Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00251
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: November 10, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00251
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text






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The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.287 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005 PRICE 500


INSIDE


TODAY


Y' S


TRIBUNE


s o


*By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
;PAUL G TURNQUEST
and KARIN HERIG
THE crowd went wild last
night when they saw former
prime minister Hubert Ingra-
ham step from his car and enter
the Wyndham Nassau resort to
attend the FNM convention. It
was Mr Ingraham's first appear-
ance at the convention, which
opened Tuesday.
Senator John Delaney, who
wkas at the podium, had to cut
his speech short as shouts of
"Hubert! Hubert!" grew to a
crescendo, drowning the sena-
tor's voice. Mr Ingraham with
the help of bodyguards and the
police slowly fought his way
through the extended arms that
reached out to welcome him.
For a time the diminutive North
Apaco MP was hidden by grop-
ing hands trying to touch and
embrace him.
As he walked to the front of
the ballroom, the crowd pushed
forward with delegates stand-
ing on chairs to get a glimpse
of him.
"That's our next prime min-
ister!" resounded throughout
the hall.
At 9.20pm he took his seat
with his Abaco delegates, while
the music played, delegates
applauded and left their seats


to crowd around the North
Abaco table to show their plea-
sure at having him with them
again.
Minutes later party leader
Tommy Turnquest made his
entrance with his wife and plac-
ard-carrying supporters. His
welcome, although lively, was
far more subdued.
Mr Ingraham remained for
the speech of Mr Dion Foulkes,
who with Mr Turnquest, are
both vying for the position of
FNM leader.
When he got up to leave at
11.15 pm delegates again crowd-
ed around him, leaving a half
empty hall for the speech of Mr
Sidney Collie.
Again Mr Ingraham made
his way slowly to the front door,
as a Tribune reporter pushed
his way through the tight crowd
to speak to him.
Mr Ingraham made it clear
that he was reluctant to make a
statement to only one media
house. However he did say: "I
am very grateful for the sup-
port I have received from the
people of the Bahamas."
Back in the convention hall,
Mr Collie completed his speech,
but Mr Niko Grant's speech
was postponed to tonight.
The reason given was the
SEE page 14


ild


P Ingrpaa


Consolidated
Water BDR
issue raises
just $6.6m

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamian Depository
Receipt (BDR) offering by
Consolidated Water raised just
$6.6 million net, it was revealed
late yesterday, just over one-
Sthird shortf its $10 million tar-
get.
In announcing its 2005 third
quarter results, the Cayman-
headquartered company said
that with the BDR public share
issue having closed on Novem-
ber 4, it had raised $16.4 mil-
lion in the Bahamas to fund the
construction of the $25 million
Blue Hills reverse osmosis
plant.
Consolidated Water made no
mention about how it would
make up the funding shortfall
left by the BDR issue, which
was less successful than hoped
for. Apart from the $6.6 million
raised about two-thirds of
the target it also received
$9.8 million from an earlier
bond issue.
It had planned to raise the
remaining $5 million from debt
financing, but it is unclear now
whether this will have to be
increased to $8.6 million.
Joe Pivinski, Consolidated
SEE page 14

Stabbed

15-year-old

in hospital

By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter
A 15-year-old R M Bailey
student is in hospital after being
stabbed repeatedly during an
altercation in a classroom.
According to police, the dis-
pute occurred around 9am yes-
terday after the boy was
approached by another student.
He was stabbed multiple times
about the body.
Late yesterday afternoon, the
victim was listed in serious con-
dition. Investigations are con-
tinuing.


GEORGE WILMORE from St Margaret's constituency
greets former prime minister Hubert Ingraham
(Photo: Felipi Major/Tribune staff)

Ministry of Foreign Affairs accused
of issuing excessive number of visas


* By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter
DURING the PLP's tenure, the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs has granted an alarming number
of entry visas to foreigners despite the urgent
need to control immigration, FNM chairman
Carl Bethel has claimed.
Mr Bethel accused top ministry officials of
removing tight restrictions on the granting of
visas to Haitians put in place by the FNM. He
further charged that visas have been granted
to un-named persons and those with high-level
political connections.
"The Department of Immigration is valiantly
trying to defend our country from the onslaught
of illegal immigrants, and it is, therefore, dis-


turbing to note that the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs has failed to explain to the Bahamian
people how it is that the number of entry visas
granted by that ministry to Haitian nationals
increased from 102 in 2002, when the restric-
tive policies of the FNM were still in place, to
more than 2,200 a year in 2004," he said.
Mr Bethel, speaking at the FNM convention
on Tuesday night, said illegal immigration is
the most vexing problem confronting the coun-
try today.
"By 2004, as a direct result of political inter-
ference from the highestfevels of the Christie
PLP government, the restrictive policies gov-
erning the grant of entry visas left in place by the
SEE page 14


School closed after vandalism


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Report
A F Adderley Jr High School had to be
closed at noon yesterday after vandals covered
school walls with graffiti and broke several
water pipes.
The graffiti, which covered the security booth
and almost every building on campus except
the gym and the front of the administration
building, featured profanities and insults toward
school officials.
The damaged water pipes left the school with
no running water, causing officials to suspend
classes from noon. Police were called in to
investigate.


Principal Drexel Miller described the act as
criminal and cowardly. He said he was made
aware of the situation when he arrived shortly
after 7am. However, he said, it will be difficult
to ascertain who was responsible.
"We have 1,250 students and we are in a cul-
ture where students do not want to 'rat' on
their classmates. You cannot make rash judg-
ments unless you have evidence," he said.
Mr Miller, who was extremely upset about
the incident, said he can only hope that the
culprit is not a student of the school.
"I pray that it is not a student, but if it is I
would like nothing more than for them to be
SEE page 14


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Tribute paid

to Cyril Tynes
A SPECIAL tribute was
paid to FNM "giant" Cyril
Tynes during last night's con-
vention. Mr Tynes, former
Opposition Leader in the
House of Assembly in the
seventies, died on Tuesday.
FNM leader candidate
Dion Foulkes took the oppor-
tunity to honour the veteran
politician during his speech.
"Mr Tynes was our leader
in the House of Assembly
during some very difficult
days for the FNM. Against
great odds, our departed
brother courageously kept the
torch burning. May he rest in
peace," he said.
Mr Foulkes thanked Mr
Tynes for teaching him valu-
able lessons about life.
"I thank Cyril Tynes, who
taught me humility," he said.
Among his many positions
in the party, Mr Tynes served
as leader of the opposition
from 1972 to 1977 when the
late FNM Leader Cecil Wal-
lace Whitfield lost his seat in
the 1972 General Election.


FNM leadership choice is 'ci

* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr I
Chief Reporter I


THE choice of who leads the
FNM into the 2007 general elec-
tion is crucial, FNM leader hopeful
and former FNM Deputy Leader
Dion Foulkes said yesterday at the
second day of the party's conven-
tion.
The Bahamian people, he said,
want to know whether the FNM
has the "vision, the resolve and the
character to rescue our country
from gross mismanagement and
missed opportunities."
"The future of our party is at
stake. The unity of our party is at
stake. Who leads this party, at this
time, is crucial," said Mr Foulkes.
He said without renewal the
FNM will "wither and die".
"We have proven that we can
do wonders for the people when
we work as a team. Teamwork
gave us our greatest successes dur-
ing our time in office," he said.
He reminded delegates that as
national Chairman in 1997 he
worked hard to keep the party
together, to mend fences and put
out potential fires.


"In that general election the
FNM got the highest percentage
of votes in the history of the
Bahamas. This did not happen by
accident. We all worked as a united
team to bring that about. We can
and for the sake of the Bahamian
people, we must do it again
"True, we had a captain, but
many brave men and women car-
ried the ball for the FNM. No one
person made us successful then,
and no one person will get us back
in government now. It will require
all hands on deck. United, we win.
Divided we lose," Mr Foulkes said.
He admitted, however, that the
party made mistakes.
"We could have listened better.
Some. people thought we were
arrogant at times. And like the old
people say, 'if you can't hear, you


ga feel.' The Bahamian voter is no
fool. Voters want to know if we
got the message they sent in 2002,"
said the former education minis-
ter.
Losing the government, he said,
was difficult "but, pointing fingers
and playing the blame game will
get us nowhere."
"Instead, we must build on our
success as an FNM team. Fix our
own house first. Then we can pre-
sent the Bahamian people a bold
new agenda. We owe this to our
Founding Fathers. We owe this to
ourselves. More importantly, we
owe this to the Bahamian people,"
Mr Foulkes said.
The next leadership team, Mr
Foulkes said, must offer the
Bahamas a real alternative to the
PLP.


* FNM leadership hopeful
Dion Foulkes


"Our base is our greatest asset.
You are the real heroes of this
struggle. By the sweat of your brow
we shall return to government. It is
my mission to unify this party. I
pray that when we all leave here
this week, we go back to our con-
stituencies, to our co-workers, our
neighbours and our friends with
one message: FNMs are all togeth-
er," he said.


Torchbearers official



claims president


'deceive(


By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

TORCHBEARERS Association president
"deceived" the Bahamian public when he said
that the association as a whole supports Tom-
my Turnquest in the leadership race, Torch-
bearers first vice-president Derek Newry Jr
said last night.
In an interview with The Tribune on the sec-
ond night of the FNM's convention, Mr Newry
said: "The president (David Jordine) has nev-
er had a meeting with the Torchbearers dele-
gates to ascertain who we want as leader. So
this block vote was always out of the ques-
tion."
Mr Jordine, in an interview with The Tri-
bune on Tuesday, had said that the associa-
tion as a whole has decided to support
Mr Turnquest to maintain the leadership posi-
tion.
* He also said that the youth arm of the FNM


public


sees Mr Turnquest as a member of the new
generation of political leaders.
However, Mr Newry said he supports the
candidacy of former prime minister Hubert
Ingraham.
"I am duty bound by my position to listen
and adhere to the voice of the people and the
people have spoken. That is why I fully support
Hubert Alexander Ingraham as leader of the
FNM," said Mr Newry.
Glen Knowles, council representative for
the Torchbearers, agreed that Torchbearer
delegates never met as a group to decide who
they would vote for as next leader.
. Mr Knowles said that based on an informal
survey of Torchbearer delegates conducted by
himself and others, it was determined that
Tommy Turnquest has 50 per cent of their
votes.
However he stressed: "We are still united
and no matter which person comes out as the
leader we will support him."


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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005


rucial


Citizenship issue

attracts attention

* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE inequality between
men and women regarding the
right to pass their citizenship
on to their children was one of
the issues that attracted the
most attention by FNMs last
night as the party went into the
second day of convention.
Giving the opening speech
at the evening session, party
chairman candidate Loretta
Butler-Turner criticised the
Christie administration for not
having changed legislation to
give children born to Bahamian
women and foreign men the
same automatic right to citi-
zenship as is given to children
of Bahamian men and foreign
women.
"I have two sisters that mar-
ried foreign men so when their
children visit the Bahamas they
are treated as strangers and
issued a visitors permit," she
said.
She pointed out the case of
former Registrar Elizabeth
Thompson, whose son -
although a resident of New
Providence does not possess
a Bahamian passport.
"(Mrs Thompson) finds her-
self having to take her son out
of the country every three
months so that he may have
his passport stamped in order
to be here legally," she said.
Mrs Butler-Turner said that
Mrs Thompson is a story that
"can be told by thousands of
other Bahamian women."
She criticised the fact that
children of illegal and legal
migrants born in the Bahamas
have no difficulty in obtaining a
Bahamian travel document
which gives them the entitle-
ment to remain in the country
unencumbered.
Mrs Butler-Turner said it is
time for government to
"finally correct this vexing sit-
uation."


FOR] 3 111IN I LAWN SERVICES
FertittleFnid,


- - - - - -


THE TRIBUNE








THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005, PAGE 3


LOA0 NW


/ Wr"4,.


CONVENTION


IN BRIEF

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie needs to explain to
the Bahamian people why
he failed to represent them
as their prime minister at
several important world
summits, Loretta Butler
Turner said at the FNM
National convention last
evening.
"I recall in recent times
at least three occasions that
he failed to represent the
Bahamas as our Prime Min-
ister at important world
events such as the sixtieth
anniversary world summit
leaders of the UN in Sep-
tember, or the summit of
the Americas last week and
the inauguration of the
President of the United
States last year.
Mrs Butler Turner said in
all those cases, Mr Christie
chose instead to send, "less-
er ministers or even parlia-
mentary secretaries who in
some cases have brought
embarrassment to our peo-
ple. She said that they were
all functions requiring the
presence of the high office
of Prime Minister.
"But for reasons
unknown you chose not to
attend. The Bahamian elec-
torate deserve better than
this."

PERRY Christie has
failed to call for the resigna-
tion or fire ministers and
other members of his party
who have violated his very
own code of ethics.
Loretta Butler Turner
told delegates attending the
FNM convention that while
the Piime Minister was a
niceguy,, heis not a prime
minister.
10fB"4i9 6 -Turndr noted-
that weetheevidenc
against Holy Cross MP Sid-
ney Stubbs was "over-
whelming" regarding his
bankruptcy hearing, BAIC
and the Korean Boat scan-
dal, in her opinion the con-
stitution of the Bahamas
was breached in an attempt
to defend his wrongdoing.
She added that when serious
allegations of conduct were
levelled against Works Min-
ister Bradley Roberts, he
should have resigned until
the matter was resolved.
"Until that time," she said,
"he could not serve in cabi-
net in good conscience."

THE stamp tax incen-
tive that the PLP legislated
for first time home buyers is
still not immediately bene-
fiting some persons, said
Mrs Butler-Turner.
"It depends on which
lending institution they are
using," she said.
Mrs Butler-Turner said
some first time home buyers
are being charged the stamp
tax and have to wait an
indefinite amount of time to
be refunded until the red
tape has been cleared away.
She added that the law is
not clear as it relates to per-
sons who may own a duplex,
triplex or some other multi-
family dwelling and would
like to apply for the
incentive when moving
to a single family
dwelling.
Bahamian families are
being removed from land
they have lived and worked
on for many years while ille-
gal immigrants are squatting
on an ever increasing
amount of Bahamian land
undisturbed.
She said that according to
recent proposals, they may
even soon enjoy the benefit
of retaining such land.
"Where,-Mr Prime Minis-
ter, is the justice in this for
real Bahamians?" she
asked.

MRS Butler-Turner
told delegates attending the
FNM convention that the
economy is up for only a
select few, that the national
deficit is up, unemployment
is up and the wages of
the working class are
down.


"Certainly you would not
invite our brothers and sis-
ters who are so badly in
need of a job to wait until
2007 to try and get one of
those jobs that may come on
stream when Baha Mar
finally gets its act together,"
she asked Prime Minister
Perry Christie.


Parliamentarians confident support for Ingraham



will not backfire on them should Thrnauest win


* By KARIN HERIG,
PAUL G TURNQUEST and
RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Tribune Staff Reporters

PARLIAMENTARIANS who
support the return of former prime
minister Hubert Ingraham as party
leader told The Tribune yesterday
they are confident their decision
will not backfire on them should
Tommy Turnquest win the leader-
ship post.
Several parliamentarians dis-
missed the report that if Mr Turn-
quest were to regain his seat as
leader of the FNM following the
party's elections today, he would
"clean house" of all of his "political
opponents."
Brent Symonette, Montagu MP
and deputy leader candidate, yes-
terday said he does not foresee his
support of Mr Ingraham having any
negative consequences for his polit-
ical future.

Team

"Obviously there have been per-
sons that have stated their dissatis-
faction with the fact that the par-
liamentary team has wanted Mr
Ingraham to come back to lead,"
he conceded.
He added, however, that the par-
liamentarians were acting on the
belief that Mr Ingraham as the
party's most seasoned politician-
"is the best way forward."
"I trust after all this is over, who-
ever wins, those who were critical of
us will understand why we did it,"
he said.


I,

BRENT SYMONETTE
(above) yesterday said he does
not foresee his support of Mr
Ingraham having any negative
consequences for his political
future.
Mr Symonette said that should
Mr Turnquest win the party lead-
ership, he would give him his full
support.
Speaking specifically to the par-
liamentarians who at last month's
council meeting were seen to give
Mr Turnquest a vote of "no confi-
dence", former deputy prime min-
ister Frank Watson said it would be
a "ridiculous move" on Mr Turn-
quest's part to "clean house."
"I don't think there is any such
fear. No, absolutely not. The par-
liamentarians have a constitutional
office. So the party can wait until the
next election and try to run other
candidates in their seats; but I don't
see anybody doing that," he said.
Mr Watson maintained that once
the leadership question is answered,


* By KARIN HERIG and
RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Tribune Staff Reporters

THE morning after FNM leader Tommy Turn-
quest took to the stage to deliver a fiery speech,
the talk of the morning on the convention floor was
whether he had enhanced his chances of retaining his
seat as party leader.
While delegates attending the FNM convention
felt that Mr Turnquest gave the "best speech of his
political career" on Tuesday night, many did not
think that he was able to sway the majority of his
audience to his side.
Alvin Smith, leader of the opposition in the House
of Assembly and North Eleuthera MP, said that in
his opinion Mr Turnquest did "a very good job"
and gave "the best convention speech."
"I was very pleased with his speech, and I think he
did a good job. Now whether it would achieve what
he hopes it to achieve, I don't know," he said.
Other delegates also believed that in his speech
Mr Turnquest showed he possesses "the strength of
a leader."
Delegate B J Moss praised Mr Turnquest for
"maintaining the high road."
"He has always been the mender of fences in his
party. And we violently support him. We believe he
will emerge victorious," he said.
Mr Moss said that he spoke with two delegates fol-
lowing the speech who as a result, said that they
would now support Mr Turnquest.
"Mr Turnquest has definitely upped the ante,
stepped up quite a few notches. It is clear for all to
see that he is ready now," he said.
However, many delegates felt that Mr Turnquest's
speech came too late to make any significant dif-
ference in his chances of retaining leadership of the
party.
Former Cabinet Minister Earl Deveaux said that
although Mr Turnquest's speech "touched all the


the party will reunite as one and
function together with the .collec-
tive goal of regaining the govern-
ment from the PLP.
"Once the fight is over the party
will come back together. Whoever
wins, the party will come back
together, and we will carry on," he
said.
When asked if certain parlia-
mentarians might be "put on the
back-burner" if Mr Turnquest won
his leadership race, Alvin Smith,
the current leader of the opposition
in the House of Assembly, said that
the race was not personal.
He outlined that the goal would
be to put the "best team forward" to
beat the current government in the
next general election.
"We are still one FNM party. Mr
Turnquest, Mr Foulkes, and, of
course, Mr Ingraham, these persons
have the maturity to come together,
and unite to form a more formida-
ble team to defeat the opponent.
So I don't worry about that. They
have been in politics before so it
can't be anything personal," Mr
Smith said.
North Abaco MP Robert Sweet-
ing said that although the issue will
not concern him directly as
chances of him running for a seat for
a fourth consecutive term are "very
slim" he is confident that Mr
Turnquest will not "punish" Mr
Ingraham's supporters.
"This is what democracy is all
about, and Mr Turnquest under-
stands that. I have the greatest
respect for him, but the vast major-
ity of my constituents are calling for
Mr Ingraham," he said.


rightbutto.s,:" 'he does not believe it' will influence
the delegates' votes too much.
"I thought going into the convention that Tommy
needed to make a comprehensive statement and
demonstrate to the convention that he was ready to
lead and able to make a wider appeal to the nation.
And his speech was comprehensive, it touched all the
right buttons and certainly demonstrated his will-
ingness," he said.
Mr Deveaux, however, said that he felt that Mr
Turnquest could have "put a little more of himself
into the speech but that is just Tommy's way of
speaking."
Addressing the question of whether Mr Turn-
quest won any more supporters, Mr Deveaux said
that in his opinion one speech would not be able to
do that.
"That speech was more for the television audi-
ence, not for the voting delegates. However, it's the
people watching. the television that call the dele-
gates saying that they liked it, which will factor in, in
the end," he said.
Mr Deveaux added that Mr Turnquest has
become a stronger leader in the last three years.
"The process and the result of the last election,
and last three years have put some scar tissue on
Tommy and he is tougher. The speech showed that
he has been toughened," he said.
Also speaking on the issue, Eleuthera delegate
Abner Pinder said that the speech showed
strength as a leader, but did not change anyone's
opinion.
"I don't think it swayed any delegate that was
here, their minds were already made up as to who
they are going to support," he said.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005


EDTRIAULTERS O TE0EITOR


IN THE wake of the Natalee Holloway
case in Aruba, the St Petersburg Times
recently interviewed US Ambassador John
Rood, who, in answer to the reporter's ques-
tions, admitted that more than 26 American
women had been raped in the Bahamas in the
past three years.
Although he told the reporter that the
number was large enough to be of concern, it
was not enough for the Embassy to issue a
travel advisory.
The headline writer, obviously with the
Aruba case uppermost in his mind, conclud-
ed in the headline that "Rapes often go unno-
ticed in the Bahamas." The sub-head said
that "Protecting tourists, including kids on
spring break, hasn't been a priority here.
Officials want that to change."
Mr Rood told the Florida newspaper that
he had been engaged in monthly meetings
with authorities to discuss ways to combat
the problem. "Aruba," he said, "has raised
everyone's awareness of how criminal situa-
tions can affect countries that are dominated
by tourism."
Tourism PR director Basil Smith appreci-
ated the ambassador's concern for the safety
of US citizens after all wherever an ambas-
sador is posted his citizens must be his first
concern.
Mr Smith said that "anytime you have
someone who commits a rape,.it is cause to be
concerned." In fact, he said, the ministry has
made a serious effort to improve safety con-
ditions for persons visiting the Bahamas.
As a result the Bahamas' first police tourist
section Visitor Safety and Security has
been set up to protect visitors from "pillagers,
hawkers and other touristic leeches" while
in this country..
On Tuesday Alabama Governor Bob Riley
called for a travel boycott of Aruba until the
authorities on that Dutch Caribbean island
cooperate more fully with the parents of 18-
year-old Natalee Holloway who disappeared
in May while on a graduation trip to Aruba
with her classmates. She is presumed dead.
This is going to have a certain amount of
fall-out for all resort islands in this area.
But there is a eertain callous attitude that
some men have towards rape that only adds
fuel to an already raging fire.
A Bahamian male was recently quoted as
blaming a victim for being raped because
of her scanty dress. In other words she


invited the predator.
This same attitude was expressed by one of
the three young men who took Natalee out
on her last night in Aruba, got her drunk -
it was suggested that something had been
put in her drink and admitted he had sex
with her because he thought she was a slut.
Again it was this same attitude that was
behind the filing of alawsuit three years ago
in Miami-Dade Circuit Court against San-
dals' US operations. It was to have gone to
trial before the end of this year.
The incident took place five years ago in
Negril, Jamaica, when a 29-year-old New
York travel writer was last seen walking on a
Negril beach in a blue bikini. The young
woman is presumed dead. Her parents
believe that some of the employees at Beach-
es Negril know what happened to her. It is
this information that the parents want.
The case is very similar to the Natalee Hol-
loway case. Like the Holloway case the
Kirschhoch family claim that important clues
were lost because of sloppy investigation.
According to the suit, log books showing who
entered and exited the Sandals all-inclusive
resort disappeared for.the period-that
Kirschhoch was there, and security surveil-
lance videos were recorded over. One of the
claims against the hotel is that it should have
had better security in place.
According to a Miami Herald report
"although the family was initially on good
terms with the hotel after Kirschhoch's dis-
appearance, that changed after a press con-
ference in Jamaica five years ago when a
public relations executive for the hotel tried
to paint their daughter as a hedonistic for-
eigner only in Jamaica for a good time."
Nothing was further from the truth, the
young woman's parents said. Their daugh-
ter was in Jamaica with a group of travel
writers to work and was an invited business
guest of the hotel chain.
These are the insensitive remarks that
make tragic situations even worse.
It is a shame that today many women throw
modesty to the four winds by the way in
which they dress. However, this does not give
any man the right to assume that these
women are sluts. Nor is it a signal for men to
take advantage of them.
What many men do not understand is that
even prostitutes can be raped. And rape
remains a crime even against a prostitute.


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


Dealing with rapes of tourists


EDITOR, The Tribune
Recently, I had occasion to be
part of a roundtable discussion
conducted at the College of The
Bahamas to discuss "The Impact
of Rising Oil Prices and Policy
Alternatives". Following are
excerpts of remarks which I
offered at the forum.
Both at the individual and the
company level the question of
the cost of energy and its corre-
sponding impact on the cost of
just about everything, weighs
heavily on all of our minds.
In the hotel industry, when
one looks at the occupancy rates
and the average daily rates real-
ized in our hotels in New Provi-
dence this year one would
think that we've had a fantastic
year.
However, when one gets
deeper and starts to look at the
numbers, our bottom lines don't
reflect that. Much of what we've
earned this year has been eaten
up in added utility costs, in par-
ticular the energy surcharge, and
in the creep factor which has
increased the costs of goods -
most which need to be trans-
ported and whose costs of pro-
duction and transportation are
also rising.
First, I'd like to provide some
background information on the
cost of utilities for hotels in the
Bahamas. As cited in the 2003
Tourism Task Force Report for
Trade Liberalization which
BHA was a signatory to the
second greatest cause for the rel-
atively poor profit performance
of Nassau hotels is mechanical
and utility expenses that at that
time were 36 per cent greater
than the Caribbean and 114 per
cent greater than the North
American hotels.
A major culprit is the inflated
cost of electricity. At the time
the report was undertaken, a
Bahamian business could expect
to pay the Bahamas Electricity
Corporation roughly twice the
level of countries like the United
States, the United Kingdom,
Mexico, Ireland, Germany,
Spain, and several of our
Caribbean competitors.
We were most grateful two
years ago when, at Bahamas
Hotel Association's urging, the
base rate for hotels and all con-
sumers, was reduced. But, as you
know, that saving was short-lived
as the dreaded fuel surcharge
started creeping up shortly after
that.
The Bahamas already is
viewed by some visitors as being
a high cost tourist destination.
Add that to the increased cost of
airline travel and we are pre-
sented with some real chal-
lenges.


To cope with the fuel sur-
charge which cannot be accu-
rately factored into our room
rates which are set well in
advance, most hotels have put
in an additional charge for ener-
gy. There is a fine line between
how much we can charge and
the actual cost we incur due to
the increased cost of electricity,
In many cases, hotels are absorb-
ing some of that increase from
BEC, which obviously cuts into
their bottom line. Again, a bot-
tom line which is already quite
tight due to other factors which
add to the high cost of doing
business.
As requested by the panel's
organizers, I've been asked to
suggest some alternatives which
The Bahamas might consider to
deal with the high cost of energy.
1. Increase peak demand sur-
charge readings for hotels. Cer-
tainly, the reduction in the base
charge by BEC two years ago
was a welcome measure. BEC
charges hotels something called
a demand charge, which is an
additional charge to our utility
bills based upon an assessment
of usage. Presently, BEC deter-
mines that charge based upon
an assessment which is done dur-
ing our highest period. We
believe that the assessment
should be based upon multiple
peak demand readings through-
out the year.
2. Expand duty exemption cat-
egories adopted last summer.
Last summer, the Government
put in place customs duty
exemptions for solar panels and
their components. We applaud
this environmental policy and
recommend that it be expand-
ed to the purchase of other ener-
gy efficient materials. As is the
case presently with solar mate-
rials, we know that an expanded
policy will stimulate more ener-
gy conserving and consciousness
by the industry. BHA recom-
mends expanding that list of
duty exempt items to include:
Energy efficient air condi-
tioning and cooling equipment;
Heat pumps;
Energy saving windows and
tinting materials;
Water control devices which
cut down on pumping time and
water production costs;
Insulation materials and
sealants;
Timers;
Energy saving light fixtures,
controls and bulbs;
Vehicles which are energy
efficient and/or use alternative


fuels like ethanol.
3. Adoption of bank lending
policies which -encourages
financing for cost saving pur-
chases. The Bahamas lending
institutions should adopt and
promote financing schemes for
equipment which results in ener-
gy savings and in the mid-term
pay for themselves.
4. Determine the feasibility
of establishing a net metering
programme. This is catching on
elsewhere and with new tech-
nology is essentially made easy
with affordable implementation
costs. For those residents and
businesses which generate a por-
tion of their own power via solar,
wind or supplemental genera-
tors, this allows for them to
return excess electricity which
they generate back into the BEC
system. Users would receive a
credit for the excess electricity.
5. Conservation by residents,
businesses, government. We
need to create a culture of con-
servation. Businesses can do
more to encourage employees
to conserve. Government should
put in place energy efficient
practices, equipment and prod-
ucts in the many Government
buildings and offices.
These are just a few initial
thoughts on policies which might
help to make a difference. How-
ever, rather than taking a piece-
meal approach, it may make the
most sense to have in place a
National Energy Policy and
Plan.
The Bahamas Hotel Associa-
tion has several programmes
which encourage energy cost and
consumption savings. Members
have a service available to them
through an allied member,
IMC/Northeast, which provides
an initial audit to identify ways
in which a member company
might initiate programmes to
reduce energy costs.
On November 15th BHA will
be conducting an Energy Savings
Workshop which will provide
practical tips, information and
assessment tools for businesses
to put in place. Many of our
hotels already have in place a
number of measures to deal with
this cost problem but are smart to
continually review matters.
Adopting broader and more
specific energy savings measures
as a matter of practice and pub-
lic policy would go a long way
toward reducing the burdening
cost of energy to residents, visi-
tors, businesses and Govern-
ment.
EARLE BETHELL
President, Bahamas Hotel
Association
Nassau
November 7 2005


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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005,OPAGNEW5


CONVEN


ION


IN BRIEF


DONALD Saunders,
'FNM Central Council rep-
resentative for Adelaide,
said there is very little the
PLP can show him and the
Bahamian people that they
have done to alleviate the
illegal immigration problem.
I Mr Saunders, speaking at
last night's session of the
FNM convention, said: "Just
a few weeks ago Minister
Vincent Peet rightfully
admitted that the illegal
immigration problem is the
.most serious challenge fac-
ing the Bahamas.
"He was incorrect with
pne thing though.... when he
said that the present PLP
.government has done more
:to solve this crisis than any
previous government."
Mr Saunders pointed out
;that they have to work to
'ensure that the individuals
who put their lives on the
line to protect the Bahamas'
borders, and who work to
enforce the immigration
laws, are provided with ade-
quate pay, equipment and
-training to do their job.

0 REECE Dean Chip-
man, an active member of
the Delaporte branch of the
FNM, said that Bahamians'
education and determination
are constantly challenged,
ignored and undermined by
Bahamians.
,."An environment of 'for-
eign is better' caps our
,careers and our potential. It
.is an environment where
,,there is no national model
to assist with the manifesta-
tion of national dreams,
.and/or the indulgence of
national professional pride,"
he said.

S MORE than 70 employ-
ees of the Royal Oasis hotel
on Grand Bahama were not
paid when the PLP govern-
ment issued severance
cheques after the hotel
closed, Eight Mile Rock MP
Lindy Russell told delegates
attending the FNM confer-
ence Tuesday.
Mr Russell said that the
employees who were not
included in the pay package,
but remained employed,
have since been terminated.
"These most recent termi-
nated employees want to
know when they will be paid
:and by whom," he said.
In addition, he said -that
while the government paid
a percentage of the monies
owed to them by the hotel,
"they have still not received
the balance.


NOVEMBER 9


Deputy candidates look for




support among delegates


* COLLIE U SYMONETTE


"We seek to influence their
decision making. It is now the
question of firming up our base
support," he said.
Illustrating some of his
advantages, Mr Bethel said that
he has considerable political
experience.
"I have been in several
national political debates, I have
been on the front-line since last
election," he said.
Mr Bethel added that his
political opponents would also
not have "any dirt" to dig up
on him.
Hhe will officially start cam-
paigning for the Holy Cross seat
as of November 14.
"I will be campaigning full


time. Going house to house,
two to three days a week, every
week," he said.
He said that in the time lead-
ing up to the last general elec-
tion time constraints resulted in
his being unable to campaign
to the extent he wished to.
Deputy leader hopeful Syd-
ney Collie said that by yesterday
most delegates would have
already made up their minds,
but he thought his chances to
win was as good as any other
candidate.
"I would say a little better
being the incumbent. All of the
candidates are recognisable
names, all of us have support,"
he said.


Turnquest 'would restore harmony'


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
FNM current party leader
Tommy Turnquest said the new
FNM government would seek
to restore harmony between
employees and employers.
Unlike the PLP, he said, the
FNM have no intentions of
"stirring up" industrial unrest.
He also stressed that they
must dedicate themselves to
building a country where eco-
nomic opportunities and the
financial patrimony that the
Bahamas inherits will be pre-
served for Bahamians first.
Turning his attention to the
country's crime problem, Mr
Turnquest said that it requires


the party's immediate attention.
"We can effectively break the
back of crime, by equipping our
young people to compete, to
earn a living and to make pro-
ductive contributions to their
families and the wider society.
Illegal immigration will not
be allowed to threaten national
sovereignty, Mr Turnquest said.
He said that under the FNM
government there will be an
aggressive application of the
immigration laws.
"Wherever corrupt Bahami-
ans are discovered compromis-
ing the sovereignty of this coun-
try, they will be prosecuted to
the fullest extent of the law,"
he said.
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said that under an FNM gov-
ernment there will be a
-revamnped national strategic
health plan that will place 100'
new doctors, with specialty
training in family practice, into
the community clinics.


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PERSONS vying for the var-
ious positions in the party were
busy canvassing support among
the FNM convention's voting
delegates.
The only position, other than
that of leader, getting the atten-
tion of delegates was the posi-
tion of deputy leader.
Deputy leader candidate and
Montagu MP Brent Symonette
yesterday would not comment
on his personal campaign plans.
He emphasised that the leader-
ship question has to first be
answered.
"Once we decide the leader-
ship issue, who will be leader
and deputy leader and the var-
ious officers out of the party
then we can move on. The new
officers will meet with the new
leader and chart the way for-
ward.
"Starting (tonight) we will
chart the way forward. What-
ever happens, we will be coming
out as a team," he said.
Carl Bethel, also deputy
leader hopeful, said that strate-
gy was to reach out and con-
nect with the delegates individ-
ually, either personally or
through people who know
them.


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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005, PAGE 5


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005


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M By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter
TO CK THE Louis J Goulet, an oil
drilling barge that ran aground
in the Exuma Cays after Hurri-
cane Jeanne last year, is again
sparking environmental con-
Several residents of Abaco
contacted The Tribune yester-
day complaining that the barge
has broken away from its
1890 anchors and is now sitting upon
.. and endangering a reef.
"There is a oil drilling
barge/derrick named the Louis


Phone: 325-3336


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J Goulet on the reef east of the
Johnny's Cays, Abaco that has
been there for over a week and
a half and must be removed
before it stays there forever or
does further damage to the frag-
ile reef," they said in a letter to
The Tribune.


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Exuma natives began voicing
concerns in September 2004
when the same drill barge was'
seen floating in shallow waters
dangerously close to one of the
country's national parks at Con-
ception Island.
In March of 2005 Port Con-
troller Captain Anthony Allens
announced that the barge would
be removed.
It has now appeared in Aba-
co residents say.
They claimed that the Glenys
Hanna Martin, Minister of
Transport and Aviation, said in
parliament that she was
informed by a reliable source
that the Louis J Goulet is not on
the reef.
They maintain however, that
"the barge is clearly on the
reef".
"We have personally
snorkelled around this wreck,
taken video and can say that it is,
on the reef and has done exten-,
sive damage already," said one
person.
"We also swam the entire
length of the chain and there is:
no anchor attached to the end,:
We have not been on board the
wreck, however from the water
it looks inhabitable and in poor
working order."
Yesterday Captain Aliens
was unavailable for comment.
The Ministry of Transport and
Aviation refused to comment.


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THE. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ OA TRNNETURDYWOEMES0 00,PG


FOR


THE


STORIES


BE HI N


THE


NEW


E E M N D A Y


0 CHRIS Brown and
Brent Hardt with
-- : iBestudents at Woodcock
Primary Schoola
IL.y

Sports star puts on his reading cap*I


-BAHAMIAN track star
Chris Brown was the featured
celebrity reader at Woodcock
Primary School yesterday,
where this week's session of US
Ambassador John Rood's
school reading programme was
held. .
Brown, who anchored the
men's silver medal winning 4x4
relay team at the World Cham-
pionship in Helsinki Finland, was
joined by US Embassy deputy
chief of mission Brent Hardt.
Brown told the students that
manners and respect will take
them around the .world.
Ile encouraged them to focus
on education and to stay away
from persons who would steer


them in the wrong direction.
The Woodcock Primary read-
ing programme began in Janu-
ary 2005.
The initiative has been dri-


ven by Ambassador Rood to
promote literacy and reading.
Each week, Embassy volun-
teers spend 30 minutes reading
to students around the country.


ORALIFF. FASHIONS
is having an end of summer


including formals up to 75% off
Starting Friday, October 28th, 2005


We are looking for people who:
* Know what it means to give outstanding customer service
* Have an interest in Food and Beverage sales and management
* Desire to bring fun and enthusiasm to our company
* Truly believe the customer always comes first

We offer:
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* A competitive salary and benefits package
* All of the training you'll need to be highly successful


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Store Managers



Operations Manager


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3+ years responsible retail or
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in management

5+ years retail or restaurant
experience at the director level


If you want to learn more about Starbucks please visit www.starbucks.com

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Monday Studa.aM-. p


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-;~~-il~e~3p---------- --- -- --- --------------------- -


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005, PAGE 7


THE.TRIBUNE


^-







PAGE 8, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


Requires the following persons:

Manageress
Sales Person
Custom Framer

Experience in any of these position would be an asset.

Reply in writing with resume to:

P.O. Box SS-5690
Nassau

or fax: 356-4805



TRADESMAN'S NOTICE FOR



JAMES OWEN,
BICA, MAAT, FCCA.


This is to notify the public and business community that
MR. JAMES WILLIAM OWEN, former Financial
Controller of The CSB5 Group of Companies, is no
longer employed in this or any other capacity, effective 2
November, 2005. As such, he is not authorized to transact
any business for the following companies or entities: -

* Dr. Conville S. Brown or Associates
* The CSB5 Group of Companies
* The CSB5 Management Company, Ltd.
* Cee Bee Investments, Ltd.
* CSB Holdings, Ltd.
* The Bahamas Center for Heart Disease, Ltd.
* The Bahamas Heart Center
* The Bahamas Chest Center Laboratory and Pharmacy
* The Bahamas Imaging Center and Nuclear Division
* The Bahamas Interventional Cardiology Center
* The Bahamas Institute of Radiotherapy, Ltd.
* Radiation Therapy Services Bahamas, Ltd.
* Radiation Therapy Services Shareholders, Ltd.
* The Centreville Medical Pavilion
* The Centreville Medical Pavilion Imaging Center
* The Centreville Medical Pavilion Executive Physical Program
* The Centreville Medical Pavilion Development Company, Ltd.
* Cee Bee Air Company, Ltd.
* Sunrise Medical Centre, Ltd.
* The Bahamas Heart Center Freeport, Ltd.

We are therefore not liable for any debts he may incur
1 Aefr haVlfas of2 November, 2005...


Work begins on cable




from Nassau to Andros


N By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Bahamas Telecommunications
Company Limited (BTC) announced yes-
one of the Bahamas Domestic Submarine
Cable Network International project.
Last .-week Sunday TYCO Telecommu-
nications' ship Reliant anchored in Nassau
harbour at Prince George Wharf to begin
laying the first cables that will connect New
Providence to Andros as part of a new fiber
optic network ring.
It is a three-phase project, with the cable
line beginning in New Providence and
extending to Andros, Exuma, Long Island,
Ragged Island, Inagua, and then down to
Haiti.
Among those present for the official
launch on board Reliant were Minister of N MICHAEL Rieger, Tyco Telecommunications ,vice-president of sales and marketing;
Works Bradley Roberts, Housing Minister BTC executive chairman Reno Brown talking with Minister of Works and Utilities
Shane Gibson, TYCO managing director Bradley Roberts at the signing in August
Rob Munier, TYCO project manager Frank
Thompson and Haitian Ambassador to the people to provide cutting-edge technology The cable will also allow for the expat-
Bahamas Luis Harold Joseph. at reasonable and affordable prices," said sion and upgrade of the Royal Bahamas
Mr Joseph said the venture has been well Minister Roberts, who has responsibility Police Force's communications netwdy
received by the Haitian government, for BTC. that the Ministry of Finance is present
He said that at the end of the project, He said Bahamians at the outer reaches working on this in conjunction with Moto6-
the cable will become the first fiber optic of the archipelago will have access to the la, he said.
link for Haiti, as all communication is same technology as those in the first and Mr Roberts said once put in place,je
presently via satellite, second cities including GSM cellular cable will also allow ZNS TV to transmit
"The cable is in keeping with my gov- phone service and high speed Internet live from regattas and other newswor y
ernment's commitment to the Bahamian access. events taking place in the Family IslindY.



US Navy helps with community projects


* By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter
A GROUP of 30 US Navy
sailors from the USS Sullivans
and the USS Ramage lent a
helping hand to the Bahamas
yesterday by conducting com-
munity service projects in New
Providence.
From 8.30am to 1pm yester-
day, 20 sailors from the USS Sul-
livans were dispatched to the
Collins Avenue headquarters of
the Bahamas National Council
for Disability, while 10 sailors
from the USS Ramage went to
the New Providence Communi-
ty Church on Blake Road.


According to a US Embassy
press release, New Providence
Community Church partnered
with the Embassy in the venture.
"The Church will provide
transportation for'the ships'
sailors to and from the project
sites," it read. "Sailors at New
Providence Church will make
repairs to the roof of a tool shed
and will prepare a vegetable gar-
den for crops which will be sold
in the community."
"While at the National Coun-
cil for Disability the volunteers
will perform a general clean-up
of the building involving tasks
such as painting, removing the
wall-to-wall carpeting, and


repairing holes in the flooring;
making it safe and user-accessi-
ble for the blind and persons in
wheelchairs."
Supplies for the project,
including several gallons of Coro-
nado paint, were generously
donated by JBR, while the
Rotary Club donated materials
and painting tools such as scrap-
ers, rollers and cement.
Caribbean Landscaping also
provided flowering plants for
landscaping projects.
According to the press release,
the restoration project at the Dis-
ability Council will continue on
Friday, November 11 when
Embassy volunteers,iled by


deputy chief of mission Dr Brent
Hardt, will give up a part of their
US Veteran's Day holiday to fyr-
ther beautify the building andsi
surroundings. The group will
work from 9am until noon,-B
"Volunteers arei hopeful tl!t
these repairs will be suffiejient.to
get the new offices ready forjDis-
ability Awarenessi.;,i)eejk,
November 26 to Dec .mberi'it
said.,,,- .us
"To further promote aware-
ness and sensitise the public
about the needs of the disablo1,
the council will hold an action
cocktail reception on December
2.at 8pm at the Radisson Hotel,"
:said therelease. in i irn;1
. 1.S f i! ) iH


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LOCAL NEWS


---~----~






THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


______LOCAL NEWS


O In

Stabi

man,

not n

by pc
POLICE ai
ing the identity
old Eleuthera
murdered on]
Yesterday
;hat on Mon
Itales got intc
cnent at around
Aah Sound res
one of the m
Ilultiple times
ath.
However, y
were still with.
|1ty of the victim
jing that he
savannah Sou
In an interview
-bune yester
'1teveaux, offi
the Eleuther
police are cur
the results ofa
This, being
.qf the year of ]
tie country's
_7.r the year to


"Copyrigh
Syndicat
Available from Comn
411----M r-'


-t




- -


brief

bed
still

amed

lice
re still withhold-
:y of the 34-year-
resident who was
Monday night.
it was reported
iday night two
o a heated argu-
d 9pm at a Savan-
sidence, resulting
aen being stabbed
s resulting in his
yesterday police
holding the iden-
m, despite admit-
is a resident of
rnd.
iew with The Tri-
rday, Wendall
icer in charge of
a division, said
rrently finalising
an autopsy.
the first murder
Eleuthera, brings
homicide count
)46.




I-






hted Material
ted Content
nercial News Providers"



- -
,



b ,


Creole 'will be the dominant



language within ten years'


THE Bahamas could
become a creole-speaking
country within ten years, it was
claimed yesterday.
With an estimated 300
Haitians per week trying to
enter the country, total sub-
mersion of Bahamian culture
is not far off.
The warning came from a
Bahamian businessman who
has close ties with Haitian
communities in Nassau,
Freeport, Abaco and Exuma.
He said a docile and moral-
ly weakened Bahamian soci-
ety, with its poor family val-
ues, is a sitting target for more
aggressive Haitians..
Within a decade, the
Bahamas could be overrun,
with people of Haitian origin
installed at every level of busi-
ness and government.
The need for people to
escape the ever-chaotic Haiti
would drive illegal immigra-
tion into the Bahamas for
years to come, he said.
And the newcomers,
inspired by the need to "get
out of the ghetto", would use
their natural aggressiveness to
become educated and succeed
in a society forever ready to
settle for something less.
"I have a passion for the
Haitian people," said the busi-
nessman, who did not want to
be named. "But with more than
50,000 Haitians here at present,
we are well on our way to los-
ing our national identity.
"Our identity is not
junkanoo, it's the way we live.
We have always been a very
passive, non-violent society,
but already we find ourselves
accepting violence as a way of
life."
While not blaming all crime
on Haitians, the businessman
said they were definitely a fac-
tor. And he said Haiti, togeth-
er with neighbouring Jamaica,
did not place the same empha-
sis on tourism as a lifeblood
industry.
.. "Now -their attitudes are
drubbing off. More of our peo-
ple are arrogant and have a


* THOUSANDS of Haitians attempt to enter the country in
sloops like this one


'take it or leave it' approach
to visitors."
Unlike older Haitians, who
embraced the Bahamian way
of life when they arrived 30 or
40 years ago, the younger ones
were coming from a com-
pletely different kind of society
where there is total chaos.
"They are living stateless and
taxless, and we have to pay the
bill," he said. "Bahamians tol-
erate everything that doesn't
affect them individually. Promi-
nent people still have their
Haitian gardeners and maids.
"Politicians say they have a
plan, but what is their plan?
You can't deport all Haitians.
You have to educate them and
make them conform to your
norm."
He drew a parallel with
south Florida where Hispan-
ics and the Spanish language
now prevail over the original
American culture.
The businessman felt the
Bahamas ought to ensure
Haitians were properly housed
instead of allowing unhygienic
shanties to spread. With cheap,
prefabricated homes'which
Haitians themselves would
fund from their own earnings,
the government could level the
slums and provide properly


organised communities.
But unless the immigration
flow was stopped, and moves
made to absorb long-term
Haitian residents into the
Bahamian way of life, local
people could become a minor-
ity in their own land. "It is
scary," he said.
"Haitian kids are doing bet-
ter at school because immi-
grants know the value of edu-
cation and parents make it a
priority.
"They are competitive
because it's their only way of
getting out of the ghetto. It's
the nature of Haitians to be
aggressive. If you turn that into
something positive, they are
more determined in getting to
where they want to go.
"Every Haitian child here is
bilingual and within a decade
creole could become the dom-
inant language. It's already
happening in petty stores over
the hill where Haitians are
running businesses and
employing Haitian assistants.
"When Bahamians find
themselves unable to speak the
language they hear all around
them, they become second-
class people in their own land.
That is already happening," he
said.


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2 years security experience required
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Fax 326-4865 P.O. BoxSS-6766 Nassau, Bahamas

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Car crashes into house


mmmon mm.AUM -4m-W =N '-,-- ---- -
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fantastic prizes just in time for Christmasl
Now through December 9 submit a photo with two empty Drypers packs
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Il e $500.00 cash & a brypers Club Pack

2 e$ 300.00 cash & a Drypers Club Pack

3~ rze $200.00 cash & a brypers Club Pack

Two enotries will be chosen every week and they will be
featured in our Babies do he Cue~sft Things newspaper
ad. These entries will qualify for grand prize drawing
December TO at Lowe's Pharmacy, Soldier Road and
announced ive on air athat day between 2pm 4pm on
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Entry forms available at Lowe's Pharmacy
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H POLICE survey the wreckage after this 1975 Nissan Sentra ploughed into a one-bedroom house
on Bernard Road. Police were unable to say whether the house was inhabited at the time of the
crash. The driver's name has not been released


Spirit Airlines launches New

York to Nassau service


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* By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Tribune Feature Editor
SPIRIT Airlines, one of the
leading low-fare carriers out of
the US, is expected to launch a
daily, non-stop service between,
New York/LaGuardia and Nas-
sau, Bahamas today.
Spirit has been serving this
market on a connecting basis
over its Fort Lauderdale hub
since last January.
"The islands of the Bahamas
extend a warm welcome to
Spirit's New York to Nassau
non-stop flight," said Obje
Wilchcombe, Minister of
Tourism. "This expansion of its
schedule is but one further
example of Spirit's commitment
to the Bahamas, and to th,
appeal of Nassau/Paradij
Island in the New York i1"
ket, buoyed by Spirit's lowl
fares."
Spirit's chief miareting,,.
cer Barry Biffle said"
response to the service has bee
tremendous. "Spirit la
received an overwhelm Jr
response to this' newnon-sl-
service and were thrill e
the day is finally here.,N
Yorkersr and Bahiansal
now have a low fare, non-stop
option with two class sericvi/
"The Bahamas anid t:i
Caribbean are exceedingly
important to Spirit as we 6 e
focused on driving both touris
and making a positive local e00-
nomic impact as the leading 1lw
fare carrier to the region." '
The inaugural flight is exp-
ed to be near full, with 120 p -
ple booked into Nassau. 'e
flight will be served by an a.i
craft named 'Spirit of .
Bahamas', a 138-seater Air*s
A319.
Lynne Koreman, Spirits
senior director of marketing
and communication, said the
booking patterns already shw4
that the flight will be incredi-
bly popular, which speaks to
the level and quality of service
offered by the airline.
"It's all very, very strong. We
can see it in the booking pat-
terns, we also see it in the oppo-
site direction. We have service
from New York to Fort Laud-
erdale, but a number are con-
nections, but now they can go
non-stop to the Bahamas. "
Ms Koreman said that Spirit
will be offering Thanksgiving
fares to New York, starting
from $79 each way. Visitors to
Fort Lauderdale will also be
able to take advantage of low
fares, beginning at $44 one way.
She noted however that spe-
cific dates are attached to the
special November fares, and
that travellers have to book pas-
sage on Spirit's website by Sun-
day night.
Asked whether Spirit was
impacted by Hurricane Wilma,
Ms Koreman said that although
flights were cancelled for a few
days, "it all came back fast"
because it is something that
they prepare for.


NOTICE

ESTATE OF
NEVILLE EMMANUEL HART

The following persons are hereby requested to contact
the Undersigned at SPEEDY SAW SERVICES,
telephone 325-4132 or 341-8906, urgently in order
to collect saws left with the Undersigned for
sharpening:

E. Adderley J. Lundy
John Adderley A. Miller
J. Bullard George Miller
W. Cooper L. Miller
0. Grant H. Minnis
Michael Hall R. McPhee
R. Knowles Mr. Reed
J. Taylor C. Finley

Goods not collected within Thirty (30) days from the
date of this notice will be sold to cover the cost of
repair.

Mrs. Nathalie Bain,
Executrix of the Estate of the late
Neville E. Hart, deceased.


I


|J^,Je,


DAY T


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005


(f~8~8~




THURSDAY, NOIVEMBER 9, 2005, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


I r mise
to6B8
Te r e.
I/ ord


Friday & Saturday
NO VEMBER
11th A 12th


"CALING MEN TO GOY LIVING"


Bhames Awakening
Friday, November 4th, 2005
Bahamas Awakeninrg
Men's March
Sunday, November 6th, 2005
Bahamas Awakening Rally
Friday & Saturday,
November 11 th & 1 2th, 2005
Clifford Park 6pm


POIE


0








PAGE 12, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


LOCAL NEWS


AND


I L A N D


MONTH


The common myths





about mental illness


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* By BETTY FOX FRAZIER
MENTAL illnesses are common.
They account for a large percentage
of hospital stays every year.
Yet in spite of the fact that
almost everyone knows someone
who has been, or will be, affected
by mental illness, few people know
very much about it.
It is human nature to fear what
we do not understand. As, such,
mental illness is feared by many
people and unfortunately, still car-
ries a stigma (a stigma is defined as
a mark or sign of disgrace).
Because of this, many people
hesitate to help persons with a
mental problem for fear of being
looked down upon. It is unfortu-
nate that this happens, because
effective treatments exist for
almost all illnesses. Worse, the stig-
ma experienced by some people
with a mental illness can be more
destructive than the illness itself.
Misconceptions about mental
illness contribute to the stigma,
which leads many people to be
ashamed and prevents them from
seeking help. Until people learn
the truth, they will continue to
deny that mental illness exists at
all or to avoid the topic entirely.
Dispelling the myths is a powerful
step toward eradicating the stig-
ma and allaying the fears sur-
rounding mental illness.
SOME COMMON MYTHS
AND FACTS ABOUT
MENTAL ILLNESS
Myth 1: Psychiatric disorders
are not true medical disorders like
heart disease or diabetes. People
who have mental illnesses are just
"crazy".
Fact: Mental illness, like heart
disease and diabetes, is a legiti-
mate medical illness. Research
shows there are genetic and bio-
logical causes for psychiatric dis-
orders and they can be treated
effectively.
Myth 2: People with severe
mental illnesses, such as schizo-
phrenia. are usually dangerous and
violent.
Fact: Statistics show that the inci-
Sdeh e6f violence in. peoplf ho


have a mental illness is not much
higher than it is in the general pop-
ulation. In fact, they are more like-
ly to be the victims of violence than
to be violent themselves. Those
suffering from a psychosis such as
schizophrenia are more frightened
and confused than violent.
Myth 3: People with a mental
illness who are psychotic are psy-
chopaths.
Fact: When a person has psy-
chosis, he perceives reality in a
distorted way he may see, feel
or taste things that are not real
and cannot be perceived by others.
By contrast, a psychopath com-
mits antisocial acts mainly for
emotional or material gain, and
generally lacks a conscience.
Myth 4: People with mental ill-
nesses are poor and/or less intelli-
gent.
Fact: Many studies show that
most mentally ill people have aver-
age or above-average intelligence.
Mental illness, like physical illness,
can affect anyone regardless of intel-
ligence, social class or income level.
Myth 5: Mental illness is caused
by a personal weakness and you
can will it away. Being treated for
a mental disorder means that an
individual has in some way
"failed" or is weak.
Fact: A mental illness is not a
character flaw. It is an illness and
it has nothing to do with being
weak or lacking will power.
Although people with a mental ill-
ness can play a big part in their
own recovery, they did not choose
to become ill and they are not lazy
because they cannot just "snap out
of it" or will it away.
They cannot stop their illness
by trying harder, just as someone
with a hearing problem cannot
hear by listening harder. Ignoring
the problem does not make it go
away, either. It takes courage to
seek professional help.
Myth 6: The mentally ill are bad
or evil.
Fact: The mentally ill are not
bad .or evil. They have done noth-
ing t6 -cause the disease. However,
many people are ashamed to have


have helped these individuals to
lead fulfilling, productive live.
Myth 12: Depression is a nor-
mal part of the aging process.,
Fact: It is not normal for older
adults to be depressed. Sign of
depression in older people include
loss of interest in activities, sleep
disturbance and lethargy. These
signs often go undiagnosed arind it
is important for seniors and their
family members to recognis6'the
problem and seek professional
help.
Myth 13: Depression and'other
illnesses, such as anxiety disorders,
do not affect children or adoles-
cents. Any problems they haveare
just part of growing up.
Fact: Children and adolescents
can develop severe mental illhiess-
es. Left untreated, these problems
can get worse. Anyone talking
about suicide should be takefi'geri-
ously.
Myth 14: Addiction is a lifestyle
and shows lack of will power:Peo-
ple with a substance abuse,prob-
lem are morally weak or "bad".
Fact: Addiction is a disease that
generally results from changes in
brain chemistry. It has nothing to
do with being a "bad" person.
Myth 15: Electroconvulgive
shock therapy (ECT), foriiferly
known as "shock treatmdn"t' is
painful and barbaric.
Fact: ECT has given a new lease
on life to many people who suffer
from severe and debilitating
depression. It is used when.ojher
treatments such as psychotherapy
or medication fail or cannot be
used. Patients who receive ECT
are asleep and under anesthesia, so
they do not feel anything. -
Betty Fox Frazier isit a ehior
nursing officer, psychiatric'nurse
; and nursing educator at Sandilands
Rehabilitation :Centre. ', -


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) Senator, Hon. Sharon Wilson, Principal, Sharon Wilson & CO,
Topic: Legal Aspects of Starting a Business

SJeanine Lampkin, FLMI,ACII, Managing Director/CEO, Lampkin & Co. Ins.
Topic: The Joys and Challenges of Entrepreneurship

i Michael Rolle, Lecturer, School of Business, College of The Bahamas
Topic: Planning and Managing for Business Success

Jerome P. Gomez, Managing Director, Gomez Corporate Mgmt. Ltd.
Topic: Venture Capital Financing and Expanding Your Business

) Carmen Massoni, Real Estate Broker, Coldwell Banker/Lightbourne Realty
Topic: Investing in The Family Islands


L BRITISH
Z!AMERICAN
EPtOblINhed 1920

C om m ... . Wl-om ..o i
T- rmes. no-2s.3122


dr
W ^'"OMENSFINANCIAL IN VESTMENTG BOU Ui


R~s~sI~W


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Tel: 326-6377,326-6464/5,326-0013/4,326-6382 Fax: 326-6315
Email: sanpln.vebicles@coralwave.com coUMONwE. BSANK


STovember 2005 is Sandilands Month. This year,:
j'jthrough a series of articles, the Sandilands staff
will focus on the importance family involvement
in rehabilitative care and educating persons about the facts
and myths of mental illnesses, in an effort to combat the
harmful stigmas that presently exist in our society.
The message to the family, church, media and policy
makers and the
community at large is that mental illness is a treatable
disease that can affect anyone. When one person is
affected we are all affected either directly or indirectly.
Therefore, it is incumbent on all of us to be educated and
supportive to those that are mentally challenged. We must
encourage wholesome attachments were persons do not
feel isolated. It is our responsibility to be conscientious of'
the harm we do with our negative attitudes.


I


a mentally ill person in the family.
Myth 7: Mental illness is a sin-
gle, rare disorder.
Fact: Mental illness is not a sin-
gle disease but a broad classifica-
tion for many disorders. Anxiety,
depression, schizophrenia, per-
sonality disorders, eating disor-
ders, substance-related disorders,
sexual and gender identity disor-
ders, sleep disorders are all classi-
fied as mental illnesses.
Myth 8: Mental illness is the
result of bad parenting.
Fact: Most experts agree that a
genetic susceptibility, combined
with other risk factors, leads to
psychiatric disorders. In other
words, mental illnesses have a
physical cause.
Myth 9: Mental illnesses can be
cured
Fact: These illnesses cannot be
cured, but can, for the most part,
be controlled. People with a severe
mental illness can expect to have
problems to some degree for life.
Myth 10: Depression results
from personality weakness or
character flaws and people who
are depressed could just snap out
of it if they just tried hard enough.
Fact: Depression has nothing to
do with being lazy or weak. It
results from changes in brain
chemistry or brain function. Med-
ication and/or psychotherapy often
help people to recover.
Myth 11: Schizophrenia means
split personality, and there is no
way to control it.
Fact: Schizophrenia is often con-
fused with multiple personality dis-
order. Actually, schizophrenia is
a brain disorder that robs people
of their ability to think clearly and
logically. Persons with schizo-
phrenia have symptoms ranging
from social withdrawal to halluci-
nations and delusions. Medications


,














Our democracy demands some


comr


ion in its politics


Over and over again,
FNM leaders have
been bombarded by the ques-
tion of whether or not the lead-
ership race in the party will
"divide" it.
This question misses three
fundamental points. First, it
misses the point that in a
democracy politics is the market
place where ideas and people
compete to gain direction and
control, that is, leadership, of
the state.
Of all the forms of govern-
ment practised by human beings
throughout the ages, democra-
cy, as imperfect as it is, has
proven the most acceptable pre-
cisely because competition
abounds.
This competition has led to
some of the most significant
advances in human relations
that we know: namely, racial
equality, gender equality, free-
dom of speech, freedom of con-
science, freedom of assembly,
freedom of worship and the list
goes on.
While the struggle to achieve
these basic entitlements divided
men, had not men been willing
to compete, those rights might
not have been achieved.
Competition between men
and women in politics increases
the likelihood that the best per-
son will prevail. Like a product
in the marketplace, the one pur-
chased is the one that makes
the greatest impression on the
consumer.
Just because you or I might
not like the top-selling product
does not mean that it is not to
the majority of consumers the
product of choice.

In our democracy those
who wish to lead must
compete and compete earnestly
for the affections of political
consumers, the voters.
This competition necessarily
divides those being courted but


principally along the lines of
choice. It is only when people
have a bad reaction to the final
vote of the marketplace that the
division becomes a destructive
thing. Otherwise, they simply
accept that their choice is not
the choice of the greater num-
ber of consumers.
Competition among compet-
ing personalities compels all to


STRAIGHT UP TALK
7 J 7 1


Z H I VA R G LA


sharpen their skills and put their
best foot forward. There is no
question that the entrance of
Dion Foulkes into the leader-
ship race made Sen Tommy.
Turnquest compete more keen-


I N G


nonsense.
We are all better off because
men like Mr Turnquest, Mr
Foulkes, Mr Ingraham and Mr
Christie place themselves in the
political market place to com-


If these wise men and women
believed that competition for the
leadership of the country or the
party was destructively divisive,
they would have specifically
prohibited elections in the


governing laws.
and wisely so.


ly and the ever looming'
prospect of former prime min-
ister, the Right Hon. Hubert
Ingraham, entering the race
made both men further refine
their political craft.
This is the nature of compe-
tition in any market place, not
merely that it divides along the
lines of choice but that it also
inspires improvements along
the lines of customer service.

econd, the question
misses the point that
there is only one Bahamas and
every day our democracy
divides us. If that split is by its
very nature destructive, then we
should be experiencing it today.
Following .the implied logic
of the question, Sir Lynden


They did not


pete for the right to lead the
nation.
* That competition has given
us better ideas, better policies,
better laws, better institutions
and a better society than the
one we would have had if we
did not have such competition.
Most especially, it has given us
choice and choice is the defining
feature of a democracy.
What is useful to note is that
following the political compe-
tition, these men are able to
civilly work in the country, for
the country and in some
instances together.

O ne. thing that can be
said about the leader-
.ship race within the FNI is that
it has been quite civil. All can-
didates, declared and unde-
clared, have conducted them-
selves on the high planes of dig-
nity.
They have not put down each
other or any of their opponent's
followers. They have been quite
gentlemanly in the conduct.
This civility should be modelled
throughout our politics, on both
sides of the divide.
Third, the question misses
the point that the constitutions
of the country and of political
parties in a democracy provide
for elections.' Why would the
framers of these important gov-
erning documents provide for
elections if they did not both
expect them and welcome
them?
If these wise men and
women believed that competi-
tion for the leadership of the
country or the "party was
destructively divisive, they


should never have competed
with Sir Roland Symonette or
Mr Hubert Ingraham with Sir
Lynden for the leadership of
the country-because that divid-
ed the country.
Additionally, Mr Christie
should never have competed
with Mr Ingraham for the same
reason and no-one should chal-
lenge Mr Christie. This is utter


would have specifically prohib-
ited elections in the governing
laws. They did not and wisely
so.
It is interesting to me that
many of the questions about
the FNM leadership race ignore
the fact that the PLP had a
fiercely contested leadership
race of their own some time
shortly after the 1997 general
elections when Sir Lynden Pin-
dling retired from frontline pol-
itics.
In that race, the competition
between Mr Perry Christie, Mr
B J Nottage and Mr Phillip
Galanis was so fierce that it
took several rounds to decide
a winner.
The competition was also so
caustic that it led to Mr Not-
tage leaving the PLP and form-
ing a political party of his own.
It is worth noting that Sir Lyn-
den was a powerful broker, in
the process whose support like-
ly determined Mr Christie's ulti-
mate success in the race.
Notwithstanding the split
that some thought might be so
destructive, the PLP is today
the governing party of The
Bahamas and Mr Perry
Christie the prime minister. If
the contemporary political his-
tory of The Bahamas is any
example, the FNM might find
comfort in its present leader-
ship struggle.
FOLLOWERS MUST
RECOGNISE THE
BEAUTY OF
THEIR POWER

After you elect a
leader, he or she is
"in charge", as we like to say,
but they can only be in charge
after voters have put them in
charge. With this said, there is
no need for people to suggest
that this one or that one should
not run for office.
If you do not want a certain
individual to be in charge, vote
for someone else, if you have a













D FREE

| DELIVER


vote, or petition those who have
the vote to vote for someone
else. This is the beauty of
democracy. In the voting sea-
son, otherwise seemingly pow-
erless people become a major
force in determining the out-
come of political events.


THOUGHT FOR THE
WEEK

t is in every man to be
ambitious for himself. I
should not envy that in him.
zhivargolaing@hotmail.com


TEACHERS REA. ESTATE HOLDINGS LIMITED
THE
1st ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING


WILL BE HELD ON


THURSDAY NOVEMBER 10th, 2005

AT

Teachers and Salaried Workers
Co-Operative Credit Union
Head Office
East Street and Independence Drive
6:00p.m.

REGISTRATION BEGINS AT 5:30P.M.

See You There!


Available At


ELECTRO JACK 1
Home & Electronics Solution Center
Town Center Mall
Tel: 356 6206/356 5971
Fax: 356 6206


NCREDIBLE CYBERJACK
Your Electronic Superstore
Mall at Marathon
Tel: 394 6254/394 6255
Fax: 394- 6211


In our democracy those who
wish to lead must compete and
compete earnestly for the
affections of political
consumers, the voters.


I - I


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005


School is vandalised


FROM page one
found, so that their parents
can know what they are up to.
They want to be in the spot-
light but it should be in a neg-
ative spotlight and go before
the courts."
He said the situation is espe-
cially vexing considering that
just last week, students missed
three half days because the
water pipes had a major leak
resulting in a lack of water.
He said the ministry had
sent a repairman to the school
who had just completed the
repairs, much to everyone's
relief.
He said that this incident
will further hamper the edu-
cation of students and affect
the livelihood of school ven-
dors who have already had
their business disrupted.


Referring to the graffiti, he
added: "We just spent lots of
money to make it look pre-
sentable."
Mr Miller said the issue of
graffiti had always been a
problem at the school, but
never with such hateful,
vengeful tones.
Mr Miller said that despite
the fact that the school had
24-hour security, no security
log entries noted that there
were any problems on cam-
pus during the night. He
added that A F Adderley
might have to hire a private
security firm.
This latest incident is esti-
mated to cost about $1,000 for
the water pump repairs. Also,
the school would use between
20 and 30 gallons of paint at a
cost of $160 a gallon to cover
the graffiti.


FROM page one

lateness of the hour. Howev-
er, it was more likely that most
of the delegates had left with
Mr Ingraham, leaving behind
them an almost empty ball-
room.
A poll taken of delegates at
the FNM convention yesterday
by "the Committee to re-elect
Hubert Ingraham" showed that
at least 60 per cent supported
the former prime minister.
More than 200 delegates
attended a luncheon yesterday
to show support for Mr Ingra-
ham at the Sandals Resort
Convention Hall.
Organisers said the event
was not held as an attempt to
influence voters and wanted
the "democratic spirit of the
convention" to continue.
During the lunch the cam-
paign ticket of Mr Ingraham
with deputy leader candidate
Brent Symonette was repeat-


Ingraham
edly brought to the attention
of those attending, but organ-
isers encouraged delegates to
support the candidates they
truly felt would best lead the
party.
Shortly before ushering del-
egates to buses waiting to take
them from the convention
area, Floyd Wilmott, one of the
organisers behind the dinner
and the recent motorcade in
support of Mr Ingraham, said:
"There are 400 delegates,
and we are looking at between
250 or 300 delegates to attend.
Mr Ingraham said that if it is
the people's will, 'I will listen'.
I think that is clear as day. That
is why our slogan is 'Hubert
Ingraham: The People's
Choice'," he said.
Mr Wilmott said that Mr
Ingraham was not personally
involved in the lunch organ-


PLP accused over visas


NOTICE




Boaters Paradise Ltd. asks that all persons
or parties with boats, trailers, engines,
vehicles, personal watercraft or any other
goods on the premises of, or in the care
of Boaters Paradise Ltd., please contact
Boaters Paradise Ltd. to settle any and all
work orders, accounts, bills or storage
charges by December 12th, 2005. At which
time any and all boats, trailers, engines,
vehicles, personal watercraft or any other
goods on the premises of or in the care of
Boaters Paradise Ltd. will be sold to settle
the amount (or any part thereof) of the
outstanding work orders, accounts, bills
or storage charges.

Please contact Danny or Tim
at 393-5713 or 393-3592.
Monday through Saturday
8:00am to 5:00pm


FROM page one
FNM were changed by the
PLP politicians and their
cronies," he claimed.
"According to documents in
our possession, in May, 2004, a
high-ranking official sought
approval for six visas to be
issued upon the application of a
Bahamian, who needed crew-
men for his boat, which traded
between Nassau and Haiti."
"In 2005, the following year
- as a result, no doubt, of his
high-level sponsorship this
same man was able to bring in
an additional 30 Haitian nation-
als," he claimed.
"Entry visas have been
granted to persons who have
not provided photographs,
which were not signed by the
applicants, and worst of all
between the first and fifth of
October, 2004, the ministry
granted 47 visas to unnamed
persons with no record of what
their names were or what was
the purpose of their visit," he
said.
According to Mr Bethel, on
September 5, 2005, the FNM
had called on Minister of For-
eign Affairs Fred Mitchell to
explain these irregularities.
As yet, he said, there had
been no response.


He said that this "slack PLP
government must go. And the
next FNM government will
move quickly to prevent abuse
of the power of the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs to issue entry
visas."
"Your Free National Move-
ment government will live up
to the promise of stationing and
equipping a full Defence Force
base in Inagua so that our mili-
tary forces might better patrol
the maritime approaches to the
Bahamas from a point closest
to our border.
"Your Free National Move-
ment government will open
meaningful dialogue with estab-
lished immigrant communities
to persuade them of the need
to stop any collaboration with
human smugglers, and to pre-
vent the harbouring govern-
ment to take a strong stand
against ethnic divisions and eth-
nic hatred in any part of our
country," he said. "And we are
ready to serve now more
than ever."
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Fred Mitchell was off the island
yesterday and could not be con-
tacted for comment on the
issue.
Acting Foreign Affairs Min-
ister Vincent Peet was also
unavailable.


ised by the committee.
"This is not all about the
FNM, this is an FNM conven-
tion. Once the committee
members do the honourable
thing and vote Mr Ingraham
in as party leader, then I think
the Bahamian people would
join forces and remove the
PLP in the next general elec-
tion.
"I can assure you of that,
under the leadership of Hubert
Alexander Ingraham," he said.
One of the lunch's emcees,
former Speaker of the House
Italia Johnson, said the issue
of the party leadership extend-
ed beyond the reach of the
convention.
"We are here to save a coun-
try, not just a party," she said.


$6.6m raised
FROM page one

Water's chief financial offi-
cer, said: "The offering, which
was available only to Bahamian
investors, wafs successfully com-
pleted on November 4, 2005
and raised approximately $6.6
million, net, through the sale of
Bahamian Depository Receipts.
"The offering increased out-
standing shares of the Comp'a-
ny's common stock by 401,122.
Combined with the Bahamian
bond offering previously con-
cluded on July 1, 2005, a net
total of approximately $16.4
million was raised in t he
Bahamas."


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PHONE: 322-8160 OR 322-8219


I- I I


- 1 11 1 I ll V I I'l 1 1 11 ., :. :: : I. - '. ". "







I- I


Do you want to make more money?
Do you want to control when you receive your next pay increase?
Are you willing to make your dream a reality?

If so, then this is for you.

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Little Switzerland is a company with 51 years experience in luxury
retailing with over 25 stores in the Caribbean, Florida and Alaska.
We offer our customers the most prestigious lines in the industry..

If you want a sales career with management opportunities in a
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Sales Professional

Earn up to US $80,000 in a fast pace, open ended commission
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Jewelry and watch knowledge is a plus but not necessary. What
is necessary is an open mind, the thirst to learn and apply the
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A competitive mindset that can take on any challenge. Driven
to succeed and self motivated to always do better.
Outgoing personality with excellent people skills. Excellent
customer care with a smile is our obsession.
Ability to work in a team and contribute to the success of the
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Trustworthy, dependable & willing to work flexible hours to
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;When you join Little Switzerland, you are joining a company with
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'have the opportunity to achieve earnings in excess of US$ 80,000,
:if you so desire. If you have the ability, focus and drive to succeed
drop off your resume/CV and/ or a letter stating why you feel you
:would be a suitable candidate to:

Mike Wilkinson, Store Manager
The Jewelry Box, Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas
Email: mwilkinson@littleswitzerland.com
Tel: 1-242-8939 Fax: 1-242-4098
Or come in and drop it off.


Save up to


Ship Now,
Fly Later


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For more convenient service, drop your
bags off the day before you travel, and
they'll be waiting for you when you arrive!


We accept most oversize/overweight items and boxes!


Bags arrive 11am


Pay in Nassau


*American Eagle's published excess baggage fees on your third bag,
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Not combinable with any other offer. Only one coupon per customer per visit. I
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- - - -|


_l~___n_________________________ I ~


69slllRP r = Ca~ll~e*r~re -~pL~Cr~rP' rl)Z- ~Yrl. rllllulCrrl`PllmIIII~CI1~.1 II 1II 1 II 1 ill 3


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005, PAGE 15


THE TRIBUNE


e*:,cessbalggage


koiw- ^^^P-^^^^'B^^ fIU~~^ ^B-B'





PAGE 16, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005


lmOCfORS HCrrcPrI'rfcnrAL


1/.~


Celebrating


50gir


of


~;i~n~le8~i~c~ EIRa


a~x~


V'"
> 1.^e


A.U


"B.:


Jt iifcr- C,.....


e StridersClub


Royal Bahamas Police Force


11f*"' ..V


Many Thanks To All Of Our Sponsors: Bahamas Ferries Bally Total Fitness Thompson Trading Gatorade
/ 7 D'Albenas Agency Ltd. Prime Bahamas Bahamas Food Services
Pepsi Cola Bottling Co. Ltd. Aquapure Water Ltd.
...........* Bahamas Heart Association Ministry of Health HIVIAIDS


V !' ,i


THE TRIBUNE


!I





THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005, PAGE 17


THE TRIBUNE


"My work at The Tribune is rewarding
and challenging. I enjoy contributing
to the look of our newspaper while
meeting the needs of our advertisers.
I am proud to work here. The
Tribune is my newspaper."


ESTHER BARRY
PRODUCTION MANAGER
THE TRIBUNE


The Tribune
/ / 4' f' "4"


_ __












Bank staff receive service training


FUEL SURCHARGE 2005 :


1n
.4nt


4 -i- -I I i R


"!3!

9 8.48920

8 ____
S7.8_______7112___ __8

6.82390 ,
6.53570 6.6486
2'
S5.5269 5.17120 5.4877


S4.6237

4








JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT
.^:- '*: iii.: ^ *i -:i 111 1; ; ^ *.* __ .!i;' __ ___ 1^ ;!' ^-i- ** *-. W S '* :_________^:'ll:ll*l~ll*-~~l''l


* THE Bank of the Bahamas
held a series of customer
service workshops under the
theme "The frontline our
first defence".
The workshops were designed
to be both educational and fun
and participants learned the
importance of "delighting"
customers and what it takes to
create a culture of superior
service.
Presenters included Michaelf
Pintard, Phillip Simon, Win-.
ston Rolle, Richard Adderley
and Mark Turnquest.
Two employees, Shandia
Smith and Patricia Hepburn
won lunch for two at Chez
Willie after receiving the
highest scores on the review
test given at the end of the
workshop.
(Employees are shown
engaged in workshop
activities)


FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 18, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005






THURSDAY, NOVEMBl-H 1U, ZUUb, Pl-Ai 19


THE TRIBUNE


American diplomat makes


call on Minister of Tourism


* MORE pictures from
the training day held by
The Bank of the
Bahamas, designed to
educate staff in the
skills of customer
service


* THE Minister Youth, Sports and Culture Neville Wisdom, right, greets Charge d' Affairs of
the United States Embassy Dr. Brent Hardt during a courtesy call on Monday at the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture.
(BIS photo: Derek Smith)


STUDIO,
OF DRAPERIES:I .








STARTS
NOVEMBER 9-16, 2005
Double Drapes........Off Rack.........$120.00
Triple Drapes.........Off Rack..........$160.00
Double Cotton Moire Drapes.........$160.00
Triple Cotton Moire Drapes........$220.00






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The Art of Island Living
Mitchell Gold I Family jewels.
Our Nicki Collection defines luxury for everyday living. As part of the Mitchell
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_ _I~


I


Ba t,2D o, |lcto"itraA e







THE TRIBUNE


I NAT NAL


MICHAEL JORDAN


S ."Copyrighted Material-

4 Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"
---R aa ^***Aa *-


0 m


VOLUNTEERS NEEDED


Kerzner International


Bahamas


. -


Limited is


-l a-


-. 1b ~**~ -~
~.. ~,e-
* -
e a .
- e ~ -
-
-~


recruiting volunteers to assist with the Michael

Jordan Celebrity Invitational Golf Tournament

to be held on January 26 -29, 2006 at the Ocean

Club Golf Course on Paradise Island.


To volunteer contact Victoria

Victoria.Bethell@kerzner.com

ext. 64561 by January 6, 2006.


Bethell

or call


~ -w 0


- -

- - .-
-a


by email at

at 363-2000


S -


- --w -
- -S C


-~ ~-
5- 0 S
~. a
- a
S S
S
- - a
.-
* 0~~

* ~
e

- .


Celebrity Invitational 2006


YOUR CONNECTION O THE WORLD


VACANCY NOTICE

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited (BTC) invites applications from I
suitably qualified individuals to fill the position of Senior Marketing & Sales Representative
in its Marketing Department.

JOB SUMMARY:

The Senior Marketing & Sales Representative conducts primary and secondary market
research to determine industry and technological issues and trends. This position is
responsible for taking market and competitive research intelligence and translating that
data into recommendations for Product Development.

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES:

Monitor, track and analyze technological trends and factors locally and
internationally to provide guidance for future strategies.
Conduct and/ or coordinate internal and external market research as required.
Develop and implement customer surveys when appropriate to gain market
intelligence.
Develop product development recommendations based on data received through
the above market research.
Interface with outside market research and competitive analysis firms as needed.
Have direct contact with customers and vendors.

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS

1. Bachelors Degree in Marketing or Business Administration with a minimum
of three (3) years in a market and competitive analysis type organization.
2. Strong computer skills, including the development of presentations with charts
and graphs.
3. Strong datatbase software skills, including but not limited to, Microsoft Access.
4. Experience in the telecommunications industry is a plus
5. Strong interpersonal and Communication skills.
6. Ability to make sound business decisions.


All applications are to be received at BTC's Head office, 21 John F. Kennedy Drive, no,
later than Friday, November 18, 2005 and addressed as follows:

DIRECTOR
HUMAN REOURCES & ADMINISTRATION
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD.
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS

RE: SENIOR MARKETING & SALES REPRESENTATIVE


I?


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PAGE 20, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005


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YOUR CONNECTION-rTO THE WORLD


VACANCY NOTICE

-The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited (BTC) invites applications from
.suitably qualified individuals to fill the position of Associate/ Graphic Artist in its
Directory Publications Department.

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES

1. Create and design ads for the different sections of the Telephone Directories
using programs supplied.
2. Edit images to be used in the layout of display ads.
3. Convert files in different format as required by the printers.
4. Account for all ads completed at the end of the business day.
5. Familiarize oneself with all functions of the graphics area.
6. Download files from external medias.
7. Follow standards and guidelines as established by management.
8. Report any malfunctions or abnormalities of computer system or files to
immediate Team Leader or Manager.
9. Keep work environment and tools for work properly maintained, and observe
safety precautions and maintenance policies consistent with BTC's rules.
10. Assist the Team Leader or Manager in the carrying out of their duties and
perform any functions that from time to time may be deemed necessary by
the Team Leader or Manager.

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS

1. A Bachelors Degree in Graphic Design or
2. An Associate Degree in Graphic Design with four (4) years practical experience
as a Graphic Artist.
3. Must be proficient on PC and MAC.
4. Must be knowledgeable in scanning images to the correct specifications.
5. Must know how to edit images using Adobe Photoshop.
6. Must be able to layout designs in CorelDraw (PC) Adobe Illustrator (PC &
MAC) Quark Express & Freehand (MAC).

All applications are to be received at BTC's Head Office 21 John F. Kennedy Drive, no
later than Friday, November 18, 2005 and addressed as follows:

Director
Human Resources & Administration
The Bahamas Telecomunications Company Limited
Nassau, The Bahamas

Re: Associate/ Graphic Artist


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005, PAGE 21


THE TRIBUNE


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please email application to
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YOUR CONNECTION TO THE WORLD


VACANCY NOTICE
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited (BTC) invites applications from suitably qualified
individuals to fill the position of Senior Associate in its Finance & Administration Division.
JOB SUMMARY
Perform varied accounting functions requiring familiarity with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles
and international Accounting Standards.
Responsibilities will include ensuring accurate input to General ledger, conducting regular monitoring of
revenue accounts and reconciling prepaid expenses and revenue in advance accounts. In addition, assist in
the production of the monthly Corporate Performance Reports.
DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
1. Review of Billing interface
Ensure that extract files agree to Billing summary reports
Ensure that debits and credits balance and that all GL accounts are valid
Ensure complete export of file to the financial accounting system
Check validation process before approval and update to general ledger.
2. Review of Cash and Adjustments interface
Ensure that extract files agree to Cash and Adjustment summary reports
Ensure that debits and credits balance and that all GL accounts are valid
Ensure complete export of file to financial accounting system
Check validation process before approval and update to general ledger.
3. Complete weekly and monthly investigations of all revenue accounts
Complete variance analysis of all accounts
Liaise with various departments for enquiries and corrections
Prepare manual journal entries where necessary.
4. Load the revenue budget into the financial accounting system on an annual basis.
5. Complete monthly reconciliations of prepayment accounts, including:
General Insurance
Vehicle Insurance
Rent
Miscellaneous
Directories
6. Complete Monthly Revenue in Advance reconciliation:
Rental
Cellular
7. Ensure that all general ledger accounts are introduced properly in the various categories:
Asset
Liability
Equity
Income
Expense
8. Journal Processing:
Ensure that all journal entries are keyed accurately and timely
Review accrual Journals ensure that flags are set properly and reversing
Journals are set for the correct period Approve and Update journals on a daily basis
9. Maintain Financial Reports
Ensure that all GL accounts are placed in the appropriate report per the class of account;
Ensure that report agree to the Trial Balance
10. Any other duties assigned by Department management.
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS
1. A Bachelor's Degree in Accounts or Finance with four (4) years experience in a related field.
2. Solid analytical and problem-solving skills, results oriented with close attention to detail
3. Excellent communication skills, both oral and written
4. Must be able to work under pressure and meet deadlines
5. Must be proficient with Mictosoft Office applications
6. Knowledge of Peoplesoft applications would be an asset.
All applications are to be received at BTC's Head office, 21 John F. Kennedy Drive, no later than Friday,
November 18, 2005 and addressed as follows:
DIRECTOR
HUMAN RESOURCES & ADMINISTRATION
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD.
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS
RE: SENIOR ASSOCIATE FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION


THE TRIBUNE


I


m


----'


PAGE 24, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005


r







THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005, PAGE 25


THURSDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 10, 2005

7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

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PAGE 28, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005


8








THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005


SECTION


business@tribunemedia.net


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occupancy


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
he Bahamas
"must act now"
on deciding
whether it wants
to target the Far
East and Eastern Europe, two
of the fastest-growing markets
for high net worth individuals,
with the Bahamas Financial
services Board (BFSB) plan-
ning exploratory trips to the
region in early 2006.
Wendy Warren, the BFSB's
chief executive and executive
director, told the Bahamas
Institute of Chartered Accoun-
tants (BICA) accountants'
week seminar that while East-
ern Europe and the far East
had not been traditional mar-
kets for the Bahamas financial
industry and its private wealth
management base, "the first
mover is seen to be critical".
Ms Warren said: "A decision
needs to be made as to whether
the jurisdiction will consider
those markets. My overall view
is: we must act now."
An IBM survey had identi-
fied eastern Europe as the
fastest growing source of pri-
vate banking clients, while east-
ern Asia was also expanding,
driven by Chinese economic
growth, with Hong Kong and
Singapore major financial cen-
tres in their own right.
Meanwhile, Ms Warren said
the Bahamas "continues to be
ideally placed" for both win-
ning new financial services
business and retaining existing


clients, two factors deemed crit-
ical for success in the sector by
a PricewaterhouseCoopers
(PwC) survey released earlier
this year.
She pointed out that the
Bahamas had "strong rela-
tions" with both the US and
China, the world's two largest
economies accounting for one
third of global GDP, the main
question being how this
nation's financial services
industry could tap into those
markets.
On the US front, the risk of
"aggressive action" against the
Bahamas by the Internal Rev-
enue Service (IRS) had dimin-
ished after this nation signed a
Tax Information Exchange
Agreement (TIEA) with
Washington, securing its Qual-
ified Jurisdiction (QJ) status.
As a result, Ms Warren said
many Bahamas-based financial
institutions could again look at
targeting US clients. She added
that if the Bahamas "can secure
a small part" of the estimated
$46-$136 trillion in wealth set
to be transferred by the US
'baby boomers' generation,
"we will all be very happy".
Ms Warren urged Bahami-
an professionals to keep
abreast of regulatory develop-
ments outside the Bahamas,
pointing out that "all eyes" will
be on Melbourne next week,
where the Organisation for
Economic Co-Operation and
Development (OECD) will
release its latest progress report
on creating a 'level playing
field' in relation to transparen-


cy and the exchange of infor-
mation for tax purposes.
She pointed out that the
OECD had already hailed the
signing of a TIEA between the
Isle of Man and the Nether-
lands as a "major step forward"
in achieving its objectives, as
this was the first such treaty
signed between an interna-
tional financial centre and an
OECD member that was not

SEE page 8B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BAHAMIAN companies would be
"targets for purchase" by their
Caribbean counterparts under the
Caribbean Single Market & Economy
(CSME), the Bahamas Trade Commis-
sion's co-chair told The Tribune yester-
day, because this nation's exchange con-
trol regime prevents them from expand-
ing abroad, hampering their competi-
tiveness and ability to gain size and scale.
Raymond Winder, who is also senior
partner at Deloitte & Touche
(Bahamas), said "the time has come"
for the Central Bank of the Bahamas to
address the exchange control regime,
which requires a 25 per cent premium to
be paid by all Bahamian companies and


.'Actno''o




targeing. East




uroe isla^




banin Mar et


Wall Street backs view Baha
Mar will grow tourism base
and complement Kerzner


Noting that Baha Mar Devel-
opment Company, along with
Harrah's Entertainment and
Starwood, had agreed their joint
venture for Cable Beach, includ-
ing a Caesar's Entertainment-
branded 1,000-room hotel and
casino, Mr Klatzkin said Kerzn-
er International's management
believed it would "make the
Bahamas a stronger destination,
thus complementing Kerzner's
Atlantis resort".
The Jefferies & Co analyst
wrote: "We also believe this pro-


ject will prove to be beneficial
for the Bahamas and it should
result in more flights to the
Bahamas (currently a limiting
factor), and additional visitors
to Atlantis as the Atlantis expan-
sion is set up to handle outside
visitors to use its outside water
park. Baha Mar will add to the
potential base of customers."
Following on from the record
third quarter $33.4 million in

SEE page 8B


individuals on investments made abroad
- an effective tax on outward investment.
"Bahamian businesses are left in a sit-
uation where they are unable to build up
size, so most will not be in a position to
compete with the large Caribbean hold-
ing companies that are likely to come
from Barbados and Trinidad," Mr
Winder said.
"Most Bahamian businesses will
become targets for purchase by those
companies........"
He added that due to the exchange
control premiums, Caribbean compa-
nies would not headquarter themselves
in the Bahamas, instead acquiring exist-
ing companies here and making them


'Requirements' for


accounting companies


with limited liability
* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE head of the Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants
(BICA) legislation committee yesterday proposed that accounting
companies and partnerships intending to practice as limited liability
companies should be registered with the Institute, with other "spe-
cific requirements" imposed on them.
Addressing BICA's Accountants' Week seminars, Lambert Lon-
gley, a partner with KPMG, suggested that among the requirements
imposed on limited liability firms should be minimum shareholder
capital and professional indemnity insurance, plus a periodic review
and review of their work to ensure they were properly applying
conditions such as International Financial Reporting Standards
(IFRS).
Mr Longley said such require- SEE a 9B
ments were necessary "to demon- SEE page


Credit rating agency

'vital' to Bahamian

capital markets


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A CREDIT rating agency
will "become vital to facilitate
and guide the expansion" of
the Bahamian capital markets
as they develop, the Bahamas
International Securities
Exchange's (BISX) chief exec-
utive told The Tribune, wel-
coming the development of
such a service at the Caribbean
level as a positive move.
Pointing out that one of the
recommendations for revital-
ising BISX was the creation of


a credit rating agency, Keith
Davies said "the level of review
and analysis" that could be pro-
vided by CariCRIS. the
Trin idad he a dq u artere d
Caribbean Information &
Credit Rating Services, on
Bahamian companies' debt
issues was another "step in the
right direction".
Mr Davies said: "As we
develop, as we liberalise our
capital markets, a credit rating
agency will become vital to


SEE page 4B


I F


Money Safe.
Money Fast.




I Bank dTIe Bhamas
li INTERNATIONAL

1-1 "mili owa


Exchange controls make Bahamas

firms 'targets for purchase'


* RAYMOND WINDER SEE page 2B


- --


- -3 1 --1I L I PI


I ~I


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
ATLANTIS is currently
enjoying record weekend occu-
pancy levels of around 96 per
cent, a Wall Street analyst has
reported, with calls to the
resort's booking centre and
room bookings both up for the
first month in the 2005 fourth
quarter.
In maintaining his 'Strong
Buy' rating and $81 per share
price target for Kerzner Inter-
national, Lawrence Klatzkin, an
analyst with Jefferies & Co,
backed the company's belief that
the $1.6 billion joint venture to
redevelop the Cable Beach strip
would benefit Atlantis, acting as
a "complement" by attracting
more tourists to the Bahamas.















IT application, not investment,




drives real business value


Companies' invest-
ments in IT have
significantly
increased since
the 1960s.
Research in the US indicates
that spending on IT has
increased from 5 per cent of
American companies' capital
expenditure in 1965, to 15 per
cent in the 1980s after the
introduction of the PC, to 30
per cent in the early 1990s and
to nearly 50 per cent by 2000.
However, research also
shows that on average, the
companies which are the
biggest investors in IT are not
the most successful in terms of
business performance. IT
investments do not automati-
cally translate into improve-
ments in business operations,
and therefore into growth in
revenue or profit.
The 2001 McKinsey Global
Institute study, US Productivi-
ty Growth 1995 2000, high-
lighted this. The study found a
significant positive correlation
between IT investments and
productivity in only six out of
59 industries. The other 53 sec-
tors, or 70 per cent of the econ-
omy, in aggregate saw few pro-


ductivity improvements as a
result of their IT investments.
Given this, more recently it
has been argued by various
researchers that IT has lost its
potential to deliver to a com-
pany a competitive or strate-
gic advantage.
Approach
This approach ignores the
fact that it is not IT that
bestows strategic advantage; it
is the application and manage-
ment of IT that enables
improvements in business per-
formance. The Gartner 'Group
states: "The intelligent and
innovative application of infor-
mation solves business prob-
lems and creates customer val-
ue at high speed, low cost and
the right scale. Sustainable
advantage comes from consis-
tently delivering greater value
to customers. This comes from
the 'information' in informa-
tion technology that is, it
comes from better under-
standing your customer, apply-
ing that understanding to your
products, services and process-
es, and integrating these to
deliver on an improved value


proposition."
In an attempt to better
understand the connection
between IT and an organisa-
tion's growth, the Keystone
Strategy Group recently under-
took a global study of IT usage
within mid-sized (100-500
employees) product, service
and financial companies. They
focused on how IT was used in
the business rather than mea-
suring IT spending. As such,
they developed the 'IT Score-
card' to measure how IT
impacts all major areas of an
organisation: sales and mar-'


keting; finance; operations;
employee productivity and IT
infrastructure. The 'IT Capa-.
bility' of an organisation was
rated based on 40 IT-enabled
business processes within each
area, and a total IT Capability
score was derived.
Finance
For example, within finance,
capabilities that were tested
included 'Easy Period Close',
'Effective Forecasting' and
'Complete Insight about my
Finances'. Within IT infra-


structure, capabilities included
'Pervasive Security' and
'Mobile and remote access to
information and processes'.
Within sales and marketing,
they included 'Customer Self
Service' and 'Incident and Sup-
port Management'.
Their results showed a strong
connection between IT capa-
bility and profitable business
growth. Companies that build
high capability IT systems
increase revenue and profits
faster than companies which
do not.
The process that the fastest
growing companies used to
achieve profitable growth
through IT was to closely inte-
grate the design and imple-
mentation of critical business
processes with the design and
implementation of IT capabili-
ties needed to manage these
processes. This integration
allowed companies to achieve
business processes scalability.
This provided those firms with:
1. Process standardisation.
2. Streamlined operations that
can grow without staff addi-
tions.
3. Flexibility to respond to
new opportunities and to


change.
4. Better visibility into busit'
ness operations.
In essence, as with all busi-
ness success, it is good man-
agement that leads to prof-
itable growth. In IT's case, it
is management's ability to inte-
grate IT into business process-
es that influences how well IT
investments are turned into
real business value.
To provide feedback on this
column, please e-mail Makin-
gITwork@providencetg.com



About the Author:
Caroline Moncur is manag-
er, business development, at
Providence Technology Group.
Ms Moncur has over 10 years'
business development experi-
ence, primarily within the
Information Technology
industry. Providence Technol-
ogy Group is one of the
Bahamas' leading IT firms,.
specialising in networking
solutions, consulting and advi-
sory services and software
solutions.


Exchange controls make Bahamas firms 'targets for purchase'


FROM page 1B
subsidiaries. "Clearly, from the point
of view of doing business, that's a
major issue, and the time has come
for the Central Bank to, at a mini-
mum, address and review that," Mr
Winder said, "for Bahamian business
who are in a position or able to grow
by acquisition or investment in anoth-
er Caribbean country, so they can
build the necessary size to be compet-
itive." "",. ; ..- "
- The Government backed away from
signing on to the CSME earlier this


year, in the face of concerted opposi-
tion from various sectors of Bahamian
society.
The reasons for the opposition were
varied, ranging from concerns that ful-
ly committing to the CSME would
exacerbate the illegal immigration
problem, to fears that the Bahamas
was being rushed into a decision and
that the costs would outweigh the ben-
efits. In addition, there were also con-
cerns that Bahamian businesses were
unprepared and not- able ,to compete
with their Caribbean counterparts,
having not fig&d thtif' fd6ctif'foint


within thi nation's borders.
For instance, Bahamian pharmacists
complained that the Right of Estab-
lishment would allow Caribbean
nationals from other CSME members
to set up businesses in this nation on
the same terms and conditions as
Bahamians, receiving treatment that
was "no less favourable".
Few Bahamian-owned companies
have looked outside this nation's bor-
ders, one of the few being Abaco Mar-
kets, which bought Turks & Caicos-
based TC Trading in 2000, an acquisi-
tion that hA siot gone smoothly. Col-


ina Holdings (Bahamas) portrayed its
life and health insurer acquisition
spree, which netted it the Caymanian
arm of Canada Life, as an attempt to
gain the size and economies of scale
that would enable it to compete with
the Caribbean insurance giants.
Mr Winder yesterday also made the
point that the Central Bank and other
regulators "may need to look" at being
more accommodating to cross-sector
or horizontal mergers to enable
Bahamian companies to compete in
the free trade era.
He used the hypothetical example of


FamGuard merging with Common-
wealth Bank to create a bancassur-
ance giant, similar to the likes of Bar-
bados-based Sagicor, as another way
in which Bahamian firms could gain-
the needed competitiveness through
size and scale. "Right now, Bahamian
businesses are not doing enough hor-
izontal mergers," Mr Winder said,
That's something the regulators have
not been prepared to assist, yet they
need to look at that and find ways to-
make it happen, if all those Bahamian
companies are to be acquirers a$
opposed to an acquiree."


ON A L


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VACANCY FOR THE POSITION OF:

RELATIONSHIP MANAGER, CORPORATE CREDIT
Core responsibilities:

Analyze and investigate financial and non-financial
information with a view of assessing the viability of business
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Prepare credit proposals for existing and potential clients.
Manage effectively, a portfolio of corporate relationships
and act as "Relationship Manager" for assigned accounts.
Increase consistently, the value of accounts through personal
marketing efforts.
Conduct consistent follow-up on delinquent accounts and
institute measures for the collection of bad accounts.
Conduct field inspections.
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(Ability to successfully implement plans to completion
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Benefits include: Competitive compensation (commensurate
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attractive package and a pension scheme.

Send resume to:
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Bank of The Bahamas International
P.O. Box N-7118
Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas


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Making


IT Work

by Caroline Moncur


Providenc Technol*oG.u


I NT E R NAT I


nk of The Bahamas


THE TRIBUNE;


PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005







THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005, PAGE 3B


BUSINESS


C ommonwealth
Bank has
launched its
online banking
service, some-
thing it anticipates will save
clients time and money, and
help broaden its reach beyond
the three main Bahamian
islands.
The bank believes the ser-
vice, www.combankltd.com,
will enable customers to con-
duct all their banking business
from home or elsewhere 24
hours per day, seven days per
week.
Executive
William B. Sands Jr, Com-
monwealth Bank's president
and chief executive, said: "We
are very excited about our
online banking product. It was
designed to be customer-
friendly and extremely easy to


use.
"With a click of the mouse,
customers will be able to view
and manage their accounts, pay
utility bills, make credit card
payments, transfer funds
between Commonwealth Bank
accounts, apply for foreign cur-
rency, request a wire transfer,
view account history, place a
stop payment order on a
cheque and even reorder
cheques."
The Commonwealth Bank
site will allow clients to down-
load data to personal spread-
sheet software, enabling them
to keep track of their deposits
and what they spend on an
Excel spreadsheet or through
personal finances software such
as Quicken.
There will also be a waiver of
sign-up and monthly fees to
encourage customers to
become acquainted with and
accustomed to doing their


banking online, a profnotion
that will continue through
March 2006.

Developed
"When we developed our
online banking product, we
went to great lengths to devel-
op a service which not only
offers our customers the con-
venience of banking online, but
also greater peace of mind with
our security features,"
explained Charles Knowles, the
bank's vice-president of infor-
mation technology.
"The bank uses advanced
technology to protect the con-
fidentiality of its customers'
financial activities while they
are online. We wanted e-bank-
ing that combined convenience
and security with the personal
touch Commonwealth Bank is
known for.
"Our customers' accounts


Bahamian firm in


'Magic-al


MAGIC Photo has doubled
its size at the Village Road
Shopping Centre, having
expanded its services to include
custom framing, in addition to
portrait services, film and the
digital processing plant.
Raymond Albury, who owns
the business with his sister,
Denise, said: "In the past, cus-
tom framing and unique mat
cutting were just for the elite.
We've made our pricing so eco-
nomical everyone can afford
it."'
Custom, computerised mat
cutting means the protective
shield between the glass and
the photo or work of art can
also be decorative, designed to
complement each project. Acid
free materials are available.
Mats can be cut to include
n4mes, even a company logo.
Inhumid climates, Mr Albury
warned, you must use a mat to
keep the glass from ruining the
photo.
'Previously, when we
processed photos we'd give
thPtE.t.thecustomer in a bag
arnd that's where most of them
st yed, in a drawer. We are try-


expansion


* JUST FRAMED RIGHT Mr Albury with his products


ing to encourage our customers
to frame their photos, or at
least put them in an album.
Enjoy them. Label them so
your children's children will
know who's who," he added.
It worries Mr Albury that


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) sq.ft.
S.


too few people ever print their
digital photographs. "If you
don't print them, you can lose
your memories in the blink of
an eye. People lose whole wed-
dings, birthdays, graduations.
All they have left are fading
memories and any shots they
e-mailed to someone who
saved them and will send them
back."
He explained: "Computers
can crash. Websites go down.
Disks get damaged or lost.
And, even if you manage to
keep your disks or cards in
good shape, what will you view
them on in 10 years...let alone
generations from now? Tech-
nology changes, but prints can
last almost forever."


are secure and their informa-
tion remains private."
Bank executives also hope
that by allowing customers to
bank online, they will broaden
their customer base to other
islands. Commonwealth Bank
now has nine branches in New
Providence, Abaco and Grand
Bahama.
"By allowing people to con-
duct their banking electroni-
cally, once a customer has


I=


A







*


signed up for online banking,
they can return home to the
most remote settlement and
access their Commonwealth
Bank account just as easily as
someone in the heart of the
capital," said Mr Knowles.

Customer
"There is also a local number
dedicated to customer support,
with a representative available


Monday-Thursday from
8.30am to 9pm and on Fridays
and Saturdays from 9am to
9pm."
"It will be like having your
own Commonwealth Bank
branch wherever you are,
whenever you need it for what-
ever you need it and in the
long run, it will save you not
only time but money," said Mr
Sands of the online banking
service.


6w mumrnmImm'


has a vacancy for the position of

CLIENT ACCOUNTANT




PROFILE:

* A university degree with a major in accounting or finance
* Certification as a CPA or be in the final stages of preparing
for the exams
* Previous experience with a bank, trust company would be
preferred



RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

* Preparation of financial statements for trusts, pension funds,
mutual funds and managed banks
* Assistance with reconciliation of custody accounts and
shareholder registers
* Liaison with clients and management
* Administrative support (pensions, funds, managed banks)
* Ability to complete work with minimum supervision
"* Goodd knowi edge of software packages including MS Office
(Excel, Word, PowerPoint)
* Knowledge of Bahamian bank, trust, mutual fund and securities
legislation
* Positive interpersonal skills/communicator, good verbal &
written skills


The successful candidate will be offered a competitive


compensation package including benefits and bonuses
commensurate with his/her experience and performance.



Send resume no later than November 30th 2005 to:

The Human Resouce Manager
Fidelity
51 Frederick St.
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
f: 326.3000

e-mail: info@fidelitybahamas.com


b U


Pricing Information As Of:
09 November 2005B

52wk-Hi 52wk-Lo w Symbol Previous Close Today's Clos e Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div PIE Yield
1.10 0.73 Abaco Markets 0.73 0.73 0.00 -0.169 0.000 N/M 0.00
10.25 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 10.25 10.25 0.00 1.456 0.340 7.0 3.32
7.24 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 7.24 7.24 0.00 0.587 0.330 12.3 4.56%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.204 0.010 3.9 1.25%
1.80 1.27 Bahamas Waste 1.27 1.27 0.00 0.112 0.060 11.3 4.72%
1.20 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.20 1.20 0.00 0.066 0.030 18.2 2.50%
9.31 6.96 Cable Bahamas 9.31 9.31 0.00 0.689 0.240 13.5 2.58%
2.20 1.50 Colina Holdings 1.50 1.50 0.00 -0.046 0.000 NM 0.00%
9.17 6.99 Commonwealth Bank 9.17 9.17 0.00 0.791 0.410 11.6 4.47%
2.50 0.96 Doctor's Hospital 2.40 2.40 0.00 0.429 0.000 5.6 0.00%
4.35 3.87 Famguard 4.35 4.35 0.00 0.428 0.240 9.1 5.52%
10.90 9.50 Finco 10.90 10.90 0.00 3,170 0.695 0.510 15.7 4.68%
10.00 7.45 FirstCaribbean 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.695 0.380 13.9 3.80%
9.25 8.39 Focol 9.25 9.25 0.00 0.675 0.500 13.7 5.41%
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 0.022 0.000 52.3 0.00%
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.94 9.94 0.00 0.526 0.405 18.9 4.07%
8.75 8.22 J. S. Johnson 8.75 8.75 0.00 0.526 0.560 16.6 6.40%
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 6.22 6.38 0.16 0.138 0.000 45.0 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.760 4.9 7.60%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Lo w Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price VeeklyM Vol EPS $ Div $ PIE Yield
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 11.00 1.768 0.960 7.5 7.25%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.044 0.000 NM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.33 13.33 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 8.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Lo w Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1.2593 1.1913 Colina Money Market Fund 1.259334"
2.4766 2.0536 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.4766 ***
10.6711 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.6711*****
2.2754 2.1675 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.275422**
1.1406 1.0755 Colina Bond Fund 1.140599****
BISX ALL SHARE INDE X- 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Coline and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 100
** AS AT AUG. 10, 2005/ .... AS AT OCT. 31, 2005
* AS AT OCT. 28, 2005/*** AS AT OCT. 31, 2005/ ***** AS AT OCT. 31, 2005


U


I _


.


I :


e








PAGE TH A


RENT


* 1,332 2,023 sq.ft. office suites.
* In the heart of the Bahamas' financial area.
* Features its own dedicated parking facilities.
* Immediate downtown location.
* Harbour views from upper levels.


Credit rating agency


'vital'


to Bahamian


capital markets


Fund


manager


passes

SSeries

AN investment manager
with Winterbotham Trust
has completed the Series 6
exam in Florida after study-
ing with the Nassau-based
Securities Training Institute
(STI).
Brian Jones (left) passed
an exam that is adminis-
tered by the New York
Stock Exchange (NYSE
and the National Associa.-
tion of Securities Dealers
(NASD).
Michael Miller, the STIl's
founder and president, said:
"....This internationally_
recognised qualification
equips Bahamian financial
professionals with the
knowledge and skills neces-
sary to administer and man-
SBRIAN JONES age investment funds."
N BRIAN JONES


Saffrey Square
East St. and Bank Lane
Nassau, Babamas ---
Tel. 242-393-8618
www.bahamasrealty.bs
www.cbrichardellis.com


BAHAMAS REALTY LTD
COMMERCIAL


CBRE
CB RICHARD ELLIS
NAVIGATING A NEW WORLD


BISX, as this would help set a
benchmark standard for their
work.
"Oi a very preliminary lev-
el", Mr Davies said BISX
would "explore creating a lev-
el of membership for credit rat-
ing agencies" that operated in
the Bahamas and rated both
corporate and sovereign debt
issues.
S. Venkat Raman, chief
executive and chief rating offi-
cer of CariCRIS, last week told
The Tribune that his organisa-
tion was able to rate the cred-
itworthiness of Bahamian com-
panies "immediately", eventu-
ally seeking to establish an
office in this nation to further.
enhance investor knowledge of
different firms' risk/reward pro-
"file s. . * *. ,. .
Mr Raman said: "We will be
looking to set up an office [in
the Bahamas], but want to start
the ratings before that. We're
hoping to do it immediately for
anyone catching on to the idea
and wants to do it.
"We're hoping to do an
investor education programme,
hopefully in conjunction with
the Securities Commission and
other like-minded stakehold-
ers."
Mr Raman said he had
received a. "very good"
response to CariCkIS and its
work during meetings held this
week with the Central Bank of
the Bahamas; Hillary Deveaux,
the Securities Commission's
acting executive director; and
Mr Davies.
Benchmark


S He explained that rating
agencies "try to give you the
right sort of benchmark in your
investment domain", and Cari-
CRIS could do this at two lev-
els a national scale and a
Caribbean regional scale.
Ratings could be assigned to
"any entity" a company, bank,
credit union or sovereign gov-
ernment that sought to raise.
funds from the capital markets
through debt instruments,
through mechanisms such as
.. floating a bond issue or com-
mercial paper.


FROM page 1B
facilitating and guiding that
expansion."
He added that the develop-
ment of a credit rating agency,
at either the Bahamian or
international level, was some-
thing he would "welcome".
"All of this is the type of
thing that should signal to the
Bahamian people that our mar-
ket is expanding, and we
should not be afraid that as we
move forward we will be in the
international eye," Mr Davies
said.
Vacuum
"As everyone knows, the
Bahamas cannot exist in a vac-
uum, so it will be exposed to
analysis, and I welcome it."
The BISX chief executive
added that as the Bahamian
capital markets continued to
develop, it would be important
for credit rating agencies oper-
ating in this nation to obtain
recognition from regulators or
self-regulatory. bodies such as


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PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, ERIC SAMUEL
JOHNSON, of McCullogh Corner East, P.O. Box GT-2158,
Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name to PRINCE
ERIC GIOVANNI DEMERA. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date
of publication of this notice.

TEACHERS AND SALARIED WORKERS
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LIMITED

NOTICE TO OUR
VALUED SHAREHOLDERS
Please be advised that Interest/Dividend payments for the year 2004
will be distributed effective Tuesday November 1, 2005 during the
hours of 11:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. as follows:
DATES ACCOUNT DATES ACCOUNT
NUMBERS NUMBERS

November 1 001-700 November 24 7201-7500
November 2 701-1200 November 25 7501-7800
November 3 1201-1800 November 28 7801-8100
November 4 1801-2400 November 29 8101-8400
November 7 2401-3000 November 30 8401-8700
November 8 3001-3600 December 1 8701-9000
November 9 3601-4200 December 2 9001-9500
November 10 4201-4500 December 5 9501-10000
November 11 4501-4800 December 6 10001-10500
November 14 4801-5100 December 7 10501-11300
November 15 5101-5400 December 8 11301-12100
November 16 5401-5700 December 9 12101-13000
November 17 5701-6000 December 12 13001-14000
November 18' 6001-6300 December 13 14001-15000
November 21 6301-6600 December 14 15001-16000
November 22 6601-6900 December 15 16001-17000
November 23 6901-7200 December 16 17001-18207


Mr Raman said: "What Cari-
CRIS does is assign a rating to
that, which tells investors or
people looking at the company
what is the creditworthiness of
this particular debt. How
strong are you in your ability to
pay back this debt, either
across the country or across the
region."
Debt
He added that "it makes
tremendous sense" for the
Bahamian debt issuers to have
credit ratings, as this would
assist both the issuer and
investor, and help to deepen
the capital markets in this
nation.
Credit ratings were essen-
tially "an opinion on the inher-
ent risk" of buying into an enti-
ty's debt offering, Mr Raman
explained, and since they were
often regarded as the "short-
est creditworthiness comment
in the world", were an invalu-
able tool in enabling investors
to assess the risk/reward profile
of any issuer.
They would be able to use
the ratings to determine
whether the risk of buying into
a debt issue, and the corre-
sponding likely rewards,
matched their own risk/reward
profile.
CariCRIS has already pro-
duced one .rating assessment,
for a $330 million debt issue
proposed by the National Gas
Company of Trinidad & Toba-
go, which it ranked on a region-
al basis with a creditworthi-
ness of CariAAA. For Bahami-
an companies wanting to be
rated on a national basis, the
notation could be something
like BAAA.
Mr Raman said CariCRIS
would benefit debt issuers, as
its ratings would enable "the
stronger ones to differentiate
themselves from the weaker
bn'es", helping companies to
price their issues more effi-
ciently. In addition, third party
opinions on creditworthiness
gave issuers the "incentive to
keep their finances in order",
encouraging financial and cor-
porate governance disciplines.


---- I


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005









TkE TRBUNE USINES THUSDAY, November 10t, 2005, AES


MUS SEL Te Tibn

MISCLLARSNEIGHSPOETE


I MILLARS HEIGHTS
SUBDIVISION
S(Nassau)
Lot #12 Block #3, a sixteen year old,
.single story triplex with floor area of
2,378 sq. ft., each apartment consist
of 2 bed, 1 bath, living, dining area
and kitchen. Lot size is 7,500 sq. ft.
75 x 100.


Appraisal: $268,411.00

Heading west on Carmichael Road, enter West Ave., on the southside
immediately after Topps Laundermat. Take first right which is Wimpole St,
go around curve on left which is London Ave., travelsouth on London Ave.,
property is 2nd to last building on the right before T, Junction (High street)
L shape triplex, painted green, trimmed white.


CYCLOPS GARDEN
(Nassau)

All that lot of land numbering as "H"
being one of several lots in Cyclops
Gardens located off the northern side
of Cowpen Road one corner west of
SFaith Avenue Junction. This property
comprise of a two and a half year old
single storey duples with a gross floor
area of 1,512.42 sq. ft., each unit
consisting of 2 bedrooms all wth wall airconditioning units, 1 bathroom,
living, dining and kitchen building is effectively new.
Appraisal: $219,450.00

Heading south on Faith Avenue to junction off Cowpen road make a right
then first right again. The subject property is the 4th on the right tan trimmed
brown.


DUNDAS TOWN
(Abaco)

2 storey, 4 bed, 2 bath on 1/2 acre
.'....... .. .. lot no. 25, living room, dining room,
family room, kitchen downstairs,
upstairs there are 4 bedrooms and
2 bathrooms.Age is 16 years, color
is yellow trimmed with white,
upperlevel 1,080 sq. ft., lower level,
1080 sq. ft., garage 420 sq. ft.,
covered verahandahs 390 sq. ft., the land is portion W of one of the Dundas
Town Crown Allotment parcels situated near Forest Drive being just under
half acre in size. Located on the southern side of a ridge being 12 feet plus
above sea level with little likelihood of flooding grounds well kept with above
average landscaping including grass cover with palms and citrus trees.
Enclosed on 3 sides with a 6 ft., metal fences and ficus trees at the fron.
30 ft.,; by 36 ft., roof garage now used as a nursery school. At the upper
'" el'on the eastern side is covered wooden verandah 6 ft., x 30 ft., interior
walls concrete, ceiling of sheet rock and floor of ceremic tiles.

Appraisal: $267,987.91


WEST RIDGE ESTATES
Main House (Nassau)

All that piece parcel or lot of land
a sb having an area of 34,089 sq. ft.,
Being lot #152, of West Ridge
Estates Subdivision, zoining is
single family residential with all
utilities avvailable. The subject
property is on hilly terrain at the top
of a ridge that offers a lovely view
to the northeast. The grounds are attractively landscaped with a grass lawn,
ornamental shrubs and flowering plants. Other improvements include chain
link fencing along the sides and rear boundaries, with a concrete block wall
at the front with asphalt paved driveway.

Appraisal: $1,049,788.90
There are two buildings located on this property. The main 2 storey house
is located at the highest point of the poroperty. This house has an approximate
gross floor area of 4,8000 sq. ft., upstairs consist of 3 full bedroom suites
(each with a full bathroom), inlcuding a master bedroom suite, an office
with a bathroom (shower only) and sitting room. Downstairs consist of living
room, formal dining area, casual dining area, powder room and spacious
kitchen (at least 500 sq ft)


S JOHNSON ROAD
S.... (Nassau)

SAll that lot of land having an area of 5,520 sq. ft., (60 x 92) situated on the corner of Johnson Road and
Step Streeet. This property is rectangular and comprised of a 12 year old single storey house that consist
of 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, living, dining room and kitchen. Also an efficiency apartment attached.
The subject property is slightly above the level of the abutting roadways with minimal landscaping.
The property is open with chain link fencing along its western boundries.

Appraisal: $139,868.40

Heading east along Bernard Road, turn through Johnson Road opposite St Augustine's College Drive all the way to the curve heading west
the subject house is first house on the right all white trimmed yellow.



ALLOTMENT 67, MARRIGOLD FARM ROAD (NASSAU), All that Idt of land having an area of 1.173 acres being lot No. and
is situated on Marigold Farm Road in the ara known as allotment 67), a said subdivision situated in the south eastern district
of new Providence, Bahamas. This property is Vacant and area has all utilities & services. Appraisal: $148,50.00

Travelling on Joe Farrington Road turn onto Marrigold Farm Road heading south, the subject is the second to last propert on
the left hand side of the road near the pond.

NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA), Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and bounded on North by Early Settler
Drive and South by Deal Investment Ltd., this is a single family zoning and 50 ft., above sea level. This site encompasses a
foundation with plumbing and roughing inplace and well compacked quarry fill. The concrete floor has not been poured as yet.
The foundation is 2,511 sq. ft. Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is vacant and a hill
over looking the Atlantic Ocean. Appraisal: $46,167.18

BAHAMA SOUND (EXUMA), Lot #7088 situated in Bahama Sound, Exuma section 10 East. Great Exuma approximately 10.5
miles west of George Town lot is square in shape on elevation of approximately 15 ft., above sea level contains 10,000 sq. ft.,
No adverse site conditions noted. This property is single family residence. Property is located on the northwestern side of the
Queen's Highway, about 10.5 miles northwest of George Town. Appraisal: $27,562.50


MURPHY TOWN (ABACO) Lot #78B vacant land, the property has average surface drainage and is not suseptible to flooding
under normal conditions. Land size 104 x 78 approximately 11,277 sq. ft. Estimated Value: $18,649.33





Please vii .e. foinrrpht


ThE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005, PAGE 5B







PAGE B, TURSDY, NOEMBE 10,2005USEINESSN


ARCHITECTS
and
ARCHITECTURAL
TECHNICIANS
Wanted

Applicants must be proficient in
Architectural Desktop with a
minimum 10 years experience.

Qualified, interested professionals
please e-mail your resume to
jobsarchitects @ hotmail.com.

All applications will be
CONFIDENTIAL.


Bank rewards its



Service Superstars


BANK of the Bahamas
International has held its first
ever Customer Service Super-
star Competition, as it moves to
involve frontline staff "in a
more meaningful way" on
enhancing service delivery.
The event was organised by
the bank's Human Resource
Department.
Competition guidelines for
tellers and customer services
representatives (CSRs)includ-
ed: how long it took to
acknowledge and serve cus-
tomers; display of high quality
service practices (smiles and
going beyond the call of duty
for the customer); sale of a new
product or service; and record


of absences and tardiness on a
daily basis.
These criteria for the tellers
and CSRs were monitored on a
daily basis by their supervisors
and were used to determine an
overall winner. A finalist was
selected from each branch of
the bank. This candidate then
participated in the final show-
down, which was held on Sep-
tember 20.
Candidate
Each candidate was asked
two customer service-related
questions. Additionally, each
finalist had to present a five-
minute presentation on the


topic, Star Quality Customner
Service: Taking customer ser-
vice at BOB to the next level.
The five finalists were: Alex
Wells, Shirley Street branch;
Kertorra Davis, Thompsyn
Boulevard branch; Aneata
Cash, Freeport branch; Stadia
Bain, Harold Road branch; aid
Sheena Bowe, Village Rood
branch.
The winning competitor, Sa-
cia Bain, was presented wfth
her overall prize by the banhi's
managing director, Pail
McWeeney. Ms Bain won a
week-long, all-expenses paid
trip, to a sales and marketing
conference in Fort Lauderdale,
Florida.


AUCTIO


Thursday, November 17, 2005

SHIPAHOY COMPLEX
(Western Gate)

West Bay Street,
opposite Well's Service Station
DOORS OPEN FOR
VIEWING & REGISTRATION
9:00am 10:00am


AUCTION
10:00am 2:00pm


Office Furniture, Computer Equipment &
other Supplies
Construction & Miscellaneous Supplies
Home Furnishing & Equipment
Vehicles by Sealed Bid on Site

GENERAL PUBLIC IS INVITED


Discount Warehouse"
^ j 1 .* .;


ACTION AUCTION SALE

Come, shop and take advantage of a wide variety of
household products with your favorite's brand names
at lowest prices.


Exciting prices, lots of give aways; everything
must go to make way for our new inventory


THIS IS THE SALE YOU
DON'T WANT TO MISS


LADBgn it.

WesI}I ] llt l4


IF YOU are... O energetic & reliable
O very computer savvy
E people oriented
D a creative multitasker
0 a good communicator
D with own trans
WE WANT TO MEET YOU!
Top ad agency has immediate opening for traffic coordinator. Interface with clients,
media houses and international firms in this fast-paced and varied position. Proficiency
in Microsoft Office and Internet functions essential. Excellent working conditions.
Company-paid medical insurance. Salary based on qualifications and experience.
Send resume to: jopatsl 111 @hotmail.com


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005


E PICTURED O-r) are winners of the Customer Service Super-
star Competition: Stacia Bain, overall competition winner and
finalist for the Harrold Road Branch; Aneatra Cash. finalist
Freeport branch; Vaughn Delaney, deputy managing director,
Information Technology and Human Resources: Annette Cash,
assistant manager, Human Resources (competition coordina-
tor); Kertorra Davis, finalist. Thompson Boulevard branch, and
Alex Wells, finalist, Shirlev Street branch. (Missing from photo is
Sheena Bowe. finalist, Viiiage Road branch.







THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005, PAGE 7B


BUSINESSES












ITC members attend

63rd international


convention

MEMBERS of International
Training in Communication
(ITC) pictured at the 63rd
international convention held
in Baltimore, USA, under the
theme 'A World within a
World'.
PICTURED from left are:
Patrice Roberts, Essence Club;
'Sally Thompson, Essence Club;
-hellyn Ingraham, Essence
Club; Dianne Miller, Essence
Club; Kendal Ingraham
.,guest); Billy Baysmith Miller,
SVellow Elder Club, Freeport;
NTara Smith, Essence Club; and
anet Thompson, Essence
liub.




Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Ltd.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC TENDER


Fidelity Bank Bahamas Limited, a leading provider of Financial Services in
the Bahamas is interested in securing the service of a cleaning company to
provide cleaning services for its branch locations in Nassau and Freeport.

Interested parties should contact:
The Compliance Unit
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-7502
Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: 327-5170 Ext. 5018 or 356-7764 ext 3183
Fax: (242) 327-5192
Email: malvern.bain@fidelitybahamas.com


. The Tender period shall close at 5:00 p.m. on 1st December, 2005
!


RBC

FINCO,



DISTRESSED PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

F HOUSES


Lot of land Blueberry Hill Road, N.P.
Single Family Residence
(3) Bedrooms, (1) Bathroom
Property Size: 3,375 sq.ft
Building Size: 1,436 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $78,700.00 / O.N.O.
From Fox Hill Road and Prince Charles Drive, travel north
on Fox Hill Road take the third right (Rolle Street also known
as Sugar Hill) then left at the T-junction, Armbrister Street
then take the first right and the subject property is the third
building fourth lot on the right.

Lot #13 Frelia Subd.
Single Family Residence
3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 5,641 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,203 sq. ft
Appraised Value: $154,000.00 / O.N.O.
From Fire Trail Road and Faith Avenue, travel east on Faith
Avenue, follow the curve around to the right (approximately
0.6 of a mile east of Faith Avenue), take the first left into
Frelia'Sbdivisioh arid the subject property is the 6th 'building
on the left.

Lot #1057, Pinewood Gardens
Single Family Residence
3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 5,000 sq. ft
Building Size: 1,990 sq.ft
Appraised Value:$175,700.00 / O.N.O.
From East Street Southland Bamboo Boulevard /Pinewood
Drive (by the South Beach Police Station), travel east on
Bamboo Boulevard, take the first left on to Thatch Palm
Avenue, then the fourth right, Rosewood Street, and the
subject property is the third on the right.

Lot #3, Rockwell Estates Subdivision
Single Family Residence
3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms .
Property Size: 6,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,449 sq. ft.
Appraised Value: $129,600.00 / O.N.O.
From Carmichael Road and Mckinney Drive, travel north
on McKinney Drive, take the sixth left, Rocky Pine Road,
then the third right and the subject is the third lot on left.

Lot #844, Golden Gates, N.P.
Single Family Residence
3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 6,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,580 sq. ft.
Appraised Value: $156,104:00 / O.N.O.
From Carmichael Road and Mermaid Boulevard East (Golden
Gates Assembly Church), travelling south on Mermaid
Boulevard, go around the bend, heading west again, and
the subject property is the 7th house on the right past the
7th corner on the right after the curve.


Lot#2, Block #7, South Beach Estates
Single Family Residence
3-Bedrooms, 2-Bathrooms
Property Size: 6,705 sq.ft
Building Size: 1,423 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $160,708.00 / O.N.O.
From East Street South and Bougainvillea travel west on
Bougainvillea Blvd., turn right at the T-junction, South Beach
Drive travel to the end then turn right and the subject building
is the first on the left after the turn.

Lot of Land off Hanna Road
Single Family Residence
3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 8,000 sq. ft
Building Size: 1,010 sq. ft
Appraised Value: $134,000.00 / O.N.O.
Enter Joe Farrington Road from Marigold Farm Road on
right (2nd corner) turn right on Hanna Road which is 2nd
corner on right take 1st left off Hanna Road 1st right property
is 2nd lot on right house is yellow trim white.

Lot 'J', Montague Bay Estates
Single Family Residence
3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 5,368 sq. ft.
Building Size: 2,405 sq. ft.
Appraised Value: $208,000.00 / O.N.O
From the Eastern Road and Johnson Road travel south on
Johnson Road, then take the first right, Bay Estate Terrace
and the subject property is the first on the right.

Lot #5 Carmichael Breezes Subdivision
Single Family Residence
3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft.
Building Size 1,064 sq.ft.
Appraised Value: $126,000.00 / O.N.O.
From Fire Trail Road and McKinney Drive, take the first right
Bellot Road, then take the first right again, unnamed road
into Carmichael Breezes Subdivision, and the subject
property is the sixth on the left.

Lot #355, Yamacraw Beach Estates
Single Family Residence
3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms
Property Size: 6,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,350 sq. ft.
Appraised Value: $165,000.00 / O.N.O.
From Yamacraw Hill Road and Fox Hill Road travel east on
Yamacraw Hill Rd take the first right on Yamacraw Beach
Drive then take the first right then turn right at the T-junction
follow the road around the curve the subject property is
house #43.


VACANT LAND
Lot #1, Port 29 Sandilands Village ,Parcel of Land, Deadman's Cay Long Island
Vacant Property Vacant Property
Property Size: 5,000 sq. ft. Property size 2 Acres
Appraised Value: TBA Appraised Value: $40,000.00 / O.N.O.
Directions Not Available Property Located in Cartwright's settlement off
Queen's Highway

APARTMENTS/CONDOMUNIUMS


Lot #1, Yamacraw Beach Estates
(a) 2 bedrooms, 2 bathroom house with an
incomplete two storey extension
Building Area: 1,240 sq. ft.
Extension: 910 sq. ft.
(b) Duplex Consisting of:
2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom each
Building Size: 1,650 sq. ft.
Property Size: 9,888 sq. ft.
Appraised Value: $306,000.00 / O.N.O.
From Fox Hill Road and Yamacraw Hill Road, travel
south on Fox Hill Road, take the first left and the
subject property is the first on the right.

Lot #30 & 31, Block #56, Nassau Village
Duplex
Each Unit 2 Bedrooms, 1 Bathrooms
Property Size: 6,620 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,701 sq. ft.
Appraised Value: $151,500.00 / O.N.O.
From Taylor Street and Soldier Road (by Lowes Wholesale),
turn left at the cross roads, Alexandria Boulevard, take the
second right, Forbes Street, go left at the T-junction,
Catherine Avenue, take the first right, travel to the end and
go right at the T-junction and the subject property is the
seventh lot on right past the first corner on the left.


Lot #4 Tall Pines off Carmichael Road
Duplex
Units 2 Bedrooms, 1 bathroom each
Building Size: 1,680 sq ft
Property Size: 8,100 sq. ft.
Appraised Value:$140,000.00 / O.N.O.
From Gladstone Road and Fire Trail, travel north on Gladstone
Road take the second right Pine Street (opposite the Catholic
Loyola Hall Auditorium) and the subject property is the
fourth on the left


Lot #2, Colony Village
4 Townhouse Apt .- 2 bedrooms, 11/2 bath each
95% completed
Property Size: 9,943 sq. ft.
Building Size: 3,798 sq. ft.
Appraised Value: $430,000.00 / O.N.O.
Travelling east on Prince Charles Drive after
Elizabeth Estates and Colony Village Drive the
subject property is the 2nd on the right hand side
after Colony Village.


We providing financing to qualified buyers
CONTACT INFORMATION
RBC Royal Bank of Canada and RBC FINCO Loans Collection Centre
Tel: 502-5170 or 502-5180 RBC
@Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada I FINCO
mThe Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada


R eS R T S
Ceptalae Ca'no








PAGENS. 0


'Act now' on targeting East Europe, Asia banking market


FROM page 1B

the US.
The Cayman Islands was also
pursuing a bilateral treaty with
the UK, a move that Jersey,
Guernsey and the Isle of Man


were also considering, which
was driven by the EU Savings
Tax Directive.
Ms Warren said: "There is a
growing view that internation-
al financial centres are at a fork
in the road." She added that
they were seen as splitting into


two camps, one seeking full
integration into the world econ-
omy and complying fully with
international regulatory and
information sharing best prac-
tices, and the other "becoming
isolationist" to avoid losing
their current business.
"What does the Bahamas
do?" Ms Warren asked. "From
a BFSB perspective, we
encourage a very measured
approach to change. The
Bahamas can ill-afford any mis-
steps that would compromise
its competitive position."
Although not suggesting that
the Bahamas refuse to adopt
international standards, Ms
Warren said this nation had to
be "extremely careful and vig-
ilant" in testing regulations it
was being encouraged to adopt,


seeing if they were being imple-
mented in OECD countries.
The Bahamas also had to
examine how it could fit its tax
neutral financial services plat-
form together with those of tax
treaty jurisdictions such as Bar-
bados, pointing out that the Isle
of Man had done this success-
fully to build a niche in film
financing.
Ms Warren said the Private
Trust Companies legislation,
which is being reviewed by the
industry currently, was seen as
providing the spur for greater
interest by high net worth indi-
viduals in establishing Family
Offices in the Bahamas.
This is seen as generating
"greater interaction" between
these clients and the rest of the
Bahamian economy. The best
example of the Family Office
concept working for the
Bahamas is the Izmirlians, the
father and so duo behind the
$1.6 billion Cable Beach rede-
velopment, who are permanent
residents and make their home
and Family Office at Lyford
Cay.
Ms Warren added that for-


eign second home owners were
ideal clients for the Bahamian
financial services industry, and
the BFSB was working with the
Government to ensure cer-
tainty over the timelines for
approving work permits and
permanent residency applica-
tions by the Ministry of Immi-
gration and Department of
Labour.
Accountants

Meanwhile, Ms Warren said
Bahamian accountants and
financial services professionals
had a "clear mandate" to not
just be responsible for good
governance in their jobs and
companies, but to develop a
"sustainable" growth strategy
for the sector that would bene-
fit both current and future gen-
erations of Bahamians.
As a result, Bahamians had
to take "greater accountability
and responsibility" for their
own future and that of the
financial services industry.
Ms Warren added that the
Bahamas needed to have a
growth strategy, as "standing


still or the status quo is an.i ad-
equate response ini Ild
where consolidation is a fei*I".
Bahamian institutions had
benefited from gloa fiaial
services consolidatiornri tley
had been larger than other sub-
sidiaries, with books of busi-
ness transferring to them, 1t if
they were smaller ,teeinhe
opposite was true, wit`, btsi-
ness lost to this jurisdictioib
Ms Warren said that in.gw-
ing the jurisdiction,; q.he
Bahamas had several treads
going in its favour, with jhe
combined worth of hlighipet
worth :individuals standing at
$30.8 trillion at year-end 20p4,
an 8.2 per cent growth:overjthe
previous year. . .,
By 2009, this was expected
to have grown to $42.2 trillion,
an annualised growth rate of
6.5 per cent. ,
Ms Warren added that for
the 2005 first half, the world's
25 top private wealth managers
by assets under management
had seen these grow by 7A29
per cent, compared to a 7:per
cent growth rate for the whole
of 2004. :


FROM page 1B


operating income generated by
Atlantis and the One & Only
Ocean Club, Mr Klatzkin said:
"Trends for the fourth quarter
2005 are looking extremely pos-
itive. Growth is continuing at
Atlantis where call counts are
up again for this quarter and
room bookings are up even high-
er.
"Furthermore, occupancy
rates are around 96 per cent on
weekends, which is the highest
ever at Atlantis. Finally, multiple
air markets are creating flights
into the Bahamas providing
many new visitors to the Atlantis
property."
However, although maintain-
ing 2005 fourth quarter and 2006


earnings per share (EPS) and
operating income targets for
Kerzner International, Mr
Klatzkin said he had "lowered
slightly" his 2005 fourth quarter
estimates for Atlantis, due to the
travel disruption in the US
caused by Hurricane Wilma.
The impact on Atlantis,
though, is forecast to be can-
celled out by improved perfor-
mances at Kerzner Internation-
al's other properties, particular-
ly the One & Only Palmilla and
Reethi Rai.
Mr Klatzkin said: "The hurri-
cane does not negatively impact
our estimates going forward. We
lowered our fourth quarter esti-
mates at Atlantis due to the fol-


PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY







PUBLIC NOTICE


REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

PHARMACY MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM

The Public Hospitals Authority (PHA), Commonwealth of The Bahamas is inviting
proposals from qualified vendors to provide a Pharmacy Management Information
System (PMIS) solution that meets its current and future business requirements.

Interested companies are invited to submit proposals in the required format and
delivered in a sealed envelope in order to reach the PHA by 12th December 2005.

A comprehensive document outlining important information for vendors, proposal
preparation instructions and technical specifications of the requirements is available
upon request; and can be collected from the PHA Corporate Office, Manx Corporate
Centre, West Bay Street, Nassau.

An electronic version of this RFP is also available by:

visiting the PHA's website at: www.phabahamas.org
(click under Business Opportunities: Current RFP's); or
* e-mail: RFPInquiries@phabahamas.org
to


CONSOLIDATE DEBT AND LOWER YOUR PAYMENTS

It can happen quickly. All of a sudden you've got more debt than
you're comfortable carrying and "...more month at the end of the
money." Let a Scotiabank representative help you become
financially fit. We offer practical solutions to consolidate your debt
into one affordable monthly payment; access some of the equity
in your home to lower your interest costs; or transfer to a lower
interest credit option. We can introduce you to credit life
protection and even help you start saving for your children's
education. Start building a stronger financial future today.


am3 3 3


POSITIONS AVAILABLE
Office Assistant
Montessori Teacher
(Ages 18 months to 5 years)
Please Send:
Resume, copy of cerficiation, copy of photo I.D.
To:
Montessori School, P.O. Box SS-5580,
Nassau, Bahamas


lowing hurricane-related f6cts.
Customers from Florida were
storm effected and without elec-
tricity and hence did not mhke
regularly scheduled trips tdithe
Bahamas; connections through
Florida to the Bahamas wpre
cancelled and/or delayed for an
extended period of time; 4nd
many travellers were worried
the hurricane was going to. hit
the Bahamas and, hence, can-
celed trips. Ultimately,,the
Bahamas was not effected by the
hurricane."
Meanwhile, Mr Klatzkin'gaid
the recently-completed sed6nd
phase at the Harborside
timehsrae resort, consisting of
116 two and three-bedrtOom
properties, was 32 per cent sold,
increasing the total number of
units sold to 244.
Construction of the 600-room
luxury all-suite hotel had begun,
and Kerzner International. was
looking at a second quarter 2007
opening date for it. ,I
Mr Klatzkin said: "Ker er
plans on making the resort iore
of a theme park with more writer
Sides and a new .wvim Wyjtiphthe
Dolphins encouunter,tWich
shouldihelp the property with
its capacity problems. 'iWe
believe these additions give
Atlantis a greater entry intgthe
luxury mass market as manage-
ment has indicated there ,as
been a large demand for a batter
lodging product at Atlanti. for
families who want to stayw 'ere
the water activities are." ,-
Kerzner International liad ur-
ther strengthened its hold on
Paradise Island with the $15 mil-
lion purchase of 7.5 acres,.athe
eastern end of Ca bage _, ch,
which will be used: to. pride
further land for its Ocean Ilub
Residences & Marina project.
The 88-unit, $130 million j9int
venture projects beiig .anced
from pre-sales.- ,,,- biuow
Another pre-sale,venturv the
condo-hotel joint: venture; with
Turnberry Associates lhawqtold
120 units or about, 24 -ler cent
of the 500 available for sale, Its
projected cost is $225 million.


NOTICE TO MARINERS

NOTICE IS GIVEN TO INTER-ISLAND CARGO
VESSELS, FISHING VESSELS, PLEASURE
CRAFTS AND OTHER VESSELS PLYING THE,
AREA DESCRIBE BELOW:

SUNKEN OIL PLATFORM

Your attention is drawn to a sunken Oil Loading.
Platform in position approximately:

26 30.3N 078-46.4 W

between North Sea Island Jetty and the shore,
with debris just above and below the surface.

Mariners should exercise extreme caution
when approaching this area.

Please be advised that a warning light will
mark the area described.

THE PORT DEPARTMENT


Grant Writer /Administrator

Bahamas National Trust ,


Primary Responsibility: To help develop long-term sustainableifdling, f0ti
organization by researching and writing grants from sources of public and private
funding such as the European Union, Global Environment Facility, Europaff
Development Fund and private foundations.

Position location: BNT Headquarters, The Retreat, Nassau, Bahamas

Reports to: Director of Development

Primary Tasks:
Identify possible sources of grant funding.
Work with senior staff to develop proposal ideas and then write concise and ,
compelling grant applications.
Assist in all aspects of the grant proposal research, project development,
budgeting, writing, grant administration.
Write and submit reports to potential donors in a timely manner.

Primary Skills Required:
Excellent writing and verbal skills.
Proven experience in researching and securing grants, particularly from public'
sector (government) donors, a major plus.

Minimum five years work experience, preferably in government grant
writing/administration
Demonstrated ability to organize time, manage diverse activities, meet deadlines
and attention to details. Proven administrative skills.
Excellent knowledge of MS Office, Word, Excel, Powerpoint and the Internet.
Willingness to work long hours to meet tight deadlines. I

To apply for this position that begins on January 3, 2006, email or send: 1) cover
letter, 2) resume, 3) telephone numbers and email addresses for three professional
references, and 4) two writing samples to HYPERLINK "mailto:bnt@batelnet.org"
bnt&.batelnet.bs or to Bahamas National Trust, Human Resources Manager, P.O.
Box N 4105, Nassau by November 23, 2005.
/


I


; I '


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8B. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005







THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005, PAGE 9B


Cruie Inc defend


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' trate" to clients and the
'Bahamian public that the
IccouIntmin rofession would act
Jesponsibly when public account-
ing firms and partnerships start
,practicing as limited liability
companies.
y- "I believe the time has come
for the accounting profession in
'the Bahamas to accept that
accountants should not bear the
burdenn of personal liability in
return for the pleasures of prac-
ticing as public accountants," Mr
Longley said.
' He pointed out that by allow-
ing Bahamian accountants to
1trctice as limited liability com-
paiiies, individual partners and
accountants would not be
,.shielded" if they were negligent
'brguilty of malpractice.
')2Instead, the limited liability
would protect partners from lia-
bilityfor'the misconduct by
another "shareholder, partner
toretiployee" of the company.
Mr Longley said he was not
-aware of any legislation outside
that which dealt specifically with
the accounting profession pre-
venting accountants from prac-
ticing with limited liability.
He added: "With that in mind,
I propose, subject to removing
any impediments in the BICA
legislation, that accountants be
encouraged to practice with lim-
ited liability."
Apart from registering with
BICA, Mr Longley proposed
that reporting requirements for
;minimum levels of capital and
professional indemnity insurance
would satisfy both clients and
the Bahamian public that limited
liability accounting firms had
adequate financial safety nets in
place should something go
wrong.
Periodic reviews of the work
of limited liability firms, without
compromising confidentiality,
would also help reassure clients,
Mr Longley said.
He indicated that fees payable
to BICA might have to rise if
the Institute became responsi-
ble for administering and regis-
tering limited liability compa-
nies, as this would require more
staff and oversight, increasing
costs. "BICA would be in a bet-
ter position to manage the pro-
fession if all firms were regis-
tered with it," Mr Longley said.
Some firms were already dis-
cussing the move towards limit-
ed liability, Mr Longley added,
and he "encouraged" companies
to move in this direction as soon
as it was passed into law, "hope-
fully in 2006".
The discussion on limited lia-
bility was part of reforms BICA
is looking to get enacted to the
Public Accountants Act 1991,
Ind the accompanying regula-
tions. Mr Longley said of the
reforms: "They will allow us in
the Bahamas to come into line
with what's happening in major
financial centres around the
world."


db a


-- v


- *


A *


* -


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JULIE AUGUSTIN OF P.O.
BOX AB-20409, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 10TH day of NOVEMBER, 2005
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
RO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





We are a growing retail company,
we are offering:
Base Salary, Bonuses, Pension Plan, Training
and lots of fun.

We are looking for:
A young lady between the age of 17 and 25,
she must be energetic, out going, mature, stable, hard
working, well groomed, honest and reliable.

Interested, then call for an interview
356-4512 or 356-4514


. .
(with Air-conditioned Passenger Cabm)
OFFERING FREIGHT, PASSENGER, VEHICLE & CARGO SERVICE
TWICE PER WEEK TO ELEUTHERA (HATCHET BAY)


ON FRIDAY ON SUNDAY

Depart Nassau 1:00pm Depart Nassau 1:00pmr
Arrive Hatchet Bay 4:35pm Arrive Hatchet Bay 4:35pm

Depart Hatchet Bay 6:00pm Depart Hatchet Bay 6:00pm
Arrive Nassau 9:35pm Arrive Nassau 9:35pm

RATES:
Passenger: One Way $40 Round Trip $70

VEHICLES:
Cars, One Way $150 Round Trip $250
Trucks & SUV's: one way $175 Round trip $300

Pallets: $60


Ted Munroe 422-3594 (Nassau)
Dwight Pinder 1(242) 332-2223,
1(242) 557-7220 (Eleuthera)
Robert Thompson 1(242) 335-5550,
1(242) 359-7727


iTHE TRIBUNE


(1) Compaq Presario Computer Monitor & Tower
(1) Whirl Microwave


Cart


Tents


* Hot dog cart with Umbrella

Tables

* (1) Wood Table (Round)
* (1) Marble Table (Rectangle)


Coolers/Freezers


(1) Two Door Chest Freezer
(1) One Door Chest Freezer
(1) Blue Coleman Cooler


(1) Canopy Tent (Plastic)

Machinery

(1) Food Mixer
(1) Wall TV Stand

Vessels

(1) 24' (2002) Chris Craft w/engine
(1) 29' (1983) Vessel (Lady Rece)
(1) 28' Vessel


Vehicles


(1) 2001 Ford F-250 Truck
(1) 1996 Ford Explorer
(1) 1997 Dodge Stratus


Cooking untensil pots, pans, plates, chaffing dishes, dry cleaning equipment.


Serious inquiries only. Sealed bids marked "Tender" should be submitted to:
Bahamas Development Bank
P.O. -Box N-3034, Nassau, Bahamas or telephone 327-5780
for additional information
Please note that all bids on the aforementioned properties and assets should be
received by November 18, 2005.
The Bahamas Development Bank reserves the right to reject any or all offers.
ALL ASSETS ARE SOLD AS IS.


m






J


BAHAMAS DEVELOPMENT BANK
Cable Beach, West Bay Street, P.O. Box N-3034
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 327-5780/327-5793-6
Fax: (242) 327-5047, 327-1258
www.bahamasdevelopmentbank.com



NEW PROVIDENCE

1. Lot #13 (5,000 sq. ft.) with duplex (1,344 sq. ft.) white trim lime green -
Bancroft Lane Bamboo Town (Appraised Value $147,000.00)

2. Lot #14, BIk #7 with sports bar along with restaurant equipment Key
West St and Balfour Ave Englerston Subdivision (Appraised Value
$187,000.00).

3. Lot #171 (100'x100') with the two story building East Street opposite
Deveaux Street (Appraised Value $3000,000.00)

4. Lot #27A (55'x90') with incomplete split level house Boastwain Hill or
Bosun Hill (Appraised Value $139,580.00)

5. Vacant Lot (18,644 sq. ft.) Situated on the western end of Carmichael
Rd about 250 feet east of Unison Rd. (Appraised Value $95,000.00)

6. Lot #39 (2,500 sq. ft.) with house (1,104 sq. ft.) 4 bedrooms, 1 bathroom
Lincoln Blvd, Englerston Subdivision. (Appraised Value $70,000.00)

7. Vacant Lot #1038 (6,000 sq. ft.) Orange Blossom Ave, Garden Hills
Estates #3 (Appraised Value $35,000.00)

ANDROS

8. Property (4,344 sq. ft.) with duplex (1,174 sq. ft.) in the settlement of
Fresh Creek, Central Andros. (Appraised Value $73, 258.00)

9. Vacant Property 100' x 150' in the settlement of Pinders, Mangrove Cay,
South Andros (Appraised Value $22,500.00)

GRAND BAHAMA

10. Lot #267.(12, 795 sq. ft.) Caravel Beach Subdivision, Freeport, Grand
Bahama. (Appraised Value $22,000.00)

11. Lot #9 with house (3) Bedrooms, (1) Bathroom and an incomplete split
level extension west Pinedale Rd, Pinedale, EMR, Grand Bahama. (Appraised
Value $90,000.00)

ABACO

12. Lot #54 (6,500 sq. ft.) with triplex foundation in Murphy Town, Abaco.
(Appraised Value $29,916.00)

ELEUTHERA

13. Property 31' x 111' with house Lord Street in the settlement of Tarpum
Bay, Eleuthera (Appraised Value $45,000.00)

14. Vacant Lot #22 (11,659 sq. ft.) in the settlement of North Palmetto Point
in an area known as Skull District, Eleuthera. (Appraised Value $9,000.00)

CAT ISLAND

15. Property 151'x145'x150'x123' with Hardware Building (3,640 sq. ft.)
situated 0.4 miles south of The Bight Airport New Bight, Cat Island. (Appraised
Value $192,000.00)

16. Property with twelve (12) room motel 1.39 acres In the settlement of
Arthur's Town, Cat Island (Appraised Value $1.3 Million Dollars)

EXUMA

17. Lot #134 (4,350 sq. ft.) with two story building 4,160 sq. ft., apartment
upstairs and shop downstairs, George Town, Exuma. (Appraised Value
$468,000.00)

INAGUA

18. Lot #43 (9,000 sq. ft.) with house Matthew Town, Inagua, Russell Street
(Appraised Value $120,000.00)


Electronic Equipment


.






PAGE OB, HURSDY, NVEMBE 10,2005UHEITIBUN


FOR LEASE









NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ANDY CARRALERO-GOMEZ, OF
WILD TAMARIND CAY, EXUMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 27TH day of
OCTOBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that CLAYTON SWEETING,
WASHINGTON STREET, N-8922, NASSAU BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 10TH day of NOVEMBER, 2005
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

GROUP FINANCIAL
CONTROLLER NEEDED

A client of our Firm, a progressive medical group with multiple
corporate structures, requires a professionally qualified accountant
to serve as the Group's Financial Controller. Excellent benefits.
All responses are confidential and should be mailed to the
following address:

Paul Andy Gomez
Managing Partner
GRANT THORNTON
Chartered Accountants
Paje House
Marlborough Street
P.O.Box N-8285
Nassau, N.P.,
The Bahamas


Lawyers urge halt




to Florida project


"NOW ~ .


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Public Utilities Commission


PUBLIC NOTICE


The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) has taken note of
telecommunications marketing activities offering reduced international
telephone rates.

The Public Utilities Commission hereby informs the public that:

(a) Section 8 of the Telecommunications Act prohibits the provision
of any telecommunications service by any person without a
licence issued by the PUC;

(b) Any person who provides telecommunication services without a,
licence from the PUC or aids the illegal provision of these services
shall be guilty of a criminal offence and may be fined up to three
hundred thousand dollars ($300,000) in accordance with Section
35 of the Telecommunications Act; and

(c) Violators of the Telecommunications Act can be expected to be
prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

The PUC also invites the public, including operators and consumers,
to provide information on such illegal activities to the PUC. Such
information will be treated in the utmost confidence.

For further information, contact the PUC at telephone 322-4437,
extension 234, fax 323-7288 or puc@pucbahamas.gov.bs.


Mr. Barrett Russell
Executive Director

Fourth Terrace East, Collins Avenue
P.O. BOX N-4860
Nassau, Bahamais
Website: wwwPUCBahamas.gov.bs


Business Analyst (BA-3)


PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT AND REAL ESTATE
Montana Holdings Ltd is undertaking a major land development programme in
Rum Cay. This project will comprise international hotels, a large marina, over 400
homes and a range of holiday resort facilities in one of the most beautiful Family
Islands of the Bahamas. We are now seeking a Business Analyst to join our rapidly
expanding Nassau office and to become a team member of a growing property
development business.

Business Analyst (BA-3)
Reporting to the Chief Financial Officer & VP of Corporate Development, the Business
Analyst will take responsibility for a range of activities. These shall include, but
not be limited to:
Property sales and conveyance
Coordination and planning
Facilitating various partnership transactions
Monitoring numerous commercial contractual arrangements
Supporting key financial and project monitoring processes

Requirements
The ideal candidate shall have at least:
3 years experience of the real estate business, land development, or the
hotel/holiday resorts business
Educated to a degree level preferably with concentration in Business
Administration, Finance or a Science Degree
Held positions dealing with executive management
Experienced in managing suppliers as well interfacing with customers
Excellent communication skills, both written and oral
Must be computer literate with excellent knowledge of Microsoft Office
-and especially proficient in Word and Excel
The successful candidates will be organized, personable, ambitious and very
productive. They shall demonstrate high levels of initiative and the ability to manage
all allocated activities to an early conclusion. They will have excellent written and
verbal communication skills and have the ability to write detailed reports and-
associated documentation. They will have a strong desire to learn new skills and
to accept more accountability and have the highest level of business acumen and
integrity.
This position is situated in Nassau with some travel to the building site in Rum Cay.
International travel may be required. The salary and benefits package shall be
commensurate with the responsibilities and experience of the successful candidate.
The Montana Holdings office environment is challenging, energetic and very
demanding. It calls for staff to accept responsibility for all types of work activities.
which shall be undertaken to high professional standards.

Contact 1
Please send cover letter and resume by e-mail quoting above reference (BA-3) td
island_development@yahoo.com or by post to P.O. Box N-9322, Nassau, The Bahamas.
The closing date for receipt of applications is November 25, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005


. .


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005, PAGE 11B


THE TRIBUNE


Oil executives defend profits


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LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

WIL VALLEY LTD.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, the dissolution of WIL VALLEY LTD., has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

KANCONE ESTABLISHMENT LTD.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, the dissolution of KANCONE
ESTABLISHMENT LTD., has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company
has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

CAMPECHE S.A.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, the dissolution of CAMPECHE S.A., has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


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WIRE TRANSFER


UPDATE!


As part of our ongoing commitment to offer you
continual improvements in our banking services,
we will be implementing a significant upgrade to our
Wire Transfer services from mid-November 2005.


These improvements will enable:
Faster settlement of international wire transfers
Continued world-class levels of safety and security
to transmit money internationally


Commencing late November 2005, our Internet Banking
facility will also be upgraded. This will give you the
flexibility and convenience of sending wire transfers to
anyone, anywhere in the world, 24 hours a day, 7 days a
week from the comfort of your home or office.


If you are an Internet Banking customer interested in
signing up for our new Online Wire Transfers service,
or if you want to learn how to get started as an
Internet Banking customer, please contact your branch's
Customer Service Representative or your Relationship
Manager.


FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK


Caribbean Pride. International Strength. Your Financial Partner.
FirstCaribbean International Bank is an Associated Company of Barclays Bank PLC and CIBC.


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PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


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TRIBNE SORTSTHUSDAY NOVMBER10,2005SPAGRTS


Hopes for a show


of


strength from Bahamas


Joel Stubbs makes good reading


* BODYBUILDING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
WHEN Joel Stubbs made his
pro debut at the Europa Super
Show on September 17 in Arling-
ton, Texas, he was only able to
muster an 12th place finish.
But when he left the stage, he
had Flex Magazine so mes-


merised by his huge back that
they called him for an encore in
the weight-room the next day for
a feature story in the December
issue that has already hit the news
stands.
Not bad for the Bahamian
"boy wonder", who can now be
talked about in the same breath
as Ronnie Coleman, Dorian
Yates and Lee Haney, all of


whom have combined to
win the past 21 Mr. Olympia
titles.
Bahamas Bodybuilding and
Fitness Federation's president
Danny.Sumner.said he.was so
impressed with what he saw when
he got a copy of the magazine
that he was so eager to share the
good news with the rest of'the
country. "


"Flex Magazine said Joey's
back is one of the biggest they
have ever seen," Sumner stressed.
"His back was so awesome that
Flex Magazine and Muscle Tech
featured him. It shows the talent
that Joey has.
"I'm pleased with his accom-
plishments because I remember
when he first came into body-
building. He's a humble person
and he is also dedicated. He's a
true ambassador for bodybuild-
ing inr this country."

Title
Sumner said Stubbs, who
became only the second Bahami-
an to turn pro following in the
footsteps of Charles Kemp when
he won the 2003 Central Ameri-
can and Caribbean Bodybuilding
Championship title, has been a
role model for the younger
bodybuilders coming into the
sport.
In 1996, Stubbs got started in
bodybuilding after he was
enrolled at Florida Technical Col-
lege where he played basketball.
But when he tore the patellar ten-
dons of both knees playing bas-
ketball, he switched his
attention to the physique compe-
tition.
In 2000, he went on to win the
super-heavyweight class of the
Southern State Championships
and the rest was history.
In the interview conducted by
Greg Merritt, the senior writer
for Flex, Stubbs was described as
an unknown competitor, whose
combination of "width, thickness
and neck-to-glutes" details in his
back astounded just about every-
body who saw him.
Merritt said he was so
impressed that he had to do a fol-
low-up interview with Stubbs in
the MetroFlex Gym, using the
same equipment that built Cole-
man's legendary lats.


* RUGBY
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
AFTER a successful pre-season, there are
hopes that rugby will make an impression among
the country's sporting disciplines with the open-
ing of this year's league.
With more than 10 games set to be played
between this coming Sunday and December,
league president Stephen Thompson is sure that
the recent reception of the sport in the country
will boost the level of play and interest.
Thompson is basing his expectations on the
success of the national teams and the high school
tournament held last year.
He believes that the sport has been reinvigo-
rated.
He said: "The league is going to be very com-
petitive again this year. We are excited to start this
year's league, especially after the success we had
over the summer.
"There is also a good mixture, there are a lot of
youth on the team, most of the teams are bal-
anced out equally with youth.
"The influx of youth and interest after the tour-
naments in the summer and the national team's
performances is great."
Although the league is playing host to only six


teams this year, executive members boast of there
beinga match played every weekend.
With the league having two playing sites,
Freeport and the Winton Meadows playing field,
the are quite certain that the attendances will
increase.
The executives have also planned to host a
high school tournament, which is designed to
assist in the senior growth.
Board members are also hoping that teams
playing in the high school tournament will double.
Thompson said: "The attendance last year in
the high school tournament was very good. We
had more than 150 young, enthused players par-
ticipating, we expect the same amount of players
of not more this year.
"The structure is just starting to be set in place
ahd we are starting to see some pay off in that in
some of the younger players taking lead roles in
some of the clubs."
The youth tournament is scheduled for Decem-
ber 3rd, with 12 teams confirming.
At the conclusion of the high school youth
tournament, a five week league will be set in
place for all interested under 19 players..-
In the senior league, the opening game in the
regular season will be played between the Buc-
caneers and Balliou at the Winton Field and
Freeport and Cuckoos in Freeport.


Full fixture


list for BSC


THE Baptist Sports
Council will continue its
regular season action on
Saturday at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex
with the following games
on tap:


0 SOUTH FIELD
10am Jubilee
vs Transfiguration (M)
11am New Destiny
vs Golden Gates (M).
Noon New Bethlehem
vs Golden Gates (M).
1pm Transfiguration
vs Golden Gates (M).
2pm New Destiny
vs Macedonia (M).


* NORTH FIELD
10am Macedonia
vs Golden Gates (M).
11 lam Transfiguration
vs New Bethlehem (M).
Noon New Destiny
vs Jubilee (M).
1pm Faith United
vs Macedonia (M).
2pm Jubilee
vs Golden Gates (M).
Wholesalers Field
10am New Bethlehem
vs Faith United (Under-
19).
11am Faith United
vs Golden Gates (U-15).
Noon Macedonia
vs First Baptist (U-15).
1pm Golden Gates
vs Macedonia (U-19).


Rugby set to make its


mark with new season
.~~ ~


BAAA's

Notice of AGM

The Bahamas Association of Athletic
Associations will be holding it's Annual
General Meeting (AGM) on Saturday,
November 26th, 2005 at 10:00am. This
meeting will be held at the Colony Club
Resorts Conference Room. All interested
persons and the general public are invited
to attend.

For further information you can contact the
BAAA office at 325-4433 or 323-5883.


TRIBUNE SPORTS


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005, PAGE 13B






PAGE14BTHURDAY NOVMBER10, 005TRIBNEOSORT


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Raptors face up to Eagles
THE CH REEVES RAPTORS line-up against the LW Young
Golden Eagles yesterday.
Raptors, who took advantage of the service errors in the first
set, went on to trample the Eagles 17-10 and 19-17.
See page one
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff) |


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TRIBUNE SPORTS


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005


SECTION




Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


a a1


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


Raptors prey





on Eagles for






two set win


* VOLLEYBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
GOVERNMENT Sec-
ondary School Sporting Asso-
ciation (GSSSA) is back on
course after a two and a half
week lay-off.
Action picked up yesterday
at the DW Davis gymnasium
with four games on schedule,
two in the junior girls, a junior
boys and senior girls game.
Starting things off were the
CH Reeves Raptors and the
LW Young Golden Eagles.
Raptors, who took advantage
of the service errors in the first
set went onto trample the
Eagles 17-10 and 19-17.

Captain
Taking the weight of the
team on her shoulders was
Raptors captain Kayla John-
son.
After losing three points to
Eagles due to service errors,
Johnson stepped to the line
and served up three aces.
The pounding from behind
the service line continued by


Johnson, who gave the Rap-
tors a 6-3 lead over the Eagles,
forcing them to call a time out.
The time-out called by
Eagle's head coach Penial
Bain broke Johnson's service'
when she returned to the line.
Johnson said: "They tried
to stop us but they couldn't,
we were ready to play them
although we knew we were
going to beat them. We
weren't too worried about the
team because we beat them
before.
"The teams we want to play
are DW Davis, SC McPher-
son and HO Nash, especially
HO Nash, we can't wait to
play them."
But before the Raptors pre-
pare to face the Lions Johnson
said they will need to put in at
least three practice sessions.
Reflecting on the way her
team played, Johnson said
that her team will not be able
to defeat HO Nash if they
continue to step to the line
and commit service errors.
"We can beat any team that
steps on the court but we will
have to step up our play," said
Johnson.
"I know sometimes we


don't play together but if we
do play together we will win.
all the games. All we have to
do is encourage each other
when we make a mistake.
"Our team will also have to
cut down on the mistakes
when we play them. But we
are ready to play anyone."

Different
Bain went to a different
line-up in the second set, send-
ing Alecia Burrows to the ser-
vice line first.
After much success in the
first set Burrows was able to
put her team up by five to
start the second. A return to
the line with the score tied 15-
all Burrows served up an ace,
but netted her second attempt
A successful service return
by the Eagles brought on the
longest volley in the game
with the break inpoint by tie
Raptors coming from a hard
driven ball from Sydline
Justilien.
The Raptors never looked
back after the break, taking
the final two points from the
service line.


Tonique in running for




female athlete award


* TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
IT MIGHT be the start of season train-
ing for the Bahamas' first Olympic gold
medallist Tonique Williams-Darling, but
the race for yet more prestigious titles
continues.
Williams-Darling is going head-to-head
with some of the world top female ath-
letes for the IAAF Female Athlete of the
Year title.
The World Championship gold medallist
is currently sitting in 12th spot with 1.45
per cent of the votes.
The race leaders are Tirunesh Dibaba of
Ethiopia with 30.19 per cent of the votes,
Yelena Isinbayeva of Russia, receiving
26.67 per cent of the votes and Paula Rad-
cliffe of Great Britain with 11.50 per
cent.


This is the second time Williams-Dar-
ling's name has been placed in the hunt for
the IAAF Female Athlete of the Year
title. She was also in the race for the Wom-
en's Performance of the Year title, last
year.

Title
Although she wasn't able to claim either
IAAF title, Williams-Darling walked away
with the Bahamas Association of Athlet-
ic Association (BAAA) title and the
Jones Communication Person of the Year
award.
In the world rankings, Williams-Dar-
ling is sitting in second with a score of
1,383 11 points behind leader American
Sanya Richards.
Her name also appears in the Prensa
Latina poll for thb 2005 best Latin Amer-


ican and Caribbean athletes.
Joining Williams-Darling in the
hunt for this title are Osleidys
Menendez, Asafa Powell, Zulia
Calatayud, Diego Forlin,
Ronaldinho Gaucho and Jeffer-
son Perez.
Virgilijus Alekna of Lithuania
leads the chase for the IAAF
men's title with 49.75 per cent of
the votes.
The closest person to Alkena is
Xiang Liu of China with 37.94 per
cent and last year's winner
Kenenisa Bekele of Ethiopia with
6.42 per cent.
The winner of the four divisional
IAAF awards are chosen by a panel of
from the federation which includes IAAF
president Lamine Diack.
Votes can be cast by logging onto the
IAAF website (www.iaaf.org).


be on Tuesday, No
r~m,FVTTMIMYTM


I_ SORRY NO PHOTOCOPIES,_NEWSPAPER PRINT ONLY


- ^ - ^----^ I, *111. ** ^----=-


-- I II


I









THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005


SECTION


Sermons, Church Activities, Awards


Church Notes
Page 6C


Bishop: 'I don't see




anything wrong' with




interfaith marriages


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
When it comes to mar-
riage, a couple has to
consider whether
they can live togeth-
er through sickness
and in health, for richer for poorer, for
better or worse. Easier enough, right?
However, many persons do not real-
ize that potential partners must consid-


er whether their love can tolerate dif-
fering religious beliefs. At the end of
the day though, it's a decision that many
couples in the Bahamas find easy to
make.
According to Bishop Ross Davis, pas-
tor of Golden Gates Assembly World
Outreach Ministries, inter-denomina-
tional marriages, where persons in dif-
ferent denominations join in matrimony,
are far more common in the Bahamas
than inter-faith unions, where couples


marry outside of their faith.
"Marrying persons from different
denominations is very common in the
Bahamas and I don't see anything
wrong with it, especially in the Protes-
tant faith because there are not many
policy differences," Bishop Davis told
Tribune Religion. "But we do suggest
that if two persons from different
denominations are marrying each other,
the woman should go with her hus-
band."
That was exactly what Patricia Bur-
rows did when she married her hus-
band,. Amos Burrows, thirteen years
ago. Mrs Burrows was a member of a
Catholic church, and her husband, a
member of a Baptist church, when they
met.
"Leaving (the Catholic church) wasn't
really a problem for me because I knew
that a wife should follow her husband
because he is thle head of the house.
That doesn't change, no matter how
professional you are or how much the
times change," said Mrs Burrows, a
retail store manager. .
It wasn't a forced decision on the part
of her husband, but a move that she
felt was "lead by God", she added.
Wliile-Mr 'Burrows says that he
believes that a husband should never
force his wife to join his church, he said
that it is better when both persons in a
marriage attend the same assembly.
"Your marriage is a union where, I
believe, all matters of your lives should
come together and be as one. Your
finances are shared, you share a home
together, you share children together, so
it makes sense to share the same church
home to keep unity in the midst."
According to Bishop Davis, the prac-
tice of the woman following her hus-
band is a tradition that has a biblical
background, where the man is the


"priest" of his home.
In the Baptist church, of which he is
apart, women and men can join freely,
whereas a person who wishes to marry
in a Catholic church, for example, must
first convert to Catholicism. The per-
son who wishes to marry in a Seventh
Day Adventist church, must also cpn-
vert to that denomination first, Bishop
Davis noted.
But marrying someone of a different
faith is something that Christianity does
not uphold, says the pastor, as it breeds
conflict within the home, that is, if the
husband or wife decides to remain com-
mitted to their own religion. There is
also another conflict that arises, how
the children will be raised.
"Usually you find that the woman in
the relationship will convert to the reli-
gion of her husband. I don't agree with
this, I think we should stay within our
own religion," he said.
Though the numbers may not be
great, some couples in Bahamian society
are entering inter-faith unions, and by
all appearances, many of them are mak-
ing it work. These couples say that it is
a respect for their partner's faith that
sustains their unions.
Many conservatii'veChristiari-deniod-F-
inations discourage inter-faith marriages
because of Bible condemnations of such
marriages, which teach that their mem-
bers should not be "unequally yoked"
with individuals who are not born-again
believers.
Religious bodies often foresee the
potential of an extra level of conflict
within inter-faith marriages, but are
generally willing to marry such couples.
Non-Christian religions vary: Hindus
openly welcome inter-faith marriages;

SEE page 3C


Archbishop

L Burke to

preside at

funeral mass

for two slain

missionaries"
By CLEMENT :
JOHNSON
KINGSTON Archbishop.
Lawrence Burke, Fr..
Richard Ho Lung and other'
bishops and priests from all
Jamaican dioceses will pre-
side at the funeral mass for
two slain Missionaries of the
Poor Brothers at the histor-
ical Holy Trinity Cathedral
in Kingston on Saturday,
November 11.
The two Missionaries of
the Poor Brothers, 22-year-
old Suresh Barwa of India
and 31-year-old Marco
Laspuna of the Philippines,
were in the kitchen of their
Corpus Christi monastery
on North Street, Kingston,
washing dishes after a cele-
bratory meal, when tragedy
struck on Thursday, Octo-
ber 27, a week ago today.
Brother Suresh was pro-
nounced dead on arrival at
hospital, while Brother Mar-
co died of his injuries three
hours later.
Fr. Richard Ho Lung,
founder of the community,
said the police were work-
" ing 6nfi-tl~"e ory that the
deaths may have been
caused by a stray bullet, but
he added that given the
physical set up of the com-
pound, it was possible that
this was a "direct hit".
The bullet, which pierced
the head of Brother Suresh
exited and struck Brother
Marco, standing beside him.
Fr. Ho Lung said the bullet

SEE page 2C


What does it mean to love God


with all your heart, soul and mind?


* By Father Timmy Eldon
Curate, St George's Anglican
Church
WE have heard this passage our whole
life but have you ever stopped to ask your-
self what it means to love God with all
your heart and all your soul and all your
mind? Love is the most precious gift any of
us can ever have. It is the greatest gift we
can receive or give to one another. It is
the most intimate feeling we can share. It
is the only thing in this world, besides the
presence of God in our soul that is eternal.
Why is love such an awesome thing?
Because it is rooted, in the very nature,
of God.
So far in His teachings, Jesus has taught
his disciples to love their enemies; he told
them to love the Lord their God with all
their heart, soul, mind, and strength, and to
love their neighbours as themselves. Jesus
gave us this command. Love one another,
but He did not stop there, He added, "As


I have loved you" This is what Jesus is
telling us. He is saying to us, "I have
showed you how to love, now you love
others the way that I do". And when you
look at Jesus, love, there are three adjec-
tives that you can use to describe it.
Undeniable
People can debate whether Jesus worked
miracles by the power of God. They can
debate whether or not He was John the
Baptist, Elijah, or one of the prophets. But
one thing that is undeniable is his love for
people. Jesus provided day after day
through his teachings, his miracles, his
healing, his compassion and acts of ser-
vice, that he loved.
To love like Jesus, we must love in such
a way that it cannot be denied. By his bold
teaching and actions, Jesus left no room for
doubting his love, and neither can we.


* FATHER TIMMY ELDON SEE page 6C


0 100%


be &Shop

_______ h Ijj




^^^^MiW~~~~bi-04":^ B ^ --- ^ ^ H


The Tribune


Hail Knight C B Moss!


* REVEREND C B Moss (centre), pastor of Mount Olive Baptist
Church, Bain Town, was inducted as a Knight of the Baptist faith and order
in the Bahamas National Baptist Missionary and Educational conven-
tion. The honour was bestowed at Kingdom Hall. Pictured (1-r) are Dr
William Thompson, president of the Bahamas Christian Council, Dr
Moss and Mrs Francisca Moss.


1


l


I _,, I ill I













Gospo-Jam, held by The College of the 'God can o n
Bahamas' Student Christian Ministries.d n


1 ,7 lead us when



we make the



decision to



let Him'


Gap Menders' Gospo-




Jam lures students and




community leaders


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
he College of the
Bahama s^'
(COB) Student
Christian Min-
istries, who go by
the name, 'Gap Menders', in
conjunction with COB's Stu-
dent Activities department,
held the 3rd Annual Gospo-
Jam, Saturday, October 29.
The event attracted as many
as 150 students and commu-
nity leaders.
According to Bradley
Cooper, assistant director of
COB's Student Affairs depart-
ment, Gospo-Jam is an effort
that Gap Menders have


organised for the past two
years. But this year, the col-
lege's administration, through
his department, decided to
merge with the club. Student
activities already had plans to
host a series of concerts this
year, and decided to bring
SCM's event under its umbrel-
la.
Decision
The decision turned out to
be a worthwhile one. "It was
very successful although a lot
of people missed it. But I
knew that we were competing
with several other events that
weekend. But still, it was
worth it," Mr Cooper told Tri-


bune Religion.
The event was held during
the same weekend that Amer-
ican Idol star Ruben Studdard
and Jamaica's Morgan Her-
itage were hosting concerts
here in the country. But
gospel music lovers who
turned out to Gospo-Jam may
have had it best as they
received entertainment, as
well as inspiration, at no cost.
The concert, which was
held at the college's new band
shell on Poinciana Drive, fea-
tured SCMs drama and dance
teams; the COB Choir; and
Tabernacle Church of God
Choir. Gospel artists Christ-
ian Massive, DJ Counsellor,
the Dunamus Crew, and
Landlord were also on hand.
Richa Strachan, who attend-
ed the free concert along with
a friend who is a student at
COB, told Tribune Religion
that she applauds the initia-
tive taken by students to host
such an event.
"From what I understand,
the concert was put on by the
students, and I think that's
great because it shows that
they are concerned about
what's going on in their com-
munity," she said.
"You have a lot of our
young people who don't care


about what's going on around
them, so events like this one
are a positive outlet for them.
They get to see what other
young people are doing."
Mr Cooper, who interacts
with the students on a daily
basis, says that the goal behind
the event was to evoke some
change in the student body,
as well as in the wider com-
munity.
"One thing we want to con-
tinue to do is change attitudes,
change the way people think,
win souls if possible. We want
to also raise an awareness so
the ,community can see that
we are not just giving students
an education here. We are
helping to develop their char-
acter."
Achieve
The effort is only the begin-
ning of what the department
hopes to achieve, along with
the Gap Menders, and other
clubs at the college. "It's very
important for us to join with
our clubs. We need more mar-
rying of clubs and student
activities. And we hope that
other clubs will be able to join
with each other to bring about
similar events," Mr Cooper
said.


* By ALLISON MILLER
This life has so many
things to offer. If at the end
of the day the only thing we
can come up with is failure,
then the only person we can
blame is ourselves.
I was having a conversa-
tion with someone who in a
short space of time became
very close to me. We were
reminiscing about our high
school days and she was
telling me how her English
teacher always expressed a
simple philosophy to the
class. It got the job done, as
they were able to compre-
hend her saying. It was sim-
ple but true. She said, "If
you fail to plan, you plan to
fail."
As my friend continued to
talk, with her voice becom-
ing the background to my
thoughts, I thought that this
teacher was right, but how
do we d.~hat? Plan to fail?
Nobody ants to fail. But,'
what she was saying to them


* A MILLER


what God has asked us to
do, we have done nothing.
I don't know about you, but
I can't leave my whole life
and not affect a single life
or not do one thing that God
asks me to do. As the song
writer pens, "Then my liv-
ing will be in vain."
All of us won't have a pul-
pit as a platform to minister
from and that's OK. The
Bible tells us in the New
Testament that if you feed


"We succeed when we
allow God to lead us all the
way all the time. He can
only lead us when we make
the decision to let Him.
When we do that we have
success in every area of our
lives and we will have a life
that's worth living. "

Allison Miller


is if they made no provision
(studying for exams and
completing assignments) to
accommodate their school
work that had to be com-
pleted and exams that they
had to sit, they would fail.
How do we fail in our
lives? By living our whole
lives and doing nothing for
God. We are an ambitious
people, their is so much we
want to do, see and have.
The Bible asks the question
what does it profit us to gain
the whole world and loose
our one soul?
After obtaining all the
goals we set out to accom-
plish and not one of those
things have anything to with


the hungry, clothe the
naked, visit the sick and go
to those who are in prison,
you have done it unto Him.
What you do for Christ will
last, the Bible tells us. We
can not live our whole lives
doing what we want to do
and finding out at the end
of the day that we failed in
what we may consider as
obtaining good.
We succeed when we
allow God to lead us all the
.way all the time. He can
only lead us when we make
the decision to let Him.
When we do that we have
success in every area of our
lives and we will have a life
that's worth living.


Archbishop Burke to preside at funeral

mass for two slain missionaries


FROM page 1C

possibly came from across the
road in the Hanover Street
neighbourhood and entered
through an open window.
In a statement prepared for
the media October 29, Fr Ho
Lung expressed his grief and
that of the community:
"I grieve from the depths of
my soul for these two innocent
lambs, Suresh and Marco. I
grieve as a father for his chil-
dren, and for all my spiritual
sons who are with us in
Jamaica saddened by the death
of their brothers.
"I grieve for the parents and
families who so generously
send their sons to give up their
lives permanently in service of
the poor, the homeless, the for-
gotten ones. I grieve for my
island Jamaica, so lost and con-
fused, so hardened and violent
and wild with anger..
"As a father of my brothers
and the poor, and, I daresay,
as father of my people in


Jamaica, I beg that we pray in
this nation for a halt to this vio-
lence.
"We forgive the murderer.
We pray for him. We pray that
there is repentance in his heart.
We will welcome him. We will
help him. We will counsel him.
He is still our brother. We
don't know if he deliberately
killed our Brothers or acciden-
tally killed them. Whatever, we
forgive him."
Homeless
"Missionaries of the Poor
will continue to take in the
homeless and destitute. We will
continue to live in the ghettoes.
Our young men are youthful
and full of heroism. They love
Jesus and have been singing a
song over and over 'greater
love no man has than to lay
down his life for his friends' ."
On behalf of the Missionar-
ies of the Poor, Fr Ho Lung
thanked Archbishop Burke,
Bishop Charles Dufour (Dio-


cese of Montego Bay), his fel-
low clergymen, and many
friends for their visits, phone
calls and messages.
"I urge you once again, he
said: 'Do not be afraid!' The
Lord is with us, and we want
you to be with us, to pray,
work, and struggle together as
we move forward to build His
kingdom."
The Missionaries of the Poor
is an international monastic
order of Brothers dedicated to
"joyful service with Christ on
the Cross" to serve the poorest
of the poor. The order, started
in 1981, has now grown to over
180 brothers, with free missions
around the globe.
Their main home is in
Kingston, Jamaica, where they
maintain five mission homes.
The Brothers also serve the
Lord with their acts of mercy in
India, the Philippines, Haiti
and Uganda.
I had an opportunity to meet
both of the saintly Brothers
who were killed while on


assignment for The Tribune to
attend the installation of Arch-
bishop Burke almost two years
ago. I visited the Monastery
and was greeted by Br. Marco,
I was impressed by all of the
Brothers who reside in the
monastery and admired the
work and spirit of the men. I
was moved to see how so many
young men from different cul-
tures and races leave family
and friends and truly take up
the mandate of Jesus "to follow
him."
Murders
To date Jamaica has record-
ed more than 1,400 murders
for the year.
This is not the first time that
Catholic religious men have
been brutally killed in Jamaica.
In 1996, I remember attending
the funeral service of a Catholic
priest, who was killed in Span-
ish Town, and about a year lat-
er an American Catholic priest
was killed in Jamaica.


World

chclrews

payb
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2005 TM


Purchase anV Extra ValMe Meal ovi

Suidaj, November 20, 2005 avid

(elp McDoViald's support

World C ildrem's Da,


Roviald McDonald HoLse Charities

gave a 0faVd last year to

The BahamWias Red Cross,
($1 o,ooo000,0oo)0

Let s give a flaevd tfis ear,


Golden Girl Debbie Ferguson will be at
McDonald's Restaurant in Oakes Field
on Sunday, November 20th, 2005 at 3:30pm


PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005


THE TRIBUNE









T^^HE TRIBUNE l T^i^~RHURIGIONSDAY NVEBES1,S00,IAG


Remembering


* DONALD Ferguson will be remembered by his four
daughters; mother, Leanna Ferguson of Nassau; sisters,
brothers, extended family and friends.


'Doc


M By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX guson's
Tribune Feature Editor sured as
A son
How is a man's life mea- his father
sured at the end of his Leesbui
days? If it is by the tears build a
that are cried at the tragic come tc
loss of a brother, a friend, city.
a father, if it can be measured by the words There
of love that will continue to be echoed by would h
everyone he touched, then Donalj Fer- cut shor


"Doc Fergie", life should be mea-
s great.
n of Bahamian soil, Donald joined
er in a small city in central Florida,
rg, where the two would work to
farm and fruit stand that would
represent the very heart of the
is no telling what heights Donald
ave achieved had his life not been
t by a tragic accident.


On October 26, 2005, Donald passed
away following a horrible traffic accident
and a brief period in the intensive care
unit of Tampa General Hospital.
US newspapers told the deadly story,
that in the early morning hours of October
18, a gasoline tanker traveling along Inter-
state 75 in Florida, struck Donald's
Chevrolet box truck, filled with fruits, from
behind. Both vehicles went in to a spin,
the two trucks overturned, and both drivers
were ejected from their trucks. Both vehi-
cles landed on their roofs and the gaso-.
line tanker erupted into flames.
While the last moments of Donald's life;
may have been filled with sorrow, his home.*
going service, at First Baptist Church, in'
Leesburg, Florida, paid tremendous tribute
to a man that will never be forgotten. He
has left a legacy of love, kindness, warmth
and generosity, his mark as an astute busi-
nessman will always be remembered, but'
most importantly, his position as beloved
and adored brother, father and friend, a,
man who never failed to give of all that was,
his own, and whose undying support stood
as the bedrock of his extended family, cans
never by replaced.
Tribute
Joining the family to pay tribute to Don-
ald was Charles Roesel, senior pastor of
First Baptist Church, Leesburg, Florida.
Warm words, Godly counsel and fond
memories flowed over the congregation
like a soothing balm, comforting the fam-
ily, and giving evidence to those that had
come to pay their respects, that Donald
had been more than a brother in Christ
to this man, he had been a friend. .
With funny stories that revealed his
stature in the community, a man that stood
tall, who had befriended everyone and
whose wishes were quickly adhered to
because of his own vibrant and sincere
personality, many stood before the pulpit
to remember Donald.


* DONALD'S World famous fruit stand in Leesburg, Florida, where pearls of wisdom and encouragement
were available, along with the sweetest tamarinds, and freshest, most inexpensive produce.


Bishop: 'I don't see


anything wrong' with



interfaith marriages


FROM page 1C

Muslims place restrictions on
them; and many Jews actively
discourage them.
Alyssa (not real name), who
grew up in a Christian church,
and proclaims to be a "child of
God" met her boyfriend of
three years, Rashad (not real
name), a Rastafarian, five years
ago while attending school in
Jamaica. The couple has a
young child together and told
Tribune Religion that their
relationship is working out
well, despite the fact that nei-
ther has made a conversion to
the other's faith.
"He does not get married in
his faith, but I am okay with
that because we understand
each other," she told Tribune
Religion. "My religion teach-
es me that God loves every-
body regardless of what differ-
ences we share."
Alyssa says that both reli-
gions, though different, share
a common believe in God, as
the Father, so their relation-
ship is founded upon that com-
mon ground. "I don't think we
would be together if it wasn't
for that. But he prays to God
and I pray to God so our chil-
dren will grow up to believe in
God, and grow up to love God
like we do."
In her Baptist assembly,
where she still worships every
Sunday, Alyssa has received
some chastisement for her deci-
sion to be, what members have
called, ."unequally yoked". But
she has a different philosophy,
which dictates that being
involved with a man of a dif-
ferent faith is not unequal, once
they have decided to remain
"true" to themselves.
Alyssa explained: "He hails
Selassie, but that doesn't mean
that I have to do the same and
be yoked up in that. People
need to stop thinking of this
thing in a prejudicial way.
Being married to a white man


doesn't mean that you have to
adopt his culture, so why do
people think that I as a believ-
er in Christ have to adopt
(Rashad's) belief?"
In their home, the couple
has decided to showcase no
expression of their faith that
may offend the other, or to
make any declaration of their
belief that may do the same.
And their child once grown,
said Alyssa, will have dread-
locks because both father and
mother wear their hair in that
style.
Union
They have an understanding
that neither of them will try to
convert the other. And this
strong will, she believes, is what
will make their union last.
"There is no way that I will
leave my faith or give up my
belief in Jesus Christ as the Son


of God, the Saviour of this
world. And if I'm not gonna
do that, there is no way I can
expect (Rashad) to give' up
something that he has believed
in for most of his life. We just
learn to deal with it because
we love each other."
Though many believe that
love will conquer all, even the
differences in beliefs, Bishop
Davis says that it is an error on
the part of the believer because
he/she is in a sense, placing love
for a man or woman above
belief in God, above their souls.
"Love cannot get your soul
right, your faith has to take
care of that, take care of the
spiritual being. You have to
realize that your time on earth
is temporary, so you cannot
place your affection for one
person over your soul which is
eternal. So you can't give up
your Christianity to follow a
man, or woman."


Fergie'


SEE page 6C


* BISHOP ROSS DAVIS


W


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005, PAGE 3C


THE TRIBUNE





PAGE 4C, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005
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PAGE 60, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005 THETBUNIEION


Remembering



'Doc Fergie'


FROM page 3C

The Mayor of the city of
Leesburg John Christian, said
that Donald, who had already
been honoured by the city of
Leesburg with both a key and
a proclamation that Tuesday,
February 2, 2005 would be
"Donald Eric Ferguson Day",
would receive a second key to
the city for his outstanding con-
tribution to the development
of the area.
Also remembering his long-
time friend from the Bahamas
was Joey Johnson, and there
would be many others who
would have come to honour his
memory, if the opportunity had


been available.
Giving words of comfort to
those left behind and expound-
ing the word of God was Bish-
op Norward Dean, pastor of
the Church of God of Prophe-
cy #1, in Miami, Florida.
Franklin Ferguson, senior pas-
tor of the Church of God of
Prophecy, East Street, also
broke the bread of life before
the congregation, and shared
the impact of his relationship
' with Donald.
With many tears, sweet songs
of heaven and words of com-
fort, Donald Ferguson was laid
to rest, Saturday, November 5.
He will be warmly remem-
bered by all he came into con-
tact with.


Church Note


'BAHAMAS AWAKENING
2005 AND BEYOND'

THE event, sponsored by
the Bahamas Christian
Council, is scheduled to
meet in a national solemn
assembly on Friday, Novem-
ber 11. The group will also
host a mass rally on Satur-
day, November 12. Both
events will be held at Clif-
ford Park, beginning at 6pm.


MACEDONIA
BAPTIST CHURCH

CONFERENCE 2005 set
for 7 pm November 16-20
at church on Bernard Road,
Fox Hill, where Rev David
S Johnson is pastor.
There will also be a
Fun/Run Walk at 6:30 am
on Saturday and health fair.
Sunday, 11 am Divine
Worship Service


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


e siriJ tuaB1lityWo]


By Fr HENRY CHARLES

(This is the fourth article in a series
that Fr Charles is writing on the spiritu-
ality of work).

he second criterion for eval-
Suating the authenticity of
work is the degree of con-
scious participation in its
process.
f To the degree that workers are treated
only as objects to be managed, or organ-
-ised, or exploited as a resource, both their
dignity and their work are disfigured.
On the other hand, to the extent that
workers are drawn into conscious partici-
pation, the work process becomes authen-
tic.
The third criterion for authentic work
is that workers regard what they do as spir-
itual in a deliberate, self-conscious way,
until it becomes their natural way of look-
ing and feeling.
Inauthentic work alienates workers, as
Marx compellingly showed, from what they
produce, from others, and from their real
selves. Marx referred to work at the dawn
of the industrialised era.
Alienation meant the worker's boredom
and the feeling of powerlessness as a cog in
a vast machine a machine built with his
own hands, which then confronted him as
oppressor.
We need to look at the picture of alien-
ation relevant to the move from factory
to office. What form does alienation take in
an era of increasing education and profes-
sional labour?
Alienation translates today into a lack of
job satisfaction, or the limited amount of
control workers exercise over the condi-
tions under which they work; or the divi-
sion of work today into narrower and nar-
rower specialties.
Workers often repress their critical and
creative feelings and surrender their dignity
in work. They treat their job as something
foreign to their real interests, or tell them-
selves that they work for reasons extrinsic
to work itself.
For example, if I have no creative voice
in my work, I can make up for it by pur-
chasing designer clothes or the latest tech-
nological gadget. I work then not for rea-
sons intrinsic to work itself, but to get mon-
ey for the things I can buy, as compensa-
tion for my alienation. Yet the very com-
pensation I seek only deepens my alien-
ation.

The rat race
Another important way in which modem
culture destroys life is by making people


'I
/
/
/
/
/


* FR HENRY CHARLES


"Again, while some
work too much,
others are not allowed
to work at all. We
refer to them as the
unemployed. They are
human beings whose
creativity is denied."
Fr Henry Charles

work excessively not only in their jobs but
in their consuming. We call this the rat
race.
It means that we have little time for any
real enjoyment of life. We are always busy
and on the move, consumed by our work
and our commodities. There's little time to
allow marriages to grow, to nurture chil-
dren, to care for others, and to build up our
local communities. Everything is subordi-
nate to work, yet so very little of life
around us is renewed.
Excessive work also means that we live
without a cycle of work and rest, or cre-
ation and recreation. Work becomes just
another form for slavery. God gave us the
commandment of the Sabbath, because
without rest the creative project turns
destructive.
The earth itself needs to rest, to lie fal-
low, otherwise its fruitfulness will be lost.
The social community needs to rest and
play, otherwise we become violent. We
need torest in God in prayer, in order not


to lose contact with the mysterious sources
of our own selfhood.
Rest is thus essential to the purposes of
work, socially, ecologically, and spiritually.
It keeps nature fruitful, prevents humans
from becoming robots, and it allows us to
tap into the wells of creativity.

The unemployed
Again, while some work too much, oth-
ers are not allowed to work at all. We refer.
to them as the unemployed. They are
human beings whose creativity is denied.:
They live routinely with boredom. It's the
other side of the rat race.
It is because of the meaning and signifi-.
cance of work that unemployment repre-
sents a fundamental assault on human dig-.
nity. It dies the image of God the creator in
some people. It provides them with no
place to exercise their co-creativity with
nature, with other human beings, and with
God.
The modern ideology of work also mili-
tates against human communion. We see
the effects every day in the weakening and
decline of family life, or neighbourhoods,
and communal life.
The ecological degradation around us
has become clearer in recent years. The
priority of nature became the subjugation
of nature. We have watched the poisoning
of rivers and streams from industrial and
agricultural pollutants.
We worry about additives and preserv-
atives in the food we eat. We seem to be
running the risk of ecological suicide
through the slow contamination of the sub-
systems of air, earth, and water. This fear
of destruction comes not from nature itself
but form what modern work does to
nature.
Ecologically destructive work is pro-
foundly anti-spiritual. It denies the reli-
gious meaning of the earth, treating it'
instead as a dead object open to plunder.
The attack on ecological dignity is ulti-
mately an attack on the Creator, the source
of that dignity. The ecological degrada-
tion of work implicitly tries to eliminate the
image of God in creation.
Work needs to be reclaimed in all its
dimensions, as fulfilment for the worker, as
the workbench, to use the Pope John
Paul's expression, of human ingenuity and
creativity, and as facilitative of human
community.
Work especially needs to be regarded
as a fundamental dimension of our dignity
as creatures. Through and in our work we
co-create with God, that is,.we contribute
to the ongoing challenge of turning cre-
ation itself into a fitting environment for
human habitation.


What does it mean to love God with all your heart, soul and mind?


Unselfish
Jesus' love was completely
unselfish. He taught us to give,


expecting nothing in return. He
taught us to give, without blow-
ing a horn or even letting our


"CALLING MEN TO GODLY LIVING"
Bahamas Awakening
Official T-Shirt Day PRMIISE
Friday, November 4th, 2005


Bahamas Awakening
Men's March
Sunday, November 6th, 2005

Bahamas Awakening Fally
Friday & Saturday,
November 1 1th &1 2th, 2005
Clifford Park 6pm


9 bahramas



0 6
0


right hand know what the left
hand is doing, and Jesus prac-
ticed such love and giving.
Acts 20:35 says: "It is more
blessed to give than to receive".

Unconditional
All too often we put condi-
tions on our love. We say I will
love you if you do this and that.
Even husbands and wives who
have pledged to love "for bet-
ter for worse, for richer for
poorer, in sickness and in
health, till death do us part,
start putting conditions on their
love soon after the honey-
moon.
But when you look at Jesus,
you see a picture of uncondi-
tional love. While we were still
sinners, Christ died for the
ungodly.
John 15:3 says: "Greater love
has no one than this that He
laid down his life for his
friends." That my brothers and
sisters, is unconditional love.
So, to understand what it
means to love God with heart,
soul, mind and strength, we
need to know what those things
meant to the ancient Hebrews.
The heart was the place
where decisions were made,
where emotions were felt,
where thinking was done,
where secrets were hidden,
where desires came from. You
could decide with your heart,
feel with your heart, think with
it, hide things in it, and desire
with it.
The soul was the place where
decisions were made, where
emotions were felt, where
thinking was done, where
secrets were hidden, where
desires came from. You could
decide with you soul, feel with
your soul, think with it, hide
things in it, and desire with it.
And guess what you do with
your mind? Decide, think, feel,
hide, and desire. Heart, soul,
and mind are used inter-
changeably in the Bible.
All three of these parts
referred to the same thing. So
what's the point of the passage
then?
When the Bible says that we
are to love God with all of our
heart, soul, mind, and strength,
it doesn't mean that there are
three or four different aspects
of our existence, all of which
must love God. It means that


we are to love God with all that
we've got. It means total com-
mitment. It means total obedi-
ence to God. The greatest
Command of loving God with
everything you've got means
that we've got to be willing to
follow our freely chosen master
to whom we give total and
complete allegiance, attention,
and adoration. When the com-
mand to love God this way was
first given, it was surrounded
by a context that demanded
obedience.
You see love means obedi-
ence. I bet you thought that I
was going to tell you that since
Jesus came, love means some-
thing different; some touchy
feely emotion, some warm and
fuzzy feeling. Well, I'm not
going to tell you that, I can't.
To Jesus, love meant, the same
thing it meant in Deuterono-
my.
Remember today we talked
about what John wrote in John
14:15, he said, "If you love me,
you will obey what I com-
mand." Well if the greatest
command is found in John
14:16, "If you love me you will
keep my commandments."
Then the second must be found
in John 15:12; "My command is
this: "love each other as I have
loved you."
It would seem from reading
the scriptures that the best way
to love God is to love God's
children. The best way to show
your love to someone is to love
their kids.
When Jesus was asked what
the greatest commandment is,
he didn't hesitate. "Love God
with everything you've got."
But then he added something
which wasn't asked. He told
the questioner the second
greatest commandment.

Commands

There were hundreds of
commands from which Jesus
could have chosen. But the one
He chose was the one that
requires us to love God's chil-
dren. I think the reason He
chose that one is because it's
the best way of loving God
himself.
In 1 Corinthians 3:16 and 17,
Paul explains why the way we
treat each other is so impor-
tant to God.


"Don't you know that you
yourselves are God's temple
and that God's Spirit lives in
you? If anyone destroys God's
temple, God will destroy him;
for God's temple is sacred, and
you are that temple."
In Matthew 25 Jesus said it
this way; when you feed the
hungry, you feed me.
When you house the home-
less, you shelter me.
When you visit the impris-
oned, you visit me.
For some strange, inexplica-
ble reason, God identifies so
closely with us that our pain
becomes his, when we are
loved, he is loved. We are his
body, he is our soul.

Believing

I think sometimes we have a
hard time believing that God
identifies with us. That God
loves us so much he feels what
we feel. Some of us just can't
believe that God would want
to be so intimate with some-
one so, dirty, shamed, .broken,
worthless and hopeless.
James says that the word of
God is like a mirror. We stand:
before it soul-naked and see.
ourselves as we really are. No
pretence, no masks, nothing,,
to hide the wounds and scars of
sin. Some of us this morning
feel like Peter in the High:
Priest's courtyard, nailed by tho:
piercing eyes of Jesus right in~t
the middle of denying that we.';
know him.
Could God love something'
so filthy? Would He really'
allow us to come into His pres-.
ence?
Let me ask you this. Why;
would Jesus tell us that the first-"
and greatest commandment is:;
to love God with everything.'
we've got, if God doesn't first.-
love us with everything He:'
has? Why would God call us.:.
to love each other, if love isn't::
what He already feels about;
every one of us?
Let us resolve to become a:,
people who will love Jesus first;'
and then express this love,
found in Christ in all its form.-
towards all things. .
God says there is nothing we:;.
can do to get God to stop lov-:
ing us. His love will never, ever,
fade. This is what the cross ot.;
Calvary was all about. ,-1"


FROM page 1C


I I I I I I


PAGE 6C, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


I





THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005, PAGE 7C


THE TRIBUNE


Bahama Islands



Baptist Association


PASTOR
A GEOFFREY WOOD
MODERATOR


5Mnday, November 13t 5SatMrda November 19th, 2005 at

Temple Baptist Church, 134 Farrimgtom Road
< __


Surviving Pastors Who Organized
The Association To Be Recognized


PASTOR
HUBERT MOSS


PASTOR
EDISON ROBERTS


T


0


PASTOR
JOSEPH ZONICAL


,UK


"Go therefore make disciples of all nations..."
(Matthew 28:19)
In 1965 eight churches came together, under the
direction of the Holy Spirit, and formed the Bahama
Islands Baptist Association (BIBA).
Of the eight churches involved, four were in Nassau:
Central Baptist Church, Pastor Roland Bryan:
Temple Baptist Church, Pastor Alfred N. Brown;
Haitian Baptist Church, McColough Comer, Pastor
Barnabas Laporte and Providence Baptist Church,
Pastor Joseph Zonical. Two were in Grand Bahama:
First Baptist Church, Pastor John S. Wimbish and
Emmanuel Baptist Church, Pastor Nathaniel
Mackey. One in Ragged Island, Ebenzer Baptist
Church, Pastor Theodore Wilson and one in Acklins,
Philadelphia Baptist Church,'Pastor Hubert Moss.
The main objective of the Association was and still
is the Missionary Enterprize, where the membership
of each church is encouraged to use every
opportunity to take the gospel of Jesus Christ to all


the islands of the Bahamas and all the nations of BIBA is proactive. During the height of the South
the world as human and financial resources become African struggle the Association strongly petitioned
available. Mr Botha, by telegram, to step aside and make way
for a free fair election. The outcome is history.
The Association faced strong opposition from the
main stream Baptist who sought to deny them the As the Association moves into the future there are
right to exist. However, by God's grace, they stayed plans to:
focused on the appointed task ahead. Today, the
Association is still vibrant and continues to 1. Continue to strengthen the fellowship
financially assist in home missions in Ragged Island through more frequent visits to churches in
and Acklins and foreign missions in Haiti and the Family Islands, Haiti and Nicaragua.
Nicaragua, Central America. More recently, the
opportunity to expand the home missions in Ragged 2. Continue to equip all affiliate churches for
Island and Acklins and foreign missions in Haiti the effective working of the Great
and Nicaragua, Central America. More recently, Commission.
the opportunity to expand the home missions base
was made possible through the Light of the World 3. Expand the present outreach to every
Ministries led by Pastor Edison and his wife Sister continent of the world.
Madge Roberts. They are assisted in conducting
annual Vacation Bible Schools in Cat Island, Abaco, 4. Recruit young men and women, from within
Eleuthera, Andros, Grand Bahama, Inagua and New the fellowship, for both long and short term
Providence. mission assignments. God being our helper.


I


Sunday, 6th November
Sunday, 13th November


Monday, 14th November
Tuesday, 15th November
Wednesday, 16th November
Thursday, 17th November
Friday, 18th November
Saturday, 19th November


Promotion of BIBA in the Churches
Opening Session and Recognition of organizing
Pastors. (Event to be held at 11 am on Sunday Morning
at Temple Baptist and taped for broadcast on TV
Channel 12 at a later date.
Men's Emphasis Night
Women's Emphasis Night
Missions Emphasis Night
Associational Business Meeting
Youth Emphasis Night
Community Help Expo (9:00am 2:00pm)


(Volunteers are needed for the Expo on Saturday.
Please call 326-5581 for further information).


I


40THANNUA SESIONl


I





THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8C, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2005


Hurricane


WILMA


Re ief Effort
When disaster strikes, it takes individuals to make a difference; it takes people
to collect, pack, load, fly and distribute the aid, people to give medical attention
and people to help pay for it of the following individuals
International Rescue woul o respond so quickly.


Anna Maria Claux

Bahamas Co

Barry Ras

Karl &

Ch


l1ub


fhaus


on


Cho

Del

Dia

Doi

Eike


st


Mark C.V. Truit

Morty & Cora Rabin

Paul Pyfrom

Paul Turhquest

Pepe Thompson


eSpector 'r eishman

Roheptarron


Errol ]


Robert Steele
Sabrina '1eB


George PI

Ian Kemp


Jarred Barton

Jason Sweeting


I1


Meteorologists: Michael Stubbs


Trevor Basden

International Rescue is very grateful to the Officers from The Royal Bahamas
Police Force who give their spare time to participate in our Airborne Training
Program. The following volunteered as First Responders or support crews for the
Hurricane Wilma relief effort:


Calvin Ingraham
Charles Charlton
Kathon Hanna


Keisa Arthur
Marcus Smith


Raymond Rahming


OUR SINCERE THANKS FOR YOUR GENEROUS SUPPORT


TO SAVE LIFE, TO SUSTAIN LIFE & TO DELIVER AID
THIS AD WAS DONATED TO INTERNATIONAL RESCUE


I L~- ~C - - P ---. I - --I







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action

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or


1


I




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