Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00242
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: October 31, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00242
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text







"COOKIES
FOR iI
CANCER" r'mloin't.

HIGH 82F
LOW 70F

SHOWERS
POSSIBLE


The


Tribune


DNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005


PRICE 500


issi


Twenty-seven-year-old

on medication has not

been seen since Tuesday


* By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
A BAHAMIAN mother is
making an emotional plea for the
return of her son, who has been
missing for almost a week.
Twenty-seven-old Parron Cur-
ry, the son of Ida and Peter Cur-,
ry, has not been seen since last
Tuesday.
According to Mrs Curry, her
son is on medication for depres-
sion. And, although he has left
home before, he has never been
gone for more than one night.
"I was spot-checking him all.-
night, but around 5am I noticed
he wasn't lying in the family room
where I left him," Mrs Curry said,
recounting the morning her son
disappeared.
"He's a very intelligent man,
but he's on medication for
depression, and that's it."
According to Mrs Curry, her
son has been on medication for
three years after dropping out of
the College of the Bahamas,
where he was majoring in bio-.
chemistry.
"He wanted to do medicine
and had one more semester to
go. This depression he has is
because he feels that he has not
fulfilled his life's goals.
"Sometimes, when he is off his
medication, he likes to go out to
South Ocean by the security
booth area. I don't know why,
but he is used to the security lady
and he goes out there and chats
with her and she talks with him,"
she said.
According to Mrs Curry, a year
before Parron's depression really
sunk in he was forced to lessen
his credit load at COB.
"I don't even want to think the
worst," Mrs Curry said. "He has
never done anything like this
before. He might go overnight
somewhere and show back the
next morning.
"My brothers, sisters and even
my father all went out from
Thursday to Saturday looking for


Athe fun of theMast
__________________ to death m


' PARDON CURRY


him. The security at South Ocean
said that the last time they saw
him was on Thursday around
5.30pm," she said.
Mrs Curry said it is not like her
son not to return home and
encouraged anyone who may
have seen him to phone
Carmichael Road police station
at 361-0478 with any information
they might have on his where-
abouts. ;
"He would have tried to make
his way home by now. So some-
one, anyone, who might have
seen him I'd ask them to please
call us. He's not the kind of per-
son to run away from home," she
said.
Mrs Curry, a mother of three
sons (Parron is her second child),
said that all she has now to hold
on to are prayers for the safe
return of her child.
"I'm trying to hold up. I don't
want to think the worst. Prayers
are the only thing that is helping
me."


BPSU president threatens to unseat Mitchell


a By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
BAHAMAS Public Services
Union president John Pinder
yesterday threatened to unseat
Foreign Affairs Minister Fred
Mitchell if he makes "one more
brazen remark" against him in
the House of Assembly.
Mr Pinder was hitting back
at comments Mr Mitchell made
in the House last Wednesday
with regard to the BPSU"
demonstration led by him.
"If Mr Mitchell makes one
more brazen remark against me
in parliament he would have
committed political suicide. I
will ensure that he loses his seat


in Fox Hill, whether that
involves me running against
him or campaigning against
him. I will make sure he loses
his seat," Mr Pinder said.
The minister yesterday
replied that Mr Pinder should
stand by for his response in the
House of Assembly on
Wednesday because, as he said,
"not only one woman born a
crazy child.",
"The public must be assured
that notwithstanding anything
Mr Pinder does, I am not going
to be drawn into some person-
al tit-for-tat with him.
"We both have a larger duty
to the public service and to the'
Bahamian public to ensure that


there is a stable public service.
The future of public servants
is not some horse of conve-
nience to be ridden for one's
personal ambitions," he said.
Mr Mitchell in parliament
last week responded to a
demonstration of about 300
BPSU members and support-
ers in front of the House of
Assembly.
The protesters claimed they
had been tricked and misled by
government in the new indus-
trial agreement proposal.
However, Mr Mitchell said
that discussions about the terms
and conditions of the agree-
SEE page 14


his home
* By PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
A HAITIAN has become the
45th homicide victim of the year
after being shot to death at his
home on Saturday night.
The identity of the 41-year-
old male resident of Faith
Avenue South has not yet been
released by police.
According to police press liai-
son officer, Inspector Walter
Evans, shortly after midnight
on Saturday the man was awok-
en by a knock on his door.
"Upon opening the door, he
was approached by two men
who spoke with him in Creole.
One of the men produced a
handgun and opened fire.
"The deceased was hit in the
left chest and lower back area.
He was pronounced dead at
3am at Princess Margaret Hos-
pital," Inspector Evans said.
Investigations are continuing.
Also, police are investigating
two armed robberies which they
believe may have been com-
mitted by the same man.
According to Inspector
Evans, a "tallish" man entered
the Audley Kemp Bar on East
SEE page 14

Activist calls for
relocation of
hundreds of
residents during
hurricane season

* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
TO PREVENT the econom-
ic and human loss which has hit
Grand Bahama during the past
hurricane seasons, government
should consider relocating hun-
dreds of Bahamians who live
on the island's coast and "in the
shadow" of the island's indus-
trial companies, lawyer and
human rights activist Fred
Smith told The Tribune yester-
day.
Mr Smith said it is time for
the country to look beyond
"band-aid" solutions to solving
persistent problems.
He said it had been forecast
that the region is in for a cycle
of catastrophic hurricanes over
the next decade and, as a con-
SEE page 14


N and Baha md a, d and I ing ews S


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION AGAIN


hBAHAMAS EDITION
BAHAMAS EDITION


HASSLE FREE MORTGAGES...
"For People Just Like You"
Sandra needs college
fees for the rest of
the school year...
"My Equity Loan
approval was Quick
,and Easy"
APPROVED \
CALL: 328-LOAN
www.approvedlendingservices.corm


Fe


g







SAGE MODAYOCTOBR 312005LOCAL NEWSbUN


* BRIAN MOREE, a senior partner in McKinney, Bancroft and Hughes, and committee chairman Franklyn Wilson,


The Action



Bahamas



Committee



to assist



victims of



hurricane


Consortium of local

leaders jqins forces


By PAUL G giving to NEMA to contin-
TURNQUEST ue, and where possible to
Tribune Staff Reporter increase their donations on
an ongoing basis.
A CONSORTIUM of Bishop Ellis, one of the
local leaders from the pri- initial organisers of the com-
vate, financial and religious mittee, petitioned residents
sectors have joined forces to in Grand Bahama to not lose
assist victims of Hurricane faith following a second con-
Wilma in Grand Bahama. secutive year of hurricane
The "Action Bahamas damage.
Committee", comprised of "I want to say to all of our
such prominent local figures brothers and sisters in Grand
as Franklyn Wilson, Bishop Bahama that it is at these
Neil Ellis, Wendell Jones, Al times, when there is loss of
Jarrett, Veronica Duncan- personal possessions, that it
son, Algernon Allen and is very, very difficult to keep
Brian Moree, will engage in hope in focus.
a number of fund-raising ini- "But I want to assure them
tiatives over the next month. that all is not lost. This ini-
According to the commit- tiative is an indication of
tee's chairman, Franklyn that. We want to assure
Wilson, they are helping vic- them that there is still hope
tims of Hurricane Wilma and that we are bringing
S-ndah ingjt, "4eepen, .hemr ejief,'" he said.,
and strengthen" a national Algernon Allen, a former
culture of giving among'cabinet minister under the
Bahamians. FNM administration, and
Therefore the committee, also a member of the corn-
in an, effort to facilitate mittee, encouraged Bahami-
direct and immediate dona- ans. from every walk of life
tions from the wider corn- to give of themselves to
munity, will establish bank assist and lift "our brothers
accounts at all major clear- and sisters in their time of
ing banks throughout the need".
country. "We have to make sure
"We are hoping that tp that we drive home in ever
initiative, will encourage this sector that we take it all seri-
sense of giving," Mr Wilson, ously. We are one. Whether
added. it is in Bimini or Abaco or
Pinders Point, we too should
Telethon feel their pangs of hunger.
We should feel as a nation
so, a nationaltele the pain of our brothers and
Als, a nationaltelethon sisters. We must be our
will be held on November 4 brothers and sisters keepers,
at 8pm on ZNS and Bahami- and lift them in their time of
ans and residents, both living need," he said.
i 11M fUl 1Ul 01 LMiA LhpUUli


CHEVROLET


FOR ALL LIFE'S ROADS


in anllU UtsiUce Uol te coun-
try, are asked to give gener-
ously to this event.
Churches, schools, civic
organisations, fraternities
and sororities, the interna-
tional communities, and
public and private compa-
nies are all being encouraged
to get their members and
employees involved in this
initiative.
Echoirig this sentiment,
Brian Moree, a senior part-
ner in McKinney, Bancroft
and Hughes, appealed to
persons in the financial ser-
vices sector to givegener-
ously of themselves! to the
initiative. f
"I am very pleased to join
this group and as Mr Wilson
said it is all the more impor-
tant now to help our oan
brothers and sisters. Speak-
ing from the business com-
munity I think we need to
understand that the
Bahamas has been very ben-
eficial to all of us and now
we are called upon to give
something back to this com-
munity that has given so
much to all of us," he said.
Additionally, the commit-
tee is calling on all major
donors who have a record of


Share,
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

TROICA]'L!


Try one of our unique formulas today:
* Kitten Formula:
* Original Formula
* Indoor Formula
* Seafood Medley
* Hairball Control Formula


I


PAGE 2, MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005


,, I. i ritaUNE








THE TIBUN MONDY, OTOBER31,C005,NAGES


- .
MINISTER of Works and
Utilities Bradley Roberts

Bid to find

engineering

solution for

Perpall Tract

By RUPERT MISSICK JR
Chief Reporter
BAHAMIANS living in the
continuously flooded Perpall
Tract area are set to receive
relief as government employs
modem techniques to battle the
problem.
Speaking at the contract sign-
ing ceremony for the rehabili-
tation of the Chippingham
storm water drain system, Min-
ister of Works and Utilities
Bradley Roberts announced
that the technical staff at this
ministry "at the strong and pre-
sistent -behest of the Attorney
General, Minister of Education
and Member of Parliament for
the area Alfred Sears" were giv-
en directives to find the best
engineering solution to this
"long-standing and vexing prob-
lem."
"Hence today marks a red let-
ter day in the lives of those res-
idents, some of whom have had
to endure the pain and suffering
and flooding and the attendant
problems associated with the
same, adversely impacted their
pockets," said Mr Roberts.
Mr Roberts said that for as
long as he can recall, residents of
Perpall Tract and the surround-
ing areas have suffered from
flooding after heavy rains or
hurricanes.
Attempts in the past to bring
relief to the community for the
most part have been unsuccess-
ful, he said.
In an effort to finally find a
successful remedy, the minister
explained, several meetings'
were held with residents and
their recommendations were
considered.
He said that government was
aware that the area was prone to
flooding so the Ministry of
Works undertook a "master
drainage study" of the Chip-
pingham Drain and associated
areas, utilising a state-of-the-art
computer model and topo-
graphic information from the
government's geographic infor-
mation systems database.
After carrying out a highly
detailed analysis of the drain
and surrounding properties it
was concluded that the flood-
ing troubles were the result of
five major conditions, namely:
Inadequately sized channels
and culverts
High ground water condi-
tions
Poor maintenance which led
to blockages from trash deposits
High tidal tailwater condi-
tions and
Sand deposition at the out-
fall.
To adequately and compre-
hensively address these flood-
ing conditions, it had been pro-
posed to divide the renovation
work into two phases with phase
one encompassing all of the
improvements that can be
accomplished to the present
drainage system within existing
right-of-way and on government
property.


BUT postpones



negotiations to



concentrate on



hurricane recovery


C Khief Reportr Union thanks the


IN CONSIDERATION of
the country's need to recover
after Hurricane Wilma, the
Bahamas Union of Teachers
(BUT) has postponed all nego-
tiations concerning their new
industrial agreement until next
year.
Union executives yesterday
announced that the BUT will
concentrate its efforts on assist-
ing those who were affected by
the hurricane, particulary the
25 union members who lost
their homes due to the devas-
tating storm.
Negotiations on the bargain-
ing agreement, which was'
scheduled to be presented to
government this Friday, will
resume in January, 2006, the
BUT said yesterday in a press
statement.
"In light of the devastation of
Hurricane Wilma to the islands
of Bimini, the Berry Islands,
Abaco, Grand Cay, and espe-
cially Grand Bahama, we have
decided to postpone all negoti-
ations until next year,. January,.
2006.
"In the interim the BUT will
focus its attention on assistance
and recovery efforts from a col-
lective perspective through the
National Congress of Trade
Unions and more specifically
to our union members," the
statement said.,


Visited


Ministry of Education


to buy items needed by mem-
bers.
The BUT thanked the Min-
istry of Education in Grand
Bahama for its quick reponse in
providing temporary shelters
for displaced teachers and com-
mended those union members
who volunteered at the NEMA
command centres and shelters
on the islands.
The union also offered "spe-
cial thanks and heartfelt grati-
tude" to teachers at Martin
Town Primary School, who
have agreed to work in less than
ideal conditions, "which will


allow for the uninterrupted edu-
cation of the children."
The BUT announced that it
has also offered the National
Emergency Management
Agency (NEMA) the services
of those members with
appropriate skills to assist with
the construction and
repairs of homes in Grand
Bahama.
Additionally, the BUT
extended its sympathy to union
member Lillimae Brown, the,
grandmother of 15-month- old
Mateo Pintard, who lost his life
during Wilma.


For those who


Answered the call


with Bravery and


Sacrifice


Their motto and creed is
"Courage, Integrity, Loyalty"
and each time new cadets first
utter those:words deep pride
resonates in their voices. They
are the'officers of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force, sworn
to serve and protect our
communities, our children -
each of us.

We have all heard and even
agree with the expression
"freedom is notfree." Yet, on
a day to day basis we seem
to be only vaguely mindful of
the real meaning of those
words and of the great
sacrifices our protectors make
for us in carrying out their
charge each day. In this day
of increasing violent crime the
sacrifices made by officers of
the RBPF are extraordinary.
Commilmentto fulfilling one's
duty can result in permanent
disability or, tragically, even
death.

In 1993 the Royal Bahamas
Police Force Dependants'
Trust was formed to give
something back to the families
of officers who had made
these ultimate sacrifices. The
charitable Trust has two main
objectives: to assist the


dependants of Officers who
lost their lives while on duty and
to provide support and
assistance to Officers who
have become incapacitated as
a result of injuries sustained
while on duty.

Managed by a first-class Board
of Trustees, the Dependants'
Trust's primarily program is to
provide financial assistance for
the continued education of
children of police officers killed
oi injured in the line of duty. At
present twenty-six young
Bahamians are receiving
support;.twenty-two recipients
are in primary or secondary
school and four are at the
tertiary level of education. This
very substantial long-term
commitment depends on the
continued support of all of us.

The Holowesko Foundation is
pleased to support this noble
cause with a donation of
$2;500..Please consider making
a cash donation as well and
adding the Royal Bahamas
Police Force Dependent's
Trust to your list of worthy
charities. Contributions can be
set to the RBPF Dependent's
Trust Secretary at P.O. Box
N458, Nassau, Bahamas.


THE HOLOWESKO FOUNDATION was established to support and
Spring attention s bng c n our
MSclety Reque altrbadorwutmg to
P.O Box N 942Nassa Bahamas.
'. '*''" -", '


VETERINARY HOUSE CALL SERVICE
by
Appointment
Dr. Dwight A. Dorsett
Veterinarian





Dogs Cats Small Pets





Call Dr. D...


24hrs, days Emergency Service


Telecommunications/Computer Network Design
Installation & Maintenance
Homes Offices Subdivisions
Call Us Today!
Tel: 393-7733


MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 4,_ MNA OTB 31,2005 TH ,I>N


EIOI *fLETT STO HEDI R


ABACONIANS struggling to get back on
their feet after their recent 'bushwith Hurri-
cane Wilma were dealt an unfair blow Thurs-
day night when their. electricity failed and'
there were no technicians to do repairs.
Residents were told that BEC technicians
S..had stopped work because of an internal 4lisr
pute in the corporation ii' Nassau.
Electricity was only recently restored in
Abaco after Hurricane Wilma disrupted ser-
vice. Fishermen now stand to lose their lobster
catch as storage freezers shut down, and
tourists' vacations are being ruined at a time
when the industry is trying to make a come-
back after the storm.-
We were told this weekend that Jamaica's
tourist industry has already started to benefit
from the destruction of Cancun, the popular
Mexican resort, which was wiped out by Hur-
ricane Wilma. HoWever, the Bahamas will not
benefit if government allows BEC employees'
to continue to play fast and loose with this
country's economy.
Abaco residents were told'hat there was no
one to restore their electrical power this week-
end because: of a vacation disputein Nassau.
This dispute arose some weeks ago when a
supervisor in one of BEC's departments
refused to grant vacation leave to an employ-
ee. Apparently, the employee later collapsed-"
workers incorrectly claimed that he had had a
heart attack. They demanded that the super-
visor be disciplined. Eventuallyishe was sent
home for a few days. 'When she-returned, the
manager assigned her to her old job. Again
there was protest. Apparently, the matter was
again settled. However, the workers have now
decided that she should: not.be allowed to
enter BEC'sbuilding..It wQuld-seem-that the
workers have effectively fired her.
Again union executives, headed by Dennis
Williams, returned fo the Ministry of Labour
on Thursday to settle the latest disruption
over the supervisor. Hdweverw'as BEC'gener
al manager Kevin Basden was'out of town,.
the union agreed to wait' until noon today for
an answer. In the meantime, the union was
to take no action. .
That night electricity started to fail in Aba-
co. On Friday morning Works:Minister
Bradley Roberts looked for staff to send to:
Abaco only to be told that they had called in
sick. Therefore, no one was available for Aba-
co.'
Is it possible that union leaders called a
sick-out after- agreeing to wait until noon
on Monday for an anAwer.to, their problem?7
Or had union ,itiimbers taken matters into
their own hands and walked out? In either


event they should be severely disciplined.
Are the unions obviouslydeyoid ofall-
- civic conscience-- laughing at the public?
How can anyone negotiate with union leaders
who obviously do not have the support of
their members to enter agreements on their '
behalf?
The matter causing the rumpus.at BEC is. a
matter for internal resolution it is of no
concern to the public. And certainly the pub-
lic should not be made to suffer for a depart-
mental problem that managers are quite capa-
ble of settling.
It is unacceptable that the residents of Aba-
co should go without electricity because union-
ists have decided to take matters, which were
still being negotiated, into their own hands.
The Trade Union Bill that was shelved
because of the protest of the PLP when in
opposition is long overdue. If it were in place
today, none of this. nonsense could take place'
without very serious consequences for union
leaders and their members.
However there is still another problem.
BEC, which is under contract until 2007, is
trying to reopen that contract to get an
increase in pensions and merit pay. Ufionists
are using the excuse that they are owed over-
time pay pay the own union leaders forgot
to include in their contract (2003-2007) at the
time of signing. Apparently, it has recently
dawned on them that something is missing.
And so they are trying to renegotiate a con-
tract that has already;been signed. .
In preliminary negotiations BEC chairman
Keith Major agreed certain rates subject to
the approval of Minister Bradley Roberts.
However, Mr Roberts quite rightly rejected
them when they were put on his desk. They
were too high, he said.
The union met with Mr Roberts about two
weeks ago.. It was agreed at that meeting that
Mr Roberts would be given time to seek legal
advice on one of the issues under negotiation_
.-Itwas also-agreed thatWh-6f he received that
advice, the meeting would be reconvened.
In the meantime there was to be no indus-
trial unrest.
When former prime minister Hubert Ingra-
ham conceded in 2000 that the Trade Union
Bill had some provisions that would be "fright-
ening" for trade union leaders, the unionists
accused him of "union busting".
However, the behaviour of these already
overpaid unionists demonstrates that legisla-
tion is needed- not to union bust but to
inject some semblance of responsibility into a
group of workers who are trying to hold the
community to ransom.


Time to put




Ingraham


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily-Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398


Abaco can't get BEC repairmen


context


EDITOR, The Tribune around for a scapegoat. Rather
than blame those who were
Erroneous reports about the charge of the election cam-iim
FNM leadership carried in the paign, it has suited the purpoS-
press over the last several es of Ingraham's detractors to
weeks have prompted this let- blame him. The fact that PLPs
ter to the Editor. at "all hours". Usually the chose to blame Ingraham
It is said by some that Prime Minister answered the ought to be a message in itself.
Hubert Ingraham is planning telephone himself, as all who Hubert Ingraham was not
his comeback; that he has cal- called him at any hour would the leader; he had stepped
culated his return for months, if know. His total commitment aside as party leader. He was
not years; that the FNM could to all of us as Bahamians was not in charge of the.campaign,
have won the election without demonstrated in this, and- so He was asked to take a back
him in 1992, because the peo- many other ways. seat, and he did. Towards the'
pie were finally fed up with the Our former Prime Minister end, when things did not seem
PLP; that he protected and was not without human faults. to be going so well, Ingrahaii
promoted PLP buddies on his He had a temper, a rough exte- was asked to take a more
watch; that he didn't look after hor at times, was impatient actie toll; and he-obtged
FNMs; that he took over Min- with what he deemed to be going to the most far flung con-
istries "over the heads" of his *foolishness, and intolerant of stituencies to try and rally t hi
Ministers; and much more. those who did not find the people. It was too late fqg
These people do not know need to be accountable or com- many candidates, but Ingra
the Rt Hon. Hubert Alexan- mitted. ham's constituents returned
. der Ingraham. He was also willing to him with a resounding victory.
There could be few, if any, Adkik6Wledge when he' was Now, after years of citicisM
men of our time more selfless wrong, quick to recover from flung at him from 1997 to this
of his own interests, or more anger or impatience, and day, that he was a man who
devoted to the people of our reflective of all that was said was power-hungry, an arrog ar
country. Most Bahamians are to him in the course of a day. man, a man whose sense of
aware that the Bahamas was He so often took steps to carry timing was appalling, Hubeit
blessed to have had Hubert out good advice that he had Ingraham has stepped a*i'
Ingraham lead the country for received, perhaps dismissed in from the spotlight. He h'6i
close to 10 years. Many also heat, then reconsidered, and enjoyed the warm circle of his
know that history will record found, to be wise counsel. family's love arid affection, li
what some do not want to see As for the claim that the has rebuilt his law practice,
that Hqbert Ingraham was the FNM would have won w.ih or and -he has been at relatiVe
most remarkable, honourable without Hubert Ingraham in peace. .
and dedicated leader this coun- 1992 Monday morning quar- Those who believe Mr.
try has known. His leadership terbacks are what they are, and Ingraham is plotting his comb-
bore the stamp of integrity and no more. It is clear however back do not know the man ar,
decency, qualities that were that in all of the years the FNM are not interested in the t'ith'
acknowledged at home and far was in opposition, no leader He does not want to come;
beyond our shores. caught the imagination and 'back; he, has no. need for'tha'
The standards he Set for ignited the "FIRE" in our peo- spotlight; he is enjoying being a
himself and all those who ple as did Hubert Ingraham. private citizen and practising
became part, however small, That charisma, coupled with his profession. No individual
of his administration, were his energetic leadership and could persuade him to leave it
lofty, and resulted in the peo- manifest honesty, is what won all. Only one thing;- a re(ent-'
ple always expecting the best of the election in 1992. less sense, of duty, fuelled by
him, and demanding ever Part of the "fire" that ignit- his love for the Bahamianppe-
more. ed us were the promises to the pie, might intrude once again
The sun never set on his con- Bahamian people that under on his private life, and lead him
cern for the well-being of our Ingraham's leadership of the to make the sacrifice that many
people and our country, and if FNM, no man or woman believe would reverse the
he Was travelling or we were would be discriminated against downward spiral our society
travelling, one could expect a because of his or her political has embarked on.
phone call at midnight, at 3 am beliefs.- that every man or The question ofleaders-ip
or at 6 am. He was never "off woman who had an ability to of the FNM will be decided at
duty, an.d.those who- served serve this Bahamas, would be- its-.onvenfion.sitshoulde,
'ihhim were not expected to eligible to serve. How loudly because Hubert I igraham
be off duty either. He drove and convincingly we cheered ..insisted it be so. The.FNM has
himself relentlessly to fulfil his for such "rights", so long bright young leaders, and when
mission, to carry out his par- denied the Bahamian people! their time comes they will be
ty's manifesto, to serve the Ingraham's commitment to brought forward.
Bahamian people. Where some a level playing field and fair Today, however, many
may not have been up to those play received near-hysterical FNMs believe that to address
standards, he stepped in to fill affirmation at FNM rallies the ills of our society we
their shoes. from thousands, some of whom require a seasoned leader, and
Little things also speak vol- later charged that he "looked for them Hubert Ingrahair-is.
umes about the man. It is inter- after PLPs", and didn't "take the man for this season of trou-:
esting that the Inigrahams' care of" FNMs with all the bled times. .
home telephone .listing innuendo such charges carry.
remained the same while he Following the humiliating "NIGHT HERON"
was Prime Minister. As a defeat of the FNM in 2002, Nassau
result, his telephone would ring .FNMs and PLPs alike looked October 2005


LIMITED
#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET 322-3775 325-3079
vi ow ,howronom d QuOlly Auto SadM (Frmpo) Ud or imol dea Queen's Ighway 3524122


:GREAT WESTERN

CONVENIENC STORE
. ..... .... .. ..1. / .j\.,.... .... .....,


1. 12 pc Rou


October 24th November 7th

iter Bit Set $29.95


2. 24V. Cordless Hammer Drill $98.95

3. 350 Watt Power-Inverter $72.95

4. 7 1/4" Carbide Tip Saw Blades $ 8.95

5. 3 pc Wood.Chisel Set' $9.95

6. Complete Toilet Set $107.C
(Tank,, Bowl & Seat)


AND
MUCH


MORE!!!




OPEN 7 DAYS

TEL: (242) 323-4375
St. Alban's Drive (East)


in


DON STAINTON

PROTECTION

WE SELL OUTER SPACE
TELEPHONE: 322-8219 322-8160


ALL ALUMINUM PATIO ROOF OR
SCREENED ROOM


WE DO IT WHEN WE SAY WE WILL!


-w
~1


ALL ALUMINUM CAR PORT
Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1978


5 :

.. . .


)0
f
-' #


". ". .." "... . ..... i....


I~ l r l


r-


I


PAGE 4, MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005


m I


I


I


Li









TH RBUEMNAY COER3,05,PGb


ore must I



tourist indi


The Ministry of Tourism
and Royal Bahamas
Police Force are to be com-
mended for their joint initiative
in the policing of tourist areas of.
New Providence and Paradise
Island.
The announcement that a
new unit is to be created specif-
ically to deal with crimes against
t6irists could not come at a
nY6re critical time, as the level
of'%rime in general (including
ifiTesort areas) seems to be
giving through one of its cus-
t6biary spikes.
Obviously someone in the


PERSPE

AND R E W

the years, now is indeed the
time to make a wise investment
in the prevention of crimes
against tourists in particular.
The Cable Beach area has
long been plagued by criminals
who purposefully target New
Providence's single biggest con-
centration of resorts in order to
sell illegal drugs to tourists.


If we are to avoid the kind of
reputation that has cost other
countries (like Jamaica) so
"iuch in lost earnings over the
p.ears, now is indeed the time
,t, make a wise investment in
the prevention of crimes
against tourists in particular.


To ::. !
.lpistry has come to realise On any given night, a local
tt we stand to lose whatever who happens to be dressed like
antage is to be derived a 'tourist' and walking the
nm the billions invested to length of the main strip is bound
-te in our tourism plant if we to be approached by shady
eyIr get to the point that visi- characters who drive up and
trs do not feel safe in the down the resort area asking
ahaminas. tourists what they are looking
4hatpoint came a little clos- for.
er last summer when British It would be very easy for the
iefevisisi gave 'huge coverage police to simply station under-
lhe'death of a British toddler cover officers in the area for the
yie ears agoat 'the hands of purpose of arresting a few of
iia hP iiani party boat opera- the perpetrators. While there is
&6. It also comes closer with no chance of arresting all of
16- robbery of a tourist in our them, the effect of just a few
ialill sort areas. arrests on the atmosphere of
impunity that'now prevails
would be enormous.
4 *we are- to avoid the kind
*f6reputation-thathas cost '. :,' ;i ,: i
e f '%Hitritfs '(like Jamt ica) a7 able eic -'ha halso
iuixcithhin4ost earnings over C f_-'recently experienced a


be done to protect



ustry from crime

many factors help to explain the now literally harassed off the
trend (among them, the matur- streets, while open but "victim-
C T IV E S ing of the notorious "baby less" activities like sexual solic-
V boomer" generation), much of itation' by prostitutes were no
MM ^ the credit belongs with the New longer tolerated.
York Police Department. Police authorities even went
L L N In that decade, the depart- so far as to remove graffiti from
ment instituted a proactive walls (and prosecute the artists)
hike in the level of robberies policing initiative that concen- in the belief that the atmos-
being perpetrated against both
locals and tourists. This trend
is, in fact, nothing new.
Four years ago, in one of
the most public and brightly- Unlicensed jet ski and boat
lit parts of Cable Beach, this
columnist was approached by operators nly their trade in
two tourists who had just been trade
robbed by the occupants of a o en view of authorities
car that had been cruising
alongside them for some time. hawkers (many of them
The police were slow in arriv-
ing and, given the generic non-Bahamian) harass tourists
nature of the description pro-
vided, stood no reasonable with dodgy Wares right in
chance of apprehending the
culprits. front of other locals.

n combatting crimes of
this kind, what is most
important is not just appre- trated not only on the detection phere of general neglect and
hending offenders and placing of crime, but on the whole 'licence' was a large part of the
them before the courts, but atmosphere of neglect and' crime problem for which the
changing the whole atmosphere impunity that sustained an city had become famous. They
in which criminal behaviour is unacceptably large criminal cul- were proved right.
tolerated, ture.
In the 1990s, the city of New People who just 'bent' the T
York experienced a sustained law (by, for instance, engaging t is clear from the
decrease in most of the major in staged street-side card games 1Bahamian police's own
study that what was wrong with
New York up until the mid
1990s is wrong with resort areas
of the Bahamas today. Unli-
In com batting crim es of this censed jet ski and boat opera,
Stores ply their trade in open view
kind, what is most important ofauthorities, hawkers (many
of them non-Bahamian) harass
is ot just apprehend tourists with dodgy wares right
offenders and placing them in front of other locals.
ffenders and placing them While few of these activities
before the courts, but chang- would be worth prosecuting
through an already overloaded
ing the whole atm osphere in criminal justice system, they all
contribute to an atmosphere of
which crim inal behaviour is 'looseness' that attracts the
criminal element and even pro-
tolerated. vides a cover for it.
Now that the new police unit
is a reality, it remains to be seen.
S .. ;,,. ust how effectively it combats
.... -/ *""' .,.;o:;i',i:, -q .7" o s,/, tl hQAolAtmom lg p xrii .. .... s
categories of crime, particularly in which they cheated:gullible's aiesssanddetty c itinali4y!-fthria d .
those against the person. While members ofithe public) were l exists-in oour resort areas.,


pa
4 nrcd



*


* *
-





"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"




..-
C -
*
*b -dam
















Share
your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
ard: ........







friparovemntsi t


Government expects to reach


agreement with union soon


'ABy RUPERT MISSICK Jr
'a ,Chief Reporter
rtuTHE Bahamas Public Ser-
;vices Union and government's
-negotiation team may reach an
agreement by the end of
November, Frank Carter, gov-
ernment's industrial relations
consultant, told The Tribune
yesterday.
The team and the BPSU have
meetings scheduled for.tomor-
row and Thursday of this week.
Mr Carter said that the dis-.
cussions, which began again last
iursday, have been civil despite
W& BPSU and the Bahamas
Electrical Workers Union
(BEWU) demonstration in front
of parliament last Wednesday
and the heated words exchanged
between the two sides.



MONDAY,
OCTOBER 31
6:30 Bahamas @ Sunrise Live
11:00 Immediate Response
12noon ZNS News Update Live
12:03 Caribbean Today News
Update .
12:05 Immediate Response
1:00 Health For The Nation
1:30 Spiritual Impact: Melba Moore
2:00 Milestones: Black Inventors
2:30 Inside Hollywood
3:00 Caribbean News In Review
3:30 Bishop Neil Ellis
4:00 Video Gospel
4:30 Gospel Grooves
4:58 ZNS News Update
5:00 Caribbean Newsline
5:30 411
6:00 One Cubed
6:25 Life Line
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
8:00 Yd 8fbour Money
8:30 Island Life Destinations
'9:00 Legends Whence We Came
10:00. Sprts Lifestyles: Black Ice
10:30 "News Night 13
11;00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
12:30 Comm. Page 1540AM
NOE:ZS-V -3reere
th rgt. o ae.as int
program hanes


Addressing the proposal by
the BPSU and the draft- indus-
trial agreement completed by
government last week, Mr
Carter said: .'"We have an agree-
ment on a number of items. We
plan to go through both docu-
ments and defer the items that
are not in agreement and come
back to them and continue on in
that way until we have gone
through both sets of proposals.'"
Hundreds of union members
descended on Rawson Square
last Wednesday for the second
time this month as tensions
between the public service and
government again reached boil-
ing point.
Close to 300 members and
supporters of the BPSU gath-.
ered in front of parliament in
protest at government's latest


proposal for pay increases with-
in the new industrial agreement.
Union members said that the
protest was the only avenue left
to them to voice their discon-
tent as government had "tricked
and misled" them.
However, members of the
government's negotiation team
pointed out that discussions
about the conditions of the new
agreement have not even begun
yet.
BPSU president John Pinder
said that on the surface the
industrial agreement appears to
meet the payment of $1,800
which the union had requested,
but a closer look showed that
government intended to pay out
the sum over a five-year period.
"We asked for $1,800 across
the board for first year, some


benefits in the second year, and
$2,f00 in the third year. Their
offer is $600 in the first year of
the contract, $600 the second
year of the contract, nothing in
the third year and $600 in the
fourth year and nothing in the
fifth year. It's a five-year pro-
posal and in our proposal we'
asked them for a three-year
proposal," he said.
Since then, however, both
sides have not had theta oppor-
tunity to discuss the pay
increase issue which sparked
last week's demonstration.
"We hope to be able to have
discussions around the table but
we have not discussed that
aspect of the proposals. We are
going through the pages and
that will be discussed later," said
Mr Carter.


I U





The Affordable Solution

to Worn-Out Bathtubs
Bathtub Liners are designed to fit over worn-out bathtubs
*Wall Surrounds to cover existing bath walls: In simulated Tile and Marble
Shower Base Liners to go over existing Shower bases
'* Cultured Marble Vanity Tops and Sinks
Great Shower Door selection
Quality Faucets, All-Wood Vanities




RE BATH BAHAMAS
"Bahamas Only One-day Bath Remodeler"


Telephone g?:
(242) 393-8501 "Authorized Dealer"
Visit our Showroom & Office located at the Red Carpet Inn, East Bay Street


1ED BATH & HOME


GIFT & BRIDAL REGISTRY
-- Harbour Bay Shopping Centre *
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448


a


MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


...............................................................................














Why CARICOM misses another




CSME deadline at its peril


* By Sir Ronald Sanders
(The writer is a former
Caribbean diplomat, now busi-
ness executive, who publishes
widely on Small States in the
global community).

THE end of 2005 is now
a few short weeks away
and so is yet another of the
deadlines that CARICOM
Heads of Government had set
for the establishment of the
Caribbean Single Market.
It is a deadline that the
CARICOM region cannot
afford to miss yet again. Should
it do so, harm of such magni-


In the last few weeks, as the
lead head of government on the
CSME, the Prime Minister of
Barbados, Mr Owen Arthur,
has visited Antigua and Barbu-
da and St Vincent and the
Grenadines to meet govern-
ments, parliamentary opposi-
tion groups and the private sec-
tor to address concerns that
seem to persist over the
Caribbean Single Market and
Economy (CSME). He is also
scheduled to lead a team to
Dominica and Guyana.
Mr Arthur is to be congratu-
lated for his single mindedness in
continuing to take the message
of the CSME into doubting and
fearful communities. From the


Along the path of regional
integration many objectives
hopes have been established,
only to be abandoned not least
because vested interest groups
within the region worked hard
to scuttle them in their own
interests


tude will be done to its credi-
bility with the international
community that it is difficult to
see how it will garner their
attention in the future.


very outset of the concept in
1989, the political directorate of
CARICOM should have been
driving the education and infor-
mation process on this vital issue.


r.. I


WORLD VIEW


In the meetings he has held
within the region so far, Prime
Minister Arthur has encoun-
tered many of doubts, fears and,
in some cases, open antagonism
to the CSME.
Yet, it was 16 years ago that
CARICOM Heads of Govern-
ment first declared that they
were "determined to work
towards the establishment, in,
the shortest possible time, of a
single market and economy for
the Caribbean community".
That declaration, entitled
"The Grand Anse Declaration
and Work Programme for the
advancement of the integration
movement", was issued at the
Tenth meeting of CARICOM
Heads in Grenada in July 1989.
It may be that many did not
take it seriously, expecting it to
fall away as another one of the
objectives set by regional lead-
ers that would amount to noth-
ing.

T here is certainly justi-
fication for such a feel-
ing. For, along the path of
regional integration many
objectives hopes have been
established, only to be aban-
doned not least because vested
interest groups within the
region worked hard to scuttle
them in their own interests.
Some of the work of "scut-
tling" continues now primarily
by some business interests who
either depend upon government
protection to survive or who
fear competition from other
Caribbean companies once a
single market is established.
Yet, such competition, will;
reduce prices to consumers andi
'demand higher standards ol'f
performance and greater effi-'
ciency in production and ser-
vice.
It is true, of course, that the
objective of the CSME was giv-
en greater impetus in recent
years because of the trade rules
being set in the World Trade
Organisation (WTO), the
necessity to negotiate an Eco-
nomic Partnership Agreement
(EPA) with the European
Union (EU) countries, and the
urgings that CARICOM coun-
tries become part of a Free
Trade Area of the Americas
(FTAA).
13ut, notwithstanding
these external pres-
sures, the CSME was always the
next step in the Caribbean inte-
gration process for the benefit
of Caribbean people.
The Europeans whose
nations are much larger and far
wealthier than those of the
Caribbean long since recog-
nised that their own growth,
development and prosperity,
together with their capacity to
compete with the large market
of the United States, and now,
increasingly, China, demanded
that they form a single market
and economy.
While it is true that there are


that to put the matter bru-
tally frankly would not be a
successful option for any of the
small states of CARICOM, not
even Trinidad and Tobago with
all its income in oil and gas.
The international financial
structures of the world are con-
trolled by the so-called G7
nations the wealthiest
nations who have had a
stranglehold on it since the end
of the Second World War. In
addition, the International
Monetary Fund (IMF) and the
World Bank police the world
order on behalf of the G7. No
small nation, by itself, will
breach that fortress. And, while
CARICOM, as the CSME, will
also have considerable difficul-
ty breaking down these estab-
lished walls, at least the sound
of its horn will be louder and
harder to ignore.
Similarly in trade. At the


* SIR Ronald Sanders


strains and tensions within the
EU, it has proved to be remark-
ably successful and durable in
its short existence, given the
much longer history of rivalry,
war and division.
Of course, there cannot be a
direct comparison between the
EU and what is contemplated in
the CSME, principally because
of two factors: first, the EU had
machinery for financing disad-
vantaged countries, bringing
them up to par within average
European standard, and, sec-


CARICOM ministers chosen to
participate in the "real" as dis-
tinct from the "formal" meet-
ings, will be chosen as a repre-
sentative of the region as a,
whole and will be expected both,
to represent the region, and,,
when the time comes, to "deliv-.
er" the region as well.
Behind such ministers, there,
should be the best Caribbeai)
brains that can be assembled'
from across the Caribbean,
nations to develop positions and
give advice.
And, in relation to the nego-
tiations with the EU on all of
the trade issues, including sugar
and bananas, I simply say; "Dit'-
to". No single small state in
CARICOM has the resources,
financial and human, to negoti-
ate the complex and technical
issues on its own.


Smallness is powerlessness,
and in today's world the
national boundaries of small
states suffocate not only busi-
ness but individual endeavour


WTO, the US, the EU and
Japan are the principal players
contending with each other for
advantage, but working togeth-
er to resist the growing strength


The basic principle remains
the same --to compete and
prosper against larger and
more powerful nations, like-
minded and similar smaller
states have to create a single
economic space and society.


ond, there is freedom of move-
ment of people amongst the
majority of.EU member states;
The CSME will not allow free-
dom of movement of labour
except in some categories that
have already been clearly spec-
ified, and, to date, there is no
agreed machinery for financing
development to an average
Caribbean standard, although
work is being done on this by
the Caribbean Development
Bank.

N bnetheless, the basic
principle remains the
same to compete and pros-
per against larger and more
powerful nations, like-minded
and similar smaller states have
to create a single. economic
space and society.
The alternative to joining the
CSME is to go it alone. And,


of China, and occasional
alliance of some large develop-
ing countries.

None of the small coun-
tries of CARICOM
will be heard in Hong Kong
when the WTO meets at minis-
terial level to :resume negotia-
tions on new trade rules. Any


S mallness is powerless-
ness, and in today's
world the national boundaries
of small states suffocate not
only business but individual
endeavour.
For, as the matter has been
put: "boundaries are not only
territorial, they are mental and
conceptual". Within all, the
states of CARICOM, business-
es, trades unions and people at
all levels need to change their
concept and mental attitude to
the notion of "boundaries";
with the CSME, the boundaries
of countries should extend to
all of CARICOM just as the
national boundaries of Texaiis
or New, Yorkers extend to all
of the United States.
Texas or New York may
make their way in the world,
but not as well as the United
States as a whole.
The political directorate of
the region should join Prime
Minister Arthur in his meetings
throughout the region between
now and year end to argue the
case for the CSME, for another
missed deadline would riot be,
in the interest of any country.,
(responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com)


BI L

0~ l]

Huriae htltom.4 r hi st ocktt last t s.n


Maviso* 06


55 -* *
0 Secret ary*
Member of Siter, isterBreast fCancer Support Group
^Breas Caner Da gnosism USepteber 2004^^^^^^^^
Number o^f y'ears as a suTnTBrvivor: one i^^^^^^^^
""The LordjK HiTsmy light an mysalvaionwhomgi~f^^^^^^^^
^^should feartheLordu Kiis the strength of my life^^^^^^S


Kotex Tips for Lifew

* Men can get breast cancer too!
ANY breast lump should be
investigated by a physician.


Registered Trademalr.kofKimberly Clark Worldwide, Inc @2005.KCWW


PAGE 6, MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


AIL
Alk
'JEW







LOA NEWS
THE TRBN. ONAOTBE 1.00,PU


New

initiative

to combat

crime
0 By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff
Reporter
COMMUNITY Assist-
ed Counselling is a new ini-
tiative being pushed by the
Bahamas Association for
Social Health in an effort
to combat crime.
Terry Miller, founder of
BASH, said there had to
ea new thrust that every-
one can participate in to
lOwer the country's crime
fate.
"In this initiative, per-
sons in the family, in the
neighbourhood, on the job
and in the larger commu-
gity can identify, by reason
qf their intimate interac-
tions, friends, family, co-
workers, who are experi-
encing emotional trauma
or are addicted to alcohol
and/or other drugs," he
explained.
-Emotional trauma is the
result of the loss of job,
death of a loved one, a
recent break-up of a mar-
riage or an affair, rape
child molestation, physical
and other types of abuse,
he added.
Violent
"They can all result in
violent expressions of the
pain and frustration asso-
ciated with emotional trau-
ma. We know that more
than 50 per cent of our
crimes are committed by
persons while under the
influence of alcohol and
other.drugs."
With these statistics in
mind, Mr Miller said it was
important that as many
persons as possible become
aware of the support agen-
lies in their communities,
t 'be.conscious of what
or6thei may be going
thidrogh and be prepared
itkliste~i,-'0ionsel br refer
-faiiiiiy', L61leaguies anid
fiends o professionals for
'help. ,
S"We can no longer sit
i ly by and.watch as help-
19s-s-zOmnbies while a family
n mber drinks himself
mnto, obloii, or while a
irieindplhins th himurder of,
,a his lover whod left hini, or
., ienwe. see children being
abused by adults or persn,"
He said persons must
Become responsible for the
.:,actions of others.
:f.Hesaid while many peo-
fple are outraged at the lev-
,l ofcrime in the country,
,ew are prepared to do
anythingg beyond talk about
it.
C '"As a Christian nation,
as a civilized people, we
must come to the clear
eognition that the answer
othe. original question
ithat man asked God is yes,
m. my brother's keeper."


t0


S 0 *




HEi Ministry of Transport
a d A.viation has announced
t figst annual National Oil
4d Chemical Spill Conference,
t be held over three days
lgmning October 31.
e conference is being held
iuionjimuction with the Nation-
-"Oil anid Chemical Spill Con-
txgency Advisory Committee
d the Ministry of Health and


livironment at the Nassau
lach Hotel.




To advertise in
The Tribune
call 322-1986


Admitted to the Bar

A DARNELL Devanee
Dorsette affirms the oath
". being held up by Chiel
....Justice Clarke No!tr
.4 Scavella (right) befreI
Chief Justice Sir Burton
Hall (not pictured) on
~October 28. Her petition
6was presented by formpn
W '...c.' prime minister HII ert


0 TANISHA Lauren Tynes is pictured October 27 with her
father Grand Bahama based lawyer Harvey Tynes, QC -
who presented her petition.


NOWONL


M AYANNA BOGUMILA HORTON is pictured October
28 with her father, Attorney Michael Horton, who presented her
petition.


0 BERNARD O Ferguson takes the oath being held up by
Chief Justice Clarke Nolan Scavella (right) before Chief Justice
Sir Burton Hall (not pictured) on October 28. His petition was
presented by Nathaniel Cooper.


0 CHRISTOPHER Francis, son of Christine Francis and the
late Carlton E Francis, is pictured on October 28 with Attorney
Elma Campbell, who presented his petition.


In observance of Breast Cancer Awareness Month redeem this
voucher for 50% off the cost of a mammogram at Doctors Hospital
Mammograms save lives, schedule yours today!
*Women who have not had a mammogram performed at Doctors Hospital.
*Women with a strong family history of breast cancer, i.e. mother, sister or grandmother




There are two kinds of mammograms: screening and diagnostic. Screening mammograms detect breast
changes in women who have no signs of cancer. Diagnostic mammograms evaluate unusual breast
changes, such as a lump, pain, nipple thickening or discharge or a change in the breast size or shape.

THE TRIBUNE OBSERVES



1745Month D'A i
I e-- r


(A to S,
Fran 1 (1,
Fe 0
rgus

'o


MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005, PAI-1 7


THE TRIBUNE





PAGE 8, MONDAY. OCTOBER 31, 2005 THE TRIBUNE
U


SUPER
VALUE
NOW ACCEnNG
SUNCARD
QUA WmSAn PRICES REMD


I


S SI
O T. 2 1 4




FRESH "
PORK
SHOULDERS


BED BATH & HOME
HOMe SALUE


MEAT SA~ lViINGS-#


MIS CUT
CHICKEN
WINGS
$ 29
1 1 PER LB


PER -LB


TRAY PACK
CHICVN
BREAST
$499
PER.-:LB


CSWETFREDH


SSWEET RED
SEEDLESS
GRAPES
S PER LB
SWEET DELICIOUS

MANGOES
2/$300


RED OR GOLDEN
APPLES
LOOSE
3/$ 00
IDAHO KING
POTATOES
LOOSE
31$100


GMOCR ELLE


SMUELLERS



I 9 9F16-0lJ


KRAFT
BBQ
SAUCE
2/$ 00
I N-o


GRLLA S
B E E F1
PATTIE
$^fc 99^^*


HARVEST FRESH "
BROCCOLI
BUNCH
$ 9.9
^ HARVEST FRESH
GREEN
PEPPERS
$ 4L39
>ER LB


C PAR
EXCELLENCE

RICE

R 5 LBS


99
S .


Located: Harbour Bay Shopping Center
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448 )


Pay Less at Discount Mart
A 4 1 1111 0 = =11,Kiil m fri f j'.p


FIRST CHOICE

SUGAR


--


FRESH
GRUN

TURKE


- -- -I I


PAGE 8, MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005


THE TRIBUNE








THE ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ OA TRBNNMNAEWCOES3,05,PG


Tommy Turnquest slams




government over crime

i "IN A hard-hitting address
il to a joint meeting of Bamboo Address to Bamboo Town
Town and South Beach con-
: stituents, FNM leader Sena-
: ..1' *I: tor Tommy Turnquest blast-
ed the present government for and South Beach constituents
A ii a what he feels is its adequate


response to crime.
"The PLP government has
introduced what they call
'Urban Renewal', but in fact
what they are doing is com-
munity policing and social pol-
itic'. ag.
"4,so, young persons have
seen unfortunately that there
appear to be two sides to the
law, one for the politician and
another for the ordinary per-
son. This generates resent-
ment and rebelliousness," he
said.
Under an FNM govern-
ment, the police and the
defence forces will be given
adequate resources to do their
jobs without fear or favour,
he said.
"All who participate in
crime, no matter lineage,
or political or social connec-
tion, will be brought before


the courts and prosecuted. An
FNM government will be a
government of the rule of law,
from the highest to the low-
est in our land," the senator
said.

Crisis
Touching on the illegal
immigration crisis in the coun-
try, Mr Turnquest said that
under an FNM government,
there will be an aggressive
application of Bahamian
immigration laws.
"Those who belong here
and deserve status shall be giv-
en such. Those who are here
illegally will be apprehended
and repatriated with dispatch.
"Wherever corrupt Bahami-
ans are discovered who are


compromising the sovereignty
of this country, they will be
prosecuted to the fullest
extent of the law," he said.
Mr Turnquest also took the
opportunity to address the
deteriorating healthcare sys-
tem in the Bahamas.
He said: "We continue to
hear too many complaints
about the level of health care
service provided, and the fre-
quent shortages of medicine
and supplies, where the PLP
government has displayed by
their actions that they do not
care.
"Under an FNM govern-
ment there will be a revamped
national strategic health plan
that will place 100 new doc-
tors with specialty training in
family practice into the com-
munity clinics.
"Patient care in the hospi-
tals will be improved by easing
access to diagnostic and ther-
apeutic equipment, thereby
permitting shorter hospitali-
sation times, shorter waiting
lists and better clinical out-
comes.
"While the biggest thrust
will be on prevention; we
recognise the need to ensure a
well-equipped tertiary system,
which is responsive to the real
needs of the citizens," he said.
Mr Turnquest also outlined
his agenda for the future of
the Bahamas.
"My vision for the Bahamas
includes the involvement of


all Bahamians, a Bahamas
where Bahamians drive the
economic engines of the
Bahamas, ensuring that every-
one has the opportunity. We
need to put our money where
our mouths are and give our
people a chance.
"We have to believe in our
country again," he told con-
stituents.
Mr Turnquest also outlined
several key issues affecting the
Bahamas and ways in which
an FNM government would
address them.

Zoning
"I think that one of the local
issues for the area is zoning.
You can see that the area is
developing into a 'New City
- South Beach City'. It must,
however, be planned and must
not be allowed to continue to
be developed in an ad-hoc
manner. The FNM had a plan
for this area, hence the school,
post office, library, and the
clinic, to join the police sta-
tion," he said.
"The planning and devel-
opment of the area require the
full participation of the resi-
dents to say what you want
the area to look like in say 20
years from now.
"We must ensure that
neighbourhoods are safe and
not overrun by unplanned
commercial activities."


Man arrested after

alleged domestic dispute
FREEPORT- Police arrested a man after he was accused of
assaulting his sister with a knife.
At 5.45pm on Saturday officers were called to a Drake Avenue
apartment following a domestic dispute between the 35-year-old
man and his 38-year-old sister.
By the time police arrived, the man had forced his way into his
sister's apartment. It is reported that during the altercation the
woman was stabbed.
The woman was taken to Rand Memorial Hospital where she was
treated for her injuries and later discharged.


Avi Copyrighted Material
I& Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Provid(


aof showing ll
A tradition of shopping excellence since 1929


%%Ai m l hr% scrth


m- _mW MEN a
- -*" *m


FNM leader Tommy Turnquest makes a point as he
addresses a joint meeting of Bamboo Town and South Beach
members


b


Ba tre


MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


s







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005


CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE
THE MOST THOROUGH RESTORATION & CLEANING EvER, OR THE JOB IS FREE'
NASSAU'S ONLY PROFESSIONAL, CERTIFIED STONE CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CARE SysTEMis.
* Carpet, Upholstery, Stone and Marble Cleaning&
Restoration Specialist.
* Prochem Cleaning Systems removes Deep & Heavy
Soil, Bacteria, Grease, Watermarks and Stains from
Carpeting & Furniture, restoring them to like new
at a fraction of replacement cost.
* Carpet, Sofa's, Loveseats, Chairs, Dining Chairs, Cars,
Boats, Grout, Tiles, Marble & Stone
* Persian, Wool & Silk Carpet Cleaning Specialist
* Restoration & Care

Authorized StoneTech Professional ContractoroTHE
YOUR LOCAL MEMBER OF THE-
CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS PROHEM SYSTEM (sm)
PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594
ONLY WE CAN DO IT RIGHT!
www.prochemsystem.com www.stonetechpro.com www.iicrc.org.
*psp@coralwave.com


CHEVROLET


Out of the spotlight: the



rights of foreigners and



minorities still a grey area


"Everyone is entitled to all
the rights and freedoms set
forth in this Declaration,
without distinction of any
kind, such as race, colour,
sex, language, religion, polit-
ical or other opinion, nation-
al or social origin, proper-
ty, birth, or other status."
Article 2, Universal
Declaration of
Human Rights

FREEDOM from dis-
crimination is the
basis upon which the pro-
tection of human rights
rests.
The failure to guarantee
freedom from discrimina-
tion is thus a fundamental
failure in such protection
practices. Amnesty Interna-
tional has documented var-
ious aspects of this failure
around the globe.
Many Bahamians are of
Greek ancestry. They may
be surprised to hear that
this report outlines the situ-
ation in Greece.
It documents a consistent
pattern of human rights vio-
lations across a range of
fields that stem from the
failure of the state to com-
bat discrimination in the
practices of its representa-
tives as well as of non-state
actors.
These practices range
from the denial of protec-
tion to refugees and the ill-
treatment of migrants, to
the forced eviction of Roma
from their settlements and
the inadequate protection
of minority rights.
In a previous report on
Greece, Amnesty Interna-
tional published jointly with
the International Helsinki
Federation in 2002 the per-
sistence of human rights
violations, and ill-treatment
in particular, was docu-
mented.
One of the major findings


in that report was that
"Roma and immigrants are
particularly at risk of abus-
es at the hands of law
enforcement officials" and
that "the pattern is suffi-
ciently clear to leave little
room for doubt that xeno-
phobia and racial profiling
have played a part in the
human rights violations suf-
fered by members of these
groups."
Since 2002, there has been
little change to this pattern,
despite the fact that new
domestic legislation has
been put in place to deal
specifically with the areas
of concern highlighted in
that report, as well as with
various other aspects of dis-
crimination.

T he legislation
relates to the use of,
firearms, access to justice,
combating trafficking in
human beings, and immi-
gration control. The reports
received by Amnesty Inter-
national of human rights
violations in the period
between 2002 and 2005
show that many of the pro-
visions of this legislation,
especially those designed to
protect human rights and to
safeguard freedom from dis-
crimination, are yet to be
implemented.
Greece's geographical
location on the south-east-
ern border of the European
Union (EU) has made it a
first-stop destination for
migrants and refugees flee-
ing persecution and seeking
protection in the EU.
Most of those who arrive
without documentation are
detained by Greek author-
ities, and many are held in
detention for up to three
months.
Overcrowded detention
centres prevent detainees
from being able to exercise
or maintain their personal
hygiene.
In some centres, children
are being detained with
adults and no special provi-
sion is made for their spe-
cific psychological needs.
There are. allegations that
guards in detention centres
have sexually abused


FOR ALL LIFE'S ROADS


2005 MODEL YEAR CLOSE-OUT SALE


Financing available with...
FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK


2005 Aveo Hatchback 2005 Aveo Sedan
The surprisingly BIG Aveo HB. Don't compromise on space.
$256/per month $264/per month

Bank terms: Down Payment 15%. Preferred rate on motor vehicle Insurance.


S e r 3 Fx 3
if@nsa-oo.com ww S -tbham sco


/


AUNMCL
^l^NAMAU JWOTWOf CO ^i


women detainees. There
have also been reports of
border police beating
migrants on their arrival in
Greece.
Many here in the
Bahamas, will see parallels
with migrant and refugees
issues here. Amnesty Inter-
national has reported
numerous times on concerns
about the Carmichael Road
Detention Centre and the
failure of the Bahamas gov-
ernment to properly identi-
fy those who might be seek-
ing refugee asylum here.
Amnesty does not dispute


that the Bahamas has the
right to protect its borders
from free movement of
migrants. However, all
migrants and refugees have
basic human rights, whiqh;
must be respected by law*,
A fair procedure must be,
observed for the determina-
tion of those who may be
refugees.
To read the full report
concerning Greece, visit the
Amnesty website at
http://web.amnesty.org/libra
ry/Index/ENGEUR2501620
05


Widespread power


outages in Abaco


BEC staff stopped working in Abaco because of a vacation dispUit ,
resulting in widespread power outages and hardship on the stofiii
weary people. ':`
Locals, still recovering from Hurricane Wilma, felt a sense of dfjd vu
when the lights started going out throughout the various communities
at about midnight Thursday.
A labour dispute in Nassau centred on an employee's vacation had
spread to Abaco.
Fishermen in Crown Haven, where power was only recently restored
after Wilma, face a potentially crippling loss of income due to lobster
spoilage.
In Marsh Harbour, and Green Turtle and Man-o-War Cays, locals,
and visitors staying in vacation rentals had no lights and in many cas-
es no water.
Businesses with electronic switchboards lost communications asi
well as power, while the larger hotels and foodstores had to switcli-t;
generators.
BEC supervisors scrambled to fill the posts vacated by linesmen but:
were unable to keep power flowing.
"This is a cry for help. It's a serious situation," Denise Kelly of
Abaco Air said.
"We are still recovering from Hurricane Wilma and this is the last
thing Abaco needs.
"These are good guys who really work.hard in all weather conditions
to keep the power going, but they're just sitting in. The powers that be
really need to do whatever they can to resolve this situation," she:
said.

Economy
Said another businessperson: "This is sending really bad signals to the
tourists. It's crippling the economy."
The first signs of unrest appeared Thursday when BEC collection'
agents refused to accept phone bill payments.
An airport employee, who tried to pay a bill, was turned away.
"They said, 'Honey, we don't want your money today,'" the employ-
ee reported.
A woman was shopping in Solomon's foodstore in Marsh Harbou0r
Friday morning when it went pitch black.
"It was kind of scary back there before the generator kicked in," she
said.
And although the Abaco Regatta was cancelled this weekend
because of Wilma, the regatta parties solid revenue earners were still
scheduled to take place.
Organisers were in the dark as to what to do cancel or wait it out
in the hope that power would be restored.
While a growing number of people have invested in small stand-by
generators as a result of the recent active hurricane seasons, many more
are without that luxury and have returned to a bygone era of kerosene
lamps. .
"It's like a yo-yo. Different places are going off at different times'".
a resident of Man-O-War Cay said of the power outages. ,
BEC's power station and emergency phones rang unanswered'as
frustrated residents telephoned for information.
"People are upset," a Green Turtle Cay resident said. "The two main
resorts here have generators and a handful of second home owners. But
only about five or six locals have generators and the tourist rentals ddo't
have any."
BEC workers in Nassau walked off the job Tuesday to press for the
removal of an information technology manager.
Workers claimed the manager refused to allow an employee to
take vacation leave after he complained of feeling ill. The employee
subsequently "fell out" on the job.
Pay stations in Nassau closed for several hours Tuesday as a result
of the dispute and customers were turned away.
Bahamas Electrical Workers Union president Dennis Williams was
quoted as saying: "The union cannot be bullied or pushed into a cofr-
ner by any person or group of persons and BEC must understand
clearly that workers will not be disrespected."



QUALITY INSIDE


AND OUT .




I ..I... ...... .. .

REFRIGERATOR .

Model FRT18S6A | .

18.2 Cube Feet



$669 00
I ...., -


Long-established, mid-sized business requires
computer-literate administrative assistant to handle
communications, client liaison, and event
coordination.
Must be responsible, reliable and energetic, with good
communication skills and own transportation.
Excellent working conditions. Company-paid medical
insurance. Salary based on qualifications and
experience.
Send resume to: jopatsl 111 @hotmail.com


I












Salvation Army .

.I- ^ Emsm| =


brings hope to-



the victims of



Hurricane Wilma ..teAy
SIN the aftermath o Hurricane i '
Wilma, the Salvation Army's :-11-
u ff ica e captain Chris Matthias helps


.Hurricane Wilma swept
through Grand Bahama leav-
ing her trail of destruction on
an island still recovering from
the double blow of hurricanes
Frances and Jeanne last year.
The Salvation Army pooled
resources to help meet the
immediate needs of those dis-
placed by Wilma's fury.
"We are working closely with
the Department of Social Ser-
vices in Freeport," said Major
Lester Ferguson, divisional
commander of the Salvation
Army in the Bahamas. "We're
responsible for providing hot
meals for 200 families in the
PjIder's Point and Mack Town
communities which received


major impact.
Now we have care packets of
cleaning and sanitation prod-
ucts we are shipping from Nas-
sau to help families get back on
track."
According to captain Rhonda
Matthias in Grand Bahama,
persons are traumatised after
losing everything but their lives
and the clothes on their backs.
The Salvation Army is step-
ping up to meet the emotional
and spiritual needs of victims.
She added that many people
are requesting blankets and
warm clothes.
Persons interested in volun-
teering their time are advised
that they can do so in Grand


Bahama at the Salvation
Army's West Atlantic Drive
location or by calling 352-4863
for more information.
The Grand Bahama division
is also working with the Depart-
ment of Social Services to assist
persons in finding their loved
ones, as contact is limited and
many residents have relocated
to shelters.
Meanwhile, the Salvation
Army is asking persons in New
Providence to make monetary
donations to the Hurricane
Wilma Fund at the Royal Bank
of Canada, account number
1744986 or drop off relief items
to the Salvation Army on
Mackey Street.


-~ m -


P.O. BOX


SBAY STREET


N-1411 NASSAU, BAHAMAS


PHONE (242) 322-1179


___


iv-JTK
..... :' I ...... i I .: lI=: : +P'I
K',,


* VETERAN Labour leader Sir Randol Fawkes is seen here addressing nearly 2,000 workers of
the Trade Union Congress at Southern Recreation Ground in June, 1982. His speech was part of
the annual Labour Day Rally.


50% OFF HOUSEHOLD LINENS
CLEARANCE SALE!
(*Regular prices)

(Credit Cards 45% Off)


Table Clothes Runners Doilies

Pillow Cases
Shower Curtains and much more


Pallet Racking Lockers Steel Shelving ,
.. ........... ....- -.---- .-


.... .. ....
SSN Ave. PO Box N8645
Wke'-A.'IN

`325.8914 F: 242.325.1305
w.hanna-mayson.com
h an na-mayson.com


F-


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005, PAGE 11













Hundreds turn out to support




trust's wine and art festival


He needed a knee replacement.


DOCTORS HOSPITAL
HIP AND KNEE
REPLACEMENT
CONSULTATIONS

Date:Wednesday, November 2
Time: 3:00pm 8:00pm

FOR AN APPOINTMENT
CALL 302-4684


And he had one here.

Do you have daily joint pain? Do you
suffer from severe Osteoarthritis? Does
your pain affect your daily activities?
Do you have stiffness of your knee
or hip joint?

Dr. Jimmy Lee M.D., F.A.C.S.,
Orthopedic and Total Joint
Replacement Surgeon will be
conducting his monthly Total Joint
(hip and knee) Replacement
Consultations at the Doctors Hospital
Sessional Clinic. Join the many
patients who lead an active lifestyle
and now live pain free.

For more information, or to schedule
an appointment call Doctors Hospital's
Sessional Clinic at (242) 302-4684.



DOCTORS HOSPITAL
health For Lif,


* By DOMINIQUE HEPBURN
HUNDREDS of loyal art and
wine lovers turned out on Sat-
urday in spite of wet weather to
the Bahamas National Trust's
annual Wine and Art Festival.
The festival, held at The
Retreat in Village Road, is a
partnership between Bristol
Wine and Spirits, which donates
all of the wine, and the trust.
It is one of the main fund-
raising events for the non-prof-
it organisation whose primary
purpose is environmental pro-
tection and conservation.
Four per cent of funding for
the Trust is received from the
government while the remain-
ing 96 per cent is obtained from
private fund-raising such as the
festival.
The event is also held to raise
awareness of the BNT and the
many initiatives they develop
in an effort to protect the envi-
ronment as well as to educate
the Bahamian public about the
need to do so.
As each person entered they
were given a wine glass and
many opportunities to fill it as
they were left to wander the
trails of the 11-acre property.
Sampling wine and viewing
works by 42 local artists such as
John Cox, Sandi George, Taino
Bullard and Tamara Russell was
just one part of the event.
It provided an opportunity
for local artisans to network and
a relaxed atmosphere for mem-
bers and friends of the BNT to
gather and have a good time.
In addition to the artwork on
display was the lush plant life
contained at BNT's property.
The Retreat is home to the
largest private collection of rare
palms in the world.
"It's a cultural thing," said
Lynn Gape, director of educa-
tion and communications for
the BNT. "The wine and art fes-
tival has always been a very spe-
cial event for the Bahamas


N A FESTIVAL-GOER passes judgment on one of the wines on offer


National Trust.
"It is a terrific fund-raiser for
us but it also allows us to pro-
vide a venue and an opportu-
nity for young Bahamian artists
to show their work and we tru-
ly enjoy doing that.
"It is really a lot of fun for us
to see artists who maybe came
in when they were very young
and to see how they improved
over the years."
A new feature of this year's
festival was the silent auction, to
which many artists donated
works. Proceeds were split
between the BNT and the artist.
At this year's festival, greater
attention was given to increasing
the membership of the BNT.
There are roughly 2,000
members of the BNT which,
according to Christopher
Hamilton, executive director of
the Bahamas National Trust, is
low for a country.
He encouraged more indi-
viduals to make donations and
to become Trust members. He
added: "It also helps when we
go: to large donors to be able to
show that there many Bahami-
ans who are members and who
support the work we do."
There was also heightened
interest in the many wines avail-
able for tasting this year.
Rusty Skates, wine director
at Bristol, said: "It shows there
is more sophistication in wine
tasting, which is fabulous."


* LEMERO Wright stands next to his painting Future, about
corruption and the decline of society in the Bahamas


* ARTIST John Cox (right) talks about his work 6
(Photos: Sid McLean/Tribune sta#)
I.


Ireland's premium butter,

famous the world over.


Nobody does
butter better.


Distributed by Bahamas Wholesale Agencies East West Highway
tel: 242-394-1759 fax: 242-394-1859 email: bwabahamas@coralwave.com


STUDIO OF DRAPERIES
ANNOUNCES ITS

BIG ANNIVERSARY SALE


Saturday, November 5, 2005
8:30am 6:00pm
There will be Gifts for the

SFirst 50 -
purchasing customers

15% off Verticals 25% off Drapes & Sheers
* 10% off Rods Residential & Commercial :
Carpet Available!!..
Don't miss this
Big Savings for Christmas!
Coffee & Donuts will be available '
Also Baloons for Kids
I^1 _.


mmmi


k MMWI


^


PAGE 12, MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


I







THE RIBNE MNDA, OCOBE 31,200, PAE 1


Some advice



on real estate



relationships


WHY are realty professionals
called "agents?" What is the
meaning of the term "agent" in
the.context of real estate?
,Real estate is practised under
tliHe-"Law of Agency," in which
ofie party the agent repre-
sents the interests of another -
the principal. The association is
termed an "agency relation-
ship."
As the vendors' agent, the
representative acts on the ven-
d6rs' behalf, with their best
interests in mind, to locate a
purchaser. The purchasers must
be treated honestly and fairly,
but they are not "represented"
by that agent. The vendors'
aggnt is always faithful to the
vendors' best interests (but not
necessarily those of the pur-
chaser).
In the past, most purchasers
were not represented by an


SE
Ba rIa
estate-toda


agent they made their buying
decisions using factual infor-
mation presented to them by
the vendors or their agent.
Because of the increasingly
complicated nature of real
estate transactions, however,
"buyer agency" has become
more common. ,To gain repre-
sentation in their purchase, pur-
chasers may employ an agent
to represent their interests and
fulfil the obligation to faithfully
serve them.
What's the real message
about agency? Both purchasers


and vendors should know
whether they are represented
and by whom. To find out, ask
your BREA agent(s): "Who are
you representing in this trans-
action?" Inform yourself and
make confident decisions by
learning the facts about agency
relationships before you buy or
sell.


(ratsh vi'tims rrnuin%


"Copyrighted Material
o* Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


I SARU
FORENBTWR


the company









POLO JEANS CO. RALPH LAUREN









Summer Clearence

40% to 50% off
men's & women


Womens Jeans Saturday
Womens Jeans Saturday
Womens fashion jeans
Men's Jeans Brixton
Men's Jeans Fashion Brixton


Reg $54 Now $32
Reg $66 Now $34
All 50% off
Reg $60 Now $39
Reg $93 Now $54


All AkarlsQ Mens' & women clearance 50% off




RBC FINCO
UNDEVELOPED PROPERTY MORTGAGE


Helping you own

your dream


ito:


ie2


space, an all wheel drive.
This vehicle goes everywhere!

Our parts department is fully stocked,
with every component to ensure that
your vehicle runs trouble free.
Trained. technicians on duty.

'gt g


Dreams come in
all shapes and sizes.
As the leading mortgage bank in
The Bahamas, RBC FINCO is
dedicated to sharing your dreams and
helping you achieve your financial goals.
Our mortgage specialists can help you
build your dreams from the ground up.
We offer:
* Competitive interest rates
* Financing with as little as 5 % down
* No penalty for lump sum
payments to reduce balance
* Flexible payment terms
with optional weekly or
bi-weekly accelerated
payments
* Up to 15 years to repay
* Ability to develop your property
while repaying your loan -
no restrictions!


Invest in an undeveloped piece of property today! Call or visit our friendly
mortgage specialists at any RBC FINCO branch. We offer FREE financial advice.


www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean


SRBC
SFINCO


SRlegistered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canad
"r The Lion & Globe symbol and RC are trademarks of Royal 8ank of Canada


r


I'


I


MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


o o








I ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ OA NEWS4 ONAOTBE 1 05 H RBN


Activist calls for relocation




during hurricane season


FROM page one
sequence, Bahamians should
investigate more long-term solu-
tions.
"Grand Bahama has been
hit repeatedly over the last
few years. Grand Bahama
has the second largest
amount of Crown Land in
the country. We need a
national commitment to
relocate these people from
those coastal zones and the
industrial corridors," he
said.


Mr Smith said there are
hundreds, if not thousands,
of people on Grand
Bahama living in the shad-
ow of the Bahamas Oil
Refining Company (BOR-
CO), as well as near the
container port and along
the low-lying coastal zones.

Restrictions
He said that very strin-
gent town planning restric-
tions needed to be put in
place requiring home-own-


ers to build on elevated
foundations.
"Alternatively, the gov-
ernemnt can allocate tracts
of land and provide it to
people inexpensively, if not
free. That creates wealth
for Bahamians. They can
borrow against it from the
bank and it will take them
from the pollution and haz-
ards in the industrial corri-
dor.
"I toured some areas on
Monday in Hunter's and
Lewis Yard and there was
three feet of water with oil,


kerosene, and what you
have is this deep toxic soup
which smelt of gas and that
trailed right into Freeport,"
he said.

Approach
Now that Bahamians
were more "environmentaly
conscious and more sophis-
ticated in their approach to
housing, developments and
urban life" there was a neec'
to use alternatives to
adequately solve these


problems.
"We are not a rich coun-
try, we need to husband and
manage the resources we
have," said Mr Smith.
Grand Bahama once
again suffered terrible loss
of homes and infrastructure
as Hurricane Wilma swept
across the island last week.
Thousands of Grand
Bahamians are thought to
be homeless after a 15-foot
vave washed away houses
along the southern and west
coasts and made hundreds
df others uninhabitable.


Man shot

to death in

his home

FROM page oine

Street South wielding a
chrome handgun. tHe
robbed the bar of cash aid
a half-pack of cigars
before fleeing in a silver
car and heading north on
East Street.
Twenty minutes later,'a
man fitting the same
description .robbed the
Bird's Nest Restaurant bf
an undetermined amount
of cash.
"Patrons who were still
in the restaurant were algo
robbed at gunpoint off
their cash, jewellery and-
personal possessions," Mr
Evans said.
Police are investigating
both robberies.


LISTED PROPERTIES RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL NASSAU

SHIRLEY STREET STAPLEDON GARDENS
LOT NO. 1 & 3 LOT NO. 544
PROPERTY SIZE: Commercial Complex PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence
(13,000 sq. ft.) (9,600 sq ft)
LOCATION: Sears Rd. Southern Side of LOCATION: 130 FT. North of Spitfire Rd.
Shirley St. APPRAISED VALUE: $224,000
APPRAISED VALUE: $775,000
COWPEN ROAD HOLLYWOOD
SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. Crown Grant A-66 (Incomplete Structure)
PROPERTY SIZE: 10,875 sq. ft.
LOCATION: 350 West of Refuge Court
APPRAISED VALUE: $133,000




LISTED PROPERTIES- VACANT LOTS I NASSAU


OLDE TOWN AT SANDYPORTI F
SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 14
PROPERTY SIZE: 1,300 sq. ft.
LOCATION: North of Sandyport Dr.
APPRAISED VALUE: $110,000


RACESUBD
L NO. ',6Trac'iC D '
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Icelyn Blvd. off Bernard Road,
Fox Hill
APPRAISED VALUE: $45,000


C1


BPSU president



threatens to



unseat Mitchell


FROM page one
ment had not yet begun when
Mr Pinder staged the protest,
and he therefore did not under-
stand the need for the demon-
stration.
"In respect to the press con-
ference (last Tuesday) the nego-
tiators told him (Mr Pinder)
what the government offer was
in the document that was some
43 articles. He (Mr Pinder) sat
down and thanked the govern-
ment for their offer said he was
very pleased withit,"',ai4 L.
Mitcell.
Mr Pinder, however, said:
"Mr Mitchell I think suggested
that I did not use my head and
he is right. Maybe I did not use
my head because I was guided
by a spirit, the Holy Sprit, to
say what I had to say.
"It was the same spirit that
led me to oppose him when he
supported the CSME. It was the
same spirit that led me to
oppose him when he tried to
make civil servants contract


workers and it was the same
spirit that helped me win my
position once again and it will


be the same spirit that helps:mne
unseat him if he continuesin::
this way," he said.


"q 6W ,, lb ,t a*







" "Copyrighted Material .
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"
- a -


zJJ.S. JOHNSON
INSURANCE AGENTS & BROKERS


IN ADELAIDE
RESTAURANT & BAR

We are Open again!!!

* Native Dishes haVmEi
IBahumian
* Fine Wines Music
* Daiquiris & Good Drinks
Rake & Scrape ,
Open 11am to 1lpm on the patio
Except Mondays (CLOSED) 9:00pm
362-1547 until midnight


'-ER'ESTVTYlPART IES:SHUC* SUBM ITOFR T'PRHAE(IH EEHN
n' `NO NACTADRES) TCHRO 39ICK, TE PAZA MCKE STEET O
'CALU'.'502''620 TiHE :NiFOR .,*,.E]ESRV TE IGH T, EJCTAN O


r~Zt~Eg~B~


IPVAGE 14, MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005


THE TRIBUNE'


. ~-duo=_


- *






I HE TRIbUNEI


fl-c -


Renewal project



makes donation



of baby products


THE Bain/Grants Town
Urban Renewal Project has
responded to requests for baby
products for Grand Bahama
hurricane victims with three
boxes of diapers.
They were added to contri-
butions collected by Senators
last Friday and Saturday dur-
ing a drive at the Senate Build-
ing.
The goods will be turned
over to the Bahamas Red
Cross for distribution in affect-
ed areas.


Musical

artists

arrive for

charity

concert

THE Nassau Chapter of
Links Incorporated, in con-
junction with its corporate spon-
sors British American Insurance
and Arawak Homes, will host
"Autumn Leaves", an evening
of elegant music at the Dundas
Centre for the Performing Arts
on Saturday, November 12
(8pm). Donation is $25 for
adults and $12 for children.
Proceeds will aid the Links
Safe House for Females in
crises. The repertoire will
include international artists
Stephanie Matthews and Kevin
KwanLoucks, and outstanding
Bahamrian artists.
Miss Matthews is a young
concert violinist who has distin-
guished herself as a consum-
mate musician. She holds a
Bachelor of Music degree from
Indiana University School of
Music in Bloomington, Indiana,
and attends The Juilliard School
of Music.
Miss Matthews has toured
Canada, Mexico and Trinidad
and Tobago and has performed
at several embassies. Her audi-
ences, have included members
of the United States Congress,
Countess Albina DuBoisrou-
vray of Switzerland, The Organ-
isation of American States, the
White House, the Central Intel-
ligence Agency, the Corcoran
Gallery of Art, the Lyceum, the
Baltimore Museum of Art and
the Kennedy Centre for the
Arts.
Mr Loucks is a pianist, soloist,
chamber musician and music
educator. He was educated at
the University of California,
Irvine, where he received a
Bachelor of Music degree. He is
completing his graduate stud-
ies at The Juilliard School.
Mr Loucks has performed
chamber music with members
of the New York Philharmonic
and principal members of the
Royal Concertgebouw Orches-
tra and at audiences in Lincoln
Centre's Alice Tully Hall, Har-
ris, Concert Hall and The
Kennedy Centre.
Other featured guest artists
wil -ticlude the renowned and
internationally acclaimed
National Youth Choir of The
Baham as under the direction of
Mr't ,eophas Adderley, and
junior' high school and senior
high school musicians from the
Ministry of Education schools.
A wine and cheese reception
will follow. Tickets are avail-
able from members of the Nas-
saik Chapter of the Links Incor-
porated and at Floral Arts,
Montrose Avenue.


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Hurricane Wilma last Mon--'
day raked the northern
Bahamas leaving many home-
less in its wake.
"We are happy that
Bain/Grants Town Urban
Renewal and others have
come to the assistance of fel-
low Bahamians in Grand
Bahama and elsewhere who
are really in need at this timee"
said Senator Yvette Turn-
quest. "We are indeed each
other's keeper."
ASP Carolyn Bowe, co-


ordinator of Bain/Grants
Town Urban Renewal, said:
"We always seek to help the
less fortunate and we were
happy when we saw the Sena-
tors open their doors for the
donations for Hurricane
Wilma victims.
"It was another good oppor-
tunity for us to do what is our
mission to do."
The urban renewal projects
in Grand Bahama have sent
teams into the hurricane
affected areas.


_ __ I __ _I__l__y___j________~PDL~e~~_YWUIWI~


IilLOCAL NEWSII ^


k1


M\ONUMY, ) i,







PAGE 6, MODAYOCTOBR 31,2005THE TIBUN


ecess baggage


Save up to


65%*


on airline excess baggage fees


Shji Now, Fly Later Drop your bags off the day before you travel,
P Ny and they'll be waiting for you when you arrive!
We accept most oversize/overweight items and boxes!
Bags arrive 11am Pay in Nassau
*American Eagle's published excess baggage fees on your third bag, if it is oversize
and overweight at 751bs, is $230. With excessbaggage you can pay as little as $75
for the same bag. We are cheaper than the competition in all other comparisons too.


Drop Off: Miami Pick Up: Nassau
4405NW, 28th St Customs Hall
( 305.) 87 -0571 (242) 377-6593
(between Thrifty and Budget) (inside the Airport Terminal)


Take a look at our other services





pdKexpress pdO:mailbox pdxcargo
next day-courier unlimited US mail.- b ulk freight
with delivery comrinrg soon


Get more information at
www.pdxbahamas.com
(242) 341-6593

----------------------&--
I Use this coupon to save

$10
off every bag you ship with eXCeSSbagqeag I

Not combinable with any other offer. Only one coupon per
customer per visit. Only applies to bags under 100 lbs. Bags
over 1001bs will be charged the full rate of $1 per lb. Only
applies to bags under 63 linear inches (L + W + H). Bags over 63
linear inches may be charged oversize fees. I
Coupon not valid after Nov 20, 2005 I
www.pdxbahamas.com
(242) 341-6593 V
L----------------- ----


afWforable air freight


Use this coupon to get your first shipment

FREE &
(5 Ibs or less) when you ship with pdxexpl eS

Not combinable with any other offer. Only obe coupon per
customer per visit. One offer per household or business, on first
shipment with pdxexpress. If package exceeds 5 Ibs, a $5
discount off of our regular rates will be offered instead. Account
required. Weight is calculated as dimensional or actual,
whichever is greater. Offer only valid Miami to Nassau.
Coupon not valid after Nov 20, 2005


I www.pdxbahamas.com
I (242) 341-6593
- -


Sparkling



fundraiser



with Miss



Universe


MOET and Chandon and its
exclusive distributor in ,the
Bahamas, Bristol Wines & Spir-
its sponsored the AIDS Foun-
dation fundraising reception
featuring the reigning Miss Uni-
verse.
"An Evening of Champagne,
Charity and Commitment"
drew a sparkling crowd to the
Cafe Restaurant, Royal Tower,
Atlantis.
Among the VIPS were
Bahamian Olympic Track and
Field Medalists Tim Munnings
and Troy Mackintosh.
-Moet and Chandon, through
Bristol Wines and Spirits, sup-
ported the fund raising event by
providing a Jeroboam (3 litres)
of famous Don Perignon cham-
pagne, vintage 1995, as one of
many "Silent Auction" items.
Cacique International put in


the winning bid for a rare bottle
valued at $4,500..
In addition, Bristol Wines and
Spirits donated Moet and Chan-
don champagnes for the enjoy-.
ment of all patrons attending
the reception.
Tickets were available from
The Aids Foundation and Beau-
ty in the Bahamas organizations:
Mrs Camille Barnett, head of
the Aids Foundation, said the
event was a sell out and well
worth the weeks of effort.
Miss Glebova, born in Rus-
sia but now a Canadian citizen,
has spent much -of-her time as
Miss Universe campaigning to
raise public awareness about
HIV/AIDS and the research
needed to find a cure. She has
even taken a public AIDS test
to emphasise that "Everyone
needs to be tested."


* BERNADETTE Christie accepts a flute of champagne frcin
Pauline Ferguson, banquet department waitress at Atlantis .-


* MICHELLE Malcolm, President of the Miss Bahamas Uni-
verse Franchise and a consultant to the Ministry of Tourism,
helped organise the fundraiser
%


KIES FOR CANCER


Donald's Cookie you purchase during the month


e00r5, McDonald's will make a donation to the


Cancer Society of The Bahamas.


I'm lovin' I f


;: ; ;; ; :--:::-;::_---;:_::: -: ;:-:_-_i-;.:;:-i:;;- -.-;-- ;-;; -;; ; ; ; ; ; ; :II--


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 16, MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005


- ------ ---- ----------- --1


I

------^ a----t-i-rw |


.
I






IfIvIV.J[L.Ai' i..Ae I V~;i 'j LXc;j~u, i .J b:


THE TRIBUNE


S A ~R.-. MIN
SOON,,.~


* MUSIC Makers chaplain Tyrone Laing, Carib Insurance
technical manager Richard Uriasz, Glenroy Taylor, Albert
Archer, and Carib Insurance financial controller Mark Taylor



Insurance



company's



donation to



.Junkanoo


Every year, Carib Insurance
donates funds to several
Juhkanoo groups.
This year, however, Carib
Insurance's managing director
Albert Archer decided to
donate solely to the Music Mak-
ers junkanoo group, because of
the group's dire need for finan-
cial assistance in its Bay Street
bid.
The $5,000 cheque was good
news for Music Makers leader
Gyenroy Taylor and chaplain
Tyrone Laing, who accepted
the donation on the group's
behalf.
Earlier this miionth in Graid


Bahama, Carib Insurance's
manager Queen Stubbs donated
to Swingers costume designer
Delon Clarke.
The Music Makers said they
are in a transitional phase and
gladly accepted the donation
because it would help them to
get back on track.
Originating from Fowler
Street off Market Street, the
Music Makers first rushed on
Bay Street on Boxing Day of
1976, and has since racked up
several wins.
The Music Makers won Box-
ing Day junkanoo parades in
1976, 1977; 1978 aiid 1982.






I-AUL- 18, MONDAY, OCTIUbH 31, 2005 -


LOCALN


Chicky keeps youngsters


Ion the ball at shoot out


* LEFT: Pictured is Chicky and youngsters
from the Marathon constituency.

* BELOW: Pictured is Marathon MP Ron
Pinder (second from right) and KFC's mascot
Chicky awarding a young competitor a prize for
winning the best shoot out.


KFC co-sponsored the recent Marathon Bas-
ketball Classic and mascot Chicky challenged
youngsters to a shoot out and awarded prizes to
the best performers. .
The company thanked all of the youngsters in
the Marathon constituency who participated
in the Basketball Classic and those that "Chal-
lenged Chicky" and won.


Al


V A


NK Ikkm Lcqk quwt ftw


"Copyrighted Material
.. Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


Iil I U


The First Stop on your Shopping List!


32" $649-
27" $419-
19" $209-


I 'A'


In-House Financir


through Commonwealth Bank:


"If HE'D JUST
LET GO OF MY
STRETCHY THING,
I'D LET HIM HAVE
ANY TOY HE
WANTS..'."


O YOU "-
CANNOT
BEAT OUR
PRICES NOT.
" EVEN IN
--g MIAMI! I


L4^


ROOM


I













Bahamians voice concern




over BEC industrial action


BAHAMAS Electrical
Corporation workers are
holding the public hostage by
refusing to accept payment
for power bills, according to
several concerned Bahami-
ans.


6n 0 m a Od100'0 w e lwN4'o*04
-mmm -b*-l


***** b w*


BEC customers com-
plained that they were turned
away from the corporation's
Mall at Marathon branch as
the members of the Bahamas
Electrical Worker's Union
(BEWU) continued with


their industrial action to
protest the corporation's
management of their contract
negotiations.
BEC management con-
firmed that, due to the "ille-
gal action on the, part of the


0
4b *a m
%E** 40 4* opo 0 4 q
b o e0 M

%Am 0 mb
S* _*
ft q 4


BIWU", the Mall at
Marathon BEC office will
not be able to accept any
payments.
However, customers can
pay their bills at BEC Main
Office on Blue Hill Road or
at their banks.
"BEC would like to apolo-
gise to its customers for any
inconvenience caused. The
corporation would like to
assure its clients that we are
doing everything to resolve
the situation and ensure the
high level of service BEC
must provide," said the cor-
poration.
Businessman Kurt Nixon
told The Tribune that BEC
staff have refused any form
of payment since Monday
and the public is afraid that if
they are not allowed to pay
soon, their power will be cut.
"They don't understand
what they are doing to the
average man on the street,"
Mr Nixon said. "BEC is hold-
ing us hostage."
He said that as many as
five of his employees have
expressed frustration at not
being able to pay their bills.
In addition, Mr Nixon said,
about 15 family members and
friends have complained to
him about the problem.
"They won't let you pay by
cash or cheque or anything.
And then when they cut you
off you will have to pay the
extra $50 to get cut back on."
"This is beyond a gang
mentality," he said. "We
have no alternative or
recourse there is no other
company."
Mr Nixon said his frustra-
tion reached a peak when he
learned that his 76-year-old
mother had resorted to mak-l,
ing the rounds of all.the BEC.
offices in Nw Profoidence in
an attempt to pay her bill.


LOOKING FOR STARS

If you're highly organized and self-motivated with strong
'communications skills... you're a star.
If you're energetic, flexible, versatile and thrive in fast-
paced environments... you're a star.
If you're of good character, honest with a great attitude
and enthusiastic about life... you're a star.
If you're committed to a successful future to benefit you,
your family and community... you're a star.


WE WANT YOU


A new and exciting food entity specializing in fresh seasonal
food opening soon. Providing a professional, fun and fair
working environment. Work part-time hours, earn over-
time pay. No prior experience necessary, passion for learning
required. Must be a high school graduate. College students
welcomed. Be a part of something great. $100 hiring bonus!
Benefits and profit-sharing.
To take advantage of this opportunity, please seek application
from Marcelles at the Shell Gas Station, West Bay Street,
Saunders Beach.


No Calls Please


Bn Irkrmr V r nr Iri m






__' "Copy righted Material .r:

2=..- Syndicated Content *n ...
Available from Commercial News Providers"


4;


;--"---------------- ---------------

Auditions will be held for a three or

four piece band for daily

performances at the Nassau

International Airport.


VENUO: -
,National Centre for the Performing Arts




Wednesday, November 2, 2005
11:00 am 2:30 pm


1 interested parties may apply by
: contacting
Telephone: 502-4241

:I. -----*-*--- -----*----**-----** *


MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005, PAGE 19


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 20 MONDA, OCTOBRT31,A005OTHETRIBUS


Pakistan, I


ndh


gree to


open


disputed


Kashmi- h. hw
-"""Copyrighted 'Material


0 b -


victims


Syndicated Content -'-


Available from Commercial News. roviders"


- w

0


OFFICE PREMISES FOR RENT
AT LYFORD MANOR
LYFORD CAY



ful' y i50dout

1, o 3ofics, secetralpol


O -b. - a- V
b & A. .00~, d
S -4w


- -
S .~ -
a
a -~
~.- ~ -
a
~ -
-
-a ~
- S
~- ~
____ ~ -
* ~- ~* -


Patrick Knowles

The Honourable Society of the Inner Temple
Called to the Bar of England and Wales
28th July, 2005
University of the West of England, Bristol, England
Bar Vocational Course
Completed with award of Very Competent
University of London, London, England
L.L.B. Second Class Honours Lower Division
(Bachelor of Laws)
The College of The Bahamas,
Nassau, Bahamas
IAssociate's Degree of Social Sciences (Credit)
-in Law and Criminal Justice
St. Anne's High School,
Nassau, Bahamas
High School Diploma Stage Ill Credit
Bahamas Bar
The son of
Mr. Gilbert Knowles and Mrs. Josefa Knowles.
He was called to the Bahamas Bar
on 28th October, 2005. He'll be practising
at Graham Thompson Law Chambers.


* r -

- a -


- ,


40 -o


* a
- a


a -


-


- -
S l.
p n.. -
- a-


a. -

a- ~


* a-
a -

-I,, -
- a


~. .S-.~


gob -- -
a .
a q


- 0' -
* a a


FOR RENT


5 Bedroom, 4 Bathroom, Split Level,
Partly Furnished. Nassau East Blvd.
$2000 per month.


Commercial
12,000 sq.ft.
Spaces.


Building ( Brand New,
@$12.50 sq.ft.. Parking'


Condo out West. Gated Community. 2
bed 2 bath. Fully Furnished. $2000 per
month


Call 328-4800 ask for
Leslia or Yasmine


LYFORD FINANCIAL CENTRE

OFFICE PREMISES FOR RENT


UPPER FLOOR PREMISES

3,600 SQUARE FEET FOR FIT-OUT BY 1 OR2 TENANTS


12 CAR PARKING SPACES INCLUDED

AUTOMATIC STANDBY GENERATOR.


HURRICANE WINDOWS


ELEVATOR


CALL MIKE KLONARIS AT:
(W) 362.5787 OR (H) 362:4124


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 20, MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005


- M


o


- -


D .


4b






MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005, PAGE 21


ww_ -_


.Wf. HeUnurecns



igite lM for
Gopyrig htedaMaterial


nadicated Content

le from Commercial News".ProvidersA
S--"w. Mo.N_ ow


!unerul CapTnI
Wulff Road & Pinedale
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 Fax: 328-8852


STEPHEN
ALEXANDER BAIN,


a resident of Soldier Road
Senior Citizens Home and.
formerly of Abraham's Bay,
Mayagauna will be held at Rock
Of Ages Funeral Chapel,
Tuesday November 1st, 2005
at 11:00a.m. Officiating will be
Rev. Geoffrey Wood, interment
will be held at Southern Cemetery, Cowpen and
$pikenard Road.
He is survived by the residence at the Soldier Road
Senior Citizens Home, the staff of the Senior Citizens
Division of the Department of Social Services and the
inlayson Street Community.
Friends may pay their last respects at The Rock of
Ages Funeral Chapel Wulff Rd. and Pinedale on
Monday 10am 5:00pm and on Tuesday from 10am
Until service time.


-

0




a-
S S


- -
p
S


- -


-- S -


4b.- u a -
- U- d -


a - -
V *
.- U
S U
~ -
* U U -- -U
-
U a -U-- -.


Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


FIRSTCARIBBEAN
NO INTERNATIONAL BANK

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

for

INTERNATIONAL PREMIER MANAGER

general Requirements/ Responsibilities:
'V Good and proven knowledge of International policies, plans and strategies,
and evidence of applying such policies in managing client relationships
.;c and be at ease with clients from differing social, religious, ethnic and
!* cultural backgrounds

.1 Detailed knowledge and application of the principles of Investment/ leading
and fiduciary services as it relates to non-resident foreign nationals and
expatriates in order to identify solutions-to clients' needs and identify sales
.: opportunities. To have proven experience in Wealth management techniques.
*V Delivers a high level of service and personal attention to the Bank's affluent
clients, with the aim of developing a significant and superior level of service
and in acquiring new business. The successful applicant will have a proven
track record in managing relationships, providing financial solutions,
working to sales numbers and being part of a team structure
Qualifications/ Experience Required:
-V/ A high level of PC literacy excellent communication style both written
: and orally together with analytical, problem solving and a complete
understanding of both operational and credit risk
;If you are interested:
:Submit your resume & confidential in WRITING ONLY before November 4, 2005
to:

'Lynette Roker
Iuman Resources Administrative Assistant
FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Financial Centre 2nd Floor, Shirley Street
P.O.Box N 3221
Nassau, Bahamas
.r email: lynette.roker@firstcaribbeanbank.com
'FirstCaribbean International Bank thanks all applicants for their interest,
however only those under consideration will be contacted.
Vacancies are open to Bahamas residents only.


Woodlawn Gardens Limited


Extends ,


ai*


Sincere Invitation


To Observe









1 n a service of prayer and
thanksgivinmgfor all departed
loved ones.

On the
2nd.November, 2005
6:00 pm
at Woodlawn Gardens
Soldier Road


We honour the memory of
thosehburiMd at Woodlawn
Gardens.


Join us as we prayand give
thanks, fo rtheir lives.


Riotrk uf I


Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa
Sandals are seeking suitable qualified applicants with drive
and ambition to fill following positions:
Security & Loss Prevention Manager/
Environmental Health & Safety Manager.
S&LPM
Sound knowledge on preventive Security principles &
practices.
Service as a Royal Bahamas Police or Defense Force.
A Minimum of three years as Head of A private Security
Services.
Knowledge of Microsoft Word, Excel and Internet
applications.
Hospitality loss and prevention experience;
Ability to Train /Supervise and work with a team concept;
Disaster Management Training/ Basic Accounting.
EH&SM
Working Experience in the Hospitality Industry at a .
Managerial level (2-3 years)
Training/experience in implementation of Environmental
Management Systems.
Strong appreciation for maintaining operating standards
Possesses strong management skills and be able to
communicate effectively
Must be familiar with Microsoft Excel spreadsheets and
Microsoft Word
Other Beneficial Qualifications
* HACCP certification
* Certified Hotel Environmental Manager
Excellent benefit package offered. "
Applications should be faxed to: 242-327-6961 or email
cmajor@srb.sandals.com z ': .


THE TRIBUNE


- -


Availab





PAGE 22, MONDAY, OCTOBR 31,2005


THE TRIBUNE
:\ ..,; ..3 =


- -~T~J' ~


SAV.A.CHEK 'Extra-Special': on each item you purchase, over
I a dollar, with One filled SAV.A.CHEK certificate get a Dollar Off!
REDEEM your SAV-A-CHEK now at:
Johns S George, Sandys, Epic Battery, GNC,
Home Fabrics, Godetts Jewelry.
FREEPORT: Dolly Madison Home Centre, GNC, Epic Battery, Play Time Sports
SAT.: 7:30AM 9:00PM Extra Extra!
7:00AM 12:00PM 7:00AM 2:00PM CABLE BEACH & I SAV.A.CHEK Snecial!


ASSORT -
12 OZ
BOOST
MEAL SUPPLEMENT
9 912--
1"2 OZ


W/D


PUPPY
DOG FOOD
17.5 LBS
$01249


SUPER INSECTOX
INSECTICIDE
SPRAY

600-ML
LIBBYS
GARDEN
PEAS
16 OZ

99'


CARIBBEAN
CHUNK LITE
TUNA WATER
66 OZ


THRIFTY MAID
WHOLE
KERNAL
CORN
29-OZ
*1 79


EILAFTI
MAYONNAISE
REGULAR
32-OZ
$369

ZEST
BATH
SOAP
3 PAK
$230


JBI
GREEN PIGEON
PEAS IN
COCONUT MILK

932- OZ


NIAGRA


EASY IRON
NONSTICK STARCH
20 OZ
mo09


TOMATOES


$1


49
EACH


MIX-N-MATCH
RED, SEEDLESS &GLOBE
JUMBO GRAPES
*/s99
EACH
LIMES
4/$1 100
EACH


WINN-DIXIE
SPREAD
3-LB
SUPERBRAND
YOGURTS
REG & FAT FREE *
2/$149
a oz


W/D
CORN ON
THE COB
S9429
12 CT
W/D
ASSTD REG &
MIX VEGETABLES


EVERCANE

SUGAR
4 LBS



ROBIN HOOD


ROMAINE
HEARTS
EACH
POTATOES
WHITE POLY 5LB BAG
I LB
ONION
3LB BAG
$S149
EACH


SLICE CHEESE

W/DI
ASSTD BISCUITS
AND BAGLES
*11?


PEPPERIDGE FARM
LAYER CAKES
ASST FLAVOURS
$369
19 OZ
WINN-DIXIE
ICE CREAM
ALL FLAVOURS
$099

LIBBYS
CORNED
BEEF
12 OZ
$1 29

POE '*C


FRAI


FLOUR SI
5 LBS
* 1e J


I POWER


NCO AMERICAN
UPERIORE
SPAGHETTI
MEATBALLS


14.75 OZ


CHESSE-N-CRACKERS 24 oz.......2/.990


REGULAR & CHX EACH..................$1.19


ASSTD COOKIES 24 PKL..................$1.99


COCONUT WATER 6 PK...............2/$1.59
NATURE VALLEY
GRANOLA BARS ASSORTED 12-pak.$3.99


ASSORTED 4.5 OZ......................2/$1.49
DELMONTE
FRUIT CUPS PEACHES, MIX FRUIT &
CHERRY 11.5 OZ...........................$2.99
REYNOLDS
STANDARD FO 24-FT.....................$1.49
GWALLNEY
HOT DOGS OR BOLOGNA EACH ......$1.29


AQUA PURE

WATER
(NASSAU ONLY)
1 GAL
99P B
i'S l


KELLOGS.
CORN
FLAKES
I 24 OZ


1 51


I PWEBU


COLGATE BURTONS
TOOTHPASTE RICH TEA
REGULAR BUSCUITS
6.4 OZ= 300 G
$259 S 4 99


PILLSBURY
CAKE
FROSTINGS
16-OZ
o1 79


CARDINAL
EVAPORATED

MILK
410-OGR
2/$ 39


LAYS
CHIPS BAG
ASSORTED
NASSAU
ONLY
16 OZ
$309


PILLSBURY
CAKE
MIXES
18-OZ
is" 7!


DELI
SLICE TURKEY OH
BREAST 8

WHOLE
ROTISSERIE MA
CHICKEN S
$7 99 $
r EACH s


CARIBBEAN
CHUNK LITE
TUNA (WATER)
6 OZ
2/$ 39

QUAKER
OLD FASHIONED,
QUICK OR CRYSTAL
WEDDI NGOATS
16 18 OZ



HUNTS
KETCHUP
SQUEEZE
BOTTLE
36 OZ
.1i4


IICKEN
WINGS.
'$30EACH
CREME
CARONI
ALAD
229
EACH


PAR-EXCELLENCE
PARBOILED
RICE
5 LBS
$209

ACT 11
POP CORN,
ASSORTED
3 PAK



KRAFT
BBQ
SAUCES
18 OZ
2/$3oo00


MON. -
SUN.:


I


I ,I I I,


i










INERATIOALNW


N -ea ** *
__ ..m,* ,,, & o *
















"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


,Finan0 .'

''19


At your convenience we'll visit you and tailor an

affordable home ownership solution that meets

your unique needs.


Call one of us today

for expert l home

finance ,ng advice


* Trademarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia. Trademarks used under license and control of The Bank of Nova Scotia.
t The Home Financing Speciali st service s only available ftew Providence.


*


S 0 b -. 0 -
6. -w

4 ** _
e.--.



4WD eg *- ap
-mdbow a 04-








0 *





41b *
41 -Eno-







-am 4w
- -

ow *O 0

% N N W








* 0R


a -
0 -
0
0


-m
~ -




*
* a




*~ -d
- -


0 "0 IP








40'.
--4-o

* 0




o,



a


- a-


- 4 4m


I r::. -
- -

___ -
S -
a 0 -
* *-. *0~


0.:0


- _


~a- *~ -
- a -
a -
- a -


*la


0~ -

-
- a -

a- -


0 -


1-- - I - -, - --I---


*" '


.__J__I


* *








-e
> -d do*


L,










Brother of one of Iraq's two



vice presidents gunned down


* *- *


" % f I* m ea 0 a V%
^"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


NOW IN STOCK
* Power Chairs Mobility Scooters Lift Chairs Wheel Chairs


Full Life Products is
dedicated to developing
innovative products to ease
and enhance the lives of those
with mobility challenges.
*^ s^ /rt:cr.' T,


.
*





o .

-
*mom


A Step Ahead

I Come see outr showroom at
SCOTTDALE BEDDING CO. LTD.
Hill Top on the East West Highway
Open: Monday Friday 8am 5pm Telephone: 394,4147-50


~-& K,
2


~-----T- II. ---- ir-i;l --C--- -


PAGE 24, MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


a
" "21


9








MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005


SECTION


business@tribunemedia.net Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


asking for it to investigate the
role played by a "shell entity"
domiciled in this nation in a
scheme that earned Saddam
Hussein's regime 9.4 million
euros, The Tribune can reveal.
The report by the Indepen-
dent Inquiry Committee
appointed to investigate the
programme revealed that the
UN's 661 Committee sent let-


IReport is grim

reading for

Bahamas fund's

investors
* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamian Supreme Court has appointed a Canadi-
an to work alongside BDO Mann Judd's Clifford Culmer as
joint provisional liquidator of the Bahamas-domiciled $375
million Olympus Univest Fund, which was placed in volun-
tary liquidation earlier this year, after receiving $200 mil-
lion in investor redemption requests.
Raymond Massi, a partner in RSM Richter, is also the
Canadian court-appointed
receiver for the Norshield
Group and its affiliates. SEE page 2B




$53m undersea

resort will be

'booked fulH'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE developer behind a
proposed $53 million under-
water resort for Eleuthera has
told The Tribune he expects
the hotel "to be booked com-
pletely full for the first year",
although he and his manage-
ment team have not yet direct-
ly spoken to the Government
about obtaining all the neces-
sary permits and approvals.


* Bruce Jones, the underwa-
ter systems engineer who is the
driving force behind the Posei-
don resort, said the financing
for the project was in place,
and all design and engineering
work had been completed.
He and his team were now
"gearing up" to complete an
Environmental Impact Assess-
ment (EIA), along with a study

SEE page 6B


Bahamas must

develop 'unique'

risk management

financial products


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE development of
"unique" risk management
products in the Bahamas could'
give its financial services indus-
try "significant upside poten-
tial", helping to diversify the
sector and enabling it to com-
pete with emerging rivals such
as Singapore, a Central Bank


of the Bahamas examiner
believes.
In an address to the
Bahamas Association of Com-
pliance Officers (BACO),
Hubert Edwards said the glob-
al demand for risk manage-
ment and professionals to pro-
vide such services was grow-

SEE page 6B


ters to the Bahamas' Perma-
nent Representative at the UN
on November 20 and Novem-
ber 23, 2001, "requesting offi-
cial investigations into the
action of those companies from
their respective states who
were involved in oil lifted by
the Essex".
The UN report alleged that
Trafigura, a Dutch-based oil
commodities broker that
agreed to buy the Iraqi oil
loaded on to the Essex, was
part of a scheme that twice saw
an extra 200,000 barrels placed
on the tanker in excess of the
UN-permitted 1.8 million bar-
rels.
The report alleged that
Trafigura and Ibex Energy, a
French oil services company,
"used offshore companies in
an effort to disguise the pay-
ments between them".
To finance the purchase of
the 200,000 extra barrels of oil,
known as a 'top-off', Trafigura
on both occasions allegedly use
a letter of credit from Credit
Agricole in the name of
Roundhead Inc.
Roundhead, named on the
Iraqi Oil Ministry bills of lading
for the 'top-off' cargoes, was
described in the report as "an
'off the shelf' Bahamian com-
pany beneficially owned by
Trafigura";
The report described the UN
661 committee's deliberations

SEE page 4B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
NEW Providence's popula-
tion will grow by about 50 per
cent to reach 300,000 or
"maybe more" due to antici-
pated economic growth, the
Prime Minister's chief planning
consultant warned at the week-
end. As a result, this nation will
need to adopt a completely
new approach to planning and
enforcement to manage the
change.
Addressing a free legal clin-
ic offered by the Halsbury
Chambers law firm at the
weekend, Malcolm Martini said
that with $6.7 billion in invest-
ment proposals before the
Government: "The changes
that you are about to experi-
ence over the next 10 years,
not 15-20, are, very, very sub-
stantial."
He added that this meant
Bahamians were likely to have
to accept more enforcement
and regulation, even though
they might not want it, and
debate subjects they may never
have thought of before.
Mr Martini, who works in
the Prime Minister's Office,
said: "I expect that what you


PM's top consultant says new
planning and rule enforcement
approach needed to manage
economic growth and 50%
people increase


will see is more planning regu-
lations. In that, you will have
the right to demand of the reg-
ulators that they be regulated.
"In all of this, government
and the private sector are going
to have to accept new limits
and responsibilities in response
to this growth. You are going
to see growth and demand for
growth that you have not
seen."
Regulation
Mr Martini added that the
Bahamas was a country that
had experienced "not a lot" of
regulation and enforcement of.
the laws, as this had been done
on an informal basis.;
However, he indicated that


the Bahamas would need a
more rigorous approach in
these areas if it was to success-
fully manage economic growth
and an expanded population
that came with it.
Most investors and tourists
who came to the Bahamas, Mr
Martini pointed out, came from
societies such as the US and
Canada where people were
used to enforcement of rules
and laws.
A key driver of Bahamian
economic growth, Mr Martini
pointed out, was the 45 million
US baby boomers who "all
want to get unstressed", and
the Bahamas, with its reputa-
SEE page 5B


Investing Is Only For Rich Fos.


SThatis the biggest lie we tell ourselves. Why speak


failure over your finances? Every day, thousands of


Bahamians are already investing andgenerating


millions of dollars in personal wealth. Why aren't


you claiming your share?


For professional financial advice In a friendly atmosphere, you should call:


Colinal
Financial.Advisors
Make Your Money Grow


502-7010


MoneyGrows@ColinaFinancial.com


MT \ .Offering the latest technologypfor today
business, With the experience and kbno-hw
to make it all work seamlessliytogether. A

BS re t ^ :TECHNOLOGY L....... a1
P.O.BoxSS-6270 Nassau,Bahamas I # 9
Tel: 242.328.3040 Fax:242.328.3043 e-mail: info@micronet.bs Web Site: www.micronet.bs


I


UN asked Bahamas



for Iraqi oil probe


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
T he United
Nations (UN)
committee
responsible for
overseeing the
corruption-ridden Iraq Oil-for-
Food programme wrote to the
Bahamian government in 2001


Aliwngl pMSl*Cedeed OWNr WlWro]Medf Ptoa4MvctMww fscttr wi..tal ofd, tietmsl]xe iewd*rfit)w yM pb


I '


Thel iiffaiffl


'NewProvdenc




pouaint







PAGE 2B, MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005 .. .. u t-


* By Fidelity Capital
Markets

DESPITE losing a trading
day due to the passage of Hur-
ricane Wilma on
Monday, more than 68,000
shares changed hands last week
in the Bahamian market. For
the week, the market saw nine
out of its 19 listed stocks trade,
of which seven advanced and
two remained unchanged.
The volume leader for the
week was Colina Holdings
(CHL) with 40,500 shares
changing hands and account-
ing for 59 per cent of the total
shares traded.


The big mover for the week
was Bank of the Bahamas
(BOB), which rose by $0.22 to
close at $7.22. Companies post-
ing new 52-week highs included
FamGuard (FAM), up $0.15 to
$4.35, Cable Bahamas (CAB)
rose by $0.01 to $9.27 and
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas)
(BAB) gained $0.10 to end the
week at $1.20.
Just a reminder that the Con-
solidated Water BDR offering
will be open for another week.
The offering will close oti
November 4, 2005, unless
extended by the company's
management. CWCO closed at
$16.30 today on the NASDAQ


exchange.

COMPANY NEWS
Commonwealth Bank (CBL)

WITH the bank on target to
achieve another record-break-
ing year in profits, the board
has decided to reward its share-
holders for their dedication and
loyalty to the bank over the
years.
CBL has declared an extra-
ordinary dividend payment of
$0.08 per share payable on
November 30,2005, to all com-
mon shareholders as at Novem-
ber 15, 2005. The regular divi-
dend payment in December is


still scheduled to take place.
Now that's a little something
extra for shareholders to smile
about.

Bahamas Supermarkets
(BSL) -
FOR fiscal Year 2005, BSL
posted net income of $8.06 mil-
lion, representing an increase
of $1.6 million or 25 per cent
year-over-year.
Net sales increased by $9.5
million or.7.7 per cent to total
$132 million, while cost of sales
rose by $6.8 million or 7.6 per
cent to total $96.3 million.
Gross profit margin remained
pretty flat year-over-year at 27
per cent, while operating
expenses rose by 4 per cent to
total $27.9 million.
Operating income was $7.9
million compared to $6.4 mil-
lion for the same period in
2004. Earnings per share
increased by $0.35 to total
$1.77, while dividends per share
was $0.96, up $0.15 year over
year.
Management of BSL said the
boost in sales was "driven pri-
marily by the impact of Hurri-
canes Jeanne and Frances and
reduced competition in the
Grand Bahama market from
competitors that have not fully
recovered from storm-related
damages".

Kerzner International (KZL)

The US brokerage firm,
Bear Sterns & Company,
upgraded KZL shares to 'Out
Perform' from 'Peer Perform'
on October 17, 2005. KZL
closed today at $57.61, or the
BDR equivalent of $5.76.





Norshield Asset Manage-
ment was the investment man-
ager for the Olympus Univest
Fund, and Mr Massi's first
report as receiver is unlikely to
make happy reading for
investors in the Bahamian-reg-
istered fund or other Norshield
clients.,
In his report, Mr Massi
described how he met Mr Cul-
mer, who advised him on his'
activities as liquidator.
Mr Massi said he was work-
ing with institutional investors
who had submitted claims of
$175 million against the Olym-
pus Univest Fund, and added,
that he had agreed with them
to form a committee featuring
both institutional and retail
investors to advise himself
and Mr Culmer. Jean Fontaine,
of the law firm Stikeman
Elliott, had been recommended
as attorney for retail investors.
Mr Massi added that the
receiver and institutional
investors had agreed to pay
$500,000 to fund the joint liq-
uidators activities in respect of
the Olympus Univest, subject
to Canadian court approval.
A rt n r - -


citlgroupi






CITIBANK N.A., NASSAU,

BAHAMAS BRANCH
















|i .

B -


















Mrs. Jannice Strachan-Brown, Operations Officer,
for being the recipient of the "Team Member of the

3rd Quarter 2005" Award. Jannice was chosen by

her colleagues for her outstanding contributions and

tireless efforts. We encourage you to keep up the great

work! L to R Mrs. Pearlene Moxey, Operations Head;

Mrs. Jannice Strachan-Brown and Mr. Luis Carlos

Ochoa, Business Head.


ricing Information As Of:
8 October 2005

2wk-HI 52wk-Lo w Symbol Previous Close Today's Cls e Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
.10 0.73 Abaco Markets 0.73 0.73 0.00 -0.169 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.23 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 10.23 10.23 0.00 1.456 0.340 7.0 3.32%
7.24 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 7.00 7.22 0.22 4,400 0.587 0.330 11.9 4.71%
.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.204 0.010 3.9 1.25%
.80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 1.40 1.40 0.00 0.112 0.060 12.5 4.29%
1.20 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.10 1.20 0.10 1,000 0.066 0.030 18.2 2.50%
.27 6.94 Cable Bahamas 9.26 9.27 0.01 2,300 0.618 0.240 15.0 2.59%
.20 1.39 Colina Holdings 1.40 1.40 0.00 -0.046 0.000 NM 0.00%
9.10 7.00 Commonwealth Bank 9.08 9.09 0.01 5,500 0.791 0.410 11.5 4.51%
2.50 0.88 Doctor's Hospital 2.40 2.40 0.00 0.429 0.000 5.6 0.00%
4.35 3.85 Famguard 4.35 4.35 0.00 0.428 0.240 9.1 5.52%
10.90 9.50 Finco 10.90 10.90 0.00 2,870 0.695 0.510 15.7 4.68%
9.90 7.35 FirstCaribbean 9.90 9.90 0.00 0.695 0.380 13.7 3.84%
9.25 8.39 Focol 9.25 9.25 0.00 0.675 0.500 13.7 5.41%
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 0.022 0.000 52.3 0.00%
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.94 9.94 0.00 0.526 0.405 18.9 4.07%
8.75 8.20 J.S. Johnson 8.75 8.75 0.00 0.526 0.560 16.6 6.40%
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 5.69 5.76 0.07 0.122 0.000 46.6 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.760 4.9 7.60%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Lo w Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price AVeekly Vol EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 11.00 1.768 0.960 7.5 7.25%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.044 0.000 NM 0.00%
3.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.33 13.33 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Lo w Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div Yield %
1.2578 1.1892 Collna Money Market Fund 1.257751'
2.4403 2.0311 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.4403 *"
10.6103 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.6103.""*
2.2560 2.1491 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.267097*
1.1395 1.0686 Colina Bond Fund 1.139546* **

BISX ALL SHARE INDE X- 19 Dec 02 = 1.000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-HI Highpst closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Collna and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
* AS AT SEP. 30, 2005/ ** AS AT SEP 30, 2005
* AS AT OCT. 30, 2005/ ** AS AT SEP. 30, 2005/ "** AS AT SEP. 30, 2005


The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 435.63 YTD 1.321%


BISX CLOSING CHANGE
SYMBOL PRICE


AML
BAB
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL


$ 0.73
$ 1.20
$0.80
$7.22
$ 10.23
$12.25
$1.40
$ 9.27
$9.09
$1.40


$0il0.

$0.22
$ -
$-
$0.01
$0.02
$0.01


VOLUME YTD PRICE
CHANGE


0.
1000'
0
5400
0
0
0
2300
7534
40500


-33.64%
'25.00%
-5.88%
25.57%
27.88%
-5.77%
-22.22%
30.56%
28.03%
-36.36%


CIB $9.90 $ 0 32.18%
DHS $2.40 $- 0 60.00%
FAM $4.35 $0.15 1250 9.85%
FCC 1.15 $- 0 -42.21%
FCL $9.25 $- 0 15.63%
FIN $ 10.90 $ 2870 12.37%
ICD $9.94 $ 0 0.51%
JSJ $ 8.75 $ 0.05 5000 6.45%
KZLB $5.76 $0.07 2456 -6.11%
PRE $ 10.00 $ 0 0.00%

DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:

* Freeport Oil Holdings (FCL) has declared a dividend of
$0.11 payable on November 15, 2005, to all common share-
holders as at record date October 31,2005.

* Commonwealth Bank (CBL) has declared an extraordi-
nary dividend of $0.08 payable on November 15,2005, to all
common shareholders as at record date November 30,2005.

* Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) (BAB) has declared a dividend of
$0.02 payable on November 15, 2005, to all common share-
holders as at record date November 2, 2005.

* Bahamas Supermarkets will hold its Annual General Meet-
ing on November 17, 2005, at 9am at its Head Office, East-
West Highway, Nassau, Bahamas.



International Markets


FOREX Rates


CAD$
GBP
EUR


Commodities

Crude Oil
Gold


Weekly %Change:


1.1775 -0.83
-1.7739 0.33
1.2068 1.21-,.


Weekly '%Change


$61.22
$475.00


0.97
1.34


International Stock Market Indexes:

Weekly %Change


DJIA
S & P 500
NASDAQ
Nikkei


Bank and Trust, the Barbadian
institution that was part of the'
Norshield Group.
Meanwhile, the rest of Mr
Massi's report struck a gloomy
tone, as he had "a concern that
there may be a shortfall in
assets required to satisfy the
claims of the retail investors
and other creditors of the Nor-
shield Group".
He added that Norshield.
operated in "an extremely
complex manner", with
investor funds "widely invest-
ed" in offshore centres such as
the Bahamas, using numerous,
companies and corporate vehi-'
cles.
Mr Massi said: "It appears
that investments made offshore
by the Norshield Group may
be illiquid and/or subject to


10,402.77
1,198.41
2,089.88
13,199.95


1.84
1.60
0,37
1.11


competing claims.
"It appears that the Nor-
shield Group may have co-min-
gled funds originating from var-
ious investors and corporate
entities. For example, the
investment funds originating
from the retail investors appear
to have been co-mingled at the
Univest level with funds invest-
ed by institutional investors.
"It appears that certain of
the investment funds originat-
ingfrom the retail investors are
currently subject to competing
claims or claims of third par-
ties that assert ownership over,
such assets/funds."
Mr Massi said a "secured"
$50 million claim had already

SEE page 3B


A runner $175,000 Canadian
dollars will also be coming
from Barbados to assist Mr
Culmer and Mr Massi's efforts,
the court there authorising the
payment of that sum as part of
the winding up of Olympus


FAMGUARD


The Board of Directors
of
FamGuard Corporation Limited
is pleased to advise that
the third quarterly dividend
for 2005
of 6 cents per share
has been declared
to be paid on
November 11, 2005
to Shareholders of record
as at November 4,2005



FAMGUARD CORPORATION LIMITED
The parent holding company of
Family Guardian Insurance Company Liited
BahamaHealth Insurance Brokers & Benefit Cons ltants Limited
FG General Insurance Agency Limit
. ... .... ......


I


i ii;


BUSINESS I


FIDLYAK


I


I


I


I







MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005, PAGE 3B


Job security 'becoming




a problem' in Bahamas


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Bahamian companies are
increasingly using workers
from agencies "to free them-
selves of the burden of
employment, a Court of
Appeal Justice has said, with job security
"becoming a problem" in this nation.
Justice Emmanuel Osadebay, a guest
speaker at the free legal clinic offered by
Halsbury Chambers at the weekend, said
Bahamian companies were increasingly
turning to employment agencies to find
workers, a trend that was already popular
in Europe and North America.
He explained that this created the issue
or whether a worker hired through or
from an agency was an employee of that
agency or the company.
"That's a very important question," Jus-
'tice Osadebay said. "If anything happens
on your job, they [the employer] could
say they're not responsible for you, an
employee of the agency.
"It is showing in the Bahamas. Once
you are classified as not an employee of
that person, that person has no responsi-
bility for you or what you do."
Justice Osadebay said the practice of
hiring workers from agencies had "come in
here through the backdoor", having start-
ed with security guards.
Companies were no longer employing
their own security officers but hiring them
from outside agencies, fearing that if they
employed them themselves, they could
join a union and not be available to protect
their property.
Justice Osadebay said the practice had
been "creeping" into the Bahamas and


was now going beyond security guards.
He added: "Security of employment in
the Bahamas is becoming a problem."
Justice Osadebay said job security was
also being threatened by employers laying
off veteran workers on the grounds that,
through promotions, increased salaries
and rising benefits such as pensions and
health care, they.were increasing over-
heads too much.
Justice Osadebay also warned Bahami-
an employers about the potential pitfalls
they could land themselves in with regard
to recommendations they made about for-
mer employees who had applied for work
with another company.
Prospects
He cited a case that went all the way to
the House of Lords, in which former
employees of an insurance company were
ultimately successful in suing that firm
over a recommendation they claimed dam-
aged their prospects of landing another
job.
Justice Osadebay said: "The employer
has no obligation to give recommenda-
tions on departing employees, but if he
does so, make sure it is accurate and can
be supported by evidence, not hearsay
and gossip. If it damages the employee
and they can't get a job, they can sue you
for damages."
He warned that given the relatively
small size of Bahamian society and tight-
knit employer groups, exchanges of infor-
mation on potential and former employees
were likely to be commonplace.
"In the Bahamas, it happens, and it
probably happens here more than any-
where else," Justice Osadebay said.


On the unilateral variation of an
employee's contract, Justice Osadebay
said a Bahamian employer could termi-
nate an existing employee relationship
and establish a new contract with that
worker, but has to pay them what they
are entitled to under the terms of the first
deal, including pension and other fringe
benefits.
He added that employment regulations
and legislation in the Bahamas was intend-
ed to strike a balance, given that employ-
ers held the advantage in terms of setting
wage rates and other conditions.
"Because of employment demand in the
Bahamas, they [employers] can get away
with a lot of things," Justice Osadebay
said. Emphasising that he did not mean all
employers were bad, he added that
because this nation had no income tax sys-
tem, it was difficult to know how much
employers were earning from their busi-
ness.
This in turn made it difficult to "strike a
balance", Justice Osadebay said, pointing
out that too much regulation and red tape
would harm the Bahamian economy by
driving investors and businessmen to
switch to other jurisdictions.
Similar to the agency situation, Justice
Osadebay said the definition of who was
an 'employee' and who was an 'indepen-
dent contractor's was also critical in the
workplace.
If an employee did something on their
job that resulted in someone being injured,
the company might find itself liable to pay
compensation, but an independent con-
tractor could be sued himself as he/she
was not an employee.
Justice Osadebay also warned employ-
ers to be careful in terminating employees.


Report is grim reading for


Bahamas fund's


FROM page 2B

been made against Norshield's
assets by Mendota Capital Cor-
poration.
The Tribune revealed earlier
this year how the Olympus
Univest Fund was operating
without a Bahamian adminis-
trator in the last five months
before it went into liquidation,
after its previous administra-
tor, Cardinal International,
shut down at the end of 2004.
That violates Bahamian law.
Olympus Univest's directors
placed the fund into voluntary
liquidation after negative press
surrounding Norshield
appeared to spark a flurry of
redemption requests from
investors in late 2004 and early
2005.
Norshield had suffered a run
of bad publicity in relation to
investments made by Cinar, a
Canadian animation company,
in two other Bahamian-regis-
tered investment funds with
which it was affiliated.
The lawsuits in the Cinar
affair are continuing to fly in


Canada, with the dispute
sparked by $122 million worth
of investments made in two
Bahamas-based funds Globe-
X Management and Globe-X
Canadiana by the Canadian
animation company, which
were allegedly carried out with-
out board approval.
Cinar, which is still seeking
to recover $40 million of the
sum it allegedly invested in the
Globe-X funds, has relied upon
reports filed with the Bahamas
Supreme Court by their liq-
uidators, PricewaterhouseC-
oopers accountants Wayne
Aranha and Clifford Johnson.
In an earlier report to Olym-
pus Univest investors, Mr Cul-
mer's report noted that the
Globe-X Management liquida-
tion was impacting his, with the
PwC liquidators having
obtained a March 11 Supreme
Court order requiring the latter
to redeem its investment.in
Globe-X as requested on Sep-
tember 30, 2004, and pay the
proceeds into an account in
Globe-X's name.
Mr Culmer said he had
"accelerated" the redemption


THE SPORTS CENTER IS HIRING!

If you live the healthy, athletic and
fashionable lifestyle that is the
Sports Center, then keep reading.
If you are energetic, sales-oriented
and personable, then we want YOU!

APPLY TODAY!

College level students are invited to
apply for part-time employment.
r----------------------------------------------------
High school / college certificates, current
police certificate and photo are all required.
Only applicants with successful BGCSE results
will be considered.
Drop off resume at either store, or submit
via fax or email.
Fax: 394-7668 /E: sportscenter@coralwave.com:
----------- ----------------------------------------J I


process "as bes
pointed out tha
uidators had
Supreme Court
ing that Glob
"rightful owner'
mon shares in
vest and wante
ferred by the cur
owners to them
And Mr Joh
Aranha, in thei
liquidators for]
entities, had ob
porary restraining
the southern d
York bankruptc


investors

t he can", but 2005oagainst Royal Bank of
it the PwC liq- Canada.
also filed a The order and preliminary
t action claim- injunction involved a Cash-Set-
e-X was the tled Index Call Option, which
" of 5,100 corn- they claimed Globe2X had an
Olympus .Uii- interest in, but Mr Culmer said
-d those trans- Olympus Univest had an inter-
rrent registered est in this instrument through
its investment with a Cayman
inson and Mr Islands entity.
ir capacities as The liquidator warned he
both Globe-X had been unable to protect the
tained a "tem- Olympus Univest Fund's inter-
ng order" from ests in this action, leaving it
istrict of New exposed to "adverse implica-
-y court in June tions".


Legal Notice

NOTICE

FRONT CHAMPION SHIPPING
COMPANY LIMITED


Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000 notice is hereby given that the
above-named Company has been dissolved and struck off the
Register pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by the
Registrar General on the 18th day of October, A.D., 2005.

Dated the 27th day of October, A.D., 2005.

Jurgen Salamon
Liquidator of
FRONT CHAMPION SHIPPING COMPANY LIMITED


Legal Notice

NOTICE

FRONT CENTURY SHIPPING
COMPANY LIMITED


Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000 notice is hereby given that the
above-named Company has been dissolved and struck off the
Register pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by the
Registrar General on the 18th day of October, A.D., 2005.

Dated the 27th day of October, A.D., 2005.

Jurgen Salamon
Liquidator of
FRONT CENTURY SHIPPING COMPANY LIMITED


THE TRIBUNE


TEACHERS AND SALARIED WORKERS
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LIMITED

NOTICE TO OUR
VALUED SHAREHOLDERS
Please be advised that Interest/Dividend payments for the year 2004
will be distributed effective Tuesday November 1, 2005 during the
hours of 11:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. as follows:
DATES ACCOUNT DATES ACCOUNT
NUMBERS NUMBERS

November 1 001-700 November 24 7201-7500
November 2 701-1200 November 25 7501-7800
November 3 1201-1800 November 28 7801-8100
November 4 1801-2400 November 29 8101-8400
November 7 2401-3000 November 30 8401-8700
November 8 3001-3600 December 1 8701-9000
November 9 3601-4200 December 2 9001-9500
November 10 4201-4500 December 5 9501-10000
November 11 4501-4800 December 6 10001-10500
November 14 4801-5100 December 7 10501-11300
November 15 5101-5400 December 8 11301-12100
November 16 5401-5700 December 9 12101-13000
November 17 5701-6000 December 12 13001-14000
November 18 6001-6300 December 13 14001-15000
November 21 6301-6600 December 14 15001-16000
November 22 6601-6900 December 15 16001-17000
November 3 6901-7200 December 16 17001-18207



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2005
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/QUI/00545
Equity Side

IN THE MATTER OF all the piece parcel or
lot of land situate on the North side of South Street in
Dunmore Town in the Island of Harbour Island one of
the Islands of the said Commonwealth comprising
approximately Eight Thousand Nine Hundred and
Seventeen (8,917) square feet.

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Harbour Island
Villas Ltd..



IN THE MAf The Quieting TitlesAct, 1959

NOTICE

The Petition or Harbour Island Villas Ltd., a company
incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas aforesaid in respect of:

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate in
Dunmore Town in the said Island of Harbour Island
which .aid piece parcel-is bounded NORTHWARDLY
partly by land the property of the Petitioner and running
thereon Eighty-nine and Seventeen hundredth (89.17)
feet and partly by land the property of Curtis Albury
and running thereon Forty-two and Ninety-six hundredth
(42.96) feet EASTWARDLY by land the property of
Pearl Albury and running thereon Fifty-seven and Fifty-
nine hundredth (57.59) feet SOUTHWARDLY by South
Street and running thereon One Hundredth and Forty-
two and Eighty-five hundredth (142.85) feet
WESTWARDLY by land the property of James Falsey
and Sandy Levinson and running thereon Seventy-two
and Fifty-one hundredth (72.51) feet as the same are
delineated with the position shape marks boundaries
dimensions and abuttals thereof on the Plan filed in this
matter and thereon coloured PINK.

Harbour Island Villas Ltd, claims to be the owner in fee
simple in possession of the tract of land hereinbefore
described and the Petitioner has made application to the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas
tinde Section 3 of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have
its title to the said land investigated and the nature and
extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate
of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with
the provisions of the said Act.

A plan of the said land may be inspected during normal
office hours in the following places:

a) The Registry of the Supreme Court in the City of
Nassau;

b) The Office of the Administrator in Dunmore Town,
Harbour Island, Bahamas;


c) The Chambers of Callenders & Co., One Millars
Court, Nassau, Bahamas, Attorneys for the Petitioner.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person havign dower
or right to dower or an adverse claim or a claim not
recognized in the Petition shall before the 21st day of
December A.D., 2005 file into the Supreme Court and
serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement
of his claim in the prescribed form, verified by an
Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such
person to file and serve a statement of his claim on or
before the said 21st day of December A.D., 2005 will
operated as a bar to such claim.
CALLENDERS & CO.
Chambers
One Millers Court
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner









PAGENESS I M1


PUBLIC NOTICE
Intent To Change Name By Deed Poll
The public is hereby advised that I, ANNA LINDA DEAL,
of North Lauderdale, Florida, intend to change my name
to ANNA KERR. If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to
the Chief Passport Officer, P.O. Box N-742, Nassau,
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of the
publication of this notice.




The Nassau


Music Society

presents


















The Endellion String Quartet

Monday, October 31st, 2005 at 8:00pm
GOVERNMENT HOUSE BALLROOM

Tuesday, November 1st, 2005 at 12:00noon
CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL

Box Office: A.D. Hanna & Co: 322-8306
Nassau Music Society: 327-7668
Tickets: Monday Concert: Members; $25,
Non-Members: $35
Students: $5
Tuesday Concert: $15, Students: Free
www.nassaumusicsociety.com
I I IoI


UN asked Bahamas




for Iraqi oil prob
*, .: "J *: : "** ; J L.:


FROM page 1B

over the affair. "It said: "Fur-
ther discussion focused on
Trafigura's payment to the
escrow account for the top-offs
and referring the matter for
investigation to each of the
member states affected by the
situation: the Netherlands,
France, the United States, the
United Kingdom, the Bahamas
and Venezuela.
"Although significant inves-
tigations were initiated in the
Netherlands, France, the Unit-
ed States and France by cus-
toms and financial prosecutor-
ial authorities, no charges were
ever brought against any of the
companies or individuals
involved in the Essex top-offs.
"Investigations. .in the&
Netherlands and the United
States remain active, while the,
United Kingdom and France
investigations have since been
closed."
It is unclear whether the
Bahamian authorities ever ini-
tiated a probe into Roundhead
and its alleged role in the affair.
The Committee's letters would
have been received at a time
when the former FNM admin-
istration was in power.
The report said Roundhead
was used twice on May 16,
2001, and on August 27 that
year, to obtain standby letters
of credit for purchasing the top-.
off Iraqi oil, thereby hiding
-Trafigura's involvement.
The report on the Oil for
Food programme again illus-
trates how vulnerable Bahami-
an-registered entities and cor-
porate vehicles are to being
used by foreign clients for
shady purposes. ,
Apart from Roundhead,tthe
UN report detailed howT au-
-rus, an -oil trading consortium
based 'in Europe and' the
Caribbean, used a Bahamian


vehicle as part of a structure ,
to finance the purchase of 256 RUPETOLEUMLTD BIAHAMAS
million barrels of Iraqi oil.
Taurus Petroleum Nassau, A C ," FAC S TRS...SS.ION
which was founded by US. i a
national Ben Pollner, its bene- 29,ueda t tsarb J ZGENSVA
ficial owner who had power of 2
attorney, used Swiss bank DAT: ..p..sa. i' .,0
accounts to finance. Iraqi oil To: /mmTE o ErO&aaa t -GEa E-YA
purchases. The other signatory '.M: !niaiit-NINUi= i
to the Bahamian entity's Swiss / {1
bank accounts was his associ- F o'RO M rw chear!nk
ate, Martin Schenker. TAL A WES" NCL.- WSCOERSHE).2
The report alleged 'that ofi
behalf of the Russian oil group.. .... .....
Zangas, Taurus Nassau I.e nonla- W fuur L m 4 .w
financed at least two of five oil 790-7',
liftings that totalled six million i.xr 230z220,,.O -.
barrels of Iraqi oil, paying the: ;,W
Iraqi oil ministry $230,221 from sin s A.c)
a UEB Geneva account on LE tf
September 18, 2000'(seedocu- I N.21
ment on the right).: .An a y ..
In addition, the UN report
alleged that Taurus Nassau a. r. .
financed "at least five of the. v" i 2 spte asso
11 letters of credit" issued in
connection with the contract
held by another Russian firm, o IR _
Zarubezhneft,to buy 15 mil-', i
lion barrels of Iraqi oil.': ..i' "si* a&isiMS A nCAs
It was alleged that two of ~, "ArI.T.oI..-
these five oil liftings by 'Tau- TA" .
rus Nassau had illegal sur-" O'(t
charges, totalling $96,302 and '
$105,000, imposed on them as i
kickbacks that would be A.DOCUMENTobtaedbytheco tteinv tingthe
received by the Iraqi govern- UN oil fot food pirogrammeon a Bahm ian al
ment. mvolvement
The report said: Again, .
Taurus Nassau directly paid
these surcharges. into an financedby TaurusNassau for anuary an Jly 2001 to sev-.
account controlled [by the Iraqi Machinoimport, the report eral Lbanese bank accoi ts.
government]. In late October alleging these were paid to the oThe Imoney .:from these-
2000, nine days before these Iraqi government on October accounts would then go direct-
two Taurus-financed liftings 16,2000, and Oct6ber 25,2000. ly to the Iraqi goverinment,-
occurred, Taurus Nassau irans- Then, the report alleged that most of which was used qopay
ferred $200,000 from its UEB Taurus Nassau and another the illegalsurcharges .
Geneva account to an Iraqi Caribbean-based entity Finally, the reportalso
government account. On this financed'at least" 73 out of 94 detailed the well-docuninted
occasion, Taurus Nassau was liftings made by Liechtenstein role played by Bayoil Supply
identified in the wire docu- front companies acting onPoll- & Trading, a Bahamian com-.
.ment,' .. ;. .... .. ner's and Schetker' -behalf. pany basd in Nassau, apd its
Eurther, surcharges of The .document added that US affiliate in lifting 403 mil-
$130,000 and $161,985 were Taurus Nassau directly trans- lion barrels of Irqi oil under
imposed on two liftings ferred $13.2 million between the programme.



Help your employees secure their facial future...
Q U .... ..... .. .. .... .. .. .


with a BA Corporate Pnsion Plan.


It's no secret that employee satisfaction and successful business
results go hand in hand. In today's competitive market,
attracting performance driven, loyal and motivated personnel is
challenge that allbusixosses face lareormal. We believe
that helping your employees secure their finial future will
keep your employees yours'

British American.Insurance Company provides top itch
Corporate Pension Plan Solutions. We offer define4-bef
defined contribution, saving plans, personal pensions, executive
pensions and annuities. We offer dynamic and flexible'
investment options.

Fot more informaton on our Co Pe nsn, Persona
Pensions, Annuiaes and Morgage Services, call the '
Financial Services And Investments Team at 461-1000


British American Insurance
Pension Services nclude:
^ Dyt-nai'F &' FexeDoigGe De, Options

^ Record Keeping and Adniinistrati Servw
) Receipt and Collectionof Pension Contributins
. 'sk.e and Compliance Services
. A icountng' Serz.ic .and Actuary Reports
T iT'medyEmployer atee n nts
* Einpoyee Seminars &Consultatons


Sa srong link in ye finan.ia future

Independence Drive, P.O. Box N-4815 NMt, NP, Tih Baihalm
.290 -.200f5 Tel (242) 461-1000 ax (242) 61-2626'
.-I ,., bafinancial@lb, nsrancel l.o
i 1'1 ... it:...i I" "iih-''" T "" ''"li''"; : :':.... ;:.:.<:,,,:.. ,. b. ..a. a.... 'Sui,...i


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005


THE TRIBUNE








TilE RIBUE MODAYOCTOER 3, 205,IPGES5


PUBLIC NOTICE
Intent To Change Name By Deed Poll
The public is hereby advised that I, IAN SEAN STORR, of
North Lauderdale, Florida, intend to change my name to
SEAN KERR, SR. If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to
the Chief Passport Officer, P.O. Box N-742, Nassau,
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of the
publication of this notice.



Legal Notice

NOTICE


FROM page 1B
tion as a law and order desti-
nation, would be a magnet for
both investment and tourism.
New Providence was "the
engine of growth" for the
Bahamas, with Kerzner Inter-
national's resorts, the Baha
Mar $1.6 billion Cable Beach
expansion, and the Albany
Project and other investment
proposals all located here.
The resulting population
expansion on New Providence
would not make this island the
world's densest urban centre,
but Mr Martini said: "It will
be dense."
Coupled with the population
growth, ;he added, would be
increased "stress on services",
both infrastructure and in
areas such as public spaces,
such as parks and beaches.
One initiative Mr Martini said
he had'been instructed to
undertake by the Prime Min-
ietreiWas 'to identify beach
inft~stthpt' could 'be acquired
by the Government to allow
public access, whether they
were existing beaches or ones
T-aPh ld a' eof created artifi-
Ser abuld'also be a need
"d~Dd6 'r:ad'ndfaicilities
s iibliigbif coirses,- Mr
V #disaidddi -g: "We need
to organ 'miisi a:waiy that
i Qd..if. t the way we've.
"bleehadoingit". :'
"We have to think like a
"'iajoi- urban centre and one
aastieharaetistisof a
P 0,r~sA fl ^


expand and replace infrastruc-
ture, such as Nassau's water
distribution system, which
leaked 53 per cent of its water,
and the downtown sewer sys-
tem, which needed to be


Bank figures, and as a result
Mr Martini said developers
would have to at least part
finance the costs of infrastruc-
ture needed to support their
developments.


"I expect that what you
will see is more planning
regulations. In that, you will
have the right to demand
of the regulators that they
be regulated. In all of this,
government and the private
sector are going to have
to accept new limits and
responsibilities, in response
to this growth. You are
going to see growth and
demand for growth that
you have not seen."
Malcolm Martini


''rebuilt, was made difficult due
to the stress this would place
on the Govdrnment's weak
finances.
The'Budget deficit' for 2004-
' -2005 'bas ,been fore'nst-at $160
afidionby, pteilna it Gtrifal


"You are going to have to
take a hard look at what hap-
pened with exemptions" that
act as incentives for investors,"
Mr Martini said. "In somecas-
Ses,ca'n' we-afford, the exemp-
nfohsh *- "s "


On some Family Islands,
such as Exuma, Mr Martini
said: "Unlocking the land is
the trick" for planning and
managing growth. This was
because much of the land on
that island was commonage
and generational land.
He also focused on MICAL,
which includes the islands of
Mayaguana and Crooked
Island, both with populations
of about 300 each and a work-
force of about 70.
Referring to the proposed I-
Group development for
Mayaguana, a 50/50 joint ven-
ture with the Hotel Corpora-
tion of the Bahamas, Mr Mar-
tini contrasted the developer's
plans to create 2,000 jobs with
the size of the island's existing
population and workforce.
"I'm not saying these guys
are wrong, but I am saying:
'Let's understand the implica-
tions'," Mr Martini said.
He added that there may be
ways to phase investments of
this nature in, but the devel-
opers could not expect to "get
carte blanche" from the Gov-
ernment.
Mr Martini said the Prime
Minister was especially con-
cerned with how the develop-
er's infrastructure and labour
requirements could be met.
He added that preliminary
calculations by himself had
shown that if New Providence
continued to keep between 60-
70 per cent of the Bahamas's
total population, "the amount
df the Bahamian population
.akvailable..to-.the reqt of,the
islandsds: excludi'ngoGrand
- Bahama and Ab co, is 10,000".


METROPOLITAN INVESTMENT CORPORATION
Voluntarily Liquidated
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (8) of the International Business Company Act (No. 45 of
2000) the Dissolution of METROPOLITAN INVESTMENT
CORPORATION has been completed. A Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register of Companies.

The Date of Completion of dissolution was 13th day of
September 2005.

Sebastian E. Paniza P.
Liquidator


EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY



Multistore, Retail Company offering career opportunities.

Store Managers;
v Minimum 3 years experience
Organizational and supervisory skills essential
Computer experience required
.Merchandising aptitude/experience an asset
Ability to work flexible hours
"* Competitive benefit package with medical
Salary commensurate with experience

Senior Sales Staff:.
: Minimum 3 years experience
Computer experience essential
Merchandising experience/aptitude an asset
Sales driven personality
Competitive benefit package with medical
Salary commensurate with experience

Warehouse Manager:
Minimum 3 years experience in:
receiving/processing/inventory management
Computer experience necessary
,* Organizational and supervisory skills essential
... Some flexibility in operating hours required
Competitive benefit package

Drivers/Equipment Assembly Personal:
........ Current drivers license 3 years minimum experience
in both manual and automatic vehicles
Ability to assemble basic mechanical consumer products
Some flexibility in operating hours required
Competitive benefit package

Please send resume to:

TIM c/o DA 2167
The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas


invites applications for the position of

SENIOR MANAGER, ELECTRONIC
BANKING AND CARD OPERATIONS
The successful candidate will have regional responsibility for Fidelity's card and
electronic banking business and will be required to manage the card products
(credit and debit) and electronic banking delivery systems (ATMs, internet and
telephone banking) to a measured plan

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:
* Providing strategic direction and overall leadership of Fidelity's e-finance unit
* Being accountable for the business unit's human and other resources, P&L
and budget performance
* Developing and executing a business plan for card and electronic banking
products and services which identifies and capitalizes on new business
opportunities
* Preparing Business Requirements for existing and new products/services and
working with the IT Head to develop technical requirements
* Developing and monitoring service level indicators to ensure superior
customer satisfaction, customer retention and growth which complements the
organization's customer centered strategy
* Working with the Marketing Head to create and execute product plans and
sales and marketing strategies for card and electronic banking products and
services


MINIMUM COMPETENCIES:
* 10+ years experience in the financial services industry with 5 years
experience in the card and electronic banking services/product development
and business management areas
* A Bachelors degree in Business Administration, Marketing or related
discipline. MBA preferred
* Business focus with some technical background
* Demonstrated project management experience and prior work experience
with either Mastercard or Visa preferred
* Strong communication (verbal and written), organizational, and supervisory
skills
* Strong demonstrated knowledge in banking regulation and operational risk
management
* Willingness to travel extensively in the Caribbean region to oversee the
development, rollout and ongoing administration of new products and
services
* Excellent inter-personal skills. Ability to effectively interact with all levels
of management and a broad range of employees across the organization
Compensation package will include a competitive salary, depending on
experience, together with a comprehensive range of benefits.
Send resume no later than November 7, 2005 to:
Senior Manager Electronic Banking .

51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-483
Nassau
Fax 326.3000
e-mail: info@fidelitybahamas.com


To






ri




Tr


Legal Notice

NOTICE

LEVNZA INC.
Voluntarily Liquidated
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (8) of the International Business Company Act (No. 45 of
2000) the Dissolution of LEVNAZ INC., has been completed. A
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register of Companies.

The Date of Completion of dissolution was 4th day of
October 2005.

Sebastian E. Paniza P.
Liquidator
; a- :i2 .' ,.,


~'


MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B. MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ALEXINA DORANGE OF
CARMICHAEL ROAD, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 24TH day of
OCTOBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


HYDRUS VALLEY CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
26th day of October, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


SEASIDE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
26th day of October, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
,(Liquidator)


Bahamas must




develop unique'




risk management




financial products


FROM page 1B

ing, and this trend "could present signifi-
cant opportunities" for Bahamians in the
financial sector.
He pointed out that many risk manage-
ment strategies and instruments in exis-
tence today, such as derivatives, securiti-
sation, tax planning and wealth manage-
ment structures, had been born out of the
need to manage specific risks.
From their development had arisen
growth in jobs such as financial engineer-
ing, risk managers, credit, market and
operational risk specialists, and specialist
insurance professionals.
Emphasising that these were his views,
not those of the Central Bank, Mr
Edwards told BACO members that
increasing demand for wealth managers
would create a need for "trailblazers, cre-
ating where there is nothing and develop-
ing systems that don't yet exist or, if they
do, are not defined and sufficiently struc-
tured to address the underlying complexi-
ties of the organisation's business activities
and the challenges of the global dynamics".
Mr Edwards added: "I think that we are
at the dawning of a new era, locally, which
if embraced could present significant
opportunities for personal and professional
growth.............
"By developing unique products, ini-
tially for risk management purposes, which
are recognised to have speculative value,
important financial products are created. It
means, therefore, that local developments
in the realm of risk management, materi-


alising as just outlined, could have a sig-
nificant upside potential for not only the
diversification of financial services but also
what I would term potentially redefining
the financial services industry to compete,.
not only with the traditional offshore cen-
tres but also with the new and emerging
ones such as Singapore and others which
are popping up in Asia.
"This can be achieved while, very impor-
tantly, ensuring that we continue to remain
relevant to other major financial centres
such as New York and London."
Support
Mr Edwards said that one "significant
deficiency" was the absence of what he
called a "support .system" for risk man-
agement activities. He added that BACO
was created to provide such a "support
mechanism" in terms of internal compli-
ance.
Describing the Basel II Capital Accord
as a major improvement over its prede-
cessor framework, Mr Edwards said it was
likely to "revolutionise" risk management
in banks, and have a "favourable spillover"
into other financial and non-financial insti-
tutions. '
The new Accord, designed to be more
'risk sensitive', has three pillars minimum
capital requirement, supervisory review
and market discipline.
Under the first pillar, when calculating
minimum capital requirements, banks had
to account for credit, market and opera-
tional risk. The third of those conditions


was not included in the first Accord.,
Mr Edwards said the impact of the Sep-
tember 11 attacks and hurricanes that had
impacted the Bahamas and other
Caribbean states in 2004-2005 had
increased the focus on business continuity.
He added: "Regulators are more and
more imposing explicit requirements for
this critical aspect of institutions' risk man-
agement systems. While there is noting
revolutionary about this requirement, it
increases the focus on operational risk and
drives home the importance of planning for
adverse eventualities.
"Note that the most profitable fentity
with the best implemented risk manage-
ment system, if it fails to restart its opera-
tions on timely basis following a signifi-
cant adverse event, is likely to go out of
business."
Meanwhile, Mr Edwards said the Sar-
banes-Ocxley Act, enacted in the USfi'i
the wake of Enron and other coiporate
scandals, was becoming the 'gold standard'
for both public and non-public entities,j
impacting risk management and internAi
controls throughout the world.fHeaidd
"Note that effective governanceis -:4pI
ority issue for all institutions. This"iss'o0
important that only this week COSOQ
issued a draft document providing guid-1
ance on how small businesses c4fi effec-4
tively comply with Sarbanes Oxley's sec'
tion 404. "While I have not yet read the
document, I think that it will hold signifi'
cant relevance to us here in eBaha,
given that relativey.eely i
porations would fall within its s'ope'."


$53m undersea resort will be 'booked ful'


FROM page 1B

that would detail the economic
benefits for Eleuthera and the
wider Bahamas if the Poseidon
Resort was given the go-ahead.
However, Mr Jones said:
"Until we have all the permits
and business licences in hand,
we won't start construction."
The five-star Poseidon
Resort will charge guests
$1,500 per night, and be situat-
ed 20 metres below sea level


on the edge of a 2,000 metre
trench off Eleuthera, sur-
rounded by coral reefs.
While all preliminary work
had been done on the undersea
aspect of the project, Mr Jones
said architectural studies on the
shore-side area were ongoing.
Demand
Of the resort's potential, Mr
Jones said he was extremely
confident about the dernand


from potential tourists, giver
the volume of information
requests and letters sent to the
project's website, seeking open-
ing and booking information.
"I expect it to be booked
completely full for the first
year. We've had hundreds of
people writing to us," Mr Jones:
said. "There's no question in
my mind that it will be a suc-
cessful endeavour.
"There was a question:
before about whether people
were prepared to spend.$1,500
per night. We now know with-
out question they will. We only
need 4,000 people per year for
it to be successful."
Mr Jones said, though, that
he and his management team
had not spoken "directly" to
the Government about obtain-
ing a Heads of Agreement for
the project, although there had
been indirect communication
through their consultants.
Feature
The Poseidon Resort will
feature a two-room, $20,000 0
night penthouse suite, which
will be "hung" over the side of
the aquatic shelf. It will only
be accessible by submarine. !
Apart from that, visitors will
be taken by escalator to one of
the resort's 22 cabins, each
equipped with their own pri-
vate coral reef garden, where
guests can operate their own,
fish feeders.



Pori


A Bahamian owned group of companies is seeking a financial controller. Applicants should possess the following qualifications:
Knowledge and Education:


* Professional accounting designation (CA or CPA)
* A minimum of five years industry experience as a financial controller in a managerial capacity
Skills


* Excellent interpersonal skills
* Strong computer skills
* Strong oral and written skills
Job responsibilities include the following:


* Excellent managerial skills
* Strong analytical skills
* Able to work in a very dynamic environment


* Supervising the complete accounting cycle for seven companies
* Preparing monthly financial statements for seven companies
* Human resource function including payroll for 100 plus employees
* Co-coordinating all other areas of the business to ensure optimal efficiency
* Dealing with all government reporting requirements
* Dealing with all share holders inquiries
Interested persons should apply no later than November 3, 200S5


Financial Controller
c/o The Tribune
DA 0971
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas


FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANiK

CAREER OPPORTUNITY


for


INTERNATIONAL PREMIER MANAGER

General Requirements/ Responsibilities:

V Good and proven knowledge of International policies, plans and strategies,
and evidence of applying such policies in managing client relationships
and be at ease with clients from differing social, religious, ethnic and
cultural backgrounds

V Detailed knowledge and application of the principles of Investment/ leading
and fiduciary services as it relates to non-resident foreign nationals and.
expatriates in order to identify solutions to clients' needs and identify sales
opportunities. To have proven experience in Wealth management techniques.

V Delivers a high level of service and personal attention to the Bank's affluent
clients, with the aim of developing a significant and superior level of service
and in acquiring new business. The successful applicant will have a proven
track record in managing relationships, providing financial solutions,
working to sales numbers and being part of a team structure

Qualifications/ Experience Required:

/V A high level of PC literacy excellent communication style both written
and orally together with analytical, problem solving and a complete
understanding of both operational and credit risk

If you are interested:

Submit your resume & confidential in WRITING ONLY before November 4, 2005
to:

Lynette Roker
Human Resources Administrative Assistant
FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Financial Centre 2nd Floor, Shirley Street
P.O.Box N 3221
Nassau, Bahamas

Or email: lynette.roker@firstcaribbeanbank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank thanks all applicants for their interest,
however only those under consideration will be contacted.

Vacancies are open to Bahamas residents only.


FOOD STORE

GENERAL MANAGER NEEDED

Established food store requires General Manager to oversee all
aspects of the store as well as expand the business. Applicant will
require the following:-
An extensive history in the retail food distribution business
Knowledge of all aspects of store management
At least 20 years experience in the industry
Excellent sales skills a must
Be self motivated and able to drive the work force
Willing to work long hours as necessary
Possess excellent communication skills
Strong computer skills required
Interested parties are requested to submit their written application,
together with a current resume, copies of references and proof of
qualification to the following address:-
P.O. Box N-63
Nassau, Bahamas


I


BUSINESS


ii'









MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
Four Services Sundays
7 AM, 9AM, 11 AM & 7:30 PM.
PRAYERS FOR YOUR BABIES EVERY SUNDAY
WEDDINGS, FUNERALS
Just call the numbers listed, I'll personally Earle Francis
handle your request. J.R Pastor
(242) 393-5798, (242) 323-6452
"Come and Worship."


Money Safe. Money Fast.


M*aleyGramI
ntimetaat Moary 7l ^ ^asw





IUnfeorettable Bahamas Weddings
^ ,* Weddngs Renewal of Vows
" Passport Picture Signing
Documents
*Affidavits & Much More
Immigrations Legalization Forms


id.#32
152, Nassau Bahamas.,


Rev Dr JM Miller, JP
Phone/Fax:1 -242-323-5195


We install sprinkler systems starting at
,'- $499 Labour. Parts may be another
$OO, d0,epending upon lawn size.
.FREE ESTIMATES.
Island Br **kor


1NTeed a Visa Card for:
- A Paypal Account? Cruise Line? Car Rental? -Reserve kHotel?
- Purchase Airline Tickets? -Online Shopping? Point of Sale?
AL.L AR.OUO D SHOPPERS
Presenrts

Shop wherever Visa Cards are accepted worldwide
U.S. Based Visa Card
Sign up now for only
,. ....... 1


DAILY WEEKLY BI-WEEKLY MONTHLY
"We Love to Clean, Let Us Show You!"


MEAUUW ANU rAHI'.tl M Mn I H
PHONE 356-0933 PO BOX GT-2243


Corporations, Developers, Institutions, Consultants or Homeowners,
with over 30 years in the construction industry,
allow me to manage your next construction project.
My experience covers all facets of the industry from
Britain, Canada, the Caribbean and the Bahamas.


E-mail: bahamasconstructionmanager@yahoo.com


Can be used for: Garbage Disposal Animal Feed
Water or Fuel Storage Drink Cooler 5gal for mope
55 Gallon $35.00 30 Gallon $25
15 Gallon $15.00 5 Gallon $ 5
We Ship To The Family Island
CALL: 393-3667.:


SERVICE 324-3703


SPECIALIZING IN:
Obtaining Grants of Probate from the Probate Registry of
the Supreme Court with or without a Will for a minimum Fee.
No one can beat our price. We can deal with the Estate for
you.We cut prices not quality.
Call us 356-0933


We supply and install Auto Glass
All make and model vehicles.
Windshields $200
Lowest Prices Guaranteed


Parts Sales eService *installation
Auto-Air Gas-up .........Start @ $29.99
Central A/C Unit ..............Start $49.00
Refrigeration Gas-up ..... Start $59.99
Duct Less A/C Unit ........start $499.00
Central A/CUnit .........Start $999.00


YOU OR[


IT .... WE WILL PICK IT


3-4~"w~--
-~ ~ ~
-ormS
~ ~
-~,AI K ~~l~0.*r ~ristl ~


NATIONAL BOOKSELLER

The Ultimate Destination
For School Books
Up to 20% DISCOUNT


EARN $10UUU.UU ftEK RAL
STAY AT HOME WITH THE KIDS
ATTEND FINANCIAL FREEDOM?
I WILL PERSONALLY TRAIN YOU
http://www.powerhomebusiness.com


Make Money On The Internet!!!
(Retire Early, Enjoy Life, Make a Differene)

www.dean-pipeline


SGreat Income Opportunities



BAHAMtAS 1uSfAU1on
BLOWN-IN ROCK-WOOL INSULATION INSTALLED AT MATERIAL COST"!I
KEEP` iUl HOUSE COOLER AND SAVE MONEY ON YOUR SEC BILL
LIFETIME WARRtANTY, FRE QUTES, INITIAL OFFERING IN NASSAU .


thonse (242) 324-1619
Cell (242) 424-1518i
Email: bahamasinsulation(Egmail.com
Website;-wwahamasinsulatin.com


Best little
Comu'Uter
In town. W
Super fast 4bit mini PC 64bit rii PCs
Incredib OOO meor HHigh-speed
HuAOOgb Hareilrv R ewoec
tltt screen =
DvOJ wrtter $1295.00 327-2519 security analysts
wireless keyboarwmomruse ,eipmy-s n Qouickooks help
One year Nassau warranty wwwpeyasnet Maintenance
Freeistalatarn Web design
Send us your cornpLger problems. suppomtOtUipersys.net


items from the Florida area.
Weekly service available.

Call: Vincent, 477-2598(Cell) or 362-0567


ALL WINDOW TREATMENTS / CARPETINGIUPHOLi
*Tel/Tax: 1-242-361-2111
Cell: 1-242-477-4335
PO Box CR-55164 Nassau, Bahamas
Email: seaviewblinds@hotmail.com
Blow Out Sale


g
occ a.


IlCl f UmlMl nIcE A I
WESTRIDGE, JFK DRIVES (Quiet & secluded)
GRADUATIONS, WEDDINGS, RECEPTIONS, CONFERENCES, RETREATS, YOUTH
CAMPS, PRIVATE GET-AWAYS.
A/C DORMS, CHAPEL, KITCHEN, DINING ROOM,
PRAYER CLOSETS.
(GROUPS UP TO 80 PERSONS)
327-0667 / 424-3330
www.thesummitretreat.org
VIEWING BY APPOINTMENT ONLY


THEOLOGY &

COUNSELING
Bachelor's, Master's, Doctorate.
one Course, One Weekend per month
VISION INT'L UNIVERSITY
Accredited and M.O.E. Registered
Details: 327-0667 / 424-3330


of Sale


for your Bu


less" -


1 Car wash Electronics Store
Chain of Stores Clothing/ Apparell Covenient
stores Beauty supply
Delis Florist *Grocery Store
Liquor Store Delivery
Fast Food Restaurant.
We can also support your existing system!


Phone: 324-5444


These 4,000-watt Generators
other emergencies, contr
$299 MONTHLY PLAN,
Available at
INGRAHAM'S AUTO IN C


FIELD


TRqACTORSEKVICES
Specializing in:- Soil, Sand, Fill, Cracker Dust,
2/4 Rock, Land Clearing. Cespite/Foundation Trenching Concrete
Pouring, Tractor Rental.
Tel: 323-4346 Eve 392-0196 P.O. Bao N7309
Fax: 356-7354 Mr Cad Missick Manager


Am, i'lleii' A5tt(o'rmig D nlaf
-PSYCHOLOGY -SOCIOLOGY
.. #.COUNSELLING- BIBLE & THEOLOGY
W. I NISTRY ANDf PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
!ois 1iclsesta *!rgl MPh em s'4,e ?iwfl

Driven for Dependability
---- Telephone ----
323-8427 (Sales) OR 326-6380 (Rentals)

Visit our site:
www.avis.com.bs/preownedvehicles.hmI

Door to Door Mail Service is Here!!! i


Can't get to the Post Office? Flamingo
Express installs a mailbox on your
premises and deliver your mail to your
home for only $25.00 per month plus start
up FEE!!

Call
FLAMINGO EXPRESS
322-2347



PGF


APPRAISALS
RENTALS
SALES
AFFIDAVITS


REV. WALER & HANCHELL, JP.
BROKERIAPPRAISER


TELEPHONE 326-8017 326-8112

DOUBLE L TRENCHING & CRANE RENTAL


Specializing in:
Foundations, Septics, Removal and Planting
of Trees and Motor Engines, Pouring
Concrete, Steel joist, etc.


LEALAND LIGHTBOURN
General Manager


..1

S 1~


3


Tel 22-33-696/ 23-37


'T~M~,:~


:br:
~ :


,,







P E M., .......... ......... 31 2005.THE.TR.BU
,,-,,el


, .


- *4


-


^~U*


hr


J I1
<.A,--p


4.
di m


I


2**


on 40M


I


bI


. .nl -
A6
* *
go o-ob
low*


4,


~,g'mpi


* 1.


O- 0- 0C4


Q0


-- a -
* a. -
- -*~ -
- **~ -~


*
*


- 4 om


0-~ -


. 4 am4


"Gopyrig hted Material


-- jSyndicated Content
- a
2Available from'Commercial News I


-. 0 a


w anD


q



a PRM ..


- a


op


A


,


m


p
ft. W 6
4b am..-

-eu. a
a q~am _.


a a.
*5 ~.


PIT


ox


- a ~
0 ~wi


-~
- - -


_ Ig
*-******


4

p
U
U
U
1I
I
m
m


6"1~w


h
S
U


I *1S
- a


E


S

.1


II

I'm,'
p


Iwo
me
0




**
4w
mm04.


= -


a"'p


.-
,- m
*~

44- 011- --


Providers".

-_ _


'I
0!


ii'!

It11


a a



=* -
a -
fto o do*

ago OGP -1 oqp

O .4 O



I - a- "


sl!-
4w 40 m


I-


0--


54 a *
aa


r- a o
IM -
mr4


>1


w
ft


S.w:
.m

.88r6 fM
f.. "
mm I1am


B M

* S
-~ S


p-4


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE BBMONDAYOCTOBR 3 5


0 1


6


II


ft,....


4r .-.


1


'I


- "a


o B
IF


. d


mnmn


--


v.


M. w


- 0








THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005, PAGE 9B


MONDAY EVENING OCTOBER 31, 2005

7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

Antiques Road- Antiques Roadshow Circa 1820 American Experience"Race to the Apollo One: Tragedy to Trumph
B WPBT show "Notting- Sunderland figurines; radio tran- Moon' Retracing the Dec. 24,1968, n
ham' script of Pearl Harbor bombing. Apollo 8 lunar orbit. (N) A
The Insider (N) The King of How I Met Your Two and a Half (31) Out of CSI: Miami The wife of a famous
WFOR n (CC) QueensProfit Mother Robin Men A (CC) Practice "Pilot" Miami baseball player is found mur-
and loss. (CC) and Ted meet. ln (CC) dered in her home. (CC)
Access Holly Medium "Coming Soon" A serial Medium "Suspicions and Certain- Medium Allison confronts the spirit
WTVJ wood (N) (CC) killer has been haunting Allison's ties" A (CC) of a psychopathic doctor responsi-
dreams. / (CC) ble for killing 14 girls. (CC)
Deco Drive Prison Break "The Old Head" C, Prison Break Tweener" Abruzzi's News (CC)
WSVN (PA) (CC) demotion puts the plan at risk. (N)
A (PA)(CC)
Jeoardyl (N) Sports Jam Live NFL Football Baltimore Ravens at Pittsburgh Steelers. From Heinz Field
*l WPLG (CC) in Pittsburgh. (Live) A (CC)

(6:001 The Se- Star Wars: Empire of Dreams The trilogy becomes a cultural phenome- Criss Angel Mindfreak "Halloween
A&E cret life of Vam- non and changes movie-making. (CC) Special" New illusions. (N) (CC)
pres (CC)
Hardtalk BBC News World Business BBC News Click Online Es- BBC News Asia Today
S BBCI (Latenight). Report (Latenight). sential guide to (Latenight).
computers.
*x HAIR SHOW (2004, Comedy) Mo'Nique, Kellita Smith, Gina Torres. A hairstylist needs The Parkers A The Parkers/ 3
BET her sister's help to win a contest. (CC) (CC)
CBCoronation Breaking Point Behind-the-scenes of the yes vs. no forces on the 1995 The National (CC)
Street (CC) Referendum. (Part 2 of 2) (CC)
:00)0n the The Apprentice: Martha Stewart Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
NBCNBC oney "Every Dog Has His Day' (N) Cl
S (:) The Stua- Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) NewsNight With Aaron Brown
CNN l on Room (cc)
*x SCARY The Daily Show The Colbert Re- The Showbiz South Park (CC) Blue Collar TV Blue Collar TV
COM MOVIE 2 (2001) With Jon Stew- port (CC) Show With Big Kids; Hal- Singing hunters;
Shawn Wayans. art (CC) David Spade loween party, cooking. (CC)
COURT Cops Cops in Psychic Detec- Psychic Detec- Psychic Detec- Psychic Detec- The Investigators The Witching
C U T Memphis'(CC) tlves tives lives tives, Hour"
That's So Raven TWITCHES (2005, Fantasy) Tia Mowry, Tamera Mowry, Kristen Wilson. Naturally Sadie Sister, Sister
DISN "Don't Have A Reunited twins use magic against evil. 'NR' (CC) School project The twins nab
Cow" stresses Sadie. Ray's car. (CC)
This Old House Weekend Deco- Material Girls Fresh Coat From Junky to Scrapbooking Knitty Gritty (N)
DIY. (CC) rating (N) Funky (N) (N)
DWL In Focus Journal: Projekt Zukunft Journal: In Euromaxx Journal: Im Focus (In
DW Tagestema Depth T7agestema German)
El News Special Kill Reality THE SCORNED (2005, Horror) Jenna Lewis, Steven Hill, Bob Guiney.
: Premiere. Strange events plague a group of housemates.
ESPN Monday Night Countdown (Live) (CC) Figure Skating World Championships -- Exhibition. From Moscow. (CC)
Goales deis- Gol ESPN: SportsCenter NFL Football Baltimore Ravens at Pittsburgh Steelers. From Heinz Field
ESPNI pana (N) Fuera de Juego Intl. Edition in Pittsburgh. (Live)
CH NT Dally Mass: Our The Journey Home Super Saints The Holy Rosary Abundant Life
FITW :00) FitTV's Marilu Henner's Shape Up Your Blaine's Low Blaine's Low FitTV's Diet Doctor "Jenny Craig"
ousecalls (CC) Life Shaping up inside. (N) A Carb Kitchen Carb Kitchen Jenny Craig. (I (CC)
FO X-N C^ ,Fox Report-. The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
-NC Shepai Smith _______Susteren (Live) (CC)
FSi NFL NHL Hoc eyFlorida Panthers at Toronto Maple Leafs. From Air Canada Centre in Toronto. Best Damn Sports Show Period
S* NFL (Subject to Blackout) (Live). (Live) (CC)
S :31)Goff Channel Academy Live (:43) Golf Channel Academy Playing Lessons 08) Champions Tour Learning
......... 0(Live) ..I.Center
GSO Lingo (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire Cl The Amazing Race The teams Poker Royale: James Woods
.SN. N.... (CC) climb sand dunes. Cl (CC) Gangvs.Unabombers
,T, h. (00) Attack of X-Play Zombies. Icons George Filter "Goriest G4TV.com (N) The Man Show The Man Show
the Showl (N) (N) Romero. (N) Games" (N) (CC) (CC)
:0 ) Walker, Walker, Texas Ranger"The Lynch- * PERRY MASON: THE CASE OF THE GLASS COFFIN (1991,
HALL Texas Ranger ing" Lynch-mob justice. C (CC) Mystery) Raymond Burr, Peter Scolari, Barbara Hale. A flamboyant show-
"Final Justice" man's assistant dies during an illusion.
Curb Appeal Home to Stay reDesign n Debbie Travis' Facelift "Nicks Of- Holmes on Homes "Best Laid Plan'
HGTV Home remodel "Queen's Day" fice Retreat" Nursery. (CC) '(CC
INS MorrisCerullo Breakthrough R.W. Scham- Inspiration To- LifeToday (CC) This Is Your Day Love a Child
INSP (CC) bach (CC) day (CC)
Transformers Sabrina, the My Wife and My Wife and Friends A (CC) Everybody Everybody
SKTLA Cyeron Teenage Witch KidsOveronng Kids Claire pre- Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
S"Space" Cl (CC) flight to Hawaii, pares dinner. A (CC) "The Home"
S* THE DEVIL'S CHILD (1997, Horror) Kim De- *,s BLESSED (2004, Horror) Heather Graham, James Purefoy, Fionnula
LIFE laney, Thomas Gibson, Colleen Flynn. A young woman Flanagan. Premiere. A clinic impregnates a woman with Satan's spawn.
is forced to bear Satan's child. (CC) (CC)
MHardball Countdown With Keith Olber- Rita Cosby Live & Direct Scarborough Country
MSNBC C mann ___
NICK Jimmy Neutron: SpongeBob Zoey101 "De- Full House "Di- Fresh Prince of Roseanne "Boo!" Roseanne "Trick
NICK oy Genius SquarePants A fending Dustin" vorce Court" A Bel-Air. C (CC) or Treat"
1NTV :31)Out of Surface C (CC) Las Vegas "Centennial" A.(CC) News ,, (CC) News
NTV >ractlce Pilot"______,____
(:00 NHL Hockey Montreal Canadiens at New York Rangers.. From NHL Postgame Fearless
OLN'-a Madison Square Garden in New York. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) A Show (Live)
SPEED NBS 24-7 (N) Inside Nextel Cup (Same-day Behind the Headlights NASCAR Nation NBS 24-7
S E B. ,N r Tape) ...
BN (5:00) 2005 Fall Praise-A-Thon

Everybody Friends Monica Friends Joey is Friends Ross is Friends Rachel's Family Guy Family Guy Bri-
TBS Loves Raymond battles for a wed- nominated for a attracted to his former sorority "Fore Father" C an joins the po-
t(CC) ding dress. "Soapie." (CC) cousin. A (CC) sister. A (CC) lice force.
(:00) Untold Sto- Trauma: Life in the ER "Last Exit to Untold Stories of the E.R. A girl Mermaid Baby
TLC des of the E.R. Oakland" The staff at Alameda paralyzed from the waist down ar-
(CC) County.Medical Center. (CC) rives at the ER. (N)
TN (00 Law & Or- Law & Order A driver faces justice Law & Order "Burned" A grandfa- Law & Order "Panic" A best-selling
iNT der .Humiliation' for hitting a bum and letting him die ther with connections to Schiff pro- author is injured in an assassination
(CC).(DVS) in her garage. (CC) (DVS) tects a teenage suspect. Cl attempt. (CC) (DVS)
TrOv Halloweenw Scary Godmother: The Revenge Camp Lazlo Grim Adven- Ed, Edd n Eddy The Life &
TO lN Spooktakular of Jimmy "Meat doll. tures Times of Juni
(5 (:00) Faut pai rlver (SC) Vivre en solo Nouveaux celi- Ombres et lu- TV5 Le Journal
I. V : .bataires. mieres
T VA/ (6:00) Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
TWC PM Edition (CC) (CC) (CC)
UI .(:0)PIel.de Contra Viento y Marea La Esposa Virgen Cristina Me dej6 per esa cosa.
UNIV oono Mujeres
valientes.
USA (:00) Law & Or- Law & Order: Criminal Intent An WWE Monday Night Raw Scheduled: John Cena takes on HBK; Stone
USA dter: Special Vic- insurance scam with homeless men Cold Steve Austin..(Live) C .(CC) '
S... : times Unit and a French connection. C
VH1 (:00) Celebrity But Can They Sing? C Embarrassing Moments Celebri- Fabulous Life Of..."Celebrity
BV Best Friends ties face humilation in 2004. Wives' C
( :00) America's America's Funniest Home Videos America's Funniest Home Videos WGN News at Nine C (CC)
WGN FunniestHome C (CC) C (CC)
Videos Cl(CC)
Everybody 7th Heaven "Helpful" Sandy admits Related "The Naked Truth" Alex WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
WPIX Lves Raymond that she slept with Martin only to asks Rose to star opposite him in a Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano
,' :,"The Home" A make Simon jealous. (N) play that requires nudity. (N) A & Mr. G (CC).
Jeopardy! (N) One on One Bre- AII of Us Neesee Girlfriends "Fits Half & Half A Dr. Phil
WSBK (CC) anna and Amaz moves in with & Starts" Vegas new tenant falls
f move. (CC) Robert. wedding. (CC) for Mona. (CC)

(6:00) ** ** CATWOMAN (2004, Action) Halle Berry, Benjamin Bratt, Sharon Bill Maher: I'm Swiss The comic
HBO-E DAVE (1993) Stone. A shy artist acquires feline strength and agility. C 'PG-13' (CC) performs at the Arlene Schnitzer
Kevin Kline. Concert Hall in Portland, Oregon.


(6:15)*** Curb Your En- Extras Andy's Rome "Caesarion" Caesar arrives in Rome "Utica" Vorenus and Pullo
HBO-P THE RUNDOWN thusiasm Larry agent gets him a Alexandria and meets the king. C have a showdown with a local thug.
(2003)'PG-13' and Jeff debate. speaking role. (CC) j1, (CC)
(:00) *** WARf SPRINGS (2005, Docudrama) *** DAVE (1993, Comedy) Kevin Kline, Sigoumey Weaver, Frank
HBO-W Kenneth Branagh, Cynthia Nixon. Franklin Delano Langella. A presidential look-alike takes over for the ailing leader. Cl 'PG-
Roosevelt struggles with polio. C 'NR' (CC) 13' (CC)
(:00 ** CHASING LIBERTY (2004, Romance-Com- ** i CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN (2003, Comedy) (:45) North
HBO-S ey) Mandy Moore. A Briton and the president's daugh- Steve Martin, Bonnie Hunt. A man must handle the Country: HBO
ter ravel Europe. Cl 'PG-13' (CC) chaos surrounding his 12 children. Cl 'PG' (CC) First Look (CC)
M(5:30) ** THE *s EXORCIST: THE BEGINNING (2004, Horror) Stellan Skarsgard, *** THE EXORCIST (1973,
MAX-E DEVIL'S ADVO- James D'Arcy, Izabella Scorupco. A former priest fights demonic posses- Horror) Ellen Burstyn, Max von
CATE 'R' sion in Egypt. C 'R' (CC) Sydow, Linda Blair. Cl 'R' (CC)
(:15) ** YOU GOT SERVED (2004, Drama) Mar- *** INTOLERABLE CRUELTY (2003, Romance- EROTIC CON-
IMOMAX ques Houston. Street dancers work together to win a Comedy) George Clooney. A successful attomey FESSIONS 9
competition. l 'PG-13' (CC) matches wits with a gold digger. C 'PG-13' (CC)
(6:05) *** **x DOLORES CLAIBORNE (1995, Suspense) Kathy Bates, Jennifer (:15) *K HELLRAISER:
SHOW EDUCATING Jason Leigh, Judy Parfitt. iTV. An abrasive woman is accused of murder- HELLSEEKER (2002, Horror) Dean
RITA (1983) iTV. ing her employer. 'R' Winters. TV. 'R' (CC)


TMC


(6:30) MAR- ** GOOD BOY! (2003, Comedy) Molly Shannon, *A LEGALLY BLONDE 2: RED, WHITE &
C X (2003) Lisa Liam Aiken, Kevin Nealon. A 12-year-old's dog has an BLONDE (2003) Reese Witherspoon. Elle Woods
Kudrow. interplanetary mission. C 'PG' (CC) fights for animal rights on Capitol Hill. 'PG-13' (CC)





MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005, PAGE 9B


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS








PAGElOBMONDY, OTOBE 31,2005TRIBNEOSORT


Lady Cheetahs

on attack for

the new season

BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
WHEN the New Providence
Women's Basketball Associa-
tion kicks off its third season
on November 19, the Lady
Cheetahs will be making their
debut.
The NPWBA will welcome
the Cheetahs, coached by
Mario Bowleg, when a pre-
season jamboree will take
place on Saturday at the DW
Davis Gym.
All six teams, with the
exception of the John Lady
Truckers, will be in action in
the jamboree that will start at
6pm.
While the Truckers will
have the night off, the defend-
ing champions Cleaning Cen-
ter Angels will take on the
Island FM male team in a spe-
cial challenge match at 8.15pm.
The two opening games will
be played between the
Defense Force and the Junior
All-Stars at 6pm and the COB
Lady Caribs against the Lady
Cheetahs at 7pm. The two
games will be played four
eight-minute quarters.
NPWBA secretary Cindy
Fox said they expect this sea-
son to be the most competitive
yet.
"We were very pleased with
the competition last year and
we believe that the competi-
tion will be greatly enhanced
with the addition of the Lady
Cheetahs and the return of the
Defense Force clubs," noted
Fox.
"Having worked as an exec-
utive of the BBF, I know the
competitive nature of Coach
Bowleg, so I expect him to
have that team ready to play,"
she said. "I also expect that
COB and the Lady Truckers
will look to challenge the
Angels for supremacy."
Bowleg, who has worked
intensely with the junior
national boys team, will be
coaching his first women's
team that will comprise of Lin-
da Pierre and Kendra Brown.
Their line-up will also include
Brooks Smith and Della Fer-
guson.

Coached
The Defense Force, on the
other hand, will by led by for-
mer national team player
Natasha Miller. She will be
joined by Chryshann Percentie
and Lannos Bennons. The
team will be coached by long-
time referee Freddie Brown.
This year, as an added
attraction, the NPWBA will
introduce it's Season Pass,
which will be designed to
develop a fan base and provide
reduced rates for fans that fol-
low a particular club.
The tickets will be priced at
$30 (general public) and $20
(students only). Persons can
watch more than 50 regular
season games for a savings of
the nightly gate fee of $3.00.
The Season Pass is exclusive of
All-Star Night, Playoffs and
Championships. Players,
coaches and sponsors will be
permitted access to all games,
including playoffs and champi-
onships at no cost.
The league's regular season
is set for Saturday, November
19 at 7.30pm at the D.W. Davis
Gymnasium with a rematch of
last year's championship series
between the Johnson's Lady
Truckers and the Cleaning
Center Angels.
The opening ceremony and
presentation of awards will
take place at halftime. BBF
executive Edgar Pickstock will
offer brief remarks and pre-
sents the 2004/05 awards.
The awards, according to
Fox, will honour persons who
have been instrumental in the
development of women's bas-
ketball in the country.
Those honorees and the
recipients are as follows:
The Randolph Swaby Sr.
Most Valuable Player -
Shantell Rolle, Johnson Lady
Truckers
The Cynthia Pratt Offen-
sive Player of the Year -
Shantell Rolle, Johnson Lady
Truckers


The Daisy Walker Defen-
sive Player of the Year Chris-
tine Sinclair, COB Lady Caribs
The Mynez Cargill-Sher-
man Rookie of the Year Alex-
is Russell, COB Lady Caribs
Sister Annie Thompson
Sportsmanship Award Dean-
dra Williams, Junior All-Stars
This year's All-Star team
will represent the top five all
around players in the league.
They are as follows:
Guard Suzette McKenzie,
Cleaning Centre Angels; guard
- Shantell Rolle, Johnson Lady
Truckers; forward Keisha
Richardson, Cleaning Centre
Angels; guard Sharelle Cash,
Cleaning Centre Angels and
guard Christine Sinclair,
COB Lady Caribs.


Bain leads NCA to their





fourth straight title win


* SOFTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

RICHARD Bain was
almost a one-man wrecking
crew for the undefeated Nas-
sau Christian Academy Cru-
saders as they clinched their
fourth straight Austin 'King
Snake' Knowles' National
High School senior boys soft-
ball title on Saturday.
Bain pitched an eight-hitter
and just missed completing the
cycle after he homered,
tripled, doubled and was
intentionally walked twice, fin-
ishing with five runs batted in
and five scored to assist in the
Crusaders' 22-14 rout over the
NGM Major High in a repeat
of last year's finals.
"I just went out there and
pitched and allow my team-
mates to play behind me," said
Bain, about his performance
on the mound. "At the plate, I
just waited patiently to hit the
ball."
The Crusaders got another


Crusaders beat


NGM Major High


11 hits from their team-mates
as they jumped all over
NGM's losing pitcher Thomas
Davis.
Harvey Knowles went 3-for-
4, including a three-run
homer, driving in a total of
five runs and scored three
times. Renaldo Rolle was
walked three times and scored
four times and Deangelo Ban-
nister had two hits with three
RBIs, scoring a run.
However, NCA's players at
times were throwing their
bats, helmets and gloves in
frustration at the officiating.
At one point, host Bahamas
Softball Federation's first vice
president Burkett Dorsett had
to hold up the game as he
went on the field and issued a


warning to the Crusaders.
Despite their unsportsman-
like conduct, coach Ainsworth
Beckford said his Crusaders
deserved the opportunity to
celebrate because they
worked hard to achieve the
victory. He was doused with
water by the team during their
celebrations.
"We played very well," he
insisted. "We worked hard to
get this one. I'm very pleased
my team. They never gave
up."
It was a keenly contested
from start to finish as the Cru-
saders had to rally from a 3-0
deficit in the bottom of the
first to surge ahead 6-3 in the
bottom and extend their lead
to 9-3 after the second.


NGM would rally back for a
15-14 deficit when they scored
five runs in the sixth. But the
Crusaders put the game out
of reach for good in the bot-
tom of the frame when they
plated six runs.
For NGM, Carlos Pratt had
a three-run homer, scoring a
total of four runs. Deral Wells
and Roscoe Wallace both
scored three times.
In the consolation game,
North Long Island nipped
Kingsway Academy 3-2 for
the bronze medal.
Pascal Dittmar had just one
hit, but it scored both Renaldo
Adderley and Donzaleigh
Hudson in a three-run top of
the fifth that sealed the victo-
ry.
Dittmar spun a two-hitter,
striking out two for the win
over Eugene Pratt, who .gave
up four hits with a strike out.
"It was good to get this
win," Dittmar stated. "We
tried hard. Nobody expected
us to win, but we went out and
played very well."


Annual


general


meeting


for BSF
* SWIMMING

THE Bahamas Swim-
ming Federation has
announced that its annual,
general meeting and elec-,
tion of officers will be held
on November 14 at 6pm at
the Betty Kelly Kenning.
Aquatic Centre. -
All member clubs and
individual members for
2005 are eligible to vote in
the elections. Nominations
for office include presi-
dent, first vice president,'/'
second vice president,
treasurer, secretary and
assistant secretary must be
submitted before midnight
on October 31.
Further information is,
available on the BSF web-
site: www.bahamasswim-,
mingfederation.com or
from the member clubs..
The BSF has announced
that it has a busy calendar.
for 2006, with the Com-
monwealth Games, World
Short Course Champi-
onships, Carifta and the
Caribbean Island Swim-
ming Championships on.
the way.
Presently there are nine
member clubs offering
Learn to Swim, Youth Fit-
ness, Competitive and
Masters Swimming Pro-
grammes at six locations :i
New Providence, two in ,
Grand Bahama and one to.
start in Abaco. :
Competitive water polo
is also offered at the Betty
Kelly Kenning Aquatic
Center and is competitors
are already training hard
and looking forward to the
federation's second Carifta
competition in April in
Barbados.
Interested persons can
contact secretary
Al Dillette at
bsf_newsa@yahoo.com or
fax 364-7047.




















qw a- 0 o
%.-b 010ft











"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"





- o -
- -


p
~ e -
S..

- -


- -


* -


qp--

~4 0
omi*s"

- ---


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005


TRIBUNE SPORTS


- *






ISO i .S


(Och (:happell savs Indian team's

performance now refects its strength


U

-~


*
em .-om-
mm m


-- -p -
6 40
a. -


-I a -


"Copyrighted Material

- -Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"

(M s -I


SiI


U itUlI


'has all of the


bases covered'


*


* a
- - a a a
a a


a *"


* ~ha~


- 0


- a


ar a

d _
A


"^~-^ -


-- - -
- a -. -q-


* I'M. *am- -f
0410 ;-momm a Nm m


-- -- a 5


Drawing will be on Wednesday, November 2nd at 12:00 noon


STelephone-
I, SORRY NO PHOTOCOPIES._NEWSPAPER PRINT ONLY
-- - T ONL


a

* ~


Sjmjl


1 hltlbui .-, <-i 1I I


1V1I .


41b







a a


MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005


SECTION



B
Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


Bahamas select

victorious over

English side

THE Bahamas select side held off the
visiting golden oldies team from Bas-
ingstoke, England 14-7 on Saturday at
the Winton Rugby Pitch.
The Bahamas took a 7-0 lead at the
half and they held onto the lead.
"It was a good group of guys to play
against," said Chris Llieda, the chairman
of the hosts Bahamas Rugby Union.
"They are a lot of fun to be around."
Llieda said rugby action will continue
on Saturday at 2pm at the Winton Rugby
Pitch with the chairman's select side tak-
ing on the vice chairman's side.
The season will officially begin on Sat-
urday, November 11.


THE Cracked
Conch Rugby team
take on the visiting
golden oldies team
from Basingstoke,
England.


(Photo: Mario
Duncanson/
Tribune staff)


N SOFTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
MANAGING to overcome
a series of obstacles, Central
Eleuthera pulled off their
most gratifying victory ever
on Sunday at the Anthony
'Bulb' McKinney Little
League Baseball Field.
Central Eleuthera, taking
advantage of an array of mis-
cues by the Kingsway Acade-
my Saints, pulled off a 19-5
rout to clinch the senior girls
title in the Austin 'King
Snake' Knowles National
High School Softball Tourna-
ment.

Injuries
"With all of the injuries we
had, we really didn't expect
to be here in the final," said
coach Tony Crean. "But once
we got here, we knew we
would be competitive. The
injuries we had to overcome
were just unbelievable."
Central Eleuthera's female
coach got ill and couldn't
make it to the tournament;
team captain Jessica Johnson
had to be rushed to the hospi-
tal with a seizure in the round
robin; first sacker Ajoa Kelly
injured her leg and ace pitch-
er Juliann St. Jean had to
receive eight stitches the night


'before they left fo her right
pitching hand.
"I had to put the injury
behind me and go out and win
this game for Jessica," said St.
Jean.
Despite the adversities,
Central Eleuthera got a four-
hitter from St. Jean and they
gave up all of their runs to the
Saints in the first inning.
Rebounding against Jessica
Sweeting, Central Eleuthera
responded with three runs in
the first, 12 runs in the second
as they batted around the
clock to push the game out of
reach and they added three
more in the third.
Lashanda Kelly and Sirlena
Thompson (two RBIs) both
scored four times, while Shan-
dera Culmer had a pair of hits
with as many RBIs, scoring
twice and Phelon Clarke was
3-for-4 with four RBIs to lead
Central Eleuthera.
After coming from an 0-2
win-loss record, Saints' coach
Ricardo Treco said they knew
exactly what went wrong.
Their problem was they could-
n't do anything about it.
"After 27 errors, I stopped
counting. The shortstop could-
n't make a play, the third
baseman couldn't make a play
and the left fielder couldn't
make a play. Errors. That is
what beat us," he stated.
SEE page 10B


* CENTRAL Eleuthera's Shandera Culmer tries to steal home but is stopped by Kingsway catcher Robin Cartwright yesterday.
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)


:4.


n1pa





aln'st








MONDAY, OCTOBER 31,2005


The stories behind the news


Former police officer Ian
Joseph Hutchinson (left) was
taken to court last week charged
with murdering softball star Jack-
ie "Lil Stunt" Moxey. Moxey, a
former member of the Bahamas
women's national softball team
and right-fielder for the New
Providence Softball Association
ladies champions Electro Tele-
corn Wildcats, died at the
Princess Margaret Hospital last
Wednesday...


I PLAESI


Hurricane Wilma slammed
into Grand Bahama last
week, taking many residents
by surprise with its destruc-
tive force. Power outages,
downed communications and
up to 15 feet of flood waters
were reported in some areas.
According to news reports,
the entire eastern coast of
the island was battered by
the storm...


Thousands of people along the southern and eastern
coasts of Grand Bahama have been left homeless fol-
lowing the devastation and destruction of Hurricane
.Wilma.
i Still recovering from last year's double blow of Hur-
ricanes Frances and Jeanne, islanders have been hit
hard once again as Wilma lashed the island with winds of
96mph and peak gusts of 119mph.
A scene of complete destruction faced residents of
the coastal areas after the season's record 12th hurricane
passed Grand Bahama last week, with homes destroyed
or severely damaged and cemeteries and roads washed
away...


Paying a high price for





public service 'monster'


When the PLP first gained power in the 1960s, they
began rewarding their supporters with jobs for life
in the public service. A culture developed in which
slackness was never penalised, and pay rises were
awarded whether the workers deserved them or
1 not. Now the government is paying the price.
INSIGHT reports...


Fury

deepens

over high-

level 'fat

cats'
UNION leaders claim
that unequal treatment
within the public service
itself is at the heart of their
pay demands.
Janitresses, labourers
and other low-ranking
workers receiving pitifully
inadequate wages feel as
bitter about well-paid,
under-employed civil ser-
vice officials as everyone
Else, they say.
Dennis Williams, BEC's
union leader, said 114 a-ii-
agers. and supervisors with-
in BEC now share $14 ihil-
lion in salaries, perks 'nd
allowances while 920 line
workers make $32 million.
It's the gulf between top
and bottom that prompts
union action, he main-
tained on a radio talk show
last week.
The public service union
chief, John Pinder,
expressed similar views,
though he claimed the lat-
est pay demands were
largely to keep up with ris-
es in the cost of living.
Unfortunately, politi-
cians themselves, and their
various aides, are often
seen as expensive luxuries
who set a poor example,
and with good reason. In
some instances not "all -
well-paid government jobs
appear to go to people
whose qualifications do not
extend beyond their polit-
ical allegiances.
In the Office of, the
Prime Minister, where the
cook earns $17,000 a year,
a financial adviser gets
$80,000 and three other
consultants share $166,000.
The national planning co-
ordinator receives $95,000
while the project co-ordi-
nator gets $54,000.
At Bahamas Informa-
tion Services, three consul-
tants share $157,000 while
a personal assistant at the
Ministry of Youth gets
$31,000. Other consultancy
and aides posts are scat-
tered throughout the pub-
lic service, most of them
created for no discernible


sweats eank tops, shorts &specialty items..
QualityBcreenppinted 'rT-shirts, polos, cape, uniform,

Embroidered shirts & cape ogosor monogramming. |
All artwork designed, printed, digitized and embroidered
right here in The 0ahamae by our talented Bahamian 6taffl


M By JOHN MARQUIS
The consultant with fancy qualifications
was taken on by the government for his
"extensive expertise" in a specialised
field. His'salary was said to be between
$50,000 and $70,000 a year.
Knowing that his appointment was entirely the
result of his political affiliations, and the impressive
degree which proclaimed him to be an intellectual
heavyweight, he was quick to recognise that the qual-
ity of his performance would never be a factor in
retaining the job.
Hence, this government official whose duty was to
offer advice to ministers and civil servants in his nar-
row areapof.expertise spent all day sending porno-
graphic e-mails to his1 igirlfriend-. With ti ie in
abundance on his hands, he fashioned fulsome prose
highlighting the sexual virtues of his various conquests
and urging them to write back in equally explicit
terms.
One of his loves, admittedly a woman scorned, told
INSIGHT: "That's all he ever does. There is nothing
else for him to do. He's being paid big money by the
government to send porno messages to his various
women. It's disgusting."
This woman admitted to having been a willing recip-
ient of these lascivious missives, and protested only
when her lover transferred his allegiance somewhere
else. However, her detailed disclosures offered fasci-
nating insights into the life of this particular civil ser-
vant. And she,said he wasn't alone in being paid a gen-
erous salary for doing hardly anything at all.
'It wuldbe.rash to imagine such behaviour is typi-
cal of all those within the public service. However, it
does point to what has long been a fault in government
employment: a belief that the pay cheque will always
arrive, whether you are doing a good job or not.
"Getting on the government payroll at all costs has
always been a major ambition of many Bahamians,"
INSIGHT was told by someone who did just that.
"For many, it means a pensionable job for life in
which you don't actually have to do much work."
Stories abound of public service workers who nev-
er actually achieve anything at all, who leave the office
at 1pm and fail to return for the rest of the day, and
who sit around talking and filing their nails while
regarding customers as inconvenient nuisances to be
treated with contempt.
In fact, the public will know that reaching the Min-
istry of Education by phone is practically impossible,
and that a call to Batelco will probably mean a 50-
minute wait. At BEC, a well-paid staff provides a ser-
vice which is frequently less than it might be, and
sometimes even worse than that.
At Bahamasair, you never know whether your flight
will take off or, if it does, will ever make the return
journey. Expecting it to depart on time is the height of
fantasy, while getting back to where you started is
often a hit-and-miss affair with no guarantee that your
bags will be on the same plane.
In fact, here's a brain-teaser for the long-suffering
public: name one area of the public service which you
would describe as super-efficient. Identify a single
department in which employees are switched-on,
dynamic, deeply motivated and eager to please.

SEE page 4C


SEE page 2C


- -


I I I -







PAGE 20. MONDAY, OCTOBER 31,2005 THE TRIBUNE


It was finally a breath
of fresh air reading
your article in this
morning's Tribune. It
is not that politicians
do not have the backbone to
fight crime in this country, but
their apathy is for the following
reasons:
They do not believe there
is a problem...to quote one of
the leaders of this country after
an attempted rape close to our
office to the victim... "there is
no crime problem and every-
thing is well under control."
What kind of person, much
less leader, makes such an idi-
otic statement when on a 21-
mile island we average over 60
murders per year and have sev-
eral thousand rapes (many of
which go unreported)?
I am of the opinion that
there are many more criminals
in this country than we would
like to believe, many of whom
are someone's brother, cousin,
uncle etc...you get the picture.
Therefore, many of these
criminals are in certain con-
stituencies and the politicians
do not want to lose their vote.
A bold statement yes, but


prove me wrong!
The media has no guts
whatsoever and has given the
government a pass on crime.
There should be an article
every single morning demand-
ing action from the government
on tackling crime. Perhaps the
media establishment is con-
cerned about being victimised
or maybe they are desensi-
tised?
Why not organise a march
on Parliament, getting as many
citizens as possible involved
and close down Rawson
Square? Perhaps MPs (Mouthy
Politicians) will take note.
Why do I make the afore-
mentioned accusations, the
public may cry. Because it is
not that freaking hard to con-
trol a 21-mile island and the
authorities can round up all the
criminals in 24 hours should
they desire!
Government refuses to allow
law-abiding citizens to carry
protection but the criminals
have more firepower than the
police force. I have been told
by a very reliable source that
when the DEA conducts their
raids they have to supply the


FEEDBACK

Royal Bahamas Police Force
with ammunition and weapons
because the police force has
weapons from the dark ages
and a huge shortage of ammu-
nition. What a joke!
Barbados, a country which
has kept much more of its
British heritage than we have,
allows all of its business owners
handguns to protect themselves
and encourages them to use
their weapons when needed.
I have a friend who owns one
of the fuel stations in that coun-
try and used his weapon during
an armed robbery attempt. The
police congratulated him as
one more criminal was dead
and there wasn't another
reported attempted armed rob-
bery on the island for eight'
months. The island has six to
eight murders per year and has


a population of 300,000 peo-
ple. How the hell can we have
60+ on an island with 200,000?
I will let you answer that ques-
tion.
Much of the sediment on the
street is that if the crime is hap-
pening to businesses "Dey can
afford it, dey need to give
somting to da people." That's
all fine and dandy, people...let
us hear the same attitude when
they all pull out of here. Don't
you naive-thinking liberals
think it won't happen.
Two cases in point: BATA
Shoe and McDonald's have
now pulled out of Jamaica due
to the escalating crime ele-
ments in that country.
Once again, thank you for
your article.
Sincerely,
Christopher Armaly


0000******0
AS usual, INSIGHT was
right. The Joy Cartwright affair
will always hang over this coun-
try like a pall because every-
one knows it was not properly
investigated and the proper
conclusion was not reached.
How can society bring law-
breakers to account when it is
itself stained by selective jus-
tice? .What this country lacks
is a true statesman. All we have
are small men scuttling around
trying to keep their political
friends happy.
A Abrahams
******

THE PLP is to blame for the
crime explosion in this coun-
try. During their first period of
government, they encouraged
the drug trade and some of
them even profited from it.
Wherever there is drug traf-
ficking, and the garbage who
peddle dope, there are always
guns. And guns lead to violent
deaths.
Drug traffickers peddlers
in death and all those pos-
sessing unlicensed firearms


should be hanged. Those who
say hanging is not a deterrent
are insane. Have you ever
heard of a dead man coming
back to haunt us?
JBB, Prospect Ridge
******

The Hon Tommy Turnquest
has my support. I am not a
member of any political party,
but I have observed this young
man over the years and have
noticed that he is a very hum-
ble and knowledgeable person
despite what others would tiy
to have us believe.
Further he is a young man
and I have always maintained
that the young people in iour
country must be given an
opportunity to prove their
worth. No longer must we con-
tinue to relegate them to the
back by saying "they are too
young". Remember the quota-
tion "And a little child shall
lead them".
Give our young people an
opportunity to propel' our
country forward.
Sincerely,
Noreen Y. Major


Fury deepens over high-level


'fat cats'


FROM page 1C
purpose since 2002.
Generally, these are seen as
less-than-onerous posts in
which the rewards are severely
at odds with those of workers
lower down the scale.
However, it's in parliament
itself that the most lurid sto-
ries over pay abound.
-Here MPs with additional
duties such as parliamentary
secretaries can clear $74,000 a


Save. up to:


Ship Now,

Fly Later


year without having to give up
their day job...and that's not
counting generous allowances.
Hence, a lawyer can carry on
a lucrative practice while con-
tinuing to pull in up to $100,000
of the taxpapers' money for his
parliamentary duties.
Some ministers, whose jobs
are admittedly more demand-
ing, earn close to $100,000 a
.y-ear-before-allowances.while
still maintaining their involve-
ment in family businesses and


the like. More attractive still
are the terms of employment.
Apart from extremely gener-
ous pension provision, long
holidays and abundant perks,
politicians have guaranteed
five-year contracts whether
they peform satisfactorily or
not.
In fact, it is theoretically pos-
sible for an MP to do absolute-
ly nothing at all between gen-
eral elections to earn his or her
parliamentary salary, while


oni airliiinie excess baggage fees


For more convenient service, drop your
bags off the day before you travel, and
they'll be waiting for you when you arrive!


We accept most oversize/overweight items and boxes!


Bags arrive 11am


Pay in Nassau


*American Eagle's published excess baggage fees on your third bag,
if it is oversize and overweight at 75lbs, is $230. With
excessbaggage you can pay as little as $75 for the same bag. We are
cheaper than the competition in all other comparisons too.


Drop Off: Miami
4005 NW 28th ;St
(305) 871-0571
(between Thrifty ahd Budget)


Use this coupon to save



$10

off every bag you ship with


Pick Up: Nassau
SCustoms Hall
(242) 377-6593
(inside the Airport Terminal)


exicessbaggage


Not combinable with any other offer. Only one coupon per customer per visit.
Only applies to bags under 100 lbs. Bags over 100lbs will be charged the full
rate of $1 per lb. Only applies to bags under 63 linear inches (L+ W + H). Bags
over 63 linear inches may be charged oversize fees.

Coupon not valid after Nov 20, 2005

www.pdxbahamas.com p daoaairfreht
(242) 341-6593
-------------- ----- -- ---- *-- -------


pursuing other interests in
unrelated fields.
In the private sector, where
there has to be a close correla-
tion between performance and
reward, such a situation could
never be tolerated.
The 35 MPs account for close
to $1 million a year in salaries
alone. Handsome perks take
.-that, figure much, much, high-
Sr...and, all for one.parliamen-
tary session per,,week, 'ong
recesses and whatever con-
stituency work they feel nec-
essary to secure another term.
Altogether, nearly $3 million
a year goes into supporting par-
liamentarians. Not everyone
thinks it is money well spent,
especially as several PLP rep-
resentatives appear to be of the
"nodding dog" variety, occu-
pying bench space with nothing
to say.
With national leaders setting
such an example, it is little
wonder that public workers at
every level see the civil service
as the ultimate gravy train. Yet,
with a burgeoning fiscal deficit,


can the country afford to keep
it running?
One critic told INSIGHT:
"As the country is facing hard
times economically, it's appro-
priate for a commission to take
a hard look at public service
pay, submit every employee to
rigorous analysis, and report
on where the deadwood lies.
"Then, ,acting on the com-
mission'sfindings, the,govern-
ment should set about trim-
ming the fat off the civil ser-
vice, forcing it to be more effi-
cient, and giving taxpayers the
service they deserve for their
investment.
"Unless that is done, the
public service will continue to
grow like topsy, costing the
country more and more with
no accountability. In addition,
with ever more powerful union
representation, this body of
under-achievers will be able to
hold the country to ransom
whenever it feels like it. It can-
not go on.
"People who work hard for
their money in the competitive


private sector are fed up with
doling out millions of dollars
for a sub-standard public ser-
vice set-up."
This argument is hard to
challenge. But can politicians
risk losing hundreds and prob-
ably thousands of votes in the
fall-out? Therein lies the dilem-
ma.
, As the government takes
stock of diminishing resources,
radical reform seems long over-
due. Powerful political leader-
ship is required to remove the
feather-bedding from this over-
comfortable institution and jet-
tison the wasters.
Then it needs to be stream-
lined under dynamic manage-
ment who will introduce an
ethos based on work ethic and
value-for-money.
Unless that is done, and
soon, the country will continue
to wilt under the burden of its
public sector, demoralising tax-
payers in the process.
What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmar-
quis@tribunemedia.net


ew*cess ba gage


'We have more criminals





than we like to believe'


~- -ii "


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2C. MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005


- --- -- *- -- ---- --- - - - - ^- -- c


6SO/01*1







PAE C MNNYSOTOEI3,H05THETIBN


Hurricane
W i 1 m a
slammed into
Grand
Bahama last
week, taking many residents by
surprise with its destructive
force. Power outages, downed
communications and up to 15
feet of flood waters were
,reported in some areas.
According to news reports,
'the entire eastern coast of the
-island was battered by the
storm. Despite warnings to
evacuate low lying areas in
Grand Bahama, 400 residents
of Pinder's Point had to be res-
cued due to serious flooding.

SOFTBALL star Jackie "Lil'
.Stunt" Moxey died in hospital
.last week from extensive
injuries she sustained during
-an argument with a man in his
.forties. Ms Moxey was 44 years
old. The former member of the
-Bahamas women's national
'softball team and the right
*fielder for the New Providence
.Softball Association lady's
champions Electro Telecom
Wildcats, was said to have been
,"injured" by a man "known to
her".

THE parents of a one-year-
old boy searched for their child
after he was swept from his
Grand Bahama home by a
storm surge during Hurricane
Wilma.
Assistant Commissioner of
Police Elliston Greenslade told
The Tribune that a search was
being conducted for 17-month
old Matario Pintard, son of
Crystal Pintard, a resident of
Hanna Hill, Eight Mile Rock.
The boy's parents were
unable to find him after the
surge demolished their home.
According to Mr
Greenslade, as Hurricane
.Wilma blew over the island an
ocean surge swept through sev-
eral homes in the Eight Mile
,Rock area, including the Pin-
.tard's beach front home.
During an attempt to rescue
their three children, another
.surge rolled in and swept the
-baby away.
However, Matario's body
. was later recovered in Hepburn
-Town near the Ritz Club,
about one mile from his par-
ent's residence, by an emer-
gency medical team from the
Rand Memorial Hospital.
The boy's body was taken to
,the Rand where he was offi-
cially pronounced dead.
SMatario was the only fatality
..,of Hurricane Wilma.

THE Supreme Court was
,,heavily flanked by police in
.preparation for the arrival of
Angelo Brennen, who was
charged with murder and
attempted murder last week.
He is accused of using an
unlicensed shotgun to kill
Ruthmae Alfreda Pinder as she
stood at a bus stop on Farring-


* FORMER police officer Ian Joseph Hutchinson, 44, has been charged with
the murder of softball star Jackie "Lil Stunt" Moxey.
(FILE photo)


ton Road with her daughter,
Calvonya Grant. Miss Grant,
who was 15 at the time,
received gunshot injuries, but
survived.
Brennen was taken before
Justice Jon Issacs, who
presided over jury selection.

THOUSANDS of people
along the southern and eastern
coasts of Grand Bahama have
been left homeless following
the devastation and destruc-
tion of Hurricane Wilma.
Still recovering from last
year's double blow of Hurri-
canes Frances and Jeanne,
islanders have been hit hard
once again as Wilma lashed the
island with winds ,of 96mph and
peak gusts of 119mph.
A scene of complete destruc-


tion faced residents of the
coastal areas after the season's
record 12th hurricane passed
Grand Bahama last week, with
homes destroyed or severely
damaged and cemeteries and
roads washed away.
According to reports, hun-,
dreds of homes in settlements,
including Pinder's Point,
Hunter's and Lewis Yard as
well as in areas in West End,
have become uninhabitable
after a 15-foot wave washed
over the coastline.
In Eight Mile Rock it is esti-
mated that more than 80
homes along the coast have
been destroyed.
All cemeteries and roads
have been wiped out. A Hait-
ian village near Lewis Yard was
washed away, leaving'not one
house standing.


GE Mechanical Room
Air conditioner, JO ES &


AGV12 .


5-,? / e9/9
Sales & Full Service Department
Rosetta & Montgomery Sts.


HUNDREDS of union
members descended on Raw-
son Square last week for the
second time in October as ten-
sions between the public ser-
vice and government again
reached a boiling point.
Close to 300 members and
supporters of the Bahamas
Public Service Union (BPSU)
gathered in front of parliament
in protest against government's
latest proposal for pay increas-
es within the new industrial
agreement.
Union members said the
protest was the only avenue left
to them to voice their discon-
tent as government had
"tricked and misled" "'thetil:'


Your car.



You trust.














Our responsibility



rake Service Suspension li inmen Eims

Oil, Lube i Filter "OD000 THIR "


*Aminhcan I liPorled Cars Light Trucknsus I SIts

* Complete InspectWion Estlmates elr we slar l ie work


2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YO1

MACKEY ST. & ROOSEVELT AVENUE EAST S1
Tel: 393-6651 or 393-6693 Tel: 356-:


T. & SOLDIER RD

2940 or 356-2941


Open: Monday -Saturday
8am.5pm


Fax 326-4865 P.. Box SS-6766 Nassau, Bahamas

AUTO SYSTEM EXPERTS *- R


"Midas is a business based on service, quality and reliability.
Factory scheduled maintenance is car care.
Midas services your car fully. Our system takes the guesswork
out of auto care for every car model out there.


WEEK I REVIE


Requires the following persons:

Manageress
Sales Person
Custom Framer

Experience in any of these position would be an asset.

Reply in writing with resume to:

P.O. Box SS-5690
Nassau

or fax: 356-4805


Quotes of



the Week
"I'm a PLP, but it was under the FNM government that I
received my fairest treatment. Bring out Hubert Ingraham -
he'll get the job done."
A protester calling out for former prime minister
Hubert Ingraham. The protester was one of hundreds of
Bahamas Public Service Union (BPSU) members who
descended on Rawson Square as tensions between the pub-
lic service and government reached a boiling point. The
union members gathered in front of parliament in protest
against government's latest proposal for pay increases with-
in the new industrial agreement.

"His legs and arms were secured with duct tape and he
had a gunshot wound to his head. He was wearing a pair of
short jeans, a white T-shirt and sandals on his feet."
Press liaison officer Inspector Walter Evans told The Tri-
bune following the discovery of the body of a young man
found tied up with duct tape and a gunshot wound to his
head.

"I am only a caretaker, my government only exists with
the full consent and approval democratically endowed by
the people of this country. It is the constitutional duty
therefore of the prime minister to always ensure that the
people of the country know that they may be called upon to
make their choice. "
Prime Minister Perry Christie said beginning debate
on the second reading of the disaster preparedness bill in
parliament.

"The downtime in terms of lost labour will be tremen-
dous."
James Smith, minister of state for finance said,
acknowledging that many Grand Bahamians had suffered
"quite a double whammy" as a result of Hurricane Wilma.
'****
"I pressed the button to open my electrical gate. It opens
slowly, just as electrical gates do, and while I was waiting I
heard the person behind me lean on the horn.
"I pulled into my driveway and started to unload some
things out of my car and the car behind pulled into the yard
across the street. Then after a while he (Billy Saunders)
camekout of his house holding a rifle with a bayonet
attached to it and pointed it in my direction.
"I stood there in disbelief and I asked him: 'Why do
you have a gun?' and he said: 'I'm tired of you crazy
niggers blocking my way'. He then told me 'if you
have a gun you better go inside and get it.
"I then went into the house and called the police.
While I was in the house I heard a shot fired. I have
never had something like this happen to me before."
Dr Judson Eneas retelling what happened outside his
High Vista home, following a run-in with neighbour William
Saunders, owner of Majestic Tours.
I .t


- -- .............


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 3C, MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005













Paying the price for a public service 'monster'


FROM page 1C

Stumped? You're not alone.
INSIGHT put those tests to
a number of people last week
and not one could name a sin-
gle area of the public service
which they regarded as any-
where near up to scratch.
Instead there was a litany of
complaints, ranging from unan-
swered phone calls to abrasive
and unco-operative attitudes -
and an overall feeling that the
public service is lethargic, inef-
ficient and completely indif-
ferent to those it serves.
Admittedly, there are good
employees among the dross.
Some of them are very good
indeed, and they must suffer
the limitations of their col-
leagues even more than we do
because they have to pick up
the slack. But the dominant
impression is that the public
service offers poor value for
money and that many of its
employees are riding on the
backs of the people.

Workers

Against this backdrop, it is
not hard to see why private sec-
tor workers, whose job securi-
ty generally depends on their
ability to function at a much
higher level, are unsympathet-
ic to the public service's cause.
Why, they ask, should we
bankroll people who are not
up to the job and who perform
much less efficiently than the
rest of us?
So when the Bahamas Public
Service Union called a mass
protest in Rawson Square last
week, many saw the demon-
strators as undeserving fat-cats
using their power to pressure
the government into submis-
sion.
Viewing the public service as
bloated, dumb and lazy is noth-.
ing new. In Britain the over-
manned civil service, with its
index-linked pensions, its slack
working practices, and its gen-
eral air of pomposity and com-
placency, is the source of much
irritation ,- , '
The altest Tow centres, ,...
pension arrangements, which
allow civil servants to retire at
60 on full, index-linked pen-
sions at a time when private
sector workers are under threat
of being made to work until
they are 70 to ease pressure on
the nation's financial resources.
What private sector workers
feel, with considerable justifi-
cation, is that they are being
called upon to subsidise peo-
ple who, in the main, are not of
the calibre to survive in a pri-
vate sector environment. They
believe their hard-earned tax
money is being squandered on
under-achieving mediocrities
reared in an uncompetitive
environment where time-serv-
ing appears to be the only
objective.
In the Bahamas, these prob-
lems are exacerbated by the
even more disturbing percep-
tion that the public service is a
kind of wastebin for political
placemen who have neither the
wherewithal nor inclination to
do anything else.
Sir Lynden Pindling, as
prime minister, overloaded
Bahamasair and other corpo-
rations with PLP supporters
whose only aim in life was to
get on the payroll and do no
work. One by-product of this
misguided policy was that polit-
ical stalwarts would demand
government jobs for their off-
spring in return for their votes.
Cronyism and "jobs for the
boys" served a dual purpose:
they reduced unemployment
figures and underpinned party
loyalty, but all at the expense of
those in the private sector who
had to work tirelessly to make
the economy function properly.
Ask any conscientious public
service worker today if they
know of such cases and they
will probably cite dozens, and
maybe scores, of government
employees who are jobless in
all but name. "They live from
one pay day to the next doing
as little as they can get away
with," a ministry worker told
INSIGHT.
There is also a belief that


overtime arrangements have
become a convenient means of
bolstering salaries. "People
who sit around doing nothing
all day suddenly become busy
when it's time to go home,"
said one observer.
"It's a means of getting into
overtime. Workers who may
earn $20,000 to $30,000 can
find themselves earning up to
$40,000 or even $50,000 by
making sure they get overtime
on a regular basis," he added.
"This means backsliding dur-
ing the normal working day so
that they have something left to
do when overtime kicks in. It's
a very simple device to make
more cash, and because it's the
taxpayers' money nobody
cares."
In the private sector, pay
awards are generally based on
loyalty and merit. In a compet-
itive environment, it is neces-
sary to keep the company
ahead of the pack by engaging
the best talent at the market
rate. As a result, assessment of
performance is a continuing
process and accountability is a
must.
In the public service, where
competition is not a factor,
paper qualifications become
the benchmark. Hence, an offi-
cial with a master's degree or a
PhD will be entitled to a cer-
tain pay scale whether he or
she is good at the job or not.
The e-mailing lothario men-
tioned earlier, whose entire
working day was spent com-
municating with his bedmates,
was highly qualified in his field.
And that's all that was required
for him to stay on the payroll.
INSIGHT was told: "The
PLP's decision to appoint so
many highly-paid consultants
has created bad morale in
many departments.
"These people are for the
most part taken on only as
political favours, but they
sometimes are allowed to oper-
ate over and above existing
senior civil servants.
"For instance, there is now
a consultant for regattas, anoth-
er for'marine life, aiotlhbr for.'1
this and another format. It's
highly expensive aniit6tally.
nonsensical. The government
is spending hundreds of thou-
sands on people whose services
are not needed."'
What many people feel now
is that a culture of entitlement
has developed in the public ser-
vice unrelated to the quality of
the service offered, Now is the
time, they feel, for public sector
pay awards to be linked to sol-
id productivity agreements
based on enhanced perfor-
mance and improved attitudes.
A Tribune reader said: "If
you go into a public service
office, you will likely have to
wait while the receptionist fin-
ishes her telephone conversa-
tion with a friend before you
get any service. However, if
you try to ring a public office,
it's likely the phone will be
engaged, or no-one will bother
to answer. In the private sector,
this kind of thing can't be
allowed because ultimately the
business will fail.
Holiday

"When a public holiday
weekend is coming, the public
service will stop working half a
day in advance to prepare for
the holiday. And' if you want
service within half an hour of
closing time, forget it. They're
already crimping their hair and
putting on their mascara. They
are having an easy ride at
everyone else's expense."
Anecdotal evidence suggests
very powerfully that some pub-
lic service workers take lunch
breaks which extend to the
afternoon school run and then
on to closing time.
At regular intervals during
entire afternoons, INSIGHT
has been told by secretaries
that senior government offi-
cials have "stepped out to
lunch".
At 4.45pm, the official who
"stepped out to lunch" at
12.30pm is still out to lunch.
"Will he be coming back
today?" "I doubt it," is the
embarrassed reply.
Having built the public ser-


vice up to its present unwieldy
proportions, the PLP now has
to live with the fact that it is
paying out massive sums for
something which performs at
a level most taxpayers find
unsatisfactory.

Unions

With trade unions now


involved, the monster they cre-
ated is ready and willing to
exercise its power in pursuit of
its demands. Hence, the tax-
payers who are already paying
too much for mediocrity face
the prospect of investing even
more under the threat of losing
vital services if they don't. It
would be easy to feel sorry for
the government if this were not


the creation of their own folly.
But it's the public who become
the helpless victims.
There are two age-old
adages that apply. The first is
that much always wants more.
The second is that people with
time on their hands invariably
cause trouble. In the public ser-
vice there are too many
employees who receive too


much for doing too little.
No doubt even the e-mailin"
lover boy would have been
last week's demo if he cou
have spared the time from h$
on-line philandering.

What do you think? FgA
328-2398 or e-mail jma6t
quls@tribunemedia.net


The Junkanoo Corporation New Providence Limited
In partnership with
The Ministry of Youth Sports & Culture


Junkanoo Judge Application


OFFICAL USE ONLY





JUDGE NUMBER


Please PRINT LEGIBLY all information in the spaces provided below


A. PERSONAL INFORMATION


Full Name (Ms/Mr./Mrs.)
Address SURNAME

Address -j

Date of Birth
DDAMWYY

P. 0. Box Sex

Telephone (W)


Employer


FIRST MIDDLE


(STREET. CITY, ISLAND)


Country of Birth


Age


Nationality


(H)


(C)


Profession


Employer's Address .---


Email


Shirt Size __
INDICATE S.- M. L. XL ec.


S. RAL&BACGRdUND INFORMAtiON

Have you resided in the Bahalhas for more tfih five years? (If NO please state previous residence)



Have you ever judged a Junkanoo Parade? (If YES please give year of parade)



Do you presently have any personal affiliation wit h ANY Junkanoo Group? (If YES please name the group)



Do you have any religious reason that may prevent you from judging a parade? (If YES please explain)



Do you work on Boxing Day and/or New Years? (If YES please state which)

Why do you wish to be a judge?



Have you ever participated in any Junkanoo parade(s) before? (If YES please give the year and name of the group)


Explain how integrity" relates to a judge and the parade,


C. MEDICAL INFORMATION
Please note this section is for insurance and medical emergency purpose ONLY

Do you have any medical condition(s) that might prevent you from judging? (EG: asthma, heart condition, diabetes,
hypertension etc.) If YES please explain and list any medication that you take for that condition.



Are you allergic to any specific medicine? (If yes please list)

Emergency Contact (LIST 2 PERSONS TO CONTACT IN THE EVENT OF AN EMERGENCY)


1. Name


Telephone (W)


2. Name


Telephone' (W)


(H)


(H)


Relationship


(C)


Relationship

(C)


I declare that the information contained in this application is true and correct. I understand that
if these particulars are false in any material respect I render myself incapable of judging and my
application will be voided.


PASTE
PHOTO HERE


APPLICANT SIGANTURE


DATE


callj,322-198


I I -


MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2005, PAGE 4Q


THE TRIBUNE











ISSUES IDEAS

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2005 I THE MIAMI HERALD


jDrilling in Gulf won't reduce

dependency on foreign oil sources
BY BILL NELSON the potential devastation of oil spills
www.billnelson.senate.gov suffered by other states such as Califor-
nia and Alaska.
A n explosion at an offshore natu- Unfortunately, the greedy oil indus-
ral-gas drilling site caused a try now is attempting to undo this
S200,000-gallon crude oil spill off longstanding ban with misleading
California's coast in claims and without good cause. And
January 1969. While they're putting at risk not only Flori-
small in comparison da's environmental treasures and tour-
to other oil spills, the ist-driven economy, but also our
incident dealt a devas- nation's military readiness and the
tating blow to neigh- environments of other coastal states.
boring beaches and On Wednesday, the U.S. House
aquatic life. Resources Committee rejected efforts
As tides brought an to block this industry-backed provision
NELSON 800-square-mile slick that could subject all coastal states to
Ashore, oil coated 35 drilling 25 miles off their shores.
I miles of the coastline, blackening Currently, waters up to 285 miles off
beaches and killing thousands of birds, Tampa Bay are protected from drilling.
dolphins, seals, fish, and other wildlife. But one pending, irresponsible proposal
r The national outcry that followed could bring gas rigs within 25 miles of
sparked a movement that eventually led the state and oil rigs within 50 miles.
to legal bans against oil drilling in the
eastern Gulf of Mexico. *TURN TO NELSON
That's how Florida has been spared


OPINION
PAGE
IRAQ WAR:
We learned in
Vietnam that
using the
'body count'
to measure
success is a
bad habit
because it
can hide a lot
of sins,
including
dead civilians
who had the
misfortune of
being in the
wrong place
at the wrong
time


SWe werefabulously prepared

for a hurricane- weren't we?


(Rejected first draft of Gov. Jeb Bush's
.candid post-hurricane remarks.)
M y fellow Floridians,
Let me begin by taking
token responsibility for the
delays in delivering supplies to areas
hit hard by Hurricane Wilma. The
effort could have been swifter and bet-
ter organized.
But, hey, didn't I warn everybody to
keep 72 hours' worth of supplies on
hand? Didn't I tell you to build a 150-
gallon gasoline depot in your back-
yard?
Still, I know that millions of you still
have no electricity, no food and no fuel
in your cars and I'd like to'assure
you that the situation is improving rap-
idly.
I'd like to, but I can't. The truth is,
you're screwed for now.
This morning I spoke with execu-
tives of Florida Power & Light, who.
sounded like they'd been drinking


heavily. They said they're awaiting a
large shipment of Leggos and rubber
bands so that they can repair the substa-
tions supplying power to Miami-Dade,
Broward and Palm Beach counties.
When I pressed for
a timetable, the FPL
officials explained
that electricity would
be restored on a
"grid-by-grid" basis,
using the same giant
IN MY OPINION dart board left over
CARL from Hurricane
HIAA$EI Andrew.
Obviously, these
are difficult times. Florida has been
through something like 83 hurricanes in
the last 14 months, causing approxi-
mately $987 jillion in losses and
that's not including the fraudulent
claims.
*TURN TOHIAASEN


7 ~ '~y~+~x;~w ix, ~7


C


~M~







6C SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2005 INTERNATIONALEDITION


<>


* .- 0 olom. q .w *

400l. af 4o a -
- oe 41 -f
_ 41--ob-a -db
qm -= mm - ,
41100- 410b
a....N- m 0 oa -a

ft- u m t .dmmmmm 41m-O

w=-Nm- 410-t 0 .


-- -



.* m e 1049l


-m mo 400 o- o 0 00
- o O




C


- OEt
*mo Omm Ab U U
elmvw f 0- c0-it m t



f4-iSyndiocaIon tent '~----o


=Available froimommercia lNews Providers"
_ ero...


- -- ---
-- 40mo- -0
40-04w4m wml Cmml


Il-



- -0 -- I 0oa "
4 lo m m I 4
C IUM 4011 011
a-o -w om dw
=4t M410 MEN 4


=--


0 1 -qd
4100 m .
o* m m -4 -0 -t
ft mmm- -4 tb qt


_


m ~

- ~


THE DARKEST HOURS


Another long night closes in


so" 6


- I


*SPANGLER

always, it seemed, to someone
else's house. We went out
again into the night.
"It's like ink," said a lonely
man on a bench on Miami's
Biscayne Boulevard and 63rd
Street.. "You walk, you don't
see where you're putting your
foot." He was Maxine Gaston,
a baker, waiting for the Met-
robus up to Hallandale Beach.
He'd spent the day clearing
branches from a friend's yard,
and now he was waiting to go
home. "I've been waiting 20
minutes already," he said, and
the bus materialized almost
with the period on his sen-
tence.
North then, to 109th Street
and the Royal Court, a collec-
tion of old wooden shacks
named by someone with a
fine sense of irony.
STORM TALES
Gary Parks and Raymond
Estes sat outside Number 11,
Raymond in his girlfriend's
wheelchair. "There was peo-
ple running around, glass
breaking, the first night," Ray-
mond said. "You couldn't
really see the people, just
shapes. That was scary."
They scraped together
some change for Budweisers
and generic cigarettes and
they sat and talked, because
the batteries were almost out
on the radio.
Parks told a strange, long
story about the time he was
drinking vodka in a barn in St.
Louis and got sucked up into a
tornado. He left that town
soon after, flipping a coin to
decide between Miami and
San Diego.
"I guessI went the wrang
way," he said. "I been here too
damn long, and now this. This
is great. This is all we need
now."
We needed food. There
was a McDonald's at the 127th
Street shopping complex.
"We closed," said the man-
ager, shutting the door on
some kids from Barri Univer-
sity who decided on the Chi-


nese takeout place down the
block instead. "I mean, it's the
only choice," said Billy Ray, a
freshman. "I never ate there
before. It could be good."
We did not follow.
We considered Publix, and
wished we hadn't. "We're
closed," said the off-duty cop
moonlighting at the entrance.
"There's a curfew."
He did not have much
patience left for the tardy.
"They've been coming in
waves," he said. "Two hun-
dred people at least. And
these people had five days to
prepare for this. It should be
common sense. I got ready. I
got canned ravioli, bread,
cakes, crackers, tuna, proba-
bly 100 gallons of water."
Closed! he said, to the man
who pulled up on his bicycle.
"C'mon, man, I gotta get
some food," the man on the
bike said. "Where am I going
to go?"
There was grumbling, and
a brief lecture on curfew
observance, followed by two
,cans of ravioli and a bottle of
water from the trunk of the
cop's cruiser.
"Closed! Curfew!" said the
cop to the next man who
pulled up out of the night, and
the next, because they kept
coming.
'EYE-OPENER'
North, then, to Jolly's Cafe,
at 167th Street and Northeast
Seventh Avenue. There were
seven Jollys outside and one
- Carine inside, cooking
fish and rice and pork on a gas
grill by candlelight. The smell
carried in the night, and it was
delicious.
The Jollys are from Haiti,
and they know something
about power outages. "My
son said, 'Momma, there's
cold water, no music, no TV
it's like being in Haiti,' "
said Yolette Lafontant, Car-
ine's sister. "It's an eye-
opener."
It was a bad storm for
them. A tree came through
the restaurant's front window,
followed by someone who


took the cash register and a
$3,000 meat slicer. "Business
was slow before," Yolette
said. "And this, it was a blow."
We took coffee and caught
1-95 south. There was a line
outside Leila's Grocery, at
Northwest Second Avenue
and Northwest 11th Terrace.
A thin light came from a hole
in the padlocked door but the
corner was dark and so were
the streets in every direction.
Ninia Wallas and Shanda
Wilson, half sisters and best
friends, got a pack of ciga-
rettes and one of Black and
Mild cigars.
"We had to use the cell-
phone phone like a flashlight
to get over here," said Shanda.
"It's so dark. But no one's act-
ing all crazy and stuff."
On Flagler, we discovered
the reason why buses were
running slow.
"I'm making three detours"
because of the tree limbs on
the ground, said Lavont Flan-
ders, driver of the No. 21 to
Bunche Park. "Not all the
street lights are up. Safety-
wise, it's horrible. We have to
be extra-sharp and alert."
Now it was late. We came
up north against the bay.
The hurricane has left us
with oddly Northern nights:
crisp and chilly on the
ground, a cold clarity to the
sky. Venus had risen and dis-
appeared. Mars was still up,
and so were all the stars nor-
mally drowned by Miamis,
electric glow.
Without it, the streets were
thickly dark, a kind of dark
that presses in. There were
noises glass smashing, foot-
steps, somebody approaching
too fast? and we might see
too late or never in darkness
this thick. Something without
form was moving upon the
face of the waters.
We were scared as chil-
dren of the dark, some of us,
and just now that fear seemed
fresh and disagreeably rea-
sonable. It was so late, really
time for us to go to bed, we so
wished for the bus to come
take us home.


, a


%hs*


4 o o -


IF


Niftli


/,-'


- mo


I j-


JIM~
40M


ISSUES & IDEAS


THE MIAMI HERALD


9-
PM /

*400


I







IN I Lr.Ii'4 r IONAL Lu I i'


OPINION
IN S. KNIGHT (1894-1981) JESUS DIAZ JR., PUBLISHER I TOM FIEDLER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR I JOE OGLESBY, EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR
S..-... ...... . . . .. . . ...... ....... ...........------- ........


JAMES L KNIGHT (1909-1991)


IRAQ




Return of the body count


BY JOSEPH L GALLOWAY
jgalloway@krwashington.com

When you pay the sort of
tuition that we Americans
paid in Vietnam 58,249 Ameri-
cans dead and more than 300,000
seriously wounded it would
seem incumbent on us to remem-
ber the lessons we
learned for at least
a generation or
two.
One important
lesson was that
using enemy body
counts as a metric
of success cor- GALLOWAY
rupts the system and makes liars
out of soldiers and officers.
The high command in Saigon in
those long-ago days seized on a
strategy of attrition we will kill
far more of them than they kill of


us and then to prove the efficacy
of their fatally flawed strategy
demanded body counts every time
gunfire erupted in the jungle.
GIs ordered to comb the gloom
of a battlefield counting bodies
joked that they would, at times,
tally up the arms and legs and
divide by four. Whatever number
they reported often grew like
Jack's beanstalk as it climbed the
chain of command.
That led to straight-faced colo-
nels at the daily press briefing in
Saigon, dubbed, not without cause,
the "Five O'Clock Follies," report-
ing that 96 enemy were killed by
body count, and 12 weapons were
recovered.
A logical response was: "The
hell you say.")
In the wake of Vietnam, Ameri-
can military commanders, from
Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf in


The trouble is that body counts can hide a lot of sins,
including dead civilians who had the misfortune of
being in the wrong place at the wrong time.


the Gulf War to Gen. Tommy Ray
Franks in the early part of the Iraq
war, refused to play the body count
game. Franks told reporters: "We
don't do body counts." Defense
Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld ech-
oed this in the fall of 2003 on a Sun-
day show on cable television: "We
don't do body counts on other peo-
ple."
Well, guess what? Now we do.
There's no evidence of any writ-
ten or announced change in U.S.
policy on body counts. In fact, the
senior military spokesmen in the
Pentagon and in Baghdad deny that
there's been any change.
It seems that we've just drifted
back into an old and discredited
way of doing business.
Air Force Brig. Gen. Don Alston
- whose mouthful of a title is
chief, communications division,
deputy chief of staff, strategic
effects, Multi-National Forcq, Iraq'
- told Knight Ridder that the fig-
ures on enemy killed were released


because the Americans "were try-
ing to provide more context to the
Tal Afar operation" against sus-
pected insurgents in western Iraq.
But he added that there's "no
intention of making this a prac-
tice." Even so, body counts have
become increasingly common,
beginning with the Marines' esti-
mate of 1,200 to 1,600 enemy killed
in the capture of the city of Fallujah
last November.
Some official communications
experts admit that beyond provid-
ing some context to an operation, a
ripping good enemy body count
can bolster the morale of American
forces and help illuminate success
in a war of shadows that increas-
ingly troubles the American
people.
The trouble is that body counts
can hide a lot of sins, including
dead civilians who had the misfor-
tune of being in the wrong place at
the wrong time.
So what do the Iraq numbers
mean? Well, last year American
commanders estimated that there
were no more than 5,000 active


insurgents in Iraq.
Those same commanders have
reported that some 1,300 insur-
gents have been killed since the
end of January 2005 and another
8,260 have been detained.
But wait! Before you declare the
war over, consider this: Gen. John
Abizaid, the head of the U.S. Cen-
tral Command, said on Oct. 2 that
he estimates that there now are
20,000 insurgents.
So let's do a little math: Five
thousand insurgents minus 1,300
killed equals 3,700 left. Minus 8,260
insurgents captured. Equals 20,000
insurgents still out there.
Hmmm.
It's the more trustworthy num-
bers out of Iraq, however, that
break our hearts. This week the
2,000th American was killed in
that war, and the number of those
wounded or injured now hovers
around 15,000.
A friend of mine who keeps
count of the number of American
children orphaned by the war in
Iraq because the Vietnam War left
her fatherless reports that 21 Amer-
ican children lost their fathers in
Iraq in the month of September
alone.
That number is a national trag-
edy. These are young Americans
who will grow up listening for a
footstep they will never hear again;
reaching out for arms that will
never hold them again; living a life-
time with a hole in their hearts
where a father was supposed to
live and laugh and love.'
And many, many times that
number of Iraqi children have been
condemned to the same heartbro-
ken existence by insurgent car
bombs and American mistakes.

Joseph L. Galloway is the senior
military correspondent for Knight
1Jcdder NewSpapers.


~"CWS


WILMA AFTERMATH


'This is the absolute pits'


*HIAASEN.

A major concern is, of
course, the fuel supply. The
good news is that South
Florida has plenty of gas.
The bad news is that we
can't get if out of the
ground.
Apparently, service sta-
tions actually need a flow of
electricity to operate the
gasoline pumps. It would
have been nice if somebody
had told me sooner.
Next time, I promise,
we'll rent truckloads of
exorbitantly overpriced
generators from politically
connected vendors and
provide them to gas sta-
tions in advance of the
storm.
Since I've been getting
calls from the travel indus-
try, let me take this oppor-
tunity to urge tourists not
to cancel their vacations to
South Florida. The weather
is fantastic, the beaches are
gorgeous and the traffic is,
for obvious reasons, excep-
tionally light.
You will need to bring
your own siphon, ice,
refreshments and possibly a
large-caliber handgun to
protect yourself from des-
perate civilians.
Speaking of desperation,
many of you are listening to
me now in your car, waiting
in line for $20 worth of
high-octane that'll barely
get you home.
Some of you may even
be trying to put your foot
through the radio, you're so
pissed .off.
All I can say is: Who the
heck knew?
Wilma was no Katrina. It
was supposed to blow


down a few trailers, not
cripple the infrastructures
of our three most over-
populated counties.
Only days earlier, I'd
bragged to a congressional
panel about how fabulously
prepared for hurricanes we
were. Florida knows the
drill, I said. Don't worry
about us.
Now you turn on the TV
- if you're lucky enough to
have juice and there's
bedlam in the streets. How
do you think that makes me
look?

'You want to blame
somebody for
Wilma's mess,
blame me."

A few so-called experts
say they aren't surprised
that Wilma caused such a
mess.
They say it was inevita-
ble, with six million people
crammed onto the tip of a
low-lying peninsula in a
hurricane zone.
I'd like to promise that
we'll do a better job of man-
aging coastal development
in the future, but who am I
kidding? We don't have the
stones to say enough is
enough. We'll let 'em keep
on building subdivisions
until every last ac- is gone.
In other words, you
don't want to be around
when the Cat 5 hits.
Finally, I know some of
you we; = nervou: .;e my
brother fly in last week for
a tour of the storm damage.
Let me assure you that
there will be no repeat of


what happened or didn't
happen on the Gulf
Coast after Katrina.
So far, FEMA has done a
stellar job on the Wilma
front. For example, none of
the relief supplies set aside
for South Florida have been
sent to Guam or even Utah
by mistake.
Yes, there have been
delays, bad information and
mass confusion. Too many
distribution sites have run
short of ice and water, leav-
ing thousands of people
angry and empty-handed.
DEPRESSED
But don't blame the fed-
eral government, especially
not my brother. Haven't
you been reading the polls?
Leave the poor guy alone.
You want to blame
somebody for Wilma's
mess, blame me. Or better
yet, blame yourselves for
not listening to me. Didn't I
tell every homeowner to
install an industrial-sized
walk-in freezer with a pro-
pane-powered ice-making
machine?
A long road lies ahead.
Just remember that today
will be about the same as
yesterday, tomorrow will
be no different than today,
and next week will proba-
bly be the same dull, gruel-
ing blur.
As your governor and
the leader of hurricane
recovery, I'd like to urge
Floridians not to get too
discouraged, depressed or
homicidal. I'd like to tell
you that, but -'t.
This is the absolute pits.
I am so glad to be up here in
Tallahassee, you have no
idea.


GULF OIL DRILLING


Much peril for little payoff


*NELSON

It's being sold- as a way to
increase current oil supplies
and reduce our dependency
on foreign oil sources. How-
ever, it does nothing to
achieve those goals, while
placing Florida's $50-billion
tourism economy in serious
jeopardy.
Studies have found that
there is relatively little oil in
the eastern Gulf of Mexico,
and that drilling in the area
will make no difference in
high gas prices or our current
foreign oil dependency.
While this additional drilling
was proposed in response to
the current interruption in
supply following Hurricanes
Katrina and Rita, new rigs in
the Gulf also would be highly
vulnerable to future hurri-
canes. The new drilling
would do nothing to maintain
the nation's oil supply in the
event of another similar natu-
ral disaster.
BIPARTISAN ISSUE
Placing our state's econ-
omy a'nd environmental
resources in jeopardy for only
marginal returns is simply not
worth the risk. Florida's over-
all economic health is depen-
dent on preserving the
coastal areas that draw tour-
ists to our state from all over
the globe. A single spill would
leave blackened beaches and
a devastated tourism indus-
try.
Protecting our coasts from
dangerous and unsightly off-
shore drilling makes good
economic sense for Florida,
regardless of political party
or ideology.
Over the past few months,
I've worked closely with both


Republicans and Democrats,
including Florida GOP Sena-
tor Mel Martinez. U.S. Reps.
Connie Mack III, also a
Republican, and Jim Davis, a
Democrat, along with 20
other members of Florida's
bipartisan congressional dele-
gation signed a letter in oppo-
sition to drilling closer to the
state. And just two weeks ago
19 senators from coastal
states and both political par-
ties publicly urged their col-
leagues to reject efforts to
end the ban on offshore oil
drilling. This is an issue that
should concern all Ameri-
cans, not just those living
along our nation's coasts.

There are ways to
solve these problems
without placing our
economy in danger.

All Americans should be
concerned because the east-
ern Gulf provides a unique
training and testing area for
our nation's military forces.
Under a 1983 agreement with
the Reagan administration,
both the Navy and Air Force
have been using the open
waters there for crucial air
and sea training and testing
that cannot be conducted
elsewhere.
In response to the recent
drilling pr-,p. als ar. L my
request, Senators John
Warner and Carl Levin, the
committee chair and ranking
member of the Senate Armed
Servy ..un
to have the Pentagon review
the impact of any new dril-
ling. I look forward to hearing
the Pentagon's findings, and


will work to ensure that
essential military operations
in the Gulf of Mexico are not
interrupted.
While most Floridians and
their elected officials agree
that we need to prevent oil
drilling off our coast, we also
recognize that Congress must
address U.S. oil shortages,
foreign dependency, and the
high gas prices. I believe
there are ways of solving
these problems without plac-
ing our economy and envi-
ronment in danger.
CONSERVE ENERGY
Raising the required fuel
efficiency standards for cars
by nine miles-per-gallon
would save the United States
about a fourth of all the oil we
currently import signifi-
cantly decreasing our depen-
dency.
Practical alternative fuel
technology exists as well.
Ethanol, nuclear power
plants, and gas made from
coal offer attractive alterna-
tives to drilling.
Consider that the United
States has only about 3 per-
cent of all the world's oil
reserves, meaning that there's
no way to drill our way out of
this crisis. Instead, we must
conserve energy and develop
alternative fuels while con-
tinuing to protect Florida's
strong economy, unique envi-
'"nmental resources, and
:; rain ag
ziies by .,opping current pro-
posals to expand drilling in
the eastern Gulf of Mexico.

a
member of the U.S. Senate
Commerce, Armed Services,
Foreign Relations, Budget and
Aging committees.


- r '-r r


, ,u/". I \-K- i


VV VV.l-lln.r ^ .... 1





Il11


IrI'r !'i


i!f.'*t.IS0t*t.4
: ******** ****

I.O t*o. .

t ,:o((tlilt.,
* ,f'golrt~l..9


* ,


II


i


:0


0 0


lo1.1 3 .01 0g101*

f '1'lllO1.11

. tit tlgt~tht!
.3 Is*4GoIoe
'~e'l ?Pl*Ied


U


Available
S 4 I
^* a


II


IN


Pt

4t
f;


*


I

I"


It'
Stb


1 .* |O"**ll|
copyrighted Matel
Syndicated Conteni
from Commercial News

Is #
*I. 10s


rial .2

Providers"



; ;I


4Iip' rP liP',Ol Il 'OVt I'i'OrP

; ,,*.p.tp,,,,,, attgt.Sg,,,,ott,:O *II 't 6 sti:,. l l's*t ,. ,s.I
*, ohtt 'i9o.Otl'ti ttiMti.t9ot.to*Io I ll;g i ttIli I' o9 ..

S ** * * ** o ***** .* "0 .


!i H
61I1 9


5 .41
S


* 4*E6
Up,,,


* o o


A


4







O
action

ssin

or


1


I




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs