Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00263
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: November 24, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00263
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text







"TA STEs

CALLING" r m.
HIGH 79F
LOW 66F

L A SUNNY
AND NICE


The


Tribune


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION AGAIN


BAHe AamiAS EITrO
BAHAMAS EDITION


Volume: 102 No.4 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005 PRICE 500


*


Keod Smith calls for

'protection' from

Ingraham comments

on his nationality


* By KARIN HERIG and
CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporters
MOUNT MORIAH MP
Keod Smith yesterday begged
Speaker of the House Oswald
Ingraham to "protect" him from
former prime minister Ijubert
Ingraham's comments regard-
ing his nationality.
Pandemonium broke out dur-
ing the House of Assembly ses-
sion when Mr Smith declared
that he would no longer stand
for Mr Ingraham's repeated
innuendoes that he is not a
Bahamian.
"(Mr Ingraham) continues to
make inferences and references
to me, suggesting that I'm not


Sailor safe after dramatic rescue at sea


Bahamian. This cowardly act
by speaking from his chair is
something I am no longer pre-
pared to condone.
"I'm not going to stand him
throwing aspersions on me, my
family, my heritage and all of
the ancestors that I have that I
stand behind. He should be
made to account for his scur-
rilous and defamatory remarks
against me. I believe no-one
else, not in this place, no one
else in this country has ,ever
called me a non-Bahamian," he
said.
Mr Smith said the remarks
by the former prime minister
were "not only unparliamen-
SEE page 13


Moves towards amending

Prime Minister's Pensions Act
E By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
GOVERNMENT and Opposition both made motions to read for
a first time amendments to the Prime Minister's Pension Act dur-
ing yesterday's parliamentary session.
Attorney General Alfred Sears was the first to move that a Bill
for an Act to prohibit a Prime Minister receiving payment out of the
consolidated fund be read a first time.
Immediately after Mr Sears made his motion, Mr Symonette
also moved for the reading of a Bill for an Act to amend the Prime
Minister's Pension Act.
However, government members protested that Mr Symonette
SEE page 13


* BRIAN BUTLER (kneeling), Moi-
ses Revera, rescued sailor James Hunt,
Eric Carter and Jason Herrell stand in
front of the H60 US Coast Guard heli-
copter used to rescue Mr Hunt early yes-
terday morning.
(Photo: Felipe Major/
Tribune staff)
* By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
A DARING attempt, fifty foot waves,
one distress call, and 12 hours later, a
sailor from North Carolina is finally rest-
ing safely in a hotel suite at the Breezes
Resort after being tormented by unfor-
giving seas for nearly a week.
Fifty-seven-year-old James Hunt was
rescued yesterday evening by US Coast
Guard officers some 220 miles north
west of Abaco, after the single mast on
his 30-foot vessel was destroyed by 50-
foot waves earlier that morning.
Since leaving Beaufort, North Caroli-
na on November 16, Mr Hunt was buf-
feted by rough seas for six consecutive
days as he attempted to navigate his way
along the eastern coast of the Caribbean
to reach St Martin.
From there, he was to navigate his
sloop along the eastern coast of South
America, down to Argentina and
through the Straits of Magellan. He
would finally head westward on to
Hawaii, where he hoped to reunite with
family members.
However, his planned six-month trip
was cut short by gale force winds of up to
50 knots and "unbearable seas" before he
could make his first stop over in St Martin.
Tired and trembling, Mr Hunt recount-
ed his ordeal to The Tribune at Million
SEE page 13


Miller to ask for,
lawyer's suspension
in connection with
his son's death
* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
TRADE and Industry Minister Leslie
Miller yesterday announced he will ask
for the suspension
of a lawyer in the
Attorney General's
Office in connec-
tion with the mur-
der of his son.
In a passionate
digression from his
contribution to the
House of Assem-
bly debate on the .i
European Union's
pre-feasibility study
for funding of 0 LESLIE MILLER
Family Island devel-
opments, Mr Miller said he will be address-
ing the "conspiracy" surrounding the unre-
solved murder of his son Mario Leroy
Miller during the future debate of the wit-
ness protection programme before parlia-
SEE page 13


Save Guana Cay
group wins appeal
against Supreme
Court ruling
ALL new work on a $175 million invest-
ment project at Great Guana Cay, Abaco,
has come to a two-month halt after a group
lobbying to prevent the development won
its appeal against a Supreme Court ruling.
In overturning the Supreme Court verdict
that threw out the Save Guana Cay Associ-
ation's against the Government over the
Heads of Agreement, the Court of Appeal
justices court president, Dame Joan Sawyer,
Justice Ibrahim and Justice Emanuel Osade-
bay ordered that the case be remitted back
to the Supreme Court for trial on the "mer-
its" of the case before January 31, 2006.
An undertaking from the Discovery Land
Company developers, made in a letter from
their attorney, Michael Barnett of Graham,
Thompson & Co, to Fred Smith, an attorney
with Callenders & Co, who represents the
Association, to halt the Baker's Bay Golf &
Ocean Club development was "only effec-
tive" until that date.
Dr Livingstone Marihall, an executive with
the Baker's Bay development, yesterday.said
the undertaking did not mean the project
had come to a complete halt, as employees
SEE page 13


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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, NOVEMBEFi 24, 2005


THE TRIBUN.


LOCAL* NEWS.


M HUBERT Ingraham makes a triumphant entry to the FNM rally on Tuesday night with his wife Dolores by his side


(Photo: Felipd Major/Tribune staff)


Disney reftes newspaper




claims about robbery


M By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
DISNEY is distancing itself from the
person who claimed the company might
never do business in Freeport again,
according to the Ministry of Tourism.
The ministry issued a press release
yesterday claiming that Walt Disney.
Studios has assured thie government
that remarks by Jason Kakebeen, quot-,
ed in The Nassau Guardian, "do not


reflect the opinion of Disney."
According to the ministry, Disney
also indicated that no one from The
Nassau Guardian contacted the studio
for comment on the matter.
The lead story in Tuesday's Guardian
stated that $20,000 worth of equipment
and checks were stolen from the pro-
duction team fil i'gt4he Pirates of the'
Caribbean triloa in 'Grand Bahama.
SMr Kakebee l quoted as stating
that the robberies "mnay affect.the fact


that Walt Disney will never do busi-
ness at Freeport Island again, as well as
Sony and Warner Brothers"
However, an official statement from
Disney to the ministry disclosed that
Mr Kakebeen is not a spokesperson for
the studios and his remarks do not
reflect the opinion of Disney.
"Mr Kakebeen was hired as an extra
in the upcoming motion picture Pirates
of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest."
"At no time was production inter-


rupted and we continue to enjoy a co-
operative and productive relationship
with the Bahamian government," the
statement said.
The ministry said Mr Kakebeen's
robbery claim is under active police
investigation.
The ministry commented it is "con-
cerned whenever crime- of any, kind
affects our guests. This concern is
shared by our police force and all
responsible Bahamians."


O In brief.


Two staff

shot while

trying to

stop raid

TWO employees of the Qual-
ity Discount Mart were shot,
yesterday afternoon as they
attempted to stop an armed
robber.
Shortly after 1pm, a mar"
armed with a handgun entered
and robbed the store, which is"
located on Robinson Road.
Police say that as he wa'r
making his getaway, two male
store employees tackled the
robber in an effort to disarm,
him.
While the three men were
struggling, an accomplice of the
robber suddenly appeared and,
opened fire on the store
employees.
The two perpetrators then'
escaped in a tan-coloured Hon-
da, licence plate number 15748;
The two Quality Discount
employees were rushed to hosg
pital.
Press liaison officer Inspec.
tor Walter Evans said both me.i
were conscious when they
arrived at the hospital and aro
expected to recover.

Officials
send 200

Haitians

back home

IMMIGRATION officials
repatriated 200 Haitian immi-
grants on Tuesday.
According to Director aof
Immigration Vernon Burrows,
the Haitians were all in, the
country illegally. F.
Mr Burrows said the immi-
grants where sent to Haiti in
two planes, each holding 100
persons. 1 .
So far, more than 3,000 illegal
immigrations have, been, repa-
triated from the Bahamas ata
cost of almost $500,000 to the
government. .


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THURSDAY, NOVEME ER 24, 2005, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


LOALNEW


o In brief


Restaurant

robbed at

gunpoint

again
THE popular Italian restau-
rant Capriccio's became the tar-
get of an armed robbery on
Tuesday night.
It was the second armed rob-
bery at the restaurant in as
many months.
At around 9pm, a man wear-
ing a brown army jacket entered
the restaurant on West Bay
Street.
He was armed with a hand-
gun and threatened an employ-
ee and patrons at gunpoint.
The intruder robbed the cash
register and demanded jew-
ellery and money from the
restaurant employee and two
patrons.
The man then fled in a dark-
coloured vehicle which had
been waiting for him in front of
the restaurant.

Police

hunt pair

for armed

robberies

POLICE are searching for
two men believed to be respon-
sible for two armed robberies.
Just after 6pm on Tuesday,
two men, both armed with
handguns, robbed the Laselle's
Notion store in the Kennedy
subdivision of a number of
phone cards.
Twenty minutes later, at
6.30pm, two men robbed Price
Busters on East Street South.
'They escaped with money
from the cash register and some
of the cashier's personal effects.
While fleeing from the scene,
they were reportedly joined by
a third man.
'One of the robbers was
described as being six foot tall,
of slim build and wearing dark
clothing.
Witnesses described the oth-
er man as five-foot seven-inch-
es tall, of dark complexion with
a gold tooth and wearing a yel-
low and white shirt.

Guns and

'drugs' are

seized in

raid

`Investigations are underway
into a firearms arrest in Nassau
Village.
; On Tuesday at 7.30pm police
executed a search warrant at a
private home on Alexandria
Boulevard in Nassau Village.
.Officers seized a German
9mm Luger pistol with 10 live
rounds of ammunition and a
sawed-off Remington 20-guage
shotgun with 16 live rounds.
,"'In addition to the weapons,
the officers also found 34 pack-
ages of a substance they sus-
pected to be marijuana.
Police have in custody and
are questioning a 34-year-old
man and a 25-year-old woman.


Gaming staff sign agreement


* By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter


terday signed an historic indus-
trial agreement with govern-
ment.
The signing of the five-year
contract follows several weeks


* BPSU president John Pinder and Labour Minister Vincent
Peet sign the agreement yesterday as Gaming Board
chairman Kenyatta Gibson looks on
(Photo: Mario Duncanson)


of tension at the board, which
came to a head last month
when Bahamas Public Services
Union (BPSU) president John
Pinder threatened to shut
down the casino industry if
government did not address
the employees' concerns.
The contract is the 52nd
industrial agreement signed
untler the present govern-
ment.
,'Once again we are here to
witness and to be a part of a bit
of history in this contract
agreement that has been com-
pleted with the Bahamas gov-
ernment and the Gaming
Board," said Mr Pinder.
He added that during the
negotiations, which began in
April, the union insisted that a
performance clause be includ-
ed, "to ensure that the employ-
er knows that the union is seri-
ous about productivity in the
work place."
Mr Pinder said that the


union is for the most part
pleased with the agreement.
"We got a lump sum of
$1,500 in the first year of the
contract. In the second year we
got $1,100 added to the base
salaries. In the third year we
will again look at the composi-
tion study that will make some
adjustments to salaries in some
cases, and in the fourth year of
the contract another $1,100 is
added to the base salary of our
workers."
According to Gaming Board


chairman Kenyatta Gibson, the
deal is a fair and equitable one.
"The government of the
Bahamas is in the business of
being fair to both workers and
tax payers alike and I think this
deal manifests that particular
endeavour on behalf of the gov-
ernment," he said.
This new agreement is effec-
tive from January 1, 2005 and
will affect more than 100 work-
ers.
The contract is estimated to
be worth more than $400,000.


Butler-Turner: 'We



must put race aside'


* By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
FORMER FNM candidate
Loretta Butler-Turner hit out
at what she said were the
PLP's "racial prejudices" dur-
ing her speech at the FNM ral-
ly on Tuesday night.
Addressing the thousands of
supporters who had gathered
at R M Bailey Park, Mrs But-
ler-Turner said she was "dis-
mayed and sickened" by the
"venomous hatred and racial
prejudices" she witnessed dur-
ing the PLP's 49th convention.
Mrs Butler-Turner said she
was referring to comments made


Minister Hubert Ingraham and
his white deputy leader, Mon-
tagu MP Brent Symonette.
"We must put this race issue
behind us once and for all and
move forward in a mature and
rational mind of one Bahamas
and deal with the real issues
that confront us as a nation,"
she said.
"Further to this is how most
of those same PLPs who
preach racial injustice to the
masses diligently ensure that
their children are employed or
partnered in institutions such
as law firms, accounting firms
and other enterprises owned
by the so-called white UBPs


ordinary Bahamian to be a
part of what they are so obvi-
ously enjoying," she said.
Mrs Butler-Turner also hit
out at what she said were sug-
gestions by PLP members that
her grandfather, Sir Milo But-
ler, would be "turning over in
his grave" if he could see her
with the FNM.
"He constantly told us, his
offspring, that what he hated
were the vices of men and
man's inhumanity to man.
"So if the soul of my dearly
departed grandfather is not
resting in peace it would be
because of the divisive hatred
and prejudice that those in the


about the recently elected FNM and Bay Street merchants, rank and file of his own party
leadership team of former Prime "Yet they do not want the are projecting," she said.


Race 'not an issue' for PLP Li


RACE is not an issue for
the PLP, according to party
chairman Raynard Rigby.
In a statement released
yesterday, Mr Rigby went on
to say that race is rather a
concern for the opposition
FNM.
This follows criticism of
the PLPs for playing the race
card by suggesting that the
election of Montagu MP
Brent Symonette as deputy
leader of the FNM is the first
step in the return of the
UBP.
"We are incensed at the
false information and propa-
ganda that Mr Ingraham
continues to spread about
the PLP and race. Not one
speaker spoke about race at
our convention," Mr Rigby
said.
He said that race must be
an issue for the FNM, "since
they are the ones who started
calling the combination of
Brent Symonette and Hubert
Ingraham salt and pepper,
bringing them up to the
strains of Ebony and Ivory."


The PLP chairman further
said that in Mr Ingraham's zeal
to please his benefactors, the
former prime minister "seeks
to say that the PLP has made
race an issue."


"That is nonsense. The PLP
stands for equality and justice for
all people. When the PLP came
to power, all Bahamians gained in
wealth, power and justice: both
black and white," he said.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4. THURSDAY, NO' MEMBER 24, 2005


THE'CRIPPLED .Children's Committee
- now celebrating 51 years of service to
Bahamian children was started in 1954
shortly after a Public Service Nurse in Florida
wrote to Sir Etienne Dupuch, publisher of
The Tribune, informing him that a B ahamian
child was a patient in Childiren's Variety Hos-
pital in Coral Gables. It was a severe case of
post-polio. Funds provided by the s'eate, she
said, were confined strictly for the care of
American children. The Bahamian chiild's par-
ents had no money. Somc.one had IUold her
that if she wrote to Sir Etienne he would do
something about it.
And as usual he did do something about it.
Sir Etienne told the child's tragic :story in
this column, begged for funds, and t he next
day donations started pouring in. Tilhe fund
was over subscribed.
Sir Etienne wrote to the nurse, informing
her that he had more mon-ey than he needed
for the child. However, there were other
mothers of crippled children who were also
begging for help. He won.dered if he might
send a couple of children t o her for attention
at the hospital.
A few days later he received a lette r from
Dr Charles Burbacher, the doctor who had
taken care of the Baham-ian child. Dr Bur-
bacher told Sir Etienne th at as he would not
know what child to send, h e should get all the
crippled children together and he would come
to Nassau to hold a clinic. He would then
decide what should be dome. A date was set.
Dr Burbacher brought Mr Arthur
Finnieston, Miami'sdleadinj brace maker, with
him. Dr Burbacher confid ed after the clinic
that his Nassau visit was a new experie:ncefor
him. He said that in Miami i the mothers took
his free clinics for granted. But he saw some-
thing in the eyes of Bahaimian mothers that
made him feel they needed help. He wanted to
help them.
He told Sir Etienne that i f he could raise the
money to pay for hospitalization and braces
needed by polio victims 1 e would hold two
free clinics a year in Nassa tu and take care of
all the colony's crippled cli tildren.
Sir Etienne launched the Crippled Chil-
dren's Committee and Dr Burbacher recruit-
ed two more outstanding loctors to his team
- Dr Walter Jones III i and Dr John Kil-
patrick. Their services bdeth here and 'when
the children were in Miani i were free.
For 20 years these doct< )rs, with volunteers
who joined over the years, performed miracles
for Bahamian children wen for adults who
also sought their medical I ielp.
When "Dr Burbacher's children from the
Bahamas" arrived at Childciren's Variety tHos-
pital, nurses dropped-what they were doing to
give them a special welconi ie. Special attention.
- and concessions- wer e given these chil-
dren.


Every Nassau clinic was a tremendous
experience for the doctors who for each clin-
ic brought a different volunteer doctor from
various Miami hospitals for the experience
because they came across cases here that they
had never seen in the United States.
And then the PLP came to power and the
atmosphere in the country changed. Around
election time mothers, hatred burning in their
eyes, arrived at the clinics wearing big PLP
badges and loud with political chatter.
Although, there was no longer the same pleas-
ant atmosphere at the clinics, this did not
dampen the spirits of the doctors. They con-
tinued to serve.
Shortly after the PLP came to power the
daughter ,of the head of Dr Burbacher's firm
decided to spend a short holiday in Nassau
with her hilsband. She was pregnant. If she
had expected a problem pregnancy she would
not have made the trip. However, while in
their hotel room one night shortly after their
arrival the baby started to come. The hotel
could find no private doctor and so she was
rushed to the Princess Margaret Hospital-
the same hospital where her father's partner
held his bi-annual clinics. From the moment of
their arrival until their baby's death they met
hostility. The mother was verbally abused by
a racially hate-filled nurse.
Her father was so horrified that he flew to
Nassau to report the case to the medical
authorities here. He felt it his duty to prevent
the same thing happening to anyone else. The
case, which landed on the desk of Milo Butler,
then Minister of Health, later the first gover-
nor-general, eventually reached the floor of
the, House. Instead of sympathy the father
received only abuse from the government of a
people whose afflicted children his firm had
served so unselfishly.
However, the doctors, sad for the change
they had seen in a once friendly people, rose to
the occasion. The free clinics continued.
However, after independence a new group
took over the Crippled Children's Commit-
tee, and the doctors' services were discontin-
ued without so much as a thank you from the
government of a people they had served.
Before they learned that they were no
longer needed in 'Nassau, they had decided to
hold their March, 1973 clinic as planned.
However, they were notified that the clin-
ic had been cancelled. They were told that
there were no urgent cases requiring hospi-
talisation among children seen at the previous
clinic.
Dr Burbacher knew better. At his last clin-
ic at least five children were set aside for
surgery at Variety Children's Hospital.
Today government would do well to pull
back from the divisive path of hate it is now |
embarked.ojn..--in the end "it is oily the
Bahamian people who will suffer.


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS AD DICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bout id to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. L f. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

PubL isher/Editor 1919-1972
Cont. ributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Publi: shed Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Managemem t Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387


A racial moment in our history


form and shape of a brand new
government's future behaviour
in office. As is usual and nor-
mal, we will proclaim that we
could'do it better!
A country and its people are
not to be treated like chips in a
poker game.'Indeed those in
the inner circle who end up
holding the reins of power and
privilege have a sacred duty to
create and maintain policies
which clearly demonstrate that
at last we have a government
which conducts itself and its
operations as one which targets
the next generation rather than
the next election. The only hope
of achieving this depends almost
totally on the caliber of the vic-
torious contestants, especially
in the Leader of the Opposi-
tion. And now here's the rub.
I have known Mr Tommy
Turnquest and liked him a lot
since he was a tiny. (no pun
intended) little boy. Indeed, in a
very, very small way I have


nothing to do with intelligence,
or age, or experience, or overall,
ability, or anything else akin to
those attributes. It has every-
thing to do with 'personality.
Indeed, it is somewhat ironic
that the personality traits some
people find offensive in Mr
Hubert Ingraham, MP, are the
very traits that Mr Turnquest
seemingly lacks. Leaders are
from time to time required to
be brash, bold, and arrogant in
order to cut a clear pathway to,
the desired goal in spite of the
roadblocks strewn in his path
by various and sundry onlook-
ers and, at times, those of his
own party.
Mr Ingraham is perhaps not
as nice a man as is Mr Turn-
quest. But I don't choose prime
ministers because they are nice.
Rather, I select them because
they are capable and because
at least most of the time they
know how to command the
staunch support of a goodly
majority of the public at large as
well as their upper echelon Cab-
inet colleagues.
I have no idea what will tran-
spire at the upcoming Novem-
ber conclave of the Free


SPECULATION is rife and helped him financially at elec- National Movement. But/I
the beat goes on! An early diag- tion time and also for some time think I know what will happen
nosis of the symptoms con- after the elections were histo- if Mr Turnquest leads the FNM
cludes that Election Fever is the ry.. .And in a small way I .shal into the next general election.
bug that ails us, and there is no continue to do so. A man of his They will lose! And if Mr Ingra-
cure for this disease which will fine character and undoubted ham is persuaded to lead? They
surely spread until the entire ability belongs in Parliament could very well win!
nation is infected and thus cre- regardless of his political party As Sir Winston Churchill was
ates a pandemic. Happily, with- persuasion. That's the good wont to say upon occasion ..."I'
in days after Election Day all part. The bad part is that Mr have not always been wrong."
the fevered brows will be.dry' Turnquest is not the type of
and cool. The crisis is over. So material from which opposition NORMAN S SOLOMON
now we prepare ourselves for leaders and Prime Ministers are Nassau
crises of a different sort in the forged and fashioned. It has October 20 2005


Deal with environmental hazards


EDITOR, The Tribune
FOR far too long the resi-
dents (including visitors) of
George Town have beeh sub-
jected to various environmen-
tal hazards.
To begin, there are many.
unenlightened baby souls who
still continue to regularly burn
with impunity anything, any-
where and anytime, forcing oth-
ers to evacuate their homes to
escape the toxic smoke. I won-
der if this illegal practice is in
anyway linked to the increas-
ing incidence of cancer in many
Bahamian communities.
Next, the ever snowballing
number of.cargo ships that fre-
quent Great Exuma's only sea-
port along with the noisy trucks
and machinery that work them.
fill the air with noxious diesel
fumes and other harmful
exhaust chemicals notwith-
standing the fact that there are
two hotels, two guesthouse
establishments, indoor/outdoor
restaurants and the George


Town Primary school all in the
immediate vicinity of what
remains of the government
docks.
Most distressing, however, is
the dust with which we are
forced to contend. Some of this
material comes from neigh-
bouring tracts of land that have
been left simply cleared, filled in
or bulldozed, for example, the
front yard of the government
primary school.
Further, dirt from eroding
higher elevations has been
allowed to accumulate near and
in sections of our roadways.
Winds and vehicles, especially
the speeders, repeatedly stir up
clouds 6f thih bactetia-lad8n
filth that contaminates the
entire environment. It is not sur-
prising that we suffer a report-
edly high rate of respiratory
related issues and primarily so
among our children.
Incidentally, speaking of ero-
sion, for quite some time the
sea has been eating away the
edges of Queen's Highway near


Yawl Road, Flamingo Bay. A
semi-oval shaped cavern'
approximately sixteen inches'
deep, twenty-eight inches inL
diameter and extending two
feet into the highway is still yet
to be repaired.
To boot, no warning whatso-
ever is given to unsuspecting
road users. We truly deserve.
better!
With the huge influx of peo-
ple to this island since the open-
ing of The Four Seasons Resort,'
the authorities, by judiciously
lessening these hazards may'
embrace a golden but fleeting
opportunity to improve the'
quality of life and safeguard the,
health and prosperity of oneM
and all while simultaneously
giving new life to phrases such
as; health awareness, improv-
ing the tourism product, and,
keeping the Bahamas clean,;
green and pristine.
LLOYD SYMONETTE
Great Exuma
November 2005


Rosetta St. Phone: 325-3336


iS seeking an outstanding candidate for the position of

Sales & Marketing Manager
We are looking for an collaborative, team-oriented colleague who exhibits
exceptional verbal and written ability, creative flair, marketplace savvy,
excellent people skills and be able to:
Establish annual sales & marketing strategic plan with quarterly
sales & marketing objectives.
Devise and implement effective marketing and promotional campaigns
Have a proven ability to analyze market trends and identify
opportunities and competitive marketing strategies.
Develop and implement new promotional strategies for partnerships.

REQUIREMENTS:
The successful applicant must have:
3+ years experience at a senior level in marketing or sales.
A passion for marketing promotional products and shaping creative
marketing plans.
Excellent communication and organizational skill
BA or BS, preferably in marketing or Business and knowledge of
the latest software applications.
Send resume to:
Human Resource Department
P.O. Box N-1277,
Nassau, Bahamas


Via Email: Suntee@batelnet.bs


Via Fax: 394-6706 or 393-2862


EDITOR, The Tribune

Please note the date on the
following letter October 20.
It was ready for publication
almost a month ago, but my
conscience got the better of me.
I just could not bring myself at
that time to add further to Mr
Tumquest's woes and, indeed, I
kept hoping he would find the
wisdom to withdraw from the
race. Alas, he did not. And that
is a prime example of poor
judgment. You gotta know
when to hold 'em and you gotta
know when to fold 'em.
As a matter of fact, I knew
on the afternoon of October 16
when Mr Ingraham called on
the Spanish Wells family of
Capt Vandell (Concher) Pin-
der, whose funeral Mr Ingra-
ham attended, that he would
soon become the FNM Party
Leader.
With thanks for the space.
NORMAN S. SOLOMON
Nassau
November 11 2005
EDITOR, The Tribune


EDITORIALTE T I TOR


Retrospect





on the FNM





convention


Ccrkve


Phone: 325-3336


Rosetta St.








THE TIBUN THUSDAY NOVEBER 4, 205, AGE


0 In brief

Ingraham

pledge to

help the

needy

FORMER Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said he has
returned for a purpose, and that
purpose is to "wrest the reins
of government out of the hands
of the governing party."
Speaking at the FNM rally at
R M Bailey Park on Tuesday
night, Mr Ingiaham said the
PLP "demonstrates almost dai-
ly that it is not deserving of our
support".
"You know that my service
has always been about you, the
women, the young men, the
children, the jobless, the physi-
cally or mentally challenged. It
has never been about me, my
family or my friends.
"It has never been about the
greedy, but about the needy.
The real needy, not those polit-
ically well-placed personalities
whose needs are defined by
standards of luxury," said Mr
Ingraham.
"I want a government which
will remove political affiliation
as a criterion to obtain a job or
a contract or a licence or a
favourable government deci-
sion."

Retirement

threat to

Perry

Christie

FORMER Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham told those
gathered at the first FNM rally
after the party's national con-
vention that he intends to send
Prime Minister Perry Christie
into retirement.
The FNM leader said retire-
ment suits Mr Christie's dispo-
sition: "laid back, easy talk, no
hard decisions".
"Perry Christie has got to
make, up his mind about what
henitiends to do with or to me.
The week before last he
announced that he thought I
was dead and buried; then he
said that hieintended to cremate
me. Now last week he said he's
g6iina beat me back into retire-
menit. I've got news for Mr
Christie, I've tasted retirement,
voluntary retirement from high
office, and it tastes good.
'"Reirement was good and I
recommend it to Mr Christie,"
Mt Infgraham said.


Nurses to
hold annual
conference
this week

THE Nurses Association of
the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas will hold its annual
general conference on Friday
November 25, 2005 at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas
Grosvenor Close Campus from
8.30am to 3pm.
The theme for this year's
conference is 'Nurses on the
move: knowledge, vitality and
innovation.'
A registration fee of $10 will
be charged.



THURSDAY
NOVEMBER 24
6:30am Community Pg./1540
11:00 Immediate Response
12:00 ZNS News Update
12:03 Caribbean Today News
Update
12:05 Immediate Response Cont'd
1:00 Legends Whence We Came
2:00 All Access: In The Mix
2:30 Inside Hollywood
3:00 Bishop Leroy Emmanuel
3:30 Gilbert Patterson
4:00 Gospel Video
4:30 Gospel Grooves
4:58 ZNS News Update


5:00 Caribbean Newsline
5:30 411
6:00 Gumbo TV
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
8:00 Progressive Liberal Party
Convention
8:35 Native Stew
9:00 Black College Talent Hour
10:00 Evening Exchange:
Armrstronr Williams
11:00 News Night 13
11:30 The Bahamas Tonight
1:00am Community Page
NOE0 N-V 3rsre
th rgh.t. mkelstmne


Chamber of Commerce ups its



membership despite hurricanes


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT Membership
of the Grand Bahama Cham-
ber of Commerce has
increased by almost 50 per cent
in the past year despite the
island's economy being in
decline after the ravages of
three major hurricanes in the
past 14 months.
A the chamber's annual gen-
eral meeting on Wednesday,
officials announced that the
organisation's membership has
increased from 154 to 235,
despite the fact that many busi-
nesses and thousands of resi-
dents have been severely
impacted by the storms.
In addition, the organisation
recovered from a $19,000
deficit to earn an income of
$14,300
At the AGM at Ruby Swiss
Restaurant, members elected
five officers and seven direc-
tors for the 2005/2006 term.
Incumbent Dr Doswell
Coakley of the JTR Group was
re-elected to serve a second
consecutive term as president
when no other nominations
were put forth by the mem-
bership.


Dr Coakley commended the
board of directors and officers
that served during 2004/2005
- one the most challenging
year for the Chamber.
In addition to increasing its
membership, he said that the
chamber also re-established
international relationship and
networks with other Chamber
organisations in the United
States.
He stressed that one of their
goals will be to deepen its rela-


tionship with government and
the Grand Bahama Port
Authority.
"We had meetings with both
earlier this year and we have
been able to discuss a number
of things in the best interest of
our members," said Dr Coak-
ley.
Dr Coakley said the Cham-
ber also plans to find creative
ways to improve dialogue
between Chamber members
and the Licensee Association.




-7",,I


* DR Doswell Coakley was re-elected to serve a second
consecutive term as president
(Photo by Denise Maycock)


Gunman holds up



service station


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT A gunman
robbed the Queens Highway
Service Station on Wednes-
day of an undetermined
amount of cash and several
items, according to Grand
Bahama Police.
A female employee report-
ed that a man entered the ser-
vice station around 12.45pm.
He took six items up to cash
register and requested change
for a $20 bill.
The woman told police that
she had bent down to pick up
an item but when she stood
up the man was pointing a gun
in her face and demanded
cash.
Inspector Loretta Mack-
ey said the women gave the
gunman the money from
the drawer. He then fled,
taking both the money and
the six items he had placed


on the counter.
Police are following several
leads and are appealing to the
public to assist them in their
investigations.
The culprit is described as
about five feet, 11 inches tall
with a light brown complex-
ion. He was wearing blue
sweat pants and a blue shirt.
A man was attacked and
robbed on Tuesday evening
while visiting a friend in the
Bass Lane area.
The 26-year-old resident of
Wendell Avenue told police
that at around 10.30pm two
black men held him up. They
took his gold chain and
nugget charm, together val-
ued $380.
Insp Mackey said there was a
struggle and one of the culprits
stabbed the man in the neck
and back with an unknown
object. The victim was taken
to hospital, where he was treat-
ed and later discharged.


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La
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U- .. :!:4i:i.:ii i ::: ... [ < i i;?"t > ,


An Eight Mile Rock man
was arrested on Tuesday after
police seized a firearm and
ammunition from a house in
Pinedale, Eight Mile Rock.
Police executed a search war-
rant around 1.15pm on the
man's home.
They discovered a black Aus-
tralia Glock 40 pistol along with
two clips, each containing nine
live rounds, in the ceiling of the
house.
Investigations continue.


WILSONART LAMINATES FOR COUNTERTOPS & CABINETS IN 50 COLOURS! i


The organisation, he said,
intends to also aggressively pur-
sue initiatives to ensure that more
decisions are taken in Grand
Bahama that affect Grand
Bahama businesspersons.
He noted that the various
trade agreements such as
CSME and FTAA are still of
concern to the Grand Bahama
business community.
Mercynth Ferguson, execu-


if-


tive director, said the Chamber
has established a Hurricane
Relief Committee td assist vic-
tims of Wilma.
Ms Ferguson said efforts are
underway to donate items, par-
ticularly for babies and children.
The Chamber has joined with
Grand Bahama Principals and
Vice Principal's Association to
donate clothing and tennis
shoes.


ALL


2006 EDITION a4

BAHAMAS
HANDBOOK

ALL THE BAHAMAS
IN ONE BOOK

' k 672 pages
informative stories,
full-colour illustrations
and maps
EXCITING FEATURES
HISTORY
FAMILY ISLANDS

FREEPORTILUCAYA
S* GOVERNMENT
HANDY BLUE PAGE
INFORMATION
SECTION
LOOK FOR YOUR NAME
People mentioned IV
from all walks of life!

AN ETIENNE DUPUCH JR PUBLICATION
Etienne Dupuch Jr Publications,1PO Box N-7513,
Nassau, The Bahamas (242) 323-5665


I A


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE ..... 6,..... NOVEMBER. 242005THELOTRIBUNE


Trining in domestic violence


* By FELICITY INGRAHAM ,
Tribune Staff Reporter i
POLICE officers the "first
responders" in domestic vio-
lence cases were given the
opportunity to meet and share
their views mina special two-day
seminar'n fite subject.
Dr David Allen, a domestic
violence expert, and his assis-
tant, psychotherapist Angela
Ward, hosted the seminar on
Monday and Tuesday entitled:


"Understanding the global
approach on domestic violence
and conflict resolution in the
workplace".
He is compiling suggestions
in a format that would be deliv-
ered to the commissioner of
police and the cabinet.
Dr Allen is applauding the
preparation of a new Domestic
Violence Bill being prepared to
go before parliament, adding
that he wants to see new legis-
lation that will stop women


Experts coach police in first response


from pulling out their com-
plaints of domestic violence
from the police.
The seminar revealed the
many issues officers face -
including the fact that domestic
violence issues today encomp ss
more than husband and wife,ior
girlfriend and boyfriend. Offi-
y, .


.SCHOOL '
I I. . I Ti IF 1 .. ... .. .






ROUNDED 194

y@world school

St Andrew's School, The International School of The Bahamas, an authorized Intemational Baccalaureate
(IB) World School, invites applications from qualified and experienced Bahamian candidates for the
following teaching vacancies, with effect from August 2006. Full information regarding the school may
be found at its website: www.st-andrews.com
Candidates should be qualified teachers who possess the necessary academic qualifications for the position(s)
for which they apply, including a teaching qualification and a bachelor's degree, and normally need to have
a minimum of two years successful school-based experience. Desirable qualifications, in addition to those
specified for individual posts, are that teachers have successful experience in an independent and/or
international school and an advanced degree. Applications from candidates able to coach team sports or
advise school clubs and activities are particularly welcomed. Secondary (i.e. middle and upper) school
teachers will be expected to iindertake the responsibility of a homeroom.
Please note that applications received from non-Bahamian candidates will not be considered at this time,
although permanent residents with the right to work are invited to submit their papers for future consideration.
Applications from candidates living outside The Commonwealth of The Bahamas will not be acknowledged
or d~~~,red. at this stage of the recruiting process. If the school is unable to recruit any position locally,
it.win.ad interationally in January.
PRIMARY SCHOOL
The school is authorized to teach the Primary Years Programme (PYP) of the International Baccalaureate
Organization. .Cadidates fo all pbsts:in the primary school should be committed to the principles of, and
preferably tried hA thl PY. 'Applications are warmly welcomed from teachers who are committed to
an inquiry-based pedagogy but who have.not yet had the opportunity to teach in a PYP school.
Homeroom teachers: Class sizes range between 15 and 20.
Prim -r sche iisic i.
Canisdidhtl^ filyqualified and have successful teaching experience at all years from pre-reception
to six. They it also have successful experience in organizing primary school music and drama
performances.
SECONDARY SCHOOL
The school offers its own middle years programme in years seven through nine and the BGCSE in years
10 and 11 (grades 9 and 10). The school is authorized to teach the Diploma Programme (DP) of the
International Baccalaureate Organization in years 12 and 13 (grades 11 and 12).
Spanish and French: Candidates should be familiar with the ACTFL standards and able to work as a
contributing member of a school-wide team. They must be qualified to teach to pre-university level and
_be familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate diploma programme.
Science:
Biology: Candidates for this post must be qualified to teach biology to pre-university level and be familiar
with the demands of the International Baccalaureate diploma programme. Candidates should also be able
to offer either chemistry or physics at BGCSE/IGCSE level.
Chenmistry:Candidatesgfor.thispost must be qualified to teach chemistry to pre-university level and be
familiar with the demands of th&ntinational Baccalaureate diploma programme. Candidates should also
be able to offer eithe-biology or physics to BGCSE/IGCSE level.
Mathematics:: C d'aets for this post must be qualified to teach to pre-university level and be familiar
with the de nans& bfheInternational Baccalaureate diploma programme. Successful experience in teaching
-calculus tfoAP and/or IB level is preferred for this post. Successful BGCSE/IGCSE and SAT 1/SAT II
experience is also desirable.
Economics and accounts : Candidates must be familiar with current computer applications theory and
practice and should also be qualified to teach business studies and economics to, pre-university level. They
should also be familiar with the demands of the International Baccalaureate diploma programme. Successful
BGCSE or IGCSE experience is desirable.
Drama: Candidates should be able and willing to teach up to IB theatre arts level and possibly coordinate
musical and drama productions throughout the secondary school.
Middle school home room and core teachers: Middle level educational qualifications, experience working
with early adolescents and a familiarity with the philosophy of middle schools are required from applicants
for these posts. Applicants may also be required to teach BGCSE courses up to year 11.
At least two of the successful applicants will have documented successful experience in teaching English
in years 7 to 9 and will be able to offer English and one of the following PSE; IT & ICA; art; drama -
possibly to BGCSE level.
Another successful applicant will have documented successful experience in teaching general science in
years 7 to 9 and will be able to offer any.combination of biology, chemistry and physics at BGCSE level.
If he/she could also teach mathematics that would be useful.
Mathematics and special needs (part time post): Candidates must have successful experience in teaching
in both areas.
NB: One successful candidate from all the posts offered will be able to offer the teaching of the
Theory of Knowledge course at 1B diploma level. Another will be able to offer the teaching of
psychology at IB diploma level.
Iffnte;esfito dates should apply to the school's principal, Mr Dennison MacKinnon, by letter, email or
fax as soon as possible. .AAlIali nations MUST include the following:
'letter of application
a personal statement detailing the candidate's educational philosophy
a full curriculum vitae,
,eth en~. e:ii addresses, telephone numbers, fax and email numbers of three people who
i :~li 'e&tlilid ^,for confidential professional references or the name and address of the
ecr itinihgagency from which:the candidate's confidential dossiers may be obtained.
Information on the teaching posts offered may be obtained from the heads of the schools by email or fax
only., .
9 f-ttr:St Andry school:
*..'** -. ':?ax: (1 242) 324 08165

oSharon Wilson, Head of the primary school:
....: Email.$,.;.SWilson@st-andrews.com


D J MacKinnon
Principal
St Andrew's School
PO Box EE 17340

Email: DMackinnon@st-andrews.com
Fax: (1242)3641654
The closing date for applications is 16th December 2005. Applications from unqualified candidates,
applications arriving without the full information requested, applications from outside The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas or applications received after this date will not be considered.
. --...I--.'""i~


cers said they now deal with
boys ages 12 to 16 being abu-
sive to their mother, brother
and sister with violence, and
homosexual abuse.
Dr Allen said about half of
the murders being committed
in the Bahamas are related to
domestic violence.
"The person we love most
is the person who can make us
most angry, and we end up
hurting them the most," he
said. "Then the person we love
the most can become 'the most
dangerous aspect of our lives."
The cycle of violence, he
explained, begins with tension,
which can be relieved by tak-
ing a deep breath and relaxing.
Verbal abuse can lead to push-
ing or shoving, and eventually,
hitting, stabbing, or shooting
comes into play.
Once the cycle happens, he


explained, it can happen more
frequently and with more
intensity, with the end result
being fatal.
Looking at how the cycle
begins, Mrs Ward said it
begins in childhood.
"When we were children,
where we expect love, we got
pain," she said. "So when we
become adults, we go looking
for pain because it feels like
love. It's what we know and
what we are used to. That's
why domestic violence is hard
to break."
Domestic violence com-
plaints can be channelled
through telephone numbers
919, 3288477, or 3028430.
The Crisis Center Hotline is
3280922; the child abuse hot-
line is 3222763; the batterer
men's programme's number is
328-4310.


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M ot A ( N of B a Bu & Truc k C.


0 In brief

Woman

jailed for

forged

documents


0 BEVERLEY Jadoo


* By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
TRINIDADIAN national,
Beverley Jadoo was sentenced-
yesterday to serve to a year and.
a half in prison after being con-
victed of committing fraud by,
false pretenses.
A jury found her unanimous-
ly guilty of fraudulently obtain-,
ing $320,000 from the Royal
Bank of Scotland in Nassau.
Prosecutor Sandradee Gar-
diner successfully argued that
on October 5,2000, Jadoo made,
false pretenses to the bank in
order to have the money trans-i
ferred to a company called
Taino Investments IncorporatT.
ed.
Taino Investments' account
was based in Guyana at the,
Guyana Bank of Trade and,
Industry, and Jadoo was the,
sole signatory, the court was
told. .
Yesterday, Jadoo's lawyer,
Gregory Hilton pleaded to
Senior Justice Anita Allen for.
mercy for his client during sen-,
tencing.
He asked the court not to-
impose a sentence on his client,',
as she had already spent 18
months in prison.
Mr Hilton also told Justice,
Allen that Jadoo had recently
undergone eye surgery and is a
diabetic.
Justice Allen took into con-
sideration the time Jadoo has
already spent behind bars.
The sentence begins from the.
date she was convicted.


q r- -. ^' o. ^ vt < (; / - vu i n i the inforest Theolt






1 ...........
pW'.1



R E S a R T
&
.' * 1
Ceptal Palai Cace io


* 6 Ur .... :


Children 0 012 and0....0er *FREE


PAGE :, THURSDAY NOVEMBER 24, 2005


THE TRIBUNEz







IH~ I~bUNz THRSDAY NOVMBER24,C205,NAGWS


o In brief

Nine-year

prison

term for

stabbing


* PHILIP Culmer


PHILIP Edison Culmer was
sentenced to serve nine years
in prison for the death of Dino
Ferguson.
He pleaded guilty to
manslaughter at the start of his
murder trial.
Culmer told the court that he
was drunk when he and his
friend were having an argument
in front of a bar on Cordeaux
Avenue.
Eyewitnesses said the
deceased asked Culmer for a
quarter, and an altercation
ensued. Mr Ferguson died from
a screwdriver wound to the
chest.
Culmer's lawyer, Michael
Hanna, pointed out to the court
that his client had already spent
three and a half years in jail
awaiting trial.
Due to the fact that Culmer
did not waste the court's time,
said Senior Justice Anita Allen,
he will serve nine years for a
crime that could have landed
him in prison for life.
Justice Allen urged Culmer
to use the time to reflect on
what he had done.
She also urged him to contin-
ue in the electronics programme
at the prison.


Globalisation 'has not created



equality in the Bahamas'


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
UNION chiefs believe
that globalisation has had a
negative impact on small
developing countries such as
the Bahamas.
George DePeana, gener-
al secretary of the Caribbean
Congress of Labour, was the
keynote speaker at the open-
ing ceremony for the Nation-
al Congress of Trade Unions
(NCTU) annual' general
meeting.
He said: "When globalisa-
tion was started, it was start-
ed on the grounds that it will
bring equality to the world.
You know and I know that
goal has not been achieved.
Worse still, the opposite has
been achieved, especially for
small developing countries
such as ours in the
Caribbean."
He added: "Whether you
are close to the United
States as you are or whether
you are further down south,
the picture is the same. We
are to struggle together."
Pat Bain, president of the
NCTU, told The Tribune
that the main objective is to
continuing lobbying for fun-
damental amendments to
labour legislation which
Labour Minister Vincent
Peet has pledged are being
reviewed.
"I know that you have
been agitating for amend-
ments to some of our labour
laws. Let me assure you that
the cries have been heard
and attention is being given
to these and other related
matters," Mr Peet told the
meeting.
Speaking at the ceremo-
ny, he said that that to
ensure the future develop-


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ment of unions, leaders need-
ed to recruit and train the next
generation of organisers, to
assist in preparing members
by way of educational oppor-
tunities and possible incen-
tives.
He said it is critical that
union leaders pay close atten-
tion to key indicators of the
labour market.
"You must not only keep
abreast of economic factors,
such as employment trends as
they relate to young and older
workers, the impact on a chang-
ing global economy, income and
productivity, the nuances of
forced labour, and gender
equality among others," said Mr
Peet.
He urged union leaders to
adhere to the International
Labour Organisation's (ILO)
central mandate, to bring
together standards and funda-
mental principles and rights at
work, employment, social pro-
tection and social dialogue in
the formulation of policies and
programmes aimed at "secur-
ing decent work for women and
men everywhere."'
Mr Bain. told The Tribune
that the aim of the two days of
meetings is for the NCTU to


* CARIBBEAN Congress of Labour general secretary George
DePena engages the Minister of Labour and Immigration
Vincent Peet, right, in conversation during a visit by union
representatives on Tuesday. Jennifer Isaacs-Dotson, left,
president Union of Tertiary Educators of the Bahamas, and Pat
Bain, president National Congress of Trade Unions (NCTU)
look on.
(BIS Photo: Tim Aylen)

look at what resolution they will also allow for the NCTU
need to put forward for the to determine how they can
future, and to develop a plan of interact with the government
action for the coming years. on a "stronger and a more
He added that the meetings definitive position."


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005, PAGE 7


THt I HIBUNE-


Jo0n iutl













Tynes 'exemplified standards of FNM


h
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* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
INDEPENDENT MP Ten-
nyson Wells told parliamentar-
ians that Cyril Tynes exempli-
fied the true moral standard of
the Free National Movement a
standard not seen in the party
today.
Mr Wells was one of several
MPs who paid tribute to the late
parliamentarian in the House
of Assembly yesterday follow-
ing a moment of silence held in
his memory.
Mr Tynes died on Novem-
ber 8.
During his political career, he
held many positions in the
FNM.
He was leader of the opposi-
tion from 1972 to 1977 after
then leader Sir Cecil Wallace-
Whitfield lost his seat.
"He was a gentle giant, who
spoke softly but firmly," Mr


Wells said of his personal friend.
He explained that Mr Tynes
stepped forward as a savior for
the fledging FNM at a time
when others fled.
"Many people did not have
the stamina or the will to stand
on principal, but Mr Tynes
stood on principal with Sir Cecil
when he was leader outside.
"When the FNM was on its
knees he stood up on principal,
not like we see today. If it were
not for men like Mr Tynes,
there would be no FNM."
He added that Mr Tynes had
honesty, decency and integri-
ty qualities today's parlia-
mentarians would do well to
emulate.
"He had a legacy in beliefs
that could stand any forensic
examination. I saw in him basic
beliefs and moral values; he
talked the talk and walked the
walk and I commend him for
that," Mr Wells added.


Deputy Prime Minister Cyn-
thia Pratt, speaking on behalf
of the government, described
Mr Tynes as a pillar of strength
who helped build a nation. .;
She said he had made invalu-
able contributions and sacrifices
during his tenure in parliament.
Mrs Pratt suggested that pho-
tographs of members of parlia-
ment both past and present
should be displayed in the
House of Assembly so the pub-
lic has a record of its elected
leaders. i".
Speaking on behalf of the
official opposition, Alvin Smith
described Mr Tynes as a "gen-
tleman of the first order".
"He was a strong leader who
did the best he could for family,
county and party. He was an
exemplary family man and I will
always remember his invaluable
contributions." .s
Mr Tynes was laid to rest on
Saturday.


N IS .lI -R


give to Wilma victims

oDIGGING deep into their
pockets, scores of Kerzner
:*;housekeeping and public ari.is
department employees gave
from the heart to victims of
.Hurricane Wilma.
The employees donated
almost $1,000 along with boi
loads of food items, canned
goods, toiletries, clothing and
toys to officials of the
Bahamas Hotel Catering and
Allied Workers Union
(BHCAWU).
The donation, earmarked
for Grand Bahama, will be
used to assist victims and
.. members of the BHCAWU
who are still recovering from
the effects of the storm.
Kerzner's director of
I JASON Butterfield, a houseman in Kerzner International's housekeeping Sheryl Christie
o sekeeping department (pictured at centre), received a special commended the group of
h ankyou after donating $100. Butterfield is pictured with employees.
Lremintha Butler (at left) and director of housekeeping Sheryl "I am very proud of the
bristie housekeeping and public area
staff for coming together and
truly showing love, she said.AL
*would like to thank Sheila
Taylor and the committee lik
organising this wonderful
donation".
Sheila Taylor, a room
attendant who led the organ-
ing committee for the dona-
tion, presented the items to
Aremintha Butler, treasurer,
of the BHCAWU.
As she was doing so,
houseman Jason Butterfield
produced a $100 note.
His special gift earned hina
rousing round of applause
from his colleagues and.a
special thank you from hotel
and union executives.
Butler thanked the
employees on behalf of the
union. "I thank those that
gave and were not able to
give," she said.
In explaining the motive
behind the donation Taylor
From: said, "We thought that it wsa,
more than fitting that we as4@t
them in their time of need
Parents Warren & Sandy because we neever know when
: DD Whitlewe may beinneed of assis- tance.
& iA4s: DD, Whitley, Shedece. Shantecee" tance."'


others, TaVaughn, Warren Jr.;
rents, Mama Ruth, Deston & Evee


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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005


THE TRIBUNE








L*S i V"'3



ny election
live concerns in anyle.


AMID all of the con-
-.,. .ventioning, rallying,
tpress conferencing and talk-
ishow appearing, there are five
.things that really matter in the
upcoming general election and
-these are:
1,j(i).the character of those who
offer for candidacy;
- (ii) the understanding of both
candidates and parties of the
issues confronting the nation;
, (iii) the vision of the parties
-for the nation;
(iv) the clarity of the parties'
strategies for delivering their
.visions; and
4((v) the track record of the
-parties in government.
ciCHARACTER MATTERS
A";
i, s far as character is
i.tc LXconcerned, nothing
could be more important to
governing. Jesus said: "By their
fruits ye shall know them." He
also said: "No good tree can
produce bad fruit and no bad
tree can produce good fruit."
Our experience over the course
of human history supports these
sentiments, as we have seen that
what mattered more than what
aqperson talked was how he or
she walked and how he or she
Walked was often dictated by
his or her character. We must
examine the characters of those
wpho will seek to lead us. Char-
acter is what a person believes
jaid how that person acts con-
sistently on the basis of that
belief. Know what candidates
believe and judge them on the
basis of how their behaviour
matches their belief.
.UNDERSTANDING THE
ISSUES MATTERS

No individual or party
should be elected to
office that does not understand
what are the opportunities and
challenges confronting the
nation. This transcends merely
nYouthing what other people say
or playing on the emotions of
the masses of people. It means
anialysing what is taking place
within and around the nation
and how those things can or are
?. '? .3" , ,


impacting the nation for good
or evil. This means a more
cerebral approach to our poli-
tics than may have been demon-
strated in the past.
STRATEGIES MATTER

It is one thing to under-
stand what is wrong in a
nation; it is an entirely differ-
ent thing to develop concrete
strategies for correcting those
wrongs. Illegal immigration,
crime, unemployment, the envi-
ronment, public health and edu-
cation are all beset by serious
problems. Those problems will
not be solved by talk and
promises. They will be solved
when we develop workable
plans to properly address them.
Candidates and parties must


work hard to produce such
plans and voters should demand
the same of them.
VISION ULTIMATELY
MATTERS

Ultimately, those who
lead or want to lead
the nation should have a vision
for it. They must be able to
clearly articulate what the
nation would look like when
they are finished acting on it.
Their vision should be clear,
reasonable, inspiring and
national. The vision may
demand more time than the five
years for which they are elected.
This is not a problem, if they
are careful to so advise the pop-
ulation and make as reasonable
progress as can be made within
the five years they do have.
Visionary leadership is the only
leadership that produces
progress. ..


STRAIGHT UP TALK

Z H I V A R G 0 L A I N G


TRACK RECORD
MATTERS

It is quite possible to hire a
person to do a job who
has not had a track record in
that job and have the person
perform wonderfully. Howev-
er, where a person does have a
track record, one has more to
draw upon in assessing his or
her qualification for the job. For
the first time in our history, we
will have an election in which
both major parties have a con-


In so far as those records are
concerned, what will matter
most is not merely what people
said they would do but what
they actually did. Additionally,
the extent to which what they'
did impacted the broader
Bahamian population will also
matter. In next week's column
we will examine some of these
performance issues and how
they might be compared in the
upcoming election season.
LET EVERY MAN BE
JUDGED BY HIS OWN
DEEDS

In those days they
shall say no more,
The fathers have eaten a sour
grape, and the children's teeth
are set on edge. But every one
shall die for his own iniquity:
every man that eateth the sour
grape, his teeth shall be set on
edge." Jer 31:29-30.
Those people among us who
proudly and publicly proclaim
their faith in God should study
this text from the Holy Scrip-
tures. Clearly, these words from
the Bible show that in a more
enlightened period in the his-
tory of God's people, children
will not be judged by the fail-
ures or failings of their parents.
Instead, every child will have
to fail for himself and be judged
accordingly. This just makes
sense.
Imagine the hardworking
daughter of a drug-convict
being told that she should nev-
er become anything significant
in the country because of her
father. Imagine that the son of a
drunkard being overlooked for
promotion after promotion at
work notwithstanding he has all
of the qualifications for the pro-
motion.
Imagine the daughter of a
politician being told that she
should not be elected to parlia-
ment or become a cabinet min-
ister because her father was a
greedy, corrupt victimiser. None


temporary track record in gov-
ernment to compare.
When the PLP won the 1967
election over the UBP, it did
not have a track record in gov-
ernment whereas the UBP did.
When it won the election a
short year later in 1968, the PLP
still had no track record in gov-
ernment of note compared to
the UBP.
When the FNM won the gen-
eral election in 1992, it had no
track record in government
compared to the PLP and when
the PLP won the election in
2002 the team of leaders had
no recent record in government
of which to speak.
When the next election is
called, the PLP would have had
a full term in office and the
FNM would have only been out
of office one term ago.
This means that the records
of both parties in government
will and should be an issue in
hie upcoming general elections.


of these things would be just or
fair. Neither is it just or fair for
a man to be denied his citizen-
ship rights because of the colour
of his skin or who his parents
were.
Judge the man on the basis
of his deeds, on his character
but not on the basis of his "her-
itage", "lineage" or "legacy",
as one government minister was
wont to do. Hold him account-
able if his deeds mirror those
of a parent guilty of misdeeds
but do not do so before. That is
"parentism", a hybrid form of
racism, an evil prejudice. Such
an attitude is inconsistent with
the principles outlined in Jer
31:29-30..
THOUGHT FOR THE
WEEK

G od help us all if we
cannot rise above the
level of our parents' deeds.


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


; I; :* .'-.'t .-.-.i.aA'MK *r.i.vmti


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B CHRISTMAS decorations are a hit at the Ministry of
Tourism's Authentically Bahamian Christmas Craft Show


THE latest creations from the
country's top souvenir produc-
ers will headline the much antic-
ipated 11th annual Authenti-
cally Bahamian Christmas Craft
and Souvenir Show.
The show, which begins
December 2 at the Wyndham
Nassau Resort's ballroom, will
feature more than 70 booths
showcasing everything from
high fashion handcrafted straw


bags, to intricate shell work, to
scented soaps and candles, to
paintings and sculptures.
A culinary corner will feature
chefs showing off their Christ-
mas recipes while patrons enjoy
complimentary Bahamian-style
eggnog.
The show is part of the Min-
istry of Tourism's on-going
effort to encourage the produc-
tion and promotion of Bahami-


* THIS reef scene is a feature at the
show


an-made crafts and souvenir
items. It has been a hit with
tourists, hoteliers, merchants,
and gift-seeking Bahamians
especially at this time of the
year.
"The response has been over-
whelming," said Rowena Rolle,
general manager, of the
Authentically Bahamian
department of the Ministry of
Tourism. "There will be some-
thing for everybody."
As the Bahamian character
of the products developed, this
event has become to a great
source of Christmas gifts and
decorations to Bahamians.
Organisers say tourists seek-
ing Bahamian memorabilia
marvel at the unique expres-
sions of scenes taken from every
day life.
"Throughout our tourism
industry," said Ms Rolle, "our
goal must be to provide our vis-
itors with an authentic experi-
ence. In fact, our visitors
demand goods made in the
Bahamas by Bahamians.
"And, due to the demand cre-
ated, the craft souvenir industry
is making a significant contri-
bution to the national econo-
my."
This year, Family Islanders
are coming from Andros, Long
Island, Eleuthera, Exuma,
Grand Bahama, Abaco, Bimini
and Cat Island.
Patrons are being treated to a
variety of Christmas ornaments
and accessories, junkanoo dolls,
fine sea shell jewellery and
conch shell crafts, Red Bays'
famous baskets and fanners,
necklaces, earrings bracelets
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ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

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In the event there is not a quorum, the next
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111 3-1 1~ ' r" "` '


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


T






THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


Farewell concert to


Governor General


* DAME Ivy is shown expressing her gratitude to the students.


SE ER
ON BAHAMAS

(^} ARAuMLATiQS


* GOVERNMENT High School Concert band conductor Yonell Justilen, centre, leads students in
a performance of "Military Escort" by Harold Bennett, during a Farewell Recital for the Governor
Genieral Her Excellency Dame Ivy Dumont on Tuesday in the Ballroom of Government House.
(Photo: BIS/Derek Smith)


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of all aspects of Starbucks Bahamas and related entities supply chain. Assist in implementing supply
chain systems for accurate demand forecasting, inventory management, procurement and store order
management. Works with third-party logistics providers, the Regional Support Center and local
suppliers to coordinate supply arrangements.
JOB REQUIREMENTS:
5 years planning experience in planning, forecasting, procurement and inventory
management.
Expert in Excel (including macros); Microsoft Access expertise a plus
Strong Analytical skills
Attention to detail
We offer:
A great group of people to work with
A competitive salary and benefits package
All of the training you'll need to be highly successful
Qualified and interested persons should send your resume to:
P.O. Box N-3737 or fax (242) 328-4365.
info@ starbucks.com.bs


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PAGE 2, TURSDY, NOEMBE 24,2005 HE TIBUN


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* COLOURS junkanoo group in action



Hilton donation to



junkanoo group


THE British Colonial Hilton
Hotel has made a donation to
the Colours junkanoo group to
be used in preparation for the
upcoming Boxing Day and New
Years parades.
"We have worked with
Colours for some years in pro-
viding a location for their prac-
tice sessions and together with
our owners, I am pleased we
were in a position to provide
them with a financial contribu-
tion this year," said British
Colonial general manager
Michael Hooper.
"We wish them much success
in this years competition," he
said.
Colours leader Chris Justilien
accepted the donation on behalf
of the group's membership and
administration team.
Ms Justilien said he and his
fellow members "deeply appre-
ciate" the contribution.
I "These funds not only assist
"with the annual'-junkanoo
'parade presentation but also


* HILTON staff hand the donation cheque to group men


will be used to assist our mem-
bers in their academic and oth-
.er ,ventures in their-personal
development. '


"We wish all a safe holiday
-season and hope that this ygars,
presentation from Colo'urs
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BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION


S VACANCY NOTICE
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC) invites applications from suitably qualified
persons to fill the position of Assistant General Manager Human Resources and Training. The
successful candidate will report directly to the General Manager. Candidates should have a
minimum of 15 years post graduate and relevant experience at senior management level.
Overview and Objectives
The Assistant General Manager Human Resources and Training will be responsible for
understanding the human capital needs of the corporation and optimizing the human
resource value provided to the organization. The objectives include:
" Preparing the current workforce for success in a cost-effective manner
" Anticipating and fulfilling the short and long term human resource needs of BEC
" Developing and maintaining the programs required to identify BEC's top performers
and weakest performers
* Effectively communicating the vision of BEC both internally and externally
Key Accountabilities and Measures:
* Develop and maintain employee records, in a confidential manner, that include all
information necessary to support the training, manpower planning, succession planning,
compensation, benefits, and performance evaluation programs for BEC
* Manage employee training to support business productivity and continuity
* Administer employee benefits in a cost-effective manner
* Provide employee relation services to keep the workforce productive and motivated
* Develop and maintain the manpower plan and succession plan
* Assist the organization with employee needs analysis and recruitment
* Monitor the implementation of collective bargaining agreements, including reviewing
recommendations for engagements, promotions, transfers, discipline, dismissals
* Assist the Labor Compliance officer in industrial relations matters and participate
in the collective bargaining process
" Create and manage BEC's public relations program and improve the impression of
BEC with customers, investors, and governmental authorities
* Effectively communicate the mission and actions of BEC to all employees
* Establish and maintain corporate policies and procedures relating to human resource
management and monitor compliance
* Develop relationships with key external constituents, including the media, to ensure
a positive message about BEC is conveyed to the public
* Develop, challenge, and evaluate subordinates
" Communicate effectively with superiors, subordinates. and peers


Applications along with resumes should be submitted by
Friday December 2, 2005 and addressed to:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Re: Assistant General Manager Human Resources
Private & Confidential


I


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005








THE TIBUN THUSDAYNOVEBER 4, 205, PGE 1


Amendments
FROM page one
could not move for a Bill
during a government's
motion without first giving
notice.
Both Bills call for a former
prime minister's pension to stop
being paid, in the event, they are
appointed Governor General, or
re-elected Prime Minister or if they
are re-elected or continue to be a
Member of Parliament.
SUnder the Government's Bill,
the prime minister would have 21
days to inform the treasurer in writ-
ing that no money should accrue
and be payable to him until he ceas-
es to hold the respective office.
A heated exchange between
both sides followed after the ques-
tion of notice was addressed, when
the Speaker had to stand to restore
order.
Mr Sears said that under rule
63, no notice is needed for a gov-
ernment bill or one already passed
by the Senate.
I Mr Symonette then told the
Speaker that in the next session of
the House, during the appropriate
time, he intended to move for a
reading for the first time, a Bill for
an Acetto amend the Prime Minis-
ter.Act.A
he two bills come after For-
eign Affairs and Public Service
Minister Fred Mitchell at the PLP's
convention last week criticised the
former prime minister who, he
claimed, could be paid a total of
$196,000 a year from the treasury
from multiple salaries.
He said that as a retired prime
minister, Mr Ingraham qualifies for
an annual pension of $100,000, as
an he would get a salary of
$28,00g;)and would be paid $50,000
as Leader of the Opposition.
' Further, he said, Mr Ingraham
qutl ,fies for the allowance of
$150 for a parliamentarian's
fl96b of supporters at the FNM' rally on
%uresdjy night, MrIngraham
eliphasised that he would never
"ubl'e dip."
i assured the crowd that he
1ip content to accept nothing
'.lIan what he was paid as a
Ar V d'E rime minister, and that he
vIdlnot accept any payment as
No frNorth Abaco.


FROM page one
tary, they are false and coward-
ly because the honourable
member refused to stand and
do it on the floor."
However, Mr Smith would not
elaborate on why Mr Ingraham's
comments carried a negative con-
notation.
Following the statement by the
Mount Moriah MP,, a shouting
match between government and


Chaos in House
opposition parliamentarians fol-
lowed.
Montagu MP Brent Symonette
pointed out that disparaging
remarks were also levelled at him,
North Eleuthera MP Alvin Smith
and Mr Ingraham, from "the back
bench" government MPs while
seated.
As Mr Symonette sought to
stand on a point of order,


Kennedy MP Kenyatta Gibson
got up and told him: "Your whole
life was a lie sit down, boy."
There was also a reference to the
North Eleuthera MP being an
"over-grown child."
Responding to Mr Symonette,
Mr Smith said that the Montagu
MP "is not what he thinks he is."
When prompted by the Speak-
er to withdraw the remark, Mr
Smith said he did not see "what
about that comment requires it
to be withdrawn."


Rescue at sea Leslie Miller


FROM page one
Air Airport, moments after being pulled from the sea.
"Yesterday I got knocked down three times in my sailboat
- the last one was a huge wave, probably 45 to 50 feet.
Tore the sails right off and disabled the engine," he said.
"I was reefing my main sail," Mr Hunt continued, "that's
making it smaller, and I was halfway in the hatch there and I
looked up and this towering wall of water just came smash-
ing down on the boat.
"Pushed me back inside; filled the boat up with water -
disabled the engine and ripped the sail off the boat," he said.
With the worst of the bad weather happening shortly after
4am, and with little visibility Mr Hunt maintained that he had
"no time to be scared".
With his three decades of experience in sailing, Mr Hunt
"kept his cool" and began to bail the sea water out of his boat
with his bare hands before radioing for help.
A nearby freighter picked up his signal, which in turn
radioed the US Coast Guard in Nassau of Mr Hunt's predica-
ment.
Upon receiving this distress call, a H60 search and rescue
helicopter was scrambled from the US AUTEC base in
Andros. Also a C130 aircraft out of Florida was sent out
and circled over Mr Hunt until the H60 arrived.
Relieved to be finally on land, Mr Hunt called his family
and assured them that he was safe and well.
According to US Coast Guard press liaison Lt Comman-
der Terry Johns, Mr Hunt still plans to go Hawaii, but will
travel there directly, by plane.


Group wins

its appeal
FROM page one
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FROM page one
ment.
"I will be asking for the indefinite suspension of recently rein-
stated Attorney General lawyer Alberta Bartlett and the re-
arrest of her son Darryl Bartlett Jr," he said.
Although Mr Miller later withdrew this statement, the com-
ments were not stricken from the record by Speaker of the
House Oswald Ingraham by the time the parliamentary session
closed.
Mario Miller, 28, was killed on June 22,2002. He was at the
time of his death the chairman of the PLP's Montagu and eastern
region branches.
The minister yesterday said he would address in depth the roles
of "public persons, religious persons and civil servants in the
continuing conspiracy of justice being subverted some three
years later."
"As a result, no peace has been found by my family," he said.
The minister said that while people like Angelo "Nasty"
Brennen who was sentenced to death three weeks ago for the
murder of Alfreda Ruthmae Pinder -' are convicted a year
after they committed murder, "my son has been lying in his
grave and my family has been living in misery since June, 2002,
but still no justice."
Responding to Mr Miller's statements, Attorney General
Alfred Sears advised that it is against the rules of the House to
comment publicly on matters that are currently before the court.
However, he added that he has "confidence in all of the
lawyers in the office of the Attorney General, including Mrs
Bartlett."


Following further shouting and
the Speaker standing up to bring
order to the House, Mr Smith
finally withdrew the comment,
stating that "perhaps (Mr Symon-
ette) is what he thinks he is."
However, he remained


adamant that he would not accept
any further maligning remarks
from Mr Ingraham, particularly
when Mr Ingraham officially
assumes the position of
Leader of the Opposition next
week.


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE












US ambassador reads in Eleuthera


ELEUTHERA, The Bluff
-As part of his ongoing effort to
promote literacy across the
Bahamas. US Ambassador
John Rood took his message
the North Eleuthera Primary
School.


Faculty, students, parents,
clergy and local government
officials gave Ambassador
Rood an enthusiastic welcome
when he visited the school on
November 16.
The visit, which aimed to


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encourage the students to read
and value literacy, was an exten-
sion of an initiative the Ambas-
sador introduced in Nassau
schools in January this year.
Ambassador Rood entered
the school's auditorium to pager
smiles as students wave US
Sflags excitedly.
Following formal intr< uc-
tions by student Ezra que
Ciash,*;the students welc ed
'ti Ambassador with son 'and
"'a r',imatic sit perform in.
Bahamian dialect.
"AibassadirS Rood shared
witkthe 210 students froi the
settlements .of the Bluff, Loweri
and Upper Bogue, and the Cur-
rent, the story of civil rights
leader Dr Martin Luther King Jr
and his dream for civil eqtiality.
Several students were invit-
ed to read the story with him.
School principal Deborah
Deal accepted a donation of
books from Ambassador Rood
and expressed her appreciation
for the visit.
Other dignitaries at the event
included North Eleuthera MP
Alvin Smith, Island Adminis-
trator Alexander Flowers, dis-
trict educational officer Ross
Smith and Althea Gibson.
Ambassador Rood described
the reading programnune as a pri-


* AMBASSADOR Rood reading to students at North Eleuthera Primary School.


ority that he will continue to
pursue throughout his tenure in
the Bahamas.
To date, he has visited St
Thomas More Primary, St


John's Primary Gerald Cash Pri-
mary and Uriah Primary in New
Providence. His Family island
visits include schools in Andros,
Exuma and Grand Bahama.


In addition to this, around 10
Embassy employees participate
in an ongoing weekly reading
programme at Woodcock Prin
mary School on Hospital La


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005


mI f


DC






THE TRIBUNE


LOCALNEWS


Remembering reunification


THIS commemorative pho-
tograph was taken last Thurs-
day night at the Nassau Beach
Hotel just prior to Dr BJ Not-
tage's appearance at the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party's 2005


national convention.
Mrs Nottage and more than
70 CDR supporters gathered at
the hotel to show their support
for Dr Nottage in his decision to
re-join the Progressive Liberal


Party and to follow him in that
decision.
Pictured left to right are: PLP
chairman Raynard Rigby, Dr
Bernard Nottage and PLP
trustee Valentine Grimes.


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J I
*RON Pinder, parliamentary
secretary in the Ministry of
Health and Environment,
addressing the eighth All-
Male Conference last Friday.
The Ministry's maternal and
clild health family planning


secretariatsponsored the event
in conjunction with the Men's
Ministry of the Church of the
Most Holy Trinity, under the
theme: "Promoting healthy
lifestyles amongst men."
The male health initiative is a


programme designed to
address male health, social
and economic issues, as well as
issues related to responsible
family planning and parenting.
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PAGE~~~~ 16 HRDY OEBR2,20 H RBN


0 1 ,


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 16, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005


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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005, PAGLNE17


Bahamas Handbook




2006 on newsstands


Enter the last days of "phan-
tom billionaire" Howard Hugh-
es, as he madly ruled his empire
from hotels on Paradise Island
and Grand Bahama.
Read about Eleuthera's mil-
lion-dollar cow caper: champion
Charolais that were smuggled
from France to revolutionise
the US beef industry.
Meet Bahamian Freemasons,
prominent citizens who use
their secret fraternity to do
good works.
.Stroll through history along
the Eastern Road, where
wealthy industrialists and nobil-
ity built their stately mansions,
mingling today with ambas-
sadors and archbishops.
Find out the future of financial
services in today's increasingly


complex investment environ-
ment, and discover the
Bahamas' "Chinese connection".
You will find these stories
and many more in the 2006
Bahamas Handbook, just off
the press and in stores now.
The Handbook, according to
its producers, Etienne Dupuch
Jr Publications, "is an indis-
pensable reference guide and
essential reading for anyone liv-
ing or doing business in The
Bahamas."
"It's also simply an interesting
read, with insightful articles on
history, the economy, govern-
ment, and people," the compa-
ny said in a press release.
In the new 2006 issue, readers
can "catch up with Julian Fran-
cis, the new head of the Grand


Bahama Port Authority, as he
reminisces about the birth of
nationalist politics and his ear-
lier years in Paris."
They can also relive the days
when "freed blacks owned
slaves and depended on slave
labour to work their land and
build their fortunes".
The press release said readers
will also:
"Find out whether foreign
investors can look forward to a
future without exchange con-
trol.
"Learn about the Island
School at Cape Eleuthera
where visionary staff teach high
school students to be informed,
self-sufficient global citizens.
"Find out how Bahamians are
growing agribusiness through


hydroponic techniques, envi-
ronmentally friendly farming
that promises to replace expen-
sive imported foods."
The 2006 issue also allows
readers to visit the Bahamas'
own "alpine range" the salt
hills of Inagua, a "far-flung
island paradise that's an eco-
nomic and ecological secret well
worth discovering."
The Bahamas Handbook also
offers a comprehensive guide
to government departments,
embassies, honourary consuls
and international organisations.
It includes the popular up-to-
date Blue Pages, which contain
essential facts about the
Bahamas.


* HOWARD Hughes, America's richest man, had a glamourous
but tragic connection to the Bahamas. He was the subject of the
acclaimed 2005 movie, The Aviator.


I WILLIAM Wood-Prince (left), his ranch manager Ed Christensen and partner Charles Potter
were key figures in a scheme to import banned Charolais cattle from France into the United States
via Eleuthera


* FR2 was one of nine champion bulls imported to Eleuthera. They sired calves in the Bahamas
that sold for $40,000 a head and more.


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005, PAGE 17


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 18, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005


THE TRIBUNE-
7__________,--------- ** w -


Malcolm Rae headlines festival


GUESTS attending the 11 annual Fes-
tival Noel are in for a special treat as this
year's guest artist is the amazing Malcolm
Rae.
Festival Noel lures hundreds of people
each year with promises of dishes pre-
pared by some of the island's best culinary
teams, many fine wines and champagnes,
stunning artwork by several local artist,
great music and other gifts and surprises
all in a beautiful nature setting.
This year's event takes place at the
Rand Nature Centre on Friday, Decem-
ber 2.
Each year the planning committee
invites a guest artist to be the star of the
evening.
This year Malcolm Rae accepted the
invitation and said he is excited to dis-
play some of his work.
Mr Rae attempts to capture the true
essence of the Caribbean in his work.
"To me the Caribbean is full of light,
full of colour, so hot and so exotic. So
when I paint the sea, the people, the fruit,
the boats, the landscapes and seascapes I:
use a varied mix of styles and media that:
capture that light, that colour,gthat heat,"
he said.
Mr Rae sculpts, paints and, draws in a
variety of different styles and media.
He enjoys painting land or seascapes,
boats, plants, and peoplie and tribess to ,
retain the realistic nature of hlis(ubjects.
Mr Rae has sold paintings, worldwide
and some well-known collectors. of his:
work include Sir Orville Turnquest, Dawn
Davies, Garret 'Tiger' Finlayson and Vin-
cent D'Aguliar, as well as many interna-
tional banks and insurance companies.
In addition to the artwork of Malcolm
Rae, the evening will feature wines and
champagnes donated by the event sponsor
Bristol Wines and Spirits.
There will be dishes prepared by local
restaurants including Le Med, Our
Lucaya, Cafe Kanoo, Roe Rhett Catering,
Every Last Crumb Catering and others.
The restaurant teams will also be par-
ticipating in a culinary competition to be
crowned Chef Noel 2005.
On the following Saturday, the very
popular arts and crafts festival returns
with activities for children, craft booths,
food, park tours and beautiful artwork
including the paintings of Malcolm Rae.
The festivities go from 11am to 4pm and
the entrance fee is $5 for adults and $3 for
children.
Tickets for Festival Noel 2005: An
Evening Under the Stars are.now on sale
for $45 at the Rand Nature Centre, or at
one of the co-sponsor locations Bristol
Wines and Spirits or Colombian Emeralds
International in Port Lucaya.


* MALCOLM Rae, who will be the guest artist at
Festival Noel 2005


0 One of Mr Rae's scenes of ihe Caribbean, All Safe
for the Night


Festival place cleaned


* Steven Bellot of Roots Landscaping and Maintenance donated plants and flowers to beau4-
tify Braider's Square at Festival Place for this year's Port Week. He is pictured with clean-up.
volunteers from the Braiders Association at Festival Place.


M MEMBERS bf the Taxi Drivers Association cleaned up their taxi stand at Festival Place
Photos by Mia Lange


Tobacco Smoking may cause Heart Disease


or Lung Cancer among other diseases.







THE TIBUN THUSDAYNOVEBER 4,O205, PGEW1


Marine completes



gunner's mate



course in US


ABLE Seaman Leslie Knowles of
the Royal Bahamas Defence Force
has returned home after successfully
completing the Gunner's Mate 'A'
course at the United States Coast
Guard Engineering and Weapons
Schools in Yorktown, Virginia.
Tle training was sponsored by the
International Military Education
Training (IMET) scheme, which is
sporfsored through the American
Embassy.
TIf course, which was conducted
froni August 24 November 4, pro-
vided Knowles with advanced acad-
emic and practical instruction on the
use of various types of small arms
and ammunition.
The students were also required
to repair and perform routine and
preventative maintenance on all the
weapons studied.
Among the subjects covered were
fundamental leadership, elementary
electricity, administrative and pre-
ventative maintenance, decoy
launching systems and basic range
work. The assembling and disassem-
bling of weapons and an introduc-
tion to the general operations of
launchers and machine guns were
also taught.
A 14-year veteran of the Force,
Able Seaman Knowles is currently
assigned to the Commando
Squadron section, which is the
infantry arm of the service


N ABLE Seaman Leslie Knowles


Best-kept

yards are

recognised

* The Bahamas National
Pride Association reward-
ed environmentally con-
scious citizen David Mason
of the Bain Town commu-
nity with the Best Kept
Yard Award for the month
of November. From left to
right are: Joanne Johnson,
neighborhood co-ordina-
tor; Olvin Rees, chairman;
David Mason, recipient;
Peter Brown, executive co-
ordinator; Rev C B Moss;
Dr Bridget Rolle, board of
directors; Luther Fergu-
son, landscaping co-ordi-
nator; and Consela John-
son, daughter of the recipi-
ent.


* Adelaide's historian
Madrian Bullard com-
ments on some of the day-
to-day problems that face
the neighborhood. She
says that residents are fed
up with the illegal dump-
ing and stealing of garbage
bins, and that it is time to
take a stand.


Defence lawyers say God's


Banker' committed suicide


0~ -


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Available from Commercial News Providers".


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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005, PAGE 19


- w


- .






THE TRIBUNE


i:URSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005


(cWhet is indicted and put under



w.s arrest on tax evasion charges


"Copyrighted Materiall
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Available from Commercial News Providers"
*


S cute photo of your baby and you could WIN
fantastic prizes just in time for Christmas!
.now through December 9 submit a photo with two empty Drypers packs
}) and a completed entry form to Lowe's Wholesale on Soldier Road.
1 ~ie $500.00 cash & a brypers Club Pack

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Entry forms available at Lowe's Pharmacy
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November2S, 2005
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December 23, 2005
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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005, PAGE 21


THE TRIBUNE





1-


PAGE 22, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005


MON.-
SUN.:


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25 -OZ
2/$500


V8 SPLASH
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16 OZ
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SWEET JUMBO
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SUGAR ADDED/UNSWEETENED
46 OZ


McCORMIK
ASSORTED
SPICES
EACH
$229


KRAFT
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2/$3oo00

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$469


CREAM CRACKERS 200-GR..............994


SODAS ASSORTED 20 oz................2.99


SAUSAGE s-oz ................................2/.991
GROWERS PRICE
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TIME OUT 1 .....................................2/.990
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KEEBLER
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JACK
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WESSON OIL
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$799 s3s9
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JBI
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15- OZ
$ 19
$119l


BAHAMA
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t Ie


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005, PAGE 23


25 OZ
$399
CAMPBELLS
CREAM OF
MUSHROOM/
ONION SOUP
10 OZ

LIBBYS
VEGETABLES
ASSORTED
15- OZ
-99s
PlANTERS
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UNSALTED COCKTAIL
12 OZ

T.M.
CRANBERRY
SAUCE
16 OZ
$1 89
ANDY'S
DL LEE 20% WHOLE
SMOKED HAM
LB
1 59s
PUMPKIN
SWEET POTATO &
APPLE PIE
EACH

WD
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CREAM CHEESE


CAVERNDISH
STRAIGHT CUT
POTATOES
32 OZ
2/$300
DINNERWARE

SET. 16PCS,
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$2999


GAN
12 OZ
2/$1g 29
WD
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50 CT

JBI
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PIGION PEAS
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WD

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WD
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12 CT
$279


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$. 89
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STUFFINGS
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items and have a cashier


* Put your name and phone number on the back of receipt


and drop in entry boxes provided
* Winners announced Wednesday, 30


November on Love 97


City Market or participating vendor
ployee may enter.


- m


HE TRIBUNE


I






GE 24, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


* Glassware
. Housewares
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fl .-


SCrystal Bab
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Salespersons:
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Available in Grand Bahama at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd Queen's Highway 352-6122


* Toys
. Christmas


Queen Elizabeth's










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THE TRIBUNE


GE 24, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005





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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005, PAGE 25


THE TRIBUNE


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PAGE 26, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


NOVEMBER 24, 2005


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

New Florida ) **** DANCES WITH WOLVES (1990, Western) Kevin Costner, Mary McDonnell, Graham Greene. A U.S.
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USA THE PARENTS McConaughey, Adam Goldberg. A writer bets she can seduce a man and then drive him CAN PIE 2
______ (2000) (CC) away. (CC) (2001) (CC)
V H1 *** GREASE (1978, Musical) John Travolta, Olivia Newton-John, Stockard Channing. Breaking Bona- Hollywood
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WSB K (CC Hates Chris (N) Honeymooners" Marty has a Triangle" (N) 0
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H BO-W Comedy) George Clooney. A successful attorney Sharon Stone. A shy artist acquires feline strength and agility. 0 'PG-13'
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PAGE 28, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005


8
o









THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005


SECTION -. -,


business@tribunemedia.net


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Controversial Guana Cay




project in two-month halt


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The developers behind the
controversial $175 mil-
lion Baker's Bay Golf &
Ocean Club develop-
ment on Great Guana
Cay yesterday gave an undertaking
to halt work on certain aspects of the
project for two months, after the
Court of Appeal reinstated an action
by the Save Guana Cay Association
lobby group that seeks to overturn
the Heads of Agreement for the
development.
Verdict
In overturning the Supreme Court
verdict that threw out the Associa-
tion's action against the Government
over the Heads of Agreement, the
Court of Appeal justices court pres-


C ,A p- I -@
oItfAp e ls'a ............. 0


ident, Dame Joan Sawyer, Justice
Ibrahim and Justice Emanuel Osade-
bay ordered that the case be remitted
back to the Supreme Court for trial on
the "merits" of the case before Janu-
ary 31, 2006.
They noted that the undertaking
from the developers, made in a letter
from their attorney, Michael Barnett
of Graham, Thompson & Co, to Fred
Smith, an attorney with Callenders &
Co, who represents the Association,
was "only effective" until that date.
Mr Smith afterwards said the case
brought by the Association went to
the heart of "due process", involving
issues such as transparency and open-


ness in the investment approvals
process, the consultation of local peo-
ple impacted by major developments
to see if they wanted them, and the
"bypassing" of local government by
central government in the approvals
and permitting process.
Residents
Explaining that the Great Guana
Cay residents regarded the proceed-
ings over the Baker's Bay project,
which is being developed by San Fran-
cisco-based Discovery Land Compa-
ny, "as a long-term battle and war",
Mr Smith said the outcome of yester-


day's Court of Appeal verdict could
well change the approach of the Gov-
ernment and investors to the
approvals process.
Mr Smith said: "We feel this is a
first step by the judiciary in vindicating
their right to be heard. We just want
an opportunity to be heard, we want
due process.......... before the central
government in Nassau dumps a $500
million development"..... on the island.
The ramifications of the Great Gua-
na Cay case, which is likely to be a
protracted affair going all the way to
the Privy Council, is likely to be felt
across the Bahamian investment land-
scape. And in what is likely to be


interpreted as a warning shot to anoth-
er controversial development, Gerado
Capo's Bimini Bay project, Mr Smith
said he had been retained by a group
who wanted to form a Save Bimini
Association to agitate for their rights
and environment.
Letter
In his letter to Mr Smith, Mr Bar-
nett pledged that Discovery Land
Company, its employees and agents
would "not cut tear down or remove
any vegetation", "not disturb or
remove any mangrove or wetlands",
"not excavate or dredge the land or
seabed", "not erect any further build-
ings or structures", and "not construct
or pave any roads" until the Supreme
Court heard the case.

SEE page 6B


* MICHAEL HOOPER


Tourism trends to

Easter 'very good'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor
BAHAMIAN hoteliers
yesterday told The Tribune
that tourism trends to East-
er 2006 were "looking very
good", with one resort
expecting to end the 2005
full-year with room rates iust


British Colonial
Hilton expects
to end year with
room rates 12%
up on 2004

and Christmas holiday peri-


Over 12 per cent ahead of ods were "looking strong".
2004. The pick up rate for Christ-
Michael Hooper, the mas holiday bookings at the
British Colonial Hilton's British Colonial Hilton was
general manager, said the, "ahead of last year's pace".
hotel was looking forward He added: "Christmas is
to "a good week", with occu- looking strong and we're fill-
pancy levels at 100 per cent ing up quicker than last
for today and Friday. year."
Saturday was 90 per cent
occupied, but Mr Hooper SEE 7B
said both the Thanksgiving page



Tourist arrivals down 3.1%

for the first nine months

* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
ALTHOUGH prior year comparatives were rendered mean-
ingless by Hurricanes Frances and Jeanne, total tourist arrivals to
the Bahamas were up by 92.8 per cent for September 2005, rising
from 150,255 to 289,710, driven by major increases in airlift from
key markets.
Primary markets, such as New York, Miami-Fort Lauderdale,
Philadelphia and Washington DC all produced double and in
some cases triple digit increases in the number of tourists that were
ferried to Nassau/Paradise Island, "producing significantly more
visitors than in the same period of 2004".
During September 2005, there was an 85 per cent increase in the
number of tourists coming to Nassau from New York; a 244 per
cent increase from Miami-Fort Lauderdale; 160 per cent rise
form Washington DC; a 136 per cent increase from Los Angeles;
and 320 per cent rise from West Palm Beach.
However, a more reliable picture of the arrivals situation comes
from the foreign arrivals figures by first port of entry for the
year to September.
While total air arrivals were up SEE page 9B
by 1.7 per cent at 1.165 million, sea


Guana Cay ruling


to boost investor


'confidence'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE case seeking to over-
turn the Heads of Agreement
for the $175 million investment
project on Great Guana Cay,
while causing the Government
and potential developers to be
more "circumspect" in their
approach, is likely to benefit
levels of foreign direct invest-
ment in the Bahamas by giv-
ing project backers "certainty"
in the process to follow.
Fred Smith, attorney for the
Save Guana Cay Reef Associ-
ation, who yesterday won a
Court of Appeal verdict rein-


stating its application for a
Judicial Review of the Heads
of Agreement for the Baker's
Bay Golf & Ocean Club, said
the case showed that "no
longer can Nassau dictate to
the Family Islands what should
or should not happen in their
communities".
Referring to the Govern-
ment's strategy of creating an
'anchor' investment or resort
for each island, which to date
has seen Heads of Agreement
signed for a $90 million resort
on 90-person Rum Cay and the


SEE page 6B


IT professionals to

form industry body


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor
BAHAMIAN information
technology (IT) profession-
als were last night embarking
on the first stages of creating
a professional body for the
industry that they hope to ful-
ly establish by mid-2006, with
a mandate to lobby govern-
ment on legislative and other
issues relating to the sector.
Executives
Some 30 Bahamian IT
executives were meeting last
night as The Tribune went to
press to discuss how to form a
professional body for their
industry, which is tentatively
being named as the Bahamas


Institute of Information Tech-
nology Specialists (B.I.I.T.S.).
Manager
Ian Fernander, deputy
manager in the Governor's
Office at the Central Bank of
the Bahamas, and one of the
main drivers of the idea to
form an industry association,
yesterday told The Tribune
that the proposed organisa-
tion would "look to the well-
being of IT professionals"
across the Bahamas and help
promote the sector and its
role in the economy.
He explained that it would
function just like other indus-
try associations, such as the

SEE page 7B


Money Safe.
Money Fast.




SBnkof The Bahanm
INTERNAL 1 ONAL
AtmOf. at














Mobile technology key




to your competitiveness


industry you work
in, employees are
increasingly on the
move. More and more business
processes and activities occur
away from the office, be that
at the customer site, over the
web, at seminars or at home.
In fact, about 35 per cent of
today's workers in the US are
mobile and it is estimated that
by December 2006 this will
increase to 66 per cent.
Employers are realising they
can generate productivity gains
and a competitive advantage
by giving employees access to
information "any time" and
"anywhere".
Critical Data Access
By giving workers access to


relevant information anywhere
at any time, workers can be far
more responsive to customers.
Critical data necessary to ser-
vice the customer, be it pric-
ing, customer records or prod-
uct design specification, can all
accelerate business activity and
productivity if information is
readily available in real time.
For example, an organisation
in the US has demonstrated
that insurance field claims
adjusters can handle an addi-
tional 7.4 claims per worker per
week using mobile solutions.
The field agents have been
equipped with cell phones and
handheld devices, enabling
them to receive, respond and
action information at any time.
Information such as client
policy renewal, alerts regard-


ing past due premiums and
changes to daily schedules are
all managed in the field. Access
to critical data has empowered
the field agents, enabled them
to successfully manage client
relationships and create new
ones.
Efficient Communication
Reliable mobile solutions in
the workplace allow companies
to connect people, information
and business processes,
enabling better decisions faster.
Microsoft's Live Meeting
and Live Communications
Server are examples of mobili-
ty solutions that can signifi-
cantly enhance an organisa-
tion's communication with
employees, customers,
prospects and partners without


the cost and time of travel.
The technology enables
organisations to demonstrate
products, negotiate deals, share
files, and collaborate with white
boards in real time and at a
moment's notice by simply
using a PC or laptop with an
Internet connection and a
phone.
This technology has huge
benefits for organisations who
find that valuable time is lost
trying to set up face-to-face
meetings with clients, or whose
financial results are impacted
by significant travel costs. Com-
panies that are able to effi-
ciently and productively com-
municate with all their stake-
holders and clients at any give
time will be a step above their
competitors.


Worker Flexibility
Flexibility in work hours is
highly valued by workers
today. Many employees seek
to have some flexibility in their


daily structures to enable better
management of all the various

SEE page 10B


'Phenomenal'



response to Cable's



Digital TV store


S"ON STREAM An outside view of the Oceans Digital TV store, Mall at Marathon.


CABLE Bahamas said it has digital able experience was all
received a "phenomenal" about and a great many of
response to the opening of its them walked out the door with
Oceans Digital TV store at the a new digital box in their
Mall at Marathon, the show- hand."
case outlet for its new digital
cable television service. FeatureS
David Burrows, Cable's
director of marketing and pay- The store features two 52-
per-view, said of the store's inch high definition televisions
Monday opening: "There was a and another 17 flat-panel tele-
steady stream of customers visions. Two choices of digital
who came in to see what the set-top boxes are also dis-


played, from the all-digital ver-
sion to a full model that
includes high definition
(HDTV) output and a person-
al video recorder. I
The new digital cable chad-
nels include up to 285 chan-
nels, with 50 channels of DMX-
digital music, 34 pay-per-viewi
channels and more than 40 pre-
mium moviechannels.


December 22, 2005 January 4, 2006
Departs Nassau at 3:00pm Departs Nassau at 10:30am
Arrive kingston 4:15pm Arrive Kingston 11:45am


Departs Kingston at 5:15pm
Arrive Nassau 6:30pm


Departs Kingston at 12:45pm
Arrive Nassau 2:00pm


Making

IT Work

by Georgette Robinson


Proidence Technology Group


THE TRIBUNE,:


PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005


I I









THETRIBUNETURSDANOVEBER2I4, 2005 PGSSS3


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Premier Commer-
cial Real Estate
Investment Cor-
poration's chair-
man has told The
Tribune that a major share-
holder's involvement in the liq-
uidation of a troubled $500 mil-
lion Bahamian-registered
investment fund will have "no
impact whatsoever" on his
company.
Hannes Babak, Premier's
chairman, said it was effective-
ly business as usual for his com-
pany, a real estate investment
trust that owns several Bahami-
an commercial properties.
He added of the $5.5 million
investment held in Premier by
Mosaic Composite, the coun-
terparty for the troubled $500
million Olympus Univest Fund:
"They are a shareholder in the
fund, and they have no influ-
ence on the fund. They have
no directors; nothing apart
from the investment."
The Tribune revealed earlier,
thigh week that a report filed
with the Canadian courts by
Raymond Massi, the receiver


for the Norshield Group of
Companies, revealed that
Olympus Univest, which Nor-
shield managed, may own $5.5
million worth of shares in Pre-
mier Commercial Real Estate
Investment Corporation.
Mr Massi is working with
Clifford Culmer, the BDO
Mann Judd accountant pri-
vately appointed as Olympus
Univest's liquidator.
In his report, he indicated
that Olympus Univest made
the investment in Premier,
which is listed on the Bahamas
International Securities
Exchange (BISX), through
Mosaic Composite Ltd, anoth-
er Bahamian-domiciled com-
pany that acted as its counter-
party.
In his report, Mr Massi said:
"In conjunction with Culmer,
the receiver has identified that
Mosaic may own shares of Pre-
mier Commercial Real Estate
Investment Corporation, a
publicly-traded Bahamian enti-
ty having real estate holdings.
The potential value of this asset
is approximately Canadian $6.6
million (US $5.5 million) based
on its current trading value and
net asset value as at June 30,


2005.
"In addition, we understand
that approximately $600,000
(US$500,000) of unpaid divi-
dends may also be owing to
Mosaic relating to these shares.
The receiver and Culmer are
working together to obtain
additional information on this
potential Mosaic asset."
Premier was a mutual fund
formed in 2003 to invest in and
take ownership of several
Bahamian commercial proper-
ties. These were the First Com-
mercial Centre in Freeport, and
Caribbean Bottling's Nassau-
based production and distribu-
tion facilities, plus its Freeport
distribution centre.
Founding
Among Premier's founding
directors, although he is no
longer on the Board, was
Stephen Hancock, president
and chief executive of Cardi-
nal International. Cardinal
International was the adminis-
trator for the Olympus Univest
fund until the former wound
itself up on December 31, 2004.
Sources have suggested to
The Tribune that the Olympus


Univest liquidators will even-
tually seek to liquidate the
Mosaic holding in Premier,
returning the value from this
investment to the fund's
investors and creditors.
However, as The Tribune
pointed out on Monday, with
no market ever developing on
BISX for its shares. The rela-
tively large dividend yield may
have something to do with this,
as it is much higher than that
obtainable on fixed deposits
with Bahamian banks, thus
encouraging investors to buy
and hold.
In addition, Premier is a
closed-end fund as opposed to
an open-ended one. Under the
latter structure, the fund itself is
responsible for funding investor
redemptions, but in Premier's
case, as a closed-end fund
investors can only liquidate
their holdings by selling their
shares to new buyers.
Some have suggested to The
Tribune that if they are unable
to sell the Mosaic stake, the
liquidators could use the weight
of their shareholding to force
the sale of some underlying
properties.
However, this was emphati-


cally rejected by Mr Babak
who, when this was put to him,


replied: "No, they cannot do
that. No way."


New restaurant for Sandyport


A SEAFOOD restaurant has opened at
Sandyport's Olde Towne mall to provide
customers living in western New Provi-
dence with an affordable, on-the-water
dining option.
Michael Fowler, co-owner of the Olde
Towne Oyster Bar & Grill, said: "We think
that there are many persons who live in the
western district of Nassau who would love
a dining option that is on the water, infor-


mal and affordable."
Having converted a wooden verandah
across from Donnabella's Candles into an
indoor/outdoor establishment, customers,
can enjoy an al fresco eating experience
overlooking the canal and Sandyport, or sit
barside and watch Executive Chef Isaac
Wright and his assistants preparing seafood
delicacies.
Open from 11.30am to 11pm, the restau-


rant caters to family-style dining, business
lunches, after-work happy hours and late
night dining. Friday and Saturday nights
will feature live music, Bahamian and
Caribbean steel pan.
Newspaper articles illustrating signifi-
cant events in Bahamian history array the
bar-top and walls of the Oyster Bar &
Grille, embellishing upon the theme of
'Olde Towne'


WINTER PROGRAMMES 2006


BTVI is now accepting application forms for the winter
(January) semester 2006 for the following programmes:





* Conch Shell Jewelry Manufacturing Day and Night


* Drywall Installation


* Evening Wear


* Painting and Decorating


* Roof Construction


* Small Gas Engine

* Tailoring


Day and Night


Night


Day and Night


Night


Day and Night

Day and Night


Application forms are available in the
Admissions Office in the J-Block of the
Campus on Old Trail Road between the
hours of 9:00am and 5:00pm


For additional information contact
Ms Lorraine Knowles or Gene Marshall at
(24 2) 393-2804 or 5, (242) 502-6338.

' "* 1 II i' i . . [ I I I


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24,2005


THE TRIBUNE


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Tradewinds Building
Bay Street, Downtown
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel. 242-393-8618
www.bahamasrealty.bs
y w.obrjchardelll- com "-


BAHAMAS REALTY LTD
COMMERCIAL


CBRE
CB RICHARD ELLIS
NAVIGATING A NEW WORLD


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Pricing Information As Of:.
22 November 2005

52wk-Hi 52wk-Lo w ... Symbol. Previous Clo Today . Da ... ol. EPS $ D. PE' id
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10.25 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 10.25 1025 ""o6 ....... 1.46" '.''." 7.
7.24 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 7.24 7.24 0.00 0.587 0.330 12.3 4.56%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.175 0.010 4.6 1.25%
1.80 1.27 Bahamas Waste 1.27 1.27 0.00 0.112 0.060. 11.3 .4.72%
1.20 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.10 1.10 0.00 0.0686 0.030 16.7 2.73%
9.53 7.05 Cable Bahamas 9.40 9.53 0.13 1,000 0.689 0.240 13.8 2.52%
2.20 1.50 Colina Holdings 1.50 1.50 0.00 -0.046 0.000 NM 0.00%
9.17 6.99 Commonwealth Bank 9.11 9.11 0.00 0.791 0.450' .11.5. 4.94%
2.50 1.15 Doctor's Hospital 2.40 2.40 0.00 0.4;9 0.000 5.6. 0.00%
4.35 4.00 Famguard 4.35 4.35 0.00 0.428 0.240 9.1 5.52%
10.90 9.50 Finco 10.90 10.81 -0.09 3.600 0.695 0.510 15.6 4.72%
10.00 7.45 FirstCaribbean 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.695 0.380 13.9 3.80%
9.50 8.39 Forcoi 9.25 9.25 0.00 0.675 0.500 14.1 5.26%
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 0.022 0.000 52.3 .0.00%
19.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.94 9.94 0.00 0.526 0.405 18.9 4.07%
8.75 8.22 J. S. Johnson 8.75 8.75 0.00 0.526 0.560 16.6 6.40%
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 6.31 6.33 0.02 0.138 0.000 45.7 0.00%A
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.760 4.9 7.60%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Lo w Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price 'Veekly Vol EPS $ Div $ P/E ., ild
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.75 13.75 11.00 ..768 .. 0.960 7.5 6.98%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 135 _.....- 10.00- 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.044 0.000 NM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.33 1.333 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings. 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0,103 0.000 N/M. 0.00%
52wk-HI 52wk-Lo w Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Yield %
1.2593 1.1913 Colina Money Market Fund 1.259334*
2.4766 2.0536 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.4766 *
10.6711 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.6711 ."
2.2754 2.1675 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.275422--
1.1406 1.0755 Colina Bond Fund 1.140599"."
BISX ALL SHARE INDE X 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina aend fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for dally volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings pet share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1. 1994 a 100
AS AT AUG. 10, 2005/*?- AS AT OCT. 31, 2005
-AS AT OCT.28, 2005/ AS AT OCT. 31. 2005/ ** AS AT OCT. 31 2005


Ii -,


LegalNotice:

S.'*NOTICE

SIBAE LIMITED


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as fllows.
(): SIBAE LIMTED jsin voluntary dissolution.under the provisions
of Section 137 (4) of the Interinati6al .Business Companies Act
S2000. .
(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on 22nd November,
05 fiik the Articles of Dissolution Were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated Ltd.,
Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI.
ated this 23rd tday of November, A.D. 2005.


S.... ,o Associated Ltd. .






RECEPTIONIST/OFFICE

ASSISTANT


S We are seeking to fill the following contract position for a project on
Paradise Island, Bahamas. This position requires experience as a
professional receptionist/office assistant. Call monitoring, Filing,
Preparation of Letters, Spreadsheets, and other documents will be required.

This professional candidate must have 5 years or more experience as a
receptionist/office assistant dealing with high end clientele, worked in a fast
pace environment, experience with switchboards, and must have extensive
knowledge in Microsoft Office including Word, Excel & Outlook. A'
professional certification in this area would be an asset.

Only a short list of candidates will be contacted.


Please.respond by email to:
Fax:
S:Mail to:


info@pbwlbahamas.com
242.363.1279
PBWL
P.O. Box'SS-6386
Nassau, Bahamas


-- "o -. S.

w 0-- -- -n4


- Aa-ilable' fom-
am .mo 4pr .p b -dMONM7 -
M 4w4- w m 00 __ w
Ob. -a 0b.1WM O aw 4



SAvailable from


FOR



R ENT


* 2,468 sq.ft. office suite.
* In the heart of the Bahamas' financial area.
* Excellent visitor and local pedestrial traffic.
* Freatures a full standby generator.
* Dedicated parking facilities.


_I ~


L ~ I-- ~ L I. J. '14 1


I


%hlo









*THE TIBUNEBUSINES THUSDAY, November 24t, 2005, AE5


MUST ELL-Te Tibn


MILLARS HEIGHTS
C r J SUBDIVISION
(Nassau)

~ Lot #12 Block #3, a sixteen year old,
single story triplex with floor area of
2,378 sq. ft., each apartment consist
of 2 bed, 1 bath, living, dining area
i. and kitchen. Lot size is 7,500 sq. ft.
75 x 100.


Appraisal: $268,411.00

Heading west on Carmichael Road, enter West Ave., on the southside
immediately after Topps Laundermat. Take first right which is Wimpole St,
go around curve on left which is London Ave., travelsouth on London Ave.,
property is 2nd to last building on the right before T, Junction (High street)
L shape triplex, painted green, trimmed white.


CYCLOPS GARDEN
(Nassau)

All that lot of land numbering as "H"
being one of several lots in Cyclops
Gardens located off the northern side
of Cowpen Road one corner west of
Faith Avenue Junction. This property
comprise of a two and a half year old
single storey duples with a gross floor
area of 1,512.42 sq. ft., each unit
consisting of 2 bedrooms all wth wall airconditioning units, 1 bathroom,
living, dining and kitchen building is effectively new.
Appraisal: $219,450.00

Heading south on Faith Avenue to junction off Cowpen road make a right
then first right again. The subject property is the 4th on the right tan trimmed
brown.


DUNDAS TOWN
(Abaco)
I 2 storey, 4 bed, 2 bath on 1/2 acre
I11 lot no. 25, living room, dining room,
family room, kitchen downstairs,
I upstairsthere are 4 bedrooms and
2 bathrooms.Age is 16 years, color
is yellow trimmed with white,
upperlevel 1,080 sq. ft., lower level,
1080 sq. ft., garage 420 sq. ft.,
covered verahandahs 390 sq. ft., the land is portion W of one of the Dundas
Town Crown Allotment parcels situated near Forest Drive being just under
half acre in size. Located on the southern side of a ridge being 12 feet plus
above sea level with little likelihood of flooding grounds well kept with above
average landscaping including grass cover with palms and citrus trees.
Enclosed on 3 sides with a 6 ft., metal fences and ficus trees at the fron.
30 ft., by 36 ft., roof garage now used as a nursery school. At the upper
level on the eastern side is covered wooden verandah 6 ft., x 30 ft., interior
j walls concrete, ceiling of sheet rock and floor of ceremic tiles.
Appraisal: $267,987.91


WEST RIDGE ESTATES
(Nassau)

All that piece parcel or lot of land
having an area of 34,089 sq. ft.,
being lot #152, of West Ridge
Estates Subdivision, zoining is
at thesingle family residential with all
utilities avvailable. The subject
property is on hilly terrain at the top
of a ridge that offers a lovely view
to the northeast. The grounds are attractively landscaped with a grass lawn,
ornamental shrubs and flowering plants. Other improvements include chain
link fencing along the sides and rear boundaries, with a concrete block wall
at the front with asphalt paved driveway.
Appraisal: $1,049,788.90

There are two buildings located on this property. The main 2 storey house
is located atthe highesttpoint;oftheporoperty. This'house has an approximate
gross floor areaof 4,80Q q0. upstairs consis of'3full b6fdrorm suites
(each with a full bathroom), including a master bedroom suite, an office
with a bathroom (shower only) and sitting room. Downstairs consist of living
room, formal dining area, casual dining area, powder room and spacious
kitchen (at least 500 sq ft)


JOHNSON ROAD
(Nassau)

7 Ii All that lot of land having an area of 5,520 sq. ft., (69 x 92) situated on the corner of Johnson Road and
Step Streeet. This property is rectangular and comprised of a 12 year old single storey house that consist
Sof 3 .bedrooms, 1 bathroom, living, dining room and kitchen. Also an efficiency apartment attached.
The subject property is slightly above the level of the abutting roadways with minimal landscaping.
The property is open with chain link.fencing along itswestern boundries.

Appraisal: $139,868.40

Heading east along Bernard Road, turn through Johnson Road opposite St Augustine's College Drive all the way to the curve heading west
the subject house is first house on the right all white trimmed yellow.



ALLOTMENT 67, MARRIGOLD FARM ROAD (NASSAU), All that lot of land having an area of 1.173 acres being lot No. and
is situated on Marigold Farm Road in the ara known as allotment 67, a said subdivision situated in the south eastern district
of new Providence, Bahamas. This property is rtVacant and area has all utilities & services. Appraisal: $148,50.00

Travelling on Joe Farrington Road turn onto Marrigold Farm Road heading south, the subject is the second to last propert on
the left hand side of the road near the pond.

NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA), Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and bounded on North by Early Settler
Drive and South by Deal Investment Ltd., this is a single family zoning and 50 ft., above sea level. This site encompasses a
foundation with plumbing and roughing inplace and well compacked quarry fill. The concrete floor has not been poured as yet.
The foundation is 2,511 sq. ft. Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is vacant and a hill
over looking the Atlantic Ocean. Appraisal: $46,167.18

BAHAMA SOUND (EXUMA), Lot #7088 situated in Bahama Sound, Exuma section 10 East. Great Exuma approximately 10.5
miles west of George Town lot is square in shape on elevation of approximately 15 ft., above sea level contains 10,000 sq. ft.,
No adverse site conditions noted. This property is single family residence. Property is located on the northwestern side of the
Queen's Highway, about 10.5 miles northwest of George Town. Appraisal: $27,562.50


MURPHY TOWN (ABACO) Lot #78B vacant land, the property has average surface drainage and is not suseptible to flooding
under normal conditions. Land size 104 x 78 approximately 11,277 sq. ft. Estimated Value: $18,649.33


.-a'Forcodiiosf al oratincnact


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005, PAGE 5B


--THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS






THE TRIBUNE


Controversial Guana Cay





project in two-month halt


FROM page 1B

Mr Smith said that under-
taking "effectively gives us the
injunction we've been seeking".
He added: "From day one,
we've said to the developers:
'Stop, rake a breather and let's
hear the case on its merits.'
Had they done that from the
beginning, this case would have
been finished in June.


"The developers wasted time
and money, and have put their
project in jeopardy."
Executive
Dr Livingstone Marshall, an
executive with the Baker's Bay
development, yesterday said
Discovery Land Company had
not "quantified" what yester-
day's ruling would mean in
terms of increased costs.


-- -- A


WININ BA SAY


REAL ESTATE SALES
REPRESENTATIVE


The Abaco Club on Winding Bay, a spectacular 520 acre
International Members Golf & Sporting Estate on Abaco,
is seeking a senior-level REAL ESTATE SALES
REPRESENTATIVE. Candidates must have a minimum
of 5 years experience in luxury market sales. Real Estate
license is preferred. Successful candidate must have
exceptional communication skills, both verbal and written.
Must be personable, professional and willing to commute
or relocate to Abaco. The Abaco Club's estate lots range
from $875,000 to more then $4 million. Please email cover
letter and resume to info@theabacoclub.com or fax to 242-
367-2930, Attn: Sales & Marketing.





NEWLY BUILT LUXURY
i & 2 Bedroom Aprtments
Sunset Park, West










...... . . ... .

PARTIALLY FURNISHED (Fridge & Stove).
CENTRAL AIR CONDITIONED
LAUNDRY FACILITIES (Washer & Dryer)
SECURITY SCREENS
_WATER INCLUDED
ENCLOSED PROPERTY
To inquire, call (242) 361-0218 or 557-3021
2Bedroms $875.00
Security Deposit $700.00
and First & Last Month
1 Bedroom $700.00
Security Deposit $550.00
SFirst & Last Month







NOTICE

The Public Hospitals Authority invites tenders for
the purchase of the following vehicles


1. 1998 Daewoo Cielo Sedan 1500cc


2. 1997 Asia Towner Van 800 cc


3. Toyota Hiace Bus


4. 1991 Chevy Pick-Up Truck

Vehicles maybe viewed at Sandilands Rehabilitation
Centre's Compound, Fox Hill Rd.

Sealed envelopes, marked tender should be address
to the Managing Director, Public Hospital Authority,
Manx Corporate Centre/ Dockendale House,
P.O.Box N-8200, and arrive no later than Friday,
December 30, 2005.

Herbert H. Brown
Managing Director


He added, though, that the
company "fully intends" to
keep the 151 Bahamians
employed on the project on
despite the two-month delay.
He added that while all new
work would stop, employees
would still be able to maintain
existing structures, and poten-
tial real estate clients could still
visit the site. As a result, the
Baker's Bay project had not
come to a stop.
Dr Marshall said the under-
taking would delay work on the
marina and construction of the
service pier, but he said the
undertakings given demon-
strated Baker's Bay's commit-
ment to safeguarding the envi-
ronment and following the
judicial process.
He said: "We still think we
will have a successful project
and complete it in a timely
manner, but it's important to
get this matter resolved so it's
resolved completely. We would


have preferred to be able to
continue, but getting it right is
much more important."
Dr Marshall added that the
delays to work on the marina
and service pier would only
cause a "two-week shift in
schedule".
Appeal
The Court of Appeal also
yesterday gave permission for
Mr Smith to add the names of
individual landowners and res-
idents on Great Guana Cay to
the action and, in reinstating
the application for a Judicial
Review, ordered that it be
heard by a different Supreme
Court judge. Costs are to be
borne by whichever side is suc-
cessful in the Supreme Court
trial.
Mr Smith said: "I think as
.far as Great Guana Cay, the
nation in general and invest-
ment goes, the court sent the


message that it is interested in
due process, it is interested in
investment occurring in the
right way and the legislation
that provides for licensing, per-
mits and approvals be followed
to the letter of the law.
"Cabinet cannot short circuit
Parliament by giving carte
blanche to any investor."
Mr Smith argued that before
investment incentives, such as
real property tax, customs
duties and business licence fee
exemptions were given, along
with the leasing of Crown
Land, this should be debated
by Parliament.
He added that many permits
and approvals were issued
under the Local Government
Act, meaning they had to come
from local government rather
than through Nassau.
Mr Smith said: "There is a
process that has to be followed,
and as much as we need for-
eign dollars, as much as we


need foreign investment, it's
just that there's a proper way
for it to happen. We are not
giving our birthright away with-
out being consulted."
Glen C Laing, a district-'
councillor for Great Guana
Cay, said local government
officials felt they had been'
"bypassed" on the project by.'
the Central Government, and.:
were treated like "guinea pigs".
Development
"We felt we were short-
changed. Really, we just want
the Crown Land back," Mr
Laing said. "The people of
Guana Cay are not against
development, but the kind of
development this size is crazy."
He added that fertilizer and
pesticide run-off form the golf
course would leach into the
waters and harm the reef,
affecting both yachting and
fishing tourism.


00




0 0
[^co fide ce^


FROM page 1B

proposed joint venture with the


I-Group that could lead to
Mayaguana's population rising
from 300 to 20,000, Mr Smith
said: "May I ask the Prime


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that PATRICE ROSE PINNOCK, 43 INFANT
VIEW ROAD, P.O. BOX SS-6292, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 17TH day of
NOVEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, ALEXANDRIA
CLAUDIA PIERRE, of Mermaid Boulevard West,
Carmichael, Nassau, The Bahamas, intend to change my
name to ALEXANDRIA CLAUDIA MACKEY. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice.




CONSTRUCTION & MATERIALS CORP.
Devcon is seeking proven marine professionals for its
dredging division in the Bahamas. Candidates must have a
minimum of five years experience in the operation of a 24"
cutter suction dredge or larger with excellent leadership and
interpersonal skills:
CHIEF ENGINEER
Manage all aspects of vessel operation including machinery,
maintenance, repair of dredge and auxiliary vessels; spare
parts. Hands on experience with diesel engines, motors,
electrical, pumps, hydraulics, dredge and crane operation;
supervision. BS. in Marine Engineering or equivalent
experience. Live aboard.
WATCH STANDING ENGINEER
Assist Chief Engineer with all responsibilities and activities
listed above. Live aboard.
PORT ENGINEER
Coordinate and execute vessel/equipment inspection,
maintenance and repair. Possess technical and supervisory
skills, develop work plans, cost control, record keeping and
regulatory compliance. BS in Marine Engineering or
equivalent experience. Florida based.
LEVERMAN
Minimum 5 years experience operating a 24" cutter suction
dredge or larger, must read marine and navigational
equipment, maintain logs. Live aboard.
MATE
Assist in supervision of personnel, management of dredging
activities and vessel operation. Operate crane on floating
barge; inspect, maintain, repair equipment; navigation skills;
movement of heavy anchors, mooring lines. Live aboard.
DECK HAND
Same responsibilities as Mate (see above) except for crane
operation. Assist with all activities, catch lines. Prior
shipboard experience required. Live aboard.
Please send resume and salary history to:
Email: cparker(a-devc.com
Visit us at www.devc.com No third parties EOE


Minister whether he asked the
people in all these islands
whether they wanted a big
anchor dropped on their set-
tlements?"
He added: "I think that this
ruling will cause the Govern-
ment, and in particular any
prospective development com-
pany, to be a little bit circum-
spect and deliberate in their
approach.
"Lawyers representing devel-
opers should take note that a
new day has dawned in the
Bahamas where people affect-
ed by development....... are not
prepared to be railroaded,
intimidated and bamboozled
into accepting the Cabinet's
diktat.
"I think that if anything
comes out of this series of liti-
gation with Guana Cay, the
Government, whether it's PLP
or FNM, will be driven back to
having debates on these huge
developments, debates about
the level and extent of conces-
sions given, dealt with in Par-
liament where elected MPs can
speak to the issues.
Developers
"From now on, developers
and the Cabinet should know
that interest groups will no
longer sit by but inquire and
protest. They will demand to
be part of the loop."
By debating developments
in Parliament, Mr Smith said


it could pass specific legislation,
giving authorisation to these
projects. He added that a Save
Grand Bahama Association
and Save Harbour Island Asso-
ciation had already been
formed, and these groups were
eventually likely to form a Save
the Bahama Islands Associa-
tion to help protect local rights
and the environment.
Outcome
However, Mr Smith said the
outcome of yesterday's appeal
should not deter foreign invest-
ment in the Bahamas, because
it would help lead to greater
clarity and due process to safe-
guard investor funds.
He added: "I represent, and
continue to represent, large
development companies, and
one thing investors want is cer-
tainty of process.
'"What are the lawful
requirements we need to fo&l
low? They are happy to inveti
in an environment where ther6
is certainty.
"This ruling and this litiga-
tion will help to bring investor
confidence to the Bahamas;
because they will know what
the rules are."
He added that investors
would know they had the proA
tection of the law, and would
not be in danger of losing theik
monies and investment as 0
r-sult of a sudden government
icy change.


CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNTANT


We are seeking to fill the following immediate muilti-year contract position:
for a project on Paradise Island, Bahamas, This position requires experience.
in all aspects of accounting including, job costing monthly invoicing, bank'
reconciliation, pay roll, accounts payable, purchase order control, contract
and change order control and review. Preparation of financial statements
and monthly reports will be required.

This professional candidate must have 5 years or more experience in
construction accounting, hold a Bachelor's or Masters degree inl
Accounting and must have extensive knowledge in ACCPAC, Crystal
Reports and Microsoft Office including Word, Excel & Outlook.

Only a short list of candidates will be contacted.


Please respond by email to:
Fax:
Mail to:


info@pbwlbahamas.coin
242.363.1279
PBWL
P.O. Box SS-6386
Nassau, Bahamas


BUSINESS


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005






I inUrloUAY, NILUV lVlDr. 2', L-UU, r2-Mc- i u


IT professionals to form industry body


FROM page 1B

Bahamas Institute of Chartered
Accountants (BICA), Bahamas Insti-
tute of Financial Services and
Bahamas Real Estate Association
(BREA).
President
Edgar Moxey, president of the Insti-
tute of Internal Auditors, was sched-
uled to address last night's meeting.
Without IT, many businesses in the
Bahamas service-based economy
would cease to function, and Mr Fer-
nander said that apart from acting as


an advocacy and lobbying group for
industry interests in areas such as leg-
islation, education was a core part of
its proposed mandate.
"One of its goals will be to force
the education among its members and
the citizenry of the country," Mr Fer-
nander said. This would involve the
promotion of IT skills at all levels of
the Bahamian educational system,
helping to make the industry as
"respected as other professions".
Mr Fernander said the educational
proposals went beyond the school sys-
tem, adding that the association would
seek to promote the use of computers
and technology in every household in
the Bahamas.


He added: "We want to promote
the IT industry and the. skills in the
industry, the IT professionals and edu-
cation in the Bahamas. We'd like
every household to become IT users
and have IT tools as part of their life."
Mr Fernander said IT profession-
als were "very much on the cusp" of
starting this initiative, with last night's
meeting "probably one of the furthest
steps taken".
Association.
He added that the hope was to get
the association fully up and running by
mid-2006, so "IT professionals see this
as an umbrella body under which all


can gather".
Many functions would be repre-
sented by the association, including
software developers and hardware
manufacturers, but also companies.
and workers involved in systems con-
sulting, solutions provision, security
personnel, computer scientists, e-com-
merce executives, and information
systems managers.
The hard work was likely to begin in
mid-January 2006, and Mr Fernander
said IT "underpins" virtually all
aspects of economic life.
As a result, the proposed associa--
tion would look to aid the growth of
the Bahamian IT industry as a key
part of the economy, fostering per-


sonal and professional linkages among
its members and similar international
and regional groupings.
Initiative
Mr Fernander said another initiative
was to set and adopt standards vital to
the IT industry's growth,' invQlving
-codes of ethics, performance criteria
and professional qualifications.
This, would enable members to
show clients they adhered to certain
standards.
B.I.I.T.S. would be a non-profit
organisation, with its members drawn
from students, institutions'and indiis-
try professionals.


Tourism trends to


Easter


FROM page 1B

While Thanksgiving was


tracking on a par with last
year's performance, Mr Hoop-
er said the full month of
November was "considerably


FREEPORT OIL
HOLDINGS
COMPANY LIMITED




DIVIDEND PAYMENT



FOCOL is pleased to announce a


dividend payment of 6 cents per


share to all shareholders of record


as of November 30, 2005, payable on


December 14, 2005.








"Fuelling Growth For People"



TEACHERS AND SALARIED WORKERS
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LIMITED
NOTICE TO OUR
VALUED SHAREHOLDERS
Please be advised that Interest/Dividend payments for the year 2004
will be distributed effective Tuesday November 1, 2005 during the
hours of 11:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. as follows:
DATES ACCOUNT DATES ACCOUNT
NUMBERS NUMBERS

November 1 001-700 November 24 7201-7500
November 2 701-1200 November 25 7501-7800
November 3 1201-1800 November 28 7801-8100
November 4 1801-2400 November 29 8101-8400
November 7 2401-3000 November 30 8401-8700
November 8 3001-3600 December 1 8701-9000
November 9 3601-4200 December 2 9001-9500
November 10 4201-4500 December 5 9501-10000
November 11 4501-4800 December 6 10001-10500
November 14 4801-5100 December 7 10501-11300
November 15 5101-5400 December 8 11301-12100
November 16 5401-5700 December 9 12101-13000
November 17 5701-6000 December 12 13001-14000
November 18 6001-6300 December 13 14001-15000
November 21 6301-6600 December 14 15001-16000
November 22 6601-6900 December 15 16001-17000
November 23 6901-7200 December 16 17001-18207


ahead" of 2004.
Month-to-date, the British
Colonial Hilton's room rates
were some $12 up on 2004,
which Mr Hooper said trans-
lated into about an 8 per cent
year-on-year increase.
For the 2005 full-year, Mr
Hooper said the British Colo-
nial Hilton was looking at an
increase in room rates "slightly
over" 12 per cent, with occu-
pancy levels also up by 4 per
cent.
Meanwhile, Jeremy
MacVean, Comfort Suites' gen-
eral manager, said his property
was "sold out" for the Christ-
mas and New Year period.
Forward
He added that forward
trends were looking "very
good", with April 2006 likely
to benefit from Easter falling
later in the coming year.


Although Thanksgiving was
looking about the same as
2004's performance, Mr
MacVean said: "We're sold out
for Thanksgiving. Wednesday,
Thursday, Friday and Saturday
are a full house.
"We always expect to have a
a good Thanksgiving and are
on track this year."
Weekends
Mr MacVean said the Par-
adise Island-based Comfort
Suites had also enjoyed "a cou-
ple of good weekends" in the
run up to Thanksgiving, with
the full month of November
ahead of its 2004 comparative.
He added, though, that Sep-
tember and October had once
again been affected by hurri-
cane season, with many peo-
ple reluctant to travel during
the period.


Full time position available with an established
kitchen cabinet dealership.. Responsibilities
include designing and drafting:- kitchens and
bathrooms, closets and various other millwork.
Construction background and CAD skills are
important. Salary and benefits are negotiable.
Located out West; this is a fun and rewarding
career opportunity for the right person.

please email application to
ckl@coralwave.com


S GN 295

MINISTRY OF FINANCE

PUBLIC NOTICE

The Ministry of Finance brings to the attention of
the public the recent amendment to Section 17 of the
Stamp Act which came into effect on 25th May 2005.

The Section now provides for increased penalty
where stamp duty remains unpaid for a period of up
to 6 months from the date. of the transaction. A
surcharge of 10% of the stamp duty is levied.

Where the time exceeds six months, then the surcharge
is 15% of the stamp duty.

The public is encouraged to present all unstamped
documents to the Public Treasury for stamping, so
as to avoid the levy of a surcharge.

The public is also advised that documents will be
stamped with the rates in effect at the time of execution
of the instruments.


Ruth Millar (Mrs.)
Financial Secretary


Security
INSU


&.General
RANCE *


A position has become available within our organization
for a suitably qualified & experienced:


The successful candidate will be responsible for the following:
/ Management of the claims department reception area.
/ Maintenance of the files, records & accounting
system.associated with the operation of the department
/ Coordination of the work flow through the department
The ideal candidate will possess the following skills and
experience:
/ Maintaining administration functions within a
-dynamic office environment *
/v Detailed knowledge of Microsoft Office Suite of products
/ Relevant qualifications related to office organization
and management within the insurance industry
/ A resilient approach to customer service with an
emphasis on communication skills
Salary will be.commensurate with relevant.qualifications &
experience. As part of.our attractive employment package,
we offer comprehensive medical and pension benefits.
Interested'candidates are invited to send their resurnd to the
attention of:
The General Manager
Security & General Insurance Company Ltd.
P. Box N 3540
Nassau, The Bahamas
Closing date for applications will be the 2nd December 2005
TH P.O;.STONS


Kingsway Academy

invites qualified

teachers for the

following positions for

January, 2006.


* Auto Mechanics and Woodwork
* Biology
* Librarian/Media Supervisor

Successful applicants must:

* Be a practicing, committed born-again Christian
* Have a minimum qualification of a Bachelor's'
Degree in the appropriate subject areas or higher
from a recognized college or university -
* Have a valid teacher's certificate or diploma
where appropriate
* Be willing to participate in extra curricular*
activities, etc.

Application must be made in writing together
with a full curriculum vitae, a recent color
photograph and names of at least three references,
one being that of your Church pastor 'to:






TelepIhone numbers[32 -6269.
DEDLN FR P~criN I FIAY,


SI 1 L I I1U )J I'Li


ISIGH .





PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS
iI qIM l


THE COLLEGE OF:
Visit our wesite at www.cob.edu.bs


HECG BAHAMA
FDUCAwNG &TRAINvcG'BAHAML4NS


LUNCHEON
Friday, 9th December @ 12:30 pm


Wyndham Nassau Resort &
Crystal Palace Casino
Tickets: $35.00


INDUCTEE:
Vernice Walkine, Director General,
Ministry of Tourism
PLAQUE
UNVEILING CEREMONY
Monday, 12th December @ 9:30 am
Foyer, The College of The Bahamas
For more information or ticket reservation
for the induction, please call the
Office of Alumni Affairs at 302-4365/6.


The College of The Bahamas School of Social Sciences announces its


Bachelor of Arts in

The History Programme offers a
fascinating range of courses including
the following and many more:
Race, Class and Gender.in the
Late 19th and Early20th""entury
Bahamas
History of Africa (Since 1850)
Pan-Africanism: Politics of the Black,
Atlantic World
Science, Religion and Society: The
Enlightenment in Europe (1700-
1800)
Caribbean Migration since the 18th
Century
Women and Gender in the History
of the English-speaking Caribbean
African American History (to 1865)


What are some of the careers paths which
history majors commonly follow?

Mhny students of history have a distinct


advantage in
Educators
Writers
Lawyers
Archivists
Librarians
Filmmakers
Journalists


seeking careers as


Museum professionals
Government advisors/policymakers

Come uncover the past, discover the roots of the
present and indicators of the future!


BUSINESS OFFICE OPERATION HOURS
NOVEMBER & DECEMBER
November 29 December 1 Cashiers booth & accounts
receivable department will.
be closed. Accounts
payable will accept transcript
payments only
December 5 22 Processing of tuition and fee
payments from returning
students
December 15 Last day for returning
students to apply for
Deferred Payment Plan
(Spring 2006)
December 16 Last day for returning
students to obtain 10%
discount on fees only
(excluding insurance fee)
for early payment of Spring
semester bill

SPRING 2006
ADVISEMENT & REGISTRATION !

November 21 Advisement/Registration Begins


December 5 Bill Collection Begins
December 21 Transcripts issued
December 22 Last day for fee payment


Advisement and registration may be conducted in facult'
offices.
The Records Office will conduct registration only, Mondays
through Thursdays.
tir more information, please call 302-4522/3


77


oe n T


T








A M ASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bs
Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs


Ronnie Butler


S.. ~,


FROM page 1B

arrivals consisting of mainly
cruise ship passengers were
off by 5.1 per cent at 2.728 mil-
lion. Although the rise in air
arrivals, who are mostly
stopover visitors, is likely to be
comforting for the resort indus-
try, since these are the higher
paying customers, the decline
in cruise visitors meant that
total arrivals for the first three
quarters in 2005 were down 3.1
per cent at 3.894 million.
Fared
New Providence had fared
best, with air arrivals for the
first nine months of 2005 up by
11.8 per cent on. 2004 at
752,336. This had helped to
cancel out the 4.2 per cent
decline in cruise visitors to the
island, ensuring that total


arrivals were up 1.2 per cent at.
2.211 million.
Suffering
Grand Bahama, though, was
still suffering, with air arrivals
for the first three quarters off
30.3 per cent at 233,245, large-
ly due to the absence of room
inventory and the still-closed
Royal Oasis resort. Cruise
arrivals were also down 13.2
per cent at 385,779.
The picture on the Family
Islands was mixed, with air
arrivals ahead by 0.8 per cent
for the first nine months at
179,843, but cruise and sea
arrivals off by 3.1 per cent at
884,230. Combined, this meant
Family Island arrivals in total
were off by 2.4 per cent at 1.064
million.
The only island to experience
a decline in air arrivals during
September was Long Island,


where they fell by 6 per cent.
On the cruise front, cruise
arrivals to Nassau/Paradise
Island in September grew by
10.1 per cent, driven by the fact
that Disney Cruises and Royal
Caribbean Cruises brought in
more passengers than last year.
Disney brought in 54 per cent
more passengers despite only
operating the Disney Wonder,
while Holland American Cruis-
es brought in 104 per cent
more.
Reduced
Carnival, though, reduced its
service to Nassau/Paradise
Island, increasing its service to
Grand Bahama instead.
In the Family Islands, Royal
Caribbean brought in 127 per
cent more passengers than in
2004, while Disney Cruises,
Norwegian Cruise Lines, Hol-
land America and Princess
Cruises also increased the pas-
sengers they took to these des-
tinations.


Share
your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you areiraising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Tourist arrivals



are down 3.1%



for the first nine



months of year


GN-296

MINISTRY OF FINANCE





CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS

NOTICE
THE BANKS AND TRUST COMPANIES
REGULATION ACT, 2000

Notice is hereby given that the Governor, pursuant to Section
18(1)(a)(ii) of The Banks and Trust Companies Regulation
Act, 2000, has revoked by Order dated 16th November,
2005, the restricted trust licence granted on 24th August,
1983, to Maddox Limited, on.the grounds that the company
has ceased to carry to trust business.

Signed
Wendy Craigg
Governor
The Central Bank of The Bahamas


College of The Bahamas
Harry C. Moore Library & Information Centre



Building Contractors are invited to PRE-QUALIFY for the
Construction of The College of The Bahamas Library and
Information Centre, to be situated at Thompson Boulevard,
New Providence, Bahamas.

The Project will comprise complete construction of the
new library approximately sixty thousand square feet in
area (60,000 sq. ft.), featuring a four-storey structure with
a domed 60-foot central atrium of 40-foot diameter. The
facility will accommodate about 1,000 users, allow for
doubling of holdings from 70,000 volumes to 150,000
volumes and will contain the technology and other amenities
to make the library client friendly and technology
appropriate.

Interested contractors may collect pre-qualification
documents from:

Axum Architecture
East Bay and Ernest Streets
Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 393-8415

There will be a non-refundable Fee of $100 for each
document, (cash or certified cheque made payable to The
College of The Bahamas.)

Sealed pre-qualification submissions will be received until
4:00 p.m., 30th November 2005 at the office of Axum
Architecture, East Bay and Ernest Streets. -


BAHAMAS
ELECTRICITY
CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE M
TECHNICAL TRAINER
HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING DEPARTMENT
A vacancy exists in the Human Resources & Training Division for a Technical Trainer.
The Technical Trainer (Electrical) is responsible for the technical instruction of employees
from all engineering departments within the Corporation encompassing Electrical Engineering,
Transmission and distribution Operations, Power Generation Operations inclusive of Plant
Installation, Maintenance, Operation and Control Workshop.
Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:
Providing instructions and training in engineering trade skills for employees within
the Corporation
Preparing candidates for external examination certification by local and overseas
organizations
Providing instructions on developing safe and efficient work habits
Providing instructions to participants in classroom workshops and job environments
SPreparing program criteria and marking schemes for trade testing in electrical based
trades.
Preparing timetables and examination schedules for visiting external examiners.
Identifying, developing and delivering engineering; courses (i.e., Electrical Technician
Training).
Evaluating, recording and reporting on the progress of students attending training
courses
Preparing course notes, training aids, evaluating and marking schemes for all courses.
Job requirements include:
A minimum of a Bachelor's Degree in Electrical Engineer or an OND in engineering
or equivalent qualifications
A minimum of 10+ years of experience in an industrial training setting
Sound knowledge of technical skills related to electrical engineering principles
Good judgment and sound reasoning ability
Excellent time management skills
Proficient oral and written communication skills
Ability to keep current with newly installed or modified plant
Comprehension of schematics, technical reports, drawings, troubleshooting and
technical activities
Good information transfer skills
Computer literate
Interested persons may apply by completing an internal Application Form forwarded to
reach: The Human Resources Department on or before Tuesday, December 6, 2005.


__


ii!!!!ii i: i


- -


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005, PAGE 9B






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10B. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005


Mobile technology key



to your competitiveness


FROM page 2B

elements in their lives chil-
dren, parents, church and oth-
er commitments. Research
shows that workers who have
some control over their work
hours are far more productive
than those who must adhere to
a strict standard schedule of
9am to 5pm.
Mobility solutions enable
organisations to provide flexi-
ble working arrangements for
their staff. Solutions such as


laptops with secure wi-fi tech-
nology, broadband connec-
tions, Virtual Private Networks
(VPN) solutions, secure virtual
Local Area Networks
(vLANS), e-mail access from
a mobile device and extranets,
can all offer worker flexibility.
Investment
Companies have to be com-
mitted to making significant
investments in mobile comput-
ing that are robust, secure and
reliable. However, executives
who see it as just a cost to the


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

GUANG CANTON CO. LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
22nd day of November, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




LEGAL NOTICE"

NOTICE


KIDAL LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the dissolution of KIDAL LTD., has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator


IT budget are allowing their
organisation to remain crip-
pled. If mobility computing is
not addressed, companies will
be left at a disadvantage due
to a lack of communication,
higher cost, poor customer ser-
vice and a lack of flexibility.



To provide feedback on this
column, please e-mail:
MakinglTwork@provi-
dencetg.com


About the Author:
Georgette Robinson is man-
ager, networking solutions at
Providence Technology Group.
Ms Robinson has 10 years'
experience working in IT
across Project Management,
Business Analysis and Net-
work Management & Imple-
mentation. Providence Tech-
nology Group is one of the
Bahamas' leading IT firms,
specialising in Networking
Solutions, Consulting and
Advisory Services and Soft-
ware Solutions.


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


NOUKARI INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the dissolution of NOUKARI INVESTMENTS
LIMITED, has been completed; a'Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck
off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator





LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


GIANFAR LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the dissolution of GIANFAR LTD., has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator


NOTICE OF VACANCY
FOR

DIRECTOR OF CITY MANAGEMENT

A vacancy exists at The Grand Bahama Port
Authority, Limited for one DIRECTOR OF CITY
MANAGEMENT in the City Management
Department.

Applicants must have the following

Bachelor of Science in Engineering
Minimum of fifteen (15) years relevant engineering
experience
Minimum of ten (10) years experience supervision multi
discipline technical teams including architectural, civil,
structural, mechanical, electrical, town planning,
environmental and maintenance professionals.
Strong administrative background

Professional Registration a plus

The individual will be responsible for the
management of the Building and Development
Services Department, including the following
functional groups:

Town Planning and Capital Projects
Building Code Compliance
Environmental Compliance
Geographical Information Systems (GIS)
Property Maintenance
City (Maintenance) Management

Resumis with supporting documentation should
be submitted to:

The Personnel Department
The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited
P.O. Box F-42666
Freeport, Grand Bahama
on or before November 30th, 2005



LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE
International Business Companies Act
(No. 45 of 2000)
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000), FALMAR
TRADING LIMITED, is in dissolution. ADOLFO SAURI., is the
Liquidator and can be contacted at PH Plaza 2000 Building, 50th Street,
Panama, Republic of Panama. All persons having claims against the
above-named company are required to send their names, addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the 21st day
of December, 2005.




ADOLFO SAURI


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) SUWANNA OVERSEAS LIMITED is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.
(b) The Dissolution of the said Company commenced on the November
23, 2005 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and
registered by the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Alisa Richardson of Shirley
House, 50 Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas.
(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 23rd day of December 2005 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may be
excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before such debts
are proved.
S November 24, 2005
ALISA RICHARDSON
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY



LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000
No.45 of 2000


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


CUMMERBUND CO. LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the dissolution of CUMMERBUND CO. LTD., has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


IRONSTONE VALLEY LTD.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the dissolution of IRONSTONE VALLEY LTD., has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


CONROE INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the dissolution of CONROE INC., has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


STAR BRIGHT INVEST. LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the dissolution of STAR BRIGHT INVEST. LTD.,
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator


In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000), HEIMWIL
INTERNATIONAL LTD, is in dissolution. CONTINENTAL
LIQUIDATORS INC., is the Liquidator and can be contacted at No. 2
Commercial Centre Square, P.O. Box #71, Aloft, Niue Islands. All persons
having claims against the above-named company are required to send
their names, addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator before Dcember 22, 2005.



B. Foster
For: Continental Liquidators, Inc.
Liquidator


I Iii' I' I --


I


BUSINESS




THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005, PAGE ilB


I 1 | I n i im rzI IIi S Ir L. .1 l i I


LOCAL NEWS


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PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005


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TRIBUNE SPORTS


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Challenges ahead of


the Bahamas Games


FOR what its worth,
the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture
might want to consider using
"Extending a Helping Hand"
as the theme for the sixth
Bahamas Games next year.
As I sat through the past
three days of the 2005
National Sports Leaders
Conclave at the Nassau
Beach Hotel, the focus of the
interaction between the
"movers and shakers"
seemed to be what assistance
they could receive.
It's obvious that since the
fifth games were held in 2001
six years removed from the
projected three year cycle a
lot has happened throughout
the Family Islands.
Where islands have not
been hit drastically by the
hurricanes that wreaked hav-
oc, there have been many
key persons who have
migrated either to New Prov-
idence or Grand Bahama for
economic reasons.
In six months, the ministry
will host the games from July
16-22. The conclave served
as an opportunity to bring


STUBBS


a 7d )


OPINION


the sports leaders together
in a forum to once again set
the pace.
But, from what was dis-
cussed, it will be a mammoth


task for many of the Family
Islands to be properly pre-
pared, even though many of
the representatives have
indicated that they will pro-
duce teams that will be com-
petitive.

O f course, they will
rely heavily on the
draft system that has been
put in place after the initial
games in 1989 to help level
the playing field.
The islands have utilised it
before, when New Provi-
dence was finally dethroned
by Grand Bahama in a close-
ly contested fifth games in
2001.
Next year, in addition to
the draft, the Family Islands
are also appealing for assis-
tance with facilities, many of
which are badly lacking.
Additionally, there's been
a constant cry from the visit-
ing delegates that they are
in dire need of certified phys-
ical education teachers or
trained coaches.
Cat Island, for instance,
has indicated that they
haven't had a PE teacher in


place for more than a
decade.
Maybe, as originally sug-
gested in the formation of
the games, hosting of a mini
Olympic Games or similar
events could be staged on the
various islands.
In that way, some ade-
quate funding can be sent to
those islands to help upgrade
the facilities.
The conclave, albeit late,
doesn't give the Family
Island teams sufficient time,
considering what they are
faced with, to get their teams
ready.
But at least the ministry
know what challenges they
must encounter in order to
make the seventh games -
whenever they are held a
success.
Next year, however, the
Family Islands will definitely
need a "Helping Hand."

* SUBVENTIONS
INCREASED

T WAS good to see
that the Minister of
Sports agreed to include


more than just track and
field athletes on the list of
those receiving subventions
from this year's budget.
However, there are still
some sporting bodies who
feel that not enough is being
done and that there should
be more athletes added. I
guess it's going to be hard to
please everybody.
But it's certainly a step in
the right direction to see
more athletes from swim-
ming, boxing and cycling
added.
After all, they are the four
sports that are currently rep-
resented at the major inter-
national events like the
Olympic and the Common-
wealth Games.
Who got what is another
item for consideration, but
it's fair to say that at least
the recommendation made
by the appointed committee
to the ministry is a compre-
hensive one.
On the other hand, some-
thing must be done to assist
the team sports so that even-
tually they can also make the
trip to compete at the more
prestigious events.


-


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Family





update


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
WITH the sixth Bahamas Games just
six months away, the Family Island
Sports Council had a chance to update
the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture on their plight of readiness.
During the final day of the three-day
2005 National Sports Leader Conclave
at the Nassau beach Hotel yesterday,
starting with Grand Bahama and ending
with New Providence, facilities, fund-
ing and the draft were the hot items dis-
cussed.
Not all of the islands were represent-
ed, but from those that were, the min-
istry was given a comprehensive update
on the state of the conditions and the
challenges that the Sports Councils are
faced with.

Here's a summary of what those
chairpersons had to say:
Churchill Tener Knowles, chairman
of the defending Grand Bahama Sports
Council, said they are suffering from
the adverse effects of the recent hurri-
canes over'the past two years.
But he indicated that the damages
have not dampened the spirits of the
athletes as there are many vibrant pro-
grammes going on, including HOYTES
(Helping Our Youth Through Educa-
tion and Sports), organised by Glad-
stone 'Moon' McPhee.
Knowles added that this year they had
the very successful hosting of the Grand
Bahama Games, which they will use as a
base for selecting their team for the
Bahamas Games.
"Despite the damages, we are a self-
help people and we will be doing all we
can to get our team ready," he charged.
Ian Stubbs, speaking on behalf of
San Salvador, said Christopher Colum-
bus would be disappointed to see that
the state of the island has not improved


Islands give





on readiness


Final day of 2005 National

Sports Leader Conclave


since he discovered it.
Even after winning the Bahamas Bas-
ketball Federation men's national bas-
ketball title in 1988, Stubbs said there's
been very little sporting activities for
the residents to participate in.
Ishmael Morley, the Youth Sports
Officer for Abaco, said the entire island
has been drastically affected by the
recent hurricanes.
But, he said, although the majority of
their facilities have been damaged or
completely destroyed, Abaco will be
represented in full force at the games.
His only concern on the island is that
there are not sufficient people who are
willing to give back to sports, as he's
doing, without seeking some type of
enumeration.
Dorcus Moss,.representing Crooked
Island, said there's nothing much going
on on the island because they don't have
any facilities and there's no PE teachers
or coaches for the athletes.
"Things are really, really rough in
Crooked Island. We really need help,"
Moss said. "No one seemed to care.
They don't even come down there to
see what's going on."
Stephen Sands, a teacher who
recently transferred to Acklins, said they
are trying to inject some interest in
sports on the island so that residents
can come together in one central loca-
tion to participate.
But he said one of the problems they
are faced with is that they don't have
that many descendants from the island


who are willing to give back financially
to help sports.
Having created their own track, Sands
said there are two promising athletes
that they.are working with and, when he
asked how could they get them into Nas-
sau to compete in national events, he
claimed the answer has been "get them
there the best way you can."
Brian Cleare, former Sports Coun-
cil chairman, now Sports Officer for
Andros, said the island is so big that
they have been divided into four dis-
tricts with chairmen for all areas, but
they are in the process of selecting one
leader for the entire island for the
games.
Having produced their Andros
Games, where each district has all-star
teams competing, Cleare said they
intend to use the games to select their
teams for the Bahamas Games.
And, based on the natural physique of
the athletes in Andros, Cleare said with
the proper training, they can showcase
the best athletes in the country. But, he
said, like everybody else, they need
some assistance in getting some trained
coaches to bring out the talent.
Ann Cartwright, representing Long
Island, said they have presented a com-
prehensive list of the problems they are
encountering on the island.
But in preparation for the Bahamas
Games, she said they too can boost of
having the "best" raw talent in North
Long Island and if they get the facili-
ties and equipment, they will produce
better results.


Tito Thurston, the newly elected
chairman of the Cat Island Sports Coun-
cil, said if it wasn't for the love of sports,
he doesn't know if he or anybody else
who is working there would have con-
tinued to make a contribution.
Thanking Gladstone 'Moon' McPhee
for his assistance during his tenure as
president of the Bahamas Basketball
Federation, Thurston said that only the
Cat Island Basketball Association is
currently affiliated with the Sports
Council.
But when the basketball season open
in two weeks, Thurston said they will
be holding a competition for the best
singer and dancer and hopefully that
will regenerate some interest in the sport
and eventually the Bahamas Games.
Bernard Swann, chairman of the
Exuma/Ragged Island Sports Council,
said they are thankful that they have
not been affected like the majority of
the other Family Islands.
With just one PE teacher, Ann
Bullard at LN Coakley High, Swann
said they have had to rely on the assis-
tance from a number of persons in the
community to keep their sporting pro-
gramme going.
"What we are looking at is some tech-
nical assistance in helping us to provide
some coaching and assistance for all
these young people so that they can get
involved in some type of organised pro-
gramme instead of getting into some
destructive activities," he charged.
M Carl Brennen, chairman of the New
Providence Sports Council, said their
main issue has to do with the draft that
many of the islands have taken advan-
tage off.
He made a recommendation that, in
fairness to New Providence, the min-
istry allows them to first select their
team and then allow all the other ath-
letes to be drafted.


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PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005


TRIBUNE SPORTS








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* SOFTBALL

THE Baptist Sports Council's
pennant race came right down
to the wire with the four playoff
spo't'decided in the final game
played in the regular season on
Saturday at the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex.
Macedonia went in undefeat-
ed on the day, but they ended
up losing their final two games -
7-5,to New Bethlehem and 3-1
to jTransfiguration. In the
process, New Bethlehem
clinched the pennant and Trans-
figuration secured a playoff
berth.
Macedonia and New Bethle-
hem'ended up in a two-way tie
for'first, but by virtue of beating
Macedonia, New Bethlehem
clinched the pennant. Third and
fou'rh place came down to
Trtiasfiguration and Calvary
De-lverance with identical
records of 7-3, but in the same
scet'ario, Transfiguration
defeated.Calvary Deliverance
in their head-to-head match-up.
The best-of-three playoff is
nowvset for Saturday at the
Baillou Hills Sporting Complex.


Here's how they will match-up:
10am Transfiguration (7-3) vs
Macedonia (8-2).
10am Calvary Deliverance (7-
3) vs New Bethlehem (8-2).
Here's a summary of games
played on Saturday on what
turned out to be a heated race
for the pennant and playoff
spots:
TRANSFIGURATION 3,
MACEDONIA 1: Alexander
Bain delivered a three-hitter,
giving up a solo home run to
Cardinal Gilbert, and he struck
out six to hand Macedonia their
second straight loss to secure
their playoff berth.
Hermis Sands and Nelson
Farrington came up with two
unearned runs of losing pitcher
Harold 'Banker;' Fritzgerald in
the first and Dennis Johnson
scored another in the fifth in
what turned out to be the best
game in the season.
NEW BETHLEHEM 7,
MACEDONIA 5: Eugene Bain,
who produced a solo homer to
get things started off losing


pitcher Fritzgerald in the first
inning, got an RBI double to
knock in Darren Stevens with
the winning run in the fourth
and he scored the insurance run
on an error.
New Bethlehem also came up
with four runs in the third, high-
lighted by Nardo Gilbert RBI
triple and Richard Bain RBI
single as they tied the game at
5-5.
Keith Johnson had an RBI
triple to knock in Chavez John-
son with their first run in the
second and they went up 5-1
with four more in the third,
thanks to Michael Thompson's
RBI triple, Ken Forbes RBI
double and Burton Saunders'
two-run homer.
N NEW DESTINY 13,
TRANSFIGURATION 12:
With their pastor, Bishop
Delton Fernander, cheering
them on, Rev. Tyrone
Knowles and Vernon Clarke
scored the tying and winning
runs in the fourth to seal the
victory.
Lennox Green got the win
over Nelson Farrington.


TRANSFIGURATION 22,
MOUNT TABOR 1: If seven
runs in the first wasn't enough,
Transfiguration came up with
13 in the fourth to stop Mount
Tabor in a big way. Ranaldo
Russell had a homer and he,
along with Dennis Johnson and
Stephen Sands, scored three
runs apiece. Nelson Farrington
got the win over David Brown.
GOLDEN GATES 13,
CALVARY BIBLE 3: Calvin
Greenslade was 3-for-4 with
four runs scored and Richard
Bastian had a two-run homer
for Golden Gates. Junior Moss
got the win over Albert
Rodgers. Patrick Stevenson
went 2-for-3 in the loss.
CALVARY BIBLE 10,
NEW BETHLEHEM 9: Basil
Miller's RBI triple knocked in
Lindsay Pinder with the game's
winning run in the fifth. Dar-
ren Rodgers was 2-for-3 with
two RBIs and two runs scored
and Marvin Nairn 2-for-3 with
three RBIs and a run scored.
Bursell Bradshaw got the win
over Valentino Munroe, who


hit a two-run homer.
CALVARY DELIVER-
ANCE 11, GOLDEN GATES
9: Brad Wood Jr had a homer
and he and winning pitcher
Danny Stubbs scored twice,
while Ozzie Rolle scored three
times. Junior Moss got the loss.
Randy Wallace homered,
scored twice and Ricardo Major
was 2-for-2 with two runs
scored.
MACEDONIA 12,
MOUNT TABOR 2: Ken
Forbes went 3-for-3 with two
RBIs and two runs scored;
Michael Thompson 2-for-3 with
a two-run homer and Brian
Capron 2-for-2 with two RBIs
and two runs to help Harold
Fritzgerald pick up another win.
David Brown suffered the loss.
MOUNT TABOR 10,
FAITH UNITED 9: Mount
Tabor batted around the clock,
scoring eight runs in the fifth
to seal this victory with the Rev.
Delton Ellis scoring the win-
ning run. David Brown got the
win over Mike Dillett.


TRANSFIGURATION 4,
CALVARY DELIVERANCE
2: Nelson Farrington threw a
five-hitter, striking out six Tues-
day night at the Churchill Tener
Knowles National Softball Sta-
dium and Jamal Johnson went
2-for-2 with a solo homer to lead
Transfiguration. Danny Stubbs
got the loss, while Brad Wood
Jr. had a solo homer.
M TRANSFIGURATION 13,
FAITH UNITED 9: Jamal John-
son was 2-for-3 with five RBIs,
including a two-run homer and
Charlie Gaitor was 3-for-4 with
an RBI and three runs scored to
give Farrington another victory.
Salathial Dean got the loss and
Anthony 'Boots' Weech went 2-
for-3 with two RBIs.
CALVARY BIBLE 8,
TRANSFIGURATION 5: Ter-
rance Pinder was 2-for-3 with
two RBIs and scored twice, while
Khalis Curry was 2-for-3 with
two runs scored Thursday at the
stadium as Lindsay Pinder got
the win. Nelson Farrington got
the loss. Hermis Sands was 2-for-
3.


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005


SECTION 4



B a
Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


DII

II
I
prii i i I I I
S P O R T .II.II..I I. .lll -".


* BASKETBALL
NPWBA RESULTS
THE New Providence
Women's Basketball
Association continued its
regular season action on
Tuesday night at the DW
Davis Gym with the Sun-
shine Auto Cheetahs mak-
ing a successful debut with
a 85-57 rout over the
Junior All-Stars.
Linda Pierre scored a
game high 28 points with
17 rebounds to lead a bal-
anced scoring attack for
the Cheetahs, coached by
Mario Bowleg. Brooke
Smith added 14 points
with 11 rebounds; Deler-
ane Ferguson had 12
points and eight rebounds
and Inderia Williams
scored 11 points with 12
rebounds.
In a losing effort, Shadia
Major scored.19 points
with six rebounds; Keva.
Barry and Garcia Red-
wood both had 11 with
Redwood pulling down six
rebounds and Deandra
Williams added 10 points.
In the feature contest,
the College of the
Bahamas Lady Caribs
nipped the Defence Force
82-81. Interum league
president Kimberley Rolle
led the way with a game
high 28 points and eight
rebounds. Christine Sin-
clair scored 22 points with
seven assists and
Kavionne Newbold helped
out with 18 points and 14
rebounds,
In a losing effort,
Natasha Miller scored 22
points with 20 rebounds;
Chryshann Percentie had
19 points and 14 rebounds
and former Angels' guard
Varel Davis helped out
with 13 points and five
assists.
The league will play a
double header tonight.

BASKETBALL
CATHOLIC DIOCESAN
PLAYOFFS
THE Catholic Diocesan
Primary Schools Basket-
ball League will hold its
sudden death playoff
today at 3.15 pm At St
Francis/Joseph, the pen-
nant winning Shockers
will play host to the fourth
place St. Bede's Crushers
and, at St. Thomas-More,
the second place defend-
ing champions Sparks will
host the third place
Xavier's Giants.
On Monday, the scene
will switch to the Loyola
Hall on Gladstone Road
where game one of the"
best-of-three playoffs will
get underway.

SPORTS CONCLAVE
WRONG TITLE
MARTIN LUNDY, the
Director of Sports at the
Ministry of Youth, St
and Culture was wrdo
identified as the Dep
Director of Sports in -
Wednesday's edition of
The Tribune.
The Tribune apologises
for the error.


* TENNIS
By BRENT STUBBS
SSenior Sports Reporter
AMERICAN Jamea Jackson
will be one of the newcomers
participating in the annual
Mark Knowles Celebrity Ten-
nis Invitational next month on
Paradise Island.
* Jackson will be joining
returning player Nicole Vaidis-
ova of the Czech Republic,
while Taylor Dent will be back
to head the list of male players.
Knowles, who will be bring-
ing his touring doubles partner
Daniel Nestor back as well, will
be in town on Sunday to finalise
plans for next weekend's invi-
tational.
And US Open junior boys
singles champion Ryan Sweet-
ing will also be coming home
for his first appearance in the
invitational.
Vicki Knowles, Mark's moth-
er, said they are very pleased
that they continue to attract
such high calibre of players
every year to the tournament.
"Taylor Dent is a great serve
and volleyer and is well respect-
ed as one of the young stars,"
she reflected.
"Nicole Vaidisova was 70th
in the world when she came on


the scene last year. At age 16,
she is now 17th in the world.
We are very fortunate to have
her back.
"Jamea Jackson is one of the
young female stars in the sport
today, so we are also happy that
she is joining us this year."
Knowles said they are also
delighted to welcome back both
Merklein and Nestor, who
played with Mark Knowles in
doubles in the Davis Cup com-
petition and on the internation-
al scene.
The players, including Amer-
ican Jennifer Capriati, will all
arrive here on Friday. They will


participate in a Pro-Am Tennis
event at the Club Med courts
on Saturday at 9.30am. At 3
p.m, they will be featured in a
Celebrity Exhibition.
A cocktail and dinner at the
Lagoon Pool Deck will close
out their participation at 7pm.
While this will be Jackson's
initial appearance in the invita-
tional, Vaidisova will be back
for her second consecutive year.
Vaidisova, from Germany,
recently won three tournaments
in a row to crack into the top 20
in the women's world rankings
at number 17.
The 139-pound right-hander


won the 2005 Japan Open Sin-
gles and the 2005 Bangkok Sin-
gles titles. She also won the
2004 Vancouver Singles, 2004
Tashkent Singles, 2004
ITF/Columbus-USA singles and
2003 ITF/Plzen-Czech Singles
titles.
Vaidisova is also a member
of the Czech Republic Fed
team.
Jackson, a native of Atlanta,
Georgia, now residing in
Bradenton, Florida, is a 5'4, 113
pound right-hander who turned
pro in 2004.
She is currently ranked at
No.73 and won two ITF Circuit


singles titles last year. She also
got to the quarter-finals iz
Memphis this year.
Dent, a native and resident
of Newport Beach, California, i)
6'2 and 195-pounds. He turned
pro in 1998 and is currently
ranked at No.21.
This year, Dent recorded vic-
tories over Lleyton Hewitt,
David Nalbandian, Marat Safin,
Guillermo Coria and Greg
Rusedski.
Last year he won a total'.f
32 matches and was the
bronze medalist at the 2004
Olympic Games in Athens',
Greece.


a


ling


i'm lovin't If


BigMac


* MARK KNOWLES and Daniel Nestor.


Knowless rearing to








old coup at nvi a ional


* FROM LEFT: Jamea Jackson, Mark Merklein, Nicole Vaidisova and Taylor Dent


IC I aa L. -


------I









THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005


SECTION


Sermons, Church Activities, Awards


'When sitting down

was standing tall'
Suee P SC


'Slew' of


intriguing


movies


set for


Christmas

'Asian the lion'
to represent
Jesus Christ
in Narnia

IN a push to pad their
pockets while influencing
worldviews, Hollywood
filmmakers are set to come
out with a slew of what
promise to be intriguing
movies that will attract the
widest possible audience,
families, teens and couples,
to theatres this Christmas
season.
Among the films set for
release during the holidays
is Narnia, based on C.S.
Lewis' novel, The Lion, the
Witch and the Wardrobe.
The book is the first of sev-
en installments in the
Chronicles of Narnia that
take readers on an incred-
ible journey through the
eyes of four children.
According to an article
on the BBC News website,
-the Narnia stories, geared
towards,,the; young f ,heart
and lovers of fantasy, are
often viewed as a religious
allegory, with Aslan the
lion representing Jesus
Christ.
The film's director
Andrew Adamson has said
however, that it is "open
to the audience to inter-
pret".
British actress Tilda
Swinton, who plays the
White Witch Jadis in the
film, told the BBC News:
"Faith is in the eye of the
beholder," adding that the
original book was more
"spiritual" than religious.
"You can make a reli-
gious allegory out of any-
thing if that's what you're
interested in".
Sacrifice
In the film Aslan sacri-
fices himself in order to
save the life of a human
boy, or "Son of Adam".
He later rises from the
dead to lead his troops in
an epic battle against the
White Witch's forces.
But New Zealand-born
Adamson, director of the
Shrek films, told the BBC
News that resurrection was
a common theme in the
fantasy genre, citing The
Matrix and Star Wars as
examples.
"The religious aspect is
something the press is
more interested in than the
world at large," he said.
"When I read the book
as a child I accepted it as a
pure adventure story."
"When I first read it, it
never occurred to me

SEE page 6C


Banquet in honour




of Catholic pastor


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON
All boats and planes will
head to the island of free-
dom this weekend as the
Catholic Archdiocese of
Nassau honours one of its
own as he celebrates 25 years as a priest.
The parishioners of Sts. Gregory,
Catherine and Paul churches will host a
banquet under the patronage of Arch-
bishop Patrick Pinder to honour their pas-
tor, Msgr John T Johnson who has served
as their pastor for more than seven years.
The banquet will be on Friday at 7.30 pm
at the activity centre of St. Catherine of


Siena Catholic Church in Hatchet Bay.
Representatives from all of the Catholic
Churches in Nassau are expected to attend,
including parishioners from as far north
as San Salvador.
Mr Mark Kemp, coordinator, said the
weekend promises to be one filled with
excitement. Msgr. Johnson's presence on


the island has been a blessing for all with
whom he comes into contact, he added.
"Msgr. Johnson is such a humble man,
one who is able to mingle with people of all
classes and creeds. We wish we could have
done more, but because our Catholic pop-
ulation on the island is small, we can only
do so much, that's why we are grateful for
our brothers and sisters from Nassau who
have sent donations to help with the ban-
quet and our annual bazaar," said the
chairman of the parish council. "The sup-
port has been outstanding; we have stu-

SEE page2C


'Anointed' couple


using their talents


to praise the Lord


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
SINCE Tyler Perry burst on
the scene with a series of Chris-
tian-based plays that use com-
edy, moral undertones, and
inspirational endings, to enter-
tain and uplift, audiences have
been eating it up. The frenzy
to see the latest Perry produc-
tion has definitely caught on in
the Bahamas.
Now two of the stars of
Tyler's plays, David Mann, bet-
ter known as Mr Brown, and
his wife, Tamela Mann, who
plays Cora in Perry's work, will
be featured in an evening of
drama and music along with
Bahamian singers and comedi-
ans like Miss Daisy, Miss Jessie
Pearl, the Teen Echo Artists
and Lona Knowles, just to
name a few.
Funds
Though the event, scheduled
for Sunday, November 27, is
being advertised as a night of
comedy, organisers say that it is
also to raise funds for a worthy
cause.
"Renaissance Academy on
Blue Hill Road (next to Star-
dust) is holding this concert in
aid of its building fund. So we
did some research, got in con-
tact with the people and got
the Mann's here to help us do
that," Darnell Whymns, prin-
cipal of the school told Tribune
Religion. Her school, though
not affiliated with a religious
denomination, is rooted in
Christianity since those who
lead the school are Christians,
the principal said.
The philosophy of Renais-
sance Academy is that learn-
ing should be "enforced with
enthusiasm". To this end, the
principles of education are
taught using dance, painting -
whatever art form will get the
student's attention. Since dra-
ma is one outlet used in the
school's system, the principals
thought it best to let the stu-


dents, and the wider commu-
nity, 'meet the Browns'.
David and Tamela Mann are
described as a dynamic and
anointed couple who are using
their talents to praise God.
.While'They -a-r 'eurrently-'olF
tour with the hit stage play,
"Meet the Browns", written
and produced by Mr Perry, the
Manns have been involvdlt in
performance and ministry long
before they became cast mem-
bers.
David, who was rather mis-
chievous in his earlier years,
soon diverted his energy to
something more constructive,
singing. He sang in his church
choir in Texas, and the training
he received would pave the
way for a promising career on
the music circuit. David went
on to add his vocal talent to
the debut album of Kirk
Franklin and The Family,
which ended up being the first
gospel album ever to go plat-
inum.
That's David's real life. On
stage however, he plays the
very eccentric Mr Brown, born
August 7, 1936 in Lubbock
Texas. Saved at the tender age
of two months, Brown became
the youngest deacon to be
ordained at "Sweet Home Mis-
sionary Holy Baptist Full
Gospel Methodist Pentecostal
Christ Holy Sanctified Church
of God in Christ".
Like nb other young person
in the church, at age 14, Brown
could pray in five languages
and speak in tongues back-
wards. That year, he met
Pauline Mabel Simmons and
his life hasn't been the same
since. He has been cursed out,
shot at, almost stabbed, and
nearly ran over by the love of
his life.
Singing
Tamela grew up in Forth
Worth, Texas, and like her hus-
band began singing in the
church at an early age. When
she was eight years old, Tamela


* DAVID & TAMELA MANN


began mimicking the singing
talents of her mother, affec-
tionately called "Mother
Eppe". By the time she was 12
years old, Tamela was singing
in the adult choir of her church.
Tamela also sang on the plat-
inum awarded Kirk Franklin
and The Family album, and she
has collaborated and per-
formed with numerous artists
including Yolanda.Adams,
Mary J. Blige, Al Green,
Celine Dion, Bono, and Fred
Hammond.
Acting
It wasn't until 1999 that
Tamela began her acting
career, a talent that playwright
Tyler Perry soon discovered.
In 2000 Tamela was cast in the
popular stage play, "I Can Do
Bad All By Myself" where she
played Cora, Madea's spiritual
daughter, and the lovable wife
of "Mr Brown". In 2001,
Tamela appeared in Tyler's
musical drama/comedy "Diary
of a Mad Black Woman",
where she played Myrtle, a bit

SEE page 6C


* REV ANGELA
PALACIOUS


'The


poison

of sin'


* By REV ANGELA
PALACIOUS
AS I recuperated at
home from the ordeal of
severe fish poisoning, I
could not help but ask the
Lord to somehow make the
experience into a blessing. I
invite you to join me in a
search for spiritual mean-
ing in theological reflections
on the image of sin (any
shortcoming, weakness,
willfulness) as a sort of poi-
soning of the soul, and the
presence of Jesus Christ as
the Great Healer of body,
mind and spirit.
Believing
There are two ways to be
poisoned by fish: To unwit-
tingly eat, for example, fil-
leted amber jack believing
that it is dolphin, or to
knowingly consume a meal
of barracuda.
Similarly, there are
"things known and
unknown" that cloud our
judgment and lead us
astray. Are you inadver-
tently or deliberately

SEE page 2C


The Tribune


i


I '


-- -


I I I a I - _ I I -









'AGE C, TURSDA, NOEMBER24, 005RTELTRBUNE


latholic Archdiocese to



honour one of its own


ROM page 1C

ts who attend the Centre
Hotel and Tourism Man-
ment (CHTM) who will be
ating their time to cook the
d for the banquet. This in
If is just overwhelming -
ee young people from Bar-
los and Trinidad willing to
p out a little church on
uthera shows the universal-
of the Christian church. We
,ect that when the Island
,k arrives in Hatchet Bay's
bour on Friday it will be full
veil wishers from Nassau,"
1 Mr. Kemp
Msgr. Johnson said he is
teful to Archbishop Patrick
ider for allowing him to
ve in his native island for as
g as he has. He said he feels
ebted to his congregation


* ARCHBISHOP'
PATRICK PINDER


for the love and support they


nnouncing... Trinity Methodist
Church's Annual


HOLIDAY



FESTIVAL



Saturday 26th November 2005

12 noon 6:00 p.m.







STinity Place and Frederick Street
;^| (next to Central Bank). 7
Adequate Parking Security Provided -
Enter From Frederick Street.


have given him over these sev-
en long years. "I have decided
to dedicated my life to God
and his priesthood until he
decides to take me to be with
him," said Msgr. Johnson with
that twinkle in his eyes and that
infectious laugh that has
become a part of him.
Msgr. John Johnson was
born in the farming communi-
ty of Gregory Town to the late
Prince Edward Johnson and his
wife, Ida. He was ordained
August 8, 1980 at St. Francis
Xavier Cathedral by the late
archbishop Samuel Carter who
was archbishop of Kingston at
the time. He attended St. John
Vianney Seminary in Tuna-
puna ,Trinidad. He holds a
master's degree in Religious
Education from St. John's Uni-
versity, Minnesota. He is
presently the pastor of St. Gre-
gory's Catholic Church, Gre-
gory Town, Eleuthera, which
includes the parishes of St.
Catherine's in Alice town and
St. Paul's in Governor's Har-
bour.
He formerly served as pas-
tor of Our Lady of the Holy
Souls and The Church of the
Resurrection in Nassau. He is
also a family life teacher at
North Eleuthera High School.


* By REV ANGELA
PALACIOUS
When I had a
hibiscus
planted,
each day I
woke to the
lovely sight of a bud that had
opened through the night. Not
only did it remind me of God's
gift of countless blessings all
around just waiting for me to
notice them, but it also spoke
to me of the need to be
"blooming-where I am plant-
ed," and to offer myself to God
once more at the start of each
day.
When I speak to groups
about spiritual formation, the
image of the flower (like that of
the metamorphosis of a but-
terfly) is most helpful to
describe the process of spiritu-
al development. The concept
of the "blighted rose" is one
which brings to mind a life
handicapped by dysfunctional
patterns at home, or life choic-
es, which severely reduce a per-
son's ability to enjoy the health
and wholeness intended by
God for each one of us. The
life-changing promise of trans-


MEDITATION

formation afforded by salva-
tion re-creates even a blighted
rose into a person of great
inner beauty.
Our little ones need to be
helped to appreciate the things
of life that have such value to
the spirit, and many deep spir-
itual lessons lie hidden beneath
the surface of much that seems
ordinary. There is so much that
money cannot buy, and no
words may fully express.
Forever
"A thing of beauty is indeed
a joy forever".
More importantly, in times
of great personal, national and
international distress, it is
imperative that we invite into
our lives every accessible
opportunity to celebrate life.
Now more than ever, we can-
not wait for others to make us
happy but we have to seek joy
for ourselves. This translates
into not waiting for flowers to
be sent to us but to provide our
own through our own initia-


'The poison of sin'


FROM page 1C

putting your reputation at risk,
jeopardizing your family's
finances, or compromising your
spiritual standards?
There is the interval between
the meal and the misery when
all seems well. No one suspects
what is to come.
The crime may seem unde-
tected, the omission unnoticed,
the un-confessed sin seems hid-
den even from God, but it is
only a matter of time.


A thena do cl

Sifnituaty cPnference

"A renewal for busy people."


This special opportunity is co-sponsored by :
The De Mello Spirituality Center at Fordham University, New York
&
New Providence Community Church,
Nassau, Bahamas

DATES:
DECEMBER 8TH-DECEMBER 10TH, 2005
Thursday, 9:00amn-5:00pm
Friday, 9:30am-5:00pm
Saturday, 9:30am-5:-00pm

LOCATION:
NEW PROVIDENCE COMMUNITY CENTER
BLAKE ROAD

FEES:
No registration fee.
Related publications (including those by Anthony de Mello) will be available for sale.

REGISTRATION DEADLINE:
December 1st, 2005

Until his death in 1987, Father Anthony de Mello touched and liberated the hearts of
thousands of people. Vibrant and humorous, his insights into happiness and discovery of
the true self had an exhilarating effect on everyone who listened to him. Author of five
best gelling books and renowned worldwide for his workshops, retreats, and prayer courses,
he aimed to teach people how to pray, how to wake up and how to live.
His close friend, Father J. Francis Stroud, S.J. is the Executive Director of the de Mello
Spirituality Center (www.demello.org) and will lead participants through Anthony de
Mello's teachings.

Anthony de Mello delighted in the command:
"Be a light unto yourself."
It is in this spirit that we invite you to join us
on a journey of exploration and spiritual transformation.


To register or for more information, please contact
Diane Turnquest at 327-1660, or e-mail diane@npcconline.org.


When the poison begins to
spread, suddenly, the signal
that all is not well is given by
the body: Those strange feel-
ings in the legs, the cramping in
the stomach, the nausea and
vomiting, diarrhea, itching,
burning in the hands and feet
and more. Help must be sought
before one is too weak to walk.
Committed
Likewise, for the committed
Christian, the poison of sin has
its symptoms: Loss of focus to
worship, loss of interest in read-
ing the Word, prayerlessness,
slow distancing from God and
the people of God, neglect of
ministry obligations, apathy
and constant negativity, refusal
to submit to the Holy Spirit's
convictions and more. Severe
spiritual warfare is being waged


Pastor Ben Bailey
Program Organizer
The Prophetic Voice
P. O. Box N-9518
Nassau, Bahamas


in the soul.
Medical attention brings par-
tial relief but some of the sen-
sations may persist for days or
weeks, even years. There is no
question that the body is in cri-
sis and needs time to recover.
Healing cannot be rushed.
Each person's reactions can
be different and unique
responses have to be taken into
account. Similarly, the sinner
has to admit what is out of
order and work with spiritual
solutions to remedy the situa-
tion. Are you seeking to allow
Jesus Christ to make a change
in your life for the rest of your
life?
Each one of us is that sinner
in need of salvation and ongo-
ing spiritual attention. From
priests and ministers who may
"turn from the right
path... (and whose) teaching


tive.
Small things like candles, soft
music, tasteful d6cor, and floral-
arrangements add gentle touch-
es to any home. Where flow-
ers are freely available let us
bring these and other articles of
nature into our dwelling spaces.'
The value of beauty need not
be defined by its price on the
market.
A hibiscus is not an orchid;
or a rose, but the intricacy of its'
loveliness is not diminished, in
my mind, by its availability"
without cost. God has been so,
good to us, I want to respond&
with far more gratitude than I
have previously, and be'
inspired by such grace.
How do you invite beauty.
into your life? If you were to'
decorate your home for Har-
vest Thanksgiving what would-
you select to celebrate God's,
goodness and beauty in your.
life? How can you add a touch4
of loveliness to the lives of.
those in need of such a lift? .
Let this be your time to be.
more intentional to celebrate;
the beauty of the earth, and to:
reveal God's grace in the beau-,
ty of your Christ-like charac-'
ter.

has led many to do wrong"-
(Malachi 2:8 TEV) to young'
people assaulted on every side,-
we all struggle with sin as a poi-
son in the soul. We all need
Jesus, the Physician, to pre-
scribe the antibiotic of the Holy
Spirit and attach us to "the-
drip" of prayer, scripture and&
worship.
Recognise
There comes a time when we
each must recognise the symp-
toms of our condition, admit
that we are far from well, and
look to God for deliverance.'
Find the forgiving love of God
waiting for you in every
moment of your life, as you
learn to thankfully love God
with all of your heart, soul,.
mind and strength. Then be so
grateful that God has rescued
you from a life of distress
caused by the poison of sin that
you help others make their way
to the hospital called the
Church.


The Character of God: Part Two

Scripture Text: New Testament Psalm 15:1-5
Charles Dickens wrote concerning Value of the New Testament. "I most
strongly and affectionately impress upon you the priceless value of the
New Testament, and the study of that book, as the one unfailing guide
in life. Deeply respecting it, and bowing down before the character of our
Saviour, as separated from the vain constructions and inventions of men;
you cannot go very wrong."
Here is an interesting insight revealed to me during our research: Paul
was born about the time of our Lord Jesus Christ; and incidentally, so
was John the Baptist. John would prepare the 'Way' for Christ, a voice
crying out of the wilderness. Christ appeared to fulfil the Prophecies written
concerning Him.
Paul [Roman] was headed for Damascus to wipe out the Christians,
somewhere near the end of his journey; the Lord appeared to Saul [Hebrew]
and converted him. The Lord told Annanias, "I will show him how great'
things he must suffer for My Name's Sake." After his conversion, Paul
went to Arabia and tarried there for three years. This writer personally
believes his journey into Arabia was the place where the Lord Jesus Christ


prepared Paul, and showed him the great things he would suffer for His Name's Sake; Paul visited
Philip the Evangelist at Caesarea Philippi, where a Prophet named Agabus took Paul's girdle and
bound himself and said, "The Holy Ghost says: the Jews at Jerusalem shall bind the man who owns
this girdle, and deliver him into the hands of the gentiles." Paul travelled to Jerusalem and was almost
murdered by a Jewish mob in the Temple. The Roman Centurion, who arrested him to save his life,
moved him to Herod's Praetorium at Caesarea Philippi upon learning of a conspiracy by the Jews to
assassinate Paul." He spent two years at Caesarea Philippi and wrote nothing, he simply rested. Felix
was succeeded by Porcius Festus, Paul decided to claim the privilege of a Roman citizen, and appealed
to the Emperor.
Euroclydon was an unpredictable and violent Mediterranean "Northeaster", which normally occurred
during springtime. In the midst of the storm Paul declared, "There stood by me this night an angel of
God, saying, you must stand before Caesar: God has granted to you, all them that sail with you [two
hundred and seventy six [276] witnesses]." Paul reached the imperial city of Rome during Spring in
61 A.D., and was permitted to occupy his own hired house, under constant military custody. His house
was visited by many anxious inquirers, both Jews and Gentiles, and as a result, his imprisonment
"turned rather to the furtherance of the gospel," and his "hired house" became the centre of a gracious
influence which spread over the whole city. During this period the Apostle wrote: Ephesians, Philippians,
Colossians, Philemon, and Hebrews. Paul was acquitted, because none of his Jewish accusers and
witnesses appeared against him in Rome: as a Roman citizen, he could not be held longer than two
years, without being convicted. During this period of freedom he wrote: First Timothy, and Titus.
The year of Paul's release was signalled by the burning of Rome; Paul was arrested and returned to
Rome. During his second imprisonment he wrote the second epistle to Timothy, the last he ever wrote:
"I have finished my course, and I have kept the faith." The Roman Historian Tacitus; commented about
the Christians of Nero's time in 64 A.D., "Christ from Whom they took their name had been put to
death as a punishment during the reign of Tiberius [Caesar] at the hands of one of our procurators,
Pontius Pilate, and a most mischievous superstition, thus checked for the moment, again broke out
not only in Judea, the first source of the evil, but even in Rome." The Christian movement became
so strong in the Roman Empire that sporadic persecution began during the reign of the Emperor
Trajan. Tertullien wrote a century later, about 160 A. D., that Christians had become "All but a majority"
in the cities of North Africa.
Paul's Ministry included suffering for Christ; his specific account documenting those sufferings is found
at 2 Corinthians 11:22-31: "Five times I received from the Jews the forty lashes minus one. Three
times I was beaten with rods, once I was stoned, three times I was shipwrecked." Paul did not grumble,
nor did he complain, instead, he endured hardness as a good soldier of Christ Jesus. "He considered
that the sufferings of this present time were not worthy to be compared with the glory, which shall be
revealed in us."
Whenever you experience problems, setbacks, or pain, remember this advice, "Trust in God and Be
Still! God knows exactly what to do when difficult times appear in our lives."


"--~ -


THE TRIBUNE::


'AGE 2C, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 200.5


0 0
Sharng u Stoies



Apprcl'ationgbeaty







THE TUE H


* FR HENRY
CHARLES


* By Father Henry Charles
On October 30,
the body of
Rosa Parks, the
92-year-old
black seam-
stress from Montgomery,
Alabama, lay in state in the
rotunda of the US Capitol, the
first woman ever accorded such
a tribute, in a list of 31 that
includes Abraham Lincoln and
nine other US presidents.
Anyone in any way conver-
sant with the history of civil
rights in the US knows of Rosa
Parks' famous bus ride. On
December 1, 1955 she boarded
a bus in downtown Mont-
gomery to go home from work.
Buses in the South at the time
were divided into three sec-
tions. The first four seats were
reserved for white passengers,
not to be used by blacks under
any circumstances. Behind this
was a middle sector, or no
man's land, of two or three
seats, which blacks could use
if'there was no white demand.
The back section was for
blacks.
Rule
Rosa Parks sat that after-
noon in the middle section with
three other blacks. The rule,
however, was that if a single
white passenger came to sit in
the middle section, all black
passengers had to get up and
go to the back. Which is what
happened that day. The other
blacks near Rosa got up and
headed for the back. The bus
driver demanded that she too
get up and do likewise. Rosa


'When sitting down



was standing tall'


said she was not moving.
She was arrested, charged,
convicted, and fined ten dol-
lars, with four dollars extra in
court costs. Her resistance set
off a year long Montgomery
bus boycott that galvanized
national attention, and brought
to public notice the Rev. Mar-
tin Luther King Jr. at the start
of his journey as a civil rights
leader and model of nonvio-
lent protest.
Rosa Parks later said that the
reason why she .didn't get up
was that her feet were tired.
What she added, and this is not
often noted, is that she was also
tired of yielding and giving
way, of having every detail of
her life subordinate to the pri-
orities of white culture.
Her death brings to a close a
transforming chapter in US and
world history. Many of the
icons in the struggle for black
civil rights have now passed on.
The occasion led some present
leaders to reflection and stock
taking.
Some of them, including one
or two who remember when
history was still experience,
lamented the lack of knowl-
edge about the struggle among
black youth. But some of this is
inevitable.
Inevitability there should not
be cause for lamentation. It can
be reduced and transformed
through teaching.
Other leaders felt that the
movement has been replaced
by more dispersed struggles
over issues like housing and
employment, health care, and
incarceration. These issues, as
Barack Obama, the black sen-
ator from Illinois noted, do not
lend themselves to easy mobi-
lization as the older issues did.
"In the absence of dogs and
hoses there is no immediate
enemy before us, so it's harder
to mobilize a sense of outrage."
The civil rights struggle has
also become transmuted world-


"Copyrighted Material

.V Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"
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wide into the struggle for
human rights. All protagonists
in this contemporary struggle
claim the movement for civil
rights as their patrimony. Mar-
tin Luther King Jr always fea-
tures prominently in the cross-
over pantheon.
Rosa Parks herself arouses
mixed feelings among black
Americans. Readers familiar
with the movie "Barbershop"
will remember one of the main
characters saying dismissively
that the only thing Rosa Parks
ever did for civil rights was "sit
on her black xxx."
Travesty
Such ignorance is a real trav-
esty. There was more to Rosa
Parks than one moment of


defiance. Before that crystal-
lizing moment, she was a civil
rights activist who had long
fought to get voting rights for
black people in Alabama. As
an official of the local branch of
the NAACP (National Asso-
ciation for the Advancement
of Coloured Peoples), she
formed a coalition of women
in Montgomery to fight segre-
gation on city transport, and as
far back as 1943 had refused
to follow the rules requiring
black people to enter buses
through the back door.
Rosa Parks came through
the Jim Crow education sys-
tem, which taught her enough
only to work as a maid, wash-
erwoman, or seamstress to
white people. But she formed
alliances with employers


(wives), when she found them
of like mind, to use political
pressure to end segregation. In
March 1955, just months before
her own arrest, she champi-
oned the rights of a teenager,
Claudette Colvin, who was
arrested for refusing to give up
her seat to a white person.
Family
Her family warned her that
she would be lynched for her
advocacy, but she had taken a
deliberate option for activism
and she would not back away.
There really is no such thing
as instant heroism. All heroes
or heroines have their prepar-

SEE page 6C


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$3500 + $200 installation $1500 + $75 installation
15"x36" with base
$25f0n +$- 15 0ins;t,,llatin


24"x30"x6" with base
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30"x30"x6" with base
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16"x24" with base
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THEME:


Preventing Stumbling,

Encouraging Growth
0


Scripture: Matthew 13: 24 30

Theme eSong: "I'll make it somehow" 0
0
Wednesday, November 30th
0
0
Sunday, December 4th, 2005
0
Day Sessions: 9:30 am *
Night Sessions: 7:30 pm
0
Mt. Nebo Union Baptist Church, Marshall Road o

0
Speakers Include:

Rev. Dr. C.W. Saunders Superintendent
Rev. Wilton McKenzie President
Rev. Dr. Victor Cooper 1st Assistant Superintendent 0
Rev. Dr. Keith Russell President of Northern District *


0 0


About

6,600

'Plymouth

Brethren'

in country

Who are they?


PART TWO

THE so-called "Ply-
mouth Brethren" have
made important contribu-
tions to the evangelical
church, but many people
have never heard of them.
There are a number of
churches in the Bahamas
associated with this move-
ment commonly known as
the "Plymouth Brethren"
(PB) or "Christian
Brethren", from which two
distinct, separate branches
have arisen: "open" (OB or
"Christian") and "closed"
(or "exclusive" (EB or
XB)).
According to the
Bahamas' 2000 Census,
about 6,600 of the popula-
tion identify themselves as
Brethren. The total num-
ber of open and closed con-
gregations combined in the
Bahamas is not known, but
it is estimated that there are
about 35 open Brethren
congregations in the
Bahamas.
The main distinction
between the open Brethren
and the closed Brethren is
that the open Brethren
advocate that each assem-
bly should have autonomy
over its own affairs. The
closed Brethren believe
SEE page 6C


T Nie D *


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005, PAGE 3C


THE TRIBUNE






PAGE 4C, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005

[Your Bahamian SupermaketsI I


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The little church that could'


of All Saints
Church on Calvary
Hill, Joan's
Heights, are asked
-ctions to their church they usually
people, "Behind the City Market
South Beach or opposite Porky's
s Station" or lately they proudly
"Where Father Sebastian Camp-
.1 is the priest".
People
3oon, the good people of All Saints
pe that 'by their works they will be
own'. Their works, a community
tiative, will be done in and based
)und a multi-million dollar centre
it they have built out of pocket and
:ough sheer sacrifice for the peo-
3, particularly the youth, in the
athern district of New Providence.
rhe Centre is the brainchild of
ther Campbell who. saw the need
the church to take an active role in
lives of the young people in the
ath who are faced with serious chal-
iges such as drugs, crime and gang
>lence.
'My vision for this project was


inspired by the fact that there was no
place for young people to engage in
positive activities, no refuge for those
coming from broken homes, no coun-
seling facility or persons to show them
alternative ways to anti-social behav-
iours," said Father Campbell.
After selling the idea to the con-
gregation and them accepting 'The
Crusade' as the building project was
called, the church held its ground-
breaking ceremony on June 18,2000.
The ceremony was performed by
Drexel Gomez, Archbishop of the
Anglican Church of the province of
the Bahamas and the Turks and
Caicos Islands and assisted by Father
Campbell.
The centre, when completed, will
be a spilt-level building with 18,400
square feet of usable floor space that
can accommodate 900 persons with
facilities to host weddings, gradua-
tions, conventions and training semi-
nars.
Five years later, for some All
Saints' members, the dream of com-
pleting the centre seems farther away
because of the astronomical costs
involved and especially since no assis-
tance has come from Government or


* FATHER SEBASTIAN
CAMPBELL


any financial institution in the form
of a mortgage.
The Crusade is funded solely from
sources within the church. The main
source is the monthly crusade offering
that is collected from various bands
within the church on the first Sunday
of every month. Other sources
include: Gift Day, Children's Coin
Drive, the Youth Dance Concerts,


and just old fashioned generosity
where people give amounts ranging
from one dollar to thousands of dol-
lars.
In 2004, church leaders were dealt a
crushing blow when the financial com-
mittee of the Diocese met with them
and stated that they could not sup-
port their application to acquire a 15-
year mortgage to complete the centre.
They knew what they heard was the
truth, but like a parent chastising a
child for their own good, it hurt any
way.
Instead of folding, rebelling and
regretting the project, members were
even more motivated. They rallied
around Father Campbell to breathe
new life into The Crusade. The rector
initiated a 'Rooms to Go' programme
where ministries, organisations and
families pledged to complete a room.
It was estimated that it would take
$65,000 to complete the rooms on the
lower level of the centre. The pro-
gramme started in January and
already the goal has been exceeded
and there are still thousands of dollars
to be collected in pledges.
The final major fundraiser was a
gala banquet honouring former rec-


tors of All Saints, Father Addison
Turnquest, Father Patrick Johnson
and Father Harry Ward, in October,
held at the Radisson Cable Beach
Hotel. Organisers are hoping to raise
$20,000 from the event for the com-
pletion of the lower level of the com-
munity centre.
Father Campbell has set a Novem-
ber date for the administrative opera-
tions to occupy the building. This, he
hopes, will deter the building from
being vandalized by students who pass
through the site on and from their
way to school.
Dedication
The next step is the dedication of
the Community Centre, set for Sun-
day, January 22, 2006. A grand cere-
mony is planned complete with the
Archbishop, the Royal Bahamas
Police Force Band, the Diocesan Band
and the church's band. It is a day
many look forward to for different
reasons, but the most important one is
to say, "We did it. We are the little
church with God's power that could
build a multi-million structure for
which we owe no one."


When sitting down About 6,600 'Plymouth


was standing tall'


Brethren' in Bahamas


FROM page 3C
ve history.
Rosa Parks always disclaimed sainthood, and
id there was more to her life than "being
rested on a bus." She was also part of a com-
.ny of lesser known and perhaps even more
fluential black women, in the movement for
ack empowerment.
Writing
There was Constance Baker Mottley, for
.stance, the first black woman to be a federal
idge, who had been an NAACP lawyer who
slped with writing the briefs used in arguing the
rown school segregation case. Mottley criss-
:ossed hostile Southern districts in the 50s after
rown, to make sure that school integration was
carried out. She also directed the legal cam-


paign that led to the admission of James Mered-
ith to the University of Mississippi.
The danger of focusing alone on what occurred
to Rosa Parks on the bus runs the risk of reduc-
ing her story to a simple morality tale. She was
more complex and more substantial than that.
Ethos
We are so far removed in time and ethos from
that period that we can hardly sense the deadly
danger involved in being anything other than
conformist. A little black lady on a bus is hard-
ly an image of non-conformism in life or courage.
So the real Rosa Parks still remains largely
unknown, despite all the adulation. But it's her
entire story, not the symbolic moment alone,
which makes her life exemplary. It's also what
makes it fitting that she, no less than presidents,
should lie in state where she did.


BAHAMAS FAITH MINISTRIES INTERNATIONAL


Dr. Myles & Ruth Munroe

Dr. Richard & Sheena Pinder

and the

entire Leadership team


'o C&w (i


The 25t Anniversary fBFM in a


SrviceqfTnkgvng
v... T.I .......: .$ :::!ii
S ... ... . .......


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER


na Dip t Ce

lonal Diplomat Center'


FROM page 3C

assemblies need to be interde-
pendent rather than indepen-
dent, including the need to hold
the same beliefs and adopt the
same practices.
The Brethren movement
originated around 1825 in Ire-
land. The founders of the
Brethren movement were a
group of young men who were
trying to find a way to gather
together for worship and com-
munion simply as fellow Chris-
tians regardless of denomina-
tional affiliation.
It was not their intent to
begin a movement or to found
a new denomination because
that would have defeated the
purpose for which they gath-
ered. In- the early days many
of these remained members of
their original churches and in
fact some of them were
ordained ministers.
The founders of the
Brethren were mainly Angli-
can evangelicals while others
came from a wide range of
church backgrounds. Some of
the early leaders were John
Nelson Darby, Anthony Norris


FROM page 1C
Aslan was anything more than
a great lion," agreed producer
Mark Johnson.
"Christian themes were very
important to CS Lewis and
imbued everything he did, but
he himself denied any religious
implications."
Despite the producer's com-
ments, the film has already
received pledges of support
from evangelical groups in the
US, many of whom say Lewis
did create the story as an alle-


FROM page 1C

more feisty than Cora, but
packing the same inspiration.
Ms Whymns says that she
expects a packed house on
Sunday.
Familiar
"Most people are familiar
with Tyler Perry plays and they
think he does some funny
work, so they'll be out," she
told Tribune Religion.
"We iust want them to know


Groves, William Kelly, C. H.
Mackintosh, and George
Mueller.
The movement spread from
Dublin, Ireland, to England
where the first Brethren assem-
bly was established at Ply-
mouth in 1831. The group
meeting at Plymouth, England,
became the most prominent
assembly in the movement and,
as the group refused to be con-
sidered a denomination, it
became known as the Brethren
from Plymouth. This naturally
resulted in the designation
"Plymouth Brethren."
Within the growing move-
ment, a separation began to
appear in the 1840s.
Division
The basic division concerns
the doctrine of separation. The
exclusive Brethren believe in
receiving no one at the Lord's
table who is not a true Christ-
ian in the fullest sense, includ-
ing being a member of a fully
separated assembly (an assem-
bly of Brethren who associate
only with Brethren and not
with persons from other
churches). The open Brethren,


gory about the life of Jesus.
Lon Allison, director of Illi-
nois' Billy Graham Centre, said
last month,
"We believe that God will
speak the gospel of Jesus Christ
through this film."
Controversy
According to Johnson,
though, any controversy sur-
rounding the film is "a false
issue".
"We're not selling the movie
to any particular group. With a


that the show will be a chance
to lighten up and release stress
and have a good laugh," added
Ms Whymns.
The event will be held at the
Church of God Auditorium on
Joe Farrington Road at
7:30pm.
Tickets are available at
Marantha Music Centre, Bucks
Gospel, Just Rite Bakery,
Satellite Sound, Classic Pho-
tography, The Juke Box, and
Airbrush Junkies. For more
information, call 326-7685.


on the other hand, accept all
believers as true Christians
(Brethren), even if other mem-
bers of their church might hold
allegedly false doctrine.
Some outsiders have looked
upon the Brethren with cau-
tion, deeming them to be
rather narrow in outlook. Some
insiders have been frustrated
that, while holding correct pre-
cepts, these have not always
been worked out practically
within the movement. Some
ex-members have left because
of negative experiences. Yet
the negative must be balanced
by the positive elements that
were and are present.
Many have held the
Brethren with a great deal of
respect, recognising their desire
to be faithful to the Word of
God and that they have done a
lot of good. More significantly,
there is widespread ignorance
of what the Brethren were and
are about, even among their
own members, as well as
prominent Christian leaders,.
and little around to challenge,:
these wrong misconceptions.
Editor's Note: Part III of
the Brethren series will be pub-
lished in December.


movie this size, we're trying to!
sell it to everybody."
Swinton, meanwhile,:
described the themes of the:
story as more "classical" than:
overtly Christian.
"It feels like an ancient myth.
It's about finding self-suffi-.
ciency in difficult circumstances,
and finding the capacity to dig'
deep, survive and prevail."
The Chronicles of Narnia:.
The Lion, the Witch and the.
Wardrobe, is expected to open
in the Bahamas on December
9.


Share

your

news
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from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


'Anointed' couple


using their talents


to praise the Lord


'AGE 6C, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005


St

ew of intriguing,


movies set for ri
'Ch *stmas


THE TRIBUNE


!;A 5 :;.w jV:






THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2005, K.-'f: /U


TUF TRIBUNE


r nr


40F

A.rI
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fCemptc of tht- Worb Mt tt trtPi


MINISTRIES 1275 Breadfr

7Ty firs! Cerauwy and
S" P.O.Box SB-50
Tel: 242 392-5





RIC: "Sowing what God has place in y(
"Pastor Kenneth H.BAdderley

FHE POWER OF STEWARDSHIP Part 2

lad: Read 11 Kings 4:2;,Exodus 4:2-4; 1 P 4:7-11;
uke 16:10 3 .


rs and sisters, God has given each one of us
to live by. God's Principles says if you
patterns, road map, trial; certain thi'S
itee to happen eVer'yf ne.
:22 is a Principle of. G 4


8,/
BI


54


V F yiLO (;)su


light,


esrom conception to death is
f Sowing and Reaping or ,
.Whatever you put into this Iitf
the same.


It is a seed (which'can be anything), planted or
deposited into something to be harvest or reap at a
later date. Everything God has place into your hand to
be a Steward over can be sowed.
WHAT IS REAPING?
It is the Harvest or end result of the seed that was
planted/sowed in the past. So Where you are today, how
you act, what you say. Seeds sowed in the past.
WHAT DO YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE PRINCIPLE
OF SOWING
AND REAPING/SEEDTIME AND HARVEST?


1. God provides the resources for Sowing? 11
Corinthians 9:8-10


2.


!e of Reproduction. Mark


S3. WevReaD what we Sow. Galtians 6:7-8
:4,4. God created all thingsafter their kind. Genesis
1:11-12
(This is true in every area of life. You can not sow
discord and reap unity. If you sow finances, you reap
finances, sow friendship, reap friendship).
5. We Reap in a different Season that we Sow. (There
are definite seasons in the cycles of sowing and
reaping). Ecclesiastes 3:12, Psalm 1:3
6. We must be patient and we will Reap. James 5:7-8,
Galatians 6:9
7. We leap in Proportion to what we Sow. 11Corinthians
9:6-7, Luke 6:38
8. GOD brings the Increase. 1 Corinthians 3:6-9
9.We are Blessed when we Sow. Acts 20:33-35
10We must Sow despite the Circumstances.
Ecclesiastes 11:4-6
1l.The need for Sowers and Reapers. Luke 10:2


Opportunity to worship


Sunday Morning Breakthrough service 8a.m.
Sunday School 9:30am
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00am
Sunday Night Service 7:00pm
Tuesday Night (WOMD) Weapons of Mass Deliverance
Wednesday Night/ Bible Study
Friday Night Youth Meeting


kenadderley @yahoo.com
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