Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00257
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: November 17, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00257
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

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The


Tribune


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION AGAIN




BAHAMAS EDITION


Volume: 101 No.293 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005 PRICE 500


r Inrham claim


Mitchell compares alleged

salary to $146,000 for

Prime Minister Christie


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
WHEN former prime minister
Hubert Ingraham formally
assumes the position of Leader
of the Opposition he will be col-
lecting $196,000 from the public
treasury, Foreign Affairs and
Public Service Minister Fred
Mitchell told the PLP national
convention last night.
Mr Mitchell said that as a
retired prime minister Mr Ingra-
ham is paid $100,000; $28,000 as a
Member of Parliament; $50,000
as the Leader of the Opposition;
$18,000 as a Parliamentary Office
allowance.
"Compare that $196,000 for a
retired politician to the working
Prime Minister, Perry Christie
who receives the sum of $146,000
per year," Mr Mitchell said.
The minister said that his
research shows that shortly before
the election of 2002, Mr Ingra-
ham's Cabinet met and agreed to
provide for former prime minis-
ters the payment of a utility or


housing allowance of $1,500 per
year; the provision of a diplomatic
passport; access to the govern-
ment's VIP lounge at Nassau
International Airport; access to
an official car for appropriate
events in the Bahamas; provision
of security by the Royal Bahamas
Police Force when necessary; pro-
vision of one aide.
The minister said that Mr
Ingraham's cabinet agreed to pro-
vide for him when attending pub-
lic functions to be in the order of
precedence immediately after the
Leader of the Opposition.
It was also agreed that he is to
be provided a police driver and an
aide and the provision of appro-
priate security by the Royal
Bahamas Police Force
Mr Mitchell said that he was to
have the provision of one maid
in a salary scale up to $16,300 per
year; the provision of one senior
personal assistant in a scale that
goes up to $44,200 per year.
SEE page 12


FNM hits out at Mitchell's

'lies and distortions'
* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
A MEMBER of the FNM, at the next sitting of the House of Assem-
bly, will move an amendment to the Prime Minister's Pension Act to
bring it in line with the Parliamentary Pensions Act which provides for
a cessation of pension payments when a pensioner is re-elected to
parliament, the FNM said in a press release yesterday.
The party was responding to what it described as "lies and distor-
tions" in the address of Foreign Affairs and Public Service Minister
Fred Mitchell, about the salary to be paid to former Prime Minister
SEE page 12


* Village Rd. Roundabout
*Harold Read
Prine Charle Plaza


Only 7,500 have

registered to vote


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
ONLY 7,500 Bahamians have
so far registered to vote in the
next general election.
Parliamentary registrar Errol
Bethel said an average of 250 to
300 persons register every day.
"Most of those would be in
Nassau. We are getting them in
as they come in from the Family
Islands. I am sure that there are
some in the Family Islands that
we have not yet received.
"I am sure the number is high-
er than that, but in terms of what
we already have in-house, there is
about 7,500," said Mr Bethel.
Mr Bethel said there is "still a
long way to go," pointing out that
an estimated 170,000 voters still
need to be registered.
However, those registering
had increased since the end of
last week and the beginning of
this week, said Mr Bethel.


FNM leader Hubert Ingraham
last week urged party officers to
turn their attention to voter reg-
istration in case of an early gen-
eral election.
Mr Ingraham, speaking at the
party's installation banquet on
Saturday, said voter registration
is important "particularly as
regards all those who failed to
register to vote in the last elec-
tion, and for those young people
who would have become 18 since
the last election."
PLP chairman Raynard Rigby
told The Tribune yesterday that
they have told delegates, during
the convention's closed sessions,
that they will have to start getting
all voters in their respective areas
registered.
"Obviously it is important
because it is a very important
part of the democratic process.
We are certainly encouraging
people to be registered," said Mr
Rigby.


inside

B Increase in
pensions, public
service salaries
GOVERNMENT has
approved the increase of pen-
sions, and will today sign an
agreement for salary increases for
the public service workers.
Seepage three
BEC denies union
members victimised
BEC "emphatically denies"
that several members of the
S, Bahamas ElectricaIl,-orkers
Union Were victimised by the
corporation's management.
See page five
Couple plan to take
case to Privy Council
A NASSAU couple who
claim they are being prevented
from getting justice from the
Bahamas Appeal Court plan to
take their case to the Privy
Council in London.
See pagefive
Police warn
business owners
BUSINESS owners are being
warned by police officials to
ensure that their establishments
are fully secure.
0 See pagefive


GHS vice principal

attacked by student


* By PACO NUNEZ
THE vice principal of Gov-
ernment High School was
attacked and beaten by a stu-
dent yesterday when he tried to
restore order after a series
of fights broke out on the cam-
pus.
According to witnesses, vice
principal Theophilus Claridge
was punched repeatedly by his
attacker and sustained several
cuts to the face.
During the uproar, one stu-
dent was reportedly struck in
the face with a concrete block
and "stomped on" by a group of
young men. One witness said a
knife was drawn during one of
the fights.
A Bahamas Union of Teach-
ers (BUT) official said the inci-
dent underscores the need for


police officers to remain in
schools and for the governmen-
t's school policing initiative to
be further developed.
Just before press time last
night, a witness called The Tri-
bune claiming that a small dis-
turbance at the back of the
school spiralled out of control
when a female police officer -
the only officer stationed
GHS at the time attempted
to separate the students
involved.
The witness said a series of
fights followed, leading to a
scene that resembled "a riot".
"The vice principal went out
there to discipline some of the
students, and one of them start-
ed punching him right in the
face," she said. 0
SEE page 12


I I Nssa a dB d d I ands' Leading NewspaperSI


00








PAGE 2, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


PLP speakers warn of return to days of UBP .


* By PACO NUNEZ

THE FNM must lose the next
general election if the country is
to avoid regressing to the days of
the UBP, according to several
speakers at the PLP national con-
vention.
This week, several references
were made to the Bahamas "going
back there" if the FNM leadership
team of Hubert Ingraham and
Brent Symonette were to be elect-
ed.
While not mentioned by name,
Mr Symonette is considered to be
the target of these comments as
he is the son of the former UBP
premier Sir Roland Symonette,
and brother of Speaker of the
House, the late RH (Bobby)
Symonette.
The Tribune contacted Mr
Symonette who did not want to
comment on what he described as
"racist" statements. However, he
said he was saddened that race was
being made a part of political
debate.


Speaking of former FNM deputy
leader Sidney Collie, who was
beaten in his bid to retain that
position by Mr Symonette, Minis-
ter of Agriculture and Fisheries
Alfred Gray said on Tuesday:
"Tonight I wish to charge him
with failure to secure his own seat
as deputy leader and I also charge
him for handing it over, not to an
FNM, but to a UBP and I can
tell you brother, the Bahamian
people ain't going back there.
"Fellow delegates, could you
imagine, God forbid, that they
should win, and something were
to happen to Hubiggity, that we
would be back in the hands of the
UBP? Please don't let me imag-
ine that," he said.
Picking up on references to Mr
Ingraham and Mr Symonette as
"the salt and pepper team", For-
eign Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell
said:
". . we all know that salt and
pepper is just a ruse for some peo-
ple who lost their country in 1967
to get their country back through


i TOP OF THE HILL MACKEY STREET *3941 2213


*LEFTI: St Cecilia Marching Band brings delegates to their feet with their perfor-
mance at last night's PLP convention.
RIGHT: Omar Bastian, leader of the Young Liberals, the youth arm of the PLP,
delivers his speech.
(Photos: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)



FNM criticises Pierre Dupuch


* By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE FNM last night issued a
statement criticising Independent
MP for St Margaret and former
FNM MP Pierre Dupuch for his
letter of resignation from the par-
ty yesterday.
According to the press release,
the FNM "finds it laughable" that


TROPICAL

EXERINATOR


Mr Dupuch has submitted his res-
ignation. It said that the party was
of the opinion that Mr Dupuch
had stopped being an FNM sup-
porter "a long time ago".
"We were not aware that he
was an FNM, since Mr Dupuch
ian in opposition to the FNM
candidate, Lorretta Butler-Turn-
er in St Margaret's in the 2002
general election.
"In 2002 he automatically dis-
pelled himself from the party,"
the release said.
Yesterday Mr Dupuch stated
that he had retained his FNM
membership even after running
as an Independent candidate in
the last election. However he out-
lined that with the current lack


of "principle and trustworthiness
in the party's current leadership"
he could not be a part of it any
longer.
The press release from the
FNM went further to state that.
Mr Dupuch, since the 2002 gen-
eral elections, has supported
"every PLP initiative" in govern-,
ment, and has abandoned the-
FNM in pursuit of his own "per-,
sonal agenda".
"The fact is that Mr Dupuch
was not actually a card-carrying,
member of the FNM until 1992
when he was forced to formally
join the party, and we assumed,
that his absence from all party,,
functions even further signalled
his departure.


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the back door. The choice is as
clear today as it was in 1967,
when the UBP was vanquished
by the rallying cry 'PLP all the
way'."
Minister of Housing Shane Gib-
son seemed to call into question
Mr Symonette's stance on work-
ers:
"I cannot imagine that the 'salt
and pepper' combination, espe-
cially the 'salt' in that combination
having any desire or any interest to
meet the concerns of workers.
"In fact, the FNM party, through
its business connections represent
the worst form or employment
practices ever," he said.
Broadcast journalists covering
the convention pointed out that
some of these comments could be
interpreted as PLP speakers
attempting to "play the race card"
as the UBP is remembered as the
white minority government that
was defeated in 1967 by the PLP,
thus ushering in majority rule.

See Editorial page 4.


'------------ --------








THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005, PAGE 3


LO CALES


CONVENTION BRIEFS

FORMER FNM Cabinet
minister and MP for the
Marathon constituency Alger-
non Allen says he is "emphati-
cally out of politics".
Mr Allen allegedly was being
"wooed" by the PLP to join the
party along with former PLP
party leader contender Dr BJ
Nottage, who currently leads
the Coalition for Democratic
Reform (CDR).
Mr Allen's statement that he
is out of politics, contradicts
current PLP convention chair-
man Obie Wilchcombe's hopes
of coaxing Mr Allen over to the
PLP.

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie will be announcing
changes in the diplomatic corps
at the beginning of next year,
Foreign Affairs Minister Fred
Mitchell told the PLP national
convention yesterday.
Among these changes will
be a reassignment of Ambas-
sador to Haiti Eugene Newry
and his wife Franqoise.
"I want to thank Ambas-
sador to Haiti Eugene Newry
who started off in this party as a
member of the famous Nation-
al Committee for Positive
Action with our Prime Minister,
and this wife, Franqoise, for
their work in Haiti at a diffi-
cult time. Mrs Newry was
injured in an attempted rob-
bery in Haiti," Mr Mitchell said.
The Bahamas also plans the
opening of an embassy in Cuba.
Mr Mitchell emphasised that
there are no adverse implica-
tions for the country's relation-
ship with the United States of
America because of the rela-
tionship with Cuba.
"I expect that the continued
good relations with the United
States will continue. I am
indeed appreciative to John
Rood, their present Ambas-
sador, whose coming to The
Bahamas was almost as good
as the fresh wind that blew here
in 2002. I look forward to the
official visit of US Secretary of
State Condoleeza Rice to The
Bahamas in February 2006. I
have developed a good working
relationship with her in my
capacity as the Chair of the For-
eign Ministers of Caricom," he
said.

MINISTER of Education
and Attorney General Alfred
Sears, during his address at the
49th PLP convention, said that
universal pre-school education
is "well on its way" to becoming
a reality in the Bahamas.
"Today children of all socio-
economic backgrounds,
throughout the Bahamas, will
be able at the age of three years
to begin their formal educa-
tion," Mr Sears said.
"From 1989 to 2002 succes-
sive governments had estab-
lished 28 public pre-schools in
the Bahamas. Under this PLP
administration, the Ministry of
Education has added 23 pre-
school units to the public edu-
cation system in three years,
with 10 of these units in the
Family Islands in Andros, in
Eleuthera and Cat Island," he
said.
Mr Sears outlined that the
Early Childhood Care Act,
enacted in July 2004 to regu-
late pre-schools and day care
facilities, is currently being
looked at to be brought into
force in early 2006.


Increase in pensions, public service salaries


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
and KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporters

GOVERNMENT has
approved the increase of.,pen-
sions, and will today sign an
agreement for salary increases for
the public service workers.
Minister of Foreign Affairs and
Public Service Fred Mitchell
made this announcement last
night to cheers of approval from
the PLP convention.
Mr Mitchell said that the pen-
sion increases will be effective
from July 1, 2005 and will be paid
retroactively as a lump sum by
Christmas.
"Each pensioner in the Christ-
mas pension packet will see an


Mitchell makes

announcements


increase of $50 per month for all
retired and re-employed public
servants and a $30 per month
increase to war veterans and wid-
ows and orphans.
"The Ministry of Finance has
made a commitment to review
the pension every year so that the
pensions can keep pace with the
expected rises in the cost of liv-
ing," the minister said.
Mr Mitchell said that he wishes
government could have done
more but hopes that this addi-


tional sum will help the pension-
ers.
The minister further
announced that negotiations
between the government and the
Bahamas Public Service Union
(BPSU) for the initial draft of a
new industrial agreement con-
cluded last Sunday.
"As we speak, the BPSU is
putting the case for an agreement
to its members. Once ratified by
them we are prepared to sign
such an agreement (today),
which will allow for raises to be
paid by the government to all
public servants in time for Christ-
mas.
"I will leave the details to the
formal signing tomorrow which
should take place in the morning


Mitchell: no visa scandal


NO SCANDAL of any kind
has been found in the visa sec-
tion, Foreign Affairs Minister
Fred Mitchell told the PLP
National Convention yesterday,
but he asked both "friend and foe
alike not to seek to put me in a
position to make personal choic-
es about visas."
He said that suggestions that
there has been mismanagement
has been "FNM propaganda and
we have invited them time and
again to go to the police if they
have any information, which ris-
es to the level of the reasonable
suspicion of criminal activity,
which the constitution demands.
"They are unable to do so.
Indeed they have provided noth-
ing by way of a complaint to the
Permanent Secretary of the Min-
istry. But if there is any wrong-
doing, I say let the chips fall
where they may.
"I have sought within existing
procedures to put in place a trans-
parent system where there is an
initial finding by the officer; if
that isrefused then it may be
reviewed again or appealed to the
Permanent Secretary. That is gen-
erally the last level of appeal,"
said Mr Mitchell.
He said that those wishing to
apply to come from China will
have to, in the ordinary course
apply through the British embassy
or consulate in the city closest to
them.
"We are seeking to put an
embassy in Beijing by late Janu-


ary 2006. When that happens, the
complaints from that quarter
should disappear," he said.
' Another example of reform in
the public service, said the minis-
ter can be seen in the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs in the issuance of,
visas.
The complaints about the
issuance of visas from people liv-
ing abroad and Bahamian citizens
seeking to have visitors come to
The Bahamas are numerous, Mr
Mitchell said.
"The criticism is that the pro-
cedures again are not open and
transparent and there may even
be issues of training. In order to


address these issues, I have
requested a management audit of
the department by the Public Ser-
vice Commission and I thank the
Acting Chair Bishop Sam Greene
for agreefig to un 'take thi'''" '

"These reco'mmendatiqns,
which will also include the rec-
ommendations of the Auditor
General, should lead to compre-
hensive changes in the delivery
of that service to Bahamians and
foreigners alike, and should result
in the enhancement and protec-
tion of the government's revenue
and the security of our country,"
Mr Mitchell said.


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if all goes well, but the Cabinet
agreed on Tuesday afternoon that
we can sign the agreement. I look
forward to it," he said.


Mr Mitchell added that if all
goes well with the signing of
agreement, "we are on the path to
true public sector reform."


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005


EDIORAUL ES TOTH EDTO


FOR A POLITICAL party that claims to be
open to "every political party, race and creed",
the "new" PLP is sounding and behaving more
like the old PLP.
The battle cry of the "new" PLP in the 2002
election was that the FNM was selling the
Bahamas to foreigners. This issue will be dif-
ficult to raise in the 2007 election because on
assuming government in 2002, the PLP quick-
ly realised that they could not maintain the
standard of living to which Bahamians had
become accustomed without the foreign
investor. And so they too had to enter the
land selling race at an even more frenzied
pace.
Are they so short of issues that they are
now back to beating the old racial drum? We
wonder how soon it will be before "Roots" will
be dusted off and returned to the screens of
TV-13. After all TV-13 was rushed into exis-
tence just for the showing of "Roots", to
enflame emotions against white Bahamians
and win the 1977 election for the PLP. At that
time it worked.
However, what the PLP failed to factor
into their evil design at that time was that
emotions, once turned on, unlike a water
faucet, cannot be turned off at will. The ani-
mosity encouraged against the white man for
the purpose of winning an election spilled
over to our tourist industry. Visitors com-
plained about the hostile attitude of Bahami-
ans; investors got the feeling that they were
not wanted. The hostility affected every facet
of life in this country.
Is the "new" PLP so unsure of its own
record that it is going to revert to racial emo-
tionalism? PLPs say they don't want to "go
back". Nobody wants to go back, either to
the days of the UBP or the days of the racist
PLP.
"The PLP is a racist government. In every-'
thing they say and do they make it clear that
the whites both Bahamian and foreign in
these islands have no rights. They are merely
tolerated by the government," the late Sir Eti-
enne Dupuch wrote in this column on June 26,
1982 about the government of the late Sir
Lynden Pindling.
It would seem that in 23 years nothing has
changed. Just scratch the surface, and there it
is racism.
The victory.of Brent Symonette as deputy
leader of the FNM will be the first time that a
white man has held an executive party position
in either the FNM or PLP in almost 30 years.
This is a giant step forward. Bahamians give lip
service to the desire for One Bahamas. This is
now the first concrete step towards that goal.


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However, as was the practice of the old
PLP, the "new" group is ,trying to mislead
Bahamians. The fact that Brent Symonette
has been voted party deputy leader, does not
mean that he automatically becomes deputy
prime minister should Mr Ingraham win the
government. PLP politicians should know this,
but like their PLP forebears, they take advan-
tage of the average Bahamian's ignorance of
these matters. .
. The position of deputy prime minister has
no place in our constitution. Therefore, who-
ever is prime minister selects his deputy, who
is not necessarily the same person as the par-
ty's deputy. And so a victory for the FNM
does not automatically mean that Mr Symon-
ette will be deputy prime minister.
Agriculture Minister Alfred Gray, chastis-
ing Sidney Collie for losing the deputy leader's
position in the FNM, blamed him for "handing
it over, not to an FNM, but to a UBP and I
can tell you brother, the Bahamian people
ain't going back there."
What a stupid statement. There is no UBP
to go back to. Brent Symonette was never a
UBP. It is true that his father, the late Sir
Roland Symonette, the first premier of the
Bahamas, was UBP as was his older brother,
Bobby, Brent's senior by 29 years. However,
Brent was a 16-year-old school boy in England
when the UBP was disbanded. And so his
first, and only, participation in politics has
been as an FNM.
Are the PLP saying that he can never get
rid of the UBP stigma because his father and
brother were UBPs? If that is so, then let's
look at Prime Minister Perry Christie. Is htea
UBP in disguise because his father for a long
period of his life was also UBP?
Or is Brent Symonette being rejected
because he is white?
If so then again what say you about Prime
Minister Christie whose great grandfather,
George Christie, was also white?
We were told that on the first night of the
PLP convention, Kennedy MP Kenyatta Gib-
son, who was that evening's commentator,
made a dismissive racial remark about the
person chosen as FNM deputy leader. We
were surprised that such remarks could come
from the mouth of a man who lists his address
as exclusive Lyford Cay.
Judging by the PLP's performance at this
convention, the FNM appears to be the party
moving into the future, while the "new" PLP.
seems to be trying-once agarinTo emotionally
shackle the Bahamian people so that they can
drag them back into their destructive, preju-
diced past.


(242) 394 5767
(242) 393 6073


ABACO (242) 367 5792


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MA GISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398 ......
Freeport, Grand Bahama:.- T-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


EDITOR, The Tribune
AS the holder of a degree in
Economic History and Political
Science (Walbrook College-
London) I have long been fas-.
cinated by the disappearance of
the small, close knitted com-
munities which most of us used
to know during the 1960's and
the 1970's.
Not only have those commu-
nities, with their extended fam-
ilies and disciplinarians, disap-
peared, but many of our peo-
ple today, especially the resi-
dents of New Providence:
Freeport and our under.25.gen-,
erations, now find themselves
'alienated" from traditional
society and its value structure.
This alienation, a mental state
of mind, in my submission,
results in them looking at the
social order as distant and out
of connect with them. They may
even regard society as incom-
prehensible; fraudulent and pos-
sibly, beyond real hope or
desire. This, of course, leads to
personal hostility and pure
anger.
We then witness the tragic
phenomenon where the bulk of
our people may have "with-
drawn" from the ever pressing
demands of state institutions;
churches; labour unions and the
traditional family unit. The
quest for community and the
inherent social nature of the
average human being would
dictate that sociologists and
their allies take a serious look at
this alienation and the debili-
tating effects which it has
wrought upon our country.
This quest has seen the rapid
emergence of so-called youth
and lesbian gangs (no doubt
there are homosexual ones but,
we don't hear too much about
these or they may have existed
for so long that they are con-
sidered a part of the "norm').
The traditional family structure
has been and is being seriously
challenged by the overt materi-
alism of the times and the gen-
trification of countless neigh-
bourhoods.
One must keep in mind, of
course, the fact that, historical-
ly, there has never been a "mas-
ter design" plan for most of our
cities; communities and far flung
islands settlements. Like Topsy,
they just popped up where there
was need for community..
Illegal immigration and
migration, especially amongst
our Haitian and Jamaican
brothers and sisters have also
placed a very heavy and com-
plex burden on our traditional
communities and now extend
into all of our social, political


and economic institutions, bar
none.
Take Englerston and Bain's
Town as illustrations of my
proposition about this elusive
quest for community. Fifteen
years ago, less than a genera-
tion, these two communities
were vibrant and bustling with
commercial and communal
activities.
Hpmes, on average, were
owned and occupied by tradi-
tional Bahamian families. There
was a father, or father type fig-
ure, and a hard working, no
nonsense mother. Not so today.
Now, at least 80 per cent of
those areas are inhabited by for-
eign sounding individuals and
groupings. Homes which were
built for single families are now
occupied by dozens of an
extended family. Sanitary con-
ditions and the environment, in
many cases, leave much to be
desired. This then becomes a
tremendous financial burden
and societal strain on our latch
key administration, be they
"old" PLP: "new" PLP or
defunct FNM.
Our family structure is under
serious attack and assault. With-
in this generation we have
borne witness to the quest for
community. It is played out
when we see persons seeking
comfort: safety and community
by joining antisocial fringe
grouping: cult like churches and
bogus political messiahs: tin
gods and iron-balled men/
women. Career criminals,
amongst our youth, are now the


norm as opposed to the excep-
tions. I !
In my opinion it is an indict-
ment on our Minister of Social
Development and her Depart-
ment of Social Servicesthat
they have, collectively, not
reached out to the vast niajpri-
ty of our de-socialised young
men and youth. The focus has
always been with the female of
the species and that is just
where it remains to this,,very
day. ,;
The abject fact that less than
40 per cent of Bahamians own
their own homes and residen-
tial property, according torthe
Department of Statisticsi, has
also seen the rapid alienation
of most Bahamians from-the
landscape and nature itself.
A tenant, usually, has little
or no incentives to maintain or
beautify his dwelling and ,nvi-
ronment. Pride of ownership
and the sense of security which
comes with it are almost sacred.
Affordable building land in
New Providence however is
beyond the reach of 65.,per
cents or more of the residents.
The quest for community is
never ending and must be dri-
ven by the recognised societal
and communal institutions.
Politicians, on average, ,cpuld
care less (until the electoral
cycle comes into play): thecol-
lective church seems togonly
care about 'the pearly gates" in
that great beyond, while:the
varied pastors; preachers;apos-
tles and, possibly, charlatans
dressed up in big robes anglhigh
necked collars, appear to "prey"
on one's pocket book.
ORTLAND H BODIEJR
Nassau
October 20 2005


Impressed by events

at FNM convention


EDITOR, The Tribune

FNM Convention 2005 is
history. As a Bahamian, I was
truly impressed with the way
the convention was conduct-
ed, but particularly how it
ended. Because, let me tell
you, it really isn't important
how you begin, but how you
end.
Yes at the outset there
appeared to be some discord
- of course that's natural -
only one person can win.
Teeth and tongue don't
always agree, but you don't
see the tongue jumping out of
the mouth. Look at how won-
derfully the convention end-
ed. As I watched the conven-
tion on my TV what I saw
brought tears to my eyes
when Mr Ingraham called all
those men on stage on Friday
past, particularly Mr Turn-
quest.
That level of mature inter-
action is to be commended
and emulated. I have renewed
faith that conflicts can indeed
be settled without someone
getting physically hurt or per-
manently emotionally wound-
ed. Just that night alone
should have been sufficient
for Bahamians across the
length and breadth of our
great country to take the


FNM very seriously. Thi is
how leaders should conduct
themselves.
Having said all that, there
was also the bold appearance
of former Senator Edison Key
and Elizabeth Thompsoin the
former Registrar General.
Both of whom were PLPs iad
are now FNMs! Embraced
and rescued by the FNM they
stood firmly side by side With
their comrades. Again mature
and heart-warming comilin-
tary coming from both per-
sons who seemed to be 0i~ht
at home in the FNM family.
Bahamas, seems to me tliat
FNMs have it right. They're
human so they're not perfect,
but so far they're impressing
me a whole lot! I have been
something over the course'of
their convention that I hiave
been longing for in Bahamian
politics: clear thinking, intel-
ligent commentary, embrhc-
ing of all persons no matter
the colour or creed and, matu-
rity. Wonderful! '9"
I'm tired of the arrogance,
the self importance, the miud-
slinging personal attacks,and
the all for me babies;' Kios
FNMs. Keep it up!
HATTIE COX
Nassau .
November 2005


CALLING ALL PAST

MEMBERS/FOLLOWERS OF
CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

a re invited to atteWd'


4TH HOMECOMING

&

127TH ANNIVERSARY SERVICE

on
Sunday, November 27, 2005 .
at 11:00am


The eternal





quest for





community


PLP's racism and prejudices


SDobcat
S BDahamas
Versatility Productivity Reliability
Crntiford St., Oakoe Field
Tel: 323-5171 Fax: 322-6969)








THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005, PAGE 5


LOCALNW


BEC denies

union members

were victimised
By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

BEC "emphatically
denies" that several mem-
bers of the Bahamas Elec-
trical Workers Union were
victimised by the corpora-
tion's management.
This response came after
a front-page story appeared
in Wednesday's edition of
The Nassau Guardian, in
which the Bahamas Electri-
cal Workers Union
(BEWU) levelled a number
':of allegations at the corpo-
ration.
Yesterday, in a press
Release from BEC's man-
agement, it was noted that
'the corporation was "very
surprised to read the report
in The Nassau Guardian on
Wednesday, and would like
Sto correct some erroneous
statements made by
Stephano Greene, secretary
general of the Bahamas
Electrical Workers Union."
The press release said
Mr Greene also contended
that "the corporation's
management was now
threatening to 'discipline'
and fire key union mem-
bers."
In response to this,
BEC's management wished
to go on record that "no
such threats have been
'made."
However, it was indicat-
ed that management was
Forced to reprimand a union
officer for allegedly using
Profanity towards a manag-
er.
The Nassau Guardian
reported that, according to
Mr Greene, he was
removed from BEC's mail-
'ing system.
In defence, Kevin Bas-
den, general manager of
BEC, confirmed that this
action was taken as a result
of Mr Greene's "misuse and
'abuse" of that system.
"However, regarding Mr
Greene's allegation that he
had been told that he was to
be fired, Mr Basden said
- categorically that the corpo-
.tation never made any such
statement," the press
release read.
Mr Greene also report-
edly said the corporation
tried to suspend two union
executives, but government
made management rescind
the letters.
Mr Basden said: "We
would like to state unequiv-
,.'ocally that this incident nev-
er happened."
Mr Basden said the cor-
'poration "has never
attempted to victimise or
threaten any union officers
or any other BEC work-
ers."
He added: "While we
Oipomote harmony in the
oi.brk place, employees are
expected to carry out the
'duties for which they have
been engaged in order to
maintainn the high quality
service our customers
expect."
Mr Basden said he
received no telephone calls
or messages from the
author of the article
requesting a response to the
,allegations.
S"I would hope that any
Future articles containing
such inaccurate information
are checked more thor-
u '06ghly before being printed
; so as to avoid the dissemi-
Snation of such misinforma-
tion," said Mr Basden.




THURSDAY
NOVEMBER 17


6:30am
11:00
12:00
12:03

12:05
1:00 '
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
4:58
5:00
5:30
6:00
6:30
7:00
8:00

,11:00
11:30
12mnn


Community Pg,/1540
Immediate Response
ZNS News Update
Caribbean Today News
Update
Immediate Response Cont'd
Legends Whence We Came
The Jackson's
Inside Hollywood
Bishop Leroy Emmanuel
Gilbert Patterson
Gospel Video
Gospel Grooves
ZNS News Update
Caribbean Newsline
411
Native Stew
News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
Progressive Liberal Party
Convention
News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
Community Page


* -
NOTE: *N-T 13.eserve


A NASSAU couple who claim
they are being prevented from get-
ting justice from the Bahanias
Appeal Court plan to take their case
to the Privy Council in London.
Greg and Tanya Cash, who are
involved in a prolonged legal battle
with the Baptist church, claim court
officials are blocking them by refus-
ing to accept their documents.
They are convinced they will get
justice once they appear before the
Appeal justices. But they say their
attempts to secure a hearing are
being frustrated.
"All Bahamians should be con-
cerned about this," Mrs Cash told
The Tribune yesterday. "It means
that if you are up against someone
in the political or religious arena
you can't get justice."
The couple have been involved in
a long court wrangle with the Bap-
tists since Mr Cash was fired from
his job as games master with Jor-
dan Prince William Baptist High
School in 2002.
Mrs Cash also claims the family
was victimised by school authori-
ties after she mobilised complaints
against rising fees and alleged gen-
eral neglect of the school.
Now they are taking court action
against the Attorney General, but
allege that they are being obstruct-
ed by officials who refuse to file
their documents.
"We are confident of success if
we get this matter to the Court of
Appeal, but they want to keep us in
limbo and stop it from going to tri-
al," Mrs Cash claimed.
The couple's three-year fight for
justice began with Mr Cash's
"wrongful dismissal" claim against
the school. At the time, two of the
Cash children were expelled after
Mrs Cash along with other par-
ents sent a confidential letter of
complaint to the Ministry of Edu-
cation about alleged neglect of the
school.
The letter found its way into the
hands of the Rev Dr William
Thompson, president of the
Bahamas Baptist Missionary and
Education Convention.
In the original action, Mr Cash
claimed damages for .alleged inhu-
mane and degrading treatment,
insulting language and behaviour,


harassment, wrongful dismissal,
malicious falsehood, character injury
and financial loss.
Mrs Cash alleged breach of trust
and confidence and of statutory and
fiduciary duty.
Both also alleged inhumane and
degrading treatment of their chil-
dren and unjust disruption of their
education.
Altogether, there are nine defen-
dants, including the Baptist Educa-
tion Authority, Dr Thompson,
Bishop Samuel Greene and the
school itself.
Three defendants, including the
Attorney General and Ministry of
Education, later applied to have the
writ struck out as vexatious with no
reasonable cause of action.
However, in September Mr and
Mrs Cash filed a criminal suit
against Attorney General Alfred
Sears claiming his office had been
perverting the cause of justice in
their civil action against the Baptist.
Education Authority.
They alleged that the govern-
ment's legal department had repeat-
edly evaded requirements of the law
by not filing proper documents.
In October, Justice Faizool
Mohammed struck out a statement
of claim as "confusing" and
ordered the couple to pay the cost
of their application.
Now they are seeking to over-
come the Appeal Court snag, alleg-
ing that police were called when
they tried to get their documents
accepted.
"They are now claiming we are
out of time," said Mrs Cash, "but
that is not so. We are being blocked
from every angle in trying to get
this matter to go to trial. We are
getting no explanations and no jus-
tice.
"We feel that we are in a reli-
gious and political battle. We have
been before five judges, including



F izer, i

esKCotr'


the Chief Justice, and we can't move
forward."
Mr and Mrs Cash believe many
Nassau lawyers are deeply con-
cerned about their situation. But
they feel they are afraid to inter-
vene.
"There are a lot of people who
are supporting us, but we feel the
Bar Association ought now to get
involved because of the serious
implications of this case. This is a
David and Goliath contest, but at
the moment Goliath seems to be
winning," said Mr Cash.
The couple said the Privy Coun-
cil would be their only option if they
fail to get before the Appeal Court.
"But we are determined to take
this matter to the very limit," they
vowed.


IBED BATH & HOME


GIFT & BRIDAL REGISTRY
Harbour Bay Shopping Centre
.. Ph:: 393-4440 or 393-4448 -


II GIS. usrcn ference.. .[1


N REV Patrick L Adderley, Dean of Christ Church Cathedral; Richard J Herring, Inter-
American Development Bank (IDB) representative; Prime Minister Perry Christie; Carolann
Albury, director of the Bahamas National Geographic Information Systems (BNGIS) Cen-
tre; Ronald Thompson, Permanent Secretary in the Office of the Prime Minister, at the
Bahamas GIS User Conference and GIS Day.
(Photo By Franklyn G Ferguson)




Police warn business owners


* By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter

BUSINESS owners are being warned by police
officials to ensure that their establishments are ful-
ly secure.
Speaking to the press yesterday, Inspector Wal-
ter Evans, said that these warnings are not being
"sparked by an increase in business crime".
"As we approach the Christmas season you'll
find that more of our proactive strategies would
be coming into place," he said. "But this is not
just going to be for the business community
it just so happens that today we are giving


it


these advisories."
"Firstly we are saying to persons be aware of
suspicious activity in and around your business.
We are also asking individuals to limit the amount
of cash held at a building, the less cash held on the
premises the less attractive it is as a target."
Mr Evans also warned that persons should vary
the days and times of making their business
deposits.
"When you do, do not always take the same
route or use the same pattern by which you make
your deposits. And we are also asking individuals
to alternate the times that you make your
deposits."


Nassau couple plan to



take case to Privy Council


A NEW collection of digital
data on all the islands of the
Bahamas will enable to country to
move into the 21st century in a
planned fashion.
This was the message of the first
Geographic Information Systems
(GIS) user conference ever held
in the Bahamas.
Addressing the conference at
the opening yesterday morning,
Prime Minister Perry Christie said
that with an "unprecedented level
of interest in the establishment of
major touristic development pro-
jects" in the Bahamas, the country
must take care to go forward in a
planned manner.
"To ensure that development
proceeds in an organised and
planned manner it is necessary to
have land use development plans,"
he said.
Richard Herring, representative
of the Inter-American Develop-
ment Bank (IDB), said GIS is an
indispensable tool for achieving
this aim.
He explained that GIS is used
for land planning, risk and disaster


management and registration of
ownership.
GIS, a collaborative effort
between the government and the
IDB, which has established its cen-
tre in the office of the prime min-
ister, serves as the central co-ordi-
nating unit and repository for col-
lection, storage and management
of geospatial data on the Bahamas.
With the use of GIS, plans are
being finalised for Eleuthera, Exu-
ma and the Cays, and for
Mayaguana, the prime minister
said.
"As a precursor for the devel-
opment of a land use for Grand
Bahama and a part of the land use
planning and administration pro-
ject aerial photography has been
produced for that island," he said.
Additionally, he said, digital data
will be developedfor the islands of
Abaco, Andros and Great Inagua
and computer systems will be
deployed and participants from
local government administration
offices in Marsh Harbour, Nichol's
Town and Matthew Town will be
trained to manage the data.









ANNOUNCEMENT

Bryan A Glinton, Roy W M Sweeting & Andrew G S O'Brien II
are pleased to announce the formation of their partnership and the opening
their chambers on the 1st day of November 2005 for the practice
of law under the name of:


GLINTON


SW MEETING


I O'BRIEN


COUNSEL & ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW



303 SHIRLEY STREET, P 0 BOX N 492
NASSAU, NEW PROVIDENCE, THE BAHAMAS
t 242 328 3500 f 242 328 8008
www.gsolegal.com info@gsolegal.com


PAE HUSDYNOEMER17N205THSTIBNI


Police, CoC



and IBM to



hold crime



seminar


IThe first and onlI

diabetic snc<


* PAUL Farquharson will be opening the seminar


You understand .
the benefits of
meal replacement
drinks- I
convenient, easy I
to digest and quick
to begin providing
nutrition. You may
even have tried
some, but do you
really like the taste
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Now there's Enterex 1
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and is lactose- and gluten-free.
Delicious Enterex Diabetic is sweetened
with SPLENDAm Brand sucralose.
Compare Enterex Diabetic to
whatever you're drinking now.
DISTRIBUTED BY
LOWE'S WHOLESALE
TEL: 393-7111 FAX: 393-0440


* By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Chamber of Commerce
(COC) in conjunction with IBM
and the Royal Bahamas Police
Force (RBPF) will hold an
information, business and per-
sonal security seminar on
November 29.
The seminar, entitled "New
approaches to overcoming
crime" is aimed at educating the
general public as well as busi-
ness owners in the various secu-
rity measures that are current
used to guard against crime.
Speaking at a press confer-
ence yesterday, assistant super-
intendent Elaine Sands of the
RBPF said that this seminar will
be "a well-worth-it venture".
"It is the mandate of every
police commander to not only
practice crime prevention, but,
to continually sensitise the pub-
lic at large about safety mea-
sures. This is well rounded
forum that will address proper-
ty crimes and crimes against the
person," she said.
Mrs Sands explained that the
morning session will focus on
the psychological side of crime
and on computer crimes.
"The evening session will end
in a panel discussion with the
police, a representative from
the attorney general's office and
other participants," she said.
"It's anticipated that the
event will be officially opened


by the Minister of National
Security and Deputy Prime
Minister Cynthia Pratt and the
commissioner of police Paul
Farquharson."
According to Branville
McCartney, chairman of the
COC Crime Prevention Com-
mittee, "for those persons, par-
ticularly in retail and wholesale
businesses and in banking, this
can be the most trying time of
year."
"The holidays are meant to
be a time of good cheer, but
tragically, what we hear too
often is the unhappy jingling of
nerves instead of the happy jin-
gling of cash registers as prop-
erty crime, burglaries, break-ins
and entering and robberies
jump in the weeks leading up
to the holidays."
Mr McCartney explained that
the conference aims "to provide
useful tips and practical advice
for everyone . on how to
avoid becoming a victim."
The cost of this day-long sem-
inar will cost about $60 for
COC members and $75 for non-
members.
Anyone seeking further infor-
mation can contact the COC.


0 In brief

Police

identify

man shot

dead
FREEPORT The mart
shot dead at Williams Town
on Tuesday has been identi-
fied by Grand Bahama Police
as 29-year-old Ryan Williams!
Williams' body was discov-
ered just before 6am lying on
the ground on the south-wdst,
side of his family's home. -;'
According to reports, a
neighbour heard screams and,
later discovered the body, P
Williams was shot severAl
times in the upper body. 'He
was pronounced dead o;
arrival at the Rand Memorial
Hospital. 4,
Police are following several
leads into the shooting death,
the 13th murder in Grand
Bahama this year.

Man in

custody

following

robbery

GRAND Bahama Polide
have taken a 22-year-old
Freeport man into custody in
connection with armed rob
bery and kidnapping.
According to reports, a 38g
year-old McCleans Town man
was at Municipal Service Sta-
tion around 6.30am putting air
into a tyre when he was
approached by three men. Thp
men were unmasked and one
was reportedly armed with, a
handgun. ,
The man was forced to get
into the trunk of his vehicle..
The culprits reportedly drove,
off with the car, later releasiig^
the man in the area of Xanadu,
Beach. ,.
The vehicle was recovered.
three hours later at Murchim-
son Drive and Hearn Lane,





Mondays


ORALE'r FAIHIONVI

New Arrivals
Clothing, Shoes & Accessories,
for the Holiday Season
Put yours on layaway today!


rolling
. The
ture adult.


Duties and Responsibilities
* Management, scheduling and training of staff ;^
* Responsible for communications between the Shift Manager!
and Store Clerks
* Daily management of till report, including the correctness
of these reports
* Daily bank deposits
* Daily management of inventory control and reporting
* Sales and Customer Service
* The overall appearance of the store
Skills
* Knowledge of Computer, Point of Sale and Credit Card
machines
* Excellent management, follow through and organisational
skills
* Knowledge of retail sales, merchandizing and inventory
control
* Knowledge of The Bahamas
* Ability and willingness to follow company policy and
procedures and to be the leader of the "Team"
Experience Required
A minimum of 3 years experience in this capacity.
Salary will be commensurate with experience.
Interested candidates should send resume to:
Human Resources Manager
P. 0. Box CB-13045
Nassau, Bahamas
Or email to: bahamasresume@yahoo.com


Retail Store Manager

Position Objective:
The incumbent is responsible to 'he owner for cont
overall operations of ret.-l ste : on Paradise Island
incumbent must be a respcsib hard working, ma


THE TRIBUNE,


PAGE 6, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005


IA ioxU I


cr


V L I i rrr t "I






THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005, PAGE 7


FOR


THE


STORIES


S E E M


BEHIND


O N D A Y 'S


THE


NEWS


-I- w 2l yrstsP~~n~


T In brief
S.................................... .. ............

Traffic

victim is

named
THE man who died in a
traffic accident on Sunday has
been identified as 30-year-old
Andre Smith of Hanna Hill,
Eight Mile Rock.
Smith was driving a 1995
Toyota Avalon around 1.30am
when he lost control of the
vehicle and crashed into a tree
on.East Sunrise Highway, just
eistfof Beachway Drive.
His death is the 20th traffic
fatality for- the year on Grand
Bahama.

Tropical

provides

supplies

'Tropical Shippingcame to
the 'assistance of hurricane
vidtims on Grand Bahama
with the donation of a 20-foot
container of water and a 20-
foot container of ice.
"Anyone who has either
seefi or heard of the impact
of'Hurricane Wilma on
Giand Bahama has to be
touched in some way to try to
ease the pain, heartaches and
Anguish felt by those affect-
ed,"; said Kelly Burrows, port
manager of the company.


Companies help with relief


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT Several corporate citi-
zens on Grand Bahama have played a
tremendous role in delivering aid and
relief to hundreds of deprived storm vic-
tims in the aftermath of Hurricane
Wilma.
The Our Lucaya Resort delivered
about 9,000 lunches over the past three
weeks in the various settlements that
were devastated along the south western
coastline.
Earnestine Moxyz, public relations
director, said the lunch programme end-
ed on Friday with the final delivery of
lunch to some residents in Mack Town,
Hunters, Lewis Yard, Pinder's Point,
Eight Mile Rock and Holmes Rock.
"As good corporate citizens we were
very happy to be able to assist persons
affected by Hurricane Wilma," she said.
A group from the resort consisted of
workers and senior managers distrib-
uted some 500 lunches every day since
the passage of the storm.
Ms Moxyz said some $15,000 in man-
hours were spent over the past 18 days.
"We were surprised by the devasta-
tion we saw in those communities and we
were glad to be in a position again this
year to assist those in need as we did
last year following hurricane Frances
and Jeanne," she said.
Ms Moxyz said that organisers of the
Connecticut Chapter of Caribbean
Tourism Organisation also assisted them
with the distribution of lunches on Fri-
day.
The resort hosted the group of 13 tray-


* THE Partners and staff of Pricewaterhouse Coopers, Bahamas made a cash
donation to the Bahamas Red Cross to assist the victims of Hurricane Wilma. Seen
are Kevin D Seymour, managing partner Pricewaterhouse northern region, Sam
Cooper chairman of the Grand Bahama Red Cross Centre, and Executive Disaster
Office Phil Franks.


el agents to a familiarisation trip to
Grand Bahama last week.
They also visited the Grand Bahama
Home and Daycare For the Aged where
they assisted with clean-up, repairs and
landscaping of the facility.
"We were extremely pleased to have
them come to the island, but we were


(Photo: TAT)

even more grateful that they were able to
also assist us with our lunch pro-
gramme," she said.
Ms Moxyz said business is good at the
Sheraton and Westin hotels at Our
Lucaya.
"The season is looking strong for
upcoming holiday and we expect it


would continue after holiday.
Many corporate citizens and busi-
nesses on Grand Bahama have been
urged to come forward and assist hurri-
cane victims on Grand Bahama.
Pricewaterhouse Cooper Bahamas
made a financial donation to the
Bahamas Red Cross to assist the victims
of Hurricane Wilma.
Managing partner Kevin Seymour pre-
sented a cheque Monday to Grand
Bahama Red Cross chairman Sam Coop-
er and Executive Disaster Officer Phil
Franks.
Cathy Wells, Grand Bahama Red
Cross executive member, said that
response from the community has been
quite good over the past weeks.
"We are very pleased by the amount
of financial and food donations to the
organisation in terms of hurricane relief
by individuals and companies on the
island.
"Many individuals are coming in and
they have been surprisingly generous.
"There has also been a lot of interest
by groups and companies, and we think
a lot of that has to do with the profes-
sional manner in which we handled relief
distributions last year," she said.
Ms Wells said the Red Cross deliv-
ered food and baby items in conjunc-
tion with the Grand Bahama Port
Authority to residents in affected areas.
She said a trailer of food items and sup-
plies such as blankets, tarpaulin and
water were off-loaded on Monday.
She said the organisation's primary
focus is bringing relief to more vulnera-
ble persons such as elderly, handicapped
and shut-in affected areas.


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THE Royal Bahamas
Defence Force has presented
Gambier Primary School with
new supplies
Several years ago, the
Defence Force chose to inti-
mately involve itself with the
school as part of the 'Adopt-A-
School' programme.
On this occasion, members
of the service donated school
supplies such as notebooks,
pencils, rulers and so on, as
well as a small freezer for use
by students and teachers of the
school.
On Monday, teachers and
students at the school held a
special assembly for guests
from the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force.
Defence Force Commander
Davy Rolle took the opportu-
nity to address the children,
particularly the young boys,
about their conduct and
appearance. Her told his
young audience, that it was
important for them to pay
attention to their teachers, and
that they should always strive
to maintain an acceptable stan-
dard of dress.
"You must learn at an early
age to listen to your teachers,
as they are only trying to help
you to become better stu-
dents," said Commodore
Rolle.
The military chief told the
young boys how important it is
for them to take time out in
order to prepare their uni-
forms for school the night
before. He instructed the
schoolboys, in particular, to
ensure that their shoes are suit-
ably cleaned and polished, and
that their neck ties are adjust-
ed to the correct length before
presenting themselves to the
public.
Paulamae Bethel, principal
of the school, thanked Com-
modore Rolle and his team for
their enduring support of her
institution and its students over
the years. Lieutenant Floyd


* COMMODORE Davy Rolle addressing the student
population of Gambier Primary School during a visit there,
during which school supplies and other items were presented


Moxey, liaison officer for the
school programme, said he was
delighted to be a part of such a
noble effort, and thoroughly
enjoyed assisting the students
where possible.
"We are firmly committed
to the goal of providing a male
influence at the school, which
we hope will serve to assist
the boys in the areas of disci-
pline, character development,
personal grooming and basic
etiquette", said Moxey.
Since the programme was
established in 1995, members
of the Defence Force have
purchased school supplies,
playground equipment, com-
puters and their accessories, a
video machine and television,
and other equipment. Mem-
bers of the Force have also vol-
unteered as music and physical
educators at the school.


* COMMANDER Rolle
with principal Paulamae
Bethel


OIn brief


Two are

injured

in traffic

accident

FREEPORT Two men
were injured in traffic acci-
dent on Wednesday when
the vehicle they were ii
crashed into a tree. j-Ur
Desty Cyrius, 34, bf
Shackelton Lane, and hid
passenger, Melege Saintilus,
37, of Columbus Drive, are
in stable condition at'thd
Rand Memorial Hospital -:l
According to report
Cyrius was driving a gray
Pontiac 6000 LP north on
Seahorse Road nearCoril
Court when he lost control
of the vehicle, which went
into the median and crashed
into a tree. The car was
extensively damaged.
Police are investigating
the matter.


Arson
suspected
in Harbour
Island fire,,


POLICE have confirm d
they suspect arson in thle
Harbour Island clinic fire on
Monday.
The north-western section
of the government clinic in
Colebrooke Street caught
fire in the early hours. :
The fire brigade and cit'-
zens worked together t'6
keep the blaze from sprea'P-
ing.
Yesterday, police liaison
officer Walter Evans said:
"At least three sets of fiFe
were discovered during tle
investigations, and we stu-
pect there has been some
suspicious activity."
However, Mr Evans said
investigations are still c6ii-
tinuing.


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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005


THE TRIBUNEI













Ingraham's return has turned




the political landscape around


Hi, UBERT Ingraham's
return as leader
greatly strengthens the Free
National Movement and
increases its prospects for vic-
tory in the next general elec-
tion.
'Mr Ingraham is a known
quantity with an impressive
track record as a political strate-
gist and leader of government.
He is without question a leader
who invokes strong emotions
on the part of friends and foes
alike; those who admire him do
so, undyingly and those who
hate him, and hate is not too
strong a word, do so intensely.
This much is true, no one is apa-
thetic towards him, no matter
how much they pretend to be.
One PLP MP during com-
mentary on the first night of his


party's convention took a great
deal of time rebutting Mr Ingra-
ham's assertion that throngs of
people asked for his return to
leadership.
The MP stated emphatically
'hat "two hundred delegates do
not represent the Bahamian
people". He then said he want-
ed to get that out of the way
and would not mention it any,
p0re. Yet, when asked about
tie greatest accomplishments
of the PLP over its three-and-a-
ialf year tenure, he briefly men-
tioned Urban Renewal and
;tien, without listing any other
.accomplishment, proceeded to
,erate Hubert Ingraham's
-r6turn to leadership.
Even Prime Minister Christie
'bas felt the need to comment


on Ingraham's return in strong
terms, claiming that Mr Ingra-
ham was putting his legacy in
jeopardy by coming back. This
just goes to show that Mr Ingra-
ham's re-emergence as FNM
leader is on lots of people's
minds, including the minds of
leaders of the PLP.
The return of Ingraham to
leadership of the FNM has dras-
tically re-ordered the political
landscape of the country.
Everyone anticipates much
sharper opposition to the gov-
ernment, keener alternatives to
its programmes, a stronger
defence of the legacy of the
FNM in government and a
much more charismatic duelling
between the leaders of the two
political parties..
Ingraham knows a lot and his
opponents know that he does. It


is therefore not surprising that
many movements are being
made to respond to the fact of
his return to leadership.
Dr B J Nottage's alignment,
Deputy Prime Minister Pratt's
political future, the Hon Ten-
nyson Well's political leaning
and a host of other issues will be
direct reactions to the fact that
Ingraham is back.
For students and fans of pol-
itics, it just doesn't get any bet-
ter than this. The generals are
positioning themselves and the
battle-lines are being drawn. It
seems sooner rather than later,
the declaration of war will be
made.
No matter where one stands
in the midst of the battle, this
much is certain, a great many
eyes will be on the man whose


STRAIGHT UP TALK

Z H IVAR G O L A I NG


political stature looms larger
than any other in our contem-
porary history, the Right Hon
Hubert A Ingraham.
THE BRENT SYMONETTE
FACTOR

Already there seems to
be a move afoot to
introduce racism into the polit-
ical campaigning of this upcom-
ing general election. Some peo-
ple are beginning to suggest that
Brent Symopette's emergence
at deputy leader of the FNM is
some attempt to take The
Bahamas back to a time before
Majority Rule.
This writer wants to put on
notice any person, FNM or
PLP, politician or priest, who
seeks to use this ploy that he
will fiercely condemn, oppose
and confront them on this score.
This race-driven politics is unbe-
coming leaders and followers in
a modern Bahamas and such
senseless assertions are unbe-
coming an enlightened people.
Certainly, anyone who claims
to own God as Lord and Jesus
Christ as saviour can find no
justification for denying a per-
son the right to maximise his
potential purely on the grounds
that his parents were such and
such or that his skin colour is
black or white.
Too many brave and noble
people gave much fighting this
evil for us to have it reintro-
duced into our society, albeit
by some backdoor cowardly
way.
There are far too many peo-
ple in this country, some of


whom now serve at high levels
in our nation, who do not want
people to start judging them on
the basis of their lineage, for
the smell of corruption, oppres-
sion and outright indecency
which are a part of their her-
itage would condemn them to a
fate far below the one to which
God's grace now grants them.
This is fair warning, for the
sake of justice and equity, I will
strongly oppose all who pro-
mote racism in this country,
directly or indirectly. I do not
want my children to grow up in
a world where they are taught
to judge people by the colour
of their skin rather than the
content of their character, as
Dr Martin Luther King once
said, or to be judged so.
THE POLITICS OF GOD

It seems that God will play
a role in this upcoming
general election but not as a
non-partisan deity. It appears
that there are those who believe
that God is a card-carrying
member of their party and that
Jesus is one of its stalwarts.
Notwithstanding the fact that
both political parties began their
conventions with a prayer-
breakfast and all opening and
closing of sessions of both con-
ventions with prayer, listening
to certain politicians and oper-
atives speak, one would swear
that one party has an exclusive
claim on God's providence and
his favour.
While both parties have peo-
ple in them who vocally and vis-
ibly profess Christianity, some


people play the politics of trying
to make the other party appear
to be a godless one, very often
disregarding those in its own
ranks who both publicly and
privately fly in the face of god-
liness.
Both FNMs, PLPs and the
general population ought to
know that there is a difference
between talking about God and
talking to God. There is also a
big difference between serving
God and trying to serve God
up. .Only time will tell those
who are doing the one or the
other. Perhaps this is why some
continue to play the game.
Those who want to play this
game can go ahead and do so


but this much I know, one
ought not be deceived, for God
is not mocked, whatsoever ;i
man, or woman for that matter,
soweth, that shall he or she also
reap.
God gives all a long rope bu,
in due course, if we persist in
foolishness, the same rope wi:l
come to hang us.
THOUGHT FOR THE
WEEK

G od made all ski
colours; not to pr(
vide a basis for discriminatio:
but to add to beautiful diversity
of his creation.


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please call 322-1007.


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005, PAGE 9











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Senior citizens enjoy


their Thanksgiving lunch

...0 By Bahamas Information
Services
SENIOR citizens in the Bain
and Grant's Town communities
were treated to their annual
thanksgiving luncheon on Tues-
day at St Agnes Church.
The event was organised by
the Bain and Grant's Town
Senior Citizens Association,,
headed by Orissa Clarke and
S ,hosted by the Urban Renewal
Project.
Senate vice president Rev Dr
C B Moss, the pastor at Mount
Olive Baptist Church in Bain
Town, and a speaker at the lun-
cheon, underscored the impor-
tance of showing seniors that
AL .they are appreciated.
"We have so much to be
grateful and thankful to them
for," he said. "They are respon-
sible for our success. We stand,
tall because we stand on their,
shoulders."
The Bain and Grant's Town
Urban Renewal Project, headed
by ASP Carolyn Bowe, also
sponsors a programme to feed
the seniors from St Agnes
SChurch.


RM46-W


* (Top) SENIORS in Bain and
Grant's Town ate to their heart's
content during their annual
thanksgiving luncheon at St
Agnes Church.


* (Bottom) JULIETTE
Barnwell, advisor to the
Bain-Grant's Town Senior
Citizens Association serves
these gentlemen during
Tuesday's Thanksgiving
luncheon for seniors.
(Photos: BIS/Gladstone
Thurston)


Tropical depression


fades near Jamaica






"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005


~ZI







THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE

LOCALNEWSS


W*STEVE McKinney, director of broadcast media, Bahamas Information Services, (foreground,
* far right) interviews Minister of Education Alfred Sears on Friday for the television programme,
The Minister's Book Club Presents. Minister Sears introduced the books chosen for the month of
November in the Minister's Book Club programme. The books include "The Green Shutters" by
Grand Bahama's SL Sheppard; "Play Me" by Telcine Turner-Rolle and "Ninety-Nine Potcakes"
by Abaconian Alice Bain. Pictured at the Bahamas Information Services studios, where the pro-
gramme was recorded are: Mrs Turner-Rolle; Alfred Sears, Minister of Education; and Mrs Shep-
pard-McCrea.
(Photo: BIS/Tim Aylen)


Activities planned for


National Woman's Week


* By Bahamas Information
Service
SOCIAL Services and Com-_
munity Development Minister
Melanie Griffin announced on
Monday that National Wom-
en's Week will be observed
November 20 to 26 in com-
memoration of the 43rd
anniversary of the enfranchise-
ment of Bahamian women.
The week will be celebrated
under the theme "Women striv-
ing for a better Bahamas" and
will be an opportunity for
Bahamian women to reflect
upon their collective progress
since gaining the franchise.
Mrs Griffin said activities will
centre on areas of concern to
women, including violence and
health.


The week will be launched by a
church service at Wesley
Methodist Church on Baillou Hill
Road on Sunday, November 20.
A healthy lifestyle initiative
will be held at the Clarence A
Bain Building on Tuesday,
November 22, and on Wednes-
day a luncheon will be held with
Bernadette Christie, wife of
Prime Minister Perry Christie.
Other activities will include
talk shows focusing on domestic
violence, a community service
day organised by the Bahamas
Girl Guides and school visits by
representatives of various wom-
en's groups.
Mrs Griffin said: "We have
arrived at a point in our country
where women have made a con-
siderable impact in the politi-
cal, business, religious world


and in our communities.
She added however that: "In
the field of health, women are
unable to negotiate safe sex in
their marriages where partners
may have HIV/AIDS or may
be promiscuous and their health
is at risk."
The minister said new domes-
tic violence legislation will
address the issue of sexual
harassment.
Mrs Griffin said she also
hopes for the creation of rigid
penalties for marital rape.
She said that awareness about
domestic violence must be
raised, because "too many times
we may work with persons who
are victims of domestic violence
and we are completely unaware
of what that person is going
through."


IELSVITlI


The deadline for su
final pr station is
Sr I9Ois
U-.


The deadline for submission of abstracts
is Friday, November 25, 2005. In no
more than 150 words, describe the
problem your work addresses and how
your work contributes to the solution.
Please ensure that you include your
name, telephone contacts, mailing
address andlor e-mail address on the
first sheet of the abstract.


Novemberg9, 200
Call .for papers (first announcement)
November 28,2005
Deadhiline for submission of abstracts
December 2, 2005
Notification of successful submissions
December 23,2005
Deadline for final paper submission


R e oR T

Crpta M ?ac( Ca io


SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS



PUBLIC NOTICE


No. 2 of 2005 17th November 2005


RE: MERCURY GLOBAL LTD.


This NOTICE is issued by the Securities Commission of The Bahamas( the Commission)
pursuant to Section 4(2) of the Securities Industry Act, 1999.

It has been brought to the attention of the Securities Commission of The Bahamas that the
above named company may be involved in the securities industry in The Bahamas.

The general public is HEREBY ADVISED that neither Mercury Global Ltd. its agents nor
its consultants are registrants of the Securities Commission. Further, Mercury Global Ltd.,
its agents and its consultants have not made application for registration with the Securities
Commission. Be FURTHER ADVISED that the Securities Commission has not approved
Mercury Global Ltd. its agents nor its consultants to operate in the securities industry in
this jurisdiction. Therefore any activity by this company, its agents or consultants in this
regard is a violation of the Securities Industry Act, 1999.


Background

Mercury Global Ltd. (Mercury) appears to be an entity engaged in providing investment
advice to the public. Mercury is purportedly recommending that investors purchase shares
in a company called Pipeline Security Technologies (PST) among others. These shares
are being touted as 'pre-IPO'.

The Commission advises that it has no knowledge of PST, its business practices nor its
officers and directors. Further, the Commission has no knowledge where the PST shares
are to be listed should they be properly brought to the public in an IPO offering.


Persons desirous of conducting business with Mercury Global Ltd. its agents, or its
consultants, should be cognizant that they are doing so with an unregulated entity
and individuals. You are therefore strongly urged to conduct full and proper due dili-
gence and exercise the utmost caution before engaging in transactions with the
above named company, its agents or its consultants.

Any persons who are already involved in transactions with the above named company, its
agents or its consultants and are concerned about these transactions should contact Ms.
Mechelle Martinborough, Secretary & Legal Counsel at the Securities Commission of The
Bahamas at telephone number 356-6291/2 or in writing to P.O. Box N-8347, Nassau, The
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FROM page one
Hubert Ingraham.
The opposition said that nei-
ther Mr Ingraham nor the FNM
believes it to be right for Mr
Ingraham to receive his pension
in addition to his MP and Leader
of the Opposition salary.
The amendment will provide
flat Mr Ingraham and any other
former Prime Minister could not
and would not receive from the
Public Treasury more money
than they received as pension
irrespective of the position which
they hold, for example Member
of Parliament or Leader of the
Opposition," the FNM said.
The party said that it would
welcome the support of the PLP
for the amendment.
"Should the Government not
support the amendment it is the
intention of Mr Ingraham to
place what he considers to be
unwarranted remuneration into a
separate, interest bearing
account, the proceeds of which
will be deposited in the Public
Treasury immediately following
upon the return of the FNM to
Government following the next
general elections," the PLP said.
The FNM said that it under-
stands the difficulty that the PLP
may have in supporting such an
amendment since they relied on
this provision to pay the former
Prime Minister, Sir Lynden Pin-
dling his full salary as Leader of
the Opposition while he received
a full pension as a retired Prime
Minister.
"This was wrong. The FNM
didn't support it for Sir Lynden
nor will it support it for Mr Ingra-
ham or anybody else for we are.a
party with principles," the party
said.
It is lamentable, the FNM said,
that Mr Mitchell, a minister of
government, charged with such
important portfolio responsibili-
ties as Foreign Affairs and the
Public Service, would see fit to
dedicate virtually his entire


FNM hits out

address to "lies and distortions
about salary and remuneration
to be paid to Mr Ingraham, fol-
lowing his election to leadership
of the Free National Movement".
Mr Mitchell said that Mr Ingra-
ham stands to receive his parlia-
, mentary salary, a salary as leader
of the opposition and a pension
as prime minister. (See story front
page).
"Notwithstanding that the PLP
Government paid Sir Lynden
Pindling's estate $114,000 per
year after he had received a
salary of $50,000 per year as
Leader of the Opposition from
1992 to 1997, (a total of $164,000
per year), neither the FNM nor
Mr Ingraham believes that a for-
mer Prime Minister should
receive one dollar more than he
receives as a retired Prime Min-
ister should he be elected to Par-
liament and/or be elected Leader
of the Opposition. Hence, we felt
that what the PLP did for Sir
Lynden was wrong," the opposi-
tion party said.
Clearly, the FNM said, Mr
Mitchell and his government do
not believe this.
"It wasn't greed according to
Mr. Mitchell, for these sums to
be paid to Sir Lynden's estate but
if paid to Mr. Ingraham, such a
payment would represent 'greed'.
"Mr Mitchell supported his
government in making these pay-
ments to Sir Lynden Pindling.
This is hypocrisy of the highest
order. We are different from
them, distinctly different from the
PLP.
"It is a matter of public record
that Mr. Ingraham's first course
of action following his party's
election to Government and his
appointment to the position of
Prime Minister in 1992, was to
reduce the salary of the Prime
Minister," the party said.
In that same vein, said the par-


ty, the FNM Government acted
to prevent the "double dipping"
of pensioners who remained in
the public service be they politi-
cians or public servants.
"Mr Ingraham in his first
speech following upon his Par-
ty's defeat in 2002 has said on
more than one occasion that he
does not think it is right nor does
he expect to receive nor will he
accept remuneration greater than
his pension as Prime Minister
notwithstanding his re-election
to Parliament," the FNM said.
His position, said the opposi-
tion, remains the same today
notwithstanding his election as
leader of the FNM last week and
his expected appointment by the
Governor-General as Leader of
the Opposition.
"Neither Mr Ingraham nor the
FNM believes it to be right for
Mr Ingraham to receive his pen-
sion and his MP and Leader of
the Opposition salary. The FNM
therefore propose an amendment
to the law. A member of the
FNM at the next sitting of the
House of Assembly, will move
an amendment to the Prime Min-
ister's Pension Act to bring it in
line with the Parliamentary Pen-
sions Act which provides for a
cessation of pension payments
when a pensioner is re-elected to
parliament," the party said.
As for the benefits granted to
retiring prime ministers, the FNM
said that Mr Mitchell ought to be
aware that the Cabinet granted
the same benefits to the former
PLP prime minister.
"Indeed, Sir Lyndin had two
personal assistants, one who trav-
elled with him and another who
(Mr Ingraham) kept on (his) staff
but who was available to (Sir
Lynden) as and when he
required," the FNM said.
Mr Mitchell, the party said,
ought also be aware that if the
Cabinet finds these benefits
offensive they need not complain
about them, they need simply to
change them.


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Ingraham,
FROM page one
"This personal assistant now
works with him in his law firm
and is paid at the public's
expense. Further, Mr Ingraham's
Cabinet agreed that the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs was to notify
appropriate officials in foreign
countries when he was travelling
abroad; the Family Island adminw
istrators are to be notified wheu
he is travelling in family islands
he was to get the same courtesies
as a Cabinet Ministers when trav'
elling to Grand Bahama or any
family island. ,
"And he accuses us of being
interested in perks. Physician heaJ
thyself," Mr Mitchell advised. 'i
The minister said that the ques,
tion must now be asked "if he is
to get $196,000 per year plus all of
those perks, what more does he
want?"
"Is he now coming back for
more? $196,000. This act is
unconscionable. It is greedy. It
must be revisited. After all, this
was the same man who stopped
all pensioners rehired and work-
ing for the Government from
receiving their pension and a
salary too. Yet he will not now
apply the same logic to himself,"
said Mr Mitchell.
The PLP, he said, knew that
the decision as it applied to pub-
lic servants was unlawful and we
have now reversed it, but perhaps
we ought to apply the logic of the
former prime minister now on
himself.
Perhaps his pension ought to
be stopped until he is once again
retired," said the minister.


Vice Principal
FROM page one
The witness claimed Mr Clar-
idge was the only male admin-
istrator on the GHS campus at
the time.
The Tribune spoke with
Donovan Cox, the vice presi-
dent of the BUT in charge of
New Providence.
Mr Cox said the vice principal
was attempting to detain a male
student he suspected of being
involved in the disturbances,
when the student broke free
and attacked him.
"The student was very reluc-
tant to go and he resisted. When
he got loose, he turned around
and started punching Mr Clar-
idge in the face."
Mr Cox said the vice principal
only sustained "some cuts under
his eye". ,
According to the witness,
however, the vice principal's
face was swollen and bloody.-!
Mr Cox said the incident illus-
trates why he fully supports the
government's move to station
police officers in schools.
He said that he was disturbed
by newly elected FNM leader
Hubert Ingraham's views on the
matter.
During his speech at the
FNM convention on Friday, Mr
Ingraham said that if elected,
he would pull police officers out
of schools and put them back
on active duty.
"That means this programnne
will be sabotaged before it has a
chance," said Mr Cox. "It just
started in September, and you
know what? we're getting
there, but we need some time."
Mr Cox said that teachers are
living in fear because of the
growing violence problem at
schools like CI Gibson and CC
Sweeting. He pointed out that
there was a stabbing incident at
RM Bailey just last week.
"And now, a student attacks
a vice principal where does
that leave teachers now?" he
asked.


Port week
TAXI cab drivers, hair
braiders, surrey drivers and scoot-
er rental owners working on
Prince George Wharf at Festival
Place recently volunteered their
services to clean and beautify
their surrounding work areas in
preparation for the kick off of
Port Week.
The purpose of Port Week is
to highlight the importance of
port facilities and in particular
Prince George Wharf, which is
significant to the economic liveli-
hood of The Bahamas as the vast
majority of visitors who come to
our shores, pass through this facil-
ity.
A Port Area Career's Fair will


be held today from 9am-2pm for
public and private school students
throughout New Providence. Fri-
day will be Port Pride and Fiesta
Day from 10am-10pm. KB, Chip-
pie and Ruppapumpum, Berkley
Van Berg, limbo dancers and
Elon Moxey will entertain the
crowd.
The Port Fiesta will continue
on Saturday with a Port Health
Run and Walk beginning at
6.30am at Festival Place on Prince
George Wharf, east along Bay
Street, north over new Paradise
Island Bridge, south over old Par-
adise Island bridge to Shirley
Street, west along Shirley Street,
north along east street to Festival
Place.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


SMEMBERS of the Humane Society 2005 Ball Committee


Humane Society



ball planned


THE annual Bahamas
Humane Society Thanksgiving
Ball will take place on Satur-
.day, November 19, at the
'British Colonial Hilton Hotel.
The ball will be held under
the patronage of Governor
'General Dame Ivy Dumont and
*Mr Reginald Dumont.
The ball will feature a five-
course gourmet meal accompa-
nied by the music of the Lou
Adams Orchestra and Modern
Vintage.
An in-house raffle features a
Grand Prize of two first class'
tickets to London donated by
American Eagle/American Air-


lines, together with a three-
night hotel stay at Claridges
Hotel, London.
The British Colonial Hilton
Hotel has donated a five-night
stay at the Hilton in Buenos
Aires, Argentina, with round-
trip travel to Buenos Aires
donated by American
Eagle/American Airlines.
Other prizes have been
donated by local businesses,
including Caf6 Martinque,
Gucci, Azure Spa, Chambers
House and Garden, Colom-
bian Emeralds, Bacardi, Villa-
gio Restaurant, Solomon's
Mines, Sandals, Bahama Hand


Prints, Coin of the Realm,
John Bull, Kelly's, Graycliff
Cigar Factory, Coles of Nas-
sau, Atlantis Resort, Design
Divas Restaurant, Windermere
Spa, Jeannie McQweeny, La
Rose Boutique, and Indigo
Restaurant.
The members of the 2005
Ball Committee are Saskia
D'Aguilar (chairman), Ruth
Cleare, Betty Sands, Sandy
McGwier, Tracie Hoo-Glinton,
Sylvia Bizzell, Charlotte Albury,
Ruth Thackray, Sanchia Hen-
ry and Paula Kelly.
For tickets, contact Betty
Sands at 393-1797.


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Designer's plan




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.. Available At

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Tel: 356 6206/356 5971 Tel: 394 6254/394 6255
Fax: 356- 6206 Fax: 394- 6211


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Requires the services of an
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The ideal candidate will be someone with the following


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Interested persons who meet the criteria should apply in
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All applications will be treated in the strictest of confidence.
Closing Date: 25th November, 2005
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A BAHAMIAN designer has
returned to put her country at
the forefront of the interna-
tional fashion design industry.
Shundal Rodgers Coakley,
CEO of URUP Designs and
Jeans recently moved from
Atlanta, Georgia and is setting
up shop on Cable Beach, bring-
ing her established boutique
that was host to clients such as
Whitney Houston, Bobby
Brown and Wesley Snipes.
"Truth be told, the Bahamas
has the talent needed but the
people from the 'Islands of the
Sun' have never been taken
serious. When compared to oth-


Do you have leg pain when you walk or
exercise? Do you suffer from cold feet or
legs? Does your pain go away when you rest?
Do you have numbness and tingling in your
legs? Do you have ulcers or sores that won't
heal?
You may have PVD (peripheral vascular
disease). Early treatment of PVD may prevent
heart attack and stroke.
Dr. Delton Farquharson, M.B.B.S.. F.R.C.S.C..
General and Vascular Surgeon, will be
conducting a FREE PVD screening Tuesday
November 22 at the Doctors Hospital
Sessional Clinic, by appointment only.

- DOCTORS HOSPITAL
!k' :"; !,, ze


er Caribbean islands such as
Jamaica and Cuba that delight
in the payoffs, the Bahamas was
forced to watch as everyone ate
like kings," URUP said in a
statement.
After years of planning, Ms
Coakley will release a jeans line
that will tap the international
market, "with the aim to be a
force to be reckoned with".
"Using top of the line mar-
keting and advertising, Ms
Coakley does not see the
URUP jeans line as a long
shot in the dark as a search
will be the first in many
schemes to solidify the com-


pany," the statement said.
The aim of the contest is to
transform an everyday woman
into a billboard queen. All par-
ticipants take photos with
ScharadL over a fixed period
to vie for the $2000 cash prize,
the cover of URUP Magazine
and the URUP Jeans ad cam-
paign 2006 contract.
"The participants are
pushed to test inner and outer
beauty along with the mental
strength to endure fashion
photo shoots and publicity
skills all caught by the Face
of URUP Model cameras,"
the statement said.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005







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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005, PAGE 15


THE TRIBUNE


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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005 u"


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Support protection of the Nassau Grouper

Prolong the life of this potentially endangered species
The precarious life expectancy of the Nassau Grouper around the world, and here in The Bahamas, has prompted a nationwide closure of the Nassau Grouper fishing season from December
16 to February 16 to allow this delicate species to spawn.
The Nassau Grouper, a favorite of Bahamians, especially for native dishes like boil and stew fish, grouper fingers and steam fish, have been rendered commercially extinct in many areas
around the world, including the Caribbean. This species is currently on the World Conservation Union's Red List of Endangered Species and is a candidate for the U.S. Endangered Species
list.
By instituting a closed fishing season to protect the Nassau Grouper, The Bahamas joins a host of other countries who currently have laws in place to protect this species. Belize recently
legislated a four-month closed season and has instituted measures to protect eleven aggregated sites within marine reserves. In 2003, the Cayman Islands closed their grouper aggregations
for eight years. The Nassau Grouper is also completely protected in United States waters.
The closed season provides protection for the Nassau Grouper during a critical point in their life cycle, during spawning.
The Nassau Grouper spends most of its life alone but during the winter months, they swim hundreds of miles and group together by the thousands to spawn. Most of the stocks of the Nassau
Grouper in the Caribbean have become commercially extinct as a result of fishermen targeting these spawning aggregations.
The spawning stage of the Nassau Grouper that takes place in these aggregation sites are critically important to the life cycle of the species as it is during this time that the entire annual
reproduction for a region is produced. Entire regional stocks of the Nassau Grouper have been wiped out as a result of intense fishing pressure on spawning aggregations.
This potentially perilous reality facing the Nassau Grouper is the driving force behind the move by regional marine research organizations and environmental protection groups advocating
protection of the species, especially during spawning.
In addition its role as a tasty Bahamian delicacy, the Nassau Grouper is also a very important predatory fish on coral reefs. Their extinction could lead to a domino effect on other marine
life as it could upset the delicate eco-balance of the marine habitat.
To protect this delicate species, The Bahamas Reef Environment Education Foundation along with other NGOs have mounted a campaign to protect the Nassau Grouper. They are asking
Bahamians to support this effort by refraining from eating the Nassau Grouper during the closed fishing season. For more information on how you can protect the Nassau Grouper contact
BREEF at 362-6477 or visit their website www.breef.org.


The Bahamas Reef Environment Education Foundation along with other NGOs have mounted a campaigjp toprotect the Nassau Grouper. They are asking Bahamians
to support this effort by refraining from eating the Nassau Grouper during the closed fishing season Dec. 16 through Feb. 16 and allow this delicate species to spawn.

U . . . . . _


Join the New Providence Community
Church's diversified Sundays

One Sunday per quarter, the New Providence Community
Church organizes community related projects that include
beach cleanups, tree planting and other activities aimed
at improving communities in the Western portion of the
island. Call NPCC at 327-1660 for further information on the
next diversified Sunday activities. Email:
dwhite@npcconline.org.


*A beach cleanup
* Painting of dumpstersby students
* Anti-litter campaigns
* Special church services Including a
message "to encourage publicS
participation in ways that will create a
cleaner environment" .r11n
* Best kept yard competition
* A cleanest "settlement" competition on
your island
* A cultural show or competition for school
on your Island
* An environmental exhibition in your
community or school
* Nature walks


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005, PAGE 17


THE TRIBUNE









PAE18 HRSAB OEBER 17,B 2005 I THEITRIBUNELOCAL EWS


CBL's bid to improve



employees' health


I Fir tuc co msso edsooI


In an effort to promote
health and wellbeing, many
companies have begun organ-
ising events to educate and
inspire their employees to live
a more health conscious life.
Commonwealth Brewery
Limited (CBL) is one of those
companies.
CBL recently held its first
annual Wellness Fun/Run
Walk-a-thon with the proceeds
raised going to the Children's
Emergency Hostel and the
Nazareth Home for Children.
This was not the first initia-
tive that CBL has undertaken
to ensure that their employees
are healthy.
"Commonwealth Brewery is
one of many companies that
have a membership plan at
Bally Total Fitness available
for its employees," said the
company in a release.
"There are many benefits
for a company to have employ-
ees involved in a fitness facili-
ty. Regular exercise can actu-
ally help employees increase
productivity and reduce
stress," it said.
Active employees are more
productive, absent less and
more enthusiastic in their jobs,
the release said. "They have
more energy, make better


* MARIO Bethel, first place winner in the 31 to 49-year-old
male category, receives his free membership to Bally Total Fit-
ness from Bally representative Yolanda Barr


decisions, and use their time
more efficiently."
The company further
pointed out that physically
fit and healthy employees
can decrease healthcare
costs, "because fit employ-
ees record fewer long-


term medical claims."
"Exercising together can
even improve staff morale.
Employees learn to push each
other, rely on each other and
to generally enjoy each other's
company more," the company
said.


* PARADISE Island's new Fire Truck 'Delta 14' will become active as early as next month. The
truck underwent a full scale inspection in Louisiana last month, while Kerzner International, the
government and the Paradise Island Tourism Development Association complete construction
of a new Fire and Ambulance Station on Paradise Island. In December of last year Kerzner
International signed a contract with Jones Construction to build the Fire Station, designed by
Jackson Burnside, a Bahamian architectural firm. Caribbean Landscaping has been contracted to
perform the landscaping work.




Atlantic Medical's




$40,000 donation


* LEFT to right are Lynda Gibson, executive vice president and
general manager, Atlantic Medical; Bradley Cooper, president
of the Diabetic Association of the Bahamas; Darren Bastian,
senior account executive at Atlantic Medical.


"My work at The Tribune is rewarding
and challenging. I enjoy contributing
to the look of our newspaper while
meeting the needs of our advertisers.
I am proud to work here. The
Tribune is my newspaper."

ESTHER BARRY
PRODUCTION MANAGER
THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune


I ^
. ............./.,,,,,,
i ,








I :


CANCER and Diabetes are
two of the leading non-commu-
nicable diseases in the Bahamas
and account for a high percent-
age of the annual mortality rate.
While there are no known
cures for cancer or diabetes,
both diseases can be controlled
through medicine and medical
treatments and, some believe -
prevented through lifestyle
choices.
In the Bahamas, two organi-
sations that work to provide
knowledge about these diseases
and assistance to patients are
the Cancer Society of the
Bahamas and the Bahamas Dia-
betic Association.
These organisations recently
received generous donations
totaling about $40,000 from
Atlantic Medical Insurance
Limited to help in their respec-
ctive fights.
Lynda Gibson, executive vice
president and general manager
of Atlantic Medical, said the
company is pleased to support
the Cancer Society and Diabet-
ic Association because of their
outstanding work in the com-
munity, where they provide
"invaluable information and
support" to the public about
cancer and diabetes.
"At Atlantic Medical we
believe in putting people first.
When one considers the high
rate of Bahamians diagnosed
with diabetes and cancer we feel
it is very important to continue
educating Bahamians about
lifestyle choices and treatment
options.
"Therefore, we are pleased
to join hands with these two
worthy organisations in their
efforts to promote awareness
and provide knowledge of these
diseases," Mrs Gibson said.
Judy Ward Carter, president
of the Cancer Society said the


society is very grateful for the
"generous" donation of $20,000
and its support over the years.
She said the funds will be
used to help furnish the admin-
istration section of the society's
new Cancer Caring Centre.
Opened in September, the
two storey, 10-room centre is
located on East Terrace in Cen-
treville and provides temporary
accommodation for cancer
patients.
Bradley Cooper, president of
the Bahamas Diabetic Associa-
tion, also expressed thanks to
Atlantic Medical.
"We appreciate the fact that
they are one of the few insur-
ance companies that take an
interest in diabetics to ensure
that they get the information
and medicine they need to stay
healthy.
"The $18,000 will go a long
way in assisting other persons
in the Bahamas in regards to
getting testing equipment and
information," he said.
Mr Cooper said his associa-
tion will conduct a number of
seminars in the Family Islands
this year and continue dissemi-
nating information in the com-
munity to emphasise that dia-
betes is serious and that persons
with diabetes must take respon-
sibility for their health.
According to Darren Bast-
ian, senior account executive
atAtlantic Medical, the dona-
tions were raised from registra-
tion fees from the company's
annual fundraiser, its Health
Fun/ Walk, held earlier this
year, that attracted around
2,000 people.
"This year's event was a great
success and we want to thank
the many people who partici-
pated and helped us to provide
support to two dynamic organi-
sations," Mr Bastian said.


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


_.___ ~ ___~_ ___ ___ ___I


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 18, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005






China confirms first three human
cases of bird flu:; WH says two died


"Copyrigted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Comm e rci al News Providers"


0* -mam, 4w a- .- p .b wa n-e 0 amp


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005, PAGE 19


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 0, TURSDY, NOEMBE 17,2005AHE TIEUN


Sri Lankan election


seen


as rcfercndum


on peace process with Tamnil rebel


Ib


_"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated ContentO .

Available from Commercial News'Providers"


S ___
b~ S


dr 0
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9


- = -


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0* 4 4-sim 44P 40
419oma~mome ts -
- llb 4 mo0 w 1 .' -.OE
4m- W 4S -w0 4 000


-u. w q n


ACER 19" LCD
$519.00


ACER'15" LCD
$349.00


17" Flat Panel LCD $389.00


Gr.dr hwrmler hb a mrwhiq d
Qosrpov, a Rui of~


* ~


- ~ 40


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Submit a cute photo of your
fantastic prizes just in


baby and you could WIN
time for Christmas!


Now through December 9 submit a photo with two empty Drypers packs
(any size) and a completed entry form to Lowe's Wholesale on Soldier Road.
.1. ie $500.00 cash & aDrypers Club Pack

2nd, ize $300.00 cash & a Drypers Club Pack
43 tpize $ 200.00 cash & a Drypers Club Pack
Two entries will be chosen every week and they will be
feared in our Babies do the Cutest Things newspaper
ad, Th se entries will qualify for grand prize drawing
December 10 of Lowe's Pharmacy, Soldier Road and
announced live an air that day between 2pm 4pm on
Love 97,
Entry forms available at Lowe's Pharmacy
4& Super Saver locations


I


Samsung
42" Flat Panel Plasma $2999.00


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 20, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005


%*a' 1


Bgra-ms


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PUgCtSyndicated.Content as 2

Available from Commercial News Providers"




w-n ow


S S -


- -


- -a -~ -~

.~. ~ .~


-
~ -


* -0


.--MOW


I IA L 1 :*
Black Motorola
Motorola V3 v547
Razor video/cam
$425.00 $349.99.


Motorola v625
video/cam
$349.99






Nokia 6101
video/ Cam/
mp3
$349.99


Nokia 1100 Nokia 3590 Motorola
$99.99 $99.99 c115
$99.99

We Stock Accessories/ Repair Phones
I I A I


EMERGENCY
AUTOMATIC(
STANDBY .?
GENERATORS
7000-45000 A
Watt



* ADDS VALUE TO YOUR
HOME
* 24 HOUR BLACKOUT
PROTECTION
* AUTOMATIC TRANSFER
SWITCH INCLUDED


Night or day, home or away,
you'll feel at ease knowing that
your GUARDIAN@ generator
is watching your utility power
around the clock.


Call Shirley Enterprises Ltd.
for details or to arrange your
free inspection today!



ENTERPRISES LIMITED

Soldier Road
Telephone: 394-4823 or 394-7926
Fax: 394-1826
P.O. Box N-9180, Nassau, The
Bahamas
email: lawnboy@batelnet.bs


Motorola
E550
Video/ cam
$349.99





Blue Tooth
$99.99


7KW Standby Package Installed pj,495.00
7KW Standby Package No Installation OJ,895.00

15KW Standby Package lnstalled$7,395.00
15KW Standby Package No Installation$5,495.00

20KW & 25KW Standby
Generators in Stock

Super Quiet Poilable Generators:
4,500 Runnim, Watts / 5,500 Surce Watts,$979.00
6,500 Runnim, Watts / 8,500 Surae Watts, 131-IR
Electric start $1,399.00


__


F'Ad Cmuicti~ I


I


I rIIicn Seso -1i^^ is Here
^^^Prtect ourBhme or !^business^^


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005, PAGE 21


THE TRIBUNE


- -







SAV.A.CHEK 'Extra-Special': on each item you purchase, over ,'
r o , nwo a dollar, with One filled SAVIACHEK certificate get a Dollar Off!


MON. -
SUN.::


REDEEM your SAV-A-CHEK now at:
Johns S George, Sandys, Epic Battery, GNC,
Home Fabrics, Godetts Jewelry.
FREEPORT: Dolly Madison Home Centre, GNC, Epic Battery, Play Time Sports
SAT.: 7:30AM 9:00PM Extra Extra!
7:00AM 12:00PM 7:00AM 2:00PM CABLE BEACH & SAV.A.CHEK Soeciall
HARBOIU RAvYNLiv SAVACA Spcia!


J11
T II


POPCORN,
ASSORTED

$1999
12/3-PAK
IMPERIO
SODAS
ASSORTED


20- OZ


2/$


11


91


RED
APPLES 3-LB BAG
EACH

RED GLOBE
JUMBO & RED
SEEDLESS JUMBO GRAPES
BC 99O
LB
BROCCOLI
*1 LB


KERRY GOLD
BUTTER REG
& UNSALTED
8-LB
W/D
SB SLICE CHEESE
$1 89
10.67 OZ

W/D
CORN ON COB
M59e
4 EAR
PRESTIGE
PUMKIN
PIE
$629
33 OZ

BARBER
CREAM
CRAKERS
200-GR



RICE LAND
REG &
PREFECTED RICE
5 LB



BLUE BIRD
GRAPEFRUIT, ORANGE ORPINAPPLE
t CRANBERIRJUICE
SUGAR ADDED!UNSWEETENED
46 OZ
$6299


FANTASTIC

CLEANERS
ASSORTED

$399
26-32 OZ


SUPER INSECTOX
INSECTICIDE
SPRAY
600-ML
$469


ROBIN HOOD


BISMART/
JASMINE RICE
21 LBS
= 00


ROMAN HEARTS
$ 99
EACH
GREEN
CABBAGE
..59 LB
POTATOES
WHITE POLY
5LB BAG
21EACH


W/D
PIE SHELLS
(15.OZ) 2 PACK
$,69
I 12- oz
PILLSBURY
CRECENT ROLLS


DANO'S
PIZZA SAUSAGE, PEPPERONI,
3 MEAT & COMBINATION
18s-,oz
WINN-DIXIE
ICE CREAM
ALL FLAVOURS
64 OZ


CARDINAL
EVAPORATE
MILK
410 GR
2/$ 39


EVERCANE


SUGAR
4-LBS



KRAFT
SALAD DRESSING
ASSORTED
8-OZ
2/$ 00


GRITS


5 LBS


FARINA HOT
CEREAL REGULAR
28 OZ

$289
SCRUBBING BUBBLES
BATHROOM
CLEANERS
25-OZ


ISLAND QUEEN
CONDENSED
MILK
14 OZ

.73
BOAST
VANILLA
SUPPLEMENT
8 OZ


$239 449


CROWN POINT
FLAKE TUNA 6 OZ.........................2/.990
GROVERS PRIDE
JUICE ASSORTED APPLE, ORANGE,
GRAPE & FRUIT MEDLY
ONLY 11.5 OZ.......................................595


McVITIES
DIGESTIVE BISCUITS so500 ..............$1.99
ECKRICH
CHICKEN VIENNA SAUSAGE s-oz..2/.990
LIBBY'S
MIXED FRUIT OR DICED
PEACHES 4-PACK.............................$3.69
CADBURY
CRUNCHIE, PICNIC &


TIME OUT


4


1 ....... ....................i..........ii


1990


McVITIES
GOAHEAD YOGURT BREAK TROPICAL
FRUIT 216-GR.,..................................$1.79
WD
JUMBO MEAT DINNER
FRANKS LB.....................................$1.99


KEEBLER
TOWN HOUSE
REG & REDUCED
FAT CRACKERS
16 OZ
I$2429


LIBBYS
CORNED
BEEF
12 OZ,

PW B29
iPS P eC^/


KELLOGS
CORN
FLAKES
24-OZ
$519


HEINZ
APPLE CIDER
VINEGAR/WHITE
32 OZ

POWE B


GLADE KRAFT
AIRESHNERS BBQ SAUCES
SASNTi ASSORTED
9-OZ 16 OZ
2/$ 3OO 2/$oo300


DL LEE
WHOLE
SMOKED
PICNIC HAM
LB
PORK LOIN
PORK LOIN


MIT[_ > rTA


WHOLE



S1-2 LBS
FRESH


END CUT GROUND


CHOPS
.89
$I LB'


TYSON
GAME
HENS$


TURKEY


sI


39
LB


t I
HICKORY SWEET


WD
BONE-IN REDI
BASTED
TURKEY
BREAST


CHICKEN
DRUM
STICK
LB

USDA /
PRESTIGE CHOICE
BONELESS
CHUCK ROAST
$289
2 ^ LB .*


HICKORY SWEET
THIN CUT
BACON
$499


COOKED ROTISSERIE!
SALAMI CHICKEN
9799
EACH
PRESTIGE PECAN
REGULAR MEAT CHEESE -OR -
BOLOGNA WALNUT DANISH
BOLOGNA RINGS : ,
99 .69
LB 16-0o2:


HELLMANS
MAYONNAISE
REGULAR
S 32 OZ

i $349


DOLE
SLICED PINAPPLE,
CHUNK, CRUSHED
20 OZ
2/$0oo

QUAKER
OLD FASHIONED, QUICK
OR CRYSTAL WEDDING
OATS
16-18 OZ
$249


NUTRAMEN'i
ASSORTEDMEAL
SUPPLIMENTSI
12 OZT



McCORMICK

GRDUHTNMEG,lNA

.75 OZ



V/8 SPLASH
ASSORTED
FLAVOUR$
16 OZ
S1 6


I ,


PAGE 22,THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005


THE


=1


91





THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005, PAGE 23


TRIBUNE


MUELLERS
READY CUT
MACCARONI
16 OZ
-99^
LAYS
POTATO CHIPS
ASSORTED -
NASSAU ONLY
6.5 OZ

MARTINELL
SPARKLING
CIDER
25 OZ
3099
CAMPBELLS
CREAM OF
MUSHROOM/
ONION SOUP
10 OZ
*1 10
LIBBYS
VEGETABLES
ASSORTED
'15 OZ
-9941
PlANTERS
JAR PEANUTS
ASSORTED
UNSALTED COCKTAIL
12- OZ

T.M.
CRANBERRY
SAUCE
16- OZ
$4 89
-ANDY'S
DLLEE 20% WHOLE
SMOKED HAM
LB
$.;'-^ 1 5&
PUMPKIN
SWEET POTATO &
APPLE PIE
EACH

WD
ITE,REGULAR&SOFTr
;CREAM CHEESE
S8 OZ

CAVERNDISH
STRAIGHT CUT
POTATOES
332-OZ
2/1300
DINNERWARE

SET 16PCS,
EACH
S2999


OK
ALL PURPOSE
FLOUR
5 LBS
$219
TM
ALL VEGATABLE
SHORTENING
42 OZ
$l289
SUNCHY MALTA
BOTTLE/
CAN
12 OZ
2/$1 29
WD
FOAM
PLATES
50 CT

JBI
GREEN
PIGION PEAS
15- OZ

SO DRI
HAND
TOWELS
1 ROLL
.890
T.M.
CUT SWEET
POTATOES
29 OZ
*2o0
NEWZEALAND
WHOLE
LAMB LEG
LB
3900
WD

SPREAD
3 LBS

WD
ORANGE
JUICE
1 GAL
$*29
WD
ORANGE CREAMBARS
OR WD FUDGE BARS
12- CT
$279


W/D

MAYONNAISE
32- OZ
2/$300oo
CHEK
SODAS
ASSORTED
2 LTR
2/$300
TM
WHOLE
KERNEL CORN
29 OZ
$1 79
W/D
RED PERRY
CUPS
20 CT
S1 89
CHEK
SODAS
ASSORTED
6 PAK

T.M.
CRUSHED/ SLICED
PINEAPPLES
20 OZ
*1 70
PEPRIDGE FARM

STUFFINGS
1 LB

W/D
REDI BASTED
TURKEY/HONEY
SUCKET-12LBS & UP
LB

WD
DIPS,
ASSORTED
12-8 OZ

WD

CORN.ON.THECOB
4 EAR

FOIL
ROASTING PEN
SNIPPER
EACH
$ 1 99


* Buy any two participating items and have a cashier
verify products
* Put your name and phone number on the back of receipt
and drop in entry boxes provided
* Winners announced Wednesday, 30 November on Love 97


[bYL~TT~


A1
41


Aq!








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OC yrighted Materia l

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"




Pope praises Italian



anti-abortion group


hrmcfr ioturcn IC IFkcI

A*4< nt n> c-r Ak'rd trlwturr


Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add
rice and saute until all grains are coated. Add onion and continue to
saute until onions are tender, about 2 minutes. Stir in half of orange juice, half of orange
zest, star anise pod and 1 cup chicken broth. Bring to a boil: cover and reduce heat to
low. Simmer 15 minutes. Remove anise pod, fluff rice and keep warm. Heat remaining
olive oil over high heat in a skillet large enough to hold fish filets. Season filets with salt
and pepper. Pan saute until filets are cooked through, about 5 minutes per side.
Remove to a platter and keep warm. Add remaining orange juice to skillet and boil until
reduced by 1/2. Return fish filets to skillet to coat with sauce. Divide rice on plates, top
.with.fish filet and garnish with remaining orange zest.


Share your news


The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Full time position available with an established
kitchen cabinet dealership. Responsibilities
include designing and drafting:- kitchens and
bathrooms, closets and various other millwork.
Construction background and CAD skills are
important. Salary and benefits are negotiable.
Located out West; this is a fun and rewarding
career opportunity for the right person.
please email application to
ckl @coralwave.com


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 24, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005


e **


* "






THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005, PAGE 25


Severe storms spawn



tornadoes across Midwest

0 0- -- 0- o O








"Copyrighted Material


Syn dicated Content ( .

Available from Commercial News Providers"


Year-end Special Prices!


2005 Camry features:
-2.4 VVTI engine
*excellent fuel economy
*reduced noise and vibration
*ECT (electronically controlled
transmission)
*front and rear crumple zones
*driver and passenger airbags
-side impact airbags
*ABS (anti-lock brakes)
*keyless entry system
*immobiliser security system


Backd b Th Baap. sex'c si e-
.OOa/6,00-ml fator ': rany


*power windows, door locks,
and side mirrors
*power driver's and front
passenger seats
*CD/radio/cassette
*6-speaker audio system
*climate-controlled air conditioning
*woodgrain dash
*alloy wheels


MOVING FORWARD
(1 TOYOTA


EXECUTIVE
MOTORS LTD
AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER
Parts and service guaranteed


Collins Ave (South of 6th Terrace)
Open Mon to Fri 8am 5:30pm
Sat 8am 12noon
Tel: 322-6705/6 Fax: 322-6714
E-mail: execmotor@batelnet.bs
Salespersons: Pam Palacious
Terrol Cash Barry Pinder


Available in Grand Bahama at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd Queen's Highway 352-6122








PAGE 6, THRSDAY NOVEBER 1,C200ITHE RPBUE


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 28, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005


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OW IWs Sroir
* Power Chairs Mobility Scooters Lift Chairs Wheel Chairs


Full Life Products is
dedicated to developing
innovative products to ease
and enhance the lives of those
with mobility challenges.

"wBa^BSBs
4l I !,niv us, f'~.


Pilof
WALKER
A Step Ahead


Come see our showroom at
SCOTTDALE BEDDING CO. LTD.
Hill Top on the East West Highway
Open: Monday Friday 8am 5pm Telephone: 394-4147-50


This Christmas at the AID True Value


Whether you need a new coat, a fresh coat or simply a new colour or accent for your current coat, AID has the widest selection
of finishes and colours by True Value to choose from. We also carry a complete selection of brushes,'rollers, paint applicators,
drop sheets and masking tapes, all designed to suite your particular style.

So make sure you've got the coat you need to help celebrate this Christmas in style.
AID.. helping you turn your house into a HO! HO! HOME this Christmas.


RENTALS
RAiim7A


Allyou really need and more!


AID- Aulomotive & Industria istributors Wulff Road, Nassau, Bahamas I Tel 393-7481 | Fax 393-4258
fieepat,Graand Babna 352-0n I tsh M amrbor.t Ma 367-2077 Rock Sound, Beutra 334-2060 wwwaiAtahmanaisandsom
We accept the thmas FirASt Gemeal 2Br e Autoafe AID DDism" tCard


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005


SECTION


business@tribunemedia.net


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


AT


FOCOL


plans


$25m


preference


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor Analysts believe proce(
T he Freeport Oil Hold- ap
as Company which needs EGM
(FOCOL) is holding an
Extraordinary General
Meeting (EGM) on Shell (Bahamas) retail di
December 7 to seek shareholder S
approval for a $25 million prefer-
ence share issue, with analysts spec-
ulating that the offering proceeds increase FOCOL's share capital to Colina Financial Advisors tob
will be used to finance the acquisition $1 million through the creation of the placement of an issue of
of Shell (Bahamas) retail division, new ordinary and preference shares. ence shares."
The Tribune understands that Franklyn Wilson, who is FOCOL's Mr Wilson explained that
FOCOL shareholders will be asked largest shareholder when the stake holder approval was neec
to approve a change in the compa- held by his Sunshine Holdings is tak- amend the company's Memora
ny's name to FOCOL Holdings Ltd, en into consideration, told The Tri- and Articles of Association.
amending the company's Memoran- bune yesterday: "I can confirm that When asked whether the pr
dum of Association. arrangements are being made for an from the $25 million preference
In addition, sources said share- EGM of Freeport Oil. issue would be used to fund th
holder consent will also be sought to "I can confirm we have retained chase of Shell (Bahamas) reta


offering


eds from issue,

val, will finance

vision purchase


handle
prefer-
share-
led to
andum
oceeds
e share
ie pur-
il divi-


sion, Mr Wilson said: "The funds are
for general corporate purposes."
He added that he could not say
anything more for "legal reasons".
However, analysts spoken to by
The Tribune said it was virtually cer-
tain that the $25 million preference
share issue was intended to finance

SEE page 7B


Bahamian firms

gain $394m worth

of building work


OECD meeting reduces

threat from national

tax blacklists


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
CRIME is "probably the
number one issue" facing the
Bahamian business community,


the Chamber of Commerce's
executive director said yester-
day, affecting companies' bot-

SEE page 4B


Regulator warns on

Bahamian financial

services provider


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor
THE Securities Commis-
sion of the Bahamas has
issued a warning notice
about a Bahamas-based
financial services provider
that has not been approved
to operate in the securities
industry, little more than one
month after The Tribune
wrote about the company.
The Securities Commis-
sion warned that Mercury
Global might be violating the
Securities Industry Act 1999,
saying neither the company


Mercury Global
'may be violating'
Act one month
after The Tribune
first wrote about
company
nor its agents and consul-
tants had applied for regis-
tration with the regulator.
Mercury Global and its asso-
ciates had also not been


SEE page 6B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
ABOUT $394 million or
"almost" one third of con-
struction contracts on new
investment projects have been
awarded to Bahamian compa-
nies, Allyson Maynard-Gibson,
minister of financial services
and investments, said yester-
day.
Addressing a Scotiabank
sales conference for its region-
al and international managers,
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said 555
contracts had been awarded to
Bahamian small and mid-size


Minister says School
of Financial Services
planned; questions why
banks see Bahamian
businesses, even those
with Atlantis contracts,
as 'high risk'

contractors, who were employ-
ing on these jobs about 1,548

SEE page 7B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor
THE Organisation for
Economic Co-Operation and
Development's (OECD) lat-
est Global Forum meeting
appears to have diminished
the threat that the Bahamas
will be increasingly named to
so-called 'national tax black-
lists' by the body's members,
the Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board's (BFSB) deputy
chairman said yesterday.
Michael Paton, a partner


with the Lennox Paton law
firm, said the outcome of the
OECD's latest meeting may
have helped this nation, as
the organisation appeared to
have accounted for concerns
that its outdated 2000 'harm-
ful tax practices' list was
being used for 'national tax
blacklists' by its members.
Acknowledging.that five
years had passed since the
OECD published its list of
riation engaged in so-called


SEE page 4B


Money Safe.
Money Fast.


ai
Blank of iTh iahamas
INTER KNA T 0O NAL
ahe-m


M FRANKLYN WILSON


- '


-I







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B. THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 17, 2005


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December 22, 2005 January 4, 2006
Departs Nassau at 3:00pm Departs Nassau at 10:30am
Arrive kingston 4:15pm Arrive Kingston 11:45am
Departs Kingston at 5:15pm Departs Kingston at 12:45pm
Arrive Nassau 6:30pm Arrive Nassau 2:00pm


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BUSINESS


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THE TIBUN THURDAYNUVL~LI-t1/,BUSINESS3L


T he Bahamas
Telecommunica-
tions Company
(BTC) yesterday
said it had chosen
Lucent Technologies as its
equipment supplier for a third-
generation (3G) cellular phone
network based on
CDMA2000(R) 1X and lxEV-
DO technology.
A Lucent Technologies press
statement said the network will
be deployed on the islands of
New Providence, Grand
Bahama, Bimini, Eleuthera


and Exuma, covering the main
towns, hotels, resorts and air-
ports with voice and mobile
high-speed data services.

Network

The network will be used to
provide roaming voice and
mobile high-speed data services
such as high-quality video-on-
demand (VoD), downloading
of large files, and Internet and
intranet access at speeds of up
to 2.4 Megabits per second to
tourists and business people


that visit the Bahamas each
year. "We are very excited by
the opportunity to offer
advanced, high-quality mobile
voice and high-speed data ser-
vices to visitors coming to our
islands carrying their CDMA
phones, PDAs and laptop PC
cards," said Antonio Stubbs,
vice-president of planning and
engineering for BTC.
"BTC's selection of Lucent's
solution to deploy the first 3G
network in the Bahamas is
quite an honour," said Javier
Falcon, vice-president of


Lucent Technologies for the
Caribbean, Southern Cone and
Central America.
"Our state-of-the-art solu-
tion will allow BTC to expand
their services offerings and
deliver on their commitment
to offer the highest quality ser-
vices to their subscribers and
visitors to the Bahamas."

Proud

"We are very proud to have
won this project based on
strong customer relationships,


product quality, dedicated sup-
port and perseverance," said
Heidy Frank, Lucent's region-
al sales director for the
Caribbean.
"We feel that this is the
beginning of a long and very
fruitful business relationship
with BTC. We'll continue to
work closely with BTC to
ensure the successful comple-
tion of the network and pro-
vide them the required support
as they roll out new 3G ser-
vices. Lucent's solution pro-
vides BTC with a cost-effective


and easy way to manage the
network and introduce new
capabilities and services."

Supply
Lucent will also supply
Juniper Networks M-series
Multiservice Edge routing plat-
forms and Riverstone Net-
works MPLS-based carrier
Ethernet routers. Lucent
Worldwide Services will pro-
vide network integration,
deployment and management
services.


Conference seeks to deal with 'most




trying time of year' for business


A CONFERENCE on how
companies can overcome crime
is intended to help Bahamian
businesses deal with "the most
trying time of year", the head
of the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce's crime prevention
committee said.
Branville 'Bran' McCartney
said cooperation among part-
ners since the idea of a pre-hol-
iday workshop was conceived
has been "nothing short of
amazing."
"For those persons, particu-
larly in retail and wholesale
businesses and in banking, this
can be the most trying time of
year," he said.
"The holidays are meant to
be a time of good chber, but
tragically, what we hear too
often is the unhappy jingling of
nerves instead of the happy jin-
gling of cash registers as prop-
erty crime, burglaries, break-
ins and entering and robberies
jump in the weeks leading up to
the holidays.

Idea

"The idea of this conference
is to provide useful tips and
practical advice for everyone -
business owner, employee, cus-
tomer, banker, restaurant or
attractions operator on how to
safeguard themselves and their
property against crime and how
to avoid becoming a victim."
Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of National Security,
Cynthia Pratt; Commissioner
of Police, Paul Farquharson;
Chamber of Commerce presi-
dent Tanya Wright; and IBM
Bahamas general manager,
Felix Stubbs, will start the
morning session at the crime
prevention forum 8.30am at the
Radisson, Cable Beach.
Other sessions throughout
the day will highlight the root


causes of crime and its emo-
tional impact on victims, iden-
tity theft and how to protect
against it and the latest trends
in security.
Top level representatives
from the Royal Bahamas Police
Force and the Attorney Gen-
eral's Office will deliver pre-
sentations on inventory con-
trols, prospective employee
screening, words to the wise
about operating hours, han-
dling deposits, preventing rob-
beries and developing a rela-
tionship with divisional police.
With crime trepds showing
an increase in identity theft, in
which the victim and the per-
petrator probably never set
eyes on each other, protection
becomes as important as detec-
tion, says IBM's Felix Stubbs, a
former Chamber of Commerce
president and long-time sup-
porter of its efforts.
"IBM was extremely pleased
to be invited to participate in
such a large way in this work-
shop," Mr Stubbs said.
"We are especially pleased
to sponsor presentations by
leading international experts
including Nigel Brown, a senior
consultant with IBM Global,
who holds four patent applica-
tions in relation to privacy-
related methodology and is the
designated worldwide subject
matter expert for information
privacy for IBM Security and
Privacy Practice."
MrBrown will be the lun-
cheon speaker. His address:
Security vs. Privacy: Safe-
guarding Your Information
Assets, is aimed at showing par-
ticipants how to identify the lat-
est trends and directions in
crime and guard against being
targeted.
Other speakers include inter-
nationally-known psychiatrist,
and author, Dr David Allen;


Chief Superintendent Hulan
Hanna; Superintendent Keith
Bell; Superintendent Glen
Miller; Assistant Director of
Prosecutions in the Attorney
General's Office, Cheryl
Bethel; CISCO specialist David
Dalva; IBM Certified Informa-
tion System Security Profes-
sional David Lewis; and Dr


Graham Cates of the Family
Medicine Centre, Western
Medical Plaza.
Drs Cates and Allen will
address the 9.30 am session on
crime: why people turn to
crime and the psychological,
emotional and physical impact
on its victim.
Participants can attend the


full day or morning or after-
noon sessions. The full day,
including lunch, is $60 for mem-


bers, $75 for non-members.
The seminar is a non-profit ini-
tiative.


Kingsway Academy

invites qualified

teachers for the

following positions for

January, 2006.


* Auto Mechanics and Woodwork
* Biology
* Librarian/Media Supervision

Successful applicants must:

* Be a practicing, committed born-again Christian
* Have a minimum qualification of a Bachelor's
Degree in the appropriate subject areas or higher
from and recognized college or university
* Have a valid teacher's certificate or diploma
where appropriate
* Be willing to participate in extra curricular
activities, etc.

Applications must be made in writing together
with full curriculum vitae, a recent color
photograph and names of at least three references,
one being that of your Church pastor to:


Financial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information As Of:
16 November 2005

52wk-Hi 52wk-Lo w Symbol Previous Close Today's Clos e Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div PIE Yield
1.10 0.73 Abaco Markets 0.73 0.73 0.00 100 -0.169 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.25 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 10.25 10.25 0.00 1.456 0.340 7.0 3.32%
7.24 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 7.24 7.24 0.00 0.587 0.330 12.3 4.56%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.175 0.010 4.6 1.25%
1.80, 1.27 Bahamas Waste 1.27 1.27 0.00 0.112 0.060 11.3 4.72%
1.20 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.13 1.10 -0.03 13,608 0.066 0.030 16.7 2.73%
9.31 7.00 Cable Bahamas 9.31 9.31 0.00 0.689 0.240 13.5 2.58%
2.20 1.50 Collna Holdings 1.50 1.50 0.00 -0.046 0.000 NM 0.00%
9.17 6.99 Commonwealth Bank 9.11 9.11 0.00 6,267 0.791 0.450 11.5 4.94%
2.50 1.05 Doctor's Hospital 2.40 2.40 0.00 0.429 0.000 5.6 0.00%
4.35 3.87 Famguard 4.35 4.35 0.00 0.428 0.240 9.1 5.52%
10.90 9.50 Finco 10.90 10.90 0.00 286 0.695 0.510 15.7 4.68%
10.00 7.45 FirstCaribbean 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.695 0.380 13.9 3.80%
9.50 8.39 Focol 9.25 9.25 0.00 0.675 0.500 14.1 5.26%
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 0.022 0.000 52.3 0.00%
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.94 9.94 0.00 0.526 0.405 18.9 4.07%
8.75 8.22 J. S. Johnson 8.75 8.75 0.00 0.526 0.560 16.6 6.40%
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 6.31 6.27 -0.04 0.138 0.000 45.7 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.760 4.9 7.60%
52wk-HI 52wk-Lo w Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Veekly Vol EPS $ Div $ PIE Yield
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 11.00 1.768 0.960 7.5 7.25%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.044 0.000 NM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.33 13.33 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Lo w Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1.2593 1.1913 Colina Money Market Fund 1.259334"
2.4766 2.0536 Fi hamas G & I Fd 2.4766
10.6711 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.6711..
2.2754 2.1675 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.275422**
1.1406 1.0755 Colina Bond Fund 1.140599"***

BISX ALL SHARE INDE X 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-Hi Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for dally volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for dally volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day j EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today I NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
** AS AT AUG. 10, 2005/ -AS A T OCT. 31 2005.
S- AS AT OCT. 28. 200/" AS AT OCT.31, 2005/g*."AS AT OCT. 31, 2005.


TEACHERS AND SALARIED WORKERS
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LIMITED

NOTICE TO OUR
VALUED SHAREHOLDERS
Please be advised that Interest/Dividend payments for the year 2004
will be distributed effective Tuesday November 1, 2005 during the
hours of 11:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. as follows:

DATES ACCOUNT DATES ACCOUNT
NUMBERS NUMBERS


November 1 001-700 November 24 7201-7500

November 2 701-1200 November 25 7501-7800

November 3 1201-1800 November 28 7801-8100

November 4 1801-2400 November 29 8101-8400

November 7 2401-3000 November 30 8401-8700

November 8 3001-3600 December 1 8701-9000

November 9 3601-4200 December 2 9001-9500

November 10 4201-4500 December 5 9501-10000

November 11 4501-4800 December 6 10001-10500

November 14 4801-5100 December 7 10501-11300

November 15 5101-5400 December 8 11301-12100

November 16 5401-5700 December 9 12101-13000

November 17 5701-6000 December 12 13001-14000

November 18 6001-6300 December 13 14001-15000

November 21 6301-6600 December 14 15001-16000

November 22 6601-6900 December 15 16001-17000

November 23 6901-7200 December 16 17001-18207


nrTEACHINGOSITIONS',


THURSDAY, NOVEMbt--M I /, euua, t-mUit 3B


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4B. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005


I


FROM page 1B

'harmful tax practices', the
organisation said: "If a coun-
try chooses to use a list of coun-
tries derived from the OECD
list, it should do so based on
the relevant and current facts.
Thus progress made in the
implementation of the princi-
ples of transparency and effec-
tive exchange of information
in tax matters should be taken
into account by such countries
and their legislatures."
Many OECD members had
adopted 'national tax blacklists'
to discourage citizens in their
nations from using interna-
tional financial centres such as
the Bahamas, which features
on a number of these lists.
However, many lists are
based on outdated information
and those drawn up by the
OECD and other countries
which, as the organisation
acknowledged, do not account
for "positive changes in indi-
vidual countries' transparency
and exchange of information
laws and practices".
A case in point is current leg-
islation making its way through
the US Senate on foreign cor-
porations, which has drawn on
the OECD list from 2000.
Position
Mr Paton said of the OECD
position: "There's no vehement
about turn on the way the pro-
ject is going. I don't think any-
one of going to go veering off
and do their own tax black-
lists."
The OECD statement fol-
lowing the conclusion of its
three-day Global Forum meet-


ing in Melbourne seemed to
design to keep all nations on
board and 'hold the course',
trying to give the impression
that progress was being made
towards a 'level playing field'
on transparency and tax infor-
mation exchange.
Expected
Mr Paton said: "Generally
speaking, it's what we expect-
ed. I think the spin-masters are
trying to put the best possible
,gloss on this, as in my mind
they want to give the impres-
sion they are moving quickly
to achieve their objectives. My
reading is that they're still a
long way off.
"As far as the Bahamas goes,
we have got to stress the
requirement for fairness and
inclusivity. We have to stress
the fairness issue, the sover-
eignty issue. I think it's still
very much a case of the status
quo, as the 'level playing field'
condition has not been met."
John Delaney, an attorney
and partner with Higgs &
Johnson, said the OECD state-
ment on using its 2000 list
seemed to be a "consequence"
of a report by the Society of
Trust and Estate Practitioners
(STEP), which had exposed the
many "frailties" in so-called
'national tax blacklists'.
He added that by dealing
with its members collectively
through the OECD, the
Bahamas was able to bring a
"more sophisticated" approach
to the negotiations than if it
was dealing with countries on a
"case-by-case" basis.
Mr Delaney said that indi-
vidual nations lacked the


resources of the OECD, and
therefore could "find it more
expedient to place us on a
blacklist and let us deal with
the consequences".
However, he added that
while Hong Kong had
endorsed,the OECD's princi-
ples of transparency and tax


information exchange, it was
more significant for the
Bahamas that Singapore had
not, despite attending the Mel-
bourne meeting.
Mr Delaney said: "The fact
that Singapore attended but
did not endorse the principles
of transparency and informa-


tion exchange is noteworthy
for the Bahamas, because that
is one financial centre in com-
petition with us, and without
Singapore on board there can
be no level playing field."
The Higgs & Johnson attor-
ney also drew attention to the
OECD's references to tax


information exchanges bene-
fiting the contracting countries'
"mutual economic interests",
with "mutual benefits" derived
from the information exchange
or in some other form.
He said these were opportu-
nities the Bahamas "should
avail itself of".


Crime is 'number one issue



facing business sector


FROM page 1B
tom lines and the physical and
psychological welfare of
employees.
Unveiling a seminar on New
Approaches to Combat Crime
in partnership with IBM
(Bahamas) and the Royal
Bahamas Police Force (RBPF),
Mr Simon said: "The Christ-
mas season is upon us and
crime becomes a hot topic at
that time. The holiday season is
typically the time when busi-
nesses and individuals experi-
ence the highest level of
crime."
Executive
The Chamber executive
added that it was "really diffi-
cult to begin to quantify" the
impact crime had on the
Bahamian business community.
It fed into the "bottom line"
through increased security costs
on items such as guards, bur-
glar bars, surveillance cameras,
alarms and software to protect


computer networks from spy-
ware and virus attacks.
In addition, there were the
psychological effects on victims
of crime and their families.
Mr Simon said: "It's really
difficult to answer, but we
believe it is probably the num-
ber one issue facing not only
business, but the entire coun-
try."
Wellington Chea, profes-
sional services manager for
IBM (Bahamas), said busi-
nesses were increasingly being
threatened by Internet crimi-
nals. He added that surveys had
shown one in three home com-
puters connected to the Inter-
net would be attacked by virus-
es or spyware.
Mr Chea said: "In addition
to these threats, criminals are
finding new and trickier ways
to steal credit card numbers,
passwords, passport numbers,
and other personal information.
"Until recently, Internet
viruses and spyware threatened
to shut down computers. Now,
with many banks offering


online services, they can be
used to pilfer a bank account
number and access a victim's
life savings."
Mr Chea described these as
"very real threats" to Bahami-
an businesses. He added that
there were no statistics on how
virus attacks had impacted
Bahamian companies, with
some businesses riot even
knowing they were under
attack, and others not wanting
to divulge information for fear
that news of their vulnerability
could be damaging.
Believe
"We believe that it's an
increasing problem," Mr Simon
said. Mr Chea added: "The
crook is a click away."
Although no Bahamian
hackers or cyber criminals have
ever been caught and prose-
cuted, the police have "a num-
ber of officers" who have been'
trained to deal with these
offences. Training is ongoing


to ensure they keep up with the
latest trends in technology.
Seminar
The November 29 seminar
will feature presentations locik-
ing at the causes of crime and
its impact on victims, recognis-
ing the symptoms of criminal
behaviour and anger manage-
ment. The seminar will also s*e
presentations from two leading
IBM security experts, David
Lewis and Nigel Brown, the lat-
ter of whom had developed
IBM's privacy practice globally.
Representatives from CISGO
Systems will also be presentto
advise Bahamian businesses pn
how to improve network sequ-
rity.
Mr Simon said the seminar
would look at how businesses
and individuals could prevent
crime, protect life and property,
guard business bank deposits,
help companies screen their
employees and guard invento-
ry.


CEO POSITION

A leading Life and Health Insurance
Company is seeking a Chief Executive Officer.

Prospective candidates are required to have
proven leadership skills and a minimum of five
(5) years experience at the top managerial level
in a business organization, preferably in the
insurance &/ or financial services industry,
however other relevant business experience will
be considered.

A University degree in finance related
disciplines, MBA or other equivalent qualification
is required.

Applications will be held in confidence
and should be sent to Post Office Box N-538,
Nassau, Bahamas by no later than November 28

Replies/acknowledgments will only be
sent to those short listed.

This position offers a competitive
compensation package.


ACCOUNTS

RECEIVABLE CLERK


* Computer skills must include Microsoft
Excel and Microsoft Word
Excellent oral and written communication
skills
Ability to work under own inititiative
Strong Interpersonal skills
Experience in A/R management and
collection preferable

Please mail resume to
P.O. Box N-4875
or fax direct to 502-5092


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JULIE AUGUSTIN OF P.O.
BOX AB-20409, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality arn
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 10TH day of NOVEMBER, 20Q5
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
RO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.






Applicant must be available
Monday to Friday 8:30am to 12:30pm
To home school four (4) children
ages 4 (preschool), 6 (grade 2), 8 (grade 3) and 11 (grade 7)

Applicant will assist parents with sourcing an appropriate
internet curriculum and furnishing a home school room

$1,000.00 per month salary + NIB + 4 weeks annual
vacation + statutory holidays
Atlantic Medical benefits available

FAX RESUME TO 242-356-5256 or call 424-2326


* JOHN DELANEY U MICHAEL PATON


An
Extraordinary General Meeting
of the Shareholders of record
as of November 18,2005
of

FAMGUARD
CORPORATION
LIMITED

will be held in the
Corporate Office Board Room
of Family Guardian Insurance Co. Ltd.
Corner of East Bay & Shirley Streets
& Village Road
at 4:00 p.m.
on Friday,
December 2,2005.


, I.-


OECD meeting reduces threat





from national tax blacklists


. . ..... ...... .....







THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2005, PAGE 5B


RAINBOW BAY SUBDIVISION
(ELEUTHERA)

Lot #44, Block 5, Section A. The lot is on a hill
overlooking the Atlantic Ocean. Area is
approximately 10,800 sq. ft. This site
encompasses a two storey apartment block of
two apartments. One upstairs and one
downstairs. Each comprising one bedroom one
bathroom, front room, dining, kitchen. There is
a wooden porch approximately 8 6 feet wide
on the upper level secured with a wooden
handrail. The garage area has been converted
into a efficiency apartment and now houses one
bedroom/frontroom in one and one bathroom.
Age: is 7 years old. The apartments could be rented at $700 per month partly furnished. The
efficiency rented at $400 per month.

Appraisal: $308,402.00





MURPHY TOWN
(ABACO)

Lot #60 with a structure, lot size 60 x 115 ft.,
6,900 sq. ft., 10 ft., above sea level but below
B I road level and would flood in a severe hurricane
Sthe duplex has dimensions of 60 ft by 30 ft partly
..of wood and partly of cement blocks with one
section virtually finished and occupied with
blocks up to window level and floor ready to
be poured. The roof is asphalt shingles, the
interior walls and ceiling are of 1x6 pine and
the floor of ceramic tiles. The finished work is
average/below, 2 bedrooms, one bath,
living/dining. The occupied portion of the
structure is not complete. Age: 10 years old.

Appraisal: $80,498.00




NO. 3 LEXINGTON SUBDIVISION
(NASSAU)
All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area
of 7,752 sq. ft. (77.5 x 100) situated in the
No. 3 in an area known as Richville of Malcolm
Road west. This property is spacious and can
probably accommodate another house at the
rear. It is landscaped and enclosed by a wall in
S, front with fence on the side. The property consist
of a single story, 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom, living
room and dining rooms, combined, family room
and kitchen, enclosed carport and a roof covered
front porch (indented) with floor area of 1,374
sq. ft.


Appraisal: $123,000.00

Heading south on East Street turn right onto Malcolm Road, then third corner on the right, the
house is the 4th on the left painted white trimmed green with wall in front.



LOT 194 BOYD SUBDIVISION
(NASSAU)

All that lot of land having an area of 6,400 sq. ft.
being lot no 194 of the subdivision known as Boyd
Subdivision, situated in the central district of New
Providence this property is comprised of a 35 year
old single family, single story residence
encompassing approximately 1,278 sq. ft. of
enclosed living area and inclusive of separate
living and dining rooms, and an average size
kitchen, three bedrooms, two bathrooms and an
entry porch, of apprc-imately 88 sq. ft. ventilation
is by 2 wall unit air conditioners. The property is
at grade and level with good drainage, landscaping
is minimal, consisting of lawns and shrubs in the front, the subject is enclosed with stone walls
mounted with wrought iron and chain link fencing and a wrought iron gate in front there is a 208
sq. ft. cement driveway leading to a single covered carport of 250 sq. ft. the subject site also
has a concrete block storage shed measuring of approximately 143 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $126,000.00
Traveling west on Boyd Road, turn left onto Foster Street, continue on Foster Street to the 4th
corner right, (Roland Ave.) the subject property is the 5th property on the left side painted orange
with red/white trim.

DUNDAS TOWN

3 two bed, 1 bath triplex 9,000 sq. ft., lot no.
18b with an area for a small shop. Age 12 years
the land is a portion of one of the Dundas Town
S Crown Allotment parcels stretching from Forest
Drive to Front Street, being just under a quarter
acre in size and on the lowside. A concrete block
structure, with asphalt shingle roof and L-shape
in design with a total length of 70x26 ft, plus
50 x 22 ft., 2,920 sq. ft., the interior walls are
codncrete blocks, ceiling is sheet rock and the

Appraisal: $220,500.00


VALENTINES EXTENSION
(NASSAU)

Lot #2 contains a 19 year old 1 1/2 storey four
plex with a floor area of 3,621 sq. ft. The two
storey section consist of a master bedroom,
bathroom and sitting area upstairs and two
bedrooms, one bath, living, dining, family room
and kitchen downstairs. The single storey consist
of one two bedroom, one bath apartment and two
efficency apartments, land size 7,500 sq. ft. Multi-
Family zoning on flat land and not subject to
flooding.
Appraisal: $347,006.00

The subject property is located on the western side of Valentine's Extension Road, just over one
hundred feet north of the roadway known as Johnson Terrace. Travel east on Bernard Road,
turn left onto Adderley Street which is opposite SAC, continue left at the deep bend, take first
right into Johnson Terrace, go to T-junction and turn left, then first right. Property is second
building on right, white trimmed brown.



KENNEDY SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)

Lot #5 land size 3,600 sq. 40 x 90 ft., contains
a 21 year old single story house 3 bed, 1 bath,
living, dining and kitchen. The lot is on flat land
and fairly level with the roadway, residential single
family zoning.

i Appraisal: $100,800.00

The subject property is located on the southern
side of Soldier rad about 200 ft., east of the
intersection of Kennedy Subdivision and Soldier
Road. Painted blue trimmed white, a low concrete
wall and concrete gateposts are located at the front with a chainlink fencing enclosing the sides
and the back also walkway and driveway in the frontyard. Ground neatly maintained with basic
landscaping in place. Accommodation consist of three bedrooms, one bathroom, living and
dining area and kitchen.




KENNEDY SUBDIVISION
(NASSAU)

Lot no. 21 all utilities available 10 year old single
story house, 3 bedroom 2 bathroom, living room,
dining area, family room, kitchen, study, laundry
and an entry porch.


Appraisal: $175,350.00
Heading west along Soldier Road take main
entrance to Kennedy Subdivision on the left, then
take the 1st corner on the left then 1Ist right, house
is second on your right with garage.


LOT NO 172 BLAIR ESTATES
(NASSAU)

All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area
of 15,403 sq. ft. being lot 172 in the subdivision
known as Blair Estates, this property is comprised
of a single family split level resident consisting
of approximately 3,456 sq. ft., of enclosed living
space with three bedrooms, two bathrooms, on
the second level and on the first a living and
dining room, kitchen, utility room, family room,
bathroom, an office, a rear uncovered porch, a
covered door entry, walkway and a driveway.
Also located on the first level in a 616 sq. ft. one
bedroom, one bathroom, living and dining room,
rental unit. The building is in excellent condition with recent renovation done, there is no signs
of structural defects or termite infestation the building is adequately ventilated with central air
conditioning installed on the second floor and in the rental unit the land is rectangular in shape
and on a level grade slightly elevated above the road to disallow flooding during annual heavy
rainy periods. The grounds improvements include landscaping, a concrete block wall and fence
enclosure on three boundaries, fruit trees and a private water supply.
Appraisal: $642,222.00
Traveling north on Village Road from the round about take the second corner right into Blair
Estates (St Andrews Drive). Drive to the t-junction and make a left which is Commonwealth
Street, continue traveling to the 7th corner which is Clarence Street then drive to Richmond
Road and make a right. The subject property is the 1st house on the left no 44 painted green
trimmed white.

MARSHALL ROAD

Lot #54, land size 42,130 sq. ft. with a masonry
building with eight inch concrete block walls. The
front 2 units are 95% complete.


Appraisal: $206,766.00
Heading west on Blue Hill Road, go pass the
intersection of Cowpen and Blue Hill Road, turn
..right onto Marshall Road (Adventure Learning
Center Road), follow road to the final curve before
the beach. The subject property is about 100 feet
on the right side, grey trimmed white with unfinished building attached.


JOHNSON'S HARBOUR VIEW ESTATES SUBDIVISION(ELEUTHERA), All that vacant lot of land having an area of approximately 4,500 sq ft being lots 12E and 13W and is situated in JOhnson
Harbour View Estates Subdivision situated on the island of Eleuthera, Bahamas. Measuring and bounded as follows, northwardly by 20' wide road reservation and running there on for a distance of 50 ft eastwardly
by lot 13E and running thereon for a distance of 90 ft southwardly by lot 30, and running thereon for ae distance of 25 ft and continuing on lot 31 and running thereon a distance of 25 ft westwardly by lot 12W of the
said subdivision and running thereon for a distance of 90 ft. This property is
well lanscaped and fenced in. This area is quiet and peaceful with all utilities and services available.
Appraisal: $47,250.00
The said pieces parcels or lot of land is situated in Johnson's Harbour View Estates Subdivision, Harbour Island, Eleuthera.


ALLOTMENT 67, MARRIGOLD FARM ROAD(NASSAU), All that lot of land having an area of 1.173 acres being lot No. and is situated on Marigold Farm Road in the ara known as allotment 67, a
said subdivision situated in the south eastern district of new Providence, Bahamas. This property is Vacant and area has all utilities & services.
Appraisal: $148,050.00
Travelling on Joe Farrington Road turn onto Marrigold Farm Road heading south, the subject is the second to last propert on the left hand side of the road near the pond.





m^^^^^B ^^^ a 0**. - 0 9 GOOGtjS'^


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


INVSTEN OPOTUIT


MUTSE LTRBN, OEBE.3H,20


MICLANEOSPOPERIE







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 20QJ5


Due to an


All-Day Seminar

involving staff, the office of

the

Public Workers' Co-operative Credit

Union Limited

will be closed on

Friday, November 18, 2C 5.


We apologize for ar

inconvenience cau- |




Management


FONR
-RENT.,"


* 880 4,538 sq.ft. office suites.
* In the heart of the Bahamas' financial area.
* Excellent visitor and local pedestrial traffic.
* Freatures a fujllstandby generator.
* Dedicated parking facilities.-


Regulator warns on




Bahamian financial




services provider


FROM page 1B
approved to operate in the
securities industry in the
Bahamas.
In its warning, the Securities
Commission said Mercury
Global appeared to be provid-
ing investment advice to cus-
tomers. It was "purportedly
recommending that investors
purchase shares in a company
called Pipeline Securities Tech-
nologies (PST) among others.
These shares are being touted_
-__as_'.pre-1PO'-
The regulator added: "The
Commission advises that it has
no knowledge of PST, its busi-
ness practices nor its officers
and directors. Further, the
Commission has no knowledge
where the PST shares are to be
listed should they be properly
brought to the public in an IPO
offering."


The Tribune published an
article on Mercury Global on
October 1. The company had
then denied claims by the
Swedish Financial Supervisory
Authority, Finansinspektionen,
that it was an unregistered and
unlicensed entity in both the
Bahamas and Sweden.
The warning came as a result
of information received by
Finansinspektionen that Mer-
cury Global had approached'
investors in Sweden by tele-
..pho-ne,- -offering ttiem the
chance to buy shares in a com-'
pany or invest in investment
funds.
The Tribune at the time con-
tacted Russ Thomas, manag-
ing director and the beneficial
owner of Mercury Global, but
he declined to comment on the
Swedish matter, instead refer-
ring all questions to his attor-
neys and registering agents,


Kings Court
Bay Street, Downtown
Nassatu, Bahamas -
Tel. 242-393-8618
www.bahamasrealty.bs
www.cbrichardellis.com


BAHAMAS REALTY LTD
COMMERCIAL
C 0


CB RICHARD ELLIS
NAVIGATING A NEW WORLD


Ship three packages between Nov. 14th and Dec. 2nd, 2005* from our
FedEx Locations at EE Mackey Plaza, Thompson Blvd. and Norfolk House,
Frederick Street, and you'll receive free tickets to see award winning
films at The Bahamas International Film Festival.
Visfftour-locations today and let FedEx take you to the world.


Bohamas
International
Film Festival


Fedxpr
Express


* while tickets last.


Anthony Thompson and Co. The release said: "Mercury
Mr Thomas is in the Bahamas Global Ltd is a Bahamian com-
on a work permit. pany registered with the
A representative from Bahamas Chamber of Comn-
Anthony Thompson and Co merce. Mercury Global Ltd is a
said the Swedish regulator did licensed Financial Services
not contact either them or Mr Provider and is a Bahamian
Thomas to verify the informa- corporation in good standing,
tion that they subsequently as opposed to the claims that
published, have recently been made by
the Finansinspektionen of Swe-
Company den. It appears that the
Swedish Finansinspektionen
"The. company has a. b.si- failedto verify the information
ness licence," the representa- that they were publishing.
tive said. "It also has a Finan- "Mercury Global's legal
cial and Corporate Service counsel has contact the
Providers licence, issued by the Swedish Finansinspektionen
Registrar General, and it is a with a view to clearing up this'
company in good standing. matter."
"The Swedish group did not Meanwhile, Finansinspek-
do any of those checks. Mer- tionen warned potential
cury Global is a company new- Swedish investors that Mercury
ly registered here. The compa- Global had asked investors to
ny was incorporated July 21, invest in funds managed by
2004, and all of the licences Apex Management Ltd and
were obtained shortly there- APEX Opportunity Fund Ltd.
after. The company was previ- Both Apex Management and
ously named Mercury Partners APEX Opportunity were pur-
.Global Ltd, but they did a ported to have an address in
name change in April and it's the United Kingdom. The
now Mercury Global Ltd.". Swedish regulator said, how-
The company representative ever, that were are no autho-
said further that when Mercury rised firms in the UK with the
Global initially came to the name Apex Management Ltd
Bahamas, it was in contact with or APEX Opportunity Fund
the Securities Commission Ltd.
about obtaining a licence to When asking about this
trade in securities, aspect of the business, The Tri-
The company was advised by bune was referred back to Mr
the Securities Commission, Thomas, with the company
however, that since Mr Thomas representative saying they had
was not a broker, he did not been retained to make sure the
need to be licensed by the company is in good standing
Securities Commission. The and in compliance with the
representative added, though, laws of the Bahamas.
that Mercury Global had again The Swedish regulator
begun to explore whether it claimed that Mercury Global's
needed to be licensed by the business address was at No.1
Securities Commission, and Bay Street, in the British Colo-
was currently in talks with the nial Hilton's Centre of Com-
regulator towards that end. merce.
The representative suggested It also alleged that Mercury
that Finansinspektionen was Global had offered investors
perhaps given bogus informa- the opportunity to buy shares
tion. Mercury Global also post- in PST, a company that was
ed a release on the Internet, registered in Anguilla.
saying it wanted to clarify the PST is the same company
information being circulated referred to in the Securities
on it. Commission warning.
















NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that CLAYTON SWEETING,
WASHINGTON STREET, N-8922, NASSAU BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 10TH day of NOVEMBER, 2005
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O..Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


POSITIONS AVAILABLE
Office Assistant
Montessori Teacher
(Ages 18 months to 5 years)
Please Send:
Resume, copy of cerficiation, copy of photo I.D.
To:
Montessori School, P.O. Box SS-5580,
Nassau, Bahamas


NOTICE


NOTICE is hereby given that PATRICE ROSE PINNOCK, 43 INFANT
VIEW ROAD, P.O. BOX SS-6292, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 17TH day of
NOVEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


I


~


" II BUSINESS


r


I








BUSINESS




Baham an fl,,rm M.-


'o 1,
0 f bu 1 -. d

rth inIg ork


FROM page 1B

people.
"Our policy of promoting
Bahamian/non-Bahamian joint
ventures, and of encouraging
growth in small to mid-size
Bahamian businesses, led to
almost one third of the total
value of all contracts being
awarded to Bahamians," Mrs
Maynard-Gibson said.
The minister added that out
of about $6 billion in invest-
ments approved by the current
government, some $937.854
million had been invested to
date, with the number of per-
manent jobs created by these
projects projected to be 15,862.
Company
Mrs Maynard-Gibsop urged
the Scotiabank executives to
aid the Bahamas and wider
Caribbean's future, overcom-
ing their reluctance to lend to


small and mid-size Bahamian
businesses, and to invest in this
nation's workforce.
Company
She said: "Managers with a
vision for the future, especially
if they believe Chambers of
Commerce who continue to
point out that economies that
have many small and mid-sized
businesses are most resilient to
external shock, will find ways
to make those contractors their
customers.
"How is it that a business-
man with a contract in hand
from Atlantis can't get a loan
to grow his business or help
' him more effectively serve,his
customers?
"And let me say that, too, I
have heard banks say that
Bahamian business people are
too high risk...they do not
understand business.. .we can't
take such risks with our depos-
itors' money."


: ALLYSON MYNAD-GIBSON
* ALLYSON MAYNARD-GIBSON


Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
Minna Israel, Scotiabank
(Bahamas) managing director,
had agreed to work with other
financial institutions to estab-
lish a School of Financial Ser-
vices at the College of the
Bahamas (COB).
Company
She added that it was hoped
the School of Financial Services
could become what COB's
School of Hospitality and
Tourism was to the Caribbean
tourism industry.
"In making this investment
in intellectual capital, all finan-
cial institutions will be devel-
oping a sound future employ-
ment pool/skills base for them-
selves and persons who in the
future may want.to set up busi-
ness in the region," Mrs May-
nard-Gibson said.
"You will also be shoring up
the sector. You know that a
very significant factor in choice


of jurisdiction is the extent of
intellectual capital in the juris-
diction...........
"Financial institutions in the
Caribbean must see themselves
not just as the region's bankers,
but as the undergirding of the
region's survival strategy and
the catalyst of its economic suc-
cess."
And Mrs Maynard-Gibson
added: "If Scotiabank invest-
ed some of its profits in entre-
preneurship training pro-
grammes for young people, all
over the region, Scotiabank
would be developing its future
customers.
Company
"If Scotiabank invested some
of its profits in a division to
help business people obtain
loans and manage their busi-
nesses, it would be today
enhancing and developing Sco-
tiabank's own profitability. This
applies across the region."


FOCOL



plans $25m



preference



offering


FROM page 1B

the Shell (Bahamas) deal. The
purchase price is likely to be
around the $25 million mark.
The Tribune revealed last
month that FOCOL had
emerged as the favourite to
win the bidding race to pur-
chase Shell's Bahamian retail
division.
.Executives from Shell's
global head office in London
and regional headquarters in
Brazil had visited the
Bahamas to meet with the dif-
ferent bid teams, then depart-
ed to consider who was the
winner of a process that has
lasted for nine months.
Several sources familiar
with the sales process had told
The Tribune that FOCOL
executives were confident they
had succeeded.
FOCOL's wholesale and
retail operations are currently
all concentrated in Grand
Bahama, and the opportuni-
ty to buy.Shell's retail busi-
ness in New Providence would
enable it to diversify and
expand its business. This could
be especially important given
the increased frequency of
hurricanes in the region, and
the damage inflicted on Grand
Bahama by three storms in a
13-month period.
Agreement
FOCOL will also have to
negotiate an agreement to
purchase its petroleum prod-
ucts from Shell Western for a
fixed period, with the Shell
logo likely to remain on the
gas stations.
Shell and FOCOL have
done similar business before,
with the latter buying Shell's


liquefied petroleum gas
(LPG) business on Grand
Bahama back in 2002. Shell is
also understood to have
offered its retail division,
which includes its gas stations,
to FOCOL around that time,
but the latter backed out
because the price was too
high.
Purchase
Any purchase of Shell's
retail division would almost
be akin to a real estate trans-
action. With margins fixed by
the Government, it is essen-
tially a volume business, with
greater profits dependent on
increasing sales by attracting
more customers to use the sta-
tions, as opposed to the net-
works owned by Esso and
Texaco.
One factor .that may have
delayed a decision from Shell
was the current review of the
Bahamian petroleum industry
under the auspices of Leslie
Miller, minister of trade and
industry, who has threatened
on several occasions to change
its structure through signing
on to PetroCaribe or cutting
the retail and wholesale mar-
gins.
The Bahamas has the high-
est retail margins in the
Caribbean for gas, set at $0.44
per gallon, something that will
have attracted both Bahamian
and foreign groups to bid for
the retail division, which
includes all Shell's gas stations.
Among the Bahamian con-
tenders apart from FOCOL is
a group headed by indepen-
dent MP and businessman
Tennyson Wells, which is
understood to be receiving
financial backing from a group
of Bahamian trade unions.


WIRE TRANSFER


UPDATE!I










As part of our ongoing commitment to offer you
continual improvements in our banking services,
we will be implementing a significant upgrade to our
Wire Transfer services from mid-November 2005.


These improvements will enable:
Faster settlement of international wire transfers
Continued world-class levels of safety and security
to transmit money internationally


Commencing late November 2005, our Internet Banking
facility will also be upgraded. This will give you the
flexibility and convenience of sending wire transfers to
anyone, anywhere in the world, 24 hours a day, 7 days a
week from the comfort of your home or office.


If you are an Internet Banking customer interested in
signing up for our new Online Wire Transfers service,
or if you want to learn how to get started as an
Internet Banking customer, please contact your branch's
Customer Service Representative or your Relationship
Manager.


FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK


Caribbean Pride. International Strength. Your Financial Partner.
FirstCaribbean International Bank is an Associated Company of Barclays Bank PLC and CIBC.


Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


N. I


I


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005, PAGE 7B








PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005


THE I litsuvic


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BENCHMARK (BAHAMAS) LTD.
ANNOUNCES A SPECIAL
DIVIDEND FOR THE SECOND
HALF OF 2005




The Board of Directors of Benchmark

(Bahamas) Ltd.


at its 3rd November Board Meeting declared a special
dividend of one cent per share based on the continued
positive performance of the company year to date.


Payment of the special dividend will be made on
15th December 2005 to shareholders of record
30th November 2005


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LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE



ITA INVESTMENTS LIMITED


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act No. 45 of 2000, ITA
INVESTMENTS LIMITED, has been dissolved and struck off the
Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the
Registrar General on the 25th day of October, 2005.


STYLIANOS GEORGIOS MARKAKIS,
Rua Gomes de Carvalho,
1306,
Liquidator


a a-. -
S


WiNOiNG BAY

HAS A VACANCY FOR:

HUMAN RESOURCES
TRAINER
Candidates should have:

* Experience in High-end Club Management
* Temporary Position for 6 months 1 year
Must be willing to relocate to Abaco

Please send resume to:
Attn: Human Resources The Abaco Club Association
P.O. Box AB-20571 Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Bahamas
Fax: 242-367-2930


a - --- n -


S -


-. S


MINISTRY OF FINANCE GN-290
PUBLIC NOTICE

The Public is hereby notified that a Public Auction will be conducted by the
Customs Department on un-entered goods at the places and times listed below:-

1. Customs Headquarters, Thompson Boulevard 28th November, 2005 on
Automobiles and boats.

2. Air Express, National International Airport, 29th November, 2005 on
General Merchandise.

3. Customs Warehouse, J.F.K. Drive 30th November 1st December, 2005
on General Merchandise.

4. Kelly's Dock, Bay Street, 2nd December, 2005 on Damaged Vehicles.

5. Union Dock, Bay Street 5th December, 2005 on Damaged Vehicles.

6. Harbour Island, Eleuthera 7th December, 2005 on General Merchandise.

7. Governor's Harbour, Eleuthera 8th December, 2005 on General
Merchandise.

8. Marsh Harbour, Abaco 12th December, 2005 on General Merchandise.

9. Congo Town, Andros 14th December, 2005 on General Merchandise.

10. George Town, Exuma 16th December, 2005 on General Merchandise.

The above goods will be sold under tbh Provision of Section 43 of The
Customs Management Act and the auction will commence at 10:00a.m. daily.

A list of the goods to be auctioned can be viewed at Customs Headquarters,
Thompson Boulevard, Customs Warehouse, John F. Kennedy Drive, Air Freight,
Nassau International Airport and at Customs office and on the bulletin Public
Board in the family Islands indicated above.

The right is reserved to accept or reject any or all bids tendered.

Ruth Millar
Financial Secretary


a. S


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005, PAGE 9B


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 17, 2005

7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

WPBT New Florida n Anatomy of an Avalanche Hero School: Mountain Rescue tSkinwalkers: Ann A rianMys

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USA der: Special Vic- promising high-school basketball Cedric the Entertainer. A barbershop owner considers selling his estab-
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WG N Funniest Home Ivory Wayans, Bob Gunton. A former government operative tracks a serial
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(' iN) (CC) f (CC) with David. (N) sweat shop. (N) (CC)

(6:15) SUR- Inside the NFL t (CC) ** THE GIRL NEXT DOOR (2004, Comedy-Drama) Emile Hirsch, EI-
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MAS a porn star. 'R' (CC)


(:00) ** CHASING LIBERTY (2004, Romance-Corn- Curb Your En- t* SPANGLISH (2004, Comedy-Drama) Adam
H BO-P edy) Mandy Moore. A Briton and the president's daugh- thusiasm Larry Sandier, Tea Leoni. A housekeeper works for a chef
ter travel Europe. ,n 'PG-13' (CC) attends seder. and his neurotic wife. n 'PG-13' (CC)
S 50 FIRST DATES (2004, Romance-Comedy) (:15) s SURVIVING CHRISTMAS (2004, Comedy) Ben Affleck, James
H BO-W Adam Sandler. A man falls for a woman who has short- Gandolfini, Christina Applegate. A lonely man celebrates the holiday with
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(:00) * CITY BY THE SEA (2002, Drama) Robert * PAPER CLIPS (2004, Documentary) Students ** HEAD IN
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tranged son commits a murder. n 'R' (CC) 'G' (CC) (2004) 'R' (CC)
* CONTACT (1997, Science Fiction) Jodie Foster, Matthew McConaughey, James FACE/OFF (1997) John Tra-
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love and betrayal. A 'R' (CC) tends to be a shark slayer. ft 'PG' (CC) "Deep Desires"
Summer (:05) * MEAN GIRLS (2004, Comedy) Lindsay :45) ***s HEATHERS (1989, Comedy) Winona
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in Athens three cruel schoolmates. ( 'PG-13' (CC) her class-conscious peers. 'R' (CC)
C 6:15) THE + PHILADELPHIA (1993, Drama) Tom Hanks, Denzel Washington, (05) * TUPAC: RESURREC-
TMC EAL BLONDE Jason Robards. A lawyer with AIDS sues his former firm over his dis- TION (2003) The life and music of
(1997) missal. f 'PG-13' rapper Tupac Shakur. A 'R'(CC)


REAL WOODFURN


Ve Gift Ceri

S.make great gifts!







SiPOT


THE St. Bede's Crushers
should be commended for tak-
ing the Catholic Diocesan Pri-
mary Schools' basketball
league to a new dimension.
On Wednesday they headed
to Xavier's to play the Giants
in one of their regular season
games in grand style.
They paraded from Sutton
Street to Kemp Road to West
Bay Street as if they had just
won the pennant or the cham-
pionship. All that was at stake
was a playoff spot.
There were three police
motorcycle escorts, one truck
with music and two that car-
ried the team and cheerlead-
ers.
The teachers and students
were driven in two buses.
The Crushers invaded
Shirley Street and West Bay
Street like no other primary
schools have done in the past
for a regular season game.
Maurice Fawkes, in his sec-
ond year as coach of St.
Bede's, said he just wanted to
do something different to
motivate both the students and
the parents.
It certainly made a differ-
ence because Xavier's coach
Nelson 'Mandella' Joseph,
their student population and


STUBBS


parents were stur
of them, who we
home, stayed bac
the game.
St. Bede's didi
game, but they sho
ly be commended


effort. Even if they don't
make the playoffs, they should
be considered for special
honours at the end of the sea-
son.


0 CARGILL BACK
IN THE CHAIR
For the second consecutive
two-year term, Algernon
Cargill will serve as president
of the Bahamas Swimming
Federation.
Despite the fact that there
were some complaints that
Cargill should not be operating
from his job in Coral Gables,
Florida, he was returned unop-
posed.
I guess those members who
had the opportunity to vote
didn't have a problem.
Cargill and his newly elected
executive team have released a
16-point plan for their two-
[O N year term in office.
[L J It's a bold initiative, but
- ra mm= Cargill said he's confident that
they will be able to achieve
their goals.
ined. Many Having placed the confi-
re heading dence in electing him unop--
:k to watch posed could only mean that
the member clubs will now
n't win the throw their support behind his
)uld certain- administration in making sure
ed for the that it is done.


Copyrighted Materia

IV^Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


* *


.* -m._ -




.--
0 d O AMMOtb a


41_Mo


* ELECTRO TELECOM
ARE SUPREME
Both the Electro Telecom
Dorcy Park Boyz and Wild-
cats emerged as the cream of
the crop in the Bahamas Soft-
ball Federation's national


championship series over the
weekend in two separate
islands.
It was the first time that two
teams with the same sponsors
have accomplished such a feat
and, as such, they should be
congratulated for a job well
done.
Both teams wanted to sweep
their respective series, but the
Wildcats had to play one more
game than anticipated against
the Batelco Communicators in
Grand Bahama.
The Dorcy Park Boyz
clinched their series with a


tough three-game sweep over
the Heavy Equipment Pan-
thers in Long Island.
I guess when you're a cham-
pion, it doesn't matter how it's
done.
The Wildcats, in the three


games they won, blew out the
Communicators, while the
Dorcy Park Boyz had to rely
on the miscues of the Panthers
to prevail.
It was just a pity that the two
series couldn't be played on
the same island at the same
time. With Long Island hosting
the nationals for the first time,
I think the fans would have
really enjoyed the treat.
Maybe it's something that
the Bahamas Softball Feder-
ation could consider when
planning for next year's grand
finale.


Anticipation over new


I aela-pth1l lb cnn


* BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
THE countdown to the beginning
of another basketball season is now
on for executive members of the
New Providence Women's Basket-
ball Association (NPWBA).
The league, which is in its third
year, will open this Saturday at the
DW Davis gym, with just one game
on schedule: the defending cham-
pions the Cleaning Center Angels
taking on the Johnson's Lady
Truckers.
There are now six teams in this
year's league and interim president
Kimberly Rolle believes that the
success from the last two years
prompted the new additions.
Rolle believes that the league's
new additions will make the play
very competitive and will increase
the fan base.

Exciting
She said: "We are looking for-
ward to a very exciting season,
especially with the new additions.
"I think with the additions of the
Sunshine Auto Cheetahs and the
return of the Defence Force you
will see some very competitive
games. There is also the defending
champs, the Lady Caribs, and the
All-Stars and the runners-up the
Johnson's Lady Truckers.
"Anyone of those five teams can,
win on any given night so I think
that the games this year will be very
good."
This year's league will feature six
teams, the Angels, Johnson's Lady
Truckers, the All-Stars, the Lady
Caribs, Defence Force and the Sun-
shine Auto Cheetahs.
Although the Angels are return-


ing to the league as the team to
beat, new kids on the block the
Sunshine Auto Cheetahs are among
the teams that are hoping to
dethrone them.
Head coach for the Cheetahs
Mario Bowleg views the team's
entry as a great opportunity to be a
part of a well structured organisa-
tion that is conducive for players,
coaches and fans alike.

Support
He said: "The atmosphere of the
fan support that is in the league is
one that coaches and players enjoy
being a part off. No one wants to
play in an empty or vacant gym.
"This environment encourages
you to continue on in your coaching
and playing career.
"This is a new team, we are very
excited to play our first game. The
team is looking pretty good and I
want to tell everyone out there that
this team will be in the fight.
"I don't want any of the teams
to sleep on the Sunshine Auto
Cheetahs, we will be there."
Also sending warning signs to the
Angels and Truckers are the
Defence Force Bluewaves.
The Bluewaves are returning
to the league after sitting out last
year.
With the return of the Bluewaves
and the addition of the Cheetahs,
more than 15 games have been
scheduled.
In an attempt to promote the
sport, the NPWBA has designed a
league pass for fans.
The pass, which is priced at
$30.00 for the entire season, makes
it easier for fans to follow the
action on their favourite teams.
All passes can be purchased at
the DW Davis gym on game nights.


Commending Crushers





for travelling in style


"The Crushers invaded
Shirley Street and West Bay
Street like no other primary
schools have done in the past
for a regular season game."


Young boxers

to get back

in the ring

* BOXING
FIRST Class Boxing Pro-
motions will continue its
Saturday matches this week-
end at the fighting arena
located on Wulff Road.
There will be at least 15
matches taking place
between boxers from clubs-."
from Kemp Road, The
Grove, Montell Heights and
Claridge Road.
Each club is expected to
be represented by 10 boxers
aged between eight and 16-
years-old.
There will be medals and
trophies for winners and
losers alike.
The event gets underway
at 5pm.















19 41. __ ____

-- -













"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"
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* w S o














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!-lMt- IUt, IHUHbUAY, NOVCMbECH I/, 2UUb


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40- 4b


OPINI







SPORT


K


Machines
storm past
Hurricanes
TOP LEFT: SAC's Terea
Sweeting swings at a high ball
yesterday in the game against
St Andrew's.
ABOVE: St Andrew's
Gernyka Gibson catches a pop
up.
LEFT: St Andrew's Jade
Strachan tries to steal second
base but is tagged out.
(Photos: Felipi Major/
Tribune staff)


Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


" ~ :~"IYI~~I-U~Yil~U~'~.~Ilri lil I .


-.W,111114#










THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005


SECTION 4



B a
Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


_~~~~~m n ~ h ~ -I~P-- -_l___ll_______-.-


11-1 victory over Hurricanes


* SOFTBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
WITH their backs against the
wall, the junior girls pennant win-
ning St Augustine's College Big
Red Machines prevailed with an 11-
1 victory, yesterday at the Churchill
Tener Knowles Stadium.
Returning to the field with heat-
ed bats, the Big Red Machines came
to the second game of the best of
three championship series looking
for revenge over St Andrews Hur-
ricanes and forced a third and deci-
sive game.
Coming in as the team to beat,
the Big Red Machines posted an
early 4-0 lead to close the first
inning.
Although the infield was given
little chance to work, the team also
brushed up on the errors made by
their infield on Monday.
The Hurricanes played an excep-
tional infield defence on Monday
evening, but they made more than
six errors in the first inning and four
more in the third yesterday. Their
outfield was held accountable for
five errors, all made on dropped
popfly balls.
The Hurricanes were facing off
with Big Red Machines' ace pitcher
Avdnie Seymour, and she was on
top of her game. As a result of this,
the Hurricanes rarely made it on
base.
In the bottom of the first inning


Seymour retired the first two batters
but had trouble putting away Ash-
ley Black to seal the inning.
Black's line drive to the rightfield
gave her a single, later on stealing
second base. But she would die on
the second base as Seymour caught
Cara Curry with a high strike.
Seymour said: "Yes it is an
extremely great feeling to come
here today and take this game, espe-
cially after Monday's performance.
We will be back on Friday to take
the series.

Focussed
"I knew I couldn't lose this game
being one of the key players on our
team, that's why I came to the game
today focussed and ready to play. I
came back pitching as hard as I
could and doing my best to get the
win for the team. My teammates
also did a remarkable job, I am
extremely proud of them, they put
themselves on the line to win this
game."
When the Hurricanes returned
to the field, pitcher Brittney Sweet-
ing took the game into her own
hands. Sweeting wasted no time in
putting away the first two batters
faced, but trouble started to arise
for the Hurricanes when they faced
off with Vanrica Rose.
Rose, the Big Red Machines
shortstop, connected with Sweet-
ing's first pitch, sending it into the


left field. The hard driven ball left
the Hurricanes leftfielder Alivia
Culmer scrambling to field the ball.
By the time she was able to secure
the ball into her glove, Rose had
secured her spot on second base.
Up next for the Big Red
Machines was Gernyka Gibson,
who batted in one of her two RBI's
on the night. This would be the only
run scored by the big Red Machines
in this inning, Gibson would die on
second.
The offensive game brought by
the Hurricanes on Monday evening
never showed up in yesterday's
game. The Hurricanes returned to
the field after being shut out. once
again by Seymour and the
Machines' infield.
"I don't know what happened to
the team today, they never showed-
up, so the best team won today,"
said Peter Wilson, Hurricanes head
coach.
"I told the girls that the team will
rebound after the win over them
and they did, all we have to do is
rebound in the next game to secure
the championship.
"We didn't perform, but the good
news is that we still have one more
game to play and the series is tied
one-one."
Wilson is predicting a rebounding
game for his team on Friday
evening, and he very confident that
Cara Curry will help to dethrone
the Big Red Machines. Curry scored
the only run for the Hurricanes.


4.,^


Cooper impresses



on Wildcats debut


* BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

IN A basketball debut,
Bahamian Alex Cooper net-
ted a triple-double to lead the
Westbury Christian School
(Wildcats) to their first victo-
ry.
Cooper, a native of Palmet-
to Point, Eleuthera, scored 20
points, 10 rebounds and 11
blocks to lead the Wildcats to
a 70-45 win over Xaviers
Christian Middle School, on
Tuesday night.
According to Frank Ruther-
ford, Cooper's mentor, the 13-
year-old, 6-foot-5-inches pow-
er forward should have scored
more than he posted, but he


missed several put-backs.
Rutherford said: "Alex is
playing very good ball and I
believe that the country
should be informed about this
remarkable achievement.
"This was Alex's debut on
the junior varsity squad, and
because of the rich legend set
there, he is really placing his
name in the school's record
books.

Performance

"That was an exceptional
performance by him. His
game and the dominance in
the lower post was great.
"He was outstanding on the
blocks and ran the floor very
well. The coaches were very


impressed with him from the
day he stepped foot in the
gym. They knew he would be
one of the leading players in
their game."
Cooper moved to Texas this
July and is playing his second
season of basketball.
His career started at the
Father Marcian Peters tour-
nament last year, where he
played with the Governors
Harbour High School.
Cooper joins Waltia Rolle, a
junior high school student also
attending the Westbury Chris-
tian High School.
Rolle is currently red-shirt-
ing the first two of games and
is expecting to play the last
game before the school breaks
for the Christmas Holiday.


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The Tribune


Sermons, Church Activities, Awards


Church Notes
Page 6C


An

historic

ordination

in Hatchet

Bay

Rev Spence
Pinder elevated
to bishop

* By CLEMENT
JOHNSON
A few weeks ago history
was made in the beautiful
community of Hatchet
Bay, Eleuthera, when Rev.
Spence Pinder was elevat-
ed to the position of bishop
at Harvest Time Taberna-
cle Church. His ordination
was the first time in 40
years that the community
of Hatchet Bay has had a,
sitting bishop the last
was the late Sonny Pinder
who died some 30 years
ago.
The service of thanks-
giving was under the
theme: "The reward of a
faithful servant"-Matthew
25:14-30.
It was a proud moment
for the family, friends and
indeed the island of
Eleuthera as hundreds
gathered to witness the
calling down of the Holy
Spirit on this saintly man.
"Holy, Holy, Holy Lord
God Almighty!
Early in the morning our
song shall rise to Thee:
Holy, Holy, Holy, Mer-
ciful and Mighty!
God in Three Persons
blessed Trinity!
The song rang out as the
bishop- elect with his wife,
Mrs. Coral Johnson-Pin-
der, walked in procession
to the altar. Bishop Albert
Hepburn was the chief cel-
ebrant. Rev. Leon John-
son, the moderator, invited
the congregation to prayer
and praise.
The service was a bless-
ing for those attending.
Bishop Hepburn delivered
a heart-warming and chal-
lenging sermon. He high-
lighted Bishop Pinder as a
man called by God, whose
life was a testimony of
faithfulness and service.
He said he knew the late
Dr. P.A. Gibson would be
proud of his prodigy, as it
was clear that the teachings
of Dr. Gibson was bearing
fruit in Bishop Pinder's life
and that of the members of
his church. Remarks came
from different representa-
tives from all over
Eleuthera, all of whom
pledged to work with the
newly ordained Bishop.
In addition to Bishop
Pinder's Episcopal ordina-
tion, two of the deacons,
Rev. Carl M. Pinder and
Rev. Claudius Bethel, were
elevated to the rank of
associate Ministers for Har-
vest Time Tabernacle
Church.
In an interview with The

SEE page 2C


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
True worship, the
kind of worship
that is done in
spirit and in truth,
may be lacking in
Bahamian culture, said a
prominent religious leader,
who believes that the country
has lost its heart for worship.
"We resemble the people of
the old covenant, the people
against whom the great
prophet preached who wor-
shipped God with their lips, but
their heart was so far from
Him," said Archbishop Drexel
Gomez of the Anglican Dio-.
cese, in his address to the con-
gregation of men and women
who attended Saturday's
Bahamas Awakening rally at
Clifford Park.
"It is so easy, so terribly easy
to become comfortable with
going through the motions. We
go to church, we attend church,
we sing the words to the hymns
and choruses, we listen to the
Bible reading, but it can all be
just going through the motions;
coming from the outside and
not from within," he said.
Saturday's rally was the cul-
mination of a series of events
geared towards making a spir-
itual impact on Bahamian men.
Its aim was to call the men to
recognize their responsibility,
and as a result, make promises
in various areas of their lives.
The outreach was chaired by
members of the Bahamas
Christian Council, in associa-
tion with Promise Keepers
Movement, a US-based men's
programme.
Basing his text on Jesus'
recorded words in Matthew
6:21, Archbishop Gomez told
the congregation that where


* ANGLICAN ARCHBISHOP DREXEL W GOMEZ
(FILE photo)


one's treasure is there his heart
will be.
"Our treasure consists of the
things that we value, the things
that we attach value to. And if
we place emphasis on money
and material things they will
have priority in your life and
your heart will be fixed on
them. That is not a theory.
That is a fact of life," he
warned the crowd.
He went on to say that those
who place their attention and
priority on sex and promiscu-


ous living, will have their hearts
fixed on these things. And an
extension of this principle, he
believes, may be seen in Mark
7:18-23, where Jesus says that it
is what comes out of a man that
defiles him. It is from within,
from the human heart that evil
intentions come. Fornication,
theft, murder, adultery, avarice,
wickedness, deceit, licentious-
ness, envy, slander, pride, folly
- all of these evils come from
within. (Mark 7:22-23)
Said Archbishop Gomez:


"And the twelve items that he
lists are all alive and well in the
Bahamas...Look at Bahamians
and you will see these twelve as
I said, alive and doing well,
against God's wish and against
God's commands."
Above all, it will take an
examination of the heart, and
the prayer of David in Psalms
51:1, which asks God to create
a clean heart and renew a right

SEE page 2C


'We resm le th peopl



wors. ,*p *' eGod



with thff lip


'Over use of religious jargon


during the conventions


was almost sickening'


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON
OVER the past week there has been much
talk about the different political parties and their
conventions.
We are not here to debate from a political
point of view, only to report on some of the
concerns expressed by a few Bahamians in the
past several days.
One lady in particular was quite upset by both
conventions and the way the various political
speakers were using the name of God unneces-
sarily. She also felt that religious music had no
place at a political convention.
"I feel that politics should be that and church
should be what it is, but during the conventions
the over use of religious jargon was almost sick-
ening," said a young lady who works in a leading
bank.
"What bothered me most," said a deacon from
a Baptist church, "was the way people were
dancing to religious music, and how some of the
speakers were going on like they were preaching.
Our people need to decide if they are going to be


political leaders or evangelical preachers," said
Deacon King.
"It is sad how politicians play on the psyche of
our people, because we say this country is a
Christian nation, they overdo it. But the problem
is the religious leaders and the politicians sleep-
ing in the same bed, so no one is able to speak
out against the other," he said.
"The government hires bishops and religious
leaders and gives them big salaries or puts them
on some consultancy board or gives them some
honour from the Queen and they all remain
silent on the moral and social ills affecting our
country today," the Deacon said.
His comments upset me and so I offered no
views on the matter. After leaving the group I
was still haunted by the exchange of views on the
use of religion in the political arena. I then
reflected that this does not only happen in the
Bahamas. It also happens in the USA, although
maybe not as much. However that does not

SEE page 6C


Lble 't Shop





P.aL m s VAUP, L 4 AM .."


,2005


SEC


I


I


I I I I


Can Harry

Potter book

offer children

i unique glimpse

into biblical

theme of

divine love?

LOUISVILLE, Kentucky
-Will the popularity of
Harry Potter lead impres-
sionable children to practice
witchcraft? Or can Harry
Potter offer children a
unique glimpse into the
majestic, biblical themes of
divine love, original sin, and
religious salvation? With the
upcoming release of the lat-
est Harry Potter movie, Har-
ry Potter and the Goblet of
Fire, Christians will once
again raise heated questions
about the spiritual values-
or lack thereof-in the best-
selling series.
Fortunately Connie.Neal,
acclaimed Christian author
and youth-group leader, has
written The Gospel accord-
ing to Harry Potter, a book
that will show Potter enthu-
siasts and spiritual .seekers
how the Harry Potter fran-
chise provides a unique
glimpse into the wondrous
themes of the Christian
gospel. In a series of brief
chapters, all written in a live-
ly and accessible style, Neal
suggests that many of Pot-
ter's "fantastic" elements
bear distinctly Christian
characteristics: Lilly Potter's
sacrifice for her son, Harry,
resembles the sacrifice of
Christ for humankind; Dum-
bledore's wisdom mirrors
the wisdom of God; and
Harry's dreams remind us
that God often speaks to us
in mysterious ways.
Although some evangeli-
cal Christians are still reluc-
tant to embrace Harry Pot-
ter-a book reviewer for
Focus on the Family called

SEE page 2C








PAE 0,THRSAYRNVEBEI1,G00OTENRI IN


* DRESSED TO IMPRESS Honourees with Anglican
Archbishop Drexel Gomez (fifth from left in front row) and
Suffragan Bishop Gilbert Thompson (fourth from left in front
row) at the Anglican Church Men 5th Annual Recognition
Banquet.


'Saluting men of integrity'


* By CLAYTON N CURTIS
The Diocesan Council of
the Anglican Church
Men (ACM) recently
held its 5th Annual
Recognition Banquet
under the theme: "Saluting Men of
Integrity". This gala event seeks to
pay tribute to outstanding men from
throughout the diocese of the
Bahamas and Turks and Caicos
Islands.
Amidst all the pomp and pageantry
associated with such events, the hon-
ourees were greeted by thunderous
applause from family, friends and
well-wishers as they entered the


packed banquet hall at the Wyndham
Nassau Resort. In his welcome
remarks, Council President, Herbert
Scott Jr, thanked everyone for their
continued support of this event.
He stressed that now, more than
ever, men must take up their roles as
leaders, mentors and positive role
models. Proceeds from this banquet
are ear-marked for the construction of
the Diocesan Centre on Carmichael
Road.
A brief address was made by His
Grace, Archbishop Drexel Gomez,
who noted that in recent years, the
ACM has been rejuvenated. They
now seek to take their rightful place
among the leading organisations in


the diocese. He also commented on
how pleased he was to see that this
event still features prominently on the
organization's calendar.
Essential
However, the Archbishop chal-
lenged the ACM not to bask in its
recent achievements or rest on its lau-
rels. There is still a lot to do and the
men were admonished to identify oth-
er worthwhile ventures, especially
those involving our young men, chan-
neling them into positive and produc-
tive activities. The honourees in par-
ticular were encouraged to go out and
do the work that God has commis-


sioned them to do.
Within the next few months, the
Diocesan Council of the Anglican
Church Men will be holding the elec-
tion of officers who will govern the
organization for the next administra-
tion period. Archbishop Gomez
charged the men to prayerfully seek
guidance, as the selection of the new
president will be crucial. That indi-
vidual's leadership ability and style,
along with his vision and goals will
determine the culture and direction
of the ACM and set the tone for all of
their endeavours.
One of the highlights of the evening
was the tribute paid to Bishop Michael
Eldon by the ACM. In an audio-visu-


al production, supported by live n4-F
ration, the life and ministry of Bishop
Michael H. Eldon were portrayed~i
Portions of his inspiring sermons wdre'
shown and individuals recalled thbir
fondest memories of the first Bahaiih
an to serve as Bishop of this diocese,.
Bishop Eldon is known for his pas-
toral care and the ability to connect
generations of parishioners to their
"roots" and trace their family tre,e-
back to their parochial origins,.
whether they were Anglicans or ngt;;;
Blessed with wit and a sharp mind!:
he has the ability to recall events arid:
conversations with remarkable detail'
Earlier this year, Bishop Eldon cele-
brated fifty years as a priest.


FROM page 1C


one book a "saga steeped in
witchcraft "-the reception of
The Gospel according to Harry
Potter has shown that many
Christians are warming up to
Harry Potter and are willing to
reexamine the books and
movies for spiritual themes.
"Christians are more open to
the Harry Potter books than
ever before," Neal remarks.
"Almost every person who
stopped by our booth at the
Christian Booksellers Associa-
tion took time to thank me for
presenting positive, even Chris-


tian, aspects of the Harry Pot-
ter stories."
First published in 2002, The
Gospel according to Harry Pot-
ter has sold more than 50,000
copies and has been featured
in magazines such as Time and
Entertainment Weekly. An
author of more than thirty
books, including What's a
Christian to Do with Harry
Potter? Connie Neal has estab-
lished herself as an expert in
examining the Christian dimen-
sions of the Harry Potter cor-
pus.


'We resemble the people who


worshipped God with their lips'


N ARCHBISHOP DREXEL GOMEZ


FROM page 1C

spirit, in order for changes to
be seen in our society.
The challenge of every Chris-
tian, said Archbishop Gomez,
is to first ensure that his/her
heart is right before God, and
to realize that there is a space
,in the heart that only God can
fill.
He used the example of the
prodigal son to show the con-
gregation that many Bahami-
ans pursue an ungodly life in
an attempt to fill a void in their
lives. But in the end, they find
that much time and energy has
been wasted and still, the deep-
seated void exists. "All of us
need to come to our senses like
the prodigal son, to fully realise
that there is this space in your
heart and mind that can only
be filled by God.
"When God fills that space
in your heart and my heart, we
become God-directed, God-
motivated, and God-empow-
ered. We become the people
that God made us to become
and that Christ died to enable,


that we will experience God's
presence in our lives. And we,
will only find peace and well
being when God is enthroned'
in our hearts," Archbishop
Gomez said,
He invited the congregation
to examine their hearts andk
give honest answers' to the
questions: Is God enthroned in
His space?'What have you
been trying to put in the space
reserved for God and Gqd
alone. "This is the source of
idolatry, the greatest sin!
denounced in the Bible, putting.
things in God's place."
It is a sin that goes beyond,
the praise of graven images,
and exists in every culture, the
Archbishop noted.
But if one is genuinely inter-
ested in God changing his
heart, he must genuinely want
God to occupy His space, since
He will not force His way into
any heart. Secondly, God wants
His people to be committed to
worship, and to share the sen-
timent of David in Psalms 108:1
that their hearts are "firmly
fixed on God", he said.
*; 4.


An historic ordination on Hatchet Bay.

FROM page IC whenever my service was tors in 1997, I was entrusted extremely special to me. My
required," said Bishop Pinder. with the responsibility to over- sister, Rose, who is my right
Bishop Pinder, describing see the affairs of the church. hand and all my loving brothers.
Tribune Bishop Pinder outlined himself as a shy man, could not On October 11th I was and sisters.


his experience, which opened
the door for his religious jour-
ney.
He said that in July of 1981,
he had a near fatal accident
when his body was badly
burned by fire, He was told by
doctors that he had a 50-50
chance of survival. However,
it was only through the mer-
cies of God that he made it.
"My life was changed as a
result of my speedy recovery,
because I came to realize it had
to be the hand of God on my
life, who saved me for some
special purpose. That purpose
was made known to me as I
worked along with my late Pas-
tor, Rev. Dr. P.A.Gibson who
took me under his watchful
care. My desire was not to
preach, but to serve, where or


imagine himself a preacher.
But as years passed, self was
pushed, aside and the Spirit
began to manifest various gifts
in his life. The spirit of bold-
ness was the one that eventu-
ally allowed him to address the
congregation when he was
appointed prayer leader, a
challenge he took up gladly as
he allowed the spirit of God to
lead him wherever he wanted
to.
Appointed
"On October 19,1986, I was
appointed to serve as a dea-
con; in February 13,1994 I was
appointed as associate minis-
ter.
"Following a period of sick-
ness experienced by our pas-


ordained pastor of the church,"
said Bishop Pinder.
Bishop Pinder, who is the
son of the late Robert and Eula
Pinder, said the influence of a
spirit-filled mother had a pro-
found influence on his spiritual
life. He said he realized that to
serve as bishop was a higher
calling on his life, and that his
will was to serve God with
humility as a servant of God.
He asked for the prayers of his
community.
"I want to thank God for giv-
ing me a loving and caring wife
(Coral Pinder nee Johnson)
who was always there for me
and supported me in my min-
istry, she has never given up
on me, and she believes in me.
I thank God for her and my
family all of whom are


Thank
"But I would like to thank,
especially my congregation f6r
accepting me and sticking with
me over these past seven years
as their pastor. Your love and,
support continue to make ramy
job easier and I thank God for
those in Eleuthera, but also-fob
the extended community.ia,
Nassau. I say to God be the;
glory"
Under Bishop Pinder t~he
faith community of Harvest,
time continues to grow'.ini
membership.
The church has undergone:
extensive renovations, and has,
one of the largest and m 6t
modern church buildings on
the island of Eleuthera.


Day
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2005 TM



Purchase an Extra Valme Meal om

Svida November 20, 2005 aid

felp McDoviald's support

World C1fildrei's ODa,


Roiald McDoiald HOMse Charities

gave a 1 avid last year to

The BaIamas Red Cross,

($1 0,O000o ),

Let Ms give a aIamd this year,


Golden Girl Debbie Ferguson will be at
McDonald's Restaurant in Oakes Field
on Sunday, November 20th, 2005 at 3:30pm


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005


I


~r~sJc







THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005, PAGE 3C


THE TRIBUNE


0


C atSharing Our Stories:



* Discovering our


='yFr HENRY CHARLES

attention to ethics, with the result
that for many people ethics
'[IL becomes identified with crisis. But
A .ethics is not a crisis discipline. It's a
necessary dimension of all human activity. Value
aig disvalue are part of everything we do. Cor-
porate ethics is one area of professional ethics,
which is ethics as applied to medicine, law, busi-
ness, public service, and so on. It's a matter of a
particular form or configuration in a particular
context.
Companies today are increasingly doing more
in-depth background checks that go beyond tra-
ditional references, to find executives with the
highest professional and personal ethics. More
companies are also taking ethical indicators into
consideration before deciding whether to hire or
promote executives.
',Jnethical executives create difficult work sit-
uations or become themselves examples of
niifeasance for subordinates. Subordinates com-
paln that they are often pressured to parry out
u6ithical demands. They may resist them, on
tlie one hand; on the other hand, they may con-
sider their own unethical behaviour excusable in
the light of what their bosses ask or what they see
bosses doing.
What this highlights, whether in executives
oriemployees generally, is the ethics of character.
By'character is meant a set of stable traits affect-
ing a person's vision, judgment and action.
Vision is primary, because judgment and action
presuppose how one sees the world. As a person
is, as Aristotle said, so do ethical matters appear
to him or her. To the jaundiced eye, everything
appears yellow.
, he ethics of character is an ethics of becom-
ing. Its aim is the coming into being of a certain
kind of person, who inhabits a particular vision.
What does such a person look like in the areas of
medicine, law, business, and public service?
"Character in medicine implies qualities such as
competence, compassion, care, respect for
patients' rights, and a commitment "to do no
harm." In the legal sphere, it includes qualities
shch as due diligence, loyalty to clients, respect
for client confidentiality, and responsibility for
the' legal system. In business, it implies good
faith, trustworthiness, integrity, reliability, and
hohour. In the public service, one thinks of
integrity, accountability, democratic governance,
courtesy and respect for the public, and care for
the public interest.
There's hardly anyone who would not endorse
these sets of qualities. Yet the recent scandals in
business, for instance, showed that bad faith,
lack of integrity, duplicity, and greed were the
rule, not the exception. Why were such choices
made and such options taken? John Maxwell,
one of America's current leadership gurus, gives
three reasons:
(1) People choose the line of least resistance,
doing what they find most convenient. If telling
a lie can cover up a mistake at work without
anyone being any the wiser, why take the diffi-
cult route?
(2) People do what they must to get ahead.
Many believe that embracing ethics limits their
opportunities and ability to succeed. If being
unethical means getting more power or more
money, they're OK with it;
(3) What is right is what I consider right. It
may be different for you. There's no objective
value in the post-modern world. Right and wrong
also varies cross-culturally. Subjectivism and rel-
ativism thus underwrite personal choices.

Official

Most organizations have some official code
of ethics. At Enron, the code was sixty-five pages
long. Nearly every principle was flouted in prac-
tice. This has led to the commonest piece of eth-
ical wisdom circulating in corporations today,
viz., a code of ethics by itself is not an ethical cul-
ture. A code exists on paper; it has to be brought
to life through engagement, ongoing discussion
and review. Codes are not meant to provide


/
A :' :


* FR HENRY CHARLES


immediate answers to concrete problems.
Answers come from a habit of addressing issues,
from dialogue, self-correction, listening to other
points of view, and openness to change.
An ethical culture is the result of this ongoing
process. It's not a one-time shot, to deal with a
particular crisis. An ethical culture is the ethical
environment pervading a particular organiza-
tion.
The benefits of such a culture are many: (a)
values are established, and organizational behav-
iour can be aligned with them; (b) sensitivity to
ethical issues can be developed; (c) ethical guide-
lines can be integrated into decision making;
(d) mechanisms to resolve ethical dilemmas can
be structured; (e) ongoing evaluation and updat-
ing of the programme can be facilitated; and
finally, (f) the entire corporation can progres-
sively realize that ethics is not a knee-jerk reac-
tion to trouble or something there for the sake of
a company's image.

Essential
It's essential that the chief executive fully sup-
ports the programme. Employees will note if
he/she is not into it, and the lack of interest will
make the organization worse off than if no pro-
gramme existed. Excellent and trustworthy chan-
nels of communication are also required for
relating to management (e.g., for whistleblow-
ing), and for making company decisions acces-
sible to stakeholders and shareholders.
Finally, a practical suggestion. There are those
who say that corporate ethics is just a matter of
"doing the right thing," since "everybody knows
right from wrong." And sometimes, of course,
the right thing is clear. Sometimes, however,
dilemmas occur that are truer to life's complex-
ity, and the right thing is not immediately obvi-
ous.
Judgment then requires some structured delib-
eration, something along the lines of the fol-
lowing:
1. The Relevant Information Test: Have we
obtained as much information as possible to
make an informed decision or frame an action
plan in this situation?
2. The Involvement Test: Have we involved all
who have a right to have an input or be involved
in making the decision or framing the plan.
3. The Consequential Test: Have we taken
into consideration the consequences of this deci-
sion (in the short, middle and long term) on all
who will be significantly affected by it)
4. The Fairness Test: If I were assigned the
place of any one of the stakeholders in the situ-
ation, would I consider the decision essentially
fair, given all the circumstances?
5. Company Values Test: Does this decision
uphold or reinforce the organization's values?
6. Light-of-Day Test: How would we feel or be
regarded by others (associates, family, friends) if
the details of this decision were disclosed for
all to know?


heroes at home


M B REV ANGELA
PiLACIOUS

TIHERE are people who
come into our lives when we
are quite young who leave an
indelible mark on our young
minds and help to shape us in
ways that we could never have
perceived at the time. My uncle
Basil was such a person.
When at the age of ten I
entered a boarding school;in
Jamaica to complete my high
school education, every mid-
term break and at the begin-
ning and end- of the term, I
lived in the Anglican Rectory
in Spanish Town, Jamaica. My
uncle was the Dean of the
Cathedral and what a gifted
person he was. He won prizes
for art, for flowers called
anthuriums grown under his
mango trees, for the produc-
tion of plays, and he had a
singing voice that was deep and
melodious.
While Uncle Basil Jones was
over six feet tall with a voice
that could be heard without a
microphone, Aunt Alma was
about five feet two and soft
spoken. She taught me how to
substitute and "make do" when
imported goods were banned
to boost local production or to
promote locally grown fruit.
I learned to welcome
strangers at all hours, to have
meals available for people who
travelled long distances to
attend special services. I
watched my uncle, the Canon,
travel miles on a Sunday to
hold several services, and
return with his shirt and under
shirt soaked with perspiration
from wearing hot robes in hot
churches and driving in a hot
car. He never complained as
he mopped his brow with soggy
handkerchiefs and laughed.


REV PALACIOUS


"Let our
heroes include
prominent
figures in
our nation,
community,
church and
family, but let
us also examine
our own lives
to see whether
we are an
appropriate
hero for
someone else."
Rev Palacious

The love of a congregation
for this lovable priest was very


PART THREE

contagious, and there was noth-
ing he would not do for the
people. They called out to him
on crowded streets, down
deserted alleys. Voices hailed
him from behind curtained
windows and closed doors. I
had no idea at the time that
God was preparing me for
long-term rectory living. I nev-
er in my wildest dreams
thought that I would marry a
priest, much less become a
priest, but that experience was
all training for ministry, mar-
riage and motherhood, balanc-
ing public appearances and pri-
vate family life.
Who are the persons who
have showed you how to main-
tain a deep trust in God by car-
rying prayers in their hearts
until they were answered in
some way? Who has modeled
for you how to develop a great
love for the Lord with a song
on their lips? From whom have
you gained so much wisdom
about godly living? Who has
lovingly guided you in the
paths of Christianity and whom
are you guiding?
Let our heroes include
prominent figures in our
nation, community, church and
family, but let us also examine
our own lives to see whether
we are an appropriate hero for
someone else. Are our values,
principles and lifestyles worthy
of emulation? Are we able to
say as St Paul did: "Put into
practice what you learned and
received from me, both from
my words and from my actions.
And the God of peace will be
with you" (Phil 4:9 NIV). Let
Christ lead us and then we may
lead others in the right way.


'My experience is that working


for God keeps you going'


* By ALLISON MILLER

IDLE hands are the devil's
workshop.
"Jt does not matter how many
goals you have accomplished
there is always something con-
structive and positive to be
done.
, was riding a #21 bus the
other day and I saw a former
teenage rival. Back in high
school we argued for no rea-
son at all, but at the time it
seemed so important. One of
us-just had to be right over
whatever the disagreement was
about.
S'L know neither of us thought
that we would ever have a
pleasant and mature conversa-
tion. But it would be a crying
shame if we were still of the
same disposition today as we
had been in high school.
Surprisingly, my rival came
over and sat right behind me
and started to talk to me. He
knew that I wrote a weekly col-
umn for The Tribune and asked
if I was still doing so. "Yes", I
replied. He then asked me,
"What's next? What's the next
thing for Allison? You know


* ALLISON MILLER


it's important to go to the next
level."
I was so amazed at what he
said because a preacher had
delivered that message a few
weeks ago in reference to going
to the next level. Both of them
were right. Neither you nor I
can settle for where we are
individually or as a corporate
body. We should always strive
for the next level in Christian-
ity, and in our way of life. God
has given us so much to do, it
can never be completed at one
time. We should always be set-


ting our hands to every good
work.
There was a time I thought
that I could do just enough and
I would be fine. However, I'm
learning that the more you do,
the greater your desire, the
greater your drive, to accom-
plish the next step. That's a
good thing!
People always say to me that
I always have something going
on, that I am always doing
something. That's because I
understood very early in my
relationship with God that you
can never do too much. Only
what is done for Christ will last.
Life does not stop until you are
dead, so there is always some-
thing to do. When you are fin-
ished with one thing you should
move on to the next project.
Even when you feel like giv-
ing up there is something on
the inside that won't allow you
to do so. My experience is that
working for God keeps you
going. It's like some people say,
"It'll keep you".
If we work for no one else
we should always be about our
father's business and He never
has too much for us to do.


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PAGE 60, THURSDAY, NOVEMBERL17,G2005NTHE-TRIBUNE


How can we care for the earth?


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON

EARLIER this year the
bishops of the Antilles Episco-
pal conference, headed by
president Archbishop
Lawrence Burke, former arch-
bishop of Nassau and present
archbishop of Kingston
Jamaica, gathered for their
annual meeting in Surinam, the
main focus was on developing a
regional approach to ecology.
A few week ago Archbish-
op Pinder of the Archdiocese
of Nassau, distributed the offi-
cial pastoral letter to all pas-
tors and administrators of the
archdiocese of Nassau. Over
the weekend at the parish bul-
letin at Sacred Heart Parish
there was an insert with the
pastoral letter highlighting
some of the various aspects on
how we can care for the earth.
"Earth reminded us of a
Christmas tree ornament hang--
ing in the blackness of space.
As we got farther and farther
away it diminished in size.
Finally, it shrank to the size of
a marble, the most beautiful
marble you can imagine. That
beautiful, warm, living object
looked so fragile, so delicate...
seeing this has to change a per-
son, has to make a person
appreciate the creation of God
and the love of God" (Astro-
naut James Irvin)

Introduction:
We, the Bishops of the
Antilles Episcopal Conference,
recognize our duty to reflect
with Catholics, other Chris-
tians, and indeed with peoples
of other faiths in the
Caribbean, on matters that
affect all our lives.
On November 30, 2003, we
issued two Pastoral Letters,
one "Justice and Peace Shall
Embrace: Crime And Vio-
lence", and another on "Stew-
ardship and the Revitalization
of Parish Life in the
Caribbean". In the latter we
looked at the notion of stew-
ardship insofar as it pertained
to the building up of our parish
communities. We knew that
stewardship was a much wider
concept. Hence, we wrote the
following:
"The truth is that all human
beings are called to be stew-
ards of God's gift of creation,
the primary sacrifice of His
love. To thankfully take
responsibility for the integrity
of creation is an important part
of what it means to be made
in God's image. We constantly
need to be reminded and to
proclaim to the world 'The


earth and its fullness belong to
the Lord the world and all that
dwell in it' (Ps. 24: 1). We are
all in the world not as owners
but as tenants and stewards.
Waste Dumping: Illegal and
indiscriminate dumping dese-
crates the beauty of nature. It is
not unusual to see fast-food
boxes, plastic cups, food con-
tainers and scraps of paper in
public places as well as mat-
tresses and old cars in gullies,
all of which can breed disease
and contaminate aquifers and
drinking water. Discarded
tyres, stoves, refrigerators, gal-
vanized sheets, and tin cans,
also found in gullies, pose a
potential danger for increasing
airborne diseases during the
rainy season.
Solid Waste: Our landfills
can pose a threat to the envi-
ronment, especially when cans,
aluminum foil, plastics and oth-
er non-biodegradable materi-
als are dumped there It is esti-
mated that in landfills, decom-
posing garbage produces car-
bon dioxide and methane, two
greenhouse gasses. Non-
biodegradable materials such
as tin, aluminum, and other
metals take 100 to 500 years to
degenerate. Seepage from
these landfills may reach the
water table and contaminate
the ground water supply.
Liquid Waste management
is inadequate in many parts of
the region. As a result liquid
waste, including detergent
(with nitrates and phosphates)
and sewerage, impacts nega-
tively on humans through pol-
luting rivers, beaches, and the
sea. Inadequate liquid waste
management can also lead to
the death of coral and other
vital marine life. It can also
contaminate surface and
ground water supplies.
Fresh Water: "The world is
in a water crises that will grow
more acute and devastating in
the coming years unless gov-
ernments start giving higher
priority to developmental and
investment plans ... climate
change during this century with
rainy seasons becoming shorter
and more intense in some
regions and droughts longer in
other areas could imperil
species and crops and occasion
a decline in food production
globally. Hence, an escalation
in food prices and costly
imports for water scarce coun-
tries.
In the context of the above,
the United Nations Commis-
sion on Water has declared
Barbados and Haiti as water
scarce countries. In territories


where tourism is a major
source of revenue, conflicting
interests for the use of water
for irrigation, industry, urban
domestic consumers, golf
courses, and other tourism pur-
poses put a stress on our water
system. The problem is aggra-
vated by the pollution of our
rivers. Many times waste is
dumped in gullies and rivers,
and hazardous chemicals
resulting from increased devel-
opment also find their way into
our rivers. So do fertilizers, pes-
ticides, herbicides and other
harmful chemicals used in agri-
culture. Land based pollution
that finds its way into our rivers
can give rise to gastroenteritis,
diarrhoea, jaundice and rash-
es.

Some Reasons For
Concerted Action:
The most obvious and prac-
tical reason for concern is the
well being of the entire com-
munity of life on the planet, a
community that includes our
children and grandchildren. In
order for us to survive and to
enjoy the bread that the earth
gives and the fruit of the vine,
the products of human hands, it
is necessary that the ecological
systems be protected. Yet
humans are shutting down the
life support systems of our
planet through the pollution of
water, air, and soil. Since the
habitability of the earth, our
only home, is being called into
question; care for our planet
will surely be the central issue
for us. At the same time there
is much more fundamental rea-
son for concerned action, that
is the moral reason.
Finally, we turn our atten-
tion to the urgency of securing
our fresh water supply. It is
imperative that water usd be
controlled. The full coopera-
tion of every resident is urgent
for the conservation of water. It
is urgent too, that everyone
realizes that water is life, that
water is God's gift to everyone
and to other living beings as
well, and therefore think of
ways in which water can be
conserved. In many of our ter-
ritories, millions of gallons of
water and other liquid vwaste
end up in the sea. Proposals
made to our governments to
collect this water, treat it and
make it available for non-
potable uses seem worthy of
serious consideration. Hotels
and other large institutions in
the region could create rain-
harvesting projects for use in
commercial facilities. How
much of our rainwater rushes
off into the sea! The building of
water tanks and catchments in
each home, business and indus-
try for non-potable purposes is
another way of harvesting rain-
water.
SThe future of our planet, i.e.
the well being of persons and
other creatures, is in our hands,
in each of our hands. We
appeal to you to be open to
seeing the relationship between
God, human beings and other
creatures as outlined in part III
of our letter. Our own person-
al involvement is vital. Also
vital is our own conversion
towards a different lifestyle, a
different way of thinking and
behaving. We all need to be
free of "a way of life that values
consumption, convenience,
wealth, status and economic
growth above all else". It is not
wrong to want to live better.


LANDMARK
BAPTIST CHURCH

THE church on Andros
Avenue and Market Street
is scheduled to hold an
exciting night of Praise and
Worship 7:15 pm November
20. Special guests will
include Jessie Pearl, the
Signing Bishop Lawrence
Rolle, also numerous
Church Choirs and Praise
Teams will be performing.
An offering will be taken in
aid of the church's Bus
Fund.


MACEDONIA
BAPTIST
CHURCH

CONFERENCE 200.5
being held until 7 pm each
night until November 20 at
church on Bernard Road,
Fox Hill, where Rev David
S Johnson is pastor.
There will also be a
Fun/Run Walk at 6:30 am
on Saturday and health fair.
Sunday, 11 am Divine
Worship Service


T he St. Francis
Xavier Catholic
Men's Associa-
tion (SFXCMA),
which launched
the special programme for men
in 2003 through the encour-
agement of Monsignor Sime-
on Roberts and Father
Kendrick Forbes, remains
faithful to its original mission:
To build relationships, to bring
the Catholic Faith community
closer together and to project a
positive Christian male image
throughout the country.
The SFXCMA began under
the leadership of its first presi-
dent, Basil Davis, and a few
dedicated Catholic men. Then
in June 2005, the baton.was
passed to the current president,
Wellington Olander. Under his
leadership, the membership
grew from some 15 to approx-
imately 43.
At SFXCMA's monthly
meetings, members gather to
discuss, plan and execute major
fundraising projects and phil-
anthropic events and activities.


They also engage in various
social activities that have
strengthened their ties with one
another as avid churchmen.
Members conduct security
patrols around the cathedral
grounds during Mass and other
church services and activities.
They also lend assistance to the
cathedral's clergy and staff on a
daily basis.

Initiatives

Other initiatives include,
assisting the parish with cen-
sus-gathering, producing com-
memorative booklets and fund-
ing the construction and erec-
tion of the cathedral's directo-
ry at the main entrance of the
cathedral grounds.
"On a monthly basis, there
seems to be a level of excite-
ment, interest and momentum
in the association," observed
president Olander. "Our goal is
to hold meetings where mem-
bers can garner something new
that would enrich their lives as
men." He also noted that


already after Mass and other
events around the cathedral,
non-members express their
desire to join the association.
Mr. Olander sees SFXCMA as
a dynamic catalyst that is cre-
ating a renaissance at the
Cathedral Parish of St. Fran-
cis Xavier.
The association has exciting
plans for 2005-2006. Members
will focus on building relation-
ships, bringing the Catholic
Faith community closer togeth-
er and projecting a positive
Christian male image through-
out the Archdiocese and the
country at large.
These initiatives will include-
Special projects to attract more
males to the priesthood and the
religious life of the church, as
well as programmes to foster
a better understanding of what
it means to be a Catholic.
Additionally, SFXCMA will
initiate an annual celebration
to honor men for their out-
standing contributions to the
family and the wider commu-
nity.


'Over use of religious jargon


during the conventions


was almost sickening'


FROM page 1C

make it right.
I am no theologian, but I
wonder if the politicians
invoke the name of God
because they have a genuine
relationship with him or are
they simply saying what the
masses want to hear?
In reflecting on the discus-
sion, I was reminded of the
readings in the Christian
church this past weekend,
where the gospel spoke
about talents, and how each
one of us has been given dif-
ferent talents. The message
of the parable is the need to
respond to God's grace by
making a genuine effort
throughout one's life. God
has given us gifts by nature
and grace and he expects us
to use them in his service and
for the service of others. It
does not matter how many
gifts we have received. What
matters is our generosity in
putting those gifts to good
use.

Ourselves

We must live no longer for
ourselves, but for Christ. We
all have different talents, we
all have certain qualities and
virtues that we must culti-
vate to produce good fruit.
The politicians have their tal-
ents, and the preachers have
theirs. The two are often


What is wrong is that a style
of life which is presumed to be
better when it is directed
towards 'having' than 'being'
and which wants to 'have more'
not in order to 'be more' but in
order to live in enjoyment as
an end itself.
In 1979 Pope John Paul II
proclaimed St. Francis of Assisi
as the heavenly Patron of those
who promote ecology. "St.
Francis of Assisi offers Chris-
tians an example of genuine
and deep respect for the


intertwined, but one should
never supersede the other,
the mission should be uni-
fied, but not one.
The mission of the politi-
cians in most cases is self
aggrandizement in any form
shrouded in altruism, the
mission of the preacher is to
bring the message of Christ
to all people, regardless of
political ideology, race or
creed.
In the parable we see a
true, trusting master, who
takes risks by handing his
property over to his servants
while he goes abroad. He
takes risks because he trusts
them. He is willing to'invest
in their goodwill, giving them
the opportunity to do some-
thing more with their lives.
So, yes, there ought to be a
difference with political con-
ventions and religious. But
using religious music in this
country seems to be the
order of the day.
I had some out of town
guest recently and I took
them to see a Junkanoo
practice at Arawak Cay.
They were enjoying the
music, but when they saw the
vulgar movements of the
dancer to such hymns as
"Life tis so sweet to trust in
Jesus", they were appalled.
This leaves us with the ques-
tion: How far will we go in
this country to try to con-


integrity of creation. As a
friend of the poor who was
loved by God's creatures, St
Francis invited all of creation,
i.e. animals, plants, natural
forces, even Brother Sun and
Sister Moon, to give honour
and praise to the Lord. The
poor man of Assisi gives us
striking witness that when we
are at peace with God we are
better able to devote ourselves
to building up that peace with
all creation which is insepara-
ble from peace among all peo-


vince ourselves that we are a
Christian nation?
Is it necessary to break one
of the commandments every
time we have an event by
taking the name of God in
vain.

God

Any time the name of God
is used, whether in song or
in word out of scared con-
text, we are using his name in
vain. Henceforth Junkanoo
groups need to stick with the
Bahamian, reggae or soca
music for their cultural per-
formances, especially when
dancers are involved.
I would like to see the day
when a church allows their
praise team to dance to the
song "roll it gal". And polit-
ical conventions should not
become revivals, with an
undue use of a certain reli-
gious form, where delegates
dance as if they are in Club
601.
I wonder what some
preachers would say if the
same religious hymns were
used in Club 601 and young
people were dancing the way
they were seen at the con-
ventions.
It is something for us to
think about. I know the con-
versation with my friends
helped me put some things
in perspective.


pies". St. Francis interceded for
all who groaned the poor, dis-
placed, refugees, hungry,
homeless, fish, birds, animals,
polluted rivers and seas, pol-
luted air, land perishing
because of drought, and he
continues to intercede for
them.
As the Catholic Bishops of
the Antilles Episcopal Confer-
ence we place all Caribbean
people under the patronage of
St. Francis of Assisi.


Church Nolt


I I


PAGE 6C, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005


THE TRIBUNE





THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005, PAGE 70


THE TRIBUNE


nJe


KEMPB
ROAD
/xii, ,, \^....;' . M tit d


l CIh


In order to accommodate the growth of the ministry Senior Pastor, Dr. Ivan F,
Butler, Jr, and the officers of Kemp Road Ministries will be commissioning various
persons to serve in the capacity of Evangelist, Deacons and Deaconesses, All of
these persons have served faithfully in the ministry for a number of years and are
willing and able to serve. The service will be held on Sunday at 6:00 p.m. The
special guest speaker for the occasion is Bishop Albert H. Hepburn, Pastor of United
Christian Cathedral.


oin Tihe Excitment!





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