Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00254
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: November 14, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00254
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text







TO HELP ORJ I
CHILDREN i'm ovin' t,.
HIGH 81F
LOW 72F

SUNNY WITH
POSSS. SHOWER


The


Tribune


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION AGAIN


SiBAHAMAS EDITION
BAHAMAS EDITION


Volume: 101 No.290


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005


PRICE 500


REMEMBERING THOSE
WHO FELL IN WORLD WARS
* SEE TRIBUNE NEWS SECTION PAGES EIGHT AND NINE


PM's warning


to Ingraham


at start of PLP


convention


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
HUBERT Ingraham has
"placed his legacy on the line"
by-returning as leader of the
FNM, Prime Minister .Perry
Christie said at yesterday's
prayer breakfast for the opening
of the PLP's convention.
Mr Christie said he feels Mr
Ingraham's return to front-line
politics was a mistake which will
not help the FNM in their
efforts to regain the govern-
ment.
"I am really sad that he (Mr
Ingraham) came back because
he has placed his legacy on the
line. When you place your lega-
cy on the line in a battle with
the Progressive Liberal Party,
Hubert Ingraham, Perry
Christie, however one would
wish to look at it, he will lose.
"The people of the Bahamas
made a mistake. They thought
he was buried. Clearly a politi-
cal cremation is now necessary,"
he said.
When The Tribune asked Mr
Christie if he felt Mr Ingraham's
return posed a threat to the
PLP being re-elected as the gov-
ernment, he refuted this with a
vehement "no".
"The PLP was elected by the
will of the people. In our
democracy the people prevail. I
am confident that the people
are very disappointed that
Hubert Ingraham, having gone


into retirement, having spent in
retirement the people's money
by way of pension, now decides
that he should come back," he
said.
Mr Christic.fur.ther. criticized
the fact that younger FNMs
were "removed" from leader-
ship positions.
"I have no real right to
describe the obvious devasta-
tion in the leadership of the
FNM in removing a generation
of leaders out of line," he said.
Mr Christie said that he is
confident that the people will
not vote for the FNM, despite
having Mr Ingraham as leader
once again.
"He has decided now to con-
test us. We believe in this coun-
try, now is the time for the will
of the people to remain tri-
umphant. I am confident, so
confident that the people of this
country clearly understand what
the issues are. During the com-
ing days we will really attempt
to ensure that they understand,"
he said.
In an interview with The Tri-
bune, convention chairman and
Minister of Tourism Obie
Wilchcombe concurred with Mr
Christie, saying that he feels
without question that the
Bahamian population will re-
elect the PLP as the governing
party.
He said the reason was simply
SEE page 12


* PRIME Minister Perry Christie and and Deputy Prime Minister Cynthia 'Mother' Pratt praying together at a prayer breakfast at
the launch of the Progressive Liberal Party convention. See page two for more pictures.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/ Tribune Staff)


Christie 'saddened'

by Key defection


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
EDISON Key's efforts to
assist the FNM in regaining
the government will prove
unsuccessful, Prime Minis-
ter Perry Christie told The
Tribune yesterday.
Attending the prayer
breakfast for the start of the
PLP's 49th convention, Mr
Christie said that he was
"very saddened" to see Mr
Key, a former PLP senator,


join ranks with the FNM.
"It is so sad for me to see
someone who is in the obvi-
ous twilight of his political
life, and really the twilight
of his years in politics and
public service, who has done
so much for the PLP, just
throw it into the wind. When
you throw something into
the wind, it just goes," he
said.
In a surprise move at the
SEE page 13


PLP 'hopes to keep

on Cynthia Pratt'
* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE PLP hopes to retain Deputy Prime Minister Cynthia
Pratt within the bounds of the party, and win back former MP
and cabinet minister Dr B J Nottage.
PLP convention chairman Obie Wilchcombe said yester-
day that the PLP believes that Mrs Pratt still has much to
offer the country and that the country respects her highly.
"She has served our country as acting prime minister in the
past and did a gallant job. We believe that she is the prime
SEE page 12


Policeman
and civilian
die after
accidents

* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
A POLICE officer and a
civilian died over the weekend
as a result of two separate traf-
fic accidents.
The deaths of Constable Ter-
rel Smith of New Providence
and a 30-year-old man from
Grand Bahama bring the num-
ber of traffic fatalities for the
year up to 56.
After fighting for his life for
more than five months follow-
ing a two-vehicle collision in
June, police officer Terrel
Smith finally died of complica-
tions due to his injuries.
The 29-year-old officer, a
motor-cyclist attached to the
Traffic Division, died at his
home in New Providence on
Friday after 7pm.
In June, Mr Smith sustained
life-threatening injuries when a
car crashed into him, knocking
him off his motor-cycle.
SEE page 12


Youths are

sought for

robbery at

gas station
* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
FREEPORT Grand
Bahama police are searching
for three young men in connec-
tion with the armed robbery of
the Texaco Service Station in
Lewis Yard on Saturday.
Inspector Loretta Mackey,
assistant press liaison officer,
reported that the bandits
entered the service station
around 12.50pm. She said one
was armed with a silver hand-
gun and demanded cash.
According to police, an
employee and several customers
were inside the service station at
the time of the robbery.
The culprits robbed the estab-
lishment of an undetermined
amount of the cash, and the
employee and customers of
their cell phones.
They got into a white delivery
truck with no licence plate
SEE page 12


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PAGE2, ONDA, NVEMER 1,205 TH TRBUN


PLP launches convention




with prayer breakfast


* WITH Deputy
Prime Minister
Cynthia 'Mother'
Pratt by his side,
Prime Minister
Perry Christie
speaks at the PLP
Prayer Breakfast.
(Photo: Mario
Duncanson/
Tribune staff)


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* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
PRIME Minister Perry Christie
yesterday paid special homage to
Deputy Prime Minister Cynthia
Pratt at the party's prayer break-
fast, which marked the beginning
of the PLP's 49th annual conven-
tion.
Scores of PLP supporters filled
the Wyndham Nassau Resort
ballroom on Sunday, where Mr
Christie pointed out that Mrs
Pratt is a "woman of God."
He added that she does not
have to preach from the book
about her community because she
lives in and with her community:
Mr Christie invited Mrs Pratt
on the stage and told PLPs:
"When God chose me to step
aside (alluding to his illness earli-
er this year) I had the confidence
in this lady to make her the acting
prime minister of the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas.
"I say right now in the pres-
ence of all of you and the Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas, I am
able to sleep so well at night
knowing that to my right hand
stands this lady..."
Rev Timothy Stewart, senior
pastor at Bethel Baptist church,
urged PLPs and the Bahamian
community to keep on working
"until the road you've trod leads
unto your God."


Perry Christie pays

tribute to Deputy PM


In an interview with The Tri-
bune yesterday, convention chair-
man Obie Wilchcombe said the
Bahamian people can expect a
very mature organisation from
the PLP's convention.

Future
"We are going to spend our
time this week talking about our
country, where our country is and
where our country is going. We
are going to show the Bahamian
people that we are a party of
thoughtful men and women.
Additionally, that we are a party
focused on the future of the coun-
try. We do not worry about elec-
tions, we worry about genera-
tions."
He stressed that the PLP is not
going to play on persons' emo-
tions, but will deal with the issues
at hand.
"We are going to face some
issues and talk about them 'as
frank as we possibly can.


"We have our problems in our'
country.
"We all have our problems, not
one particular party.
"We inherited some problems,
but that is what you inherit when'
you become a government. So'
because of that we have to carry
on, and we don't point fingers
and we just seek to deliver to the-
Bahamian people good gover-
nance."
Expressing his opinion on the
progress of the government, he
told The Tribune that no govern-r
ment has done more than the
PLP in the three-and-a-half years
it has been in power.
"Investors have come to this
nation in large numbers and with
large dollars, as never happened
before.
"We are building on a founda-
tion, a foundation we are
very proud of," said Mr Wilch-
combe.
Keynote speaker at tonight's
convention will be Deputy Prime
Minister Cynthia Pratt.


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THE TRIBUNE,


PAGE 2, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005


R


65%*








THE T E M, NE 1, 2


Mitchell:

Bahamas

should

celebrate

cultural

diversity
By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Bahamas is a country
built by immigration a coun-
try which should celebrate its
cultural diversity, Minister of
Foreign Affairs Fred Mitchell
told students of Lyford Cay
School.
Speaking at the special
occasion of 'international day'
at the school on Friday, the
minister sought to convey to
assembled students the impor-
tance of the United Nations
organisation to the Bahamas.
"People from Africa and
Europe replaced the original
inhabitants of these islands.
After that people from as far
afield as Asia, the Pacific and
the Antipodes came to live
within our shores. All of us
make an exciting and dynamic
society," he said.
Mr Mitchell emphasised
that it is important for
Bahamians to "salute" their
diversity.
"We must learn to
acknowledge those differ-
ences and see them as some-
thing of which we ought to be
proud, yet at the same time
recognise that it is by our vari-
eties that we make the world a
more exciting and dynamic
place,',' he said.
Seeking to illustrate the
importance of the United
Nations organisation to the
students, Mr Mitchell
explained some of the non-
political aspects of the UN
which touch Bahamian lives.
"The United Nations Edu-
cation Scientific and Cultural
Organisation (UNESCO) in
Paris promotes what its title
says education, science and
culture. The Bahamas has an
ambassador to UNESCO,
Sidney Poitier, and he does an
excellent job in representing
our interests there," he said.
Mr Mitchell also talked
i about'the United Nations
Children's Fund (UNICEF),
which promotes the rights of
the child.
"In our own region, the
United Nations has a peace
mission in the sister nation
Haiti to our south, trying to
bring peace and stability in
that l4nd," he said.
Heifurther told the Lyford
Cay students that the
Bahamnas has committed itself
to the Millennium Develop-
ment oals.
"We renewed that commit-
ment just this past September.
Those goals include ensuring
gender equality, universal
access to primary school edu-
catio4, a commitment to sus-
tainable development, and
cutting poverty in half by the
year 4015," he said.
Mr Mitchell said the
Bahamas is well on its way to
achieVing that objective.
"The statistics show that in
2001, some 9.3 per cent of the
people of the country lived in
poverty. We are committed
therefore to cutting that in
half 4y the year 2015. Just as
somerof us would wish a goal
of reaching the status of a
developed country by the year
2020,' he said.
In {losing, the minister
encouraged the students to
seek careers in the interna-
tional civil service as workers
at the UN or in the foreign
service.

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Ingraham calls for


greater attention to


voter registration


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
AS ONE of the first points on the FNM's new
agenda, party leader Hubert Ingraham is urging his
party officers to pay greater attention to voter reg-
istration.
Speaking at Saturday night's installation ban-
quet for the newly-elected FNM principals, Mr
Ingraham emphasised the need for this greater atten-
tion in view of a possible early general election.
"I urge that you turn your attention to voter reg-
istration, particularly as regards all those who failed
to register to vote in the last election, and for those
young people who would have become 18 since the
last election.
"Those of us who registered in the last election
are on the current register and remain eligible to
vote in any new election which might be called ear-
ly and at short notice."
Mr Ingraham told his fellow FNMs that the "next
year or so in this country will be a time of test and
trial."
Quoting from one the United States' founding
fathers, Thomas Paine, Mr Ingraham said "these
will be times in this country that will try the very
souls of Bahamians."
Mr Ingraham further confirmed that as new par-
ty leader it is his "full intention to involve intrinsi-
cally in the work and the administration of this
organisation all those who seek better for our
Bahamas." *
"Over the past few days the Free National Move-
ment went through a season of re-definition, of
rearrangement, nay change, which will help us to be
victorious at the polls in the next general elections,"
he said.
Mr Ingraham also took the opportunity of the
installation banquet to recognise immediate past
deputy leader Sidney Collie, whom he inadvertent-


ly neglected to mention on Friday night, declaring
that he expects Mr Collie to be a parliamentary
candidate in the next election.
"Sidney, you have been in the FNM a long time;
you suffered when you stood up as a school princi-
pal in South Andros. It's time for you to move up
and forward to a higher rank in our organisation. As
a consequence, I confidently expect that you will be
on our team of 40 candidates in the forthcoming
election."


Two in hospital



after shooting,



traffic accident


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

TWO men are in hospital
fighting for their lives today
following a shooting incident
at a basketball court and a
traffic accident.
Shortly after 2am yesterday,
a man sustained severe
injuries when he lost control
of his motor-cycle and was
thrown on to the pavement on
West Bay Street, near the San-
dals Resort.
He was unconscious when
he was taken to Princess Mar-
garet Hospital, where up until
press time last night he was
listed in critical condition.
Police have not yet identi-
fied the man, and are asking
for assistance.
The man was driving a blue
and white 600 Suzuki with
licence plate number 2491.

Investigating

Police are also investigating
the shooting of a 37-year-old
man of McCullough Corner.
According to reports, the
man and a female friend were
at the basketball court on East
Street, when shortly after mid-
night a man armed v4ith a
handgun suddenly started fir-
ing shots at the couple.


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The McCullough Corner
man received woundsapo his
right chestVand wasirt s t|p
hospital. :
He is listed in critical condi-.
tion.
Investigations are also
underway into the armed-rob-
bery of,a popular eatery,
which resulted in a security
officer being shot in his
leg.
Around midnight on Satur-
day, two armed men entered
Double D's take-out restau-
rant on East Bay Street.
One man threatened the
cashier and forced him into a
booth, while he robbed the
cash register and demanded
jewellery and money from the
restaurant's patrons.
As the eatery's on-duty
security guard attempted to
intervene, the second man
shot him in his right leg.
The gunmen then left the
restaurant and at gunpoint
forced a man who was parked
outside to drive them to the
rear of Double D's.
At the corner of York and
Ernest Streets, at the back of
the restaurant, the two men
then continued their escape
on foot.
The security guard was
rushed to hospital, where he
has since been treated and dis-
charged.


INDEX 1-


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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE








PAGI4OMODA, OVEBE 14205EHEDRIUN


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
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Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Ingraham back at helm of FNM


AFTER the excitement and public interest
generated by last week's FNM convention, the
PLP will find it difficult to maintain the:same
momentum when its convention opens this
evening.
Although PLP chairman Raynard Rigby
has promised that this week's convention will
entertain and outshine the FNM's, many think
it will be the usual PLP show without sub-
stance. There might be more music, there might
be more and gaudier pom-poms, but the same
desire for a change to get the country back on
course will not be there.
Hubert Ingraham resisted the call -t lead-
ership to the bitter end. He kept slamming the
door on public cries for his return. Then their
voices, like a violent tsunami smashed down'his
resistance, and swept him to the front. Only
those who daily pounded at his closed door
know how difficult it was to break down. There
were times when they gave up in despair.
"We've lost our man!" was the wail that trick-
led down the line. But others would not take
"no" for an answer. Even those who were told
"if you are my friend you won't do this to me,"
and others who got the blunt order: "You need-
n't call me back; I don't want to discuss it fur-
ther", refused to give up. There was a group
that intended to put his name forward at con-
vention without his consent and dare him to
face the people and say: "No." It was easy to
say no to friends who came in small groups, or
who called on the telephone, but was he strong
enough to face the people?
In the end the will of the people prevailed.
He had just settled down to a way of life
that he was enjoying. He had rebuilt his law
practice and was doing well. All outside pres-
sures were off and he could go fishing when he
liked. And if there is one thing that Mr Ingra-
ham does like it is a weekend of good fishing in
the crystal clear waters of the Bahamas. But the
people weren't interested. They demanded he
give it all up for his country.
In his acceptance speech at the convention's
close Friday night he recalled that 20 years
ago when the PLP dumped him overboard in
"shark infested waters, firing heavy artillery
at me while I swam for my political life, you vol-
untarily came to my rescue.
"Instead of helping to kill me politically you
called a unilateral ceasefire and instructed your
supporters throughout the Bahamas and most
especially in North Abaco, to support me."
Bahamians were now calling on him to save
them and their country. As they had not
refused him in his hour of need, how could he


now turn his back on them? A crisis of con,
science overcame him.
By the time the FNM convention opened
last Tuesday he was on board and by week's
end he was once again captain of the ship.
Yesterday morning Prime Minister Perry
Christie held a prayer breakfast for his sup-
porters. In an interview afterwards he expressed
his regret that Edison Key, a lifetime PLP, had
joined the FNM. He commented that what Mr
Key wanted a change of government-
would "not prevail".
"Perry Christie was the first Bahamian to
win an international medal in field events, to
win a medal internationally, one who has been
committed to preparation," Mr Christie told
our reporter as a reminder to Mr Key. "The
Lord gave Perry Christie a message. Look at
Perry Christie and look at the transformation,
you can see therefore the discipline, the dedi-
cation and the commitment. There is no Edison
Key, there is no Hubert Ingraham and there is
no FNM that can substitute itself or themselves
for the will of the people of this country."
We don't think Mr Ingraham got a message
from the Lord, but he did get a loud and clear
message from the Bahamian people. And at
the FNM installation banquet Saturday night
Mr Ingrahain made it clear that he could ,not:
..deliver the government to them without their
ul support. "Tonight I invite all FNMs" ad`
indeed all Bahamians to come along with me on
this quest."
He called his troops together. After the elec-
tion those who lost the contest rose to the occa-
sion, put personal ambitions behind them and
pledged their full support. As Dion Foulkes,
who with Tommy Turnquest, was defeated as
leader, made it clear he was born an FNM,
and would remain loyal to the end. And while
detractors had hoped that a wedge would have
been driven..between.Mr Ingraham and Mr
Turnquest, this did not happen.
The team was together and ready for polit-
Sical battle. Mr Ingraham wasted no time in
mending fences and gathering his troops. He
urged Bahamians to register to vote, and FNMs
who had fallen by the wayside to return to the
fold.
He had no messianic vision about himself,
but agreeing with Mr Foulkes that "one man
can't provide victory", he reminded his sup-
porters that "one man can make a hell of a
difference in an election."
He hoped that he was that man. Again, as
Mr Christie has acknowledged, the Bahamian
people will decide the victory.


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displayed


EDITOR, The Tribune
Larry Smith in his Novem-
ber 2 column in The Tribune dis-
cussed "the internet and the
growing power of the blog." His
discussion of this new phenom-
enon was comprehensive includ-
ing its virtues and limitations.
A good illustration on how a
"Blogging" works is the follow-
ing "posting" made recently on
the Bahama Pundit website.
This posting is the latest in an
exchange of comments following
"On Why Free Trade Isn't
Free", an article originally
entered into the website by one
of its contributors.
A Pundit in a posting dated
November 4th stated that my
comments of October 28th did
not "prove my position is erro-
neous; rather, they seem to rein-
force it."
This is an amazing conclu-
sion and warrants further com-
ment.
1.) "In pure theory Commu-
nism is as democratic as the
American electoral system."
(Bahama Pundit).
This comparison is so narrow
that it is without substance. The
valid comparison is 72-years of
Communism in Russia versus
229-years of Democracy in the
United States.
"The catastrophe of Commu-
nism included the creation of a
totalitarian state; the reintro-
duction of slave labour on an
epic scale; and politically
induced famines and govern-
ment created poverty of
unprecedented proportions;
political purges and mass exe-
cutions resulting in the deaths
of an estimated 100 million peo-
ple."(i).. . ..
The absolute horror of the
Russian experience can be
grasped in the work of Alek-
sander Solzhenitsyn or in the
callous statement attributed to
Josef Stalin 'The death of one
person was tragic, the death of a
million a mere 'statistic'." (ii)
According to its founders,
Communism was a state where
all classes were absorbed into
the "proletariat" and the state
withered away. It was the utopia
envisaged by Karl Marx that his-
torically followed from Capital-
ism and Socialism.(iii)
This utopia proved to be an
illusion that unfortunately cap-
tivated liberals of the West for
decades; in practice the state did
not wither away; and after 72
years Communism failed com-
pletely.
Pundit's statement ignores
this history and trivializes both
the Communist and American
experiences.
2.) "If your economy is not a


50% off


SStorewide


producer [of computers, tele-
phones, satellites and pro-
grammes] you have begun at a
disadvantage, and your trade
can't be free." (Bahama Pun-
dit).
This statement has two
dimensions: the conditions for
growth and the wisdom of free
trade. With regard to the first,
my original statement contended
that Ireland was a good example
of what is possible for a small
underdeveloped country.
Ireland is a small island coun-
try that experienced poverty and
starvation on a massive scale in
the mid 19th century and
achieved independence in 1922
after a 3-year guerilla war with
Great Britain. After 1960 it
reformed its education system.
At that time Ireland did not
provide universal secondary
education and its tertiary sys-
tem was limited. In the 1970s it
aggressively courted foreign
investment in high tech compa-
nies in Ireland. It provided them
with a unique investment envi-
ronment that included one of
the best educated populations
in Europe.
It succeeded admirably; it got
a high-tech light manufacturing
base; and it became the centre
for financial services in the
European Union. In the 1980s
Ireland also conquered a crip-
pling tendency to fiscal irre-
sponsibility. In one generation
it went from the poorest country
in the European Union to the
most prosperous.
This seems to support the
proposition that, for the
Bahamas, Ireland is one good
example of what is possible.
Ghana and South Korea.
One can also find clues about
the "conditions for growth" by
looking at pairs of countries.
With a real sense of drama one
can contrast "resource rich"
Argentina and "resource poor"
Japan after World War II.
Samuel Huntington, a Politi-
cal Scientist from Harvard, uses
two countries that had similar
natural resource endowments:
"In the early 1990s, I hap-
pened to come across economic
data on Ghana and South Korea
in the early 1960s, and I was
astonished to see how similar
their economies were then.
These two countries had rough-
ly comparable levels of per capi-
ta GNP; similar divisions of their
economy among primary prod-
ucts, manufacturing, and ser-
vices; and overwhelmingly pri-
mary product exports, with
South Korea producing a few
manufactured goods. Also, they
were receiving comparable lev-
els of economic aid.
"Thirty years later, South
Korea had become an industrial
giant with the fourteenth largest
economy in the world, multina-
tional corporations, major
exports of automobiles, elec-
tronic equipment, and other
sophisticated manufacturers, and
a per capita income approxi-,
mating that of Greece.
Moreover, it was on its way
to the consolidation of democ-
ratic institutions.
No such changes had occurred
in Ghana, whose per capita
GNP was now about one-fif-
teenth that of South Korea's.
"How could this extraordi-
nary difference in development
be explained? Undoubtedly,
many factors played a role, but it
seemed to me that culture had
to be a large part of the expla-
nation. South Koreans valued
thrift, investment, hard work,
education, organization, and dis-
cipline. Ghanaians had differ-
ent values.(iv)
Samuel Huntington con-
cludes "In short, cultures count."
Thomas Friedman, the New
York Times journalist, claims


that these elements cannot be
defined; he siniply calls them
"the intangible things."(v)
Orlando Patterson, a Har-
vard University Sociologist,
states that "culture is a reper-
toire of socially transmitted and
intra-generationally generated
ideas about how to live and
make judgments, both in gener-
al terms and in regard to specif-
ic domains of life." (vi)
The point is that these basic
factors facilitate constructive
societal change and should be
discussed and highlighted.
3.) "To compete, we make
other nations richer, because we
don't control the basic materials
and objects (and...skills, and
attitudes, though we have more
control over them) needed to
become competitive." (Bahama
Pundit).
This statement in part is
based on the fallacy that, when
two parties exchange goods
and/or services, it is not likely
to be a win-win exchange for
both parties since one is
inevitably more "powerful." For
Pundit this takes on even greater
meaning if one of the parties is a
foreign-owned corporation,
hence the conclusion that trade
makes "other nations richer."
This is an "accepted" and
"popular" assertion that has its
roots in the economics of Karl
Marx and not Adam Smith and
his successors. Pundit does not
provide evidence to support the
assertion whereas the under-.
signed did so with an "Alternate
History of Free Trade."
Furthermore, the underde-
veloped nation can "control" its
intangibles if it has the national
will.
The World Bank's Latin
American and Caribbean Stud-
ies Group in a recent
study "Closing the Gap in
Education and Technology"
builds on the concept of
"Human Capital", these are
investments in human resources
that improve
productivity. The Group
develops the theory that there
is a strong interaction between
Human Capital (the quantity
and quality of the knowledge
base) and a society's ability, to
absorb foreign technology; to
adapt and modify that technol-
ogy; and then to create new
technologies.
The success of this process is
a key ingredient to economic
growth. (vii).
Taking refuge in "popular"
assertions only diverts attention
and energy from the more
important tasks at hand.
References!
[i] David Horowitz, Unholy
Alliance, Regnery, 2004, page
55.
[ii] Martin Amis, Koba The
Dread: Laughter And The
Twenty Million, Talk Miramax
Books, New York, 2002.
[iii] The MIT Dictionary of
Modern Economics, The MIT
Press, 1999, page 69. :
[iv] Samuel P. Huntington,
"Cultures Count", in Culture
Matters: How Values Shape
Human Progress, Edited by
Lawrence E. Harrison and
Samuel P. Huntington, Basic
Books, 2003, page xiii. I
[v] Thomas L Friedman, The
World Is Flat: A Brief History
of the Twenty-First Century,
Farrar, Strauss and Giroux,
2005, p. 330.
[vi] Orlando Patterson, "Tak-
ing Culture Seriously: A Frame-
work and an Afro-American
Illustration", page 208, in Cul-
ture Matters.
[vii] David De Ferranti et all,
"Closing the Gap in Educatio-
nand Technology", The World
Bank Latin American and
Caribbean Studies Group,
Washington, D.C., 2003, page 1.


RALPH J MASSEY
The Nassau Institute
Nassau
November 10 2005


T ( ) M S -
stli tewaehoi t ec 'ht)r.-


SJllVl'y


I


I


PAGE 4, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


PAW







MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


ahrtu -





..Ot eS. *0r6 ?


THERE is simply no
denying it: the
return of Hubert Ingraham
to the leadership of the Free
National Movement has set
in train one of those
sequences of events that
everyone senses will end in
dramatic fashion.
FNMs, of course, will be
hoping that the only person
ever to lead them to elec-
toral victory will prove able
to do it again when the call
comes.
1In the PLP camp, the
response is more mixed and
muted. Predictably, Fred
Mitchell's once and future
website led the attack on the
Brutus Ingraham who, it
alleges, deserves to be dri-
vei from Bahamian politics
fpr the sake not only of all
Bahamians, but for FNMs
more specifically. Equally
predictably (but even less
believably in light of how
much the site devotes to the
matter), it claims that no-
one is afraid of the big, bad
Hubiggity anyway.
' Privately, most PLPs must
and do realise that Mr Ingra-
ham's return has significant-
1y lengthened the odds of
their retaining power in the
fashion that they captured it
three years ago.
According to some news
sources, some PLPs are now
frantically hoping that ex-
leadership contender Dr
Bernard J Nottage will
choose now to re-enter the
fray of mainstream politics,
and will choose a return to
the PLP at its upcoming con-
vention as the most
favourable entr6e.

Resistant
As this': column has
observed on more than one
occasion, Dr Nottage is a
politician who should not be
taken lightly for a number
of .reasons. Firstly, as his
continuing efforts with the
CDR demonstrate, he seems
to have a genuine passion
for, national development,
not just winning office. This
may seem a natural trait in
any politician in a country
'that is so tantalisingly close
ye't so stubbornly resistant
to 'making the leap out of
'developing-country' status.
Unfortunately, it has been
'&'very rare trait indeed
among the two generations
of politicians that we have
seqn since independence.
Both parties are stacked to
the brim with obvious blue-
plate seekers and empty ves-
-sls, longing for the glory and
perks of office, but who take
liftle interest in the issues of






IPa-I '






MONDAY,
NOVEMBER 14
6A30 Bahamas @ Sunrise Live
11:00 Immediate Response
12noon ZNS News Update Live
12:03 Caribbean Today News


PERSPECTIVES


AN D R


E W


government until they are
confronted with .them.
(From the crop now being
touted as the incoming gen-
eration of both parties, this
trend appears to have a good
deal of life left in it).

Principle

So the sight of a main-
stream politician giving up
the prospect of high office
on a matter of principle is
one that wins admiration
among voters who are accus-
tomed to the dismal norm of
style over substance.
It is no coincidence that
both the last two Prime Min-
isters sacrificed high minis-
terial jobs in one of the most
dramatic acts of principled
defiance in our political his-
tory.
Of course, this does not
mean that Bahamians do not
love the sometimes shallow
show and glitz of politics.
They absolutely love it. But


A LLEN


in Dr Nottage, as in Mr
Ingraham, they can sense a
serious, committed individ-
ual at the core of the politi-
cal animal that he undoubt-
edly is. That explains the
almost electric response that
both he and Mr Ingraham
have elicited among the
ranks of their respective par-
ties.
Secondly, like Ingraham,
Dr Nottage is uncomfortable
playing any role in a team
other than its leader, espe-
cially if being part of the
team involves deferring to
others who are clearly less
suited to the role.
It is this trait that makes
his return to the PLP at this
time unlikely. Although the
rumoured impending pro-
motion of Cynthia Pratt to
Government House would
indeed open up both the safe
seat in St Cecilia and the
Deputy Premiership, noth-
ing in his career to date sug-
gests that Dr Nottage has


Ninety-two immigrants

are apprehended

THE Royal Bahamas Defence Force was kept busy over the
weekend as they apprehended two groups of Haitians totalling
some 92 immigrants.
The groups, a total of 78 men and 14 women, were found onboard
40ft Haitian sloops. These recent arrests brings the number Haitians
detained by the Force in the last four days to 212.
Early on Sunday morning, while conducting a routine patrol of
the central Bahamas, the HMBS P-43 detained 50 Haitian immi-
grants about 18 miles southeast of East End Point, New Provi-
dence.
On Friday evening, the HMBS P-43 intercepted 42 Haitians
just west of Little Farmer's Cay in the Exumas.
The Haitians, who all appeared to be in good physical condition,
were brought to the capital and turned over to immigration officials
for processing.
Most of them said they were from Port-de-Paix, Haiti, and that
their intended destination was Nassau.
Some said that deteriorating conditions in their impoverished
homeland forced them to make the journey in the hope of finding
work in the Bahamas.
Defence Force officials said that although they are admittedly
challenged by this. recent apparent influx of illegal Haitian immi-
grants attempting to make landfall in the Bahamas, they will do all"
within their powers to safeguard the borders of this country.
"We will continue to strategically place our assets in the known
paths of these Haitian sloops, and hopefully will continue to be suc-
cessful in our efforts to intercept them," said one official.
SEE today's INSIGHT section on
the Haitian immigration problem


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been grooming himself to be
Perry Christie's deputy.
Then there is the question
of how he would jettison the
(CDR) party apparatus that
he has spent the last eight
years creating.
In that time, the party's
well-articulated develop-
ment agenda has demon-
strated its leader's strong
commitment to develop-
mental issues that have
received lacklustre attention
under all previous govern-
ments.
The thought of him agree-
ing to merge with perhaps
the most lacklustre govern-
ment of all, on terms reflect-
ing that government's
incumbent status and his
own relative marginalisation,
is slightly fanciful.
The rub is that the stag-
nant public service culture,
dead-hand centralisation,
directionless investment pol-
icy, half-conceived industri-
al policy and non-existent
immigration policy that the
CDR has so loudly
bemoaned are now
entrenched pillars of PLP
philosophy, or at least PLP
culture.

Replaced

These would have to go
and be replaced by some-
thing visibly and meaning-
fully different in order to
attract someone of Dr Not-
tage's calibre back to the
party.
And like Groucho Marx,
who refused to be part of
any club that would have
him, Dr Nottage is unlikely
to want to be part of any
party: that would throw out
its on anemic philosophy
just to get i l i ''
deputy.


TRADESMAN'S NOTICE FOR



JAMES OWEN,
BICA, MAAT, FCCA.



This is to notify the public and business community thal
MR. JAMES WILLIAM OWEN, former Financial
Controller of The CSB5 Group of Companies, is no
longer employed in this or any other capacity, effective 2
November, 2005. As such, he is not authorized to transaci
any business for the following companies or entities: -

* Dr. Conville S. Brown or Associates
* The CSB5 Group of Companies
* The CSB5 Management Company, Ltd.
* Cee Bee Investments, Ltd.
* CSB Holdings, Ltd.
* The Bahamas Center for Heart Disease, Ltd.
* The Bahamas Heart Center
* The Bahamas Chest Center Laboratory and Pharmacy
* The Bahamas Imaging Center and Nuclear Division
* The Bahamas Interventional Cardiology Center
* The Bahamas Institute of Radiotherapy, Ltd.
* Radiation Therapy Services Bahamas, Ltd.
* Radiation Therapy Services Shareholders, Ltd.
* The.Centreville Medical Pavilion
* The Centreville Medical Pavilion Imaging Center
*The Centreville Medical Pavilion Executive Physical Program,
* The Centreville Medical Pavilion Development Company, Ltd.i,
* Cee Bee Air Company, Ltd.
* Sunrise Medical Centre, Ltd.
* The Bahamas Heart Center Freeport, Ltd.

We are therefore not liable for any debts he may incur
on their behalf as of 2 November, 2005.


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A tale of three trade talks


* By Sir Ronald Sanders
(The writer is a business exec-
utive and former Caribbean
diplomat who publishes widely
on Small States in the global
community).
F ROM Argentina
through Anguilla to
London and Geneva,
trade talks that will affect the
people of the Caribbean
searched for answers to trade
problems at the start of Novem-
ber creating greater uncertainty
for Caribbean economies.
The first of the these talks
was the Summit of The Ameri-
cas held in Argentina with
almost- all of the Heads of Gov-
ernment of Central and South
America present alongside
George W Bush,-the President
of the United States, and Paul
Martin, the Prime Minister of
Canada.


No head of government of
the Organisation of Eastern
Caribbean States (OECS)
attended. It may be that they
had decided ahead of time that
the Summit had nothing on
offer for their countries. Other
CARICOM Heads did attend.
But, the Summit produced
no progress on the much vaunt-
ed Free Trade Area of the
Americas (FTAA) which
should have been completed
this year.
Two opposing views
emerged at the meeting. One,
pushed by the US, Canada and
Mexico, wanted to set an April
deadline for talks; a second,
view from Brazil, Argentina,
Uruguay, Paraguay and
Venezuela urged the postpon-
ing of movement on the FTAA
until after a World Trade
Organisation (WTO) Ministe-
rial meeting in Hong Kong in
December.


Given the significant weight
he is throwing around, it is
arguable that there was a third
view the loudly stated per-
sonal position of Venezuelan
President Hugo Chavez who
pronounced the FTAA "dead"
at a protest rally not far from
the official meeting.
In the end, the Communiqu6
of the meeting declared: "The
conditions do not exist to attain
a hemisphere free trade accord
that is balanced and fair, with
access to markets, that is free
of subsidies and distorting prac-
tices". It was also agreed that
officials will resume negotia-
tions "during 2006".
The only useful reference for
CARICOM countries in the
Summit declaration was that the
FTAA negotiations would take
account of the need for special
treatment for small
economies. This was a point
that was insisted upon by the


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CARICOM leaders who were
present at the summit. Without
it, it is difficult to see what real
benefits there would be for
CARICOM countries in the
FTAA.
In any event, President
George Bush had had enough
of the meeting before it came to
an end. He took off for Brazil
where he was paying a state vis-
it, and forced the Brazilian Pres-
ident Luiz Lula da Silva to
depart as well. This occasioned
an exodus of leaders, leaving
officials to wind-up the meet-
ing.

few days later, all but
A. two OECS leaders
did gather in Anguilla. The
Prime Ministers of St Vincent &
The Grenadines and Grenada
were absent.
According to a report by the
Caribbean Media Corporation
(CMC), St Kitts-Nevis Prime
Minister Denzil Douglas gave
the clearest indication yet that
the member states of the OECS
might not be part of the
Caribbean Single Market and
Economy (CSME) scheduled
to be operational by the end of
this year.
Dr Douglas is reported to
have said the establishment of a
Regional Development Fund
from which the OECS can draw
"is a condition of our full par-
ticipation in the Caribbean Sin-
gle Market".
The failure to create this
Fund had long been seen by
Caribbean commentators as a
stumbling block to the creation
of the CSME with full partici-
pation of all CARICOM states
particularly the OECS. It is an
issue that should have been
-efl gnised and, addressed by
CARICOM ,leaders from the
beginning.
Why OECS governments left
it so late in the day to raise this
as an obstacle, and why the larg-
er CARICOM countries and
the CARICOM Secretariat did
not themselves insist on machin-
ery being put in place to address
the problem is a distinct puz-
zle.
Whatever the reason, the
problem is now confronting
CARICOM and it will not go
away. It needs to be managed
swiftly, and in ways that will
reassure. the .OECS govern-
ments.
At the end of their Anguilla
meeting, the OECS Heads did


* SIR Ronald Sanders

not indicate in their official
Communique what they pro-
posed to do about the CSME,
but it is obviously a lingering
issue,. particularly as .they
seemed to have accepted the
proposition of forming an
OECS Economic Union on the
basis of a new binding treaty.

Amongst the charac-
tetistics of the Eco'-
nomic Union would be the
"upgrading (of) the current
OECS Secretariat into the
'Eastern Caribbean Commis-
sion', and provided Commis-
sioners with the responsibility
to prepare legislation for the.
Authority to approve, as well
as to strengthen the linkages
between the proposed Com-
mission and Member States".
The idea of a Commission
was proposed to CARICOM
Heads of government by the
West India Commission in 1992
but it was not implemented. It
was proposed again in connec-
lioniwiththe governance of the
-CSMEv but again no action has
been taken. Clearly the OECS
countries recognise the value of
the Commission structure in the
governance of their economic
union. In this regard, the OECS
is moving ahead of CARICOM.
If such an Economic Union
is created and the OECS mem-
bers then join the CSME as a
single entity, this may very well
prove to be a good develop-
ment for CARICOM as a
whole. It has to be hoped in the
interest of the region as a whole
that this is the intention.
The OECS meeting, like the
Summit of the Americas, con-
sidered the WTO ministerial
meeting to be held in Hong


Kong in December.' In the
Communique the OECS Heads
"emphasised the need of a
strong and focused OECS team
to represent the sub-region's
interests".

here will be need for a
strong, technical team
and political team not only at,
the OECS level, but at the lev-
el of CARICOM as a whole.
For, the WTO director-geneal,
Pascal Lamy, has already said
that he does not believe that
discussion of matters such as
"small economies, preference
erosion and specific special and
differential treatment propos-
als have revealed any signifi-
cant substantive advances".
Indeed, the discussions held
in London by the so called,
"Five Interested parties" the
European Union (EU), the US,
India, Australia and Brazil -
ended up in failure with the EU
and Brazilian representatives
blaming each other for the
breakdown.
The sticking point was the
refusal of the EU to make any-
more concessions on reducing
its subsidies to its already very
wealthy farmers, and the relpc-
tance of the developing coun-
tries to reduce tariffs on indus-
trial goods and open their mar-
kets to services including bank-
ing and telecommunications
until the EU particularly but
the US as well-cuts their farm
subsidies.

A wider meeting con-
vened in Geneva by
Mr Lamy was also unsuccess-
ful in creating a blueprint that
could be taken to the Hong
Kong Ministerial. Mr Lamy
declared that the meeting did
not have "a sufficient level of
convergence".
It has been agreed therefore
that the expectations of the
Hong Kong meeting should be
lowered in order for it not to
be declared another failure.
This is a good development
for the Caribbean whose inter-
ests have not yet! been taken
into account in any of these pre-
liminary discussions that have
taken place.
There is no good reason why
the Caribbean and indeed
the Africa, Caribbeaa. iifl
Pacific (ACP) group should
give an inch until they gettirp
undertakings that their ,vital
interests will be addr6sged
meaningfully. r
It should be recalled tlhal.t
the WTO, it is one countryofle
vote. As a group, the A!P'
should stand up for better rea-
ment or stall the talks untilth.y
get the world's attention. $
Responses to: roniald-
sanders29@hotmail.com


ANNOUNCEMENT

Bryan A Glinton, Roy W M Sweeting & Andrew G S O'Brien II
are pleased to announce the formation of their partnership and the opening'
their chambers on the 1 st day of November 2005 for the practice
of law under the name of:




G INTaN I SW. N G I ...I..


COUNSEL & ATTOR NEYS-AT-LAW




303 SHIRLEY STREET, P 0 BOX N 492
NASSAU, NEW PROVIDENCE, THE BAHAMAS
t 242 328 3500 f 242 328 8008
www.gsolegal.com info@gsolegal.com


YOUR CONNECTION'O THE WORLD


TENDER


PLUMBING SERVICE

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. is pleased to invite
tenders from suitably qualified companies to submit tender for Plumbinge
Services.

Interested companies may collect a Tender Specification document
from BTC's administration building on John F. Kennedy Drive, between
the hours of 9:00am to 5:00pm Monday through Friday.:

Tender must be sealed in an envelope marked "TENDER FOR
PLUMBING SERVICES" and delivered to the attention of::

Mr. Michael J. Symonette
President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.
P.O.Box N-3048
Nassau, The Bahamas

Bids should reach the company's administrative office on John F.
Kennedy Drive by 5:00pm on Wednesday, November 23, 2005.

Companies submitting bids are invited to attend a bid opening on
Thursday, November 24, 2005 at 10:00am at BTC's Perpall's Tract'
Drive location.

Only applicant with valid plumbing licence will be accepted.

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all-tenders..


THE TRIBUNE:


PAGE 6, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005












intuesday's



^l Tl I" l it





ARTHUR FOULKES: NOTED JOURNALIST,
.UNIVERSAL PERSPECTIVE, HISTORICAL CONTEXT A MUST-READ COLUMN THAT GETS To THE POINT
11, V..
\'I ___________________ ______________________________ _ _


Call for powers away


from Nassau in the


wake of Wilma


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
- "Tribune Freeport Reporter
.,'FREEPORT The chairman
offGrand Bahama's Chamber
Of-Gommerece says it is time
forlocal government to take a
gr-eater role in rebuilding local
Ocimnunities with less micro-
rivhagement from Nassau
SLDt Doswell Coakley believes
tltia there is need for more local
decision-making authority on
Giand Bahama in the wake of
MHliticane Wilma.
"Unfortunately, many of our
nation's capital seem oblivious
to the needs of Grand Bahama,
and the delay in getting a
response for local business and
community needs hurts the
economy and does little to build
confidence," he said.
Though Wilma has dealt
another blow to the Grand
Bahama economy, Dr Coakley
is hopeful that the island will
overcome this new challenge.
"''The island is at its lowest
pborht, but all is not lost," Dr
GCoakley said in a press release
issued to The Tribune.
;Since the passage of Hurri-
cai6e Wilma, NEMA officials
haie' reported that some 800


households were destroyed in
various settlements along the
southern coast of the island. It is
believed as many as 3,000 peo-
ple were left homeless.
The entire stretch of small
shops and businesses at Sunset
Village in Eight Mile Rock was
wiped out by the surge. How-
ever, this year, not many busi-
nesses in Freeport were affected
by the storm.
Last September, the island
sustained a severe blow and
many businesses were severely
affected by Hurricanes Frances
and Jeanne. About 1,600 work-
ers were laid off alone at the
Royal Oasis Resort, which
closed due to extensive storm
damage.
Over the past year, many
businesses had been rebuilt.
"Just when we felt we were
regaining our business sea legs,
following last year's two 'back-
to-back' devastating hurricanes,
the challenge of survival is once
again on our doorstep," he said.

Appeal

Dr Coakley has called. on
civic groups, the; business isec-


tor and community to join
hands with the government in
its rebuilding and redevelop-
ment efforts on Grand Bahama.
The areas that were severely
affected include the settlements
of Williams Town, Mack Town,
Hunters, Bevans Town, Lewis
Yard, Pinder's Point, Eight Mile
Rock, Deadman's Reef and
Bootle Bay.
Dr Coakley commended the
Prime Minister and his govern-
ment for moving quickly in try-
ing to find a resolve for the
scores of deprived and home-
less Grand Bahamians.
Immediately after the storm,
the government negotiated with
Lehman's
Brothers temporary housing
at the Royal Oasis Resort for
some 300 displaced residents on
Grand Bahama.
Dr Coakley said that many
of its members continue to try
to rebuild their businesses in
the hope of providing continu-
ous employment for many
affected residents.
He stressed that the people
of Grand Bahama have shown
that they are of the utmost
resilience, and will overcome,
:too, thisnew"ohallenge. i.,


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THE TRIBUNE






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YOUR CONNECTIO#'O THE WORLD


VACANCY NOTICE

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited (BTC) invites applications from
suitably qualified individuals to fill the position of Associate/ Graphic Artist in its
Directory Publications Department.

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES

1. Create and design ads for the different sections of the Telephone Directories
using programs supplied.
2. Edit images to be used in the layout of display ads.
3. Convert files in different format as required by the printers.
4. Account for all ads completed at the end of the business day.
5. Familiarize oneself with all functions of the graphics area.
6. Download files from external medias.
7. Follow standards and guidelines as established by management.
8. Report any malfunctions or abnormalities of computer system or files to
immediate Team Leader or Manager.
9. Keep work environment and tools for work properly maintained, and observe
safety precautions and maintenance policies consistent with BTC's rules.
10. Assist the Team Leader or Manager in the carrying out of their duties and
perform any functions that from time to time may be deemed necessary by
the Team Leader or Manager.

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS

1. A Bachelors Degree in Graphic Design or
2. An Associate Degree in Graphic Design with four (4) years practical experience
as a Graphic Artist.
3. Must be proficient on PC and MAC.
4. Must be knowledgeable in scanning images to the correct specifications.
5. Must know how to edit images using Adobe Photoshop.
6. Must be able to layout designs in CorelDraw (PC) Adobe Illustrator (PC &
MAC) Quark Express & Freehand (MAC).

All applications are to be received at BTC's Head Office 21 John F. Kennedy Drive, no
later than Friday, November 18, 2005 and addressed as follows:

Director
Human Resources & Administration
The Bahamas Telecomunications Company Limited
Nassau, The Bahamas

Re: Associate/ Graphic Artist


Remembering the fallen



heroes of two world wars








% 1




M THE RBPF and the
".RBDF honor guards
stand before the war
1 6 :memorial
memorial (Photos: Felipi
''i Major/Tribune staff


...... .. .. .. / : ... . ... ...


PAGE 8, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005








17... Officers from the police and RBDF joined the
( Boys Brigade, Girl Guides, civilians, diplomats
ftand others on Sunday for Remembrance Day,
Sas Bahamians gathered in respect for those
who gave their lives for freedom


* Units gather at
the Garden of
Remembrance
yesterday for a service
,;Which included a
sounding of the Last
Post, two minutes of
silence and the laying
of wreaths by officials
and residents of the
diplomatic corps











* MEMBERS of the
Boys Brigade place a
wreath at the Garden
of Remembrance
(Photo: Felipe
Major/Tribune staff)


Butler & Sands





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2005
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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005, PAGE 9









PAGE 10, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


IIIoPI^s*


The themetis MA
,!Ci Corl0i


NOWgONLY

I"T^r


Nassau architect




dies in England


* By PAUL BOWER

RAY Nathaniels, well-known
architect and artist who has lived
in Nassau for many years, has
died in Hastings, England, after
a long battle with lung cancer.
He was cared for during the
last six months of his life by his
former wife, Elizabeth, sup-
ported by their three daughters
Zoe, Clio and Miranda, who
were with him at the end.
Of Irish/Scottish and Sri
Lankan descent, Ray was born
in Colombo, Ceylon, (now Sri
Lanka), where his father was a
senior civil engineer for the Cey-
lon Civil Service. He was edu-
cated in England, took up archi-
tecture as a profession and,
before coming to the Bahamas
in 1956, worked in Libya, Jor-
dan and India.
He was awarded a fellowship
of the Royal Institute of British
Architects for his buildings in
these countries as well as in the
Bahamas.
In the late 1950s, with a part-
ner, Clive St George, he under-
took the design of Gleniston
Gardens, one of Nassau's first
middle-class sub-divisions. He
also designed many homes for
Nassau's elite, including the East
Bay Street house of Bahamian


movie actor, Sidney Poitier a
fine example of the Modernism
that Ray was the first architect
to introduce to the Bahamas.
His modernistic work origi-
nal and sensitive has inspired a
whole generation of Bahamian
architects.
On the many royal visits to
the Bahamas over the past 50
years, Ray was called upon by
the Government to decorate all
of Nassau's main thoroughfares
and Rawson Square, together
with the main public buildings,
with Bahamian flags and
emblems.
He was personally congratu-
lated by the Queen for these as
well as for "Bahamarama", an
exhibition describing the Fami-
ly Islands in the 1960s.
On Eleuthera, Ray Nathaniels
designed a number of outstand-
ing homes, including Paw Paw
Bay, for Sir Desmond and Lady
Cochrane a house that became
famous for the way it appeared
to "grow out of" the rocky
promontory on which it was
built.
In 1957, Ray married Eliza-
beth Anne Frith, and the couple
bought one of the Cable Beach
Manor houses where Ray had
his architect's studio. For some
years, Elizabeth helped him run


his practice and assisted clients
with the interior design of some
of his highly original buildings.
The couple had three daugh-
ters Zoe, Clio and Miranda.
Clio, when a student at Gor-
donstoun in Scotland, was for a
while "an item" with fellow stu-
dent Prince Andrew, and found
herself besieged even in Nassau
by reporters hoping for a royal
romantic scoop.
A generous and attentive
host, Ray entertained frequent-
ly and was noted for his Sri
Lankan curries which always
drew guests back for second
helpings. He will be much
missed by his many friends, not
least his many Bahamian friends
who looked for him to join them
in a daily swim in the sea near
his Cable Beach home.
One of his clients, Paul Rip-
pon, who later because an archi-
tectural judge for the Royal
Institute of British Architects,
recently wrote: "He has created
many eye-catching buildings not
only of beauty but also which
work conveniently. A chain of
jewels in the golden setting of
the Bahamas. They will long
outlast us all".
A funeral service will be held
in Hastings UK on Wednesday,
November 16.


RE: SENIOR ASSOCIATE FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION


YOUR CONNECT O fFO THE WORLD



VACANCY NOTICE
h ', fm. as.Te.lsonmi ration Company Li=rted .(BTC)iyites applications from suitably qualified
s to fill tHe poloih of Senior Associate in its Finance & Administration Division.

JOB SUMMARY
Perform varied accounting functions requiring familiarity with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles
and international Accounting Standards.

Responsibilities will include ensuring accurate input to General ledger, conducting regular monitoring of
revenue accounts and reconciling prepaid expenses and revenue in advance accounts. In addition, assist in
the production of the monthly Corporate Performance Reports.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

1. Review of Billing interface
Ensure that extract files agree to Billing summary reports
Ensure that debits and credits balance and that all GL accounts are valid
Ensure complete export of file to the financial accounting system
Check validation process before approval and update to general ledger.

2. Review of Cash and Adjustments interface
Ensure that extract files agree to Cash and Adjustment summary reports
Ensure that debits and credits balance and that all GL accounts are valid
Ensure complete export of file to financial accounting system
Check validation process before approval and update to general ledger.

3. Complete weekly and monthly investigations of all revenue accounts
Complete variance analysis of all accounts
Liaise with various departments for enquiries and corrections
Prepare manual journal entries where necessary.
4. Load the revenue budget into the financial accounting system on an annual basis.

5. Complete monthly reconciliations of prepayment accounts, including:
General Insurance
Vehicle Insurance
Rent
Miscellaneous
Directories

6. Complete Monthly Revenue in Advance reconciliation:
Rental
Cellular

7. Ensure that all general ledger accounts are introduced properly in the various categories:
Asset
Liability
Equity
Income
Expense

8. Journal Processing:
Ensure that all journal entries are keyed accurately and timely
Review accrual Journals ensure that flags are set properly and reversing
Journals are set for the correct period Approve and Update journals on a daily basis

9. Maintain Financial Reports
Ensure that all GL accounts are placed in the appropriate report per the class of account;
Ensure that report agree to the Trial Balance

10. Any other duties assigned by Department management.

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS
1. A Bachelor's Degree in Accounts or Finance with four (4) years experience in a related field.
2. Solid analytical and problem-solving skills, results oriented with close attention to detail
3. Excellent communication skills, both oral and written
4. Must be able to work under pressure and meet deadlines
5. Must be proficient with Mictosoft Office applications
6. Knowledge of Peoplesoft applications would be an asset.

All applications are to be received at BTC's Head office, 21 John F. Kennedy Drive, no later than Friday,
November 18, 2005 and addressed as follows:

DIRECTOR
HUMAN RESOURCES & ADMINISTRATION
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD.
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS


FINAL PAPER~


PAGE 10, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


'WASSSS


I THE ABSTRACT I'~:







THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005, PAGE 11


Gearing up for the Jollification


ONE of Nassau's most popu-
lar pre-Christmas events of the
year will be held at The Retreat
on Village Road this weekend.
Thousands are expected to
turn out for Jollification, the
arts and crafts charity festival
which has become a major
November draw for locals and
visitors.
A wide range of craft work,
beautiful plants and the best
second-hand book stall in town
are among the attractions at the
Bahamas National Trust event.
"The best advice is join the
Bahamas National Trust and
come to Christmas Jollification
members' night on Friday,
November 18," says a devoted
fan of the festival.
"The best gifts and plants go
really fast so this gives you the
best shopping time," she added.
The two-day festival opens
at 11am on Saturday. By mid-
afternoon, The Retreat is
expected to be packed, with
stall-holders enjoying brisk
sales.
Orchids and bromeliads
nearly sold out during Members
Night last year. Beryl Sheasby
of "Beryl's Bromeliads" said:
"People tell me the food stalls
did best and that I must have
been next in volume sold."
Winning the awards for car-
rying out the theme "Jingle
Shells, Jingle Shells, Christmas
by the Sea" in 2004 were Kim-
berly Sturrup-Roberts, own-
er/artist of Bahama Dawn
Designs (Marsh Harbour, Aba-
co) with a quilted mermaid
singing the theme and holding a
tiny Christmas tree with starfish
ornaments; and Dr P's Cre-
ations by Dr Janet Patterson for
the Jolly Market, with a shell-
studded sign and many shelly
creations in ornaments and dec-
orations.
"We are all wondering how
'Under the Big Top' will be
made Christmasy,'* said long-
time volunteer Debbie
Krukowski, again in charge of
the White Elephant booth.
The first Bahamians to taste
George Dubouf 2005 Beaujo-
lais Nouveau will gather round
Bristol Wines and Spirits wine
director Rusty Scates to try and
discuss the new vintage.


As a major sponsor, Bristol
keeps spirits high with sampling
and recipes of festive spirits
such as: Cruzan Rum, Kahlua,
and Finlandia Vodka; Cour-
voisier Crepes, Beefeater Gin;
Amarula; Jack Daniels and Red
Bull non-alcoholic energy drink
and mixer, also available now
in a non-sugar formula.
Last year, fans waited for the
Hpnotiq booth to open just as
they waited for the champagne


Thompson and Co., Interna-
tional Merchant Bank Ltd.,
Insurance Management (Bah.)
Ltd., John Bull, Majestic Tours,
Royal Bank of Canada, Ocean-
ic Bank, Tyrone and Lynne
D'arville, McGregor Robertson
and anonymous donors.
Each year, "Jollification"
features a special enclosure for
youngsters, the Bluebird Chil-
dren's Crafts Area, organised
by Linda Pritchard, Sheila


* HAPPY HOLIDAY CRUZAN-Bristol's Happy Cruzan
Rum Bar will again feature delightful flavoured rums and fruit
drinks at Jollification 2005.
(Photo: Keith Parker/PS News/Features)


at the recent Wine and Arts
Festival.
Cacique. International
dreamed up and executed a
remarkable theme each year.
This year it is circus, last year it
was underwater.
Mrs Lynn Gape, BNT public
relations and education officer,
says tickets can be bought early
this year at Zip-X, Village Rd.,
opposite Tuckaway. The event
is a major source of funds for
the work of the Bahamas
National Trust.
Those who helped with
advertising support last year
included: Amoury C6mpany,
ARCOP Ltd., Avis Rent-A-
Car, Bahamas Realty, Dami-
anos Realty, Deltec Panamerica
Trust Co. Ltd., Family
.Guardian'Insirance Ltd,, Gra-
ham Real Estate, 'Grahamn


Pritchard and Michele Stan-
hope. It offers magical crafts for
children who proudly carry
them home by the tray load.
This area features a special Blue
Bird Juice Bar for children.
East Nassau Rotary and
Interact also offered non-alco-
holic drinks and water, plus
hamburgers for all ages. St
Andrews Interact paints cheer-
ful faces.
Among the many outstand-
ing Jollification displays each
year are semi-precious stones

TOICAL
ETRINATOR

PHNE 32-15


and sea glass set into distinctive
jewellery; carved conch shells,
pillows and bookmarks by Pip-
pa Cole, stunning quilts and
woodwork.
Beyond crafts most years are


the art of Mick Guy, Wild
Tamarind Pottery by Dennis
Knight, banana leaf sculptures
by Christina Maillis, and beach
scenes carved in cork by Linda
Sands.


Best advice: Get there early.
Wear a hat or bring an umbrel-
la for sun or rain. Don't forget
a strong shopping bag and lots
of cash...for a really good time
and a really good cause.


Butler & Sands
Company Limited


Butler & Sands Wine Experience 8005 to Aid
Grand Bahama Hurricane Victims


. Butler & Sands, a member of the Bums House
Group of Companies, has announced that all
ticket proceeds from its upcoming Wine
Experience will be donated to Grand
Bahama's hurricane relief efforts.
The holiday wine tasting, scheduled for
Friday, November 18, attracts hundreds of
New Providence wine lovers, and The Bums
House Group of Companies Managing
Director, LeRoy Archer says that they simply
could not pass up the opportunity to help
those in need.
"We were in the midst of planning Wine
Experience 2005 as hurricane Wilma
devastated parts of Grand Bahama. We
realised that we had the perfect opportunity,
not only for Butler & Sands to assist and
show once again that we are a good corporate
citizen,:b iutalsoto have our consumers assist"


Pictured from left:
McPernell Poitier, Wine
Sales Representative,
Burns House Group;
e 0 Clement Knowles, Sales
SMerchandiser/Promoter,
o Burns House Group;
Captain Chris Matthias,
Salvation Army; Cathy
Wells, Past Chairman,
Relief Co-ordinator and
S Trainer, Bahamas Red
Cross Society, Grand
Bahama Centre; Steve
Burrows, Field Manager,
Burns House Group;
Tom Doyle, International
Representative/Special
Logistics and Disaster
Management.

as well by attending a fantastic event,"
he said.
Michael Hooper, General Manager of The
British Colonial Hilton has agreed to partner
with Butler & Sands in making Wine
Experience 2005 a successful charitable event.

The Butler & Sands Wine Experience, now
a holiday season tradition, gives wine
enthusiasts an opportunity to sample some
of the company's best offerings. The Grand
Tasting will showcase 50 wines from around
the world and the Connoisseur's Tasting will
feature 20 super premium wines in addition
to the 50 wines shown in the Grand Tasting.
Tickets are available at selected Butler &
Sands Store locations. All proceeds will be
donated to the Grand Bahama branches of
the Red Cross and the Salvation Army.


Bahamas Port Authority

Health Run & Walk

Registration Form


DATE:Saturday, 19th November 2005
TIME:6:30 a.m. (6 a.m. late registration)
FEE: 5 includes T-shirt


ROUTE: From Festival Place (Prince George Wharf) east along Bay Street
north over new Paradise Island bridge, south over old Paradise
Island .bridge to Shirley street, west along Shirley street, nc
along east street to Festival Place.


DATE OF BIRTH:


NAME:


PHONE: (H) __


CLUB/SCHOOL:


AGE: MALE: FEMALE:


CATEGORIES: (Please tick the appropriate group)


WALK:


RUN:


UNDER 15


UNDER 50


DECLARATION: I, the undersigned, declare that all information above
is true and I am a bona fide amateur. I also release the organizers,
sponsors and officials of this event from any liability for injuries that
may occur during this event. I also grant permission for the organizers
to use any photo of myself for promotional purposes.

SIGNED: DATE:
Parent/Guardian if under 18


.1


UNDER 40


P.G.W Employee:


(W)


UNDER 30


OVER 50


_ C _01


""~ i` ---I


- I I _, _p-C_ I II ~e









PAGEB12,HMONDAYNOVEMHBERH14,H2005 TLOHEATRBUNE


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\S\JJ^JoJ\ H^**'' ^^l


PLP wants to keep on Pratt


FROM page one
minister's right hand and he is
very proud of her. We expect
her to remain in office and we
support her," said Mr Wilch-
combe.
Mr Wilchcombe added that,
as far as he is aware, Mrs Pratt
is the PLP's St Cecilia candi-
date and will remain as such.
However, Minister of Works
and Utilities Bradley Roberts
told The Tribune he expects to


retire at the end of the term.
Meanwhile, the party wants
Dr Nottage, who resigned
membership in the PLP in
February, 2000, to return to
the political organisation.
"B J Nottage served this party
with distinction. He was an out-
standing member of parliament,
he ran and served for deputy
leader of our party and ran for
leader of our party and lost.
"He had differences with
certain things in the past, but


his contribution to our organi-
sation can't go unnoticed," said
Mr Wilchcombe.
Dr Nottage presently serves
as chief executive officer and
leader of the Coalition for
Democratic Reform (CDR).
Mr Wilchcombe pointed out
that the PLP was never critical
of Dr Nottage during the time
he had been with the CDR.
He indicated this was because
the PLP knew one day he
would come back home.


Two dead after traffic accidents


FROM page one
According to reports, Mr
Smith was on duty travelling
north on Montgomery
Avenue in Flamingo Gardens,
when a car travelling in the
opposite direction collided
with his machine.
Immediately following the
accident, Mr Smith was air-
lifted to a hospital in Miami
where he was treated for his
injuries and later discharged.
However, press liaison offi-
cer Inspector Walter Evans
told The Tribune that Mr
Smith's injuries, including
extensive head wounds, were
so severe that he died from


resulting complications.
Police commissioner Paul
Farquharson and the entire
police force extended sympa-
thies to the family and friends
of their deceased colleague.
The driver of the car is
expected to appear before the
courts this week charged in
connection with the incident.
Police are also investigating
the death of a 30-year-old man
of Grand Bahama, who died
after his vehicle hit a tree in
the early hours of yesterday.
Police were notified of a
traffic accident at 1.38am on
East Sunrise Highway, just
east of Beachway Drive.
Officers discovered a green


1995 Toyota Avalon, licence
plate number 112198, in the
median.
According to reports, the
vehicle was being driven east
on East Sunrise Highway
when the male driver lost con-
trol and crashed into a tree.
The vehicle was extensively
damaged and driver was
trapped inside.
The 'jaws of life' were used
to free the driver from the car
and he was taken to Rand
Memorial Hospital by ambu-
lance.
At 2.20am on Sunday, on
arrival of the ambulance, the
driver was pronounced dead.
Investigations continue.


Christie

makes

Ingraham

challenge

FROM page one
because the PLP is a "good'
government."
"We have proven to this
country that we are loyal, a
mature party, and t-hat we
fully understand the issues of
the day in that we are deliv-
ering," said Mr Wilchcombe.
He said the PLP does not
claim to be perfect and point-
ed out that the party always.
closely scrutinises its own.
efforts and criticises its mis-
steps.
Mr Ingraham, in his accep-.
tance speech on Friday, told
party supporters that he had.
steadfastly indicated that he
never sought or intended to
reassume the leadership posi-
tion of the party, but was
humbled by the support
placed in him by the FNM and
the wider Bahamian public.
"What began as just a.
whispering call quickly.
became over the last few.
days an almost deafening'
roar- a demand if you will
that I once again step to the
helm of this organisation."


Men sought for station raid


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FROM page one
attached and fled the scene
headed in an easterly direction.
Mrs Mackey said the sus-
pects, who are believed to be in
their 20s, were wearing dark
clothing and were not masked.
Officers from the Central
Detective Unit and the uni-
formed branch are investigat-
ing.
A male resident of East
End was abducted and robbed
of his vehicle early Sunday
morning in Freeport by three
men, according to Grand
Bahama Police.
The man, a 38-year-old resi-
dent of McCleans Town, was


at the Municipal Service Sta-
tion around 3am putting air
into one of the tyres of his 1995
black Chevy Cavalier car when
three black men approached
him.
He was forced to get into the
back trunk of the vehicle.
Inspector Loretta Mackey,
assistant press liaison officer,
said the victim reported that
the men were unmasked and
one was armed with a hand-
gun.
She said the suspects drove
around in the car with the man
for a period of time. They later
released him unharmed near
Xanadu Beach and drove off
in his vehicle.


Police recovered the vehicle
around 9am at the junction of
Murchinson Drive and Hearn
Lane. Investigations into this
matter are continuing.
Police are appealing to the
public to assist them, with their
investigations into Saturday's
armed robbery of Texaco Ser-
vice Station, where three men
robbed an employee and sev-
eral customers.
The suspects were also
unmasked and one of the men
was armed with a silver hand-
gun. They escaped in a white
delivery truck with no licence
plates attached.
Anyone with information is
should call police at 352-9774/5.


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ext. 64561 by January 6, 2006.


- I -- --


PAGE 12, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


C>_ UWqti6ZLIC- TIIAC








THE TRIUNE MONAY, NOEMBER 1, 2005,PAGEW1


Edison Key 'will not be



successful', says Christie


FROM page one
FNM's convention on Friday,
the former senator called to
the podium by leader-elect
Hubert Ingraham said he
would do anything in his power
to help restore the FNM as the
government in the next general
election.
Mr Key said that with him
joining the FNM, and with Mr
Ingraham as leader and Brent
Symonette as deputy-leader,
"we have created something
here tonight that is the great-
est nightmare that Perry
Christie has ever seen."
While Mr Christie said he
respects Mr Key's right to
"change his views, his political
party, and to use all of his pow-
er to ensure that what he wants


happens in the Bahamas," he
asserted that the difficulty for
Mr Key is that "what he wants
will not prevail."
"Perry Christie was the first
Bahamian to win an interna-
tional medal in field events, to
win a medal internationally, one
who has been committed to
preparation," he said.
"The Lord gave Perry
Christie a message. Look at Per-
ry Christie and look at the
transformation, you can see
therefore the discipline, the
dedication and the commit-
ment.
"There is no Edison Key,
there is no Hubert Ingraham
and there is no FNM that can
substitute itself or themselves
for the will of the people of this
country," he said vehemently.


Ch l\
.i .
lioD


Mr Key, a 30-year PLP stal-
wart, resigned his scat in the
Senate in January, 2004, fol-
lowing accusations by him that
the prime minister was unable
to put a stop to corruption with-
in his government.


Mr Christie yesterday was not
willing to go into the details of
Mr Key's resignation.
"Edison Key will not cause
me to say now (why he left).
He knows, I know, and one day
I will say why," he said.


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For further details

please call 322-1007.


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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE













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Date: Tues. November 22
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CALL 302-4707

Visit our website
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Take the PVD Test


Do you have leg pain when you walk or
exercise? Do you suffer from cold feet or
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Do you have numbness and tingling in your
legs? Do you have ulcers or sores that won't
heal?
You may have PVD (peripheral vascular
disease). Early treatment of PVD may prevent
heart attack and stroke.
Dr. Delton Farquharson, M.B.B.S., F.R.C.S.C.,
General and Vascular Surgeon, will be
conducting a FREE PVD screening Tuesday
November 22 at the Doctors Hospital
Sessional Clinic, by appointment only.


4 DOCTORS HOSPTt-L
f-kthah fvr L, s


4o-


---ailable from Co -me rial News Providers'.
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es s


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I Ronny Deryckere of #97 Yorkshire Street, Nassau, The Bahamas,
having made sworn deposition that Life of Barbados policy No.
0100641 on my life been lost and having made application to us
to grand a duplication of the same, notice is hereby given that unless
objection is raised within one month of the date thereof, the duplicate
policy asked for will be issued.
Dated: 02 November, 2005
By Order:
Althea Hazzard,
Corporate Secretary


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Lecture Series
Schedule

November 17,2005
Diabetes
Dr. Christine Chin
Internal Medicine

December 15, 2005
Managing Stress
& Depression
Dr. Timothy Barrett
Family Medicine

January 19,2006
Women's Health
Dr. Reginald Carey
Obstetrician/Gynecologist

February 16, 2006
Heart Month
Dr. Delton Farquharson
Vascular Surgeon

March 16, 2006
Diabetes & Kidney Disease


FREE Public Health Talk
Every 3rd Thursday

Speaker: Dr. Christine Chin-Chea
Internal Medicine Specialist

Topic: There Is Nothing Sweet About Diabetes:
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Venue: Doctors Hospital Conference Room

Q & A: Question and Answer Session .

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Syndicated Content


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You may have PVD
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YOUR CONNECTION TO THE WORLD


VACANCY NOTICE

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited (BTC) invites applications from
suitably qualified individuals to fill the position of Senior Marketing & Sales Representative
in its Marketing Department.

JOB SUMMARY:

The Senior Marketing & Sales Representative conducts primary and secondary market
research to determine industry and technological issues and trends. This position is
responsible for taking market and competitive research intelligence and translating that
data into recommendations for Product Development.

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITES:

Monitor, track and analyze technological trends and factors locally and
internationally to provide guidance for future strategies.
Conduct and/ or coordinate internal and external market research as required.
Develop and implement customer surveys when appropriate to gain market
intelligence.
Develop product development recommendations based on data received through
the above market research.
Interface with outside market research and competitive analysis firms as needed.
Have direct contact with customers and vendors.

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS

1. Bachelors Degree in Marketing or Business Administration with a minimum
of three (3) years in a market and competitive analysis type organization.
2. Strong computer skills, including the development of presentations with charts
and graphs.
3. Strong datatbase software skills, including but not limited to, Microsoft Access.
4. Experience in the telecommunications industry is a plus
5. Strong interpersonal and Communication skills.
6. Ability to make sound business decisions.

All applications are to be received at BTC's Head office, 21 John F. Kennedy Drive, no
later than Friday, November 18, 2005 and addressed as follows:

DIRECTOR
HUMAN REOURCES & ADMINISTRATION
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD.
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS

RE: SENIOR MARKETING & SALES REPRESENTATIVE


THE TRIBUNE-


PAGE 14, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005


---









Chile says jailed Fujimori not


allowed to promote campaign


regain Peru's presidency


ETcM- 2Copyrigh MateriaI
-- ---- Syndicated Content i

Available from Commercial News Providers"





.. -SH SCHOOL-






-St Andrew's School Limited
Wwill take place in the school's new,library
a-









*on Thursday, 1 December, 2005
S---m f At7:00pm.
S-.. Financial statements and roxy forms
Smay be obtained fr world sce at St Andrew's Schoolhool
.. -The Annual General Meeting of
St Andrew's School Limited
-mo .... will take place in the school's newlibrary
_on Thursday, 1 December, 2005
-- -" -- At 7:00pm.

S* --- -o Financial statements and proxy forms
-*, may be obtained from the Business Office at St Andrew's School


The Ministry of Tourism
In Cooperation with
The Bahamas Hotel Association's Annual
General Meeting
Presents
The 11th Annual
Authentically


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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005, PAGE 15


THE TRIBUNE


v







PAGE 16 MONDAY NOVEMERE14,A005OTHETRIBUN


Hotair balloon


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Pfood Cbpring ted Material


.vSyndicated Content

:.Available from CommercialNewsPrc


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"Meeting the needs of advertisers
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ESTHER BARRY
PRODUCTION MANAGER
THE TRIBUNE


The Tribune
Noyr -VO- / mw


PAGE 16, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


- 490


flrr~rd








MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005


SECTION -., ,.


ss


business@tribunemedia.net


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Ba



-s


Cabinet




approves


$lbn


Ginn


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas must discuss
the "status" of the conditional
commitment given by the for-
mer FNM administration in
March 2002 to comply with the
Organisation for Economic Co-
Operation and Development's
(OECD) 'harmful tax prac-
tices' initiative, the Financial
Services Consultative Forum's
clhairman said yesterday, as a
"level playing field has not
been achieved".
*Brian Moree, who is also
senior partner at McKinney,
Bancroft & Hughes, said that
fact "raises a couple of ques-
tions" in regard to the
Bahamas' policy towards the
OECD initiative, and dis-
cussing them now would be
timely given the meeting this
week in Melbourne of the
,Pais-based .bdy' s. Globa-,
Forum.
Mr Moree pointed out that
the Bahamas' commitment let-
; *


Forum chair calls fpr public ,


debate on anti-competitive
'harmful tax practices' as level
playing field not achieved

ter provided that, subject to the legal entities, and on the
establishment of a 'level play- trustees and beneficiaries of
ing field' that would see all trusts domiciled in the
OECD states and non-mem- Bahamas, would be available
ber states such as Hong Kong to the regulatory authorities.,
and Singapore implement the But Mr Moree said: "In my
same standards, this nation view, a 'level playing field' has
would accept greater trans- not been achieved and conse-
parency and the exchange of quently that raises a couple of
information on tax matters questions. One, has the corn-
through various treaties. mitment expired? And, if not,
does it continue to be the poli-
Agreed cy of the government of the
Bahamas?"
In addition, the Bahamas Headde6: "One of the issues
also agreed, subject again to I do think needs to be dis-
the creation of a 'legeapl saying1 0 ussed.nthe public dorainis
field', that information on the
beneficial owners of compa-
nies, partnerships and other SEE page 4B


investment


* By NEIL HAIRTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Cabinet has
approved the
Ginn Develop-
ment Corpora-
tion's billion-dol-
lar tourism and real estate
investment for Grand
Bahama's West End, The Tri-
bune can reveal.
Touted as the largest invest-
ment yet seen in Grand
Bahama, long-term the Ginn
project will be a tremendous
shot in the arm for an island -
and particularly the West End
which is struggling to recover
from the impact of three hurri-
canes in 13 months. It should
generate increased direct and
indirect employment, both in
the construction phase and dur-
4ng full-time operations, ...
A source familiar with events
confirmed to The Tribune that
the Ginn project was "a go",


with the developers wanting to
proceed as rapidly as possible
after receiving formal approval
notification from the Govern-
ment.
"Ginn and the Government
are preparing a joint state-
ment," the source said.
Announcement of the
approval is likely to have been
held back to enable Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie to make an
impact at this week's PLP Con-
vention, and take back some
of the political momentum gen-
erated last week by the FNM
through Hubert Irigrahamf's
return as party leader.,
Project
Although some may feel the
Ginn project was pushed
through rapidly in the after-
.math of Hurricane Wilma, the
reality is that the timing was
coincidental.
The Prime Minister had


worked hard behind the scenes
to salvage the investment and
bring Bobby Ginn, the Ginn
Development Corporation's
president and chief executive,
back to the negotiating table
through intensive talks held
during the summer and early
autumn.
In a conference call with
Grand Bahama religious lead-
ers, Mr Christie admitted he
had to negotiate the Ginn pro-
ject twice, after his officials
botched the conclusion of a
deal earlier this year. The
agreement between the parties
was set to be sealed on the day
that the Prime Minister suf-
fered his minor stroke.
. Describing the Ginn project
as "the largest and single most
important investment in Grand
Bahama, for western Grand
SBahama", Mr Christie told reli-

SEE page 3B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BUTCH Kerzner, Kerzner
International's president and
chief executive, said the com-
pany viewed the $1.6 billion
Baha Mar resort development
as "a net positive", relieving the
pressure on it to drive airlift and
marketing of the Bahamas as a
destination, and generating
increased day visitors to
Atlantis from Cable Beach.


Wilma

'flattens'

Atlantis

RevPAR
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor
KERZNER Interna-
tional executives have fore-
cast that revenue per avail-
able room (RevPAR) at
the Atlantis resort during
the 2005 fourth quarter will
be flat, as opposed to ear-
lier predictions of a 4-5 per
SEE page 5B


In a conference call with Wall
Street analysts, Mr Kerzner
described the Bahamian
tourism market as "totally
undeveloped" and having "just
scratched the surface in terms of
what can be done".
He added that Baha Mar, in
partnership with its partners,
Harrah's Entertainment and
Starwood, would increase the

SEE page 5B


Film studios

shrug off

Wilma's

effects
E By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas Film Studios
suffered "no structural damage"
from Hurricane Wilma, and Dis-
ney's production crew returned
quickly after the storm had
passed to continue filming the
$400 million Pirates of the
Caribbean II and III.
Paul Quigley, one of the prin-
cipals behind the Grand
SEE page 5B


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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


Sank of The Bahamas

I INTERNATIONAL

"A growing and dynamic Bahamian institution"

VACANCY FOR THE POSITION OF:

RELATIONSHIP MANAGER, CORPORATE CREDIT
Core responsibilities:

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Increase consistently, the value of accounts through personal
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Strong analytical and organizational skills
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Send resume to:
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Bank of The Bahamas International
P.O. Box N-7118
Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas

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* By Fidelity Capital
Markets
IT was a relatively quiet trad-
ing week in the Bahiamian mar-
ket as less than 10,000 shares
changed hands. The';market saw
six out of its 19 listed stocks trad-
ing, of which two advanced, one
declined and three remained
unchanged.
The volume leader for the
week was FINCO (FIN) with
3,170 shares changing hands and
accounting for 33 per cent of the
total shares traded.
The big mover for the week
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Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
declined by $0.06 t6 end the
week at $9.11. I
COMPANY NEWS
Consolidated Water
Company (CWCO)
Persons who purchased
CWCO BDRs this past week are
already earning a return on their
investment. This past week,
CWCO announced a cash divi-
dend of $0.06 per share, which is
equivalent to $0.012 per BDR.
The dividend is payable on
February 7, 2006, to sharehold-
ers of record as at December 31,
2005. CWCO closed today at
$18.76, which is equivalent to
$3.752 per BDR.
Kerzner International
(KZL) -
Not only has KZL achieved
record breaking occupancy lev-
els (over 90 per cent) while some
hotel properties within the
Bahamas continue to struggle,
but its recent thrid quarter 2005
financial results are strong.
For the third quarter, KZL
posted a net loss of $4.9 million,
compared to a loss of $11.1 mil-
lion for the same period in 2004.
However, when all the one-time
gains and losses, including a $28
million charge for the early ter-
mination of a debt issue are tak-
en into account, KZL's adjusted
net income was $10.6 million.
Total revenues grew.by 25 per,
cent to. total $161,million, while
costs and expenses increased by


16 per cent to total $165 million.
KZL's Paradise Island opera-
tions continue to generate the
lion's share of the company's
revenue, contributing $129 mil-
lion versus $106.5 million year-
over-year.
Investors in both the US and
the Bahamas reacted positively
to KZL's latest financial results,
which is evident in the sharp
climb in its share price from
$58.74 at the start of the week to
Friday's close at $64.07. This rep-
resents an increase of 9.07 per
cent. -`
FamGuard Company '
(FAM) '
The 2005 third quarter proved
to be a stellar quarter for FAM,
as net income topped $1.1 mil-
lion, which represents an
increase of $567,000 or 99 per
cent over the same period last
year. Total revenue grew by $3.2
million or 25 per cent to total


POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
Office Assistant
Montessort Teacher
(Ages 18 months to 5 years)
Please Send:
Resume, copy of cerficiation,
copy of photo I.D.
To:
Montessori School,
P.O. Box SS-5580,
Nassau, Bahamas


$16.2 million, while benefits and
operating expenses increased by
$2.7 million or 22 per cent to
total $15 million.
For the third quarter, earn-
ings per share increased by $0.06
year-over-year to total $0.13. As
at September 30, 2005, annv.,
alised return on shareholder,-'
equity stood at 12.7 per cett,
compared to 6.7 per cent for the
equivalent period last year.
FAM's Board has declared-a
$0.06 per share dividend payable
on November 11, 2005, to all
shareholders of record as at
November 4,2005.
Benchmark (Bahamins)
(BBL) -
The 2005 third quarter saw'
BBL post net income of
$140,000, declining by $143,000.
or $0.03 per share when comi7-
pared to 2004 third quarter net,
income of $284,000.
For the nine months ending
September 30,2005, net incompeg
stood at $784,000 compared fo,
$642,000 for the comparable,
period last year. I.,
BBL's management has attribi
uted the growth in net income tb
the performance of BBL"V
investment portfolio and stroig'
earnings from its subsidiary',
Alliance Investment ManageL'-L
ment. For the 2005 third quarter,
BBL's net assets stood at $5 mil,
lion compared to $4.2 million inr
2004, while its book vale per
share increased to $1.03, up from-
$0.86 in 2004.


We are a growing retail company,
we are offering:
Base Salary, Bonuses, Pension Plan, Training
and lots of fun.

We are looking for:
A young lady between the age of 17 and 25,
she must be energetic, out going, mature, stable, hard
working, well groomed, honest and reliable.

Interested, then call for an interview
356-4512 or 356-4514


The Bahamian Stock Market
FINDEX 435.63 YTD 1.321%
BISX CLOSING CHAN E VOLUME YTD PRICE,;
SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML $0.73 $- 0 -33.64%
BAB $1.20 $- 0 25.00%'
BBL $0.80 $- 0 -5.88%
BOB $7.24 $- 0 25.91%
BPF $10.25 $- 0 28.13%
BSL $12.25 $- 0 -577%
BWL $1.27 $- 0 -29.44%
CAB $9.31 $0.01 1100 31.13%
CBL $9.11 $-0.06 1193 28.31%,
CHL $1.50 $- 0 -31.82%
CIB $10.00 $- 0 33.51%0
DHS $2.40 $- 0 60.00%
FAM $4.35 $- 0 9.85%
FCC $1.15 $- 0 '-42.21%'
FCL $9.25 $- 100 15.63%
FIN $10.90 $- 3170 12.37%
ICD $9.94 $- 0 0:51% !
JSJ : $8.75 $- 3000 6.45% -
KZLB $6.40 $0.53 1062 5.61%'
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%
DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:
Freeport Oil Holdings (FCL) has declared a dividerid 'of
$0.11 payable on November 15, 2005, to all common shared
holders as at record date October 31,2005. ,
Commonwealth Bank (CBL) has declared an extraordi$
nary dividendof $0.08 payable on November 30,2005, to all,.
common shareholders as at record date November 15, 2005.- ,i
Bank of Bahamas International (BOB) has declared ani
extraordinary dividend of $0.07 payable on November 21,- -1
2005, to all common shareholders as at record date November
15,2005.
FamGuard Company (FAM) has declared a dividend of,'
$0.06 payable on November 11, 2005, to all common share.-,j
holders as at record date November 4, 2005.
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) (BAB) has declared a dividend-
of $0.02 payable on November 15, 2005, to all common share--
holders as at record date November 2, 2005.
J. S. Johnson (JSJ) has declared a dividend of $0.14 payable
on November 18, 2005, to all common shareholders as at,'
record date November 14, 2005.
ICD Utilities (ICD) has declared a dividend of $0.135.',
payable on November 24,2005, to all common shareholders as,.
at record date November 10, 2005. I
Bahamas Supermarkets will hold its Annual General -
Meeting on November 17, 2005, at 9am at its Head Office,.
East-West Highway, Nassau, Bahamas.


NOTICE



Any person(s) knowing the relatives of the infant
that was abandoned on the MATERNITY WARD
of THE PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL
on 24th July, 2005 are asked to contact:

The Placement Division
Department of Social Services

as soon as possible at
Phone: 502-2875/502-2874


I BUSINESS


,r








THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005, PAGE 3B


'0


FROM page 1B

giouis leaders: "This will have,
in the form that it has come to
me, having negotiated with
them a second time personally,
a monumental impact on the
future of the men and women
and children, and churches for
that matter, of your island."
In its initial form, the Ginn
project involved a hotel, two
18-hole golf courses, single
family lots, second homes,
three marinas and the re-
opening of the West End
Airport as a private non-
coinmercial airport. Govern-
ment officials have estimated
it would create more than
1,000 direct jobs, being situ-
ated on 2,500 acres of land,
which include the old Sam-
mons Estate.
The project, which could
be.valued at up to $2.5 bil-


we need an


Office of Public


Sector


* By Kenred M. A. Dorsett
Partner, commercial
and financial services
practice
Halsbury Chambers

Public sector reform
and modernisation
is not only crucial
to everything the
Government
wants to achieve for the coun-
try, it is essential if we, in the
Bahamas, are to enjoy strong
and high quality public services.
1 Reform and modernisAtion
will only be brought about
where the Government has the
political will to embark on such
an endeavour and the overall
vision of where we must go.
And it will only be achieved
through the collective efforts
of skilled, dedicated and high-
ly motivated public servants.
The Government must. listen
and learn from the experiences
of such persons, wherever they
exist in the public sector, and
give them the recognition and
resources needed to bring
about the changes we all want
to see.


Transforming our public ser-
vices is a daunting task. If it
were not, it would have been
achieved long ago. However,
the reality for this nation, which
appears to be on the brink of
unprecedented ,economic
growth, is that the Government
must be ready to put in the
investment and effort over the
long-term to effect public sec-
tor reform.
I am confident that the
Christie administration is com-
mitted to public sector reform,
particularly having read 'Our
Plan' and the Prime Minister's
contribution last November at
a discussion between members
of the Civil Society Consulta-
tion Group and the Govern-
ment. But I think that public
sector reform is so critical that
the Government ought to con-
sider the creation of a Depart-
ment or Office of Public Sector
Reform, staffed by people
throughout the civil service,
public services and private sec-
tor, to advise the Prime Minis-
ter or the Minister responsible
for the Public Service, and
work with government depart-


Reform?


KENRED4DORSETT

(Photo: T Aylen/ Vision)

ments on how reform of public
services, including the civil ser-
vice, can be achieved.
Its aim should be to improve
existing structures, systems,
incentives and skills to deliver
better, more customer-focused
public services.
The Office should also be
responsible for continuously
assessing the productivity and
deliverance of public services,
and strive to enhance each
department's capacity for high


performance, providing an
external view and drawing on
expertise, knowledge, experi-
ence and evidence from across
the public and private sectors.
The Government must
develop and implement a long
term strategy for all our public
services, including: the devel-
opment of national standards
with tough, but achievable
objectives; and devolution,
which may require the politi-
cal directorate to let go and
give successful professionals
the freedom to deliver these
standards and flexibility, thus
removing unnecessary barriers
that prevent public servants
improving the delivery of ser-
vices. The creation of a long-
term strategy will only be the
beginning of the journey to
improve public services, but it
is a necessary first step in
spreading opportunity and
prosperity throughout our
beloved Bahamas and empow-
ering Bahamians.


lion, was designed to take
advantage of the burgeoning
demand for luxury second
homes in the Bahamas.
And the West End
approval could also mean
that the Ginn project
planned for the Grand
Bahama Port Authority Area
will come back on track, as
that development hinged on
the Government giving the
go-ahead for the first.
The Tribune was the first
to reveal that the Ginn pro-
ject was in trouble. Mr Ginn
was earlier this year said to
have "taken his marbles and
moved on to Mexico".
However, the Prime Min-
ister worked hard behind the
scenes to-revitalise the Ginn
project. He met with Mr
Ginn in early October, and
that followed a late August
meeting, after which the'
developer was said to have
reworked certain numbers


for the project.
The Tribune understands
that Mr Ginn largely gained
the deal he was looking for.
The Ginn Corporation ini-
tially proposed the creation
of a $10 million foundation
for the redevelopment of the
West End settlement in
Grand Bahama as part of its
Heads of Agreement with the
Government.
It has also included a pro-
vision for the revitalisation
of the West End community
that will begin with a $3 mil-
lion donation to the founda-
tion.
The proposal further stip-
ulated that the foundation
will continue to be funded by
part of the proceeds from the
sale of each residential lot,
with Ginn earmarking $2,000
on the occasion of each sale.
The foundation was expected
to total some $10 million
within its first five years.
Ginn was asking for no real
property tax exemptions, just
a seven-year stamp tax conces-
sion. The company was said to
be asking for $200 million back
from its project, "but that's
wealth we created".


Pricing Information As Of:
11 November 2005


1.10
10.25
7.24 '
0.85
1.80
1.20
9.31
2.20
9.17
2.50
4.35
10.90
10.00
9.25
1.99
10.20
9.75
6.69
10.00


0.73
8.00
5.55
0.70
1.27
0.87
6.96
1.50
6.99
0.96
3.87
9.50
7.45
8.39
1.27
9.50
8.22
4.36
10.00


52wk-Hi 52wk-Lo w


13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
D.60 0.40 RND Holdings
43.00 28.00 ABDAB
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings
H'at^^^fw^.ct^vyeS4&t% ,,;.w.^n

52k-i 52k-ow' Fund Name


ACCOUNTS


RECEIVABLE CLERK



* Computer skills must include Microsoft
Excel and Microsoft Word
Excellent oral and written communication
skills
Ability to work under own inititiative
Strong Interpersonal skills
Experience in A/R management and

collection preferable


Please mail resume to
P.O. Box N-4875
or fax direct to 502-5092


SFincial A ors
~Financial Advisors Ltd.


Previous Close Todays Clos


0.73
10.25
7.24
0.80
1.27
1.20
9.31
1.50
9.11
2.40
4.35
10.90
10.00
9.25
1.15
9.94
8.75
6.35
10.00
Bid $


12.~b 13.20 11 .uu


12.25
10.00
0.29
41.006
12.33
0.29
NAV


0.73
10.25
7.24
0.80
1.27
1.20
9.31
1.50
9.11
2.40
4.35
10.90
10.00
9.25
1.15
9.94
8.75
6.41
10.00
Ask $


13.2-5
10.35
0.54
43.00
13.33
0.54
YTD%


IPS Div IE Yield


-0.169 0.000
1.456 0.340
0.587 0.330
0.175 0.010
0.112 0.060
0.066 0.030
0.689 0.240
-0.046 0.000
0.791 0.410
0.429 0.000
0.428 0.240
0.695 0.510
0.695 0.380
0.675 0.500
0.022 0.000
0.526 0.405
0.526 0.560
0.138 0.000
2.036 0.760


Last Price ~Veakly Vol


S1 .UU
10.00
0.00


. .
41.0 2.220 0.000 19.4 E


41.00
12.50
0.35


1.766 0.960 7.5


1.768 0.960 7.5
0.000 0.800 NM
-0.044 0.000 NM


2.220 0.000 19.4
1.105 0.810 14.6
-0.103 0.000 N/M


N/M 0.00%
7.0 3.32%
12.3 4.56%
4.6 1.25%
11.3 4.72%
18.2 2.50%
13.5 2.58%
NM 0.00%
11.5 4.50%
5.6 0.00%
9.1 5.52%
15.7 4.68%
13.9 3.80%
13.7 5.41%
52.3 0.00%
18.9 4.07%
16.6 6.40%
46.0 0.00%
4.9 7.60%
P/E Yield


7.25%
7.80%
0.00%


0.00%
6.93%
0.00%
z .. .. .


/ ~rn A
Last 12 Months Dlv $ Yield %


1.2593 1.1913 Colina Money Market Fund 1.259334"
2.4766 2.0536 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.4766 ***
10.6711 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.6711***
2.2754 2.1675 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.275422**
1.1406 1.0755 Colina Bond Fund 1.140599****

BISX ALL SHARE INDE X 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-HI Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1. 1994 = 100
** AS AT AUG. 10. 2005/" AS AT OCT. 31, 2005
* AS AT OCT. 28. 2005/' AS AT OCT. 31. 2005/ -..* AS AT OCT. 31. 2005
ITY Li2-054,M76 4 .......


BUSNES


Share your news


The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Cabinet approves



$1bn Ginn investment


Grant Writer /Administrator

Bahamas National Trust


Primary Responsibility: To help develop long-term sustainable funding for the
organization by researching and writing grants from sources of public and private
funding such as the European Union, Global Environment Facility, European
Development Fund and private foundations.

Position location: BNT Headquarters, The Retreat, Nassau, Bahamas

Reports to: Director of Development

Primary Tasks:
Identify possible sources of grant funding.
Work with senior -taff to develop proposal ideas and then write concise and
compelling grant applications.
Assist in all aspects of the grant proposal research, project development,
budgeting, writing, giant administration.
Write and submit reports to potential donors in a timely manner.

Primary Skills Required:
Excellent writingarnd verbal skills.
Proven experience iniresearching and securing grants, particularly from public
sector (government)donors, a major plus.

Minimum five years work experience, preferably in government grant
writing/administration
Demonstrated ability to organize time, manage diverse activities, meet deadlines
and attention to details. Proven administrative skills.
Excellent knowledge of MS Office, Word, Excel, Powerpoint and the Internet.
Willingness to work long hours to meet tight deadlines.

To apply for this position that begins on January 3, 2006, email or send: 1) cover
letter, 2) resume, 3) telephone numbers and email addresses for three professional
references, and 4) two writing samples to HYPERLINK "mailto:bnt@batelnet.org"
bnt@batelnet.bs or to Bahamas National Trust, Human Resources Manager, P.O.
Box N 4105, Nassau by November 23, 2005.


TEACHERS AND SALARIED WORKERS
t CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LIMITED

NOTICE TO OUR

VALUED SHAREHOLDERS
Please be advised that Interest/Dividend payments for the year 2004
will be distributed effective Tuesday November 1, 2005 during the
hours of 11:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. as follows:

DATES ACCOUNT DATES ACCOUNT
NUMBERS _NUMBERS


November 1 001-700 November 24 7201-7500

November 2 701-1200 November 25 7501-7800

November 3 1201-1800 November 28 7801-8100

November 4 1801-2400 November 29 8101-8400

:November 7 2401-3000 November 30 8401-8700

November 8 3001-3600 December 1 8701-9000

November 9 3601-4200 December 2 9001-9500

November 10 4201-4500 December 5 9501-10000

November 11 4501-4800 December 6 10001-10500

November 14 4801-5100 December7 10501-11300

November 15 5101-5400 December 8 11301-12100

November 16 5401-5700 December 9 12101-13000

November 17 5701-6000 December 12 13001-14000

:November 18 6001-6300 December 13 14001-15000

November 21 6301-6600 December 14 15001-16000

November 22 6601-6900 December 15 16001-1700

November 23 6901-7200 December 16 17001-18207
c -------- ________ __ i- -----


Abaco Markets .
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Kerzner International BDRs
Premier Real Estate
Syr. .. .. :!$ ;


-~--


Syi


IN


Last Price Weekly Vol


EPS $ DIv $


BE


Last 12 Months DIv $


Yield %








PAGE 4B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14,-2005-THE-TRIBUNE-


Regulators


and officer


to attend SEC seminar


TWO Securities Commission of the
Bahamas officials and a police detec-
tive will participate in the Securities
and Exchange Commission's (SEC)
SEC") Annual International Institute
programme on Securities Enforce-
ment and Market Oversight, from
November 14-18, 2005.
Manager
Christopher Hanna, manager of
inspections, and Alysia A. Archer,
assistant to the executive director at
the Securities Commission, will par-
ticipate, along with Detective Inspec-
tor Michael Moxey, deputy director
of the Commercial Crime Section of


the Royal Bahamas Police Force's
Central Detective Unit.
Participation
Detective Moxey's participation is
intended to better equip police officers
to assist financial services regulators in
combating financial crime.
During the SEC programme, par-
ticipants will focus on the interrela-
tionship between enforcement, sur-
veillance and inspections. The increas-
ingly important issue of international
cooperation among securities regula-
tors will also feature in the delibera-
tions.


* CHRISTOPHER HANNA


M ALYSIA ARCHER


E MICHAEL MOXEY


Bahamas must assess commitment to OECD,


FROM page 1B
the current status of the com-
mitment of the Bahamas gov-
ernment to the OECD, which
was made in March 2002.
"In view of the OECD meet-
ing in Melbourne, this is a par-
ticularly relevant time to dis-
cuss these issues."
The Melbourne meeting is
being viewed as a key moment
for the OECD's 'harmful tax
practices' initiative, as there
have been indications that if
the organisation fails to achieve
progress at the multilateral lev-
el, individual country members
will resort to their own 'nation-
al tax blacklists' as a way of


imposing pressure on the
Bahamas and other interna-
tional financial centres.
The meeting will receive a
report from the Global Forum
sub-commitee, on which the
Bahamas is represented, that
will set out progress made in
achieving a 'level playing field'
and whether countries such as
Singapore have come into the
fold.
Meanwhile, Mr Moree said
the 'harmful tax practices ini-
tiative' itself was regarded as
being "anti-competitive" by the
US and others, something that
again should give the Bahamas
pause for thought in making


policy decisions.
"There is a serious question
as to whether tax harmonisa-
tion is in the national interest of
many countries," Mr Moree
said. "The Bahamas as a juris-
diction must also consider its
position on this 'harmful tax
practices' initiative, and see
whether we regard it as an anti-
competitive initiative or an ini-
tiative that must be embraced
or complied with."
The Forum chairman added:
"All of these issues are impor-
tant, and in furtherance of our
mandate and terms of refer-
ence, it is the intention of the
Forum to consult with persons
in the financial services sector
and the public at large provid-
ed the Government makes
available adequate resources


for that process.
"I think it's critically impor-
tant to be proactive and ahead
of the curve on these issues and
not to wait and simply react to
the acts of others.
"We don't want to address
these issues in the context of
crisis management, but in a
process which is deliberate,
thoughtful and consultative.
Now is the time when we need
to address these issues."
Industry

Mr Moree said the financial
services industry was of such
vital importance to the
Bahamian economy and this
nation's quality of life, touching
everyone resident in this coun-
try, that its future should be


FINANCIAL CONTROLLER NEEDED
SF6r Credit Co-operative
The successful candidate must have the following
qualifications:
* Bachelor's Degree in Accounting
* Minimum of 3 to 5 years experience at a Management/
Supervisory Level
* Possess significant computer experience
Submit resume to fax# 393-8117


Legal Notice

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
COMPANIES ACT 2000

CATHOLIC VOICE INSTITUTION LTD.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act,
CATHOLIC VOICE INSTITUTION LTD. is in
Dissolution.

The date of commencement of the dissolution was 8th day
of September 2005.

Diane Fletcher of Buen Retiro, Nassau, Bahamas is the
Liquidator of CATHOLIC VOICE INSTITUTION LTD.


Liquidator



LENNOX PATON

Counsel and Attorneys-at-Law, Notaries Public

The Partners of



LENNOX PATON



are pleased to announce that



Michelle E. Neville-Clarke


has become a Partner



of the Firm.


the subject of a public debate
that "no Bahamian should opt
out of".
But for Bahamians to make
a proper contribution to
national dialogue on financial
services, Mr Moree said the
Government needed to ensure
all its people "have access to
better and more complete
information on a timely basis".
In turn, citizens had to read all
the available information.
"Given the stakes, we do not
have the luxury of experiment-
ing or making mistakes," Mr
Moree said.
"To put it simply, the pres-
ence of the financial services
industry in critical to our exist-
ing economy and it is now time
for this reality to be reflected in
our national priorities and in


the allocation G
resources.............
"Every responsible Bahami
an should be focused on tlh
future of the industry, as
touches the life of all segment
of our community.... The
future is partially linked to the
future of the financial services
industry."
Apart from domestic chal-
lenges, the financial services'
sector was also facing external
threats, Mr Moree said;
because "we live in an era 6f
coercive interference in the'
affairs of sovereign countries.
through agencies clothed witYh
supranational power, and thl
has wholly changed the par -1
digm for acceptable intern-
tional behaviour between court,
tries".
,'T i


Legal Notice

NOTICE


JUBILEE OF THE BAHAMAS, INC.

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named Company "
are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned c/o P.O.Box
N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 21st December A.D., 2005.;
In default thereof they will be excluded from the benefit of any
distribution made by the Liquidator. ',

Date the 4th day of November A.D., 2005.

Fred J. Collins
LIQUIDATOR
1341 Rutherford Road
Greenville SC 29609 'I
U.S.A.


GROUP FINANCIAL
CONTROLLER NEEDED

A client of our Firm, a progressive medical group with multiple,;
corporate structures, requires a professionally qualified accountant, C
to serve as the Group's Financial Controller. Excellent benefits.'
'All responses are confidential and should be mailed to their
following address:

Paul Andy Gomez
Managing Partner
GRANT THORNTON
Chartered Accountants
Paje House
Marlborough Street
P.O.Box N-8285
Nassau, N.P.,
The Bahamas

Email:pgomez@gtbahamas.com





1 n a,
WItNOINOG BAy

HAS A VACANCY FOR:
DEPUTY GENERAL MANAGER
Duties include:
Assisting Club Director and General Manager
Food & Beverage, Housekeeping and Front House experience
4-5 star experience essential
Must be willing to relocate to Abaco.
Please send resume to:
Attn: Human Resources The Abaco Club Association
P.O. Box AB-20571 Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Bahamas
Fax: 242-367-2930


IN THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2005/CLF/Qui/00903
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law and Equity Side

IN THE MATTER all that piece parcel or lot of land
situated in Section Two (2) of the said Subdivision?
called and known as "Sea Breeze Estates" having
the number Five (5) in Block Number Eleven (11)
in the said plan of the said Subdivision filed in the
Department of Lands and Surveys and having the
Number 439.
AND

IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959.

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of E. Pedro Roberts Jr.


NOTICE

TAKE NOTICE that E. Pedro Roberts Jr. of Number 5.
Block 11 in Section Two of the Subdivision known as Sea
Breeze Estates in the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands in the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas claims to be the owner of the unencumbered fee
simple estate of ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land
situated in Section Two (2) of the said Subdivision called
and known as "Sea Breeze Estates" having the Number Five
(5) in Block Eleven (11) in the said plan of the said Subdivision
filed in the Department of Lands and Surveys and having the
Number 439:
E. Pedro Roberts Jr. claims to be the owner in fee simple of
the said land fee from encumbrances and has made an
application to the Supreme Court in the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act 1959
to have its title to the said land investigated and the nature
and extend thereof determined and declared, in a Certificate
of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with the
provisions of the said Act.
A plan of the said land may be inspected during normal office
hours in the following places.

a. The Registry of the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau:
b. The Chambers of Johnson-Hassan & Co. Suite No. 2
Grosvenor Suites. Grosvenor Close off Shirley Street,
Nassau, N.P., the Bahamas Attorneys for the Petitioner.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower or
right of dower or an Adverse claim or a claim not recognized
in the Petition shall on or before the 5th day of January, A.D.,
2006, file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
or the undersigned a Statement of his claim in the prescribed
form, verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure
of any such person to file an serve a statement of his claim
or before the said 5th day of January, A.D., 2006 will operate
as a bar to such a claim.

JOHNSON-HASSAN & CO.
Suite No. 2 Grosvenor Close
Off Shirley Street,
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner


I


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005


BUSINESS














Wilma 'flattens' Atlantis RevPAR


FROM page 1B
cent year-on-year increase, due
to the effects of Hurricane
Wilma.
Howard Karawan, president
and managing director of the
company's Destination Resorts,
saitfthe travel disruption caused
by Wilma affected Atlantis's
group and leisure business dur-
ing October the first month of
the fourth quarter and caused a
loss of about 6-7 per cent of
occupancies. He pointed out that
the loss of occupancies also
affected Atlantis's other revenue
streams, food and beverage and
the casino.
However, Mr Karawan point-
ed out that Wilma's impact was
only short-term, adding that
Kerzner International was in
talks involving the finalising of
filiming the new James Bond
film, Casino Royale, at both
Atjaniisaniid the One & Only
Opean Club. Online bookings
fo'Atlintis were up by 31 per
cgqt in 'September and October
codipared to the previous year,
and Mr Karawan said the guest
experience would be further
enhanced when this function was
taken in-house for next year,












FROM page 1B

number of tourists coming to
the Nassau/Paradise Island des-
tination and develop a business
model that would complement
Atlantis.
J-Iarrah's would be able to use
its slot and gaming database to
attract customers to its Caesars
Ehtertainment-branded 75,000
square foot casino and 1,000-
room luxury hotel, and Mr
KIrzner pointed out that "not
many people will come to New
Providence, Nassau and not vis-
it us".
' Kerzner International's $730
million Phase III expansion at
tlantis includes a dolphin
encounter and water-based
theme park designed to attract
increased numbers of day guests
from the cruise ships, locally
and other hotels, as well as its
own customers, and the com-
pany seems to believe Baha
Mar will also provide it with
day-pass customers.
"Overall, we see it [Baha
Mar] as a net positive," Mr
Kerzner said.
Kerzner International's tune
has changes somewhat since
2004, when its former chief
executive for the Bahamas, Paul
O'Neil, told a Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce luncheon that
the company had "concerns"
Over the proposed Baha Mar
development.
n He indicated that Kerzner
International feared Atlantis
and Baha Mar could effectively
split the market for the wealth-
ie-ftourists if they went 'head-
to-head', ensuring that neither
woni. However, the Atlanllis
owner now seems to view Baha
Mar's presence as helping to
grow the whole Bahamian
tourism pie for both.
Mr Kerzner added: "Cable
Beach, for all of us in the
Bahamas, has been in decline
for the, last several years. The
properties were becoming run
down, the room rates were com-
ing down, and it has not been
terribly helpful in marketing the
Bahamas [and increasing air-
lift]. We've had to drive all that.
S"The way we look at it, it's
high time something happened
at Cable Beach to stem the
'decline and stop it from going
down and down. The customer
base was so different that very
few had wanted to come over to
Atlantis. When they finally get
!it redeveloped, I think it's good
for us."
Mr Kerzner added that Nas-
sau/Paradise Island currently
had 7,000 hotel rooms, a total
'that was likely to increase to
around 8,000 when Phase III
iWas completed. When Baha
' (ar's development was fin-
ihed, scheduled for 2010, the
total was likely to strike 9,000.


t, Mr Kerzner said this paled in
Comparison with Las Vegas's
,36,000-strong room inventory,
,nd 110,000 rooms in Orlando.
He added: "The market in
he Bahamas is so totally unde-
Veloped. It's only just scratched
' he surface in terms of what can
be done."
j Mr Kerzner was at pains to
Point out, though, that his com-
:pany's competitive positioning
vould not be threatened by
13aha Mar, describing Paradise
, sland as a "very special loca-
lion" and a "magical place".


meaning that guests could book
the various activities they want-
ed to take part in and develop an
itinerary.
Meanwhile, Mr Karawan said
the recently-opened Marina Vil-
lage had produced "just an
amazing result", proving a large
factor behind the 22 per cent
food and beverage revenue rise
in the third quarter.
However, he added of Marina
Village: "We're still tweaking
pricing and the operational effe-
iciency. The contribution to
profitability levels is not there
as we'd like it to be, but that will
come in the next couple of
months as we tighten up opera-
tions."
At the Harborside timeshare
development, Mr Karawan said
32 per cent of the 116 two and
three-bed units completed as
part of a Phase II expansion had
been sold, and forecast that 38
per cent will be sold by year-
end. The prices Phase II units
were selling for were 36 per cent
ahead of those realised during
Harborside Phase I.
Some 137 units of the 500-
room condo hotel joint venture
project with Turnberry Associ-
ates had been sold, Mr Karawan
said, with a selling price "in
excess of" $1,400, per square
foot. The $225 million develop-
ment is being financed through


pre-sales, and construction is set
to being shortly.
At the Ocean Club Resi-
dences, the first phase of 44 units
had largely been sold, with
Kerzner International now
"finalsing" the last two unit sales.
On phase two of this project, the
company had received commit-
ments on 13 of the 44 units being
offered for sale, with the sales
price having increased over
phase one by 11 per cent.
Describing Kerzner Interna-
tional's $15 million acquisition
of 7.5 acres of beachfront prop-
erty at the eastern end of Cab-
bage Beach, Mr Karawan said
the site would be used for the
Beach Club attached to the
Ocean Club Residences and
Marina. He added that the land
might also be used for extra
future home sites, and be auic-
tioned off as five to six lots.
Mr Karawan said the long-
term indicators for Paradise
Island post-Phase III were "very
good", with group bookings
expected to be up 100 per cent in
2007 over 2006 when the new
100,000 square foot of conven-
tion space came on stream.
Kerzner International added
that it was "comfortable" with
Wall Street expectations of
$0.31-$0.34 in earnings per share
(EPS) for the 2005 fourth quar-
ter.


FROM page 1B


Bahama-based $76 million film
studio investment, told The Tri-
bune that its water tank suffered
no damage from the storm.
Mr Quigley said: "We didn't
suffer an awful lot of damage, it
was mostly debris. There was no
structural damage to the tank;
it did extremely well during the
hurricane.
"By the time Disney came
back [the following week], we
actually had everything back in
shape so they went straight into
filming.
"Things are going well. We're


making great progress and it's
all working extremely well for
them. The weather has been
absolutely wonderful and per-
fect for Disney to do both day
and night shoots."
Mr Quigley said both ships
that featured in the films, the
Black Pearl and the Flying
Dutchman, were in the studios'
water tank.
He added that Disney was
also set to do four days of film-
ing in the Exumas, saying:
"Everything's better than
expected."


WINDING 'AY

HAS A VACANCY FOR:

HUMAN RESOURCES
TRAINER
Candidates should have:

Experience in High-end Club Management
Temporary Position for 6 months 1 year
Must be willing to relocate to Abaco

Please send resume to:
Attn: Human Resources The Abaco Club Association
P.O. Box AB-20571 Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Bahamas
Fax: 242-367-2930



GN-292

,MINISTRY OF WORKS

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

INVITATION FOR TENDERS

The Ministry of Works and Utilities invites tenders for the
Supply of Vehicle License Plate Materials.

The items are to be procured and delivered to The Ministry's
Warehouse, John F. Kennedy Drive, with cost, freight,
duty and all delivery charges paid.

Interested parties may obtain further information and a
copy of the bidding document from:

THE MINISTRY OF WORKS & UTILITIES
SUPPLIES DIVISION
JOHN F. KENNEDY DRIVE
P.O.BOX N-8156
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS
TELEPHONE: 322-4830-9
TELEFAX: 302-9766

During normal working hours 9:00a.m. to 5:00p.m.,
Monday thru Friday any time after 4th November, 2005.

Tenders are to be submitted in sealed envelope(s) marked,
"Tenders for the supply of Vehicle License Plate and
addressed to:

THE CHAIRMAN, THE TENDERS BOARD,
MINISTRY OF FINANCE
CECIL WALLACE WHITFIELD CENTRE,
WEST BAY STREET
P.O.BOX N-3017
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS

All tenders must reach the Ministry no later than 5:00p.m.
on Friday, 18th November, 2005. Tenders will be opened
on Tuesday, 22 November, 2005 at 10:00am in the
Conference Room, 3rd floor, Ministry of Finance, West
Bay Street, Nassau Bahamas.

Companies who have submitted tenders are invited to
attend the tenders opening The Ministry reserves the right
to reject any or all tenders.


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005, PAGE 5B


(1) Compaq Presario Computer Monitor & Tower
(1) Whirl Microwave


Cart


Hot dog cart with Umbrella


Tables


(1) Wood Table (Round)
(1) Marble Table (Rectangle)

Coolers/Freezers

(1) Two Door Chest Freezer
(1) One Door Chest Freezer
(1) Blue Coleman Cooler


Tents


(1) Canopy Tent (Plastic)


Machinery


(1) Food Mixer
(1) Wall TV Stand

Vessels

(1) 24' (2002) Chris Craft w/engine
(1) 29' (1983) Vessel (Lady Rece)
(1) 28' Vessel


Vehicles


(1) 2001 Ford F-250 Truck
(1) 1996 Ford Explorer
(1) 1997 Dodge Stratus


Cooking untensil pots, pans, plates, chaffing dishes, dry cleaning equipment.


Serious inquiries only. Sealed bids marked "Tender" should be submitted to:
Bahamas Development Bank
P.O. Box N-3034, Nassau, Bahamas or telephone 327-5780
for additional information
Please note that all bids on the aforementioned properties and assets should be
received by November 18, 2005.
The Bahamas Development Bank reserves the right to reject any or all offers.
ALL ASSETS ARE SOLD AS IS.


THE TRIBUNE


BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK
Cable Beach, West Bay Street, P.O. Box N-3034
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 327-5780/327-5793-6
Fax: (242) 327-5047, 327-1258
www.bahamasdevelopmentbank.com



NEW PROVIDENCE

1. Lot #13 (5,000 sq. ft.) with duplex (1,344 sq. ft.) white trim lime green -
Bancroft Lane Bamboo Town (Appraised Value $147,000.00)

2. Lot #14, BIk #7 with sports bar along with restaurant equipment Key
West St and Balfour Ave Englerston Subdivision (Appraised Value
$187,000.00).

3. Lot #171 (100'x100') with the two story building East Street opposite
Deveaux Street (Appraised Value $3000,000.00)

4. Lot #27A (55'x90') with incomplete split level house Boastwain Hill or
Bosun Hill (Appraised Value $139,580.00)

5. Vacant Lot (18,644 sq. ft.) Situated on the western end of Carmichael
Rd about 250 feet east of Unison Rd. (Appraised Value $95,000.00)

6. Lot #39 (2,500 sq. ft.) with house (1,104 sq. ft.) 4 bedrooms, 1 bathroom
Lincoln Blvd, Englerston Subdivision. (Appraised Value $70,000.00)

7. Vacant Lot #1038 (6,000 sq. ft.) Orange Blossom Ave, Garden Hills
Estates #3 (Appraised Value $35,000.00)

ANDROS

8. Property (4,344 sq. ft.) with duplex (1,174 sq. ft.) in the settlement of
Fresh Creek, Central Andros. (Appraised Value $73, 258.00)

9. Vacant Property 100' x 150' in the settlement of Pinders, Mangrove Cay,
South Andros (Appraised Value $22,500.00)

GRAND BAHAMA

10. Lot #267 (12, 795 sq. ft.) Caravel Beach Subdivision, Freeport, Grand
Bahama. (Appraised Value $22,000.00)

11. Lot #9 with house (3) Bedrooms, (1) Bathroom and an incomplete split
level extension west Pinedale Rd, Pinedale, EMR, Grand Bahama. (Appraised
Value $90,000.00)

ABACO

12. Lot #54 (6,500 sq. ft.) with triplex foundation in Murphy Town, Abaco.
(Appraised Value $29,916.00)

ELEUTHERA

13. Property 31' x 111' with house Lord Street in the settlement of Tarpum
Bay, Eleuthera (Appraised Value $45,000.00)

14. Vacant Lot #22 (11.,659 sq ft in th Nsettlement of North Palmetto Point
in an area known as Skull District, Eleuthera. (Appraised Value $9,000.00)

CAT ISLAND

15. Property 151'x145'x150'x123' with Hardware Building (3,640 sq. ft.)
situated 0.4 miles south of The Bight Airport New Bight, Cat Island. (Appraised
Value $192,000.00)

16. Property with twelve (12) room motel 1.39 acres In the settlement of
Arthur's Town, Cat Island (Appraised Value $1.3 Million Dollars)

EXUMA

17. Lot #134 (4,350 sq. ft.) with two story building 4,160 sq. ft., apartment
upstairs and shop downstairs, George Town, Exuma. (Appraised Value
$468,000.00)

INAGUA

18. Lot #43 (9,000 sq. ft.) with house Matthew Town, Inagua, Russell Street
(Appraised Value $120,000.00)


Electronic Equipment







PAGE6B, ONDA, NOEMBE 14,2005TRIBNEOSORT


Ambitious Jeremiah




wins first boxing match


N BOXING
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
YOUNG, up-and-coming
boxer Jeremiah Andrews is
stating that he will become the
first Bahamian heavyweight
champion of the world.
Andrews, 12-years-old,
fought in his first boxing
match on Saturday after sev-
eral months of training with
coach Ray Minus.
Fighting in a three rounder
against Tryonne Oliver,
Andrews took his opponent
down in a unanimous decision.
Although the fight for Oliv-
er is just the beginning of big-
ger and better things, he is cer-
tain that hard training will get
him to the level of a profes-
sional boxer.
"I want to be the best boxer
the Bahamas ever made, the
first heavyweight champion,"
said Andrews.
"I am working hard towards
it and with the help of my
coaches I will be there. This
fight tonight wasn't hard. I
went in there knowing that I
was going to come out on top.


Young fighter comes out


on top in three rounder


He tried to hit me, but I had
put up my guard so he had a
hard time hitting me.
"When I went in on him his
guard was down, he had
already dropped his hands so I
was getting open punches to
his face. His nose started to
bleed a little so I didn't want
hit him any more, I got scared.'

Bell
"But the referee he didn't
know so, when we break I had
to tell him, but in the end
everyone was asking me why I
stopped fighting I was scared
to hit him again. But I know
that in other fights I will have
to fight until I hear the bell.
The fight was go6d though, he
is a good fighter."
In the nine-years-and-under


division, Aparachio Davis of
the Kemp Road boxing club
got the better half of Cleve-
land Dorsett, who was repre-
senting the Grove Communi-
ty boxing club.
After his second match of
the year, Davis is confident
that his winning streak will
continue throughout the Sat-
urday matches.
He said: "I just wanted Ito
go in the ring and do my bqst,
I wasn't scared when I started
fighting, and all I wanted to
do was get the whole fight
over with.
"I like to box, boxing is fun
to me, and even the training
sometimes can be fun.
"I think I am getting
stronger every time we train.
Training is fun and I learned a
lot. I learned how to use the
jab and upper cut now and we


be doing some push ups and
sit ups."
The bell was the only sepa-
rating force between Richard
Charlton and Avery Francis,
who went at it from the begin- .
ning.
Charlton had pinned
Francis to the rope in the first
round of action, but
Francis got his revenge in the
second.

Punches
With the boxers evenly
matched by the start of the
third round, the wild punches
started to fly, as they both
tried to separate themselves
from each other.
Minutes into the third,
Charlton got the upper edge
he wanted over Francis, once


again pinning his
shorter opponent to the ring-
side.
The hands of a helpless
Francis dropped to his sides
leaving Charlton with open
shots to the head.
Charlton said: "I wanted to
use more jab on him but the
bell rang. I got to use the jabs
in the first round, but I was
tired in the second round so
he ended up punching me
more. I wasn't worried when
he did this, I knew I had to
come and have big punches in
the third.
"When the third round
started I was firing away on
him, some of the punches
landed and I missed him on
some. But think I did good."
The Saturday boxing match-
es are hosted by the First
Class Boxing Promotion
agency, it is held in an attempt
to not only promote boxing
in the country but to intro-
duce younger boxers to the
ring.
All fights are held at the
fighting arena located on
Wulff Road opposite
Whymms Automotive.


OO40 al om qj- _4m
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Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


.1


TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005


Mystic


Marlins
FROM page one
el Dean had eight, Kirklynf
Gibson seven and Lamont
Nesbitt and Martino Fergu'
son both contributed six.
Travis Flowers had a game
high 24 and Stevon Thomp-
son added 10 in the loss.
Doris Johnson's coach
Mark Hanna said it was a dif.
ficult loss, considering the
fact that they led for the first
three quarters.
"We ran out of gas down
the end, but my guys played
hard," he stressed. "I know
we can beat this team. Some-
how, between South Andros
and now, they got bigger."
The third place consola-
tion prize went to CI Gib-
son, who defeated CV Bethel
38-31 as M Moxey led the
way with 13, L Flowers had
12 and R Wallace helped out
with eight.
Granville Gibson and
Anton Storr both scored sev-
en in a losing effort.


Wildcats

clinch

series
FROM page one
most strike outs to share
the MVP award with Far-
rington.
The All-tourna-
ment team comprised
of the following play-
ers:
Pitcher Jean Minus;
catcher Dornette
Edwards; first base -
Chyshann Percentie;
second Hyacinth Far-
rington; third Oleta
Thomas (Abaco);
shortstop Moeshe
Munroe; leftfield Rita"
Mackey; centrefield -
Mary Edgecombe;
right-field Allison
Bowe (Exuma) and
utility player Crystal
Armbrister (Long
Island),.
On the men's side,
Electro Telecom's sec-,
ond baseman Andy
'Smudge' Ford won the
batting crown with a
.533 average. He also
had the most hits with
eight and most runs
scored with 10. His
brother, shortstop
Mario Ford, drove in
the most runs with
nine.
Grand Bahama's
Vaughn Malakius had
, the most stolen bases
with three.
Edney Bethel record-
ed the most wins six -
and produced the best
ERA with a stingy .029
He also had the most
strike outs with 48 and
shared the MVP honor,
with Andy Ford.
The All-tourna-
ment team comprised
of the following:
Pitcher Edney
Bethel; catcher Ange-
lo Lockhart (Grand
Bahama); first base -
Anthony Moss (Exu-
ma); second base -
Andy Ford; third base -
Dumont Charlow;
shortstop Mario Ford;
leftfield Julius John-
son (Exuma); centre-
field Dereck Wells
(Long Island); right-
field Darren Bowleg
and utility player -
Vaughn Malakius.






I I LILJJi I" t I I


Trescothick puts





England in control


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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005


SECTION




Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


INSIDE


Trescothick

puts England

in control
ENGLAND stand-in captain
Marcus Trescothick blasted a
stylish unbeaten century Sunday
and led his side to a strong posi-
tion on the second day of the first
cricket test against Pakistan.
Seepage 7B


* BASKETBALL
By BRENT STU
Senior Sports F
THE Doris Johi
Marlins, despite hav
ing facilities to wor


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


Ystic Mar







Ie against



Reporter Shockvictory
nson Mystic
ing over Rnospo-attlers
rk with, haveov L a lers


won their first senior boys bas-
ketball title.
The Mystic Marlins defied the
odds on Saturday when they
stunned the highly favoured CI
Gibson Rattlers 50-49 in the
championship game of the
delayed South Andros High
Invitational Basketball Tourna-
ment.
The tournament was started
last month in South Andros, but
was not completed because of
the inclement weather. So
organisers brought the remain-
der of the tournament to the
Kendal Isaacs Gym.

Celebrations
While the Mystic Marlins held
off the Rattlers, the South
Andros Barracudas had even
bigger celebrations in the gym
when they clinched the junior
boys title with a 56-48 triumph
over Doris Johnson.
"I think they came out and
played excellent," said Doris
Johnson's coach Harcourt


McCoy. "When I came to the
game, they were in the locker
room, they were praying trying
to get ready for the game.
"Everything was done. I just
had to lay the game plan out for
them and they came out fired
up. They really wanted this one
for loyalty because, last year,
the centre that is now at CI Gib-
son came from us."
McCoy was referring to Rob-
son Memnon, who along with
former CR Walker guard Dan-
nie McKenzie, made the switch
over to the Rattlers.
Robson turned out to be a
tower of strength in the middle
down the stretch against his for-
mer team, scoring 12 and
McKenzie did a good job in. run-
ning the ball and finishing with
six.
The Rattlers, however, were
led by Denkyco Bowles with 16
and Jermaine Storr with 10.
Doris Johnson, who led by


five going into the final minute,
couldn't find an answer for
Memnon, whose three-pointer
with 44.9 seconds and his one
free throw with 11 seconds,
drew CI Gibson within one.

Steal
But the championship's most
valuable player Robert Byrd
went to the foul line and missed
both charity shots for the Mystic
Marlins. On an errant pass, Rar-
cino Dorsett came up with a
steal as Doris Johnson celebrat-
ed.
"We really feel this one, we
are really proud of the victory
because we had to overcome so
much to get it," McCoy stressed.
"It's not fair, but we played
against it and for a team that
doesn't have anything to work
with, we played with a lot of
heart."
Despite missing the two free


. I i


iens take


throws, Byrd finished with a
game high 17 points and was the
only Mystic Marlins' player in
double figures. Renaldo Kemp
and Leo Hall both had eight and
Dorsette, Leslie St. Fleur
and Cori Frazier added four
apiece.
CI Gibson took control of the
game early as Bowles led the
way with nine points in their 11-
7 first quarter surge. Byrd had
all seven for the Mystic Marlins.
But in the second quarter,
Doris Johnson made it a con-
test when they pulled even at
19-19 at the half and they went
ahead 34-30 at the end of the
third.
The game was close until the
Mystic Marlins made a mine run
for their five-point advantage,
only to watch it dwindle as the
Rattlers fought back.
"I felt we didn't have the
energy level to pull it off," CI
Gibson's coach Kevin 'KJ' John-
son admitted. "Doris Johnson
wanted it a little more and they
played that way."
The third place consolation
prize went to the CV Bethel
Stingrays, who knocked off
Doris Johnson 71-51, thanks to
Rommel Johnson's game high
17. Sherman Ferguson added
13, Deshike Henfield had 11 and


Renard Minus chipped in with
10.
Hubert Hanna led the Mys-
tic Marlins with 16.
In the fast paced junior boys'
game, Doris Johnson went on a
9-0 spurt at the end of the third
quarter to take a 41-31 lead into
the fourth.
But South Andros went on to
different surges in the fourth,
tying the score at 44-44 and that
out-scoring Doris Johnson 12-4
down the stretch to win.

Rain
"This is a huge victory. Wb;
came a long way," said BierS
racudas' coach Danny Pratt;
"We were ,doing good iii'
Andros, then the rain canf&:
down and we had to come here,
to try and organise another tou&
nament. *
"We didn't have a chance. to
practise like we wanted to, buf
in the long run, the guys weJri
able to pull it off, even thotigh9
they were not used to the wo5d-
en floor."
Darren Sturrup scored 20
points, including 12 in the
fourth, and: he was named the
MVP for the Barracadas. Drex-
SEE page 6B


Wildcats clinch series


win ladies'


tory, following their 6-1 loss to ti
municators on Saturday night.
Meanwhile in Long Island, the
Telecom Dorcy Park Boyz pull
three-game sweep over the Heav
ment Panthers in a real defensive
All three games turned out
pitcher's duel between Dorcy Pa
ace Edney 'the Heat' Bethel and I
Pedro Marcellus, two front line
team pitchers.

Victories
The Dorcy Park Boys, howev
able to pull off the victories on
by the Panthers. No official stats
summaries were available.
In Grand Bahama, the Electro
had taken the first two games, win
1 on Friday night and 13-1 on S
But, despite the loss, most valuab
Mary 'Cruise' Edgecombe said
wanted to get the job done.
"We didn't get the sweep, but
glad that we were able to co
today and win it," Edgecor
"We made a promise to ,
Jackie 'Lil Stunt' Moxey
did it."
Moments after the


crown

he Com- Edgecombe said they called the family of
Moxey to inform them that they had
Electro achieved their goal.,
led off a The Wildcats had dedicated the series to
y Equip- Moxey, who died just after their fifth
e battle. straight New Providence Softball Associ-
to be a ation's title.
rk Boyz' No stats on the four games played were
Panthers' available, but the final stats for the series
national showed that Edgecombe had an earned
run average of 1.50 with 11 strike outs and
a 3-1 win-loss record for the MVP lion-
ors.
Edgecombe also did her part offensive-
ly with six runs batted in. Centrefielder
er, were Vernie Curry and catcher Dornell
miscues Edwards shared the most hits with six
or game apiece.
Telecom Curry and second sacker Hyacinth Far-
Telecom 10-rington both shared the most runs scored
inning 10- with five each.
Saturday. From the round robin, Farrington Won
le player the batting title with a hefty .714 average.
they just She also produced the most hits and scored
the most runs. Munroe had the most RBIs
we were with eight. Andros' Christine Jenore ,had
me back the most stolen bases with five.
nbe said. Wildcats' Jean Minus had a perfect 4-0
win it for win-loss record, the best ERA and the


y ana we
victory,


SEE page 6B


All square

in playoffs

TRINIDAD & TOBAGO
were held to a 1-1 draw by
Bahrain in the 2006 World Cup
playoffs.
Seepage 6B









MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005


The stories behind the news


Ministry of Health officials say that they are still working on
"a multifaceted plan" to combat a potential outbreak of the
Avian flu in the Bahamas but cannot yet say when it will come
to fruition. Last week the Ministry of Health announced that it
was preparing a response in the event of pandemic influenza
here in the Bahamas.
However, when The Tribune contacted the Ministry of
Health yesterday, officials said that were still in the process of
"bringing everything together". They would not disclose any
further details, except to say that the plan would focus on pro-
tecting the Bahamian public by limiting the impact on the
population and limiting social disruption...


A


As of Thursday, November 10, Hubert
Ingraham (left) is ready to do battle. The
former prime minister and leader of the
FNM made this declaration during his first
press conference following his election.
Decentralisation of government, the crip-
pled Grand Bahama economy and the prob-
lem of illegal immigration were just a few of
the issues Mr Ingraham touched on last
night Mr Ingraham said that the return to the
leadership of the party .was the "most diffi-
cult decision he had to make in his life"...


pending


Eleuthera has recorded its first murder of the year
with the stabbing death of a 34-year-old resident.
At about 9pm Monday two men got into a heated
argument at a Savannah Sound residence, according
to police.
Press liaison officer Walter Evans said the row result-
ed in one of the men being stabbed several times. The
victim was taken to the local clinic where he was pro-
nounced dead.
Police are withholding the victim's identity pending
official identification by relatives. However, police said
the man lived at Savannah Sound.


calamity


Haitian issue needs to dominate everyone's political agenda


ver the last 30
ypars, south
Florida has
0 become pre-
. domin antly
Hispanic. If you want a job
there, mastery of Spanish will
be a primary requirement.
In shops, "Buenos dias" is
more prevalent than "Have a
nice day" and Cubans are as
plentiful as beach shoes and
wvrap-around shades.
By any estimation, the tra-
ditional American population
has now been submerged by
an alien presence. And there
is no prospect that Miami and
its environs will ever return to
what they used to be.
A Bahamian businessman
closely associated with Haitian
communities in Nassau,
Freeport and Abaco claims this
country is now undergoing a
similar transformation.
Within ten years, he says,
Creole could be challenging
English as the predominant
tongue while Josephs and St
Justes will be close to outnum-
bering Rahmings and Rolles as
the Bahamas moves into a new
era under a foreign culture.
Ridiculous? Not the way he
tells it, for the imposition of a
Haitian cultureon the tradi-
tional Bahamian lifestyle is
already well underway and
with an estimated 300 Haitians
a week seeking a new life here,
total subjugation of the old
order will not take long.
Older Haitians, he says, have
already bred a new generation
now established in various gov-
ernment services, including the
customs department and police
force.
With their emphasis on edu-
cation, their resilient family
structures, and their strong
work ethic, it will not be hard
for the Haitian community to
overrun the now morally weak,
dispirited and often lackadaisi-
cal resident population, he says.
The businessman who made
these troubling disclosures is
not an anti-immigrant fanatic.
On the contrary, he says he has
a passion for the Haitian peo-
ple and employs them in his
business.
However, he genuinely
believes the Bahamas is ripe


for a takeover. And the
process, he claims, is already
well underway.
The parallels between Nas-
sau and Miami are apt for sev-
eral reasons. South Florida has
been fed by a huge influx of
Cubans fleeing the Castro
regime. Relieved to be free of
oppression, they arrive full of
diligence and determination,
and an eagerness to be suc-
cessful in their new homeland.
Many Haitians are fired by the
same zeal. Unfortunately, not
all.
While some Haitians are
escaping their hellish homeland
to seek a better life in a
civilised land, the intentions of
others are less wholesome.
Haiti has now become the
Caribbean's main drugs tran-
shipment centre, with Colom-
bian cocaine finding its way to
the United States via the old
French colony and the
Bahamas.
Hence, the Bahamas has
become one of the regional
strongholds of the internation-
al Zopound gang, which has a
cluster of members probably
numbering hundreds all told -
in Freeport and Nassau.
These Haitian hardmen are
interested only in plying the
drug trade through the
Bahamas and removing any
obstacles in their path..
INSIGHT's source said:
"The Zopound gang originated
in Haiti but is now well-estab-
lished in Florida, New York
and California. There is a
strong branch in the Bahamas,
especially Freeport, and there
is some indication of member-
ship in Abaco and Exuma.
"Back when drugs were


* ILLEGAL Haitian immigrants get ready for repatriation


(FILE photo)


heavy in the Bahamas, these
guys were protectors of the
traffickers. They are now very
organised in the US and are a
growing force here."
In Nassau, the network is
rooted in Fox Hill, Yamacraw,
Carmichael, Bain Town and
Grants Town. "They are now
mixed in the community," he
said, adding that many gang
members are former "militia
types" from Haiti who have
easy access to guns.
"At one time it was very
shameful to be a Haitian in the
Bahamas," said the business-
man, "Now a Haitian will tell
you his name because they
believe the very word 'Haitian'
strikes fear into Bahamians.
The word Zopound carries
respect among the gang frater-
nity and this gives Haitians a


measure of security."
Besides drugs, Zopound is
also implicated in human smug-
gling, using the Bahamas as a
stop-off point for pushing ille-
gal immigrants into Florida.
Freeport is seen as the Bahami-
an headquarters of this illicit
trade.
In various parts of Nassau
and Freeport there are "safe
houses" where human cargo is
stored to await the processing
of false papers. Then the immi-
grants are rushed by go-fast
boats to the Florida coastline;
With Haitians now inveigling
their way into every area of
Bahamian society, the busi-
nessman feels total submersion
is not far off. Within a decade,
he says, Creole will be widely
spoken in Nassau. In 50 years,
at the present rate of expan-


sion, Bahamian culture will
have been completely sub-
merged.
This process, he says, will be
helped along by the unwilling-
ness or inability of politicians to
get to grips with the problem.
With so many people of Hait-
ian origin already established
in key positions, resistance to
tougher immigration laws will
grow to the point where the
country is overrun by foreign
hordes.
Alarmed Bahamians are
already questioning the extent
to which high-level attitudes
are influenced by Haitian fam-
ily and religious links.
Several powerful Bahamians,
for instance, have Haitian or
half-Haitian spouses. Others
are second or third generation
Bahamians with Haitian ori-
gins.
One source told INSIGHT:
"There is undoubtedly a reluc-
tance among some prominent
Roman Catholics here to do
anything that could be con-
strued as anti-Haitian because
most Haitians are Catholics.
"There is already a reluc-
tance among PLPs to resist
Haitian immigration because
they feel Haitians, once they
have the vote, are likely to vote
for them. There are several
powerful forces that prevent
politicians from making ratio-
nal decisions on the immigra-
tion problems.
"Yet, and this is no exagger-
ation, the Haitian problem is
the biggest issue facing the
modern Bahamas. It is
undoubtedly the most impor-
tant issue these islands have
ever faced. When will politi-
cians face up to this simple


fact?"
The business source who last
week offered Tribune readers a
disturbing assessment of Hait-
ian infiltration said aggressive
attitudes among some Bahami-
an tourism workers are the first
signs that the nature of local
life is changing.
"In Haiti and Jamaica they
no longer care whether people
visit their countries or not.
They adopt a 'take it or leave
it' attitude to foreigners. I have
noticed this happening here.
They don't appreciate that this
country depends entirely on
tourists.
"In the Bahamas, we have
always been a passive, non-vio-
lent society. Now we have
crime all around us. The
changes are happening before
our eyes."
The businessman is not
advocating mass deportation.
In fact, he believes the coun-
try has long since passed the
point when that was possible.
What is needed, he says, is a
proper strategy aimed at stop-
ping the inward flow of immi-
grants and educating those who
*are already here to live by
Bahamian standards.
He feels many Haitians are
ready to take out mortgages
and buy their own homes, leav-
ing behind forever the
appalling slum conditions cre-
ated in places like The Mud
and Pigeon Pea in Abaco.
He also believes some of
them, though not all, will be
ready to embrace Bahamian
laws if given the right guidance
and encouragement.
Money now finding its way
into the hands of unscrupulous
Haitian landlords can be direct-
ed into home loans, he said.
And, with the right inceri-
tives, Haitians with status will
be ready to abandon makeshift
and illegal banking arrange-
ments and become part of the
Bahamian financial system.
At the moment, many
Haitians run banks on asue
lines, accumulating and hold-
ing vast amounts of money
without offering any security.
The unofficial "bankers" are

SEE page 2C


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Disturbing predictions were made last week by a

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spkin _cowvv_,,! _kx S'

econd-class status. S..G


^WvfWI







PAGE 2C, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


Re: George W Bush
Another
INSIGHT
classic !
Thanks for the
marvellous
item on George W Bush.
You're right. This spoilt brat -
self-confessed drunk and drug-


user in his youth had neither
the character nor the ability to
be president of the United
States. The thought of another
three years of him makes me
weep.
J B Burrows, Nassau
******00000


WHILE some of your com-
ments were well below the
belt, I think your assessment
of George W Bush was cor-
rect. As an American who is
frankly embarrassed by this
dreadful regime in America, I
wish the press in my homeland
was as ruthless and incisive as
you are. I feel TV and news-


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papers in the US have been
too easy on Bush and his
cohorts.
Lee Harrington, visitor
******

I AM appalled that you
could be so disrespectful
towards a man who, whatever
his faults, is head of state in
my homeland.
Republican and proud of it
00000******0

AS an American from the
southern states, I felt sad to
see the savage but brilliantly
effective way you dismem-
bered my president last week.
At first I was appalled at your
insolence. However, after giv-
ing it further thought, I accept
that your appraisal is fair and
appropriate.
George W Bush will
undoubtedly go down as one
of the worst if not the worst -
presidents in our great coun-
try's history.
Bellaby
******00000

I AM from the Carolinas
and I have to agree with every
word you said about George
W Bush.
He was unsuited to high
office because of his past.
Whatever anyone says, people
with drink and drugs problems
have a deep-down weakness
of character.


FEEDBACK

This president was a creation
of that political genius Carl
Rove, whose talents have been
badly misdirected in recent
years. Rove built a false presi-
dent on the back of a promi-
nent political name and tried to
sell him to the American peo-
ple...successfully, as it turned
out.
Now we are counting the
cost. America's image has been
irreparably damaged around
the world. I am not sure that
we can ever recover.
Middle-class American
000000******

YOU are brutal but right.
That is what people have a
right to expect from their press.
I wish the US had newspapers
as forthright and effective as
yours.
Jean Allenby


******


TO answer the question in
your headline: Yes, George W
Bush is the worst president of
all time. Even more troubling,
I think he will still be the worst
when a similar poll is taken a


century from now.
Robert L Smyth


HOW right INSIGHT is on'
America and its people. I am.
an American, but it shocks me.
that only 15 per cent of my.
countrymen have passports.'
The mass who live in the mid-
dle are ignorant, naive and;
insular and the Bush govern-
ment reflects their prejudices"
and their stupidity.
K Mack, from Connecticut'
******eO

MY wife and I are commit-
ted Republicans, but I have to
admit our allegiance to Bush is'
now beginning to waver.
M and M, year-round resi-
dents
******

WHEN Bush said "I am
relying on the guidance of a'
higher father" I knew we were
in trouble. Having a religious
fruitcake in charge of national
affairs 'is not a good idea.
Ben Evans


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A pending calamity


FROM page 1C
part of the foundation of a
flourishing sub-economy.
"What you must remember
is that most Haitians are just
pleased to be here. It's a
change from being shot at 24
hours a day," he said.
"Although some are here for
unlawful purposes, including
members of Zopound, others
are just looking for jobs and a
better life.
"Things are so bad in Haiti
right now that people would
actually rather be in
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre than in their own coun-
try. I don't think Bahamian
people always realise that."
Hence, the Haitian diaspora
will continue for the foresee-
able future and the Bahamas
will remain the yellowbrick
road to better things.
Strategy
Unless the government
devises a strategy for con-
fronting the looming crisis, the
Bahamas could face cultural
obliteration, he said.
As things stand, police and


Defence Force corruption is
smoothing the way for human
smuggling and that is the first
obstacle the government will
have to tackle if it is serious in
bringing it to an end.
Money
Big money is involved boat
captains can earn $50,000 or
$60,000 or more per trip with a
cargo of Haitians aboard so
corrupt police can receive gen-
erous piay-offs for their c6-.
operation.
As Zopoupd'has discovered,
drugs and humans generate big
bucks in the Bahamas as they
are smuggled into and through
the islands on their way to the
States.
And the humans who stay -
an estimated 60,000 to date,
with more landing every week
- could alter the entire Bahami-
an lifestyle within a generation,
Growing recognition of this,
pending calamity could domi-
nate the next general election.
If it doesn't, it ought to.
What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail:
jmarquis@tribunemedia.net


chil OreMs,


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_ __ __~_ I 1 I


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,







MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005, PAGE 3C


THE TRIBUNE


'Ingraham was our only


chance'


says FNM


everal weeks ago,
INSIGHT tracked
the detailed predic-
tions of a political
veteran who
claimed that, whatever was
being said to the contrary,
Hubert Ingraham would end
up leading the FNM into the
next general election.
He said the Turnquest and
Foulkes campaigns were noth-
ing more than diversions, and
that events were being careful-
ly orchestrated to ensure that
Mr Ingraham made a come-
back amid euphoric scenes.
In addition, he said that Mr
Ingraham ostensibly, at least -
would do nothing to encour-
age. this process, and that his
return would be portrayed as a
response to a desperate cry
from the people.
Well, so it transpired and
everyone, including Mr Ingra-
ham's rivals for the leadership,
were kept guessing right up
until the eleventh hour. Insid-
ers were convinced as late as
last Monday afternoon that the
leadership battle would be a
two-horse race between Turn-
quest and Foulkes.
Party stalwarts in both camps
were even calling all their
friends late last Sunday night
to announce that the ex-PM
was definitely out of the run-
ning. They said he had called
Mr Turnquest and Mr Foulkes
separately to say he would not
be throwing his hat into the
ring. Shrieks of "Thank God!"
and "Praise the Lord!" could
be heard as supporters erupted
with joy.
Sources
INSIGHT, written the pre-
vious Thursday and based on
information from several trust-
worthy party sources, carried
the same message. Having
been given a tepid reception
by the party's council, and a
heap of abuse from detractors,
it seemed that Mr Ingraham
had backed off.
Well, everyone was wrong.
Mr Ingraham, in what a local
tabloid called a late change of
mind, issued a statement which
some called ambiguous but
others interpreted as a clear
indicator that he was back in
the fight after all.
In essence, it said that, while
he had never sought the lead-
ership, he was prepared to lis-
ten to the people's voice. In
other words, if they wanted
him, he was available. Brent
Symonette responded immedi-
ately by announcing he was
running for deputy leader, indi-
cating he would be proud to
serve as Mr Ingraham's num-
bet two.
The veteran whose predic-
tions came true, just as most
FNMs were dismissing them as
thd ramblings of someone who
knew no better, called
INSIGHT immediately to say:
"I told you so." No wonder he
found it hard to disguise the
gloat in his voice.
Nonetheless, it is still diffi-
cult to discern exactly how
mich of this tawdry affair was
stage-managed, and how much
wqs simply the product of
unfolding events. The only cer-
tainty is the sour taste left
behind by what appeared to
many to be a shabby exercise in
deceit and double-dealing.
At the end of several weeks
ofMr Ingraham's shadow box-
ing, even his own closest fans
were punch-drunk and befud-
dled. Tommy Turnquest, the
stupefied sparring partner in


With Hubert Ingraham back as

FNM leader, the party now feels

it has a real chance of recapturing

the country from the PLP. But not

everyone was happy with the

process by which this outcome

was achieved. At 8pm last Sunday,

the political camps of both Tommy

Turnquest and Dion Foulkes were

jubilant as supporters were told:

"Ingraham is not running." The

following day, they were deflated

when it became clear that the

former prime minister had left

the way clear for his name to

go forward in the leadership

battle. What happened?

INSIGHT reports...


this sad affair, didn't seem to
know whether he was coming
or going. As it happened, he
was going and fast.
Meanwhile, Dion Foulkes -
known by some as The Bruiser
- didn't get a chance& to lay a
glove on anybody. It was all
over before he climbed into the
ring.
Whatever people's misgiv-
ings about the distasteful
machinations leading up to
Ingraham's triumph, his sup-
porters will feel the end justifies
the means.
From the start, they saw him
as the only realistic hope of
success at the next general elec-
tion. And, they reasoned, the
Bahamas simply could not
afford another five years of the
PLP, by common consent a
government which has demon-
strated new dimensions of
incompetence since it was
handed power on a platter in
2002.
One FNM insider told
INSIGHT: "I don't like the
way it was done, but having
Ingraham back is, quite frankly,
the party's only chance.
"What remains to be seen is
whether Ingraham will contin-
ue to be the force he once was.
Does he have the energy, the
sheer will, to repeat his suc-
cesses of the past? Will he have
learnt anything from his mis-
takes?
"Will we rue the day we
allowed him to return? These
are all questions that will find
answers in the months and
years to come. All we know
now is that, in the short-term at
least, Ingraham is our best bet."
Future
Others felt that more than
the FNM's future was at stake.
Another five years of the PLP
would, in their minds, have set
the country on the road to ruin.
In its current state, what the
Bahamas needed was a prop-
erly devised national strategy
on several fronts not least
immigration, education and
economic development. What
it got was inertia, a kind of


institutional paralysis.
Particularly heartened by the
re-emergence of Hubert Ingra-
ham are a long line of potential
investors who have grown
weary of the PLP's inability or
unwillingness to reach deci-
sions.
An impression has devel-
oped that Prime Minister Perry
Christie, in his eagerness to
share power, finds it hard to
come down on either side of
an argument, probably because
he is under so much pressure
from more forceful characters
within his own party.
Mr Christie has been depict-
ed by his detractors as someone
who loves the premiership and
the power it implies but
shrinks from the irksome
responsibilities it imposes.
Relishes
He relishes the celebrity that
goes with the job as a
Junkanoo shuffler and banquet
buff he has no equal and glo-
ries in the nickname "Holly-
wood" among his colleagues as
he jets off to meet the world's
movers and shakers.
But the less glitzy aspects of
the premiership give him
headaches. His reluctance to
rein in recalcitrant elements in
his own Cabinet has given cre-
dence to those who say he
shuns confrontation.
Mr Ingraham's advantage
over him is a capacity to over-
ride the opposition of his Cab-
inet colleagues if he feels what
he is doing is right. Hence,
when Mr Ingraham leaves a
meeting, the other side know
exactly where they stand.
However, one unfortunate
by-product of recent events is
that Mr Ingraham's famous
declaration "I say what I
mean and mean what I say" -
has developed a rather hollow
ring.
One FNM insider said: "The
big question now is whether
anyone knows what he means
when he says it. For weeks he
has been either totally silent or
talking in code, a kind of dou-
blespeak that the rest of us are
supposed to unravel.
"To say one thing one night,
and something completely dif-
ferent the following day makes
one wonder whether we can
ever believe anything he says in
the future."
Another FNM supporter
told INSIGHT: "No-one is pre-
tending Mr Ingraham is per-
fect. He isn't. But he is the best
we have at this time. On bal-
ance, the future is brighter now
that he is back in the picture."
What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmar-
quis@tribunemedia. net


IBu ledrhp-rcs evsI.so,~ at,


Share your news
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Area or have won an
Award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.








PAGE40, ONDA, NOEMBE 14, 2005HESTIBUN




IJI


As of Thursday,
November 10,
Hubert Ingra-
ham is ready
to do battle.
"I he former prime minister
ani leader of the FNM made
this declaration during his first
prcs conference following his
election.
Decentralisation of govern-
ment. the crippled Grand
Bahama economy and the
problem of illegal immigration
were just a few of the issues
Mr Ingraham touched on last
week.
Mr Ingraham said that the
return to the leadership of the
pa lyv was the "most difficult
de;i on he had to make in his
life however, he said, it was
his Iitv to come back.



1 (IE Free National Movement
poli ical party is preparing for a
"gr it victory", with me as their
leader, incumbent leader Tom-
my Turnquest said last week.
Speaking at the opening of the
FNM Convention last week, Mr
Turnquest, said that "tonight, I
stand before you as the leader of
this great party, as we prepare
the campaign for the next gen-
eral elections".
"We are preparing for a great
victory. We are preparing to
restore good government to our
people," he said.



FNM leader Senator Tom-
my Turnquest said he is disap-
pointed in former prime minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham for not
keeping his promise that he
would not be running for the
party leadership.
Speaking with The Tribune
last week, Mr Turnquest said
he was contacted by Mr Ingra-
ham on Sunday when he was
told by the former prime min-,
ister that he would be making a
public statement to the effect
that he had no desire to lead
the FNM once again.
However, Mr Ingraham
issued a press release on Mon- -
day stating that, although he ,
had no desire to run as leader.
of the party, if the people want-
ed him to 'lead he "would lis-
ten."



AFTER a three-way "tug of
war", Brent Symonette, the
only FNM to win his seat in


New Providence in the 2002
general elections, was elected
deputy leader of the FNM,
beating out Carl Bethel, and
the former deputy leader Sid-
ney Collie.
Speaking with The Tribune
moments after his victory, Mr
Symonette said he was proud
to honour his father's memory,
Sir Roland Symonette the
first premier of the Bahamas
by winning the position of
deputy leader of the FNM.
"I'd like to thank the dele-
gates of the great party, the
FNM, for having the confi-
dence in me to elect me as
deputy leader. I am also very
honoured to be a part of a
team that starts with Mr Ingra-
ham, with myself, and other
members that won here today
that will present the FNM plat-
form as we move forward in
the next election whenever Mr
Christie (Prime Minister Per-
ry Christie) should so call it,"
he said.
When the votes were tallied
by Michael Barnett, the execu-
tive chairman of the FNM con-
vention, Mr Symonette won
the majority of the votes taking
167, with Mr Bethel coming in
second at a relatively close 124
votes. The former deputy
leader Mr Collie, rounded out
the three with only 79 votes.



RECEIVING only 40 of
the 375 possible votes, Dion
Foulkes on Thursday lost the
leadership race to former
prime minister Hubert Ingra-
ham.
As Michael Barnett, execu-
tive party chairman, counted
the votes yesterday afternoon,
the many "Turnquests" and
even more "Ingrahams" were
interspersed with only a few
"Foulkes".
Finally shortly after 7pm it
became clear that Mr Foulkes
would only receive 40 of the
delegates' votes, with Mr
Ingraham receiving 227 and
Tommy Turnquest 104.
*i': 5|!' ': '

1MINISTRY of Health offi-
cials say that they are still
working on "a multifaceted
plan" to combat a potential
outbreak of the Avian flu in
the Bahamas but cannot yet
say when it will come to
fruition.
Last week the Ministry of
Health announced that it was


preparing a response in the
event of pandemic influenza
here in the Bahamas.
However, when The Tribune
contacted the Ministry of
Health yesterday, officials said
that were still in the process of
"bringing everything together".
They would not disclose any
further details, except to say
that the plan would focus on
protecting the Bahamian public
by limiting the impact on the
population and limiting social
disruption.



ELEUTHERA has record-


ed its first murder of the year
with the stabbing death of a 34-
year-old resident.
At about 9pm Monday two
men got into a heated argu-
ment at a Savannah Sound res-
idence, according to police.
Press liaison officer Walter
Evans said the row resulted in
one of the men being stabbed
several times.
The victim was taken to the
local clinic where he was pro-
nounced dead.
Police are withholding the
victim's identity pending offi-
cial identification by relatives.
However, police said the man
lived at Savannah Sound.


Quotes of the Week


"I was very disappointed
in the statement. Mr Ingra-
ham called me on Sunday
and indicated to me that he
was out, that he was not
going to run, and that he
was going to make a state-
ment the following day.
"... That his statement was
going to say that he was not
going to run and that he
would encourage persons
not to nominate him. So
'when you told me the state-
ment you got was ambigu-
ous, my comment to you
was that it was very clear.
"It was very clear that he
intended to allow his name
to go in for nomination.
That he intended to serve
as leader of the party, and
that is totally contrary to
what he told me less than
24 hours previously."
Tommy Turnquest,
ousted leader of the Free
National Movement, fol-
lowing reports that former
prime minister Hubert
Ingraham, had made the
decision to allow his name
to be entered in the race
for leadership of the par-
ty.



"I did not decide to allow
my name to go forward
until Monday. I called Th,a-
my and Dion both on Su,
day night and I was not
going to allow my name to
go forward. I told you that
the calls were incessant, the
demands were great and I
decided the following morn-
ing to allow my name to go
forward. If you call that the
breaking of a word then I
did. I don't call it that
though."
Newly elected leader
of the FNM Hubert Ingra-
ham, denying that he broke
his word to incumbent
Tommy Turnquest about
vying for the leadership
position of the party.



"Tommy Turnquest is a
good man, and Mr Ingra-
ham will be able to use him.
But at this time, the people
of this country believe that
with the state of this country,
Hubert Ingraham is the
strongest leader this coun-
try can have."
Arlington Miller, a
meritorious council mem-
ber and a voting delegate,
told The Tribune that he
was very pleased with the


results from the FNM's
leadership race.


"It over, that's it we got
our salt and pepper team!"
Following news of
Hubert Ingraham's win to
the leadership spot of the
FNM, pandemonium broke
out on convention floor'
with delegates screaming,
hugging each other and
dancing. Men broke out cig-
ars and hit the bar for a cel-
ebratory round of drinks.
** *

"Bahamian businesses are
left in a situation where they
are unable to build: up size,
so most will not be in a posi-
tion to compete with the
large Caribbean holding
companies that are likely to
come from Barbados and
Trinidad, Mr Winder said. I
"Most Bahamian busi-
nesses will become targets
for purchase by those com-
panies........ .
Raymond Winder,
partner with Deloitte &,
Touche, and the Bahamas *
Trade Commission's co-'
chair, told The Tribune>
that BAHAMIAN compa-
.a-.s would be "targets for '
urchase" by their '
aribbean counterparts
under the Caribbean Sin-
gle Market & Economy .
(CSME) because the -
Bahamas' exchange control ,
regime prevents them from -
expanding abroad, ham-
pering their competitive- ;
ness and ability to gain size
and scale.



"As we develop, as we lib-
eralise our capital markets, a
credit rating agency will
become vital to facilitating
and guiding that expansion.
"All of this is the type of
thing that should signal to
the Bahamian people that
our market is expanding, '
and we should not be afraid
that as we move forward we
will be in the international
eye.
Keith Davies, chief
executive of the Bahamas
International Securities
Exchange's (BISX), saying
that tie development of a
credit rating agency, at
either the Bahamian or, :
inter ational level, was
something he would "wel-
come".
/ ,, *:;


PAGE 4C, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005


THE TRIBUNE





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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005, PAGE 5C


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6C, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005


MONDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 14, 2005

7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

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HBO-W Benjamin Bratt, Sharon Stone. A shy artist acquires fe- well, Alison Lohman. A con man bonds with his daughter and plans a
line strength and agility. C 'PG-13'(CC) swindle. n 'PG-13' (CC)
(6:45) *** COLLATERAL (2004, Suspense) Tom ** TITANIC (1997, Drama) Leonardo DiCaprio, Kate Winslet, Billy
H BO-S Cruise,Jamie Foxx, Jada Pinkett Smith. A contract Zane. A woman falls for an artist aboard the ill-fated ship. C 'PG-13' -
killer uses a cabdriver for his jobs. n 'R' (CC) (CC)I
(6:30) ** BUT *** OCEAN'S TWELVE (2004, Comedy-Drama) George Clooney, (:05) **' SHARK TALE (2004,
MAX-E IM A CHEER- Brad Pitt, Matt Damon. Indebted criminals plan an elaborate heist in Eu- Comedy) Voices of Will Smith,
LEADER (1999) rope. ( 'PG-13' (CC) RobertDe Niro. C 'PG' (CC)
* GARFIELD: THE MOVIE (2004, Comedy) GHOST SHIP (2002, Horror) Julianna Margulies, 35) NIGHTCAP:
MOMAX Breckin Meyer. A cat tries to save a kidnapped dog. Ron Eldard, Desmond Harrington. Salvagers are FORBIDDEN
Live action/animated. n 'PG' (CC) trapped aboard a haunted oceanliner. n 'R' (CC) LUST 'NR'
6:15) * THE * PAYCHECK (2003, Science Fiction) Ben Affleck, Aaron Eckhart, * OUT OF TIME (2003) Denzel
SHOW MAN WHO Uma Thurman. i. A technical wizard lears his memory has been Washingon.A police chief is ac-
CRIED (2000) erased. Cl 'PG-13' (CC) cused o setting a deadly fire.
6:25) MY THE PRINCE & ME(2004 Romance-Comedy) Julia Stiles, Luke *** A FEW GOOD MEN (1992,
TMC IFE SO FAR Mably, Ben Miller. A collegian and a Danish prince fall in love. 'PG' Drama) Tom Cruise, Demi Moore.
(1999) (CC) (CC) Cl 'R' (CC)


I~ )'"


Let Ckcwlie tke .
Bacimiacv PLppet ad d
kis sidekick Derpek pt4+
some. smileS OVn yOtAr-
kids's fac-es.



Bing youi, ckildrien to the

Mc-cHappy HoT'i aft DoAnald's in

Oaksfield every Tkhursday

from 3:30pm to 4:30pm duinq the

mok bof JNovembe- 2005.


Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.


i'm lovin' it"





MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005, PAGE 7C


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ISSUES IDEAS

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2005 I THE MIAMI HERALD


ANDRES OPPENHEIMER


IN' MY OPINION
CARL HIAASEN




When will we be

ready for the

next one? Never


Sixth its usual foresight and
timeliness, the Florida Leg-
islature is now grappling
with the issue of hurricane prepared-
ness.
We all know what that means:
-absolutely nothing.
The Democrats are blaming the
Republicans for the halting response
to Hurricane Wilma, and the Republi-
cans are blaming the citizens for not
heeding calls to be ready.
There's a breath of truth in both
arguments and plenty of hot air.
The fact is, urban South Florida
will never be prepared for a major
hurricane. The idea of evacuating six
million people is ludicrous, and the
vast majority will be either stuck on
the highways or stuck in their homes.
If a slow-moving Category 4 or 5
storm strikes head-on any place from
West Palm Beach to South Miami,
plan on mass destruction, long-term
shortages of fuel and food, disorder in
the streets and, of course, darkness.
There's no other possible scenario,
unless they bulldoze the whole penin-
sula, boot everybody out and start
over. Catastrophic mistakes have lit-
erally been set in concrete, as has our
fate.
How many cities and counties in
South Florida govern development
with future hurricanes in mind? The
road systems are designed purely to
feed growth. High-rises and subdivi-
sions are mapped to maximize den-
sity.
The result is sprawl, suffocating
congestion and when thestorm
hits the collapse of an overbur-
dened infrastructure. Big surprise.
For decades thestate's governors
and legislative leaders have avidly
encouraged reckless coastal growth,
beholden as they've been to mega-de-
velopers, road builders, banks and
others getting rich from cramming
morepeople into Flori :da.
Now our lawmakers sit around,
scrounging for somebody to blame for
the havoc caused by Hurricane
Wilma. What boneheads.:
I love the comments from|Sen.
Alex Diaz de la Portilla of iamiand
Sen. Paula Dockery of Lakeland. They
say Floridians need to take more per-
sonal responsibility for hurricane
Preparation.
Are you slackers listening? Next
time a tropical storm is brewing, rush
out and buy your 72 hours worth of
food, ice and D batteries. You'll be
just fine after the storm hits.
For 72 measly hours at least. After
that, good luck.
And here come the Democrats,
carping about the Federal Emergency
Management Agency and demanding
to know why some supply trucks
didn't get where they were supposed
to go. Sure, there was some bungling
and confusion, but it's hard to envi-
sion a smooth operation in the
absence of traffic signals and fuel for
the relief vehicles.
Meanwhile, Florida Power & Light
has been asked to explain how so
many of its substations got knocked
out, and why so manyof itspower
poles snapped like matchsticks, leav-
ing more than 3.2 million people in
the dark.
SThe utility probably isn't taking the
- inquiry too seriously, having been
awarded last week a whopping rate
increase of 20.6 percent for the aver-
age residential customers. Interest-
ingly, the company had asked for less.
It was with the same unbridled
Generosity that the so-called Public
Service Commission earlier decided
that FPL should be handsomely com-
pensated for revenues lost from the
massive outages caused by the 2004
hurricanes.
So, even though your electricity
was off, the meter was still running.
Many thousands of private busi-
*TURN TO HIAASEN


OPINION PAGE
AMERICAS SUMMIT: It's not
enough for regional leaders to wish


for job creation. They have to work
for it, and it's hard work
STATE VS. CHURCH: If we were to
allow the IRS to silence us, we
would lose our integrity and the
very soul of our ministry


LEARNING HOW TO COMPETE


Co yrightedMaterial


Syndicated Content


Available rom.Commercial News Providers"


m -


AMAZINGL
SCHOC


. --


WHILE CHINA HAS BEGUN TEACHING ENGLISH IN ALL PUBLIC


)LS STARTING AT THIRD
LATIN'AMERICAN COUNI


This is a translated excerpt from
Andrds Oppenheimer's new book,
Cuentos Chinos:
El engafio de Washington, la men-
tira populista y la esperanza de
America Latina (Sudamericana,
2005: $24.95). In English, the title
can be loosely translated as "Tall
Tales: Washington's Deceit and
Latin America's Populist Charade."
Halfway through the first
decade of the 21st century,
two studies from very dif-
ferent sources one from the
CIA's long-term think tank, the
other one from the socialist chair-
man of the European Parliament's
committee on South American
affairs, Rolf Linkohr shocked
the few Latin Americans who had a
chance to read them.
Both studies contradicted the
prevailing view in Latin America
that the region is enjoying a
healthy recovery after three years
of robust growth and that it has a
promising future ahead of it.
And both arrived at the same
conclusion: The region has
become irrelevant in the world
scene, and if it continues on its
current path it will become even
more irrelevant by the year 2020.
In the new global economy,
where countries that produce
sophisticated goods have much
bigger incomes than those that sell
raw materials, "almost none of the
Latin American countries will be
able to invest their already meager
resources in major research and
development projects" needed to
produce higher value-added goods,
the CIA's National Intelligence
Council said. Only 1 percent of the
world's investment in research and
development currently goes to
Latin America, as opposed to 27
percent that goes to Asia. And the
region's growing number of popu-
list regimes are unlikely to attract
foreign investments in research
and development, or to reform
their outdated education systems
to create high-skilled work forces
that could better compete with
China, India or Eastern Europe.
As a result, Latin America is
likely to fall increasingly behind
much of the rest of the developing
world, the CIA's experts and the
Linkohr report concluded.
Were the CIA and European
Parliament futurologists right? Or
were they so blinded by China's
economic boom that they failed to
see beyond the headlines of the
day?


Andres
Oppenheimer
will present his
book Sunday,
Nov. 20, at the
Miami Book Fair
International.


And were Latin America's lead-
ers right in pursuing a growing dis-
tance from the U.S.-backed free-
market recipes that many of them
followed in the 1990s, or were they
telling tall tales to their people
when they claimed that all-out cap-
italism was bad for their countries?
Over two years ending in late
2005, I traveled to some of the
world's countries that have been
most successful in reducing pov-
erty including China, Ireland,
Spain, Poland, and the Czech
Republic and to some of Latin
America's most troubled countries
- including Venezuela, Argentina,
Brazil and Mexico to try to find
answers to these questions. I inter-
viewed most of their leaders,
opposition politicians and average
citizens on how their countries can
best prosper and reduce poverty in
the new global economy. And one
of the issues I most looked into -
and where I found the most star-
tling differences between Asia,
Central Europe and Latin America
- was education, science and
technology.

Of all the people I met in Bei-
jing, including senior government
and Communist Party officials, the
one who impressed me the most
was Xue Shang Jie, a 10-year-old
boy I met at the private English-


GRADE, FOUR HOURS A WEEK, NO MAJOR
qTRY COMES EVEN CLOSE TO THAT.-:


and math-tutoring Boya School.
I was doing research on China's
2005 decision to teach English as
an obligatory assignment for all
children starting at third grade of
elementary school. I had written a
column saying that 250 million
Chinese children were about to
begin intensive English studies -
which meant that more Chinese
than American children are study-
ing English on any given day -
and I wanted to see it with my own
eyes. So I visited the Boya School
one evening at about 6:30 p.m., and
was soon allowed to attend an Eng-
lish class. When I was introduced
to the class, the children reacted
with surprise, giggles and welcome
nods. More than a dozen kids were
sitting in the front rows while sev-
eral men and women in their 60s
and 70s obviously, their grand-
parents were sitting in the back,
doing crosswords or reading maga-
zines.
I soon noticed an exceptionally
bright kid in the front row. He had
huge reading glasses, a bright
smile, and spoke fluent English. I
later learned from his teacher that
his name was Xue. He didn't need
remedial English classes but was
taking them because he wanted to
improve his academic record and
qualify for his country's English
and math Olympics, I was told.
I had first thought that Xue was
the son of diplomats, who had
picked up his English abroad. But I
couldn't have been more mistaken:
His father was a mid-level army
officer at the People's Liberation
Army, and his mother an
employee. They were middle class,
and they had never lived outside
China.
How's a typical day of yours? I
asked Xue.
He told me in fluent English
- that he woke up at 7 am, got to
school at 8 am, and studied until 3
p.m. or 4 p.m., depending on the
day of the week. Then he did
supervised homework in school
until 6 p.m., when his father picked
him up. From there, they would go
twice a week to the Boya School to
take English and math classes. He
also had private tutoring on Satur-
days and Sundays.
Could he watch TV when he got
home on weekdays, I asked. If he
was done playing the piano and
finishing his homework by about 9
p.m., he was allowed to watch TV
for half an hour, he said. And do
you like studying that much? I
asked. "Yes," he replied, smiling


again. "It's very interesting. And if
I study a lot, my father gives me a
toy."

Amazingly, while China has
begun teaching English in all pub-
lic schools starting at third grade,
four hours a week, no major Latin
American country comes even
close to that. Chile in 2005 intro-
duced compulsory English classes
at fifth grade for two hours a week.
In Mexico, state-run schools in
most states start teaching English
in seventh grade for two hours a
week. As strange as it sounds, Chi-
nese kids who have a Commu-
nist government and a totally dif-
ferent alphabet are studying
English much sooner, and much
more intensively, than their Latin
American counterparts, many of
whom live close to the United
States, share the same alphabet
with their North American neigh-
bors and grew up watching Holly-
wood movies.

Why do children in Asia study
more than Latin Americans, I
asked in Beijing, Washington,
Mexico City and Buenos Aires.
Many experts told me it's a cul-
tural phenomenon, which has to do
with Confucius' philosophy, which
emphasizes education. Others said
it has to do with China's capitalist
revolution, which is driving par-
ents to invest more in their chil-
dren's education, because they
know that with socialism's full
employment policies on their way
out it's the only way in which
they will get a good job in a market
dominated by private companies.
And in China's case, it's also due to
the country's controversial one-
child policy, which often results in
two parents and four grandparents
investing in one single child's edu-
cation.
But many Chinese and Latin
American education officials
pointed at another factor: Asian
schools have a "culture of evalua-
tion," which is mostly absent in
Latin America's state school sys-
tems.
"In Latin America, school sys-
tems focus on quantity, rather than
quality," said Jeffrey Puryear, a
Latin American education expert
with the Inter-American Dialogue,
a Washington, D.C., think tank.
When I asked Argentina's edu-
*TURN TO OPPENHEIMER, 2C


.....................................~ S ~.~


C


I~I 11 -~III X~_____lil~l~^~XII~


. g


-Y,








0.C SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13,2005' INTERNATIONAL EDITION


<>


WORLD VOICES


A LOOK BACK AT
THE WEEK OF NOV. 6


IRAQ
Bombers killed 42 people
Thursday at a Baghdad restaurant
favored by police and at an army
recruiting center to the north. Iraqi
troops along the Iranian border
found 27 decomposing bodies.
As of Thursday, at least
2,056 members of the U.S.
military have died since March
2003, according to AP.


LIBERIA
A Harvard-trained economist,
Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, was poised
last week to become Africa's first
female head of state as she built a
nearly insurmountable lead in
Liberia's runoff presidential
election. George Weah, a former
soccer star and the preelection
favorite, has challenged the
results, claiming that ballot boxes
were stuffed for his opponent.
Election officials will investigate,
but international observers said
Tuesday's election appeared fair.


MEXICO


WASHINGTON, D.C.
* Four new Bush administration
appointments to positions that
affect U.S. policy on Cuba, plus a
pledge to restart a presidential
commission on the island's future,
are stoking hopes among some
Cuban Americans for a further
tightening of sanctions on Havana.
Chief among the changes is the
arrival of Thomas Shannon as
assistant secretary of state for the
Western Hemisphere, the region's
top diplomatic post. Among other
new Cuba faces: Michael Parmly,
head of the U.S. diplomatic
mission in Havana, and Stephen
McFarland, head of the Cuban
affairs desk at the State
Department, both of whom quietly
took over this summer. Then there
is Caleb McCarry, the Cuba
transition coordinator at the State
Department a potentially
powerful post filled in late July
after it was recommended by a
Cabinet-level panel that Bush
created, the Commission for
Assistance to a Free Cuba.


UNITED STATES POLITICS
* On Tuesday, Democratic Lt.
Gov. Tim Kaine was elected
governor of Virginia, despite a
last-minute campaign appearance
by President Bush on the part of
his GOP opponent, Jerry Kilgore.
* A Democrat, Jon Corzine, was
also elected New Jersey governor.
* In California, all four ballot
measures Gov. Arnold
Schwarzenegger tried to get
passed in a special election on
Tuesday lost decisively, including
his spending-limit proposal and his
measure to curb the clout of
public-sector unions (Proposition
75).


-aw -aim-


ANDRES OPPENHEIMER



Doomed in race


to compete?


*OPPENHEIMER

cation minister Daniel Filmus
whether he agreed with that
premise, he nodded. "For the
past 30 years, Argentina has
not had a culture of excel-
lence, nor a culture of effort,
nor a culture of hard work.
Our culture has rather been
one of cutting corners and
trying to pass the grade,
rather than seeking excel-
lence through effort, hard
work and research. Our big-
gest challenge is how to intro-
duce a culture of quality in
education."


Nowhere is the absence of
quality controls more evident
than in Latin America's big-
gest state universities, includ-'
ing some of the region's best-
known, such as Mexico's
269,000-student National
Autonomous University
(UNAM) and Argentina's
152,000-student University of
Buenos Aires (UBA).
Both are scandalous exam-
ples of lack of accountability
to their respective societies:
They both refuse to be evalu-
ated and certified by their
respective countries' school
accreditation institutions,
claiming they are too presti-
gious to submit themselves to
an evaluation alongside other
schools in their own country.
"Virtually all universities
in the country have submitted
themselves to outside evalua-
tion, except the UNAM,"
Mexico's education minister
Reyes Tames told me. Filmus,
Argentina's education minis-
ter, told me that the UBA has
even sued the Education Min-
istry to block any attempt to
evaluate it. "Their argument
is that their academic level is
so high, that nobody can eval-
uate it, and that an outside
evaluation would violate their
[political] autonomy," Filmus
said.
As a result, these and other
major state-run universities
are monuments to educa-
tional backwardness.
Despite receiving more
money from their govern-
ments than most of their
counterparts UNAM gets
$1.5 billion a year, or more
than 30 percent of the govern-
ment's budget for all national
universities their schools
are overpopulated, their
buildings are deteriorating,
they lack proper equipment,


and most of their cla
taught by recent grad
While 40 percent o
university professor
Ph.Ds, the percentage
zil is only 30 perc
Argentina and Chile
cent, and in Mexico 3
Worse, 40 percent o:
11,003 professors w
free because the uni
system can't pay them

Latin America's
state-run university
tuition-free, have virt
entry exams for pros
students, no limits on t
it takes students to gi
and no standardized
tion tests.
In Argentina, only
of 10 university stude:
graduate. Because st
universities are tuiti
and the country has l.5
students in its universe
tern, taxpayers are sup
hundreds of thousand
students. In Mexico,
mated 1.8 million stud
pursuing undergr
degrees, but only at
percent ever graduate
In China, meanwhile
is a two-day-long nati
entry test for all univ
taken by 6 million s
annually. About 40 pe
those tested fail a
bumped off the uni
system. And the 60
who do get into the un
system are ranked, v
best-scoring students
the best-ranked univ
China's state-run univ
charge students an es
$550 in tuition fees a
fortune by Chinese sta
Only those who pro
can't pay are given s
ships.
Student fees help C
where the government
comparatively less th
Latin American coun
university education
port first-class unive
According to a Londoi
ranking of the worl
best universities, Beiji
versity ranks 17th, wt
best-ranked Latin An
university, UNAM,
195th.


And while Asian an
ern European universe
graduating large num
engineers, scientists ai
nicians, Latin Americ


I


ABOUT THE AUTHOR


/ ANDRES OPPENHEIMER,
53, is a columnist with the
Miami Herald and author of
three best-sellers on Latin
American affairs.
He previously worked
sses are five years with The
uates. Associated Press in New
f British York, and has contributed,
rs have among other publications,
in Bra- to The New York Times,
:ent, in The Washington Post and
12 per- The New Republic. He was
percent. a member of the Miami
f UBA's Herald team that won the
ork for 1987 Pulitzer Prize for
iversity uncovering the Iran-contra
1. scandal; won two
Inter-American Press
biggest Association awards for
ies are investigative reporting and
ually no f olumn writing in 1989 and
spective 1994; and won the National
the time Association of Hispanic
graduate, Journalists prize for print
gradua- reporting in 1997. In 1993,
he won Spain's Ortega y
two out Gasset Award, the most
nts ever prestigious investigative
tate-run journalism prize in the
ionfree Spanish-speaking world,
Smillion for his reporting from
sity sys-
porting
s of idle
s of ide versities are producing record
an esti- numbers of psychologists and
ents are sociologists. In Mexico, an
aduate oil-exporting country, UNAM
produces 15 times more psy-
ie, there chologists than oil engineers.
ionwide A total of 620 psychologists
ersities, graduate every year, com-
tudents pared with only 40 oil engi-
rcent of neers. In Argentina, a country
nd are that relies heavily on its agri-
iversity cultural exports, UBA pro-
percent duces 1,300 psychologists -
dversity and only 173 graduates in agri-
,ith the cultural sciences each year.
going to 0
ersities. Education ministers and
ersities experts throughout Latin
timated America told me that there is
year, a little they can do to change
andards. the system: Their countries'
ve they big state-run universities are
scholar- constitutionally autonomous
ina and run by old-guard leftist
- sea d unions. Originally, political
spends autonomy was designed to
an most prevent governments from
tries on curbing academic freedoms.
- sup- But over the years, it has
ersities: become a shield for well-en-
n Times trenched university teachers
d's 200 and workers unions that resist
bile the any changes.
hile the "In Latin America's educa-
mericanks tion systems, there's virtually
ranks no accountability," says Pur-
year, of the Inter-American
Dialogue. "You can have good
d East- or bad teachers, but it doesn't
make any difference: You
abers of don't lose your job for bad
nd tech- performance, nor do you earn
nan uni- a raise for good perfor-
mance."
1


Cuba.In 1998, he won:
Columbia University's.
Maria Moors Cabot Award,
the oldest prize in U.S.
international journalism.
Born in Buenos Aires,
Argentina, he studied law
for four years at the
University of Buenos Aires,
got a one-year fellowship
from the World Press
Institute in 1977, and
obtained his master's
degree in journalism from
Columbia University's
Graduate School of Journ-
alism, New York, in 1978.
His books include
Castro's Final Hour:An
Eyewitness Account of the
Disintegration of Castro's
Cuba, (Touchstone/Simon
& Shuster, 1993); and
Bordering On Chaos (Little,
Brown & Co., 1996) on the
Mexican crisis of the
mid-'90s; and Cr6nicas de
HeroesyBandidos
(Grijalbo, Mexico, 1998), a
collection of stories from
various Latin American
countries.



Is Latin America doomed
in the world race for competi-
tiveness?
Not necessarily.
There are promising exam-
ples in the region: Brazil's
Embraer aircraft factory is
exporting 110-seat jets to Jet
Blue, Air Canada, Saudi Ara-
bian Airlines and several
major carriers around the
world. In Costa Rica, exports
from Intel's microprocessors
factory already represent 22
percent of the country's
export income. Mexico's
Corona beer and Cemex con-
crete empire are gaining mar-
kets worldwide. Chile and
Argentina are exporting many
varieties of excellent wines.
But these are exceptions to
the rule. Overall, Latin Amer-
ica continues to be an
exporter of raw materials.
In South America's case,
key countries depend on pri-
mary goods for about 80 per-
cent of their export income. If
countries in the region imple-
mented very simple reforms
- including an overhaul of
their education systems -
they could quickly reduce
poverty and lift their stan-
dards of living, as China, India
and other countries have
done.
If they don't do it, it's
because many of their leaders
are more interested in selling
empty ideologies than in
reducing poverty.


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ISSUES & IDEAS


THE MIAMI HERALD


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OPINION
JOHN S. KNIGHT (1894-1981) JESUS DIAZ JR., PUlR I TOM FIEDLER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR I JOE 0GLESBY, EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR


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LATIN AMERICA


Tackling job creation


BY SUSAN SEGAL
ssegal@as-coa.org

When first envisioned during
the 1994 Summit of the
Americas in Miami, the 2005 sum-
mit was intended to be a capstone
to celebrate the Free Trade Area of
the Americas and an opportunity to
chart a course for future hemi-
spheric cooperation, integration
and mutual engagement. Much has
happened since the first summit,
the result being that at the just-
completed gathering of
hemispheric leaders in Mar
del Plata, Argentina, signifi-
cant differences led to
"frank discussions" about
the future vision for the
hemisphere. The free-trade
area will not occur this L
year, and there is some SEGAL
question whether it ever will.
But before we pronounce last
rites on the hemispheric agenda,
it's worth taking a step back,
beyond the political posturing and
self-interested rhetoric of the usual
commentators most of whom
were not at the summit to take
stock of where we truly are and
where we go from here.
President Bush traveled to
Argentina to discuss the primary
topic on the agenda: job creation in
the hemisphere. It is a matter of the
highest importance. People must
have hope based on the belief that
they can deliver a better life for
their children and that each person
has a personal economic future in a
democratic society. Without
enhanced creation of good jobs,
people's lives cannot improve,
Latin America's huge wealth gap
will not narrow and democracy
will continue to be undermined by
the siren call of populism as people
increasingly question its ability to
deliver benefits.
TRADE EXPANSION
But it's not enough for regional
leaders to wish for job creation.
Rather, governments must take
active steps to create a framework
within which jobs can be created. It
is hard work, and, globally, Latin
America lags far behind.
Trade expansion is one of the
best tools available to draw direct
foreign investment leading to the
creation of good jobs, but it is only
effective at the margins of econo-
mies. Of equal, if not more, impor-
tance are steps to improve social
mobility through broad-based edu-
cation, enhanced political and eco-
nomic predictability, increased
labor mobility and transparent


rules of the game.
With this in mind, there is a path
ahead. After all, despite foreknowl-
edge that the summit would be dif-
ficult, all the parties showed up in
Mar del Plata, an important signal
that the hemisphere continues to
see value in meeting together.
As well, 29 of the 34 leaders
expressed support for moving the
free-trade area forward by
jump-starting negotiations. Mean-
while, the United States and Brazil
separately indicated a strong desire
to collaborate in the Hong
Kong WTO meetings next
month to resolve the global
agriculture impasse with
the European Union and
Japan. Even without a for-
mal agreement, as I spoke
to many of the private-sec-
tor summit participants it
became abundantly clear that
regional trade and investment is
already happening and will only
grow in the future the private
sector is showing the way.
And sector-specific areas such
as energy, technology and infra-
structure are ripe for further inves-
tigation and collaboration.
More broadly, leaders such as
Chile's Ricardo Lagos and Mexico's
Vicente Fox, among others, under-
stand that they are competing in a
global environment and that a con-
tinuation of the reform agenda and
a focus on competitiveness are nec-
essary for success in the face of
competition from Asia and Eastern
Europe.
HARD WORK, SPIRITEDNESS
Although the demonstrations in
Mar del Plata may color regional
impressions in the eyes of the
casual observer, that doesn't
change the wisdom of engaging
with those who seek to develop
their economies through hard
work, public spiritedness and a
focus on quantifiable results.
It may not be sexy or capture
headlines, but steady and sustained
engagement of the parties based on
a hard-nosed analysis of mutual
interests will, in the end, prove to
be the most effective method for
securing the democratic, economi-
cally developed hemisphere that
leaders envisioned a decade ago.
Like most things worth having, it's
just going to take a bit longer than
we originally thought.

Susan Segal, president and CEO
of the Council of the Americas, par-
ticipated in the Summit of the Amer-
icas in Mar del Plata and the pri-
vate-sector forum that preceded it.


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STORM SEASON


How to prepare for the next hurricane


*HIAASEN

nesses took huge hits from Wilma,
yet only a select few are being res-
cued by our concerned leaders in
Tallahassee.
Take Citizens Property Insur-
ance, the shambling, state-run outfit
that will likely receive a humongous
rate hike, including increased
assessments on innocent policy
holders using other coverage.
Citizens was set up because real
insurance companies were bailing
out of Florida, which wasn't unex-
pected.
Only gamblers or fools would
write windstorm policies in Hurri-


cane Central, so it's fitting that the
state leapt into the void.
You won't be shocked to learn
that Citizens is teetering toward
insolvency, with losses projected to
exceed $1 billion. To bail out South
Florida's largest home insurer, we'll
all be opening our wallets.
See, it's not just the next hurri-
cane we should prepare for. It's the
inevitable reaming that follows.
Wilma wasn't a cataclysmic
event on the scale of Katrina smash-
ing the Gulf Coast. It was a Cat 1
storm swiftly raking across an
insanely overpopulated swampland.
Imagine a hurricane exponen-
tially stronger, and slower. Imagine


sustained winds of 120 mph instead
of 85 mph. Imagine four feet of rain-
fall and streets flooded for weeks.
When the big one arrives the
really big one plan on the pits.
Plan on devastation. Plan on may-
hem. Plan on bungling by those
who've been telling you how to plan.
And plan on way more than 72 hours
of grief and gouging.
Be prepared, they're warning us.
Next time, you'd better be prepared.
Know how to prepare? Stock up on
Prozac, that's how.
Because it's going to be real bad,
both miserable and tragic, and
there's nothing to be done except
wait.


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