Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00231
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: October 17, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00231
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text








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The


Tribune


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION AGAIN


he SAiami EDITaION
BAHAMAS EDITION


Volume: 101 No.266


ALL THE ACTION FROM THE
NASSAU SIXES
* SEE TRIBUNE SPORTS SECTION


MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005


PRICE 500


RONALD SANDERS ON IMMIGIAION AND
WHAT IT MEANS TO THE CARIBBEAN
SEE NEWS SECTION PAGE EIGHT


Sin


19-year-old is


stabbed to death


as crowd look on


M By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
and SAMORA ST ROSE
A CROWD of nightclub rev-
ellers watched in horror as a
young man was stabbed and
beaten to death before their
eyes over the weekend.
In what one observer
described as "a sad and dis-
graceful scene", the teenager,
was killed by a group of men at
Waterloo while party-goers
made no attempt to intervene.
The concrete poolside was
covered in blood as 19-year-old
Glen Fulford lay dying in front
of scores of onlookers. "This
shows how callous and desensi-
tised we have become as a peo-
ple," said one witness.
The club was full for the
weekly "ladies night" and this
helped Glen's killers to escape,
he added.
According to witnesses, a
group of males accosted Glen
near the pool, beating him to
the ground, where they then
began to kick and stomp his
body until he was motionless.
A Tribune employee wit-
nessed the fight-turn-murder at
the East Bay Street nightclub
around 2am on Friday. He and
others were stunned by the hor-
rific murder.
"It shows how callous and
desensitised to violence we have
become as a people. It's just
very, very sad and disgraceful,"
said one observer.
As some people scrambled to
get out of the way of the melee,
others danced on, unaware of
what was happening.
By this time, the music -


being played by just-crowned
"DJ of the Year" Dion da
Butcha was ordered to be
turned off. Security officers
rushed over in an attempt to
break up the crowd and get
hold of the culprits, shouting at
everybody to clear, the pool
area.
"Please, everybody clear this
area, give him some room to
breathe," said a woman in tears.
After some of the crowd dis-
persed, others came back to see
what had happened, forming a
large circle around the victim,
whose clothes were drenched
in blood.
"I bet he ain't wake up this
morning thinking this gonna
happen to him. That's really bad
eh, and this was inside the club,
you see," said a male who didn't
wish to be identified by name.
"I just glad it ain't me, ma
boy," headded.
"What happened to him, he
get stab eh, cause I ain't hear
no shots," said one man.
The victim was identified as
19-year-old Glen Fulford, by
Supt Walter Evans. "We have
one person currently assisting
police in their investigation,"
he said.
Glen lay on the ground for
about half an hour before help
came, according to witnesses.
Later, police taped off the
crime scene and began asking
questions. From the outside,
around 3am, a number of peo-
ple heard a woman crying inside
the club. Some said it was the
victim's mother, who had been
called to the scene to identify
her son.


SEA swells caused by a
tropical depression off the
Cayman Islands dumped loads
of sand on to West Bay Street
yesterday.


Bahamas Met Office is
expecting that the slow-
moving system could become
the season's 21st named
storm, tying the record for the


Haitian dies in


traffic accident


M By DENISE MAYCOCK"
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
FREEPORT A Haitian
woman lost her life over the
holiday weekend, in a traffic
accident in the Caravel Beach
area. She is the 19th person to
die on Grand Bahama roads
this year.
Chief Supt Basil Rahming
reported that Roseline
Novembre, 37, of LaTortue,
Haiti, died instantly when the
vehicle she was in overturned
in bushes around 3.15am Sat-
urday.
The accident occurred on
East Atlantic Drive, near the
junction with Sunset Highway,
involving a blue 1996 Chevy
Lumina licence 1871 and a


maroon Mitsubishi Galant
licence 31663.
According to police, Peter
Roberts, 41, of 8 Alex Lane,
was driving the Lumina south
on East Atlantic Drive.
He had left a nightclub and
was headed home when he
collided head-on with the
Galant, which was occupied
by Novembre and driver Luc
Luckson, 26, of Hearn Lane,
who were also returning home
from a night of partying.
The collision sent Luckson's
vehicle hurtling out of control
into bushes, where it over-
turned.
Mr Rahming said the Hait-
ian woman was trapped in the
wreckage and appeared to be
SEE page 11


most storms in an Atlantic
season.
The only other time that so
many storms have formed
since meteorological record-


keeping began 154 years ago
was in 1933.
At 5 pm, the depression was
SEE page 11


Hunt is on for


missing surfer


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
FAMILY and friends of
Anthony Adderley are comb-
ing the beaches and waters of
Paradise Island after the 18-
year-old went missing while
surfing on Saturday.
Anthony had been
employed at Paradise Blue
Surf Shop since the opening
of Marina Village on July 15.
Mrs Michelle Kelly, owner
of the shop, said Anthony is
"a great kid from a great fam-
ily.".
"He is eager and wanting to
please. He was experiencing
a whole different side of life
working on Paradise Island,"
she told The Tribune.


Mrs Kelly explained that
Anthony had gone out surf-
ing with four friends, but nev-
er returned to shore. She
received a report that a boat
found his surfboard, but no
sign of him.
Upon hearing news of his
disappearance, she herself
combed the beach area and
went up in a helicopter to look
for him.
Bahamas Air and Sea Res-
cue also launched its own
search. The helicopter com-
pany has also been very sup-
portive, making a point of
searching the area on every
trip.
She said searchers were
SEE page 11


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Winds whip New Providence


* SEA swells caused by Tropical Depression 24 dumped sand on West Bay Street. Heavy equipment had to be called in to
clear roads. This picture was taken near Sandyport.


lub


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Man is cut from car after traffic crash


THREE Grand Bahama res-
idents were taken to hospital
following a traffic accident ear-
ly Sunday morning.
Freeman Basden,17, of
Green Turtle Street, was dri-
ving a blue 1998 Mitsubishi


Mirage south along Seahorse
Road when he lost control of
the vehicle.
The car skidded on to the
median and crashed into a
strongbark tree. Freeman and
his front seat passenger, 18-


year-old Latoya Ferguson of
Williams Town, both received
multiple cuts and bruises.
The back seat passenger, 20-
year-old Clayton Powell of
Magellan Crescent, suffered
multiple injuries to his hands,


head and spinal cord.

Surgery

According to police, Clayton
was trapped in the vehicle and
had to be removed using the
jaws of life. All three were tak-
en to Rand Memorial Hospital
for surgery. Their conditions


were not known at the time of
going to press.
In other news from Grand
Bahama, a librarian at Sir
Charles Hayward Library was
accosted and robbed as she
walked to her car on Saturday
afternoon.
Josephine Zonicle told police
that she was walking to her car
after closing the library when


she was accosted by a "dark
male" armed with a silver hand-
gun.
She described the man as 5ft
7ins of slim build clad in an
orange tee-sheet.
The man robbed her of an
envelope containing an undis-
closed amount of cash, the
property of the, library, before
fleeing into nearby bushes.


TRIBUNE staff celebrate the latest circulation increase, which reinforces the paper's position as
the Bahamas' number one daily




Industry praise




for Tribune's




circulation rise


MEDIA experts have praised
The Tribune's latest circulation
increase, claiming it showed the
paper was now first choice in
all sections of the community.
"The Tribune is often sold
out in many areas by 10am,"
said one industry source,
"There is a tremendous demand
for it all over the island."
Excellent news, business and
sport content, plus intelligent
opinion, were cited as major
draws. "Better stories, better
columns and better sports cov-
erage are the paper's main
strengths," said the source.
Latest ABC figures show that
The Tribune has boosted its
position as the Bahamas' num-
ber one daily, outselling its main
rival, The Nassau Guardian, by
nearly 12,000 copies a week
over the past year.
While The Tribune has con-
tinued its steady climb, the
Guardian has slumped by
another 6.3 per cent year-on-
year, showing a total loss of
more than 18 per cent over the
last two years.
The-Guardian's weekly sale
now stands at 64,713 compared
with The Tribune's 76,297.
The Tribune's rise continues a


trend which began when the
paper converted to morning
publication in 1998.
The Guardian, once the dom-
inant morning paper, has now
been forced into second place,
with The Bahama Journal a dis-
tant third.

Development

A media analyst said: "The
Tribune has made tremendous
inroads into the black commu-
nities over the last few years. It
has also developed a course
where it can properly be called
a national newspaper, with
something for all of the
Bahamas.
"It is a paper for independent
minds. When something
appears in The Tribune, peo-
ple take it seriously."
He added: "There is no doubt
that The Tribune is now a seri-
ous force editorially."
Alongside its circulation gains,
The Tribune is also showing
impressive increases in adver-
tising sales. "More and more
businesses see The Tribune as
the premier promotional medi-
um," said the analyst.


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I- I- I-l IIIIIII- I I I ll l.ll II


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005








THE TRI^BUNE MONDAY, OCTOiLOCALKNEWSBER17 PAGE


. I S photo
I. aw


Ministry of Foreign Affairs



requests Freeport office


TO stay in step with the economic
growth of Freeport, the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs has requested an
office for its services as well as
expanded passport processing facili-
ties for the Bahamas' second city.
Presented
Minister of Foreign Affairs Fred
Mitchell on Thursday announced that
the Ministry of National Insurance
had presented plans for the con-
struction of a major new building in
Freeport and that his ministry has


requested space for an expanded
passport office and an office of the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs within
that building.
"I believe that this city has grown
to the point, and its future growth
clearly points toward, a Deputy Chief
of Protocol for Freeport with an offi-
cer to assist. There is a need for a
protocol lounge in Freeport airport.
There is the need for a secure facility
so that if our friends the Americans
want to conduct interviews for grant-
ing visas they can have such a facili-
ty," he said while addressing law


enforcement officers of the northern
Bahamas at an excercise in Grand
Bahama last week.
Passport ,
The minister said there is a partic-
ular need for expanded passport facil-
ities as machine-readable passports
will be issued out of Freeport when
they begin to be issued next year.
The expansion of these services,
said Mr Mitchell, is part of the gov-
ernment's effort to increase interac-
tion between the capital and Grand


Bahama as well as the other Family
Islands.
"The country is a nation of islands,
and the centre must come out to the
parts and speak with and interact with
those who live outside the capital. It
helps to build us as a country," he
said..
In support of this effort, Mr
Mitchell said, the government has
held two major international meet-
ings in Freeport the Foreign Minis-
ter's Conference of Caricom earlier
this year and the meeting with the
South African Foreign Minister.


Three


men are


charged


with rape
THREE men have been
charged with rape before
Eleuthera's Magistrate's
Court.
Asst Supt Wendall
Deveaux, officer-in-charge of
Eleuthera division, said that
on October 9 an incident
involving an alleged sexual
offence was reported to the
police.
Officers conducted an inves-
tigation which resulted in
three Eleuthera males appear-I
ing in court last week charged i
with rape. Police said the!
female allegedly raped is also
a resident of Eleuthera.



I


Share

your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


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MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


pri~w








PAG4 MONDARIYTESTTHED O2I
I *'h S.. I


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

.Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama


Explanation from government needed


A MAJOR article in the Business section
of The Tribune on Tuesday, October 11, cannot
be ignored.
The story, written by Tribune Business Editor
Neil Hartnell, told how government ignored 87
recommendations put forward by the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce after consultation with
members of the business community dealing
with the Consumer Protection Bill.
The Chamber of Commerce said it was "baf-
fled" that government "had ignored the 87 rec-
ommendations it had made for improving the
Consumer Protection Bill" and instead had for-
warded the proposed legislation for debate in
the House of Assembly last Wednesday, Octo-
ber 5.
In a statement the Chamber of Commerce
said it was "disappointed" that the Bill had
gone to Parliament, after its Legislation Com-
mittee and other private sector partners had
formally presented its 87 recommendations and
other "general points" to Leslie Miller, the min-
ister of trade and industry in August 2004.
Apart from the Chamber, the other organi-
sations involved in the review included the
Bahamas Employers Confederation, the
Bahamas Hotel Association, the Insurance Insti-
tute of the Bahamas, the Bahamas Manufac-
turers Representatives and Wholesale Associ-
ation, the Small Business Association, the
Bahamas General Insurance Association, the
Bahamas Motor Dealers Association and
Amnesty International.
The Chamber said it had forwarded its rec-
ommendations to the minister "in keeping with
the Chamber's mandate of representation of
the private sector and its responsibility to pre-
sent for government's consideration our assess-
ment of -the impact of proposed legislation on
the business and wider community."
The Chamber went on to say: "To date, we.
have not had the courtesy of a reply anridwe
are disappointed to learn that the proposed Bill
has proceeded to the House of Assembly for
debate without consideration by government
of the Chamber's extensive response."
The Tribune is amazed at the moderate tone
of the Chamber's language. It could have been
phrased a lot stronger, and in our opinion -
should have been.
It's about time that Prime Minister Christie
started exercising some discipline among the
ranks of his Cabinet ministers.
There's no, point in asking members of the
public or such public institutions as the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce to participate in fine
tuning a piece of government legislation if it
has absolutely no intention of even considering
their recommendations. It is a foolhardy exercise
that wastes the time and effort of busy people
who could well have put that time to better use
for their own businesses or their families.
Furthermore it is just common courtesy for
government to at least acknowledge receipt of
such proposals, especially if the Chamber had
presented their recommendations to the minis-
ter in August of last year. This gave him plenty
of time to read over the document and at least


meet with the group for further discussion.
Such high-handedness by some of Mr
Christie's Cabinet ministers is becoming all too
commonplace. He should remind them that
they are in government to serve the public.
They are not there for their own pleasure.
Said the Chamber: "...So it is baffling that
the impact of the single largest business organ-
isation in the country appears to have not been
considered."
And "while we understand that government
is charged with the making of policy, wherever
possible, it would be prudent to seek the input
of stakeholders in matters of national impor-
tance. After all," it added, "this is the purpose
and process of consultation."
The Chamber in its 19-page review of the
proposed Bill said: The Bill is blanketed with
reasons that the Minister can summarily convict
people. The criminal aspect of this is objec-
tionable and should be removed and left to the
discretion of the courts."
The review went on to say that the overriding
concern regarding the Act wag the power grant-
ed to a single person (the minister) while
attempting: to limit the power of the courts.
"We all share concerns that Acts such as these
- that make it less likely that matters will go
before the courts distort the fundamental
democratic system ie: the Constitution, the
court, Parliament, citizens and civil society."
"We cannot emphasise enough that if there is
a perceived problem with the court system, this
should be fixed, rather than circumvent the sys-
tem."
The greatness of our system of democracy is
that government adheres to the rule of law.
Therefore, even a Prime Minister or Cabinet
minister is answerable under the law. When
they stand before the bar of justice they are the
same or should be the same as an ordinary
citizen.
It's true that a Cabinet minister is placed in a
high position of government by the leader of
government. But he/she-should never forget
that they are the servants of the people and are
there to serve and not to rule over them. This
fact is often forgotten.
This failure of common courtesy by govern-
ment and its indifference to the views of the
Chamber of Commerce is .so grievous, that an
appropriate response from government is in
order. Government does not exist without the
consent of the people. And for government to
summarily ignore their views in a case such as
this shows a callous disregard of the norms of
behaviour and an arrogance that belies proper
democratic governance.
Furthermore, to expect members of the pub-
lic to give up their own time to participate in bur
so-called democracy only to be treated in such
a cavalier manner shows the public that the
present government is anything but democratic.
Mr Christie maintains that he heads a consul-
tative government. It would seem that once
again this is just so much talk?
Mr Christie should take particular note, espe-
cially with an election year not far away.


EDITOR, The Tribune
Since 2003 Leslie Miller,
Minister for Trade and Indus-
try, has waged a one man verbal
war against the local oil industry
both the wholesalers and
retailers while promising
relief for the. Bahamian
motorists from the high cost of
fuel.
The benefits that accrue
from lower prices are numer-
ous. There is confusion, how-
ever, about the plans the minis-
ter may have to achieve this
desirable end.
Following is a brief outline of
events over the past two years.
Initially Mr. Miller charged
the local oil companies and gas
stations with gouging the
Bahamian driving public. On
this assumption, a National
Energy Corporation (NEC) was
proposed to lower the cost of
fuel at the gas pumps.
He assumed that the NEC
would replace the oil compa-
nies in the oil supply chain and
would pass the excess profits on
to the customer.
No evidence has been sup-
plied to support this claim; and,
in fact, government's track
record of effectively managing
any business enterprise is less
than stellar.
Then, after being wooed by
President Chavez of Venezuela
with PetroCaribe, an oil financ-
ing deal, the language became a
little more hostile and it was
suggested the price of gasoline
at the pump would be reduced
to $2.60 a gallon.
Earlier this year, the "heat"
was turned up, but recently the
focus has been turned on the
foreign oil companies, the ones
now identified as "thegougers".
'' After this, the' rhetdric'hlias
intensified and it is now envi-
sioned that the price of gas at
the pumps will be reduced by
10 per cent to 15 per cent. With
gasoline now selling at approx-
imately $4 a gallon it will be
reduced to $3.40 if a 15 per cent
reduction materialises.
Nowhere near the promised
$2.60 per gallon.
Most recently the focus has
shifted from lower prices at the
pumps to promises of signifi-
cant savings on electricity and
the PetroCaribe oil financing
deal is touted as good for the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion (BEC).
The PetroCaribe document
and proposed bi-lateral agree-
ment do not include a discount
on the price of oil; but propose
to sell oil on deferred credit.
But, it also incorporates the


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additional obligation of joining
the Bolivarian Alternative for
the Americas (ALBA), intend-
ed to be a rival to United States
initiatives. So we suspect these
have caused Mr Miller to
change the focus of the discus-
sion.
Russell Roberts, professorof
economics at George Mason
University and the Features
Editor at the Library of Eco-
nomics and Liberty recently
wrote: "Friedrich A. Hayek, in
The Fatal Conceit, wrote that
'The curious task of economics
is to demonstrate to men how
little they really know about
what they imagine they can
design.' Unfortunately, when
politicians try to didl down
prices to preserve order, they
only worsen the problem. We
would do well to remember the
emergent nature of prices, espe-
cially in times of crisis."
Mr Miller, and his Petroleum
Usage Review Committee
(PURC), hope to convince the
Bahamas that they can design a
perfect petroleum market and
consumers will not be affected
by the shocks of the world mar-
ket for fuel.
However, now that the
rhetoric has changed from
arranging huge savings at the
pumps to providing huge sav-
ings on electricity bills through
BEC, maybe Mr Miller has


stopped believing his own
promises?
As pointed out in this article
titled Gasoline and Price Con-
trols back in 2003, the factors-
determining the price of fuel do
not include the Minister of
Trade's pronouncements of
what margins the oil industry
should maintain. Supply and
demand are the determining
factors, and no individual can
control either for very long.
The rise in prices is due to
the increase in the world
demand principally India and
China and the increased per-
ception of uncertainty in exist-
ing supplies from the Middle
East, Nigeria, Venezuela, etc.
In fact, Venezuela owns the
refinery in Curaqao from which
most of the fuel entering the
Bahamas. is imported. So if Mr.
Chavez wanted to lower the
price of fuel, he could simply
discount the price on the pur-
chases from his country's refin-
ery.
It is also worth noting that
Venezuela owns the Citgo gas
stations in the United States,
but the cost of fuel at those sta-
tions is sold at the market price
- not below.
It is Obvious Mr. Chavez is
playing political games and is
not as generous as he would like
Bahamian and Caribbean politi-
cians to believe. So please Mr
Miller, let's scrap the Petro-
Caribe deal.
THE NASSAU INSTITUTE
Nassau
October 3 2005


National problem

with punctuality


EDITOR, The Tribune
LET me begin by giving
highest accolades to the Govw
ernor General. Dame Ivy is
always gracious, warm and on
time she will be greatly
missed when she retires.This
letter however, addresses
what I feel is a serious prob-
lem in our community not
being on time.
For too long now the
Bahamian public have
allowed the powers that be -
namely government ministers
and their minions to feel
that they are better than the
common man and hence they
can do whatever they wish
and the public is supposed to
accept it without question. It
is most discourteous for gov-
ernment ministers or high-
ranking officials to arrive
after the Governor General.
Well, time waits for no one,
and I for one am advocating
that the ridiculous rule of pro-


tocol that demands that pub-
lic functions to which goy-
erinent officials have been
invited have to be put on hold
until the "powers that be"
arrive is a load of nonsense.
Government officials need to,
get a reality check because
this foolishness has got to
stop! In case they don't
realise it, we are no longer"
slaves waiting to do the mas-
ter's bidding. Common cour-
tesy is a two-way street and it
is high time that the public
demand to be treated with-
respect.
If you are unable to come
on time to a function have the'
decency and be man/woman
enough to call ahead and ask
persons to continue without
you.
No small wonder the coun-
try is going to the dogs!
PAMELA BURNSIDE
Nassau
October 3 2005


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The changing




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Leslie Miller


On Saturday 1st October, 2005 at 5:55p.m. at
Police Headquarters, East Street, the Annual Royal
Bahamas Police Force Raffle was drawn live on
Z.N.S. Radio Station 1540. The following were
the winners.




$10,000.00 To go towards the payment for a piece
of property which was won by
ANDRE FORBES of
Great Harbour Cay
with ticket #45112



$10,000.00 Worth of Furniture which was won


HAROLD GRANT of
Pioneers Way, Freeport, Grand Bahama
with ticket #33844


$10,000.00 worth of appliance was won by
DEREK NORTH
c/o Lagan Holdings Ltd.
with ticket #34616


PAGE 4, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005


THE TRIBUNE















'By some standards, Abaco





has come into its own'


Abaco has come
into its own. Any-
one visiting the
island for the first time in a few
years will be shocked at the lev-
el of growth it has recently
experienced. The famed traf-
fic light in Marsh Harbour, long
a somewhat unnecessary
curiosity, now increasingly
serves an actual purpose, as the
surrounding area develops into
a real city centre.
In local government terms,
Abaco's three District II Coun-
cils and various town commit-
tees are allotted some 20 per
cent of the local government
budget for the entire country,
reflecting the island's popula-
tion growth.
New resorts, a harbour full
of boaters and new restaurants


* By NATARIO McKENZIE

CZECH-born investor Vik-
tor Kozeny spent another
weekend behind bars as Mag-
istrate Carolita Bethel was
unable to make a ruling in his
bail application bid.
Philip Davis, lawyer for
Kozeny, and Francis Cumber-
batch, who is representing the
United States in the extradi-
tion bid, continued their sub-
missions on Kozeny's bail
application last Thursday.
After Mr Cumberbatch
made his submissions, which
were in response to arguments
which Mr Davis had made in a
previous hearing, the magis-
trate said she would be unable
to hear another lengthy sub-
mission that day and adjourned
the bail hearing to Tuesday. Mr
Davis told the court he would
be willing to present a written
submission.
Mr Davis, who told the mag-
istrate on Thursday that his
client had been co-operative
with US authorities by turning
over bundles of documents to
them, presented two more of
Mr Kozeny's passports which
he said signified that Mr
Kozeny was willing to be "full
and frank with the court."
One was a Czech passport
issued in 1994 and the other an
Arab passport issued in 2000.
The passports were report-
edly missed when authorities
raided Kozeny's Lyford Cay
residence. Mr Davis also
reminded the court of a sub-
mission in which he indicated
that even if Mr Kozeny were
to flee to Venezuela there



Ii!',,tlii i


everywhere you look signify an
economy on the move. But if
you blink too much you are
likely to miss the signs of cor-
responding public investment
growth in Abaco.
To put it mildly, the much-
vaunted resilience of an econ-
omy driven by repeat visitors
and second home owners has
not been matched either by
public investment in infra-
structure or by robust manage-
ment of local affairs and
resources.

Troubling

The result is a troubling
developmental imbalance of
which the infamous Mud and
Pigeon Pea settlements are
only the most visible examples.
Smart new office suites and


VIKTOR KOZENY
would still be a possibility for
him to be extradited to the
United States.
Mr Cumberbatch argued
that Kozeny, who is facing
extradition to the United States
to answer charges relating to
the laundering of hundreds of
millions of dollars, is a flight
risk as he has no ties to the
Bahamas.

Magistrate

Mr Cumberbatch told the
magistrate that Kozeny has
Irish citizenship, Venezuelan


PERSPECTIVES


N D R EW


surprisingly large supermarkets
and hardware outlets must be
accessed on horrifically pot-
holed roads. Tourists are treat-
ed to an "International" air-
port that is built to Family
Island standards and must be
closed in the event of a little
rain (in which instances, inci-
dentally, Bahamasair does not
cover the cost of travelling to
Treasure Cay for the Nassau
flight).
Electrical and telephone ser-
vices are simply substandard,


L E N


and all the new projects look
certain to create further strain.
The general disparity between
private investment and public
investment looks set to grow
even starker with all the devel-
opments being slated for Aba-
co.
In the circumstances, Aba-
conians are sick of being pdint-
ed to by Nassau politicians as a
Family Island success story,
only to have the fruits of that
success siphoned off into the
consolidated fund with noth-
ing to show for it in terms of
public investment. They seem
to know all too well that an
economy increasingly like
Grand Bahama's cannot be
governed in the manner of Cat
Island. For growth to be sus-'
tainable, planning and decision-
making must exist primarily at
the local level.
The mood at Guana Cay,
which is at the centre of gov-
ernment's controversial plans
for an "anchor" project for the
area, epitomises the sense of
inertia and frustration that
takes root when locals are
denied both real decision-mak-
ing and the tools to implement
it.
The post office and adminis-
trative complex constructed on
the island by the FNM govern-
ment have been unmanned for
over a year now. Since that
time, locals have been obliged
to travel to Marsh Harbour
even to collect their mail. Local
government claims to have
found no-one prepared to take
the job.
If you look at some of the
things the people of the Abaco


identification and "empires" in
different parts of the world. Mr
Cumberbatch told the magis-
trate that not only did Kozeny
have multiple passports but
that they were also inter-
changeable.
Mr Cumberbatch said there
were several occasions when
Kozeny left the Bahamas for
the United States using one
passport and returned using
another.
Mr Cumberbatch argued
that the. passports had been
stamped 'cancelled' but that
there was no date on them to
indicate when they were qan-
celled. Mr Cumberbatch also
argued against Mr Davis' sub-
mission that even if Kozeny
were to flee to Venezuela there
was still a possibility for him
to be extradited.
Mr Cumberbatch explained
that there were extradition lim-
itations in that country and that
it was quite possible for
Venezuelan authorities to
refuse to extradite Kozeny.
Magistrate Bethel said she
could make a ruling on
Wednesday if by then both
sides have made final submis-
sions.


Cays have organised for them-
selves, independent of central
government (a reliable ferry
service, a successful fishing
industry, a solid tourist industry
based on the rental of their
homes) it may seem strange
that they would wait years for
someone to come and bring the
mail. But that is the nature of
government in the Family
Islands. It comes in, makes the
rules, puts up the buildings,
takes over the responsibility
(sometimes even monopolises
it!), then fails to deliver..
Like on the mainland, the
things that are best maintained
and ordered on Guana Cay are
those that private individuals
have taken an interest in main-
taining. The best paved roads
are those leading north of the
settlement, all built and main-
tained at the expense of a pop-
ular foreign resident.
Like many Abaconians, the
people of Guana Cay possess
an admirable spirit of self-help
that is unusual among Family
Islanders. But without the
funds to match, even this is not
enough.

Comprise

Elbow Cay, Man-o-War Cay
and Great Guana together
comprise one local administra-
tive unit. Between them, these
little islands contribute more
than their fair share to the trea-
sury. But under our system of
local government, they are
funded from the consolidated
fund, rather than retaining tax-
es at source.
The entire annual budget
allotment for these three
bustling cays is around
$400,000, a miniscule sum when
you consider that the dump
maintenance contract for
Marsh Harbour alone is some
$60,0Q0. ,Even:witoQu,t the,
expected influx of new, employ-
ees, visitors and business activ-


ity, this generally low level of
public investment makes for a
badly kept, inadequately cared
for community.
A few weeks ago in Guana
Cay, I spoke to one of the
opponents of the Baker's Bay
resort who had a very personal
example to relate. During a
recent spell of bad weather, her
son, together with several oth-
er schoolchildren, had taken
refuge in an unsecured struc-
ture supposedly maintained on
the island by BEC. When he
went to put his drink down on
what appeared to be a suitable
object, the child received a
blast of electricity that very
nearly caused his death.
Today, some feeble tape and
a new door deny entry to any-
one insufficiently nimble and
mischievous to enter through
the gaping, uncovered roof!
A more long-term concern
of locals is that a local govern-
ment that is so under-funded,
so weakened by politics and so
second-fiddle to Nassau in
terms of decision-making, will
never be able to keep up with
the growth of their communi-
ties. In such circumstances, it
is hard to see how that growth
will continue to be orderly.
So for all their success, many
Abaconians suspect that theirs
is a. model that cannot be long
sustained with the current con-
straints on self-government.
The signs of negative urbani-
sation and badly.co-ordinated
growth are already appearing
with alarming speed.
The fully employed people
of Guana Cay, about to be
treated (by Nassau politicians)
to a massive investment pro-
ject, will now presumably have
to accommodate an influx of
immigrant labourers. And they
have only the politicians in
Nassau to look to for solutions
, to.theyprpblems this has creat-
ed elsewhere in The Bahamas.
'Good lick.


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Kozeny spends another



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MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 6, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


SANPIN MOTORS


DEd a


Ioptima


......... .. ... ..
Dim^E s


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Thompson Boulevard, Oakes Field, Nassau, Bahamas, P.O. Box GT-2947
Tel: 326-6377, 326-6464/5, 326-0013/4, 326-6382 Fax: 326-6315
Email: sanpin.vehicles@coralwave.com


Bahamas taken



off blacklist by



finance watchdog


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Bahamas has been
removed from the monitoring
list of the Financial Action Task
Force, Attorney General Alfred
Sears has announced.
In June, 2000, the Bahamas
was one of 15 offshore finan-
cial services identified by the
FATF as non-Co-operative
countries and territories.
This so-called "blacklisting"
propelled the financial services
sector to implement a battery
of legislative and institutional
measures to combat money
laundering and reduce the vul-
nerability of its financial sys-
tem, Mr Sears explained.
He added that since the coun-
try's removal from the non-co-
operative list in 2001, the coun-
try was still being monitored by
the FATF.
However, he said that in "an
important if long overdue
acknowledgment of the efforts


N ALFRED Sears


of the Bahamas," the FATF at'
their October, 2005, plenary in
Paris, France, formally discon-
tinued their monitoring.
Among issues of concern was
Athe ability of Bahamian author-
ities to adequately respond to


foreign judicial and regulatory
requests.
However, Mr Sears main-
tained that .the country has
always expeditiously processed
requests for assistance through
the AG'S office.,
He added that the country
remains committed to interna-
tional co-operation and ensur-e
ing that the financial services
industry remains regulated and.
vigilant against the dangers oft
money-laundering and the"
financing of terrorism.
He also thanked the many.
industry personnel who worked,
long hard hours to get the coun-
try to this stage.
Both Foreign Affairs Minister
Fred Mitchell and Financial Ser-
vices Minister Allyson May-,
nard-Gibson called the occasion-
an important and vital compo-
nent to the country securing
itself as a major player in the
financial arena.
SEE Business


Six in hospital following


Grand Bahama pile-up


SIX people are in hospital fol-
lowing a two-car collision on
Grand Bahama Highway.
The accident occurred on Fri-
day at 6.10pm about three miles
east of South Riding Point.
Police say Andre Wells, 34,
was driving his car west when
he was side-swiped by another
vehicle. His car left the road
and overturned in a pond. The
other vehicle failed to stop.
Mr Wells and his five passen-
gers all received injuries and


were taken to hospital by ambu-
lance and private vehicle.
Police are seeking the pub-
lic's help in locating the uniden-
tified hit-and-run vehicle. Any-
one with information should call
352-1919.
A LONG-time British resi-
dent of Bimini was found dead
at home by his caretaker.
Police reported that 61-year-
old Paul Wood was discovered
around 10am on Friday lying
motionless in his bed.


Mr Wood's caretaker, Paul&
Ellis, told police she discovered
her employer after entering hig
room when he failed to answer
several knocks on his door:
Police concluded that foul
play was not involved.
Mr Wood had been living
alone and was known to have
suffered from diabetes and
heart disease.
An autopsy will be performed
in New Providence to deter-
mine the cause of death.


PAGE 6, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005


THE TRIBUNE.












intesdy M


UNIVERSAL PERSPECTIVE, HISTORICAL CONTEXT A MUST-READ COLUMN THAT GETS To THE POINT
................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. . .............................. . ........................................................ ..............


Historic gown



given to gallery


* CURATOR Erica James with the gown


A BALLGOWN worn at
Government House by Lady
Ranfurly during a 1950s visit to
Nassau by Princess Margaret
has been presented to the
Bahamas National Art Gallery.
The gown, made by Paris
couturier Jacques Faith, was
handed over by Lady Ran-
furly's daughter, Lady Caroline
Simmonds, who as a child of
four raised the flag at the open-
ing of Ranfurly Home for Chil-
dren.
Lady Caroline, whose father
Lord Ranfurly was Governor
of the Bahamas between 1953
and 1956, presented the gown
to gallery curator Erica James.
She said she was delighted to
make the donation and promised
to hand over the handbag, shoes
and gloves that Lady Ranfurly
wore for the occasion.
The gown, made of cream


Brussels lace over silk and
linen, has a bodice beaded with
flower design and halter neck
and sash in sea green satin.
The 1950s photograph shows
Lady Ranfurly in the gown
being saluted by Corporal
Grant, the Governor's driver.
The other picture shows
Lady Caroline with the gown
on the balcony of the National
Art Gallery.
Lady Caroline sits on the
Council of Book Aid Interna-
tional (the outgrowth of Nassau's
circulating library) and chairs
Ranfurly Charitable Services.
Her parents left a lasting
impression on the Bahamas,
particularly with the establish-
ment of the Ranfurly Home,
which still provides food and
shelter for deprived children.
Lady Ranfurly's determina-
tion to set up a home for needy


children was sparked by a fire
in Bay Street during the 1950s.
As Lord Ranfurly helped
man the fire hoses, Lady Ran-
furly was by his side and noticed
homeless waifs emerging from
narrow passages between
downtown businesses.
The Ranfurlys returned to
the Bahamas in 1960 so that
she could officially open the
home bearing her name.
During a trip to the Family
Islands, Lady Ranfurly was
shocked at how few books
there were for children to read.
So she launched an appeal and
established the Ranfurly Out
Island circulating library, which
continued after her return to
England and became an inter-
national organisation.
Lady Ranfurly died in Feb-
ruary, 2001, at her home in
Chesham, Buckinghamshire.


N LADY Ranfurly wearing the gown


BASRA gets



ready for


fundraising


THE Bahamas Air-Sea Res-
cue Association (BASRA) has
announced that its main annual
fundraising event will be held
;on Friday, October 28.
The event, the BASRA Ball,
;will be held at Sandals Royal
Bahamian Spa Resort on Cable
Beach.
According to a press release
jissued.last week, "Long-time
BASRA favourite, the Soulful
Groovers, will provide the
'music and tickets are $150 each
,and include cocktails, dinner,
wine and the chance to win the
.main door prize of two Ameri-
can Airlines business class tick-
ets to London."
"Throughout 2005, BASRA
3ias continued to conduct safe
boating courses and, having
nfow graduated in excess of 200
"persons, BASRA feels strongly
'that every boater should take
some sort of boating course and
is working with the Ministry of
"Transport and the Port Depart-
ment to bring this to fruition."
According to the release, it
costs more than $100,000 a year
to operate BASRA, and a large


part of this is traditionally col-
lected at the ball.
BASRA, which was founded
in 1963, is the only completely
volunteer search and rescue
organisation in the Bahamas.
"They maintain a network of
willing volunteers throughout
Nassau and the Family Islands
who are prepared to respond to
situations by co-ordinating cas-
es and using their own vessels
and aircraft.
"BASRA therefore relies
heavily on receiving the public's
financial support which assists
greatly in maintaining their two
rescue vessels, the Lady Pearl
and the Uncle Ben," it said.
BASRA said it appreciates
the support from volunteers and
from those individuals and busi-
nesses that continue to make
contributions by way of adver-
tising in the BASRA Ball pro-
gramme, taking a corporate
table at the ball or by providing
raffle prizes.
For further information about
the ball, contact BASRA head-
quarters at 325-8864 or 477-
2941.


N THE Soulful Grooves performing at last year's Basra Ball


Ivy V Cartwright
60
Accountant
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Breast cancer diagnosis on November 13 2001
Cancer survivor 4 years with 1 recurrence
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The TOM= obsepves Bpeast Cancep Awapeness Month Octobep 2005


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.


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005, PAGE 7


NOTED JOURNALIST,


ARTHUR FOULKES:


da













Turning Caribbean migration to the


* By Sir Ronald Sanders
(The writer is a former
Caribbean diplomat, now busi-
ness executive, who publishes
widely on Small States in the
global community).


IN a report that should
deeply trouble the
Caribbean, the International
Monetary Fund (IMF) reveals
that a majority of Caribbean
countries have lost more than
50 per cent of its people who

Almost all
the Caribbean
countries are
among the top
20 nations in
the world with
the highest
tertiary
education
migration
rates.

have been educated beyond sec-
ondary school.
They have migrated to the
countries of the Organisation
for Economic Cooperation and
Development (OECD), the
world's richest nations.


The report says, for exam-
ple, that the tertiary educated
labour force (people with more
than 12 years of schooling) has
been reduced by 89 per cent in
Jamaica and 82 per cent in
Guyana.
Almost all the Caribbean
countries are among the top 20
nations in the world with the
highest tertiary-education
migration rates.
It is significant that even oil-
rich Trinidad and Tobago has
a high number of tertiary-edu-
cated people who
migrate. Indeed, Trinidad and
Tobago ranks fifth in the region
behind Haiti, Suriname,
Jamaica and Guyana.
This is a truly troubling situ-
ation for the Caribbean. For not
only does it mean that the
region is losing a very large
number of its most educated
people, it also shows that the
richest nations are the benefi-
ciaries of the scarce financial
resources that Caribbean coun-
tries, particularly Barbados,
Trinidad and Tobago, and
Jamaica, spend on the educa-
tion of their brightest people.
This is yet another form of
resource transfers from devel-
oping countries to developed
countries that are not taken into
account in the uneven relation-


To Mr & Mrs.
Zrlington aa!minG
from both familys & friends &
especially from
Grants Town Church Family'

We love you guys -
't ,,


N SIR Ronald Sanders


ship between rich and poor
countries.
And, the problem is about
to get worse.

wo of the three major
immigrant-receiving
countries are Australia, Canada'
and the United States. Of those
three, Caribbean people emi-
grate to Canada and the US.
In mid-October, the Cana-
dian Foreign Affairs Minister,
Pierre Pettigrew, declared that
Canada's population of 32 mil-
lion must reach 40 million with-
in "the next few years" if Cana-
da is "to maintain its quality of
life".
Mr Pettigrew was reflecting
the concern that Canada's pop-,
ulation is aging with more
demands on the social welfare&
system. There is, therefore, an'
urgent need for a younger and
bigger work force to contribute
financially to the system.
But, since the Canadian pop-
ulation grew by only one per:
cent between 1994 and 2004, if


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Meeting the


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PAGE 8, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRI^BUNE MONDAY, OCTOBER17,2005,LPAGENEW9


advantage of the region


would not reach 40 million until
2026 if it relied on natural
growth.
Canada, therefore, will
encourage migration to its
shores, and given the proximity
of the Caribbean and the tradi-
tional links between the two
areas, it is obvious that the
Caribbean will be one region to
which Canada will look for
fresh immigrants. And, those
immigrants will be the best
qualified.
To add to the problem, over
the last few years, the United
States and the United Kingdom
have been actively recruiting
skills that are required in a
nuniber of fields including
teaching, health care and com-
puter technology. Both Guyana
and Jamaica have already lost a
large number of nurses and
teachers to the US and Britain.
While, now and in the future,
the largest number of such skills
will come from Asian countries,
the largest number as a per-
centage of the population will
come from the Caribbean. In
other words, the Caribbean will
continue to be the region that
will lose the largest number of
its qualified people.

There should be no
doubt about it: it is not
the poor, the wretched and the
unskilled that will be accepted
as migrants into the OECD
countries. The drive is for qual-
ified and skilled people who can
fill a void in the work force, con-
tribute to the creation of new
jobs and new businesses, buy
property, spend in the econo-
my and pay into the social secu-
rity scheme.
The loss of a significant num-
ber, of its ablest and brightest
people clearly has a negative
impact on the social and eco-
nomic development of the
Caribbean.
When this loss of talent is
combined with the erosion of
preferential markets for the
area's traditional exports, the
decline in official development
assistance, and the slow down in
the growth rates of national
economies, it is very likely that
both poverty, and unemploy-


ment will increase.
There are, of course, two fac-
tors contributing to the migra-
tion of skills from the region.
First is the "pull" factor,


motes their retention by job
conditions that compensate
them for lower salaries; and
which allows adequate space for
their creative abilities.


There should be no doubt
about it: it is not the poor, the
wretched and the unskilled
that will be accepted as
migrants into the OECD
countries.


among them better salaries and
wider opportunities to work in a
chosen field.
Second is the "push" factor
which includes political dis-
crimination and victimization,
lower salaries, and limited
opportunities for personal
growth.
There is nothing that the
Caribbean can do to compel its
skilled and qualified people to
remain at home. They can only


While the
largest number
of such skills
will come from
Asian countries,
the largest
number as a
percentage of
the population
will come from
the Caribbean.

be encouraged to do so.
Such encouragement would
require a more inclusive system
which does not shut out persons
from opportunities and from
contributing on party political
grounds; which actively pro-


Additionally, the creation of
the Caribbean Single Market
and Economy with free move-
ment of labour would expand
the area of opportunity for
skilled nationals within the
region.
But even such conditions
would not end skilled migration
to OECD countries.'
The Caribbean should there-
fore try to turn this significant
migration to advantage.


n financial terms, there
are already considerable
benefits from Caribbean migra-
tion as immigrants send remit-
tances to their home countries
to relatives and friends.
According to the IMF, the
Caribbean is the largest recipi-
ent of worker remittances in
proportion to its GDP. The
report says that, in 2002, total
remittances "constituted about
13 percent of the region's
GDP". In comparison, foreign
direct investment (FDI) was 6
per cent and official develop-
ment assistance (ODA) was
only 1 per cent of GDP.
What is more, remittances
rose between 1990 and 2002
while FDI and ODA declined.
Remittances are, therefore,
significant. The money'that is
sent home alleviates poverty
and supports the unemployed; it
is spent in the economy help-
ing to sustain businesses and to
maintain the jobs of people
employed in them.
I Caribbean governments and


the private sector, particularly
the financial services industry,
should try to increase the bene-
fits of remittances sent from
nationals abroad.
They could, for instance,
allow nationals abroad to save
in domestic financial institutions
at home at higher rates of inter-
est and with convertibility to
the currencies in which they
earn. This would increase the
capital available in the domestic
market to lend for productive
purposes.
A serious effort should also
be made to encourage nationals
abroad to invest not only in
their native countries, but in
other parts of the Caribbean.
Proposals should be drawn-
up for investment in govern-
ment bonds and private sector
projects at a preferred rate of
interest. This would call for gov-
ernments and private sector
organisations to devise jointly
a portfolio of projects structured
by investment' bankers, and
endorsed by Central Banks to
provide a satisfactory level of
comfort.
It is obvious that there is con-
siderable experience and knowl-
edge in a wide range of areas
among Caribbean nationals
abroad. Governments, along
with the private sector, should
implement a public diplomacy
strategy in the main areas of the
world in which nationals are
located with the twin objectives
of benefiting from their ideas,
network of contacts, and know-
how in their fields of compe-
tence, and of arming them with
the information they need to
advance the Caribbean's inter-
est visibly in the overseas com-
munities in which they live,
work and, very importantly,
vote.
Governments and the pri-
vate sector in the region should
turn Caribbean migration to
advantage by creating condi-
tions in which nationals abroad
find it beneficial to invest in
their one Caribbean homeland,
and by structuring machinery
to pick their brains; brains that
were born and nurtured in the
Caribbean.
responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005, PAGE 9







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005


___OCLNW


* SENIORS have their blood pressure taken during last Wednesday's Farm Road Urban Renewal
seniors health fair








LISTED PROPERTIES RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL NASSAU

SHIRLEY STREET STAPLEDON GARDENS
LOT NO. 1 & 3 LOT NO. 544
PROPERTY SIZE: Commercial Complex PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence
(13,000 sq. ft.) (9,600 sq ft)
LOCATION: Sears Rd. Southern Side of LOCATION: 130 FT. North of Spitfire Rd.
Shirley St. APPRAISED VALUE: $224,000
APPRAISED VALUE: $775,000
COWPEN ROAD HOLLYWOOD
SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. Crown GrantA-66 (Incomplete Structure)
PROPERTY SIZE: 10,875 sq. ft.
LOCATION: 350 West of Refuge Court
APPRAISED VALUE: $133,000




LISTED PROPERTIES VACANT LOTS I NASSAU


OLDE TOWN AT SANDYPORT
SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 14
PROPERTY SIZE: 1,300 sq. ft.
LOCATION: North of Sandyport Dr.
APPRAISED VALUE: $110,000


BERNARD TERRACE SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 20 Tract C
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Icelyn Blvd. off Bernard Road,
Fox Hill
APPRAISED VALUE: $45,000


INTRETE PRTES SHOUD UBITOFER T PUCHSE(WTHTEEPON
CONAC AD OSALADRES) O HERYMISIKTH PLZA MCKY TRET O
CAL5260 O UTE NOMTO. ERSRETERGTT EETAYO


PRIME Minister Perry Christie speaks to persons attending the senior health fair
(Photo: BIS/Peter Ramsay)



Need for better




access to medicine,




as age increases


* By Bahamas Information
Services

BAHAMIANS are living
longer and healthier lives.
Seniors now make up around
17 per cent of the population,
and it is a sector on which non-
communicable diseases such as
diabetes, hypertension, asthma
and arthritis continue to wreak
havoc.
A seniors' health fair hosted
by the Farm Road Urban
Renewal Project (FRUR) pro-
ject on Wednesday and spon-
sored by the Ministry of Health
underscored the need for
seniors to regularly access
health care.
The fair provided services
and information to help seniors
with high blood pressure, heart
disease, diabetes, nutrition,
exercise, oral health, medica-
tion and other health matters.
SIJ hve seen, the. wopetff ul
work that urban renewal is


doing," said Prime Minister Per-
ry Christie, the MP for the Farm
Road constituency.
"Over the ensuing period, I
would expect to have a major
thrust in urban renewal where
the idea of (an urban renewal
headquarters) is to have gov-
ernment's services working
together and where the infor-
mation coming out of this build-
ing would literally force a gov-
ernment to reorder its priori-
ties, because the suffering of
those people who live in cir-
cumstances that no one in this
country would agree with, could
be addressed," he said.
"Given improved social and
economic conditions and tech-
nological ,advances in the diag-
nosis and treatment of dis-
eases," said Health Minister Dr
Marcus Bethel. "Senior citizens
are fast becoming a growing
sector of our society.
Paediatric surgeon Dr, Da-
ny Johnson, who is the national


director for the Chronic Non-
communicable Diseases divi-
sion for the Ministry of Health;
pointed to "better health care
and education" to support
Bahamian longevity.
"As people live longer you
will see some of the diseases
you have not seen," he noted.
"At the turn of the last century
the average age for man in the
Bahamas was in the 40s. Now it
is in the 70s."
Although "more advanced"
health care systems are avail-
able to Bahamians, "we are
behind in how we access them.
"We have everything on offeo
but people are not accessing-it
early enough because of fear,
normally fear of the
unknown, fear of what's going
to happen when they go to the
doctor, fear of misinformation.
"The only thing you can fight
fear with is the facts. If we could
access ,it,, srlie oi pur.pqfile
would look even better." ,:.












High winds caused ou
DOCby depressionR


by depression


FROM page one
centred about 150 miles south-
east of Grand Cayman, fore-
casters said.
It was moving west-northwest
near 2mph and had sustained
winds near 35 mph. Depressions
become tropical storms when
their winds reach 39 mph.
The islands of the south east-
ern Bahamas yesterday experi-
enced some thunderstorms
because of the system. And
while the rest of the islands
should not experience more than
scattered showers and more
thunderstorms from the system,
because of its slow movement
forecasters say residents should
still follow its progress.
Long-term forecasts show the
storm would likely move west
and north, putting the storm in
the Gulf of Mexico on Thursday
or Friday. Forecasters said water
temperature and other condi-
tions were favourable for it to
become a significant hurricane.
The system had yet to form
the well-defined core needed
for significant strengthening
Sunday afternoon. Dry air also
appeared to be stopping the rise
of warm, moist air needed for


FROM page one
trying to look in the direc-
tion of the tides, but bad sea
conditions hampered their
efforts.
Mrs Kelly said the situa-
tion is unfortunate, but added
that everyone is hoping he
will be found alive and well.
His family and friends spent
all day combing the beach.
She said his co-workers
had been very respectful to


development, he said.
A hurricane watch was issued
for the Cayman Islands, mean-
ing hurricane conditions could
be felt there within 36 hours. A
tropical storm warning, meaning
tropical storm conditions within
24 hours, also was posted.
The depression is expected
to bring four to six inches of
rain in the Cayman Islands and
Jamaica, with as much as 12
inches possible in some areas..
In Jamaica, officials issued a
flash flood warning for north-


the family and helpful in the
search.
Michel Wells was surfing
with Anthony just off the
Club Med site when they got
into difficulties. Three friends
- more experienced surfers
- were further out, riding
the white-tops. Michel man-
aged to scramble ashore but
Anthony who had a larger
surfboard vanished.
An air search will continue
today.


western parts of the island. Hur-
ricane season ends November
30.
Wilma is the last on the list of
storm names for 2005; there are
21 names on the yearly list
because the letters q, u, x, y and
z are skipped.
If any other storms form, let-
ters from the Greek alphabet
would be used, starting with
Alpha. That has never hap-
pened in roughly 60 years of
regularly named Atlantic
storms.


Woman

killed in

accident
FROM page one
lifeless when paramedics arrived
at the scene.
Her body was removed from the
wreckage by firemen and trans-
ported by hearse to Rand Memor-
ial Hospital, where she was offi-
cially pronounced dead by doctors.
Both vehicles were destroyed. The
two men were taken to hospital,
where Roberts was treated and lat-
er discharged.
Luckson, however, is detained in
stable condition.


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December 15"'
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Family Medicine
January .9th
Women's Health
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February 16th 2006


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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005, PAGE 11






PAGE 12, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005


Meeting of Bethel and B indt


BACARDI & COMPANY LIMITED

Bacardi & Company Limited is seeking
candidates for the position of
Assistant Controller of Finance.

The Company has been based in Nassau for over 40 years with
significant manufacturing operations in the areas of bulk rum
production and bottling of various spirit beverages, primarily for
export markets.

The Assistant Controller will be responsible for leading the budgeting
and analysis functions within the Finance department. While
reporting to the Financial Controller the incumbent will be required
to plan and implement the annual budget and quarterly revised
estimate processes across the entire organisation. In addition the
successful candidate is expected to manage the budget reporting
submissions into the parent company including treasury forecasts.
Other key duties include the performance of quarterly financial
statement variance analysis and management of our global product
costing system.

The successful candidate must hold a professional designation
with ten (10) to fifteen (15) years experience.
A CA or CPA designation is preferred.
Furthermore the individual must possess the ability to work
independently under pressure to consistently meet deadlines.
Must be a self starter and a team player.

Salary and benefits are commensurate with experience.

Interested candidates should forward copies of their curriculum
vitae directly to the Bacardi & Company Limited PRO. Box N-4880,
Nassau, N.R, The Bahamas.
Attention The Human Resources Manager

Information may also be forwarded via e-mail to
dacartwright@bacardii.com

Application Deadline: October 28, 2005

BACARDI AND THE BAT DEVICE ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF BACARDI & COMPANY LIMITED


THE 2005 Global Leadership
Summit promises to be a jour-
ney of self-discovery accord-
ing to Dr Myles Munroe.
The summit will be held on
November 7 to 10 under the
theme: "The spirit of innova-
tive leadership".
Keynote speakers at the sum-
mit will include Dr Munroe,
popular US speaker Dr AR
Bernard, financial motivational
trainer Bob Harrison, former
political adviser from Curaqao
Josephine Bakuis, former MP
and minister Zhivargo Laing
and prolific Brazilian author


Robson Rodovalbo.
The cost of registration for the
full four days will be $300 per
person. Registration for a day
pass will be $100 per person.
Dr Munroe said: "We have
been basically trained to be
employed. Trained to go to
school, get a good job and to
make a living. I was never
taught to get an education, and
to employ people," he said. "By
doing that, I discovered that our
real purpose in life is not to be
employed but to be deployed."
Mr Munroe explained that
deployment is when a "person


discovers that they have a gift tp
give to the world and use it to
help people."
"Many companies are invest-
ing millions of dollars in would-
be leaders, but they come back
and are still the same, they db
nothing for the company. Bit
leadership has more to do with
discovery than with technique;"
he said.
Mr Munroe said the summit
will focus on, "the discovery of
one's leadership skills."
Call the Diplomat Centre on
Carmichael Road at 341-6444
fro more information


A'Joelk. .IN FUR '," AL


Saturday, October 22nd 2005
7am (6am late registration)
Fee; $10 includes T-shirt & water bottle
ee: Doctors Hospital Shirley Street parking lot
Pre-register at Doctors Hospital Marketing Department on or before Friday, October 21
4 Trophies and medals will be awarded Health Fair and free screenings will
* All participants will receive a follow the race in the Doctors Hospital
certificate of completion and prizes Conference Room
A Theo nmnanv with the mnot I B.A.C.O. will officiate the race


* A -&SV A E 3 SU'


* THE Minister of Health and Environmental Services Senator the Hon. Dr. Marcus Bethel, right,
greets Charge d'Affairs of the US Embassy Dr Brent Hardt during a courtesy call last Wednesday
at the Ministry of Health headquarters.
(BIS Photo: Tim Aylein)


Summit is 'journey


of self-discovery'


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BIOCAL NEWS


THElRIBUNE


I








THE TIBUN MONDY, OTOBER17,205, PGEW1


Government to exploit FNM leadership crisis
THE FNM's flip-flopping over the party leadership has
encouraged the PLP to savour dreams of sweet victory in
2007.
The opposition's self-imposed implosion could not come at
a better time for the government.
With unions going berserk, unemployment spiking, illegal
immigration unimpeded, the PLP needs people to be looking
elsewhere.
Now, with dissent brewing in the FNM, PLP insiders say
their party is organising a campaign to capitalise on its rival's
weaknesses and portray the FNM to the Bahamian public as a
party of indecisive position-seekers.
The PLP appears to be working on a dream team in
response to the hype over a Hubert Ingraham-Brent
Symonette line-up in 2007.
Well-placed sources claim that the PLP is actively lobbying
Dr Bernard Nottage to run alongside Perry Christie in the
-next general election.
A high-level party official said: "Tell the FNM to bring
Hubert. We gat something for them. We want Perry to shuffle
him straight into the retirement home.
"Everybody rowing over those two rookies (Tommy
Turnquest and Dion Foulkes), but bring Hubert, that's who
we want. We want see Bahamian people toss him into the
political boneyard."
If Bernard Nottage was to leave the hapless CDR, insiders
speculate that he may run for the PLP stronghold of St
Cecilia, particularly as many insiders believe Cynthia
'Mother' Pratt may not run at the next election.
Further, the PLP has a perfect opportunity to quash any
FNM resistance by calling an early election in 2006.
If the PLP were to mount an early offensive, the FNM will
be caught with their pants down as they would not have time
to regroup and unite behind one leader.
There would still be resentful cliques in the party
regardless of who is leader. The party may not have a clearly
defined agenda and Bahamians will not unite behind a party
that is not portraying the image of unity.
What's more, because Bahamians have short memories
and the PLP is the governing party, electioneering strategies
such as road works and beautification campaigns (parks and
communities) will begin.
As election time draws near, the public should expect to
hear of sudden increases in the salaries of teachers and public
servants and shadowy job creations.
And look for the PLP to capitalise on the Baha Mar
-investment, which is conveniently slated to begin construction
in 2007, either the year after or the year of the next general
election.
As a young person yet to vote for the first time, what really
are my options in 2007?

By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.conm


1 SHENIQUE McKenzie greets patrons at the Bahama Craft
Centre, Paradise Island, with colourful straw bags.



From trash



to treasure


0 By Bahamas Information
Services,
DEFENCE Force officer
Timothy Moss and artisans
Astrid and Ellison Pinder are
finding treasures among items
that are normally destined for
the dump.
And they have polished them
into pieces of art that have res-
idents and visitors gushing with
amazement.
Moss took limbs from the
lowly coconut tree and created
striking figurines replicating
Bahamian scenes.
The Pinders have discovered
that with a little elbow grease,
the ordinary whelk shell reveals
its true texture mother-of-
pearl right through.
They are among 100 special-
ists with booths at the Bahama
Craft Centre on Paradise Island
near Ihe exile bridge.
Many of them will be show-
cased at the three-day eighth
annual BahaArts Festival at the
Heritage Village (Arawak Cay
Fish Fry site) which begins on
October 28.
"The Bahama Craft Centre
is a Bahamian dream that has
become a Bahamian reality pro-
viding \ isitois and residents with
products made from the hearts


and hands of Bahamians," said
BAIC's Donnalee Bowe, man-
ager of the Handicraft Devel-
opment Department. "All prod-
ucts depict the history, culture
,and flavours of the islands."
The Pinders are comfortable
in shells king conch, cameo
conch, triton trumpet, pink
conch, milk conch, and the
numerous small rainbow-
coloured shells found on the
beach.
Moss was in his backyard
when he casually picked up a
coconut and curiously looked
at it only to find it looking back
at him.
"I saw a face and I said all I
need is a body to go along with
that," he recalled. "Since I was
at the coconut tree I decided to
stay there and see whether I
could do that using items from
the coconut tree."
The reception, he said, has
been great. "The product moves.
People come by. They never saw
it before. I am the only one in
the Bahamas who is doing it.
This is a unique product and
they have to get a piece."
"1 need to be at the
BahamaArts Festival this
month so I can.show Bahami-
ans what we have right here in
the Bahamas," said Moss.


* SCENTS by Astrid and Ellison Pinder warm the environment
(Photo: BIS/Tim Aylen)



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Omega Psi PhiFraternity, Inc.

SPi Xi Chapter

presents


The First Annual
Omega Psi Phi Cleveland Eneas, Sr. Award

Bahamian students in their final year of secondary studies
are invited to apply for the new scholarship
sponsored by the Brothers of Omega Psi Phi in The Bahamas,
tenable at the College of The Bahamas commencing
September, 2006

Applicants are requested to write a 1,000-word essay on the
following theme:

"Are we as a people doing all that we can
to deal,with illegal i;nmigration?
Explain your view."

Essays may be submitted in a sealed envelope to
the Office of the Vice President for Financial Aid,
College of The Bahamas main campus administrative building,
or by e-mail to: pixichapter@hotmail.com.

Essays received after
Friday, October 21, 2005
will not be considered.

Essays will be assessed to determine 20 finalists.
Finalists will be invited to write another essay,
under exam conditions at the College of The Bahamas,
to determine the winner of the Award.

Applicants are allowed to submit one essay only
and are reminded to include complete contact details with their
submission


LO NT W.IIHPE.O OR FURTHER DETAIL


~ J I ~-a~a


Y6ung man,s.:..

Mim view,


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005, PAGE 13


I


I


- TRAIL








PAGE 14, MOND, 1EI


........... We Keep You Talking
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Casino takes on some





celebrity styling


A NEW musical production
opens at the Crystal Palace
Casino this month featuring
the music of some of today's
musical greats.
Neil Diamond, Cher, Elton
John and Barbara Streisand,
all in one theatre or at least
that's what one might think
when sitting down for Celebri-
ties on Stage. In reality, the
'stars' on stage are actually
The Edwards Twins two
California-born celebrity
impersonators who take on
the roles of more than 100
superstars.
Identical twin brothers
Anthony and Eddie Edwards


have entertained audiences for
more than 20 years with their
realistic portrayal of some of
the world's best-loved celebri-
ties, and have opened for some
of the most popular, including
Michael Jackson, Celine Dion,
Rod Stewart and U2.
Now, after more than a year
of planning, the duo is bring-
ing their act to the Crystal
Palace Casino, in what casino
executives call a "return to
value-added gaming enter-
tainment:.
The revue has an initial 60-
show run with a gala premiere
on October 21 and public
opening on October 23.
The Edwards Twins'
onstage vocals and visuals
have been called "better than
watching the real thing" by
People Magazine.
The show was born out of a
childhood fascination with
celebrities, said Anthony the
show's producer and elder
brother (by 4 minutes).
"When we were very young,
we would listen to our par-
ents' records, and found out
very early that we had a
tremendous gift in mimicking
the superstars, so much so that
now when we perform, peo-


EDDIE and Anthony
Edwards
ple leave feeling like they
were watching the actual stars
on stage."
Anthony's natural tenor
morphs from a raspy Neil Dia-
mond to an accented Elton
John. "There is no lip synch-
ing, and we never spoof our
subjects," says Anthony.
Eddie, who performs all of
the show's female characters,
transforms himself using tricks
learned from Hollywood
make-up artists in the tradi-
tion of Robin Williams' Mrs
Doubtfire and Eddie Mur-
phy's Mother and Grand-
mother Krump to deliver
Barbara Streisand's soprano,
Cher's outfits and Tina Turn-


er's leggy strut in a manner
intended to flatter their childK
hood idols.
Workmen are curren,
transforming the Rainforegt
Theatre as\part of Cable Bea'
Resorts' $7 million commKt
ment to renovating the CrA
tal Palace Casino. "This will'&
the only 'Las Vegas, styI
entertainment in a Bahanm,
casino," said Robert'San.
vice-president of adininist1
tion and external relations
Baha Mar (Cable Bea;:
Resorts' parent company). :$:
"We're in a gaming enki:
ronment and our guests expat
a different kind of entertaiki
ment. The Edwards Twitis
revue will help us achieve this\,
.and will be complemented 1bi'
monthly or bi-monthly intei-
national performers for the.
benefit of our casino cw\--
tomers and the general puil:
lic." The casino entertainmm-,
calendar, includes Top'
Orlando on October 22. ',
Celebrities on Stage play's
Wednesday through Sunday:
at 8.30pm at the Rainfordst
Theatre, Crystal Palace Cai-
no.: For tickets, $24.95.t
$34.95, call the theatre Q 3
office, 327-6200 ext 6758.


Counting your chickens


before they're hatched


IT'S a common predicament:
you need to sell your home and
at the same time buy and move
into another, possibly on
another island.
Since it's not likei_ thac t
'ou'll close onbfO
the same day, how doyour6pro-
ceed? Buy first or sell first? It's
a classic "chicken 'or the. egg"
scenario.
If you sell first, you're pres-
sured to move, perhaps into
temporary quarters. But if you
face something like relocation
to another island, there may
be little choice. If you buy first,
you might be paying two mort-
gages for some time. But if you
can't afford. two payments,
you'll probably have to sell first
to qualify .for a loan. What a
headache!
There's a beast called a
"contingency contract," where-
in you make an offer on a
home that is "contingent" upon
selling your current home.


Ih real

estate, today
Care Masn


Experience has shown, how-
ever, that vendors will not be
enthused by such an offer. Why
should they take their home
off the market while waiting
for the possible sale of your
home?
The best bet is to go ahead
and list your home for sale as
soon as possible, and start
looking at other homes.
When your home is under


contract, get your loan P.4
approval and choose firomrn
houses you've, already select
ed as your top three. Tfiti
make your offer anid mO
your plans to start movingg,


TENDER NOTICE


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) is pleased
to invite Tenders for the printing, binding and delivery of the four
editions of the 2006-2008 Bahamas Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a tender specification from the
office of the Vice President, Central and Southern Bahamas, located
in BTC's Administrative Building, John F. Kennedy Drive, between
the hours of 9:00a.m. and 4:30p.m. Monday through Friday.

Tenders are to be sealed in an envelope marked"TENDER FOR THE
SUPPLY OF TELEPHONE DIRECTORIES"' 4 e-
attention of:

Mr. Michael J. Symonette
President & CEO
Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
John F Kennedy Drive
RO.Box N-3048
Nassau, The Bahamas

All tenders must be received by 4:00p.m. on Monday October 17,
2005.

BTC reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.


_ __ L


PAGE 14, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005


THE TRIBUNE




MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005, PAGE 15


"I get a better sdnse of what
is happening inI The
Bahamas
from reading the Tribune.
Where other daily
newspapers fall short, the
Tribune delivers. I'm
confident knowing The
Tribune looks out for my
interests. The Tribune is
my newspaper.
NELSON JOHNSON
TAXI DRIVER


The
71444


Tribune


N4-


- -----P~---P~-~.II.-~I~~"~--_I I


THE TRIBUNE


~Zat~tr~P/


ti*~i





PAGE 16, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005


A chance to mix some


finance and culture


THE TRIBUNE


* BARBARA Rose, renowned photographer Rol
recent art show at the Central Bank of the Bahmas
Artist"


(Photos: Franklyn G Ferguson)


m NICOLE Minnis-Ferguson and Tanya Pearce
meaning of her sculpture.


Jaic2 w Vvu L.I
(242) 4274841


a(242) 424v4276
(242) 424-4276


2IUonai II422I a7I
(242) 424-4237


(242)24 IVIU-4273
(242) 424-4273


At your convenience, we'll visit you and tailor an
affordable home ownership solution that meets
your unique needs.


Call one of us today
for expert home
financing advice..


* Trademarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia. Trademarks used under license and control of The Bank of Nova Scotia.
t The Home Financing Specialist service is only available in New Providence.


CONSOLIDATED WATER COMPANY LIMITED
A NASDAQ Company (symbol: CWCO)




CONSOLIDATED
WATER
Is Offering
3,250,000 Bahamian Depositary Receipts (BDRs) representing
650,000 ordinary shares of Consolidated Water Company Limitea
Offering available from Monday October 17th until 5:00 p.m.
Friday November 4 2005.

Features of the 3 week Consolidated Water Co. Ltd. Offering:
Company has paid dividends every year for last 20 years
It has a "Take or Pay" Government guaranteed contract in
The Bahamas
It operates in 5 countries including The Bahamas
Bahamian holders will enjoy the same ownership benefits as
CWCO international ordinary shareholders
The BDRs will be denominated in Bahamian Dollars
They will be listed and will trade on BISX and the ordinary
shares will trade on NASDAQ offering better liquidity to
sell and buy shares
The minimum investment is $1,000
Offering is open to:
o Bahamian citizens
o Permanent residents without restriction on
employment
o Temporary residents
o Companies or the investment vehicles owned by
investors
o Special purpose resident Bahamian companies with
non-Bahamian ownership

The Offering Memorandum will be available on Monday October
17th 2005 from all branches in Nassau and Freeport of Fidelity,
Bank and Fidelity Merchant Bank & Trust and as a download at
www .fidelitycwco.com.

Read the Offering Memorandum carefully before you invest.


Fidelity Capital Markets Limited
51 Frederick Street, Nassau
Tel: 242.356.7764.


FinancingS^

y u S m--












B Specialistsat iabi k 5 .


)lFlIUD l




MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005, PAGE 17 1


THE TRIBUNE


digital.ev


lw













Bank donates $15,000 to relief




efforts after Hurricane Katrina


Submit a cute photo of your baby and you could WIN
foutastic prizes just in time for Chrkstnwo
Now throw DveaVnt 19 ws 3 a 0hoto wo ntwo emya
(sey aie) Ind a'coPpletedentry form 0to" 4.o WWd es ao ade


~ Thu.
$1 ; .


c & a b.p w


$t2000 C&s a ryps C w




En ,


* Ambassador John Rood, Minna Israel, managing director Scotiabank (Bahamas), Debra Wood;
senior manager, marketing and public relations, lonie Diggiss, assistant manager manpower and
succession planning and Ronald Blackman, credit risk manager


In support of local fund-rais-
ing efforts for victims of Hurri-
cane Katrina, Scotiabank
(Bahamas) Limited made a
donation of $15,000 during a
live media broadcast of a
national telethon.
The telethon, a local private
sector initiative, was spear-
headed by Franklyn Wilson,
Chairman of the Bahamas for
Katrina Hurricane Relief Fund
and was held on September 30.
This $15,000 donation by Sco-
tiabank is in addition to a con-
tribution of C$100,000 made to
the Red Cross by Scotiabank's
parent company, which has also
pledged to match funds of up
to C$150,000 for its employee


donations.
Minna Israel, Managing
Director of Scotiabank
(Bahamas) Limited, together
with her management and staff,
engaged in various activities in
order to raise the funds.

Co 1inutment

- "Natural disasters are
unpredictable," said Ms Israel,
"and can affect any of us at
anytime. We at Scotiabank
sympathise with those affected
by the wrath of Hurricane
Katrina and reaffirm our com-
mitment to give generously of.
our time, our talents and our


treasures to alleviate the plight;
of our brothers and sisters in*
need."
Last year, Scotiabank con-
tributed US$592,765 toward
Caribbean relief efforts in th.
aftermath of hurricanes
Charley, Frances, Ivan an&
Jeanne. The bank also donated
C$75,000 plus matching funds
of C$100,000 following the.
December 26,2005 Tsunami i
Asia.
"Our hearts go out to the
people of New Orleans and,
Mississippi who were struck b
this tremendous force of
nature," said Rick Waugh, Sc :
tiabank president and chief
executive officer.


PAGE 18, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005


THE TRIBUNE




THE TRIBUNE
I ....s -:-in,..--.&An ll i & a CMAHlf DIMIf I


SUPER
VALUE
NOW ACCUSING
JSUNCARD
NGHT~ANOP1dICESRS


i4-M1ATSAI IY IR1v


MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005, PAGE 19


BED BATH & HOME
HOME SALe


Bed Spreads 20% off


Throw Pillows 20% off Touch of VelvetSheetSets25% off




Homz Bath Organizer 20% off Kitchen Curtains 20 % off


U.S. CHOICE
CHUCK STEAK
OR ROAST
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PERSIAN HARVEST FRESH
LIMES BROCOLI
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IDAHO BAKING HARVEST FRESH
POTATOES LETTUCE
LOOSE EAD
3I99_ $119


$3


B E
TUA0


SCAMPBELLS
SUPERIORE
SPAGHETTI &
MEATBALL

14.75 OZ


Rice Cookers 20% off Toaster Ovens 20% off Food Processors 20% off
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Palm Springs Towels...................... .............$3.99
M adison Throw Rugs.................................................$11.99
6 Located: Harbour Bay Shopping Center .
Ph: 393-4440 or 393V4448--


Rugs Comforters Towels Tablecloths Throw Pillows
Bed Rests Drapes Carpet Sweeper* Large Plastics Iron Toasters
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Glass Sets Cord Craft Flowers
Niagr EXTRA SAVINGS
Niagra Spray Starch 22oz...............................................$1.99
Sunchy Apple & Fruit Punch Juice............................ 2/0.990
Famous Amos Cookies............................................. 2/0.980
Sunchy M alta................................... ......................... 2/$1.25
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Starkist Tuna.............................................................. 2/$1.25
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WE ACCEPT AMERICAN EXPRESS MASTER, VISA AND SUNCARD, WE ALSO REDEEM QUALITY STAMP CARDS
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PAGE 20, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


Romanian authorities kill thousands


of birds to prevent spread of virus


"Copyrig hted1


Syndicated C

Available from Commercia


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Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


FOX HILL *INURSEF
P 0. BOX S.S. 6321 O TEL: (242) 324-1302
BERNARD ROAD (242) 324-6147
NASSAU, BAHAMAS FAX:.(242) 324-6088


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THE TRIBUNE


SAVA.CHEK 'Extra-Special': on each item you purchase, over
h pie a dollar, with One filled SAV/A. CHEK certificate get a Dollar Off!
REDEEM your SAV-A-CHEK now at:
Johns S George, Sandys, Epic Battery, GNC,
Home Fabrics, Godetts Jewelry.
FREEPORT: Dolly Madison Home Centre, GNC, Epic Battery, Play Time Sports
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HOURS: SUN.: 7:00AM 12:00PM 7:00AM 2:00PM CABLEBEACH & IA CHEK Secial!
HARRBOU1 RAY OLNIY I IA. V-IK /P 11-


MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005, PAGE 21


I-: I


--I


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PAGE 22, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005 THE TRIBUNE


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PAGE 22, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


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MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005, PAGE 23


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MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005


SECTION -- --


business@tribunemedia.net


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


IMF: B h JEFFREY Parker,
0 chairman of Consolidated
chairman ofCos ofldcaei Water, speaks during a press
Conference at the British
r IColonial Hilton hotel on
7 Sunday.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/
dTribune staff)


due to oil prices


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Bahamas will
be one of the
Western Hemi-
sphere's hardest
hit countries from
the sharp increase in global oil
prices, the International Mone-
tary Fund (IMF), has predict-
ed, facing "considerable hard-
ship" and a "substantial" reduc-
tion in per annum gross domes-
tic product (GDP).
Annop Singh, director of the
Fund's Western Hemisphere
Department, in a speech on the
economic outlook for the Latin
American and Caribbean
region, named the Bahamas as
one of those likely to suffer the
most because of its position as a


Fundsay naton ill e n-.f he


net oil importer.
The spike in global oil prices
had not had a major impact on
world economic growth to date,
Mr Singh said, and many coun-
tries in the Latin American
region were benefiting because
they were net oil importers:
But he added: "This masks
the considerable hardship being
faced by net oil importers. Sub-
stantial output losses are expect-
ed to result for some Caribbean
countries, in particular, Belize,


the Dominican Republic, Haiti
and the Bahamas, and Central
America.........
"Moreover, trade balances
and inflation are being adverse-
ly impacted in the Latin Amer-
ican and Caribbean region, and
fiscal positions are coming
under pressure, because the
pass-through into domestic
prices of fuels and energy have

SEE page 2B


'Don't wait for a new FATF crisis'


.* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas needs to develop a "proac-
tive" national policy approach to dealing with
agencies such as the Financial Action Task
Force (FATF), the Financial Services Con-
sultative Forum's head told The Tribune yes-
terday, rather than waiting until "a crisis
occurs and trying to climb out of the abyss
or problem".
Brian .Moree,, senior partner with McKin-
ney, Bancroft & Hughes, said that while the


Bahamas could feel "justifiably satisfied" that
the FATF had discontinued monitoring it
over the implementation of its anti-money
laundering regime, an action that was "long
overdue", it was not "an end to the challenges
to the Bahamas and offshore centres from
the supranational agencies".
While the FATF may have ended its formal
interest in the Bahamas, this nation is still
locked in negotiations with the Organisation

SEE page 7B


Consolidated's $11.2m


BDR issue to 'liberalise'


exchange control further


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
WORK permit holders and resident Bahami-
an companies with "some degree" of foreign
ownership are for the first time being allowed to
invest in a public offering in the Bahamas, as
Consolidated Water yesterday unveiled this
nation's second Bahamian Depository Receipt
(BDR) issue, which seeks to raise a net $11.2 mil-
lion.
The company, which won the contract from
the Water & Sewerage Corporation. (W&SC)
to construct and operate the $23 million Blue
Hills reverse osmosis plant, said 3.25 million


BDRs will be issued, representing 650,000 ordi-
nary shares. This means five BDRs will be equiv-
alent to one Consolidated Water ordinary share
listed on New York's Nasdaq exchange.
The decision to allow work permit holders,
permanent residents with the right to work
(restricted or not) and companies designated
'resident' for exchange control purposes but
with some foreign ownership, to participate in
the Consolidated Water BDR offering, will be
viewed as a major step towards liberalising the
Bahamas; exchange controls and capital mar-

SEE page5B


Winn-Dixie names

Souder successor


WINN-Dixie has named its
Miami district manager, Ken
Burns, as Bruce Souder's
replacement at Bahamas
Supermarkets, subject to
"pending approval" from
immigration authorities in this
nation.
There was still no mention
in Winn-Dixie's statement of
the reasons for Mr Souder's
departure, but Mr Burns will
assume all his responsibilities
when he takes the role of
Bahamas Supermarkets' man-
aging director.
Meanwhile, Bryan Knowles,
who was Mr Souder's No.2 as


financial controller, will remain
in that post but has received a
promotion to vice-president,
chief financial officer and
administrative officer.
Mr Burns, like his predeces-
sor, is something of a Winn-
Dixie stalwart, having spent 35
years with the'company after
starting with it in 1968 as a
part-time stock associate.
"Winn-Dixie is extremely
proud of our Bahamas opera-
tions," stated Mark Sellers,
group vice-president of opera-

SEE page 6B


Shell officials

in Bahamas to

determine sale


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
TOP executives from Shel-
l's global and regional head
offices in London and Brazil
are expected in the Bahamas
this week to inform bidders
whether the company is going
through with the sale of its
Bahamian petroleum retail
division, and who the winner
is.
The sale process has dragged
on for more than half a year,
ever since Tribune Business


first revealed in March 2005
that Shell was looking to dis-
pose of its retail division,
despite the company's denials.
It is understood that the bid-
ders, of whom three were
Bahamian companies and
groups, have become increas-
ingly frustrated in recent
months over Shell's apparent
inability to settle on a winning
bidder and, indeed, whether it
will go through with the

SEE page 8B


Investing Is Only For RichFolks.


-- -- -- - -
S ,, That is the biggest lie we tell ourselves. Why speak


failure over your finances? Every day, thousands of


Bahamians are already investing and generating


millions of dollars in personal wealth. Why aren't


you claiming your share?


For professional financial advice in a friendly atmosphere, you should call:

aColina

Financial. Advisors
Make Your Money Grow *


MoneyGrows@ColinaFinancial.com 502-7010
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)Wen ui ig., a as me c in tfUatthk f me me s a ts adl, w nhe i psay m Moe l


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# 56 Madeira Street, Palmdale
P.O. Box SS-6270 Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 242.328.3040 Fax: 242.328.3043


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keep you ahead of the class.

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--- -- ~---- --- I" Ibl I I


I







PAGE~ 2B ODY COE 720 H RBN


FIDELITY MARKET WRAP


* By Fidelity Capital
Markets
t was another slow
trading week in the
Bahamian market as a
mere 7,316 shares
changed hands. For
the week, the market saw six
out of its 19 listed stocks trade,
of which two advanced and
four remained unchanged.
The volume leader for the
week was Cable Bahamas
(CAB) with 4,000 shares
changing hands and account-
ing for 55 per cent of the total
shares traded.

Mover

The big mover for the week
was the Bahamas Property
Fund (BPF), which gained
$0.10 to close at a new 52-week
high of $10.10. On the down
side, Kerzner International's
BDR (KZLB) lost $0.03 to end


the week at $5.40, which is one-
tenth of its NYSE equivalent
share price.
COMPANY NEWS

Investors Tip of the Week
The 'Risk-free Asset' In the
world of investment, the con-
cept of risks and returns goes
hand in hand. For a given level
of return, the investor must
take on a corresponding level
of risk. Therefore, the higher
the rate of return one expects
to earn from an investment, the
greater the risks associated and
vice versa.
So, you might ask then: What
is a risk-free asset? A risk-free
asset can be described as an
asset that has a certain future
return. Treasury (T-Bills) and
T-Bonds are considered risk-
free securities because they are
backed by the sovereign gov-
ernment of the country issuing
them. Because these invest-


ment securities are considered
so safe, the return on risk-free.
assets is very close to the cur-
rent interest rate.
Many academics say there is
no such thing as a risk-free
asset because all financial assets
carry some degree of risk.
Technically, this may be cor-
rect. However, the level of risk
is so small that, for the aver-
age investor, it is okay to con-
sider T-bills or T-bonds issued
by stable Western governments
to be risk-free.
Bills

In the Bahamas, government
Treasury Bills and Registered
Stocks are considered to be
risk-free because they are
backed by the Bahamian Gov-
ernment. Treasury bills, or T-
bills, are sold in maturities of 91
and 182 days. Bills are sold at a
discount from their face value.
For instance, you might pay


$97 for a $100 bill. When the
bill matures, you would be paid
$100. The difference between
the purchase price and face val-
ue is your interest. The cur-
rent interest rate of B$ T-Bills
is less than 1 per cent. Usually,
large companies and institu-
tional clients such as banks sub-
mit a tender offer to the Cen-
tral Bank to acquire these
investments.
Government Registered
Stock, on the other hand, have
longer maturities ranging from
20 to 25 years. The interest rate
paid on these securities is tied
to the Bahamian Prime Rate,
which presently stands at 5.5
per cent. The stocks are sold
in lots of $100, making them
accessible to small investors.
Registered stock pay interest
every six months until they
mature. At maturity, the par
value or the amount initially
invested will be returned to the
investor.


FROM page 1B


generally lagged."
One of the Bahamas' greatest


exposures to rising oil prices is
that its per capita consumption


of petroleum and energy is the
highest in the Caribbean, stand-


ing at 1,038 gallons in 2004 com-
pared to 376 gallons per capita


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No. 45 of 2000)

SEASHORE GLOBAL COMPANY LIMITED


Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act, No.45 of 2000, the
Dissolution of SEASHORE GLOBAL COMPANY LIMITED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register. The
date of completion of the dissolution was 5th October, 2005.



ALENAMOXEY
LIQUIDATOR


in Jamaica and 404 gallons per
head in Trinidad and Tobago.
The Bahamas, according to
the Ministry of Trade and
Industry's statistics, consumed
313 million gallons or some 12
per cent of the Caribbean's total
energy consumption in 2004. As
a whole, this nation spent $350
million on gasoline alone in
2004.
Mr Singh's comments are
likely to be seized upon by both
sides of the raging debate on
whether the Bahamas should
sign up to PetroCaribe, the oil-
on-credit deal being offered by
Venezuelan president Hugo
Chavez, who is using it as a
guise to achieve his political
objectives.
Leslie Miller, minister of
trade and industry, and his
Petroleum Usage Review Com-
mittee, have been pushing
PetroCaribe as a short-term fix
to rising fuel prices faced both
by the Bahamas Electricity Cor-
poration (BEC) and the con-
sumer. By purchasing oil on
credit from Venezuela, with
possibly as much as 40 per cent
of the cost deferred, they have
argued that these savings can
be passed on to consumers.
Many, though, have been
unconvinced by these argu-
ments, saying PetroCaribe
would ultimately end up plung-
ing the Bahamas into taking on
more debt as a result of the oil-
on-credit deal, with prices at the
pump unchanged.
They have instead focused on
issues similar to those high-
lighted by a paper produced last
summer by the Bahamas Envi-
ronment, Science and Technol-
ogy Commission (BEST), which
called for "non-BEC power


generation" and to provide real
property tax reductions for
homes that use solar water
heaters and other renewable
, power sources, as part of a
National Energy Policy. .
The IMF has forecast that the
Bahamian economy will grow
by 3.5 per cent during 2005, just
below the Caribbean's 3.6 per
cent average. This nation's eco-
nomic growth was predicted to.
be 4 per cent for 2006, again
below the Caribbean average
of 4.8 per cent.
Mr Singh added in his pre-
sentation that the entire
Caribbean was "confronting a
large and rising debt public debt
burden". His statistics showed
that the Bahamas was among
the better performers, running a
national debt just above 46 per
cent of GDP at the end of 2004,
which was only marginally
worse than the Caribbean's best
performers Trinidad and
Tobago and, bizarrely, Haiti.
Mr Singh said fiscal perfor-
mances had been worst in coun-
tries with pegged or 'fixed'
exchange rate regimes, although
he did not single out the
Bahamas on this, pointing to
the countries in the Eastern
Caribbean Currency Union
(ECCU).
Calling for debt reduction to
be "a top priority" for
Caribbean nations, Mr Singh
said they needed to widen their
tax bases and "eliminate costly
tax concessions and exemp-
tions". Oil price rises had to be
permitted to flow through to
domestic prices, while public
investment had to become more
efficient, with Caribbean coun-
tries taking a more proactive,
role in debt management.


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The Local Stock Market

FMINDEX 435.63 YTD 1.321%/

BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML $0.73 $- 0 -33.64%
BAB $1.10 $- 0 14.58%
BBL $0.80 $- 0 -5.88%
BOB $7.24 $- 0 25.91%
BPF $10'10 $0.10 1000 26.25%
BSL $12.25 $- 0 -5.77%
BWL $1.40 $- 0 -22.22%
CAB $9.26 $0.01 4000 30.42%
CBL $9.10 $- 0 28.17%
CHL $1.53 $- 951 -30.45%
CIB $9.50 $- 1140 26.84%
DHS $2.40 $- 0 60.00%
FAM $4.20 $- 0 6.06%
FCC $1.15 $- 0 -42.21%
FCL $9.25 $- 0 15.63%
FIN $10.70 $- 125 10.31%
ICD $9.94 $- 0 0.51%
JSJ $8.65 $- 100 5.23%
KZLB $5.40 $-0.03 0 -11.72%
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%
DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:
* COLINA Holdings (Bahamas) will hold its Annual General
Meeting on October 18,2005, at 4pm at the J. Whitney Pinder
Building at Colinalmperial Insurance, Collins Avenue, Nas-
sau, Bahamas.


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No. 45 of 2000)

CARAMBA LIMITED

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act, No.45 of 2000, the
Dissolution of CARAMBA LIMITED has been completed, a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register. The date of completion of
the dissolution was 5th October, 2005.


ALIMA MOXEY
LI0IDATOR


I I


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005


r- BUSINESS I


THE TRIBUNE







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and meeting facilities
to accommodate
up to 70 people.
Our guests have
full use of the
exclusive facilities of
the fabulous Atlantis
just steps away.
In-room amenities
include: king size or
double double beds,
sitting area
with sofa bed,
cable tv, refrigerator,
in-room safe,
coffee maker, hair dryer,
complimentary deluxe
continental breakfast
served daily,
Pool with swim-up bar,
Crusoe's garden
restaurant serving
breakfast and lunch,
Bamboo cocktail bar.
Ask about our local
corporate, group and
wedding rates.
Contact our
management team
for a site inspection.


PARADISE ISLAND
BAHAMAS
1 Paradise Island Drive
Paradise Island, Bahamas


0 _p_


* Otter only valid at the Westin at Our Lucaya and for stays consumed between 10/22 and 11/3/05. Subject to availability of room type. Advance reservations are required. Not applicable to group travel. Additional service charge and tax may apply. Offer cannot be combined with
any other offers or promotions. Length of stay restrictions may apply. Starwood Hotels & Resorts is not responsible for typographical errors or omissions. 2005 Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. Single Advance Purchase Rate/Single Property.


----I~--


MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE
BUSINESS.


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005


Public Utilities Commission


PUBLIC NOTICE


The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) has taken note of
telecommunications marketing activities offering reduced international
telephone rates.

The Public Utilities Commission hereby informs the public that:

(a) Section 8 of the Telecommunications Act prohibits.the provision
of any telecommunications service by any person without a
licence issued by the PUC;

(b) Any person who provides telecommunication services without a
licence from the PUC or aids the illegal provision of these services
shall be guilty of a criminal offence and may be fined up to three
hundred thousand dollars ($300,000).in accordance with Section
35 of the Telecommunications Act; and

(c) Violators of the Telecommunications Act can be expected to be
prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

The-PUC also invites the public, including operators and consumers,
to provide information on such illegal activities to the PUC. Such
information will be treated in the utmost confidence.


For further
extension


information, contact the PUC at telephone 322-4437,
234, fax 323-7288 or puc@pucbahamas.gov.bs.


Mr. Barrett Russell
Executive Director

Fourth Terrace East, Collins Avenue
P.O. BOX N-4860
Nassau, Bahamas
Website: wwwPUCBahamas.gov.bs


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE FINANCIAL Action
Task Force has stopped its
monitoring of the Bahamas in
what the Attorney General,
Alfred Sears, called an "impor-
tant if long overdue acknowl-
edgment" of the efforts of the
Bahamian financial services
sector.
The announcement came
after the FATF's October ple-
nary meeting in Paris, France.
The FATF had been monitor-
ing the country ever since the
Bahamas was removed from a
list of 15 countries considered
to be "uncooperative" in the
fight against money laundering
in 2001.
However, despite the fact
that the "blackballing" pro-
pelled the sector to implement
a battery of legislative and insti-
tutional measures to combat
money laundering and reduce
the vulnerabilities of its finan-
cial.system, the FATF:felt the
need to monitor the Bahamas,
ostensibly due to concerns
about its ability to adequately
respond to foreign judicial and
regulatory requests.
At a press conference held
to announce the decision, Mr
Sears said: "The Bahamas has
always maintained, and con-
tinues to maintain, that both
judicial requests for assistance,
processed through the Office
of the Attorney General, and
regulatory requests, processed
through respective regulatory
agencies in the Bahamas, have
and continue to.be expedi-
tiously processed within the
framework of regulatory
requirements, due process con-
siderations and institutional
capacity,"
Mr Sears added that the -
commitment to fighting inter-
national terrorism and ensur-


ing the financial services indus-
try was properly regulated had
resulted in tens of millions in
lost revenue for the Govern-
ment.
Foreign Affairs Minister
Fred Mitchell, who also partic-
ipated in the press conference,
noted that he has spoken at the
United Nations on several
occasions about unregulated
bodies, like the FATF, having
mandates such as the monitor-
ing list.
He said the financial services
sector deserved "a great deal
of kudos" for meeting all the
conditions imposed by the
FATF.
Financial Services Minister
Allyson Maynard Gibson said
the occasion marked a very,
important day for the industry.
She said Prime Minister Perry
Christie has been very resolute
about the outcome of the issue.
Now that the country was no
longer being monitored, Mr


Sears said the Government
planned to remain extremely
vigilant to ensure its reputation
as a financial services sector
was not compromised. He said
officials will actively engage the
international community and
constantly review activities
here. -
This will include the har-
monisation of Bahamian reg-.
ulators.
Mr Sears explained that the
regulators will meet on-a'
monthly basis, both among:
themselves anid with industry
officials, to ensure they areiall"
working within the same guide
lines. "No more will regulators
not be aware of the full pica
ture," he added.
Both Mrs Maynard Gibsoil
and Mr Sears spoke to the need'
to improve staff capacity by:
numbers and through constanif-
retraining if the Bahamasis ts
remain a player in the fitnhih-
cial arena.


I q


The American Embassy
is presently considering applications for the following position
MAINTENANCE SUPERVISOR

This position reports directly to the Supervisory General Services Officer and is"
responsible for managing, coordinating, planning and scheduling all maintenance
repairs for the Chancery, residences and government owned buildings. The
incumbent is directly responsible for the supervision of a multi-trade technical
work force performing preventive maintenance and repair task including: Electrical
Power Distribution System, Emergency Power Generation System, HVAC System,
Water Distribution System, Fire Alarm System and Associated Equipment.

Prepares engineering plans, designs, drawings, specifications, bills of materials
and cost estimates for construction, alterations, and maintenance and repairs
projects of Embassy and/or associated agency buildings, facilities and equipment,
as directed. Analyzes scope of work for technical accuracy, provide technical
advice concerning the purchase of any machinery and equipment required by post
assuring quality purchases, while reducing the cost of maintenance programs. Use
construction and engineering knowledge to monitor and inspect conditions of
government owned or leased buildings and contract work in progress.

Prepares performances evaluation reports and.recommends training and disciplinary
actions, as needed, for the FSN employees force within the facilities maintenance
section.

This position is open to candidates with the following requirements:
* Completion of a BS or equivalent degree in Engineering is required.
* Excellent command of the English language, both written and oral'.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:
* Excellent managerial, supervisory and training skills
* Highly confidential in nature
* General knowledge of building maintenance operations and terminology
* Must be able to prepare engineering drawings using CAD software and ability
to draft construction plans and specifications
* Must have a solid background in electrical, mechanical, or structural engineering
or technical knowledge in other engineering field is essential, i.e. interfacing
with mechanical and plumbing, HVAC system
* ability to prioritize tasks

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation package
including outstanding benefits such as performance-based incentives, medical and
dental insurance, life insurance, pension and opportunities for training and
development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are eligible for
employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application forms are available from 80:0am to 5:30pm, Monday through
Friday at the security area of the American Embassy, Queen Street, completed
applications should be returned to the Embassy: Attention of the Human
Resources Office no later than Friday, October 21, 2005.


Management and staff of


Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited are


pleased to announce the opening of


its Emerald Bay Branch in,


Farmer's Hill, Exuma. Customers


are invited to conduct regular


banking transactions during


Mondays through


Fridays.


We welcome the opportunity to


serve you.


* ATTORNEY GENERAL ALFRED SEARS













Default concerns on existing



Consolidated Water contract


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
CONSOLIDATED Water has
admitted in the offering document for
its $11.2 million Bahamian Deposito-
ry Receipt (BDR) offering that it
"may be technically in default" of the
terms in an existing 15-year contract to
supply the Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration (WSC) with water from its
Windsor Plant.
Factors
Among the 'risk factors' cited in the
offering document for investors, Con-
solidated Water said: "From time to
tinie, and since October 2004, the
company has been unable to deliver


But no WSC complaints, and problems

now expected to be remedied


the required water volumes to WSC
from the Windsor Plant because of
mechanical equipment problems and
fouling of the reverse osmosis mem-
brane elements.
"As a result of this fouling, the com-
pany has been subject to water rate
adjustments that have reduced sales,
and may be technically in default of
the Windsor contract."
However, Consolidated Water said


it expected the problem to be "reme-
died" by the end of the 2005 third
quarter, a period that has just ended.
And WSC had not told it that it had
breached the terms of their Windsor
Plant contract.
Penalties
In 2004, Consolidated Water
incurred $313,408 in penalties for not


supplying minimum water volumes to
WSC under the terms of the Wind-
sor contract, which calls on the com-
pany to supply 16.8 million gallons
per week. Some 831 million gallons
in total were supplied last year.
Elsewhere, Consolidated Water
acknowledged that it not paid any
business licence fees to the Bahamian
government for its Bimini retail water
operations since they began opera-


tion on July 11, 2001. Although
National Insurance Board (NIB) con-
tributions had been paid on behalf of
employees, the company believed it
owed "less than $7,500" in gross rev-
enues to the Government.
Proceeds
The $23 million Blue Hills reverse
osmosis plant, which will be financed
partly from the proceeds from the
$11.2 million offering, will be the
largest constructed by Consolidated
Water, and "there are inherent uncer-
tainties in the cost estimates to con-
struct this facility".
In addition, operating cost overruns
could affect the rate of return on Con-
solidated Water's investment.


Consolidated's $11.2m


BDR issue to 'liberalise'


exchange control further


FROM page 1B

kets.
It will extend the breadth
and liquidity of the Bahamian
capital markets by increasing
the number of potential
investors, and also marks a
major step towards the Gov-
ernment fulfilling its promise
in. its Capital Markets Devel-
opment statement of liberalis-
ing the exchange control
regime.
The Consolidated Water
offering, which begins today
and closes at 5pm on Novem-
ber 4, is the nation's second
BDR issue behind Kerzner
International last year.
The minimum subscription
is $1,000, and the issue price
per share will be determined
on the November 4 closing
date. That price will be the
ayerage of the closing price on
NASDAQ for the perevious
five days, between October 28
and November 3.
Dividends are to be paid
quarterly, and the current rate


TOPIC:




DATE:


TIME:


per BDR would be 1.2 cents
per share, with the current div-
idend yield of 1.5 per cent.
Consolidated Water will use
the net proceeds from the
BDR issue after expenses to
finance both the construction
of the new seawater desalina-
tion plant at Blue Hills Plant
and the expansion of its exist-
ing Windsor plant.
Frederick McTaggert, Con-
solidated Water's president and
chief executive, said the BDR
was a very attractive package
for Bahamian investors. He
explained that shareholders
would be buying into a com-
pany with strong roots in five
countries, spreading out geo-
graphical risk.
Holders
This meant that Bahamian
holders would enjoy the same
ownership benefits as Consoli-
dated Water's ordinary share-
holders. In the event that a pur-
chaser wants to liquidate, the
shares can easily be sold
because they will be traded on
NASDAQ.


Market makers, such as
Fidelity Capital Markets, will
also be able to enhance liquid-
ity by buying and selling up to
15 per cent of the total BDR
issue on Nasdaq. The current
NASDAQ price for a Consoli-
dated Water ordinary share is
$16.58.
Jeffrey Parker, the compa-
ny's chairman, added that there
had been much debate about
whether governments should,
be in the manufacturing busi-
ness. He explained that Con-
solidated Water was removing
the risk of the Water and Sew-
erage Corporation by providing
the water. Should his company
not be able. to deliver, then the
Government was not obligat-
ed to pay..
Consolidated Water won the
Blue Hills bid against five oth-
er bidders. Although one bid-
der, Biwater, has taken legal
action against the Water and
Sewage Company over that
decision, the company had
decided to go ahead with the
contract with Consolidated
Water, a representative of the
WSC told The Tribune.


CFA PROGRAM INFORMATION EVENING:
"AN INTRODUCTION TO THE CFA (CHARTERED
FINANCIAL ANALYST) PROGRAM AND THE
EDUCATION REVIEW COURSE"

Wednesday, October 19th, 2005


6:00 p.m. Cocktails
6:30 p.m. Presentation

Abaco Island room
British Colonial Hilton
One Bay Street


PLACE:


COST:

RESERVATIONS:


Complementary

PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED


David Ramirez, CFA
David.ramirez@ansbacher.bs
Telephone: 502-3683


NOTICE,

The following persons or their nearest relatives are kindly asked to visit the
PENSIONS DEPARTMENT of the National Insurance Board located in the
Board's Jumbey Village complex on Baillou Hill Road. For further Information,
you may contact the Department at telephone number 502-1500:


NAME


N.I. NUMBER


ADDERLY Janice
ALBURY Camielle
ALLEN Marsha
BAMBULA Peter
BETHEL Edith
BRAYNEN Wilton
DANIELS Alfred
DAVIS Vernita
DE-BOISSIERE Norbert
ELIEDIEU Joseph
ELIONOR Loriston
FARQUHARSON Emily
FERGUSON Frankiemae
FERGUSON Merlene
FRADIN Christophe.
HANNA Doris
INGRAHAM Sharon
JEKIR Barbara
KEMP Karen
LINO Marconcini
LOUIS Adnau
McDONALD Diana
McKINNEY Thomas
MULRINE Maurean
MUNNINGS Joyce
NESBIT Dorris
NISBRETT Suna
OWENS-FISHER Edythe
PINDER Prescola
RAHMING Joycelyn
SIMONS Alan
SKEETE Kenrick
SMITH Constance
SMITH Gwendolyn
SMITH Shandrea
SOLOMON Roland
SYMONETTE Inez
TAYLOR Gabriel
THOMPSON Janet
THOMPSON Pearl
WELLS-GREEN Ann
WILLIAMS Albert
WILSON Marissa
WOODSIDE Keith
YOUNG Sheryl


12585653
11005416
12435635
12491403
13798464
10523391
10423451
10128441
12431346
11512261
12013315
10378361
10977430
11047259
12843385
11478381
11795638
13298437
13276719
11041404
12972401
10157417
62001566
10756329
12068357
10957456
13067435
12585416
12135437
13317474
30163439
11244356
10885447
68007310
12935816
10924426
12187402
15235653
10175547
11705442
13628437
11014326
14765659
15473716
10747524


ADDRESS


Fleming Street
Shiburmy Circle
Scott Street
Miramar
Eneas Avenue
Delaporte
South Beach
Hospital Lane
West Bay Street
Cowpen Road
Palmdale
Miami, Florida
Lily Valley Corner
McCollough Corner
Lyon Road
Domingo Heights
Sunshine Park
Sunderland Road
Address Unknown
Italy
Bacardi Road
Ridgeland Park West
Gilbert Street
Sandy Port Drive
Adress Unknown
Farrington Road
Jamaica
New Jersey
St. Vincent Street
Nassau Village
Colony Way
Hillside Street
Albatros Road
Inagua
Quackoo Street
Sydney Street
Haven Subdivision
Poinciana Drive
Guanahani Circle
Mandica Place
Faith Avenue
Johnson Road
Halifax Road
Savannah Drive
Yellow Elder


CFA SOCIETY OF THE BAHAMAS


The Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) Program is a globally recognized
standard for measuring the competence and integrity in the fields of portfolio management
and investment analysis. Three levels of examination verify a candidate's ability to apply
the fundamental knowledge of investment principles across all areas of the investment
decision-making process.
The next examination date is June 3, 2006 and the final registration and enrollment
date is March 15, 2006. We encourage all interested persons to attend the information
evening to learn more about the CFA Program.
Miss Magali Granges, CFA, President of the CFA Society of The Bahamas, will
present a brief outline of the CFA Institute, the CFA Program and the local society. Mr.
Christopher Dorsett, CFA, Education Chair, will provide an outline of the 2005-06
Education Programs planned for Level I, II, and III candidates.


I


MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE6BMONDA, OCTBE1


BSINS


Winn-Dixie names Souder successor


leaders for our Bahamas stores.
They are as committed to our
customers, our associates and
to our community as Winn-
Dixie is committed to main-
taining our leadership in the
Bahamas market."
The Tribune reported previ-
ously how Winn-Dixie execu-


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


FIRST STAR LTD.



NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the dissolution of FIRST STAR LTD., has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


VISTA DELMERE INC.



NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the dissolution of VISTA DELMERE INC., has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


MARIETTEINC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 11th
day of October, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc.,
,of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


FROM page 1B

tions for Winn-Dixie Stores,
and who was named recently
as interim head of operations
for the Bahamas division.
"We are sure that Ken Bums
and Bryan Knowles will be fine


tives called the Bahamian
directors of Bahamas Super-
markets to an emergency meet-
ing at the private Million Air
airport to formalise the depar-
ture of Mr Souder.
Executives from the strug-
gling US-based retail, group,
which is headquartered in Jack-
sonville and still in Chapter 11
Bankruptcy Protection, flew in
to Nassau by private plane to
complete the terms of Mr
Souder's departure, which
sources yesterday said was
understood to be mutually
agreed by both parties.
After the meeting, both Mr
Souder and the Winn-Dixie
executives returned to
Bahamas Supermarkets' head
office on the East-West High-
way. Mr Souder then cleared
out his desk.
The exact reasons for Mr,
Souder's departure are unclear,
although the swiftness indicates
a complete breakdown in rela-
tions between himself and the
Winn-Dixie head office.
Bahamas Supermarkets
operates nine stores in New
Providence under the City
Markets brand, and three
stores under the Winn-Dixie
banner.
Winn-Dixie has denied it is


LEGAI NOTICE


NOTICE


KAMLOOPS S.A.



NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that in accordance with
Section 137(8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the dissolution of KAMLOOPS S.A., has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.




ARGOSA CORIl INC. .. .. .
Liquidator


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

SCUNCHEON INVESTMENTS CORP.
S (In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
14th day of September, 2005., The Liquidator is Argosa -
Corp. Inc., of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.,
(Liquidator)


actively seeking to sell its 75
per cent majority stake in
Bahamas Supermarkets,
although a company spokes-
woman admitted she would not
be "surprised at all" if potential
buyers were circling the latter.
The Tribune revealed last
month how potential bidders
were circling Bahamas Super-
markets.
One source close to a party
interested in the company told
The Tribune: "I can confirm
there is interest in Bahamas
Supermarkets."
Winn-Dixie has repeatedly
said that Bahamas Supermar-
kets and its staff are unaffected
by the Chapter 11 situation,
which is forcing the New York
Stock Exchange (NYSE) list-
ed company to close 35 per
cent of its stores and make 28
per cent of the workforce
redundant. Bahamas Super-
markets has always been
among Winn-Dixie's most
profitable arms, with net earn-
ings for the three months to
April 6,2005, ahead of last year
at $2.2 million compared to
$1.7 million. Year-to-date to
April, earnings for 2005 were
$5.9 million or $1.28 per share,
compared to $5 million, or
$1.09 per share, last year.


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JUDY JACKSON, #60B GLADSTONE
TERRACE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should|
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 10TH day of OCTOBER;
2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship",
P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas. ....



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that PA. HENRY CULMER OF SKYLINE
LAKES, c/o P.O. BOX N-128, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, fqr
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 17TH day qf
OCTOBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality ani
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MILBERT BELTON, ENESAS
ST., NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, foi
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration!
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight day4
from the 10TH day of OCTOBER, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147;
Nassau, Bahamas.


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


SPRING SURPRISE LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
30th day of September, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE


CATIA LA MAR LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the above-name4
Company is irr dissolution, which commenced on the 7th da,
of October, 2005. The Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., of
P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator


* KEN BURNS


Financial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing information As Of:
13 October 2006

52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Previous Close Todays* Close Change Daily Vol. EPS S Div PIE Yield
1.10 0.73 Abaco Market ..3 0.7 0.00 -0.207 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.10 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 10.00 10,10 0.10 1,000 1.456 0.340 6.9 3.37%
7.24 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 7.24 7.24 0.00 0:587 0.330 12.3 4.56%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.204 0.010 3.9 1.25%
1.80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 1.40 1.40 0.00 0.112 0.060 12,5 4.29%
1.15 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.10 C.10 0.00 0.066 0.030 16.7 2.73%
9.26 6.94 Cable Bahamas 9,26 9.26 0.00 0.818 0.240 15.0 2.59%
2.20 1.53 Colina Holdings 1.53 1.53 0.00 '-0.046 0.000 NM 6.00%
9.10 6.90 Commonwealth Bank 9.10 .9.10 0.00 .. 0.705 0.410 12.9 4.51%
2.50 0.67 Doctor's Hospital 2.40 2.40 0.00 0429 0.000 5.6 0.00%
4.20 3.85 Famguard 4.20 4.20 0.00 0.428 0.240 8.8 5.71%
10.70 9.50 Finco 10.70 10.70 0.00 125 0.695 0.510 15.4 4.77%
9.50 7.25 FirstCaribbean 9.50 9.50 0.00 0.695 0.380 13.7 4.00%
9.24 8.39 Focol 9.24 9.24 0.00 0.675 0.500 13.7 5.41%
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 0.022 0.000 62.3 0.00%
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.94 9.94 0.00 0.526 0.405 18.9 4.07%
8.65 8.20 J. S. Johnson 8.65 8.65 0.00 0.526 0.560 16.4 6.47%
3.89 4.36 Kerzner International BDRa 5.30 5.40 0.10 0.122 0.000 43.4 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.760 4.9 7.60%
"2wk-HI 2wk-Low Symbol .; Bld$ Ask S Last Price Oeek y Vol EPS S DIv S PIE Yield
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 11.00 1.488 0.960 9.1 7,25%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 60000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0.80 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 M.. .04 0.000 NM. 0.00%
3.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
16.00 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.33 13.33 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -.0.103 0.000 NIM 0.00%
52wk-Hi S2wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Divt Yield%
1.254 1.1874 Colina Money Market Fund 1.2664268
2.4403 2.0311 Fidelity Bahamas 0 & I Fund 2.4403-
10.6103 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.81031
2.2560 2.1491 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.267097*"
1.1347 1.0631 Colina Bond Fund 1.134722** .
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-HI Highest closing price in tast 52 weeks Bid i Buying price of Coina and Fidelity
52wk.Low Lowest dosing price In last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekldy Vol. Trading volume of the prior week
Change Change in closing price from day to day E A. company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Dally Vol. Number of total shares traded today. N. IAf eatAies arue pr e
DIV $ Dividends per siwepaid in the last 12 neionthe r N 'i- No. MesriiliYful .2
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings :NDEX TI S Pidellty Bahnmas Sock Index ,~nay 1 1994 100
- AS AT SEP. 30, 20051* AS AT AUG 31, 2005
*-ASAT SEPT. 23,200W80 AS AT SEP. 30, 2005/** AS AT SEP. 30, 2006


I


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005














'Don't wait for a new FATF crisis'


FROM page 1B

r Economic Co-Operation
'#d Development (OECD)
:a'er its 'harmful tax practices'
'Iitiative.
,,.'In addition, a number of
'ECD nations and leading
jidustrialised countries have
placed the Bahamas on so-
cEalled 'national tax blacklists'
'.I discourage financial services
businesss from coming here,
.Jhile the Financial Stability
:lprum (FSF) the body that
4nked the Bahamas among
lowest of three offshore
e.tre categories for having
Mak regulatory and supervi-
a.ry standards is also plan-
ing to launch a new initiative
:against international financial
entres.
Mr Moree said the Bahamas
jeeds a proactive national
'licy statement in dealing with
Ihese supranational agencies.
will allow us to manage
fairs with them in a proac-
e, rather than a reactive,
nner. The Government
eds to consider a new
s


approach to the different ini-
tiatives coming from the supra-
national groups".
He added that the Forum
was developing a policy paper
on how the Bahamas should
manage relations with these
groups that would be presented
to the Government.
The Bahamas, Mr Moree
said, needed to do a better job
in communicating with the
likes of the FSF and OECD,
showing them what happened
in this jurisdiction and "pre-
senting our case" in a "better
way".
He added that there was
"often a significant period of
time" available for the
Bahamas to respond to the
likes of the FATF when their
initiatives and report had yet
to be fully published and
launched. It was rare for their
to be a total information vacu-
um, and these initiatives such
as the 'blacklists' to appear
totally 'out of the blue'.
"Too often in the Bahamas,
unless it is a crisis in the
Bahamas, we do not respond
proactively or correctly within


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
,,you are raising funds for a
.good cause, campaigning
or improvements in the
,area or have won an
award.
'If so, call us on 322-1986
_and share your story.


Legal Notice

NOTICE


EXXON EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
TRINIDAD LIMITED

I Creditors having debts or claims against the above-hamediECnimupi
are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned c/o P.O.
Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 7th November, 2005. In
-default thereof-they-willb-e .excluded from the benefit of any
distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 13th day of October, A.D.; 2005

Gail Huff
Liquidator
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060
U.S.A.



AMENDED
NOTICE
RANEW DEVELOPMENT, LTD.
(In Dissolution)

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 138(4) (a), (b) and (c) of The
International Business Companies Act, 2000, notice is hereby
given that: -
(a) RANEW DEVELOPMENT, LTD. is in dissolution.
(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution is the 12th day
of October A.D., 2005.

(c) The Liquidator is Jonathan F. Catherwood for the above-named
Company.


Jonathan F. Catherwood
Director
RANEW DEVELOPMENT, LTD.
(In Dissolution)




o o .S -



NOTICE is hereby given that the creditors of the above-
named Company are required on or before the 14th of
November, 2005 to send their names and addresses and
the particulars of their debts or claims to the attention of
Mr. Juan M. Lopez and Mr. Simon J.S. Townend, Joint
Liquidators of the said Company at the offices of KPMG,
Montague Sterling Centre, East Bay Street, P.O. Box N-
123, Nassau, Bahamas, and if so required by notice in
writing from the undersigned, to come in and prove such
debts or claims, or in default thereof they will be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made before such claims
are proved.

Dated the 17th day of October, 2005


Mr. Juan M. Lopez
Joint Liquidator


Mr. Simon J.S. Townend
Joint Liquidator


an appropriate time," Mr
Moree said.
The Bahamian financial ser-
vices' industry's interests, and
those of the entire country,
would be better served, the
Forum chair added, by focusing
the resources and political will
- as this nation did in 2000 dur-
ing the FATF 'blacklisting' -
before such initiatives hit, using
the talent, knowledge and
expertise it had built up over
the last two years.
Responses

However, Mr Moree pointed
out that the Bahamas had to
devise different responses to a
body such as the FATF, which
was concerned with anti-money
laundering and combating ter-


ror financing, and the OECD,
which was instead focused on
tax matters and preventing the
flight of.capital to internation-
al financial centres, as the sub-
jects were totally different. '
"There is a major difference,
in my view, between national
security issues and anti-money
laundering and anti-terror
regimes on the one hand, and
the enforcement of national tax
codes and collection of rev-
enues on the other," Mr Moree
said.
"There is a very big differ-
ence between dealing with the
FATF and.IMF.on the one
hand, and the OECD on the
other hand. A monolithic
approach to all these interna-
tional agencies is not appropri-
ate and not in our national


Legal Notice

NOTICE


EXXON EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
TRINIDAD (DEEPWATER) LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named Company
are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned c/o P.O.
Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 7th November, 2005. In
default thereof they will be excluded from the benefit of any
distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 13th day of October, A.D., 2005

Gail Huff
Liquidator
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060
U.S.A.



LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE

EXXON EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
TRINIDAD LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GI a i
(a) EXXON EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION TRINIDAD LIMITED
is in dissolution under the provisions of the International Business Companies
Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 13th day of
October, 2005 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Gail Huff of 16945 Northchase
Drive, Texas 77060, U.S.A.
Dated the 13th day of October, 2005.
HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company



LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No. 45 of 2000)


In Voluntary Liquidation


Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (8) of The
International Business Companies Act No. 45 of 2000, the Dissolution
of RIMAR NV has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.
The date of completion of the dissolution was the 26th day of September,
2005.


interests."
He added that "an element
of anti-competitiveness" was
behind the OECD initiative,
which was aiming to prevent
capital and financial services
business coming to interna-
tional financial centres by
attacking the likes of the
Bahamas, rather than focusing
on their own problems.
On the FATF decision to dis-
continue monitoring, Mr
Moree said it removed a shad-
ow from over this nation's rep-
utation, having "validated" this
nation's stance that it had both
introduced and implemented
its anti-money laundering and
anti-terror financing regime.
The move also showed this
nation was fully cooperative
with requests for assistance and


information from overseas reg-
ulators and legal authorities,
and was in full compliance with
the FATF and its 40 recom-
mendations.
Mr Moree acknowledged,
though, the belief that the
FATF held the Bahamas "to a
higher standard" than other
international financial centres,
and should have ended moni-
toring some time ago.
"There is no question, in my
view, that the Bahamas was
treated differently to its com-
petitors. The standard being
applied to the Bahamas was
more rigorous," Mr Moree
said.
"It did, in some ways, affect
the competitive position of the
Bahamas......"


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE

EXXON EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
TRINIDAD (DEEPWATER) LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) EXXON EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION TRINIDAD
(DEEPWATER) LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 13th day of
October, 2005 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Gail Huff of 16945 Northchase
Drive, Texas 77060, U.S.A.
Dated the 13th day of October, 2005.
HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2005
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/Qui/00721
New Providence

IN THE MATTER of the Quieting
Titles Act, 1959.



IN THE MATTER of the Petition
of Judd and Dale Rosen.

AND

IN THE MATTER of Lot No. 176, Phase Three,
Section One, Stella Maris Subdivision, Long Island,
Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that Judd and Dale Rosen
are applying to the Supreme Court to have their Title
to the following investigated under Section 3 of The
Quieting Titles Act, and the nature and extend thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be
granted by the said Court in accordance with provisions
of the said Act.

"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No.
176 of Phase Three, Section One of the Stella Maris
Subdivision situate on the Northeastern side of Skyview
Crescent in the vicinity of the Northeastern coast of
Long Island and bounded NORTHEASTWARDLY by
Lot No. 177 the property of the Petitioner and running
thereon One hundred and Eighty-one and Seventy-four
One hundredths (181.74) Feet SOUTHEASTWARDLY
by Lot No. 179 and running thereon One hundred and
Ten (110.00) Feet SOUTHWESTWARDLY by Lot No.
175 and running thereon One hundred and Sixty and
Fifty-on One-hundredths (160.51) Feet and
NORTHWESTWARDLY by a road called Skyview
Crecent and running thereon One hundred and Eighty
(180.00) Feet".

Copies of the Plans may be inspected during normal
office hours at the following places:-

1. Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street
North in the City of Nassau, N.P., Bahamas; or,

2. The Chambers of James M. Thompson,
Terrace House, First Terrace, Collins Avenue,
Centerville in the City of Nassau, aforesaid.

Any person who objects to the granting of the said
Certificate of Title is required to file in he Supreme
Court and serve on the Petitioner or its Attorney a
Statement of his, her or its Claim in the prescribed
form, verified by an Affidavit and other related
requirements to be filed and served therewith by the
15th day of November, 2005. Failure of any such person
to file and serve a Statement of his, her or its Claim by
the 15th day of November, 2005 will operate as a bar
to such Claim.

ANDREW J. THOMPSON
ATTORNEY FOR THE PETITIONERS


Liquidator


Legal Notice


NOTICE



MAYBUD LIMITED


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act No. 45 of
2000, MAYBUD LIMITED, has been dissolved and struck
off the Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution
issued by the Registrar General on the 7th day of October,
2005.

Minimax Ltd,
c/o Multiconsult,
10 Frdre Felix de Valois Street,
Port-Louis,
Liquidator


MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005, PAGE 7B


i.


,THE TRIBUNE







PAGE8BMONDAYCTOBERB1,2005ITHENTRIBUN


Drill down



deep to solve



business woes






"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


-*


- w


~
- - -.- -


- o M


-x d .&
-
eme *S -


b q mm.oe S IMP
Qu &ANEW-40 -


The machine is Check
not being maintenance
properly records
maintained Improve
*systems
______________ Train staff
The machinery Get engineers
: The machinery has developed to test the
is contaminated a fault machinery
:, .. :" .* Check with the
______ manufacturer
_._:- __,_:::"_:_ :..|* Someone is Hire private

sabotaging detective
machine Discuss with .H
........ o. .... C a ll p olice-

complaint about
the water
tt. . . . .. . . . . . . . .... ......................... .. ............. .. .........
Staff are not Make spot
cleaning bottles checks on staff
properly Improve
systems
*' Train staff
The bottles are The cleaning Make periodic
not properly water is of poor checks of the
cleaned quality water quality
Meet with water
__ 1_ S& sewa.ge.. .


* Someone is
sabotaging the
cleaning
process


*. Hire.private
detective
* Discuss with HR
* Call police ._


* 12 Month Warranty
* Meets or exceeds manufacturer's specifications
* Available for most makes of American, Japanese,
SKorean and European passenger vehicles and
heavy-duty trucks
Available throughout the Bahamas ......
Parts Department;,
Shirley Street 356-7932 __M
partsorder@nassaumotor.com iwsaoco
www.acdelcobahamas.com


)a


I









s~ale


FROM page 1B

process at all.
Sources familiar with the
process said some groups had
even mulled withdrawing from
the sale, given the time and
expenses they were racking up
on due diligence and keeping
their financing in place. How-
ever, they are all still under-
stood to be at the table, and it
is hoped that this week's meet-
ings with the Shell executives
will break the seeming logjam
in the process.
Delayed
One factor that may have
delayed a decision from Shell
was the current review of the
Bahamian petroleum industry
under the auspices of Leslie
Miller, minister of trade and
industry, who has threatened
on several occasions to change
its structure through signing on
to PetroCaribe or cutting the
retail and wholesale margins.
The Bahamas has the highest
retail margins in the Caribbean
for gas, set at $0.44 per gallon,
something that will have
attracted both Bahamian and
foreign groups to bid for the
retail division, which includes
all Shell's gas stations. Any cuts
in this could reduce the asset's
attractiveness, with Shell
thought to be seeking a price
between $20-$25 million.
Contender
The SOL Group, headed by
wealthy Barbadian Kyffin
Simpson, was considered by
many to be the leading con-
tender for the bid.
However, any sale to the
SOL Group could run into
opposition from the Govern-
ment, concerned about the


political effect from approving
any sale to a foreign purchaser.
Mr Miller has publicly said he
would like the business to be
sold to a Bahamian purchaser if
a deal can be struck, and this is
the main reason why sentiment
on the likelihood of the SOI;
Group's success has cooled in
recent weeks.
Unions

Among the Bahamian con-
tenders are the BISX-listed
Freeport Oil Holdings Com-
pany (FOCOL), and a group
headed by independent MP
and businessman Tennyson
Wells, which is understood to
be receiving financial backing
from a group of Bahamian
trade unions. A third Bahami-
an group is also thought to
involve Franklyn Butler.
FOCOL is seen by many as
the likely winner should the
SOL Group falter. However,
there are obvious reasons why
Shell would favour a sale to the
SOL Group, given that it dis-
posed of its eastern Caribbeani
Guyana, Suriname and Belize
retail operations to the compa-
ny late last year and earlier in
2005.
Commercial,'
The SOL Group has now
taken over Shell's retail and
commercial fuel business in
Barbados, St Lucia, Antigua,
Anguilla, Guyana, Suriname,
Belize, St Kitts/Nevis, St Vin-
cent, Grenada, British Virgin
Islands, Netherlands Antilles
and Dominica.
It runs more than 100 gas sta-
tions across the Caribbean
region, as well as nearly three
dozen distribution depots.
The SOL Group is continu-
ing to use the Shell name and
logo in its operations under a
trademark licence agreement.


-1986


FirstCaribbean
Career Opportunity





FirstCaribbean International Bank is the combination of CIBC and Barclays Bank in the Caribbean, Bahamas
and Belize. We are the region's largest publicly traded bank with over 3,000 staff serving over 5.3 million
people in 16 countries. We manage over 700,000 active accounts via 100 retail branches and
corporate/international banking centres.
RESPONSIBILITIES
To develop and continuously refine tools and processes to support Card Campaign Management through predictive and
regression modelling as required
To develop segmentation and targeting strategies for card campaign and Customer Lifestyle Management
To develop and implement forecast and planning tools for all aspects of Campaign Management
To accept responsibility for the Cards Business Planning Unit and strategic initiatives with key internal stakeholders and partners
To develop competitive and comprehensive Card pricing strategies
PREREQUISITES
Extensive knowledge and experience of Data Base Management and Marketing is required
Cards/Fast Moving Consumer Goods/Telecoms experience is a mandatory prerequisite. Credit and Debit Card experience will be
a valuable asset
The ability to select and apply analytical and statistical techniques to data
Must be able to interpret and present findings including limitations across Cards and other lines of businesses as appropriate
Sound analytical and modelling techniques with demonstrated experience
A university degree with a minimum of 7 years' experience in the business/financial world
We offer an attractively structured compensation and reward package as well as performance bonuses.
Applications with detailed resum6s should be submitted no later than Friday October 21, 2005 to:
Ms. Marilyn Galloway
General Manager, Cards
FirstCaribbean International Bank
Head Office
Warrens
St. Michael
Tel: (246) 367-2526
Fax: (246) 424-8977
Email: marilyn.galloway@firstcaribbeanbank.com
Only applicants who are short-listed will be contacted.


FIRSTCARIB BEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK


Caribbean Pride. International Strength. Your Financial Partner.
FirstCaribbean International Bank Is an Associated Company of Barclays Bank PLC and CIBC.


_


THE TRIBUNE,


PAGE 8B, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005


-,w


o








THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


MONDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2005, PAGE 9B


T HE COLLEE F
H E ~TTO is y^LT ''"^^1 ^^ *T


Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs


IEDucAING &i T


STAFF VACANCIES

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the following positions:


Assistant Bookstore Manager

The successful candidate will report to the Bookstore Manager and assist the Manager by performing the following duties:
Manage the general operation of the bookstore and open/close the bookstore on a daily basis in coordination with the Manager
and in accordance with College shift policy.
Order textbooks in coordination with the Office of Academic Affairs and ensure the timely receipt of textbooks to meet College
course timelines.
Purchase all general merchandise required for resale after predetermining the appropriate reorder quantities and costs.
Ensure orders are received accurately and the correct mark-up prices are applied to all items purchased.
Forward approved purchase orders, matching delivery receiptsvendors statement and invoices to Accounts payable for payment
Develop shift schedules for bookstore staff to accommodate opening store hours of 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m., Monday through
Saturday.
Assist in interviewing potential bookstore assistants, train, supervise, evaluate and discipline bookstore employees
Oversee daily sales operations and ensure that end-of-day sales reports and bank deposits are correctly prepared for cash/credit
card/scholarship transactions.
Report and document all overages and/or shortages to Manager and Financial Controller.
Participate in the daily operations of the store by constantly patrolling the store to ensure that security is adequate, all merchandise
is properly displayed and customers' queries are answered..
Maintain inventory control by periodic taking physical inventory and comparing with point-of-sale database. Review/approve
returns, mark-up and mark-downs.
Perform other related duties as required.
Qualifications/experience
An Associate Degree in Accounting or Business. Minimum of three (3) years experience in a similar position
Experience with automated financial application is an advantage Trustworthy and of good character
*Meticulous and ability to work under pressure


Bookstore Clerks/Assistants


The successful candidates will report to Manager/Asst. Manager, Bookstore and be responsible for the following:
Work 40 hours a week, 8 hours a day, on shifts that will be scheduled between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. Monday
through Saturday.
Daily receipting of sales using the Counterpoint System. Manual receipts must be used if system is inoperable,
Preparing accurate end -of-day sales reports and bank deposit slips.
Reporting and documenting all overages and/or shortages to Manager/Asst. Manager.
Participate in the daily operations of the store by patrolling the store, when not cashiering, to ensure all merchandise is properly
and cleanly displayed.
Assist with the periodic taking of physical inventory when required.
Assist with receiving, stocking and displaying merchandise as required
SPerform other related duties as required
Qualifications/experience
At least a secondary education Experience in a similar position would be an advantage
Trustworthy and of good character Meticulous and able to work under pressure
Willingness to work shift hours and weekends


Purchasing Officer


Cafe Clerks/Assistants
The successful candidates will report to the Manager/Asst. Manager, Cafe and be responsible for the following:
Working 40 hours a week, 8 hours a day, on shifts that will be scheduled between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m.
Monday through Saturday.
Presenting and maintaining the appropriate health certificates
Setting up the Caf6 for customer service
Operating and cleaning equipment in accordance with instructions provided.
Preparing food and serving
Daily receipting of sales using the Counterpoint System. Manual receipts must be used if system is inoperable.
Preparing accurate end -of-day sales reports and bank deposit slips.
Reporting and documenting all overages and/or shortages to Manager/Asst. Manager.
Participating in the daily operations of the Cafe by constantly patrolling the store to ensure that tables, chairs, countertops
are always clean.
Assisting with the periodic taking of physical inventory when required:
Assist with receiving, stocking and displaying merchandise as required
Performing other related duties as required
Qualifications/experience
At least a secondary education Experience in a similar position would be an advantage
Trustworthy and of good character Meticulous and able to work under pressure
Willingness to work shift hours and weekends

Assistant Cafe Manager
The successful candidate will report to the Cafe Manager and assist the Manager by performing the following duties:
Manage the merchandising arid operation of the Caf6 in coordination with the Manager and in accordance with College
standard Government health and sanitation regulations.
Oversee food preparation and service, assisting where necessary.
Ensure orders are received accurately and correct:prices are applied to all items sold.
Develop shift schedules for Cafe staff to accommodate opening store hours of 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m., Monday through
Saturday. I.
Assist in interviewing potential Cafe support staff, train, supervise, evaluate and discipline Cafe employees
Oversee daily cash sales operations and ensure that end -of-day sales reports and bank deposits are correctly prepared for
cash transactions.
Report and document all overages and/or shortages to Manager and Financial Controller.
Maintain inventory control by periodic taking physical inventory and comparing with point-of-sale database.
Perform other related duties as required.
Qualifications/experience
At least a secondary education Minimum of three (3) years experience in a food and beverage environment.
Trustworthy and of good character Meticulous and ability to work under pressure
Interested candidates should submit an up-to-date resume and other relevant documents, by Monday, October 24, 2005 to:
The Director, Human Resources Department
The College of The Bahamas, Nassau, Bahamas


The successful candidate will report to the Financial Controller and be responsible for the following along with other duties:
Implement policies and procedures for inventory control: timetable for inventory counts, setting inventory re-order levels,
determining inventory obsolescence, and managing cost
Liaising with the appropriate Department Heads to ensure that policies and procedures relating to the ordering, payment, receipting,
issuing and costing of all assets/inventory items ordered are being correctly implemented
Account for and minimize inventory shrinkage, loss & damages
Calculate landed costs of all goods imported
Reconcile inventory balances with General Ledger accounts on a monthly basis
Manage the operations of the Purchasing/Receiving Department in accordance with College policies to ensure that:
authorized Purchase Orders are processed timely, authorized goods are-properly receipted, stocked and issued to the relevant
department, goods received are accompanied with the proper invoice, quoting the authorized purchase order, vendor invoices
approved for payment and submitted to accounts payable
Stock and maintain/supervise inventory control of the following:


0 Food & Beverages ....... ding.
0 Office Supplies: -".....': 'Y -aper
0 Building Maintenance Supplies &' Computer Supplies .
0 Copy Machine Parts 0 Chicks & chicken feed.'


Issue supplies in accordance with College policy and procedures. Ensure that the issuance of supplies are properly assigned to
the correct department and that the relevant data entries are made in Great Plains.
Qualifications/experience
Associate Degree (or equivalent) in Accounting or related field .from an acceptable institution
At least five (5) years experience in performing similar duties
*Competency in Microsoft Excel & Word
Knowledgeable about Financial Reporting
Personal Qualities
Strong organizational, communication and'interpersonal skills.
Ability to meet deadlines with minimum supervision
Strong self-motivation, a positive attitude and willingness to work flexible hours when necessary.


ChiefAccountant

The successful candidate will report to the Associate Vice President/Financial Controller and be responsible for the following along
with other duties:
Manage the operations of the Accounts Payable, Accounts Receivable, General Ledger/Budget departments and Fixed Assets
Oversee the operations of the Accounts Payable department to ensure the timely payment, recording, documentation, filing and
reporting of College expenditure
Classify and code invoices and transactions in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles and the approved chart
of accounts
Manage the operations of the Income Audit/Cashiers department to ensure the timely preparation of daily revenue receipts reports
Ensure that all revenue and cash receipts are reconciled and posted to the Great Plains General Ledger on a daily basis
Ensure that all bank reconciliations are prepared on a monthly basis and all relowant journal entries posted
Prepare month end accrual and prepaid journal entries
Determine and post monthly entries for depreciation, amortization, cost of goods sold (books, food & beverage)
Liaise with the Bookstore, Cafe, Business Centre, Freeport and other satellite campuses to ensure that all revenue is collected
and all monies deposited to the appropriate bank accounts and that Great Plains is updated in timely manner.
Produce monthly Revenue, Expenses, Ministry of Finance, & Budget vs. Actual reports
Prepare Balance Sheet reconciliations and analytical spreadsheets for the corresponding expense accounts
Perform other related duties as required
Qualifications/experience
Bachelor's Degree ( or equivalent) in Accounting from an accredited institution.
At least five (5) years experience in managing/supervising an accounts department
Knowledge of Great Plains/PowerCampus System would be an asset
Personal Qualities
Strong organizational, communication and interpersonal skills.
Ability to meet deadlines with minimum supervision
Strong self-motivation, a positive attitude and willingness to work flexible hours when necessary.


Accountant


The successful candidate will report to the Chief Accountant and be responsible for the following along with other duties:
Manage the operations of the Scholarship department ensuring that all .donor accounts are reconciled, bills submitted on a timely
basis and scholarships receivables are collected on a timely basis
Ensure that all scholarship transactions.are posted daily to Great Plains.
Manage the creation of scholarship codes and tuition received in advance.
Administer COB Awards and tuition waivers
Administer deferred payment plans and ensure collection of the same
Administer students' credit balances and security deposits
Liaise with the Purchasing Officer/Bookstore Manager to reconcile financial inventory with physical inventory for Fixed Assets
and Inventories (Text Books, Office & Stationery-Supplies, Food & Beverage Supplies, Computer Supplies, Maintenance &
Cleaning Supplies)
Maintain fixed asset register to account for additions & deletions and prepare monthly depreciation analysis for the following:
0 Buildings 0 Leasehold Improvements
0 Furniture, Fixtures & Equipment 0 Computer Equipment
0 Computer Software 0 Vehicles
0 Library Materials
Liaise with the various departments to ensure proper recording for fixed asset deletions and ensure that appropriate journal entries
are recorded
Perform other related duties as required
Qualifications/experience
Associate Degree (or equivalent) in Accounting or related field from an acceptable institution
At least three (3) years experience in performing similar duties
Competency in Microsoft Excel & Word
Knowledgeable about Financial Reporting

Personal Qualities
Strong organizational, communication and interpersonal skills.
Ability to meet deadlines with minimum supervision
Strong self-motivation, a positive attitude and willingness to work flexible hours when necessary.


FallSemester
COURSE NO. SECT COURSE DESCRIPTION' TIME DAY


BUSINESS

CUST900 01

COMPUTER


SUPERIOR CUSTOMER
SERVICE W/S


COMP:941 01 QUICKBOOKS
COMP960 01 MS POWERPOINT W/S
COMP930 01, WEB PAGE ESIAN W/S-
COSMETOLOGYl' s9op ". .

COSM804 01 MANICURE & PEDICURE

DECORATING


DECO800
DECO801
FLOR800
FLOR801
FLOR802

ENGLISH

ESL 900


LANGUAGES

FRE900 0

MANAGEMENT


MGMT902

MEDICAL

MEDT900

SEWING

SEW 800

SEW 802
SEW 805


INTERIOR DECORATING I
INTERIOR DECORATING II
FLORAL DESIGN I
FLORAL DESIGN II
FLORAL DESIGN III


01 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANG.



01 CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH. I



HUMAN'RESOURCE
01 MANAGEMENT W/S


01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY I


01 BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING
BASIC OF FREEHAND
01 CUTTING 11
01 DRAPERY MAKING I


.930AM-4:30PM Thur


6:60-9:00PM Tue
930AM-4:30PM Thur
9:30am-4:30PM ;Thur/Fri


6:00-9;OPM Tue


6:00-9:OOPM
6:00-9:OOPM
6:00-9:OOPM
6100-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM


START DUR. FEE


13Oct


1 day $170


27 Sep 6 weeks $330
13Oct 1 day $160
20& 21 Oct 2 days $500


11 Oct 8 weeks $225


11 Oct
12 Oct.
10 Oct
13 Oct
11 Oct


6:00-9:OOPM Mon


6:00-7:30PM


8 weeks
8 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks


10 Oct 10 weeks $250


Tue/Thur 11 Oct


6:00-9:OOPM Thur/Fri


6:00-9:OOPM Thur 6 Oct


6:00-9:00PM

6:00-9:OOPM
6:00-9:OOPM


10 weeks $225


20 & 21 Oct 2 days


10 weeks $225


6 Oct 10 weeks $225

10 Oct 10 weeks $250
11 Oct 10weeks $225


Superior Customer Service
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior customer service. It focuses on customer
value, retention and relationship building and employee motivation.


Date:
Time:
Venue:
Tuition:


13 October 2005
9:30am 4:30pm
Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre
$170.00


Effective PowerPoint Presentations
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It focuses on developing
effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.


Date:
Time:
Venue:
Tuition:


13 October 2005
9:30am 4:30pm
CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
$160.00


Web Page Design
This course will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy fiddling with computers and would like
to create their own web pages are encouraged to attend; Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables
and hosting of web pages.


Date:
Time:
Venue:
Tuition:


Thursday, 20th & Friday 21st October, 2005
9:30am 4:30pm
CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
$550.00


Human Resource Management Workshop
This two-day workshop is designed to equip managers and leaders in organizations and enhance the skills of current Human Resource
professionals with the theory, tools and techniques required for effective human resource management practices in today's workplace.
Date: Thursday, 20th & Friday 21st October, 2005
Time: 9:30am 4:30pm
Venue: Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre
Tuition: $350.00
EN UIRIES: Contact the Co-coordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/ 328-1936 or email nlacroix(&cob.edu.bs. All fees
are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting application, kindly provide copies of
the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Coitrse


PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT


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Teams

hoping for

place in

basketball

play-offs

N BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporters
TEAMS will be jockeying for
final positions for a spot in the
play-offs for basketball in the
first Church Games today at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.
Already, the Baptist, coached
by Joyce Minus, have clinched
the under-17 girls' title after
they defeated the Anglicans on
Friday. The Baptist have also
reached the final of the open
women's division. They will
play AME on Wednesday at 6
p.m. for the title.
Today, the participants in the
men's division will be decided,
according to Lawrence Hep-
burn, a Bahamas Basketball
Federation's executive. The fed-
eration is co-ordinating basket-
ball.
So far, Full Gospel Baptist
leads division one with a 4-0
win-loss record, the same as the
Catholics in division II.
Nazarene and the Anglicans are
both 3-1 in division three. Only
the top two teams in each divi-
sion will advance.
As for the under-17 boys, the
Catholics are 2-0 with AME sit-
ting in second at 3-1 in division
one and the Church of God in
Jesus are out front at 2-0 with
the Baptist in second at 2-1. The
top two teams in both divisions
will advance to the playoffs.
"Only four teams have,
entered the under-13 division.
Their playoffs are set with Full
Gospel, undefeated at 3-0, tak-
ing on the Catholics, 0-3, while
BNNAC, 2-1, facing the Angli-
cans, 1-2.
"Right now, things are going
pretty good," Hepburn said.
"It's been very keen competi-
tion across the board.
"The men's division seemed
to be wide open and once we
start playing again on Monday,
we expect that it will get even
more competitive as teams bat-
tle for a play-off spot."
Here is a summary of some of
the games played:
COG in Jesus 48,3Baptist 43:
Corey Williams scored 10 and
Robert Missick added eight as
Church of God in Jesus won a
big men's game. Tario Brooks
had a game high 13 and play-
er/coach Brendon Ingragham
added 10 in the loss.
Brethren 37, BNNAC 22:
Abul Bally's game high 12 was
enough to pace the Brethre in
the men's victory. Orlyn Young
had 10 in the loss.
BNNAC 30, Catholic 24: Jer-
mjaine Hallv pumped in a game
high 24 points to lead the win-
ners in this under-13 game.
Elvaredo Burrows scored eight
in the loss.
Anglican 41, Full Gospel 39:
Terrino clarke scored nine and
Christopher Morley eight as the
Anglican pulled off this under-
17 game. Travis Fowler scored a
game high 19 and Renaldo
Kemp had 13 in the loss.
Catholic 22, BNNAC 16: Kei-
th Russell's seven and Miguel
Neely's six was good enough to
lead the Catholics to a under-17
win. Joshua Rollins and Reggie
Saunders both had five in the
loss.
Full Gospel 42, BNNAC 21:
Dustin McKenzie scored a
game high 12, Re'o johnson had
11 and Leonardo Miller added
10 in the under-13 win for Full
Gospel. Anthony Sands scored
eight in a losing effort.
COG in Jesus 32, Baptist 19:
Carlos Thompson scored a
game high '13 to lead Church
of God in Jesus to a under-17
victory. Theo Cleare scored
eight in a losing effort.
Full Gospel 22, Catholic 8:
Leonaredo Miller scored more
than their opponents with nine
to single-handedly lead Full
Gospel to victory. Four players
had two points apiece in the
loss.
AME 47, CCAMI 33: Kevin


McPhee canned a game-high 28
to lead the open men's winners.
Anthony Carey had 12 in the
loss.
Full Gospel 38, Anglican 27:
Dustin McKenzie scored a
game-high 12 to pace the win-
ners in this under-13 game.
Harold Smith matched the
point total in the loss.
Baptist 31, cNazarene 30:
Ja'Vaughn Saunders scored
three of his game high 13 points
in overtime to lead the Baptist.
Theo Cleare finished with nine.
Stephano Johnson had 11 in the
loss.


- .


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005


TRIBUNE SPORTS


*






.i..I"ILJMYU I, '.sv.l JIt fli ,n


'Banker' steps up to help Baptist




triumph over Calvary Deliverance


* SOFTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
HAROLD "Banker"
Fritzgerald felt like a young
man going to the bank to cash
his first paycheck.
The 65-year-old veteran
pitcher, known for his modi-
fied pitching, was called upon
by the Baptist to pitch slow-
pitch. He cashed in big-time
in a 20-2 rout over Calvary
Deliverance to clinch the first
Church Games men's title in
softball on Saturday night at
the Andre Rodgers Baseball
Stadium.
"I feel good with all these
fellows behind me," said
"Ageless Wonder" Fritzger-
ald as he joined his team-
mates in victory celebrations
that included collecting their
gold medals from Pastor VG
Clarke of Calvary Deliver-
ance.'
Having pitched for more
than 30 years, Fritzgerald said
he had to start all over again,
but his team-mates encour-
aged.him, advising him on
"how' to hold the ball and I
just did like they said."
The Baptist, managed by


Dwayne Stevens, had to battle
back from losing 13-3 in their
first game to Calvary Bible..
But they knocked off Calvary
Deliverance 9-5 and Calvary
Deliverance beat Calvary
Bible to set up a three-way tie
going into the playoffs.
It came down to the point
spread and after Calvary Bible
lost by default, it allowed Cal-
vary Deliverance and the Bap-
tist to advance.
In the playoffs, Calvary
Deliverance knocked off the
Anglicans and the Baptist won
over the Catholics to set up
the final. The Catholics, how-
ever, went on to beat the
Anglicans 11-9 to clinch the
bronze medal.
The competition, which
began on Wednesday night,
was divided into two pools of
six teams each.
While Fritzgerald turned in
a masterful job on the mound
for the Baptist in the final,
Michael Thompson went two-
for-three with a run batted in,
scoring three times. Julian
Collie was two-for-three with
two RBIs and as many runs
scored, and Greg Smith was
two-for-four with two RBIs
and two runs scored.


Calvary Deliverance got a
two-for-three day with a run
scored from Jason Clarke.
Brad Wood Sr and Jr. were
also two-for-three with a RBI.
Wood Sr. however, went on
to score a run. Danny Stubbs
was the losing pitcher.
Catholic 11, Anglican 9: In
an extra inning game, Cardinal
Gilbert went three-for-three
with three RBIs and Ramon
'Shakey' Johnson was one-for-
three with two RBIUs and
three runs scored to lead the
Catholics to the bronze medal.
Jason Sweeting was two-for-
three with theee RBIs in a
losing effort.
Peter Rahming picked up
the win, while Ju;lius Seymour
suffered the loss.

Results

Summaries of some of the
other games played are as fol-
lows:
Baptist 17, Prophecy 4:
Leonardo Stevens was two-
for-three with four RBIs;
Chavez Thompson two-for-
three with two RBIs; Calvin
Greenslade two-for-three with
a RBI, scoring twice; Tim


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


* *. *. m
* 1 1 *e41.4-


Clarke two-for-two with a
RBI, scoring a run and Darren
Stevens two-for-three with
three runs scored for the Bap-
tist.
Fritzgerald got the win over
Steve Hepburn.
Matthew Rolle was two-for-
two with a RBI and run
scored; Hepburn was 1-for-2
with two runs scored and Elvis
Reckley was one-for-two with
a run scored.
Full Gospel Baptist 22, Born
Again 2: Wilbert Hanna went
three-for-three with four
RBIs, scoring twice to lead
Full Gospel Baptist as David
Brown picked up the win.
Michael Gibson was tagged
with the loss. Jason Rahming
was two-fbr-twowith a RBI for
the losers.
Anglican 17, BNNAC 2:
Treco Johnson went two-for-
three with two RBIs, scoring
twice as help Julius Seymour
pick up the win. Wilfred Cul-
mer was one-for-two with a
RBI as Dereck Sweeting suf-
fered the loss.
Bsptist 9, Calvary Deliver-
ance 5: Darren Stevens went
two-for-three with three RBIs,
scoring twice; Greg Smith 1-
for-3 with three RBIs and a


run scored and Julian Collie
two-for-three with a RBI,
scoring a run as Banker
Fritzgerald got the win on the
mound.
Taja Wright was two-for-
two with a RBI, scoring a run
and Brad Wood Jr was two-
for-three with a RBI, scoring
a run.
Calvary Bible 2, Brethren 0:
Byron Ferguson was two-for-
two with a run scored to lead
Calvary Bible as Basil Miller
clinched the win on the
mound. Leon Cooper was
two-for-two in the loss. He
was also the losing pitcher.
Calvary Deliverance 12,
Brethren 2: Taja Wright and
Jason Clarke were both two-
for-three with three RBIs,
scoring two and one run
respectively in the win. Julian
Johnson was one-for-two with
a run scored in the loss.
Calvary Bible 7, Nazarene
4: Terrance Pinder and Byron
Ferguson were both two-for-
two with two and one RBI and
run scored respectively. Basil
Miuller got the win on the
mound. Lavardo Gray was
two-for-two with a run scored
in the loss. Tiko Gray was the
losing pitcher.


Team pulls out


" the stops to win


Church Game s


*SOFTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

VERSATILE Joyce Minus and the
Baptist were in a groove of their own
as they ran through the competition in
the ladies' division of softball in the
first Church Games.
Pitching the slow-pitch competition,
Minus guided the Baptist, managed
by Olympia Morris, to a perfect record
as they completed the tournament
with a 19-3 rout over the Anglicans in
the championship game on Saturday
night at the Andre Rodgers Baseball
Stadium.
"Since this was the first Church
Games, we wanted to make sure that
we won it," Minus said. "Even though
there wasn't much of a competition
between the other teams, I have to
congratulate the Baptist.
"With the players that I had behind
me, I felt from the get-go that we were
the better team and we would have
gone through the tournament unde-
feated."
The Baptist were hoping to be chal-
lenged by Full Gospel Baptist in the
final, but they were relegated to the
bronze medal game after they were
defeated by the Anglicans. The Bap-
tist defeated the Catholics to advance
to the final.
Full Gospel Baptist, however, shut
out the Catholics 6-0 to clinch the
bronze medal.
Although they did not shut out any
of their opponents, the Baptist won by
huge margins in all of the games they
played with the exception of the
match-up with Full Gospel Baptist.
But in the championship game, the
Baptist turned it up a notch as they
pounded the Anglicans,.
Minus helped her own cause with a
two-for-three night with a home run,.
driving in four runs and scoring once.
Vonette Nairn was two-for-three with
three RBIs, scoring three times and#
Kelly Smith was three-for-three'with a
homer, driving in two runs and scoring
twice.Bridgette Sweeting was tagged
with the loss. Michelle Wilson was


one-for-two with a RBI, scoring twice
and Jeannie Minus was two-for-two.
Full Gospel Baptist 6, Catholic, 0:
Zella Symonette helped her own
cause with a hit, driving in two runs
and Shavette Taylor was two-for-three
with three RBIs, scoring twice as Full
Gospel Baptist secured the bronze
medal. Lovia Farquharson was tagged
with the loss.
Here is a summary of some of the
other games played:
Baptist 10, Full Gospel 3: Joyce
Minus got another wein, helping her
cause with a three-for-three day, dri-
ving in two runs and scoring another,
while Mary Edgecombe was two-for-
three with three RBIs. Fredericka
Delancey had one hit with a RBI and
run scored. Zella Symonette got the
loss.
Full Gospel Baptist 6, Catholic 0:
Zella Symonette got the win, helping
her own cause with hit hit and two
driven in and Shavette Taylor was
two-for-three with three RBIs, scoring
two runs. Lovia Farquharson got the
loss.
Baptist 12, Anglican 1: Kelly Smith
was three-for-three vwith three RBIs
and three runs scored; Candice Smith
two-for-three with two RBIs and two
runs scored and Renee 'Sunshine'
Curry two-for-three with two RBIs
and a run scored as Joyce Minus won
again. Bridgette Sweeting got the loss
and Loretta Maycock was one-for-
two with a RBI.
Baptist 15, Catholic 0: Kelly Smith
was two-for-two with four RBIs, sco-
riung a run; Mary Edgecombe two-'
for-two with two RBIs and two runs
scored and Nacara Knowles two-for-
three with a RBI, scoring twice to
enable Joyce Minus to get another
win. Gertrude O'Brien got the loss.,
Anglican 14, Full Gospel Baptist 7:
Loretta Maycock was two-for-three
with three RBIs and two runs scored;
Denise Foster two-for-two with a RBI
and two runs scored and Sherry Bow-
leg two-for-three with three RBIs.
Zella Symonette got the loss and Ran-
dell Cooper was three-for-three with
two RBIs, scoring twice.


Seventh


game to


decide


men's


softball


title



*SOFTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
A SEVENTH and deciding
game will be played tonight for
the New Providence Softball
Association men's champi-
onship title.
The pennant-winning Elec-
tro Telecom Dorcy Park Boyz
made sure of that when they
pulled off a 7-3 victory over the
defending champions TBS
Truckers on Thursday night at
the Churchill Tener Knowles
National Softball Stadium.
Game seven, however, was
not played on Saturday night
because of the holiday week-
end and the first Church
Games.
Edney "the Heat" Bethel
pulled off another victory, toss-
ing a four-hitter. Leroy Thomp-
son was tagged with the loss.
In their victory, Mario Ford
went two-for-three with a triple,
driving in a run and scoring
three: times. Bethel helped his
owh causee with'a' ohe-for-one,
night, driving in two runs and
scoring twice. Darren Bowleg
was two-for-three with a RBI.
The Truckers played without
manager Perry Seymour and
left fielder Philip Culmer, who
were both ejected from game
five. It is likely that they will
both have to sit out game seven
tonight because an ejection in
the postseason mean that they
will be gone for the entire
series.
Marvin "'Tougie" Wood went
two-for-three with a RBI and
Steven "Slugger" Brown was
one-for-three with a double,
scoring a run.
The Truckers had taken a 3-1
lead in the series, but they could
not put the' Dorcy Park Boyz
away.
Now it will come down to
who wants it the most. No
doubt, the Dorcy Park Boyz will
go with Bethel on the mound
while Thompson will get the
ball for the Truckers.
The winner of the series will
join the Electro Telecom Wild-
cats as NPSA representatives
in the Bahamas Softball Feder-
ation's National Round Robin
Tournament that gets under-
way on Thursday at the stadi-
um.
The tournament will be
played between the champions
from New Providence, Grand
Bahama, Eleuthera, Exuma,
Long Island, Abaco and
Andros. Only Eleuthera will not
be represented in the ladies'
division.


I1 TIOUlvL..01 L./1110








MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005


SECTION


Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


0 C MOHAMMED of Everest is almost out yesterday at the Haynes Oval


* CRICKET
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
COMMONWEALTH and Everest were
the teams to defeat in the regular play of the
Nassau Sixes, heading into the cross-over
play-off action with perfect win-loss records.
The two teams dominated the weekend
six-a-side cricket action, held at the Haynes
Oval, but had to face off to determine who
would advance to the final rounds, played
on Sunday.
Commonwealth started out the three-
day tournament.strong, clinching their
opening game against Paradise 69-64. Their
second match played against the Police saw
them go up 96-70.
As Commonwealth took a rest from their
winning, Everest, the visiting team from
New York, started their dominance, hand-
ing Paradise their first lost of 61-58.
The team showed no sign of fatigue,
although they had to try and recover quick-
ly for the match against the Police. Everest
was able to make an arrest on the
Police squad, defeating them 80-36.
The big match-up was set, Common-
wealth taking on the visiting team Everest,
but that match-up had to wait as T-Birds
and the Titans took to the field.
Titans, who were playing in the Bobby
Evans pool, were able to defeat the Titans


50-49, with the Titans bowling out four for
the score of 49.

Victory

In the Titans' second game was another
nail-biting victory for them, as they claimed
victory over the Twilights. The game, which
had to be viewed closely by the scores to
determine the winner, was claimed by the
Titans, who lost one wicket to the score of
81.
Twilights scoring also read 81, but the
close examination of the score book saw
them lose two wickets.
Executive member Paul Thompson
described the play action as close, building
high anticipation for the final game.
He said: "The scores reflect how will
played and close each of the games have
been. I can hardly wait to see who will
emerge into the finals because you have to
two teams that have won all their games,
but have to play each other to see who will
cross over.
"That should be exciting. All the other
games were very close as well. Tomorrow's
action should even be better with the
finals."
Play action continued yesterday, but
scores were unavailable up until press time.
Scores will printed in Tuesday's edition.


* JAMAL Bowes tries to hit a fast ball bowled by Narendra Ekanayake yesterday
(Photos: Fetlip Major/Tribune Staff)


i


- -- --L ~---~-----L-


Il


s









MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005


The stories behind the news


FNM parliamentarians have voted
against making any changes to the party's
structure before its national convention in
November. Party leader Tommy Turn-
quest last week told The Tribune that
the decision was taken during a meeting
at his Dowdeswell Street office last week
Tuesday. "We decided that we will not
make any changes and that Alvin Smith
(left) will remain as the leader in parlia-
ment and that we will move towards the
convention where we will discuss that
and other issues at that time," he said.


The Bahamas' murder rate
over the past 12 years was high-
er than the United States and
about three times as high as
Canada's, a study revealed last
week. However, the country
had a higher average detection
rate than the US. An# while
almost 70 per cent of murders
were solved, about 37 per cent
of persons charged with mur-
der were convicted...


The Tribune has boosted its position as the Bahamas' number
one daily newspaper by outselling its main rival, The Nassau
Guardian, by nearly 12,000 copies a week over the past year.
While The Tribune continues its steady circulation climb, the
Guardian has slumped by another 6.3 per cent year-on-year,
showing a total loss of more than 18 per cent over the last two
years. The news came as The Tribune launched a new promo-
tional campaign based on the slogan "My Voice My Newspaper"
- highlighting the paper's solid standing in all sections of the
community. Managing editor John Marquis said last week: "The
Tribune is a paper for every section of Bahamian society. People
know they can rely on us to take on the big issues and tell the
truth..." '.


* TOMMY TURNQUEST- Hanging on


(FILE photo)


* HUBERT INGRAHAM Mystery man U DION FOULKES Uniying force
(FILE photo) (FILE photo)


The


Best Show


In


Town


But will it be high drama or pure comedy at FNM rally?


veryone is looking for
hidden meanings behind
the FNM's statement
last week that all is back
to square one in the
leadership fight.
Is Hubert Ingraham still in the run-
ning or has he finally bowed out? That
was the question doing the rounds
while Alvin Smith remained House
opposition leader until convention
time.
Even senior figures in the party
seem unsure. He's out, said a stalwart
who felt there could only be one inter-
pretation of leader Tommy Turn-
quest's disclosure that Mr Smith
would remain in the parliamentary
hot-seat.
"The FNM's parliamentary group
has been left adrift," said the observ-
er. "It seems Mr Ingraham has simply
walked away from the whole thing


Whatever is on at the movies in Nassau next month,
the FNM national convention promises to be the best
show in town. For intrigue, suspense and maybe even a
surprise ending, the party's leadership drama is bound
to be a box-office hit. INSIGHT reports...


following the failed coup against Turn-
quest and told them to get on with
it."
Not so, said another who believes
Mr Ingraham has merely been forced
to change tack by Mr Turnquest's
intransigence. "Between now and the
convention, everything possible will
be done to persuade Tommy to stand
down," he said.


"If he doesn't, the matter will be
thrashed out on the floor of the con-
vention. Contrary to what some peo-
ple think, Ingraham actually wants to
come back as party leader.
"All this talk of him being the reluc-
tant blushing bride is hogwash. All
else having failed, he now has to tack-
le Tommy at the convention, some-
thing he really didn't want to do."


Another source said: "If Ingraham
goes for the leadership, it means he
believes the party can win the gov-
ernment, otherwise he wouldn't both-
er."
Meanwhile, former education min-
ister Dion Foulkes remains very much
in the fight, though he has gone sur-
prisingly quiet since his initial promo-
tional flurry.


S However, he told INSIGHT that he
was ready for the challenge and saw
himself as the only person capable of
uniting the party after its recent
reverses. And he stressed that he
would not be open to any pre-con-
vention deals.
Whatever the line-up and a three-
pointed contest is not ruled out the
run-up to this eagerly-awaited feature
event will focus largely on Mr Ingra-
ham.
For it's the former prime minister's
intentions that hold the key to this
unfolding drama. And he has yet to
tell anyone what his intentions are.
After a private meeting with Mr
Turnquest last weekend, the ex-PM
was said to have emerged with his arm
round his protege saying: "Tommy is

SEE page 2C


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PAGE20,MONDY, CTOER 1, 205TH TRBUN


FE' ~ C


FNM leadership:

ommy Turnquest just
doesn't have it, and most
people know it. Ingraham
did a superlative job as
prime minister and should
be brought back, not necessarily with
Symonette.
If Christie had done with three or
four of his ministers what Ingraham
did with Wells and Dupuch, he'd be a
much better PM.
Wells' and Dupuch's rantings are
sour grapes and a laughing stock.
Non-affiliated observer

000******

THE way things are going, it could
be that Tommy Turnquest will be the
last man standing when it comes to the
vote.


I'm still unsure about the commit-
ment of Dion Foulkes. Is he for real -
or is he just jostling himself into a
strong bargaining position?
Re Ingraham: is it wise to cajole a
man who, deep down doesn't really
want to lead the FNM?
There is no guarantee that he will
be as effective second time around.
Perhaps his inner fire has burnt out.
J L Gordon




FEW have emerged with their repu-
tations intact in the FNM leadership
mess.
Whatever else Turnquest lacks, at
least give him credit for standing his
ground in the face of some quite with-
ering criticism.
On the basis of what I've read over
the last few weeks, I'd prefer him over
Brent Symonette any day of the week.


G Moss, Carmichael

******OOO


IF there is one major negative
against the FNM, it is that they are still
dependent on what's left of the Bay
Street Boys.
It seems that a wealthy white group
who were kicked out of power nearly
40 years ago are still calling the shots by
saying who's getting financial backing
and who isn't when it comes to the,
FNM leadership.
Hubert Ingraham is seen by these
people as their personal delivery boy.
Self-interest is what drives them. They
have no regard for the democratic
process. And the people, as far as they
are concerned, can go to the dogs.
Let democracy take its course in the
FNM, and to hell with the Eastern
Road mafia.
PP, Wulff Road


The Best




Show In




Town


FROM page IC

my man."
As they slipped away for a
late-night tete-a-tete' leading
FNM figures were once again
left wondering exactly where,
Mr Ingraham stood.
Was he really backing Turn-
quest, in spite of the young
leader's alleged deficiencies?
As the FNM leadership
blockbuster has unfolded over
the last couple of weeks, many
acres of newsprint, and hours
of airtime, have been devoted
to what Bahamians have found
to be a compelling topic.


But, interestingly, Mr Ingra-
ham has been the only one with
a non-speaking part, keeping
his counsel while his colleagues
have been involved in, and
besieged by, endless conjec-
ture.
"It's the classic Ingraham
approach," said one party
observer, "Ingraham is the
puppet-master, everyone else
is a marionette. He will not
commit himself because he
doesn't have to. If things go his
way, he will step into the lime-
light and accept the bouquets.
If they don't he will say it had
nothing to do with him."
Behind the scenes, big-mon-
ey backers are rooting .for
Ingraham, exercising their con-
siderable power by refusing to
support anyone else. The ex-
PM, meanwhile, has other con-
siderations to ponder, not least
what happens to his generous
pension if he makes a come-
back.
Alongside Eastern Road's
blandishments, Mr Ingraham
has to consider harsh practi-
calities. Having probably givr-
en his best shot during ten
years in power, does he now
have the energy and inclina-
tion to meet the high expecta-
tions of his admirers?
Mr Turnquest, meanwhile,
appears to be standing firm,
encouraged by those who feel
that all things considered it's
probably time for the FNM to
move on, come what may.
Insider
In fact, one insider told
INSIGHT that Mr Turnquest
had already squared up to the
money-men, telling them to
withdraw their financial sup-
port if they wanted to, but he
was staying on.
His determination in the face
of so much criticism and his
weaknesses have been cruelly
scrutinised by his detractors in
recent weeks has surprised
many.
Independent MP Pierre
Dupuch is one who has been
taken aback by the FNM lead-
er's "gristle" and has com-
mented upon it on a radio talk
show. Whether "gristle" alone
is enough to carry the Turn-
quest bandwagon to victory in
an election is another matter.
Apart from long experience
and a proven track record, Mr
Ingraham's advantage over Mr
Turnquest in a general election
battle is a natural instinct born
of circumstance.
Mr Ingraham is a self-pro-
claimed "barefoot boy from
Abaco", an unashamed son of
the soil who attained profes-
sional status by hard toil. An
illegitimate child, he was
helped on his way by a strong
grandmother who laid the
foundation of his life.
Unlike some Bahamian
lawyer-politicians of the past,
Mr Ingraham did not take the
scenic route to qualification via
the English Inns of Court. He
became an articled clerk and
hammered out a career for
himself in someone else's
chambers.

SEE page 4C


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- -----:------~ -------------~~~~~-~---~'-'-~'~~~-~~-`-~ ~i~~~~~- ---;- --


k PAGE 2C, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005


1r


. INSIGHT I


THE TRIBUNE








II
THEsa TurIBUNEMONDAYOCTOBER117,0005,oPAGE3
week........he pastyea..
: -' p h o t o ) : : :,:-::.::::.. -.21


THE Tribune has boosted its
position as the Bahamas' num-
ber one daily newspaper by
outselling its main rival, The
.Nassau Guardian, by nearly
12,000 copies a week over the
past year.
While The Tribune contin-
ues its steady circulation climb,
the Guardian has slumped by
-another. 6.3 per cent year-on-
year, showing a total loss of
*more than 18 per cent over the
*last two years.
The news came as The Tri-
bune launched a new promo-
tional campaign based on the
slogan "My Voice My News-
paper" highlighting the
.paper's solid standing in all sec-
tions of the community.
Managing editor John Mar-
quis said last week: "The Tri-
.bune is a paper for every sec-
tion of Bahamian society. Peo-
ple know they can rely on us to
take on the big issues and tell
,the truth. That's why they are
turning to us in increasing num-
bers.
"The Tribune's continuing
climb'is particularly hearten-
ing when the global trend for
'daily newspapers is down-
,wards. It shows that we are
.,being seen by more people as
the leading media voice in the
.Bahamas."

THE Bahamas' murder rate
over the past 12 years was high-
er than the United States and
about three times as high as
Canada's, a study revealed last
week.


However, the country had a
higher average detection rate
than the US. And while almost
70 per cent of murders were
solved, about 37 per cent of
persons charged with murder
were convicted.
These facts were released in
a new book published by the


Tihe book, written by Corpo-
ral Chaswell Hanna, is an
examination of murder inci-
dents that occu rred in the
Bahamas between 1991 and
2003. It addresses, the murder
rate of the Bahamas in com-
parison to other regional coun-
tries as well as larger countries
across the world. The informa-
tion contained in the volume
took two and-a-half years to
compile.
******
FNM parliamentarians have
voted against making any
changes to the party's structure
before its national convention
in November.
Party leader Tommy Turn-
quest last week told The Tri-
bune that the decision was tak-
en during a meeting at .his
Dowdeswell Street office last
week Tuesday. "We decided
that we will not make any
changes and that Alvin Smith
will remain as the leader in par-
liament and that we will move
towards the convention where
we will discuss that and other
issues at that time," he said.


* ALVIN Smith (pictured) will remain as
opposition leader in parliament.
(FILE photo)


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R v





THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005, PAGE 3C








PAGE40, ONDA, OCOBER17, 005INSITIBUN


The


FROM page 2C

One thing he shared with his
mentor, Sir Lynden Pindling,
.was a humble background
which gave him the common
touch. On the hustings, he
could be relied upon to find
exactly the right down-home
phrase to get the crowds jump-
ing.


Best Show In


Mr Turnquest, reared-in a
comparatively privileged set-
ting, appears not to possess
those skills. "When Tommy
goes to an out island, he takes
up residence in a resort and the
people come to him," said an
observer.
"If Ingraham goes to an out
island, you can find him down
at the bar shooting pool with
the boys. That's the differ-


Air conditioner
AGV12 .

,.3 ":x

a 0 'c91- ):


ence.",
It was also the difference in
the mid-1960s between Pin-
dling and the man seen then as
his main challenger for the
ascendancy in radical politics,
Paul Adderley.
Pindling was from the blocks,
a slick talker who could always
be relied upon to dredge up a
few colloquialisms to get the
locals laughing. From the podi-


JiONES! & CO


Sales & Full Service Department
Rosetta & Montgomery Sts.


urn, he knew exactly how to
stir people's emotions and
which buttons to press.
Mr Adderley, meanwhile,
was burdened by his nickname
- The Prince of Poinciana Hill -
which left him politically dis-
abled in the public's percep-
tion as irredeemably bourgeois.
No matter how he tried to
be otherwise, the Cambridge-
educated Mr Adderley came
over as a patrician figure
uneasy in the company of com-
mon folk. His father, A F
Adderley,.was the leading
Bahamian advocate of his day.
There was no disguising his
middle-class credentials and
they were to help seal his fate
at the polls.
If Mr Ingraham really does
drop out of the leadership fight,
Mr Turnquest will somehow
have to reinvent himself if he is


Town


to endear himself to the grass-
roots.
He will have to shed what
his critics regard as his some-
what tetchy, slightly arrogant
manner, learn to cultivate the
press, and stage a major charm.
offensive in those working-class
areas where he is seen as a
product of privilege. It will not
be easy.
Uncertain
In a party where most things
seem uncertain, one absolute
certainty is that this year's con-
vention will be packed out.
PLPs and FNMs will be on the
Cable Beach strip for an occa-
sion which could have all the
atmosphere of a world cham-
pionship fight.
A political commentator told
INSIGHT: "The FNM con-


vention will be the big draw for
members of both major parties
this year because of the lead-
ership issue. I wouldn't be sur-
prised if tens of thousands
don't turn up.
"In fact, I think it will be the
biggest convention for many,
many years. There will be a lot
of excitement because of the
uncertainty created by the
Ingraham situation. Those who
turn up late won't get in."
If the FNM appears to be
falling short as a political force
at the moment, its place in
showbusiness seems assured.
Whether the convention proves
to be high drama or pure com-
edy remains to be seen.

What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmar-
quis@tribunemedia.net


e Tr un baeK s

The Tribune


AmericanAirlinesg


S ~ u n ______


__.____111_______1___~--__111__..._.~.~


PAGE 4C, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005


THE, TRIBUNE








THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY. OCTOBER 17, 2005, PAGE 5C


SGN 279


OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER AND

MINISTRY OF NATIONAL SECURITY




OFFICE OF THE PARLIAMENTARY


Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

ALBURY SAYLE PRIMARY SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate Other Names Occupation
Surname In Full


Place of
Residence


BELIZAIRE Michelene Teacher #62 Rupert Dean Lane

FISHER Donna Michelle Security Supervisor Barcardi Road

FORBES Clarice Patrice Teacher #13 Golden Way Dr. Carmichael Road

MCBRIDE Gayland Bank-r Monastary Park

MILLER Amanda Vivicor Teacher Hampdon Rd, Stapledon Gardens

ROLLE' Samuel Clarington Plumber Coral Harbour

WILLIAMS Janet Louise Hotel Room Constitution Drive
Attendant

Date: 5th October, 2005

Signed: Mary E. Mortimer
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner

Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
S FOR

C.W. SAWYER PRIMARY SCHOOL

NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.

Candidate Other Names Occupation Place of
Surname In Full Residence

CARTWRIGHT Loretta Patrice Office Clerk Coral Harbour, Nassau

GLINTON Fred Steven Contractor Yellow Elder Garden, Nassau

JOHNSON Janice Corine Police Officer Kool Acres, Nassau

PETERSON Denise Desarea Teacher Nassau Village
FARQUHARSON
SAUNDERS Willis Plumber Nassau Village

SIMMONS Daphne Juanita Teacher Fire Trail Road, Nassau
WILSON
SMITH Barry Baron Police Officer Yellow Elder Garden, Nassau

WILLIAMSON Conrad Willard Engineer Carmichael Estates, Nassau



Date: 5t October, 2005

Signed: Lorraine Lightboume
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner



Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR.

CARLTON E. FRANCIS PRIMARY SCHOOL

NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.

Candidate Other Names Occupation Place of
Surname In Full Residence


CURTIS Randolph Philip Manager Summer Haven, Nassau

ELLIS Garven Craig Administrator Garden Hills #2

HEADLEY Lynette Myrna Teacher Bahamas

HINSEY Arineta Eleanor Teacher Blue Hill Road

JOHNSON Garth Antonio Marine (RBDF) Holiday Drive, Nassau

KING-ROLLE Prenell Civil Servant South Beach, Nassau

MOXEY-SIMMS Grace Pequita Administrative Asst Coral Harbour

STRACHAN Debbie Sharlene Accountant Nassau

STUBBS Sheila Dianne Administrator South Beach, Nassau


.D:z:. 5th October, 2005

';?ined: Earl Smith
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner


Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

CARMICHAEL PRIMARY SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is. hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate
Surname


Other Names
In Full,


Occupation


Place of
Residence


AUMOTHE Linda Maria Teacher #101 Flamingo Gardens, Nassau

BRENNEN Dwayne Bellman Malcolm Raod, Nassau

ELLIOTT Anthea Marietta Computer Programmer Golden Gates #, Nassau

JOHNSON Petrona Mary Teacher Bel Air Estates, Nassau

MCDONALD James Accountant/Banker Golden Gates II, Nassau

ROLLE Archie Defence Force Officer Malcolm Road, Nassau

WILLIAMS Diane Bleneva Teacher Pinewood Garden, Nassau


Date: 5th October, 2005

Signed: Albert Clarke
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner



Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

............ ... CENTREVILLE PRIMARY SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT
Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY.
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.

Candidate Other Names Occupation Place of
Surname In Full Residence

DAXON Timothy Police Officer Carmichael Road, Nassau

FERGUSON Brian Kenrick Teacher #10 Weybridge Road, Nassau

MOSS Beulah Louise Carpenter McCollough Comer, Nassau

STRACHAN Carla C Clerk Providence Avenue, Nassau

WALKES Florence Elizabeth Janitress Sunlight Cottage, Nassau


Date: 5t' October, 2005

Signed: Audrey Farrington
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner





Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

CLARIDGE PRIMARY SCHOOL

NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate
Surname


Other Names
In Full


Occupation


Place of
Residence


BAKER Linda Dianne Human Resource Officer #17 Dawson Street, Nassau

CURRY David Edgar Computer Technician Butler Street, Nassau

HARRIS Audrey Marie Security Officer Nassau Village, Nassau

MARTIN Yienderia Shonell Teacher #37 Jackson Street, Nassau

MYCKLEWHYTE Jonathan Theodore Retiree #15 Bristol Street, Blair
Estate

ROLLE Joseph Retiree Claridge Dale, Nassau

ROLLE Ricardo Eden Educator #89 Windsor Lane, East St.

SMITH Nakita Mary Louise Administrative Asst. Churchill Drive, Nassau

TRACEY Kenneth Roland Contractor Danottage Estate, Nassau


Date: 5h' October, 2005

Signed: Angela Russell
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner


.. .. r .- .. ,...> ... .. .. .. .. ... .. .. ... ......... .. ... .... ... .. ................. ... -..- ..... ........... .. .. ..


~4~aB~







RAGE 6C, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


GOVERNMENT NOTICESI


Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

CLEVELAND ENEAS PRIMARY SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate
Surname


Other Names
In Full


Occupation


Place of
Residence


BETHELL Renardo Ventro Youth Director Nassau, Bahamas

DOTSON -ISAACS Jennifer Arlene Lecturer Shirley Street, Nassau

LOGAN Sidney Dwight Security Officer Eastwood Estate, Nassau.

MCFALL Martha Patricia Candie Insurance Broker Pinewood Garden, Nassau

MCKENZIE Genette Vanetta Accounts Clerk Windsor Place, Nassau

MOTT Tyrone Vincent Contractor Pinewood Garden, Nassau

MUNROE Maria Melsada Teacher Pinewood Garden, Nassau

SEYMOUR Lashan Nicola Administrative Yellow Elder Garden, Nassau
Assistant
WILLIAMS Marvin Kahlil Tile Layer Pinewood Garden, Nassau


Date: 5th October, 2005

Signed: Linda Moultrie Missick
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner








Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

COLUMBUS PRIMARY SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members ofthe above mentioned School Board.


Candidate Other Names iOccupation Place of
Surname InEillUM., Gl i'/ AO /,'.! '1 . O i". Residence

DEAN Audrey Gertrude Cle k Fire Trail Road, Nassau

EDWARDS Joseph Teacher Wilson Track, Nassau

FORBES Pamela Self-employed Fritz Lane, Nassau

FOX Sandra Althea Auditor Clifton Street, Nassau

GIBSON Livingston Teacher Pinewood Garden, Nassau

GOODRIDGE Donna Clerk Tucker Road, Big Pond, Nassau

JOHNSON Janice Teacher Johnson-Road, Fox Hill, Nassau

MCDONALD Annelle Administrative Assistant Nassau

TUCKER Joy Registered Nurse Margaret Avenue, Nassau


Date: 5"' October, 2005

Signed: Marcia Roberts
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner








Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election-

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

E. P. ROBERTS PRIMARY SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned, election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.

Candidate Other Names Occupation Place of
Surname In Full Residence

ADDERLEY Vestra Office Manager South Beach


Monioue


BUTLER Sidney Charles Security Officer Podoleo Street

CAPRON Enid Teacher Bernard Road

DARLING Dorinda Nadia Pre School Teacher Palm Beach St

JOHNSON Kara Teacher Gamble Heights

SIMPSON Flora Educator Fox Hill Road


RIGBY-HEILD Estella Denesi Cook

SMITHiI Da'nita Vaj:essaa n tory Clerk


Step Street, Fox Hill


Yellow Elder


Dale: uvr:ber, 2005


Signed: T. Milton Lewis
(.;;. Parliamentary Commissioner


Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

GARVIN TYNES PRIMARY SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate
Surname


Other Names
In Full


Occupation


Place of
Residence


BETHELL Shanequia Sharene Banker Nassau

CURRY Ronique Teacher Tropical Gardens, Nassau

FERGUSON Phalmon Alexander Minister of Religion East Avenue, Miller Heights

MCKINNEY Claudia Louise Security Officer Sunset Park, Nassau

THURSTON Lynn Patricia Teacher Carmichael Road, Nassau


Date: 5th October, 2005


Signed: Vanessa Coakley
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner

Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

GERALD CASH PRIMARY SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate
Surname


Other Names
In Full


Occupation


Place of
Residence


CAREY Charlotte Marie Teacher #6 Crescent Creek, Nassau
DAVIS
KNOWLES Ingrid Heather Shawn Teacher Soldier Road, Nassau

PILGRIM Elsie Marie Teacher Ibis Street, Nassau

ROLLE Doris Theresa Teacher Palm Breeze Raod, Nassau
RAMSEY
WALKER Cherisse Rosemary Seamstress #39 Flamingo Gardens,Nassau


-........ ........ -Date:-5 ctoberi 2005 . .

SSigned: Sylvia Stubbs
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner

Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

MABEL WALKER PRIMARY SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate Other Names Occupation Place of
Surname In Full Residence

CAPRON Florence Patrice Asst. House Keeper #175 Lakeview Road, Nassau

HORTON Susan Veronica Store Manager Caribbean Garden Close, Nassau

MORTIMER Lisa Teacher Nassau

SIMMONS Sandra Maria Sales Clerk Big Pond, Nassau

WALLACE Cynthia Maria Teacher Belshore Drive, Nassau

Date: 5th October, 2005

Signed: Willamae Bridgewate'
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner

Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

NAOMI BLATCH PRIMARY SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate
Surname


Other Names
In Full


Occupation


Place of
Residence


FRANCIS Carmeta Agnes Supervisor Hospital Lane, Nassau

GIBSON Yvette Veola Hair Braider Watlings Street, Nassau

KNOWLES Melony Florender Banker Pond Lake, Black Village, Nassau

MAJOR Gregory Alexander Store-Keeper Hospital Lane, Nassau

TAYLOR Tekenia Police Officer Big Pond, Nassau

Date: 5'h October, 2005


Signed: Shirley Barr
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner


I


, rri I I


I







THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005, PAGE 7C


G E E N I


Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

OAKES FIELD PRIMARY SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate
Surname


Other Names
In Full


Occupation


Place of
Residence


ARCHER Anastacia Senior Private Secretary Millennium Garden, Nassau

GOMEZ Subrenna Genevieve Director of Systems & Nassau
Programming
KEMP Valderine Sherry Teacher Coral Lakes, Nassau

KING Jennifer Camille Registered Nurse Nassau

KNOWLES Joan Erica Teacher Stapledon Garden, Nassau

KNOWLES Karen Monique Teacher Wrights Lane, Nassau

MAJOR Michael McDermott Croupier Carmichael Meadows, Nassau




Date: 5th October, 2005


Signed: Beryl Gray
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner

Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

PALMDALE PRIMARY SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate Other Names Occupation Place of
Surname In Full Residence

DELEVEAUX Rochelle Antionette Attorney-At-Law Seven Hills Estatee, Nassau

FRANCIS Sandra Mae Lease Sales/Marketing Rep. #7 Lancasta Road, Nassau

GREY Neville Steveson Engineer #1992 Pinewood Garden

GLINTON Kate Ann Claims Supervisor Elizabeth Estate

STRACHAN Eric Charles Sub. Leut. Defence Force Nassau
Officer


Date: 5h" October, 2005


Signed: Beccamae Stubbs
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner

Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

RIDGELAND PRIMARY SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate
Surname


Other Names
In Full


Occupation


Place of
Residence


CURTIS Katherine Homemaker #13 Bachelor's Buton, Garden Hill

GIBSON Ingrid Antionette Senior Clerk Cadia Street, Pinewood Garden

MALCOLM Kela Clerk Ridgeland Park West, Nassau

ROBERTS Daphne Teacher #2 Kiki Street, Nassau

ROLLE Dorothy Mae Teacher #21 Caster Street, Highland Park

SWEETING Andrea D Teacher Garden Hills #1, Nassau

TAYLOR Dorisse Salesperson Oxford Avenue, Nassau




Date: 51h October, 2005


Signed: Cleomi Burrows
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner

Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

SADIE CURTIS PRIMARY SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to se :,': as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate Other Names Occupation Place of
Surname In Full Residence

BAKER Linda Dianne Human Resource Officer Dannottage Estates, Nassau

BROWN Donna Mae Teacher Yamacraw Beach Estates


Candidate
Surname


SADIE CURTIS PRIMARY
Other Names Occupation
In Full


Place of
Residence


CHRISTIE Marc Anthony Manager Prince Charles Drive, Nassau

DEAN Sean Anthony Carlos Broadcaster Nassau

LARODA Alexander Livingston Police Officer Summer Haven Estates

MILLER Lennard, Alexander Asst. Director #27 St. Lucia Road, Golden
Environmental Health Gates
PATTON Practon Police Officer Pine Yard Road, Sea Breeze

*RITCHIE Troy Franklyn Educator Kennedy Sub-Division

TURNER Mildred Rowena Retiree Educator Garden Hills #3, Nassau



Date: 5h' October, 2005

Signed: Lillian E. Citlmer
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner

Vorm of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

SANDILANDS PRIMARY SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate Other Names Occupation Place o
Surname In Full Residence

COX Beauford, Holland Teacher Bernard Road, Nassau

DEMERITTE' Wendell Livingston Messenger Soldier Road, Nassau

LOCKHART Hazel Celestial Nurse Fox Hill Road, Nassau

MOULTRIE Dorothy Teacher Smith's Cove, Nassau

PINDER Sabrina Inez Church Administrator Pinedale, Nassau

PRATT Gwendolyn Louise Teacher Bernard Road, Nassau

WILLIAMS Yvonne Elizabeth Louise Retired Sugar Cane Lane, Nassau


Dale: 5th October, 2005


Signed: Norma Dean
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner

Form of Notice of Nomination in a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
.. .. ... . .. FO R . . .. ..

STEPHEN DILLET PRIMARY SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS': -.
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate Other Names Occupation ,Placeof
Surname In Full Residence


BURROWS Annamae Monique Teacher New Providence

COOPER Nathaniel Arthur Attorney New Providence

FARRINGTON Shirley Ann Teacher New Providence

JOHNSON Lydia Shantell Sales Clerk New Providence


Date: 51h October, 2005


Signed: Wenly Fowler
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner

Vorm ol Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS&
FOR


Cand
Surn


THELMA GIBSON PRIMARY SCHOOL

NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby givw-' that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.

didate Other Names Occupation Plece of
iame In Full Residence


BROWN Philip,
Livingstone


DAVIS


Vernita, Alberta


Field Mechanic


Teacher


Tangerine Terrace, Winton
Meadows


Sapodilla Boulevard, Pinewood
Gdn.


DORSETT Barbara Laveme Teacher Soldier Road, Nassau

GIBSON JudymaeD. Manager Pine Yard Road

RIGBY Eulerpie Louise Teacher Nassau

ROLLE Ricardo Businessman/Selfcmployed Prince Charles Dr.

WILLIAMS Karalee Louise Sales Representative #15 ScabreezeLane, Nassau

WRIGHT Tealeh Yamique Beautician Sandilands Village, Nassau

YORKE Carolyn Marilyn Clerk Sir Lynden Pindling Estates,
Nassau


Date: 5'h October, 2005.

Signed: Shedrach Johnson
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner


---------------------------- -


----------- ----------------- ----







PAGE 8C, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005


THE TRIUNE


Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

T. G. GLOVER PRIMARY SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate
Surname


Other Names
In Full


Occupation


Place of
Residence


BETHEL Margaret Ernestine Self-employed Ferguson Street, Nassau

BAIN Rozena Mae Teacher Kenilworth Street West,
BULLARD
CUNNINGHAM Lucy Georgianna Teacher Price Street, Nassau

LAFRENIER Carl Pastor Millennium Garden, Nassau

MCQUEEN Marvin cARLOS Security Officer Polhemus Garden, Nassau

RUTHERFORD Avinel Deneda Teacher Johnson Terrace, Nassau

SMITH Jane Annie Teacher #76 Leeds Road, Nassau


Date: 5h October, 2005

Signed: Cassandra Forbes
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner
Form of Notice of Nomination in a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

URIAH MCPHEE PRIMARY SCHOOL

NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate Other Names Occupation Place of
Surname In Full Residence

BENSON Delerise Tula Filing Assistant Mason's Addition

BURNSIDE Lydia Maria Janitress C, x Street, Fox Hill

BUTLER Gregory William Deputy Director of 8 Terrace, Centreville
Youth
MILLS-PFRASER Murriel Bernadette Legal Administrative #32 Faith Garden Sub.
Assistant
MUNROE Peter Anthony A Jr Messenger Sir Lynden Pindling Estate

MUNROE Richard Herman Businessman Crabapple Drive

MURPHY Sharita Laura Assistant Underwriter #18 India Drive, Flamingo
Gardens
ROBERTS Jaqueline Elizabeth Teacher Bel Air :

WILLIAMS Jevone Dwayne Guidance Counsellor Yamacraw Road


Date: 5* October, 2005

Signed: Thelma Dean
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner

Form ol Notice ot Nominationi in a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

WOODCOCK PRIMARY SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate Other Names Occupation h Plaef
Surname in Full Residence

BAIN-BROWN Mary Olivia Senior Clerk #5 Edward Avenue

COLEBY Deborah Ivelean Teacher Bay Lily Drive

MCCOY Vanessa Renea Teacher #3 Arawak Avenue

MORLEY Louis Gene Manager Shirley's Courte

NOTTAGE Chanaki Barbara N. Customer Service Sherwood Drive

THOMPSON-JOHNSON Tereka Lanett Supervisor Toote Shop Comer

Date:,5k October, 2005

Signed: Deborah Stuart
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner

Form of Notice of Nomination in a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

YELLOW ELDER PRIMARY SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby give.. that the candidates named below being.the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidnie Other Nunes Occupation Place o
SERlinme lJF a Residenceasa
ANDERSON Arlene Fymicia i-toiclier Marathon Estates, Nassau


Candidate
Sursame


YELLOW ELDER PRIMARY SCHOOL


Other Names
InDll


Occupation


Place of
Residence1


BURROWS' Setesa De-Lotoya Bank Teller Malcolm Road, Nassau /
/.
CONLIFFE Aoycetina Health Aide Domingo Heights, Nassau

HEASTIE Arnold Roland Vincent Businessman Blue Hill Road, Nassau

MUNROE Oscar Theodore Teacher Faith Avenue, Nassau

PAUL Lyden Oral Tour & Taxi Operator Oxford Avenue, Nassau

ROLLE Edith Teacher Sapodialla Boulevard, Nassau

TURNER Michael Pastry Chef Rosewood Street, Nassau

WOODSIDE Bernadette Olive Dispatcher Exuma Street, Nassau
ROLLE


Date: 5' October, 2005

Signed: Catherine McPhee
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner

Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

A. F. ADDERLEY JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.

Candidate Other Names Occupation Place of
Surname IFull Residence

DIXON Omelia Janitress Cottonwood St. Pinewood Gdn

FORBES-HANNA Brendalee Chief Clerk Ridgeland Park East, Nassau

KEMP Noel Emmanuel Police officer Baillou Hill Road South

LAING Tyrone Minister of the Gospel Millennium Garden, Nassau

MCQUAY Persephone Grace E. Teacher Berry Avenue, Nassau

ROMER Virginia Alicia B. Guidance Counselor Domingo Heights East, Nassau--

STRACHAN Patricia Teacher- Nassau, Bahamas

SULLIVAN Vincent Horatio Teacher Stapledon Gardens, Nassau.


Date: 5" October, 2005

Signed: Drexwill Miller
(for) Parliamentary Commisijoner

Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Etection

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

C. C. SWEETING JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION-OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.

Candidate Other Names Occupation Place of
Surname In Full Residence

BARTON Marlene Marie Banker #32 Belair Estate, Nassau

BURROWS Archelaus Retiree #45 St.Vincent Road, Nassau

CARTWRIGHT Angela Rose Teacher Williams Lane, Nassau

DELANCY Frederick Police Officer Coral Harbour, Nassau

JOHNSON Helen Public Servant #25 Garden View Estates

MCFORD William Teacher Millennium Garden, Nassau

ROLLE Dwight Road Traffic Inspector Millennium Garden, Nassau

TUCKER, Michael Beran Chief Clerk Margaret Avenue, Miller Heights

WALLACE- Sonja Guidance Counselor The Grove, West Bay Street
WHITFIELD


Date: 5* October, 2005

Signed: Angela R. Rolle
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner
Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

C. H. REEVES JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate
Surname


Other Names
In Full


HAMILTON Sharon


Occupation


Housewife


Place of
Residence


Wintotr Meadows, Nassau


JOHNSON Collin Teacher Bullen Terrace, Nassau

JOHNSON Stephanie Clarice Self-employed Jennie Street, Nassau

MORTIMER Craig Training Officer Nassaui Bahamas

PENNERMAN Paul : Contractor ;i Hihista, Nassau


G()VF RNNMF NT NOTICES-


"







THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005, PAGE 9C


GOVERNMENT. .....S


C. H. REEVES JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL


Candidate
Surname


Other Names
In Full


Occupation


Place of
Residence


STUBBS Joe Willard Interior Decorator Sunrise Road, Nassau

SUMNER Naomi P. Secretary Coral Heights, East

TINKER Edgburt Printer #28, Windsor Place, Nassau


Date: 5"' October, 2005


Signed: Pauline Adderley
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner

Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

D. W. DAVIS JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL,

NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION.OF RESULT
Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School BoeL-d.

Candidate Other Names Occupation Place of
Surname In Full Residence

BURROWS Owen Augustus Salesman Sapphire Ridge, San Souci
FERGUSON Ricardo Senior Master Kennedy Subdivision, Nassau

SMITH-HANNA Raina Teacher Step Street, Fox Hill

HIGGINS Dwayne L. Teacher #16b mermaid Blvd west

JOHNSON Priscilla Teacher Nassau
Eugenia
NAIRN Andra Vincent Teacher Sutton Street, Nassau

RAHMING Kim Guidance.Counselor Royal Valley Subdivision

SEARS Ivan Kent Heavy Equipment Yamacraw Beach Estate
Operator
SMITH Shantel Sarah Guidance Counselor Nassau

-.--- -. .... Date: 5h October, 2005


Signed: Abraham Stubbs
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner

Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Ejection
ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

H. 0. NASH JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

NOTICE OFNOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is Rereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates-standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate
Surname


Other Names
In Full


Occupation


Place of
Residence


ALLEN Jacqueline D Teacher OffMarshall Road

BLYDEN Louise Sylvia Elaine Accounts Receivables #42 Baldwin Avenue
Supervisor
BULLARD William Marcus Business Executive #23 Sunset Drive, Nassau

CLARKE Deidre T. Teacher Cable Beach, Nassau

KING Arlington Teacher #13 Oxford Drive, South Beach

GIBSON- Sherel Gibson Teacher Golden Isles, Nassau
TURNQUEST

Date: 5"h October, 2005

Signed: Franklin Lightboume
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner

Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

L. W. YOUNG JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS.
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby, given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected-to-serve-as-members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate
Surname


Other Names
In Full


Occupation


Place of
Residence


BROWN Jacqueline Nail Technician Kool Air Drive, Nassau

CARGILL Ava Banker New Providence

ELDON Kimberley M. Sales Representative #55 East Par, Nassau

JOHNSON Kevin Joseph Hotelier Nassau, Bahamas

KEMP Dwayne Bank Branch Manager #15 Lawson Street, Nassau

PRATT Bastien Computer Consultant #68 Woodland Way, Nassau

SAMUELS Cheryl Caroline M. Teacher/Educator Hampton St, Imperial Park

WISDOM Evon Ricardo Teacher- Nassau, Bahamas


Date: 51h October, 2005


Signed: Telford Munnings
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner


Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR


S. C. MCPHERSON JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
(AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned Schdol Board.


Place of
Residence


BETHEL Marvin Lorenzo Self-employed #97 Flamingo Gardens, Nassau

BOWE Patrice Lavrette Assistant Accountant McKinney Drive, Carmichael Road
15D AVKTT1J D -I 'T-;-


BRAYNEN Raquel Narize


Self-employed


#7 Opal Drive, Emerald Gardens


DAMIANOS Basil Jefford Foreman, B.E.C. Grosham Close, Belair, Nassau

HART Florence Anita Manageress Kennedy Subdivision, Nassau

HEILD Nehemiah Ishmael Entertainer Flamingo Gardens, Nassau

LONGLEY Gladys Loretta Teacher Bamboo Blvd., South Beach, Nassau

POITIER Lee Anora Teacher Fire Trail Road, Nassau

WILLIAMS Anthia Nicola Teacher Golden Gates #2, Nassau


Date: 5"' October, 2005


Signed: Antionette Storr
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner

Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

C. C. SWEETING SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT
Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate
Surname


Other Names
In Full


Occupation


Place of
Residence


DEMERITTE Terry Valarie Broker/Realtor Nassau

FOWLER Patricia Teacher Faith Avenue, Nassau

ROLLE Caroline M Teacher Tropical Gardens, Nassau
SANDS Lavaughn Patrice Educator Nassau
i__________Nassau___


ItETH


SeniorsMaSt~ar


Hillside Estat;Nassau


'PARRIS-UBANI Marjorie Janee -Guidance Counsellor Queens Road, Nassau

WILCHOMBE Edith Olga Teacher Nassau

WILLIAMS. Inell Elizabeth Retiree Nassau

WOOD Judy Yvonne Teacher #28 Jack Fish Drive, Nassau

Date: 5"' October, 2005

Signed: Delores Ingraham
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner

Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR
C. I. GIBSON SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND-
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.

Candidate Other Names Occupation Place of
Surname In Full Residence

BAIN-CURTIS Dorothy Diana Teacher Coral Harbour

COOPER Joseph Gordon Safety Engineer Fox Hill

HANNA Charmaine Jacinta Teacher Millers Height

JOHNSON Kevin Luther Teacher Kool Acres

PALACIOUS Deidre Patrice Front Desk Agent Nassau, Bahamas

RPRATT Annette Yvonne Teacher Grace Avenue, Marathon Estates

'SMITH Kayla Veronica Self-employed Blue Berry Hills, Fox Hill

WHYMMS Mavis Francina Legal Asistant Garden Hills
Date: 5h October, 2005

Signed: Lillian Hall
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner

Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

C. R. WALKER SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.

Candidate Other Names Occupation Place of
Surname In Full Residence

ARTHUR Samuel Jr Mechanic Bel Air Estatest

BARNWELL Juliette Juanita Retired Hospital Lane


Candidate Other Names
Surname In Full


Occupation


I


I







PAGE 10C, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


THE TRIBUNE


Place of
Residence


CARTWRIGHT Michael Superintendent Village Road

CHIPMAN Reece Dean Accountant Cable Beach Manor

HALL-CAMPBELL Virginia E. Executive officer Lake View Drive

HAMILTON Sonia Events Planner Sea Breeze Drive

MILLER Jerome Harris Stylist Artist Yamacraw Beach Ests.

PEET Cyril Ira Insurance Broker 36 Retirement Road

THEOPHILUS Ludell Elfreda Consultant/Lecturer Theophilus Close, Oakes Field

Date: 5 October,2005

Signed: Julian Anderson
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner

Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR
C. V. BETHEL SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.

Candidate Other Names Occupation Place of
Surname In Full Residence

BRAYNEN Nelson Chauffeur Zinnia St. Kennedy Subdivision

COLEBY Alcott Gary Aviation Manager Windwood Isles Road, G. G. R

DORMEUS Exanna National Youth Officer Pinewood Drive

MURPHY Charles Chief Inspection HMP Hopkins Drive, Coral Harbour

NOTTAGE Carl Teacher Infant View Rd, Chippingham

ROLLE/ADDERLEY Bloneva Patricia Teacher #8 Honesty Road

PEARSON Rhinehart Retired #10 Buttonwood Drive, Seabreeze

ROLLE/ADDERLEY Bloneva Patricia Teacher #8 Honesty Road

SKIPPINGS Yvonne. Supervisor NIB Blue Bonnet & Marigold, South
Beach
STRACHAN Paulette Housewife Talbot Road, Nassau Village

Date: 5 October, 2005

Signed: Eulease Beneby
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner

Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

DORIS JOHNSON SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate Other Names Occupation Place of
Surname In Full Residence

GLINTON Edna Darlene Teacher Garden Close, Garden View

MAJOR Andrew M. Teacher Wilson Track, Englerston

McCOY Harcourt Terrell Teacher Seabreeze, Estate

MILLER Janet Marie Filing Assistant Foxdale, Subdivision

MINNIS Carol D. Guidance Counsellor Danottage Estate

SAUNDERS Byron Teacher Prince Charles Drive

SMALL Byron S. Senior Master #3 Greenway Drive

STRACHAN Samuel L. Technical Systems East Park Estates, Nassau
Administrator
Date: 5th October, 2005


Signed: Geoffrey McPhee
(fur) Parliamentary Commissioner
Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

GOVERNMENT HIGH SCHOOL
NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate Other Names Occupation Place of
Surname In Full Residence

ADDERLEY Jacob Circulation Distributor, Nassau Yellow Elder Garden
Guardian
ARMBRISTER Angelius Philip Acting Director, Testing Services Eastern Road, Nassau
(C.O.B.)
FRANCIS Wendell Businessman Belair Estate, Nassau

HAMILTON Annamae .Senior Secretary Garden Hills, Nassau


HORTON Francina Accountant South Beach, Nassau

JACKSON Rhoda First Assistant Secretary, Foreign Oakes Field, Nassau
Affairs
LOCKHART- Sophia Tania Store Manager Millennium Garden,
MINUS Nassau
MORTIMER Julliann Taxi Driver Sunset Park

SMALL Annishka Sales Consultant Miami Street, Nassau


Date: 5h October, 2005
Signed: Lnda Major
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner


GOERMETNO-IE


Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR -.

R. M. BAILEY SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Other Names
In Full


Occupation


Candidate
- Surname


Place of
Residence


CUNNINOHAM Perry R. Educator Imperial Park, Nassau

FOX Sandra Auditor Clifton Street, Nassau

FRAZER Nelrose Draftsman Park Forest, Carmichael Rd.

HEPBURN Cynthia Secretary Cox Way East Street

NEWBOLD Inderia L. Student Soldier Rd.

ROLLE Brian K. Contractor #104 Minnie Street

SANDS Janet Sharon Senior Clerk Colony Village

SOLOMON Hilton E. Supervisor Gleniston Gardens

TAYLOR Gregory H. Clergyman Palmetto Village
Date: 5*1 October, 2005

Signed: Dressler Sherman
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner
Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

FREEPORT PRIMARY SCHOOL

NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.'


Candidate
Surname


Other Names
In Full


Occupation


Place of
Residence


BARNETT Ivan Warehouse Assistant #23 Pearl Avenue, G.B.

FORBES Dorene Domestic Engineer #15 Beachway Drive, G.B.

ROBERTS Roy Thaddeus Teacher #562 Jamaica Avenue, G.B.

Date: 5" October, 2005


Signed: Colotha Mortimer
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner

Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

HUGH W. CAMPBELL PRIMARY SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.
Candidate Other Names Occupation Place of
Surname In Full Residence

BAIN Francis John Retired #14 Increase Way, Freeport

CULMER Berthlyn Welfare Officer #105 BeringLane ,Freeport

GARLAND Alicia Ann Educator Freeport, Grand Bahama

LEARY Moriique Elizabeth Office Manager #42 Coral Reef Estates, Freeport

OUTTEN Elrod Sales Manager #5 Victoria Avenue, Freeport

ROBERTS nell Lauretta Office Clerk Freeport, Grand Bahama

ROLLE Annie Estella Teacher Freeport, Grand Bahama

SMITH Pleasant Dantie Registry Clerk #11 Breamer Circle, Freeport


Date: 5s" October, 2005
Signed: Betty McCartney
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner

Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

MARTIN 'TOWN PRIMARY SCHOOL

NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the
only candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE
HEREBY DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above
mentioned School Board.

Candidate Other Names Occupation Place
Surname In Full Residence

ARCHER Vanda Unemployed Jones Town, Eight Mile Rock

BECKLES Annie J Director of Administrative #22 Robert Maynard Drive, Freepc
Services
COX Eunice L Chef Seagrape, Eight Mile Rock

JONES David McDonald Taxi Driver #70 Pine Forest, Eight Mile Rock

JONES Uta Pollyanna Cook Matin Hill, Eight Mile Rock

SEYMOUR Nacy Patronella Janitress Jones Town, Eight Mile Rock

WILLIAMS Mahalia Yokie Administrative Asst. Martin Town, Eight Mile Rock


Date: 5h October, 2002


Signed: Victoria Wright
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner


Candidate
Surname


CRWALKER SENIOR H L


Other Names
In Full


Occupation


S.X% %-LAXN-CIA% IAAWX% __


u











THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005, PAGE 11C


G -M O


Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

LEWIS YARD PRIMARY SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate Other Names Occupation Place of
Surname In Full Residence

ARMBRISTER Sandra Suzanne Teacher #164 Pigeon Plum Close, G.B.

FARRINGTON Judith Angella Teacher Lewis Yard, G.B.

FORBES Walton Senior Porter Lewis Yard, G.B.
Emmanuel
MARSHALL Aretha Justina Domestic #251 Melbourne Crest, G.B.
Engineer
MCINTOSH Barbara Ann Waitress Lewis Yard, G.B.


Date: 5"' October, 2005


Signed: Rodney Smith
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner


Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

EIGHT MILE ROCK HIGH SCHOOL

NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing.nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate
Surname


Other Names
In Full


Occupation


Place of
Residence


CAPRON Teresa Monike Unemployed #53 Tudor Gardens, Albacore Dr

DEAN Dyan Self employed Martin Town, Eight Mile Rock

GLINTON Jonathan Bradley Contractor Holmes Rock, Grand Bahama

BLACK-MUNNINGS Deloris Janitress Eight Mile Rock







Date: S't October, 2005


Signed: Sandra Edgecombe
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner


Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

JACK HAYWARD HIGH SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate Other Names Occupation Place of
Surname In Full Residence

BARNETT Ivan Warehouse Assistant #23 Pearl Avenue, G.B.

BARR Keith Warren Vice Principal Albacore Drive, G.B.

COOPER Helena a ndrea Administrative Assistant Mather Town, G.B.

KNOWLES Kenneth Anthony Store Manager #18 Clerkenwell Place, G.B.



Date: 51' October, 2005


Signed: Benjamin Stubbs
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner



Form of Notice of Nomination In a Uncontested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

ST. GEORGES HIGH SCHOOL


NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
DECLARATION OF RESULT

Notice is hereby given that the candidates named below being the only
candidates standing nominated in the above mentioned election, ARE HEREBY
DECLARED elected to serve as members of the above mentioned School Board.


Candidate Other Names Occupation Place of
Surname In Full Residence

ALBURY Melvina Case Aide #22 Newton Circle, G.B.

FOWLER Patrice Indianna Seamstress #148 Ponce De Leon, G.B.

KNOWLES Leevan Augustus Teacher Freeport, G.B.

RUSSELL Ricardo Anton Educator #6 Yellow Pine Street, G.B.

SAUNDERS Kenneth Rodger II Technician #20 Amunsden Lane. G.B.


ST. GEORGES HIGH SCHOOL


Candidate Other Names
Surname In Full


Occupation


Place of
Residence


SMITH Cornelius Alvin Air Traffic Controller #7 Seahorse Lane, G.B.

SMITH Sylvia Vanria Teacher #212 Rutherford Close, G.B.

Date: 5" October, 2005


Signed: Kenneth Romer
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner

Form of Notice of Nomination In A Contested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

BARLETT HILL PRIMARY SCHOOL

NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND,
NOTICE OF POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that the candidates named below stand nominated in the
above mentioned election and NOTICE is hereby given that the Poll will take place on
Tuesday the 25th day of October, 2005, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. at
the above named School.

Candidate Other Names Occupation Place of
Surname In Full Residence

GARLAND Patricia Janitress Pine Forest Estate

HARVEY Gretel May Teacher Bartlett Hill

PENNINGTON Wilhemena Janitress Bootle Bay

RAHMING-FERGUSON Natasha Sabrina Beautician Hepburn Town

ROLLE Charles Sylvester Contractor Hepburn Town

ROLLE Ella Pauline Housewife Hepburn Town

SIMMONS Eleanor Secretary Hanna Hill

SMITH Clarence School Security Eight Mile Rock


orTT DO


Natasha Moni ue Cashier


Pine Forest Estate


Date: 5th October, 2005

Signed: E. Patson Neely
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner

Form of Notice of Nomination In A Contested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR


MAURICE MOORE PRIMARY SCHOOL

NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND
NOTICE OF POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that the candidates named below stand nominated in the
above mentioned election and NOTICE is hereby given that the Poll will take place on
Tuesday the 25th day of October, 2005, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. at
the above named School.

Candidate Other Names Occupation Place of
Surname. In F l Residence


ALLEN Matthew Keith Pastor South Bahamia, G.B.

BURROWS Anne Renee Teacher #14 Tennents Road, G.B.

COX-STRACHAN Debra M. Social Worker Grand Bahama

EDGECOMBE Keshi Lavanka Senior Mistress #7 Florin Drive, G.B.

ELLIS Tammy Lee Teacher 13 Cutlass Ave, Freeport

HIELD Daleina S. Janitress #5 Faith Avenue, G.B.

INGRAHAM Allan Electronic Engineer #21 Sandpiper Place, G.B.

MISSICK Verona Bernadine 'Teacher 24 Samoa Drive, Freeport

PRATT Evelyn Janitress #1 Gambier Drive, G.B.

Date: 5th October, 2005


Signed: Sheila Scavella
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner

Form of Notice of Nomination In A Contested Election

ELECTION OF SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
FOR

WALTER P. PARKER PRIMARY SCHOOL

NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS
AND'
NOTICE OF POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that the candidates named below stand nominated in the
above mentioned election and NOTICE is hereby given that the Poll will take place on
Tuesday the 25'h day of October, 2005, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. at
the above named School.
Candidate Other Names Occupation Place of
Surname In Full Residence

BAIN Rose, Mari Seamstress Freeport, Grand Bahama

'BARNETT Wycliffe Emmanuel Barber Freeport, Grand Bahama

GARVEY April Business Woman Freeport, Grand Bahama

GREENE Paulette Minerva Teacher Freeport, Grand Bahama

HART Raquel Maureen Sales Executive Freeport, Grand Bahama

MARTINBOROUGH Warren Nehemiah Sr. V/P Global United Ltd. Freeport, Grand Bahama

MCPHEE Harold Daniel Terminal Operator Freeport, Grand Bahama

MORRIS Shirley Mae Police Reserve Officer/ Freeport, Grand Bahama
Taxi Driver

PINDER Godfrey Tyrone Assistant Supervisor Freeport, Grand Bahama

ROBERTS Kenneth Genrett Teacher Freeport, Grand Bahama

THOMPSON Stephanie Anquinette Banker Freeport, Grand Bahama

WILLIAMS Marcia Lynn Teacher Freeport, Grand Bahama

YOUNG Clayton Eugene Plumber #91 Coral Reef Estates


Date: 5" October, 2005


Signed: Barbara Thompson
(for) Parliamentary Commissioner


sT0N q1U --AL- .-A-


t






THE TRIBUNf


PAGE 12C, MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2005


COMICS PAGE


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ISSUES IDEAS


PRO & CON


WHAT DOES LATIN AMERICA GAIN WITH FREE TRADE?


BY MARK WEISBROT
weisbrot@cepr.net

T he winds of political and economic
change are reaching severe storm lev-
els in Latin America, and it's not difficult to
see why: The region has suffered a 25-year
economic failure, unprecedented in its
modem history.
At a recent conference in Bogota, Jos6
Serra the mayor of Brazil's mega-city of
Sao Paulo argued that "the Washington
Consensus" had failed in Latin America,
and that a new economic model
needed to be created.
Serra served as-health minister
in the previous (centrist) Brazilian
government and is currently poll-
ing close to President Luiz Inicio
Lula da Silva for the 2006 election.
He pointed out that Brazil in the
1960s and '70s had one of the fast- WEISBRi
est-growing economies in the world. Since
1980, Brazil's income per person has grown
by less than one-half percent annually.
Serra is right. Brazil would have Euro-
pean living standards today if its economy
had continued to grow as it did prior to
1980. The story is similar for Mexico, which
- doubled its income per person from 1960 to
1980 but has seen lackluster growth since
then.
For the region as a whole, growth in GDP
(or income) per person the most basic
measure of economic Success or failure -
was about 80 percent from 1960 to 1979, but
only 11 percent for the 1980-1999 period and
a mere 3 percent for 2000-2004.
Higher interest rates
There is no way to hide a. collapse like
this. A generation and a half has lost out on
a chance to improve their living standards.
The failure occurred during a period in
which Latin American governments
adopted a number of economic reforms that
were supposed to promote economic
growth. These reforms were strongly
advocated by the United States, as well
as Washington-dominated institutions
such as the IMF and World Bank, some-
times with considerable economic and
political pressure.
Trade was liberalized, and average
tariffs cut by half since the
'70s. Restrictions on interna-
tiorial investment flows were
abolished or drastically
reduced in most countries. In
the 1990s alone, more than
$178 billion of state-owned
industries were priva-
tized more than 20
times the value of privati-
zation in Russia after the
collapse of the Soviet Union.
Governments also adopted
higher interest rates and tighter
fiscal policies. The short-term
interest rate set by Brazil's
central bank is currently at
19.5 percent, as compared
with 3.75 percent in
the United States. The result-
ing
long-term failure has produced a pop-
ular and electoral backlash against the


reforms, which are often labeled "neoliber-
alism" in Latin America.
In the last seven years, left-populist can-
didates running against "neoliberal" poli-
cies have taken the presidency in Argentina,
Brazil, Ecuador, Uruguay and Venezuela.
Bolivia is possibly next. And in Mexico, for-
mer Mexico City Mayor Andr6s Manuel
L6pez Obrador of the left opposition Demo-
cratic Revolutionary Party, whio has
denounced "25 years of economic failure" in.
Mexico, is in the lead for next year's presi-
dential election.
The electoral revolt has already
produced some positive results.
Argentina, after engaging in the
largest sovereign debt default ever,
rejected the IMF's economic pre-
scriptions,' took a hard line with
foreign creditors, and without
any outside assistance has
T grown by about 9 percent annually
for the last two and a half years.
Venezuela's government has kept its
promise to share the country's oil wealth
with its poor majority, providing. free
healthcare, subsidized food and much
improved access to education and literacy
.programs.
For its part, Washington has yet to
accept the new reality. Given the impor-
tance of Florida-based Cuban Americans in
our national elections, it is politically more
convenient here to blame Venezuelan Presi-
dent Hugo Chavez or even Fidel Castro
for the growing political and social
unrest in the region. But these revolts are
very much home-grown and the predictable
result of a prolonged, failed economic
experiment.
Mark Weisbrot is co-direc- f


Economic freedom


democracy, prosperity


A


BY MARIO DIAZ-BALART
www.house.gov/mariodiaz-balart.

O nce a region of despots, Latin Amer-
ica is now predominantly made up of
burgeoning democracies, and the primary
U.S.-backed economic reform in helping
these young democracies stabilize and
develop their economic promise is free
trade.
In 1974, 10 of the then-23 members of
the Organization of American States had
democratically elected governments,
whereas today all 34 member
states have democratic, constitu-
tional governments.
Furthermore, according to the
2005 Index of Economic Freedom
jointly published by The Heritage
Foundation and The Wall Street
Journal, 20 of the 26 Latin Ameri-
can and Caribbean nations have DIAZ-BAI
improved their economic-freedom scores
since 1995.
President Bush wisely made passing the
Central American Free Trade Agreement
(CAFTA-DR) a major legislative priority
because he understands that free trade is
key to the futures of both the United
States and Latin America.
"As CAFTA helps create jobs and
opportunity in the United States," Bush
said when signing CAFTA into law, "it will
help the democracies of Central America
and the Dominican Republic deliver a bet-
ter life for their citizens."
By passing CAFTA-DR, we immedi-
ately eliminated tariffs on nearly 80 per-
cent of U.S. products shipped to those
nations, which will make it easier for U.S.
goods to be purchased and increase sales.
But the long-term value and geo-
political significance of this
trade 'agreement far out-
weighs the short-term eco-
nomic boost.
Stable economies
allow countries and
the hemisphere as a
whole to become more
peaceful,. democratic
and prosperous. Trade
agreements such as
CAFTA-DR will do
more to raise working
standards, reduce pov-
erty, discourage illegal
immigration and pro-
vide economic oppor-
tunities than anything
we could accomplish
by simply providing
foreign assistance.
intent on heavilyv
increasing its. invest-
ment and .trade in
Latin America. Mean-
whilej tyrants in the
region namely
Cuba's Fidel Castro and
Venezuela's Hugo Chavez
-- are actively trying to
incite socialist shifts and under-
cut young democracies.
According to a recent Herald arti-
cle, China's trade with Latin America dur-


ing the past five years "has grown at an
annual rate of 42 percent, reaching
nearly $22 billion last year," and "more
than half of China's foreign investments
have been directed at Latin America to
acquire natural resources."
With subversive intentions, Cuba
sends doctors to other nations even
while leaving many Cubans without
access to decent healthcare. ChAvez
uses his strongman grip on Venezuela's
oil supply to peddle influence in neigh-
boring countries, even going so far as to
fund Colombian rebels.
It is in our nation's eco-
nomic and national-security
interests that we confront these
anti-democracy forces. Clearly,
the United States needs to con-
tinue providing foreign assis-
tance to Latin American coun-
LART tries.
This year, the United States is pro-
viding an estimated $1.8 billion of for-
eign assistance to Latin America and
the Caribbean. Aid programs cover a
variety of issues including counter-nar-
cotics, poverty reduction and economic
growth. Yet, as important and benefi-
cial as these programs can be, much
more important to the future of Latin
America and to the United States -
is free trade throughout the hemi-
sphere.

Free trade strengthens US.
ties throughout the region
instead of ceding political
influence to China and others
opposed to democracy.

Free trade enables free Latin Ameri-
can nations to develop strong eco-
nomic infrastructures and improve
economic stability and prosperity.
This strengthens U.S. ties throughout
the region instead of ceding political
influence to China and others opposed
to democratic government and eco-
nomic freedom.
Furthermore, by binding our econo-
mies through trade, we make it in
those nations' self-interests to fight
corruption, crime, drug traffickers and
terrorists.
Wherdas foreign assistance is skin
deep, free trade with free democracies
works from deep within to make key
strides toward a prosperous and
peaceful tomorrow.
After all, free and healthy econo-
mies foster peaceful, democratic soci-
eties.
U.S.-backed economic reforms are
working, but we cannot forget about
our neighbors. As these young democ-
racies continue to grow and prosper,
they will continue to be among our
strongest allies.
U.S. Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart, R-Fla.,
is a member of the House Budget Com-
mittee.
*


THE MILITARY

Prophetic words: Armies
J' :.':^ ". "^ ^ ':: F\11 1; *, ^ 11 : ^:. / '


are easily brokeli

BY JOSEPH L. GALLOWAY
jgalloway@krwashington.com
( ^ rmies are fragile institutions and, for
all their might, easily broken."
'A Remember those words? They
were published in my Sept. 28, 2003, column
in this newspaper. I laid out the recipe for
how to break a magnificent Arpay that had
taken nearly two decades to rebuild itself in
the wake of the Vietnam debacle.
In that early fall two years ago, Defense
Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld was still run-
ning victory laps and the words of his boss,
President Bush, were still ringing: "Bring 'em
on!"
Sadly, those two were, and still are, in
charge.
Now they've broken the Army, and after
this administration is history, it will take 12
or 15 or 20 years to repair the damage it's
inflicted on an institution that our country
desperately needs in a century as dangerous
as this one.
Both political parties, though, have failed
the American voter by offering up candi-


dates for high office who, I L3_I
in simpler times, would GALLOWAY
barely have qualified for tar and feathers and
rides out of town.
How can I say this about the Army when
just a week ago, at the Association of the U.S.
Army convention, Secretary of the Army
Francis J. Harvey and a veritable galaxy of
stars were declaring, under orders, that
everything in the Army was just line; better
than good; never better.
I say this because we don't jump when
Rumsfeld yells frog, an' I look at the evi-
dence that accumulates day by day. I hear
this from other generals, active and retired:
The U.S. Army is utterly broken and in need
of immediate repair.
It's not just recruitment, although that's
bad enough this year and looks as if it will be
a great deal worse in fiscal 2006. The Army
fell more than 7,000 bodies short of recruit-
ing the number of soldiers it needs this year.
Some say that shortfall will become 15,000 or
*TURN TO GALLOWAY


DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

Successes have been

wrought 'against all odds'


BY MARIFELI PEREZ-STABLE
marifeli@starpower.net

t is the oldest among the democracies
that emerged in Latin America after
1978. During the 1990s, it had one 'of the
region's fastest-growing economies. More
than 70 percent of its people rank democ-
racy as the best form of government. Yes,
that's the Dominican Republic.
By fits and starts, Dominicans have com-
piled an unheralded success story in an
inauspicious context. We are, after all, talk-
ing about a country that suffered the scourge
of Rafael Leonidas Trujillo (1930-1961) and
then lived under the tutelage or the shadow
of Joaquin Balaguer (1961-2002). In 1978, the
Dominican Republic's first ever peaceful
transfer of power finally took place.
What is the Dominican balance sheet?
In the plus column:
Upon assuming power, the Dominican
Revolutionary Party (PRD) secured civil lib-
erties and a climate of freedom. After voters


returned him to the presi-
dency in 1986, Balaguer his record of
repression notwithstanding did not
rescind the PRD's gains which have
remained a fixture.
In response to electoral fraud in 1990
and 1994, civil society mobilized and played
an important part in ensuring free and fair
elections in 1996 and thereafter. Voter turn-
out is consistently high.
Political parties are strong and
strongly rooted in the citizenry.
In the minus column:
Corruption has been a blight on every
administration since 1978. Long after Trujillo
and Balaguer's last presidency (1994-1996),
Dominican politics remains suffused by an
officeholder culture of self-entitlement and
patronage.
Even in the face of a rapidly expanding
economy, social deficits have continued to
accumulate.
*TURN TO PEREZ-STABLE


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16,2005 I THE MIAMI HERALD


C


13C


Economic failure,


stagnation, social unrest


1911ICC-9arsp"~lllIllllsDBslPlslllss~B


............................


; _~


III '' _I ~scleu~a~ I I I






14C SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2005 INTERNATIONAL EDITION


JOHN S. KNIGHT (189,-i981)


THE MIAMIIHERALD



OPINION
JESUS DIAZ JR., PUBLISHER I TOM FIEDLER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR I JOE OGLESBY, EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR JAMES L l1G6H (1909-1991)
...............I....... ............. ........... ........... .....


Mhel iamil Meralt I EDITORIAL



Better storm predictions possible


N ow we know. Despite the generally excel-
lent work that we have come to expect
from our national hurricane forecasters, they
are laboring under enormous handicaps not
enough money, equipment or manpower, and
not enough attention from Washington. This is
the alarming but inescapable conclusion drawn
from The Herald's four-part series, Blind Eye,
that ran last week [To read the series online, go
to herald.com, click on Herald Investigation,
Blind Eye].
Better forecasts are possible, and the payoff
would be fewer deaths and less destruction. But
improvements must be made before another
series of disastrous storms strikes. The prob-
lems can be fixed for relatively little cost if
Washington responds positively instead of with
a knee-jerk defense of the status quo.
More than 200 people were interviewed for
the report. Every former director of the Miami-
based Hurricane Center dating back to Robert
Simpson in the 1970s came forward to say that
the absence or poor maintenance of weather-
observing equipment and chronic cuts to
research are a huge problem. Commendably,
the current director, Max Mayfield, whose chief
concern is trying to save lives, spoke up as well.
It is impossible to make the most accurate fore-
cast when the tools aren't there, he said.
Unfortunately, Hurricane Center directors
have been reluctant to go public for fear that
they could be fired for speaking up or trying to
cut through the Washington bureaucracy.
"Woe be to me if I phoned a senator," said Neil
Frank, who served as director for 13 years and
sought more funding.
o The problem: Some 45 hurricanes have
made landfall since Hurricane Andrew in 1992,
but forecasters have had to cope with a lack of
basic weather-observing equipment during
nearly half of these emergencies. The net result


THE MILITARY


The Army is

broken and

in need of

repair

*GALLOWAY

20,000 during the next 12 months, even
though the Army hopes to throw lots of
money at the problem.
If Congress approves, the Army plans
to double its $20,000 enlistment bonus
for trigger-pullers to $40,000. And if a
young enlistee further agrees to be sent
to one of the divisions bound for Iraq or
Afghanistan in the next rotation, he'll
get an extra pay raise of $400 a month
for 36 months.
Has it come to that? Must we now
acknowledge that the only way we can
attract young Americans to protect and
defend us is to buy them? The Army has
already relaxed its once-sacred stan-
dards so that twice as many recruits
who score in the lowest category on
mental aptitude tests can enlist, along
with many more high school dropouts
and other borderline candidates.
Now Harvey has laid out how, with-
out increasing the Army's strength, he'll
beef up what he calls "the operational
Army," the Army that kills people and
blows things up, without increasing the
long-term permanent strength of the
Army by even one soldier above the,
hopelessly low.total of 482,400. It's a
brilliant capitalist stroke worthy of a
cold-blooded CEO. We'll hire civilians
who like to be paid low civil-service
wages to replace military people who
treat and nurse the wounded coming
home from Iraq; replace those who han-
dle payroll issues for other soldiers;
replace those who do a thousand crappy
jobs well because they know that what
they do is important to other soldiers.
Then we can ship the "savings" off to
Iraq or some other preemptive war.
Another part of the plan calls for
shutting down some of the Army
schoolhouses and shifting more than
11,000 of those who educate and train
soldiers to more lethal jobs. It seems
somewhat counterintuitive to reduce
training at the same time that we begin
to fill the ranks with the less intelligent,
less fortunate or just plain unlucky who
walk the streets of the black and His-
panic ghettos and people from the hills
and hollows of Appalachia.
If contracting out Army work to the
private sector the Halliburtons and
Blackwaters works so blessed well,
why then don't we contract out our
national defense in its entirety to the
bottom-line guys?
No doubt the private sector would be
happy to bid on our wars and fight them
for cost plus 20 percent. They could hire
all the military people put out of work
when we close down the Army and
Marine Corps and Navy and Air Force.
We could put in a penalty clause if they
lose the war.
Joseph L. Galloway is the senior mili-
tary correspondent for Knight Ridder
Newspapers.


gtl


2 EE


OUR OPINION: A SMALL INVESTMENT

WOULD SAVE LIVES, MONEY, PROPERTY



S M A R T ................................ ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................


URGENT PRIORITIES:
$100 million in facility, equipment and researcher costs to upgrade and strengthen
computers and computer power required by forecasters.
$100 million for a second Gulfstream jet to fly in the environment around a hurricane,
with no limits on flight hours.
* $4 million to add 13 buoysrecommended by the Hurricane Center for the Bahamas
and the eastern Atlantic.


was that forecasts were often way off course.
Last year's Hurricane Charley, forecast as a
Category 2 storm to strike the Tampa area, hit
the Punta Gorda-Port Charlotte area instead as
a powerful Category 4 hurricane. Unfortu-
nately, there were a number of forecasting defi-
ciencies: Weather-observing stations along the
Florida coast were malfunctioning; the govern-
ment's $43-million Gulfstream jet with up-do-
date equipment was grounded in the hours


before landfall; and two turboprop planes
weren't flown at all. Other equipment failures
have been all too common. Busted buoys, miss-
ing weather balloons, inoperable Doppler
radars and other sensors all have contributed
to the failure to provide the most accurate fore-
casts possible.
The remedy: Much of the problem has
do with money and tight budgets. The Gulf-
stream jet, an invaluable flying weather station,


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is budgeted for only 250 hours. It was grounded
for a critical period before Katrina made land-
fall in Florida because, as Mr. Mayfield
explained, he did not want to "break the bank,"
thus potentially missing the chance to detect
Katrina's sudden turn into South Dade. A sec-
ond jet would cost an estimated $100 million,
with an additional $3 million to $5 million per
year for additional flight crews.
In all, the increased cost of fixing the system
comes to about $353 million, with about $54 mil-
lion in annual recurring costs. A lot of money?
You bet, but compare that to the $50-billion
first installment to help the victims of Katrina
in Louisiana and Mississippi How much of that
could have been avoided with a better, earlier
prediction of the ultimate landfall? How many
lives could have been saved?
Some critics blame the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the
National Weather Service, the parent agencies
of the Hurricane Center, for diverting
resources elsewhere.
We do not doubt that these agencies face
agonizing decisions about the proper allocation
of funds. But, really, shouldn't Katrina and Rita
- and this and last year's hurricane seasons -
be convincing evidence that the lives and well-
being of tens of millions of Americans are at
increased risk as a result of a cycle of intensi-
fied hurricanes? This public-safety issue
demands immediate attention.
The role of Congress: Ultimately, it's up
to Congress to appropriate the money neces-
sary to repair our impaired forecasting system.
The disclosures in The Herald's series may
prompt hearings; certainly, the issue merits
investigation. But there is little time to waste
before the next'hurricane season. The Herald's
report offers a blueprint for much-needed
improvements.


DOMINICAN REPUBLIC


Successes


'against all


odds'

*PEREZ-STABLE

Under irregular circumstances,
presidential reelection was reintro-
duced in 2004.
There are, of course, many other
entries in both columns. Mine are
meant to highlight the setting of the
crisis that befell the Dominican
Republic during the PRD adminis-
tration of Hip61lito Mejia
(2000-2004) and how the nation has
dealt with it..
Between 1996 and 2000, Leonel
FernAndez of the Dominican Libera-
tion Party (PLD) presided over
impressive economic growth and
significant efforts to modernize the.'
state. A combination of factors a
perennial energy crisis, unaddressed
social problems, corruption allega-
tions and an uninspiring candidate
- Weakened the PLD, and Mejia
*won handily.
The new president quickly popu-
lated the ministries with PRD cro-
nies who used their offices to
advance partisan and personal inter-
ests. In 2003, a monumental fraud by
Baninter the country's third-larg-
est bank grievously compounded
an incipient slowdown. The econ-
omy shrank, inflation surged, the
peso collapsed, public debt doubled
and capital fled. Bailing out Baninter
cost Dominicans about $2.2 billion,
i.e., 15 percent of GDP. At the same'
time, Mejia ramrodded an electoral
reform that allowed him to stand for
reelection in May 2004. The PRD
spent untold amounts of public mon-
ies pursuing that doomed effort.
Sounds messy, and it was in
almost every way but the one that
mattered. While the campaign had
its-share of troubles and rumors
swirled that Mejia would hijack the
results, the PLD's Fernandez won
decisively. As usual, voters turned
out in droves. After 14 months in
office, FernAndez has steered the
economy out of the trough. A repeat
of the "golden" 1990s is, however,
nowhere in sight. Redressing social
deficits and confronting endemic
corruption remain a steep but urgent
climb.
Dominican democracy works well
enough. Otherwise Mejia might have
been brought down by massive dem-
onstrations or elite shenanigans
before his term expired. But the
Dominican Republic is no Bolivia or
Ecuador. Like Argentines in
2001-2002, Dominicans found an
institutional way out of their recent
crisis. Though their country must
still do much better, we should her-
ald the successes that have been
wrought against all odds.
Marifeli Perez-Stable is vice presi-
dent for democratic governance at the
Inter-American Dialogue in Washing-
ton, D.C.


~~~~__~_~~~_


ii I I


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I.33V C1 Ot ILm/-.4


A LOOK BACK AT
THE WEEK OF OCT. 9

IRAQ
* U.S. and Iraqi forces stepped up
security across Iraq on Thursday in
an effort to reduce insurgent
attacks aimed at wrecking
Saturday's constitutional
referendum. Interior Minister
Bayan Baker Solagh announced a
raft of security measures during all
or part of the period from
Thursday to Monday, including an
extended nationwide curfew, a
weapons and driving ban and
international border closures.
* On Wednesday, Iraqi lawmakers
approved a set of last-minute
amendments to the constitution
designed to win minority Sunni
Arab support for the charter.
Under the deal, Shiite, Sunni and
Kurdish leaders agreed that a
panel would consider further
revisions once general elections
are held in December. Other
measures reiterated the country's
unity and Arab character. Still,
several Sunni groups continued to
oppose the draft.


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_* The White House on Thursday
dismissed the possibility that
Supreme Court nominee Harriet
Miers might withdraw if she
encounters heavy fire in her
Senate confirmation and
'suggested her nomination was
becoming embroiled in "side
issues like religion." Conservative
critics have complained that Miers
lacks a clear judicial philosophy
and have questioned whether she
is the best-qualified nominee.
* A top CIA manager, who
remains undercover and is known
publicly only as "Jose," will soon
oversee traditional human spying
activities for the entire intelligence
community as director of the new
National Clandestine Service, a
position created in the post-Sept.
11 intelligence overhaul.


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