Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00245
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: November 3, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00245
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text






"GIVE A HAND f
TO HELP j1 .
CHILDREN 'm lovin it.
HIGH 83F
LOW 72F

C PARTLY SUNNY
SmANDeBREEZY


The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.281 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2005 PRICE 500


Police arrest 10

after month-long

undercover operation


Sscal


Police remove workmen in land row


* By KARIN HERIG and
RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Tribune Staff Reporters
POLICE have arrested 10
alleged "hackers" at Nassau
International Airport, exposing
an illegal taxi scam which for
the past several months has
threatened the livelihoods of
legitimate taxi-drivers.
Following a month-long
undercover operation, which
involved the police traffic divi-
sion, airport police and detec-
tives, the group of "well-organ-
ised hackers" -believed to
have Haitian connections -
was finally caught on Sunday.
Press liaison officer Inspec-
tor Walter Evans said yester-
day that police are very pleased
to have foiled this illegal oper-
ation.
Explaining the modus
operandi of the hackers, Mr
Evans said they learned flight
schedules and specifically tar-
geted Haitian travellers arriv-
ing on flights from Haiti and
Abaco.
"These persons knew when
the flights came from the desti-
nations, and they would walk
into the terminal and speak in
Creole to the travellers," he
said.
Mr Evans said the hackers
mostly solicited Haitian trav-
ellers because Bahamians would
not hire the services of unli-
censed taxi-drivers.
"Generally speaking,
Bahamians do not accept a ride
with a hacker. Bahamians


would accept a ride with a per-
son who is a taxi-driver, which is
legitimate business," he said.
Mr Evans said Haitian trav-
ellers may have accepted offers
by hackers because they felt
more comfortable with some-
one speaking their language.
Earlier this year, taxi-driver
Perry Gilbert told The Tribune
that Haitians touting for trade
at the airport were depriving
Bahamian taxi-drivers' of tens
of thousands of dollars every
week.
"They openly boast of mak-
ing $150 a day from the airport.
There are an average of 20 of
them working from there at any
one time, so you can see how
much money legitimate drivers
lose over the course of a week,"
he said.
Mr Evans explained that for
the past two and a half months
officers carried out surveillance
work at the airport on Sundays
when most hacker activity
occurred.
"On the weekends these
hackers had this thing down to a
science. Between the hours
from 10am to 3pm on Sundays
this thing was really down to a
'T'," he said.
Police finally gathered suffi-
cient evidence and were able to
apprehend a group on Sunday.,
"These persons were caught
on the main thoroughfare (lead-
ing from the airport). Nine out
of the 10 persons were identi-
fied, one was a female," he said.
SEE page 13


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
A HEATED row escalated
in Bozine Town after work-
men attempting to excavate
land were removed by police
yesterday.
The area has been the site
of a massive land dispute since
October, 2004, when the 500
or so residents received let-
ters from the law firm of
Lockhart and Munroe,
informing them that its clients,
the Harrold Road Land
Development Company,
(LANDCO) had been grant-
ed certificates of title to prop-
erty between Bozine Town,
Knowles Drive and Harrold
Road. Residents were initial-
ly given 30 days to either buy
the land or vacate.
However, the residents
vowed to fight back, organis-
ing a steering committee, stag-
ing demonstrations and rais-
ing funds to secure legal coun-
sel. Since the initial notice,
they have had a number of
extensions and the matter has
been before the courts.
The situation escalated after
workmen brought in a tractor
and began clearing land on
Bozine Town Drive earlier
SEE page 13


L................ ...................................... .....................


LESLIE MILLER speaks in the
House yesterday.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/
Tribune stafj)


Leslie Miller hits
out at Turnquest
* By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
MINISTER of Trade and Industry Leslie Miller
yesterday lambasted FNM leader Tommy Turn-
quest while making a presentation to the House of
Assembly on the Disaster Preparedness and
Response Act.
Mr Miller, who said he was merely defending
himself following comments made by Mr Turn-
quest on a radio show a day earlier, said he would
use his position in the House to defend himself
from those who wished to "constantly assault
him".
SEE page 13


BEC workers won't let disputes

affect hurricane relief efforts


* By CARA BRENNEN.
Tribune Staff Reporter
BEC workers have vowed
not to let their industrial dis-
putes with management
interfere with Hurricane
Wilma relief efforts, even
though they are working on
"reduced enthusiasm."


The Bahamas Electrical
Workers Union Secretary
General Stephano Green
said the union made a com-
mitment to management that
it will send additional staff
to the hurricane ravished
areas, including Grand
Bahama to assist Grand
Bahama Power workers.


"We understand that in
cases of national disaster we
need every man out there
who is capable of doing the
work and so we made the
commitment," he said at a
press conference yesterday.
The statement came on the
SEE page 13


Nassau and Bahama Islands'Leading Newspapei


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION AGAIN


h BAHAMASi EDITIraONt
BAHAMAS EDITION


1


e







PAGE 2, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2005 ..





FNM convention


otour starts next week


The FNM will celebrate 35
years of service to the Bahami-
an people during the party's
forthcoming "Convention
2005".
The convention will be held
from November 8 to 11, in the
ballroom at the Wyndham
Resort and Crystal Palace Casi-
no at 7.30 every night.
The theme for this year's con-
vention is "Ready to Serve -
Now More Than Ever".
The party says it believes this
theme represents its sense of
readiness "as we have spent the
past few years preparing and
fine-tuning our machinery for
whenever the election bell is
rung.
"We are truly 'Ready' to take
back the government from the
PLP, and to truly serve the
Bahamian people."
The week begins with a
prayer breakfast on Monday,
November 7, at 7.30am in the
ballroom at the Wyndham
Resort and Crystal Palace Casi-
no.
The party will move into con-
vention mode on Tuesday,
November 8, at 3pm when the
official nomination of candi-
dates for all party offices will
begin.
All those seeking office,
including the posts of leader and
deputy leader, will be nominat-
ed in time for the party elec-
tions, which will be held on
Thursday, November 10.
On Tuesday at 7.30pm the
convention will officially con-
vene, starting with a special
audio/visual tribute to the par-
ty's 35 years of service.
Key speakers will include par-
ty chairman, Carl Bethel, the
Women's Association president,
Caron Shepherd, and FNM MP
for Eight Mile Rock, Lindy
Russell. Party leader, Senator
Tommy Turnquest, will deliver
the keynote address.
The party will also utilise this
opportunity to showcase some
of its most dynamic speakers
and talent, some of whom will
serve as FNM candidates in the'


* DION Foulkes and Tommy Turnquest are expected to contest
the FNM leadership


next general elections.
In addition, prominent fig-
ures representing major seg-
ments of the community will
also appear as special guest
speakers.
"The Bahamian people can
expect a very dynamic and
exciting convention, filled with
charismatic speakers, electrify-
ing performers and thought-
provoking commentary," said
the party.
"We intend to also use this
convention to ignite our troops
for battle as we anticipate that
the prospect of a general elec-
tion is very near.
"The public, especially those
who will watch on television or
listen to the convention on
radio, can also expect the FNM
to take the PLP government to
task for their ineffective mis-
handling and mismanagement
of the country for the past three
and a half years.
"This government has been
asleep since it took office' and'


we intend to sound the alarm
on the PLP performance over
the past three years, as we will
spare no PLP member of par-
liament, Cabinet minister or the
prime minister himself, all of
whom will have to face the fire
of accountability, and not one of
them will be able to escape the
FNM's torchlight of political
exposure next week."
The FNM will also use thp
convention to raise funds for
Hurricane Wilma victims. "We
are very sensitive to the suffer-,
ing and the plight of all Grand
Bahamians who were in some
way touched by the hurricane,"
said the party. "Especially those
families who lost their homes
as well as other valuable pos-
sessions in the storm."
The party has invited all
Bahamians to attend the con-
vention "as we move our party
in position to rescue the country
as well as the economy from the ,
hostile mistreatment of this PLP
government."


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THE TIBUNETHURDAY NVEMBE 3,C005,NAGES


0 In brief

Bahamas

and the US

renew drug

agreement

THE Bahamas and the Unit-
ed States have renewed the
agreement which provides US
funding for narcotics control
and law enforcement.
The amended Letter of
Agreement on Narcotics Con-
trol and Law Enforcement was
signed last week by Minister of
Foreign Affairs Fred Mitchell
and US Ambassador John D
Rood.
Under the amended agree-
ment, the US State Department
will provide the Bahamas with
$592,000 in 2005 for its anti-drug
programmes.
"This funding represents a
continuation of our long-stand-
ing commitment to co-opera-
tion with the government of the
Bahamas that dates back more
than 20 years," Ambassador
Rood said at the signing cere-
mony.
This year's funding includes
$270,000 to be used to increase
the efficiency of the Bahamian
police and Customs Depart-
ment through enhanced train-
ing and equipment, $282,000
in direct support for Opera-
tion Bahamas, Turks and
Caicos (OPBAT), and $40,000
to assist local prevention and
drug demand reduction initia-
tives.
Since the initial signing of the
agreement, the US Government
has provided the Bahamas with
more than $14 million through
the US State Department, and
$30 million annually under the'
OPBAT programme to help
strengthen the capacity of
Bahamian law enforcement to
meet the challenge posed to by
drug traffickers.

Scotiabank

donation

to disabled

children

SCOTIABANK (Bahamas)
has presented the Crippled
Children's Committee with a
donation to assist in their cause
to bring relief to children who
are physically challenged.
The Crippled Children's
Committee supplies prostheses,
corrective devices and wheel
chairs and supports the preven-
tion of conditions that might
lead to disabilities.
The Crippled Children's
Committee is a non-govern-
mental organisation that was
founded in 1954 and is support-
ed by voluntary contributions.


Miller defends role of NEMA


* MINISTER of Trade and Industry Leslie Miller yesterday
during the House of Assembly
(Photo Mario Duncanson/ Tribune Staff)


* By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
BLUE Hills MP Leslie
Miller defended the role of the
National Emergency Manage-
ment Agency (NEMA) in the
House of Assembly yesterday.
He was speaking on the pro-
posed Disaster and Prepared-
ness Response bill, which he


said has been presented at a
timely point in Bahamian his-
tory as the country is coping
with two consecutive years of
hurricane damage.
He said that for this reason,
the proposed bill should be
"incorporated as soon as is
humanly possible to relieve
the human suffering and the
pain that our brothers and sisters


at this very moment are going
through in Grand Bahama".
He said those who criticise
the bill believe that "govern-
ment has no responsibility to
have a mechanism to have a
safety net in place to assist the
residents of our country -
indeed, assist those who have
given us the opportunity to
represent them in this parlia-
ment and to try and help
them as best we can."
Mr Miller quoted from an
article, which he claimed was
collaborated upon by the
Chamber of Commerce and
the Nassau Institute, listing
concerns about inefficiencies
in NEMA.
The article, he said, stressed
that there should be no gov-
ernment interference with
relief aid.
"What they are saying [is]
that there is no need to have
any safety net in this country
to assist those who are in dire
need of assistance. It is wrong,
but that is the way they think.
"Anytime you come with
anything that is going to assist
the majority, it is this little
fringe group on the side line
that will criticise and do their
best to derail the concerted


efforts of this government that
is elected to serve the majority
of the people."
Mr Miller stated that follow-
ing a national disaster, the gov-
ernment cannot simply "open
the flood gates" and allow any-
one to come into the country
and distribute items freely.
Reading from the article, Mr
Miller remarked: "It says that
NEMA's job should only be to
allow any foreigner who has a
private jet plane and yacht to


come in.
"So we should open our Ior-
ders too. 'Come in man, brtig
your drugs in too on your pri-
vate planes while you're here
and take some out while you're
here. This is open season now,
because we have a problem.'
"But, Mr Speaker, I reao a
quote and it said, 'Those who
can, do. Those who can't, criti-
cise'. And that is a glaring
example of what is happening in
this country today."


Nassau's Premier Store

For Gifts & Home Decor


Witness claims about



accused's relationship


* By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
A CLOSE friend of mur-
der accused Angelo Bren-
nen yesterday claimed that
he and alleged victim Ruth-
mae Alfreda Pinder had
been trying to patch up their
relationship.
However, Thomas Fergu-
son was the only one of the
three witnesses scheduled to
testify on behalf of Brennen
who turned up to court yes-
terday.
Mr Ferguson, said he had
known Angelo Brennen all
his life and referred to him
as "son".
Brennen is on trial for the
murder of Pinder, who was
shot as she stood on a bus
stop'on'Farrington Road on
October 29 last year.
He is also accused of
attempting to kill Calvonya
Grant, who was 15 at the
time.
Mr Ferguson is the owner
of Tom's Bar on Quakoo
Street and of the company
Phoenix Pest Control.
Mr Ferguson said he knew
the victim Ms Pinder


voML

IINDEX


through her relationship with
Brennen.
He said he was aware that Ms
Pinder had told Brennen that
she did not wish to continue the
relationship.
However, he said he also
knew that the two were trying
to "patch things up", and said
that he was acting as a counsel-
lor of sorts for the couple.
The witness said that on the
day before the murder, he saw
Ms Pinder at the Kenny Roger's
restaurant on West Bay Street.
Mr Ferguson said he was
aware that Brennen spoke to


Ms Pinder before coming to the
restaurant, where he met her.
She was with other company.
Mr Ferguson said Brennen
sat next to Ms Pinder at the bar
and seemed "happy to be with
her".
The witness told the court
that the last call he got from
Brennen was at 12.30am on the
day of the murder.
He said Brennen told him he
had just dropped off the pas-
sengers and was coming to his
house.
Mr Ferguson told the court
that the accused never came.


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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2005, PAGE 3








PAGT4,THUSDYOVEBER3,200DTHOTIB


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352


Mayhem on Bahamian beaches


THE TRIBUNE has a thick jet-ski file in its
morgue. Through this column, starting in the
early 1990s, we have urged government to intro-
duce legislation to regulate jet ski operators
on beaches in the Bahamas. We have written
several columns-urging the policing of jet-ski
and water sports operations.
After a 22-year-old tourist was killed in a jet
ski accident in February 1991, the late Dr
Matthew Rose, Port Authority Chairman,
decided to ban all jet ski operations when
licences expired at the end of that year. In the
meantime, the operators formed themselves
into an association. They went to Dr Rose and
pleaded with him to rescind the ban. In return
they would discipline their members in an effort
to save their businesses. The ban was lifted.
However, nothing changed. Mayhem contin-
ued on the beach.
Deaths and injuries mounted. Complaints
grew to a crescendo. Hoteliers complained that
jet ski operators were putting lives at risk
because laws to control them were not being
enforced. The public called for a total ban.
In the wake of the many jet-ski and boating
accidents that occur every year in the Bahamas,
the Grand Bahama Human Rights Associa-
tion-at the end of last year again called for leg-
islation and enforcement.
The British High Commission issued an advi-
sory for the 70,000 UK tourists who are attract-
ed to the Bahamas annually. Said the advisory
in part:
S Thewater sports industry in the Bahamas is
Sery, poriy reguated.i Every year people are
klled or seriously injured by the improper use
of jet-skis or other water craft or by the careless
or reckless operation of such equipment by
others.
"In view of a number of recent fatal acci-
dents, we advise you not to rent jet-skis in New
Providence and Paradise Island unless you are
experienced jet-ski users."
The death of three-year-old Paul Gallagher
three years ago has again turned the spotlight
on--the dangerous industry in the Bahamas.
Baby Paul was asleep at his mother's side at
Paradise Island beach when an out of control
power boat, moving at 30mph and towing a
banana boat, lunged onto the-beach. As it flew
through the air, the propellor hit the child and
split his head in two. Five days later Paul died
of his injuries. A British coroner who reviewed
the accident, urged the Bahamas government to
prosecute. It was claimed that at the time of the
accident the company that owned the runaway
boat was not registered, licensed or insured.
However, a damning documentary broad-
cast by ITV Carlton in the UK on July 26 has
Europeans, holidaying as far away as the lush
resorts of the Middle East, talking. We under-
stand that after the public broadcast in England,


the television documentary was shown at a
recent Ministry of Tourism planning workshop
to explore the possibility of establishing a
Bahamas Visitors Safety Board here. Making a
presentation at the seminar was an official from
Aruba.
The UK documentary opens with a wild
scene in the water just off Paradise Island beach
- jet ski operators zoom back and forth, in
and out, zig-zagging in crazy and dangerous
patterns among swimmers, running their craft
up on the beach a frightening and dangerous
scene.
Mark Durden-Smith, the presenter of the
programme, "Package Holiday Undercover",
opened with these words:
"Now, none of us would feel particularly
safe if we went sunbathing in a car park, would
we? That's just stating the obvious. But there is
a beach in the Bahamas where that's basically.
what happened, except the vehicles passing by
are on water, not on land. The beach at Par-
adise Island has an appalling record for injuries
and unfortunately deaths too. So we went to
investigate."
Because of the numerous complaints about
the beacheso-f the Bahamas, particularly Par-'
adise, "Package Holiday Undercover" invited
Dave Garvey, one of the world's top water-
sports instructors, to go undercover on the
beach at Paradise Island. Mr Garvey is an advis-
er to the Irish Sailing Association and interna-
tionally recognised as an expert in watersports
safety.
He spent two days undercover on Paradise
Island beach, which shocked him into com-
menting that what he saw was "just like a night-
mare." He was forced to conclude that there
"doesn't appear to be any safety culture or that
safety procedures are being enforced by any-
body."
He watched as safety laws for parasailing,
banana boats and jet-skis were openly broken.
Alan Fein, a lawyer, told ITV2 viewers that
"the Bahamiain government could fix this prob-
lem tomorrow if they were of a mind to, and I
can't tell you why it's not that important to
them."
The Port Authority, the government depart-
ment that licenses watersports operators and
which is supposed to police their activities, was
seriously criticised on the programme. "Under-
cover" discovered that, in at least one case, a
serious conflict of interest existed. The allega-
tions are so damaging that government ,has a
duty to investigate.
If true then there is an extremely serious
problem at the very heart of the enforcement
body.
We shall return to this subject tomorrow
when we shall describe the programme's con-
tent in more detail.


Lamenting





the poor state





of BaTelCo


EDITOR, The Tribune
I AM outraged by the pathet-
ic and abhorrent service that
the Bahamas' only telecommu-
nications corporation extends
to its customers in the East I
am told that customers in the
West fare considerably better.
On Wednesday, October 19,
2005,1 I contacted the Bahamas
Telecommunications Corpora-
tion to inform them that my
telephone is not working -
there is no dial tone. I was put
on hold for almost half an hour
before someone informed me
that my phone had an open line.
I was also informed that the
technicians at the Camperdown
exchange were occupied at that
time with complaints that had.
been made from October 10,
2005. The customer service rep-
resentative went on to explain
that it would be quite some time
before they would get to my
line. She thanked me and hung
up.
I expressed my disappoint-
ment about this matter to a col-
league of mine, who lives in the
Winton Heights area. She
laughingly informed me that her
telephone had been out of ser-
vice for weeks before anyone
from BaTelCo showed up at her
door. She went on to say that
her eldest brother who lives in
Sans Souci has problems with
his phone on a consistent basis
- every time it rains.
During a conversation with
two of my exercise companions
who also live in the East, I dis-
covered that a superintendent
who lives in Eastern Estates and
a nurse who lives in Nassau
East also have similar stories to
tell. The superintendent stated
that his phone had been out of
service for one month before
BaTelCo fixed it. The nurse
stated that her telephone is on
the blink because she is able to
hear the conversations of her
neighbours.
Yesterday, on a visit to the
Harbour Bay Shopping Centre,
I learned that a customer ser-
vice representative's aunt who
lives in the East and who is an
employee of BaTelCo has been
without a useable telephone for
some six weeks.
Unbelievably in each of these
cases the telephone bill from
BaTelCo remained unaltered.
Is this fair? Are residents of the
Bahamas being taken advan-
tage of by the country's only
telephone service provider? The
answer to the aforementioned
questions is quite obviously yes
and blatantly so., BaTelCo
habitually charges its customers
for service even when the phone


A a


lines aren't working. I have
been a victim of this practice
for years. I believe that all resi-
dents of the Bahamas ought to
be refunded the money that has
been extorted from them
through this practice by BaTel-
Co.
I request a refund of all the
money that BaTelCo has extort-
ed from me through the years
and I don't want to have to go
to BaTelCo to beg for it as
though they're doing me a
favour. In this nation which
alleges itself to be Christian,
why ought I to beg for money
that has been unjustly taken
from me through charges for a
service not provided?


As a citizen of the Bahamas; I
call upon the Minister of Works
to look into this inequitable pro-
clivity by the Bahamas' only
telecommunications company
that has been placed in his
charge. It is hoped that once the
matter is brought to the atten-
tion of the honourable minister
he will do the honourable thing
and demand that this outra-
geous exploitation of residents
of The Bahamas cease.
It is unfortunate that Ms.Toh-
qiue Williams-Darling has lent
her name to a company with
such a dismal record. I think
that if not for the sake of its
customers then for the sake of
Ms Williams-Darling's credibil-
ity, BaTelCo in the East ought
to pull up its socks and jockeys.

AVA M CARGILL
Nassau
October 25 2005


The overuse of



racial profiling


EDITOR, The Tribune
MR John Marquis defends
his statements against accu-
sations from Leandra Esfakis
about his racial profiling of
the Haitians by resorting to
racial profiling of the Ger-
mans, particularly during
World War II, without any
reference to the cause of that
war, namely the Treaty of
Versailles.
The first US Ambassador
to the USSR from 1933-
1936, and subsequently US
Ambassador to France from
1936 until the Nazi invasion,
William C Bullitt, who
attended the 1919 peace
conference, observed in a
March 27, 1944. "Lift" mag-
azine article: "The cumula-
tive impression produced by
the Treaty of Versailles was
one of .rancorous se.veri-
ty...There were within the
treaty too many talking
points for specialists in
hatred like Hitler... The
most atrocious provisions
were those dealing with
reparations. They seemed to
promise that for an indefi-
nite future the entire Ger-
man race would have to,
labour for the Allies...There
was no winners in the
tragedy of Versailles. The
whole of mankind was the
loser."
In 1998 Mark Mazower,
who taught at the University
of Sussex and Princeton, and
was Professor of History, at
Birbeck College, University
of London, wrote an inter-
esting book entitled The
Dark Continent, intriguingly
subtitled "Europe's twenti-
eth century".
The prestigious London
Economist (September
11,1999) commented in its
20th century survey: "The
Versailles Treaty punished
and humiliated Germany,
and the raising of national
barriers to trade in the 1920s


and 1930s yielded economic
failures."
The article continued:
"And, as Mark Mazower
points out in his book, the
fighters for freedom and
against facism and racism in
1939-1945 were rank hyp-
ocrites, since they were them-
selves running dictatorial
empires in which racial supe-
riority was a strong theme".
Another interesting article
was "Cursed by Eugenics"
("TIME" magazine January
11, 1999) by Paul Gray, sub-
titled "A belief that human
intelligence could guide evo-
lution led the world to con-
centration camps." The
author observed: "Less
amusing is the number of
intellectuals, businessmen
and political leaders who'
gave eugenics their blessings
or fervid support.
The list begins with Dar-
win, who in The Descent of
Man praised his cousin Gal-
ton and decreed that genius
'tends to be inherited.' Other
champions included the
young Winston Churchill,
George Bernard Shaw,
Alexander Graham Bell,
John Maynard Keynes,
Theodore Roosevelt and the
usually taciturn Calvin
Coolidge, who declared dur-
ing his vice presidency that
'Nordics deteriorate when
mixed with other races."
In short, racial profiling
can be employed and has
been employed by all
nations and races in order td
serve their own ends! :
Incidentally, if the Christ-
ian concepts of reconcilia'
tion, peace and forgiveness
had motivated the victorious
Christian nations of World
War I, there might never
have been a World War II.M

CHRISTIAN
HISTORIAN
Nassau
October 3 2005


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PAGE 4, THURSDAY,'NOVEMBER 3, 2005


THE TRIBUNE







THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2005, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


LC NE


O In brief


Officials

have 'duty'

to visit

islands

THE people of New Provi-
dence have a responsibility to
ensure that every island effect-
ed by Hurricane Wilma recov-
ers, Fred Mitchell said yester-
day.
Announcing that the Ministry
of Public Services will be send-
ing out "a circular" to all min-
istries in an effort to collect aid
for Hurricane Wilma victims,
Mr Mitchell said that "we must
support Grand Bahama and
every island in this chain".
,' "This country is not held
together by military coercion,
or, by force of arms. It is held
"together by the consent of the
,governed," he said.
".The people in every island
support the fact that Nassau is
.their capital, and that we are
Atlejir leaders, and we in turn
Shave to show and demonstrate
this in every way."
'4r Mitchell said that every
permanent secretary and every
j;iblic official who is involved in
decision-making should visit the
.ifipacted islands, especially
Grand Bahama.
Last year, the Ministry of
Public Service collected $16,000
in relief funds, Mr Mitchell said.


-


-4 "Copyrighted Material -
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"
- -






- -







. THURSDAY
NOVEMBER 3


6':30am
11:00
12:00
12:03
12:05
1:00
2:00
-2:30
3:00
:30
4:00
4:30
600
,6;30
7:00
8:00
0
A30
10:30
11:00
41:30
1;:30


Community Pg./1540
Immediate Response
ZNS News Update
Caribbean Today News
Update
Immediate Response Cont'd
Legends Whence We Came
Portraits in Black: Della
Reese
Inside Hollywood
Bishop Leroy Emmanuel
Gilbert Patterson
Video Gospel
Hurricane Wilma: The After-
math ( Live Freeport)
Caribbean Newsline
News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
Native Stew
Black College Talent Hour
Darold Miller Shining Star
Show
News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
Immediate Response
Community Page


Crime rate is 'not



due to immigration'


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
NEW prison statistics dispel
any myth that the crime rate is
the result of the country's immi-
gration problem, according to
Prison Superintendent Dr Ellis-
ton Rahming.
It was revealed this week that
85 per cent of Fox Hill prison
inmates are of Bahamian
descent.
This figure was released along
with a number of other trou-
bling prison statistics, including
the fact that 50 per cent of
inmates are thought to be illit-
erate.
Dr Rahming told The Tri-
bune that as a people, Bahami-
ans tend to blame others for
their problems.
He said that the statistics,
however, show that Bahamians
have to take responsibility for
their own country,. as the major-
ity of crime is committed by
persons born and raised here.
"If you took all the immi-
grants out of the country, you
would still have a big crime
problem," he said.
Dr Rahming said it is impor-
tant to raise the educational lev-
el of inmates.
He said that in the past, there
has been an emphasis on train-
ing, providing inmates with
experience in trades and manu-


Mitchell welcomes



challenge for seat


* By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter
FOREIGN Affairs and Pub-
lic Service Minister Fred
Mitchell yesterday welcomed
a challenge from John Pinder
for tje Fox; Hill constituency; :
seat. : . . .,
On Sunday Mr Pinder; the,
president of the Bahamas Pub-
lic Services Union (BPSU),
publicly threatened to unseat
Mr Mitchell, who is the cur-
rent Fox Hill MP.
Mr Pinder said he would
cause Mr Mitchell to lose the
seat if the minister made "one
more brazen remark" about


him in the House of Assem-
bly.
"I will ensure that he loses
his seat in Fox Hill, whether
that involves me running
against him or campaigning
against him," Mr Pinder said.
"Speaking in the House of
Assembly yesterday;,- Mr'
Mitchell made his stand on the
issue clear by welcoming a
challenge.
"I am here this morning
under a warning that if I dare
to mention a particular name,
that person will be running in
my constituency. So I say,
come on my brother, bring all
your troops."


On Tuesday, Mr Mitchell
was reported as saying that the
BPSU's president's "irrespon-
sible and unseemly" threats
will not deter government from
reaching an agreement with
public servants.
Last week Wednesday, hun-
dreds of. union members
descended on Rawson Square
to protest government's latest
offer in an ongoing labour dis-
pute.


al labour. This focus, the super-
intendent said, led to a neglect
of literacy and other basic dis-
ciplines.
Dr Rahming pointed out that
as the prison seeks to move
from a punitive institution to a
rehabilitate one, inmates will
be required to mix the work and
trade aspect with educational
training, to ensure that when
they are released they possess
the ability "to reason, read and
write."


Dr Rahming pointed out that
there is a demonstrated rela-
tionship between the ability to
read and write and a person's
self-esteem, which in turn has
an affect on a person's behav-
iour and the likelihood that they
will commit a crime.
The prison issued a newspa-
per supplement this week com-
memorating Bahamas Prison
Recognition Week, in which a
number of statistics were high-
lighted.


160th Anniversarv
committee

p r e s e n t s

GUY FAWKES CELEBRATION

OF

GOLDEN OLDIES


FRIDAY NOVEMBER 4TH, 2005
AT 8:00PM
WORKERS HOUSE
HARROLDROADO,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS


TICKETS AVAILBLFO
CHRC FFC TL: 2-24


IBED BATH & HOME


NT:ZS -T 13eseve


Murder accused in court


* JAMAL Bastian, a 20-year-old resident of Kemp Road
is shown leaving court yesterday after being accused of
shooting Theitis Johnson to death on October 6 2005. His
preliminary inquiry is set for 9th January 2006.
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune Staff)


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2005


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Subway's $50,000




to Wilma victims


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
'Reporter
^FREEPORT Subway
restaurants in Grand Bahama
and Abaco are once again offer-
ing a $50,000 donation to assist
hurricane victims.
,. The funds will go to benefit
more than .100 hurricane vic-
tims of Hurricane Wilma in dev-
astated coastal communities on
the island.
Shuffle Hepburn, who oper-
ates four Subways in, Freeport,
.announced that he is donating
$40,000, and Yvette White of
Abaco is contributing $10,000.
The pair hope to provide
relief to 110 individuals by
donating $400 and $500 cheques
to affected families.
So far, they said, 48 persons
have been targeted for assis-
tance.
"Subway is just excited to be
able to assist again in a small
way to help those persons who
have been severely affected by
the recent hurricane to get their
lives back together. And, we
feel that ready cash is some-
thing that they need," Mr Hep-
burn said.
Last year, Subway donated
$50,000, which was shared
between Grand Bahama and
Abaco.
This year, the entire donation
will go to those along Grand
Bahama's devastated coastline
between Williams Town to


Bootle Bay.
Mr Hepburn said that per-
sons who have lost their homes
and all their belongings may
register for assistance at Sub-
way in the International Bazaar
between 10am and 2pm.
They are asked to bring their
most recent power bill or
receipt from their last payment,
a copy of their passport or dri-
ver's licence, and to explain the
exact location of their home.
Cheques will be issued at the
restaurant on Friday.
Mr Hepburn revealed that
190 persons were assisted by the


ORALF'tS FASHIONS
is having an end of summer


including formals up to 75% off
Starting Friday, October 28th, 2005


donation last year.
"Subway would like to
continue its efforts of being a
good community partner.
Our hearts go out to the per-
sons living in coastal areas
that were devastated by the
storm.
"We are certain that there
are lot of people are making
contributions in their own
way, but we like to encour-
age all of our business part-
ners in
Freeport to reach out a
helping hand to those per-
sons in need," Mr Hepburn
said.
"Last year, I felt God lead-
ing me to do this and once
again we have the same kind
of situation and we are in the
position again to assist in the
same fashion," he said.

I *0' M


0 In brief

Defence
personnel
on disaster
training
SUB Lieutenant Bertram
Bowleg and Leading Seaman
George Black of the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force recent-
ly returned from a four-week
disaster preparedness course in
the United States.
The training was sponsored
by the International Military
Education Training (IMET)
scheme which is facilitated by
the American Embassy in Nas-
sau.
The month-long training
course was undertaken at the
United States Army base in
Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri.
Topics covered included dis-
aster preparedness devllop-
ment planning, natural, and
man-made threats, threat
assessment, shelter manage-
ment, radiological surveys and
hazards, identifying chemical
and biological agents and gen-
eral hazardous threats assess-
ment.










m "Copyrighted Material o
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


4b --m a





. ,~. d~o-. m. .-
o-
=dlbqdtG mm40


and vendors.


Wholesalers and vendors needing to e^ .-hange existing
Bahamas Direct Pre-Paid Cards to the new "HELLO CARDS,
can do so from November 3rd to November 11th. BTC will,
exchange UNUSED Bahamas Direct Pre-paid Cards ONLY.


Exchange stations are as follows:
(Monday to Friday ONLY)
Perpall Tract Phone Card
Management Department
Grand Bahama Mall drive location
Family Islands CTO payment center's


9:00- 3:30
9:00 4:00
9:00 4:00


ONE WEEK ONLY!

NOVEMBER 3RD TO 11TH





YOUR CONNECTIO 0 THE WORLD

Ikr


* SHUFFLE Hepburn, right, making the announcement


~- I I


I


LOCAL NEWS







I'lI I ri~u'Ji MU1~LJY, U~iii~i LOCAL NEWSw~


EVE OF CONVENTION


SPECIAL


DON'T


MISS THE BUZZ BEHIND


THE SCENES


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FOR NEXT WEEK'S


PARTY CONVENTION


PLUS: Is GEORGE W BUSH THE WORST US
PRESIDENT EVER? BE SURE TO READ THIS
PROVOCATIVE ASSESSMENT

ONLY IN THE TRIBUNE

IN MONDAY'S


Strike rumours




unconfirmed as




lights go out


tONCERNS have surfaced
.Xer a rumour that Bahamas
Electrical Corporation workers
in Abaco may be on strike.
Yesterday, a concerned Aba-
conian contacted The Tribune
to say that several areas have
been without power for several
days.
dHe said that although it has
not been admitted openly,
many believe that BEC workers
on the island are refusing to
york. 9 DENNIS Williams
Se'When we spoke to manage-
ment yesterday (Tuesday) they And here, many didn't have
s5pid that the workers did not power for more than 24 hours."
come to work, but were present "I am told that areas of
on Monday. Marsh Habour are still off, but I
,."Power has been out in sev- can't verify this. I called the
ral areas since Friday and no local emergency line and no one
one can say when it will be is answering the phones, they're
restored. just letting. it ring until it cuts
He said that rumours have off."
surfaced that BEC workers He said that yesterday, some-
yvent on strike over the past one answered the emergency
Weekend. line, but was unable to answer
,"'It's all over the Bahamas," any of his questions.
e, said. "Power was out for a Industrial action flared up in
day in Eleuthera, so I, ataold'. Abao-two.days later, with BEC


workers there saying they were
supporting their Nassau col-
leagues.
Bahamas Electrical Workers
Union president Dennis
Williams was quoted as saying:
"The union cannot be bullied
or pushed into a corner by any
person or group of persons and
BEC must understand clearly,
that workers will not be disre-
spected."
Then BEC workers in Nas-
sau staged a sick-out Friday.
Williams said the union is
pushing for an acceptable for-
mula for a merit system, pen-
sion plan improvements and an
adjustment of working hours.
Last Tuesday, BEC union
members stopped working in
Nassau to press for the removal
of an information technology
manager.
Workers claimed the manag-
er refused to allow an employee
to take vacation leave after he
complained of feeling ill. The
employee subsequently 'fell out'
on the job.


PLUS: LIVELY FEEDBACK ON THE
PUBLIC SERVICE DEBATE WHEN INSIGHT
READERS HAVE THEIR SAY



insight


Residents and tourists suffer


ABOUT 50 high school stu-
dents were forced to dress by
flashlight in Green Turtle Cay,
Abaco, after the power went
out Wednesday in what appears
to be an ongoing labour dispute
with BEC.
A resident of Man-O-Way
Cay, which lost power at 8pm
Tuesday, reported watching the
sky turn blue over Marsh Har-
bour.
"I was told the transformers
blew up. It was so bright, it
looked like fireworks, like blue
sparks. I saw it happen twice,"
the resident said.
However, the report
remained unconfirmed and
rumours spread through the
tourist and fishing communities
like wildfire.
Power was still off when the
resident left Man-O-War for
Marsh Harbour the next morn-
ing.
A Green Turtle Cay busi-
nessman said: "The power goes
off between 6am and 9am when
the kids are getting ready for
school and people are getting
ready for work. It goes off at
dinner time, too."
The Green Turtle students
have to get up at 6am to make it
to school in Marsh Harbour on
time.
The daily journey includes
a 10-minute ferry ride from
Green Turtle to Treasure Cay
and a 40-minute car ride to
Marsh Harbour where they
attend Forest Heights Academy.
BEC owns a stand-by gener-


ator in Green Turtle Cay, but
no-one will turn it on, the busi-
nessman said.
Meanwhile, visitors were
being shuttled from vacation
rental to vacation rental as
premises with stand-by gener-
ators became available.
"There are a couple of very
unhappy visitors in town. The,
weather's bad and they don't
have air-conditioning, phones or
TV. It's not what they bargained
for. It's just not good for


tourism," an industry worker said.
Residents in Man-O-War
Cay, where an estimated 80 per
cent of the population have gen-
erators, fared better.
As a BEC team flew to
Grand Cay from Nassau on
Tuesday to help restore power
there, rumours swirled as to the
cause of the power outages.
An airport worker said the
Nassau BEC team appeared to
comprise senior, non-union
employees.


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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2005


ere is question of e ..ardian n b .s as th.
aper is audited by the highly respected and trusted Audit
Bureau of Circulation, which keeps tabs on the irculation
numbers of many of the world's top publications newspa-
pers and magazines. / ;il
The same, however, cannot be said for The Tribune as.............
er s and mLavepi



FACT: k
The Tribune is audited by the same Audit Bureau of Cir-
culation (ABC) as The Guardian. So our paid circulation
numbers are verified by the same people as The Guardian!
So whatever the colour of the sky in the Guardian's com e1
world don't worry! We know their numbers are going ere
down and ours up. The Tribune has been audited for o r"4O
many years by ABC as is our partner The Miami Herald. P ," and
We just choose not to put the logo on our editorial page. / anodOa oa
e P".e ,ih.
believe Urge -
The Tribune would wish to have the Bahamian peopi ep
believe the claim that it outsells The. -Guardianon averg' tfthat7Wk&
2,000 copies per day The se fgres though t1158
. . . ..le oin e untin ecause at the end of...
SideoY Gua ir t



That's right we outsell The Guardian by more than 3,000 papers/ K ua
on some days and less on others. The net result according to ABC le


numbers is that we sell 11584 more paid papers a week than The a Corn t
Guardian which makes us #1. We know it's hard being #2 since lthankfsoG TCoD atern
you lost your government subsidy but that's what happens oofo r rdoa
when the People's paper rules the nation! nGuar oan e ca. 9oj01I
and th Iea ats pup e
TRIBUNE GUARDIAN DIFFERENCE / tre u8saWo
paid circulation paid circulation PER WEEK 4er S0needo I-Iasee

2003-2004 73,939 69,055 4,884

2004-2005 76,297 64,713 11,584

; -* i


THE TRIBUNE





THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2005, PAGE 9
milI


cr t it a. way of boost th wni g
For more than five years now The tribune has piggybacked
off The Guardian by having its circulation van parked out-p
side The Guardian's backs gate to distribute its paper t ven~
ders as ey are leaving wittheir supply of The Guardian.
I re ritica for the Thursday edition of the
r or i lay pte


OF$24.45;1 6 f (26labs s


Weeks


llf37~j~A.



on'

r9eaed to .. -'
, o oa .L. ".


IdeFce

'FACT:
e1 J ei
6


NLOT NJ URII


You can't piggyback on someone whose circulation
has decreased 6% this year and another 11% the pre-
vious year. We know the Guardian has no idea of
customer service, but we're making it easier for the :
street vendors to buy all the papers at one time and at
one location saving both gas and time!


GUARDIAN
circulation. 03-05


TRIBUNE
circulation. 03-05


I


It's not what you say, it's what you do! Talk is cheap folks!
When you want action and results the people's paper The Tribune -
The Bahamas' first daily newspaper is where everyone turns


The


Tribune


I


(94






PAGE 10, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER J, 2UUb


Mass bleaching posing threat




to coral reefs in the


*mw- u


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Fax: 394-7668 /E: sportscenter@coralwave.com
-------- ------ ------------------ ----------- ------------....


i"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


-






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THE TIBUNETHURSAY, OVEMBRL3,205L PGEW1


GBHRA launching initiatives


to help with hurricane relief


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT The Grand
Bahama Human Rights Asso-
ciation has reactivated its dis-
aster relief organisation and is
launching several new initiatives
to help with hurricane relief and
recovery efforts on the island.
GBHRA president Fred Smith
announced that in addition to
reopening its disaster relief fund,
the association will be creating a
disaster relief directory and a hur-
ricane relief hotline to help vic-
tims of Hurricane Wilma.
He said that the association
also intends to act as a facilita-
tor between the various relief
organisations, and between aid
agencies and victims.
"In this way, the association
hopes to help the organisations
to help each other, to get relief
to the victims more effectively
and to facilitate a direct hotline
(352-4633) for victims to get
help," said Mr Smith.
He noted that there has been
a "fantastic" outpouring of help
from communities in Grand


Bahama, where many people,
associations, church groups and
government agencies and
organisations are scrambling to
provide relief.
Unfortunately, he said, there
has been a "vacuum" in terms
of co-ordination.
"The association has found
that so many people are willing
to help in so many different
ways but have had difficulty in
channeling their efforts effec-
tively. This has caused much
frustration and exasperation
which has unfortunately at
times discouraged help.
"The catastrophic collapse of
the coastal communities along
the south west coast of Grand
Bahama has been unprece-
dented in scale and scope. The
association intends to help the
communities in channeling the
outpouring of generosity," said
Mr Smith.
The association intends will
connect those who need help
-with those who can help by pub-
lishing a disaster relief directory
with the names of organisations,
contact persons, telephone num-


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bers and email addresses.
The directory will also give a
brief description of the kind of
assistance each person or organ-
isation can provide in both the
short and long term.
A questionnaire is available
for persons or organisations
wishing to be included in the
directory.
He said that Tourism Minis-
ter Obie Wilchcombe, MP for
West End, has expressed his
support of the association's
efforts in Grand Bahama.
"He stands completely
behind its effort. And we have
found that the government has
been much more responsive on
this occasion than last year.
The association has hired
Nevardo Saunders as a disaster
relief co-ordinator to man the
hotline. He will also act as facili-
tator between civic organisations,


government agencies and victims
"The association appreciates
that many of victims of hurri-
cane Wilma in the coastal set-
tlements are illegal immigrants.
And so there is a reluctance on
their part to come forth to gov-
ernment agencies and they are
trying to struggle through on
their own.
Mr Smith thanked the public
for the generous donations
made to the Grand Bahama
Disaster Relief Fund, which
was established last year.
Persons wishing to contribute
to the fund may make cheques
payable to the Grand Bahama
Disaster Relief Fund.
Cheques can be delivered to
Kelly's in Freeport or mailed to
PO Box F-40132, Freeport,
Grand Bahama.
They can also contact Mr
Saunders at the hotline.


Your car.


Your trust.


Our responsibility


raKe Serice Suspension iglmet Eioul

Oil, Lube I Filter "iOODYEAl TYRES"


*American i Imported Cars LigM Trucks Van SI's

* Complete inspection & Eslimates before we sIrt tIe work


--- LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOI

MACKEY ST. & ROOSEVELT AVENUE EAST S'
Tel: 393-6651 or 393-6693 Tel: 356-


T. & SOLDIER RD
2940 or 356-2941


Open: Monday Saturday
8am-5pm


Fax 326-4865 P. O. Box SS-6766 Nassau, Bahamas

AUTO SYSTEM EXPERTS U ia

"Midas is a business based on service, quality and reliability.
Factory scheduled maintenance is car care.
Midas services your car fully. Our system takes the guesswork
out of auto care for every car model out there.


Telecommunications Consultant
(Fiber Optic)
Caribbean Crossings Ltd

CAR.1 BEAN



Caribbean Crossings Ltd., (a wholly owned subsidiary of Cable
Bahamas Ltd) is in search of a Fiber Optic Telecommunications
Consultant to maintain its international submarine fiber optic
cable system linking the Bahamas with the continental Umted
States.
The successful candidate must possess a University degree or
electronic technology equivalent, highly specialized and well-
honed technical skills and, extensive experience and in-depth
knowledge of state of the art high-speed long distance submarine
fiber optic telecommunication systems.
The successful candidate will be expected to provide "hands-on"
specialized practical submarine fiber optic training to existing
managers and other senior level technical staff. In addition, the
successful candidate must have strong leadership, as well as
supervisory skills and technical "hands on" expertise in fiber optic
telecommunications technology utilized by Caribbean Crossings
Ltd.
It is also expected that the successful candidate would have strong
reasoning abilities for analysis planning, problem solving and
project management; and strong written and verbal
communication skills for corporate executive level presentations.
It is further desired that the successful candidate have a working
knowledge of fiber optic engineering design and the necessary
skills to support and develop high capacity and metro fiber optic
based SONET systems, subsystems and services.
Additional duties include:
*Supervise the daily operations relative to services and support to
CCL Customers.
*Evaluate, install, integrate, and comnunission fiber optic based
telecommunications systems, RAN and associated equipment.
*Assemble, configure, and maintain the documents for high
capacity telecommunications circuits and systems.
*Support Data Problem Management and MAC (Moves, Adds,
Changes) in the New Providence and Family Island facilities.
*Supervise MAC for customers' data, telecommunications and
network connections.
*Oversee staff that maintain and monitor all Telecommunications
systems and adjuncts for performance, errors, back up and
alarms.
*Maintain hardware / software on Network Management System
*Perform testing and inspection of fiber optics Network interfaces
and passive components, and optical cables.
*Establish and maintain all new optical span databases and
physical to optical reconciliation.
*Facilitate details necessary for updated database records.
*Issue repair orders and service as needed
Resumes to be submitted by November 8, 2005 to
Mr. Richard B. Adderley or sent electronically to
rbadderley@cablebahamas.com.


DIVIDEND NOTICE




COMMONWEALTH BANK

TO COMMON SHAREHOLDERS

The Board of Directors of Commonwealth Bank
Limited has declared an Extraordinary Dividend
of 8 cents per share, on Common Shares, to all
shareholders of record at November 15, 2005:-

The payment will be made on November 30,
2005, through Colina Financial Advisors Ltd.,
the Registrar and Transfer Agent, in the usual
manner.


Charlene A. Pinder-Higgs
Corporate Secretary


TYRFLE STR MTOR


'Il-dit -y ukvfpeql, tu t


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2005, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE






PAGE~~ ~ ~ ~ 12 HRDY OEBR ,20 H RB


High school students

attend career festival


TEAK FURNITURE


* Gifts & Handicrafts *

Christm-As Selection


NOW

OPEN k


KURA KURA

26 Virginia St., Tel: 325-1389
1 blk west of Hilton hotel entrance, in large two storey
turquoise building, on one way westbound street


BAHAMAS Registrar of
Real Estate Wendell Seymour
is pictured, second from left,
with some of the students who
attended the recent high school
Careers Fest 2005, held at San-
dals Royal Bahamian Resort.
The event, organised by the
Bahamas Financial Services
board, the. Rotary Club of East
Nassau and Sunrise Rotary
Club, gave more than 150 High
School students an opportunity
to review presentations by var-
ious organisations and profes-
sionals to assist them in mak-
ing career choices.
The exhibit by the Bahamas
Real Estate Association proved
popular with the students who
were given a booklet with infor-
mation about the association's
history, legal basis and regula-
tions governing real estate
transactions and the licensing
of sales persons.


Gibson; Phillipa Strachan, CI
Gibson; Lavantha Lookie, Tem-
ple Christian; June Fife, office
manager of the Bahamas Real
Estate Association.


SCHONDREOL
SCHOOL


xV


TIiff h~ternwt hltf .Srl w; rislr 7 i lfta llits
!OI.Ni A D ;9i .





at
a ed"eca u on



'/\/tze^cittza(a^CT W'^9d^


7.'0 9..0 .

'..6 /'-. a.e,: . v, ; e s ..,& :
........ a:..., :,.:...i: .. .. .... ..... ... ti- :^ (


P. Farmer 422-5334, K. Smollet 324-7737, D. Thompson 565
J. Treco 325-2586 & M. Albury 324-2105


5-8418,


~' ,~. 9-


Sredt from Losegas V enoy the amazing impersonating t ents of The Edwards
wins lve in he Rainforest Iheater.

"Teleheities ot Stay" is a mosca celebration featuring impressions of Cher, Barbra



R ESORT S
C#pptaI ?afli Caai#g
Contact the Box Office for more information at.327.200 ext. 6758
Sub ject to d(hange or canc aotion.


Pictured left to right are:
Sharmain Hutchison, Temple
Christian; Wendell Seymour,
registrar of Real Estate in the
Bahamas; Ashlin Culmer, CI


"'9


97.0et
X3O. 0.0


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2005







THE TIBUNETHURSAY, OVEMBRL3,205, PGEW1


Police

remove

workmen

in land row

FROM page one

this week.
Tryone Brown, a mem-
ber of the Bozine Town
steering committee, said
workmen from Bethel
Trucking told them that
the work was authorised
by Elliot Lockhart, whose
firm Lockhart and
Munroe represents
LANDCO.
According to Mr
Brown, because the case is
before the courts, no such
work should be done in
the area. He said residents
immediately held a meet-
ing and contacted the
Department of Lands and
Surveys to see if the work-
men did have a permit to
do the work.
Mr Brown said he spoke
with Michael Major of the
Department of Lands and
Survey and was told they
did not have a permit. He
then asked Carmichael
Road police to remove
the men from the proper-
ty.
Mr Brown claimed that
a heated dispute then
took place when police
officers asked the men to
either show them a
permit to do the work or
leave.
He said that finally the
workmen did leave,
although up to yesterday
afternoon they had not
removed their equip-
ment.
i The Tribune was unable
to contact Michael Major
at Lands and Surveys for
comment.
Mr Lockhart would not
comment on the issue,
saying he does not speak
to the press.


Leslie Miller hits out at Thrnquest


FROM page one
"Mr Speaker, the beating I
get in the press, all I have is this
chamber to address them. One
yesterday went after me for no
reason, the leader of the oppo-
sition, Tommy T, Mr Turn-
quest.
"Mr Speaker, I attack no-one
but I am always attacked. I was
attacked yesterday on the radio
for no reason. Mr Turnquest
attacks me at every opportunity
he gets this jokey poodle," he
said.


Mr Turnquest, while a guest
on "Issues of the Day" with host
* Michael Pintard, said Mr Miller
was a "disaster" in Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie's Cabinet,
adding that it was inconceivable
that Mr Christie had not
removed him from his position.
Oswald Ingraham, Speaker
of the House, asked Mr Miller
to withdraw his "poodle" com-
ment about Mr Turnquest.
"I take that back, Mr Speak-
er," said Mr Miller, "but he has
called me worse names than
that, believe me even in public.


BEC workers


FROM page one
heels of public criticism that BEC's industrial
actions were causing blackouts throughout the
country and would delay hurricane repairs.
However Mr Greene maintained that the union
is not operating on a work-to-rule or go slow.
Instead he said workers are on "reduced
enthusiasm" after management reneged on the
latest proposed industrial agreement.
"The government through its representative,
the minister of Works and Utilities chose for
whatever reason not to ratify the agreement made
between the parties. The union considers this to
be unprofessional, as it is not within the scope of
proper industrial relations," he said.
Mr Greene said that they are working with
management to address the hurricane issues
despite the fact that all the employees were affect-
ed by government's decision not to ratify the
agreement which would encompass pressing
issues, including a proposed salary increase dur-
ing the fourth year of the contract, safety concerns
and a pension scheme.
According to Mr Greene, BEC workers have
the most dangerous job in the country, but do
not have any safety managers which he claimed is
legal.
Noting the concerns raised by workers at the
Clifton Plant who said they did not have the
proper safety equipment and were forced to
breathe in toxic fumes, .Mr Greene said the cor-
poration has addressed the situation temporary.
He said, however, that the union is still awaiting
a permanent and satisfactory solution.
Mr Greene said the union does not feel that
their demands were too high and said that
employee morale has plummeted since the latest
proposal was not put into place.
He said that union members have staged a
massive, appeal to the public for support by dis-
tributing fliers explaining what they are demand-


These people need to appreci-
ate that we all have families,
not only them. So I'm supposed
to keep taking all these blows?
Of course I can take them but I
can give them, too.
"A fella' hit me I will hit him
back, but I sure I ain't ga' give
him nothing cheap, I'll tell you
that," he said.
Mr Miller then said if Mr
Turnquest wanted an example
of criminality, he could speak
to his father, former Governor
General Sir Orville Turnquest.
"If this young gentleman real-



i VOW


ing and highlighting the problems they say are
prevalent in the corporation.
Mr Greene said this has proven to be very
effective as they have received a number of calls
from members of the public expressing support
and calls from high ranking government officials
asking them to stop doing it.
The union is also accepting donations from its
members for Hurricane Wilma relief efforts.


Police arrest

10 after month

long undercover

operation
FROM page one
Mr Evans said that, following the arrest,
the drivers were taken to the airport police sta-
tion.
The passengers they were carrying at the
time were transferred to legitimate taxis.
The 10 alleged hackers are expected to be
charged in court next week with operating
without a franchise or licence.
"You can't go to the airport where you have
a legitimate operation, where you have taxi-
drivers. That's their livelihood and to have a
hacker take their livelihood, that's illegal,"
he said.
Mr Evans said that police will continue
to monitor the airport closely and act imme-
diately if a similar situation should arise
again.


ly wants to know what crimi-
nality is all about he could eas-
ily ask his dad, who was inti-
mately involved with both
Vesco and Joe Lehder, both of
them.


"He knows them well. He
should be careful. When you
live in glass house, you should-
n't throw stone, cause I ga'
throw rock," Mr Miller mocked.


SSlTUDIO OF DRAPERIES
ANNOUNCES ITS
BIG ANNIVERSARY SALE



S Saturday, November 5,2005
8:30am 6:00pm
There will be Gifts for the
First 50
purchasing customers
15% off Verticals 25% off Drapes & Sheers
10% off Rods Residential & Commercial
Don't miss this
Big Savings for Christmas!
Coffee & Donuts will be available
SAlso Balloons for Kids


CALLING ALL PAST
MEMBERS/FOLLOWERS OF
CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

are invited to atteno
0o 041

4TH HOMECOMING
&

127TH ANNIVERSARY SERVICE
on
Sunday, November 27, 2005
at 11:00am
at


O il


I. .I r - ----l i


PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS, proper operation and
success of organizations are inextricably
bound to the establishment and
maintenance of proper and accurate
systems of accounting;

AND WHEREAS, it is essential that
persons performing accounting functions
in organizations maintain the hightest
standards and possess an awareness of
current practices;

AND WHEREAS, The Bahamas Institute of Chartered
Accountants was established to assist in the development of
the accounting profession in The Bahamas, by prescribing
standards which require careful attention to performance;

AND WHEREAS, the said Institute wishes to set aside a
week to engage in activities to promote a greater understanding
and appreciation of accounting in the Bahamian community;


NOW THEREFORE, I, Perry G. Christie, Prime Minister of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, do hereby proclaim this
week commencing Saturday, 5th November, 2005 and ending
Friday, 11th November, 2005 as "ACCOUNTANTS' WEEK".

I WITNESS WHEREOF, I have
hereunto set my Hand and Seal
this 27th day of October, 2005.






PERRY G. CHRISTIE
PRIME MINISTER


The Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants

Accountants' Week 2005
Continuing Professional Education Seminar

The Ballroom at SuperClubs Breezes, Cable Beach
November 7th 10th 2005
9am 5:00pm

Theme:

Diversiiy of The Accounting Profession and Self-Governance


Monday Opening Ceremony
Opening Address: Minister of State Finance, Senator Honourable Mr. James Smith

AML Initiatives & Their Impact John Bain, CA, AML Specialist
Diversity of the Accounting Profession L. Edgar Moxey, PwC
Central Bank Expectations of External Auditors- Michael Foot, Central Bank

Tuesday'
Financial Statements & InternationalFinancial Reporting Standards
Peter Chant of Deloitte & Touche, Canada

Wednesday
Technological Tools for Businesses Deloitte & Touche, Bahamas
Key Changes to the 1991 Public Accquntants Act Lambert Longley, KPMG
Combating White Collar Crimes- Ed Smith, Financial Intelligence Unit
Facing the Future Collectively- Wendy Warren, BFSB
Investments and Retirement Planning-Ursula Rolle, Fidelity Bank & Trust


Thursday
Proposed Changes to NIB Law -The Inside Scoop Derek Osborne, NIB,
Professional Accountants/Auditors -Purveyors of Justice Sen. Philip Galanis
Recognizing and Avoiding Scams A Local Perspective.

Who Should Attend
Accountants, Auditors, Bankers, Managers in Govt. Corporations, Lawyers & Students

Cost: $100 for Members, $125 for Non-Members, (Daily Lunch & Refreshments)
(No billings for This Event)

Call BICA's Office at 326-6619 for Registration/Additional Information


-


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2005, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 4, THRSDAY NOVMBER ,2005THE TIBUN


Visit us and see other used cars
and make your own deal!


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Manageress
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Experience in any of these position would be an asset.
Reply in writing with resum6 to:
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or fax: 356-4805


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Project promoting




fitness for all ages

THE Farm Road Urban
Renewal Project's first annual
Health Fair gave Bally Total
Fitness the perfect opportuni-
ty to promote the value of a
healthy lifestyle to Bahamians
of all ages.



attended by the Prime Minis-
ter Perry Christie and other
MPs.
The fair catered to seniors
living within in the Farm Road
community as well as those liv-
ing in other urban areas.
It was part of the celebrations
for Senior's Month, an occasion m EVERYONE
which is recognised every Octo- who visited the
ber around the world. s Bally booth at
About 200 seniors were in the fair was
attendance and Bally Total Fit- encouraged to
ness representatives were also practise healthy
there giving seniors and others habits and given
who attended information on a free Bally
health and fitness. sport bottle
Bally representatives said
seniors were interested to find
out that exercise could actually
help them to feel better and live
longer, more fulfilling lives.
A study led by doctors at the .
John Hopkins University
showed that six months of aer-
obic exercise increased the
physical fitness of a group of
heart failure patients ages 61 to
91 by an average of 22 per cent.
Studies have shown that older
people who exercise regularly
experience fewer aches and pains
than other people their age. l
According to studies, being
active can help reduce the risk
of high blood pressure, diabetes,
osteoporosis, stroke, depression,
and premature death.
Exercise has also proven to
be beneficial for persons with
ar [] -e==:: EPRIME Minister Perry
A Bally employee said: "Bal- Christie was presented with
ly Total Fitness has a regular a one year membership to
membership of older persons Blly Total Fitness b Blly
and even offers special rates." reBally Totative John EBallsII
anc even ouers special rates." representative John Ehis r t


comet US I R a^^B^iff Call Us ^Bat P' 34-115,0 -Or ax: 394-862
^^B^ ^n!;H.[n'S~ln'or ai OfMWBI uBat w||w|id^lli
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. ... . . . . . .. . . . . ....l ll.. . . ................................. .. ........................................................................................................... .......


THE TRIBUNE,'


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2005











Radio telethon raises $90,000 for



victims of Hurricane Katrina


* SILBERT Mills (left) and Stone McEwan


RADIO Abaco (93.5 FM)
held a two-hour telethon on Fri-
day October 28 to raise funds
for the victims of Hurricane
Katrina
The show was hosted by Sil-
bert Mills, who is also the pro-
ducer for the radio station.
It was also the third telethon
hosted by Mr Mills to obtain
funds for communities on Aba-
co.
Thefirst was held a few years
ago to purchase a fire truck for
the Dundas and Murphy Town
communities.
The second was to raise funds
for the Marsh Harbour fire sta-
tion. .
Thbmost recent event was to
garner assistance for the unfor-
tunate persons on Grand Cay
and Grand Bahama, who were
affected by the devastation
caused by Hurricane Wilma.
Some of the staff at the Aba-
co Club on Winding Bay are
from Grand Bahama and many
others have relatives and friends
there.
The telethon raised around
$90,000 with a portion donated
by Peter de Savary, the founder
and the chairman of the Abaco


Club on Winding Bay.
When Mr de Savary became
aware of the catastrophes, he
asked his public relations man-
ager Stone McEwan how the
club could best assist. He was
advised to donate funds or
building materials. Mr de
Savary donated both.
Mr de Savary pledged
$20,000 to the National Emer-
gency Management Agency
(NEMA).
A cheque for $10,000 was
presented to Mr Mills by Stone
McEwan hours after the pledge
was made and $10,000 worth of
building supplies are to be
shipped directly to Grand
Bahama in the next two weeks.
Mr Mills said: "By far this is a
record breaking outpouring of
donations ever. A major part is
due to the contributions made
by Peter de Savary and the
Abaco club".
"It was not until de Savary
phoned in with his donation,
the listening public followed
suite".
He added he has informed
Prime Minister Christie of the
contributions made by the Aba-
co club.


A JS l '-


Professional award

goes to realtor


LOCAL Realtor Ken Chap-
lin has been awarded the pres-
tigious Certified Residential
Specialist (CRS) designation by
the Council of Residential Spe-
cialists and the National Asso-
ciatidn of Realtors worldwide.
Realtors who receive the
CRS designation have com-
pleted advanced courses and
have demonstrated profession-
al expertise in the field of resi-
dential real estate.
Fewer than 38,000 realtors
worldwide have earned the cre-
dential and only 25 in the
Bahamas.
Mr Chaplin is a Sales Associ-
ate with ERA Dupuch Real
Estate in Nassau, a member of
the Bahamas Real Estate Asso-
ciation and already holds the
BRI designation.


* KEN Chaplin


LA CASITA
The Art of Island Living


property > electrical fire
motor
home
liability
marine





itha ens
call before it happens to






nassau t 242.328.7888 f 242.325.3151
freeport t 242.352.4564 f 242.352.5118
w rsabahamas.com


CONSOLIDATED WATER CO. LTD.
A NASDAQ Company (symbol: CWCO)




CONSOLIDATED
WATER


CONSOLIDATED WATER CO. LTD.
PUBLIC OFFERING OF BAHAMIAN
DEPOSITARY RECEIPTS (BDRS)
CLOSES THIS FRIDAY NOVEMBER
4TH AT 5:00 P.M.


The Offering Memorandum can be
downloaded from www.fidelitycwco.com
or collected from all branches in
Nassau and Freeport of Fidelity Bank
and Fidelity Merchant Bank & Trust.


These BDRs are not offered or sold in
the United States.
Read the Offering Memorandum carefully
before you invest.

Fidelity Capital Markets Limited
51 Frederick Street, Nassau
Tel: 242.356.7764.
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r




PAGE 16, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3rd, 2005


"'The art and entertainment communities
in The Bahamas are thriving. Every
Wednesday, I enjoy reading about my
colleagues' contributions to the world of
culture in "The Arts" section of The
Tribune. The Tribune is my newspaper."


JOHN BEADLE
ARTIST


The Tribune


-, i


THE TRIBUNE


//1 y0


Noe- 11AAM*


B~pe


N",







THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2005, PAGE 17


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* TAI Keov (St Kitts) fourth place; Michael McFarlance (USA) second place; Stacy Armstrong
(Canada), 2005 Mr Caribbean International; Godfrey Stephen Robinson (Bahamas) third place;
and Kurt Dunn (Jamaica) fifth place.



Bahamian third


in com


BAHAMIAN Godfrey
Stephen Robinson has been
placed third in an interntional
modelling and fitness competi-
tion.
Robinson, 39, competed in
the fourth annual Mr Caribbean
International Competition at
Hedonism III in Runaway Bay,
Jamaica which was held on
October 3 to 10.
Under the theme, "Military
Playground", 12 men repre-
senting the United States, Cana-
da, the Bahamas, Trinidad and
Tobago, St Kitts, Jamaica, Mar-
tinique, Cayman Islands, Bar-
bados, and Venezuela compet-
ed in a week of preliminary
competitions that included a fit-
ness challenge that required the
"recruits" to swim, kayak, run,
perform push-ups; demnonstrate--
'their basketball-abilities and
pose for individual photo ses-


sions with a leading Canadian
photographer.
They also had to model
swimwear, be interviewed, and
take part in a talent show.
The men were also judged on
personality by their individual
dates in a blind date segment
of the competition.
On the final night of compe-
tition, the "recruits" clad in
army fatigues, performed mili-
tary drills and stunts with the
female lead dancer to Destiny's
Child hit song, Soldier, com-
plete with entrances from the
ceiling along twenty-feet ropes
and wires.
The talent competition and
show featured martial arts,
African drumming, fitness rou-
tines, Carnival-Style soca
demonstrations and -dramatic
'acts. .
The top five finalists, selected


.on


to compete in the final inter-
view segment, were: Stacy Arm-
strong (Canada), Tai Keov (St,
Kitts), Kurt Dunn (Jamaica),
Michael McFarlane (United
States), and Stephen Robinson
(Bahamas).
The men were then asked
questions on current world and
Caribbean issues, relationships,
and their personal biographies.
The winner of this year's
competition was Stacy Arm-
strong, a financial analyst from
Toronto, Canada. Michael
McFarlane, a computer consul-
tant from the United States
placed second. Stephen Robin-
son, a food and beverage man-
ager from the Bahamas placed
third, Tai Keov, a fitness train-
er from St Kitts placed fourth,
and Kurt Dunn, a fitness train-
er and aerobics instructor from
Jamaica placed fifth.


home in Paradise. Bask in the warmth of this inviting new


mrmunity. These eighty-eight luxurious condominiums offer tropical splendor,
evel of service like you would expect at One&Only Ocean Club.


AD I SE I S L A N D B A H A M A S F R Q M $ 1 7 T O 6 M I L L I O N
s bjtct to availability. This is not an offer or solicitation in any state in which the legal requirements for such an offering have not been met.


LOCANEW


THE TRIBUNE


--


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Janice vveecn uellarece vvorreii lIorann Iratnwalte Lillian MOSS
(242) 427-4841 (242) 424-4276 (242) 424-4237 (242) 424-4273


At your convenience, we'll visit you and tailor an
affordable home ownership solution that meets
your unique needs.


Call one of us today
for expert home
financing advice.


* Trademarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia. Trademarks used under license and control of The Bank of Nova Scotia.
t The Home Financing Specialist service Is only available in New Providence.


nefidatte


IHE TRIBUNE


PAGE 18, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2005


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This SATURDAY, Nov. 5th, 2005

ONE DAY ONLY.
Village Road Ph.394-2378


Bedrooms
Living Rooms
Sets & Separates
Dining Rooms
Recliners
Accessories
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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2005, PAGE 19


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 20. THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 3rd, 2005


SAV.A.CHEK 'Extra-Special': on each item you purchase, over
| a dollar, with One filled SAV.A.CHEK certificate get a Dollar Off!
REDEEM your SAV-A-CHEK now at:
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& CHEESE
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SCRUBBING
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CLEANER, REGULAR
& LEMON
25 OZ
Sao*1


ROBIN HOOD


GRITS
$239
_5 LBS
THRIFTY MAID
WHOLE
KERNEL CORN


S-1


79
29 OZ


GOLDEN CROWN
LEMON
JUICE
15 OZ
. ml 4e


V8 SPLASH
ASSORTED
FLAVOURS
16 OZ
$ 169


LIBBYS WD
SLICED PUPPY
BEETS DOG FOOD
104 OZ 17.5 LB
$539 $1249


SUNCHY

MALTA
12 OZ
000


MAHATMA


BISMATI/ JASMINE
RICE
2 LBS
990


POTATOES STRAWBERRIES
10 LB BAG CLAMSHELL 16.0Z
EACH EACH


ORANGES 4 LB BAG
$399
EACH
LIMES
4/-, 100
EACH


WINN-DIXIE
SPREAD
S3-LB
W/D
SLICE CHEESE
$s 89
10-


CARROTS
CELLO
$0 49
EACH
ONION
3LB BAG
1E$ 49
EACH


WI/U
CREAM CHEESE
REG
$299 oz
SUNNY DELIGHT
SMOOTH CALOFORNIA STYLE
SUNNY DELIGHT TANGY
ORAGINAL FLA STYLE
2/ 5 1 o0
15 OZ


JENO'S GREEN GIANT
PIZZA CHEESE, ASSTD
SAUSAGE, PEPPERONI, VEGATABLES
& COMBINATION 09
7.8 OZ
W/D WINN-DIXIE
ICE CREAM VANILLA, CHOCOLATE, CORN ON
NAPOLITAN, FUDGE, ROYAL BUTTER SCOTCH, THrE CO B
BUTTER PECAN, COOKIES & CREAM
se-3 $429
64 OZ 12 CT


THRIFTY MAID
SPAGHETTI RINGS W/MEATBALLS &
REGULAR SPAGHETTI
W/ MEATBALLS 15 OZ.......................994
SUNCHY
100% APPLE & FRUIT
PUNCH JUICE 11.5 OZ...................2/990
ECKRICH
CHICKEN VIENNA SAUSAGE s- oz...2/.99
DELMONTE
FRUIT CUPS PEACHES, MIX FRUIT &
CHERRY 4 -.PAK..............................$2.99
NATURE VALLEY
GRANOLA BARS ASSORTED 12-pak.$3.99
SNAPPLE
100% DRINKS


ASSORTED 16 -OZ.


,............ ................... $


1.49


JBI
COCONUT WATER
CAMPBELL'S


PORK & BEANS 8 OZ..................2/$1.50
HICKORY
GLEN MEAT FRANKS 2.5LB.....$3.99


FRESH MINI N.Z.
TURKEY PORK SHOULDER CHOPS
WINGS RIBS naHEI


LB
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DYVne'In
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FLANDER USDA DL LEE
BEEFPRATTi PRESTIGE CHOICE WHOLE
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5.LB BOX EACH N.Y. STRIPSTEAKS HAM
$,599 $C 99 $ 39
EACH LB LB
USDA CENTER CUT CENTER CUT
PRCTsI E PORK LOIN PORK LOIN
BONELES CHOP CE
CHUCK REGULAR rE
ROAST REGULAR
=89 S49 $249
$LB LB LB_


PRETIOGE HORMEL
COOKED COOKED
SALAMI $ 99
WHOLE LATTICE
ROTISSERIE APPLE PIE
CHICKEN 8"
$799c $4i39
EACH EACH


MUELLERS
READY CUT
MACARONI
16 OZ
990


EVERCANE


SUGAR
4 -LBS



EVAPORATED

MILK
410-GR
2/$139


RICE LAND
REG & PERFECT
RICE
5 LB
$239_


LIBBYS
CORNED
BEEF
12 OZ
Sl 29

BURTONS
RICH TEA
BUSCUITS
300 G
S$ 99


OK
ALL PURPOSE
FLOUR
2 KG
$219


KELLOGS
CORN
FLAKES
24 OZ
$519


COLGATE
TOOTHPASTE
REGULAR
6.4 OZ

2-,a


I PB


HELLMANS
MAYONNAISE
REGULAR
32 OZ :
___ '"^'^4 9


LAYS
CHIPS BAG
ASSORTED
NASSAU
ONLY
16 OZ


HUNTS
KETCHUP
SQUEEZE
BOTTLE
36 OZ
^^ -e9


IS PO E CUSi


LIBBYS
CANNEDVEGETABLES
ASSORTED
18 OZ
.990


I POWEBUS


POWE BU


QUAKER AQUA PURE
OLD FASHIONED, W ATE
QUICK OR CRYSTAL WATER
WEDDING OATS (NASSAU ONLY)
16 18 OZ 1 GAL
S249a' 99I


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PEACHES, MIX
FRUIT &
CHERRY
4 PACK
A299


CARIBBEAN
CHUNK LITE
TUNA (WATER)
6-OZ
2/$1 39


MON. -
4 SUN.:


I I


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17 OZ................ $1.19






THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2005, PAGE 21


'"Copyrighted Material

Al Syn d i cated Cl'Nte ntv
Available from Commercial News Providers"


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*front and rear crumple zones passenger seats
*driver and passenger airbags 'CD/radio/cassette
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*ABS (anti-lock brakes) *climate-controlled air conditioning
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THE TRIBUNE








THE TRIBUNE I THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3rd, 2005, PAGE 22


THURSDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 3, 2005

7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

SEverday Food ToBeAn- NewFlorida 0 Jungle (CC) Krakatoa A (CC)
WPBT n (c) nounced
The Insider (N) Survivor: Guatemala The Maya CSI: Crime Scene Investigation Without a Trace Jack and Danny
B WFOR n (CC) Empire The ninth castaway is voted "Secrets and Flies" The team head to Mexico to find a wealthy va-
off. (N) (CC) probes a young mother's death. cationer who was abducted. (N)
Access Holly- Joey leas Will & Grace The Apprentice A candidate's (9:59) ER "Dream House" Dubenko
S WTVJ wood (N) (CC) to pay poker. (N) "The Hole Truth" derogatory remark to a teammate tortures the staff via a robotic TV
(CO) -.. C(N) (CC) threatens to destroy the group. camera from home. (N)
Deco Drive The O.C, "The Perfect Storm" Ryan Reunion "1989" A wedding brings News (CC)
S WSVN makes a life-changing decision. (N) out old rivalries. (N) n (CC)
n (CC)
Jeopardy!(N) * PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: THE CURSE OF THE BLACK PEARL (2003, Adventure) Johnny
WPLG (CC Depp, Geoffrey Rush, Orlando Bloom. Premiere. A blacksmith and a pirate must rescue a kidnapped damsel.
n (CC)

American Jus- Cold Case Files Baby for Sale; Cold Case Files A senral killer is The First 48 A young woman is as-
A&E tice: Sister The Barrel" Infant's body; crawl- linked to a woman's slaying after her sauted and murdered in her apart-
Against Sister space. (CC) husband is jailed. (CC) ment. (N) (CC)
Hardtalk BBCNews World Business BBC News Talking Movies BBC News Asia Today
BBCI (Latenight). Report (Latenight). (Latenight).

BET BETStyle Movie The Ultimate Hustler
CBC Coronation The Canadian Antiques Road- The Passionate Eye "Killer Flu: The National (CC)
Street (CC) show (CC) H5N1" The H5N1 virus. (N) (CC)
CNB (00) On t T hTe Apprentice: Martha Stewart Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNBC Money "Swimming Against the Tide" (N)
C N :00) The Situa- Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) NewsNight With Aaron Brown
CNN lon Room (CC)
Comedy Central The Daily Show The Colbert Re- Comedy Central South Park Par- South Park (CC) The Showbiz
COM Presents Daniel With Jon Stew- port (CC) Presents Russ ents ward off kid- Show With
Tosh. art(CC) Meneve. nappers. David Spade
COURT Cops n (CC) The Investigators Veteren murders Forensic Files Body of Evi- The Investigators 40-year-old dou-
his family. "Soiled Plan" dence ble homicide. (N)
That's So Raven KIM POSSIBLE: SO THE DRAMA (2005, Adventure) (:25) American The Buzz on Sister, Sister
DISN "Hizzouse Party" Voices of Christy Carlson Romano. Animated. Ron re- Dragon: Jake Maggie (CC) Twins take pity
alizes he has feelings for Kim. (CC) Long (CC) on a pig. (CC)
This Old House Weekend Wood Works Freeform Furni- Home IQ DIY to the Res- DIY to the Res-
,DIY ( (CC) Handyman Glass tabletop. ture (N) cue cue
DWIn Focus Journal: Europa Aktuell Journal: In Euromaxx Journal: Im Focus (In
DW Tagestema Depth Tagestema German)
E! El News THS Investigates: Women Who Kill High-profile murder cases show JonBenet Ramsey: The E! True
women wronged by their husbands. Hollywood Story nC (CC)
ESPN College Football Pittsburgh at Louisville. (Live) (CC) SportsCenter
Corn I _(Live) (CC)
ESPNI :00) UEFA Champions League Soccer Teams TBA. Simplemente F(tbol (N) SportsCenter International Edi-
SPNI (Taped) (CC) _______ tion(Uve)
EWTN Daily Mass: Our Life on the Rock Back Stage The Holy Rosary Gospel of John In the Heart of
EW N Lady the Church
STV :00) FtTV's Insider Training Basketball" Bas- Deadly Arts "Muay Thai" Male dom- No Opportunity Wasted Roller-
IT V ousecalls (CC) ketall players. (N) inated world of Muay Thai. skating serpentine. C (CC)
FOX-N Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
FOX-NC Shepard Smith ,ISusteren (Live) (CC)
FSNFL (:00) NHL Hockey Florida Panthers at Boston Bruins. From TD Ban- Best Damn Sports Show Period Best Damn
knorth Garden in Boston. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) (Live) (CC) Sports Show
GOLF Corona Mazatlan Classic High- The Big Break IV: USA v Europe Quest for the Card: Inside the Na- College Central
GOLF lights Jaime Gomez. ItionwideTour
GSN Lingo (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire l The Amazing Race The teams Dog Eat Dog ,, (CC)
S(CC) make their way back to Bangkok.
G4Te h (:00) Attack of Fastlane "101" n (CC) Game Makers Icons George The Man Show The Man Show
ec the Show! (N) "GUN" (N) Romero. (CC) (CC)
:00) Walker, Walker, Texas Ranger "Break In" * RETURN TO SNOWY RIVER (1988, Adventure) Tom Burlinson,
HALL exas Ranger Walker goes under cover in a maxi- Sigrid Thomton, Brian Dennehy. Australian horseman Jim Craig retums to
"Flashpoint" mum security prison. (CC) reclaim his home. (CC)
Dream House Holmes on Homes "House 2 Real Renos Restaurant The Block Tempers flare. (C (CC)
HGTV r (CC) Home" ) (Part 2 of 2) (CC) "Dancing Fool" Makeover"Via
(CC) Oliveto" (CC)
INSP Morris Cerullo Breakthrough Lovea Child Inspiration To- Life Today (CC) This Is Your Day ValerieSaxion
(CC) day (CC)
Transformers Sabrna, the MWife and MyM Wife and Friends The Everybody Everybody
KTLA Cybertron "Col- Teenage Witch Kids "Diay of a Kids"Empty One in Barbados" Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
lapse" A (CC) Mad Teen (CC) Nest" (CC) (CC) Debra's sister. "P.T. & A'(CC)
** A MURDER ON SHADOW MOUNTAIN (1999, MURDER IN THE HAMPTONS (2005, Docudrama) Poppy Montgomery,
LIFE Mystery) Michele Lee. A woman must find evidence to David Sutcliffe, Shawn Christian. Multimillionaire Ted Ammon is found
clear her husband of murder. (CC) (DVS) dead at his estate. (CC)
M C 00Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- Rita Cosby Live & Direct Scarborough Country
MSNBC cl mann'
Jimmy Neutron: SpongeBob Romeo! "Art of Full House Fresh Prince of Roseanne nl Roseanne "Call
NICK Boy Genius SquarePants n, Deception" (CC) (CC) Bel-Air (CC) Waiting" (CG)
NTV Will & Grace (N) Survivor: Guatemala- The Maya The Apprentice "Back to School" News l (CC) News
SV (CC) Empire (N) (CC) (N) n (CC)
OL Ultimate Shark Shark Hunters: Ultimate Tourna- Bull Riding PBR World Finals- Round 1. From Las Vegas.
0L Tourn. ment
SPEED ASCAR Be- The Chase Is OnCar Crazy (N) Barrett-Jackson Automobile Auc- NASCAR Beyond the Wheel
SPEED yond the Wheel (N) tion (N)
(5:00) 2005 Fall Praise-A-Thon
TBN
Everybody Friends Chandler Friends Chandler Friends The pos- Friends Chandler ** WAYNE'S WORLD 2 (1993,
TBS Loves Raymond gets cold feet. gets cold feet. sibility of preg- loses the wed- Comedy) Mike Myers, DanaCarvey.
n (CC) (CC) (CO) nancy. (CC) ding film. (CC)
(:00) Noah's Ark: Da Vinci Declassified Psychic Witness "Why My Child?" Dead Tenants "The Last Resort" A
TLChe True Story A woman disappears. (N) headless 2-year-old boy's ghost
(CC) makes a man lose sleep.
(:00) Law & Or- NBA Basketball Indiana Pacers at Miami Heat. From the AmericanAirines Arena in Miami. NBA Basketball:
TNT der Savages" (Live)(CC) Suns at Lakers
1 (CC)(DVS)
TOON Grim Adven- Grim Adven- Codename: Kids Ed, Edd n Eddy Home for Imagi- Cartoon Car- Yu-Gi-Oh! G/X
IT N tures tures Next Door nary Friends toons
TV5 :00) La Guerre Envoy6 special Une sant4 qui nous est chore TV5 Le Journal
dluacifique *
FWC r 6:00) Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
T_ C P>M Edition (CC) (CC) (CC)
(:00) Noche de Latin Grammy 2005 El 60 entrego anual de los premios Latin Grammy. Interpretes incluyen a BebB, Intocable,
UNIV Fstrellas de los Laura Pausini, Juan Luis Guerra y Los Tigres del Norte. Desde el Shrine Auditorium en Los Angeles.
Latin Grammy
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order: Criminal Intent De- * THE JACKAL (1997, Suspense) Bruce Willis, Richard Gere, Sidney
USA der: Special Vic- tectives probe a shady state official Poitier. An imprisoned Irishman accepts an offer to nab an assassin. (CC)
times Unit tied to grave-robbing. (CC)
VH1 Most Awesome Breaking Bona- Breaking Bona- Breaking Bona- Breaking Bona- Breaking Bona- R.Kelly's
Celebrity Beefs duce duce duce duce "Rehab" duce Trapped
:00) America's ** GRAVE SECRETS: THE LEGACY OF HILLTOP DRIVE (1992, Hor- WGN News at Nine n (CC)
WGN Funniest Home ror) Patty Duke, David Selby, David Soul. A couple comes to believe their
Videos ,l (CC) new dream home is haunted. n, (CC)
Everybody Smaliville "Exposed" Jonathan's Everwood "Free Fall" (N) C\ (CC) WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
WPIX Loves Raymond oldest friend visits the Kent farm Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
"P.T. & A" (CC) looking for their support. (N) (CC) & Mr. G (CC)
eoardy!(N) Everybody Love, Inc. Clea ve Unveilin the Cuts "Hair Tease" Dr. Phil Food obsessions. (N)
WSB K (CCa Hates Chris (N) tries to live in the new clothing line. (N) (CC)
-, (CC) moment. (N) (N) (CC)

(:00) Real Sports Inside the NFL C (CC) *** COLLATERAL (2004, Suspense) Tom Cruise, Jamie Foxx, Jada
HBO-E n (CC) Pinkett Smith. A contract killer uses a cabdriver for his jobs. ,C 'R'(CC)


(6:15) *** Real Time Actor Billy Connolly. n Curb Your En- CATWOMAN (2004, Action) Halle Berry, Ben-
HBO-P MARRIED TO (CC) thusiasm Larry jamin Bratt, Sharon Stone. Ashy artist acquires feline
THE MOB'R' and Jeff debate, strength and agility. ,C 'PG-13' (CC)
(:45) SPEED 2: CRUISE CONTROL (1997, Suspense) Sandra Bullock, Jason Patric, Real Sports C, (CC)
HBO-W Willem Dafoe. A madman seizes the helm of a luxunous ocean liner. C 'PG-13' (CC)
(6:30) ** SOMETIMES IN APRIL (2005, Docudra- *r* INVENTING THE ABBOTTS (1997, Drama) Joaquin Phoenix, Billy
HBO-S ma) Idris Elba, Debra Winger. Rwandan genocide tears Crudup, Liv Tyler. Siblings in 1950s Illinois share complicated relation-
apart a Hutu family. n 'R' (CC) ships. 0 'R' (CC)
(6:00)** LAST (:15)*x WING COMMANDER (1999, Science Fiction) Freddie Prinze *x EXORCIST: THE BEGINNING
MAX-E ACTION HERO Jr., Saffron Burrows, Matthew Lllard. Hotshot space pilots defend Earth (2004, Horror) Stellan Skarsgard.
(1993) from marauding aliens. n 'PG-13' (CC) A 'R' (CC)
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MOMAX RobertDowney Jr., Charles S. Dutton. Strange events Alec Baldwin, Maria Bello. A casino director's employ- ZONE: ALL
plague a confined psychologist. A 'R' (CC) ee falls for a waitress. Ct 'NR' (CC) OUTTA LOVE
(6:05)** **~t LEGALLY BLONDE 2: RED, WHITE & (:35) ** THE PERFECT SCORE (2004, Comedy)
SHOW AGAINST THE BLONDE (2003) Reese Witherspoon. Elle Woods Erika Christensen. iTV. Students try to steal the an-
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(2001) 'R' (CC) no for an answer. Ct 'R' (CC) crepit apartment building. n 'R' (CC)


WOOD* Y-OUti~^.n~


I HURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3rd, 2005, PAGE 22,


THE TRIBUNE












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Come see our showroom at
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Open: Monday Friday 8am 5pm Telephone: 394,4147-50


THANKS FOR YOUR SUPPORT

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monies collected in the canisters in the restaurants
during the month of September 2005 will be
donated wL the Hurricane Katrina relief efforts.


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FIIC I -~--l----srr~-rr~lIIs~s~---l -P~--~-rsrrsl- -- lss


PAGE 24, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


d funeral of








THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2005


SECTION


business@tribunemedia.net


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Fra^d.9





busdIhe




.cortproes


.A convicted
frauds t er
accused of
investors out of
$22 million through a group of
Bahamas-registered investment
funds has appealed a Supreme
Court verdict that accused him
of being "dishonest and quick
to abuse the court processes"
to cover up his activities and
thwart US investigators.
A stinging judgement by Jus-
tice John Lyons found that Ian
Renert, who was described as
,the "brains" behind the
Hawthorne Sterling family of
funds and its beneficial owner,
the Tenesheles Trust, initiated
'an action seeking various court


Appeal against judge's ruling
relating to $22m investment scam

using Bahamas-registered funds


orders against the Securities
Commission and their receiver,
accountant Clifford Culmer, as
a "smokescreen" to cover his
activities.
Justice Lyons wrote: "I find it
very difficult not to conclude
that this application was a
smokescreen put up by the
applicants as a means of divert-
ing attention away from their
fraudulent activities, and an


attempt to thwart the investi-
gations of the Securities and
Exchange Commission (SEC)
in the US.
"I may be wrong, but there
are so many peculiar and irreg-
ular features of this application
and the history of its course
through the courts, that it is

SEE page 6B


Call for 'stop




work order'




on $175m




investment


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A US.marine biologist has
called for an "immediate stop
work order" to be imposed on
the controversial $175 million
Baker's Bay Golf & Ocean
Club on Abaco's Great Gua-
na Cay, on the grounds that
nutrient run-off from the golf
course will destroy surround-
ing coral reefs.
Dr James Cervino, a scien-
tist with Pace University in
New York, said his assessment
of Discovery Land Company's


But Guana Cay developers

likely to say golf course

concerns addressed


proposed development would
threaten a coral'reef ecosystem
that was already under pres-
sure from rising sea tempera-
tures by increasing the level of
algae on reef habitats.
Dr Cervino was particularly
concerned by the proposed golf


course, which he said would be
situated just 10 metres away
from the coral reefs, and Dis-
covery Land Company's dredg-
ing plans.

SEE page 4B


Consolidated offering

is 'largely' on target


Chamber launches its Business Crime Survey


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Chamber of Commerce has
launched a Business Victimisation Survey,
seeking the private sector's feedback and
personal experiences of how crime impacts
businesses in the Bahamas.
Philip Simon, the Chamber's executive
director, said the survey was "the first
step of many initiatives" its Crime Pre-
vention Committee had partnered with
the Royal Bahamas Police Force (RBPF)
on in a bid to combat rising crime.
Mr Simon said of the survey: "It's to
really assist in garnering feedback from
the business community through actual
data and responses relating to the experi-
ences they've had."
In the survey, Bahamian companies are.
asked whether anyone ,has tried to take
money or property by force; whether they
have had anything stolen; and whether


anyone has given them counterfeit money
or forged their organisation's signature.
Other questions include whether com -
panies have been given bad cheques, or
been cheated or swindled out of money or
property in any other way; if any employ-
ee has been in a fist fight or attacked by
another worker or outsider; whether any-
one in the company has been threatened
with harm by phone or in writing; and
whether the company has been cheated by
someone misrepresenting the price of
what they were selling.
Offenders
The final questions ask whether any
offenders were prosecuted, and asks the
firm to identify them.
Mr Simon said the survey, and the part-
nership with the polie, ere intended to
disseminate information about how the
business community and Bahamian public


at large could take steps to combat crime,
particularly the precautions they needed
-to take.
The Chamber's executive director
pointed out that the Bahamas would soon
be entering what he termed "high crime
season" in the run up to Christmas, when'
there was "a tremendous cash flow" in
the local economy.
People often tended to let their guard
down during the Christmas period because
it was regarded as a jovial and fun time,
Mr Simon said, adding that the Chamber
just wanted to ensure that businesses and
people took all necessary precautions so as
not to become victims.
He added that the Chamber had
received a greater response to its Busi-
ness Victimisation Survey than for its gen-
eral business survey, dealing with educa-


SEE page 2B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
FIDELITY Capital Markets
yesterday said it was "largely"
on target to meet the $10 million
Consolidated Water required
from its Bahamian Depository
Receipt (BDR) offering, after
receiving a good response from
institutional investors and bro-
kerage accounts customers.
1 With just today and tomor-
row to go before the offering
closes, Michael Anderson,
Fidelity Capital Markets presi-
dent and chief executive, urged
more retail investors to get
involved and buy into the
BDRs, as Consolidated Water
may not issue them to investors
in this nation again.
Mr Anderson said: "We've
had a very good response from
brokerage accounts and from
standard investor groups and
the institutions. We anticipate


More retail investors
urged to buy in two days
before offering closes
that on Thursday and Friday,
we will get in a significant
amount of subscriptions, s peo-
ple typically wait to the end. We
encourage the small individual
investor to take advantage of
it."
He added that any underly-
ing Consolidated Water shares
that were not subscribed for
would be withdrawn once the
offering deadline passed, and
would not be available to the
market again.
"It's really a one-time offer,
an opportunity for people to get
involved. We encourage the
small investor to come in and

SEE page 2B


Bahamas needs better

funding for Universal

telecoms service

UNIVERSAL service telecommunications provision in the
Bahamas is achievable, despite its archipelagic nature and
sparsely populated islands, with adequate funding, Kathleen Riv-
iere-Smith, financial analyst at the Public Utilities Commiis-
sion (PUC), said yesterday.
However, she told the third annual meeting of the Organisa-
tion of Caribbean Utility (OCCUR) regulators yesterday that
universal service may not be possible under the Bahamian
telecommunications sector's current set-up
Ms Riviere-Smith pointed out that there are various options
available for funding the Universal Service Obligation (USO)
of telecoms companies. These are Mandatory Service Obliga-
tions; Market Based Reforms; Cross Subsidisation;
Access Deficit Charges; and Universal Service Funds.
In the case of mandatory service obligations, she said the
Government and regulators
would impose obligations to
provide service to certain areas SEE page 6B


b u" ne.


I .-----WNWMNNM


- --- -


Money Safe.
Money Fast.



at
1| Bank of The Bahamas
IN TER. NATION NAL
Online at
BankBsahamOnline.com








PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


The fundamentals that






underpin Exempted


"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content: : --



Available from Commercial News Prov


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FROM page 1B

play a more active role and
ensure the opportunity is taken
up," Mr Anderson said.
Consolidated Water had been
seeking to raise at least $10 mil-'
lion from the BDR issue. When


it was launched, the increasing
price of the company's ordinary
shares on New York's Nasdaq
exchange meant the issue was
valued at $11.2 million if fully
subscribed, and price apprecia-


tion since then means it is now
closer to $12 million.
"It's largely met our require-,
ments and Consolidated's
requirements," Mr Anderson
said, indicating that the total


amount raised was set to come
in at the high end of an $8-$10
million range, although it was
hard to predict.
He pointed out that Consoli-
dated Water could have raised


Amsterdam Trust Corporation, ATC, is one of the largest independent
trust companies in the world. It offers a broad range of fiduciary and
administrative services to financial institutions, corporations, corporations,
pravate individuals and investment funds. ATC has offices in the
Netherlands, Aruba, Curacao, Spain, Luxembourg, Switzerland, Grand
Cayman, The British Virgin -Islands, Bahamas, Hong Kong, Singapore
and New Zealand.
Due to continuous growth ATC Trustees (Bahamas) Limited, has a
vacancy for the following position:

Trust Officer
Tasks and responsibilities:
Administration of a diverse portfolio of trust and company
client accounts.
Qualifications/ experience:
STEP Foudation Certificate and Diploma in International
Trust Management.
3 to 5 years experience in trust and company administration.
Strong Communication and interpersonal skills.
Remuneration and Benefits:
- ATC offers an attractive salary and other benefits, including
discretionary bonus scheme, paid vacation and health benefit.
Applicants are invited to send their resumes and application letter to
Kenneth Clowes, Managing Director ATC Trustees (Bahamas) Limited,
P.O.Box CB-12399 Nassau, Bahamas. Or to e-mail
kenneth.clowes@atctrust.bs


the financing for the $25 million
Blue Hills reverse osmosis plant,
part of which will come from
the BDR issue, elsewhere rather
than doing an offering to
Bahamian investors.
Consolidated Water wanted
to have local involvement in all
the territories it operated in
through Board directors and
investor participation, and Mr
Anderson added: "This is them
acceding to government
requests to make shares avail-
able to the public, and one


would assume the public will
take advantage of that option.
"People need to look at it as
an opportunity and not some-
one trying to take their mon-
ey."
He refuted claims that
Bahamian investors were pay-
ing a premium for the BDRs as
opposed to buying stock direct-
ly on the US exchanges, some-
thing Bahamians were not per-
mitted to do without paying a
hefty exchange control premi-
um.


Chamber launches its

Business Crime Survey


FROM page 1B

tional and training issues.
Mr Simon said: "We've had
quite a few people responding."
The Chamber was yesterday
holding a meeting with the
police and IBM (Bahamas)
towards organising a crime pre-
vention seminar for later this
month, which would focus on
issues such as personal security,
data security, business security,
fraud, theft by reason of


employment, and why people
commit drime.
\ Mr Simon said crime could
only be solved; if the Govern-
ment, police, business sector
and community at large came
together to fight crime.
Apart from the extra costs
caused by hiring extra security
guards and equipment to com-
bat crime, Mr Simon said it also
had an "emotional and psycho-
logical impact" on businessmen
and their employees.


-


~.-
-
- -


SNOW HIRING'
N Store Managers


Qualifications:
a You must be at least 25 years of age
* You should have the equivalent of a high school
diploma
* Past managerial experience is a plus
* You should have a valid Driver's license, good driving
record history
" You must be available for day & night shifts, including
weekend
* You should demonstrate strong communication,
leadership and people management skills
. You should have the willingness to learn
' You must have a GREAT attitude towards Customers
Benefits:
Annual Bonus a Health Benefit
Pension Plan a Paid Vacation

INTERESTED?!?
Submit resumes to Caribbean Franchise Holdings Ltd.
Town Centre Mall, P.O. Box SS-6704
Tel 325-2122 Fax 356-7857


Financial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information As Of:
02 November 2005

52wk-Hi 52wk-Lo w Symbol Previous Close Today's Clos e Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
1.10 0.73 Abaco Markets 0.73 0.73 0.00 -0.169 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.24 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 10.24 10.24 0.00 1.456 0.340 7.0 3.32%
7.24 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 7.24 7.24 0.00 300 0.587 0.330 12.3 4.56%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.204 0.010 3.9 1.25%
1.80 1.27 Bahamas Waste 1.27 1.27 0.00 0.112 0.060 11.3 4.72%
1.20 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.20 1.20 0.00 1,000 0.066 0.030 18.2 2.50%
9.27 6.97 Cable Bahamas 9.27 9.27 0.00 700 0.618 0.240 15.0 2.59%
2.20 1.50 Colina Holdings 1.50 1.50 0.00 -0.046 0.000 NM 0.00%
9.10 7.00 Commonwealth Bank 9.09 9.10 0.01 11,352 0.791 0.410 11.5 4.51%
2.50 0.96 Doctor's Hospital 2.40 2.40 0.00 0.429 0.000 5.6 0.00%
4.35 3.87 Famguard 4.35 4.35 0.00 0.428 0.240 9.1 5.52%
10.90 9.50 Finco 10.89 10.90 0.01 2,830 0.695 0.510 15.7 4.68%
10.00 7.45 FirstCaribbean 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.695 0.380 13.9 3.80%
9.25 8.39 Focol 9.25 9.25 0.00 0.675 0.500 13.7 5.41%
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 0.022 0.000 52.3 0.00%
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.94 9.94 0.00 0.526 0.405 18.9 4.07%
8.75 8.20 J. S. Johnson 8.75 8.75 0.00 0.526 0.560 16.6 6.40%
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 5.92 6.12 0.20 0.122 0.000 48.4 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate. 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.760 4.9 7.60%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Lo w Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price -Veekly Vol EPS $ Div $ PIE Yield
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 11.00 1.768 0.960 7.5 7.25%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.3, 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 ,. 0.00 -0.044 0.000 NM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.33 13.33 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Lo w Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1.2578 1.1892 Colina Money Market Fund 1.257751*
2.4403 2.0536 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.4403 ***
10.6103 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.6103*****
2.2560 2.1491 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.267097*
1.1395 1.0686 Colina Bond Fund 1.139546" ..

BISX ALL SHARE INDE X- 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earpings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
" AS AT SEP. 30, 2005/ ." AS AT SEP 30, 2005
- AS AT OCT. 30, 2005/ AS AT SEP. 30, 2005/ ..... AS AT SEP. 30, 2006
1OT~at 'ZPcz CALL~ I


TEACHERS AND SALARIED WORKERS
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LIMITED

NOTICE TO OUR
VALUED SHAREHOLDERS
Please be advised that Interest/Dividend payments for the year 2004
will be distributed effective Tuesday November 1, 2005 during the
hours of 11:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. as follows:

DATES ACCOUNT DATES ACCOUNT
_ l NUMBERS NUMBERS-


November 1 001-700 November 24 7201-7500

November 2 701-1200 November 25 7501-7800

November 3 1201-1800 November 28 7801-8100

November 4 1801-2400 November 29 8101-8400

November 7 2401-3000 November 30 8401-8700

November 8 3001-3600 December 1 8701-9000

November 9 3601-4200 December 2 9001-9500

November 10 4201-4500 December 5 9501-10000

November 11 4501-4800 December 6 10001-10500

November 14 4801-5100 December 7 10501-11300

November 15 5101-5400 December 8 11301-12100

November 16 5401-5700 December 9 12101-13000

November 17 5701-6000 December 12 13001-14000

November 18 6001-6300 December 13 14001-15000

November 21 6301-6600 December 14 15001-16000

November 22 6601-6900 December 15 16001-17000

November 23 6901-7200 December 16 17001-18207


- o








THE TIBUN THUSDAYNOVEBER 205,IPGES3


Bahamas needs stronger



financial services 'brand'



to retain 'leadership' role


The Bahamas must
provide a com-
pelling reason for
clients to do busi-
ness from this
nation if it is to remain a "lead-
ership centre" and differenti-
ate its financial services indus-
try from competitors, the min-
ister of financial services and
investments said.
In launching the Strategy and
Branding survey of the
Bahamas' financial services
industry, which will be con-
ducted by PricewaterhouseC-
oopers (PwC), Allyson May-
nard-Gibson said the Govern-
ment had realised increased
global competition in financial
services had created the need
for a stronger Bahamas 'brand
identity'.
She added: "It is a fiercely
competitive world, a world of
change at all levels, a world
where 'average' is not suffi-
cient. If the Bahamas is to
remain a leadership centre, we
must be able to adapt quickly
to tap into the growth oppor-
tunities afforded by this global
industry.
"We need to distinguish our
financial services platform from
those of other International
Financial Centres (IFC). We
must refine and expand our
response to 'Why the
Bahamas?'."
Comparing the PwC survey
to similar exercises that have
long been used by the Ministry
of Tourism to obtain feedback
from visitors to the Bahamas,
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
"investment in strategy and
brand development is essen-
tial" if the Bahamas was to
grow its financial services mar-


* ALLYSON MAYNARD-GIBSON


ket share.
She added: "Government
understands and recognises
that global competition is
intensifying the need for
stronger brand recognition in
the financial services sector.
We recognise that winners in
this global race will be the com-
panies and jurisdictions that
can proactively turn challenges


into opportunities."
The 20-question on-line sur-
vey, which can be accessed
through passwords issued by
the Bahamas Financial Services
Board (BFSB), aims to provide
an assessment of the Bahamas'
reputation as an international
financial centre; assess its abil-
ity to provide "key services";
give an understanding of why


clients use or do not use the
Bahamas; identify areas and
products that need more focus
or expansion; and determine
whether "growth constraints
are primarily due to perception
or experience".
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said:
"For example, we want to
know if.our customers believe
that our platform is one that
will continue to be of service
to them, now and in the future.
We want to learn what matters
most to the respondents when
choosing an international finan-
cial centre and what aspects of
the industry should receive our
greatest attention in order to
expand the services offered by
the country."
She asked that Bahamian
financial institutions obtain sur-
vey responses from their head
offices and subsidiaries, plus
other businesses that had cho-
sen not to locate in this nation.
Asking that Bahamian finan-
cial services providers seek to
get "at least" 10 of their inter-
national contacts to respond to
the survey, Mrs Maynard-Gib-
son said the views of attorneys,
accountants and other inter-
mediaries, including represen-
tatives of family offices and
independent asset managers,
were also required.
The survey will be available
online on November 9, and will
close on November 18. Fax and
paper response forms will also
be available.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
the information collected by
the PWC survey would be
reviewed by the Government
and industry partners, to deter-
mine how the Bahamas
responded.


STEAM COOKS
APPLICANTS MUST POSSESS THE FOLLOWING:
* DISCIPLINED IN FOLLOWING AND ADHERING TO SET RECIPES
* AT LEAST THREE YEARS EXPERIENCE IN PREP/COOKING
* AN APPRECIATION FOR FOOD PREPARATION
* AN APPRECIATION FOR CLEANLINESS AND ORDER
* STRONG SENSE OF URGENCY
* THE ABILITY TO WORK UNDER PRESSURE
FORWARD RESUMES TO EMAIL ADDRESS: RR@SBARROBAHAMAS.COM OR FAX # 356-0333



FOR RENT


5 Bedroom, 4 Bathroom, Split Level,
Partly Furnished. Nassau East Blvd.
$2000 per month.


Commercial
12,000 sq.ft.
Spaces.


Building (Brand New)
@$12.50 sq.ft.. Parking


Condo out West. Gated Community. 2
bed 2 bath. Fully Furnished. $2000 per
month


Call 328-4800 ask for
Leslia or Yasmine


PUBLIC MEDICAL BULLETIN

Is your doctor licensed?
da i is d that
TheBahamas Medical t* concerne
therearean ii medicine.
who a Mcill doctors.
0

Thp our
p Pt
suitable qua ifications. 16`11, order to j;77tect life and
health, we must noti, *-,oodr Bah public of this
dangerous trendV:- 01
isei.' R $1,1111iisue... nge us practices!
We strongly ad 'Will,

Under the medical act
section 14 (1) subjec (4), any person who:
(a) whether or not regist ct, does any act or thing
announcing to the practi or surgery when there is
not in force at the time i I a valid license issued to
him by the Council auth ng that act.or thing shall
be guilty to an offense;
(b) not being licensed un practice, or holds himself
out as a practicing or bei to practice medicine or
surgery is guilty of an offe
(c) willfully and falsely pre e or takes oruses the name
or title of doctor of medicine s or medical practitioner or
any name, title, addition or des ion implying that he is registered
shall be guilty of an offense; and y person who, not being licensed,
takes or uses any name, title, ad ion or description implying that
he is licensed shall be guilty of an offense."

The Medical Council of the Bahamas is entrusted
with licensing and' verification of medical
qualifications.

Is your doctor duly registered and licensed to treat
vou? If you are not sure, please contact the Medical
Council.

THE LIFE YOU SAVE MAY BE YOUR OWN


AUCTION




Thursday, November 17, 2005

SHIPAHOY COMPLEX
(Western Gate)


West Bay Street,
opposite Well's Service Station
DOORS OPEN FOR
VIEWING & REGISTRATION
9:00am 10:00am



AUCTION
10:00am -- 2:00pm


Office Furniture, Computer Equipment &

other Supplies
Construction & Miscellaneous Supplies
Home Furnishing & Equipment
Vehicles by Sealed Bid on Site

GENERAL PUBLIC IS INVITED


I


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2005, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE















Call for 'stop work order'


on


$175m investment


FROM page 1B

In his report, which has been
published on the Save Guana
Cay Reef Association's web-
site in an effort to bolster their
campaign against the develop-
ment, Dr Cervino said: "An


immediate stop work order on
the proposed development
location should be established
as a result of human-caused
nutrient additions from [the
project] to these coastal waters
surrounding Guana Cay.
"This is needed to prevent
the corals from being over-


grown and killed by weedy
algae. This golf course will be
a point source and will create
dangerously high levels of
nutrients. Any nutrient
drainage in this area will cause
the reefs to deteriorate further/
"This includes nutrients from
development projects involv-
ing dredging, which will lead
to sediment loading on the sur-
faces of corals on the north and
south side of Guana Cay, as
well as from construction of the
golf course and excess sewage
that is usually accompanied by
such projects."
And Dr Cervino added:
"The Discovery Land Compa-
ny Environmental Impact
Assessment (EIA) plans are to
dredge up a portion of the one-
mile island, dump the sediment
on to the surrounding reef and
add soil fill, combined with
quartz sand for this golf course.
"This limestone substrate
will act as a permeable filter
for the nutrients to leach duit
into the reef, thereby feedihg
the invasive species."
Dr Cervino's comments are
likely to be vehemently reject-
ed by Discovery Land Compa-
ny, whose executives have
repeatedly said that the golf
course will be designed in such
a way to ensure that all water
run-off goes back into island,
and not down towards the sea,
thus preventing any coral reef
damage.
Steve Adelson, a partner in
San Francisco-based Discovery
Land Company and vice-pres-
ident of development for the
Baker's Bay project, told The
Tribune in a previous inter-
view: "We fit ourselves into the
environment, not impose our-
selves on it," Mr Adelson said.
"We think we are making sig-
nificant headway with the local
people, and they are going to
be very proud of what will hap-
pen on Great Guana Cay. It's


just going to take time."
Discovery Land Company
has predicted the project will
have a $1 billion "direct effect"
on the Abaco and BIahamian
economies. They have
described the project as a
"model for economic develop-
ment in the Bahamas" that
cannot be bettered.
Mr Adelson said: "I don't

"An immediate stop
work order on the
proposed development
location should be
established as a result
of human-caused
nutrient additions
from [the project] to
these coastal waters
surrounding Guana Cay."
Dr James Cervino

know a better model for eco-
nomic development in the
Bahamas than what we're
bringing. It's appropriately
sized.... we're creating admin-
istrative jobs, staff jobs and
entrepreneurial jobs. We're
bringing in all this foreign
investment, adding to the pot
and not taking away from it.
"The reason I say this is a
model development and eco-
nomic gain for the Bahamas is.
that it is clean and environ-
mentally sound. It contains
economic gains for the people
of the Bahamas through the
taxes created from real estate
sales, and jobs created for
Bahamians.
"It's a model for the future
economic development of the
Bahamas as long as people fol-
low these guidelines."
In addition, Dr Michael Risk,


a marine biologist also hired
by the Save Guana Cay Reef
Association, said the EIA pre-
pared for the development by
Dr Kathleen Sullivan-Sealey
and her team had been com-
pleted "to a high level of pro-
fessional competence".
"Sections on terrestrial ecol-
ogy, water management and
solid waste management stand
out as being very good," he
wrote.
In addition, Dr Risk also said
that comments in the EIA that
criticised current residents of
Guana Cay, most of whom are
opposing the Baker's Bay pro-
ject, were deserved to an
extent.
He wrote: "The EIA comes
down fairly hard on the pre-
sent residents of Guana Cay,
condemnation which to a cer-
tain extent, they deserve. They
are described as being NIM-
BYs (Not In May Back Yard-
ers).
"The EIA points to exam-
ples where shoreline setbacks
have not been observed, and
where construction has resulted
in buildings inappropriate to
the setting. The inhabitants are
criticised for using 'soakaways'
for septic waste, and for not
,having organised solid waste
management plans."
In his assessment of the
developers' initial EIA, Dr


Risk said his main concerns
were what appeared to be a
minimal degree of marina
flushing; a lack of documenta-
tion for the marine environ-
ment from land-based stress-
es; and "insufficient concern"
that the Baker's Bay Ocean &
Golf Club would restrict access
by locals to sources of food and
income.
But Ed Devita, Discovery
Land Company's senior vice-
president, previously told Tri-
bune Business would take
every care to preserve Guana
Cay's environment, since the
island's reef, sea and natural
vegetation would be the hook
that attracted homeowners,
boaters and tourists to Baker's
Bay.
However, Dr Cervino
described the Baker's Bay Golf
& Ocean Club as an example
of "unsustainable develop-
ment", adding that he would
be happy to supply Discovery
Land Company with his find-
ings.
He said: "We are surprised
that a team of marine scientists
financially supported by the
developer would claim that a
golf course and dredge project
will not harm the host tis-
sues....... on the surfaces of
these diverse coral reefs 10
metres away from the proposed
development site."


COUNCIL. OF LEGAL EDUCATION
ENTRANCE EXAMINATION FOR ADMISSION
IN 2006 TO:

NORMAN MANLEY LAW SCHOOL (Jamaica)
HUGH WOODING LAW SCHOOL (Trinidad & Tobago)
EUGENE DUPUCH LAW SCHOOL (Bahamas)

Legal Education Certificate Two Year Programme

Applications are invited from holders of a first degree in Law obtained in a
common law jurisdiction or the Common Professional Examination Certificate
(UK) together with vocational training and who wish to be considered for
selection for the Two-Year Legal Education Certificate Programme. Persons
who will attain this qualification by September 1, 2006, may also apply and sit
the examination. ALL APPLICANTS will be required to sit an entrance examination
which will be in July 2006.

The following persons are exempt from taking the Entrance Examinations:
a) holders of the University of the West Indies LL.B. degree;
b) holders of the University of Guyana LL.B degree issued from 1998, who
qualify under the terms of the Collaborative Agreement between University
of Guyana, University of the West Indies and the Council of Legal
Education.

This examination will serve to provide priority placing to the Law Schools and
is subject to the availability of spaces.

The examination will consist of testing in basic core courses and selected pre-
professional courses. There will be two composite papers which allow applicants
a wide range of options.

Further details and application forms are available from:


The Secretary, Admissions Board
Council of Legal Education
Norman Manley Law School
P.O. Box 231
Kingston 7
Jamaica


The Registrar
Council of Legal Education
Hugh Wooding Law School
P.O. Bag 323, Tunapuna
Trinidad


The Registrar
Council of Legal Education
Eugene Dupuch Law School
P.O. Box SS 6394
Nassau,The Bahamas


All applications must be submitted to the Secretary, Admissions Board, Council
of Legal Education, Norman Manley Law School, Mona, Jamaica along with
a non-refundable fee of US$150.00 and one recent passport size picture no
later than January 31, 2006.

LATE APPLICATIONS WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED.

Legal Education Certificate -Six-Month Proaramme

Professionally trained persons who have been admitted to practise law in a
common law jurisdiction should apply directly to the Registrar of the respective
Law School for application forms.


NOTICE
To the general public the office of
COOKE-MCIVER & CO.
has relocated to
HEPBURN HOUSE
Shirley Street & Sears Road, First Floor
Please contact us at 1-242-356-5613/356-5491
or email us @ cookemciver@speedwavinternet.com
for any further details.


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANDY CARRALERO-GOMEZ, OF
WILD TAMARIND CAY, EXUMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 27TH day of
OCTOBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK

CAREER OPPORTUNITY


for


INTERNATIONAL PREMIER MANAGER

General Requirements/ Responsibilities:

V Good and proven knowledge of International policies, plans and strategies,
and evidence of applying such policies in managing client relationships
and be at ease with clients from differing social, religious, ethnic and
cultural backgrounds

V Detailed knowledge and application of the principles of Investment/ leading
and fiduciary services as it relates to non-resident foreign nationals and
expatriates in order to identify solutions to clients' needs and identify sales
opportunities. To have proven experience in Wealth management techniques.

V Delivers a high level of service and personal attention to the Bank's affluent
clients, with the aim of developing a significant and superior level of service
and in acquiring new business. The successful applicant will have a proven
track record in managing relationships, providing financial solutions,
working to sales numbers and being part of a team structure

Qualifications/ Experience Required:

V A high level of PC literacy excellent communication style both written
and orally together with analytical, problem solving and a complete
understanding of both operational and credit risk

If you are interested:

Submit your resume & confidential in WRITING ONLY before November 4, 2005
to:

Lynette Roker
Human Resources Administrative Assistant
FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Financial Centre 2nd Floor, Shirley Street
P.O.Box N 3221
Nassau, Bahamas

Or email: lynette.roker@firstcaribbeanbank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank thanks all applicants for their interest,
however only those under consideration will be contacted.

Vacancies are open to Bahamas residents only.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2005








THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3rd, 2005, PAGE5B


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


RAINBOW BAY SUBDIVISION
(ELEUTHERA)

Lot #44, Block 5, Section A. The lot is on a hill overlooking the
Atlantic Ocean. Area is approximately 10,800 sq. ft. This site
encompasses a two storey apartment block of two apartments.
One upstairs and one downstairs. Each comprising one bedroom
one bathroom, front room, dining, kitchen. There is a wooden
porch approximately 8 6 feet wide on the upper level secured
with a wooden handrail. The garage area has been converted into
a efficiency apartment and now houses one bedroom/frontroom
in one and one bathroom. Age: is 7 years old. The apartments
could be rented at $700 per month partly furnished. The efficiency


Appraisal: $308,402.00


MURPHY TOWN
(ABACO)

Lot #60 with a structure, lot size 60 x 115 ft., 6,900 sq. ft., 10
ft., above sea level but below road level and would flood in a
severe hurricane the duplex has dimensions of 60 ft by 30 ft partly
of wood and partly of cement blocks with one section virtually
finished and occupied with blocks up to window level and floor
ready to be poured. The roof is asphalt shingles, the interior walls
and ceiling are of 1x6 pine and the floor of ceramic tiles. The
: finished work is average/below, 2 bedrooms, one bath, living/dining.
The occupied portion of the structure is not complete. Age: 10
years old.

Appraisal: $80,498.00


EARLY SETTLERS DRIVE
'44(ELEUTHERA)
Lot #7 Early Settlers Drive, North Eleuthera Heights, size 11,200
sq. ft., contains incomplete 3 bed, 2.5 bath, living room, dining
room, kitchen and tv room.

Appraisal: $141,716.40




ROCK SOUND
(ELEUTHERA)

All that piece parcel or lot of land and improvements having an
area of 22,800 sq ft situated on Fish Street in the vicinity of Rock
S|Sound Primary School on the island of Eleuthera, Bahamas. This
property is comprised of a 38 year old single storey residence
consisting of approximately 1,332.18 sq ft of enclosed living area
and inclusive of, living room, dining room, kitchen, 3 bed rooms,
two bathrooms and sitting room. The home is in fair condition,
there is also carport but in poor condition. The neighbourhood
is quiet and peaceful and has a topography of approximately 2
ft.

Appraisal: $57,853.95
The said piece parcel or lot of land and improvements is located in the settlement of Rock Sound, on the
island of Eleuthera.

: LOT 7, BLOCK 7 MILLARS HEIGHTS


All that lot of land having an area of 7,500 sq. ft. being lot no 7
of the subdivision known as Millars Heights subdivision situated
.iin the south western district of new Providence. This property is
comprised of a 7 year old single family/multi family single storey
duplex consisting of approximately 1,533 sq. ft. of enclosed living
area inclusive of living room, dining room, kitchen, 2 bedrooms
and 1 bathroom. Both apartments have a wall unit in one bedroom.
SThe building is well maintained and has an effective age of 3 years.
The land is on flat terrain and appear to be sufficiently elevated
above road to disallow flooding during annual heavy rainy periods. The grounds are fairly maintained and
site improvements includes a grass lawn with fruit trees and a concrete paved driveway leading to the
carport. The yard is open along the front with its back and side boundaries enclosed with chain link fencing.
Appraisal: $231,806.40

Traveling west along Carmichael Road, take the third corner left after the Carmicheal Road Police Station
then the first right then first left again which is Margaret Street the subject property is the third property left
painted white trim green with green doors.



KENNEDY SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)

Lot #5 land size 3,600 sq. 40 x 90 ft., contains a 21 year old single
story house 3 bed, 1 bath, living, dining and kitchen. The lot
is on flat land and fairly'level with the roadway, residential single
family zoning.

Appraisal: $100,800.00

The subject property is located on the southern side of Soldier
rad about 200 ft., east of the intersection of Kennedy Subdivision
and Soldier Road. Painted blue trimmed white, a low concrete
wall and concrete gateposts are located at the front with a chainlink fencing enclosing the sides and the
Back also walkway and driveway in the frontyard. Ground neatly maintained with basic landscaping in
place. Accommodation consist of three bedrooms, one bathroom, living and dining area and kitchen.


HAMILTON'S
(LONG ISLAND)


-' rnted at $400 per month.


Queen's High Way, lot of land 13,547 sq. ft., dwelling house of
solid concrete floors, foundation column and belt course with
finished plaster. Two bedrooms, one bathroom, kitchen, dining,
and living room. Total living space is 1,237 sq. ft., utilities available
are electricity, water, cable tv and telephone.
Appraisal: $98,057.00


CORAL VISTA SUBDIVISION (NASSAU), All that vacant lot of land having an area of approximately 7,500 sq. ft. being lot #61 and is situated on Blue Heron Cresent in the Coral Vista Subdivision a said subdivision situated in the
western district of New Providence, Bahamas. This property is bounded on the north by Blue Hebron Cresent and running thereon 75 ft, on the west by lot #60 and running 100 ft on the south by portions of lots #72 & 73 and running thereon 75
ft, and on the east by lot #62 and running thereon 100 ft. This area is zoned residential with all utilities and services available.
Appraisal: $69,300.00 ,
Travelling from the Coral Harbour round about, (Coral Harbour Road), take 1st left (Central Drive East), go across the cross road turn right at Pink Coral Drive west turn 1st left (Blue Heron Drive) the subject property is the 6th on the right side.
GROVE; WEST BAY SUBDIVISION (NASSAU), All that vacant lot of land having an area of approximately 12,000 sq ft being lot #17 block #20 and is situated on Bougainvilla Avenue in the Grove Subdivision situated in the
western district of New Providence, Bahamas. The property is retinacula in shape and is bounded on the north by lot #18 and running thereon 120 ft on the west by Bougainvilla Avenue and running 100 ft on the south by lot #16 and running 120
ft, and on the east by lot #8 and running there on 100 ft. This area is zoned residential with all utilities and services available.
Appraisal: $153,300.00
Travelling west on West Bay Street, turn onto Bougainvilla Avenue, travel across the crossroad (Coral Drive) the subject property is the 4th on the left side with broken chain lik fence.
JOHNSON'S HARBOUR VIEW ESTATES SUBDIVISION(ELEuTHERA), All that vacant lot of land having an area of approximately 4,500 sq ft being lots 12E and 13W and Is situated in JOhnson Harbour View Estates
Subdivision situated on the island of Eleuthera, Bahamas. Measuring and bounded as follows, northwardly by 20' wide road reservation and running there on for a distance of 50 ft eastwardly by lot 13E and running thereon for a distance of 90 ft
southwardly by lot 30, and running thereon for a distance of 25 ft and continuing on lot 31 and running thereon a distance of 25 ft westwardly by lot 12W of the said subdivision and running thereon for a distance of 90 ft. This property Is
well lanscaped and fenced in. This area is quiet and peaceful with all utilities and services available.
Appraisal: $47,250.00
The said pieces parcels or lot of land is situated in Johnson's Harbour View Estates Subdivision, Harbour Island, Eleuthera.
ALLOTMENT 67, MARRIGOLD FARM ROAD(NASSAU), All that lot of land having an area of 1.173 acres being lot No. and is situated on Marigold Farm Road in the ara known as allotment 67, a said subdivision situated in
the south eastern district of new Providence, Bahamas. This property is Vacant and area has all utilities & services.

Appraisal: $148,050.00
Travelling on Joe Farrington Road turn onto Marrigold Farm Road heading south, the subject is the second to last propert on the left hand side of the road near the pond.

f ______________PhilipWhite__@_502 -3077__em ail___ ___p^^white___ct______k^cm or


L


I


VALENTINES EXTENSION
(NASSAU)

Lot #2 contains a 19 year old 1 1/2 storey four plex with a floor
area of 3,621 sq. ft. The two storey section consist of a master
bedroom, bathroom and sitting area upstairs and two bedrooms,
one bath, living, dining, family room and kitchen downstairs. The
single storey consist of one two bedroom, one bath apartment and
two efficency apartments, land size 7,500 sq. ft. Multi-Family zoning
on flat land and not subject to flooding.

Appraisal: $347,006.00

The subject property is located on the western side of Valentine's Extension Road, just over one hundred
feet north of the roadway known as Johnson Terrace. Travel east on Bernard Road, turn left onto Adderley
Street which is opposite SAC, continue left at the deep bend, take first right into Johnson Terrace, go to
T-junction and turn left, then first right. Property is second building on right, white trimmed brown.

DUNDAS TOWN
(ABACO)

3 two bed, 1 bath triplex 9,000 sq. ft., lot no. 18b with an area for
a small shop. Age 12 years the land is a portion of one of the
|::si Dundas Town Crown Allotment parcels stretching from Forest Drive
to Front Street, being just under a quarter acre in size and on the
lowside. A concrete block structure, with asphalt shingle roof and
L-shape in design with a total length of 70x26 ft, plus 50 x 22 ft.,
2,920 sq. ft., the interior walls are concrete blocks, ceiling is sheet
rock and the floors of vinyl tiles.

Appraisal: $220,500.00


KENNEDY SUBDIVISION
(NASSAU)

Lot no. 21 all utilities available 10 year old single story house, 3
bedroom 2 bathroom, living room, dining area, family room, kitchen,
study, laundry and an entry porch.


Appraisal: $175,350.00

Heading west along Soldier Road take main entrance to Kennedy
Subdivision on the left, then take the 1st corner on the left then
1st right, house is second on your right with garage.

NO. 3 LEXINGTON SUBDIVISION
(NASSAU)
All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of 7,752 sq. ft.
(77.5 x 100) situated in the southern district of New Providence
being lot No. 3 in an area known as Richville of Malcolm Road
west. This property is spacious and can probably accommodate
another house at the rear. It is landscaped and enclosed by a wall
in front with fence on the side. The property consist of-a single
.---- story, 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom, living room and dining rooms,
combined, family room and kitchen, enclosed carport and a roof
covered front porch (indented) with floor area of 1,374 sq. ft.


Appraisal: $123,000.00

Heading south on East Street turn right onto Malcolm Road, then third corner on the right, the house is
the 4th on the left painted white trimmed green with wall in front.
LOT 194 BOYD SUBDIVISION


All that lot of land having an area of 6,400 sq. ft. being lot no 194
of the subdivision known as Boyd Subdivision, situated in the
central district of New Providence this property is comprised of a
35 year old single family, single story residence encompassing
approximately 1,278 sq. ft. of enclosed living area and inclusive
of separate living and dining rooms, and an average size kitchen,
three bedrooms, two bathrooms and an entry porch, of approximately
88 sq. ft. ventilation is by 2 wall unit air conditioners. The property
is at grade and level with good drainage, landscaping is minimal,
consisting of lawns and shrubs in the front, the subject is enclosed with stone walls mounted with wrought
iron and chain link fencing and a wrought iron gate in front there is a 208 sq. ft. cement driveway leading
to a'single covered carport of 250 sq. ft. the subject site also has a concrete block storage shed measuring
of approximately 143 sq. ft.

Appraisal: '$126,000.00
Traveling west on Boyd Road, turn left onto Foster Street, continue on Foster Street to the 4th corner right,
(Roland Ave.) the subject property is the 5th property on the left side painted orange with red/white trim.


LOT NO 172 BLAIR ESTATES
(NASSAU)

All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of 15,403 sq. ft.
being lot 172 in the subdivision known as Blair Estates, this property
Sg is comprised of a single family split level resident consisting of
approximately 3,456 sq. ft., of enclosed living space with three
bedrooms, two bathrooms, on the second level and on the first a
living and dining room, kitchen, utility room, family room, bathroom,
an office, a rear uncovered porch, a covered door entry, walkway
and a driveway. Also located on the first level in a 616 sq. ft. one
bedroom, one bathroom, living and dining room, rental unit. The building is in excellent condition with recent
renovation done, there is no signs of structural defects or termite infestation the building is adequately
ventilated with central air conditioning installed on the second floor and in the rental unit the land is rectangular
in shape and on a level grade slightly elevated above the road to disallow flooding during annual heavy
rainy periods. The grounds improvements include landscaping, a concrete block wall and fence enclosure
on three boundaries, fruit trees and a private water supply.

Appraisal: $642,222.00
Traveling north on Village Road from the round about take the second corner right into Blair Estates (St
Andrews Drive). Drive to the t-junction and make a left which is Commonwealth Street, continue traveling
to the 7th corner which is Clarence Street then drive to Richmond Road and make a right. The subject
property is the 1st house on the left no 44 painted green trimmed white.


I---


- : 09 59








PAG 6, HUSDYNOVMBRN,205TH TIBN


Fraudster 'abused the cou.


FROM page 1B
difficult not to draw inferences sug-
gestive of an ulterior motive......... "
Renert, through his attorney Mau-
rice Glinton, had sought several court
orders against the Securities Com-
mission and Mr Culmer, relating to
the return of Hawthorne Sterling
assets and property after the receiver-
ship was ended, and for allegedly
exceeding their powers. Justice Lyons
dismissed all these requests.
The saga began when Renert set up
his investment funds in 1997 as part of
a private investment scheme he was
promoting, incorporating most as
Bahamas-registered International
Business Companies (IBCs). The
IBCs were beneficially owned by the
Tenesheles Trust, which had as its
trustee Nancy Lake, described in the
judgement as Renert's key associate.
She was also director of the IBCs.
From 1997 to March 2000, Renert's
investment funds were operating ille-
gally in the Bahamas because they
were not registered under the Mutual
Funds Act 1995. Renert then sought
the help of Mr Culmer and Michael
Scott, an attorney with Callenders &
Co, to help reorganise the funds and
enable them to be licensed under the
Act.
After approaching the Securities
Commission on the matter, with


Lake's consent, it was decided that
the funds be put into receivership to
reorganise them before licences were
granted.
However, Justice Lyons noted in
his judgement: "Some short time after
the receivership commenced, the
applicants who had previously con-
sented to and requested the receiver-
ship changed their mind. They no
longer wished for the receivership to
continue. Renert and Lake actively
set about hindering the receivership."
In early 2001, Justice Lyons said the
Securities Commission thought it was
"no longer feasible" to licence the
funds as mutual funds, because their
affairs "were in a shambles" due to
poor bookkeeping, the acceptance of
all investor funds, into one commin-
gled account and "other critical and
serious irregularities".
The Securities Commission then
applied to the Supreme Court to wind-
up the HawthorneSterling funds, but
on April 11, 2001, Justice Emmanuel
Osadebay declined to do so and over-
turned the receivership on the grounds
that because they were unlicensed,
the Mutual Funds Act did not enable
their liquidation.
Justice Lyons said of these events:
"I am drawn to conclude that Renert
and Lake most likely decided upon
the course of retaining attorneys and
accountants to 'reorganise' the affairs


of the company so that they could stall
the SEC investigators by represent-
ing to the SEC that the licensing of the
mutual funds was in the hands of their
attorneys and accountants. This
would, they hoped, buy them time.
"Renert and Lake soon realised that
the likely outcome of their decision
to place the reorganisation under the
court's supervision was that the fraud
would be discovered.
Supervision
"As this was being conducted under
the supervision of the court, any fraud
or illegal activity would be reported to
the court by the various authorities
for action. Renert and Lake then had
to get rid of the receiver as soon as
possible to regain control of the com-
panies' assets so that they could con-
tinue to defraud their investors and
avoid prosecution."
Justice Lyons said Renert
"appeared to shift direction" during
his application, and was critical of his
failure to lay all the circumstances sur-
rounding the case before the Supreme
Court.
When asked what was happening
with the SEC action initiated against
Renert in the Connecticut district
court, Mr Glinton told the Supreme
Court he "did not want to go there".
This meant the full facts might not be


presented.
When (he receivership was ended
after the winding-up of the mutual
funds failed, Justice Osadebay issued
an order that the documents on the
Hawthorne Sterling Group be
returned to Lake, provided she filed a
certificate with the Registrar General
saying she was still the sole director.
Because she did not, the receiver
. did not release the documents because
the Hawthorne Sterling funds were
not in compliance with the IBC Act.
Justice Lyons said Lake did not do
this because, as the companies would
never be licensed to operate as mutu-
al funds, the only recourse she had
was to place them in voluntary liqui-
dation and return investor monies -
an action that could have exposed the
wrongdoing. Thus compliance with
Justice Osadebay's order was "not a
preferred option" for Renert and
Lake.
In addition, in response to the SEC
action, Renert argued against its appli-
cation to enforce discovery, saying he
would be exposed to criminal liability
in the Bahamas if he complied. He
was eventually ordered to pay around
$1 million in penalties and interest in
the US, after filing material to con-
test the SEC action and then later
withdrawing it.
Of that action, Justice Lyons said:
"This is a common modus operandi


rocess'

adopted by fraudsters. By not fully
litigating a case, the fraudster can dis-
honestly claim that there has not been
a fully litigated decision finding that
his actions were fraudulent,
"That way the fraudster hopes (and
sadly sometimes succeeds) to convince
the hapless but hopeful investors that
he is not a fraudster and that it is the
court system, not the fraudster, who is
wrong. The fraudster tries to paint
himself as a victim."
Justice Lyons said of the SEC case:
"It shows the applicant companies
were set up to be vehicles of an egre-
gious fraud perpetrated by the fraud-
ster Renert and his sidekick Lake. It
shows Renert (he was the brains
behind the whole operation) to be dis-
honest and quick to abuse the court
processes.
"It also supports the receiver's
claims that Renert and Lake vigor-
ously opposed his efforts at every step.
Renert and Lake engaged in frequent
hostile attacks on the receiver. They
informed investors and brokers not
to cooperate with the receiver and
they engaged in deliberately moving
the assets of the companies away from
the hands of the receiver.....
"So long as the receiver retained
control of the documents and assets of
the companies, Renert and Lake's
position (and perhaps even their free-
dom) was extremely tenuous."


Bahamas needs better funding for Universal telecoms service


or to install a specific number
of lines within a certain peri-


Small established firm seeks
Attorney with up to 5 years


experience, salary
with experience.


commensurate


Fax resume: 393-4910
or mail to P.O. Box N-1462



4UBS

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. a leading international Wealth
Manager, has an opening for a

Wealth Management Client Advisor

In this challenging position you will be responsible for
high net worth individuals from Europe. Your main tasks
are:

Advising and servicing existing clients
Supporting the acquisition of new clients
Proposing of investment solutions in the client's
mother tongue

We are searching for a personality with extensive
experience in international wealth management,
specializing in the fields of customer relations, investment
advise and portfolio management. A proven track record
in a comparable position with a leading global financial
institution as well as fluency in English, French and
German is essential.

Written applications by Bahamian nationals only should
be addressed to:

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources Management
P.O.Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas


FOR


RENT M



* 532 5,095 sq.ft. finished office suites
* Ideal location with incredible views.
* Available for immediate occupancy.
* Full standby generator.
* Ample parking. Central air-conditioning.


od.
"An advantage of using
mandatory service obligations
is that generally the funding
is provided by the private sec-
tor and not from public
funds," Ms Riviere-Smith said.
Obligations
"However, if excessive roll-
out obligations are imposed
on the Universal Service
Provider it may have to
finance the roll out to uneco-
nomic service areas by way of
cross subsidisation monopoly
profits or future considera-
tions."
The introduction of market
reforms, Ms Riviere-Smith
said, such as privatisation,
competition and cost-based
pricing, can significantly
increase the supply of
telecommunications services.
Meanwhile, Prime Minister
Perry Christie yesterday
repeated at the conference the
Government's oft-uttered line


that it was 100 per cent com-
mitted to privatising the
Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Company (BTC),
despite the failure of the pre-
vious process in 2003.
However, it is unlikely there
will be much interest in the
state-owned monopoly, and
the chances are the Govern-
ment will not realise the price
it wants for BTC, as the com-
pany's only unit of real value
is the cellular monopoly.
The Bahamas is the last
country in the Caribbean
region to be burdened with no
cellular competition.
Production
Mr Christie said the Water
& Sewerage Corporation was
moving towards full privatisa-
tion of water production via
reverse osmosis, and said
there was a call for the
Bahamas to develop a similar
policy for the Energy Sector as
was developed for the


Island Traders Building
East Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel. 242-393-8618
www.bahamasrealty.bs
www.cbrichardellis.com



BAHAMAS REALTY LTD
COMMERCIAL


CBRE
CB RICHARD ELLIS
NAVIGATING A NEW WORLD


Telecommunications Sector.
Policy
The Prime Minister said the
Government had pursued a
policy of liberalisation in the
telecommunications sector
that had resulted in the sepa-
ration of regulators and oper-
ators, and the provision of
wider choices to consumers in
the areas of data, Internet and
customer premises equipment
and, to a limited extent, tele-
phone service.
The Prime Minister pre-
dicted that the PUC will face


challenges in the future
because of the steep increase
in resort developments that
are taking place throughout
the islands and the demand
for high quality utilities in less
populated settlements.
Noting that telecommuni-
cations was vital to disaster
preparedness, he explained
that the Government had
decided to link all of the
islands with BTC's fibre optic
cable, notwithstanding the
presence of a cable operator in
Caribbean Crossings/Cable
Bahamas:


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps.
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANDY CARRALERO-GOMEZ, OF
WILD TAMARIND CAY, EXUMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 27TH day of
OCTOBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



A leading security firm is seeking




ELIGIBLITY CRITERIA:

Be between the ages of 25-45 years old.
Must be well-groomed and a good performer.
Must have the legal right to work in the Bahamas
No history of Felony convictions
Ability to ready, comprehend, and perform written
orders, understands policies, procedures, and
instructions.
Must have a High School Diploma or equivalent.
Positive attitude, great people skills, and career-
oriented. Ability to perform as a team player and
act independently.
Be able to pass a background investigation and
drug screening.
Must be willing to work nights, weekends,
holidays and overtime.

Success Applicants are entitled to:

A superior benefits package
Learning and development opportunities
Advancement potential
Award, bonuses and incentive programs
Exciting employee relations calendar

Interested persons can contact
325-6170/4 between the
hours of 9am-5pm, Mon.-Fri.


FROM page 1B


ICD UTILITIES

LIMITED

Notice To Shareholders





The Board of Directors of

ICD Utilities Limited is pleased

to advise that a dividend of

13.5 cents per share

has been declared to all Shareholders

of record as at 10th November, 2005

and payable on 24th November, 2005


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2005


THE TRIBUNE




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PAGE8B, HURSAY, OVEMER 3 200 TRIUNEOPOTT


Defending champions hit




form in BSC softball season


ia Ibro


* SOFTBALL
CALVARY Deliverance
have started to turn things
around and that could spell
trouble for the opposing teams
in the Baptist Sports Coun-
cil's 2005 softball season.
The defending men's cham-
pions pulled off a double
header over the weekend at
the Baillou Hills Sporting
Complex for their third victo-
ry of the season after drop-
ping their first two games.
They nipped Calvary Bible 8-
7 and blasted New Destiny 14-
3.
In the two other men's
games played, New Bethle-
hem stopped New Destiny 22-
1 and Faith United stunned
Golden Gates 8-7.
* Here's a summary
of the games played:
0 CALVARY
DELIVERANCE 8,
CALVARY BIBLE 7:
A five-run bottom of the
third inning on consecutive
two-run singles from Taja
Wright and Clayton Rolle and
an RBI sacrifice fly from
Dwayne Mortimer enabled
Calvary Deliverance to take
a 8-1 lead as they held on for
the victory.
Mortimer finished with a
hit, two RBIs and a run
scored; winning pitcher Brad
Wood Jr was 2-for-3 with a


Victories in


double header


run scored; Jason Clarke
scored twice and Brad Wood
Sr singled, drove in a run and
scored another. Marvih Nairn
had a three-run home run and
Khalid Curry and Jamie
Bethel both had a single,
drove in a run and scored a
run each, while Burshel Brad-
shaw suffered the loss.
* CALVARY
DELIVERANCE 14,
NEW DESTINY 3:
An explosive 10-run top of
the third inning as they bat-
ted around the clock enabled,
Calvary Deliverance to put
this game out of reach for
Golden Gates.
Jeff Beckles and Jason
Clarke both produced a pair
of hits, including a two-run
homer run apiece in the rally.
They both finished with two
runs scored.
Winning pitcher Brad
Wood Jr and his father Brad
Wood Sr both added two hits,
scoring one and two runs
respectively with Sr. chipping
in with an RBI. Clayton Rolle
was 2-for-3 with two runs
scored and Jason McPhee was


also 2-for-3 with three RBIs
and two runs scored.
Brad -Sands was 2-for-3,
scoring twice for New Destiny
as Lennox Greene suffered
the loss.
M NEW BETHLEHEM 22,
NEW DESTINY 1:
Darren Stevens had a field
day, going 4-for-4 with four
runs batted in and three
scored to lead a 17-hit attack
for New Bethlehem. Eugene
Basin was 3-for-4 with three
RBIs and two runs scored and
Alcott Forbes was 3-for-4 with
an RBI and four runs scored.
.As Val Maura helped his


own cause with two hits, an
RBI and three runs scored,
New Bethlehem also got two
hits, three RBIs and two runs
scored from Leonardo Stevens
and Nardo Gilbert (two hits)
and Dwayne Stevens (one
hit), scored twice with Stevens
driving in two.
Rev. Tyrone Knowles Sr
scored New Destiny's lone run
on Jay Stevens' RBI single.
Lennox Greene was tagged
with the loss.
* FAITH UNITED 8,
GOLDEN GATES 7:
Tied at 4-4 going into the
fifth and final inning, Faith
United produced four runs to
surge ahead in the top half of
the inning and Colin 'Troppy'
Knowles and Faith United
held on for the win.
Neko Brown had a pair of
hits, scoring twice, Raymond
Rolle was 2-for-3 with two
RBIs and a run scored and


Stevenson Barr was 2-for-3
with a run scored for Faith
United.
Losing pitcher Peter Rah-
ming was 2-for-3 with an RBI
and run scored and
Philip Culmer had a solo
homer in the loss for Golden
Gates.
M The BSC will take a
break from its regular season
action this weekend because
of the funeral service of the
late Jackie 'Lil Stunt' Moxey,
a former player in the league
with New Destiny Full Gospel
team.
The BSC extends its
condolences to the family of
Moxey.
The league, however, will
resume competition on Satur-
day, November 12, with a full
slate of games being played
on all three fields at the Bail-
lou Hills Sporting Complex in
the men's division.


- ~-


Knowles and


Nestor march on


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content -.
Available from Commercial News Providers"


S*..-
S -.


GN-287



MINISTRY OF FINANCE

NOTICE

THE TARIFF ACT
(NO. 5 OF 2003)

DECLARATION OF EXIGENCY (NO. 12)

The Minister of Finance, pursuant to Item 11
of Part B of the Fourth Schedule to the Tariff
Act, hereby declares the following exigency
to be an exigency which qualifies for the
purposes of the exemption permitted under the
said Item 11, namely:

the urgent need of residents in Bimini, Berry
Islands, Grand Bahama and Abaco for goods
specified in the Schedule which the Minister
is satisfied are intended for the relief of persons
who have suffered hardship or loss as a result
of the hurricane known as "WILMA".

Provided that the importation of goods under
the provision of the said Item 11 is permitted
during the period commencing on 27th October
2005 and ending on 31st January, 2006.

SCHEDULE

DUTY FREE GOODS

Building Materials
Electrical Fixtures and Materials
Plumbing Fixtures and Materials
Household Furniture and Appliances
Clothing (including footwear)
Motor Vehicles*

Where any abuse or misuse of goods imported
under this Declaration is observed, the goods
may be seized and disposed of in accordance
with Section 83 of the Customs Management
Act, Chapter 293.

*Approval to be sought by application to the Ministry of Finance.
Exemption shall be based on the market value of the motor
vehicle destroyed on the date of the hurricane.

Dated this 27th day of October, 2005


Perry G. Christie
Minister of Finance


TRIBUNE SPORTS


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2005


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2005


SECTION 4




Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


NCAA stars

line up for

Junkanoo

Jam event
N BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports
Reporter
THE tip-off for the
annual Thanksgiving
Junkanoo Jam Basketball
tournament is set for
November 25th-26th, at St,
George's High School,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
The event, which is host-
ed by the Bahamas Bas-
ketball Federation (BBF),
will feature eight schools
playing under the NCAA
Division I umbrella.
Although the tourna-
ment is viewed as an exhi-
bition event for the
Bahamas, no local teams
are allowed to take part,
with win-loss records from
the tournament being
added to the participating
teams' regular season play.
Six of the eight colleges
invited down to this year's
tournament have all
advanced to NCAA cham-
pionships, with one claim-
ing a top spot in the tour-
nament's Elite Eight.
Colleges participating in
the two divisional tourna-
ment will be Iowa State,
NC State, North
Texas, North Florida, Rut-
gers, Purdue, George
Washington and South
Carolina.

Appearance
Rutgers College, a team
that made it's fifth appear-
ance in the Elite Eight at
the NCAA tournament,
will lead the charge in the
Freeport Division.
But the battle for the
crown will not come easy
for Rutgers, with Iowa
State looking to improve
their win-loss record with
a win over the squad.
The defending champi-
ons in the Freeport Divi-
sion, Iowa State, one of
the six schools that played
in the NCAA champi-
onship tournament last
year, will rely heavily on
returning point guards
Lyndsey Medders and
Megan Ronhovde to pull
off the upset.
Also playing in the
Freeport Division will be
NC State and University
of North Florida.
This will be the Univer-
sity of Florida's first time
playing in the tournament.
The Lucaya Division
plays host to three of the
top second round finishers
in the NCAA champi-
onships tournaments.
Making their return to
the tournament after a two
year break are George
Washington, who will fight
off Texas and Purdue for
the championship title in
the Lucayan Division.
Defending champions in
the Lucayan Division
Duke University will not
be returning.


* TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
IT'S official, the Bahamas
can now add two more medals
to their tally from the 2003
World Championships, held
in Paris, France.
The wait for members of the
men's 4x400m relay team and
Chandra Sturrup came to an
end yesterday, when president
of the Bahamas Association
of Athletic Association
(BAAA) Mike Sands official-
ly announced the date the
individuals will be presented
with their medals.
The two bronze medals will
be presented to Sturrup and
members of the 4x400m team
on December 30th by the
IAAF president Liame Diak,
who will be in town for the
annual BAAA banquet.


low-


da


8


Presentation for World Championship bronze

winners Chandra Sturrup and men's 4x400 team:


The Bahamas was awarded
the two extra medals after
American Kelli White and the
4x400m team were disquali-
fied.

Leap
Leevan Sands was original-
ly the sole medallist at the
games capturing the bronze
medal in the men's triple
jump, with a leap of 17.26
meters.
Sands said: "We want to
recognise the performances of
our athletes, they have a


remarkable job on the track.
"We haven't contacted the
athletes by word of mouth, but
letters have been sent out. In
fact they all are aware of the
decision made by the IAAF.
"Yes, the process has been
long and timely, but it didn't
detour the mental state of our
athletes. They remained
focused producing excellent
times and this is what we in
this association will like to cel-
ebrate.
"The Bahamas has fine ath-
letes and they should be
awarded for the great job
they've been doing."-


Sturrup had originally fin-
ished fourth at the champi-
onships behind White, Torri
Edwards and Zhana Block.

Banned
White, who also went onto
win the 200m was stripped of
both medals and banned from
the sport for two years.
In a past interview with the
Tribune, Sturrup did indicate
that she would accept the
medal if White was stripped,
but admitted that the feeling
will not be the same.


This is the second time the
Bahamas has won the bronze
medal at a major games after
the American men's 4x400mi
team were disqualified at the.
2000 Olympic games.
It took two years for
the Bahamas to be awarded
the medals in bot,h:
incidents. ,
The medal was awarded to
the team of Avard Moncur,
Dennis Darling, Nathaniel
McKinney and Chris Brown,
who ran a time of 3:00.53 sec-
onds, behind France, 2:58.96
seconds and Jamaica, 2:59.60
seconds.


m mtI-M --m1-- -` -- - -


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4









THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2005



SECTIONw


The Tribune


Sermons, Church Activities, Awards


Church Notes
Page 6C


'Man i

E By FATHER JAMES MOULTRIE
"This people worship me with their lips, but
their hearts are far from me"
(Matt 15:8).
Jesus had some harsh criticism to make of
the Scribes and Pharisees. He called them
hypocrites because they did not practice
what they preached. Hypocrisy is pre-
tending to be what we are not, when our
deeds betray our words. Which of us can truly say
that our deeds match up to our words? Therefore, to
some extent, we all are hypocrites.
Jesus was critical of those who use religion to
gain spiritual power, and who did not live by what is
at the heart of religion: love, compassion, justice, and
faith. Matthew speaks today to Christian leaders
(and not just clergy) who are in danger of repeating
the mistakes of the Scribes and Pharisees. The mes-
sage is as relevant now as it was then. Religious
office holders are reluctant to let go of ostentatious
dress, places of honour, titles, and so on, which are
clearly contrary to the spirit of the Gospel. But
each time we come to celebrate the Eucharist we are
called by God to a life of truth and genuine good-
ness.
At the very root of innumerable wrongs in our
world today is the discrepancy between word and
deed. It is the weakness of churches, political parties,
and individuals. It gives individuals and institutions
split personalities. This was the chief fault Jesus
found with the Scribes and Pharisees and us.
If we practice what we preach, if we live by our
.beliefs, we will be the first to benefit. We will also set
,a good example for others. Like beautiful flowers
*that have no scent, so are the well-chosen words of
.a person who does not act on his/her own words.
There can be no happiness for us, as long as the
things we believe are different from the things we
"do. Ralph Waldo Emerson once said, "Do not say
:-things. What you are stands over you all the while
-and thunders so loudly that I cannot hear what you
say to the contrary". In other words, do not pretend
to be what you are not.
Today there is a great temptation to concentrate
on appearances. Image is everything. People put
on a front, but deep down they are not like that at
all. You can't go-by appearances'today. Many of us
give one impression of ourselves, but hide the real
person from the public. We are one thing out and
another at home. Our children are confused by our
outward persona and our home persona. We are
often little more than a shell. How deceptive appear-
ances can be! Some of us are so holy in church and
when we get on the outside we are the devil incar-
nate.
So it was with the Scribes and Pharisees, and in
the Gospel today Jesus removes their masks and


the mirror'


* FATHER JAMES MOULTRIE


exposes them as they are. Many of us are just like
the Scribes and Pharisees. On the outside they
appeared to be good and holy people. But inside
they were anything but good and genuine people.
This is the danger that faces all of us. Each of us has
two selves, an outer self and an inner self. The inner
self is the private self, the one seen only by ourselves.
The outer self is the shell; the inner self is the kernel.
Too often nuts with the biggest shells are empty.
Why do we feel the need to pretend, or to impress
others? Because most of us get our self-worth from
what others think about us. Hence, in our need for
approval, acceptance, and status, we may promote
the outer self at the expense of the inner self. But
what use is the appearance without the reality, the
image without the substance? We can never achieve
happiness or holiness as long as we pretend to be
what we are not. The moment we try to be what we
are not, we become a fictitious personality; an unre-
al presence. Many religious people are not saints
because they never succeed in being themselves.
When people concentrate on inner goodness they
do not have to shout about it, or even want to shout
about it. They know with a quiet certainty that they
have something which no one can take from them,
something which makes them feel worthwhile, no
matter what others might think of them.
Christ is able to see beneath the surface and
behind the masks. He can see the inner person.
That is why He looked at the Scribes and Pharisees


and saw a pious exterior. But on looking deeper, He
saw that beneath the religious pomp and show, they
were hollow inside. On the other hand, it gave Him
great joy when He found a genuine person. He
gladly put up with Peter and Mary Magdalene
because he knew that despite their obvious faults
their hearts were sound.
Yet the Scribes and Pharisees were not a unique-
ly evil group of people. They were just human
beings. They could be any group of peiople'any time
and anywhere. The picture Jesus pain* of them is
a mirror into which we too are invited to look. If we
do look into it, we will see our own face there, for we
have some, if not all, of their faults. iD we some-
times consider ourselves better than others? Do we
not lay down the law for others? Do we not demand
sacrifice of others which we do not demand for our-
selves? Do we not look to be noticed, to be admired,
and to take the best seat, if we can get it? Are we
also lacking in charity, compassion, a sense of justice,
and a spirit of service? Do we not wait for someone
to do something for the church and then we criti-
cize? Do we not talk about each other? Do we not
tell others, "You just reach; I've been here long
time?" Do we make newcomers feel welcomed?
Do we reach out to all equally, or only to those we
know? Are we Christ-like in all our actions? Or
are we just Christians in name?
The real tragedy of the Scribes and Pharisees was
not that they had faults, but that they were blind to
their faults. Many of them were sincere and pious
people. But what good is piety if it does not make us
more humble, more loving, and more compassion-
ate? Piety is no substitute for goodness. We do not
have to put oi an outward show, or pretend to be
what we are not. If we take care of the inner self, the
outer self will take care of itself. All we have to do
is to try to be true to what we are, God's sons and
daughters. So this morning let us take a good look in
the mirror and inside of ourselves and see whom we
really are, and if we do not like what we see, to ask
God to change us into what He would have us be.
Can we alter this pattern of being like the Scribes
and the Pharisees? I have good news for you this
morning. When we want to change, help is never far
away. God the Holy is never far away. The Holy
Spirit is in constant communication with us. Some-
times we find ourselves doing things without know-
ing why, or an unexplained coincidence may take
place in our lives. These are all signs of the Holy
Spirit being in touch with us, but we do hot always
recognize His presence. When we have tough deci-
sions to make, we turn to God for guidance and
suddenly everything is all right. That is the power of
the Holy Spirit in our lives. If we want to be better
and more reliable Christians, it can happen for us. If

SEE page 2C


0 DR W THOMPSON


Church


leaders


to tour


Grand


Bahama'

THE Bahamas Christian
Council is extremely saddened
by the devastation wrecked upon
the islands of the northern
Bahamas by hurricane Wilma.
This is especially tragic in the
case of Grand Bahama and Aba-
co, which are still struggling to
recover from the double assault
of hurricanes Frances and Jeanne
last year.
Based upon initial reports, the
loss and damage to real and per-
sonal property is of massive and
unprecedented proportions, with
thousands of residents left home-
less. Most tragic of all was the
reported death of an infant in
Grand Bahama.
The Bahamas Christian Coun-
cil takes this opportunity to
remind Bahamians that even in

SEE page 6C


'The lottery makes us all losers'


1 By ALBERT MOHLER
President, Southern Baptist
Theological Seminary
THE newspaper headlines certainly
command attention when a record Power-
ball jackpot of at least $350-million is at
stake. As a matter of fact, the gambling
interests are counting on lots of atten-
tion...and hoping for even greater sales.
The multi-state Powerball lottery's
newest record jackpot comes almost three
years after the last record-setting pay-off in
2002 ( a mere $314.9-million), and has been
produced by a change in the lottery intend-
ed to boost jackpots in order to compete
with other state lotteries.
Of course, the reality of the lottery is a
bit more complicated. If a winner shows up
with a ticket that matches all six numbers,
the winning ticket-holder will not walk
away with the full $350-million. The "cash
option" for the jackpot will be $164.4-mil-
lion...and that's before the government
steps in to claim taxes. Nevertheless, we
can be sure there will be enough money
left to entice participation. Thousands of
ticket-buyers are rushing to purchase tick-
ets.


"Lottery sales are going great. It's just a
mess," Dennis Thornton, owner of L.A.'s
Milk Depot in Scottsdale, Ariz., told USA
Today. "People are all over the place, buy-
ing for themselves and for pools," he said.
Another drawing is scheduled for
Wednesday night, and ticket buyers are
lining up in 27 states, the District of Colum-
bia, and the U.S. Virgin Islands to pur-
chase their tickets. $300-million is a lot of
money. A ticket to play costs only one dol-
lar. So, where's the harm?

Where is the harm?
The tidal wave of state lotteries that has
engulfed the nation in recent years is dri-
ven by a very clear state interest...the desire
for more revenue. Legislators and gover-
nors see lotteries as a means of raising vast
sums of revenue for state projects and pro-
grammes without raising taxes. The lot-
tery is most often sold to the public as a
way to fund education and other popular
causes. With the public dead set against
raising taxes, a lottery looks like an easy
way out.
But, as is the case with most apparently


easy options, the reality just isn't that sim-
ple. As The Christian Science Monitor has
reported, the headlines don't tell the whole
story. "The proceeds from state lotteries
are less than you might think," says Molly
Burke, researcher at the Education Com-
mission of the States in Denver. "Even if
they're all earmarked toward education, it
isn't a huge amount. It's never quite as
much as states would like the schools and
the taxpayers to think."
In some states, dependence upon lot-
tery proceeds has actually caused revenue
for education to shrink. Even in Georgia,
where the popular state lottery is credited
with an impressive college scholarship pro-
gramme, a dependence upon lottery rev-
enue has put the entire programme at risk.
The moral problems involve even
greater risks. A Christian understanding of
the lottery involves at least four vital moral
considerations. A quick review of these
considerations may help Christians frame
the lottery issue in a new and much need-
ed light.
First, lotteries lie about the true path to


SEE page 6C


Bible Bb1*62t Shop




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Gospel choirs to compete


at Prince George


Wharf


NASSAU, BAHAMAS -
(rospel choirs will be compet-
i ng each Saturday, for a period
of six weeks at the Braiders
Square at Festival Place on
Prince George Wharf.
Choirs will be judged on
musicianship, group coordina-
Iion and symmetry, technique,
versatility of chosen song, pro-
gramme choice and presenta-


tion of final performance. The
choir categories include ladies,
men, mixed voice, youth and
groups of choirs. The competi-
tion commenced with prelimi-
naries in October and will
move to the final rounds in
November and December.
One group will' be eliminated
each Saturday. The selection
of the winning choir is sched-


uled to take place at the Christ-
mas Tree Lighting Ceremony
on December 10, at 6pm at
Festival Place.
Each group must consist of
twenty-five persons or more,
comprise of ninety per cent
choir members, excluding the
conductor and must be ama-
teurs (people who do not earn
a living as singers). No person


may compete as a member of
more than one choir.
Prizes include $5000 for the
first place winners, with a
recording time of six hours, sec-
ond prize is $3000, with a
recording time of three hours
and the third prize winners will
receive $2000, with two hours
of recording time. Studio
recording time has been donat-
ed, courtesy of FAM FEST.
"We anticipate that the com-
petition will be enjoyed by
cruise passengers, stop-over vis-
itors, Bahamian families,
church congregations and fol-
lowers of mass choirs. This
event is also an opportunity to
further expose Bahamians to


Festival Place's diverse prod-
uct offerings," said Carla Stu-
art, director, Cruise Develop-
ment, Ministry of Tourism.
Visitors
She said also that the com-
petition provides an avenue to
expose visitors to Bahamian
culture and establish Festival
Place and the port area as a
centre which attracts a diver-
sity of cultural entertainment.
The competition will be held
for an hour and a half each Sat-
urday evening, with each group
singing three songs. Festival
Place will provide the basic
sound system, but groups that


require additional equipment,
must be prepared to bring
whatever is deemed necessary
for maximum performance.
Judges have been selected
from the local gospel and
entertainment arena, based on
their familiarity with choirs,
and who are respected in the
entertainment business. They
include Anton Wallace, Sen-
ovia Pierre, Patricia Bazzard
and Kent Minnis. The man-
agement of Festival Place will
serve as the competition direc-
tor.
For more information on
the competition, please contact
Festival Place.


'Man in the mirror'


FROM page 1C
we really think about it, we will
be surprised how many oppor-
tunities there are for us to bet-
ter ourselves.
Again it is God the Holy
Spirit at work in us, but weodo
not always recognize Him. Do
we want to experience and
enjoy a sense of serenity, peace,
joy, and love? God the Holy
Spirit is there to help us, just
waiting for us to let Him show
us how and what steps to take.
Through prayer we come into
contact and in communication
with our Triune God who is
there to help us if we truly want
to change our lives. Tired of
being hypocrites like the
Scribes and Pharisees? Try
Jesus!
If we keep talking to God
through prayer we will become
familiar with the power of the
Holy Spirit to free us from
whatever is shackling us. The


Holy Spirit is a friend who can
inspire us to want to change
and will help us to make the
changes we need to make us
better and more effective
Christians, fit for God's ser-
vice. God the Holy Spirit is a
Friend, Counselor, and
Encourager who can help us to
turn what is hollow in our lives
into a fullness of love, joy, and
peace.
Mission
The Holy Spirit will guide us
into the right relationship with
Our Triune God that will
enhance our mission as chil-
dren of God. When we operate
like the Scribes and Pharisees
we want other people to
change, not ourselves. But
often we need to change. We
have to examine ourselves and
see where we need to change
before we try to change oth-
ers. Every now and then we


need to look in the mirror to
see who is there. If we do not
like want we see, then we know
what we have to do. Every now
and then we need to take a
look in the mirror and recog-
nize ourselves for what we tru-
ly are. Indeed, the person in
the mirror is really me.
Listen to the words of song
written by Michael Jackson
called Man In The Mirror, "I'm
going to make a change, for
once in my life. I'm going to
feel real good. Going to make a
difference, going to make it
right. I'm starting with the man
in the mirror...I'm asking him
to change his ways. And no
message could have been any
clearer if you want to make the
world a better place. Take a
look in the mirror and then
make a change, take a look in
the mirror and then make a
change". The man in the mirror
is you! Don't be a hypocrite,
make a change today!


I-ive ut-dcir coyzei,-t ilitil


... i rriBUNE


PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2005







I nUnroIMT,/ i I'IV V LIVIULiI 1 u, i, i-"- ,-.


Tracing the 'Christian Brethren'





movement's roots in Bahamas


The "Plymouth Brethren"
or "Christian Brethren"
movement's roots in The
Bahamas can be traced
to a Charles Holder
(1875) and a William Slomans (1890).
These Christian men ministered in
New Providence and Eleuthera. Bro
Holder ministered at the Current,
Harbour Island and Spanish Wells set-
tlements. Bro Slomans ministered in
Palmetto Point, Savannah Sound and
Tarpum Bay. The earliest Gospel
Chapels in New Providence were
located at Dowdeswell Street. The
Open Brethren in the Bahamas began
as a result of a split or division with
the then 'mother' Brethren Assem-
bly in the Bahamas which was "Exclu-
sive". After the split Mr Slomans
established the first 'mother' Open
Brethren church, the Central Gospel
Chapel.
In the early 20th century, there were
only two full-time Bahamian work-
ers, Evangelists Cecil Simms and W.
H. Farrington, who ministered among
the saints of the New Providence and
Family Island Assemblies of
Brethren. In 1944, the United Mis-
sionary Effort (United Missions
Department) was formed to better
support financially full-time workers,
hold missionary meetings, and dis-
seminate reports to Assemblies
throughout the Bahamas. Brothers
Bernard Fell and Murdo McKenzie
were the non-Bahamian full-time
workers labouring among the city and
Family Island Assemblies during this
period.
The Association of Assemblies of
Brethren was incorporated in 1954 as
a legal entity so that difficulties could
be minimized in the administration of
the affairs of the Association and oth-
er fellowshipping assemblies. Over the
years the United Missions Depart-
ment (U.M.D.) has held united East-
er Conferences, crusades, united
Breaking of Bread services, rallies,
leadership retreats and Bible confer-
ences.
Over the past fifty years God gave
the Assemblies many gifted.full-time.
Bahamian workers ip the .persons of


Tom Roberts, David Cartwright, Lew-
ton Neilly (deceased), Hartley
Thompson, Rex Major, Hesketh John-
son, Allan Lee, Ed Allen, Marcel
Lightbourne, T. Michael Flowers, and
others who proclaim the Word nation-
ally and internationally. Bahamian
Brethren have also been responsible
for the establishment of many funda-
mental evangelical assemblies in black
communities in the USA, for example,
the Nottage brothers.
The Brethren Assemblies in the
Bahamas had no major split until 1977
when there was a break away group
from Grace Gospel Chapel forming
a new assembly Abundant Life Bible
Chapel. Many of the Brethren assem-
blies fall under the Association of the
Assemblies of Brethren in the
Bahamas which serves more of a legal
function only to hold properties.
Pastor William (Al) McCartney of
the East Street Gospel Chapel, has
served as the Association's president
for many years and one of the major
goals is the completion of the Christ-
ian Life Centre which will house an
auditorium and conference centre
large enough for crusades, youth activ-
ities, a Bible College and united func-
tions.
The Christian Life Centre will spon-
sor ministries to several population
segments in our nation. Presently,
there are six city and 19 Family Island
assemblies in the Association. Some
assemblies are associations unto them-
selves. The 1990s saw a couple
Brethren assemblies no longer call-
ing themselves Brethren assemblies
but Non-Denominational churches
with Brethren roots and influence.
These churches, with roots in the
Open Brethren tradition, have thrown
off their connection and have pursued
distinct identities, abandoning many of
the strictly non-scriptural practices,
becoming aligned more with other
evangelical, charismatic, or commu-
nity groups. There have also been
groups adopting Brethren principles,
often led by those who had earlier
come from a more traditional
Brethren background, yet which do
not come under the title


PART ONE

"Brethren". These include indepe
dent Bible or fundamentalist chur
es and organisations.
At some point the dividing li
between "Brethren Assembly" a
"Independent Bible Church" ge
blurred. Open Brethren Assembli
in the Bahamas might be deemed
being either traditionalist or progr
sive. Traditionalist refers to those w
have sought to maintain those asse
bly principles and practices that ha
long been widely accepted, wher















the progressives are those who ha
often looked beyond the Brethr
Movement for their inspiration a
have sought to accommodate oth
church traditions when deemed app:
priate, often dispensing with Brethi
traditions and Brethren-speak li
"assembly". |
Most will fall somewhere betwe
these two extremes. The strength
the traditionalists may be their fai
fulness and adherence to New Tes
ment principles when all around
compromised. Their weakness m
be their refusal to change and rec
nise what God is doing outside th
circle and an emphasis on doctri
over life. The strength of the progr
sives may be their willingness to ma
changes when necessary and acco
modate the good things found in o


er church traditions. Their weakness tutions. Throughout the years thc
may be their abandonment of the Assemblies have enjoyed a number
good things of the past and compro- of successful publications. The short
rising doctrinal soundness in order lived Good News magazine was intro-
en- to gain popularity. Overall, there is a duced in 1983 with Bro Barton Dun-
ch- great deal of diversity and breadth of canson as managing editor. Pastor
outlook amongst today's Brethren. David Cartwright of the Marsh lnar-
ne Dr Cedric Gibbs, ex-principal of bour Gospel Chapel, has for many
nd Emmaus Bible College in Sydney, years produced the Christian Witness
ets Australia, commenting on the ques- magazine.
ies tion: 'Why are some assemblies effec- The assemblies have enjoyed suc-
as tive in outreach and growing in num- cess in other areas of Church life. The
es- bers while others stagnate, said, successes of Brethren assemblies in
'ho "Three things seem to mark successful the Bahamas are too numerous to
m- assemblies in all parts of the world: a mention in a single article.
Ave high view of the authority of Scrip- Over the past forty years there has
eas ture (preferring this to cherished tra- been a general decline in Brethren
ditions), Godly and strong leadership church membership in the Bahamas.
(willing to make decisions that involve A few assemblies have closed or are
risk), and relevance to their local com- struggling, because of a small, aging
munities (even when that means membership, and the difficulty in
changing established ways so as to be maintaining an effective outreach.
able to reach our neighbours)." Reasons for decline include: a gen-
Brethren assemblies throughout the eral drift in society away from tradi-
Bahamas have historically been very tional Christianity, a lowering of the
successful in reaching the people with spiritual temperature within the
the gospel. Those, whose main assemblies, becoming side-tracked by
employment was secular, along with non-essentials, failing to address the
"full-time workers", planted assem- great changes taking place in society,
blies in areas of New Providence and members leaving to join existing
the Family Islands. denominational and new charismatic
The buildings used to hold meet- churches, dissatisfaction with the
ings were often called "Gospel Hall", ineptness of assembly life and a desire
where the main function was to do for something livelier and more cul-
With proclaiming the gospel. As the turally relevant.
ive years passed, many assemblies One aspect of the "success" in the
*en dropped this title in favour of some- past of the Brethren was due to the
nd thing like Chapel, Fellowship, Church, time and energy freely given by its
her Centre, Evangelical Church, or Corn- members in assembly service.
ro- munity Church, in an attempt to be The Open Brethren movement has
*en more in tune with modem sensibilities. spread to islands throughout the
ke Several Assemblies sponsor their Bahamas over the past 100 years, in
own radio programmes. Abundant no small part because of the sacrificial
en Life Bible Church sponsors a month- labours of Brethren missionaries, fol-
of ly television programme. Several lowed by the efforts of strong local
th- Assemblies spearhead international leaders. They have been successful in
ta- missions efforts. Of notable mention is leading many to Christ and establish-
I is Grace Community Church which has ing believers in the Word.
lay for many years sponsored a mission
og- trip to Haiti and other parts of the For more information about the
eir West Indies. The first Assemblies of Assemblies of Brethren in the
ne Brethren School in the Bahamas was Bahamas contact: U.M.D.
es- commissioned by Freeport Gospel Office/Association Office, Corner of
ike Chapel in 1978. Christie and Dowdeswell Streets, P.
m- Several other Assemblies have since 0. Box SS-6345. Phone: 325-2921,
th- established Christian education ihtisti -.a 325-8384 ,


presents


CONVOCATION
under the Theme:


"... The Lord Has Brought Us Out..."
Exodus 13:14


Hosts: Bishop Ross & First Lady Althea Davis
on 2nd to 6th November, 2005
Wednesday through Friday at 7:30pm and on
Saturday at 8:00 am to 10:30 am and at 3:30 pm
Carmichael Road & Antigua Street

Ckvocation kers:
Q/n ~~. ^ liHHa g i^'~m


Apostle Apostle Dennis Douglas Bishop Bishop
Rodney Roberts, Love Temple Deliverance Vernal Clarke, Calvary Larry Skinner,
Five Porches of Church of Jesus Christ, Deliverance Church, Bread of Life
Deliverence Centre, Houston Texas Nassau, Bahamas Christian Center.
Nassau, Bahamas Atlanta, Georgia


Power Praise and Worship
Convocation climaxes on Sunday with the
Annual Community march


I Mlr- I I-IDUI'Jr






PAGE 4C,THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3rd, 2005


(Your Baharnian Supermarkets'


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3rd, 2005, PAGE 5


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PAUL ;U. I HUHbUAY. NUVLMt3LIM J. zUUO


'BAHAMAS AWAKENING
2005 AND BEYOND'
THE event, sponsored by
the Bahamas Christian Coun-
cil, is scheduled to meet in a
national solemn assembly on
Friday, November 11. The
group will also host a mass ral-
ly on Saturday, November 12.


Both events will be held at
Clifford Park, beginning at
6pm. There will also be a T-
Shirt Day, and Men's March
on Sunday, November 6.
Registration for the Men's
March will be held at Rawson
Square from 11am to 3pm on
Friday, November 4 and Sat-
urday, November 5.


'The lottery makes





us all losers'


FROM page 1C


financial security.
The vast jackpots advertised by lotteries
attract a great deal of attention and entice
many persons to believe that their true
hope for financial security lies in taking a
chance on the lottery. In truth, this is non-
sense.
A 1999 study by the Consumer Federa-
tion of America and Primerica found that
many low and middle income workers
thought that the lottery was their best hope
of a retirement nest-egg. The odds of win-
ning anything of consequence from a lot-
tery is negligible. The odds of winning the
jackpot in this week's Powerball drawing is
one in 146,107,962. As your local gangster
would advise, fuhgedaboutit.
The Bible points to a very different
financial strategy, work and save. Ten dol-
lars played in the lottery each week adds
up to over $10,000 in twenty years. Saved
and invested, those same funds would pro-
vide a good start toward a college educa-
tion, a down-payment for a home, or a
retirement fund.
The Bible links labor and reward. The
worker is worthy of his reward, and the
wise man favors thrift over risk. The Chris-
tian worldview honors and dignifies work
and warns that separating work from
reward leads to danger. The lottery lies, not
only about a vain and empty hope of rich-
es, but about the necessity for hard work,
honest labor, and the satisfaction of know-
ing that a dollar has been earned, not won.

Second, the lottery preys upon the poor.
Wealthy persons are not fueling lottery


sales. Studies indicate that over 80 per cent
of all lottery tickets are bought by only 20
per cent of purchasers -- and these buyers
are, as described by an MSN report, dis-
proportionately "low-income, minority
men who have less than a college educa-
tion."
The real victims of the lotteries are fam-
ilies who go without necessities because
scarce monies are spent on lottery tickets.
You will not see the faces of sad and hun-
gry children when the lottery winnings are
announced,' of course. Instead, you will
see the ecstatic faces of the winner(s). The
millions of losers will go unnoticed.

Third, the lottery puts government in
the position of preying on citizens.
Governments are charged to protect cit-
izens, not prey upon them. The success of
a state lottery depends upon the state's
ability to convince a sufficient number of
its citizens to buy lottery tickets, even
against their own best interests.
The official Powerball Web site urges
caution: "Lottery games are just that -
games. Lottery games are designed to be
enjoyable entertainment for adults, and
for the vast majority of lottery players,
that's exactly what they are. Multi-State
Lottery members sell lottery tickets for
the benefits of their citizens, raising mil-
lions of. dollars for worthy causes and pro-
jects. The Multi-State Lottety Association
encourages all lottery players to be respon-
sible in their amount of play. Never spend
more than you can afford on any lottery
product. Please remember, it's just a
game." Right.
Are we really to believe that state lot-
teries are designed for the primary pur-
pose of providing entertainment for the


general population? This claim merely
adds insult to injury.

Fourth, the lottery leads citizens to prey
on fellow citizens.
The enormous jackpots awarded by lot-
teries are made possible only because mil-
lions of losers fund a very small group of
winners.
Some persons justify their purchase of
lottery tickets by claiming that they are
playing merely for entertainment, and that
they can easily afford a few lottery tickets
a week. After all, as some explain, it's real-
ly no more expensive than going to a
movie.
Well, that argument won't withstand
scrutiny. You may be able to'afford a few
dollars a week as "entertainment," but you
are buying into a system that only works by
enticing those who cannot afford tickets to
do so.
You can count on a banner headline
when the winner is announced, and a new
record jackpot is probably right around
the corner. Remember these considera-
tions when you see the happy winners. In
the end, the lottery makes us all losers.
R. Albert Mohler,.Jr. is president of
The Southern Baptist Theological Semi-
nary in Louisville, Kentucky. For more
articles and resources by Dr. Mohler, and
for information on The Albert Mohler
Programme, a daily national radio pro-
gram broadcast on the Salem Radio Net-
work, go to www.albertmohler.com. For
information on The Southern Baptist The-
ological Seminary, go to www.sbts.edu.
Send feedback to mail@albertmohler.com.

The article was published on cross-
walk.com during the week of October 16.


Church leaders to tour Grand Bahama


FROM page 1C


the midst of this disaster that
the ever protecting arms of the
all-merciful God are still
around us, and therefore we
are safe and secure.
"Residents in the affected
areas can be assured that as
was done last year, the
Bahamas Christian Council
and the entire church commu-
nity will respond to this tragedy
to the fullest extent that we are
able," said Council president
Dr William Thompson.
Dr Thompson, who returned
to the Bahamas last week, is


expected to conduct a tour of
Grand Bahama on Friday,
along with a delegation of
church leaders.
At this time of deep physical
and emotional suffering of our
brothers and sisters in the
north, the Bahamas Christian
Council said that it was calling
upon the entire nation, espe-
cially those of the household
of faith, to offer prayers on
behalf of all those affected and
indeed the entire Common-
wealth of the Bahamas.
The Council also announced


that as a result of the national
calamity, the celebration of a
National Day of Thanksgiving
has been postponed to a date
to be announced.
The Council further used the
opportunity of the release to
remind Bahamians that "God
is our refuge and strength, a
very present help in trouble,
therefore will not we feat,
though the earth be removed,
and though the mountains be
carried into the midst of the
sea". Psalm 46.


"CALLING MEN TO GODLY LIVING"
Bahamarrs Awakening IS
Official T-Shirt Day PRMISE
Friday, November 4th, 2005


Bahamas Awakening
Men's March
Svndoy, November 6th, 2005

Bahamas Awakening Rally
Friday & Saoturday,
November 11th &12th, 2005
Clifford Park 6pm


9 a b 1 3* Wd1 <

.o.
0


Church Notes


_ __ I I I


de


^H^II^^^^~i^^i^l^REL^^^^^~ IG^JIB^^^^^^B^^^^~^^BIONIH


--














'Let's always

S ri htu 1


* By ALLISON MILLER

I ALWAYS thought that
as long as I lived nothing
bad or traumatic would hap-
pen to me. I would just grow
up, graduate from high
school, go to college, get the
career I desired, get married
and have my family. Life
Would be a bed of roses with
peaches and cream on the
.side. However, life is teach-
ing me differently.
Some weeks ago my
actions were misinterpreted
and the reaction of the one
who interpreted them
caused me a great deal of
pain. I had never experi-
enced anything like that in
my life before. It was a blow
below the belt. It was not
what happened, but who did
it. I cried with a lot more
tears, prayed a bit longer,
and read extra scriptures,
just to relieve myself of the
pain.
As always, God minis-
tered to me and I was com-
forted. God looks after His
own and even rains on the
unjust. That's the God we
.serve!
What do you do when the
people whom you are sup-
posed to have the most con-
fidence in and who should
have your back at all times,
put a knife in it. I was so
amazed and in unbelief, you
would have thought that I
had seen a ghost.
That experience caused
me to ponder Jesus enter-
ing Jerusalem and hearing
shouts of, "Hosanna to the
son of David. Blessed is he
that cometh in the name of
the Lord. Hosanna in the
highest." And then those
same people a week later
shouting, "Let him be cruci-
fied. Let him be crucified."
Then, in the Garden of
Gethsemane, when Judas
Iscariot came and kissed


A MILLER

Him as a sign of betrayal,
Jesus handled it well by suf-
fering it all. He knew that
all of this would happen.
That was the reason His for
coming. To die for an
ungrateful people who
deserved to go to a Christ-
less Hell.
What do I do in this case?
I didn't know that any of this
would happen, that persons
I should have credit with
and who should be my
shield at all times, would fail
me. I'm encouraged by His
example to suffer it all.
Someone once asked me,
"What did Jesus do for the
man who challenged Him on
the cross?" He died for him
and all the people who said
'crucify him'.
What love, what forgive-
ness. That's the example I
must follow, to love and for-
give at all times no matter
what is done or said. Now,
that may be hard for some
of us, but it has to be done.
That is the only way you can
get over pain that someone
has caused you.
Besides, He wouldn't ask
us to do it if it wasn't in us to
do. We must love and when
you love you will forgive. By
this, the Bible says, men
may know we are His disci-
ples.
Let's always set righteous
examples.


examples'


I Ml


* By Fr HENRY CHARLES

(This is the third article in a series that
Fr Charles has been writing on the spiri-
tuality of work).

Perhaps the most important
recent contribution to the spir-
ituality (and theology) of work
has been an encyclical of the
late John Paul II, entitled
Laborem Exercens (On Human Work).
The encyclical in fact single-handedly
shifted .the traditional Catholic under-
standing of work from being basically pun-
ishment or only something humans have to
do, to an understanding in which humans
discover their dignity, and collaborate with
God as co-creators in the continuing enter-
prise of creation.
The first sentence of the encyclical intro-
duced a new perception of human life and
nature. "Through work man must earn
his daily bread and contribute to continu-
al advance of science and technology and,
above all, to elevating unceasingly the cul-
tural and moral level of the society within
which he lives in community with those
who belong to the same family."
You're as far here as you can get from
work as something we are condemned to.
It is work that distinguishes human beings
from the rest of creation. Animals don't
work. Only humans freely engage them-
selves in work, following the devices not of
their instincts, but of their mind. By their
daily work, they build up human life, and
reveal their very special dignity.
Where does John Paul II get the fun-
damentals for his vision of work? From
the Book of Genesis. God in Genesis is a
worker who fashions the world with his
own hands like a potter. He is not ashamed
to work with his hands.
He takes the slime of the earth and
forms a figure out of it, breathes into it, and
it becomes a living soul. He continues by
performing all the different "works" of
creation. His work, like any human work,
is said to be arduous, like the vine dresser
who digs the.soil, throws away the stones
and plants a vine.
The human being, created in God's
image, is put at the centre of the earth, to
work the earth, transform his habitation,
explore the universe, and put it to human
use.
The starting point and basic point of
continuing reference for any spirituality
of work is thus the doctrine of creation. It
is within creation as continuing or ongoing
that we must understand the spiritual (and
theological) meaning of work.
In its context, Genesis speaks of the agri-


on nature, not, however, like a two-sto-
ried building, but in the sense of grace as
deeply operative through nature.
Thus, grace does not descend extrinsi-
cally upon creation, but comes from the
very source of creation, deeper than cre-
ation itself, healing its woundedness, and
intensifying its co-creativity with the Cre-
ator.
Three important implications follow
from human participation in God's cre-
ative work. First, it means that creation is
development and process. It is not some-
thing over and done with. Creation is
always a work in process, something fun-
damentally unfinished.
Secondly, human consciousness is a part
of the process. The process, in other words,
is not blindly evolutionary. Thirdly,
because work shares in God's creative pur-
pose, it's all religious, whether we are con-
scious of the fact or not.
The meaning of work can be obscured
by disfiguring structures, and we must
therefore also distinguish between work
as either authentic or degrading.
Three ethical criteria have been pro-
posed for determining authenticity in
human work: the ecological, the human,
and the divine.
These criteria are all interrelated.
First, the ecological. Just as contempo-
rary work tends to treat workers as objects
to be exploited or managed, so too it treats
the earth as an object to be plundered.
The end result, as we know, is ecological
crisis. Work becomes degrading when it
treats the earth as something to be used
with no respect for its regenerative cycles
or its religious meaning.
Authentic work cooperates with nature
as with a partner in the creative process.
Authentic work learns from nature, does
not abuse nature, and treats nature as a
dimension of the sacred.
Nature also follows a rhythm of renew-
al which is cyclical. Modern work, on the
other hand, is structured along a linear
model of efficiency. The linear drive means
work without rhythm, without rest or play,
which makes life seem so much like a rat
race.
An important dimension of nature's
rhythm turns is the phenomenon of waste.
Work associated with waste tends to be
held in low esteem. Yet this is an authentic
task where a special dimension of God is
revealed, namely the dimension of the cir-
cle in which life appears to die, yet provides
the seeds of its renewal.
The apparent waste of life is a sacred
moment of life itself. Waste is the natural
'cross ofhtuniverse, leading to a natural
resurrection of life


* FR HENRY CHARLES


WOODLAWN GARDENS LIMITED


& PETRA BIBLE MINISTRIES



& Plebra tdthe mcmdrzcs c


JChm lie's d our departed' loved ones


Honour the memory of those laid to rest at Woodlawn Gardens and elsewhere.

Join us as we pray and give thanks for their lives.

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2005, PAGE 7C


THE TRIBUNE


"Work is anything
that can be
recognised as work.
It's agricultural,
clerical, scientific,
service-oriented,
and intellectual."
Fr Henry Charles


cultural worker, the gardener, and the
farmer. These are privileged forms of work
(verified in Israel up to this day).
But "work" in the thought of John Paul
II also means any human activity, whether
manual or intellectual, whatever its nature
or circumstances, that can be recognised as
work.
John Paul spends no time refining a
definition of work that meets all objec-
tions while taking in all positive factors an
impossible undertaking.
Work is anything that can be recog-
nised as work. It's agricultural, clerical,
scientific, service-oriented, and intellectu-
al. It includes homemaking in the family,
service offered to society at all levels, as
well as governmental and managerial skills.
For John Paul, it's all co-creation.
Catholic theology has always considered
that creation was not totally corrupted by
sin, but retained a foundational goodness.
In the language of principle, ths foun-
dational goodness 'means that grace builds







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