Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00248
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: November 7, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00248
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text






"GIVE A HAND

CHILDREN Ymi't.
m* .3..


LOW 72F

r CLOUDS
S AND SUN

Volume: 101 No.284


The


Tribune


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION AGAIN


BAhe Aami EDITra0
BAHAMAS EDITION


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005


: decision td


Former PM due

to announce if

he will stand for

FNM leadership

- By KARAN MINNIS Mr Ingraham will be their next
Tribune Staff Reporter leader, they will support any-
FR Rone who is'elected.
-: FORMER prime minister "We're committed that who-
Hilbert Ingraham's decision as ever wins we will throw all our
to whether he will allow his support behind them, but Mr
name to be put forward at the "Ilngraham is our choice.
FNP-M convention in the elec- "He is our leader," said
ti6n for party leader will soon Anastacia Greenslade, a proud
be announced, said North FNM supporter.
Eleuthera MP Alvin "He's a good man, and ain't
Smith,Opposition Leader in the no one can beat him. It is he
House. that will lead this country to
Speaking to The Tribune yes- greatness. He only went on
terday Mr Smith said: "I think vacation, so now it's time for
Mr Ingraham knew for a long him to take over once again,"
time that there are persons in she said.
our party and outside our party According to Mr Smith, such
that appreciate what he has events are encouraging for his
done and want him to return, party.
".But you know what, his "Well you know any group
decision will be revealed in a within our party can demand
dciy or two, by tomorrow who they want to support," he
(today) you should hear from said. "Any group can choose
him," he said. and can push for who they want
On Saturday over 20 cars, to support. If they want to sup-
and about 100 persons partici- port Tommy they can do it, and
pated in a motorcade held in those who want to support
honour of Mr Ingraham to urge Dion they can do it."
him to return as FNM leader. According to Montagu MP
" We are confident that Mr Brent Symonette it is being
Ingraham is the best man for rumoured that Mr Ingraham
the job. We are confident that will make an announcement
under his leadership the today.
Bahamas will be a much better "I have heard from a few
place," said one participant. people that he will be making a
"'Mr Ingraham already said that statement tomorrow. If he puts
if he is nominated at the con- him name in the hat I am con-
vention he will not withdraw it, fident that the convention will
and we are confident that he elect him as leader," said Mr
will win because he is our leader Symonette.
of choice." Mr Ingraham has been under
On Saturday several partici- intense pressure lately to
pates in the motorcade said that
although they are confident that SEE page 11


'Mother' Pratt celebrates 60th birthday
---A BANQUET was held
at the Radisson Cable
vzBeach Hotel on Friday to
celebrate the sixtieth birth-
day of Deputy Prime Minis-
ter Cynthia "Mother" Pratt.
More than 100 persons
ranging from politicians to
community members
attended the function
In a message written to
Mrs Pratt and printed in the
programme, Prime Minister
Perry Christie extended
special words of apprecia-
tion.
"Having always been a
community and social
activist, sportswoman and
educator, it can be said that
'Mother Pratt' has truly
found her niche working
hand in hand with the peo-
ple of the community in
which she lives and where
she is respected and loved
5 .beyond words," he said.
See pages eight and nine
N CYNTHIA Pratt with Prime Minister Perry Christie (Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson) for more pictures


Government accused of stalling relief efforts


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
HUMAN rights lawyer Fred Smith
accused government of stalling hurricane
relief efforts on Grand Bahama when cus-
toms refused to clear $20,000 worth of sup-
plies.
According to Mr Smith, who is the pres-
ident of the Grand Bahama Human Rights
Association, the Humane Society at Grand
Bahama secured three boatloads of dona-
tions, including pet and human food and
medication, clothing and baby items from
Florida.
The shipment arrived at Grand Bahama
on Saturday. It has remained in a customs
warehouse for two days because the


Humane Society cannot afford to pay the
customs duty on the supplies which, as they
are for relief aid should be exempt, he said.
Mr Smith said they were, told that they
would have to write a letter to NEMA
requesting a tax exemption before the fees
could be waived and the goods distributed.
"We are calling on Prime Minister Perry
Christie as the Prime Minister and minister
of finance" to have the interference with
relief efforts stopped, said Mr Smith.
Mr Smith said that the Humane Society
wanted to act swiftly because it was aware
that there was a large number of animals
affected because their owners suffered
extensive hurricane damage. Inmany cases,
he said, the animals and their owners were
going hungry.


Woman gunned down

outside her home


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
A 30-year-old resident of
Nassau Village is fighting for
her life in Princess Margaret
Hospital after being gunned
down as she tried to enter her
home in the early hours of
Sunday morning.
According to police reports,
the woman whose name has
not been released arrived
home shortly after 4 am and
was entering her house when
she was shot multiple times.
She was rushed to hospital


and is listed in serious condi-
tion. Police said the circum-
stances surrounding the inci-
dent remain unclear, but they
have launched an intense
investigation.
The shooting is just one of
several that have occurred in
recent months prompting
police to issue strong warnings
to persons to be extremely cau-
tious as they enter their homes
after dark.
In other crime news, an
eighteen-year-youth is also
SEE page 11


He said that all the red tape requirements
are only making the residents, already
wounded from the storm, suffer more by
making them wait needlessly for NEMA
to act.
And, he said,-the fact that supplies were
not immediately distributed discourages
donations.
"They need those supplies desperately,"
he said.
Mr Smith said that government needs to
loosen up its hold on donations, because
there are a number of private, companies
anxious to help the relief efforts. However
he said many of the companies prefer to
distribute the supplies themselves.
SEE page 11


Oil spillage after

BEC malfunction


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
BEC workers had to scram-
ble to contain an oil spill at
Clifton Pier power station after
the reverse osmosis plant mal-
functioned this weekend,
dumping oil into the sea.
"On Saturday morning,
November 5, a BEC reverse
osmosis plant located on the
BEC Clifton Pier Power Sta-
tion compound developed a
problem that caused a large
discharge of water into some


old, disused trenches on the
Clifton property," the corpo-
ration said in a release yester-
day.
According to the release, the
trenches also contained a small
quantity of residual oil that
then mixed with the water and
was carried into the sea off
Clifton.
According to the release
once workers were aware of
the problem on Saturday, they
had to quickly stop any more
SEE page 10


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PAGE 2,IMONDAYNOVEMBER7,2005LIrN IEIW


New campaign 'will help


Bahamians regain pride'


* By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter
ALL Bahamian citizens will benefit
greatly from the new "My Bahamas" cam-
paign, said Tourism Minister Obie Wilch-
combe Friday.
Speaking at the official launching cere-
mony on Friday, Mr Wilchcombe said
that Bahamians who are capable of doing
and achieving everything have lost all
pride in their nation, and therefore this
campaign "will help them to regain it."
According to Mr Wilchcombe, "we do
not take, as we should, pride in our
nation."
"We have proven that we have
Bahamians who are as good as anyone
else in the world," he said, "but what we
don't have, or what we have lost, is pride."


"We are forgetting that we are citizens
of this unique country and that we should
be proud of it," he said. "Am concerned
about our future, and about our nation,
and I feel as though this programme will
change that."
This year-long campaign aims to "repo-
sition the islands of the Bahamas as a
greatly improved and more enhanced des-
tination," and focuses mainly on improv-
ing local tourism relations.
According to Mr Wilchcombe, the Min-
istry's efforts will require the involvement
of all Bahamians, including students.
"Already plans have been formulated
to secure the participation of all primary,
secondary and tertiary institutions," he
said.
"Students should be prepared to enter
the many competitions that have been


designed to educate them on these mat-
ters."
Additionally, he said, the Ministry is
also launching radio, television and news-
paper promotions that will expose adults
to some of the individuals who are already
making a significant difference in improv-
ing the environment and image of the
Bahamas.
Persons involved in these promotions
will include Mark Knowles, Bahamian
tennis player, Dellarese Frazier, employ-
ee of the year at the Cacique Awards,
and Kirkland "KB" Bodie, a local enter-
tainer.
Mr Wilchcombe said that,"these indi-
viduals will tell their personal stories, and
they will explain why they constantly
strive to improve themselves and their
work."


REJUVENATE'



FOR THE HOLIDAYS!









O N N OVW!


TOP OF THE HILL MACKEY STREET34*2213
TOP OF THE HILL MACKEY STREET*394*2213


* OBIE WILCHCOMBE
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/
Tribune staff)


I, V; (


* In brief

Phase one
is opened
at Exuma
resort
PHASE one of the marina at
the Four Seasons Emerald Bay
Resort in Exuma was officially
opened yesterday.
The marina, which is
designed as a deep-water mega
yacht facility, offers visiting ves-
sels a 24-hour port of entry with
notification for customs and
immigration.
The temporary harbour mas-
ter's office is outfitted with a
crew lounge, billiards tables,
restrooms, laundry facilities and
shuttle service to the private
beach club, pool and the Four
Seasons.
Phase two of the marina will
include the completion of the
remaining 103 slips, a dry storage
building, a private yacht club-
house, a members' exclusive
beach club, a cabana spa and fit-
ness centre with an infinity pool
and a Greg Norman golf course
which is currently ready to play.
As of spring 2006, the resort
will also have completed con-
struction on its European-style
casino.
"The master plan at Emerald
Bay has always been to create a
five-star enclave on Great Exu-
ma having every imaginable
amenity that visitors, members
and residents alike would want
at a location as ours," said CEO
Kevin Clemente.

Share
your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7,2005, PAGE 3


Final farewell

to softball star

Jackie Moxey

By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter
OVER 200 persons gathered
at Kemp Road Ministries on
Saturday to say their final
farewells to softball player
Jacqueline "Lil Stunt" Moxey.
Reflecting on Jackie's life,
her former high school princi-
pal Vincent Ferguson said:
"Jacqueline Armbrister as I
knew her some 26 years ago at
Aquinas College was a light to
her world.
"Not only in her study group,
pursuing business studies, but
she was always the light of the
softball team," he said. "Jackie
set her legacy by bringing
laughter and cheer and joy to
all, that is a legacy that you
should not let die."
In a tribute to her mother,
Jackie Moxey's daughter,
Jerdeshia, said: "I must and will
say no matter the problem or
situation my mother was always
there.

Blessing
"I know it's a blessing to me
every night and day to have a
one in a million mother and
friend like Jacqueline Jackie
'Lil Stunt' Michelle Armbrister
Moxey."
According to Jackie's
youngest daughter, Jeravinique
Moss, her mother was her
heart, her soul, her everything.
"I know she's in a better
place watching over me and her
loving family and all I can do is
pray to her and look up into the
sky and give her thanks.
"If it wasn't for her, I would-
n't be here today to say how
much I love her and give her
thanks for all she has done for
me," she said. "My love for her
cannot be described in words,
but that shows how much she
means to me."
Also speaking at the funeral
was Youth Sports and Culture
Minister Neville Wisdom. He
promised to honour Jackie's
memory in "some shape or
form" in the near future;
Ms Moxey, 44, died on Octo-
ber 26 at the Princess Margaret
Hospital. She was interred in
the "Garden of Love" at Lake-
view MbmorialGardens on ..
JFK Drive.

Tourism patrol

unit head speaks

out on 'lack of

communication'
By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter
THERE is little or no com-
munication between the Unit-
ed States and the Bahamas in
terms of Bahamian deportees,
said assistant superintendent
Christopher Rahming, head
of the new Tourism patrol
unit.
Speaking to the press last
week, Mr Rahming said that
the lack of communication on
this issue could lead to a major
increase in terms of local
crime.
"Any person who has been
deported back to the Bahamas
is a threat to our safety
because of the type of crimes
they get into in the United
States," he said.
"It has nothing to do with
race or nationality, but more
to do with whether or not if
they have a criminal intent
and that is what we have to
watch."
According to Mr Rahming,
despite the Royal Bahamas
Police Force having a Crimi-
nal Intelligence Bureau, which
looks into these matters, there
are still major difficulties with
communication.
"A lot of time persons are
deported and you get to find
out later that they were," he
said.
"There is some communi-
cation, but you must under-
stand that persons are deport-
ed from all over the United
States back to the Bahamas."
On Thursday Prison Super-
intendent Dr Elliston Rah-
ming said that as a people,


Bahamians tend to blame oth-
ers for their problems.
However, according to Dr
Rahming, the statistics show
that Bahamians have to take
responsibility for their own
country, as the majority of
crime is committed by persons
born and raised here.
According to Mr Rahming,
the Criminal Intelligence
Bureau is attempting to keep
"track of these individuals
because of their potential
threat to society."
"We are doing the best we
can," he said. "And we will
continue to do so."


Mitchell: little


excuse for


widespread


hurricane


devastation
* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
FOREIGN Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell told del-
egates attending the fourth Summit of the Americas
that there is an urgent need for governments to allocate
adequate resources to provide the greatest security
possible for citizens against the ravages of hurricanes.
Mr Mitchell attended the summit held in Mar Del
Plata, Argentina on behalf of Foreign Minister Perry
Christie who was unable to attend.
"Given all the available technology today, there is lit-
tle excuse for the widespread devastation that hurri-
canes continue to cause in tropical America," he said.
"States in the hurricane belt should re-assess build-
ing codes, from a scientific and technological per-
spective, to develop economically feasible designs that
could withstand the strongest hurricane force winds.
"Scientific and technological principles and prac-
tices must be applied in the development of land-use
policies, urban planning and zoning regulations, to
minimize the effect that mud-slides, storm surges,
floods, and the like, can have on our human settle-
ments."
"In the same way that scientific inquiry and tech-
nological application have been used successfully, over
the past one hundred years or so, to combat the ravages
of pathogenic diseases in human populations, so now
must we use scientific inquiry and technological appli-


M MINISTER of Foreign Affairs
Fred Mitchell

cation to stop the ravages of hurricanes and their
attendant disasters," he added.
Mr Mitchell also felt that too little time was spent on
the Plan of Action.
"The Plan of Action should be the practical blue-
print for hemispheric development and advancement;
and as such, much more resources must be put into
it. Otherwise, we are likely to be sucked into a vicious
vortex that would eventually make the summit's
process a mere talk shop and a largely meaningless
exercise."
Mr Mitchell said it might be useful for the plan of
action to cover a narrow range of readily achievable
objectives; a short list of priorities, so to speak, of
clearly identifiable and easily verifiable targets, based
on critical issues affecting the hemisphere."


Dion Foulkes makes final



appeal to party voters


By A FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
AS THE days wind down for
members of the Free National
Movement to elect a leader to
take the party into the next gen-
eral election, Dion Foulkes made
a final appeal to party voters.'
He released an information
packet outlining his career and
objectives with the theme: "The
world of tomorrow belongs to the
person who has vision today".
Mr Foulkes presented his pack-
age to. more than 200 members
- arid officers of the FNM Blue
Hills Constituency Association at
his headquarters on Saturday.
The packet includes a profile
Sof Mr Foulkes, details of his
reform and renewal agenda for a
21st century FNM, and an out-
line of his policy agenda for all
Bahamians.
Mr Foulkes is relying on his
track record while he served as a
Cabinet Minister for the FNM
government of 1992 to 2002; as
well as his triple portfolio, hav-
ing served as Secretary General,
Chairman, and Deputy Leader of
the party.
"Fellow FNMs," said Mr
Foulkes, "the past few weeks
have deepened within me my
decision to run for the leadership
of our noble party and, if elected,
to lead this blessed and beautiful
democracy.
"From Grand Bahama to the
islands of MICAL, from Blue
Hills to Garden Hills, in shopping
malls and radio talk shows I hear
people calling for a new style of
leadership and a more decisive
direction for the party and the
country."
Amongst Mr Foulkes' vision


TSa t em.a t.,


322-21157IL~ELL1


for Bahamians is the creation of a
Ministry of Environmental
Affairs. He said it would coordi-
nate the protection of the envi-
ronment from abbse by enforc-


ing effective regulations, and it
would also serve as a programme
to strengthen nationall
awareness of our national her-
itage".


Pay it forward for


those who made


the ultimate sacrifice


In the award-winning book
"Pay it Forward", Trevor, the
story's 12-year-old hero, is
tackling a school assignment:
think of an idea that could
change the world and describe
how you would put that idea
into action. Trevor's answer
is simple, yet so profound. In
the book, it starts a national
movement; in real life, it
spawned a movie, a charitable
foundation, and a global
initiative for good.

Trevor's answer was this:
"You see, I do something real
good for three people. And
then when they ask how they
can pay it back, I say they
have to Pay It Forward. To
three more people. Each. So
nine people get helped. Then
those people have to help.
twenty-seven." He turned on
the calculator, punched in a
few numbers. "Then it sort of
spreads out, see. To eighty-
one. Then two hundred forty-
three. Then seven hundred
twenty-nine. Then two
thousand, one hundred eighty-
seven. See how big it gets?"

The Royal Bahamas Police
Force Dependants' Trust
gives each of us a chance to
pay it forward. The Fund was
established to give something


back to the families of Officers
who lost their lives or suffered
permanent disability while on
duty. The "good" that these
Officers did in service to their
communities benefitted far
more than just three people.
Every day each one of us is the
beneficiary of the dedication,
commitment and sacrifice of
police officers.

Managed by a first-class Board
of Trustees, the Dependants'
Trust's primary objective is to
provide financial assistance for
the continued education of 29
cliildren of police officers killed
or injured in the line of duty.
This very substantial financial
commitment depends on on-
going community support and is
a pefect way for each of us to .
"pay it forward" in honor ofthe
sacrifices Officers made on our
behalf.

The Holowesko Fopndation is
pleased to support this noble
cause with a donation of
$2,500. Please consider making
a cash donation to the Trust as
well and adding the Royal
Bahamas Police Force
Dependent's Trust to your list
of worthy charities.
Contributions can be set to the
Secretary at P.O. Box N458,
Nassau, Bahamas.


THE HOLOWESKO FOUNDATION was established to support and
bring attention to the many good works being carried out in our
society Requests for information can only be made in writing to
P.O. Box N 942, Nassau, Bahamas.


IB BThe M.Ia-at-Mamthon *I
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DOOM C 1:05 3:30 N/A 60 820 1050
THEFOG T 1:15 3:30 N/A 600 830 10.50
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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


I









PAG 4, MONDAYN BE7,20TLi7iTOTHITORIUN


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. D UPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama


Water sports rules need to be enforced


LAST WEEK we discussed how the lack of
enforcement of existing rules, and the slowness in
introducing tougher legislation to control this
country's water sports industry is damaging the
Bahamas' number one industry tourism.
Further damage has been done by a UK tele-
vision documentary, seen by millions of Euro-
peans earlier this year, which advises holiday-
makers not to go on beautiful Paradise Island
beach. "It's just not safe," they were told.
As a result of complaints about the dangers of
this country's unregulated water sports, ITV Carl-
ton's television programme, "Package Holiday
Undercover", set up an undercover operation.
Its mission was to investigate a beach, which was
described as having "an appalling record for
injuries and unfortunately deaths too."
For two days Dave Garvey, one of the world's
top water sports instructors, went undercover on
Paradise Island beach. Mr Garvey, an adviser to
the Irish Sailing Association, is internationally
recognised as an expert in water sports safety."
The following is what he had to say at the end of
his assignment:
"From what I've seen in the last two days," he
said, "I'm not surprised that there have been
accidents in this resort. There doesn't appear to
be any safety culture or that safety procedures are
being enforced by anybody."
This observation is not true for the section of
Paradise Island beach, which is owned by the
resort and which is well patrolled by its own secu-
rity officers. However, their ownership only goes
down the beach as far as high water mark. The
problem exists below high water mark, over
which there is no proper regulation. This is gov-
ernment's responsibility.
This section of the beach and adjacent waters
was likened to a "wild west" scene with jet-skis
criss-crossing each other and weaving in and out
among swimmers.
Mr Garvey advised a minimum 100-metre
exclusion zone for swimmers off the beaches.
All power craft would be banned in this area..
There should also be clearly defined and clearly.
marked channels for powered craft to come in
and out from the beach, he said.
These exclusion zones are already in place. But
with no enforcement, power craft operators
ignore them. Under Bahamian law powered craft
cannot come within 200 feet of the shore. But
they do on a daily basis, because there is no one
there to confiscate their craft and withdraw their
licence for breaking the law.
Following are some of the incidents that Gar-
vey saw and which his hidden cameras pho-
tographed at the beach.
Two people on the beach were nearly crushed
by jet-skis, and two people were swimming out in
the middle of the channel in the path of jet-skis
and banana boats. "It's like a nightmare!" Garvey
commented.
Under Bahamian law jet-skis cannot be rent-
ed to anyone under the age of 16. But Garvey
invented a 14-year-old nephew to test the oper-
ators and their observance of the age restriction.
The camera then focused on an unnamed ven-
dor with long rasta-style locks. Garvey explained
to him that the boy was "very young, like 14, is
that okay?"
With an index finger to his lips, the vendor
whispered: "You've just got to keep it on the


quiet," his eyes darted sideways to make certain
no one was listening.
Further down the beach water sports operators
were filmed illegally renting a powerful 700cc
jet-ski to a 13-year-old American boy.
Cameras then zoomed in on a powerboat dri-
ver pulling his banana boat. He was breaking
the law because he was alone in the tow boat
with 10 or 11 riders on the banana boat behind.
Within minutes his boat was ploughing through
the zoned-off swimmers' area the area was
filled with swimmers. The tow boat operator was
not wearing a safety lanyard, which would stop
the boat's engine if he fell overboard.
Garvey and the cameraman then switched to
the parasailing rides. The operator, who was
named, produced a "closely typed contract" for
them to sign. The operator described it as a
"physical fitness form" and asked if they were in
good health. "But he doesn't seem too keen for us
to spend time reading it," commented Mark Dur-
den-Smith, the programme's presenter.
Garvey asked if they were covered by insur-
ance "or do you guys have it?"
"We have insurance, yes, yes," the operator
replied. But said Durden-Smith "the contract
says otherwise. It explicitly states that we're fly-
ing at our own risk and neither the operator (his
name was given) nor his company is liable for any
injuriess"
Garvey joins 10 tourists on the parasailing
boat. Everyone on board should have been given
a detailed safety briefing, explaining how to get
out of the harness should anything go wrong wJth
either it or the boat. There was no briefing. :
Although lifejackets were on board none of
the passengers, including the children, were giv-
en them. This was another safety breach.
Then with the boat heading toward the zoned-
off swimmers' area and his parasailor up in the
sky, the boat driver stepped away from the steer-
ing wheel to answer his mobile phone.
"I was very,, very c Ipcerned through that,
whole operation," said Garvey. "He left the dri-
ve position... the drivii'g'position while the boat
was still in gear, while the boat was still travelling
forward, and answered his mobile phone. And
basically at that stage the boat could have gone
anywhere. And that was just... that's just dan-
gerous."
All of this is shown on camera.
Durden-Smith told his audience that there
have been parasailing accidents on this beach.
He said that last year an American family
received a $1.7 million out-of-court settlement
after their daughter died on a parasail ride.
And then there was an earlier incident of a ski-
boat that zoomed past taking off the right arm of
a 13-year-old boy who was swimming with his
father. And, of course, there was the case of 3-
year-old Paul Gallagher, sleeping on the beach
near his mother, whose head was split in two by
an unmanned banana tow boat, which leaped,
engine still running, from the water onto the
beach and over the sleeping child's head. Over
the years there have been many more injuries
and fatalities.
No wonder the lawyer on the ITV progamme
could not understand why the Bahamas govern-
ment, "which could fix this problem tomorrow if
they were of a mind to," did not appear to be tak-
ing it too seriously..


eason for





concern


on '


EDITOR, The Tribune

YOUR October 11 edition
carried a letter by Mr Jerry
Roker criticising us for our pub-
lic statement and stance against
the topless/strip dancing activi-
ties of The Butterfly Club.
The letter writer 'correctly.
pointed out that other forms of
sexual immorality (fornication,
adultery, etc) produce more
devastating negative social
implications than topless/strip
dancing, and wrongly called us
hypocrites because we did not
call for fornication and adultery
to be made illegal as well.
On the face of it, Mr Roker's
illogical, subjective reasoning
seems to betray a personal bias
or hidden agenda because he
overlooks a very obvious dif-
ference between personal sexu-
al immorality and commercial
sexual immorality.
We state that difference now
for his edification: Unlike the
case of the Butterfly Club, in
which the Bahamas government
facilitated commercial sexual
immorality by issuing opera-
tional licences and work per-
mits for the eight Russian strip
dancers, no form of official per-
mit, licence or approval is issued
or needed for individuals who
choose to engage in personal
sexual immorality (fornication,
adultery, homosexuality, etc).
Hence the Bahamas govern-
ment is not responsible for the
personal sexual decisions that
adults make so we have no case
to put to them concerning per-
sonal sexual immorality.
As pastors, as it relates to
addressing personal,sexual
immorality (and sin in gener-
al), our task is to proclaim the
gospel of Jesus Christ which is
the only message that saves sin-
ners and can transform their
lives. However, both as respon-
sible pastors and citizens of the
Bahamas we regard it an oblig-
ation to hold our government
accountable for not passing laws
or issuing licenses and permits
to facilitate sexual immorality
in both private and public
places, whether there is free or
paid access to such places or
events.
Mr Roker incorrectly called
us hypocrites because as he said
we are known to be very selec-
tive in "picking our fights".
While the observation about us
being selective about the issues
we address is correct (even as
he is undoubtedly selective in
"picking" this issue), the con-
clusion that we are hypocrites
simply because we are selective
is wrong and illogical (which
may or may not be true in his


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dancers


case!) The reality is that we can-
not fight every battle even if we
wanted to. Therefore, we must
choose them wisely. In the pre-
sent situation, we believe that
the matter of public morality is
a worthy "battle" for us to fight
and we are spurred on by our
deeply held convictions that the
majority of Bahamians share
our values for public morality
as opposed to Mr Roker's.
Mr Roker also expressed his
concern about the employees
of the Butterfly Club who
would lose their jobs if the club
were to close down. However,
we are in sheer amazement that
he could express such a concern
while being indifferent to the
commercial sexual exploitation
of those unfortunate Russian
young ladies (eight of them
ranging in age from 21 through
35 years old) who need to be
rescued and protected from
their "sexual slave masters".
One must wonder: Is it per-
haps because they are foreign-
ers that Mr Roker does not care
about their personal welfare
and their dignity?
While we do not have time
or space to elaborate, for the
benefit of Jerry Roker and oth-
ers who may think like him, we
would mention that Russia
ranks very high among those


nations that are hot spots for
recruiting women and children
for the "commercial sex trade"
and topless/strip/lap dancing are
the "appetiser" activities 'of
prostitution (which is adultery
and fornication both of which
Mr Roker seems to be con-
cerned about). In other words,
there is more to it
(topless/strip/lap dancing) than"
meets the eye.
It is our understanding that
the work permits issued to the
Russian dancers and their Russ-
ian "owner" expired on Octo-.
ber 8th, and they were not
renewed. This being the case,
they may have already left the
country. Since it is very unlike-
ly that they will return to Rus-
sia, we are deeply saddened to
know that these "used" young
women will no doubt wind up in
another country and be thrust
deeper into the horrific an'd
dark world of commercial sex-.
ual exploitation.
Tragically, Bahamian gov-
ernment-issued work permits
would have aided and abetted
their sexual exploitation and
suffering wherever and howev-
er they progress in the "sex
industry" beyond our shores.
This should make all right
thinking and morally minded
Bahamians sad.

PASTORS ALLAN LEE,
LYALL BETHEL
& CEDRIC MOSS
Nassau
October 22 2005


Good lob BEC


EDITOR, The Tribune
I WOULD like to recall an
event that took place during
the recent passage of Tropical
Storm Rita in South Andros.
During the night, my electric-
ity flickered and I was
plunged into pitch-black dark-
ness.
However,I noticed a glow
on the outside coming
through a space in the wood-
en shutter covering one of the
front windows. Glancing
through the crack on tiptoe, I
observed that a light pole next
to my home was on fire; and
with the fierce winds, sparks
and flames were flying all
over the place. Needless to
say, I became extremely
alarmed.
Thoughts of what I was
going to do if the house
caught fire in all this wind
started to swirl in my mind. I
quickly found (I let my fin-
gers do the running) the
emergency number for BEC
in the telephone book with
the use of my trusted, "crab-
bing" flashlight. My land-
based telephone was not
working, and my cell tele-
phone kept disconnecting
after I dialled the number. By
this time the wind was getting
worse and the glow brighter.
What was I going to do!?


liz


"Why don't you try send-
ing a text message to a friend"
I thought. It worked. My:
friend (along with a few oth-
ers I was told) was able to'
contact BEC, I felt a little-
relieved. At least they would
check it out and possibly mon-:'
itor it until the winds died"
down. In less than 15 minutes
I saw the lights from a BEC '
truck in winds gusting to '
over 70-mph for sure. Amaz-
ing.
But to my astonishment,
they not only responded to
the call, those guys got up '
there with the bucket-truck,
put the fire out, did what else,
they had to do and had lights
restored to the community.
before the night was out. I
was overwhelmingly im-
pressed. Those guys risked'
their lives in such conditions'
just to do their jobs.
Acting BEC Manager in"
South Andros, Mr Bertram
Taylor, along with his team,
deserve the highest praise for
being on duty in such adverse
weather and seeing to it that'
property and lives are kept
safe. Thank you, South
Andros BEC!

HUEL F MOSS JR
Long Bay, South Andros
October 17 2005


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I t $60.00


PAGE 4, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005


THE TRIBUNE












*INi' I I,,X









I 6.P. p


ASK any Bahamian
A who lives on the Mon-
tagu foreshore, Lyford Cay,
Adelaide or South Beach where
he lives and he will assure you
that his home is in 'Nassau'.
Visitors to The Bahamas
(and even Bahamians them-
selves) have sometimes become
confused by this unusual aspect
of Bahamian common usage and
taken 'Nassau' to designate the
whole island and 'New Provi-
dence' the city.
Barbados, Bermuda and
Grenada are all, like our most
populous island, 21 miles long.
Barbados is twice as wide in
most places, Bermuda around a
fifth'as wide. But the same
understanding of the relation-
ship between the metropolis and
its surrounding areas exists in
both islands.
Just as no Barbadian living
anywhere outside the inner city
areas of St. Michael Parish


PERSPE

AN DR EW

metropolis in The Bahamas
functions for its inhabitants.
And it is owing to this, psychol-
ogy on the part of the governing
as much as the governed that
the city's functions have often
been handled in a way that is
less than optimal.
The lack of A proper commu-
nity psychology in New Provi-
dence informs every aspect of
the design and management of
the city and of the whole island.
Most basically, it has made it
very natural for successive gov-
ernments to avoid delegation
(something Bahamian govern-
ments dislike instinctively) to
any kind of local authority in
the governance of an increas-
ingly complex urbanity.


"In the absence of local authorities
for New Providence, traffic and road
planning, and commercial zoning
are all left to a central government
whose members seem to view the
whole island as one uncoordinated
sprawl, lacking any form of logical
communal segmentation."


would identify himself as a res-
ident of Bridgetown, so no
Bermudian from any of the
peripheral parishes would say
that he lives in Hamilton.
To anyone other than a
Bahamian all this will perhaps
seem merely logical, or even
banal. After all, as in the US,
Canada or Britain, both these
ex-colonies would have derived
their sense of what makes a
town or city from historical
Anglo-Saxon (mostly feudal)
laws and practices, which clear-
ly distinguish urban core com-
munities from their satellites
and surrounding areas.
Historically, the laws and
practices would have been con-
cernred with such matters as poll
taxes, liege law and ecumenical
organization. More latterly, they
would have evolved into town
planning concepts more in line
with modern concerns.
At any rate, most Bajans or
Bermudians (like most people
everywhere) will, as a conse-
quence of history, have a gen-
eral idea of a town as a locale
where most of an individual's
daily needs can be serviced
without leaving its limits.
Not so Bahamians. Here,
conventions of 'town planning'
have (with the exception of
downtown Nassau and Dun-
more Town, Harbour Island)
been either absent or followed
informal rules of convenience.
People simply settled at will,
with services coming later (often
on the basis of patronage) from
central government. Hence,
most Bahamian communities
were not 'towns' or 'villages',
but .'settlements'.
There is more to this obser-
vation than mere linguistics.
There'is a whole 'psychology of
settlement' that is today affect-
ing the way the most important





MONDAY,
NOVEMBER 7
6:30' Bahamas @ Sunrise Live
11:00 Immediate Response
12noon ZNS News Update Live
12:03 Caribbean Today News
Update
12:05 Immediate Response
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In the absence of local
authorities for New Providence,
traffic and road planning, and
commercial zoning are all left
to a central government whose
members seem to view the
whole island as one uncoordi-
nated sprawl, lacking any form
of logical communal segmenta-
tion.
Hence, one central licensing
board makes decisions
for the entire island as if it
were a single, sprawling coin-
munity.
Zoning, which falls within the
ambit of the Town Planning
Office of the Ministry of Works,
is guided by highly centralised
notions of where it would be
appropriate to locate commer-
cial or residential activities in
New Providence.
As a result, rather than being
clustered at intervals among
genuine communities, commer-
cial activities are spread gener-
ally along highways and impor-
tant streets, increasingly giving
the island the soulless feeling of
a 'new' American southern or
western town. This in turn
strongly influences the behav-
iour of residents, who tend to
(or, rather, have to) take to the
roads for even the smallest dai-
ly conveniences.
Few people in most countries
work in one town, live in anoth-
er, drive their children to school
in a third and go shopping in a
fourth. But if New Providence
were transposed (in purely geo-
graphical terms) onto Grenada,
Barbados, or other land mass-
es of similar size, then that is
exactly what most of its inhabi-
tants essentially do. The whole
island is one big, sprawling com-
munity with a 'centre' in the
Northeast, rather than a hinter-
land containing various centres.
In fact, the government is



TOICALI

IEXTERM 'INTR
FO PETPOLM


CTIVES

ALLE N

now putting the finishing touch-
es on a traffic plan that is sure to
maximize urban sprawl and the
related nuclear settlement pat-
tern of the island.
Rather than installing a road
system that would (in conjunc-
tion with commercial zoning
with a community emphasis)
encourage motorists to remain
in local communities, the
emphasis is now on getting peo-
ple into and through the 'cen-
tre' from peripheral points all
over the island.
Rather than finding ways to
spare people living in South
Beach or Cable Beach the need
to go into Nassau proper on a
daily basis, we simply come up
with better ways to facilitate
their passage. Sooner or later,
this will lead to levels of traffic
that no amount of new asphalt
roads can ease.
LOCAL POWER MAKES
LOCAL COMMUNITIES

In the 1990's an effort was
admittedly made to
address the lack of communities
in New Providence. The then
governing Free National Move-
ment settled upon the 'town
centre' concept as a means of
addressing this irregularity.
At the centre of the new
communities were a police and


fire station, a post office some-
times housing a computer centre
and a library. Such all in one
'town centres' were located in
Carmichael Road, Elizabeth
Estates and South Beach.
While the effort deserves
some credit, two primary criti-
cisms may be made.
Firstly, as a politician-led ini-
tiative, it bears all the suspicious
hallmarks of having been con-
ceived with too broad and con-
voluted a constituency in mind.
Politicians have 'sold' the idea
to a national constituency in
terms typical of modern political
rhetoric.
Hence, it is to be observed
that only a particular demo-
graphic group was targeted. Any
genuine approach to communi-
ty planning in New Providence
would have to concern itself not
only with the politicians' mantra
of bringing 'hope and help' to
the underprivileged, but with
the whole community, without
regard to social class or income
levels. If Elizabeth Estates is in
need of better planning and a
deeper sense of community,
then so too are the Eastern
Road, Sans Souci and Prospect
Ridge.
Secondly, and more impor-
tantly, it continues to reflect a
misapprehension among
Bahamian politicians that viable
peripheral communities can be
built without actual power being
.ceded away from the centre.
They cannot. Unless local deci-
sions on town planning issues
are left to local decision-mak-
ers, the whole thing is doomed
to failure.


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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005. r 5


s~~~" "








PAGEI 6, MODY OEME ,05 H RBN


LOCANW


No deal better than a bad deal




at WTO December meeting


* By SIR RONALD SANDERS
(The writer is a business exec-
utive and former Caribbean
diplomat who publishes widely
on Small States in the global
community).

F IVE of the "big boys"
in international trade
have assumed the role of guid-
ing discussions leading up to the
Sixth Ministerial Conference of
the World Trade Organisation
(WTO) due to be held in Hong
Kong in December;.As usual,
they are trying to work out
arrangements that will suit
themselves and then attempt-
ing to bounce the rest of the
world mostly smaller devel-
oping countries into accept-
ing them.
The five are Australia, Brazil,
the United States, India andihe 1e
Eurqpean.Union..
-The formation of this grb ip
of "interested parties", as they
are called, follows the usual pat-
tern of the two biggest players,
the United States (US) and the
European Union (EU), in
which they. attempt to manage
decision making in the
WTO. First, the US and the EU
attempt to harmonise their own
positions and then they include
big developing countries to try
to get them on board. Once this
is done, the theory is that influ-
ence could then be exerted on
other countries to fall in line.


But, so far in the discussions
that have taken place at the
WTO headquarters in Geneva
and elsewhere, the Hong Kong
Ministerial meeting -just like
the last Ministerial meeting in
Cancun in 2003 has nothing
-'oh offer for the Caribbean.
In Cancun, the refrain of the
Caribbean and other developing


WORLD VIEW


countries was "no deal is bet- where its people are not rele-
ter than a bad deal". And, so it gated to "drawers of water and
should be in Hong Kong as hewers of wood", and where
well. trade terms do not impoverish
_its economies.
The interesting thing about
The trade the group of five "interested
parties" is that it includes on
ruleS that apply the one hand the US and the
to large EU, and, on the other, India
O y and Brazil. At Cancun, India
countries and Brazil along with China and
u South Africa led the fight to
should not be resist the efforts of the US and
i. the EU to impose theiragenda-.
applied..tO t ---on-the-resfo-tfie world.
Whether the five will be able
-small ones to agree even a..framework to..
whose take forward to other countries
WhOSC is left to be seen, but such a
economies are prospect is doubtful given the
significant differences in their
already interests. It is to be assumed
that India and Brazil have main-
relatively Open tained close touch with the
alliance of developing nations
they formed for the Cancun
For what is at stake here is meeting; satisfying all their don-
the future development of the cerns to reach agreement iith
region in circumstances where the US and EU is an unlikely
Caribbean-owned businesses outcome.
are not overrun by companies Rightfully, the African
from large developed nations, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP)
group has already signalled that
"it is notgwilling-to.aceep a fair
aiccompli in the negotia-
tions". This position was report-
pecializing in: Building edly communicated to WTO
Installation- Storm Shutters Director General Pascal Lamy
ressure&Mildew Cleaning,Water "and the Chair of the WTO Gen- -
roofing,Painting & Vanishing, eral Council Amina Mohamed
'indow Cleaning, Replace Rotton of Kenya.
roodwork,Repair Cracks to This ACP position signals as
oncrete Walls,Drywall much their differences with the
installation, Roofing home large developing countries such
stallaton Roofingas India and Brazil as it shows
[aintenance, Tile laying interior differences with the US and the
nd Exterior "No job is too small EU.


* SIR Ronald Sanders


T he larger developing
countries want access
to the markets of the developed
countries through lower tariffs
.and other non-tariff barriers;
they also want the developed
countries to end export subsi-
dies and domestic support to
their own farmers which give
them an advantage in the world
market. Those desires are fair
as far as they go, but the larger
developing countries also con-
test special arrangements that
smaller developing countries
enjoy in the markets of the
developing countries.
Were it not for challenges by
developing Latin American
countries to the arrangements
under which ACP bananas
entered Europe, the
Caribbean's banana industry
might have continued to sur-
vive with proper reform.


The Caribbean's interest does
not necessarily coincide with
the concerns of all developing
nations, and on crucial matters
relating to the export of agri-
cultural products they diverge.
ACP countries have taken a
hammering on access, to the EU
market for their banana
exports,,andthey are faced with
another sledge hammer over
the sale of sugar.
EU proposals in respect of
both sugar and bananas hold
out increased unemployment
and wider poverty in countries
such as St Vincent, Dominica,
Guyana, Jamaica and Belize.
Fortunately on the sugar
front, on October 25th eleven
EU countries rejected the pro-
...posed European Commission
sugar reforms. They did so in
.their own farmers'- interest
demanding lower price cuts,
longer transition periods and
higher compensation exactly
what ACP countries have called
for in relation to the arrange-
ments, that the EU has
announced it will impose on
them.

T he sharp division with-
in the EU can block
movement in the run-up to the
WTO Ministerial meeting in
Hong Kong. Sugar producers in
the Caribbean would welcome
such a development.
In -the first full week of
November, the man with the
unenviable task of chairing the
Hong Kong Ministerial meet-
ing will be in the Caribbean for
meetings. Mr John Tsang, the
Hong Kong Secretary for Com-
merce, Industry and Technolo-
-gy will meet the Trade Ministers
of Barbados, Guyana and
Jamaica.
His job is to try to understand
the views of governments, try
to build a consensus and pro-
mote a successful outcome for
the Hong Kong meeting. Just
at this moment, his task seems


ill-fated. Of the nine Ministeri-
al meetings since 1988, four
have broken down because of
the distrust that exists between
the developed and the develop-
ing countries, and two of those
have been in the last three
Meetings. ..
In the case of CARICOM
countries, the matter boils down
to a simple issue: the trade rules
that apply to large countries -
developed or developing -
should not be applied to small
ones whose economies are
already relatively open and
whose volume of exports in
world terms is minute. They
should not be subjected to
"equal" treatment when they
are pitted against "unequals"
much larger and far better
resourced.
"Reciprocity"'. -be.twee.n.
CARICOM countries and the
EU, or CARICOM countries
and the US would become an
.unholy principle that would
enfeeble the Region and reduce
its countries to outposts of large
companies and countries.

If special and differential
treatment is accorded to
CARICOM countries under
WTO rules so that they have
longer periods in which to adjust
to new rules for agricultural
exports, for services an'd for gov-
ernment procurement and if
they are given the assistance to.
do so in conditions of good gov-
ernance within "their countries-
-the Caribbean would be bet-
ter placed to maintain its identi-
ty as a region and contribute to
global growth and development.
At Hong Kong, the
Caribbean should not be
bounced into accepting recip-
rocal arrangements with larger
countries and into applying
rules that weaken its terms of
trade. That would be a bad
deal.
(responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com)


ot o,


has a vacancy for the position of

CLIENT ACCOUNTANT




PROFILE:

A university degree with a major in accounting or finance
S* Certification as a CPA or be in the final stages of preparing
for the exams
Previous experience with a bank, trust company would be
preferred
-- ------------------


RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

Preparation of financial statements for trusts, pension funds,
mutual funds and managed banks
Assistance with reconciliation of custody accounts and
shareholder registers
Liaison with clients and management
- Administrative support (pensions, funds, managed banks)
* Ability to complete work with minimum supervision
* Good knowledge of software packages including MS Office
(Excel, Word, PowerPoint)
Knowledge of Bahamian bank, trust, mutual fund and securities
legislation
Positive interpersonal skills/communicator, good verbal &
written skills


The successful candidate will be offered a competitive
compensation package including benefits and bonuses
commensurate with his/her experience and performance.



Send resume no later than November 30th 2005 to:

The Human Resouce Manager
Fidelity
51 Frederick St.
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
f: 326.3000

e-mail: info@fidelitybahamas.com


I


I


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005






MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005, PAGE 7


THF TRIRUNE


LOCAEXSII


v^d2f


IN 1975, then
'M1inister of Tourism
",$.'r Clement
launched an
experimental
initiative designed
.16a bring visitors and
IB ahamians together.
'One year later, more
than 800 Bahamians
had signed up to be
delegates to the
world under the
People-to-People
Programme.
December will mark
the 30th anniversary
of the initiative, and
In Days Gone By
looks back at a
highly successful
venture that
changed the face of
Bahamian tourism.


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Refreshments will be provided.

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..._....__._ I






TH-IE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005


Cvnlthia 'Mother'
t! i I/I^i ft


VACANCY NOTICE

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited (BTC) invites applications from
suitably qualified individuals to fill the position of Associate/ Graphic Artist in its
Directory Publications Department.

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES

1. Create and design ads for the different sections of the Telephone Directories
using programs supplied.
2. Edit images to be used in the layout of display ads.
3. Convert files in different format as required by the printers.
4. Account for all ads completed at the end of the business day.
5. Familiarize oneself with all functions of the graphics area.
6. Download files from external medias.
7. Follow standards and guidelines as established by management.
8. Report any malfunctions or abnormalities of computer system or files to
immediate Team Leader or Manager.
9, Keep work environment and tools for work properly maintained, and observe
safety precautions and maintenance policies consistent with BTC's rules.
10. Assist the Team Leader or Manager in the carrying out of their duties and
perform any functions that from time to time may be deemed necessary by
the Team Leader or Manager.

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS

1. A Bachelors Degree in Graphic Design or
2. An Associate Degree in Graphic Design with four (4) years practical experience
as a Graphic Artist.
3. Must be proficient on PC and MAC.
4. Must be knowledgeable in scanning images to the correct specifications.
5. Must know how to edit images using Adobe Photoshop.
6. Must be able to layout designs in CorelDraw (PC) Adobe Illustrator (PC &
MAC) Quark Express & Freehand (MAC).

All applications are to be received at BTC's Head Office 21 John F. Kennedy Diive, no
later than Friday, November 18, 2005 and addressed as follows:

Director
Human Resources & Administration
The Bahamas Telecomunications Company Limited
Nassau, The Bahamas

Re: Associate/ Graphic Artist
________________________________________!\


* LAWRENCE Rolle, the 'Singing Prophet',
entertains the crowds


* MRS Pratt enjoys the music, sitting next to
Prime Minister Perry Christie


Pallet Racking


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Pratt celebrates sixtieth birthday


* MRS Pratt's birthday cake is carried in by officers from the police, the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force and prison security


* TANYA McCartney, former FNM senator; florner housing in.hister Algernon Allen, FNM; and
Frank Hanna, businessman



Your car.


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AUTO SYSTEM EXPERTS RD

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Factory scheduled maintenance is car care.
Midas services your car fully. Our system takes the guesswork
out of auto caie for every car model out there.


Deputy Prime Minister Cynthia 'Mother Pratt celebrated her 60th
birthday on Friday, with a large crowd of friends and colleagues
turning out to wish her well at the Radisson in Cable Beach.
Photos by Franklyn G Ferguson
I


43~


SCHOOL


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'S/e &/ C~oua4ew-'j C.buwy ctatiw~
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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005, PAGE 9


!1. r;,'uiiLitiirl l ;'hi/d ,,/lh *f fh""..I t.....







PAGE 10, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005


THE TRIBUNE
LOCA NEW


YOUR CONNECTION/TO THE WORLD


VACANCY NOTICE

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited (BTC) invites applications from
suitably qualified individuals to fill the position of Senior Marketing & Sales Representative
in its Marketing Department.

JOB SUMMARY:

The Senior Marketing & Sales Representative conducts primary and secondary market
research to determine industry and technological issues and trends. This position is
responsible for taking market and competitive research intelligence and translating that
data into recommendations for Product Development.

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITES:

Monitor, track and analyze technological trends and factors locally and
internationally to provide guidance for future strategies.
Conduct and/ or coordinate internal and external market research as required.
Develop and implement customer surveys when appropriate to gain market
intelligence.
Develop product development recommendations based on data received through
the above market research.
Interface with outside market research and competitive analysis firms as needed.
Have direct contact with customers and vendors.

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS

1. Bachelors Degree in Marketing or Business Administration with a minimum
of three (3) years in a market and competitive analysis type organization.
2. Strong computer skills, including the development of presentations with charts
and graphs.
3. Strong datatbase software skills, including but not limited to, Microsoft Access.
4. Experience in the telecommunications industry is a plus
5. Strong interpersonal and Communication skills.
6. Ability to make sound business decisions.

All applications are to be received at BTC's Head office, 21 John F. Kennedy Drive, no
later than Friday, November 18, 2005 and addressed as follows:

DIRECTOR
HUMAN REOURCES & ADMINISTRATION
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD.
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS

RE: SENIOR MARKETING & SALES REPRESENTATIVE


M PIANIST and singer Neville Peter, third from left, presents Deputy to the Governor General
the Hon. Paul Adderley with a copy of his latest CD titled Simply Hymn as he paid a courtesy cill
on the Deputy to the Governor General on Friday at Government House. Peter and fellow singer
Allison Mason will be performing at a benefit concert "Wonder of a Miracle" on Sunday evening
at 7pm at Abundant Life Bible Church on Abundant Life Road. Proceeds from the concert will go
towards the medical expenses of Rev. Ed Godet. Shown at the courtesy call, from left are Saneen
Cochran, manager Good News Music; Rob Cochran, manager Good News Music; Mr Peter; Paul
Adderley; and Naomi Taylor, sponsor.


[BED BATH & HOME 1


GIFT & BRIDAL REGISTRY
Harbou t3a iOO ig-,Centre
k Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448 A


(BIS Photo: Tin iylen)

Oil spill

at Chfto

Pier

FROM page one,
oil from escaping and use &eivi-
ronmentally friendly chemicals
to clean up oil in the trenches
and the shore area.
Yesterday, BEC workers
took additional steps to address
the situation.
"Although the sea is now
clear of all oil, BEC is check-
ing along the coast east'aind
west of the area to ensure that
there is no sign whatsoever .of
any oil in the sea anywhere
around the site.
"Measures are presently
underway to make certain tliat
similar incidents cannot occur
Sin the future. The corporation
regrets this incident hdI assures
' tie 'public of its conmitmenrito
environmental protection," the
release added.


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Freeport Oil Holdings Company Ltd. is seeking qualified candi-
dates for the position of FINANCIAL CONTROLLER for one of its
subsidiary companies.

The successful candidate must be a Chartered Accountant or
equivalent. Previous experience in a managerial position is
required. Knowledge of basic computer applications is required

The Financial Controller will be responsible for:

Preparation of financial statements, budgets and forecasts

Implementation and monitoring of internal controls

Reporting financial results to the Executive Committee


Salary and benefits are commensurate with experience


Interested candidates should forward applications to:


Ask for it at your favorite drug store.


Or by e-mail to arobinson@focol.com
All applications will be treated in the strictest confidence.
Application deadline: November 25,2005


- 1 -9--








THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7,2005, PAGE 11


I OA NWI


Government 'stopping

delivery of supplies,

FROM page one
Mr Smith said it was appalling that after all the problems
experienced during the relief efforts in the aftermath of hurri-
canes Jeanne and Frances last year, government would prevent
supplies from getting to residents.
Members in the House of Assembly recently passed the dis-
aster preparedness bill.
Mr Smith said he understood that government has to ensure
that there is not an abuse on duties, but said that clearly the gov-
ernment should be more flexible in a time of crisis.
"During a crisis, there will be some abuse, but the majority of
goods will be brought to assist the needy. There are hard-
working volunteers standing by ready and willing to help,." .
Mr Smith said non-profit organisations, churches, and human
rights organisations known to be responsible' and reasonable
should be given leeway.
"Once a crisis has happened and the customs officers see that
the items are relief items, then they should allow ,them to.be
brought into the country immediately."
Mr Smith also suggested that government compile a list of
such organisations prior to a disaster, so that when supplies
come in there is no "constipation in relief efforts."
Yesterday, a government spokesman said NEMA has no
interest in blocking any hurricane relief efforts and is working.
expeditiously to facilitate the residents of Grand Bahama. He
added that the government will certainly look into Mr Smith's
claim.

Ingraham decision today?


FROM page one
-change his mind about taking a,
back seat in politics. Support-
ers have' been trying to, get. a.
commitment from him that if
they nominate him, he will not
withdraw his name.
Mr Smith said that the motor-
cade is a great way to generate
more public interest in: the,
upcoming convention.
"The FNM convention, which
is scheduled to begin today,
seems to have generated more
public interest than the PLP!s .
convention, scheduled for next
week," said Mr Smith.
"No one seems too interested
in the PLP convention," he said.
"The FNM is the party of
choice, and the people strongly
believe that it's time for the
PLP to go, but clearly they are
more interested in what the
FNM is doing rather thart the
PLP.
"They're looking to the
future and it's obvious that they
are considering the PLP as a
thing of the past."
Mr Smith said there will be
several major issues for the par-
ty to discuss during the conven-
tion.
"There are several proposals


for the amendme
constitution and"
committin part of
to deawith platfof
manifesto, ,oU" co
to the Bahamian p
said .. *
"We are the only
commits ourselves
we put in our i
Those are our con
it is our guide.


ent of our
we are also
three days,
tais for our'.
)mniitment
people,"' ie"
y party that
es to what
manifesto.
nmitments,


Woman

fighting for

her life


FROM page one
recovering in Princess Margaret
Hospital after he was shot in his
right calf on Saturday. The
young man told police that he
was walking east on Sunlight
Village when he heard a loud
sound and felt a burning sensa-
tion in his leg. He was taken to
the hospital where he is in sta-
ble tohdition.
Police are also investigating
two armed robberies. The first
occurred at Budget Meats,
Yamacraw Road, on Friday
when a gunman entered the
store and walked away with an
undisclosed amount of cash and
* several phone cards. He is
described as of medium build,
i aria dark b'6wi dc6itplexion.
He had a towel over his face.
Shortly after 6pm on Satur-
day, Burns House on Thomp-
son Boulevard was also robbed.
Police were told that a man
about 5'7" entered the store.
He had a mask over his face
and was. in a camouflage suit.
According to police reports the
' mad field up .the employees,
forcing one of them to lie on
the floor while another opened
the company safe. The gunman
stole a deposit bag from the safe
and an undisclosed amount of
cash from the register before
fleeing the scene.
in Police investigations continue
into all.the matters..


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I Bank of The Bahamas
t L I M I E 0



Head Office
Claughton House
Charlotte & Shirley Streets
RO. Box N-7118
Nassau, Bahamas














The Board of Directors of Bank of The

Bahamas Limited is pleased to advise

that based oa the continued positive

performance of the Ban k an

extraordinary dividend of seven cents

(7-) per share was declared on 4th

November, 2005 to all shareholders of

record as at 15th November, 2005 and

payable as of 21st November, 2005.




K1 LAURA A. WILLIAMS
SECRETARY
4th November, 2005


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 1, MONAY, NOEMBER7AR200BTHE RIBUN


egot


ators fail to agree


on free trade proposal


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SyndicatedContent,

Available from Commercial News Providers"


YOUR CONNECTION TO0


THE WORLD


-W-%
Wp .,-

af mdb

4b


VACANCY NOTICE
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited (BTC) invites applications from suitably qualified
individuals to fill the position of Senior Associate in its Finance & Administration Division.
JOB SUMMARY
Perform varied accounting functions requiring familiarity with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles
and international Accounting Standards.
Responsibilities will include ensuring accurate input to General ledger, conducting regular monitoring of
revenue accounts and reconciling prepaid expenses and revenue in advance accounts. In addition, assist in
the production of the monthly Corporate Performance Reports.



Ensure that extract files agree to Billing summary reports
Ensure that debits and credits balance and that all GL accounts are valid
Ensure complete export of file to the financial accounting system
Check validation process before approval and update to general ledger.
2. Review of Cash andAdjustments interface
Ensure that extract files agree to Cash and Adjustment summary reports
Ensure that debits and credits balance and that all GL accounts are valid
Ensure complete export of file to financial accounting system
Check validation process before approval and update to general ledger.
3. Complete weekly and monthly investigations of all revenue accounts
Complete variance analysis of all accounts
Liaise with various departments for enquiries and corrections
Prepare manual journal entries where necessary.
4. Load the revenue budget into the financial accounting system on an annual basis.
5. Complete monthly reconciliations of prepayment accounts, including:
General Insurance
Vehicle Insurance
Rent
Miscellaneous
Directories
6. Complete Monthly Revenue in Advance reconciliation:
Rental
Cellular
7. Ensure that all general ledger accounts are introduced properly in the various categories:
Asset
Liability
Equity
Income
Expense
8. Journal Processing:
Ensure that all journal entries are keyed accurately and timely
Review accrual Journals -ensure that flags are :set properly and reversing
Journals are set for the correct period Approve and Update journals on a daily basis
9. Maintain Financial Reports
Ensure that all GL accounts are placed in the appropriate report per the class of account;
Ensure that report agree to the Trial Balance
10. Any other duties assigned by Department management.
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS
1. A Bachelor's Degree in Accounts or Finance with four (4) years experience in a related field.
2. Solid analytical and problem-solving skills, results oriented with close attention to detail
3. Excellent communication skills, both oral and written
4. Must be able to work under pressure and meet deadlines
5. Must be proficient with Mictosoft Office applications
6. Knowledge of Peoplesoft applications would be an asset.
All applications are to be received at BTC's Head office, 21 John F. Kennedy Drive, no later than Friday,
November 18, 2005 and addressed as follows:
DIRECTOR
HUMAN RESOURCES & ADMINISTRATION
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD.
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS
RE: SENIOR ASSOCIATE FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION


--
a


n. .- 0. -M*
L S e. b f 9 w
o m


Mercedes Drivers!
Rene Telle is no longer with Tyreflex.
I am now at the
new Mercedes Center on
Rosetta Street.

Telephone: 323-4957




'4S NOW HIRING
Store Managers

Qualifications:
You must be at least 25 years of age
You should have the equivalent of a high school
diploma
Past managerial experience is a plus
i You should have a valid Driver's license, good driving
record history
You must be available for day & night shifts, including
weekend
You should demonstrate strong communication,
leadership and people management skills
You should have the willingness to learn
You must have a GREAT attitude towards Customers
Benefits:
Annual Bonus a Health Benefit
Pension Plan a Paid Vacation

INTERESTED?!?
Submit resumes to Caribbean Franchise Holdings Ltd.
Town Centre Mall, P.O. Box SS-6704
Tel 325-2122 Fax 356-7857


N


D IG


I


- I r ~P s


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005


* -






THE~~~CRBBA TRBNNONAENVMBRWS05 AE1


Carlning in 'Cartagena




'I S* 9


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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 20Q6, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


~~S~CHEiD~liE


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THE TRIBUNE:


-A.GE 14, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005


thes date ad lctos:^

'.M atney's Ph a r mayMt
ilfB^T.?3esay5Noveber 22f
Lo e', olie R
91i^B^ ayi November 29,,.^^^^B
resciptin CetreRoset t







THE THIBUNE


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oIColina General

Insurance Agency


drug trade



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Share

your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


C^((lW


* VIl3ege Rd. Reeidsheet
M ebtldm fRle
PAWfa&e thwles aboe


Rom of oese
Fri &06S0oam- 12pm
Fn'-Set^siem-f iw


- I I- --~I--~


; ;;;.;;


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PAGE 16, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7th 2005


THE TRIBUNE


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"My work at The Tribune is rewarding
and challenging. I enjoy contributing
to the look of our newspaper while
meeting the needs of our advertisers.
I am proud to work here. The
Tribune is my newspaper."
ESTHER BARRY
PRODUCTION MANAGER
THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune


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PAGE 18, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7th, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


0


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00.


)od.


My Bahamas will operate on
two levels:.
,Within the community
In the schools


opportunities for
to pitch in and
Hitter for tourism in


Watch the press for c
and get with the
programme.







ft TRIUN MN71OANVB


4' ;h % Jv-
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*


* ACTING Governor
General Paul Adderley
(front centre) poses with
Prison Superintendent
Elliston Rahming (left)
and Acting Deputy
Superintendent Charles
Rolle (right) and prison
officers during the
Bahamas Prison Service
awards presentation, held
in the ballroom of
Government House on
Thursday morning
(Photo: Franklyn G
Ferguson )


ExploIm kill fhre I

cooy W corarg pm


,, *3qW.rt 4 fI4w|as
"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content- --


- .


Available from Commercial News Providers"


0 -


"CALLING MEN TO GODLY LIVING"
Bahaerns Awakening
official T-Shir Day PROMISE
Friday, November 4th, 2005 : -


Bahamas Awakening
Men's March
Sunday, November 6th, 2005
Baharnas Awakening Rally
Friday & Saturday,
November 1 th &1 2th, 2005
Clifford Park 6pm


f)a~iB


Are you rilblasing "


Are you raising "TRA


ILBLA ZERS" or "HELL-RA


ISERS"?


Need help wit h your children? T HEN COME... allow God to
give you the answers that you have been looking for to
nurture your children His way! BE THERE!!


Host Pastor
Rev. T.G. Morrison
& Family


Please contact the
church's office at
325-3556 to register.
Cost: $20


DYNAMIC, PRACTICAL AND ANOINTED TEACHING
BY VERY SPECIAL GUEST SPEAKERS


Sister Pastor


Cheryl Carroll


Wayne Thompson


Pastor
Barrington Brennen


November 11th 7:00 pm 9:00 pm
November 12th 9:00 am 3:30 pm
Zion Baptist Church, East & Shirley Streets


6(rdidltv /iA s yu t. its

3rdZ Annual

Open c5oua

LA 'rcvier w &fur fall
&a (5hrIs merchandise

Cbample cur murtmet foads

c7h all happening- at 'Te cy7Cme
Qteore
11th S 172th -ovember, 2005
Iandpport lde cwe OcTr//l
S1000am.-O0 Opm
.'-.&^am an .** i(^^^ 3y> h&eimn/li]


$L I I c 9 ii II


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005, PAGE 19


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 20, MONDAY. NOVEMBER 7th. 2005


BURNS HOUSE GROUP

Increases Efficiency With New Warehouse Facilities


The Burns House Group of Companies recently celebrated
the opening of its new warehouse facilities located
at the company's Butler & Sands location on John F. Kennedy
Drive opposite the Ministry of Works. The more spacious
modern warehouse allows the group to offer customers
increased-efficiency and an elevated level of service
and convenience. Outfitted with five loading doors,


EcLCuny, Scotiabani ,Lauvantius Boots, Group Financial Myrna Malve, HR Caribbean Manager, Heineken; Alana
Manager, BUG; Louis Carlo Ochb4, V. Citigoup Bahamas; McCartney, HR Commonweaith Brewery Limited; Michael
LeRoy Archer, Managing Director, BHG; Kieran Valey, Rela- Wight, Internal Auditor, C81; Joyanne Archer; Domnique
tionship Manager, CitibanqWinston Miller, Co!trfller Batelo Schewebach, Business Analsts Purchasing Manager


Guillaume Duverier, Group Comercial Manager Hon. Lesie Miller, Minsterof Trade &
Industry; Peter Van Brecht Deputy Chairman, BHG; Garett 0. Finlayson, Chairmain BHG;
Joyanne Archer; LeRoy Archter,Marnagr Director, BHG


a new organisation system, a cooler area for all refrigerated
products and customer service offices adjacent to the
warehouse, the new facility is state-of-the-art. Ample parking
is available and technologically advanced machinery is
used to assist in load transportation. Below are photos of
staff and friends who attended the Burns House Group Grand
Warehouse Opening.


Dennis Hanna, Warehouse Manager, BHG; Garett Finlay-
son, Chairman, BH; Sh'ron Saunders, Customer Service
Manager, BHG; LeRoy Archer, Managing Director, BHG


Peter Van Brecht, Deputy Chairman, BHG; Joyanne Archer; Gatett 0. Finlayson, Chairman,
BHG; LeRoy Archer, Managing Director, BHG; Neko Grant, Group Manager, Northern
Bahamas; Hon. Leslie Miller, Minister of Trade & Indusfry


Stanley Wilson, Trade Marketing Supervisor,
BHG; Erin Bain, Hostess; Wendell Seymour,
Marketing Manager, Buffer & Sands


Mark Finlayson, DirectorABDAB; Najah Finlay-
son; Andrew Quayfe, Heineken Caribbean
Financial Manager;, Massimo Von Wunster,
PresidentAmericas, Heineken International;
Joost Roldan, Financial Manager Americas,
Heineken International


Ed Curry, Scotiabanl Guillaume Duverdier,
Group Commercial Manager, BHG; Joost
Roldan, Financial Manager Americas


David Gibbons Jr, Director ABDAB; Najah Fin- Sir David Gibbons Sr., Director ABDAB; Peter Van Brecht, Deputy Chairman, BHG; Andrew Quayle, Heineken Caribbean Finan-
layson; Mark Finlayson, DirectorABDAB; Peter Andrew Quayle, Heineken Caribbean Financial Massimo Van Wunster President Americfr, riat Manager, Joost Roldan, Financial
Van Brecht, Deputy Chairman, BHG Manager Heineken International Manager Americas Heineken International;
David Gibbons Jr., Director ABDAB


Peter Van Brecht Deputy Chairman, BHG; Massimo Van Richard Byer, Wine Sales; Mark Firnlayson, DirectorABDAB; Joost Roldan, Financial Manager Americas, Heineken Intema-
Wunster President Amercas, Heineken International; Sir Hon. Leslie Miller, Minister of Trade & Industry Neko Grant, tonal; Guillaume Duverdier, Group Commercial Manager, BHG
David Gibbons Sr., Diector ABDAB; LeRoy Archer, Managing Group Manager, Northern Bahamas
Director, BHG


I I RI~BI~B~R~


PM --E[E





THE TRIBUNE


SUPER

VALUE
NOW ACCEPTING
A. SUNCARD
QUALffY RIGHTS ANW ICES RESEROKED


HAM


BED I


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7th, 2005, PAGE 21


lATH & HOME
HOM SALE
7\FL


t


Solid ConforWers 20% off


SI** I














PER LB


I


SWEET RED -T F 0


0 SWEET RED
SEEDLESS
GRAPES
99PER LB


Cherish Luxory Towels 20% off


r TRAY PACK
CHICKEN

BREAST

$499
4 PER LB
\ __ mJ


RED OR GOLDEN
APPLES,
LOOSE
3/$ 4100
IDAHO BAKING


Totally Home 5pc Shower Curtaiins
20% off


Coffee Makers 20% off


Chatea Sheet Sets 20% off




Wall Pictures $52.99
Wall Pu ctres $52.99


Totally Home 3pc Rug Set 20% off
A ,44_/


Single Pot & Fty Pans 20% off


EXTRA SAVINGS
Air Beds ......................................... 20% off
Table Cloths...................... ........................... 20% off
Kassafina Towels .............................................. 25% off
Fitted & Flat Sheets........................................... 20% pff
Touch of Velvet Sheet Sets............ .............. 25% off
Located: Harbour Bay Shopping Center
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448


D U MAmji


HARVEST FRESH
BROCCOLI
BUNCH
$499
HARVEST FRESH
GREEN
PEPPERS
$ I4.39
$PER LB


(?VJ7 ?U7L*J;


I ~


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PK' T- .9m2ff


S
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9


LIBBIT'
WHOLE KERNEL
CORN
OR SLICED
BEETS
15 OZ





.


'PAR EXCELLENCE


RICE


5 LBS
_________ ^


YK I'
/ 4


Cr


3F^


WINE RACK TOASTERS IRONS BLENDERS SHOWER CURTAINS
TABLECLOTHS KITCHEN CURTAINS WALL PAPERS WALL
PICTURES TOYS SHEET SETS TOWELS RUGS BLINDS*
COMFORTERS BED SPREADS BED RUFFLES MATTRESS PADS
FLATWARE SETS DINNERWARE SETS

Pay Less at Discount Mart
WE ACCEPT AMERICAN EXPRESS MASTER. VISA AND SUNCARI), VE ALSO REDEEM QUALITY STAMP CARDS
MACKEY STREET, TOP OF THE HILL (next to Super Value) PHONE: 393-3411/393-5569


SWEET DELICIOUS


f -it


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Residents of Paris suburbs still


at the mercy of criminal gangs




opyrighted Material

SSyndicatedContent
",Availab e from Commercial News Providers"


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LA CASITA
The Art of !s, I d Living
Mitchell Gold I Family jewels.
Our Nicki Collection defines luxury for everyday living. As part'of the Mitchell
Gold Platinum Collection, her generous scale offers a sumptuous sit like
no other. Her secret? Cushions thickly stuffed with a band of European
white goose down feathers. The Nicki Collection is available slipcovered
in a vast wardrobe of Mitchell Gold washable or dry-clean fabrics. Which
proves to be Just as luxe in regards to ease of care and versatility. Welcoming
of lss than perfect children (of all ages).


Bayt, 2IDoos es o icttiaAe
Te-24-5670
e ina if:a iaia aaitet


THE TRIBUNE


''AGE 22, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005





MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7th, 2005, PAGE 23


THE TRIBUNE


Caribbean Liv




This title basically hits the Caribbean
L Style of Architecture and Cuisine


Special Price:


*


10


NASSAU:
City Markets Lyford Cay
City Markets Harbour Bay
Super Value Cable Beach


Super Saver Stores
Lowes Pharmacy
United Book Stores
Island Merchant Stores
News Cafe


FREEPORT:
Winn Dixie Lucaya
Oasis Drugs
L.M.R. Drug


8 8


I


--








E 2, M


GN-288



MINISTRY OF TRANSPORT



PORT DEPARTMENT


Notice Of Sitting For New Providence Port Authority Board
To Consider Applications For Licence Under The Boat Registration
Act Chapter (277)

Notice is hereby given that a meeting of the New Providence Port Authority Board for
New Providence and the Family Islands will be held at the Port Administration
Building Prince George Wharf on the 24th November 2005 at 3:00pm for the purpose
of granting Licenses under The Boat Registration Act Chapter (277)

Any person entitled to and wishing to object to any application should do so at least
six (6) day before the date of the hearing by submitting his/her objections in writing to
the Board and to the applicant.

Persons attending the meeting on behalf of an applicant must produce written
authorization at the meeting.

Applicants for renewals are not required to attend, unless they have received written
n otification from the New Providence Port Authority.

The under mentioned persons have applied for grant of licenses as specified below:
RENEWAL JET SKI NEW PROVIDENCE


NP: 710 RCB



NP: 718 RCB


Rolle Renwick
P.O.Box N-9057
Nassau ,Bahamas

Rolle Renwick
P.O.Box N-9057
Nassau ,Bahamas


NP: 719 RCB Rolle Renwick
P.O.Box N-9057
Nassau ,Bahamas


NP: 717 RCB


Rolle Renwick
P.O.Box N-9057
Nassau ,Bahamas


NP: 715 RCB Rolle Renwick
P.O.Box N-9057
Nassau ,Bahamas


NP: 716 RCB


NP: 622 ATW


NP:139 ATE


NP: 140 ATE


NP: 121ATE


NP: 120 ATE


NP: 122 ATE


NP: 608 ATW


Adderley Telford
Nassau, Bahamas

Adderley Telford
Nassau, Bahamas

Cartwright Jerome
Nassau,Bamahas

Cartwright Jerome
Nassau,Bahamas

Cartwright Jerome
Nassau, Bahamas

Glinton Patrick
P.O.Box SB-50310
Nassau,Bahamas


BOAT NAME


No Name
9ft
Jet Ski
No Name
9ft
Jet Ski
No Name
9ft
Jet Ski
No Name
9ft
Jet Ski
No Name
9ft
Jet Ski
No Name
9ft
Jet Ski


CLASS PASS


D 2


D 2


D 2


D 2


D 2


D 2


USE


Rental


Rental


Rental


Rental


Rental


Rental


NP: 802 BSC


NP: 800 BSC



NP: 900 BSC



NP: 819 BSC


NP: 816 BSC


Rolle Renwick
P.O.Box N-9057
Nassau, Bahamas


Sears Alexys
P.O.Box SB-50016
Nassau ,Bahamas

Neely Keith
P.O.Box N-4733
Nassau ,Bahamas

Neely Keith
P.O.Box N-4733
Nassau ,Bahamas

Taylor Cynthia
P.O.Box N-4733
Nassau ,Bahamas

Johnson Dennis
Nassau ,Bahamas

Johnson Dennis
Nassau ,Bahamas


No Name
9ft
Jet Ski

No Name
9ft
Jet Ski

No Name
9ft
Jet Ski

No Name
9ft
Jet Ski

No Name
9ft
Jet Ski

No Name
9ft


No Name
9ft


No Name
9ft


No Name
9ft


No Name
9ft


No Name
9ft

No Name
9ft


NP: 609 ATW Glinton Patrick
P.O.Box SB-50310
NassauBahamas

--NP: 167 ATW Glinton Patnui.
P.O.Box SB-50310
^'*r ';'* 7_7


N: 166 ATW



NP: 116 ATE


NP: 820 BSC



NP,: 818 BSC



NP: 806 BSC


NP: 168 ATE


NP: 162 ATE


VP: 722 RCB


Glinton Patrick
P.O.Box SB-50310
Nassau,Bahamas

Mark Edwin
Nassau,Bahamas

Johnson
Watersports
Nassau,Bahamas

.Johnson
Watersports
Nassau,Bahamas

Knowles A.C
Nassau,Bahamas

Mejias Pedrito
Nassau ,Bahamas

Mejias Pedrito
Nassau ,Bahamas

Rolle Renwickl
P.O.Box N-9057
Nassau,Bahamas


NP: 721 RCB Rolle Renwick
P.O.Box N-9057
Nassau,Bahamas

720 RCB Rolle Renwick
P.O.Box N-9057
Nassau,Bahamas


NP: 720 RCB



NP: 723 RCB



NP: 708 RCB



NP: 706 RCB


NP: 705 RCB


NP: 707 RCB



NP: 709 RCB


Rolle Renwick
P.O.Box N-9057
Nassau ,Bahamas

Rolle. Renwick
P.O.Box N-9057
Nassau ,Bahamas

Rolle Renwick
P.O.Box N-9057
Nassau,Bahamas

Rolle Renwick
P.O.Box N-9057
Nassau,Bahamas


Rolle Renwick
P.O.Box N-9057
Nassau ,Bahamas

Rolle Renwick
P.O.Box N-9057
Nassau ,Bahamas

Rolle Renwick
P.O.Box N-9057
Nassau ,Bahamas


No Name
9ft
Jet Ski
No Name

Jet Ski

No Name
9ft
Jet Ski
No Name
9ft
Jet Ski
No Name
9ft
Jet Ski

No Name
9ft
Jet Ski

No Name
9ft
Jet Ski
No Name
9ft
Jet Ski
No Name
9ft
Jet Ski
No Name
9ft
Jet Ski

No Name
9ft
Jet Ski

No Name
9ft
Jet Ski
No Name
9ft
Jet Ski

No Name
9ft
Jet ski

No Name
9ft
Jet Ski

No Name
9ft
Jet Ski


No Name
9ft
Jet Ski


No Name
9ft
Jet Ski

No Name
9ft
Jet Ski


D 2


D



D 2



D 2
D 2



D 2

D 2


Rental


Rental


NEW JET SKI FOR NEW PROVIDENCE


Rental


Rental


Rental


Rental


REG. NO APPLICANT
I NB/01/05 Bethel Brendan
Nassau Bahamas

NB/02/05 Bethel Brendan
Nassau,
Bahamas
NB/03/05 Newry Mario
Nassau,
Bahamas


BOAT NAME,
No Name


No Name


No Name


CLASS
D


D


D


PASS
2


USE
Rental


Rental


Rental


RENEWAL BOAT LICENCE NEW PROVIDENCE


D 2


D 2


D 2


D 2


D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2


Rental


Rental


Rental


Rental


Rental



Rental


REG NO APPLICANT
NP: 1500. Bahama Divers Ltd
P.O.Box SS-5004
Nassau ,Bahamas

NP:4697 Bahama Divers Ltd
P.O.Box Ss-5004
Nassau ,Bahamas
NP: 60.55 Sturrup Jason
P.O.Box CR-56535
Nassau ,Bahamas

NP: 6614 Mckinney Kenneth
Nassau ,Bahamas


NP: 6496


NP: 1


Rental


NP: 119


Rental'


Rental



Rental


Mckinney Kenneth
Nassau ,Bahamas

Rolle Renwick
P.O.Box N-9057
Nassau ,Bahamas

Rolle Renwick
P.O.Box N-9057
Nassau ,Bahamas


NP: 6450 Sea Island Adventure
P.O.Box SS-5414
Nassau ,Bahamas

NP: 6397 Taylor Limas
P.O.Box SS-6411
Nassau ,Bahamas


NP: 6407


D 2


D 2


D 2


Tumquest Michael
Nassau ,Bahamas


BOAT NAME
"Dreadnaught"
42ft


"Dreadnaught
IV" 42ft

"Sky Rider
28ft


No Name
18ft

No Name
17ft

"Chilly Willy"
28ft


"Boss Lady"
28ft


"Transit"
18ft


"Fiesta Mail"
225ft


"Jolly Roger"
45ft


CLASS
B


PASS
30


B 45


B 15


B 10


B 10


D 12



D 12



B 5



A 253



B 80


USE
Charter



Charter


Charter


Charter


Charter


Parasail



Parasail



Charter



Mailboat



Charter


Rental


Rental


NP: 2254


NP: 6611


Rental


Tumquest Michael
Nassau ,Bahamas

Moss Luther
Nassau ,Bahamas


"Mary Jane"
38'

"Ace"
20ft


B 60


B 12


Charter


Charter


REG. NO APPLICANT


D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2


D 2


D 2



D 2



D 2



D 2


D 2


Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental


Rental


Rental



Rental



Rental



Rental


Rental


- 1 111 1 I I II _. I


PAGE 24th, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7th, 2005


THE TRIBUNE













LICENCE #
1035


RENEWAL MASTER'S LICENCE NEW PROVIDENCE


8081

6982


8139


7873


6458


7828


7618


C ptain Anthony J. Allens
\ Port Controller


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005, PAGE 25

INERATIOALNW


2005 Camry features:
*2.4 VVTI engine
*excellent fuel economy
*reduced noise and vibration -power windows, door locks,
ECT (electronically controlled and side mirrors
transmission) 'power driver's and front
*front and rear crumple zones passenger seats
-driver and passenger airbags CD/radio/cassette
*side impact airbags *6-speaker audio system
*ABS (anti-lock brakes) *climate-controlled air conditioning
*keyless entry system *woodgrain dash
*immobiliser security system 'alloy wheels


O very computer savvy
El people oriented
o a creative multitasker
0 a good communicator
O with own trans

WE WANT TO MEET YOU!
Top ad agency has immediate opening for traffic coordinator. Interface with clients,
media houses and international firms in this fast-paced and varied position. Proficiency
in Microsoft Office and Internet functions essential. Excellent working conditions.
Company-paid medical insurance. Salary based on qualifications and experience.
Send resume to: jopatsl 111 @hotmail.com


^- Syndicated Content, .

Available from Commercial News Providers"





girl's death was




caused by bird flu




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fo r %iManI'c


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3-year/6,00-mie factor warranty
a U a-^^^^^^^^


EXECUTIVE

MOTORS LTD

AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER
Parts and service guaranteed


MOVING FORWARD

( TOYOTA


Collins Ave (South of 6th Terrace)
Open Mon to Fri 8am 5:30pm
Sat 8am 12noon
Tel: 322-6705/6 Fax: 322-6714
E-mail: execmotor@batelnet.bs
Salespersons: Pam Palacious
Terrol Cash Barry Pinder


S@o


Available in Grand Bahama at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd Queen's Highway 352-6122


0 'a
0 -
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- ..
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NAME
Brown Troy
Nassau ;Bahamas
Davis K.Kenton
Nassau,Bahamas
Rolle N. Renwick
P.O.Box N-9057
Nassau ,Bahamas

Russell R. Scott
P.O.Box SS-5515
Nassau ,Bahamas
Williamson Leslie
P.O.Box SB-1733
Nassau ,Bahamas
Williams Patrick
Nassau ,Bahamas

Mckinney Kenneth
P.O.Box N-8868
Nassau ,Bahamas
Rolle R. Whitfield
P.O.Box CR-54716
Nassau ,Bahamas

Sturrup D. Jason
P.O.Box CR-56535
Nassau,Bahamas

Smith Dennis
P.O Box SB50544
Nassau ,Bahamas
Turnquest Michael
Nassau ,Bahamas


CLASS

A
B

B


B


A


B


B


A


A



A


B


7933


7084


6461


0 energetic & reliable


IF YOU are...


o o





THE TRIBUNE:


PAGE 26, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005


INERATIOALNW


Pirates that attacked luxury cruise

liner likely from p that

hijacked IN essel, says


0 am m m4


"Copyrighted.Material

SSyndicated. Content-


"r"d II


em


Available from Commercial News Providers"


IAM


*~ '

411- 49 m 410 4-
--
t~f
-- -
-
- -v.
_ .0 m


2005 FORD ESCAPE


-
,~c.*"'


Starting


at $29,995.00


$1000 Customer Cash Back Incentive
For October
License And Inspection To Birthday, Floor Mats, Full Tank Of Gas,
3 Year Road Side Assistance, First 5 Services To 12,000 Miles Free
3 Year or 36,000 Mile Warranty
See The Full Line Of All Your Favourite Fords At

FRIENDLY MOTORS LTD
THOMPSON BOULEVARD TEL.: 356-7100 FAX: 328-6094
EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com


e -
- a
a -


-a -


ab


- 4b


S


a


TEAK FURNITURE

* Gifts & Handicrafts *

ChristWna Selection

o*.- OPEN -,
1lOam 5pm


KURA KURA
26 Virginia St., Tel: 325-1389
1 blk west of Hilton hotel entrance, in large two storey
turquoise building, on one way westbound street


----- --- --------------- ----------


,rib


8


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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005, PAGE 27


iPO&


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THE TRIBUNE


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- 8






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 28, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7th, 2005


0r Bahamas Culinary Classic
Wine & Food Festival


Tbe Ministry of Tourism & Ministr of Agriculture


Congratulate the winners of The Bahamas Culinary Classic 2005


Winner Minister of Agriculture's Cup (for the best use of indigenous products) Alpheus Ramsey
Highest Scoring Wine Dish Wayne Moncur
Winner Best Display Lyford Cay


SHOWPIECE CATEGORY


STUDENT COMPETITION


Trocey Sweeting
Kerry Roblinson
Lou Johnson
Peter Dotagan
Whirfietd Sounders


GOLD
SILVER
SILVER
BRONZE
BRONZE


SIGNATURE DISH CATEGORY


Lou Johnson
Jamoall Petty
Wayne Moncur
Tracey Sweeting
Alpheus Romsey
Joson, McBride
Emmonuel Gibson
Tiffany Barton
Tracey Sweeting
Osborne Pintard
Jason McBride
Carvison Pratt
Osborne Pintaird
Shone Darrefl
Peter DolQgan
Wayne Mioncur
Wayde Sweeting
Patrice Bethel
Lynette Taylor
Antonio Wiilimams
Jason Johnson
Antonio W'illiams
Kermit Mackey


GOLD
GOLD
GOLD
GOLD
SILVER
SILVER
SILVER
SILVER
SILVER
SILVER
SILVER
SILVER
SILVER
BRONZE
BRONZE
BRONZE
BRONZE
BRONZE
BRONZE
BRONZE
BRONZE
BRONZE
BRONZE
BRONZE


CELEBRITIES CHOICE COCKTAIL


Atlantis Paradise IWnd
Cable Beach Resorts Radisson
Cable Beach Resorts.. Wyndham
SuperCtubs EBreezes
College of The Bahamas
Lyford Coy


RECEPTION


GOLD
SILVER
SILVER
BRONZE
BRONZE
BRONZE


Antonio Huyler
Nyke Joseph-
Osborne Pintard
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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005


SECTION -. -


business@tribunemedia.net


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Bidder does



due diligence



on BTC


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A mystery group
interested in
buying into the
Bahamas
Telecommuni-
cations Company (BTC) is cur-
rently conducting due diligence
on the state-owned telecom-
munications provider, The Tri-
bune has been told, with an
offer possibly "a couple of
weeks away".
James Smith, minister of
state for finance, acknowledged
that there was "an urgency" in
government circles to privatise
BTC, as the company's value
was being eroded on a daily
basis, both by legal competition
such as IndiGo Networks and
illegal Voice over Internet Pro-
tocol (VoIP) and callback oper-
ators.
Although a confidentiality
agreement with the Govern-
ment prevented Mr Smith from
naming the interested group,
he said: "There's no inertia. We
have an interested party.
"They are going through a
due diligence exercise, looking
at the company, and .at the end

SEE page 4B


Offer may follow shortly,
says finance minister


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A BAHAMIAN company
with a seeming physical pres-
ence in this nation played a


* MINISTER JAMES SMITH


central role in a scheme that
allegedly earned it and its affil-
iates $7.5 million in "illicit rev-
enues" from the Iraqi oil-for-
food programme, a US Senate
report seen by The Tribune


reveals.
A report by the Senate's Pet-
manent Subcommittee on
Investigations found that Bay-
oil Supply & Trading, a
Bahamas-registered company,
and its affiliates, in 2001 gen-
erated these funds by divert-
ing four million barrels of Iraqi
oil from its approved destina-
tions, a violation of both the
United Nations (UN) and US
requirements.
"By diverting oil that had
been discounted in price by
Iraq, with the approval of the
UN, for sale in North America,
and instead selling that oil in
higher-priced European mar-
kets, Bayoil was able to gener-
ate millions of dollars in illicit
revenues," the Senate report
alleged.
The report is the second one
to focus on .Bayoil, earlier doc-

SEE page 2B


Nassau/PI casino

revenues ahead

in 2005 first half


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
CASINO revenues for the
Nassau/Paradise Island desti-
nation were ahead of their 2004
comparatives for each month
in the 2005 first half, Ministry
of Tourism data has shown,
with the Atlantis and Crystal
Palace casinos generating com-
bined turnover of $558.535 mil-
lion.
The casino win percentage,
which is the amount of money


Total winnings
just under $100m
left after a casino has paid all
expenses, including customer
winnings, was 17.8 per cent for
the two New Providence casi-
nos, the same as for the 2004
full-year. Total casino winnings
for the 2005 first half were just

SEE page 6B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
AN appeal brought against an Industrial Tribunal ruling by the
Bahamas Hotel Managerial Association (BHMA), involving an
action initiated against the Bahamian Kentucky Fried Chicken
franchise, has been dismissed for being "without merit" and "mis-
conceived".
The Court of Appeal made its ruling after the BHMA's attor-
ney, trade union leader, Obie Ferguson, appealed a May 25,
2004, decision by the Industrial
Tribunal, which found that the
agreement reached between the SEE page 7B


Investing Is Only For Rich Folks.


That is the biggest lie we tell ourselves. Why speak


failure over your finances? Every day, thousands of


Bahamians are already investing and generating


millions of dollars in personal wealth. Why aren't


you claiming your share?


For professional financial advice In a friendly atmosphere, you should call:


Colina.
Financial .Advisors
Make Your Money Grow *


502-7010


MoneyGrows@ColinaFinancial.com


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P.O. Box SS-6270 Nassau, Bahamas
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to make it all work seamlessly together.



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Biahamian firm








Im il~iciCtrq



oil.reeus


Bahamas commercial

law firms are ranked
* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A LEADING international legal magazine has ranked
three' Bahamian law firms in its 'Tier 1' category for com-
mercial and corporate firms in 2o06, with another two placed
just behind in 'Tier 2'.
Those placed in the top bracket by the International Finan-
cial Law Review magazine's IFLR 1000, its guide to the
world's leading financial law
firms, are the firms of Higgs
& Johnson, Lennox Paton SEE page 7B


I


I I I I-llr


- --- -- ~I--~--------~--~ i' I I


b T, une








PAGE B, MODAYNOVEMER 7,2005THEITIBUN


The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 435.63 YTD 1.321%


* By Fidelity Capital
Markets
he levels of trad-
ing activity was
red hot, as
investors took
advantage of the
many good bargains in the
market. Over 70,000 shares
changed hands last week in
the Bahamian market, with 11
of the 19 listed stocks trading.
Seven advanced, one declined
and three remained
unchanged.
The volume leader for the
week was Commonwealth
Bank (CBL) with 70,176
shares changing hands and
accounting for 32 per cent of
the total shares traded.
The big movers for the
week were Colina Holdings
(CHL) and FirstCaribbean
International Bank
(Bahamas) (CIB), both of
which rose by $0.10 to close
at $1.50 and $10 respectively.
On the down side, Bahamas
Waste (BWL) lost $0.13 to
end the week at its 52-week
low of $1.27.

COMPANY NEWS
Consolidated
Water (CWCO) -
CWCO's BDR offering


International Markets


FOREX Rates


Weekly %Change


CAD$
GBP
EUR

Commodities

Crude Oil
Gold

International Stock Market Index


DJIA
S & P 500
NASDAQ
Nikkei


closed to the public on Friday.
The issue price was $3.566.


1.:
1.1
1.7


1834
7492
1810


0.50
-1.39
-2.14


Weekly %Change
$60.58 -1.05
$457.90 -3.60

es:
Weekly %Change
10,530.76 1.23
1,220.14 1.81
2,169.43 3.81
14,075.96 6.64


Persons who were unable to
take part in the initial public


offering will be able to pur-
chase CWCO BDRs once
they are listed on BISX.
Colina Holdings (CHL) -
CHL has announced the
appointment of Terry Hilts as
its new chairman of the Board,
effective November 2, 2005.
CHL officials have said the
appointment of Mr Hilts as
chairman is "in keeping with
the corporate governance
guidelines that CHL recently
commissioned and adopted".

Cable Bahamas (CAB) -
CAB is on track to achieve
another banner year of profits.
For the 2005 third quarter,
CAB posted net income of 3.5
million, representing an
increase of $1.4 million or
67.89 per cent over the same
period in 2004.
Revenues increased by 14
per cent to total $14.3 million,
while expenses declined mar-
ginally to total $7.5 million.
Operating profit margin
increased by 7.6 per cent year-
over-year to 47.64 per cent
versus 40.04 per cent in the
2004 third quarter. Earnings
per share (EPS) grew by $0.07
to total $0.18, compared to
$0.11 for the equivalent period
in 2004.


BISX CLOSING
SYMBOL PRICE


AML
BAB
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
DHS
FAM
FCC
FCL
FIN
ICD
JSJ
KZLB
PRE


$ 0.73
$1.20
$0.80
$ 7.24
$10.25
$ 12.25
$1.27
$9.30
$9.17
$1.50
$ 10.00
$ 2.40
$ 4.35
$1.15
$ 9.25
$ 10.90
$ 9.94
$ 8:75
$5.87
$ 10.00


CHANGE VOLUME


$ -
$-
$-
$0.02
$ 0.02
$-
$ -0.13
$0.03
$0.08
$ 0.10
$0.10
$0.11
$-
$-
$-
$-
$'_
$0.11
$-


0
1000
0
1300
8450
0
4300
1700
22622
9094
12643
0
0
0
0
7830
600
0
637
0


YTD PRICE
CHANGE
-33.64%
25.00%
-5.88%
25.91%
28.13%
-5.77%
-29.44%
30.99%
29.15%
-31.82%
33.51%
60.00%
9.85%
-42.21%
15.63%
12.37%
0.51%
6.45%
-3.14%
0.00%


DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:
Freeport Oil Holdings Ltd (FCL) has declared a divi-
dend of $0.11 payable on November 15,2005, to all common
shareholders as at record date October 31, 2005.
Commonwealth Bank (CBL) has declared an extraordi-
nary dividend of $0.08 payable on November 30, 2005, to all
common shareholders as at record date November 15,2005.
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) (BAB) has declared a dividend
of $0.02 payable on November 15,2005, to all common share-
holders as at record date November 2,2005.
ICD Utilities (ICD) has declared a dividend of $0.135
payable on November 24,2005, to all common shareholders as
at record date November 10, 2005.
Bahamas Supermarkets will hold its Annual General
Meeting on November 17, 2005, at 9 am at its Head Office,
East-West Highway, Nassau, Bahamas.




Bahamian firm



gained $7.5m



in 'illicit' Iraqi



oil revenues


banks, hotels, agenicses, ret.1

bausenscu, g taw firns all over
The is and h~v sw ched to IndiGO



why haven't you?


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I FROM page 1B
uments alleging that the group,
including its Bahamian affili-
ate, paid "at least" $37 million
in illegal surcharges to Saddam
Hussein's regime under the
Oil-fo~-Food programme.
DocUments used by Senate
; investigators, and which have
been seen by The Tribune,
detail how Bayoil Supply and
Trading, the Bahamian com-
pany, was approved as a pur-
chaser of Iraqi crude oil on
June 17, 1999, after its affili-
ates made an application on its
behalf to the UN's 661 com-
mittee, which oversaw the oil-
for-food programme.
A letter dated January 18,
2001, between Bayoil Supply
and Trading and a Russian
company called Rosnefteim-
pex, was alleged by the Senate
to show how the two parties
amended a July 11, 2000, sales
agreement to facilitate the
$0.35 per barrel illegal sur-
charges being demanded by
Saddam's regime. The amend-
ment required Bayoil to pay
$0.35 per barrel above the
approved UN sales price.
Letter
The letter gave Bayoil Sup-
ply and Trading's details, not-
ing that-it was based in Nas-
sau, the Bahamas, with a PO
Box CB-12918 address. The let-
ter gave a phone and fax num-
ber for the company with the
area code '362', indicating that
it operated from premises in
the Lyford Cay area, something
that corresponds with phone


book listings for Bayoil.
The US Senate, report:
alleged that UN officials who"
oversaw the oil-for-food pro-
gramme had become con-
cerned in Spring 2001 about'
tracking the ultimate destina-.
tion of Bayoil's Iraqi oil that's
was approved for sale in North
America, which was discharged,
into a pipeline in Egypt. They
were attempting to determine'
whether it had been reloaded'
for its original destination, or'
transported on a different ves-.
sel to Europe.
Refused
Bayoil allegedly refused to,
co-operate with UN efforts to';
obtain information, and the.'
Senate committee drew on doc-'"
uments sent by the oil over-'
seers to Bayoil Supply and
Trading in Nassau, Bahamas,'-
asking for information about'
the oil shipped on two vessels,"
the MT Hellespont Paradise'd
and the MT Tina.
The UN Overseers added:
"As nearly six months have'
now passed since we first'
requested this information, we'
would like to advise that, in'
absence of a prompt response,
we have to inform the UN
Sanctions Committee of this
situation."
A response from David'
Chalmers, on behalf of Bayoil'
Supply and Trading, accused -
the oil overseers of being prej-
udiced against his company
and said they did not feel oblig-'
ated to provide the informa-
tion sought, as it was likely to
be used "out of context".


GET THERE. TOGETHER.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005


FIDEIT ARETWAP


i


hata you

walItig.for",















Bahamas regulator assists




$3m insider trading probe


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Securities Commission
of the Bahamas has been
involved in an investigation
that has led to the freezing of
about $3 million in assets, on
the suspicion that they repre-
sent the profits from insider
trading.
The Bahamian capital mar-
kets and investment funds reg-
ulator's involvement was
revealed in a press release
issued by its US counterpart,
the Securities and Exchange
Commission (SEC), which said
it had obtained a US court
order freezing the assets of
"unknown purchasers" of call
options relating to shares in
Placer Dome.
The SEC investigation
relates to a takeover offer for
Placer Dome, a Canadian-
based gold mining company,
that was submitted on October
31, 2005, by Barrick Gold Cor-
poration, a rival gold mining
company that is also located in
Canada.


If the Barrick offer is accept-
ed, Placer shareholders will
receive about $20.50 per share.
The SEC said that as a result of
the public announcement on
October 31, Placer's stock
increased by 20 per cent over
its Friday, October 28, close to
start trading on that day at
$19.82 per share.
Contracts
However, the SEC alleged
that on October 25 and 26,
"unknown purchasers", while
in possession of material, non-
public information, "used over-
seas accounts" to buy 10,000
call option contracts on Placer
stock through an account with
a US-based broker/dealer.
The SEC said: "As the com-
plaint alleges, over 5,000 call
option contracts were 'out of
the money' and set to expire
in November, within weeks of
the purchase. The complaint
further alleges that, as a result
of the increase in price of Plac-
er stock following the
announcement, the unrealised


profits on these option con-
tracts total over $1.9 million."
Hillary Deveaux, the Secu-
rities Commission's acting
executive director, did not
return The Tribune's phone
calls, so it was impossible to
determine what assistance in
terms of information provision
- it rendered to the SEC. How-
ever, the US regulator said it
was working with its foreign
regulatory counterparts to
identify the account holder.
However, an article pub-
lished in last Friday's Toronto
Globe and Mail, drawing on
the contents of the SEC law-
suit, said the account that has
been frozen is in the name of
Banque SCS Alliance, a Gene-
va-based private bank that also
has an office in the Bahamas.
Given this, the Securities
Commission's involvement is
likely to be connected to the
Banque SCS Alliance branch
in the Bahamas, although there
is nothing to suggest that it, nor
its officers, directors and
employees, have done anything
wrong.


Credit control reliance


hurts bank competition


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE absence of interest rate
competition in the Bahamian
commercial banking industry
could be "an unintended con-
sequence" of the Central
Bank's reliance on credit con-
trols in monetary policy, the
International Monetary Fund
(IMF) believes.
In a paper on how the
Bahamas could reform its mon-
etary framework, the IMF said
lending and deposit rates in the
nation's commercial banking
sector had been "remarkably
stable", with the banks not
competing on interest rates
despite the presence of excess
liquidity in the sector.
The IMF, in a paper, noted
the lack of price competition
among banks, and said: "This
may be an unintended conse-
quence of the long-standing
reliance on credit controls,
which have reduced the scope
and incentive for banks to gain
market shares by adjusting
lending rates."
The Central Bank had long
used such controls, along with
capital flow restrictions, to
manage liquidity due to what
was perceived as a domestic
credit market that lacked the
depth to support open market
operations by the regulator.
However, the IMF said the
Central Bank was becoming
concerned at the "microeco-
nomic distortions" arising from
its direct controls. Changes in
the discount rate had always
played a secondary role.
To maintain the Bahamian
dollar's one-to-one peg with
the US dollar, the Central
Bank needed to keep an eye
on the nation's external
reserves, and had to maintain
external assets that were the
equivalent of at least 50 per
cent of demand liabilities.
However, the IMF said that
since 2003, reserves had been
targeted at 100 per cent of base
money or more, exceeding the
statutory limit.
Acknowledging that the cur-
rent system had "worked rea-
sonably well" in achieving the
Central Bank's objectives, with
external reserves having recov-
ered "sharply" form the low
experienced post-September
11. And in the two years
between September 2001 and
the end of 2003, aggregate
bank; credit growth had fallen
to almost zero.
Yet the moves to deepen the
Bahamian capital markets,
including creating a secondary
market for government bonds,
reviving the Bahamas Interna-
tional Securities Exchange
(BISX) and increasing the use
of interest rates to indicate the
cost of money had forced the
Central Bank to look at setting
up a true money market.
As a result, it was eyeing a
gradual liberalisation of capi-
tal controls, something it hoped
would increase investment


opportunities for Bahamians
and generate increased com-
petition in the banking sector.
The IMF said the Central
Bank could consider setting a
formal operational target for
interest rates or the reserve
money supply, a tactic that was


useful in markets that had lim-
ited depth and exchange con-
trols.
The Fund also noted that
there was a limited supply of

SEE page 6B


STEAM COOKS
APPLICANTS MUST POSSESS THE FOLLOWING:
* DISCIPLINED IN FOLLOWING AND ADHERING TO SET RECIPES
* AT LEAST THREE YEARS EXPERIENCE IN PREP/COOKING
*AN APPRECIATION FOR FOOD PREPARATION
* AN APPRECIATION FOR CLEANLINESS AND ORDER
* STRONG SENSE OF URGENCY
* THE ABILITY TO WORK UNDER PRESSURE
FORWARD RESUMES TO EMAIL ADDRESS: RR@SBARROBAHAMAS.COM OR FAX #356.-0333




FOR RENT I


5 Bedroom, 4 Bathroom, Split Level,
Partly Furnished. Nassau East Blvd.
$2000 per month.


Commercial
12,000 sq.ft.
Spaces.


Building
@$12.50


(Brand New)
sq.ft.. Parking


Condo out West. Gated Community. 2
bed 2 bath. Fully Furnished. $2000 per
month



Call 328-4800 ask for

Leslia or Yasmine


placed through Fimat USA,
which conducted the Placer
purchases on the Chicago


The report said the account
was held at Fimat Frankfurt in
Germany, and orders were


0


dames begin November 19 at the D W Davis Gymnasium.
For a copy of the schedule log onto
www.cob.edu.bs


For more information, call 380895.


HEALTHY PEOPLE 2005

osted by The College of
N9XV E Venue:

SEastern Grounds, COB
Date: Wednesday, 9th November, 2005
^Time: 10:00 am 4:00 pm


I Opening Ceremony @ 10am
Remarks by: Dr. Rhonda Chipman-Johnson, Acting President, COB
Mrs. Linda Campbell, Pan American Health Organization

Healt Fair Booths^


Independent Beauty Consultant
INARU
Dudley Q, T & M Products
Lowe's Wholesales Agency
Healthy Lifestyle and Deli
International Orthopedic Therapy
GNC
Hollis Beauty Care
Women Crisis Center
Blood Bank PMH
Tupperware
Bahamas Food Services
Subway Sandwich and Salads
Asa H. Pritchard
Better Body Gym
Gold's Gym
Sea Venture
Bahamas AIDS Secretariat
National Nutrition Center
Nassau Agencies
Bahamas Council on Alcoholism


Doctors' Hospital
Trinity Naturopathic
Porter Cay Exchange
Tranquility Health Spa
Pump-It Up Fitness Center
Commonwealth Drugs Pedro Roberts
Department of Public Health/ Nutrition Unit
Cancer Society
The Medical Association for Doctors
Bahamas Heart Association
Snack Food Wholesale Ltd.
Bally Total Fitness
Health Education Unit
Lightbourne Trading Co.
COB's Counseling Services Department
Symmetry Products
Thompson Trading Co. Ltd.
DENT PLAN
ATLANTIC MEDICAL
FOOTCARE


ADVISEMENT AND REGISTRATION

Spr/n Semester



Advisement & Registration in Faculty Offices


Registration, Records Department: 9:00am 5:00pm
(including LLB, Masters & CEES students)


ABSOLUTELY NO REGISTRATION ON FRIDAYS


November 21
November 28


Advisement/Registration Begins
Bill Collection Begins


Board Options Exchange. It is
the Fimat USA account that
has been frozen.


Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs -


I I ,


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 4B. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


Emerald Bay opens marina first phase


THE Four Seasons Emerald Bay resort last Friday opened the
first phase of its marina on Great Exuma, with capacity to accom-
modate 47 vessels ranging from 35 feet to 175 feet in length.
A statement from the resort said the marina had fixed and
floating concrete docks, along with a high-speed fuelling dock. The
temporary Harbourmaster's office has a crew lounge, billiards,
restrooms, laundry facilities and shuttle service to the private
beach club, pool and the Four Seasons Resort.
The marina's Wahoo's Waterfront Restaurant is based. next-to-


the marina services building while awaiting the construction of its
permanent location, scheduled for completion in 2007.
"We are anticipating that the 'channel markers will be in place
in November to warrant the entrance for visiting Captains," said
Doug Black, vice-president of marina operations.
"The channel maintains 14 feet at low tide, with off-lying reefs
on either side of the channel.
"The new Exuma charter destination of a one-week itinerary
from-Nassau to GtatfExumia will allow charter companies to book


the Marina at Emerald Bay for embarkation or disembarkation,
call ahead for reservations and confirmation".
Phase Two of the Marina Village will include completion of the
remaining 103 slips, bringing the total to 160, dry storage building,
private yacht clubhouse, a members-only Beach Club, and spa and
' fitness centre.
Until the completion of Phase Two, visitors will have use of the
infinity pool, pool-side Pallappa Restaurant and bar, fitness cen-
tre and beach club at Grand Isle Villas.


Bidder does due diligence on BTC


A leading security firm is seeking





ELIGIBLITY CRITERIA:

Be between the ages of 25-45 years old.
Must be well-groomed and a good performer.
Must have the legal right to work in the Bahamas
No history of Felony convictions
A Ability to ready, comprehend, andperform written
orders, understands policies, procedures, and
instructions.
Must have a High SchooflDiploma or equivalent.
Positive attitude, great people skills, and career-
oriented. Ability to perform as a team player and
act independently.
Be able to pass a background investigation and
drug screening.
Must be willing to work nights, weekends,
holidays and overtime.

Success Applicants are entitled to:

A superior benefits package
Learning and development opportunities
Advancement potential
Award, bonuses and incentive programs
Exciting employee relations calendar

Interested.persons can contact
325-6170/4 between the
hours of 9am-5pm, Mon.-Fri.


FROM page 1B

of that stage they will be in a
Position to make an offer. But
that's a couple of weeks away."
In a bid to revive BTC's pri-
vatisation, which collapsed in
2003 after the Government and
its Tenders Committee decided
that none'of The three finalist*
bidders met their valuation of
the company and criteria for
enhancing, the .administration.
has quietly adopted a new
..process for private sector con-
sortiums to acquire "an inter-
est" in the incumbent operator.
Rather than employ an open
'beauty contest', the process
used in the run-up to the 2003
failure, the Government is now
employing a three-stage proce-
dure through which groups can
express an interest in BTC, con-
duct due diligence, and then
make an offer to, then negoti-
ate with, the Government. -
Stage one involves an inter-
ested bidder approaching the
Government, which will then
require information so it can
assess its "managerial, technical
and financial"...capabilities, its
"vision" for BTC and the


biographies and experience of
the group's principals.
The next step, which has
been reached now, is for the
interested bidder to conduct
due diligence on BTC, having
satisfied the Government of its
capabilities. Due diligence is
conducted after a non-refund-
able fee of $250,000 has been
paid to the Government, and
Mr Smith confirmed to The Tri-
bune that a sum has been paid
in this regard.
Finally, if both the Govern-
ment and the bidder are still
interested in "strategic
alliance", an offer will be sub-
mitted on "the terms and con-
ditions" by which it will seek
an equity stake in BTC.
It is unclear how much of
BTC would be available and
whether it will follow the same
formula as the previous process,
which envisaged a strategic
partner, taking a 49 per cent
stake.
Mr Smith acknowledge that
the need to privatise BTC was
becoming increasingly urgent,
as the carriers' long-distance
voice and Internet. businesses
were increasingly suffering


P from the pressure applied by
more efficient competitors.
He said: "Up to now, BTC
has not responded very well to.
competition iii that [long dis-
tance] area, and it suggests
. there is a need for a different
;:4 kind of. management outlook
that is more service-oriented,
More customer-oriented, rather.
than what you get in a public
monopoly."
The Government's policy
statement for the Bahamian
-, telecpr.munication sector
I involves the creation of "High
Technology Free Trade
Zones", something Mr Smith
said was related to plans to
"build an e-commerce platform
in the Bahamas as another pil-
F lar to our development and
diversification".
., This involved BTC provid-
ing fibre0o.ptic links throughout
the country; ensuring the"
Bahamiiin people were. "in
tune" with information tech-
nology, and expanding e-gov-
ernment and the number of ser-
vices that could be accessed and
paid for online.
Mr. Smith said he had met
last week with the Canadian
group that will expand the Gov-
ernment's e-platform, adding:
"They'll be going full scale at
the beginning of the year."
Whether the Government is
successful in privatising BTC
with the current group or not, it
'is unlikely to. realise as much
as the'$130 m nionioffered for a
49 per cenit stake mBTC by the
BahamaTel consortium last
time round. That bid featured
the private equity arms of Citi-
group and JP Morgan Chase,


and involved no leverage.
The real remaining value in
BTC is locked into its.cellular
monopoly, but this will end up
costing the consumer in terms
of both price and choice the
longer it is maintained. The
Bahamas is the last Caribbean
nation to permit a cellular
monopoly.
Bradley Roberts, minister of
public works and utilities, pre-
viously told The Tribune a
European-based group was
interested in BTC, and talking.
to the Prime Minister's Office
and Ministry of Finance.


CHESHIRE ACADEMY
Grade 6 to 12 plus post graduates
ww*cheshirecadenmarg

Residencesfor boy and girls
Culturally diversefamily environment
Dedicatedfacuy, small class size -
Encourages high academic achievement
Traditional college preparatoryprogram
Specialty programs include theRoxbury Support. Center
ESL, and the Postgraduate program
Founded in 1794, Cheshire AcadWey educates boarding and day students that hail from
25 countries, 20 states, and 57 towns in Connecticut, Cheshire is conveniently located
approximately -1/2 hours from NewYorkCityand 2 hoursfromBoston.

Mr. Micdeal "Bedi" Walker. Associate Dean Of Admissions, Head Boy's Varsity Soccer
Coach. will host an eveningfor personal family visits,

Comfort Suites
Paradise Island
Flamingo RoomA&B
Thursday 10th, November 2005
7:000pm-9100pm
Forteinfmw nationplt coiawer
Ms. aidgcat 324-1S06afterpn


Small established firm seeks
Attorney with up to 5 years
experience, salary commensurate
with experience.


Fax resume: 393-4910
or mail to P.O. Box N-1462




UB S

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. a leading international Wealth
Manager,.has an opening for a

Wealth Management Client Advisor

In this challenging position you will be responsible for
high net worth individuals from Europe. Your main tasks
are:

Advising and servicing existing clients
Supporting the acquisition of new clients

Proposing of investment solutions in the client's
mother tongue

We are searching for a personality with extensive
experience in international wealth management,
specializing in the fields of customer relations, investment
advise and portfolio management. A proven track record
in a comparable position with a leading global financial
institution as well as fluency in English, French and
German is essential.

Written applications by Bahamian nationals only should
be addressed to:

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources Management
P:GwWo 'N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


COLOMBIAN EMERALDS
INTERNATIONAL
is looking
To fill the following position: ,

Accounts Clerk

Candidates should possess the following basic
requirements:-

2 years accounting/bookkeeping experience
Completed recognized Accounting courses
Proficient in Quick books & Microsoft
Office especially Excel & Word
Demonstrated ability to do reconciliations
Experience in a retail/ sales environment
would be an asset
Good Organizational and Planning Skills
Strong Interpersonal Skills

Successful candidates can look forward to competitive
Benefits and Remunerdtion Package inclusive of
Training, Medical and Life Insurance. Pleaseforward
resumes to:

The Human Resources Manager
P.O.Box N-623
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 322-6607


Financial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information As Of:
04 November 2005

52wk-HI 52wk-Lo w Symbol Previous Close Today's Clos e Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ PiE Yield
1.10 0.73 Abaco Markets 0.73 0.73 0.00 -0.169 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.25' 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 10.25 10.25 0.00 450 1.456 0.340 7.0 3.32%
7.24 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 7.24 7.24 0.00 0.587 0.330 12.3 4.56%
0.85 0.70 Behchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.204 0.010 3.9 1.25%
1.80 1.27 Bahamas Waste 1.27 1.27 0.00 0.112 0.060 11.3 4.72%
1.20 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.20 0 420 000..00 ........ 0.066 0.030 18,2.. :. 2.60%
9.30 6.96 Cable Bahamas 9.27 9.30 0.03 1,000 0.618 0.240 '15.0 ...2.58%
2.20 1.50 Colina Holdings 1.50 1.50 0.00 900 -0.046 0.000 NM 0.00%
9.17 6.99 Commonwealth Bank 9.10 9.17 0.07 10,270 0.791 0.410 11.6 4.47%
2.50 0.96 Doctor's Hospital 2.40 2.40 0.00 0.429 0.000 5.6 0.00%
4.35 3.87 Famguard 4.35 4.35 0.00 0.428 0.240 9.1 5.52%
10.90 9.50 Finco 10.90 10.90 0.00 0.695 0.510 15.7 4.68%
10.00 7.45 FirstCaribbean 10.00 10.00 0.00 143 0.695 0.380 13.9 3.80%
9.25 8.39 Focol 9.25 9.25 0.00 0.675 0.500 13.7 5.41%
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 0.022 0.000 52.3 0.00%
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.94 9.94 0.00 0.526 0.405 18.9 4.07%
8.75 8.22 J.S. Johnson 8.75 8.75 0.00 0.526 0.560 16.6 6.40%
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 5.87 5.87 0.00 0.122 0.000 48.1 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.760 4.9 7.60%
52wk-HI 52wk-Lo w Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Veekly Vol EPS $ Div. $ P/E Yield
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 11.00 1.768. 0.960 7.5 7.25%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 d.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.044 0.000 NM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.33 13.33 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 .6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Lo w Fund Name NAV YTD% Last. 12 Months DIv $ Yield %
1.2593 1.1913 Colina Money Market Fund 1.259334 .. --- -
2.4403 2.0536 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 24403 .. ...-- -
10.6711 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.6711 ..
2.2754'----- '2.1675 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.275422"
1.1406 1.0755 Colina Bond Fund 1.140599" .
BISX ALL SHARE INDE X- 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-HMI Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change In closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the t It 12 rrthl..
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1. 1994 = 100
" AS AT AUG. 10. 2005/ "" AS AT OCT. 31, 2005
* AS AT OCT. 28., 2005/ AS AT SEP. 30. 2005/ ."* AS AT QCT. 31. 2005


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Ship three packages between Nov. 14th and Dec. 2nd, 2005* from our
FedEx Locations at EE Mackey Plaza, Thompson Blvd. and Norfolk House,
Frederick Street, and you'll receive free tickets to see award winning
films at The Bahamas International Film Festival.
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Legal Notice


NOTICE

CARLISLE INTERNATIONAL LIMITED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) CARLISLE INTERNATIONAL LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on November 4,
2005 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Manex Ltd., 3rd Floor, The
Bahamas Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas.
Dated this 7th day of November, A.D. 2005.


Manex Ltd.
Liquidator


Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Ltd.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC TENDER

Fidelity Bank Bahamas Limited, a leading provider of Financial Services in
the Bahamas is interested in securing the service of a cleaning company to
provide cleaning services for its branch locations in Nassau and Freeport.

Interested parties should contact:
The Compliance Unit
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-7502
Nassau, Bahamas.
Ph: 3217-5170 Ext. 5018 or 356-7764 ext 3183
SFax: (242) 327-5192
Email: malvern.bai: @ ag i ) .

The Tender period shall c loOse-at 5:.0 p.. ....... ,-


- a -
- a -
-
~- -
-~ a-


THE


TRIBUNE


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005, PAGE 5B


I


-


.


p - .







PAGE 6B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


0 A aA*
0[
I-ed 2irt .f



005 fl


produce 26.4 per cent and 28
per cent increases in win per-
centages for May and June
2005 respectively, compared to
their 2004 comparatives.
Their combined win per-
centage was also ahead of Jan-


NOTICE TO MARINERS

NOTICE IS GIVEN TO INTER-ISLAND CARGO
VESSELS, FISHING VESSELS, PLEASURE
CRAFTS AND OTHER VESSELS PLYING THE
AREA DESCRIBE BELOW:

SUNKEN OIL PLATFORM

Your attention is drawn to a sunken Oil Loading
Platform in position approximately:

26 30.3N 078-46.4 W

between North Sea Island Jetty and the shore,
with debris just above and below the surface.

Mariners should exercise extreme caution
when approaching this area.

Please be advised that a warning light will
mark the area described.

THE PORT DEPARTMENT



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

CUMMERBUND CO. LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 1st
day of November, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp.
Inc., of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

BIKINI SEA SHELL CO. LTD.


Notice is hereby given that the in accordance
with Section 137(8) of the International Business
Companies Act, 2000, the dissolution of BIKINI SEA
SHELL CO. LTD., has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore
been struck off the Register.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


OSHAWAN PUTA INC.

Notice is hereby given that the in accordance
with Section 137(8) of the International Business
Companies Act, 2000, the dissolution of OSHAWAN
PUTA INC., has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore
been struck off the Register.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


uary and March's 2004 com-
paratives, coming in 11.1 per
cent and 36.1 per cent up
respectively.
However, they were off by
22.4 per cent and 17.9 per cent
respectively on February and
April 2004's win percentage.
Casino drop, which is the
amount of money casinos col-
lect from the drop boxes locat-
ed at the end of each gaming
table, was ahead of 2004 com-
paratives throughout the 2005
first half for the Nassau/Par-
adise Island.casinos.
Again, with combined rev-
enues of $77.326 million and
$75.269 million for May and
June 2005, the Atlantis and
Crystal Palace casinos gener-
ated casino drop that was 25.3
per cent and 20.2 per cent


ahead of 2004's respective com-
parisons.
They were also 22.8 per cent
ahead of casino drop compara-
tives for March, when there
was a particularly large spike
over the previous year to
$112.754 million, compared to
$91.8 million. Usually, Atlantis
and the Crystal Palace only
produce casino drop of more
than $100 million in December
and January, the two busiest
months in the tourism season.
The win percentage for the
2005 first half fluctuated
between a 20 per cent high in
January to a low of 14.7 per
cent in February. The com-
bined win percentage of the
Atlantis and Crystal Palace
casinos exceeded 2004 com-
paratives in January, March,


May and June.
In the sportsbook side, which
involves casino patrons betting
on the outcome of sporting
events, such as horse facing and
football, the two Nassau casino
combined to produce a win
percentage of 4.8 per cent for
the 2005 first half, ahead of the
2004 full-year figure of 4 per
cent.
Combined
Atlantis and the Crystal
palace produced combined
sportsbook losses of $41,795
and $27,014 in April and June
2005, although they were prof-
itable during the other four
months.
Sportsbook write was ahead
of the 2004 comparatives for


all months apart from January'
and April, having increased by
29.3 per cent in February, 39.3
per cent in March, and 25.9 per
cent in June.
For the 2005 first half,
Atlantis and the Crystal Palace
combined to generate just over
$9 million in sportsbook rev-,
enues, and win of $428,313.
In Grand Bahama, compar-
isons with 2004 were rendered
meaningless by the absence of
the still-closed Royal Oasis,
which was still operating during,
the first half last year.
The Isle of Capri's casino al
Our Lucaya, though, managed
to produce an 18.4 per cent wi'n"
percentage for the 2005 first
half, gaining $12.951 million in
casino win from $70.435 mil-
lion in casino drop.,


Credit control reliance



hurts bank competition


FROM page 3B

short-term, domestic financial
instruments, while the level of
interbank transactions had
been reduced by predictable


and structural excess liquidity.
"Indeed, excess bank
reserves increased sharply dur-
ing 2004 and early 2005, as
strong external inflows out-
paced the private sector's


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, MELBOURNE PENN. of
Garden Hills No. 1, P.O. Box N-537, Nassau, Bahamas, intend
to chaigb'eay'rnm6 ioMELBOURINE SOUTH. If thear are any
objections to this chand'of name byDeed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau,
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication
of this notice.'


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, ETHNIE STUBBS, of
Freeport, Grand Bahama, The Bahamas, intend to change
my name to CHARLES ETHNIE STUBBS. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
F-43536, Grand Bahama, no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice.


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

IRONSTONE VALLEY LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 3rd
day of November, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp.
Inc., of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

CONROE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 3rd
day of November, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp.
Inc., of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


capacity to borrow," the IMF
added.
To develop market-based
policy instruments, the IMF
said the Central Bank could
issue its own paper for market
operations, but warned this
could lead to losses that might
force the Government to
recapitalise the bank.
Open market operations
could be conducted with Trea-
sury Bills, but the IMF warned
that due to legal ceilings on the
amount outstanding, the sup-


ply of bills might not be ade,
quate to ensure their liquidity.
Another option, the Fund'
added, was to auction short-
term Central Bank deposits to
withdraw liquidity, and repur-
chase agreements of govern-
ment securities to inject liquid-
ity.
Other considerations in
designing a money market, the
IMF said, were for the Central
Bank to identify counterpar-
ties and review its role as a
lender of last resort.


PUBLIC NOTICE

Ms. Olive Forbes, formerly of Mars Bay,
South Andros, is kindly asked to visit the
PENSIONS DEPARTMENT of the
National Insurance Board located at the
Board's Jumbey Village complex on
Baillou Road. For further information, you
may contact the Department at telephone
number 502-1500.


Legal Notice

NOTICE

EQUATOR ADVISORY SERVICES LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an extraordinary general
meeting of the shareholders of EQUATOR ADVISORY
SERVICES LIMITED is hereby called to be held at the Registered
Office of the Company on the 12th day of December, 2005 at 10:00
o'clock in the forenoon of that day.
The object and purpose of the said meeting is to have laid before
the shareholders of the Company the account of the Liquidator
thereof, Arthur Seligman, showing ti inner in which the winding
up of the Company has been co0.duc! the property of the Company
distributed and the debts and obl ar- of the Company discharged,
and also to hear any explanation that may be given by the Liquidator.
Dated this 3rd day of November, 2005.

Arthur Seligman
Liquidator



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


DONNIE GOULD INC.



Notice is hereby given that the in accordance
with Section 137(8) of the International Business
Companies Act, 2000, the dissolution of DONNIE
GOULD INC., has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore
been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


FROM page 1B

under $100 million, at $99.15
million.
The Atlantis and Crystal
Palace casinos combined to


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)















Union action against KFC thrown out


FROM page 1B

union and Restaurant Bahamas Ltd,
which trades as KFC, "was not in
effect because it had not yet been reg-
istered as required by section 50 of
the Industrial Relations Act".
The BHMA appealed on two
grounds. The first was that the Tri-
bunal "erred in law and by fact" not to
realise that while the agreement
between the two sides had not been
registered, it had been agreed and
honoured, and its terms were included
in the contracts of all members of the
BHMA bargaining unit.
Appealed
The BHMA also appealed on the
grounds that the Tribunal's finding it
had rino jurisdiction "is an error of
law".
In its judgement, the Court of
Appeal said that despite the appeal


grounds, Mr Ferguson "has been at
pains" to reveal the real dispute with
KFC "was whether or not the terms
which they were observing were, or
were not, binding" given the provi-
sions of section eight of the Employ-
ment Act 2001.
The judgement noted that subsec-
tion four of this section stated that
the Employment Act's standard hours
of work provisions did not apply to
workers who held supervisory or man-
agerial positions.
The Court of Appeal first asked Mr
Ferguson whether it had the jurisdic-
tion to hear his first ground of appeal,
which "seems to be a ground based
on mixed law and fact".
The judgement added: "We are not
quite sure what Mr Ferguson's answer
to that question is, although we have
been at this for quite some time this
morning."
The Court ruled that section 64 of
the Industrial Relations Act did not
give it the power to rule on "matters


of fact" already decided by the Indus-
trial Tribunal.
Interpretation
Mr Ferguson then argued that the
interpretation of a contract "can be a
matter of mixed law and fact", but
the Court of Appeal ruled that con-
tract interpretation was not the dis-
pute placed before the Industrial Tri-
bunal, either in relation to the old
agreement between the BHMA and
KFC in 1998, or the new one entered
into in 2004.
Instead, the initial dispute placed
before the Industrial Tribunal had
been about the interpretation of a spe-
cific part the section related to the
exemption from the standard hours
of work for managerial and supervi-
sory staff.
The Court of Appeal ruled that
both the 1998 and 2004 contracts
between the BHMA and KFC con-
tained provisions for, the hours of


work for the union's members.
However, by virtue of the Employ-
ment Act statutes, the court ruled:
"The statute itself, in our judgement,
creates the exception from its opera-
tion as regards managerial and super-
visory staff. It seems quite clear on its
terms that it cannot apply to that cat-
egory of persons."
On the second ground of the
BHMA's appeal, the Court of Appeal
recorded that the 1998 agreement with
KFC was "more favourable" to union
members than what the law provided
for under the then Fair Labour Stan-
dards Act.
And the 2004 agreement contained
an "identical provision" on hours of
work to the 1998 agreement, although
both parties should have known the
Employment Act had replaced the
previous legislation when it was nego-
tiated.
The Court of Appeal ruled: "Parties
are free under the law to contract
what terms they consider to be


favourable to them. If they choose to
contract what seems more burden-
some an agreement than the general
law provides, that is their right. That
cannot be changed by a simple inter-
pretation of a statute which does not
deal with the issue. In this case, it was
a simple matter of statutory interpre-
tation."
Adding that the case should never
have been brought before the Indus-
trial Tribunal, the Court of Appeal
said the whole issue related to inter-
pretation of a statute, and a declara-
tion as to whether the Employment
Act's hours of work provision applied.
Court
The court said: "That is what should
have been asked for and should then
have been answered by the appropri-
ate forum, not the Tribunal, whose
jurisdiction is entirely statutory and
who is not given any statutory author-
ity to make a declaration of right".


Bahamas commercial law firms are ranked


FROM page 1B
and McKinney, Bancroft &
Hughes.
In Tier 2 are Callenders &
Co and, perhaps somewhat sur-
prisingly, Graham Thompson
& Co.
In its analysis of the five law
firms, IFLR 1000 described
Higgs & Johnson as "univer-
sally recognised as one of the
leading law firms in the
Bahamas", with 100 staff work-
ing from three offices.
Describing the firm as having


"the biggest trust practice in
the Bahamas", the IFLR 1000
described Higgs & Johnson as
enjoying a consistent amount
of work relating to mortgages,
loans and other banking prod-
ucts due to its close ties with
many banking institutions.
While younger than its rivals,
Lennox Paton was described
by IFLR 1000 as having "made
its mark" on the Bahamian
legal scene, and was the only
one of the rated firms to have
expanded outside the
Caribbean through its London


NOTICE
To the general public the office of
COOKE-MCIVER & CO.
has relocated to
HEPBURN HOUSE
Shirley Street & Sears Road, First Floor
Please contact us at 1-242-356-5613/356-5491
or email us @ cookemciver@sDeedwavinternet.com
for any further details.




FOR LEASE









LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


GIANFAR LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 3rd
day of November, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp.
Inc., of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


SEASIDE INC.

Notice is hereby given that the in accordance
with Section 137(8) of the International Business
Companies Act, 2000, the dissolution of SEASIDE INC.,
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.,





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


office.
Partner Michael Paton was
praised for his financial exper-
tise, particularly on securitisa-
tion, while the firm's affiliate,
Lennox Paton Corporate Ser-
vices, provided administrative,
management and fiduciary ser-
vices to special purpose vehi-
cles involved in such transac-
tions.
McKinney, Bancroft &
Hughes, like Higgs & Johnson,
was praised for its financial ser-
vices ties, meaning it was often
looked to for "advice on the
full range" of banking and


financial law issues.
The IFLR 1000 drew on
quotes from market peers
claiming that Callenders & Co
was "not as prominent as it
used to be" for its Tier 2 rank-
ing, having lose some lawyers
over the past year.
However, it acknowledged
name partner Colin Callender
as one of the Bahamas' "lead-
ing insolvency and restructur-
ing experts", and praised the
firm's attorneys for having "a
wealth of experience".
Graham Thompson was also
said to have lost some attor-


LEGAL NOTICi

NOTICE

NOUKARI INVESTMENTS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
18th day of October, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


HYDRUS VALLEY CORP.


Notice is hereby given that the in accordance
with Section 137(8) of the International Business
Companies Act, 2000, the dissolution of HYDRUS
VALLEY CORP., has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore
been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


MAXIMILLAN HOLDINGS

CORP.

Notice is hereby given that the in accordance
with Section 137(8) of the International Business
Companies Act, 2000, the dissolution of MAXIMILLAN
HOLDINGS CORP., has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


neys by the IFLR 1000,
although it noted that these
were "at the junior level".


The survey said the company
still had a "sought after" core
of 15 partners.


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

ELEUSIAN FIELDS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
section 137(8) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, the dissolution of ELEUSJAN FIELDS INC.
has been completed; a Certificate of dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP, INC .
(Liquidator)




LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


STAR BRIGHT INVEST LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 3rd
day of November, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp.
Inc., of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)






An international company is seeking to
establish a branch in Freeport and require a
dynamic and highly motivated individual to
oversee the financial and administrative aspects
of the operation and work closely with the parent
company to develop and expand the sale and
distribution of the company's products.

The candidate should have prior experience
with cosmetic products and be knowledgeable in
U.S., Swiss and IFRS accounting standards.
Knowledge of software systems including the J
D Edwards accounting system and Hyperion
reporting and consolidation systems would be
helpful. It is expected appropriate qualifications
will be held. The candidate must be fluent in
written and spoken English and French and
knowledge of other continental languages would
be helpful. The ability to train is essential.

An attractive remuneration package is
offered for the appropriate applicant. Persons with
Bahamian status preferred. Qualified persons
should forward a resume via facimile to 242-352-
3966 or mail to P.O.Box F-43913, Freeport, Grand
Bahama to be received by November 18, 2005.


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE






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TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005, PAGE 9B



Tributes paid to Jackie Moxey

FROM page one
dug-ouLt because, even if her team was losing by 10-
15 runs. you could still hear her mouth. She had a
spirit that you couldn't discourage because "you
didn't know whether she was losing or winning. She
always had a smile. I called her the great pretender
because even if she was hurting, you never knew
it."
Also making remarks were Minister of Education
.and Attorney General Alfred Sears and Minister of
Youth, Sports and Culture Neville Wisdom.
In his remarks, Sears spoke of Moxey's role she
.played as nation builder, adding that his constituen-
cy of Fort Charlotte is a "much better place" because
of the contribution that Moxey made, assisting
many persons, especially those recovering from
drugs.
In an emotional tribute, Jeannie 'Bubbles' Minus,
speaking on behalf of the Wildcats, said their late
motivator, confidence builder and chaplain inspired
them all to excel and become better, not just on the
Field, but in life in general.
Jackie was an organiser. She had the natural abil-
ity to put things together,", Minus stressed. "Some
things were just left for her to do because we knew it
was in good hands. Jackie would get the job done."
During the service, members of the NIB Labour
Queens, the team she played with in the Bahamas
Government Departmental Softball Association,
stood at the side of her coffin.
After the service, members of the Electro Telecom
Dorcy Park Boyz served as pallbearers along with the
# Wildcats. She was ushered into the Lake View
.: .Graveyard with a junkanoo rush out by the Valley
Boys.
.". ......," .Many persons wore t-shirts that bore her pictures
on the front and the big number five she wore on her
softball jersey on the back.
E THE Valley Boys Junkanoo group pay tribute
to Jackie Moxey.
(Photo: Mario Dunicanson/Tribune staff)
................. .................................................................................................................................................................................. ;.................................................................................... .. ........................................................... ............ ........ :.... :..... :.;. I........ .............................. ..


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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005


SECTION





Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


0 THE friends and family
of Jackie Moxey march to
the grave site followed by
Junkanoo music.
The softball star was laid
to rest at the weekend, fol
lowing a service at Kemp-
Road Union Baptist Church
where Bishop Delton Fer-
nander, her pastor at New
Destiny Full Gospel Baptist,
Church, remembered her as
someone who did the best
she could to make a
difference in the life of
everybody she came in
contact with.

(Photo: Mario
Duncanson/
Tribune siafJ)i


* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

A FITTING tribute was
paid to the late Jackie 'Lil
Stunt' Moxey on Saturday, as
she was remembered as some-
one who touched the lives of
many with her "infectious"
smile and her "tenacity" to get


Softball star remembered as player and 'community builder'


the job done as both a player
and "community builder".
Moxey, who died on Octo-
ber 26th, was eulogised in a
service on Saturday before a
large audience at the Kemp


Road Union Baptist Church.
Bishop Delton Fernander,
her pastor at New Destiny
Full Gospel Baptist Church,
said in his eulogy that Moxey
was a "changed person" who


did the best she could to make
a difference in the life of
everybody she came in con-
tact with.
In his reflections, Fernan-
der said he recalled how, dur-


ing their first year of existence,
they were invited to partici-
pate in the Baptist Sports
Council's softball league.
New Destiny, according to
Fernander, were in the pen-


"Copyrighted Material
L -- wSyndicated Content LOl


Available from Commercial News Provide


rs" TENNIS
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

MARK KNOWLES and doubles t
ner Daniel Nestor's chances of win
third consecutive title was stopped by
bles Race leaders Mike and Bob Bryan
The Bryan's defeated Knowles and
4, 7-6 and 6-3 for the BNP Pa
ters title.
This is the fifth ti
Byrans in th
Series.


and Nestor have claimed three.
The race to the finals for Knowles and Nestor
wasn't easy, having to pull off each win in three
sets.
ennis part- Although Knowles and Nestor didn't get the
dining their win, the duo have already qualified for the Tennis
ATP Dou- Masters Cup tournament set for Shanghai,
yesterday. China.
d Nestor 6- The appearance in the BNP Paribas finals and
ribas Mas- the three previous wins will help to improve
Knowles and Nestor's record and standings in the
itle for the ATP Doubles Race.
ie Masters Currently Knowles and Nestor are ranked fourth
with a score of 685, leading the charts are the
Knowles Bryans with 1100 points.


nant race, and when hd
attended a game and realise4
that the team was down, he
called Moxey to the fence and
she instructed him that it was
no problem, "we will take thd
whole hog".
They went on to win thiq
championship and, during a
church service when he pre-
sented her trophy to her, with
her big broad smile on her
face, she indicated to him: ''I
told you so Rev. We took the
whole thing."
Deputy Prime Minister
Cynthia 'Mother' Pratt, who
played against Moxey 30 years
ago, said she remembered her
as a 14-year-old entering the
sport, who was one of those
budding young stars who
came into her own.
"Jackie was endearing. You
knew what she was going 4o
do, but you couldn't stop her,"
reflected Pratt, the country's
most versatile female athlete
at the time. "Most of the time
when she batted, you knew
she was going to bunt. She was
so quick and left-handed. By
the time she put the bunt
down, she was half way down
the baseline." ,-
Pratt called her the life of
the party and the life of the
SEE page 9B









MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005


The stories behind the news


Police have arrested 10 alleged "hackers" at Nassau Inter-
national Airport, exposing an illegal taxi scam which for the
past several months has threatened the livelihoods of legitimate
taxi drivers. Following a month-long undercover operation,
which involved the police traffic division, airport police and
detectives, the group of "well-organised hackers" believed to
have Haitian connections was finally caught last week Sun-
day. Press liaison officer Inspector Walter Evans said that the
police are very pleased to have foiled this illegal operation.
Explaining the modus operandi of the hackers, Mr Evans said
they learned flight schedules and specifically targeted Haitian
travellers arriving on flights from Haiti and Abaco...


Cheryl Albury (left) was
appointed Acting Justice of the
Supreme Court last week at
Government House. Mrs
Albury, also a published
author, was appointed Senior
Magistrate in 2003 and Deputy
Chief Magistrate in 2005. She
previously served as chairman
of Rent Control Board and
currently serves as the legal
advisor to the New Providence
Licensing Authority.


A new immigration scam is luring Jamaicans to the
Bahamas with the promise of employment for a price, then
billing them of almost $1,000 and leaving them jobless, a
source revealed last week.
Police say this tactic is primarily used between charlatans
based in the Bahamas and their immigrant victims in Jamaica.
Last week, the source told The Tribune of a scheme where
immigrants are brought to the Bahamas from Jamaica by a
former policeman who charges each of them $700-1,000 while
promising that the money will enable him to find them a job
and file the necessary papers with the Immigration Depart-
ment.


* TOMMY TURNQUEST


'It seems FNM leadership will




be decided in two-man fiiht'


After all the conjecture,
all the predictions, it
seems that the FNM
leadership will be
decided in a two-man
fight, with current leader Tommy
Turnquest marginally favoured to car-
ry the day.
Former Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, whose huge shadow has
settled across the leadership debate
for many weeks now, is not likely to
feature in the convention vote, accord-
ing to inside sources.
That means Mr Turnquest's only
challenger will be the former educa-
tion minister Dion Foulkes, who
claims to be carrying a huge body of
support with him into the convention
hall.
It will be an interesting and many
say close tussle for the spoils, with
the once unfancied Tommy T the like-
lier victor in a contest that will effec-
tively decide the party's chances in
the upcoming general election.
If Mr Ingraham fails to materialise
in the leadership battle and that now


With the FNM convention due to begin tomorrow, all the

buzz is about the leadership and who will take the party

into the next general election. INSIGHT goes behind the

scenes to discover what's being said about whom...


appears near certain after his less-
than-enthusiastic reception from the
party council a few weeks ago it will
undoubtedly hearten the PLP.
For if there was one thing this lack-
lustre government dreaded it was cru-
el exposure in the House of Assembly
by the ex-PM back in leadership-
mode.
As a parliamentary performer,
there's no doubt the Abaco pitbull
struck fear into a government which
has provoked widespread disillusion-
ment among its own supporters over
the last three years.
With Ingraham in savage pursuit,


armed with a dossier replete with
damning evidence against them, the
PLP had good reason to feel some-
what tremulous in his presence.
As a former PLP himself, Ingraham
knows where all the bodies are buried.
And, more importantly, he has the
kind of rasping, aggressive, mocking
delivery that makes lesser men shrink
inside their morning suits.
Sad to say, Tommy Turnquest and
Dion Foulkes do not carry that kind of
firepower. Alongside Ingraham's
shoulder-held bazooka, this pair have
little to offer but a peashooter and a
pop-gun. No-one knows that better


than the delegates who will decide the
leadership issue at this week's con-
vention.
It will therefore be with a certain
resignation that they take the vote.
Unless the winner, whoever it turns
out to be, can transmogrify overnight
into an inspirational force, the FNM
can say goodnight to power for at least
another five years, according to some
despondent insiders.
The politically uncommitted find
that a sad prospect, for the PLP has
been far from impressive since it
seized power at the polls against all
expectations in 2002.


With its usual commitment to
sleaze, its exasperating inertia, its
inability to reach decisions, and its all-
round air of inefficiency and muddle,
the PLP administration is unlikely to
set the electorate's hearts a-racing.
However, unless the FNM can fash-
ion itself within a few short months
into a sharp-ended fighting force with
a properly defined national strategy
and some semblance of unity, there
seems little doubt that the PLP will
edge back in by default.
Does Tommy Turnquest have what
it takes to lead his troops over the
top, revolver aloft, like a World War
One subaltern? Or is he likely to
assume the more diffident air of a
deskbound ordnance clerk?
If the PLP decides to pull a fast one
and call a general election next year,
he has precious little time left to con-
vince the people that he is the dynam-
ic force he needs to be. That will be his
biggest challenge.

SEE page 11C


Quality Screenprinted T-shirts, poloe, caps, uniforms,
sweater, tank tops, shorts & specialty item.
Embroidered shirts & cape logos or monogramming.
All artwork designed, printed, digitized and embroidered
right here in The Sahamas by our talented Bahamian Staff!


OUTER
BANKS-


F 5A .wa 'Av.-- .O............... BxS 68 NsaBhms Tl:22.9.33A-Fx:22.9.42


(FILE photo)


I


I I ------------ 1


The l lrWibuSeI







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2C, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005


Re: The Public Service
AS usual, the INSIGHT arti-
cle today is excellent, excel-
lent...it hit a lot of nails right on
the head. Undoubtedly, a time-
clock in every government min-
istry would save millions.
Observer, Out West
YOUR article was right on
the ball. Everyone knows that's
how it works. It is a system of
patronage where cushy jobs are
passed on down families from
one person to another.
Am I concerned about it?
Yes, very concerned. I believe
everyone working for the gov-
ernment should be 60 per cent
lower-paid than those in the pri-
vate sector. Top officials in gov-
ernment are paid far too high.
Prime Minister Ingraham
brought a big hike in salaries. I
think we could survive on at
least a 50 per cent downsize of
the public service, except in the
police and nursing, where there
appear to be shortages.
It must, however, be remem-
bered that both parties have
been guilty of "padding" the
public service. In fact, the first
PLP government did so much
of it that there was no more
room for padding when the
FNM arrived in 1992.
No government seems to
want to touch this problem, yet
it is vital that someone should
take the matter in hand. Also,
the unions ought to go there's
no need for them nowadays.
Legislation is in place to pro-
tect workers' rights.
DJ, Nassau


FEEDBACK

IT'S wrong to suggest these
problems exist only in the pub-
lic service. I sat waiting at the
bank for 15 minutes the other
day while the receptionist fin-
ished a conversation with a
friend.
Reader
IT is a fact that people work-
ing in a con-competitive envi-
ronment funded by taxpayers
feel they can get away with
murder.
The government should set
up an inquiry into the public
service with power to study
work practices very closely.
With private sector style man-
agement, a streamlined work-
force, and an ethos centred on
diligence and efficiency, the
Bahamas could get the public
service it deserves.
J B Rahming
Excellent article, and sadly
all too true!
There is, however, one public
service corporation that stands
out way above the others in that
their personnel, no matter what
grade, be it manager or clerk,
are always very helpful, cour-
teous and a pleasure to deal
with the National Insurance
Board.


Being "semi-retired" now, I
have two part-time jobs, and
have to deal with National
Insurance for both companies,
and have had dealings with
them over many years in the
past. There is absolutely no
comparison between their atti-
tude and that of other govern-
ment corporations, not only in
their main office, but also at the
Cable Beach Post Office station
- it's wonderful!
Sheena Arteaga
YOUR piece on the public
service was both timely and nec-
essary. Many of the structural
and organisational problems
that exist in the modern
Bahamas are rooted in the
almost fully corroded public ser-
vice.
We as Bahamians will not see
better schools, or better roads,
or even less' crime, until our
political leaders, and other
members of civil society, stand
up and confront this monster.
The largely ineffectual pub-
lic service is responsible for the
administration and regulation
of our society. If it is in a state
of decay, then so are we,
Bahamas!
Thank you for publicly begin-
ning this discussion. I hope


INSIGHT, and your paper at
large, keeps aggressively on this
topic, as many seem unaware
of the stakes.
BLD
MY name is Serge Mansur,
and I am president of the Aru-
ba Trade and Industry Associa-
tion (www.atiaruba.org).
I was sent your article via fax,
and read it carefully. I find it
very well written and also
very relevant to our situation
here on Aruba. We have been
warning our government for
years about the very same issues
you so eloquently describe in
your article.
The reason I am writing to
you is to request you to send
me an electronic version of your
article so that I can distribute
it to the local media. I will, of
course, credit you and your pub-
lication when doing so.
Serge Mansur
THE Bahamas suffers the
fate of most western democra-
cies in having to support an
overblown civil service.
It's ironic that the private sec-
tor which, by its nature, has to
be sharp and competitive, is
expected to support a public
sector which, being uncompeti-
tive, is overmanned and ineffi-
cient.
Major streamlining is long
overdue. Let the discarded
deadwood go out into the world
and earn a living instead of liv-
ing off the backs of the rest of
us.
D L Thompson


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- I


* CHERYL Albury was appointed Acting Justice of the
Supreme Court last week at Government House.
(FILE photo)


WEEK IN REVIEW


A NEW immigration
scam is luring Jamaicans to
the Balamas with the
promise of employment for
a price, then billing them of.
almost $1,000 and leaving
them jobless, a source
revealed last week.
Police say this tactic is pri-
marily used between charla-
tans based in the Bahamas
and their immigrant victims
in Jamaica.
Last week, the source told
The Tribune of a scheme
where immigrants are
brought to the Bahamas
from Jamaica by a former
policeman who charges each
of them $700-1,000 while
promising that the money
will enable him to find them
a job and file the necessary
papers with the Immigration
Department.


CHERYL Albury was
appointed Acting Justice of
the Supreme Court last
week at Government House.
Mrs Albury, also a pub-
lished author, was appointed
Senior Magistrate in 2003
and Deputy Chief Magis-
trate in 2005. She previously
served as chairman of Rent
Control Board and current-
ly serves as the legal advisor
to the New Providence
Licensing Authority.
******

TWO men wanted for
questioning in connection
with a Fox Hill murder,
which three years ago
sparked fears of a killing
spree in the community,


have been detained by
Defence Force officers while
on routine patrol.
Randino "Dinghy" Pratt
and Deslin Nicholls of Fox
Hill, both thought to be of
Haitian heritage, were dis-
covered onboard a Haitian
sailboat last Monday after-
noon. They were turned
over to police officials at
Matthew Town, Inagua.


POLICE have arrested 10
alleged "hackers" at Nassau
International Airport, expos-
ing an illegal taxi scam which
for the past several months
has threatened the liveli-
hoods of legitimate taxi dri-
vers.
Following a month-long
undercover operation, which
involved the police traffic
division, airport police and
detectives, the group of
"well-organised hackers" -
believed to have Haitian
connections was finally
caught last week Sunday.
OeeeeO

ANGELO "Nasty" Bren-
nen was sentenced to death
last week, after a jury unani-
mously found him guilty of
the murder of Ruthmae
Alfreda Pinder, who was
gunned down while she stood
at a bus stop on Farrington
Road with her two daughters
last year.
He was also sentenced to
25 years behind bars for the
attempted murder of Ms Pin-
der's daughter, Calvonya
Grant.


on airline excess baggage fees


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I


INSIGHT


I








THE RIBUE MODAYNOVEBER 205,SPGEH3


Is


Bush


the worst


US


president of


all


Barring miracles, he is doomed to ignominy because of Iraq debacle


By JOHN MARQUIS

able book on
American
presidential
history is
unequivocal on at least two
points: that one James
Buchanan was the worst White
House incumbent the union
has ever known, and that War-
ren Harding ran him a very
close second.
Buchanan, you might recall,
was a bungler of epic scale. He
was the kind of guy who
knocked over a piece of best
china every time he turned
around. Then, as he bent over
to pick up the bits, his back-
side would upend the crystal
decanter. Some people are
born like that.
His dithering did not actual-
ly cause the American Civil
War, but it was certainly a con-
tributor. And few question his
place in the lower basement of
public esteem.
Harding, on the other hand,
was elected largely because he
looked like a president. With
his snow-white sideburns and
magisterial bearing, he had the
kind of features that would
have been totally at home on
the side of Mount Rushmore.
The trouble is, looks can be
deceptive. When an aide found
him in the Oval Office writing
with painstaking deliberation
to a woman in Minnesota who
had sought his help in recon-
structing her picket fence,
Harding said: "I guess I was
never cut out for this job, any-
way."
Inevitably
With Abraham Lincoln,
George Washington, Franklin
Delano Roosevelt and Thomas
Jefferson in the top slots as out-
standing presidents, and the
likes of Bill Clinton and John F
Kennedy languishing some-
where in the middle ranks, the
book offers an intriguing
league table of White House
talent right back to the War of
Independence. But it's the duf-
fers, the ne'er-do-wells and no-
hopers who inevitably make
the most enthralling reading.
When the book goes into its
next edition, the editor might
like to consider another candi-
date for its "lame president"
category. His name is George
W Bush, whose administration
is now unravelling at such a
pace that it's hard to view the
next three years without closing
one's eyes and hoping for the
best, which is likely to be a
frightening impact against
something solid and unforgiv-
ing.
All the signs were there from
the start, of course. How does a
draft dodger turned lush turned
cokehead turned religious nut
end up being portrayed as a
presidential strongman? He
had the swagger, a line in tough
talk, and a family score to set-
tle, but it's hard' to see what
else Bush brought to the table.
However, he hit all the right
notes with the dim-witted reli-
gious right, promised to feed
still more swill into the fat faces
of the avaricious neocons, and
was helped on his way by the
spinmaster extraordinaire Carl
Rove. That, along with his
high-flown connections, was
enough to propel him to Wash-
ington DC on the back of a
dodgy vote.
Now the United States is
picking up the tab, and what a
tab it promises to be. Two
thousand US troops have died
already along with countless
Iraqis and the financial bur-
den is already running into
many billions.
Short of heavenly interven-
tion, which Bush no doubt
prays for every day, this presi-
dent's legacy looks doomed.
And all the blame lies at his
door.
Hoisted to almost instant
stardom by the events of 9/11,
Bush threatened and delivered
retribution to the muslim per-
petrators. No problem there.
No-one disputes that the Tal-


iban, as protectors of Osama
bin Laden, needed to be
erased.
It's what happened next that
began Bush's descent into the
catacombs of despair, with his
people turning against him in
ever greater numbers.
The monumental failure of
US Intelligence.to provide the
truth about Iraq that it did
not have weapons of mass
destruction, and was in no posi-
tion to deliver armageddon
within the hour left Bush dan-
gerously exposed to his own
bellicose instincts.
That he and his main advis-
ers, Cheney and Rumsfeld
among them, wanted badly to
eliminate Saddam at all costs
is now beyond doubt. They
lusted for war and seemingly.
used the CIA to provide justi-
fication for their cause.
In so doing, they made no
provision for the aftermath,
which they naively thought
would be a triumphal march
through Baghdad, but which in
fact has become a conflagra-
tion without end.
The result is a sickening tab-
ulation, night after night, of yet
more civilian and military casu-
alties as a rampant insurgency
consumes this unhappy land.
Having defied a large swathe
of international opinion at the
time, and in a bullish fashion
which made no friends, Bush
looks an increasingly hollow
figure as his folly comes back to
haunt him.
In toppling Saddam, and pre-
senting Iraq with the "free-
dom" of the abattoir, its people
offered tip for slaughter day
after day, the Americans over-
looked one of the most salient
facts of geopolitical life.
That is that tyrants exist for a
purpose. And that purpose is
usually the unification by force
of disparate factions who are
kept from each other's throats
only by the strongman's intim-
idating presence.
Dragging this appalling
tyrant from his rat-hole was the
equivalent of uncorking a tox-
ic brew for which no-one
knows the antidote. Now it is
spilling over,.scorching and poi-
soning everything in its path.
Containing it will not be easy.
Exposed
For those who like and care
for America, Bush's presidency
has been a calamitous event.
Not only has it exposed gap-
ing fissures in America itself -
left and right have never been
so far apart it has also sav-
agely undermined the nation's
image around the world.
Bush has come to personify
the hubris, the reckless conceit,
which foreshadows the decline


(FILE photo)


of all great nations.
And that's what really trou-
bles those who see the US as
the western world's only real
hope of survival against the
emerging economic powers of
the east and the terrifying
threat of Islamic fundamental-
ism.
The West needs a strong
America and the leadership it
has the economic wherewithal
to provide. What it also needs,
however, is an America which
is savvy enough in internation-
al affairs to make mature and
responsible judgments.
The impression left by the
Iraq debacle is that America is
inept in gathering intelligence
and in flexing its military mus-
cle. Its enemies have been
emboldened by its apparent
incompetence, and have taken
heart from its growing discom-
fiture. That's bad news for all
of us.
In the light of that, it is hard
to swallow the US Right's
belief best exemplified by the
arrogant UN ambassador John
Bolton that Uncle Sam is enti-
tled to call all the shots in inter-
national affairs.
Truth
The truth is that, when it
comes to dealing with others,
the US is victim of its own
inbuilt naivete and insularity.
A true superpower needs to
become fully acquainted with
what goes on outside its own
borders, and show real under-
standing of what makes others
tick. The Americans trade on
the misguided belief that every-
one thinks like them, and that's
their downfall.
In Iraq, they are trying to
foist democracy on a frag-
mented nation of conspirators,
backstabbers and head-loppers
whose ethnic and sectarian
divisions date back centuries.
To imagine that the average
Iraqi possesses the same stan-
dards of rationality and
fairmindedness as the average
westerner is like saying
Haitians are as phlegmatic as
Scandinavians. It's an absurdi-
ty.
So, what next? US admirers
will be hoping that this great
country, with its high-flying
ideals and its admirably upbeat
approach to life, can regener-
ate, as it has more than once
before.
After all, its Civil War in the
1860s was one of the most hell-
ishly divisive conflicts in the
history of mankind. With fam-
ily set against family, state
against state, it might have
ripped the soul out of the entire
American enterprise.
However, what emerged
from the flames of the South


As he ahaas'gret n ighou oIh

not nuesaohrpanu eioo l






dsiciniUntdSaehistory.S


was a power which now has no
equal in terms of its economic
might, its dedication to free-
dom and its ability to confront
its inner woes.
Illusions of indestructibility
are, however, dangerous and
potentially corrosive.
In Bush, the US produced a
president who represents the
kind of big-sh6t braggadocio
the nation's critics have long
reviled.
The fact that he has fallen
flat on his face has exposed the
country's underlying fallibility
and given its foes much to
sneer about.
With China well on its way
to becoming the world's domi-
nant economic power in the
next half-century, and India on
course to be a major player
among 21st century democra-
cies, the US cannot take its
continued dominance for grant-
ed.
What US admirers now fear
is that the Bush administration
has added credence to what
many were saying after'the
humiliation of the Vietnam
War, that the United States is a


chronic bungler when it comes
to foreign affairs.
Even worse, its allies will be
wondering whether it can ever
be trusted to make the right
decision when it comes to
assessing and acting upon
major international issues in
future.
With such misgivings flying
around, it's even conceivable
that the US's standing in the
world will be left so weakened
that its influence will go into a
marked decline over the com-
ing decades.
Impossible? That's what the
Romans thought as the bar-
baric hordes began capitalising
on their complacency and chis-
elling away at their empire.
And they had been top dogs
for much longer than the good
old USA.
History
Barring miracles, the Iraq
war will condemn Bush to per-
petual ignominy, earning him a
place alongside Buchanan and
Harding among the nincom-
poops of presidential history.


An American student of US
presidents told INSIGHT: "As
things stand today, I would def-
initely put Bush in the bottom
five. He did well after 9/11, but
since then it's been downhill
all the way."
However, there is a big dif-
ference between Bush and his
fellow bunglers. Buchanan was
out of his depth, recognised the
fact, and managed to get out
in time for Lincoln to'take over
and save the day. Harding was
a starstruck, affable buffoon
who wanted to please every-
one, but it was corruption not
warmongering that proved his
undoing.
In their different ways,
Buchanan and Harding ended
up doing relatively little harm,
even though they were woeful-
ly ill-fitted to the task.
Bush, on the hand, h.s
immersed his country in :ata-
strophic events that aplxc:r to
have no end. He could yet end
up as the worst president the
US has ever known.
What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmar-
quis@tribunemedia.net


Santa Snowbear


* GEORGE W BUSH


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005, PAGE 3C


time?








PAGE 4C, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7th, 2005 THE TRIBUNE
I .i


MONDAY EVENING


NOVEMBER 7, 2005


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 110:30 >
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WTVJ wood (N) (CC) periors that Cirko's death was nec- to 1962 and the Jubilee Hotel and fate of a man who keeps appearing '
Sessary in the long run. (N) T, Casino. (N) (CC) in Allison's dreams. (N) .
Deco Drive Arrested Development Michael Prison Break Michael sacrifices Fi- News (CC) .-
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must ferret out a corporate mole. to commander. (N) (CC)
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....*(6:05) s COFFEE AND CIGARETTES (2003, Comedy-Drama) Roberto Be- **s JU-ON (2003, Horror) Megu-
TMC CRAZY AS HELL nigni, Steven Wridht, Jole Lee. Premiere. Vignettes revolve around mi Okina. In a Japanese house, a
t (2002) R' celebrities. f R (CC) curse passes on.' .'R





MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7th, 2Uub, r '\I-


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:






PAE6.MODY OVME t. 05TE RB11


ere o question oeuardan brsasthe
paper is audited by the highly respected and trusted Audit
Bureau of Circulation, which keeps tabs on the circulation
numbers of many of the world's top publications newspa-


pers and magazines.
The same, however, cannot
S iso p et


be said for The Tribune as


FACT:
The Tribune is audited by the same Audit Bureau of Cir- 3
culation (ABC) as The Guardian. So our paid circulation
numbers are verified by the same people as The Guardian!


AM-
/777


So whatever the colour of the sky in the Guardian's / C0-
world don't worry! We know their numbers are going apu;i's r
down and ours up. The Tribune has been audited for o/
many years by ABC as is our partner The Miami Herald. /
We just choose not to put the logo on oureditorial page. / ndheo 9, t
faUcts. eS ,
The i
believe the "e
2, ol" 2000
The Tribune would wish to have the Bahamian peopl
believe the claim that it outsells The Guardian, on averKe#e ,. p o Q
2,000 copies per day..These fgures though =ay :m U
ss i ^ll.s tn o l '^'*(oth
dp le going e untin ecause at the end of O "tht
f.sold0pdf t s
ic s le Th

FACT: S *i;MdtedZ
o ^^urs ate 4ses to a
That's right we outsell The Guardian by more than 3,000 papers .a.
on some days and less on others. The net result according to ABC
numbers is that we sell 11,584 more paid papers a week than The coS ^See
Guardian which makes us #1. We know it's hard being #2 since a i o s
you lost your government subsidy but that's what happens Ile?
when the People's paper rules the nation! aw ihase hele
a d th s sei atl 2 1P: )
TRIBUNE GUARDIAN DIFFERENCE he o o a
paid circulation paid circulation PER W EEK Sr e ^aev Se

C L0add Mieorr

2004-2005 76,297 64;713 1.1,584


THE TRIBUi.


PAGE 6C. MONDAY. NOVEMBER 7th, 2005






MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7th, 2005, PAGE 7C


For more than five years now The Trbune has piggybacked
ioff The Guardian by having its circulation van parked out-
side The Guardian's back gate to distribute its paper to ven-
decs as ey are leaving with their supply of The Guardian.
re ritica for the Thursday edition of the
.. Vea"v ...


FACT:


NOTe pTRUE *


You can't piggyback on someone whose circulation
has decreased 6% this year and another 11% the pre-
vious year. We know the Guardian has no idea of
customer service, but we're making it easier for the
street vendors to buy all the papers at one time and at
one location saving both gas and time!


GUARDIAN
circulation. 03-05


TRIBUNE
circulation. 03-05


I


vast nub P
rOUn1d ,)22ber Of read Ph
1t et. eWorld, W'h ces 1
ians in 0n- access
Pintl any divel"Se p
j20 ^ thmp

Ust a 11 tOuch MW.t
!In Th Bahaareciate being
ess.elf Uns
as all itW1as
"oad as Php 1 tWns h
hOt b~~er- of e
heeve th t eoa
r ead it 1. o a een t
The Uardian
s, sF
7' : ....


/ It's not what you say, it's what you do! Talk is cheap folks!
When you want action and results the people's paper The Tribune -
The Bahamas' first daily newspaper is where everyone turns


The


Tribune


I


B













ISSUES IDDEAS

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2005 I THE MIAMI HERALD


COMMENTARY

My lunch with

Mr. Rumsfeld

and the brass

BY JOSEPH L. GALLOWAY
jgalloway@krwashington.com
ASHINGTON It was a
slide down the toad hole
that ended with a bump as I
landed in Wonderland: The E Ring
office of Secretary of Defense Donald
H. Rumsfeld, where the great man
waited to do battle.
The occasion was an invitation to a
private lunch with the secretary, and I
knew I was not there to receive the
Defense Distinguished Service Medal
or a pat on the back. My recent col-
umns on the state of
the Army and the
conduct of the war in
Iraq have not been
well received at the
uppermost levels in
the Pentagon.
The surprise was
that four others were
GALLOWAY joining us: the chair-
man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff,
Marine Gen. Peter Pace; the vice chief
of staff of the Army, Gen. Richard
Cody; the director of the Joint Staff,
Lt. Gen. Walter Sharp; and acting
Assistant Secretary of Defense for
Public Affairs Larry DiRita.
Good! Five to one. I had them sur-
rounded.
Rumsfeld was working at his
stand-up desk when I entered. He was
cordial and smiling and remained so
throughout. He did a fast count and
informed me that I was outranked by
a grand total of 11 stars on the three
generals he had brought in.
Then the battle was joined: "I'm
not hearing anything like the things
you are writing -about,"' Rumsfeld v
said. 1T i spoidid flitE it had b1en& my.;,
exp erie-e% fikmation, iciingfifrg
up the chain to someone with
Rumsfeld's reputation was often not
the whole truth. Him: "Oh, I know
that, but I talk to lots of soldiers all the
time. Why, I have given over 600
Town Hall meetings and anyone can
ask me anything." Uh-huh.
He suggested that perhaps my
sources were all retired general offi-
cers who had been too long away
from what was happening today. I
told him that in fact about half my
*TURN TO GALLOWAY




Adventures of

Jack Abramoff

an ugly story

he glistening slime trail left by

| lobbyist Jack Abramoff leads to
an infamous homicide scene in
South Florida.
And while the indicted bosom
buddy of indicted Rep. Tom DeLay
says he had nothing to do with the
mob-style execution of casino fleet
founder Gus Boulis, Abramoff proba-
bly wasn't turning
cartwheels when
S three men were
recently charged
with murdering Bou-
lis backing February
\ l 2001.
SN! o6f One of the defen-
CARL dants is Anthony "Big
HtiAASEN Tony" MoscatieUllo,
identified by police
as an associate of the Gambino crime
family. Moscatiello is a longtime pal
with lawyer Adam Kidan, who was
Abramoffs partner in what prosecu-
tors say was a fraudulent purchase of
Fort Lauderdale-based SunCruz casi-
nos from Boulis.
Kidan and Abramoff go way back.
At the Georgetown Law Center they
were both members of the College
Republicans.
Abramoff grew up to be a big-time
GOP operative whose friendship with
House Speaker DeLay opened doors
to all sorts of wondrous opportunities.
For example, his lobby firm received
*TURN TOHIAASEN


OPINION PAGE
-l


EMPLOYER HEALTHCARE:
Improving corporations' health
costs begins with improving
America's health, and companies
large and small can all do their
part


MUSLIM WOMEN


IN THE UNITED STATES


MARSHA HARPER/ HERALD S,TArF,
Sahar Slha'kh,:foreground. reads:.apassage of the Koran during a Koran ,st.L yand'Orayer 'halaqa' an Islarnic gatheri'ng- afher<: ,
^So6uth aloidca h6 2e i,20'



Their numbers keep growing
.~~ 1*JL ^ L /


BY DONNA GEHRKE-WHITE
dgehrke@herald.com

n my South Florida, neighbor-
hood in far western Pembroke
Pines, two of my favorite
supermarket clerks are Muslim. A
Muslim family runs the neighbor-
hood dollar store. A neighbor
pasted an Arabic greeting near his
front door, while women wearing
hijabs walk in the neighborhood.
And the closest house of worship?
A mosque being built in a Pem-
broke Pines pasture.
As Ramadan came to a close this
week, I think of all the Muslims I
now know and how many are
probably not being counted in vari-
ous religious studies.
That impression was strength-
ened as I researched my book, The
Face Behind the Veil: The Extraordi-
nary Lives of Muslim Women in
America, to be published in March
by Citadel Press.
I found the Muslimah, as Muslim
women are called, from coast to
coast, from Las Vegas to Baltimore,
from Phoenix to Coral Springs. I
found Muslim women in Washing-
ton's Beltway, a South Dakota ham-
let, Manhattan and the Lone Star


state. They grew up in Arkansas,
Alaska and Afghanistan. Some con-
verted to Islam; others are immi-
grants or the daughters of those
from predominantly Muslim coun-
tries.
Their numbers keep growing.
Yet, we do not know exactly
how many Muslims are in America.
The U.S. Census does not ask peo-
ple to name their religion. Many
traditional religious studies still
count the U.S. Muslim population
at only one million or two million.
In 2001, for example, the American
Religious Identity Survey said that
Muslims had more than doubled in
a decade to 1.1 million.
However, Ihsan Bagby, an asso-
ciate professor of Islamic Studies at
the University of Kentucky who has
studied U.S. mosques, believes that
the number of U.S. Muslims may
actually reach up to six million.
Backing him up is the 2001 Cana-
dian Census. Two percent of Cana-
dians identified themselves as Mus-
lims. If that same percentage holds
true for its southern neighbor, then
about six million Muslims now call
the United States home.
Indeed, statistics from the U.S.
Department of State show a dra-


matic influx of Muslim refugees
arriving to our shores in the last 15
years. ..
From 1990, to Sept. 30;, 2004, the.,
world's turmoil brought us more
than 229,000 Muslims from 77
countries from little known
Uzbekistan (formerly of the Soviet
Union) to the more familiar
Afghanistan, Sudan, Bosnia and
Iraq.
By comparison, the State Depart-
ment recorded that no Muslim refu-
gees arrived in 1988 nor in 1989.
Economic immigration is further
fueling the growth of American
Islam.. Companies are recruiting
techies and engineers from pre-
dominantly Muslim countries.
First-generation Muslims are also
bringing the rest of their families
here. And more Americans are con-
verting to Islam.
Zuly Martinez told me how
lonely it was just five years ago to '
be the only Latina at her Houston-
area mosque. Since then, she says,
many Latinas have joined, enough
to form their own "community."
Now the mosque offers classes in
Spanish about Islam.
In rural South Dakota, convert
Anisah David found that she wasn't


alone. Other Muslims worship in an
old house in nearby Brookipgs.
(population 18,504),
All this suggests that traditional
religious studies may not have the
most accurate count on Muslims in
America.
Indeed, it is not easy to find
these new Muslims. Counting
heads at a worship service is not the
most effective way as research-
ers have traditionally done for
Christians and Jews.
Many Muslims have emphasized
praying five times a day, for exam-
ple, more so than attending a reli-
gious service at a mosque.
Many immigrant Muslim women
in America do not attend a mosque,
just as they didn't in the country
they came from. Other Muslims
have trouble finding the right one.
In Erie, Pa., Bosnia refugee Sen-
ada Alihodzic does not attend a
mosque because she is more com-
fortable with a European-style
Islamic worship service and there.
aren't any near her.
Still, she is proud to be a Muslim
- and wants to be counted as such.
Donna Gehrke-White is a Herald
staff writer.


0 Author Barbara Ehrenreich
who examined the working
poor in Nickel and Dimed, no
turns her attention to the
white-collar unemployed in h
new book, Bait and Switch.
As she arrives for the intervi
Barbara Ehrenreich seems
embody the cultural contrasts t
she has long observed, with bi
humor and outrage, about life a
work in modern America.
She is sitting in a hotel in Ma
hattan's swank Upper East Si
the nation's wealthiest urb


w

ler

ew,
to
hat
oth
and


neighborhood. But with her sweat
shirt, jeans and sneakers, Ehren-
reich clearly isn't one of the privi-
leged "ladies who lunch," as Ste-
phen Sondheim once dubbed them.
She served a few lunches, how-
ever, before she wrote the devas-
tating tome Nickel and Dimed
while living in the Keys. The 2001
book describes how she took a
number of pink-collar jobs in order
to explore how the working class


SOFT-SPOKEN IN PERSON:
Social critic and
essayist Barbara
Ehrenreich stirs
rnnfrnvptri ;4ri


makes ends meet. Or doesn't. .c,, LI Jvery aOaii, .
an- The idea was supported by PHOTOBYANDREWSHURTLEFF/AP
d e I I I. ... , : -. . . ...
)an *TURN TO EHRENREICH DAVID WALTERS/HERALD STAFF

.. ......... . .. ..... :... .......... ... .. I,: :: : '. C ; :7! : :: === === ==== =


Many Muslims emphasize praying five times a day, for example, more so than attending
a religious service at a mosque. Many immigrant Muslim women in America
do not attend a mosque, just as they didn't in the country they came from.


BARBARA EHRENREICH


In white-collar world, 'success


breeds your own execution'


- . .... .-







INTERNATIONAL EDITION 'UNDAY, NCvEMBER 6, 20059(


WWW.HERALD.COM -----------


OPINION
JOHN S. KNIGHT (1894-1981) JESUS DIAZ JR., PUSISER I TOM FIEDLER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR I JOE.OGLESBY, EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR


EMPLOYER HEALTHCARE



Corporation,



heal thyself


JAMES L. KNIGHT (1909-1991)


IV.


BY MICHAEL J. CRITELLI acknowledged the benefits of a pro-
www.pb.com active prevention and wellness
strategy.
T he recently leaked confidential "At Dow, our analysis shows that
Wal-Mart memo exposes a real- prevention can improve both our
ity that we are aware of but rarely direct healthcare costs and indirect
see so blatantly exposed: the crisis of health-related costs," Andrew N.
major employers staggering under Liveris, president and CEO of the
the weight of skyrocketing health- Dow Chemical Company said
care costs., recently. "Our profit potential .is
Well, now is the time to reframe. .intrinsically linked to the capability
the healthcare debate. Improving and performance of our employ-
corporations' health costs begins ees."
-with improving America's health,' Land's End, for its part, offers
and companies large'and small can on-site- medical 'clinics, physical *
all do their part. therapy, a registered dietitian and
The current strategy of most monetary award programs for
companies pushing down tobacco cessation and weight man-
employer healthcare costs by beat- agement. It offers scrtenings; sup-
ing up providers and shifting costs port groups, prenatal classes and
to employees is a fool's massage therapy: During
errand; short-term costs go peak seasons'the company
down, long-term costs go offers incentives to work-
up. Prevention works in ers who exercise daily with
reverse: Companies pay a co-workers.
little more now, but reap the In 2001, Pitney Bowes,
savings over the long haul. which covers 22,000
This strategy takes time to employees and another
work But a good number of CRITELLI 24,000 dependents in the
companies have found that United States, slashed the
it is nt. just the right thing to do. amount our .employees .pay for
The results flow to the bottom.line.. some,4iabetes and asthma drugs to
Among the biggest line items in see if lower price voiild encouiage.
any corporate healthcare budget are people to take their medications
treatments for long-term, chronic more regularly. The idea was to
diseases that require daily manage- avoid costly medical crises by get-
ment to avoid crises. Managing ting people to comply with their
those diseases turns out to be far prevention regimens.
more cost-effective than not. The results were dramatic. Since
Take diabetes, for example. The 2001, employees with these chronic
American Diabetes Association illnesses have been refilling their
reports that people, with .poorly prescriptions more regularly. We're
managed diabetes lost more than 8 paying a little more for medication,
workdays per year, accounting for 14 but the overall median medical cost
million disability days. Or depres- for people with asthma has dropped
sion: A U.S. Surgeon General's more than 16 percent, and for diabe-
report shows that untreated depres- tes 8 percent. Altogether the com-
sion costs businesses as much as $79 pany is saving more than $1 million
billion per year. The price tag is also a year by paying more of our
extremely high for asthma, obesity, employee's prescription-medi ca-
hypertension and smoking, among tion bills. . . ..
other health and wellness problems. These programs are just part of
the picture.' Starting in the early
Health promotion 1990s our companylaunched educa.-
r tional 'seminars, Web-based and
averaged $3.50 savings for print education tools, obesity and
stress programs, healthier foods in
every $1 ofprevention. our cafeterias, on-site.clinics and
even promoted the use of staircases
In addition, companies can get to encourage workers to walk
powerful results by encouraging rather than take elevators. These
workers to lead healthy lifestyles, initiatives, and others, have kept
particularly at a time when the our company's medical-cost
workforce is aging and is likely to increases well below national
suffer more sick days and hospital- benchmarks for the past decade.
izations from being in poor shape.
A review of 73 published studies MEASURABLE SAVINGS
by Steven Aldana, a professor at For example, the cost of care for.
Brigham Young University, found employees receiving primary-care
that companies engaged in work- services from on-site clinics was
site health promotion averaged a $276 per year compared with $645
savings to cost ratio of $3.50 for for hose treated outside in the
every $1.00 invested in prevention. community. In addition,'we've seen
Another evaluation, which a 66 percent drop in the average
appeared in The American Journal length of disability leave and a 19
of Health Promotion, found a 28 percent reduction in lost workdays.
percent reduction in sick-leave Prevention' strategies don't''
absenteeism and a 26 percent replace the annual exercise of nego-
reduction in healthcare costs- in tiating with our healthcare pFovid-
companies with established work- ers and determniiing employee cost
site health-promotion programs. sharing. But prevention strategies
The Partnership for Prevention, clearly can generate the best long-
a nonprofit group that supports pre- term results by improving the
ventive health, estimates productiv- health of workers and reducing
ity losses related to health problems health risks. Focusing on the waist-
cost U.S. employers at $225.8 billion line can do a lot for the bottom line.
annually.
Companies such as Dow Chemi- Michael J. Critelli is the chairnian
cal and. 1and's End have publicly and CEO of'Pitney Bowes Inc.


,opyrighted Material

Syndicated Content 1U


Available from Commercial News Providers"



WrNt


LUNCH WITH RUMSFELD


Tm going to keep k cking your butt


*GALLOWAY
sources were active duty officers
and NCOs. "How about 70-30 or
maybe 80-20?" Rumsfeld count-
ered. No, not really, I said. In fact
many of them are not only active
duty but also work in the Penta-
gon perhaps some even on his
staff.
The debate took us to ques-
tions of whether the Army was
broken, or not. Rumsfeld said, in
his opinion, the Army was "light
years better than it was four years
ago."
Strategy and tactics
I asked whether qur strategy
and tactics in Iraq maUe any sense
at all when we cannot figure out
.some better way of fighting than.
sending the finest troops in the
world down the same roads to be
blown up by ever improving ter-
rorist bombs. That by so doing we
were playing to the enemy's
strong suit in this asymmetric
war. Rumsfeld emphatically
agreed, saying he had ordered the
U.S. commander in Iraq, Gen.
George Casey, to begin shifting
away from that focus on patrol-
ling to a big push to stand up an
effective Iraqi defense force last
January, and this wa now being
done.
Rumsfeld said he had told Iraqi
leaders that the American forces
needed to begin stepping back
because the growing casualties
were having an impact on Ameri-
can public support for the war
"arid they understand that and


agree with it." When I asked why
would the Army send bill collec-
tors out to pursue soldiers who
lost limbs to a bomb or mine
because they didn't check in their
armor and the equipment on leav-
ing Iraq or Afghanistan, or were
dunned or their paychecks
docked for overpayment of com-
bat pay and benefits, Cody and
Rumsfeld spoke of a Pentagon
computer system that had been
running on automatic.
They said weeks or even
months passed before a wounded
soldier shipped back to the
United States for treatment was
marked down as having left Iraq
and thus was no longer eligible
for combat pay and benefits.
Then it automatically began bill-
ing that soldier or deducting
money owed from his pay.
Body counts
Now, Rumsfeld said, there is
someone at the Landstuhl Medi-
cal Center in Germany and at
Walter Reed Army Hospital and
Bethesda Naval 'Hospital who
checks every patient into the
computer upon arrival so records
are accurate.
'Pace said he agreed totally
with one recent column that
decried the apparent return to the
use of enemy body counts in Iraq.
Rumsfeld said flatly: "We are not
going to do body counts." Me: But
you are doing body counts and
releasing them; been doing it for a
year and the frequency is grow-
ing. If you' don't want to do body
counts then stop doing them.


Throughout the discussion the
defense secretary took notes
when he thought he heard a valid
point or criticism. Others at the
table winced.
They had visions of a fresh
shower of the secretary's famous
"snowflakes," memos demanding
answers or action or both.
An hour and a bit later as I
headed for the door, Rumsfeld
detoured me by a small room in
his suite of offices. He wanted to
show me a letter he found in his
late father's belongings, now
framed. -It was written by Defense
Secretary James Forrestal to the
elder Rumsfeld, thanking him for
his service in the Navy in the
Pacific War.
'I love soldiers'
Rumsfeld told me: "My dad
was over-age but volunteered for
the Navy. A year later he was the
deck officer on an aircraft carrier
fighting the war in the Pacific."
On the way out the defense
secretary said, in prting: "I want
you to know that I love soldiers,
and I care about soldiers. All of us
here do." ,-
I replied that concern for the
troops and their welfare and
safety were my only purpose
"and I intend to keep kicking your
butt regularly to make sure you
stay focused on that goal."
He grinned and said: "That's
all right. I can take it."
Joseph L. Galloway is the senior
military correspondent for Knight
Ridder Newspapers.


When I asked why would the Army send bill collectors
out to pursue soldiers who lost limbs to a bomb or mine, or their
paychecks were docked for overpayment of combat benefits, Cody and
Rumnsfeld spoke of a Pentagon computer that had been running on automatic.


JACK ABRAMOFF



Once a star in Washington, he's now political poison


*HIAASEN
$66 million in fees from Indian tribes
that either wanted to set up casino
operations, or block rival tribes from
doing the same.
Sen. John McCain, the tenacious
Arizona Republican, is currently
holding hearings about Abramoff's-
unorth'bdox lobby tactics and the
favors he seems have bought at the
Interior Department, which oversees
Indian matters.
It's an ugly story, but not the
worst of Abramoff's legal problems.
That would be his partnership with
Kidan, whose keen business acumen
and sterling ethics had already led to
multiple bankruptcies and the loss of
his New York law license.
In 2000, Abramoff shiningly rec-
ommended Kidan to Gus Boulis as a
buyer for the SunCruz casino boat
fleet, which Boulis was being forced
to sell because he wasn't a U.S. citi-
zen.


The buyout sounded like such a
sweet deal that Abramoff decided to
go 50-50 with Kidan, and the papers
were finally signed in September
2000.
Boulis, who'd kept a stake in Sun-
Cruz, soon became enraged with
Kidan's free-spending management.
Among those hired for catering and
security services were Kidan's old
mob friend Moscatiello and another
upstanding citizen named Anthony
"Little Tony" Ferrari. When Boulis
started to raise hell about the money,
thiligs'grew so'tense that Kidan got a
restraining order and even hired
three bodyguards.
Boulis. filed suit, .and the next
month he was dead, shot to death in
his BMW after leaving his office in
Fort Lauderdale. Like Abramoff,
Kidan says he knows nothing about
Boulis' murder.
In September, Moscatiello, Fer-
rari and a third man, James "Pudgy"
Fiorillo, were charged with the


crime. But back to the deal:
Four months after Boulis died,
SunCruz was in the toilet. Court
records showed that Kidan and
Abramoff had diverted $310,000 of
company funds for a luxury skybox
at FedEx Field in Washington, D.C.,
where.Abramoff entertained politi-
cians and GOP fat cats.

Big-shot friends can't help,
and wouldn't if they could.

He and Kidan also had helped
themselves to $500,000 salaries and
lots of expensive perks. But here's
the best part: According to prosecu-
tors, the two men took control of the
casino line without ever putting
down a dime of their own dough.
Abramoff and Kidan were
indicted in South Florida last sum-
mer for allegedly faking documents
showing they'd invested $23 million


in the deal. Those papers enabled
them to obtain $60 million in real
financing.
Both men say they're innocent.
Predictably, Abramoff blames Kidan
for the alleged fraud and insists he
didn't know about his pal's past busi-
ness flops, or the disbarment.
It's quite a tale, and quite a state-
ment about the prevailing culture in
Washington, D.C., where until his
troubles began Abramoff owned a
restaurant popular with the conser-
vative crowd.
His role in the SunCruz takeover
wasn't widely known four years ago
when Gus Boulis was shot, but Abra-
moff obviously wasn't concerned.
He and Kidan blithely siphoned the
cash out the company and moved on.
Abramoff was coasting along
nicely, ripping off the Indian tribes,
until the SunCruz indictments last
summer. Today his big-shot friends
can't help him, and wouldn't if they
could.


Once a star and darling of con-
gressional Republicans, Abramoff is
now political poison. No more sky-
box parties or free Scottish golf
vacations for the Speaker of the'
House. No more schmoozing with
Ralph Reed and Grover Norquist.
Indicted in Florida, under fire
from McCain in Washington, Abra-
moff can now look forward to an
upcoming mob-hit trial in which his
once-golden name might be unflat-
teringly invoked.
He could even be asked to testify,
an event that would reduce his once-
bulging Rolodex to the thickness of a
library card.
The players and politicians who
are so desperately distancing them-
selves from Abramoff would prefer
that we think of him as some small-
time hustler, a fringe sleazeball who
crawled out of the shadows.
He wasn't. He was a big-league
hustler and a mainstream sleazeball.
And he was all theirs.


~ ___ 1_____1___1


I I I I I I I ,I


JAMES L KNIGHT (1909-1991)


I -M A I __1 ^^M


N







THE MIAMI HERALD


10C SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6,2005 INTERNATIONAL EDITION


*EHRENREICH

Lewis Lapham, her editor at
Harper's. "There was all this
talk about how welfare
reform would solve all these
problems with a job, and I
knew it wouldn't."
The best-selling book's
subtitle: On (Not ) Getting
By in America.
But today she's here to
talk about Bait and Switch.
In this, her latest book,
which was released in Sep-
tember, she immersed her-
self in the white-collar neth-
erworld of the downsized,
the outsourced and the pre-
maturely retired. Her goal
was to find a white-collar
job and see if the profes-
sional class is feeling under
siege the way blue-collars
laborers felt in the 1990s.
As she made her through
career counselors, profes-
sional support groups and
bogus sales jobs, however,
she discovered a simple
truth: No one wants to hire
middle-aged professionals
in America, at least not at
wages that would let them
retain their living standards.
Again, the subtitle pro-
vides a window on what's to
come: The (Futile) Pursuit of
the American Dream.
"Success breeds your
own execution," she says. "I
talked to so many people for
Bait and Switch who seemed
so successful. They'd been
promoted. That was perhaps
their undoing."
She came to conclude
that there's "a total irratio-
nality of corporate culture"
from the perspective of uti-
lizing human talent.
LIKES CONTROVERSY
Ehrenreich, 64, holds a
Ph.D in biology from Rocke-
feller University in New
York City.
It was her immersion in
the roiling politics of the
1960s that led to her writing
career, and she later became
a pundit for Time, The New
York Times and, most nota-
bly the firmly left-leaning
The Progressive.
She has become a poster
child for "immersion jour-
nalism," where reporters
participate in the worlds
they're writing about.
It has produced a smat-
tering of criticism, she
acknowledged. "I got more
criticism with Nickel and
Dimed, with people saying,
"You're slumming. You're a
rich journalist.' She smiles.
"Where did they get the idea
that journalists are rich?"
Detractors aside, it
doesn't appear to have
diminished her appetite for
controversy. Later on the
day of this interview, for
instance, she was to speak at
New York's 92nd Street Y, a
sort of community center
for the ultra-rich. Its mem-
bers and directors, which in-
clude some of the country's
top corporate leaders, are
part of the elite that she
often skewers.
Soft-spoken in person,
Ehrenreich is laugh-out-
loud funny in parts of Bait
and Switch, which she wrote
largely from her home in
Alexandria, Va. Her obser-
vations about a perky
resume coach are, simply,
withering.
There are also career


counseling charlatans who
get unemployed people to
pay big bucks for buzzword-
ladened seminars. And
briefly, Ehrenreich even
debates the temptations of
selling Mary Kay cosmetics
door to door.
But this is a serious sub-
ject, and readers don't get a
candy-coated version of the
devastation job hunters are
experiencing today. At some
meetings, people burst into
tears spontaneously. Others
seem too mortified to talk. A
sense of humiliation is a
common denominator.
"With Nickel and Dimed,
I heard a lot about people
who made wrong choices,"
she said. "They didn't go to
college, although surely
your adolescent passion
can't be accounting. But
with Bait and Switch, they
had done everything right."
American society, she
adds, seems to view une n-
ployment as a moral failing,
rather than a societal ot syrs-
temic shortcoming. "There
still seems to be a lot of
stigma attached," she said.
In the book's greatest
irony, Ehrenreich herself is
unable to get hired. Using
her maiden name of Barbara
Alexander, she strives
mightily to land a job in cor-
porate communications-
type work. The closest she
gets is automated e-mail
responses saying her
resume has been received:
"It's hard to say I got
rejected. It was more a feel-
ing of being invisible."
What happened? "The
resume concealed age, so I
can't blame age discrimi-a-
tion," she said. "I think there
was too much consulting on
the resume." Consulting,
she learned, is code for "laid
off" in human resources
departments. Meanwhile, at
a support group, members
exchanged resumes "and
they were pretty impressive.
So whatever it was, it wasn't
specific to me."
LABOR MARKET
What the people in the
book reflect, she said, is how
the labor market has
changed much faster than
society. "It's ridiculous to
have health coverage
attached to jobs when jobs
aren't attached to us," she
said. Her best insurance, she
said, was when she was mar-
ried to a Teamster.
Furthermore, many of the
people in the book seem
destined to deplete retire-
ment savings long before
they're 65.
And of course Social
Security is under assault and
corporate pensions are dis-
appearing.
"What I think is getting
to be a career trajectory is,
you bounce around in the
white-collar world ur*il
you're 65, and then you
become a blue-collar service
worker," she said.
She adds: "We need more
of a social safety net. We
have gone for a particularly
brutal form of capitalism."
She smiles and says she
has to go. Ever the observer,
she had been walking
around the Upper East Side
earlier "and I just couldn't
believe the outfits."
She smiles. "I need to go
iron my dress."


<>


BARBA

IIR\NREICH


PROVOCATIVE:
Barbara
Ehrenreich's
book on
white-color
employment
and the
changing
corporate
culture will
appeal to
many fans
of her
previous
book, but
some critics
have
written that
Bait and
Switch isn't
as
persuasive
as Nickel
and Dimed.


DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
* A top Roman Catholic
group, The Confederation of
Dominican Religious Orders,
urged the Dominican
government Thursday to
grant citizenship to children
of illegal Haitiahtmiigiants-:
born on Dominican soil.


A LOOK BACK AT
THE WEEK OF OCT. 30


IRAQ
Al Qaida in Iraq claimed
Thursday to have shot down
a U.S. attack helicopter that
crashed near Ramadi, killing
two Marines aboard, and a
third serviceman died when
his patrol struck a roadside
Sbomb while rushing to their
rescue. Another U.S. soldier
was killed Thursday when
his vehicle hit a roadside
bomb during a combat
operation near Baqouba,
northeast of Baghdad, the
military said. The killing
raised to at least 2,037 the
number of U.S. military
service members who have
died since the war began in
2003, according to an
Associated Press count.

ASIA
China and Vietnam each
confirmed new bird flu
outbreaks which killed
thousands of birds, despite
increased efforts to fight the
disease. The Asian
Development Bank warned
that a global flu pandemic
could kill up to 3 million
people in Asia and plunge
the world into recession.
The latest Chinese outbreak,
discovered on Oct. 26, killed
8,940 chickens and
prompted officials to
destroy 369,900 other birds
in a village in Liaoning
province, east of Beijing, the
Agriculture Ministry said
Thursday. In Vietnam, more
than 3,000 poultry
reportedly died or were
culled last week in three
villages in Bac Giang
province, about 35 miles
northeast of Hanoi.


DETROIT
* U.S. Rep. John Conyers Jr. chats with his son, Carl, during the funeral Wednesday of Rosa
Parks. In a seven-hour funeral filled with song and impassioned eulogies, thousands of mourners
crowded into Detroit's Greater Grace Templeto pay their final respects to the civil rights icon.
The funeral marked the end of more than a week of mourning for Parks, who became the first
woman ever to lie in state at the Capitol Rotunda in Washington. Parks' casket was taken by
carriage to a mausoleum, where she was entombed near her husband and mother.


UNITED STATES
* On a trip designed to
underline trans-Atlantic ties,
Prince Charles and Camilla,
Duchess of Cornwall, began
their first joint trip to the
United States in strong style
Tuesday in New York, where
they were met by modest
but enthusiastic crowds, and
then traveled on to
Washington, D.C. Among
the highlights: a visit to
Ground Zero, and then to a
room full of mementoes left
by families of the victims.
Wednesday, the pair
attended a rare White
House black-tie evening.
Later in the weeklong tour,
Charles and Camilla are
scheduled to meet with
hurricane victims in New
Orleans.


WASHINGTON, D.C.
* The Senate reversed a
decades-old ban on drilling
in a pristine Alaska refuge,
opening the area for oil
exploration in what critics
derided as a political ploy
that will do little to allay
America's dependence on
foreign oil. With a 51-48
vote on Thursday, the
Senate approved requiring
the Interior Department to
begin selling oil leases for
the coastal plain of the
Arctic National Wildlife
Refuge within two years.
Senators also overwhelm-
ingly voted to ban exporting
any of the crude from the
region. But whether House
and Senate will be able to
reach a compromise that
could pass both chambers
remains an open question.


NEW YORK
* Spending an average of
$1 million a day in the final
stretch of his re-election
campaign, New York Mayor
Michael Bloomberg is
closing fast on the record
$74 million he spent in 2001,
campaign finance records
show. He had spent at least
$66 million by Oct. 27.

* With its new Amazon
Pages service, Amazon.com
Inc. plans to let customers
to buy portions of a book -
even just one page for
online viewing. A second
program, Amazon Upgrade,
will offer full online access
when a traditional text is
purchased. Both services
are expected to begin next
year.


WORLD VOICES


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Sfass &'Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"
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*


EDITORIAL
EXCERPT

On the
Iranian

president's

statements

on Israel

* From La Stampa,
Turin, Italy
resident Mahmoud
Ahmadinejad knows
better than we do
that the United States is in
a difficult situation
because the war in Iraq
threatens to be the same
hell as it is today for the
next 10 years. It is true that
a democracy can coexist
with terrorism and a hos-
tile war and then finally
win, but it's bound to pay a
high cost [both in lives
and in dollars].
In his personal exalta-
tion and ignorance of the
world that make him a
slave of self-esteem and
wrongly calculated risk,
Ahmadinejad doesn't
seem to be destined to win
the battle.


But he could appease
his nuclear fever and keep
quiet both Europeans and
Americans.
Ahmadinejad should
try to look around: the
United States might be in
trouble, but it can still
overturn the situation
even tomorrow, if neces-
sary. And if his statement
on Ariel Sharon is mostly
political, it is also true that
Israel can eventually "get
seriously angry."


r

t.' _



"Copyrighted Material

ASynd icaNtedContent
Available from Commercial News Providers"


BARBARA EHRENREICH



'We need more of


a social safety net'


BBI a ' r ~lsle r ii I'


ISSUES & IDEAS


I: j


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4


1%








TI-H TPIRI IMNF


'It seems FNM leadership will





be decided in two-man fight'


FROM page 1C

Hence, this week's conven-
tion will have enormous rami-
fications for both major par-
ties.
A media analyst told
INSIGHT: "I think it is going
to be a straight fight between
Turnquest and Foulkes, and I
think Turnquest will win it by a
close margin.
"In the last few weeks, I
believe Turnquest has realised
he needed to do more to win
and he has become more high-
profile. Unless Foulkes steps
up the pace in.the last few days
before the convention, Turn-
quest will come out of the con-
vention as leader.
"I know there is a level of
irritation among Ingraham sup-
porters, who believed their
man was the only chance of vic-
tory at the polls, but a lot of
young members think it is time
to move on, and that Ingraham
has had his day."
The analyst feels all the pre-
dictions about Ingraham
angling for a comeback were
true. But the shatteringly tepid
response of the party council
towards such a prospect weak-
ened the former prime minis-
ter's resolve.
That, together with Turn-
quest's intransigence, when he
effectively told the party's
money-men to get lost, scup-
pered any Ingraham comeback
plan and left the future very
much in the younger genera-
tion's hands.
Now, many observers
believe, the FNM must prepare
for a new era, honing whatever
talent it has in its ranks to pre-
pare for victory in 2012.
By then, national disgruntle-
ment with the PLP will be at
such a pitch that a pack of pot-
- cakes would probably carry the
vote. However, six years is a
long, long time to wait for
those FNMs who see the PLP
as disastrously inept.
The FNM parliamentary
group, together with deposed.
former ministers, undoubted-
ly wanted Ingraham back, not
because he is Mr Popularity in
the party he isn't but
because they badly wanted to
regain power.
For all his faults, he was their
best shot and Mr Turnquest is
seen among Ingrahamites as a
far from scintillating substitute.
An analyst told INSIGHT:


"Frankly, I think once the par-
ty council gave him the cold
shoulder, Ingraham backed
away from the whole leader-
ship issue. I think he was sur-
prised at the amount of flak he
got. I don't think he expected
to get criticised so strongly.
"Now, I don't think he would
accept a nomination even if his
supporters were to move a res-
olution at the convention. I just
don't think it will be a factor. If
it is, it will be a sidebar ques-
tion.
"Had the party been solidly
behind him, it would have been
a different matter. However, it
seems that he made too many
enemies in his own party to
come through strongly at coun-
cil level. A man of consider-
able ability was ultimately
undermined by his own volatile
temperament."
This week's leadership vote
will be in the hands of dele-
gates, constituency leaders and
council members. The extent
to which Mr Foulkes has been
working behind the scenes to
lobby support will undoubted-
ly have an impact, but the
smart money is still on Turn-
quest to shade it.
Analyst
The analyst said: "The up-
and-coming generation don't
want the older heads at the
forefront of the party anymore.
It is time to move on as far as
they are concerned.
"There was a level of anger
among younger party members
that Ingraham was even being
considered. I think older mem-
bers wanted to guarantee vic-
tory, but younger people are
taking a longer term view."
For Mr Turnquest, the con-
vention will provide an oppor-
tunity to dispel some of the
less-than-helpful impressions
created during his three-year
tenure as party leader.
Many believe that he failed
lamentably to seize the high
ground offered by his position,
and instead languished inef-
fectually on the political side-
lines.
His late run for the line has
been helped to some extent by
his unexpected obstinacy in
resisting the parliamentary
group's request for his resig-
nation to make way for Mr
Ingraham.
In so doing, Mr Turnquest


displayed a level of spirit and
determination not especially
evident in the past. Some were
undoubtedly impressed.
The analyst said: "There is
no doubt that Tommy was seen
as a lame duck leader. Now he
has come out in fighting mode.
In spite of his deficiencies, he is
likely to win."
However, the diligent Mr
Foulkes cannot be written off.
In his campaign, he is feasting
voraciously off the image of the
party's founding luminary, Sir
Cecil Wallace-Whitfield. And
for several weeks now has been
canvassing the support of party
delegates, outlining his plans
for the party and the country.
In his convention package,
describing himself as a "Bold
New Leader for Change", Mr
Foulkes reproduces Sir Cecil's
inspirational speech at the PLP
convention in October, 1970,
when he resigned as Minister of
Education and Culture and cre-
ated the split that was to lay a
new template for Bahamian
politics.
From that day on, PLP
leader Lynden Pindling whose
totalitarian instincts were well
on their way to producing a
one-party state was faced with
new-style opposition from erst-
while supporters.
In his campaign, Mr Foulkes
evidently wants to recapture
some of the vision and spirit of
the Dissident Eight a group
led by Sir Cecil which included
his father, Sir Arthur Foulkes -
and set his floundering party
back on course.
In an address to Grand
Bahama FNMs, Mr Foulkes
referred to people's call for "a
new style of leadership and a
more decisive direction for the
party and the country."
With a call for "renewal and
reform" Mr Foulkes credited
the Dissident Eight with
launching a movement which
"transformed the Bahamas and
helped safeguard democracy
and freedom for future gener-
ations."
And, with admirable can-
dour, he said: "But we must
not whitewash history or pre-
tend that we are a perfect par-
ty. With humility and contri-
tion we must admit that at
times we became arrogant and
did not consult the people. We
forgot some of the very things
we fought against before we
came to power."


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Mr Foulkes told INSIGHT:
"I think delegates are looking
for someone who can unite the
party after the dispute between
Ingraham and Turnquest. I
think I am the only person who
can do it. I can relate to both
Ingraham and Turnquest sup-
porters."
Defeat

He also said there was still
time to defeat the PLP in the
next election. "After all, what
can you point to in terms of
accomplishment? Crime is
rampant, unemployment is
rampant there are major
problems with immigration and
education.
"I think we have good issues
to campaign on and we can car-
ry our programme to the peo-
ple."
Reaffirming the FNM's
underlying philosophy is, in
fact, the challenge facing who-
ever emerges as leader from
this week's convention.
The PLP, for all its faults,
was a movement born of the
people at a time when they


were under the heel of a self-
serving oligarchy.
It blossomed on a seedbed
of high emotion and magnifi-
cent ideals at a time when civil
rights were the predominant
cause in neighbouring Ameri-
ca. Its focus has always been
well-defined.
No-one needs to be told
what the PLP stood for then.
Today, the party still trades off
its past and relies greatly on a
bedrock of support which has
been immoveable since the ear-
ly 1960s.
The FNM, however, was a
hybrid from the beginning, a
welding together of disaffect-
ed PLPs and the more radical
remnants of the old white
order.
Over the decades, it has
needed to remind itself of what
it stands for and where it's
going. Now that redefinition of
aims and ideals is more crucial
than ever, especially after the
internecine warfare which has
so riven the party in recent
months.
Whoever stands astride the
pile at the end of this week's


events, he needs to focus
intently on the issues which
now cry out for strong, deci-
sive leadership.
Crime, immigration and edu-
cation are three areas which
cause people most despair. The
party able to devise realistic
strategies for tackling them will
make a significant impact at
the polls.
Equally important, however,
is a proper national blueprint
for economic growth.
An international study of
world population trends shows
the Bahamas with a projected
population of 466,000 in the
year 2050. That's 143,000 more
people than the country sup-
ports at present.
To accommodate such an
enormous increase in just 45
years requires careful thought
and long-range planning. Who-
ever runs the country between
now and then faces some
daunting challenges. And they
need to be up to the job.
What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmar-
quis@tribunemedia.net


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KOTEX* SECURITY Regular
Count 10 18 36


Kotex,


KOTEX* SECURITY Super
Count: 10 18 36


KOTEX* SECURITY Multi-PakTM
Count 18 Regular, 18 Super & 10 Super Plus


Kotex.
tB4~,44


KOTEX SECURITY Super Plus
Count: 18 36


KOTEX SECURITY Multi-PakTM
Count 18 Regular, 18 Super


Use this ad to get the product you want.

Kotex fits. Period
@Registered Trademark and TM Trademark of Kimberly Clark Worldwide, Inc. 02005 KCWW.
Ditrbue b Ted'l-ns.Ag-cyPomae3214


McDonald's thanks our valued customers for helping us support the


Cancer Society of the Bahamas. Proceeds from the sale of our


McDonald's Cookies during Canc A'"


will be


donated to the CarSodety o l s- a


fj~-
I'm lovin' ItT


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:::: ::


--- -1--------


;;---


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2005, PAGE 11C


SoSSSSSS&mS-SPiltE "SI^S








Hurricane


WILMA


Relief Effort


In a time of need, when HELP is urgently required and the prayers of those
who are suffering seem to go un fns11wing organizations, insisted
on being part of a solution. Th public credit, the only
demnd made was that we must nd victims should


Doctors Hospital

SPECIAL THANKS


Higgs & Johnson


The Tribune


Where do you start when it comes to saying thank you to a company
that has, helped save or sustain the life of your fellow citizen? We
believe the best way is by purchasing their products or services.
IT'S NOW YOUR TURN, YOU KNOW IT'S THE RIGHT THING TO DO.


TO SAVE LIFE, TO SUSTAIN LIFE & TO DELIVER AID
THIS AD WAS DONATED TO INTERNATIONAL RESCUE
S. r, ...11.... \ 1 I '"


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MEDICAL AID







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