Group Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Title: The Tribune
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/00221
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau Bahamas
Publication Date: October 3, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084249
Volume ID: VID00221
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850

Full Text







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The


Tribune


Volume: 101 No.257

MITCHELL CALLS FOR 'MUTUAL
RESPECT' IN PUBLIC SERVICE
SEE NEWS SECTION PAGE THREE


MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005


PRICE 500


I BAHAMIAN ATHLETES
FOR A WARM WELCOl
SEE TRIBUNE SPORTS SECTION
.... ... .... ... ....I -..... ... .... ... ... .... ... .... ... .... ... .... ... ...


Tommn.



Former Deputy P

Turnquest must

decide if he is in

FNM's best intere


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
and PAUL G TURNQUEST
TOMMY Turnquest should
take stock of where he is in the
FNM and determine whether it's
in the best interest of the country
to lead the party into the next
election, former deputy prime
minister Frank Watson said yes-
terday. .
"If I were him, I would have
to think that you can't continue to
be defeated- by motions which
you carry or have the council
make a decision contrary to your
wishes. That's demoralising and I
think it erodes your moral author-
ity to lead these people, and so I
think he has to make a choice,"
said Mr Watson.
At the FNM's council meeting
last Thursday, Alvin Smith, leader
of the opposition in the House,
moved a motion to have former


Sas to mke ch oice




M: All dressed up for hurricane fundraiser BPSU to
M : M ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................desd u o h urJ n u nri e PUt


St


prime minister Hubert Ingraham
replace him as leader of the
FNM's team in the House of
Assembly.
Council members voted 88 in
favour and 40 against Mr Ingra-
ham taking the leadership post in
parliament.
The MPs, said Mr Watson,
were obviously responding to the
"cries of their own constituents
and hearing the louder cry in the
country", and thought that some-
thing had to be done for the FNM
to step up its pace and to appear
to be doingveh&job'of represent-
ing the opposition in the
Bahamas.
"They did not think that was
coming from the leadership
presently. They went to the Right
Honorable Hubert Ingraham and
asked him if he would accept the
SEE page 12


Symonette will offer

himself as deputy if 'other

things fall into place'
N By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
FNM MP Brent Symonette said yesterday that he will offer
himself for Deputy Leader of the Free National Movement subject
to "other things" falling into place.
He said there are ongoing "negations and discussions" in the par-
ty on what course the FNM should take going into the next general
election.
In the meantime, Mr Symonette said that when the House con-
venes on Wednesday it will "never be the same again".
"From here on, it is straight into election. The appointment of
(Hubert) Ingraham as leader in the House will cause the PLP to fast
forward a number of things they had no intention of doing or were
slow in doing in a last minute, desperate attempt to win the next
SEE page 12








before November 5th & doc win


N SPECIAL fundraising events for victims of Hurricane Katrina which ravaged the US
Gulf Coast were held at the weekend, including a national telethon by the Bahamas for Amer-
ica Fund, which raised more than $100,000 for hurricane victims. Pictured are St Andrew's
School first graders Julia Aylen and Cassidy Joudi dressed in Mardi Gras colours and
adorned with beads at the school's own fundraiser for hurricane victims at the weekend. See
page 5 for telethon story.
(Photo. Christine Aylen)


Man found shot with

gun near his hand


[ By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
GRAND Bahama police are
investigating the death of a 22-
year-old man who was found
with a gunshot wound to the
head and a revolver lying near
his right hand.
While police say foul play is
not suspected in the death of
Perez Clarke, who is also
known as "Heads of Power",
officers are interviewing sever-
al persons who were in the
house at the time of the shoot-
ing, said Chief Supt Basil Rah-
ming, Northern Bahamas press
liaison officer.
According to Supt Rahming,
police received a report at
11.38pm on Friday that a man
had been shot in a house at
Egret Circle off Fiddlers Green,
in Yeoman Woods, Grand
Bahama.


Several units were dispatched
to the location, where officers
found Mr Clarke lying face
down on the kitchen floor. He
had a single gunshot wound to
the head behind the right ear,
and a .38 special revolver con-
taining one spent round of
ammunition was found on the
floor near his right hand, said
Supt Rahming.
Mr Clarke was pronounced
"dead on arrival" at the Rand
Memorial Hospital by a on-duty
doctor, said police.
An autopsy to determine the
exact cause of death is expected
to be performed some time
today, he added.
In New Providence crime
news:
A teenager was stabbed
multiple times about the body
on Saturday afternoon in the
area of the Marathon Mall
SEE page 12


march on

House of

Assembly
* By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
MEMBERS-of the Bahamas
Public Services Union will
march on the House of Assem-
bly when it reconvenes on
Wednesday to demonstrate
their frustration with industri-
al negotiations, said the newly
re-elected president John Pin-
der.
Mr Pinder told The Tribune
yesterday that the union intends
to turn up the heat in their push
for a salary increase.
"Certainly we intend to heat
up the process of government
to conclude that entire contract
of $1,800, which speaks of $150
a month to be added to our
members' salaries. Certainly we
will pursue that forthwith and
we will do what we have to, to
get that matter resolved in a
timely manner," he said.
"We will be marching to Par-
liament when it resumes on
Wednesday to show our dis-
pleasure in the way this whole
thing has panned out."
Mr Pinder believes that gov-
ernment has intentionally "held
out" on their industrial negoti-
ations, hoping that he would not,
SEE page 12


Hotel union warning for

Kerzner International

* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
THE hotel union has warned Kerzner International, the
country's second largest employer, that it can "expect a very cold
winter" if it continues to "ignore" the industrial agreement it
signed with the union.
In a press release, secretary general of the Bahamas Hotel
Catering and Allied Workers Union, Leo Douglas, also warned
members of the Bahamas Iotel Employers Association, gen-
erally, and Kerzner International, specifically, to honour the
industrial agreement or face "serious, repercussions".
Mr Douglas said it was "most disrespectful" to the union
and the sprit of the agreement for Kerzner International to
"refuse" to meet with the union to resolve a number of out-
standing labour disputes, many of which he claims date back to
early 2004. Mr Douglas did not specify what the outstanding dis-
putes involved.
"What makes it worse is that Kerzner International is the lead-
ing and biggest member of the BHEA and should be the ones
setting the example. They should set the pace in good industri-
al relations and practices but they seem to be behaving worse
than the other members of the BHEA," Mr Douglas said.
He said it is the desire of the hotel union that Kerzner's
management simply abide by the obligations of the contract,
SEE page 12


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Shortage of pilots forces



staff into double shifts


* By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
BAHAMASAIR pilots are
being forced to work almost
double shifts and on their days
off because of a short-fall of
"certified" pilots at the nation-
al flag carrier, it was claimed
last night.
A source at the airport con-
firmed these statements made
by a Bahamasair pilot to The
Tribune yesterday.
On Friday, Senator and
leader of the FNM Tommy
Turnquest revealed that 35
Bahamasair pilots were uncer-
tified.
Paul Major, Bahamasair man-


aging director, admitted last
week that the airline's Training
Pilot had to be certified by the
Flight Standards Inspectorate
(FSI) and that certification had
to be renewed at regular inter-
vals.
He said that the airline
neglected to renew this certifi-
cation, and confirmed that this
"procedural oversight" effect-
ed 22 pilots, not 35.
However, he said that the
Training Pilot's certification had
since been renewed and that the
22 pilots were receiving their
training in the presence of the
Training Pilot and a represen-
tative of the FSI inspector.
But the source at Bahama-


sair is claiming that in the mean-
time pilots are being pushed to
make up for the shortage.
"This is a problem that is
affecting the Dash-8 fleet in par-
ticular. They are really lucky
that this is a slow time for the
airline because otherwise they
would be catching hell for this,"
the source said.
"The company hasn't said
anything on what has happened.
So we only know about the
noise in the market, but appar-
ently some of the pilots in the
737 fleet are being affected by
this as well."
It is alleged that pilots who
may have been previously
required to work a six-hour day


are now being asked to put in
up to an additional four hours
to cope with the shortage. It is
also being claimed that the air-
line is trying to "make up" for
the shortage by combining Out
Island routes and out-sourcing
others to smaller airlines.

Training

Mr Major has confirmed that
Bahamasair was out-sourcing
flights to two areas, Rock
Sound, Eleuthera and Cat
Island, and clarified that they
are still training the "uncerti-
fied" pilots and that they hope
to have all of them back to work


* PAUL Major


within two weeks.
"These pilots are still in their
process of being trained and
they are coming home in pairs.
I want to say that maybe within
the next two weeks they all will
be back. Yes, the pilots ard rou-
tinely called in on their days off,
but they certainly can only work
for a certain regulated amount
of hours," Mr Major told The
Tribune yesterday.
"But if people are objecting
for being called in on their days
off that's another matter. So
yes, until all pilots are trained
we have to call in people but
we can't push them beyond
what the law allows," he said.
Mr Major added that for such
an unexpected problem, it
couldn't have happen at a better


time of the year, as the Sep-
tember/October period is one
of the slowest for the industry.
The airline source added:
"(The pilots) are still working
within the legal limits in terms
of the amount of hours that
pilots are being allowed to fly,
but the system is definitely not
working.
"Why should we be forced to
work longer and have all these
'topsy turvy' schedules because
management didn't renew the
training pilots certification.
"That has nothing to do with
us, or the flight crew who has to
scramble to load and offload
flights. They have us running
around out here, but I don't see
anyone in the head office taking
any heat for this problem."


Former Miss


Commonwealth


in court on


assault charges


LAWYER Rhonda Hull is
expected to appear in an Abaco
magistrate's court today in con-
nection with assault and disor-
derly behaviour charges.
Hull pleaded not guilty in a
Marsh Harbour magistrate's
court on September 8 to five
counts brought against her in
connection with an alleged inci-
dent at the Hope Town home of
Mr and Mrs James Sullivan on
Sunday August 28.
The former Miss Common-
wealth 1985, of the Marsh Har-
bour law firm, L C Hull and Co,
was granted $1,000 bail with
sureties.
Hull was charged with enter-
ing the home of the Sullivans
at about 5.15pm on Sunday
August 28, without their per-
mission, harming Mr Sullivan
by burning the left side of his
face with a cigarette, assaulting
his wife, Rebecca, behaving in a


disorderly manner and throw-
ing missiles to the annoyance
of the Sullivans.
She was arraigned in Marsh
Harbour before magistrate
Crawford McKee.


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005








THE TIBUN MONDY, OTC)BE 3, 005, AGE


Pay cut would put staff at



less than minimum wage


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
EMPLOYEES of Nassau
Flight Services will be making
below minimum wage if man-
agement is allowed to institute a
proposed 20 per cent pay cut,
Nelerine Harding, president of
the airport union told The Tri-
bune yesterday.
The Airport, Airline and
Allied Works Union hopes that
a meeting with management
tomorrow will resolve the issue
and secure the ability of the
company's employees to "make
a decent living".
"They were asking to reduce
the work week by 20 per cent -
to four days instead of five -
which would in fact be cutting
their (the workers) salaries by


20 per cent," said Ms Harding.
The proposed cuts are to last
for a month, she said, so that
the company could save approx-
imately $28,000.
"We did not agree with this,
for one, because management
was not willing to make the
same sacrifice and because
these are funds which will not
be recouped by the workers,"
she said.
Mrs Harding said she was
informed of the decision, which
she described as a "unilateral
violation" of an employees con-
tract, by Nassau Flight Services
in a letter stating that the reduc-
tion of the work week would
begin on September 29.
"This is certainly not follow-
ing the normal legal process.
They have no grounds to set a


date, to do this without having
the employees agree to it, and
neither the employees nor the
union agree with this process,",
said Mrs Harding.

Suggestions

The union, she said, has rec-
onimended several ways the
company can generate more
income, one of which is oper-
ating a courier service.
"Nassau Flight Services does
the handling for Spirit Airlines,
Air Canada and British Air-
ways. We are saying that they
can enter into talks with their
clients and have services offered
to the public like FedEx or UPS
does," she said.
Given the current earnings of


Nassau Flight Services employ-
ees, Mrs Harding believes that it
is unfair to cut pay.
She estimates that at least 40 to
45 employees earn $200 a week.
"A cut in a working week
would bring that to $160, and
after the pension and national
insurance deductions this will
bring them below minimum
wage and that is not acceptable
by law," said the union leader.
Nevertheless, Mrs Harding
said that the decision by man-
agement to discuss the matter
on Tuesday illustrates that Nas-
sau Flight Services is willing to
negotiate in good faith. "The let-
ter we got informing us of their
intent to meet was in the spirit of
good relations and we are hop-
ing that we can resolve this for
the sake of the workers."


Mitchell calls for 'mutual

respect' in public service


PUBLIC Service Minister
Fred Mitchell yesterday warned
zivil servants not to mistake
government's "openness" for
weakness.
"It is important that we all
appreciate the difference
between openness and civility
and weakness," said Mr
Mitchell on Sunday, in an
address that marked the start
of Public Service Week. "The
two should not be confused.
There must be mutual respect
and mutual appreciation of the
role which each side has to
play."
He said that government is
always willing to talk "with any-
one at any time and on any sub-
ject to move the service for-
ward".
Mr Mitchell said that during
the course of the week propos-
als are expected to be
exchanged on the way forward
in the service.
"The country expects both
the management side and. the
line staff to work in harmony
and to ensure that the country
continues to operate smoothly
and without disruption," he
said.
"Our work toward the more
efficient arrangement of our
country's business must be
done in an atmosphere of har-
mony, without resort to threats
and histrionics on either side."
A professional team has
been assembled to review the
matters that arise on the indus-
trial relations side, so that



Abaco

man is

bitten


by shark


By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
AN Abaco man is lucky to
be alive today after he was bit-
ten in the face by a shark during
a weekend fishing and diving
trip.
The species of shark is still
unknown, however Nixon
Pierre, 35, was listed in serious
condition Sunday at the Rand
Memorial Hospital in Grand
Bahama.
Chief Superintendent Basil
Rahming, press liaison officer
for the Northern Bahamas,
reported that at about 2.30pm
on Saturday, Oliver Russell, 36,
and Mr Pierre, both of Grand
Cay, Abaco, were out in a 17ft
Freeport skiff, fishing and div-
ing up conch about one mile
north of Grand Cay, when the
incident occurred.
Mr Pierre was diving in about
20ft of water when he was sud-
denly attacked by a "large"
shark that bit him on the right
side of his face, said Supt Rah-
ming.
"He was assisted into the
boat by (Mr) Russell, who fer-
ried him back to Grand Cay
where he received emergency
medical treatment at the gov-
ernment clinic," said Supt Rah-
ming.
Mr Pierre was taken by boat
to Walker's Cay and then air-
lifted to Freeport.
A doctor at the Rand Memo-
rial Hospital described Mr Pier-
re's injuries as: serious but not
life threatening.
/t :


negotiations are conducted
through a professional spe-
cialised team, he said, adding
that the Industrial Relations
Negotiation Committee should
be advancing some "interest-
ing" proposals within a very
short time.
Public Service Week kicked
off yesterday with a special
*church service at Bethel Bap-
tist Church and continues
through October 8 with a week
of activities which highlight the
role of the public service in pre-
serving the' fabric of the soci-
ety.


* LINEN
* LAMOUR
* BROADES
* BRIDAL
* SPECIAL OCCASION


* FRED Mitchell


* COTTON
* SILK
* CHIFFON
* TROPICAL FABRICS


Diabetic Association


takes fight against


"silent killer" to


grassroot communities


Diabetes has been called a
silent killer. It often goes
undiagnosed because many of
its symptoms-excessive thirst,
extreme hunger, weight loss,
increasediatigue, irritability, and
frequent urination seem
hannless. It also ranks as one:
ofthe most expensive diseases
known. In 2002, costs
associated with diabetes in the
U.S. were estimated at $132
billion.As shocking asthatmay
be, the cost simply cannot be
measured in financial terms
alone. The cumulative affect the
ravages ofthe disease have on
the human body overtime can
be staggering and include
cardiovascular disease,
blindness, amputation and
kidneyfailure.

While the cause ofdiabetes still
eludes researchers, doctors
knowthatgenetics, obesity and
lack of exercise play an.
important role. They also know
that certain ethnic groups are
more likely to develop the,
disease. U.S. statistics show
that African Americans are
nearly 2 times more likey <1o
have diabetes than Caucasians.


According to the Bahamas
Diabetic Association (BDA) a
similar reality exists here. It is
estimated that between 7-10%
of our population has diabetes
and, as usual for the disease,
many don't know it. To tackle
this problem, BDA recently re-
located its entire operation to
East Streetto aggresively target
grassroot communities.

One aim is to help diabetics cope
with monitoring costs so thatthey
can be better managers oftheir
health and special medical needs.
Blood glucose monitors
(BGMs) and strips are often so
costlythatmany diabetics cannot
afford them. In this year alone
the Association has distributed
more than 100 BGMs
throughout the Bahamas fiee of
change oratanominal cost. With
the help of a $2,000 donation
from The Holowesko
Foundation, theAssociation will
restock its BGM supply and
make these important devices
available to those most in need.
Ifyou know ofa diabetic in need
of a BGM or if you are able to
support the Association please
give them a call at 356-2349.


THE HOLO WESKO FOUNDATION was established to support and
bring attention to the many ;ood works being carried out in our
society. Requests for information can only be made in writing to
P.O. BoxN 942, Nassau, Bahamas.


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i


MONDAY, OCTC)BER 3, 2005, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE










PAGE 4,MONDAYOCTBER3,20053TEHEXRTOBUTHEN


Where is NE]


ON JANUARY 7 The Trib.une published a
statement by Mr James Smith that the mil-
lions of dollars, donated by the public to the
National Emergency- Management Agency
(NEMA) to repair damage done by last year's
devastating hurricanes, were being audited.
The audited report, he said, would be pub-
lished "next week."
Mr Smith is the Minister of State in the
Ministry of Finance and co-chairman of
NEMA's Disaster Relief F'uind. He said the
accounting firm of Deloitte and Touche was
compiling the financial report even though
the fund was still being used.
With just two months left before the end of
this year's hurricane season and almost
nine month's after Mr Smith's statement -
"next week" is yet to arrive for the promised
accounting of the $5 million donated by the
public to repair the extensive, damage done
by last summer's hurricanes. Not only have
.audited accounts not been produced for this
fund, but no one seems to know when a pub-
lic accounting will be made.
Even Sir Jack Hayward, chairman of the
Grand Bahama Port Authority', could not get
a satisfactory explanation for a million dollar
donation that he and his late partner, Edward
St George, had made to NEMA to be used for
specific purposes.
It was all very simple, said Sir Jack, if $1 mil-
lion was spent by NEMA, all he wanted to
know was how and where it wads spent.
In that same article, published in The Tri-
bune on January 7, governme.tit announced
plans to pass a National Disaster Prepared-
ness and Response Act.
"A draft is being prepared n.low which will
truly legislate a mandate of disaster respon-
siveness that will give back the pvill of the leg-
islative power of doing the things that we try to
do now," said Prime Minister P'erry Christie.
The House, which reconvenes Wednesday,
was prorogued for the summer without the
promised legislation being put on the agenda.
And so another hurricane season is here and
almost gone hopefully witholit further dam-
age but still no legislation to control NEMA,
which operated in such confusion last year.
It was also announced in that same article
that a $1.2 million official Emergency Oper-
ating Centre the cost to be shared equally
between the American and Bahamas govern-
ments&-- would be completed this-year. The.
article said the centre would be responsible
for handling any type of disaster in the country,
including acts of terrorism, drug trafficking
and certain aspects of illegal immigration.
Nothing more has been heard of the project.
The US Embassy has confirmed that its


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MA's report?

government's $600,000 donation towards the
project has been secured. However, there has
been some delay on their part because the
attention of US Navy engineers was diverted to
New Orleans where Hurricane Katrina
breached the levies and drowned that historic
city.
It is understood that the Navy's engineers
should be here sometime next month to assess
the capabilities of the three- firms. that have -
bid on the project.
It is also understood that a site has been
identified near the Ministry of Works for the
construction of the centre. However, on the
Bahamas' side a further agreement is needed
to confirm that the centre will be used for the
purpose for which it will be built. Apparently,
the construction that government wants will
exceed $2.1 million. If extra funds are needed,
government will have to apply to.the Inter-
American Development Bank (IDB) for a
further loan. Now this opens uip a whole new
can of worms.
IDB has been holding a loan for $16.7 mil-
lion, which government estimated it would
need to do necessary repairs after last year's
hurricanes. But IDB had a cut off date-"'June
23, 2005, nine months after the last hurricane
when all applications had to be submitted'
for contract approval. This contracted work
must now be completed by April 2006, when a
surveyor will confirm that it has in fact been
done. Deloitte and Touche then has to check
and approve all the invoices against the com-
pleted work. Only then will IDB pay anything
out from its loan fund.
It is understood that the Ministry of Works
was only able to complete applications for $10
million worth of projects before IDB's June 23
cut off date. This means that government has
lost $6.7 million of the loan earmarked' for
hurricane damage a damage that govern-
ment estimated would take $16.7 million to
repair. But slowness again for whatever
reason has caused it to miss the boat and
several million dollars with it.
In disbursing the approved $10 million the
Works Minister can enter into contracts for
projects up to $50,000. These would include
small repairs, such as schools, clinics, teachers'
cottages, and the like. However, anything over
$50,000 has to go to.the Tenders-Board for'
approval. -
This sequence of events again illustrates
government's pattern of big talk, great promis-
es, but slowness in delivery. Unless it picks
up the pace, and civil servants start to shuffle
the paper work more efficiently across their
desks, doors are going to be closed on many
golden opportunities for this country.


i


Our tourist




development




needs control,


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., KM., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Puiblished Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

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EDITOR, The Tribune
FOR the past several
decades, tourism has been the
main staple of the Bahamian
economy, being referred too as
its "bread and butter".
Sir Stafford Sands under the
UBP is the noted catalyst for
the tourism industry of today.
When the PLP government
came to power, the objective of
tourism was to reach an annual
visitor count of one million. This
was achieved when Sir Clement
Maynard was at the helm of
tourism. Under the FNM gov-
ernment, the position was that
the Bahamas had regained the
confidence of the foreign
investor, the vast majority of
whom were investing in the
tourism sector. The current PLP
government is laying out the
. red carpet for investors who are
supposedly investing billions of
dollars in the Bahamas, the
major share of which is for
tourism related projects.
The strong justification for
giving generous concessions to
these investors in the Bahamas
tourism product is the produc-
tion of jobs. Whenever a
tourism-related project is
announced, almost in the same
breath, the number of jobs that
will be created is also men-
tioned. As the majority of
Bahamians in the private sec-
tor work in the tourism field,
decreased unemployment in this
area is perceived as a successful
Bahamian economy.
But is success in the tourism
sector equated with success in
the Bahamian society? Or
should the Bahamas be looking
elsewhere to diversify its econ-
omy and not be so dependent
on tourism?
Let's face facts. The investors
in our tourism industry have
only invested in the Bahamas
to make money. They may not
have any patriotic love for' the
Bahamas. They really don't care
about the socio-economic-polit-
ical situation in the Bahamas.
When the going gets tough, they
can simply pack up and leave as
the owners of the Royal Oasis in
.Freeport did after hurricane
Frances and Jeanne, leaving the
government and the people of
the Bahamas holding the bag.
Thd overall effect of this
insensitive and uncaring act on
the part of the principles of the
Royal Oasis was to send the
economy of Freeport into a tail-
spin from which it is yet to
recover. It has also called into
question the continued existence
of longtime Freeport businesses
such as the International Bazaar.


The interesting thing and con-
trary to the understanding of
most Bahamians, is the fact that
every country on earth now
seems to be in the tourism busi-
ness. No matter whether the
government is democratic or
dictatorial, socialist or commu-
nist, for whatever reason every
country now wants to get into
the tourism business. So much
so, that as of the year 2000,
tourism has been determined
to be the number one industry
in the world.
It is interesting to note the
impact of tourism on these
countries. Even countries that
previously shunned outsiders
are now opening their doors to
tourism. Even our neighbour
Cuba under Fidel Castro was
not tourist friendly. Today,
however, Cuba under a con-
trolled environment is aggres-
sively promoting tourism, hop-
ing that they will be spending
lots of "Yankee dollars."
In the August 22 2005 edition
of their featured magazine
Awake, the Jehovah Witnesses
presented an interesting article
entitled "Tourism-A force for
good"? The adverse impact on
a community are pointed out.
For example, by their sheer
numbers, tourists can destroy a
structure or natural habitat. The
Pyramids in Egypt and the Taj
Mahal in India are victims of
overuse by zealous tourists. The
Himalayan tourist routes and
the Amazon rain forest are
examples of destruction of a
natural habitat by tourists. In
the Bahamas, our precious coral
reefs have been endangered by
tourists collecting corals that
took thousands of years to grow
or by local Bahamians who
gather these items to sell to
tourists.
Tourists often consume a dis-
proportionate amount of
resources at the expense of local
inhabitants. In Grenada, it is
estimated that a tourist con-
sumes seven times the amount
of water than the local inhabi-
tants. In New Providence where
water shortages have been a
common occurrence, tourism
could affect the health and con-
venience of Bahamians using
the Grenada model as a guide.
In Hawaii, tourists consume
about forty per cent of the ener-
gy, even though only one in
eight persons are tourists. Clear-
ly, the Bahamas with a much
larger ratio of inhabitants to
tourists, did the wrong thing
when the government two years
ago reduced the electricity rates
to hotels. Shouldn't tourism pay
to ease the burden on Bahami-
ans? According to the UN
Environment Programme,
tourists produce pollution at the
rate of 2.2 pounds of solid waste
and litter each day per tourist.
Coupled with the pollution pro-
duced by cruise ships and plea-
sure boaters (who bring in much
of the guns and contrabands)


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the fragile environment of the
Bahamas is under continuous
assault. Incredibly, one would-
be surprised to learn that the
World Bank figures indicate.
that only about 45 per cent df
the revenue raised by tourism'
reaches the host country. Most,
of the money floods back to'
developed nations by way of
overseas tour operators and for-.
eign-owned accommodations.
The figure of monetary repatri-
ation is much higher as we are
an importer nation.
According to the Awake arti-
cle, tourism can adversely affect
the culture and identity of a
community or even cause a cori
flict. The more affluent tourist'-
can demand more material
comfort. Locals may be inspired,
to achieve this, even if it means
undergoing a major lifestyle
change a change that may
involve detrimental social
behaviour.
Some tourists come to the
Bahamas just to party. The
demand for illegal drugs is easnw
ily satisfied by Bahamians who':
are willing to commit a criminal
act to profit from tourism. Pros-
titution and illicit sex has put.
the Bahamas at high risk for'
sexually transmitted diseases
such as AIDS. Underage drink-.
ing by inexperienced teenagers'
far too often ends in a 'rape'
accusation when they sober up.
When it came to the opening
of casinos for the "sinful" prac-,
tice of gambling, a Christian,
Bahamas had little difficulty
making a decision, making mil-
lions in taxes from this "sinfuV",
practice. After four decades of,
operating in the Bahamas, it is
no justification that it is only,
for the tourist. If it is bad, fo,
Bahamians, then shouldn't it be
bad for everyone? The
Bahamas may just as well per-
mit tourists (but not Bahami-
ans) to do drugs or any other
illegal or immoral activity that
they wish using this logic.
Sadly, many communities'
lose the charm and isolated
sense of paradise even when
they are successful. Take Har-
bour Island for example that
was recently voted the best des.
tination in the region of forty-
four destinations. Gone are
those, peaceful days of "Pink.
Sands and Jelly Coconuts!"
Today "Briland" has become a
golf cart jungle and the "Brt-
landers" are fast becoming
strangers in. their .own lan&
What will happen to Guana CaO
when their mega development
is completed?
The Bahamas needs to esta-
lish a quality control commit-
tee that will oversee the devel-
opment of the Bahamas tourism
product. Cultural, historical,
ecological and environmental
tourism should be encouraged.
This reckless wholesaling al
warehousing of what todayfs
tourism cannot continue as in
the long run it is detrimental'to
the Bahamas.
DR LEATENDORE "
PERCENTIEDDD D
Boston, Massachusetts
September 28 2005


--


PAGE 4, MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005


THE TRIBUNE









T^HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, OCTOBER 3LN,
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^S^


Indira is sworn in
INDIRA Demeritte-Francis is pictured being congratulated by
Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall following the oath of office. She is the
first Registrar of the Court of Appeal since the post Mischihnged in
1999.
The effective date of appointment is July 1, 2003 in accordance
with the Act which is deemed to come into force July 1, 2003.
Mrs Demeritte-Francis who was sworn in on September 29, 2005,
has in fact been doing the work of the Registrar, Court of Appeal
since April, 2002.
(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)


Telethon raises more



than $100,000 for victims



of Hurricane Katrina


hiy RUPERT MISSICK Jr
"Chief Reporter

",RGANISERS were yes-
t-eday calling Friday's
te6ethon that raised more than
$100,000 for victims of Hurri-
clne Katrina a "rousing suc-
cess".
.-Co-chairman of the
Bahamas for America Fund,
Fa-nklyn Wilson, described
the, night as "magical" and a
truee sign of solidarity".
-?I am sure that the
Bahamas is a better country
than it was three weeks ago.
We have proven how we ican
c6me together without regard
tftle'ftliihg thA't'-ten-d roe
divide us," Mr Wilson itiol i
The Tribune yesterday.
2The event, which was held
Qof September 30 at the Radis-
son Cable Beach Resort, was
organised as a show unity with
tle US after hurricane Katrina
devastated the US Gulf Coast.
,Hurricane Katrina was the
eleventh named tropical storm
of. the season, the fourth hur-
ricane, the third major hurri-
cane, and first category five
hurricane of the 2005 Atlantic
hurricane season.
'It first made landfall as a


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'Magical' night held at Radisson Cable Beach


Category 1 hurricane just
north of Miami, Florida on
August 25, 2005, then again
on August 29 along the Cen-
tral Gulf Coast near New
Orleans, Louisiana, as a Cate-
gory 4 storm. Most of the city
was subsequently flooded.
Along with other major
damage caused to the coastal
regions of Louisiana, Missis-
sippi and Alabama made Kat-
rina the most destructive and
costliest,natural disaster in the
history ,of,the,U nited States, .
The national telethon, was
attended by many of the coun-
try's political, entertainment,
media, religious and civic lead-
ers, and US Ambassador John
Rood.
Mr Wilson said that the
night was well organised and
left him impressed with the
participation from the general
public.
"The evening was magical,
the way everything was organ-
ised, how the evening, unfold-
ed, the ambassador spent the
whole evening there and kept


making the comment that it
was unbelievable, the out
pouring from the public," he
said.
Now, said Mr Wilson, the
only remaining challenge is to
follow up with the pledges and
to complete the proper
accounting.
"We will now work on get-
ting those pledges translated
into cash over the next sever-
al days, and we are encour-
aged by the demonstration of
t, Biia Aian people t"helj5
others, because when you hielp'
others you help yourself," said
Mr Wilson.
The co-chairs of the initia-
tive include Jones Communi-
cations CEO Wendall Jones,
and Bank of the Bahamas



I ROICA


chairman Alfred Jarrett.
Other organisers and spon-
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Guardian publisher Charles
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MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2u,,,


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 6, MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005


THE-TRIBUNE


Urgent: an international donors




conference for the Caribbean


* By Sir Ronald Sanders
(The writer is a former
Caribbean diplomat, now busi-
ness executive, who publishes
widely on the Caribbean).


challenges confronting the
region and possible solutions.
Throughout the conference,
there were clear differences in
the positions of Caribbean rep-
resentatives and the represen-
tatives of the European Com-


A mission and European govern-
PROPOSAL that an ments.
International Donors For the most part, Caribbean
Conference on the Caribbean representatives argued that
should be held was one of the because most of their
ideas that came out of a three- economies were small and vul-
day conference on the nerable, they needed conces-
Caribbean held in the United sions, such as preferential prices
Kingdom from September 23 for their goods, in order to sur-
to 25. vive. They pointed out that
But, the conference partici- since the region accounts for
pants were agreed that for such
a conference to be beneficial,
Caribbean. countries had to The prospects
bring to the table a strategy and
regional plan of action dealing for the
with the challenges that con-
front them in an integrated way. Caribbean at
There was consensus that if
such a strategy and plan of every JUncture
action is not created, then donor look bleak.
countries and agencies in the l
international community would That there is a
have nothing tangible that they
could support financially, and crisis in the
an international conference on 0 .
the Caribbean would be nothing region is
more than a "talk shop". L o %.
Organised by Wilton Park, beyond. OUDt.
one of the world's leading insti-
tutions for in-depth discussion
of policy challenges, the UK less than 0.1 per cent of global
conference was entitled, "The trade, concessions to Caribbean
Caribbean: How can security countries would not affect trade
and prosperity be achieved?" regimes.
It brought together Ministers For their part, representatives
and officials of the British and of the European Commission
Caribbean governments, repre- and European governments
sentatives of the European argued that many Caribbean
Union Parliament and the countries were "middle income"
European Commission, officials countries that should diversify
of US and Canadian agencies, their economies out of a
Caribbean and European diplo- reliance on single agricultural
mats, academics and commen- crops such as bananas and sug-
tators on the Caribbean, repre- ar.
sentatives of the private sector, They also conTended that the
and former and current trade European Community has pro-
negotiators for the Caribbean. vided Caribbean countries with
In the wide ranging discus- considerable funds over the
sions that were conducted for- years to help diversify their
mally and informally, the,; pr-~-. ,economiies.but little of this has
ticipants focused on the graves occurred,


WORLD VIEW


Bananas and sugar were
the two commodities
uppermost in the minds
of Caribbean represen-
tatives. Employment for thou-
sands of people in the region is
at stake, with little prospect of
them moving into other eco-
nomic activity.
While the development of
services industries was touted
time and again, it was pointed
out that it is well nigh impossi-
ble to transfer persons who had
worked all their lives on sugar
estates or banana farms into
tourism or financial services.
In this connection, the
region's advocates repeated
their call for recognition within
the World Trade Organisation
(WTO) of a category of "small
and vulnerable countries" that
would be given special and dif-
ferential treatment including
preferential access to world
markets.
Later this year, the WTO will
hold it sixth ministerial meet-
ing in Hong Kong in a round
that is supposed to be about
more than trade. It is also sup-
posed to focus on "reducing
poverty, promoting growth,
helping developing countries to
integrate into the global econo-
my".
But, in reality these matters
will not be meaningfully
addressed for the Caribbean if
the issues of bananas and sugar
are not settled before the WTO
Hong Kong meeting, particu-
larly if the Caribbean will be
required to sign-on to opening
their own markets .to imports,
while their major agricultural.
exports lose market share in


0 SIR Ronald Sanders


Europe.
The European Union cer-
tainly needs the meeting in
Hong Kong to be successful for
its own purposes. For the meet-
ing to succeed, the support of
the African, Caribbean and
Pacific (ACP) countries will be
necessary.
At the ministerial meeting in
Cancun, Mexico in 2003, the
ACP resisted going along with
the agenda of the EU, joining
instead with Brazil, India, South
Africa and China in insisting
that there was nothing on offer
that benefited developing coun-
tries. They could do so again in
Hong Kong.
At Wilton Park, Eamon
Courtney, the former Minister
of Foreign Trade of Belize,
said': The retreat. fro'X ,nd'
now near absence of, social jus-


tice as a guiding precept in and on dr
international economics and security in 1
trade has resulted in a world
far less caring for the dispos-
sessed". t

ister of Na
hat is why the Jamaica, Pe
Caribbean cannot look sised the h
for social justice in the interna- drug traffic
tional community; it has to use security. O0
its voting power, and what little US$30 milli
leverage it has to block the tion of the
ambitions of larger powers, to budget.
negotiate the concessions and Mr Philli
assistance that it needs. tried about t
Before Hong Kong, the ity to susti
Caribbean and its partners in fight drug t
the ACP have an opportunity vide secure
to demand concessions from the were so hi
EU. Among them must be ade- economic g
quate compensation for coun- ous threat.
tries that will suffer from the the very te
loss of preferential access to the international
EU market for bananas and fions- do-no
sugar. But, equally, there should security.
be an insistence that the EU So, while
join small and vulnerable being pushe
economies in seeking recogni- scarce reso
tion of them as a special cate- war on terry
gory within the WTO. greater sec
Pascal Lamy told the IMF look to the:
and World Bank governors in cial instituti
September: "Developing coun- The pr
tries, need help to build the nec- Caribbean
essary capacity to take advan- look bleak.I
tage of more open markets in the region
everything from roads and rail- Equally ol
ways, to services and suppliers. region will
And they need to be helped crisis without
through the adjustment process but to do so
because although trade cre- ments must
ates more winners than losers, and plan of
the losers cannot be left es their cha
behind". Such a pl;
Mr Lamy is, of course, in scope an
right. But the problem is that with region
not enough money is forthcom- implement
ing on concessionary terms, in be put to thi
the case of the Caribbean to munity at a
build capacity and to help on the Cari
through the adjustment time, the (
process., where Afric
The conditions of losing mar- international
kets for exports and insufficient ing very hi
concessionary financing to help semblance o
diversify economies will have a responses
knock-on effect on rising unem -,'sasiindes290@
ployment, increasing poverty;, ;.


Help your employees secure their financial fut


ug trafficking and
the region.

the Wilton Park
'onference, the Min-
itional Security of
;ter Phillips, emph4-
igh cost of fighting
king and providing
ne patrol boat cost
on, a significant por-
Jamaica national
ps and others Wor-
he Caribbean's abil-
ain their efforts to
trafficking and pro-
ity when the costs
gh at a time when
rowth is under seri-
The minister made
lling point that the
al financial institu-
i provide money for
e the Caribbean is
,d to contribute very
urces to aid in the
or, and the fightfor
;urity, they cannot
international finan-
ions for help.
ospects for the
at every juncture
That there is a crisis
in is beyond doubt.
obvious is that fhe
not pull out of this
it international help,
Caribbean govern-
establish a strategy
action that address-
llenges clearly. ,
an must be regional
id include policies
nal machinery for
ition, and it should
e international comn-
Donors Conference
bbean. Or, in rapid
Caribbean will be
ca is today with the
al community bear-
gh costs for s ie
of recovery. !
ses to: ron*l-
hotmail.com) '


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Missing man's wif




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- - -


* By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
'Chief Reporter
"'AN AMERICAN woman
Who believes she may have lost
'her husband to the Bahamas'
'nefarious drug trade in the
1980s, has become part of an
organisation she hopes will help
'alleviate the. suffering of per-
's6ns who also have lost loved
-ones, especially during the
height of the drug war.
'For the past 22 years, Don-
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'her husband Gary after he came
"tthe Bahamas on December 2,
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techniques
Managing money and keeping records
Reading and Understanding Financial
Statements
STARTING A BUSINESS SEMINAR
,ctober 22nd @ 10:00 am


BUSINESS PLANS & FINANCING
PROPOSALS
Quick affordable business
Plans & financing proposals


'PERSONAL FINANCIAL PLANNING
October 22nd @ 2:00 pm
BUSINESS PANS SPECIAL
'Preparation/ Financing Preferrals
COMPUTERIZED QUICKBOOKS
* Setup Training


~. .


Donna Weaver acts in memory of her "Copyrighted Material

husband, who disappeared 22 years ago Syndicated Content
h Available from Commercial News Providers


for me to honour Gary's mem-
ory then to try to help others
in a similar situation and make
something positive out of what
happened. It is my wish to give
something back to a place and
cause close to my heart," Mrs
Weaver told The Tribune.
The Doe Network is a volun-
teer organisation devoted to
helping law enforcement agen-
cies all over the world solve cold
cases related to unexplained dis-
appearances and unidentified
victims.
It is their mission to "give the


Author
F. A. Hepburn FCCA
Chartered Accountant
Small Business Consultant
Seminar Leader





Tel: 325-7313/322-6000
Fax: 323-3700
Order Your Copies Today!
Knowledge is Power


EASY BOOKKEEPING SYSTEMS
V Simplified Bookkeeping Records
V Fits every business $150
V Quickbooks Setup Training

NEW BUSINESS KIT $49
A guide to starting and
Managing a Small Business


nameless back their names and
return the missing to their fam-
ilies".
"I believe it is possible that
there are many Bahamian fam-
ilies that have suffered much
like I have because of losing
loved ones, especially during
the bad days of the drug war,"
said Mrs Weaver.
Mrs Weaver said that she has
learned how hard it is for good,
hardworking police officers in
the Bahamas and elsewhere to
keep up with and work on old-
er cases.
"There just isn't enough time
and manpower for many depart-
ments to do so, as new cases and
crime happen. Here in the Unit-


ed States many of the cold case
missing and unidentified are no
longer in the system of local
agencies or never were, depend-
ing on the resources at the
time," said Mrs Weaver.
The organisation cross checks
the description of missing per-
sons against cases in an organi-
sation's cold case file for match-
es. Only the best possible
matches are forwarded to the
referring agency.
While it is not the policy of
the agency to contact the fami-
lies of the missing and uniden-
tified, families are always wel-
come to .contact them through
their website www.doenet-
work.org.


-e -
-
- -~ --


- .-4o


- -


* S -


Kotex Tips for Life.
When is the best time to schedule a breast exam? Generally
it's the week after your period. Breasts tend to be least
lumpy, so the breast exam will be as painless as possible
and any serious lumps will be easiest to feel.





Registered Trodemork of Kimboly o Cok Wordwide, e. 2005 KCWW


ARTHUR FOULKES: NOTED JOURNALIST,
UNIVERSAL PERSPECTIVE, HISTORICAL CONTEXT A MUST-READ COLUMN THAT GETS To THE POINT


arch


at


- ^- -^ ^- -- -________________________________* ----------


i


;,,-HE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005, PAGE 7


Ahdrea S. Sweeting
56
Hotelier
Member of Sister, Sister Breast Concet Suppoo Goup
Breast Cancer diaqnosis in janUory, 2002
Cancer survivor 3 1/2 years

"Doubtless thou art our Father, thou 0 ko"J .irt
our Redeemer, Thy norne is everiasihlilq


.m,...
o


Q


41 I-













CTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SVCES


COMPUTER OFFERINGS
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
Course Description: This course is for the beginner who knows very little about computers and does
not understand how they work. This course covers the major computer concepts with extensive hands on practice
of various software using: (1) Microsoft Office Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft
Access Database Management.
Pre-requisite: None Begins:Monday, 26 September 2005 6:00pm- 9:00pm Section 01 (CEES)
Saturday, 24 September 2005 10:00am-1:00pm Section 02 (CEES)
Duration:12 weeks Venue:CEES Computer Lab Tuition: $450.00
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II
Course Description: This course covers the major advanced concepts with extensive hands-on practice with a
variety of software including: (I) Microsoft Office Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft
Access Database Management.


Pre-requisite: Computer Applications I
Duration:12 weeks


Begins:Thursday, 29 September 2005
Venue: CEES Computer Lab


Time:6:00pm-9:00pm
Fees: $550.00


EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint.
It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.
Pre-requisite: None Begins: Thursday, 13 October 2005 Time:9:3Oam 4:30pmr
Duration: 1 day Venue: CEES Computer Lab Fees: $160.00
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY I
Course Description: This course covers basic concepts of Information Technology. The course providestraining
in the following areas; Basic Hardware Proficiency, Application Features Proficiency, Operating System Proficiency,
Internet and Email Proficiency.
Pre-requisite: None Begins:Wednesday, 28 September 2005 Time:6:00pm 9:00pm
Duration:12 weeks Venue: CEES Computer Lab Fees: $450.00
PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR
Course Description: This course is a hands-on introduction to technology systems for use in information
environments. The course will cover the following topics: Basic Hardware, Operating Systems, Troubleshooting
and Repairs.
Pre-requisite:None Begins:Tuesday, 27 September 2005 Time: 6:00pm 7:30pm


Tuesday and I Tursdays
Venue: BHTC Computer Lab Fees: $500.00


Duration:12 weeks


QUICKBOOKS
Course Description: This course is designed to train new and existing small business entrepreneurs (less that 20
employees) how to organize and manage their accounting activities using QuickBooks Pro software. Students will
learn how to set-up their company files, chart of accounts, budget, customers, vendors and employees.
Pre-requisite:None Begins:Tuesday, 27 September 2005 Time:6:00pm 9:00pm
Duration: 6 weeks Venue: CEES Computer Lab Fees: $330.00
WEBPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP
Course Description: This course targets persons who would like to create their personal webpages and will cover
Web page creation, Web site management, and HTML. Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia,
Forms and Tables and hosting of web pages.
Pre-requisite: Participants must be computer literate and have a basic knowledge of word-processing
Begins:6 & 7 October, 2005 Time:9:30am-4:30pm Duration:2 days
Venue: CEES Computer Lab Fees: $550.00

COMPUTER WORKSHOP
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior customer service.
It focuses on customer value, retention and relationship building and employee motivation.
Date: 13 October 2005 Time: 9:30am 4:30pm
Venue: Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre Tuition:$170.00
EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint.
It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.
Date: 13 October 2005 Time: 9:30am 4:30pm
Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road Tuition: $160.00
WEB PAGE DESIGN
This course will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy fiddling with
computers and would like to create their own web pages are encouraged to attend. Specific topics will include
Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web pages.
Date: Thursday, 6th & Friday 7th October, 2005 Time: 9:30am 4:30pm
Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road Tuition: $550.00
HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP
This two-day workshop is designed to equip managers and leaders in organizations and enhance the skills of current
Human Resource professionals with the theory, tools and techniques required for effective human resource
management practices in today's workplace.
Date: Thursday, 6th & Friday 7th October, 2005 Time: 9:30am 4:30pm
Venue: Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre Tuition: $350.00

HEALTH AND FITNESS COURSE OFFERINGS
MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I
This is an introductory course for learning basic techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major topic
areas will include Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniques, Wellness Education (Psychological and Physiological
Benefits), Indications and Contraindications, Serving Special Populations and Complementary Bodywork Systems
to include Aromatherapy Essentials.
Starting:Thursday, September 29, 2005 6:00-9:00pm Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee: $465.00 Venue: The College of the Bahamas
MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS II
This is an advance course for learning techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major topics include
introduction to hydrotherapy; spa and body treatments; the basic facial; aromatherapy-fundamentals or essential
oils; relaxation and meditative methods; and hot stone therapy.
Starting: Monday, September 26, 2005 6:00-9:00pm Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee:$620.00 Venue: The College of the Bahamas
GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR
This is an introductory course in teaching group fitness instruction. Major topics of discussion will include basic
anatomy and physiology; choreography and cueing; the five components of fitness, nutrition, basic exercise testing
and how to teach group exercise.
Starting: Thursday, September 29, 2005 6:00-9:00pm Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee:$400.00 Venue: TBA


CULNARY & HOSPITAUTY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE
(Formerly School of Hospitality & Tourism Studies)

Industry Training Department
CULINARY COURSES FALL SEMESTER 042005
COURSE CODE BEGINS DUR. DAYS TIME TUITION & FEE RESOURCE Venue Max. Enroll
(ADDITIONAL $40 MATERIALS
APP FEE FOR
NEW STUDENTS)
1. Bahamian Cuisine COOK 806 September 29 6weeks Thurs. 6:00-9:00pm $225.00 $10-$12 per week SHTS Main 15
Kitchen
2. Gourmet Cooking I COOK 823 October3 6 weeks Mon. 6:00-9:00pm $200.00 $20 per week SHTS Main 15
Kitchen
3. Gourmet Cooking II COOK 824 October 3 6 weeks Mon. 6:00-9:00pm $225.00 $20 per week SHTS Main 15
Kitchen
8. Cake & Pastry Making I C00K813 October4 10weeks Tues. 6:00-9:00pm $225.00 $10 $15per week SHTSLarder 15
Kitchen
9. Cake & Pastry Making II COOK 814 October4 10 weeks Tues. 6:00-9:00pm $250.00 $10-$15perweek SHTSPastry 15
Kitchen
10. Bread Making COOK810 September29 6weeks Thurs. 6:00-9:00pm $200.00 $5-$10perweek SHTSLarder 15
Kitchen
11. Cake Decorating I COOK817 September 28 10weeks Wed. 6:00-9:00pm $225.00 $10 $15 per week SHTS Larder 15
Kitchen
12. Cake Decoration II COOK818 September28 10 weeks Wed. 6:00-9:00pm $225.00 $10-$15perweek SHTSPastry 15
SKitchen
For further information please contact the Industry Training Department of the School of Hospitality & Tourism Studies at 323-5804, 323-6804 or fax 325-8175


Diploms f 1rDecemer 204an Aril205gadaesae vilbe o


-collecionfomteieord PJG~l s Department, Monday Friday fro m 9-00I a,' m.


PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT

Fall Semester


COURSE NO. SECT


ACCOUNTING
ACCA900
ACCA901
ACCA902
BUSINESS
BUSI900
CUST900

COMPUTER
COMP901
COMP901
COMP902
COMP903
COMP 941
COMP953
COMP960
COMP930


COSMETOLOGY
COSM802 01
COSM804 01
COSM807 01


DECORATING
DEC0800
DECO801
FLOR800
FLOR801
FLOR802
ENGLISH
ENG 900
ESL 900


COURSE DESCRIPTION

ACCA FOR BEGINNERS I
ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II
ACCA FOR BEGINNERS III


01 CREDIT& COLLECTIONS I
01 SUPERIOR CUSTOMER
SERVICE W/S


COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II
INFORMATION TECH. I
QUICKBOOKS
PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR
MS POWERPOINT W/S
WEB PAGE DESIGN W/S

MAKE-UP APPLICATION
MANICURE & PEDICURE
NAILART TECHNICIAN

INTERIOR DECORATING I
INTERIOR DECORATING II
FLORAL DESIGN I
FLORAL DESIGN II
FLORAL DESIGN III


01 EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS
01 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANG.


HEALTH AND FITNESS
MASG900 01 MASSAGE THERAPY
ESSENTIALS I
MASG901 01 MASSAGE THERAPY
ESSENTIALS II
HLTH 800 01 GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR


LANGUAGES
CRE 900 l
CRE 901
SPA 900 I
SPA 901 I
FRE 900 0
MANAGEMENT
MGMT900
MGMT901
MGMT902 I
MEDICAL
MEDT900 I
SEWING
SEW 800 I
SEW 802 I
SEW 805 I
SEW 811 I


01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE I
01 CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE II
01 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I
01 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH II
01 CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I

D1 HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT. I
01 HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT. II
01 HUMAN RESOURCE
MANAGEMENT W/S
01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY I

01 BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING
01 BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING II
01 DRAPERY MAKING I
01 UPHOLSTERY MAKING I


TIME

6:00-8:OOPM
6:00-8:OOPM
6:00-8:OOPM


DAY START DUR. FEE


Mon/Wed
Mon/Wed
Tue/Thur


26 Sep.
26 Sep
27 Sep


10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks


6:00-9:00PM Mon 3 Oct 8 weeks
9:30AM-4:30PM Thur 13 Oct 1 day


6:00-9:00PM
- 1OAM-1:OOPM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-7:30PM
9:30AM-4:30PM
9:30am-4:30PM

6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM

6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM


Mon
Sat
Thur
Wed
Tue
Tue
Thur
Thur/Fri


26 Sep
24 Sep
29 Sep
28 Sep
4 Oct
27 Sep
13 Oct
6 & 7 Oct


12 weeks
12 weeks
12 weeks
12 weeks
6 weeks
12 weeks
1 day
2 days


Mon 3 Oct 8 weeks
Tue 4 Oct 8 weeks
Mon 3 Oct 6 weeks


Tue
Wed
Mon
Thur
Tue


8 weeks
8 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks


6:00-9:00PM Tue 4 Oct 8 weeks $225
6:00-9:00PM Mon 3 Oct 10 weeks $250


6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM

6:00-7:30PM
6:00-7:30PM
6:00-7:30PM
6:00-7:30PM
6:00-7:30PM

6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM


Thur 29 Sep
Mon 26 Sep
Thur 29 Sept


Mon/Wed
Tue/Thur
Mon/Wed
Tue/Thur
Tue/Thur

Thur
Mon
Thur/Fri


3 Oct
4 Oct
30ct
4 Oct
4 Oct

29 Sep
26 Sep
6 & 7 Oct


10 weeks $465
10 weeks $620
10 weeks $400


10 weeks
10 weeks
10weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks

12 weeks
12 weeks
2 days


6:00-9:00PM Thur 6 Oct 10 weeks $225


6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM
6:00-9:00PM


10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks


ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-coordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/ 328-1936 or email All fees are included with the
exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of
your passport. CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course






There will be an important meeting for all first

year students at The College of The Bahamas

on Thursday, October 6 at 5:00 pm in the

auditorium, Oakes Field. All freshmen are urged

to attend. For more information, please contact

Bradley Cooper at 302-4525 or 302-4591.








TOPIC:
'The impact of rising oil prices: Policy alternatives for a
small, open economy like The Bahamas."

VENUE:
Choices Restaurant, Thompson Boulevard

DATE:
Thursday, October 6, at 7:00 pm

PANELISTS:

The Hon. Pierre Dupuch/ H. Vincent Coleby,
Petroleum Usages Review Committee
Ministry of Trade & Industry


Garnett Dawkins, President,
Bahamas Petroleum Retailers Association

Earl Bethell, President,
Bahamas Hotel Association

Rupert Pinder, Lecturer,
COB's School of Business



For more information, please call 302-4430.


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

EDUCAVTNG & TAIZmw BAIIAMANs
Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005






THE TRBN ODYOTBR3 20,PG


Commissioner presents Englerston

community with policing award


* THE Commissioner of
Police, Paul Farquharson, pre-
sents the International Associ-
ation of Chiefs of Police
Community Policing award
recently won by The Royal
Bahamas Police Force back to
the community of Englerston
at the Englerston Urban
Renewal Project Office
opening on Friday, September
30. Shown, from left: Crystal
Stubbs, nine; the Minister of
Transport and Aviation and
the MP for Englerston,
Glenys Hanna-Martin; Ledia.
Butler, 9; Commissioner
Farquharson; Lillian Solomon;
and Kevin Ferguson.
(BIS Photo: Tim Aylen)


Police association president meets Mitchell


* THE Minister of Foreign
Affairs and the Public Ser-
vice, Fred Mitchell, greets
Joseph Eptey, president of the
International Association of
Chiefs of Police on Friday,
September 30, during a
courtesy call at the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs.
(BS Photo.,Derik Smith)


our cr.


Your trust.o


Our responsibility


Irake Serce Suspension i Alignment ExhaslI
Oil, Lube i Filer. "GOODYEAR TIRES"

*American & Imported Cars Light Trucks Vans i SU's
Complete Inspection & Estimates Befor8e e start the work
2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YO---

MACKEY ST. & ROOSEVELT AVENUE EAST ST. & SOLDIER RD
Tel: 393-6651 or 393-6693 Tel: 356-2940 or 356-2941

| Open: Monday Saturday
8amSpmi

Fax 326-4865 P. 0. Box SS-6766 assau, Bahamas

AUTO SYSTEM EXPERTS *|

"Midas is a business based on service, quality and reliability.
Factory scheduled maintenance is car care.
Midas services your car fully. Our system takes the guesswork
out of auto care for every car model out there.


Share

your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Double
The


allows


VETERINARY HOUSE CALL SERVICE
by
Appointment
Dr. Dwight A. Dorsett
Veterinarian


Dogs Cats Small Pets




Call Dr. D...

24hrs/7 days Emergency Service


, yEz


h. .. FAMILY MEDICINE
7 CENTER

Featuring:
* Dr. Chinyere-Carey-Bullard MD
AFMC Medical Director


* Canadian Board Certified Family Physician I';'.
* Family Medicine graduate from the University of Western Ontario
in Canada
* Member of the American Academy of Anti-aging



In the Renaissance Medical Centre #153 Shirley St.
Opposite New Oriental Laundry
P.O.Box EE-16 236 Nassau, Bahamas
,,Determiind to make your life longer,
healthier and happier"


S OARING,

ISUZU DIESEL!


out
and


Cab D-MAX.


diesel
P-


to


smoother


engine


r a more
drive and


Isuzu has gone all
with the new Single


fuel efficient operation.
Our parts department is fully stocked,
with every component to ensure tdihalt
your vehicle runs trouble free.
Trained technicians on duty.

' "S A MO


t


I


I I~rT~TLOCAL NEWS


~B~gBdOB~i~BBD~


T~8FS8~PL~i~~


_ U B U


\MONDAY, OCTOBER 3,2005, PAGE 9
MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


i













Abaco 'needs more investment'


* By KARAN MINNIS
THERE must be public
investment in Abaco if the
island is going to expand, said
Minster of Works and Utilities
Bradley Roberts.
Speaking on the topic, "Man-
aging the Challenges of
Growth" at the second Abaco
Business Outlook Forum, Mr
Roberts said that while the
Abaco economy is "very
strong", there is still a need for
"considerable investment" if the
community's future is to remain
secure.
Mr Roberts explained that
public expenditure can act as a
spur for such investment.
"The World Bank irr a report
noted that there is a direct link
between infrastructure devel-
opment and economic activity,"
he said. "Public investment in
infrastructure is a necessary
requirement if we are to
encourage private sector expen-
diture. Therefore, as the econ-


omy of Abaco expands, so must
its infrastructure."
Mr Roberts explained that
when discussing infrastructure,
"water, sewerage, electricity,
telephone facilities, roads, air-
ports and docks must be at the
top of the list".
According to Mr Roberts, the
Water and Sewerage Corpora-
tion in Abaco operates a total of
10 water supply systems.
"Two of them are located on
the small islands of Grand Cay
and Moores Island, where the
water provided in these locations
is produced by reverse osmosis,"
he said. "The cost to produce
water at these locations is highly
subsidised by government."
However, he added that both
of these systems were damaged
in the hurricanes in 2004, but
repairs are now complete.
"Today, the only major
Bahamian community on main-
land Abaco without piped water
is Cherokee Sound. And in an
effort to address this case, the


Water and Sewerage Corpora-
tion's, plans are to embrace the
proximity of the Abaco Club at
Winding Bay to extend service
from this development into
Cherokee Sound," he said. -
"The challenge, on the other
hand, is to secure the fundiifg
required for the necessary trans-
mission main and a distribution
system."
The next phase of water sup-
ply development will focus on
Green Turtle Cay, where there
are pipes in place.
According to Mr Roberts,
new developments in Abaco will
be made to install sewer systems
and marinas will all have to have
pump-out facilities.
"The reality is that commu-
nities like Marsh Harbour,
Hope Town and Green Turtle
Cay, where there are enclosed
harbours and which have always
been considered to be beauti-
ful and pristine, need proper
sewerage systems for the dis-
posal of refuse," he said.


Cause and effect when


selling your home


TRADITIONALLY, BREA
agents have emphasised their
"selling" prowess as a reason
for listing homes with them.
Naturally, vendors want their
home sold, and an agent who is
a successful "salesperson"
would appear to be the likely
listing candidate.
Today, agents can play a
more important role by organ-
ising and attracting the atten-
tion of other agents. You don't
necessarily need an agent to
"sell" your property you need
an agent to "cause" it- to sell,
and there's a big difference.
Consider the odds. Say there
are 100 active BREA agents
working in our market. Would
you rather have just one or all
of them working to sell your
home?
When interviewing agents to
list your home, ask how they


-E
,Bhmsra


intend to mobilise the entire
realty community to show your
home to their ready-and-waiting
pool of buyers.
Choose the right agent, and
you will enjoy the best possible
marketing efforts available,
focusing on exposing your home
to all buyers, not just a few. The
more buyers who see your
home, the sooner it will sell.
The more buyers are compet-
ing for your home, the higher
it will sell.
In today's fiercely competi-
tive market, it is imperative that


your BREA agent "markets"
your home and not just "selts"
it.
Once you understand the dif-
ference and find an agent who
follows that philosophy, you can
just about begin packing!
Ms Massoni is a sales asso-
ciate at Coldwell Banker/Light-
bourntRedTty in Nassadu.'


Antiquities Monuments, and Museums

roSration


Announces


Entrance fees to Fort Charlotte

Asof Monday October 3, 2005

















Fees aire as fo :

Local adults $3
Senior citizens (60 yrs +) $2
Children (1i4 yrs aid under): .! $



Visiting adults $5

Visit seniors $3

VMting childmn $2


Fort Charloe is a non profit historical site. *Fuds~wi
be used to maintain the fort and surrounding grounds
and: eserve and restore other istoriWa tes,


VACANCY NOTICE

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd (BTC) invites applications
from suitably qualified individuals for the position of Senior Manager/Marketing
Communications, Advertising & Public Relations.

This position will report to the Vice President of Marketing & Sales and is
specifically responsible for developing the Marketing Communications Plan
in support of Product Development and Product Management including
developing and coordinating public relations opportunities to elevate company
and product awareness.

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES

1. Managing brand identity and ensuring consistency across all mediums.
2. Manager development of communications strategies and campaigns to
support product marketing, channel marketing and partner marketing.
3. Develop press releases, speeches, articles.
4. Develop ideas and secure opportunities for feature articles, interview,
presentations, speaking and other public relations activities that promote
awareness of the company and its products or services.
5. Field and direct responses to all media-related inquires.
6. Manage the design media and press opportunities that compliment
marketing plans.
7. Manage the organization and coordination of media efforts at conferences
and special events.
8. Manage and direct activities with public relations agencies to create copy
and media for company promotional material.
9. Manage and tract public relations aspects of customer promotional
programs.
10. Manage interactive marketing with specific responsibility for interactive
communications in the areas of e-marketing, web development, and
advertising.
11. Manager marketing web site strategy and tract and manage expenditures
to marketing budget.
12. Tract and manage expenditure to the advertising, promotions, and public
relations budget.
13. Recruiting, selection, and hiring of qualified marketing communication
personnel.
14. Develop and implement training plans for the individuals and group.
15. Develop and implement individual improvement programs to enhance
subordinate performance in functional areas.
16. Set performance goals consistent with corporate objectives.
17. Conduct annual performance evaluations on all subordinates.

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS

1. A Bachelors Degree or higher in Marketing, Public Relations or Business
with a minimum of ten (10) years public relations experience in a high
technology industry and five years in marketing functions in a high tech
company.
2. An advanced degree such as MBA would be desirable.

All applications are to be received at BTC's Head Office, 21 John F Kennedy
. Drive, no later than Wednesday, October 5, 2005 and addressed as follows:

Director
Human Resources & Administration
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.
Nassau, The Bahamas

Re: Senior Manager/Marketing, Advertising & Public Relations
moo


THE TRIBUNE:


PAGE 10, MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005


NO: FIC'1.1.4







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THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005, PAGE 11


Sl


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PAGE 2, MNDAYOCTOER 3,2005THE TNBUN


Man is found shot
FROM page one
parking lot, police said yesterday.
According to Inspector Walter Evans, police press liaison officer, an
unidentified 18-year-old was stabbed numerous times by another
male, sometime after 4pm.
The victim was rushed to the hospital, where he was listed in serious
condition. As of last night his condition had been upgraded to stable,
said police.
On Friday afternoon, Virgo Car Rental, Independence Drive,
was robbed by two armed men who entered the office after 3 o'clock.
According to Inspector Evans, the two men held up an employee and
escaped in a "northern direction" on foot with an undetermined
amount of cash.
On Sunday morning, two men dressed in camouflage outfits and
armed with handguns, entered Indigo Cafe on West Bay Street and held
up the restaurant. Before leaving the cafe, nine persons were robbed
of personal effects, cash and credit cards. Investigations continue.


FROM page one

have been re-elected.
Government, he said, may have
been hoping that if someone else
had been elected they would
"simply accept" whatever pro-
posal was placed before them.
"I feel as though they held out
because of our elections and to
see if I would have been re-elect-
ed. Maybe if I was out of the pic-
ture the other president would
have accepted their lump sum.
But what we did and are asking
for is a $30 increase a week. Mind
you, we could have asked for
retroactive pay from 2003, when


BPSU
the last contract expired.
"But we take into account the
hurricanes and the state of the
economy so we don't think that
this increase is that bad at all. We
think that it is very reasonable,"
he said.
Mr Pinder was voted in for the
second time as leader of the esti-
mated 5,000 member union on
Friday, and every officer of his
team, including trustees, was re-
elected by a margin of 300 or
more votes.
See page 3


'Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants Seminar
October 6, 2005 @
Wyndham Nassau Resort, 8.45am to 4.30pm
FOREIGN INVESTMENT IN THE BAHAMAS. WHAT
BRINGS IT ....and WHAT KEEPS IT HERE

BICA President's Address Kendrick Christie, CA
Hon. Obediah Wilchcombe
Minister of Tourism
* Foreign Investment & Tourism -,How & Why they Complement
Each Other
Christopher Baker
CA Baker's Bay, Abaco
Perspective on Capital Investments in the Family Islands
Robert "Sandy" Sands
.Bah Mar, Cable Beach, New Providence
*Why We AreHere & Why We williStay .-
Patrick Bain
President of Bahamas Hotel Catering & Allied Workers Union
Why Workers Drive the Success of Major Properties
Owen Bethel
Investment Advisor & Owner/Director
Bringing All Together What keeps investment here?

Why You Will Benefit:
Update on Major Projects
Answers to "burning" questions
BICA Members Earn 7 CPE hours

IC., Meiibet-:$IOONa i-MeiXb^i-.i:,,']'
^^^^^^^Nyah*MnillB,(Mice oi- al [)ool-.^^^


Hotel union warning for

Kerzner International

FROM page one
which the union fought hard to secure in December of 2003
after "nearly bringing the tourism industry to a standstill at
the time".
"If Kerzner International continues to operate the way they
are presently, they can expect a very cold winter and the only
heat they will be experiencing is heat from the membership
of the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union,"
said Mr Douglas in the release.
He said that after 16 months of negotiations, both the
union and Kerzner International are "experiencing many
difficulties", which are preventing them from operating in the
good spirit of the industrial agreement they signed.
In December of 2003, union president Pat Bain, Mr Dou-
glas and other members of the BHCAWU executive faced off
against the BHEA in an effort to obtain a number of con-
cessions from hotel employers.
An island-wide work-to-rule was implemented, which
affected the British Colonial Hilton, the Radisson Cable
Beach Resort and the laundry department of Kerzner's
Atlantis resort on Paradise Island.
"We are calling on the Hotel Employers Association in
general, especially Kerzner International, to honour the
agreement and to stop their violation of the contract or face
serious repercussions," said Mr Douglas.
The Tribune was not able to contact Ed Fields, vice-pres-
ident of Public Affairs at Kerzner International, for comment
on the union's statement.

Turnquest

'has to make

a choice'
FROM page one
job of leader in the House. He
told them that if they gave him
the job he would have no choice
but to take it but that he would
wish that they would first speak
with the leader of the party,
Tommy Turnquest, and get the
consent of council," said the for-
mer deputy prime minister.
Mr Watson, who was the
guest on Love 97's Jones and
Co yesterday, said that from
what he understood, Mr Turn-
quest did not feel that it would
be a good idea for Mr Ingra-
ham to take over the leadership "
in the House.
"But the council felt other-
wise. I think it is fair to say that
if one wants to browse around
the country, any part, any time,
our present leader is having a '
difficult time selling himself to
the populace and indeed even
en9 rising his own base has
binome a very difficult thing
W'~f~t~iilfl 16db," he'said:'
Mr Watson admitted that the
backing of Mr Turnquest as
leader heading into the 2002
general election "did not turn
out the way we thought it
would".
"The first suggestion of that
was that Mr Turnquest, with the
support of the Cabinet, hardly
got 50 plus 1 per cent of the
vote in the party's 2001 leader-
ship election," said Mr Watson.
"After that, we were on the
campaign trail and we contin-
ued to hear people say,
'Between Perry and Tommy, I
prefer Perry'. These were . .
FNM s." .....


Symonette will offer himself as

deputy if 'other things fall into place'

FROM page one
election, but it's not going to work," he told Island FM's Parliament
St hosts Fayne Thompson and Anthony Delaney. ,
Last week, members of the FNM's council told The Tribuno
that the vote that propelled Hubert Ingraham to opposition
leader in the House was the first in a series of carefully planned
moves to reinstate the former prime minister as FNM leader.,
The official tally at the end of the night was 88 in favour
and 40 against Mr Ingraham becoming leader of the opposition
in parliament.
Mr Symonette said yesterday that Mr Ingraham is preparing
himself to be sworn in as leader of the opposition in the House
of Assembly.
"Some people asked the question: 'Is Mr Ingraham prepared
to accept that he has been elected by his colleagues to be leader
of the opposition in the House of Assembly?' The answer is
yes," Mr Symonette said.
No one, he said, can doubt that Mr Ingraham is the most
experienced on the FNM side to lead the parliamentarians.
Mr Symonette said that he met with Mr Ingraham after
Thursday night's vote and told the former prime minister that
he would be willing to relinquish his current position in the
House in order to allow Mr Ingraham to make his own appoint-
ments.
"(Mr Ingraham will) put the fear of God into the government.
The House of Assembly will never be the same again," said Mr
Symonette.
"The honeymoon is now certainly over."


THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANY LTD.
P.O. BOX N-3048 NASSAU, BAHAMAS
TEL. (242) 302-7000

EQUIPMENT UPGRADE PARADISE ISLAND

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.
wishes to inform its valued customers on Paradise
Island that technicians will conduct an equipment
upgrade beginning Friday, September 30, to Monday,
October 3, 2005 between the hours of 9:00am and
4:30pm daily.


As a result, subscribers in the following areas may
experience some disruption in service:


* East of the RIU/Old Grand Hotel on Paradise
Island North Road
Sunrise Villas
Casa International
The RIU Hotel


BTC apologizes for any inconvenience caused, and
assures the public that every effort will be made to
complete the upgrade in the shortest possible time.


Look what's happening at

Nassau


gymNastics!


Mom & Tots Gym Classes (from 18 months)

"On the Move" Pre-School Program

"Healthy Kids" Class (for overall fitness & weight loss)

All-Star Competitive Cheerleading

Adult Tumbling Class

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Class


r GYMNASTICS FOR CHILDREN
AGES 3 and UP
6 DAYS A WEEK!



Call now to schedule your FREE trial class! *

Nassau gymNastics Oakes Field ph & fax 356-7722
Nassau gymNastics Seagrapes ph & fax 364-8423
Nassau gymNastics Blake Road ph & fax 356-7722


S www.nassaunastics.com ,
nassaunastics(a yahoo.com


A proud member of the Gymnastics Federation of the Bahamas


Fourteen

lawyers

admitted

to Bar

FOURTEEN new lawyers
were admitted to the
Bahamas Bar on Friday
before Chief Justice Sir Bur-
ton Hall.

* TOP:
From left to right: Kahlil
David Parker, Anishka Ani-
ta Hanchell, Agatha Dorcas
Forbes, Chief Justice Sir
Burton Hall, Kimberley A
Smith, Lena Melissa Heild,
Yolantha Monet Ward, and:
Jomo Chaka Campbell.
* ABOVE:
From left to right: Justine
A Cleare, Raquel Leandra
Miller, Kenneth L Light-
bourne III, Chief Justice Sirt
Burton Hall, Kelli A Ingra-K
ham, Thamara Takia Saun-,
ders, Sabrina Jenille Hanna;
and Christopher S Sam.

(Photos by:
Franklyn G Ferguson)


*Restrictions apply. Call for details.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005





MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005, PAGE 13


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PAGE 14, MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


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THEJTRIBUNE


MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005, PAGE 15


I .C Ai II


* ACCEPTING a cheque on behalf of the Valley Boys is John Archer, treasurer


* VALLEY Boys chairman, Brian Adderley (left), Stephen Bain (centre), and fundraising
committee Chairman Richard Treco (not pictured) presented Cable Beach Resorts vice-president
of administration and external relations, Robert Sands, with a T-shirt bearing the new logo


ble Beach Resorts take on




sponsorship f alle" Boy


THE Valley Boys will return
to Bay Street this Boxing Day
under a new banner Cable
Beach Resorts. I
Cable Beach Resorts and The
Valley Boys jointly announced
a new sponsorship agreement
that will see The Valley Boys
become a significant part of the
resort's thrust on providing an
authentic product at Baha Mar,
its. planned billionrdollar rede-
velopment in western New
Providence. .
"We are thrilled to enter into
a partnership with The Valley
Boys. They are a winning team
with an excellent track record,"
said Baha Mar vice-president
of Administration i and Exter-
nal Relations, Robert Sands.
"Junkanoo is an experience that
is dear to many long serving
members of Cable Beach
Resorts, and has been
embraced by our newest execu-
tives. We could not pass up the
opportunity to get involved."
Under the agreement, Cable
Beach Resorts assumes title
sponsorship of the 'renowned
Junkanoo group, pdaking a
yearly financial contribution to
thie newly dubbed Cible Beach


Resorts Valley Boys.
The resort has also engaged
the group as on-site cultural
emissaries, and the two organi-
sations are in discussions on
expanding the CBR Valley
Boys' role to include consulta-
tion with design architects on
incorporating Junkanoo and
other cultural forms into the
project's.theme.
Both organisations also have
agreed to partner on specific
community outreach pro-
grammes both in Cable Beach
and in targeted urban areas.
"I have a tremendous amount
of respect for the team at Cable
Beach Resorts for wanting to
contribute to Junkanoo and
embrace Bahamian culture,"
said CBR Valley Boys chair-
man, Brian Adderley.
"They've looked for good
opportunities to give back to
the community in a number of
aspects and we're happy to
work with them on making their
mark in this arena. Junkanoo is
very demanding, and requires
a great deal of financial and
human resources. We appreci-
ate their very generous sup-
port."


I
'I


Quality drinking water from Consolidated Water's state of the art, sea water
reverse osmosis plant that meets or exceeds quality standards set by the World
Health Organization. Nine million imperial gallons will be generated daily for
Water and Sewerage Corporation improving the quality and taste of water in New
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Kia to hold

training

event for

sales staff

U KIA Motors annouced that
they will be holding their first
ever five-day conference in
the Bahamas over the week-
end. The conference is aimed
at effectively training dealers
and sales persons with
upgraded skills needed to
continually increase sales
volumes and customer
satisfaction.
Pictured from left to right:
Yong-Won Cho general ;
manager export support team,
Donald Johnson, managing
director Sanpin Motors
Limited, Han Kwak,
general manager regional
headquarters of Central and
South America of KIA
Motors, and Andrew
Johnson, sales representative
advertising, and marketing
manager at Sanpin Motors
Limited.

(Photo by: Franklyn
Ferguson)


I





PAGE 16, MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005


'i ,i!


I,



~. I


I.


I work hard to provide a comfortable life for my family.
But if anything should happen to me I know they are still protected.
That's the confidence I have in Colinaimperial.


Colina Imperial.
Insurance Ltd.


Confidence


for Life


THE TRIBUlr


1~~







THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, UlU FOBER 3, 2005, PAGE 17


Law rP





sponsors





f'trst lega









A LOCAL law firm has
announced sponsorship of two
free legal clinics in October.
The legal clinics packed
with experts providing infor-
mation on a wide range of legal
and social issues, from genera-
tion land to understanding the
Stamp Tax Act 2005 is
believed to be the first in the
Bahamas.
Called "Information You
Need for the Life You Want,"
the interactive sessions will be
held on two successive Satur-
days, October 22 and October
29, starting at 9am at Halsbury
Chambers, headed by partners
W A Branville McCartney and
Kenred M A Dorsett.
Speakers and participants will
touch on a variety of subjects.
The first Saturday will be devot-
ed to personal legal issues and
the second to business and cor-
porate matters, including con-
tractor responsibilities.
"We are very pleased to offer
a first for the Bahamas, a com-
plimentary legal clinic where
information can be shared,
ideas exchanged and the barrier
that many perceive between the
legal fraternity and the com-
munity can be reduced," said
the firm's partners.
"As a relatively young firm,
Halsbury Chambers has been
fortunate to tveexpan'ded to
three offices in two countries
and to have been honoured in
being selected to represent the
Bahamas at international legal
forums. This is our way of giv-
ing back to a community that
has given so much to us."
The Saturday morning ses-
sions, to be held at Halsbury
Commercial Centre, Village
Road, are intended "to help
answer nagging questions
among persons who, for one
reason or another, stop short of
engaging legal counsel, hoping
to find the answers elsewhere",
the partners said.
"While our team of counsel-
lors and attorneys will be on
hand to answer questions, we
are very pleased to announce
that community leaders from
outside the firm will be partici-
pating, for those who want to
take advantage of the compli-
mentary opportunity to get the
life they want."
Experts will participate in 15-
to 30-minute sessions .ranging
from estate administration, wills
and trusts, to how to avoid iden-
tity theft.
Speakers set for the first ses-
sion on October 22, dealing with
personal and individual issues, |
include Bank of The Bahamas S
STrust Limited manager, Tanya
Wright who will address the [-
issue of wills, trusts and pro- 1
bate; Dr David Allen, president
of the Renascence Institute
International on the subject,
"Divorce: Before seeing the
lawyers...when counselling can
save a marriage or smooth the
separation process for a fami-
ly"; Pat Strachan, president of
the Bahamas Real Estate Asso- ^:I.tiS..
ciation will address the topic
"Real Estate Fees, Are they B
ever negotiable? How to elimi-
nate delays in closings and what :
specific questions you should
ask a real estate agent or broker :.,t:.; "
before engaging their services." des ntmatniter where o a
Shirley Cartwright, senior
vice president, Credit Risk, trb o where i want to go, you can
Commonwealth Bank will dis- :m a wih the new Miga
cuss personal trends in banking


0 HALSBURY Chambers partners Kercedi Dorsett, left, and Branville McCartney announced plans to host two free
legal clinics with nearly a dozen speakers in addiioii< to attorneys.
(Photo: Christine Aylen)


and borrowing. mp y esgned riesuti in a
She will tackle everyday con-
cerns that often go unspoken,. riung exterjfero wth a J0re spaI
like whether you should bank
with more than one institution. S omforta ntor But th new -CIa
Troy Sampson of Approved 011\1 gsig .\e
Lending Services will meet with desin A n le h
participants to discuss "Mort- Arlm| c upensioo, which raises tl
gages: Everything you ever
wanted to know about rates. -. -
Are there significant differences -g
between lending institutions or
is it a matter of your credit? ,i.
Does it pay to refinance and if
so, when?"


_ ~ Y ____l ____ Y _~___ __ nn___ b__PIw







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 18, MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005


LOCAL*NEWS


* FOUR-year-old Xavier Stubbs draws a wining entry, photographed with Tony Williams and
Owen Burrows



Supermarket gives



away computers


TWELVE lucky shoppers
each got a Dell desktop com-
puter during a Back-to-School
giveaway.
The giveaway of a dozen
Dells "will help students
immeasurably and open up the
world of the Internet which is
such an important tool in
today's world," according to
Bahamas Supermarkets man-
aging director Bruce Souder.
"The presentation of 12 com-
puters is part of Bahamas
Supermarkets ongoing com-
mitment to youth development,
and we'd like to thank staff and
all the co-sponsors who saw the
value in this and worked along


with us to make it happen -
Asa H Pritchard, BWA, D'Al-
benas Agency, DC Technolo-
gy, Island Wholesale, Snack
Foods Ltd and Thompson
Trading."
Xavier Stubbs, four, of
Gleniston Pre-School helped
draw the name of one of the
lucky winners during a live
Love 97.5fm radio remote host-
ed by Tony Williams and assist-
ed by Owen Burrows, a buyer
for Bahamas Supermarkets, at
the flagship Harbour Bay store.
Winners were drawn from
names collected at each of
Bahamas Supermarkets stores,
nine City Market stores in Nas-


sau and three Winn-Dixie stores
in Grand Bahama.
Nassau winners included Lex
Brown, South Beach; Valencia
LaRoda, Oakes Field; Linda
Moreley, Rosetta Street; Mari.-
ana Curtie, Lyford Cay; Jack-
lyn Johnson, Independence
Highway; Sherene Brown, Vil-
lage Road; Aaron Strachan,
Cable Beach; Sheree Minnis,
Seagrape; and Catherine Glin-
ton, Harbour Bay. Grand
Bahama's Winn-Dixie winners-
were Paula Reily, Eight Mile
Rock; Lonna Munroe, Seahorse
Shopping Plaza; and Hazel
Roach, Downtown Shopping
Plaza.


TOPRIIA* H N..0~t EI AYPES CSLT INU


n 4d d 4 rie P0O -4 :N -
ep3nen- 0us au c it -


Sing-Sing with Minister Mitchell



KW
















* FOREIGN Affairs and Public Service Minister Fred Mitchell receives a copy of the song
"Da Public Service Sing-Sing" by singer and songwriter Enid Darling on Tuesday, September
27, at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Shown from left are Irene Stubbs, permanent secretary
in the department of Public Service; Ms Darling; Minister Mitchell and Margo Adderley, chief
training officer IN the department of Public Service.
The presentation of the song is one of the highlights of this year's Public Service Week,
scheduled for October 2-8 and is intended to disavow the negative connotations about the
Public Service conveyed by the song "Civil Servants".
(BIS photo: Tim Aylkn)

Diplomat's visit to Maynard-Gibson


* MINISTER of Financial Services and Investments Allyson Maynard-Gibson greets Dr
Brent Hardt, United States Embassy deputy chief of mission on Wednesday, September 28,
during a courtesy call
(BIS photo: Derek Smith)
_____ *______ ,*______ _


LN61 AB IN R 'A







THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 20uj,


INTAERNAIONALS


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UMARALTHON WO
PRESENTS *
m Walk the RvIwaIj for a CLire
at Center Court
Saturday, October 8th, 2005 @ 2pm

ONOTB oER7.


LEE NATION 'zL DENI M DYI 0YASSRN
Le a ioaDe im a vsu h hnet eert h ie ftoeta aebe oce ybes


GE Mechanical Room
Air conditioner JOlJN &
AGV12 .2 ., . .


Sales & Full Service Department
Rosetta & Montgomery Sts.


Join The Mall at Marathon avid British AmericaM Isurance on Saturday, October
8t6 to give your support to Tie Camcer Society of Tle Ba~iaas, avd tte Sister,
Sister Cancer Support Group at our Fasdiovn Snow at 2pm in Cemter Court. British
Americam Represemtatives will be selling Pinv Ribbov Pins, T-shirts amd Car Clings


I--~~~"--------'-;~------


-----------~II


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PAGE 20, MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005


THE TRIBUNE


RATOA


US plans for Cuba after




the departure of Castro


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FOX HILL NURSERY
RP. 0BOX SS, 6321 TEL; (242) 324-1302
BERNARD ROAD (242) 324-6147
NASSAU, BAHAMAS FAX: [242) 324-6086


OCTOBER ONLY













All Asian Pots


Huge Selection


ft


.


-







THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005, PAGE 21
n --- I


,MONDAY EVENING


OCTOBER 3, 2005


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30
Antiques Road- Antiques Roadshow Tur-of-the- Secrets of the Royalt Kitchen Leonardo's Dream Machines (N)
WPBT show 'Newmar- century carousel horse head; water- (CC) nl (Part 1 of 2) (CC)
ket" color by George Kilbum. (CC)
The Insider (N) The Kingof How I Met Your Two and a Half (:31)utof CSl: Miami"Prey ( A teena e
SWFOR (CC) QueSns N) l Mother Ted's ad- Men (N) A (CC) Practice Lyd s oust goes missing. (N) (CC)
WFO( ( L CC) venture. (N) approval party. Simply t sR
Access Holly- Surface 'Episode 3" Lee and Cirko Las Vegas Danny, Mike and Ed re- Medium Allison has dreams of be-
VF TVJ wood (N) (CC) link the species to global warming. unite with Dr. Cavanaugh to solve a ng a woman committed to a mental
(N) A (CC) high-stakes kidnapping, institution in 1959. (N) ,
Deco Drive Arrested Devel- Kitchen Confi- Prison Break"Part 2 (N) (PA) News (CC)
WSVN opment Famy ential Radical (CC)
party. (N) (CC) request. (N)
J rpa dyl (N) Sports Jam Live NFL Football Green Bay Packers at Carolina Panthers. From Bank of
WPLG ')America Stadium in Charlotte, N.C. (Live) a (CC)

00D)Cold Case SUPERMAN 11 (1980, Fantasy) Christopher Reeve, Margot Kidder, Gene Hackman. Airline "No Go
A&E(CC) Premier Threecriminals from Krypton take over the United States. (CC) ing Back" (CC)
Hardtalk BBC News World Business BBC News Click Online Es- BBC News Asia Today
,BBCI (Latenight). eport (Latenight). sential guide to (Latenight).
computers.
The Gospel SOMETHING TO SING ABOUT (2000, Drama)Irma P. Hall, Darius Mc- The Parkers t The Parkers t
ET Movie Special Crary. A saintly grandmother helps a musically gifted ex-con, (CC) (CC)
Coronation Into the West Jacob Wheeler's children witness history; Mary Light CBC News (CC) Venture 'ezley
CBC Street (CC) Shines is captured by the Cheyenne. (N) (Part 4 of 6) CC) Weber"
CN3C Katrina: CrIsis, The Apprentice: Martha Stewart Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNBC Recovery "Business Is Blooming' (N) (CC)
:00) Anderson Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) NewsNight With Aaron Brown
__ __N M oop r aeO (CC)
SSAVING SIL- The Daily Show The Showbiz Drew Carey's South Park Cart- Blue Collar TV Blue Collar TV
COM VERMAN (2001) With Jon Stew- Show With Green Screen man must find his NASCAR baby "Fighting" .
SJason Biggs. art (CC) David Spade Show/ (CC) dad. delivery. (CC) (C
Cops 'Copsin The Investigators A woman kills Forensic Files North Mission Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege
'_COURT KansasCiy" her landlord, Road & Justice
That's So Raven HALLOWEENTOWN HIGH (2004. Fantasy) Debbie (:35) Buzz on Naturally Sadie Sister, Sister
DISN 'Fourts a Crowd" Reynolds, Kimbedy J. Brown. Witches protect students Maggie (CC) Sadie considers Victor prepares to
(CC) from Knights of the Iron Dagger.'NR' (CC) a battle. (CC) propose. 3
This Old House Weekend Deco- Material Girls Fresh Coat From Junky to Surapbooking Knitty Gritty (N)
)DIY (CC) rating (N) Funky (N) (N)
,DW Euromaxx Journal: In Fath Matters Journal: Projekt Zukunft Journal: In Euromaxx
D Depth Tagestema Depth
E The Soup The Women of Desperate Housewives: The El True Hollywood Story Hollywood Wives' Tales
E Life on Wisteria Lane. 1 (CC)
ESPN Monday Night Countdown (Live) (CC) Figure Skating European Championships. From Torino, Italy. (CC)
To Be An- Goles de Es- Gol ESPN: NFL Football Green Bay Packers at Carolina Panthers. From Bank of
ESPNI ounced pana (N) Fuera de Juego America Stadium in Charlotte, N.C. (Live)
S DailyMass: Our The Journey Home Super Saints St. The Holy Rosary Abundant Life
'EWf "N Lady Francis.
:00) FitTV's FiTrV's Housecalls Trainers help a FitNation "Gadgets Get-Ups and Guru2Go A woman learns to relax
FIT TV Housecalls (CC) diabetic man lose weight, (CC) Gizmos" Fitness gadgets. t and balance home life. (CC)
Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
OX-NC Shepard Smith Susteren (Live) (CC)
SFCMI: The Chris PRIDE Fighting Championships MLB 2005: A Season on the Wire Nothin' But Best Damn`7
FT SNFL Myers Interview Knockouts Sports Show
GOLF 31))Golf Channel Academy Live e.:43 Golf Channel Academy Cindy Playing Lessons :08) Champions Tour Learning
GSN Lingo (CC) Who Wants to Be a Millionaire f The Amazing Race ft (CC) Ballbreakers (CC)
(:00) Attack of X-Play Cheat "San An- Icons Mark Judgment Day Filter Must-have Judgment Day
G4Tech the Show (N) dreas" Cuban. "NH 06". games. (N) (N) S e
00) Walker, Walker, Texas Ranger Walker finds **PERRY MASON: THE CASE OF THE FATAL FASHION (1991, V e a e tl
HALL Texas Ranger the drug ring leader and investigates Mystery) Raymond Burr, Valerie Harper, Scott Baio. Mason investigates'.
(CC) a string of rapes. (CC) the murder of a fashion-magazine editor.
Curb Appeal f Home to Sta reDesign ft Debbie Travis' Facelift 'Tina's Full Holmes on Homes "Bungled Bun- m a k e g re a t g ft s !
HGTVHeathStree (N) House" f (CC) galow" f (CC)
T(CC)
SINSpe Morris Cerullo Breakthrough R.W. Scham- Inspirational Life Today (CC) Inspiration To- Love a Child
IS(CC) bach (CC) Programming day
Transfonire Sabrina, th' My Wife and My Wife and Friends Ross Everybody Everybody
KTLA Cbertron TeenageWitch Kids Claire Kids Tee for Too sings an off-color Loves Raymond Loves Raymond .
'Deep' 'Sabrina Claus" sneaks out. ft Many" (CC) lullaby. ft ft (CC) ft (CC)
** VICTIM OF TlE HAUNT (1996, Horror) Sharon HAUNTING SARAH (2005, Suspense) Kim Raver, Audrey Dwyer, Rick
LIFE Lawrence, Beau Bridges. A malevolent spirit comes af- Roberts. Premiere. A child falls under the influence of her dead cousin.
ter a couple's young son. (CC) (CC)
MSNBC Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- Rita Cosby Live & Direct Scarborough Country
NICK Jimmy Neutron: SpongeBob Zoey 101 "Spring Full House f Fresh Prince of Fresh Prince of The Cosby
NICK Boy Genius SquarePants Fling" (CC) BeIl-Air Bel-Air Show f (CC)
:31) Out of Surface Lee and Cirko link the Las Vegas "Double Down, Triple News f (CC) News
NTV Practice (N) A species to global warming. (N) ft Threat" (N) f (CC)
OLN (:00) Survivor: Countdown: Outdoor Investi- E-Force Outdoor Out- Survivor: Africa "Truth Be Told" ft
OLN frica A(CC) Worst Jobs gations takes (CC)
SPEED NBS 24-7 (N) Inside Nextel Cup (Same-day World's Greatest Auto Shows:. NASCAR Nation NBS 24-7
SPEED Tape) Frankfurt (N)-
Bishop T.D. Behind the Mark Chironna Jentezen Jesse Duplantis Praise the Lord (CC) v
TBN Jakes (CC) Scenes (CC) Franklin (CC) (CC)
Everybody Friends Rachel Friends Phoebe Friends Joey's Friends Phoebe Family Guy Pe- Family Guy Pe-
TBS Loves Raymond helps Joey with discovers Moni- girlfriend gets finds a police offi- ter infiltrates the ter tries to con-
(I (CC) his purse. (CC) ca's secret. f physical. (CC) cer's badge. high school. f vert Chris. (CC)
T :00 Incredible Trauma: Life in the ER "Family Untold Stories of the E.R. "Surgery 627 Lb Woman: Jackie's Story
TIC ,cal Myster- Forces" Louisville's University Hos- Won't Help" A man has a laceration
le (CC) pital. (CC) on his eyelid. (CC) -
:00) Law & Or- Law & Order A woman is murdered Law & Order A rap artist is shot to Just Legal 'The Limit" A plastic sur-
TNT der "Blood Mon- after testifying against a reputed death and the evidence seems.to geon paralyzes a woman. f (CC)
eyT" Nazi war criminal. point to his young protege. f(
TOON Codename: Kids Grim Adven- Codename: Kids Grim Adven- Cartoon Car- Ed, Edd n Eddy Dragon Ball Z '
T O Next Door tures Next Door tures toons "In a Bind"
(:00) Vie priv6e, vie publique Extremis II: Disparaitre Ombres et lu- TV5 Le Journal
mitres
6:00 Weather: Storm Stories Storm Stories Weather: Evening Edition (CC) .Le C kc li eA

UNIV 00) Inocente de Contra Viento y Marea La Esposa Virgen Cristina Juan Soler y su familia. B a h a ,Tian P p -t c ,fd
A 2 FAST 2 (7:55) WWE Monday Night Raw Scheduled: Stone Cold, Hulk Hogan, Mick Foley, Vince McMahon and Triple his sid ek ic k 1 e rpk
USA FURIOUS (2003) Hreturn; John Cena battles Eric Bischoff. (Live) f (CC)
Paul Walker. some SW iles on your

[':00) America's America's Funniest Home Videos America's Funniest Home Videos WGN News at Nine f (CC)
WGN Funniest Home ft (CC) ft/(CC)
Videos f (CC)
Everybody 7th Heaven Simon and Rose de- Just Legal 'The Limit" A plastic sur- WB11 News at Ten With Kaity
WPIX Loves Raymond cide to make changes in their rela- geon paralyzes a woman. (N) ft Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Marchiano B ri g you children to the
Jeo ardyl (N) One on One All of Us Robert Girlfriends Todd Half & Half (N) Dr. Phil L 1 1
WSBK (cc) "House Dad" (N) meets a great must take drastic ft(CC) clour o
WaeMarlborough every Thursday
6:30) ** ,k4 THE WHOLE TEN YARDS (2004, Comedy) Bruce Wallace & A DODGEBALL: A TRUE UN-
HBO-E SOHNNY ENG- Willis, Matthew Perry. A mobster ursues a retired hit Gromit: Curse of DERDOG STORY (2004, Comedy) LO m 3 30pm to 4:- 30 A during the
(:O0) Children of Curb Your En- Extras Andy Rome "The Ram Has Touched the Rome "Egeria" Mark Antony runs m o O ctobe r 2
HBO-P Beslan (Subti- thusiasm Larry wants a speaking Wall" Caesar weighs Pompey's Rome while Caesar pursues Pomr- 1'\Of'\ OCiOL e ZUU
tied-English) f adopts a dog. role. (CC) counteroffer. f (CC) pey. ft (CC)
B:,00) *** SEABISCUIT (2003, Drama) Tobey Maguire, Jeff Bridges, ** JOHNNY ENGLISH (2003, Comedy) Rowan
HBO-W Chhns Cooper. Three men lead a racehorse to glory in the 1930s. ft 'PG- Atkinson, John Malkovich. A bumbling agent tries to re-
13' (CC) cover stolen jewels. f 'PG' (CC)


(:15) ** DOWN WITH LOVE (2003, Romance- ** i VANITY FAIR (2004, Drama) Reese Witherspoon, Eileen Atkins,
HBO-S Comedy) Renee Zellweger. A womanizing reporter Jim Broadbent. A woman climbs the social ladder in 19th-century Eng- e r a i of f
casts a spell on a feminist writer. n'PG-13'(CC) land. n'PG-13'(CC) ,EnjoN Great Foo d, Plizes alnda Lo ts O Fu .
(6:00)*** ** CLOSER (2004, Drama) Julia Roberts, Jude Law, Natalie Port- ** SUDDEN IMPACT (1983,
MAX-E HUNDER- man. Four people grapple with love and betrayal. 'R' Drama) Clint Eastwood, Sondra
HEART (1992) Locke, Pat Hingle. n 'R' (CC) lI
S!00) **' FLIGHT OF THE PHOENIX (2004, Adven- *** COLLATERAL (2004, Suspense) Tom Cruise, Jamie Foxx, Jada
MOMAX re Dennis Quaid. Plane-crash survivors endure Pinkett Smith. A contract killer uses a cabdriver for his jobs. ft 'R' (CC)
hardships in the Gobi desert. t 'PG-13' (CC) i'm lovin' it
:(00) ** PHILADELPHIA (1993, Drama) Tom Han- (:05) The L Word "Luminous" (iTV) Weeds 'The Pun- Weeds "The Pun-
SHOW ks, Jason Robards.iTV. A lawyer with AIDS sues his Alice and Dana begin dating, ishment Lighter" ishment Lighter"
former firm over his dismissal. f 'PG-13' (CC) (N) (CC)
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(2003) 'PG-13' a scientist for Pandora's box. n 'PG-13' (CC) Will Patton. Premiere. f 'R' (CC)






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 22, MONDAY, OCTOER 3, 2005


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Opportuit


World, Class- Retailer


Esso, a market leader in fuels and
convenience retailing, is looking for
operators/ franchisees 'for its.
service stations across the country.
Retails Sites immediately available
in New Providence.
If you have...
* Successful experience in sales,
finance, or administration;
A minimum of five years
successfully supervising a team
of workers;
A desire to provide superior
customer service;!
Computer literacy; I
Organisational discipline;
Access to capital anda good
credit history
...We want to know you!



OH^OA


Application forms may be collected at
our Windsor Field Office (immediately
West of Nassau International Airport).
,Completed forms should be addressed
and returned to:
Yorick Cox
Caribbean Sales
Support Co-ordinator
Esso Standard Oil S.A. Ltd.
Windsor Field Road
Nassau, NP
Bahamas

Applications should be submitted no
later than September 30 2005


)AWN, ddtve too


McDonald's thanks our valued customers for

"reei m thea victims of Hurticane Katrina."
Proceeds from the sale of our hamburgers and
lonies collected Min the canisters in the restaurants


ring the month of September 2005 will be
ated to the rrcane Karina relief forts.


i-o ViOWW


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005, PAGE 21


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 24, MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005


THE TRIBUe


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


-





-


FOR ALL LIFE'S ROADS


CHEVROLET


INTERNATIONALNEWS


- qp








MONDAY, OCTOBER 3,2005


SECTION -


business@tribunemedia.net


ss


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Economy on 'path



that will not succeed'


may4,:,
g





seleced as


By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business
Reporter
M ayaguana has
been identi-
fied as the.
next free
port and eco-
nomic enterprise zone in the
Bahamas, Allyson Maynard-
Gibson, minister of financial
services and investments, told
The Tribune.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
the Government had chosen
Mayaguana as the first location
for an economic initiative that
will attempt to model what the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement
has done for Freeport.
She added that Mayaguana
was chosen because the Gov-
ernment wanted to implement
a: fully-planned development,
rathern than superimposing the
initiative on a population and
infrastructure that were already
in place.
L-:ooking-at. the -promisedcL
developpnpt Qf free pqt.sand
economic enterprise zones in
the Family Islands, the minister


Island chosen to be next
economic enterprise zone
in Bahamas, modelled on
Freeport initiative

of financial services and invest- Company (MDC).
ments emphasised, however, Looking at Grand Bahama,
that creating such a venture in Mrs Maynard-Gibson said the
Mayaguana: would be a long- Government, along with the
term development and was not Grand Bahama Port Authority,
slated for the short-term. was in the process of develop-
"Like Freeport, the con- ing the area between the
struction of a free port zone in sea/container port and the air-
Mayaguana will take 20 to 25 port into a logistics centre,
years to be fully built out," Mrs which wotild further solidify
Maynard-Gibson added, the island's position as an
She said the Government industrial centre.
was still considering how such a Addressing points in the
development would work in Government's National Invest-
Mayaguana and to what extent ment Strategy paper, Mrs May-
the I-Group, developers of a nard-Gibson said her ministry
$500 million tourism develop- had hoped to get legislation on
ment, would be involved. The amendments to the Timeshare
I-Group is participating in a Act out by October. She said,
joint venture with the Hotel however, that.the legislation
Corporation of the Bahama .,,.
and the pair have formed the
Mayagua'na Development SEE page 4B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamian economy
"has taken a path that will not
lead to success", the Grand
Bahama Port Authority's co-
chairman has warned, hitting
out at the "unreality" trade
unions live in and the tendency
of politicians to pander to vot-
ers' desires as the main factors
behind this nation "losing its,
competitiveness".
In a hard-hitting speech to
the Bahamas Institute of Finan-
cial Services Awards dinner,
Julian Francis, the former Cen-
tral Bank of the Bahamas gov-
ernor, also blamed Bahamians'
tendency to believe that the
world owed them a living for
blunting the economy's ability
to compete with world rivals.
He warned that relatively
high wage levels in the
Bahamas, coupled with.low


* By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
Senior Business Reporter
MERCURY Global,.a Bahamas-based finan-
cial services provider, has denied claims by the
Swedish Financial Supervisory Authority,
Finansinspektionen, that it is an unregistered ,
and unlicensed entity in both this nation and:


Francis says political pandering to
voters, unrealistic unions and belief
Bahamians are owed a living taking
nation 'out of the game'

productivity and labour prac-
tices, could mean the Bahamas
"will be out of the game" in
economic terms.
Mr Francis said: "I fear the
Bahamas today, even beyond
the financial services and in
areas outside the industry, has
taken a path that will not lead
to success.
"I. call it the path of entitle-
ment. We all believe our coun-
Jtry, our government, our indus-

U JULIAN FRANCIS


Sweden.
The Swedish regulator last week warned
investors that Mercury Global was not autho-
rised by Finansinspektionen. It also stated that
Mercury Global was not an authorized firm in

SEE page, 5B


Government

to decide on

Isle of Capri

incentive

demands

this week
* ByYOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business
Reporter
OFFICIALS are expected to
make a decision early this week
on whether they will agree to
the Isle of Capri's request for a
reduced casino tax rate and an
increase in the Government's
financial contribution for mar-
keting initiatives, the minister
of tourism said.
Obie Wilchcombe said the
Government was in the process
of considering a number of pro-
posals put forward by the still-
.struggling casino, which report-
ed losses of $573,000 for the
fiscal year to April 24, 2005.
The administration is expect-
ed to make a decision by
tomorrow.
Without receiving $2 million
from a hurricane business inter-,
ruption insurance claim, result-
ing from Hurricanes Frances
and Jeanne in September 2004,
Isle of Capri's Grand Bahama-
based isle Lucaya casino would
have lost more than $2.5 mil-
lion in the past fiscal year.
In July, the losses were
blamed for the lay off of 45

SEE page 4B


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Bahamiancompany hits out at
claims by Swedish regulator
*i.: *,^ -* lll-. ll^ *^ :;^ .^ : *:,:;l-... ll~ l'; l -


Shock at

Souder's

departure
By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor
THE Bahamian retail
industry and Bahamas
Supermarkets employees
were left stunned over the
weekend by the abrupt
departure of Bruce Soud-
er, the company's manag-
ing director.
A short press release
from Winn-Dixie, Bahamas
Supermarkets' US parent,
which has about a 75 per
cent stake in the company,
said Mr Souder's job would
be taken over temporarily
by Mark Sellers, Winn-Dix-
ie's group vice-president of
'operations, who is based in
Jacksonville..
In describing how Mr
Sellers would oversee the
operations of the 12
Bahamian stores on "an
interim basis" until a per-
manent. replacement was
found, the Winn-Dixie
release said Mr Souder was
"no longer with the com-
pany".
Terry Derreberry, a
Winn-Dixie spokeswoman,
declined to comment when
The Tribune asked why Mr
Souder had left and where
he was going now.
However, this newspaper
understands that his depar-
ture came as a surprise to
Bahamas Supermarkets
SEE page 5B


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PAGE B, MNDAY CTOBR 3,2005UHEITIBUN


* By FIDELITY
CAPITAL MARKETS
IT WAS an active trading
week in the Bahamian market as
more than 133,000 shares
changed hands. For the week, the
market saw 10 out of its 19 listed
stocks trade, of which five
advanced, two declined and three
remained unchanged.
The volume leader for the
week was Colina Holdings
(CHL), with 75,000 shares chang-
ing hands and accounting for 56
per cent of the total shares trad-
ed.
The big movers for the week
were J.S. Johnson Company
(JSJ) and Cable Bahamas
(CAB), which gained $0.15 and
$0.14 respectively to close at new
52-week highs of $8.65 and $9.19.
On the down side, Colina
Holdings Ltd: lost $0.16 to close
at its new 52-week low of S1.53.

* COMPANY NEWS
Bahamas Property Fund Lirm-


ited (BPF) -
For the six months ended
June 30. 2005. BPF posted net
income, of 51.15 million, up
$27.000 or 2.44 per cent from
$1.12 million in 2004, while
earnings per share stood at
$0.48. ai 0.01 increase from
2004's $SO.47.
Total income rose by $47,000
or 2.33 per cent to total $2.08
million, while operating expens-
es increased by $23.000 or 2.61
per cent to total $929.000.
Funds from operations stood
at $1.15 million, a $23,000 or
2.10 per cent gain compared to
the $1.13 million for the same
time last year.
The Net Asset Value (NAV)
of the lund rose by $1.50 or
17.10 per cent year-over-vear to


LEGAL NOTICE




NOTICE



FIRST STAR LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 29th day of
September, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc.,
of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator



LEGAL NOTICE



NOTICE



KMLOOPS SA*
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 29th day of
September, 2005. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc.,
of P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
Liquidator


total $10.25. BPF is trading at a
slight discount of $0.25 to the
NAV, with a current share price
of $10.

* BAHAMAS WASTE
(BWL) -
For the first half of 2005,
BWL has reported a less than
stellar financial performance.
For the six months ended
June 30, 2005, net income
declined by $42,000 or 16.04
per cent to total $221,000,
compared to $263,000 in
2004.
Earnings per share decreased
by $0.01 to stand at $0.05. Sales
and services rendered grew by
$137,000 or 5.57 per cent to total
$2.6 million, while cost of sales,
which contributed to the decline


in total income, increased by
$92,000. totalling $1.6 million.
Also contributing to the decline
in income was an $87,000 or 13.3
per cent increase in total oper-
ating expenses.

* BANK OF THE
BAHAMAS (BOB) -
BOB ended the fiscal year by
posting impressive financial
results. For the year, the bank
earned $7.016 million in net
income, an increase of $982,000
or 16.28 per cent over 2004's fig-
ure of $6.034 million.
Total assets increased by $68
million or 17.77 per cent to total
$453,000, while shareholders
equity gained $4.9 million or
12.68 per cent to total $44.3 mil-
lion.


BISX
SYMBOL
AML
BAB
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
DHS
FAM
FCC
FCL
FIN
ICD
JSJ
KZLB
PRE


CLOSING
PRICE
$0.73
$1.14
$0.80
$7.01
$10.00
$12.25
$1.40
$9.19
$9.10
$1.53
$9.50
$2.40
$4.20
$1.15
$9.25
$10.70
$9.94
$8.65
$5.52
$10.00


CHANGE
$-0.07
$-0
$-0
$-0.13
$-0
$-
$0.04-
$0.14
$0.10
$-0.16
$-
$-
$-
$-
$0.04
$-
$-
$0.15
$0.16
$-


VOLUME YTD PRICE


10,000
4,943
800
13,000
0
0
0
8,350
11,900
75,000
0
0
0
0
2,000
4,350
0
3,000
0
0


CHANGE
-33.64%
14.58%
-5.88%
21.91%
25.00%
-5.77%
-22.22%
29.44%
28.17%
-30.45%
26.84%
60.00%
6.06%
-42.21%
15.63%
10.31%
0.51%
5.23%
8.91%
0.00%


DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:

Commonwealth Bank (CBL) has declared a dividend of
$0.08 payable on September 30, 2005, to all common share-
holders as at record date September 15, 2005.


Cable Bahamas (CAB) has declared a dividend of $0.06
payable on September 30,2005, to all common shareholders as
at record date September 23, 2005.


Colina Holdings (Bahamas) will hold its Annual Gener-
al Meeting on October 18, 2005 at 4pm at the J. Whitney Pin-
der Building at Colinalmperial Insurance, Collins Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.


Economy on paththat will not succeed'


FROM page 1B

try, owe us a job, owe us a place
in the system. Nothing could
be further from the truth, and I
am always greatly distressed
when compatriots take the
position that they should have
something because they're
Bahamian."
Mr Francis said Bahamians
"should not take the view the
Bahamas should be cosseted
and protected", but rather push
and believe in themselves that
they have the ability to com-
pete "with anyone around the
world".
If foreign companies estab-
lished operations in Nassau,
Bahamians should know they
were "good enough to compete
against them".

Careful

The Port Authority co-chair
added: "We have to be very
careful in the Bahamas not to
allow politicians to cause us to
lose our way. It is politicians


Fred Maura
*Lifetime Achievement Award


The late Fred Maura dedicated more than 45 years to the
development of tourism. After World War II, Mr. Maura would
photograph visitors on vacation in The Bahamas and get the
photographs published in the society pages of the visitors'
hometowns. This amounted to incredible advertising for The
Bahamas.

His work as a photographer with the Bahamas News Bureau and
Bahamas Development Board since 1947 earned Mr. Maura the very
first Lifetime Achievement Award.
The next Cacique winner could be someone you know,


who pander to the desires of
the electorate.
"'This is one of the major
contributors 'to the Bahamas
losing its competitiveness, and
I think it's a cycle we have to
work out how to stop."

Political

Mr Francis said he was not
singling. out any olne political
party: or grouping, but added:.
"I believe that most of our
politicians are guilty of that,
and that we are guilty of caus-
ing them to act that way. Peo-
ple get the politics they deserve.,
This is something we 'absolute-
ly have to figure out how to.
stop,"
While he had nothing against
trade unions, and there was
much truth in what they said,
Mr Francis said there was "a
great deal of unreality in unions
around the Bahamas".
"I think many of the unions
in the Bahamas today are tak-
ing us where we should not go,"
Mr Francis said. "We have the


opportunity to cause there to
be a rethink on this issue.
"We have to think carefully
about this issue of competi-
tiveness. Wage levels in the
Bahamas are making us
uncompetitive, labour practices
nare making us uncompetitive,
and the way we work, mean-
ing being productive, is mak-
ing us uncompetitive. This
means one day we will be; out
of the game."
Mr Francis said, the
Bahamas' geographical prox-
imity to the US would not be
able to save it, as the Internet
and improved communications
technology meant this nation
was now competing with rivals
spread put across the world.
"I really am absolutely con-
cerned about this and what it
means for our country in the
future, and my children and
your children," Mr Francis said.

Cultural

He called for a cultural
change in the Bahamas, calling


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O


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on its people to "abandon the
idea of protectionism" and
decide to be challenged and
take risks.
Mr Francis said he was tired
of people moaning that things
were difficult, like after the
2004 hurricanes, adding:
"That's life. There will be times
when things will be tough...........
"We will not succeed if we
believe these thongs will;be giv-
en to us, and handed to us on a
silver plate."
Although arguing that the
use of the word 'great' was
overstated, Mr Francis said: "I
think the Bahamas does have a
tremendous opportunity still to
be a fine country....... in every
respect. We have the opportu-
nity to be a great, little econo-
my, we have a vibrant, ener-
getic people, we have a geog-
raphy unmatched. We have all
the tools anyone else has and
there is no reason why the
Bahamas cannot succeed in the
global marketplace."
Turning to financial services,
Mr Francis said the Bahamas
should "not take ourselves too
seriously" and had to be careful
in believing it had arrived. "In
fact today, I think we are only
on the crest of the beginning
of building a financial services
industry," Mr Francis said.
The Bahamas had so far ben-
efited from external events that
had worked in favour of a
financial services industry
developing here, but Mr Fran-
cis warned that the sector had
become increasingly competi-
tive in recent years.
It was an industry, he added,
"where the rules are not very
clear because they are set by
some who are much more pow-
erful than we are".
The skills required to build a
Bahamian financial services
industry in the current envi-
ronment had not existed in the
past, and this nation was "not
there yet".
Mr Francis added: "What we
are faced with today is the chal-
lenge of being able to compete
and build an industry against
formidable odds."
To build a financial services
industry, the Bahamas needed
to inspire confidence among
clients that it could deliver the
services they sought. It also
needed to inspire confidence
in its integrity, that those deliv-
ering the services were not dis-
honest and would not take
advantage of clients.
Banking institutions, Mr
Francis said, were often reluc-
tant to take dishonest employ-
ees to court for fear that it
would create the impression
they were vulnerable.
But he added: "You cannot
be dishonest without itnpuni-
ty, especially in a small com-
munity. At the end of the day,
people will know what you are
worth and whether you can be
trusted. In small communities,
people do things they can't get
away with, and yet they do
them."


International Markets
FOREX Rates
Weekly % Change
CAD$ 1.1616 -0.79
GBP 1.7636 -0.71
EUR 1.2021 -0.18


Commodities
Weekly % Change
Crude Oil $66.24 3.19
Gold $479.50 1.96


International Stock Market Indexes:
Weekly % Change
DJIA 10,568.70 1.43
S&P500 1,228.81 1.11
NASDAQ 2,151.69 1.65
Nikkei 13,574.30' 3.15


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005


I ' IThe Local Stock Market

FINDEX 435.63 YTD 1.321%


THE TRIBUNE









THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, t BUSINESSS




Minister: Realtors




c an benefit from .......





$1.535 billion in




investments


* By YOLANDA
DELEVEAUX
Senior Business
Reporter
B ahamian real
estate agents can
benefit from
more than
$1.535 billion in
condo hotel, timeshare and sec-
ond home investment projects
that have already been
approved by the Government,
the minister of financial ser-
vices and investments said.
Allyson Maynard-Gibson
told the Bahamas Real Estate
Association (BREA) that
between the Turnberry Resi-
dences at Atlantis, Grand Isle
Villas in Exuma, and Valen-
tines Resort in Harbour Island
projects, some $291 million was
to be invested in condo hotels
that are approved and either
under construction or about to
begin construction.
She added that between The
Abaco Club on Winding Bay;
the International Marinas
Chub Cay, in the Berry Islands;
the Bimini Sands and Bimini
Bay resorts; the Crystal Mount
in Cat Island; Pittstown Point
in Crooked Island; Eleuthera
Properties, Current Club Villas,
Governor's Harbour Resort,
Powell Pointe, and Winder-
mere, which are all on
Eleuthera; the Emerald Bay
Resort and Marina and
Roker's Point in Exuma; the I-
Group in Mayaguana; Mon-
tana Holdings in Rum Cay;
Charlotteville and Ocean Club
Terraces on New Providence,
$1.1 billion was to be invested
in approved second home
developments either under
construction or about to begin
construction.
The minister also listed Har-
borside on Paradise Island and
the 80/50 project in Exuma as
contributing some $145 million
that will be invested in
approved timeshare or frac-
tional ownership projects, and
which are either under con-
struction or about to begin con-
struction.
The total capital investment
represented by the projects was
some $1.5 billion, with every
dollar having the real possibil-
ity of directly impacting
Bahamian real estate agents,
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said.
Bahamian agents must be
connected to the sale of land
in the Bahamas, the minister
added, signalling her readiness
to deal with an issue that has
plagued the real estate sector
for some time.


Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
that together with her ministry,
BREA would work to close
loopholes in the current legis-
lation that has allowed foreign
agents to sell land in the
Bahamas to their benefit and to
the exclusion of Bahamians.
After months of complaints
from BREA president Pat
Strachan, who said licensed
Bahamian agents were being
sidestepped in a substantial
number of sales processes,
often involving lucrative con-
tracts, Mrs Maynard-Gibson
committed herself to dealing
with the matter expeditiously.
"I look forward to receiving
your proposals for amendment
or enhancement of the law to


"I agree with
yOu that
Bahamian
real estate
agents deserve
the same
legislative
recognition
given other
Bahamian
professionals,
and that if
loopholes exist
in the law, they
should be
closed swiftly."

Allyson Maynard-
Gibson


ensure that sales of Bahamian
real estate involving real estate
agents must involve a Bahami-
an real estate agent," Mrs May-
nard-Gibson said.
"I agree with you that
Bahamian real estate agents
deserve the same legislative
recognition given other
Bahamian professionals, and
that if loopholes exist in the
law, they should be closed
swiftly."
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
further that the Government
was also expected to look at
benchmarking Bahamian leg-
islation against those of other
jurisdictions that have had to
deal with the issue of foreign


parties attempting to sell land
without proper licensing.
The Bahamas Real Estate
Brokers and Salesmen Act
1995 stipulates that BREA is
the licensing body for realtors
and brokers, and only licensed
individuals can sell real estate
in the Bahamas. The Act also
identifies the requirements that
need to be in place before an
individual can receive a com-
mission on the sale of real
estate, such as the listing of the
property and the holding of a
licence.
Addressing BREA's lun-
cheon meeting, held at the
Royal Palm Court in the
British Colonial Hilton, Mrs
Maynard Gibson urged the
agents to enhance their sales
by encouraging Bahamians to
own a second home in the
Bahamas, as opposed to Orlan-
do or other destinations in
which Bahamians invest in
timeshare or other second
home products.
She added that similar
investment opportunities in the
tourism sector have mostly
been taken advantage of by
foreign entities, but are open
to Bahamians as purchasers
and as investors.
The minister said that as the
agents extend their outreach
and diversify their services,
they should also look to
encourage Bahamian invest-
ment and reinvestment in the
Bahamas.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
that while the real estate mar-
ket in New Providence had
been steadily growing, the
remarkable growth of interest
in the Family Islands, which
translates into a more balanced
environment of economic
opportunity for a wider spec-
trum of Bahamians, was the
real story.
She said her ministry was
negotiating with the Bahamas
Technical and Vocational Insti-
tution (BTVI) and the Ministry
of Tourism to determine ways
in which they can formally col-
laborate to implement the now
standard Heads of Agreement
commitments to engage
Bahamian musicians and other
artists, and to implement train-
ing programmes.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
the climate is positive for
Bahamians seeking greater par-
ticipation in the construction
and operation of develop-
ments, in the establishment of
private enterprise directly con-
nected to the provision of sup-
plies and services to develop-
ment projects.


IEMYADIBSNI


Located next to Atlantis,
with 228
beautifully
appointed Junior Suites
and meeting facilities
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up to 70 people.

Ourguests have
full use of the
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In-room amenities
include: king size or
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sitting area
with sofa bed,
cable tv, refrigerator,
in-room safe,
coffee maker, hair dryer,
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Pool with swim-up bar,
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restaurant serving
breakfast and lunch,
Bamboo cocktail bar.

Ask about our local
corporate, group and
wedding rates.

Contact our
management team
for a site inspection.









PARADISE ISLAND

1 Paradise Island Drive
Paradise Island, Bahamas


Prime Office Suite for Immediate Occupancy

1,390 Sq.Ft. (additional 800 Sq.Ft. optional)
Beautiful Views of Nassau Harbour & Paradise Island
3 Parking Spaces included In Rental
Turnkey Fit-out Office Suite
24 Hr. Automatic Standby Generator
Two Elevators (wired for modem communication needs)
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Automated Gated Entrance & Intercom System
24 Hr. Security Guards
24 Hr. Surveillance Systems (Recorded) & Access Control
Professionally Managed
$5,200.00 Monthly


To View Contact


Mr. Elmer I.G. Lowe
Bahamas Facility Management Ltd.
Telephone: (242) 328-BFMM or 322-7419
P.O. Box SS-19784
Nassau, Bahamas


H I- ^S'MH Financial Advisors Ltd.
Pricing Information As Of:
30 September 2005

52wk-HI 52wkLow Symbol Previous Close Today's Close Change Dall Vol. EPS Dv PIE Yield
1.10 073 Abaco Markets 0.80 0.73 -0.07 10,000 -0.207 0.000 N/M 0.00T
10.00 8.00 Bahamas Property Fund 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.456 0.340 6.9 3.40%
7.01 5.55 Bank of Bahamas 6.99 7.01 0.02 10,000 0.587 0.330 11.9 4.71%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.204 0.010 3.9 1.25%
1.80 1.40 Bahamas Waste 1.40 1.40 0.00 0.112 0.060 12.5 4.29%
.15 0.87 Fidelity Bank 1.10 1.10 0.00 0.06 0.030 16.7 2.73%
9.19 6.94 Cable Bahamas 9.06 9.19 0.13 2,150 0.618 0.240 14.9 2.61%
2.20 1.53 Colina Holdings 1.53 1.53 0.00 -0.046 0.000 NM 0.00%
9.10 7.05 Commonwealth Bank 9.10 9.10 0.00 0.705 0.410 12.9 4.51%
2.50 0.67 Doctor's Hospital 2.40 2.40 0.00 0.429 0.000 5.6 0.00%
4.20 3.85 Famguard 4.20 4.20 0.00 0.428 0.240 8.8 5.71%
10.70 9.50 Finco 10.70 10.70 0.00 0.695 0.510 15.4 .4.77%
9.50 7.25 FirstCaribbean 9.50 9.50 0.00 0.695 0.380 13.7 4.00%
9.24 8.40 Focol 9.24 9.24 0.00 0.675 0.500 13.7 5.41%
1.99 1.27 Freeport Concrete 1.15 1.15 0.00 0.022 0.000 52.3 0.00%
10.20 9.50 CD Utilities 9.94 9.94 0.00 0.526 0.405 18.9 4.07%
8.65 8.20 J.S. Johnsoney.50 8.65 0.15 3000 .0.526 0.560 16.4 6.47%
6.69 24.36 Kerzner International BDRs 5.52 5.55 0.03 0.122 0.000 45.2 0.00%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10Fund0010.0 0.00 2.036 0.760 4.9 7.60%10.5576
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $4 Last Price Veekly Vo EPS $ Dlv $ PIE YI.. e-ld--
132.2560 2.149150 Bahama Suprefermared Fund 2.255981 13.25 11.00 1.488 0.90 9.1 7.2
10.14 1.0 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00 10.35 10.00 0.000 0.80 NM 7.80%

1 0 .1.60
S0.40 RND Holdings 0.29 0.54 0.00 -0.044 0.000 NM 0.00%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.29 0,54 0.35
52wk- Low Lowest Fund Name .-NAV YTIuD% ast 1Driv 62 i el '
1.2521 1.1845 Colina Money Market Fund 1.252089"
2.4169 2.0311 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.4169porteor 12 m
10.5576 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.5576"****
2.2560 2.1491 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.255981**
1.1347 1.0631 Colna Bond Fund 1134722he aama1, 100
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec02 1,00.0 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk-HI Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBd $ Buying price of Coin d Felty
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina end FidelIty
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the priorIweII
Change Change In closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months NIM Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock nndle. January 1, 1994- 100
-AS AT AUG. 31, 20051l -AS AT AUG 31,.2005
AS AT SEPT. 9,20051 - AS AT AUG. 31, 2005/ AS AT AUG. 31, 2005
I1 1 : X ii ~ := / "tl 141'r "; !.. ": % ==?70.4 =. "' =" .. ................ ..... qr..


MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 200b, P.,


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 4B, MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005


THE TRIBUNE:


Government to decide on Isle of



Capri incentive demands this week


FROM page 1B
front-line workers and man-
agers at the Grand Bahama
casino. It has also been report-
ed that Isle of Capri owes the
government $6 million in taxes.
Following the downturn in
business, Isle of Capri man-
agement had earlier this year
approached the Government
about reducing the casino tax
rate levied on the property
from 17 per cent to 9 per cent.
They also requested $5 million
from Government for promo-
tional campaigns.
Mr Wilchcombe told The
Tribune over the weekend:
"The dynamics of this situation
are not in one particular area,
but there are several compo-
nents to it and we're trying to
solve the entire matter. They


HELP

W1;NTEDl,



Youg eronnede a


want more marketing and pro-
motional dollars, which they
are hoping to get, but the Gov-
ernment has fulfilled its com-
mitment to them.
"We're also looking at the
future of Grand Bahama in
general. We want to put some
sustainable development in
Grand Bahama to make sure
the destination can find a way
to realise steady growth in its
tourism development, through
more hotel rooms, sustained
cruise business and operating
casinos with leverage."
Isle of Capri had also
expressed concerns about the
lease fees imposed by Hutchi-
son Whampoa, owners of the
Our Lucaya resort, and the
high costs of operating in the
Bahamas.
Hutchison Whampoa has
indicated, however, that it may
be willing to reduce fees which
have Isle of Capri 'paying $2
million a year to sublease the
19,000 square-foot casino under
a deal that lasts until December
2012.
The lease agreement does
provide Isle of Capri with an
option to cancel the arrange-
ment if operating income is
below $3 million at November
30, 2006. If the casino opera-
tors continue with the annual
lease after that November 2006
date, the lease payments are


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that EMILIENNE JOSEPH, MACKEY
STREET, HILLSIDE STATES, P.O.BOX FH 14168, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 3RD day of OCTOBER, 2005 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.


UBS


UBS (Bahamas) Ltd., a leading international wealth manager, is
looking for a
Senior Compliance Officer
As part of the existing Legal, Risk & Compliance Team, the
successful candidate will be responsible for the following main
tasks:
Identify potential compliance risks to the bank;
provide expert advice and feedback on regulatory, market
and business specific issues relating to compliance;
advise management, client advisors and other internal
clients in order to prevent, mitigate and control compliance
risks (incl, KYC, AML, etc); .
work closely with the business to identify opportunities
for better or new processes where compliance issues are
at stake and develop alternative solutions and
recommendations on compliance related issues;
report to relevant trends and developments;
review and produce policies and procedures;
develop and deliver training; programs to Bank and Trust
employees.
This position is open to candidates with the following requirements:
Extensive experience in a comparable position in a
compliance/audit environment with a global financial
services provider (international exposure required);
sound knowledge of the financial services industry and
banking products and services;
excellent communication, presentation and negotiation
skills;
team player with strong interpersonal skills;
Bachelors degree required;
other compliance and/or banking related training is a plus.
Interested persons meeting the above criteria should apply in
writing, enclosing a full resume with cover letter to:
UBS (Bahamas) Ltd..
Human Resources
East Bay Street
P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas
SApplications will only be accepted until October 12, 2005.


LEGAL NOTICE



NOTICE

MANCHESTER ENTERPRISES LTD.


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 MANCHESTER
ENTERPRISES LTD. is in dissolution.
The date of the Commencementof dissolution was 29th September 2005.
David Thain of Amer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd, 308 East Bay Street,
P.O. Box N3917 is the Liquidator of MANCHESTER ENTERPRISES
LTD. All persons having claims against the above-named company are
required to send their address and particulars of their debts to the Liquidator
before the 31st October 2005.


set to increase to $2.5 million in
the third and fourth years,
before hitting $3 million for the
remainder of the lease.
In addition to the annual
lease payments, Isle of Capri
is also committed to paying
$125,000 per year for "common
area maintenance" and "a min-
imum room buy of fifty from
the Our Lucaya at arate of $54
per night."
And the agreement Isle of
Capri signed with Our Lucaya
also requires the casino opera-
tor to pay a monthly resort
marketing fee set at 6 per cent
of the casino's annual gross rev-
enues.
Receipts
This fee kicks in "where such
receipts are in excess of $33.3
million a year for the first two
years, $40 million a year for
years three and four, and $45
million a year for years five
through 10".
Mr Wilchcombe said previ-
ously that the trouble with
agreeing to Isle of Capri's tax
reduction request would be
that other casino operators in
the Bahamas would then
request the same treatment.'
He said the Government had
to explain to investors that the
amount of tax concessions was
based on the size of the invest-
ment.
He added: "The Isle of Capri
is a $12 million.investment.
They are a casino, not a hotel.
What, then, justifies the reduc-
tion?"
At the time, Mr Wilchcombe


said the request for a $5 million
grant for promotional cam-
paigns could also pose a prob-
lem for the Government.
"We are in a bind because
we want Bahamians employed
and are being asked to give up
the revenue from taxes, and
having the ministry pay for
marketing for properties at
around $7-$10 million a year.
This placed you in a position
where government may as well
pay the salaries of the workers
themselves," he said.
Isle of Capri has described
its Grand Bahama casino as
"experiencing growing pains",
expecting it to continue "to
generate negative operating
income with an improving
trend".
The company appears to
have changed its business plan
intentions for the Isle-Lucaya
property, now requiring it to
make a profit and return on
investment, rather than just act
as a reward destination for its
. regular players.
In a 2004 interview with The
Tribune, Isle of Capri's gener-
al manager, Eddie Llambias,
indicated that the casino served
as a reward for guests based
on their play at other Isle of
Capri properties, with some of
the high rollers receiving com-
plimentary trips to the
Bahamas where airfare, accom-
modations, food and trans-
portation are taken care of.
Other frequent players get dis-
counts and other complimen-
taries for playing at the brand's
casinos in the US mainland.
"Although it would be nice


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that THEOPHILE WILSON, GIBBS
CORNER, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, arid that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 3RD day of
OCTOBER, 2005 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.'





THE WALK IN
MED I CAL CLINIC

at Collins Avenue

is looking for

FULL-TIME

GENERAL PRACTICIONERS
REGISTERED NURSES
LAB TECHNICIANS
MESSENGER/CLERK
(MUST HAVE DEPENDABLE TRANSPORTATION)

PART TIME

HOUSEKEEPER

Qualified service professionals must be
current licensed and locally registered.

Please deliver Curriculum Vitae to:

The Walk-in Medical Clinic
35 Collins Avenue
Attention: Mr. Dionisio Mycklewhyte


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) FEBDES INVESTMENTS LIMITED is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act2000.
(b) The Dissolution of the said Company commenced on the September
29, 2005 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and
registered by the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the Said company is Shakira Burrows of Shirley
Street, Nassau, Bahamas.
(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 3rd day of November 2005 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may be
excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before. such debts
are proved..
October 3, 2005
SHAKIRA BURROWS
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY


to see a profit, this property is
more a reward for customers,"
he added.
Mr Llambias said the Isle of
Capri planned to advertise its
Grand Bahama location as a
resort "thank you" for guests
that have frequented other
group casinos. Mr Llambias
said the Isle Miles programme


allowed gamblers to earn free
trips to Grand Bahama.
The casino, which opened in
2003, employed more than 300,
workers.
Mr Llambias declined tp
comment when contacted by,
The Tribune for an update last,
week.


NOTICE

RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS


RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land Unit #104 Casa De Tranquil &
Unit 5A Carefree Condos, West Bay Street situated in the Western District
on the Island of New Providence one of the islands othelhe Commonwealth
of the Bahamasl Situated thereon-is-aCondominium.Town House consisting.
of (2) two bedrooms, (2) bathrooms.

Gross Unit Size: 1,250 sq. ft. to *;. t..p ;

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should e forwarded in writing in athe sealed envelope, addressed
t o the sleandager, Royal Banke Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-, Nassau
Bahamas and marked Tenderon 0142". All offers must be received by the
close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 14th October, 2005.








NOTICE

RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS
RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land Powering of Sale contained ian a Mortgageon
stAll offers sithoulad e forwarded in Distriti in a sealed envelope, addressed
ton the islands agerof tyalhe BankCommllectionwealth of the P.OBahamas. SiBoxtuN-7549,tuNassauth
is Baham two-as and tormarked Town House Apartment consffers mustang of (2) two bedrooms by the
close(2) bathrooms.

Property Size: 7,800 sq. ft. f

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.
All offers should be forwarded in writ!i, in a sealed envelope, addressed








FINCO
Providence one of the islanands of thds of the Commonwealth of he Bahamas. Situated thereon
Situated there Town House Apartment consisting of (2) two bedroomsnd.
I o(2) bathrooms.















Property Size: 9,500 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage

to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.




All offers should be forwarded in writing in a, sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,Nassau,




Nassau, Bahamas and marked "Tender 0629". All1648". All offers must bereceived by the





received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 14th October, 2005.
RBC INC tt tfdt o eprhs ftefloig














Bahamian company hits out at




claims by Swedish regulator


FROM page 1B

the Bahamas.
The warning came as a result
of"information received by
Finansinspektionen that Mer-
cury Global had approached
investors in Sweden by tele-
ph6ne, offering them the chance
to buy shares in a company or
invest in investment funds.
The Tribune contacted Russ
Thomas, managing director and
thM beneficial owner of Mer-
ciEy Global, but he declined to
c unment on the matter, instead
referring all questions to his
attorneys and registering agents,
Anthony Thompson and Co.
WMThomas is in the Bahamas
o work permit.
r. representative from
Anthony Thompson and Co


said the Swedish regulator did
not contact either them or Mr
Thomas to verify the informa-
tion that they subsequently pub-
lished.
"The company has a business
licence," the representative said.
"It also has a Financial and Cor-
porate Service Providers
licence, issued by the Registrar
General, and it is a company in
good standing.
"The Swedish group did not
do any of those checks. Mer-
cury Global is a company new-
ly registered here. The company
was incorporated July 21, 2004,
and all of the licences were
obtained shortly thereafter. The
company was previously named
Mercury Partners Global Ltd,
but they did a name change in
April and it's now Mercury


Global Ltd."
The company representative
said further that when Mercury
Global initially came to the
Bahamas, it was in contact with
the Securities Commission
about obtaining a licence to
trade in securities.
The company was advised by
the Securities Commission,
however, that since Mr Thomas
was not a broker, he did not
need to be licensed by the Secu-
rities Commission. The repre-
sentative added, though, that
Mercury Global had again
begun to explore whether it
needed to be licensed by the
Securities Commission, and was
currently in talks with the regu-
lator towards that end.
The representative suggest-
ed that Finansinspektionen was


perhaps given bogus informa-
tion. Mercury Global also post-
ed a release on the Internet,
saying it wanted to clarify the
information being circulated on
it.
Registered
The release said: "Mercury
Global Ltd is a Bahamian com-
pany registered with the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce. Mercury Global Ltd is a
licensed Financial Services
Provider and is a Bahamian cor-
poration in good standing, as
opposed to the claims that have
recently been made by the
Finansinspektionen of Sweden.
It appears that the Swedish
Finansinspektionen failed to
verify the information that they


were publishing.
"Mercury Global's legal
counsel has contact the Swedish
Finansinspektionen with a view
to clearing up this matter."
Anthony Thompson and Co
had contacted the Swedish reg-
ulator on several occasions, and
it had acknowledged receipt of
their letter. Mercury Global
continues to wait, however, for-
confirmation that the Swedish
authority will issue a retraction.
According to the representa-
tive, Mercury Global hopes the
matter will be resolved soon.
Meanwhile, Finansinspektio-
nen warned potential Swedish
investors that Mercury Global
had asked investors to invest in
funds managed by Apex Man-
agement Ltd and APEX
Opportunity Fund Ltd.
Both Apex Management and
APEX Opportunity were pur-
ported to have an address in the


United Kingdom. The Swedish
regulator said, however, that
were are no authorised firms in
the UK with the name Apex
Management Ltd or APEX
Opportunity Fund Ltd.
When asking about this
aspect of the business, The Tri-
bune was referred back to Mr
Thomas, with the company rep-
resentative saying they had
been retained to make sure the
company is in good standing
and in compliance with the laws
of the Bahamas.
The Swedish regulator
claimed that Mercury Global's
business address was at No.1
Bay Street, in the British Colo-
nial Hilton's Ceptre of Com-
merce.
It also alleged that Mercury
Global had offered investors
the opportunity to buy shares
in PST, a company that was reg-
istered in Anguilla.


,FROM page 1B
employees and companies that
perform work for the company,
i icating that events were very
rfpid. It is understood that
Vin-Dixie executives were in
the Bahamas earlier this week,
although it is not known if the
two events are connected.
Mr Sellers said: "This change
in management does not mean
a change in our business goals.
We will remain committed to
our customers, our associates
and to our community. In addi-
tion, we will remain commit-
ted to maintaining our leader-
ship in the Bahamas market."
:Bahamas Supermarkets
operates nine stores in New
Providence under the City
Markets brand, and three
stores under the Winn-Dixie
banner.


Winn-Dixie has denied it is
actively seeking to sell its 75
per cent majority stake in'
Bahamas Supermarkets,
although a company spokes-
woman admitted she would not
be "surprised at all" if potential
buyers were circling the latter.

Bidders

The Tribune revealed last
month how potential bidders
were circling Bahamas Super-
markets.
A spokeswoman said: "It's
absolutely not for sale. They
are mot entertaining any dis-
cussions, and are not negotiat-
ing with anybody. There's
nothing on the table."
But she added: "I would not
be surprised, given the circum-
stances surrounding the com-
pany, having field for Chapter


11 bankruptcy protection, for
someone to be looking at this
particular area and looking to
pluck it [Bahamas Supermar-
kets].
"It could be ripe for pluck-
ing, but it's not for sale. People
think they can get the healthy
part, but that is not the case."
One source close to a party
interested in the company last
week told The Tribune: "I can
confirm there is interest in
Bahamas Supermarkets."
Winn-Dixie has repeatedly
said that Bahamas Supermar-
kets and its staff are unaffected
by the Chapter 11 situation,


which is forcing the New York
Stock Exchange (NYSE) list-
ed company to close 35 per
cent of its stores and make 28
per cent of the workforce
redundant.
Bahamas Supermarkets has
always been among Winn-Dix-
ie's most profitable arms, with
net earnings for the three
months to April 6,2005, ahead
of last year at $2.2 million com-
pared to $1.7 million. Year-to-
date to April, earnings for 2005
were $5.9 million or $1.28 per
share, compared to $5 million,
or $1.09 per share, last year.


REQUIRED


* Age 20 to 40
* Maximum Height 5'8"
*High school Diploma or Higher
* Pleasant Personality
* Good Interpersonal Skills


Fax: 377-3107
email: slabrecque@skybahamas.org
DEADLINE: Saturday, October 1


S- R E -a R. T



Baha Mar, a 5oo-acre, mixed-use destination resort complex represents the single largest resort investment in
the history of The Bahamas. Phase one will include more than 2,ooo guest rooms across multiple, first-class
branded hotels, and the Caribbean's largest branded Las Vegas-style casino. Baha Mar Development owns
and operates the Wyndham Nassau Resort, Radisson Cable Beach & Golf Resort, and Nassau Beach Hotel.
The three properties, the 35,0oo square-foot Crystal Palace Casino and adjoining 18-hole golf course were
recently acquired by Baha Mar, which is currently investing $15 million in cross-property renovations.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Cable Beach Resorts, the operations arm of Baha Mar Development Company Ltd, seeks to hire
professional individuals for the following positions:

Director of Human Resources: Responsible for three resorts and casino, staffing qualified
personnel, ensuring employment statue compliance. Ability to create/develop various company-
wide programs including but not limited to: benefits, insurance, bonus incentive compensation,
pension and 40iK. Complete familiarity with, and knowledge of the labor laws of The Bahamas,
unions and industrial relations. A graduate degree in Business Administration or Human Resources
with at least 5 years of progressive experience in the hotel industry is preferred.

Resort Manager: Responsible for guest satisfaction, cost control and hotel profitability. Focus is
general services, rooms division emphasis and integrity of the resort operation. Ability to evaluate
and select alternative courses quickly, identify and solve problems as well as handle complex
matters in the workplace is required. A degree with 8-10 years of progressive experience in the hotel
industry including 3-4 years as Rooms Division Manager, Resident Manager or Assistant General
Manager, international experience and excellent housekeeping managerial skills are preferred.

Director of Food & Beverage: Responsible for coordinating, supervising and directing all property
food and beverage operations, including but not limited to restaurants, bars, catering, room service,
kitchens and culinary, purchasing, promotions and in-house merchandising. Achieves profitability
through increased sales, and payroll control, while maintaining high quality products and service
levels. An undergraduate degree or equivalent is preferred with at least 6 years of progressive
experience in a hotel or related field.

Chief Engineer: Responsible for ensuring operations, repair, maintenance, and service of all
mechanical, electrical, and plumbing equipment, while supporting the resorts' goals of guest
satisfaction, cost control and quality workmanship. Oversees and participate in the Preventative
Maintenance program to ensure that all guest rooms, public space, meeting facilities, pool and
beach, landscaping and grounds meet required standards. A 4-year college degree or equivalent with
5 or more years of related experience is preferred, in addition to computer skills and current
certification and licensing.

Housekeeping Manager: Responsible for ensuring the operation of the Housekeeping Department
in an attentive, friendly, efficient and courteous manner, providing all guests with quality service
and a clean and safe environment throughout their stay, while efficiently managing expenses and
maximizing service levels. A minimum of 2 years of progressive experience in a hotel or a related
field is required, or an undergraduate degree with i or more years of related experience.

To ensure full consideration, interested candidates should submit a cover letter and curriculum vitae
with salary requirements under confidential cover to hr(5cablebeachresorts.com no later than
October io, 2oo5. All responses will be held in the strictest confidence.


SABLE BEACH COLF RESORT
NASSAU BAHAMAS


0
WYNDHAM NASSAU RESORT-
& CRYSTAL PALACE CApP4IW.


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2005
IN THE SUPREME COURT No.00424

Equity Side

IN THE MATTER OF a piece parcel or lot of
land contained by measurements one and two
hundred and forty hundredths (1.240) acres and
situate on the north eastern side of the Queen's
Highway in the vicinity of Palestine Baptist
Church in the settlement of Deadman's Cay in
the Island of Long Island, The Bahamas.

AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Alvin S. Tumquest.

AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles Act 1959

NOTICE

The Petitioner in this matter claims to be the owner in
fee simple possession of the tract of land hereinbefore
described and the Petitioner has made an application to
the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas
under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have
his title to the said land investigated and the nature and
extent thereof determined and declared in the Certificate
of Title granted by the Court in accordance with the
provisions of the said Act.

Copies of the Plan may be inspected during normal office
hours at:

(1) The Registry of the Supreme Court.
(2) The Administrators Office at Clarence Town,
Long Island.
(3) The Chambers of the undersigned.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person having
dower or right to dower or an adverse claim not recognized
in the Petition shall before the 22nd day of November,
A.D., 2005 from the publication of the notice inclusive
of the day of such publication file Notice in the Supreme
Court in the City of Nassau in the Island of New
Providence aforesaid and serve on the Petitioner or the
undersigned a statement of his or her claim in the
prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. The failure of any such person to file and serve
a statement of his or her claim within the time fixed by
the Notice aforesaid shall operate as a bar to such claim.

Date this 3rd day of October, A.D., 2005

PYFROM & CO.
Chambers
No.58, Shirley Street,
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioner.


NASSAU
B E AC H-


ISok at Souders departur


I


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005, PAGE 5B









PAGE 6B, MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005 TRIBUNE SPORTS


Wildcats find their stride





against the Brackettes


* SOFTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
THIS is the time of the season
when the Electro Telecom Wild-
cats bring out their claws.
The New Providence Softball
Association's pennant winning
Wildcats will continue their quest
for another ladies' championship
when they attempt to go up 2-0 in
their best-of-seven series against
the DHL Brackettes.
On Friday night, the Wildcats
fought their way to an impressive 7-
0 shutout over the Brackettes.
They will play game two of the
series tonight at the Churchill Ten-
er Knowles National Softball Sta-
dium. They were scheduled to play



























%6 ti
-












em

Available r
._ - I l


Shutout win in game


one of the series


Saturday night, but the game was
postponed because of the men's
double header between the TBS
Truckers and the Electro Telecom
Dorcy Park Boyz.
In game one, Mary 'Cruise' Edge-
combe was stingy on the mound,
firing a three-hitter, striking out
eight for the win, while Ernestine
Butler-Stubbs was tagged with the
loss on eight hits with a pair of
strike outs.


While the Brackettes' offence
was none existent against Edge-
combe, the Wildcats were all over
Butler-Stubbs.
Right fielder Jackie 'Lil Stunt'
Moxey led the attack with a 2-for-4
night, driving in a run and scoring
another. Catcher Dornette Edwards
went 2-for-3 with three RBIs, scor-
ing twice, and second sacker
Hyacinth Farrington was 1-for-4
with an RBI.


The Wildcats scored a pair of
runs in the bottom of the first,
thanks to Moxey's RBI double. But
they didn't score again until the
sixth when they added five more,
sparked by Edwards' three-run in-
the-park home run. Farrington
helped out with a run-producing
ground out.
If the Brackettes, managed by
Bobby 'Baylor' Fernander, intend
to stop the Wildcats, they will not
only have to find a way to hit Edge-
combe, but they will also have to
play better defence to contain their
offensive attack.
Wildcats' coach Anthony Bullard
and Jack Davis have indicated that
this is the time of the year that they
play in a totally different zone than
the regular season.


* __ -
lo





- .
4i0








mbm


.


Truckers


move up


a gear


FROM page one

ter on deck behind Winston
Bethel.
"We had a batter in the box, but all of ai
sudden' he called the game. We never'
refused to play. How could we play when
he didn't even get the Truckers team off
the field? It was a bad decision against
us. It just showed that they didn't want us;
to win."
In the sixth, with one out, Mario Ford
drilled a rocket to right, scoring Edney
Bethel on his triple. But Ford attempted
to score on Edmund 'Binks' Bethel's
grounder and was stopped at the plate by,
Sarge Johnson.
On an errant throw that went outfield,.
Binks Bethel tried to show some rejuve-
nation in his old legs, but he too was
gunned down and stopped in his tracks -
tagged out by Sarge Johnson to end the
inning.
Tied at 2-2 going into the bottom of
the frame, the Truckers got an RBI single
from Philip Culmer, scoring Marvin
'Tougie' Wood with the game's winning
run after Sarge Johnson singled.
Dorcy Park Boyz then intentionally
walked Winston Seymour to load the
bases and got both Johnson and Culmer
out at the plate. But Ramon Storr came
through with a two-run single up the mid-
dle as they added the insurance runs.
"From the beginning, as I told you,
once my players cut down on the strike
outs, we will play because we're a better
team than them," said manager Perry Sey-
mour. "They were even scared to pitch to
us.
"I know that if Edney misses, he's going
to pay for it. In game one, that's what
happened. He can't hold us. We rise to the
occasion. I don't know if Edney was 100,
per cent, but we were ready for him."
The Truckers even got a big lift when
reliable Everette 'Abe' Johnson got the
starting nod on the mound in game two.
He out-dueled Binks Bethel on the
mound with Edney Bethel having to set-
tle for rightfield in the back-to-back game.,
Normally used in a relief role since he
joined the team this year, Johnson pitched
his best game, firing a four-hitter with
three strike outs as he went the distance
for the win. Binks Bethel gave up six hits'
with four strikeouts in the loss.
"I told them it was long overdue," John-
son bragged. "Perry was right for choosing
me tonight."
Now that they are up 2-0 and could'
move into the driving seat in game three
on Tuesday night, Johnson said if his side
didn't believe that they could repeat, they
shouldn't be there.
"They manhandled us through the reg-
ular season," he said. "We didn't feel good
about that. So we made it a point to show
them who is the better team."
Smudge Ford, however, insisted th4t-
Dorcy Park Boyz will be back.
"We'll be ready. There's no doubt ii,
our minds that we can beat them," he
charged. "We'll be back and we will beat
them."
Here's a summary of the first two
games:
Truckers 14, Dorcy Park Boyz 8:
Leroy Thompson came in relief of starter
Terrance Culmer in the third to pick up
the win in the split game. He gave up six
hits with three strike outs, In his start,
Culmer surrendered five hits with a strike
out.
Stephen 'Slugger' Brown went 4-for-5
with four RBIs and three runs scored and
Van 'Lil Johnson was 3-for-5 with a RBI:
and four runs scored. Ramon Storr helped
out with a 3-for-4 night with an RBI and'
two runs scored.
Edney 'the Heat' Bethel gave up 1.8
hits, giving up more hits than he did in the
entire season, while striking out just eight
batters, less than half of what he aver-
aged in the regular season. He did, how-
ever, help his cause with a 3-for-4 nighf,
scoring twice.
Darren Bowleg was 2-for-4 with an
RBI, while Mario Ford and Sigmund
Bethel were both 1-for-4 with an RBI,
scoring a run. Edmund Bethel was 1-for-
2 with an RBI and run scored.
Truckers 5, Dorcy Park Boyz 3:
While Abe Johnson went the distance for
the win, Philip Culmhner was 2-for-3 with an
RBI and run scored and Marvin Wood
and Jamaal Johnson both singled and
scored a run. Ramon Storr drove in two
runs.
Sigmund Bethel and Darren Bowleg
both had a hit, scoring a run.


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005


TRIBUNE SPORTS







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MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005

SECTION


B
Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com


-Te Utr ff i bune


MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


ah amas


UH



* RUGBY
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
THE Bahamas' hopes of
winning the Caribbean Cup
and advancing to the North
America segment of the Rugby
World Cup qualifying tourna-
ment were dashed in a humili-
ating defeat on Saturday by
Barbados.
The Bahamas, the Northern
champions, were simply no
match for the "Bajans Boyz",
the Southern champions, and
were routed 50-3 at the Hasley
Crawford National Stadium in
Port-of-Prince, Trinidad &
Tobago.
While it was a huge margin
of defeat, it wasn't quite as bad
as the 82-0-reversal that St
Lucia suffered against the
Bajans during the Southern


lOes



Barbados storm

to 50-3 victory


Caribbean championships in
-Trinidad in June.

Historic
This historic game for the
Bahamas, which enabled the
winner to go on to play Cana-
da and the United States in the
North America region, was
played on a neutral site, but it
made little difference with the
Bahamas team out of their
league playing against a


more talented side.
- Jamaal Curry, one of the
Bahamian players available at
their hotel for comments on
.Sunday, admitted that they
were totally outclassed in every
.'facet of .their game,
I "They were much bigger and
quicker," he reflected. "When
you add that combination
together, it was just too much
for us to handle."
Curry said they were play-
ing against a Bajan team that
was loaded'with players based


in Britain and he admitted that
it was more of a learning expe-
rience.
"They just had too many
players who play professional-
ly," Curry noted. "The major-
ity of our players work full
time and then, after work, we
go to practice.
"Their players only play rug-
by, so it was hard for us to play
with them. They were just that
much better than we were."
Throughout the game, Curry
said the Bajans scored try after
try and the Bahamian team
couldn't find the defensive
stoppers.
Despite the loss, Curry said
,the team was still upbeat and
they're looking forward to
coming home and going back
to the drawing board.
"We know what we have to
do, having played against a


.............................. . . . ................................................................... .............................................................................


team that was so much more
superior than we were," he
stated. "It's going to take a lot
of work, but we have commiait-
ted ourselves to getting bet-
ter."

Final
This was the first time that
the Bahamas has played in the
Caribbean final,, having
clinched their berth by virtue
of winning the-Northern divi-
sion over the Cayman Islands,
Bermuda and Jamaica hereiin
June.
Although the team, coached
by Steve Thompson, played
without two key players,
William Russell and Anton
Roberts who were on the
injured reserve list, they added
Philip Davis and William Pilch-e
er.


A warm

welcome

ahead for

Bahamian

athletes
* By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter
THE Bahamas will welcome back the 19-
member track and field team today that attend-
ed the World Championships in Helsinki, Fin-
land on August 6th-14th.
The welcome home parade at the Nassau
International Airport will kick off the week-
long celebrations planned by the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture.
The main event this week will be. the renam-
ing of the Harrold Road highway to Tonique
Williams-Darling Way.
The much anticipated motorcade through
*the streets of New Providence will be held on
Tuesday followed by a national mass rally,
where the athletes will be signing autographs.
The Bahamas finished 13th at the games,
with a gold and silver medal.
The gold was won by Olympian Williams-
Darling with the silver coming from the men's
4x400 metre team (pictured).


I....


World







dashed


Truckers

move up a

gear against

the Dorcy

Park Boyz
* SOFTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS,
Senior Sports Reporter
DERAILED all season
long by the pitching of,
Edney 'the Heat' Bethel,
the TBS Truckers got back
on track and are now ,
rolling full steam ahead of
the pennant winning Elec-
tro Telecom Dorcy Park
Boyz.
The Truckers had been.
short-circuited by Bethel
and the Dorcy Park Boyz,
who clinched the last three
of their four head-to-head
clashes in the New Provi-
dence Softball Associa-
lion's regular season.
But, so far in the best-of-
seven championship series,
Bethel and his first year
squad have no answer, for.."
the defending champioins,
who clinched the first tw62
games of the finals on Sat-
urday night at the
Churchill. Tener Knowles
National Softball Stadium.
In the completion of .,
game one, stopped due'Ztol
rain with the Truckers .
leading 6-4 in the top of
the fourth, TBS came bgck
and rolled past the Dodcy"
Park Boyz 14-8. .
The Truckers went on to
score two more runs in the
fourth, three in the fifth,
two in the sixth and one in
the seventh as their potent
offensive attack came alive
to turn things around from
the regular season.

Heated
Later in the evening, in a'
heated game two, which
was called at the top of the
seventh to avoid a con-
frontation with players and:
umpires, the Truckers were
awarded a 5-3 decision.
Plate umpire Danny
Stubbs said afterwards:
"When we called play ball,
Dorcy Park refused to
play, so the game was
called."
Dorcy Park Boyz had
argued a force out at the -
plate when Truckers'
catcher Jamaal 'Sarge'
Johnson put the squeeze
on the base runner, stop-
ping them from scoring
their second run on Dur-
mont Charlow's RBI sin-
gle.
Dorcy Park Boyz players
rushed to the plate in
protest and, after a lengthy
discussion that saw both
dugouts eventually cleared,
order was restored. But
when Stubbs called "play
ball" the game never con-
tinued.
"We never decided not
to play. When the umpire
called play ball, the Truck-
ers entire team was on the
field," said Dorcy Park.
Boyz' second baseman
Andy 'Smudge' Ford, who
was intended to be the-bat-
SEE page 6B


~c~ - -- -- II' I I- I--








MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005


The stories behind the news


3 A


Governor General
Dame Ivy Dumont will
demrnit office on November
30, it was announced last
week,
Her replacement was not
named, but government
insiders say that former
Attorney General Paul
Adderley will be asked to
serve as deputy to the Gov-
ernor General until after
the next general election...


Unrest continued at H 0 Nash
School last week as teachers who
were continuing their week-long
sit-out walked out of a meeting
with Education Minister Alfred
Sears.
The teachers had been stag-
ing a sit-out all week and were
expected to continue in protest
of the appointment of Shavanda
Darville as senior mistress of
the school...


Profit margins on gasoline for the three major oil
companies may be cut by more than half as government
reviews proposals to lower prices at the pumps, it was
announced last week.
Minister of Trade and Industry Leslie Miller said that
the proposal, now on the table, calls for a cut of
importers' margins from 33 cents a' gallon to 15 cents, a
decrease of retailers' margins from 44 cents to 30 cents,
and a reduction of the duty on gas from $1.10 a gallon to
90 cents.
Mr Miller said this proposal is part of an attempt by his
ministry and the Fuel Usage Committee to reverse the
trend of increasing gas prices...


FNM:


the real message


behind the council vote


hen the FNM
council voted 88-40
to make Hubert
Ingraham the
-opposition's par-
liamentary leader, it unwittingly sent a
powerful message to the nation.
It was a message which left current
party leader Tommy Turnquest feel-
ingdown in the mouth, Mr Ingraham
hinlself less than jubilant, and wiser
party stalwarts in a state of despair.
For the vote indicated,, in no uncer-
taini terms, that although Mr Ingra-
ha;i might well emerge as overall par-
ty leader come convention time, his
chances of winning a general election
ar'far from convincing.
',,The fact is," said an FNM veteran,
"ttiat at least a third of the party is
solidly against Ingraham. And, no
mgter how bad the PLP has been
over the last three years, these people
are never going to vote for Hubert.
-'That is not very encouraging for
the FNM, especially if the PLP calls an
early election in 2006, which some


Last week's vote by the FNM council to install Hubert
Ingraham as Opposition leader in the House of Assembly
is, according to insiders, the former prime minister's
first major step along the comeback trail. But what do
the numbers tell us about the party's chances at the
general election? INSIGHT reports...


people consider a real possibility."
Last Thursday's council meeting
broke with party precedent. Ostensi-
bly, it was to elect the FNM's leader in
the House. But such an election has
never been held before. MPs are left
to choose their own leader. So what
was the sub-text?
The real objective of the meeting
was, according to members, to tell Mr
Turnquest that his days as party leader
are numbered.
In fact, one delegate urged the


meeting to recognise that as the crux
of the issue and not be misled into
thinking it was for any other purpose.
Mr Turnquest, as a Senator, could
not possibly be in the running for the
House role anyway, so the vote was
intended to be a repudiation of his
overall leadership. In other words, it
was a carefully orchestrated event
aimed at smoothing Mr Ingraham's
return.
With only five weeks to go before
the FNM convention, pressure is


building on Mr Turnquest to step
down and make way for the man who
is considered by many to be the par-
ty's only realistic chance of regaining
power.
However, the numbers emerging
from the meeting left no-one laughing.
Mr Turnquest went into a sulk he
refused to speak to The Tribune the
morning after the vote and Mr Ingra-
ham was not exactly doing cartwheels.
However you slice them, these fig-
ures do not amount to a united front.


And they have left the party in a
predicament which most observers see
as untenable and unsustainable.
With Mr Turnquest as party leader,
and Mr Ingraham as opposition leader
in the House, replacing Alvin Smith,
the roles of the sorcerer and his
apprentice have been reversed.
Mr Turnquest, once the ex-PM's
prote6g, is now Mr Ingraham's boss.
Evetl the most fervent Turnquest sup-
porters will find this amusing, while
the Ingraham camp can hardly contain
their laughter.
"You think Hubert will be taking
instructions from Tommy?" asked one
FNM as he tried hard to stifle his
mirth. "Are you crazy?"
So how will the next five weeks pan
out? The smart money is still on Mr
Turnquest being persuaded, very gen-
tly, to accept reality and move on.
If that doesn't work, it seems certain
that pro-Ingrahamites will nominate

SEE page 4C


S Quality Screenprinted T-shirts, polos, caps, uniforms, -s
p S\sweats, tank tops, shorts & specialty items.
Embroidered shirts & caps logos or monogramming. BAN KS
All artwork designed, printed, digitized and embroidered
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F-


--


The Tr'bu' n-







PAGE20, ONDA, OCOBER3, 205 INSITGBUN


0 Al ili:j 'FocsMIangBBjijg i ..s... a poi5t..


Racial profiling:



the case for



and against


L ast month, a
newspaper editor
in Britain was
charged under the
Public Order Act
for highlighting his readers'
concerns about immigrants
being housed in the local com-
munity centre.
The people felt the imposi-
tion of such a large group of
aliens on a small town was
potentially dangerous for all
concerned.
Upstarts in the race relations.
industry reported the editor for
alleged provocative behaviour,
claiming he was inciting ethnic
conflict.
Wisely, the court acquitted
him, taking the view that open
discussion of important issues
was essential to the function-
ing of a free society.
It was one of the few suc-
cesses rational people have
enjoyed in recent years against
Britain's race relations zealots,
a growing force who jump on
anyone they feel is fuelling
emotions over the immigration
issue. *
I was reminded of this case
when Nassau attorney Lean-
dra Esfakis took me to task last
week over alleged "racial pro-
filing" in the INSIGHT article
on the Haitian immigration
problem.
The gist of her complaint was
that generalisations about Hait-
ian temperament and attitudes
were highly inflammatory and
that sensationalist journalism
thrives off the lack of proper
official statistical data. She
wanted to know whether jour-
nalists have a moral responsi-
bility to the society they inforn.
The term "racial profiling"'
has been embraced, and was
probably even invented, by the
race relations lobby in response


to security and law enforce-
ment decisions made on eth-
nic grounds.
The lobby argues that no-
one should be "targeted" as
suspects because of their eth-
nicity even if a crime points to
a particular racial group.
At its most ludicrous, it sug-
gests that airport security ought
to spend valuable time search-
ing for explosives in the cloth-
ing of a blue-rinsed caucasian
granny in her eighties rather
than the blue-chinned man
called Mustapha standing next
to her.
Practical
You might find this laugh-
able but that is actually what
the "racial profiling" strictures
mean in practical terms. The
British are so twitchy about
doing anything that could be
construed as racially motivated
that they go to absurd lengths
to avoid being accused of it. -
Hence, a middle-aged Eng-
lish dad on his way to Disney-
land with his wife and kids
faces a strip-search by airport
guards while the swarthy
anoracked Iranian with a dis-


tinctly furtive look about him
slides through the system. It's
pure idiocy, but that's the way
it is.
In a Bahamian context, resis-
tance to "racial profiling" -
stringently applied would
mean no meaningful discussion
of a problem which is poten-
tially the most serious that this
country will have to face over
the next two or three decades.
It is, frankly, impossible to
discuss the immigration situa-
tion in the Bahamas without
mentioning Haitians. And to
make any reasonable assess-
ment of the impact large num-
bers of Haitians are likely to
have on the Bahamas, it is
important to discuss the kind
of people they are.
Ms Esfakis takes particular
issue with my contention that
"Haitians, unlike Bahamians,
are volatile and impatient peo-
ple."
She asks: "What makes Mr
Marquis think that the charac-
ter and behaviour of a people
can and should be summarised
and condemned in one short

SEE page 4C


dIES FOR CANCER


)nald's Cookie you purchase during the month
^l~b; i^^ ,.s.

--- . ::, *:*.* -^*;:^ '^0 ** *"; -. *'


005, McDonald's will make a donation to the


Cancer Society of The Bahamas.


i'm lovin' it


INSIGHThas been criticised
for alleged 'racial profiling'
in its article on the Haitian
problem. JOHN MARQUIS
argues that ethnic sensibilities
must not be allowed to thwart
open discussion of important
issues.


PAGE 2C, MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005


ir1 TRIBUNE








THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005, PA..


The Free National
Movement Cen-
tral Council voted
last week that for-
mer Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham would be
the new leader of the opposi-
tion in the House of Assembly.
The council voted 88 40 in
favour of Mr Ingraham in what
was said to be a lively session
late Thursday night.
The vote came just days after
FNM MPs met with FNM
leader Tommy Turnquest and
asked him to step aside to make
way for Mr Ingraham.
Mr Turnquest has so far
refused to step down and said
last week that hd plans to run
for the leadership post at the
party's upcoming national con-
vention in about five weeks.
Mr Ingraham will replace
Alvin Smith, the MP for North
Eleuthera, as opposition leader
in the House.
Mr Ingraham's detractors say
that the FNM will not win if he
is eventually elected party
leader.


PROFIT margins on gasoline
for the three major oil compa-
nies may be cut by more than
half as, government reviews pro-
posals to lower prices at the
pumps, it was announced last
week.
Minister of Trade and Indus-
try Leslie Miller said that the
proposal, now on the table, calls
for a cut of importers' margins
from 33 cents a gallon to 15
cents, a decrease of retailers'
margins from 44 cents to 30
cents, and a reduction of the
duty on gas from $1.10 a gallon
to 90 cents.
Mr Miller said this proposal is
part of an attempt by his min-
istry and the Fuel Usage Com-
mittee to reverse the trend of
increasing gas prices.
Mr Miller, who appeared as
a guest on Love 97's talk show
Issues of the Day last Wednes-
day, said he feels the govern-
ment should take the lead by
lowering duty on gas.
A further proposal, said Mr
Miller, is the possibility of intro-
ducing self-service at Bahamian
gas stations.


THE Airport Airline and
Allied Workers Union last week
gave government five-days to
respond to its proposal for a new
industrial agreement or face
industrial unrest.
The union added its voice to
the growing chorus of industrial
unrest in the country, claiming
that the government has not
responded to their proposal for
an industrial agreement.
According to union president
Nelerene Harding, the union
has given both Bahamasair and
Nassau Flight Services seven
days to respond to their claims
and submit a proposal so that
the parties can resume:contract
negotiations.
*****

GOVERNOR General
Dame Ivy Dumont will demit
office on November 30, it was
announced last week.
Her replacement was not
named, but government insiders
say that former Attorney Gen-
eral Paul Adderley will be
asked to serve as deputy to the
Governor General until after
the next general election.
The names of former
Grand Bahama Port
Authority chairman Sir
Albert Miller, Mr Adderley
and George Mackey were
said to be under considera-
tion as well.
It is expected that a state
farewell will be held in honour
of Dame Ivy, who was appoint-
ed on January 1, 2002.


UNREST continued at H 0
Nash School last week as teach-
ers who were continuing their
week-long sit-out walked out of
a meeting with Education Min-
ister Alfred Sears.
The teachers had been stag-
ing a sit-out all week and were
expected to continue in protest
of the appointment of Shavanda
Darville as senior mistress of
the school.
According to the teachers,
some of whom have taught Ms
Darville, she is not yet quali-
fied or experienced enough to
hold the position.
The post of senior mistress
would mean the applicant had
administrative power over the
rest of the teachers there.


* UNREST continued at H 0 Nash School last week as teachers who were
continuing a week-long sit-out walked out of a meeting with Education Minister
Alfred Sears. Here, students head to the basketball court.

(Photo: Felipg Major/Tribune staff)


I I


I I


Quotes of


the Week
"The (FNM) is rife with
mischief-makers, always has
been and they are not happy
unless they have something
that messes with the smooth
flow of the FNM."
Former Cabinet Minis-
ter Tennyson Wells (inde-
pendent MP) on the ongoing
turmoil within the ranks of
the Free National Movement.

"We have the highest (gaso-
line price) margins in the
Americas. We have the figures,
we have facts that what is
presently being thrown at the
Bahamian people is unfair, it
is a burden that they should
not be allowed to bear any
longer in this country."
Leslie Miller, Minister
of Trade and Industry
announced last week that
profit margins on gasoline for
the three major oil compa-
nies may be cut by more than
half.

"Everyone in town
knows how I feel about
things like that."
Paul Adderley
responds to The Tribune
about whether or not he
was being considered to
replace out-going Gover-
nor General Dame Ivy
Dumont.

"He must think we are very
silly to just say that he sees
what the problem is and then
bring the problem along with
him and sit her right up in the
front of us. So what does that
tell you? He doesn't want to
correct it. Because the easiest
way to do that is to just move
her. Does she really think we
want to work with her or that
we will? The ministry has
done too much of this'before
and we have had enough. So
the teachers, we who have
worked so hard to build this
institution, we have to put up
with the ministry not being
able to find an alternative
place for one person? Well
either they find a place for one,
or a place for 40."
A teacher at H 0 Nash
High School on last week's
meeting with the Minister of
Education Alfred Sears to dis-
cuss the appointment of Sha-
vanda Darville as senior mis-
tress of the school.


r^&iif








PAG ~MODAICTBER3,00HTE RIUN


Racial profiling: the




case for and against


FROM page 1C

sentence?"
Well, I said it once and I'll say it again
that the answer to that lies in Haiti's his-
tory.
Since 1804, when the slave revolt over-
threw French rule, Haiti has been in a state
of almost permanent turmoil. It has
changed rulers more often than many peo-
ple change their socks, and frequently dis-
penses with them in the most brutal fash-
ion.
Jean-Jacques Dessalines was butchered
and fed to the pigs, Cincinattus Leconte
was burned alive in his palace, and Guil-
laume Sam was impaled on a fence and
ripped to pieces by the mob. Another pres-
ident was poisoned, while '20 more were
deposed by force.
Only last year, President Jean-Bertrand
Aristide was spirited away by the Ameri-
cans while a rebel mob full of bloodlust
was marching on Port-au-Prince. Had he
not left by the back door, there is a very
good chance that he would have been
burned or butchered by the supercharged
marauders seeking his head.
When the Duvaliers finally fled Haiti in
1986, their Tontons Macoutes henchmen
were slaughtered in the streets. Some were
chopped up, others were roasted alive.
The lucky ones were shot in the head. All
this was in response to a 30-year reign of
terror in which 40,000 people died, many of
them in Papa Doc's torture chambers.
A few nights ago, I saw a BBC docu-
mentary on Haiti in which rebellious
activists from Gonaives were boasting
openly about the way their city always'
decides Haiti's future by brutal force if
necessary.
I-ieed, a gentle Haitian soul of my
acquaintance frequently expresses exas-
pei ation at his homeland's lack of political
progress and the irrational impulses of its
citl""ns.
ey people crazy," he says in quaint
pi. : English, screwing his finger against
hi. ;ad, "They don't know what they
w;, First one thing, then another..."
lie toid me that he will never return
home because he's afraid of being gunned
down in the street or dismembered by
machetes. And he's being absolutely seri-
ous.
If this doesn't add up to Haitians being
"volatile and impatient people" then I
don't what does. One would need to be
particularly myopic for any other conclu-
sion to be drawn.
If, therefore, the Bahamas finds itself
',vamped by Haitians over the next few
years, it is important that the people know


what they are up against.
It would be extremely naive to assume
that Haitians will react to contentious
issues affecting themselves with the same
respect for democracy and fair play
instilled into Bahamians during three cen-
turies of British colonial rule.
As I pointed out in my first article, Haiti
gained its independence from a country
that was itself fresh from revolutionary
turmoil and being led by a rampant mili-
tary dictator. Its people have no experi-
ence or understanding of democracy and
their volatility has contributed in large part


"If Ms Esfakis

wants to know
Whether journalists
have a moral

responsibility to
the society they

inform, the answer

is yes. And that

responsibility is


however

unpalatable it
proves to be."
John Marquis


to the nation's current woes.
The question Bahamians need to ask
themselves is this: "Do we want the local
culture to be overlaid with another cul-
ture which is so alien, in every respect, to
our own?" I suspect the answer might be
No.
Of course, there is another side to Haiti.
It has a rich and fascinating heritage found-
ed on French and African influences. It
has internationally renowned writers and
artists. Its musical tradition is impressive. I
have to admit that I find it one of the most
fascinating places on earth. However, its


people's undoubted talents have not
stretched to governance. In that area, the
country is fundamentally dysfunctional.
It's true, as Ms Esfakis pointed out, that
Adolf Hitler applied racial profiling in neg-
ative ways when sending six million Jews to
their deaths in the Holocaust. He saw them
primarily as an economic threat, an insid-
ious force eating away and undermining
German society from the inside. No-one
holds a brief for the fuhrer. He was a beast
and everybody knows it.
However, racial profiling has positive
applications, too.
Had Britain's appeasers in the 1930s
recognised the truth about Germany and
its people and the unfortunate charac-
teristics which led them to believe they
were the world's super race it's likely
their response to the Nazi threat would
have been quite different.
Like it or not, Germans of the time were
expansionist, militaristic, arrogant and
utterly in thrall to an Austrian madman.
Although there were dissidents, and very
brave ones too, the overwhelming majori-
ty of Germans were behind Hitler's pre-
posterous delusions and encouraged him
into the vile excesses of the Nazi regime.
It is extremely politically incorrect to
say so, but it was because Germans were
the kind of people they were that Hitler
was able to rise to power. They liked his
strutting stormtroopers, his idiotic salute,
his supremacist mindset and his grandiose
ideas about a thousand year Reich. They
even liked his persecution of ethnic minori-
ties that were out of line with his Aryan
ideals.
In Britain, Hitler would have been
laughed off the stage as the dangerous buf-
foon he was, as was his ranting acolyte,
Oswald Mosley. That's because the British
are a very different people, with no truck
for tyrants and tinpot caesars, and no time
at all for shrieking demagogues like Hitler
and Mosley.
When it comes to the Bahamas' Haitian
problem, it's important to know the nature
of those whose presence in very large num-
bers threatens to engulf local society.
Individually, Haitians like many Ger-
mans can be kindly, cultured, considerate
people. Collectively, they are something
else. Dessalines, Leconte, Sam and Aristide
would all vouch for that. And it's important
for the Bahamas to know it, too.
If Ms Esfakis wants to know whether
journalists have a moral responsibility to
the society they inform, the answer is yes.
And that responsibility is to tell the truth,
however unpalatable it proves to be.

What do you think? Fax 328-2398 or e-
mail jmarquis@tribunemedia.net


FEEDBACK


HAITIAN IMMIGRATION:

YOUR article was comprehensive.
Rarely has this topic been addressed in
its entirety. And although I exist out-
side and inside, as a Haitian who grew
up in the 70s and 80s under the negative
backlash against Haitians by Black
Americans and Bahamian Americans"
removed by one generation, my per-
spective remains global.
If possible, maybe we can address the
global problem of black-on-black stu-
pidity. Thanks for a very fine article.
Haitians are no joke.
James Denestan
*O****


THERE have been fights among
Bahamians and Haitians from when I
was a child over 50 years ago. What hap-
pened in Nassau Village this year is only
a taste of what can happen on a full
scale in the Bahamas.
The Bahamas is being overrun by for-
eigners. How is the country going to
survive, with this influx of people?
Concerned
0000******

IT looks like INSIGHT was spot-on
with its appraisal of the FNM leader-
ship issue. Mr Ingraham's comeback has
been on the cards for a long time. How-
ever, the ex-PM was saddled with his


own "two terms" promise, so had to find
a means of returning without appear-
ing to have gone back on his word.
Come general election time, you can
guarantee Hubigetty will be back in
charge.
B M Dorsett

GIVING any kind of credence to
Tommy Turnquest and Dion Foulkes
as potential prime ministers is not doing
the Bahamas any favours.
V Lowe


FROM page 1C

and support their man at con-
vention, even though the ex-
PM himself will not deign to
throw his hat into the ring.
Hence, Mr Ingraham will
have achieved a comeback
without dirtying his hands in a
leadership election, and Mr
Turnquest will be forced to
accept that his time has yet to
come.
Last week's council meeting
was being interpreted by ana-
lysts as "the first step to get-
ting Ingraham back as leader"
even though the man himself
was nowhere to be seen.
"All his old Cabinet was
there," said one observer,
"including people like Frank
Watson and C A Smith. Ex-
ministers who have been
underground for the last three
years suddenly re-emerged in
force."

Election

There is now real fear among
FNMs that the PLP whose
performance since 2002 has
won them few friends will lob
a curveball-by-calling- an elec=--
tion next year, capitalising on
the Baha Mar project at Cable
Beach and a series of trade
union pay settlements.
If that transpires, the FNM
will have very little time to get
its act together for a full-blood-
ed election campaign.
If an Ingraham comeback
was achieved by unanimous
acclamation, the party could
feel confident of powering
through the PLP's defences.
But that is unlikely to be the
case.,
What the 88-40 council vote
along with a large number of
abstentions told us was th t at
least a third, and probably
more, of the FNM's leading fig-
ures. are solidly and unshake-
ably against Hubert Ingraham.
One party veteran said:
"This was an election for leader
in the House, but I don't recall
such a vote ever going to coun-
cil before. Members in the
House decide their leader for
themselves.
"However, what this vote
told us was that 40 council
members did not even want
Ingraham in that capacity, nev-
er mind as party leader. It was
a back-handed slap in the face
for Ingraham, and you can be
sure he was not gloating about
it.
"It also showed that the par-
ty is hopelessly split. If Hubert
had any consideration for the
party, he should take his pen-
sion and get out, leaving the
new generation to come
through.
"People are getting tired of
all this fooling about all this
'maybe this' and 'maybe that'
from him and Brent Symon-
ette. People are not children
and they don't like being treat-
ed like children."
The consensus now is that
Ingraham's installation as par-
ty leader at the convention is
an odds-on bet. But his re-


emergence as prime minister
at the next election is consid-
ered much less certain.
"People in the Bahamas are
not as stupid as some think.
They don't like him. In fact,
many are afraid of him," said
an insider.
"Those who are pushing for
his comeback are those who
want something. They are the
hangers-on who see Hubert as
the delivery boy. Their support
base may be wealthy, but it is
very small.
"Then there are the 'prosti-
tutes' who say they're behind
Tommy one minute and
against him the next. They will
back anyone who promises
them something."
While the FNM struggles
.with itself, the PLP must now
be considering the best strategy
for neutralising an Ingraham
comeback. An early election is
being seen as the likeliest tactic
for several reasons.
If the country goes to the
polls in 2006 instead of 2007,
the FNM will have less time to
achieve cohesion and build
their case against the PLP.
What ministers fear most
about a fired-up Ingraham is
-his.capacity for making them
look like fools in the House.
As a former PLP with long
parliamentary experience, he
knows where all the bodies are
buried. You can be sure he has
documentary evidence of every
piece of chicanery the govern-
ment has been involved in since
2002. And he will not hesitate
to lob embarrassing disclosures,
like hand-grenades, across the
floor into the PLP ranks.
With his immaculate timing
and brutal delivery, he will take
every opportunity to under-
mine the PLP's position. The
1l:nger he is allowed to do that,
the stronger the FNM will
become.
"It makes sense for the PLP
to go to the polls in 2006," said
an analyst. "Everyone knows
they are going to get fewer
seats next time around because
of growing disillusionment in
the country.
"I think they have probably
given up on Grand Bahama,
except perhaps for Obie Wilch-
combe'sseat at West End, and
they know the longer Hubert
bombards them, the weaker
their position will become."

Uncertainty

Add to all this continuing
uncertainty over Perry
Christie's future as prime min-
ister and you have a political
scene which has suddenly
sprung into life after a long
period of slumber.
Both parties look shaky as
they approach convention and
election showdowns. And both
have major internal issues to
resolve.
However, Christie versus
Ingraham still looks the likeli-
est general election line-up and
a close result seems a certainty.

What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmar-
quis@tribunemedia.net


PAGE 40, MONDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2005


FNM the0rea


THE TRIBUNE









ISSU EbS(I IDEAS

$UNDAY, OCTOBER 2,2005 | THE MIAMI HERALD


HURRICANE KATRINA: A PERSONAL STORY


PHOTOS BY CLARENCE WILLIAMS/IRIS PHOTO COLLECTIVE
AFLOAT: The 'Robin Hood Looters' give me a ride as I look for my uncle's home. Timothy James Waters, 55, looks out as 'Capt.' Gregory Scott, 54, not seen here,
steers. These half-dozen men storm victims themselves, all in their 50s banded together to deliver supplies and search for survivors who want to leave.



Invitation to a i


Clarence Williams, a Los
Angeles-based freelance
photographer, was in New Orleans
visiting relatives
when Hurricane
Katrina hit. This
story is based
upon a journal
that he kept
during that time.
Williams, 38, won
the 1997 Pulitzer
WILLIAMS Prize for feature
photography while he was on staff
at the Los Angeles Times.

Heraldcom

Click on Today's Extras for a
video and a photo slideshow
narrated by Hurricane Katrina
survivor Clarence Williams.


Shen I receive the invitation to
my cousin Jason's wedding in
"Naw-Lens," I figure I'll dip
into town on Saturday, hit the wedding
on Sunday, visit my father's grave on
Monday and split on Tuesday. Hurri-
cane Whoever? Me worry? How bad
could this one possibly be? It's just wind
and rain.
Soon after my arrival in the Big Easy,
I realize I'm so wrong.
My uncle, Sid Williams, and I return
to his house in the Lake Carmel neigh-
borhood of East New Orleans a one-
story brick house built about 20 years
ago, in a nice middle-class class neigh-
borhood, set back on a banked area a
few feet above the road.
There I do what any dedicated photo-
journalist without film would. I drink
up, eat some freshly boiled crabs, enjoy
a couple of smokes and go to sleep.
My uncle and his girlfriend Eraina,
both 58, had heard the dire warnings, but
they had decided to stay put anyway.


They had both made it through Hurri-
cane Betsy in 1965 and the various other
severe storms that had whipped New
Orleans in the years since. They didn't
want to risk getting caught in traffic on
the road out of the city which thou-
sands did. And they thought evacuating
would have been very hard on Eraina's
mother, 85-year-old Gertrude Brul6e.
It was well into Katrina's madness
before my uncle wakes me up on mid-
morning Sunday.
Kneeling on the bed, I look out the
window and see a world that seems to
be stuck in a giant whirlpool as wind
blasts sheets of driving rainwater from
left to right. On the house across the
street, most of the roof is missing.
I join the others in the kitchen, where
they're piling towels on the floor. Rain
seeps in around window panes, under
doors, through walls through any
opening at all. We hustle to put the TV
*TURN TO WILLIAMS


SURVIVOR: Mary London, 85, lives in Kenner,
La. Despite having flood- waters in her
house for weeks, and being barely able to
walk, London remained at her home
throughout the storm and afterward.


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THE MIAMI HERALD


6C SUNDAY, OCTOBER 2,2005 INTERNATIONAL EDITION ISDISUES & IDEAS


STREETS WITH NO BOUNDARIES: Ruined cars and other debris deposited by floodwaters trash desolate roadways, makirig it difficult to see where their contours
are. Last weekend, soon after some of the waters unleashed by Katrina receded, Hurricane Rita stepped in to flood some city streets again.


We know we re not alone





in our situation,





but still, we feel like we are.
>1:w-je Ilk


*WILLIAMS
and furniture up on bricks and to move
the Range Rover under the carport so
we can drive out after the storm.
Outside, the swelling water turns the
four small lakes nearby, which are also
near Lake Pontchartrain, into a single
one that will envelop our neighborhood.
None of us realizes how dangerous
things are.
"The water has breached my boots," I
joke as I work in the driveway. I'm dis-
traught because I don't have any film
with which to record this stuff.
In the house, I look out through the
clear Plexiglass base of the door, watch-
ing the rising water.
"Look at that door, y'all." Eraina
becomes frantic; she owns the house
where she has lived for the past eight
years.
Water soon bursts through the base.
On another door, streams of water spurt
in between the jamb and the door.
Within hours, gray, dirty water at least
three feet high soaks the 'rooms. Days
later, that stagnant water will be black,
opaque and smell like sewage and gaso-
line.
In the roads, water swells to a torrent,
lapping against the letters in stop signs.
Cars are buried. Turtles and big fish
swim by. We worry about poison water
moccasins although we see none.
My uncle and I grab food canned
sardines, meat and soup; crackers, cook-
ies, beer and a couple of small bottles of
water. We all climb to the attic, bunking
on blankets.
We wait for daybreak, or maybe just
any break.
I listen to an hour's worth of music
on my iPod, and then to news on a
wind-up radio. There I hear for the first
time that flood victims like us are being
called "refugees."
LABELING
"Refugees" indeed! That didn't
bother me until weeks after, when I
really thought about it, and then I
became angry at the idea of American
citizens being "refugees" in their own
country. That this label falls dispropor-
tionately on African Americans will fur-
ther incense me.
But that's for later, when I have time
to ruminate on the many social inequi-
ties some of which have led, directly
or indirectly, to the deaths of hundreds
in this storm.
Right now, I'm just trying to get
through this thing.


The four of us spend the next three
days and two nights here, in boiling
heat.
During the day, my uncle and I climb
up to the roof and see what looks like
endless miles of water. We hear and see
other people on other roofs, but we're
not comforted. We know we're not '
alone in our situation, but still, we feel
like we are.
We think we see the head of a corpse
floating past, but we can't be sure. I
don't think we want to be sure.
Among the other things we don't
know is how long our food and, more
important, our water will last; we ration
it to make everything lasts as long as
possible. And we try to minimize our
need to go to the bathroom, given that
the toilet is under four feet of water.
What we're most scared of, however,
is that Gertrude will die. My uncle, usu-
ally strong, cries at the thought. She
can't get up, especially after the first
day; the attic's oven-like heat steals her
appetite and her energy.
HOPING FOR HELP -
At daybreak the day after the storm
hits, we see Coast Guard helicopters
hovering, dropping baskets and lines
seemingly at random to stranded peo-
ple. Uncle Sid and I spend much of the
next few days waving a white shirt at
the choppers. We even spray-paint, in
huge white letters, a message on the
roof: "HELP 4 OF US."
At one point, a helicopter pilot
swings by, giving me a thumbs-up. He
disappears, never returns.
"Unc, what are you thinking about?" I
ask Uncle Sid as we sit on the roof. "If
they pass over us one more time, I might
have to shoot at them. At least that way
they'll have to come arrest us."
We never seek out the semi-auto-
matic rifle or the pistol that are some-
where in the house, even if we talk
about our desire to do just that.
Later, as we thought back on our situ-
ation, we agree we would've appreci-
ated more communication from our
would-be rescuers even if they
couldn't come for us just then.
My uncle wondered if they could
have used a loudspeaker to tell us, "WE
SEE YOU." Or, "WOMEN, CHILDREN
AND THE SICK FIRST." Or, "TOMOR-
ROW." Or, "JUST US, NO BOATS, BE
PATIENT."
After long days and nights after
forever passes the helicopters come
for us. Eraina and her mom are taken to
Atlanta; my uncle and I eventually end


MARINES: Lance Cpl. Daniel Bowman
of the 4th Amphibious Assault
Battalion based in Tampa keeps
watch in East New Orleans.
up in Houston.
I return because I must.
I've left my photo gear, and my con-
tact sheets of photos of my father's last
month of life, in New Orleans, which are
so, so precious to me.
RELATIVE MISSING
Most important, though, is that one of
my dozens of relatives in the area -
sickly Uncle Freddy, really my great-
uncle isn't accounted for.
After meeting another photojournal-
ist, Andre Chung from The Baltimore
Sun, in Jackson, Miss., we drive down
and stay with a cousin of mine in Ken-
ner. Next day, I set out for my uncle's
house in New Orleans. Andre drives as
far into the city as he can, then drops me
off. I still have a long hike ahead.
Wearing waders that cover my legs
and most of my torso, I inch along
flooded, nearly empty streets, encoun-
tering a few people who wouldn't leave
when the evacuation orders came.
Among them is a woman who stayed
behind because of her three dogs.
Another guy strolling along is checking
on an older friend, taking medicine to
him.
I slog through about eight blocks in
two hours before the putrid waters
become chest-high too deep for me; if


my waders fill up, I'll really be in trou-
ble. Needing a ride, I flag down the
"Robin Hood Looters" a band of men
led by one Gregory Scott, who in the
days after storm, commandeered boats
to deliver supplies and help rescue peo-
ple. From the Robin Hoods' motorboat,
all I see is desolation and water. I shoot
a few pictures.
I make it to where I was told Uncle
Freddy lives, on Hamilton. I slip in
through a side window, but after I see
family pictures on the wall, I think, "I
don't know these people."
I don't know them because I've bro-
ken into the wrong house.
I'm feeling low, so low.
It would be a couple of days before I
learn that Uncle Freddy was rescued
and was in a San Antonio hospital.
Meanwhile, there's a bunch more of
my relatives to help: I must buy food for
some, shuttle another to the Wal-Mart,
find a Western Union, send money to
yet another, and check on most of their
homes. That's life, family first.
But I never see my ailing uncle again......
Last week, he died of complications
from a stroke he suffered prior to the
hurricane.
CLEANUP, AND REBUILDING
Nearly two weeks after Katrina hits,
I'm parked in the Central Business Dis-
trict, waiting for a colleague before
going to make more pictures.
Here, not only is cleanup taking
place, but the beginning of rebuilding is
under way. There's a cadre of Latinos,
white folk and a few black folk hard at
work fixing high-end hotels, office
buildings, the streets themselves. Gun-
carrying security guards scrutinize pass-
ers-by.
It strikes me later that this rebuilding
of offices and hotels necessary for the
city's economy to restart, I realize -
takes place when we don't know what
the future will bring for the majority of
city residents of impoverished neigh-
borhoods.
And that thought bothers me.
What's really going on?
What I believe in my gut is that
there's no way all the destroyed neigh-
borhoods will be rebuilt, at least not for
the poor. That New Orleans will be
much whiter and wealthier. That only a
few poor black folk, relative to the num-
ber who lived here before Katrina, will
move back to their homes; tourist-based
"New Orleans Land" will need them to
add that authentic feel.
I hope I'm wrong again.


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