Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00224
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: October 6, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00224
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text











HIGH 89F
LOW 76F

SUN, SHOWER
OR T-STORM


The


Tribune


Volume: 101


* U


Governor


General called


on to enter


FNM leadership


controversy


* By PAUL TURNQUEST
ilRtPERTMiSSICK"w .
THE Governor General is
being asked to step in to resolve
a "constitutional crisis" and
appoint a definite leader of the
opposition in the House of
Assembly.
The House's first session fol-
lowing its summer break
opened with a bang as Inde-
pendent member Tennyson
Wells launched a scathing
attack on the official opposi-
tion.
Mr Wells said under consti-
tutional article 82, the opposi-
tion leader must be leader not
only on paper (in law) but also
in fact as a living political reali-
ty.
"The majority of the sitting
members of the FNM, including
the member for North
Eleuthera (Alvin Smith), have
publicly stated that they no
longer support the member for
North Eleuthera as leader of
the oppostion. They voted to
that effect in their National
Council and it has been widely
reported in the press," said Mr
Wells.
If this "crisis" was not
resolved by the FNM's sitting
members, Mr Wells said that


the Governor General may
have to exercise hiajudgmerifti
under article 82.4 of the Con-
stitution and appoint some oth-
er person maybe the member
for Lucaya (Neko Grant).
Mr Wells said that, in spite
of the vote of confidence by the
FNM parliamentary group, the
member for North Abaco (for-
mer prime minister Hubert
Ingraham) had "clearly demon-
strated" that he did not want
the leadership as he did not get
the majority of the FNM coun-
cil as he had hoped.
"They did not give him the
kind of majority he wanted in
the FNM council and the mem-
ber for North Abaco treated his
FNM parliamentary colleagues,
the FNM council, the system,
this parliament, and the country
with contempt.
"I can't say that I blame him
with respect to some of his for-
mer Cabinet ministers and his
FNM parliamentary colleages.
But to treat the FNM council,
the system, this parliament and
the country like that is down-
right uncalled for, disrespectful
and contemptuous."
Mr Wells said it was clear that
Mr Smith had disavowed the
SEE page 11


* ET TU, FNM? Perry Christie (left) criticised Opposition inembers for their 'immoral' actions against SenatorTommy Turnquest,
in a speech addressed to Brent Symonette in the House of Assembly.
(Photos: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)
............................................................................................ ................................................................


Bank admits


Hundreds of workers


that $10 bill march on Rawson Square


has been

forged

THE Central Bank of the
Bahamas has officially con-
firmed that the newly-released
"counterfeit-proof" $10 ban-
knote has been counterfeited.
Yesterday the bank sent out
advisories warning the public
to be cautious about the new
fake bills. However, just the day
before, police said they had not
received any reports of the
bogus notes.
The bank promised to release
more information on the new
notes, serial number 161315.
On Tuesday, police said that
despite reports in The Tribune
about the bills being counter-
feited, they had received no
reports to that effect.
In an effort to prevent coun-
terfeiting, the Central Bank
announced in August that a
new "counterfeit-proof" $10
dollar bill would be circulated.
It was planned for the bill to
be circulated until the old ban-
knote is phased out.
SEE page 10


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
SIMMERING union ten-
sions reached boiling point yes-
terday as hundreds of Nation-
al Trade Union Congress
members descended on Raw-
son Square to protest the coun-
try's labour relations.
Representatives from
almost all unions under the
NTUC umbrella were on hand
to make their displeasure


known to MPs returning to the
House of Assembly following
the summer recess.
They carried such banners
as "Labour all for one," "Stop
ignoring trade unions please,"
"You can't live on $4,000 per
month, but you want me to live
on $1,500 per month" and
"Stop hiring these consultants
with high pay who have no
sense of direction."
SEE page six


9.3 per cent live below

poverty line in Bahamas


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
IN the Bahamas 9.3 per cent
of the population live below
the poverty line.
Social Services Minister
Melanie Griffin made the
announcement yesterday while
outlining to the House of
Assembly results of the
Bahamas Living Conditions
Survey. .
The report establishes for
the first time a poverty line in


the Bahamas the minimum
amount of money needed for
an individual to satisfy basic
needs pver a specific period of
time.
The poverty rate is slightly
lower in New Providence and
Grand Bahama but signifi-
cantly higher in other islands,
with the highest found in the
southern islands 21 per cent.
Mrs Griffin said it should
be noted, however, that
SEE page 10


Second FNM
senator

steps down

By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
A SECOND FNM senator
has given notice of resigna-
tion from the Senate.
Senator Tanya McCartney,
in a release to The Tribune
yesterday, announced that she
will be leaving the upper
chamber, effective October
31.
Thanking both former
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham and current FNM leader
Tommy Turnquest for giving
her the opportunity, she said
she remains committed to
being an advocate for the bet-
terment of the quality of life
for all Bahamians.
"My intention at this time is
to focus more on my profes-
sion and other civic commit-
ments. Moreover, I have
determined that sacrificing or
compromising one's reputa-
tion and integrity ought not
to be a pre-requisite to public
service," said Ms McCartney.
The senator said she had
SEE page 10


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I HE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6,2005


LOCLNW


'$600,000'


rise in Bridge




v's earnins


Minister of Works

and Utilities presents

financial statement

in the House


* By KARAN MINNIS
THE Bridge Authority
earned $600,000 more in 2004
than it did the previous year
according to Minister of
Works and Utilities Bradley
Roberts.
Mr Roberts explained that
in the year ending December
31, 2004, the authority's
income was $415,769, com-
pared to -$210,563 in 2003.
He also announced that the
authority's long-term loan
balance has been reduced
from $1.1 million to $0.5 mil-


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lion in the same year.
During his communication
to the House of Assembly
yesterday, Mr Roberts pre-
sented the audited financial
statement for the Bridge
Authority for the year end-
ing December 31, 2004.
Mr Roberts explained that
in October of 2004, the Par-
adise Island bridge toll sys-
tem was "completely upgrad-
ed" by the company IBI
Group Limited.
According to Mr Roberts,
as a result of these upgrades
the Bridge Authority's audit
and cash controls were
"greatly improved" in the
areas of the prepaid cash col-
lection, enforcement of pre-
paid accounts and transpon-
der inventory.

Upgrades
"The upgrades to the over-
all system also give the bridge
authority the ability to place a
monetary value on all delib-
erately manipulated over-
rides and miscellaneous trans-
actions carried out by staff,"
he added. "Today, the com-
pany is now able to accurate-
ly determine each vault's
monetary contents."
"That is to say the overages
and shortages at each toll
booth and consequently the
bridge authority can now
trace deficiencies or defalca-
tions to their original source,"
he said.
Mr Roberts stated that the
company's accounts payable
have also been reduced, from
$336,759 to $191,174 over the
same period.
"The authority's gross
income from fiscal year 2004
was $4.42 million compared
to $4.51 million from year
2003. This slight reduction of
approximately $84,000 is a
result of prior adjustments
and not a reduction in the
revenue collected," he
explained.
The minister also stated
that the authority's expenses
have deceased from $4.72
million in 2003 to $4.0 mil-
lion.
"And the primary reason
for this reduction was the
implementation of a detailed
fixed asset register for the
year ended 31 December
2004," he said.
Mr Roberts added that the
warranty inspection report
carried out on both bridges
in 2001 will be completed by
the end of next week.


MINISTER of Works and Utilities
Bradley Roberts in the House yesterday.
(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)

Water and Sewerage

Corporation is

'still not on sound

financial footing'


DESPITE positive signs, the
Water and Sewerage Corpora-
tion is still not on "sound finan-
cial footing" said Bradley
Roberts during a communica-
tion in the House of Assembly
yesterday.
Referring to the corpora-
tion's audited financial state-
ments for 2004, Mr Roberts
indicated the corporation's
operating revenue for that year
was $35,035,742, versus
$34,032,917 for the previous
year an increase of $1,002,825.
He added that operating
expenses for the period totalled
$37,140,233, in comparison with
the previous year's expenses of
$38,724,631 a reduction of
$1,584,398.
Mr Roberts described this as
"A very positive step in the
right direction."
The government subsidy to
the corporation for the year was
$12,040,000 versus $10,000,000


for the previous year, an
increase of $2,400,000.
"This demonstrates the gov-
ernment's increased commit-
ment to the growth and
strengthening of the Water and
Sewerage Corporation," said
Mr Roberts.
He pointed out that the net
profit for the corporation in
2004 totaled $7,843,694, in com-
arison to the net loss of
4,511,481 sustained in the pre-
vious year.
"A review of the past 5 years,
dating back to 1999, reveals that
the Water and Sewerage Cor-
poration never showed a net
profit during the period.
"I must caution members not
to be misled that the corpora-
tion is on a sound financial foot-
ing, nothing could be further
from the truth.
"There are many challenges
that face the corporation and
will be addressed on an incre-
mental basis, as the corporation
continues to strengthen and
funding for needed capital
investment is secured," said Mr
Roberts.


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are.
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


*illYI~Y*YirY-Y-LP;I .~I~-YiYYYI~1IYll(s~iYI~~~YYYY-I~1Xel







THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6,2005, PAGE 3


LOCAL NEWSIIIITBI


FNM officials on

Grand Bahama:

Ingraham as

leader would be

'positive step'

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT FNM party
officials on Grand Bahama
believe it would be a positive
step for the party to have Hubert
Ingraham installed as leader of
the opposition in the House
Assembly.
Former FNM minister and
Grand Bahama MP CA Smith
told The Tribune he feels that
Mr Ingraham has proven himself
to be a very capable leader in the
past both as leader of the opposi-
tion, and as party leader.
"If he accepts, I have every
confidence that he will serve with
same passion as he did in the past
and provide the kind of leader-
ship that the Bahamian people
are crying for," Mr Smith said.
Former MP David Thompson
also supports the idea of a more
active Ingraham in parliament.
"The careful concern of most
of us in Grand Bahama is that we
think it is a positive develop-
ment. We think that a more
active Mr Ingraham in parlia-
ment is something that is most
desirable and necessary," he said.

Vocal
According to Mr Thompson,
MPs being more vocal and
focused in their representation in
the House and Senate can only
assist the leadership of the FNM.
Last week, FNM council mem-
bers voted in favour of Mr Ingra-
ham taking up the position of
party leader in the House.
Party Leader Tommy Turn-
quest did not vote.
Mr Thompson stressed the
need for Mr Turnquest to consult
and work with other members of
the party team including Ingra-
ham, the MPs and council in
moving the party to a position
where it stands the best chance of
winning an election.
Mr Turnquest traveled to
Grand Bahama on Tuesday to
attend a fundraising event to gar-
ner financial support for the par-
ty's upcoming convention in
November.
He also met earlier with FNM
MPs to discuss house business.
Mr Smith and Mr Thomipson
said the issue of party leadership
is something that would be
addressed during party's conven-
tion on November 7.
"My perspective on the situa-
tion is that the FNM'needs all of
the members of its team in order
to stand the best possible chance
of winning the next general elec-
tions," Mr Thompson said.
He said he hopes that any dis-
agreements over who should be
party leader will not cause dis-
unity among party members and
supporters.
"The clear indication is that
the FNM needs in addition to
Tumquest, Ingraham, Fpulkes
and others to all come together
in order for us to win.


Dion Foulkes: I

am more able to

unify the party

DION Foulkes, candidate
for leadership of the Free
National Movement, told the
Torchbearers Association at
FNM Headquarters on Tues-
day that he has a vision and
ambitious agendas for the
party and the country.
"But," Mr Foulkes told the
FNM's youth organisation,
"there is'another reason I
entered the race and this is
another one of those lessons
I've learned I'm running
because I believe I will be
more able to unify the party
and lead us to victory than
any other individual within
the FNM at this time.
"Without a unified party we
will fail at the polls. Without
a unified party we will set
back party reform. Without a
unified party the nation will
be condemned to more years
of PLP misrule, mismanage-


ment and missteps."
Mr Foulkes said he knows
now more than ever that his
task is not only to win an elec-
tion but also to preserve the
integrity and unity of the par-
ty beyond the next election
cycle.
He said the party must be
prepared to deal effectively
and creatively with the many
issues on the policy agenda,
including globalisation and
rapid technological change.
Mr Foulkes reminded his
young audience that the
founders of the FNM encour-
aged the formation of the
Torchbearers as the first
youth organisation of a major
political party in the
Bahamas.


Act amendment proposed to make


entrapment of public officials legal


N By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE proposal for an Act to
amend the current laws that pro-
hibit the legal entrapment of pub-
lic officials was tabled before the
House of Assembly yesterday.
The Act, which is viewed by
some as controversial as it could
lead to penalisation of public offi-
cials caught issuing or taking
bribes, was tabled by indepen-
dent MP for St Margaret Pierre
Dupuch.
It calls for an amendment to
the previous Prevention of
Bribery Act, would officially
make it legal for the entrapment
of public officials in the Bahamas,
as a means of rooting out corrup-
tion and under-handedness.

Cautioned
Mr Dupuch cautioned that he
might be "poking a hornet's nest
with a stick" before reading out
his resolution to a deafeningly
quiet House.
It read as follows:
"Be it resolved that the prime
minister instruct the attorney gen-
eral to draft amendments to the
Prevention of Bribery Act mak-
ing entrapment legal, and remov-
ing the provisions penalising per-
sons offering an advantage to an
agent, public body or public ser-
vant as defined by the said Act.
"And that the provisions of the
said Act be further amended to
include ministers, members of
parliament, parliamentary secre-
taries and permanent secretaries
as persons regulated by the Act."
Mr Dupuch asked Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie to instruct the
current attorney general Alfred
Sears to draft and present a par-
liamentary bill including the
prime minister's "Code of Ethics"
as outlined by the PLP in 2002.
Mr Dupuch asked that the
resolved bills be drafted, debated,
and passed in parliament before


the next general election.
When asked if he believed that
the Act would be passed, and if
so, whether it would be done
before the next election, Mr
Dupuch said that it was difficult
to say, but added that the House
would be hard pressed not to.
"This is not poised particularly
at this government; I have been
drafting this for years.
"If you aren't crooked you
don't have anything to hide. This
is meant to stop a lot of people
wanting to run who only have
their eyes on the money bag.
"So if this law is passed this
would put a stop to people accus-
ing people of being crooked and


put a stop to people being
crooked in my opinion," he said.

Law
Mr Dupuch said that if the law
was passed, any public officials
who are rumoured to be suscep-
tible to bribes can be "set up, and
brought down".
"Now, if you are a MP who is
on the take, I'd set you up and
take you down. Now, if you were
on the take before, this would
make them straighten up.
"People should not interpret
this to being only for the PLP
government. I have heard of this


Pierre Dupuch defends -i

the role of the press
By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
DURING a heated opening of the House of Assembly yesterday,
Independent MP for St Margaret Pierre Dupuch defended the role of
the press in the country.
Mr Dupuch claimed that during certain recent political controversies,
information has been given or withheld from the press in an attempt to
suit a certain faction or point of view.
Mr Dupuch claimed that many politicians will either leak informa-
tion or simply hang up the phone on reporters depending on how the
mood or situation suited them.
"The people (reporters) have tried to get information from them and
they laugh at them and slam the phone down I understand.
"The reporters are trying to do their job; trying to find out for the
people the truth of the matter and that is how they are treated.
"They are the people whether you like what they report or don't like
what they report.
"They have a job to do just like we've got a job to do and they can-
not do a proper job unless they have the proper information.
"How do you expect them to do a proper job if the leaders of this
country, the 'so called leaders'- one in particular who laughs when he
picks up the phone and then hangs up the phone without giving them
any information?" he asked.
Mr Dupuch called this kind of attitude "disgraceful." He said this
kind of behaviour by politicians has been reported to him by numerous
radio and newspaper reporters.
"They leak something to the press for the public to read an then they
laugh about it thinking it's a joke. They come here they make a mock-
ery of the system and they think it's a joke." he said.


kind of activity from the PLP,
and the FNM government,
but this should put some
more transparency to our minis-
ters.
"In the present law, if you bribe
me and I do you a favour, if we go
to court and you talk, you go to
jail with me.
"So a lot of people won't do
that. Now what I'm proposing is
that the guy who sets you up and
has the evidence could prosecute
the minister or official and they
would go free," he said.


* INDEPENDENT MP
Pierre Dupuch in the House
yesterday.
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/
Tribune staf)


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005


EITORAULTTES T6TH3EDTO


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas ---
Insurance Management Building., P.. -F-485,-Fre-port, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
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Looking for methods to conserve fuel


WHILE Trade and Industry Minister
Leslie Miller acts as though the world par-
ticularly the Bahamas' three major oil com-
panies---is out to get Bahamians by hiking
oil prices, President Bush, with the same
problem, frankly admits he has no "magic
wand to lower prices at the pump." However,
he has a far-reaching energy plan that will
eventually do so.
In not too many more years Venezuela,
currently the fourth largest supplier of oil to
the US, will be the first supplier to be
dropped from that list.
Hugo Chavez's loud boast that "out of dig-
nity", he would "have reason to break rela-
tions with this (US) government", because it
circulated a letter to Caribbean countries,
which Chavez claimed attempted to upset
his PetroCaribe plan, is just that a bom-
bastic boast.
In truth Chavez cannot afford to break
relations with the US until he can find a new
customer for his oil. Obviously that is why he
is so ardent in his pursuit of China. A break
with the US at thistime would mean eco-
nomic disaster for Venezuela.
And should the Bahamas becoming depen-
dent solely on Venezuelan oil where would
Bahamians be in this economic tug-of-war?
Concerned that America's economy is
being crippled by its dependence on foreign
oil, Mr Bush's focus is to cut that Gordian
lknot.
Many in the oil business today are con-
vinced that Venezuela's Hugo Chavez will
not be able to afford the generous terms
promised Caribbean countries in his Petro-
Caribe deal. However, should Chavez lose
the US account-1.75 million barrels of oil a
day, roughly 15 per cent of America's oil
imports- he undoubtedly will not be able to
:support PetroCaribe.
When improved .efficiency and conserva-
tion measures to increase mileage standards
take full effect in the US, American drivers
will save about 340,000 barrels of gasoline a
day. Hybrid cars, which produce lower emis-
sions, are now coming off the assembly line.
Mr Bush says his "budget next year propos-
es that every American who. purchases a
hybrid vehicle receives a tax credit of up to
$4,000." The US also plans to increase the use
of diesel energy. Today, unlike Europe, few-
er than one per cent of American cars use
diesel. "According to the Department of
Energy," said Mr Bush, "if diesel vehicles


made up 20 per cent of our fleet in 15 years
we would save 350,000 barrels of-oil a day.-
That's-ab-out -a quarter of what we import
every day from Venezuela."
As America plans to open new refineries
and continue to explore new technologies,
already new alternatives to gasoline and
diesel have been developed. Virginia
BioDiesel, for example, is now using Vir-
ginia soybean oil to produce a clean-burn-
ing fuel. Other biodiesel refiners are mak-
ing fuel from such waste products as recy-
cled cooking grease. Another fuel alterna-
tive is ethanol, which comes from corn and
can be mixed with gasoline to produce a
clean, efficient fuel. In low concentrations,
said Mr Bush, ethanol can be used in any
vehicle.
As America pushes on, determined to be
completely independent of foreign suppliers
producing their own cleaner, cheaper fuel,
the Bahamas should be negotiating, not with
Mr Chavez of uncertain future, but with the
US that is determined to have a sound future.
It's important for the Bahamas to secure
itself on the ground floor to benefit from this
new technology.
In the meantime, Mr Bush has urged his
countrymen to conserve fuel wherever pos-
sible, and use public transport as often as
p ossible. ..
Last week the Dominican Republic, in its
effort to conserve fuel, grounded all govern-
ment vehicles. These vehicles can now only be
used in cases of emergency, or "extreme cas-
es of necessity."
While Mr Miller concentrates on cutting
margins, government vehicles are still seen
parked outside foodstores after office hours
and at the beach over the weekends. If tax
payers are financing these vehicles for gov-
ernment business, then they should be parked
at the respective ministries at 5pm, not driven
around on family errands and weekend_-
4aunts- ---... -
If the Bahamas had a proper public trans-
portation system, with regular routes, bus
stops and timetables, Bahamians could have
been encouraged to park their car and take
the jitney. Without a reliable, safe and clean
transport system, Bahamians will continue
to use their cars. The most that can be asked
of them is that they car pool. Not only would
it conserve the family's fuel, but it would
relieve the congestion on the roads, particu-
larly now that schools are open.


Rosetta St. Phone: 325-3336


PetroCaribe





should still





be pursued


EDITOR, The Tribune
--I WRITE-to put into per-
spective the efforts by Leslie
Miller, who seems to be one of
the few persons concerned
about the havoc being wreaked
on our people and our econo-
my by the rising price of gaso-
line and other fuels.
It appears that some people
are upset with Mr Miller
because he is promoting the
idea that we sign the Petro-
Caribe deal with Venezuela,
the largest supplier of petrole-
um and its products in this
region. We are being told that
Venezuela is a socialist state
and Senor Hugo Chavez, the
-president of Veniezuela, is too
friendly with Senor Fidel Cas-
tro, the president of Cuba, a
Communist state, and we
ought not to be talking with
Chavez because it might upset
the United States of America.
These same people would
tell us that the US frowns on us
doing business with the Repub-
lic of China, the country with
the world's largest population
and the world's fastest-grow-
ing economy.
What they will not tell you is
that everyone now realises that
China has become the United
States' largest trading partner.
But isn't it hypocritical that the
US continues to enforce the
embargo which they invoked
against the small island state
of Cuba which arose because
Castro took power in 1959 and,
a few years later, he declared
his country to be a Communist
state but they have no difficul-
ty trading with China, the
,Communist giant? .. .
These critics will suggest that
because Venezuela has ignored
the US embargo and trades
with Cuba, in spite of it, then it
is also quite likely to become a
target for sanctions by the US.
But, I believe they know better
because what they have not
mentioned is that despite the
rhetoric emanating from Pres-
idents Bush and Chavaz, from
time to time, Venezuela enjoys
_a-healthy--trade relationship
with the US and more than
half of the crude oil that
Venezuela pumps every day
ends up in an American port.
They have also not told you
that Venezuela owns the Cit-
Go group of gasoline service
stations, with over 17,000 sta-
tions spread across the whole
country, representing one of
the largest such operations in
the entire US.
Incidentally, Mr Miller is
seeking to have the Bahamas
government do business with
the national oil company of
Venezuela or Petroleos de
Venezuela SA, called PDVSA,
which has operated in
Freeport, Grand Bahama,
since 1990, when it bought the
Bahamas Oil Refining Com-
pany (BORCO), the largest oil
refinery in this region, from
Chevron Oil of the US.


By the way, do you wonder
why these hypocrites among us
are so concerned about the
Bahamas government doing
business with Venezuela, but
they express no concern about
the oil companies operating
here doing business with this
same country? Do you believe
it is possible they are unaware
that the gasoline we purchase
from the service stations oper-
ated locally by Shell, Exxon,
Texaco etc is bought by these
companies from this same
PDVSA and shipped here
from its refineries in Caracas,
Venezuela?
These critics will also say
that this deal cannot be con-
summated because Venezuela,
a member of OPEC, the oil
cartel, is not allowed to sell its
products below the prices set
by OPEC. But, this is a gross
misrepresentation of the facts
for you can be absolutely cer-
tain that Venezuela is not fool-
ish and would not even con-
template violating the rules of
OPEC from which it has bene-
fited so much.
What is, in fact, very clear is
that Venezuela is very unhappy
because it knows of the hefty
mark-ups the oil giants tack
onto the prices at which they
purchase their fuel supplies
from PDVSA. To counter this
excessive gouging, Venezuela
has offered to sell its gasoline
directly to the various
Caribbean governments for
' them to make these products
available to the oil giants who
own the service stations from
which it is distributed to the
consumers.
These countries, including
the Bahamas, would allow the
oil companies and its dealers
a reasonable profit, but they
will be in a position to monitor
the mark-up and prevent their
citizens from being exposed to
the unmefcifii-gouging whidh
is so prevalent, today.
But there could be other
important benefits for the
Bahamas from this exercise.
We know already that
Venezuela owns BORCO,
which at one time employed
hundreds of Bahamians. How-
ever, BORCO, which is now
used primarily as a storage
facility, is a "grass-roots" refin-


ery.which produced various
-fuel oils-and -kerosene plus othl
er first-run products such as
naptha and benzene, which are
used as feed-stock for other
more sophisticated refineries
to produce various petro-chem-
icals.
BORCO never produced
any gasoline because it was riint
equipped with a crackingg
unit" which is a necessary piece
of equipment for this process.
But, I have made some
inquiries and have been
advised that BORCO can be
refitted to produce gasoline.
This refit would take about
three years, and would provide
jobs for a large number of
Bahamians during the time this
work was in progress. But, in
the meantime, it could take
only a few weeks for PDVSA
to put in place some tempo-
rary refining apparatus to pro-
duce all the gasoline required
by the Bahamas.
Now, when the refit is com-
pleted, BORCO could be able
to refine up to a half-million
barrels of crude, daily, thus
producing more than enough
gasoline and other fuels to sat-
isfy the needs of all the
Caribbean countries which
signed onto the PetroCaribe
agreement. Of course, any
overage could easily be sold to
the United States or other
countries.
But, ladies and gentlemen,
can you imagine the potential
benefit of this arrangement
for the Bahamas? Besides the
general reduction in the price
of fuels, especially gasoline,
this scenario is likely to create
hundreds of pernirent jobs
as BORCO could become the
plant supplying the fuel needs
of the whole Caribbean
region.
I honestly believe that this
is an opportunity we cannpt
afford to ignore and while
some of us are anxiously pur-
suing a political agenda arid
will use any excuse to beat up
on the minister, I believe that
most Bahamians would
encourage him to pursue t.is
initiative with as much vigoiur
as he can muster once they
understand the fantastic bene-
fits our country and its citizens
are likely to enjoy from tliis
proposed PetroCaribe agree-
ment.

CALVIN KEMP JR
Freeport
September 22 2005


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THE TRIBUNE TIHURSDAYOCTOBER 6, 2005,CPAGEE5


Court


briefs

By KARAN MINNIS
TAVARES Roker, 24,
pleaded not guilty to the
charge of assault yesterday
before Chief Magistrate
Rodger Gomez.
It is alleged that on
September 24, Roker
unlawfully assaulted
Rochell Ferguson.
Roker was granted $1,000
bail with one surety.
The matter was then
adjourned to October 19.
Jeffery Neilly, 39, was
also charged with assault.
It is alleged that on
September 18 Neilly
unlawfully assaulted
Tameca Pinder.
Neilly pleaded not guilty
to the charges.
Bail was set at $800 and
the matter was adjourned to
October 26.
Herbert Green, 23, was
charged with making death
threats.
He pleaded not guilty to
the charges.
It is alleged that on July
12, Green threatened
Darrell Ferguson with the
intent to put him in fear of
death.
Green pleaded not guilty
to the charge and the mat-
ter was adjourned to Octo-
'ber 26.
Bail was set at $1,200 with
one surety.
Windsor Lane man
Christopher Butler, 42, was
charged with threats of
death but failed appear
before the court.
As a result, a warrant was
issued for his arrest,
It is alleged that on
September 12, Butler
threatened Darrell
Ferguson with the intent to
put him in fear of death.
Norman Nairn, 30, of
Podoleo Street, was
charged yesterday with
unlawfully carrying a
dangerous instrument
without lawful cause on
September 21 in the
Podoleo Street area.
Nairn pleaded not guilty
to the charge.
Bail was set at $800 with
one surety and the matter
was adjourned to
November 1.


Share
your


news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Man shot in the head


* By KARAN MINNIS
A FOX Hill man was shot
in the head while in the Bain
Town area on Tuesday evening.
According to police reports,
while in the area of Augusta
Street shortly after 9pm, the 28-
year-old was shot while in the
passenger seat of a Nissan Max-
ima.
This incident is said to have
occurred after an attempted
robbery of the car's passengers.


Police said an unknown male
had approached the vehicle and
demanded cash. When he did
not receive any money, he
reportedly responded by pro-
ducing a hand gun and shooting
the passenger in the back of the
head.
The victim was then taken to
the Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal, were he is in critical condi-
tion.
Best of Best Beauty Salon
on East Street South was


robbed around 3.30pm on Tues-
day by two men, one of whom
was armed with a gun.
The men entered the salon
and demanded cash and per-
sonal effects.
The man carrying the gun is
said to be around 18 to 20-
years-old, six foot tall, slim and
of dark complexion.
His accomplice is said to be
about five foot tall and of dark
complexion. Both men fled on
foot.


Texaco Service Station on
East Bay Street Was also robbed
on Tuesday.
Shortly before 12am, a lone
male had entered the store
dressed in all blue with a corn-
row hair style. He was report-
edly wearing a black mask with
a red symbol.
The man, who was armed
with a shot gun, demanded
cash.
He fled the scene and police
investigations are continuing.


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT The Northern
Archdeaconry of Anglican Dio-
cese is hosting Shalom 2005 a
youth jamboree that seeks to
address the many hidden habits,
fears and anxieties plaguing
today's young persons.
More than 200 teens, aged 13
to 18, from the 10 Anglican
parishes on Grand Bahama,
Abaco, and Bimini, are expect-
ed to attend the jamboree,
which is set to take place' Octo-
ber 7 through 9 in Freeport.
Under this year's theme:
"Trapped in the Closet A
Christian Response" workshop
presentations will be held to
help young people discover hid-
den talents and untapped cre-
ativity, develop good moral
relationships with family and
friends, and to overcome hid-
den habits, fears, and anxieties.
Motivational speaker Michael


Pintard is expected to deliver
the keynote address at the
opening on Friday at the Foster
B Pestaina Hall at 7pm.
Bishop Michael Eldon will
host the workshop sessions on
Saturday between 8am and
4pm.
The jamboree will culminate
on Sunday with a closing ser-
vice at 4pm at the Church of
God the Shepherd.
Lynden Douglas, co-chair-
man of Shalom 2005, said that
in today's Bahamas many
young persons are going
through a crisis of identity.
Rev Father Bernard Been
said this year's theme is appro-
priate because many issues that
plague and frustrate young per-
sons are kept locked away in
secret places.
"God has given all of us tal-
ents and we want to help them
identify their talents and to not
be ashamed of it and to used to
the honour and glory of God,"
he said.


Man is

questioned

following

shootings


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT A Grand
Bahama man is in police
custody and assisting with
investigations into a shoot-
ing incident early Tuesday
morning.
Assistant Commissioner
of Police Ellison
Greenslade reported that
police are questioning an
adult man in connection
with the death of 55-year-
old Phil Martin.
Martin, a resident of
Somerville Drive, Freeport,
was taken to Rand Memor-
ial Hospital sometime
around lam with multiple
gunshot wounds to the
body.
Mr Greenslade said
police have interviewed Mr
Martin, who is now con-
scious and able to speak.
He said charges could be
forthcoming in the matter.
Police are also continu-
ing their investigations into
the death of 27-year-old
Anne Thompson, who was
found hanging from ceiling
rafters in the bathroom at
her house in Hanna Hill,
Eight Mile Rock.
"We are looking closely
at this case and police have
interviewed quite a number
persons already," Mr
Greenslade said.
Thompson was found by
her teenage daughter
around 6pm Tuesday, hang-
ing by the neck with a yel-
low nylon rope tied around
her throat.


Further witness places Pritchard in yard


* By FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Staff Reporter
ELKENO Pritchard told
police that he was not in his
yard when Michael Francis was
shot to death, the investigating
officer told the Supreme Court
yesterday.
The jury also heard testimony
from the third witness to place
murder accused Pritchard at the
scene.
Sergeant 1368 Mitchell Fer-
guson, of the Criminal Detec-
tive Unit, said on June 1, 1999,
two days after the incident,
Pritchard said he was swimming
alone near the "Haitian dock"
when Mr Francis was shot in
the accused's yard.
Sergeant Ferguson testified
that he made attempts to con-
tact lawyer Michael Kemp and
Pritchard's family, but was
unsuccessful. He said Pritchard
did not sign the statement.
Meanwhile, Alexi Sawyer
told the court that he was sitting
on the porch at his friend
Tasha's house when he heard
two gunshots.
He heard "about three or
four more shots" and then went
to Pritchard's yard, which was
across the street from where he
was, he said.
There, Mr Sawyer said he saw
"Keno" with "something in his
left hand" and he was "pushing
something into his waist".
Pritchard appeared "shaken
up" at the time, he said.
"Yankee and Keno" ran one
way, while "Farlin" and anoth-
er man ran in the other direc-


tion, Mr Sawyer testified. They
did not appear to have anything
in their hands, he testified.
However, Sergeant Ferguson
said when he asked Pritchard
about the witnesses' testimony,
the accused called them liars.
He also said Pritchard told
him he had not seen the
deceased for about a week
before the murder.
The accused, he said, also told
him that he did not see "Yan-
kee" and "Farlin" on the day
in question.
Mr Sawyer told the court that
he knew the deceased for most
of his life, and the accused for
about 10 years, as they all lived
in the Hawkins Hill community.
He said about 10 to 20 min-
utes before hearing the shots,
the victim had driven through


the corner, known as "Death
Valley", and "hailed everyone".
His demeanor at the time was
normal, said the witness.
Mr Sawyer is the third prose-
cution,, witness to place
Pritchard in his own yard and
testify to seeing him running
through a shortcut at about
noon on May 30, 1999.
He also told the court that
the body of Michael Francis was
not in the position shown in
police photos when the incident
first occurred.
Pathologist Dr Govinda Raju
testified that Mr Francis' heart
and lungs were perforated as a
result of "firearm injuries".
Dr Raju said the victim's
blood had collected in both
sides of his chest cavity.
The victim, he continued, suf-
0


fered from four wounds, two of learned that the wounds would
which were entry wounds and have to have been inflicted from
two of which were exit wounds. below, with the weapon point-
In his opinion, Dr Raju said, in in an upward direction.
the injuries were fatal and em.e- M....' ucille',as'i8 Able to
gency medical services would ascertain that ifre'absece bf
not have been able to save him. blackening or singeing on the
During cross examination by wounds indicated that the shots
Murrio Ducille, the court were not fired from close range


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE








AGE 6, THULOCALRAEOSCTOBE 5BUNE


WORKERS hold
their protest yesterday
in Rawson Square as
Chief Supt Hulan Hanna
looks on.
(Photo: Mario
Duncanson/
Tribune staff)


The Government High School
80th Anniversary
Celebrations Committee
Salutes

ir. Arlington Butler
attended Government High School
in 1951 thru 1954 and began his
teaching career at same in 1964 to
1966. He is now practicing law at
his firm Arlington Butler & Co.


80th Anniversary Gala Banquet
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Fred Mitchell: NCTU




protest was 'drama




and histrionics


* By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
GOVERNMENT leaders
yesterday expressed shock
and confusion about the rea-
sons why trade unionists felt
the need .to storm Rawson
Square, -
As hundreds of National
Congress of Trade Unions
(NCTU) members took 'to
Bay Street, Fred Mitchell, the
minister responsible for the
Public Service, told members
of the House of Assembly
that the protest was over a
proposed salary lump sum
payment to public workers.
According to Mr Mitchell,
the protest amounrtgldto "a
great deal of drama and
histrionics" which he felt was
aimed primarily at assisting
certain union leaders in their
re-election campaigns.
"Now that the re-election
is behind us, I had hoped that
sanity would prevail," he said.

Payment
The Bahamas Public Ser-
vice Union (BPSU) has said
that rather than accept a
lump sum payment of $1,300,
its members would prefer-to
receive an across-the-laoard
pay increase of $1,800, which
would amount to about $150
per person per month.
However, Mr Mitchell
explained that the union's ini-
tial request was for the gov-
ernment to pay the $1,300
dollar figure in two install-
ments of $600 and $700 the
first to be paid immediately
to aid parents prepare for the
school year starting in Sep-
tember.
Mr Mitchell said the
request was forwarded to his
ministry for negotiations with
the government's labour con-
sultants Frank Carter and
Keith Archer, representatives
of the Ministry of Finance,
the Department of Public


Public Service


Minister speaks


in the House




Service and the union, agreement proposal would
He said that at the end of not be ready until November
negotiations, the government 4 which is still a month
left the bargaining bl'wF i .h..i' Way..-.- -" .. .......
the belief that the union "So what issue arises that
would accept a $1,300 lump would cause them to
sum payment. protest?" he asked.
However, he claimed, when Also speaking to the issue
BPSU president John Pinder were Works Minister Bradley
told his members about the Roberts and Transport Min-
offer, they refused to accept ister Glenys Hanna-Martin,
it. who both claimed that nego-
Mr Mitchell said that the tiations between their rele-
$1,300 offer was an effort to vant employees were also
bring industrial harmony and progressing.
peace. "I am simply astonished at
He said it is the maximum all the storm in the teacup,"
that the government can said Mr Roberts.


afford.
Since the bid was rejected,
Mr Mitchell said, that the
next step would be for new
proposals to be submitted by
both sides and that the gov-
ernment's proposal was to go
before Cabinet next week.
Mr Mitchell said he was not
aware of how the government
could be called delinquent in
negotiations, as the union has
claimed in the press.
He said that when he con-
tacted National Trade Union
Congress President Pat Bain,
he was told that there were
only two matters of concern -
the lump sum payment and a
concern raised by the
Bahamas Union of Teachers
(BUT) regarding salary
increase.
However, he told Mr Bain
that the BUT had informed
him that their industrial


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Understood
Housing Minister Shane
Gibson, himself a former
unionist, said he understood
the persons protesting,
because they felt they were
standing up for their rights.
Prime Minister Perry
Christie, returning to the
House after being absent
since May because of illness,
said he is confident that the
government has done every-
thing possible to address
union concerns.
"Politics being what it is
people try to take advantage
of a government near elec-
tion and there are people in
opposition in unions who try
to vent opposition views."
The government, he said,
will not back down.


Hundreds

march on

Rawson

Square
FROM page one
Despite a heavy police presence,
barricading the protesters from
getting too close to the House and
a directive from the Department of
Public Service threatening to cut
the pay of any public worker who
left work to participate, union offi-
cials said they were very pleased
with the turnout.
John Pinder, newly re-elected
head of the Bahamas Public Ser-
vice Union, told The Tribune that
the government had taken the
public service for granted for far
too long.
He added that he could not
L blameL thegovernment for trying to-
intimidate workers by threateningly!
to cut their pay, but warned that
the tactic could backfire on negotiw
ations.
"If they want to be hard, we can2
play hardball with them at the
negotiating table," he said.
The BPSU feels that, rather
than accept a lump sum payout of
$1,300, they would prefer to
receive an across-the-board pay
increase of $1,800, which would
amount to about $150 per person
each month.
However, he noted that this is
not the only outstanding issue
affecting the union as there remain
a number of concerns, some dating
back at least 14-18 months.
While Mr Pinder acknowledged
that Labour Minister Vincent Peet
has demonstrated some level of
friendship to the unions, he
expressed extreme displeasure that
the union had not been able to
meet with Fred Mitchell, the minis-
ter responsible for the public ser- i'
vice, whom Mr Pinder claimed has
been too busy to meet the union.
Instead, he said the union has
been forced to deal with the minis-
ter's representatives, who them-
selves are two former trade union-
ists.
He also expressed displeasure
that Mr Mitchell did not come.out
and speak with the crowd as he
arrived at the House, saying "that
would have been the sensible thing
to do."
Robert Farquharson, president
of the Bahamas Communications
and Public Officers Union, said he
was also pleased with the turnout.
lHe said unions advised'nieifi-
bers to take their lunch-breaks
between 10am and 11am, so they
could not have pay deducted for
taking time off work.
"Workers will not be placed on
the backburner, and this is just the
first step in our actions. Govern-
ment must prioritise the trade
unions," he said.
According to Bahamas Hotel
Catering and Allied Workers
Union chief, Pat Bain, the trade
union movement is fully prepared
to go as far as possible to make the
government respond to their
demands and would not hesitate to
call a general strike if necessary.
_Denis Williams, president of
the Bahamas Electrical Workers
Union, which made headlines after
it implemented a work-to-rule fol-
lowing a breakdown in negotia-
tions, said it is disappointing that
the government is not working
hand-in-hand with labour.
They were joined by several oth-
er union executives, including
Nelarine Harding, president of the
Airport Airline and Allied Work-
ers Union, who is still in tense
negotiations with the government
over privatisation of Bahamasair
and other pressing issues.
According to Chief Superinten-
dent Hulan Hanna, the unions
exercised their constitutional right
to a peaceful protest and said they
fully complied with police requests
not to block the road. He said
they behaved in a manner befitting
the country in 2005.


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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005






I I-iUnoLJu / uLiI IVDLc;n 0, .UVVu, i rn.,AL.-


THE TRIBUNE


LOA NW


m


* By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE FNM Torchbearers
Association has announced that
it will host a youth conclave in
an effort to foster more aware-
ness about the role young per-


Conclave to focus on Opposition politics, youth and education


sons can play in Bahamian soci-
ety.
The conclave, which will be
held under the theme, "Securing


our future: Blazing the path
ahead," will focus on such issues
as: Opposition politics, religion
in politics, youth and education


and youthful minds breaking
barriers to opportunity.
"It is to get the young people
talking. It's to spark that flame


in the hearts and the minds of
young people. Also to get them
passionate about this country
and the issues facing the coun-
try.
"At the end of the day, our
forefathers built this country for
us. It is expected that we need to
preserve this country for. future
generations," said president of
the Torchbearers Association
David Jordine.

Connection
Ideas will also be formulated
as to how the FNM can establish
a connection with the youth of
the Bahamas in a meaningful
and rewarding way, Mr Jordine
said.
The morning session of the
youth conclave will feature
interactive discussions led by
youth leaders such as Italia
Johnson, Michael Pintard, Paul
Moss, and Don Saunders.


Mr Jordine said there will a
panel discussion aimed at gath-
ering views on topical issues
such as, "trade liberalisation and
what it means to the average
young person."
Mr Jordine described the PLP
government as "stagnant".
Young persons did not get what
they voted for, he said.
"When I go to Grand Bahama
and I see the number of
young people that is unem-
ployed.
"When I go to Eleuthera in
Hatchet Bay and Gregory Town
and just about the entire North
Eleuthera and see the nonexis-
tence of an economy, I feel that
this country is lacking, and the
present leadership is not doing
what is ought to be done in
order to move us swiftly in the
right direction," he said.
The youth conclave will be
held on Friday at the student
union building of the College of
the Bahamas.


Entrepreneur Dania means business


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
FREEPORT At a time
when so many small busi-
nesses in Freeport are strug-
gling to remain open
because of a downturn in
the economy, one young
entrepreneur is pursuing her


dream of starting a new
business.
. Dania Thompson, the
owner of Bahama Brides
Unleashed, is preparing for
the grand opening
of her very own bridal store
in the Regent Centre
near Finco Bank on Satur-
day.
Her dream, she says, has


finally become a reality.
"If God gives you a
dream you should go after it
because He will open doors.
We often say we don't have
the money or the economy
is bad, but if you have faith
and believe in yourself, God
will make a way," she said.
Despite the economic
hardship in Freeport, Mrs


Thompson said that
young women can still have
the wedding of their
dreams at an affordable
price.
Bahama Brides
Unleashed caters to the
entire range of bridal needs,
saving the bride the
headache and stress of plan-
ning a wedding.


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The First Annual

Omega Psi Phi Cleveland Eneas, Sr. Award

Bahamian students in their final year of secondary studies
are invited to apply for the new scholarship
sponsored by the Brothers of Omega Psi Phi in The Bahamas,
tenable at the College of The Bahamas commencing
September, 2006

Applicants are requested to write a 1,000-word essay on the
following theme:

"Are we as a people doing all that we can
to deal with illegal immigration?
Explain your view."

S Essays may be submitted in a sealed envelope to
the Office of the Vice President for Financial Aid,
College of The Bahamas main campus administrative building,
or by e-mail to: pixichapter@hotmail.com.

Essays received after
Thursday, October 21, 2005
will not be considered.

Essays will be assessed to determine 50 finalists.
Finalists will be invited to write another essay,
under exam conditions at the College of The Bahamas,
to determine the winner of the Award.

Applicants are allowed to submit one essay only
and are reminded to include complete contact details with their
submission


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A message to young employees


A MESSAGE TO YOUNG
EMPLOYEES
Recently I conducted a
management training
seminar for a local
company. I was impressed with
the company's strong desire to
improve the skills of its workers
and in its willingness to invest in
doing so.
At the same time I hosted the
seminar, the company was train-
ing some 15 new recruits. All
the recruits were young people.
All were young ladies.
I was asked to make a brief
presentation to the recruits and
I was more than willing to do so.
In my short remarks to these
freshman employees, I made
five points, which I outline
below.


EVERY MOMENT IS
EITHER AN ACCIDENT
OR DESIGN

First, I told the employ-
ees that they must
recognise that every moment of
their lives was either going to
be an accident or a design.
Either it was going to propel
them forward to their dreams
or plough them deeper into
some nightmare they were hav-
ing. Or that the moment would
enhance their value as a person
or diminish it.
I advised them that what their
moment became depended very
much on the decisions they
made in that moment. If they
want to live the life of their
design, move toward their


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STRAIGHT UP TALK


Z H IVAR GO LA I


dreams and enhance their per-
sonal value, they had to make
good decisions.
ATTITUDE IS
EVERYTHING

Second, I advised the
employees starting their
new jobs that "attitude" was
critical and that they needed to
have a healthy attitude in life.
I told them that attitude had
to do with what they thought
about life or any aspect of it,
how they felt about life or any
aspect of it and what they did
about what they thought and
felt.
I told them that they had to
see the moment they were in
not just in terms of the here-
and-now but in terms of what it
could mean for helping them
get to where they ultimately
wanted to be.
I warned them that they
could never be sure who was
watching them and that their
performance in their new jobs
could become a springboard to


NG


was prime minister, had the
opportunity to observe my atti-
tude, competence, character
and work ethic while I worked
in his office and based on what
he observed was willing to give
me a place in his cabinet,
notwithstanding my youthful-
ness and lack of political expe-
rience. Attitude makes a differ-
ence.
VALUE IS THE KEY
TO STABILITY AND
PROSPERITY

Third, I told the young
workers that they
needed to understand and
embrace the concept of "val-
ue". I shared with them how
often people would come to me
when I was an MP saying that
they needed a "government"
job.
When asked why they needed
a government job, they would
tell me that they needed a gov-
ernment job because it provided
stability. I pointed out that for
many of these people the sta-


I learned early in life that if I
proved my value to an
organisation, it would be
willing to keep me as long as I
was willing to stay and that
oftentimes, I could earn better
than the average person in
that same organisation.


something greater. g.
I used as example my owp
-that Hubert h shaeift, when tt
that Hubert Ingrahim, when he


!ility of a government job
meant that they yjol.d ,o
. edicre work or'6 o woWlk af
al ll aidstili keep the job.


I quickly let them know that
for me such a thing was unac-
ceptable. I told these attentive
new employees that such people
missed a critical point about
what provides stability on the
job, which wag that stability on
the job came from having gen-
uine value to the workplace. I
asked them if they felt that any
employer would easily seek to
get rid of an employee who was
a definite benefit to the com-
pany's profitability. They did
not think so.


I told them that I learned ear-
ly in life that if I proved my val-
ue to an organisation, it would
be willing to keep me as long
as I was willing to stay and that
oftentimes, I could earn better
than the average person in that
same organisation.
I further informed them that
while I knew that Icould be fired
from any job, I wanted to be of
such value to the organisation
that hired me that if they had to
get rid of me, they would have to
think about the decision very
carefully because they would
have to assess the impact of my
loss. Value, for me, was key to
success at work and in life.
YOU GO TO YOUR JOB
TO DO WORK


the single largest contributor tod
the social ills in our society andc
that it was a principal ingredients,
in producing poverty-for manyik
I shared with them how one of
my greatest fears was that my
children would grow up to be
sluggish people and how I
attempt diligently to instil it'
them an attitude and spirit of
industry.
I make them work hard at
their chores now so that they
would not be afraid of it of.
unwilling to work later. I told


them to go on their jobs an.'
make certain that their work;
made them a standout amox.;
their colleagues.
EACH HUMAN BEING
HAS GREAT POTENTIA!

ifth, I told these beauti-
ful young people why
had earned employment with
this progressive company thkt
they had great potential and
that they should do-alt in their
power to realise it. I told them
that, with the right attitud#
industry and a pursuit of value,
I had no doubt that when I
came to do another manage-
ment seminar for the company
some time in the future, it was
possible that I could very wOP
be training them.


r ourth, I told the recruits
that while they had THOUGHTFORTHE
been given a job, they had to WEEK
realise that they were going to
work. Many people have jobs
but do not want to work. They ith a more intelli-
want the job to get paid but V gent, focused a6d
don't realise that theyget paid creative approach, all employ-
-oni the j6b. tos dho te Worv" ,"i''raii get more'"oit of their
I told them that laziness was workers. -


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THE TRIBUNE,


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


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OW EESTOC K

NO W 1N S OCK


Nearly a tenth



living on less than



$3,000 a year


FROM page one
notwithstanding this given
the distribution of the popula-
tion 76 per cent of all poor
people live in New Providence
and Grand Bahama.
It was also found that nearly
75 per cent of poor households
have five or more members, 45
per cent of all poor households
are headed by single female
parents and children 14 years
and younger comprise 50 per
cent of the nation's poor.
The standard of living varies
greatly among nationalities,
with Haitians faring worst of
immigrant groups.
In comparison, according to
the March 2001 issue of Finance
and Development the quar-
terly magazine of the Interna-
tional Monetary Fund 36 per
cent of the population in Latin
America and the Caribbean
lives below the poverty line -
the same proportion as a decade
before.


The Bahamas Living Condi-
tions Survey commissioned in
2001 determined that the min-
imum amount of money needed
to buy an adequate low-cost
diet with allowances for non-
food needs in the Bahamas was
estimated as $7.84 per person
per day, which translates into
an annual income of $2,863 per
person.
The minister said the cost is
estimated in two stages: the first
takes into account the minimum
expenditure needed to buy a
nutritionally adequate diet while
the second considers the mini-
mum required cost of non-food
items like clothing and shelter.
The sum of these two estimates
equals the poverty line.
The report is a first for the
Bahamas and provides infor-
mation on household expendi-
ture, food and non-food items,
use of health facilities and social
programmes and general char-
acteristics of the population.
It is intended to provide a gen-


Forgeries of $10 confirmed


FROM page one
Speaking to The Tribune on
Tuesday, Supt Glenn Miller said he
was not aware the new $10 notes
were already being counterfeited.
However, he did not rule out the
possibility.
"The possibility is there, people
try to counterfeit anything these
days, but I have not received any
report of the new $10 bill being
counterfeited," Mr Miller said.
Mr Miller admitted, however,
that police are constantly investi-
gating forgery of Bahamian $50 and
$100 bills.
He said that once reports of coun-
terfeit money being distribtftd''are
made, police conduct an investiga-


tion until the source is uncovered.
A press release yesterday advised
the public to "pay attention to all
banknotes they receive, as there
may be counterfeits of all denomi-
nations in existence".
The release said that, on the
CRISP $10 bill, ensure that a water-
mark is present and that the por-
trait and watermark are of the same
image of Queen Elizabeth 11.
"Also, ensure that two threads
are present one wide, shiny thread
that weaves in and out of the paper
and changes colour when tilted back
and forth and one narrow thread
fully embedded in the paper."
The public is also asked to contact
the commercial crime unit if they
possess a suspected counterfeit bill.


eral picture of conditions under
which Bahamians live and in
particular the aim was to pro-
duce a poverty line with which
to estimate the proportion of
populations or households
unable to afford basic necessi-
ties for living.
"The findings should prove
to be a useful tool for the devel-
opment of socio-economic poli-
cies," said Mrs Griffin.
The survey spanned late 2001
and early 2002 when all of the.
field work was completed.
The survey was commissioned
to provide a general overview
of living conditions in the
Bahamas and focused on eight
inter-related issues demogra-
phy, migration, poverty, house-
hold expenditures; health, edu-
cation, employment, access to
community services, social pro-
grammes and housing.
More than 2000 households
were randomly selected
throughout the country to par-
ticipate in the survey.


JAMAL Bastian


Police

hunt

man for

robbery

Jamal Bastian also
known as "Sprinter" of
Kemp Road is being sought
by the Central Detective Unit
(CDU) for armed robbery.
He is of a dark brown com-
plexion, five feet nine inches
high, weighs 145 pounds and
is of a slim build.
He is considered armed
and dangerous. Anyone with
information of his where-
abouts is asked to contact the
CDU at 502 9930 /9991, the
police control room at 322
3333, Crimestoppers at 328
8474, or their nearest police
station.


Senator resigns

FROM page one
been exposed to a lot in the past four years and made
a personal determination that it was time for her to
move on.
"My aim at all times has been to add to the quality of
the debates and to ensure that the interests of all Bahami-
ans were protected, promoted and served," she said.
Ms McCartney is the second FNM senator to resign.
In April the FNM announced that Desmond Bannis-
ter resigned because of a number of personal and busi-
ness issues Which had arisen requiring his "full attention".
In addition, former FNM Cabinet Minister Zhivargo
Laing announced that he was retiring from active politics.
Ms McCartney was reappointed to the Senate on May
21, 2002, following an unsuccessful attempt to win the
South Beach seat in the House of Assembly.
She ran on the FNM ticket in the May, 2002, general
election. She was initially appointed to the Senate in
Julhe, 2001.


Supervisor of the Quarter (April June 2005)
Jacqueline Evans, Housekeeping.
with Andrew HeLal (VP, Operations) and Anthony
Smith (Director of Housekeeping Services)


Manager of the Quarter (April June 2005)
Selina Lockhart, Kitchen, with Andrew HeLal and
Gunther Kilian (Executive Chef)


Employee of the Month (July 2005)
Stephen Douglas
Public Space Housekeeping


Winners for the Month of August 2005
Stephanie Leadon (Supervisor of the Month -
Security), Benjamin Davis (GM), Angela Bain
(Supervisor of the Month, Housekeeping), Edwin
Roxbury (Associate of the Month, Laundry), Hasley
Sands (Manager of the Month, Kitchen)
Not pictured: Associate of the Month Valentino
Musgrove (Beverage Departmentfand Manager of
the Month Almonica Williamson (Housekeeping)


Associate of the Month (August 2005)
Gweneth Lightbourne, Front Desk Agent with
Zipporah Smith (Front Office Manager)ond
Andrew HeLol (V.P. of Operations)


Associate of the Month (June 2005)
Ruth Hanna Housekeeping


Supervisor of the Quarter (April June 2005)
Diane Murray-Flowers with Andrew HeLal
(VP, Operations), Pamela Rahming (HR
Manager)and Earle Bethell (GM)


Associate of the Month ( June 2005)
Dena Burnside with Andrew HeLal
(VP, Operations), Pamela Rahming (HR
Manager) and Earle Bethell (GM)


NASSAU
BEACH
Hotel


Associate of the Month July 2005
Kendrick Knowles, Kitchen, with Andrew
HeLal (VP, Operations), Pamela Rahming,
HR Manager, and F. Renee McKinney,
Director of HR (Cable Beach Resorts)


Manager or me luarrer (April June 2uuW)
Desiree Moxey, Sales with Andrew HeLal
(VP, Operations)and
Pamela Rahming, (HR Manager)


Employee of the Month August 2005
Philip Hepburn, Space Cleaning with
Renee McKinney (Director of HR Cable
Beach Resorts), Earle Bethell (GM), Charlene
Adderley, Exec Housekeeper and Pamela
Rahmlng (HR Manager)


Winners for the Month of July 2005
Chef Kenhugh Rolle (Manager of the Month, Staff
Cafeteria). Sandra Nottage (Associate of the Month
Dolphin Grill), Benjamin Davis (GM), Renee
McKinney (Director of HR Coble Beach
Resorts), Feleciana Williams (Supervisor of the
Month, Front Office)and Leroy McPhee (Manager of
the Month, Food & Beverage Department.)
Not pictured: Andy Clarke Winner of Associate of
the Month, Engineering and Theresa Bailey Super-
visor of the Month, Kitchen








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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005


THE TRIBUNE















Opposition comes under attack


N TENNYSON WeHs in the House of Assembly
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/ Tribune Staff)


SALVIN S ith ", . .. .
(Photo: Franklyii G Ferguson)


FROM page one
leader's position. It was no
longer a matter of whether he
had delivered his resignation
letter to the governor general.
"It is a public fact that his
parliamentary colleagues have
publicly withdrawn their sup-
port for him and there is no
such thing as an acting leader
of the opposition...there must
be a substantive holder of the
post of leader of the opposi-
tion.
"It appears to be clear that
neither the member for North
Abaco nor the member for
North Eleuthera have been in
touch with the prime minister
or the governor general or you,
Mr Speaker.
"That is the political reality
in the country today. The mem-
bers who voted for him to be
their leader of the opposition
have now publicly stated that
they want someone else the
member for North Abaco who
appears to be reluctant to take
up the post. This is serious,"
he said.
Mr Wells said those who
orchestrated the "embarrassing
situation" and allowed them-
selves to be "used as tools for
ulterior motives" should be
ashamed of themselves.
"Some of them were former
Cabinet ministers, even attor-
ney generals, and they ought to
have understood the system and
how it ought to function. This
conduct on their part shows a
lack of knowledge or under-
standing of the constitution and
the law and/or callous disregard
or disrespect for the system.
"The official opposition of
our country ought to behave in
a responsible manner. Members
ought to behave and act in a
principled manner and not out
of expedience," he said.
MP for Montagu Brent
Symonette interjected, stating
that the official leader of the
opposition is still the member
of North Eleuthera (Alvin
Smith) and that no offical notice
to the contrary had been issued.
"The constitutional leader of
the opposition is the member
of North Eleuthera, who is.sit-
tidrg right hereJYou (Mr Wells),


council that "they have no faith
in him", didn't have the cour-
tesy to submit his resignation.
"Just this morning it was
denied in the press, and I was
waiting for the denial to come,
with something about an
accommodation to be made,
and I understand accommoda-
tion to be a little bit of this
stuff," Mr Dupuch said, mim-
icking the fumbling of money
between his fingers.
"But I want to know how


anybody can fix their face to
come in here as an acting leader
of the opposition when he has
been sworn in as the leader of
the opposition. The public, not
only the thousands of decent
FNMs, have been dragged
down, the entire Bahamian peo-
ple, Bahamian system, has been
dragged down by these people,"
Mr Dupuch said, glaring at
opposition members.
"And they say they want to
lead the country?" he asked.


nor the prime minister, nor the
governor general are on notice
of anything to the contrary in
your official capacity. And as
such, Mr Speaker, the post of
leader of the opposition in this
place is not vacant and is
presently filled in law, majority,
whatever you want to say by
the member for North
Eleuthera, and Mr Speaker
those are the facts and the facts
speak for themselves," he said.
Mr Wells said he was deeply
saddened and disappointed to
see the FNM in the state it is in
today.
The party he had given so
much effort to was now being
destroyed on the altar of expe-
dience and selfishness. "But
more than that, this country
desperately needs an official
opposition that is functioning
properly, both legally and polit-
ically," he said.
Rising to welcome back to
the House Prime Minister Per-
ry Christie, Independent MP for
St Margaret Pierre Dupuch said
that Mr Christie had brought
"dignity and integrity" back to
the office of prime minister.
Mr Dupuch did not stop
there, but launched his own
criticism of the FNM.
"The public might be justi-
fied in saying that you (Mr
Christie) make your decisions
rather slowly, but the most
important thing is dignity and
integrity...character. People can
believe what you say. I stand
here this morning, Mr Speak-
er, and I have seen this parlia-
ment pulled down to the gut-
ter.
"We hear on the radio, with
no contradiction, that the mem-
bers of the FNM in this House
have recalled their confidence
in the leader. We hear on the
radio that the member of North
Eleuthera has appeared here
this morning as the acting
leader.
"I don't know if it is through
ignorance or complete lack of
respect for this office or the
public, but I don't know -
maybe I don't understand how
a man can be deputy to him-
self'iMr. Dupuch mocked.
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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE






PAGE 12, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005


THE TRIBUNEl


*LOALNEWS


House devastated



by huge blaze


A HOUSE on Saxon Way
that was a home to a large fam-
ily including eight children went
up in flames around 1.30am on
Wednesday.
Smoke from the blaze bil-
lowed far into the downtown as
area residents raced from their


homes to come to the rescue of
their neighbours' home that is
located next to the Father Mar-
shall Cooper Park.
The entire family was able to
escaped the flames.
Police said that three fire
trucks rushed to the scene. Fire-


fighters are seen here rushing
to put out flames that had taken
over the western end of the
building.
The family reportedly lost
everything. Investigations into
the cause of the blaze are con-
tinuing, police say.


* FIREFIGHTERS tackle the blaze
.......................................................................................................................... ................................................... ........................... .


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Government

officers on

project

management

training

* ANITA Bernard, perma-
nent secretary in the Ministry
of Works and Utilities speaks
at the opening of of a project
management course for senior
technical officers on Tuesday,
October 4,2005.
(BIS Photo: Derek Smith)


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* GEORGE Markantonis, president and managing director of Kerzner International Bahamas
Limited, at left, is shown presenting to the media attending the Marina Village press trip
(Photos: Tim Aylen)


* MR Markantonis, at right, is pictured with Margaret and Aaron Fodiman of Tampa Bay Maga-
zine moments after his presentation on Atlantis Phase III.


Foreign press experience Marina Village


MEMBERS of the American
media were recently hosted by
Kerzner International for a
,- viewing of the newly opened
Marina Village at Atlantis. *
The group included journal-
ists from Florida, New York,
Los Angeles and North Caroli-
na.
During their three-day, two-
night stay, the media were not


only immersed in the myth of
Atlantis but experienced a bit of
Bahamian culture at the Marina
Village.
Enjoying everything from the
vibrant Bahamian artwork and
crafts in the shops to the infec-
tious island music, the group
strolled through the colourful
streets lined with quaint clap-
board style houses with gables


and dormer windows that are
characteristic of local island
architecture.
The journalists enjoyed lunch
in the Bimini Road restaurant,
experiencing local island spe-
cialties created from ingredients
found throughout the islands of
the Bahamas, including conch
and Johnny cake.
They were also treated to din-


ner in the Seafire .Steakhouse
and. to a special chef's table in
Caf6 Martinique hosted by
celebrity chef, Jean-Georges
Vongerichten.
The final evening included a
cocktail reception and presen-
tation in Atlantis' luxurious
Bridge Suite hosted by the
company's public relation's
executives and George


FBI dclav% kow in-mMagatm into)


expk;'Copyrighted Material iptal


Syndicated Content -- _

Available from Commercial News Providers"


- 0e otw --p
dw 4b Now am
-=a- .


-MOO
-.m..


Markantonis, president and
managing director of Kerzner
International Bahamas Limit-
ed.


Mr Markantonis presented an
overview of the company's
Phase III project showcasing
renderings of the development.




The Government High School
80th Anniversary
Celebrations Committee
Salutes

Ms. Camille Johnson
attended the Governement High School
in 1963 thru 1970 and began her teaching
career at same in 1975. She taught
through 1982. Ms. Johnson is now
employeed at the Ministry of Agriculture
& fisheries and Local Government as
the Permanent Secretary.


80th Anniversary Gala Banquet
Saturday, 22nd October, 2005
The Ctystal Ballroom, Wyndham Nassau Resort
Cocktails at 7:00 pm Dinner at 8:00 pmr
For information call: 362-2922/424-2744 or 356-5460


BACARDI & COMPANY LIMITED


Bacardi & Company Limited is seeking
candidates for the position of

Assistant Controller of Finance.

The Company has been based in Nassau for over 40 years with
significant manufacturing operations in the areas of bulk rum
production and bottling of various spirit beverages, primarily for
export markets.

:The.Assistant Controller will be responsible for leading the budgeting
and analysis functions within the Finance department. While
reporting to the Financial Controller the incumbent will be required
to plan and implement the annual budget and quarterly revised
estimate processes across the entire organisation. In addition the
successful candidate is expected to manage the budget reporting
submissions into the parent company including treasury forecasts.
Other key duties include the performance of quarterly financial
statement variance analysis and management of our global product
costing system.

The successful candidate must hold a professional designation
with ten (10) to fifteen (15) years experience.
A CA or CPA designation is preferred.
Furthermore the individual must possess the ability to work
independently under pressure to consistently meet deadlines.
Must be a self starter and a team player.

Salary and benefits are commensurate with experience.

Interested candidates should forward copies of their curriculum
vitae directly to the Bacardi & Company Limited P.O. Box N-4880,
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas.
Attention The Human Resources Manager

Information may also be forwarded via e-mail to
dacartwright@bacardi.com

Application Deadline: October 28, 2005

"ACARDI AND THE BAT DEVICE ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF BACARDI & COMPANY LIMITED


MARATHON
PRESENTS "


Walfkt Rwiwaj for a
at Center Court
Saturday, October 8th, 2005 @


I7


Cwre

2pm


loiv The Mall at Maratovi avid British American Iisiravice oM Saturday, October
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----;-


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005, PAGE 13


FMce


Ul
1:8 M!"N'
0 B E R 7, 4:
I R
,MMIENATIONAL DE M"'iq' STRONG
N
)enim Day gives us f 0 C.
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W .ation will go furth, q cure fol 're,-'5 cancer.
i once to join British Am"dei amas in doing something positive,
V
tamcer Sociefy Of The Bah poort Grou
M.0
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0.,


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t










Ingraham's daughter called to bar


KELLI Keria Alexandria
Ingraham was called to the Bar
of the Bahamas as a counsel and
attorney-at-law last Friday.
Ms Ingraham, 25, is the sec-
ond daughter of former prime
minister Hubert Ingraham and


wife Delores. Mr Ingraham was
also called to the Bar at 25.
A member of the Hon-
ourable Society of Lincoln's
Inn, Ms Ingraham graduated
from the University of Western
Ontario with a bachelor's


degree in economics and stud-
ied law at the University of the
West Indies department of law,
then graduated from the Uni-
versity of Sussex in the UK.
She will practise with Higgs
and Johnson.


RaImLs tow $s aninnn, U s.I na'dJ 4 '

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to invite Tenders for the printing, binding, and delivery of the four
editions of the 2006-2008 Bahamas Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may collect a tender specification from the
office of the Vice President, Central and Southern Bahamas, located
in BTC's Administrative Building, John F. Kennedy Drive, between
the hours of 9:00a.m. and 4:30p.m. Monday through Friday.

Tenders are to be sealed in an envelope marked "TENDER FOR THE
SUPPLY OF TELEPHONE DIRECTORIES" and delivered to the
attention of:

Mr. Michael J. Symonette
President & CEO
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John F. Kennedy Drive
RO.Box N-3048
Nassau, The Bahamas

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2005.

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- -


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005







LCALANDARIBBAN


* COLYN Major, VP of student affairs; Cheryl Carey, director of financial aid and housing; Dr
Rhonda Chipman-Johnson, acting president; Jonathon Ford and Arien Rolle, members of Omega
Psi Phi Fraternity; Deyron Jones, president of Omega Psi Phi.



Fraternity backs



COB scholarship


next year


THE Omega Psi Phi Frater-
nity is collaborating with the
College of the Bahamas to pro-
lvide scholarship opportunities
for college-bound students.
The fraternity has agreed to
provide a full scholarship,
including tuition and fees, to an
incoming freshman for the
Autumn 2006 semester.
The announcement was made
when representatives of Omega
Psi Phi called on COB's acting
president Dr Rhonda Chipman-
Johnson.
High school students will get
the opportunity to compete for
the scholarship during an essay
competition in November.


The competition will take a
two-tier approach. The first
essay will be on the topic: "Are
we as a people doing all we can
to deal with the illegal immi-
gration situation?" and will be
judged by a select group of
teachers, including of COB
English lecturers.
The second tier will require
the top 20 entrants to write in a
controlled environment on a
topic to be determined.
.The winner will receive the
scholarship to attend the Col-
lege of the Bahamas.
The fraternity said it plans to
make this an annual competi-
tion, in an effort to give more "


young persons the opportunity
to pursue tertiary education.
Dr Chipman-Johnson
thanked the fraternity for the
scholarship and its contributions
in the past.
While she acknowledged that
the College of the Bahamas is
an affordable option compared
with many of its counterparts
in the Caribbean, the United
States and Canada, many of its
entrants are still in need of
financial assistance.
She also urged the fraternity
to consider a mentoring pro-
gramme for the young men
studying at the College of the
Bahamas.


rvcgor o mw


film I, Cua


W "Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content -
Available from Commercial News Providers"
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[HURSDAY, UL, i UBtH b, owuo, -.,..


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 16, TY E 6 0


Celeb


chefs h


Caribi


flavo

THIS year's Culinary Clas-
sic Food Festival got off to a
bang with the attendance of a
delegation of chefs from the
renowned Gourmet Magazine.
They were headed by their
corporate chef, Sara Moulton
of the Food Network fame,
Marc Murphy of the Landmarc
restaurant in New York and
Hurbert DesMarias, executive
chef at the Four Seasons in
Palm Beach.
This year the event has two
components.: The Bahamas
Culinary Classic and the Grand
Wine and Food Festival.
According to the Ministry of
Tourism, the event attracted
the highest calibre of culinari-
ans from hotels and institutions
in the Bahamas who competed
at the student and professional
levels.
These competitions were
open to all persons in the food
and beverage industry.
Events took place between
Tuesday September 27 and
Thursday September 29 at the
School of Hospitality and
Tourism Studies on Thompson
Boulevard.
Sara Moulton, corporate chef
of Gourmet Magazine hosted
the three-day Wine and Food
Festival.
Patrons of the event were
exposed to a variety bf delights
that speak to the flavour and
cuisine of the islands.
Celebrity chefs rated among
the top ten chefs in America
gave seminars and demonstra-
tions at the event on Village
Road. Seminars on wine pair-
ings and "Wine and Caribbean
Cuisine" were presented by two
of the top wine experts in the
United States.
The Ministry of Tourism's
objective for the festival was to
provide an exciting event so
that visitors and Bahamians
could be exposed to the cultur-
al diversity in food productivity
and presentation in the
Bahamas.
The ministry also wanted to
encourage greater utilisation of
indigenous foods, encourage
the upgrading of standards
within the local food produc-
tion industry and provide
opportunities for certification
testing and seminars for
Bahamian culinarians through
the American Culinary Feder-
ation.


















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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 16, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005












Local beauty




competing for


Miss

SHE is beautiful, intelligent,
and has an inner beauty that
radiates, even on the outside.
She is 20 year old Miss Haiti
Earth, Channa Cius, who is
currently in Manila, the Philip-
pines competing for the title'of
Miss Earth 2005.
Channa was born in the
Bahamas to Haitian parents.
She is a part time student
studying education and social
sciences, and a part time sales
associate who uses her spare
time to express herself
through art and fashion
design.
In addition to her creativity,
Channa said she is defined by
her ambition and compassion.
"When I was growing up, my
parents did not have much
financially but they instilled
in all of their children the
importance of getting a good
education, and using it to bet-
ter our condition," she
explained. larly f
"I am driven to succeed at discri
whatever I put my hands to, "I
thanks to their influence," she wher
said, adding that she is happi- sit ne
est when she is making others I was
happy. type
Channa's said she feels that for ye
she brings to the Miss Earth prouc
competition a maturity and she s,
kindheartedness that can be Ch
attributed to lessons learned title
while growing up as a Haitian the NI
child in the Bahamas. tion,
The presence of thousands francl
of illegal Haitian immigrants Haiti
has been a long standing social "I b
concern in the Bahamas., my t
As a child of Haitian par- cause
*eat-.Channa said she.regu- Chan


faced the stigma of ethnic
mination.
remember an incident
e a little girl refused to
xt to me in class because
'the Haitian girl.' This.
of thing really hurt me
ears until I learned to be
d of my Haitian heritage"
aid.
anna was bestowed the
of Miss Haiti Earth by
liss Bahamas Organisa-
owners of the Miss Earth
hise for the territory of
)elieve that it was not just
physical beauty that
d me to be chosen," says
nra. "I think that my


inner beauty is what made the
difference. I am a very spiri-
tual person, and I've been told
that I have a kind heart."
Her aim as Miss Haiti Earth
is to encourage visionary lead-
ers to consider the benefits of
sustainable development as
more important than quick fix
solutions to their economic
woes.
Channa said she is passion-
ate about the economic
empowerment of the less for-
tunate, particularly the peo-
ple of Haiti.
She said she dreams of one
day establishing holistic
schools across Haiti that will
not only teach&.the-basics :ofs


title


education, but will teach
people how to thrive
without harming their envi-
ronment.
Channa said she believes
that despite the many chal-
lenges facing it, Haiti is one
of the jewels of the Caribbean
with a rich history and distinct
culture which can be seen in
its exquisite art, music, anid
foods.
"With a little help," she
said. "Haiti can become the
vibrant country it once.was".
Channa hopes to become
known as the first woman of
Haitian heritage to capture
the Miss Earth title on Octo-
ber 2 .


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005, PAGE 17


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 18, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


LOCAL EW


THREE COB faculty members received the newly established Stanley A Wilson Award for Excellence in Research at the college's recent opening convocation
ceremonies. Established by COB to encourage and reward excellence in research, the new awardinemorialises Stanley Wilson, brother of COB council chairman
Franklyn Wilson. It is funded from an endowment created from a donation by Mr Wilson. Pictured from left to right are: Franklyn Wilson; award recipient Dr Ian
Strachan; award recipient Anne Albury Lawlor; Kara Wilson, COB freshman and daughter of Stanley Wilson; award recipient Dr Llewellyn Curling; Dr Rhon-
da Chipman-Johnson, acting president of COB.
(TLC photo by Wendell Cleare)




COB faculty members receive




Excellence in Research awards


THREE College of the
Bahamas faculty members
received the newly estab-
lished Stanley A Wilson
SAwax.d..for.- Excellence in
Research at the college's
opening convocation cere-,,.
monies.
Llewellyn Curling PhD,
from the school of sciences
and technology was awarded
for his research in the analy-
ses for random flow-induced
vibration of cylindrical
structures subjected to tur-
bulent axial flow.
Submitted and authored
by Dr Llewellyn Curling,
along with MP Paidoussie.
this work presents a physical
system or model that corre-
sponds to that of a nuclear
reactor/heat exchanger used
by electrical companies like
BEC.

Committee

According to the awards
committee, led by Dr Pan-
dora Johnson, COB vice
president of research, plan-
ning and development, "It
explains in an analytical way
that there is a much simpler
solution to handling experi-
mental data in engineering
that is usually a problem for
engineers."
Curling's work was
described as "a highly tech-.
nical but excellent and orig-
inal scientific paper that has
been peer, reviewed by oth-
ers in the field and it was


Presentation at opening


convocatll ceremonies


said that a search via Inter-
net revealed that there were
nine citations re: Its journal
impact assessment and
30 web citations of the
work."
Anne Albury Lawlor,
MA, from the school of
English studies, was recog-
nised for "The Harbour
Island" story which was co-
authored by her husband
Jim Lawlor.
It is "an historical
overview of Harbour Island
that provides a descriptive
perspective of life in Har-
bour Island and indicates an
extensive gathering of data."
Ian Strachan, PhD, from
the school of English was
commended for "Paradise
and Plantation," a substan-
tial literary work that pre-
sents the concept of the
tourism economy as a plan-
tation system or form of
slavery and is regarded as a
scholarly piece of work that
examines the present struc-
ture of tourism as well as
attitudes toward it."
The Stanley A Wilson
Award memorialises Stan-
ley Wilson, brother of COB
council chairman Franklyn


Wilson. It was established
by the College of the
Bahamas to promote and
reward excellence in
research.
The awards were present-
ed by Stanley Wilson's
daughter, COB freshman
Kara Wilson.

Welcomed

At the convocation, the
college welcomed 25 new
faculty members in the areas
of marketing, computer
information systems, music,
law, foreign languages, art,
mathematics, literature and
composition, accounts,
English studies, psychology,
economics, nursing,
linguistic composition,
mathematics, sociology and
biology.
Council chairman
Franklyn Wilson noted that
COB now has faculty from
over 20 countries.
"There are creditable uni-
versities all over the world
who cannot say the same. I
see that as a strength. Let's
build on that strength," Mr
Wilson. said.


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12 OZ



HEINZ
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S299


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ROMAINE HEARTS

EACH
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S EACH
ONIONS
3LB BAG
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SOFT & LITE
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KRAFT
AMERICAN
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7 oz ............. ........ ...................... 2/$2.99
HILL
COOKIES, BOURBON, COCNUT, CUSTARD,
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ORVILLE REDENBACKER
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ARMOUR
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FRANCO AMERICAN
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H BO-W CINDERELLA Esposito. A bumbling policeman and a cabby chase bank robbers. C
STORY (2004) 'PG-13' (CC)
O (:00) ** BULL DURHAM (1988, Comedy-Drama) *** THE TERMINAL (2004, Comedy-Drama) Tom Hanks, Catherine
H BO-S Kevin Costner. A baseball groupie gives pointers to a Zeta-Jones, Stanley Tucci. A European living in an airport befriends a
brash young pitcher. Cl 'R (CC) stewardess. Cl 'PG-13' (CC)
HARRY POT- *** THE WAR OF THE ROSES (1989, Comedy-Drama) Michael Dou- **' MAN ON FIRE (2004, Crime
MAX-E TER-PRISONER glas, Kathleen Turner, Danny DeVito. An attorney recalls a once-happy Drama) Denzel Washington, Dakota
OF AZKABAN couple's bitter divorce, n 'R' (CC) Fanning. 'R' (CC)
(:00) * MATCHSTICK MEN (2003, Comedy-Dra- * TORQUE (2004, Action) Martin Henderson, Ice HAUNTING DE-
MOMAX ma) Nicolas Cage. Acon man bonds with his daughter Cube, Monet Mazur. A drug dealer frames a biker for SIRES (2003)
and plans a swindle. Cl 'PG-13' (CC) murder. 'PG-13' (CC) Beverly Lynne.
(:00) **% OUT OF TIME (2003, (:45)SHO Me Soul Food "Love Me or Leave Me" Barbershop Barbershop
SHOW Suspense) Denzel Washington, iTV. Fist (iTV)"Eliza- (iTV) Lem discovers Bird. C (CC) Calvin neglects Calvin neglects
Cl PG-1 3'(CC) bethtown.' the barbershop. the barbershop.
(6:30) s MAR * THE DISTINGUISHED GENTLEMAN (1992, Comedy) Eddie Mur- * *s HEATHERS (1989, Come-
TMC CI X (2003) Lisa phy, Lane Smith, Sheryl Lee Ralph. iTV Premiere. A con man embarks on dy) Winona Ryder, Christian Slater.
Kudrow. an unlikely trip to Washington, D.C. A 'R' (CC) Premiere. 'R' (CC)


THE TRIBUNE


REA WOO3DFUNT EFOLSS


Tel: 9 6 6 3


3256 MaOOD
46 Madeira Street


lvie Gift Certific

( make great gifts






THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6,2005, PAGE 23


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 24, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005


SECTION


BUSINESS


business@tribunemedia.et Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Fiscal deficit




for 2004-2005




struck $165m


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
rThe Government will be hoping that
the "modest" $0.1 million fiscal sur-
plus it achieved for the first month
of its 2005-2006 budgetary year
,:proves an ongoing trend, after the
Central Bank of the Bahamas yesterday revealed
that it racked up a $165 million deficit for the
2004-2005 full year.
The Central Bank's monthly report for August
revealed that the Government had failed to
reduce the fiscal deficit much beyond the one it
ran in 2003-2004. The deficit that year was $166.3
million, meaning that the 2004-2005 deficit was
only 0.79 per cent lower.
Those figures are likely to lend more credence
to arguments advanced by the likes of the Nas-,
sau Institute, which is dismissed in some quarters
as consisting of "right-wing kooks"; However,


0 By NEIL HARTNELL
Deficit flat compared to 2003- Tribune Business Editor


2004, but $0.lm 'modest
surplus' for July gives
government better news


the evidence produced by the Central Bank to
date appears to be fully supportive of their argu-
inents.
The Central Bank figures showed that while
government revenue and grants had increased by
.10.35 per cent in the 12 months to June 30, 2005,
going from $943.7 million in 2003-2004 to $1.041
billion this year, this was again offset by rising

SEE page 7B


THE Bahamas is "particu-
larly vulnerable" to further
OECD-style initiatives that will
attempt to impose greater
transparency and reporting
requirements on its financial
services sector because it is the
only country in the. Western
Hemisphere yet to join the
World Trade Organisation
(WTO).
The warning came yesterday
from Mark Sills, an attorney
who is a key adviser to the
Government on the WTO and
related free trade matters. He
also warned that bilateral
investment agreements with


other nations, which were
being looked at by the
Bahamas as a way to boost its
financial services industry and a
"possible substitute" for joining
the WTO, carried their own
perils.
In a presentation to a
Bahamas Financial Services
Board (BFSB) seminar, the
partner in the law firm Fasken
Martineau DuMoulin said:


"The Bahamas, as the only
non-WTO member country in
the Western Hemisphere, is
particularly vulnerable to new
initiatives to impose greater
transparency and accountabil-
ity obligations relating to off-
shore companies operating
within its jurisdiction."

SEE page 6B


Bahamas leaving Barbados

double tax opportunities

unexploited
- By NEIL HARTNELL Att rn ue d
Tribune Business Edito At. ey.rgesfinite


A LEApING Barbadian
accountant yesterday said
Bahamian financial services
providers and those from other
countries had left the wealth-
creating opportunities provided
by their nations' no-tax status
and his country's tax treaties
"largely unexploited".
Ben Arrindell, Ernst &
Young (Barbados) country
managing partner and an inter-
national tax partner, told the
Bahamas Financial Services
Board's (BFSB) product devel-
opment seminar: "I've always
felt there are opportunities,


revenue sharing
agreements as
alternatives to TIEAs
and OECD 'hostility'
largely unexploited, for enti-
ties established in countries like
the Bahamas, which have no
taxes and no tax treaties, to
leverage on the tax treaties of
other countries, particularly
where investments are con-
cerned.......

SEE page 8B


PwC to survey

financial sector


N ALLYSON MAYNARD-GIBSON


Allyson Maynard-Gibson,
minister of financial services
and investments, yesterday
said the Government has
agreed to engage PriceWater-
houseCoopers (PWC) to do
a survey on the Bahamas
financial industry, with the
findings expected to be used
to review and update the
Government's five-year
strategic plan.
Addressing the Bahamas
Financial Services Board's
(BFSB) Tax Symposium, held
at the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel, the Minister confirmed
the PwC survey's findings,
which will assess the
Bahamas' marketing strate-


gies and competitive posi-
tioning, would first be pre-
sented at the BFSB's annual
Exuma retreat in January
2006.
Rferring to an international
PWC survey realeased earlier,
,Mrs Maynard-Gibson said:
"Knowledge of international
tax, but also of domestic tax-
ation, is surprisingly low and
will need to be improved dra-
matically if client expectations
are to be met".
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
the PwC survey further indict-
ed that currently, the knowl-
edge of international tax mat-
SEE page 8B


Money Safe.
Money Fast.



|I@ Bank of The Bahamas
Onne at
B2 -,a--B--- Onhm "m


Government's free trade
adviser says bilateral investment
treaties may impact National
Investment Policy


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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005


I -t TRIBUNE


What brokera


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for stocktakingo

Saturday, October 8, 2005











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We thank you for your patronage and apologize
to our customers for any inconvenience caused.


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Invites Applications
For The
Regional.Certificate i diction Studies Programme

Qualified persons are asked tb return the completed
applications to the office'of the Resident Tutor on Thompson
Boulevard,
By 15th October 2005

The nine month Certificate Programme is due to begin
November 2005
The programme includes courses in Fundamental Concepts
in Addictions, Pharmacology, Communication Skills,
Programming for Special Populations, Prevention, An
Integrative Seminar: An Independent Study Project,
Counseling Skills and a Practicum in Counseling


Applicants are expected to be able to satisfy the university's
criteria for Matriculation, and must have attained a basic
level of secondary education, with adequate language,
science and math skills

Applications can be obtained from the office of Dr Nelson
Clarke at Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre
Ph: 324-1246

An application fee of $100 is required, and must accompany
the completed application

(By bank draft only)


Financial Avisors Lt
gFinancial Advisors Ltd.t


Pricing Information As Of:
5S October 2005


S2wk-Hi 2wk-Low Symbol Previous Cose Today's Close CharDge daily Vol. EPS $ DivF PE Ieid
1.10 0.73' Abaco Markets 0.73 0.73 0.00 -0.207 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.00 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.456 0.340 6.9 3.40%
7.24 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 7.24 7.24 0.00 0.587 0.330 12.3 4.56%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.204 0.010 3.9 1.26%
1,80 1,40 Bahamas Waste 1.40 1.40 0.00 0.112 0.060 12.5 4.29%
1.15 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.10 1.10 0.00 0.066 0.030 16.7 2.73%
9.19 6.94 Cable Bahamas 9.19 9.19 0.00 0,618 0.240 14.9 2.61%
2.20 1.53 Colina Holdings 1.53 1.53 0.00 -0.046 0.000 NM 0.00%
9 10 7.05 Commonwealth Bank 9.10 9.10 0.00 0.705 0.410 12.9 4.51%
2.50 0.67 Doctor's Hospital 2,40 2.40 0:00 0.429 0.000 5.6 0.00/
4.20 3.85 Famguard 4.20 4.20 0.00 0.428 0.240 8.8 5.71%
10.70 9.50 Finco 10.70 10.70 0.00 0.695 0.510 15.4 4.77%
9.50 7.25 FirstCaribbean 9,50 9.50 0.00 0.,695 0.380 13.7 4.00%
9.24 8.40 Focol 9.24 9.24 0.00 0.675 0.500 13.7 5.41%
1 99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 0.022 0.000 52.3 0.00%
10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities 9.94 9.94 0.00 0.526 0.405 18.9 4.07%
8.65 8.20 J. S. Johnson 8.65 8.65 0.00 0.526 0.560 16.4 6.47%
6.69 4.36 Kerzner International BDRs 5.63 5.51 -0.12 107 0.122 0.000 46.1 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 2.036 0.760 4.9 7.60%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Veekly Vo EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
13.00 12.50 Bahamas Supermarkets 12.25 13.25 11.00 1.488 0.960 9.1 7.25%
10 14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10,00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.800 NM 7.80%
0 60 0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.044 0.000 NM 0.00%
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41 00 43.00 41.00 2,220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
1600 13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 1233 13.33 12.50 1.105 0.810 14.6 6.93%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.35 -0.103 0 000 N/M 0.00%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% ast 12 Month Div $ Yield %
M.5 1 iv6 iviel set;r ,iu


1 1.4Z>Z 1.,^.-, 1 1 C5140 L l Mon y Market Fund
2.4169 2.0311 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund
10.5576 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
2.2560 2-1491 Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1 1347 1.0631 Colina Bond Fund 1
IDEX LOSE435-031; /Yfti31I031


2.4169 "*^
10.5576" '
2.255981'"
,1347s22"'


4 .5t5~ '55/


B1SX ALL SHARE INDEX- 19 Dec 02 1,000,00 YIELD last 12
52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid S Buying I
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask S Selling
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Lae
T1day's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. T
Canrge Change In closing price from day to day EPS S A comr
Daily Vol Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asse
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Mear
P/F Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The F
- AS AT AUG. 31, 2005/ .. AS AT AUG 31, 2005
- AS AT SEPT. 9, 2005/ - AS AT AUG. 31, 2005/ "". AS AT AUG. 31. 2005
ATO T* 0 a ,j0YM W is7 I 4FloEUTY I (I?"4.. .'"o .


month dividends divided by closing price
price of Colina and Fidelity
price of Collna and fidelity
st traded over-the-counter price
Trading volume of the prior week
pany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
It Value
ringful
'Idelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100


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NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that SCHAERER HANS-PETER OF
TOWER HEIGHTS, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 6TH day of
OCTOBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.








SE NIORFUND ACCOUNTANT


The successful candidate will have 5 7 years
experience in the accounting/auditing fields. CPA
required. Responsibilities include verification of
fund portfolios and Net Asset Value Calculations,
liaison with administrators and related parties,
management of cash and custody portfolios and
liaison with offices in multiple jurisdictions.



CORPORATE ACCOUNTANT

The successful candidate will. have 3 5 years
experience in the accounting/auditing fields.
Responsibilities including consolidation of accounts
and liaison with audit firms and institutional and
regulatory bodies.


SENIOR COMMISSION AG

The successful candidate will be responsible for
ensuring management of agent trails which include
the calculation and payment of trails and
commissions per the contracts with these parties
Maintain and update the contracts with agents and
communicate with both individual and institutional
agents in multiple jurisdictions. Some supervisory
responsibilities will also be required.

Please send resumes via fax: 242-326-3839,

email gems@batelnet.bs

or Post Office Box CB-12809


BUSINESS


-- I ---c~-` -


-


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Nassau hotels room

1 ^ Ac/ ^^^^H^I^H


revenue rises Dy 9. 47


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
TOTAL room revenue for
New Providence's hotels was
up by 9.4 per cent against 2004
comparatives for the eight
months to August 2005, offset-
ting a drop in tourist arrivals
during a period when concerns
over rising oil costs and
increased consumer prices
mounted.
The Central Bank of the
Bahamas' report on monthly
economic developments for
August, released yesterday,
said the 9.4 per cent increase
in New Providence's total room
revenues was fuelled by a 1.1
per cent rise in average daily
room rates, while occupancy
levels were up 4.1 per cent.
However, the Central Bank
report found that total tourist
arrivals to the Bahamas for the
year to August had fallen by
6.9 per cent to 3.744 million,


Ministry


seeking


Cacique


nominees

NOMINATIONS for the
annual Cacique Awards are
open and the Ministry of
Tourism is working hard on
getting the word out to
ensure the best and brightest
in the tourism industry are
recognised.
-9tensive

In addition to an extensive
print campaign, the Cacique
Planning Committee has tak-
en to the airwaves to encour-
age Bahamians to nominate
the persons who they think
have provided exemplary
service in one of the eight
general categories of the
Cacique Awards.
The one-hour Cacique
Radio Show is broadcasted
every Monday at 8am on
ZNS 1540 from a different
island in the Bahamas. Dur-
ing the show, Cacique win-
ners from that island are
showcased. The first show
began on September 12.
Winners

Just last Monday, the
Cacique Radio Show broad-
casted from Grand Bahama
where well-known Cacique
winners like Anthony Han-
na, Hadley Forbes and Erica
Gates were interviewed by
"Good Morning Bahamas
Show" host Brett Archer.
Once nominations close, a
Blue Ribbon panel meets
and selects the winners in
each category. The Cacique
winners will then be present-
ed with their Duhos at a gala
banquet in January.


I ^ ^


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.
I II I I J


But concern on rising oil

prices and inflation revealed


with air arrivals off by 1.9 per
cent and sea arrivals down by
9.1 per cent in comparison to
2004.
Reduction

Due to last year's hurricanes,
Grand Bahama saw a reduc-
tion in total tourist arrivals by
25.6 per cent, with air arrivals
off by 34.5 per cent and sea
arrivals down 20.1 per cent.
Arrivals to the Family Islands
were down by 8.8 per cent, with
declines in air and sea arrivals
of 1.4 per cent and 10.3 per
cent respectively.
However, there was better
news on New Providence,


where the 8.5 per cent increase
in air arrivals offset the 5.3 per
cent fall in sea arrivals, leaving
total tourist arrivals relatively
unchanged.
Meanwhile, the Central
Bank said the lifting of credit
restrictions in 2004 had
increased demand for non-oil
imports and this, coupled with
rising international oil prices,
had led to "significantly higher
prices for consumers in the sec-
ond quarter".
Consumer price inflation for
the 12 months to August 2005
was 1.8 per cent, according to
the Central Bank, but "the
,impact of higher energy prices
was more pronounced in the


second quarter when the over-
all rate of increase advanced
to 2.5 per cent from the corre-
sponding period last year".
Among the categories that
saw cost increases were trans-
portation and communication;
food and beverages; education
' and medical and healthcare.


But despite the concerns, the
Central Bank said: "The out-
look for the domestic econo-
my remains favourable through
the end of 20o5, supported by
ongoing tourism investments
and robust residential con-
struction activity.
"While still higher energy
prices remain a threat to the
outlook, expectations of the US
economy's resilience following
the passage of Hurricane Kat-
rina should sustain the growth
momentum."


* CARMETA Miller, senior
manager, communications,
Grand Bahama Tourist Office
and Good Morning Bahamas
Show host Brett Archer inter-
viewed the Nature Tourism
Cacique Award winner for
2000, Erica Gates (far right).


'Responsibilities:
* To manage the active investigation and liquidation of all
outstanding items in agreed specific accounts across the region
* To take ownership of establishing and guiding regional, teams
engaged in investigation activity.
* To ensure the timely and accurate production of periodic'status
reports on the Suspense and General Ledger accounts
* To provide expert analysis, identify trends and changes and
make recommendations to senior management in areas within
the organisation that need improvement in accordance with
the organisation's Internal Controls and Service Level
Agreement criteria
* To manage the relationship between the relevant department
and the internal/external units, thereby ensuring that all
identified issues are resolved and actioned
* To be accountable for the Risk and Control requirements of the
Investigations Unit
* To evaluate the unit's performance, developing new features in
the department where required, ensuring that Internal Controls
is given full priority and highlighting areas of strengths and
concerns
* To manage and control the unit's budget and resources


Responsibilities
* To establish and strengthen the production of periodic
financial reporting to all bank areas for reconciliations,
investigations, and verifications
* To take responsibility for the timely, complete and accurate
production of all regional management reporting related to
internal General Ledger and Bank account reconciliation
* To ensure that the reconciliation systems used are operating
within agreed parameters
* To provide expert analysis, identify trends and changes and
make recommendations to senior management in areas that
need improvement so Internal Controls and Service Level
Agreement criteria are met
* To manage the relationship between the relevant department,
the internal and external audit teams and Finance, thereby
ensuring that all audit items are resolved and actioned
* To be held accountable for the department's Risk and Control
requirements
* To take responsibility for evaluating the unit's performance,
developing new features in the department where required,
ensuring that Internal Controls is given full priority and


Applications with detailed resumes should be submitted no
later than Monday 17th October, 2005 to:
Marisa Chadderton
Operations & Technology Resource Officer
FirstCaribbean International Bank
Head Office, Warrens
St. Michael
Barbados
Tel: (246) 367-2142
Email: marisa.chadderton@firstcaribbeanbank.com


Only applicants who are short-listed will be contacted.


Legal Notice


NOTICE

GASPARI LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) GASPARI LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on October 5th,
2005 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated Ltd.,
Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI.
Dated this 6th day of October, A.D. 2005.


Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator



NOTICE
FOR SALE
2000 Ford Crown Victoria
(Damaged condition)

This vehicle may be inspected during working hours,
Monday thru Friday upon request through the office of the
Administrative Officer, IDB House, East Bay Street, Nassau.
Sealed offers marked "Bid for Automobile" should be sent
to:

The Administrative Officer
P.O.Box N-3743
Nassau, Bahamas

Offers will be accepted until noon on October 17th, 2005.
This car will be sold "as is".
The right is reserved to reject any or all offers.


Prerequisites:
* A minimum of five (5) years in a managerial role and in a large
operations centre environment (preferably in the financial services
industry)
* Proven track record of excellent people management and team
building, especially where it relates to Remote Management
* Ability to operate under strict timelines and over extended periods of
time, particularly during peak periods
* Experience in the use of business processes and accounting policies to
resolve investigations
* Demonstrated banking and accounting knowledge. (Foreign currency
accounting experience would be an asset)
* Experience in the use of operational and automated banking and
reconciliation systems
* An understanding of the use of technology to achieve targets and goals
* Developed communication and computer literacy skills
* Good decision-making and problem-solving skills
* Good accounting, analytical, and reporting skills
* Well-developed negotiation and persuasion skills


highlighting areas of strengths and concerns in order to ensure compliance
with the Internal Controls environment within the Reconciliations area
* To prepare and control the unit's budget
* To identify deficiencies within the relevant departments for the purpose of
developing and implementing enhancements and improvements
Prerequisites
* A minimum of four (4) years in a similar role and in an operations
environment (preferably in the financial services industry)
* Extensive Audit, Risk Management and Internal Controls experience
* Advanced knowledge of accounting, particularly Financial and
Management Accounting
* Proven experience in people management and team-building, especially
where it relates to remote management of resources
* Evidence of strong planning skills
* Strong decision-making and analytical skills
* Good accounting, analytical and reporting skills .
* Well-developed organisational skills
* Excellent relationship-building skills
* Experience in foreign currency accounting will be an asset


FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK


Caribbean Pride. International Strength. Your Financial Partner.
FirstCaribbean International Bank is an Associated Company of Barclays Bank PLC and CIBC.


FirstCaribbean International Bank is the-combination of CIBC and Barclays Bank in the
Caribbean, Bahamas and, Belize. We are the region's largest publicly traded bank with over
3,000 staff serving over 5.3 million people in 16 countries. We manage over 700,000 active
accounts via 100 retail branches and corporate/international banking centres.


B^Mffw~aTTa~iC~f~i^


UMAAE ACCOUNTING CNRL (OPERATIONS


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE'


PAGE 4B. THURSDAY. OCTOBER 6, 2005


GN-270
MINISTRY OF TRANSPORT &
AVIATION DEPARTMENT OF
CIVIL AVIATION


DEPARTMENT NOTICE
SALE BY TENDER


The following vehicle is offered for sale:


2000 Chevrolet Cavalier Sedan 2200 CC
Serial No. 3G1JX5447YS201515
Plat #C2157


This vehicle can be viewed by contacting Mr..
Dudley Pratt at the Department of Civil
Aviation, Crawford Street, Oakes Field, Nassau.
Viewing hours are between 10:00a.m'. and
4:30p.m. Monday through Friday.


Sealed tenders should be addressed:


Tender for Vehicle
Director of Civil Aviation
P.O.Box N-975
Nassau, Bahamas


Tenders are to be submitted no later than
5:00p.m. on Friday 28th October 2005. The
Director reserves the right to reject any or all
Tenders.


SOTHEBY'S International
Realty Affiliates yesterday
announced that the holder of
its master franchise for the
Bahamas, the former Dami-
anos Realty, has opened five
offices for the Bahamas.
George Damianos and Vir-
ginia Damianos-Premock, own-
ers of the firm, will operate


four offices as Damianos
Sotheby's International Realty,
and a fifth office as Lyford Cay
Properties Sotheby's Interna-
tional Realty.
"Joining the Sotheby's Inter-
national Realty network allows
us to take our client service to
an even higher level," Mr
Damianos said.


"In addition to the presti-
gious name, we can provide
greater global exposure for our
Bahamian property listings,
thus securing the best possible
value for our clients.
"The credibility, recognition
and international reach of the
Sotheby's International Realty
brand are unparalleled. Being
connected to such a strong and
powerful real estate network-
is a tremendous benefit to our
firm and, most importantly, to
our clients."
Michael Good, president and
chief executive of Sotheby's
International Realty Affiliates,
said: "This expansion reflects
our commitment to provide
luxury real estate services in
many of the world's most beau-
tiful locations. George Dami-
anos leads an elite group of real
estate professionals who are
dedicated to consummate
knowledge and excellent client
service.


"The properties listed by
these offices will be marketed
to a worldwide audience. We
look forward to helping con-'
nect the international clientele
of our Sotheby's International
Realty affiliates with homes in
the Bahamas."
In July, Damianos Realty
was awarded exclusive master
franchise rights for the Sothe-
-by's International Realty brand
for the Bahamas.
Specialised
The firm was established in
1945 and specialised in the
finest luxury properties the
Bahamas has to offer, including
waterfront estates, beach front
condominiums, private islands
and vacation homes.
Damianos Sotheby's' Inter-
national Realty will have three
offices in the Family Islands',-
Marsh Harbour and Hop:e
Town in Abaco, and Eleuthera.


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE.

RANEW DEVELOPMENT, LTD.
(In Dissolution)
Pursuant to the provisions of section 138 (4)(a), (b) and (c) of The
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice is hereby given
that:- .. .
(a) RANEW DEVELOPMENT, LTD. is in dissolution.,
(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution is the 28th
day of September A.D., 2005.
(c) The Liquidator is Jonathan E Catherwood for the above-
named Company.
................ I.
Jonathan F. Catherwood
Director
-RANEW DEVELOPMENT, LTD.
(In Dissolution),


,
4




Baha Mar, a 50oo-acre, mixed-use destination resort complex represents the single largest resort investment in
the history of The Bahamas. Phase one will include more than 2,o00 guest rooms across multiple, first-class:
branded hotels, and the Caribbean's largest branded Las Vegas-style casino. Baha Mar Development owns
and operates the Wyndham Nassau Resort, Radisson Cable Beach & Golf Resort, and Nassau Beach Hotel.
The three properties, the 35,000 square-foot: Crystal Palace Casino and adjoining x8-hole golf course were
recently acquired by Baha Mar, which is currently investing $15 million in cross-property renovations.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Cable Beach Resorts, the operations arm of Baha Mar Development Company Ltd, seeks.to hire
professional individuals .for the following positions:

Director of Human Resources: Responsible for three resorts and casino, staffing qualified
personnel, ensuring employment statue compliance.. Ability to create/develop various company-
wide programs including but not limited to: benefits, insurance, bonus incentive compensation,
pension and 4oxK. Complete fam iliarity with, and knowledge of the labor laws of The Bahamas,
unions and industrial relations. A graduate degree in Business Administration or Human Resources
with at least 5 years of progressive experience in the hotel industry is preferred.

Resort Manager: Responsible for :guest satisfaction, cost control and hotel profitability. Focus is
general services, rooms division emphasis and integrity of the resort operation. Ability to evaluate
and select alternative courses quickly, identify and solve problems as well as handle complex
matters in the workplace is required. A degree with 8-xo years of progressive experience in the hotel
industry including 3-4 years as Rooms Division Manager, Resident Manager or Assistant General
Manager, international experience and excellent housekeeping managerial skills are preferred.

Director of Food & Beverage: Responsible for coordinating, supervising and directing all property
food and beverage operations, including but not limited to restaurants, bars, catering, room service,
kitchens and culinary, purchasing, promotions and in-house merchandising. Achieves profitability
through increased sales, and payroll control, while maintaining high quality products and service
levels. An undergraduate degree or equivalent is preferred with at least 6 years of progressive
experience in a hotel or related field.

Chief Engineer: Responsible for ensuring operations, repair, maintenance, and service of all
mechanical, electrical, and plumbing equipment, while supporting the resorts' goals of guest
satisfaction, cost control and quality workmanship. Oversees and participate in the Preventative
Maintenance program to ensure that all guest rooms, public space, meeting, facilities, pool and
beach, landscaping and grounds meet required standards. A 4-year college degree or equivalent with
5 or more years of related experience is preferred, in addition to computer skills and current
certification and licensing.

Housekeeping Manager: Responsible for ensuring the operation of the Housekeeping Department
in an attentive, friendly, efficient and courteous manner, providing all guests with quality service
and a clean and safeenvironmrnent e hroighout their stay, while efficiently managing expenses and
maximizing service levels.' A.miti u&rn f~ years of progressive experience in a hotel or a related
field is required, or an undergraduate degree with i or more years of related experience.

To ensure full consideration, interested candidates should submit a cover letter and curriculum vitae
with salary requirements under confidential cover to hr(5)cablebeachresorts.com no later than
October o10, 2005. All responses will be held in the strictest confidence.


NASSAU
BE ACH
Hotel


Damianos to op erate




five Bahamas offices




as Sotheby's affliate


LEGAL NOTICE
THE ISLE OF MAN
COMPANIES (TRANSFER OF DOMICILE) ACT 1998

TEAM TRADE INTERNATIONAL LIMITED
OMPANY NUMBER: 58353C


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, in accordance with Section
8 (2)(c)(i), of the isle of Man Companies (Transfer of
Domicile) Act 1998 that the above company proposes to
apply to the inancialSupervision Commission to redomicile
the abovecompanty to the Bahamas and that unless written.
objection is made within ten days of the date of this notice,
the Company may be redomiciled.

Dated this 21st day of July, 2005. -

Pamela France
Director


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MARCIA MAY SANDS OF
CARMICHAEL ROAD, P.O. BOX CR-55770, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement o the facts within'twenty-eight
days.from the 29TH day of SEPTEMBER, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas..


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ODONEL VALBRUN OF ANDROS
AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight c.ays from the 29TH day of
SEPTEMBER, 2005 to the Min. ':er responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.








NEEDED

A financial Institution is seeking a Financial Controller.

The successful candidate must have the following
qualifications:


B.Sc in Accounting
Chartered or Certified Public Accountant
Minimum of three years experience
Management Level
Possess significant computer experience


SubmitResme t Fa #93-11


ABLE S MACH &0U.IF ROUORT
MA$SAU A"H*t


WYNDHAM NASSAU RESORT'
& CWSTAL PMAC S CAS4NO--


--- --~----~~-


I


BUSINESS I


I







THETRBUEIUSNES HUSDYOCOBR-, 00,-AG-5


I II ........


MILLARS HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION
(Nassau)

Lot #12 Block #3, a sixteen year old, single
story triplex with floor area of 2,378 sq. ft., each
apartment consist of 2 bed, 1 bath, living, dining
area and kitchen. Lot size is 7,500 sq. ft. 75 x
100.


Appraisal: $268,411.00


Heading west on Carmichael Road, enter West
Ave., on the southside immediately after Topps
Laundermat. Take first right which is Wimpole St, go around curve on left which is London Ave.,
travelsouth on London Ave., property is 2nd to last building on the right before T, Junction (High
street) L shape triplex, painted green, trimmed white.

No. 8 BELL SNOW CLOSE
BEL-AIR ESTATES SUB.
(Nassau)
All that piece parcel or lot of land having an
area of 6,000 sq. ft. (60 x 100) designated as
lot No. 348 of Bel-Air Subdivision, situated on
Turtle Drivve on Bel Snow Close, being the
fourth lot east of Turtle Drive, on the south side
of the road. The subject property is on flat
terrain with grass lawn and paved driveway in
front, the grounds are competley enclosed and
fairly maintained. This property consist of a 6
year old single story, 4 bedroom, 2 bathroom,
livingroom, diningroom, familyroom and kitchen
single family residence with floor area of 1,711 sq. ft.
Appraisal: $193,200.00
Driving west on Carmichael Road until you reach Turtle Drive, turn left onto Turtle Drive and Bel
Snow Close is the first corner on the left after the Fedder Road that runs parallel to Charmichael
Road. The house is the 4th on the right painted white trimmed pink with wall in front.


CYCLOPS GARDEN
(Nassau)

All that lot of land numbering as "H" being one
of several lots in Cyclops Gardens located off
the northern side of Cowpen Road one corner
west of Faith Avenue Junction. This property
comprise of a two and a half year old single storey
duples with a gross floor area of 1,512.42 sq.
ft., each unit consisting of 2 bedrooms all wth
wall airconditioning units, 1 bathroom, living,
dining and kitchen building is effectively new.
Appraisal: $219,450.00


Heading south on Faith Avenue to junction off Cowpen road make a right then first right again.
The subject property is the 4th on the right tan trimmed brown.

WEST RIDGE ESTATES
aine (Nassau)

All that piece parcel or lot of land having an
area of 34,089 sq. ft., being lot #152, of West
Ridge Estates Subdivision, zoining is single
wa c t family residential with all utilities available.
The subject property is on hilly terrain at the
top of a ridge that offers a lovely view to the
northeast. The grounds are attractively
landscaped with a grass lawn, ornamental
shrubs and flowering plants. Other
improvements include chain link fencing along
the sides and rear boundaries, with a concrete block wall at the front with asphalt paved driveway.,
Appraisal: $1,049,788.90

There are two buildings located on this property. The main 2 storey house is located at the highest
point of the poroperty. This house has an approximate gross floor area of 4,8000 sq. ft., upstairs
consist of 3 full bedroom suites (each with a full bathroom), inlcuding a master bedroom suite,
an office with a bathroom (shower only) and sitting room. Downstairs consist of living room, formal
dining area, casual dining area, powder room and spacious kitchen.(at least 500 sq ft)


........ TROPICAL GARDENS
(Nassau)

Lot #3 a four year old single story house with
floor area of 1,340 sq. ft., and consisting of 3
bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, living room, dining
room, tv room and kitchen. Lot size is 7,200
sq. ft., wide in front, and 98 ft wide at the back,
84 ft long at the north and 80 ft long at the
south.

Appi isal: $189.963.90

Traveling west on John F Kennedy drive, pass the second entrance into the airport, the first right
after Esso's Division Office which is Tropical Gardens Road, then first right which is Kiskadee Drive,
then first corner on the left, property is third house through on the right.


DUNDAS TOWN
(Abaco)
2 storey, 4 bed, 2 bath on 1/2 acre lot no. 25,
living room, dining room, family room, kitchen
downstairs, upstairs there are 4 bedrooms and
2 bathrooms.Age is 16 years, color is yellow
trimmed with white, upperlevel 1,080 sq. ft.,
lower level, 1080 sq. ft., garage 420 sq. ft.,
covered verahandahs 390 sq. ft., the land is
portion W of one of the Dundas Town Crown
Allotment parcels situated near Forest Drive
being just under half acre in size. Located on
the southern side of a ridge being 12 feet plus
above sea level with little likelihood of flooding
grounds well kept with above average landscaping including grass cover with palms and citrus
trees. Enclosed on 3 sides with a 6 ft., metal fences and ficus trees at the fron. 30 ft., by 36 ft.,
roof garage now used as a nursery school. At the upper level on the eastern side is covered
wooden verandah 6 ft., x 30 ft., interior walls concrete, ceiling of sheet rock and floor of ceremic
tiles.
Appraisal: $267,987.91


JOHNSON ROAD
(Nassau)

All that lot of land having an area of 5,520
sq. ft., (60 x 92) situated on the corner of
Johnson Road and Step Streeet. This property
is rectangular and comprised of a 12 year old
single storey house that consist of 3
bedrooms, 1 bathroom, living, dining room
and kitchen. Also an efficiency apartment
attached. The subject property is slightly
above the level of the abutting roadways with
minimal landscaping. The property is open
with chain link fencing along its western boundries.
Appraisal: $139,868.40
Heading east along Bernard Road, turn through Johnson Road opposite St Augustine's College
Drive all the way to the curve heading west the subject house is first house on the right all white
trimmed yellow.

5,ELIZABETH ESTATES
(Nassau)

All that piece, parcel of land having an area
of 5,000 sq. ft., being lot no. 46 of the said
subdivision situated in the eastern district of
... New Providence, between Prince Charles and
Yamacraw Road, approximately 2,200 ft east
of Fox Hill. This property consist of a 21yr old
single storey house which was expanded from
700 sq ft within the last 11yrs, to having a
gross floor area of 1,460 sq ft quality of
construction is good and maintenance is
average. The effective age of the building is
5 years, the house is comprised of 3 bedrooms,
2 bathrooms, living, dining area kitchen and laundry room. The property is sufficiently elevated
and yard is open and the grounds are neatly maintained with minimal landscaping in place.
Appraisal: $162,750.00
Heading east along Prince Charles, drive passing the intersection of Fox Hill, take first corner
right (Trinidad Ave), corner right before Government Clinic, then first right again, (Tobago Cresent)
the subject house is second house on the curve right, just after BEC Power Plant. Painted all
white.


ALLOTMENT 67, MARRIGOLD FARM ROAD (NASSAU), All that lot of land having an area of 1.173 acres being lot No. and is situated on Marigold Farm Road
in the ara known as allotment 67, a said subdivision situated in the south eastern district of new Providence, Bahamas. This property is Vacant and area has all
utilities & services. Appraisal: $148,50.00

Travelling on Joe Farrington Road turn onto Marrigold Farm Road heading south, the subject is the second to last propert on the left hand side of the road near
the pond.
NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA), Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and bounded on North by Early Settler Drive and South by Deal Investment
Ltd., this is a single family zoning and 50 ft., above sea level. This site encompasses a foundation with plumbing and roughing inplace and well compacked quarry
fill. The concrete floor has not been poured as yet. The foundation is 2,511 sq. ft. Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is
vacant and a hill over looking the Atlantic Ocean. Appraisal: $46,167.18
BAHAMA SOUND (EXUMA), Lot #7088 situated in Bahama Sound, Exuma section 10 East. Great Exuma approximately 10.5 miles west of George Town lot is
square in shape on elevation of approximately 15 ft., above sea level contains 10,000 sq. ft., No adverse site conditions noted. This property is single family
residence. Property is located on the northwestern side of the Queen's Highway, about 10.5 miles northwest of George Town. Appraisal: $27,562.50
MURPHY TOWN (ABACO) Lot #78B vacant land, the property has average surface drainage and is not suseptible to flooding under normal conditions. Land
size 104 x 78 approximately 11,277 sq. ft. Estimated Value: $18,649.33
LOWE SOUND (ANDROS) All that parcel of lot of land located next door to the New Mt Freedom Baptist Church or approximately five miles from the administrative
complex approximately 5,000 sq. ft., and rectangular in shape with a 3 bed, 1 bathroom wooden residence. Appraisal: $52,258.50
FLAMINGO BAY SECTION 3 (EXUMA) Lot #102, Palm Hill situated inland in the Flamingo Bay development. It is Hillside Residential and has 150 ft., footage
on Hill Road and contains 10, 438 sq. ft., in area. This property is undeveloped. The subject property is about one mile south of the George Town township.
Appraisal: $33,075.00
BAHAMA SOUND (EXUMA) Lots 12571 & 12572 Bahama Sound of Exuma No. 10 underveloped residenial lots located near the Forest and Mt Thompson on
Utopia Drive. 80 feet frontage and depth of 125 ft 10,000 sq. ft., in area each there is no service in the area. The road is gravel George Town 10 miles away.
Appraisal: $26,250.00 EACH
BAHAMA SOUND NO. 18 (EXUMA) Lot No. 17861 Bahama Sound of Exuma No. 18 a subdivision situate approximately 2.5 miles north westwardly of George
Town. The property is zoned residential and is level. Electricity, paved roads, water, telephone lines and cable tv services are available along Queen's Highway.
Water is also available from dug wells but city supply is available. The propert is undeveloped. Land size 82.10 x 122.11 x 82.10 x 121.0 Estimated Value:
$33,075.00


Fo odtoso aead te nomto otc


ISNPU


I' -


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS






THETRIBUNE


PAGE 6B. THURSDAY. OCTOBER 6, 2005


BUSISS


I


TOPIC:
'The impact of rising oil prices: Policy
alternatives for a small, open economy like The
Bahamas."


VENUE:
Choices Restaurant, Thompson


Boulevard


cnNt






44
aN ^S/l.


Bahamas vulnerablei


outside WTO


FROM page 1B
Mr Sills added that it was
likely that the European Union
(EU) would seek to extend its
Savings Tax Directive to
nations such as the Bahamas,
having already gone beyond the
EU's borders to include depen-
dent or associated territories
such as the Cayman Islands and
the Isle of Man.
The Savings Tax Directive
had initially sought to require
non-EU countries to agree to
mandatory information
exchange with EU countries
about foreign account holders
with accounts in their jurisdic-
tion. Any countries that refused
would be-subject to withholding
taxes imposed on payments to
recipients of EU-sourced
income or dividends in their
country.
The EU has backed off
slightly from this approach, and
has compromised with Switzer-
land, Austria and Luxembourg
on information sharing, allow-
ing them to impose a withhold-
ing tax of 15 per cent for the
first three years, 20 per cent for


the following three years, and
35 per cent thereafter.
However, Mr Sills warned
that the Bahamas and other
international financial centres
were likely to experience "con-
tinuing pressure" to provide
greater disclosure and trans-
parency on entities operating
and registered in their coun-
tries.
Bilateral
On bilateral investment
treaties, which some have
viewed as providing guarantees
of security of access, and forc-
ing the Bahamas to make fewer
commitments than under the
WTO, Mr Sills suggested that
Washington's '2004 model'
treaty would serve as the tem-
plate in any negotiations
between the US and this nation.
This model treaty, though,
contained several clauses with
implications for the Bahamas'
current national investment
policy and economy. The US
model treaty required both par-,
ties to give investors from either
country "treatment no less
favourable than it accords" to


those from its own nation,
"with respect to the establish-
ment, acquisition, expansion,
management, conduct, opera-
tion and sale or other disposi-
tion of investment in its terri-
tory".
Mr Sills questioned the impli-
cations of this clause for the
Bahamas' National Investment
Policy, as it would force the
Government to open up sec-
tors previously reserved for
Bahamians if it signed up.
"That's something the
Bahamas should consider very
carefully if it embarks on this
route," Mr Sills said.
The model US bilateral
investment agreement also pro-
vided for investors who felt
they had lost funds or profit
from regulatory changes or oth-
er measures introduced by the
host government to submit a
claim to an international arbi-
tration centre outside the sig-
natory countries.
This, Mr Sills, added created
further concerns for the
Bahamas if it signed up to such
an agreement with the US
when it came to devising legis-
lation and regulations.
He also warned that the US
model bilateral investment
agreement contained clauses
that might enable Washington
to interfere with financial trans-
fers to the Bahamas.
Stating that his thoghts were
"purely personal", Mr Sills said:
"At first glance, the idea of
negotiating a bilateral invest-
ment treaty with a few pre-
ferred investors may seem
attractive,
"However, if the US bilater-
al investment treaty model, is
any guide, the ultimate negti-
ated result is likely to be mdre
intrusive in terms of modiflia-
tions to existing Bahamian
investment policies in the finan-
cial services sector, than tbhse
negotiated pursuant to W1O
membership."
Mr Sills added that the WVO
would not force the Bahamasto
give up banking coiflidentia1ty

visions in the W .


DATE:
TONIGHT at 6:30 pm

PANELISTS:

The Hon. Pierre Dupuch/ H. Vincent Coleby,
Petroleum Usages Review Committee
Ministry of Trade & Industry


Garnett Dawkins, President,
Bahamas Petroleum Retailers Association

Earl Bethell, President,
Bahamas Hotel Association

Rupert Pinder, Lecturer,
COB's School of Business

Marion Johnson, Corporate Secretary,
Small Business Association



For more information, please call 302-4430.


I





fr44
0

~


SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATION LOAN DIVISION
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

NOTICE

COMMONWEALTH SCHOLARSHIPAND FELLOWSHIP PLAN
CANADIAN AWARDS 2005
Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for scholarships tenable in Canada
under the Commonwealth Scholarship and Fellowship Plan commencing September, 2006.
The scholarships are intended for men and women of high intellectual promise wanting
to pursue advanced courses of study in Canada for two (2) academic years. The scholarships
will be awarded of post-graduate study, i.e. Master's or Doctoral degrees only. Scholarships
to undertake research in Canada for up to twelve (12) months are available to assist
individuals who are enrolled in a doctoral program as a provisional or full-fledged student
at a university in their home country, or a third country.
Candidates wishing to undertake a second Ph.D. degree, studies in medicine or dentistry,
postdoctoral studies/research or clinical training, an MBA program, cost-recovery or any
other academic program not publicly funded are not eligible.
There is no restriction to age of candidates. However, preference will be given to those
who have obtained a university degree within the last five (5) years.
It should be noted that the normal minimum requirement for consideration for a Canadian
Commonwealth Scholarship is an upper Second Class degree.
Those candidates planning on applying for a place in the Master of Business Administration
Degree Program (Commerce, Accounting, Finance, etc.) must undertake the Graduate
Management Admission Test (GMAT). The minimum acceptable scores vary from university
to university in the range of 550-600.
In recent years, a number of Canadian university graduate admissions have required a
candidate, before entry, to take the Princeton Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

VALUE OF AWARD
Each scholarship is intended to cover the expenses of travel, living and study and include:
(a) transportation to Canada and return, by the most direct economy air
passage, as arranged by the Canadian Bureau for International Education (CBIE);
(b) a settling-in allowance of $500 (CDN);
(c) approved tuition and other compulsory university fees (excluding board
and residence);
(d) a personal maintenance allowance of $1,200 (CDN) per month from the
scholarship start date;
(e) approved medical and hospital expenses;
(f) an annual book allowance of $800 (CDN) and certain research and
equipment allowances;
(g) extra baggage vouchers for personal effects when returning to home
country;
Further details and application forms may be obtained from the Scholarship and Educational
Loan Division of the Ministry of Education. Applications should be returned in time to
reach the Scholarship and Educational Loan Division, Ministry of Education, P.O. Box N-
3913, no later than Friday November 4th, 2005. Application forms received after this date
will not be considered.


Scholarship and Education Loan Division
28 September, 2005


PUBLIC NOTICE

DEFENCE FORCE RECRUITMENT EXERCISE

CORAL HARBOUR BASE (RBDF) The Royal Bahamas Defence
Force is presently conducting a Recruitment Exercise. Applications
can be obtained at the Ministry of National Security 3rd floor of The
Churchill Building, Rawson Square.

The deadline for submission of Applications is 10th October 2005
Commencement date for training of successful applicants is scheduled
for February 2006.

Applicants Should:

Be a Bahamian Citizen
Be between the ages of 18-24 years
Possess a minimum of (5) BJC's or equivalent including Math
and English with 'C' passes or above.
Obtain two Character references and a Police Character
Certificate.

Applicants are required to be successful in all the following:

A Psychometric Evaluation
Recruitment (written) Examination (Math, English and General
Knowledge)
Physical Fitness and Swimming Tests
Vetting Assessment and Medical Examination
Interview Assessment

Emphasis for recruitment will be placed on candidates with:

Strong Character and leadership qualities
Desire to maximize potential in a disciplined environment
Willingness to spend time at sea
Willingness to conduct tour of duty at satellite base on a
Family Island or outside the Bahamas.
Good Academic background
Proficiency in a second language
Proficiency in a musical instrument


Interested persons may contact:

Lieutenant Commander Franklin Clarke
Personnel & Recruiting Officer
Defence Force Headquarters
P.O. Box N-3733
Coral Harbour, New Providence


~~`-~- --' ~- I ___~_ I ill ''


KONMARIS& CO.,





Will b


::-:__::_::: _:_:::::::-:::::: :: ::. ::: ::::::j::::::






THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005, PAGE 7B


Fisc deict or204RBC

Royal Bank
PRof Canada"


PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE


import and related stamp
duties, the key driver of the
22.3 per cent rise in total rev-
enue. The latter outpaced the
5.1 per cent increase in total
expenditure, which was con-
centrated in interest payments
as well as subsidies and other
transfers."
Still, the improved fiscal pic-
ture could yet be 'wiped out'
if the Bahamas Public Services
Union (BPSU) and other pub-
lic sector unions are successful
in achieving their demands for
wage rises.
Economic
The Nassau Institute, which
is an economic think-tank, ear-
lier this week reiterated its call
for the Government to "reign
in" its expenditure to prevent
Bahamian taxpayers' suffering
"a rude awakening" from what
it described as "reckless spend-
ing habits".
"It is patently clear that the
Bahamas government must


reign in expenditures and
improve tax collection within
the present tax regime or face
increasing taxes," the Nassau
Institute said.
"Even though the country
was provided with impressive
sounding revenue numbers, the
facts are that excessive spend-
ing by the Government
remains the order of the day."
Apart from the fiscal picture,
the Central Bank's outlook for
the Bahamian economy during
the remainder of 2005 is still
favourable. "Preliminary indi-
cations are that economic cone
ditions remained favourable
during the first eight months
of the year, fuelled by robust
private sector credit demand,
which supported domestic
expenditures, particularly for
residential construction activi-
ty," the regulator added.
However, it acknowledged
the concerns that existed over.
the impact on the Bahamian
and other economies from ris-
ing fuel prices.


FROM page 1B

recurrent expenditure.
This measures the Govern-
ment's fixed costs, such as puyb-
lic service wages and rents,
Recurrent spending increased
by 3.18 per cent for the 2004-
2005 fiscal year, according to
the Central bank, rising from
$994 million to $1.025 billion.
The Government's capital
spending, which goes on items
such as infrastructure projects,
:rose by 35.35 per cent in fiscal
2004-2005, probably at least
partly due to repairs provoked
by the September 2004 hurri-
,canes. The $109.5 million in
.apital spending was much
'higher than the previous year's
,$80.9 million.
And while revenues and
grants may have increased,
.import duties, which constitute
the bulk of the Government's
revenue, fell slightly in 2004-
2005, dropping by 0.2 per cent
:.to $408.5 million.
However, the 2005-2006 fis-
.cal year started off on a better
note for the Government and
James Smith, the minister of
,state for finance.
a,,. The Central Bank report
-said it achieved a "modest sur-
plus" of $0.1 million for July,
the year's first month, com-
..pared to a $12 million deficit
.fr 2004-2005.
The Central Bank report
said: "The general buoyancy in
economic activity underpinned
a 29.9 per cent growth in


Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each property.

HOUSES/APARTMENTS/COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS


(702) Lot #30 Golden Gates
#1, containing a duplex/
apartment residence, with 2
- two bed one bath, living,
dining rooms and kitchen
units (lot size 6,000 sq ft.).
Appraised value $177,000.
(433) Lot #165 located
Dorsetteville Subdivision,
Bamboo Town Southern
District containing duplex
apartment building (2,112
sq. ft.). Property 5,000 sq. ft
(50 x 100). Appraised value
$180,000.
(401) Lots #17 & #18 Crown
Allotments, Love Hill
Settlement, Andros. Contain-
ing a two-storey residence.
Appraised Value $100,000.

(806) Lots #1 & #2, Block
3 with a parcel situated
between Lot #1, Block 3,
containing a 4 bedroom
condominium Sunset View
Villas, West Bay Street.
Appraised Value $750,000.
(806) Lot #13, Block 4 of
Coral Waterways, Section
One, Coral Harbour, N.P.
with two houses and a
swimming pool, #312 N.P.
bounded Northwardly by a
canal or waterway of the said
Subdivision known as
Flamingo waterway and run-
ning 102.004 ft. Eastwardly
by lot #14 and 146.145ft
Southwardly by a reservation
for a private road. Appraised
Value $530,000
(601) Lot #25, containing
a fourplex (2 bed 1 bath)
George Glinton Subdivision
- west of Kennedy Subdivi-
sion, off Soldier Road Lot
approximately 8,967 sq. ft.
Appraised value $172,000.
(433) Lot #27 of Village
Allotment #14 in the Eastern
District, containing residence
situated on Denver Street off
Parkgate Road in the Ann's
Town Constituency, N.P.
Property size 2,500 sq.ft.
Building size 990 sq.ft.
Appraised value $50,000.
(304) Lot #213 containing
residence in Elizabeth Estates
East Subdivision, N.P.
Appraised value: TBO


(102) Condominium Unit
N-310 Silver Sands Lodge,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
Appraised value: TBO
(304) Lot #2 in block #8,
Steward Road, Coral Heights
East Subdivision situated in
Western District of N.P.,
approx. size 8,800 sq. ft. with
a split level containing two
bed, two bath, living, dining
& family rooms, kitchen and
utility room-approx. size of
building 2,658 sq. ft.
Appraised value: $322,752
(902) Parcel of land located
at the southern end of
Tarpum Bay containing a
single family two-storey
residence 4,888 sq. ft.- 7
bedrooms/2 bathrooms..
Appraised value $77,000.
(902) Lot #4 located in "The
Village" in the settlement of
Rock Sound, Eleuthera with a
11/2 storey building contain-
ing a 3 bed, 2 bath, kitchen,
living room and linen closet.
Appraised value $109,795
(902) Lot #80 (57 ft x 50 ft)
located Tarpum Bay,
Eleuthera containing 3
bed, 1 bath house. Appraised
valued $80,000
(902) 0.281 acre lot situated'
Governor's Harbour with (1)
2 storey stone commercial
and apartment building con-
taining six apartment units,
one laundry and (2) One sto-.
rey building containing two
2 bed/1 bath apartments.
Appraised value $387,900.
(902) Lot situated North Pal-
metto Point, 100 x 100 x 100
x 100 containing a one story
house with 3 bed, 2 bath,
living room, kitchen and
linen closet. Appraised value
$123,192.
(902) Lot #14, Block #23
(125 x 80) situa e&dlajnbow
Bay, leputi fgfiing
a one stbirey ho with 2
bed/1 bath, kitchen, living
room and 2 linen closets.
Appraised value $89,998.
(902) Lot of land 94 x 94 x
150 x 150 on Queens High-
way just south of Palmetto
Point with a two storey stone
building containing two
apartments. Each unit has 3


bed/2i/z bath, kitchen, living
room and 3 linen closets.
Appraised value $287,209.
(902) Lot #50 x 75 x 75 x
51 situated in Tarpum Bay
containing a one storey stone
house with a 3 bed/2 bath,
kitchen, living room and
linen closet. Appraised value
$107,750.
(105) Lot with three bed, two
and a half bath residence,
situated Bailey Town, North
Bimini. Appraised value TBO
(903) Lot #15 located
Johnson Harbour View
Estate, Harbour Island, size
6,750 sq. ft. with a 3 bed,
2 bath residence. Estimated
value $95,000.
(901)Lot 97 Johnson's
Harbour View Estates,
Harbour Island. 9,063 sq. ft.
containing 4 bed/3 bath CBS
residence. Appraised value
$421,000.
(902) Lot of land 175 x 184 x
175 x 200 situated one mile
south of the Palmetto Point
intersection, containing a
partially completed two
storey structure. Appraised
value $107,222.
(903) Southern portion of Lot
#27, located Johnson's Har-
bour View Estates, Harbour
Island. Lot size 72 x 48, con-
taining a 2 storey building.
Appraised value $110,000.
(701) Single storey commer-
cial building situated on the
south side of Harrold Road
containing two offices.
(108) Lot #146 Magellen
Crescent Poinciana Garden
Subdivision, Freeport, Grand
Bahama, with partially built
2,700 sq ft triplex 1 bed, 1
bath apartment. Appraised
value $47,500.
(902) Lot (8,000 sq. ft.) situ-
ated Sand's Alley, North Pal-
metto Point with incomplete
triplex (concrete structure
- belt course 2,529.6 sq. ft).
Appraised value $49,414.

(601) Lot (3,150 sq. Ft.) lo-
cated Mason's Addition with
partly completed restaurant.
Appraised value $35,000.


S_______VACANT PROPERTIES __


-(701) 2 Vacant lots situated'
Domingo Heights Subdivi-
sion, east of East St. South
and north of Malcolm Allot-
ment. Appraised value TBO.
(304) Lot D-2,415 west of Fox
Hill Road and 659 ft. south
of Joe Farrington Road, N.P.
Appraised value: TBO
(565) Vacant lot #5 located
Eleuthera Island Shores, Sea-
side Drive Section B, Block
#15, Eleuthera. 9,691 sq. ft.
Appraised value $21,805.
(902) Vacant Lot situated
South Palmetto Point, Eleu-
thera, North of Public Road
known as "Hog Hole Road".
Dimensions 140 x 135 x
100 x 35. Appraised value
$15,000
(902) Lot #46, Block #32,
Bahamia. Section IX Free-


port, Grand Bahama 90 ft
wide along Stratford Way and
150 ft along Stratford Court.
Appraised value $26,000.
(108) Lot #296 Section A
Royal Bahamian Estates,
Grand Bahama, vacant single
family lot .49 acre. Appraised
value $22,000
(902) Lot #5 & 6A, Block #3
Club Estates Subdivision
situated in Rock Sound near
the Rock Sound Club.
Appraised value $25,000.
(902) Lot #5 of Bowles Tract,
8.35 acres (2,017.17 ft x 200
ft.) located approximately 2
miles southeast of Governor's
Harbour. Appraised value
$292,000
(401) Lot #38 located Love
Estates Subdivision western


district of N.P. Approximate
size 1.39 acre Appraised
value $300,000.

(400) 1 acre parcel of land
situated Conch Sound,
Andros. Appraised value
$18,000.
(565) Vacant Lot #9
(11,406.65 sq. ft.) situated
in Mango Lane Section "B"
Block #15, Eleuthera Island
Shores on the island of
Eleuthera. Appraised value
$25,665.
(717) Vacant Lot #16 (4,920
sq. ft.) in Caroline Estates
Subdivision, in the southern
side of Cowpen Road west
of Faith Avenue. Appraised
value $42,000.


OFFICERS
COMMERCIAL ANDROS TOWN LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE
BANKING CENTRE Tel:242-368-2071 Tel: 242-394-3560
Tel: 242-356-8567 (400) Mrs. Vanessa Scott (716) Mrs. Ingrid Simon
(800) Mrs. Monique Crawford NASSAU MAIN BRANCH (717) Mrs. Kaye Forsythe
(802) Mr. Marvin Clarke Tel: 242-322-8700 (723) Ms. Alistair Curry
(803) Mr. Brian Knowles (701) Mrs. Stephanie Saunders (724) Mrs. Nancy Swaby
(806) Mr. Jerome Pinder (702) Mrs. Anastacia Knowles (725) Ms. Marguerite Johnson
(807) Mr. Larry Bowleg (703) Mrs. Venus Bonimy (565) Mrs. Catherine Davis
(808) Mrs. Hope Sealey .JFK DRIVE BRANCH MACKEY STREET
PALMDALE SHOPPING Tel: 242-325-4711 Tel: 242-393-3097
CENTRE BRANCH (401) Mr. James Strachan (601) Ms. Nicola Walker
Tel: 242-302-3800 PRINCE CHARLES BAY & VICTORIA BRANCH
(201) Mr. David Barr SHOPPING CENTRE Tel: 242-322-2451/3
(202) Mr. Frank Dean Tel: 242-393-7505/8 (303) Mr. Desmond McIntosh
(205) Ms. Thyra Johnson (501) Mr. Keith Lloyd (304) Mrs. Alicia Thompson
NASSAU INT'L AIRPORT CABLE BEACH FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH
Tel: 242-377-7179 Tel: 242-327-6077 Tel: 242-352-6631/2
(433) Mrs. Lindsey Peterson (466) Mrs. Winnifred Roberts (101) Mr. Tobure Holder
GOVERNOR'S HARBOUR, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO (102) Mrs. Damita Newbold-
ELEUTHERA Tel: 242-367-2420 Cartwright
Tel: 242-332-2856/8 (908) Mrs. Joyce Coleby-Riviere (103) Ms. Garnell Frith
(902) Mr. Brian Hanna (909) Mrs. Sylvia Poitier (104) Ms. Jackie Knowles
HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH (910) Mr. Travis Spicer (108) Ms. Sylvie Carey
Tel: 242-333-2230 BIMINI BRANCH
(901) Mr. Antonio Eyma Telephone:242-347-3031
(903) Mrs. Rose Bethel (105) Ms Velderine Laroda

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean RBC
SRoyal Bank
SRegstered trade-mark of Royal Bank ofC anada Of Canada-
The Lion & Globe symbol and R8C are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MURGLEN REID STRACHAN,
CROOKED ISLAND ST., C/O BOX 3216, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 29TH day of
SEPTEMBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that SCHAERER KATHARINA OF
TOWER HEIGHTS, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and-that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 6TH day of
OTOBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
B -oX N- 7T147, Nasau, Bah, ia.
'"nK ''''iGii~ril'rjf .- *-:..'. ---- '. 1" '11 '.L'*m iju. -'"* ^ ,"' 1


IN SIGH
-o.te toie
bein thenes ,


FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK

Caribbean Pride. ilnternation-al Strength. Your Financial Partner

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

for

MANAGER, CORPORATE FINANCE
We are the combination of CIBC and Barclays Bank in the Caribbean, Bahamas and Belize. We
are the region's largest publicly traded bank, serving over 4 million people in 15 countries. We
manage over 500,000 active accounts, with over 3,000 staff, 80 branches and centers.

FirstCaribbean is inviting applications from suitably experienced candidates for positions
working with other Corporate Finance professionals in our Corporate Banking unit.

About the job:

This position will be based in the Bahamas and reports to the Director, Corporate Finance.
As a senior member of the Corporate Finance team within Corporate Banking, this role
is key to the achievement of business growth targets in all 16 countries that FirstCaribbean
is represented.

The primary focus of this role is source, negotiate, structure and close transactions for
large value and complex business clients. Transactions vary from small private deals to
high profile multinational acquisitions and disposals, expansions and new project finance.

About You:

V At least 5 years experience in the corporate and financial services business
and comprehensive understanding of the products, financing solutions, and
services offered to regional and international corporate clients.
V Re-pe-aflsucces-insourcing and closing financing solutions in the excess of
US$10 Million for major clients in the Real Estate, Retail/Wholesale
Distribution and Service (including Financial institutions) business sectors.
V Expert-level knowledge of at least one of the following industry sectors:
Retail/Wholesale Distribution, Real Estate, or Service Industries (including
Financial Institutions); and the proficiency to effectively deliver solutions
to other sectors.
V A University degree status with ACIR qualification or, professional and
related work and business experience.

About our Offer:

You will have a challenging, diverse experience. There are opportunities for professional
growth. Our compensation and reward package is attractively structured and performance
bonuses are offered.
About Applying:

Applications are to be sent with a cover letter by October 19th, 2005 to:

Lynette Roker
Human Resources Administrative Assistant
FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Financial Centre 2nd Floor, Shirley Street
P.O. Box N-3221
Nassau, Bahamas

Or email: Lynette.roker@firstcaribbeanbank.com


TRETRiBTJNE ---


;'i


M;?








POSITION AVAIABLE:,


The Senior Manager Operations will design and coordinate activity
programs for a Bahamian destination management company.
Knowledge/Skill Requirements:
Minimum of 10 years experience;
Very good organizational and interrelation skills;
Very creative and ability to adapt quickly;
Working on irregular hours, often on Sundays and late-nights;
Experience in managing staffs;
Very good knowledge of events management services;
High energy, motivator, self starter willing to work without supervision;
Good computer skills and good knowledge of Word, Excel, Internet and ACT.
Fluent in English, Spanish and French.
Salary
Salary according to experience level.
Applications
If you are interested please do it before October 10th, 2005. Please send your resumes
to:
By Mail
P.O. Box CB-12762 (Suite #225)
West Bay Street, Shopping Centre
Cable Beach, Nassau, Bahamas


Bahamas leaving Barbados



double tax opportunities




unexploited'


SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATION LOAN DIVISION
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

NOTICE

GERACE RESEARCH CENTRE SCHOLARSHIPS
(FORMALY) BAHAMAS FIELD STATION

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for seven (7) Scholarships
tenable at accredited institutions in the United States of America under the Bahamas
Field Station/Ministry of Education Agreement (1971), commencing January 2006.


Under the Agreement, participating Colleges and Universities will offer full tuition
scholarships and the Ministry of Education will pay board and lodging charges.


Applicants should have gained admission into one of the following institutions
where the number of awards available is indicated in bracket:


YOUNGSTOWN STATE UNIVERSITY, OHIO
LYNCHBURG COLLEGE, VIRGINA
BELLARMINE COLLEGE, KENTUCKY
COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA
MIAMI UNIVERSITY, OHIO,
MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY, MISSISSIPPI
WITTENBERG UNIVERSITY, OHIO


2
1
1
1
1 PARTIAL
1 PARTIAL
1 PARTIAL


Applications will be accepted only for the Colleges/Universities specified.
Applicants should have successfully completed high school education and be in
possession of at least 5 G.C.E./B.G.C.S.E. subjects, including English and Mathematics
at grade A, B, C.
Persons presently pursuing studies at one of the named institutions should submit
an up-to-date transcript along with the completed application form.


Applicants should note that the area of study must be one deemed acceptable for
the further development of the country.


Further details and application forms may be obtained from the Scholarship and
Education Loan Division of The Ministry of Education or from the Ministry of
Education website at http://www.bahamaseducation.com.


Completed application forms should be returned to The Scholarship and
Education Loan Division, Ministry of Education, P. 0. Box N-3913,


No later than Friday, November 11th, 2005.


Application forms received after this date will not be considered.
SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATION LOAN DIVISION
September 27, 2005


FROM page 1B

"You can very easily use a
Bahamas/Barbados structure
to benefit your clients. In this
competitive environment we
are in, I think it's important
jurisdictions close to each oth-
er, particularly in the
Caribbean, exploit their syner-
gies to maximise the benefits."
Barbados has signed an
extensive network of double
taxation treaties with the likes
of the US, UK and Canada. Mr
Arrindell yesterday used the
example of a Bahamas-based
mutual fund with Canadian
investments to illustrate the
"synergies" between this nation
and Barbados, explaining that
if the returns from Canadian
were distributed directly to the
Bahamian fund, they would
incur a 25 per cent withhold-
ing tax.


By sending the Canadian
returns to a Barbados-resident
trust owned by the Bahamian
mutual fund, Mr Arrindell said
the withholding rate applied
under the tax treaty was just
15 per cent. Under Barbados
tax rules, if the returns from
Canada were fully distributed
out to the Bahamian mutual
fund as income within a year,
no tax would be incurred, leav-
ing the fund with a 10 per cent
savings.
Mr Arrindell added that it
would be "an opportune time"
for the Bahamas and other
international financial centres
to look at the possibility of
agreeing tax treaties with
OECD member nations, given
the pressures being put on for
Tax Information Exchange
Agreements (TIEAs).
Barbados had initially tar-
geted double tax treaties as a
strategy for growing its inter-


national financial services busi-
ness as a way of establishing a
niche for itself, as it realised it
could not compete against the
likes of the Bahamas, Bermuda
and the Cayman Islands, which
had been in business for
decades.
But when the OECD's
'harmful tax practices' initia-
tive was at its height, Mr
Agrindell said Barbados held
firm on not signing any TIEAs,
believing this was "a one way
thing. It puts the burden on us
and we see no benefit from it".
And Marshall Langer, a US
lawyer with Shutts & Bowen,
yesterday put forward similar
arguments to Mr Arrindell,
saying the Bahamas should
look to sign "limited revenue
sharing" agreements with high-
tax nations as a means of elim-
inating the OECD's "current
hostility to smaller interna-
tional financial centres".


Mr Langer told the BFSB
seminar: "The current lose-lose
situation can be transferred
into a .win-win scenario by
using limited revenue-sharing
arrangements between high-
tax countries and low-tax or
no-tax countries that would
provide tax benefits to bona
fide resident individuals, but
not to companies or other enti-
ties.
"The answer is to create a
new type of tax arrangement
that will increase investment in
the relevant OECD country by
wealthy individuals living in the
tax haven and increase tax rev-
enues in both the OECD coun-
try and the tax haven. If this is
done "correctly, it will accom-
plish these results and will help
to curtail treaty shopping that
improperly benefits third coun-
tries to the detriment of both
the source country and the res-
idence country."


FROM page 1B

ters stands at 5 per cent of
client relation managers being
very competent and 22 per cent
being competent.
The PWC survey found that
in three years time, institutions
across the globe expect that the
number of their client relation
managers that are very compe-
tent will triple and that the


number that are competent will
increase to 36 per cent.
The findings of the Bahamas
survey will be presented at the
2006 BFSB annual retreat.
Meanwhile, Mrs Maynard-
Gibson said a number of insti-
tutions continued to express
concern about the level of
expertise in the Bahamas, and
on professional awareness of
the rapidly changing world
environment.


She urged Bahamian profes-
sionals, calling them the great-
est asset in financial services,
to take note of the concern and'
make every effort to address it.
Looking at the regulatory
environment, Mrs Maynard-
Gibson said that a well-under-
stood,, efficient and respected
regulatory environment was
important
She noted that meaningful
talk about a level playing field
by the Bahamas would suggest
a. willingness to compete. It
would also follow that the
Bahamas must look outside its
borders to ensure that its prod-
ucts and services were relevant
and a viable alternative for the
client.
"I want to stress that the gov-
ernment of The Bahamas is
committed to providing a tax
neutral platform," Mrs May-
nard-Gibson said, adding that
draft legislation on private trust
companies was now being cir-
culated for industry comment.


ra


Are you lookingfor a new challenge?

We are currently seeking qualified Seniors to join our Audit practice.

Successful candidates for the Senior position will have approximately two to
four years of work experience in a public accounting firm. The position will
require the individual to hold a CPA, CA or other professional designation
recognized by the Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants.

Excellent opportunities exist in our Nassau and Freeport offices to broaden
your professional experience in a varied practice that offers competitive
compensation and benefits packages.

Applicants should submit a cover letter, resume, a copy of their professional certification and a copy of their
transcripts if applying for an entry level position, to: KPMG, Human Resources Manager, P.O. Box N123, Nassau,
Bahamas or tdavies@komq.com.bs.

AUDIT TAX v ADVISORY

02005. KPMG, a Bahamian partnership, the Bahamian member firm of KPMG Interational, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved.


PwC to survey



financial sector


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GEORGINA NATANISHA MCDONALD
OF #25 ALLEN BY LANE, P.O. BOX F-44188, GRAND BAHAMA,
*BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 6TH day of
OCTOBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.


BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION


TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF REPAIRS/
REPLACEMENTS
TO POWER STATION BUILDING GREAT HARBOUR CAY

TENDER NO. 590/05

TheBahamas Electricity Corportation invites tenders from eligible bidders for
the provision of repairs and replacements to the power station building as
described above.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office, Blue
Hill & Tucker'Roads by contacting:-

Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 19 OCTOBER 2005 by 4:30pm
and addressed as follows:

The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 590/05

"POWER STATION BUILDING REPAIRS GREAT HARBOUR CAY"

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005


THE TRIBUNE






THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005, PAGE 9B


Government buildings



undergo key 'surgery'


THE Ministry of Tourism
building, located across from
Festival Place, will be next to
undergo "reconstructive
surgery" as part of a campaign
to give downtown Nassau a
facelift.
'The Nassau Tourism and
Development Board (NTDB),
along with a number of Gov-
ernment ministries, has
launched an initiative that will
see the buildings surrourqding
Parliament and Rawsop6iiW
undergo a clean-up, following
the recognition that the build-
ings were badly in need of a
facelift.
Melanie Roach, director of
the Ministry of Works, said:
"We recognise the importance
of the area as a prime tourist
attraction. We realise that
many buildings downtown,
owned by both the public and
private sector, need attention.
We look forward to continu-
ing to address the issues per-
taining to the aesthetic beauty
of downtown in partnership
with the private sector and oth-
er ministries."
The Ministry of Tourism
building, located across the
;street from Festival Place, is
slated to be next in line for a
:makeover. Along with this
'effort, the Ministry of Works
'and the Ministry of Tourism
,are partnering to fix the water
'fountain outside the port area
,because it was recognised as a
;feature that was immediately
'visible to visitors exiting the
cruise ship gateway.
Dramatic
Charles Klonaris, chairman
of the Nassau Tourism and
Development Board, said: "We
are very pleased with the work
that is being done, it will have a
dramatic impact on the area.
We hope that this is just the
beginning, and that this beau-
tification project will inspire
private owners downtown
whose buildings need a similar
overhaul to follow suit."
The Ministry of Works, the
Ministry of Tourism and the
Nassau Tourism and Develop-
ment Board (NTDB) are work-
ing together on a number of
initiatives, such as the Down-
town Improvement Initiative.
The objective of the initia-
tive, which was spearheaded by
the Ministry of Tourism and
the NTDB in 2003, is to create
a downtown district that is
unique, safe, clean, attractive
and exciting for visitors and
local residents.
A long list of improvements
and enhancements for the
downtown area have been
achieved through the initiative
with funding coming primari-
ly from the Ministry of Tourism
and from contributions by
many of the downtown banks
and retailers.
"We welcome and appreci-
ate the public sectors commit-
ment to enhancing and improv-
ing our nation's key visitor
gateway and to those good cor-
porate citizens who have par-


ticipated in our downtown
improvement initiative volun-
tary assessment programme,"
Mr Klonaris said. "We want to
encourage all downtown busi-
nesses to contribute toward
being part of the solution by
making historic Nassau the
incredible city which it can be."
Manager
Senior manager of Product
* tXkt ~^ etfrt t miestry
of Tourism Christine Ferguson,
said, "More than five million


WESTIN
HOTFIS s RF.SORTS


tourists visited the Bahamas
last year, almost two million of
those came via the port of Nas-
sau, which is conveniently
located in the heart of down-
town.
"In order to entice these vis-
itors back to our shores, we
need to make a good first
impression. The ongoing
improvement and enhance-
ment of the downtown area is
n.ce,ssary if we are to realize
our g0oalf creating a v'rld;
class destium'tjpon. .


Sheraton
^ r, ..... .u,-o .-,e...*r
^^ j:.. al^. ^S <,@ tC.m.. ,.vA


EXCELLET CARER OPORTUITIE









organization skB~l~~m^i ndw ll b epnsible o angn
all Baspetsofthe ^banut kiM8Bii~iaitcenaind h ay t da
banquet culinary opea]^tions. n aditSionmut!BBervice
p^^^roduct and laning and conistently'H maintain food nd


labor cots as udete with thehget qualityresults





Otherrequle* ts nlu de:^^w^^55s^B^
Excellent written fil andvrbaiEl cmmngBicaion sills;

^Knowledgeable in basic computer programs, Excel,




a volu^^^Bffi anut opraionH~ in xcs Ryof 75,000. square
feet, creatSivBTitfd ims {iitBt;^^^^
High school Educa^^*^^r^tion. Cuinary certification at anl
accredited Ba^insitue soiaKEite degree levl prefer're


TTT-l:- --- 1~"3u~a~aad~Yr=-rr~-: --:


* three to four years experience
* willing.to relocate to Abaco


* landscape
* manage up to 30 employees


I Please send resumes to:
Attn. of Human Resources
P.O. BoxAB-2057
Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Bahamas


SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATION LOAN DIVISION
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

NOTICE

COMMONWEALTH SCHOLARSHIP AND FELLOWSHIP PLAN
UNITED KINGDOM AWARDS 2006

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for scholarships tenable in the
United Kingdom under the Commonwealth Scholarship and Fellowship Plan commencing,
October 2006.

The scholarships are intended for post-graduate study at the Master's and Doctoral levels;
i.e. a one (1) year Master's or equivalent degree or six (6) months clinical training in Medicine
or Dentistry, or a three (3) year doctoral or equivalent degree.

Men and Women of intellectual and academic excellence who have a degree or equivalent
qualification with at least upper second class honours are encouraged to apply.

Applicants in Medicine and Dentistry whose programme requires them to practice clinically
can be considered only if they are eligible for registration with the general Medical Council
or the general Dental Council.

Candidates who wish to undertake post-graduate study in Business and/or Management
should have taken, before applying for the scholarship, the Graduate Management Admission
Test. Those who wish to study Economics or related subjects should note that a number
of university departments will require candidates, before entry, to take the Princeton Graduate
record Examination (GRE).

VALUE OF AWARD

The scholarships are intended to cover the expenses of travel, living and study and include:

(a) approved air fare to the United Kingdom by the most direct and economical route
and return on expiry of the scholarship (a scholar's dependents are not eligible);
(b) a personal maintenance allowance of 689 per month; (854 per month for those
studying at institutions in the London Metropolitan area)
(c) approved tuition, and examination fees;
(d) a grant towards the expenses of preparing a thesis or dissertation where applicable;
(e) an initial arrival allowance, incorporating an initial clothing grant for scholars from
tropical countries;
(f) a grant for expenses for approved study travel within the UK or oversea;
(g) where a host institution has in advance declared, and the Commission has accepted,
the need for fieldwork outside the United Kingdom, a grant towards the cost of such
fieldwork, which shall not normally exceed one economy or tourist-class return fare
to the fieldwork location. Scholars for whom fieldwork fares are provided to their
home country shall not be entitled to a mid-term fare home;
(h) for married scholars selected for awards exceeding one academic year, a marriage
allowance of 200 per month is payable provided that the husband and wife are
residing together at the same address in the United Kingdom. It is not paid when
a husband or wife of the scholar is also a recipient of an award. For such married
couples accompanied by their children, a child allowance is payable at the rate of
116 per month for the first child and 91 for the second and third child under the
age of 16, provided they are residing with their parents;

Irrespective of the length of the award, a scholar who is widowed, divorced or a single
parent, will receive an allowance in respect of the first accompanying child and child
allowances for the second and third accompanying children.

Further details and application forms may be obtained from the Scholarship and Educational
Loan Division of the Ministry of Education. (Please be advised that UK application forms
have been revised) Applications should be returned to reach the Scholarship and Educational
Loan Division, Ministry of Education, P.O. Box N-3913, no later than Friday, November
18th 2005. Application forms received after this date will not be considered.




Scholarship and Education Loan Division
28 September, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, LORETTA LOLITTA
PELFRESNE, of #8 Queen's Road, Nassau East Boulevard,
P.O.Box N-778, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my
name to LORETTA LOLITTA LOCKHART. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
RO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.







WINODING BAY

HAS VACANCIES FOR
Club Director
Candidate should have:
four to five years experience
experience in development of Golf Courses
experience in high-end members/private club management
willing to relocate to Abaco

Asst. Construction & Property Development Manager
Candidate should have:


..BUSINESS







PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005


TRIBUNE SPORTS


SPORT


Temperature rising





for election time


IT'S election time again.So expect
the heated clashes that come with
determining who will be elected as the
presidents of the various associations
and federations.
Already the race for the president of
the Bahamas Golf Federation is turning
out to be a fierce battle between a male
and a female and they only have one
more week before they go to the polls.
Milford 'Shaggy' Lockhart has claimed
that there are some obstacles that may
hamper his quest to win the presidency
position over Agatha Delancy.
But Delancy has declined to get
involved in a war of words. The election
is set for the annual general meeting
next weekend in Grand Bahama.
For the sake of the public, it's probably
best if the conflicts are handled inter-
nally. After all, these elections are for
members only.
While the race for the president's
position is turning into a heated
battle, it's good to know that the elec-
tions for the chairman of both the South-
ern and Northern Divisions ran smooth-
ly.
Wayde Bethel and Chris Harris went
in without any incidents in their elec-
tion process that took place in New Prov-
idence and Grand Bahama respectively
last weekend.
When it's all said and done, it should
come down to the man or woman who
runs the best campaign.
Two other elections are on the agenda
for this year, but so far no dates have
been announced.
The New Providence Basketball Asso-
ciation is scheduled to host its election of
officers this month.
And, before the year is out, the
Bahamas Swimming Federation is


STUBBS


OPINION


expected to go to the polls.
While the NPSA doesn't seem to have
any commotion ahead, it would appear
that there could be some sparks flying in
the BSF.


Incumbent Algernon Cargill, who
works out of Fort Lauderdale, Florida
has insisted that, whenever the elections
are held, he will be returned as presi-
dent for another term.
Already two persons have expressed
an interest in running for president of
the NPBA.


But I hope that whoever is elected will
find the vision to work closer with its
parent body, the Bahamas Basketball
Federation.
Elections are so unpredictable. But
anytime that one is looming in local
sports, you can expect the intensity lev-
el to soar.


THANKS to the suggestion by former distance runner Sdm Williams of the
Bahamas Loving Care Association, Tonique Williams-Darling now has her own
highway.
The newly constructed Tonique Williams-Darling Way replaced the old
Harrold Road in a ceremony that was held on Monday.
The ceremony kicked off the week-long celebrations for the Bahamas' team
that competed at the 10th IAAF World Championships in Athletics in Helsin-
ki, Finland in August.
I still feel, however, that our other Olympic or world champions, such as Eliza
Obed, Durward Knowles, Golden Girls Savetheda Fynes, Chandra Sturrup,
Pauline Davis-Thompson and Eldece Clarke-Lewis, along with Avard Moncur,
should be recognised in a similar fashion.
While Williams-Darling's feat is still fresh in our minds, the above mentioned,
along with Frank Rutherford, were just some of the athletes who paved the way.
As such, they should not be forgotten.


Australia bounces back





with win over World XI


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Grand Bahama can't get




enough of celebrations


0 By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter 0 ANDRE WILLIAMS enjoys his return to Jack Hayward High.
(Photo: Felipi Major/Tribune staff)
THE red carpet was
rolled out as drums kept
the rhythm, but the cry .,, r .
coming out of Grand
Bahama yesterday evening
to the 19-member World
Championships team was
"stay just a little bit
longer".
Members of the team
were greeted by a warm,
patriotic crowd that was
begging for the celebrations
to continue.
For some, the sight of the
Bahamas' finest track and
field athletes was an his-
toric moment, while others
embraced the chance to see
the athletes once again.
Although the warm wel-
come was extended to all, it
was the sight of Andre
Williams that sent the
crowd, gathered around the
Sir Jack Hayward school
gymnasium, crazy.
The island received
Williams, their 'hometown
boy' and one of the
youngest members of the
team, with open arms.
Icelyn Williams, mother
of Andre Williams,
described the moment as
priceless.

Dream
Reflecting on the games
and the races Williams took
part in, Icelyn said that it
was a dream.come true for
her son, who she constantly,:
prays for.
She said: "To know that
he has achieved and ran so
well on the world circuit on
his first year is indeed a
great privilege. I ama .
7 proud mother. .
"This is a gieat occasion
for him, he's been working
for him, hes been working signs autographs for students yesterday.
goaextremely hard towards hisreach (Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)
goals~and to see him reach .:!::::
it means everything to me
as a parent.
"I am so excited, it is a
wonderful feeling. The
entire island has been
opened to his achieve-
ments, wishing him much
success in the future."
As a former student of
Sir Jack Hayward, Williams
was treated to a king's wel-
come and he thanked the
persons who have assisted
him in his journey.
Singing praises to his
family and friends for the
support he received
thrd )ughout the years,
Williams asked for their
continuous support, as he
looks to boost his career.
He said. "Thanks to my
family, friends and the
many persons who support-
ed me through out my track
career. The support I have
gotten from you has really
boosted me as I look for-
ward to the upcoming
years.
"I would like to thank
everyone for coming out,
showing their support to
me and my teammates.
Thank you for keeping us
in your prayers."
Williams, who attends the
Texas Tech University, will
be returning to school on
Monday in preparation for
off-season training.





THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005
SECTION


Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


mhue' TYr 1m rrn


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


A aco enthralled

by athletes' visit


I 1IN 1111 il im l ol N 111,1 I ------ --- - F ow I









THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005


The Tribune


SECTION


Sermons, Church Activities, Awards


Church Notes
Page 2C


Muslim, Jewish


holidays start within


hours of each other

* A MAN leaves the Diwan mosque after he broke his fast with Ifta, the
meal that breaks the dawn-to-dusk fast, during the second day of
Ramadan in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. For the coming four weeks,
Muslims are expected to abstain from food, drink, smoking and sex
during daylight hours to focus on spiritual introspection. See full story
and more pictures on Page 3C
(AP Photo: Kamran Jebreili)


'We have agreed





to disagree'


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
ifferences of opinion
within the leadership
of St Agnes Anglican
Church have in no
t way hindered the
work of the parish, nor cast a negative
light on the Anglican faith, a clergy-
man yesterday attempted to assure
the public.
Father Rodney A Burrows, one of
the assistant rectors at St Agnes, in a
letter to the editor published on Tues-
day, refuted an article carried in a
local tabloid which reported that the
three clergymen at the parish were
"fired" by Bishop Drexel W Gomez.
While his letter did state that the
tabloid's report was "defamatory",
"false and misleading", it also con-
firmed that there are "differences of
opinion" among the priests.
Speaking with Tribune Religion yes-
terday, Father Burrows did not wish to
elaborate on these differences, except
to say that they have existed "for some
time now", and that they are over
"certain church matters".
But these differences, he empha-
sised, have not come in the way of
work at the church. Nor does it reflect
negatively on the Anglican faith.
"This is not something'that reflects
poorly on the church because here,
we are dealing with the personalities
of three individuals, not the church
as a whole. And like (Archbishop
Drexel Gomez) said, membership
here is going up and financially we
are doing well. We are still going on
with business as usual at the church.
We work together, but we have
agreed to disagree," Father Burrows
noted.
Though no one involved seems to
be giving any specific details concern-
ing the matter(s), Father Burrows says
that there is "some tension, as (the
clergy) see things differently". -


BISHOP DREXEL GOMEZ

According to one parishioner who
was "born into the church", the
appointment of Father Simeon P
Johnson after the death of then rector,
Archdeacon William Thompson, was
a "smooth transition".
In fact, the parishioner says that she
didn't notice any contention between
the rector and" his two assistants,
Father Melvin Johnson and Father
Rodney A Burrows, even after
"rumours in the street started circu-
lating about their arguments".
Parishioner
And according to the parishioner,
who asked not be named, St Agnes
has always been a "tightly knit family-
like church", where clergymen "get
along well".
Father Burrows said that while the
church is a united body, there will be
parishioners who are more comfort-


able with one clergyman over the oth-
er, as in any other church. "There are
people who gravitate to people, so all
of us have our following. It's just based
on how people see the person they
are following."
Archbishop Drexel Gomez has
reported that the matter will be
resolved internally, though he will
consider transferring the leaders of
the church to other parishes. He has
already spoken to the congregation
at the St Agnes parish about the mat-
ter and addressed their concerns two
Sundays ago.
"That was the last communication I
got from the bishop. I'm not sure if thf
others have heard anything else," said
Father Burrows.
Father Burrows, who has served at
Christ The King and St Gregory's
parishes before moving to St Agnes
eight years ago, said that though he
will miss the congregation at St Agnes,
he will have no problem moving if
directed by the bishop. "I'm open
because the bishop will do what he
sees fit. So I will gladly go, without
any animosity towards anyone. St
Agnes has some lovely people, some
beautiful people, and I love being
there. But I worked in other church-
es before (going) there. That's what a
priest has to be open to."
The assistant director, who says that
he "came late" into the clergy,
believes that one has only choices
when working in any field, even it is
religion-oriented.
"Before coming into the priesthood,
I was a police officer for 31, almost 32
years. Then I retired in 1992 With a
sense of a strong call from God. But
the situation was exactly the same in
the force; either you go where the
agency sends you or you go home," he
explained.
"But I feel like the Lord still has
something for me to do here. He still
has work for me to do, so as long as
that's the case, I'm staying."


'My help comes from the Lord'


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON.
"MY Help Comes From the Lord" was
the closing song at one of the mostmoving
and emotional gospel concerts I have ever
attended. It was at the Church Of God
Auditorium on Sunday evening, October 2.
The concert was held to help defray
thousands of dollars in medical bills for
Colette Newry, who was diagnosed with
breast cancer earlier this year.
What was so different about this con-
cert was that Ms Newry had participated in
numerous concerts to aid others, or simply
to magnify the Lord at any opportunity
she's had to sing.
The people came from East, West, North
and South to support Ms Newry, a member
of the cathedral of praise, choir leader,
usher, Sunday School teacher and hum-
ble child of the King.
The gospel artists appearing were from
among the best in the local religious com-
munity. They included most of the choirs
from Churches of God in New Providence,
the Public Officer's Union Chorale, Land-
lord and Christian Massive, to name a
few.
I had heard Ms Newry sing a few times


Gospel concert to help defray

Colette Newry's medical bills


before, but on Sunday evening she was
truly filled with the spirit. It was evident
that this young woman was covered in a
divine presence that was contagious.
The song she sang was an adaptation
from Psalm 121.
"I lift mine eyes unto the hills, from
whence cometh my help. My help comes
from the Lord, the maker of Heaven and
earth."
Testimony
Before she sang, Ms Newry gave a mov-
ing testimony recounting and recalling how
and when she discovered her illness:
"This year my birthday was a most mem-
orable one, not because of becoming a
year older but because of something I dis-
covered that would change my life.
"The morning of March 6, after I got
up, a voice that I know was the Holy Spir,
it said check your breast. I did and to my


surprise I felt a lump that seemed to be a
'good size.
"The next day I went to the doctor and
was told to get a scan and a mammogram.
I did that and following the results I was
referred to a specialist.
"By then I had a sense that something
was not right but in the midst of it all God
gave me a peace.
"Upon review of the results the special-
ist suggested having a biopsy to see if the
lump was malignant, when the results came
back the doctor told me that it was can-
cerous, and yes, I did not want to hear that
but I knew that God was going to help me
though this. He proceeded to say that I
needed a radical mastectomy!! That was
not cool at all!! This was very difficult for
a lot of my family because I was so young!!
This was most difficult for my mom


SEE page 2C





!





- e" I II








PAGE 0, THRSDA, OCTBER 62005EHEITIBUN


CALVARY
DELIVERANCE
CHURCH
THE church on East Street
south is scheduled to hold wor-
ship services at 7 am, 9 am and
11 am on Sunday, October 9:
(Speakers: Elder Lena Pratt
and Bishop V G Clarke)
Weekly events
Monday, 12:30 pm Mid-day
Praise and Deliverance Ser-
vice, 7 pm Men's Fellowship
Meeting
Tuesday, 7:45 pm CDC
Mass Choir rehearsal
Wednesday, 7 pm Bible
Enrichment Session (Teacher:
Bishop V G Clarke)
Thursday, 7:45 pm CDC
Band & Praise Team rehearsal
Friday, 7:45 pm Massive
Youth Meeting
Saturday, 3 pm to 6 pm -
Girls Brigade
Bishop V G Clarke is the
senior pastor.
Upcoming Events
October 31 through
November 2 Morning Devo-
tions
October 17 through 20 -
Healing & Break Through
Crusade

EVERCHANGING
LIVES MINISTRY
THE church in the Robinson
Road Plaza, where Prophet


Church Notes


Niemoller is pastor, is sched-
uled to hold the following
weekly services:
Sunday, 9:30 am Sunday
School, 11 am Divine Wor-
ship, 7:30 pm Evangelistic Ser-
vice
Monday, 7:30 pm Prayer
Meeting
Tuesday, Mid-day Service, 8
pm Choir Practice
First Wednesday of each
month, 7:30 pm Women's Fel-
lowship Ministry
Thursday, 7:30 pm Break-
through Miracle Healing Ser-
vice

ST ANDREW'S
PRESBYTERIAN
KIRK
YOU are invited to worship
with the church family at 9:30
am or 11 am on Sunday. Sun-
day School meets during the
11 am service and the Youth
Group meets on Friday
evenings.
The Kirk is located at the
corner of Peck's Slope and
Princes' Street, across from the
Central Bank. Parking is avail-
able immediately behind the
Kirk. Visit us also at:
www.standrewskirk.com


EAST ST
GOSPEL
CHAPEL
THE church at 83 East
Street, "where Jesus Christ is
Lord, and everyone is special",
is scheduled to hold the fol-
lowing services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday
School & Adult Bible Class,
11 am Morning Celebration,
7 pm Communion Service, 8
pm 'Jesus, the Light of
World' Radio Programme on
ZNS 1
Tuesday, 8 pm Chapel
Choir Practice
Wednesday, 8 pm Mid-
week Prayer Meeting (Second
Wednesday) Cell Group
Meeting
Thursday, 6 pm Hand Bells
Choir Practice, 8 pm Men's
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th.
Thursday), 7:45 pm Women's
Fellowship Meeting (Every 4th
Thursday)
Friday, 6:30 pm Con-
querors for Christ Club (Boys
& Girls Club), 8 pm East
Street Youth Fellowship Meet-
ing
Saturday, 6:30 am Early
Morning Prayer Meeting


In church,



it's not about



what you wear


* By ALLISON MILLER
A friend and I
were dis-
cussing how
liberation
could cause a
person to fall in their faith.
Let me be bit more clear.
We were going to a church
service and I told my friend
that I was going to wear
pants. She asked me if I was
sure that it was OK to wear
such attire to the church we
were visiting.
Honestly, I didn't know
and it was not at the top of
my list of concerns. She
called an elder of our church
to find out if it would be OK,
and I took it a step further.
I called the church we were
going to visit. I spoke direct-
ly with the pastor and she
said that it was OK, but that
the members of her church
didn't wear pants during the
service.
Now, you may wonder why
we went through all of that
over some clothing. In my
mind, I am free in knowing
that wearing a pair of pants in
church does not have any-
thing to do with my salvation
or the pureness of my heart.
God's interest is the heart
and the intent thereof, the
bible tells us. Therefore, I'm
free in my spirit to do so.
However, that does not mean
I am to do as I please because
I know that God has liberat-
ed me.
Why?
Simply because I was
bought with his blood. The
welfare of brother or sister
in the faith is my concern.
As Christians, whether we
accept it or not, we are
responsible for each other.
We are our brother's keep-
er.
If wearing pants or any-


* ALLISON MILLER


"Does
wearing a
pair of pants
say that

people are
not saved
from their
sins? Or you
can't be used
by God if a
female wears
a pair of
pants in
church?"
A Miller

thing that would offend, over
throw or be a stumbling
block to some in the faith,
then I must not wear it or do
that thing in their presence.


Some may say; "youT are
living for others". And they
.would be absolutely correct.,.
In fact, we don't live for
ourselves but for others.
Whatever we do or decisions
we take will affect those that
are coming up behind us and
those who look up to us.
For example, parents know
without a shadow of a doubt
that they cannot live one way
and tell their children to live
the next.
Today's world does not
accommodate that. People
live by example. What your
children see you do, that is
what they will do. Therefore,
it is important that we give
examples that both God and
us will be pleased with.
Now for those who some
young people may refer to as
"old school", you have to be
careful that things that you
set in place don't do the com-
plete opposite to the will and
purposes of God.
Does wearing a pair of
pants say that people are not
saved from their sins? Or you
can't be used by God if a
female wears a pair of pants
in church?
I think not. It is the heart
and the intent that concerns
God.
At the end of the whole sit-
uation I wondered to myself,
what does it mean to be lib-
eral?
It simply means to be free.
Free from the ideas, thoughts
and opinions of others on
how I should live, think or
be. To live in the freedom
that God has given us
through his son Jesus Christ
is the best thing in life. That's
why he came and died, to
make men, women, boys and
girls free. Free in him to live
the lives that he has prede-
termined for each one of us
to live.


ZION
METHODIST
MINISTRIES
THE church in the South
Beach Shopping Centre, East
Street south, is scheduled to
hold the following worship ser-
vices:
October 9, 10:15 am Sun-
day School, 11 am Dedica-
tion of Ministry Workers &
Eucharist Service (Preacher &
Celebrant: Pastor Charles
Lewis)
Third Monday, 7:30 pm -
Ladies Ministry
Wednesday, 7:30 pm -
Prayer and Bible Study
Thursday, 7:30 pm Music
Ministry
Saturday, 3 pm Dance Min-
istry, 4 pm Children's Choir
Ministry

ST BARNABAS
ANGLICAN
CHURCH
THE church on Blue Hill
and Wulff Roads is scheduled
to hold the following services:
October 9, 7 am Sung
Mass, 10 am Sunday School
and Adult Bible Classes, 11 am
- Praise and Worship, Sung
Mass, 7 pm Solemn Evensong
and Benediction
Moriday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 4 pm Youth Band
Practice, 6:30 pm Lay Pas-
tors' Training, Laying A Solid
Foundation, Adult Band Prac-
tice -
Tuesday, 6:40 am Mattins


and Mass, 1 pm Mid-day
Mass, 6 pm Prayer Chapel, 7
pm Bible Class
Wednesday, 6:30 am Mass,
6:30 pm Marriage Enrich-
ment Class, 7 pm Prayer
Band and Bible Class
Thursday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 6 pm to 9 pm -
Young Adult Choir Practice,
7 pm Senior Choir Practice
Friday, 6:40 am Mattins
and Mass, 4 pm Confirma-
tion Classes, 6 pm St
Ambrose Guild, 6:30 pm -
Christian Youth Movement
Saturday, 10 am to 1 pm -
Boys Brigade (ages 5-9), 1 pm
- Youth Alpha (every third
Saturday), 3:30 pm to 4 pm -
Boys Brigade (ages 10+), 4 pm
- Youth Band Practice, 6 pm -
Altar Guild, 6 pm Confes-
sions

FIRST HOLINESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
THE church on First Holi-
ness Way, Bamboo Town, is
scheduled to hold the following
services:
Sunday, 9:45 am Sunday
School, 11 am Morning Wor-
ship, 7 pm Evening Worship
Monday, 7:30 pm Prayer
Meeting
Wednesday, noon Prayer
& Praise Service, 7:30 pm -
Bible Study
Thursday, 7:30 pm Praise
& Worship Service
Friday (2nd and 4th), 7:30
pm Youth Meeting
Second Tuesdays, 7:30 pm -
SALT Ministry (Single Adults


FROM page 1B

because I was her firstborn and the only daugh-
ter. However, in the midst of it all God gave
me the courage and the strength to continue to
go on. My faith began to build and I asked God
that in the midst of all this I want people to
leave my presence feeling encouraged from me
and not sorry for me.
"I let them know that God has more than one
way of healing and whatever means he uses with
me was OK. Believe you me, I was determined
not to let "cancer" control my life!! The devil
mess with the wrong sista!!
"April 25 I was admitted to PMH and the
next day I had surgery. I had never spent a night
in the hospital until that time. The first night I
felt alone but I know that God was with me!!
The next morning I had a peace out of this
world. As I lay on my bed waiting to go in the
theater I begin to sing and hum praise songs.
My life was in His hands and He was in total con-
trol.
"I was in the hospital for seven days and I
must say that there was never a dull moment.
One nurse, when she came into my room she
said she likes to come into my room because
the atmosphere was different. Another one said
after having surgery such as yours and you can
still smile is not a usual thing we see. I told them
it's all God.
Healing
"My body began to heal very quickly and
shortly thereafter I began chemo. The devil saw
that he could not get me down, so when the
results of the surgery came back; it was an
uncommon type of breast cancer stage 2/3. My
doctor was concerned because this tended to be
aggressive and has a tendency to spread. Because
of that I had to begin chemo ASAP. Well I must
say I have heard all kinds of horror stories about
the side effects of chemotherapy and I said, OK
God here goes your daughter, be with me. God
is faithful and I must say the side effects from the
chemo have not been bad for me. Yes, I do have
my down days, but in the midst of it all I try to
remain positive because your attitude plays an
important role in the healing process. I find that


Living Triumphantly)
Fourth Saturdays, 4 pm -
SOME Ministry (Save Our
Mer Evangelism)
1st Sundays Women's Day
2nd Sundays Youths
Day/Dedication of Infants
3rd Sundays Mission
Day/Communion
4th Sundays Men's Day
Service

ALL SAINTS
ANGLICAN
CHURCH
SERVICES and meetings to
be held at the church on All
Saints Way, South Beach, for
the week of October 9-15:
Sunday (Feast: Pentecost
21), 7 am Sung Mass and Ser-
mon under the theme, "The
Forgiving Community"
(Preacher: Archdeacon James
Palacious), 10 am Family
Eucharist & Sunday School
under the theme, "The For-
giving Community" (Preach-
er: Archdeacon James Pala-
cious), 6:30 pm Mission Ser-
vice under the theme, "Enter-
ing His Presence"
Monday, 7 pm Education
For Ministry (EFM), Band
Practice at St Matthew's
Tuesday, 8:30 am Mass at
St. Luke's Chapel, Princess
Margaret Hospital
Wednesday, 6 am Mass and
Breakfast, 7 pm Chorale
Practice
Thursday, 6:30 pm Band
Practice at All Saints, 7:30 pm
- Senior Choir Practice
Friday (Public Holiday -
National Heroes Day Discov-
ery) Observed, 6 am Sunrise
Mass and Breakfast
Saturday, 6 am Prayer Ses-
sion, 2 pm Acolyte Practice
(Rector: Rev Fr S Sebastian
Campbell)


* COLETTE NEWRY


complaining does not help you feel any better.
However, if you know who you are, you can be
assured that "this too shall pass" and it is just a
process. I realised that in the midst of all this I
am a showcase for God's glory.
"I presently have one more chemo treatment
and I thank God for that day!! In total I have to
do eight sessions of chemo!! I count it a blessing
that God would allow me to go through this.
He knew he could trust me, and it is indeed very
humbling for me. I thank God for all the prayers
and words of encouragement from my family
and friends during this time. These have been a
source of encouragement for me. Everyone who
has given unselfishly, I ask God to bless you
and enlarge your territory. Thank-you so much
for everything."
By the time Ms Newry had finished her testi-
mony, there was hardly a dry eye in the room.
God is surely using Colette to spread his mes-
sage that He is still able.


'My help comes



from the Lord.'


COOKIES FOR CANCER


For every McDonald's Cookie you purchase during the month


of October 2005, McDonald's will make a donation to the



Cancer Society of The Bahamas.


--- -"


..


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2C, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005


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* By REV ANGELA
PALACIOUS
For 10 days in
1979, I lived with
the Sisters of St
Margaret in the
convent down-
town Haiti and in the retreat
house in the mountains of
Kenscoff. The main convent
was located in Port-au-Prince
and those of us testing our
vocations visited the school,
orphanage and hospital that
were operated by the nuns at
that time. The organised gen-
erosity of the church was well
known there. Food, clothing
and other forms of outreach
were already available to
those in need.
Have you visited Haiti? If
not, I think it would be a
most enlightening experience.
Kenscoff is in the mountains,
and this was an altogether
different world for me. At the
retreat house, we slept on
grass mattresses and walked
the rocky roads like Jesus and
his disciples did.
It is amazing how much
easier it is to be open to spir-
itual reflection when the
rhythm of the day is altered
to include regular periods of
prayer, Bible reading, walks
through nature and purpose-
ful work. Are you following a
pattern or Rule of Life yet?
Don't wait until Advent or
Lent. Just start today. You
don't have to be in a convent
to make a change.
There was one young
woman from Santo Domin-
go who only spoke Spanish,


* REV PALACIOUS


"... Let us open
our hearts to
the beauty of
these lands,.
and celebrate
with them the
wonder of
living together
in our part of
the world."
Rev A Palacious

eight from Haiti who only
spoke Creole, and me, speak-
ing English and high-school
French. We cooked togeth-
er, laughed together and
found the most interesting
ways to communicate using


hand signals, smiles and body
language. Fortunately, the sis-
ters spoke several languages
but we rarely depended on
them. God has a way of bind-
ing hearts together with love.
The Bible is full of stories
of Our Lord's encounter with
strangers. Very often, they
approached him and ask for
healing, for blessing or for a
question to be answered.
Occasionally, he initiated the
conversation or the contact. It
is as if he had a common
ground on which to stand
with each person. He seemed
as comfortable with strangers
as he was with his disciples.
How comfortable are you
with those who outside of
your immediate family or cir-
cle of friends?
When last were you among
total strangers? How did you
feel? Are you the first "to
break the ice?"
Our Caribbean region is a
fascinating place. There are
so many races, nationalities,
religions and cultural expres-
sions, and yet we also have
much in common. Have you
visited the countries in the
West Indies? Are you famil-
iar with the concerns and
accomplishments of your
neighbours to the South?
Make a point to pray for
those who are island people
like ourselves. Let us open
our hearts to the beauty of
these lands, and celebrate
with them the wonder of liv-
ing together in our part of the
world. I find traces of God's
grace not only in the convent
but everywhere.


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Charles Vincent Street


Join us as we Celebrate our Pastoral


38th Anniversary Service


Theme: "Come Alive in 2005"


Sunday 9th October, 2005 3:00p.m.


Rev. Dr.El
FirstLad e


For Further Information Contact


(242)322-8161 Fax: 323-6144


BISHOP DAVID DAWKINS D.D. J.P.
&
FIRST LADY EVANGELIST GLORIA DAWKINS
On their 36th Pastoral Anniversary
From the Greater Bethel Cathedral Family
Come Celebrate with them from:
Wednesday October 5th 2005 to Friday October 7th 2005
7:45pm Nightly and Sunday October 9th 2005 at 3:00pm
At the Church
Greater Bethel Cathedral
Faith Way, Off Blue Hill Road
Comer of Carlton E. Francis Primary School
THEME: "We Praise God, for all His Benefits"
Scripture Text: Psalm 116:12


THE TRIBUNE


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THET


PAGE 4C, THURSDAY, OCTBER 6. 2005


"Your Bahamian Supermarketsr"'


SUPER II
VALUE
NOW ACCEPTING
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THURSDAY, OCTOBER .6, 2005, PAGE 5C


IBUNE















Celebrating the Feast of





St Michael and All Angels


"You shall see the sky open ful spirits, swift, powerful, enlightening,
and the angels of God and sometimes highly personable.
Of the many angels mentioned in the
ascending and descending..." Bible only four have names: Michael,
Gabriel, Raphael, and Ureal. Angels sig-
(John 1:52) nal God's presence and remind us that
our natural world is influenced by the
N By REV JAMES MOULTRIE world of spirits. Look closer and you will
see that angels reveal God's secrets,
Last Thursday was the Feast guard and protect the vulnerable and
of St Michael and All sing in endless praise. Every now and
Angels, and today we cele- then, on a midnight clear, listen: you may
brate it with the priests and hear once again a glorious sound of
people of the churches ded- angels bending near the earth to touch
icated to St Michael and All Angels: their harps of gold. So today we cele-
Green Castle, Eleuthera; Roses, Long brate not only the achievements of
Island; Rolleville/Moss Town, Exuma, angels, but also the potential we have to
and Sweetings Cay, Grand Bahama. be angels of God in our day.
Our concept of angels is peripheral. Now I want to share with you two mes-
We don't understand them, and we don't sengers of God in our time who signifi-
concern ourselves with them too much. cantly affected the peoples of the world
The Scriptural word angel literally means with their messages of justice, grace, and
messenger, and these messengers of God dignity. To do so we look to today's
can be visible or invisible, and may Gospel.
assume human or non-human form. They "The stone which the builders rejected
come to us for many reasons: to has become the cornerstone; that was
announce major events, to guide, to res- the Lord's doing, and it is marvelous in
cue, to open prison doors, and to sing our eyes."
anthems. History is littered with stories of good
Angels enter our lives at the subcon- tenants and wicked landlords, and good
scious level, but we know that they are landlords and wicked tenants. We have
there, for each one of us has a guardian both kinds in the Bahamas. In today's
angel to protect us. Christians have Gospel we have the story of wicked ten-
always felt themselves tended by health- ants and a good landlord. The story is


REV JAMES MOULTRIE

really one of God's dealings with His
people. The landowner is God. The
wicked tenants are the people of Israel,
but more especially the religious lead-
ers, who had been given charge of the
vineyard by God. The servants are the
prophets sent by God and whom they so
often rejected and killed. The Son is Jesus
Himself whom they also killed. This para-
ble was directed at the chief priests and
elders. It was meant to be a warning, but
it went unheeded. The tenants came to a
bad end, Jerusalem was destroyed, and


Thanking God for life


THE children, family, friends and
associates of Willamae Albury of
Gregory Town, Eleuthera will come
together at St Gregory's Roman
Catholic Church on Friday, Octo-
ber 14 at 7:30 pm to give thanks and
praise to God for sparing her life
for 70 years.
The service will be conducted by
Monsignor John Johnson. A recep-
tion will follow in the Parish Hall in
Gregory Town.
Mrs Albury was born in Gregory
Town on October 18, 1935 to Ivy
Johnson-Lee and Nemiah Forbes of
the Turks and Caicos Islands and
Inagua. She never knew her biolog-
ical father, but came to know and
love her Stepfather Charles Lee. She
grew up to be a beautiful young
woman who learned to love the
Lord.
She attended the Gregory Town
All Age School and the St Joseph
Catholic School in Nassau. On her
return to Gregory Town, she met
and fell in love with a young man
named Cyril Albury, the son of
Naomi Thompson and William
Albury, a school teacher.
Willamae and Cyril were married
at St Gregory's Roman Catholic
Church on Valentine's Day, 1955.
They were married for more than
40 years when Cyril passed away,
on Labour Day of 1999. From this
union came 10 children, seven of


whom are still alive. They are
Stephen, a supervisor at BTC; Mar-
tin, a deputy general manager at
ZNS; Brad, a machine operator at
the Betty K Agency; Jennifer, a tele-
phone operator at BTC; Margaretta,
an employee at the Gregory Town
Primary School; Ashton, a busi-
nessman; and Shavonne, a cosme-
tologist. The Alburys have 24 grand-
children.

Family

They have been the only family
with the name Albury in the area
for the last 50 years and Mrs Albury,
along with some of the family mem-
bers, still live in Gregory Town.
Willamae Albury is a faithful
member of St Gregory's Roman
Catholic Church.
In her early days, she worked as a
maid, babysitter, housekeeper/cook
for many winter residents, doctors
and teachers who came to Gregory
Town to work over the years.


She has developed life-long rela-
tionships with some of them, espe-
cially Mr K 0 and Patricia Murray,
who taught in Gregory Town for
more than 10 years.
Mrs Albury was also employed at
Arawak Cove Club as housekeeper
and she was later employed at Club
Med in Governor's Harbour, from'
its opening day until her retirement
in 2000. She is a member of the
Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied
Workers Union, still active with the
Hotel Union Mother's Club, former
representative of the Bahamas Red
Cross Society in Eleuthera and a
Worthy Matron of the Household
of Ruth of the Grand United Order
of Odd Fellows.
Said Msgr John Johnson: "Mrs
Albury is a faithful and dedicated
member who brought her children
up in the church to respect God and
others. She is a very loving, kind,
helpful and caring individual who
always placed service to others
above self."


the Gentiles replaced the Jews as God's
people. So let us pick up the story and see
how it applies to us today.
The United States is a country blessed
by God in many ways. It is a large coun-
try with many different regions and is
rich in agricultural, mineral, and indus-
trial resources. This country should have
been a haven for all people, but alas,
until the Civil Rights Act of 1965, it was
a racially divided country with a "Jim
Crow past". Many people of colour were
discriminated against in the most vile
and pernicious ways.
South Africa is also a beautiful country
blessed by God in a great many ways. It
has a good climate and it too is rich in
agricultural and mineral resources, espe-
cially gold and diamonds. But the coun-
try, which should have been a haven for
all people, became instead a haven for
the privileged white minority. Many peo-
ple were discriminated against in the
most vile and pernicious ways. Its official
policy was apartheid.
Many people tried in vain to free both
countries from their iniquitous systems.
Then finally, God raised up two great
black men, Martin Luther King, Jr and
Nelson Mandela. Both of them tried to
bring about reform, but like the reform-
ers before them, they were rejected. Both
were hounded by their governments and
were unjustly imprisoned, Martin Luther
King, Jr for short periods, and Nelson
Mandela for 27 years. While Martin
Luther King, Jr faced many indignities in
the struggle for racial equality, it paled in
comparison to what Nelson Mandela suf-
fered. However, they not only suffered
indignities for a righteous cause, but they
survived prison, and eventually Martin
Luther King, Jr was assassinated by an
overzealous racist. Nelson Mandela not
only survived prison, but came out of his
ordeal with the respect of his enemies
and of the entire world. Both men are the
most respected of mortals and impact-
ed history like no others. The Gospel
message applies aptly to them: "The
stone the builders rejected, has become
the cornerstone."
What they had in common was that
both of them came out of their ordeals
without bitterness. In fact, both of them
came out of prison smiling, and immedi-
ately sought reconciliation. Both took
the path of non-violence when they had
every reason to do the opposite. Martin
Luther King, Jr is a national hero in
America and has almost reached the
stage of sainthood. He is more revered
than many American heroes. Nelson
Mandela became an even greater figure
on the world stage. He forgave the
regime that imprisoned him for all those
years. But there were even greater things
in store for him. The man once rejected.
was to become the President of multira-
cial South Africa. In his case too we can
say, "the stone which the builders reject-
ed has become the cornerstone" of a new
and better society. Both countries are
better off because of their messages of
justice for all.
Martin Luther King, Jr and Nelson
Mandela are marvelous stories, two of
the greatest of the century. What makes
their stories so great is the fact that good
finally triumphs over evil. Make no mis-
take about it, what was done to these
two international heroes was evil. They
did not deserve to be treated that way
because of the colour of their skin. Their


only crime was seeking justice for their
peoples. But in the end good came out of
the evil perpetrated against them. Two
new, free societies emerged, and they
help us to understand Jesus' story in
today's Gospel.
God had bestowed on His people the
kind of love and care, which a dedicated
vine dresser bestows on a vineyard. But
the vineyard failed to produce the fruits
of right living. God sent messenger after
messenger in the persons of the prophets
to warn the people, but they paid no
attention. Far from listening to them, the
people abused some of them and killed
others. Finally God sent His Son and
Heir, Jesus, hoping that they would treat
Him differently. But the tenants killed
Him in the hope of taking over the vine-
yard themselves.
What the tenants did was ugly and
wicked. Yet God did not abandon or
destroy the vineyard. He simply handed
it over to others, who would produce
fruits. Thus a new building came into
being, the new people of God. Jesus, the
One they rejected and killed, is the cor-
nerstone of this new building (the
Church), and we today are the benefi-
ciaries.
God never retaliated, never returned
evil for evil. He was not vindictive in tak-
ing the vineyard from the Jews and giving
it to the Gentiles. The tenants brought it
on themselves. God never gave up on
His people. Just as the rain ensures that
the earth becomes fruitful, so God per-
sists until He gets a response. The para-
ble shows us that there is only one way to.
overcome evil, and that is with good.
What happened in the story is both nasty
and ugly. But while there is much evil in
the story, evil does not have the last say.
In the end, good triumphs. That is the
message the lives of Martin Luther King,
Jr and Nelson Mandela gives to us. They
were truly messengers of God.
No one can say that Jesus did not live
in the real world. He did. He experienced
its ugliness Himself, even death on a
cross. But He didn't answer it with more
ugliness. He triumphed over evil by good.
He has become a model for all those who
suffer unjustly in the cause of right. And
He challenges us, His followers, the ten-
ants of the new vineyard (the church), to
produce the fruits of justice, peace, and
love. It's a great privilege and a chal-
lenge too. So the next time you are treat-
ed unjustly in any way, on the job, in the
home, in the community, in the church,
do what Jesus did. Do what Martin
Luther King, Jr did. Do what Nelson
Mandela did. When life deals you heavy
blows, and friends and relatives disap-
point you; when you don't get the job
you wanted; when the boss on the job
mistreats you; when people talk badly
about you and try to pull you down; when
you marriage or relationship is not going
the way you hoped; when love disap-
points you; and when all is going against
you; when you feel that your world is
crumbling down around you, be stead-
fast. God will take care of you. And when
you rebound from your difficulty and
succeed in life, you will be able to look at
your enemies and those who thought you
would never make it and say, "The stone
that the builders rejected, has become
the cornerstone."
Rev James Moultrie is the Rector of St
Matthew's Anglican Parish.


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PAGE 6C, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005


Monsig I nor John Johnson to

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THE TRIBUNE








THE TIBUNETHURDAY, CTOBE 6,205,IPGEON


'Preparing




the Way for




His eturn


* By CLEMENT
JOHNSON
UNDER the


theme


"Preparing the Way for His
Return", taken from Matt:
3:1-3, the Living Word Min-
istries will host it 17th
Annul Family Conference
in Governor's Harbour,
Eleuthera over the Discov-
ery Day holiday weekend.
Conference
Founder of Living Word
Ministries International,
Evangelist Shirley Burrows,
said that this year's confer-
ence promises to be "uplift-
ing". She is inviting partici-
pants to engage in some
deep spiritual soul search-
ing.
And added that those
who attend the conference
can look forward to:
A new sense of purpose
and destiny;
becoming trained,
equipped and transformed
in an anointed atmosphere
to become an invincible,
powerful force in this end
time hour;
receiving revelation
knowledge and power -
essential keys for spiritual
growth and maturity;
a clean vision of God's
mandate for his church and
mankind and;
hunger and thirst for a
manifestation of God's
power and glory.


A cadre of national and
international powerful men
and women of God will
address the conference,
including Rev Janice
McCullougn and Minister
Leon Isaac Kennedy of the
US; and Pastor Maureen
Magnuson of Grenada, and
Pastor Claude Brooks of
Guyana.
Anointed guest speakers
will include Dr Mary
Thompson, Prophetess
Monique Darville, Apostle
Clifford Smith III and Pas-
tor Tony and Anne Grant.
Special music will be pro-
vided by Alvin Slaughter
out of the US. In addition to
the family conference, Ms
Burrows sponsors youth
seminars, spiritual work-
shops and rallies. Her min-
istry involves a range of
activities art and craft
exhibitions, youth and fam-
ily matters, health and fit-
ness and financial and
social.
Prayer
Some of the topics to be
discussed during the con-
ference, which will take
place October 12-15, are
effective fervent prayer,
healthy living and Christian
, ministry. Day sessions will
be held at Ebenezer Bap-
tist Church and evening ses-
sions at the Workers House
complex in Governor's Har-
bour, Eleuthera.


Republican status and




'the wayward chicken'


* By FATHER HENRY CHARLES
TRINIDAD Saturday, September 24
was Republic Day, the 29th anniversary
of our changed status from Independent to
Republican nation. I am not sure many
Trinidadians understand the difference. I
imagine they think it comes down to the
same thing in the end. It's all a matter of
freedom.
Thus, as far as the meaning of "republic"
goes, you have a certain fuzziness. On the
other hand, there's a clear local meaning in
Naipaul, which becomes more
"entrenched" every day. Ramlogan defines
it in The Suffrage of Elvira.
In the novel, Ramlogan and Chittaranjan
are neighbours, and trading insults across
the fence is their daily routine. Sometimes
the volume of insult increases, as it does
one day when a breadfruit from Ramlo-
gan's tree lands on Chittaranjan's roof. A
window pane breaks, and Chittaranjan is
roused to eloquent fury. ,
Ramlogan gets the worst of the
exchange, until it occurs to him to attack
Chittaranjan through his wife. "Chit-
taranjan," he says, "the next time one of
your wife's chickens comes in my yard,
don't bother to look for it. Because that
night I eating good... everybody chicken
think they could just walk in my yard, as if
my yard is a republic."
I used to find Ramlogan's remark quite
funny, until it struck me that it wasn't just
fiction; it also had realistic application. For
instance, one morning last week, I was
coming back to the presbytery through the
back entrance on Picton Street. As I drove
in, I saw this man, not a vagrant, I should
add, relieving himself against the church
wall. It caught me by surprise, and I slowed
down a little. When he noticed that it was
he who caused me to slow down, he dis-
missed me with his free hand, his mouth
twisted in some equally dismissive remark.
I said to myself: how can people do that
in broad daylight? A "grown man", etc..
Well, the answer is obvious. He feels free
to do what he likes whenever he likes. He
thinks Trinidad is a republic.
A couple of weeks ago, I was coming
into Port of Spain over the LadyfY'ung,


/

; : .
/-'
/1


* FR HENRY CHARLES


Road, around midday. The heat made me
drowsy. It was all I could do to keep my
eye on the road, when a Kentucky chicken
box flew like a projectile from the back
seat of the car in front of me, and landed in
the bushes on the side of the road.
,It made me immediately alert, and I
honked my horn in protest. Someone in
the back seat turned around, sucking a
chicken bone, to see what the nuisance
was. A moment later, the driver sped up
and away they went.
Earlier
Some months earlier, I was driving along
the Eastern Main Road, on my way into
the city, just before the junction at Champs
Fleurs. I had been noticing in my rear view
mirror a driver hustling down the road,
bearing right down on me. The lights
turned yellow and I slowed. There was no
way I would make it. When I came to a
stop, he pulled up in a rush alongside, sche-
upsed rather belligerently, and said: "You
make me mash mih brakes for nutten!"
Now, if you ask what makes passengers
treat the environment as an open invitation
to dispose of trash in any way and at any.


time they feel, or makes drivers regard
traffic lights as adversarial entities, the
answer again is obvious. They do as they
please, because like Mrs. Chittaranjan's
chicken, they feel Trinidad is a republic.
How can you be expected to govern a
country that has 246 different kinds of
cheese? Charles de Gaulle of France once
famously asked.
It's manageable, compared to govern-
ing Trinidad, I sometimes think. This is a
republic where everybody is a nation, and
the motto is Napoleonic: the state is me!
What the situation often generates is a
sense of barely contained lawlessness. This
does not mean that law abiding citizens
do not exist. They do, just as there are any
number of persons who actively wish to
turn the country around. The pressures in
the other direction are enormous and
extremely powerful.
It's lawlessness too at those more pow-
erful levels. Consider, for instance, that
the country is reeling from murder and
mayhem generated by guns, gangs, and
particularly drugs. We're told that Trinidad
is a "jumping-off point" for drug-running
to the US and the UK. Now and again,
somebody, a lone "jumper," is escorted
off a plane, taken to court and incarcerat-
ed without bail. No Olympic-sized
"jumper" has yet been caught.
What does this mean? That they operate
so consistently below radar? None has so
far been apprehended, and the reason, one
surmises, is that they know not simply
think that Trinidad is a republic.
Republican status in Ramlogan's sense is
thus alive and well. Any other sense is a
mystery to most people. All I heard on
the radio on days preceding the holiday
and on the day itself is that we "no longer
obey the Queen." Which, of course, says
nothing about what we obey. But if all our
status means is freedom from allegiance to
a foreign entity that has no bearing what-
ever on life in the country, it's little wonder
that what we are ruled by is individual will,
big and small, each a nation unto itself,
with its own form of lawlessness.
Father Charles is pastor of St
Patrick's Catholic Church in Trinidad


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* LA VING A FIRM FOUNDATION: The officers and members of the Kiwanis Club of Fort Montagu began a new administrative year with a church service at St Mark's Native Baptist Church,
Fox Hill, during the 8am service. Rev Dr Carrington Pinder is the pastor and the Sunday message was delivered by Rev Hervis Bain III. His topic was: "You must go through it, to do it." Standing
(1-r) in the front of St Mark's Native Baptist Church: Rev Hervis Bain III; Rev Dr Carrington Pinder, pastor; and Glen Knowles, president of the Kiwanis Club of Fort Montagu.
i t ,


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005, PAGE 7C


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