Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00260
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: November 21, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00260
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

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Sc Ui
L """"""""

II I II


FNM chairman

calls for answers

or resignation

from Mitchell


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
BAHAMIAN visas issued at
the request of a PLP senator
and MP suggests directt politi-
cal involvement ... at the high-
est level of the Christie admin-
istration, including the Minis-
ter of Foreign Affairs," former
FNM Chairman Carl Bethel
alleged at a press conference
yesterday.
Mr Mitchell, who denied the
allegations, announced last
week that an investigation was
underway.
Mr Bethel said that the
inquiry must be public and inde-
pendent; independent in fact
and seen to be independent;
and its report must be made
public. It must also be chaired
"by nothing less than a person
of status and impartiality of a
judge of the Supreme Court or
of the Court of Appeal."
"Anything less than an inde-
pendent inquiry into this scan-
dal is unacceptable, and could
only be viewed as a political
cover-up," he said.
Mr Bethel said that visas
issued in the Bahamas to Hait-
ian nationals had grown from
102 in 2002 to more than 2,200
in 2004, a twenty-fold increase.
The number of visas issued
to Chinese nationals has also
quadrupled since 2002. Assur-
ances that the ministry had
effective systems in place to
ensure that persons issued with
visas actually left the Bahamas
before the expiration of the
visas were never given, Mr
Bethel said.


The Minister of Foreign
Affairs, said Mr Bethel, must
account to the Bahamian peo-
ple for these and other irregu-
larities or resign.
The scale of the alleged irreg-
ularities in the issuance of entry
visas and the involvement of
PLP politicians, their family
members, cronies and well-'
known political supporters,
"cannot even be imagined", Mr
Bethel claimed.
"From an apparently random
collection of copied visa appli-
cation forms, I have isolated 84
approved visas issued at the
request or upon the sponsor-
ship of one man between the
23rd September, 2004 and the
30th November, 2004, a period
of about nine weeks," said Mr
Bethel. "On average this nian
was able to secure at least nine
visas a week.
"On November 1 2004 alone
he was able to obtain 24.
approvals. At such'a rate of activ-
ity spread over the course of a
year he would be responsible for
bringing more than 470 Haitians
legally to the Bahamas in one
year alone,, all by himself," the
former attorney general said.
Mr Bethel produced an
alleged e-mail message sent to
Mr Mitchell from Senator
Trevor Whylly, attached to the
Office of the Prime Minister, in
May 2004 which read:"Minis-
ter, I wish your approval for
Bruce Bain who operate a cargo
boat from Nassau to Haiti. Mr.
Bain has been waiting for per-
mission to travel from back and
SEE page 14


* PRIME Minister Perry Christie talks with Ministe'r of Alfred Sears just before leaving yesterday
at the International Airport. See page seven for the story.
(Photo: Felipi Major/Tribune Staff)

Government to get

tough on immigration


* By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Bahamas will be taking a
strong stance on dealing with illegal
immigration, predominantly from
Haiti, with "true enforcement" of cur-
rent legislation, Prime Minister Perry
Christie said yesterday.
Shortly before leaving for London
yesterday Mr Christie said that current
legislation signed during the tenure of
Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aris-
tide provides that Haitians coming to
the Bahamas illegally after 1985 can
in fact be returned home.
"If you came to the Bahamas
before 1985, then the government .has
a discretion leaning on the side of
accommodating you, and it is expect-
ed that the government would accom-
modate those persons, by policy, by
treaty who came here prior to 1985.


That is the policy we inherited.
"When we have the issue of negoti-
ating a new arrangement with the gov-
ernment of Haiti during the time of
President. Aristide, we adopted the
same position. It means therefore in
the true enforcement of any immigra-
tion policy, the persons coming to the
Bahamas after 1985, notwithstanding
their longevity here, can be in fact be
returned home by what was a negoti-
ated position between the government
of Haiti and the government of the
Bahamas,": he said.
Mr Christie said that the stability of
the Bahamas is directly related to the
stability of Haiti, and as such the
opportunity to meet with world leaders
is always used to remind them of their
obligation to ensure Haiti's economic
stability.
SEE page 14


inside

Unidentified
motorcyclist
dies in crash
POLICE are asking for the
public's assistance in identify
the latest traffic fatality on the
streets of New Providence over
the weekend.
See pageflive

Former FNM
leader Tynes is
laid to rest
FORMER Opposition leader
Cyril Tynes was buried was
buried in a "semi-state funer-'
al" at St Barnabas Church on
Saturday.
0 Seepage two


* GABRIEL Cash, Miss Mr Pretzels, was
crowned the new Miss Teen Bahamas yesterday
at the Rain Forest Theatre, Wyndham Nassau
Resort
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune Staff)


Officer is wrongly

accused of assault


A HIGHLY regarded
police officer and communi-
ty role model became the
victim of mistaken identity
when he was wrongfully
accused of assault.
Corporal Andrew Sweet-
ing, an officer on the staff of
SDeputy Prime Minister Cyn-
thia Pratt, was incorrectly
identified in last week Fri-
day's Tribune as one of two
persons who witnesses said


assaulted a photographer
during Dr B J Nottage's
speech to the PLP conven-
tion.
Corporal Sweeting told
The Tribune he saw two
men pushing photographer
Franklyn Ferguson, but said
that he was not one of them.
Witnesses, .including
Deputy Prime Minister
SEE page 14


Ingraham
pledges
$10,000 for
Mud residents
E By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
MARSH HARBOUR
FNM Leader Hubert Ingraham,
MP for North Abaco, has
pledged to give $10,000 on
behalf of his party to assist Hait-
ian residents of the Mud who
SEE page 14


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Former FNM leader remembered


N SIR Arthur Foulkes gives the eulogy at the funeral service


I BAHAMIANS who served with the RAF in the Bahamas Air Service Squadron alongside Mr
Tynes. L-R: Thomas Cleare, Reverend Matthias Munroe; Percy Strachan; Lloyd Toppin; Maceo
Coakley; and Charles Fisher


. BRENT Symonette, deputy leader of the FNM and family member Earnel Hanna viewing the
body
(Photos: Franklyn G Ferguson)


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FORMER Opposition leader
Cyril Tynes was buried was
buried in a "semi-state funer-
al" at St Barnabas Church on
Saturday.
Mr Tynes was a member of
the House of Assembly from
1972 to 1977, and served for one
year as Leader of the Opposi-
tion, following the resignation
of the late Sir Kendal Isaacs as
leader of the FNM in 1976.
In his tribute to Mr Tynes,
Sir Arthur Foulkes reminded
the congregation at St Barnabas
Church that the former MP has
left a "rich legacy of a life well
and truly lived".
"To say that he has left us
with footprints in the sands of
time would be an altogether
inadequate tribute to his mem-
ory. He left us a monumental
example of the true nature of
manhood, of humanity, of citi-
zenship, of brotherly love and of
Christian faith," Sir Arthur said.
He said that one of the things
that stood out was Mr Tynes'
"extraordinary courage and
resilience".
"Cyril Tynes had both physi-
cal courage and moral courage
and he was never afraid to take
risks in a world, and in a com-
munity, that yield most painful-
ly to change. He was not physi-


cally a big and powerful man.
But in that slight frame of his,
weakened for most of his life
by the ravages of a dreaded
affliction, beat a heart big and
strong," Sir Arthur said.
As leader of opposition, Sir
Arthur said Mr Tynes conduct-
ed himself with dedication and
intelligence and courageously
endured the slings and arrows
of "that sometimes cruel are-
na", and emerged with his dig-
nity and integrity intact.
"At a time when our society is
besieged with crude behavior on
all sides, when traditional val-
ues are openly scoffed at, when
honesty is regarded as naivete,
when so many of our young men
are confused about what it
means to be a man, we can cele-


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brate the life of Cyril Tynes. We
can say, here's a great role mod-
el, here's a fine citizen, here's a
real man," Sir Arthur said.
Sir Arthur also spoke of the
bravery of Mr Tynes when he
"answered the call" to serve in
World War II with the Royal
Air Force.
"It was thousands of miles
away from the remote island of
Acklins in the colony of the
Bahamas. But Cyril knew that it
was important to Acklins, to the
Bahamas, to humanity, that the
war should be won.
"And he was not prepared to
leave it to others. So, the Out
Island boy came to Nassau and -
one month before his 18th birth-
day enlisted with the Royal
Air Force," Sir Arthur said.


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PAGE 2, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


~i~li~f~t~F~ diP f~j~~~








THE TIBUN MONDY, NVEMBE 21,005, AGE


* THE devastation in The Mud after last week's fire
(Photo: Dave Ralph)



Mud fire 'could impact




on Abaco economy'


M By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
THE Department of Immi-
gration is expected in Abaco
this week to determine which
of the hundreds of people dis-
placed by The Mud fire are ille-
gal immigrants, Labour and
Immigration Minister Vincent
Peet told The Tribune yester-
day.
These determinations, Mr
Peet said, will be done along
with the other assessments fol-
lowing the devastating blaze of
Thursday which left hundreds
of Haitian nationals and
Haitain/Bahamians displaced.
In the past 10 years there
have been five major fires in
the Mud and Pigeon Pea town-
ships. In October 1994 five were
destroyed, 14 houses in Decem-
ber of 1998, 20 houses in March
2000, 70 houses in May 2003,
and 128 houses in last week's
blaze.
And residents fear that the
latest fire could have a devas-
tating effect on the Abaco econ-
omy, which is generally
acclaimed as the most robust in
the Bahamas.
"Abaco is and has been expe-
riencing an economic boom and
there is a shortage of labour at
all levels. In general terms the
Haitians get comparable wages
to Bahamians but their living
expenses are much less. They
do not have mortgage payments
or car payments to consider. If
the Haitians were taken out of
Abaco, our economy would
have a melt-down," one resi-
dent said.
He pointed out that Haitians
come to Abaco because there
are jobs and is also closer to
Florida than the southern
islands. However, the situation
gets more complex when the
second generation is factored
in.
"(Second generation)
Haitians are not willing to
accept any job as the first wave
of refugees did. The refugees
come with nothing and are hap-
py to get work. Their children
do not know first hand of the
conditions their parents escaped
from. They only see the living
standards in the greater com-
munity that they are denied.
This makes for social unrest.
"These same problems prob-
ably exist in Nassau but they
are easier to see in a smaller
population such as Abaco
where their presence is a larger
part of the total. With a small-
er economy than Nassau, the
























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Telephone:
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Fax: (242) 328-1248


Haitian effect is easier to
gauge,"'the resident said.
Temporary shelters have been
opened at three churches in
Marsh Harbour and at the
Assembly of God Church in
South Abaco for those affected
by Thursday's fire. However, the
government will not allow any
homes to be rebuilt in the Mud.
The blaze destroyed about
130 houses and left a 74-year-
old Haitian woman, Cilianes
Booca, dead. It is believed that
fire broke out when Ms Booca,
who was blind, attempted to
light her kerosene lamp some-
time around 6.30pm Thursday.
Estimates of the number of
Haitians left homeless by the
fire range between 600 and
1,500.
Ministers Shane Gibson and
Meelanie Griffin assured for-
mer Mud residents that gov-
ernment would assist by pro-
viding food, clothing, and shel-
ter for the homeless, however,
government would not allow
the rebuilding of any more
homes in the fire stricken area
of the Mud.
During a town meeting in
Abaco on Friday, many
Haitians were very angry and
complained that volunteer fire-
fighters at Marsh Harbour did
nothing and watched helplessly
as their homes burned.


Inspector Walter Evans, assis-
tant press liaison officer, said
three fire engines two from
Marsh Harbour and one from
Casaurina responded to the
fire. He commended the volun-
teer firemen for their valiant
efforts in fighting the blaze,
which was made worse by high
wind and propane gas tanks
exploding.
Mr Gibson said that the
densely populated areas of the
Mud and Pigeon Pea pose dan-
gers to firefighters, who often
have difficulty finding their way
in and out of the community.


Mr Gibson noted that gov-
ernment would be identifying
land in more structured com-
munities, where Mud residents
could purchase property.
While some Haitians
applauded Mr Gibson, others
who could afford to purchase
land wanted to know what oth-
er provisions would be made
for them in the meantime.
Mr Gibson said the govern-
ment had been unable to find
temporary accommodations
because of a serious shortage
of rental accommodation and
temporary housing in Abaco.


The National Parkinson
Foundation was established in
2000 with two main goals in
mind: to ensure that people
with Parkinson's Disease
receive the best possible
support, information, and
assistance in facing and living
with their condition, and to
sensitize the general public
about Parkinson's and other
debilitating neurological
diseases.

Awareness of Parkinson's
Disease in the Bahamas is
relatively low. The primary
symptoms muscle rigidity,
poor balance, "shaking", and
generalized physical slowness
- have contributed worldwide
to the "face" of the disease.
But, according to Mrs. Mavis
Darling-Hill, founder of the
National Parkinson Foun-
dation, many Bahamians
erroneously view these
symptoms as a normal part of
aging.


In early 2006 the National
Parkinson Foundation will host
a two-day, national screening
and training session to help raise
awareness of the disease
among the general public and
health practitioners and to point
both groups in the right direction
for treatment and support. U.S.
Parkinson specialists will
participate in the session to
ensure the latest and best
screening techniques and
treatment regimes are shared
with Bahamians.

Recent research has shown
that Parkinson's is by no means
just a "physical" disease. Those
afflicted also commonly suffer
from anxiety, depression and
mood swings, making the
disease that much harder to
cope with. To counter this, the
Foundation is working to
establish support groups,
"circles of friends", for
Parkinsonians and their
families.


As a result, many afflicted The Holowesko Foundation is


Bahamians in need of special
care do not receive it and they
live with an unnecessarily low
quality oflife, often in pain and
in isolation from their families
and community.


pleased to support the work of
the National Parkinson
Foundation with a donation of
$2,000. For more information or
to get involved please contact
Mrs. Darling-Hill (393-2515).


THE HOLOWESKO FOUNDATION was established to support and
bring attention to the many good works being carried out in our
society.Requests for informatiponcan.onlybe made in writing to
P.O. Box N 942, Nassau, Bahamas.


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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE4,ONDYOVEBER21,200DTH TRB


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608


Union pressure helped close hotel


THE International Bazaar in Freeport is
teetering on the brink of closure. When fully
operational-it employed about 300 Bahami-
ans. Today some of the store owners don't
even bother to open. They see no point in
unlocking their doors for a mere $10 in trade.
According to a Grand Bahama resident the
Bazaar looks like a "ghost town" since the clo-
sure of the Royal Oasis Golf Resort and Casi-
no. The hotel's visitors were its patrons, and
without them, business is dead.
It is understood that the Grand Bahama
Port Authority is working with Bazaar owners
to try to help them stay in business, but now
that the hotel has been opened as temporary
housing for about 300 Grand Bahamians left
homeless from Hurricane Wilma, its reopening
for resort business seems remote.
The Bazaar's store owners and vendors,
depended almost entirely on the old Princess
resort now the Royal Oasis for its busi-
ness. It was said that the reason the Interna-
tional Bazaar was built was to take advantage
of the nearby resort.
In opening the newly-refurbished hotel on
May 16, 2002, Prime Minister Perry Christie,
said that the "anticipated development bodes
well for the hotel's owners and employees. It
also brings to the adjacent International Bazaar
store owners and vendors, as well as nearby
Goombay Park vendors, the opportunity to
grow their earnings significantly as the resort
takes on a new life."
However, the new hotel hadn't a chance. It
had industrial problems from the very begin-
ning.
As a matter of fact the hotel and union
fought all during the refurbishment and open-
ing, almost up to the closure of the hotel. They
are still squabbling.
The fact that the Bahamas Hotel, Catering
and Allied Workers Union is the majority
shareholder of the Baziaar, one would have
thought that union leaders would have done
their best to help the hotel succeed.
Not so. The only concession union officials
made was to guarantee no demonstrations dur-
ing the property's official opening. However, a
month later the union and 60 placard-carrying
resort staff paraded in the rain at the front of
the hotel, for the reinstatement, among other
things, of hotel employees laid off during the
hotel's refurbishment. It is understood that
that disturbance, which some union members
told The Tribune was a "strike", interrupted
service at the resort.
The only press that the hotel received
between its opening in 2002 and closure,


because of hurricane damage last yea, wer.e
reports of disputes' andt demnistratiions by the
union.
In the short time that the hotel was in busi-
ness its owners had no time to turn a profit.
Driftwood Freeport, a US firm noted for
buying into and turning around ailing hotel
properties, bought the old Princess properties
in May 1999 for $25 million. After nearly two
years it had spent more than $42 million on
renovations. By June, 2003 union president
Pat Bain was asking that Driftwood president
David Buddemeyer be removed. "We are also
asking government, if possible," said Mr Bain,
"to put Mr Buddemeyer out of this country
so that we can find some peace in this proper-
ty."
By March, 2003, Donald Archer, the hotel's
senior vice-president, broke his silence, not
only to complain about the poor level of service
from certain staff of which guests were also
complaining, but to give the union a bit of
advice.
Not only would the strike action, which
they were threatening, said Mr Archer, be ille-
gal, but "any responsible union would examine
the current and future needs of its members,
the fragile economic environment, the financial
status of the company and global conditions.
This is particularly true given the threat of war
in the Middle East. ,
"All these factors should be considered
before making decisions that would greatly"
impact not only their members, but also the
community in which they live.
"Over 1,200 families who receive regular
pay cheques would be affected by a strike, to
say nothing of the impact on these families
and the businesses that they patronise.
"There must be cooperation on both sides.
Press conferences are not the forum to resolve
our disagreements," he said.
Obviously the union did not take him seri-
ously. And so when the hurricane interceded
by putting the hotel out of business, Lehman
Brothers, the Wall Street investment bankers
to which Driftwood was indebted and which
now owned the hotel, looked at the damage
and the difficulty with the union and refused to
extend the hotel's life.
Not only were more than 1,200 Bahamian
employees out of work, but the union itself
was hurting because the hotel's closure has
almost closed its International Bazaar.
This should teach the union a lesson that
when it pushes its claims too far everything
can collapse under the strain, taking even the
union with it.


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EDITOR, The Tribune
The fact that Atlantis has a
.licence to import 40 dolphins is
a direct attack on Bahamian
business, considering that the
government of The Bahamas
has continued to stop the
expansion of Dolphin Encoun-
ters Ltd. on Blue Lagoon
Island, a Bahamian owned com-
pany.
Dolphin Encounters Ltd. will
not be a6bl to compete with
Atlantis as 40 dolphins on Par-
adise Island will produce way
more dolphin swim spaces than
the demand can fill. As the
spaces on Paradise Island will
fill first, there will be, nothing
left for Dolphin Encounters
Ltd, which currently employs
120 Bahamians.
Dolphin Encounters Ltd. was
limited to start with 8 dolphins
in 1989 and now has 16 dolphins
via excellent animal care and
births at Blue Lagoon Island.
Atlantis is getting 40 dolphins
off the bat, a huge unfair advan-
tage over a Bahamian company
that has worked so hard in 16


years to get to this point.
Isn't there any respect for
Bahamian businesses at all,
where Atlantis can do and get
what they want at every turn
and corner?
While Dolphin Encounters
Ltd. has an excellent track
record of providing safe and
quality dolphin programmes for
visitors and locals alike, includ-
ing education programmes in
ldcal schools, beach clean ups,
and bringing movies and TV
commercial productions like
"Flipper" to the Bahamas, the
Bahamian company was told in
1999 that no further expansion
of dolphin facilities will be
allowed, nor will there be more
imports or collections of dol-
phins in The Bahamas.
Dolphin Encounters Ltd. has
since expanded to the Domini-
can Republic, where this
Bahamian business is treated


better than in its own home-
land.
Even Sea World praised the
operation of Dolphin Encoun-
ters Ltd. when a team of execu-
tives from the theme park and
beer company Busch Enter-
tainment came for an inspec-
tion to Blue Lagoon Island and
was impressed by Dolphin
Encounters' facilities and ani-
mal care.
Dolphin Encounters Ltd. was
even admitted to the prestigious
Alliance of Marine Parks and
Aquariums which sets high
standards for the operation of
marine mammal facilities.
" Now a foreign company can
come into the Bahamas and
import 40 dolphins and put
them out of business. The gov-
ernment should be ashamed!
Water sports and excursion
operations for Bahamians -
yeah right! Please stop the
hypocrisy.
A CONCERNED
BAHAMIAN
Nassau
November 2005


Problems with our



road traffic system


EDITOR, The Tribune
PLEASE allow me the
opportunity to express my dis-
appoifitiment with the manner
in whichlour money is spent
contracting foreigners to rec-
ommend and make changes and
seemingly nothing is done to
maintain the system..
About two years ago, we had
a re-routing of traffic and road
construction on Gladstone
Road. For months, road users
were inconvenienced but in the
end it was worth it. A wonderful
traffic light system was imple-
mented after testing the flow of
traffic from Gladstone Road
onto J F Kennedy Drive (JFK).
The way the traffic light was
intended to work was to allow
equal timing during the morn-
ing hours (rush hour) for those
coming from Gladstone Road
onto J F Kennedy Drive as well
as those travelling eastward and
westward on JFK. Thereafter,
the light, is designed/pro-
grammed to switch to allow a
shorter timing for those com-
ing from Gladstone Road and


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Closing Date: 25* November, 2005
4 - - - -


more time for the JFK road
users. This helped with the flow
of traffic during the 5 o'clock
rush.
'I am one of those persistent
persons who would call Road
Complaints Hotline and I am
often told that they would
inform the relevant authorities.
At the commencement of the
new school year, traffic cops
were stationed at the light
directing the flow of traffic. For
approximately three weeks now
no one is stationed there any-
more.
When we .pulled up to the,
light it is disheartening, to see
only about half a dozen cars
lined up to the traffic light on
JFK. However, road users on
Gladstone Road sometimes are
backed up to Fire Trail Road!
Added to this frustrating situa-
tion, we would then see the
reckless travelling on the right
hand side of the road and
pulling on the grass area to
allow the oncoming traffic to
pass.
Needless, to say I am tired of
the lazy and unconcerned atti-
tude of persons who are sup-
posed to be doing their jobs
whilst we, the taxpayers, con-
tinue to suffer. We had a light
system that worked perfectly
but it appears that no one wants
to maintain it!
I trust that this letter reaches
the powers that be and that
something is done soon. With


the price of gas on the increase,
commuters should not be idle
in traffic unnecessarily.
Finally, j recall that a few
years ago, alaw was passed to
allow heavy equipment vehicles
to move only in the early morn-
ing hours or, at least, not during
rush hours.
As the western area is
under major development, I
have seen a number of sand
trucks and tractors during
rush hours. I have even had
an incident where the driver
of a sand truck attempted to
force me off the road as he
tried to cut into traffic from
the sidewalk; yes the sidewalk.
I reported the incident to the
police giving them the licence
plate number but I never
heard anything from the
police.
I later explained this to a cor-
poral and it was sad to know
that instead of him comforting
me, I had to offer some conso-
lation to him because he told
me that it makes no sense giving
Bahamians a ticket, when they
go to the "Commissioner" and
their "MP" to have the charges
dropped.
To those whom we employ
(members of parliament), it's a
sad world out here. Open your
eyes and ears.
J E BAIN
Nassau
October 31 2005


.. . ..... .. ...................................... ...................... ................................. .. ...;. ....... ......


Government



agency ruins



lovely street


EDITOR,The Tribune
ANYONE travelling the
Eastern Road over the past two
weekends must still be shaking
their heads at the antics on the
that street. Some government
agency is creating havoc. What
once was a tree-lined street that
helped alleviate some of the
stress in having to deal with a
very heavy traffic flow now
resembles what I can only imag-
ine parts of war torn treeless
Baghdad must look like.
The character of this street
that once was, is no more. The
trees lining this street are being
systematically mutilated. I won-
.dered if thifmtust be s9me
-attempt at hurricane prepared-
ness? Thankfully we are fast
approaching the end of that
period and if the tree mutila-
tors hadn't noticed the power


lines are on the south side of
the street and they continue to
mutilate the north side.
What appalled me the most
that if the tree mutilators hadn't
noticed is that one of the largest
trees mutilated was a silk cotton
and that it is a protected specie
- I am sure a permit was
applied for and granted.
One had to travel Eastern
Road during this period to real-
ly experience road rage caused
by the less than adequate, total-
ly uncoordinated efforts to con-
trol traffic.
If this Ministry has money to
waste I, along with many others
could suggest areas to use this
surplus budgets anyone
notice any potholes?
APPALLED
Nassau
November 13 2005


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PAGE 4, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005


I


THE TRIBUNE







MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005, PAGE 5


JTHE TRIBUNE


LOCA N


The PLP must s


using the race


card if we are to move forward


ONE of the things that
Last week's conven-
tion demonstrated is that the
PLP still has some way to go if it
is to finally bury the divisive
race card that served it well in
Sthe 1960's, but has served both
it and the Bahamas badly since
then.
To many of us, there was
something frankly amusing
about seeing Kenyatta Gibson,
.a man in his thirties, attempt-
Sing to invoke the spirit of the


early PLP pioneers by describ-
ing the career advancement of
Mr. Symonette as a movement
"back 300 years" for the coun-
try.
The Tribune was quite right
to remind readers of a subse-
quent.editorial column that this
particular Mr. Gibson, who
gives his address as Lyford Cay,
would have been in his early
infancy when Mr. Symonette's


father last held office in this
country. His invocation of the
horrors of a return to 1705 (!)
must then be read in all its stark
ludicrousness.
While it may be easy to dis-
miss the theatrics of Mr. Gib-
son as the attention-seeking of a
very junior politician, some of
the comments of more seasoned
and thoughtful members of the
PLP hierarchy may be inter-
preted as truly troubling. For
Ministers Fred Mitchell and
Alfred Gray to have called


attention to the 'salt' in the 'salt
and pepper' combination was
as cynical an act as any in recent
memory.
What these and other senior
PLP's seem to have missed is
that the public has now reached`
a point of maturity where the,
benefits of invoking the race
card are outweighed by some
very tangible, if unexpected, lia-
bilities.


b
w
tl
1p]


PERSPECTIVES Had the PLP concentrated on
imin i i 11the inordinate role played by
ANDREW A L L E N money or monied ciques
L the race card is that it has taken within FNM politics, instead of
ooking around the PLP on a life of its own, and has nowin
Convention floor last just become an item of the col- on race and histrionics, they
'eek, many viewers must have lective PLP mindset that
een shocked at the number of responds not to external stimuli, Would probably have struck a
'hite Bahamian faces among but to internally reinforced t
he audience. In Abaco, North group behaviour. chord across the political
*I-,ithprn dJ nnr4e n T-.w


EIeULituera ianU parts oA I eCW
Providence, the votes of many
white Bahamians are virtually
up for grabs these days, maybe
for the first time in memory.
White Bahamians represent
a solid block of something over
40,000 people, many of whom
are voters. Further, they have
recently shown an increasing
tendency to shop around polit-
ically. To take this opportunity
to remind the world of the racial
orientation of the PLP is there-
fore not merely tasteless, but
downright daft.
On the other hand, an
increasing number of black
Bahamians are either tired with
or insulted by the Machiavel-
lian invocation of the race card
by politicians whose own life
experiences and characters
make them unlikely racial war-
riors. So while it is hard to see
many blacks joining the PLP
because of the antics of such
men, it is. easy to see many
whites leaving it because of
them.
PLP leaders must know this.
So what one must conclude
from the tiresome invocation of


JUDGE MR. SYMONETTE
FOR AND AS HIMSELF

Of course, not to like or
support Brent

What was
notable in his
speech was its
repeated
emphasis on
social issues,
such as health
care insurance,
elevating the
fevel of
education and
expanding
opportunities


spectrum.


Symonette (or anyone else for
that matter) does not make
someone a racist.
Had the PLP concentrated
on the inordinate role played
by money or monied cliques
within FNM politics, instead of
on race and histrionics, they
would probably have struck a
chord across the political spec-
trum.
Wherever Mr. Symonette
himself may stand on this issue,
there is clearly a concern among
many FNMs that the party's
reliance upon small groups of
monied backers is a weakness
both in getting elected, and in
implementing balanced indus-
trial and investment policies
once in office.
Many Bahamians probably
simply assume where Mr.
Symonette stands in relation to
such issues simply on account
of his background and obvious
wealth.


In the event, however, Mr.
Symonette's own speech to the
FNM convention a week earlier
was as good a defence to such
charges as could have been
hoped for. What was notable in
his speech was its repeated
emphasis on social issues, such
as health care insurance, ele-
vating the revel of education
across the board for Bahami-
ans and expanding opportuni-
ties for Bahamians who have
not already done so to join the
professional classes.
From the start that he has
made in his new role, PLP
detractors will simply have to
find something other than either
the race card or the image of
the rich eastern roader to beat
him with.
So get to work Fred and
Kenyatta. That is your job in
politics. But it is not your job
to insult Bahamians with cheap,
played out rubbish.


Unidentified motorcyclist



dies in traffic accident


[BED BATH & HOME I


* By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
POLICE are asking for the
public's assistance in identify
the latest traffic fatality on the
streets of New Providence over
the weekend.
A male motorcyclist died at
the scene of a head on collision
after he was thrown from his
motorcycle on John F Kennedy
Drive, just east of Lake Nancy.
This 61st traffic fatality of the
year occurred when the motor-
cyclist, who was travelling east
on a Symms 100 CC motorcy-
cle, collided with a Dodge Stra-
tus travelling west on the JFK
highway shortly after 11 pm Sat-
urday.
' According to police press liai-
son officer Inspector Walter
Evans, the rider of the motor
bike was thrown "some distance
' away", and died at the scene.
"He was dressed in a beige











MONDAY,
NOVEMBER 21
6:30 Bahamas @ Sunrise Live
11:00 Immediate Response
12noon ZNS News Update Live
12:03 Caribbean Today News
Update
12:05 Immediate Response
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1:30 Spiritual Impact: Shirley Lewis
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2:30 Inside Hollywood
3:00 Caribbean News In Review
3:30 Bishop Neil Ellis
4:00 Gospel Video
4:30 Gospel Grooves
4:58 ZNS News Update'
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6:00 One Cubed
6:25 Life Line
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Joyner Kersee
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:00 Comm. Page 1540AM
NOE N-V 3rsre
therihttomak lstmiut


short trousers, a white short
sleeve shirt, and brown sandals.
He is believe to be in his late
30s or early 40s. The registra-
tion number of the motorcycle
is 2358," he said.
Mr Evans urged anyone who
may have any information on
the identity of the motorist to
contact their nearest police sta-
tion.
Also another male resident
is listed in serious condition at
the Princess Margaret Hospital
after being "rolled over" by a
truck on Paradise Island on Fri-
day evening.
According to Insp Evans, the
man was attempting to get on
top of the moving vehicle, and
slipped.


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As a result the man's lower
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Police reported the confis-
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rate incidents on Friday
evening.
At about 10.30 am, CDU offi-
cers found a high powered
AK47 weapon, and two maga-
zines of live rounds on a sloop
docked on the western side of
Arawak Cay.
Also later that day, shortly
before noon, a 9mm Luger
Tech machine gun was found
in a home in the area of
Marigold on Farm Road.
According to Insp Evans,
drug enforcement officers con-
ducted a search of the home


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and discovered the weapon
along with 17 live rounds of
ammunition. The 23-year-old
male resident was taken into
custody and charged. He is
expected to appear before the
courts later this week.
Police also reported over the
weekend an armed robbery at
Twin Brothers on Boyd Road
around 11.30pm, Friday night.
Two males, both described as
being six feet tall, were carrying
hand guns.
One of the men is described
as being of a "light complex-
ion" and the other dark.
They robbed the establish-
ment and a number of cus-
tomers of an undetermined
amount of cash before making
their escape on foot.
Investigations continue.


GIFT & BRIDAL REGISTRY
Harbour Bay Shopping Centre
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448


NEW ARRIVALS


Rosetta St.


An increasing number of
black Bahamians are either
:tired with or insulted by the
Machiavellian invocation of
?the race card by politicians
whose own life experiences
,and characters make them
;unlikely racial warriors.


Phone: 325-3336


i















Time to ground national airlines


P1 By SIR RONALD
SANDERS
(The writer is a business exec-
utive and former Caribbean
Kliplomat who publishes widely
fpn Small States in the global
communityty.


N 1992, the West Indian
Commission, in its com-
ipiehensive report to CARI-
AO()M Heads of Government on
rthi future of the region, dealt
clearly with the matter of
n gional air transportation. The
C(mnmmission called for a "defin-
itive community policy" to
Ensure intra-regional movement
|of goods and people, to facili-
tale tourism and non-tourism
travel and the exchange of
oods with the outside world.
The Commission had
reviewed the experience of the
Region in which countries had
pursued the option of national
airlines, with at least three of
them serving multi-destinations
within the Caribbean.
The Barbados-based,
.Caribbean Airways, had already
Collapsed, and Guyana Airways
- even though it plied only
,between Guyana and countries
outside the region was
already dying.
Inevitably the Commission
came to the conclusion that a
single CARICOM airline, in
some form, was vitally neces-
sary and the national airline
option should be abandoned.
Nonetheless, the policy of
individual national airlines con-
,tinued and has proven to be a
[long, very expensive and dismal
failure.
It is a failure that the region
cannot afford to continue.
The opportunity to do some-
thing positive and constructive
is now ripe. Our governments
should seize the moment.
Three government-owned
airlines that serve multi-desti-
nations within the region, are
all undergoing major restruc-
turing exercises. This follows a
decade during which they col-
lectively incurred losses in
excess US$1.5 billion fundedby
-taxpayers', mone'yT. eir-
lines are: Air Jamaica, BWIA
and LIAT.


Bahamas Air, which moves
only between the Bahamas and
US ports, is also losing money
and the government is consid-
ering privatizing it, but privati-
zation did not work for Air
Jamaica, BWIA or LIAT.
The current restructurings
are expensive and again are
being funded by the taxpayers
to the tune of US$400 million
for Air Jamaica, US$250 mil-
lion for BWIA and US$ 50 mil-
lion for LIAT the LIAT
funding coming from the
regional Oil Stabilisation Fund
initially established for pover-
ty eradication.
These investments warrant
examination.
The CARICOM region has
relied on BWIA for 65 years,


airline on each route they now
compete with several.
Our airlines are small -
their collective annual traffic is
around 3.5 million passengers.
As a basis for comparison
the US annual Domestic Traffic
is almost 500 million. Interna-
tional traffic to/from the US is
140 million annually with 54 per
cent of that carried by US air-
lines. Traffic between the
Caribbean and the US in 2004
was 15 million of which 83
per cent was carried on US air-
lines.
Caribbean airlines have sur-
vived apart from huge gov-
ernment subsidies of taxpayers'
money on loyalty from the
domestic and Diaspora markets.
Passenger load factors for


Caribbean airlines have

survived apart from huge

government subsidies of

taxpayers' money on

loyalty from the domestic

and Diaspora markets.


LIAT for 50 and Air Jamaica
for 35.
Other than the periodic
exception that proves the rule,
not one :of these airlines has
been profitable under govern-
ment or private sector owner-
ship for a collective total of over
150 years.

The Airline Context

T he airline industry is
now characterised,
increasingly, by an "Open
Skies" environment under
which, between any two coun-
tries, any airline from either
country can fly as often as they
choose and charge whatever
fares the market will bear to,
anywhere in the other country-,
Where Caribbean airlines
used to compete with just one


our airlines have been below 65
per cent not enough to be
profitable when the major US
airlines continue to lose mon-
ey even with load factors abqve
75 per cent.
The problem of Caribbean
carriers is insufficient passen-
gers a consistent problem for
over 25 years but worse now
with more competition which
has led to lower fares.
Those fares are going to get
lower still with the arrival of the
new breed of Low Cost Carriers
(LCCs) such as JetBlue in New
York and Spirit in Florida.
They have been setting the
fare levels which the higher cost
airlines have to match. The
LCCs are profitable at lower
fares, the higher cost.airlines
are not. Half of the:UJS airline
industry is presently in formal
bankruptcy protection as a


result.
With the imminent arrival of ..
the LCCs in the Caribbean, the S
financial problems faced by
Caribbean airlines, including
Bahamas Air, are going to get
worse as fare levels plummet tot
well below their costs but above
the costs of the newer, more
efficient LCCs.
In Europe, Ryanair has just
reported an after tax profit for -
the last three months of
US$82.5 million on revenues of
US$476 million from 8.5 mil-
lion passengers while the Brazil-
ian LCC, GOL, has announced
three months profits of US$62.5
million on revenues of US$316
million from 3.5 million pas- SIR Ronald Sanders
sengers.
through co-operation and dif-
Is There a Solution for ferent levels of integration. The
Caribbean Airlines? annual savings were sufficient
to offset the annual losses that
These airlines typically sus-
ir Jamaica, BWIA tained.
a and LIAT, over the THE CTO-commissioned
last ten years, have incurred study was ignored.
lossesinexcessof US$1.5billion Each airline did its own
and are now, between them, thing. More money -- a few
receiving US$700 million to changes the same basic sys-
restructure their operations in tern though this time under
the hope of making them prof- private sector management.
itable. The result? US$1.5 billion in
Despite the losses, incurred taxpayer funded losses.
by their separate operations, Recently, the Caribbean
each airline is again restructur- Hotel Association (CHA)
ing its own operations, on its examined the issues again and
own and without reference to in clear, unequivocal terms con-
the others. eluded that a regional airline is
But isn't there a better the only way forward.
approach? It issued a White Paper to
Ten years ago, the Caribbean form the basis for a discussion
Tourism Organisation (CTO) between the three airlines and
commissioned an analysis of the their government owners on the
potential benefits of inter air- regional dimension to the air-
line co-operation and integra- line crisis in the region and
tion to present to the airlines called for the creation of a
and their government owners regional airline.
to form the basis of a rational So far, this White Paper has
discussion of how to create a also been ignored.
,.Niabte, sustainable regional air- sa ..
The report identified h e at r ed'it limited o ic
savings that could be achieved dislocai ymakingse'fthe
": ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ l ... "dS1cfi6h-15y making uise 6df'the


STRING AT1.1


The deadline for submission of abstracts
is Friday, November 25, 2005. In no
more than 150 words, describe the
problem your work addresses and how
your work contributes to the solution.
Please ensure that you include your
name, telephone contacts, mailing
address and/or e-mail address on the
first sheet of the abstract.


ovember 9,2605
Call for papers (first announcement)
November 25, 2005
Deadline for submission of abstracts
December 2, 2005
Notification of successful submissions
December 23,2005 i
Deadline for final paper submission


K IA.


Ilb


I FN L APR


I AWAiRDS MI


:PAGE 6, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


*


WORLD VI


operational units of the exist-
ing airlines and retaining their
individual airline brand identi-
ties while having them operate
an integrated flight schedule
developed by an integrated
head office and marketing
organisation for all three air-
lines with significant cost sav-
ings from streamlined systems,
reduced overlap, economies of
scale, greater network efficien-
cies and a greater revenue base
through having an integrated,
connected network.
The arguments offered by
the airlines for not even exam-
ining the regional solution are
the same as before: each says
we are willing but the others
cannot be relied upon.
They also argue that each
airline has to fix its own prob-
lems before it can enter a merg-
er or part of an alliance.
In the end, these are nothing
but excuses that maintain failed
airlines that are sucking gov-
ernment money that is needed
elsewhere.

Conclusion

The national airline
option has not worked
for the CARICOM area. And,
if it continues to,be pursued, air
traffic into and out of the region
will pass only to carriers of oth-
er countries with little if any
regard for CARICOM's devel-
opment goals.
The CTO and CHA studies
provide suggestions for a
regional entity that would help
the CARICOM area to protect
its interests, and save a large
part of the monies now being
spent to maintain the appear-
ance of fitness among sick air-
lines.
It's high time that the deci-
sion makers in governments
develop the Community Policy
on air transportation that the
West India Commission
urged. Ministers of Tourism and
transportation should join the
CTO and CHA in insisting that
the recommendations of the
recent studies be given serious
attention..
" responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com







MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


Sinta esdays


ARTHUR FOULKES: NOTED JOURNALIST,
UNIVERSAL PERSPECTIVE, HISTORICAL CONTEXT A MUST-READ COLUMN THAT GETS To THE POINT
..................................... ........... ............. ............................................................................................................................................................................................. ................................................................. ..................................................................


CDR will not be joining any


other political organisation


THE CDR has not agreed to join the PLP or
any other political organization but will
continue its challenge to develop and empower
Bahamians, Phenton Neymore, one of the
party's leaders, told a press conference yester-
day
Former CDR leader, Dr Bernard Nottage last
Thursday, brought to the stage by CDR members,
addressed the PLP national convention confirm-
ing for the nation that he had decided to rejoin the
PLP.
After being consulted by Dr Nottage, Mr Ney-
more said, members of the CDR "safely delivered
Dr Nottage to his first political home without a
scar and a blemish".
However, Mr Neymore said that despite the
presence of CDR members at the convention the
party has decided to press on.
"I have been given assurances, through their
actions that the members of the CDR ...are com-
mitted in assuring that Bahamians are afforded an
opportunity to have the option of supporting


* By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
PRIME Minister Perry
Christie, two Cabinet minis-
ters and several staff members
left the Bahamas yesterday to
attend the Commonwealth
Heads of Government confer-
ence in Valletta, Malta. This
will be the prime minister's
first international conference
since his illness earlier this
year.
Since his minor stroke in
May and his recuperation, Mr
Christie has slowly resumed
most of his previous duties.
Leaving with Mr Christie
were Foreign Affairs
Minister Fred Mitchell, and
Tourism Minister Obie Wilch-
combe.
London, where they will
spend three days, will be the
delegation's first stop. Mr
Christie said that while in Lon-
don he will have lunch with
Prime Minister Tony Blair to
discuss issues relevant to the
region, and the Bahamas in
particular.
Mr Christie said that the
closing of the British High
Commission in the Bahamas,
and the removal of its head-
quarters to Jamaica will be a
particular matter that will be
highlighted.
"Clearly for the Bahamas
we have always had a point of
view over whether or not
British interests are best rep-
resented in the Bahamas at
this time, in view of the fact
that they have moved their
headquarters in the region to
Jamaica; most certainly that
they operate in the Bahamas
from Jamaica.
"And so clearly it is a point
of view that I would have, for
the first time since it occurred,
an opportunity to speak direct-
ly with the Prime Minister
Tony Blair," Mr Christie said.
The prime minister said that
in Malta, the second leg of the
journey where they will spend
three days, a broad rage of
issues pertinent to the
Bahamas will be discussed,
among them a proposed
reform of the United Nations,
the issue of light weapons, and
the problem of illegal migra-
tion.
"One of the issues that is
very significant to our coun-
try, and which I spoke to
directly several days ago when
I spoke at the convention is
the issue of the burden the
Bahamas has to take arising
out of the deteriorating econ-
omy of Haiti," he said.
While the prime minister
will be abroad, deputy prime
minister Cynthia Pratt will
assume his responsibilities
when the House of Assembly
meets on November 23.
It is during this time that she
is expected to announce the


such an organization (at the next general elec-
tion)," he said.
Charles Maynard, the party's "Deputy CEO"
will assume Dr Nottage's responsibilities until the
party meets in convention in 90 days to hold an
election for a new slate of party officers.
"The CDR is proud to have had Dr Nottage as
leader and wish him well in his new political
home," Mr Neymore said.
The party's interim leader Charles Maynard
said that Dr Nottage served with great zeal and
passion.
The party, he said, has been energized by its
new challenge and are committed to "our goals
now more than ever".
FAYNE THOMPSON, head of political
action, Phenton Nemour, acting deputy head of
the CDR, and Charles Maynard, acting head of
the CDR. A convention to confirm the posi-
tions will be held in 90 days.
(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)


retirement of Dame Ivy
Dumont and the new appoint-
ment of an acting governor
general.


The prime minister and his
team are expected to return
to the Bahamas on November
28.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005


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WASHINGTON DC -
Top media minds Jayne Wise
of National Geographic Trav-
eller, Veronica Stoddart of
USA Today and Elinor
Tatum of New York's Ams-
terdam News will join some
of the world's top authorities
on multicultural marketing in
Nassau when the seventh full
scale edition of the Caribbean
Media Exchange on Sustain-
able Tourism (CMEx) is held
December 8-12 at Breezes.
Directors of Counterpart
International, the interna-
tional non-profit develop-
ment organisation in Wash-
ington, DC, announced that
this December's four-day
meeting has attracted some
of the media industry's top
writers and editors, as well as
seasoned experts in the area
of niche marketing to exam-
ine the theme: "Exploring
Niche Markets for Caribbean
Tourism". Delegates will
examine the vibrant, millions-
strong Caribbean Diaspora in
North America and Europe,
and the lucrative African-
American, Hispanic-Ameri-
can and Asian-American
markets which wield tremen-
dous resources and influence.
The Bahamas conference
follows eleven other regional
media exchanges since Octo-
ber 2001 which have gathered
regional and international
media people with tourism
experts and officials.
In addition to the full-scale
media exchanges, Counter-
part launched streamlined
one-day sessions with its dis-
tinctive interactive focus. The
day-long CMExPressmeet-
ings were held in Antigua and
Barbuda, Trinidad and Toba-
go and Brooklyn, New York
this year, while full CMEx
meetings have been success-
fully staged in the Bahamas,
Barbados, Jamaica (Kingston,
Montego Bay and Ocho
Rios) and St. Lucia. A spe-
cial edition was held in the
Dominican Republic in
August.
The conference has attract-
ed a strong contingent of
Caribbean and Caribbean-
American community and
business leaders, as well a
cross-section of journalists
from across the Caribbean,
from Antigua to Curaqao,
and in the Diaspora from
California to New York.
Experts confirmed to attend


Event set for


December 8-12


the meeting include Michael
Deflorimonte, former Vice
President of African Ameri-
can Affairs at Charles
Schwab & Co; Lisa Skriloff,
President of Multicultural
Marketing Resources; Hugh
Riley, Director of Marketing
for the Americas of the
Caribbean Tourism Organi-
sation; Andria Hall, Presi-
dent, SpeakEasy M.E.D.I.A;
Basil Smith, Director of Com-
munications, Bahamas Min-
istry of Tourism; Irwine
Clare, Managing Director of
the Caribbean Immigrant
Services; Frank Comito,
Executive Vice President of
the Bahamas Hotel Associa-
tion; Halim Majeed, Deputy
Director of the Dubois-
Bunche Centre for Public
Policy of Medgar Evers Col-
lege; Saul Gitlin, Executive
Vice President at Kang &
Lee Advertising; internation-
al author and journalist, Ian


Williams; Dr. Basil Springer,
Chairman of Counterpart
Caribbean; and Patrick Cozi-
er, Secretary General of the
Caribbean Broadcasting
Union.
CMEx's wide range of
sponsors and supporters
includes Almond Resorts,
American Express, Bahamas
Hotel Association, Bahamas
Ministry of Tourism, Breezes
Bahamas, Association of
Caribbean Media Workers,
Black Entertainment Televi-
sion, Caribbean Alliance for
Sustainable Tourism,
Caribbean Broadcasting
Union, Caribbean Hotel
Association, Caribbean
World News Network, Coca-
Cola, Coco Resorts, ENG
Caribbean Vision Center,
Ruder Finn, Spirit Airlines,
United Nations Development
Programme, and "We are
the Caribbean Media Ser-
vices".


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I







THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005, PAGE 9


LOCALN


TOP public servants and judges along with Foreign Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell during awards presentation. Pictured from left
(standing) Deputy Permanent Secretary Antoinette Thompson, Clifford Nairn (first runner-up), Voneil Smith (special mention),
Jason Saunders (public officer of the year), Philip Simon (judge), Melvina Pratt-Thompson (second runner-up), Prisca Gibbs (special
mention), William Pedro Morely (special mention), Rev James Palacious (judge), (seated) Permanent Secretary Irene Stubbs, Foreign
Affairs Minister and Minister for the Public Service Fred Mitchell, and Kingsley Black (judge).
(BIS photo by Derek Smith)



Civil servants honoured for



'exemplary performances'


FOREIGN Affairs Minis-
ter Fred Mitchell, presented
trophies and cheques to top
civil servants during a cere-
mony Friday.
Jason Saunders, Senior
Radar Controller, Ministry of
Transport and Aviation, was
named public service officer
of the year 2005-06.
First runner-up was Clifford
Nairn, head messenger, Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs. Sec-
ond runner-up was Melvina


Pratt-Thompson, filing assis-
tant, Ministry of Social Ser-
vices and Community Devel-
opment.
Special mention went to
William Pedro Morley, mes-
senger, Ministry of Labour
and Immigration; Voneil
Smith, accountant, Treasury
Department, Ministry of
Finance; and Prisca Gibbs,
chief executive secretary,
Ministry of Works and Utili-
ties.


"Each of you are to be con-
gratulated and commended
for your exemplary perfor-
mances and notable contribu-
tions in providing public ser-
vice par excellence, which, no
doubt, underscored your
respective nominations and
indeed your selection as win-
ners," said Mr Mitchell.
"Your presence today
attests to the caliber and qual-
ity of public officers that are
represented at all staffing ley-


els in the public service.
"It no doubt bodes well for,
not only motivating your col-
leagues and peers, but also for
demonstrating what can be
achieved with hard work and
commitment."
The Public Service Officer
of the Year Award was a high-
light of the annual Public Ser-
vice Week and Recognition
of Retirees.
Sixteen nominations were
received this year.


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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


r


Share your news
The Tri5une wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

:,H .E RY/






PAGE 10, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


Mud residents voice concerns

0 RIGHT: Ministers Shane Gibson and Melanie Griffin met
with residents of the Mud to hear their concerns following the
devastating fire. Assistant Commissioner of Police Ellison
Greenslade in charge of the Grand Bahama and northern Bahamas
district, is also seen.
0 OPPOSITE: Following Thursday night's fire, Mud residents
packed the Marsh Harbour Seventh Day Adventist Church on
Friday for a meeting with Housing Minister Shane Gibson and
Social Services Minister Melanie Griffin.
0 BELOW: A distraught Haitian man expresses his
concern to ministers.
SEE PAGES ONE AND THREE
(Photo: Denise Maycock/Tribune staff)




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Devise and implement effective marketing and promotional campaigns
Have a proven ability to analyze market trends and identify
opportunities and competitive marketing strategies.
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REQUIREMENTS:
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A passion for marketing promotional products and shaping creative
marketing plans.
Excellent communication and organizational skill
BA or BS, preferably in marketing or Business and knowledge of
the latest software applications.
Send resume to:
Human Resource Department
P.O. Box N-1277,
Nassau, Bahamas


Via Email: Suntee@batelnet.bs


Via Fax: 394-6706 or 393-2862


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005, PAGE 11


FRE q

e-


Tuesda, November 22
'b*
er 22
Lo* e 's, Sldie Rd







THE TRIBUNE


AP GE 12 MONDAY NOVEMBER 5


C'U
COMMONWEALTH BANK

Employment Opportunity
Assistant Manager, Delinquency
Freeport Branch

Commonwealth Bank is the premier Bahamian Bank with
branches located in New Providence, Abaco and Grand Bahama.
We are committed to delivering superior quality service, to training
and developing our employees, to creating value for our
shareholders and to promoting economic growth and stability in
the community.

Core Job Responsibilities:
Performing administrative functions to assist with the recovery
process in accordance with the Bank's policies and procedures
Making field calls and contacting delinquent customers for the
recovery of funds
Preparing reports and court documents to assist with the recovery
process
Promote excellent service quality
Effectively lead, support and coach Special Credit personnel to
achieve delinquency objectives
Managing reports on delinquent activities

Qualifications, Skills and Experience
Bachelor's degree in Business Administration, Banking & Finance
or related field
At least eight years commercial banking experience with a
minimum of 2 years managerial experience and 4 years
collections experience
Experience in Delinquency Management
Excellent Leadership and coaching skills
Excellent communication, analytical and reasoning skills
Strong interpersonal skills to work effectively with staff and
customers
Strong PC skills (Microsoft Office Suite)

Remuneration Package
We offer an excellent remuneration and benefits package, which
includes a stock option plan; performance based incentives; health,
vision, dental and life insurances; and a pension plan.


Interested persons should submit their resumes and copies of certificates
in writing or email before December 2, 2005 to:

HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT
"Re: ASSISTANT MANAGER DELINQUENCY, Freeport Branch"
Head Office, The Plaza, 2d Floor, Mackey Street
P.O. Box SS-6263,
ENassau, Bahamas
Fax: 394-0758
E-mail address: Tanya.Astwood@combanldtd.com

4~'.Now


Ingraham visits the Mud

FNM leader Hubert Ingraham, MP for North Abaco, and
Robert Sweeting (right of Mr Ingraham) conducted a walkabout
in the Mud following massive fire.I
SEE STORY PAGE ONE
(Photo: Denise Maycock/Tribune staff):,
.............................................. ..................... ."........................ ............................... ......... "



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LOCAL NEWS


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Competition to promote cleanliness


* BEy Bahamas Information Mrs Gomez said that this competi- done. The committee thereforedecided ments have been observed at the Min-
Services tion is a part of the Ministry of Health's to postpone to November 30. istry of Works, Ministry of Health,
I larger environmental health and public "There are 18 entrants, to name a National Insurance and The College
THE Department of Environmen- awareness programme. few, Ministry of Health, Ministry of of the Bahamas, she added.
tal Health Services launched a "Clean, "This initiative undertaken by the Public Service, Ministry of Works, Min- "There has been an initial and sub-
Green, Pristine" competition to pro- government is an ongoing process in its istry of Agriculture and Fisheries, Min- sequent inspection-of these properties
mote a culture of clhariliffess, discipline mission to enhance the beauty and istry of Education, National Insurance by the Judges," Mrs. Gomez said.
and service starting within government tranquility of the seven hundred islands and College of the Bahamas," Mrs. The judges are Alpheus Ramsey,
buildings and offices. for the enjoyment of the residents and Gomez said. Peter Brown, Sheila Cox, Ann Gar-
Veronica Gomez, education consul- visitors," said Mrs Gomez The judges are pleased with raway, Mary Rahming and Veronica
tant and judge of the competition, The previous date for the judging of improvements as well as the initiatives Gomez.
made the announcement at a press the competition was scheduled for Sep- observed so far and also with the The competition's focus is excellent
conference held at the National Pride tember 30 but due to the inclement enthusiasm displayed by the entrants, service, Mrs Gomez said.
headquarters on Friday. weather much of the work could not be said Mrs Gomez. Notable improve- "Contestants pre encouraged to


consider proper signage, the avail-
ability of information, friendly recep-
tion and special customer services
such as facilities for the physically
challenged, public parking, attractive
green space and native flowering
plants," she added.
"Keeping the environment clean is
not just for government but it is peo-
ple's responsibility," she said.
Mrs Gomez added that government
buildings are generally unkempt and
they need to invest more in mainte-
nance.


Travel firm represents



Bahamas at trade show

CACIQUE International
recently joined the Nassau Par-
adise Island Promotion Board,
the Ministry of Tourism and
other Bahamian industry exec-
utives in representing The ..S
Bahamas at the biggest incen-
tive travel trade show. and con-
ference held in North Amen-ri
ca.
The incentive Travel and
Meeting Executives annual
Motivation Show in Chicago,
Illinois brought together prod-
uct, service and destination sup-
pliers as well as some of the
most influential "conference
and incentive" travel buyers.
Participation in the IT&ME
trade show gives Cacique Inter-
national an opportunity to liaise
with existing clients and to meet E PICTURED from left: Lio Mograbi, VP sales and marketing/DMC operations,
new potential ones, and over- Cacique International; Trish Adams, director of industry relations for the Caribbean,
all to help promote The Maritz Travel Company; Chris Wheeler, executive director -incentive sales, Kerzner
Bahamas as a leading destina- International; Claudette Davis, director of marketing services, Nassau Paradise Island
tion in the world and to keep Promotion Board; James Malcolm, executive director group travel, Bahamas Ministry
competitive in the international of Tourism; and Shawn Shawyer, president and CEO, Cacique International.
arena.: .....
a.The trade show also gives
C acique and other Bahamian
participants insight into what
other destinations and destina-
tion management companies
are offering, enabling them to
become even more attractive
and competitive.


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005, PAGE 13


A








PAGE 4, MODAY, OVEMER 21 2005THE TIBUN


Call for Mitchell to answer visa questions


FROM page one
forward to Haiti with his cargo. He has
requested permits for six persons who work
with him on his boat.
"PM has asked me to assist Mr Bain with
his concern which is now a financial prob-
lem (for) him and his business and family."
"The minister forwarded the e-mail to
the Permanent Secretary under the heading
'Re: Your Approval', and she duly
approved the issuance of visas on May 11
2004."
Mr Bethel said that documents in the par-
ty's possession indicate that this same Mr
Bain was later able to obtain entry visas for
additional groups of Haitian nationals in addi-
tion to the first 6, totalling at least 30 more.
Further, Mr Bethel said that a copied


ledger entry from a ledger maintained by
the Consular Section of the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs, dated November 13,2004,
clearly states that it was the "Minister"
who approved the issuance of entry visas
for a group of Chinese nationals, and that
the sponsor of this group, the person who
obtained the Minister's approval, was Sid-
ney Stubbs, the MP for Holy Cross.
"From these two documents alone it is
clear that Minister Fred Mitchell's assertion
that there was no ministerial involvement
in the issuance of entry visas cannot be
believed. It is clear that at least so far as the
public servants were concerned it was the
Minister, himself, who approved the visas
for a group of Chinese nationals sought by
his political colleague, Sidney Stubbs," Mr
Bethel said.


Retail Store Manager


Position Objective:
The incumbent is responsible to the owner for controlling
overall operations of retail store on Paradise Island. The
incumbent must be a responsible, hard working, mature adult.

Duties and Responsibilities
* Management, scheduling and training of staff
* Responsible for communications between the Shift Manager
and Store Clerks
* Daily management of till report, including the correctness
of these reports
* Daily bank deposits
* Daily management of inventory control and reporting
* Sales and Customer Service
* The overall appearance of the store

Skills
* Knowledge of Computer, Point of Sale and Credit Card
machines
* Excellent management, follow through and organisational
skills
* Knowledge of retail sales, merchandizing and inventory
control
* Knowledge of The Bahamas
* Ability and willingness to follow company policy and
procedures and to be the leader of the "Team"

Experience Required
A minimum of 3 years experience in this capacity.

Salary will be commensurate with experience.

Interested candidates should send resume to:
Human Resources Manager
P. 0. Box CB-13045
Nassau, Bahamas
Or email to: bahamasresume@yahoo.com


"The Minister of Foreign Affairs, Fred
Mitchell, sought to dismiss the allegations
in a series of press statements, without ever
answering any of the very serious ques-
tions that have 'been raised," Mr Bethel
said.
Mr Mitchell has said that as minister he
does not directly approve Bahamian visas.
He said that suggestions that there has
been mismanagement has been "FNM pro-
paganda".
"The criticism is that the procedures again
are not open and transparent and there may
even be issues of training. In order to
address these issues, I have requested a
management audit of the department by
the Public Service Commission and I thank
the Acting Chair Bishop Sam Greene for
agreeing to undertake this work.


Christie on immigration

FROM page one
Mr Christie added that a Communication will be made in the
House of Assembly on Wednesday about the recent fire in the Mud.'
"Hopefully systemic change will come to the conditions down
there, including prohibiting any further construction and any return
of persons to that site who may have lost their homes," he said.
Mr Christie said that the minister of Housing and National
Insurance Shane Gibson, who visited the site of the fire in Abaco,
has strongly recommended a structural change to the way the
issue of illegal immigration is being dealt with in Abaco.
"Governments in the past have refused, or failed to deal with the
issue and it has just been a cumulative effect. Now that we have had
this message this reminder that it is a potential disaster everyday,
we can not allow any expansion of that community.
"In fact as a point of policy we will prohibit any reconstruction in
that area. This is going to be an opportunity for us to determine
their status, their entitlement to additional accommodation in the
Bahamas, and be able to once and for all begin the process of
adjustment that has to take place in Abaco," he said.


1'Mother' Pratt's praise for young officer


FROM page one
Pratt, confirmed that Corpo-
ral Sweeting was not one of the
men in question.
According to Mrs Pratt, the
corporal is an "honest, trustwor-
thy young man". She called the
accusation against him "unfair".
Corporal Sweeting said: "I
have been in the police force
for 16 years and I have never
been in a problem and never
did anything to bring something
like this on me. I was very upset
when I saw the paper".
The officer said he was par-
ticularly concerned about


impression that the article may
have made on the many young
persons who look up to him.
Corporal Sweeting donates
his time to youth initiatives and
practices with a junkanoo group
at the St Thomas More Catholic
primary school, where his
daughter is a student.
"I train a group of young men
and I am a role model for them.
What will their parents say
about me when they open the
paper?" he asked.
Deputy Prime Minister Pratt
said that Corporal Sweeting is
"highly respected" at the school.
"Parents and teachers look


up to him and really regard him
highly," she said.
Corporal Sweeting said he is
also concerned about the mis-
take because he feels he is ready
to move to the next level as a
police officer, and fears that the
photo may affect his chances
for promotion.
"If the commissioner sees
this, what will he think?" the
corporal asked.
According to the deputy
prime minister however, he
should have nothing to worry
about in this regard:
"Corporal Sweeting is a fine
officer who is very diligent


about his work. I find him to be
an extremely trustworthy young
man with focus," she said.
"He has been with me for three
years. What has really impressed
me is how much of a family man
he is for such a young man."
Mrs Pratt said that as well as
being a young husband and
father struggling to establish the
best possible life for his family,
Corporal Sweeting is a gener-
ous and helpful officer that
takes his job very seriously.
"He came to the force with
every intention of working dili-
gently to make his way up," she
said.


Ingraham pledge to Haitian community


FROM page one i
were tragically affected by the
fire. f
Mr Ingraham and South Aba-
co MP Robert Sweeting met
distraught residents during a
walkabout in the Haitian set-
tlement on Friday. He
expressed his sympathy to all
those who lost their homes in
Thursday's massive blaze.
"You have my sympathy and
the sympathy of my colleague,
Mr Sweeting, and my party,"
Mr Ingraham told a large crowd
of Mud residents.
He also visited Moniquea
Noal, the grief-stricken daugh-
ter of 74-year-old Cilianes
Booca who perished in the fire.
Mrs Noal, who is eight


months pregnant, and has six
children, was still in shock.
Many Haitians ran over to
greet Mr Ingraham as he
walked through the settlement.
Some even referred to him as
"prime minister".
"I believe the government'
will do what it can to assist you.
We will seek to determine what
we can do. We will give the
Catholic priest $10,000 today to
assist yourselves," he said.
Abaco's Chief welfare offi-
cer reported that fire assess-
ments revealed that some 128
homes were destroyed. She said
that they are still trying to assess
the number of persons left
homeless by the fire.
"We started registering per-
sons on Friday, but a lot of per-


sons have not come in to regis-
ter because many of them have
no status and are afraid," she
said.
During a meeting on Friday,
Housing Minister Shane Gib-
son promised that government
would assist those individuals
without passports, but who have
legal status in the Bahamas, to
purchase land in more struc-
tured communities.
Scotty Fenelus, a Haitian
Bahamian, is not convinced that
government will keep its
promise to Haitians.
"I have been hearing that talk
since I was a youth in primary
school for 10 years now, and
many Haitians are still waiting
for years and are still not regu-
larized," he said.


The dilemma facing many
Haitians is the inability to pu *-
chase government-subsidized:
property. They cannot afford tk
purchase property from private
companies.
"A lot of them just don't have,
the money. And that is a big
concern for many of them," said,
Haitian Pastor Sitoire of First-
Bethel Baptist Church in Marsh-
Harbour.
"Many of them want to buy.
land, so we want government
to help Haitians because many
of them look forward to move,
but the high cost of land would
not allow them and we are
asking government to look
into this for them so they can
find long term housing," she
said.


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S VACANCY NOTICE

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC) invites applications from suitably qualified
persons to fill the position of Assistant General Manager Human Resources and Training. The
successful candidate will report directly to the General Manager. Candidates should have a
minimum of 15 years post graduate and relevant experience at senior management level.

Overview and Objectives

The Assistant General Manager Human Resources and Training will be responsible for
understanding the human capital needs of the corporation and optimizing the human
resource value provided to the organization. The objectives include:
" Preparing the current workforce for success in a cost-effective manner
* Anticipating and fulfilling the short and long term human resource needs of BEC
* Developing and maintaining the programs required to identify BEC's top performers
and weakest performers
. Effectively communicating the vision of BEC both internally and externally

Key Accountabilities and Measures:
" Develop and maintain employee records, in a confidential manner, that include all
information necessary to support the training, manpower planning, succession planning,
compensation, benefits, and performance evaluation programs for BEC
" Manage employee training to support business productivity and continuity
" Administer employee benefits in a cost-effective manner
" Provide employee relation services to keep the workforce productive and motivated
* Develop and maintain the manpower plan and succession plan
* Assist the organization with employee needs analysis and recruitment
* Monitor the implementation of collective bargaining agreements, including reviewing
recommendations for engagements, promotions, transfers, discipline, dismissals
" Assist the Labor Compliance officer in industrial relations matters and participate
in the collective bargaining process
* Create and manage BEC's public relations program and improve the impression of
BEC with customers, investors, and governmental authorities
" Effectively communicate the mission and actions of BEC to all employees
* Establish and maintain corporate policies and procedures relating to human resource
management and monitor compliance
* Develop relationships with key external constituents, including the media, to ensure
a positive message about BEC is conveyed to the public
" Develop, challenge, anl evaluate subordinates
* Communicate effectively with superiors, subordinates, and peers


Applications along with resumes should be submitted by
Friday December 2, 2005 and addressed to:

The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Re: Assistant General Manager Human Resources
Private & Confidential


- -- --


PAGE 14, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005.


THE TRIBUNE








THE TIBUNEMONDA, NOEMBER21,O205, PGEWS


Student wins top prize



in essay competition

BAHAMIAN student Felisha Pratt:
placed second in a regional essay competi-
tion and won a cash scholarship of $1,500.
The 10-year-old is a student at EP f
Roberts primary school.
Each year, the Florida Caribbean Cruise
Association (FCCA) opens its Children's
Essay Contest to students from through-
out the Caribbean.
"The contest, which is sponsored by the '
association's charitable arm, the FCCA
Foundation for the Caribbean, was created
to encourage children's creativity and gen-
erate awareness of the vital role cruise
tourism plays in the Caribbean," said the
association in a statement.
The contest is conducted in two cate-
gorier, a junior division for children 12 years
old and under and a senior division for chil-
dren between 13 and 16 years old. 0 EP Roberts teacher lanthe Bain,
For the past two years, several Bahamian second place winner Felisha Pratt,
students have captured top spots in the director of cruise development
competition. Carla Stuart and Milton Lewis,
As a result of her success, Felisha's school principal of EP Roberts.
was awarded $750. junkanoo costumes are made, and more
The competition required students to entertainment for tourists, such as theatres,
write a 300 to 500 word essay on "What museums and cultural shows." "In order for our country to increase the
their country should do to encourage cruise In addition she stated: "We need to cre- number of land-based visitors, we must
passengers to return as land-based vaca- ate a more secure and controlled environ- work together, striving for creative ideas
tioners." ment for our cruise passengers and curb that will encourage foreigners to come."
In'her essay, Ms Pratt argued for "regular the amount of criminal activity within the Carla Stuart, director of cruise develop-
displays of our culture for public enjoy- islands, especially in the capital of Nassau. ment at the Ministry of Tourism presented
ment, such as junkanoo parades and If vacationers feel safe in a particular place, cheques to Felisha and to Milton Lewis,
junkanoo exhibits to show tourists how they will stay and consider returning, principal of EP Roberts Primary School.


Poultry expert


named farmer


of the year


CHARLES Gibson, who
owns and operates Diamond
Farms Limited on Fire Trail
Road, has been selected as
Farmer of the Year.
Mr Gibson, 56, started
farming in the early 1980s
when he was 32 years old.
He gained his early experi-
ence under the late Henry
Burrows and at Gladstone
Farms.
His poultry operation start-
ed in 1983. He grew mangoes,
avocados, tomatoes, sweet
peppers, cabbages, Persian
limes and hot peppers.
Eventually, he streamlined
his operation to the produc-
tion of goats, sheep, hogs and
chicken. Poultry and pork are
his main products.
Since the closure of Glad-
stone Farms a few years ago,
import restrictions have been
relaxed and poultry produc-
ers seem to have sold less in
the face of foreign competi-
tion, the Farmer of the Year
awards committee said.
According to the commit-
tee however, Mr Gibson has


been resilient, in that while
all other small producers
dropped out of the market,
he kept his market share.
Mr Gibson no longer raises
sheep and goats but still main-
tains a 30-strong breeding sow
operation. Four mature boars
are kept to service sows.
Diamond Farms customers
include City Markets, Super
Value, On the Run, Bamboo
Shack, Budget and select
small snack food outlets.
"Mr Gibson has distin-
guished himself as a leader in
poultry and many of the
smaller producers rely on him
to place orders for baby
chicks and feed," the com-
mittee said.
-In addition, Diamond
Farms supplies chicks and in
some cases feed to govern-
ment schools involved in
poultry production.
Mr Gibson also gives tech-
nical advice to the schools and
to smaller producers.
He attends St Joseph's
Catholic Church on a regular
basis.


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005, PAGE 15


THE TRIBUNE






PAGE 16, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005


illsttefteaeest rSg

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agB8la


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THE TIBUN MONAY, OVEMER 2, 205, PGE 1


V79 r I


S THE ISLANDS OF THE


: j .%

0'8S


s o reTraining Trom
iing season, Dec. 16 -
now on the World
angered Species. For
"F at 362-6477 or


eco-system.


The Nature Conservancy and The Coastal Awareness
Month Committee are asking Bahamians to protect The
Bahamas' delicate ecosystem by removing all invasive
species. For more information, contact The Bahamas
National Trust at 393-1317.

Join the New Providence Community
Church's diversified Sundays

One Sunday per quarter, the New Providence Community
Church organizes community related projects that include
beach cleanups, tree planting and other activities aimed
at improving communities in the Western portion of the
island. Call NPCC at 327-1660 for further information on the
next diversified :Sunday activities. Email:
dwhite@npcconline.org.


If you wish
here are s<


:nup
is For


)unity
ipoagn


* A beach cleanup
* Painting of dumpsters by students
* Anti-litter campaigns
* Special church services including a
message "to encourage public
participation in ways that will create a o
cleaner environment" 2
* Best kept yard competition
* A cleanest "settlement" competition on
your island
* A cultural show or competition for school
on your Island
* An environmental exhibition in your
community or school
* Nature walks


0 e% t phi
H e-mail


I II


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005, PAGE 17


THE TRIBUNE


o. 00 ,,e ,, ..










PAGE 18, MONDAY, NOVEMBERI21,2005 THELTRIBUNE


LBahamasair launchenwAb osri


* A BAHAMASAIR Dash-8 aircraft drives through a wall of water sprayed from fire engines as it
touched down in Marsh Harbour, Abaco on its inaugural flight from Fort Lauderdale, Florida on
Thursday, November 17,2005







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* TYRONE Sawyer, director of Airlift Development, and Jeritzan Outten, director of Abaco for
Ministry of Tourism, present a special gift to Paul Major, managing director of Bahamasair, to
mark the occasion of the airline's inaugural flight into Marsh Harbour
(Photos: Ministry of Tourism/Derek Smith)




Men urged to take



care of their health


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* By Bahamas Information
Services
MEN are becoming more
interested in living healthy
lifestyles but there are still
many more who need to take
charge of their health, say
health officials.
The Male Health Initiative
held its eighth annual Male
Conference on Friday at the
Holy Trinity Activity Centre,
Trinity Way, Stapledon Gar-
dens, under the theme: "Pro-
moting Healthy Lifestyles
Amongst Men".
The conference focused on
the health of adult men and
senior high school males.
Ezekiel Munnings, co-ordi-
nator of the Male 'Health Ini-
tiative, Maternal and Child-


care/Family Planning Unit,
Department of Public Health,
said: "There has been an
increase in the amount of men
coming for treatment. At the
clinics we are seeing a change in
the attitudes of men, but we
want to see bigger changes. This
is because many people are pro-
viding initial checkups, and they
(men) are overcoming the initial
fear of needles and doctors. We
(men) call everything gas.
"One thing that we are stress-
ing is that men do an annual
examination, and we are trying
to create a male friendly envi-
ronment so they will feel more
comfortable. Ve are encour-
aging them to get a physical,
inclusive of that prostate check,
at least once a year, preferably
on their birthday or anniver-


sary, so they will remember."
Men should start getting their
prostates checked at around age
35, he said, but if prostate prob-
lems run in the family, the
checks should begin at age 30.
The Male Health Initiative is
a comprehensive programme of
physical, social and spiritual
health activities for males.
"We believe that the pro-
gramme and activities of the Ini-
tiative will assist greatly in pro-
viding our men with the skills
needed to become better men,
husbands, and fathers," he said.
"Traditionally we have
focused on healthy mothers and
babies,.but the department.has
come to realise that men, as
fathers and providers, need to
check themselves to assess their
health status."


Tobacco Smoking may cause Heart Disease


or Lung Cancer among other diseases.


- -- -- = I-- -- -


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 18, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005







THE ~ ~ ~ LOA TRBNNONAENVMBR2W205SAE1
Wor strtsonnewlibar

I I voaHiu7


* ATTORNEY General and Minister of Education Alfred Sears speaks at the ground breaking
and awards ceremony for the library at the Simpson Penn Centre for Boys on Friday


* ATTORNEY General and Minister of Education Alfred Sears, second from left, turns the soil
over with Janet Brawn, president of the Kiwanis Club of Nassau AM and Rev Dr William
Thompson, president of the Bahamas Christian Council, to officially break ground for the library.
Shown looking on are Henry Gibson, left, Lt Governor Division 22 Kiwanis Club of the Bahamas,
Cleomie Taylor, third from right, acting superintendent, Willie Mae Pratt Centre for Girls, and
Wade Seymour, right, supervisor, Simpson Penn Centre for Boys.
(Photos: BIS/Tim Aylen)


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- I- -


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005, PAGE 19


THE TRIBUNE









PAGE 20 MONDAY NOVEMERE21,A005OTHETRIBUN


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RUGS TOWELS SHEET-SETS TABLE CLOTHS
COMFORTER SETS SHOWER CURTAINS BATHROOM
ACCESSORIES LAMPS BLENDERS FIGURINES BAKEWAES
WALL CLOCKS WALL PICTURES PICTURE FRAMES *
FLATWARE SETS COOKWARE SETS GLASSWARE SETS
i DINNERWARE SETS


SLocated: Harbour Bay Shopping Center
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448


hTi.


;j-TJ.


I I IL. I I IIYVI'u[_ __ I


AL


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m


I


MAHATMA
ONG GRAINPARBOILE

R I C.E
.1 5 LBS
$ 2 '89


WPY I






PAGE 22, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005


MON. -
SUN.:


SAV.A.CHEK 'Extra-Special': on each item you purchase, over
Sa dollar, with One filled SAVACHEK certificate get a Dollar Off!
REDEEM your SAV-A-CHEK now at:
Johns S George, Sandys, Epic Battery, GNC,
Home Fabrics, Godetts Jewelry.
FREEPORT: Dolly Madison Home Centre, GNC, Epic Battery, Play Time Sports
SAT.: 7:30AM 9:00PM Extra Extra!
7:00AM 12:00PM 7:00AM 2:00PM CABLE BEACH & SAV.A.CHEK Special!
HARBOUiR BAY NiY WV.CHErKf Special!f BBBMMHII^


POPCORN,
ASSORTED

S$ 99AK
12/3-PAK
IMPERIO
SODAS
ASSORTED
20 OZ
2/1$1 19


FANTASTIC
CLEANERS
ASSORTED

$399
26-32 OZ


AHATMA


BISMART/
JASMINE RICE
21 LBS
g^ go


SUPER INSECTOX
INSECTICIDE
SPRAY
600 ML
$469

ROBIN HOOD

GRITS
5 LBS
$239


QUAKE


FARINA HOT


CEREAL REGULAR
28 OZ


SCRUBBING BUBBLES
BATHROOM
CLEANERS
25 OZ
$449


ISLAND QUEEN
CONDENSED
MILK
14-OZ


BOAST
VANILLA
SUPPLEMENT
8 OZ


RED GLOBE
JUMBO & RED
SEEDLESS JUMBO GRAPES
BOl* 99
LB
BROCCOLI


KERRY GOLD
BUTTER REG
& UNSALTED
8 LB
W/D
SB SLICE CHEESE
10.67 OZ


W/D
CORN ON COB
$259
4 EAR
PRESTIGE
PUMKIN
PIE
$629
33-OZ

BARBER
CREAM
CRAKERS
200- GR
990

RICE LAND
REG&
PREFECTED RICE
5-LB
$2ae

BLUE BIRD

SCRAC ll JUICE

46-OZ
4 99


SWEET JUMBO ROMAN HEARTS
YAMS Sm99
PER LB EACH
.59 ,&=


CABBAGE
.59 LB
POTATOES
WHITE POLY
5LB BAG
$049
2m EACH


W/D
PIE SHELLS
(15.OZ) 2 PACK
S 12.-02
PILLSBURY
CRECENT ROLLS
s3 .oz


DANO'S
PIZZA SAUSAGE, PEPPERONI,
3 MEAT & COMBINATION
18 oz
WINN-DIXIE
ICE CREAM
ALL FLAVOURS
640oz
'^964 -0O


CARDINAL
EVAPORATE
MILK
410 GR
2/$ -1 39


EVERCANE


SUGAR
4 LBS
$ 39


KRAFT
SALADDRESSING
ASSORTED
8-OZ
2/$30


CROWN POINT
FLAKE TUNA 6 OZ .........................2/.99

GROVERS PRIDE
JUICE ASSORTED APPLE, ORANGE,
GRAPE & FRUIT MEDLY
ONLY 11.5 OZ............... ............... 59
McVITIES
DIGESTIVE BISCUITS 500G ..............$1.99
ECKRICH ..., i
CHICKEN VIE USAGEOZ..2/.994
LIBBY'S
MIXED FRUIT OR DICED
PEACHES 4-PACK..............................$3.69
CADBURY
CRUNCHIE, PICNIC &
TIME OUT 1............................................2/990


McVITIES
GOAHEAD YOGURT BREAK


TROPICAL


FRUIT 216-GR.................................$1.79
WD
JUMBO MEAT DINNER
FRANKS LB........................................$1.99


KEEBLER
TOWN HOUSE
REG & REDUCED
FAT CRACKERS
16-OZ



LIBBYS
CORNED
BEEF
12 OZ

s1 29


GLADE
AIR
FRESHNERS
ASST'D
SCENTS
9-OZ ,
2/$3oo


KELLOGS
CORN
FLAKES
24-OZ
$519


HEINZ
APPLE CIDER
VINEGAR/ WHITE
32 OZ

POWE


KRAFT
BBQ SAUCES
ASSORTED
16 OZ
2/$3oo00


DL LEE
WHOLE
SMOKED
PICNIC HAM


PORK LOIN
END CUT


CHOPS


FRESH


TURKEY


BASTED
TURKEY
BREAST


CHICKEN
DRUM


USDA


BONELESS
CHUCK ROAST


PRESTIGE WHOLE
COOKED ROTISSERIE
SALAMI CHIKEACH


PRESTIGE
REGULAR MEAT
BOLOGNA
S14 99
.


HELLMANS
MAYONNAISE
REGULAR
S32 OZ
eS349


DOLE
SLICED PINAPPLE,
CHUNK, CRUSHED
20 OZ
2/$ 300
POWE BUY


QUAKER
OLD FASHIONED, QUICK
OR CRYSTAL WEDDING
OATS
16-18 OZ
$249


PECAN
CHEESE OR
WALNUT DANISH
RINGS
$569...
O'S Joe-


NUTRAMENT
ASSORTED MEAL

SUPPLEMENTS
12-OZ
914 99


McCORMICK

G RUND im OLE CLS,

.75 OZ

PO E B


V/8 SPLASH
ASSORTED
FLAVOURS
16 OZ
$ 69


v .' .


7yTm F 1
in @j;j;j=jj17;rIt i Ans- -T IL -


-"" a


I-






MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005, PAGE 23


INERATIOALNW


MUELLERS
READY CUT
MACCARONI
16 OZ
.990
LAYS
POTATO CHIPS
ASSORTED -
NASSAU ONLY
6.5 OZ
S 3O9
MARTINELL
SPARKLING
CIDER
25 OZ


CAMPBELLS
CREAM OF
MUSHROOM/
ONION SOUP
10 OZ


LIBBYS
VEGETABLES
ASSORTED
15 OZ
.99
PlANTERS
JAR PEANUTS
ASSORTED
UNSALTED COCKTAIL
12- OZ


T.M.
CRANBERRY
SAUCE
16- OZ
4% l 89

ANDY'S
DL LEE 20% WHOLE
SMOKED HAM
LB
459
PUMPKIN
SWEET POTATO &
APPLE PIE
EACH


WD
LTE, REGULARI&SOFT
CREAM CHEESE
8-OZ


CAVERNDISH
STRAIGHT CUT
POTATOES
32 OZ
2/S300oo

DINNERWARE

SET. i6PCS
EACH
S 2999


OK
ALL PURPOSE
FLOUR
5 LBS

$2-19
TM
ALL VEGATABLE
SHORTENING
42 OZ

SUNCHY MALTA
BOTTLE/
CAN
12 OZ
2/$ 4 29
WD
FOAM
PLATES
50 CT
$2e89
JBI
GREEN
PIGION PEAS
15 OZ


SO DRI
HAND
TOWELS
1 ROLL


T.M.
CUT SWEET
POTATOES
29- OZ
$209

NEWZEALAND
WHOLE
LAMB LEG
LB

WD

SPREAD
3 LBS


WD
ORANGE
JUICE
1 GAL

WD
ORANGE CREAMBARS
OR WD FUDGE BARS
12-CT
$279


W/D

MAYONNAISE
32- OZ
2/300oo
CHEK
SODAS
ASSORTED
2 LTR
2/$300
TM
WHOLE
KERNEL CORN
29 OZ
$m1 79
W/D
RED PERRY
CUPS
20 CT
$1 a89
CHEK
SODAS
ASSORTED
6 PAK


T.M.
CRUSHED/SLICED
PINEAPPLES
20 OZ
*1 70

PEPRIDGE FARM

STUFFINGS
1 -LB

W/D
REDIBASTED
TURKEY/HONEY
SUCKEL.-12LBS &UP
LB
$1 39

WD
DIPS,
ASSORTED
12-8 OZ

WD

CORN.ON.THE COB
4 EAR

FOIL
ROASTING PEN
SNIPPER
EACH
$1 99


One step at a time for Su Lin
IN A photo provided by the San Diego Zoo, senior veterinarian Geoff Pye wraps his hands around
the zoo's 15-week-old giant panda cub, Su Lin, during the animal's weekly checkup, last week in San
Diego. On Tuesday, the cub took her first steps. Keepers say Bai Yun, the cub's mother, had taken Su
Lin out of the den and into a walkway that leads to a garden, but left the cub a few feet short of the
outdoor area. The cub then took her first clumsy steps into the garden in search of her mother. While
Su Lin's newly-found strength is a good sign her mom will soon take her on exhibit, the giant panda
team does not yet have a date for her debut.
(AP Photo/San Diego Zoo, Ken Bohn)


2005 Camry features:
2.4 VWTI engine
-excellent fuel economy
*reduced noise and vibration *power windows, door locks,
*ECT (electronically controlled and side mirrors
transmission) power driver's and front
*front and rear crumple zones passenger seats
*driver and passenger airbags *CD/radio/cassette
-side impact airbags "6-speaker audio system
*ABS (anti-lock brakes) *climate-controlled air conditioning
*keyless entry system *woodgrain dash
*immobiliser security system 'alloy wheels


EXECUTIVE
MOTORS LTD
AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER
Parts and service guaranteed


U MOVING FORWARD
TOYOTA
Collins Ave (South of 6th Terrace)
Open Mon to Fri 8am 5:30pm
Sat 8am 12noon
Tel: 322-6705/6 Fax: 322-6714
E-mail: execmotor@batelnet.bs
Salespersons: Pam Palacious
Terrol Cash Barry Pinder


Available in Grand Bahama at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd Queen's Highway 352-6122


THE TRIBUNE


''






PAGE 24 MONDAY NOVEMERE21,A005OTHETRIBUN

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4b -ow modbo. -no -dmmm4b- .b40- -maum
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- ^"Copyrighted Material
C TSyndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"
-1a


In TJal ltm (j.mnu UrArIm

AftLr dl I 2 m I Iiiwuraks hhr


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Imagination 1.6-fitre 4-cylinder engine
The 2006 Suzuki Liana takes Automatic transmission
you out of the ordinary and AM/FM/CD Player
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imagination and sense of door locks & mirrors
adventure have free reign. Spacious interior with
plenty of leg room


SSUZUKI
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EAST SHIRLEY STREET 322-3775 325-3079
Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals, Queens Hwy, 352-6122
or Abaco Motor Mail, Don Mackay Blvd, 367-2916


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7000-45000
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ENTERPRISES LIMITED
Soldier Road
Telephone: 394-4823 or 394-7926
Fax: 394-1826
P.O. Box N-9180, Nassau, The
Bahamas
email: lawnboy@batelnet.bs


.7KW Stan dby Packagel.,nsta I led,$5, 1 495.00
7KW Standby Package No Installation'$3,895.00

15KW Standby Package Instalied$7395.'00
15KW Standby Pxkage No Installation$5,495.00

& 25KW Standby
Generators in Stock:
Super Quia Portable'Generitom.
4,500 Running Watts 1,5,500 Surga I e Whtts$979.00
6,500 Running Watts 8,500 Surge Watts. 1.31-IR
Electric start $1,399.00


-


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 24, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005


- W.


. Ab






THE TRIBUNE


1^^


THE C OLLE G j
Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs


MONDAY. NOVEMBER 21, 2005, PAGE 25


2g& RA


Friday, 9th


LUNCHEON
December @ 12:30 pm


Wyndham Nassau Resort &
Crystal Palace Casino


Tickets: $35.00


INDUCTEE:
Vernice Walkine, Director General,
Ministry of Tourism
PLAQUE
UNVEILING CEREMONY
Monday, 12th December @ 9:30 am
Foyer, The College of The Bahamas


For more information or ticket reservation
for the induction, please call the
Office of Alumni Affairs at 302-4365/6..


BUSINESS OFFICE OPERATION HOURS
NOVEMBER & DECEMBER


November 29 December 1


SDecember 5- 22


December 15


SDecember 16


Cashiers booth & accounts receivable department
will be closed. Accounts payable will accept
transcript payments only
Processing of tuition and fee payments from
returning students
Last day for returning students to apply for Deferred
Payment Plan (Spring 2006)
Last day for returning students to obtain 10%
discount on fees only (excluding insurance fee)
for early payment of Spring semester bill


SPRING 2006
ADVISEMENT & REGISTRATION


November 21 Advisement/Registration Begins
December 5 Bill Collection Begins
December 21 Transcripts issued
December 22 Last day for fee payment


Advisement and registration may be conducted in faculty offices.
The Records Office will conduct registration only, Mondays through Thursdays.


For more information, please call 302-4522/3


The School of Business


PANEL DISCUSSION:
Housing Dilemma:
How to improve access to affordable
housing







Choices Restaurant
Bahamas Tourism Training Centre
Thompson Boulevard
Nassau, Bahamas


PANELISTS:


Hon. D. Shane Gibson
Minister of Housing and National Insurance


Dr. B. J. Nottage


Mr. Lynden Nairn
Deputy Managing Director, Bank of The Bahamas
Mr. Rupert L. Pinder
Lecturer, College of The Bahamas
A representative from the Bahamas Real Estate
Association (BREA)


V EETING OF.
0AA`EN TS/ GUARDIAN OF
`FRESHIVIEN_.


Acting President,
Dr. Rhonda Chipman-
Johnson
is'ektending an invitation
to parents of COB
freshmen to learn more
abo' Utthe. services of The
College*of The Bahamas,
itt',,.ttudent life, faculty,
staff and the progress of
the'institution during an
informal meeting on
'Monday, November 21
at 6:30prn
at
ce' Restaurant,
Thompson Boulevard.



Forfurther details,
P'lease contact
Ariene'Albury,
at
302-4525


B 2005 Alumni
Hal ffI Fame InductioI







I


(6:15) FAT Curb Your En- (:35)Extras (:05) Rome "The Spoils" Vorenus is Rome "Kalends of February" Pullo L o \r 2
HBO-P ALBERT (2004) thusiasm Larr ndy wants a rewarded. 01 (CC) and Vorenus are rewarded. 0 (CC) m OlV/V \ O f V e-m O ZU 200
01 'PG' (CC) makes a friend. speaking role.
:00) EMPIRE FALLS (2005, Drama) (Part 1 of * IN AMERICA (2002, Drama) Samantha Morton, Paddy Considine,
HBO-W 2) Ed Harris. Unfulfilled lives abound in a declining Sarah Bolger. Irish immigrants try to succeed in New York. A 'PG-13'
Nw England town. A 'NR' (CC) (CC)
(:00) * A LIFE LESS ORDINARY (1997, Comedy- * THE GODFATHER, PART III (1990, Drama) Al Pacino, Diane
HBO-S Drama) Ewan McGregor. A fired janitor kidnaps his for- Keaton, Talia Shire. Mob infighting leads the Corleones into a bloody E o G r a Food Prizes a nd Lols of F im
mer boss's daughter. nI'R'(CC) gang war. 0 'R' (CC) LIjON Great Fw Priz s ds a JlAts 0( f Fu .
(5X:45) * x RAY (2004, Biography) Jamie Foxx, Kerry Washington, Regina King. Ray Charles **THE
MAX-E THE TERMINALovercomes hardships to become a legend. ,1 'PG-13' (CC) RUNDOWN
(2004) 'PG-13' (2003)'PG-13' I
** CRIMINAL (2004, Crime Drama) John C. Reil- t PAPARAZZI (2004, Suspense) Cole Hauser, Sex Games: Ve-
MOMAX ly, Diego Luna. A con man and his protege try a com- Robin Tunney, Dennis Farina. An actor takes revenge gas College
plicated scam. n 'R' (CC) on intrusive photographers. 'PG-13' (CC) friends reunite. m lovin'it
LARA CROFT ** EDGE OF AMERICA (2003, Docudrama) :45) AGAINST THE ROPES (2004, Drama) Meg
SHOW TOMB RAIDER James McDaniel, Irene Bedard. iV. A high-school Ryan, Omar Epps. iTV. A female boxing-manager
teacher coaches a girl's basketball team. 1 'NR' bonds with a fighter. 0 'PG-13' (CC)
(6:30) LOVE IN * WHILE YOU WERE SLEEPING (1995, Comedy) Sandra Bullock, ** THE REAL BLONDE (1997,
TMC THE TMEOF Bill Pullman, Peter Gallagher. A lonely woman latches onto a comatose Comedy) Matthew Modine, Cather-
MONEY (2002) accident victim. 0 'PG'(CC) ine Keener. n 'R' (CC)


iTHE TRIBUNE


PAGE 26 MONDAYNOVEMBER 21, 2005


MONDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 21, 2005

7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30D

Antiques Road Antiques Roadshow Tomorrow's JFK: Breaking the News 1 (CC) American Experience "Fatal Flood
SWPBT show Stroud Antiques (1950s-1970s)" Pop col- c (CC) (DVS) i
lectibles. (CC)
The Insider (N) The King of How l Met Your Two and a Half (:31)Out of CSI: Miami "Urban Hellraisers" A-
SWFOR 01 (cc) QueensDoug Mother Ted and Men (N) 1 (CC) Practice group of video gaiers start to play -
gets fan mail. Robin volunteer. "Thanks" (N) their game for real. (N) (CC) Simply the Best
Access Holly- Surface Laura and Rich learn the Las Vegas "Mothwoman" (N) 0 MedIum Still Life" An artist's work
B WTVJ wood (N) (CC) creatures are laying thousands of (CC) causes Allison to see disturbing im-
eggs on the ocean floor. (N) (CC) ages. In 3-D. (N) 01
Deco Drive Prison Break 'And Then There Prison Break "Odd Man Out" One News (CC)
U WSVN Were 7" Everyone is shocked by of the group's relentless pursuers
Michael's conjugal visitor. (CC) becomes the pursued. (N)
Jeopardyl (N) Sports Jam Live NFL Football Minnesota Vikings at Green Bay Packers. From Lambeau
* WPLG (cc) Field in Green Bay, Wis. (Live) A (CC)

(:00) Cold Case Inside Har Potter and the Gob- Growing Up Growin U Airline Comic en- Airline Gina *
A&E Files )"Lady in the let of Fire (CC) Gotti (CC) Gohtti Art school; tertains passen- takes wing as a
Box" (CC) __ sightseeing. gers. (CC) flight attendant.
Hardtalk BBC News World Business BBC News Click Online Es- BBC News Asia Today
BBCI (Latenight). Report (Latenight). sential guideto (Latenight).
computers.
BET,com Count- ** NEW JACK CITY (1991, Drama) Wesley Snipes, Ice-T, Judd Nel- The Parkers 1 The Parkers 1
BET down son. Two street-smart cops try to bust a venomous drug lord, (CC) (CC)
Coronation The Secret Mulroney Tapes (N) (CC) The National (CC)
CBC Street (CC)
B:.00) On the The Agprentice: Martha Stewart Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
Coney "The offee Achievers' (N) (CC)
(:00) The Situa- Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)
CNN tion Room
A BUBBLE The Daily Show The Colbert Re- Comedians of South Park The Mind of Mencia Reno 9111 (CC)
COM BOY (2001) Jake With Jon Stew- port (CC) Comedy New boys discover a Road sign inves-
Gyllenhaal. art (CC) York City. (CC) frozen man. tigations.
COURT Cops 1 (CC) The Investigators A missin Forensic Files North Mission Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege
COURT woman's husband is found ead. Road & Justice Ruthann Aron.
That's So Raven KIM POSSIBLE: SO THE DRAMA (2005, Adventure) (:25) The Buzz Naturally Sadie Sister, Sister
DISN "Gettin' Outta Voices of Christy Carlson Romano. Animated. Ron re- on Maggie (CC) Sadie loses a The twins get
Dodge" alizes he has feelings for Kim. (CC) class pet. (CC) "married." (CC)
DIY This Old House Weekend Deco- Material Girls Fresh Coat From Junky to Scrapbooking Knitty Gritty (N)
DIY 1 (CC) rating (N) Funky (N) (N)I
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DW man). Tagestema Depth Tagestema
E! News Janice Dickinson: The El True Tyra Banks: The El True Holly- Gla: Supermodel: The El True
EHollywood Story 0 (CC) wood Story 0 (CC) Hollywood Story 01 (CC)
ESPN Monday Night Countdown (Live) (CC) College Basketball EASports Maui Invitational First Round Arizona vs.
Kansas. From Maui, Hawaii. (Live) (CC)
Goles de Es- Gol ESPN: SportsCenter NFL Football Minnesota Vikings-at Green Bay Packers. From Lambeau
ESPNI pana (N) Fuera de Juego Intl. Edition Field in Green Bay, Wis, (Live)
WTN Daily Mass: Our The Journey Home Super Saints The Holy Rosary Abundant Life
:00) FitTV's Marilu Henner's Shape Up Your Blaine's Low Blaine's Low FItTV's Diet Doctor "Dean Omish"
FIT TV Housecalls (CC) Life Removing junk. 0i Carb Kitchen Carb Kitchen Dr. Dean Omish.i
FOX-NC Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
FOX-NC Shepard Smith Susteren (Live) (CC)
CMI: The Chris Mohegan Sun AKC Challenge Dog Show From Uncasville, Conn. CMI: The Chris AKC Challenge
FSNFL Myers Interview (Taped Myers Interview Dog Show
:31 Golf Channel Academy Live (:43) Golf Channel Academy (N) Trick Shots (:13) Grand Slam Clinic 2005 (N)
GOLF im cLean. (Live) U.K. Style (N)
GSN Lingo (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire 01 The Amazing Race 3 "Don't Try to Dog Eat Dog 01 (CC)
GSN (C) BetheMoralist Now!" (CC)______ G .r
(:00) Attack of X-Play "Andi Cheat "World of Xbox 360 Special: Countdown to Xbox 360 Xbox 360 game reviews, A IA
G4Tech the Show! Street all." Warcraft" previews and cheat codes. (N) A f ,
(:00) Walker, Walker, Texas Ranger Drug deal- C ** PERRY MASON: THE CASE OF THE KILLER KISS (1993, Mys- G ,
HALL Texas RanI r ers attack a camp for underprivi- tey) Ra mond Burr, Barbara Hale, William R. Moses. An ad-libbed kiss i mk re A *
"Mayday" () leged teenagers. 0a (CC) proves deadly for a soap opera star,
Curb Appeal 1 Home to Stay reDesign 0 Debbie Travis' Facelift "Helen's Holmes on Homes "Hullaba-loo" m g re at i....
HGTV "Western Battery" Nursery Ensuite" A (CC) 01 (CC)
0 (CC)
NSP Morris Cerullo Breakthrough R.W. Scham- Inspiration To- Life Today (CC) This Is Your Day Love a Child
INSP(CC) bach (CC) day (CC)
Transformers Sabrina, the My Wife and My Wife and Friends Phoebe Everybody Everybody
KTLA Cybertron Teenage Witch Kids "The Re- Kids Claire discovers Moni- Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
Pen pa visits, model" A (CC) learnmsto drive. ca's secret. 01 "Meant to Be" 01 (CC)
MARRIED TO A STRANGER (1997, Drama) Jaclyn MIND OVER MURDER (2005, Suspense) Tori Spelling, Dean McDermott.
LIFE Smith, Robert Clohessy, Kim Coates. A husband tries Premiere. A prosecutor develops the ability to hear others' thoughts. (CC)
to restore his amnesiac wife's memory. (CC)
Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- Rita Cosby Live & Direct Scarborough Country
Jimm Neutron: SpongeBob Full House 0 Full House "Viva Fresh Prince of Roseanne 01 Roseanne"Con-
NIC Boy genius SquarePants 0 (CC) Las Joey" Bel-Air (CC) fessions"
NhakOut of Practice Surface "Episode 9" (N) 01 (CC) Las Vegas "Mothwoman" (N) 0A News 01 (CC) News
"Thanks" (N) (CC)
Ultimate Shark Shark Hunters: Ultimate Tourna- Shark Hunters: Ultimate Toumrna- Shark Hunters: Ultimate Tourna-
OLN Tourn. ment Stakes are raised, ment ment The big prize is on the line.
SPEED NBS 24-7 (N) Inside Nextel Cup (Same-day Victory by Design Corvette Test NBS 24-7
SPEEDTape) Drive__1_WDriv
Bishop T,D. Behind the Mark Chironna Jentezen Jesse Duplantis Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN Jakes (CC) Scenes (CC) Franklin (CC) (CC)
Everybody Friends "The Friends Joey Friends Rachel Friends Monica Family Guy 01 Family Guy Pe-
TBS Loves Raymond One Where No begs for Ross' calls doctor non- invites pal for (CC) ter duels the
A battle of wills. One Proposes" forgiveness. ,0 stop. (CC) Thanksgiving. Black Knight.
(:00) Amazing Trauma: Life in the ER "Family Untold Stories of the E.R. "Red 160 Lb, Tumor (CC)
TLC Medical Stories Forces" Louisville's University Hos- Blanket" A patient passes out for no
(CC) pital. (CC) apparent reason. (CC)
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order "Dazzled" A woman's Law & Order "The Ring" A ring Law & Order A missing baby is
TNT der "Bait" f0 fatal fall from a roof might not have identifies woman who supposedly found dead, and neglgnt parents
(CC) (DVS) been an accident. 01 died in the Twin Towers collapse. may be responsible.
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Share your news
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THE TRIBUNE;I


PAGE 28, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005


-o- -


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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005


SECTION


.B USIN S S


business@tribunemedia.net


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


BISX-listed firm embroiled in




troubled fund's liquidation


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
ABahamian publicly-
quoted company list-
ed on the Bahamas
International Securi-
ties Exchange (BISX)
has become embroiled in the liquida-
tion of a Bahamas-registered invest-
ment fund, whose assets are likely to
be insufficient to cover all liabilities
and money owed to investors and
creditors.


Cardinal International sits at centre of

$500m Olympus Univest fund's troubles


A report filed with the Canadian
courts by Raymond Massi, the receiv-
er for the Norshield Group of Com-
panies, reveals that the Bahamian-
registered Olympus Univest Fund,
which Norshield manages, may own


$5.5 million worth of shares in Pre-
mier Commercial Real Estate Invest-
ment Corporation.
Mr Massi is working with Clifford
Culmer, the BDO Mann Judd accoun-
tant privately appointed as Olympus


Univest's liquidator. In his report, he
indicates that Olympus Univest made
the investment in the BISX-listed enti-
ty through Mosaic Composite Ltd,
another Bahamian-domiciled compa-
ny that acted as its counterparty.


In his report, Mr Massi said: "In
conjunction with Culmer, the receiver
has identified that Mosaic may own
shares of Premier Commercial Real
Estate Investment Corporation, a pub-
licly-traded Bahamian entity having
real estate holdings. The potential val-
ue of this asset is approximately Cana-
dian $6.6 million (US $5.5 million)
based on its current trading value and
net asset value as at June 30, 2005.

SEE page 7B


LESLIE Miller denied Chamber's and Institute's claims
(FILE photo)


Bahamas economic

freedom 'threatened'

by legislative trends


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BAHAMIAN economic
freedoms are being threatened
by an increasing trend in legis-
lation to make government
ministers 'all-powerful', allow-
ing them to "summarily convict
people" without reference to
the courts, an economic think-
tank has warned.
Referring to the slew of con-
sumer-related Bills currently in
the pipeline, such as the Con-


sumer Protection Bill, Stan-
dards Bill and Unfair Terms in
Consumer Contracts Bill, the
Nassau Institute said in its latest
missive: "A legislative trend of
the past few years has increased
the power of government min-
isters. They can summarily con-
vict and fine 'offenders' and
order the search of private
property without reference to
the courts.
"While successive govern-
SEE page 5B


Bahamas resident named

in 'insider trading' probe


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A CANADIAN with a residence in the
Bahamas has been named in court papers as
the investor who is currently being investigated
by the Securities and Exchange Commission
(SEC) in relation to $3m in possible insider
trading profits.
An article published in the Toronto Globe
& Mail said court documents filed by the SEC
in New York had named John Fraleigh, a Cana-
dian who was said to spend time in both the
Bahamas and Canada, as the man who pur-
chased call options in Placer Dome just before
the firm became the subject of a takeover bid.
However, no charges have been filed against
Mr Fraleigh, and there is nothing to suggest he


did anything wrong.
The SEC had previously thanked the Securi-
ties Commission of the Bahamas for helping it
with its investigation into the Placer Dome
affair.
The trading in the call options had originated
from a Bahamian account held with the Nassau-
based branch of Banque SCS Alliance, accord-
ing to the SEC's court papers.
The bank quite rightly refused to provide the
SEC with the name of the beneficial account
owner, so the Securities Commission was asked
to assist in obtaining disclosure through the
proper channels that exist. There is nothing to
suggest Banque SCS Alliance or its employees
have done anything wrong in relation to the
SEE page 6B


Convention Tax
to generate 15-
20% growth in
group travellers

'Greatest potential'
lies in Family Islands,
with Grand Bahama
developing 'real niche'
* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas "should see
annually a growth of 15-20 per
cent" in the volume of business
SEE page 9B


Hurricane absence

helps Isle of Capri

reduce loss to $309k
* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
ISLE of Capri's Isle-Lucaya casino saw its operating loss for the
three months to October 23, 2005, drop to just $309,000 compared
to a $2.13 million in the 2004 comparative period, which was
hugely affected by Hurricanes Frances and Jeanne.
Unveiling its fiscal 2006 second quarter results, Isle of Capri said
net revenues for its Grand Bahama-based casino, which is in the
Our Lucaya resort, had increased by 80.1 per cent to $4.572 mil-
lion, compared to $2.538 million in the year-before period.
Isle of Capri said: "Isle-Our Lucaya experienced an increase in
net revenues and a decrease in the negative adjusted operating
income compared to the prior year, primarily due to being closed
in the prior year related to Hurricanes Frances and Jeanne."
The negative adjusted operat-
ing margin for Isle-Our Lucaya
fell from 83.9 per cent in 2004 to SEE page 3B


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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


December 22, 2005 January 4, 2006
Departs Nassau at 3:00pm Departs Nassau at 10:30am
Arrive kingston 4:15pm Arrive Kingston 11:45am


Departs Kingston at 5:15pm
Arrive Nassau 6:30pm


Departs Kingston at 12:45pm
Arrive Nassau 2:00pm


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The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


I BUSINESS I


gi~i.


40100-411b.
---.Wmgmo.
appIdnblaw











THE TIBUN MONAY, OVEM~ER 1,205,IPGES3







Millr.4 Ovr 9,00 ew sinse


MINISTER LESLIE MILLER



Hurricane absence helps Isle

of Capri reduce loss to $ 309k


FROM page 1B

6.8 per cent in the three months
to October 23, 2005.
Isle of Capri's net loss at Our
Lucaya for the 2006 second
quarter was $707,000, account-
ing for $408,000 in deprecia-
tion and amortisation.
For the six months to Octo-
ber 23, 2005, Isle-Our Lucaya
experienced a 24.3 per cent
Increase in net revenues, which
moved up from $9.27 million


the year before to $11.527 mil-
lion.
Adjusted operating income
for the first half was $1.003 mil-
lion, compared to a $3.123 mil-
lion loss in 2004, with operating
margins positive at 8.7 per cent.
Accounting for $857,000 in
amortisation and depreciation,
Isle of Capri's net income for
the 2005 first half slipped to
$146,000.
Isle of Capri management
had earlier this year
approached the Government
about reducing the casino tax


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
Some 9,602 new
Bahamian business-
es have been
licensed since the
PLP administration
took power in 2002, Leslie
Miller, minister of trade and
industry, told his party's con-
vention.
In his address to delegates,
Mr Miller said revenues from
business licence fees had
increased by $566,000 in the
last fiscal year to $28.5 million.
He added that 506 companies
were now registered under the
Industrial Encouragement Act.
Meanwhile, Mr Miller said
real property tax revenues had
increased by $16 million over
the past fiscal year to $53.8 mil-
lion, "due in part to a more
efficient revenue collection".
Elsewhere, Mr Miller said
the Government had approved
an oil exploration licence for
Bahamas Offshore Petroleum
Ltd, a subsidiary of Australian
oil exploration giant, Hardman
Resources.
He added that this was set
to generate $2 million for the
Government over the next two
years, while the company con-
ducted seismic testing.
The Hardman Resources oil
exploration licence is in addi-
tion to the one granted to the
US company, Kerr-McGee, in
2002. That firm has completed
its seismic testing and has cre-
ated a joint venture with anoth-
er oil exploration firm, Cana-
dian-based Talisman.


rate levied on the property
from 17 per cent to 9 per cent.
They also requested $5 million
from Government for promo-
tional campaigns.
The company had requested
this following consistent loss-
es and problems experienced


Mr Miller said the Govern-
ment has earned more than $3
million in revenues from Kerr-
McGee to date, and if it was
successful in finding oil in
Bahamian waters, the Treasury
would receive between 12.5-25
per cent of revenues generated.
The minister added that dis-
cussions were continuing about
re-establishing the oil refinery
capabilities at Borco in Grand
Bahama, with proposed refin-
ing capacity of 500,000 barrels
per day. Mr Miller said this, if
successful, would require a $2
billion investment and create
800 full-time jobs.
While bashing critics of his
'pet project' Petro Caribe and
the proposed National Energy
Agency Mr Miller acknowl-
edged the importance of ener-
gy conservation, and said his
Ministry had begun assembling
a group to devise a National
Energy Policy.
He added that the Bahamas
consumed 300 million gallons
of petroleum products annual-
ly, the Bahamas Electricity
Corporation (BEC) account-
ing for about one third of that
amount and paying more than
$100 million per annum for its
oil.
The Bahamas also has the
highest per capita fuel con-
sumption rate in the region, at
1,038 gallons per person, and
is the third largest fuel con-
sumer in CARICOM, account-
ing for 12 per cent of the total.
Still, Mr Miller could not
resist a swipe at the oil com-
panies, saying: "You will be
surprised to learn that we


recently compared the
importers' FOB (freight on
board) prices to market prices,
and found instances where the
importers' prices were as much
as $0.44 per gallon higher than
the US Gulf Coast benchmark


prices. The companies have yet
to explain this variation.
"If $0.44 is saved on a gal-
lon over a one-year period, this
would translate into a savings
of $29 million to the Bahamian
consumer."


at its Grand Bahama casino,
which in July were blamed for
the lay off of 45 front-line .
workers and managers at the *
Grand Bahama casino. It has 4
also been reported that Isle of -
Cg i gpth ovpernn $6
mI n in tix.


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address
Sagicor


S FAMGUARD AND SAGICOR
GRANTED APPROVAL FOR STRATEGIC ALLIANCE

Norbert Boissiere, Chairmanri FamGuard Corporation Limited (FamGuard), the parent
company of Family Guardian'jiurance Companjy (Family Guardian), and Dodridge Miller,
President and CEO of SagicoitFinancial Corporation (Sagicor), have announced that the
strategic alliance between the two companies has been approved by the Bahamian
Government and regulatory authorities.


Under the terms of the approved alliance, FamGuard intends to sell to Sagicor 2,000,000
newly issued shares at a price of B$6.20 per ordinary share ("Sagicor Investment"). This
transaction will increase the total issued capital ,of FamGuard to 10,625,000 shares.


Concurrent with the closing of the Sagicor Investment, FamGuard intends to repurchase
625,000 ordinary shares from existing shareholders at the same price as paid by Sagicor
for the shares issued in the Sagicor Investment ("Tender Offer").


FamGuard intends that upon the closing of the Sagicor Investment and the Tender Offer,
the shares purchased by Sagicor in the Sagiicor Investment shall represent 20% of all
issued and outstanding ordinary shares and the total issued share capital of FamGuard
will be 10,000,000 shares.


FamGuard will hold an Extraordinary General Meeting on December 2, 2005 to
both of these issues before its shareholders. It is anticipated that both the
Investment and the Tender Offer will be concluded before the end of this year.


As a part of the strategic alliance, FamGuaird will appoint :Sagicor's President and CEO,
Dodridge Miller, and Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary, Sandra
Osborne, to its board of directors. FarnGuard's wholly-owned subsidiaries, Family
Guardian Insurance Company, BahamaHealth Insurance Brokers and Benefit
Consultants, and FG General Insurance Agency, will continue to operate under the
present management structure.


The alliance with Sagicor will bring to Family Guardian access to new technology, a wider
range of life insurance and wealth accumulation products and services, and an avenue to
take advantage of joint marketing and sales initiatives. With the changing business
landscape both locally and internationally, this alliance with Sagicor will allow Family
Guardian to achieve greater efficiencies in its operations thereby allowing it to compete
more effectively on scope of product and pricing capabilities.


For 40 years Family Guardian has helped Bahamians plan for their future with a
comprehensive portfolio of group and individual life and health insurance, residential and
commercial mortgage loans; and investment products. FamGuard Corporation is a
publicly traded Bahamian company listed on the Bahamas International Securities
Exchange.


Sagicor is a leading provider of financial services in the Caribbean with operations in 22
territories including Panama and the United States. The group was established in 1840 in
Barbados and today has assets in excess of US$1.5 billion and a policyholder base of
approximately 450,000. Sagicor is a widely-held publicly traded company with 40,000
shareholders and is listed on the stock exchanges of Barbados and Trinidad and Tobago.


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


__ ______ ^A 21Y


El


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PAGENS I


KTOS]I


Y WANTADI


Small established out island firm seek

Attorney with up to 5 years experience,

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Recent graduates may be considered.


Email resume to:


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*


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
B ahamasair's pro-
jected loss for
2005 is set to
increase by $7
million com-
pared to the previous year to
$18 million, as the airline con-
tinues to be squeezed on both


*


sides by rising fuel costs and
the influx of low cost carriers
into its markets, which have
reduced revenues and yields.
In his address to the PLP
convention, Bradley Roberts,
minister of public works and
utilities, said revenues were
forecast to have risen by $6 mil-
lion in 2005, but expenses rose
by $11 million. He added that
the rise in expenses was.driven
by increased fuel prices and a
$2 million write-down in the
valuation of Bahamasair's jets.
The airline's fuel costs were
said to have increased by $6
million, but Mr Roberts said
the Government subsidy paid
to Bahamasair had remained
flat at the same level as ,2004,
$16 million.
Mr Roberts said: "Present
circumstances dictate that any
responsible government should
seek to privatise the airline to
avert having to inject $17-$20
million in direct subsidies into
the airline, and another $4-$5
million indirectly through oth-
er governmental agencies. The
situation is simply becoming
untenable........"
Although the Government
and Bahamasair Board are
understood to have effective-
ly shelved the privatisation and
placed it on the back burner,
due to global airline market
conditions and the absence of
enough interested bidders, Mr
Roberts added that he had
received the final privatisation
report from management con-
sulthnts, McKinsey & Co.
The report dealt with
changes to Bahamasair's fleet,
staff, salaries and benefits,
work rules, and restructuring
of the balance sheet.
Meanwhile, Mr Roberts said
the airline would press ahead
with seeking to open new
routes to Jamaica and other
nations, expand its charter busi-
ness and increase the "tourist
component" of its passengers,
which has risen from 12 to 15
per cent.
The minister said Bahama-
sair had made 84 charter flights
in its last fiscal year, earning
$1.3 million in revenues, to des-
tinations such as Suriname,
Trinidad, Canada and Panama.
Mr Roberts also sought to
score some political points, say-
ing that during the first three
years of the PLP administra-
tion, subsidies to Bahamasair
stood at $52.6 million, com-
pared to $55.9 million in the
last three years of the FNM
government.
In addition, he argued that
losses had fallen from $86.2
million during the final three
years under the FNM to $56.8
million for the past three years
under the PLP.
Turning to the Bahamas
Telecommunications Compa-
ny (BTC), Mr Roberts said that
up to August" this year, the
state-owned carrier had paid
$12.23 million in discounts to


* BRADLEY ROBERTS


Bahamian businesses and
entrepreneurs that sold its pre-
paid cellular cards. That was
on top of the $8.6 million paid
out in 2004.
BTC, which retains a
monopoly over cellular services
in the Bahamas, has some
46,000 TDMA QuickCell sub-
scribers and 90,000 GSM
CyberCell subscribers for its
pre-paid card services.
Spending

Mr Roberts said BTC was
spending $3 million on deploy-
ing an additional six GSM cell-
sites in New Providence, to
improve service coverage and
reliability, and eliminate 'dead
spots'.
The carrier was also expand-
ing the GSM network from a
capacity for 120,000 customers
250,000 customers, work set to
be completed by December
this year at a cost of $6 million.
Mr Roberts said that when
fist built, the GSM network in
New Providence had capacity
for 90,000 customers, but more


i 'Jr
than 100,000 were now :tegs-
tered on it.
He added that BTC was
deploying CDMA technology
in New Providence and Grand
Bahama to help it realise addi-
tional roaming revenues, which
are expected to reach $19.5 mil-
lion this year.
BTC was also working with
Research in Motion to estab-
lish Blackberry services in the
SBahatias, and this service is
likely to be deployed in the
2006 first quarter.
As for the Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation, Mr Roberts
said the entry into service of
three new generators would
create $21.8 million in cost sav-
ings, mainly relating to fuel.
Improved maintenance and
modernisation had enabled
BEC to reduce its usage of
ADO diesel fuel by 14 per
cent, with a corresponding 15
per cent rise in the use of HFO,
the cheapest fuel it used.
There had also been a 14 per
cent improvement in plant reli-
ability and a 4 per cent reduc-
tion in works power.


Kingsway Academy

invites qualified

teachers for the

following positions for

January, 2006.


* Auto Mechanics and Woodwork
* Biology
* Librarian/Media Supervisor

Successful applicants must:

* Be a practicing, committed born-again Christian
* Have a minimum qualification of a Bachelor's
Degree in the appropriate subject areas or higher
from a recognized college or university
* Have a valid teacher's certificate or diploma
where appropriate
* Be willing to participate in extra curricular
activities, etc.

Application must be made in writing together
with a full curriculum vitae, a recent color
photograph and names of at least three references,
one being that of your Church pastor to:





DECEMBR, 162005.


,Featuring The Bahamas Premiere Artists


31 Financial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information As Of:
17 November 2005

52wk-Hi 52wk-Lo w Symbol Previous Close Today's Cls e Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ PIE Yield
1.10 0.73 Abaco Markets 0.73 0.73 0.00 -0.169 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.25 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 10.25 10.25 0.00 1.456 0.340 7.0 3.32%
7.24 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 7.24 7.24 0.00 0.587 0.330 12.3 4.56%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.175 0.010 4.6 1.25%
1.80 1.27 Bahamas Waste 1.27 1.27 0.00 0.112 0.060 11.3 4.72%
1.20 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.10 1.10 0.00 0.066 0.030 16.7 2.73%
9.40 7.00 Cable Bahamas 9.31 9.40 0.09 2.000 0.689 0.240 13.6 2.55%
2.20 1.50 Colina Holdings 1.50 1.50 0.00 -0.046 0.000 NM 0.00%
9.17 6.99 Commonwealth Bank 9.11 9.11 0.00 0.791 0.450 11.5 .4.94%
2.50 1.05 Doctor's Hospital 2.40 2.40 0.00 0.429 0.000 5.6 0.00%
4.35 3.87 Famgluard 4.35 4.35 0.00 0.428 0.240 9.1 5.52%
10.90 9.50 Fince 10.90 10.90 ..... 0.00. .......50 0.695 0.510 15.7 4.68%
10.00 7.45 FirstCaribbean .10.00 i.........0 0.00 0.695 0.380 13.9 3.80%
9.50 ..... 8.39 Focol 9.25 9.25 0.00 0.675 0.500 ,14.1 5.26%
1.99 -.. 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1,15 0.00 0.022 0.000 52.3 0.00%
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.94 9.94 0.00 -0.526 .0.405 18.9 4.07%
8.75 8.22 J. S. Johnson 8.75 8.75 0.00 0.526 0.560 16.6 6.40%
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 6.27 6.26 -0.01 C 0.138 0.000 45.7 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.760 4.9 7.60%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Lo w Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Laat Price Veekly Vol EPE Yield
13.00 12.50 Bahairnas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 11.00 1.768 0.960 7.5 7.25%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.044 0.000 NM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABIDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.33 13.33 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 NIM 0.00%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Lq. w .- Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1.2593 1.1913 Colina Money Market Fund 1.259334*
2.4766 2.0536 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.4766***
10.6711 10.0000. Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.6711 ...
2.2754 2.1675 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.275422**
1.1406 1.0755 Colirla Bond Fund 1.140599-*
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks .....- B $ Budyng price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price.in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous-Close Previous day':s weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day .EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
* -AS AT AUG. 10, 2005/. AS AT OCT. 31. 2005
* AS AT OCT. 28, 2005/** AS AT OCT. 31, 2005/ ...* AS AT OCT. 31, 2005
i*r a 'UVql I F0Ai 40~t, ipeIY424 2 -/4A S


I ~...............~~..~.~...~~............ ~~l~~l~ll;ll~--rrrr~.r ~~~.I...............~.......~~.. ~~~............~..-...-...........-....- -------------------


s os( t


Ims.


nTEACHNGPOSITC ION


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005















Minister talks job creation


M By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor


D evelopers and
Bahamian contractors
have each created
3,000 jobs as a result
of foreign direct
investment inflows into this nation,
the minister of financial services and
investments has said.
In an address to the PLP convention
that was filled with statistics and num-
bers, Allyson Maynard-Gibson said
Peter deSavary's Abaco Club at
Winding Bay had awarded Bahamian
entrepreneurs $16 million in contracts,
creating 300 new jobs.
Elsewhere on Abaco, the contro-
versial Discovery Land Company


development on Great Guana Cay,
the Baker's Bay Golf & Ocean Club,
had spent more than $1 million with
Bahamian companies, helping to cre-
ate 100 new jobs.
'Talking telephone numbers' by the
island, Mrs Maynard-Gibson said the
Chub Cay project in the Berry Islands
had awarded "almost $25 million in
contracts" to Bahamian operators,
creating 400 jobs there and in Andros.
Providing numbers to show that the
Government's strategy of creating an
'anchor resort' for each Bahamian
island was working, Mrs Maynard-
Gibson said that on Bimini, more than
200 new jobs had been created and
$19.4 million worth of contracts given
to Bahamian companies.
On Mayaguana, where. the


* ALLYSON MAYNARD-
GIBSON


Mayaguana Development Company,
a 50/50 joint venture between the
Hotel Corporation and the Boston-
based I-Group is in progress, the min-
ister said the developer "understands"
that an.effort will be made to attract
Bahamians, especially those descend-
ed from the island, to live and set up
businesses there.
She added that the Development
Company was already employing 15
workers, having spent some $7 mil-
lion to set up its plant and equipment.
On Eleuthera, Mrs Maynard-Gib-
son said projects worth $465 million
had been started, with some $66 mil-
lion already spent. About $22 million
of that latter amount had gone to
Bahamian contractors, she added, cre-
ating "700 new jobs".


In Exuma, the minister said $130
million in contracts had been awarded
by investment project developers, cre-
ating 1,000 new jobs, while on Grand
Bahama, Old Bahama Bay had spent
$9 million of the $70 million invested
to date with Bahamian contractors,
creating 200 new jobs.
Finally, turning to Kerzner Inter-
national's Phase III expansion, Mrs
Maynard-Gibson said out of the $264
million invested to date, $138 million
had gone to Bahamian entrepreneurs.
Some 1200 jobs had been created,
although it was unclear how many had
gone to Bahamians.
At the Ocean Club Residences,
some $55 million had been spent, with
$32 million going to Bahamian com-
panies and 250 jobs created.


FROM page 1B


ments have suggested there is
.,nothing new about granting the
minister such wide powers,
Stliere are lawyers and business
p.e'ople who dispute such a
"'j}Accountability is lacking in
i.te legislative process. It
becomes arbitrary and danger-
"tuis when the consultative
i'$cess is not fully honoured.
The vital role of government in
making new law is to insure the
im partiality of the law and that
ift apply equally to everyone."
.sDrawing attention to the
"Bliamber of Commerce's
y:reiew of several consumer-
vrelated Bills, performed in con-
junction with other business
and non-governmental organi-
sations, the Nassau Institute
quoted directly from the main
concern with all three, particu-


larly the Consumer Protection
Bill and Standards Bill.
In their review of the Bill
published last year, the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce and other private sector
organisations said: "The over-
riding concern regarding this
Act is the power granted to a
single person [the minister]
while attempting to limit the
power of the courts. We all
share concerns that Acts such
as these that make it less like-
ly that matters will go before
the courts distort the funda-
mental democratic system ie;
the Constitution, the court, Par-
liament, citizens and civil soci-
ety. We cannot emphasise
enough that if there is a per-
ceived problem with the court
system, this should be fixed,
rather than circumvent the sys-


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


SABA INTERNATIONAL
INVESTMENTS LTD.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, the dissolution of SABA INTERNATIONAL
INVESTMENTS LTD., has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

ASHLAND SPRINGS LTD.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, the dissolution of ASHLAND SPRINGS
LTD., has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


TRELEX LIMITED


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 17th
day of November, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp.
Inc., of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.







ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


tem."
Leslie Miller, minister of
trade and industry, has vehe-
mently denied that the Gov-
ernment has sought to circum-
vent the court process through
its consumer legislation.
Address
In his address to the PLP
convention last week, the min-
ister said the Standards Bill was
now before the Senate, while
the Consumer Protection Bill
was being dealt with by the
Attorney General's Office to
see if suggested amendments
could be incorporated.
However, on the latter Bill,
Mr Miller had said that some
60 per cent of the Chamber's
87 recommendations were
"redundant", having previously
told its executives that he would
only incorporate suggestions
that benefited consumers.
The latest missive, though, is
likely to re-ignite the 'war of
words' between Mr Miller and
the Nassau Institute, the two
having recentluy disagreed over
fuel prices and Petro Caribe.
The Nassau Institute said
laws needed to be universally
and impartially applied; adding
'that trade unions weie one
'aiample tf'a Tblocklvots'" that
could influence the legislative
process in their favour.


Arguing that "discrimination
is imbedded" in the 2000 labour
legislation passed by the for-
mer FNM government, the
Nassau Institute said: "Mini-
mum wage and other regula-
tions of the labour market were
introduced that discriminate
against the unskilled or handi-
capped individual, who would
qualify for a job at a price
below the minimum wage. The
increased number of unem-
ployed persons since 2000 may
well be the unintended conse-
quence."
And it added: "In the course
of discussions with the govern-
ment on the labour legislation,
the opposing views of repre-
sentatives from the business
community were deemed to be
'mischievous' rather than being
honoured for their legitimate
concerns.
"The same process is taking
place now by members and
leaders of the present govern-
ment regarding legitimate crit-
icism of the controversial con-
sumer protection legislation.
"If opposing and/or different
views are discouraged or not
given audience in the legisla-
tive process, economic and
political, freedoms, cannot be,
preserved. Future generations t
are at ris'of becoming'ftli
property of the leviathan state
as a consequence."


WINDING BAV


REAL ESTATE SALES
REPRESENTATIVE


The Abaco Club on Winding Bay, a spectacular 520 acre
International Members Golf & Sporting Estate on Abaco,
is seeking a senior-level REAL ESTATE SALES
REPRESENTATIVE. Candidates must have a minimum
of 5 years experience in luxury market sales. Real Estate
license is preferred. Successful candidate must have
exceptional communication skills, both verbal and written.
Must be personable, professional and willing to commute
or relocate to Abaco. The Abaco Club's estate lots range
from $875,000 to more then $4 million. Please email cover
letter and resume to info@theabacoclub.com or fax to 242-
367-2930, Attn: Sales & Marketing.





NEWLY BUILT LUXURY
I & 2 Bedroom Apartments
Sunset Park, West











PARTIALLY FURNISHED (Fridge & Stove)
CENTRAL AIR CONDITIONED
LAUNDRY FACILITIES (Washer & Dryer)
SECURITY SCREENS
WATER INCLUDED
ENCLOSED PROPERTY
To inquire, call (242) 361-0218 or 557-3021
2 Bedroms $875.00
Security Deposit $700.00
and First & Last Month
1 Bedroom $700.00
Security Deposit $550.00
IFirst & Last Month A


Applicant must be available
Monday to Friday 8:30am to 12:30pm
To home school four (4) children
ages 4 (preschool), 6 (grade 2), 8 (grade 3) and 11 (grade 7)

Applicant will assist parents with sourcing an appropriate
internet curriculum and furnishing a home school room

$1,000.00 per month salary + NIB + 4 weeks annual
vacation + statutory holidays
Atlantic Medical benefits available

FAX RESUME TO 242-356-5256 or call 424-2326


Are you just back from College?
Maybe you are saving up to go to college?


WE WANT YOU!

You are young and energetic between 21 35 years old.
Love team work and are good with people!
Like working at night, "6p.m. 12a.m."
Have your own Transportation and currant driver's licence
Have a current police and health certificate.
Posses a high school Diploma
Have legal status to work in the Bahamas.

If you can say yes to 7 out of 7 of these questions we want
to meet you, to interview for an exciting new job in the
entertainment field. We presently have openings for 1 bar
manager, 1 bartender, 1 bar back & 5 wait staff.


Contact us with a written resume at mail box...

DA-1417
c/o The Tribune
P.O.Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas



NOTICE OF VACANCY

FOR

DIRECTOR OF CITY MANAGEMENT

A vacancy exists at The Grand Bahama Port
Authority, Limited for one DIRECTOR OF CITY
MANAGEMENT in the City Management
Department.

Applicants must have the following

Bachelor of Science in Engineering
Minimum of fifteen (15) years relevant engineering
experience
Minimum of ten (10) years experience supervision multi
discipline technical.teams including architectural, civil,
structural, mechanical, electrical, town planning,
environmental and maintenance professionals.
Strong administrative background

Professional Registration a plus

The individual will be responsible for the
management of the Building and Development
Services Department, including the following
functional groups:

Town Planning and Capital Projects
Building Code Compliance
Environmental Compliance
Geographical Information Systems (GIS)
Property Maintenance
City (Maintenance) Management

Resumes with supporting documentation should
be submitted to:

The Personnel Department
The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited
P.O. Box F-42666
Freeport, Grand Bahama
on or before November 30th, 2005


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 6B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


- .- -


~- w-


- "Copyrighted Material


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE
International Business Companies Act 2000,
(No. 45 of 2000)

YOXFORD TRADING LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000), YOXFORD
TRADING LIMITED, is in dissolution. CONTINENTAL
LIQUIDATORS INC. is the Liquidator and can be contacted at No. 2
Commercial Centre Square, P.O. Box #71, Alofi, Niue Islands. All
persons having claims against the above-named company are required
to send their names, addresses and particulars of their debts or claims
to the Liquidator before December 19, 2005.



For. Cont.enlal Liquidators, Inc.
Liquidator


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE
International Business Companies Act 2000,
(No. 45 of 2000)

SALFORD TRADING LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000), SALFORD
TRADING LIMITED, is in dissolution. CONTINENTAL
LIQUIDATORS INC. is the Liquidator and can be contacted at No. 2
Commercial Centre Square, P.O. Box #71, Alofi, Niue Islands. All
persons having claims against the above-named company are required
to send their names, addresses and particulars of their debts or claims
to the Liquidator before December 19, 2005.



For: Continental Liquidator Inc.
Liquidator


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE
International Business Companies Act 2000,
(No. 45 of 2000)

WILROSS INTERNATIONAL LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000), WILROSS
INTERNATIONAL LIMITED, is in dissolution. CONTINENTAL
LIQUIDATORS INC. is the Liquidator and can be contacted at No. 2
Commercial Centre Square, P.O. Box #71, Alofi, Niue Islands. All
persons having claims against the above-named company are required
to send their names, addresses and particulars of their debts or claims
to the Liquidator before December 19, 2005.



I F-or: Coninoontal Liqoidator, Inc.
LiquidaTor


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE
International Business Companies Act 2000,
(No. 45 of 2000)

DUTTON HOLDINGS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000), DUTTON
HOLDINGS LIMITED, is in dissolution. CONTINENTAL
LIQUIDATORS INC. is the Liquidator and can be contacted at No. 2
Commercial Centre Square, P.O. Box #71, Alofi, Niue Islands. All
persons having claims against the above-named company are required
to send their names, addresses and particulars of their debts or claims
to the Liquidator before December 19, 2005.



For: ConlSeral Liquidators, Ine.
Liquidator


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


B

S


a


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE
International Business Companies Act 2000,
N 45 of 2000)

ROYTON OVERSEAS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000), ROYTON
OVERSEAS LIMITED, is in dissolution. CONTINENTAL
LIQUIDATORS INC. is the Liquidator and can be contacted at No. 2
Commercial Centre Square, P.O. Box #71, Alofi, Niue Islands. All
persons having claims against the above-named company are required
to send their names, addresses and particulars of their debts or claims
to the Liquidator before December 19, 2005.



J B. Foetter
-or Continerntal Liquidators Inec.
tiquidator

LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE
International Business Companies Act 2000,
(No. 45 of 2000)

ACORN OVERSEAS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000), ACORN
OVERSEAS LIMITED, is in dissolution. CONTINENTAL
LIQUIDATORS INC. is the Liquidator and can be contacted at No. 2
Commercial Centre Square, P.O. Box #71, Alofi, Niue Islands. All
persons having claims against the above-named company are required
to send their names, addresses and particulars of their debts or claims
to the Liquidator before December 19, 2005.



For: Conlinnsal Liquidaloto. Isne.
Liquidator


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE
International Business Companies Act 2000,
(No. 45 of 2000)

JOLLY OVERSEAS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000), JOLLY
OVERSEAS LIMITED, is in dissolution. CONTINENTAL
LIQUIDATORS INC. is the Liquidator and can be contacted at No. 2
Commercial Centre Square, P.O. Box #71, Alofi, Niue Islands. All
persons having claims against the above-named company are required
to send their names, addresses and particulars of their debts or claims
to the Liquidator before December 19, 2005.



For: Coeinential Liquidators. Inc.
Liquidator


- -


FROM page 1B

--Placer Dome affair.
.. The SEC investigation relates
to a takeover offer for Placer
Dome, a Canadian-based gold
mining company, that was sub-
mitted on October 31, 2005, by
Barrick Gold Corporation, a
rival gold mining company that
is also located in Canada.
If the Barrick offer is accept-
ed, Placer shareholders will
receive about $20.50 per share.
The SEC said that as a result
of the public announcement on
October 31, Placer's stock
increased by 20 per cent over
its Friday, October 28, close to
start trading on that day at
$19.82 per share.
However, the SEC alleged


that on October 25 and 26,
unknownw, purchasers", while
in possession of material, non-
public information, "used over-
seas accounts" to buy 10,000
call option contracts on Placer
stock through an account with a
US-based broker/dealer.
The SEC said: "As the com-
plaint alleges, over 5,000 call
option contracts were 'out of
the money' and set to expire in
November, within weeks of the
purchase. The complaint fur-
ther alleges that,. as a result of
the increase in price of Placer
stock following the announce-
ment, the unrealised.profits on
these option contracts total over
$1.9 million."


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE
International Business Companies Act 2000,
(No. 45 of 2000)

POLVAN INVESTMENTS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000), POLVAN
INVESTMENTS LIMITED, is in dissolution. CONTINENTAL
LIQUIDATORS INC. is the Liquidator i, "d can be contacted at No. 2
Commercial Centre Square, P' B, 71, Alofi, Niue Islands. All
persons having claims against the ibo,' amed company are required
to send their names, addresses and particulars of their debts or claims
to the Liquidator before December 19, 2005.



JraB. Fosr -
For. ContinenIal Liquidators. Inc.
Liquidator


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE
International Business Companies Act 2000,
(No. 45 of 2000)

KALBAC HOLDINGS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000), KALBAC
HOLDINGS LIMITED, is in dissolution. CONTINENTAL
LIQUIDATORS INC. is the Liquidator and can be contacted at No. 2
Commercial Centre Square, P.O. Box #71, Alofi, Niue Islands. All
persons having claims against the above-named company are required
to send their names, addresses and particulars of their debts or claims
to the Liquidator before December 19, 2005.



Fer: Continental Liquidator, Inc.
Liquidator


I ch sae
[mm] a *


w


w














BISX-listed firm embroiled in





troubled fund's liquidation


FROM page 1B

"In addition, we understand
that approximately $600,000
(US$500,000) of unpaid divi-
dends may also be owing to
Mosaic relating to these shares.
The receiver and Culmer are
working together to obtain
additional information on this
potential Mosaic asset."
'Premier, a real estate invest-
ment trust, is a mutual fund
formed in 2003 to invest in and
take ownership of several
Bahamian commercial proper-
ties. These were the First Com-
mercial Centre in Freeport, and
Caribbean Bottling's Nassau-
based production and distribu-
tion facilities, plus its Freeport
distribution centre.
Among Premier's founding
directors, although he is no
longer on the Board, was
Stephen Hancock, president
and chief executive of Cardi-
nal International. Cardinal
International was the adminis-
trator for the Olympus Univest
fund until the former wound
itself up on December 31, 2004.
No market has ever devel-
oped on BISX for Premier's
shares, with The Tribune
unable to recall a single trade
in the stock. As a result, liqui-
dating any Mosaic holding in
the company could prove prob-
lematic.
In addition, given that Pre-
mier was seeking to raise
$14.153 million to fund its
property purchases at the time
it was raising capital, the Mosa-
ic holding is possibly worth
more than one/third of the total
investment. It is unclear what
impact withdrawal of this hold-
ing would have on the under-
lying properties and their com-
panies, although it is quite pos-
sible another buyer might step
in.
* Mr Massi's report is likely to
make grim reading for the
1,900 Canadian retail investors,
plus numerous institutional
investors, who invested millions
with Norshield. The affair is
shaping up as a major invest-
ment fund scandal, bigger than
the debacle Fortis Fund Ser-
vices found itself embroiled in
with the Oracle Fund.


In his report, he said: "All of
the funds invested in Olympus
Univest were invested into
Mosaic. The Olympus Univest
joint liquidators have instituted
certain proceedings against
Mosaic to recover the funds
invested."
The report described a com-
plex investment structure,
where the 1,900 retail investors
collectively put some $132 mil-
lion into 12 different classes of
shares in Norshield's Olympus
Funds, enabling them to access
a particular trading strategy.

Funds

These funds then flowed into
segregated accounts at Barba-
dos-based Olympus Bank &
Trust, to prevent liabilities
from being transmitted across
the different trading strategies.
The bank then invested 10-15
per cent of the investor funds
with several hedge fund man-
agers, but "the balance of the
assets between 85-90 per cent
of the monies originating from
retail investors was invested
into Olympus Univest in the
Bahamas".
The receiver's report
detailed how John Xan-
thoudakis and Dale Smith,
Norshield's braintrust, were
unable to identify the beneficial
owners of BICE Internation-
al, a Bahamian company that
was the majority shareholder
in Olympus Univest and put it
into liquidation. There was a
declaration in the Offering
Memorandum, though, that it
was not associated with the
Olympus companies.
In addition, Xanthoudakis
and Smith were also unable to
identify the beneficial owners
of Mosaic Composite, and nei-
ther they nor Cardinal Inter-
national had been able to sup-
ply Mr Massi or Mr Culmer
with a copy of the investment
agreement between Olympus
Univest and Mosaic.
In addition, The Tribune has
obtained correspondence
showing that Xanthoudakis
had failed to provide "infor-
mation and documents" relat-
ing to Cardinal International's
activities as Olympus Univest


RBC
FINCO

NOTICE

RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot of Land of Allotment
#75 Harrold Road. Fire Trail situated in the Western District on the
Island of New Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas. Situated thereon is Vacant Land.

Property Size: 27,583 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked "Tender 1505". All offers must be
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 2nd December, 2005.



RBC
FINCO


NOTICE

RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 3 & 4, Blk #18,
Nassau Village 655 Pinewood Gardens Subdivision situated in the Southern
District on the Island of New Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single Family
Residence consisting of (2) two bedrooms, (2) two bathrooms.

Property Size: 5,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 864 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau,
Bahamas and marked "Tender 2564". All offers must be received by the
close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 2nd December, 2005.


administrator and with Mosaic,
despite repeated requests to do
so.
Cardinal International sits
squarely at the middle of the
affair. The receiver's report
concludes that the former
Bahamian fund administrator
was responsible for determin-
ing the net asset value (NAV)
of each class of shares in the
Olympus Univest fund.
The report said: "The
method of calculation of the
net asset values used by the
Norshield Companies, Olym-
pus Univest and Mosaic......
may have resulted in incorrect
and possibly inflated subscrip-
tion and redemption values......
"To the extent that the
underlying value of certain
assets of Mosaic was impaired
and it could not fulfil its oblig-
ations to Olympus Univest, the
values at which the shares of
investors were subscribed for
and/or redeemed would have
been inflated."
A. Cardinal International
"representative" has also told
the receiver that $3.524 million


in cash that Smith said it was
holding for liquidity purposes
in relation to Olympus Univest
did not "currently exist".
Olympus Univest co-mingled
funds received from the retail
investors with institutional
monies, plus $40-$100 million
of 'assets in kind' which were
paid by investors investing
directly in the fund. All these
assets were invested into Mosa-
ic.
Mosaic's assets, according to
the report, were divided into
two categories hedged and
non-hedged. Premier Real
Estate fell into the latter, as did
investments in a group of
Bahamian funds known as the
Channel funds.
The receiver concluded that
there was a lack of disclosure
for investors in Olympus Uni-
vest, who were unaware of the
investment agreement with
Mosaic and the associated
risks. The segregation of assets
between hedged and non-
hedged "does not appear to
have been disclosed", and nor
were the investments "in illiq-


RBC
FINCO

NOTICE

RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot of Land Tower
Heights situated in the Eastern District on the Island of New
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Situated thereon is Vacant Land.

Property Size: 20,000 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked "Tender 0914". All
offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday
2nd December, 2005.



RBC
FINCO
I-

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 2927, Blk #6,
Sir Lynden Pindling Estates situated in the Southern District on the
Island of New Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting
of (2) two bedrooms, (2) two bathroom.

Property Size: 5,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 896 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked "Tender 2549". All offers must be
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 2nd December, 2005.



RBC
FINCO


NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #318, Evansville
Subdivision situated in the South-Western District on the Island of
New Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Duplex Apartment consisting of 2 (two)
two bedrooms, (2) two bathrooms.

Property Size: 6,981 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,595 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked "Tender 2978". All offers must be
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 2nd December, 2005.


uid companies" in the Chan-
nel Entities.

Concluded

Mr Massi concluded that
apart from the 85-90 per cent of
the $132 million in retail
investor money, some $350 mil-
lion from institutional and
direct investors placed in
Olympus Univest also
"remains outstanding".
"Other than recoveries
which may flow up to Olym-
pus Univest from Mosaic, there
does not appear to be other
assets available for recovery at
the Olympus Univest level for
the benefit of the Olympus
preference shareholders and,
more particularly, the retail
investors," Mr Massi said.
One Mosaic hedge asset, a
call option with Royal Bank of
Canada, has been liquidated
and a premium of $44.4 mil-
lion realised. However, own-
ership of this premium is being
contested in court proceedings
in New York and the Bahamas.


Among the contesting par-
ties are Merrill Lynch and
PricewaterhouseCoopers (Pwc)
Bahamas accountants, Wayne
Aranha and Cliff Johnson, in
their capacities as liquidators
of Globe-X Canadiana and
Globe-X Management. They
are alleging that the funds use
to purchase the call options
came from their creditors.
And Mosaic's non-hedged
assets have embroiled another
Bahamian company, Emerald
Key Advisors, described as an
asset manager with $50-$100
million in assets under man-
agement.
Dale Smith had told the
receiver some $8 million was
with Emerald Key Advisors as
at September 30, 2003.
Emerald Key has recently
been placed in voluntary liqui-
dation, with accountant Mike
Parnell as liquidator. There is
nothing to suggest the compa-
ny's staff, directors or share-
holders have done anything
wrong in relation to the
Norhshield affair.


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2005
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/QUI/00545
Equity Side

IN THE MATTER OF all the piece parcel or
lot of land situate on the North side of South Street in
Dunmore Town in the Island of Harbour Island one of
the Islands of the said Commonwealth comprising
approximately Eight Thousand Nine Hundred and
Seventeen (8,917) square feet.

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Harbour Island
Villas Ltd.

AND

IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

NOTICE

The Petition or Harbour Island Villas Ltd., a company
incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas aforesaid in respect of:

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate in
Dunmore Town in the said Island of Harbour Island
which said piece parcel is bounded NORTHWARDLY
partly by land the property of the Petitioner and running
thereon Eighty-nine and Seventeen hundredth (89.17)
feet and partly by land the property of Curtis Albury
and running thereon Forty-two and Ninety-six hundredth
(42.96) feet EASTWARDLY by land the property of
Pearl Albury and running thereon Fifty-seven and Fifty-
nine hundredth (57.59) feet SOUTHWARDLY by South
Street and running thereon One Hundredth and Forty-
two and Eighty-five hundredth (142.85) feet
WESTWARDLY by land the property of James Falsey
and Sandy Levinson and running thereon Seventy-two
and Fifty-one hundredth (72.51) feet as the same are
delineated with the position shape marks boundaries
dimensions and abuttals thereof on the Plan filed in this
matter and thereon coloured PINK.

Harbour Island Villas Ltd, claims to be the owner in fee
simple in possession of the tract of land hereinbefore
described and the Petitioner has made application to the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas
under Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have
its title to the said land investigated and the nature and
extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate
of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with
the provisions of the said Act.

A plan of the said land may be inspected during normal
office hours in the following places:

a) The Registry of the Supreme Court in the City of
Nassau;

b) The Office of the Administrator in Dunmore Town,
Harbour Island, Bahamas;

c) The Chambers of Callenders & Co., One Millars
Court, Nassau, Bahamas, Attorneys for the Petitioner.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person havign dower
or right to dower or an adverse claim or a claim not
recognized in the Petition shall before the 21st day of
December A.D., 2005 file into the Supreme Court and
serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement
of his claim in the prescribed form, verified by an
Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such
person to file and serve a statement of his claim on or
before the said 21st day of December A.D., 2005 will
operated as a bar to such claim.
CALLENDERS & CO.
Chambers
One Millers Court
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


PAGE 8B MONDAYNOVEMBE 5


GN-294












SUPREME COURT


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00521

In the estate of Martha Nan Barrett aka Martha N.
Barrett, late of Devonshire Way, Palm Beach, Florida,
one of the states in the United States of America,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its
Probate Side by WILLIAM LAWRENCE ROBERTS of
Fox Hill Creek, in the Eastern District of the island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is the Authorized
Attorney in The Bahamas for the Resealling Grant of
Letters of Administration in the above estate granted to
WILLIAM LAWRENCE ROBERTS, by The probate
Division, Circuit Court for Palm Beach County in the
State of Florida on the 7th day of July A.D., 2005..

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00525

In the estate of Peter Vukas, late of Nimishillen Township,
Stark County, Ohio, one of the states in the United States
of America,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The BahamasonI"its
Probate Side by ALEXANDER BERKLEY FERGUSON
of The Eastern District on the island of New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-at-Law, is the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for the Resealing of a Grant of Probate in the
above estate granted to JUDITH ANN GARDNER, by
The probate Court of Stark County on the 26th day of
February A.D., 1993.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00526

In the estate of John Micheal Heskith Bridge, late of
Parkside House, Villiers Street in the Spennymoor in the
County of Durham, DL16 6AL in the United Kingdom,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its
Probate Side by VERONICA DELORES GRANT of 19D
Santa Maria Avenue, in the city of Freeport on the Island
of Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for the Resealing
Grant of Probate in the above estate granted to ANITA
BRIDGE, by The High Court of Justice The District
Probate Registry at New Castle Upon Tyne in the United
Kingdom on the 24th day of February A.D., 2003..

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00541


In the estate of Betty Ellen Winifred Blanche Fischer,
late of 4 York Street, Penzance in the Sub-District of
Truro, in the Administrative Area of the County of Cornwall,
England, United Kingdom,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its
Probate Side by EARL A. CASH of Marlin Drive, in the
Western District on the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-at-Law, is the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for the Resealing of Letters of a Grant of
Representation in the above estate granted to HEATHER


BAKER, ROBERT WOODLEY, HEATHER WOODLEY
and JAMES DUNCAN JACOBY, by The District Probate
Registry at Bristol, England, United Kingdom on the 15th
day of December A.D., 2003.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for)Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00543

In the estate of Mae Levy, late of 3634 7th Avenue in
the City of San Diego, in the San Diego County, in the
State of California, one of the states of the United States
of America,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its
Probate Side by NEVILLE B. WILCHOMBE II of the City
of Freeport, on the Island of Grand Bahama, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-
at-Law, is the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for
the Resealing of Letters of a Grant of Testamentary in
the above estate granted to SANDRA GEIST GODLFARB
and VIVIAN EBERSMAN, by The Superior Court in and
for San Diego County in the State of California on the
24th day of March A.D., 2005.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00552

Whereas Hartis Eugene Pinder of Mareva House,
4 George Street, New Providence, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed
of Power of Attorney for Lesley Adam Schuitemaker, has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
for Letters of Administration with the Will Annexed of the
real and personal estate of Marinus A, Schuitemaker,
later, of the settlement of Cherokee Sound in the Island
of Abaco, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from
the date.thereof, ..

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00570

Whereas EDWARD DAVIS of Windsor Lane West,
Southern District, New Providence, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the Lawful Widower
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas for Letters of Administration of the real and
personal Estate of PAULETTE VILNEUS DAVIS, late of
Windsor Lane West, Southern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00571

Whereas VANITA RAMSEY of the Southern
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the mother, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for
Letters of Administration of the real and personal estate
of SHANNETTE SABARIACBA ROXBURY, late, of
Millineum Gardens, Southern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date thereof.


Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005


2005/PRO/npr/00573


Whereas PAULINE ELIZABETH LEWIS of the
City of Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the mother, has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
for Letters of Administration of the real and personal
estate of IVA ELIZABETH MCINTOSH, late, of the City
of Freeport Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from
the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00574

Whereas WILLIAM ALBERT LOWE of Port New
Providence, Eastern District, New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the
Lawful Widower has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas for Letters of Administration of
the real and personal estate of GLORIA CAROLYN
LOWE, late of Port New Providence, Eastern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00575

In the estate of AGNES LEHMANN, late of 3470 South
West, 57th Place, in the City of Hollywood, in the State
of Florida, U.S.A.,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its
Probate Side by ANGELA MARIA SIMMS of Tuckaway
Road, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, is the
Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for the Resealed
Grant of Letters of Administration Single Personal
Representative in the above estate granted to DEBRA
HOFFMAN, the Personal Representative, by the Circuit
Court in and for Broward County, Florida, U.S.A., on the
16th day of August, 2005.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00576

Whereas KIRKWOOD MILLER SEYMOUR of
Buen Retiro Subdivision, Eastern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for the Executors,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas for Letters of Administration with the Will
Annexed of the real and personal estate of WINIFRED
MCKENZIE, later, of No.59 of Sausalito Drive, Boynton
Beach, Florida, U.S.A., deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00579
Whereas ARTHUR SELIGMAN of Cable Beach,
Western District, New Providence one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed
of Power of Attorney for the Executor, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for
Letters of Administration with the Will Annexed of the
real and personal estate of GLADYS RUTH SPENCER-
HARTY, late, of Skyline Drive, Western District New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased.


Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005


1, 4MW V& ,I -








THE TRIBUNE NOVEMBER 21,2005, PAGE 9B





Convention Tax



to generate 15-



20% growth in



group travellers


FROM page 1B

group travellers coming to its
shores to hold meetings and
conferences once the Conver-
tion Tax break agreed with the
US kicks in from 2006 onwards,
the Ministry of Tourism's direc-
tor of group travel told The Tri-
bune.
James Malcolm said this-
increase should be seen once
both customers and Bahamian
tourism suppliers became
"more educated" about what
the Convention Tax deduction
meant and who it applied to.
He explained that it did not
apply to non-profit organisa-
tions, but could be used by
businesses and business groups
who travelled to the Bahamas
for conventions or to hold
meetings and conferences for
business purposes. As a result
of the agreement with the US,
which was the trade-off for the
Bahamas agreeing a Tax Infor-
mation Exchange Agreement
(TIEA) with the US, these
business travellers will be able
to deduct the expenses associ-
ated with attending a confer-
ence in the Bahamas against
their income tax.
Growth
Mr Malcolm said: "We
should see annually a 15-20 per
cent growth in our volume of
group business."
Meanwhile, Grand Bahama's
tourism industry has moved to
exploit the expected increase
in group business by forming.
a Group Travel;aTsk Force, :
consisting of representatives
from the Ministry of Tourism,
Grand Bahama Promotion
Board, hotels, tour operators,
ground transportation opera-
tors, the taxi union and the
Grand Bahama Port Authority.
Describing Grand Bahamas
as a "unique" destination for
the convention business, Mr
Malcolm said several business
groups had already relocated
their conventions and meetings
to that island and Nassau as a
result of the devastation inflict-
ed on Cancun by Hurricane
Wilma.
He added of the island: "I'm
very bullish on Grand Bahama.
It's become a very rich envi-
ronment for me to execute my
mandate."
Describing his role as being
to "broker and arbitrate and
market" the Bahamas, with the
ultimate aim of bringing group
business to the island, Mr Mal-
colm said Grand Bahama had
the infrastructure needed to
accommodate large group busi-
ness, including the airport,
hotels and roads.
He added: "Grand Bahama
is very unique. In many ways,
right now until Baha Mar rede-
velops Cable Beach, the West-
in and Sheraton [at Our
Lucaya] is probably the best
destination for convention busi-
ness."
Adding that the property
had developed "a real niche",
Mr Malcolm said it had all the
attractions and-amenities-group
business travellers wanted, such
as the beach, sea, room view,
shopping, restaurants and golf.
He added that he was in
negotiations to bring a 700-
strong group booking to Grand
Bahama for April 2007, as
group meeting planners often
planned two to 'three years in
advance.
In addition, he was also seek-
ing to have the launch of a new
truck product held in Grand
Bahama in September 2006, as
the island's roads would enable
visitors to test drive it. Several
thousand visitors were expect-
.ed to attend the launch, coming
to Grand Bahama in "five


waves" spread over several
. days.
Apart from its infrastructure
and space, Mr Malcolm said
further advantages for Grand
Bahama in its search for group
business was that it was backed
by the Port Authority, and the
island's hotels covered the full.
range of price points.
Old Bahama Bay was posi-
tioned as a high-end boutique,
while the Sheraton and Westin
were at the low and mid-end
points respectively. In addition,
Mr Malcolm said Our Lucaya
was planning to develop the
eastern end of its property at
Lighthouse Point with some
high-end villas.
Pelican Bay, too, was plan-
ning to build meeting space so
it could hold small functions,
while Viva Fortuna offered fur-
ther options.
While the Bahamas' largest
hotel properties were likely to
benefit most from the Conven-
tion Tax kick-in, Mr Malcolm
said nine islands in this nation
had the rooms and space to
accommodate group business.
He added: "I think the great-
est potential for growth in
terms of percentage, for group
business, will be the Family
Islands. The Out Islands in the
next three years show the
greatest potential for growth."
Mr Malcolm explained that
aside from large conventions
and groups, other group busi-
ness being hosted already by
the Bahamas included groups
of 20-40 couples who came in
on incentive programmes. Oth-
ers not wanting to become
'lost' in a large resort, and
wantig somen here.'qieterto
retreat to, included small
groups of executives.
Some 80 per cent of the
group business already done
by the Bahamas was incentive-
based, Mr Malcolm said. He
added that the Family Islands
had "a lot of room for growth",
with the Four Seasons resort
in Exuma having "set the stan-
dard" for those islands in terms
of catering to high-end clien-
tele.
Mr Malcolm said the
Bahamas now needed to "qual-
ify and quantify" the group
business it received, and work
out the destination that pro-
yided "the best fit" for each
client's needs, whether it be a
large Nassau hotel or small
Family Island property.
He added that to promote
the Bahamas as a group desti-
nation, the sales team at the
overseas Bahamas Tourism
Offices had been reorganised.
There were now seven sales
managers selling group busi-
ness, working out of offices in
cities such as Chicago, Fort
Lauderdale, New York and
Washington DC.
Promoted
All islands were being pro-
moted and marketed to the full
range of potential group clients,
who included religion, African-
American, educational, gov-
ernment, business arid frater-
nity groups. In January, the
sales eai' members will visit
and stay at hotels in Grand
Bahama, Abaco and Eleuthera
to enable them to better sell
those islands.
Mr Malcolm said five trips,
beginning next May, were
planned to bring group meeting
planners and group travel buy-
ers to the Bahamas, so they
could better understand this
nation's possibilities.
He pointed out that group
travel was a create volume dri-
ver for the tourism industry,
and the "multiplier effect is
much greater" when spread
around the Bahamian econo-
my.


2005/PRO/npr/00580

Whereas DUDLEY SINCLAIR COVERLEY of
South Beach Estates, Southern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
the Eeldest Son, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas for Letters of Administration with
the Will Annexed of the real and personal estate of
MARY STEED late, of Soldier Road, Southern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00581

Whereas LOUIS ALMACE of Ibis Court, Kennedy
Subdivision, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters of
Administration of the real and personal estate of Lottie
Smith-Almace late of Ibis Court, Kennedy Subdivision,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00583

Whereas Althea Johnson of Holmes Rock, on
the Island of Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas for Letters of
Administration of the real and personal estate of Uncoln
Johnson late, of Holmes Rock, on the Island of Grand
Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications-will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from
the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00584

Whereas Charmaine Williams of McLean's
Town, East End, on the Islanid of Grand Bahama, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
for Letters of Administration of the real and personal
estate of Dwayne Williams late, of McLean's Town,
East End, on the Island of Grand Bahama, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from
the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00585

In the estate of Edward M. O' Keeffe, late of the Town
of Harrison, Westchester, in the State of New York, USA.,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its
Probate Side by BRUNO ROBERTS FOR THE PRIVATE


TRUST CORPORATION LIMITED, of Old Post House,
Prospect Ridge of the Western District on the Island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, is the Authorized
Attorney in The Bahamas for the Resealing of a Grant
of Probate in the above estate granted to CHRISTINE
P O'KEEFEE by The Surrogate's Court of the State of
New York on the 10th day of January A.D. 1966.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00593

Whereas CHARLES ASHBEL PINDER of
Spanish Wells, St. George's Cay, The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
for Letters of Administration of the real and personal
estate of QUINTELLA PINDER late, of Spanish Wells,
St. George's Cay, The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from
the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00595

Whereas JOANNE MARIE WHYLLY (nee)
STRACHAN of Yamacraw Estates, New Providence,
The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of
the real and personal estate of REGINALD NATHANIEL
WHYLLY late, of Yamacraw Estate, New Providence,
The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date thereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COUR
PROBATE SID
NOV 24, 200


2005/PRO/npr/00597

In the estate of RONALD WLLIAM SAUNDERS late
11 Astbury House, Lambeth Road, Lambeth, Londei
England, United Kingdom,

deceasec

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiratior
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application wil
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its
Probate Side by EJ. MARIA AGEEB, of Cable Beach,
.New Providence, The Bahamas, Attorney-at-Laaw, is the,
.,Aiithbrized AttoirriyI'in:ThRe Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealed Letters of Administration in the above estate
granted to FREDERICK GEORGE SAUNDERS the
administrator, by the High Court of Justice, the Distric
Probate Registry at Winchester, on the 9th day of Ma.
2005.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COUR-
PROBATE SlP
NOV 24, 20c

2005/PRO/npr/00599

Whereas C.V HOPE STRACHAN of The Eastern
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The.Bahamas for Letters o
Administration of the real and personal estate of PEARLE
WILKINSON late, of Ninth Terrace, Centreville, Nev
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealtf
of the Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
hered by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date thereof.


Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE SIDE
NOV 24, 2005

2005/PRO/npr/00602

In the estate of SAMUEL ROTHMAN, late of 4-535 Rue
Chapel Street, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its
Probate Side by DOLLY P. YOUNG, of Nassau East
North, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, is the
Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas, for the Resealed
Grant of Probate in The Bahamas, for the Resealed
Grant of Probate in the above estate granted to HOvyA+Ri)
STEPHEN ROTHMAN, CORINNE RHODA TAYI OR
and SIDNEY ROTHMAN the Executors, by the Surrogate
Court of the Judicial District of Ottawa Carleon, Ontario,
Canada on the 5th day of February, 1990

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar
21, 22, 23, Nov 0'


Bthenewsread0I ns igt
on Monday


""rI


I I I







P BA E1T E


Angels


on


put the


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brakes




opener


t BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
COACH Sharon "the Gen-
eral" Storr wasn't impressed
with his debut with the Cleaning
Center Angels. But, after their
87-77 triumph over the John-
son's Lady Truckers, he felt
they will still be the team to
beat in the New Providence
Women's Basketball Associa-
tion.
Suzette 'Sleepy' McKenzie
was wide awake, pumping in 27
points, Sharelle "Money" Cash
connected on 14 and Keisha
Richardson helped out with 12
for the two-time defending
champions Angels in Saturday's
rematch of the last year's final
at the DW Davis Gym.
Shantelle Rolle poured in a
game high 33 and Glenda
Gilcud had 16 in a losing effort.
"Too shaky, too inconsistent
and too sloppy," was how Storr
summed up the performance of
the Angels. "We haven't had a
good opportunity to work
together properly. Once we do,
we will be able to iron out those
things."

Season
The Angels won't have more
time to do any fine tuning as
they will be back on the court
on Thursday when they face the
Defense Force in the opener of
a league double header. Storr
said, as the season progresses,
the Angels play at a much high-
er level.
Cash welcomed Storr, who is
coaching a local ladies team for
the first time, but has coached
numerous national teams. She
insists that he will certainly
make them play much better
than they did last year.
Cash said, "I've been under
him for a number of years on
the national team, so it's good


to have him there as the head
coach. He makes some good
decisions. A lot of people may
not like it, but he knows what
he's doing."
On the team's victory, Cash
said, "It was a good win. We
have a lot of new faces and
we're trying to work together
as a team. Everybody has a role
to play. Hopefully we can come
together and play as a unit."
It took the Angels a full first
to get their act together as they
turned a 47-45 half-time deficit
into a 70-60 advantage midway
in the third and they held onto a
74-71 margin at the final break.
Tiffany McKenzie, one of the
young stars on the Angels team,
provided up an up-tempo lift
with her ball handling skills and,
when they needed some extra
help, they got it from Jean Bap-
tiste, who crashed the boards
and was able to put in eight
points. McKenzie scored two
and Felicia Cartwright added
five.
The Truckers suffered a big
blow when Gilcud fouled out
on the first play of the fourth
quarter, breaking up their
potent 1-2 back-court combo
with Rolle. Stacy Horton and
Marissa Burrows chipped in
with six apiece.
But the Truckers were also
able to utilise the tough inside
play of veteran Jackie Conyers,
who came out of retirement to
cement her position in the post.
Back after a 10-year hiatus in
which she continued to play vol-
leyball, Conyers said she just
has to get back into some "run-
ning shape" and she vowed that
"I will be able to do some dam-
age."
After contributing her four
points, she said: "I still have the
fundamentals down. I just need
to get in some running shape
and I know I can make a con-
tribution to this team."
Despite the loss, Conyers said


the Truckers are a solid team,
and, once they get in some
more practises, she's convinced
that they will be able to play a
lot better against the Angels
and the other three teams in the
league.
Truckers' coach Jean Minus
said it was obvious that they
"didn't gel together because the
chemistry wasn't there yet." But
she too stated that the Truckers
will produce a better showing
as the season progresses
Minus said once she can get
Conyers "back in shape," the
Truckers will be different.
"She's hurting," said Minus,
"but I'm going to work her out
on Tuesday and she will
"ready" to play on Thursday
when the Truckers play the
newly formed Sunshine Auto
Cheetahs at 8.15pm.

Coached
Conyers will have to deal
with the Cheetahs line-up that
features Linda Pierre and
Brook Smith. They are coached
by Mario Bowleg, who will be
making his debut as a female
coach, having coached at the
junior boys level for a number
of years.
At half-time in Saturday's
game, the league presented
awards to the deserving athletes
from the past season.
Suzette McKenzie, Sharelle
Cash and Keisha Richardson,
who led the Angels in their vic-
tory, were named to the All-
NPWBA team. They were
joined by Chantelle Rolle and
Christine Sinclair of the Col-
lege of the Bahamas Caribs.
Sinclair and Kimberley Rolle,
who moved up from first vice
president to take over as presi-
dent of the association after the
resignation of Mynez Cargill-
Sherman, will lead the Caribs
as they take on the Defence
Force on Tuesday night.


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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005


SECTION


Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


OUung


* BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
BAHAMAS Basketball Federa-
tion treasurer Edgar Pickstock liked
what he saw Saturday night at the
DW Davis Gym as he watched the
New Providence. Women's Basket-
ball Association open its third sea-
son.
The two-time defending Cleaning
Center Angels beat the Johnson's
Lady Truckers 87-77 in the season
opener, a rematch of last year's final.
During the half-time, the league pre-
sented awards to the outstanding
players from last year.
Pickstock, who spoke and pre-
sented some of the awards, named in
honour of Randolph Swaby Sr, Sister
Annie Thompson, Deputy Prime
Minister Cynthia 'Mother' Pratt,
Mynez Cargill-Sherman and Daisy
Walker all pioneers of the sport -
said he was impressed.
"For women's basketball, I think
the formation of-this league is the
best thing that could have happened
in the country," he quipped. "They
get to chart their own cause and
make things happen for the sport.'!
Having played in the New Provi-
dence Amateur Basketball Associa-
tion for a number of years, Pickstock
said he felt the players were stag-
nant, but now they have shown that
they can develop a product that is
envious of all other leagues.
"I think I have proven with their
professionalism that they can only
go on to new heights."
The league is now operated by
Kimberley Rolle, the first vice pres-
ident, who'was elevated to president,
taking over from Mynez Cargill-
Sherman, the past president from
the league's inception, who resigned
because of family commitments.
Rolle, a key member of the Col-
lege of the Bahamas Lady Caribs,
said Saturday's opening was just an
indication of what to expect in the
remainder of the season.
"I thought we had a very good
crowd," she reflected. "Of course,
obviously, it's just the first game; so
both teams have to work on some
things, but I expect that they will get
better as the season progresses."
After Tuesday night, Rolle said
the league would have showcased
all of their teams, which should give
the public an opportunity to see what
is in store for the rest of the season.
When the league resumes cohipe-
tition on Tuesday, the Junior All-
Stars will take on the Sunshine Auto
Cheetahs at 7pm and at 8.15pin the
Defence Force will play .the COB
Lady Carib .
On Thursday, the Angels will play
the Defence Force in the opener and
the Cheetahs will take on the Lady
Truckers in the feature contest.
Rolle said the association is com-
mitted to providing a clean atmos-
phere for the fans, but, 'at the same
time, they are also ensuring that the
competition is even more keenly
contested on the court.
Newly elected NPABA president
Keith 'Belzee' Smith was one of
those spectators in the stands. He
too indicated his delight in what he
saw.
Alexis Roberts, centre.of the Lady
Caribs, was named the Rookie of
the Year; Deandra Williams, a guard
with the Junior All-Stars, won the
. Sportsmanship award; Christine Sin-
clair, point guard of the Lady Caribs,
was the Defensive Player of the Year
and Shantelle Rolle, guard of the
Lady Truckers, was the Offensive
Player of the Year.
The All NPWBA Team com-
prised of Shantelle Rolle of the Lady
Truckers; Christine Sinclair of the
Lady Caribs and Suzette McKenzie,
Sharelle Cash and Keisha Richard-
son of the Lady Angels.


* SWIMMING
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
BRIA DEVEAUX and Kieran
Deveaux got off to fast starts on
Saturday, opening their swimming
seasons with more than three wins
at the Barracuda Swim Club Invi-
tational.
Bria Deveaux started her day off
with an impressive time in the 50
meter back in the girl's 9-10 divi-
sion. She won the event in 37.83.
seconds, coming in second was
Je'Nae Saunders in 38.05 seconds
and Shonae Musgrove in 43.02 sec-
onds.
In the 100m fly Bria clocked
1:19.56 seconds for the win, Lauren
Glinton was second in 1.32.00 sec-


ing


S


a


immers







sasash


Barracuda Swim


Club Invitational


onds and Francesca Curry third in
1:46.71 seconds.
By the 50 meter marker,
Deveaux had established .a com-
manding lead ahead of the field.
She swam the first half of the race
in 38.27 seconds, the closest per-
son to her was Glinton in 43.13 sec-
onds.
Bria returned to the pool to cap-


ture her third victory of the day,
this one coming in the 200m indi-
vidual medley.
Once again she edged out Saun-
ders for the win with a final clock
reading of 2:51.11 seconds. Saun-
ders' second place time was record-
ed at 3:00.30 seconds with Mus-
grove in third with 3:19.09 seconds.
In the 400m free, Bria jumped


to an early lead, opening up the
event with a 37.18 seconds 50m
swim.
Deveaux dipped under the 40
second marker four times in the
race, posting a final time of 5:19.10
seconds.
The opening leg was the
strongest for Saunders, who
clocked 38.42 seconds in the first
50m. She would finish in second
with a time of 5:37.59.
Saunders said: "I am pretty
pleased with my performances and
times, this is the first swim meet
of the year I am looking forward to
other meets. d:
"I wanted tdoo a little better r;
some of the events, but the times
were close enough for me and it
helps me work on the things I need
to in practise."
Saunders captured the 50-r
breast in a time of 44.01 seconds
Curry was second in 47.28 seconds
while Riquel Rolle finished up
third in 47.64 seconds.
The team of Deveaux, Saunders;
Krystal Huyler and Anna
Misiewicz clocked 2:25.87 seconds
to take the girl's 200m free relay
for the Barracuda Swimming Club.
Finishing in second was the Dol-
phin Swimming Club team which
consisted of Glinton, Berchadette
Moss, Riquel Rolle and Zoe Gala-
nis-in 2:32.10 seconds. Third place
went to Swift, Musgrove, Beijing
Rodgers, Sarah Schmidt and Shan-
nel Carey, who clocked a time of
2:40.80 seconds.
It was a productive day at the
office for Teisha Lightbourne, who
competed in the girl's 15 and over
division.
Lightbourne picked up four
medals on the day for the Seabees
Swimming Club, the 50m back and
breast, 100m fly and the 200m indi-
vidual medley.
In the 50m back Lightbourne
clocked 34.14 seconds for the win
ahead of Chanteia Musgrove who
finished up in 34.96 seconds ahead
of Franshon Francis in 37.79 sec-
onds.
Lightbourne was the only swim-
mer to dip under 40 seconds in the
50m breast, clocking 38.07 seconds
for the win. Coming in second was
Christal Clashing in 43.62 seconds
and Jessica Nixon in 48.94 seconds.
Kieran went three for five on the
day taking the 400m free, 4:44.06
seconds; the 200m individual med-
ley 2:40.80 seconds and 200m free
relay 1:57.71 seconds.
His teammates in the relay were
Drew Lightbourne, Christopher
Camito and Taran Kerr.
Kieran also took home two sil-
vers in the 50m back and 100m fly.
Winning the 50 breast was Drew
Lightbourne in 35.71, Kieran's sec-
ond place time was posted as 35.78
seconds, while Jonathan Bain cap-
tured third in 37.09 seconds.
It was also a close race for Kier-
an in the 100m fly.
He finished just seconds behind
Bain, who clocked 1:12.57 seconds.
Kieran's time was 1:12.85 seconds.


I --- 11"~"""""9"








MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21,2005


The stories behind the news


'PLACES


Nothing short of pandemonium can
describe the atmosphere as CDR leader
Dr B J Nottage (left) made his way to
the stage to address the standing capac-
ity crowd at the PLP convention last
Thursday night. Dr Nottage, riding a
wave of supporters, fought his way
through to the podium and addressed
the standing crowd. Thanking the thou-
sands of well wishers, Dr Nottage
promised the crowd that he is "here to
serve", and that he did not take his deci-
sion to come back to the PLP lightly...


MARSH HARBOUR, Abaco-
A massive blaze swept through
"The Mudd" last week as hundreds
of Haitians fled the shanty-town,
clutching whatever possessions
they could carry. At least one
casualty was reported. Up to press
time last Thursday night it was
estimated that at least 40 homes
had been destroyed and between
60 to 90 per cent of the slum
would be gone by daybreak...


without


A POLICE officer and a civilian died last weekend as
a result of two separate traffic accidents.
The deaths of PC Terrel Smith of Nassau and a 30-
year-old Grand Bahama man brought the number of
traffic fatalities for the year up to 56.


SO far, only 7,500 Bahamians have registered to vote
in the next general election, it was reported last week.
Parliamentary registrar Errol Bethel told The Tri-
bune that an average of 250 to 300 persons register every
day.


hope


,UUS w@Joman'EsJplight51inE a piti[esss@iV WIN


* By JOHN MARQUIS
P atricia Freed is desperate.
So desperate that she
agreed to have details of
her humiliating plight
published in The Tribune
along with a far from flattering pho-
tograph.
. rom being a self-conifident profes-
siotnal woman with a bright future,
she has descended i-nto a pit- of
despair, not knowing where the next
meal is coming from.
Haunted, ravaged and hungry, she
spends her days walking the streets
of Nassau, eating sachets of ketchup
from fast-food restaurants and drink-
ing sugared water donated by sympa-
thetic staff.
-To keep clean, she jumps into the
sea at Long Wharf. It is the nearest
she gets these days to having a bath.
Times are very hard for the twice-
divorced woman whose life has taken
a sudden turn for the worse.
Ms Freed, a 52-year-old American
with an architecture degree, has tried
without success to extract compassion
from churches, charitable agencies
and others. But she says she has now
run out of options and doesn't know
where to turn.
Most days, she receives a cup of
soup from the Salvation Army. A
young couple allows her to occupy a
room at their home, but there are no
utilities laid on. It is a shelter and
that's all.
To keep herself occupied, she walks
aimlessly around downtown Nassau,
covering many miles every day. From
being slim but robust, she has now
lost 40 pounds and looks disturbingly
thin. Her deeply lined face suggests
growing anxiety and resignation.
Her deteriorating condition, she
believes, is now making her more con-
spicuous. "I am penniless," she told
INSIGHT. "Penniless, hungry and
very unsure about where I go from
here. I no longer have self-confidence.
Things are bad."
Predicament
Ms Freed's predicament began sev-
en years ago when she was struck by a
garbage truck as she stepped off a
kerb. She almost died from her
injuries.
Later, the driver admitted leaving
the scene and she began court action
for damages. These proceedings have


What happens when an intelligent, educated woman slips from

middle-class respectability to the edge of skid row in a city like

Nassau where, she says, there is no safety net for those who fall

on hard times. INSIGHT reports...

been so protracted that her resources
have dwindled to.nothing,....- .
She reckons to have lost $250,000 in
legal costs, medical fees and pay she
might have earned had she been able
to work. At one time, she was com-
manding $1,000 a week in a Nassau
bank.
To make things worse, she was
mugged and robbed of what little she
had as she walked in broad daylight up
Frederick Street. She was left uncon-
scious on the sidewalk and recovered
to find she no longer had full use of
her left hand.
Troubles
Shakespeare said troubles come not
as single spies but in battalions. In Ms
Freed's case, they have come as entire
armies. Her self-esteem has been flat-
tened as her life has spun out of con-
trol.
Last week, she came into The Tri-
bune for the second time in seven
days. On her first visit she displayed
flashes of humour, though it was clear
that laughter did not come easily. The
second visit was quite different. Ms
Freed appeared to be slipping fast.
She agreed to speak out about her
plight for two reasons.
Firstly, she is so desperate that even
harsh exposure in a newspaper is
worth the risk if there is even a sliver
of a chance that good will come of it.
Secondly, she wants Bahamians to
know how easy it is to lose all in a
pitiless society where little or no pro-
vision is made for those whose for-
tunes turn dramatically downwards.
Ms Freed, who says she comes from
a good middle-class home and was
educated in preparation for a secure
professional life, has Bahamian sta-
tus through marriage. But she says
that churches, social services and oth-
er agencies have declined her pleas
for help.
A succession of politicians have also


SEE page 2C


* PATRICIA FREED: penniless and desperate


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Life


I _


",-a%


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P G M


Nothing short of
pandemonium
can describe the
atmosphere as
CDR leader Dr B J Nottage
made his way to the stage to
address the standing capacity
crowd at the PLP convention
last Thursday night.
Dr Nottage, riding a wave
of supporters, fought his way
through to the podium and
addressed the standing crowd.
Thanking the thousands of
well wishers, Dr Nottage
promised the crowd that he
is "here to serve", and that
he did not take his decision
to come back to the PLP
lightly.
******
MARSH HARBOUR,
Abaco A massive blaze
swept through "The Mudd"
last week as hundreds of
Haitians fled the shanty-town,
clutching whatever posses-
sions they could carry. At
least one casualty was report-
ed. Up to press time last
Thursday night it was esti-
mated that at least 40 homes
(right) had been destroyed
and between 60 to 90 per cent
of the slum would be gone by
daybreak.
******
A POLICE officer and a
civilian died last weekend as a


result of two separate traffic
accidents. The deaths of PC
Terrel Smith of Nassau and
a 30-year-old Grand Bahama
man brought the number of
traffic fatalities for the year
up to 56.
00******


SO far, only 7,500 Bahami-
ans have registered to vote in
the next general election, it
was reported last week.
Parliamentary registrar
Errol Bethel told The Tribune
that an average of 250 to 300
persons register every day.


Life without hope


FROM page 1C

failed to assist her. And she
says she has no friends.
"So where do I go from
here?" she asked after turning
up at The Tribune with a des-
perate plea for compassion. "I
am hungry. I am helpless."
Ms Freed's troubles were
first spotlighted in The Tribune
last week. As a result, the name
of an agency was passed on to
us. This, in turn, was relayed
to Ms Freed.
But when she had outlined
the full extent of her troubles
to whoever was at the other
end of the line, the conversa-
tion was abruptly halted and
the phone slammed down.
"They were very cold," she
said.
Ms Freed has considered fly-
ing to the United States, but
she has no money for the air
ticket and no-one to help her
when she arrives. She is reluc-
tant to burden her elderly
mother with her problems, and
her only other close relative is
bankrupt.
As she pounds the pave-
ments round Nassau, Ms
Freed's piercing blue eyes stare
. straight ahead, focused on a
future that isn't there. Walk-
ing is her way of keeping occu-
pied, but every step saps ener-
gy from a body already dimin-


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ished by lack of sustenance.
"I didn't think it could ever
come to this," she said, reflect-
ing on the spiral of bad luck
that had reduced her to penury.
Bahamians rely on family to
provide a cushion between mis-
fortune and dereliction. In hard
times, there is usually a parent,
aunt or cousin to provide tem-
porary shelter and a meal or
two.
Those belonging to Nassau's
plethora of churches seek
solace among the congregation.
However, the "outsiders" -
those who are somehow dis-
qualified from tapping into
such support quickly join the
street people, the wreckage of
a fundamentally selfish society.

Admits
Ms Freed admits that only
the room she uses prevents her
from joining the vagrants who
panhandle from day to day to
keep body and soul together.
She says she is right on the
edge of the social abyss into
which she could fall at any
time.
Ms Freed's predicament is
unusual only in that she came
from such promising origins. "I
came from a good family," she
said. "My parents were good
parents. I had a college educa-
tion. I had no reason to think I
could end up like this."'
However, Nassau has more
than its share of forsaken peo-
ple and seemingly fewer of the
guard-rails that first world soci-
eties provide for those who fall
foul of the system.
While some are born into
dysfunctional homes and are
defeated from the start, others
find themselves on the streets
following a single cataclysmic
event in their lives.
In the case of Ms Freed, it
was being knocked down by a
garbage truck. She lost con-
sciousness and almost died.
Nothing has gone right since
that awful day.
In the case of old G (whose
real name is being withheld) it
was the loss of a job which pre-
cipitated his decline into
vagrancy.
G was once a valued employ-
ee of a well-established Nas-
sau business. But when that
business was overtaken by the
times and closed its doors, he
found it hard to get another
job.
Bad fortune often has a
domino effect. The lost earn-
ings put a strain on his mar-
riage, which finally collapsed.
His only child turned her back
on him. He now spends his life
wandering around in the small
part of town where he finds
security and friendship.
G depends on a few coins
and notes handed over by sym-
pathisers, and occasional sodas
and sandwiches offered by a
local shop.
Whenever I ask him "How's
life?" he shrugs his shoulders
and replies: "T'ings are bad,
man." Sometimes I've seen him
yelling at no-one in particular,
just bellowing in the middle of
the street. His strangulated
voice betrays extreme anguish.
One can only guess at the
depths of his despair.
Michael N was a very smart
boy from a family of Haitian
immigrants. At some stage in
his boyhood, he committed an
offence which disqualified him
from following his parents and
siblings when they were even-
tually offered the chance of a
new life in the United States.
When they left for Florida,
Michael devastated by his loss
and racked by guilt lost his
mind and began wandering
around Nassau. To counter the
unbearable reality of his life,
he made artistic installations
around the town, using plastic
bottles, chunks of stone and
discarded flowers.
It was his means of finding
expression in a society that
wouldn't see, and didn't hear.
Many times, I saw him trudg-
ing along East Bay Street, a
string of plastic bottles round
his neck, old feathers stuck in
his hair.
In the Montagu area, his
"work" piles of stones topped
by flowers, bottles and ribbons
hanging from lamp-posts bore
testimony to a creative mind


ripped asunder by grief. A
juvenile felony had led to his
abandonment in a society that
didn't care. All he had in life
was a stunted talent which he
used to cry out to a pitiless
world.
For a time, he slept in a bro-
ken tomb in a small burial
ground near St Matthew's
Church. Later, he moved to a
"den" in the bush near Mon-
tagu Beach.


It was there, close to a dis-
play of his artistic work, thaf
he was found dead in the
undergrowth a few years back.
If he ever dreamed of a
reunion with his family, it nev-
er happened.
A photographer who attend-
ed the same school said: "He
was such an intelligent and able
young man. He could have
done great things with his life.
But when his family left him
behind, his mind went bang."
Some say he died of a bro-
ken heart.
Sigmond (assumed name)
was a promising law enforce-
ment officer a potential high
flier until he found the youig
wife he loved in bed with his
boss.
The impact on his mind was
so devastating that he was
transformed virtually overnight
into a mental wreck.
Unable to work, his mind i~
pieces, he took to the streets,
begging at road junctions and
"cussing out" those who did-
n't help him.
His family, shocked and
appalled by his inability to cope
with life, and his quick decline
into vagrancy, could do nothing
but hose him down once-a
week in a forlorn bid to, keep
him clean. U
A friend said: "He was such
an able, articulate young guy.
He would have made a fine
officer, but one incident of infi-
delity destroyed him. It seemed
to him that the whole purpose
of his life had been removed."
Street people sometimes sink
into deep clinical depression.
This can progress to a total
mental breakdown leading 4to
a delusional state. Sometimes,
their fantasies ate outrageous,
leading victims to imagine
themselves in positions of
extreme power or wealth. Oth-
ers take mental refuge in inno-
cent and more modest ways'.
Jeb was such a man. He built
a concrete submarine' on a
beach off Eastern Road. In
design, it looked like a small
spaceship, but his plan was' to
sail it out to sea and explore
the ocean depths.
During a long conversation
about his weird craft, Jeb told
me excitedly about his remark-
able scheme for submarine
exploration. The concrete ves-
sel was the entire purpose of
his life.
As we talked, he was
"installing" an old car battery
he had found among the flot-
sam on the beach. Its terminals
were rusted beyond hope, its
cells were empty of fluid, but,
he was convinced this battered
old box would provide power
for his trusty sub.
"I'm launching it next Octo-
ber," he said proudly. Howev-
er, before October came, some-
one with rather less imagina-
tion broke up the craft and
carted it off in a truck. "It had
about as much chance of float-
ing as half a ton of ball-bear-
ings," an onlooker said as Jeb's
craft was hauled away in bits.

Time
The last time I saw Jeb he
was pushing a shopping trolley
full of coconuts along East Bay
Street, no doubt dreaming up
other schemes to keep his mind
together from day to day.
For Ms Freed, things have
not yet descended this far. But
she admits to feeling an affini-
ty with those who have also
suffered great emotional and
financial loss and felt unable
to take the strain.
Interestingly, she has also
fdund the most compassion
among those who, like her, are
unsure where the next meal is
coming from. "Sometimies,'they
will give me a dollar," she said.
"However, for people like
me, this society offers nothing.
There is no social security, no
safety net. The churches have
been no help. Politicians have
turned their backs. Where else
is there to go?"
As preachers sweep to
church in their fancy limos this
weekend, and congregations
sing hosannas in all their fin-
ery, it's a question they might
ask themselves.
As politicians bank their gen-
erous salaries, look forward to
their lavish pensions, and cruise
around in their free sedans,


they might also ponder the
plight of those who, for what-
ever reason, fail to make the
grade.
Patricia Freed, a woman
seemingly without hope, badly
needs help. But none is forth-
coming.

What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmar-
quis@tribunemedia.net


Ship Now, Fly Later


WEEK I REVIE


I


PAGE 2C, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


I Ilrr~rINSIGHT







MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2005, PAGE 3C


THE TRIBUNE


Manhandling the press


is


not a good idea


It's time for PLP to abandon this self-defeating mindset


* By JOHN MARQUIS


Franklin G Fergu-
son, a stalwart of
the Bahamian
press for 40 years,
was threatened
and assaulted by a leading PLP
supporter at last week's party
convention.
The threat to "kick your
black ass" if he did not move
-from in front of the podium
-was not only thoroughly dis-
tasteful, it also spoke volumes
about the pernicious under-
,currents in a party which has
;never been able to move on
from its past.
Whatever its more intelligent
.and rational elements like to
say to the contrary, the PLP is
still poisoned on the inside by a
ridiculous anti-foreign mind-
set, a deep colour prejudice,
and a boorish element whose
attitudes were burnished in less
enlightened times.
In Franklyn Ferguson's case,
of course, not all these charges
are relevant. Franklyn is not
.only Bahamian his family
hails from Acklins he is black-
er than most of his compatriots.
Yet he is refreshingly free of
race prejudice and, one hopes,
is just the kind of person the
Bahamas will produce more of
as it heads into a future in
which attitudes to outsiders of
all shades will become increas-
ingly important.
Franklyn Ferguson is not
only "colour blind" his long
list of friends embraces the
entire racial and social spec-
trum he is an "international"
character who has travelled the
wider world.
He is totally free of the
absurd notions that still con-
demn large swathes of the PLP
as bitter, small-minded racists.
And he was genuinely appalled
at the rough treatment hand-
ed out to him as he pho-
,.tographed his friend Dr
. Bernard Nottage on his way to
. the podium last Thursday
.night.
The incident, in which the
PLP's ludicrously misnamed
-"protocol" officer, Ron Rolle,
pushed and threatened Mr Fer-
guson as he tried to take pic-
ture.s of Dr Nottage, is sadly
reminiscent of the party's bad
old days.
Before the 1967 general elec-
tion, th'e PLP organised goon
squads to disrupt public meet-
ings, harass the press and intim-
idate dissenters.
One assumes the party hier-
. archy gave their muted blessing
to these mindless fools as they
charged fro.m one rally to the
next in an attempt to corrupt
the democratic process.
And had or.e asked them to
Explain their actions, to say
why they were doing what they
., .were doing, it's an odds-on cer-
tainty that they would not have
.been able to give an answer.
I imagine the same would be
,.true of Mr Rolle. Does he
know why he did what he did?
Did he seriously believe it was
in his party's interests to pre-
, vent a photographer recording
the stage-managed return of
Dr Nottage to the PLP fold?
If there was one event the
PLP needed to publicise to the
* skies, it was Dr Notta.ge's
return. For in the minds of
most intelligent people, he rep-
resents the kind of astute, rea-
soned and measured thinking
the party requires as it tries to


come to terms with its lamen-
table performance over the last
three years.
To actually obstruct a press
photographer from giving
exposure to this event is idiocy
of the most extreme kind.
Yet, astonishingly, that anti-
press attitude is not confined
to the party's lower basement,
the ignorami and the brain-
dead.
When Tribune reporters
arrived at the convention hall
last week, highly-paid press
aides (another gross misnomer)
made it clear they would not
be getting the party's co-oper-
ation.
One reporter was accused of
sucking up to the FNM the
week before because he hap-
pened to be pictured with a
smile on his face in the pres-
ence of Hubert Ingraham.
Another was vilified for sitting
at the same table as the former
prime minister during a press
conference.
The PLP imagined, with no
evidence to back it up, that the
Tribune's news team were
working as FNM propagan-
dists.
In truth, Tribune reporters
tackle all political assignments
without an agenda. The news-
paper's editorial stance is well-
known, but it is confined to the
daily comment column and
does not spill over into its news
coverage.
Nonetheless, government
officials charged with spread-
ing the party line one of them
apparently earning $80,000 a
year insist on accusing young
Tribune journalists of working
against the PLP's interests.
During the convention, par-
ty agitators even vilified
reporters for following media
careers, asking why they did-
n't become nurses or doctors
instead.
They wanted to know why
they were involved in a profes-
sion which, in truth, is the one
absolutely indispensable insti-
tution in a functioning democ-
racy.

Experience

In my experience, journalists
become journalists simply
because no other job is good
enough.
If they were after the money,
they would become drug-deal-
ers, lawyers or Baptist preach-
ers, certainly not journalists.
All of the foregoing are less
demanding, requiring a lower
level of skill and expertise than
journalism. But in the media,
love of the job is the prime
motivator.
Over the last two weeks Tri-
bune staff showed tremendous
commitment as they strived to
cover very successfully, as it
turned out the party conven-
tions. Yet, in the PLP's case,
they faced the kind of hostility
which not only demotivated
them, but also left them won-
dering what kind of institution
the party is when it can con-


guson and his camera have
been part of that noble process.
The Rolle-Ferguson incident
has exposed three deep flaw-
lines in the party's psyche
which need to be addressed if it
is to equip itself for power in an
increasingly globalised world.
The first is that racist streak
which all thinking people revile
so much, but which was active-
ly encouraged by the leader-
ship during the party's first 25
years in power. The second is
the "goon squad" attitude that
brings out the worst in some
of the leadership's henchmen.
The third is that vicious anti-
press mindset which is not only
counter-productive for any
organisation wishing to win
over public approval, but is
indicative of an underlying
desire to keep the public in the
dark.
Some prominent PLP mem-
bers were extremely embar-
rassed by Thursday night's
events, notably businessman
Franklyn Wilson, Tourism
Minister Obie Wilchcombe and
MP Frank Smith.
Politicians have to under-
stand that they need the press
far more than the press needs


them. Manhandling journalists
is not a wise tactic because it
betrays attitudes to free speech
which the rest of the western
world would find difficult to
understand.
Every quarter, I have to fill
in a return to the Common-
wealth Press Union giving my
impressions of press freedom
in the Bahamas. So far, I've
been able to give the country a
clean bill of health.
It would be most unfortunate
if the uncontrolled behaviour
of someone like Ron Rolle
were to put that fine reputa-
tion in jeopardy. However you
look at it, those who try to
obstruct the press are also
obstructing the public's right
to know. In the enlightened
world, such attitudes are not
appreciated, and reflect very
badly on the Bahamas and
those who run its affairs.
Smarter elements in the PLP
hierarchy ought to have a qui-
et word in Mr Rolle's ear and
end this outrageous and self-
defeating behaviour once and
for all.
What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmar-
quis@tribunemedia.net


demn well-qualified young pro-
fessionals for doing their jobs.
Journalists are among the
brightest, most enterprising,
morally courageous and artic-
ulate people in any society.
Through public ignorance, they
are widely disliked but they.
know the quest for the truth is
never an easy one.
When the British essayist H
V Morton described newspa-
per journalism as "the most
bewitched and attractive calling
in the world" he was giving
expression to what all print
journalists recognise as a self-
evident truth.
Not only are journalists influ-
ential in fact, it is no exagger-
ation to say that they have a
more powerful impact on
national agendas around the
world than any other profes-
sion they are such anathema
to despots and demagogues
that many die every year in the
cause of free expression.
In being so resolutely anti-
press, old PLP hands still carry
the taint of the Pindling years,
when people were intimidated
into silence. And they are
reflecting the attitudes of more
repressive regimes, where jour-
nalists are under threat every
working day.
They are following the Pin-
dling creed which, had it been
allowed its head, would have
led this country into totalitari-
anism a one-party state in
which all would have been
cowed by the imperious voice
of a maximum leader. This
would have been another Zim-
babwe, reflecting the hideous
excesses of Robert Mugabe.
The press and specifically
The Tribune has helped to
prevent such a disaster from
coming to pass. Franklyn Fer-


Quotes of the Week


"Compare that $196,000 for a retired politi-
cian to the working Prime Minister, Perry
Christie who receives the sum of $146,000
per year."
Speaking at PLP convention, Foreign
Affairs and Public Service Minister Fred
Mitchell compares Hubert Ingraham's
alleged salary to $146,000 for Prime Minis-
ter Perry Christie
"Many friends and colleagues have been
encouraging me to return to what they call the
mainstream of Bahamian politics for many


years. Some of my advisers got so angry with
me that they convinced me that this act
tonight is ordained by God."
Speaking at PLP convention, CDR
leader Dr B J Nottage breaks silence on his
return to the PLP
"A battle cry should be sounded against
rape, jealousy, envy and deceit."
Part of Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of National Security Cynthia Prat-
t's fiery PLP convention speech


I


A well-known press photographer was 'roughed up' at the PLP

convention last week. It was the latest manifestation of an anti-

media mindset that poisons the government party and leaves a huge

question-mark over the judgment of its leaders. INSIGHT reports...


LE
r ~c .Ii I ll










ISSUES&IDEAS


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2005 I THE MIAMI HERALD


LATIN AMERICA


FUJIMORI'S ARREST

A hopeful sign

for nascent

democracies
BY EDUARDO GONZALEZ
egonzalez@ictj.org
or decades central characters in
the region's unfolding dramas,
Latin American strongmen are
now facing indictments and prosecu-
tions.
Former Peruvian President Alberto
Fujimori has become the latest in the
string of recently disgraced heads of
state, including former Chilean dicta-
tor Augusto Pinochet and former
Mexican President Luis Echeverria, to
face indictments and prosecution. This
is a hopeful sign for
nascent democracies
struggling to affirm
the rule of law.
Having left the
safe haven he
enjoyed for five
years in Japan, Fuji-
mori is now.sitting in
GONZALEZ a Chilean prison cell
awaiting the results
of a request for extradition to Peru. If
extradited, instead of realizing his
dream of returning to politics, he will
face prosecution for crimes including
massacres, forced disappearances, tor-
ture and large-scale embezzlement.
This is a critical moment, espe-
cially for those who opposed the Fuji-
mori regime, which with the 1992
' auto-coup" brought an end to the
rule of law and orchestrated massive
human-rights violations and corrup-
tion.
For years, local and international
.human-rights organizations and advo-
cates profiled the testimony of victims
of human-rights abuse in Peru. The
hope was that their stories would raise
awareness of the regime's true nature
and eventually lead to justice and
political change.
When Fujimori's regime finally
collapsed in 2001, the interim admin-
istration followed the South African
*TURN TO FUJiMORIS ARREST


,
.* /-/:
/d|


fi


"FOITUNE,"2
QUIXOTE TO HIS
AS SOON AS HE HAD SEEN
THEM,. "IS ARRANGING"
MATTERS FOR US rETTRS
THAN WE COULD HAV
HOPED. LO
FRIEND AA
wRi. A OR MORE
U





NI M. Mu RIG6HTEOUSN

WARFARE, AND
IT IS GOD'S
GOOD SERVICE
TO SWEEP SO EVIL
A BREED FROM
OFF THE VA

EARTH[


Errant knight's tale shaped


books for 400 years


demned. This new study by Harvard
researchers lends weight to the argu-
ment that what's condemned is about
politics and stigmatization rather than
health. What native peoples say
empowers them has too often been
labeled as hazardous, while what
enriches Western societies is branded
as beneficial.
Peyote is a good example. A 1970
bulletin written by Harvard botanist
Richard Evans Schultes for the U.N.
Office on Drugs and.Crime notes that
the Spanish who conquered Mexico
began prohibiting peyote as early as
the 1500s because it was consider-ed
pagan, not because it was harmful. In
the last century, U.S. authorities'
efforts to make peyote illegal focused
on the supposed harmful effects, say-
ing that ignorant indigenous people
couldn't be trusted to act in their own
behalf. A 1995 federal law legalized
peyote for native religious ceremo-
nies, though it's still illegal in other
settings.
*TURN TO INDIGENOUS CULTURES


T


old by an overimaginative boy
about a crowd of Spaniards and
Arabs with "two hundred


elephants, and six hundred camels",
Huckleberry Finn rushes to see them, only to
find a school picnic. When he relates his
disappointment to his friend Tom Sawyer, the
latter insists the Spaniards and "A-rabs" were
there all along but invisible to Finn's eye,
adding that "if I warn't so ignorant, but had
read a book called Don Quixote, I would know
without asking. He said it was all done by
enchantment."
STORY BY ENRIQUE FERNANDEZ/HERALD STAFF

STORY BY ENRIQUE FERNANDEZ/HERALD STAFF


Thus Mark Twain winks at the reader,
acknowledging Huckleberry Finn's debt to
Miguel de Cervantes, whom Twain admired
and whose influence on the great American
writer has been widely noted by critics, and
the Spanish writer's own overimaginative
.character, Don Quixote,.who insisted the
giants he fought had been turned into
ordinary windmills "by enchantment."
Cervantes' Knight of the Sad Countenance
first sallied into the windmill-strewn fields of
La Mancha in print 400 years ago. This fall,
TURN TO QUIXOTE

ILLUSTRATION BY ANA LENSE LARRAURI


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REISSUES & IDEAS


WORLD VOICES


A LOOK BACK AT THE WEEK OF NOV. 13


IRAQ


* The U.S. warned the Iraqi
government Thursday not
to allow militias affiliated
with religious groups to
control Iraq's security
forces. The warning was a
clear reference to charges
that Shiite militiamen from
the Badr Organization ran
an Interior Ministry jail
where U.S. troops found as
many as 173 starved,
beaten prisoners most
likely from Iraq's Sunni
minority on Monday.









SOUTH KOREA

* While in Gyeongju
Thursday, President Bush
took a hardline stance
against North Korea, saying
the United States won't
help the communist nation .
build a civilian nuclear
reactor to produce
electricity until it
dismantles its nuclear
weapons programs. He and
South Korean President
Roh Moo-Hyun issued a
joint statement that 'a
nuclear-armed North Korea
will not be tolerated."


CHINA


* The World Health
Organization said Thursday
it sees no sign that bird flu
is being passed from
person to person after
China reported its first
cases of human infection.
"There is not any evidence
for human transmission so
far," said Henk Bekedam,
the WHO representative in
China. "If there would be
something like that, we
would expect more people
would be unexpectedly
dying of very severe
pneumonia." The Health
Ministry on Wednesday
reported China's first
human cases of bird flu -
those of a 24-year-old
woman who died and a
9-year-old boy who
recovered. The H5N1 bird
flu virus has killed at least
64 people in Asia since
2003 and experts have
warned that it could mutate
into a form that can easily
spread between people.'


NEVADA

* The Miss America
pageant is taking the show
on the road after 84 years
in Atlantic City, and
heading for Las Vegas a
change of venue organizers
hope will renew interest in
the contest,


NEW Y
Wedn
Didion's
death of
author Jo
Dunne, b
. 70-year-
National
40-yearc
The Year
Thinking


TEXAS
Last w
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satellite
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municipal


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that it is I
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shores up
viability
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plans for
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O


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esdayJoan
memoir about the
her husband,
ohn Gregory
brought the
old writer her first
Book Award in her
career. The book is
'of Magical
I.


'eek, the town of
irphed into the
DISH in exchange
ade of free
TV frorp the DISH
for the
ility's 55 homes.


NGTON
s of workers and
worried that their
es will renege on
promises got
es from Congress
moving to protect
ire benefits. The
n a bipartisan 97-2
dnesday, approved
n to tighten rules
panies that
d defined-benefit
plans a shortfall
estimated at
ion. The bill also
p the financial
of the federal
hat irfsures pension
some 44 million
ins.


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"

_'O w. w


DON QUIXOTE



Quixote a giant in literature


*QUIXOTE

Miami Dade College's Florida
Center for the Literary Arts
picked Don Quixoce for its
"One Book, One Community"
program in homage to the
anniversary.
MASTER NARRATIVE
To call Don Quixote semi-
nal is an understatement.
Some narrative works
changed the life of Western
letters forever. Certainly
Homer's epics, most notably
The Odyssey, which, like Don
Quixote, is a road (or "wine-
dark sea") story: the long,
adventure-rich journey home
after the War of Troy. Dante's
The Divine Comedy, another
road trip, this time into the
hereafter. Tolstoy's War and
Peace, which illuminated the
convergence of heroic history
and the intimate life. Joyce's
Ulysses, which did the same,
except that the life of heroes
is a distant and ironic echo in
the life of ordinary folk. One
could argue for Melville's
Moby Dick (another sea trip)
and Huckleberry Finn itself (a
river trip). Books that altered
the shape of books.
And one could also argue
that Don Quixote is the "ur-
book," the master narrative,
the master text. Its self-
consciousness is downright
modernist in the second
book of Quixote (the novel
Swas published in two install-
ments, which subsequent edi-
tions combined into one), the
characters discuss the first
book. And how many narra-
tives since have a hero who
faces adventure in the com-
pany of a sidekick?
Like Twain, Cervantes
infused his story with humor.
And like the American who
followed his lead, the Span-
iard's humor was dark. Don
Quixote makes a fool of him-
self; the world is pitiless and
cruel toward his foolishness.
Violence, as in Twain, lurks in
the shadows of a good laugh.
Cervantes' humor is at the
base of the work's popularity.
In the middle of his campaign,
Cuban War of Independence
Gen. Loynaz del Castillo
would read Don Quixote and
comment on it in his war jour-
nal. The fun of reading about
the Don and Sancho Panza
was his between-battles rest
and relaxation.
But the good general did
something that, truth be told,
is unusual. He actually read
the work. Next to Ulysses,
Don Quixote must be the
most-commented-upon and
least-read work of Western
literature. For, contrary to the
general's enthusiasm and
praise from writers and crit-


Like Twain, Cervantes infused his story with
humor. And like the American who followed
his lead, the Spaniard's humor was dark.

ics, the book is not an easy touched the popular imagina-
read. Hard to take for readers tion in so many ways, it is no
who seek a simple good yarn surprise that it made for such
are the Dfn's lohg disserta- a boff6 musical. To its credit,
tions on the life of letters and the show dares to tackle some
the life of arms. of the play of mirrors that
Cervantes knew both well, makes the novel interesting,
having pursued both careers even if, in the end, it's all
with great zeal. The Spaniard about the banality of dream-
was a soldier, and a brave one. ing the impossible dream.
In the battle of Lepanto a That play of mirrors is a
1571 naval encounter in which trope of Cervantes' era. His
European forces, including contemporary William Shake-
Spain's, defeated those of the speare, for example, indulged
Ottoman Empire he lost in it: Hamlet staging a mirror
the use of his left arm. Pirates play "to catch the conscience
captured him; he spent five of the king," and pretending
years as a prisoner in Algiers. he is mad or isn't he?
It was during that impris- Although Cervantes the sol-
onment that he demonstrated dier had his feet firmly
his valor, staging more than planted on the ground and
one failed escape attempt, his good hand on his sword -
even when he knew that he the writer played with irreal-
risked torture and death if ity and ambiguity. In the end,
caught. That he did not suffer there is no real agreement on
either was proof of the admi- what Don Quixote is about.
ration he provoked in his cap- Except that it's a book
tors, who were impressed by about books, a novel about a
his person and even thought, man whose major activity
mistakenly, that he was before the story's beginning
important and wealthy was reading, which "withered
enough to bring a rich reward his brain." What the Don read
if kept alive and intact. He was chivalric romances, i.e.,
was eventually ransomed, but what today we'd call pulp fic-
it took his family five years to tion. What Cervantes wrote
gather the sum. was a novel, the first.
It was also during that time
that he assumed the second LENGTHY TALE
surname Saavedra, after a Sure, there had been prose
famously valiant Spanish mili- narratives of various lengths
tary man to whom he was not before, but none that marked
related. In her 2002 book Cer- what the novel, as we know it,
vantes in Algiers, Maria would be: a lengthy tale with
Antonia Garc6s sees that fully developed characters,
move as an act of self-cre- realistic descriptions of the
ation. Cervantes' adoption of world that reflect the world as
the family name of a warrior we know it, a coherent narra-
he admired is not a sham but tive arc, plots and subplots,
points to a larger truth the lively dialogue, a mix of high
'real valor of the writer/sol- and low culture as messy as
dier Miguel de Cervantes. life itself, and still plenty of


LOVED BUT LITTLE READ
And Don Quixote has
enjoyed or suffered a life
beyond that of the book that
birthed him. Representations
of the gaunt knight and his
portly squire abound, from
the inmediately recognizable
Picasso sketches to popular
Lladr6 figurines, with tile
images of the Don adorning
Spanish restaurants with the
same frequency and poor
taste as that of big sombre-
ros at Mexican ones. And
then, there's The Man of La
Mancha.
"No, but I saw the play"
must be the most frequent
reaction spoken or silent -
to Cervantes' book. Romanti-
cized, vulgarized, simplified,
Cervantes' knight, conflated
with the writer himself, has


room for digressions, disser-
tations, reflections and even
recipes. Food, yeah. In the
very first paragraph, Cervan-
tes tells us about his protago-
nist's weekly njenu: "A mid-
day stew with rather more
shin of beef than leg of lamb,
the leftovers for supper most
nights, lardy eggs on Satur-
day, lentil broth on Fridays
and an occasional pigeon as a.
Sunday treat."
Spanish food writer Gloria
Sanjuin has picked up on Cer-
vantes' frequent references to
food in her 2004 Ollas, sar-
tenes y fogones del Quijote
(Pots, Pans And Ovens In Don
Quixote), published by Libro-
Hobby in Madrid, a compen-
dium of traditional recipes
from La Mancha and Castille,
spiked with quotes from Cer-
vantes' novel. The very exis-


tence of such a cookbook is
partof the long shadow cast
by Cervantes' knight.
LITERARY TRAIL
One could fill libraries
with books about this book,
including books that are, in
their way, rewritings of Don-
Quixote. ... :.
The most important, one of
literature's masterworks, is
Gustave Flaubert's Madame
Bovary, which recasts the
story in a petit bourgeois
Frenchwoman whose brain is
withered by reading what we
now call chick lit that is,
romantic fiction. Like Qui-
xote, Bovary's romantic
worldview results from an
overimmersion into the world
of books.
And the most important
recent work of Cervantes crit-
icism is Roberto GonzAlez
Echevarria's Love and the Law
in Cervantes (Yale University
Press, 2005), which argues
that this work emerges as
Spain itself emerges as the
first modern nation, thanks to
its imperial power and the
power of the printing press.
Under the Don's elongated
shadow, the most playful
work is Borges' short story
Pierre Menard, Author of The
'Quixote,' in which a modern
Frenchman rewrites the
novel, down to the last
comma, but, as Borges insists
in a mock scholarly tone, it's
really a totally different work
by virtue of being (a) modern,
(b) written by a Frenchman.
GonzAlez Echevarria finds
in the story a necessary step
in establishing Latin Ameri-
ca's literary identity.
Although Don Quixote is the
most important work in the
language of the Argentine
writer, as a Latin American,
Borges is no longer bound to
Spanish identity.
His story both acknowl-
edges the linguistic tradition
in which Borges is embedded
and a break from that tradi-
tion; the masterwork of Span-
ish literature becomes Borges'
literary joke.
But it's all a joke, isn't it.
Although much, far too much,
has been made of the pathos
in the novel, truth is that its
popularity, as mentioned
above, is due to its humor.
One reads Don Quixote for
laughs before one reads it for
depth. Like his contemporary
Shakespeare, Miguel de Cer-
vantes y Saavedra strikes us
as a trickster and could
there be a better definition of
an artist? That the joke is on
all of us, writers and readers
alike, is what has allowed Don
Quixote to be the world's
greatest and shaggiest shaggy
dog story.


A CHEAT SHEET

PLOT SUMMARY
This, from Wikipedia, an online encyclopedia:
"The plot covers the journeys and adventures of Don
Quixote and his squire, Sancho Panza.Alonso Quijano iis
an ordinary Spaniard (an hidalgo, the lowest rank of the
Spanish nobility) who is obsessed with stories of knights
errant, especially those written by Feliciano de Silva. His
friends and family think he is crazy when he decides to
take the name of Don Quixote de la Mancha and become
a knight errant himself (a don being a title of a higher
nobility, and a quixote in Spanish was a piece of armor).
Then he sorties to wander Spain on his thin horse
*,Rocinante, righting wrongs and protecting the oppressed.
"Don Quixote is visibly crazy to most people. He believes
ordinary inns to be enchanted castles, and their peasant
girls to be beautiful princesses. He mistakes windmills for
i.oppressive giants sent by evil enchanters. He imagines a
neighboring peasant to be Dulcinea del Toboso, the
beautiful maiden to whom he has pledged love and
fidelity.
*"Sancho Panza, his simple squire, believes his master to
ibe a bitcrazy, in particular he knows that there is'really'
no Dulcinea, but he plays along, hoping to get rich. He and
Quixote agree, for instance, that because Dulcinea is not
as pretty nor does she smell as good as she should, she
'must have been enchanted,' and from that point on the
mission is to disenchant her.
"Both master and squire undergo complex change and
development throughoutthe story, and each character
takes on attributes of the other as the novel goes on. At
the end of the second book, Quixote,decides on his
deathbed that his actions have been madness. Sancho
begs him not to give up, but to no avail."
SOURcE: www.wikipedia.org

BY THE NUMBERS
2: The number of parts the book was originally published
in (1605 and 1615).

The first, Elingenioso hidalgo Don Quixote de la Mancha,
was published in 1605 (off Juan de la Cuesta's printing
press in Madrid on Dec. 20, 1604, and made available to
the public on Jan. 16,1605) and the second, Segunda
parte del ingenioso caballero Don Quixote de la Mancha,
in 1615 (a year before the author's death). In Part I, Quixote
imposes himself on his environment. By Part II, he is no
longer physically capable, but people know about him,
"having read his adventures," and so, he needs to do less
to maintain his image. By his deathbed, he has begun to
assume a new identity, including a nickname, "the Good."

50: The age of Alonso Quijano when he becomes Don
Quixote.

58: Age of Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616) when he
published the book's first half.

126: The number of chapters in the original version of Don
Quixote.

757: The number of characters in the novel.

1,000,000: The number of copies the Venezuelan
government printed this year, in summarized editions, for
free distribution. Similar initiatives took place around the
.world this year. Spain issued a commemorative coin.

OTHER FACTOIDS
The book's famous first sentence: En un lugar de la
Mancha, de cuyo nombre no quiero acordarme, no ha
mucho tiempo que vviva un hidalgo de los de lanza en
astillero, adarga antigua, rocin flaccoy galgo corredor, "In-
some village in La Mancha, whose name I do not care to
recall, there dwelt not so long ago a gentleman of the
type wont to keep an unused lance, an old shield, a
greyhound for racing, and a skinny old horse."
Many reports say Don Quixote is the second most
published book in the world, after the Bible.
Among the novel's "firsts" for European literature: the
psychological revealing of the characters' troubles.
SOURCES: www.wlkipedia.org;
Publisher's Weekly;
www.proyectoquijote.com


~ III L~ I I I I I I 1 111 1 II I


INTERNATIONAL EDITION SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2005 5C


WWW.HERALD.COM





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FUJIMORI'S ARREST


A hopeful sign for


nascent democracies


* FUJIMORI'S ARREST

example and established a truth
commission. The Peruvian Truth
and Reconciliation Commission
was given a mandate to shed light
on the abuses perpetrated against
Peruvians by both guerrilla insur-
gent groups and government
counterinsurgency forces.
The commission organized
public hearings in which victims
told their stories of suffering and
resis pa iony after testi-
monbr si ners and the
Peruvian public heard not only
about the brutality of the Shining
Path insurgents, but also about the
operations of government-spon-
sored death squads. The "war
against terror" was used to justify
the crimes committed by the death
squads, which included the execu-
tion, torture and forced disappear-
ance of unarmed civilians. Nearly
70,000 Peruvians lost their lives
during the 20 years of conflict
from 1980 to 2000 a third of
them under Fujimori's regime.
The commission also docu-
mented Peru's demise into a cor-
rupt dictatorship that depended on
the war on terror for its legitimacy
and as a shroud for its corrupt
activities. In its final report, the
commission described how Fuji-
mori had constructed a counterin-


surgency strategy when the insur-
gency had already been defeated,
clamped down on independent
media, restricted other civil liber-
ties, crippled his opponents and
participated in the rampant cor-
ruption. The Chilean government
should be applauded by the inter-
national community for taking the
first bold steps to ensure that the
former dictator does not once
again elude standing trial in Peru
for the full spectrum of crimes that
he is alleged to have committed
there.
It would be a tragedy if at this
point, when justice is finally
within reach, the Peruvian nation's
hopes for accountability would die
on the sword of diplomatic horse-
trading or political machination, as
was the case during his sojourn in
Japan. At a time when the region's
other strongmen are being forced
to confront their nefarious pasts
and real progress is being made
worldwide in bringing former
heads of state to justice, Fujimori
should face nothing less.
Eduardo Gonzdlez is a senior
associate at the International Cen-
ter for Transitional Justice. He was
in charge of public hearings and on
the final report editorial committee
at the Peruvian Truth and Recon-
ciliation Commission, which com-
pleted its work in 2003.


INDIGENOUS CULTURES


U.S. condemnation is


about politics, not health


*INDIGENOUS CULTURES

The stigmatization of peyote,
though, has long kept researchers
from investigating what could be
beneficial uses. Ironically, peyote
is considered by native peoples to
be a treatment for alcoholism and
drug abuse. Researcher John Hal-
peru, lead author of the new study,
now hopes to be able to test that
hypothesis.
Recently, researchers at Brig-
ham and Women's Hospital in
Boston also found evidence that
ginkgo traditionally used by
Chinese communities as medicine
- may help lower a woman's risk
of ovarian cancer. Ancestral com-
munities' wisdom is being valued
more in the world of U.S. science.
But it doesn't seem to be happen-
ing in the U.S. political sphere.
Beyond peyote, an even clearer
case of politics trumping cultural
tradition can be found in Bolivia,
where indigenous people have
long chafed under U.S. drug poli-
cies that destroy their coca crops.
Coca leaves are considered sacred
by a number of Bolivian indige-
nous groups that have chewed
them as part of their rituals and
brewed a medicinal tea from them
to ward off mountain sickness.
The U.S. government decided
that Bolivian coca plants should be
destroyed because someone not
a Bolivian native found a way to
process the coca leaves into


cocaine. U.S. authorities didn't
take seriously enough the deep'
cultural dimensions of coca use
among indigenous communities.
As a result, the indigenous popula-
tion has organized itself as
never before in Bolivian history -
driven out two presidents and
launched the presidential candi-
dacy of an indigenous leader, Evo
Morales. He is head of the national
coca growers' union and, accord-
ing to polls, likely the next presi-
dent of Bolivia.
"A big part of the tensions are
the result of the lack of communi-
cation between those who design
the policies and those who suffer
the consequences of the destruc-
tion of coca crops," Morales told
me months ago. Washington is not
welcoming the prospect of
Morales winning the Dec. 18 presi-
dential election. He once vowed to
close down the DEA offices in
Bolivia if elected and has recently
said that he will not protect U.S.
interests. Instead he will
strengthen ties with China.
Bad blood with Bolivia could
have been avoided if U.S. officials
had made an effort to understand
the indigenous culture. It's time
for politics to catch up with sci-
ence.

Maria Cristina Caballero is a
fellow at Harvard's Center for Pub-
lic Leadership at the John F. Ken-
nedy School of Government.


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OPINION
JOHN S. KNIGHT (1894-1981) JESUS DIAZ JR., PUBLISHER I TOM FIEDLER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR I JOE OGLESBY, EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR JAMES L, KNIGHT (1909-1991)








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THE TRIBUNE


AP GE 8C MONDAY NOVEMBER 005


Dear Mr Marquis
I've enjoyed your
recent articles in The
Tribune. Allow me to
make a few comments
of my own as a Brit
who has lived in the Caribbean
and The Bahamas for over 30
years.
My personal experience of
US presidents runs from 1934
(the year of my birth) to the
present. There is no doubt in
my mind that Bush is the worst.
Bush will go down in history
as the worst president (to date).
I would put Roosevelt as num-
ber 10 (on a score of 1 to 10),
mainly as an imaginative post-
depression president and for
what he did for Britain before
the US entered the war and lat-
er.
Truman I would rate highly


as a very spunky and honest
man who did not abuse the
office and had the courage to
drop the atomic bomb (the
Buck Stops Here). An eight I
think.
Ike was hopefully a better
golfer than president, and fie
mishandled the spy plane
affair. A four in my view.
Kennedy was more charisma
than accomplishment, so.-I
would only give him a five.
LBJ lacked style but did
push through some civil rights
legislation. A seven. Nixon did
well in the area of foreign
affairs, but he would have been
nothing without Kissinger. I
would give him four. He did
give the language the suffix of
'gate'.
Ford never seemed to go
anywhere, so I would give him
a three. Carter was a good


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Christian man but got involved
in the Tehran rescue, and was
not too good a Washington
politician, so I'd give him a five.
Reagan was the great com-
municator but was (in my view)
managed by his advisers and
by Nancy. I was never taken
by his charisma, but I'd give
him only a six.
Bush Sr always seemed to
me to be an austere man lack-
ing charisma, most remem-
bered for the invasion and lib-
eration of Kuwait. This war


seems to be to have been a well
managed affair, whereas Gulf
War II was a shambles from
the start, as well as costly in
terms of lives.
Clinton had charisma and
passed a number of environ-
mental bills as well as two exec-
utive orders that I know of. He
should never have been
impeached: the Starr report
reads like a poor pornographic
novel. I would rate him an
eight. Some of his legislation
was quickly overturned by the


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INSIGHT


Bush Administration.
Bush (G.W.) has proved
anti-environment and his show-
ing over Katrina was appalling.
He is clearly given to cronyism
and his choices seem ingenu-
ous to say the least: the unfor-
tunate Director of FEMA is a
case in point.
To change the subject: who
decided that Bush was "The
Leader of the Free World"? Is
democracy the best choice for
all countries? A relatively
benign dictatorship such as
Tito's Yugoslavia seemed to
work: look at the chaos on
break-up.
Certainly, what appears to
be the US approach of "beat
the hell out of them and then
talk about freedom and democ-
racy and hearts and minds?"
doesn't seem to work and
indeed shouldn't be made to


work. Why not aim at "free-
dom" (elections, speech, etc.)
and not be in a hurry to force
western-style democracy on
everyone?
Changing subjects again, and
concerning the editorial of.
November 10, and the remarks
of Ambassador Rood: I think
"unnoticed" is an inappropriate
term: "unreported" and "un-
acted upon" seem more appro-
priate. How many of the 26
reported were spring breakers?
Were any male spring break-
ers accused of rape? I don't
wish in any way to diminish-the
horror of 'rape by thes.e
remarks, nor to imply that
spring breakers are, to put it.
crudely, "a randy" lot.
I suspect that reports on this
are not available and that if
spring breakers were accused
they would be hustled out of
the country. If I were a raped
female spring breaker in a for-
eign country, I doubt I would
go to either the police or the
embassy to report it.
John Hammerton -
Nassau
LAST Monday I saw the let-
ters commenting on your
November 7 Insight article.
Having missed the paper on
7th, I bought the back num-
ber because I wanted to see
what you had said to draw so
much support from our visi-
tors.
As an old soldier, whose
father was killed in WW II, I
am sickened by the direction
that Bush is leading the free
world. To me the worst aspect
is his advocacy of torture, the
proposed use of bunker-busting
nuclears and disdain for pris-
oners: to say nothing of his
greed, attitude to the suffering
of the poor, especially women,
and lack of concern for the
environment.
I believe the problem stems
from his addictive personality.
The "lush and cokehead" has
become a dangerous megalo-
maniac. The Yanks, for all their
faults, always come good in the
end and it seems they are wak-
ing up now as evidenced by the
letters of support for your
excellent piece. I belive W is
in for a very rough time. Con-
gratulations.
Nicholas Nuttall
YES, Bush is a disaster. Yes,
he is the worst US president of
all time. No, I don't kflow what
happens next in Iraq. I just
hope the Democrats come up
with someone special in 2008
to save my country from this
awful mess.
J Donaldson

Re: Haitian problem
'A Pending Calamity'
YOUR article in this morn-
ing's Tribune was very enlight-
ening. While it may be scary to.
some, it should be viewed as
an opportunity by all Bahami-
ans because, if managed care-
fully, it should benefit our
country.
C Weech, Nassau
THE most troubling point
you make in your article "A
Pending Calamity" is that
Bahamian society is now so
weakened morally that it is a
sitting target for a more aggres-
sive outside force wishing to
take over. That's frightening,
but almost certainly true. How
do we fight back?
Fathom, Prince Charles
WE are at the mercy of the
Haitian diaspora. Our only
hope is that the natural aggres-
siveness of Haitians is leavened
by Bahamian docility. Immi-
grants tend to moderate their
behaviour when faced with a
more tolerant culture.
Hopeful, Abaco




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