARD & VISA.
.15% FREIGHT AND HANDLING CHARGES TO BE ADDED TO EACH PURCHASE.
.ALL ITEMS SOLD 'AS IS'.NO EXCHANGES OR REFUNDS AFTER FALL OF AUCTIONEER'S HAMMER.


HLA-


9-33-11


We are pleased to announce the
formation of Partnership with
CAREFUL PEST CONTROL,
DRAKE'S PEST,
PEST FREE PEST CONTROL
AND LOWE'S PEST CONTROL
on the 1st December, 2005.

Trading as
CAREFUL PEST
MANAGEMEN LTD
Located on Village Road next door to
TCBY traveling North
Business Hours
Monday Friday 9am 5pm
Phone: 393-1045 Fax: 394-4534
To our most value customers we say,
"THANKS" and we appreciate your
loyalty over the years. We shall continue to
count you as number one in our business.


Government



High winners



collect prizes


* GOVERNMENT High School students Dnaje Pratt (right) and Nikia Adderley accept
prizes for winning the Bands Competitionfrom BAIC's chairman M.chaaelHalkitis and
Donnalee Bowe, manager of the handicraft development department. Also pictured are
Inspector Ronald Campbell; Natasha Adderley, manager of the evaluation arid assessment
department at BAIC; and First Caribbean's representative Teresa Williams.
(Photos by Gladstone Thurston)







PAGE 0, TURSDY, DCEMBE 1, 005 HE TIBUN


ULfe fZ1'I[]a U(. dmil [orhur ic n vi ct~im[s I m


* MEMBERS of the Cursillo Communion presented Arch-
Movement of the Anglican bishop Drexel Gomez with a

SCRUBS & MORE
Phone: 393-7200 Kemp Road South
BI-ANNUAL SALE
You can't afford to miss it!.!
Thursday, December 1st, 2005 to
Saturday, December 3rd, 2005
S Scrub Sets $20.00 Printed V-Neck Scrub Tops1
S I $12.00' Snap Tops $15.00
I Scrub Pants $10.00 All Clogs $25.00 I
S All Rockers footwear $60.00 '
All White Swan & Cherokee Uniforms 10% offII
1 - - - I .


cheque of $500 for the Diocesan
Hurricane Relief Fund.
William Lowe, director and
Ms Ena Stubbs (centre),
assistant treasurer, made the
presentation at Addington
House on behalf of the
organisation as Archbishop
Gomez receives the cheque.
The Cursillo Movement also
made a cheque presentation to
the Ministry of Education
programme at Her Majesty's
Fox Hill Prison.
(Photo: Carvel Francis/
Diocesan Communications
Ministry)


City Market



contributes






to Red Cross


THEIR stores are
crowded and bustling this
i esjingling, Thanksgiv- TE BAHAM Ss
time of year, cash regis-
ters jingling,. Thanksgiv-
ing decorations coming
down, making way for
Christmas d6cor, turkeys,
hams and all the trim-
mings.
But amid the gaiety,
employees of City Mar-
ket stores in Nassau and
Winn-Dixie stores in
S Grand Bahama want to
spread another message
one of remembering the
men, women and children
who are still homeless,
jobless and trying to
rebuild their lives after
Hurricane Katrina ripped
apart Gulf Coast towns in
the United States.
The employees took up
a collection among them-
selves and donated the
funds to the Bahamas
Red Cross to send to the
American Red Cross.
which this week helped
provide Thanksgiving
dinners for thousands of
persons still displaced
from the devastating hur-
ricane that struck three
months ago.
"We have so much to
be grateful for," said
Senior accountant Nicole
Riley. "Let us open our
hearts to help others. The
people of America have
been there for us when
hurricanes have hit the
Bahamas. It is our turn to 0 NICOLE Riley presenting a cheque to Marina Glinton of the,
give back." Bahamas Red Cross


Jo n or


Portmeirio


PO T I ON1


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION


S VACANCY NOTICE
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC) invites applications from suitably qualified_
persons to fill the position of Assistant General Manager Human Resources andTrain-ing. The
successful candidate will report directly to the General Manager. Candidates should have a
minimum of 15 years post graduate and relevant experience at senior management level.
Overview and Objectives
The Assistant General Manager Human Resources and Training will be responsible for
understanding the human capital needs of the corporation and optimizing the human
resource value provided to the organization. The objectives include:
* Preparing the current workforce for success in a cost-effective manner
* Anticipating and fulfilling the short and long term human resource needs of BEC
* Developing and maintaining the programs required to identify BEC's top performers.
and weakest performers
* Effectively communicating the vision of BEC both internally and externally
Key Accountabilities and Measures:
" Develop and maintain employee records, in a confidential manner, that include all
information necessary to support the training, manpower planning, succession planning,
compensation, benefits, and performance evaluation programs for BEC
* Manage employee training to support business productivity and continuity
" Administer employee benefits in a cost-effective manner
* Provide employee relation services to keep the workforce productive and motivated
* Develop and maintain the manpower plan and succession plan
" Assist the organization with employee needs analysis and recruitment
" Monitor the implementation of collective bargaining agreements, including reviewing
recommendations for engagements, promotions, transfers, discipline, dismissals
* Assist the Labor Compliance officer in industrial relations matters and participate
in the collective bargaining process
* Create and manage BEC's public relations program and improve the impression of
BEC with customers, investors, and governmental authorities
* Effectively communicate the mission and actions of BEC to all employees
" Establish and maintain corporate policies and procedures relating to human resource
management and monitor compliance
* Develop relationships with key external constituents, including the media, to ensure
a positive message about BEC is conveyed to the public
" Develop, challenge, and evaluate subordinates
Communicate effectively with superiors, subordinates, and peers


Applications along with resumes should be submitted by
Friday December 2, 2005 and addressed to:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Re: Assistant General Manager Human Resources
Private & Confidential


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 20, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005







THE TRIUNE THUSDAY, DCEMBERAI2005,PAGEW2


French hospitals say


doctors perform world's


first partial face transplant


OP, Pturf




*mos
eom awe

dOmopl t m
to .


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


S


- 4mu Gammp- whof ap qvmm ,
a ob w m mm &EOdt wom 0MME


/m 0


-Ab q..-


Specialize in
Computer Repairs and Upgrade
Pansats 2500, 2700, 3500s
ViewSats2000, Foretec Star
Avr-X Boards, Atmega Board for
Dishnetwork 2700, 2800, 301-10, 301-13


Properitors:


DANIEL ALBURY
356-5520 (shop)
359-0307 (cell)


GERARD JOHNSON
356-5520 (shop)
557-2778 (cell)


Business Analyst (BA-3)
PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT AND REAL ESTATE
Montana Holdings Ltd is undertaking a major land development programme in
Rum Cay. This project will comprise international hotels, a large marina, over 400
homes and a range of holiday resort facilities in one of the most beautiful Family
Islands of the Bahamas. We are now seeking a Business Analyst to join our rapidly
expanding Nassau office and to become a team member of a growing property
development business.
Business Analyst (BA-3)
Reporting to the Chief Financial Officer & VP of Corporate Development, the
Business Analyst will take responsibility for a range of activities.
These shall include, but not be limited to:
Property sales and conveyance
Coordination and planning
Facilitating various partnership transactions
Monitoring numerous commercial contractual arrangements
Supporting key financial and project monitoring processes
Requirements
The ideal candidate shall have at least:
3 years experience of the real estate business, land development, or the
hotel/holiday resorts business
Educated to a degree level preferably with concentration in Business
Administration, Finance or a Science Degree
Held positions dealing with executive management
Experienced in managing suppliers as well interfacing with customers
Excellent communication skills, both written and oral
Must be computer literate with excellent knowledge of Microsoft Office
-and especially proficient in Word and Excel
Experience in Microsoft Project or similar project management software
is highly desired
The successful candidates will be organized, personable, ambitious and very
productive.' They shall demonstrate high levels of initiative and the ability to
manage all allocated activities to an early conclusion. They will have excellent
written and verbal communication skills and have the ability to write detailed
reports and associated documentation. They will have a strong desire to learn new
skills and to accept more accountability and have the highest level of business
acumen and integrity.
This position is situated in Nassau with some travel to the building site in Rum
Cay. International travel may be required. The salary and benefits package shall
be commensurate with the responsibilities and experience of the successful candidate.
The Montana Holdings office environment is challenging, energetic and very
demanding. It calls for staff to accept responsibility for all types of work activities,
which shall be undertaken to high professional standards.
Contact
Please send cover letter and resume by e-mail quoting above reference (BA-3) to
island_developmentl@yahoo.com or by post to P.O. Box N-9322, Nassau, The
Bahamas.
The closing date for receipt of applicationsis December 19, 2005


MAJOR CREDIT I I -~ "-
CARDS ACCEPTED ,,


F-AAIL-BRY'SCOMPTER


I


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005, PAGE 21


THE TRIBUNE


--


INS IG T'


Fo the tories4-
^behMind it hei^^
news, vTread*^^
Insight on^
Mondays1 r'T^^


*


tl fl. --







PAGEB22, THURSDAY, DECEMBER1INT2N05IONHLTRBWSUE


John Sentam


u inaugurated as


Britain's first black archbishop


0 F


-O0


-Copyrighte Material


SyndicateCjonentn
.~~~Oo /hllom.


Available from Commercial News Providers
C o


S-0


Is having a storewide Christmas sale.


50-75% off
of
Selected merchandise
We specialize in the very best in kitchen
and home accessories.
Wusthof Knives, Le Creuset and All Clad
cookware, Cuisnart and Delonghi electrics.


* -* *




~ --
* __ *4 __e

S-s -b



-
- *
4b 40 MM n
am o.__ one

Gomm. o * wa
4b edtS
a*IP b 04oo


- ~0*


QUALIFICATIONS
* BA or MA in Physiotherapy
* Minimum of 2 years experience in a hospital
Rehabilitation setting
Registration with the Health Professions Council
Excellent customer service skills
Good oral and written communication skills
POSITION SUMMARY
The successful Candidate will:
* Provide clinical treatment on an in- and out-
patient basis;
Assist in the presentation and education of
Associates and students;
Reassess and prepare progress and discharge
summaries,
Liaising with referring Physicians.
Salary commensurate with experience
Excellent benefits
Plas sbitreum o:Th Hmn esure Dpatmn


HY8SO LD.AN
'89 TOYOTA BUS


Visit us and see other used cars
and make your own deal!

a aUAL I Tslies s
LIMITED
#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET 322-3775 325-3079
Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals Queen's Highway 352-6122


CHRISTIAN

BOOK SHOP
Your Full Service
Christian Book and Supply Store



20% I SALE

CASH Er CARRY ONLY
THURSDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY
December 1st, 2nd & 3rd
Christmas Cards
Gift Items Galore
Books/ Bibles/ Bible Cases
Journals
Children's Books/ Novelties
CD's/ Cassettes/ Videos
Nativities & Other Christmas Decor Items
Gift Cards
Rosetta St. @ Mt. Royal Ave.
l Ph # 322-1306 I


Share yourP news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share-yqur-story -- -


FREEPORT OIL
HOLDINGS
COMPANY LIMITED



DIVIDEND PAYMENT


FOCOL is pleased to announce a

dividend payment of 6 cents per

share to all shareholders of record

as of November 30, 2005, payable on

December 14, 2005.






"Fuelling Growth For People"


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 22, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005


f o


.


e




THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005, PAGE 23


THE TRIBUNE


"j









Global United's Gift To You...
Hassle Free Shipping!

elivery of Your Goods Direct to You!













Miami Warehouse

1360 NW 78th Avenue, Miami, Fl 33126
Drop off or ship your goods to our Miami
warehouse and we'll deliver them direct to you!

OPEN:
MONDAY- FRIDAY
Bi 8:30 am to 6:00 pm
OPEN Weekends

November 19th December 18th

Throughout the Bahamas, from Miami or anywhere
else in the world we take care of your goods from startA


to finish!





PAGE 24, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005


SAV.A.CHEK 'Extra-Special': on each item you purchase, over
a dollar, with One filled SAV.A.CHEK certificate get a Dollar Off!
Purchase $50 or more will receive a FREE gift card to Colombian Emeralds InteratIoria
and you will be eligible to enter a drawing to win over $3000 worth of Jewelry!!


REDEEM your SAV-A-CHEK now at:
Johns S George, Sandys, Epic Battery, GNC,
Home Fabrics, Godetts Jewelry.
FREEPORT: Dolly Madison Home Centre, GNC, Epic Battery, Play Time Sports
MON. SAT.: 7:30AM 9:00PM Extra Extra!
SUN.: 7:00AM 12:00PM 7:00AM 2:00PM CABLE BEACH & SAVA CHEK Special!fI
HAPRflIR RAY ONLY A CHK eca


HELLMANNS f IDAHO
MAYONNAISE I MASHED POTATO/


REGULAR
32 OZ

$349


CHEESE/ GARLIC
4.0 OZ
S1 79


AJAX


CLEANSERS
21 OZ
S 169a


GRITS
5 LBS
sAppae


KEEBLER
REG & REDUCED FAT
CLUB CRACKERS


16-


OZ
79


CADBURY

BOURNVITA
400 G
SGS9


ULTRA PALMOLIVE
DISHWASHING LIQUID ANTIBACT,OXY
PLUS ALPINE, OXY PLUS MARINE,
LEMON, GREEN APPLE, SENSATIONS
OCEAN, TRANQUIL, BREEZY
13' -6 z ':,


IRISH SPRING
BAR SOAP
3PACK
3 PACK


; BLUE BIRD
GRAPEFRUIT, ORANGE OR
PINEAPPLE &CRANBERRY JUICE
SUGAR iDDED/UNSWEETENED
46 -OZ


FRENCH'S
MUSTARD
SQUEEZE


14-
s$0


OZ
up*


SWEET JUMBO ROMAN HEARTS
YAMS 9299
PER LB
.59 EACH
.59KUT0


RED GLOBE
JUMBO & RED
SEEDLESS JUMBO GRAPES
$1L99
*LB


CARROTS
CELLO 2.LB
$~ AC59
EACH


BAKING POTATO MUSHROOMS,
$1499
3.890 LB A EACH

KERRY GOLD LENDER'S
BUTTER REG PLAIN, RAISIN,
& UNSALTED ONION BAGELS
8 LB$ 14.25 OZ
SORGENTO SUPERBRAND
RED MONSTER, MOZZORELLA SWISS,E
DELI STYLE COLBY AND CHEDDAR ORANG E JUICE
9 369OZ 5 1 .9GAL


W/D
CORN ON COB
$259
4 EAR
W/D
CT GREEN BEANS, SWEET PEAS, SWEET CORN, MIXED
VEGETABLES, CUT OKRAI& BROCCOLI CUTS
6/479
6/48 OZ


COOL WHIP
TOPPING REG.
F/REE & LITE
9249
a Oz
W/D
ICE CREAM VANILLA CHOCOLATE, NEAPOLITAN,
FUDGE ROYAL ANDORANGE VANILLA
2/5 QRTS


CHICKEN VIENNA SAUSAGE s-oz...2/990
GROWERS PRIDE
JUICE ASSORTED APPLE, ORANGE,
GRAPE & FRUIT
MEDLY ONLY 11.5 OZ...........................590
SUNCHY
MALTA ($10.49 PER CASE) 6-PAK....$2.89'
QUAKER FARINA
'HOT CEREAL REGULAR 28-02......$2.89
LYONS
ASSORTED CREAMS 150o-..............890
LIBBY'S
MIXED FRUIT OR DICED
PEACHES 4-PACK....................................$3.69
FRANCO AMERICAN
SPAGHETTI & MEATBALLS 7.5-oz.......990
BARBER
CREAM CRACKERS 200-GR................990
HICKORY
SWEET THIN CUT BACON 12-OZ......$1.99


WHOLE
SMOKED
PICNIC HAM
LB
Sol 39


NZ
LAMB
SHOULDER
CHOPS
LB


s


S99


FRESH
GROUND
TURKEY
LB.99


PORK LOIN MINI FRESH
ASSORTED CHOPS PORK GROUND
(INCLUDES RIBS CHUCK
CENTER) LB
+L1 .0-99e s59


WIN PACK
~ANISH
HENS

7 A99
PER PAK


USDA,
PRESTIGE
CHOICE RIB
STEAKS
BONE-IN
$ 99
Bj LB


USDA


LB
2899


DELI PECAN
SLICE TURKEY BREAST CHEESE OR WALNUT
OR COOKED HAM DANISH RINGS
.$P o o EACH
S LB TURKEY DINNER
WHOLE FEAST CONSISTING OF 10-12LB
ROTISSERIE TURKEY COOKED, 2LB OF
CHICKENs STUFFINGS, 2LBS OF PEAS & RICE,
CHICKEN 1LB TURKEY GRAVY, WILL FEED
S799A 10-12 PEOPLE
9 EACH EACH


MUELLERS
READY CUT
MACARONI
16-OZ
994

CROWN POINT
FLAKE
TUNA
6 OZ

2/990

HUNTS
KETCHUP
SQUEEE BOTTLE
36 OZ
$ 099


MAHATMA

RICE LONG
GRAIN & PARBOILED
5 LBS


POWER BUY


BAHAMA
CORNED
BEEF
12 OZ
$0109

HEINZ
APPLECIDER
VINEGAR/I WHITE
32 OZ
$299


ROBIN HOOD


FLOUR


51


LB
99


I OWR UY


DEL MONTE
GREEN PIGEON
PEAS
15 OZ



DOLE
SLICED PINEAPPLE,
CHUNK, CRUSHED
20 OZ
2/$300


JACK
FROST
SUGAR
4 LBS
$ 29


HUNTS
TOMATO
PATSE
32 OZ
$125

McCORMICK
WHOLE ALL SPICE,
GROUND CINNAMON,
WHOLE CLOVES
NUTMEG, PAPRIKA &
SEASON ALL
.75 OZ
lom ma.


WESSON OIL '
VEGETABLE,
CANOLA & CORN
OIL
48-OZ
$289


REYNOLDS
FOIL
WRAP
75 FT.
$369


KRAFT
SALADDRESSING
ASSORTED
8 OZ
2/$300


CARDINAL
EVAPORATED
MILK
410 GR



PILLSBURY
CAKE FROSTIN
CAKE MIXES
18/16 OZ
1 79


PLANTERS

PEANUTS
12 OZ


THE TR


r(


I--





THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005, PAGE 25


THE TRIBUNE


4 moon, Tian, has


rm dramatic weather,


it geological activity


Pn hc un4Plrr%


S ."Copyrighted Material K'%
---- Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


e *-
o*


b
-


*
* a


* -
4m0-
- a. --
ew qm.


- ~.


~ a.
- ~


S a ~
-w


Simply make purchase and

p ace your receipt in the ent

box with your name and phon

-number, -<



isten to Love 97 for daily .:. ,..' I4

drawings for winners. -



i ustomers will have15

minutes to call Love 97 to WIN!



No City MeaNt or prtld ing vndor employee may epter,


Expand Your Features include:
Imagination 1.6-litre 4-cylinder engine
The 2006 Suzuki Liana takes Automatic transmission
you out of the ordinary and AM/FM/CD Player
into a realm where your Power steering, windows,
imagination and sense of door locks & mirrors
adventure have free reign., o.,. ,. w ,,,,iwh
SJa.1. i ineio &IwithV&D


*SUZUKI
Dependable, Reliable Quality


opacousl lurl WL11
plenty of leg room

ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING
with COMMONWEALTH BANK


Price includes rustproofing, licensing and inspection to birthday, full tank of fuel,
24,000 miles/24 months warranty and emergency roadside assistance.


#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET 322-3775 325-3079
Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals, Queens Hwy, 352-6122
or Abaco Motor Mall, Don Mackay Blvd, 367-2916


K'"


ai^ "


IBUNE


o


O Q


s-


F





THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 26, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005


Indonesian authorities confirm


a new


death from bird flu


copyrightedd Material.'

Syndicated Content

Available from CommerciaNews Providers"
A& i .i


1-
I. S -* w -
oo o 1
es o O0 _o U~ll


4 0NW 0 -b


amp an-d ob,.o


*
4 **


* o
*o


iGr cnmf tnhunal ac wq
dcif Ioanwq Uhbmw%'54n du


- ,,,o *hml, m o -


- w -


Submit a cute photo of your baby and you could WIN
fantastic prizes just in time for Christmas!
Now through December 9 submit a photo with two empty Drypers packs
(any size) and a completed entry form to Lowe's Wholesale on Soldier Road.
1 e $500.00 cash & a Drypers Club Pack
2Si"l.e $300.00 cash & a brypers Club Pack
3~ zpre $200.00 cash & a brypers Club Pack
Two entries will be chosen every week and they will be
featured in our Babies do the Cutest Things newspaper
ad. These entries will qualify far grand prize drawing
December 10o at Lowe's Phormacy, Soldier Road and
announced live on air that day between 2pmr 4pm on
Love 97.
Entry forms available at Lowe's Pharmacy
& Super Saver locations


v


__ _'_


qUlU,


qn' -






THE TRIBUNE


',U8 % L


a t P


40 W
o ,R -dam. 4i. o
40- *
op 41b


am..NdL 40


|I "Copyrighted Material
1t Syndicated Content 4
Available from Commercial News Prov

hem1W A


*. "-- y ** b
* M an S. *


, irkrtmas Gift


En an
BUILT TO LAST!
10% CASH DISCOUNT
Dryers LP Gas........................................................f..... rom $905
Refrigerators side by side............................................. $2,015
Chest Freezers 5 cu.ft. and up........................... from $584
Upright Freezers -12 cu.ft. and up .............................from $709
Microwave Ovens..................................... .................from $184








TAYLOR INDUSTRIES
SHIRLEY STREET TEL: 322-8941
OPEN: MON FRI 7:30 am 4:30 pm
SAT 8:00 am 12 noon


EMERGENCY
AUTOMATIC
STANDBY (
GENERATORS
7000-45000
Watt


* ADDS VALUE TO YOUR
HOME
* 24 HOUR BLACKOUT
PROTECTION
* AUTOMATIC TRANSFER
SWITCH INCLUDED

Night or day, home or away,
you'll feel at ease knowing that
your GUARDIAN@ generator
is watching your utility power
around the clock.

Call Shirley Enterprises Ltd.
for details or to arrange your
free inspection today!



ENTERPRISES LIMITED
Soldier Road
Telephone: 394-4823 or 394-7926
Fax: 394-1826
P.O. Box N-9180, Nassau, The
Bahamas
email: lawnboy@batelnet.bs


H ri I eSeso is N __r
Protctyourhom orbusi h- eI


7KW Standby Package Installed$5,495.00
7KW Standby Package No Instillation$3,895.00

15KW Standbv Packaae Iiistalled$7,395.00
15KW Standby Package No Installation$5,495.00

20KW & 25KW Standb
Generators in Stock
SlIpel- QLIiCt POI-table Generators:
4.500 RL11111ill" Watts / 5,500SLINIC Watts 0779.00
6.500 RL11111iffil Watts / 8,500 uroc Watts, 13HP,
Electric start$1,399.00


I


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005, PAGE 27


JL JLAL







PAGE 2, THURDAY, DCEMBE 1, 205 THE RIEWS


German ladr signals closer


US relations, but also addresses


transAtlantic tensions


11h.
-m-f-

- -4w
- .0 .41


*In, nrf

age"=,


.


opyrightedaeria


Syndicated Content


Available fromL Commercial News Providers"
omeraaew


- - -
* .0
.0 *


-1 wOfo qm q~o-.0 m0.W.- w qw- b Wo.- a.- MWwoo u
WOW 0 ob____ womb o -woof 4b -anw 411 f*- .Wo .4b410 o o
ftw --NNM d--d qm 40mm 4 --llft pow0 4 4 40quoow


se em
- mA


O -


- 0


0


S


-.0 o


-~ 0~
- S

- S
S - -


THE TRiibNE


PAGE 28, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005






THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005, PAGE 29


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

Everyday Food To Be An- New Florida 0 Jungle (CC) Krakatoa (CC)
0 WPBT yC) F bounced
The Insider (N) Survivor: Guatemala The Maya CSI: Crime Scene Investigation Without a Trace Martin and Danny
S WFOR n (CC) Empire "Price for Immunity" (N) 01 "Bodies in Motion" The team tackles are ambushed while transporting an
(CC) three investigations. FBI detainee n (CC)
Access Holly- Joey English as Will & Grace A The Apprentice The final four con- (9:59) ER Gallant surprises Neela
0 WTVJ wood (N) (CC) a second lan- (CC) testants must create a promotional with a request to bring their relation-
guage. 0 (CC) video. (N) A (CC) ship to the next level. (N) (CC)
Deco Drive The O.C, Ryan, Seth, Summer and Reunion When the six friends cele- News (CC)
WSVN Marissa ponder what they want to brate Thanksgiving together, accu-
do with their lives. (N) 0 sations plague the dinner. (N)
Jeopardy (N) HAVE NO FEAR: THE LIFE OF POPE JOHN PAUL II (2"05, Biography) Primetime (CC)
B WPLG (CC) Thomas Kretschmann, Bruno Ganz, Jasper Harris. Premiere. Karol Wojty-
la promotes faith and peace around the globe.

American Jus- Cold Case Files A 3-year-old boy Cold Case Files 'The BTK Killer: The First 48 CC)
A&E tice Black Wid- provides police with evidence in a Bind, Torture, Kill" BTK Dennis Rad-
ow of Vegas murder case. (CC) er terrorizes Wichita, Kan. (N)
Hardtalk BBC News World Business BBC News Talking Movies BBC News Asia Today
BBCI (Latenight). Report (Latenight). (Latenight).
BET BET Style The Parkers A Girlfriends The Multitude of Mercies Church is- The Ultimate Hustler
BET (CC) Pact" n (CC) sues. (N)
iCac Coronation The Canadian Antiques Road- The Passionate Eye The kidnap- CBC News: The National (CC)
_C _Street (CC) show "Kingston" (N) (CC) ping of journalists in Iraq. (N)
S :00)On the The Apprentice: Martha Stewart Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNBC o=y (N)hrnCC)
CNN :00) TheSitua- Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)
COM Reno 911! (CC) The Daily Show The Colbert Re- Premium Blend South Park South Park (CC) The Showbiz
COM With Jon Stew- port (CC) Chris Mata; Rich "Hooked on Mon- Show With
art (CC) Williams. key Fonics" David Spade
COURT Cops 0 (CC) The Investigators A man is mur- Forensic Files Body of Evi- The Investigators "Nowhere to
COURT dered on his way to work. dence Hide' (N)
That's So Raven * % GEORGE OF THE JUNGLE (1997, Comedy) Brendan Fraser, The Buzz on Sister, Sister
DISN "Driven to Insani- Leslie Mann, Thomas Haden Church. A clumsy ape man falls in with a so- Maggie (CC) Ray reveals a
, ty" cialite on safari.'PG' (CC) dark secret. A
This Old House Weekend Wood Works Freeform Furni- Home 10 DIY to the Res- DIY to the Res-
DIY n (CC) Handyman Display table. ture (N) cuecue
W In Focus Journal: Europa Aktuell Journal: In Euromaxx Journal: Im Focus (in
DW Tagestema Depth Tagestema German)
E! El News THS Investigates: Plastic Surgery Nightmares Risks of plastic surgery. Supermodels Gastineau Girls
E! I I Gone Bad_____
ESPN College Football Marathon MAC Championship --Teams TBA. From Detroit. (Live) (CC) SportsCenter
ESPN _(Live) (CC)
Bodybuilding: World's Strongest Man Competi- Simplemente Futbol (N) SportsCenter International Edi-
ESPNI Fit. Universe tion From Uncasville, Conn. (N) tion (Live)
S Daily Mass: Our Life on the Rock Back Stage The Holy Rosary Gospel of John In the Heart of
EWTVIN Lady the Church
[:00) FItTV's Insider Training Surfer Laird Hamil- Deadly Arts Josette seeks out No Opportunity Wasted "Tour
FIT TV Housecalls (CC) ton. 01 (CC) Capoeira's Mestres. 0, D'Alaska; Rockin' the Rockies"
Fr Cv Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannily & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
FOX-NC Shepard Smith Susteren (Live) (CC)
S :00) NHL Hockey Washington Capitals at Florida Panthers. From the Best Damn Sports Show Period Best Damn
FSNFL Ban tlantic Center in Sunrise, Fla. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) (Live) (CC) Sports Show
Wonderful World of Golf Classic match between Fred The Big Break IV: USA v Europe The Big Break IV: All Access
GOLF Couples and Phil Mickelson._____________
GSN Lingo (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire A The Amazing Race 01 (CC) Dog Eat Dog 0 (CC)
(:00) Attack of Fastlane "Slippery Slope" Van's Icons The NES Cinematech The Man Show The Man Show
G4Tech the Show! (N) past comes back to haunt him. console. (N) "Lost in Blue." (CC) (CC)
(:00) Walker, Walker, Texas Ranger Walker con- THE READING ROOM (2005, Drama) James Earl Jones, Joanna Cas-
HALL Texas Ranger vinces ex-con Charlie Brooks to im- sidy, Keith Robinson. A widower teaches low-income people how to read.
A (CC) personate a crime boss. 0 (CC)
Dream House Holmes on Homes "Falling Flat" Holmes for the Holidays 1 (CC) The Block A private investigator is
HGTV A (CC) 01 (CC) hired. (CC)
INSP Morris Cerullo Breakthrough Love a Child Inspiration To- Life Today (CC) This Is Your Day Valerie Saxion
S, 1 (CC) day (CC)
TLA Transformers Sabrina, the My Wife and My Wife and Friends Marital Everybody Everybody
KTLA Cybertron Teenage Witch Kids Michael's Kids n (CC) questions Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
mHaven" "Jealousy" (CC) brother visits, abound. (CC) "Net Worth" 01 1 )(CC)
** A SONG FOR THE SEASON (1999) Naomi Judd, ** THE CHRISTMAS WISH (1998, Drama) Neil Patrick Harris, Deb-
LIFE Gerald McRaney. A superintendent is forced to cut the bie Reynolds, Naomi Watts. A man looks for a woman named in his late
school music program. (CC) grand ad's diary. (CC)
MSNBC 00Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- Rita Cosby Live & Direct Scarborough Country
iMV NB (CC) mann
Jimmy Neutron: SpongeBob Full House 01 Full House 01 Fresh Prince of The Cosby The Cosby
NICK Boy Genius SquarePants 0 (CC) (CC) Bel-Air Show 1 (CC) Show 0 (CC)
NTV Will & Grace 1 Survivor: Guatemala The Maya The Apprentice 'To Lead or Not to News 0 (CC) News
(CC) Empire "Price for Immunity' (N) Lead" (N) 01 (CC)
Best & Worst of Dangerous Hunting Adven- Benelli's Dream Expedition Sa- Wanted: Ted or Alive A contestant
OLN Tred Barta Game tures Hunts (CC) fan (CC) goes hunting with Ted. (CC)
SPEED American Mus- Sports Car Rev- Sports Car Rev- Street Tuner NOPI Tunervi- Barrett-Jackson Automobile Auc-
SPE cle Car olution solution Challenge slon 0 tion
Praise the Lord Behind the Michael Youssef Bishop T.D. This Is Your Day Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN (CC) Scenes (CC) (CC) Jakes (CC) (CC)
Everybody Friends Monica Friends Rachel *** THE WEDDING SINGER (1998, Comedy) Adam Sandier, Drew
TBS Loves Raymond sings karaoke. and Ross go on Barrymore, Christine Taylor. A 1980s wedding crooner attempts to find
'The Ingrate" 01 (CC) blind dates. 01 true love. (CC) (DVS)
(:00) What Were What Were You Thinking? People Sports Disasters "Over the Edge" Sports Disasters "Extreme Danger"
TLC You Thinking? immerse themselves in freezing wa- Drag racer; rodeo mishaps; sky div- Car race; whale-watching; base-
ter. (CC) ing. (CC) jumping; speedboat. (CC)
(:00) Law & Or- NBA Basketball San Antonio Spurs at Dallas Mavericks. From American Airlines Center in NBA Basketball:
TNT der "Jeopardy" Dallas. (Live) (CC) Lakers at Jazz
0A (CC) (DVS)
Tl \ON Foster's Home: CASPER'S HAUNTED CHRISTMAS (2000, Fantasy) Voices of Brendon Code Lyoko Yu-Gi-Oh! G/X
IOON A Lost Claus Ryan Barrett, Kathleen Barr, lan James Codett. Premiere. "Frontier"
5 Alexandrie la Envoye special On aime trop la vie TV5 Le Journal
,TV5 cite
TW(C 6:00) Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories The Weather Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
PM Edition (CC) "Holding On" Capsized boat. Channel Top 10
U .. (:001Pielde Contra Vientoy Marea La Esposa Virgen Aqu y Ahora
*UNIV Otono Mujeres
Svalientes.
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order: Criminal Intent A COYOTE UGLY (2000, Drama) Piper Perabo, Adam Garcia, Maria
^USA der: Special Vic- well-known atheist leader is kid- Bello. A struggling songwriter cuts loose in a rowdy New York bar. (CC)
tims Unit 0 napped and murdered. 01 (CC)________________
\uVH Most Awesome 2005 Hook-Ups and Break-Ups 01 Fabulous Life Of... "Celebrity Super Breaking Bona- Hollywood
!, Celebrity Beefs ______ Spenders'05" (N) 01 duce 0 Snappers 0
,. .* ** DISCLOSURE (1994, Drama) Michael Douglas, Demi Moore, Donald Sutherland. An WGN News at Nine 0 (CC)
VWGN executive faces unwanted sexual advances from his boss.
Everybody Smallville "Spirit" A wannabe prom Everwood The Next Step" Andy WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
WPIX Loves Raymond queen's spirit is released, affecting learnsthat Ephram has no plans to Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
A (CC) the behavior of others, move back home. 0 (CC) & Mr. G (CC)
Jeo pardyl (N) Everybody Love, Inc. "Mad Eve Shelly gets Cuts Kevin tries Dr. Phil Drug abuse; alcoholic moth-
WSBK (cc) HatesChris AboutYou" 0 two proposals, togethis job er. (N)
._(CC) (CC) 0 (CC) back. 0 (CC)

HB (6.615) JOHNSON Inside the NFL 0 (CC) *** YESTERDAY (2004, Drama) Leleti Khumalo, A (:45) Syriana:
HBO-E FAMILY VACA- woman who has AIDS tries to secure her daughter's HBO First Look
TION (CC) ___future. (Subtitled-English) 0 'NR' (N) (CC)
(:15) * YOU GOT SERVED (2004, Drama) Mar- Curb Your En- **x FLIGHT OF THE PHOENIX (2004, Adventure)
H BO-P ques Houston. Street dancers work together to win a thusiasm 0 Dennis Quaid. Plane-crash survivors endure hardships
competition. 0 'PG-13' (CC) (CC) in the Gobi desert. 0 'PG-13' (CC)


(6:45) ** KAZAAM (1996, Come- Mighty Times: (:15)** JOHNSON FAMILY VACATION (2004, Comedy) Cedric the
'HBO-W dy-Drama) Shaquille 0 Neal, Fran- The Legacy of Entertainer, Vanessa L. Williams, Solange Knowles. A man takes his fami-
cis Capra. 0 'PG' (CC) Rosa Parks 01 ly on a disastrous road trip. A 'PG-13' (CC)
(:00) *** SOMETHING THE LORD MADE (2004, SHE HATE ME (2004, Comedy-Drama) Anthony Mackie, Kerry
HBO-S Docudrama) Alan Rickman. A lab technician helps a Washington, Ellen Barkin. Premiere. A man impregnates his ex-fiancee
doctor with surgical techniques. 0 'NR' (CC) and lesbians. 1 'R' (CC)
(:00) Orphans of Nkandla (N) *A A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET 5: THE ** THE CHRONICLES OF RID-
MAX-E DREAM CHILD (1989) Robert Englund. Freddy DICK (2004, Science Fiction) Vin
Krueger tries to move in on a teens unborn child. Diesel. ('PG-13'(CC)
S(6:45) SPIDER-MAN 2 (2004, Action) Tobey WILD THINGS (1998, Drama) Kevin Bacon, Matt Dillon, Neve
MOMAX Maguire, Kirsten Dunst. Peter Parker fights a man who Campbell. Two high-school vixens conspire against a faculty member. ,
has mechanical tentacles. 'PG-13' (CC) 'R' (CC)
Pills, Profits, * *THE STORY OF THE WEEPING CAMEL * WHEN WILL I BE LOVED (2004, Drama) Neve
SHOW Protest: Global (2003, Documentary) Members of an extended family Campbell, Dominic Chianese. iTV Premiere. A woman
AIDS Movement herd camels in Mongolia.'PG' plots against a hustler and a mogul. 'R'
(6:00) **% *s LEGALLY BLONDE 2: RED, WHITE & (:35) * THE BIG EASY (1986, Crime Drama)
TMC BASQUIAT BLONDE (2003) Reese Witherspoon. Elle Woods Dennis Quaid, Ellen Barkin. Premiere. Romance com-
S(1996)'R'(CC) fights for animal rights on Capitol Hill,'PG-13' (CC) plicates a detective's murder investigation. 'R'


THE TRIBUNE

I THURSDAY EVENING


V


SIS .. ....irl i '


DECEMBER 1, 2005







PAGE 30, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


COMICS PAGE


. *
a e- 4


- o t
a -


I -


W


* ~
9


-4 qw
yaC


0" .i


- e *
* a e N M
MOM 4


~ C466


- ,o4


I


0 a


0~~ 0
0


pyrighted Material


Copyrighted Material


- ~Q


.a~. ~-A


* *



--o


- ~ 0


Syndicated Content -: "


from Commercial News Providers" .


- Availab


AAvailabli


lwmm


4o- -49m-


'
'Sm


I. r


* *o

a,.



***

* * a*.

a C *
* O
a. PO ,


. 0

** 0*
* *

o *


* ** * ^
orw-


0Mb 4o am
K * * *


O a








oa.,e
*, O a



em



* o a,, ,a. o
* *


-
* eun
e e
* a **
a *


* ,,p a D -. ,
* ** a

a a


* e- *


me
me

me
mm.
me

~0
in..
m


ae -

a * *i
4 am, ** *

-0 Mop inm


g o m

-.a.gol. aw .
4w - f
dft 4b 4b -
-u=* nmaD

, 4 b -. --

tp 4b


I

p

0


0



'I


- 4 _F 4W
- - Wm.


m
m**
*
* ~-
* ~.
* ~*
* ~.
* ~*
* ~.
* -~.
* ~.
* ~.
* ~.
* me
* ~.
* ~A.
* ~*
* me
* ~.
* ~0
* ~
* ~
* -~- __


'I

I'


II'


Ill



Ii~


I,,
'9
'I
I:,
he
IA


*-


-
- a
- -


Pd

V


O 0


*


f o


a

V.


* -
a -


'pp


I


* *


*Mb G~b0


I A


-I


so


" .
4B.4400,
GM.,4 4, o
4mw o quo


o --


C. -~

S
- a
A -
a. -
5- a-a


-- a
40am& 0




b 0 &-


*
*

*
*


*

*


_____________________________________________ I ________________________________


-I


__


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 30, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005


.. 46


Inrm=


*



"!


0 0














Gems of 20th century art in Paris




on rare foray from Washington


o --. -


S


*


"Copyrighted Material


I-Syndicated Content -
Available from Commercial News Providers" -


- Available from Commercial News Providers"


- -

- =

* 0 0.

-

- -
=


- a
5-
S ~
~
9-
~0


.wh


- ,4m
- -0


4 -.. o -
o-


- Sb


* S - a

-~ -~
a -
0 - -

S -~ -


o p




*D 0


o q
o
op
d:-


0
- S
w*-
5- 5~**


a -


-S ~~I


Donald's Furniture 322-3875 Best Buy Furniture 394-2378
Roberts Furniture 322-8862 Palmdale Furniture 322-3703
The Sleep Gallery 327-5338 Home Furniture 322-8646
Wood You Furniture 325-9663 Bahama Beds 394-8015
.. .' . . .. ' .. -: * \


b


- Ske q 4
-sib
& -


- - - S

--


Posturx

-SUPPW-tl tnsl- c6mfiwt


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005, PAGE 31


THE TRIBUNE


p-B


O *






PAGE 32, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005


AIInIrica tf


food


BEST CHOICE BEST D1ALS!
Nassau, Grand Bahama, Abaco, Andros, Eleuthera & Harbour Island, Bimini, and Exuma


Producer: UNDURAA
Wine: Aiwen Chardoifiay
Region: Central Valley, Chile
Accompaniment: smoked salmon toast,
roast beef roll-ups & tortillas with
black bean salsa


4I~
& Se~U~
1v,~it~


THE TRIBUNE








THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1,2005


SECTION


business@tribunemedia.net


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Government



rejects Baha



Mar approvals


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Government has
refused" to grant approval for
Baha Mar Development Com-
pany's acquisitions of several
private properties on Good-
man's Bay, The Tribune has
learned, deciding instead that it
wanted to preserve beach
access for the Bahamian public.
The Tribune has been told
that the Cabinet, through the
National Economic Council
(NEC), turned down the
approval applications by the
developer of the $1.6 billion
Cable Beach strip revamp
because it felt the purchases
would "further compromise the
amount of beach space avail-
able for the general public".
A source told The Tribune:
"The rationale behind it was
that the Prime Minister had
made it clear the Government
wanted to preserve as much
beach space as possible in the
West Bay Street area."
Approving Baha Mar's appli-
cations would have brought the
public beach at Goodman's
Bay almost inside the develop-
er's proposed resort campus,
and the source said: "I think
the Government intention is,
even if it has to do so itself, to
acquire those properties to be
turned over for additional
space."
Baha Mar had been attempt-
ing to close the purchases of
several privately-owned prop-
erties to the east of the public
recreation area at Goodman's
Bay. The properties involved
were situated on the left hand
side of West Bay Street for
commuters heading into down-
town Nassau. They are oppo-
site SG Hambros Bank and
Trust (Bahamas) Ltd and the
Radisson Cable Beach Resort's


Cabinet turns down $1.6bn
Cable Beach developer's
Goodman's Bay purchases,
but gives nod to Prospect
Ridge deals


a PRIME Minister Perry Christie (far right) with executives
of the Baha Mar Development Company


golf course.
The decision to refuse
approval is consistent with
Prime Minister Perry Christie's
articulated policy of preserv-
ing beach access for Bahami-
ans, rather than let all the best
spots be gobbled up as part of
major foreign direct investment
projects.
Addressing the PLP Con-
vention last month, the Prime
Minister said: "While on the
subject of beaches, let me say
that my Government has
already committed itself to the
acquisition, by private contract


with interested landowners, of
additional beach properties
that will be converted to public
use by Bahamians and visitors
alike. Further, let me reassure
you that none of the develop-
ments I am discussing this
evening will involve in any way
any deprivation of the rights of
access to beaches that Bahami-
ans presently enjoy.
"On the contrary, the thrust
of my Government's policy in
this area is to augment the


SEE page 6B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

B ank of the
Bahamas Inter-
national will go
to the Supreme
Court on Febru-
ary 8-9, 2006, to defend itself in
an action brought by a design-
er of electronic payment and
automated cash withdrawal sys-
tems, which claims the bank
has breached its copyright.
Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national said in the offering
document for its current $25.2
million rights issue that it
"believes it has a good defence
to the action" being brought
by Sabrina Enterprises, a
Bahamian-incorporated com-
pany, that filed its writ and
statement of claim more than
two years ago.
Andrew Allen, Sabrina's
attorney, yesterday told The


Bank of the Bahamas International

says it has 'good defence' to
lawsuit over electronic payment

system and cards


Tribune that the bank had tried
to have the action dismissed on
the basis that it could not pro-
ceed unless the plaintiff pro-
vided specific examples of
copyright breaches.
Position
He added that Bank of the
. Bahamas International had
since "backed down" from this
position, abandoning its sum-
mons to dismiss the action in
October 2005. The case was
"now proceeding in earnest",


and a Court-issued Summons
on October 28 had ordered
both parties to attend the
Supreme Court in Freeport on
February 8-9 "for the trial of
this matter".
In its rights issue document,
Bank of the Bahamas Interna-
tional said Sabrina was alleg-
ing that, as "successor in title"
to Workers Bank, which it
acquired in 2001, the bank "has
breached its proprietary rights

SEE page 8B


No Golden Pages in 2006


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas Golden Pages directory will
not be appearing in 2006, the company that pro-
duced the publication having shut down its office
operations on Village Road, The Tribune has
learned.
Sources familiar with the situation said
Bahamas Data and Media had closed its office
on the second floor of the A&K Mini Plaza,
with staff having been laid-off last week and
computer and office equipment being put up
for sale.
The Tribune was unable to contact Bahamas
Data and Media. executives for comment, the
company's phone at Village Road just ringing
out with no one answering it.
Althoughith Bahamas Golden Pages web-


site still appears to be active, sources told The
Tribune that the producer of on-line and hard
copy business directories listings had been forced
to shut its office after its main financial backer,
which is based in Bermuda, withdrew financing
support after it failed to deliver the expected
investment returns.
Several prospective Bahamas Golden Pages
advertisers had been refunded their payments for
advertising in the 2006 directory.


SEE page 6B


Bahamas has yet

to implement law

passed in 2003


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas has not
implemented legislation to pro-
tect personal data that was
passed two years ago because it
has yet to appoint a Commis-
sioner to oversee the Data Pro-
tection Act 2003.
This failure to implement
legislation already enacted was
pointed out by Nigel Brown,
of IBM, who was a speaker at
the New approaches to Crime
conference organised by his



Regulator

in bank

warning

THE Central Bank of the
Bahamas has issued another
warning notice about a
financial institution that
may be breaching the law.
It said First Citizen Trust
Bank was not licensed
under the Banks and Trust
Companies Regulation Act
2000 to conduct banking
and/or trust business in or
from within the Bahamas.
As a result, the regulator
said it "may be operating in
breach" of the Act.


company and the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce.
The Data Protection Act
2003, part of a package of leg-
islation passed by Parliament
to develop an e-commerce plat-
form in the Bahamas, was
designed to protect the privacy
of personal information on
individuals, particularly con-
sumers, in the Bahamas and
outside.
Under its provisions, persons
collecting and .using personal
data on individuals are
required to observe and abide
by specific standards of confi-
dentiality, and are prohibited
from transferring personal data
to jurisdictions with less strin-
gent data protection legislation,
without the consent of the per-
son from whom the data is
obtained.
Mr Brown said that under
the Bahamian legislation,
members of the public were
able to make requests of com-
panies, asking what personal
data they held on them, and
giving them the right to check
whether this was correct and
make changes.
This was consistent with
international standards, Mr
Brown said, but the 40 days
given to Bahamian companies
in which they had to respond to
such requests was "not long"
if the firm was large.
The IBM executive said the
Bahamas "did quite well" when


SEE page 8B


Money Safe.
Money Fast.



at
WBnk of The Baamias
T N T I. R N A T 1 O A IL
OQinos at
BnkShamasuOnltno,.tm


I I - -


Bank's Februar




cout dte ve




coyrgt cto







PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005


1 HE TRIBUNE


-USNES


Win what you

purchase this

December as

Easy As 1 2 3 !


Royal Bank wishes you Happy Holidays
with a special gift! For every 3 purchases
you make with your RBC VISA or
MasterCard during the month of
December, your name will be
automatically entered to win the value
of what you buy.
RBC Royal Bank credit cards offer great
benefits:
' Solid value
/ Security
/ Convenience
V Credit when you need it


Bank confidentiality



takes numerous forms





.ow -u .







- --"Copyrighted Material :
----- Syndicated Content -

Available from Commercial News Providers"


41b --
- -Ne



amNI 4- 4w
. m -a o. -
4W- .4- 4b
mw wl -e





-4w 48- 0

qftw- m -


WAND --dom


. -- -- .-
S-.NNW-

41._


4b -END ft






a.Ob.


b S -
* S


-dl-
-NOW

4w -

-Imp M
* -- W mo

.b do-
Iwom 41





4w


4. 7"m


to OWG


A. Gwenique Percentie


Gwenique is the daughter of Gwen Brown. She is a graduate of St. Paul's Methodist
College. Gwenique received a Associate of Arts degree in Accounting in 2000
from the College of The Bahamas. She graduated from Georgia Southern University
in 2003 where she earned a Masters degree in Accounting. In April of 2005.
Gwenique began working at KPMG Freeport in where she successfully completed
the CPA examination in August of 2005 in the State of Georgia.


Gina M. Parks
Gina is the daughter of Richard and Mary Parks. She is a graduate of Kingsway
Academy High School. In 2001 Gina was awarded the KPMG Scholarship and
subsequently completed her education at Taylor University where she earned a
Bachelor of Arts Degree in Accounting and Business in 2003.
Prior to the scholarship award, Gina worked as a summer student in the Nassau
office from 2000 until graduation. Upon graduating from college and as part of
her scholarship award, Gina was placed in the KPMG Atlanta, GA office where
she completed a two year international rotation. In November 2005, she returned
to the Nassau office. She successfully completed the CPA examination in the State
of Georgia in August of 2005.


Paul Frazier Jr., is 20 years old and presently in his final year at Acadia University in Nova Scotia, Canada. He is enrolled
in the Bachelor of Business Administration with Honors program and has a concentration in Accounting and Finance. Along
with pursuing the Certified Public Accountant designation. Paul is also participating in the CFA program and will sit the
Level I examination is June of 2006. He is an active student at Acadia, serving as President of the Acadia business Society,
a member of the Board of Directors for the Acadia Centre for the Acadia Centre for Small Business and Entrepreneurship,
and a representative for the Bahamas on the International Concerns Committee at Acadia University. During his spare time,
Paul participates in co-ed volleyball and stilt walking.

Paul graduated with honors in 2002 from St. Augustine's College. He is the recipient of the Best Performance Award in
Commerce for the 2002 BGCSE examinations.

Paul would like to give thanks to God for the strength He has provided, and also to his wonderful family for their consistent
love and support.


Paul Frazier Jr.


2005. KPMG, a Bahamian partnership, the Bahamian memberfirm of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved.


Cogrtuaton O Psin Te PAExmiato


120015 Scholarship Recipie














Author paints 'doomsday' picture




of international financial centres


A nyone with the
slightest con-
cern about the
Bahamas as an
offshore finan-
cial centre should read this
doomsday scenario. Published
just this year, it's the work of a
former BBC producer and
investigator for the well-known
international security firm,
Kroll Associates, so he has a
good background for digging
out revealing facts about the
offshore financial world. This
makes for a lively read.
Alarm
It's not the facts that alarm
me, it's the personal philoso-
phy he attaches to them. If gov-
ernments, the OECD, the IMF.
the Bank for International Set-
tlements, and all the associated
bodies like the notorious
Financial Action Task Force
(FATF) agreed with this
author, we would see every
international bank in every off-
shore centre, not just the
Bahamas, soon shut down. For-
tunately, he writes only as a
private citizen, with no posi-
tion of authority.
He focuses on the Cayman
Islands, and is superb at
recounting the multitude of
scandals, bankruptcies, and
financial shenanigans that have
run through the banking/legal
community there. He describes
Enron's use of hundreds of off-
shore companies to conceal its
indefensible in-house deals that
eventually led to its collapse:
also the enormous bank
deposits of the Italian milk con-
glomerate, Parmalat, that when
discovered to be fictitious
caused a massive default on its
debt. He relishes the story of
Swiss fast-money man Jean
Doucet, whose friendly Inter-
bank Group locked its doors
in 1974 with the curt notice.
"CLOSED BECAUSE OF.


LIQUIDITY PROBLEM".
Along the way, Mr Brittain-
Catlin explains why major US
companies reincorporate in
Bermuda, how trading compa-
nies use offshore vehicles to
save billions in taxes through
"transfer pricing" schemes, and
how the state of Delaware pro-
vides much-the'same"servic@~i
any offshore jurisdiction.
His most colourful story tells
of the 2002 criminal prosecu-
tion of senior executives at
Euro Bank Corporation,
accused of running a system-
atic money laundering opera-
tion. A junior officer of the
bank secretly gave all the
incriminating information to
Brian Gibbs, head of Cayman's
Financial Reporting Unit. But
the case fell apart when anoth-
er secret was revealed at trial:
Gibbs was also working for
Britain's intelligence service,
M16. After Gibbs' flagrant
deceptions and destruction of
evidence to hide his M16 role,
the judge chastised the prose-
cution and acquitted all the
defendants. Gibbs abruptly fled
Cayman back to England, fear-
ing he would be charged local-
ly with obstruction, of justice -
or worse. Bitter diplomatic
complaints ,flew from the Cay-
man prime Minister to Lon-
don, and the relationship
between the 'colony and the
parent country was seriously
strained.
The author cites this tragi-
comedy as an example of the
contradiction between Cay-
man's encouragement of bank
secrecy and the pbwer of a for-
eign power to investigate
crime. Cayman, he writes, was
"paralysed and humiliated by
the outside forces of the secret
state and secret capital". The
dominant theme of Mr Brit-
tain-Catlin's book can be sum-
marised as follows: Allowing
secrecy for large amounts of
mobile capital inevitably cor-


rupts 'and distorts the global
economy and the legitimate
functioning of governments. In
what he calls "the secret realm"
that prevails offshore, all goals
are sacrificed to the purely cap-
italist ones of minimising taxa-
tion and regulation and max-
imising return. Although pri-
vacy, personal freedom and
free enterprise are stated to be
the values protected, in fact it is
greed backed by deception that
sets the rules.
Grim
Having painted this grim pic-
ture, Mr Brittain-Catlin is led
to take an extremist view of
the present financial regime, as
revealed by his astounding, and
frightening, statement: "A dis-
tinction cannot be made
between the use and abuse of
offshore tax havens." He
indulges in such emotional gen-
eralities as alleging: "A murky
stream of offshore capitalism
that spends its life hidden off-
shore...behind which stand
secret beneficiaries operating
as corporate raiders, silently
creeping up on companies to
steal away control".
He argues that to cleanse the
rot, half-measures are useless.
He derides the so-called
"reformers" who are engaged
in "checking the excesses of the,;,
offshore network" by exposing
illicit transactions, attacking


Book


Review


money laundering, curtailing
tax evasion and eliminating
rogue banks. These measures
merely try to sustain the
integrity of a banking system
that already "defies integrity".
To him, legally acceptable
schemes of incorporating off-
shore to reduce taxes raise vir-
tually the same moral issues as
laundering drug money
through an offshore bank
account.
Without saying so explicitly,
he implies that any system
embodying financial secrecy
cannot be reformed, it must be
destroyed. He refers to the dra-
conian post-9/11 measures tak-
en by the US to control money
movements in the newly
declared "war on terror", mea-
sures of unprecedented severi-
ty and risks to personal rights.
But he points out that even
these measures fail in the off-
shore arena, as other national
interests prevail and tracing Al-
Qaeda funds proves to be an
impossible task.
But after all his rhetoric, the
author pulls away from offering
any specific solutions to the
alleged evils he has described.
The clarity of his narrative is
often marred by a strong strain
of melancholy mysticism. After
strolling one night through the
deserted Cayman banking

SEEpage SB .-


NOTICE

The Public Hospitals Authority invites tenders for
the purchase of the following vehicles

1. 1998 Daewoo Cielo Sedan 1500cc


2. 1997 Asia Towner Van 800 cc

3. Toyota Hiace Bus

4. 1991 Chevy Pick-Up Truck

Vehicles maybe viewed at Sandilands Rehabilitation
Centre's Compound, Fox Hill Rd.

Sealed envelopes, marked tender should be address
to the Managing Director, Public Hospital Authority,
Manx Corporate Centre/ Dockendale House,
P.O.Box N-8200, and arrive no later than Friday,
December 30, 2005.

Herbert H. Brown
Managing Director -


1,000 songs. Impossibly small. iPod nano


Enter to win your very own iPod
nano and Free Music on iTunes
as we celebrate our one year
anniversary at our new location.

Call for details.


starting at

$269
cash






S Authorized
Dealer


NOW AVAILABLE
For Mac and Windows





COMPUTERS L MITED
T.................... he Know How Store ............


Island Traders Building
East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas
web: www.customcomputers.bs
email: apple@customcomputers.bs



Tel: (242) 322-2115


Got Questions?
Ask 'The Mac Guy'


BANKING IS OUR BUSINESS
COMMUNITY IS OUR COMMITMENT!


Princess Margaret


Hospital ABM


Grand Prize Winner


Mr. Anthony O'Brien was the recent grand prize winner of RBC Royal Bank
of Canada's Princess Margaret Hospital ABM Promotion.


By using the automated banking machine located at the Princess Margaret
Hospital (near the entrance to the maternity ward) clients were entered
into a random draw to win a roundtrip ticket to Miami or Ft. Lauderdale.

RBC Client Card is FREE! Visit your nearest RBC Royal Bank of Canada
branch and sign up for a ABM client card today, so that you can access
your funds 24/7 at our 40 ABM locations throughout the Bahamas.

Pictured are Ms. Thyra Johnson, acting manager, Personal Financial
Services, RBC Royal Bank of Canada Bay & Victoria Branch and Mr.
Anthony O'Brien (right) grand prize winner.


www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean RBC
SRoyal Bank
0 Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada of Canada'
The Lion & Globe synmbi and TriC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada. o Canada,


I... . . . . . . . .


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005, PAGE 3B


r








PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


* PICTURED from L to R (front row): Christine Ferguson, Ministry of Tourism; Frank Comi-
to Bahamas Hotel Association; ASP Christopher Rahming, Royal Bahamas Police Force; Police
Constable 50 Neymour Royal Bahamas Police Force; Suzanne Pattusch-Smith, Nassau Tourism
and Development Board; Charles Klonaris, Nassau Tourism and Development Board; C15 Latia
Lee Davis, Royal Bahamas Police Force; Angela Cleare Ministry of Tourism. (Back Row): Tim
Lightbourn The Perfume Shop; Erica Ingraham, Ministry of Tourism


RENTED



* 720 2,285 sq.ft. office suites.
* In the heart of the Bahamas' financial area.
* Excellent visitor and local pedestrial traffic.
* Freatures a full standby generator.
* Dedicated parking facilities.


A BOARD and Secretariat
are being created to formalise
the Bahamas Visitor Safety and
Security Board (BVSSB), which
aims to link the private and
public sectors in a bid to fight
crime.
Assistant Superintendent
Christopher Rahming, who is
in charge of the initiative to
bring the Traffic Point Police-
man back to Bay Street, under
the auspices of the BVSSB,
said: "The BVSSB's focus is to
address visitor crime and safety
issues, which include everything
from harassment to crimes of a
more serious nature. The Roy-


Scotiabank Building
Bay Street, Downtown
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel. 242-393-8618
www.bahamasrealty.bs
www.cbrichardellis.com



BAHAMAS REALTY LTD
COMMERCIAL


CBRE
CB RICHARD ELLIS
NAVIGATING A NEW WORLD


al Bahamas Police Force has
increased manpower in tourist
areas, including Paradise Island
beaches and the Downtown
area.

Advisory

"The configuration of an
advisory Board and a Secre-
tariat is currently underway as
part of an overall strategic plan
designed to engage the public
and private sector in a cooper-
ative approach to fight crime.
The strategy also hopes to expe-
dite processing of tourist- relat-
ed incidents while providing an
effective, immediate, appropri-
ate reaction and follow up for
crime victims and their fami-
lies."
The Traffic Point Policeman
was a heavily photographed
image for tourists visiting the
Bahamas, in addition to improv-
ing traffic flow on Bay Street.
ASP Rahming said: "The
programme currently has an
officer on Bay and Frederick
Street, an area prone to con-
gestion.
"We also hope to place
another officer regularly at the
intersection of Bay and East
Street. The Traffic Police are
trained to expedite the flow of
traffic. However, we expect to
see a reduction in other types of
crimes, both pedestrian and
traffic-related as their physical


presence will act as a natui al
deterrent."
"The Ministry of Tourism is
thrilled with the project" sE id
Angela Cleare, senior direct r
of product development for t ie
Ministry of Tourism. "Touri ts
love to see the traffic police 4t
work, dressed smartly in thiir
uniforms. The look is unique to
the Bahamas and is memorat le
for our guests."
The Traffic Point Police P i o-
gramme is one component of
many being planned as part of
the BVSSB initiative. The R y-
al Bahamas Police Force a id
the Ministry of Tourism e
spearheading the overall sa e-
ty initiative, working clos( ly
with the Bahamas Hotel As o-
ciation, the Nassau Tourism a id
Development Board, t ie
Bahamas Chamber of Co -
merce and Safe Bahamas.

Chairman

Charles Klonaris, chairman
of the Nassau Tourism ahd
Development Board, said:
"Crime affects every aspect~of
our existence. It impacts ur
personal lives and our econo -n-
ic well-being as individuals a ad
as a nation. The Nassau
Tourism and Developmint
Board welcomes the oppor u-
nity to be part of this important
effort".


FOR SALE!

OCE*AWN


Ma-Ag ^


Serious Inquires only!

Call: 242-325-3794/ 427-5919 or 242-454-9278


o.uu
5.55
0.70
1.27
0.87
7.05
1.50
6.99
1.15
4.00
9.50
7.45
8.00
1.27
9.50
8.22
4.36
10.00


Fniancal Advisors Ltd.


Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
,$ ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Kerzner International BDRs
Premier Real Estate


u.o
10.25
7.24
0.80
1.27
1.10
9.60
1.50
9.10
2.17
4.35
10.90
10.00
10.00
1.15
10.15
8.75
6.45
10.00


0.73 0.00 -0.169 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.25 0.00 1.456 0.340 7.0 3.32%
7.24 .0.00 0.587 0.330 12.3 4.56%
0.80 0.00 0.175 0.020 4.6 2.50%
1.27 0.00 0.112 0.060 11.3 4.72%
1.10 0.00 0.070 0.040 15.7 3.64%
9.60 0.00 0.689 0.240 13.9 2.50%
1.50 0.00 -0.046 0.000 NM 0.00%
9.10 0.00 0.791 0.450 11.5 4.95%
2.17 0.00 0.429 0.000 5.1 0.00%
4.35 0.00 0.428 0.240 9.1 5.52%
10.90 0.00 0.717 0.510 15.2 4.68%
10.00 0:00 0.695 0.380 13.9 3.80%
10.00 0.00 0.675 0.500 12.6 5.00%
1.15 0.00 0.022 0.000 52.3 0.00%
10.15 0.00 0.526 0.405 15.4 5.32%
8.75 0.00 0.526 0.560 16.6 6.40%
6.50 0.05 0.138 0.000 46.7 0.00%
10 00 0.00 2.036 0.760 4.9 7.60%
Ask Last Price NVeeklv Vol EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield


13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.75 13.75 11.00 1.768 0.960 7.5 6.98%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 0.044 0.0....00 NM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.33 13.33 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NA V YTD% Last 12 Months DIv $ Yield %
1.2593 1.1913 Colina Money Market Fund 1.259334"
2.4766 2.0704 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.4766 ***
10.6711 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.6711*****
2.2754 2.1675 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.275422**
1.1406 1.0755 Colina Bond Fund 1.140599****

BISX ALL SHARE INDE X 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelit
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelit>
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
** AS AT AUG. 10, 2005/ *.** AS AT OCT. 31, 2005
* AS AT OCT. 28, 2005/ "" AS AT OCT. 31, 2005/ "**. AS AT OCT. 31. 2005
TO~~.. ....... 80- ON~22SS&/MMA


Copier Technician

We are expanding our technical support team and require an
experienced copier technician.

Micronet Business Technology is a leading business
technology supplier and the exclusive distributor and service
center for Toshiba copiers and fax machines in The Bahamas.

Great career opportunity and working environment
Will provide extensive Toshiba factory training
Experience in the copier field a plus
Must have your own transportation
.* .Soary commensurate with experience and qualifications

All applications confidential
No telephone calls. Please reply in writing via email
(subject line: Copier Tech.) or fax to:

Copier Tech. c/o Manager
Micronet Ltd.
P.O. Box SS-6270
Nassau, Bahamas
Email: gpinder@micronet.bs
Fax: 328-3043



TOSHIBA Micronet
COPY. FAX PRINT BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY
Since 1983




COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
2002/COM/bnk/1503
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law Side


IN THE MATTER OF
GLOBE-X MANAGEMENT LIMITED

AND

IN THE MATTER OF
SECTION 92 OF THE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
COMPANIES ACT, 2000

NOTICE TO CREDi "ORS AND OTHER
CLAIMANTS

TAKE NOTICE that all persons having clair s
against Globe-X Management Limited, whether as creditor s,
shareholders, contributories, debenture holders, assignees r
any other capacity, must, before Friday the 6th January, 200 5,
send to the Joint Official Liquidators at the address sho n
below, by letter or facsimile, full particulars of the amount
and nature of their claim together with invoices, receipts,
certificates or any other documents evidencing the sarre.

TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that the Joint Official
Liquidators may require any claimant to verify their clami
by Affidavit as prescribed by the Winding Up Rules.

Dated this 28th day of November A.D., 2005

Clifford A. Johnson and Wayne J. Aranha
Joint Official Liquidators
Globe-X Management Limited
(In Compulsory Liquidation)


Pricing Information As Of:


C/o PricewaterhouseCoopers
Providence House
East Hill Street
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 302-5300
Facsimile: (242) 302-5350


Board for visitors'




safety being former


PRPEITYI tRTHANDRU3


I -


m'uu


I DEL.~i


---~-


ME


Bir ad


s









S:-E TB UNE-BUSINESS-THURSDAY,-DECEMBER-1,------- PAGE-5B


RAINBOW BAY SUBDIVISION
(ELEUTHERA)

--. .... Lot #44, Biock 5, Section A. The lot is on a hill
=.... overlooking the Atlantic Ocean. Area is
approximately 10,800 sq. ft. This site
encompasses a two storey apartment block of
two apartments. One upstairs and one
downstairs. Each comprising one bedroom one
bathroom, front room, dining, kitchen. There is
a wooden porch approximately 8 6 feet wide
on the upper level secured with a wooden
handrail. The garage area has been converted
into a efficiency apartment and now houses one
bedroom/frontroom in one and one bathroom.
Age: is 7 years old. The apartments could be rented at $700 per month partly furnished. The
efficiency rented at $400 per month.

Appraisal: $308,402.00


VALENTINES EXTENSION
(NASSAU)

A B Lot #2 contains a 19 year old 1 1/2 storey four
plex with a floor area of 3,621 sq. ft. The two
storey section consist of a master bedroom,
bathroom and sitting area upstairs and two
bedrooms, one bath, living, dining, family room
and kitchen downstairs. The single storey consist
of one two bedroom, one bath apartment and two
efficency apartments, land size 7,500 sq. ft. Multi-
Family zoning on flat land and not subject to
flooding.

Appraisal: $347,006.00

The subject property is located on the western side of Valentine's Extension Road, just over one
hundred feet north of the roadway known as Johnson Terrace. Travel east on Bernard Road,
turn left onto Adderley Street which is opposite SAC, continue left at the deep bend, take first
right into Johnson Terrace, go to T-junction and turn left, then first right. Property is second
building on right, white trimmed brown.


MURPHY TOWN
(ABACO)

Lot #60 with a structure, lot size 60 x 115 ft.,
6,900 sq. ft., 10 ft., above sea level but below
road level and would flood in a severe hurricane
the duplex has dimensions of 60 ft by 30 ft partly
of wood and partly of cement blocks with one
section virtually finished and occupied with
blocks up to window-level and floor ready to
be poured. The roof is asphalt shingles, the
interior walls and ceiling are of 1x6 pine and
the floor of ceramic tiles. The finished work is
average/below, 2 bedrooms, one bath,
living/dining. The occupied portion of the
10 years old.

Appraisal: $80,498.00


KENNEDY SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)
Lot #5 land size 3,600 sq. 40 x 90 ft., contains
a 21 year old single story house 3 bed, 1 bath,
living, dining and kitchen. The lot is on flat land
and fairly level with the roadway, residential single
family zoning.

Appraisal: $100,800.00
-i The subject property is located on the southern
side of Soldier rad about 200 ft., east of the
intersection of Kennedy Subdivision and Soldier
Road. Painted blue trimmed white, a low concrete
wall and concrete gateposts are located at the front with a chainlink fencing enclosing the sides
and the back also walkway and driveway in the frontyard. Ground neatly maintained with basic
landscaping in place. Accommodation consist of three bedrooms, one bathroom, living and
dining area and kitchen.


NO. 3 LEXINGTON SUBDIVISION
(NASSAU)
All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area
of 7,752 sq. ft. (77.5 x 100) situated in the
southern district of New Providence being lot
No. 3 in an area known as Richville of Malcolm
Road west. This property is spacious and can
probably accommodate another house at the
rear. It is landscaped and enclosed by a wall in
front with fence on the side. The property consist
of a single story, 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom, living
room and dining rooms, combined, family room
and kitchen, enclosed carport and a roof covered
front porch (indented) with floor area of 1,374
sq. ft.


Appraisal: $123,000.00

Heading south on East Street turn right onto Malcolm Road, then third corner on the right, the
house is the 4th on the left painted white trimmed green with wall in front.



LOT 194 BOYD SUBDIVISION
(NASSAU)

All that lot of land having an area of 6,400 sq. ft.
being lot no 194 of the subdivision known as Boyd
Subdivision, situated in the central district of New
Providence this property is comprised of a 35 year
old single family, single story residence
encompassing approximately 1,278 sq. ft. of
enclosed living area and inclusive of separate
living and dining rooms, and an average size
kitchen, three bedrooms, two bathrooms and an
entry porch, of approximately 88 sq. ft. ventilation
is by 2 wall unit air conditioners. The property is
at grade and level with good drainage, landscaping
is minimal, consisting of lawns and shrubs in the front, the subject is enclosed with stone walls
mounted with wrought iron and chain link fencing and a wrought iron gate in front there is a 208
sq. ft. cement driveway leading to a single covered carport of 250 sq. ft. the subject site also
has a concrete block storage shed measuring of approximately 143 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $126,000.00
Traveling west on Boyd Road, turn left onto Foster Street, continue on Foster Street to the 4th
corner right, (Roland Ave.) the subject property is the 5th property on the left side painted orange
with red/white trim.

A DUNDAS TOWN
(ABACO)

3 two bed, 1 bath triplex 9,000 sq. ft., lot no.
18b with an area for a small shop. Age 12 years
the land is a portion of one of the Dundas Town
Crown Allotment parcels stretching from Forest
Drive to Front Street, being just under a quarter
acre in size and on the lowside. A concrete block
structure, with asphalt shingle roof and L-shape
in design with a total length of 70x26 ft, plus
50 x 22 ft., 2,920 sq. ft., the interior walls are
concrete blocks, ceiling is sheet rock and the
floors of vinyl tiles.

Appraisal: $220,500.00


KENNEDY SUBDIVISION
(NASSAU)

Lot no. 21 all utilities available 10 year old single
story house, 3 bedroom 2 bathroom, living room,
dining area, family room, kitchen, study, laundry
and an entry porch.


Appraisal: $175,350.00

Heading west along Soldier Road take main
e france to Kennedy Subdivision on the left, then
:'take the 1st cmner on the left-theri"st ight, house
isecond on your right with garage.


LOT NO 172 BLAIR ESTATES
(NASSAU)


All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area
of 15,403 sq. ft. being lot 172 in the subdivision
known as Blair Estates, this property is comprised
.4 of a single family split level resident consisting
S of approximately 3,456 sq. ft., of enclosed living
space with three bedrooms, two bathrooms, on
the second level and on the first a living and
6 dining room, kitchen, utility room, family room,
bathroom, an office, a rear uncovered porch, a
covered door entry, walkway and a driveway.
Also located on the first level in a 616 sq. ft. one
bedroom, one bathroom, living and dining room,
rental unit. The building is in excellent condition with recent renovation done, there is no signs
of structural defects or termite infestation the building is adequately ventilated with central air
conditioning installed on the second floor and in the rental unit the land is rectangular in shape
and on a level grade slightly elevated above the road to disallow flooding during annual heavy
rainy periods. The grounds improvements include landscaping, a concrete block wall and fence
enclosure on three boundaries, fruit trees and a private water supply.

Appraisal: $642,222.00
Traveling north on Village Road from the round about take the second corner right into Blair
Estates (St Andrews Drive). Drive to the t-junction and make a left which is Commonwealth
Street, continue traveling to the 7th corner which is Clarence Street then drive to Richmond
Road and make a right. The subject property is the 1st house on the left no 44 painted green
trimmed white.

MARSHALL ROAD

Lot #54, land size 42,130 sq. ft. with a masonry
building with eight inch concrete block walls. The
front 2 units are 95% complete.

Appraisal: $206,766.00

Heading west on Blue Hill Road, go pass the
intersection of Cowpen and Blue Hill Road, turn
'right onto Marshall Road (Adventure Learning
Center Road), follow road to the final curve before
the beach. The subject property is about 100 feet
on the right side, grey trimmed white with unfinished building attached.


JOHNSON'S HARBOUR VIEW ESTATES SUBDIVISION(ELEUTHERA), All that vacant lot of land having an area of approximately 4,500 sq ft being lots 12E and 13W and is situated in JOhnson
Harbour View Estates Subdivision situated on the island of Eleuthera, Bahamas. Measuring and bounded as follows, northwardly by 20' wide road reservation and running there on for a distance of 50 ft eastwardly
"'by lot 13E and running thereon for a distance of 90 ft southwardly by lot 30, and running thereon for a distance of 25 ft and continuing on lot 31 and running thereon a distance of 25 ft westwardly by lot 12W of the
said subdivision and running thereon for a distance of 90 ft. This property is
well lanscaped and fenced in. This area is quiet and peaceful with all utilities and services available.
Appraisal: $47,250.00
The said pieces parcels or lot of land is situated in Johnson's Harbour View Estates Subdivision, Harbour Island, Eleuthera.


ALLOTMENT 67, MARRIGOLD FARM ROAD(NASSAU), All that lot of land having an area of 1.173 acres being lot No. and is situated on Marigold Farm Road in the ara known as allotment 67, a
said subdivision situated in the south eastern district of new Providence, Bahamas. This property is Vacant and area has all utilities & services.
Appraisal: $148,050.00
Travelling on Joe Farrington Road turn onto Marrigold Farm Road heading south, the subject is the second to last propert on the left hand side of the road near the pond.


.11

L

r)..
h

'I;
C, -


structure is not complete. Age:


<
*f


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005, PAGE 5B


M:,,IE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


INVESTMENT OPPO RT.UNITY


TRIBUNE,
MUST'SELL.... DECEMBER IST, 2005


MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES







PTH A E E 2T R


Bank confidentiality


takes n


urn


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that NESTLEY BEAUCHAMP, WULFF
ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 1ST day of DECEMBER, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box F-41085, Grand
Bahama, Bahamas.


erous forms


%m .o -4b .


p
-. - -


* .* 9 *n -
" ap---4r -







* ----.- Syndicated Content --. -
Available from Commercial News Providers"


* .
_______ 0

-
*
m. a .
- __

e*... ** ~*
ba * -* -



* *

me 4a .
*4%

S a 4 0- **

-mmo 4 am 0ft
o m m 10 S.om404


-. -



-
- mq .m- -




--
b a **
ammm am ommmam



S- -


40 mili -D 1b 41

Ww- 41b

m -mw -I-m
*MNNo t


L -.
-* 0
~*
O am o r
--M



- S -


**

-
"6 wpm 0

"Noftew-wo
do oqm"o


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF RENOVATIONS/UPGRADE TO
OFFICE BUILDING THE BLUFF, SOUTH ANDROS

TENDER NO. 592/05

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
provision of repairs and replacements to office and power station buildings as
described above.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office, Blue Hill
& Tucker Roads by contacting:-

Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 13 December 2005 by 4:00p.m. and
addressed as follows:

The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 592/05

"OFFICE BUILDING RENOVATIONS SOUTH ANDROS"

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.












A 4

'^Global United's Gift To You...

I Hassle Free Shipping!

Delivery of Your Goods Direct to You!


INSIG.HT


- w U


Bank of The Bahamas
IN T ER N AT IO N A L


GOVERNMENT GUARANTEED

ADVANCED EDUCATION LOAN SCHEME

In collaboration with the Educational Guaranteed Fund Loan Program
of The Ministry of Education, Bank of The Bahamas International is
pleased to advise that the cheque disbursement for ALL Students in
The Loan Program will take place at The Holy Trinity Activities
Centre Stapledon Gardens from December 1st, 2005 through
December 7th, 2005 from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm as follows:-

NEW STUDENTS (FIRST TIME RECIPIENTS)
AND RETURNING STUDENTS

A-C: Thursday 1st, December 2005
D-I: Friday 2nd, December 2005
J-M: Monday 5th, December 2005
N-S: Tuesday 6th, December 2005
T-Z: Wednesday 7th, December 2005

Time: 9:00 am 3:00 pm

Place: Holy Trinity Activities Centre,
Stapledon Gardens

Returning Students: Both Students OR Guarantors should be present
and must bring relevant Identification.
(Valid Passport and National Insurance Card).

New Students: Both Students AND Guarantors should be present and
bring relevant Identification.
(Valid Passport, National Insurance Card, Current Job Letter and a copy of
Utility Bill)

Cheques will not be released until all necessary documentation has been
completed.


NO DISBURSEMENTS WILL BE MADE AT THE BANK!


Throughout the Bahamas, Frorm Miamrzi or anywhere else in the
world we take care of your goods from start to finish!


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005










BSN TRIBUE T


No Golden




Pages in 2006


FROM page 1B
iA letter sent to them by
Bahamas Data and Media said:
':,'Bahamas Golden Pages is
'making a change in the strate-
:gic direction of the business.
.1"For the next six months, the
',o6pany will advertise exclu-
,isiely through our on-line
advertising vehicle,
www.bahamasgp.com. This is
consistent with a worldwide
1ldnd towards Internet adver-
Itsing.
t e'MWith immediate effect, we
'*ikll no longer be offering
advertising space for sale in our
laditional print medium, the
Bathamas Golden Pages."
li'tBahamas Data and Media's
,ftain financial backer is under-
Moleod to have been KeyTech,
1ihe Bermudan publicly-listed
&6Stpany that acts as a holding
-4hicle for companies includ-


ing the Bermuda Telephone
Company.
Back in July 2003, KeyTech
warned investors it may not
recover a $1.26 million loan to
Bahamas Data and Media after
regulatory limits on foreign
ownership stymied its plans.
KeyTech had planned to
convert the loan into a "major-
ity equity ownership position"
in Bahamas Data and Media,
the former's annual report said.

Regulatory
However, due to regulatory
requirements that Bahamians
retain majority ownership in"
sectors such as retail and
wholesale, KeyTech was told
by the Exchange Control
Department of the Central
Bank in March 2003 that its
application for majority own-
ership in Bahamas Data and


Media had been denied.
KeyTech's annual report said
that, after the Central Bank
refusal: "The company
[KeyTech] is currently seeking
additional Bahamian partners
and intends to submit a further
application to the Central Bank
of the Bahamas for approval
of a combination of a loan to
BD&M from the company and
a reduced foreign ownership
positioA by the company in
BD&M."
The Royal Gazette report
said KeyTech warned that
recovery on the $1.26 million
loan could be anywhere
between zero to $2.29 million
over a five-year period, but
"having reviewed the various.
future scenarios of participa-
tion in BD&M by the company
and the probability of each
occurring" it said that it expects
to get $1.26 million back.


Government rejects



Baha Mar approvals


,-ROM page 1B cations and agreements with the Government
indicated the $1.6 billion Cable Beach expansion
itationaltinventoryof public beaches, especially would stop at the current Bahamas Develop-
le~eit.New Providence, so that all Bahamians ment Bank building.
will have ready access to a much greater number However, The Tribune also understands that
of beaches than is presently the case. This will be Baha Mar has had better luck with its proposed
an important element of a new comprehensive purchases of properties and land on Prospect
cythatis right now the subject of con- Ridge from private owners, the Government
ourpit~vate sector partners."' having approved the acquisitions.
gue off balancing investment projects Among the properties acquired is the home of
on0omicdevelopment with public access to Sir William Allen, the former FNM finance min-
i tadeliciate oineand isbound up With ister. Baha Mar is also understood to be looking
jaiodisionslfacing this nation; such as at further acquisitions in the Prospect Ridge
iO et of a'National Land Use policy. .". area. Sir William's property the most easterly
. a .. ,a pnP ct Ridge next to the Water & Sewer- ,
er, ,indicaedthe land east. of Goodi anis Bay' age Cdiation's'*a.terfields ewaisne oth-
6 l "-Va8 "11P^y Bah'ff Maf Was seeking to:3'u5tf






The CGUL tore
















-, International r y D eom gtic Travel







S&annn11 0 f Printing servicee
A CCc& fE-mail


Courier Services
Daily domestic & International Courier & Cargo Shippil
Mcsscngcr Services
Daily Services to & From the family Islands

Customs Clearance Services
Express Entry Preparation
Full Service: Preparation, Processing, and Delivery

U.8. & Local Mail box Services
Mail delivered directly to your box
Next day delivery from U6
24 hour access to your mail
ackages


RESERVE YOUR MAILBOX TODAY!
Call Bridgette or Kathleen at 242-327-6045

SPECIAL OFFER

Bring this Ad into The GUL Store and You Will Automatically
be Entered to Win Round Trip Tickets for 2 to New York!


RBC
[ji Royal Bank
I of Canada-


PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each property.

HOUSES/APARTMENTS/COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS


(702) Lot #30 Golden Gates
#1, containing a duplex/
apartment residence, with 2
- two bed one bath, living,
dining rooms and kitchen
units (lot size 6,000 sq ft.).
Appraised value $177,000.
(433) Lot #165 located
Dorsetteville Subdivision,
Bamboo Town Southern
District containing duplex
apartment building (2,112
sq. ft.). Property 5,000 sq. ft
(50 x 100). Appraised value
$180,000.
(401) Lots #17 & #18 Crown
Allotments, Love Hill
Settlement, Andros. Contain-
ing a two-storey residence.
Appraised Value $100,000.

(806) Lots #1 & #2, Block
3 with a parcel situated
between Lot #1, Block 3,
containing a 4 bedroom
condominium Sunset View
Villas, West Bay Street.
Appraised Value $750,000.
(806) Lot #13, Block 4 of
Coral Waterways, Section
One, Coral Harbour, N.P.
with two houses and a
swimming pool, #312 N.P.
bounded Northwardly by a
canal or waterway of the said
Subdivision known as
Flamingo waterway and run-
ning 102.004 ft. Eastwardly ,
by lot #14 and 146.145ft
Southwardly by a reservation
for a private road. Appraised
Value $530,000
(601) Lot #25, containing
a fourplex (2 bed 1 bath)
George Glinton Subdivision
- west of Kennedy Subdivi-
sion, off Soldier Road Lot
approximately 8,967 sq. ft.
Appraised value $172,000.
(433) Lot #27 of Village
Allotment #14 in the Eastern
District, containing residence
situated dri- Deier Street 'off
Prrkgate Road in the Ann's
Town Constituency, N.P.
Property size 2,500 sq.ft.
Building size 990 sq.ft.
Appraised value $50,000.
(304) Lot #213 containing
residence in Elizabeth Estates


East Subdivision, N.P.
Appraised value: TBO

(102) Condominium Unit
N-310 Silver Sands Lodge,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
Appraised value: TBO
(304) Lot #2 in block #8,
Steward Road, Coral Heights
East Subdivision situated in
Western District of N.P.,
approx. size 8,800 sq. ft. with
a split level containing two
bed, two bath, living, dining
& family rooms, kitchen and
utility room-approx. size of
building 2,658 sq. ft.
Appraised value: $322,752
(902) Parcel of land located
at the southern end of
Tarpum Bay containing a
single family two-storey
residence 4,888 sq. ft.- 7
bedrooms/2 bathrooms.
Appraised value $77,000.
(902) Lot #4 located in "The
Village" in the settlement of
Rock Sound, Eleuthera with a
11/2 storey building contain-
ing a 3 bed, 2 bath, kitchen,
living room and linen closet.
Appraised value $109,795
(902) Lot #80 (57 ft x 50 ft)
located Tarpum Bay,
Eleuthera containing 3
bed, 1 bath house. Appraised
valued $80,000
(902) 0.281 acre lot situated
Governor's Harbour with (1)
2 storey stone commercial
and apartment building con-
taining six apartment units,
one laundry and (2) One sto-
rey building containing two
2 bed/1 bath apartments.
Appraised value $387,900.
(902) Lot situated North Pal-
metto Point, 100 x 100 x 100
x 100 containing a one story
house with 3 bed, 2 bath,
living room, kitchen and
linen closet. Appraised value
$123,19 ......
(902) Lot #14, Block #23
(125 x 80) situated Rainbow
Bay, Eleuthera containing
a one storey house with 2
bed/I bath, kitchen, living
room and 2 linen closets.
Appraised value $89,998.


(902) Lot of land 94 x 94 x
150 x 150 on Queens High-
way just south of Palmetto
Point with a two storey stone
building containing two
apartments. Each unit has 3
bed/21/2 bath, kitchen, living
room and 3 linen closets.
Appraised value $287,209.
(105) Lot with three bed, two
and a half bath residence,
situated Bailey Town, North
Bimini. Appraised value TBO
(903) Lot #15 located
Johnson Harbour View
Estate, Harbour Island, size
6,750 sq. ft. with a 3 bed,
2 bath residence. Estimated
value $95,000.
(901) Lot #7 Johnson's
Harbour View Estates,
Harbour Island. 9,063 sq. ft.
containing 4 bed/3 bath CBS
residence. Appraised value
$421,000.
(902) Lot of land 175 x 184 x
175 x 200 situated one mile
south of the Palmetto Point
intersection, containing a
partially completed two
storey structure. Appraised
value $107,222.
(903) Southern portion of Lot
#27, located Johnson's Har-
bour ViewEstates, Harbour
Island. Lotsize 72 x 48, con-
taining a 2 storey building.
Appraised value $110,000.
(701) Single storey commer-
cial building situated on the
south side of Harrold Road
containing two offices.
(108) Lot #146 Magellen
Crescent Poinciana Garden
Subdivision, Freeport, Grand
Bahama, with partially built
2,700 sq ft triplex 1 bed, 1
bath apartment. Appraised
value $47,500.
(902) Lot (8,000 sq. ft.) situ-
ated Sand's Alley, North Pal- :
metto Point with. incomplete
triplex (concrete structure
- belt course 2,529.6 sq. ft).
Appraised value $49,414.

(601) Lot (3,150 sq. Ft.) lo-
cated Mason's Addition with
partly completed restaurant.
Appraised value $35,000.


VACANT PROPERTIES
(701) 2 Vacant lots situated (108) Lot #296 Section A (717) Vacant Lot #16 (4,920
Domingo Heights Subdivi- Royal Bahamian Estates, sq. ft.) in Caroline Estates
sion, east of East St. South Grand Bahama, vacant single Subdivision, in the southern
and north of Malcolm Allot- family lot .49 acre. Appraised side of Cowpen Road west
ment. Appraised value TBO. value $22,000 of Faith Avenue. Appraised
value $42,000.
(304) Lot D-2,415 west of Fox (902) Lot #5 & 6A, Block #3
Hill Road and 659 ft. south Club Estates Subdivision (902) Vacant Lot approxi-
of Joe Farrington Road, N.P. situated in Rock Sound near mately 50 x 75 x 75 x 51 situ-
Appraised value: TBO the Rock Sound Club. ated north of Tarpum Bay,
Appraised value $25,000. Eleuthera. Appraised value
(565) Vacant lot #5 located $6,500.
Eleuthera Island Shores, Sea- (902) Lot #5 of Bowles Tract,
side Drive Section B, Block 8.35 acres (2,017.17 ft x 200 (902) .281 acre of vacant
#15, Eleuthera. 9,691 sq. ft. ft.) located approximately 2 land off Queen's Highway in
Appraised value $21,805. miles southeast of Governor's the settlement of Governor's
Harbour. Appraised value Harbour, Eleuthera. Ap-
(902) Vacant Lot situated $292,000 praised value $31,320.
South Palmetto Point, Eleu-
thera, North of Public Road (400) 1 acre parcel of land (505) Lots # 12 15, Block
known as "Hog Hole Road'" situated Conch Sound, #11 Greater Chippingham
Dimensions 140 x 135 x Andros. Appraised value Subdivision situated on
100 x 35. Appraised value $18,000. the south side of Flamingo
$27,845 Avenue, the 2nd lot west of
(565) Vacant Lot #9 Hibiscus Avenue extending to
(902) Lot #46, Block #32, (11,406.65 sq. ft.) situated the 4th lot east of Myrton Av-
Bahamia. Section IX Free- in.Mango Lane Section "B" enue. Appraised value TBO
port, Grand Bahama 90 ft Block #15, Eleuthera Island
wide along Stratford Way and Shores on the island of
150 ft along Stratford Court. Eleuthera.'Appraised value
Appraised value $26,000. $25,665.

OFFICERS
COMMERCIAL ANDROS TOWN LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE
BANKING CENTRE Tel:242-368-2071 Tel: 242-394-3560
Tel: 242-356-8567 (400) Mrs. Vanessa Scott (716) Mrs. Ingrid Simon
(800) Mrs. Monique Crawford NASSAU MAIN BRANCH (717) Mrs. Kaye Forsythe
(802) Mr. Marvin Clarke Tel: 242-322-8700 (723) Ms. Alistair Curry
(803) Mr. Brian Knowles (701) Mrs. Stephanie Saunders (724) Mrs. Nancy Swaby
(806) Mr. Jerome Pinder (702) Mrs. Anastacia Knowles (725) Ms. Marguerite Johnson
(807) Mr. Larry Bowleg (703) Mrs. Venus Bonimy (565) Mrs. Catherine Davis
(808) Mrs. Hope Sealey JFK DRIVE BRANCH MACKEY STREET
PALMDALE SHOPPING Tel: 242-325-4711 Tel: 242-393-3097
CENTRE BRANCH (401) Mr. James Strachan (601) Ms. Nicola Walker
Tel: 242-302-3800 PRINCE CHARLES BAY & VICTORIA BRANCH
(201) Mr. David Barr SHOPPING CENTRE Tel: 242-322-2451/3
(202) Mr. Frank Dean Tel: 242-393-7505/8 (303) Mr. Desmond McIntosh
NASSAU INT'L AIRPORT (501) Mr. Keith Lloyd (304) Mrs. Alicia Thompson
Tel: 242-377-7179 CABLE BEACH FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH
(433) Mrs. Lindsey Peterson Tel: 242-327-6077 Tel: 242-352-6631/2
GOVERNOR'S HARBOUR, (466) Mrs. Winnifred Roberts (101) Mr. Toure Holder
ELEUTHERA MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO (102) Mrs. Damita Newbold-
Tel: 242-332-2856/8 Tel: 242-367-2420 Cartwright
(902) Mr. Brian Hanna (908) Mrs. Joyce Coleby-Riviere (103) Ms. Garnell Frith
HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH (909) Mrs. Sylvia Poitier (104) Ms. Jackie Knowles
Tel: 242-333-2230 (910) Mr. Travis Spicer (108) Ms. Sylvie Carey
(901) Mr. Antonio Eyma BIMINI BRANCH
(903) Mrs. Rose Bethel Telephone:242-347-3031
(105) Ms Velderine Laroda

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean | RBC
Royal Bank
0 Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada I Of Canada-
T' The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005, PAGE 7B


.iTHE TRIBUNE













Bank's February court date over copyright action


FROM page 1B

as the registered proprietor of
Patent Number 1262, issued in
respect of its electronic pay-
ments and currency system,


IOOCS, and it has infringed
Sabrina's copyright in using its
design on the bank's ATM
card".
Sabrina alleged that it had
signed an agreement in
November 2000 with Workers


Bank, the institution then
majority owned by the Hotel
Workers' Union, that would
see the institution use its
patented Integrated
Online/Offline Currency Sys-
tem (IOOCS). The IOOCS


SBAHAMAS

0 ELECTRICITY

CORPORATION

- VACANCY NOTICE4--

TECHNICAL TRAINER
HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING DEPARTMENT
A vacancy exists in the Human Resources & Training Division for a Technical Trainer.
The Technical Trainer (Electrical) is responsible for the technical instruction of employees
from all engineering departments within the Corporation encompassing Electrical Engineering,
Transmission and distribution Operations, Power Generation Operations inclusive of Plant
Installation, Maintenance, Operation and Control Workshop.
Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:
Providing instructions and training in engineering trade skills for employees within
the Corporation
Preparing candidates for external examination certification by local and overseas
organizations
Providing instructions on developing safe and efficient work habits
Providing instructions to participants in classroom workshops and job environments
Preparing program criteria and marking schemes for trade testing in electrical based
trades.
Preparing timetables and examination schedules for visiting external examiners.
Identifying, developing and delivering engineering; courses (i.e., Electrical Technician
Training).
Evaluating, recording and reporting on the progress of students attending training
courses
Preparing course notes, training aids, evaluating and marking schemes for all courses.
Job requirements include:
A minimum of a Bachelor's Degree in Electrical Engineer or an OND in engineering
or equivalent qualifications
A minimum of 10+ years of experience in an industrial training setting
Sound knowledge of technical skills related to electrical engineering principles
Good judgment and sound reasoning ability
SExcellent time management skills
Proficient oral and written communication skills
Ability to keep current with newly installed or modified plant
Comprehension of schematics, technical reports, drawings, troubleshooting and
technical activities
Good information transfer skills
Computer literate
Interested persons may apply by completing an internal Application Form forwarded to
reach: The Human Resources Department on or before Tuesday, December 6, 2005.
















WINTER PROGRAMMES 2006


BTVI is now accepting application forms for the winter
(January) semester 2006 for the following programmes:




Conch Shell Jewelry Manufacturing Day and Night


* Drywall Installation

* Evening Wear

* Painting and Decorating

* Roof Construction

* Small Gas Engine

* Tailoring


Day and Night

Night

Day and Night

Night

Day and Night

Day and Night


Application forms are available in the
Admissions Office in the J-Block of the
Campus on Old Trail Road between the
hours of 9:00am and 5:00pm


For additional information contact
Ms Lorraine Knowles or Gene Marshall at
(24 2) 393-2804 or 5, (242) 502-6338.


system had the patent number
1262, and includes a "graphi-
cally designed" Automated
Transaction Machine (ATM)
card.
However, Bank of the
Bahamas International
acquired Workers Bank the
following year, and the lawsuit
alleges that the former contin-
ued to use the IOOCS system
and its associated card without
paying Sabrina according to the
terms of the November 2000
agreement.


FROM page 3B
streets in central George
Town, he muses in one of his
summary passages:
"The mythic power of
darkness enveloped us as a
ceiling we could not pierce,
except through the ferocity
of our mad, loving intent to
break the claustrophobic veil
that holds us down."


Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national's document said: "The
claim is that Sabrina Enter-
prises agreed to permit Work-
ers Bank for a fee of $0.50 per
transaction conducted on ATM
facilities to use the Patent
IOOCS business model for its
automated banking services,
including the use of IOOCS
cards, and that the banks as
successor in title to Workers
Bank had been using its
IOOCS business model and the
design of its ATM card and has


Poetic perhaps, but what
does it mean? This kind of
language offers no guide
whatever to the policymak-
ers and regulators struggling
with the every-day practical
tasks of cleaning up interna-
tional finance. But the mes-
sage that runs like a hidden
thread through the book is
clear any secrecy for off-
shore finance has no


not paid the requisite fee."
When The Tribune first ran
the story on Sabrina's lawsuit i4
2003, Bank of the Bahamai
International described it a;
"groundless" and "having no
merit".
It added that it had never
entered into an agreement or
arrangement with Sabrina
Enterprises, and said it had not
used the company's patented
IOOCS system or its card "at
all".


redeeming social value. Mr
Brittain-Catlin clearly is
opposed not just to recog-
nised financial crimes but
also to the entire modern
trend of the global economy,
with its emphasis on free
movement of capital. If peo-
ple of influence ever come
to share his views, then our
international banking busi-
ness will be in real trouble.'


FROM page 1B


it came to drafting its legislation for protecting
personal privacy in' the electronic world, hav-
ing visited other countries and evaluated their
practices and experience.
Mr Brown, though, warned Bahamian com-
panies that a California law, which obligated
companies that held personal data to inform
everyone they held data on if there was a sus-
pected security breach, was going to become
"the global standard".
He explained that the law was intended to
prevent identity theft, but had caused enormous
problems for multinational corporations..-that
conducted business in California, as they could
not restrict the security breach disclosure to that
'.state, but had to do it for all US states.
Some very well-known names, including banks


arid insurance companies, had been forced to'
inform customers after security breach es, the
large being a company that processed 40 million'
credit cards.
Warned
Mr Brown warned that the cost of-security
breaches for companies that held personal data
was the loss of customers to competitors when
breaches had to be disclosed. As.a result, it was
critical that firm not hold on to data the d'i'no
,need. '." :. '
He added that"comfpaniies needed to "nin'--
imise the sensitivity of data", restricting access to
customers' personal information on a need-to-
know basis.


Author paints 'doomsday'


picture of international


financial centres


THE TRIBUNE:


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005






THE TRIBUNE


Krispy Kreme


may miss


flin


deadline


a-


- '"Copyrighted Material


-" : Syndicated Content


I-- ,-.


Available from Commercial News Providers"
..0 -* -%.N *


.* ** -
-,N 461- -a-m- ft


a W ..


. O a-
S-- -


a a '~ -.


- a -. a -
- - - -
* -
0 -


a-
a a a
a a
a-
e.-a ~ -


.. .
- 4100- -
-won


0~


- a


b. 80 o


"m a- -M.-Momq


b __ 4


- -low


- I .-6
gill -s -


* a
- - -
S
S
S -
~ S a' S a


-.0 40M
moo B*


- *


- ai


0111 10 --48 -
- a 0'a.


--W 1- 4*a f ~ d a- -


.~ S a- *


. W m
0" a-


STEAM COOKS
APPLICANTS MUST POSSESS THE FOLLOWING:
DISCIPLINED IN FOLLOWING AND ADHERING TO SET RECIPES
AT LEAST THREE YEARS EXPERIENCE IN PREP/COOKING
*AN APPRECIATION FOR FOOD PREPARATION
AN APPRECIATION FOR CLEANLINESS AND ORDER
SSTRONG SENSE OF URGENCY
THE ABILITY TO WORK UNDER PRESSURE
FORWARD RESUMES TO EMAILADDRESS: RR@SBARROBAHAMAS.COM OR FAX # 356-0333








Small established out island firm seek

Attorney with up to 5 years experience,

salary commensurate with experience.

Recent graduates may be considered.


Email resume to:

outislandlaw@yahoo.com

or mail to

P.O.Box AB 20415, Marsh Harbour


LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
International Business Companies Act
(No. 45 of 2000)
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act, No. 45 of 2000, ATTIC INVESTMENTS
LIMITED., has been completed, a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register. The date of
completion of dissolution was the 9th day of November,
2005.


Signed *
PANAMERICAN MANAGMENT
SSERVICES(BAHAMAS) LTD.
Liquidator


Full time position available wthh anstaMbsihed
kitchen cabinet dealership; Responsibilities
include designing and drafting:- kitchens and
bathrooms, closets and various other millwork.
Construction background and CAD skills are
important. Salary and benefits are negotiable.
Located out West; this is a fun and rewarding
career opportunity for the right person.

please email application to
ckl@coralwave.com






Kingsway Academy

invites qualified

teachers for the

following positions for

January, 2006.

* Auto Mechanics and Woodwork
* Biology
* Librarian/Media Supervisor

Successful applicants must:

* Be a practicing, committed born-again Christian
* Have a minimum qualification of a Bachelor's
Degree in the appropriate subject areas or higher
from a recognized college or university
* Have a valid teacher's certificate or diploma
where appropriate
* Be willing to participate in extra curricular
activities, etc.

Application must be made in writing together
with a full curriculum vitae, a recent color
photograph and names of at least three references,
one being that of your Church pastor to:

Acadey Aff Irs 1111111


I0J' l. IBahamas
Forfuther inf *io p et a te BUS1i l SOffice X
Te alepho nenumbrs i_2-06
DEDINEORAPLIATON0S : IS FIDA,v


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
2002/COM/bnk/1502
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law Side

IN THE MATTER OF
GLOBE-X CANADIANA LIMITED

AND

IN THE MATTER OF
SECTION 92 OF THE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
COMPANIES ACT, 2000

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHER
CLAIMANTS

TAKE NOTICE that all persons having claims
against Globe-X Canadiana Limited, whether as creditors,
shareholders, contributories, debenture holders, assignees or
any other capacity, must, before Friday the 6th January, 2006,
send to the Joint Official Liquidators at the address shown
below, by letter or facsimile, full particulars of the amount
and nature of their claim together with invoices, receipts,
certificates or any other documents evidencing the same.

TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that the Joint Official
Liquidators may require any claimant to verify their claim
by Affidavit as prescribed by the Winding Up Rules.
Dated this 28th day of November A.D., 2005
Clifford A. Johnson and Wayne J. Aranha
Joint Official Liquidators
Globe-X Canadiana Limited
(In Compulsory Liquidation)
C/o PricewaterhouseCoopers
Providence House
East Hill Street
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone: (242),302-5300
- Facsimile:-(242) 302-5350 ...


Securities Finance
Administration Manager GAT
(Global Arbitrage & Trading)
The successful candidate should possess the following
qualifications:
* 10 to 15 years Equity Finance Experience
* Experience of working in Asian and European locations
* Microsoft Office/Bloomberg Proficiency
SStrong Organizational & Accuracy skills
* Ability to follow up and promptly escalate issues
* Ability to be extremely aware of time limits
. Ability to work under pressure
* Ability to, work to tight deadlines in a high volume
environment
Strong commitment to Quality and Excellence
SCommunication skills written and verbal
* Meticulous attention to detail

Job Description
Global Arbitrage & Trading, the proprietary equity trading
desk within Royal Bank of Canada Capital Markets, is
currently looking to recruit a senior securities finance
trader responsible for the trading and borrowing of Securities
Finance positions and related collateral. The role requires
detailed understanding of Securities Lending and Equity
Swap business taking into consideration tax, legal and
credit issues and an acute awareness of the time critical
and complex nature of the Securities Lending environment.
An ability to work under pressure and to tight deadlines
in a high volume environment is essential. The role also
requires extensive liaison with Global trading desks and
Hedge funds and experience of working in Asian, European
Equity markets.
Tasks & Responsibilities
* Trading and Daily review of all stock lending/borrowing
and collateral exposure.
, Ability to generate and implement innovative new trading
structures.
* Profit & Loss reconciliation
* Daily dialogue with extensive client base
A competitive compensation package (base salary & bonus)
will be commensurate with relevant experience and
qualifications.
Please apply before December 9, 2005 to:
Daniel Rosenbaum
Global Arbitrage & Trading
Royal Bank of Canada
Lyford Manor, Lyford Cay
P.O. Box N-7549, New Providence, The Bahamas
Via fax: (242)362-6441
Via email: bahcayjp@rbc.com


t Reglitetd trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada
"Th. Uo & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarksof
Royal Bank of Canada


RBC
Capital
I~sMarkets


G. e


BUSINESS


w


IHUHbUAY, ut-UEMBER 1, 2005, Pu L-"'


- -


. .Ib


*


*


I







I MnOIUlINC orurn i


g~ (up


~- -f



0~
~ ~-
0~


Suggestion on


the


use of gymnasiums


T'S becoming evident
that more has to be
-- done for the core sports in
the country, especially in
New Providence.
S- There's no reason why bas-
- ketball and volleyball have
S to be clashing over the use
of a gymnasium to play their
S- regular season games.
n There's no reason why the
national gymnasium, which
was ideally designed to host
sporting events, is not avail-
able upon request because in
S_ some instances, it's been
S- used for other national
events.
S ^ The fact that both volley-
ball and basketball can't
secure a permanent home
S_ has affected the level of par-
m ticipation from the fans and
the morale of the players.
Since being elected as
president of the NPABA,
- Keith 'Belzee' Smith has
been saddled by the fact that
S neither the Kendal Isaacs
National Gymnasium or the
-AF Adderley Gym are avail-
able for their use.
nw aThe NPVA have access to
the DW Davis Gym, but they
S- __ are still being forced to post-
S,. -dm poned games from time to
time.
Currently there are four


STUBBS


OPINI


public gymnasium
available in New Pi
but it's anyone's gi
they can have acce
KGLI, AF Adde:
Davis or the CI
Gymnasiums.
At present, th


board have been given
responsibility for the use of
the three school gyms, while
the ministry has direct
responsibility for the KGLI
Gym.
They determine who can
use the facilities and what
charges, if any, are levied to
them for the maintenance of
them.
As the governing bodies,
why can't the gyms be placed
in the hands of the national
federations, such as the
Bahamas Volleyball Feder-
ation and the Bahamas Bas-


ketball Federation?

/ s the governing
.L bodies, they can be
given a grant from the gov-
ernment that will be ear-
marked for the upkeep of the
T gym. In that way, if they fail
to maintain them, they could
be denied the opportunity to
use them in the future.
In that way, they will
assume more responsibility
s that are for the affiliated associations
rovidence, and ensure that all other
guess when local organisations, whether
ess to the recreational or competitive,
rley, DW apply for membership if they
Gibson too intend to use the facili-
ties.
e school The same could be said


about the Bahamas Softball
Federation, whose responsi-
bility would cover the use of
the Churchill Tener Knowles
National Softball Stadium as
well as the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex.
The Bahamas Association
of Athletic Associations
would assume full responsi-
bility for the Thomas A
Robinson Track and Field
Stadium and the Bahamas
Football Association could
take care of the National
Football Centre at Baillou
Hills.
Offices with a full-time
administrator should be set
up for the federations of the
core sports in one central
location, preferably at the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Cen-
tre, where associations and
other sporting organisations
can make inquiries for the
use of the facilities.
Sanctions, and whatever
assistance is needed for the
operation of their activities,
can be easily presented at the
same time.
Government, in turn, can
gear more of their attention
on getting the sporting bod-
ies to adhere to the rules and
regulations that govern their
sports and bringing the Fam-
ily Islands closer together.


At the same time, the min-
istry could concentrate a lit-,
tle more on trying to upgrade
or construct the facilities in
the Family Islands that the
sports administrators com-
plained so much about dur-
ing the recent 2005 National
Sports Leaders Conclave.
The Family Islands have
complained that too much.
emphasis is being placed on".
New Providence and they:;
are left out in the cold ina;
terms of having the proper:
facilities.
But I'm sure that, under'
the present system, many of :
the local associations and9"
federations feel left out when
it comes to the use of the,
facilities here in New Provi-'
dence.
Some other form of'7
operation must be imple-;
mented because too many'i
organisations are crying out'
over the lack of a facility to*
play in.
With the $30 million"
reconstruction of the QESC
by the Chinese Government
over the next two years, I'm
sure that the ministry will be
looking at a lot of changes
to its user policy.
This might be one of the
suggestions that the ministry
might consider.


- -
S. S -
a- -
a -
*
-. -
- -
S *
a a





- -.- -
-
- - -


4.-I


.-4b


"Copyrightel Material



Sy dcateConte


Availablefrom,.Commercial News Pro


- -a
B
--4
-S
- 5- -a -
S


-o -


.*


* b-- 0-
I S
- -a- S


S -


9


wviders"


PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005


I MI UI I-- O Jn I


^^^SI^H^SiS^^SS~~fS^^^SII^^I^^^H^^^^ESPORSSSS^I^i^^^^^^^^SHSSISS


o


-


- ft


b


---INN




I~-IUIICL'Ii L:IL I


I HtIUl Olruh IZ:


Shockers


with


take the title


perfect record


3,I 'I n0^, sI


Drawing will be on December 14 before 12:noon


STelephone: Cell: I
1_ _ _SORRY NOPHOTOCOPIES.NEWSPAPER PRINT ONLY


mom" I
SPORTS-









THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005


SECTION


B 1

Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


The Lions tie

series against

the Warriors
* SOFTBALL
ON THE strength of seven
extra base hits, including back-
to-back three-run home runs in
the bottom of the first inning,
Golden Gates Native Baptist
Lions out-slugged Macedonia
Warriors 14-10 Tuesday night
at the Churchill Tener Knowles
National Softball Stadium.
With the win, the Lions
roared back to even the Baptist
Sports Council's 2005 co-ed
best-of-three championship.
series at 1-1, forcing a third and
deciding game on Saturday at
10am at the Baillou Hills Sport-
ing Complex.
Centrefielder Richard Bast-
ian had two of the seven extra
base hits for Golden Gates in
his perfect 3-for-3 night at the
plate as he cracked the first of
two three-run shots off War-
rior's losing pitcher Harold
'Banker' Fritzgerald in the first.
Bastian also had an RBI triple,
scoring three times.
Catcher Johnny Burrows was
2-for-3 as he belted the second
three-run shot with one out in
the first. Burrows also had! a
run-producing triple and he fin-
ished with a total of five RBIs
with just one run scored.

Scored
Golden Gates also got a 3-
for-3 night from leftfielder
Calvin Greenslade, who scored
a run. Rebounding from a first
inning strike out, third sacker
Linda Knowles was also 2-for-
3, including hitting a three-run
triple. She ended up with four
RBIs and two runs scored.
Shortstop Denise Sears..
added a pair of hits with an
RBI, scoring twice; second
sacker Cara Knowles scored
twice and designated player
Ivan 'Showtime' Francis had a
triple and scored three, times to
help Junior Moss pick up the
win.
For Macedonia, centre field-
er Michael Thompson was 3-.
for-4 with a triple and a pair of
doubles, driving in two runs
andl scoring once. Shortstop
Vonette Nairn had two hits
with an RBI, scoring three
times.
Brian Capron had a pair of
hits and scored a run, while
Lynden George Burrows,
Olympia Morris, Christine
Saunders and John Lockhart all
scored a run for Macedonia.
While the third and deciding
game will be played on Satur-
day for the co-ed at 10am, the
clincher in the men's semi-final
series between Macedonia and
Transfiguration will follow at
noon.
The winner of that game will
go on to play the defending
champions Calvary Deliverance
in game one of the men's best-
of-three championship series,
starting at 2pm.
Also on Saturday at 10am on
another field, Macedonia and
Golden Gates will clash in the
19-and-under best-of-three
championship series. Games
two will follow at noon. If nec-
essary, they will play game
three at 2pm.


~~~ _. ~ ~_~~ le *--_, ~ ~


Shockers take title







weith oect recorP


* BASKETBALL
By BSENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
SHAQUILLE Pennerman
wanted to make sure that the
St. Joseph/Joseph Shockers
didn't lose the game, nor their
perfect winning streak in their
quest to win the Catholic
Diocesan Primary Schools'
2005 basketball title.
So he decided to run the
ball.
The move resulted in the
Shockers pulling off a 38-20
rout over the Xavier's Giants
for a two-game sweep in the
best-ff- three championship
series -,iAd a perfect 8-0 win-
loss rec6bl in the process.
"I justdidn't want our team
to turn .over the ball," said


Pennerman, who drew
Xavier's defence out, allowing
his Shockers' team-mates to
get the easy baskets inside.
Pennerman, 12, did make
his contribution offensively as
he and Chet Johnson canned
11 points apiece to lead the
Shockers. Laron Morley had
six, while Denzil Bain added
five and Teran Watson
chipped in with four.

Finished
For Xavier's, Justin Symon-
ette paced the way with 11 as
well, while Kent Wood had
five and Jermaine Smith fin-
ished with two.
Shocker' coach Devon John-
son said it was a victory that


was calculated from the start
of the season.
"From the start of the sea-
son, I told my team that, as
long as we played defence, we
will come out victorious in
every game we play," he
charged. "Today, we did that
and we came out as champi-
ons at the end."
At the beginning, it turned
out to be a real defensive bat-
tle as both teams struggled to
score. St. Francis/Joseph, how-
ever, took a 5-1 lead, thanks to
Watson's three points.
In the second quarter,
Xavier's went on a 3-0 run to
trim the deficit to 5-4 as Kent
Wood got hot.
But the rally was short lived
as St. Francis/Joseph got a free
throw from both Denzil Bain


and Chad Pratt to surge ahead
7-4 at the half.
In the third, Xavier's would
come within one, 9-8, as Justin
Symonette brought them back.

Surge
But, once again, St. Fran-
cis/Joseph went on a surge of
their own as Pennerman got
inside for two consecutive bas-
kets and Chet Johnson added
another for a 15-10 lead.
Before the Giants knew what
happened, the Shockers had a
20-12 advantage at the end of
the third.
In the fourth, Pennerman
went to work on the ball
directing the show from the
top and the Shockers turned


up their offence another notch
as they out-ran, out-hustled,:
out-rebounded and out-scored
the Giants.
Giants' coach Nelson 'Man-
della' Joseph said it was a
tough pill to swallow, but they
were simply outplayed when
it counted the most. -
"I felt like St Francis really
wanted it more. But we had a
lot of easy shots. We just did-
n't hit them," he summed up.
"But, like I told my guys, we
came a long way, coming back
after losing the first two games
of the season. I think we did
okay."
Next year, however,'-both
teams will be in a rebuilding
stage as they will be losing the
majority of their players t0
graduation.


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


*t '









THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1,2005 The Tribune



SECTION /- /M m AI


Sermons, Church Activities, Awards


'God on trial'
See Page 2C


Mentorship programme





targeting young men


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
What does it
take to
change the
Bahamas
for the bet-
ter, to change the world for the
better? You touch those indi-
viduals who will be responsi-
ble for building the future of
the country. You try to give the
nation's young people a differ-
ent perspective on values,
equip them with the tools they
willineed to make the right
,hoices, and help them to make
a successful transition from
thinking like a child, to thinking
With the responsibility of an
gdult.
, The Total Youth Church, the
youth department of Bahamas
Faith Ministries International
tBFMI) has taken up that man-
t4e with the young men of our
nation in mind. In a mentor-
ship programme they have
dubbed, "Young Champion:


Boys becoming Men", the
church is reaching out to young
men in the school system.
The programme is currently
in L W Young Junior High
School, and will be initiated at
C H Reeves, H 0 Nash and S.
C McPherson, all junior high
schools, in January. The club
meets every Tuesday from
12:30pm to 1:30pm at the
respective schools. Weekly
speakers, like programme
director Pastor Dave Burrows,
Michael 'Selector' Davis, Big
Willy, Marlin Nichols and
Ricardo Stubbs, serve as men-
tors for the young men.
While young Bahamian
women also need attention and
positive role models to follow,
this initiative has its eyes on
males, though another pro-
gramme of the church, the
"Hardcore Christian Club"
(currently operating in local
schools and colleges as far
away as Devry University in
Florida), is open to both male
and female students.


SE COREY ROLLED
0 E COREY ROLLE


"Young men do seem to be
the most trouble makers in
society. It's evident in the
prison system and juvenile jails.
The enemy attacks these young
men early, because once they
become distorted then there
won't be proper homes and a
country is only as strong as its
homes," E Corey Rolle, better
known as DJ Counsellor, told


Tribune Religion.
"A woman can never fulfill a
man's roll completely. There is
hope for the males of this coun-
try, that hope is the gospel of
Jesus Christ," he added. Mr
Rolle, who serves as the assis-
tant youth pastor at BFMI, is
also one of the programmes
speakers.
Most youth leaders would
agree that when young men
exhibit negative social behav-
iour, there are almost always
unresolved, underlying issues,
such as low self esteem, family
turmoil, or a distrust of author-
ity that stems from past expe-
riences. These issues often lead
to young men acting out in vio-
lence. And while this reasoning
is not an excuse to tolerate
youth violence, it should help
society to developprogrammes
to get at the heart of the mat-
ter.
"I have come to realise," said
Mr Rolle, "that these children
don't have teal parenting at
home. Most of them are frus-.


trated and not loved, they go
through life just floating, and
they end up becoming like their
environment, many of which
are negative."
Waiting on the government
to do something about it may
not be the answer either. The
church, which understands the
principle of fighting a spiritual
battle, should be at the helm.
Unfortunately, many churches
do not make youth develop-
ment programmes a priority,
the youth leader noted.
This nonchalant attitude is a
huge mistake that has many
repercussions, he believes.
"Churches find money for
everything other than their
youth. So the kids spend there
attention on who is catering to
them, like .50 Cent and Ele-
phant Man. They spend the big
bucks to cater to the youth, but
the church and government
haven't caught on yet."
While there exists in
Bahamian society correctional
facilities and programmes that
help delinquent youth, who
have been in trouble with the
law, "Young Champion: Boys
Becoming Men" has a proac-
tive strategy in mind. It sub-
scribes to-the-theory that unless
a society catches the problem
when warning signs appear, the
situation will only become
worse. It hopes to encourage
other churches not to view
young people as a group of per-
sons who need no attention,
but to see that youth are the
future.
Said the youth leader: "Why
do you think that in Iraq, the
greatest fuel behind their mis-
sion is getting youth to fulfill
their mandate. Look at the

SEE page 2C


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


w :1e....a ge.


100%

ble Bo 6'&it Shop


SdiaajLs44


(Laeall a -116 W~aa a g &ta
i^~~~~~f4 4afij amAoi^ M Msois


Diocesan Hurricane Relief Fund gets $500


* MEMBERS of the Cursillo Movement of the Anglican House. Recently, the Cursillo Movement donated money for
Communion presented Archbishop Drexel Gomez with a the Education for Ministry programme at Her Majesty's
$500 cheque for the Diocesan Hurricane Relief Fund. Here, Prison, Fox Hill.
Anglican Archbishop Drexel W Gomez receives the cheque
from William Lowe, director, and Ena Stubbs (centre), assis- (Photo: Carvel Francis/Diocesan
tant treasurer. The presentation was made at Addington Communications Ministry)


I


i


I


- -








PAGE 0, THRSDA, DECMBER 2 0 0THEITIBUN


Contributing Writer: Christian Hamaker
Genre: Drama
Run Time: 127 minutes
Director. Joe Wright
Actors: Keira Knightley, Matthew Macfadyen, Brenda Blethyn,
Donald Sutherland, Tom Hollander, Rosamund Pike, Jenna
Malone, Simon Woods, Rupert Friend, Judi Dench
JANE Austen fans, rejoice. "Pride and Prejudice" has been
brought newly to'the screen with competence, visual flair and
respect for the source material. And yet, the confines of a two-
hour feature necessitate certain compromises that might not sit
well with less forgiving Austen devotees.
Keira Knightley stars as Elizabeth Bennet, a well-read, eligible
young lady in late 18th century England, who nevertheless is not
anxiously awaiting a proposal of marriage. Her four sisters are
more singularly focused, driven by their mother's obsessive desire
that they "marry well."
When Mr Bingley (Simon Woods) moves into the neighbor-
hood, he brings his friend, Darcy (Matthew Macfadyen). Eliza-
beth, initially rebuffed by the mysterious Darcy, comes to find him
intriguing, until Darcy dissuades Bingley from marrying her
beloved sister, Jane (Rosamund Pike). Darcy's silence on the
matter of his estrangement from Mr Wickham (Rupert Friend)
further distances Darcy from Elizabeth, until Elizabeth and Darch
confront their suspicions and the secrets of Darcy's past.
The social mores on display in "Pride and Prejudice" seem
pleasantly quaint by today's standards, yet Austen's story has a
timeless appeal. Director Joe Wright and screenwriter Deborah
Moggach, whose previous work has been mostly for television, find
a suitable tone for the repartee among Elizabeth, Darcy, and
the iest of the Bennet family not "Masterpiece Theater" stuffy,
nor modernised for undiscriminating ticket-buyers.
More surprising is the visual grace Wright brings to the project.
Dazzling interior shots during a crowded ballroom dance sequence
track from character to character, revealing individual tumult
amidst the pomp and circumstance, while lush exteriors make won-
derful use of the UK setting.
Knightley carries the film admirably, bringing the right note of
sass and defiance to Elizabeth's verbal jousting, but the casting of
Knightley is not without problems. Various characters insist that
Elizabeth's older sister, Jane, is the superior beauty a con-
testable point in light of Knightley's leading-lady good looks.
Nevertheless, Elizabeth knows her place as subordinate to the old-
er Jane, and nothing in Knightley's performance makes us believe
otherwise.
Macfadyen's Darcy is more than adequate, especially in light of
the challenge the actor faced in making viewers forget about
Colin Firth's memorable performance as the same character in the
beloved British "Pride and Prejudice" miniseries a decade ago.
The rest of the cast is stellar. Brenda Blethyn's Mrs Bennet,
while overbearing, is also affectionate, and Donald Sutherland's
languid, but loving Mr Bennet delivers one of the film's most
heartfelt scenes. Judi Dench as Lady Catherine de Bourg domi-
nates every scene in which she appears; it's the strongest perfor-
mance in a movie chock-full of memorable acting,
Some fans of the novel may be disappointed in this adaptation's
compression and elimination of characters from Austen's novel,
but most viewers should be pleased with this elegantly mounted
period piece.
AUDIENCE: Adolescents and up
CAUTIONS:
Language/Profanity: A man refers to a female as "goddess
divine"; exclamation of "Good Lord!"
Drugs/Alcohol: None
Sex/Nudity: None
Violence: None
Source www.crosswalk.com




Mentorship



programme



targeting



young men


FROM page 1B

armies. In the eastern part of
the world men are taught to be
men from their homes. But in
western cultures that's not the
focus, money is. When these
kids go home it is sometimes
hours before they see a mom or
dad, sometimes days."
The passion of this youth
leader, and that of this new
programme, is to "bend the
tree" while it is young, to offer
an alternative to what the
world is offering. "We help
these (children) to realise that
they were made in the image of
God and in His likeness...Then


I help them to realise that
when they do wrong, it's not
man they hurt and offend, but
God because they fight His
image, they destroy His ves-
sel."
What will it take to change
the Bahamas for the better, or
to develop a group of young
people who will affect positive
change in this world? It will
take leaders who help young
people to understand their pur-
pose in God. DJ Counsellor
and his male mentorship pro-
gramme is well on its way to
helping young men find a rela-
tionship with God, and suc-
cessfully make a transition
from boyhood to manhood.


on


* By ALLISON MILLER
Y ou know
what I love
about God,
the fact that
He is a lov-
ing and merciful God. Even
after all the blame that peo-
ple put on Him or how they
question his actions; "Where
was God when this bad
thing happened?" He still
loves and delivers us.
A friend of mine brought
me a very interesting article
entitled, "Why? Asia's
tsunami puts God on trial".
When I saw it my interest
was sparked. "God.......on
trial", for what? I read the
article and the gentlemen
who wrote the story said
that God allowed the tsuna-
mi to warn the rest of us that
we must have Godly fear.
I don't about you, but the
tsunami sure made me
aware that God is merciful.
The Bahamas could not sur-
vive a tsunami or a category
five hurricane (my belief).
However, we can not put
God on trial for a decision
that we make and at the end
of the day the result is dis-
astrous.
When something bad hap-
pens we go right here, "God
why did you allow that to
happen?" After we make up
our minds what we are going
to do and then do it. Who is
to blame?
Think
What would you think of
God if He was to force him-
self on you? No one wants
to be violated. We all like
the fact that we have -the
freedom to choose. It is our
choice that will let us know
what is in our hearts. God
lets us know the conse-
quences of our decisions. In
His word, which He puts
above His name, it tells all
who would read what will
be at the end of the day.
The majority of the time
when we choose, we choose
wrong and God still deliv-
ers us. Now I don't know
why God would allow the
tsunami or hurricane Katri-
na and Rita to happen. All I


ALLISON MILLER


"I don't about
you, but the
tsunami sure
made me
aware that God
is merciful.
The Bahamas
could not
survive a
tsunami or a
category five
hurricane
(my belief).
However, we
can not put
God on trial
for a decision
that we make
and at the
end of the day
the result is
disastrous."
-A Miller


ThLis


know is He is the beginning
and the end, the Bible
describes it as the Alpha and
Omega. He created the
World in six days and on
one of those days breathed
into man the breath of life
and he became a living soul.
At one command a dead
man rose from the grave. It
is in Him we live move and
have our being.
I don't know if we realise
that if it had not been for
God we would not be able
to get up in the morning. So
whatever He does, it is done
well. We may never under-
stand why God does what
he does. Nevertheless, we
know this, that He does it
for a reason and if that rea-
son is to teach the rest of us,
then let us learn.
Heed
/
We must take heed to
what is happening around
us. The Bible says that we
mqst watch and pray. We
tell God to get out of the
schools that our children go
to and then wonder why
they are killing each other.
The devil is doing his job.
Which is to kill, steal and
destroy. When we take God
out of our lives everything
will be chaotic.
I was part of a discussion
last week where two persons
agreed that they should take
public prayer out of schools
and other public places.
They believe that Christian-
ity is infringing upon the
rights of someone who
might be a Muslim, Rasta-
farian, Hindu, or Jew. Now
all these people have their
way of praying all they have,
to do is pray the way they
know how, to whomever
they pray to. How can we
take prayer out of our
schools?
As.,if ,wpe d,qn',taye
enough problems on our
hands min dealing with our ,
children and the school sys-.
tem now.
Thankfully, there are no
shootings, but the stabbing is
just as bad. Taking God out
of the equation is not the
answer, we will only end up
in more trouble.


for frtl


nd s.xhth


dlrt


--


"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Provid
|. .... .....


-~~~ ~ < .


**,-- -0- W-0 oi


CANON NEIL ROACH


Moments


alone...


trust in


the Lord

* By CANON NEIL ROACH
Assistant Priest
"Happy are those whose help
is the God of Jacob, whose
hope is in the Lord their God."
-Psalm 146:5.
PRAISING raising the Lord'
includes trusting in him. Wek
may not put our trust in man or-
our leaders, for they are not
finite. But the Lord reigns for-'
ever, he helps all who hope in
him. He is just and caring for'
the widows and orphans, he'
gives food to the hungry, open-
ing the eyes of the blind and'
setting those held captive by,
sin free.
Our God reigns, despite the,
fact that satan attacks us. His-
kingdom is an everlasting king-,
dom and will continue to the
end of time, however strong,
those who attack us may be.-
Christians can shout 'Praise the;l
Lord."
In these days of social,
upheaval and anti-social behy:
iour, the emphasis of the/PsalmL
is uponisocialrighteousness. !.a
Luke chapter 4:14, Jesus .se.ts\
out from the beginning that his.
mission was one of social!
reform; the spirit to free us.'
from our social ills anointed.'
him.
Man, even though he is a
leader, is not an adequate'


source of help. Remember thar'
we are dust and to dust we
must return as decreed in Gen-
esis 3:19, and all his well laid'
out plans will die'with him.f,
S Nevertheless there must. be a
Mutual trust in the ups and'
downs of life. All good comi'
munity life depends on trust;
even trust in man. Without
trust in our fellowmen, busi-r
ness becomes impossible,Ifam-,
ily life becomes impossible if:
parents and children do not
trust each other. We live by.
faith. But we must not expect,
'too much. Remember the,
S' frailty of man.
Our life demands that we,
trust one another. Man cannot.
save himself. "Put not yours
S trust in princes, in a son of man,.
in whom there is no help..." ;
"Happy is he whose help is,
the God of Jacob."
e rs" It is God who has created their
universe and all that is in it. He'
is the source of all power.'
Throughout the history of the
universe He has kept faith, exe-'
cuted justice and fed the hun'
gry. In every age God has met
the needs of the individual, set'
free the captive, had mercy on
the blind, the widow, the
orphan, the foreigners residing
among us. The gospels are full
of stories of God's concern for
social responsibility.
In Luke chapter 2:51-55, the
Magnificat or the Song Of
Mary tells of the social revolu-

SEE page 6C


McDonald's complimentary coupon.


im lovin' it


_ _~~~__~ _~~__1___ ~__ ~___ I


I


PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005


bookgWstore


THE TRIBUNE,








THE RIBUE I UK~UAYUL(.tiV~i~zi I,~uuRELIGION'~


Apostles'


Creed


'captures essentially




what they professed'


* By FATHER HENRY
CHARLES
(This is 'the first in a six-part
series on the Apostles' Creed).
he Apostles'
Creed was not
written by the
apostles, though
it captures essen-
tially what they professed.
Similarly the Nicene Creed
(the one sung at Latin Mass-
es) was not composed at the
Council of Nicea. It captures
the "mind" of the Council.
The origin of the Apostles'
Creed was the liturgy of bap-
tism, both in terms of prepa-
ration and in terms of the rit-
ual of baptism itself. The
Creed was utilized in ques-
tion-and-answer fashion to
elicit the responses of the cat-
echumens. The format was
Trinitarian: Do you believe in
God the Father/ do you
believe in the Jesus Christ the
Son/ do you believe in the
Holy Spirit the format we
still use today in baptismal
ceremonies or in the renewal
of baptismal vows.
The Creed was also a 'vade-
mecum' (portable summary)
of the faith for the unlettered.
They could memorize it easily
and take it all to heart.
The Creed is very economi-
cal in form, comprised of very
carefully chosen words, 75 in
the Latin of the Apostles'
Creed, and 162 in the Latin of
the Nicene Creed.
The rudiments of the Creed
are found in the Scriptures.
Creeds distilled and summa-
rized the essentials. They
were the way Christians gave
account of what they believed
before the canonical writings,
the New Testament, began to
emerge. In the Acts of the
Apostles, for instance, when
the Ethiopian eunuch makes
his confession of faith, all he
says is: "I believe that Jesus
Christ is the Son of God
(Acts 8:37)."
Article 1:1 I believe in God,
the Father almighty, creator
or heaven and earth."
The word "credo" very
likely comes from Latin roots
via Sanskrit: "cor dare" "to
give one's heart." Thus to
"believe" in God is to give
one's heart to God. It's not
purely a rational adherence to
God, but a personal surren-
der. It is to believe "in," to
give oneself to God.
One trusts or believes in
someone because of some
quality. I believe in God
because I believe that He is
trustworthy, that it is entirely
fitting to give one's heart to
Him. This shows the two fun-
damental dimensions of
belief: "in" and "that." The
"in" dimension is the person-
al, self-surrendering, trusting
side of faith. The "that"
dimension is the "substance"
side, the "what" of belief.
St. Paul has given us in 1
Corinthians an excellent
example of the "substance"
dimension: "I delivered to
you as of first importance
what I also received, "that
Christ died.. .that he was
buried.., .that he was
raised.. .that he appeared..."
Of the two dimensions the
"in'" is more important. It is
this dimensions that makes
faith living faith.
The first "substance" area
of belief is "God..." What I
believe in is "God..."
Belief in God is not belief
in one thing (God) alongside
other things, which I may also
believe in. "Believe" here is a
unique act. God is not some-
thing, but the reality or mys-
tery behind and beyond all
things. Belief in God is belief
in infinite being sustaining
everything.
The major difficulties for
belief today stem from the
culture of secularism. This is
liot the atheism we once
called militant (communism).
It is everyday, more 'de facto'
;atheism. The world is just
what it seems and only that.
Another world feels implausi-
,ie and unreal.
The subject of belief is "I,"
the individual person, not
"We." Both the Apostles'
and the Nicene creeds begin
With "Credo," not "Cred-
imus." The reason, of course,
is that no one can believe for


FR H CHARLES

anybody else. I can say and
know that I believe. You
must say it for yourself.. Thus
"We believe" is really socio-
logical statement or sociologi-
cal declaration rather than
faith.
The "God" believed in is
"the father almighty, creator
of heaven and earth." We do
not believe in a generic God,
but a God of unlimited poten-
cy and sovereignty, of every-
thing from "a to z," and of
whatever may be yet discov-
ered in the universe.
But if God transcends all
sexual reference God is nei-
ther male nor female why
is God called Father? The
Bible also has feminine
metaphors, which show that
the maternal nature of God is
also valued. But the dominant
metaphors are masculine.
Answer
Part of the answer lies in
the understanding of human
procreation when the Bible
was written. An undeveloped
biology credited the male
with a greater role in procre-
ation than the female. His
seed contained the life force;
her womb was only the nur-
turing context. His role was
dominantly active; hers essen-
tially passive. There was no
sense of female contribution
to the development of the
seed other than context. Soci-
ologically also, males had
power and education, without
equal opportunity for
females. Thus, if God was
"sovereign" and "all-power-
ful," God inevitably had to be
male. Overall, the rich female
metaphors for God are still to
be appropriated, though their
day may have already
dawned.
Article 2: And in Jesus
Christ his only Son our Lord.
Jesus is the short from of
Yehoshua (Joshua), meaning
He who saves. Jesus, howev-
er, is also an ordinary inhabi-
tant of a particular town in
Galilee, called Nazareth, dur-


ing the time of the Roman
occupation of Judaea.
He was an itinerant preach.
er and healer, who pro-
claimed the coming of God's
Kingdom. Jesus is also the
Son, who calls Yahweh his
father, Abba. The "and" of
the second article is not to be
read disjunctively.as a separa-
tion of the Father who is not
the Son, from the Son who is
not the Father. Faith is in
Father and Son conjunctively.
Their relation is the only dis-
tinction between them.
"Christ" is not Jesus' sur-
name. The "Christ" of "Jesus
Christ" means the "anointed"
one. The sacramental gesture
in the Bible that correspond-
ed to divine election was the
laying on of hands and the
anointing of the head with oil.
Grace was rubbed into the
chosen one, as it were, whose
body was to be the vehicle of
God's will on earth.
"Jesus Christ" thus means
"Jesus the chosen of God,"
the vehicle of the Holy One.
In the phrase you have the
union of person and role.
Jesus is messiah and saviour;
Christ is anointed vessel and
chosen instrument.
Jesus is uniquely the Son,
not one of the many holy men
of Israel who were called
"sons of God." The sonship
of these other sons is essen-
tially derivative. It "resem-
bles" the sonship of Jesus. In
Jesus sonship means the
fullest correspondence. The
Nicene Creed would clarify
this further by adding "light
from light, true God from
true God, begotten not made,
consubstantial with the
Father, one in being with the
Father, etc."
The clarification arose. .
under challenge from the A-i-
an controversy in the4th' cen-
tury. Arius had said that Jesus
was subordinate to the
Father, only a son, not
uniquely the Son.
Jesus is also "our Lord."
For the Hebrews the word for
the ineffable mystery of God
was the tetragrammaton
YHWH, something which
was never pronounced. We
do not know what its vowels
were. When the Scriptures
were readaloud, the scribes
rendered Adonai for YHWH.
The Septuagint, the Greek
Translation of the Old Testa-
ment, then rendered Kurios
(Greek for "Lord") for Adon-
ai. Jesus "our Lord" is thus
the same as God who is
YHWH/Adonai. All the
attributes of God are trans-
ferable to him, except Father.


Trinity Method:

Church
Presents


A
CONCERT
OF
CHRISTMAS MUSIC
produced.by Geoffrey Sturrup




Featuring many of your favorite local artist, including:
Kendrick Coleby
Charles Zonicle
The Bahamas Concert Orchestra
Ronnie Ambrister
The Allegro Singers directed by Antoine Wallace

Admission Free
An Offering will be received

(enter parking lot from
Frederick Street, opposite Church)
opoie hrh


* By REV ANGELA
G BOSFIELD
PALACIOUS
WE went through the phase
of joining the gym, my husband
and I. It was a great start but it
was difficult for us both to be
free at the same time each
morning to meet the trainer,
or to find the equipment we
needed available at the time.
Meant
We meant well but it did not
work. We walked the beach a
few afternoons a week, some-
times father and son walked or
jogged the bridge, or we all
swam when the temperature of
the water permitted. This was
not good enough. I acquired
some videos that had exercises
on a step, weights to be lifted,
and other moves to tackle
every part of the body, and I
began. Casually dressed, com-
fortably situated, and reason-
ably scheduled, I had found the
answer to my prayer. It was
only a matter of motivation.
How motivated are you to
keep fit? What can be done to
change our attitudes toward
exercise?
In prayer, it was revealed to
me that exercise could become
an extension of prayer time. If
spiritual discipline was to be a
matter of body, mind and spir-
it, then exercise was my gift
back to God in thanksgiving
for a healthy temple. How
could I forget the times when
surgery prevented the simplest
movements of bending and
stretching? What a privilege to
be able to lift weights or do
floor exercises or aerobic dance
in the following months. How
well do you feel right now and
how grateful are you for your


MEDITATION


REV A PALACIOUS

health?
There is, a feeling of sweet
exhaustion that comes after a
long hike, energised refresh-
ment that comes after a bal-
anced workout, and a peaceful
connectedness that overtakes
me when I walk on the beach
in deep sand to work the mus-
cles. The warm shower after-
wards creates the readiness to
work for the rest of the day,
and reminds me of how much
is to be gained from a proper
regimen of attention to body,
mind and spirit. How do you
structure your time?
Exercise
Exercise is a discipline, and
like all disciplines it requires
concentration and effort. When
I travel, my rhythm is broken
requiring the intentional re-
establishing of a former habit. I
place it in the time frame for
morning devotions so that my
entire being comes under the


"heavy manners" of the Holy
Spirit.'
At times, it is truly a sacrifi-
cial offering because the god
of sleep calls me to worship at
the altar of "snoozie-woozi-
ness" when alarms are turned
off and the theology of "just
five more minutes" is seen as
being faithful to "loving one-
self". The guilt that follows,
affords ample opportunity to
confess my shortcomings, and
to evoke fervent prayers for
proper self-denial. What do
you feel guilty about? How do
you resolve your feelings?
Gift
Sometimes sleep is the gift
of the Holy Spirit and this is
what makes for a real chal-
lenge. Rest is a form of loving
oneself in.deed. If I am up late
writing or praying or "thinking
in the presence of the Lord"
as a kind of "stream of con-
sciousness in the Spirit", then I
know that I am called to have a
later morning. If I am up late
because I am exercising my
"homemaker's duty" to put the
house in order with my special
flair for detail, it then becomes
a matter of prioritising how I
handle the events of my life in
the sequence of importance.
What do you consider your pri-
orities? How much of a priori-
ty is your relationship with
Jesus Christ and the Holy Spir-
it?
Let us work on our options
to make exercise a sign of the
development of a persevering
personality. Even as we want to
have the "perishable crown"
of persistence in "subduing the
flesh", let us want even more
the imperishable crown won
for us by the Saviour of the
world.


JOY TO THE












Thursday, December 1, 7:00pm Gala Premiere


Friday, December.2, 7:00pm-


Saturday, December 3, 12:30 Matinee


Saturday, December 3, 7:00pm







CHRISTMAS DRAMA





Presented by


.Cooper City Church of God

(Florida)


Church of God Auditorium

Joe Farrington Rd. Nassau, Bahamas


THE TRIBUNE


I HUHbUAY, UtUtlVlIt-l I, ,uuo, r r- oka


Shri *u,.R



'D * b n






PAGE 4C, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005


.5*


SUPER

VALUE
WNOW ACCEPTNG
Aj1 SUNCARD
flUALTYRIGHTS AND P S R ESRVED


THE TRI


MUELLERS
READY CUT


MACARONI


E SP ECIAL L MANNS:
DEC.I ST -DE. 7TH 200


SHELLMANNS
REGULAR

MAYONNAISE

$ 59
3 32-oz


WE~SSO
VEGETALE/T*CO

r ^^ 7"TTT *?8 9 ^
^K4~4 OZ*T^^


~9rii:
B -


.L


KETCHUP SUGAI
$2 191 B* 29
S36- 0Z 4 LB.


BORDENS 32-OZ
EGG NOG ... $4.99
CAMPBELLS SUPERIORE 14.75-OZ
SPAGHETTY WIMEATBALLS


400
ff 9




















0


SHURFINE
RED CHERRIES


... $1.59
18 OZ
...... $1.99
14.75 OZ
..... $1.39
16 OZ
....... $3.39


SHURFINE 7.25-OZ
MACARONI & CHEESE... 241.09


DIAMOND
JUMBO WALNUTS


DIAMOND
MIXED NUTS


1-LB
.... $3.19
1-LB
...... 3.99


1 KG
SUGAR...$1.66


RED PATH
DARK BROWN


SHURFINE
SALT.......


QUAKER
QUICK GRITS...


OCEAN SPRAY
CRANBERRY SAUCES...


SO-DRI
TOWELS.......


VALU TIME
FOAM PLATES...


SHURFINE
PLASTIC


CUPS........


NIAGARA
SPRAY STARCH...


26 OZ
.690
5 LB
$2.79
16- OZ
$1.89
1 ROLL
$1.f 19

50- CT
$1.99
20 CT
$2.09
22- OZ
$1.99


I M:4:


| )


MARTINELLI
SPARKLING

CIDER


I.I .. ..1. 1 _
C L ~~UB PACK


KELLOGGS
TRI FUN CEREAL......
LIBBY'S
WHOLE KERNEL CORN


40 OZ
$7.99
GAL


SUNLIGHT
VEGETABLE
SO DRI
TOWELS......


OIL...


2.5 GAL
$10.99
- ROLLS
$6.59


' DOLE
SLICED/CHUNK/CRUSHED

PINEAPPLES
$ 49
S20-OZ
DOLE PINEAPPLE MANGO
JUICES 46 OZ $2.69


GLADE
AIR
FRESHENERS


$*5
L 1 25 Q. T 71-


PILSUR -
AK MIXE
OR*


' DOWNY
NON-CONCENTRATED
FABRIC
SOFTENER


64 OZ
\------- T .TI


Saving.
starts at

SSUPER VALUE
I To.I I:I I z& fl ,I IA TII. : lH VlA-A I klIl


ROBIN HOOD


FLOUR

$ 29
S LBS


' KRAFT
MACARONI
& CHEESE
2/ $159
S7.25 OZ


I*
'O A'


FRENCH'S

MUSTARD


w -Ifi


4gI]


I~s


I:1


WI


VALUE TIME
CORNFLAKES
HUNTS
WHOLE/PEELED
TOMATOES


I ab -,%K''


I


I






THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005, PAGE 5C


m'r~zY15 Um


Rlv-
DAA


FRESH
GROUND

TURKEY
'PER.LB


RED OR GOLDEN "SWEET RED GLOBE"
APPLES GRAPES
SPER LB
3/99, $89


ARVEST FRESH

LETTUCE
$ 4 39
HEAD


CENTER CUT
PORK
CHOPS

$0189


PETTIE JEAN

E COSORNISH
HENS PT
TWIN PACKS
$799
99,


PHILADELPHIA REGULAR 8.OZ


2.5 LB


CREAM CHEESE $1.99 FRENCH FRIES $1.89


DKOTA ASST'D FLAVOR 16 -OZ


BAGLES

GALAXY SLICED
SANDWHICH
CHEESE


$1.79


GREEN GIANT MIXED VEG.
SWEET CORN/ GREEN BEANS &


NIBLETTS


16 OZ


$2.29


10 OZ PEPPERIDGE FARM 19 OZ
$1.39 LAYER CAKES $3.59


A -w


OSCAR MAYER
SLICE
BACON
$4B L


G T
HIKE


HARVEST FRESH
BROCCOLI
BUNCH
$l 99
FRESH
MUSHROOMS
$199o
8 oz


S( ,. V T
2% P? e^H


CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS
CHRISTMAS TREE'S
TOYS
SHEET SETS
TABLE CLOTHS
KITCHEN CURTAINS
TOWELS
COMFORTER
RUGS SHOWER CURTAINS
THROW PILLOWS
DRAPES
MATTRESS PADS
PLACE MATS
,_' k .' -lJ o ml_,J


Pay


PICTURE FRAMES
WALL PICTURES
WALL MIRRORS
FLATWARE SETS
CUTLERY SETS
POT SETS
STOCK POTS
DINNERWARE SETS
CERAMIC SINGLE PLATES
TOASTERS
IRONS
BAKEWARE SETS
BLINDS
IRONING BOARDS
[o0 >' = -1 i 'B-y lin. _, l'i .= i : =1 e[;i m Ii 01i T


Less at


Discounlt


Mart


WE ACCEPT AMERICAN EXPRESS MASTER, VISAAND SUNCARD, WE ALSO REDEEM QUALITY STAMP CARDS
MACKEY STREET, TOP OF THE HILL (next to Super Value) PHONE: 393-3411/393-5569


RUGS TWELS SHEETl.SETS TABLEl CLOUHS
COMFORTER SETS SHOWER CURTAINS BATHROOM
ACCESSORIES LAMPS BLENDERS FIGURINES BAKEWAES
WALL CLOCKS WALL PICTURES PICTURE FRAMES *
FLATWARE SETS COOKWARE SETS GLASSWARE SETS
DINNERWARE SETS


Located: Harbour Bay Shopping Center
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448


EI


DDf]


(~o
A A


STAR FRITES


BAR-S
CHICKEN
FRANK
S992- o0


D -i ,, 1:


VTES Rn-e


IDAHO BAKING
POTATOES
LOOSE
3/990%


I


PER LB)


LA <















Why Thanksgiving matters


* By ALBERT MOHLER
Speaker, Author &
Seminary President
The holiday police
are at it again;
looking for vio-
lations of the
nation's new pol-
icy of separating faith and civic
celebrations. The same folks
who will soon be trolling cour-
thouse squares looking for
manger scenes are now call-
ing on Americans to have a
happy Thanksgiving . but
leave God out of it.
School textbooks filled with
revisionist history tell children
that the first Thanksgiving was
a celebration at which the Pil-
grims thanked the Indians for
teaching them how to survive
the harsh New England cli-
mate and plant successful
crops. God is simply not part
of the picture.
Some educators, worried
that even the word "thanks-
giving" might be too contro-
versial, have renamed the hol-
iday "Turkey Day." Of


course, this implies that the
central thrust of the celebra-
tion comes down to poultry.
The revisionist historians
want to have it both ways.
They present the Pilgrims as
wild-eyed religious fanatics--
precursors to the Religious
Right--and then suggest that
the first Thanksgiving was
essentially a secular holiday.
The historical basis for the
Thanksgiving observance is
clear. In 1621, the Pilgrims cel-
ebrated "the goodness of
God" as they feasted with
friendly local Indians. In real-
ity, the Pilgrims had faced far
greater adversity than had
been expected. The climate
was harsh, the crops were
sparse, the native peoples
were often hostile, and their
ranks were thinning. Hunger,
disease, discomfort, and dis-
couragement were ever close
at hand.
Aiming for Virginia, these
Christians--dissenting from the
Church of England and deter-
mined to establish a truly'
Christian community--actual-


ly landed in New England.
That miscalculation meant
that disaster was almost cer-
tain. Nevertheless, they "fell
upon their knees and blessed
the God of heaven who had
brought them over this yast
and furious ocean," recorpled
Governor William Bradford.
In 1789, President George
Washington declared the first
national day of Thanksgiving
by asking Americans to "unite
in most humbly offering our
prayer and supplications to
the great Lord and Ruler of
nations."
Later presidents followed
Washington's example. Abra-
ham Lincoln issued moving
Thanksgiving proclamations
during the Civil War.
Franklin Roosevelt, who reg-
ularised the holiday on the
national calendar, called the
nation to thankfulness in the
middle of World War II.
"The Almighty God has
blessed our nation in many
ways. He has given our people
stout hearts and strong arms
with which to strike mighty
blows for freedom and truth....
So we pray to Him now for a
vision to see our way clearly--
to see the way that leads to a
better life for ourselves and
for our fellow men--to the
achievement of His will, to
peace on earth."
Is all this just a demonstra-
tion of civil religion? Do most
Americans really follow the
example of the Pilgrims in
expressing thankfulness to
God, or is it just another holi-
day with emotional overtones-
-and an orgy of overeating?
Millions of Americans will,
no doubt, celebrate an essen-
tially secular festival. For
them, it might as well be
"Turkey Day" or something
equally vacuous. This reveals
the most important contrast
between the Pilgrims and the
current generation. The Pil-
grims were driven by a world-
view that was centered in the
worship of the one true and


living God, the Creator of the Their horizon of thankfulness
universe, the Father of the is, to say the least, rather low.
Lord Jesus Christ. They, The civic holiday may not
understood His providential mean a great deal to many
rule over the universe to moderns--but that doesn't
explain everything that hap- mean that it is meaningless.
pened to them--and every- At the very least, it implies
thing that blessed them. They that we cannot really take care
did not attribute their survival of ourselves. That is just as

"The historical basis for the
Thanksgiving observance
is clear. In 1621, the Pilgrms
celebrated 'the goodness of
God' as they feasted with
friendly local Indians. In
reality, the Pilgrims had
faced far greater adversity
than had been expected. The
climate was harsh, the crops
were sparse, the native peoples
were often hostile, and their
ranks were thinning. Hunger,
disease, discomfort, and
discouragement were ever
close at hand."

Albert Mohler


in New England to their own
fortitude--nor to the help of
the Indians--but to God.
Secularized Americans are
driven by no impulse to give
thanks, and wouldn't know to
whom thanks should be
addressed. They think of
themselves as self-sufficient,
self-directed, and self-reliant.


true today as it was in Pilgrim
New England.
Christians understand that
the call to thanksgiving is far
more urgent than a holiday,
and far more important than
the calendar. True thanksgiv-
ing cannot be limited to a day
or a season. We recognize that
God has given us everything


that we have--and everything
that we need. We acknowl-
edge our unconditional depen-
dence upon Him for every sec-
ond of our lives, every morsel
we will eat, and every joy we
will ever experience.
Deserving nothing but
God's wrath, we were granted
forgiveness through the Son.
Needing all things, we have
been given everything need-
ful for our salvation and eter-
nal life. To these God has
added joys, comforts, and pro-
vision beyond our imagina-
tion--"far more abundantly
than all that we ask or think:"
[Ephesians 3:20]
So, gather together to give
thanks to God. While others
celebrate "Turkey Day" and
ponder poultry, direct your
thoughts to the God of Heav-
en, by whose hand we have
been brought near and given
more than we can even
remember.
The Pilgrims knew to whom
they were praying--and why.
Let's follow their example and
remember that their depen-
dence upon God was no
greater than our own.
R Albert Mohler, Jr is
president of The Southern
Baptist Theological Seminary
in Louisville, Kentucky. For
more articles and resources
by Dr Mohler, and for infor-
mation on The Albert Mohler
Program, a daily national
radio program broadcast on
the Salem Radio Network, go
to www.albertmohler.com.
For information on The
Southern Baptist Theological
Seminary, go to
www.sbts.edu. Send feedback
to mail@albertmohler.com.
See also the most recent
entries on Dr. Mohler's Blog.


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON
THE congregation at St
Catherine's Catholic Church
was reminded on Sunday to
enter the spirit of Advent with
anticipation. Msgr John John-
son in his homily urged parish-
ioners and visitors alike to
prepare for Christmas, by par-
ticipating in the season of .
Advent. He further informed
them that Advent was often *
overlooked, because Christ-
mas celebrations and decora-
tions were happening earlier
every year.
"The season of Advent
reminds us that we need to
get our house in order," said
Msgr; Johnson in a very spir-
ited homily following a ban-
quet that was held in his hon-
our the previous Friday night.
"The reading of today


reminds us that we need to be
ready for the time when Jesus
comes, because we do not
know the day nor the hour
when the Master will come."
His homily was greeted with
many 'Amens' and 'Praise the
Lord'.
I sat and watched as Msgr.
Johnson lit the Advent can-
dle, which he said reminded
us of the promise of God the
father that he will return to
his people, one which he did,
because he sent his son Jesus
Christ to deliver mankind.
Listening
While listening to Msgr.
Johnson, I wondered how
many of us still see Advent as
.a season in itself or just as a
reminder that Christmas
"soon come", the carols are


TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLIES

PRE CHRISTMAS


25% STOREWIDE
(EXCEPT SALE ITEMS)


(SALE ENDS DECEMBER 9TH)
AlChristmas Box Cards: 50% Off
Al hi|stmias C.D's: $10, Cassettes: $5
Gift& Award Biblbs: $
Uarge Selection of Books: 50% Off
STUDY BIBLES, REFERENCE BOOKS
CHILDREN'S BIBLES, C.D'S, CASSETTES & VIDEOS
Evangelistic Temple, Collins Avenue at 4th Terrace West
Hours: 9:00-5:00 P.M., MONDAY-FRIDAY
Phone: 322-8304
II II I I [I I I I I iI I I


being sung already in church-
es.
The question that Chris-
tians must continue to ask
themselves is: "Who decides
what, how and when we cele-
brate our seasons?" If the
Christian Church is not care-
ful, the merchants will do this:
That is why it is so important
for us as Christians to enter
the season of Advent.
Advent is the special sea-
son that comes just before
Christmas. The word Advent-
comes to us from the Latin
word adventus, which means
"coming." Advent is a beauti-
ful and worshipful way of
preparing our hearts and
minds for the celebration of
the first coming -the birth-
of our Lord Jesus Christ. It is
also a time of preparation as
we look forward to His sec-
ond coming, as Msgr. Johnson
urged us to.
Celebrating Advent helps
us as Christians to focus on
Christ's coming and not on
material gifts. The Advent
wreath is a reminder of what
the season is all about. The
four candles each highlight
what it's about. The first can-.
dle symbolizes the hope of
Israel for the Messiah and the
Christian hope for the coming
again of Christ in final victo-
ry.
The second candle symbolic
izes the preparation for the
comings (past, present,
future) of Christ. The third
candle is a mark of our com-
ing joy at the coming of
Christ. Sometimes it is rose
coloured, in contrast to the
purple of the other candles,
and the fourth candle symbol.-
izes God's love for the world&-
in giving his only Son to be
our saviour.
So, as we prepare for
Christmas, let us first go
through the season of pre-
paredness and not rush
Christmas. Many times we
are so busy preparing for
Christmas that we lose sight
of what it is all about.


Moments alone...


trust in the Lord

FROM page 2C tion, which Jesus came to
bring about. "The Lord lifts
up those who are bowed
down; the Lord loves the righteous." We stand in need of
this confidence too. God is the hope of the needy. God
loves the righteous who love him.
Earthly kingdoms will fail, God's kingdom continues.
God has made himself known to us through Jesus Christ,
our Saviour and Lord, He is the way, the truth, the life.
The one true God of the whole universe has chosen to
make himself known through his body, the Church. As
Saviour and Judge he has a special concern for us.
Prayer: Praise the Lord, 0 my soul.
I Promise I will praise the Lord as long as I live; I will
sing praise to my God all my life long.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6C, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005


*^^33<-spiwj

'E ,ter 0Q



Of Advent wi^t


r ^^^^^^^^^^^g^^^^^i. al',





SI''iri II,(


. *** *, **


0 0 0 0 *


6', *.g 1.~


9.O** ?
0. 0 0


.0

C5


9'@9~ .1
0 0 S


's* 1**I ,' '***


0 0 0 *


.9,,
'a':' !I~I


,.- .YP


* IO'f't 't*' .
* .O .


hi (fopyrnighted I'
I of %- %. I** *
^Syndicated Cc
Available from'Commercial
^ i,,,||


I'

Vlateri
S* 'I
)ntentj,
News P
m a


I


~I


IlI


*4 *4


* 0


I
*
6
S


providers
roviders2


'


; 1*
*.. **1 ** tt .i.*rf KrrtI* i|. ** slt.tth eTi I
ii 'o<,oetTl#: O,.*'O* :lto:,l:t3 o O0 ****4f rt*1 14 1 ar t'

t tits ,*. **** o** **o *o o* : t *. *.


666Ilr


ii,


2
I
(III'


'I


t t.a


P,


t * '


*:' I
'to,


* S S S 0 0 *


.0 0


Ill


C


l*


I


9 0.,-


I l







PAGE 8C, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2005


Watching and waiting!


* By FATHER JAMES
MOULTRIE
Rector St. Matthew's
Anglican Church
"And what I say to you, I say
to all: Keep awake"
(Mark 13:37).
From the earliest
times the church
believed that the
second coming of
Jesus would mark
the end of the world. Some still
preach about the imminent end
of the world, often as a scare
tactic to get listeners anxious
about the end of time.
The reason why the early
church believed that the end
of the world was imminent was
because of Jesus' prediction of
the destruction of the Temple
and His resurrection from the
dead. In the Old Testament the
destruction of the Temple and
the resurrection marked the


end of time and so Our Lord's
resurrection was a fulfillment
of that expectation.
But as time went on and the
end did not come, Christians
were convinced that the Lord
would come at an unexpected
time, like a thief in the night!
And so the watchword of the
church has been one of watch-
fulness and readiness. And that
is the essential message of
Advent.
Time
Advent is a time of watch-
fulness. We are waiting for the
final coming of Jesus. And we
will be waiting for His coming
at the time of our death. And
since both times are hidden
from us, we should maintain a
state of watchfulness and readi-.
ness so that we are ready to
meet the Lord at any moment.
Jesus gives a warning in dra-
matic fashion: Three times in


today's Gospel passage He
urges His disciples to "stay
awake". The call to "stay
awake" is intended for us too,
and it is very appropriate to
make such a call at the very
beginning of the liturgical year.
And so we wait with great
expectation and anticipation
for the second Advent and the
new liturgical year.
Each year around this time
we see flocks of birds flying
south, trying to get away from
the cold winter in the north.
They do so the exact time each
year and we can predict with
some degree of certainty when
they would pass over the
Bahamas. Their movement
helps to remind us of the com-
ing of winter. We can predict
their movement because they
are creatures of habit. And just
like the birds we too are crea-
tures of habit.
It is said that we live the sec-
ond half of our lives according


* Power Chairs Mobility Scooters Lift Chairs Wheel Chairs


Full Life Products is
dedicated to developing
innovative products to ease
and enhance the lives ofthose
with mobility challenges.


WA.LK ER
A Stop Ahead


Come see our showroom at
SCOTTDALE BEDDING CO. LTD.
Hill Top on the East West Highway
Open: Monday Friday 8am 5pm Telephone: 394-4147-50


* FATHER MOULTRIE

to the habits acquired in the
first half. While it would be
comforting for those who have
formed good habits, it is not so
good for those who have
formed bad habits.
Advent gives us a jolt from
our habits and issues an awak-
ening call to us. It gives us an
opportunity to start again. We
can easily become Christians
by habit. And many of us are!
Many of us are just going
through the motion, taking part
in the rituals of the church out
of habit, but we have lost our
freshness and meaning. We
come to church but we do not
hear the Gospel anymore. We
daydream through the service
then we say it is boring!
Advent calls us to wake up!
We rely on tradition rather
than on Jesus Christ.
Ordinary
What happens in ordinary
life also happens in the Christ-
ian life. We can get into a dead-
ly routine with the result that
we are Christians by habit only.
We are merely going through
the motions. We are taking
part in the service, but we don't
hear the Lord anymore. Words
spoken go in one ear and come
out through the other. Jesus
has virtually vanished from our
sight.


Truth be told, few of us real-
ly hear the Scriptures read in
church, or internalize the words
of the Creeds, or the seasonal
hymns we sing. Do we really
hear what is happening in
church, or is everything so rou-
tine? Are we too creatures of
habit?
We need to be shaken from
our slumber and routine. And
this is what Advent does.
Advent issues a great "wake-up
call" to us. It provides us with
the opportunity to drop our
habits and to allow Christ to
become alive within us once
again! Advent issues a wake-
up call to us, and has an awak-
ening power. Unless we are
spiritually awake we are only
half living. In this regard, some
people are little.better than
sleepwalkers. They have eyes
but do not see, ears but do not
hear. Their minds are narrow
and closed. I am reminded of a
book called "The Closing of
the American Mind". Our
hearts can become hardened.
To be awake spiritually means
to be open and receptive, vigi-
lant and active.
Spirituality is about waking
up. It is about understanding
things, seeing things, and hear-
ing things. It is necessary to
reflect, to have the will, and to
be wide awake, not to spend
our time in drowsiness and la-la
land. To be spiritually awake
means to be attentive to God
and to others. It means to be
living with love.
We have two options: We
can be a watcher or a sleeper. It
is easy to be a sleeper. But
sleepers waste away their lives.
It is harder but much more
rewarding to be a watcher. To
watch means to be awake, to
be alert, to be concerned, to be
active, to be interested, to care.
In a word, to be a watcher is to
be responsible. Jesus urges us
to stay awake, to be on our
guard, to be on the watch. We
have nothing to fear and every-
thing to gain from answering
Advent's wake-up call.
Some of us see Advent only
as a time to prepare for Christ-
mas. But that is only part of
the story. Christmas is a won-
derful time, to be sure. It recalls


the greatest event in human
history, namely the Incarna-
tion, when God's Son came
down to confer on us the dig-
nity of children of God. It is
true that our December calen-
dar serves more as a count-
down to Christmas shopping
than an Advent calendar of
expectation and anticipation of
the Lord's return in judgment.
Advent is a time of watch-
fulness and faithfulness. It is
also about transformation of
our lives as we prepare for the
second coming of the Messiah.
Real conversion must be evi-
dent in the way we live. We
must heed the call of the
prophets of old and make this
Advent a time of real change
and transformation so that the
Messiah will be welcomed in
our lives.
Children
Some say Advent/Christmas
is about children. It is not true
that Advent/Christmas is just
about children. It is about us
all. We may consider ourselves
very ordinary. But nobody is
ordinary any longer, not since
Jesus came to earth. That is
what we should celebrate at
Christmas, and that is what
Advent prepares us for. But
Advent also prepares us for the
second coming of Jesus when
He will judge the world. And
remember, the second coming
is just as important as the first.,
Advent says that the Lord is:
coming. He will come to each
of us, even if in death, and to
the world at the end of time.
We do not know the day nor.
the hour, but we do know that:
He is coming again! But any
time is the wrong time for the'
unfaithful servant; and anytime:
is the right time for the faithful
servant of God. The faithful
servant does not fear the
Lord's coming.' He/she is
always prepared, and in fact-
he/she welcomes the Lord's
coming!
We all have to be ready by
being alive, alert, and respon-
sible until the Lord comes! This
is the good news of Advent.
Let us open our hearts to
receive the good news.


Bishop Harrold


and Mother Agnes


Nairn to celebrate


their 15th pastoral


anniversary


"STRENGTH made perfect celebrating their 15th pastoral
whilst fulfilling mission" is the anniversary this week at the
theme for the Pastoral Vision of Hope Cathedral
Anniversary of Bishop Harrold Church of God. Services are
A Nairn and Mother Agnes slated for Friday, December 2,
Nairn. at 7:30pm and again on Sun-
Bishop Harrold Nairn and day, December 4, at 11:30am
Mother Agnes Nairn will be at the church in Yamacraw.


I Ht i MibUNt




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs