Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00261
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: November 22, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00261
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

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HIGH 79F
LOW 61F

PARY SUNNY
~AND WINDY


The


Tribune


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION AGAIN


he BAHAMAS EDITION
BAHAMAS EDITION


Volume: 102 No.2


TO THE POINT WITH
ARTHUR FULKES
SEE NEWS SECTION PAGE TWO
................. .........................................


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2005


S400,ll fo bleachers' claim



Government expected to Tribute to young traffic victim inSide


handle Junkanoo seating


By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
AN ALLEGED new
arrangement promises to put
junkanoo seating back in the
hands of government as the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture is expected to spend
about $400,000 to rent bleachers
from C3 for the Junkanoo sea-
son.
In addition, in this new
arrangement with the seating
company, government is expect-
ed to be responsible for provid-
ing the marshals, and taking
over the ticket sales and mar-
)- keting of the parades.
In 2002 Youth, Sports and
Culture Minister Neville Wis-
dom came under heavy political
fire for renting bleachers from a
Canadian seating company in
the hopes of making an addi-
tional million in profit.
A year later a draft copy of
the Junkanoo Report showed
that the Ministry of Youth
Sports and Culture, instead of
making a profit, had lost more
than $1.18 million during the
2002/2003 seasons and still owed
government $838,590.
Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday Mr Wisdom would
not comment on the matter. He
said that he and the ministry
were "concluding arrangements
with C3 and the arrangements
are being concluded in the best
interest of the Bahamian public
and C3.
'No one is attempting to hurt
any Bahamian company," he
said.
In fact C3, the seating com-
pany, is not expected to be
"hurt" at all under this new
agreement. A source told The
Tribune that the owners of the
company would be pleased with
this new arrangement as it
would only require them to be
responsible for the "building
and breaking" down of their
bleachers and removes the


expense and hassle of provid-
ing and selling tickets, paying
staff to act as parade marshals,
and so forth.
Under the original agree-
ment with the company C3 was
to provide a minimum of 10,000
seats for the next five years at
no cost to the government or
the Bahamian taxpayer. At the
expiration of the contract, gov-
ernment would own the bleach-
ers.
Currently, the government
owns no bleachers. The ones
provided for the 2002/2003
parade by the Canadian com-
pany were returned and the
bleachers used in last year's
parade were the property of C3.
The government now pro-
Soses to rent bleachers for
400,000 from the company.
However, Mr Wisdom said
that he was "not in a position"
to comment on this and "in very
short order we will provide a
plan for junkanoo, seating, tick-
eting and every other aspect of
the parades."
In the years C3 has been
responsible for the parades
there were no significant profits
but throughout the five-year
span the company said that it
was satisfied that things could
only get better.
However, The Tribune's
source said that government
may be taking on more risk
than it should. Government,
under the current agreement
received 10 per cent of C3's
gross profit "without losing a
dime".
"Mr Wisdom was seen to
have restored his error when he
awarded the contract to a
Bahamian company, now its
becoming a matter for the trea-
sury," he said.
The source offered a "politi-
cal" explanation as to why gov-
ernment might now want to
take over the responsibilities
SEE page nine


Abaconians voice concern over Mud

residents accommodation speculation


* By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter
SPECULATION over new residential accom-
modation for survivors of the recent Mud fire is
causing grave concern for Abaco residents.
Yesterday disgruntled Abaconians expressed
disquiet in calls to The Tribune.
Abaco government official Dale Hill claimed
former Mud residents will soon be living in a
summer camp called Camp Abaco five miles
south of Marsh Harbour.
"We have been told that either the govern-
ment or the Christian Council have gone to the
Assembly of God and requested use of Camp
Abaco for residents of The Mud," he said.


"During the summers over 300 children come
to Abaco and use that camp, and if those Haitians
are allowed to live there they will ruin it for those
children. It would have to be burnt!"
According to Mr Hill, the Bahamas should not
be providing local housing for illegal immigrants.
"I am a council and town committee member
and I feel that this is just ridiculous that we use
our limited resources to house and accommo-
date these illegal immigrants," he said.
"Why are we replacing them (the houses)?
Why are we using our money to do this? I feel for
them, but I think that both political parties are
down there looking for votes. But they need to
SEE page nine


Firefighters claim they
were 'attacked in Mud'
FIREFIGHTERS claim
that they were threatened and
even attacked by Haitians
whose homes they were
attempting to save during last
week's devastating fire in the
Abaco settlement known as
the Mud.
SEE PAGE THREE
Acting PM Cynthia Pratt
considering turning
home into museum
ACTING Prime Minister
Cynthia Pratt said she is con-
sidering converting her inner
city home into a museum after
she retires from politics.
SEE PAGE FIVE

Long Island roads
are 'in urgent
need of attention'
ROADS in north Long
Island need urgent attention
according to one concerned cit-
izen.
SEE PAGE SEVEN



Mitchell asks
police to

investigate
allegations
by Bethel

* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
FOREIGN Affairs Minister
Fred Mitchell has asked police
to investigate allegations by for-
mer FNM chairman Carl Bethel
that visas issued at the request
of a PLP senator and MP sug-
gest "direct political involve-
ment... at the highest level of
the Christie administration,
including the Minister of For-
eign Affairs".
Inquiries will seek to discover
how documents "that appear to
have been stolen from the Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs" got into
the possession of Mr Bethel.
In a statement from London,
Mr Mitchell said it is clear that
the FNM attack on him and the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs is
"ill-conceived and misdirected;
a cowardly political act by an
ever more desperate Opposi-
tion, clutching at straws."
"Having now examined pre-
liminarily the so-called evidence
SEE page nine


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PAGEB 2, TUSDAYNOVEMER 222005THELNEWS


Both parties have hurdles




before the general election


THE captains and the kings (and nowadays
the warrior queens) may leave the convention
floor but they do not depart.
In fact, one of the purposes of a national convention
is to help get the captains and the troops all fired up to
do battle in the wider political arena. This is particu-
larly important before a general election.
It is not likely that there will be an early general
election despite the predictions. Even so, both major
political parties will be watching each other closely to
see if one will attempt to pull off a special convention
to launch its platform and introduce candidates.
The 2007 encounter can go as late as the middle of
the year, and the later it goes the more likely the par-
ties will be to stage such events.
But chances are that neither will go to the great
expense of a regular week-long convention. The cap-
tains on both sides probably feel that their productions
were great successes, and with some justification.
They know too that they have some formidable obsta-
cles ahead.
The high point of the FNM's convention was with-
out doubt the triumphant return of former Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham to the leadership. Former
PLP Senator Edison Key provided a big boost by
openly declaring his allegiance to the opposition par-
ty.
For the PLP, the return of former CDR Leader Dr
Bernard Nottage to the fold was undoubtedly the
high point, even though it was a little disappointing to
hear him declare that his act was ordained by God.
Dr Nottage's decision was, in a broader sense, a
good one for Bahamian politics. Splinter parties are
going nowhere and are generally a waste of potential
talent. Dr Nottage's former CDR colleagues should
now choose sides.
After the tumult, the shouting and the heady
moments, the leadership of both parties will, if they are
wise, reflect on the significant hurdles which confront
them.



H ubert Ingraham has some serious fence-
mending to do if he hopes to command the
full and enthusiastic support of all FNM members
and supporters. After all, the manner of his return
was not exactly designed to inspire confidence and
respect.
If the process of healing and confidence-building is
to be successful, some of Mr Ingraham's supporters
will have to stop aggravating matters by blaming
FNMs for the disastrous defeat of 2002. It is a bit
much to expect FNMs to swallow that.
It was not the "meanspiritedness" of rank and file
FNMs which brought about the defiat,'as suggested by 7
Punch columnist The Scribe. It was the fault of the
government and Mr Ingraham must accept the major*
share of the blame for that. He had been Prime Min-
ister for 10 years and right up to election day.
Mr Ingraham was a great success as a political direc-
tor and he and his government achieved wonders for
the Bahamian people. But they made some mistakes,


Mr Ingraham was a great
success as a political
director and he and his
government achieved
wonders for the Bahamian
people. But they made
some mistakes, and
because you do good does
not mean you are free to
treat the people with
disrespect.


and because you do good does not mean you are free
to treat the people with disrespect. Most notable
among these mistakes was the way constitutional
amendments were proposed and pursued, and Mr
Ingraham was directly responsible for that.
. ,: The days when people fell in line and followed the
leader no mriatter what are over. Accountability, trans-
parency and taking responsibility are now indispens-
able. A little humility also helps. Lynoen Pindling
took a long time to absorb this and he and his party
were taught a bitter lesson in the end.



Perry Christie has more than his hands full. In
addition to the multitude of problems facing
the government in the country, the return of Dr Not-
tage presents its own challenges for the internal
dynamics of the PLP.
It is significant that Mr Christie did not arrange it so
that he could call Dr Nottage to make his grand
entrance while he was speaking Friday night. He was
apparently not even in the hall when Dr Nottage
entered.
It is significant, too, that Dr Nottage should say
that the person most responsible for getting him to
return was Trade and Industry Minister Leslie Miller.
Mr Miller is the most unruly member of Mr Christie's
cabinet and has at times displayed utter contempt for
the Prime Minister, the cabinet and the rules govern-
ing ministerial conduct.
Also, Mr Miller was among those who supported Dr
Nottage in the nasty leadership fight which led to Mr
Christie's ascendancy and Dr Nottage's bolting the
party. ,
One of the things Mr Christie is being roundly crit-
icised for by friend and foe is his apparent unwilling-
ness or inability to deal with errant ministers like Mr
Miller. Now, Mr Miller's hands would seem to be
considerably strengthened by the return of his pow-


It is not likely that there
will be an early general
election despite the
predictions. Even so, both
major political parties will
be watching each other
closely to see if one will
attempt to pull off a
special convention to
launch its platform and
introduce candidates.



erful friend to the party and, no doubt, to the cabinet.
Mr Christie keeps insisting that he will lead the
PLP into the next general elections but there are sev-
eral hurdles he has to overcome in this regard.
One is a shift of the power balance in the party
around the popular Dr Nottage, and the absence of Sir
Lynden Pindling to protect him in the councils of the
party. Some see Dr Nottage as towering over Mr
Christie in the competence department.
Then there are the lean and hungry ones in the
party who have been nursing a desire to take over
from Mr Christie. One went so far as to declare his
ambition after Mr Christie's illness.
Others have not been so clumsy but nevertheless see
themselves as leaders in the not too distant future. The
more astute ones have been doing what they are sup-
posed to do and that is work and show loyalty and dis-
cipline. But all of those who remained faithful to the
party and to the leader are now likely to feel a little
agitated. This can be a further challenge for Mr
Christie.
Mr Christie's greatest problem is, of course, his
health. His family and his doctors will no doubt give
him good advice based on his own personal welfare.
But the health or illness of a prime minister is a mat-
ter for the nation as well, and people are still con-
cerned about it.
It may be that Mr Christie intends to stand down
before the election but will not say so now, and that'
would be understandable. Maybe that is why a pro-
posed amendment to the Prime Minister's Pension
Act seeks to qualify him to receive a full pension after
four years.
If he does stand down after four years, that will
allow his party to elect a new leader and prime min-
ister who can be in office for a year before leading his
party into the general election. That is the way it is usu-
ally done in the parliamentary system of government.
The Canadians did it just recently. The British have
done it before and, from all accounts, Prime Minister
Tony Blair intends to step aside so his party can elect
Chancellor Gordon Brown. What the FNM did in the
run-up to the last election was a mistake.



I missed most of Mr Christie's convention speech
but I am told that he quoted some passages from
my last column to attack FNM Leader Hubert Ingra-
ham.
Mr Christie would do well to look at my comments
about the noble art of politics and reflect on the record
of some in his own party who have indulged in brazen
character assassination, false allegations, abuse of
conventions and boorish behaviour.
-(If life and events permit, I intend to discuss two
things at later dates. One is the tendency to politi-
cise and trivialise God. The other is race and poli-
tics, and a little history may surprise some people).
Website: www.bahamapundit.typepad.com
E-mail: sirarthurfoulkes@hotmail.com


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Share'

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
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for improvements in the -
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award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

TR PICA


E 1M T
PSTI OTO


THE TRIBUNE:,


PAGE 2, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2005


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THE TRIBUNE UESAY, NVEMBE 22,C005,NAGES


@In brief

Tourism

conference

planned

next month

BASIL Smith, director of
communications at the Ministry
of Tourism and Frank Comito,
executive vice-president of the
Bahamas Hotel Association are
among the speakers expected
to xmiake presentations at next
month's Caribbean Media
Exchange in Nassau.
The two tourism experts will
address journalists and indus-
try officials gathered here for
the seventh annual Caribbean
Media Exchange.
lii particular, they will discuss
multi-cultural marketing under
the theme "Exploring Niche
Markets for Caribbean Tourism."
Counterpart International,
the, international non-profit
development organisation
based in Washington, DC, is
arranging the conference.
'Delegates will examine the
vibrant, millions-strong
Caribbean Diaspora in North
America and Europe, and the
lucrative African-American,
Hispanic-American and Asian-
Amnerican markets which wield
tremendous resources and influ-
ence," the organisation said in a
statement.
Other experts confirmed to
attend the meeting include
Michael Deflorimonte, former
vice-president of African Amer-
ican Affairs at Charles Schwab
and Co; Lisa Skriloff, president
of multicultural marketing
resources; Hugh Riley, director
of marketing for the Americas
of'the Caribbean Tourism
Organisation
The group is expected to
spend five days in the Bahamas
from December 8-12. The
meeting will be held at Super-
culbs Breezes.


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S


M FAMILY and friends come out to support and pay repect to little Treak Paul, who died in a
traffic accident on Wulff Road



Firefighters 'were



attacked in the Mud'


* By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter
FIREFIGHTERS claim that
they were threatened and even
attacked by Haitians whose
homes they were attempting
to save during last week's dev-
astating fire in the Abaco set-
tlement known as the Mud
Speaking to The Tribune
yesterday, Doug Evans, a
reserve fire fighter in Abaco,
explained that some Mud res-
idents greeted firefighters with
hostility.
"When we got there, there
were no police officers," he
said. "And that was because
they had no patrol cars. As a
result, we were out there with-
out any assistance and sur-
rounded by a bunch of hostile
people."
"One firefighter had a knife
pulled on him, a water worker
was struck with a two-by-four
across his legs, and rocks were
thrown at the fire trucks
because they didn't feel like


we were doing enough to save
their homes," he claimed.
Mr Evans said the entire
experience was one he "will
not likely forget".
Mr Evans said that there was
practically no road access to
the area and no access to water.
"When we got there we had
no easy way of getting water
because there are no hydrants
there, so we had to pump the
water from the harbour and
that took a lot of time," he
explained
The blaze reportedly began
early Friday morning.
It destroyed around 130
houses and a 74-year-old Hait-
ian woman was killed.
The fire is estimated to have
left more than 600 people
homeless.
According to Mr Evans, the
fire fighters did all they could
to put out the fire and save
homes.
"It was a very difficult time
for us," he said. "We had to
try and figure out how to get


the water to the houses while
attempting to control the fire."
"It took a while to set up and
the fact that we were dealing
with so many angry people was
not helping. But we did every-
thing we could to help those
people and we tried our best,
but the problem was that they
didn't feel that way."


* By SAMORA ST ROSE
Features Sub-Editor
THE victim of Saturday
night's fatal motorbike crash
on John F Kennedy Drive
was British, a police traffic
officer confirmed yesterday.
The man's name was being
withheld up to press time last
night.
"The only thing I would
confirm is that he is a British
national," said Sergeant 2155
Lockhart, officer in charge
of the Road Traffic Division
on Chesapeake Road.
Police "will be doing a pos-
itive identification in the
morning," he added. "Once
that is done, then we will be
able to release his identity."
According to police
reports released at the week-
end, a male motorcycle rider
died after he was thrown
from the vehicle following a
head on collision with a
Dodge Stratus.
No one in the second vehi-
cle was seriously injured,
according to unconfirmed
reports.


on Saturday,
26th November, 2005
at Serendip Cove
Lyford Cay



^0



Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family
Parliament Street (near Bay St.) Tel: 322-8393 or 328-7157
Fax: 326-9953
Bay Street (next to Athena Cafe) Tel: 323-8240
Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island Tel: 363-4161/2 "
Lyford Cay (next to Lyford Cay Real Estate in
e Harbour Green House) Tel: 362-5235
e-mail: www.colesofnassau.com P.O. Box N-121


Police press liaison officer
Inspector Walter Evans said the
motorcyclist was travelling east
at around 11pm on a Symms
100 CC motorcycle when the
collision occurred.
Inspector Evans said the bik-
er was thrown "some distance
away" and succumbed to his
injuries at the scene.
"He was dressed in a beige
short trousers, a white short
sleeve shirt, and brown sandals.
He is believed to be in his late
30s or early 40s," Mr Evans
said.


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Motorcyclist 'was a

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I -


I UESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2005, PAGE 3


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THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 4, TUESDAY NOVEMBER 22, 005TTHE TRIBUN


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday .. -

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
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Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
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Chairman's





premature





conclusion


EDITOR, The Tribune

AS it has been said so man:
times before, whenever Chair
man Raynard Rigby of the PL]
speaks, it is time to put on you
boots as the stuff starts to ge
deep. His latest episode of ver
bal diarrhoea came at a pres;
conference last week when hi
commented on the achievemen
of the PLP government.
Obviously, with the FNN
going into convention, chair
man Rigby had to do something
to distract the public's atten
tion. This on his part was a grea
strategy, but he lost all credi
bility when those aware of the
facts can describe his speech as
nothing short of utter nonsense
a standard so characteristic of
Chairman Rigby.
His attempt to mislead the
public can easily be rebutted
With irrefutable facts. To pro.
mote such a misrepresentation
of the facts, Chairman Rigby is
doing the PLP a disservice and
clearly identifies himself as a
propaganda machine who, in
my opinion, appears to have lit.
tle interest in the truthfulness
of his statements. For someone
in his position as chairman ol
the governing PLP party, this
is absolutely unacceptable.
Chairman Rigby's claim thai
the PLP government has
achieved 75-90 per cent of its
objective is so ridiculous that it
cannot go unchallenged. Either
Chairman Rigby is living on
an6tlief planet or he just has an
overactive imagination that
does not distinguish. between
reality and fantasy. He does not
identify as to how he had con-
cluded these figures or the fact
that there is another year and a
half before the next election. If
the agenda is already almost
completed, what will the PLP
government be doing to pass
the time? Does this mean that
there will not be a Cabinet shuf-
fle?
To begin with, everyone is
aware of the numerous promis-
es made during the campaign
leading up to the 2002 election.
But, like it has been said so
,often that promises are made
to be broken. In the heat of the
campaign, anything could have
been said to seduce a voter to
support the PLP, knowing full
well that they never intended
to deliver on such promises,
For example, on Grand
Bahama it was promised that
the airport at West End would
re-open in 30 days when the
PLP became the government.
An ambulance would be placed
in west Grand Bahama full


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STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
22ND day of NOVEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



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r
t time. A bridge over the trou-
bled waters of the Fishing Hole
s Road was to be construct-
e ed...After all, the money for this
t venture had already been
obtained from the Inter-Amer-
[ ican Development Bank under
- the previous FNM administra-
g tion.
It should have been just a
t matter of convenient time to
begin such a construction.
e Bradley Roberts, the Minister
s of Works, has promised Senator
, Caleb Outten some time ago
f that such construction of the
Fishing Hole Bridge was forth-
e coming and imminent. To date,
no visible sign of any bridge
- construction exists. 1 6
\ Many persons have
s expressed disappointment with
I Caleb Outten who had made
the construction of this bridge
his number one campaign issue.
- Concerned persons such as
s myself had fully supported him
on this position. Yet, since being
f appointed a PLP Senator, he
s has been mysteriously silent on
this matter. In the recent
t tragedy of hurricane Wilma,
s tsunami-size waves came ashore
s in west Grand Bahama. Had
t the Fishing Hole Road flooded
and became impassable, west
Grand Bahama would have
been cut off from the rest of
t Grand Bahama, with thousands
of persons trapped with no way
t out.
Fortunately, the good Lord
t smiled on Grand Bahama that
day and a major catastrophe
f was averted. It is time that those
t in power in Nassau stop jiving
the people of Grand Bahama
and construct the bridge over
t the Fishing Hole Road imme-
diately.
However, the vast list of
promises made to the Bahamian
public are embedded in a
brochure entitled "Our Plan"
that represented the commit-
ment of the PLP. If elected to
government, this is what they
had promised the Bahamian
people that they would do. It
doesn't take a rocket scientist
or a College of the Bahamas or
a University of Wulff Road or
Yamacraw graduate to under-
stand that the vast majority of
promises in Our Plan were nev-
er carried out or apparently had
no intentions of being carried
out. Our Plan was simply a doc-
ument that, in my opinion, was
created to fool the Bahamian
people. Regrettably, far too
many Bahamians gave the PLP

believing that the PLP would
actually deliver what they had
promised.
The contents of Our Plan
included everything from
promising to construct docks,
marinas, harbours, sport facili-
ties, etc. Refeiendumis 6n vari-
ous issues were to be held, in
particular constitutional mat-
ters. With no such referendums


forthcoming under this adinin-'
istration, women in :th4e
Bahamas will continue tioi, e
treated as second-class citizens
when they marry a non-:
Bahamian. The Financial Act's
passed under the FNM were to
be reviewed and repealed if
necessary. Nothing was doie to
change these acts as it' lhad
recently been announced tliat
the Bahamas has been removed
from the blacklist than 6to
the former FNM government.
Otherwise to meddle with these
Acts, the blacklisting could have
continued.
Simple legislative procedures
that would not cause the gov-
ernment lots of money but will
improve the lives of Bahamians
have been left by the wayside.
Mandatory registration of inter-
est in land to stop people steal-
ing your land has been ignored
along-with a Consumer Protep-
tion Bill and a Bill of Rights for
the Disabled has only been giv-
en lip service by. this :PEP
administration.
What about the implementa-
tion of the much talked about
Code of Ethics? Why doesthe
Bahamian public have to coln-
tinue to suffer such embarrass-
ment when certain persons-n-
tinue to sit in the Honourable
House of Parliament? The
promise to make it better. for
the small man remains just that
a promise. Unemployment
is unacceptably high despite the
promise in Our Plan to create
16,000 jobs. For Grand Bahama
who for the first time in decades
voted for the PLP has not- got
any relief under the PLP. 4h
fact, to the contrary, as since
2002, the economy of Gtand
Bahama has been in a tailspin.
On Grand Bahama, people-are
hoping for help as they have
been told to travel elsewhere.to
seek employment. I am certain
that the eternal excuse will be
the hurricanes, but the prdb-
lems on Grand Bahama start-
ed long before the hurricanes
came.
The provisions in Our Plan
are certainly not worth the
paper, that they are printed on as
the promises made in it were
not sincere. At the fdaext
Junkanoo Rushout, they should
be used to help light the fire to
warm the drums. In the-late
1970s, pop star Billy PreStOn
wrote a song that said "soife-
thing from nothing leaves fio6h-
ing!" Far too many peQple,
including PLPs, believe that this
PLP administration has .d6ie
nothing or too little. Whtlher
10, 30, 50, 80 or 90 per cent fim
nothing, it still leaves notlitg.
Chairman Rigby's claiin 'of
achievements is most prniria-
ture. His preoccupation with the
leadership battle of the FNM is
an obsession. He should
remember that some timelago
his own election to office' *as
described as "undemocratic 'by
his opponent.

DR LEATENDORE
PERCENTIE
Boston, Massachusetts
November 13 2005


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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2005


. -


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, NOVEMBILH -22, ZUU,, I-AULb


LOCAL NEWS


OIn brief


Gamma is

reduced to

tropical

depression

GRAND Bahama and the
northern Bahamas can breathe
a sigh of relief as Tropical
Storm Gamma has been
reduced to a Tropical Depres-
sion.
According to reports from
the Meteorological office, Gam-
n is not expected to be a dis-
turrlance to the Bahamas.
Iits last report, the Meteo-
rological office reported Gam-
nm locatedd at 17 degrees north
and longitude 85.5 degrees west
'r about 85 miles north of Hon-
durs.,
'hl i'e depression is moving
tiw'ard the north near two miles
per hour, and little or no motion
is' expected over the next 24
" mixYiimu sustained winds
are"hear 35 miles per hour with
higher gusts, but the storm is
expected to dissipate over the


fi~p.is;" S '


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"




~G-


0~


'Mother' Pratt considering




turning home into museum


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
ACTING Prime Minister Cynthia
Pratt said she is considering converting
her inner city home into a museum after
she retires from politics.
Mrs Pratt made the remark yester-
day at her St Cecilia constituency's
Urban Renewal senioitcitiZens Thanks-
giving luncheon.
In an interview with The Tribune,
Mrs Pratt said it is important for local
history to remain a part of New Provi-
dence's inner city.
"It is my dream that in the future,
my house would eventually become a
museum," she said.


Mrs Pratt said she hopes the house
can become a place "where we are real-
ly able to highlight all of the activities
that took place over the years, once I
demit office."
"It is important for the Bahamian
generations to understand that in the
years to come, if the Lord should tarry,
that there was once a woman who lived
there who was in government and actu-
ally lived in the inner city."
The acting prime minister has lived
on Sixth Street in Coconut Grove for 32
years. She has hosted university presi-
dents, US congressmen and members of
Caribbean and European parliaments in
her house.
Remembering history is important


for children who live in the inner city,
said Mrs Pratt. "Right now, some may
be living in squalor and feel that nothing
can never happen for people like us.
"But, they can say that there was a
woman back then who actually grew -
up in a squalor, who actually lived in the
inner city. Even while in office she was
still there."
Mrs Pratt said the museum idea was
inspired by her visit to the former home
of the American civil rights leader Mar-
tin Luther King.
Mrs Pratt pointed out that making
her dream a reality would also serve as
a tribute to her family and those who
. worked closely with her on community
projects in the past.


"My husband and children are a part
of this. People who lived in the area
that helped to build the work that I am
doing will be a part of it.
"It would not just be isolated just
around me; it will a part of the com-
munity itself, the people of today -
because you are talking 20 to 30 years
down the road, most of us will be gone.
"The pictures of these people and
the work that they do, just like the
Urban Renewal, will be a part of it
because this is a reality during this time.
These are the things that I would like to
do."
Mrs Pratt declined to specplate on
how soon her dream might become a
reality.


Rally planned to welcome

back Hubert Ingraham


* FNM MPs Brent Symonette and Hubert Ingraham, who took the positions of deputy leader
and party leader respectively at the FNM convention two weeks ago


Human rights group makes leniency

plea to Grand BaamabDanks


The Grand Bahama Human
Rights Association (GBHRA)
is calling on banks and mort-
gage companies on the island
to be lenient in the wake of
two devastating hurricane sea-
sons.
GBHRA president Fred
Smith said that before
demanding payment, collect-
ing, foreclosing or repossess-
ing homes, lending institutions
should consider "hurricanes
Jeanne, Frances and Wilma,
the collapse of the Grand
Bahama economy because of
the Royal Oasis Hotel and the
drop off of tourist arrivals to
Grand Bahama".
"Thousands of homeowners
in Grand Bahama are in jeop-
ardy of losing their homes, not
because they do not want to
pay or that they are bad
debtors, but that they simply
have not been able to afford
to pay for the simple reason
that they do not now have
jobs," Mr Smith said.
The association says it has
received reports from home-


owners who claim that several
banks and mortgage compa-
nies have been aggressively
demanding delinquent mort-
gage payments and threaten-
ing to take away homes.
"The association appreciates
that lending institutions are in
the business of making mon-
ey. However, the association
urges the banks and mortgage
companies to adopt a more
socially responsible conscious-
ness and sensitivity at this
time," the GBHRA said in a
statement.
The association urged lend-
ing institutions to appreciate
"the dire straits and challenges
facing the residents of Grand
Bahama" and urged banks to
help homeowners "by resched-
uling and reducing or even
placing a moratorium on out-
standing loans."
"Many of these homeown-
ers have been good and faithful
customers for many, many
years and lending institutions
should work with them not
only in good times, but also in


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these bad times when they are
needed the most," said
GBHRA.
"Many homeowners are
under tremendous stress
because they are in fear of los-
ing their homes, their life sav-
ings; they cannot provide for
their families; the hurricanes
have turned their lives upside
down and they are anxious
because many insurance claims
were settled for much less than
they should have been simply
because they needed the mon-
ey or many insurance claims
were simply rejected," said the
statement.
The association repeated its
call on the government to
enact strong consumer protec-
tion legislation to ensure that
there is good faith in the han-
dling of insurance claims.


The FNM is staging a mass ral-
ly to reintroduce Hubert Ingra-
ham as party leader tonight.
FNM deputy chairman
Anthony Musgrove said the par-
ty will show its unity by pre-
senting Mr Ingraham and for-
mer leadership contenders Tom-
my Turnquest and Dion Foulkes
on the platform together.
Other FNMs slated to
address the rally include the
new deputy leader Brent
Symonette and former chair-
man Carl Bethel.
"The focus is basically to rein-
troduce the Bahamian public to
the people's choice, which is
obviously Mr Hubert Ingraham.
The event will be held at the
R M Bailey park starting at 6pm
with entertainment. The rally
will begin in earnest at 7pm.
The FNM reportedly has ten-
tative plans to host rallies on
Grand Bahama, Exuma and
Abaco in December.


IFOR 3IN I I LAWN SERVICg


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TUESDAY
NOVEMBER 22


2:00am
11:00
12noon
12:03
12:05
1:00
1:30
2:00
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
4:58
5:00
5:30
6:00
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8:30
9:00
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10:30
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1:00am


Community Page/1540AM
Immediate Response
ZNS News Update Live
Caribbean Today News
Update
Immediate Response Contd
Ethnic Health America
Spiritual Impact: Marion
Jackson
Sports Lifestyles: Bill Lester
Durone Hepburn
Paul S. Morton
Gospel Video
Gospel Grooves
ZNS News Update
Caribbean Newsline
411
Bahamian Things
News Night 13
Bahamas Tonight
Ethics & Excellence
Urban Renewal Update
Da' Down Home Show
Inside Hollywood
News Night 13
Bahamas Tonight
Immediate Response
Community Page 1540 AM


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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2005TLOCHETRBUNEEW


Senior citizens



are treated to



lunch for



Thanksgiving


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
SENIOR citizens of the St Cecil-
ia constituency were treated to a
thanksgiving lunch yesterday.
The event gives the elderly in
the community a chance to enjoy
each other's company another
while having a hot meal.
The lunch was hosted by the St
Cecilia Urban Renewal Project and
sponsored by Big 10 restaurant,
Arawak Cay.
Inspector Robert Simmons, pro-
ject co-ordinator for the St Cecilia
Urban Renewal project, said that
the luncheon is not politically moti-
vated.
"For quite some time, the senior
citizens are overlooked. They are
people that give so much to this
country. When they become at that
advanced age, they are just put
aside and put out to pasture.
The keynote speaker at the
event, Cynthia Pratt, MP for St
Cecilia, applauded the seniors for


being the pillars of the nation.
"I always loved people and said
as a young girl 'if God would allow
me to grow up I would want to be
able to look after the old people
and little children.'
"I did not see politics. I had no
interest in politics (and) I still don't.
I care about people because people
are people. I don't play politics
with lives. I don't play politics with
human suffering," said Mrs Pratt.
She said that older persons in
the community have wisdom that
cannot be learned out of a book,
adding that while the young peo-
ple of the nation are appreciated,
there will be no young without the
old.
"You (the seniors) have sown,
years ago, what we are now reap-
ing in 2005," said Mrs Pratt.
Margaret Rose, a resident of
Ridgeland Park west for 40 years,
said that yesterday's gathering was
"good for the senior citizens
because some are shut in and can
hardly get out."


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* CYNTHIA 'Mother' Pratt greets 60-year-old Cydney Lloyed and 71-year-old Rose
McKenzie, elderly numbers of the St Cecilia constituency, at a Thanksgiving luncheon
held yesterday at th OBig 10 resturant in Arawak Cay


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SIn brief,

Government
fees can
now be paid
with cards

THE Ministry of Finance has
approved the use of Sun Card,
MasterCard and Visa to pal
government fees.
Minister of State for Finance
James Smith has announced
that duty and Customs fees,
business licences and other fees
at the Public Treasury, Roa't"
Traffic licences and passports,
and birth, death and marriage
certificates can now all be piid,
for in this fashion.
The process will be expanded
to the Family Islands shortly..,
"During the recent Bidget
debate, it was pointed out thqa
the government was engaged ini
a major revenue collection exer-
cise. The intentiQnoiai oeiies i
that all revenue due to the goy-
ernment is collected," s9d a
release from Mr Smith's office.
The release said the process
would allow the g6Vefniieht ii6
determine the potential limits.
of the present tax system, "and'
to provide the revenue neces-'
sary to undertake tboth, recur--
rent and capital expenditures'.'
"The goal is to collect rev-'
enue equalling 20 per cent of,
our Gross Domestic Product," t*
said.

Marathon
Thanksgiving,
to be held
this week

THE annual Marathon,
Thanksgiving seniors luncheo,
will be held on Thursday,;!
November 24.
The event is being hosted by,
Marathon MP Ron Pinder's
consituency office, in conjunce
tion with the Sandals Roya
Bahamian Resort.
The lucheon is for senior cit
izens who live in the Marathonr
community, particlel aily resi
dents of the Soldier Road
Senior Citizens Home and tlih2
Golden Age Retirement Home;
The venue is the Holy Cross
Community Centre. For more'
information contact ShantelW
Bethel at 393-1120/1

Renewal

band to

host first

concert

THE Farm Road RenewAl'
Band will be hosting its firs't'-
ever concert on December 4.
The concert will be hefl
under the patronage of Prirnik
Minister Perry Christie an14'
Bernadette Christie at the Wyi-'
dham Nassau Beach Hotel.'
Tickets are $10 and are avail-
able at the Farm Road Project
headquarters on Quakoo Street;
the 100 Per Cent Book Store in
the Mall at Marathon and in
Palmdale, and at the Reef
Restaurant on Thompson
Boulevard.
Children's tickets are $5 and
must be purchased on the door.


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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2005


THE TRIBUNE"














inwednesday's


A R R Y


MITH WITH


ANO THE


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ARTI


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Ban

forcec

mor

prin

SCOTI
Limited he
"Forgive a
campaign.
The cam
Scotiabani
qualified
efforts to
establish a
ship with t
The cam
give" $10,0
winner's n
$7,500 of t
ner's `prin(
payment f
customers.
Debra V
of market
tions, said:
campaign,
in not only
customers
to them ir
way, at this
the year."

C-1


-It








"Copy
Syn
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- 8 a


n brief

kto

give'

tgage

cipals

ABANK (Bahamas)
eld its second annual
ind forget" mortgage
npaign, according to
k, is designed to assist
individuals in their
D own a home and
meaningful relation-
he bank.
ipaign seeks to "for-
D00 of the grand prize
mortgage principal,
he second place win-
cipal, and $250 off a
or 20 new mortgage
Vood, senior manager
ing and public rela-
"With this mortgage
we pride ourselves
y receiving from our
,but in giving back
this very generous
s very special time of













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Commercial News Providers"


Long Island roads are 'in




urgent need of attention'


ROADS in north Long
Island need urgent attention
according to one concerned cit-
izen.
The citizen contacted The
Tribune yesterday claiming
that a culvert north of the Stel-
la Maris marina has collapsed
and area residents had to fill
the road-wide hole with sand.
He said there is another
sinking culvert in Simms,
"where residents placed a 55
gallon drum with a piece of
bush adorned with Christmas
decorations to warn motorists
of impending danger."
"The drum had been work-
ing its way to the center of the
culvert over the past week as
the sinking increases.
"Last week a retired woman,
a local senior citizen was spied
filling holes on Queen's High-
way and the road to O'Neils,
north of Simms.
"The elderly lady's car has
suffered damage when she
drove into a hole and was tak-
ing it upon herself to fill in the
hole to insure others did not
meet similar fate," he said.
According to the source, the
island's independent MP Larry
Cartwright was seen in the area
not too long after the drum was


placed on the culvert "tbut still
no remedy is'forthcoming".
The Tribune poke with Lar-
ry Cartwright about the matter
yesterday.
Mr Cartwright said he is
aware of the collapsed culvert
near Simms. He said local gov-
ernment inspected the site
before the collapse and recog-
nised that the culvert needed to
be replaced.
The Ministry of Works was
alerted about the problem and
the matter is now in their
hands, he said.
Mr Cartwright said local
government is also aware of
the hole north of the Stella
Maris marina, but said that it is
not a collapsed culvert, but
probably a sinkhole exposed
by recent heavy rains.
Both the problems "will be
fixed in short order," the MP
assured The Tribune.
According to the concerned
citizen however, the holes are
just the tip of the iceberg. He
said the roads in north Long
Island were being neglected
long before Mr Cartwright
took office.
"The governmentborroiwed
millions of dollars in 1993 to
build the roads in Loiig Island


* GOVERNOR General Dame Ivy Dumont presents letters
of credence to His Excellency Daouda Diabate, Ambassador
Designate of the Republic of Cote d'Ivoire to the Bahamas at
Government House on Friday


(BIS Photo: Tim Aylen)


STHE road in Simms where residents have placed a 55-gallon drum to warn motorists about a
collapsed culvert


and if nothing is done to main-
tain the surfaces they will be
Borrowing millions more
again," he said.
The source claimed that the
funds were sent to local gov-


ernmnent, but that most of the
money was spent on roads in.
the south.
"Queens Highway in the
north needs attention quickly.
Not to mention the crossroads


to Alligator Bay, Bridgwaters,
O'Neils, Millerton and many
Others whose surfaces are
already a tyre merchant's
dream," he said.


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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2005, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE









LOCALNWSS


Drinks for diabetes


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Craig Walkine, president of Pricebusters Stores, recently
made a donation of a pallet of Fruit Melody all natural bever-
ages to the Bahamas Diabetic Association (BDA).
The drinks contain no sugar, no carbohydrates and no fat and
will assist members in maintaining a healthy diet.
Mr Walkine said that the drinks are "an excellent complement
to a healthy diet for diabetics as well as all Bahamians."
Bradley Cooper of the BDA thanked Pricebusters and
assured Mr Walkine that the beverages will be available to
members throughout the Bahamas as quickly as possible.




CALLING ALL PAST
MEMBERS/FOLLOWERS OF
CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL
to ,e invited to attez/


4TH HOMECOMING
&

127TH ANNIVERSARY SERVICE
Son
4i Sunday, November 27, 2005
at 11:00am


Noel festival


is planned

FREEPORT Festival Noel 2005 is set for December 2 at thi;
Rand Nature Centre with the theme: "An evening under the stars",.
Organisers say the evening will feature a variety of wines and
champagnes, delicious food from some of the island's best restau-
rants and beautiful artwork from talented Bahamian artists.,La"t,
year's gala was a sold-out affair.
Pictured above is the team from Irie's Restaurant. Irie's was
last year's winner of the festival's Chef Noel culinary competi-,
tion. Each year the event features delicious food from some of the
island's best restaurants.


Wisdom makes

call to young men


* By Bahamas Information
Services
THE Salute To Manhood cel-
ebrations began on Saunday
with a parade by male organi-
sations marching from the East-
ern Parade, and Windsor and
Clifford Parks and the annual
candlelight service in Rawson
Square.
The activities are being held
by the Salute To Manhood
Committee in partnership with
the Ministry of Youth, Sports
and Culture. A boys camp is
also scheduled for the Coral
Harbour Camp Site from
November 25-26, organise by
the Royal Rangers of The


Bahamas.
The ministry will honour
more than 30 men in the Annu-
al Salute to Manhood Lun-
cheon on November 27.
Minister of Youth, Sports and
Culture Neville Wisdom said:
"These men are products of var-
ious areas of society. My Min-
istry is pleased with the com-
mittee's selection of a cross sec-
tion of Bahamian men who con-
tinue to work in molding the
lives of young Bahamian
males."
He added that it is the lack of
a proper response to manhood
that is creating many of the
problems that the Bahamas is
experiencing today.


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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2005


THE TRIBUNE







TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2005, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


LOA NW


FROM page one

provided by the FNM
spokesman, the explanations
are all entirely innocent and
consistent with the routine work
of*a Ministry of Foreign
Affairs," said the minister.
He said the FNM statement
was issued just upon his depar-
ture for Malta and the party obvi-
ously gambled that he would not
have the opportunity to properly
respond to it and promised to
deal with the matter fully upon
hiSreturn to the Bahamas.
ti'n the meantime, as I have
said before, this is a matter for
the police. Since the FNM is
reluctant to share their allega-
tidns with the police despite my
repeated invitation to do so on
three separate occasions, I will
in jte forthwith the Commission-
er of Police to determine the
quality of their evidence and to
determine also how stolen docu-
ments of the Ministry came to be
in their possession," the minister
said .
During a press conference on
Sunday, Mr Bethel produced an
e-mail message sent to Mr
Mitchell from Senator Trevor
Whylly, attached to the Office of
the Prime Minister, in May, 2004,
which read: "Minister, I wish your
approval for Bruce Bain who
operates a cargo boat from Nas-
saut'to Haiti. Mr Bain has been
waiting for permission to travel
back and forward to Haiti with
his cargo. He has requested per-
mits for six persons who work
with him on his boat.
'PM has asked me to assist Mr
Bain with his concern which is
now a financial problem (for) him
and his business and family.
"The minister forwarded the
e-mail to the permanent secre-
tary under the heading 'Re: Your
Approval', and she duly approved
the issuance of visas on May 11,
2004."
Mr Bethel said that documents


Mitchell asks police to investigate


in the party's possession indicate
that this same Mr Bain was later
able to obtain entry visas for addi-
tional groups of Haitian nationals
in addition to the first six,
totalling at least 30 more.
Mr Bethel also said that copied
ledger entries from a ledger main-
tained by the consular section of
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs,
dated November 13, 2004, clearly
states that it was .the "Minister"
who approved the issuance of
entry visas for a group of Chinese
nationals, and that the sponsor of
this group, the person who
obtained the Minister's approval,
was Sidney Stubbs, the MP for
Holy Cross.
"From these two documents
alone it is clear that Minister Fred
Mitchell's assertion that there was
no ministerial involvement in the
issuance of entry visas cannot be
believed. It is clear that at least so
far as the public servants were
concerned it was the Minister,
himself, who approved the visas
for a group of Chinese nationals
sought by his political colleague,
Sidney Stubbs," Mr Bethel said.
A separate release from the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs said
that the documents neither dis-
close a breach of security nor that
a decision was made which was
outside the discretion of the offi-
cers who made the decisions.
"One document purports to
support their case that the Prime
Minister, the Minister and a Sen-
ator are involved in the political
issuance of visas. The document
proves no such thing. What the
document shows is that a com-
plaint was made about visa
issuance.
"This is one of several com-
plaints which the Minister, his
office assistants or aides receive
about visas on a daily basis. They
are all routinely referred to the
Permanent Secretary for investi-


gation. The case in the document
produced by the FNM was han-
dled no differently. The Minister
had no other role in the matter,"
the ministry said.
With regard to the allegations
about the issuance of visas to per-
sons sponsored by Holy Cross
MP Sidney Stubbs, the ministry
said that the FNM must again
point to the evidence of some
wrongdoing on the part of the
minister or any public officials.
"They are unable to do so. The
information which they provide
is only part of the story. The rules
on the granting of visas are even
tougher than they were under the
FNM in that brokers or middle
men are restricted from applying
for visas," the ministry said.
The ministry reiterated that it is
the permanent secretary who con-
ducts the day-to-day business of
the ministry and there is no inter-
ference on visa decisions by the
Minister of Foreign Affairs.
"One must be careful, howev-
er, to note that even if the Minis-
ter gives an instruction to deny,
grant, or review a visa applica-
tion, that is not political interfer-
ence. In law, the last level of
appeal is to the Minister. During
his time in office, the Minister
does not ever recall exercising
such a power," the ministry said.
It said the minister has never
sought to cast the political respon-
sibility for the ministry on public
servants, but the decision of the
minister to isolate himself from
day-to-day visa decisions is appro-
priate.
"To avoid precisely the instant
circumstances where ill-founded
gossip, based on stolen docu-
ments, that tell half the story, can
find their way into the public
domain through overly ambitious,
half-baked and irresponsible
politicians," said the ministry.


YOUR CONNECTIOfIf' O THE WORLD


TENDER


PLUMBING SERVICE


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. is pleased to invite
tenders from suitably qualified companies to submit tender for Plumbing
Services.

Interested companies may collect a Tender Specification document
from BTC's administration building on John F. Kennedy Drive, between
the hours of 9:00am to 5:00pm Monday through Friday.

Tender must be sealed in an envelope marked "TENDER FOR
PLUMBING SERVICES" and delivered to the attention of:

Mr. Michael J. Symonette
President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.
P.O.Box N-3048
Nassau, The Bahamas

Bids should reach the company's administrative office on John F.
Kennedy Drive by 5:00pm on Wednesday, November 23, 2005.

Companies submitting bids are invited to attend a bid opening on
Thursday, November 24, 2005 at 10:00am at BTC's Perpall's Tract
Drive location.

Only applicant with valid plumbing licence will be accepted.

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.


FROUVI page one
realise that the majority of
votes are still Bahamian."
Yesterday, Troy Cornea, son
of Rev Bob Cornea, the care-
taker of Camp Abaco, said he
cannot officially confirm spec-
ulation, but relayed informa-
tion received from his father.
"I can only say what I was
told," he said. "I've been told
that they (the government)
would like to house the
Haitians affected by the fire at
the youth camp," he said.
"BEC are to run the gener-
ators, the Defence Force are
to provide security and social
services are to provide the
food.
"My dad was not consulted.
He was just told that it was
being negotiated by the 'pow-
ers that be' and the officials
from Assembly of God. I guess
they were just desperate to
have some place to put them
(the Haitians). I just don't
know if this was thought-out
well."
Mr Cornea added that his
father may be considering
resigning from his post.
"But I don't know for cer-


- 4 4 aa.I 7," dI


Abaconians

tain what they will do," he said.
"No-one here is for this. The
youth camp is not set up for
this.
"It is self-service, so the gov-
ernment will have to provide
everything.
"There are only two employ-
ees there, my parents, and
that's too much for them to
handle. You know what, out
of sight, out of mind is just
what the government is trying
to do."
Yesterday, the Rev Patrick
Paul, general superintendent
of the Assembly of God, con-
firmed claims that the Assem-
bly has granted the govern-
ment "consent to use it if nec-
essary."
This announcement comes
just days after Thursday's dev-
astating blaze, which left. hun-
dreds of Haitians and Hait-
ian/Bahamians displaced.
The blaze destroyed about
130 houses and left a 74-year-
old Haitian woman dead. It is
estimated that the number of
Haitians left homeless by the
fire ranges between 600 and
1,500.


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CONTRACTOR

PRE-QUALIFICATION


College of The Bahamas
; Harry C. Moore Library & Information Centre




Building Contractors are invited to PRE-QUALIFY for the
Construction of The College of The Bahamas Library and
Information Centre, to be situated at Thompson Boulevard,
New Providence, Bahamas.


The Project will comprise complete construction of the
- ew library- approximately sixty thousand square feet in
area (60,000 sq. ft.), featuring a four-storey structure with
a domed 60-foot central atrium of 40-foot diameter. The
facility will accommodate about 1,000 users, allow for
doubling of holdings from 70,000 volumes to 150,000
' volumes and will contain the technology and other amenities
to make the library client friendly and technology
appropriate.


Interested contractors may collect pre-qualification
documents from:


Axum Architecture
East Bay and Ernest Streets
Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 393-8415


There will be a non-refundable Fee of $100 for each
document, (cash or certified cheque made payable to The
College of The Bahamas.)


Sealed pre-qualification submissions will be received until
4:00 p.m., 30th, November 2005 at the office of Axum
Architecture, East Bay and Ernest Streets.


I---r i ----- I --- I


-- -- -- L - IL ~ L I - I I -I L -- -L- I~R


To nrr i.tr hk


i empjoraLy loneli.te nave
been opened at three churches
in Marsh Harbour and at the
Assembly of God Church in
South Abaco for those affected
by Thursday's fire.
However, the government
says no homes will be rebuilt in
the Mud, but it will instead
assist with providing accom-
modation.


Bleachers

FROM page one

they gave up in 2003.
"In the past, years before
C3, junkanoo tickets have
been used as political currency
given out to constituents, influ-
-ential people, friends and such.
Under C3, 108 tickets have
been reserved for government
but when government was
responsible for the ticketing
hundreds more were given
away," he said.
The Tribune contacted Peter
Adderley, public relations offi-
cer for the company who said
that he "was not in an
informed position to com-
ment" at the time.


IL - II I L I ~-sBdB~e~


I









PAGE 10, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 22, 2005

7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

Anatomy of a Nova A minute-b -minute, eyewit- FrontlineTheStorm" A political Nova 'The Wave That Shook the
* WPBT Huncane ness account of urricane Katrina. storm surrounds Gulf Coast destruc- World"3 A (CC) (DVS)
( N) A (CC) (DVS) tion. (N) A (CC)
The Insider (N) NCIS "Frame-Up" Tony is suspected The Amazing Race: Family Edi- Threshold Three women from com-
* WFOR A (CC) of murder when part of a female ton 'How's That Face Feel?" The pletely different walks of life show
body is found at Quantico. teams go 1i new heights. (N) signs of infection. (N) (CC)
SAccess Holly- The Biggest Loser (N) A (CC) My Name Is Earl The Office"E- Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
* WTVJ wood (N) (CC) "Cost Dad the Mail Surveillance" A runaway teenage gid from Virginia
Election" A (N) (CC) is found badly beaten. (N)
Deco Drive Bones "A Man on Death Row" House "Hunting" House treats News (CC)
* WSVN Brennan and Booth race to tie up unique symptoms exhibited by a gay
loose ends before an execution. AIDS patient and his father.
Jeopardyl (N) 2005 American Music Awards Cedric the Entertainer hosts thievent at Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles;
* WPLG (CC) scheduled performers include the Rolling Stones, Madah Cargy,,Kenny Chesney and Rob Thomas. (Live) 1
(CC)
AmericJus- Cold Case Files DNA technology Dog the Bounty Dog thBount Random 1 Mark/Joe" Addicts are
A&E ce convicts a rapist and a murderer. Hunter Search- Hunter Terminal- given the chance to get dean. (N)
_(CC) ing for Jonah. ly ill fugitive. (CC)
Hardtik BBC News World Business BBC News Kill or Cure BBC News Asia Today
BBCI (Latenight). Report (Latenight). (Latenight).
BET Access Granted The Ultimate Hustler The Ultimate Hustler Comicview
CBC Coronation Rick Mercer Re- The Tournament Da Vinci's City HalrPut Down the The National (CC)
Street (CC) port (CC) (N) (CC) Hose, Pick Up a Gun" (N)
CN BC :L)On the The Apprentice ) (CC) Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch

S :00) TheSiua- Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)
CNN Ion Room,__ _L
Drew Carey's The Daily Show The Colbert Re- Chappelle's South Park Ms. Chappelle's The Showbiz
COM Gren Screen With Jon Stew- port (CC) Show Music Crabtree helps in Show (CC) Show With
Show A (CC) art (CC) guest Fat Joe. bus crash. David Spade
COURT Cops f (CC) Cops "Las Ve- Cops "Coast to Cops "Coast to Cops "Las Ve- The Investigators A woman dies af-
gas" A (CC) Coast" A (CC) Coast" A (CC) gas" A (CC) ter being served a warrant.
That's So Raven ** BEETHOVEN (1992, Comedy) Charles Grodin, Bonnie Hunt, Dean American Drag- Sister, Sister Tia
DISN (CC) Jones. An evil veterinarian kidnaps a lovable Saint Bernard, 'PG' (CC) on: Jake Long and Tamera skip
(CC) an exam.
This Old House Weekend Gar- Fresh From the Garden Sense Weekend Land- Grounds for Im- Rock Solid
DIY A (CC) denying Garden scaping provement "Slate Floor"
DW Special Pro- Journal: Sondersendung Journal: In Euromaxx Journal: Im Focus
grammilng Tagestema Depth Tagestema
El News It's So Over: 50 Biggest Celebrity Break-Ups! Hot Love Gone Celebrity
Bad (N) Friends-Bad
N :00) College Basketball EA Sports Maui Invitational College Basketball EA Sports Maui Invitational Semifinal -- Teams TBA.
ESPN Semifinal-Teams TBA. From aui, Hawaii. From Maui, Hawaii. (Live) (CC)
ESPNI Cn- UEFA Champions League Soccer Arsenal vs. FC Thun. (Same-day SportsCenter International Edi-
ESPNI Ter4pce Tape)(CC) tion(Live)
EWTN Daily Mass: Our Mother Angelica Live Classic Religious Cata- The Holy Rosary Threshold of Hope
Lady Episodes logue I
IT TV :00) FItTs Reunion Story "Life's a Beach"A Marilu Henner's Shape Up Your FitNation 'All Stressed Out" Manag-
FIT V ousecalls (CC) day at the beach. (N) A Life Removing junk. [A ing stress. )
c Xv N S ,Fox Report- The O'Relly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannlty & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
FOX-NC ShepardSmlth Susteren (ULive) (CC)
FSNFL Totally Football CMI:TheChris Poker Learn Best Damn Sports Show Period Totally Football Best Damn
FSNFL Myers Interview From the Pros (Live) (CC) Sports Show
GOLF Playing Lessons The Big Break IV: USA v Europe The Big Break IV: USA v Europe Natalie Gulbis The Daly.Planet
(L N) Show
GSN Ungo (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire A Dog Eat Dog A (CC) Extreme Dodgeball 3 (CC)
____ ______ (CC)
A box 360 SPtret Fury StrFury ury Filter Gift giving Filter Children's The Man Show The Man Show
G4Tech cial: Countdown advice. (N) gaming gear. (CC) "Movie Show"
(:00) Walker, Walker, Texas Ranger A woman STRAIGHT FROM THE HEART (2003, Romance) Ted Polo, Andrew Mc-
HALL Texas Ranger nearly gives up her dream of be- Carthy, Patricia Kalember. Romance grows between a photographer and
"Full Contact" coming a Texas Ranger. A (CC) a Wyoming rancher. (CC)
Hot Property Deslgn Inc. Desl ner Guys Opening Soon Design Match Debble Travis' Facellft "Andy's
HGTV "Lancast Mikes Living Seeing the ght by Design Oscar "Parent's Retreat Kitchen" A (CC)
(CC) Room CD" (CC) A (C ) deaRena
INSP MorrisCerullo Breakthrough Christ in Inspiration To- Life Today (CC) This Is Your Day Missions
INSP _____ CC) Prophecy day (CC)
Transformers Sabrina, the My Wife and My Wife and Friends Joey's Everybody Everybody
KTLA Cybertron Teenage Witch Kds "Graduation KidsClaire and girlfriend gets Loves R ndLoves Raymond
"SilentMovie" Day"(CC) Tony talk sex. physical. (CC) "Young Gir" A 'No Faft"(CC)
IN THE LAKE OF THE WOODS (1996, Suspense) Pe- ** IN DREAMS (1999, Horror) Annette Bening, Aidan Quinn, Robert
LIFE ter Strauss, Kathleen Quinlan. A promising politician's Downey Jr. Premiere. A woman's nightmares begin to take over her reali-
darkest secret comes to light. (CC) (DVS) ty. (CC)
MSNBC ) Hrdball Countdown With Keith Olber- Rita Cosby Live & Direct Scarborough Country
(c Cmann
Jimmy Neutron: SpongeBob Yours, Mine & Full House Fatherhood Roseanne"The Roseanne A
NICK Boy Genius SquarePants A Ours (CC) "Family Table" Wedding" (CC) (CC)
NT' My Name Is Ead Bones "'A Man on Death Row" (N) House "Hunting" (N) A (CC) News A (CC) News
(N) N (CC) A (CC)
(:00) NHL Hockey Tampa Bay Lightning at Philadelphia Flyers. From the NHL Postgame Wanted: Ted or Alive One contest-
OLN Wachovia Center in Philadelphia. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) Show (Live) ant goes hunting with Ted.
E 2 Wheel Tues- American Thun- Texas Hardtails Build or Bust Dodge Test Dri- 2 Wheel Tues-
SPEED day (N) der ve day
Unfolding Behind the Enjoying Every- John Hagee To- Bill Gaither (CC) Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN Majesty Scenes (CC) day Life With day (CC)
Joyce Meyer
Everybody Friends Thanks- Friends Monica Sex and the City (:35) Sex and (:10) Seinfeld (:40) Seinfeld
TBS Loves Raymond giving dinner with keeps a secret Samanth. akes the City A (CC) Girdfriend piques The Doll" A
(CC) 1iends. A from parents. a stand. Jerry's interest. (CC)
:00) Rides Overhaulln' "Nova-Caine" Surprise. Overhaulln' "Clean LeMans" Hair- Adam Carolla Project "Fast Times
TLC Working on a Ca- (CC) dresser's car needs repair. (CC) at Carolla High" (N)
maro.
(00) PGA Golf PGA Grand Slam of Golf First Round. From Poipu Bay Golf Course in Las Vegas The Kashmir Sapphire,
TNT Kauai, Hawaii. (Live) (CC) a priceless gemstone on loan and
display at the Montecito.
S Home for imagl- Grim Adven- Codename: Kids Ed, Edd n Eddy Cartoon Car- Code Lyoko Yu-Gi-Ohl G/X
TOON nary Friends tures Next Door toons "Just inTime"
TV5 (:00) Tout le monde en parole Soda TV5 Le Journal
T C (6:00) Weatherr Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
'IN PM Edition (CC) "Weather Dog" (CC)
(:00)Piel de Contra Viento y Marea La Esposa Virgen Casos de la Vida Real: Edlci6n
UNIV Otono Mujeres Especial
valientes,.
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order: Criminal Intent A Law & Order: Criminal Intent A Law & Order: Criminal Intent A re-
USA dercal Vic- musician romantically linked to a church's campaign to canonize a searcher is found poisoned in a
tiUt psychologist is murdered. (CC) saint leads to murder. A (CC) swimming pool. n (CC)
VH1 Hollywood making Sona- I Love the Holidays A Driven "Shakira" Shakira. A
N (. 0)Ameidca's De VInci's Inquest Da Vinci investi- Da Vincl's Inquest "Fantasy"A sex- WGN News at Nine A (CC)
WGN Funiet Ho gatesa baby's death brought on by trade worker is found tied up and
______ Videos A (CC) brain injury. (CC) locked in a trunk. (CC) ________
Everybody Glmore Gils Christopher reap- Supernatural Tortured spirits cause WB11 News at Ten With Kalty
WPIX Loves Raymond pears with an offer to make up for the brothers to go insane, tuming Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchlano
"No Faf (CC) ost time.(N) A (CC) Dean against Sam. (N) A &Mr. G (CC)
,eopardyI (N) America's Next Top Model "The America's Next Top Model A mod- Dr. Phil A woman says her sex lif'
WSBK (CC Gid Whose Boyfriend Is Cheating on el talks about her competitors be- is boring. (N)
Her" A (CC) hind their backs. A (CC)

(5:45 *** The Sopranos "Long Term Parking" Rome "Kalends of February" Pullo Curb Your En- '(:35 George
HBO-E BIG FlS(2003)Johnny Sack makes Tony a deal. and Vorenus are rewarded. A (CC) thuslasm Larry arin: Life Is
A 'PG-13 (CC (CC) (C) _______makes a friend. Worth Losing
(5:30)****s **s VANITY FAIR (2004, Drama) ReeseWitherspoon, EileenAtkins Jim Broadbent A RealSports A
HBO-P MYSTIC RIVER woman climbs the social ladder in 19th-century England. A 'PG-13' (CC) (CC)
(2003) 'R' (CC)


(:00) * EMPIRE FALLS (2005, (:45) *** BIG FISH (2003, Drama) Ewan McGregor, Albert Finney, Billy Crudup. A young
HBO-W Drama) (Part 2 of 2) Ed Harris, He- man investigates his father's tall tales. A 'PG-13' (CC)
en Hunt. A 'NR'(CC)
(:15) *** INTOLERABLE CRUELTY (2003) * ETERNAL SUNSHINE OF THE SPOTLESS MIND (2004, Ro-
HBO-S George Ck ney. A successful attomey matches wits mance-Comedy) Jim Carrey, Kate Winslet, Kirsten Dunst. A couple erase
with a gold digger. 'PG-13' (CC) the memories o their relationship. A 'R' (CC)
MAX (5:35) A*** ** KISS THE GIRLS (1997, Suspense) Morgan Freeman, AshleyJudd, *** OCEAN'S TWELVE (2004,
MAX-E FAC10/FF Cary Elwes. An escaped victim and a forensic expert trail a killer. A 'R' Comedy-Drama) George Clooney,
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S A 3 S


WOOL)


PAGE 10, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2005


THE TRIBUNE










Thousands turn out to enjoy Jollification


* THOUSANDS of people
turned out to the anuual
Jollification at the weekend.
Visitors were able to enjoy
foods from around the world,
free samples from drinks
manufacturers and browsing
various craft and bric-a-brac
stalls, as well as some
Bahamian entertainment in
the shape of a steel band
and a junkanoo parade
(Photos: Sid McLean/
Tribune staff)


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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2005, PAGE 11


TME TRIBUNE


pdr





THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2005


U U I E i n ~ ~ 1Aid


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SECTION






business@tribunemedia.net Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


FamGuard set




to reduce its




dividend rate


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
FamGuard Corpora-
tion is planning to
gradually reduce
the amount of divi-
dends it distributes
to shareholders from 60-80 per
cent of annual profits to no less
than 40 per cent, in a bid to
retain more capital to support
future growth, The Tribune has
learned.
The decision to gradually
lower the percentage of profits
paid out as dividends came as
the company, which is the par-
ent of life and health insurer,
Family Guardian, sought to gain
shareholder approval for the
consummation of its alliance
with Barbados-based financial
services giant, Sagicor, a move
the Bahamian firm believes will
"take it to another level".


Sagicor deal to take company 'to
another level', with Barbados firm
paying 42.5% premium to BISX
price and injecting over $8m


Sagicor will be taking a 20 per
cent stake in FamGuard by pur-
chasing two million shares in
the latter at a price of $6.20 per
share, valuing the gross invest-
ment by the Barbadian compa-
ny to $12.4 million.
"Simultaneously" with that,
FamGuard is launching a Ten-
der Offer to repurchase 625,000
shares from its existing share-
holders, offering the same price
of $6.20 per share. It will have
to spend $3.875 million to buy
back the stock at that price.
Once both transactions are


* MINISTER JAMES SMITH


completed by the scheduled
close of the end of December
2005, the net capital injection
into FamGuard will be $8.525
million. Ordinary shares issued
and outstanding will have
increased from 8.625 million
shares to 10 million.
Investment proceeds from the
Sagicor purchase will be used
for "general corporate purpos-
es", sources told The Tribune,
which will include the develop-
ment of pension plan and other
products, and expansion of the
existing life and health insur-
ance business.
The $6.20 purchase price in
both the Sagicor deal and the
Tender Offer represents a 42.5
per cent premium to Fam-
Guard's $4.35 closing price on
the Bahamas International
Securities Exchange (BISX) last
night.
SOne analyst told The Tribune
of the premium: "I don't know
where the value is. I don't see it.
It's nice and stable, but I don't
see anything that jumps out at
me to create a 42.5 per cent pre-
mium."
Patricia Hermanns, Family
Guardian's president, yesterday
told The Tribune that both her
company and Sagicor had per-
formed a valuation on Fam-
Guard, and came up with the
$6.20 price "based on that".
She pointed out that because
BISX was a relatively thin mar-
ket, with liquidity "not as big
as we'd like, it to be", the true


SEE page 3B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BAHAMIAN businesses are
concerned about the increased
cost burden that could be
imposed on them if the Gov-
ernment adopts recommenda-
tions that would make it manda-
tory for companies to establish
pension schemes for their work-
ers, in a bid to ease a ticking
social "timebomb".
Although not made official
yet, The Tribune can confirm
that the Social Security Reform
Commission has recommended
in its report on reforming the
National Insurance Board
(NIB) that company pension
plans be made mandatory to
solve the problem that Bahami-
ans, as individuals, are not sav-
ing enough for their retirement.
If enacted, this would force
Bahamian businesses to estab-


lish defined benefit or defined
contribution plans for their
workers. Defined benefit plan
payouts to retirees are calculat-
ed on a formula involving years
of service and final salary, while
defined contribution plans
involve employers matching
employee contributions up to 5
per cent of their annual salary.
President
Philip Simon, the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce's presi-
dent, told The Tribune that the
costs involved in company pen-
sion schemes were "a concern"
for the business community that
was raised with the Commis-
sion at a luncheon earlier this


year.
"The intention is great, but
there has to be a middle ground
in terms of the programme. We
don't know what the costs will
be. That was the thing," Mr
Simon said.
He added that a middle
ground needed to be reached,
both with respect to the busi-
ness community and the indi-
viduals affected.
However, some Bahamian
businessmen fear the Commis-
sion's recommendation will
effectively act as another tax on
the private sector, raising the
cost of doing business and forc-

SEE page 5B


Hilton's financial backer sees


its solvency deficiency grow


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Canadian pension fund that is the main
financial backer for Nassau's British Colonial
Hilton and the still-closed South Ocean Golf &
Beach resorts has $307.308 million solvency
deficiency measured in Canadian dollars,
according to an actuarial valuation of the plan at
December 31, 2004.
A report seen by The Tribune, which was
prepared for the Financial Services Commis-
sion of Ontario, showed that the solvency defi-
ciency facing the Canadian Commercial Work-
ers Industry Pension Plan (CCWIPP) had
increased from just under $259.5 million in 2003
to more than $307 million a year later, a rise of
almost f 0' million.
This means that if it were wound up today,


CCWIPP would not have enough assets to cov-
er its $1.673 billion in liabilities and obligations
to current plan members and existing retirees,
most of whom are low income workers who
work in the Canadian food store industry.
In addition, CCWIPP has $41 million worth of
real estate investments "that are in default of
their principal and/or interest payments". These
investments are secured and the fund is carrying
out whatever procedures it considers to realise
its value on its security and recover its invest-
ment".
The British Colonial Hilton and South Ocean
are among CCWIPP's real estate investments,
although the report does not mention whether
they are included in the $41 million worth of
defaults.
SEE page 5B


Bahamas can be


'firmer' with OECD


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas can take a
little more firmer" line against
the Organisation for Economic
Co-Operation and Develop-
ment's (OECD) 'harmful tax
practices' initiative following
last week's Melbourne meeting,
a government minister told The
Tribune yesterday.


Hong Kong's double
tax position blows
'one size fits all'
TIEA apart
James Smith, minister of state
for finance, said OECD mem-


SEE page 2B


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I


I _


----- - I I


IE

Business []r


!r!








PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2005


THE TRIBUI


Reserves in rude health




but land policy needed


An
Extraordinary General Meeting
of the Shareholders of record
as of November 18,2005
of

FAMGUARD
CORPORATION
LIMITED

will be held in the
Corporate Office Board Room
of Family Guardian Insurance Co. Ltd.
Corner of East Bay & Shirley Streets
& Village Road
at 4:00 p.m.
on Friday,
December 2,2005.


oday, I wish to
address two topics
that have been giv-
7. amount of press
coverage in recent days foreign
reserves and foreign direct
investment.
Foreign Reserves
It was very interesting to see
the various references to the fact
that our foreign reserves are in
excess of $800 million and the
many interpretations of what it
actually meant. The level of for-
eign reserves is a measure that I
have followed very closely over
the years, and I am indeed
extremely pleased to see that
they are healthy and on a very
positive trend.
Recently, the Minister of State
for Finance, Senator James
Smith, indicated that the size of
the Bahamian economy (Gross
Domestic Product or GDP) is
now about $6 billion. At $800
million, our level of foreign
reserves is currently about 13
per cent of GDP which, quite
frankly, is quite impressive.
However, in all our euphoria, I
think it is important that the dif-
ference between gross and net
foreign reserves is clearly
explained.
While the country does have
$800 million in foreign currency
deposits and bonds, we did bor-
row some US$ 200 million just
after the September 11 terror
attacks. This means that 25 per
cent of our foreign reserves are
borrowed.
Therefore, deducting the bor-
rowed reserves from the total
reserves gives us a net foreign
reserve position of $600 million
or 10 per cent of GDP. Howev-
er, this level of foreign reserves
is still an impressive and historic
accomplishment.


Why are our foreign reserves
so buoyant?
The growth in our net foreign
reserve position has benefited
from the very large investment
inflows from many of the pro-
jects that have been announced.
The Minister of Financial Ser-
vices, Allyson Maynard-Gibson,
recently announced that over
$1.3 billion has already been
spent on progressing projects
during the past three years. This
is a rate of some $400 million
plus per year.
Secondly, until a few months
ago, the Central Bank had
imposed a moratorium on new
bank lending beyond certain
pre-established limits. The net
effect of this was that banks
became awash in cash and their
liquidity (surplus cash available
for lending) grew to record lev-
els. Now that the moratorium
has been lifted, liquidity in the
banking system is being quickly
run down as banks are aggres-
sively lending once again mort-
gages, consumer loans ... you
name it.
The net effect of all this is that
the new credit that is being
extended will result in signifi-
cant spending in the US, which
will create renewed demand for
foreign exchange. Nonetheless,
net reserves at the $600 million
level will be more than adequate
to cover demand.
Foreign Direct Investment
(FDI)
In addition to the $1.3 billion
already spent, we have been told
that there is some $4.5 billion
already approved and to be
invested during the next several
years. If this happens over a five-
year period, it should create
quite a robust economy for the
country during that period.
The Bahamas is most unique


However, my major concern is
the rapidly escalating cost of
land in recent years, and the faot
that the prospect of land owner-
ship will become a fading dream
for progressively more Bahafmli-
ans if left unabated.
Need for a Land Policy
Now that we are in the 'man-
ifesto drafting' mode, I challenge
all political parties to clearly
articulate their land policy,-
should they become elected.
Home ownership must remain
an achievable objective for .tle
masses. Until next week...
NB: Larry R. Gibson, a
Chartered Financial Analys -s
vice-president pensions, Col. -
nial Pensions Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owined
subsidiary of Colonial Group
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insuraace anid
is a major shareholder of Secu-
rity & General Insurance Com-
pany in the Bahamas. Y"
The views expressed a~etiose
of the author and do hno neehs-
sadly represent those of Colo-
nial Group International or any
of its subsidiary and/orbffili-
ated companies. Please direct
any questions or comments to
rlgibson@atlantichouse.com.fs


FROM page 1B


bers such as Hong Kong and
Singapore *had effectively
destroyed the "one size fits all
approach" to tax information
exchange by insisting that "dou-
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ble tax treaties serve similar pur-
poses to Tax Information
Exchange Agreements"
(TIEAs).
The Tribune understands that
the Bahamas was represented
at the OECD Global Forum
meeting in Melbourne by
Rowena Bethel, the Ministry of
Finance's legal adviser, and on
official from the Attorney Gen-
eral's Office.
Mr Smith said briefings from
officials who attended the meet-
ing had provided him with infor-
mation that OECD members
who had previously not bought
into the 'harmful tax practices'
process had attended in Mel-
bourne, but told the forum they
would not enter into any net-
work of TIEAs, blowing away
the 'level playing field condi-


tion'.
Mr Smith said: "The OECD
countries that were not origi-
nally on board, like Hong Kong,
Singapore and others, came in
and told them they would not
enter into a series of TIEAs -
that's out of the question -
because of the double taxation
treaties which they've done, and
have a similar effect."
As a result, Mr Smith said the
pressure on the Bahamas had
"abated somewhat" and it could
adopt a position towards the
OECD and its initiative "with a
little more firmness".
"We don't have to be more
Catholic than the Pope, as we
might have been in the initial
reaction," Mr Smith added.
The minister said the resis-
tance mounted by Hong Kong


NOTICE OF VACANCY

FOR

DIRECTOR OF CITY MANAGEMENT

A vacancy exists at The Grand Bahama Port
Authority, Limited for one DIRECTOR OF CITY
MANAGEMENT in the City Management
Department.

Applicants must have the following

Bachelor of Science in Engineering
Minimum of fifteen (15) years relevant engineering
experience
Minimum of ten (10) years experience supervision multi
discipline technical teams including architectural, civil,
structural, mechanical, electrical, town planning,
environmental and maintenance professionals.
Strong administrative background

Professional Registration a plus

The individual will be responsible for the
management of the Building and Development
Services Department, including the following
functional groups:

Town Planning and Capital Projects
Building Code Compliance
Environmental Compliance
Geographical Information Systems (GIS)
Property Maintenance
City (Maintenance) Management

Risumes with supporting documentation should
be submitted to:

The Personnel Department
The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited
P.O. Box F-42666
Freeport, Grand Bahama

on or before November 30th, 2005


Legal Notice


NOTICE

VICTORY WORLDWIDE LIMITED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) VICTORY WORLDWIDE LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on November
18th, 2005 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse Trust Ltd.,
Rue de Lausanne 17 bis, 1211 Geneva 70, Switzerland.
Dated this 22nd day of November, A.D. 2005.


et(i redt TSuit' e il .
Liquidator


in that it has a tremendous
inventory of Crown Lands,
which form the basis of most of
these investment projects. Suc-
cessive Governments have given
vast amounts of Crown Land to
investors in order to attract new
investment. Whenever the land
grant element is remotely ques-
tioned, we are quickly reminded
that governments all over the
world give massive tax incen-
tives for new and sustainable
investment.
Long ago, most of the land
was granted on 99-year leases,
which meant that the land
remained part of our national
heritage. Today, more and more
land is being granted 'fee sim-
ple', which means it is being per-
manently and irrevocably con-
verted to private foreign own-
ership. More and more, many of
these projects seem to be a 'land
play' where land is being carved
into hundreds of 'million dollar'
lots to be sold off to the highest
international bidder.
The fact that we have so much
Crown Land in inventory makes
the 'giveaways' of the past 10
years relatively insignificant in
the overall scheme of things, giv-
en the overall positive impact
on the economy.


and Singapore had, shown tihe
OECD that it would nrotbe'able
to bully its way towards itsigoals.
He added that :the:Bahamas
simply had to maintain its orig-
inal stance, outlined in the
March 2002 commitment letter,
and state that the 'level playing
field' on tax information
exchange, transparency and
information on beneficial own-
ers had not been achieved yet. It
also had to keep talking to the
OECD.
Mr Smith repeated the line
reiterated by the Bahamian lfri-
vate sector, which was that the
Bahamas must seek to gain rec-
iprocal benefits from entering
into a TIEA, gaining some tr4de
or economic advantage in
return.
This had been achieved with
the US TIEA through the Cid-
vention Tax treaty, but Mr
Smith yesterday pointed out
that the Bahamas did not have
such strong economic relations
with other OECD members
also wanting TIEAs. As a result,
it was difficult to see what they
could give the Bahamas in
return.' ;
He added that the Global
Forum's survey had shown that
many OECD members hail
"deficiencies" in areas they were
supposed to remedy to create a
'level playing field'.
The report had shown that8Qp
per cent of OECD members still
had bearer shares, which the
Bahamas and other interna-
tional financial centres had ab9l-
ished. .
"For all offshore centres, thl6y
are finally now understanding
the different make-ups of dc-
ferent economies, their del,-
ciencies, and recognising the ini-
tiative's application was a t
uneven and a bit discriminatory
against offshore financial cen-
tres," Mr Smith said. 1
The United Nations (UN)
had also taken up the 'harm il
tax practices' issue, and gy
"shifting the battleground"
there, Mr Smith said the
Bahamas and other nations
hoped to "get a fairer shak "
from a process more inclsusie
than the OECD's. .
He added that the OECD
meeting's outcome had al~g
helped the committee working
on recommendations ft'r
streamlining the Bahamian
financial services industry's reg-
ulatory regime.
The committee had bedn
attempting to balance the need
to make the regime mote
friendly for business develTp-
ment with maintaining intenra-
tional standards, which had
been a "moving goal post". ',
Mr Smith said the conl dit-
tee's work was continuing, and
"they are pretty much coming to
the point where they can rec-
ommend a particular structure".


II I IIBUSINESSn


.. . ...... ........








THE TRIBUNE


Bahamas Super-
markets has seen
its sales increase
by 10.8 per cent
during the first
quarter of its 2006 fiscal year,
Which ended on September 19.
A Addressing the company's
ahfnual general meeting
(AGM), newly-appointed man-
aging director Ken Burns said
the company, which is 75 per
cent majority owned by US
retailer Winn-Dixie, planned to
implement new systems
i'firoughout the company to
*ifprove customer service and
operating efficiency.
"Construction of the new
..Cable Beach supermarket is
'well underway, renovation of
'our Winn-Dixie store in down-
town Freeport is in progress and
the remodelling of the Lyford
Cay supermarket is complete,"
Mr Burns said.
"We also plan to implement
nfew systems in our stores, dis-
tiibution centre and offices to
*improve customer service and
operating efficiency."
"Separately, The Tribune
iinderstands that no questions
were asked by shareholders at
the AGM regarding the sudden
and mysterious departure of
former managing director,
Bruce Souder.
'It is also understood that Mr
.Burns said Bahamas Super-
'inarkets' stores, nine of which


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2005, PAGE 3B


* BAHAMAS Supermarkets re-elected its Board of Directors last week at the Annual General
Meeting. From L to R: Mark Sellers, resident; Kenneth Burns, executive vice-president and man-
aging director; Bryan C. S. Knowles, vice-president, cheif financial and administrative officer and
treasurer;, Dr Keva M. Bethel, director and member of scholarship committee; Hugh G. Sands, direc-
tor and member of scholarship committee; Peter Lynch, chairman of the Board of Bahamas
Supermarkets and president and chief executive of Winn Dixie Stores; Barry J. Rassin, director and
member of scholarship committee; and L. B. Johnson (not pictured), director and member of the
scholarship committee.
(Photo by Letitia Henderson for DP&A)


operate under the City Markets
brand and three under Winn-
Dixie, need to be maintained
on a more consistent basis, with
many facilities needing
improvement.
However, Mr Burns told the
AGM that the improvement in
sales during the 2006 first quar-
ter was due to competitive pric-
ing and "continued investment
in promotions".
He added: "Bahamas Super-
markets concluded our fiscal


year 2004-2005 with excellent
results. Thanks to our dedicated
associates, loyal customers and
supportive shareholders,
Bahamas Supermarkets expe-
rienced an increase in sales of
7.8 per cent over the previous
year. Net earnings were $8.1
million, or $1.77 per share, as
compared to $6.5 million, or
$1.42 per share last year repre-
senting an increase of 24.6 per
cent."
In its annual report released


earlier this month, Bahamas
Supermarkets reported some
$132 million in gross sales, dAp
nearly $10 million from the pre-
vious year.
"I am impressed with the
dedication and tenure of many
of our associates and excited
about the future with Bahamas
Supermarkets," Mr Burns told
shareholders.
"With your continued sup-
port, we look forward to an
even better 2006," he added.


FamGuard set to reduce its dividend rate


FROM page 1B

.value of many listed Bahamian
stocks was "not reflected in the
trading price, on both the high
side or the low side".
Ms Hermanns added that
FamGuard's willingness to buy
back stock at $6.20 "reflects
.confidence" in the company's
future, and indicates to the mar-
ket that its true value is higher
than the BISX price.
.,The Tender Offer will be
.filled from the "bottom up",
-with the first 500 shares offered


accepted by the company. If
shareholders offer to sell any
more, this will be worked out
on a "pro rata basis".
Ms Hermanns acknowledged
that to sustain its level of earn-
ings per share (EPS), given the
increase in issued shares, Fam-
Guard's profits would have to
increase.
FamGuard generated around
$040-$041 in EPS for fiscal 2004,
and Ms Hermanns pointed out
that the $3.9 million in net
income generated during the
first nine months of fiscal 2005
were almost as much as that


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that KEVIN BRUTUS, TREASURE CAY,
,ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
-Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizenn of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
'reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
'should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 15TH day of NOVEMER, 2005 to
fhe Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
-Ni- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




I NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that STEVEN MICHAEL WILLIAMS OF#158
CLIVE AVENUE, P.O. BOX F-42398, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
'Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
-'"naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
* signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 22ND
day of NOVEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
'and Citizenship, P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.
%







W NoiN& BAY


REAL ESTATE SALES
REPRESENTATIVE


The Abaco Club on Winding Bay, a spectacular 520 acre
International Members Golf & Sporting Estate on Abaco,
'is seeking a senior-level REAL ESTATE SALES
REPRESENTATIVE. Candidates must have a minimum
of 5 years experience in luxury market sales. Real Estate
license is preferred. Successful candidate must have
exceptional communication skills, both verbal and written.
Must be personable, professional and willing to commute
or relocate to Abaco. The Abaco Club's estate lots range
from $875,000 to more then $4 million. Please email cover
letter and resume to info@theabacoclub.com or fax to 242-
367-2930, Attn: Sales & Marketing.


produced in the 2004 full year.
She said: "We are feeling very
comfortable with a 10 million
share base. We should be in the
ball park of our existing EPS.

Excellent

"We have had an excellent
year this year. The business is
doing really well on all product
lines. We see the Sagicor deal as
being able to take it to another
level.
"We're quite excited about it
and looking forward to the ben-
efits it will bring across the
board, particularly for the poli-
cyholders."


Ms Hermanns said the Sagi-
cor deal would be fully con-
summated by the end of this
year, and early 2006 would be
when the company started to
seek the benefits from the Sagi-
cor alliance.
"Our view is that we'd like
to start developing the benefits
of this alliance as quickly as pos-
sible, without putting a specific
timqframe on it," Mr Hermanns
said.
Technology sharing was like-
ly tq be one of the first benefits,
along with product, and pre-
liminary discussions had already
been held on technology and
systems issues.


* 2,468 sq.ft. office suite.
* In the heart of the Bahamas' financial area.
* Excellent visitor and local pedestrial traffic.
* Freatures a full standby generator.
* Dedicated parking facilities.


BUINS


Tradewinds Building
Bay Street, Downtown
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel. 242-393-8618
www.bahamasrealty.bs
www.cbrichardellis.com



BAHAMAS REALTY LTD
COMM ERCIAL


CBRE
CB RICHARD ELLIS
NAVIGATING A NEW WORLD


IF aColina rttd .
gl^ Financial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information As Of:
21 November 2005

52wk-Hi 52wk-Lo w Symbol Previous Close Today s Clos e Change Daily Vol. EPS $ DIV $ PiE Yield
1.10 0.73 Abaco Markets 0.73 0.73 0.00 -0.169 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.25 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 10.25 10.25 0.00 1.456 0.340 7.0 3.32%
7.24 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 7.24 7.24 '-0.00 0.587 0.330 12.3 4.56%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.175 0.010 4.0 1.25%
1.80 1.27 Bahamas Waste 1.27 1.27 0.00 0.112 0.000 11.3 4.72%
1.20 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.10 1.10 0.00 0.066 0.030 16.7 2.73%
9.40 7.05 Cable Bahamas 9.40 9.40 0.00 0.689 0.240 13.6 2.55%
2.20 1.50 Colina Holdings 1.50 1.50 0.00 -0.046 0.000 NM 0.00%
9.17 6.99 Commonwealth Bank 9.11 9.11 0.00 0.791 0.450 11.5 4.94%
2.50 1.15 Doctor's Hospital 2.40 2.40 0.00 0.429 0.000 5.6 0.00%
4.35 4.00 Famguard 4.35 4.35 0.00 0.428 0.240 9.1 5.52%
10.90 9.50 Finco 10.90 10.90 0.00 0.69W 0.510 15.7 4.68%
10.00 7.45 FirstCaribbean 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.696 0.300 13.9 3.80%
9.50 8.39 Focol 9.25 9.25 0.00 0.678 0.600 14.1 5.26%
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 0.022 0.000 52.3 0.00%
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.94 9.94 0.00 0.528 0.405 18.9 4.07%
8.75 8.22 J. S. Johnson 8.75 8.75 0.00 0.526 0.600 10.6 6.40%
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 6.28 6.31 0.03 0.138 0.000 45.3 0.00%
10.0000 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.760 4.9 7.60%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Lo w PE5Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price JVeek Vol EPS $ V PIE Yield
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.75 13.75 11.00 1.768 0.90 7. 6.9
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 WI 7.80%
0.600.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.044 0.000 NM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.33 13.33 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Lo w Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months DIv $ Yield %
1.2593 1.1913 Colina Money Market Fund 1.259334*
2.4766 2.0536 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.4766 *
10.6711 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.6711
2.2754 2.1675 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.275422**
1.1406 1.0755 Colina Bond Fund 1.140599..

BISX ALL SHARE INDE X 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends dvided by closing proe
52wk-Hi Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid G Buying price of CoNna and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colna and fdelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 100
AS AT AUG. 10, 2005/**** AS AT OCT. 31, 2005
AS AT OCT.28.2005/**-ASAT OCT. 31,2005/....ASAT OCT. 31. 2005
[O TRADEOC L: COLINA 242-502-.7010iYFlIDELIT242-6-in.. .III E'


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


SKNOWNAN INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 18th
day of November, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp.
Inc., of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


ANGEL GLOBE VENTURE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution; which commenced on the
29th day of July, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp.
Inc., of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


WYTHEVIILE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
18th day of November, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., of P.O.Box 'N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
.(Liquidator)
,*. *"..-


.-"*








P A G E 4B, T U E D A Y N O V M B E 22 20 5 T H T R B U N B U IN S


GN-294












SUPREME COURT


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00521

In the estate of Martha Nan Barrett aka Martha N.
Barrett, late of Devonshire Way, Palm Beach, Florida,
one of the states in the United States of America,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its
Probate Side by WILLIAM LAWRENCE ROBERTS of
Fox Hill Creek, in the Eastern District of the island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is the Authorized
Attorney in The Bahamas for the Resealing Grant of
Letters of Administration in the above estate granted to
WILLIAM LAWRENCE ROBERTS, by The probate
Division, Circuit Court for Palm Beach County in the
State of Florida on the 7th day of July A.D., 2005..

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00525

In the estate of Peter Vukas, late of Nimishillen Township,
Stark County, Ohio, one of the states in the United States
of America,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas. on. its
Probate Side by ALEXANDER BERKLEY FERGUSON
of The Eastern District on the island of New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-at-Law, is; the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for the Resealing of a Grant of Probate in the
above estate granted to JUDITH ANN GARDNER, by
The probate Court of Stark County on the 26th day of
February A.D., 1993.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00526

In the estate of John Micheal Heskith Bridge, late of
Parkside House, Villiers Street in the Spennymoor in the
County of Durham., DL16 6AL in the United Kingdom,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its
Probate Side by VERONICA DELORES GRANT of 19D
Santa Maria Avenue, in the city of Freeport on the Island
of Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the.
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for the Resealing
Grant of Probate in the above estate granted to ANITA
BRIDGE, by The High Court of Justice The District
Probate Registry at New Castle Upon Tyne in the United
Kingdom on the 24th day of February A.D., 2003..

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00541


In the estate of Betty Ellen Winifred Blanche Fischer,
late of 4 York Street, Penzance in the Sub-District of
Truro, in the Administrative Area of the County of Cornwall,
England, United Kingdom,

deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its
Probate Side by EARL A. CASH of Marlin Drive, in the
Western District on the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-at-Law, is the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for the Resealing of Letters of a Grant of
Representation in the above estate granted to HEATHER


BAKER, ROBERT WOODLEY, HEATHER WOODLEY
and JAMES DUNCAN JACOBY, by The District Probate
Registry at Bristol, England, United Kingdom on the 15th
day of December A.D., 2003.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00543

In the estate of Mae Levy, late of 3634 7th Avenue in
the City of San Diego, in the San Diego County, in the
State of California, one of the states of the United States
of America,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application .will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its
Probate Side by NEVILLE B. WILCHOMBE II of the City
of Freeport, on the Island of Grand Bahama, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-
at-Law, is the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for
the Resealing of Letters of a Grant of Testamentary in
the above estate granted to SANDRA GEIST GODLFARB
and VIVIAN EBERSMAN, by The Superior Court in and
for San Diego County in the State of California on the
24th day of March A.D., 2005.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00552

Whereas Hartis Eugene Pinder of Mareva House,
4 George Street, New Providence, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed
of Power of Attorney for Lesley Adam Schuitemaker, has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
for Letters of Administration with the Will Annexed of the
real and personal estate of Marinus A, Schuitemaker,
later, of the settlement of Cherokee Sound in-the Island
of Abaco, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from
the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00570

Whereas EDWARD DAVIS of Windsor Lane Wesi,
Southern District, New Providence, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the Lawful Widower
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas for Letters of Administration of the real and
personal Estate of PAULETTE VILNEUS DAVIS, late of
Windsor Lane West, Southern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00571

Whereas VANITA RAMSEY of the Southern
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the mother, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for
Letters of Administration of the real and personal estate
of SHANNETTE SABARIACBA ROXBURY, late, of
Millineum Gardens, Southern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005


2005/PRO/npr/00573


Whereas PAULINE ELIZABETH LEWIS of the
City of Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the mother, has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
for Letters of Administration of the real and personal
estate of IVA ELIZABETH MCINTOSH, late, of the City
of Freeport Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from
the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005


2005/PRO/npr/00574

Whereas WILLIAM ALBERT LOWE of Port New
Providence, Eastern District, New Providence, one of.
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the '
Lawful Widower has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas for Letters of Administration of ;'
the real and personal estate of GLORIA CAROLYN
LOWE, late of Port New Providence, Eastern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth -
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the datethereof. 0

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT-i
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00575

In the estate of AGNES LEHMANN, late of 3470 South'-;
West, 57th Place, in the City of Hollywood, in the State'
of Florida, U.S.A.,

deceased.,-;

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application will'
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its,.'
Probate Side by ANGELA MARIA SIMMS of Tuckaway,.
Road, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, is the
Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for the Resealed
Grant of Letters of Administration Single Persorial
Representative in the above estate granted to DEBRA
HOFFMAN, the Personal Representative, by the Circuit
Court in and for Broward County, Florida, U.S.A., on the,
16th day of August, 2005.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT'
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00576

Whereas KIRKWOOD MILLER SEYMOUR of.,
Buen Retiro Subdivision, Eastern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for the Executors,
. has. made application to. the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas for Letters of Administration with the Will
Annexed of the real and personal estate of WINIFRED
MCKENZIE, later, of No.59 of Sausalito Drive, Boynton
Beach, Florida, U.S.A., deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00579

Whereas ARTHUR SELIGMAN of Cable Beach,
Western District, New Providence one of the Islands of-
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed
of Power of Attorney for the Executor, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for'
Letters of Administration with the Will Annexed of the
real and personal estate of GLADYS RUTH SPENCER-
HARTY, late, of Skyline Drive, Western District New :
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date thereof.


. .


Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) 'Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT,
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005,


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2005







T~4E TRBN NOEME 22205 PAG 5B


Business worry



over mandatory



company pension


FROM page iB

ing them to compensate
-through measures such as
downsizing, lay-offs and pass-
ing on price increase to the end
consumer, thus generating infla-
tion. In some cases, it could
push some companies under.
Rick Lowe, operations man-
-ager at Nassai Motor, said the
-Government would be effec-
.tively legislating to force com-
.panies to save for the retire-
-ments of Bahamian workers
-because individuals were not
-taking responsibility for their
,own life savings and financial
-futures.
"People should take respon-
isibility for themselves, their own
.savings, and the cost factors are
significant," Mr Lowe said.
However, Tanya Wright, the
`Chamber of Commerce's presi-
dent who was also a member of
.the Commission, said that while
'mandatory company pensions
:-could increase the cost of doing
,business, companies "can put
.mechanisms in place to recoup
>those additional costs of doing
-business, streamlining adminis-
'trative costs and not necessarily
-reducing salaries".
-VMTsWright said: "From the


So-tcal Security Reform Com-
mission's point of view, you
have to look at whether or not
the NIB is the relevant mecha-
nism to have to provide for
Bahamian employees during
their retirement. The fact is, it's
not. The recommendations
speak directly to that.
"We're looking at a situation
where the future of our work-
force is grim. I certainly think
that the Commission that's
responsible for these recom-
mendations, its foremost objec-
tive is to ensure that in retire-
ment workers of the Bahamas
have a relevant source of
income."
On whether 'mom and pop'
stores would be forced to have
employee pension plans, Mrs
Wright suggested that rather
than be exempted, they could
pool their resources into plans
such as those run by Colina,
Fidelity and SG'Hambros.
The Chamber president
added that making company
pension plans mandatory could
also force some large interna-
tional companies with opera-
tions in the Bahamas to offer
to their Bahamian workers the
same pension benefits as those
offered to their employees in
other countries.


FROM page 1B


But between December 31,
20Q3,4and December 31, 2004,
thetotal value of all CCWIPP's
reaf estate investments had fall-
en from $97.78 million to
$56.028 million in Canadian dol-
lars, the actuarial report showed.
The Financial Services Com-
mission-of-Ontario, in a report
earlier this year, said it had
"special concern" about the
investments made in the British
Colonial Hilton and South
Ocean Golf & Beach Resort.
It :demanded that the fund's
Board of Trustees conduct "a
complete independent due dili-
gencereyiew" of their invest-
ments in the British Colonial
Hilton and South Ocean resorts
to determine, among other
issues, whether all funds'
advanced to- the resorts, since
December 2000 are "recover-
able".
The Commission's report, a
copy of which has been seen by
The Tribune, details that over
an 18-month period between
June 14, 2001, and December
22, 2003, CCWIPP advanced a
total of almost $20 million to
the British Colonial Hilton and
South Ocean resorts.
Over that period some


$11.638 million was sent to
South Ocean's holding compa-
ny, the South Ocean Develop-
ment Corporation, through
Propco 34, the investment vehi-
cle which acts as the 'in' com-
pany for CCWIPP to funnel
funds to that property.
Similarly, some $8.304 million
was channelled to the British
Colonial Hilton through Propco
39, which acts as the 'in' com-
pany for that resort. Lending to
the resorts has continued
through 2004, the report added.
The Commission's examina-
tion of CCWIPP blasted the
pension fund for poor record
keeping and the absence of
financial statements in relation
to companies through which
investments in the British Colo-
nial Hilton and South Ocean
were made.
The regulator was especially
concerned at the absence of
financial statements for two
companies, PRK Holdings, a
Bahamian entity, and RHK
Capital, firms through which the
Propco entities send money to
the Bahamian resorts. This, it
added, made the pension fund
non-compliant with Canadian
regulations.


Legal Notice


NOTICE

DEVON ALGERIA EXPLORATION, LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned
at Sandringham House, 83 Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas, as
sole Liquidator on or before the 2nd day of December, 2005. In
default thereof they will be excluded from the benefit of any
distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 18th day of November, 2005

Lynden Maycock
LIQUIDATOR



Legal Notice


NOTICE

DEVON ENERGY MALAYSIA, LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned
at Sandringham House, 83 Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas, as
sole Liquidator on or before the 2nd day of December, 2005. In
default thereof they will be excluded from the benefit of any
distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 18th day of November, 2005

Lynden Maycock
LIQUIDATOR


2005/PRO/npr/00580

Whereas DUDLEY SINCLAIR COVERLEY of
South Beach Estates, Southern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
the Eeldest Son, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas for Letters of Administration with
the Will Annexed of the real and personal estate of
Mvi RY STEED late, of Soldier Road, Southern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
.l ed by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00581

Whereas LOUIS ALMACE of Ibis Court, Kennedy
Subdivision, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters of
Administration of the real and personal estate of Lottie
Smith-Almace late of Ibis Court, Kennedy Subdivision,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00583

Whereas Althea Johnson of Holmes Rock, on
the Island of Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters of
Administration of the real and personal estate of Uncoln
Johnson late, of Holmes Rock, on the Island of Grand
Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from
the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00584

Whereas Charmaine Williams of McLean's
Town, East End, on the Island of Grand Bahama, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
for Letters of Administration of the real and personal
estate of Dwayne Williams late, of McLean's Town,
East End, on the Island of Grand Bahama, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from
the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00585

In the estate of Edward M. O' Keeffe, late of the Town
of Harrison, Westchester, in the State of New York, USA.,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its
Probate Side by BRUNO ROBERTS FOR THE PRIVATE
TRUST CORPORATON LIMITED, of Old Post House,
Prospect Ridge of the Western District on the Island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is the Authorized
Attorney in The Bahamas for the Resealing of a Grant
of Probate in the above estate granted to CHRISTINE
P O'KEEFEE by The Surrogate's Court of the State of
New York on the 10th day of January A.D. 1966.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00593

Whereas CHARLES ASHBEL PINDER of
Spanish Wells, St. George's Cay, The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
for Letters of Administration of the real and personal
estate of GUINTELLA PiNDER late, of Spanish Wells,
St. George's Cay, The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from
the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00595

Whereas JOANNE MARIE WHYLLY (nee)
STRACHAN of Yamacraw Estates, New Providence,
The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of
the real and personal estate of REGINALD NATHANIEL
WHYLLY late, of Yamacraw Estate, New Providence,
The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00597

In the estate of RONALD WLLIAM SAUNDERS late of
11 Astbury House, Lambeth Road, Lambeth, London,
England, United Kingdom,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its
Probate Side by E. J. MARIA AGEEB, of Cable Beach,
New Providence, The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is the
Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealed Letters of Administration in the above estate
granted to FREDERICK GEORGE SAUNDERS the
administrator, by the High Court of Justice, the District
Probate Registry at Winchester, on the 9th day of May,
2005.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00599

Whereas C.V HOPE STRACHAN of The. Eastern
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters of
Administration of the real and personal estate of PEARLE
WILKINSON late, of Ninth Terrace, Centreville, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005


2005/PRO/npr/00602


In the estate of SAMUEL ROTHMAN, late of 4-535 Rue
Chapel Street, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its
Probate Side by DOLLY P YOUNG, of Nassau East
North, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, is the
Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas, for the Resealed
Grant of Probate in The Bahamas, for the Resealed
Grant of Probate in the above estate granted to HOWARD
STEPHEN ROTHMAN, CORINNE RHODA 1AYLOR
and SIDNEY ROTHMAN the Executors, by the Surrogate
Court of the Judicial District of Ottawa Carleon, Ontario,
Canada on the 5th day of February, 1990

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


21, 22, 23, Nov. 05'


Ef TRIBUNE


NOVEMBER 22, 2005, PAGE 5B




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"Copyrighted Material



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lerom commercial News Providers


. $ Net Profit for the first nine months of the year was $1,018,723 which is a 4.3% increase over the same period in the previous year. Loans increased by 7% over the
: corresponding period last year. Our emphasis is on attracting quality loans with a vigorous focus on the level of delinquencies to ensure that the improved level of
performing loans is maintained. There has also been a 6% increase in the deposit base over the same period. Net Interest Income for the first nine months regis-
tered a 6% increase and Non-Interest Income increased by 13%. Expenses are 9% ahead of the same period last year mainly due to the additional staff costs.


We continue to implement the re-branding initiatives introduced earlier in the year and the centralization of accounting, information technology and operations and
administration is progressing. We expect to have these completed by the year end. Our project of introducing Financial Centres is on track and we expect to com-
mence construction work on the first Centre early next year. Our new product delivery service is already being implemented in some of our branches and training
has been implemented for staff, particularly in the area of customer service. We have also begun to streamline our Western Union business and the first separate
Banking area for these customers has been opened.


We remain confident that we will finish the financial year on a strong note and be well positioned for 2006. The support of our shareholders, customers and staff is
'appreciated as we dedicate ourselves to a continuous improvement strategy for the future,


R. J. Goom
President


FIDELITY BANK BAHAMAS LTD.
Consolidated Balance Sheet (Unaudited)
For the Third Quarter ended 30th September 2005
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)


FIDELITY BANK BAHAMAS LTD.
Consolidated Statement of Changes in Shareholders' Equity (Unaudited)
For the Third Quarter Ended 30th September 2005
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)


3-Sep5 3-Sep4 31-Dec-04


ASSETS
Cash on hand and at banks
Investments
Loans
Fixed assets
Other assets


LIABILITIES
Deposits
Mortgage-backed bonds
Long-term loans
Other liabilities
Minority interest

Preference shares


SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
Share capital
Retained earnings
Revaluation surplus


$ 13,185,196
17,707,800
93,130,862
7,187,385
1,364,785
$ 132,576,028


$ 113,797,342 $ 107,537,599
755,485 755,526
600,000 750,000
932,795 917,382
872,263 831,540
116,957,885 110,792,047
10,000,000 7,000,000
126,957,885 117,792,047


5,000,001 5,000,001
8,712,201 8,037,903
1,705,472 1,746,077
15,417,674 14,783,981
$ 142,375,559 $ 132,576,028


$ 15,689,298
17,613,500
92,715,550
7,079,377
1,385,262
$ 134,482,987


$ 105,186,672
755,543
700,000
2,265,621
842,867
109,750,703
10,000,000
119,750,703


5,000,001
7,996,358
1,735,925
14,732,284
S 134,482,987


FIDELITY BANK BAHAMAS LTD.
Consolidated Statement of Income (Unaudited)
For the Third Quarter Ended 30th September 2005
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)


Income
Interest income
Interest expense
Dividends on preference shares
Net Interest Income

Non-Interest Income
Total Income

Expenses
Salary and staff benefits
General and administrative
Depreciation
Loss on Sale of Fixed Assets
Total Non-Interest expense
Provision for credit losses
Total Expenses

Net income before minority interest
Minority interest
Net income

Weighted average number of
common shares outstanding
Earnings per share
'Dividends per.common share


3 Months Ending
30-Se-05 30-Sep-04

2,694,815 2,472,828
(871,962) (1,081,019)
(187.500) (126,875)
1,635,354 1,264,934


9 Months Ending
30-Sep-05 30-Sep-04


7,687,528
(2,814,541)
(562,500)
4,310.488


7,768,395
(3,322,457)
(380,625)
4,065,313


612,767 614,683 2,119,054 1,871,121
2,248,121 1,879.617 6,429,542 5,936,434


744,665
670,957
166.953
274
1,582,849
(8,940)
1.573,909


389.110 305,708
(10,619) (9,750)
378,490 295.958

16,666,670 16,666,670


2,595,867
2,233,480
357,304

5.186,651
194,772


2,214,405
2,140,724
502,118
274
4,857,521
68,950


5,381,423 4.926,471

1,048,119 1,009,963
(29.395) (33,174)
1,018,723 976,789

16,666,670 16.666,670


Share Capital
Atat I January 2004 S 5,000,001


Fixed asset revaluation
Net Income
Dividends Paid
As at 31 December 2004

As at I January 2005

Fixed asset revaluation
Net Income
Dividends Paid
As at 30 September 2005


Retained
Revaluation Earnins Total
$ 1,776,532 $ 7,530,662 $ 14,307,195


(40,607) 40,607
1,091,756 1,091,756
S(666,667) (666,667)
5,000,001 1,735,925 7,996,358 14,732,284

5,000,001 1,735,925 7,996,358 14,732,284

(30,453) 30,453
1,018,723 1,018,723
S333,33) (333,333
S 5,000,001 S 1,705,472 S 8,712,201 $ 15,417,674


FIDELITY BANK BAHAMAS LTD.
Consolidated Statement of Cash Flow (Unaudited)
For the Third Quarter Ended 30th September 2005
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)


Cash flow from operating activities
Net income (before minority interest)
Adjustments for:
Increase/(Dccrease) in provision for credit losses (net)
Depreciation
Impairment charges
Loss on Sale of fixed assets
Operating income before changes in operating
assets and liabilities
(Increase)/Decrease in loans, net of repayments
Decrease/(Increase) in other assets
Decrease/(Increase) in other liabilities
Increase in deposits, net of withdrawals
Net cash flows used in operating activities

Cash flows used in investing activities
Purchase of government securities
Sale of government securities
Purchase of fixed assets
Sale of fixed assets
Net cash flows used in investing actitivies

Cash flows used in financing activities
Proceeds!(Maturities) from Mortgage-backed bonds
Redemption of Preferred shares
Issuance of Preferred shares
Ordinary dividends paid
Repayment of long-term loans
Net cash flows used in financing aclitivies
Net increase/(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the year
Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the period


30 e-Sp-5 30-Sep4 31-Dec-04

1,048,119 1,009,963 1,136,260


357,304


(17,033)
502,118

272


(199,293)
655,067
9,530
(176)


1,405,422 1,495,320 1,601,388


(6,866,371) 7,538,753
(158,031) 91,939
(1,332,826) (145,726)
8,610,670 (6,541,230)
1,658,864 2,439,056


8,136,323
61,931
609,735
(8,299,378)
2,109,999


(1,786,300) (2,350,000) (2,501,200)
124,100 369,600
(380,858) (112,682) (157,622)
S 3,000 3,449
(2,167,158) (2,335,582) (2,285,773)


(58) (17) -
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(333,333) (500,000) (666,667)
(100,00) (150,000) (200,000)
(433,392) (650,017) 2,133333
(941,685) (546,543) 1,957,559
15,689,298 13.731,739 13,731,739
14,747,613 13,185,196 15,689,298


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19,399,800
99,581,921
7,102,932
1,543,293
$ 142,375,559


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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2005


SECTION



B
Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
MORE than two decades after he made
his mark among the most decorated
sprinters in the University of North Texas,
co-national 100 metre record holder Rudy
Levarity returned to his alma mater over
the weekend.
He was inducted into the 2005 Athletic
Hall of Fame class with four other for-
mer athletes. The induction was held dur-
ing a breakfast ceremony at the Gateway
Center Ballroom.

Greeted
"It was good to meet old friends," said
Levarity, who was greeted by both the
head and assistant coaches who worked
with him when he passed through the
doors of the university from 1979-1982.
During that time, Levarity was labelled
as possibly the "greatest sprinter" ever


to attend North Texas where he still holds
the school records in the 100-meter dash
of 10.18 seconds, the 200 of 20.50 and as a
member of the 800 relay team that ran
1:23.84.
Incidentally, Levarity's century time
has him tied with Andrew Tynes and
Rendward Wells for the Bahamas nation-
al record.
Levarity was also a member of the 1981
400m relay team that posted 39.84, the
second-best time in school history. He
was a two-year letterman from 1980-81
and was the second North Texas men's
track and field athlete to compete at the
NCAA Championships.
The ceremony, according to Levarity,
was short and sweet. All five honourees or
their designees, all spoke during the cer-
emony. North Texas president Dr. Norval
Pohl and athletic director Rick Villarreal
addressed the audience.
Joining Levarity in the 2005 induction
class were soccer player Krista Davey and
football players Burkley Harkless, Charles


Shepard and Brian Waters. They we 1all
presented with a plaque and a ring.
"It brought back many memories,"
Levarity recalled. "They put down a-new
track, which we didn't have when I-was
there, so we never got to compete ,at
home."

Strong
But Levarity said from what he's seen
and heard since his departure, the athlet-
ic programme at North Texas is "just as
strong."
Levarity was accompanied to North
Texas for the induction by his wife, Lana;
son, Rudy Jr.; sister, Ingrid; sister-in-law,
Laverne; father-in-law Nolan; Clyde
Rashad from Esso on Village and Wulff
Road; Dianne Miller from the Bahamas
Olympic Association and Greg Rolle from
the Ministry of Tourism Sports Depart-
ment.
They returned home on Sunday.


II


* BOXING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
SHERMAN 'the Tank'
Williams will be back in the
ring on Saturday, December 3
when he takes on Levin
Castillo for the vacant World
Boxing Council's Continen-
tal Caribbean title.
The fight will be the co-
main event of the card that
features Stevie Johnson
against Andre Eason at the
St. Petersburg Coliseum in St.
Petersburg, Florida.
Williams, fighting under the
management of Jim Ryder
and the Silver Hawk Promo-
tions, will take a 26-10 win-
loss record into the ring
against Castillo, a native of
Ecuador, who is fighting ou'
of Connecticut with a 12-3
record.
"I'm really looking forward
to this fight," said Williams, in
an interview with The Tri-
bune from his residence in
Fort Pierce on Monday.
"I hope to take the fight to
him early and eventually pull
off the victory.
"I know he's a tough guy,
but he hasn't fought a fighter
like Sherman Williams
before."
This will be Williams' third
fight of the year, having split


his previous two encounters.
However, this is just his sec-
ond under his new manage-
ment. He has also returned
to his old trainer Buddy
McGrit.

Confident
As a result of what's going
on in his camp, Williams said
he's confident that he will
prevail next month.
"I've been having some
very good training sessions
with Buddy McGrit," he stat-


ed. "It's good to be back
training with some world class
fighters again."
Having won the FEDE-
CARIBE title last year,
Williams said if he wins this
time as well, it will help to
propel him into the top 20
rankings in the WBC.
But Williams said he still
wants to come home and
have a big fight in the
Bahamas. He said, however,
there are too many logistics
preventing his management
team from securing a


possible fight.
In the meantime, Williams
said he will continue to pre-
pare for any and every oppor-
tunity that comes his way in
the United States or in
Europe.

Victory
His last fight was in Europe
where he lost a split decision,
which he dubbed a "home-
town decision." Williams,
however, opened up with a
victory in his first fight.


And, as it would appear
that this will probably be the
last fight that he will have for
the year, Williams said he
would like nothing better
than to "end it on a winning
note."
While the vacant title is
high on his agenda, Williams
said he's hoping to use this
as a "stepping stone" for big-
ger and better things to come
next year.
As for the upcoming fight
against Castillo, Williams
said: "This is a good oppor-


tunity for me to win another
title, so I'm going to be reapy,
"If I can win this figtlii
think it will give me-th^
incentive to get ready for inext
year. Me and my promotion-
al team have a lot of things in
store for me. I just have to be
ready." .
Williams said he will con-
tinue to work hard with
McGrit because he wants to
make sure that he doesn't let
an opportunity to climb up
the ladder slip away from
him.


is



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B A H A M I A N


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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2005


Unique exhibition raises





$17,000 for Cancer Society



Silent auction for THERE were 30 models whose
forms were used to make plaster sculp-
dures of the female torso.
decorated busts Each bust was then given to an artist
w.h..u dew iL t]n d.a tpU i ..it in


w o was encouraged to aecorae u m
their own uiniquie style.


* By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Tribune Feature Editor
JOINING the fight to help
empower women against the
life altering disease of breast
cancer, Kate Law and Susan
Katz-Lightbourn raised more
than $17,000 for the Cancer
Society of the Bahamas' Car-
ing Centre, as they hosted a
unique exhibition and silent
auction that featured the dec-
orated busts of some 30
women of all ages, some
breast cancer survivors, some
having had mastectomies, at
Government House last week.
According to Sue, the
evening was an incredible suc-
cess and those in attendance
were wowed by the exhibition.
"I think it was just seeing
the pieces together in one
room. All the artists did an
incredible job with their
pieces, I think people didn't
know what to expect when
they walked in. I've gotten
great feedback, people have
been calling all morning about
the show. We made an incred-
ibly amount of money for the
Cancer Society"
Out of the 36 busts that
were available, only five or six
of them remain unsold. The
busts are however, expected
to be donated to the Cancer
Society's Caring Centre.

Experiences
Also on hand at the exhibi-
tion was Paula Roberts, a 27-
year breast cancer survivor.
She addressed the gathering
about her experiences and
about the inner strength need-
ed to emerge as a whole per-
son following a diagnosis and
the treatment of breast can-
cer. Judy Ward-Carter, presi-
dent of the Cancer Society,
said the Caring Centre, which
is expected to benefit directly
from the proceeds of the auc-
tion, told exhibition goers that
the centre stands as a home
away from home for women
from the Family Islands who
need to travel to Nassau for
treatment after a cancer diag-
nosis.
Many of these women, she
said, might not otherwise have
a place to stay. Also on hand
to market the event was gov-
ernor general Dame Ivy
Dumont.
Said Sue: "All in all we did a
great job, for the first time
around it was really well put
together. I think people


walked out with a better
understanding of the impor-
tance of self evaluation for
breast cancer and how it is
important to get regular test-
ing and that it is treatable if
caught in time, and to be dili-
gent and go to the doctor for
regular testing."

Models
In an earlier interview, the
women explained that they
had 30 models whose forms
were used to make plaster
sculptures of the female torso.
Each bust was then given to
an artist who was encouraged
to decorate it in their own
unique style. The busts would
then be used to educate the
community about the impor-


tance of regular screening, self it is associated with the female
examinations and testing, and form.
to challenge the modern day
thinking of sexuality, and how SEE page two


Gabriel's crowning glory








PAGE20,TUEDAY3NOVMBE 22 200 THWTRBUN


Silent auction for


unique exhibition


FROM page one

According to Sue, the
idea for the exhibition came
when her husband saw a
similar show that had been
done to raise awareness for
breast cancer by a group in
the United States.
He thought the concept,
body sculpting, would be
one that his wife would
enjoy working with and also
realised that it was an
important message: "I
thought it was a fantastic
idea to be done in the
Bahamas, to educate the
community about the one of
the biggest health threats
against women," she said,
once he brought it to her
attention.
"People don't know a
lot about breast cancer,
but everyone knows some-
one who has had breast can-
cer.
"Bahamian woman are
not getting regular mam-
mograms, they don't do reg-
ular self examinations and
they often find out they
have this disease when it
has already progressed to a
dangerous level," she said.
Passionate about educat-
ing both women and men
about breast cancer, Kate,
in a previous discussion with
The Tribune, said she want-


ed the exhibition to get
the public to think of the
female form beyond the tra-
ditional role of sex object,
and to see it as a piece of
art.
The sculptures, she felt,
would resonate even more
intensely with the viewer
because they are three
dimensional, and viewers
would be able to touch the
pieces and feel the various
textures that were used to
create the work.

Planning
With the success of the
event, the women are
already planning a second
one for next year. They are
also considering a slightly
different concept for the
exhibition.
"It's important to make
women feel less afraid, and
to emphasize that early
detection is critical to suc-
cessful care and recovery.
It's important that women
are made aware of the need
for self examination, to
know what a normal breast
feels like.
"Sure you feel a bit ner-
vous standing in the show-
ing feeling your breast, but
it's a curable cancer once
it's found in the early
stages," said Kate.


Miss Teen Bahamas contestants are all smiles


* FROM LEFT: Miss Teen Bahamas contestants Britney Gray; Ashanique Anderson,
Tessah Munroe; Ashanteh Bain; and winner Gabriel Cash.
(Photo: Felipi Major/Tribune stf)


----------- ---


...J


PAGE 2C, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


...............-- -


e
I









HALT


Dr Bethel: 'all is


not lost'


in fight


against diabetes


a By ZANDRA THOMPSON
T he Ministry of
Health has joined
forces with the
rest of the world
for the seventh
.onsecutive year to raise public
i'tireness of diabetes, a global
1iublic health problem, Dr Mar-
'cus Bethel, Minister of Health
and Environmental Services,
said Wednesday.
Dr Bethel was addressing the
opening ceremony of the Min-
istry of Health's World Dia-
betes Day Health Expo 2005,
commemorating World Dia-
betes Day at the Town Centre
Mall. The expo was held under
the theme, "Put Feet First, Pre-
vent Amputation".
"World Diabetes Day is a
tool to raise public conscious-
ness. Each year, on November
14, people focus on diabetes,"
Dr Bethel said.
Addressing Bahamian
SwQomen, Dr Bethel said, "It is
not wise to buy smaller shoe
sizes. Your feet need to be
-comfortable, buy the right shoe
'size to avoid complications lat-
er on."
The Minister noted that
worldwide foot problems are
the most common cause of
'admission to hospital for peo-
ple with diabetes.
"In the Bahamas, we have a
-diabetic population of approx-
-imately 30,000, and it has been
established that about 20 per
.cent of the diabetes mellitus
.admissions to hospital are pri-
marily due to complications of
the foot," said Dr Bethel.
S"Kidney failure, heart dis-
'ease and blindness are associ-
ated with the multi-system
complications of diabetes mel-
litus, but foot ulceration and
amputation takes the greatest
toll on a person's life physical-
ly and economically.
"It is estimated that approx-
imately 40 per cent to 70 per
cent of all lower extremity
amputations are related to dia-
betes," said Dr Bethel.
According to the Interna-
tional Diabetes Federation,
diabetes currently affects more


than 194 million people uni-
versally and the figure is
expected to reach 333 million
by 2025, with the massive bur-
den falling on developing coun-
tries.
"Even thoughtthese statistics
sound alarming, all is not lost,"
he said.
Bahamians must adapt new
strategies, including preven-
tion, well organised foot care
teams, treatment of foot ulcers,
close monitoring and educa-
tion of people with diabetes.
"We can also stave off type
II diabetes if we are seriously
prepared to watch our diets,
eat healthy and exercise, have
good diabetes control and be
well informed about self-care,"
said Dr Bethel.
Medicine
The Department of Podiatric
Medicine and Surgery in the
Ministry of Health discovered,
in a foot clinical study con-
ducted in 1995, that 60 per cent
of non-traumatic limb ampu-
tations were performed on
patients with diabetes.
Dr Bethel noted that the
main factors leading to ampu-
. tation were: Ulceration 64
per cent, Ischaemia 28 per
cent; and others eight per
cent (neuropathy, infection and
Gangrene).
He said finding a solution to
the lower limb complications


W DR MARCUS BETHEL, MINISTER OF HEALTH


'It is important to


detect diabetes in


its earliest stages'


THE month of November
is observed as Diabetes
Awareness month. Diabetes
can hit without warning, and
a lot of people don't even
know they are at risk for this
serious disease. That is why it
is important to detect it in its
earliest stages.
In the journal Diabetes
Care, the American Diabetes
Association (ADA) recently
reported that about 40 per
cent of adults, ages 40-74,
suffer from a condition called
prediabetes. In other words,
these persons are at risk for
developing type I diabetes -
the most common type of
diabetes. This number is
twice as large as previously
thought.
Prediabetes occurs when
glucose levels climb higher
than normal, but are not yet
considered diabetic. The
ADA has found that many
people with prediabetes
develop diabetes within 10
years.
There is a bright side to
the news about prediabetes:
It does not inevitably lead to
diabetes. People with predi-


abetes have the power to
delay or even prevent dia-
betes by taking steps to low-
er their glucose levels.
If you are carrying around
excess pounds, losing just 5
to 10 per cent of your body
weight can delay or prevent
the onset of diabetes. You
can do this by eating a
healthy diet and exercising
moderately such as walk-
ing briskly -just 30 minutes a
day. In fact, researchers have
found that these simple
lifestyle changes delayed the
development of diabetes by
58 per cent in people with
prediabetes.
For more information
about prediabetes or dia-
betes and to receive free
screenings, attend World
Diabetes Day at the Town
Center Mall, Wednesday
November 16; also, the Doc-
tors Hospital Distinguished
Lecture Series will focus on
diabetes featuring Dr. Chris-
tine Chin, Thursday, Novem-
ber 17 at 6pm in the Confer-
ence Room.
Source: Doctors
Hospital


of diabetes is two-fold. The first
approach is to employ simple
and inexpensive lifestyle
changes, which include
increased physical activity and
healthier eating habits, to pre-
vent new cases of diabetes.
The second approach is to
implement programmes, which
include community communi-
cation, early diagnosis and ear-
ly medical and surgical treat-
ment.
Central to the solution Dr
Bethel said, is the importance
of early intervention and treat-
ment of diabetic wounds,
including infection manage-
ment, diagnosis of
osteomyelitis and gangrene.
"Caribbean governments
have recognised the signifi-
cance of diabetes as a public
health problem, and as such
the development of diabetes
prevention and control was tar-
geted as a goal of the first
phase of the Caribbean coop-
eration in health initiative dur-
ing the Caribbean Conference
of Health Ministers," he said.


What is exfoliation?


* By SARAH SIMPSON
WHILE worldwide aware-
ness of exfoliation has explod-
ed in the last decade, it's a
concept that is thousands of
years old. Even Cleopatra's
exfoliation secrets are well
documented.
Generally speaking, exfo-
liation refers to any technique
that removes cells from the
skin surface, not only imme-
diately "refreshing" the skin's
appearance, but also stimu-
lating cell renewal.
The benefits are dramatic,
and when used with profes-
sional guidance, exfoliation
can be used to treat a wide
variety of skin problems -
including acne, hyperpig-
mentation, premature aging
and scarring.
Of course, there is huge
variety in these techniques -
scrubs, peels, masques, der-
pnabrasion and lasers. Fortu-
nately, your skin care thera-
pist can help you identify
what will help you best
achieve your goals.


SARAH SIMPSON'

How do Hydroxy
Acids work?
Unlike physical exfoliants
that remove debris through
gentle abrasion, hydroxy acid-
based exfoliants smooth the
skin by dissolving the inter-
cellular "glue" that attaches
the cells to the surface.
Hydroxy acids are the most
common form of at-home
exfoliant because they are
extremely effective and, when
used properly, very safe.
Of course, there are sever-
al different hydroxy acids.
Glycolic Acid was the first to
be used in a cosmetic appli-
cation, and is still widely used


despite its high incidence of
skin irritation. Lactic and sal-
icylic acids, which are as effec-
tive as glycolic Acid, are now
the choice of leading skin care
professionals because they
deliver the same level of
results with considerably less
irritation. There are great at-
home exfoliants that use this
combination of lactic and sal-
icylic acids that can be pur-
chased to apply to your skin
in between professional treat-
ments.
Hydroxy acids may be
combined with enzymes
derived from papaya
(propain) and pineapple
(bromelain) to help digest
dead skin cells, resulting in
even smoother skin. The
phytic acid in rice bran also
effectively dissolves dead sur-
face cells.
Sarah Simpson is a med-
ical skin care specialist at the
Dermal Clinic at the Walk In
Medical Clinic Sandyport.
This information was taken
from the Dermalogica web-
site. For more information log
on to www.dermalogica.com.


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THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2005, PAGE 3C





PAGE 4C, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2005


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THE TIBUN fUEUAYNOVEI3E~ 22,2U05HEALTH 6


LIGHTEN UP & LIVE HEALTHY

According to the International
Diabetes Federation, Every
thirty seconds a leg is lost to
diabetes. Up to 70 per cent of
all leg amputations happen to
people with diabetes. Foot
problems are the most common
cause of admission to hospital
for people with diabetes. As we
continue our focus on diabetes
and foot care, our message to
you is, it does not have to
happen to you. You can prevent
foot problems by taking very
good care of your feet. In order
to show you how, we are
forwarding an article taken
from an Internet link TelMedPak.
We hope that you enjoy this
article and are able to follow
the very practical advice given.





Give your feet



some love


Provided by Adelma Penn,
Camelta Barnes, and Shan-
dera Smith, Nutritionists from
The Department Of Public
Health/Ministry of Health
I f you have diabetes,
you probably already
know that you face
special health chal-
lenges as a result of
your disease. People with dia-
betes often suffer from poor
blood circulation, which slows
healing and may increase the
risk of infections. Also, because
of damaged nerves, many peo-
ple with diabetes lose some of
the sensations that make it pos-
sible to feel hot and cold, or
the pain that might accompany
an injury.
As you can imagine compli-
cations, like infection and
injury, can be particularly seri-
ous when they affect the feet.
The good news is that by fol-
lowing these steps and taking
care of your feet, you can
greatly reduce your risk of hav-
ing problems.
Check your feet
Perhaps most important of
all these suggestion is this one;
examine your feet closely every
day to look for any changes
and/or breaks in the skin.
More precisely, what you are
looking for on your feet is any
redness, swelling, broken skin,
sores, bleeding, pus-like dis-
charges, pale or blue skin,
noticeable changes in temper-
ature, or any unusual feelings
like tingling or numbness. You
may need to use a hand mir-
ror to examine the bottoms of
your feet. If that's too difficult,
either place a mirror on the
floor to examine your feet, or
have someone else check them
for you.
Any of these changes could
indicate the early stages of a
potentially serious complica-
tion, so you can imagine how
important it is to identify prob-
lems early and make an
appointment to see your dia-
betes healthcare provider as
soon as possible!
Keep your feet clean
Wash your feet with soap"
and warm water every day.
While this may seem like a lot
of work, it's very important!
And make sure the water is
warm not hot by checking it
with your elbow. Don't check
it with your hands or feet,
because you may not feel the
temperature differences accu-
rately enough. And be certain
to dry your feet completely,
including between the toes.
Go soft on your skin
As much as one third of the
diabetic population suffers
from dry skin on their legs and
especially their feet. You may
need to apply a moisturizer to
your feet every day to keep
them from becoming dry and


cracked- because damaged skin
can lead to very serious prob-
lems. And if your skin is
extremely dry, you may require
more specialized treatment.
Where your feet are con-
cerned, avoid the heat
Do not use a heating pad or
hot water bottle on your legs or
feet for any reason.
Listen to your healthcare
experts
Be sure to stay in contact
with the health professionals
who make up your diabetes
care team. Never use any med-
ication on your feet unless you
talk to your healthcare team
first. And always follow their
instructions exactly.
Let your clothes stay loose
If you have problems with
your blood circulation (ask
your doctor if you're not sure),
avoid crossing your legs and
stay away from garters, girdles,
or other clothing that might
restrict blood flow to your feet.






























Be careful with sharply
instruments
off your feet. This invites infec-




tion- and people with diabetes

more than the rest of the pop-



cussinsr instruments, cut
your toenails straight across to


avoid ingrown toenails or if you
are not sure how to trim your
nails visit your foot doctor for
advice.
Maintain a proper weight
Lose weight if you need to,
because not only will it help
because not only will it help


Reduce your


risk

* By JACQUELINE LIGHTBOURN


of diabetes


WHEN to start worrying?
FOR overall health and well-being it is good
to try to exercise, eat right and attempt to stay in
shape. But when does doing the opposite start to
become life threatening?
The opinion is out now that not all fat is dan-
gerous. Despite the fact that not fitting in our
favorite jeans may be upsetting to us, weight
on our hips and thighs should not be as immense
of a concern as fat in our abdominal area.
Visceral fat (fat around or orgaAs) deposits fat-
ty acids more readily and at a rapid pace into the
bloodstream which travels to the liver. This
process can reduce the capability of controlling U JACi
insulin in the blood. An overload of insulin can LIGHT
result in diabetes, high cholesterol, and heart
disease.
Heart disease and strokes account for sixty-five percent of
deaths in people with diabetes. Diabetes has become the lead-
ing cause of blindness in the 20-74 age bracket. It is also now the
leading cause of kidney failure. Sixty to seventy percent of
diabetics have mild or severe loss of their nervous system.
Amputation rates are ten times higher for people with dia-
betes compared to those without. Also men with diabetes are
two times more likely to experience erectile dysfunction. Com-
plications of diabetes are ruthless, but the good news is pre-
vention methods and measures to control the disease can allow
for a long, healthy, and happy life.
GETTING STARTED
On a positive note the type of fat most dangerous to us is the
easiest to lose. Healthy habits including eating better, exercis-
ing and reducing your stress will drastically change the risk
for diabetes and its complications.
Make sure the changes are steps that are realistic.
Take one step at a time and make changes you can stick to.
Try to make lifestyle goals as opposed to quick fixes.
Get together with others. It's always easier to start a new chal-
lenge and stick to it if another person is going through the
same situation and you both motivate each other.
Reward yourself to stay motivated. The reward should be per-
sonal and meaningful to you. Buying smaller size clothing
because of weight loss is always satisfying.
EATING RIGHT
A healthy diet reduces the risk of diabetes and can reduce the
progression into heart disease or strokes.
Variety and small portion sizes are important to a healthy
diet.
No one type of food should be excessively consumed. Selec-
tions should be made from each food group making sure that
they are rich in vitamins, minerals and fiber, while reducing the
foods that are processed. Balance is key.


you control your diabetes, it
will mean less pressure on your
feet. Being overweight makes
more work for your feet.
Be kind to your feet
Before you put on your
shoes, examine them to make
,sure that there are no pebbles
or rough surfaces inside. And
check your socks to avoid
rough seams or mended areas.
Everything should fit smoothly
and comfortably.
Regular doctor & nurse visits
To keep your body and your
feet healthy, keep regular doc-
tor appointments. Find a doc-
tor and nurse who will get to
know you and your feet and
will have the time to talk with
you when you need help.
Kick the smoking habit
People with diabetes already
face blood circulation problems
due to their disease- and smok-
ing makes things even worse.
Quitting might just be one of
the best health choices you'll
ever make.
Your feet are living parts of
your body. To stay happy and
healthy, they need a constant
supply of the right kinds of
food.
Diet-Eat for your feet
A proper diet provides nec-
essary food and energy for your
feet.
A healthy diet includes..
Whole grain products (cere-
als, breads)
Plenty of vegetables
Fresh fruit and fruit juices
Foods high in protein, low in
fat
At least eight glasses of water
every day
Limit the amount of choles-
terol and caffeine in your diet
by eliminating or cutting down
on...
Butter
Red meats
Fatty meats and foods
Eggs
Whole milk
Cheeses
Coffee
Chocolate
Colas (soft drinks)
Greasy fried foods
Of course, following these
guidelines is no substitute for
seeing your doctor on a regular
basis, but diligently following
these steps will be a big help
to you and your doctor.


QUELINE
rBOURN


A healthy lifestyle plan is better than a fad
diet, which once stopped, will put the weight
back on.
Don't deny yourself foods you love (unless
instructed by your medical doctor) because it
can backfire into a binging episode. Modera-
tion is key.
Getting help from a dietician or nutritionist is
beneficial to constructing a practical and func-
tional food plan.
Snack on oranges for Vitamin C because just
500 milligrams boosts fat burning by thirty per
cent. Switch from mayonnaise to mustard. Eat
an apple instead of drinking apple juice. Drink-
ing green tea can boost your metabolism and
increase your energy by twenty-four per cent.


ELIMINATING STRESS
Always get an adequate amount of sleep and take the time to
relax.
EXERCISING
Just 30 minutes a day of moderate physical activity, coupled
With a five to ten per cent reduction in body weight, produces
a fifty-eight per cent reduction in diabetes.
Burning calories and naturally increasing your glucose uptake
by increasing your metabolism and muscle mass, can also
improve the body's response to insulin.
Walking is a great cardio vascular.workout that can help to
reduce your risk of heart disease, while combating depression
and lower back pain, increasing your muscular strength, improv-
ing coronary condition, reducing risks of infection and hyper-
tension, aids in maintaining a healthy weight and helps in the
control of diabetes.
Exercising three times a week for 30 minutes is advanta-
geous.
Tips for days you can't make it to the gym
Isometrics can be performed in the car while driving to work
by pulling your belly button toward your spine and contracting
your gluts for 30 seconds at a time.
Park in the furthest parking space and walk to get exercise.
When waiting in the airport during a layover, always have a
Walkman or an iPod handy to do laps around the airport.
In the office, take a 15 minute break to walk around.
Always take the long route to the rest room.
Walk the dog.
Use the stairs instead of the elevator.
All these changes in your lifestyle will help you become
healthier, feel better, and decrease your risk for certain diseases.
Also, consult your medical doctor before any drastic changes.
Should you have any questions or require additional
information please do not hesitate to contact Dr Jacqueline
Lightbourn, DC at Life Chiropractic Centre phone: (242)
393-2774.


*ooD.ivou


Tel: 9 6 6 3


3W25OOD
46 adeira Street


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2005, PAU~E 5C


THE TRIBUNE


I








PAGE 6C, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


How does chiropractic




keep me healthy?


S By SUSAN DONALD D.C.

How does chiropractic
heal me and keep me
healthy? I'm asked
that question often. In order to
understand how chiropractic
can help a certain condition, it is
important to get a better under-
standing of what chiropractic is
and how the body works.
Chiropractic is a branch of
the healing arts which is based
on the premise that good health
depends, in part, upon a nor-
mally functioning nervous sys-,
tem especially the spine, and
the nerves extending from the
spine to all parts of the body.
Chiropractic comes from the
Greek word Chiropraktikos,
meaning "effective treatment
by hand." Chiropractic stresses
the idea that the cause of many
disease processes begin with the
body's inability to adapt to its
environment. It looks to address
these diseases not by the use of
drugs and chemicals, but by
locating and adjusting a muscu-
loskeletal area. of the body
which is functioning improperly.
These musculoskeletal areas
which do not function properly
are what chiropractic calls a ver-
tebral subluxation. A subluxa-
tion interferes with normal


* SUSAN DONALD


nerve function which results in
decreased ability of the brain
to communicate properly with
the body. This could eventually
result in some sort of condition
or symptom. When you suffer
from a subluxation, your natur-
al healing ability is lessened,
your resistance is lowered and
you can get sick.
The examination of the spine
to evaluate its structure and
function is what makes chiro-
practic different from other
health care procedures. Your
spinal column is a series of mov-


able bones which begin at the
base of your skull and end in
the center of your hips. Thirty-
one pairs of spinal nerves
extend down the spine from the
brain and exit through a series
of openings. The nerves leave
the spine and form a compli-
cated network which influences
every living tissue in your body.
Accidents, falls, stress, ten-
sion, overexertion, and count-
less other factors can result in a
displacement or derangement
of the spinal column, causing
irritation to spinal nerve roots.
These irritations (subluxations)
are often what cause malfunc-
tion in the human body. It is
the chiropractors' job to reduce
the interference that is caused
by the subluxation. This is done
by adjusting the spine to return
the normal function to the ner-
vous system so your body can
operate more efficiently and
more comfortably. You cannot
be truly healthy, reach your full
potential or achieve your great-
est healing ability if you have
pressure on your nervous sys-
tem.
Dr Susan Donald, DC is a
Doctor of Chiropractic at the
Life Chiropractic Centre on Vil-
lage Road. For more informa-
tion please call 393-2774.


'Joining hands for health'


INFLUENZA (also known as
S"the flu") is all around us, espe-
cially during the winter and early
spring. And.yet, as common and
widespread as influenza can be,
its potential to cause hospitaliza-
tion and death is often unappre-
ciated, so is the ability to prevent
it. Tune in to Joining Hands for
Health, Wednesday, November 23,
2005 at 7:30 pm on Radio
Bahamas 1540 and 810 A.M., as
Deborah Fox, senior nursing offi-
cer with the-Depairteni-ffl*bif
Health and Kathy Johnston, pro-
ject officer with the Planning Unit
Ministry of Health, join host,
Audrey Lightbourn, in a discus-
sion about influenza. .

WHAT IS INFLUENZA?
INFLUENZA (the flu) is an
infection of the respiratory tract
that is caused by a virus. The infec-
tion spreads easily from person to
person, through direct and indi-
rect contact with affected persons.
In most people the 'flu' is con-
tagious for up to two days before
the onset of symptoms until about
five days after they begin. Gener-
ally, the infection lasts about a
week and consequently is conta-
gious (can spread to anyone with
whom an infected person comes
into contact) for about seven days.

WHAT ARE THE SIGNS
AND SYMPTOMS OF THE
FLU
Some common signs and symp-
toms of the flu are: Fever, chills,
cough sore throat, muscle aches,
fatigue (extreme tiredness), weak-
ness or exhaustion, severe
headache and runny nose.Individ-
uals infected by the influenza can
become extremely ill and even die.

WHAT IS THE DIFFER-
ENCE BETWEEN A COMMON
COLD AND THE FLU?
Often people mistake the com-


mon cold for the flu because they
share some signs and symptoms.
If you have a stuffy nose, sneez-
ing, sore throat and a hacking
cough you may have a cold. If you
have a high fever, severe headache,
muscle and body aches, exhaus-
tion and a dry cough you may have
the 'flu'.

WHO IS AT GREATEST
RISK FOR CONTRACTING
THE FLU AND DEVELOPING
COMPLICATIONS FROM IT?
The groups of persons at great-
est risk for contracting the flu and
developing complications from it
are:
Children 6-23 months of age
People 65 years and older
Residents of nursing homes
People who have long-term
health problems, such as heart dis-
ease, chronic lung disease, asthma,
kidney disease, metabolic diseases
such as diabetes, anaemia, and oth-
er blood disorders, such as sickle
cell disease
People with certain conditions
that can cause breathing problems
(nerve and muscle disorders)
People with a weakened immune
system due to: HIV/AIDS and/or
other diseases/disorders affecting
the immune system
Long-term treatment with drugs,
such as steroids, for lupus
Cancer treatment with drugs or
x-ray
Persons on long term aspirin
treatment
Pregnant women particularly
those who will be pregnant during
influenza season
People who can spread influenza
to those at high risk:
Household contacts and out of
home caretakers of infants from 0-
23 months
Physicians, nurses, family mem-
bers or anyone else in close con-
tact with people at risk of serious
influenza


CAN THE INFLUENZA BE
PREVENTED?
Influenza can be avoided by
engaging in a combination of pre-
vention measures. These include:
Practicing good health habits -
including eating a nutritious well-
balance diet, adequately manag-
ing stress and exercising regularly,
obtaining the 'flu' vaccine, and
stopping the spread of the influen-
za germ to self and others.
It is suggested however, that
"the single best way to protect
against the flu is to be vaccinated
each fall" (Center for Disease Con-
trol).

TIPS FOR LIMITING THE
SPREAD OF THE INFLUEN-
ZA VIRUS INCLUDE:
Avoid close contact with people
who are sick.
When you are sick, keep your
distance from others to protect them
from getting sick too. If possible,
stay home from work, school, and
errands when you are sick. You
will help prevent others from catch-
ing your illness.
Cover your mouth and nose with
a tissue when coughing or sneez-
ing. It may prevent those around
you from getting sick. Put your
used tissue in a bin or wastebasket
(If you don't have a tissue, cough or
sneeze into your upper sleeve, not
your hands.)
Wash you hands after covering
you mouth and nose. Clean your
hands with soap and water or
wash/clean with alcohol-based hand
cleaner. Washing your hands ofen
will help protect you from germs.
Avoid touching your eyes, nose
or mouth.
Germs are often spread when. a
person touches something that is
contaminated with germs and then
touches his or her eyes, nose, or
mouth. Studies have shown that
human influenza (flu') viruses can
generally survive on surfaces
between two and eight hours

WHY GET VACCINATED?
The 'flu' is a very contagious
disease, which spreads from an
infected person to the nose and
throat of others. While some per-
sons are at greater risk for con-
tracting the influenza virus than
other, the flu can affect anyone.
There are two types of 'flu' vac-
cine:
An inactivated (killed) vac-
cine, given as a shot (available for
use in the Bahamas for Influenza
Vaccination Campaign)
A live, weakened vaccine
sprayed into the nostrils.

FACTS ABOUT THE
INJECTABLE INFLUENZA
VACCINE
This form of the influenza vac-
cine can be given to people six
months of age and older.
Children under nine years old
who are getting the influenza vac-
cine for the first time, two doses of
vaccine are required; everyone else
needs just one dose.
A common complaint after get-
ting vaccinated is pain and swelling
at the site where the vaccine was
received. This is not a serious prob-
lem and it usually last only one or
two days. Fever, tiredness, and
muscle aches can also occur.
Yearly vaccination is necessary,
because every year different strains
of 'flu' (influenza) virus can arise.
'Flu' vaccines are formulated to
protect against the strains of virus'
likely to cause widespread influen-


QUESTION: Dear Dr.
Carey, my hair is falling out
more now than ever. I feel
like if it continues falling out
this way, I am not going to
have any hair. I am only 46
years old and becoming quite
depressed. Is there anything I
can do?

Answer:
TWO thirds of women
experience hair loss at some
stage in their life and this can
often be a very stressful time
for women and is an integral
part of their self image.
Unlike men, women rarely go
bald, but may experience sig-
nificant thinning and reduc-,
tion of the hair shaft diameter
around the forehead and
crown of the scalp as they
age.
If you are one of the mil-
lions of women who suffer
from hair loss the most
important factor is to under-
stand why you are losing your
hair before you seek out a
remedy or solution.

Causes of hair loss:
Genetics: The most com-
mon cause of hair loss is root-
ed in your genes.
Also known as androge-
netic alopecia, hereditary hair
loss can begin any
time after puberty, but usu-
ally sets in before the age of
forty and may
accelerate around the time
you reach menopause.
Pregnancy: A large
amount of oestrogen is pro-
duced during pregnancy caus-
ing the hair follicles to go into
their growth phase. Once the
birth is over the hormonal
balance is restored and the
opposite happens with the
hair follicles going into a hair
loss phase.
Alopecia areata: The rea-
sons for this are relatively
unknown, but research has
shown that the cause is
thought to be an auto


za in a particular year.
The 'flu' vaccine should not be
given to infants less than six
months of age or to anyone who is
allergic to eggs, egg products or
any component of the vaccine.
As with any vaccine, 'flu' vac-
cines may not protect everyone
one hundred per cent from the
influenza (flu). For most people
the influenza vaccine prevents seri-
ous illness caused by 'flu' virus.
The 'flu' vaccine will not prevent
"flu-like" illnesses caused by other
viruses, like the common cold.
It takes about two weeks for
protection to develop after the shot
and protection can last up to a
year.
Inactivated 'flu' vaccine can be
given at the same time as other
vaccines, including pneumococcal
vaccine.

WHEN SHOULD ONE SEEK
TO RECEIVE THE 'FLU' VAC-
CINE?
The best time to get influenza
vaccine is in October or Novem-
ber.
Influenza season generally peaks
in February, but it can peak any-
time from November through
May. So getting the vaccine in
December, or even later, can serve
as protection, for as long as the
influenza season lasts.
Most people need one 'flu' shot
each year. Children younger than
nine years of age getting influenza
vaccine for the first time should
get two doses, given at least one
month apart.

WHERE CAN THE 'FLU'
VACCINE BE OBTAINED?
To date the influenza vaccine is
available at all government com-
munity clinics. The vaccine is avail-
able without cost to the recipient
within these settings. However,
you may be required to pay a fee
at private clinics. Vaccines can be
obtained by calling the community
clinic nearest your home for the
times you can obtain the vaccine.

WHAT KILLS INFLUENZA
VIRUS?
The Influenza virus is destroyed
by heat (167-212oF). In addition,
several chemicals, including bleach,
hydrogen peroxide, detergents
(soap), iodine-based antiseptics,
and alcohol are effective against
influenza. For example, wipes or
gels with alcohol in them can be
used to clean hands.

TREATMENT FOR THE
'FLU'?
Treating symptoms is the cor-
nerstone of managing flu in chil-
dren and adults. Home care meth-
ods most recommended include
rest, drinking adequate amounts
of fluids, control of fever and body
aches with nonprescription med-
ication, and maintaining comfort-
able breathing by means of humid-
ified air in the sleeping area.
Rest in bed. Avoid physical
exertion. Avoid using alcohol and
tobacco.


* DR REGINALD CAREY

immune disorder where the
body mistakenly attacks the
hair follicles. What follows is
an inflammation of the folli-
cles and surrounding hair
structures. This causes the
hair follicles to retreat into
the deeper layers of skin shut-
ting off an important nutri-
ent supply, the follicles starve
and the hair starts shedding
followed by a dormant peri-
od.
Stress: Another common
reason for hair loss in women
is stress also known as Telo-
gen Effluvium. What happens
is that the growing healthy
hairs enter the resting (telo-
gen) phase of hair growth.
The hair's matrix appears to
stop dividing causing the hair
to begin falling out. This in it
self produces more stress
making matters worse.
Women in their 40s to 60s will
be affected by this kind of
hair loss.
Drugs or Supplements:
The most common drug treat-
ment that causes hair loss is
chemotherapy. This kind of
medication attacks the hair
cells of the matrix causing 90
per cent hair loss from the
scalp. Prescription drugs are
also known to thin hair out.
These can be blood thinners,


Drink plenty of fluids such as
water, fruit juices, and clear soups
(chicken).
Water should never be the sole
or main liquid consumed because it
does not contain adequate elec-
trolytes (sodium and potassium,
for example) that the body
requires. Commercially available
products such as Gatorade and
other similar sports drinks can be
useful in this regard. For children,
ORS (Oral Dehydration Solution)
packets are another good way toc
replenish the body. This solution
can be used by anyone regardless
of age.
Treat fever and aches with over-
the-counter medications such as
acetaminophen (Tylenol is a com-
mon brand), ibuprofen (Advil or
Motrin are examples), and nap
oxen (Aleve or Narcosis), which
can be purchased at most drug
stores. Aspirin should not be used.

CAUTION: For children


high blood pressure and cho-
lesterol drugs. Some dieting
supplements can also be caus-
es of hair loss.
Hair pulling: Also known
as trichotillomania. Unlike
other types or hair loss this is
not a medical but more a psy-
chological disorder. This is
similar to the nail biting that
many people do when
stressed. There are literally
millions of people around the
world that suffer from this
condition. These are mostly
adult women that suffer from
low self esteem, anxiety,
depression or are dissatisfied
with their bodies. This con-
dition can be treated with
counseling.
Traction alopecia: This is
hair loss produced by certain
tight, stressed
hairstyles very common in
women of African decent.
Other causes: Certain
diets, thyroid hormone defi-
ciency, some
infections. Unlike men the
hair loss in these cases are
usually temporary and
healthy re-growth can occur
over time.

If the cause is not obvious,
then an evaluation by your
physician or a specialist, such
as a dermatologist, is encour-
aged before you embark on
any treatment despite the
many advertisements of prod-
ucts that purport to cure hair
loss.

This informative weekly
column provided by Doctors
Hospital is intended to edu-
cate women about important
issues regarding their health
and is not intended as a sub-
stitute for consultation with
an obstetrician/gynaecolo-
gist. Please send questions
via e-mail to tribune@tri-
bunemedia.net or
mrassin@doctorshsoptial.co
m. For more information call
302-4707.


younger than 16 years with symp-
toms of flu or cold, aspirin is not
recommended because itis associ-
ated with liver and brain damage
(a condition known as Reye syn-
drome).
Use cough suppressants and
expectorants to treat the cough.
Steam inhalations may be useful
in opening up a blocked nose and
thus make breathing easier.
The 'flu' is a serious, contagious
disease that can prove fatal. Per-
sons at risk can receive protection
from vaccination. Once infected
with the flu follow the simple steps
provided to prevent worsening of
the condition and complications.
To protect your family, set up your
immunization appointment today.
By preparing now you and your
loved ones can be ready for the
'flu' before it strikes. To learn
more talk to your doctor or health-
care provider about influenza and
the importance of vaccination.


Seven steps to help



families deal with



mental illness


THE transition from a
healthy person to one with
severe symptoms of mental
illness can be confusing and
frightening.
The ill person feels very
isolated and may be in
denial. His or her percep-
tion of reality becomes dis-
torted. Performing at work
and school often becomes
difficult. Family loyalty and
friendships are tested dur-
ing this time.
Although the symptoms
of mental illness can occur
quickly, the signs are usual-
ly gradual. It is important to
know that mental illness is
a disorder of the brain which
causes the person not to
function normally. It can be
treated effectively with fam-
ily support and proper med-
ical care. Seven effective
coping strategies to help
families in dealing with men-
tal illness:
Keep informed- every-


one needs to learn about the
symptoms, duration and
treatment of the illness.
Do not listen to rumors
discuss with your medical
professionals about the ill-
ness and do not listen to or
believe myths.
Find a friend, support
group, or social club this
can reduce your stress and
anxiety. Participate in activ-
ities with the patient and
make a difference for oth-
ers in your community.
Keep healthy exercise
regularly and maintain a
well balanced diet.
Take time out for your-
self.
Do not hesitate to ask
for help communicate with
your medical providers and
express your concerns hon-
estly.
Do not blame yourself
or others.
Source: Doctors
Hospital


health matters


HEALTH
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PAGE B 80,BTUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2005 THEATRIBUNE


I welcome November
because I love Kalan-
choe and it is during
this month the blos-
soms return after five
months off. The cheerful red,
yellow, orange or violet flowers
are produced in glorious clus-
ters that brighten the patio and
invite bees and hummingbirds
to feed.
There are six hundred
species of Kalanchoe and the
one I love for its winter flow-
ering is K blossfeldiana. It has
an upright manner of growth
and bears thick, succulent
leaves with the flower dusters
held above the foliage.
Flowering
Once the flowering starts for
the season it will continue until
early summer. The flowers stop
but the leaves remain green
and provide pleasant foliage. I
have often recommended that
K Blossfeldiana share a flow-
ering bed with Caladiums. Dur-
ing the summer the Caladiums
,provide colour, but they die off
. as winter approaches just as K
blossfeldiana puts out its flow-
ers.
I Not all Kalanchoes are as
pretty as K Blossfeldiana. K
daigremontiana bears thick
long triangular leaves with ser-
rated edges. Baby plants form
along these edges and drop -off
when they have produced
roots, giving the plant the com-
mon name Leaf of Life. K pin-
nata is often found in Bahami-
an gardens. If the leaves are
laid on the ground, new plants
form around the edges. Other-
wise, these plants are green and
boring.
Far more interesting is K ver-
ticillata, a plant that bears tubu-
lar foliage. That makes it dif-
ferent but it turns truly spec-
tacular when it sends up its


'I love


Green Scene
by Gardener Jack

five-foot long flowering stalk
crowned with tubular flowers
that much resemble Aloe flow-
ers.
A flower that much resem-
bles K blossfeldiana from a dis-
tance is the enormously popu-
lar Pentas lanceolata. Pentas is
popular because it is a peren-
nial that flowers all year round.
It comes in pink, lilac and white
but it is the red-flowered Pen-
tas that is most striking. It
attracts hummingbirds like a
magnet while the lilac-flowered
Pentas attracts bees.
Pentas should be grown in
full sun for best flowering. It
likes a little more water than
most plants and will wilt when
neighbouring plants are quite
content with their lot. Pentas
is a great plant for growing in a
container and placing around
a patio but it is seen to greatest
effect when planted in a mass:
Mostly red with a few white-
flowering Pentas to add con-
trast.
Plant
Another plant that, like
Kalanchoe, takes a break from
blooming during the summer
is the Chalice Vine (Solandra
guttata). The Chalice Vine is
one of the most spectacular of
tropical plants due to the size
of its flowers (up to ten inches
long) and the profusion in
which they are produced.


"There are six hundred
species of Kalanchoe
and the one I love for
its winter flowering is
K blossfeldiana. It has
an upright manner of
growth and bears thick,
succulent leaves with
the flower dusters held
above the foliage."


Kalanchoe'


8 KALANCHOE blossfeldiana is a very colourful plant that derives its appeal from masses of four-petalled flowers.


The Chalice Vine uses aerial
roots to fasten itself to any sup-
port it can find. It is much
heavier than most vines and
therefore needs substantial sup-
port, a wall preferably. It grows
best in a location that provides
partial shade.
The flowers of the Chalice
Vine start off whitish-green and
resemble an elongated balloon.
The balloon pops at the thick
end, usually in the morning
hours, and opens up into the
familiar chalice shape that is
so attractive. The colour deep-
ens into a yellowish gold and
the flowers are held away from
the main plant, not hanging
down like its near relative
Datura. The interiors of the
flowers have purple lines.
Vine


The Chalice Vine occasion-
ally puts out a long, angular
seedpod and the seeds can be
used to propagate the plant. It
is more usual, however, to
obtain new plants through air
G Jack layering.
gardenerjack
@coralwave. comic


Mf l THE Chalice Vine is a 'rampant grower that prefers a partially shaded area with strong supports.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8C, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2005







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